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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

B U L L E T IN O F T H E U N IT E D S T A T E S \
B U R E A U OF LABO R S T A T IS T IC S /
W H O L E S A L E

P R I C E S

•

----- N 320
o.
S ER I E S

WHOLESALE PRICES




1890

to

1921

DECEMBER, 1922

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1922




ADDITIONAL COPIES
OF THIS PUBLICATION M A Y BE PROCURED FROM
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CONTENTS.

Page.

Introduction.......................................................................................................................
7,8
Changes in grouping of commodities and in weights used for computing index
numbers........................................................ ..................................................................
8, 9
Method of computing index numbers..................................................... . ................... 9-12
Prices of commodities in 1921...............................................................................
12-49
Average wholesale prices of important commodities,1890 to 1921.........
49-239
T able 1.— Sources of price quotations, 1920 and 1921.............................................
11
T able 2.— Number of commodities, or series of quotations, b y markets, 1920
and 1921......................................................................................................
11
T able 3.— Number of commodities, or series of quotations, classified as to fre­
quency, 1920 and 1921............................................................................
12
T able 4.— Changes in average prices from 1920 to 1921, b y groups of commodi­
ties...............................................................................................................
13
T able 5.— Index numbers of wholesale prices, b y groups of commodities, 1890
to 1921..................................................................................................... 14,15
T able 6.— Index numbers of wholesale prices, b y groups of commodities and
b y months, 1913 to 1921................................
28-31
T able 7.— Wholesale price indexes of identical commodities in raw and manu­
factured state, 1890 to 1921....................................................................
44
T able 8.— Wholesale price indexes of identical commodities in raw and manu­
factured state, b y months, 1913 to 1921.............................................. 46, 47
T able 9.— Average wholesale prices of commodities, 1890 to 1921...................... 52-239
A ppendix A .— Table of weights used in constructing index num bersof wholesale
prices, b y groups o f commodities.............................................. 241-248
A ppendix B.— Relative importance of commodities as measured b y their
wholesale values in exchange, 1921.......................................... 249-257
A ppendix C.— Revised index numbers of wholesale prices of building materials,
b y subdivisions, 1913 to 1921..................................................... 258, 259
A ppendix D .—Wholesale prices in other countries.............................................. 260-270
Australia......................................................................................
260
B e l g i u m . . .. . .. ..........................................................................................................
261
Canada..................................................................................................................... 261,262
France........................................................................................................
262
Germany . .............................................................................................................. 262, 263
Great B ritain ......................................................................................................... 263, 264
Italy..............................................................................................................................
264
Japan.............................................................................................. ......................... 264,265
Netherlands.................................................................................................................
265
New Zealand...........: .............................................................................................. 265, 260
N orw a y..........................................
266
South Africa................................................................................................................
267
Spain........................................................................................................................ 267-269
Sweden.........................................................................................................................
269
Switzerland............................................................................................................. 269, 270




3

4

CONTENTS.

CHARTS
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Chart

SHOWING Y EA RLY FLUCTUATIONS OF WHOLESALE
PRICES OF COMMODITIES. 1890 TO 1921.

1.— All commodities com bined......................................................................
2.— Farm products............................................................................................
3.— Foods.............................................................................................................
4.—Cloths and clothing....................................: . ...........................................
5.—Fuel and lighting.......................................................................................
6.—Metals and metal products.......................................................................
7.—Building materials.....................................................................................
8.—Chemicals and drugs..................................................................................
9.—House-furnishing goods.............................................................................
10.—Miscellaneous commodities.......................................................................
11.— Identical commodities in raw and manufactured state......................
12.— Com: Contract grades, cash, Chicago, 1890-1921, and No. 3, mixed,
cash, Chicago, 1913-1921........................................................................
13.— Oats: Contract grades, cash, Chicago......................................................
14.— Wheat: No. 1, northern spring, and No. 2, red winter, cash,
Chicago, 1890-1913; No. 1, northern spring, cash, Chicago,
1913-1921; and No. 2, hard winter, cash, Kansas City, 1913-1921.
15.— Cattle: Steers, good to choice and choice to prime, Chicago.............
16.— Hogs: Light and heavy, Chicago............................................................
17.— Cotton: Middling, upland, spot, New York, 1890-1921, and mid­
dling, spot, New Orleans, 1913-1921...................................................
18.—Eggs: Fair to fancy, near-by, New York, 1890-1913; firsts, fresh
gathered, New York, 1913-1921; and firsts, fresh, Chicago, 19131921.............................................................................................................
19.—Hides: Packers’ , green, salted, heavy native steers, Chicago, 18901921; packers’ , green, salted, heavy Texas steers, Chicago, 19131921; and calfskins, country, No. 1, Chicago, 1913-1921..............
20.—Milk: Fresh, New York, 1890-1921; fresh, Chicago, 1913-1921;
and fresh, San Francisco, 1913-1921.........................................
21.— Wool: Ohio, fine fleece, scoured, 1890-1916; Ohio, fine clothing,
scoured, 1916-1921; and Ohio, medium fleece, scoured, 1890-1921.
22.— Beef: Fresh, native sides, New York, 1890-1921; and fresh, car­
cass, Chicago, 1908-1921........................................................................
23.— Sides, short clear; and ham, smoked, loose, Chicago........................ .
24.—Butter: Creamery, extra, New York, 1890-1921; creamery, Elgin,
1890-1916; and creamery, extra,St. Louis, 1916-1921...................
25.— Wheat flour: Winter straights, New York, 1890-1913; winter
straights, Kansas City, 1913-1921,1 and second patents, Minne­
apolis, 1913-1921 2.......................................................................................
26.— Sugar: Granulated, and centrifugal, 96°, New Y ork ..........................
27.— Shoes: Men’s v ici kid, Goodyear welt, 1890-1921; w om en’s solid
grain, 1890-1913; and women’s M cKay sewed, 1913-1921............
28.— Print cloth, 28-inch, 64 b y 64, 1890-1913; 27-inch, 64 b y 60, 19131921; and calico, American standard prints, 1906-1921.................
29.— Suitings: Middlesex, 14-ounce, 1890-1912; Middlesex, 16-ounce,
1912-1921; and clay worsted, 16-ounce, 1895-1921..........................
30.—Anthracite coal: Chestnut and stove.................................................. ...
31.— Bituminous coal: Georges Creek, 1890-1913; New Fiver, 19131921; and coke, Connellsville, furnace, 1890-1921..........................
32.— Pig iron: Foundry, No. 2, northern, and Bessemer............................
33.— Steel billets: Bessemer, 1890-1921; steel rails, Bessemer, 1890-1921;
and steel sheets, No. 27, 1894-1921.....................................................
34.— Copper: Ingot, lake, 1890-1907; ingot, electrolytic, 1907-1921; and
copper wire, bare, No. 8, 1890-1921....................................................
35.— Brick: Common, red, building, New Y ork ......................................
36.— Lumber: Yellow pine siding, New York, 1890-1914; yellow pine
siding, Norfolk, 1914-1921; and hemlock, 1890-1921......................
37.— Glass: Plate, polished, 5 to 10 square feet, unsilvered, 1890-1905;
glazing, 1905-1921; and window, single, B, 1890-1921..................
38.— A cid: Sulphuric and m uriatic.................................................................
39.— Leather: H em lock sole, 1890-1921; wax calf, B grade, 1890-1907;
and chrome calf, 1907-1921.................................................................
40.—Paper: Wrapping, manila, 1890-1921; newsprint, 1890-1921; and
wood pulp, sulphite, 1913-1921...........................................................

»U. S. Food Administration standard in 1918.



*Bakers’ patent after 1919.

Page.
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
45
54
56
60
62
64
70
74
78
82
88
92
96
102
114
124
132
136
148
158
162
170
178
184
188
194
204
210
232
236

5

CONTENTS.

CHARTS SHOWING M O N TH LY FLU CTU ATIO N S OF W HOLESALE
PRICES O F COM MODITIES, 1913 TO 1921.
Page.

Chart
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C hart
Chart
i U.

la .—All commodities com bined....................................................................
2a.— Farm products..........................................................................................
3a.— Foods..........................................................................................................
4a.— Cloths and clothing..................................................................................
5a.— Fuel and lighting.....................................................................................
6a.— Metals and metal products....................................................................
7a.— Building materials............................................................
8a.— Chemicals and drugs...............................................................................
9a.— House-furnishing goods..........................................................................
10a.—Miscellaneous commodities.....................................................................
11a.— Identical commodities in raw and manufactured state....................
12a.— Corn: Contract grades, cash, and No. 3, mixed, cash, C h icag o...
13a.— Oats: Contract grades, cash, Chicago...................................................
14a.— Wheat: No. 1, hard white, cash, Portland, Oreg.; No. 1, northern
spring, cash, Minneapolis; and No. 2, hard winter, cash, Kansas
C ity..........................................................................................................
15a.— Cattle: Steers, good to choice, and choice to prime, Chicago.........
16a.— Hogs: Light and heavy, Chicago..........................................................
17a.— Cotton: Middling, upland, spot, New York; and middling, spot,
New Orleans...........................................................................................
18a.— Eggs: Firsts, fresh gathered, New York; firsts, fresh, Chicago;
and pullets’ , fresh, San Francisco......................................................
19a.— Hides: Packers’ , green, salted, heavy native steers, Chicago;
packers’, green, salted, heavy Texas steers, Chicago; and calf­
skins, country, No. 1, Chicago...........................................................
20a.— Milk: Fresh, New York, Chicago, and San Francisco......................
2la.— W ool: Ohio, fine fleece, scoured, 1913-1917; Ohio, fine clothing,
scoured, 1917-1921; and Ohio, medium fleece, scoured, 19131921.........................................................................................
22a.— Beef: Fresh, native sides, New Y ork; and fresh, carcass, Chicago.
23a.— Sides, short clear; and ham, smoked, loose, Chicago.......................
24a.— Butter: Creamery, extra, New Y ork; creamery, extra, Chicago;
and creamery, extra, San Francisco.................................................
25a.—Wheat flour: Winter straights, Kansas C ity;1and standard patents,
Minneapolis............................................................................................
26a.— Sugar: Granulated and centrifugal, 96°, New Y ork .........................
27a.— Shoes: Men’s tan calf, Goodyear welt, and women’s black kid,
Goodyear ’welt...........................................................................
28a.— Print cloth, 27-inch, 64 b y 60; and calico: American standard
prints.......................................................................................................
29a.— Suitings: Middlesex, 16-ounce; and clay worsted, 16-ounce..........
30a.—Anthracite coal: Chestnut and stpve....................................................
31a.— Bituminous coal: Pittsburgh and Kanawha; New River; and
coke, Connellsville, furnace...............................................................
32a.— Pig iron: Foundry, No. 2, northern; basic; and Bessemer.............
33a.— Steel: Billets, Bessemer; rails, Bessemer; and sheets, No. 2 7 . . . .
34a.— Copper: Ingot, electrolytic; sheet, hot rolled; and copper wire,
bare, No. 8 ...........................................................................
35a.— Brick: Common, red, New Y ork; common, salmon, Chicago; and
common, red, Cincinnati.....................................................................
36a.—Lumber: Douglas fir, No. 1, common; hemlock, No. 1, north­
ern; and yellow pine, southern, No. 2, com m on..........................
37a.— Glass: Plate, glazing, 5 to 10 square feet, and window, single, B . .
38a.—A c id : Sulphuric, muriatic, and n itric.................................................
39a.— Leather: Chrome calf, B grade; glazed kid; and oak sole..............
40a.— Paper: Wrapping, manila; newsprint; and wood pulp, sulphite..

S. Food Administration standard in 1918.




34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
48
55
57
61
63
65
71
75
79
83
89
93
97
103
115
125
133
137
149
159
163
171
179
185
189
195
205
211
233
237




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W ASHINGTON

NO. 320

DECEM BER, 1922

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.
INTRODUCTION.

The first of a series of reports on wholesale prices in the United
States was published by the Department of Labor, now the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, in 1900.1 The purpose of that report was to
continue, as far as practicable, the results of the investigation made
by the U. S. Senate Committee on Finance for the years 1840 to
1891 and published in 1893.2 In the report of the Department of
*
Labor much of the information contained in the Senate Finance
Committee's report was brought up to date.
In 1902, however, when the material for a new bulletin on whole­
sale prices was being assembled, it was found that many of the
articles included in the report of the Senate Finance Committee
were either no longer manufactured or had ceased to be important
factors in the market. On the other hand, a number of articles not
shown in that report had become of such importance as to render
necessary their inclusion in the new report. These facts necessitated
a revision of the list of commodities and the computation of a new
series of index numbers. Prices for the revised list of commodities
were obtained for the period dating back to 1890, so that the infor­
mation presented in the 1902 report covered the 12 years from 1890
to 1901, monthly as well as yearly prices being shown for each
commodity.
This information was continued in subsequent wholesale-price
reports to 1914, being contained in the March issues of the bimonthly
bulletin of the bureau for the years from 1902 to 1911, inclusive,
and published in separate form for 1912 and subsequent years. In
each of these bulletins monthly prices were shown in detail for the
last completed year, while yearly summaries were included for the
period since 1890.
Beginning with the report for 1914s the number of commodities
included in the exhibit of wholesale prices was greatly increased,
and in addition a radical change in the method of constructing the
index numbers from the money prices quoted was introduced.4 In
the bulletins for 1915 and 1916 the plan was continued of publishing
1U. S. Department of Labor Bui. No. 27, March, 1900. Subsequent reports are Bulletins Nos. 39, 45,
51, 57, 63, 69, 75, 81, 87, 93, 99, 114, 149, 181, 200, 226, 269, and 296.
2 Report from the Committee on Finance of the U. S. Senate on Wholesale Prices, Wages, and Trans­
portation, Mar. 3,1893 (52d Cong., 2d sess.). Kept. No. 1394.
8 U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. No. 181.
4Idem, pp. 239 to 256.




7

8

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

monthly prices for the last completed year and yearly averages back
to 1890. Owing to the situation, brought about by the World War,
no report was published in 1917 or 1918. In 1919, however, a
bulletin containmg data for all months from January, 1917, to
December, 1919, and for all years since 1890 was prepared. This
report was finally published early in 1921. A bulletin continuing
the information through 1920 was published late in 1921. In the
present report the prices have been brought up to the end of 1921
and a considerable number of new commodities .have been added.
CHANGES IN GROUPING OF COMMODITIES AND IN WEIGHTS
USED FOR COMPUTING INDEX NUMBERS.

An important change has been made in the grouping of com­
modities ior the purpose of computing the index numbers shown in
the present bulletin. In preceding reports of the bureau the plan
was tallowed of arbitrarily confining an article to a particular group,
regardless of its fitness for inclusion also under other group designa­
tions. In the present bulletin articles properly falling under more
than one of the classifications adopted have been included under
each classification. For example, structural steel, nails, and certain
other metal products used in building have been placed in the group
of building materials as well as in that of metals and metal products.
Similarly, food articles produced on the farm which reach the con­
sumer practically unchanged in form, as potatoes, rice, eggs, and
milk, are included both among farm products and among foods.
In computing the general index number for all commodities, how­
ever, such articles nave been counted only once, thereby avoiding
duplication in the final result.
Besides the inclusion of certain articles in. more than one group,
there has been a rearrangement of commodities within the several
groups to provide for subgroups of closely related articles. The
system of grouping adopted is as follows:
1. Farm products:
(a) Grains.
( b) Live stock and poultry.
(c) Other farm products
(ct) All farm products.
2. Foods:
(a) Meats.
( b) Butter, cheese, and milk.
(c) Other foods.
(d) All foods.
3. Cloths and clothing:
(a) Boots and shoes.
(b) Cotton goods.
(c) Woolen goods.
(d) Silk, etc.
( e) A ll clothing.
4. Fuel and lighting:
(a) Anthracite coal.
(b) Bituminous coal.
(c) Other fuel and lighting.
(d) All fuel and lighting.
5. Metals and metal products:
(a) Iron and steel.
(b) Nonferrous metals.
(c) All metals and metal products.




6. Building materials:
(а) Lumber.
(б) Brick.
(c) Structural steel.
(d) Other building materials.
(e) All building materials.
7. Chemicals and drugs:
(a) Chemicals.
(b) Fertilizer materials.
(c) Drugs and pharmaceuticals.
(d) All chemicals and drugs.
8. House-furnishing goods:
(a) Furniture.
(b) Furnishings.
(c) All house-furnishing goods.
9. Miscellaneous:
(a) Cattle feed.
(b) Leather.
(c) Paper and pulp.
(d) Other miscellaneous.
(e) All miscellaneous.
10. All commodities.

CHANGES IN GROUPING OF COMMODITIES.

9

In computing the index numbers for the above groups of com­
modities, the prices have been weighted by data from the 1919
census instead of the 1909 census data formerly employed. This
conforms to the plan contemplated by the bureau at the inception
of its weighted index number system in 1914 of revising the weight­
ing factors every 10 years as new census information should become
available. The method of constructing group and general index
numbers from the aggregate values of commodities, employed for
the first time in the report for 1914, has been continued in the present
bulletin. A full explanation of this method is contained in the
1914 report,5 but a brief account is here given in order that the
statistical tables appearing in the following pages may be more
readily understood.
METHOD OF COMPUTING INDEX NUMBERS.

The average price of each article in the year 1913, selected as the
base period in order to provide a pre-war standard for measuring
price changes, has first been multiplied by the estimated quantity
of that article marketed in the census year 1919. The products
thus obtained have then been added, giving the approximate value
in exchange in 1913 of all articles in the group or in the total list of
commodities. Similar aggregates have likewise been made for each
remaining year and each month since January, 1913. The index
number for each year and each month has been obtained by com­
paring the aggregate for such year or month with the aggregate for
1913 taken as 100.
If, during the period under consideration, there had been no
changes in the list of commodities which comprise the index num­
bers, the percentage changes in the cost of the different groups of
commodities and of all commodities combined would be accurately
measured by dividing the aggregates for the months and years cov­
ered by the bureau’s index numbers by the corresponding aggregates
for 1913. However, articles have been added or dropped from time
to time as circumstances demanded, while substitution of one article
for another at a different price has been necessary in numerous
instances. Therefore, in computing the index numbers for a series
of years a method had to be adopted that would allow for variations
in the number and kind of commodities. This method, which is
identical in principle with that now being used by the bureau in its
reports on retail prices and on wages, consists in computing two sep­
arate aggregates for any year or month in which a change occurs,
the first aggregate being based on the list of articles before making
additions, subtractions, or substitutions, and the second aggregate
on the revised list of articles. „ In this way comparison between any
two consecutive years or months is limited to aggregates made up
of identical commodities only.
The following statement relative to lumber in the group of build­
ing materials will serve to illustrate the method employed, it having
been necessary in several instances to substitute other lumber series
in 1918 in place of the series formerly carried.
& S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bui. No. 181, pp. 239-256.
TJ.




10

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1981,

IN D E X NUMBERS BASED ON AGGREGATE VALUES OF COMMODITIES 1917,191& AND 1919.
,
Approximate value (000 omitted).
Commodity.
1917

1918-A

1918-B

Douglas fir, No. 1 common, boards.............
Douglas fir, No. 2 and better, drop siding.
Gum, sap, firsts and seconds.................... .
Hemlock, northern, No. 1......................... .
Maple, hard, No. 1, common..................... .
Oak, white, plain, No. 1, common_______
Pine, white,Ho. 2, barn ........................... .
Pine, yellow, flooring, B and better......... .
Pine, yellow, timbers, square edge, sound
Poplar, No. 1, common...............................
Spruce, eastern, random............................ .
Lath, yellow pine, No. 1.............................
Shingles, cypress, 16 inches long............... .
Shingles, red cedar, 16 inches long.............

$70,279
35,301
23,089
46,497
28,100
92,143
84,692
151,501
170,982
12,513
29,303
13,203
4,792
28,902

$80,793
41,328
27,451
51,816
26,169
107,143
104,158
165,373
209,867
16,654
34,081
18,370
6,412
28,663

$80,793
41,328
30,646
55,477
31,548
124,529
82,581
165,373
209,867
18,436
34,081
9,486
6,412
28,663

$112,520
58,548
43,361
68,377
39,790
182,087
93,486
269,427
245,393
21,771
41,062
15,585
7,138
46,041

Total...................................................

791,297

913,278

919,220

1,244,586

index numbers (1913 equals 100)...............

134.62

155.38

1919

210.38

The index number for 1917, with 1913 as the base period, was found
to be 134.62. Dividing the comparable aggregate for 1918 ($913,278)
by the above aggregate for 1917 ($791,297) we obtain 115.42. This
figure is the index number for 1918 on the 1917 base. T o convert it
to the 1913 base we multiply 115.42 by 134.62, giving 155.38 as the
index for 1918 on the 1913 base. This is rounded off to 155 when
published. To obtain the index number for 1919 we first divide the
aggregate for 1919 ($1,244,586) b y the comparable aggregate for 1918
($919,220), giving 135.40 as the index number for 1919 on the 1918
base. To convert this to the 1913 base we multiply 135.40 by 155.38
(the index number for 1918 on the 1913 base), which gives 210.38 as
the index number for 1919 on the 1913 base. This is rounded off to
210 when published. Index numbers for all other groups and sub­
groups are found in the same manner as for lumber in all eases where
a change in the list of included articles has been made.
Not all of the commodity prices shown in the present bulletin have
been used in constructing the index numbers. Several articles of
minor importance, as crackers and cornstarch, have been omitted
because of their negligible influence upon price movements. A few
articles of some importance, such as hammers, saws, and shovels,
were omitted because satisfactory weighting factors could not be
obtained. In still other instances, as brick, lumber, and structural
steel, where more than one price series has been included in the
bulletin, only those series believed to be most representative have
been used in the index. Of the 450 series of quotations for 1920 and
1921 shown in the detailed tables of this bulletin, 404 series have
been weighted and used in computing the index numbers.®
To ascertain the quantities of the various commodities marketed in
1919, every available source of information, official and private, was
drawn upon. In the case of articles consumed to a large extent by
the producer, as corn, oats, hay, etc., only the portion actually mar­
keted, as near as could be determined, was taken. A similar plan
was followed with regard to semimanufactured articles, as cotton and
worsted yarns, pig iron, and steel billets, which often are carried into
further processes of manufacture in establishments where produced.6
6 See Appendix A , pp. 241 to 248.




11

METHOD OF COMPUTING INDEX NUMBERS.

The quantity of each article sold in the markets was ascertained as
nearly as possible and used to weight the prices for the different years
and months.
Jn the selection of commodities it has been the aim to choose only
important and representative articles in each group. To this end, in
addition to utilizing all available information from official sources, a
careful inquiry was instituted in the principal market centers to deter­
mine which articles within the general class or group enter to the
largest extent into exchange from year to year. The sources from
which price quotations for the past two years have been drawn are as
follows:
T able 1.— SOURCES OF PRICE QUOTATIONS, 1920 AND 1921.

Source.

Standard trade journals..........
Manufacturers or sales agents..
Boards of trade, associations,
etc..........................................
Federal or State bureaus.........
Total...............................

Cloths Fuel Metals Build­ Chem­ House Mis­
Farm
and
fur­
and
and
ing
prod­ Foods. cloth­ light­ metal mate­ icals nish­ cella­ Total.
and
prod­ rials. drugs. ing
ucts.
neous.
ing.
ing.
ucts.
goods.
46
4

80
19

64

1
5

6

6

56

105

70

10
9

33
18

28
13

1

1
1

8

20

53

47

43

18
7

21
10

32
7

31

43

256
155

25

450

So far as possible the quotations for the various commodities have
been secured in their primary markets. For example, the prices
quoted for live stock and most animal products as well as grains
are for Chicago; wheat and flour prices are mainly for Kansas City
and Minneapolis; pig iron and steel for Pittsburgh, etc. The following
table shows the various markets in which wholesale price quotations
were obtained.
T able 2 ,—NUMBER OF COMMODITIES OR SERIES OF QUOTATIONS, B Y M ARKETS,
192ft A N D 1921.

Market.

Birmingham, A la.....................
Boston, Mass............................
Buffalo, N. Y ...........................
Chicago, 111...............................
Cincinnati, Ohio......................
Cleveland, Ohio........................
Decatur, 111...............................
Gloucester, Mass ...................
Kansas City, M o .................
La Salle, 111..............................
Los Angeles, C a lif...................
Louisville, K y ..........................
Minneapolis, M i n n ..............
New Orleans, La......................
New York, N. Y ......................
Norfolk, V a...............................
Philadelphia, Pa......................
Pittsburgh, Pa........................
Portland, Oreg.........................
St. Louis, Mo
San Franeisco, C a lif...............
Toledo, Ohio.............................
W ilm ington, N. C....................
Mills, wells, factories, etc
Genera l market
._
.........
Total...............................




Cloths Fuel Metals Build­ Chem­ House- Mis­
furand
Farm
and
ing
and
prod­ Foods. cloth­ light­ metal mate­ icals nish- cella­ Total,
and
neous.
prod­ rials. drugs. ing
ucts.
ing.
ing.
ucts.
goods.
1

1

4

25
2

22

3

4

2

2
1
2

1
1
!
5 ;
3

1
1
3

6
i
l

4

2

2

1

2
i
2
4

7
1
2
2
2

2

1

1
3
3
47

1
12
1
65
13
2

2
8

4

8
1
2

1
3
4
1

20
3
17

1

1
4

3

62

56

105

7°

37
16 !
I
1,
i..........
|

6

1
17

20

53

47

1

... ..

1
1

3

13

.......... 1
...........

i

2
1

20
7

43 |

31

1 !
25

1
4
1
1
1
7
7
156
3
10
19
3
5
7
1
1
50
77
4o0

12

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

As has been stated, more than one price series for commodities of
great importance has been included in the present bulletin. In no
case, however, is an article of a particular description represented
by more than one series of quotations for the same market. For
most articles weekly prices have been secured. In a large number of
instances, particularly since the beginning of 1918, it has been possible
to obtain average monthly prices. For those commodities whose
prices are quite stable, as certain textiles and building materials,
only first o f the month prices have been taken. These details are
summarized for 1920 and 1921, as follows:
T a b l e 3.—NUMBER

OF COMMODITIES, OR SERIES OF QUOTATIONS, CLASSIFIED
AS TO FREQUENCY, 1920 AND 1921.

Frequency of quotation.

Cloths Fuel Metals 'Build­ Chem­ HouseFarm
and
furMis­
and
ing
and
prod­ Foods. cloth­ light­ metal mate­ icals nish- cella­ Total.
and
ucts.
prod­ rials. drugs. ing neous.
ing.
ing.
ucts.
goods.

W eekly.....................................
Monthly....................................
Average for month...................

47
6
3

89
14
2

1
15
54

10
5
5

32
12
9

16
14
17

43

Total...............................

56

105

70

20

53

47

43

11
20

12
8
5

250
85
115

31

25

450

PRICES OF COMMODITIES IN 1921.

The year 1921 was a period of falling prices for many important
commodities. From the beginning to the middle of the year prices
declined rapidly, reacting to some extent in late summer and autumn,
but subsiding again in the last three months. For practically all
commodities except cotton and its manufactures, which were in­
fluenced by the short crop, prices at the end of the year were con­
siderably lower than at the beginning.
In the farm products group there were decided reductions during
the first six months in the price of cotton, barley, corn, oats, rye,
wheat, hay, hops, cattle, hogs, sheep, poultry, and tobacco. Food
products, including butter, cheese, eggs, fish, flour, lard, meats of
some kinds, milk, rice, and sugar, also declined sharply. Exceptions
were recorded for fresh fruits, ham, lamb, veal, and potatoes, all of
which were higher in June than in January. In the remaining groups
of commodities a strong downward tendency was manifest through­
out the first half of the year, shoes, cotton and woolen goods, fuel,
metals, building materials, chemicals, and house furnishings all con­
tributing to the general decline.
In July prices began to react, with farm products and foodstuffs
taking the lead. B y September farm products had advanced over
8 per cent above the June level, but a subsequent slump due to abun­
dant harvests brought the December average down to a par with late
summer prices. In foodstuffs, also, prices declined steadily after
August, m which month potatoes reached the highest point of the
year.
During the second half of 1921 prices of some articles rose sharply,
as butter, eggs, milk, rice, cotton, cotton goods, hides, pig tin, lead,
zinc, crude and refined petroleum, and lumber. Brick, lime, cement,




IS

PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

plate glass, nails, structural steel, and linseed oil, on the contrary,
decreased materially in price in the period stated.
Comparing 1921 with 1920, the group of commodities showing the
greatest decrease in average yearly prices was that of farm products,
the decrease in the group as a whole being 43 per cent. Cloths and
clothing come nex*, with a decrease of 39 per cent. In the remaining
roups the decrease in average yearly prices from 1920 to 1921 was:
►uilding materials, 37J per cent; foodstuffs and miscellaneous com­
modities, 34^ per cent; metals and metal products, 33 per cent;
chemicals and drugs, 32 per cent; house-furnishing goods, 23 per cent;
and fuel and lighting, 17 per cent. All commodities, considered in
the aggregate, decreased 35 per cent.
The following table shows for each of the nine groups the number of
commodities, or separate commodity units, for which comparable
wholesale prices were obtained for 1920 and 1921, and the number
that increased or decreased in average yearly price:

S

T able 4.—CHANGES IN AVERAG E PRICES FROM 1920 TO 1921, B Y GROUPS OF COM­

MODITIES.

Change.

Metals Build­ Chem­ House
Cloths Fuel
fur­
and
Farm
icals nish­ Mis­
and metal ing
and
cella­ Total.
prod­ Foods. cloth­ light­
and
prod­ mate­ drugs. ing neous.
ucts.
ing.
ing.
ucts. rials.
goods.

1
1
6
Increase.....................................
14
Decrease....................................
104
55
70
No change.................................
Total................................

56

105

70

20

1
52

3
44

2
41

2
29

53

47

43

31

24
1

16
433
1

25

450

It is seen from the above table that of the 450 comparable price
series secured by the bureau for 1920 and 1921 increases were re­
ported for only 16 series and decreases for 433 series. In the case of
1 series (smoking tobacco) no change in price took place. Detailed
information concerning price changes will be found in the table on
pages 52 to 239 of this bulletin.
Revised index numbers for the several groups of commodities for
the years from 1890 to 1921 are shown in the table which follows.
As has been explained, these index numbers are computed on the
year 1913 as the base period to provide a pre-war standard for meas­
uring price changes. To assist in the comparison afforded by the
index numbers, there is also shown the percentage of increase or
decrease in prices for each year as compared with the next preceding
year.




14

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1880 TO 1921.

T able 5 .—IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES,
1890 TO 1921.
(Base: Estimated value in 1913=100.)
[For explanation of method used in computing these index numbers, see pp. 9 t© 12.]

Farm products.1

Year.

Cloths and
clothing.3

Foods.2

Fuel and light­ Metals and metal
ing.4
products, e

Percent
Percent
Percent
Percent
Per cent
o f in­
of in­
of in­
of in ­
©fincrease (+ )
crease (+ )
crease (4-)
crease (+ )
crease ( + )
Index
or de­ Index or de­ Index ot de­ Index or de­ Index
or de­
num- crease ( —) num­ crease (—) num­ crease ( —) num­ crease ( —) num­ crease ( —)
ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
withprewitfe pre­
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
year.
year.
year.
year.
year.

1890...................
1891...................
1892...................
1893...................
1894...................

70
75
68
71
61

+7
-9
+4
-1 4

86
85
79
85
75

-1
-7
+8
-1 2

95
91
91
90
79

1895...................
1896...................
1897...................
1898...................
1899...................

61
55
59
63
64

(6
)
-1 0
+7
+7
4-2

74
69
71
74
74

-1
-7
+3
+4
(«)

1900...................
1901...................
1902...................
1903...................
1904...................

70
74
81
77
81

+9
+6
+9
-5
+5

79
79
83
81
84

1905...................
1906.-.................
1907...................
1908...................

-2
+1
+9
-1

1909.....................

79
80
87
86
97

1910...................
1911...................
1912...................
m 3 ...................
1914.................

103
93
101
106
103

1915...................
1916...................
1917...................
1918...................
1919..............; . .
1920...................
1921..............

(«)
-1
-1 2

62
69
57
58
56

-3
-5
+2
-3

116
102
92
85
72

77
76
75
77
80

-3
-1
-1
+3
+4

66
65
55
56
67

+18
-2
-1 5
+2
+20

77
78
72
72
110

+7
(*)
+5
-2
+4

88
81
82
87
88

+10
-8
+1
+6
+1

76
73
84
98
87

+13
-4
+15
+17
-1 1

108
103
100
99
88

-2
-5
-3
-1
-1 1

86
83
89
91
97

+2
-3
+7
+2
+7

90
98
105
94
98

+2
+9
+7
-1 0
+4

81
85
89
88
84

-7
+5
+5
-1
-5

98
113
121
95
93

+11
+15
+7
-2 1
-2

+6
-1 0
+9
-1
+3 ;

101
97
104
106
102

+4
-4
+7
—4
+2

100
96;
97
160
93

+2
-4
+1
+3
—2

78
76
84
166
98

-7
-3
+ 11
+16
-7

94
89
99
166
85

+1
-5
+11
+1
-1 5

104
123
190
218
231

+1
+ 18
+54
+ 15
+6

106
121 ;
167
188
207

+ 13
+ 10

98 1
127
175
228
253

«■
+30
+38
+30
+11

88
126
160
170
181

-5
+43
+34
+1
+6

99162
231
187
162 |

+16
+64
+43
-1 9
-1 3

218
124

—6
—43

220
144

+6
-3 5

295
180

+17
—39

241
199

+33
-1 7

192 !
129

+19
-3 3

+ 13

* Number ©f commodities varied from 1 =to
■
6
* Number o f commodities varied from 40in
* Number o f commodities varied from 5®in
4 Mtunber e f comm odities varied from la in
s Number of commodities varied from 18 in
* N o change.




+3
+15
+ m

1890 to- 56 in
1S©0 to 95 in
1890 to 65 in
ISQB’te '& ia
1890 to 37 in

1921.
1921,
1921.
1921.
1921.

-4

-i2
-1 0
-8
-1 5
+7
+1
-8
(8)

+53

15

PRICES OF COMMODITIES.
T a b l e 5 . — IN D E X

NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES,
1890 TO 1921—Concluded.
(Rase: Estimated value in

BY

GROUPS OF COMMODITIES,

1 9 1 3 = 1 0 0 .)

[For explanation of method used in computing these index numbers, see pp. 9 to 12.]
Building ma­
terials.7

Year.

. Chemicals and House furnishing Miscellaneous.1
0
goods.9
drugs.8

Per cent
of in­
crease (+ )
Index
or de­ ’Index
num­ crease (—), num­
ber. compared ber.
with pre­
ceding
year.

Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
of in­
of in­
of in­
©f in­
crease (+ )
crease (+ )
crease (+ )
crease (+ )
or de­ Index
or de­ Index
or de­
or de- Index
prease ( —) num­ crease (—) num­ crease (—) num­ crease (—>
compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared
with pre­
iwith pre­
with pre­
with pre­
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
year.
year.
year.
year.

(6)
-6

99
97
91
92
88

-2
-6
+1
-4

81
80
75
77
69

77
77
75
78
80

-4
(6
)
-3
+4
+3

93
92
93
96
100

+6
-1
+1
+3
+4

70 ;
67
67
70
75

+1
+3
+3
-3
(6)

87
87
87
90
89

+9
(6)
(6
)
+3 :
-1

104
96
93
102
110

+4
-8
-3
+10
+8

103
96
98
99
100

-2
-7
+2
+1
+1

88
91
98
92
92

-1
+3
+8
-6
(8)

117
116
111
101
130

+6
-1
-4
-9
+29

81
79
84
86
86 :
86 :
89
94
90
97

102:
102
101

+2
(8)
-1
-1
+1

96
93
94

+4
-3
+1
+6
(6)

151
111
110

+16 .
-2 6
-1

............
1890
1891...................
1892...................
1893-................. .
1894...................

82
78
74
73
70

-5
-5
-1
-4

91
92
93
91
82

+1
+1
-2
-1 0

88
80
85
85
80

1895...................
1896............ .
1897...................
1898...................
1899...................

68
68
66
70
77

-3
(6)
-3
+6
+10

81
81
88
97
101

-1
(6
)
+9
+10
+4

1900...................
1901.......... .
1902...................
1908...................
1904...................

81
78
80
82
79

102
105
108
105
105

1905...................
1906...................
1907...................
1908..................
1909...................

85
95
100
92
95

+8
+ 12
+5
-8
+3

1910...................
1911...................
1912...................

98
98
99

+3
(6)
+1

1913.........................

100

+5
-4 ;
+3
+3 !
-4

+1

100

100

92

-8

101

1915...................
1916................... .
1917...................
1918.......... ...... . 1
1919...................

94
120
157
172
201

+2
+28
+31
+10
+17

134
181
202
215
169

+33
100
106 s
+35
+ 12
125
+6- • 153
—21
184

1920...................
1921...................

264
165

+31
-3 8

200
136

+ 18
-3 2

1914...................

All commodi­
ties.1
1

100

254
195

+1

101
93
99

-1
-6
+3,
-1 0
+1
-4
(6)

+4
+7
+8
-2
+6
+2-

(6)
(6)
+3
+6
-4
+8
+4
-8
+6

100

-9

100

95

-5

98

-2

+1

+6
+ 18
+22
+20

95
121
148
156.
175

(8)
+27
+22
+5
+12

101
127'
177
194
206

+3
' +26>.
+39
+ 10
+6

+38
-2 3

196
128

+ 12
-3 5

226

+ 10
-3 5

(6
)

17
4

6 No change.
7 Number of commodities varied from 22 in 1890 to. 32 in 1921.
s Number of commodities varied from 9 in 1890 to 43 in 1921.
9 Number of commodities varied from 14 in 1890. to 3.1 in 1921.
1 Number of commodities varied from 12 in 1890 to 25 in 1921.
0
1 Number of commodities varied from-192 in 1890 to 494 in 1921.
1

To enable tbe reader to follow more readily the rise and fall of
prices year by year since 1890 a series of charts has been constructed.
A glance at the first of these (Chart 1) shows that the general trend of
wholesale prices for all commodities taken together was downward
during the first eight years of the period, or until 1897, after which
they rose steadily until 1910, except for a slight decline in 1901 and a
more decided one in 1908. In 1911 there was a sharp decline, followed
by a quick recovery in 1912 which lasted through 1913. In 1914
prices again subsided to some extent, but reacted in the following
year. Between 1915 and 1916 occurred by far the most pronounced
price advance that had taken place between any two years up to that




16

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

time, the index number for all commodities rising from 101 to 127, an
increase of 26 per cent. An even greater advance took place between
1916 and 1917, the index for 1917 rising to 177, an increase of 39 per
cent. A further advance in prices brought the index number for
1918 up to 194, a point 10 per cent above the level for 1917. In 1919
the index number increased to 206, or 6 per cent above the 1918 index,
and in 1920 to 226, or 10 per cent above the level of prices in 1919 and
126 per cent above the basic figure for 1913. In 1921 the index de­
clined to 147, a fall of 35 per cent from the 1920 price level.
Comparing the all-commodities curve with the curve for farm
products shown in Chart 2, one is struck by their great similarity.
The food curve also, as is seen by reference to Chart 3, follows quite
closely the curve for all commodities. The reason for the preponder­
ating influence of farm products and food upon the yearly price
changes of all commodities becomes clear when one consults Appendix
B of the present bulletin, which gives the approximate values in 1921
of the commodities comprising the several groups in the exchanges
of the country.
Cloths and clothing (Chart 4) remained relatively stable in price
from 1890 to 1915, except for rather sharp declines in 1894, 1901, and
1908. The great increases that took place in this group from 1915 to
1920 are clearly brought out in the chart, as is also the decided drop
in 1921. Marked fluctuations since 1890 have occurred in the groups
of fuel and lighting (Chart 5) and metals and metal products (Chart
6). In the latter group prices were relatively quite high in 1890-91.
Fuel and lighting reached the lowest levels m 1894 and in 1897-98,
while metals and metal products also were lowest in the same period.
The steep increases in steel prices in 1917 and in coal and coke prices
in 1920 are reflected in these charts. Building materials (Chart 7)
conformed to the same general trend as all other commodities from
1890 to 1915 and reached unprecedented levels in the last six years of
the period.
The curve for chemicals and drugs in Chart 8 shows slight variations
up to 1914, but clearly exhibits the early influence of the war on the
prices of these commodities. In 1915 prices in this group had in­
creased 34 per cent over the average lor 1913, while in no other
group had the increase been more than 5 per cent. From 1915 to
1918 prices continued to advance sharply, but with the termination
of hostilities in the latter year a decline took place, followed by a
reaction in 1920 and another decline in 1921. The group of house­
furnishing goods (Chart 9) shows a downward trend from 1890 to
1897, a gradual upward trend to 1913-1915, and a steep increase to
1920. In 1921 prices in this group dropped back to an average of 95
per cent above 1913 prices. The group of miscellaneous commodities
(Chart 10), like all other groups, plainly reflects the influence of war
and its aftermath upon prices in the years from 1916 to 1920 and the
pronounced tendency toward pre-war levels in 1921.




11083°— 22— B ui. 320----- %

400
375
350

275
250
225

200
175
150

125

100

75

50

o

i—

c-i

M

40
>"

«

•«

N frl

PRICES OP COM M ODITIES..




325
300

400
375
350
325

00

300
275
250
225
200
175
150

125

10
0

75

50

40

W HOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO . 1921,




Chart 2.




C hart 3.
400
375
350

1

325

300

FOODS
* oo.)
U

275
250

225

225

200

200

175

175

150

150

125

12$

too

10
0
>r-

75

75

50

'^LI^mOMMQO £ 0 s w o m z

275

m

J

300

250

400
375
350

_ i_

50

40

C
M
eft
«© t - co a*
O (R s> oi ?i a> « j>

e f to » o t < « t c oo
^ f o -> 9
O

cm

eft

• O
ft

40

o

I (*
*

s

400
375
350
325

60
O

300
215
250
225

200
175
150

125

10
0

75

50

40

W HOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,




Chart 4.

400
375
350

325
300
275

250
225
200
175

150

125

ibO

PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




Chart 5.

7
$

50

40

to

WHOLESALE PBiGES, 1890 TO 1921.




Ch art 6.

m
375
350
325
300
275
250
225
200

175
150

125

100

PRICES OF COMMODITIES.




Chart 7.

75

50,

o
<>
x

C
l

CO

irt «>

at> ci

4*
<

to

00

to
400
375
350
325
300
275
250
225

200
175
150

125

10
0

T
5

50

40

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 ®Oi 1921,




Chart 8.

400
375
350
325
300
275
250
225
200
175

150

125

10
0

PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




C hart 9.

75

50

40

to

Ol

to

400
375
350

a

325
300
275
250
225

200
175
150

1$
2

100

75

50

©

<>
£

p

t-

p

co

©

10
©

©

2 2 ii

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1800 TO 1021,




Chart 10.




28

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1896 ^TO 1921.

T able 6.—IN D E X NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES

AND B Y MONTHS, 1913 TO 1921.

(Base: Estimated value in

1 9 1 3 = 1 0 0 .)

[For explanation of method used in computing these index numbers, see pp. 9 to 12.]

Farm products.

Year and
month.

Fuel and light­ Metals and metal
ing.
products.

Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
of in­
of in­
of in­
of in­
of in­
crease (+ )
crease (+ )
crease (+ )
crease (+ )
crease ( + )
Index
or de­ Index
or de­ Index or de­ Index
or de­ Index
or de­
num­ crease (—) num­ crease (—) num­ crease (—) num­ crease ( —) num­ crease (—)
ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
month.
month.
month.
month.
month.

1913.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November.......
December.........

98
98
98
99
97
98
99
100
103
103
103
103

1914.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November.......
December.........

103
103
102
102
101
101
103
106
106
101
102
101

1915.
January............
February.........
March...............
April................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November.......
December.........

104
105
104
104
105
101
104
103
101
106
104
105

1916.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November.......
December.........

110
110
111
113
115
114
117
125
131
136
147
146

1917.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................

152
157
166
184
196
195

i No change.

Cloths and
clothing.

Foods.




G)

0)

+1
-2
+1
+1
+1
+3

6)
6)
G)
G)
G)

-1

G)

-1

G)

+2
+3

G)

-5
+1
-1
+3
+1
-1

G)

+1
-4
+3
-1
-2
+5
-2
+1

99
98
98
98
97
99
101
102
103
102
103
101
101
100
98
95
96
97
99
109
111
106
106
105
106
108
106
105
105
102
104
102
99
102
106
108

+1
+2
+2
-1
+3
+7
+5
+4
+8
-1

109
110
112
114
115
115
117
122
126
134
141
137

+4
+3
+6
+ 11
+7
-1

140
145
148
164
175
171

+5

G)

-1

G)
G)

-1
+2
+2
+1
+1
-1
+1
-2

G)

-1
-2
-3
+1
+1
+2
+ 10
+2
-5

G)

-1

99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
101
101
101
100
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
97
96
94
94
94
95
95
96
96
96
96
97
99
101
105
107

+1

G)
G)
G)
G)
0)

G)

+1

G)
G)

-1

-1

G)
G)
G)
G)
G)
G)
(1)- 2
-1
-2

G)

100
101
101
98
98
98
99
101
101
102
102
99
99
99
100
98
95
91
91
89
89
88
88
88

+1
+2
+2
+4
+2

87
86
84
82
82
81
81
85
91
94
98
103

+2
+4
+3
+6
+5
-3

110
114
117
118
120
122
125
128
130
137
147
154

+3
+4
+3
+1
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+5
+7
+5

113
115
119
120
120
122
121
116
120
128
155
163

+2
+4
+2
+ 11
+7
-2

158
157
158
164
167
174

+3
-1
+1
+4
+2
+4

171
178
174
164
.178
183

+1
+2
-2
-1

G)

-3
+2
-2
-3
+3
+4
+2
+1
+1
+2
+2
+1

G)

G)

+1

G)

+1

G)
G)
G)

+1

G)

-3

G)
G)

+1
+2

G)

+1

G)

-3

G)
G)

+1
-2
-3
-4

G)

-2

G)

-1

G)
G)
-1
-l
-2
-2

107
105
105
104
103
101
98
98
98
97
94
89
88
89
89
88
85
84
83
84
86
83
80
81

-2

G)

-1
-1
-2
-3

G)
G)

G)

-1
-3
-5
«
-1
+1
-l
-3
-1
—1
+1
+2
-3
-4
+1

82
86
88
90
96
102
105
103
104
105
110
122

+1
+5
+2
+2
+7
+6
+3
-2
+1
+1
+5
+ 11

+2
-1
-4
+3
+7
+21
+5

133
142
156
164
168
164
158
157
160
164
174
199

+9
+7
+ 10
+5
+2
-2
-4
-1
+2
+3
+6
+ 14

+5
+4
-2
-6
+9
+3

198
204
218
230
240
267

-1
+3
+7
+6
+4
+ 11

G)

-1

G)

+4
+7
+3
+4
+5

+10
+2
+3
+1

G)

29

PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

T able 6 .— IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES

AND B Y MONTHS, 1913 TO 1921—Cobtinued.
(Base: Estimated value in 1913=100.)

[For explanation of method used in computing these index numbers, see pp. 9 to 12.]

Farm products.

Year and
month.

Cloths and
clothing.

Foods.

Fuel and light­
ing.

Metals and metal
products.

Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
of in­
of in­
of in­
of in­
of in­
crease (+ )
crease (4-)
crease (4-)
crease (4-)
crease (4-)
Index
or de­ Index
or de­ Index
or de­ Index
or de­ Index
or de­
num­ crease (—) num­ crease ( —) num­ crease (—) num­ crease ( —) num­ crease (—)
ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
month.
month.
month.
month.
month.

1917—Concld.
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

196
202
202
207
212
207

1918.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

211
211
211
213
209
210
217
227
234
225
225
227

1919.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

224
216
224
230
234
226
241
242
225
227
237
242

1920.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

247
237
237
243
241
237
233
218
210
187
173
152

1921.
January............
February.........
March...............
April....*..........
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

143
133
127
117
118
114
119
123
124
124
121
120

+1
+3
0)

4-1

182
183
179
181
180
180
185
189
195
198
204
206

-1
-4
4-4
+3
+2
—3
4-7
(2
)
-7
4-1
4-4
4-2

203
194
199
205
210
204
210
214
205
205
210
220

4-2
-4

231
222
220
238
248
243
238
221
215
201
190
170

+2
(0
(0

+1
-2
(2)
4-3
4-5
4-3
-4

C)
1

0)

4-3
-1
-2
-2
-6
-4
-1 1
-7
-1 2
-6
-7
-5
-8
4-1
-3
4-4
4-3
4-1

0)

1 No change.



+2
+2
-2

169
175
176
180
181
181

—2
-1

162
151
151
144
139
137
141
146
142
140
139
136

-1
+4
4*1
4-2
+1

C)
1

181
186
185
185
191
195

4-4
4-3
-1

C)
1

4-3
4-2

176
167
160
153
161
163

201
205
211
220
226
233
238
239
245
245
241
233

4-3
4-2
4-3
4-4
+3
+3
4-2
(2
)
4-3
-2
-3

164
164
165
166
169
169
175
175
176
176
179
179

+2
4-5

220
210
203
205
216
243
262
276
283
291
304
317

-6
-5
-3
4-1
+5
4-13
+8
4-5
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-4

178
178
178
177
178
180
181
184
188
189
188
189

4-5
-4
-1
4-8
4-4
-2
-2
-7
-3
-7
-5
-1 1

339
346
344
336
328
314
300
- 286
266
245
226
215

4-7
4-2
-1
_2
-2
-4
-4
—5
-7
-8
-8
-5
-9
-4
-3
-4
-2
-1

4-1
4-1
-2
4-1
-1

G)

4-3
4-2
4-3
4-2
4-3
4-1

-1
-4
4-3
4-3
+2
-3
4-3
4-2
-4

G)

-5
-7
0)

-5
-3
-1
4-3
4-4
-3
-1
-1
-2

196
188
183
176
173
172
172
171
178
180
180
180

C)
1

C1
)

-1
4-4
4-1

C)
1
C)
1

-4
—5
-4
-4
4-5
4-1

292
282
260
207
183
183

4-1

183
184
184
184
185
184
189
190
190
192
191
1S7

C)
1

+1
4-1
4-2

C)
1

-K

G)

4-1

G)

4-2

C)
1
-1
-1
4-1
4-1
+1
4-2
4-2
4-1
-1
4-1

175
170
163
153
153
154
160
162
161
162
164
168

194
199
208
231
239
250
259
269
281
280
264
254

4-3
4-3
4-5
4-11
+3
4-5
4-4
4-4
+4
(2)
—6
-4

175
190
197
203
202
200
202
202
200
191
176
160

247
225
212
205
200
191
186
184
181
189
197
199

-3
-9
-6
-3
-2
—5
-3
-1
-2
4-4
4-4
-f l

153
147
140
138
138
133
124
117
116
116
114
113

G)
C)
1

2 Less than one-half of 1 per cent change.

4-9
-3
-8
-2 0
-1 2

G)
C)
1
G)
0)

(!)

4-1
4-1
-1
4-3
4-1
4-1
-1
-2
-6
-3
-4
-6

G)

4-1
4-4
4-1
-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-4
+9
4-4
4-3

(2
)

G)

-1
4-1
-1
-5
-8
-9
-4
-4
-5
-1

G)

G)

-4
-7
-6
-1
_2
-i

m

W HOLESALE PRICES, 1890 m

T able

1021.

IN D E X NUM BERS OF W H OLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS O F COMMODITIES
AN D B Y M ONTHS, 5B13 T O I»21—CimtinuwL
(Base: TS»tAma.ted value in 1813=100.)
[For explanation, of m e thod usedin cimiputirigthese index numbers, seepp. 9 to 12.]
Build*Bg:materials.

Year and
month.

Chemicals and
drugs.

flouse-furnishing goods.

Miscellaneous. , All commodi­
ties.

Per cent
Percent
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
o f in­
of in­
of in­
of in­
of in­
crease (+ )
crease ( + )
crease (+ )
crease (+ )
crease ( + )
Index; or de­ Index; or de­ Index? ©r de­ Index; ©r de­ Index
or de­
num­ crease (—) num­ crease ( —) num­ crease (—) num­ crease (—) num­ crease ( —)
ber. compared ber. , compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared
withprewithprewithp re­
with pre­
with pre­
eeding
oeding
ceding
ceding
ceding
month.
month.
month.
month.
month.

1913.
January............
February.........
March...............
April
May
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

101
102
103
103
103
102
99
99
99
98;
97
96

1914.
January.........
February..........
March..............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

93
94
94
93
93
93 ;
92
93
92
90 :
88
88

1915.
January............
February_____
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

88
89
90
90
93
93
94
93
94
98
191
104

1916.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November____
December.........

HO
113
118
120
121
120
120
120
121
124
126
132

1917.
January............
February_____
March...............
A pril................
M ay..................
June..................

138
140
144
155
159
169




— 2

0)
(*)
C)
1
C)
1
(l)
C
1)
C)
1
(l)
+1
-1
0

98
98/
98
97
97
96
95
96
109
108
107
107

0)
C
1)
C)
1
-1
(*)
-1
-1
+1
+14
-1
-1
0)

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

0
C)
1
C
1)
(r)
(*)
0)
C)
1
C)
1
0)
(!)
(!)
C)
1

108
116
118
118
116
123
130
136
143
151
165
179

+1
+7
+2
C)
1
-2
+6
+6
+5
+5
+6
+9
+8

99
99
99
99
100
1&
0
100
100
100
100
100
101

+.1
+2
+2
+5

184
204
206
200
193
191
175
157
158
164
167
172

+3
+11
+1
-3
-4
-1
-8
-1 0
+1
+4
+2
+3

+5
+1
+3
+8
+3
+6

173
173
181
186
194
195

+1
C)
1
+5
+3
+4
+1

-3
+1
0)
0)
0)

-i
-1
+1
-1
-2
-2

0)
0)

+1
+1

0)

+3
(l)
+1
-1
+1
+4
+3
+3
+6
+3
+4
+2
+1
-1
0)
0)

100
191
101
101
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
101
100
100

+1
+1
(*)
C)
1
-1
-3
C)
1
0)
-1
—1
-1

+i
C)
C)
1

-l
C)
1
C)
(!)
0)
C)
1
C)
1

94
96
98
98
99
95
93
94
96
92
91
96

-1
-2
-3
-2
+2
C)
1
-2
+2
-2
-1
-1
-2
+2
+2
0)

+1
-4
-2
+1
+2
—4
-1
+5

100
100
100
100
99
99
100
100
102
101
100
99
98
99
98
98
97
97
97
101
102
97
97
97

+1
C
1)
C)
1
C
1)
C
1)
(!)
(*)
+1

99
93
93
93
93
93
94
93
92
93
95
100

+3
-6
(*)
0
C
1)
C
1)
+1
-1
-1
+1
+2
+5

98
99
99
99
100
99
100
100
100
102.
104
108

103
103
104
104
105
105
107
107
107
109
111
111

+2
C
1)
+1
C
1)
+1
(*)
+2
(!)
C
1)
+2
+2
C
1)

110
105
108
no
114
120
120
121
124
132
139
147

+10
-5
+3
+2
+4
+5
C)
1
+1
+2
+6
+5
+6

113
115
119
121
122
123
123
126
130
1-36
146
149

118
119
120
121
121
123

+0
+1
+1
+1
C
1)
+2

149
150
151
153
151
153

+1
+1
+1
+1
-1
+1

153
157
162
173
183
185

i No change.

-1

106
105
103
100
98
100
100
98
100
98-'
97
96

C)
1
(!)
(!)

(!)
(1)
(1)
-1
C
1)
0)

+1
+2
—1
-1
-1
-1
+1
-1

(!)
f1
)
C
1)

-1
+4
+3
-5

C
1)
C)
1
+1
+1
C)
1
(1)
+1
-1
+1
<D
C)
1

(i)

+2
+2
+4
+5
+2
+3
+2
+ 1
+1
+2
+3
+5
+7
+2
+3
+3
+3
+7
+6
+1

31

PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

T ab le 6 .—IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES

AND B Y MONTHS, 1913 TO 1921—Coneluded.
(Base: Estimated value in 19X3=100.)

[For explanation of method used in computing these index numbers see pp. 9 to 12.]
Building
materials.

Year and
month.

168
167
167
156
156
158

1918.
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

161
161
164
169
170
172
177
179
179
177
177
177

1919.
January............
February.........
March...............
April................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November.......
December........

176
173
171
169
173
189
209
226
229
229
232
248

A u g u s t................
S e p te m b e r.........
O c to b e r...............
N o v e m b e r .........
D ec em b er..........

1921.
January............
F e b r u a r y ...........
M arch..................

April................
May..................
June.................
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November.......
December.........

House-furnish­
ing goods.

All
commodities.

Miscellaneous.

Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
of in­
of in­
of in­
of in­
of in­
crease (+ )
crease (+ )
crease ( + )
crease ( + )
crease (+ )
or de­
Index or de­ Index
or de­ Index
or de­ Index
or de­ Index
num­ crease (—) num­ crease ( —) num­ crease (—) num­ crease ( —) num­ crease ( —)
ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared ber. compared
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
with pre­
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
ceding
month.
month.
month.
month.
month.

1917—Concld.
July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

1920.
January............
February.........
March...............
April................
May..................
June................
July..................

Chemicals and
drugs.

205
211
223
231
223
228

-1
-1
0

-7

0

+1
+2

0

+2
+3
+1
+1
+3
+1

0

-1

0
0

.

-1
-2
-1
-1
+2
+9
+ 11
+8
+1

+5
+3
+6
+4
-3
+2

129
129
130
130
131
133

223
227
229
228
222
205
209
212
210
211
209
194

-2
+2
+1

137
138
140
144
146
152
159
161
163
164
164
163

+1
+7

181
169
162
160
161
162
167
170
170
173
176
182

274
293
297
300
293
275
269
265
255
240
215
204

+ 10
+7
+1
+1
-2
-6
-2
-1
-4
-6
-1 0
-5

189
195
205
210
213
212
212
209
205
198
181
164

192
180
173
167
165
163
160
156
156
159
163
158

-6
-6
-4
-3
-1
-1
-2
-3

153
149
143
135
134
133
129
129
131
131
129
127

0

0

1 No change.




+2
+3
-3

0

0

-3
-8
+2
+1
-1
-1
-7
-7
-7
-4
-1
+1
+1
+3
+2

0

+2
+2
+3
+4
+3
+5
+2
+1

0
0

-1
-2
-3
-9
-9
-7
-3
-4
-6
-1
-1
-3

0
0

+2
-2
-2

167
165
164
167
168
180
183
188
190
194
217
222
239
242
242
242
247
248
275
274
273
271
260
242
217
217
216
216
209
196
180
179
179
180
178
178

+5
0

+1

0

+1
+2
+3
+1
+1
+3
+1
+4
+5
+1
+1
+1

153
150
147
142
140
140

-1

+8
+1

194
197
200
206
208
205
203
199
195
188
179
166

0
0
0
0
0

+2
+11
- l

-4
-7
-1 0
0
0
0

0

-3
-6
-8
-1
+ 1

-1

0

154
147
139
130
126
125
123
119
118
118
119
121

0

+1
+3
+2
+3
-1
+1
+1
+1
+1
-1

i
!

1
!
!
l
i

+2
-2
-1
-1
+1
+4
+6
+6
+1
-1
+1

233
232
234
245
247
243
241
231
226
211
196
179

- i

-2
-2
-4
-5
-7
-7
-5
-5
-6
-3
-1
-2
-3
-1
0

0

j
!
:
j

+ 1

+2 !
i

2 Less than one-half of 1 per cent change.

170
160
155
148
145
142
141
142

141
142
141
140

-1
+1
+1
+1
+2

0

+1
+3
+2
+2
-1

0

0

199
193
196
199
202
203
212
216
210
211
217
223

+3
+2
+2
+3
+i
-l

0

+2
+1
-1
-2

184
186
187
190
190
191
196
200
204
202
203
202

+4

166
163
161
160
161
167
177
187
189
187
189
189

0

188
189
187
183
183
182

-2
-2
-3
-1

0

145
145
147
152
155
160
159
160
161
163
164
163

+2
-1
-1
+2
+1
+7
+2
+3
+1
+2
+ 12
+2

0

-1
-3
+2
+2
‘+2
0

0

+4
+2
-3
+3
+3
+4

j
i

|

!
1
!
!

0

+1
+5
+1
-2
-1
-4
-2
-7
-7
-9
-5
-6
-3
—5
-2
-2
-1
+1
-1
+1
-1
-1

32

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Table 6 and Charts la to 10a furnish a comparison of group price
fluctuations by months from January, 1913, to December, 1921. The
charts here shown are not directly comparable with those indicating
yearly price changes, owing to the difference in the time units. They
may, however, be compared directly with the several charts showing
monthly price variations of important individual commodities
appearing elsewhere in this bulletin.
In the two important groups of farm products and foodstuffs
(Charts 2a and 3a) it is seen that prices moved within comparatively
narrow limits during 1913 and the first half of 1914, the monthly
variation at no time being more than 3 per cent. The upward trend
of prices in both groups in the summer of 1913 and the downward
trend of food prices early in 1914 are, however, quite noticeable.
With the opening of hostilities in the summer of 1914 prices in these
two groups at first rose steeply and then declined as abruptly, due to
the prevailing business stagnation resulting from the war. In 1915,
as business became adjusted to the changed conditions brought about
by the war, prices became more stable. The unprecedented advances
in the last half of 1916, and in the first half of 1917 when this country
entered the struggle, contrast strongly with price changes in the early
months of the period of the World War. The steadying effect of
governmental price control, inaugurated in the summer and fall of
1917, is clearly discernible in the charts, as is also the steep increase
that took place in each of these two groups in 1919. In 1920 the
prices of farm products continued high until April, after which
declines set in that brought the December level down to a point below
that of any month since January, 1917. Food prices reached their
peak in May, followed by sharp decreases to the end of the year. In
1921 prices in both groups continued steadily downward until June,
reacting in the next three months and declining again in the fall and
winter. The close of the year found farm products 20 per cent
higher and foodstuffs 36 per cent higher than the 1913 level.
In the cloths and clothing group (Chart 4a) prices showed little varia­
tion until late in 1915, after which they rose rapidly until the armistice
period in 1918. Following the cessation of hostilities, prices declined
until the spring of 1919, when they again advanced sharply. The peak
of prices in this group was reached early in 1920, when they approxi­
mated three and a half times the 1913 level. Later declines brought the
level in the summer of 1921 to a point only 71 per cent above the 1913
level. Small increases took place in the last four months of 1921.
The curve for the fuel and lighting group in Chart 5a shows the
steep increases that took place in fuel prices in the second half of
1916 and the first half of 1917, before price control was instituted.
The drop in prices from June to October of 1917, immediately before
and after the Fuel Administration began to function, is strikingly
brought out in the chart. The great height to which fuel prices rose
in the fall of 1920, as well as subsequent declines to the fall of 1921,
is also emphasized by the chart.
Metals and metal products (Chart 6a), after slumping in ^ ^ f o l ­
lowing the outbreak of the war, began to recover early in the next
year due to a readjustment of business and the receipt of large orders
for materials from the warring countries. In 1916 and the first half
of 1917 prices of metals continued steeply upward, reaching their
highest level in July of the latter year. At this time prices had
increased 192 per cent over the average for 1913. With the inaugu­



PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

33

ration of control following the entry of the United States into the
war, prices declined rapidly, being only 83 per cent above the 1913
average at the end of 1917. During most of 1918 prices in this group
slowly advanced, but declined again m the first half of 1919. Areaction
took place in the second half of 1919, which continued into the spring
and summer of 1920. After this prices again slowly subsided to
the end of 1921, when they were only 13 per cent higher than in 1913.
In the remaining groups (Charts 7a to 10a) the effects of war are
equally evident. The curve for building materials (Chart 7a)
shows a downward trend from 1913 to the beginning of 1915, and a
steep upward trend thereafter. With the resumption of building
operations enormous increases took place in this group during 1919
and 1920, the price level in the spring of 1920 being three times the
1913 level. Like other commodities, building materials fell sharply
in price in 1921, with a tendency toward recovery late in the year.
Chemicals and drugs were affected by war conditions as early as the
fall of 1914, as is seen from Chart 8a, the demand for medical and
hospital supplies influencing prices from the beginning of hostilities.
The high peak of prices in'this group was reached in the fall of 1917,
since which time prices have declined, with an upward swing in 1920
and a downward swing in 1921.
House-furnishing goods (Chart 9a) varied but little in price from
1913 to 1915, but increased steadily in the next five years. In July,
1920, prices were 275 per cent of the 1913 level. Steady recessions
were recorded in this group during 1921. In the group designated as
miscellaneous (Chart 10a), composed of cattle feed, leather, paper,
wood pulp, and other commodities not falling under the other group
designations adopted, prices fluctuated below the pre-war level during
all of 1914 and 1915. From 1916 to the spring of 1920 prices as a
whole advanced, with temporary setbacks in certain months. After
May, 1920, steady declines set in which continued through 1921,
with a tendency to react in the closing months of the year.
In order that the price fluctuations of commodities in their raw
state may be compared with the price fluctuations of such commodi­
ties after being converted into manufactures, the following tables
and charts covering the years from 1890 to 1921 and the months
from January, 1913, to December, 1921, have been constructed. In
this presentation the index numbers are computed in the one case
from the prices of 20 important raw materials, representing 27 price
series, and in the other case from the prices of 70 articles either manu­
factured directly from or closely akin to those same 20 raw materials.
The list of raw and manufactured commodities, arranged in pairs,
is as follows: Cattle (2 quotations) and beef products (3 quotations);
copper ingots and copper wire; corn and corn meal (2 quotations);
cotton and cotton textiles (21 quotations); flaxseed and linseed oil;
hides and leather (4 quotations); hogs (2 quotations) and hog products
(5 quotations); manila hemp and rope; milk and milk products
(butter, 3 quotations; cheese, 1 quotation); petroleum (crude and
refined petroleum, 2 quotations); pig iron (4 quotations) and iron
products (6 quotations); pig lead and lead pipe; pig tin and tin plate;
rye and rye flour; sheep (2 quotations) and mutton; slab zinc and
sheet zinc; raw sugar (96° centrifugal) arid granulated sugar; sulphur
and sulphuric acid; wheat and wheat flour (2 quotations); wool (2
quotations) and woolen textiles (11 quotations).
11083°— 22— Bull. 320------3




©HART l a .
400
375
350

35
3

300
175
150
115

10
0
173
150

123

10
0
7P

40

WHOLESALE PBICJES, 1890 TO 1921,




£

400
375
350
325
300
275
250
225
200

175
150
125
too

?
.%

PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




Chart 2a.

50

y o j: S
5 > a ^ > < * a J > ci
illfiliiiiiii-illllsiiiiiiiliij >salfilaalSSfSsa

•18

1918

40

1920

in




co
C*
Chart 3a.

3
M
te
i

B
o
fe
l
co
■0
0
8
H
O

400
375

350
325
300
275
250
225

200
175

150

125

100

75

PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




Chart 4a.

50

40

CO

00

Chart 5a.

W HOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.




o
t>

400375

350
325

300
275

250
225

200
175
150

125

10
0
75

PRICES OP COMMODITIES,




Chart 6a.

50

40

05
CD

WHOLESALE PBICES,
1890

TO
1921.




o
Chart 7a.

400
375
35 0
325
300
275
250
225 '

200

1£
?
150

125
too

75

50

4
0

PRICES OE COMMODITIES,




Chart 8a.

H O U S E - FURN ISH IN G
119X3.

•

1 S s 3 I s23!

C hart 9a.

GOODS

ISO)




175

150

125

100

75

S
O

40

1017

1918

1921

40ft
37ft
35ft
325
300

275
250
225

200

175
150

125

1ft
0

75

PRICES OP COMMODITIES,




Chart 10a.

5ft
4ft

CO

44

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

T able 7.—W HOLESALE PRICE INDEXES OF IDENTICAL COMMODITIES IN R A W

AND

MANUFACTURED STATE, 1890 TO 1921.
(Base: Estimated value in 1913= 100.)

[For explanation of method used in computing these index numbers, see pp. 9 to 12.]

Raw commodities
(27 price series).

Year.

Per cent
of in­
crease ( + )
or de­
Index
number. crease ( - )
compared
with pre­
ceding
year.

Manufactured com­
modities (70 price
series).

Index
number.

All commodities (97
price series).

Per cent
of in­
crease ( + )
or de­
Index
crease ( —) number.
compared
with pre­
ceding
year.

Per cent
of in­
crease ( + )
or de­
crease ( —)
compared
with pre­
ceding
year.

1890......................................................
1891......................................................
1892......................................................
1893......................................................
1894......................................................

69
68
62
64
57

-1
-9
+3
-1 1

87
86
81
83
72

1895......................................................
1896......................................................
1897......................................................
1898......................................................
1899......................................................

61
56
57
61
67

+7
-8
+2
• +7
+10

72
70
71
74
78

1900....................................................
1901......................................................
1902......................................................
1903......................................................
1904....................................................

73
72
77
77.
79

+9
-1
+7
+3

83
82
87
86
86

1905......................................................
1906......................................................
1907......................................................
1908......................................................
1909......................................................

78
81
87
84
91

-1
+4
+7
-3
+8

88
88
94
93
98

1910......................................................
1911......................................................
1912......................................................
1913......................................................
1914......................................................

95
86
95iod
99

+4
—9
+10
+5
-1

101
93
100
100
101

+1

98
89
97
100
100

1915......................................................
1916......................................................
1917.....................................................
1918.....................................................
1919......................................................

101
125
184
208
216

+2
+24
+47
+ 13
+4

106
131
182
203
215

+5
+24
+39
+ 12
+6

103
128
183
206
215

+3
+24
+43
+13
+4

1920......................................................
1921......................................................

220
121

+2
-4 5

233
148

+8
-3 6

225
132

+5
-4 1

1 No change.




0

-1
-6
+2
-1 3

-i
-7
+3
-1 3

-3
+1
+4
+5

65
62
63
66
72

+3
-5
+2
+5
+9

+6
-1
+6
-1

77
76
81
80
82

+7
-1
+7
-1
+3

+2

0)

76
75
70
72
63

82
84
90
87
94

0)
0

+7
-1
+5
+3
-8
+8

0

0

+2
+7
-3
+8
+4
-9
+9
+3

0

400
375
350
325

300

300

275

275

250

250

225

225

200

200

175

175

150

150

125

125

|0
p

100

75

75

50

PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




Chart 11.
400
375
350
325

50

40
*n

- «>
*

t©

r-

oe>

40

C
n

46

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1&90 PCX 1921.

T able 8.—W H OLESALE PRICE IN D E XE S OF ID E N TICA L COMMODITIES IN R A W AND

M ANUFACTURED STATE , B Y MONTHS, 1913 TO 1921.
(Base: Estimated value in 1913= 100.)

[For explanation of method used in computing these index numbers, see pp. 9 to 12.]

Raw commodities
(27 price series).

Year and month.
Index
number.

1913.
January...............................................
F e b ru a ry ..........................................
March..................................................
April...................................................
M ay.....................................................
June............ ........................................
July.....................................................
August................................................
September..........................................
October...............................................
November...........................................
December............................................

100
101
101
101
97
95
97
103
100
94
94
93

1915.
January...............................................
February............................................
March..................................................
Apii*....................................................
M ay.....................................................
June.....................................................
July.....................................................
August................................................
September..........................................
October...............................................
November................................ ..........
December............................................

96
99
100
100
102
101
103
100
100
103
102
106

1916.
January........ .....................................
February.............................................
March..................................................
April....................................................
May...................................... ...............
June....................................................
July.....................................................
August................................................
September...........................................
October...............................................
November...........................................
December............................................

111
114
117
120
122
120
122
126
130
137
144
144

1917.
January...............................................
February.............................................
March..................................................
April....................................................
M ay.....................................................
June.....................................................

148
153
165
176
188
191

Per cent
of in­
crease ( + )
or de­
Index
crease (—) number.
compared
with pre­
ceding
month.

96
99
101
100
98
99
100
101
103
102
101
99

1914.
January..............................................
February.............................................
March..................................................
April....................................................
M a y ....................................................
June.....................................................
J u ly ...................................................
August................................................
September..........................................
October...............................................
November...........................................
December............................................

i No change.




Manufactured com­
modities (70 price
series).

+3
+2
-1
-2
+1
+1
+1
+2
-1
-1
-2
+1
+1
(!)
0)

0)

—4
-2
+2
+6
-3
-6
-1
+3
+3
+1

C)

+2
-1
+2
-3
+3
-1
+4
+5
+3
+3
+3
+2
-2
+2
+3
+3
+5
+5

0)
+3
+3
+8
+7
+7
+2

98
99
100
102
99
100
101
101
101
100
99
99
99
98
97
96
96
97
99
108
110
105
104
103

All commodities (97
price series).

Per cent
of in­
crease ( + )
or de­
Index
crease (—) number.
compared
with pre­
ceding
month.

+1
+1
+2
-3
+1
+1
C
1)
0)

-1
-1

0)

97
99
100
101
98
99
101
101
102
101
100
99

Per cent
of in­
crease ( + )
or de­
crease ( —)
compared
with pre­
ceding
month.

0)

+2
+1
+1
-3
+1
+2
+1
-1
-1
-1

-1
-1

99
100
99
99
97
96
98
105
104
99
98
97

105
108
106
107
109
106
107
104
100
103
106
111

+2
+3
-2
+1
+2
-3
+1
-3
-4
+3
+3
+5
:

99
103
102
103
105
103
105
101
100
103
104
108

+2
+4
-1
+1
+2
-2
+2
-4
-1
+3
+1
+4

114
117
122
125
127
128
128
133
136
142
150
149

+3
+3
+4
+2
+2
+1

112
115
119
122
124
123
124
129
132
139
146
146

+4
+3
+3
+3
+2

152
156
163
179
193
191

(l>

(0

0)

-1
-1
-1
+1
+2
+9
+2
-5

+4
+2
+4
+6

-1

+2
+3
+4
+10
+8

-1

150
154
164
177
190
191

C
1)
(1)

+1
-1
-2
-1
+2
+7
-1
—5
-1
-1

-1

+1
+4
+2
+5
+5
0)
+3
+3
+6
+8
+7
+1

47

PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

T able 8.—W HOLESALE PRICE IN DEXES OF IDENTICAL COMMODITIES IN R AW AND
MANUFACTURED STATE, B Y MONTHS, 1913 TO 1921—Concluded.

Raw commodities
(27 price series).

Year and month.
Index
number.

1917—Concluded.
July.....................................................
August................................................
September..........................................
October...............................................
November...........................................
December...........................................

193
199
199
200
202
196
199
200
203
203
202
201
207
217
220
214
211
213

1919.
January..............................................
February............................................
March..................................................
April...................................................
May.....................................................
June....................................................
July.....................................................
August................................................
September..........................................
October...............................................
November...........................................
December............................................

208
202
208
214
217
213
226
224
213
213
223
229

1920.
January...............................................
February............................................
March..................................................
April...................................................
May.....................................................
June....................................................
July.....................................................
August................................................
September..........................................
October...............................................
November...........................................
December...........................................
1921.
January...............................................
February............................................
March..................................................
A pril.............................................. .
May.....................................................
June....................................................
July.....................................................
August................................................
September..........................................
October...............................................
November...........................................
December............................................




Per cent
of in­
crease ( 4 )
or de­
Index
crease ( —) number.
compared
with pre­
ceding
month.

+1
+3
0)

+1
+1
-3

191
195
193
190
188
192

All commodities (97
price series).

Per cent
Per cent
of in­
of increase (4-)
i crease ( 4 )
or de­
or de­
Index
crease ( —) number. crease ( —)
compared
compared
with pre­
with pre­
ceding
ceding
month.
month.

:
!
i
i
i

+2
-i
_2
-1
4-2

192
198
196
196
197
194

!
+2 j
I
0)
4-3
(2) +2
o
(2)
(1) 4-3
o
-1
4-2
+1

196
198
200
202
201
202
206
212
216
211
211
213

(o

41
43
-1
• 0)

41
-2

I

1918.
January..............................................
February............................................
March..................................................
April...................................................
May.....................................................
June....................................................
July.....................................................
August................................................
September..........................................
October...............................................
November...........................................
December...........................................

1 No change.

Manufactured com­
modities (70 price
series).

+2
+1
+2
0)
(2)
(2)

+3
+5
+1
-3
-1
+1
-2
—3
+3
+3
+1
-2
+6
-1
—5

192 :
195 |
195 !
201
200
203
204
204
210
207
211
214

+5
+3
+3
-3
+2
+4
4-1
-1
-2
-5
-4
-1 1
-9
-1 1

243
240
240
257
261
257
248
236
230
212
196
177

152
133
123
116
119
109
110
114
116
121
121
121

-4
-1 3
—8
-6
+3
-8
+1
4-4
+2
+4

170
160
161
154
146
144
145
143
141
138
136
134

0)

(0
0)

41
41
41
41
(2)
(2)

0)

42
43
42
—2
41

-3
-3
+2
4-2
4-1
-1
4-3
41
-3
41
43
44

208
202
207
213
215
212
223
223
213
214
222
230

45
—1

-1 0

238
233
236
248
251
248
242
231
223
203
185
166

43
-2
41
45
41
-1
-2
-5
-3
-9
-9
-1 0

-4
-6
41
-4
—5
-1
41
-1
-1
-2
-1
-1

159
144
138
131
129
123
124
125
126
127
327
126

-4
-9
-4
-5
—2
-5
41
41
41
41

208
202
206
211
214
211
218
221
214
216
222
231

236
228
233
243
245
242
238
227
219
196
178
158

0)

(1
)

47
42
-2
-4
-5
-3
-8

-8

1 Less than one-half of 1 per cent change.

-2
-3
42
43
41
-1
45
0)
(2)

0)

-4
44
44

-1

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,




00
Chart 11a.

PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

49

An examination of the figures in Table 7 and of Chart 11 reveals
that, in the main, fluctuations in the prices of manufactured com­
modities from 1890 to 1921 synchronized closely with fluctuations
in the prices of raw materials. In only two years, 1905 and 1914,
did the manufactured commodities curve move in a direction con­
trary to that of the raw commodities curve. In several instances
the per cent of change from the preceding year was exactly the
same for the two curves. It will be observed, moreover, that in
most of the years prior to 1917, when, this country entered the war,
manufactured commodities fluctuated at a considerably higher level,
as compared with the base period, than did raw commodities, and
that from 1917 to 1919 these conditions were exactly reversed. In
1920 and 1921 manufactured commodities again fluctuated at a
relatively higher level than did raw commodities.
In the table and chart showing monthly price variations since 1913
the great similarity of the two curves is also clearly shown. Out of
108 months for which index numbers are here given only 19 months
show a movement of manufactured commodities at variance with the
movement of raw commodities, and in most of these instances the
variance may properly be ascribed to a lag between the two series of
prices. An exception appears in the figures for the last half of 1921,
in which period manufactured commodities continued to decline in
the face of rising prices of raw commodities. It will be noted, how­
ever, that in the months immediately preceding this period the
spread between raw and manufactured commodities was much
greater than at any other time, indicating that prices of manu­
factured goods had attained abnormal levels as compared with prices
of their raw materials. An inspection of the figures in the columns
showing the per cent of change from the preceding month serves to
emphasize the fidelity with which prices of manufactured articles in
the main have followed those of raw materials since the beginning of
the period in 1913.
AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF IMPORTANT COMMODI­
TIES, 1890 TO 1921.

The average wholesale prices of individual commodities for each
year from 1890 to 1921 and for each month of 1921 are shown in
detail in Table 9, which follows. Monthly figures for the years from
1913 to 1920 have in most instances been published in previous
bulletins of the bureau .7 The table contains, in addition to the aver­
age money prices, the relative price for each year or month as com­
pared with price in 1913; that is, the per cent that the average price
in each year or month is of the average price in 1913. For articles
added since 1913 no relative prices could be computed.
The average prices shown in the table are, in all instances where this
information could be obtained, based on first-hand transactions in
primary markets. Thus the cattle and other live-stock prices used
are those paid by slaughterhouses to the commission man acting for
the producer. Grain prices are those ruling on the floor of the ex­
change for grain shipped in by country elevators. Cotton and wool
7 Bulletins Nos. 149, 181, 200, 226, 269, and 296.

11083°— 22— Bull. 320------ 4




50

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 192L.

prices are for sales made to manufacturers. Cotton and woolen goods
prices are in most instances those quoted b y manuf acturers to whole­
salers, jobbers, and manufacturers of wearing apparel. Butter and
egg prices are for consignments to the wholesale trade. Flour prices are
those made by millers to large wholesale dealers, jobbers, and bakers.
Leather prices are from tanners to manufacturers. Coke prices are
to operators of blast furnaces. Pig-iron prices are those to foundry
operators and large steel makers. Steel prices are to jobbers or large
manufacturing consumers.
In collecting prices for inclusion in this table the aim was to secure
quotations on those particular grades or qualities of an article that
represent the bulk of sales within the class. Thus, in the case of
commodities classed as chemicals or drugs, the lower quotations were
selected where a range of prices was found, because of the fact that
these were believed to represent the prices of larger lots while the
higher quotations represent the prices of smaller lots. For the same
reason eggs classed as “ firsts” are now quoted instead of the “ new
laid” grade at one time carried, since it has been ascertained that
“ firsts” are relatively more important in the market. In the cases
of butter and several other articles the quotations have been enlarged
in recent years b y the addition of lower-priced grades that were
found to constitute a considerable part of the volume of sales.
In many instances it has been ascertained that the price of bread
per loaf is not affected by slight changes in the price of flour, but the
weight of the loaf is changed instead. For this reason the compara­
tive prices of bread shown in the table are based on a pound of (lough
before baking and not on the baked loaf. In the case of flour the
prices shown for 1918 are necessarily restricted to the grade estab­
lished by the United States Food Administration regulations, which
became effective with the beginning of that year.
The closing of the New York and New Orleans cotton exchanges in
1914, following the outbreak of hostilities in Europe, made it impos­
sible to obtain satisfactory price quotations for this staple during a
part of that year. The average yearly prices reported for cotton in
1914 are therefore somewhat higher than would have been the case
had they included quotations for the period of business demoraliza­
tion during which the exchanges were closed. The prices for the
four grades of wool appearing in the table for 1917 to 1921 were
obtained as for unwashed worn and then reduced to the scoured wool
basis by increasing the price in proportion to the amount of shrinkage.
For years prior to 1917 the prices for the two grades of wool shown
were first obtained as for washed wool and then reduced to the
scoured basis in a similar manner.
For all commodities the average price for the year was computed
by dividing the sum of the quotations by the number of quotations.
Where a range of prices was shown, except in the case of chemicals
and drugs as stated, the mean price for each date was found and the
sum of such means was divided by their number to give the average
rice for the year. For example, the sum of the 52 mean prices of
To. 1 northern spring wheat at Minneapolis obtained for 1921 was
found to be $76.23. This total divided by 52 gives $1,466 as the
average price for 1921. In instances where prices during one or
more months of the year were missing, the yearly averages were
computed from the number of quotations actually obtained. For

S




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES QE COMMODITIES.

51

monthly averages a similar plan was followed in cases where prices
cm a particular day of each week were used, For many commodities;
however* monthly averages based on daily quotations have been
obtainable. First of the month prices have been used for a limited
number of articles whose prices are quite stable.
It is obvious that in order to arrive at a strictly scientific average
price for any period one must know the precise quantity marketed
and the price at which each unit of the quantity was sold. It is
manifestly impossible to obtain such detail, and even if it were pos­
sible the labor and cost involved in such a compilation would be pro­
hibitive. The method adopted here, which is the one usually
employed in computing average prices, is believed to yield results
quite satisfactory for all practical purposes.
In computing the averages shown m the table the net cash price
was used for textiles and all other articles subject to large and vary­
ing discounts. In the cases of a few articles, such as plain wire, cut
and wire nails, steel plates, steel sheets, etc., the prices of which are
subject to a small discount for cash within 10 days, no deduction has
been made.
A series of charts showing percentage price changes for a number of
selected articles of special importance accompanies the table in the
following pages. As in the table, the change in each ease is measured
by the average price in 1913 as the base. The charts showing
yearly price changes since 1890 are all drawn to the same scale, so
that these charts can readily be compared with one another. They
are likewise comparable with the charts indicating yearly price
fluctuations in the several groups and in all commodities combined
(Charts 1 to 11). In like manner the charts showing monthly price
variations since the beginning of 1913 can be compared directly one
with another and with the group charts la to 11a.




T a b l e 9 . — AVER AG E

C!
7

W H OLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921.

[This table shows the average actual and the relative price of each commodity each year from 1890 to 1921 and each month in 1921. The base price of each commodity, on which the
relative prices are based, is shown in heavy-faced type and is the average of the actual prices for the year 1913. F or further explanation and discussion of the table, see pp. 49 to 51.1

to

Farm products.
(a)

Corn: Cash, con­ Com: Cash, No. 3,
tract grades.
mixed.

Oats: Cash.

Wheat: Cash, Chicago.

Rye: No. 2, cash.

Year or month.
Fair to
Choice
to fancy
good
malting, malting,
average average
price per price per
bushel.
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Range of
No. 1
No. 1
northern
northern
spring,
spring and
average
No. 2 red
winter, aver­ price per
age price per bushel.
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894

$0,506
.610
.509
.469
.513

72.9
87.9
73.3
67.5
74.0

$0.395
.574
.450
.396
.433

63.2
91.9
72.0
63.4
69.2

$0,311
.387
.304
.283
.311

82.7
103.1
80.9
75.2
82.8

$0.545
.833
.675
.490
.466

85.6
131.0
106.2
77.0
73.2

$0,893
.962
.788
.677
.559

93.7
100.9
82.6
71.0
58.6

1895.
1896
1897.
1898
1899

.430
.298
.323
. 435
.443

62.0
42.9
46.5
62.6
63.8

.396
.258
.255
.314
.333

63.3
41.3
40.7
50.3
53.3

.237
.180
.183
.247
.245

63.1
47.9
48.6
65.7
65.2

.483
.352
.396
i .496
.552

75.8
55.3
62.3
77.9
86.8

.600
.641
.795
4 885
.711

62.9
67.3
83.4
92.8
74.6

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

.482
.588
.632
.549
.530

69.4
84.8
91.1
79.2
76.4

.381
.497
.597
.461
.505

61.0
79.5
95.5 ............... ............
73.7
80.7

.227
.318
.396
.354
.365

60.4
84.6
105.4
94.2
97.1

.518
.533
‘ .542
.516
.706

81.4
83.7
85.2
81.0
110.9

.704
.719
.741
.790
1.039

73.8
75.4
77.8
82.8
109.0

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

.485
.512
.766
.734
.674

69.9
73.7
110.4
105.7
97.1

.501
.463
.528
.684

.299
.328
.450
.510
■ .481

79.6
87.3
119.8
135.6
128.0

.711
.611
.769
.783
.783

111.8
96.0

11
.0 0

.668

80.1
74.1
84.5
109.5
106.8

123.0
123.0

.793
.907
.990
1.200

106.0
83.2
95.2
103.8
125.8

1910.

.720

103.7

.581

92.9

386

102.6

.777

122.2

1.097 ................

115.1




120.8

No. 2
red
winter,
average
price per
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Barley: By sample.

Grains.

1911 ........................
1912...........................

1.102
1.019

1913 ..................................

.6 9 4

.590
.686

94.4
109.7

385
,438

102.4
116.5

.902
.798

141.7
125.5

.984
1.049

100 .0

.6 2 5

1 0 0 .0

$0.616

100 .0

376

1 00 .0

.6 3 6

1 0 0 .0

.9 5 3

.615

98.4

.695

111.2

.683

110.9

419

111.5

.768

1915.............................
1916...........................
1917.............................
1918.............................
1919.............................
1920.............................

.704
.867
1.315
1.305
1.217
1.263

112.5
138.7
210.2
208.8
194.6
202.0

.730
.825
1.637
1.605
1.597
1.414

116.7
132.0
261.9
256.8
255.4
226.2

.722
.812
1.620
1.523
1.580
1.397

117.3
131.9
263.2
247.4
256.7
226.9

496
455
637
,775
,700
796

131.9
121.1
169.6
206.1
186.3
211.8

1921.............................
January...............
February.............
March..................
April....................
May.....................
June....................

.635
.750
.689
.714
.636
.657
.639

101.6
119.9
110.2
114.2
101.6
105.1
102.2

.580
.682
.665
.649
.578
.616
.614

92.8
109.1
106.4
103.9
92.5
98.6
98.2

.565
.655
.635
.618
.555
.609
.608

91.8
106.5
103.2
100.4
90.1
98.9
98.7

,387
454
431
,432
378
392
,377

July.....................
August.................
September..........
October...............
November...........
December.. . . ___

.645
.629
.608
.554
.554
.548

103.1
100.6
97.2
88.6
88.6
87.6

.614
.570
.539
.470
.482
.482

98.2
91.2
86.2
75.1
77.2
77.0

.602
.558
.534
.465
.473
.467

97.8
90.6
86.8
75.5
76.8
75.9

371
360
384
347
354
364

1914.............................




103. 3
110.0
$0 ,913

1 00 .0

120.6

1.041

114.0

1.092
1.113
1.871
1.940
1.534
1.873

171.6
174.9
294.1
304.9
241.1
294.4

1.344
1.417
2.321
2.235
2.563
2.601

103.0
120.9
114.7
115.0
100.7
104.3
100.4

1.213
1.648
1.488
1.447
1.339
1.467
1.284

190.6
259.0
233.9
227.4
210.5
230.6
201.9

98.7
95.7
102.3
92.3
94.3
96.9

1.223
1.066
1.060
.883
.804
.858

192.2
167.5
166.7
138.7
126.4
134.9

$6.9 8 6

100 .0

1.005

101.9

147.2
155.1
254.2
244.8
280.7
284.9

1.307
1.351
2.278
2.209
2.357
2.523

132.5
136.9
231.0
224.0
239.0
255.8

1.466
1.861
1.689
1.650
1.462
1.600
1.532

160.5
203.8
185.0
180.7
160.1
175.2
167.8

1.435
1.961
1.919
1.680
1.387
1.568
1.438

145.5
198.9
194 6
170.3
140.6
159.0
145.8

1.370
1.295
1.365
1.298
1.226
1.254

150.0
141.8
149.5
142.2
134.3
137.3

1.229
1.237
1.277
1.194
1.176
1.177

124.6
125.4
129.5
121.0
119.2
119.3

AVEKAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

158.8
146.8
$ 0 .6 2 5

Cr*
CO




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




C h a r t 12a.

<*
5
cn

Chart 13,

O
t
05

400
375
350
325
300
275
250

WHOLESALE PBICES, 1890 TO 1921,

225

200
175
150

125

100
75

50

40



888SS8IS88I8S&8

» ‘o H . e } e o ^ » a < 6 f » o o •S 853

40

400
375

350
325
300
2X
5

250
225
200

175
150
125
100

75

5
C
4ft

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.




Chart 13a.

Or

-3

9 .—AVE R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Q
O

Farm products.
(5) Live stock and poultry.
(a) Grains.

Wheat: No. 2
Wheat: No. 1
Wheat; No, 1
hard winter, cash, northern spring, hard white, cash
cash, Minneapolis. Portland, Oreg. ,
Kansas City.

Average
price per
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

mi.

Cattle: Steers,
choice to prime.

Rela­
Average
tive
price per
100 pounds. price.

Average
price per

100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

Hogs: Heavy,

Average
price per

100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

1394.
189$.

19.
8$
189T-

189$ .

1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

77.8
58.3

51.1
40.1
42.9
45,5
48,3

4.253
3.559
3.722
3.759
4.071

50.3
42.1

57.4
63.3

4.278
3.358
3.591
3.805
4,039

5.394
5.590
6.557
5.062
5.192

63.4
65,7
77.1
59.5
61.0

5.082
5.958
6.970
6.057
5.155

60.7
71.2
83.3
72.4
61.6

5*114
5.918
6.735
6.054
5.148

66.5
70.0
79.7
71.6
60.9

5.219
5.357
5,812
5.998
6.453

61.4
63.0
68.3
70.5
75.9

5.291
6.235

63.3
74.5

5.799
7.572

6a 3
90.5

5.321
6.327
6.216
5.635
7.361

62.9
74.8
73.5
66.7
87.1

7.017
6.727
8.402
8.507

82.5
79.1
98.8

8.943
6.747
7. 595
8.365

106.9
80.7
90.8

9.009
6.726
7.552
8.454

106.6
79.6
89.3

$3,953
4.433
5.155
6.549
4.972

01.6

61.4
51.5
58.5
60.2
67.1

4.934
4.271
4.774
4.885
5.385

56.1

58.0
50.2

64.8

7.472
5.568
5.956

1905.
1900.
1907.
1908.
1909.

5.968
6.130
6.544
6.816
7.339

19i0.
1911.
1912.
1913.

7.771
7.234
9.359
8.929

100.0

$0,874

100.0

$0.929

100.0

pounds.

68.6

83.7
62.4
66.7

66.8

68.6

73.3
76.3
82.2

87.0
81.0
104.8

100.0

Rela­
tive
price.

6.575
4.983

48.6
59.9
52.9
56.9
53.2

6.122

$0. 877

100

78.3
59.4

$4.138
5.098
4.500
4.839
4.525

5.783

1393.

Average
price per

46.4
51.3

54.5
65.9
57.0
61.8
57.8

5.485
4.596
5.226
5.378
5.993

1392.

Hogs: Light.

$3,926
4.340

$4,870
5.885
5.091
5.521
5.159

1890.




Cattle: Steers,
good to choice.

100.0

52.9

72.7

100.0

69.9

48.2

100.0

‘ism oi 06€t ‘saoraa aTvsarKmjs.

Live stock (lor food).

.....

.939

107.1

1.003

114.8

1.009

108.6

9,652

108.1

9.039

106.2

8.361

99.9

8.382

99.1

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
....

1.29Q
1.329
2.296
2.159
% 418
2,455

147.2
151.6
261.8
2|46.3
275.8
280.0

1,306
1.411
2.325
2.191
2.566
2.558

149, 5
161.5
266.1
250. 8
293.8
292.9

1.116
1.175
2.059
2.159
2.398
2.575

120.2
126.5
221.6
232.5
258.1
277,1

9.312
10.420
13. 831
17.343
18.658
15.907

104.3
116. 7
154.9
194.2
209.0
178.2

8. 702
9. 573
12. 809
16.42.4
17.496
14.486

102.3
112. 5
150.6
193,1
2Q5. 7
170.3

7.131
9.615
15. 705
17,600
18.244
14.187

85.2
114.9
187.7
210. 4
218.1
169.6

7.187
9.400
15.459
17.804
18.326
14.711

85.0
111.2
182.9
210.6
216.8
174.0

1921
....
January...
February..
March____
April........
May.........
June.........

1.326
1.724
1.619
1.545
1.313
1.471
1,378

196.6
184.0
176. 2
149.7
167.8
157.1

11
5 .2

1.466
1.788
1.671
1.614
1.406
1.492
1,499

167.8
204.7
101.3
184.7
160.9
170.8
171.7

1.266
1.633
1.563
1.448
1.295
1.360
1.303

136.3
175.7
168.2
155.9
139.4
146.4
140.2

9,545
10,540
10.031
10,250
9.156
8,895
8.581

106.9
118.0
112.4
114.8
102.6
99.6
96.J

8.780
9.840
9.313
9.063
8.719
8.425
8.094

103.2
115.7
109,5
112.4
102. 5
99.0
95.1

8.473
9.305
9,156
9.463
8.225
8.195
8.125

101.3
111.2
109.5
113.1
98.3
98.0
97.1

8.891
9.670
9. 706
10.306
8.856
8.455
8.250

105.2
114.4
114.8
121.9
104.8

12
.2 Q

139.2

1.438
1.395
1.483
1.319
1.254
1.259

164.7
159.7
169.7
151.0
143.' 5
144.2

1.140
1.144
1,130
1. Q
78
1.044
1.075

122.7
123.2
121,6
146. 0
112,4
115.7

8.906
9.850
9.325
9.835
IQ. 000
8.938

99.8
110.3
104. 4
ho. 2
112.0
100. i

8.406
8,775
8.375
8. 875
8.563
8.219

98.8
103.2
98.4
104.3
100.7
96.6

9,725
9.690
7.950
7.945
6.838
6.744

116.3
115.8
95.0
95.0
81.7
80.6

10.200
10.395
8. 500
8.180
6. 869
7.025

120.7
125.0
100.5
96.8
81.3
83.1

July.........
August___
September
_
October_
November.
December.

1.210

1.103

12
3 .3
138.0
125.8
123,5
124.8

97.6

COMMODITIES.




1.16Q

100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE FEICES m

1914

C
n

art

14

c*

o

WHOLESALE EKICES, 1890 TO 1921,




Ch




175

150

WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

g i H i i a i

Chart 14a.

C*

WHOLESALE. PRICES,- 1890 XQ 192!.




Chart 15,

400
375
350'
325
300
275
250
225

200
175

150

125

too

75

50

AVERAGE W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




Chart 15a.

<. ,
T
CC




400
375
350
325
300
27a
250
225

200

150)

125

100

75

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

11083°— 22—B u ll. 320------ 5




Chart 16a.

0%

T able 9.—A V E RAG E WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

<S>

O

Farm products.
(6) Live stock and poultry.
Poultry.

Live stock (for food).

Western
wethers,
average
price per
100
pounds.

Western
wethers,
plain to
prime,
average
prieeper

Ewes,
average
price per
100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

Lambs,
average
price per
100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

Native
wethers,
average
prieeper
pounds.

Wethers,
average
price per
100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Live fowls:
New York.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

pounds.
1890.............................................................
1891.............................................................
.
......................
1892...........
1893..
.......
1894.............................................................

$4.664
4. 572
4.870
4.126
2.981

97.8
95.8
102.1
86.5
62.5

$4,528
4.511
4.780
3.878
2.696

99.4
99.0
104.9
85.1
59.2

1895..............
. .
1896.............................................................
1897............
................................
1898.. ..
. . ..
1899___

3.094
3.141
3.769
4.163
4.162

64.9
65.8
79.1
87.2
87.2

2.950
2.932
3.497
3.925
3.884

64.7
64.4
76.8
86.2
85.2

1900..............
1901... .
1902...
1903......
1904...

4.521
3.744
4.178
3.877
4.261

94.8
78.5
87.7
81.3
89.3

4.124
3.352
3.782
3.710
4.146

90.5
73.6
83.0
81.4
91.1

$5.421
4.812
5.271

106.5
110.7
102.4
90.8
99.4

5.053
4.948
4.896

5.395

101.8

......................
............
...........................
......................

1905...
.
...........................
1906..
1907...........................................................
1908.............................................................
1909...........................................................
1910.............................................................




5.080
5.279
4.884

$5.746
4.951
5.430

110.9
108.7
107.5
92.6
101.6

$0.133
.160

79.3
95.4

5.544

103.7

.169

101.0

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1800 TO 1021.

Live fowls:
Chicago.

Sheep.

Year or month.

1911
1912
1913
1914

3.941
4-901
5.301

74.4
92.5

$4,687
5.044

100.0

.............

100.0
104.1

4.280
4.928
5.347
5.830

80.0
92.2
100.0
109.0

$0,154
.145

100.0
94.2

.145
.149
.167
.165

86 3
8 .’ 7
,8
100.0
98.6

5.929
7.166
10.332
11.288
9.351
8.744

126.5
152.9
220.4
240.8
199.5
186.6

9.233
11.017
16,092
17.325
16.125
15.904

118.5
141.3
206.5
222.3
206.9
204.1

6.690
7.994
11.708
12.589
11.008
10.443

125.1
149.5
219.0
235.4
205.9
195.3

.137
.164
.198
.259
.284
.308

88.6
106.2
128.2
168.3
184.2
199.8

.161
.189
.238
.324
.341
.377

96.4
112.6
142.0
193.6
203.6
225.3

1921.................
January...
February..
March.......
April........
May..........
June..........

3-413
3.450
3.688
4.031
4.406
4.125

72.8
73.6
78.7

2.688

57.3

10.013
10.925
9.438
10.031
10.313
11.790
10.781

128.5
140.2
121.1
128.7
132.3
151.3
138.3

5.527
5.800
5.375
6.344
6.781
6.675
4.938

103.4
108.5
100.5
118.6
126.8
124.8
92.3

.250
.289
.308
.325
.310
.264
.256

162.3
187.4
199.5
210.9
201.2
171.3
166.3

.318
.380
.3*61
.388
.378
.326
.304

189.8
227.0
215.8
231.5
225.5
194.9
181.5

July..........
August___
September.
October...
November.
December.

2.906
3.075
3.156
2.915
2.750
3.781

62.0
65.6
67.3
62.2
58.7
80.7

10.388
9.740
8.813
8.490
8.719
10.500

133.3
125.0
113.1
108.9
111.9
134.7

5.406
5.050
4.563
5.060
4.594
5.625

101.1
94.4
85.3
94.6
85.9
105.2

.255
.223
.218
.191
.177
.190

165.5
144.7
141.1
123.7
114.5
123.3

.311
.290
.285
.269
.281
.265

185.8
173.2
170.3
160.6
168.0
158.3

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
192Q




86.0

94.0
88.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES,

107.6

$7.79.4
8.115

o*
-a

ca

T able 9 .—A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

00
Farm products.

(c) Other farm products.
Cotton.
Year or month.

Beans: Medium, choice.

Clover seed:
Contract grades.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Middling, upland:
New York.
Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890
3*891
1892
1893
1894

$2,029
2.253
1.870
1.991
1.847

84.8
94.2
78.1
83.2
77.1

$0. I ll
.086
.077
.083
.070

1.790
1.174
1.045
1.248
1.453

74.8
49.0
43.7
52.1
60.7

.073
.079
.072
.060
.066

2.097
2.193
1 920
2.263
2.010

87.6
91.6
80.2
94.5
83.9

.096
.086
.089
.112
.121

75.1
67.5
69.8
87.9
94.6

1905
1906
1907
1908
1909

2.150
1.900
1.777
2.320
2.450

89.8
79.3
74.3
96.9
102.4

.096
.110
.119
.105
.121

2. 399
2.289

100.2
95.6
116.8

.151
.130
.115
.128
.121

118.2
102.0
89.9
10 0
0.
94.6

Average
price per
dozen.

Rela­
tive
price.

74.7
86.2
92.9
81.8
94.7

1910
1911
1912
1913
1914

Rela­
tive
price.

57.1
61.9
55.9
46.7
51.4

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904

Average
price per
ton.

86.7
67.3
60.1
65.1
54.7

1895
1896
1897
1898
1899

Firsts: Western,
Boston.




$3.814
4.661
3.990
4.033

100.0
101.1

$16.517

100.0

14.798

89.6

$6.1.27
.113

100.0
88.7

4

$21.790
20.405

166.6
93.6

$0.252
.263

100.6
104.7

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Rela­
Average
Rela­
Average
Average
price per
price per
tive
price per
tive
bushel. 100 pounds. price. 100 pounds. price.

Middling: New
Orleans.

Eggs.
Cotton seed.

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

5.813
8.450
13.785
12.109
8.058
7.430

345.5
303.5

1921
.....
January...
February..
March.......
A pril.........
M ay..........
June..........

5.171
5.594
5.594
5.545
5. 219
4. 825
4.750

July..........
August___
September.
October. . .
November.
December.

4.719
5.025
5.375
5.138
5.175
5.125

186.2

16.263
16. 830
21.016
33.658
48.717
36.002

98.5
101.9
127.2
203.8
295.0
218.0

.096
.141
.226
.311
.319
.330

75.7
111. 0
177. 9
245.1
250.8
259.9

.102
.145
.235
.318
.325
.339

79. 4
113. 1
183. 7
248. 5
253.9
264.9

24. 568
41.147
58. 305
68.185
65.563
51. 728

112. 8
190.3
267.6
303. 7
300.9
237.4

.251
.291
.400
.483
.530
.566

100.0
115. 8
159. 0
192.1
210.9
224.9

129.6
140.2
140.2
139.0
130.8
120.9
119.1

18.787
21.520
18.550
18.190
17.850
19.000
19.000

113.7
130.3
112.3
110.1
108.1
115.0
115.0

.141
.145
.132

.111
.112

.118
.110

111.3
114.2
104.1
87.0
87.9
92.8
86.7

.151
.167
.139
.118
.121
.129
.120

118.2
130. 6
108.7
92.1
94.9
101.1
94.1

22.183
18. 980
19. 760
18. 920
17. 230
17. 280
17. 060

101.8
87.0
90.7
86.8
79.1
79.3
78.3

.404
.676
.428
.310
.272
.251
.264

160.4
268. 9
170.0
123.1
108.1
99.6
105.0

118.3
126.0
134.7
128.8
129.7
128.5

19.000
19.000
18. 010
18.320
18.500
18.500

115.0
115.0
109.0
110.9
112.0
112.0

.115
.129
.196
.191
.175
.171

90.3
101.6
154. 6
150.6
137.8
134.9

.124
.139
.204
.197
.182
.183

96.6
108.6
159.8
154.0
142.3
143.4

18. 750
22. 060
27.190
31. 050
29.150
28. 780

86.0
101.2
124.8
142.5
133.8
132.1

.324
.338
.379
.490
.599
.539

128. 7
134.4
150.6
194.8
238.2
214.2

202.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.




145.7

211.8

O
CD

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1880 TO 1921




Chart 17,

375
350
325
300
m

250
225
200-

175

150

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




Chart 17a,

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

•^1

to

Farm products.

(c) Other farm products.
Eggs.
Year or month.

Average
price per
dozen.

Rela­
tive
price.

New
Candled: Western,
Firsts:
New Orleans. laid: Fair Fresh
to fancy,
near-by, gathered, RelaNew
New
tive
York,
York,
Rela­ Average Rela­ average average price.
tive price per tive
price per
dozen.
price.
price. price per dozen.
dozen.

Firsts: Fresh,
Cincinnati.

Average
price per
dozen.

Extra firsts:
Western,
Philadelphia.

Average
price per
dozen.

Rela­
tive
price.

Fresh: Selected,
pullets’ , San
Francisco.

Average
price per
dozen.

Rela­
tive
price.

Chicago Minne­
apolis
market, market,
average average
price per price per
bushel.
bushel.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890....................................
1891....................................
1892....................................
1893....................................
1894....................................

$0,195
.216
.217
.225
.184

59.5
66.1
66.3
68.8
56.2

$1.397
1.081
1.018
1.088
1.353

106.5
82.4
77.6
82.9
103.2

1895....................................
1896 ..................................
1897....................................
1898....................................
1899....................................

.200
.174
.172
.182
.199

61.3
53.3
52.6
55.6
61.0

1.245
.812
.870
1.112
1.158

94.9
61.9
66.3
84.7
88.2

1900....................................
1901....................................
1902....................................
1 9 0 3 ................................
1904....................................

.198
.210
.241
.242
.265

60.5
64.1
73.7
74.0
81.1

1.622
1.623
1.503
1.047
1.109

123.7
123.7
114.5
79.8
84.5

.271
.262
.277
.279
.315

83.0
80.0
84.8
85.3
96.3

1.198
1.103
1.181
1.202
1.565

.326
.298
.332

99.7
91.1
101.4

2.267
2.392
1.866

1905....................................
1906....................................
1907....................................
1908...................................
1909...................................

............ .................
________ i__________

1910....................................
1911...................................
1912...................................
1913 ...........................................




$ 0 .2 2 6

1 6 6 .6

$ 6 .2 2 4

1 6 6 .6

$6.234

100.0

.3 2 6

$6 .249

1 0 0 .0

$6.264

1 6 6 .6

$ 0 ,268

1 6 6 .6

•

91.3
84.1
90.0
91.6
119.3

$1.919

172.8
182.3
142.2

1 .349

100 .0

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Firsts: Fresh,
Chicago.

Flaxseed: No. 1.

.233

103.3

.234

104.4

.235

100.3

.266

106.7

.278

105.3

.288

107.5

1.525

113.1

1915....................................
1916....................................
1917....................................
1918...................................
1919...................................
1920 ..................................

.227
.262
.365
.443
.485
.516

100.6
115.9
161.6
196.2
214.7
228.4

.224
.262
.382
.453
.500
.535

100.0
122.2
170.7
202.3
223.5
239.3

.234
.244
.309
.409
.397
.450

100.0
103. 9
132.0
174.7
169.5
191.8

.257
.293
.401
.487
.529
.569

103.2
117.6
161.2
195.6
212.3
228.6

.272
.301
.408
.499
.553
.596

103.3
114.3
154.1
189.4
209.6
226.3

.266
.278
.362
.515
.531
.524

99. 2
103.9
135.3
192.3
198.2
195.5

1.794
2.228
3.093
3.940
4.533
3. 792

133.0
165.2
229.3
292.1
336.0
281.1

1921 ................................
January......................
February....................
March.........................
April..........................
May............................
June................... ........

.361
.598
.352
.271
.238
.218
.239

160.0
264.8
155.7
119.8
105.6
96.7
106.0

.377
.615
.376
.272
.227
.213
.239

168.4
274. 9
168.2
121.6
101.4
95.0
106.8

.317
.573
.368
.275
.231
.263
.263

135 4
244.3
156.8
117.4
98.4
112.2
112.0

.404
.675
.423
.312
.273
.249
.269

162.3
271.1
169.9
125.3
109.4
100.0
108.0

.423
.665
.428
.323
.275
.251
278

160.5
252.3
162.4
122.3
104.2
95.3
105.5

.372
.554
.331
.298
.254
.214
.271

138.9
206.8
123.7
111.3
94.8
79.8
101.2

1.849
1.964
1.813
1.770
1.535
1. 809
1.813

137.0
145.6
134.4
131.2
113.8
134.1
134.4

July............................
August.......................
September.................
October......................
November..................
December...................

.285
.302
.333
.438
.525
.508

126.2
133.7
147.5
194.0
232.5
224.8

.293
.330
.365
.478
.598
.539

130.8
147.5
163.2
213.5
267.3
240.9

.265
.273
.285
.303
.335
.405

113.1
116.5
121.6
129.1
143.0
172.9

.333
.353
.393
.480
.579
.544

133.5
141.6
157.6
192.8
232.5
218.4

.347
.386
.413
.528
- .638
.568

131.6
146.5
156.5
200.1
241.8
215.5

.323
.370
.393
.473
.520
.478

120.4
138.2
146.8
176.4
194.2
178.5

1.941
2.029
2.023
1.807
1.773
1.914

143.9
150.4
149.9
133.9
131.4
141.9




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

1914....................................

00

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,




Chart 18,

O
o

W
W W O O O C O r T— < f - ' - H r '
$ }
O N O ^ O O O O O O O O - t irC HI C O Tl} ri A < X > r - ~l< r 0-0 t r - l i —

h




Chart 18a.

cs

9 ,—AVERAG E WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Farm products.

(c) Other farm products.
Hides.

Hay.

Average
price per
short ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Clover, mixed:
N o .l.

Average
price per
short ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Timothy: No. 1.

Average
price per
short ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$9,995
12. 286
11.838
11.207
10.418
11.384
10.327
8. 442
8. 332
10.075
11.567
12.826
12.615
12. 428
11.731
11.260
12. 962
16. 939
12.337
13.457
17. 269
19.664
20. 410
16. 029
15.686

107.7
122.7
127.3
100.0
97.9

Average
price per
pound.

$0.189
.210

100. 0
111.3

$0.670
.649

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

100.0
96.8

$0.151
.161

Rela­
tive
price.

70.2
80.9
105.7
77.0
84.0

1910.
1911
1912.
1913.
1914.

Rela­
tive
price.

Green, salted:
Heavy, country
cows, No. 1.

72.2
80.0
78.7
77.5
73.2

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

Average
price per
pound.

Goatskins: Bra­
zilian.

71.0
64.4
52.7
52.0
62.9

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904,

Goatskins.

62.4
76.7
73. 9
69.9
65.0

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

Calfskins:
Country, No. 1.




$14.186
14.375

100. 0
101.3

$15.583
17.292

100. 0
111.0

100.0
105.6

WHOLESALE .PRICES,. 1890 TO 1921,

Alfalfa: N o .l.

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

13.476
14.577
24.610
27. 842
31.942
30.293

95.0
102. 8
173.5
196.3
225.2
213.5

17.958
16.000
19.948
26.708
30.863
33.091

115.2
102.7
128.0
171. 4
198.0
212.3

16,476
16.625
20. 846
28.582
32.184
36.098

102. 8
103.7
130. 1
178.3
200. 8
225.2

.215
.338
.406
.371
.685
.368

114. *2
178. 9
215.3
196.8
363.0
195.3

1921
.....
January...
February..
March.......
April........
May..........
June.........

20.151
23.200
20,438
20.688
21. 450
22. 250
19.188

142.0
163.5
144.1
145.8
151.2
156.8
135.3

17.813
23.875
20.250
19.900
18.625
17.100
15.500

114.3
153.2
129.9
127.7
119.5
109.7
99.5

23.365
26.750
24.000
25.100
23.875
21.800
22.125

145.8
166.9
149. 7
156.6
149.0
136. 0
138.0

.149
.153
.134
.125
.136
.169
.156

July..........
August —
September
October...
November.
December.

17.500
19. 250
17. 438
19. 700
20. 500
19.950

123.4
135.7
122. 9
138.9
144.5
140.6

16.875
16. 400
15. 750
16. 563
16.600
16.625

108.3*
105. 2

24.125
23. 200
23.125
22.000
22.600
21.875

150.5
144.7
144.3
137.3
141.0
136.5

.153
.162
.160
.155
.145
.140

106.3
106.5
106.7

$1. 371
1.242
1.904
1.723

78.8
122. 4
192. 8
174.7
267.8
242.3

.195
.214
.235
.191
.304
.199

129.4
142.0
155.4
126.6
201.6
132.1

78.8
80.9
70.9
66.3
71.9
89.5
82.4

.811
.800
.800
.625
.650
.706
.755

114.1
112.6
112.6
87.9
91.4
99.3
106.2

. 077
.109
.091
.088
.066
.079
.073

50.9
72.1
60.0
45.1
43.9
52.2
48.0

81.2
85.9
84.8
82. 2
76.9
74.2

.775
.825
.889
.903
.962
1.060

108.9
116.1
124.9
126.9
135.3
149.0

.068
.072
.086
.074
.079
.083

45.1
47.4
43.9
48.9
52.0
54.7

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.




101.1

.528
.820
1.292




19.

" m i o s ■gost % ao tM s iv s h t o h m

Ch art

19a.
491

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OP COMMODITIES,




Chart

CO

T able 9.—AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

00

O
Farm products.

(c) Other farm products.
Hops.

Hides.

Milk: Fresh.

Year or month.

Average
price per
pound.

1
890

................................
...........................
...................................
................................
...........................

1895
1896
1897
1898
1899

.....................................
................................

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909

Green, salted,
packers’ : Heavy
Texas steers.
Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Rela­
tive
price.

New York State:
Prime to choice.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Pacific coast.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Chicago.

Average
price per
quart.

New York.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
quart.

Rela­
tive
price.

$0,093
.095
.087
.075
.064

50.7
51.7
47.3
40.7
34.9

$0.262
.264
.251
.227
.152

98.4
99.1
94.1
85.3
56.9

$0,033
.033
.033
.034
.033

.103
.081

.094
.088
.116
.162
.156

35.3
32.9
43.6
60.9
58.7

.032
.030
.030
.030
.032

*.
. . ' ....................
.
...............
...............
...................................

.119
.124
.134
.117
.117

64.9
67.3
72.8
63.6
63.4

.148
.172
.238
.283
.348

55.7
64.6
89.2
106.1
130.5

.034
.033
.035
.035
.034

76.5
73.8
79.7
79.7
76.7

. . .. .................
...........................
.........................
. . .

.143
.154
.146
.134
.165

77.8
83.9
79.1
72.6
89.6

.267
.163
.174
.119

100.4
61.2
65.3
44.6
75.4

.035
.037
.040
.039
.040

79.9
82.6
90.3
88.9
91.0

1910
..............................
1911
...................
1912.
..............................
1913...............................................
1914...............................................

.155
.148
.176
.184
.196

84.1
80.3
95.7

.259
.365
.410
.266
.396

97.2
137.1
154.0

.043
.040
.044
.044
.042

97.7
90.5
98.6

Rela­
tive
price.

71.8
67.5
67.7

.115
.124

55.9
44.1
54.2
62.6
67.2

Average
price per
quart.

74.0
74.9
75.2
77.7
74.0

.100

San Francisco.

f 891
1892
1893
1894

................................
...............
.




10
0 .0
106.7

.2 1
0

$0.181
.192

10
0 .0
105.9

10 .0
0
148.8

$0,172
.153

10
0 .0
88.8

$6.043
.043

10
0 .0
100.7

68.6
71.8

10
0 .0
93.9

$0,043
.043

10
0 .0
100.5

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1021,

Green, salted,
packers’ : Heavynative steers.

.242
.262
.327
.301
.393
.312

131.6
142.4
178.0
163.8
213.8
169.8

.215
.239
.312
.280
.357
.271

118.9
132.0
172.2
154.6
197.5
150.0

.183
.284
.533
.385
.588
.799

68.5
106.7
200.3
144.6
220.7
300.2

.114
.103
.129
.179
.555
.732

66.1
60.1
75.0
104.2
322.7
425.8

.043
.044
.057
.069
.079
.077

99.8
103.0
133.9
161.4
183.4
180.8

.042
.045
.063
.078
.084
.085

94.8
102.3
143.1
174.9
190.5
191.4

.042
.041
.050
.069
.078
.091

97.9
96.7
115.9
162.5
182.7
213.6

1921...............................................
January.................................
February...............................
March....................................
April......................................
May.......................................
June.......................................

.139
.168
.136
.115
.101
.119
.140

75.6
91.1
74.1
62.5
55.1
64.6
75.9

.133
.140
* .125
.098
.089
.115
.140

73.5
77.4
69.1
54.2
49.4
63.6
77.4

.342
.438
.415
.388
.384
.324
.290

128.3
164.3
155.8
145.7
144.1
121.7
108.9

.198
.245
.198
.157
.175
.200
.154

115.2
142.5
114.9
91.3
101.8
116.3
89.5

.056
.064
.061
.061
.061
.055
.055

130.1
149.8
142.3
142.3
142.3
127.8
127.8

.075
.085
.072
.062
.062
.066
.059

168.8
191.6
162.8
140.2
140.2
149.9
133.0

.074
.088
.083
.078
.078
.078
.078

172.8
204.9
194.1
181.5
181.5
181.5
181.5

July.......................................
August...................................
September.............................
October..................................
November.............................
December..............................

.139
.141
.141
.148
.158
.165

75.5
76.4
76.5
80.5
85.9
89.7

.141
.141
.141
.147
.157
.162

77.7
77.7
77.7
81.2
86.7
89.5

.280
.282
.344
.343
.321
.305

105.1
105.9
129.1
128.6
120.5
114.5

.138
.161
.248
.245
.261
.199

80.0
93.7
144.0
142.5
151.8
116.0

.060
.060
.043
.048
.050
.050

140.2
140.2
101.4
113.1
116.8
116.8

.067
.079
.079
.089
.089
.089

150.3
178.6
178.6
200.7
200.7
200.7

.068
.068
.068
.068
.068
.068

158.1
158.1
158.1
158.1
158.1
158.1




AVEBAGE W HOLESALE PKICES OF COMMODITIES.

11083°— 22— B ull. 320-

1915...............................................
1916...............................................
1917...............................................
1918...............................................
1919...............................................
1920...............................................

oo

300
275
250
225

00

{[S i
j fe

M IL K :

l t
__L
1
__i_
FRESHNEWA0R 1813-1921 ........
,, C ICYO 1690-1921 ----K
FRESH H G
FR ,SANFRNISC 19/3-1921-----ESH AC O
i

400
375
350
325
300
275

(Average price in 1013 100)

250

>nr
A V\*
*
•Ns

200

175
150

125

£
//
//
(/

100

/

h
f:l
7
7

•
•

9

•

225

200
175
150

125

100

75

75

•
50

50

*

40
Ok

9fe

9*

tD ,
9»

<«

CO

et>

o

to

o

ro

oo
o

H

»

4

i

A

«

h

a

D

9

40

>

2!

WHOLESALE PBICES, 1890 TO 1921,




Chart 20.
400
375
350
325

Chart 20a.
400
375

325
300
275
250
225

200
175

150

125

100

75

50.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

350

40

1913




1914

1915

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

00

CO

T able 9.—AVE R AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

fe'

Farm products.

(c) Other farm products.
Peanuts: No. 1
grade.

Onions.

Year or month.

Rice.

Potatoes: Sweet.

Potatoes: White.

Honduras,
head,
Rela­
average
tive
price per price.
pound.

1890...............................
1891...............................
1892...............................
1893...............................
1894...............................

84.344
4.125
3.604
3.188
3.250

193.4
183.8
160.6
142.0
144.8

$0,993
1.288
.758
1.119
1.021

100.4
130.3
76.6
113.2
103.3

$0.061
.064
.057
.046
.053

109.2
115.0
102.7
82.9
94.9

1895...............................
1896...............................
1897...............................
1898...............................
1899...............................

3.115
1.948
3.927
3.271
3.224

138.7
88.7
174.9
145.8
143.7

.721
.328
.547
.849
.695

72.9
33.1
55.3
85.9
70.3

.053
.052
.054
.061
.061

96.2
93.7
97.8
109.7
109.6

1000...............................
1901..............................
1902...............................
1903...............................
1904...............................

2.427
3.500
3.646.
2.568
2.557

108.2
155.9
162.4
158.9
158.5

.623
.940
.993
.875
1.217

63.0
95.1
100.4
88.5
123.1

.055
.055
.056
.057
.044

98.9
98.9
100.9
102.3
79.6

1905...............................
1908...............................
1907...... ........................
1908...............................
1909...............................

3.239
3.292
3.500
3.536
3.089

144.2
146.6
155.9
157.5
137.6

.671
.913
.819
1.187
1.143

67.9
92.3
82.8
120.0
115.6

.042
.047
.053
.062
.062

75.3
85.6
96.4
112.6
111.7

1910...............................
1911.............................
1912...............................
1913...............................
1914...............................

2.964
3.104 ....... $i.*804"
2.120
1.304

132.1
138.3
162.6
100.0
176.3

.713
1.284
1.522
.989 1
.

72.1
129.9
154.0
100.0

.055
.050
.055
.065

98.7
90.4
98.7
100.0
101.4




$0.857
1.510

$0.036
.040

100.0
113.2

r

,

$1,024
1.155

112.8

$0,483
482

100.0
99.8

•

$0.051
. 051

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1800 TO 1921.

Jersey,
Ordinary
Good to
Blue Rose, Domestic,
New York, New York, Chicago, Rela­ Average Rela­ to fancy,
No. 1,
head,
Rela­ average Rela­
choice,
choice,
average tive price per tive
average
average
average
average
average
average
tive price per tive
price per
price per price per price. pound. price. price per
price per price. f-bushel price. price1per price per
sack.
barrel.
100 pounds.
pound.
pound.
100 pounds. 100 pounds.
basket.

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

.598
1.313
2.664
1.059
1.953
1.156

69.7
153.2
310.9
123.6
228.0
134.9

.035
.036
.069
.098
.074
.081

97.5
101.4
193.8
276.6
207.9
229.0

.758
1.851
3.204
1.620
2.378
4.343

74.0
180.8
313.0
158.3
232.3
424.2

.716
.585
1.156
1.283
1.647
1.364

148.3 i
121.3
239.5
265.7
341.3
282.5

1921
.....
January - - February..
March.......
April.........
May..........
June..........

1.329
.970
.886
.692
.591
(2
)
(2)

155.1
113.2
103.4
80.8
68.9

.053
.049
.052
.050
.049
.052
.060

148.7
137.5
146.2
140.3
137.5
147.3
169.0

1.790
1.300
1.138
1.220
.994
1.401
1.639

174.8
127.0
111.1
119.2
97.1
136.9
160.1

1.103
1.135
1.375
1.400
1.345
1.550
(2)

1.375
1.680
1.719
2.063
2.083
(2)

160.5
196.1
200.6
240.7
243.1

.058
.054
.054
.054
.056
.046

162.8
153.0
151.5
151.5
158.9
128.5

2.475
3.110
2.556
1.900
1.800
1.850

241.7
303.8 i
249.7
185.6 1
175.8
180.7

(2
)
^.875
. 813
.705
.794
1.000

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920




1No relative price computed.

. 048
.045
.065
.089
.106
.107

93.9
89.5
128.0
175.3
209.1
210.7

228.6
235.2
284.9
290.1
278.7
321.2

.033
.032
.026
.026
.024
.028
.026

.044
.046
.048
.045
.040
.035
.039

86.4
89.9
93.7
89.0
78.1
69.0
75.9

181.3
168.4
146.1
164.5
207.2

.030
.036
.043
.046
.040
.039

.033
.044
.048
.053
.048
.049

64.7
87.0
93.7
103.9
93.7
97.4

* No quotation.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

July...........

August----September.
O ctober...
November.
December.

$0.049
.038
.033
.082
.098
.096

00

cn

*

T able 9.—AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

00
OS

Farm products.

(c) Other farm products.
Tobacco: Burley,
dark red, good
leaf.

Wool: Ohio, scoured fleece.

$0,716

.686

1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

.612
.564
.445

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

.377
.394
.496
.615

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

.659
.545
.577
.655

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

.759
.718
.718
.716
.738




$15,063
17.598

114.1
133.3

Fine
clothing,
average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Territory,
staple,
F. and
F. M.,
average
price per
pound.

Fine
delaine,
average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Territory,
combing Half-blood, Rela­
half-blood, ’ average
tive
average
price per
price.
price per
pound.
pound.

Medium
(I and f
grades),
average
price per
pound,
based on
price of
washed
wool.

Medium
(i and |
grades),
average
price per
pound,
based on
price of
unwashed
wool.

Rela­
tive
price.

130.4
123.6

121.6
116.5
103.9
95.8
75.6

$0,614
.582
.528
.462
.354

64.0
66.9
84.2
104.5
105.9

.328
.319
.400
.481
.497

67.6
84.9
102.0
105.4

92.6
98.0
111.2
116.6

.530
.432
.444
.466
.487

112.4
91.6
94.2
98.9
103.4

128.9
122.0
122.0
121.7
..................................
125.3 .................. 1

.535
.513
.516
.490
.543

113.5
108.8
109.5
104.0
115.3

112.0

112.0

98.1
75.2

WHOLESALE PBICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Fine
and X
Rela­ (Xgrades),X
Average
price per
tive
average
100 pounds. price.
price per
pound.

1910................................
1911..................................
1912.............................:..

15.537
11.346
11.428

1913 .........................................

13.202

116.6
109.9
109.9
100.0
98.3

.665
.775
1.402

$1,471
1.804
1.728
1.673

112.9
131.7
238.2
292.3
279.9
271.1

1914..................................

14.654

1915 .
...................
1916..................................
1917..................................
1918..................................
1919..................................
1920..................................

13.789
15.231
22.302
36.567
32.346
34.183

104.4
115.4
168.9
277.0
245.0
258.9

1921..................................
January.................
February..............
March....................
April......................
May.......................
June......................

29.293
32.500
32.500
32.500
32.500
28.750
27.500

221.9
246.2
246.2
246.2
246.2
217.8
208.3

.791
.838
.865
.838
.811
.757
.757

128.2
135.8
140.1
135.8
131.2
122.7
122.7

1.000

July.......................
August..................
September............
October.................
November............
December..............

27.500
27.500
27.500
27.500
27.500
27.500

208.3
208.3
208.3
208.3
208.3
208.3

.757
.757
.757
.757
.784
.811

122.7
122.7
122.7
122.7
127.0
131.2




100.0

$0.561
.590
.706
.844
1.565

105.2

100.0
108.2

$0. 528
.571

$1,379
1.746
1.678
1.554

131.3
158.4
277.2
351.2
337.4
312.4

1.000
.952
.905

168.6
190.6
19(1.6
182.0
182.0
173.3
164.7

.761
.913
.913
.804
.761
.717
.717

.857
•ooo
.833
.833
.881
.929

156.0
151.6
151.6
151.6
160.2
168.9

.717
.696
.696
.696
.717
.783

$1,534
1.881
1.885
1.897
.927
1.048
1.048

125.9
150.5
279.1
342.2
343.0
345.2

.693
.836
1.463

.488
.449
.479
.471
.440

103.7
95.3
101.7
100.0
93.4

$1.164
1.440
1.189
.971

121.3
144.3
243.1
300.7
248.4
203.0

153.0
183.5
183.5
161.6
153.0
144.1
144.1

.508
.546
.546
.527
• .527
.509
.491

106.0
114.0
114.0
110.1
110.1
106.5
102.6

144.1
140.0
140.0
140.0
144.1
157.4

.491
.473
.473
.473
.509
.527

102.6
98.7
98.7
98.7
106.5
110.1

.571
.680
1.145

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

.686
.647
.647
.589
.579

117.7
85.9
86.6
100.0
111.0

00

<1

oo
oo

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1800 TO 1921,




Chart 21,

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.




Chart 21a.

oo
CO

T able 9.—AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

O
O

Foods.
(a) Meats.
Beef: Fresh.
Steers, loins
ends (hips),
Chicago.
Average
price per
pound.

Average
price per
pound.

Steer, rounds,
No. 2, Chicago.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$0.069
.082
.076
.081
.075

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

.079
.070
.077
.078
.084
.080
.079
.097
.078
.082

64.2
62.9
77.6
62.6
65.3

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

$0.105
.110

81.3
84.6

.080
.078
.088
.093
.095

64.1
62.3
70.6
74.6
75.8

1910.
1911.
1912.

.115
.112
.133

89.1
86.6
102.6

.103
.098
.121

82.0
78.4
96.9

Ribs, No. 2, city,
New York.

Rounds, No. 2,
city, New York.

Average
price per
pound.

Average
price per
pound.

Average
price per
pound.

63.3
55.8
61.4
62.4
66.7

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

Loins, No. 2,
city, New York.

55.0
65.4
60.9
64.9
59.7




Relative
price.

Relative
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Native sides,
New York.

Average
price per
pound.

Average
price per
pound.

Relative
price.

Steer, ribs, No. 2,
Chicago.

Rela­
tive
price.

Rela­
tive
price.

1

Rela­
tive
price.

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Carcass, good
native steers,
Chicago.

.130
.136

100.0
105.3

$0.168
.171

100.0
102.2

80.157
.162

100.0
103.1

$0.131
.133

100.0
101.6

.125
.135

100.0
107.5

$0.158
. 184

100.0
116.0

$3.151
.167

100.0
110.7

$0.121
. 128

100.0
105.5

1915.......................................
1916.......................................
1917.......................................
1918.......................................
1919.......................................
1920.......................................

.129
.138
.167
.221
.233
.230

99.5
106.7
129.1
170.9
180.2
177.9

.176
.191
.215
.292
.313
.350

105.1
113.8
128.4
173.9
186.6
208.8

.146
.162
.198
.274
.314
.315

93.2
103.]
125.8
174.2
199.9
200.6

.124
.130
.162
.221
.224
.213

94.7
99.2
123.4
168.4
171.4
162.6

.126
.134
.164
.209
.215
.206

100.2
106.9
131.0
166.5
171.6
164.4

.171
.181
.217
.299
.366
.371

108.2
114.2
137.4
189.1
231.5
234.4

.158
.168
.211
. 285
.324
.309

104.6
111.6
139.7
189.1
214.7
205.0

.124
.130
.170
.241
.231
.224

102.8
107.9
140.7
199.1
190.7
185.2

1921.......................................
January.........................
February......................
March............................ 1
April..............................
May................................
June..............................

.163
.174
.160
.163
.165
.165
.160

125.6
134.2
123.6
125.5
127.4
127.4
123.6

.265
. 325
.275
.280
.284
.255
.245

157.9
193.8
164.0
167.0
169.3
152.1
146.1

.213
.260
.233
.235
.224
.195
.200

135.5
165.6
148.1
149.7
142.7
124.2
127.4

.145
.160
.143
.150
.160
.158
.155

110.4
122.2
108.9
114.6
122.2
120.3
118.4

.148
.169
.146
.164
.164
.153
.149

118.5
135.1
116.3
130.6
130.8
121.8
118.8

.285
.300
.278
.288
.302
.293
.280

179.9
189.6
175.4
181.7
190.9
184.9
177.0

.230
.273
.253
.250
.248
.228
.225

152.5
180.7
167.4
165.8
164.5
150.9
149.2

.155
.160
.155
.155
.155
.166
.170

128.1
132.3
128.2
128.2
128.2
137.6
140.6

.149
.160
.160
.164
.173
.164

115.1
123.6
123.2
126.9
133.2
126.6

.256
.260
.258
.250
.250
.244

152.7
155.0
153.8
149.1
149.1
145.5

.190
.218
.217
.180
.190
.214

121.0
138.5
138.2
114.6
121.0
136.3

.160
.160
.144
.125
.114
.108

122.2
122.2
110.0
95.5
86.9
82.5

.140
.146
.136
.138
.139
.141

111.8
116.6
108.9
109.8
111.0
112.9

.280
.290
.300
.263
.270
.270

177.0
183.3
189.6
165.9
170.7
170.7

.221
.218
.220
.211
.210
.210

146.6
144.2
145.9
140.1
139.3
139.3

.170
.170
.164
.145
.128
.123

140.6
140.6
135.6
119.9
105.5
101.7

July...............................
August..........
.......
September....................
October.........................
November.....................
December......................




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

1913.......................................
1914.......................................

CD

CD
fcO

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.




Chart 22.




Chart 22a.

T able 9 .—A V ER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

CD

Foods.
(a) Meats.

Lamb:
Dressed.

Mutton:
Dressed.

Extra mess.

Aver­
age
price
per
barrel.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$6,960
8.365
6.797
8.194
8.093

36.8
44.2
35.9
43.3
42.8

1895.
1896.
1897.

8.127
7.510
7.676
9.156
9.289

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

Chicago.

Western
New York.

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
age
Rela­
age
Rela­
Rela­
age
age
age
Rela­
Rela­
price
price
price
tive
tive
price
tive
price
tive
tive
per
per
per
price.
per
price.
per
price.
price.
price.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.

$0,100

Salt, mess.

Aver­
age
price
per
barrel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Rough sides.

Short clear
sides.

Aver­
Aver­
Rela­
age
Rela­
age
tive
price
tive
price
per
price.
price.
per
pound.
pound.

.098
.108
.125
.102

59.9
59.1
64.7
75.1
61.3

$0,093
.087
.091
.080
.061

91.0
84.5
89.2
78.3
59.0

$12.150
11.303
11.525
18.339
14.126

54.1
50.3
51.3
81.6
62.9

$0,059
.068
.076
.101
.074

47.4
55.1
61.8
81.7
59.5

$0,060
.070
.079
.105
.075

47.3
54.9
61.8
82.3
58.9

42.9
39.7
40.6
48.4
49.1

.095
.094
.089
.081
.092

57.0
56.7
53.8
48.6
55.5

.062
.063
.073
.074
.071

60.5
61.0
71.0
72.0
69.4

11.826
8.940
8.999
9.868
9.346

52.6
39.8
39.6
43.9
41.6

.063
.048
.052
.059
.056

51.1
38.8
42.2
48.1
45.1

.065
.049
.054
.060
.058

51.0
38.8
42.5
46.8
45.8

9.754
9.320
11.789
9.067
8.769

51.5
49.3
62.3
47.9
46.3

.103
.108
.121
.127
.107

61.7
64.7
72.9
76.5
64.5

.073
.068
.074
.074
' .078

70.9
65.9
72.0
72.6
75.9

12.507
15.611
17.940
16.651
14.029

55.7
69.5
79.8
74.1
62.4

.073
.087
.105
.094
.076

59.2
70.3
84.6
75.9
61.2

.075
.089
.103
.096
.078

59.0
69.9
84.2
75.3
60.8

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

10.024
8.846
9.817
13.184
11.023

53.0
46.7
51.9
69.7
58.2

.105
.124
.130
.113
.131

62.9
74.3
78.4
67.1
78.8

.086
.091
.088
.086
.090

83.8
88.8
85.4
84.2
87.7

14.418
17.512
17.568
15.974
21.344

64.2
77.9
78.2
71.1
95.0

.078
.092
.092
.087
.113

63.3
74.4
74.4
70.4
91.7

.080
.094
.095
.090
.117

62.8
73.9
74.9
70.7
92.1

1910.....................................
1911.....................................

14.589
12.909

72.1

.164
.140

98.9
84.1

.101
.075

98.0
73.4

23.738
19.159

105.6
85.3

.129
.093

104.4
75.1

.133
.095

104.6
74.5




68.2

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Hams:
Smoked.

Year or month.

Pork: Cured.

Pork: Fresh, loins.

Beef: Salt.

15,793
18.923
19. 755

83.5
100.0
104.4

.143
.166
.167

86.0
100.0
100.5

$0,149
.152

100.0
101.9

.084
.103
.101

81.9
100.0
98.5

$0.149
.154

100.0
103.8

$0,152
. 163

100.0
107.0

19.285
22.471
22.736

85.8
100.0
101.2

.108
.124
.130

87.2
100.0
104.8

.111
.127
.132

86.9
100.0
103.8

1915.....................................
1916.....................................
1917.....................................
1918.....................................
1919.....................................
1920.....................................

18.639
18.939
28.250
33.049
31.080
18.058

98.5
100.1
149.3
174.6
164.2
95.4

.153
.185
.252
.318
.343
.334

92.1
111.3
151.6
191.5
206.6
201.0

.164
.183
.240
.270
.277
.291

110.0
123.0
161.2
181.8
186.3
195.8

.107
.125
.166
.198
.167
.162

104.7
122.0
162.3
193.4
162.7
158.2

.143
.162
.244
.295
.315
.307

96.2
108.9
163.9
198.2
212.0
206.6

.148
.170
.245
.312
.350
.315

97.2
111.6
160.7
204.8
229.9
207.0

18.317
26.770
41.765
48.240
52.190
37.221

81.5
119.1
185.9
214.7
232.3
165.6

.113
.146
.238
.261
.266
.192

91.3
118.3
192.7
211.1
215.5
155.6

.116
.149
.248
.279
.291
.207

90.7
116.7
194.9
219.2
228.5
162.2

1921.....................................
January.......................
February.....................
March...........................
April............................
May..............................
June.............................

14.750
17.000
17.000
17.000
17.000
17.000
13.750

77.9
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
72.7

.268
.249
.260
.273
.276
.273
.282

161.1
149.7
156.4
164.0
166.2
164.0
169.8

.205
.228
.178
.200
.204
.240
.268

137.7
153.0
119.4
134.5
137.2
161.4
179.9

.104
.113
.094
.116
.134
.136
.093

101.2
110.5
92.1
113.2
130.5
132.7
90.2

.225
.218
.193
.253
.270
.223
.195

151.1
146.4
129.5
169.9
181.7
149.7
131.2

.259
.271
.233
.258
.281
.264
.245

170.3
178.1
152.7
169.1
184.5
173.2
160.9

26.611
29.750
31.500
30.100
28.063
25.350
24.250

118.4
132.4
140.2
133.9
124.9
112.8
107.9

.124
.136
.132
.142
.136
.126
.128

100.2
110.3
106.7
114.8
109.6
101.6
103.6

.135
.143
.144
.154
.139
.134
.138

105.6
112.1
113.1
121.1
108.9
104.9
108.4

July..............................
August.........................
September...................
October.......................
November...................
December....................

13.000
13.000
13.000
13.000
13.000
13.000

68.7
68.7
68.7
68.7
68.7
68.7

.320
.325
.276
.237
.224
.215

192.5
195.4
165.8
142.7
134.7
129.4

.230
.198
.170
.165
.178
.204

154.7
132.8
114.3
111.0
119.4
137.2

.104
.090
.088
.093
.075
.111

101.9
87.8
85.4
90.2
73.2
108.6

.223
.285
.274
.240
.180
.141

150.1
191.8
184.4
161.5
121.1
94.9

.248
.283
.304
.288
.228
.210

162.8
185.5
199.6
188.8
149.4
137.9

24.500
25.350
25.625
25.188
25.125
24.656

109.0
112.8
114.0
112.1
111.8
109.7

.129
.136
.126
.096
.098
.102

104.5
109.6
101.6
77.9
79.3
82.2

.142
.149
.138
.105
.112
.114

111.1
116.8
108.4
82.6
87.9
89.6




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

1912.....................................
1913.....................................
1914.....................................

CD
Ox

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.




Chart 23.

400*
375
350
325
300

27$
250
225

200
175

150

AVEBAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

11083°— 22— Bull. 320------ 7




Chart 23a.

CD

T a b l e 9 . —A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

OO

Foods.
(b ) Butter, cheese, and milk.

(a) Meats.
Butter.

Ioed, Chicago.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Western, dry
packed, New
York.
Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Veal.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Creamery: Extra, Creamery: Extra
Creamery: Extra, Creamery: Firsts,
Creamery:
Chicago.
firsts, Chicago.
Seconds, Boston.
Boston.
Boston.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.
1895.
1896,
1897.
1898.
1899,
'

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904,
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.




SO 139
.
.162

76.2
88.8

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Poultry: Dressed fowls.

.176
.156
.162

1910..........................................
1911..........................................
1912..........................................

____ _ . . . . .

96.5
85.5
88.5

$0,145

100.0

.1 8 2

100.0

$0.181

io o .6

$0,317

100.0

$0,297

100.0

$0,275

100.0

$0,310

100.0

$0,297

102.6

.184

100.7

.185

100.6

.148

102.2

.294

92.6

.273

91.7

.245

89.1

.287

92.6,

.273

92.0

1915..........................................
1916..........................................
1917..........................................
1918..........................................
1919..........................................
1920....................................................

.137
.166
.206
.273
.297
.322

95.0
114.9
142.2
189.1
205.3
222.7

.175
.212
.251
.342
.357
.385

97.3
116.2
137.7
187.4
195.2
211.2

.182
.190
.226
.274
.302
.316

100.8
105.3
125.1
151.4
166.9
174.9

.293
.334
.415
.506
.598
.600

92.2
105.4
130.8
159.6
188.6
189.2

.273
.318
.403
.492
.578
.568

91.7
107.1
135.5
165.4
194.3
191.2

.251
.302
.388
.467
.550
.520

91.2
109.9
140.9
169.7
199.8
189.2

.284
.325
.411
.495
.586
.584

91.4
104.8
132.4
159.3
188.7
188.1

.274
.318
.403
.489
.572
.568

92.4
107.1
135.9
164.5
192.6
191.4

1921..........................................
January...........................
February.........................
March...............................
April.................................
May..................................
June.................................

.262
.273
.275
.307
.305
.271
.265

180.9
188.5
190.2
212.3
210.9
187.4
183.3

.342
.354
.381
.378
.390
.354
.328

187.7
194.0
209.0
207.0
213.8
194.0
179.6

.301
.315
.300
.300
.300
.300
.300

166.6
174.2
165.9
165.9
165.9
165.9
165.9

.431
.528
.468
.480
.455
.321
.328

135.9
166.3
147.4
151.3
143.4
101.3
103.4

.400
.480
.435
.450
.438
.308
.313

134.7
161.5
146.3
151.4
147.2
103.6
105.1

.361
.414
.384
.400
.405
.283
.287

131.3
150.5
139.6
145.5
147.3
102.7
104.4

.416
,483
,476
.460
.450
.292
.319

134.0
155.4
153.2
148.2
145.0
94.1
102.7

.400
.462
.458
.440
.435
.285
.301

134.9
155.6
154.1
148.2
146.5
96.0
101.5

July..................................
August.............................
September......................
October............................
November.......................
December........................

.256
.251
.239
.240
.218
.240

177.2
173.6
165.1
166.0
150.8
166.0

.333
.360
.318
.326
.314
.284

182.6
197.4
174.3
178.9
172.0
155.7

.300
.300
.300
.300
.300
.300

165.9
165.9
165.9
165.9
165.9
165.9

.405
.424
.436
.463
.446
.430

127.7
133.7
137.5
145.8
140.6
135.6

.386
.400
.395
.416
.404
.390

129.7
134.4
132.9
140.0
135.9
131.2

.354
.374
.355
.368
.359
.358

128.7
136.0
129.1
133.6
130.5
130.0

.386
.404
,410
.446
.438
.439

124.5
130.2
132.1
143.7
141.1
141.4

.377
.391
.396
.435
.421
.411

127.0
131.8
133.5
146.5
141.9
138.4




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

1913....................................................

1914..........................................

CO
CO

100

T a b l e 9 . — AVER AG E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Foods.
(5) Butter, cheese, and milk.
Butter.

Creamery:
Extra, Cin­
cinnati.

Cen­ Creamery:
Creamery: Cen­ Creamery:sec­
tralized
tralized firsts, onds, Cincin­ Fancy, New
Cincinnati.
Orleans.
nati.

Creamery:
Choice, N ew
Orleans.

Creamery:
Extra, New
York.

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Rela­
age
age
Rela­
age
Rela­
age
Rela­
age
Rela­
age
Rela­
age
tive
tive
tive
tive
price
tive
price
price
price
price
price
tive
price
per
per
price.
price.
price.
per
per
per
per
per
price.
price.
price.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.

Cream­
Dairy:
ery:
New
Firsts, Rela­
York
New
tive
State,
York,
average average price.
Rela­ price per price per
tive
pound.
pound.
price.

1890
1891
1892,
1893
1894,

$0.228
.259
.261
.270
.229

70.6
80.2
81.0
83.8
70.9

1895,
1896,
1897
1898
1899,

.214
.184
.190
.195
.213

66.3
57.1
58.8
60.6
65.9

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904,

.225
.216
.248
.235
.219

69.6
67.1
76.9
72.8
67.9

1905,
1906
1907.
1908.
1909.

.249
.249
.283
.271
.292

77.2
77.2
87.8
84.1
90.5




$0.195

64.3
78.3
77.3
82.9

.252
.209

68.8

.167
.168
.175
.197

61.9
54.8
55.4
57.5
64.6

.212

69.6

.201

66.0

.232
.215
.197

76.3
70.7
64.8

.234
.233
.267
.245
.265

76.9
76.5
87.9
80.6

Creamery: Sec­
onds, New
York.

AverRelaprice
tive
per
price,
pound.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Creamery
Firsts,
Chicago.

1910...............................
1911...............................
1912...............................
1913.................................. $0,276

.301
.267
.314

$0,347

.252

100.0

$0.302

100.0

91.3

.328

$0,256

100.0

100.0

.269

89.1

.222

$0.336

94.5

86.6

.316

94.1

1915...............................
1916...............................
1917...............................
1918............................
1919...............................
1920..............................

.254
.301
.383
.469
.544
.522

92.3
109.3
138.8
170.2
197.5
189.6

.324
.365
.441
.533
.622
.624

93.3
105.2
127.1
153.7
179.3
179.7

.265
.306
.386
.487
.571
.572

87.7
101.4
127.9
161.3
189.2
189.5

.230
.276
.358
.474
.563
.551

89.8
107.8
139.8
185.5
220.3
215.4

.313
.356
.441
.526
.623
• .632

1921...............................
January.................
February...............
March.....................
April......................
May........................
June.......................

.359
.405
.409
.402
.402
.258
.273

130.3
146.8
148.4
145.9
145.9
93.5
99.1

.457
.543
.508
.520
.495
.334
.355

131.7
156.3
146.3
149.9
142.6
96.3 '
102.3

.386
.468
.451
.458
.435
. 282
.295

128.0
154.9
149.5
151.8
144.1
93.4
97.7

.343
.378
.356
.404
.390
.242
.255

134.1
147.6
139.3
158.0
152.5
94.6
99.7

July........................
August............ .
September..............
October..................
November..............
December..............

.350
.366
.354
.372
.373
.360

127.0
132.7
128.4
134.8
135.2
130.7

.425
.454
.453
.480
.468
.465

122.5
130.8
130.4
138.3
134.9
134.0

.360
.382
.378
.393
.378
.370

119.3
126.6
125.1
130.1
125.3
122.6

.330
.352
.348
.363
.352
.350

129.1
137.7
135.9
141.8
137.7
136.9

100.0

$0.278

92.6

.251

.282
.327
.411
.500
.577
.573

93.5
108.6
136.4
165.9
191.5
190.1

.257
.308
.388
.469
.535
.512

92.6
110.8
139.6
168.7
192.6
184.4

134.4
164.3
145.6
151.3
144.7
99.7
103.7

.401
.474
.438
.464
.443
.299
.314

133.1
157.4
145.4
154.0
147.0
99.2
104.1

.349
.385
.374
.406
.384
.259
.279

125.7
138.6
134.8
146.0
138.2
93.2

122.9
130.9
133.7
144.8
140.3
135.3

.376
.396
.394
.419
.408
.400

124.9
131.2
130.9
139.0
135.4
132.7

.342
.361
.349
.357
.349
.349

123.1
129.9
125.8
128.5
125.6
125.8

$0.321

100.0

.323

100.0

.302

$0.301

93.9

.299

92.8

.279

93.2
105.9
131.3
156.4
185.3
188.1

.301
.347
.434
.519
.614
.622

93.7
108.1
135.0
161.3
190.9
193.5

.299
.341
.427
.516
.605
.614

92.7
105.7
132.3
160.1
187.7
190.4

.464
.548
.520
.528
.508
.364
.361

137.9
162.9
154.7
157.1
151.0
108.3
107.5

.454
.538
.510
.516
.498
.354
.351

141.2
167.2
158.7
160.5
154.8
110.1
109.3

.434
.530
.469
.488
.467
.322
.334

.439
.454
.445
.469
.472
.465

130.6
135.1
132.4
139.5
140.4
138.4

.430
.446
.435
.459
.462
.455

133.8
138.8
135.3
142.8
143.7
141.6

.396
.422
.431
.467
.453
.436

100.0

90.2

100.6

101




95.6
84.6
98.7

AVEBAGE WHOLESALE PBICES OF COMMODITIES.

100.0

1914...............................

93.2
82.6
97. 3

102
W HOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,




Chart 24.

400
375
350
335
300
275
250
225

200
175

150

125

100
75

50

40

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.




Chart 24a.

O
Od

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

1890

TO

1921—

Continued.

104

T a ble 9 .—

Foods.
(&) Butter, cheese, and milk.
Cheese.

Butter.

Creamery:
Extra firsts,
Philadelphia.

Creamery:
Firsts,
Philadelphia.

Creamery:
Extra, San
Francisco.

Creamery.

Creamery:
Firsts, San
Francisco.

Whole milk:
American
twins,
Chicago.

Whole milk:
Colored, aver­
age, fancy,
New York.

California
flats: Fancy,
San
Francisco.

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
E l^ in , St. Louis,
Relar
age
Relar
age
Rela­
age
age
age
Relar
Rela­
age
age
age
Rela­
RelaRela­
Mo.,
Rela­
price
tive
tive
price
price
tive
price
tive
price
tive
price
price
tive
price
rive average average tive
tive
per
per
per
per
per
price.
price.
per
per
price.
per
price.
price.
price.
price. price per price per price.
price.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
pound.
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894,

$0.224
.250
.253
.258
.219

72.7
81.3
82.2
83.9
71.3

SO 096
.
.101
.106
.108
.106

62.2
65.6
68.7
69.8

1895,
1896,
1897
1898
1899,

.206
.179
.184
.189
.208

67.1
58.3
59.7
61.3
67.4

.093
.091
.097
.082
.108

60.3
58.9
62.8
53.3
69.8

1900.
1901,
1902,
1903,
1904.

.218
.241
.230
.218

70.8
'68.7
78.4
74.8
70.8

.113
.101
.113
.122

73.2
65.6
73.1
79.0

.102

66.1

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

.243
.246
.276
.269
.289

78.9
79.9
89.7
87.5
94.0

.121
.131
.141
.136
.149

78.6
85.2
91.8
88.5
96.4

1910.
1911.

.298
.264

96.7
85.9

.157
.140

102.0
90.9




.211

68.8

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Creamery:
Extra,
Philadelphia.

1912.
1913
1914.

$0.317
.271

100.0
85.5

$0.296
.247

100.0
83.4

$0.142
.144

100.0
101.4

.165
.154
.152

106.7
100.0
98.5

$0.159
.148

100.0
93.0

$0.329
.415
.502
.589
.585

92.5
108.4
134.3
162.5
190.7
189.2

.262
.290
.398
.525
.603
.602

82.7
91.5
125.5
165.7
190.1
189.8

.239
.275
.382
.503
.564
.588

80.5
92.8
128.9
169.8
190.4
198.3

.142
.174
.227
.264
.301
.262

100.4
123.0
160.0
186.2
211.9
184.5

.151
.181
.241
.268
.315
.274

97.9
117.1
156.3
173.7
204.4
178.1

.132
.156
.213
.279
.326
.307

82.5
97.9
133.6
174.8
204.2
192.7

126.5
149.8
141.5
146.9
141.9
90.6
97.2

.413
.490
.460
.465
.430
.285
.308

133.7
158. 5
148.9
150.4
139.2
92.2
99.5

.435
.460
.494
.403
.366
.336
.370

137.0
145.1
155.7
127.1
115.5
106.1
116.7

.401
' .458
.400
.385
.368
.327
.346

135.5
154.4
135.0
129.9
124.0
110.3
116.8

.194
.234
.251
.253
.180
.139
.140

136.7
164.7
176.7
178.1
126.8
98.3
98.9

.204
.231
.228
.246
.214
.155
.150

132.4
149. 6
148.0
159.3
138.7
100.6
97.3

.227
.250
.250
.239
.191
.150
.180

142.5
156.8
156.8
149.9
120.0
94.1
112.9

120.5
126.2
122.2
129.3
127.3
123.8

.384
.398
.403
. 443
.433
.434

124.3
128.6
130.2
143.3
139.9
140.4

.424
.460
.469
.496
.503
.446

133.6
145.1
147.9
156.5
158.5
140.7

.383
.450
.445
.476
.460
.428

129.1
151.9
150.2
160.8
155.3
144.5

.169
.188
.189
.195
.194
.194

119.4
132.9
133.1
137.7
137.1
137.0

.184
.203
.206
.218
.210
.206

119.7
131.7
133.9
141.5
136.0
133.4

.233
.219
.224
.253
.321
.227

145.9
137.3
140.5
158.4
201.6
142.4

100.0
93.1

$0.313
.291

100.0
92.9

$0.300
.276

100.0
92.1

..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............

.302
.346
.431
.517
.616
.624

92.6
106.2
132.2
158.8
189.0
191.6

.289
.333
.419
.507
.598
.606

92.2
106.4
133.8
161.7
190.7
193.2

.275
.321
.406
.490
.563
.554

91.8
107.2
135.5
163.4
188.0
184.8

1921 .............
January...
February..
March.......
April........
May..........
June..........

.440
.525
.483
.485
.470
.318
.333

134.9
161.1
148.1
148.8
144.2
97.4
102.0

.420
.510
.468
.470
.455
.298
.319

133.9
162.7
149.2
150.0
145.2
94.9
101.7

.379
.449
.424
.440
.425
.271
.291

July..........
August___
September
October...
November.
December.

.403
.432
.436
.481
.459
.450

123.7
132.5
133.8
147.7
140.8
138.1

.389
.408
.408
.453
.434
.428

124.0
130.0
129.5
144.4
138.4
136.6

.361
.378
.366
.388
.381
.371

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920




.297
.308
.288
.285
.327

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

96.5
100.0
93.6

$0.326
.303

O
Cl

106

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Foods.
(6) Butter, cheese, and milk.

(c) Other foods.

Milk.

Bread: Loaf, before baking.

Average
price
per
case.

Rela­
tive
price.

Evaporated.
Average
price
per
case.

Rela­
tive
price.

Chicago,
average
price
per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Washington,
D. C., aver­ Cincinnati,
age price per average price
per pound.
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

New
Orleans,
average
price
per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

New York,
average
price
per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$0,036
.036
.036
.036
.036

89.0
89.0
89.0
89.0
89.0

$0.032
.032
.032
.032
.032

75.5
75.5
75.5
75,5.
75.5

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898,
1899.

.033
.036
.036
.036
.036

83.2
90.8
89.0
89.0
89.0

.032
.029
.032
.032
.032

75.5
67.7
75.5
75.5
75.5

1900.
1901.
1902,
1903.
1904.

.036
.036
.036
.036
.036

89.0
89.0
89.0
89.0
90.8

.032
.032
.032
.032
.035

75.5
75.5
75.5
75.5
82.5

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908,
1909.

.036
.036
.036
.036
.038

89.0
89.0
89.0
89.0
94.2

.038
.038
.038
.040
.040

88.7
88.7
88.7
94.3
94.3

1910.
1911.
1912.

.039
.039
.039

97.0
97.0
97.0

.040
.040
.042

San
Francisco, Rela­
average
tive
price
price.
per
pound.

94.3
94.3
100.0

1913.

1914.




$4.700

4.563

100.0
97.1

$3.535

3.416

100.0
96.7

$6,043
.043

100.0

100.0

.0 4 0

.040

$0,036

100.0
100.0

$0,031
.032

100.0
103.6

.0 4 2

.044

100.0

104.0

$0. 040
.040<

100.0

100.0

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Condensed.

1915.............................
1916.............................
1917.............................
1918.............................
1919.............................
1920.............................

4.621
98. 3
5.284
112. 4
6.812
144. 9
156.,3
7.348
8.211 ' 174.,7
202.,6
9.522

3.076
3.745
5.217
5.639
6.350
5.934

87.0
106.0
147.6
159. 5
179.7
167.9

.044
.047
.068
.075
.076
.093

102.8
109.8
160.0
175.4
177.0
218.7

.040
.045
.067
.072
.076
.083

112.4
126.1
186.8
203.1
212.4
232.0

.039
.040
. 056
.065
.069
.081

129.2
130.5
184.6
212.1
227.2
264.6

.048
.048
/069
.073
.074
.087

112,0
112.5
163.4
171.9
175.5
205.7

.041
.042
.059
.069
.071
.082

101.3
105.3
146.3
173. 5
178. 5
204.5

7.061
10.750
9.125
8.000
7.375
7.125
6.813

150..2
228.,7
194. 2
170.,2
156..9
151.,6
144.,9

5.101
5.031
5.250
5.550
5.781
5.750
5.219

144.3
142.3
148.5
157.0
163". 6
162.7
147.7

.080
.089
.089
.089
.089
.076
.076

187.4
208.2
208.2
208.2
208.2
177.0
177.0

.072
.076
.076
.076
.076
.076
.071

200.8
212.4
212.4
212.4
212.4
212.4
199.7

.067
.080
.075
.071
.073
.062
.064

218.0
262.3
246.9
231.5
239.7
203.9
209.8

.078
.082
.080
.081
.080
.084
.074

183.0
194.3
188.7
191.5
188.7
197.4
174.1

.070
.078
.078
.078
.069
.069
.069

174.8
194.5
194.5
194.5
173.0
173.0
173.0

July......................
August.................
September...........
October................
November............
December............

5.875
6.450
6.075
6.038
5.875
5.431

125. 0
137. 2
129. 3
128. 5
125. 0
115. 6

4.825
5.090
4.875
4.838
4.650
4.200

136.5
144.0
137.9
136.9
131.6
118.8

.076
.076
.076
.076
.076
.076

177.0
177.0
177.0
177.0
177.0
177.0

.071
.071
.071
.071
.062
.062

199.7
199.7
199.7
199.7
174.7
174.7

.062
.062
.062
.062
.062
.062

203.9
203.9
203.9
203.9
203.9
203.9

.076
.076
.075
.075
.074
.074

179.7
179.7
176.9
176.9
174.1
174.1

.069
.069
.069
.069
.061
.061

173.0
173.0
173.0
173.0
151.3
151.3




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES,

1921.............................
January...............
February.............
March...................
April....................
May......................
June.................. ...

O

108

Table 9 .—A V E R A G E W H O L ESAL E PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921-Continued.

Foods.
(c) Other foods.
Fish.
Cocoa beans:
Arriba.

Coffee: Rio,
No. 7.

Copra:
In bags.

Crackers.

Dry,
Pry,
bank,
bank,
Butter, Oyster,
Soda,
Aver­
large,
Aver­
Aver­
large,
age
New
Rela­
Rela­ aver­ aver­ Rela­ aver­ Rela­ Boston,
age
age
Rela­
age
age
age
price
York,
tive
tive
tive
price
price
tive
tive
price price. price price. aver­ average
per
per
price. price
per
price.
price.
age
per
per
per
pound.
pound.
pound.
price price per
pound. pound.
pound.
hundred­
per
quintal. weight.

Shore, Nova
Large shore
round, Scotia,
(pickled,
cured),
Boston, split,
Gloucester, Rela­ aver­ Bosion,
aver­
tive
average
age
age
price per price. price
price
per
hundred­
per
weight.
barrel. barrel.

Newfound­
land, split,
large No. 1, Rela­
New York, tive
price.
average
price per
barrel.

1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$0.179
.167
.143
.172
.165

161.1
150.1
128.5
154.8
148.6

$0,070
.070
.069
.065
.065

77.8
77.8
76.4
72.2
72.2

$0,080
.080
.076
.075
.073

123.1
123.1
117.4
115.4
111.5

$5.677
6.729
7.052
6.380
5.958

71.2
84.4
88.5
80.0
74.7

$3,525
4.707
2.938
3.813
3.396

54.9
73.3
45.8
59.4
52.9

1895.
1896,
1897.
1898.
1899.

.159
.123
.079
.063
.060

110.8

143.0
71.2
56.9
54.3

.065
.065
.059
.073
.071

72.7
72.2
65.8
81.4
79.2

.068
. .066
.059
.076
.066

103.8
101.2
91.1
116.6
102.0

5.521
4.208
4.521
4.667
5.135

69.3
52.8
56.7
58.6
64.5

3.156
3.354
3.635
4.208
5.031

49.1
52.2
56.6
65.5
78.4

1900,
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

.082
.065
.059
.056
.078

73.9
58.0
52.7
50.2
70.3

.075
.080
.080
.076
.078

83.3
88.9
88.9
84.2

.068
.070
.070
.065
.066

103.8
107.7
107.7
90.4
101.2

5.302
5.990
5.094
5.865
7.281

66.5
75.2
64.0
73.6
91.3

5.083
4.979
4.906
5.729
5.453

79.2
77.6
76.4
89.3
85.0

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

.083
.081
.066
.063
.078

74.8
72.9
59.1
56.4
70.4

.068
.065
.065
.065
.065

105.1

7.396
7.604
7.740
7 302
-.
7.021

92.9
95.4
97.1
91.6
88.1

6.000
6.344
6.150




86.1

99.1
100.0

.090

$0,065
.065
.065

100.0
100.0

100.6

100.0

100.0
100.0

100.6

$7,208
7.083
7.068

93.5
98.9
95.8
94.1
93.6

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Herring.

Cod.

85.5
120.5
131.4
100.0
73.3

$0.104
.104

.176
.170
.129
.136
.225
.204

115.2
110.8
84.3
89.0
146.8
133.5

.075
.092
.093
.094
.179
.120

66.9
83.0
83.3
84.0
160.4
107.6

.102
1921..................
January...
.120
.112
February..
March.......
.109
.102
April.........
May.......... . .097
.099
June..........

66.3
78.4
73.1
70.9
66.6
63.0
64.5

.072
.067
.067
.064
.060
.062
.067

.095
.094
.101
.103
.093
.099

62.1
61.3
66.0
67.3
60.4
64.3

.065
.070
.079
.081
.088
.093

1915..................
1916..................
1917..................
1918..................
1919..................
1920..................

July..........
August---September.
O ctober...
November.
December.

107.7
107.7
100.0
100.0
100.0

.070
.065
.065
.065
.065

107.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

.102
.147
.104
.092
.088
.090

97.5
140.6
99.8
88. 5
84.3
86.6

.071
.073
.114
.148
.152
.175

109.7
111.5
175.7
228.2
234.5
269.2

.071
.073
.114
.148
.152
.175

64.6
60.1
•60.4
57.4
53.9
55. 8
59.8

.048
.057
.050
.046
.046
.052
.050

46.2
54.7
48.0
44.4
44.1
49. 8
48.0

.138
.160
.160
.160
.140
.140
.140

212.8
246.2
246.2
246.2
215.4
215.4
215.4

58.1
63.2
70.9
73.0
79. 3'
83.6

.046
.047
.049
.046
.043
.046

44.0
45.0
46.8
44.4
40.8
43.7

.140
.140
.120
.120
.120
.120

215.4
215.4
184.6
184.6
184.6
184.6

6.938
7.958
8.104

$6.708
7.000

87.1
99.9
101.7
100.0
104.4

109.7
111.5
175.7
228.2
234.5
269.2

7.417
8.042
8.942
10.033
9.888
9.229

110.6
119.9
133.3
149.6
147.4
137.6

6.813
7.313
9.813
12.553
9.689
9.260

.138
• .160
.160
.160
.140
.140
.140

212.8
246.2
246.2
246.2
215.4
215.4
215.4

7.146
8.250
8.250
7.750
7.750
7.500
7.000

106.5
123.0
123.0
115.5
115.5
111.8
104.4

8.236
9.750
9.750
9.750
8.250
8.250
8.063

124.3
147.2
147.2
147.2
124.5
124.5
121.7

.140
.140
.120
.120
.120
.120

215.4
215.4
184.6
184.6
184.6
184.6

6.750
6.500
6.500
6.500
6. 500
6.500

100.6
96.9
96.9
96.9
96.9
96.9

7.500
7.500
7.500
7.500
7.500
7.500

113.2
113.2
113.2
*113.2
113.2
113.2

$7.948
7.813

7.313
6.861
7.500

$6.604
6.625
6.625

97.2
91.2
99.7

100.0
100.0

102.8

110.4
148.1
189.5
146.2
139.8

109




100.0
100.2

.070
.070
.065
.065
.065

AVEBAGE WHOLESALE FKICES OF COMMODITIES.

100.0
84.8

.095
.134
.146
.111
.082

1910..................
1911.................
1912..................
1913.................. $0.153
1914..................
.130

HO

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W H OLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Foods.
(c) Other foods.
Flour.

Fish.
Mackerel; Salt,
large, No. 3s.

Average
price per
barrel.

Rela­
tive
price.

Salmon: Canned.

Chinook
fancy,
tails, Is,
average
price per
dozen cans.

Alaska,
red,
average
price per
dozen
cans.

Rye.

Rela­
tive
price.

New
York,
average
price per
barrel.

Minne­
apolis,
average
price per
barrel.

Wheat.

Rela­
tive
price.

Winter
patents,
Kansas
City, aver­
age price
per barrel.

Winter
Winter
straights,
Rela­ New York, straights,
Kansas
tive
City, aver­
average
price.
age price
price per
per barrel.
barrel.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890..................................
1891..................................
1892..................................
1893..................................
1894..................................

$18.250
15.313
13.000
13.000
11.056

162.8
136.6
116.0
116.0
98.6

$1,642
1.500
1.483
1.494
1.425

73.8
67.4
66.7
67.1
64.0

$3,365
4.921
4.017
3.085
2.781

91.7
134.1
109.5
84.1
75.8

$4,652
4.905
4.122
3.283
2.750

108.0
113.9
95.7
76.2
63.8

1895..................................
1896.................................
1897..................................
1898..................................
1899..................................

15.625
13.917
12.229
13.667
15.250

139.4
124.2
109.1
121.9
136.1

1.504
1.550
1.338
1.267
1.529

67.6
69.7
60.1
56.9
68.7

3.133
2.683
2.806
3.081
3.298

85.4
73.1
76.5
84.0
89.9

3.231
3.620
4.361
4.145
3.382

75.0
84.0
101.2
96.2
78.5

1900..................................
1901..................................
1902..................................
1903...................... '..........
1904..................................

13.896
10.818
13.750
17.448
14.500

124.0
96.5
122.7
155.7
129.4

1.771
1.713
1.615
1.621
1.725

79.6
77.0
72.6
72.8
77.5

3.425
3.321
3.442
3.148
4.348

93.4
90.5
93.8
85.8
11& 5
,

3.349
3.309
3.489
3.592
4.826

77.7
76.8
81.6
83.4
112.0

1905..................................
1906..................................
1907..................................
1908..................................
1909..................................

13.917
14.792
13.917
11.354
10.188

124.2
132.0
124.2
101.3
90.9

1.704
1.683
1.668
1.921
1.700

76.6
75.7
75.0
86.3
76.4

4.467
3.844
4.602
4.738
4.485

121.7
104.8
125.4
129.1
122.3

4.543
3.615
3.988
4.291
5.451

105.5
83.9
92.6
99.6
j 126.5

1910..................................
1911..................................

14.583
16.000

130.1
142.8

1.744
2.104

78.4
94.6

4.229
4.694

115.3
127.9

4.691
3.984

108.9
92.5




Bakers7
patent,
Los Ange­
les, aver­
age price1
per barrel.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Year or month.

13.208
11.096
10.065

117.8
100.0
90.7

1915.................................
1916.................................
1917................................
1918.................................
1919.................................
1920....................

10.560
13.860
17.845
25.211
21.698
17.160

95.2
124.9
160.8
227.2
193.6
154.6

1.500
1.678
2.535
2.732
3.039
3.546

1921......................
January..................
February..................
March.......................
April.........................
May..............
June........................

16.789
17.820
17.820
17.325
17.325
16.830
14.850

151.3
160.6
160.6
156.1
156.1
151.7
133.8

J u ly ...,....................
August......................
September...............
October....................
November................
December.................

15.840
16.830
16.830
16.830
16.830
16.335

142.8
151.7
151.7
151.7
151.7
147.2

„

1No relative nrice computed




2.183
2.225
2.225

98.1

4 519
3 669
.’

$3.123
3.521

123.2
100.0
112.7

$4.012
4.363

100.0
108.7

102.7
114*9
173.6
187] 0
208.1
242] 8

5.214
5.727
9.697
10.097
8.402
10.205

166.9
183.4
310.5
323.3
269.0
326.7

5.861
6.364
10.950
(2)
11.719
12.524

146.1
158.7
272.9

2.889
3.475
3.425
3.325
3.250
3.025
2.863

197.8
237 9
234.5
27 7
2 .*
222.5
207." 1
198.0

7.153
9.756
8.794
8.150
7.531
7.760
7.300

229.0
312.4
281.6
261.0
241.1
248.5
233.7

2.469
2.665
2.588
2.550
2.520
2.525

169.0
182. 5
177.2
174.6
172.6
172.9

7.094
6.545
6.863
5.550
5.295
5.413

227.1
209.6
219.7
177.7
169.5
173.3

$1.460

100! o

ioo!o

2 No quotation

4.686
4.308

$3.847
4.125

108. 8
100] 0
107.2

292.1
312.2

5.612
6.091
10.551
3 10.302
10.695
11.580

145.9
158.3
274.3
267.8
278! 0
301.0

3 $10.897
11.921
13.256

7.735
9.260
8.950
8.694
7.740
8.219
8.294

192.8
230.8
223.1
216.7
192.9
204.9
206.7

7.034
8.295
7.963
7.994
6.980
7.625
7.700

182.8
215.6
207.0
207. 8
181.4
198.2
200.2

8.601
10.000
9.800
9.581
8.787
8.716
9.187

7.445
6.994
7.300
6.990
6.544
6.560

185.6
174.3
182.0
174.2
163.1
163.5

6.895
6.419
6.681
6.305
5.900
5.860

179.2
168.9
173.7
163.9
153.4
152.3

8.729
8.323

8 U. S. Food Administration standard.

8,200

7.581
7.213
7.097

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

1912.................................
1913.................................
1914.................................

112

T a b l e 9 . — AVE R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Foods.
(c) Other foods.
Flour: Wheat.
Year or month.
Standard
patents,
Minne­
apolis,
average
price per
barrel.

Second patents,
Minneapolis.
Relative
price.

1890
1891
1892
1893
1894

$5.186
5.305
4.347
4.006
3.595
3.643
3.796
4.591
4.729
3.774
3.842
3.810
3.808
4.330
5.378
5.422
4.276
4.876
5.418
5.757
5.495
5.078
5.271
4.544

Relative
price.

Average
price per
barrel.

Relative
price.

Average
price per
barrel.

Relative
price.

Average
price per
barrel.

Relative
price.

Average
price per
barrel.

$4,422
4.939

100.0
111.7

$4,495
4.871

100.0
108.4

$4.566
4.413

100.0
96.6

$4,253
4.105

100.0
96.5

$4,726
4.749

Relative
price.

120.9
111.8
116.0

1913

Average
price per
barrel.

119.3
94.1
107.3
119.2
126.7

1910
1911
1912

Patents, Toledo.

84.6
83.9
83.8
95.3
118.4

1905
1906
1907
1908
1909

Second patents,
St. Louis.

80.1
83.5
101.0
104.1
83.1

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904

First patents,
St. Louis.

114.1
116.7
95.7
88.2
79.1

1895
1896
1897

Patents, Portland,
Oreg.

1914




$4,584
5.096

100.0
111.2

100.6
100.5

WHOLESALE PBICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Spring
patents,
New York,
average
price per
barrel.

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

6.663
7.264
11.391
(2)
11.998
12.675

145.4
158.5
248.5

1921
.....
January...
February..
March.......
April.........
May..........
June..........
July..........
August___
September.
O ctober...
November.
December.

5.426
5.687
9.929
3 9.967
10.861
12.408

120.7
126.5
220.9
221.7
241.6
276.0

5.894
6.354
10.551
(2)
10.758
12.291

8.326
9.625
9.181
8.730
7.950
8.745
9.006

181.6
210.0
200.3
190.5
173.4
190.8
196.5

7.974
9.300
8.844
8.310
7.631
8.365
8.694

180.3
210.3
200.0
187.9
172.6
189.2
196.6

8.274
9.944
9.751
9.494
8.398
8.519
8.517

184.1
221.2
216.9
211.2
186.8
189.5
189.5

8.900
8.120
8.319
7.425
7.170
6.881

194.2
177.1
181.5
162.0
156.4
150.1

8.613
7.805
7.925
7.038
6.805
6.513

194.8
176.5
179.2
159.1
153.9
147.3

7.864
7.761
7.761
7.348
6.965
6.965

174.9
172.6
172.6
163.5
154.9
154.9

* No quotation.

130.9
140.3
238.0
242.4
236.1
258.8

6.036
6.520
10.730
(2)
10.745
11.877

127.7
138.0
227.0

235.6
269.2

5.568
5.965
10.122
s 10.310
10.040
11.007

7.608
10.360
9.981
9.138
7.175
7.688
7.694

166.6
226.9
218.6
200.1
157.1
168.4
168.5

6.615
8.855
8.388
7.919
6.295
6.750
6.856

155.5
208.2
197.2
186.2
148.0
158.7
161.2

7.282
9.290
8.994
8.669
7.130
7.906
7.644

154.1
196.6
190.3
183.4
150.9
167.3
161.7

6.770
6.563
6.950
6.605
6.092
6.150

148.3
143.7
152.2
144.6
133.4
134.7

5.915
5.688
5.844
5.830
5.375
5.520

139.1
133.7
137.4
137.1
126.4
129.8

6.735
6.319
6.538
6.300
6.050
6.035

142.5
133.7
138.3
133.3
128.0
127.7

* U. S. Food Administration standard.

227.4
251.3

113




147.1
160.3
254.0
229.3
271.0
277.4

129.1
139.1
231.1

261.8
276.5

6.503
7.090
11.230
3 10.141
11.982
12.266

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

11083°— 22— Bull. 320Q
o

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

25,

114
W HOLESALE PBXGES, 1390 TO 1921.




Chart

25a.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

115




Chart

116

T a b l e 9 .— AVE R A G E W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Foods.
(c) Other foods.
Fruits: Dried.

Fruits: Canned.

Average
price per
case.

Pineapples:
Hawaiian, sliced
standard, 2J.
Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
case.

Average
price per
case.

Rela­
tive
price.

Apples: E vaporated,
choice.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Currants: In
barrels.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Prunes: California,
in boxes.

Average
price per
pound.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$0,114

158.2
153.2
95.8
129.1
152.1

$0,048
.043
.030
.027
.017

69.9
62.3
43.4
39.5
25.3

$0,107

.069
.093
.109

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

.068
.053
.056
.089
.087

94.4
74.2
77.3
124.0
121.0

.025
.033
.048
.058
.047

37.1
47.8
70.0
84.8
68.7

.110

Coast,
seeded,
average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

$2.360
1.802
1.469
1.700
1.154

174.6
133.3
108.6
125.7
85.4

.067
.058
.055
.054
.057

101.5

1.429
1.019
1.398
1.392
1.283

105.7
75.3
103.4
102.9
94.9

79.6
80.0
84.0
70.3

1.521
1.442
1.685
1.446
1.473

112.5
106.6
124.7
106.9
108.9

70.0
98.5
90.4
91.2
80.9

1.188
1.600
1.627
1.810
1.270

87.8
118.3
120.3
133.9
93.9

.104
.074

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

.062
.071
.092
.061
.060

85.7
98.7
128.3
85.1
84.0

,072
083
049
048
049

105.3
121.5
72.2
69.6
71.3

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

.070
.098
.084
086
.077

97.3
136.2
117.4
120.2
107.1

049
061
070
061
060

71.6
89.8
102.8
89.0

.046
.065
.059
.060
.053




London
layer,
average
price per
box.

162.8
152.4
151.7
158.4
112.0

.100

052
053
055
048
046

88.2

Rela­
tive
price.

Raisins: California.

88.6

82.9
86.1

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Peaches:
Peaches:
X standard, Standard,
^ C a li­
2\ Cali­
fornia.
fornia.

1910........................................
1911........................................
1912........................................
1913........................................
1914........................................

.120

116.4
167.5
115.2
100.0
131.2

.065
.076
.075
.068
.067

95.2
111.3
109.8
100.0
98.2

.063
.116
.074
.066
.093

95.3
177.3
113.3
100.0
141.5

1.224
1.413
1.425
1.352
1.790
1.425

.084
100.0
100.7

$2.053
1.642

100.0
80.0

1.452
1.504
2.092
2.625

$2,343
3.329
3.247

85.4
88.5
123. 0
154.4
219.4
214.0

1.480
1.533
2.007
2.625
4.230
4.481

72.1
74.7
97.8
127.9
206.0
218.2

.077
.067
.120
.157
.192

107.5
93.7
167.0
218.5
267.8
235.1

.077
.123
.204
.211
.199
.165

112.0
180.0
298.0
308.2
291.4
241.4

.079
.074
.107
.110
.198
.147

120.4
112.2
162.3
167.4
302.0
223.6

1921........................................
January..........................
February........................
March.............................
April................................
May.................................
June................................

2.230
2.850
2.850
2.400
1.900
1.900
2.181

147.0
187.9
187.9
158.3
125.2
125.2
143.7

2.762
3.250
3.250
3.250
3.250
3.250
2.594

134.5
158.3
158.3
158.3
158.3
158.3
126.3

.097
.098
.084
.083

135.0
135.8
117.6
114.9
120.2

.137
.143
.140
.140
.140
.140
.134

200.4
208.3
204.7
204.7
204.7
204.7
196.5

.091
.098
.105
.086
.073
.088
.087

July.................................
August............................
September......................
October...........................
November......................
December........................

2.325
2.325
2.194
2.131
1.900
1.900

153.3
153.3
144.7
140.5
125.2
125.2

2.375
2.375
2.375
2.3^5
2.375
2.375

115.7
115.7
115. 7
115.7
115.7
115.7

.135
.135
.138
.138
(2
)
.125

197.4
197.4
201.0
201.0

.084
.091
.095
.096
.094
.098

1915........................................
1916........................................
1917........................................
1918........................................
1919........................................
1920........................................

* No quotation.




(2)

.138

(2)
(2)
(2)

(2)

191.5

182.8

90.5
104.5
105.4
100.0
132.4
$0,077
.073
.084
.092
.123
.234

105.4
100.0
115.4
126.5
169.7
322.1

138.6
148.6
160.1
130.3
111.4
133.4
132.9

* .194
.248
.248
.248
.229
.210
.199

267.6
341.0
341.0
341.0
315.3
289.3
274.8

128.7
138.6
144.4
145.7
142.5
148.6

.188
.160
.155
.150
.150
.150

258.3
220.5
213.5
206.7
206.7
206.7

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

$1.700
1.713

.083
.072
.094

118

T a b l e 9 . —AVER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Foods.
(c) Other foods.
Fruits: Fresh.
Year or month.

Average
price per
barrel.

Lemons: Cali­
fornia.

Bananas.

Rela- Jamaica, 8s, Jamaica, 9s,
tive
price.
bunch.
bunch.

Relative
price.

Average
price per
box.

Rela­
tive
price.

Oranges: Cali­
fornia.

Average
price per
box.

Rela­
tive
price.

(flucose.

Hominy grits.

Average
Rela­
price per
tive
100 pounds. price.

Average
Rela­
price per
tive
100 pounds. price.

1890....... ............
1891..........................
1892..........................
1893..........................
1894..........................

SI. 763
1.580

1895..........................
1896..........................
1897..........................
1898..........................
1899..........................
1900..........................
1901..........................
1902........................
1903..........................
1904........................

Lard: Prime
contract.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

82,5
73.9

|0.063
.066
,077
.103
,077

57.5
59.9
70.0
93.6
70.2

1.549
1.159
1.219
1.302
1.356

72.5
54,2
57. 0
60.9
63.4

.065
.047
.044
.055
.056

■59.3
42.6
40.1
50.1
50.5

1.488
1.646
2.179

69.6
77.0
101.9

62.7
80.4
96.2
79.7
66.4

1.792

83.8

.069
.089
.106
.088
.073

1905..........................
1906..........................
1907..........................
1908........................
1909.................

1.774
2.027
2.261
2.640
2.473

83.0
94.8
105.8
123.5
115.7

.075
.089
.092
.091
.117

67.7
80.6
83.6
82,5
106.2

1910.___
1911..........................
1912...........
1913..........................
1914..........................

1.942
1 .858
2.313
2.138
2.160

90.8
86,9
108, 2
100.0
101.1

.125
.091
.105
.110
.104

113.8
83.5
95.3
100.0
94.2




1.840

$3.174
4.042

100.0
127.4

$0. 796
.852

100.0
107.1

$5.773
4.151

100.0
71.9

86.1

$4.420
2.772

100.0
62.7

%
1.651
1.786

100.0
108,2

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Apples: Fresh,
Baldwins.

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............

2.775
3.168
4.784
5.503
8.491
7.194

87.4
99.8
150.7
173.4
267.6
226.7

1921 ..............
January...
February..
March.......
April.........
May..........
June..........

6.020
4.500
4.469
5.225
5.625
6.700
7.000

July..........
August___
September.
October. . .
November.
December.

(2
)
(2)
7.500
6.813
6.500
7.250

3.033
4.305
4.952
6.771
5.464
4.320

52.5
74.6
85.8
117.3
94.6
74.8

3.502
3.484
3.315
7.225
4.805
6.272

79.2
78.8
75.0
163.5
108.7
141.9

2.294
2.573
4.801
4.421
5.498
5.384

107.3
120.4
224.6
206.8
257.2
251.9

1.666
2.040
4.273
4.428
3.477
3.163

101.0
123.6
258.9
268.2
210.6
191.6

.094
.135
.217
.255
.290
.200

85.4
122.3
197.1
231.8
263.6
181.3

189.7
141.8
140.8
164.6
177.2
211.1
220.6

2.675
1.150
2.000
2.225
2.844
3.000
3.000

173.8
74.8
130.0
144.7
184.9
194.8
194.8

5.226
3.438
3.875
3.475
3.250
3.900
7.750

90.5
59.5
67.1
60.2
56.3
67.6
134.2

5.219
3.906
4.125
3.775
3.625
3.950
5.406

118.1
88.4
93.3
85.4
82.0
89.4
122.3

2.602
3.265
3.140
2.900
2. 565
2.790
2.765

121.7
152.7
146.9
135.7
120.0
130.5
129.4

1.243
1.400
1.475
1.425
1.250
1.300
1.538

75.3
84.8
89.4
86.3
75.7
78.8
93.1

.111
.136
.125
.122
.105
.097
.102

100.9
123.3
113.8
111.1
95.4
87.9
92.7

236.3
214.7
204.8
228.4

3.000
3.000
3.000
3.000
3.000
2.750

194.8
194. 8
194.8
194.8
194.8
178.8

9.750
6.300
8.125
6.438
3. 975
3.250

168.9
109.1
140.7
111.5
68.9
56.3

5.344
6.150
6.438
7.156
6.725
6.094

120.9
139.1
145.7
161.9
152.2
137.9

2.615
2.490
2.365
2.240
2.070
2.053

122.3
116.5
110.6
1()4. 8
96.8
96.0

1.400
1.150
1.113
.960
.975
.990

84.8
69.7
67.4
58.2
59.1
60.0

.121
.119
.115
.102
.098
.094

109.5
107.8
104.3
92.2
89.2
85.4

119




$4.041
3.038

103.4
116.5
168.6
271.7
262.6
197.5

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

2No quotation.

.823
.927
1.342
2.163
2.090

120

T a b l e 9 . — A VER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OP COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Food.
(c) Other foods.
Molasses: New
Orleans, open
kettle.

Meal: Corn.

Fine
yellow.

Fine white.

Average price per
1 0pounds.
0

Rela­
tive
price.
New York. Decatur,
11
1.

Oleomargarine.

Oleo oil.

Spices: Pepper,
black, Singapore.

White
table.

Average price per
1 0pounds.
0

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
gallon.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
per 100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

New York. Philadel­
phia.
$1.020
1.458
1.161
1.083
1.063

7 .6
1
12
0 .3

1.119

74.5
103.5
83.7
77.3
78.5

81. 5
76.0
74.6

$0.354
.279
.319
.335
.309

78.7
62.0
70.8
74.4
68.7

$0.115
.087
.069
.060
.052

106.1
80.5
63.5
54.8
47.6

1895.........................
1896.........................
1897.........................
1898:....... ................
1899......................

1.072
.813
.816
.882
.955

75.2
57.0
57.2
61.9
67.0

1.061
.785
.763
.846
.927

74.5
55.1
53.6
59.4
65.1

.308
.325
.262
.308
.353

6. 5
8

.050
.050
.066
.089

.112

45.8
46.1
61.2
82.1
102.9

1900.........................
1901.............. .. . .
1902....................
1903.........................
1904......................

1.198
1.535
1.297
1.340

11
.0 2

71.0
84.1
107. 7
91.0
94.0

.991
1.188
1.525
1.278
1.333

69.5
83.3
107.0
89. 7
93.6

.478
.378
.364
.355
.340

106.1
84.1
80.8
78.8
75.5

.129
.129
.126
.129
.123

119.0
119.1
115.7
118.8
113.3

1905
1906 ......................
1907
1908 ........................
1909.........................

1.325
1.267
1.358
1.615
1.625

93.0
88.9
95. 3
113.3
114.0

1.325
1.263
1.358
1.615
1.610

93.0

95.3
113.3
113.0

.323
.340
.409
.355
.350

71.8
75.6
90.8
78.9
77.8

1890.........................
1891^. ..............
1892.........................
1893....................
1894.........................

$1,061
1.475
1.192




10
.1 1

8 .6
8

72.1
58. 2
68.5
78.3

'

.122

.114
.099
.072
.071

12
1 .2

104.9
91.6
65.9
65.5

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Year or month.

Oatmeal.

1.479
1.291
1.652
1.425
1.571

103.8
90.6
115.9
100.0
110.2

.370
.406
.435

1915.........................
1916.........................
1917..........................
1918.........................
1919.........................
1920.........................

1.616
1.990
4.211
4.386
3.469
3.112

101.0
124.3
263.1
274. 0
216. 7
194.4

1.725
2.060
3.960

$4.239
4.963
3.952
4.032

121.1
144.6
277.9
325.4
259.1
264.3

1921.........................
January............
February.........
March...............
April................
May..................
June.................

1.193
1.350
1.425
1.375
1.200
1.250
1.488

74.6
84.3
89.0
85.9
75.0
78.1
92.9

2.141
2.225
2.150
2.000
1.900
2.000
2.250

July..................
A u g u st...........
September __
October............

1.350
1.100
1.063
.910
.925
.940

84.3
68. 7
66.4
56.9
57.8
58.7

2.310
2.350
2.290
2.200
2.200
1.800

N o v e m b e r

____

December.........
* No quotation.

82.3
90.3
96.8

10
0 .0

$2,475

106.0

2.695

.467
.450
.491
.704
.825
1.042

103.7
100.0
109.2
156.4
183.4
231.6

140.3
145.9
140.9
131.2
124.5
131.2
147.5

.684
.670
.693
.700
.700
.700
.700

151.5
154.0
150.1
144.2
144.2
118.1

.700
.700
.675
.650
.575
(2
)

.450

. 477

10
0 .0

$0.115

99.0

.109

.158
.177
.255
.295
.343
.318

97.4
108.7
156.9
181.5
210.8
195.8

132.3
147.0
131.9
133.3
119.5
131.5
136.5

.208
.249
.236
.222
.205
.198
.185

137.4
150.1
142.8
126.7
119.0
110.8

.189
.205
.205
.205
.201
.195

10
0 .0

$0.163

108.9

.161

3.110
3.103
4.897
5.569
4.752
5.199

125.7
125.4
197.9
225.0
192.0
210.1

152.1
148.9
153.9
155.6
155.6
155.6
155.6

3.275
3.639
3.264
3.300
2.958
3.256
3.379

155.6
155.6
150.0
144.4
127.8

3.399
3.714
3.535
3.135
2.944
2.743

10
0 .0

.080
.097
.115
.109

73.7
89.1
106.0

10
0 .0

94.2

.116

.122
.140
.217
.257
.306
.214

105.7
121.2
187.7
222.4
265.5
185.4

.136
.176
.236
.256
.202
.142

125.1
162.2
217.3
235.7
186.5
130.7

127.9
152.9
145.0
136.5
126.2
121.6
113.8

.113
.133
.129
.125
.100
.102
.097

97.7
114.8
111.6
108.3
86.9
88.6
84.0

.091
.097
.107
.102
.093
.092
.090

84.2
89.3
98.2
93.5
85.3
84.4
83.2

116.2
126.2
126.2
126.2
123.7
120.0

.093
.110
.127
.125
.115
.104

80.8
95.3
109.9
108.6
99.7
89.9

.089
.088
.084
.085
.085
.086

82.1
80.9
77.3
78.5
. 78.2
79.6

107.3

121




1.542
1.293
1.650
1.425

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

$1.601
1. 736

108. 2
90. 8
115.8
100.0
108.4

1910.........................
1911.........................
1912.........................
1913.........................
1914
..............

122

T able 9.—AVE R A G E W H OLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Foods.
(c) Other foods.

‘

Sugar.
Starch: Corn.

90° centrifugal.

AverRelaage
price
tive
per
price.
pound.

Granulated.

Tea: Formosa,
fine.

Republic, Western,
Republic, "NTn . 9
IN U
No. 2,
No. 5,
No. 2, stdiiid^rdj
sieve,
Rela­
Rela­ sifted,
Rela­ fancy,
n i V c l d crn
TTQVQ g r
d
average average tive
tive
average price per tive
price. price per
price. price per price per price.
rl U ^ C nl
A vo l
U
dozen
dozen
dozen
C IL *
E S
cans.
cans.
cans.

Rela­
tive
price.

156.0
111.7
94.9
105.1
92.3

$0,062
.047
.044
.048
.041

144.5
110.3
101.9
113.3
96.3

$0,273
.282
.301
.289
.278

110.1
113.4
121.1
116.3
112.1

.033
.036
.036
.042
.044

92.9
103.4
101.7
121.1
126.3

.042
.045
.045
.050
.049

97.4
106.1
105.4
116.4
115.2

.270
.258
.280
.296
.312

108.7
104.0
112.8
119.1
125.5

98.1
84.0
62.4
60.2
75.5

.046
.040
.035
.037
, .040

130.6
115.4
101.1
106.3
113.4

.053
.051
.045
.046
.048

124.8
118.3
104.4
108.7
111.7

.298
.285
.302
.230
.276

119.9
114.8
121.4
92.5
111.1

.755
.714
.793
.785
.818

74.0
70.0
77.8
77.0
80.1

.043
.037
.038
.041
.040

122.3
105.4
107.1
110.0
114.3

.053
.045
.047
.049
.048

123.2
105.9
108.9
115.7
111.5

.268
.235
.230
.213
.233

107.7
94.6
92.6
85.9
93.8

$0,900
.908

94.3
95,2

$1,383
1.400

86.7
87.7

.755
.828
.988

74.0
81.1
96.8

.042
.045
.042

119.7
127.4
118.9

.050
.053
.051

116.2
124.8
118.3

.240
.242
.245

96.7
97.5
98.7

.983
1.075
.950

103.0
112.6
99.6

1.383
1.500
1.625

101.8

Relative
price.

Average
price
per
barrel.

Relative
price.

1890...........................
1891...........................
1892...........................
1893...........................
1894...........................

$0.055
.060
.060
.060
.057

91.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.5

$0.792
.787
.758
.702
.719

77.7
f7 .1
74.3
68.8
70.5

$0.055
.039
.033
.037
.032

1895...........................
1896...........................
1897...........................
1898...........................
1899...........................

.055
.051
.050
.050
.050

92.3
85.5
83.3
83.3
83.3

.702
.623
.661
.665
.637

68.8
61.0
64.8
65.2
62.4

1900...........................
1901...........................
1902...........................
1903...........................
1904...........................

.050
.047
.044
.051
.053

83.3
78.3
73.3
84.5
87.5

1.001
.857
.636
.614
.770

190£.........................
1906...........................
1907...........................
1908...........................
igo9...........................

.055
.058
.060
.058
.060

92.0
96.2
100.0
95.8
100.0

1910...........................
1911...........................
1912...........................

.060
.060
.060

100.0
100.0
99.3

Aver­
age
price
per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Aver­
age
price
per
pound.

Peas.

Corn.

Average
price
per
pound.

Average
price
per
pound.




Vegetables: Canned.
Tallow:
Edible.

86.7
94.0

WHOLESALE PM CES, 1890 TO 1921,

Year or month.

Salt:
American.

....

....

.060
.062

100.0
102.8

*1.020
1.020

100.0
100.0

.035
.038

100.0
109.7

.043
.047

100.0
110.3

$0.080
.074

100.0
93.3

.248
.248

100.0
100.0

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

....
....
....
....
....
....

.065
.068
.067
.069
.069
.100

108.3
113.2
112.3
114.5
114.5
167.3

1.070
1.145
1.623
1.976
2.053
2.725

104.9
112.3
159.1
193.7
201.3
267.1

.047
.058
.063
.064
.075
.130

132.9
165.4
179.4
183.1
214.6
372.0

.056
.069
.077
.078
.089
.127

130.2
161.1
180.6
182.4
209.4
296.7

.076
.106
.165
.184
.190
.139

95.4
133.7
206.7
231.7
238.4
175.0

.240
.240
.306
.358
.353
.337

1921
....
January...
February..
March____
April........
May.........
June.........

.078
.098
.088
.083
.078
.078
.078

130.5
162.5
145.8
137.5
129.2
129.2
129.2

2.700
3.080
3.080
3.080
2.776
2.700
2.700

264.7
302.0
302.0
302.0
272.2
264.7
264.7

.047
.054
.053
.061
.054
.049
.042

134.6
153.1
150.6
173.4
154.9
139.7
120.0

.062
.076
.071
.078
.073
.063
.057

144.3
177,3
166.0
183.6
169.8
148.0
133.3

.070
.074
.070
.064
.060
.065
.060

87.4
93.1
87.6
80.9
75.1
81.7
75.4

.240
.245
.245
.245
.241
.224
.220

July.........
August___
September.
October—
November.
December.,

.078
.073
.073
.073
.073
.073

129.2
120.8
120.8
120.8
120.8
120.8

2.700
2.482
2.450
2.450
2.450
2.450

264.7
243.4
240.2
240.2
240.2
240,2

.044
.047
,043
.042
.041
.037

126.6
133.7
123.4
119.1
117.4
106.3

. 055
.058
.056
.052
.052
.050

127.9
136.5
130.9
121.5
121.1
117.1

.064
.074
.081
.080
.073
.070

80.8
92.3
102.1
100.9
91.8
88.3

.220
.220
.223
.230
.280
.290

100.0

$0,725

100.0
114.3

96.7
96.7
123.4
144.3
142.3
135.7

.781
.850
1.615
1.777
1.366
1.110

123.2
134.0
254.5
280.0
215.5
174.9

.730
.779
1.323
1.504
1.466
1.547

84.2
90.0
152.7
173.5
169.2
178.5

96.8
98.7
98.7
98.7
97.2
90.2
88.6

.875
.763
.750
.750
.800
.800
.859

138.0
120.2
118.2
118.2
126.1
126.1
135.4

1.504
1.575
1.575
1.575
1.575
1.575
1.544

173.5
181.7
181.7
181.7
181.7
181.7
178.1

.888
.933
1.019
.975
.975
1.000

139.9
147.0
160.6
153.7
153.7
157.6

1.450
1.450
1.450
1.425
1.425
1.425

167.3
167.3
167.3
164.4
164.4
164.4

88.6
88.6
89.6
92.6
112.8
116.8 ...............

1.596
1.500

$0,815

94.0

123




.954
1.091

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

1913

1914




400
375
350
325

300
275
250
225

200
175

150
125

109

75

50

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




Chart 26a.

40

to

Cn

'%ZX.

T albe 9 .—AVER AG E W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Foods.
(c) Other foods.
Vegetables:
Canned.

Average
price per
dozen
caps.

Rela­
tive

price.

Coconut: Crude.

Corn: Crude.

Cottonseed: Summer
yellow, prime.

ItalianAverage
price.
per
pound-

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price
per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price
per
gallon.

Average
price
per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$Q.345
.357
.309

57.2
84.3
60.0

1895,
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

.272
.23?
.229
.266

5Q.4
46.6
43.8
42.4
49.4

1900.
1901.
19Q2.
1903.
1904.

.356
.357
.4Q7
.398
.314

66.2

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

.270
.361
.487
.409
.440

50.0
67.0
90.3
75.8
81.6




.455
.324
,251

$1,079
.963

83.0
74.0

63.9
66.1

65.9

75.3
73.7
-58.1

Peanut:
Crude.

Olive.

Average
price per
gallop.

Average
price!
• per
pound.

Average
price
per
pound.

Edible.

Average
price per
gallon.

Soya bean: Crude-

Rela­
tive
price.

1

Rela­
tive
price.

"lS6i o i o m ‘saoTM aTvsaaoHM.

Tomatoes:
Standard New
Jersey, No. 3.

Vegetable oil.

.921
1.115
1.417
1.300
1.008

70.8
85.8
109.0
100.0
77.6

$0.120
.122

100.0
101.8

$0,061
.062

1915..................................
1916..................................
1917...................................
1918..................................
1919...................................
1920..................................

.988
1.246
1.900
2.239
2.050
1.804

76.0
95.8
146.2
172.2
157.7
138.8

.123
.151
.171
.181
.174
.174

102.7
126.2
142.3
151.0
144.9
145.3

1921..................................
January....................
February...................
March........................
April.........................
May...........................
June...........................

1.450
1.400
1.400
1.400
1.400
1.400
1.400

111.5
107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7

.101
.115
.094
.090
.095
.106
.104

July...........................
August......................
September.................
October.....................
November.................
December.................

1.500
1.500
1.500
1.500
1.500
1.500

115.4
115.4
115.4
115.4
115.4
115.4

.101
.108
.105
.103
.096
.094

i No relative price computed.




.597
.466
100.0
101.6

$0,063
.062
.073
.006

110.6
86.3
85.4
100.0
91.4

.063
.096
.145
.180
.175
.150

103.8
158.2
239.2
297.0
288.1
246.8

.068
.106
.154
.201
.241
.154

93.9
146.8
211.7
277.4
331.9
211.7

84.1
95.5
78.7
75.1
79.2
88.1
86.6

.084
.088
.085
.080
.077
.076
.078

139.0
145.6
140.5
131.6
127.2
125.9
127.8

.079
.084
.070
.062
.080
.072
.075

84.2
89.7
87.6
85.5
80.3
78.4

.077
.084
.096
.094
.091
.087

126.7
138.1
158.2
154.2
150.4
143.0

.086
.088
.099
.088
.082
.083

$2,004
2.075
2.177

100.0
103.5

$0,061
.063

100.0
102.9

$1,833
1.875
2.400
4.904
3.429
3.338

108.6
111.1
142.2
290.5
203.1
197.7

$0.110
.153
.182
.187
.135

.063
.089
.142
.183
.167
.152

102.1
145.6
232.2
298.7
272.6
247.6

109.1
115.9
96.6
85.1
82.5
98.8
103.9

2.146
3.400
2.750
2.500
2.000
2.000
1.750

127.1
201.5
162.9
148.1
118.5
118.5
103.7

.069
.069
.063
.060
.057
.060
.060

.079
.082
.066
.083
.070
.074
.078

129.7
134.0
107.2
102.1
114.4
121.6
127.1

118.3
121.0
136.1
121.9
113.7
114.6

2.250
2.250
1.750
1.750
1.750
1.600

133.3
133.3
103.7
103.7
103.7
94.8

.064
.073
.076
.085
.078
.078

.081
.087
.083
.089
.088
.090

132.0
142.0
135.3
145.4
143.0
146.2

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

1910..................................
1911...................................
1912..................................
1913..................................
1914..................................

to

-<r

Cloths and clothing.

Foods.
(c) Other foods.

(a)

Boots and shoes.

Children’s: Gun Little boys’ : Gun
metal, blucher.
metal, button.
Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pair.

Rela­ Average
tive price per
pair.
price.

Rela­
tive
price.

Youths’ .

Black vici,
button.

Gun metal,
blucher.

Average
price per
pair.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pair.

Men’s.

Calfbal.,
Good­
year welt,
dongola
top,
Rela­
average
tive
price per
price. • pair.

Black calf,
Good­
year welt,
blucher,
average
price per
pair.

Black calf, Good­
year welt, bai.
Rela­
tive
price.

$2,400
2.400
2.400
2.400
2.400

83.5
83.5
83.5
83.5
83.5

96.7
86.7
86.7
88.3
93.3

2.400
2.400
2.400
2.320
2.240

90.0
88.3
93.9
86.7
88.3

2.240
2.300
2.300
2.350
2.350

77.9
80.0
80.0
81.7
81.7

1905...........................
1906.............................
1907 ..
1908
1909.............................

.146
.170
.173
.184
.180

97.2
113.3
115.0
122. 8
120.0

2.375

1910...........................
1911
1912.............................
1913.............................
1914.............................i

.175
.199
.157
.150
.174

116.7
132.5
104.7
100.0
116.1

Rela­
tive
price.

83.5
83.5
83.5
80.7
77.9

.135
.133
.141
.130
.133

Average
price per
pair.

1890.............................
1891...................... .
1892.............................
1893...........................
1894...................

$0.156
.180
.164
.150
.150

103.9
120.0
109.5
100.0
100.0

1895........................
1896 ........................
1897....... ...................
1898...........................
1899;...........................

.145
.130
.130
.133
.140

1900 ...........................
1901.............................!
1902 ...........................
1903............................
19 04.........................




$6. i30

,

$0,833
.873

100.0
104.9

$0,970
.970

100.0
100.0

$1.019
1.019

100.0
100.0

$1.027
1.071

ioo.o
104.3

$2.570
2.775
2.800
2.800
2.950

i

82.6
89.1
89.9
89.9
94.8

96.9
3.017
96.4
3.000
98.2
3.058.
100.0
3.113
3.175 : 102.0

$3.167
3.283

100.0
103.7

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Misses’ .

Vinegar: Cider.
Year or month.
Series 1, Series 2,
average average
price per price per
gallon.
gallon.

128

Table 9 .—A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

1915.
1916.
r
1917.

....

June

.Tnly

____

A n g n s f:

Sppt.pm hp.r
Op.t.nhp.r

December...........

I 'J n v A m h f i r

.881
1.083
1.547
1.627
2.128
2.402

105.8
130.1
185.8
195.4
255.5
288.5

1.019
1.237
1.716
1.753
2.284
2.545

105.0
127.5
176.9
180.7
235.5
262.3

1.075
1.415
1.861
2.015
2.709
3.077

105.6
138.9
182.7
197.9
265.9
302.1

1.128
1.334
1.757
1.716
2.118
2.336

109.8
129.9
171.1
167.1
206.3
227.6

3.254
3.713
4.750
5.628
7.604
8.952

104.5
119.3
152.6
180.8
244.3
287.6

3.350
3.888
5.146
5.313
7.104
7.500

105.8

.230
.220
.200
.200
.200
.200
.200

206.1
197.1
179.1
179.1
179.1
179.1
179.1

1.777
1.900
1.900
1.900
1.900
1.759
1.710

213.5
228.2
228.2
228.2
228.2
211.3
205.4

1.889
2.043
2.043
2.043
2.043
1.866
1.805

194.8
210.6
210.6
210.6
210.6
192.4
186.1

2.239
2.423
2.423
2.423
2.423
2.211
2.138

219.8
237.9
237.'9
237.9
237.9
217.1
209.9

1.811
1.995
1.995
1.995
1.995
1.784
1.710

176.4
194.3
194.3
194.3
194.3
173.7
166.6

7.000
7.250
7.250
7.250
7.000
7.000
7.000

224.9
232.9
232.9
232.9
224.9
224.9
224.9

4.800
5.500
5.500
5.500
4.600
4.600
4.600

151.6
173.7
173.7
173.7
145.3
145.3
145.3

.190
.210
.240
.300
.300
.300

170.2
188.1
185. 2
268. 8
268.8
268.8

1.710
1.710
1.710
1.710
1.710
1.710

205.4
205.4
205.4
205.4
205.4
205.4

1.805
1.805
1.805
1.805
1.805
1.805

186.1
186.1
186.1
186.1
186.1
186.1

2.138
2.138
2.138
2.138
2.138
2.138

209.9
209.9
209.9
209.9
209.9
209.9

1.710
1.710
1.710
1.710
1.710
1.710

166.6
166.6
166.6
166.6
166.6
166.6

7.000
7.000
7.000
6.750
6.750
6.750

224.9
224.9
224.9
216.8
216.8
216.8

4.600
4.600
4.600
4.500
4.500
4.500

145.3
145.3
145.3
142.1
142.1
142.1

•

122.8
162.5
167.8
224.3
236.8

129




101.5
116.4
154.5
290.5
277.1
291.2

AVEBAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OP COMMODITIES.

11083°— 22— Bull. 320-

i
....................
1921.
Ja.rma.ry
Fp.hrna.ry
March
April
M a.y__

.113
.130
.173
.324
.309
.325

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Cloths and clothing.
(a) Boots and shoes.

Year or month.

Black, dress,
Goodyear
welt, side
leather.

Gun metal,
Goodyear
welt,
blucher.

Gun metal,
Goodyear
welt, bal.

Tan, dress,
Goodyear
welt, calf.

Tan, dress,
Goodyear
welt, side
leather.

Average Rela­ Average Rela­ Average Rela­ Average Rela­ Average Rela­
price per tive price per tive price per tive price per tive price per tive
pair. price.
price.
pair.
pair.
pair.
price.
pair.
price.
price.

Brogans,
split,
average
price per
pair.

Seamless
Creedmores,
average
price per
pair.

Split
seamless
Creedmores,
^-double
sole, aver­
age price
per pair.

Tan grain
blucher,
^-double
sole, aver­
age price
per pair.

Rela­
tive
price.

Vici kid,
black,
Goodyear
welt.
Average Rela­
price per tive
pair.
price.

1890..........................
1891..........................
1892..........................
1893..........................
1894..........................

$1.050
1.050
1.038
1.013
.969

73.2
73.2
72.3
70.6
67.6

$2.500
2.500
2.500
2.500
2.500 .

87.2
87. 2
87.2
87.2
87.2

1895..........................
1896..........................
1 8 9 7 .....................
1898..........................
1899..........................

.981
.994
.050
,913
.938

68.4
69.3

2.250
2.250

63.6
65.3

78.5
78.5
69.8
69.8
69.8

1 9 0 0 ..,....................
1901..........................
1902..........................
1903..........................
1904.........................

.938
,944
.931
.925
,925

65.3
65.8
64.9
64.5
64.5

1905..........................
1906..........................
1907..........................
1 0 ..........................
98
1909..........................

1.004
1.254
1,273
1.135

7Q 0
.
87.5
88.7
79.1
83.7

.2,196
2.379
2.500
2.500
2.600

76.6
83.0
87.2
87.2
90.7

1910..........................
1911..........................
1912..........................
1813..........................
19i4..........................

1.138

79.4
76.7
88.9

2.600
2.617
2
.733
2.867
2.983

90.7
91.3
95.3
106.0
104.1

66.2

10
.2 0

$2,288
2.275




ioo.o’
101.7

$55

2.121

ioo.o
108,5

$8.630
2.773

ioo.o
105,3

*$8.i67’ ioo.o
3.283 103.7

$2.038
2.275

ioo.o'
101.7

$1,100
1.063
1,231
1.385

$1.112
1.152

10
0.0
103.5

2.0 0
0
2,000
2,000
2,0 0
0
2.0 0
0
2.000
20
,0 0

. 2,008

*•69.8
69.8
69.8
69.8
70.1

01 0681 ‘SSOMM 3'WSS'SJHM,

Men’ s.

1915..........................
1916..........................
1917..........................
1918..........................
1919..........................
1920..........................

2.475
2.708
3.283
3.300
4.317
4.496

110.6
121.0
146.7
147.5
192.9
200.9

3.250
2.675
3.350
4.054
5.883
6.655

115.1
136.8
171.4
207.4
300.9
340.4

2.900
3.404
4.250
4.708
6.750
7.533

U0.2
129.3
161.5
178.9
256.4
286.2

3.350
4.008
5.683
5.650
7.771
8.142

105.8
126.6
179.5
178.4
245.4
257.1

2.475
2.883
3.700
3.783
5.083
5.338

110.6
128.9
165.4
169.1
227.2
238.5

1921..........................
January............
February..........
March...............
April.................
May...................
June..................

3.208
3.600
3.500
3.500
3.150
3.150
3.150

143.4
160.9
156.4
156.4
140.8
140.8
140.8

4,946
5.894
5.850
5.786
5,025
4.600
4.600

253.0
301.5
299.2
295.9
257.0
235.3
235.3

6.041'
6.645
6.500
6.436
6.000
6.000
6.000

229.5
252.5
246.9
244.5
228.0
228.0
228.0

5.175
5.850
5.850
5.850
5.000
5.000
5.000

195.0
184.7
184.7
184.7
157.9
157.9
157.9

3.563
3.900
3.900
3.900
3.500
3.500
3.500

July...................
August..............
September..___
October............
November.........
December.........

3.150
3.150
3.150
3.000
3.000
3.000

140.8
140.8

4.600
4.600
4.60Q
4.000
4.600
4,600

2$5.3
235.3
235.3
235.3
235.3
235.3

6.000
6.000
6.000
5.716
5.600
5.600

228.0
228.0
228.0
217.2
212.8
212.8

5.000
5.000
5.000
4.850
4. 850
4,850

157.9
157.9
157.9
153.2
153, 2
153.2

3.500
3. 500
3. 500
3.350
3.350
3.350

134.1
134.1
134.1

$2.38)
2.598

113.7
118.8
135.2
135.6
176. 8
192.9

3.104
3. 504
5.067
5.442
7.246
8.338

176.7
189.8
252.8
290.8

159.2
174.3
174.3
174.3
156.4
156.4
156.4

1.951
2.299
2.256
2.256
2,156
1. 880
1.880

144.8
170.6
167.4
167.4
160.0
139.5
139.5

6.396
6.500
6.500
6.500
6.500
6. 500
6.500

223.1
226.7
226.7
226.7
226.7
226.7
226.7

156.4
156. 4
156. 4
149. 7
149.7
149. 7

1.880
1.880
1.880
1.751
1,645
1,645

139.5
139.5
139.5
129.9
122.2
122.2

6.500
6.500
6.500
6.250
6.000
6.000

226.7
226.7
226.7
218.0
209.3
209.3

108.3
122.2

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES..

131




140.8

1.265
1.322
1.504
1.509
1.967

400
375
350

132

325

SHOES MEN’S V I KID. GOODYEAR W LT, 1090-1R2F
IC
E
W M ’S SO
O EN
LID GRAIN- 1890-1^13
W M ’S M K Y SEW
O EN
C A
ED, I9I3-I92L
(Average price in 1913*100.)

300
275
250
225

200
175
i50

125

100

75

50

40

WHOLESALE PBICES, 1890 TO 1921,




Chart 27,

400
375
350
325
300

275
250
225

200
175

150
125

100

75

50
40

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

133




Chart 27a.

T able 9 .—AVER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Cloths and clothing.
(o) Boots and shoes.

(&) Cotton goods.

Women’s.

Denims.

Calicp.

Gun
Good­
metal,
Good­
year
welt,
year
Rela­
welt,
kid,lace, tive
average
Average Rela­ button, price per price.
average
price per tive price per
pair.
pair.
price,
pair.

Patent leather
Gun
pump, McKay
metai,
McKay
sewed.
sewed,
MeKay
sewed, kid, lace, Rela­
tive
button, average
average prioe per price. Average Rela­
price per
price per tive
pair.
pair
pair.
price.

Cocheco Ameri­
can
prints,
Rela­
average standard tive
prints,
price
average price.
per
price per
yard.
yard.

Amoskeag,
average
price
per
yard.

Massa­
chusetts, Rela­
average tive
price
price.
per
yard-

i

= ***«?6

lilt!

Black kid, lace,
Goodyear welt.

1890........................
1891........................

73.9
69.6
67.4
65.2
65.2

$0,065
.058
.065
.063
.055

114.5
101.3
114. 5
110.1
96.6

$0.118
.114
.114
.118
.110

82.9
80.7
80.7

.850
.850
.850
.850
.850

73.9
73.9
73. 9
73.9
73.9

.053
.053
.050
.045
.048

92.5
92.5
88.1
79.3
85. i

.099
.099
.093
,090
.090

69-7
69.7
65.7
@3.3
63.2

1900........................
19Q1........................
1902........................
1903........................
1904........................

.904
.854
.863
.888
.918

78.6
74.3
75.0
77.2
79. 9

.053
.050

92.5
88.1
88.1
88.8
93.2

.107
.105
.105
.113
.122

75.7
73.8
74.1
79.5
85.9

19 05,..,.................

.977
1.031
1.006
.969
1.040

85.0
89. 7
87. 5
84. 2
90.4

.052
.055

$0,050
.060
.052
,048

91.1
96.9
U7. 8
101.6
94,5

.108
.123
.138
.116
.125

76.4
87.0
97-5
8j.9
88.4

1.023
1.017
1.090
1.150

88. 9
88. 4
94. 7
100.0
105.0

.053
.050
.050
.051
.049

103.9
97.6
97. 6
100.0
96.5

.145
.138
.136
.142
.140

102.3
97.2
95.7
100.0
98.8

i m , ......................

189B........................
1894........................

$0.850
.800
.775
.750
.750

1895........................
1805........................
1807........................
1898........................
1899........................

1907
ioOR
1909........................
1910........................
1911........................
1912........................
1913........................
1914........................

$3.000
3.000




100.0
100.0

$2.175
2.275

100.0
104.6

...

$1.659
1.741

.0 5 0

,Q5Q
,053

$1.375
1.458

100.0
106.1

77.6

‘To6I ©I 0681 ‘5333KM HlySaTOHAt

Year or month.

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

3.000
3.442
4.496
4.375
6.596
7.663

100.0
114.7
149.9
145. 8
219.9
255.4

1921
....
January...
February..
March.......
April........
May..........
June..........

5.063
5.500
5.500
5.500
5.000
5.000
5.000

July..........
August___
September.
October. . .
November.
December.

5.QO
O
5.000
5.000
4.750
4.750
4.750




2.350
2.763
3.500
4.204
5.879

$6,671
7.643

108.0
127.0
160.9
193.3
270.3
309.8

168.7
183.3
183. 3
183.3
166.7
166.7
166.7

5.917
7.000
7.000
6.871
6.000
5.884
5.600

239.8
283.5
283.5
278.4
243.0
238. 4
226.9

166,7
166.7
166. 7
158.3
158.3
158.3

5.600
5.600
5,600
5.352
5.250
5.250

226.9
226. 9
226. 9
216. 8
212.7
212.7

1.850
2.333
3.250
3.708
5.029

111.5
140.7
195.9
223.6
303.2
359.6

1.500
1.908
2.750
2.938
4.079
4.866

109.1
138.8
200. 0
213. 6
296.7
353.9

.049
.064
.094
.162
.152
.144

95.3
124. 5
183.6
316.2
298.2
281.2

5.936
5.500
5.355
5.000

267.1
308.1
304.4
301.1
278.9
271.7
253.7

4.008
4.250
4.250
4.250
4.250
4.177
4.000

291.5
309.1
309.1
309.1
309.1
303.8
290.9

.088
.090
.090
.090
.090
.088
.088

5.000
5.000
5.000
4.823
4.750
4.750

253.7
253.7
253.7
244.7
241.0
241.0

4.000
4.000
4.000
3.716
3.600
3.600

290.9
290.9
290. 9
270.3
261.8
261.8

.088
.088
.088
.088
.088
.088

$5,975
7.086
5.266
6.073
6.000

.164

$0.149
. 228
. 299
.368
.352
.460

115.9
177.6
232.4
286.4
273.8
358.0

173.0
175. 9
175. 9
175. 9
175. 9
171.6
171.6

.178
.176
. 176
.176
. 176
. 176
. 174

138.5
137.2
137.2
137.2
137.2
137.2
135.2

171.6
171.6
171. 6
171.6
171.6
171.6

.167
. 166
. 173
. 183
.196
.196

129.6
129.2
134.2
142.2
152.4
152.4

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

.....
.....
.....
....
....
....

00
OX

WHOLESALE PKICES, 1890 TO 1921,




Chart 28,

; s

375
325
300

275
250
225

200
175

150

125

IOO

75

50

4ft

187:




400
350

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OP COMMODITIES.

s a S s sa t

Chart 28a.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921-Contiimed.'

ggj

T able 9 .—

Cloths and clothing.
(*>) Cotton goods.
Drillings: Brown.

Ginghams.

Flannel.

Pepperell.
Stark A.,
average
price per
yard.

Massachu­
setts D
standard,
average
price per
yard.

Colored, 2f yards
to the pound.
Unbleached,
tive
price.

Average
price per
yard.

Rela­
tive
price.

73.7
69.1
61.6
64.8
57.8

$0.08$
.08$

86-4
80. 4
82-7
71.6

.049
.052
.046
.044
.046

56-4
60.1
53.3
50.3
52.6

5073

73.6
71.1
69.9
75.2
88.3

.054
.053
.054
.058
,066

ig g .
1907.
1908.
1909.

.072
.078
.083
.071
.074

87.6
94.2
100.2
85.8
89.7

,063
.074
.07$
.072
.079

1910.
1911.
1912.

.083
.082
.080

100.0

Average
price per
yard.
1890.
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895,
1899
1897.

1898

Rela­
tive
price.

80.068
.065
.058
.059
.056

83.0
79.2
70.7
71.7
67.9

$0,064
.060
.054
.050
.050

.058

04.3
69.6
63.8
62.3
62.0

.0 5 7

.068
.051

1899.

.051

1900.
1901.
1902.
1908.
1904,

.061
.059
.058

im.

.062

1913.

.082

1914.

.079




100.2
97.5

100.0

95.9

the pound,
average price
per yard.

Unbleached, 8.80
yards to the pound.
Average
price per
yard.

Lancaster.

Atnoskeag.

Rela­
tive
yard.

Average
price per
yard.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
yard.

80.9

$0,063
.063
.065
.063
.049

90.2

97.1
74.6

$0,069
.070
.070
.064
.050

112.0

loo. o
loo-o

Rela­
tive
ptice.

.077

.065
.065
.058
.058
.062

64.2
64.2
56.8
56.8
61.1

.053
.055
.055
.040
.051

69.4
69-4
58.5
64.1

66.8

.047
.047
,044
.043
.048

71.7
72-6
67.4
06.3
73.4

.050
.050
.049
.049
.052

80.3
80.9
79.9
79.0
83.3

.074
.064
.065
.074
.089

72.9
64.2
72.6
87.4

.057
.058
.05$
.063
.072

71.6
72.6
72.6
79.4
91.3

.052
.049
.052
.055
.055

79.2
75.4
80.5
84.6
84.3

.055
.053
.058
.058
.056

89.0
85.9
93.0
93.0
90.0

72.9
85.3
90.1
82.7
90.5

.083

80.9
82.1
72.6
69.4

62-4
61.3
62-1
66.9
75.8

$0,082
.081
.079

66.6

$0,069
.009
•
005
.058
.055

.085
.092
.099
.083
.075

84.3
91.1
97,5
81.8
74.4

.068
.072
.080
.070
.063

86.0

.052
.057
.066
.055
.059

79.2
86.9

101.0

101.2

.052
.059
.069
.057
.060

111.6

.090

88.8

.100
.100
.101
.102

98.7
99.1

.075
.076
.075
.079
.078

98.7
97.9
95,5
100.0

92.6

,084

.073
.068

68.2

100.0

100.4

91.3
87.9
79.9

94.7
96.3
95.2
100.0

97.9

.070
.068
.063
.065
.063

84.3
90.5

107.7
104.8
96.2
100.0

96.2 I

.066
.065
.060
.062
.060

113.3
113.3
103.2
81.6

83.7
95.8
92.7
96.4
106.8
,104.5
97.1
100.0

96.6

*i® ox oeei ‘saorax irivsarcoHJA
6T

Year or m outh.

.064
.081
.128
.180
.189
.221

98.2
125.1
196.8
277.2
290.9
340.6

.059
.074
.114
.177
.177
.218

96.1
120.4
184.9
286.6
286.1
352.7

183.2
320.8
196.8
158.1
160.4
160.4
160.4

.152
.240
.240
.175
.121
.121
.121

204.6
323.6
323.6
235.9
163.5
163.5
163.5

.119
.105
(*)
C
2)
.108
•108
.108

182.3
161.5

198.2
198.2
198.2
198.2

166.2
166.2
166.2

.123
.123
.123
.123
(2)
(2
(2)

160.4
160.4
172.3
182.6
182.6
182.6

.121
.121
.133
.143
.143
.143

163.5
163.5
178.9
192.2
192. 2
192.2

.108
.108
.135
.135
.135
.135

166.2
166.2
207.7
207.7
207.7
207.7

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

.069
.092
.157
.224
.237
.291

84.3
111.4
190. 6
271.9
288.2
353.8

,066
.095
.163
.241
.225
.274

80.2
114.9
197.4
291.2
271.8
330.8

.083
.119
.182
.321
.288
.443

81.4
117.7
179.2
317.2
284.4
436.9

1921...............................................
January.................................
February...............................
March.................................
April......................................
M ay........................................
June.......................................

.126
.141
.134
.125
.115
.115
.115

153.6
171-7
162.3
151. 5
139. 7
139.7
139.7

.125
.146
,140
.129
.117
.110
.107

150.9
176.2
168.7
155.6
141.4
133.0
128.8

.186
.325
.199
.160
.163
.163
.163

July........................................
August.............................. v..
September.............................
October,.............................. .
November.............................
December.......... ...................

•111
•110
.128
.144
.145
.134

134.9
134.0
155. 9
175.0
176.2
162.7

.103
.103
.117
.143
.143
.142

124.4
124.4
141.4
172.6
173.0
171.2

.163
.163
.175
.185
.185
.185

2No quotation.

i

139




.068
.086
.134
.259
.235
.339

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

$0,317

86.0
108.2
169.4
327.3
296.5
428.1

1915...............................................
1916...............................................
1917...............................................
191$.............................................
1919...............................................
1920...............................................

140

T able 9 .—AVER AGE W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Cloths and clothing.
(a) Cotton goods.
Hosiery.

Muslin: Bleached, 4-4.

Twothread,
average,
price per
dozen
pairs,
Septem­
ber
price.

Single­
thread,
average,
price per
dozen
pairs,
Septem­
ber
price.

Single­
thread,
carded
yarn,
average
price per
dozen
pairs.

Women’s.
Fruit of the
Loom.
Seamless, single-thread.
Silk
Combed
mercer­
Full
yarn,
fash­
ized,
fast
26 to 28
16-ounce,
mock
black, Rela­ ioned,
26-ounce, 220 needles,
combed seam, Rela­ ounce, 160 to
176
188
176 needles, needles,
combed
220
tive
yarn,
needles, tive
Rela­ Average Rela­
yarn,
average
tive price per tive
average price. price per needles, price. average price average * average
per dozen price per
average
price per
price. yard. price.
price per
pairs,
dozen price per
dozen
dozen
dozen
September
dozen
pairs.
pairs.
pairs.
pairs.
price.
pairs.

102.7
102.7

145.6
133.9
128.1
125.2
116.4

$0.085
.080
.081
.083
.073

97.1
91.8
92.9
95.6
83.6

$0.085
.082
.081
.083
.073

96.8
94.2
93.0
95.4
83.3

1.875
1.875
1.850
1.800
1.750

101.4
101.4
100.0
97.3
94.6

.858
.784
.760
.711
.735

101.9
93.2
90.2
84.4
87.3

.070
.070
.064
.058
.064

80.5
80.0
73.7
67.1
74.0

.070
.069
.063
.060
.063

79.8
78.5
72.6
68.3
71.7

80.8
70.7
75. 7
80. 8
80.8

1.900
2.000
1.850
1.875
1.800

102.7
108.1
100.0
101.4
97.3

.760
.662
.735
.809
.760

90.3
78.6
87.3
96.1
90.3

.075.075
.076
.077
.080

86.5
86.2
86.9
88.2
92.2

.073
.074
.074
.076
.080

83. 8
84.5
84.9
86.5
91.2

80.8
83. 9
93. 2
87.4
94.5

1.750
1.900
2.025
1.775
1.775

94.6
102.7
109. 5
95.9
95.9

.784
.760
.833

93.2
90.3
99.0
93.2
94.4

.075
.082
.112
.091
.091

86.0
93.9
128.4
104.9
104.4

.074
.081
.103
.087
.088

84.6
92.4
117.4
100.1
100.7

$1.274
1.176
1.078
1.054
.980

131.3
121.2
111. 1
108.6
101.0

$1.900
1.900

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

.907
.833
.784
.735
.735

93.4
85. 8
80. 8.
75. 7
75.7

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

.784
.686
.735
.784




$0,637
.637
.637
.662
.735

(New
Aver­ construc­
age
tion), Rela­
price average tive
per
price.
yard. price per
yard.

$1.225
1.127
1.078
1.054
. .980

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.

Lonsdale.

$0,800
.750
.810

$0,850
.800
.810

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Men’ s.

93.7
93.2
96.7
100.0
98.7

1.831
1.844
1.850
1.795
1.791

99.0
99.7
100.0
100.0
99.8

.813
.825
.854

$1.035
1.533
1.904
2.106
2.688

102.0
128.7
190.6
236.7
261.8
334.1

1.782
2.102
2.522
3. 739
4.365

.871
1.142

$4.306
5.684

99.3
117.1
140.5
208.3
243.2
321.0

1921..........................
January............
February..........
March...............
April.
May...................
June..................

1.654
1.750
1.750
1.600
1.600
1.600
1.600

205.7
217.5
217. 5
198.8
198. 8
198.8
198.8

2.627
3.271
3.200
2.666
2.280
2.334
2.400

148.4
184.8
180.7
150.5
128.9
131.8
135.6

1.792
1.850
1.850
1.750
1.750
1.750
1.750

July .................
August
___
September........

1.600
1.600
1.650
1.700
1.700
1.700

198.8
198.8
205.1
211.3
211.3
211.3

2.461
2.500
2.500
2.558
2,600
2.750

139.1
141.3
141.3
144.5
146.9
155.4

1.750
1.750
1.750
1.850
1.850
1.850

.804
.800
.829
.858
.847

1915..........................
1916 .
..............
1917..........................
1918
....................
1919 ........................
1920 ........................

.875
1.104

October ............
Novem ber .
"December..........

.092
.087
.083

105.4
99.4
95.3

$0,084
.078
.079

102.2
95.0
95.3

10
0 .0

.0 8 5

98.6

.091

106.3

.083

102.8

101.5
$1,283 133.0
1. 817 188.3
2.104 218.1
2.350 •243.6
3.125 323.9

.077
.094
.145
.230
.270
.344

89.9
110.3
169.5
269.5
316.6
402.7

.073
.089
.139
.230
.243
.295

90.0
110.6
172.4
284.4
301.0
365.3

185.7
191.8
191.8
181.4
181.4
181.4
181.4

.166
.165
.166
.166
.166
.152
.152

194.0
193.9
195.0
195.0
195.0
178.2
178.2

.149
.154
.152
.152
.152
.149
.137

184.2
190.8
188.0
188.0
188.0
183.9
169.8

181.4
181.4
181.4
191.8
191.8
191.8

.152
.156
.167
.190
.187
.166

178.2
182.3
195.5
222.7
219.1
195.0

.137
.137
.139
.162
.162
.154

169.8
169.8
171.8
200.1
200.1
190.2

.8 5 8

.846

10
0 .0

.089

.081

10
0 .0

141




94.7
96.1
99.5

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OP COMMODITIES.

iQin
..............
1911
...............
1912 ........................
1913..........................
1914..........................

g fi

T able 9 .—
-AVERAGE W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Cloths and clothing.
(b) Cotton goods.

Year or month.
New York
Mills, *
1890-1905;
Williamsville, A l,
1906-1909,
average
price per
yard.

Wamsutta
<0>
Rough
XX.
Rider,
aver­ Rela­
age
tive Aver­
price price. age
Rela­
per
price tive
per price.
yard.
yard.

Average
price
per
yard.

4-4, Pep­
4-4, Indian
4-4, Massa­
pered R.
Head.
chusetts
4-4,
28-inch, 27-inch,
Stark mills, Fly­
aver­
A, aver­ ing Horse
age
Rela­ aver­
Rela­
age
brand,
Aver­
age
price
tive
tive Aver­
price
average
price
per
Rela­
Rela­ age
price.
price. age
per
price
per
price tive price tive
yard.
yard.
per
per price. per price. yard.
yard.
yard.
yard.
88.6 $0,073
.073
78.0
.065
89,9
.068
86.2
72,9
.060

86.1 $0,064
86.3
.060
77.0
.057
80.6
.058
71.0
.053

87.3
81.4
77.6
79.5
72.4

.029
.026
.025
.021
.027

75.9
68,4
66,0
54, 6
72,4

.059
.062
.059
.054
.054

69.5
73.9
69- 8
64.1
64.6

.053
.056
.053
.048
.050

72.2
76.1
71,6
64.8
08,8

86,4
78.3
79. 2
87.2
82.5

.031
.028
,031
.032
.033

81,7
74,8
82.0
85,4
88,3

.062
.063
.063
.068
.080

74.0
74.9
74.2
80.9
95.2

.059
.059
.057
.060
.007

80.8
80.8
77.6
81,7
91.3

.094
.103
.110
.112
. 106

84.8
92.5
98.5
100.2
94.7

.031
,036
.048
.034
.036

82.8
96,0
126.0
88.9
95.2

,076
.080
.084
.078
.075

90.0
95.2
99,2
92.5
89,3

.064
.069
,075
.068
.069

87.0
93.4
101.8
93.2
93.9

.114

101.9
98.9
'93.5

.038
,035
.038

101.6
92.6
101.1

.084
'.088
.081

99.2
104,4
95.7

,073
.068
.069

93.2
94.1

.097
.095
.094
.081
.089

86.8
85.1
83,7
7^2
79.9

.....

.078
.073

98.0
101,8
96.2
90. 2
83.5

1900......... .................
1901
1902
1903
1904

.079
.076
.077
.085
.083

90.4
87.5
88.1
97.8
95,6

.097
.088
.089
.097
.092

1905
1906
1907
1908
1009

.085
.095
. 116
.094
.088 $0,083

97,6
108.9
133. 8
108.0
100.7

1910

.085
.079
.079

102.3
95.9
95.0

1898
1896
1897
1898
1899 .

$0,097
.097 ..........
.093
.093
.089
.085
.089

..

1^11

1912...........................




.

L .L ., Rela- ,
aver­ tive
age price.
price
per
yard.

.051
.049 ....... $6*058’
.057
.062
.072

$0,033
.029
.034
.033
.028

■

4-4,
Ware

Shoals

.051
.051
.045
.042
.045

90-5 . . . . . . . .
90.3
87.1
87.8
85.0

*

Law­
rence
L. L.,
aver­
age
price
per
yard.

$0.066
.059
.055
.057
.052

111.4 $0.101
111. 1 . 101
1Q7.1 .097
106. 4
.098
101.8
.095

1890 . . .
1891.
1899
1898.
1894

Sheetings: Brown.

Print cloths.

.111

.104

99.7

,

UP. 5
99.4
91.2
96.1
87.2
85.8
85.5
75.7
71,0
75.5
85.0
82.7
81.4
89.7
102.9

,073
.077
.078 $0.065
.052
.056
,061 $0.005
.058
.061

104.3
110.3
111. 8
89.7
97.0
105.4
93.7
98.5

"im oi 068T ‘saoraa aravsaTOHiK.

Percale: Scout,
36-inch.

Muslin: Bleached: 4-4.

100.0

1913
1914

............................................................
080 100.0
.....
080
99.5

.112
.112

100.0
100.0

$0.068
.068

100.0
100.0

$0. 035
.030

100.0
88.1

.084
.080

100.0
94.8

.073
.069

100.0
93.5

.061
.056

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

071
091
,150
225
,246
,268

87.9
113.3
187.5
281.1
306.4
333.7

.100
.125
.196
.302
.357
.477

89.6
112.2
175.7
270.1
319. 5
426.7

.063
.087
.132
.223
.218
.198

93.0
129.0
196.0
329.6
323.0
293.8

.029
.042
.066
.113
.099
.126

83.5
121.5
192.2
327.5
287.0
363.8

.068
.088
.145
.235
.232
.288

80.9
104.7
171.6
279.3
275.1
342.5

.061
.083
.136
.201
.193
.218

82.7
113.1
185.1
274.6
262.6
297.3

.052
.072
. 118
.195
.168
.211

84.0
117.6
192.7
317.3
273.5
343.5

1921

.....

,135
,133
,126
,126
.126
.129
,129

168.8
166.3
157.2
157.2
157.2
160.2
160.2

.286
.290
.284
.284
.284
.284
.284

256.1
259.5
254.4
254.4
254.4
254.4
254.4

.129
.125
.128
.128
.128
.125
.125

191.0
185.2
188.9
188.9
188.9
185.2
185.2

.051
.058
.053
.045
.043
.043
.043

148.7
167.5
153.0
130.4
124.1
124.1
124.1

.131
.133
.133
.133
.133
.133
.133

156.1
157.4
157.4
157.4
157.4
157.4
157.4

.114
.121
.118
.113
.100
.100
.100

155.8
165.6
160.3
154.2
136.4
136.4
136.4

.087
.095
.093
.087
.076
.074
.071

142.2
155.2
150.8
141.9
124.3
119.9
115.8

.138
,141
,145
,146
,146
,141

172.3
175.4
180.8
181.4
181.4
175.4

.284
.284
.287
.289
.289
.289

254.4
254.4
256.7
258.8
258. 8
258.8

.125
.125
.125
(3)
.143
.143

185.2
185.2
185.2

.043
.047
.058
.064
.060
.058

124.3
136.8
168.4
185.5
173.9
167.5

.133
.098
(2)
.140
.140
.140

157.4
115.8

.100
.100
.127
.135
.135
.122

136.4
136.8
172.9
184.2
184.2
166.4

.071
.072
.093
.103
.105
.107

115.8
117.6
151.6
167.6
171.7
173.5

8 No quotation.

166.3
166.3
166.3

143




211.1
211.1

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

January...
February..
March........
April.........
May...........
June..........
July...........
August___
September.
October...
November.
December.

91.2

144

T able 9 .—A V E R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Cloths and clothing.
(&) Cotton goods.
Underwear.
Year or month.

Men’ s shirts and
drawers.

Average
price per
12 gar­
ments.

Yarns: Carded.

Women’s union
suits.

Average
price per
12 suits.

White, mulespun, northern,
cones, 10/1.

White, mulespun, northern,
cones, 22/1.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

80.4
79.6
79. 6
79.6
79.6

$0.179
. 179
. 189
. 181
.152

80.9
81.1
85.2
81.7
68.8

$0.221
.224
.230
.214
.180

89.2
90.7
92.9
86.4
72.6

.031
.931
.031
.031
.031

79.6
78. 8
77. 8
77. 8
77.8

.148
. 148
.145
.146
. 141

66.7
67.0
65.6
65. 8
63.6

.182
.184
. 179
.179
.176

73.3
74.5
72.2
72.4
71.1

1900 ........................
1901 ..............
1902........................
1903 ......................
1904.........................

.037
.037
.037
.037
.037

94.9
94. 9
94.9
94.9
94.9

.185
. 159
. 154
. 187
.198

83.6
71.6
69.5
84.5
89.5

.228
. 193
. 182
.216
.228

92.2
77.9
73.5
87.1
92.1

1905........................
1906.........................
1907.........................
1908............ .............
1909.........................

.037
.037
.042
.041
.039

94.9
94.9
108.6
104.1
100.0

.173
.200
.220
.178
.197

78. 3
90.6
99.6
80.3
88.9

.204
.230
.257
.210
.226

82.3
93.1
103.9
85.0
91.3

Average
price per
spool.

Rela­
tive
price.

$0.032
.031
.031
.031
.031

1895 ....................
1896.........................
1897.........................
1898 ......................
1899.........................

1890
1891 ....................
1892 .................
1898
1894......................




Rela­
tive
price.

Rela­
tive
price.

Twisted,
Eastern,
Southern, Twisted,
2-ply for ordinary for Rela­ peeler cones ordinary for Rela­
for weaving, weaving,
weaving,
weaving,
tive
tive
16/2, aver­ 20/2, aver­ price. 50/2, aver­ 40/2, aver­ price.
age price
age price,
age price
age price
per pound. per pound.
per pound. per pound.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1880 TO 1921.

Thread: 6-cord,
200-vard spools,
J.& P . Coats,
freight paid.

1910
1911
1912

............
..........

.039
.039
.039

.233
.210
.201

100.0
100.0

100. 0
100. 0

105.4
95.1
90.8

.252
.235
,228

101.8
94.8
92.2

100.0

$8.250

100.0

.221

100.0

.248

100.0

$0.215

100.0

$0.501

4.250

100.0

8.250

100.0

.197

88.9

.218

88.0

. 191

88.7

.488

.036
.037
.043
.051
.055
.098

91.6
93.6
108.9
130.4
140.6
249.5

4.188
4.609
6.677
13.029
11.461
13.521
7.699

98.5
108.5
157.1
306.6
269.7
318.1

8.250
9.031
12.292
18.021
17.846
22.632

100.0
109.5
149.0
218.4
216.3
274.3

.173
.265
.397
.599
.534
.625

78.0
119.6
179.4
270.5
241.3
282.2

.198
.297
.449
.662
.596
.703

80.0
120.0
181. 2
267. 5
240. 8
283.8

. 167
.268
.389
.643

$0,694
.621
.719

77.5
124.3
180.6
298.7
267.0
309.5

.441
.706
.933
1.176

1921.........................
January............
February.........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June.................

.069
.077
.076
.076
.076
.076
.076

175.3
196.4
193.6
193.6
193.6
193.6
193.6

8.500
8.000
7.758
7.375
7.375
7.375

181.1
200.0
188.2
182.5
173.5
173.5
173.5

14.917
15.500
14.500
14.500
14.500
14.500
14.500

180.8
187.9
175.8
175.8
175.8
175.8
175.8

.290
.288
.278
.245
.239
.249
.255

131.2
130.1
125.4
110.6
107.9
112.6
115.0

.331
.336
.321
.283
.278

133.6
135.6
129. 8
114. 2
112. 2
115.4
116.7

.273
.287
.279
.236
.220
.224
.226

July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November........
December.........

.076
.058
.058
.058
.058
.058

193.6
148.7
148.7
148.7
148.7
148.7

7.375
7.375
7.750
8.000
8.000
7.500

173.5
173.5
182.3
188.2
188.2
176.5

14.500
14.500
16.000
16.000
16.000
14.000

175.8
175.8
193.9
193.9
193.9
169.7

.241
.259
.345
.383
.366
.339

108.9
116.9
155.7
173.2
165.2
153.2

.279
.303
.396
.421
.397
.382

112.6
122. 3
160.0
170.2
160.2
154.2

.216
.247
.334
.359
.337
.316

.039

11083°— 22— Bull. 320-

.038

1915.........................
1916.........................
1917.........................
1918.........................
1919.........................
1920.........................

97.5

$0,900
.921
1.421

88.0
140.9
186.4
234.9
240.3
370.9

117.7
123.4
120.1
101.6
94.7
96.5
97.1

.422
.404
.402
.356
.335
.342
.358

109.9
105. 5
105.0
92.8
87.6
89.3
93.5

93.2
106.3
143.7
154.4
144.9
135.9

.342
.383
.485
.580
.546
.527

89.3
99.8
126.6
151.3
142.3
137.4

145




100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

$4.250

95.7

1913...........................

1914.........................

9 . — AVER AG E

146

T able

W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Cloths and clothing.
(c) Woolen goods.
Flannels: White,
4-4, Ballard Vale,
No. 3.

Suiting.

Overcoating.

Average
price
per yard.

Rela­
tive
price.

Kersey:
27 to 28
ounce,
average
price per
yard.

Soft faced:
Black,
plain twill,
24-ounce,
average
price per
yard.

Clay worsted:
Diagonal,
12-ounce.
Rela­
tive
price.

Clay worsted:
Diagonal,
16-ounce.

Middlesex.

Average Rela­
tive
price
per yard. price.

Average Rela­
tive
price
per yard. price.

Indigo blue, Wool-dyed,
all wool,
blue,
Rela­
14-ounce,
16-ounce,
54-inch,
tive
55-56 inch,
price.
average
average
priee per
price
yard.
per yard.

Wash­
ington
Mills,
6700,
average
price
per yard.

11-ounce
Fulton
Mills,
3192,
average
price
per yard.

Rela­
tive
price.

$1.547
1.547
1.547

100.1
100.1
100.1
97.6
95.1

$0,910
.910
.683

97.4
97.4
73.1

68.3
63.8
68.0
81.2
83.0

1.152
1.138
1.047
1.138
1.138

74.6
73.6
67.7
73.6
73.6

.683
.614
.660
.751
.811

73.1
65.8
70.6
80.3
86.7

1.346
1.118
1.093
1.129
1.104

97.4
80.9
79.1
81.7
79,9

1.138
1.185
1.312
1.440
1.444

73.6
76.6
84.9
93.2
93.4

.810
.803
.791
.756
.774

86.7
85.9
84.7
80.9
82.9

1.301
1.474
1.403
1.339
1.485

94.2
106.7
101.5
96.9
107.5

1.530
1.710
1.710
1.575
1.575

99.0
110.6
110.6
101.8
101.8

.964
1.044
1.050
.994
1.069

103.2
111.8
112.3
106.4
114.4

1890..........................
1891..........................
1892 ........................
1893 ........................
1894..........................

10.440
.440
.437
.413
.355

94.9
94.9
94.2
89.0
76.5

1895..........................
1896..........................
1897 ........................
1898..........................
1899..........................

.308
.322
,311
.369
.375

66.5
69.4
67.2
79.5
80.9

fl. 183
1.300
1.258

67.6
74.3
71.9

$0.762
.734
.760
.917
.946

64.7
62.3
64.5
77.8
80.3

$0.945
.882
.939
1.122
1.147

1900
. ..
1901..........................
1902..........................
1903..........................
1904..........................

.410
.380
.399
.431
.443

88.4
82.0
86.0
92.9
95.6

1.575
1.500
1.500
1.575
1.650

90.0
85.7
85.7
90.0
94,3

1.082
.911
.913
.949
.924

91.9
77.4
77.5
80.6
78.5

1905..........................
1906..........................
1907..........................
1908..........................
1909..........................

.446
.461
.464
.461
.459

96.2
99.5
100.1
99.5
99.1

1. 831
2.042
1.971
1.850
1.788

104,6
116.7
112.6
105.7
102.1

1.093
1.215
1.170
1.114
• 1.238

92.8
103.2
99.4
94.6
105.1




Serge.

1.508
1.470

$i. 294

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Year or month.

1910..........................
1911..................... .
1912
....................
1913..........................
1914..................... .

.466
.430
.452
.464
.455

100.4
92.8
97. 5
ibo. o
98.1

$1.395
1.354
1.373
1.294

110.0
101.6
98.6
100.0
94.3

1.223
1.093
1.215
1.178
1.Q80

103.8
92.8
103.2
100.0
91.7

1.459
1.273
1.406
1.382
1.283

105.6
92.1
101.8
100.0
92.8

1915..........................
1916..........................
1917..........................
1918..........................
1919......... ................
1920..........................

.475
.515
.728
.882
.867
1.036

102.4
111.2
157.1
190.2
187.1
223.6

1.423
1.920
2.569
3.105
2.140
3.519

103.7
139.9
187.2
226.2
155.9
256.4

1.223
1.631
2.375
3.322
2.453
3. 826

103.8
138.5
201.7
282.1
208.3
324.9

1.481
1.996
3.125
4.262
3.150
4.995

1921..........................
January............
February..........
March...............
April.................
May..................
June..................

.820
.820
.820
.820
.820
.820
.820

176.9
176.9
176.9
176.9
186.9
176.9
176.9

1.880
2.287
1.828
1.845
1.845
1. 845
1.845

137.0
166.6
133.2
134.4
134.4
134.4
134.4

2.079
2.535
2.160
2.029
2.025
2.025
2.025

176.6
215.2
183.4
172.3
172.0
172.0
172.0

July..................
August..............
September........
October............
November........
December.........

.820
.820
.820
.820
.820
.820

176 9
176.9
176.9
176.9
176.9
176.9

1.845
1. 845
1.845
1.845
1.845
1.845

134.4
134.4
134. 4
134.4
134.4
134.4

2.025
2.025
2.025
2.025
2.025
2.025

172.0
172.0
172.0
172.0
172.0
172.0

101.8
96.3
98.5
100.0
94.4

1.266
1.127
1.142
1.131
1.078

111.9
99.7
101.0
100.0
95.4

107.1
144.4
226.1
308.4
227.9
361.5

1.564
1.974
3.158
4.040
4.009
4.179

101.2
127.8
204.4
261.5
259.5
270.5

1.194
1.513
2.273
3.391
2.989
3.679

105.6
133.8
201.0
300.0
264.4
325.4

2.657
3.363
2.858
2.575
2.565
2.565
2.565

192.2
243.3
206.8
186.3
185.6
185.6
185.6

2.933
3.060
3.060
3.060
3.060
2.925
2.925

189.8
198.1
198.1
198.1
198.1
189.3
189.3

2.225
2.741
2.138
2.181
2.183
2.183
2.183

196. 8
242.5
189.1
192.9
193.0
193.0
193.0

2.565
2.565
2.565
2.565
2.565
2.565

185.6
185.6
185.6
185.6
185.6
185.6

2.925
2.835
2.835'
2.835
2.835
2.835

189.3
183.5
183. 5
183.5
183.5
183.5

2.183
2.183
2.183
2.183
2.183
2.183

193.0
193.0
193.0
193.0
193.0
193.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

147




$1. 523
1.545
1.459

1.575
1.489
1.523

29.

148

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921




C hart

29a.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,




C hart

CO

150

Table 9 .—A V E R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Cloths and clothing.

(c) Woolen goods.
Trousering.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.
1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

2 -2 1 -11*
12 1

ounce,
aver­
age
price
per
yard.

ounce,
aver­
age
price
per
yard.

Shirts and drawers.
Cotton
warp,
Merino,
Merino, Merino,
worsted
All natural, Merino,
white, white,
filling, Rela­ wool, 50 per full-fash52 per 60 per
1 -11* tive white, cent ipned, 60
1
tent
cent
ounce,
wool,
price. average wool, per cent Rela­ wool,
tive
average
price average wool,
average
average
price
per 12 price average price. price
price
per
price
per 12 per 12
per 12 per 12
gar­
yard.
ments. gar­ garments.
gar­
gar­
ments.
ments. ments.

$2,073
2.073
1.924

99.5
99.5
92.3

1.710
1.796
1.796

86.2
86.2

82.1

$24.750
25.650
25.650
25.650
21.600

Union
suits:
Merino,
natural,
40 per
cent
wool,
light
weight,
average
price per
1 suits.
2

Union
suits:
Merino,
natural,
33* per
cent
wool,
light
weight,
average
price per
1 suits.
2

Broadcloth.
CashUnion
mere1
.
suits:
Cotton
33 per Rela­
Rela­
warp,
53-54
cent
54-56
tive
tive Atlantic
worsted, price. Mills F., inches, inches, price.
average
average average
average price per price per
price per
price per yard.
1 suits.
2
yard.
yard.

100.9
106.4
106.4
106.4
90.0

91.7 $16.650
95.0 17.55Q
95.0 17.550
95.0 17.550
80.0 14.850

$0.181
.181
.179
.150
.135

80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
86.7

14.400
14.400
14.400
i4 .850
13.500

87.3
87.3
87.3
90.0
81.8

.127
.127
.137
.143
.159
.164
.159
.164
.168
.174

. 77.9
75.2
77.9
79.7
82.6

.202

95.7
102.3
108.0

2.120
2.073

101.7
99.5

21.600
21.600
21.600
21.600
23.400

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

2. 287
1.988
1.980 $2.030
2.093
2.124

109.7
95.4
95.0
97.9
99.4

23.400
23.400
23.400
23.400
23.400

86.7
86.7
86.7
86.7
86.7

14.850
14.850
14.850 $i6.200
16.200
16.200

90.0
90.0
9(L 0
90.0
90.0

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

2.233
2.413
2.447
52.494
62.484

104.5
112.9
114.4
116.7
116.2

23.400
27.000
27.000
27.000
27.000

10
0 .0
100. Q
10
0 .0
10
0 .0

86.7

16.200
18.000
18.000
18.000
18.000

10
0 .0
10
0.0
10
0 .0
10
0 .0




8 .0
6
8 .0
6

84.9
71.0
64.0

90.0

.216
.223

.2 1
1

.223

60.5
60.3
65.1

6 .1
8
75.6

10
0 .0

105.8

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Fancy worsted.

22-23
ounce,
aver­
age
price
per
yard.

Women's dress goods.

Underwear.

72.578
82.381
82.363
9 2.138
92.138

120.6 27.000
111.4 27.000
110.5 27.000 $12.690
12.690
100. 0
12.690
100.0

1915 .................
1916
............
1917 .
.........
............
1918
1919...................
1920 .................

92.211
9 2. 596 $1,941
2.348
3.465
3.512

$2,488
2.657

103.4
121.5
147.0
217.0
219.9
234.9

1921 .................
January___
February...
March.........
April..........
M a y ..........
June............

1.738
1.850
1. 850
1.850
1.750'
1.750
1.750

July............
August.......
September..
October
November.
December..

1.750
1.750
1.750
1.600
1.600
1.600
519 to 20 ounce.




12.690
13. 548
17.667
21. 560

100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0

loao

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

$8.460

8. 460

100.0

8.460

100.0

8.460
9.365
13. 854

100.0

176.5
194.6
194.6
194.6
194.6
173.2
173.2

269.6
269.6
269.6
269.6
269.6
269.6

2.279
2.279
2.279
2.279
1.976
1.976

173.2
173.2
173.2
173.2
150.2
150.2

155.8
155.8
155. 8
155. 8
155.8
155.8

26.460
26.460
26.460
26.460
26.460
26.460

154.6
154.6
154.6
141.4
141.4
141.4

30.500
30.500
30.500
30.500
30.500
30.500

ns

s 17 to 18 ounce.

1.172
1.484
2.079
2.530

2.321
2.558
2.558
2.558
2.558
2.279
2.279

26.950
28. 420
28. 420
28. 420
26. 460
26.460
26.460

30.583
31.500
30.500
30.500
30.500
30. 500
30.500

$1.039

274.6
289.4
289.4
289. 4
269.6
269.6
269.6

156.3
160.9
155. 8
155. 8
155. 8
155.8
155.8

153.5
163.4
163.4
163.4
154.6
154.6
154.6

108.2
103.5
103.5
100.0
95.3

$3,054
3.451
3.676

$23. 520
23. 520
46. 223

$33.250
30.000
33.500

$12. 021
17.588

.228
.218
.218
.211
.201

107.6
136.2
190.8
232.2
262.4
279.6

110.7
163.8
239.6
239.6
470.8

106.8
139.2
169.9
153.2
171.3

« 18 to 19 ounce.

18.000
18.000
18.000

s 16£ to 17| ounce.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OP COMMODITIES,

1910...................
1911...................
1912...................
1913
.............
1914
............

Ox

1.52

Table 9.—AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Cloths and clothing.
(c) Woolen goods.
Women’s dress goods.

Cashmere: Cashmere:
10-11 twill, 8-9 twill,
35-inch,
38-inch,
Atlantic
Atlantic
Mills,
Mills J.,
average
average
price per
yard.

French
serge:
35-36
inches,
average
price per
yard.

Franklin
Rela­ sackings:
tive 54-inch,
average
price. price per
yard.

Poplar
Storm
Alpaca:
Cashmere:
serge:
Panama
cloth:
22-inch,
22-inch,
Worsted Rela­
cloth:
Double Rela­
Hamilton, filling,
warp,
54-inch,
tive Hamilton,
tive
average
average
36-inch, price.
average 50-inch,
price per
price per average price. price per
average
yard.
yard.
yard.
price per
price per
yard.
yard.

Danish
cloth:
Worsted
filling,
22-inch,
average
price per
yard.

Silician
cloth:
50-inch, Rela­
tive
average price.
price per
yard.

570. t

1890
1891
1892.
1893.
1894.

$0,348
.366
.372
.325
.245

87.1
91.7
93.3
81.3
61.4

$0.594
.618
.618
.606
.489

101.8
106.0
106.0
103.8
83.8

$0,083
.083
.082
.081
.076

100.3
100.3
98.9
97.4
91.5

93.4
91.9
90.v4
87.2

1895
1896,
1897
1898.
1899,

.235
.196
.239
.257
.321

49.1
59.8
64.4

.434
.416
.424
.455
.489

74.5
71.2
72.6
78.1
93.9

.074
.071
.069
.069
.071

88.5
85.6
82.6
82.6
85.0

81.0
81.0
81.0
81.0
83.5

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904

.346
.323
.323
.332
.342

81.0
81.0
83.2
85.6

.610
.538
.558
.590
.584

104.5
92.3
95.8
101.1
100.1

.076
.076
.075
.074
.081

$0,185

91.5
91.5
90.8
89.2
97.4

1905
1906
1907
1908
1909

.373
.392
.392

93.5
98.2
98.2
92.5

.675
.687
.653

.187
.190
.191
.197
.191

98.3
100.0
100.4
103.5
100.4




$0,338
.319
.348

101.1

$0.698
.698
.704

115.7
117.8
112.0
112.0
112.9

/

.071
.071
.071
.069
.076

W‘i
..

90.4

057. U

87.7
97.1

$0.113
115
122

125

$0,349
.349
.332

99.3
105.1
107.9
107.9
102.6

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Cotton warp.

All wool.

Year or month.

..............
1910.
1911.
1912.
.............................
1913.
..............
1914.

.
1

.368
.354
.346
.344
.319

106.8
102.7
100.5
$0.305

100.0

.695
.671
.652
.624

$0.563
.500

111.5
107.6
104.5
100.0
88.9

.

.200
.199
.190
.190
.190

105.3
104.8
100.0
100.0
100.0

.338
.328
.327
.323
.281

104.6
101.5
101.0
100.0
86.9

.315
.426
.713
.897
.901
1.083

95.3
129.2
216.3
271.8
273.3
328.1

.557
.762
1.088
1.465
1.318
1.341

99.1
135.4
193.4
260.4
234.2
238.3

.193
.207
.350
.439
.422
.538

101.7
108.8
184.2
231.2
221.9
282.9

.312
.455
.569
.715
.697
.805

96.3
140.7
175.9
221.0
215.5
248.8

1921.
L
.............................
January...............
February.............
March...................
A pril.......
M ay......................
June..

.725
.946
.725
.725
.725
.725
.725

219.9
286.6
219.7
219.7
219.7
219.7
219.7

.882
1.047
.885
.885
.885
.885
.885

156.7
186.2
157.3
157.3
157.3
157.3
157.3

.360
.385
.385
.385
.385
.385
.385

189.5
202.6
202. 6
202.6
202.6
202.6
202.6

.546
.728
.535
.535
.535
.535
.535

168.9
225.1
165.4
165.4
165.4
165.4
165.4,

July......................
August...............
September............
October................
November............
December............

.725
.725
.725
.660
.650
.650

219.7
219.7
219.7
200. 0
197.0
197.0

.885
.885
.885
.824
.815
.815

157.3
157.3
157.3
146.5
144.9
144.9

.385
.325
.325
.325
.325
.325

202.6
171.1
171.1
171.1
171.1
171.1

.535
.535
.535
.518
.515
.515

165.4
165.4
165.4
160.0
159.2
159.2




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES,

1915.
.............................
1916.
1917.
.............................
1918.
).............................
1919.
).............................

Or
CO

154

Table 9 .—A V ER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Cloths and clothing.
( d ) Silk, etc.

(c) Woolen goods.
Linen shoe
thread: 10s,
Barbour.

Worsted yams.
Year or month.
2-32s,
crossbred
stock,
average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

2-40S,
2-40s,
Australian half blood,
tine,
average
average
price per
price per
pound.
pound.

2-50s,
fine domestic.
Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Relative
price.

China: Canton
filature, extra
extra A.
Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Japanese: Fila­
China: Steam
filature, best No. 1. tures, Kansai,
No. 1.
Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890......................
1891......................
1892......................
1893......................
1894......................

$1,250
1.263
1.156
1.083
.919

112.1
113.1
103.6
97.1
82.3

$1,226
1.235
1.218
1.134
.929

104.3
105.1
103.6
96.5
79.1

$0.891
.891
.891
.899
.918

99.8
99.8
99.8
100.7
102.8

$5,243
4.011
4.327
4.541
3.363

144.1
110.2
118.9
124.8
92.4

1895......................
1896......................
1897......................
1898......................
1899......................

.756
.750
.819
1.004
1.071

67.8
67.2
73.4
89.9
96.0

.743
.725
.852
1.031
1.091

63.2
61.7
72.5
87.7
92.8

.851
.851
.851
.851
.851

95.3
95.3
95.3
95.3
95.3

3.786
3.407
3.464
3.638
4.409

104.0
93.6
95.2
99.9
121.1

1900......................
1901......................
1902......................
1903......................
1904......................

1.194
1.028
1.139
1.213
1.172

107.0
92.1
102.1
108.7
105.0

1.205
1.040
1.123
1.177
1.188

102.5
88.5
95.5
100.1
101.0

.888
.891
.891
.846
.850

99.4
99.8
99.8
94.7
95.2

4.169
3.513
3.822
4.135
3.642

114.5
96.5
105.0
113.6
100.1

1905......................
1906......................
1907......................
1908......................
1909......................

1.273
1.309
1.293

$0,900
.802
.923

114.2
117.3
115.9
103.2
118.9

1.253
1.293
1.297
1.23Q
1.307

106.6
110.0
110.3
104.6
111.2

.850
.893
.893
.893
.893

95.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.991
4.163
5.060
3.890
3.840

109.7
114.4
139.0
106.9
105.5

.869
.788
.828

111.9
101.4
106.6

106.5
102.6
103.8

.893
.893
.893

100.0
100.0
100.0

3.524
3.471
3.445

.777

1.252
1.206
1.220

160.0

1.17$

100. Q

.G40

82.4

1.027

87.4

96.8
95.4
94.7
100.0
101.5

1910......................
1911......................
1912......................
1913......................
1914......................




$1,054

.981

106.0

93.1 ;

.863

100.0

$3,496

100.0

$4,463

ioo.o

3.640

.907

101.-6

3.142

89.8

4.113

92.2

3.694

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

2-40s,
X X X and
xxxx,
average
price per
pound.

Silk: Raw.

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

.............
............
............
............
............
............

.788
1.050
1.556
2.109
1.627
1.825

101.4
135.2
200.3
271.5
209.5
235.0

1921 ............
January...
February..
March......
April........
May...........
June.........

1.179
1.150
1.150
1.200
1.200
1.250
1.200

July..........
August_
_
September.
October_
_
November.
December..

1.150
1.150
1.150
1.150
1.150
1.250

$1.404
2.113
3.175
3.236
3.423

94.0
125.8
189.2
284.4
289.9
306.7

1.129
1.550
2.354
3.600
3.633
3.986

107.1
147.0
223.3
341.5
344.6
378.1

1.076
1.358
1.478
1.654
1.706
2.482

120.5
152.1
165.5
185.3
191.1
277.9

3.185
4.244
5.110
5.546
6.778
7.914

91.0
121.3
146.1
158.5
193.7
226.2

3.985
6.129
6.750
7.613
9.379
9.944

89.3
137.3
151.3
170.6
210.2
222.8

3.318
4.867
5.494
6.273
8-880
8.277

91.2
133.7
150.9
172.4
244.0
227.4

151.8
148.1
148.1
154.5
154.5
160.9
154.5

1.779
1.900
1.800
1.750
1.800
1.800
1.800

159.4
170.2
161.3
156.7
161.3
161.3
161.3

2.071
2.250
2.200
2.050
2.100
2.100
2.150

196.4
213.4
208.7
194.5
199.2
199.2
203.9

2.186
2.200
2.200
2.200
2.200
2.200
2.200

244.8
246.3
246.3
246.3
246.3
246.3
246.3

5.797
5.027
4.959
5.027
5.606
5.292
5.635

165.7
143.7
141.7
143.7
160.2
151.2
161.0

6.514
6.037
6.027
6.086
6.478
6.272
6.350

146.0
135.3
135.1
136.4
145.2
140.5
142.3

6.035
5,782
5.733
5.880
5.782
5.635
5.733

165.8
158.9
157.5
161.6
158.9
154.8
157.5

148.1
148.1
148.1
148.1
148.1
160.9

1.800
1.800
1.800
1.750
1.700
1.650

161.3
161.3
161.3
156.7
152.3
147.8

2.100
2.100
2.100
2.000
1.900
1.800

199.2
199.2
199.2
189.7
180.2
170.7

2.200
2.200
2.200
2.200
2.159
2.077

246.3
246.3
246.3
246.3
241.8
232.6

5.919
5.772
5.860
6.272
6.605
7.585

169.2
165.0
167.5
179.3
188.8
216.8

6.478
6.429
6.468
6.713
6.899
7.928

145.2
144.1
144.9
150.4
154.6
177.7

5.733
5.390
5.978
6.027
7.154
7.595

157.5
148.1
164.3
165.6
196.6
208.7

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OP COMMODITIES.

155




1.105
1.479

156

T able 9 .—A V E R A G E W H O L ESAL E PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

i
Cloths and clothing.
(d)

Fuel and lighting.

Silk, etc.

(a) Anthracite coal.

Silk: Raw.

Silk: Spun.

Broken.

Chestnut.

Year or month.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Italian:
Classical,
average
price per
pound.

Japanese:
Filatures,
special,
extra,
extra,
average
price per
pound.

Yarn: Domestic,
gray spun, 60/1.
Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Yarn: Domestic,
gray spun,
60/2, No. 1.

Yarn: Imported,
200/2, gray.

Average
price per
pound.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Rela­
tive
price.

New York
tidewater,
average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

New York
tidewater,
average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890..........................
1891..........................
1892..........................
1893..........................
1894..........................

$5,224
4.187
4.483
5.029
3.682

119.4
95.7
102.4
114.9
84.1

$3.486
3.443
3.615
3.563
. 3.417

78.4
77.5
81.3
80.1
76.9

$3.353
3.458
3.944
4.167
3.542

63.1
65.1
74.2
78.4
66.7

1895..........................
1896..........................
1897..........................
1898..........................
1899..........................

4.037
3.620
3.640
3.877
4.771

92.2
82.9
83.2
88.6
109.0

3.283
3.269
3.247
3.211
3.135

73.8
73.5
73.0
72.2
70.5

2.979
3.556
3.737
3.553
3.646

56.1
66.9
70.3
66.9
68.6

1900..........................
1901..........................
1902..........................
1903..........................
1904..........................

4.513
3.847
4.109
4.524
3.865

103.1
87.9
93.9
103.4
88.3

3.271
3.551
3. 719
4.250
4.247

73.6
79.9
83.6
95.6
95.5

3.917
4.327
4.460
4. 825
4 825

73.7
81.4
83.9
90.8
90.8

1905..........................
1906..........................
1907..........................
1908..........................
1909..........................

4.109
4.325
5.581
4.181
4.378

93.9
98.8
127.5
95.5
100.0

4.213
4.202
4.204
4. 202
4.200

94.8
94.5
946
94.5
94 5

4 823
4 860
4 820
4.821
4820

90.8
91.5
90.7
90.7
90.7

1910..........................
1911.........................
1912.........................
1913.........................
1914.........................

4.005
3.888
3.811
4.377
4.341

91.5
88.8
87.1
100.0
99.2

4.200
4.199
4.354
4.446
4.450

94.5
94.5
97.9
100.0
100.1

4 813
4 999
5.281
5.313
5.315

90.6
94.1
99.4
100.0
100.0

$3,717
3.688




100.0
99.2

$2,917
3.221

100.0
110.4

$3,467
3.779

100.0
109.0

$3,340
3.297

100.0
98.7

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Japanese:
Filatures,
Sinshin, No. 1.

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

3.372
5.017
5.667
6.' 442
8.622
8.642

90.7
135.0
152.5
173.3
232.0
232.5

1921-.................
January...
February..
March.......
April........
May..........
June..........

5.916
5. 743
5. 723
5.635
5.870
5.576
5.733

July..........
August___
September.
October. . .
November.
December.

5.674
5. 517
5.694
5. 958
6.448
7.419




3.634
5.952

$5.541
6.273
6.960
9,639
9.084

83.0
136.0
154.0
170.8
236.6
222.9

3.000
3.849
5.546
6.788
7.645
7.732

102.9
132.0
190.1
232.7
262.1
265.1

3.658
4.213
5.133
6.375
8.636
9.466

105.5
121.5
148.1
183.9
249.1
273.1

2.988 ' 89.5
4.258
127.5
5.925
177.4
7.235
216.6
8.269
247.6
6.482
194.1

159.2
154. 5
154.0
151.6
157.9
150.0
154.3

6.574
6,321
6.272
6.468
6.664
6.321
6.370

161.3
155.2
154.0
158.7
163.6
155.2
156.4

4.201
4.296
4.249
4.362
4.305
4.202
4.183

144.0
147.3
145.7
149.5
147.6
144.1
143.4

5.389
5. 847
5.847
5.678
5. 499
5. 452
5.452

155.5
168.7
168.7
163.8
158.6
157.3
157.3

4.727
4.551
4.575
3.665
4.010
4.775
4.736

152.7
148.5
153.2
160.3
173.5
199.6

6.370
5.880
6.370
6.321
7.497
8.036

156.4
144.3
156.4
155.2
184.0
197.2

4.136
4.117
4.080
4.051
4.117
4.315

141.8
141. 2
139. 9
138.9
141.2
147.9

5.170
5.255
5.170
5.085
5.085
5.151

149.1
151.6
149.1
146.7
146.7
148.6

4.655
4.631
4. 775
5.167
5.225
5.955

4. 444
4.692
5.423
6.700
7. 756
9.002

100.0
105.5
122.0
150.7
174.4
202.5

5.326
5.565
5.936
6.861
8.268
9.502

100.2
104.7
111.7
129.1
155.6
178.8

141.5
136.2
137.0
109.7
120.1
143.0
141.8

10.070
10.113
10.152
10.116
9.696
9,814
9.911

226.5
227.5
228.3
227.5
218.1
220.7
222.9

10.527
10.637
10.637
10.642
10.141
10. 241
10.360

198.1
200.2
200.2
200.3
190.9
192.7
195.0

139.4
138.7
143.0
154.7
156.4
178.3

10.009
10.112
10.250
10.243
10. 227
10.203

225.1
227.4
230.6
230.4
230.0
229.5

10.502
10.540
10.658
10.662
10.656
10.653

197.6
198.4
200.6
200.7
200.5
200.5

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

Or

400
375
350

158

Chart 30.

325
300

COAL: chestnut , teeo-igat.
STbVE, 1090-1921-.
(Average p rice In 1913=100.)

AN THRACITE

275
250

200

200

175

175

150

150

125

125

100

100

75

75

50

50

40

40




C7* S 3 8w8
w#

5 3

w*

3 !

G*

-S
:
Cm£ £9>

a § § -S'-8 8 S 8 * 8 S 5 ' 3 i 3 S I S S f i 2 9 p
®
S

•

2

WHOLESALE PBICES, 1800 TO 1021.

225

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

159




Chart 30a.

160

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Fuel and lighting.
(a) Anthracite coal.

(6) Bituminous coal.

Stove.

Egg.

Chicago.

Year or month.
Mine run,
southern
Illinois
field,
average
price1per
short ton.

Prepared- Screenings,
sizes,
southern
southern
Illinois
Illinois
field,
field,
average
average
price1 per
price1 per short ton.
short ton.

Pitts­
burgh:
Georges
Run of
Creek
mine,
Rela­ (at mine):
f. o. b.
tive
Cincin­ price. Average
nati,
price per
average
short ton.
price per
short ton.

Georges
New
Poca­
Creek:
River:
F .o . b. hontas:
F. o. b.
F. o. b.
New
Cincin­ Rela­
Norfolk, Rela­
tive
York
tive
nati,
Va.,
price. Harbor, average price.
average
average price per
price per
price per
short ton.
long ton. long ton.

1890...........................
1891...........................
1892...........................
1893...........................
1894...........................

$3,614
3.751
3.980
3.852
3.390

71.8
74.5
79.1
76.5
67.4

$3.711
3.854
4.153
4.193
3.600

73.3
76.2
82.1
82.8
71.1

$0,066
.079
.075
.076
.063

79.4
94.4
89.6
90.7
75.8

$0,863
.950
.900
.921
.821

57.2
63.0
59.7
61.0
54.4

$2,988
3.031
2.931
2.950
2.738

97.8
99.3
96.0
96.6
89.6

1895...........................
1896...........................
1897...........................
1898...........................
1899...........................

3.030
3.549
3.799
3.599
3.371

60.2
70.5
75.5
71.5
67.0

3.126
3.794
4.015
3.798
3.705

61.8
75.0
79.3
75.0
73.2

.060
.057
.057
.057
.053

71.8
68.5

.775
.900
.833
.913
1.013

51.4
59.7
55.2
60.5
67.1

2.813
2.663
2.442
2.175
2.700

92.1
87.2
79.9
71.2
88.4

1900.........................
1901.........................
1902...........................
1903...........................
1904...........................

3.584
4.057
4.367
4.825
4.823

71.2
80.6
86.8
95.9
95.8

3.945
4.322
4.463
4.825
4.825

77.9
85.4
88.2
95.3
95.3

.075
.075
.079

89.9
89.9
94.1

1.200

79.6
88.7
140.9
158.8
116.0

2.908
2.925
4.058
4.438
3.196

95.2
95.8
132.9
145.3
104.6

1905...........................
1906...........................
1907...........................
1908...........................
1909...........................

4.825
4.863
4.821
4.820
4.785

95.8
96.6
95.8
95.8
95.1

4.823
4.862
4.822
4.823
4.820

95.3
96.1
95.3
95.3
95.2

106.1

.079
.082
.085
.081

3.150
3.125
3.238
3.079
3.052

103.1
102.3
106.0

1910...........................
1911...........................
1912...........................
1913...........................
1914...........................

4.813
4. 807
5.030
5.064
5.059

95.6
95.5
99.9
100.0
99.9

4.818
4.806
5.033
5. 061
5.061

95.2
95.0
99.4
100.0
100.0

.080
.084

3.047
3.021
3.126
3.054

99.8
98.9
102.3




68.2

67.6
63.5

110.6

101.9

1.338
2.125
2.396
1.750

95.7
94.4
98.6
101.8
96.8

1.600
1.550
1.538
1.442
1.379

96.3
98.8
96.2

1.408
1.446
1.463
1.508

2.200 100.0

$

2.200

100.0

102.8

101.9
95.6
91.4
93.4
95.9
97.0

$2.413
2.400

100.0

99.5

100.8

$3.000
3.000

100.0

100.0

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

New
New
York
York
tide­
Rela­
Rela­
tide­
water,
tive
water,
tive
average price. average price.
price per
price per
long ton.
long ton.

Pitts­
burgh
(Youghiogheny):
At Cin­
cinnati,
average
price per
bushel.

....
....
....
....
....
....

5.046
5.291
5.622
6.509
7.920
9.167

99.7
104.5
111.0
128.5
156.4
181.0

5.045
5.454
5.872
6.758
8.164
9.427

99.7
107.8
116.0
133.5
161.3
186.2

$3,889
3.783
4.039
5.608

$4,267
4.008
4.367
6.068

$3.102
3.317
3.329
4.647

2.200
2.675
4.583
3.883
4.108
5.850

100.0
121.6
208.3
176.5
186.7
265.9

2.450
3.067
5.192
4.100
4.542
6.288

101.6
127.1
215.2
169.9
188.3
260.6

2.850
3.729
5.432
4.477
4.911
6.285

95.0
124.3
181.1
149.2
163.7
209.5

1921
....
January...
February..
March.......
April........
May.........
June.........

10.223
10.334
10.326
10.332
9. 831
9.934
10.034

201.9
204.1
203.9
204.0
194.2
196.2
198.2

10.554
10.637
10.638
10.638
10.138
10.291
10.390

208.5
210.2
210.2
210.2
200.3
203.3
205.3

5.428
5.740
5.690
5.530
5.545
5.545
5.545

6.015
6.360
6.640
6.280
5.970
5.970
6.095

3.884
4.195
4.058
4.558
4.095
4.031
3. 848

4.558
5.600
5.100
4.850
4.850
4.850
4.600

207.2
254.5
231.8
220.5
220.5
220.5
209.1

5.513
6.700
6.200
5.700
5.700
5.700
5.700

228.5
277.7
257.0
236.3
236.3
236.3
236.3

6.353
7.280
7.280
6.720
6.720
6.720
6.720

211. 7
242.7
242.7
224.0
224.0
224.0
224.0

July.........
August—
September.
October_
_
November.
December.

10.155
10.279
10.377
10.350
10.350
10.374

200.5
203.0
204.9
204.4
204.4
204.9

10.505
10.604
10.708
10.713
10.686
10. 706

207.6
209.5
211.6
211.7
211.1
211.5

5.295
5.289
5.245
5.245
5.245
5.245

5.945
5.945
5.745
5.785
5.770
5.745

3.675
3.643
3.588
3.570
3.588
3.790

4.600
'4.100
4.100
4.100
4.100
3.850

209.1
186.4
186.4
186.4
186.4
175.0

5.700
5.450
5.200
4.950
4.700
4.450

236.3
225.9
215.5
205.2
194.8
184.5

6.720
6.720
5.800
5.800B
)
5.000
4.750

224.0
224.0
193.3
193.3
166.7
158.3

1 No relative price computed.




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

11083°— 22— Bull. 320----- 11

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

C*

162
WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.




Chart 31,

40 0
875
350
325

300
275

250
225

200

19®

163

151?

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OP COMMODITIES.




Chart 31a.

ble 9 .—A V E R A G E W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

O*
Fuel and lighting.
(c) Other fuel and lighting.
Coke: Connellsville
furnace.

Gasoline:
Motor.

Crude.
Refined.
Average
of Safe
Home,
Kansas150° fire test,
Bird's
California.
Oklahoma. Pennsylvania. For export. water-white.
Eye, and Rela­
Search­
tive
light,
average price. Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
price per
age
Rela­ age Rela­ age Rela­ age Rela­ age Rela­
matchprice tive price tive price tive price tive price tive
man’s
per price. per price. per price. per price. per price.
gross.
gallon.
barrel.
gallon.
barrel.
barrel.
130.6
116.7
116.7
116.7

111.1

$0,868
.670
.556
.640
.839

1.750
1.750
1.750
1.750

112.5
116.7
116.7
116.7
116.7

1.358
1.179
.787
.912
1.293

55.4
48.1
32.1
37.2
52.8

108.5
80.4
110.2
119.4
67.1

1.750
1.750
1.583
1.500
1.500

116.7
116.7
105.6
100.0
100.0

1.352
1.210
1.237
1.589
1.627

93.8
109.6
115.8
70.0
82.1

1.500
1.500
1.500
1.500
1.500

100.0

1.384
1.598
1.734
1.780
1.663-

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$2,083
1.875
1.808
1.479
1.058

85.4
76.9
74.1
60.6
43.4

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

1.325
1.875
1.617
1.677
2.185

54.3
76.9
66.3
68.7
89.6

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

2.646
1.963
2.688
2.913
1.638

1905.
1908.
1907.
1908.
1909.

2.288
2.675
2.825
1.708
2.002

$1,958
1.750
1.750
1.750
1.667

1.688

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

35.4 $0.073
.069
27.3
.061
22.7
26.1
.052
.052
34.2

84.9 $0.100
.088
79.4
70.6
.079
60.5
.073
59.7
.073

86.7
71.3
64.4
58.8
58.8

.071
.070
.060
.063
.079

82.4
81.3
69.2
72.8
91.7

.092
.104
.090
.091
.102

74.8
84.3
73.0
73.7
82.3

55.2
49.4
50.5
64.8
66.4

.085
.075
.073
.086
.083

99.0
86.8
85.0
99.6
95.7

.119
. iio
.in
.136
.137

98.4
88.9
89.9
110.5
110.9

56.5
65.2
70.8
72.7
67.9

.072
.076
.082
.087
.084

83.7
88.3
95.5
100.7
96.8

.126
.130
.135
.135
.123

102.4
105.4
109.2
109.5
99.4

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Parlor, Globe,
Aver­
do­
Aver­
No. 1,
age
Rela­ age Rela­ mestic, average
price tive pnce tive average
price
per price. per price. price
snort
per 144 per 144
gallon.
boxes.
ton.
boxes.




Petroleum.

Matches.

iqm
..............
1911
..........
1912 .......... ..........
1913 ....................
1914........................

1.969
1.642
2.400
2. 440
1.808

100.0
85.7

73.2
133.0
338.2
245.9
194.2
443.4

.138
.230
.238
.242
.245
.293

82.2
136.7
141.1
143.9
145.6
174.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0 $0.350
100.0
.388

100.0 $0.934
.798
110.7

$1,410
1.410
1.410
1.464

103.9
128.9
173.7
173.7
173.7
180.3

.356
.618
.898
1.178
1.263
1.543

101.8
176.7
256.4
336.7
360.9
440.9

$0.950
.950
.950
.988
1.225
1.650

100.0
85.5

1.344
1.300
1.575
2.450
1.917

54.9
53.1
64.3
100.0
78.2

.077
.073
.084
.086
.085

89.2
84.9
97.2
100.0
98.0

.108
.093
.112
.123
.120

87.5.
75.0‘
90.6
100.0
97.3

.583
1.258
1.775
2.197
2.279
3.404

62.4
134.7
190.0
235.2
243.9
364.3

1.529
2.483
3.200
3.972
4.135
5.975

62.4
101.4
130.6
162.1
168.8
243.9

.077
.088
.102
.146
.181
.234

88.9
101.6
118.7
169.2
209.4
270.9

.121
.122
.124
.170
.200
.263

98.0
98.7
100.7
137.5
162.5
213.2

1915 ....................
1916 ....................
1917
.........
1918
.................
1919......................
1920 ....................

$3.266
3.362
3. 503
4.688

1921........................
January___
Fp.hmary
Marr*h
April .
May........ ...... 1
.Tiinp,

3.796
4.250
4. 250
4.100
3. 750
3.750
3.600

3.665
4.300
3.840
3.640
3.680
3.680
3.360

3.636 149.0
5. 531 226.7
5.188 212.6
5. 000 205.0
3. 719 152.4
3.325 136.3
3.094 126.8

.261
.310
.290
.268
.260
.260
.250

155.2
184.2
172.3
158.9
154.5
154.5
148.5

1.540
1.540
1. 540
1.540
1.540
1.540
1.540

189.7
189.7
189.7
189.7
189.7
189.7
189.7

1.405
1.660
1.660
1.660
1.660
1.535
1.410

401.5
474.3
474.3
474.3
474.3
438.6
402.9

1.731
3.400
1.938
1.750
1. 750
1.500
1.188

185.3
363.9
207.4
187.3
187.3
160.6
127.1

3. 314 135.3
5.775, 235.7
4.188 170.9
3.000 122.4
3.188 130.1
3.350 136.7
2.625 107.1

.166
.245
.220
.192
.183
.160
.150

192.6
283.9
254.9
222.4
212.0
185.4
173.8

.243
.290
.275
.263
.254
.240
.220

197.2
235.2
223.0
212.9
206.0
194.6
178.4

3.600
3.500
3.500
3.500
3. 750
4.000

3.270
3.550
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

2.906 119.1
2. 800 114.8
3.188 130.7
3.275 134.2
2.970 121. 7
2.750 112.7

.235
.240
.240
.246
.263
.270

139.6
142.6
142.6
146.2
156.0
160.4

1.540
1.540
1.540
1.540
1.540
1.540

189.7
189.7
189.7
189.7
189.7
189.7

1.410
1.223
1.160
1.160
1.160
1.160

402.9
349.3
331.4
331.4
331.4
331.4

1.000
1.000
1.000
1.550
2.125
2.250

107.0
107.0
107.0
165.9
227.5
240.8

2.250
2.250
2.313
3.125
3.900
4.000

91.8
91.8
94.4
127.6
159.2
163.3

.150
.130
.125
.132
.150
.150

173.8
150.6
144.8
152.9
173.8
173.8

.220
.220
.220
.232
.240
.240

178.4
178.4
178.4
188.2
194.6
194.6

.il
Tly

Aneiist
September___
Otopr
n.h.

N ovember. . . .
December.......

a No quotation.

165




i No relative price computed.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

1.785
3.246
$2. 838 8.250
3. 203 6.000
3.022 4. 738
4.408 10.816

1.500
1.500
1.500

80.7
67.3
98.4
100.0 $0.168
.144
74.1

166

Table 9. —AVER AG E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 19^1—Continued.
Metals and metal products.
(a) Iron and steel.

Augers.

Chisels: Socket
firmer.

Butts.

Door knobs:
Steel, bronzeplated.

Files: 8-inch
mill, bastard.

Hammers: Maydole,
No. 1*.

f-inch, Extra, Regular,
1-inch, 1-inch,
average average average Rela­
tive
price
price
price
price.
each.
each.
each.

Loosejoint,
cast,
3 by 3
inch,
average
price
per
pair.

63.4
63.4
63.4
60.0
51.4

$0.035
.035
.031
.031
.030

1895...........................
1896...........................
1897...........................
1898...........................
1899...........................

.133
.139
.143
.143
.147

44.4
46.4
47.5
47.5
48.8

1900...........................
1901...........................
1902...........................
1903...................... .. .
1904...........................

.200
.170
.180
.231
.240

1905...........................
1906...........................
1907...........................
1908...........................
1909...........................

.307
.357
.360

1910...........................
1911...........................




Loose-pin,
wrought
steel,
3i by 3*
inch, aver­
age price
per dozen
pairs.

Extra, Regu­
lar,
Rela­ 1-inch, 1-inch, Rela­
tive aver­ aver­ tive
price. age
age
price price price.
each. each.

Aver­
AverRela­
age * Rela­
age
tive
tive
price
price
per
price.
per
price.
pair.
dozen.

Aver­
age
price
each.

Aver­
age
price
per
dozen.

Rela­
tive
price.

88.3 $0,210
88.3
.210
76.5
.210
77.8
.193
75.8
.173

84.0
84.0
84.0
77.3
69.3

$0.166
,166
,166
, 166
.166

61.5
61.5
61,5
61,5
61,5

$0.910
.892
.872
.867
.830

98.9
96.9
94.7
94.2
90.2

$0,350
.350
.350
.350
.350

79.5
79.5
79.5
79.5
79.5

.032
.033
.031
.029
.029

79.3
82.3
76.5
73.0
78.0

.171
.179
.171
.172
.204

68.4
71.7
68.4
68.8
81.5

,195
.173
.166
.166
.166

72.3
64,2
61.5
61.5
61.5

.813
.778
.805
.825
.936

88.4
84.5
87.5
89.6
101.7

.353
.380
.380
.363
.387

80.1
86.4
86.4
82.6
87.9

66.6
56.6
60.0
77.0
80.0

.040
.037
,040
.040
.040

100.0
92.3
100.0
100.0
100.0

.242
.230
.270
.280
.300

96.7
92.0
108.0
112.0
120.0

. 181
.190
.215
.225
.246

67.1
70.4
79.7
83.3
91.0

1.090
1.050
1.050
1.050
1.040

118.4
114.1
114.1
114.1
113.0

.419
.423
.423
.466
.466

95.2
96.2
96.2
105.9
105.9

$0.420
.420
.372

102.2
118.9
120.0
120.0
106.4

,040
.040
,040

$0.090
.090
.093

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0

.397
.419
.444
.375
.332

158.7
167.5
172.5
150.0
132.8

.363
.441
.450
.400
.400

134.3
163.3
166.7
148.1
148.1

1.037
1.022
.998
.954
.933

112,6
111.0
108.4
103,7
101.4

.466
.466
.460
.466
.466

105.9
105.9
105.9
105.9
105.9

.366
.340

104.6
97.1

.108
.090

119.4
100.0

.348
.250

139.0
100.0

.475
.250

175.9
92.6

.930
.930

101.1
101.1

,469
.440

106.6
100,0

1890 TO 1921.

1890........................... $0.190
1891...........................
.190
1892...........................
.190
1893...........................
.180
1894...........................
.154

Loose-pin,
wrought
steel,
3i by 3£
inch,
average
price
per
pair.

WHOLESALE PRICES,

Year or month.

1912.
1913.
1914.

.350
.350

$0.230
.230

100. 0100.0
m o

100.0

.090

$0. 720
.720
.720

100.0
100.0
100.0

.250
.250 $0.200
.200

100.0
100.0
100.0

.270
.270
.270

100.0
100.0
100.0

.926
.920
.916

100.6
100.0
99.5

.440

$5.280
5.280
5.280

100.0
100.0
100.0

.230
.286
.380
.615
.708
.931

124.3
165.2
267.4
3019
404.6

.960
1.650
2.812
3.200
3.413
4.076

133.3
229.2
390.5
444.4
474.1
566.1

.202
.262
.329
.390
.420
.518

100.9
130.9
164.4
195.1
210.2
259.1

.300
.371
.428
.470
.471
.630

111.1
137.3
158.6
174.1
174.4
233.3

.914
1.050
1.372
1.637
1.656
1.729 '

99.4
114.0
149.1
177.9
179.9
187.9

5.280
6. 840
9.450
11.108
12.100
14.067

100.0
129! 5
179.0
210.4
229.2
266.4

1921.

January...
February.
March___
A pril........
M a y .........
June.........

.852
.950
.950
.860
.860
.860
.860

370.3
413.0
413.0
373.9
373.9
373.9
373.9

2.992
3.700
3.700
3.300
3.000
3.000
3.000

415.5
513.9
513.9
458.3
416.7
416.7
416.7

.470
.530
.530
.460
.460
.460
.460

234.8
265.0
265.0
230.0
230.0
230.0 „
230.0

.378
.640
.580
.580
.320
.320
.320

139.8
237.0
214.8
214.8
118. 5
118.5
118. 5

1.450
1.550
1.550
1.550
1.550
1. 550
1.550

157.6
168.4
168. 4
168.4
168.4
168.4
168.4

13. 833
14.500
14. 500
14. 500
14. 500
13. 500
13. 500

262.0
274.6
' 274.6
274.6
274.6
255.7
255.7

July...........
August.......
September.
October___
November.
December..

.860
.812
.803
.803
.803
.803

373.9
353.0
348.9
348.9
348.9
348.9

2.700
2.700
2.700
2.700
2.700
2.700

375.0
375.0
375.0
375.0
375.0
375.0

.460
.460
.460
.460
.460
.434

230.0
230.0
230.0
230.0
230.0
217.0

.320
.290
.290
.290
.290
.290

118.5
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4

1.350
1. 350
1.350
1.350
1.350
1.350

146.7
146.7
146.7
146.7
146.7
146.7

13.500
13.500
13.500
13.500
13.500
13.500

255.7
255.7
255.7
255.7
255.7
255.7




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

1915.
1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.

I
—*
O

168

Table 9.—AVERAGE W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921-Continued.
Metals and metal products.
(a) Iron and steel.
Iron ore: Mesabi.

Average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Non-Bessemer..

Average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Foundry,
No. 1,
average
price per
long ton.

Bessemer.
Basic,
average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Foundry, No. 2,
northern.

Average
price each.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890,
1891.
1892,
1893,
1894.

$0,083
.083
.083
.083
.082

69.2
69.2
69.2
69.2
68.2

$18,408
17.521
15.749
14.517
12.664

107.9
102.7
92.3
85.1
74.2

$18,873
15.950
14.367
12.869
11.378

110.2
93.1
83.9
75.1
66.4

$17.156
15.396
13.773
12.440
10.846

107.2
96.2
86.0
77.7
67.8

1895.
1896,
1897.
1898.
1899.

.083
.087
.083
.075
.075

69.4
72.2
69.4
62.5
62.5

13.103
12.955
12.101
11.661
19.363

76.8
75.9
70.9
68.3
113.5

12.717
12.140
10.126
10.332
19.033

74.2
70.9
59.1
60.3
111.1

11.675
11.771
10.100
10.027
17.350

72.9
73.5
63.1
62.6
108.4

1900.
1901,
1902.
1903.
1904.

.079
.075
.085
.090
.103

65.7
62.5
70.8
75.0
85.4

19.980
15.868
22.193
19.916
15.573

117.1
93.0
130.0
116.7
91.2

19.493
15.935
20.674
18.976
13.756

113.8
93.0
120.7
110.8
80.3

18.506
14.719
21.240
19.142
13.625

115.6
91.9
132.7
119.6
85.1

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

.150
.181
.200

124.7
150.7
166.7
138.3
132.7

17.885
20.983
23.895
17.700
17.806

104.8
122.9
140.0
103.7
104.3

16.359
19.544
22.842
17.070
17.408

95.5
114.1
133.3
99.6
101.6

16.410
19.267
23.869
16.250
16.410

102.5
120.4
149.1
101.5
102.5

137.5
83.3
100.0

17.362
15.713
16.558

101.7
92.1
97.0

17.193
15.713
15.938

100.4
91.7
93.0

15.983
14.519
15.088

99.8
90.7
94.2

Foundry, No. 2,
southern,
Birmingham.

1910.
1911.
1912.




.166
.159
.165
.100

.120

Average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
short ton.

.

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PBICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Bessemer.

Pig iron.
Locks: Common
mortise.

554.150

100.0

1914..........................

3.717

89.6

1915..........................
1916..........................
1917..........................
1918..........................
1919..........................
1920..........................

3.475
4.325
5.700
5.992
6.262
7.123

1921..........................
January............
February..........
March...............
April.................
May...................
June..................
July...................
August..............
September........
October.............
November.........
December........

100.0

3.033

89.2

83.7
104.2
137.3
144.4
150.9
171.6

2.825
3.675
5.050
5.300
5.612
6.473

83.1
108.1
148.5
155.9
165.0
190.4

.128

6.662
7.200
7.200
7.200
7.200
7.200
6.700

160.5
173.5
173.5
173.5
173.5
173.5
161.4

61
.0 2
6.550
6.550
6.550
6.550
6.550
6.050

6.2 0
0
6.200
6.200
6.200
6.200
6.2 0
0

149.4
149.4
149.4
149.4
149.4
149.4

5.550
5.550
5.550
5.550
5.550
5.550

100.0

$14,706

100.0

17.133

12.873

87.5

100.0

14.889

- 16.008

86.9

100.0

13.903

86.9

.321
.365
.373
.477

106.9
175.0
267.3
304.2
310.4
397.2

13.741
19.760
38.904
32.509
27.697
42.269

93.4
134.4
264.5

22 .1
1
188.3
287.4

15.783
23.888
43.608
36.663
31.132
44.459

92,1
139.4
254.5
214.0
181.7
259.5

14.873
21.065
41.392
34.460
30.314
44.902

92.9
131.6
258.6
215.3
189.4
280.5

10.671
15.696
35.067
33.104
28.500
40.692

91.3
134.2
299.9
283.1
243.8
348.0

,176.8
192.6
192.6
192.6
192.6
192.6
177.9

.363
.480
.430
.430
.355
.355
.355

302.7
400.0
358.3
358.3
295.8
295.8
295.8

21 8
.66

20.750

147.3
204.0
187.0
164.6
155.6
149.6
141.1

25.277
33.960
31.460
28.160
26.960
26.160
24.710

147.5
198.2
183.6
164.4
157.4
152.7
144.2

25.095
33.835
29.960
27.660
26.710
25.360
23.835

156.8
211.4
187.2
172.8
166.9
158.4
148.9

22.188
33.750
27.700
25.100
23.000
22.500
21.700

189.8
288.7
236.9
214.7
196.7
194.2
185.6

163.2
163.2
163.2
163.2
163.2
163.2

.355
.320
.320
.320
.320
.320

295.8
266.7
266.7
266.7
266.7
266.7

19.375
18.200
19.125
19.188
19.000
18.625

131.8
123.8
130.1
130.5
129.2
126.7

22.835
21.960
21.960
21.960
21.960
21.960

133.3
128.2
128.2
128.2
128.2
128.2

22.085
21.860
22.960
22.960
22.660
21.960

138.0
136.6
143.4
143.4
141.6
137.2

20.250
19.000
19.000
19.000
18.250
17.000

173.2
162.5
162.5
162.5
156.4
145.1

0 .0
.1 0 1 0
2
.2 0
1

30.000
27.500
24.200
22.875

22 0
.0 0

$11,692

10.208

100.0

87.3

169




.120

$3,400

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

1913............................

32.

M

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 .TO 1921,




Chart

Chart 32a.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

!§2 s 1 s 2 8
191?




1915

192

i
Hi
—I

172

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Metals and metal products.
(a)Iron and steel.
Pig iron.

Ferromanganese.

Spiegeleisen, 18
and 22 per cent.

Gray forge,
southern,
coke,
average
price per
long ton.

Foundry
No. 2,
southern,
average
price per
long ton.

Best refined,
from store. Phila­
delphia.
Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average Rela­
price per tive
long ton. price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Bars.

From mill, Pittsburgh.

Best
Com­
refined,
mon,
average average
price per price per
pound.
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Nails: Wire.

Concrete rein­
forcing, mill,
Pittsburgh.

Average
price
per 100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$14,500
12.517
11.792
10.635
8.938

102.9
88. 8
83.6
75.4
63.4

$0.021
.019
.019
.017
.013

106.8
99.0
97.4
88.5
69.8

$0.018
.017
.016
.015
.012

102.5
95.2
91.4
83.6
66.9

$2.965
2.467
2.190
1.992
1.652

163.0
135.6
120.4
109.5
90.8

1895
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

10.323
9.604
8.802
8.719
15.063

73.2
68.1
62.4
61.8
106.8

.014
.014
.013
.013
.021

75.0
72.9
68.2
66.7
101.8

.013
.012
.011
.011
.020

69.6
67.9
61.3
59.6
108.7

2.118
2.925
1.485
1.438
2.388

116.4
160.8
81.7
79.0
131.3

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

15.604
12.552
17.604
16.229
11.677

110.7
89.0
124.9
115.1
82.8

.020
.018
.021
.020
.017

102.1
95.8
110.9
104.2
89.6

.022
.018
.019
.018
.015

119.8
100.3
108.1
98.7
82.4

2.633
2.365
2.104
2.075
1.906

144.8
130.0
115.7
114.1
104.8

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

14.490
16.531
20.988
14.375
14.938

102.8
117.3
148.9
102.0
106.0

.019
.020
.021
.017
.018

100.0
103.1
109.9
88.5
91.7

/ .019

$0,017
.017
.018
.015
.015

104.2
102.4
106.1
88.5
88.5

1.896
1.958
2.117
2.100
1.917

104.2
107.7
116.4
115.5
105.4

1910.
1911.

14.573
12.833

103.4
91.0

.019
.016

96.4
85.4

.016
.013

93.9
78.8

1.888
1.804

103.8
99.2

1




WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Year or month.

Bar iron.

1912.............................

14.240

1913...............................

14.098

101.0

.018

100.0

'$58,290

100.0

$25. 000

100.0

91.1

.014

$14.903

1914............................

.019

13.390

56.857

97.5

25.000

.017

100. 0

100.0

.016

100.0

89.9

83.3

.013

77. 0

1915.............................
1916.............................
1917............................
1918.............................
1919.............................
1920.............................

13. 576
18.671
38.808
36.526
32.175
44.508

91.1
125.3
260. 4
245.1
215.9
298.7

100.583'
231.700
327. 208
277.500
142.117
193. 208

172.6
397.5
561.4
476.1
243.8
331.5

26.196
50.023
74.750
78.719
42.033
70.113

104.8
200.1
299.0
314.9
168.1
280.5

.017
.033
.046
.048
.038
.048

90.6
170.3
241.7
251.0
199.0
251.6 ---- •
-.......

.013
.026
.041
.038
.034
.044

1921............................
January...............
February.............
March..................
April....................
May.....................
June....................

26.606
36.750
32,625
29.800
28.000
26. 700
26.375

178.5
246.6
218.9
200.0
187.9
179.2
177.0

79. 533
112. 500
100.000
96.000
90.000
85.000
80.000

136.4
193.0
171.6
164.7
154.4
145.8
137.2

31. 250
45.000
40.000
35.000
34.000
32.000
32.000

125.0
180.0
160.0
140.0
136.0
128.0
128.0

.030
.037
.036
.034
.031
.031
.030

154.2
191.7
185.4
179.2
159.9
159.9
155.7

July.....................
August................
September..........
October...............
N ovem ber.........
Decomber............

24. 750
23.500
23.500
23.500
22.900
21.750

166.1
157.7
157.7
157.7
153.7
145.9

70.600
70.000
65.800
63.000
61.500
60.000

121.1
120.1
112.9
108.1
105.5
102.9

27.000
26.000
26.000
26.000
26.000
26.000

108.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0

.029
.028
.025
.025
.025
.026

148.4
145.3
129.2
129.2
132.3
136.5

1.740
$1.376

100.0

95.6

1.153

,83.8

1.819

100.0

1.679

92.3

78. 8
156. 4
246. 1
232. 7
204. 8
266. 7

1.307
2.480
3.490
2.900
2.488
2.875

95.0
180.3
253.7
210.8
180.8
209.0

1.746
2.596
3.633
3.600
3.518
4,187

96.0
142.7
199.8
197.9
193.4
230.2

.026
.036
.034
.029
.028
.028
.028

158. 8
218. 8
204. 8
175. 8
166. 7
166. 7
166. 7

2.010
2.350
2.350
2.300
2.175
2.100
2.100

146.1
170.8
170.8
167.2
158.1
152.6
152.6

3.056
168.0
3.350
184.2
182.1
3.313
3.120 ' 171.5
3. 225
177.3
173.2
3.150
170.4
3.100

.026
.023
.023
.022
.021
.021

155. 2
137. 6
136. 4
133. 3
129. 7
124. 2

2.100
2.100
1.750
1.650
1.650
1.500

152.6
152.6
127.2
119.9
119.9
109.0

2. 913
2.850
2.963
3.000
2.940
2.788

160.1
156.7
162.9
164.9
161.6
153.3

AVEEAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.
.

173




83. 6

174

T able 9 .—A V E R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Metals and metal products.
(a) Iron and steel.
Pipe: Cast-iron, 6-inch.

Planes: Jack planes.
Crosscut: Disston, No. 2.

Average
price per
short ton.

Relative
price.

Bailey
No. 5,
average
price
each.

Steel.
Shovels: Ames,
No. 2.

Hand: Disston.

Skelp:
Grooved.

Billets: Besse­ Billets: Open
hearth.
mer.

Sargent
No. 414, Rela­
No. 8,
average tive
No. 7,
Average
26-inch,
Average
Average
Average
price. Average Rela­ 26-inch,
price
skewback, Rela­ price Rela­ price Rela­ price Rela­ price Rela­
each.
price
tive
tive per 100 tive per long tive
tive average
per
tive
per
average
each. price. price per
price. long price.
price per price. dozen. price. pounds. price.
ton.
dozen.
ton.
dozen.

1890..
1891..
1892..
1893..
1894..

$1,420
1.420
1.420
1.420
1.378

94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
91.9

$1,604
1.604
1.604
1.604
1.604

90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0

$14.400
12.600
12.600
12.600
12./600

111.2
97.3
97.3
97.3
97.3

$7.870
7.870
7.870
7.870
7.450

100.6
100.6
100. .6
100.6
95.2

$30,468
25.329
23.631
20.436
16.578

118,1
98.2
91.6
79.2
64.3

1895..
1896..
1897..
1898..
1899..

1.242
1.230
1.230
1.230
1.230

82.8
82.0
82.0
82.0
82.0

1.604
1.604
1.604
1.604
1.604

90.0
90. .0
90.0
90.0
90.0

12.600
12.600
12.600
12.600
12.600

97.3
97.3
97.3
97.3
97.3

7.450
7.810
7.930
7.930
8.608

95.2
99.8
101.3
101.3
110.0

18.484
18.833
15.080
15.306
31.117

71.7
73.0
58.5
59.3
120.7

1900..
1901..
1902..
1903..
1904..

1.414
1.460
1.510
1.530
1.530

94.3
97.3
100.7
102.0
102.0

1.604
1.604
1.604
1.604
1.604

90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0

.12.600
12.600
12.600
12.600
12.600

97.3
97.3
97.3
97.3
97.3

9.120
9.120
9.355
8.020
7.653

116.6
116.6
119.6
102.5
97.8

25.063
24.131
30.599
27.912
22.179

97.2
93.6
118.7
108.2
86.0

1905..
1906..
1907..
1908..
1909..

1.530
1.710
1.530
1.530
1.530

1Q2.2
114.0

1.604
1.604
1.604
1.604
1.604

90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0

12.600
12.950
12.950
12.950
12.950

97.3

102.0
102.0
1Q
2.0

100.0

7.620
7.620
7.840
7.822
7.620

97.4
97.4
100.2
100.0
97.4

24.028
, 27.448
29.253
26.313
24.616

93.2
106.4
113.4
102.0
95.5

1910..
1911..
1912..

1.658
1.540
1.540

110.5
102.7
102.7

1.604
1.782
1.782

90.0

12.950
12.950
12.950

100.0
100.0
100.0

7.738
7.450
7.451

98.9
95.2
95.2

25.380
21.458
, 22.378

98.4
83.2
86.8




$1.540

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100. 0

W HOLESALE PEICES. 1890 TO 1921.

Year or month.

Saws.

1913......................
1914......................

$23,371
20.898

100.0
89.4

1.500

100.0

1.782

100.0

$15,609

100.0

7.825

100.0

$1.390

100.0

25.789

1.500

100.0

1.782

100.0

15.609

100.0

7.850

100.3

1.169

84.1

20.078

77.9

20.058

76.9

1915......................
1916......................
1917......................
1918......................
1919......................
1920......................

22.943
31.618
55.369
60.687
57.501
74.046

98.2
135.3
236.9
259.7
246.0
316.8

1.500
1.800
2.282
2.801
3.435
4.420

100.0
120.0
152.1
186.7
229.0
294.7

1.782
2.011
2.785
3.375
3.600
4.000

100.0
112.8
156.3
189.4
202.0
224.5

15.609
17.503
22.008
25.958
27.637
33.000

100.0
112.1
141.0
166.3
177.1
211.4

6.923
8.314
11.276
13.481
13.267
14.160

88.5
106.3
144.1
172. 3
169.6
181.0

1.265
2.336
3.953
2.890
2.505
3.000

91.0
168.0
284.4
207.9
180.2
215.8

22.441
43. 946
69.856
47.274
40.539
56.260

87.0
170.4
270.9
183.3
157.2
218.2

22.763
43.825
71. 771
47.500
40.267
60.592

87.2
167.9
275.0
182.0
154.3
232.2

1921......................
January........
February___
March............
April.............
May...............
June..............

54.531
63.300
63.300
63.300
63.300
61.300
53.300

333.3
270.8
270.8
270.8
270.8
262.3
228.1

3.589
4.070
4.070
4.070
3.670
3.670
3.670

239.3
271.3
271.3
271.3
244.7
244.7
244.7

3.800
4.000
4.000
4.000
4.000
4.000
4.000

213.2
224.5
224.5
224.5
224.5
224.5
224.5

30.000
33.000
33.000
33.000
33.000
33.000
33.000

192.2
211.4
211.4
211.4
211.4
211. 4
211.4

13.228
14.160
14.160
14.169
14,. 160
14.160
14.160

169.1
181.0
181.0
181.0
181.0
181.0
181.0

1.991
2.500
2.450
2.330
2.150
2.200
2.200

143.3
179.9
176.3
167.6
154.7
158.3
158.3

34.385
43.500
42.250
38.400
37. 500
37.000
37.000

133.3
168.7
163.8
148.9
145.4
143.5
143.5

34.567
43.500
41.000
38.500
37. 750
37.000
37.000

132.5
166.7
157.1
147.5
144.7
141.8
141.8

July...............
August..........
September...
October.........
November....
December___

52.300
45.300
47.300
47.300
47.300
47.300

223.8
193.8
202.4
202.4
202.4
202.4

3.670
3.300
3.300
3.300
3.300
2.980

244.7
220.0
220.0
220.0
220.0
198.7

3.600
3.600
3.600
3.600
3.600
3.600

202.0
202.0
202.0
202.0
202.0
202.0

27.000
27.000
27.000
27.000
27.000
27.000

173.0
173.0
173.0
173.0
173.0
173.0

14.160
12.795
11.670
11.670
11.670
11.814

181.0
163.5
149.1
149.1
149.1
151.0

1.975
1. 775
1.680
1.600
1.600
1.500

142.1
127.7
120.9
115.1
115.1
107.9

32.250
29.600
29.000
29.000
29.000
29.000

125.1
114.8
112.5
112.5
112.5
112.5

32.250
30.000
29.800
30.000
29.000
29.000

123.6
115.0
114.2
115.0
111.1
111.1

100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

175




100.0 $26,096

T a b l e 9 . — AVER AGE W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Metals and metal products.
(a)

Iron and steel.
Tin.

Steel.
’X

One-fourth
inch thick, Rela­
tive
average
price per
price.
pound.

Rails: Besse­
mer.

Sheets: Box an­
nealed, No. 27.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

$0,024

107.3

.024
.022
.020
.019
.027

111.4
98.2
89.0
86.8
121.9

115.3
97.6
100.0
100.0

100.0

.029
.032
.029
.026
.021

133.8
143.8
132.9
118.7
95.9

28.000
28.000
28.000
28.000
28.000

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

.022
.024
.025
.024
.022

101.4
108.2
114.2
109.6
101.8

28.000
28.000
28.000

100.0

100.0

.023
.020
020

103.7
91.3
89.5

Average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$31,779
29.917
30.000
28.125
24.000

113.5
106.8
107.1
100.4
85.7

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

24.333
28.000
18.750
17.625
28.125

86.9

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

32.288
27.333
28.000
28.000
28.000

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
1910.
1911.
1912.




Rails: Openhearth.

100.0

67.0
62.9
100.4

100.0

Average
price per
long ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Structural.

Chicago,
average
price per
pound.

Mill,
Rela­ Pittsburgh, Rela­
average
tive
tive
price per
price.
price.
100 pounds.

Roofing
(terneplate).
Average
price per
base box
(200
pounds).

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Plates: Tank.

100.0
74.4

$0,015
.012

100.0
78.4

28.000
28.000

100.0
100.0

$30.000
30.000

100.0
100.0

.022
.019

100.0
85.4

$0,016
. .013

100.0
82.5

$1,510
1.175

100.0
77.8

$6,937
6.580

100.0
94.9

1915.............................
1916.............................
1917.............................
1918.............................
1919.............................
’ 1920.............................

1.313
2.666
3.628
2.892
2.495
3.218

84.8
172.2
234.3
186.8
161.1
207.8

.013
.032
.056
.032
.027
.033

85.8
218.9
376.4
218.9
183.1
221.6

28.000
31.333
38.000
54.000
47.264
51.827

100.0
111.9
135.7
192.9
168.8
185.1

30.000
33. 333
40.000
56.000
49.264
53.827

100.0
111.1
133.3
186.7
164.2
179.4

.019
.030
.065
.049
.044
.053

85.8
135.2
297.3
225.6
200.0
243.8

.015
.028
.043
.032
.028
.032

92.5
176.9
269.4
201.9
174.4
198.1

1.279
2.525
3. 738
3.000
2.521
2.829

84.7
167.2
247.5
198.6
166.9
187.3

6.354
8.558
14.665
15.300
14.262
14.100

91.6
123.4
211.4
220.5
205.6
203.3

>1921.............................
January...............
February.............
'
March..................
,
April....................
*
May.....................
5
June.....................
>
5
July.....................
August................
September..........
1
October...............
?
November...........
December............

1.872
2.350
2.150
2.000
2.050
2.100
,2.050

120.9
151.8
138.9
129.2
132.4
135.6
132.4

.019
.027
.023
.020
.021
.022
.020

130.4
179.1
157.4
137.8
141.9
148.6
131.8

44.039
45.000
45.000
45.000
45.000
45.000
45.000

157.3
160.7
160.7
160.7
160.7
160.7
160.7

45.654
47.000
47.000
47.000
47.000
47.000
47.000

152 2
156.7
156.7
156.7
156.7
156.7
156.7

.035
.043
.043
.041
.040
.040
.038

160.3
196.3
194.1
186.3
180.8
180.4
174.9

.024
.028
.028
.026
.026
.026
.025

148.1
176.9
173.1
163.1
161.9
161.3
158.1

2.044
2. 450
2.450
2.300
2.225
2.200
2.200

135.3
162.2
162.2
152.3
147.3
145.7
145.7

12.277
14.100
14.100
14.100
13.350
12.600
12.600

177.0
203.3
203.3
203.3
192.4
181.6
181.6

1.840
1.740
1.630
1.550
1.500
1.500

118.8
112.4
105.3
100.1
96.9
96.9

.019
.018
.016
.016
.015
.015

125.0
120.3
110.8
108.1
102.7
101.4

45.000
45.000
45.000
43.750
40.000
40.000

160.7
160,7
160.7
156.2
142.9
142.9

47.000
47.000
47.000
45. 250
40.000
40.000

156.7
156.7
156.7
150.8
133.3
133.3

.034
.029
.028
.030
.029
.030

153.4
132.4
127.4
134.7
132.0
134.7

.023
.022
.021
.020
.019
.019

146.3
138.1
130.6
125.6
121.3
120.6

2.100
1. 850
1.850
1.750
1.650
1.500

139.0
122.5
122.5
115.9
109.2
99.3

12.100
11.600
11.600
11.600
9.850
9.600

174.4
167.2
167.2
167.2
142.0
138.4




AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES,

$1.548
1.153

11083°— 22— Bull. 320-

1913.............................
1914.............................

-a

33.

178
WHOLESALE PRICES, 1880 TO 1821.




Chart




—T

CD

180

Table 9 .—A V ER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Metals and metal products.
(6) Nonferrous
metals.

(a) Iron and steel.

Tin.

Wire: Fence.

Plate: Domestic.

Vises: Solid box,
50-pound.

Barbed, galva­
nized.

Plain, annealed.

Nos. 6 to 9,
F. o. b.
Coke at Coke, f. o. b.
New York, Pittsburgh, Rela­ M. C. O., Johnson’s, Rela­ Firm No. FirmNo Rela­ Chicago, Rela­ f.o. b. Pitts­ Rela­
average
1, aver­ 2, aver­ tive
average
average tive burgh, aver­ tive
average
average
tive
tive
price
price per
age price
price
price per
price per price.
price.
price. age price age price price. per 100 price.
per 100
each.
each.
dozen.
each.
100 pounds. 100 pounds.
pounds.
pounds.

Wood screws:
1-inch, No. 10, Aluminum,
98-99 per cent.
flat-head.

Aver­
age
price
per
gross.

Rela­
tive
price.

$0,340
.340
.340
.340
.340

1890.
1891.
1892,
1893.
1894,

97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1

$4.140
4.140
4.255
4.198
4.057

80.0
80.0
82.2
81.1
78.4

$3,567
3.219
2.766
2.519
2.175

154.4
139.4
119.8
109.1
94.2

$0,197
.200
.210
.156

183.3
186.0
195.3
195.3
144.9

.210

1895.
1896,
1897.
1898,
1899.

$3,435
3.182
2.850
4.191

91.2
84.5
75.6
111.3

.340
.340
.340
.340
.340

97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1

3.793
3.720
3.500
3.280
3.927

73.3
71.9
67.7
63.3
75.9

2.246
1.963
1.800
1.838
3.170

97.3
85.0
77.9
79.6
137.3

.112
.103
.085
.092
.145

103.9
96.1
79.1
85.4
135.1

1900,
1901,
1902,
1903.
1904.

4.678
4.190
>4.123
3.940
3.603

124.2
111.3
109.5
104.6
95.6

.340
.340
.340
.340
.340

97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1

4.268
4.020
5.130
5.177
4.255

82.4
97.0
99.1

3.394
3.038
2.954
2.738
2.508

147.0
131.5
127.9
118.5
108.6

.182
.105
.095
.109
.095

169.3
97.2

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.

3.707
3.861
4.090
3.890
3.737

98.5
102.5
108.6
103.3
99.2

.340
.340
.340
.340
.340

97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1

4.140
4.521
5.750

2.383
2.428
2.634
2.622
2.359

103.2
105.2
114.1
113.5
102.2

.106
.106
.122
.100
.116

98.1
98.1
113.4
93.0
107.6




100.0

82.2

$4.370
4.370
4.600

80.0
87.3
111.1

11
1 .1
116.9

88.6

101.7
87.9

Aver­
Rela­
age
price
tive
per
price.
pound.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Trowels: Brick, lOJ-mch-

1910 ......................
1911 ......................
1912........................
1913........................
1914 .....................

3.840
3.865
3.657

3.655

91.1
142.1
249.1
217.2
198.8
212.4

4.500
4.500
4.875
5.583
6.250
8.598

100.0
100.0
108.3
124.1
138.9
191.1

5.888
7.000
7.000
7.000
6.438
6.250
6.250

165.5
196.7
196.7
196.7
180.9
175.6
175.6

5.688
5.250
5.250
5.125
4.750
4.725

159.8
147.5
147.5
144.0
133.5
132.8

9.380
8.850
8.850
8.850
8.850
8.850

1915 .....................
1916........................
1917 .....................
1918
.................
1919........................
1920........................

3.242
5.057
8.864
7.727
7.074
7.558

1921........................
January...........
February.........
March..............
April...............
May.................
June................
July.................
August............
September. . . .
October...........
November.......
December. _

.340
.350
.350

114.0
111.1
105.2

2.133
2.180
2.134

92.9

2.152

95.3
3.749
5.248 . 133.4
7.760 197.2
9.048 229.9
8.764 222.7
9.200 233.8

9.159 203.5
9.380 208.4
9.380 208.4
9.380 208.4
9.380 208.4
9.380 208.4
9.380 208.4

6.302
7.470
7.470
7.470
6.550
6.550
6.550

208.4
196.7
196.7
196.7
196.7
196.7

6.550
6.550
5.180
5.180
5.180
4.920

3.935

10
0 .0

92.3
94.4
'92.4

10
0 .0

$1.513

93.2

1.373

2.535
3.515
4.527
4.594
4.467
4.724

109.8
152.2
196.0
198.9
193.4
204.6

160.1
189.8
189.8
189.8
166.5
166.5
166.5

4.095
4.480
4.355
4.230
4.355
4.480
4.180

166.5
166.5
131.6
131.6
131.6
125.0

3.843
3.780
3.893
3.930
3.900
3.718

2 .309

10
0 .0

.149
.100
.120
.108

90.8

.078

1.469
2.417
3.450
3.250
3.114
3.358

97.1
159.8
228.1
214.9
205.9
222.0

177.4
194.0
188.6
183.2
188.6
194.0
181.0

2.801
3.250
3.188
3.125
3.063
3.000
2.750

166.4
163.7
168.6
170.2
168.9
161.0

2.563
2.500
2.575
2.600
2.560
2.438

138.4
93.0
111.6

10
0 .0

$0,236

10
0 .0

72.8

.186

.093
.168
.239
.216
.205
.252

86.8
156.6
222.5
200.9
190.7
234.4

.340
.607
.516
.337
.330
.333

143.7
256.8
218.2
142.4
139.6
140.8

185.2
214.9
210.7
206.6
202.5
198.3
181.8

.215
.259
.259
.238
.238
.238
.238

200.0
241.1
241.1
221.0
221.0
221.0
221.0

.215
.227
.251
.233
.242
.242
.224

91.0
96.1
106.2
98.4
102.4
102.2
94.6

169.4
165.3
170.2
171.9
169.3
161.2

.194
.194
.194
.194
.175
.159

180.8
180.8
180.8
180.8
162.8
147.4

.222
.212
.198
.183
.175
.175

93.8
89.5
83.8
77.4
74.0
74.0

78.6

3

W
}►

3
W
o

PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

97.1
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

102.0
102:6
97.1
100.0
94.7

181




4.485
4.370
4.140

$4,500
4.500
4.500

$3,456
3.558
3.369

182

Table 9.—A V ER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Metals and metal products.
(&) Nonferrous metals.
Copper.
Year or month.

Lead: Pig.

Electro­
Lake,
Average
lytic,
average average Rela­ 'price per
tive
price per price per price. pound.
pound.
pound.

Quicksilver.

Silver: Bar, fine.

Wire: Bare.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Tin.

PigAverage
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price
per 100
pounds..

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
ounce.

Rela­
tive
price.

Aver­
age
Rela­
price
tive
per
price.
pound.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$0.158
.131
.115
.109
.095

97.9
81.1
71.7
67.9
58.9

$0,228
.190
.160
.150
.143

107.4
89.7
75.5
70.8
67.2

$0.188
.165
.144
.135
.116

112.1
98.6
86.0
80.7
69.1

$0,044
.644
.041
.087
.033

100.0
99.3
98.9
85.0
75.2

$5.400
5.600
5.183
5.006
4.433

106.3
110.2
102.0
98.4
87.2

$0.730
.628
.564
.521
.479

129.2
111.2
99.9
92.3
84.8

$1.053
.990
.876
.782
.640

172.0
161.7
143.0
127.7
104.6

$0.212
.203
„ .204
.200
.181

47.3
45.1
45.4
44.6
40,4

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

.108
.110
.113
.119
.177

66.8
68.2
70.4
74.2
109.9

.143
.143
.146
.140
.218

67.2
67.2
69.0
66.1
102.6

.124
.136
.138
.138
.183

74.0
81.1
82.2
82.2
109.1

.033
.030
.036
.038
.045

74.1
68.2
81.4
86.4
101.8

4.200
4.100
4.317
4.600
5.350

82.6
80.7
84.9
90.5
105.3

.513
.498
.516
.543
.600

9(1.8
88.1
91.3
96.0
106.3

.663
.682
.608
.591
.605

108.2
111.4
99.2
96.5
98.8

.141
.133
.136
.155
.272

31.3
29.6
30.3
34.6
60.6

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

.166
.169
.120
.137
.131

103.3
104.9
74.6
85.1
81.5

.207
.209
.178
.192
.180

97.5
98.5
84.1
90.5
84.9

.180
.182
.133
.150
.144

107.6
108.5
79.3
89.5
86.0

.045
.044
.041
.043
.044

101.1
99.5 :
93.4
97.3
100.7

5.121
5.048
5.217
5.196
4.795

100.8
99.3
102.7
102.2
94.4

.677
.663
.646
.634
.590

119.8
117.3
114.3
112.2
104.4

.621
.597
.528
.542
.578

101.4
97.5
86.2
88.5
94.4

.301
.282
.265
.282
.280

67.0
58.3
59.0
62.7
62.4

1905.
1906.
1907.
19081
1909.

.158
.196
.213

$0,208
.133
.131

98.0
121.9
132.1
84.8
83.3

.199
.238
.279
.179
.179

94.0
112.1
131.8
84.6
84.6

.170
.211
.240
.152
.148

101.7
126.0
143.6
90.8
88.6

.048
.059
.055
.042
.043

108.9
133.6
125.5
95.9
97.5

5.225
6.421
6.705
4.740
4.821

102.8
126.3
131.9
93.3
94.9

. 545
.552
.543
.610
.632

96.4
97.6
96.1
108.0
111.8

.610
.674
.660
.535
.522

99.6
110.0
107.7
87.4
85.2

.313
.392
.388
.294
.296

69.7
' 87.4
86.3
65.6
65.9

.129
.125
.164

82.1
79.3
104.4

.180
.166
.213

85.1
78.1
100.5

.144
.139
.175

85.8
83.0
104.4

.045
.045
.044

101.8
101.1
100.7

5.061
5.028
5.201

99.6
98.9
102.3

.649
.660
.589

114.9
116.7
104.3

.543
.540
.620

88.6
88.2
101.3

.342
.427
.463

76.2
95.2
103.1

m o.
m i.
1912.




WHOLESALE PEIGES, 1880 TO 1021.

Sheet: Hot rolled
(base sizes).

Ingot.

Lead pipe.

100.0

.....

1914

....

.157
.134

100.0
85.1

.212
.188

100.0
88.7

.167
.147

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

....
....
....
....
....
....

.173
.275
.294
.247
.191
.180

109.7
175.1
186.9
156.8
121.5
114.2

.225
.359
.391
.338
.285
.284

106.0
169.5
184.4
159.6
134.6
133.8

.185
.305
.359
.276
.222
.219

1921
....
January...
February..
March.......
April.........
May..........
June..........

.126
.129
.129
.122
.125
.128
.128

80.2
81.9
81.9
77.7
79.3
81.6
81.6

.204
.213
.209
.203
.200
.202
.212

96.4
100.6
98.8
95.8
94.4
95.5
100.1

.150
.159
.157
.151
.148
.152
.155 ;

89.9
95.0
93.8
90.3

July..........
August___
September.
October__
November.
December.

.125
.117
.120
. 127
.130
.136

79.7
74.6
76.3
80.6
82.8,
86.2

.207
.198
.193
.200
.203
.210

97.5
93.5
91.2
94.5
95.6
99.1

.149
.141
.139
.149
.151
.155

'

110.6

182.4
214.6
165.1
132.7
130.8

88.6
90.8
92.6

88.8

84.0
83.1

88.8

90.4
92.6

100.0

.044
.039

100.0
88.4

5.082
4.523

100.0
89.0

.565
.666

100.0
117.8

.612
.563

100.0
92.0

.449
.351

.046
.068
.091
.074
.058
.081

104.3
154.5
207.0
168.6
131.4
183.6

5.301
7.598
10.068
8.887
7.266
9.732

104.3
149.5
198.1
174.9
143.0
191.5

1.183
1.825
1.622
1.802
1.212
1.071

209.4
323.0
287.1
318.8
214.4
189.6

.511
.671
.840
1.126
1.015

.989

83.4
109.6
137.2
161.4
183.9
165.7

.876
.433
.594
.852
.655
.503

83.8
96.4
132.3
189.8
146.0

.046
.050
.047
.041
.043
.050
.045

103.9
113.0
106. 4
92.0

5.680
6.781
6.230
5.390
5.623
6.090
5.963

111.8
133.4
122.6
106.1
110.6
119.8
117.3

.600
.629*
.633
.603
.605
.627
.617

106.3
111.4
112.1
106.8
167.1
110.9
109.1

.631
.664
.598
.567
.598
.603
.591

103.1
108.4
97.7
92.7
97.7
98.5
96.5

.298
.355
.326
.288
.304
.322
.290

66.5
79.1
72.7
64.1
67.7
71.8
64.6

5.551
5.140
5.223
5. 390 :
5.390
5.390

109.2
101.1
1Q2.8
106.1
106.1
106.1

.613
108.6
.595
105.3
96.2
.543
.512 1 96.6
98.5
.557
.664
117.5

.608
.621
.662
,714
.685
.663

99.3
101.4
108.2
116.5
111.8
108.2

.278
.267
.268
.276
.289
.326

62.0
59.4
59.7
61.4
64.5
72.6

.044
.044
.046
.047
.047
.047

97.3

112. 5
102.5

166.0

i

100.0
104.8
106.8
106.8
106.8

78.3

112.0

183




87.6

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

1913

34,

184

.COPPER* IN G O T, l a k e , |890~I907
•••••••
IN GO T, ELECTR O LYTIC. 1907-1 ?2 — < ».
.
Copper wire; b a r e , n o s . 1090-t< i
%
— — ——
(Average p r ic e in 19i3*l00.)

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,




Chart

Chart 34a.
400
375
350

275
250
225

200
175

150

125

100

75

50

1913




1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES,

325
300

1911.

00
Ol

186

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Metals and metal products.

Building materials.

(&) Nonferrous metals.

(a)

Zinc.
Slab.

Douglas fir: No.
2 and better,
drop siding, f.
o. b. mill.

Gum: Sap, first and seconds.

Average
price per
M feet.

Average Rela­
price per tive
M feet. price.

F. o. b.
mill,
average
price per
M feet.

Hemlock, No. 1, northern.

Average
price per
100
pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

1&90.......... ..............
1£91.........................
1892.........................
1893.........................
1894.........................

$6,054
5.719
5.490
4.994
3.950

83.6
78.9
75.8
68.9
54.5

$0,055
.051
.047
.041
.036

95.0
87.1
79.8
70.3
60.9

$12.583
12.458
12.292
12.000
11.708

1895.........................
1896.........................
1897.........................
1898.........................
1890.........................

4.522
4.940
4.940
5.498
7.004

62.4
68.2
68.2
75.9
96.7

.036
.040
.042
.045
.059

62.1
68.8
72.2
77.7
100.9

11.146
11.167
11.000
11.750
13.521

46.0
46.1
45.4
48.5
55.8 ,

1900.........................
1901.........................
1992.........................
1903.........................
1904.........................

6.095
5.558
5.731
6.018
5.609

84.1
76.7
79.1
83.1
77.4

.044
.041
.049
.056
.052

75.8
69.5
83.5
95.7
88.3

16.500
15.000
15.833
16.792
17.000

68.1
61.9
65.4
69.3
70.2

1905.........................
1906.........................
1907.........................
1908.........................
1909.........................

6.825
7.173
7.486
6.440
6.643

94.2
99.0
103.3
88.9
91.7

.059
.062
.062
.048
.055

iqi.5
106.3
105.8
81.5
94.5

17.875
21.896
22.250
20.875
20.583

73.8
90.4
91.8
86.2
85.0

1910.........................
1911.........................
1912.........................
1913.........................
1914.........................

7.019
7.048
7.924
7.245
6.919

96.9
97.3
109.4
100.0
95.5

.056
.058
.071
.058
.053

96.6
100.2
121.1
100.0
90.4

20.625,
20.682
21 .455
24.227
24.396

85.1
85.4
88.6
100.0
100.7

F. o ,b .
inili,
average
price per
M feet.

51.9
51.4
50.7
49.5
48.3 .




$9.208
7.917

Rela­
tive
price.

100. 0
86.0

$17.333
14.292

100.0
82.5

$18.525
16.875

St. Louis,
average
price per
M feet.

Rela­
tive
price.

100.0
91.1

New York, Rela­
average
tive
price per
price.
M feet.

$19.700
18.138

Chicago,
Rela­
average
tive
price per
price.
M feet. .

100
0.
92.1

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1880 TO 1821.

Douglas fir: No.
1, common, f.
o. b. mill.

Year or month.
Sheet.

Lumber.

16.158
18.783
18.093
14.238
9. 837
11.338

223.0
259.3
249.7
196.5
135.8
156.5

.144
.140
.093
.083
.074
.081

246.7
240.7
158.7
141.9
126.9
138.6

7.875
10.375
15. 875
18.250
25.417
29.917

85.5
112.7
172.4
198.2
276.0
324.9

14.292
18.583
23.917
28.000
39.667
54.750

82.5
107.2
138.0
161.5
228.8
315.9

1921.........................
January............
February.........
M^rch...............
April.................
May..................
June.................

9.453
10.580
10.186
10.120
10.120
9.645
9.200

130.5
146.0
140.6
139.7
139.7
133.1
127.0

.051
.059
.054
.052
.052
.054
.049

8?.2
101.4
92.3
88.9
89.7
91.8
84.6

11.833
15.500
12.500
12.500
12.500
11.500
11.500

128.5
168.3
135.8
135.8
135.8
124.9
124.9

24.000
26.000
23.000
23.000
23.000
21.009
21.000

July..................
August.............
September.......
October............
November.......
December.........

9.200
9.200
9.200
9.200
8.617
8.161

127.0
127.0
127.0
127.0
118.9
112.7

.048
.047
.047
.051
.052
.053

82.2
80.3
81.1
87.7
88.7
90.1

11.500
10.500
10.500
10.500
11.500
' 11.500

124.9
114.0
114.0
114.0
124.9
124.9

21.000
21.000
21.000
26.000
31.000
31.000

$36.012
50.953
82.164

89.7
109.9
146.5
174.1
246.4
397.3

2r. 591
23.542
27.708
33.929
39.750
56.667

89.1
97.2
114.4
140.0
164.1
233.9

138.5
150.0
132.7
132.7
132.7
121.2
121.2

44.423
50.750
48.500
44.900
42. 500
42. 500
42.500

214.$
245.3
234.7
217.1
205.4
205.4
205.4

40.896
48.000
48.000
48.000
41.000
41.000
‘ 41.000

121.2
121.2
121.2
150.0
178.8
178.8

42.500
41.300
40.500
41.000
48.500
47.750

205.4
199.7
195.9
198.3
234.5
230.9

37.500
37.250
37.250
37.250
37.250
37.250

17.263
20.275
26.494
29.525

$31,611
38.962
52.467

87.6
102.9
134.5
149.9
184.8
248.8

168.8
198.1
198.1
198.1
169.2
169.2
169.2

33.990
42.250
37.500
37.000
35.000
34.800
33.500

161.1
200.4
177.8
175.4
165.9
165.0
158.9

154.8
153.8
153.8
153.8
153.8
153.8

31.625
30.500
30.500
30.875
32.000
32.750

149.9
144.7
144.7
146.5
151.7
155.3

187




16.625
20.368
27.132
32. 258

AVEEAGE WHOLESALE PBICES OF COMMODITIES.

1915.........................
1916.........................
1917.........................
1918.........................
1919.........................
1920.........................

35.

188
WHOLESALE PRICES,

1890 TO 1921




Ch a r t

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

189




Chart 35a.

190

table

9 . — A V ER AG E W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Building materials.
(d) Lumber.
Year or month.

Maple: Hard and soft.

Relative
price.

lg ..

$26,500
26,500
26.500
26.500
26.500

1895..
1895..
1897..
189$..
1899..

F .o.b.m ill,
average
price per
M feet.

Chicago,
average
price per
M feet.

Relative
price.

69.1
69.1
69.1
69.1
69.1

$37.875
38.000
38.45$
38.750
37.250

62.5
62.7
63.5
64.0
61.5

$51,458
53.583
53. pO
O
53.000
51.125

58.3
60.7
60.0
60.0
57.9

26.500
26.500
26.500
26.500
26.542

69.1
69.1
69.1
69. i
69.2

36.250
36.250
36.250
36.250
38.958

59.8
59.8
59.8
59.8
64.3

53.250
54.500
53.833
52.500
60.521

60.3
61.7
61.0
59.4
68.5

1900..
1901..
1902..
1903..
1904..

27.500
26.708
28.583
32.667
31.000

71.7
69.6
74.5
82.5
80.8

40.833
36.771
40.875
44.833
46.500

67.4
60.7
67.5
74.0
76.7

64.458
59.167
63.083
74.792
80.750

73.0
67.0
71.4
84.7
91.4

1903..
190$..
1907..
190$..
1909..

30.500
31.000
32.250
31.625
31.000

79.5
80.8
84.1
82.4
80.8

47.333
60.417
55.208
49.292
48.417

78.1
83.2
91.1
81.4
79.9

79.167
80.000
80.167
84.333

I9 li.
1911..
1912..
1914..

31.800
34.318
36.455
38.364
38.500

82.9
89.5
95.0
106.0
100.4

$25.000
25.000

ioo.o
100.0

54.250
54.682
56.227
60.591
60.042

89.5
90.2
92.8
100.0
99.1

$31.839
28.472

ioo.6
89.4

87.756
87.182
86.500
8$.318
88.333

100.0

1915..
1916..
1917..

38.500
40.583
49.708

100.4
105.8
129.6

24.250
26.583
32.750

97.0
106.3
131.0

57.682
61.333
66.292

95.2
101.2
109.4

27.197
29.257
34.026

85.4
91.9
106.9

86.500
86.500
90.000

101.9

1890..
1891..

1913..




F. o. b. mill,
average
price per
Mfeet.

Cincinnati,
average
price per
Mfeet.

New York,
average
price her
Mfeet.

New York,
average
price per
Mfeet.

Relative
price.

Relative
price.

80.250

Relative
price.

90.9
89.6
90.6
90.8
95.5
99.4
98.7
97.9

100.0
97.9
97.9

WHOLESALE BRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

New York,
average
piiee per
M feet.

Oak: White, quartered.

Oak: White, plain.

1918
1919
1920

60.125
68.067
143.750

156.7
179.0
374.7

1921
......................
January......................
February....... ...........
March.........................
April..........................
May............................
June...........................

100.625
150.000
120. O O
O
92.500
85.000
105.000
105.000

July............................
August.......................
September.................
October......................
November.................
December...................

95.000
95.000
95.000
95.000
85.000
85.000




30.500

$36.769
46.375
iO . 896
O

122.0
153.8
334.8

75.625
102.125
204.667

124.8
168.5
337.8

262.3
391.0
312.8
241.1
221.6
273.7
273.7

55.000
*72.500
71.250
67.500
57.500
57.500
52.500

182.5
240.6
236.4
224.0
196.8
190.8
174.2

128.417
150.000
140.000
130.000
130.000
i20.000
120.000

247.6
247.6
247.6
247.6
221.6
221.6

51.250
46.500
42.500
43.750
47.900
49.500

170.1
154.3
141.0
145.2
159.0
164.2

125.000
120.000
120.000
120.000
130.000
136.000

39.565

$45,986
67.246
129.559

124.3
181.7
350.2

104.271
156.875
296.250

118.1
177.6
335.4

211.9
247.6
231.1
214.6
214.6
198.0
198.0

59.078
75.000
67.5oo
61.000
57. 500
53.500
55.000

159.7
202.7
182.5
i64.9
155.4
144.6
148.7

165.167
200.000
20Q O
.O O
i65.606
i65.o00
i65. 000
165.000

187.0
226.5
226.5
186.8
186.8
186.8
186.8

206.3
198.0
198.0
198.0
214.6
224.5

55.250
52.500
52.500
58.500
62.500
63.000

149.3
142.0
142.0
158.1
168.9
170.3

155.000
156. ooo
145.000
145. 000
161.000
166.000

175.5
169.8
164.2
164.2
182.3
i88,0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

......................
......................
......................

192

T a b l e 9 . —A V E R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES O F COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Building materials.
(a) Lumber.
Pine: Y e low.
Boards: No. 2
common. S2S.
1 by 10
1 by 10
inches,
inches,
Buffalo, New York,
average
average
price per price per
Mfeet.
Mfeet.

1 by 8
inches,
Buffalo,
average
price per
Mfeet.

Rela­
tive
price.

1890...................
1891...................
1892...................
1893.....................
1894...................

#16.792
17.000
17.146
18.625
18.167

50.9
51.5
52.0
56.5
55.1

1895...................
1896.....................
1897.....................
1898.....................
1899...................

17.250
16.5 P
0\
15.833
15.500
18.292

1900.....................
1901.....................
1902....................
1903....................
1904.....................

21.500
20.875
23.500
24.000
23.000

1905.....................
1906.....................
1907.....................
1908.....................
1909...................

24.167
29.750

1910.....................
1911.....................
1912.....................




1 by 8
inches,
f. o. b. mill, Rela­
tive
average
price per price.
M feet.

Flooring.

New York,
average
price per
M feet.

Rela­
tive
price.

F. o. b.
mill,
average
price per
M feet.

Siding.

Rela­
tive
price.

Timbers.

New York, Norfolk,Va., Rela­
average
average
tive
price per
price per
price.
M feet.
Mfeet.

64.6
62.1
57.5
57.5
57.5

52.3
50.1
48.0
47.0
55.5

16.917
16.417
16.438
18.625
20.042

52.6
51.1
51.1
58). 0
62.4

65.2
63.3
71.3
72.8
69.7

20.708
19.667
21.000
21.000
21.417

64.4
61.2
65.3
65.3
66.6

$33.250
37.417
36.375
37.104
*

$20.750
19.958
18.500
18.500
18.500

73.2
90.2
101.5
98.7
100.7

$43.917
45.833

98.5
102.8

24.917
29.333
30.500
30.500
33.042

77.5
91.3
94.9
94.9
102.8

38.250
38.346
37.227

103.8
104.0
101.0

46.300
46.546
44.546

103.8
104.4
99.9

30.800
30.591
33.136

95.8
95.2
103.1

,

F. o. b.
mill,
average
price per
Mfeet.

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PBICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Year or month.

Pine: White, boards, No. 2 bam.

88.1

44,591
42.750

100.0
95.9

$23.036
21.372

100.0
92.8

32.136
29.625

11.852
14.622
21.477
26.002
32.116
37.197

93.1
114. 8
168. 6
204. 2
252. 2
292.1

39.591
39.375
50.909
60.750
78.833
145.417

88.8
88.3
114.2
136.2
176.8
326.1

20.286
22.641
30.931
33.763
55.008
74.530

88.1
98.3
134.3
146.6
238.8
323.5

28.182
31.818

246.0
268.6
247.2
242.9
247.2
260.1
260.1

16.747
17.500
16.910
16.700
15.970
16.490
16.260

131.5
137. 4
132. 8
131.1
125.4
129.5
127.7

93.708
110.000
95.000
95.000
91.000
91.000
91.000

210.2
246.7
213.0
213.0
204.1
204.1
204.1

35.901
36.890
33.990
31.920
30.710
31. 780
32.390

260.1
260.1
260.1
224.1
212.1
212.1

15.750
14.770
15.400
17.410
19. 710
18.090

123.7
116.0
120.9
136. 7
154. 8
142.0

91.000
92.000
92.000
90.000
91.000
95.500

204.1
206.3
206.3
201.8
204.1
214.2

32.270
31.520
35.790
42.570
47.410
43.570

11.219

$47.901
54.226
81.077

101.7
101.7
133.3
163.9
185.5
277.5

1921.................
January.......
February___
March..........
April............
May.............
June.............

71.904
78.500
72.250
71.000
72.250
76.000
76.000

July.............
August........
September...
October.......
November...
December...

76.000
76.000
76.000
65.500
62.000
62.000

37.500

1915.....................
1916.....................
1917.....................
1918.....................
1919.....................
1920.....................

37.500
37.500
49.125
60.417

$14.634
12.875

100.0
88.0

87.7
99.0
133.2
157.8
200.5
352.1

12.908
15. 768
20.941
25.703
30.054
40.923

88.2
107.7
143.1
175.6
205.4
279.6

155.8
160.1
147.6
138.6
133.3
138.0
140.6

49.083
182.4
54.500
200.5
54.500
200.5
49.500
182.1
49.500
182.1
49.500 •182.1
49.500
182.1

21.330
27.840
24.870
23.010
20.810
21.120
20.260

145.8
190.2
169.9
157.2
142.2
144.3
138.4

140.1
136.8
155.4
184.8
205.8
189.1

42.500
42.500
44.500
47.500
50.500
54.500

19.220
19.250
18.950
19.590
21.660
19.380

131.3
131.5
129.5
133.9
148.0
132.4

$26,917
36.208
42.917
54.500
95.750

156.3
156.3
163.6
174.7
185.7
200.5

193




100.0
92.2

AVEBAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

$12.735

101.7

36.864

1914.....................

11083°— 22— Bull. 320-

10
0 .0

10
0 .0

1913 .....................

LUMBE •
.R

yellow

p t9 ,m w mu, i63 i9M.
in it)iire
fr~ ’

YELLOW PINE SIDING, NORFOLK, I f l l V '
HEMLOCK, IA 9 0 - I8 E I

(1913s 100)

1921.

400
375
350
325
300

194

275
250
225
200

175

150
125

100

75

50
40

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.




Chart 36.

Chart 36a,

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES,

1913




1914

1913

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

CD

Oi

196

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Building materials.
(a) Lumber.

Poplar.

Shingles: Cypress, 16
inches long.

Lath.

Spruce.

Year or month.

Boston,
average
price per
M feet.

Relative
price.

Eastern
spruce, 1£inch slab,
New York,
average price
per M.

Southern
yellow pine,
No. 1, f. o. b. Relative
mill, average price.
price per M.

Average
price per
M.

Relative
price.

1890...............................
1891 .....................
1892...............................
1893.............................
1894............................. .

|30.500
30.500
30.604
33.625
31.750

49.4
49.4
49.6
54.5
51.4

$16.292
14.218
14.854
13.771
12.708

58.5
51.0
53.3
49.4
45.6

$3,350
3.250
3.150
3.000
2.800

94.6
91.8
88.9
84.7
79.1

1895...............................
1896.............................
1897.............................
1898...............................
1899............................

31.000
31.000
30. 667
30.000
34.021

50.2
50.2
49. 7
48.6
55.1

14.250
14.250
14.000
13.750
15.396

51.1
51.1
50.2
49.3
55.3

2.650
2.500
2.350
2.500
2.663

74.8
70.6
66.4
70.6
75.1

1900...............................
1901.............................
1902...............................
1903......... .....................
1904.............................

37.688
36.708
42.104
49.646
50.329

61.1
59.5
68. 2
80.4
81.5

17.375
18.000
19.250
19.188
20.500

62.4
64.6
69.1
68.9
73.6

2.850
2.850
2.671
2.567
2.600

80.5
80.5
75.4
72.5
73.4

1905...............................
1906...............................
1907...............................
1908...............................
1909...............................

48. 208
50.958
58.083
58.292
57.625

78.1
82.6
94.1
94.4
93.4

21.417
25.542
24.000
20. 792
25.250

76.9
91.7
86.0
74.6
90.6

2.725
3.242
4.225
3.538
3.267

76.9
91.5
119.3
99.9
92.2

1910...............................
1911...............................
1912...............................
1913...............................
1914...............................

61. 500
61. 591
61.500
61.727
60.667

99.6
99.8
99.6
100.0
98.3

24.600
24.273
26.955
27. 864

88.3
87.1
96.7
100.0
96.6

3.492
3.608
3.483
3.542
3.329

98.6
101.9
98.4
100. 0
94.0




$29. 833
29.541

ioo. 6
99.0

$21.678
20.947

$4.284
3.904

100. 0
91.1

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1880 TO 1921,

F. o. b. mill, Cincinnati,
New York,
New York,
average
average
average
average
Relative
Relative
price per
price per
price.
price per
price per
price.
M feet.
M feet.
M feet.
M feet.

58.909
60.292
63.458
84.708
110.000
195.636

95.4
97. 7
102.8
137.2
178.2
316.9

1921...............................
January.................
February...............
March....................
April......................
May........................
June.......................

131.667
170. 000
165. 000
130. 000
130. 000
122. 500
122.500

July........................
August...................
September.............
October..................
N ovember..............
December..............

125.000
120.000
120.000
120.000
124.000
131.000




28.167
29.417
35. 750
47.583

$52.673
62.202
105.147

94.4
98.6
119. 8
159.5
188.4
318.4

20.610
22.009
29.901
34.776
41.900
49.700

95.1
101.5
137.9
160.4
193.3
229.3

213.3
275.4
267.3
210.6
210.6
198.5
198.5

58. 578
78.750
69.167
62.500
56.375
55.000
51.625

177.4
238.5
209.4
189.3
170. 7
166. 5
156.3

34.827
37.000
37.250
37.400
36.625
35.600
34.625

202.5
194.4
194.4
194.4
200.9
212.2

53.250
56.000
53.750
55.500
57.500
57.500

161.3
169.5
162.7
168.1
174.2
174.2

33.500
32.700
32. 750
33. 500
33.500
33.500

3.839
4.221
4.938
5.000

$3. 548
5.828
8.988

89.6
98.5
115.3
116.7
191.7
295.7

3.067
3.446
4.054
5.425
6.039
8.067

86.6
97.3
114.5
153.2
170.5
227.8

160.7
170.7
171.8
172.5
169.0
164.2
159.7

4.131
3.440
3.240
3.230
3.270
3.720
4.140

135.8
113.2
106.5
106.3
107.6
122.4
136.2

* 6.524
7.823
7.500
7.242
7.000
7.000
6.733

184.2
220.9
211.8
204.5
197.6
197.6
190.1

154.5
150.8
151.1
154.5
154.5
154.5

4.240
4.260
4. 570
5. 340
5.410
4.710

139.5
140.2
150.3
175.6
178.0
155.0

6.234
5.750
5.750
5.750
5.750
5. 750

176.0
162.4
162.4
162.4
162.4
162.4

AVEEAGE WHOLESALE PEICES OE COMMODITIES.

1915...............................
1916...............................
1917...............................
1918...............................
1919...............................
1920...............................

CD

19*8

T able 9 .—AVER AGE W HO LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.
Building materials.
(a) Lumber.

(6) Brick, common.

(d)

Other building materials.
Cement.

Shingles.
Year or month.

Red: Cincin­ Red: Domestic,
nati.
New York.

F .o.b . F. o. b.
plant,
yard,
average average Relafor
82
tive
U. S.,
yards,
White Michigan Red
cedar,
average average price.
pine,
white
New
Aver­
price
Aver­
price
18
pine, 16
16
Aver­ Rela­
York,
per M. per M.
inches inches inches Rela­ age Rela­ age Rela­
age
tive
tive
tive
tive
average
long,
long,
long, price. price price. price price. price
price per
per M.
per M.
average average average
per M. price.
barrel.
price
price
price
per M. per M. per M.
73.4
76.4
74.6
73.5
71.7

$6,563
5.708
5.771
5.833
5.000

100.0
87.0
87.9
88.9
76.2

1895........................
1896........................
1897........................
1898........................
1899........................

3.700
3.613
3.542
3.552
3.679

70.7
69.0
67.7
67.8
70.3

5.313
5.063
4.938
5.750
5.688

81.0
77.1
75.2
87.6
86.7

$1.969
2.000
1.967
1.998
2.048

1900-............ .........
1901........................
1902........................
1903........................
1904........................

4.000
4.188

76.4
80.0
87.9
89.5
87.6

5.250
5.766
5.385
5.906
7.495

80.0
87.9
82.1
90.0
114.2

2.158
1.890
1.950
2.029
1.460

85.8
112.5
137.1
102.3
101.9

8.104
8.547
6.156
5.104
6.385

123.5
130.2
93.8
77.8 :
97.3

1.427
1.575
1.646
1.460
1.412

1905........................
1906........................
1967........................
1968........................
1909.......................




S3.263
3.588
3.650
3.575
3.500

$1,688
2.213
2.606
2.013
2.004

F. o. b. F. o. b.
F. o. b.
plant,
plant,
plant,
average average Rela­
near
Rela­
for
of 6
Chicago, tive
U. S., plants, tive
average price. average average price.
price per
price per price per
barrel.
barrel. barrel.

1890 TO 1021,

1890........................ $3.842
1891........................
4.000
1892........................ 3.906
1893........................ 3.850
1894........................ 3.750

Portland: Domestic.

WHOIJiSALE PSICES,

Salmon: Run
of kiln,
Chicago.

im.
Mi.
tm.

1913.

1914.
1915.

2.008
1.813
1.939

102.1
92.2
98.6

1.967

ioo. o $4,938

1.713

87.1

4.872

100.0 $7,000

5.719
5.891
6.760

87.1
89.8
103.0

6.583

100.0

$6.200

96.4

5.531

84.3

6.120

96.8 6.250
89.3
96.4
96.9 6.750
100.2 8.43'8 120.5
150.9 12.938 184.8
181.2 13.583 194.0
231.7 17.467 249.5

6.052
8.035
8.885
11.927
15.958'
21.854

92.2
122.4
135.4
181.7
243.2
333.0

6.150
6.680
8.170
10.900
12.790

6.750

100. 0

$1.Oil
.922

100.0
91.2

$1,005
.927

100.0
92.2

$14,014
18.946

99. 2
107. 7
131.
175.
206. 3
278. 9

.971
1.187
1.532
1.665
1.663
1.802

96.0
117.5
151.5
164.7
164.5
178.3

.860
1.103
1.354
1.596
1.710

$1. 767
2.042

85.6
109.8
134.7
158.8
170.1
196.6

98. 7

1.580

1917.
1918.
19191920.

1.664
1.910
2.818
2.794
4.488
4.723

84.6 4.780
97.1 4.783
143.3 4.947
142.1 7.449
228.2 8.947
240.2 11.441

1921.
January...
February.
March.......
April........
May..........
June.........

2.672
2.490
2.560
2.400
2.420
2.570
2.520

135.8 9.334 189.0 16.930
126.6 11.310 229.0 20.300
130.2 11.210 227.0 18.700
122.0 li.586 234.5 17.980
123.0 9.170 185.7 17 800
130.7 8 740 177.0 17.040
128.1 8.410 170.3 16.600

242.0
290.0
267.1
256.9
254.3
243.4
237.1

15.208
16.500
16.500
16.250
15.000
14.500
14.500

231.7
251.4
251.4
247.6
228.6
221.0
221.0

15.759
18.465
18.295
17.719
16.869
16.049
15.640

231.
271. 9
269. 2
260. 8
248. 4
236.
230.

2
2

1.662
1.931
1.718
1.700
1.700
1.700
1.700

164.4
191.0
170.0
168.2
168.2
168.2
168.2

1.931
2.172
1.997
1.982
1.975
1.975
1.975

185.9
209.1
192.2
190.9
190.2
190.2
190.2

July..........
August —
September.
October...
November.
December.,

2.430
2.500
3.060
3.320
2.870
2.920

123.6
127.1
155.6
168.8
145.0
148.5

232.1
220.7
220.7
220.7
228.6
232.1

14.750
i4 .760
15.250
15.000
15.000
14.500

224.8
224.8
232.4
228.6
228.6
221.0

15.177
14.838
14.180
14.073
13.962
13.846

223. 4
218. 5
208. 8
207. 1
205. 5
203. 8

1.700
1.700
1.593
1.500
1.500
1.500

168.2
168.2
157.6
148.4
148.4
148.4

1.975
1.975
1.853
1.775
1.768
1.750

190.2
190.2
178.4
170.8
170.1
168.4

1916.

171.9
172.3
171.3
173.6
174.8
180.8

16.250
15.450
15.450
i5.450
16.000
16.250

199




8.490
8.510
8.460
8.570
8.630
8.930

AVEKAGE WHOLESALE PEICES OF COMMODITIES.

100.0

98.7

1.448
1.461
1.315

200

9 .—A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Building materials.
( d ) Other building materials.
Crushed stone,
1^-inch.

Rela­
tive
price.

Western, If Westernj 1| Western, If
Unmolded f inches thick, inches thick, inches thick,
1£ inches
5-panel, No. 1 5-panel, No. 1 4-panel, No. 2 Rela­
thick,
O .& .,
O. d .,
O. G.,
Buffalo,
tive
Chicago,
Buffalo,
Chicago,
average
price.
average
average
average
price per
price per
price per
price per
door.
door.
door.
door.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

$1,375
1.250
1.225
1.050

86.5
78.7
78.7
77.1
66.0

895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

.913
.838
.813
.925
1.292

57.4
52.7
51.1
58.2
81.2

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

1.590
1.891
2.121
1.729
1.690

100.0
119.0
133.4
108.7
106.3

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909
1910.
1911.




x
.

$1.740
1.837
1.727
1.884

112.3
105.6
115.2
110.9
112.9

$1.811
1.744
1.775
1.673
1.603
1.513

106.4
102.0

$1,338

Hollow tile:
Building.

Gravel.

96.2

F .o.b .p it, F .o.b.p it,
average of average of
22 plant
14 plant
pnces,
pnces,
average
average
price per
price per
ton.
ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
block.

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Average
price per
cubic
yard.

Doors: White pine, 2 feet 8 inches by 6 feet 8 inches.

...............

$1. 633

1914

..............

1. 633

100.0
100.0

$0.900
.938

100.0
104.2

1.390
1.373

100.0
98.7

$0. 432
.455

100.0
105.2

$0.064
.064

100.0
100.0

1915...........................
1916...........................
1917...........................
1918...........................
1919...........................
1920...........................

1. 633
1. 633
1. 633
2. 100
2. 050
2. 469

100.0
100.0
100.0
128.6
125.6
151.2

.810
.883
1.117
1.604
1.704
1.908

90.0
98.1
124.1
178.2
189.4
212.0

1.343
1.373
1.543
1.992
2.719
4.371

96.6
98.7
111.0
143.3
195.6
314.4

.481
.481
.583
.741
.833

$0. 953
1.107

111.3
111.3
134.8
171.4
192.7
223.9

.064
.064
.074
.076
.080
.136

100.0
100.0
115.9
118.8
125.0
213.0

1921...........................
January.............
February...........
March.................
April..................
May...................
June...................

2.,567
2. 650
2. 650
2. 650
2. 650
2.,650
2.,650

157.2
162.3
162.3
162. 3
162.3
162.3
162.3

1.925
1.950
1.950
1.950
1.950
1.950
1.950

213.9
216.7
216. 7
216.7
216.7
216.7
216.7

2.799
3.050
3.050
2.900
2.900
2.900
2.750

201.4
219.4
219.4
208.6
208.6
208.6
197.8

1.005
1.156
1.126
1.094
1.050
1.019
.991

303.3
233.7
227. 8
221.2
212.4
206.0
200.4

.103
161.4
.135
210.5
.120
187.5
.120
187.5
.120
187.5
.110 1 171.1
.110
171.1

July....................
August...............
September.........
October..............
November.........
December..........

2.,650
2.,650
2.,400
2.,400
2. 400
2. 400

162.3
162.3
147.0
147. 0
147.0
147.0

1.950
1.950
1.950
1.850
1.850
1.850

216.7
216.7
216.7
205.6
205.6
205.6

2.630
2.630
2.530
2.750
2.750
2.750

189.2
189.2
182.0
197.8
197.8
197.8

.969
.957
.938
.921
.914
.927

196.0
193.7
189.8
186.3
184.8
187.3

.095
.095
.093
.093
.082
.069




148.1
148.1
144.7
144.7
128.3
108.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

1913

to

o

T a b l e 9 . — A V E R A G E W H O L E SA L E PRICES OP COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

,C>
b©
Building materials.
(d)

Other building materials.

Rock- Lump, f. o. b.
port,
plant,
average age for aver­
price per averageU. S.,
price
barrel.
per ton.

Polished, area 3 to 5 square
feet.

F.o. b.pit, F.o. b.pit,
Mason’s lump,
Unsilvered, Glazing,
Average
Unsilvered, Glazing,
f. o. b. plant,
average
average
average Rela­
average
average
average
average of 15 Rela­ for U. S., of 26 plant Rela­ price per Rela­ price per price per Rela­ price per price per tive
tive
tive
100
tive
tive
plant prices, price.
prices, av­ price. square price.
average
square price.
square
square
square price.
price per erage price
average price
foot.
foot
feet.
foot.
foot.
per ton.
ton.
per ton.

SO 979
.
.913
.929
.920
.848

90.8
84.6
86.2
86.2
78.6

1895..
1898..
1897. .*
1898..
1899..

.781
.694
.719
.742
.798

72.5
64.3
66.7
68.8
74.0

1900..
1901..
1902..
1903..
1904..

.683
.774
.806
.788
.825

63.4 !
71.8 ,
74.7
73.0
76.5

.891
.047
.949
1.045
1.045

82.6!
87.888.0
96.9
96.9

.241

1908..

1009..
m o .,
m i..

!




1.045
1.108

96.9
102.8

.480
.540
.320
.430
.480

123.3
138.7
82.2
110.5
123.3

117.8
110.8
89.2
125.5
78.8

.340
.320
.258
.363
.228

1905..
1908..
1007..

179.8
177.2
141.3
141.3
115.6

103.9 :
117.8
69.3
93.5
103.9

.300
.340
.200
.270
.300

1891..
1892..
1893..
1894..

SO 700
.
.690
.550
.550
.450

.540
.490
.411
.431
.365

138.7
125.9
105.7
110.8
93.8

183.6
180.1
145.4
145.4
114.3

SO.530
.520
.420
.420
.330

1.890- -

Polished, area 5 to 10 square
feet.

SO 198
.
.227
.230
.173
.202
.249
.225

83.4
95.8
97.2
73.2
85.2 .
105.3
95.1

.373

$0.305
.330
.340
.275
.282

95.8
103.7
106.8
86.4
88.5

.348
.316

109-2
99.2

'XW i

Sand: Building.

Lime: Common.

Year or month.

os 0981 ‘sat)®** a'lvsartoHM*

Glass: Plate.
Slate: Roofing
No. 1.

1912

1.085

1913

1 .078

100.6

100.0

4.360

1915.
1916
1917.
1918
1919
1920

4.260
5.210
6.630
8.510
9.640
11.700

1921................
January..
February.
March___
April.......
May........
June........
July..........
August___
September.
October...
November.
December.

.300
.315
.388
.496
.560

$4.*62&' lOO.O
4.896 105.9

.217
.237
.211

91.6
100.0
89.1

.297
.318
.291

93.2
100.0
91.4

95.2
99.9
123.0
157.4
177.5
203.1

5.000
5.208
6.500
7.583
7.875
10.050

140.5
164.0
170.3
217.3

.187
.292
.340
.361
.463
.745

78.9
123.2
143.6
152.4
195.4
314.7

.253
.338
.393
.453
.583
.809

79.6
10.6.0
123.3
142.2
183.0
254.2

9.772 236.9
11.045 267.8
10.796 261.7
10.703 259.3
10.614 257.2
10.479 254.1
9.821 238.0

695 182.5
799 209.6
793 208.0
760 199.5
727 190.8
706 185.5
688 180.5

10.483
11.900
11.900
10.200
10.200
10.200
10.200

226.7
257.3
257.3
220.5
220.5
220.5
220.5

.627
.780
.780
.780
.780
.600
.600

264.8
329.5
329.5
329.5
329.5
253.5
253.5

.707
.820
.820
.820
.820
.700
.700

222.0
257.6
257.6
257.6
257.6
219.9
219.9

9.777 236.9
8.946 216.8
8.831 213.9
8.785 212.9
8.753 212.1
8.712 211.0

675

10.200
10.200
10.200
10.200
10.200
10.200

220.5
220.5
220.5
220.5
220.5
220.5

.600
.600
.600
.600
.400
.400

253.5
253.5
253.5
253.5
169.0
169.0

.700
.700
.700
.700
.500
.500

219.9
219.9
219.9
219.9
157.1
157.1

$0

668

653
627
620
627

177.1
175.4
171.3
164.5
162.8
164.5

108.1
112.6

208




$10,898

96.2
117.6
149.7
192.1
217.6
264.1

101.6

100.0

$0,315
.320

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

98.4

$4,430

1914

400
375
350
325

204

300
275
250
225

200
175
150

125
lOO

75

50

40*

WHOLESALE PEICES, 1890 TO 1921




C hart 37.

400
375
350
325
300
275
25 0
225

200
175

150

125

100

50

40

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

205




Chart 37a.

T a b l e 9 . — AVE R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

*3

Building materials.
(d)

Other building materials.
Paint materials.

Glass: Window.

Year or month.

American,
American, single, 25- single, B, 25inch, 6 by 8 to 10 by inch, 6 by 8 to
15 inches.
10 by 15 inches.

Linseed oil,
raw.

Rosin: Com­
mon to good,
strained.

Putty.

Turpentine,
spirits of.

Tar.

Lead, carbon­
ate of (white
lead): Ameri­
can, in oil.

Zinc, oxide of
(white zinc).

81.9
81.3
73.3
78.6
73.2

$1,786
1.770
1.595
1.710
1.633

80.4
79.7
71.8
77.0
73.5

$0.616
.484
.408
.463
.524

133.3
104.8
88.4
100.3
113.4

$0.018
.018
.016
.016
.016

152.2
152.2
140.0
139.0
136.5

$1,384
1.474
1.342
1.262
1.251

28.7
30.6
27.9
26.2
26.0

$1.475
1.583
1.300
1.046
1.092

66.3
71.2
58.4
47.0
49.1

$0,408
.380
.323
.300
.293

......

1.599
1.802
2.199
2.643
2.708

58.8
66.3
80.8
97.2
99.6

1.392
1.600
1.963
2.343
2.399

62.7
72.0
88.4
105.5
108.0

.524
.368
.328
.393
.427

113.4
79.7
70.9
84.9
92.3

.015
.015
.015
.015
.017

126.1
126.1
126.1
126.1
146.1

1.562
1.746
1.613
1.421
1.346

32.4
36.2
33.5
29.5
27.9

1.142
1.013
1.054
1.098
1.246

51.3
45.5
47.4
49.3
56.0

.292
.274
.292
.322
.458

68.3
64.1
68.3
75.3
107.1

.053
.052
.054
.054
.057

77.7
76.5
79.0
80.3
84.0

65.1
.035
.038 ■ 71.2
.038
tb .i
.040
73.6
.044
81.4

1900 .....
1901 .....
1902 .....
19Q3..........
1904..........

2.699
4.128
3.219
2.640
2.887

99.2
151. 8
118.3
97.1
106.1

2.319
3.282
2.565
2.160
2.328

104.4
147.8
115.5
97.3
104.8

.629
.635
.593
.417
.416

136.2
137.4
128.4
90.2
90.0

.019
.015
.019
.014
.011

165.2
130.4
167.0
122.6
95.7

1.602
1.530
1.613
2.216
2.833

1.363
33.3
1.282
31.8
33.5
1.325
46.0 . 1.67.9
58.8 , 1.679

61.2
57.6
59.6
75.5
75.5

.477
.373
.474
.572
.576

111.5
87.1
110.8
133.6
134.5

.063
.058
.054
.062
.059

92.5
85.2
79.7
91.0
87.7

.045
.044
.044
.046
.046

83.8
81.4
81.8
86.1
86.1

1905..........

2.T64
2.920
2.813
2.360
2.320

101.6
107.3
103.4
86.8
85.3

2.137
2.256
2.242
1.881
1.849

96.2
101.6
101.0
84.7
83.3

.468
.405
.434
.438
.580

101.2
87.6
94.0
94.7
125.5

. 011
.012
.012
.012
.012

94.8
103.5
. 104.3
104.3
104.3

3.423
4.015
4.377
3.282
3.500

7i. i
83.3
90.9
68.1
72.7

79.0
88.0
104.7
71.9
73.6

.628
.665
.634
.453
.491

146.6
155.4
148.3
105.9
114.7

.063
.069
.070
.065
.064

93.6
102.5
103.1
96.2
94.2

.047
.051
.054
.051
.052

86.4
94.4
100.0
95.4
96.1

.....
.....
......
......

1895

1894
1896
1897
1898
1899

1906
1907
1908
1909

.....

.....
...............
...............
.....

.....
.....
.....
.....




1.758
1.958
2.329
1.600
1.638

95.3 $0.064
88.7 ; .065
75.4
.066
70.2
.061
68.5
.052

94.4
96.2
97.3
90.1
77.5

$0,043
.042
.043
.041
.087

$2,228
2.213
1.994
2.138
1.992

1890
1891
1892
1893

79.0
77.9
79.2
76.8
69.3

,E PRICES, ,1890 TO 1921.

In
I n i, 2,
A,
AA,
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
aver­
aver­ Rela­ Aver­ Rela­ Aver­ Rela­ bulk, 3, and 5 Rela­
RelaRela­
Rela­
Rela­
age
Rela­
age
age
age
age
aver­
pound
age
age
age
age
price
price .tiv$
tive
price
tive
price
tive
price
tive
tive
price
age
tive
tive
tive
. tins,,
price
price price. price
pet. price.
price.
per
per
price.
per
price.
per
price.
per
per
price. price average price.
price.
per
per
pound.
gallon.
pound.
barrel.
barrel.
gallon.
per
price per
50 sq.ft.
50 sq.ft. 50 sq.ft.
pound. pound.

2.338
1.796
1.785
2.221
2.168

105.3
80.9
80.4
100.0
97.6

.847
.879
.673
.462
.502

183.2
190.3
146.5
100.0
108.6

.012
.012
.012
.012
.012

1915....................
1916....................
1917....................
1918....................
1919....................
1920....................

2. 550
3.150
4.123
6.322
6. 554
6.900

112.1
138.5
181.3
278.0
288.2
303.5

2.423 109.1
2. 494 112.3
3.325 149.7
5.689 256.2
6.226 280.4
6.555 295.2

.562
.751
1.107
1.697
1.769
1.459

121.6
162.5
239.5
345.6
382.8
315.7

.012

1921....................
January.......
February. . .
March.......
April..........
_
M&y_ _
June__

5.909
6.900
6* 900
6.900
6.900
5.400
5.400

259.9
303.5
303.5
303.5
303.5
237.5
237.5

5.614
6. 555
6.555
6. 555
6. 555
5.130
5.130

252.8
295.2
295.2
295.2
295.2
231.0
231.0

.700
.782
.655
.658
.604
.700
. 750

July.............
August........
September..
October.......
November
December...

5. 400
5.400
5. 400
5.400
5.400
5.400

237.5
237.5
237.5
237.5
237.5
237.5

5.130
5.130
5.130
5.130
5.130
5.130

231.0
231.0
231.0
231.0
231.0
231.0

.744
.743
.745
.680
.670
.674

2.930
2.253
2. 240
2.720

........

5.233
6.717
6.642
4.817
4.017

108.6
139.4
137.9
100.0
83.4

2.254
2.125
'2.000
2.225
2.188

101.3
95.5
89.9
160.0
98.3

.683
.679
.470
.428
.473

159.6
158.7
109.9
100. 0
110.6

.069
.071
.068
.068
.068

102.4
104.6
100.9
100.0
99.9

.054
.054
.052
.054
.054

100.0
99.4
95.7
160.6
100.0

$0.027
.033
.040
.047
.047
.055

100.0
122.6
150.9
176. 2
175. 8
207.5

3.767
5.800
6.392
10.584
15.201
15.278

78.2
120.4
132.7
219.7
315.6
317.2

1.733
2.254
3.192
3.677
4.452
5.123

77.9
101.3
143.4
165.3
200.1
230.3

.459
.491
.488
.594
1.210
1.734

107.4
114.7
114. 0
138.9
282.8
405.3

.070
.093
.112
.127
.131
.152

103.3
137.1
165.8
188.0
194.1
225.3

.067
.092
.100
.100
.087
.089

124.0
170.8
186.6
185.5
162.3
165.4

151.5
169.2
141.7
142.3
130.7
151. 5
162.3

.051
.052
.051
.053
.053
.053
.053

192.5
194.3
193.6
198.1
198.1
198.1
198.1

5.763
8.813
7.500
5.850
4.950
5.260
5.050

119.6
183.0
155.7
121; 5
102.8
109.2
104.8

2. 890
3.875
3.313
3.000
3.000
3.000
3.000

129.9
174.2
148.9
134.8
134.8
134.8
134.8

.681
.724
.609
.584
.591
.717
.604

159.2
169.2
142.3
136.4
138. 2
167.6
141.1

.127
.132
.130
.130
.130
.130
.130

187.7
195.3
192.3
192.3
192.3
192.3
192.3

.077
.085
.080
.080
.080
.080
.080

142.6
158.0
148.7
148.7
148.7
148.7
148.7

161.0
160.7
161.2
147.2
145.0
145.9

.053
.053
.053
.048
.048
.048

198.1
198.1
198.1
179.2
179.2
179.2

5.050
4.970
5.425
5.600
5.680
5.325

104,8
103.2
112.6
116.3
117.9
110.6

2.875
2.500
2.525
2.550
2.650
2.500

129.2
112.4
113.5
114.6
119.1
112.4

.613
.633
.718
.755
.810
.814

143.1
147.9
167.7
176.4
189.3
190.2

.129
.123
.123
.123
.123
.123

190.1
181.2
181.2
181.2
181.2
181.2

.073
.073
.073
.073
.073
.073

134.8
134.8
134.8
134.3
134.8
134.8

207




100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

12.274
2.274

107.7
82.8
82.4
100.0
100.0

1910....................
1911....................
1912....................
1813....................
1914.....................

2 .0 8

T a b l e 9 . — AVE R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued,

Chemicals and drugs.
(a) Chemicals.
Acid.

•

Alcohol.

Year and month.

Alum: Lump.
Muriatic, 20°.

Nitric 42°.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Stearic, triple
pressed.

Sulphuric, 66°.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

80.0
75.4
93.1
77.7
67.7

$0,009
.008
.010
.009
.007

.008
.008
.011
.013
.014

73.8
57.7
83.8
98.5
103.8

1900.....................................
1901.......................................
1902.....................................
1903.....................................
1904.......................................

.014
.015
.017
.016
.016

1905.......................................
1906.......................................
1907.....................................
1908.......................................
1909.......................................
1910.....................................
1911 ............
1912.......................................
1913.......................................
1914.......................................

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

88.0
81.0
95.0
85.0
73.0

$1.138
1.160
1.297
1.292
.720

237.8
242.5
271.2
270.1
150.5

$0.018
.016
.016
.017
.017

104.0
90.3
91.4
99.4
96.6

.007
.007
.010
.011
.012

70.0
70.0
95.0
113.0
120.0

.867
.850
.694
.750
.771

181.2
177.7
145.1
156.8
161.2

.016
.016
.017
.017
.017

91.4
93.7
94.9
94.3
96.0

103.8
115.4
129.2
123.1
123.1

.012
.013
.013
.013
.013

120.0
125.0
130.0
127.0
129.0

.800
.613
.642
.592
.588

167.3
128.1
134.2
123. 7
122.8

.018
.018
.018
.017
.018

100.0
100.0
100.0
98.9
100.0

.016
.014
.014
.014
.013

123.1
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.1

.012
.010
.010
.010
.010

124.0
100.0
100.0
102.0
100.0

.675
.700
.399
.428
.500

141.1
146.3
83.5
89.4
104.5

.018
.018
.018
.018
.018

100.0
iqo. o
100.0
100.0
100.0

.013
.013
.013
.013
.013

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

.010
.010
.010
.010
.010

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

.500
.500
.500
.478
.450

104.5
104.5
104. 5
100.0
94.1

.018
.018
.018
.018
.020

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
113.1

Rela­
tive
price.

1890.......................................
1891.......................................
1892.......................................
1893.......................................
1894.......................................

$0.010
.010
.012
.010
.009

1895.......................................
1896.......................................
1897.......................................
1898.......................................
1899.....................................




Average
price per
gallon.

$0.019
.016

100.0
80.4

$0.049
.049

100.0
100.0

Average
price per
pound.

$0.133
.129

100.0
97.4

$0,366
.338

Rela­
tive
price.

Wood: Refined,
. 95 per cent.
Average
price per
gallon.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Denatured,
180 proof.

100.0
92.5

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1880 TO 1821.

Acetic, 28 per
cent.

.024
.060
.052
.056
.030
.034

125.3
309.3
267.5
290.7
155.2
174.7

.016
.025
.018
.023
.016
.021

123.8
189.2
134.6
174.6
123.1
160.0

.066
.078
.077
.087
.075
.076

134.8
159.6
157.6
178.9
153.5
155.7

.177
.150
.217
.251
.263
.268

133.4
112.9
164.0
196.8
198.4
202.5

.013
.020
.017
.016
.010
.011

129.0
200.0
169.0
163.0
95.0
112.0

.372
.563
.798
.686
.477
.980

101.6
153.8
218.0
187.5
130.4
267.8

.458
.671
1.046
1.015
1.273
2.557

95.8
140.2
218.6
212.1
266.2
534.5

.030
.041
.042
.046
.041
.045

170.3
233.1
240.6
262.9
234.9
256.0

1921.......................................
January.........................
February.....................
March............................
April............................
May...............................
June.............................

.026
.028
.028
.026
.025
.025
. 025

131.4
141.8
141.8
132.0
128.9
128.9
128.9

.014
.017
.017
.017
.015
.013
.012

109.2
133.1
131.5
126.9
115.4
98.5
92.3

.071
.075
.075
.075
.071
.070
.070

144.7
153.7
153.7
153.7
144.5
143.4
143.4

.119
.145
.145
.135
.130
.113
.108

89.7
109.4
109.4
101.9
98.1
84.9
81.1

.009
.009
.010
.010
.010
.009
.009

91.0
92.0
98.0
100.0
95.0
90.0
90.0

.447
.704
.670
.600
.364
.365
.360

122.1
192.5
183.2
164.0
99.5
99.8
98.4

.801
1.354
1.280
.900
.770
.770
.770

167.4
283.1
267.6
188.2
161. 0
161.0
161.0

.038
. 044
.043
.041
. 040
.039
.037

218.3
248.6
242.9
236. 0
228.' 6
225i 1
210.9

July...............................
August..........................
September....................
October.........................
November...................
December......................

.025
.025
. 025
. 025
.025
.025

128.9
128.9
128.9
128.9
128.9
128.9

.012
.012
.014
.014
.014
.014

92.3
92.3
107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7

.070
.070
.070
.068
' .068
.068

143.4
143.4
143.4
138.3
138.3
138.3

.108
.108
.115
.103
.113
.105

81.1
81.1
86.8
77.4
84.9
79.2

.009
.009
.009
.009
.009
.009

90.0
90.0
90.0
85.0
85.0
85.0

.352
.350
.363
.406
.413
.412

96.2
95.7
99.1
111.0
112.8
112.6

.758
.633
.600
.600
.578
.580

158.5
132. 2
125.4
125.4
120. 7
121.3

.035
.035
.035
.035
.038
.037

200.0
200. 0
200. 0
200.0
214.3
211.4

209




-

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

11083°— 22— Bull. 320-

1915.......................................
1916.......................................
1917.......................................
1918.......................................
1919.......................................
1920.......................................

210
WHOLESALE PBICES, 1890 TO 1921.




Chart 38.

00

® l » » 0 3 B o O o S o 8 S o O H r t r t H H H H r t 3 2 H
o>

2

AVERAGE WHOLE9AU3 PRICES OF COMMODITIES.




Chart 38a,

fcO
W

212

T able 9 .—A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
Chemicals and drugs.
(a) Chemicals.

Ammonia: An­
hydrous.

Borax: Crys­
tals.

Copper sul­
phate (blue
vitriol), 99 per
cent crystals.

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­ Aver­
age
age
Rela­
age
age
Rela­
age
Rela­
Rela­
price
tive
price
tive
price
price
tive
price
tive
per
per
price.
per
per 100 price.
price.
per
price.
pound.
pound.
pound. pounds.
pound.

1890...................
1891...................
1892...................
1893...................
1894...................
1895...................
1896...................
1897...................
1898...................
1899...................
1900...................
1901...................
1902...................
1903...................
1904...................
1905...................
1906...................
1907...................
1908..-..............
1900...................




Formaldehyde.

Palm kernel
oil: Crude.

(War In­
(Data
from
dustries
Aver­
Board
trade
Rela­
age
Rela­
journals.) tive
data.)
tive
price
Average Average price.
per
price.
price per price per
pound.
pound.
pound.

Potash: Caustic, 88-92 per
cent.

Soda:
Carbonate of
(sal soda).

(War In­
(Data
dustries
Aver­
from
Board
trade
Relar
age
Rela­
data.) journals.) tive
price
tive
Average Average price. per 100 price.
price per price per
pounds.
pound.
pound.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Year or month.

Bleaching powder.

100.0
100.0

$0.013
.013

100.0
100.0

$0.038
.038

100.0
100.0

$0. 052
.046

1915...................
1916..................
1917...................
1918...................
1919...................
1920...................

.250
.250
.254
.385
.303
.336

100.0
100.0
101.7
154.1
121.1
134.2

.025
.065
.027
.031

$2.956
1.946
4.935

200.0
520.0
216.8
250.4
164.8
418.2

.047
.065
.072
.073
.073
.082

124.5
174.4
191.7
193.3
194.7
219.2

.064
.134
.098
.093
.082
.079

123.4
256.2
187.9
178.9
156.6
151.2

1921...................
January___
February...
March.........
April..........
May............
June............

.303
.304
.303
.285
.304
.300
.300

121.2
121.6
121.0
114.0
121.6
120.0
120.0

2.272
2.520
2.563
2.463
2.380
2.200
2.150

192.6
213.6
217.1
208.6
201.6
186.3
182.0

.060
.071
.070
.063
.062
.059
.058

159.2
189.3
186. 7
166.7
165.3
158.4
153.3

.055
.060
.056
.052
.052
.053
.055

July............
August.......
September..
October___
November..
December..

.300
.303
.310
.310
.310
.306

120.0
121.0
124.0
124.0
124.0
122.4

2.020
2.125
2.250
2.250
2. 213
2.140

171.0
180.0
190.6
190.6
187.5
181.3

.058
.056
.055
.055
.055
.055

153.3
148.3
146.7
146.7
146.7
146.7

.058
.057
.054
.053
. 053
.056

$0. 085
.085

100. 0

100.0
100.0

$0.101
.104

$0.175
.227
.464

103.9
129. 7
177. 4
206.8
268.6
549.5

.105
.138
. 161
.178
.180
.172

104.1
136.3
159. 2
176.5
178.3
170.6

105.0
115.2
108.1
99.6
98. 8
100.8
105.6

. 135
.180
.179
. 158
. 147
.144
.135

160.3
213.4
212.0
186.7
174.1
170.4
160.1

.094
. 112
. 100
.096
.093
.099
.095

93. 4
110. 9
99. 0
95.3
91. 6
97. 8
94.1

067
129
105
089
064
054
051

186.3
361.8
293.3
248.4
179. 8
152.0
143.4

110. 4
109. 2
103.5
100.8
100. 8
106.9

.128
.121
.113
.110
. 105
.105

151.8
143. 7
133.4
130.3
124.5
124.5

.088
.092
.092
.092
.087
.087

87.1
91. 0
91.0
91.1
86.0
85.6

047
042
048
054
056
055

130.6
117.8
132.7
152.0
156.3
154.2

88.9

.088
.110
.151
.176'

102. 8

100.0

$0.035
.076

100.0
213.3

$0.600
.600

100.0

.299
.823
.858
.758

844.1
2323.5
2424.6
$0 764 2141.0
398 1115.5
271 757.9

.600
1.046
1.117
1.371
1. 437
1.737

174.3
186.1
228.5
239.4
289.4

100.0

1.650
1.650

293.4
333.3
325.0
316.7
300.0
275.0
275.0

1.650
1.650
1.650
1.850
1.750
1.600

275.0
275.0
275.0
308.3
291.7
266.7

1.760
2.000

1.950

213




100. 0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

1910...................
1911...................
1912...................
1913................... $0.250
1914...................
.250




j-j;g
‘sa^BM a'ivsa,iOHjs\
06SI

m i oi

1910.
1911.

100.0
98.6

.694
3.052
3.058
2.674
2.011
3.300

118.9
523.2
524.3
458.4
344.7
565.8

.010
.016
.021
.030
.025
.025

103.0
158.0
213.0
297.0
253.0
254.0

.031
.048
.064
.045
.031
.053

214.4
331.5
436.3
305.5
211.6
361.6

January...
February..
March......
April........
May..........
June........ .

2.372
2.280
2.275
2.250
2.270
2.450
2.625

406.6
390.9
390.0
385.7
389.2
420.0
450.0

.022
.021
.020
.024
.023
.023
.023

215.0
208.0
200.0
235.0
229.0
225.0
225.0

.038
.038
.038
.036
.037
.038
.041

261.6
261.0
262.3
247.3
251.4
259.6
283.6

1.091
1.210
1.150
1.250
1.150
1.175
1.175

171.6
190.4
181.0
196.7
181.0
184.8
184.8

July............
August.......
September..
October___
November..
December..

2.470
2.375
2.450
2.430
2. 4j25
2.210

423.5
407.2
420.0
416.6
415. 7
378.9

.023
.023
.020
.020
.020
.021

225.0
225.0
200.0
200.0
200.0
206.0

.038
.036
.040
.040
.039
.038

256.8
243.2
270.5
275.3
267.8
258.9 ......................

1.000
1.000
3.000
1.000
1.000
1.000

157.2
157.2
157.2
157.2
157.2
157.2

1914.
1915.
1910.
1917.
1018.
1919.

19201921.

$0.071
.069

142.4
197.0
146.8
127.3
108.4

.069
.099
.156
.179
.154
.131

98.0
139.9
220.5
253.6
217.1
185.4

15.906
20.000
17.000
16.000
16.000
16.000
15.500

72.3
90.9
77.3
72.7
72.7
72.7
70.5

.064
.068
.065
.058
.056
.060
.055

89.8
95.5
91.9
82.2
78.9
84.9
77.8

12.906
16.200
15.000
15.000
14. 400,
13.000
12.250

167.8
210.7
194.9
194.9
187.3
169.0
159.3

15.000
15.000
15.000
15.000
15.000
15.000

68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2

. 056' 78.9
.066
93.5
.073 103.0
.073 102.5
.069
97.3
.066
93.1

11.600
12. 375.
12.500
12.100
10.500
10.000

150. 7
160. 9
162.5
157.2
136.6
130.1

$0.015
.014

100.0
97.9

$0.650
.658

100.0
101.3

22.000
22.000
22.000
22.000

.850
1.071
1.729
2.271

$2,220
1.851
1.226

130.8
164.7
266.0
349.4
291.4
192.9

22.000
31.333
43.333
32.290
28.000
23.846

m o
100.0
100.0
100.0

m o

$7,667
7.200

100.0
93.9

8.200
11.842
14.000
17.750

107.0
154.5
182.6
231.5
223.2
255.8

$17,808
17.159
19.683

215




.073
.065
.062
.063

116.1
103.3
98.9
100.0
97.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

$0,583
.575

.010
.010
.010
.010

.

1012

216

9 .—A V E R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921-Continued.

Chemicals and drugs.
(c) Drugs and pharma­
ceuticals.

(&) Fertilizer materials.

Bones: Ground, steamed.

Soda, nitrate
of (Cnile salt­
peter), 95 per
cent.

(War
(War
(Data
Indus­
Indus­
(Data
Aver­
Aver­
from
tries
from
tries
Rela­
age
Rela­
Rela­
age
trade
Rela­ Board
trade
Board
tive
tive
journals.) tive •price
price
tive
data.)
data.) journals.)
per
price. per 100 price.
Average Average price. Average Average price. ton.
pounds.
price
price
price
price
per ton. per ton.
per ton. per ton.

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.




Acid: Citric, domestic,
crystals,

(War
(Data
Indus­
from
tries
Rela­
trade
Average Rela­ Board
journals.) tive
tive
price
data.)
price.
per ton. price. Average Average
price per
price per pound.
pound.

1890 TO 1921.

1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

Tankage:
Crushed slaughter-house, 9
and 20 per cent.

WHOLESALE PRICES,

Phosphate
Muriate of potash, 80 to 85 rock, Florida
land pebble,
per cent.
68 per cent.

1910..................
1911..................
1912..................
1913....................

$20.000
20.000

100.0
100.0

$38.342
39.237

100.0
102.3

$3,408
3.000

100.0
88*>

$2.469
2.110

100.0
85.5

$23.359
26.274

100.0
112.5

$6.447
.593

100.0
132.6

$6.767
4.875
6.165

103.5
120.3
186.9
213.6
155.9
197.2

20.000
20.000
24.750
31.167

$31,346
30.654
34.423

100.0
100.0
123.8
155.8
152.4
171.1

197.643
388.333
383.750
302.500

515.5
1012. 8
1000.9
$300,000 789.0
157.773 415.0
115.846 304.6

2.896
2.750
2.659
4.226
5.000
9.126

85.0
80.7
78.0
124.0
146.7
267.8

2.404
3.164
4.029
4.697
3.551
3.507

97.4
128.2
163.2
190.3
143.9
142.0

21.442
25.062
42.425
57. 500
54.408
64.689

91.8
107.3
181.6
246.2
232.9
276.9

.597
.699
.745
.885

$0.861
1.053
.783

133.5
156.3
166.5
197.9
242.0
179.9

1921...................
January___
February. .
March........
April..........
May...........
June...........

2.654
3.350
3.225
3.038
2.800
2.650
2.313

84.8
107.2
103.2
97.2
89.5
84.8
73.9

22.981
28.000
28.000
25.500
23.800
22.000
22.000

114.2
139.1
139.1
126.8
118.3
109.4
109.4

49.494
80.640
72.000
64.800
51.360
48.000
45.600

130.2
212.2
189.4
170.4
134.9
126.2
119.9

5.582
9.000
9.000
7.875
4.500
4.500
5.000

163.8
264.1
264.1
231.1
132.0
132.0
146.7

2.470
2.830
2.813
2.688
2.640
2.750
2.575

100.0
114.6
113.9
108.9
106.9
111.4
104.3

24.738
28.010
27.875
26.750
25.400
22.813
21.125

105.9
119.9
119.3
114.5
108.7
97.7
90.4

.473
.498
.470
.470
.470
.470
.470

108.6
114.4
108.1
108.1
108.1
108.1
108.1

July...........
August......
September.
October___
November.
December..

2.210
2.125
2.275
2.620
2.600
2.570

70.7
67.9
72.8
83.7
83.1
82.2

22.000
20.250
21.000
21.000
21.000
21.000

109.4
100.6
104.4
104.4
104.4
104.4

43.200
40.800
40.800
37.920
35.400
33.600

113.6
107.3
107.3
99.4
93.1
88.4

5.000
5.000
5.000
4.900
4.275
3.250

146.7
146.7
146.7
143.8
125.4
95.4

2.270
2.050
2.163
2.320
2.263
2.280

91.9
83.0
87.6
94.0
91.6
92.4

20.000
20.000
23.825
28.100
24.500
27.200

85.6
85.6
102.0
120.3
104.9
116.4

.470
.470
.470
.470
.470
.470

108.1
108.1
108.1
108.1
108.1
108.1

1915..................
1916..................
1917..................
1918..................
1919.................
1920...................

$3.141

2.685
3.252
3.779
5.871
6.708

.................

217




................
................

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

100.0
85.5

1914..................

218

T a b l e 9 . — A VER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

Chemicals and drugs.
(c) Drugs and pharmaceuticals.
Acid: Tartaric, crystals,
U. S. P.

Epsom salts:
U. S. P.

Cream of tartar.

Year and month.

1891..
1892..
1893..
1894..

Opium: Nat­
ural, in cases.

Peroxide of
hydrogen.

Phenol: U. S. P.
(carbolic acid).

(War In­
(War In­ (Data
Aver­
from
dustries
Aver­
dustries
age
Aver­
Aver­
trade
age
Board
Rela­ price Rela­ Board
Rela­ age
Rela­ age
Rela­
tive
tive price tive price tive
per
price
data.)
data.) jorunals.) tive
Average Average price. per 100 price. per price. per price. gross of price. Average
price per
pounds.
4-ounce
price per price per
pound.
pound.
pound.
bottles.
pound.
pound.
$0,177
.154
.140
.135
.119

.
.“
.
.

89.7 $2.621
78.0 1.944
70.8 1.671
68.3 2.392
6 6 2; 285
a

(Data
from
trade Rela­
journals.) tive
Average price.
price per
pound.

43.6
32.3
2 7 .8

39.8
38.0

1895
...
1896
...
1897
...
1898;.,................
189ft................

93.2
92.1
91.1
93.0
96.5

.120
.167
.131
.124
.133

61.1
84.8
66.4
62.8
67.4

1.841
2.092
2.342
3.342
3.073

30.6
34.8
38.9
55.5
51.1

1900.
1901.
m
1903.
1904.

95.5
98.4
96.3
95.9
97.3

.152
.150
.144
.145
.140

76.9
76.3
73.3
73.4
70.8

3.200
3.229
2.831
3.081
2.750

53.2
53.7
47.1
51.2
45.7

97.1
98.6
100. *
9
105.5
104.7

.124
.113
.138
.149
.170

62.8
57.3
70.2
75.7
86.3

3.033
2.950
4946
4 715
4610

50.4
49.0
82.2
78.4
76.6

.214 #08.7
.227 115.1
.184
93.5
.197 100.0
.215 109.0

5,371
6.433
7.117
6.017
7.355

89.3
106.9
118.3

1905..
1906.. . .

1907. .
1908.. ..
1909..

.

.
.

1910.
iftll.

1914

$0.306

.329




100.0
107.4

90.240

.273

100.0

113.9

$

1.100 100.0
1 .550

140.9

100.0
122.2

$4 000
4 77$

100.0

119.4

$0,113
.203

100.0
180.7

WHOLESALE PB1CES, 1890 TO 1921.

(War In­ (Data
from
dustries
Board
trade
data.) journals.)
Average Average
price per price per
pound.
pound.

Glycerine:
Refined.

1915
1910
1917
1918
1919
1920

2.562
2.663
3. 775
4.959
4.857
5.289

102.5
106.6
151.0
198.4
194.3
211.6

1921
January..'.
February..
March.___
April.........
May..........
June..........

.373
.432
.390
.390
.390
.390
.390

122.5
141.6
127.9
127.9
127.9
127.9
127.9

4.773
5.070
4.925
4.850
4.800
4.700
4.700

July..........
August___
September.
October.. .
November.
December.

.366
.350
.350
.350
.350
.332

120.1 4.700
114.7 4.700
114. 7 4.700
114.7 4.700
114.7 4.700
108.8 4.700

m.

.324
.407
.476
.640

$0.635
.580
.549

135.1
169.5
198.5
266.7
243.5
230.4

3.217
2.758
3.604
3.500
2.802
3.354

292.4
250.8
327.7
318.2
254.7
304.9

.296
.508
.611
.598
.197
.255

150.2
257.7
310.1
303.4
100.1
129.6

8.092
11.338
25. 583
24.413
11.264
7.219

134.5
188.4
425.2
405.8
187.2
120.0

6.229
6.996
6.833
7.479
7.250
8.417

155.7
174.9
170.8
187.0
181.3
210.4

191.0
202.9
197.1
194.1
192.1
188.1 '
188.1

.337
.392
.350
.325
.300
.350
.350

141.6
164.6
147.0
136.6
125.9
147.0
147.0

2.542
2.750
2. 750
2.500
2.500
2.500
2.500

231.1
250.0
250.0
227.3
227.3
227.3
227.3

.163
.196
.198
.183
.171
.169
.160

82.6
99.4
100.2
92.6
80. 8
85.6,
81.2

5.925
7.500
7.375
6.375
5.500
5.500
5.500

98.5
124.7
122.6
106.0
91.4
91.4
91.4

8.771
9.250
9.250
9.250
9.250
9.250
9.250

219.3
231.3
231.3
231.3
231.3
231.3
231.3

.098
.091
.108
.106
.105
.096
.095

89.3
82.9
97.9
96.6
95.7
87.6
86.3

188.1
188.1
188.1
188.1
188.1
188.1

.346
.330
.330
.330
.330
.312

145.4
138.7
138.7
138.7
138.7
130.9

2.500
2.500
2.500
2.500
2.500
2.500

227.3
227.3
227.3
227.3
227.3
227.3

.150
.143
.145
.142
.144
.155

75.9
72.3
73.6
72.0
73.0
78.6

5.500
5.750
5.625
5.500
5.500
5.500

91.4
95.6
93.5
91.4
91.4
91.4

9.250
9.250
8.750
7.500
7.500
7.500

231.3
231.3
218.8
187.5
187.5
187.5

.096
.091
.091
.090
. 1Q
0
.108

87.2
82.9
82.9
82.1
91.0
98.3

1.271
.810
.450
.481

1,129.6
720.0
406.0
427.4
$0.470
.112
101.7
.116
105, $

219




...........

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

8i9
.823
.712

142.7
205.8
247.6
268.7
270.0
233.5

.437
.629
.757
.822

220

table

9 . — AVER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Chemicals and
drugs.

House furnishing goods.

(c) Drugs and phar­
maceuticals.

(a)

Furniture.

Bedroom.
Quinine: Manu­
facturers’ quo­
tations.

Average
price per
ounce.

Rela­
tive
price.

Bed: Combination.

Average
price^per

Rela­
tive
price.

Chair: All gum,
cane seat.

Average
price per
chair.

Rela­
tive
price.

Chifforette:
Combination.

Average
price per
chifforette.

Rela­
tive
price.

Dresser:
Combination.

Average
price per
dresser.

Chairs: Bedroom.

Maple, cane Oak rocker,
Chicago,
Rela­
seat, New
average
tive York, average
price per
price.
price per
dozen.
dozen.

Quartered
oak rocker,
Chicago,
average price
per chair.

Rela­
tive
price.

$0,328
.251
.218
.215
.262

149.1
114.2
99.4
97.9
119.4

$7,000
7.000
6.850
6.850
6.000

66.7
66.7
65.2
65.2
57.1

1895 ...............
1896...........................
1897 ............
1898
. ..
1899..................

.251
.241
.183
.215
.298

114.2
109.6
83.3
97.7
135.5

6.000
6.000
5.000
5.125
6.125

57.1
57.1
47.6
48.8
58.3

1900 ...............
1901
1902
1903
1904

.333
.303
.258
.253
.233

151.4
137.7
117.3
115.0
106.2

8.000
7.000
7.333
7.917
8.000

76.2
66.7
69.8
75.4
76.2

1905
1906
1907
1908
1909 ...

.210
.166
.178
.157
.141

95.6
75.5
80.8
71.4
64.1

8.000
8.917
10.000
9.417
9.000

76.2
84.9
95.2
89.7
85.7

.140
.140

63.8
63.8

9.000
9.000

85.7
85.7

1890....................
1891..........
1892............................
1893.................
1894 ............

.

1910............
1911..............................




............. 1 '
“
.
.................. 1
.........

WHOLESALE PKICES, 1890 TO 1921,

Year or month.

.177
.220
.273

80.5
100.0
124.1

$22,500
22.500

100.0

1915..............................
1916..............................
1917..............................
1918..............................
1919..............................
1920..............................

.328
.683
.717
.842
.829
.865

149.5
311.2
326.4
383.6
377.4
394.1

22.500
22.500
23.000
27.000
35.208
55.583

100.0
100.0
102.0
120.0

1921..............................
January.................
February..............
March....................
April.....................
May.......................
June......................

.694
.700
.700
.700
.700
.700
.700

316.2
318.8
318.8
318.8
318.8
318.8
318.8

July.......................
August..................
September............
October.................
November............
December.............

.700
.700
.700
.700
.700
.640

318.8
318.8
318.8
318.8
318.8
291.4




$2,250
2.250

100.0
100.0
100.0
122.2

156.5
247.0

2.250
2.250
2.750
3.250
4.208
7.208

42.146
49.000
49.000
49.000
49.000
49.000
37.250

187.3
217.8
217.8
217.8
217.8
217.8
165.6

37.250
37.250
37.250
37.250
37.250
37.250

165.6
165.6
165.6
165.6
165.6
165.6

100.0

$36.000
36.000

ioo.o
100.0
100.0
100.0

210.8

36.000
36.000
36.000
41.625
54.833
83.583

50.042
58.500
58.500
58.500
58.500
58.500
44.000

154.0
180.0
180.0
180.0
180.0
180.0
135.4

63.000
72.000
72.000
72.000
72.000
72.000
72.000

44.000
44.000
44.000
44.000
44.000
44.000

135.4
135.4
135.4
135.4
135.4
135.4

54.000
54.000
54.000
54.000
54.000
54.000

$32,500
32.500

100.0

144.4
187.0
320.4

32.500
32.500
32.500
37.125
48.833
68.500

100.0
100.0
100.0

5.750
6.250
6.250
6.250
6.250
6.250
6.250

255.6
277.8
277.8
277.8
277.8
277.8
277.8

5.250
5.250
5.250
5.250
5.250
5.250

233.3
233.3
233.3
233.3
233.3
233.3

100.0

100.0

114.2
150.3

100.0

9.500
10.500

90.5

$10.780
10.780

100.0

10.780
12.413
15.680
19.518
22.890

100.0

100.0

$4.350
6.558

115.2
145.5
181.1
212.3
320.1

200.0
200.0
200.0
200.0
200.0
200.0

5.084
5.880
5.880
5.880
5.880
5’ 880
5.145

248.2
287.0
287.0
287.0
287.0
287.0
251.2

150.0
150.0
150.0
150.0
150.0
150.0

4.410
4.410
4. 410
4.410
4.410
4.410

215.3
215.3
215.3
215.3
215.3
215.3

115.6
152.3
232.2
175.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES,

1912..............................
1913..............................
1914..............................

to
to

Table 9.—A V E R A G E W H OLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
House-furnishing goods.
(a) Furniture.

Ash,
New
York,
average
price
per set.

1890......................
1891,.....................
1892,1....................
1893...:...............
1894......................

Iron bed­
stead,
hardwood
dresser and
washstand,
New
York, aver­
age price
per set.

1009.
f<m
1905...................
190(6......................
m
......................

Iron bed­
stead, quar­
tered oak
Aver­
Aver­
dresser and
age
age
plain oak Rela­ price Rela­ price Rela­
tive
tive
tive
washstand, price.
per
price. per 6 price.
Chicago,
buffet.
chairs.
average
price
per §et<

$12.000

51.8
51.8
51.8
47.4
47.4

12.000
12.000
11.000
11.000

9.950
1895.....................
1896.................... 8.750
1897?,.................. 8.750
1898.:................... 10.000

...........

Iron bed­
stead,
plain oak
dresser and
washstand,
Chicago,
average
price
per set.

10.100

42.9
37.7
37.7
43.1
43.6

11.250
11.250
11.750
12.167
12.250

48.5
48.5
50. 6
52.4
52.8

12.354
12.958
14.500




•

$1}. 250

Chair: All
gum, leather
slip seat.

53.3
; 55.9
62.5

Table: Ex­
tension,
combination.

Aver­
age
price
per
table.

Davenport:
Standard
pattern.

Aver­
age
Rela­ price Rela­
tive
tive
per
price. daven­ price.
port.

Table: Li­
brary, com­
bination.

Aver­
age
price
per
table.

Chairs.

Hard­
Common wood,
bow
spindle,
back,
Rela­
Rela­
New
Chicago, tive
tive
York,
price. average average price.
price
price per
per
dozen.
dozen.

$4,200
70.0

70.0

4.200

4.250
4.250
3.500

70.8
70.8
58.3

3.500
3.500
3.313

3.500
4.042

5.208
4.750

58.3
58.3
55.2

58.3
67.4
86.8

5.000

79.2
81.9
83.3
79.5

4.750
5.125
5.792

79.2
85.4
96.5

4.917
4.771

WHOliKSAIiK BRICES; 189ft TO 1921.

Buffet:
Combina­
tion.

Bedroom sets.
Year or month.

Kitchen.

Living room.

Dining Room.

Bedroom.

1908.
1909.
mo.

mi.
1m.

1913.

1914.
1913.

11.000

61.1
60.4

11.875
13.750
15.250
18.000

6.000

66.0

10.875

5.500
5.750

91.7
05.6

6.000
6.000

100.0

76.4
84.7

$16,415
15.925

100.0 $43,000

15.925
19.608
23.046
31. 838
39. 568

97.0 43.000
119.5 43. 333
140.4 47.500
194.0 50.417
$45. 754 241.0 62.125
68.143 358.8 86.500

97.0

100.0

5.583

42.000

100.0 $15,000

100.0 $18.500
100.0 18.500

97.7

15.000

100.0
100.8

101.7
125.0
159.2
217.8
340.0

100.0 $34.500
100.0 34.500

O
100.0 $20. P O 100.0
100.0 20.000 100.0

93.1

$6.370
6.370

m o
100.0

201.2

15.000
15.250
18. 750
23. 875
32.667
51.000

June.........

41.344
47.726
46.256
46.256
46.256
42.581
42.091

217.9 59.500
251.4 63.000
243. 7 63.000
243.7 63.000
243.7 63.000
224.4 63.000
221.7 63.000

138.4
146.5
146.5
146.5
146.5
146.5
146.5

36.000
40.500
40.500
40.500
40.500
40.500
40.500

240.0
270.0
270.0
270.0
270.0
270.0
270.0

40. 750
47.500
47.500
47.500
47.500
47.500
47.500

220.3
256.8
256.8
256.8
256.8
256.8
256.8

63.063
65. 750
65.750
65. 750
65.750
65. 750
61.000

182.8
190.6
190.6
190.6
190.6
190.6
176.8

39.000
44.000
44.000
44,000
44.000
44.000
44.000

220.0
220.0
220.0
220.0
220.0
220.0

16.480
17.640
17.640
17.640
17.640
17.640
15.925

258.7
276,9
276.9
276.9
276.9
276.9
250.0

July..........
August_
_
September.
October_
_
November.
December.

38.269
37.779
37.779
37.044
37.044
37.044

201.5
199.1
199.1
195.2
195.2
195.2

130.2 31.500 210.0
130.2 31.500 210.0
130.2 31.500 210.0
130.2 31.500 210.0
130.2 31.500 210.0
130.2 31.500 210.0

34.000
34.000
34.000
34.000
34.000
34.000

183.8 61.000
183.8 61.000
183.8 61.000
183.8 61.000
183. 8 61. 500
183.8 61.500

176.8
176.8
176.8
176.8
178.3
178.3

34.000
34.000
34.000
34.000
34.000
34.000

170.0
170.0
170.0
170.0
170.0
170.0

15.925
15.925
15.925
15.288
15.288
15,288

250.0
250.0
250.0
240.0
240.0
240.0

im.

1917.
1913.
1919.
1920.
1921................
January...
February..
March......
April........

May........

100.0

18.500
20.500

20.000
21.000

24.000
32.000
54. 750

118.9
129.7
173.0
295.9

34.500
34.500
41.500
47.000
56.500
67.000

100.0
100.0

22.000

120.3
136.2
163.8
194.2

23. 500
25.917
31.167
46.667

105.0
117.5
129.6
155.8
233.3

100.0
110.8

100.0

195.0

6.370
7.003
8.759
11.662
13.704
22.932

109.9
137.5
183,1
215.1
360.0

100.0

3
M
a

w

w

OF COMMODITIES.

223




56.000
56.000
56.000
56.000
56.000
56.000

110.5
117.2
144.5

22 4

T able 9.—AVE R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.
House-furnishing goods.
(a) Furniture.

( 6) Furnishings.

Kitchen.

Aver­
age
price Rela­
tive
per
refrig­ price.
erator.

Tables.

Carpets.

Cotton.

Woolen.

2

3£-foot, Hardwood
11-4,5
5
New
base,
pounds to pounds
pounds
York, 24 by 42
the pair,
to the Rela­ to the
Rela­ cotton warp, pair,
aver­
inches,
pair,
tive
Chicago, price. cotton and average tive average
age
price
wool filling, price price. price
average
per
price per
per
per
average price
dozen.
table.
per pound.
pound.
pair.

Ingrain;
2-ply,
Lowell,
4 to 5
aver­
pounds
age
to the Rela­
pair,
price
tive
per
average price.
yard.
price
per
pound.

Axminster:
Lowell,
aver­
age
price
per
yard.

Axminster:
Bigelow, |, Rela­
aver­
tive
price.
age
price
per
yard.

Wilton: 5Brussels: 5frame, Bigelow. frame, Bigelow.

Aver­
age
price
per
yard.

Rela­
tive
price.

Aver­
age
price
per
yard.

Rela­
tive
price.

79.9
87.3
79.9
76.2
72.4

$1.920
2.016
1.920
1.920
1.920

79.7
83.7
79.7
79.7
79.7

1891.
1892
1893
1894.

$15,000
15.000
15.000
15.000
14.250

65.8
65.8
65.8
65.8
62.5

$0,460
.460
.430
.420
.410

66.4
66.4
62.1
60.6
59.1

$0,910
.890
.900
.900
.850

86.7
84,. 8
85.7
85.7
81.0

$0,516
.552
.504
.528
.468

84.7
90.6
82.7
76.8

$1,032
1.128
1.032
.984
.936

1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.

14.250
13.800
13.800
13.800
14.450

62.5
60.5
60.5
60.5
63.4

.400
.400
.420
.420
.420

57.8
57.8
60.6
60.6
60.0

.750
.750
.750
.900
.800

71.4
71.4
71.4
85.7
76.2

.420
.408
.432
.468
.456

68.9
66.9
70.9
76.8
74.8

.936
.936
.960
1.032
1.032

72.4
72.4
74.3
79.9
79.9

1.680
1.680
1.728
1.824
.1.824

69.8
69.8
71.8
75.7
75.7

1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.

15.600
15.600
15.600
15.600
15.600

68.4
68.4
68.4
68.4
68.4

.525
.475
.475
.500
.525

75.8
72.1
75.8

.900
.850
.850
.925
.925

85.7
81.0
81.0
88.1
88.1

.492
.480
.484
.514
.518

80.7
78.8
79.4
84.3
85.1

1.032
1.032
1.030
1.088
1.104

79.9
79.9
79.7
84.2
85.4

1.872
1.872
1.884
2.008
2.040

77.7
77.7
78.2
83.4
84.7

15.600
16.500
18.000
18.000
18.000

68.4
72.4
78.9
78.9
78.9

.600
.600
.600

86.6

1.000

95.2
97.6
95.2
90.5
95.2

.552
.552
.576
.554
.528

90.6
90.6
94.5
90.9

1.152
1.180
1.248

86.6

1.192

89.2
91.3
96.6
92.9
92.3

2.136
2.192
2.280
2.216
2.216

88.7
91.0
94.7
92.0
92.0

1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.




6 8 .6
68 .6

86.6
$0,524
.504
.500

1.025

86.6

1.000

83.3
82.6

1.000

.950

86.6

'

1.200

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Refrigerator:
Lift top type.

Blankets.

!

1910

$10.330
10.465

87.7
92.1

20.000
21.000

. ..
100.0

101.3

22.800
22.800

$i.42i
1.421

100.0
100.0
100.0

.550
.570
.567
.605
.640

90.9
94.2
93.7

1.054
1.000

1.025

100.4
95.2
97.6

100.0

1.050

100.0

105.8

.528
.528
.580

86.6
86.6

1.200
1.200

$1.024

95.2

1.240

92.9
92.9
96.0

2.232
2.232
2.312

92.7
92.7
96.0

100.0

1. 076

100.0

1.292

100.0

2.408

1.017

96.8

1.052

97.8

1.268

98.1

2.332

1.150
1.375
2.015
2.625
2.500

$1.822
1.905

109.5
131.0
191.9
250.0
238.1
249.1

1.084
1.372
1.638
2.070
2.402

$2.991
3.936

100.7
127.5
152.2
192.4
223.3
293.9

1.296
1.544
1.838
2.621
3.407
4.272

100.3
119.5
142.3
202.9
263.7
330.6

2.429
2.880
3.416
4.505
5.412
6.784

100.9
119.6
141.9
187.1
224.7
281.7

96.8

10.600

102.6

10.900

105.5
142.2
164.8
170.1
205.0

1.421
1.527
1.887
2.736
3.695
5.239

107.5
132.8
192.5
260.1
368.7

.538
.734
1.234
1.894
1.695
2.035

...
February.
Marnh
April
May
.Tnnp.

18.450 178.6
20.700 200.4
20. 700 200.4
20.700 200.4
20.700 200.4
20.700 200.4
20.700 200.4

4.202
5.292
5.292
4.851
4.165
4.165
4.018

295.7
372.4
372.4
341.4
293.1
293.1
282.8

1.278
1.630
1.180
1.030
1.030
1.235
1.235

269.5
195.1
170.2
170.2
204.1
204.1

1.127
1.127
1.127
1.127
1.127
1.127
1.127

147.4
147.4
147.4
147.4
147.4
147.4
147.4

3.272
3.888
3.888
3.888
3.888
3.024
3.024

244.3
290.3
290.3
290.3
290.3
225.8
225.8

3.552
4.320
4.320
4.320
4.320
3.312
3.312

274.9
334.4
334.4
334.4
334.4256.3
256.3

5.432
6.432
6.432
6.432
6.432
5.040
5.040

225.6
267.1
267.1
267.1
267.1
209.3
209.3

.Tnly
Angiifit.
September.
October___
November.
December..

16.200 156.8
16 200 156.8
16.200 156.8
16! 200 •156.8
16.200 156.8
16.200 156! 8

3.773
3.773
3.773
3.773
3.773
3.773

265.5
265.5
265.5
265.5
265.5
265.5

1.235
1.235
1.323
1.400
1.400
1.400

204.1
204.1
218. 7
231.4
231.4
231.4

1.127
1.127
1.127
1.127
1.127
1.127

147.4
147.4
147.4
147.4
147.4
147.4

3.024
3.024
3.024
3.024
2.784
. 2.784

225.8
225.8
225.8
225.8
207.9
207.9

3.312
3.312
3.312
3.312
2.736
2.736

256.3
256.3
256.3
256.3

5.040
5.040
5.040
5.040
4.608
4.608

209.3
209.3
209.3
209.3
191.4
191.4

1915
^918
1917
1918
1919
1929
1921
0 (U O J .
lU il

14.690
17.025
17.575
21.180

88.8

121.4
204.0
313.0
280.1
336.4
211.2

211.8
211.8

225




100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

11083'— 22— Bull. 320M

Ol

1911
1912
1913
1914

T a b l e 9 . — AVE R A G E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

House-furnishing goods.
(b)

Pails.

Table cutlery.

Furnishings.
Glassware.

Sheeting: Bleached.

Year or month.
Knives and forks:
cocobolo handles.

Galva­
Wooden,
nized
average
iron,
price per average
dozen. price per
gross.

Average
price per
dozen.
1890..
1891..

1892..
1893..
1894..

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
dozen.

Rela­
tive
price.

$0,800
.800

106.7
106.7
106.7
126.7
106.7

$7,750
7.750
6.850
5.500
5.500

134.8
134.8
119.1
95.7
95.7

$1.592
1.450
1,350
1.313
1,258

106.7
106,7

5.500
5.500
5.OO0
5.500
5.750

95.7
95.7
87.0
95.7

1,121

.800

,950
,800

1895..
1896..
189?..
1898..
1899..

,800
,800
.?50
.750
,750

1900.
1901.
1902*
1905.
1904.

.750
.750
.750
.750
.750

1905*
1900.
1907*
1908.
1909.

.750
.750
.800
.750
.750

100.0
100.0

6.050
6.483
5.417
5.000

1910.
1911.
1912.

.750
.750
.750
.750
.767

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
102.2

5.000
5.000
5.292
5.750
5.813

1913.

1914.




100.0

l 60*0
100,0

m o
100,0
100,0
100.0
100.0
100,0
100.0

106.7

5.750
6.500
6.500
6.500
6.667
6.688

100.0
100.0

113.0
113.0
113.0
115.9
116.3
105.2
112.8

ioi.1

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
dozen.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
dozen.

91.6
83.9
79.4
81,4
72.8

$0.313
.316
,294
.306
.276

96.0
97.1
90*4
93.8
84*6

$0.120

109.1
109.1
109.1
109.1
109.1

$1.250
1.250
1.250
1.250
1.250

156.3
156.3
156.3
156.3
156.3

$0.180

.120
,120
.120
,120

.190
.190
.190

150.0
166.7
158.3
158.3
158.3

74.6
74.9
72.7
71.9
84.5

.272
.293
.293
.293
.295

83,5
89*8
89.8
89*8
90.6

*120
*100
.100
.100
.100

109.1
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9

1.250
1.250
l.odo
1.000
1.000

156.3
156.3
125.0
125.0
125.0

.185
.180
.iTo
.160
.130

154.2
150.0
141.7
133.3
108.3

95.8
88.5
87.8
95.1
101.4

.308
.293
.293
.304
.278

94.4
89.8
89.8
93.3
85.2

.100

.140
.140
.140
.140

90.9
127.3
127.3
127.3
127.3

1.300
1.300
1.300
1.150

125.0
162.5
162.5
162.5
143.8

.180
.180

.185
.177
.160

150.0
150.0
154.2
147.2
133.3

94.8
103*5
120.5

.270
.273
.305
.279
,287

82.9
83.9
93.6
85.8

.140
.i40
,i40
. 122
*117

127.3
127.3
127.3
110.9
106.4

1.050
1.05D
1.050
.963
.996

131.3
131*3
131.8
120.4
124.5

.150
.150
.150
.133
.134

125.0
125.0
125.0
110.4

.340
*306
,278
.326
, 344

104.4
94.1
85.4
ldo.o
105.7

.113

102.7

117.8

.120

100.0

.110
,110

,iio

100.0
100.0
100.0

.120

109.1

.942
.800
.sdo
.800
.900

62.6
70.5
69.3
63.3
70.7

.179
,179
.174
*172
.202

.229

83.3
86.5
86.5

.212
.210

88.6

*228
.243

94.9
94.9

2.100

1.900
1.750
1.750
1.792
1.800

Average
price per
dozen.

,190
,195
,174

110.0

87.0
87.0
92.0

Rela­
tive
price.

.201

1.700
1.700
1.971

117.2
107.0

1.917

106.0
97.7
97.7
100.0

$ii. 742

100.5

Pitchers: 4-gallon, Tumblers: 4-pint,
common.
common.

Average
price per
yard.

$0.219

94.9

Nappies: 4-inch.

Rela­
tive
price.

88.8

1.492
1.550
. 1.550
1.588
1.700

10-4, Wamsutta,
S. T.

Average
price per
yard.

80,9
75,3
73.3
70*2

1,263
1.242
1,133
1.267

94.2
87.0

100.0

10-4, Pepperell.
Rela­
tive
price:

.227
.248
.288
.244
.252
.268
.245
.228
. 289
.253

102.1

105.2
111.8

102.4
95.4
1Q
0.0

105.9

88.0

.

1.000

100.0
100.6
100*0

112.5

.200

. iio
.110
.120
.120

Rela­
tive
price.

111.8

91.7
91.7
100.0
100.0

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1§90 TO 1921.

Carvers: stag
handles.

.750
.858
1.033
1.150
1.242
1.550

114.4
137.8
153.3
165.6
206.7

5.750
6.875
10.083
12.333
13.308
14.737

119.6
175.4
214.5
231.4
256.3

18.954
26.313
34.042
47.500
36.177
42.962

129.2
179.4
232.1
323.8
246.6
292.9

.232
.298
.383
.600
.581
.726

96.9
124.5
160.2
250.9
242.8
303.3

1.220

93.5
117.3
178.5
254.3
282.3
374.5

1921.....................
January.......
February___
March..........
April............
May.............
June.............

1.450
1.450
1.450
1.450
1.450
1.450
1.450

193.3
193.3
193.3
193.3
193.3
193.3
193.3

14.000
14.500
14.500
14.500
14.500
14.500
14.500

243.5
252.2
252.2
252.2
252.2
252.2
252.2

24.314
32.194
28.125
25.952
24.500
24.500
23.333

165.7
219.5
191.8
176.9
167.0
167.0
159.1

.432
.439
.439
.439
.439
.418
.406

180.5
183.4
183.4
183.4
183.4
174.6
169.8

.911
.903
.903
.903
.903
.903
.903

July..............
August.........
September...
October.......
November...
December...

1.450
1.450
1.450
1.450
1.450
1.450

193.3
193.3
193.3
193.3
193.3
193.3

13.500
13.500
13.500
13. 500
13.500
13.500

234.8
234.8
234.8
234.8
234.8
234.8

23.250
23.250
23.708
21.952
20.500
20. 500

158.5
158.5
161.6
149.6
139.8
139. 8

.406
.410
.428
.496
(2)
(2
)

169.8
171.2
178.7
207.3

.903
.903
.903
.903
.946
.959

2 No quotation.

100.0

........

.305
.382
.581
.828

.920

.135
.208
.250
.275
.314

122.7
146.6
188.6
227.3
250.0
285.8

279.8
277.3
277.3
277.3
277.3
277.3
277.3

.315
.320
.320
.320
.320
.320
.320

286.4
290.9
290.9
290.9
290.9
290.9
290.9

277.3
277.3
277.3
277.3
290.4
294.4

.320
.320
.320
.300
.300
.300

290.9
290.9
290.9
272.7
272.7
272.7

.161

.850
1.000

1.254
1.444
1.595
1.897

2.050
2.100
2.100
2.100
2.100
2.100
2.100
2.100
2.100
2.100

1.900
1.900
1.900

106.3
125.0
156.8
180.5
199.4
237.1
256.3
262.5
262.5
262.5
262.5
262.5
262.5
262.5
262.5
262.5
237.5
237.5
237.5

.110

.125
.220

.314
.328
.320
.258
.300
.280

.280
.280

.255
.255

104.2
183.3
261.8
272.9
266.7
214.9
250.0
233.3
233.3
233.3

212.5

212.5

.255
.255
.255
.240

212.5
212.5
212.5

.220
.220

183.3
183.3

200.0

227




100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

1915.....................
1916.....................
1917.....................
1918.....................
1919.....................
1920.....................

House furnishing goods.

Miscellaneous.

( b) Furnishings.

Plates: White
granite.
Year or month.

(a)

Tickings:
Amoskeag,
A. C. A.

Teacups and saucers:
White grante.

228

T a b l e 9 . — AVER AGE W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Tubs.

Bran.

Cattle feed.

Linseed meal.

Aver­
age
price
per
snort

Rela­
tive
price.

Aver­
age
price
per
ton.

Average
Relaprice
tive
per
price.
dozen.

Average
price per
gross (6
dozen
cups and
6 dozen
saucers).

1890...................... $0.489' 105.5
1891.......................
.479 103.3
1892.......................
.464 100.2
.464 100.2
1893.......................
1894.......................
.457
98.6

$3,760
3.682
3.572
3.572
3.525

110.0

107.7
104.5
104.5
103.1

$0.120
.118
.115
.118
.108

89.1
87.3
85.4
87. 7
80.5

$1,650
1.567
1.400
1.308
1.288

98.0
93.1
82.2
77.7
76.5

$23.375
25.208
23.696
25. 704
22. 558

74.0
79.8
75.0
81.3
71.4

3.237
3.091
3.091
3.360
3.403

94.7
90.4
90.4
98.2
99.5

.101

. 102
.098
.089
.092

74.4
75.7
72.4
66.4
68.6

1.250
1.250
1.250
1.250
1.258

74.3
74.3
74.3
74.3
74.8

18.913
19.938
20. 438
19.000
20.796

59.8
63.1
64.7
60.1
65.8

104.6

.108
. 105'

107.7
106.8

.110
.121

1.442
1.450
1.450
1.450
1.450

85.6

110.1
110.1

80.5
75.3
78.0
82.0
90.1

86.1
86.1
86.1
86.1

25.546
25.021
27.133
26.708
26.200

80.8
79.2
85. 8
84.5
82.9

80.5
93.8

95.1
98.0
98.0

26.358
30.392
28.704
29.392
32.037

83.4
96.2
90.8
93.0
101.4

95.8
98.0
95.1

33.563
29.767
31.463

106.2
94.2
99.5

Average
price per
dozen
cups and
saucers.

Relative
price.

Average
price
per
yard.

.
Wooden, Galvanized
Rela- oakgrained, iron, No.3, Rela­ Aver­ Rela­
age
tive
average
average
tive
tive
price. price per
price per price. pci fAn price.
■nor bU
ilnest of 3.
dozen.
ton.

1895.......................
1896.......................
1897.......................
1898.......................
1899.......................

.416
.399
.399
.452
.461

1900.......................
1901.......................
1902.................. .
1903.. . : ...............
1904 ....................

.484
.510
.510
.499
.494

110.0
110.0

107. 7
106.7

3.575
3.763
3.763
3.683
3.650

1905
1906
1907
1908
1909

.459
.459
.459
.459
.459

99.0
99.0
99. 0
99. 0
99.0

3.387
3.387
3.387
3.897
3.387

99.0
99.0
99.0
114.7
99.0

.108
.126
.137
.113
.118

102.0

83.6
87.7

1.450
1.450
1.600
1.650
1.650

1910
1911
1912.......................

.462
.462
.462

99.7
99. 7
99.7

3.413
3.413
3.413 .......$0,569

99.8
99.8
’ 99.8

.129
.133
.129

95.5
99.0
95.7

1.613
1.650
1.600




89.8
86.1
86.1

97. 5
99.4
104.5

.101

86.1
86.1

__v__

Rela­
tive
price.

Millfeed:
Middlings,
standard.

Aver­
age
price
per
ton.

Rela­
tive
price.

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Cottonseed
meal: Prime.
%

.463
.463

100.0
100.0

.570
.570

100.0
100.0

.135
.133

98.7

1.683
1.763 .......$4,300

1915.......................
1916.......................
1917........................
1918.......................
1919........................
1 9 2 0 ....................

.463
.484
.718
.928
1.085
1.233

100.0

100.0

229.9
277.0

.570
.596
.892
1.193
1.369
1.650

104.6
156.4
209.1
240.1
289.4

.118 87.9
.163 120.7
.303 225.0
.407 302.0
.350 260.0
.536 398.0

1921.......................
January..........
February........
March.............
April...............
May................
June...............

1.218
1.400
1.400
1.400
1.400
1.400
1.260

262.8
302.2
302.2
302.2
302.2
302.2
272.0

1.565
1.800
1.800
1.800
1.800
1.800
1.620

274.5
315.7
315.7
315.7
315.7
315.7
284.1

.208

July................
August...........
September___
October..........
November___
December.......

1.260
1.170
.980
.980
.980
.980

272.0
252.5
211.5
211.5
211.5
211.5

1.620
1.504
1.260
1.260
1.260
1.260

284.1
263.8
221.0
221.0
221.0
221.0

2 No quotation.

200.2

100.0 $18,365

100.0

104.7

21.017

114.4

31.608
30.438

100.0 $28,417

96.3

30.792

5.496
7.950
10.592
15.363
11.028
13.361

133.8
193.6
257.9
374.1
268.6
325.3

20.041 109.1
20.452 111.4
32. 368 176.2
31. 818 173.3
38.899 211.8
41.724 227.2

31.979
36.682
48.292
56.350
69.229
65.841

101.2

116.0
152.8
178.3
219.0
208.3

35.000
36.167
47.750
53. 583
73.942
62.827

123.2 21.603
127.3 22.207
168.0 36.074
188.6 33.658
260.2 44.738
221.1 45.620

154.3
148.6
148.6
133.7
126.3
126.3
126.3

7.497
9.629
8.738
8.247
7.617
7.500
7.267

182.5
234.4
212.8
200.8

185.4
182.6
176.9

17.010
26.250
21.375
21.500
16.250
16.050
14.438

92.6
142.9
116.4
117.1
88.5
87.4
78.6

40.083
37.500
36. 500
36.500
33.500
36.500
41.500

126.8
118.6
115.5
115 5
106.0
115. 5
131.3

43.189
49.000
43.000
43.750
44.200
35.250
37.000

152.0
172.4
151.3
154.0
155. 5
127.6
130.2

20.750
15.375
15.500
14.656

.170 1^6.3
.185 137.4
.280 208.0
.280 208.0
.280 208.0
(2)

7.250
7.065
7.092
6.758
6.400
6.400

176.5
172.0
172.7
164.6
155.8
155.8

13.781
13.900
12.969
12.063
14.650
21.375

75.0
75.7
70.6
65.7
79.8
116.4

39.500
43.750
42.750
45.000
44.000
44.000

125.0
138.4
135.2
142.4
139.2
139.2

41.400
46.250
46.000
41.200
40.750
47.600

145.7
162.8
161.9
145.0
143.4
167.5

13.781
13.350
14.000
13.000
15.275
21.563

.200
.200

.180
.170
.170
.170

100.0 $19,452

108.4

21.534

16.853
23.688
20.688

111.1

114.2
185.4
173.0
230.0
234.5

86.6

121.8

106.4
105.7
79.0
79.7
75.3
70.8
73.8
72.0

66.8

78.5
110.9

229




104.6
155.0

100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OE COMMODITIES.

1913........................
1914.......................

.230

T a b l e 9 . — AVER AG E W HOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Continued.

Miscellaneous.
(&) Leather.
Glazed: Kid,
top grades, from
Brazilian skins.

Calf.
Year or month.

Side: Chrome,
tanned,
“ B ” grade.

Harness: Oak.

Sole: Hemlock.

Sole: Oak.

Sole: Union.

1890......................
1891......................
i892......................
1893......................
1894......................

$0.600
.647
.693
*645
*604

65.4
70.5
75.5
70.2
65.8

1895.......................
1896......................
1897......................
1898......................
1899......................

*733
.643
*616
.676

1900.....................
1901.. i .................
1902......................
1903......................
1904......................

.656
.628

1905......................
1906......................
1907......................
1908.....................
1909.....................

.697
.717
.767

1910......................
1911.....................
1912......................




79.9
70.1
67.1
73.6
74.9

.660

.690
.688

$0,225
.218
.231
.228
.226
.247,

. 28$
.255
.243
*283
.300

71.5
68.4
71.9
75.2
74.9

.688

73.0
73.3
67.3

$0,257
.258
.237
.240
.228

.303
*297

9

82.0
72.6
69.1
80.3
85.3

.207
.188
.203
.213
.225

73.5
66.7

$0.333
.333
.331
.319

85.9
84.4
84.4
84.1
81.0

.333
.371
.374
.351
.381
.379
.369
.382

$0.377
.368
.342
.348
.328

84.0
82.0
76.2
77.6
73.1
76.2
65.2

75.5
79.9

.342
.293
.308
.321
.336

.249
.248
.237
.227
.226

88.3
87.7
83.9
80.4
80.0

.361
.353
.380
.374
.345

80.4
78.5
84.7
83.4
76.9

84.6
94.3
94.9
89*1
96.7

.229
*254
*264
.251
.255

81.2
90.0
93.7
88.9
90.4

.366
.380
.382
.380
.413

81.6
84.6
85.1
84.7
91.9

98.3
93.7
97.0

.247
.238
.258

87.5
84.2
91.4

.415
.388
.415

92.4
86.5
92.6

68.2

75.9
78.1
83.5
81.0
85.8
84.4
83.9
91.5

68.1

64.7

$0.192
.186
.173
.180
.172

.

i

65.9
61.2
63.7
60.8

72.1

68.6

71.6
74.8

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

Wax calf, 30
Cali­
Countryto 40 pounds Chrome
No. 1,
calf,
Average
fornia,
Average
to the dozen, average Rela­ price per Rela­ middles,
No. 1, Rela­ price per Rela­ Average Rela­ Average Rela­ Average Rela­
average
B grade,
tive average
tive
tive
tive price per tive price per tive price per tive
average price price per price. square price. price per price per average price. square price. pound. price. pound. price. pound. price.
foot.
square
pound. price per
foot.
per square
pound.
foot.
pound.
foot.

.270

100.0

.280

103.9

1915......................
1916......................
1917......................
1918.................
1919.................
.1920............

.285
.450
.579
.598
.970
.985

105.7
166.9
214.7
221.8
359.6
365.5

1921..............
January.......
February..
March.......
April........
May.............
June.........

.521
.525
.525
.525
.525
.525
.525

193.2
194.7
194.7
194.7
194.7
194.7
194.7

.525
.525
.525
.525
.500
.500

194.7
194.7
194.7
194.7
185.5
185,5

July..............
August..........
September__
October.......
November___
December.. .
io No market prices; estimated.

100.0

$0.409

100.0

103.8

.419

102.3

io .270
10.497
.663
1.015
1.073

107.7
198.4
274.6
264.6
405.4
428.5

.452
.498
.689
.693
.761
.720

.694
.700
.700
.650
.650
.650
.700

277.1
279.6
279.6
259.6
259.6
259.6
279.6

.675
.700
.750
.750
.700
.700

269.6
279.6
299.5
299.5
279.6
279.6

10.688

'

.394

$0,256
io *268

100.0

.282

100.0

.449

100.0

$0.401

104.8

.302

100.0

107.0

.471

105.0

.422

105.1

110.4
121.5
168.3
189.4
185.9
175.9

io . 279
io . 325
.439
.412
.640
.617

109.0
127.0
171.7
160.9
250.2
241.1

.309 109.7
.388 137.6
.535 189.8
.484 171.6
.528 ' 187.3
.534 189.4

.504
.640
.831
.796
.913
.856

112.4
142.5
185.2
177.4
203.5
190.7

.448
.629
.790
.709
.841
.836

111.7
156.7
196.9
176.6
209.5
208.4

.439
.520
.510
.490
.410
.410
.410

107.3
127.0
124.6
119.7
100.1
100.1
100.1

.312
.375
.375
.335
.335
.300
.300

122.0
146.6
148.6
131.0
131.0
117.3
117.3

.358
.400
.380
.370
.370
.370
.360

127.0
141.8
134.7
131.2
131.2
131.2
127.6

.548
.600
.550
.575
.575
.550
.550

122.1
133.7
122.6
128.1
128.1
122.6
122.6

.503
.575
. 550
.550
.513
.500
.500

125.3
143.3
137.1
137.1
127.7
124.6
124.6

.410
.410
.410
.430
.430
.430

100.1
100.1
100.1
105.0
105.0
105.0

.300
.300
*300
.275
.275
.275

117.3
117.3
117.3
107.5
107.5
107.5

.350
.340
.340
.340
.340
.340

124.1
120.5
120.5
120.5
120.5
120,5

.550
.525
.525
.525
.525
.525

122.6
117.0
117.0
117.0
117.0
117.0

.488
.466
.420
.470
.500
.500

121.5
116.1
104.7
117.1
124.6
124.6

231




io $0,250
io .260

AVERAGE WHOLESALE FRIGES OF COMMODITIES.

1913......................
1914......................

400
375

232

350
325
300
275
250
225

200
175

150

125
100

75

50

40

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 19-21.




Chart 39.

406
375
350
325
300
275
250

225
200

175
150
125
100

75

50)

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

40

233




Chart 39a.

T able 9 .—AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921—Continued.

jg

Miscellaneous.
(c) Pafrer and pulp.

(d )

Other miscellaneous.

\
------------------------------------------------

Wood pulp: Sul­
phite) domestic,
. unbleached.

Paper.
Year or month.

Average
price per
Series 2 ,
average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

100

pounds.

Rela­
tive
price.

Avetage
price per
pound.

Rela­
tive
price.

Lubricating oil:
Paraffin.

Jute.

Wrapping:
Manila.

Newsprint.

Series 1,
average
price per
pound.

Hemp: Manila,
current
shipment.

Raw,
average
price per
pound.

Raw,
M-dOubie
triangle,
average
price per
pound.

ROpe: Manila,
base Size and
larger.

I
Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price per
gallon.

Rela­
tive
price.

Average
price pCr
pound.

Relative
price.

53

G
Q

ft!
1890.........................
1891..... . ..................
1892.........................
1893.........................
1894.........................

80.038
.034
.034
.032
.032

169.8
151.1
151.1
141.3
143.6

80.058
.058
.056
.058
.058

117.8
117.8
114.3

1895.........................
1896.........................
189?.........................
1898.........................
1899.......... ..............

.031
.028
.027

136.9

120.1

.022
.021

120 4
97.3
92.9

.059
.059
.059
.046
.044

1900............... .........
1901.......................
Ig02.........................
i903.........................
1904

.028
.023
.024
.025
.027

124.9
100.4
107.6
112.4
118.7

.048
.050
.050
.053
.053

98.4
102.9

1905.........................
1906....................
1907.........................
1908.............
1909.........................

.024
.025
.025

107.6
97.3
110.7

.021

91.1

.053
.050
.051
.050
.048

107.6
102.5
103 7
102.5
97.3

1910.........................
1911.......................

.021
.021

91.6
94.2

.048
.048

97.3
99.0




.022

122.2

110.2

80.039
.037
.048
.035
.035

120.5
120.5
94.1
89.8

101.8

107.8
108.6

,

101.8

5

70.8
78.3
62.6
52.5

H
C
G
"*
gj

30.6
35.0
40.9
36.4
40.0

.074
.066
.063
.084
.109

50.1
54.3
43.0
57.4
74.6

S

.044
.040
.044
.046
.044

119.7

80.149
.104
.115
.092
.077

.028
.032
.037
.033
.037

118.6

42.6
40.7
52.1
37.9
37.8

80.033

47.7
43.9
48.1
50.9
48.7

.132
.109
.135
.115
.117

90.0
74.4
91.9
78.1
79.8

.040
.054
.049
.037
.032

59.5
80.6
72.6
55.3
47.5

.120

.084

81.5
85.3
87.9
69.2
57.3

.034
.047

51.4
69.8

.088
.087

59.9
59.4

.125
.129
.102

g
w
H^

.022
.023
.023

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

.022

1921...............
January..
February
March...
April___
May........
June.......
July.........
August___
September
October...
November.
December.

.049
.049
.049

100.0
100.0
100.2

$2.226
2.156

100.0
96.9

$0,021
.027
.034
.034
.039
.060

99.1
130.5
161.9
164.8
187.6
290.1

.049
.079
.101
.105
.120
.147

100.2
162.5
207.8
214.8
244.9
301.4

2.119
3.815
4.813
3.837
3.522
6.579

.050
.058
.057
.055
.055
.055
.055

241.7
278.0
275.1
265.9
265.9
265.9
265.9

.089
.093
.102
.093
.091
.087
.085

181.4
189.6
208.8
189. 6
185.7
178.3
174.2

.053
.049
.046
.042
.040
.036

256.7
234.9
221.4
203.6
193.3
175.5

.085
.085
.085
.085
.086
.088

174.2
174.2
174.2
174.2
175.2
179.3

$0,093
.073

100.0
78.2

.051
.067
.062

76.7
100.0
93.1

$0.143
.151

100.0
103.8

.101
.147
.123

100.0

95.2
171.4
216.3
172.5
158.3
295. V

.094
.124
.222
.241
.152
.162

101.1
133.5
238.8
259.2
164.0
174.2

.053
.076
.103
.129
.113
.096

79.8
114.0
153.8
192.2
168.6
143.5

.147
.201
.215
.341
.306
.434

102.9
140.8
150.9
239.5
214.6
304.7

.133
.183
.283
.325
.201
.275

90.3
124.4
193.1

3.495
6.000
4.656
4.075
3.344
3.875
3.625

157.1
269.7
209.3
183.1
150.3
174.2
162.9

.083
.120
.106
.086
.089
.090
.077

89.3
129.3
114.5
92.1
95.7
96.8
82.5

.053
.058
.058
.053
.053
.053
.050

79.5
86.0
86.0
78.5
78.5
78.5
74 7

.282
.456
.435
.365
.308
.220
.220

198.1
320.0
305.3
256.1
216.1
154.4
154.4

.190
.225
.200
.200
.200
.200
.190

129.5
153.4
136.3
136.3
136.3
136.3
129.5

3.438
2.625
2.625
2.625
2.625
2.625

154.5
118.0
118.0
118; 0
118.0
118.0

.070
.065
.067
.079
.075
*076

75.4
70.0
72.1
84.9
80.8
82.2

.050
.051
.053
.062
.053
.048

74.7
75.6
79.5
92.7
78.5
71.0

.220
.220
.220
.220
.243
.250

154.4
154.4
154.4
154.4
170.2
175.4

.160
.177
.173
.183
.180
.188

109.1

68.7
84.0

221.8

178.1
187.5

120.3

117.6
124.4
122.7
127.8

235




96.0
100.0
100.0

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

1912.
1913.
1914.

400
37$
350

236

325
300
275
250
225

200
175
150

125

100

75

50

AO

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.




Chart 40.

40a.
am
37$
350
325
300
275
250
•225

200
173

150

125

100

75

50

40

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

237




C hart

bd

T a b l e 9 . — AVE R A G E W H O LESALE PRICES O F COMMODITIES, 1890 TO 1921— Concluded.

88
Miscellaneous.
( d ) Other miscellaneous.
Rubber: Para, Sisal: Mexican,
Current ship­
island.
ment.
Year or month.

Soap: Laundry.

Starch: Laun­
dry.

Tobacco: Smoking, granulated, 1-ounce
bags.

Tobacco: Plug.

Seal of
Black­
12 pieces 14£ ounces
Seal of
North well’s Bull
to the
to the
North
Rela­ Carolina, Carolina, Durham, Rela­
pound,
plug,
tive average average
tive
average
average average
price per price per price. price per price per price per price.
gross
gross
pound.
pound.
pound.
bags.
bags.

1890.................... $0.838
.791
1891....................
.676
1892....................
.717
1893....................
.674
1894....................

103.8
98.0
83.8
88.8
83.6

$0.037
.043
.037
.037
.037

101.6
116.7
102.2
100.3
100.3

$0.405
.401
.373
.397
.400

92.0
91.1
84. 7
90.2
90.9

$6,500
.500
.500
.500
.500

79.8
79.8
79.8
79.8
79.8

1895....................
1896....................
1897....................
1898....................
1899....................

.743
.800
.845
.927
.995

92.0
99.1
104.7
114.9
123.3

.036
.031
.030
.030
.030

99.5
84.9
82.2
82.2
82.2

.400
.381
.376
.413
.418

90.9
86.5
85.4
93. 9
94.9

.500
.500
.500
.530
.560

79.8
79.8
79.8
84.6
89.4

1900....................
1901....................
1902....................
1903....................
1904..............

.982
.850
.727
.905
1.088

121.6
105.3
90.1
112.2
134. 7

.034
.036
.045
.043
.037

93.1
99.5
124.4
118.1
101.1

.443
.466
.454
.450
.470

100.7
105.9
103.2
102.3
106.8

.560
.560
.559
.570
.583

89.4
89.4
89.3
91.0
93.1

1905....................
1906....................
10Q7....................
1908....................
1909....................

1.243
1.213
1.063
.871
1.481

153.9
150.3
131. 7
107.9
183.5

.033
.037
.040
.046
.043

90. i
100.5
110.7
118.6
117.5

.490
.483
.470
.470
.470

111.4
109.8
106.8
106.8
166.8

.600
.600
.600
.600
.600

95.8
95.8
95. 8
95.8
95. 8

1910....................
1911....................
1912....................

1.908
1.110
1.052

236.3
137.6
130.3

.039
.033
.038

105.8
89.0
102.7

.470
.440
.440

106.8
100.0
100.0

.585
.628
.628




$0,470 I

$5.157

93.4
100.2
100.2

WHOLESALE PRICES. 1890 TO 1921,

Average
Average
14§ ounces
Aver­
Aver­
price per
Aver­
to the
age
Rela­
age
Rela­ price per Rela­ box of Rela­
age
Rela­
box of
Plug,
price
tive
tive
tive
tive
price
tive
100
100 bars price. eleven- price. price price. average
per
price.
price.
per
per
(75
price per
pound.
ounce
pound.
pound.
pounds).
pound.
cakes.

1913........................
1914........................

.807
.616

100.0
76.3

$0. 043
.051

100.0
117.8

$3. 528
3.528

100.0
100.0

$3.083
3.050

100.0
98.9

.0 3 7
.0 3 9

100.0
106.8

.4 7 0
.4 7 0

100.0
100.0

1915.........................
1916........................
1917........................
1918........................
1919........................
1920........................

.557
.669
.648
.549
.483
.333

69.0
82.9
80.3
68.0
59.8
41.2

.059
.090
.177
.178
.126
.079

136.8
208.6
408.8
412.3
290.7
182.4

3.528
3.565
4.451
5.336
6.334
6.906

100.0
101.0
126.2
151.2
179.5
195.7

3.050
3.150
4.616
6.212
6.841
7. 211

98.9
102.2
149.7
201.5
221.9
233.9

.0 4 0
.0 4 5
.0 5 8
.0 6 0
.0 7 3
.0 9 3

109.6
1 22.2
160.0
164.1
199.7
253.4

.4 9 0
.4 9 0
.585
.7 4 7
.9 0 9
.941

1921........................
January........
February. . .
March............
April..............
M a y ...............
June...............

.182
.173
.168
.180
.178
.179
.164

22.5
21.4
20.8
22.3
22.0
22.2
20.3

.061
.056
.056
.059
.069
.076
.076

140.7
130.3
130.3
136.1
160.0
175. 9
175.0

5.588
6.125
6.125
6.125
5. 562
5.390
5.390

158.4
173.6
173.6
173.6
157.6
152.8
152.8

5.310
6.600
6.600
6.600
5.276
5.011
5.011

172.2
214.1
214.1
214.1
171.1
162.5
162.5

.0 7 0
.0 9 5
.0 8 3
.0 8 0
.0 7 0
.0 7 1
.0 7 1

192.3
260.3
2 2 6 .0
2 1 9 .2
191.8
193.1
193.1

July................
August..........
September. .
October........
N ovem ber. .
Decem ber.. .

. 164
.165
.174
.210
.215
.211

20.3
20.4
21.6
26.0
26.6
26.2

.078
.071
.051
.051
.037
.051

179.4
164.4
117.8
117.1
85.6
117.1

5.390
5.390
5.390
5.390
5.390
5.390

152.8
152.8
152.8
152.8
152.8
152. 8

5. Oil
4.913
4.706
4.706
4.706
4. 585

162.5
159.3
152.6
152.6
152.6
148.7

.0 7 1
.0 6 1
.0 6 1
.0 6 1
.0 6 1
.0 6 1

193.1
1 66.0
1 6 6 .0
1 6 6 .0
1 6 6 .0
166.0

$ 5 .6 4 0
5 .6 8 0

1 0 0 .0
100.7

778

104.2
1 0 4 .2
1 2 4 .4
1 5 8 .7
193.1
200.0

5 .7 6 0
5 .7 6 0
5 .7 6 0
8 .0 8 0
9 .1 7 6
9 .9 2 0

102.1
102.1
102.1
143.3
1 62.7
175.9

.7 1 4
. 779
.7 7 9
.701
.701
.701
.701

183.6
2 0 0 .2
200. 2
180. 2
1 8 0.2
180. 2
180.2

9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0

175.9
1 7 5 .9
175.9
1 7 5.9
1 75.9
1 7 5 .9
1 75.9

.701
.701
.701
. 701
.701
.701

180.2
180. 2
180. 2
180. 2
1 8 0.2
180.2

9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0
9. 920
9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0
9 .9 2 0

1 7 5.9
1 75.9
1 7 5 .9
1 75.9
175.9
175.9

SO.

AVERAGE WHOLESALE PRICES OF COMMODITIES.

239




5.145




APPENDIXES,

APPENDIX A.

The weighting factors used in constructing the revised index
numbers of wholesale prices computed by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics are contained in the table which follows. The figures are
taken from the 1919 census, supplemented in some instances by
information from other Government sources and from trade associ­
ations, etc. In each case the figures represent, as nearly as could be
determined, the quantity of the article sold in the markets in 1919.
For commodities represented by more than one series of price quo­
tations, the total quantity marketed has been apportioned among
the several markets or grades of the commodity in proportion to their
relative importance.
TABLE

OF

WEIGHTS USED IN CONSTRUCTING REVISED IN D E X
W HOLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES.

Commodity.

NUMBERS

Unit.

OF

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted.)

Group I.— Farm products.
(а) Grains:
Barley, malting, Chicago........................
Corn, Chicago—
Contract grades.................................
No. 3 mixed......................................
Oats, contract grades, Chicago...............
Rye, No. 2, Chicago................................
W h eatNo. 1, northern spring, Chicago......
No. 2, red winter, Chicago...............
No. 2, hard winter, Kansas City---No. 1, northern spring, Minneapolis
No. 1, hard white, Portland, Oreg..
(б) Live stock and poultry:
Cattle, steers, ChicagoChoice to prime..................................
Good to choice..................................
Hogs, ChicagoHeavy ...............................................
Light.................................................
Sheep, Chicago—
Ewes, native, all grades...................
Lambs, western, good to choice----Wethers, fed, good to choice............
Poultry, live fowls—
Chicago..............................................
New Y ork.........................................
(c) Other farm products:
Beans, medium, choice, New York.......
Clover seed, contract grades, Chicago...
Cotton, middling—
New Orleans.....................................
New Y ork.........................................
Cotton seed, average price at gin...........
Eggs, fresh—
Firsts, western, Boston....................
Firsts, Chicago..................................
Extra firsts, Cincinnati....................
Candled, New Orleans......................
Firsts, New Y ork.............................
Extra firsts, western, Philadelphia.
Extra pullets, San Francisco..........

11083°— 22— Bull. 320------ 16




Bushel.

57,705

...... do.
...... do.
...... do.
...... do.

164,459
246,689
325,609
88,909

...... do.
...... do.
...... do.
.......do.
.......do.

72,534
305,358
285,799
104,378
39,747

100 pounds___
___ do..............

45,450
90,901

...... do..............
...... do..............

32,775
98,327

...... do..............
...... do..............
...... do..............

2,259
7,906
1,129

Pound............
...... do..............

299.223
299.224

100 pounds___
...... do..............

8,709
467

Pound............
...... do..............
Ton.................

3,806,921
1,908,461
4,069

Dozen.............
.......do..............
.......do..............
.......do..............
.......do..............
.......do..............
.......do.............

107,278
297,545
32.386
32.386
387,619
110,314
44,531

241

242

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

TA BLE

OF W EIGH TS USED IN CONSTRUCTING REVISED IN D E X NUMBERS
W HOLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES—Continued.

Commodity.

Unit.

OF

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted.)

Group I.—Farm products—Concluded.
(c) Other farm products—Concluded .
Flaxseed, No. 1, Minneapolis....................................................................... Bushel.............
H ay-

Alfalfa, No. 1, Kansas Citv ....................................................................
Clover, mixed, No. 1, Cincinnati..........................................................
Timothy ? No. 1, Chicago................. .......................................... : ........
Hides and skins-Calfskins, No. 1, country, Chicago...................................................
Goatskins, Brazilian, New York......................................................
Hides, heavy, country cows, No. 1, Chicago.....................................
Hides, packers, heavy, native steers, Chicago...................................
Hides, packers, heavy, Texas steers, Chicago...................................
Hops, prime to choice—
New York State, New York ..................................................................
Pacific coast, Portland, Oreg.................................................................
Milk, fresh—
Chicago........................................................................................................
New Y ork. . .
.....................................................................................
San Francisco............................................................................................
Onions, fresh, yellow, Chicago....... .............................................................
Peanuts, No. 1, Norfolk, Va ..........................................................................
PotatoesWhite, good to choice, Chicago.............................................................
Sweet, No. 1, Philadelphia..............................................................
Rice, New OrleansBlue Rose, head, clean.....................................................................
Honduras, head, clean.....................................................................
Tobacco, Burlev, good leaf, dark red—
Louisville, K y ...................................................................................
Wool, Ohio, Boston—
Fine clothing, scoured............................................................................
Fine delaine, scoured........................................................................
Half blood, scoured .................................................................................
One-fourth and three-eighth grades, scoured.....................................

22,036

Ton ...................
....... do ...............
.......do.............

5,648
3,116
3,408

_____do ...............
....... do ...............
....... do ...............

Pound............
.......do..............

152,926
132,905
371,746
371.747
371.747

....... do ...............
.......do ...............

4,258
25,551

Quart

.........

........ d o...............

100 pounds—
P ou n d ...........

4,052,905
5,066,131
1,013,226
5,773
751,982

100 pounds___
§ bushel
__

72,355
12,067

Pound............
.......do..............

742,836
346,366

100 pounds___

15,116

Pound .............
....... do ...............
.......do ...............

146,851
55,069
73,426
91,782

Pound............
___ do..............
Barrel (200#)..
Pound............
...... do..............
___ do..............

2.484.747
2.484.747
650
1,383,017
339,505
169,752

----- do..............
___ do..............

454,762
454,761

Barrel (200#)..
Pound............
___ do..............

6,909
691.508
691.508

.......do..............
___ do..............
___ do..............

274.388
274.388
422,928

Group II.—Foods.
(o) Meats:
Beef, fresh—
Carcass, good native steers, Chicago..........
Sides, native, New Y ork...........................
Beef, salt, extra mess, New York....................
Hams, smoked, Chicago...................................
Lamb, dressed, Chicago...................................
Mutton, dressed, New York.............................
Pork, fresh—
Loins, Chicago................... .
Loins, western, New Y ork........................
Pork, cured—
Mess, salt, New York.................................
Sides, rough, Chicago.................................
Sides, short clear, Chicago........................
Poultry, dressed—
Hens, heavy, Chicago................................
Fowls, 48--56 pounds to dozen, New York.
Veal, dressed, good to prime, New York........
(6) Butter, cheese and milk:
Butter, creamery—
B oston Extra...................................... ............
Firsts....................................................
Seconds..................................... .
ChicagoExtra................................ ...................
Extra firsts...........................................
Firsts............... ...................................
CincinnatiExtra....................................................
Centralized firsts..................................
Centralized seconds.............................
New OrleansFancy....................................................
Choice...................................................




.do.
do.
.do.

31,209
109,229
15,604

.do.
.do.
.do.

79,292
277,523
39,646

.do.
.do.
.do.

1,849
6,473
925

.do.
.do.

11,443
26,700

243

APPENDIXES,
TABLE

OP W E IG H T S USED IN CONSTRUCTING REVISED IN D E X N U M BER S
W H O L E SA L E PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES—Continued.

Commodity.

Unit.

OF

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted.)

Group II.—Foods—Continued.
(6) Butter, cheese, and milk—Concluded.
Butter, creamery—Concluded.
New York—
Extra.....................................................................
F irsts...................................................................
Seconds.................................................................
PhiladelphiaExtra.....................................................................
Extra firsts...........................................................
Firsts.....................................................................
St. L o u is Extra.....................................................................
San FranciscoExtra.....................................................................
Prime firsts...........................................................
Cheese, whole milk—
American twins, Chicago.......................................... .
State, fresh flats, colored, average, New York..........
California flats, fancy, San Francisco...................... .
Milk, fresh. (See Farm products.)
Milk, condensed, 14-ounce tins, New Y ork.....................
Milk, evaporated, 16-ounce tins, New York....................
(c) Other foods:
Beans, medium, choice. (See Farm products.)
Bread—
Chicago........................................................................
Cincinnati.................................................................. .
New Orleans...............................................................
New Y ork...................................................................
San Francisco..............................................................
Cocoa, beans, Arriba, New Y o rk .. . . ..............................
Coffee, Rio, No. 7, New Y ork..........................................
Copra, South Sea, sun dried, New Y ork.........................
Eggs,fresh. (See Farm products.)
F is h Cod, large, shore, pickled, cured, Gloucester, Mass.
Herring, large, split, New Y ork................................
•
Mackerel, salt, large, 3s, Boston................................
Salmon, canned, Alaska, red, factory...................... .
Flour, rye, white, Minneapolis......«............................... .
Flour, wheat—
Winter patents, Kansas City.....................................
Winter straights, Kansas City...................................
Standard patents, Minneapolis................................
Second patents, Minneapolis....................................
Patents, Portland, Oreg.............................................
Patents,soft, winter, St. Louis................................ .
Straights,soft, winter,St. Louis..............................
Patents, Toledo.............................. ..........................
Fruit, canned, New York—
Peaches, California, standard 2§s.............................
Pineapple, Hawaiian, sliced, standard 2Js..............
Fruit, dried, New York—
Apples, evaporated, State, choice............................
Currants, uncleaned, barrels....................................
Prunes, California, 60-70s...........................................
Raisins, coast, seeded, bulk..................................... .
Fruit, fresh—
Apples, Baldwins, Chicago....................................... .
Bananas, Jamaica, 9s, New Y ork...........................
Lemons, California (300-360 count), Chicago.......... .
Oranges, California, choice, Chicago........................
Glucose, 42° mixing, New Y ork..................................... .
Hominy grits, bulk, car lots, f. o. b. m ill......................
Lard, prime contract, New York....................................
Meal, c o r n White, f. o. b. Decatur, 111.......................................
Yellow, Philadelphia................................................
Molasses, New Orleans, fancy, New Y ork.....................
Oatmeal, car lots,in barrels (180 pounds), New Y ork..
Oleomargarine, standard, uncolored, Chicago...............
Oleo oil, extra, Chicago....................................................
Pepper, black, Singapore, New York.............................
Rice. (See Farm products.)
Salt, American, medium, Chicago..................................




Pound.
.......do.,
.......do.,

76,518
267,814
38,259

.......do.,
.......do..
.......do.,

17,569
61,492
8,785

.......do.,

38,143

.......do.,
.......do.,

14,217
33,173

.......do.
____ do.,
.......do.,

390,640
81,281
20,690

Case—
.......do.

16,643
29,125

Pound
___ do.
.....d o .
----- do.
....d o .
___ do.
----- do.
.....d o .

2,680,740
400,680
381,600
5,571,360
505,620
348,758
1,252,434
167,820

100 pounds... .
Barrel.............
.......do..............
Dozen.............
Barrel.............

27,079
2,575

___ do..............
.......do.............
.......do.............
.......do..............
.......do.............
.......do..............
.......do.............
.......d o .............

36,676
12,225
39,181
13,060
13,895
8,818
2,939
6,814

Case................
.......d o .............

15,414
10,457

Pound............
.......do..............
.......do.............
.......do.............

46,624
24,919
136,377
302,556

Barrel.............
Bunch............
B ox.................
.......do..............
100 pounds___
.......do.............
Pound............

26,223
35,117
4,536
22,075
14,661
2,923
1,372,550

100 pounds___
.......do..............
Gallon............
100 pounds___
Pound............
.......d o .............
.......do..............

14.495
14.495
72,474
7,479
348,976
129,863
24,387

Barrel.............

49,168

1,394
495

121

244

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

TABLE OF W EIGHTS USED IN CONSTRUCTING REVISED IN D E X NUMBERS OF
W H OLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES^-Continued.

Commodity.

Unit.

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted.)

Group II.—Foods—Concluded.

(0

Other foods—Concluded.
Sugar, New York—
Granulated, in barrels.................................................
Raw, 96° centrifugal...................................................
Tallow, edible, Chicago.....................................................
Tea, Formosa, fine, New York.........................................
Vegetables, canned—
Corn, Maryland-Maine style, New York...................
Peas, State and western, No. 5, New Y ork..............
Tomatoes, New Jersey, standard, No. 3, New York.
Vegetables, fresh. (See Farm products.)
Vegetable oil—
Coconut, crude, Pacific coast.....................................
Corn, crude, in barrels, New York............................
Cottonseed, prime, summer, yellow, New York......
Olive, edible, in barrels, New Y ork..........................
Peanut, crude, f. o. b. m ill.........................................
Soya bean, crude, in barrels, New Y ork...................
Vinegar, cider, 40 grain, in barrels, New York...............

Pound
___ do.
— .do.
----- do.

7,884,900
7,128,130
36,506
93,550

Dozen.
.....d o .
.....d o .

28,805
18,651
21,619

Pound
----- do.
___ do.
Gallon.
Pound
___ do.
Gallon

244,325
83,764
1,180,285
8,959
243,620
88,987
56,530

Pair...
----- do.
.......do.
.......do.

16,180
16,180
16,180
26,500

----- do..............
___ do..............
----- do..............
----- do..............
___do..............
----- do..............
----- do..............
----- do.............
----- do.......... .

10.560
10.560
10.560
10.560
10.560
10.560
10.560
10.560
10.560

___ do..............
___ do..............
----- do..............
----- do..............

26,200
26,200
26,200
26,200

Group III.— Cloths and clothing.
(a) Boots and shoes, factory:
Children’s—
Little boys’ , gun metal, blucher—
Child’s, gun metal, polish, high cut.
Misses’ , black, vici, polish, high cut
Youths’ , gun metal, blucher...........
Men’s—
Black, calf, blucher...............................................................
Black, calf, Goodyear welt, bal............................................
Black, dress, Goodyear welt, side leather...........................
. Gun metal, Goodyear welt, blucher....................................
Mahogany, chrome, side, Goodyear welt, bal.....................
Tan, dress, Goodyear welt, calf............................................
Tan, dress, Goodyear welt, side leather..............................
Tan, grain, blucher...............................................................
Vici kid, black, Goodyear welt............................................
Women’s—
Black, kid, Goodyear welt, 8^-mch lace..............................
Kid, Goodyear welt, 9-inch lace..........................................
Kid, McKay sewed, 8£-mch lace..........................................
Patent leather pump McKay sewed..................................
(6) Cotton goods:
Denims, Mass., 2.20 yards to the pound, New Y ork................
Drillings, brown, New York—
Massachusetts D standard, 30-inch......................................
Pepperell, 29-inch, 2.85 yards to the pound........................
Flannels, New York—
Colored, 2.75 yards to the pound.........................................
Unbleached, 3.80 yards to the pound..................................
Ginghams—
Amoskeag, 27-inch, 6.37 yards to the pound, New Y ork...
Lancaster, 26^-inch, 6.50 yards to the pound, Boston........
H osieryMen’s half hose, combed yarn, New Y ork..........................
Women’s, cotton, silk mercerized, mock seam, New York
Women’s, combed yarn, 16-ounce, New Y o rk ...................
Muslin, bleached, 4/4—
Fruit of the Loom, New York.............................................
Lonsdale, factory...................................................................
Rough Rider, New York......................................................
Wamsutta, factory................................................................
Print cloth, 27-inch, 7.60 yards to the pound* Boston..............
Sheeting, brown, 4/4—
Indian Head, 2.85 yards to the pound, Boston..................
Pepperell, 3.75 yards to the pound, New York...................
Ware Shoals, 4 yards to the pound, New Y ork..................
Thread, 6-cord, J. & P. Coats, New York..................................
UnderwearMen’s shirts and drawers, New York..................................
Women’s union suits, combed yarn, New York....................




Yard...............

161,804

----- do..............
----- do..............

157.197
157.197

___ d o . ...........
___ do..............

139.420
139.420

___ do..............
___ do..............

232.434
232.434

Dozen pairs...
___ do..............
___ do..............

22,721
15.731
15.731

Yard...............
___ do..............
.......do..............
.......do..............
.......do..............

63.079
63.079
63.079
63.079
1,237,960

.......do..............
.......do..............
.......do..............
Spool, ............

186.433
186.433
186.433
1,038,636

D o z e n gar­
ments.
Dozen..............

6,332
3,985

245

APPENDIXES,
TABLE

OF W EIG H TS USED IN CONSTRUCTING REVISED IN D E X NU M BER S OF
W H O L E S A L E PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES—Continued.

Commodity.

Unit.

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted).

Group III.—Cloths and clothing—Concluded.
(6) Cotton goods—Concluded.
Yarn, B o sto n Carded, white, mulespun, northern, 10/1 cones..............................
Carded, white, mulespun, northern^ 22/1 cones..............................
Twisted, ordinary, weaving, 2 0 /2..................................................
Twisted^ ordinary, weaving, 40/2....................................................
(c) Woolen goods:"
Flannel, white, 4/4, Ballard Vale, No. 3, factory..................................
Overcoating, soft-faced, black, Boston..................................................
Suitings—
Clay worsted, diagonal, 12-ounce, factory.......................................
Clay worsted, diagonal, 16-ounce, factory.......................................
Middlesex, wool-dyed, blue, 16-ounce, New York.........................
Serge, 11-ounce, factory....................................................................
Trousering, cotton warp, 11-11 |-ounce, New York..............................
UnderwearMerino, shirts and drawers, factory.................................................
Men’ s union suits, 33 per cent worsted, New York........................
Women’s dress goods—
Broadcloth, 9J-ounce, 54-56-inch, New York..................................
French serge, 35-inch, factory.........................................................
Poplar cloth, cotton warp, factorv..................................................
Sicilian cloth, cotton warp, 50-inch, New York.............................
Storm serge, double warp, 50-inch, factory.....................................
Y arnCrossbred stock, 2/32s, Boston.........................................................
Half blood, 2/40s, Philadelphia.......................................................
Fine domestic, 2/50s, Philadelphia..................................................
0d ) Silk, etc.:
Linen shoe thread, 10s, Barbour, New York........................................
Silk, raw—
China, Canton filature, extra extra A , New York.........................
Japan, Kansai, No. 1, New York....................................................
Japan, special extra extra, New Y ork............................................
Silk yarn, New York—
Domestic, gray spun, 60/1................................................................
Domestic, gray spun, 60/2, No. 1.....................................................

Pound............
. . .do.............
....... do..............
....... do..............

271.669
271.669
99,542
99,542

Yard...............
....... do..............

2,200
25.207

....... do..............
....... do.............
....... do.............
....... do.............
....... do.............

27.923
27.923
25.207
27.923
22.372

D o z e n gar­
ments.
Dozen.............

650

Yard...............
....... do..............
....... do.............
....... do.............
....... do..............

25,207
27.923
22.372
22, 372
27.923

Pound............
....... do.............
....... do..............

27.700
27.700
27.700

911

....... do..............

3,210

. __do..........
....... do..............
....... do.............

9,398
26,199
8,733

....... do.............
....... do..............

4,601
4,601

Group IV.—Fuel and lighting.
1
(a) Anthracite coal, New York, tidewater:
Broken...................................................................
......................... Gross ton........
4,625
Chestnut................................................................................................... ....... do..............
28 242
Egg.....................................................................
. . . . 1 ......... .......do............
15,628
Stove.............. ......................................................................................... ....... do..............
21,585
(6) Bituminous coal:
Mine run, Chicago................................................................................... Net ton..........
42.700
Prepared sizes, Chicago........................................................................... ....... do.............
54,900
Screenings, Chicago................................................................................. . __do..........
24,400
Mine run, Kanawha, Cincinnati............................................................ ....... do..............
40.700
Mine run, smokeless, New River, Cincinnati....................................... ....... do..............
40.700
Mine run, Pocahontas, Norfolk, Va....................................................... Gross ton........
54.500
Prepared sizes, Pittsburgh..................................................................... Net ton..........
81,300
Indiana, No. 4 mine run, f. o. b. Indianapolis...................................... ....... do..............
61,000
(c) Other fuel and lighting:
Coke, Connellsville, furnace, at ovens.................................................... ....... do..............
28,559
Gasoline, motor, New York................................................................... Gallon............
3,637,045
Matches, average o f several brands, New Y ork.................................... Gross..............
16.500
Crude petroleum, at wells—
164,332
California, 20°.......... : ....................................................................... Barrel.............
216,370
Kansas-Oklahoma............................................................................. ....... do.............
Pennsylvania.................................................................................... ....... do..........
32,041
Refined petroleum, New York—
1.152.425
Standard white, 110° fire test........................................................... Gallon............
....... do..............
Water white, 150° fire test................................................................
1.152.425




246
TABLE

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.
OF W E IG H T S U SED IN CONSTRUCTING R E V IS E D IN D E X N U M BER S
W H O L E S A L E PRICES, B Y GROUPS O F COMMODITIES^Continued.

j
Commodity.

|

OF

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted).

Unit.

Group V.— Metals and xeetal products.
(a) Iron and steel:
Iron ore, lower lake ports—
Mesabi, Bessemer, 55 per cent......................................................... Gross ton........
21,355
Non-Bessemer, 51j per cent........................ ................................... ....... do.............
35,440
Pig iron—
Basic, valley furnace......................................................................... ....... do.............
4,541
Bessemer, Pittsburgh....................................................................... ....... do..............
2,920
Foundry, No. 2, northern, Pittsburgh............................................ ....... do............
748
Foundry^ No. 2, Birmingham, A la................................................. ....... do.............
748
Ferromanganese, seaboard..................................................................... ....... do.............
218
Spiegeleisen, 18 and 22 pier cent, furnace.............................................. ....... do.............
84
Bar iron—
Best refined, Philadelphia............................................................... Pound..........
506,373
Common, f. o. b. Pittsburgh............................................................ ....... do.............
506, 373
Bars, reinforcing, Pittsburgh.................................................................. 100 pounds___
6,751
Nails, wire, Pittsburgh............................................................................ ....... do..............
13, 094
Net ton__
Pipe, cast-iron, 6-inch, New Y ork..........................................................:
703
Skelp, grooved. Pittsburgh........................................................ .......... 100 pounds___
57,994
Steel billets, Pittsburgh—
Bessemer............................................................................................ Gross ton........
1,320
Open hearth....... . ........................................................................... ....... do.............
4,908
Steel merchant bars, Pittsburgh............................................................. 100 pounds___
88,370
Steel plates, tank, Pittsburgh................................................................ Pound............
9,648,128
Steel rails, Pittsburgh—
Bessemer, standard.......................................................................... Gross ton........
214
1,893
Open hearth, standard..................................................................... ....... do..............
Steel sheets, black, f. o. b. Pittsburgh................................................... Pound.
5,130, 944
Steel, structural shapes, Pittsburgh...................................................... 100 pounds___
56,617
854
Terneplate, 8 pounds I. C., Pittsburgh................................................. Box (200#)......
Tin plate, domestic, coke, Pittsburgh.................................................. 100 pounds___
24,076
W ir e .do.............
6,823
Barbed, galvanized, Chicago...........................................................
11,849
Plain, fence, annealed, Pittsburgh................................................. ....... do.............
(5) Nonferrous metals:
Aluminum, New Y o r k ........................................................................... Pound............
159,176
Copper, ingot, electrolytic, refinerv........................... ........................
1,805,307
do.............
105, 400
Copper, sheet. New York............
.................................................
323,320
Copper wire, Dare, mill............................................................................. ....... do..............
964,440
Lead, pig, New York............................................................................... .. . .do.............
932
Lead pipe, New York.............................................................................. 100 pounds___
2,404
Quicksilver, New York............................................................................ Pound............
56,682
Silver, bar, fine, New York..................................................................... Ounce.............
89,665
Tin, pig, New York................................................................................. Pound............
1,086
Zinc, sheet, factory................................................................................... 100 pounds___
931,486
Zinc, slab, New York.............................................................................. Pound............
Group VI.— Building materials.
(a) Lumber:
Douglas fir, mill—
No. 1 common, boards.............................................................
No. 2 and better, drop siding..................................................
Gum, sap, firsts and seconds, St. Louis........................................
Hemlock, northern, No. 1, Chicago...............................................
Maple, hard, No. 1 common 4/4, Chicago......................................
Oak, white, plain, No. 1 common, 4/4, Cincinnati.......................
Pine, white, No. 2 barn, Buffalo, N. Y ........................................
Pine, yellow, southern, mill—
Floorings, B. and better..........................................................
Timbers, square edge and sound............................................
Poplar, No. 1 common, 4/4, Cincinnati.........................................
Spruce, eastern, random, Boston..................................................
Lath, yellow pine, No. 1, f. o. b . mill............................................
Shingles—
Cypress, 16 inches long, mill....................................................
Red cedar, 16 inches long, m ill...............................................
(5) Brick, common building, simple average of 82 yard prices........... .
{ c ) Structural steel. (See Metals and metal products.)
id) Other building materials:
Cement, Portland, f. o. b. plant, simple average of 6 plant prices.
Crushed stone, ljin ch , New York............................................... .
Gravel, f. o. b. pit, average of 22 plant prices..............................
Hollow tile, building, Chicago......................................................




1.000 feet.
___ do—
___ do...,
___ d o ...
___ do....
___ d o....
....d o ,,,.

4,427
1,476
851
1,755
858
2,708
1,724

___ do....
___ do....
___ do....
___ d o ...
1.000

4,898
8,165
350
980
2,674

_______

.......d o...
.......d o...
.......d o...
Barrel..............
Cubic yard___
Ton.................
Block..............

1,182
10,258
4,553
86,141
27,200
34,607
264,050

247

APPENDIXES.

TA BLE OF W EIGH TS USED IN CONSTRUCTING REVISED IN D E X NUMBERS OF
W H OLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES—Continued.

Commodity.

Unit.

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted).

Group VI.—Building materials—Concluded.
(d)

Other building materials—Concluded.
Lime, common, lump, f. o. b. plant, average of 15 plant prices..........
Sand,building, f. o. b. pit, average of 26 plant prices...........................
..................................................................
Slate, roofing, f. o. b. quarry
Glass, plate—
3 to 5 square feet, New Y ork...........................................................
5 to 10 square feet, New Y ork.........................................................
Glass, window, American, f. o. b. works—
Single, A ............................................................................................
Single, B ............................................................................................
Linseed oil, raw, New Y ork...................................................................
Putty, commercial, New Y o r k ..............................................................
Rosin, common to good, (B), New York..............................................
Turpentine, southern, barrels, New York............................................
White lead, American, in oil, New York..............................................
Zinc oxide (white zinc), New York.......................................................
Pipe, cast-iron. (See Metals and Metal products.)
Copper, sheet. (See metals and metal products.)
Copper wire. (See Metals and Metal products )
Lead pipe. (See Metals and metal products.)
Nails. (See Metals and metal products.)
Reinforcing bars. (See Metals and metal products.)
Roofing tin (terneplate). (See Metals and metal products.)
Zinc, sheet. (See Metals and metal products.)

Ton.................
....... do..............
100 square feet

3,071
21,970
454

Square foot___
....... do..............

28,808
28,808

50 square feet.
....... do..............
Gallon............
Pound............
Barrel........ .
Gallon............
Pound.............
....... do..............

3,689
3,689
62,536
66,682
2,272
19, 271
237,359
279,321

Pound.............
....... do..............
....... do..............
....... do..............
....... do..............

53,084
294, 260
38,880
16,970
6,592,540

Gallon............
....... do..............
Pound............
....... do..............
100 pounds___
Pound............
.......do..............
.......do..............
....... do..............

60,399
6, 985
654,000
54,700
1,771
42, 870
35, 288
98,561
19,664

....... do..............
....... do..............
.......do..............
....... do..............
....... d o .............
100 pounds___
....... do.............
Pound............
....... d o .............
100 pounds___
Gross ton........
Pound............

244,325
13,636
41,564
88,987
12, 625
1, 437
20, 670
283,120
638,980
5,736
678
263,951

Ton.................
100 pounds___
Ton.................
....... do..............
....... do.............
100 pounds___
Ton.................

3,680
5,950
60
21
2,272
8,978
297

Pound............
.......do..............
Gallon............
Pound............
100 pounds___
Pound............
....... do.............
Gross..............
Pound............
Ounce.............

3,164
5,313
25,000
2, 855
587
64,343
619
875
64,300
3,937

Group VII.— Chemicals and drugs.
(a) Chemicals:
Acids, New York—
Acetic, 28 per cent............................................................................
Muriatic, 20°.....................................................................................
Nitric, 42°..........................................................................................
Stearic, triple pressed.......................................................................
Sulphuric. 661............
............................................................
Alcohol, N e w 'Y o rk Denatured, No. 5, 188 proof.............................................................
Wood, refined, 95 per cent...............................................................
Alum, lump, New York.................................................. , .....................
Ammonia, anhydrous, New Y ork..
.
................................
Bleaching powder, New York................................................................
Borax, crystals and granulated, New York..........................................
Copper sulphate, 99 per cent, crystals, New Y o r k ...............................
..............................
Copra., South Sea, sun dried, New York. _
Formaldehyde, New Y ork.....................................................................
Oil, vegetableCoconut, crude, Pacific coast............
_
.........
Corn, crude, in barrels, New York..................................................
Palm kernel, crude, New Y ork.. .
. . . .
...............
Soya bean, crude, in barrels, New Y o rk ........................................
Potash, caustic, 88-92 per cent, New Y o r k ..........................................
Sal soda, New York.................................................................................
Soda ash, 58 per cent, light, New York.................................................
Soda, bicarbonate, American, f. o. b. works.........................................
Soda, caustic, 76 per cent, solid, New York..........................................
Soda, silicate of, 40°, New York.............................................................
Sulphur, crude, New York.....................................................................
Tallow, inedible, packers’ prime, Chicago............................................
(6) Fertilizer materials:
Acid phosphate, 16 per cent basis, bulk, New York............................
Ammonia, sulphate, double bags, New Y ork.......................................
Ground bone, steamed, Chicago..........................................................
Muriate of potash, 80-85 per cent, K. C. L. bags, New Y ork..............
Phosphate rock, 68 per cent, f . o. b. mines .......................................
Soda nitrate, 95 per cent, New York.....................................................
Tankage, 9 and Jft per cent, crushed, f . o. b. Chicago...........................
>
(c) Drugs and pharmaceuticals:
A pid citric, domestic crystals New York
_
_______ _____
Acid, tartaric, crystals, U. S. P., New Y ork.........................................
Alcohol, grain 190 proof, U. S. P., New Y ork......................................
Cream of tartar powered, New Y o r k ...................................................
Epsom salts, U S P., in barrels, New York........................................
Glycerine, refined, New York .............................................................
Opium, natural T
T
P New York.. .
................................ ..
Peroxide of hydrogen 4-ounce bottles, New York...............................
Phenol, U. S. P. (carbolic acid), New Y ork.........................................
Quinine sulphate manufacturers’ quotations, New Y o rk ....
____




248

WHOLESALE PRICE'S, 1890 TO 1921,

T A BLE OF W EIGHTS USED IN CONSTRUCTING REV ISE D IN D E X NUMBERS OF
W H OLESALE PRICES, B Y GROUPS OF COMMODITIES—Concluded.

Commodity.

Unit.

Quantity
used as
weight (000
omitted).

Group VUI.— House furnishing goods.
(а) Furniture:
B ed room Bed, combination, factory.....................................................
Chair, all gum, cane seat, factory..........................................
Chifforette, combination, factory..........................................
Dresser, combination, factory......................................... ......
Rocker, quartered oak, Chicago............................................
Set, 3 pieces, Chicago..............................................................
Dining room—
Buffet, combination, factory.................................................
Chair, all gum, leather slip seat, factory...............................
Table, extension, combination, factory................................
Living room—
Davenport, standard pattern, factory..................................
Table, library, combination, factory.....................................
K itch en Chair, hardwood, Chicago......................................................
Refrigerator, lift top type, factory....................................... .
Table, with drawer, Chicago................................................ .
(б) Furnishings:
Blankets—
Cotton, colored, 2 pounds to the pair, New Y o rk .............. .
Wool. 4 to 5 pounds to the pair, factory...............................
Carpets, factory—
Axminster, Bigelow.............................................................. .
Brussels, Bigelow.................................................................. .
Wiltpn, Bigelow.................................................................... .
C utleryCarvers, 8-inch, factory........................................................ .
Knives and forks, factory...................................... ................
Pails, galvanized iron, 10-quart, factory.................................... .
Sheeting, bleached, 10/4—
Pepperell, New Y ork............................................................ .
Wamsutta, factory................................................................
Tableware—
Glass nappies, 4-inch, factory...............................................
Glass pitchers, one-half gallon, factory................................
Glass tumblers, one-third pint, factory...............................
Plates, white granite, 7-inch, factory...................................
Tea cups and saucers, white granite, factory......................
Ticking, Amoskeag, A. C. A., 2.85 yards to pound, New York.
Tubs, galvanized iron, No. 3, factory.........................................

Each...............
___ do..............
___ do..............
___ do..............
___ do..............
Set...................

3,914
2,035
783
783
1,018
783

Each...............
Half dozen___
Each...............

2.349
2,416
1.174

.......do..............
.......do..............

2.349
1.174

Dozen.............
Each...............
.......do..............

2.349
1.174

Pair........
Pound..

5,139
2,880

Y a rd ....
.......d o...
.......do....

19,600
13,328
6,612

Pair.......
Gross___
.......do....

980
275
5

Y a rd ....
.......do—

*73,829
73,829

Dozen__
.......do...
.......d o...
.......do...

10.240
10.240
25,180
19,112
7,434
36,309

Yard..
Dozen.

201

220

Group IX.—Miscellaneous.
Cattle feed:
Bran, Minneapolis............................................................
Cottonseed meal, prime, New Y ork...............................
Linseed meal, New York.................................................
Mill-feed middlings, standard, Minneapolis...................
(5) Leather:
Calf, chrome, B grade, Boston.........................................
Glazed kid, black, top grade, Boston.............................
Harness, California oak, No. 1, Chicago..........................
Side, black, chrome, B grade, Boston............................
Sole, B o sto n Hemlock, middle, N o . l ............................................
Oak, scoured backs, heavy.......................................
Union, middle weight................................................
(c) Paper and pulp:
P a p e rNewsprint, rolls, f. o. b. m ill....................................
Wrapping, manna, No. 1, jute, New York..............
Woodpulp, sulphite, domestic, unbleached, New York.
( d ) Other miscellaneous:
Hemp, manila, fair current shipment, New York.........
Jute, raw, medium grades, New Y ork...........................
Lubricating oil, paraffin, 903 gravity, New York..........
Rope, pure manila, best grade, New York....................
Rubber, Para, island, fine, New York...........................
Sisal, Mexican, current shipment, New York................
Soap—
Laundry, Cincinnati.................................................
Laundry, Philadelphia..............................................
Starch, laundry, bulk, New Y ork..................................
Tobacco—
Plug, New Y ork ........................................................
Smoking, 1-ounce bags, New Y ork..........................

(a)




Ton.................
.......d o . . . . . . . . .
___ do..............
----- do..............

2.409
1,817
164
2.409

Square foot—
.......do..............
Pound............
Square foot_
_

191,068
161,860
44,145
220,565

Pound............
___ do..............
.......do..............

26,819
156,220
113,287

....... do..............
....... do..............
100 pounds___

3,899,590
1,868, 750
48,390

Pound............
....... do..............
Gallon.............
Pound............
....... d o .:...........
....... do..............

149,000
135,972
818,950
130, 420
530,829
299,180

100 cakes.........
....... do..............
Pound............

. 16,890
16,890
783,500

Gross

141,038
25,396

249

APPENDIXES,

APPENDIX B.
R E LA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES, AS MEASURED B Y T H E IR W HOLESALE
VALUES IN EXCHANGE, 1921.

Group and commodity.

Value in ex­
change (000
omitted).

Value expressed
as percentage
of aggregate
value of—
Com­
mod­
ities in
group.

All
com­
mod­
ities.

Group I.— Farm products.
(a) Grains:
Barley, malting, Chicago.......................................
Corn, Chicago—
Contract grades................................................
No. 3 m ixed......................................................
Oats, contract grades, Chicago..............................
Rye, No. 2, Chicago................................................
W h e a tNo. 1, northern spring, Chicago......................
No. 2, red winter, Chicago...............................
No. 2, hard winter, Kansas City.....................
No. 1, northern spring, Minneapolis...............
No. 1, hard white, Portland, Oreg.................
(b) Live stock and poultry:
Cattle, steers, Chicago—
Choice to prime................................................
Good to choice..................................................
Hogs, Chicago—
Heavy...............................................................
Light.................................................................
Sheep, Chicago—
Ewes, native, all grades..................................
Lambs, western, good to choice......................
Wethers, fed, good to choice...........................
Poultry, live fowls—
Chicago..............................................................
New York.........................................................
(c) Other farm products:
Beans, medium, choice, New Y ork......................
Clover-seed, contract grades, Chicago...................
Cotton, middling—
New Orleans.....................................................
New York.........................................................
Cotton seed, average price at gin. .•
........................
Eggs, fresh—
Firsts, western, B oston..................................
Firsts, Chicago.................................................
Extra firsts, Cincinnati....................................
Candled, New Orleans.....................................
Firsts, New Y ork.............................................
Extra firsts, western, Philadelphia................
Extra pullets, San Francisco..........................
Flaxseed, No. 1, Minneapolis................................
H ayAlfalfa, No. 1, Kansas City.............................
Clover, mixed, No. 1, Cincinnati....................
Timothyj No. 1, Chicago.................................
Hides and skins—
Calfskins, No. 1, country, Chicago.................
Goatskins, Brazilian, New York....................
Hides, heavy, country cows, No. 1, Chicago..
Hides, packers, heavy, native steers, Chicago
Hides, packers, heavy, Texas steers, Chicago,
Hops, prime to choice—
New York State, New Y ork...........................
Pacifies, Portland, Oreg..................................
Milk, fresh—
Chicago.............................................................
New Y o rk ........................................................
San Francisco...................................................
Onions, fresh, yellow, Chicago...............................
Peanuts, No. 1, Norfolk, V a..................................
PotatoesWhite, good to choice, Chicago.......................
Sweet, No. 1, Philadelphia.............................




$36,660

0.47

0.11

95,386
139,330
125,978
107,802

1. 24
1.80
1.63
1.40

.30
.43
.39
.33

106,299
438,280
378,855
153,018
50,328

1.38
5.67
4.90
1. 98
.65

.33
1.36
1.17
.47
.16

433,829
798,138

5.62
10.33

1.35
2.47

277,689
874,255

3.60
11. 32

.86
2.71

7,709
79,159
6,240

.10
1. 03
.08

.02
.25
.02

74,836
95,093

.97
1.23

.23
.30

45,036
8,773

.58
.11

.14
.03

538,299
287,803
90,261

6. 97
3. 73
1.17

1.67
.89
.28

43,287
107,473
12,197
10,273
156,637
46,663
16,570
40,738

.56
1. 39
.16
.13
2. 03
.60
.21
.53

.13
.33
.04
.03
.49
.15
.05
.13

113,812
55,504
79,629

1.47
.72
1.03

.35
.17
.25

22,740
107,773
28,550
51,673
49,442

.29
1.40
.37
.67
.64

.07
.33
.09
.16
.15

1,455
5,059

.02
.07

.01
.02

186,028
325,752
68,089
11,480
39,705

2. 41
4. 22
.88
.15
.51

.58
1.01
.21
.04
.12

129,491
13,491

1. 68
.17

.40
.04

250

WHOLESALE PRICES, I860 TO 1921.

RELA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES. AS MEASURED B Y T H E IR W HOLESALE
VALU ES IN EXCHANGE. 1921—Continued.

Group and commodity.

Value expressed
as percentage
of agg
value of—
Value in ex­
change (000
omitted).
Com­
All
com­
mod­
ities in mod­
group. ities.

Group I.—Farm products— Concluded.
(c) Other farm products—Concluded.
Rice, New OrleansBlue Rose, head, clean.....................................................................
Honduras, head, clean.....................................................................
Tobacco; Burley, good leaf, dark red—
Louisville, K y...................................................................................
Wool, Ohio, B oston Fine clothing, scoured.....................................................................
Fine delaine^ scoured.......................................................................
Half blood, scoured..........................................................................
One-fouth and three-eighth grades, scoured..................................

$24,365
15,171

0.32
.20

0.08
.05

442,785

5.73

1.37

116,100
51,027
55,870
46,589

1.50
.66
.72
.60

.36
.16
.17
.14

Farm products.......................................................................

7,724,474

100.00

23.95

$404,268
368,488
9,588
370,372
69,531
17,603

4.82
4. 40
.11
4. 42
.83
.21

1.25
1.14
.03
1.15
.22
.05

102,140
117,920

1.22
1.41

.32
.37

183,853
85,678
93,008

2.19
1.02
1.11

.57
.27
.29

71,780
93,923
127,386

.86
1.12
1.52

.22
.29
.39

13,451
43,735
5,635

.16
.52
.07

.04
.14
.02

32,985
107,152
14,681

.39
1.28
.18

.10
.33
.05

Group II.—Foods.
(a)

( b)

Meats:
Beef, fresh—
Carcass, good native steers, Chicago...............................................
Sides, native, New York.................................................................
Beef, salt, extra mess, New Y ork.........................................................
Hams, smoked, Chicago.........................................................................
Lamb, dressed, Chicago.........................................................................
Mutton, dressed, New Y ork..................................................................
Pork, fresh—
Loins, Chicago..................................................................................
Loins, western, New York..............................................................
Pork, cured—
Mess,salt, New York.......................................................................
Sides, rough, Chicago.......................................................................
Sides, short clear, Chicago...............................................................
Poultry, dressed—
Hens, heavy, Chicago......................................................................
Fowls, 48-56 pounds to dozen, New Y ork.....................................
Veal, dressed, good to p r i m e , New Y ork............................................ .
cutter, cheese, and milk:
Butter, creamery—
B o sto n Extra..........................................................................................
Firsts..........................................................................................
Seconds......................................................................................
ChicagoExtra ..........................................................................................
.............................
Extra firsts..........................................
Firsts..........................................................................................
CincinnatiExtra ..........................................................................................
Centralized firsts........................................................................
Centralized seconds......................................................... .........
New OrleansFancy .........................................................................................
Choice.........................................................................................
New Y o r k Extra................. .....................................................................
Firsts..........................................................................................
Seconds......................................................................................
PhiladelphiaExtra ..........................................................................................
Extra firsts.................................................................................
Firsts..........................................................................................
St. Louis—
Extra..........................................................................................
San FranciscoExtra
........................................................... .........................
Prime firsts.................................................................................

1Less than one one-hundreth of 1 per cent.




.

845
2,501
317

.01
.03
C
1)

0)

.01
C
1)

5,305
12,114

.06
.14

.02
.04

33,171
107,474
13,356

.40
1.28
.16

.10
.33
.04

7,722
25, 802
3,329

.09
.31
.04

.02
.08
.01

15,765

.19

.05

6,177
13,316

.07
.16

.02
.04

251

APPENDIXES.

R E LA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES, AS MEASURED B Y TH E IR W HOLESALE
VALUES IN EXCHANGE, 1921—Continued.

Group II.—Foods—Continued.
(&) Butter, cheese, and milk—Concluded.
Cheese, whole milk—
American twins, Chicago................................ .
State, fresh flats, colored, average, New York
California flats, fancy, San Francisco............. .
Milk, fresh—
Chicago.............................................................
New Y o rk ........................................................ .
San Francisco...................................................
Milk, condensed, 14-ounce tins, New York.......... .
Milk, evaporated, 16-ounee tins, New Y ork.........
<c) Other foods:
Beans, medium, choice, New Y ork......................
Bread—
Chicago............................................................. .
Cincinnati.........................................................
New Orleans.....................................................
New York.........................................................
San Francisco....................................................
Cocoa, beans, Arriba, New York............................
Coffee, Rio, No. 7, New York................................ .
Copra, South Sea, sun dried, New Y ork.............. .
Eggs, .fresh—
Firsts, western, Boston...................................
Firsts, Chicago.................................................
Extra firsts, Cincinnati...................................
Candled, New Orleans.....................................
Firsts, New York.............................................
Extra firsts, western, Philadelphia................
Extra pullets, San Francisco............................
F is h Cod, large, shore, pickled cured, Gloucester, Mass.
Herring, large, split, New York..............................
Mackerel, salt, large, 3s, Boston..............................
Salmon, canned, Alaska, red, factory.....................
Flour, rye, white, Minneapolis......................................
Flour, wheat—
Winter patents, Kansas C ity..................................
Winter straights, Kansas City................................
Standard patents, Minneapolis...............................
Second patents, Minneapolis...................................
Patents, Portland, Oreg..........................................
Patents, soft, winter, St. Louis..............................
Striaghts, soft, winter, St. Louis............................
Patents, Toledo........................................................
Fruit, canned, New York—
Peaches, California, standard 2^-s............................
Pineapple, Hawaiian, sliced, standard 2Js.............
Fruit, dried, New York—
Apples, evaporated, State, choice...........................
Currants, uncleaned, barrels...................................
Prunes, California, 6G-70s.........................................
Raisins, coast, seeded, bulk.....................................
Fruit, fresh—
Apples, Baldwins, Chicago.....................................
Bananas, Jamaica 9s, New York............................
Lemons, Califronia (300-360 count), Chicago.........
Oranges, Califronia, choice. Chicago.......................
Glucose, 42° mixing, New York....................................
Hominy grits, bulk, car lots, f. o. b. mill......................
Lard, prime contract, New Y ork..................................
Meal, c o m White f. o. b. Decatur, 111.......................................
Yellow, Philadelphia............................................. .
Mollasses, New Orleans, fancy, New Y ork..................
Oatmeal, car lots, in barrels (180 pounds), New York.
Oleomargarine, standard, uncolored, Chicago..............
Oleo oil, extra, Chicago..................................................
Pepper, black, Singapore, New Y ork..........................




$75,745
16,589
4,701

0.90
.20
.06

0.23
.05
.01

186,028
325,752
68,089
117,518
148,578

2.22
3.89
.81
1.40
1.77

.58
1.01
.21
.36
.46

45,036

.54

.14

214,459
28,649
25,376
432,338
35,343
35,399
90,050
8,072

2.56
.34
.30
5.16
.42
.42
1.07
.10

.66
.09
.08
1.34
.11
.11
.28
.02

43,287
107,473
12,197
10,273
156,637
46,663
16,570

.52
1.28
.15
.12
1. 87
.56
.20

.13
.33
.04
.03
.49
.14
.05

9,961
4,077
2,031
78,242
18,419

.12
.05
.02
.93
.22

.03
.01
.01
.24
.06

283,685
85,991
326,237
104,140
114,966
67,089
19,441
49,617

3.39
1.03
3. 89
1.24
1.37
.80
.23
.59

.88
.27
1.01
.32
.36
.21
.06
.15

34,370
28,882

.41
.35

.11
.09

5,723
3,402
12,397
58,756

.07
.04
.15
.70

.02
.01
.04
.18

166,257
93,938
23,705
115,205
38,141
3,634
152,490

1.98
1.12
.28
1.37
.46
.04
1.82

.51
.29
.07
.36
.12
.01
.47'

17,298
31,037
47,804
24,491
72,517
14,636
2,229

.21
.37
.57
.29
.87
.17
.03

.05
.10
.15
.08
.22
.05
.01

252

WHOLESALE PEICES, 1890 TO 1921.

R E LA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES, AS MEASURED B Y T H E IR W HOLESALE
VALU ES IN EXCHANGE, 1921—Continued.

Group and commodity.

Value in ex­
change (000
omitted).

Value expressed
as percentage
of aggregate
value of—
Com­
mod­
ities in
group.

All
com­
mod­
ities.

Group II.—Foods—Concluded.
(c) Other foods—Concluded.
Rice, New OrleansBlue Rose, head, clean....................................................................
Honduras, head, clean........................................................... .........
Salt, American, medium, Chicago.........................................................
Sugar, New Y o r k Granulated, in barrels.....................................................................
Raw, 96° centrifugal........................................................................
Tallow, edible, Chicago..........................................................................
Tea, Formosa, fine, New York..............................................................
Vegetables, canned—
Com, Maryland-Maine style, New Y ork........................................
Peas^ State and western, No. 5, New Y ork...................................
Tomatoes, New Jersey, standard, No. 3, New Y ork.....................
Vegetables, fresh—
C>nions, fresh, yellow, Chicago........................................................
PotatoesWhite, good to choice, Chicago......................................... .
Sweet, No. 1, Philadelphia.......................................................
Vegetable oil—
...................................
Coconut, crude, Pacific coast..................... •
Corn, crude, in barrels, New Y ork .................................................
Cottonseed, prime, summer, yellow, New Y ork...........................
Olive, edible, in barrels, New York...............................................
Peanut, crude, f. o. b. mill..............................................................
Soya bean, crude, in barrels, New York..-.....................................
Vinegar, cider, 40 grain, in barrels, New Y ork....................................
Foods ...........................................................................................

$24,365
15,171
132,749

0.29
.18
1.58

0.08
.05
.41

485,710
335,735
2,541
22,489

5.80
4.01
.03
.27

1.51
1.04
.01
.07

25,204
28,047
31,348

.30
.34
.37

.08
.09
.10

11,480

.14.

.04

129,491
13,491

1.55
.16

.40
.04

24,628
7,070
93,361
19,224
16,737
7,066
13,002

.29
.08
1.11
.23
.20
.08
.16

.08
.02
.29
.06
.05
.02
.04

8,380,910

100.00

25.98

$30,569
28,758
36,221
47,994

• 1.02
.96
1.21
1.61

0.09
.09
.11
.15

73,920
50,688
33,880
52,232
63,797
54,648
37,620
20,598
67,540

2.48
1.70
1.14
1.75
2.14
1.83
1.26
.69
2.26

.23
.16
.10
.16
.20
.17
.12
.06
.21

132,638
155,031
137,956
105,044

4.45
5.20
4.62
3.52

.41
.48
.43
.32

Group III.— Cloths and clothing.
(a) Boots and shoes, factory:
Children’s—
Little boys’ , gun metal, blucher.....................................................
Child’s, gun metal, polish, high cut...............................................
Misses’ , black, vici, polish, high cut...............................................
Youths’, gun metal, blucher...........................................................
Men’s—
Black, calf, blucher..........................................................................
Black, calf, Goodyear welt, bal......................................................
Black, dress, Goodyear welt, side leather............................. .......
Gun metal, Goodyear welt, blucher...............................................
Mahogany, chrome, side, Goodyear welt, bal................................
Tan, dress, Goodyear welt,calf ....................................................
Tan, dress, Goodyear welt, side leather.........................................
Tan, grain, b lu ch er........................................................................
Vici kid, black, Goodyear welt.......................................................
Women’s—
Black, kid, Goodyear welt, 8i-inch lace.........................................
Kid, Goodyear welt, 9-inch lace......................................................
Kid, McKay sewed, 8§-inch lace.....................................................
Patent leather pump, McKay sewed..............................................
(6) Cotton goods:
Denims, Mass., 2.20 yards to the pound, New Y ork...........................
Drillings, brown, New York—
Massachusetts D standard, 30-inch.................................................
Pepperell, 29-inch, 2.85 yards to the pound...................................
Flannels, New Y o r k Colored, 2.75 yards to the pound....................................................
Unbleached, 3.80 yards to the pound.......................- ....................
Ginghams—
Atnoskcag 27-inch , fi.37 yards to the p oun d , New York..............
Lancaster, 26J-inch, 6.50 yards to the pound, Boston...................
H osieryMen’s half hose, combed yarn, New York.....................................
Women’s cotton, silk mercerized, mock seam, New York.........
Women’s, combed yarn, 16-ounce, New York...............................




28,801

.97

.09

19,618
19,870

.66
.67

.06
.06

25,876
21,150

.87
.71

.08
.07

27,021
31,522

.91
1.06

.08
.10

37,585
41,321
28,185

1.26
1.38
.94

.12
.13
.09

253

APPENDIXES.

R E LA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES, AS MEASURED B Y TH EIR WHOLESALE
VALUES IN EXCHANGE, 1921—Continued.

Group and commodity.

Value in ex­
change (000
omitted).

Value expressed
as percentage
of agg
value of—
Com­
mod­
ities in
group.

All
com­
mod­
ities.

Group III.—Cloths and clothing—Concluded.
(6) Cotton goods—Concluded.
Muslin, bleached, 4/4—
Fruit o f the Loom, New Y ork................................
Lonsdale, factory......................................................
Rough Rider, New Y ork.........................................
Wamsutta, factory...................................................
Print cloth, 27-inch, 7.60 yards to the pound, Boston..
Sheeting, brown, 4/4—
Indian Head, 2.85 yards to the pound, Boston___
Pepperell,-3.75 yards to the pound, New York___
Ware Shoals, 4 yards to the pound, New York___
Thread, 6 cord, J. & P. Coats, New Y o rk .: .................
Underwear—
Men's shirts and drawers, New Y ork....................
Women's union suits, combed yam, New Y ork...
Yam, B oston Carded, white, mulespun, northern, 10/1 cones___
Carded, white mulespun, northern, 22/1 cones.......
Twisted, ordinary, weaving, 20/2............................
Twisted, ordinary, weaving, 40/2............................
(c) Woolen goods:
Flannel, white, 4/4, Ballard Vale, No. 3, factory.........
Overcoating, soft faced, black, Boston..........................
Suitings—
Clay worsted, diagonal, 12-ounce, factory...............
Clay worsted, diagonal, 16-ounce, factory..............
Middlesex, wool-dyed, blue, 16-ounce, New York.
Serge, 11-ounce, factory............................................
Trousering, cotton warp, 11-11J ounce, New York......
Underwear—
Merino shirts and drawers, factory.........................
Men’s union suits, 33 per cent worsted, New York
Women’s dress goods—
Broadcloth, 9J-ounce, 54-56 inch, New Y ork .........
French serge, 35-inch, factory..................................
Poplar cloth, cotton warp, factory..........................
Sicilian cloth, cotton warp, 50-inch, New York_
_
Storm serge, double warp, 50-inch, factory............
Y am Crossbred stock,2/32s, Boston.................................
Half blood, 2/40s, Philadelphia...............................
Fine domestic, 2/50s, Philadelphia.........................
(d) Silk,etc.:
Linen shoe thread, 10s, Barbour, New Y ork................
Silk, raw—
China, Canton filature, extra extra A, New Y ork..
Japan, Kansai, No. 1, New Y ork............................
Japan, special extra extra, New York....................
Silk yarn, New Y o r k Domestic, gray spun, 60/1........................................
' Domestic, gray spun, 60/2, No. 1.............................
Cloths and clothing.......... .............................

$10,440
9,386
8,541
18,047
63,507

0.35
.31
.29
.60
2.13

0.03
.03
.03
.06
.20

23,964
21,291
16,276
71,354

.80
.71
.55
2.39

.07
.07
.05
.22

48,748
59,443

1.63
1.99

.15
.18

78,893
89,841
27,215
41,967

2.64
3.01
.91
1.41

.24
.28
.08
.13

1,804
47,399

.06
1.59

.01
.15

58,055
74,180
73,920
62,134
38,871

1.95
2.49
2.48
2.08
1.30

.18
.23
.23
.19
.12

19,879
24,551

.67
.82

.06
' .08

58,508
20,255
8,054
12,222
24,623

1.96
.68
.27
.41
.82

.18
.06
.02
.04
.08

32,664
49,284
57,361

1.09
1.65
1.92

.10
.15
.18

7,017

.24

.02

54, 477
158,116
57,412

1.83
5.30
1.92

.17
.49
.18

19,329
24, 796

.65
.83

.06
.08

2,983,867

100.00

9.25

$46,576
297,312
159, 763
227,817

0.94
6.02
3.23
4.61

0.14
.92
.50
.71

231,793
330,234
94, 777
185, 523
224,359
346,211
308,599
227,115

4.69
6.68
1.92
3. 75
4.54
7.00
6.24
4.60

.72
1.02
.29
.58
.70
1.07
.96
.70

Group IV.—Fuel and lighting.
(a) Anthracite coal, New York, tidewater:
Broken.................................................
Chestnut..............................................
(5) Bituminous coal:
Mine run, Chicago.............................................
Prepared sizes, Chicago.....................................
Screenings, Chicago...........................................
Mine run, Kanawha, Cincinnati......................
Mine run, smokeless, New River, Cincinnati..
Mine run, Pocohontas, Norfolk, V a.................
Prepared sizes, Pittsburgh................................
Indiana, No. 4 mine run, f. o. b. Indianapolis.




254

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,

RELA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES, AS M EASURED B Y T H E IR W HOLESALE
VALUES IN EXCHANGE, 1921—Continued.

Group and commodity.

Value in exchange (000
omitted).

Value expressed
as percentage
of, aggregate
value of—
Com­
mod­
ities in
group.

All
com­
mod­
ities.

Group IV.—Fuel and lighting—Concluded.
(c) Other fuel and lighting:
Coke, Connellsville, furnace, at ovens...................................................
Gasoline, motor, New York...................................................................
Matches, average o f several brands, New York....................................
Crude petroleum, at wells—
California, 20°........................................... ......................................
Kansas-Oklahoma............ ...............................................................
Pennsylvania...................................................................................
Refined petroleum, New York:
Standard white, 110° fire test..........................................................
Water white, 150° fire test.................................. •
............................
Fuel and lighting....................................................................

$103,843
949,996
25,410

2.10
19.22
.51

0.32
2.94
.08

230,936
374,558
106,197

4.67
7.58
2.15

.72
1.16
.33

191,533
280,270

3.88
5.67

.59
.87

4,942,822

100.00

15.32

$142,256
213,048

5.70
8.54

0.44
.66

98,396
73,810
18,771
16,596
17,338
2,625

3.95
2.96
.75
.67
.70
.11

.30
.23
.06
.05
.05
.01

14,989
13,267
13,572
40,013
38,335
115,483

.60
.53
.54
1.60
1.54
4.63

.05
.04
.04
.12
.12
.36

45,388 1
169,653
165,402
186,209

1, 82
6.80
6.63
7.47

.14
.52
.51
.58

9,424
86,423
180,096
115, 714
10,484
141,74V

.38
3. 47
7.22
4.64
.42
5.68

.03
.27
.56
.36
.03
.44

27,943
33,183

1.12
1.33

.09
.10

34, 255
227, 830
21,523
48,627
44,075
5,294
1,443
35, 778
26, 756
10,265
47, 878 !

1.37
9.14
.86
1.95
1.77
.21
.06
1.44
1.07
.41
1.92

.11
.71
.07
.15
.14
.02

Group V.— Metals and metal products.
(а) Iron and steel:
Iron ore, lower lake ports—
Mesabi, Bessemer, 55 per c e n t............
Non-Bessemer, 51£ per cent.................
Pig iron—
Basic, valley furnace............................
Bessemer, Pittsburgh...........................
Foundry, No. 2, northern, Pittsburgh
Foundry, No. 2, Birmingham, Ala___
Ferromanganese, seaboard.........................
Spiegeleisen, 18 and 22 per cent, furnace..
Bariron—
Best refined, Philadelphia...................
Common,f. o. b. Pittsburgh...............
Bars, reinforcing, Pittsburgh.....................
Nails, wire, Pittsburgh...............................
Pipe, cast-iron, 6-inch, New York.............
Skelp, grooved, Pittsburgh........................
Steel billets, Pittsburgh—
Bessemer...............................................
Open hearth..........................................
Steel merchant bars, Pittsburgh................
Steel plates, tank, Pittsburgh....................
Steel rails, Pittsburgh—
Bessemer, standard..............................
Open hearth, standard....................... .
Steel sheets, black, f. o. b. Pittsburgh.......
Steel, structural shapes, Pittsburgh..........
Terneplate, 8 pounds I. C., Pittsburgh—
Tin plate, domestic, coke, Pittsburgh.......
W ir e Barbed, galvanized, Chicago...............
Plain, fence, annealed, Pittsburgh---(б) Nonferrous metals:
Aluminum, New Y ork...............................
Copper, i ngot, electrolytic, refinery...........
Copper, sheet, New Y ork............................
Copper wire, bare, m ill...............................
Lead, pig, New York..................................
Lead pipe, New Y ork.................................
Quicksilver, New Y ork..............................
Silver, bar, fine, New York........................
Tin, pig, New Y ork....................................
Zinc, sheet, factory.....................................
Zinc, slab, New York..................................
Metals and metal products...............
i

Less than one one-hundredth of 1 per cent.




2,493,889 , 100.00

(0

.11
.08
.03
.15

7.73

255

APPENDIXES.

R E LA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES, AS MEASURED B Y TH E IR WHOLESALE
VALUES IN EXCHANGE, 1921—Continued.

Group and commodity.

Value in ex­
change (000
omitted).

Value expressed
as percentage
of aggregate
value of—
Com­
mod­
ities in
group.

All
com­
mod­
ities.

Group VI.— Building materials.
Lumber:
Douglas fir, mill—
No. 1 common, boards.....................................................................
No. 2 and better, drop siding.........................................................
Gum, sap, firsts and seconds, St7 Louis.................................................
Hemlock/northern, No. 1, Chicago.......................................................
Maple, hard, No. 1 common 4/4, Chicago.............................................
Oak, white, plain, No. 1 common, 4/4,'Cincinnati..............................
Pine, white,*No. 2 barn, Buffalo, N. Y ................................................
Pine, yellow, southern, mill—
Flooring, B and better....................................................................
,
Timbers^ square edge and sound....................................................
Poplar, No. 1 common, 4/4, Cincinnati.................................................
Spruce, eastern, random,’ Boston..........................................................
Lath, yellow pine, No. 1, f. o. b. mill...................................................
Shingles—
Cypress, 16 inches long, mill...........................................................
Red cedar, 16 inches long, mill.......................................................
(6) Brick, common building, simple average of 82 yard prices....................
(e) Steel, structural shapes/Pittsburgh.. .7.......... 7___ ? .............................
(d) Other building materials:
Cement, Portland, f. o. b. plant, simple average of 6 plant prices___
Crushed stone, 1§ inches, New York.....................................................
Gravel, f. o. b. pit, average of 22 plant prices.......................................
Hollow tile, building, Chicago........................ .....................................
Lime, common, lump, f. o. b. plant, average of 15 plant prices.........
Sand, building, f. o. b. pit, average of 26 plant prices.........................
Slate, roofing, I. o. b. quarry....................................................
Glass, plate—
3 to 5 square feet, New York...........................................................
5 to 10 square feet; New York.........................................................
Glass, window, American, f. o. b. works—
Single, A ...........................................................................................
Single, B ................................................................
Linseed oil, raw, New Y ork..................................................................
Pntty; eommercdal, New York..............................................................
Rosin, common to good,(B), Now York...............................................
Turpentine, southern, barrels, New York............................................
White lead, American, in oil, New York..............................................
Zinc oxide (white zinc). New Y ork......................................................
Pipe, cast-iron, 6-inch, New York.........................................................
Copper, sheet, New York......................................................................
Copper wire, bare, m ill..........................................................................
Lead pipe, New York ..........................................................................
Nails wire, Pittsburgh..........................................................................
Reinforcing bars, Pittsburgh.................................................................
Roofing tin (terneplate), 8 pounds, I. C., Pittsburgh.........................
Zinc, sheet, factory..................................... ...........................................
(a)

Building materials........................................................................

$52,386
35,424
37,804
59,653
47,190
159,984
123,962

2. 79
1.88
2.01
3.17
2.51
8.51
6.59

0.16
. 11
. 12
. 19
. 15
.50
.38

175,842
174,159
20,502
34,130
11,046

9.36
9.27
1.09
1.82
.59

.55
.54
.06
.11
.03

7,711
27,406
71, 752
115,714

.41
1.46
3.82
6.16

.02
.09
.22
. 36

166,338
52,360
34,787
27,276
30,010
15,271
4,759

8.85
2. 79
1.85
1.45
1.60
.81
.25'

.52
. 16
.11
.08
.09
.05
.01

18,054
20,359

.96
1.08

.06
.06

21,800
20,710
43,775
3,401
13,092
13,127
30,121
21, 424
38,335
21, 523
48,627
5,294
40,013
13, 572
10, 484
10, 265

1.16
1.10
2. 33
. 18
.70
.70
1.60
1.14
2.04
1.14
2. 59
.28
2.13
.72
.56
.55

.07
.06
. 14
.01
.04
.04
.09
.07
. 12
.07
. 15
.02
. 12
.04
.03
.03

1,879, 442

100.00

5. 83

$1,354
4,178
2,745
2,016
59,992

0.23
.72
.48
.35
10. 38

(l)
0.01
.01
.01
.19

26,974
5, 592
24,983
16,574
4,024
2,559

4.67
.97
4.32
2. 87
.70
.44

.08
.02
.08
.05
.01
.01

Group VII.— Chemicals and drugs.
(a)

Chemicals:
Acids, New Y o r k Acetic, 28 per cent............................................................................
Muriatic, 20°.....................................................................................
Nitric, 42°........................................................................................
Stearic, triple pressed.......................................................................
Sulphuric, 66°...................................................................................
Alcohol, New York—
Denatured, No. 5,188 proof.............................................................
Wood, refined, 95 per cent..............................................................
Alum, lump, New Y ork........................................................................
Ammonia, anhydrous. New York........................................... ............
Bleaching powder, New York
........................................................
Borax, crystals and granulated, New Y ork.........................................

1 Less than one-hundredth of 1 per cent.




256

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

R E LA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES, AS MEASURED B Y TH E IR WHOLESALE
VALUES IN EXCHANGE, 1921—Continued.

*
Group and commodity.

Value in ex­
change (000
omitted).

Value expressed
as percentage
of aggregate
value of—
Com­
mod­
ities in
group.

All
com­
mod­
ities.

Group VII.—Chemicals and drugs—Concluded.
Chemicals—Concluded.
Copper sulphate, 99 per cent, crystals, New Y ork...............................
Copra, South Sea, sun dried, New York...............................................
Formaldehyde, New Y o rk ...................................................................
Oil, vegetable-^Coconut, crude, Pacific coast..........................................................
Corn, crude, in barrels, New Y ork.................................................
Palm kernel, crude, New York.......................................................
Soya bean, crude, in barrels, New York........................................
Potash, caustic, 88-92 per cent, New Y ork..........................................
Sal soda, New York................................................................................
Soda ash, 58 per cent, light, New York................................................
Soda, bicarbonate, American, f. 0 . b. works.........................................
Soda, caustic, 76 per cent, solid, New Y ork.........................................
Soda, silicate of, 40°, New York............................................................
Sulphurj crude, New York....................................................................
Tallow, inedible, packers’ prime, Chicago............... ............................
(6) Fertilizer materials:
Acid phosphate, 16 per cent basis, bulk. New York...........................
Ammonia, sulphate, double bags, New Y ork......................................
Ground bone, steamed, Chicago ..........................................................
Muriate of potash, 80-85 per cent, K. C. L. bags, New York..............
Phosphate rock, 68 per cent, f. 0 . b. mines...........................................
Soda nitrate, 95 per cent, New Y ork.....................................................
Tankage, 9 and 20 per cent, crushed, f. 0 . b. Chicago..........................
(c) Drugs and pharmaceuticals:
Acid, citric, domestic, crystals, New Y ork...........................................
Acid, tartaric, crystals, U. S. P., New York........................................
Alcohol, grain, 190 proof, U. S. P., New York.....................................
Cream of tartar, powdered, New Y o rk .. ..............................................
Epsom salts, U. S. P., in barrels, New Y ork..................................... .
Glycerine, refined, New Y ork...............................................................
Opium, natural, U. S. P., New Y ork...................................................
Peroxide of hydrogen, 4-ounce bottles, New York...............................
Phenol, U. S. P. (carbolic acid), New York.........................................
Quinine, sulphate, manufacturers’ quotations, New Y ork.................

1,495
1,984
119,315
962
1,492
10,475
3,667
7,674
6,308
2,733

.26
.34
20. 65
.17
.26
1.81
.64
1.33
1.09
.47

.01
.01
.37
0)
0)
.03
.01
.02
.02
.01

Chemicals and drugs....................................................................

577,785

100.00

1.79

$164,959
11,701
39,183
49,329
5,175
32,372

14.23
1.01
3.38
4.25
.45
2.79

0.051
.04
.12
.15
.02
.10

139,766
86,976
47,841

12.05
7.50
4.13

.43
.27
.15

148,134
45,786

12.78
3.95

.46
.14

3,313
43,339
4,933

.29
3.74
.43

.01
.13
.02

6,567
3,246

.57
.28

.02
.01

(a)

$1,930
4,741
2,659

0.33
.82
.46

24,628
1,151
3,919
7,066
840
2,530
49,023
6,087
24,409
6,256
10,784
16,761

4.26
. 20
.68
1. 22
.15
.44
8.48
1.05
4.23
1.08
1.87
2.90

47,493
15,790
1,379
1,039
12,683
22,174
7,347

8.22
2.73
.24
.18
2. 20
3.84
1. 27

0.01
.02
.01
.08
C1)

.01
.02
(l)
.01
.15
.02
.08
.02
.03
.05

(i)
(')

.15
.05

.04
.07
.02

Group VIII.— House-furnishing goods.
(а) Furniture:
B ed room Bed, combination, factory....................................
Chair, all gum, cane seat, factory.........................
Chifforette, combination, factory..........................
Dresser, combination, factory................................
Rocker, quartered oak, Chicago.............................
Set, 3 pieces, Chicago..............................................
Dining room—
Buffet, combination, factory..................................
Chair, all gum, leather slip seat, factory...............
Table, extension, combination, factory................
Living room—
Davenport, standard pattern, factory...................
Table, library, combination, factory.....................
K itch en Chair, hardwood, Chicago......................................
Refrigerator, lift top type, factory.........................
Table, with drawer, Chicago.................................
(б) Furnishings:
Blankets—
Cotton, colored, 2 pounds to the pair, New York.
Wool, 4 to 5 pounds to the pair, factory...............
1 Less than one one-hundredth of 1 per cent.




257

APPENDIXES,

RELA TIV E IMPORTANCE OF COMMODITIES, AS MEASURED B Y THEIR WHOLESALE
VALUES IN EXCHANGE, 1921—Concluded.

Group and commodity.

Value expressed
as percentage
of aggregate
value oP~
Value in ex­
change (000
omitted).
Com­
All
mod­
com­
ities in mod­
group. ities.

Group VIII.—House-furnishing goods—Concluded.
(6) Furnishings—Concluded.
Carpets, factory—
Axminster, Bigelow........................................................................
Brussels, Bigelow............................................................................
Wilton, Bigelow...............................................................................
C utleryCarvers, 8-inch, factory...................................................................
Knives and forks, factory............................................: ..................
Pails, galvanized iron, 10-quart, factory...............................................
Sheeting, bleached, 10/4
Pepperell, New Y ork......................................................................
Wamsutta, factory..........................................................................
TablewareGlass nappies, 4-inch, factory.........................................................
Glass pitchers, one-half gallon, factory..........................................
Glass tumblers, one-third pint, factory.........................................
Plates, white granite, 7-inch, factory..............................................
Tea cups and saucers, white granite, factory................................
Ticking, Amoskeag, A. C. A., 2.85 yards to the pound, New Y ork ...
Tubs, galvanized iron, No. 3, factory....................................................

$64,131
47,341
35,916

5.53
4.08
3.10

1,421
3,850
122

.12
.33
.01

31,879
67,280

2.75
5.80

.10
.21

3,226
20,992
6,494
23,269
11,636
7,541
1,649 '

.28
1.81
.56
2.01
1.00
.65
.14

.01
.06
.02
.07
.04
.02
.01

1,159,367

100.00

3.59

$40,976
72,831
7,083
40,600

1.94
3.44
.33
1.92

0.13
.23
.02
.13

99,508
112,298
19,000
68,838

4.70
5.31
.90
3.25

.31
.35
.06
.21

9,609
85,593
56,949

.45
4.05
2.69

.03
.26
.18

194,980
165,384
169,133

9.22
7.82
7.9,9

.60
.51
.52

12,352
7,234
231,190
24,780
96,611
18,190

.58
.34
10.93
1.17
4.57
.86

.04
.02
.72
.08
.30
.06

80,722
94,381
55,002

3.81
4.46
2.60

.25
.29
.17

100,673
251,928

4.76
11.91

.31
.78

Miscellaneous....................................................

2,115,845

100.00

All commodities...............................................

32,258,401

House-furnishing goods................................................................

0.29
.15
.11
0)

.01

0)

Group .IX.— Miscellaneous.
Cattle feed:
Bran, Minneapolis....... .....................................................
Cottonseed meal, prime, New York................................
Linseed meal, New Y ork..................................... ...........
Mill-feed middlings, standard, Minneapolis...................
(б) Leather:
Calf, chrome, B grade, Boston.........................................
Glazed kid, black? top grade, Boston..............................
Harness, California oak, No. 1, Chicago..........................
Side, black, chrome, B grade, Boston.............................
Sole, B oston Hemlock, middle, No. 1........................... ................
Oak, scoured backs, heavy........................................
Union, middle weight................................................
(c) Paper and p u lp Paper—
Newsprint, rolls, f.o.b. m ill.......................................
Wrapping, Manila, No. 1, jute, New Y ork..............
Woodpulp, sulphite, domestic, unbleached, New York
(id ) Other miscellaneous:
Hemp, Manila, fair current shipment, New Y ork.........
Jute, raw, medium grades, New Y ork............................
Lubricating oil, paraffin, 903 gravity, New York..........
Rope, pure Manila, best grade, New Y ork.....................
Rubber, Para, island, fine, New Y ork...........................
Sisal, Mexican, current shipment, New Y ork................
Soap—
Laundry, Cincinnati..................................................
Laundry, Philadelphia..............................................
Starch, laundry, bulk, New Y ork...................................
Tobacco—
Plug, New Y ork.........................................................
Smoking, 1-ounce bags, New York...........................
(а)

i

Less than one one-hundredth of 1 per cent.

11083°— 22— Bull. 320------17




6.56
100.00

258

W HOLESALE P&ECES, 1890 TO 1921,
APPENDIX C.

REVISED IN DEX NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES OF BUILDING M ATERIALS, B Y
SUBDIVISIONS, 1913 TO 1921.
(1 9 1 3 = 1 0 0 .)

(a)
Year and month.

(«)

m

Lumber.

Brick,
common.

id)

(«)

Structural
steel.

Other
building
materials.

AH
building
materials.

100
101
99
113
113
111
99
99
99
96
96
88
86

100
100
101
100
100
101
180
99
99
101
101
100
98

100
101
102
103
103
103
102
99
99
99
98
97
96

95
96
96
97
97
96
95
95
96
95
94
91
91

92
93
94
94
93
93
93
92
93
92
90
88
88

Year 1913.......................................................
January...................................................
February.................................................
March......................................................
A pril. ......................................................
May.........................................................
June.........................................................
July.........................................................
August....................................................
September...............................................
October...................................................
November............................................. .
December...............................................

100
102
103
103
104
103
103
99
98
98
96
96
95

100
101
101.
101
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99 ,
99

Year 1914........................................................
January...................................................
February.. . , ..........................................
March......................................................
April........................................................
May.........................................................
June..... . ..................................................
July.........................................................
August...................................................
September...............................................
October...................................................
November...............................................
December...............................................

92
94
94
94
93
93
93
92
92
92
88
87
87

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

Year 1915.......................................................
January...................................................
February.................................................
March......................................................
A pril.......................................................
May.........................................................
June.........................................................
July.........................................................
August....................................................
Seotember............. .................................
October...................................................
November...............................................
December................................................

89
87
87
88
88
87
87
87
87
88
94
95
97

99
98
98
98
96
96
96
101
101
101
102
102
102

85
73
76
76
76
79
79
83
83
93
93
99
106

. 102
91
94
95
97
103
105
106
104
101
104
109
114

94
88
89
90
90
93
93
94
93
94
98
101
104

1 ear 1916........................................................
January...................................................
February.................................................
March......................................................
April........................................................
May.
June........................................................
July.........................................................
August....................................................
September...............................................
October...................................................
November...............................................
December...............................................

102
101
102
103
102
101
100
99
100
109
104
106
108 :

108
101
101
101
105
105
105
117

167

120
110
113

117
125
125
125

174
174
174
174
177
177
179
199

137
121
128
133
135
138
139
137
137
138
142
145
154

120
121
120
120
120
121
124
126
132

132
125
125
125
129
129
129
134
134
134
139
139
139

247
215
215
218
248
252
331
298
298
298
199
199
199

172
157
160
163
168
171
174
179 |
176 I
175 !
172
170
170

157
138
140
144
155
159
169
168
167
167
156
156
158

Year 1917........................................................
January...................................................
February.......................................... ......
March......................................................
A pril........................................................
May.........................................................
June.........................................................
July.........................................................
August....................................................
September...............................................
October...................................................
November...............................................
December................................................




135
113
116
120
133
139
143
143
142
. 144
138
140
144

117

78 ’
73
79
81
76
76
76
76
81
81
81
78
74

119
129
157
174

118

259

APPENDIXES.

REVISED IN D E X NUMBERS OF W H OLESALE PRICES OF BUILDING M ATERIALS B Y
SUBDIVISIONS, 1913 TO 1921—Concluded.

(« )

(» )

(c)

(d)

(e)

L u m b e r.

B rick ,
co m m o n .

Structural
steel.

O ther
b u ild in g
m aterials.

A ll
b u ild in g
m aterials.

Y e a r and m on th .

Y e a r 1918...................................................................
J a n u a r y .............................................................
F e b r u a r y ...........................................................
M a rc h .................................................................
A p r i l ...................................................................
M a y .....................................................................
J u n e....................................................................
J u ly .....................................................................
A u g u s t ...............................................................
S ep tem b er........................................................
O c to b e r .............................................................
N o v e m b e r .........................................................
D e c e m b e r ................................................'____

155
148
148
149
157
157
157
161
160
160
156
156
157

176
149
149
149
173
173
173
187
187
187
194
194
194

199
199
199
199
199
199
199
199
199
199
199
199
199

189
172
174
179
180
184
189
195
200
202
200
202
199

172
161
161
164
169
170
172
177
179
179
177
177
177

Y e a r 1919...................................................................
J a n u a ry .............................................................
F e b r u a r y ..........................................................
M a r c h ................................................................
A p r i l ..................................................................
M a y ....................................................................
J une....................................................................
I n l y .....................................................................
A u g u s t ..............................................................
S eptem b er........................................................
O c to b e r .............................................................
N o v e m b e r .........................................................
D e c e m b e r ...................................................* ..

210
159
158
158
160
169
195
.221
249
256
257
262
292

206
202
202
202
204
204
204
207
207
207
213
213
213

167
199
185
185
162
149
149
162
162
162
162
162
162

195
194
189
184
179
181
189
200
209
207
208
206
207

201
176
173
171
169
173
189
209
226
229
229
232
248

Y ea r 1920...................................................................
J a n u a ry .............................................................
F eb ru a rv ................ „ ........................................
M a r c h . ...........................................................
A p r il..................................................................
M a y ....................................................................
J une................................................ ....................
Inly ....................................................................
A u g u s t ..............................................................
S ep tem b er........................................................
O c to b e r .............................................................
N o v e m b e r........................................................
D e c e m b e r .........................................................

307
334
368
373
385
351
317
310
305
288
262
221
209

279
245
254
283
274
283
288
292
295
293
290
287
283

187
162
162
162
213
213
213
205
184
184
184
184
180

218
214
218
222
227
228
226
222
224
222
216
206
196

264
274
293
297
300
293
275
269
265
255
240
215
204

Y ea r 1921...................................................................
J a n u a ry .............................................................
F e b ru a ry ..........................................................
M a r c h ................................................................
A p r i l ..................................................................
M a y ....................................................................
J u n e . .................................................................
J u ly ............................ .......................................
A u g u s t.................................. ............................
S e p te m b e r.......................................................
O c to b e r .............................................................
N o v e m b e r........................................................
D e c e m b e r .....................................................

163
194
176
167
159
158
157
154
151
154
163
174
168

232
272
269
261
248
238
230
223
218
209
207
206
204

135
162
162
152
147
146
146
139
122
122
116
109

169
190
181
178
176
172
170
167
163
161
159
155 :
153

165
192
180
173
167
165
163
160
156




99

156

159
163

158

W H O LESALE PR ICES,

260

1890

TO

1921.

APPENDIX D .— WHOLESALE PRICES IN O THER COUNTRIES.
AUSTRALIA,

Index numbers showing the course of wholesale prices in Australia
are published by the Commonwealth Bureau of Census and Statis­
tics, Melbourne,1 in the Quarterly Summary of Australian Statistics.
In the following table are given index numbers for the period from 1861
to 1921, arranged by commodity groups, the year 1911 being used as
the base period and monthly data for 1920 and 1921 being included.
IN D E X NUMBERS OF W H OLESALE PRICES IN M ELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, B Y GROUPS
OF COMMODITIES, 1861 TO 1921.
[Source: Quarterly Summary of Australian Statistics, Bulletin No. 86, December, 1921, page 80.]
[Base: 1911=1000.]

Year.

Jute, Agricul­
Metals
Dairy
tural
Building Chem­ All com­
and coal. leather, produce, produce. Groceries. Meat. materials. icals. modities.
etc.
etc.

1861.................
1871.....................
1881.....................
1891.....................

1438
1096
1178
895

1381
1257
1115
847

1583
1236
1012
1024

1008
864
935
995

1963
1586
1421
1032

1901.....................
1902.....................
1903.....................
1804.....................

1081
1007
923
821

774
756
834
885

928
1192
1209
754

1029
1215
1059
876

1048
945
936
916

1905.....................
1906.....................
1907.....................
1908.....................

772
882
1037
1033

850
978
1017
901

894
916
973
1312

980
972
1020
1198

1909.....................
1910.....................
1911.....................
1912.....................

1014
1004
1000
1021

907
1052
1000
991

1000
969
1000
1370

1913.....................
1914....................
1915.....................
1916.....................

1046
1099
1284
1695

1070
1032
1017
1423

1917.....................
1918.....................
1919.....................
1920.....................

2129
2416
2125
2298

January.......
February___
March..........
A pril............
May..............
June.............

888

1070
1044
1091
780

2030
1409
1587
1194

1538
1229
1121
915

1345
1447
1443
1427

841
837
875
845

917
881
921
875

974
1051
1019
890

942
923
948
968

1209
1110
1294
1335

801
896
988
935

859
864
961
891

910
948
1021
1115

1119
1100
1000
1206

978
999
1000
1052

1088
1008
1000
1357

911
996
1000
1057

815
898
1000
978

993
1003
1000
1170

1097
1207
2162
1208

1054
1137
1530
1485

1024
1021
1133
1322

1252
1507
2435
2515

1128
1081
1275
1491

995
1253
1528
1760

1038
1149
1604
1504

2008
2360
2363
2624

1157
1444
1985
2439

1423
1454
1651
2209

1343
1422
1516
1918

2403
2385
2348
3279

1884
2686
2851
3226

2171
3225
2898
2825

1632
1934
2055
2480

2079
2112
2258
2258
2351
2351

2972
3085
3055
2977
2884
2828

2420
2424
2411
2497
2692
2792

1722
1792
1942
2035
2124
2249

1605
1659
1653
1985
2028
2013

2377
2409
2360
2595
2749
3370

3090
3141
3262
3262
3367
3367

2746
2786
2868
2868
3047
3047

2311
2354
2383
2478
2567
2358

July..............
August.........
September...
October........
. November...
December. . .

2322
2306
2328
2440
2440.
2280

2742
2733
2421
2180
1981
1660

2605
2547
2643
2227
2201
2060

2266
2272
2519
2574
2544
2522

1990
1994
2025
2026
2014
2043

4230
4604
4425
3661
3427
3136

3362
3414
3235
3161
3077
2970

2906
2889
2825
2825
2615
2583

2671
2692
2618
2450
2371
2245

1921.....................
January.......
February___
March..........
April............
May..............
June.............

2173
2388
2350
2229
2220
2141
2143

1362
1581
1442
1161
1246
1172
1145

1767
2107
2049
1876
1750
1724
1704

2000
2506
2472
2485
2166
2110
2055

1976
2030
2030
2038
2024
2006
1940

2158
3094
2980
2888
2332
2274
2169

2733
3070
3322
3318
3110
3060
2735

2303
2506
2484
2399
2372
2299
2282

1903
2233
21£0
20.8
1947
1898
1845

July..............
August.........
September...
October.......
November...
December. . .

2142
2137
2121
2121
2089
2018

1208
1284
1580
1598
1500
1460

1688
1706
1697
1673
1661
1569

1991
1971
1755
1538
1484
1470

1942
1960
1931
1945
1941
1933

-1930
1948
1778
1587
1407
1504

2604
2531
2473
2302
2170
2106

2254
2295
2255
2255
2134
2100

'

1813
1827
1827
1779
1724
1684

1 For a full explanation of the index numbers published by the Bureau of Census and Statistics of Austra*
lia see U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bui. No. 284, pp. 175-184.




261

APPENDIXES,

BELGIUM.
Index numbers of wholesale prices/computed according to the chain
system, are published by the Ministry of Industry, Labor, and Food
Supplies of Belgium. The series dates only from August, 1921. In the
following table are shown the index numbers for the last five months
of 1921, average prices in April, 1914, being taken as the base, or 100.
IN DEX NEMBEDS OF WHOLESALE PRICES IN BELGIUM, AUGUST TO DECEMBER, 1921.
[Source: Revue du Travail, May, 1922, p. 676.]
[Base: Average prices in April, 1914=100.]
1921
Number
of com­
modities.

Group.

Foodstuffs.....................................................
Combustibles...............................................
Tar and its derivatives................................
Metal products.............................................
Petroleum products.....................................
Ceramics.......................................................
Glassware......................................................
Chemicals......................................................
Mineral fertilizers........... .............................
Oils and fats.................................................
Textiles............... ........................................
Building materials.......................................
Resin products.................1..........................
Hides and leather products.........................
Tobacco.........................................................
Paper
.................................................
Rubber .......................................................
All commodities.................................

Septem­
ber.

October.

Novem­
ber.

387
458 /
\
292
377
526
427
335
318
289
342
362
333
267
295
401
53

389
445
476
318
380
538
429
340
346
337
394
357
394
291
295
402
62

381
445
523
326
403
520
394
341
346
321
421
360
372
305
295
402
72

382
446
420
343
447
528
416
351
355
316
400
361
' 407
293
295
417
81

369
439
405
340
445
528
416
345
362
306
416
360
366
295
295
433
82

347

368

372

374

369

August.

16
4
3 ]•
15
7
10
2
12
4
7
21
13
2
9
1
1
1
128

Decem­
ber.

CANADA.

The following table showing the course of wholesale prices, classi­
fied into commodity groups, in Canada during the period from Decem­
ber, 1913, to December, 1921, has been taken from the Labor Gazette,
published by the Department of Labor, Ottawa.2 The figures since
December, 1918, are preliminary and subject to possible revision.
IN D E X

NUMBERS

OF

W HOLESALE PRICES IN CANADA, DECEMBER,
DECEMBER, 1921.
[Source: The Labor Gazette, January, 1922, p. 102.]
(Average prices 1890-1899=100.)

1913, TO

Group.

Dec.,
1913

Dec.,
1914

Dec.,
1915

Dec.,
1916

Dec.,
1917

Dec.,
1918

Dec.,
1919

Dec.,
1920

Nov., Dec.,
1921 1921

Grains and fodder......................
Animals and meats....................
Dairy products...........................
Fish............................................
Fruits and vegetables__
_
Miscellaneous foods....................
Textiles.......................................
Hides, leather, and shoes..........
Metals and implements.............
Fuel and lighting......................
Building materials....................
House furnishings......................
Drugs and chemicals.................
Miscellaneous.............................

141.0
188.4
185.5
157.2
130.8
111.9
136.6
166.2
113.3
114.4
141.4
128.1
111.5
148.8

178.5
174.2
180.1
160.0
114.2
132.2
124.6
175.6
111.9
109.1
139.3
131.3
134.0
117.0

173.3
188.3
189.6
155.2
156.6
137.4
163.3
183.1
158.6
115.6
152.0
140.5
228.1
163.8

238.4
234.5
245.7
180.0
230.1
174.1
216.3
309.0
191.1
163.4
194.6
171.8
238.5
198.8

312.5
312.0
254.7
239.1
263.2
223.1
322.9
272.9
243.7
186.9
234.6
222.0
279.5
263.6

283.4
343.3
293.0
268.3
249.6
262.0
379.5
280.7
254.1
249.6
279.8
296.3
276.8
341.8

344.4
326.4
355.2
242.4
286.6
267.3
399.7
377.8
224.7
247.6
338.7
352. 8
214.4
576.7

261.1
320.8
340.0
236.5
226.1
256.3
328.6
231. 8
230.4
317.6
356.5
390.2
228.1
277.5

171.6
202.8
243.0
191.4
210.0
181.7
234.1
163.6
190.9
249.3
274.2
307.0
187.5
314.9

179.4
219.6
261.9
191.4
224.6
183.2
230.4
163.6
191.2
249.3
273.9
307.0
188.6
321.0

All commodities............... 137.1

137.6

162.4

207.4

257.1 ■288.8

322.7

290.5

227.3

230.7

% For a full explanation of the index numbers compiled by the Department of Labor of Canada see Bureau
cf Labor Statistics Bui. No. 284, pp. 189-201.




262

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

In the next table are shown monthly index numbers for 1921 of
all commodities taken together:
IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES IN CANADA, B Y MONTHS, 1921.
[Source: The Labor Gazette, January, 1922, p. 105.]
[Average prices 1890-1899=100.]
Index
num­
ber.

Month.

Index.
num­
ber.

Month.

Index
num­
ber.

Month.

January.......
February....
March..........

281.3
270.1
263.1

April........
May..........
June.........

253.7
247.3
242.6

July..........
August___
September

238.6
236.4
232.7

Month.

October...
November
December.

Index
num­
ber.
229.2
227.3
230.7

PRANCE.

The quarterly bulletin issued by the General Statistical Office of
France (.Bulletin de la Statistique generate de la France et du Service
d'observation des Prix) contains in each number a table showing
index numbers of wholesale prices since 1913.3 The following table
has been reproduced from the January, 1922, issue:
IN DEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES IN FRANCE.
[Source: Bulletin de la Statistique gdndrale de la France et du Service d’observation des Prix, January,
1922, p. 122.]
[Base period, 1901-1910=100.]
1921
Kind and number of
commodities.

General index (45).................
Foodstuffs (20)........................
Vegetable foods (8).................
Animal foods (8).....................
Sugar, coffee, cocoa (4 )..........
Industrial materials (25)........
Minerals and metals (7).........
Textiles (6).............................
Miscellaneous (12)...................

1920

Decem­
ber.

Novem­
ber.

October.

376.5
361.9
363.0
382.7
318.1
388.2
323.2
438.5
400.9

383.6
371.7
366.8
390.8
343.4
393.0
332.6
453.6
398.0

383.0
374.0
366.3
406.6
323.6
390.1
314.1
456.9
401.0

1919

1918

1913

Year.
398.8
410.6
395.8
448.6
363.8
389.3
329.8
415.4
411.1

589
532
512
593
447
635
539
863
577

412
389
. 376
463
268
430'
327
520
445

392
325
358
338
235
446
340
538
461

115
116
120
118
106
115
120
117
110

GERM ANY.

Index numbers of wholesale prices for seven groups of commodi­
ties are compiled by the German Statistical Office (Statistisches
Reichsamt), average prices in the year 1913 being used as the base
in the computations. An index number is computed for each of the
seven groups from the arithmetic mean of the individual commodity
price relatives. The group index numbers are then weighted accord­
ing to the value of the commodities in each group consumed by the
German people during the period 1908-1912 to form the general
index, the latter being obtained by multiplying the several group
indexes by their appropriate weights and dividing the sum of the
products by the sum o f the weights. The articles included in each
group are as follows: Group I— Rye, wheat, barley, oats, and potatoes.
Group II— Rutter, lard, sugar, beef, veal, pork, haddock, and cod­
3 For a full explanation of the index numbers compiled by the General Statistical Office of France see
U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bui. No. 284, pp. 206-209.




APPENDIXES,

fish. Group II I Hops, cocoa, coffee, tea, and pepper. Group IY —Ox and cow hides, calfskins, sole leather, and box calf leather. Group
V— Cotton, cotton yarn, cretonne, linen yarn, jute, and jute yarn.
Group V I— Lead, copper, zinc, aluminum, refined nickel, and petro­
leum. Group V II—Pig iron, hard coal, and lignite.
The following table shows the index numbers for March and
November, 1920, and for each month of 1921:
IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES IN GERMANY.
[Source: Wirtschaft und Statistik, herausgegeben vom Statistischen Reichsamt, No. 1, January, 1922, p. 20.1

Year and month.

II.
I.
III.
IV.
Fats,
Grain
Colonial
sugar, products, Hides
and
and
meat and
leather.
potatoes.
hops.
fish.

1913.............................
1920:
March..................
November...........
1921:
January...............
February.............
March...... ...........
April....................
May......................
June.....................
July......................
August.................
September..........
October...............
November...........
December............

V.
Textiles.

VI.
Metals
and
petro­
leum.

V II.
Coal
and
iron.

All com­
modities.

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

963
951

1733
2179

3017
1767

5439
2310

5401
2954

2687
2186

1496
1553

1709
1509

1043
1014
1005
993
1015
1043
1096
2033
2016
2380
3197
3127

1984
1775
1595
1514
1409
1626
1633
1762
1943
2325
3154
3106

1256
1180
1148
1120
1159
1273
1447
1731
2317
3099
4923
4652

2042
1795
1821
1804
1649
1818
1914
2305
3727
4539
6077
4054

2258
1986
1922
1821
1773
1814
1985
2193
'3070
4176
6518
6158

1735
1660
1605
1572
1513
1551
1581
1673
2036
2965
5123
4379

1587
1628
1628
1696
1671
1671
1740
1774
1830
1885
2380
3298

1439
1376
1338
1326
1308
1366
1428
1917
2067
2460
3416
3487

GREAT BRITAIN.

Index numbers of wholesale prices for various groups of commodi­
ties in Great Britain are contained in the Board of Trade Journal and
Commercial Gazette, published by the Board of Trade, London.4 In
the following table the index numbers for December, 1920, and for
certain months in 1921 are expressed as percentages of the averages
for the year 1913.
IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES IN GREAT BRITAIN.
[Source: Board of Trade Journal and Commercial Gazette, January 12, 1922, p. 28.]
[Average for 1913=100.]

Groups.

I. Cereals................................................
II Meat and fish .
. .
. . . .
III. Other foods.........................................

Decem­ Novem­ Septem­
ber, 1921. ber, 1921. ber, 1921.
152.5
181. 3
186.7

157.1
179.2
194.9

June,
1921.

196.5
201.2
201.2

199.3
218.9
219.6

March,
1921.

Decem­
ber, 1920.

204.6
251.4
229.2

262.1
291.5
256.9

Total food................ .......................

173.4

177.1

199.7

212.6

227.6

269.3

Iron and steel.....................................
Other metals nad minerals...............
Cotton................................................
Other textiles....................................
Other articles.....................................

172.0
151.6
188. 4
166.6
177.3

180.9
153.0
198.9
168.9
183.2

206.7
160.1
212.8
163.2
190.4

240.4
188.8
179.9
161.8
198.5

.282. 5
192.3
173.2
178.8
205.2

^ 381.3
235.5
254 1
239.0
236.1

Total not food.................................

170.3

176.0

186. 4

196.3

208.5

269.5

All articles.......................................

IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.

171.4

176.4

191.0

209.8

215.1

269. 4

4 For a full explanation of the index numbers published by the British Board of Trade see U. S. Bureau
Labor Statistics Bui. No. 284, pp. 290-294.




264

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

In reviewing the course of wholesale prices in 1921 the issue of the
journal referred to above states that—
The fall in prices was much more rapid during the first quarter of the year than
during the other nine months, and slowest from April to September. The period of
rapid fall which began in September, 1920, and extended to April, 1921, resulted
in a total fall in the general index number during those seven months, amounting
to over 34 per cent. In the five months from April to September, 1921, the aggregate
fall was 8 per cent, and in the last quarter of the year a further fall of rather over 10
per cent was recorded. Comparing the price level of December, 1921 with that of
May, 1920, when the highest aggregate figure was recorded, the total fall has amounted
to 48J per cent, namely, from 332.6 to 171.4. The fall in wholesale food prices during
the period was 36J per cent (from 273 to 173.4) and in other articles covered b y the
in dex number a fall of 54 per cent (from 370.4 to 170.3) is shown. In the aggregate
for food the largest desreases in 1921 were in January, February, September, and O cto­
ber, while industrial materials show the largest decreases in January, February, March,
and November.
#

ITALY.

A series of wholesale price index numbers, with several different
basic periods, is calculated by Prof. Riccardo Bachi of Italy.5 The
results are published in PItalia Economica, an annual review of com­
mercial, industrial, agricultural, financial, and economic conditions.
The following table showing the index numbers, by groups of com­
modities, for the months of 1921 as computed on prices in 1920 as
the base has been taken from the February, 1922, number of the
Bollettino di Notizie Economiche, published at Rome.
IN D E X NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES IN IT A L Y , 1921.
[Source: Bollettino di Notizie Economiche, February, 1922, p. 118.]
[Average prices in 1920=100.1

Month.

Vege­
table
foods.

Animal Chemi­
cals.
foods.

Number of commodities...

19

10

1921.
January...............................
February.............................
March..................................
A pril....................................
May.....................................
June.....................................
July.....................................
August................................
September...........................
October...............................
November...........................
December............................

106.7
103.4
107.8
105.9
101.5
97.0
99.8
106.7
113.6
115.8
114.1
115.3

120.7
119.5
117.4
115.9
112.1
100.5
109.3
112.7
124.8
128.5
125.8
120.6

•

Tex­
tiles.

Miner­ Build­
Other
als and ing ma­ vegetable Sun­
metals. terials. products. dries.

All
com­
modi­
ties.

8

9

12

5

4

9

76

98.1
89.2
86.9
82.9
82.9
76.2
63.4
67.9
71.2
74.6
75.7
73.5

77.4
65.4
63.5
65.5
46.6
45.8
53.7
61.7
75.2
75.6
75.4
79.4

88.2
79.5
72.0
69.0
62.3
60.4
60.0
59.7
58.9
64.1
65.2
66.0

113.3
117.0
112.9
109.1
106.8
101.6
94.6
92.3
90.0
90.9
89.7
89.1

128.4
127.3
123.2
111.3
110.0
95.0
91.6
96.1
102.2
114.4
113.7
113.7

107.1
106.7
103.9
105.5
95.4
90.4
85.6
86.8
92.9
94.2
93.7
93.8

102.89
98.23
96.66
93.51
87.59
81.49
83.28
86.77
92.89
95.95
95.27
95.23

JAPAN.

Index numbers of average monthly prices at wholesale in Tokyo
are compiled by the Bank of Japan.6 The number of commodities
included is 56, the average price m October, 1900, being taken as the
base. The following table is reproduced from a statement issued by
the Bank of Japan, supplemented by data for 1921 from the Monthly
Bulletin of Statistics of the League of Nations.*
•
6 For a full explanation of the index numbers compiled by Prof. Riccardo Bachi see U. S. Bureau of
Labor Statistics Bui. No. 284, pp. 290-294.
, • For an explanation of the index numbers of the Bank of Japan see U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Bu i. N o . 284, pp. 306-308.



265

APPENDIXES,

IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES IN TOKYO, JAPAN, 1912 TO 1921.
[Source: Monthly statement of Bank of Japan and Monthly Bulletin of Statistics of League of Nations.
[Base period: October, 1900=100.]
Index numbers.
1*1011 U l .

1912
January....................
February..................
March.......................
April.........................
May.....................
June....... .................
July..........................
August.....................
September................
October....................
November................
December.................

129
130
131
132
133
131
133
131
130
132
133
134

1913
134
133
132
132
131
132
130
130
132
133
132
131

1914
130
128
128
127
125
125
125
127
129
125
121
119

1915

1916

120
123
125
127
128
127
125
126
126
127
133
141

145
153
154
153
150
147
147
151
153
157
168
172

1917

1918

168
166
167
173
182
190
206
221
214
214
212
216

224
232
238
243
242
245
252
267
274
280
278
277

1919

1920

277
275
267
267
278
295
319
324
332
352
370
383

398
414
425
397
359
327
316
311
304
298
292
271

1921
265.8
257.9
253.0
251.1
252.4
253.9
259.8
263.5
273.5
289.8
283.3
277.0

NETH ERLANDS.

The monthly journal of the Central Statistical Bureau of Nether­
lands ( Maandschrift van T Centraal Bureau voor de StatistieJc) con­
iet
tains index numbers of wholesale prices calculated on the period
1901-19X0 as the base.7 The following table has been taken from
the Maandschrift for January 31, 1922:
IN D E X NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES IN NETHERLANDS, 1911 TO 1921.
[Source: Maandschrift van het Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek, January 31, 1922, page 79.]

Year and month.

1901-1910................................
1911.........................................
1912
................................
1913.........................................
1914.
.............................
1915.........................................
1916
.............................
1917.........................................
1918.........................................
1919 .
.........................
1920.
.............................
1921.
..............................

General
Index
index number of
number foodstuffs
(53 com­
(33 com­
modities). modities).
100
115
119
114
120
165
253
326
447
339
320
206

100
117
120
113
121
167
251
300
330
318
276
206

Year and month.

1921—January........................
February........................
March..............................
April................................
May.................................
June................................
July.................................
August............................
September......................
October...........................
November.......................
December........................

General
Index
index
number of
number foodstuffs
(53 com­ (33 com­
modities). modities).
243
225
214
201
207
208
201
205
205
193
188
188

227
220
214
204
211
213
202
212
207
191
186
186

N E W ZEALAND.

The Census and Statistics Office of New Zealand compiles each
month an index number of wholesale prices for eight groups of com­
modities based on the average annual aggregate expenditure in four
chief centers of the Dominion in 1909-1913.8 The figures in the
following table have been taken from the January, 1922, issue of the
Monthly Abstract of Statistics.
7 For an explanation of the index numbers of the Central Bureau of Statistics of Netherlands see U. S.
Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. No. 284, pp. 308,309.
e For a full explanation of the index numbers published by the Census and Statistics Office of New Zeal­
and, see Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. No. 284, pp. 309-315.




MS

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921,
IN D E X NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES IN N E W ZEALAND, 1921.
[Source: Monthly Abstract of Statistics, January, 1922, p. 29.]
[Base: Average annual aggregate expenditure, four chief centers, 1909-1913=1000.]
Wool, General
Flour,
hides, merchan­ Build­
Agicul- bran,
ing
tural pollard, tallow,
dise,
mate­
produce. oatmeal. butter, crock­
rials.
ery.
cheese.

Periods.

1921.
January......... '..........
February...................
March........................
April..........................
May...........................
June...........................
July...........................
August......................
September.................
October.....................
November.................
December..................

1818
1655
1656
1541
1543
1547
1556
1526
1521
1512
1596
1612

1735
1730
1901
2010
2020
2023
2029
2028
2036
2039
2033
2033

1708
1685
1577
1615
1593
1615
1583
1600
1694
1508
1386
1343

2385
2314
2275
2250
2216
2184
2187
2185
2169
2168
2012
1963

2617
2597
2568
2522
2479
2451
2437
2405
2392
2374
2359
2328

Chemi­
cals
Leather. and ma­
nures.

.2341
2280
2087
1961
1928
1864
1794
1772
1769
1754
1750
1725

2441
2326
2290
2158
2089
2103
2043
1969
1953
1983
1972
1931

All
com­
modi­
ties.

Coal.

2244
2210
2233
2242
2223
2223
2358
2190
2194
2226
2198
2195

2233
2163
2146
2108
2079
2065
2065
2029
2030
2010
1969
• 1948

NO RW AY.

The trend of wholesale prices in Norway is shown by index numbers
compiled by the Qkonomisk Revue of Christiania. Quotations for
about 90 commodities are included, divided into 12 groups. The
prices are roughly weighted according to the relative importance of
commodities, average prices at the end of December, 1913, and June,
1914, being used as the base. The figures in the following table have
been compiled from various issues of the United States Federal
Reserve Bulletin:
IN DEX NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES IN NORW AY, 1921.
[Source: Federal Reserve Bulletin.]
[Base: Average prices at end of December, 1913, and June, 1914=100.]

Month.

1921.
January.......................................
February.....................................
March..........................................
April............................................
May..............................................
June.............................................
July..............................................
August.........................................
September...................................
October.......................................
November...................................
December....................................

Fuel.
FeedAnimal Vegetable stuffsand
Petro­
foods. fertilizers. Coal and leum and
foods.
coke.
benzine.
307
294
307
283
280
273
301
296
302
297
273
263
Building
materials.

1921.
January.......................................
February....................................
March..........................................
April............................................
M ay.............................................
June............................................
July.............................................
August........................................
September.................................
October.......................................
November..................................
December...................................




378
362
339
329
324
308
309
305
299
297
293
291

370
324
315
304
303
323
408
360
303
305
282
279

512
358
289
317
317
345
388
371
333
333
316
289

317
292
287
279
277
275
254
260
254
251
233
233

T o v H Iaq

374
352
350
329
324
324
319
315
309
315
320
320

Hides and
leather.
217
212
203
199
190
197
197
197
210
228
219
219

384
364
357
343
343
336
303
297

297
297
276
276

Pulp
wood.
321
.289
289
289
289
289
276
262
227
227
227
183

Iron.

394
340
328
295
295
296
307
307
339
335
319
278
aper.
472
472
472
413
413
413
392
392
377
350
338
338

Metals.

165
167
169
166
166
167
190
190
190
197
184
183
All com­
modities.
344
319
312
297
294
294
300
297
287
286
276
269

267

APPENDIXES.
SOUTH AFBICA.

Wholesale price trends in the Union of South Africa are shown by
index numbers compiled by the Office of Census and Statistics"9
These index numbers are published in the Quarterly Abstract of
Statistics to October, 1921, and in the Monthly Bulletin of Union
Statistics since that time. The figures in the following table have
been compiled from various issues of these two publications:
IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES IN THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA, 1921.
[Source: Quarterly Abstract of Union Statistics and Monthly Bulletin of Union Statistics.]
[Base: Index number for 1910=1000 in each case.]
1921
Group.
January.

April.

July.

October.

i

Year.

Metals............................................................
Jute, leather, hides, and skins.....................
Grains, meal, etc...........................................
Dairy produce...............................................
Groceries........................................................
Meat...............................................................
Building materials........................................
Chemicals......................................................
Fuel and light...............................................
Soft goods. . . .
.......................................
Miscellaneous.................................................

3213
1979
1717
1702
1958
1989
2354
1284
1890
4275
3356

2821
1602
1455
1709
1858
1687
2212
1262
1788
3550
3063

2304
1493
1413
1547
1599
1475
1980
1251
1679
2940
2822

2089
1521
1301
1396
1496
1401
1781
1246
1614
2532
2434

2607
1649
1472
1589
172>.
163*
2082
1261
1743
3324
2899

All groups............................................

2116

1864

1688

1553

1805

SPAIN.

Index numbers of wholesale prices in Spain are compiled by the
Institute of Geography and Statistics of that country, according to
information published in the May 19, 1922, issue of the Economic
Review, London (pp. 630, 631) and which in turn was taken from
Espana Economica y Financiera of April 24, 1922
The index
numbers, it is stated, are constructed from prices of 74 articles,
divided into two main sections and eight groups, as follows:
Section I.—F ood (38 articles).

Group 1.— Of animal origin: Beef, veal, pork, mutton or lamb,
salt bacon, butter, cheese, eggs, milk, salt cod, fresh fish (hake,
sardines, and bream).
Group 2.— Of vegetable origin: Wheat, flour, rye, barley, oats,
maize, rice, lentils, chick-peas, beans, kidney beans, potatoes,
carobs, hay, straw, and vetch.
GroupS.—Other food and beverages: Beet sugar (4 kinds), cane
sugar (3 kinds), olive oil (3 kinds), wine (3 kinds), beer, soup paste,
salt, coffee, and cacao.
Section II.—Industrial Materials (38 articles).

Group J Fuel, gas, and electric current: Asturian coal (4 kinds),
j..—
foreign coal (4 kinds), coke, petroleum, tallow candles, electric
current and illuminating gas.
9 For an explanation of the index numbers compiled by the Office of Census and Statistics of the Union of
South Africa see Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. No. 284, pp. 328-332.




W HO LESALE PR ICES,

268

1890 TO 1921,

Group 5 .—Textiles and leather: W ool (4 kinds), cotton, raw silk*
hemp, jute and leather (5 kinds).
Group 6.—Metals: Aluminum, antimony, quicksilver, copper, tin,
cast iron, lead, and zinc.
Group 7 .— Building materials: Timber and wood (4 kinds), bar
iron, lime, hydraulic cement, artificial Portland cement, brick, tile,
and plaster.
Group 8 .— Chemicals and miscellaneous: Fertilizers (hyperphos­
phate of lime, sulphate of ammonia, sulphate of potash, sulphate of
copper, nitrate of soda, chloride of potash, kainit, carbonate of cal­
cium), spirits (3 kinds), oil (3 kinds), soap, and paper.
Index numbers for the years from 1913 to 1921 are as follows:
IN D E X NUMBERS OF WHOLESALE PRICES IN SPAIN, 1913 TO 1921.
[Source: The Economic Review (London), May 19, 1922, p. 631.]
Animal Vegeta­ Other
ble
food,
food.
food.
etc'.

Year.

1913.........................................
1914.........................................
1915.........................................
1916.........................................
1917.........................................
1918........................................
1919........................................
1920.........................................
1921.........................................

100
102
no
121
142
181
204
215
203

100
102
121
127
144
172
177
201
176

Build­
Fuel, Textiles Metals. ing ma­ Chemi­ All com­
and
cals,
modi­
etc.
leather.
terials.
etc.
ties.

100
99
106
115
118
135
152
197
159

100
107
118
166
194
304
269
294
218

100
100
105
120
166
221
234
239
151

100
94
167
210
202
240
147
184 •
168

100
101
112.
129
151
197
194
230
261

100
98
107
144
197
242
224
243
187

100
101
110
130
160
204
195
222
190

The monthly fluctuation of wholesale prices during 1920 and 1921
is shown by the index numbers in the next table:
IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES IN SPAIN, B Y MONTHS, 1920 AND 1921.
[Source: The Economic Review (London), May 19,1922, p. 631.]
[1913=100.]

Year and month.

Animal Vegeta­ Other
ble
food,
food.
etc.
food.

Build­
Fuel, Textiles Metals. ing ma­ Chemi­ All com­
and
cals,
modi­
etc.
leather.
terials.
etc.
ties.

1920.
January..................................
February................................
March.....................................
April.................... .................
May.........................................
June........................................
July.........................................
August....................................
September..............................
October..................................
November..............................
December...............................

231
217
219
210
214
203
200
211
214
221
222
236

184
182
193
203
212
207
207
196
198
202
213
209

178
187
191
191
201
212
212
209
206
203
194
188

307
290
289
294
298
298
298
301
302
314
293
289

262
259
252
262
247
245
238
244
239
230
210
189

169
171
184
181
178
214
190
192
190
198
193
197

216
221
222
223
224
224
246
245
247
248
247
245

210
222
230
245
242
255
254
252
251
247
239
237

213
213
218
221
222
228
227
227
226
229
224
224

1921.
January..................................
February................................
March.....................................
April.......................................
May.........................................
June........................................
July.........................................
August...................................
September..............................
October..................................
November..............................
December................. .............

233
211
197
204
199
193
200
202
205
213
207
206

203
187
178
180
180
181
174
169
167
163
165
166

183
171
163
159
159
155
153
151
151
153
158
159

285
240
238
225
222
218
217
196
199
196
202
197

178
161
145
137
136
136
138
143
155
161
167
160

197
187
178
175
173
163
163
163
163
163
163
163

264
264
255
256
254
255
265
266
235
261
261
261

226
219
214
206
179
195
180
180
173
176
170
168

221
204
194
192
189
188
187
184
184
185
183
182




269

APPENDIXES.

In explanation of the above figures it is stated that the prices of
meat, cheese, eggs, butter, and fresh fish are exclusively those of
Madrid and subject to influences which that fact suggests. The
prices of vegetable foods are taken from the Boletin de Agricultura
Technica y Economica, which only publishes quotations for the fif­
teenth of the month. The beer prices are those of a single Madrid
brewery, and the prices used for coffee and cacao are those quoted
in Barcelona. As regards the other articles, the information is
always local and comes from Madrid, Segovia, Barcelona, Valencia,
Bilboa, or Ciudad Real.
SW EDEN.

The Svensk Handelstidning, a trade journal of Stockholm, Sweden,
publishes a monthly index number of wholesale prices based on prices
in the period July 1, 1913, to June 30, 1914, as 100.1 The figures in
0
the following table have been taken from the issue of April 21, 1922:
IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES IN SWEDEN.
[Source: Svensk Handelstidning, Apr. 21, 1922.]
[Base: Average prices July 1 ,1913-June 30, 1914=100.]
Agri­
Build­
cul­
ing
Tex­ Hides Woodtural Coal. Fuel Metals. mate­ tiles.
and
oils.
mate­
leather. pulp.
rials.
rials.

All
com­
modi­
ties.

Year and month.

Vege­
table
foods.

Ani­
mal
foods.

1920.
June a ...................

250

273

313

1252

308

318

381

368

212

778

366

1921.
February..............
March...................
April....................
May......................
June.....................
July......................
August.................
September...........
October................
November............
December............

231
238
232
221
237
236
217
183
167
161
156

241
229
231
217
206
230
230
208
198
196
186

248
240
236
245
236
216
214
207
200
197
202

362
279
291
369
371
315
250
223
202
194
197

318
-268
264
238
207
191
191
191
187
179
179

204
185
178
153
149
149
130
130
130
133
134

319
298
236
237
224
199
198
191
211
239
243

147
134
125
132
129
133
132
166
161
149
146

108
85
84
106
108
112
107
108
119
108
110

511
510
510
286
286
197
183
178
169
181
189

250
237
229
218
218
211
198
182
175
174
172

a

Highest.

SW ITZERLAND.

The course of wholesale prices in Switzerland is shown by a series
of index numbers constructed by Dr. J. Lorenz and published by the
Neuen Ziircher Zeitung. The index numbers include 71 commodities,
divided into three mam groups, viz, consumers’ goods (33 commodi­
ties), materials necessary to agriculture (12 commodities), and indus­
trial products (26 commodities). The group of consumers’ goods
is in turn divided into (a) food and drink, (b) clothing, and (c) hous­
ing, including building materials, fuel, and light. Materials used in
agriculture fall into two classes, forage and fertilizers. Industrial
products comprise minerals, textiles and leather, and miscellaneous
materials. Subdivisions of these groups also are made. Suitable
weighting coefficients are assigned to each commodity, as well as to
each group and subgroup, in constructing the index numbers.
w For a condensed account of the index numbers of the Svensk Handelstidning see U. S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Bull. No. 284, p. 342.




270

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1890 TO 1921.

The information in the following table has been compiled from
■ Die Schweizerischen Grosshandels-Indexzahlen im Jahre 1921/ '
“
published by the Neuen Ziircher Zeitung:
IN D E X NUMBERS OF W HOLESALE PRICES IN SW ITZERLAND, 1921.
[Source: Die Schweizerischen Grosshandels-Indexzahlen im Jahre 1921, separatabdruck aus der Neuen
Ziircher Zeitung.]
[July, 1914=100.]

Month.

1921.
January....................
February..................
March.......................
April.........................
May...........................
June..........................
July...........................
August.....................
September................
October.....................
November..............
December.................




Materials
Consumers’ necessary
goods.
to agri­
culture.

Industrial
products.

All com­
modities.

188.9
180.7
166.1
155.4
155.9
161.6
141.2
143.7
152.3
156.3
157.8
158.7

222.0
216.7
197.1
191.2
148.6
145.1
144.0
145.3
153.0
166.3
164.6
166.6

237*9
230.2
219.1
208.3
186.3
184.7
178.6
176.9
180.6
183.7
182.1
177.5

27R 4
261.7
256.7
243.3
220.3
216.0
214.6
209.2
208.5
206.1
203.0
192.4

Articles, (See Commodities; see also Prices, wholesale, of specified commodities.)
Page.
Australia, wholesale prices in.....................................................................................................................
260
Average wholesale prices of individual commodities, each year, 1890 to 1921, and each month, 1921.. 49-239
B.
Belgium, wholesale prices in ......................................................................................................................
261
Building materials:
Average and relative prices, 1890 to 1021......................................................................................... 186-207
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number o f.................................................................. 11,12
Importance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921..................................
255
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921....................................................
15
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913to 1921................................ 30,31
Index numbers of, by subdivisions..................................................................... ............................ 258,259
Table of weights used in computing index numbers of.................................................................. 246,247
C.
Canada, wholesale prices in ................................................................................................................. . 261,262
Chemicals and drugs:
Average and relative prices, 1890 to 1921......................................................................................... 208-221
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number o f ................................................................... 11,12
Importance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921.............................. 255,256
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921....................................................
15
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913to 1921................................ 30,31
Table of weights used in computing index numbers o f....................................................................
247
Cloths and clothing:
Average and relative prices, 1890 to 1921....... ................................................................................ 128-157
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number o f................................................. ................ 11,12
Importance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921............... .............. 252,2K
5
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921..................................................
14
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913 to 1921........................... .
28,' 29
Table of weights used in computing index numbers of................. ................................................ 244,245
Commodities:
Average prices, number of commodities showing changes in, 1920 to 1921......................................
13
Average prices of individual commodities, each year 1890 to 1921, and each month, 1921............ 49-239
Grouping and weights used in computing index numbers, changes in............................................ 8-12
Identical, in raw and manufactured state, index numbers of, 1890 to 1921.....................................
44
Identical, in raw and manufactured state, index numbers of, by months, 1913 to 1921................. 46,47
Importance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921.............................. 249-257
Index numbers of all commodities.............................................................. .................................. 15,30,31
Quotations, series of, carried in present report, and sources of..... .................................................
11
Quotations, series of, classified as to frequency................................................................................
12

E.
Exchange, wholesale values in, relative importance of commodifies as measured by, in 1921......... 249 -257
Explanation of tables showing prices................................ ....................................................................... 49-51
F.
Farm products:
Average and relative prices. 1890 to 1921............................................................................................. 58-89
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number of................................................................. 11,12
Importance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921.............................. 249,250
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921..... ..
14
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913 to 1921 ............................... 28,29
Table of weights used in computing index numbers o f ...................................... ........................ 241,242
Foods:
Average and relative prices, 1890 to 1921........................................................................................... 90-129
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number o f.................................................................. 11,12
Importance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921.............................. 250-252
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921.........................
14
• Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913 to1921 ............................... 28,29
Table of weights used in computing index numbers o f ....... ...................................... ................ 242-244
France, wholesale prices in ............................................... ................. ......................................................
262
Fuel and lighting:
Average and relative prices, 1890 to 1921......................................................................................... 156-165
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number o f.................................................................. 11,12
Importance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921.............................. 253,254
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921..................................................
14
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913 to 1921 ............................... 28,29
245
Table of weights used in computing index numbers o f ...................................................... ............

G.
Germany, wholesale prices in .................................................................................................................. 262,263
Great Britain, wholesale prices in ......................................................................................................... 263,264




271

272

INDEX,

H.
House-furnishing goods:
Average and relative prices, 1890 to 1921....................................................................... ..
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number o f................................................
Importance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921................
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921..................................
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913 to 1921 . . . .......
Table of weights used in computing index numbers o f ................................................. .

Page.
220-229
11,12
256,257
15
.. 30,31
. 248
..

I.
Importance, relative, of commodities as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921
Index numbers of wholesale prices:
Australia..............................................................................................................................
Belgium........................................................................................ . ......................................
Canada..................................................................................................................................
France...................................................................................................................................
Germany............................................................................................................................. .
Great Britain....................................................................................................................... .
Italy......................................................................................................................................
Japan........................................................... ........................................................................
Netherlands..........................................................................................................................
New Zealand.............................................................. . ........................................................
Norway......................................................................................................................... .
South Africa.........................................................................................................................
Spain.....................................................................................................................................
Sweden................................................................................................................................ .
Switzerland.................................................................................... .....................................
United States—
Commodity groups, 1890 to 1921................................................................... ............
Commodity groups, by months, 1913 to 1921..............................................................
Identical commodities in raw and manufactured state, 1890 to 1921......................
Identical commodities in raw and manufactured state, by months, 1913 to 1921:.
Method of computation of...........................................................................................
Table of weights used in computing.........................................................................
Italy, wholesale prices in..........................................................................................................

249,257
..
260
..
261
261,262
..
262
262.263
263.264
..
264
264.265
..
265
265.266
..
266
..
267
267-269
..
269
269-270
.. 14,15
.. 28-31
44
.. 46,47
.. 9,10
241-248
..
264

J.
Japan, wholesale prices in

264,265
M.

Manufactured and raw commodities, index numbers of, 1890 to 1921....................
Manufactured and raw commodities, index numbers of, by months, 1913 to 1921.
Markets and series of quotations carried...................................................................
Metals and metal products:
Average and relative prices, 1890 to 1921.............................................................
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number o f..................................
Im portance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921..
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921....................
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913 to 1921.
Table of weights used in computing index numbers o f.....................................
Miscellaneous commodities group:
Average and relative prices, 1890 to 1921.............................................................
Commodities, or series of quotations carried, number o f..................................
Im portance of, relative, as measured by wholesale values in exchange, 1921.
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, 1890 to 1921....................
Index numbers and per cent of increase or decrease, by months, 1913 to 1921.
Table of weights Used in computing index numbers of.....................................

44
. . 46,47
11
166-187
11,12
254
14
.. 28,29
..
246

..

..

228-239
.. 11,12'
..
257
..
15
.. 30,31

N.
Netherlands, wholesale prices in..................................................................................................................... 265
New Zealand, wholesale prices in............................................................................................................ 265,266
Norway, wholesale prices in........................................................................................................................
266
P.
Price quotations, sources o f..............
Prices of commodities in 1921........................
Prices, wholesale, in other countries............
Prices, wholesale, of specified commodities:
Acid, acetic..............................................
Acid, carbolic (phenol)...........................
Acid, citric................................................
Acid, muriatic.........................................
Acid, nitric................................. ............
Acid phosphate.......................................
Acid, stearic.............................................
Acid, sulphuric........................................
. Acid, tartaric...........................................
Alcohol, denatured..................................
Alcohol, .grain...........................................
Alcohol, wood, refined............................
A lum ........................................................
Aluminum...............................................
Ammonia, anhydrous.......... .................
Ammonia, sulphate o f............................
Apples, evaporated.................................




11
,.. 12,13
260-270
.. . . 208,209
. ... 218,219
.. . . 216,217
.. . . 208-211
208,209,211
. . . . 214,215
. . . . 208,209
. . . . 208-211
. . . . 218,219
. . . . 208,209
. . . . 218,219
. . . . 208,209
. . . . 208,209
. . . . 180,181
. . . . 212,213
. . . . 216,217
. . . . 116,117

273

INDEX,
Prices, wholesale, of specified commodities—Continued.
Apples, fresh..................................................................................
Augers............................................................................................
Bananas.........................................................................................
Bar iron..........................................................................................
Barley............................................................................................
Bars, reinforcing............................................................................
Beans..............................................................................................
Bedroom sets.................................................................................
Beds, combination........................................................................
Beef, fresh......................................................................................
Beef, salt.........................................................................................
Blankets, cotton............................................................................
Blankets, wool...............................................................................
Bleaching powder..........................................................................
Bone, ground.................................................................................
Boots and shoes (men’s, women’s, misses’, youths’, children’s)
Borax, crystals...............................................................................
Bran................................................................................................
Bread, loaf......................................................................................
Brick, common..............................................................................
Brimstone. (See Sulphur, crude.) *
Buffets............................................................................................
Butter.............................................................................................
Butts..............................................................................................
Calfskins.........................................................................................
Calico..............................................................................................
Canned goods.................................................................................
Carpets...........................................................................................
Carvers, knives and forks.............................................................
Cattle, steers..................................................................................
Cement, Portland..........................................................................
Chairs..............................................................................................
Cheese.............................................................................................
Chifforettes.....................................................................................
Chisels............................................................................................
Clover seed.....................................................................................
Coal, anthracite.............................................................................
Coal, bituminous...........................................................................
Cocoa beans....................................................................................
Coconut oil, crude..........................................................................
Codfish............................................................................................
Coffee..............................................................................................
Coke................................................................................................
Copper, ingot.................................................................................
Copper, sheet.................................................................................
Copper sulphate (blue vitriol)......................................................
Copper wire....................................................................................
Copra..............................................................................................
Corn.................................................................................................
Com, canned...................................................................................
Corn oil, crude............................................................................... .
Cornstarch.......................................................................................
Cotton..............................................................................................
Cotton flannels............................................................................... .
Cotton goods.................................................................................. .
Cotton seed......................................................................................
Cottonseed meal............................................................................
Cottonseed oil.................................................................................
Crackers...........................................................................................
Cream of tartar................................................................................
Crushed stone...................................................; ............................ .
Currants...........................................................................................
Cutlery, table..................................................................................
Davenports......................................................................................
Denims............................................................................................
Door knobs......................................................................................
Doors................................................................................................
Douglas fir.......................................................................................
Dressers...........................................................................................
Drillings...........................................................................................
Earthenware (plates, teacups, and saucers).................................
Eggs.................................................................................................
Epsom salts.....................................................................................
Ferromanganese..............................................................................
Files.................................................................................................
Fish. (See Cod; Herring; Mackerel; Salmon.)
Flannels, cotton..............................................................................
Flannels, wool.................................................................................
Flaxseed...........................................................................................
Flour, rye..................... ..................................................................
Flour, wheat.................... ...............................................................
Forks and knives, table..................................................................
Formaldehyde.................................................................................
Fruit, canned (peaches, pineapples).............................................
Fruit, evaporated (apples, currants, pmnes, raisins)................. .
Fruit, fresh (apples, bananas, lemons, oranges)...........................
Furniture.........................................................................................
Gasoline, motor...............................................................................

----- 18

11083°—22




. .. .. ..

J .J .O ,

.......... 166,167
.......... 118,119
.......... 172,173
.............. 52,53
.......... 172,173
................68,69
.......... 222,223
.......... 220,221
.............. 90-93
................94,95
.......... 224,225
.......... 224,225
.......... 212,213
.......... 216,217
.............. 128-135
.......... 212,213
.......... 228,229
.......... 106,107
188,189,198,199
.......... 222,223
............ 98-105
.......... 166,167
.............. 76-79
.......... 134-137
. . . 110,116,122
.......... 224,225
.......... 226,227
.. . 58,59,62,63
.......... 198-201
.......... 220-223
.......... 104,105
.......... 220,221
.......... 166,167
................68,69
.......... 156-161
........... 160-165
.......... 108,109
.......... 126,127
.......... 108,109
.......... 108,109
.......... 164,165
.......... 182-185
.......... 182-185
.......... 212,213
.......... 182-185
........... 108,109
.............. 52-55
.......... 122,123
.......... 126,127
.......... 122,123
.............. 68-71
.......... 138,139
.......... 134-145
................68,69
.......... 228,229
.......... 126,127
.......... 108,109
.......... 218,219
.......... 200,201
.......... 116,117
.......... 226,227
.......... 222,223
.......... 134,135
.......... 166,167
.......... 200,201
. . . 186,187,195
.......... 220,221
.......... 138,139
.......... 228,229
.. . 68,69,72-75
.......... 218,219
.......... 172,173
.......... 166,167
138,139
146,147
.. 72,73
110,111
110-115
226,227
212,213
116,117
, 116,117
118,119
220-225
164,165

274

IUDEX,

Prices, wholesale, of specified commodities—Continued.
Ginghams.......................................................................
Glass, plate....................................................................
Glassware (nappies, pitchers, tum blers).....................
Glass, window....... . . ....................................................
Glucose..........................................................................
Glycerin, refined...........................................................
Grain. ( S e e Bariey; Com; Oats; R ye; W heat.)
Gravel............................................................................
Gum, sap.......................................................................
H am m ers......................................................................
Hams, smoked...............................................................
H ay, alfalfa....................................................................
H ay, elover, m ixed.......................................................
H ay, tim othy.........................................'......................
H em lock........................................................................
Hemp, Tnamlft,...............................................................

Hominy grits............................................................
Hops.........................................................................
Hosiery, cotton........................................................
Hydrogen peroxide..................................................
Iron ore.....................................................................
goprP te....................................................................
Knives and forks, table...........................................
Lamb, dressed.........................................................
Lambs.......................................................................
Lard..........................................................................
la th , pine................................................................
Lath, spruce.............................................................
Lead, carbonate of (white lead).............................
Lead, pig..................................................................
Lead pipe..................................................................
Leather.....................................................................
Lemons.....................................................................
Time, common.........................................................
linseed meal...........................................................
linseed oil................................................................
l iv e stock (for food). ( S e e Cattle; Hogs; Sheep.)
Lubricating oil.........................................................
Lumber....................................................................
Mackerel, salt...........................................................
Maple........................................................................
Matches.....................................................................
Meal, c o m .................................................................
Meal, cottonseed......................................................
Meal, linseed.............................................................
Meats........................................................................
Milk, condensed......................................................
Milk, evaporated......................................................
Milk, fresh................................................................
Mill feed, middlings.................................................
Molasses....................................................................
Muslin, bleached......................................................
Muslin, unbleached.................................................
Mutton, dressed.......................................................
Nails, wire................................................................
Nappies, glass..........................................................
Oatmeal.......................
Oats.............................
Oil, lubricating...........
Oleomargarine............
Oleo oil........................
Olive oil.......................
Onions.........................
Opium.........................
Oranges........................
Overcoatings...............
Pails.............................
Palm kernel oil, crude
Paper, newsprint........
Paper, wrapping.........
Peaches, canned.........
Peanut oil, crude........
Peanuts........................
Peas, canned...............
Pepper, black..............
Percale.........................
Peroxide o f hydrogen.
Petroleum, crude........
Petroleum, refined----Phenol (carbolic acid).
Phosphate rock...........
Pig iron........................




Page.

............ 138,139
............ 202-205
..............226,227
............ 204-207
...............118,119
.............. 218,219
..................76,77
............. 200,201
..............186,187
...............166,167
............. 94-97
....... .
76,77
.............. 76,77
..................76,77
186,187,194,195
. . . . . . . . 234,235
........... 108.109
..................7o-81
___ 58,59,64,65
...........118,119
.............. 80,81
........... 140,141
...........218,219
........... 168,169
........... 168-173
........... 234,235
........... 226,227
............. 94,95
.............. 66,67
........... 118,119
........... 196,197
.............. 196,197
........... 206,207
. . . . . . . 182,183
...........182,183
........... 230-233
...........118,119
........... 202,203
........... 228,229
.......... 206,207
.............. 168,169
........... 234,235
........... 186-199
........... 110,111
. . . . . . . 190,191
.............. 164,165
........... 120,121
............ 228,229
........... 228,229
.............. 90-99
.............. 105,107
...........106,107
..................80-83
............ 228,229
............ 120,121
.............. 140-143
.............. 142,143
................. 94,95
.............. 172,173
............ 226,227
...............190,191
............ 120,121
.. . . 52,53,56,57
............. 234,235
............ 120,121
.............120,121
...........128,127
.............. 84,85
...........218,219
...........118,119
. . . . . . . 146,147
. . . . . . . . 226,227
.............. 212,213
............. 234-237
............ 234-237
............116,117
.............. 126,127
........... .
84,85
.............. 122,123
.............120,121
. . . . . . . . 142,143
.............. 218,219
............ 164,165
............164,165
..............218,219
............ 216,217
............ 168-173

INDEX,
Prices, wholesale, of specified commodities—Continued.
Pig lead...........................................................................
Pig tin..................................................................................
Pineapples, canned...........................................................
Pine, white..........................................................................
Pine, yellow........................................................................
Pipe, cast-iron....................................................................
Pitchers, glass.....................................................................
Planes...................................................................................
Plates, white granite.........................................................
Poplar...................................................................................
Pork, cured.........................................................................
Pork, fresh...........................................................................
Potash, caustic....................................................................
Potash, muriate of.............................................................
Potatoes, sweet...................................................................
.Potatoes, white..................................................................
Poultry, dressed.................................................................
Poultry, live fowls................................... ........................
Print cloths.........................................................................
Prunes..................................................................................

Quicksilver....................................................................
Quinine..........................................................................
Raisins...........................................................................
Refrigerators.................................................................
R ice................................................................................
Rope, manila................................................................
Rosin.............................................................................
Rubber, Para, island....................................................
R ye................................................................................
Rye flour......................................... .............................
Salmon, canned............................................................
Sal soda (carbonate of soda)........................................
Salt.................................................................................
Saltpeter, Chile (nitrate of soda).................................
Sand, building..............................................................
Saws...............................................................................
Sheep.............................................................................
Sheeting, bleached........................................................
Sheeting, brown............................................................
Shingles, cypress...........................................................
Shingles, red cedar........................................................
Shoes (men’s, women’s, misses’, youths’ , children’s)
Shovels..........................................................................
Sides, cured...................................................................
Silk, raw........................................................................
Silk, spun......................................................................
Silver, bar.....................................................................
Sisal, Mexican...............................................................
Skelp..............................................................................
Slate, roofing.................................................................
Soap, laundry................................................................
Soda ash........................................................................
Soda, bicarbonate o f.....................................................
Soda, carbonate of (sal soda).......................................
Soda, caustic.................................................................
Soda, nitrate of (Chile saltpeter).................................
Soda, silicate o f.............................................................
Soya-bean oil, crude.....................................................
Spelter (zinc)................................................................
Spiegeleisen...................................................................
Spruce............................................................................
Starch, corn...................................................................
Starch,! aundry............................................................
Steel bars, merchant....................................................
Steel billets....................................................................
Steel plates....................................................................
Steel rails.......................................................................
Steel sheets....................................................................
Steel, structural............................................................
Sugar, centrifugal................... •.....................................
Sugar, granulated.........................................................
Suitings..........................................................................
Sulphur, crude..............................................................
Tables, dining...............................................................
Tables, kitchen.............................................................
Tables, library..............................................................
Tallow, edible................................................................
Tallow, inedible............................................................
Tankage, slaughterhouse.............................................
Tar.................................................................................
Tea.................................................................................
Teacups and saucers....................................................
Thread, cotton..............................................................
Thread,linen, shoe.......................................................
Tickings.........................................................................
Tile, hollow, building...................................................
Tin, p i g ......................................................................




275
Page.
.......... 182,183
.......... 182,183
.......... 116,117
.......... 192,193
.......... 192-195
.......... 174,175
.......... 226,227
.......... 174,175
.......... 228,229
.......... 196,197
................94-97
..................94,95
.......... 212,213
...........216,217
..................84,85
..................84,85
..................98,99
..................66,67
136,137,142,143
.............. 116,117
............ 206,207
...............182,183
............ 220,221
..............116,117
............ 224,225
................. 84,85
............ 234,235
............ 206,207
............ 238,239
................. 52,53
............110,111
............110,111
............212,213
............122,123
..............216,217
............ 202,203
........... 174,175
................. 66,67
............ 226,227
............142,143
............ 196,197
............198,199
............ 128-135
............ 174,175
................. 94-97
............ 154-157
............156,157
............182,183
............ 238,239
............174,175
............ 202,203
............ 238,239
............214,215
............214,215
............212,213
............214,215
............216,217
............214,215
..............126,127
............186,187
............172,173
............ 196,197
............ 122,123
............ 238,239
..............176,177
......... 174-179
............ 176,177
............ 176-179
............ 176-179
............176,177
............ 122-125
............ 122-125
............ 146-149
............214,215
............ 222,223
............ 224,225
............ 222,223
............ 122,123
............ 214,215
............ 216,217
............ 206,207
.............. 122,123
............ 228,229
.............. 144,145
.............. 154,155
............ 228,229
............ 200,201
.............. 182,183

276

INDEX,

Prices, wholesale, of specified commodities—Concluded.
Tin, roofing (temeplate)...................................................
Tobacco, Burley, leaf........................................................
Tobacco, plug......................................................................
Tobacco, smoking...............................................................
Tomatoes, canned...............................................................
Trouserings..........................................................................
Trowels.................................................................................
Tubs and pails....................................................................
Tumblers, glass..................................................................
Turpentine, spirits of.........................................................
Underwear, cotton.............................................................
Underwear, woolen............................................................
V eal.......................................................................................
Vegetables, canned (corn, peas, tomatoes)...................
Vegetables,fresh (onions, potatoes)..............................
Vinegar, cider......................................................................
Vises......................................................................................
Vitriol, blue (copper sulphate).......................................
W heat...................................................................................
Wheat flour..........................................................................
White lead (carbonate of lead).......................................
Wire, fence...........................................................................
Women’ s dress goods.........................................................
Wood pulp...........................................................................
Wood screws........................................................................
Woolen goods......................................................................
Wool, Ohio, scoured fleece...............................................
Worsted yam s....................................................................
Yarns, cotton......................................................................
Yarns, worsted....................................................................
Zinc, oxide of (zinc white)...............................................
Zinc, sheet............................................................................
Zinc, slab..............................................................................

. 176,177
... 86,87
238.239
238.239
126,127
150.151
180,181
228,229
226,227
206,207
144,145
150.151
.............oo, m

122-127
. . . . . . 84,85
.... 128,129
.. . . 180,181
.... 212,213
52,53,58-61
_ 110-115
_
.... 206,207
.... 180,181
.. . . 150-153
. . . 234-237
.. . . 180,181
.. . . 146-155
........ 86-89
. . . . 154,155
. . . . 144,145
. . . . 154,155
. . . . 206,207
. . . . 186,187
. . . . 186,187
....

Q.
10-12

Quotations, series of, carried in present report
R.

Raw and manufactured state, identical commodities in, index numbers of, 1890 to 1921....................
44
Raw and manufactured state, identical commodities in, index numbers of, by months, 1913 to 1921.. 46,47
S.
Sources of price quotations..........................................................................................................................
11
South Africa, wholesale prices in ...............................................................................................................
267
Spain, wholesale prices in ........................................................................................................................ 267-269
Sweden, wholesale prices in ........................................................................................................................
269
Switzerland, wholesale prices in .............................................................................................................. 269,270
V.
Values in exchange, relative importance of commodities, 1921............................................................. 249-257
W.
Weights, table of, used in computing revised index numbers............................................................. 241-248




O