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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

•No. 454

B U L L E T IN O F T H E U N IT E D S T A T E S !
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S /
WAGES

AND

HOURS

OP

LABOR

SERIES

HOURS AND EARNINGS IN
BITUMINOUS COAL MINING
1922,1924, AND 1926




NOVEMBER, 1927

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON
1927




ADDITIONAL COPIES
OP THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM
THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS
TJ. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
•WASHINGTON, D. C.
AT

18 CENTS PER COPY
V

CONTENTS
Page
Introduction and summary___________________________________________________
1 -5
Classified average earnings per hour_________________________________________
5 -9
Tonnage workers_________________________________________________________
5 -7
Time workers_____________________________________________________________
8, 9
Regular or basic hours per day and per week_______________________________ 10, 11
Increases in wage rates between October 15 and December 31, 1926______
11
Classified hours in half m onth_______________________________________________ 12, 13
Classified earnings in half month_____________________________________________ 14, 15
Averages for miners and loaders, by States_________________________________ 16, 17
Index numbers of tonnage rates of hand loaders and hand or pick miners
in Hocking Valley district_________________________________________________ 17, 18
Classified starts (days) in half m onth________________________________________ 18, 19
Number of mines, production, and wage earners, 1925_____________________
20
Importance of bituminous coal mining, 1914 to 1925_______________________20, 21
Occupations in the industry__________________________________________________
21
General tables_________________________________________________________________ 22 -5 7
T able A .— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and
earnings of miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by occupa­
tion and State_________________________________________________________ 23 -2 5
T able B.— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and
earnings of employees other than miners and loaders, 1922, 1924,
and 1926, by place of work, occupation, and State______________ 2 6 -3 3
T able C.— Number of miners and loaders in each State whose average
earnings per hour were within each classified amount, 1926, by
occupation_____________________________________________________________ 34 -3 6
T able D .— Number of employees other than miners and loaders in
each State whose average earnings per hour were within each
classified amount, 1926________________________________________________ 37, 38
T able E.— Number of employees in each specified occupation in each
State who worked each classified number of hours in half month,
1926_______________________________________ ______________________ ______ 3 9 -4 4
T able F.— Number of employees in each specified occupation in each
State whose earnings in half month were within each classified
amount, 1926__________________________________________________________ 45 -4 9
T able G.— Number of employees making each specified number of
starts (days) in.half month, 1926, by place of work, occupation,
and State______________________________________________________________ 5 0 -5 7
Appendix.— Agreement between bituminous miners and operators________58 -6 6




ill




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
n o . 454

WASHINGTON

N o v e m b e r , 1927

HOURS AND EARNINGS IN BITUMINOUS COAL
MINING, 1922, 1924, AND 1926
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY
This bulletin presents averages for each of the various inside and
outside occupations in bituminous coal mining in the United States
in 1926, together with summary figures of like character for 1922
and 1924. It also gives classified average earnings per hour, and
average hours, earnings, and starts or days in half month in 1926 for
11 of the most important occupations in the industry.
Average number of starts or calendar days on which employees
worked in half month, average hours in half month and per start
or day, and average earnings per hour, start, or day, and in half
month are shown by occupations in Table 1 for miners and loaders
for each of the years 1922, 1924, and 1926, for which figures are
available. In 1926 “ miners and loaders” included 66,414 hand
loaders, 20,594 hand or pick miners, 6,055 machine miners (cutters),
1,065 gang miners, 882 machine miners, (cutters') helpers, 694 con­
tract loaders, and 306 machine loaders, and in the aggregate repre­
sented 65 per cent of the 148,155 bituminous wage earners covered
in that year. The wage earners in these occupations mine the coal;
that is, take it from the vein or seam and load it into mine cars after
which it is hauled to the surface in slope or drift mines or to the
foot of the shaft in shaft mines. In practically all mines they are
paid tonnage rates and are, therefore, generally called “ tonnage
men.” Employees in other occupations are as a rule paid hourly
or daily rates and are called “ day men” or “ time workers.” Aver­
age hours and earnings for each of the seven occupations of miners
and loaders as presented are based on (1) time at the face or place
of work in the mine, including time for lunch, and also on (2) total
time in the mine, including time for lunch and time of travel in
mine from its opening to the face or working place and return.
Miners and loaders in one-half monthly pay period worked an
average of 8.9 starts or days in 1922, 8.3 in 1924, and 9.5 in 1926.
Based on time at the face, including time for lunch, they worked an
averageof 68.1 hours in 1922,64.6 hours in 1924, and 75.4 hours in 1926.
Their average hourly earnings, based on time at the face including time
for lunch, were 91.5 cents in 1922, 84.3 cents in 1924, and 81.7 cents
in 1926. They earned an average of $7.03 per start or day in 1922,
$6.60 in 1924, and $6.46 in 1926, and in the half month they earned
$62.30 in 1922, $54.44 in 1924, and $61.61 in 1926.
In the half-month pay period in 1926 hand loaders worked an
average of 9.4 starts or days as compared with 8.7 in 1922 and




1

2

fetTUMiNOUS COAL MINING

8.i in i924. Based on time at the face, including time for lunch,
hand loaders worked an average of 66.2 hours in 1922, 63.3 hours
in 1924, and 73.7 hours in 1926, and earned an average of 90.2 cents
per hour in 1922, 81.1 cents in 1924, and 77.9 cents per hour in 1926.
Their average earnings per start or day were $6.90 in 1922, $6.32
in 1924, and $6.12 in 1926, and in the half month they earned an
average of $59.75 in 1922, $51.29 in 1924, and $57.48 in 1926.
T a b l e 1 .— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of miners

and loaders, inside mine} 1922, 1924) and 1926, by occupation
Number of—

Occupation and year

Loaders, contract:
1924.................................
1926.................................
Loaders, hand:
1922................................
1924.................................
1926.................................
Loaders, machine:
1924.................................
1926.................................
Miners, gang:
1924.................................
1926.................................
Miners, hand or pick:
1922.................................
1924.................................
1926.................................
Miners, machine (cutters):
1922................................
1924.................................
1926.................................
Miners’, machine (cutters’)*
helpers:
1926.................................
Total:
1922......................
1924......................
1926......................

Average hours

In half
Aver­
month
age
num­ based on—
ber of
Wage starts Time
Mines earners (days) at
in half face Time
in
month in­
clud­ mine
ing
lunch

Average earnings

Per start
based on—

Per hour
based on—

Per
Time
Time
In
start half
at
at
face Time face Time (day) month
in­
in­
in
in
clud­ mine clud­ mine
ing
ing
lunch
lunch

24
61

170
694

9.5
10.1

79.9
85.3

84.3
92.4

8.4
8.4

8.9 $0,929 $0,881 $7.82
9.1
.849
.7& 7.16

176
514
488

22,560
61,936
66,414

8.7
8.1
9.4

66.2
63.3
73.7

71.5
68.6
80.3

7.7
7.8
7.8

8.3
8.5
8.6

.902
.811
.779

.836
.748
.715

6.90
6.32
6.12

59.75
51.29
57.48

10
23

102
306

9.4
9.9

84.3
87.3

90.4
93.7

9.0
8.8

9.6
9.5

.690
.788

.644
.735

6.20
6.96

58.20
68.80

40
32

1,036
1,065

8.1
9.5

65.6
78.7

71.1
86.0

8.1
8.2

8.8
9.0

1.387
1.377

1.094 9.66
1.260 11.36

77.79
108.33

127
291
254

8,429
21,424
20, 594

9.2
8.5
9.8

71.0
65.6
77.0

77.5
71.2
84.3

7.7
7.7
7.9

8.4
8.4
8.6

.840
.808
.783

161
485
464

2,371
6,499
6,055

9.5
8.8
10.3

75.4
72.9
86.0

81.5
78.6
93.3

7.9
8.3
8.3

8.6
8.9
9.0

1.274
1.163
1.195

151

882

8.8

79.0

84.5

9.0

9.6

.681

.637

6.14

53.77

200
599
556

33,360
91,167
96,010

8.9
8.3
9.5

68.1
64.6
75.4

73.7
70.0
82.2

7.7
7.8
7.9

8.3
8.5
8.6

.915
.843
.817

.845
.777
.749

7.03
6.60
6.46

62.30
54.44
61.61

.769
.744
.715

$74.26
72.43

6.47
6.26
6.18

59.62
53.02
60.31

1.180 10.10
1.079 9.65
1.101 9.93

96.14
84.79
102.68

As already stated, the averages in Table 1 are for miners and
loaders who are usually paid tonnage rates.
Table 2 gives for 1922, 1924, and 1926 the average number of starts
or calendar days and average hours and earnings for all other “ inside”
and for all “ outside” occupations. These employees are usually time
workers and are paid rates per hour, day, or week. The averages in
the table for each occupation, and also for the total of all time-work
occupations, are based on the number of hours actually worked in
one-half monthly pay period.
The table shows that in 1926 the total of 52,145 time-workers worked
an average of 10.7 starts or days, 91.7 hours, and an average of 8.6 hours
per start or day in the half-monthly pay period taken in 1926, and that
they earned an average of $60.87 in the half month, $5.70 per start,
and 66.4 cents per hour. Engineers and pumpmen worked more starts
and hours in the half month than the employees in any of the other
occupations. A large percentage of the employees in these occupations
work overtime and on Sundays and holidays. Average earnings per




IN T R O D U C T IO N

AND

3

SUM M ARY

hour in 1926 for inside occupations exclusive of trappers (boys) range
from 62 cents for laborers to 81.1 cents for cagers, and for outside oc­
cupations range from 54.6 cents for laborers to 76.2 cents for engineers.
The average earnings per hour, all occupations, was 66.4 cents in 1926,
as compared with 69.6 cents in 1924 and 75.3 cents in 1922.
T

2 . — Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of
employees other than miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by place of
work and occupation

able

Place of work and occupation

Number of— Average Average hours
Average earnings—
worked—
number
of starts
Year
In
In
Per
Per
Wage (days)
half
start
Mines earners in half half
start Per
month month (day) month (day) hour

INSIDE MINE

Brakemen_______________. . . . . . . .
Bratticemen and timbermen_____
Cagers..............................................
Drivers............................... .............
Laborers..........................................
Motormen........................................
Pumpmen.....................................
Trackmen.......... ............................
Trappers (boys)..............................
Other employees............................
OUTSIDE MINE

1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926

Blacksmiths.................................... 11922
1924
1926
1922
Carpenters and car-repair men..
1924
1906
Engineers......................................... 1922
1924
1926
Laborers.,....................................... 1922
1924
1926
Other employees________ ________ 1922
1924
1926
Total...................................... 1922
1924
1926

1,333
4,259
4,368
986
2,521
2,800
185
410
414
2,080
4,603
4,530
2,967
7,228
8,823
1,296
3,751
4,239
452
1,015
1,081
1,393
4,026
4,246
393
925
693
2,294
4,786
5,745

19.4
8.9
9.9
210.4
9.8
10.8
810.3
9.6
11.1
<9.5
8.8
10.2
89.9
8.9
9.4
«10.1
9.7
10.8
13.0
11.7
12.7
710.7
9.7
10.8
9.1
8.3
9.9
«10.9
10.5
11.3

77.3
75.0
83.8
85.7
81.1
89.2
89.4
83.2
99.5
78.7
72.3
84.4
80.8
74.2
78.7
84.2
83.6
94.7
110.2
103.4
118.3
87.3
81.2
91.0
72.3
66.7
79.7
91.4
89.7
98.0

18.2
8.4
8.5
*8.1
8.3
8.3
88.6
8.7
9.0
<8.2
8.2
8.3
«&0
8.3
8.4
•8.4
8.6
8.7
8.5
8.8
9.3
?8.2
8.3
8.4
7.9
8.0
8.0
«8.3
8.5
8.7

339
191
969
581
909
54j0
427
157
474
1,354
1,545
484
129
267
732*
333
674
320
195 2,407
7,514
591
7,877
550
193 2,242
578 4,823
540 4,201
200 «19,388
599 “ 49,552
556 52,145

•11.7
10.7
11.9
w 11.1
10.4
11.4
U 3.9
12.9
13.3
1110.1
9.5
10.7
1211.8
11.1
12.1
10.1
9.8
10.7

m o
92.0
104.8
94.7
89.6
98.3
121.3
114.4
119.6
84.8
81.2
92.6
101.3
99.1
108.1
87.8
83.1
91.7

»8.6
8.6
8.8
i° 8.4
8.6
8.6
18.7
8.9
9.0
“ 8.4
8.6
8.7
1 8.5
2
8.9
8.9
8.7
8.5
8.6

181
547
518
181
484
484
83
198
188
125
377
320
181
502
500
183
548
520
157
402
402
198
587
554
103
273
207
188
538
522

1Not including data for 8 employees whose starts were not reported.
2Not-including data for 79 employees whose starts were not reported.
•Not including data for 2 employees whose starts were not reported.
<Not including data for 89 employees whose starts were not reported.
•Not including data for 237 employees whose starts were not reported.
•Not including data for 6 employees whose starts were not reported.
7 Not including data for 30 employees whose starts were not reported.
•Not including data for 137 employees whose starts were not reported.
•Not including data for 9 employees whose starts were not reported.
1 Not including data for 22 employees whose starts were not reported.
0
1 Not including data for 51 employees whose starts were not reported.
1
** Not including data for 75 employees whose starts were not reported.
Including data for 327 employees not shown in the details of this table.
1 Including data for 636 employees not shown Jn the details of this tab!#*
4




$60.18 1 $6.41 $0,779
53.25
5.96
.710
57.61
5.82
.687
70.26 *6.81
.820
63.04
6.44
.778
66.20
6.16
.742
77.82 8 7.53
.871
71.53
7.46
.860
80.73
7.29
.811
64.84 <6.82
.824
6.12
54.08
.748
59.80
5.88
.708
56.30 5 5.73
.697
48.74
5.47
.657
48.82
.620
5.18
68.62 •6.82
.815
62.89
6.46
.752
67.97
6.27
.718
6.24
.734
80.90
6.02
70.38
.681
74.04
5.84
.626
.826
72.05 7 6.77
6.14
59.83
.737
.705
64.15
5.92
.472
3.75
34.09
27.24
3.27
.408
3.04
30.17
.379
.826
75.49 •6.97
73.32
.817
6.97
.775
6.71
75.96
87.42
71.75
77.94
71.23
61.96
64.28
99.50
91.56
91.17
55.06
46.73
50.53
70.02
62.73
65.31
66.17
57.81
60.87

#7.47
6.72
6.56
1 6.42
0
5.93
5.64
17.21
7.09
6.83
ii 5.49
4.93
4.74
12 5.96
5.64
5.41
6.55
5.92
5.70

.857
.780
.743
.752
.691
.654
.820
.801
.762
.649
.575
.546
.691
.633
.604
.753
.696
.664

4

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

The data obtained for each employee included the number of
starts or days, hours worked, and earnings in a half-month pay period
in the latter part of 1926 or early in 1927. The data for 1926 were
taken directly from the pay rolls and other records of 36 representa­
tive mines in Alabama, 17 in Colorado, 39 in Illinois, 17 in Indiana, 11
in Kansas, 86 in Kentucky, 45 in Ohio, 151 in Pennsylvania, 14 in
Tennessee, 22 in Virginia, and 118 in West Virginia. Except for a
very few instances the data were taken from the mine records by
agents of the bureau. According to the 1926 figures of the United
States Bureau of Mines, approximately 90 per cent of all wage
earners in bituminous coal mining were in these 11 States.
Data for which averages and classified figures are presented in the
tables of this bulletin were taken from the records of 200 mines in
1922, 599 in 1924, and 556 in 1926. The 1926 figures are for 148,155
employees, of whom 132,949, or 89.7 per cent, are for those who work
underground or “ inside” and 15,206 are for those who work on the
surface or “ outside” of the mine. The 1924 data are for 140,719
wage earners, of which 124,691, or 89 per cent, are for those under­
ground, and the 1922 data are for 52,748 wage earners, of whom 89
per cent are for those underground.
The 1926 data were taken from the November pay rolls of 10 mines,
the December pay rolls of 253 mines, the January pay rolls of 223
mines, the February pay rolls of 50 mines, and the March pay rolls
of 20 mines.
The three basic occupations in bituminous coal mining are those of
hand or pick miners, machine miners, and .hand loaders. They
represent approximately 63 per cent of all wage earners in bituminous
coal mining, and are usually paid a rate per ton of 2,000 pounds
run-of-mine— that is, of coal as mined, including “ slack.”
Machine miners generally undercut the coal by machine. Hand
loaders shovel the coal into mine cars from the floor of the mine after
it has been undercut and blasted from the seam by loaders or shot
firers. Hand or pick miners undercut the coal with a pick, blast it
from the seam, and shovel it from the floor of the mine into mine cars.
Contract loaders, machine loaders, gang miners, and machine
miners, helpers are of much less importance than other loaders and
miners.
As loaders and miners are usually paid tonnage instead of time rates,
very few companies keep a daily time record for such workers. It was
therefore necessary, in order to get hours worked by these employees,
to make arrangements with officials of the mines to a have a special
day-by-day record kept of the hours of each tonnage worker for a
half-month pay period. The time worked by each time worker and
the earnings of each time and each tonnage worker are of regular
record.
In the tables given in this bulletin occupations of underground wage
earners are grouped under the head “ Inside mine,” and occupations
of surface employees are grouped under “ Outside mine.”
The term “ starts,” as used in the tables of this report, means the
number of days or parts of days on which the wage earners worked
in a half-month pay period.
The average hours and earnings of wage earners in the seven occu­
pations of miners and loaders are based on (1) time at face, including
time for lunch, and also on (2) total time in mine, including time for




CLASSIFIED AVEBAGE EAHNINGS

5

lunch and time of travel in mine from the mine opening to the face and
return. Since it was reported that in many mines a considerable
number of employees in these seven occupations had no stated length
of time for lunch, eating while at work or while waiting for mine cars,
hours at the face exclusive of lunch time could not be determined;
therefore, no averages are shown for employees in these occupations
for time at face with time for lunch excluded.
The term “ face” in the report means the perpendicular surface of
the seam of coal on which miners work, and at or near which loaders
shovel the coal from the floor of the mine into mine cars.
Time for lunch, as reported, was usually about 30 minutes, and the
time of travel in the different mines ranged from 10 minutes per day
for the mine with the shortest time of travel to 2 hours for the one
with the longest time of travel. The average time of travel was
about 46 minutes per day or 23 minutes each way.
Average earnings, per hour for each of the 66,414 hand loaders,
the 20,594 hand or pick miners, and the 6,055 machine miners in­
cluded in the 1926 study have been computed by dividing his net
earnings in the half-month pay period for which data were taken
(1) by his total hours at the face in the half month, including time
for lunch, and also (2) by his total hours in the mine, including time
for lunch and time of travel in the mine. The first method gives
average earnings per hour for each man based on time in mine
exclusive of time of travel, and the second gives his average earnings
per hour based on time in mine including time of travel. Average
earnings per hour by the first method are greater than by the second
because the time used in the former does not include the unproduc­
tive time of travel in mine which is included in the latter.
The term “ net earnings in half month” as used above means the
remainder after deductions from total or gross earnings of the costs
or charges for powder, dynamite, or other explosives, fuses, and caps
used by miners and loaders in blasting coal from the seams, and
for tool sharpening or blacksmithing. There are very few companies
which do not charge employees for explosives or for tool sharpening.
Table 3 shows the number and the per cent (actual and cumula­
tive) of hand loaders, hand or pick miners, and machine miners
(cutters) whose average earnings per hour, based on time at the face
including time for lunch and based on total time in the mine, were
within each classified amount in 1926.
CLASSIFIED AVERAGE EARNINGS PER HOUR
Tonnage workers.— The 66,414 hand loaders in Table 3 earned an
average of 77.9 cents per hour based on time at the face, including
time for lunch, and 71.5 cents per hour based on total time in mine.
Keading part of the cumulative percentages based on time at the
face, it is seen that 3 per cent earned under 30 cents per hour, 9 per
cent earned under 40 cents, 19 per cent earned under 50 cents, 32
per cent earned under 60 cents, 58 per cent earned under 80 cents,
and 78 per cent under $1 per hour. Averages for hand or pick
miners are almost the same as for hand loaders. Machine miners
averaged $1,195 per hour based on time at the face and $1,101 per
hour based on total time in mine. Based on time at the face, 54
per cent earned under $1.20 per hour and 76 per cent earned under




6

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

$1.50 per hour. For classification of employees in these three occu­
pations in each State according to average earnings per hour see
Table C, page 34.
As a rule, mines employing hand loaders to shovel the coal from
the floor of the mine into mine cars after it has been blasted from
the seam also have machine miners (cutters) to operate the machines
for undercutting the coal. In Table 3 and in other tables figures are
shown for loaders of 488 mines and machine miners (cutters) of 464
mines. In a number of mines in which machine miners work at
night, time was not kept for them, as the mine employee designated
to keep the time was on duty during the day only, while in a few
others time was not kept for other reasons.




T

able

3 . — Number and per cent of loaders and miners whose hourly earnings were within each classified amount, 1926

Loaders, hand (488 establishments)
Number based
on—

Cumulative—
Time
at face,
includ­
ing
lunch

3
9
19
32
45
58
69
78
85
91
95
97
99
99

4
12
25
39
54

482
939
1,858
2,552
2,965
2,790
2, 595
2,129
1,477
1,034

Cumulative—

Time in
Time in
Time mine, Time mine,
at face, includ­ at face, includ­
includ­
ing
includ­
ing
ing
lunch
ing
lunch
lunch
lunch
and
and
travel
travel

2
5

Actual—
Time
at face,
includ­
ing
lunch

Time in
mine,
includ­
ing
lunch
and
travel

5
31
78
309
308
435
471
485
565
587
574
423
351
307
285
197
164
138
297
33

43
160
366
430
454
528
656
557
652
469
384
318
277
215
161
129
96
128
18

Under 30 cents.................
30 and under 40 cents........
40 and under 50 cents........
50 and under 60 cents........
60 and under 70 cents____
70 and under 80 cents........
80 and under 90 cents........
90 cents and under $1.......
$1 and under $1.10............
$1.10 and under $1.20.......
$1.20 and under $1.30____
$1.30 and under $1.40____
$1.40 and under $1.50____
$1.50 and under $1.60____
$1.60 and under $1.70....... .
$1.70 and under $1.80....... .
$1.80 and under $1.90____
$1.90 and under $2.............
$2 and under $2.50.............
$2.50 and under $3.............
$3 and over....................... .

1,704
4,021
7,088
8,461
8,867
8,146
7,302
6,103
5,006
3,801
2, 555
1,548
856
438
224
107
61
43
63
15
5

2,452
5,535
8,345
9,678
9,539
8,343
6, 952
5,361
4,177
2,726
1,642
864
420
159
83
50
27
18
37

Total....................... .

66,414

66,414

20,594

20,594

6,055

Average earnings per hour. $0.779

$0. 715

$0,783

$0.715

$1.195

Time in
Time mine, Time
at face, includ­ at face,
includ­
includ­
ing
ing
lunch
ing
lunch
lunch
and
travel

6,055

$1.101




0)
0)
(*
)
0)
0)
i1
)

i Less than one-half of 1 per cent.

2 100

2 100
2100

6
6
77
85
91
95
97
99
99

2 100
2 100
2 100

2100

2 100

2 100

2100

2100
100

2 100

100

688

477
261
150

8
6
46
26
16
19
4

676
1,317
2,463
3,100
3,089
2,960
2,428
1,695
1,151
742
457
227
144
65
44
13

6
4
1
2
1

9
12

14
14
13

1
0
7
5
3

(*
)
(»)
0)
0)
(!)
<)
1

2
1
1

92
95
97
99
99

97
98
99
99

0
0)
8

2 100
2

2 100

2100

2 100

2100
2100
100

10
0

2 100

2100
2100
100

1
2

Cumulative—

0)

0)

0)

1
2
7
1
2

6

5
5
4
3

2
2
2
C
1
)

* This percentage, entered as 100, is between 99.5 and 100.

8

19
27
35
44
54
64
71
76
81

8
6

Time in
mine,
includ­
ing
lunch
and
travel

0)
1
0

17
24
33
44
53
64
71
78

89
92
94
99

91
94
96
97
2100

2 100

2 100

100

100

EARNINGS

Time in
mine,
includ­
ing
lunch
and
travel

Per cent based o n -

AVERAGE

Time in
Time mine, Time
at face, includ­ at face,
includ­
ing
includ­
ing
lunch
ing
lunch
lunch
and
travel

Number based
on—

Per cent based o n -

ActualTime in
mine,
includ­
ing
lunch
and
travel

Miners, machine (cutters) (464 establishments)

CLASSIFIED

Time
at face,
includ­
ing
lunch

Time in
mine,
includ­
ing
lunch
and
travel

Number based
on—

Per cent based on—
A ctu al-

Classified earnings per
hour

Miners, hand or pick (254 establishments)

8

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

Time workers.— Table 4 shows the percentage (actual and cumula­
tive) of employees whose average earnings per hour were within each
classified amount, for each of 6 specified occupations inside the mine
and of 2 outside the mine. The employees in these occupations are
considered next in importance to hand loaders, pick or hand miners,
and machine miners. The data for the 6 inside occupations cover
29,006 employees and for the 2 outside occupations cover 9,422
employees, a total of 38,428, or 26 per cent of the total number of
bituminous employees included in the 1926 study.
The actual percentages show two distinctive groups of employees—
one consisting of a considerable percentage of employees at an
average earning of 50 and under 60 cents per hour and the other of a
much larger percentage (excepting carpenters and laborers) at an
average of 90 cents and under $1 per hour. This is due, as can be
seen in General Table D, page 37, to differences in averages in dif­
ferent States.




T a b le

4 .— Per cent of employees in each specified occupation whose hourly earnings were within each classified amount, 1926

Brakemen,
inside mine

Bratticemen
and timbermen, inside
mine

Drivers,
inside mine

Laborers,
inside mine

Motormen,
inside mine

Trackmen,
inside mine

Carpenters and
car-repair men,
outside mine

Laborers,
outside mine

Per cent

Per cent

Per cent

Per cent

Per cent

Pear cent

Per cent

Percent

Classified earnings per hour

2
7
22
17
8
2
43
1

0

0
0
1

1

1 Less than one-half of 1 per cent.

® .
8
30
47
55
57
99
2100
2100
100

1
11
22
26
5
7
5
23

(\
5
22
18
5
2
38

15
37
55
60
62
2100
100

0

0

1
11
33
60
65
72
77
2 100
2 100
0

I
0
‘ "’ 1

2
5
31
18
7
2
22
12

.........

100

0)
0

2
7
38
57
63
65
88
2 100
2100
2 100
100

0

6
32
16
6
1
36
8

2
8
40
57
63
64
2100
2 100
100

4
16
25
19
9
9
18
1
0

* This percentage, entered as 100, is between 99.5 and 100.

4
19
45
63
72
81
99
2100
100

6
18
23
21
5
2
21
4
0

6
25
47
69
73
76
96
>100
100

EAftNINGS




0)

®4
23
47
58
63
68
U00
100

19
24
11
5
5
32

AVEllAGE

Under 30 cents................................................
30 and under 40 cents.....................................
40 and under 50 cents.....................................
50 and under 60 cents.....................................
60 and under 70 cents.....................................
70 and under 80 cents............................ ........
80 and under 90 cents....................................
90 cents and under $l...... ............................
$1 and under $1.10..........................................
$1.10 and under $1.20.....................................
$1.20 and under $1.30............ ........................
$1.30 and under $1.40.....................................
$1.40 and under $1.50......................................

CLASSIFIED

Actual Cumu­ Actual Cumu­ Actual Cumu­ Actual Cumu­ Actual Cumu­ Actual Cumu­ Actual Cumu­ Actual Cumu­
lative
lative
lative
lative
lative
lative
lative
lative

10

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

REGULAR OR BASIC HOURS PER DAY AND PER WEEK
The number of hours of work per day and per week of time workers
at the 556 bituminous mines included in this report are fixed by a
specified time for beginning work on each working-day of the week,
for the midday lunch or dinner, and for quitting work in the after­
noon. The vast majority of the time workers at these mines begin
work at 6.30, 7, or 7.30 a. m., work 43^ or 5 hours in the morning,
take 30 minutes for lunch, work 3 or 3J^ hours in the afternoon,
and quit work at or near 3.30 p. m. The regular or basic hours of
work of these employees are therefore 8 per day and 48 per week,
exclusive of lunch time. Some of the pump men, engineers, motormen, drivers, and cagers, and a few employees in some of the other
occupations work at times or whenever necessary more than 8 hours
per day, and in several occupations some work on Sunday. The
Sunday work and the time in excess of 8 hours per day is paid for
at the regular rate.
The hours of tonnage or piece workers are presumed or expected
to be approximately the same as those of the time workers, but in
actual practice their hours are usually more or less irregular. Some
tonnage workers enter the mines as early as 6 or 6.30 a. m., begin
work immediately on arrival at the face, and work throughout the
day, eating their lunch while waiting for mine cars or material; some
quit for the day at or near noon; while others enter the mines around
or after 7 a. m., take as much time for lunch as they desire, and often
quit work before the mine as a whole ceases operation.
The United States Bureau of M ines1 reports a total of 619,604
bituminous coal mine employees of 7,586 mines in 1924, and of these
employees 575,028, at 6,250 mines, as having the regular or basic
8-hour day. The 8-hour day in bituminous mining has been in
effect in a very large per cent of the mines in the United States for
more than 25 years. Section 5 of the Chicago (January 28, 1898)
agreement between the miners and operators of the central com­
petitive field states: “ That on and after April 1, 1898, the 8-hour
workday, with 8 hours’ pay, consisting of 6 days per week, shall be
in effect in all the districts represented, and that uniform wages for
day labor shall be paid the different prices of labor in the fields
named.”
The data in Table 5 on basic or regular hours per day for each of
the years from 1903 to 1924 are as reported by the Bureau of Mines.1
From these figures it is seen that the general trend has been to the
8-hour day. The 8-hour-day mines employed 56.4 per cent of the
total number of wage earners in bituminous coal mining in 1903.
This percentage increased to 64 in 1907, decreased to 58.6 in 1916,
increased to 79 in 1917, to 90.6 in 1918, to 95.5 in 1919, to 97.1 in
1920, the highest percentage during the period, and then decreased
from year to year to 93.7 per cent in 1924.
The percentage of employees in 9-hour-day mines decreased from
17.1 in 1903 to 2.0 in 1920, and increased to 5.1 in 1924.
1 United States. Department of Commerce. Bureau of Mines.




Coal in 1924. Washington, 1927, p.

11

INCREASES IN WAGE RATES

The percentage of employees in 10-hour-day mines decreased from
26.5 in 1903 to 0.9 in 1920, and to 0.5 in 1921, and increased to 1.2 in
1924*

Weighted average hours per day for all bituminous employees
decreased from 8.7 in 1903 to 8.04 in 1920 and 1921, and increased to
8.08 per day in 1924.
T a b le 5.— Percentage of men employed in bituminous coal mines that had an estab­
lished working day of 8, 9 y or 10 hours, 1903 to 192I 1
j.
Per cent of total
employees in—

Per cent of total
employees in—

Year

1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1910.
1911.
1912.
1913.
1914.

Weighted
average
working
day
8-hour 9-hour 10-hour (hours)
mines mines mines
56.4
62.1
61.1
63.0
64.0
63.5
62.1
62.9
61.6
61.9
60.7

17.1
13.8
13.6
13.5
11.6
11.1

11.3
10.9
11.5
15.2
15.4

26.6
24.1
25.3
23.5
24.4
25.4
26.6
26.2
26.9
22.9
23.9

8.7

8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6

Year

1915.
1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.

Weighted
average
working
day
8-hour 9-hour 10-hour
mines mines mines (hours)
59.6
58.6
79.0
90.6
95.5
97.1
96.6
95.1
94.7
93.7

17.0
17.4
12.6

6.7
3.5

2.0

2.9
4.0
4.2

5.1

23.4
24.0
8.4
2.7

1.0
.9
.5
.9
1.1
1.2

8.60
8.60
8.30
8.12
8.06
8.04
8.04
8.06
8.06
8.08

1 Percentages are calculated on base of total number of men in mines definitely reported as having an
8-hour, 9-hour, or 10-hour day. A small number of mines that work more than 10 hours or less than 8
hours have been excluded, as have also all mines for which the reports were defective or which changed
their working day during the year.

INCREASES IN WAGE RATES BETWEEN OCTOBER 15 AND
DECEMBER 31, 1926
As a result of the coal strike in England in 1926 there was an
unusual demand for coal from bituminous coal mining companies in
the United States. This demand resulted in temporary increases in
wage rates between October 15 and December 31, 1926, at 289 of the
556 mines for which data are presented in this report. The increases
in nearly all cases continued in effect for only a short time, when the
rates were reduced to those in effect prior to the increase. The in­
creases by mines and States range from 5 to 40 per cent at 58 mines
in Kentucky, 15 to 25 per cent at 3 in Ohio, 20 to 50 per cent at 86
in Pennsylvania, 20 or 25 per cent at 12 in Tennessee, 10, 20, 25, or
30 per cent at 21 in Virginia, and from 10 to 50 per cent at 109 mines
in West Virginia.
Wage rates were not increased during this period at 36 mines in
Alabama, 17 in Colorado, 39 in Illinois, 17 in Indiana, 11 in Kansas,
28 in Kentucky, 42 in Ohio, 65 in Pennsylvania, 2 in Tennessee, 1 in
Virginia, and 9 in West Virginia.
The earnings in this report are based on the rates in effect prior to
the temporary increases between October 15 and December 31. Earn­
ings from mines for a period later than the date of the increases were
adjusted so as to show equivalent earnings prior to the increases.
This action was taken so as to put all mines on a comparable basis
and to show earnings for the rates that were in. effect the greater
part of 1926.




12

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

CLASSIFIED HOURS IN HALF MONTH
Table 6 shows for 1926 the actual and cumulative percentages of
employees whose hours in the half month were within each classified
number of hours for each of nine of the most important underground
or inside occupations and two of the most important surface or out­
side occupations in bituminous coal mining. Hand loaders, hand or
pick miners, and machine miners are tonnage workers. Their hours
are the total time in mines, including time for lunch and time of travel
in the mines. The employees in the other occupations are time
workers, and their hours are actual time at work exclusive of time for
lunch and time of travel in mines. For similar classifications of em­
ployees in these occupations in each State see Table E, page 39.
Reading the actual percentages for brakemen in the table, it is seen
that the hours in the half month of 9 per cent of them were 80 and
under 88; of 13 per cent, 88 and under 96; of 15 per cent, 96 and
under 104; and of 14 per cent, 104 and under 112. Approximately
50 per cent of the employees in most of the other occupations in the
table are in these four groups. Except in a few cases less than 10
per cent of the employees of any of the occupations are found in any
of the other groups.
The cumulative percentages in the table show that 70 per cent of
the brakemen, 62 per cent of the bratticemen and timbermen, 71 per
cent of the drivers, 72 per cent of the laborers inside mine, 57 per
cent of the motormen, 60 per cent of the trackmen, 49 per cent of the
carpenters, 58 per cent of the laborers outside mine, 77 per cent of
the hand loaders, 57 per cent of the machine miners, and 73 per cent
of the hand or pick miners worked less than 104 hours in the half
month. Thus, it is seen that a larger percentage of the hand loaders
and of the hand or pick miners, even with the inclusion of time for
lunch and time of travel in the mine, worked fewer hours in the half
month than the employees in any of the other occupations.




T a b le

6 . — Per cent of employees in each specified occupation whose hours in half month were within each classified number of hours, 1926

62411

Bratticemen
Brakemen,! and timberDrivers,*
inside mine men,! inside inside mine
mine

Laborers,!
inside mine

Carpenters
Motormen,! Trackmen,!
and carLaborers,2
inside mine inside mine repair men,2 outside mine
outside mine

Classified hours in half
month
Cu­
mu­
lative

Miners,3
hand or
pick, inside
mine

Cu­
Cu­
Cu­
Ac­ mu­ Ac­
Ac­
tual lative tual mu­ tual mu­
lative
lative

8

(4 )«

2
3
6
7
9
11
15
19
26
34
45
62
80
89
94
97
98
99
*100
M
OO
*100
«100
100

(4
)
3
2
2
2
2
3
5
5
7
10
14
17
16
7
3
1
1
(<)
(4
)
(*)
4
)

1

(4
)

3
6
8
9
12
14
19
24
31
41
55
71
87
94
97
99
99
*100
*100
*100
*100
*100
*100
100

1
5
4
3
3
3
4
4
5
6
8
11
13
13
7
4
2
1
1
(<)
(*)
(4
)
(4
)

8

1
7
11
14
17
20
23
28
33
39
48
59
72
85
92
96
98
99
99
*100
*100
*100
*100
*100
100

Cu­
mu­
lative

(4
)
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
4
5
8
11
16
17
11
7
4
2
1
1
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)

(4
)

2
4
5
6
8
10
12
16
21
29
41
57
73
84
91
95
97
99
99
*100
*100
* 100
100

Cu­
Ac­
mu­
tual lative
(4
)
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
5
5
7
12
17
15
11
6
3
2
1
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)

(4
)

2
4
5
7
9
11
14
19
24
31
44
60
76
87
93
96
98
99
*100
*100
*100

(4
)
(4
)

*100
100

Cu­
Ac­
mu­
tual lative

Ac­
tual

Cu­
mu­
lative
(4
)

(4
)
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
3
4
6
10
15
18
14
8
5
2
2
1
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)

(4
)

1
2
4
5
6
8
11
14
18
24
34
49
67
82
90
95
97
98
99
*100
*100
*100

(4
)
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
5
7
10
15
15
11
6
4
2
1
1
C)
4
(<!

(4
)

100

w

1 The hours for this occupation are hours actually worked or time at face, exclusive of travel time and lunch time.
3 The hours for this occupation are hours actually worked.
* The hours for this occupation are total time in mine, including hours actually worked, travel time in mine, and lunch time.
* Less than one-half of 1 per cent.
4 This percentage, entered as 100, is between 99.5 and 100.

3
5
6
8
10
13
16
20
25
33
43
58
73
84
90
95
97
98
99
99
99
*100
*100
100

Cu­
Ac­
mu­
tual lative
1
2
3
3
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
12
12
10
7
4
1
(<)
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)

8

1
3
5
8
11
16
20
26
34
43
53
65
77
87
95
99
*100
*100
*100
*100
* 100
*100
*100
*100
100

Cu­
Cu­
Ac­ mu­ Ac­
mu­
tual lative tual lative
(4
)
2
2
2
1
3
2
3
5
7
8
10
11
15
13
9
3
2
1
1
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)

8

(*)

2
4
5
7
10
12
15
21
27
35
45
57
71
84
93
96
98
99
99
* 100
*100
*100
*100
100

(4
)

1
2
2
3
3
4
5
8
11
10
12
12
12
8
5
1
1
(4
)
(4
)

(4
)

2
4
6
8
11
15
20
28
39
49
61
73
86
94
99
99
*100
«100
100

HOURS

(4
)
2
1
2
2
2
2
4
4
6
9
11
17
17
10
5
3
2
1
1
(<)
(4
)

Ac­
tual

CLASSIFIED

1
1
3
4
2
6
3
8
3
11
3
14
17
3 i
4
21
27
5
6
33
9
42
13
55
15
70
14
84
8
92
4
95
2
98
1
99
99
(4
)
*100
(<)
*100
(4
)
«100
(4
)
100
(4
)
1




Miners,8
machine,
inside mine

Per cent
Ac­
tual

Under 8 hours_____________
8 and under 16........................
16 and under 24 hours___
24 and under 32 hours___
32 and under 40 hours___
40 and under 48 hours___
48 and under 56 hours___
56 and under 64 hours____
64 and under 72 hours___
72 and under 80 hours____
80 and under 88 hours____
88 and under 96 hours____
96 and under 104 hours...
104 and under 112 hours..
112 and under 120 hours..
120 and under 128 hours..
128 and under 136 hours..
136 and under 144 hours..
144 and under 152 hours..
152 and under 160 hours..
160 and under 168 hours..
168 and under 176 hours..
176 and under 184 hours..
184 and under 192 hours
192 hours and over...........

Loaders,*
hand, in­
side mine

V
-1

CO

14

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

CLASSIFIED EARNINGS IN HALF MONTH
Actual and cumulative percentages of employees whose earnings
in the half month were within each classified amount are presented
in Table 7 for the same occupations for which classified hours are
shown in Table 6. For similar classification of employees in these
occupations in each State see Table F (p. 45).
Table 6 in effect shows the number of hours worked or on duty
in the half month and Table 7 shows the amount of money earned
in those hours. Employees who lost time or worked short time in
the half month on account of sickness or other causes and whose
hours in the half month were consequently few in number, of course
earned a small amount of money in the half month and are therefore
in the lowest groups of classified earnings in the half month.
In Table 7 it is seen that in the half month 27 per cent of the
brakemen, 15 per cent of the bratticemen and timbermen, 24 per
cent of the drivers, 39 per cent of the laborers inside, 13 per cent
of the motormen, 17 per cent of the trackmen, 14 per cent of the
carpenters, 37 per cent of the laborers outside, 31 per cent of the
hand loaders, 9 per cent of the machine miners, and 25 per cent
of the hand or pick miners earned less than $40 in the half month
pay-roll period covered in 1926. These figures show that a smaller
f>er cent of machine miners and a larger per cent of inside and outside
aborers earned less than $40 in the half month. Only 3 per cent
of the laborers, both inside and outside, earned $100 or over during
the half month pay period, while 49 per cent of the machine miners
earned $100 or over during the period. From 7 to 12 per cent of
the employees in the other occupations earned $100 or over during
the half month.




T a b le 7.— Per cent of employees in each specified occupation whose earnings in half month were within each classified amount, 1926

Brakemen,
inside mine

Bratticemen
and timberDrivers,
men,
inside mine
inside mine

Laborers,
inside mine

Motormen,
inside mine

Classified earnings
in half month

Trackmen,
inside mine

Carpenters,
Loaders,
and carLaborers,
hand,
repair men, outside mine
inside mine
outside mine

Miners,
Miners,
hand or pick,
machine,
inside mine inside mine

Per cent
Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­ Ac­ Cumu­
tual lative tual lative tual lative tual lative tual lative tual lative tual lative tual lative tual lative tual lative tual lative

5
7
10
13
17
21
27
33
42
49
55
62
67
72
77
85
93
97
99 I

1

2

2
2

6
11

14
4

2

1

0)

40
48
55
61
67
78
92
97
99

7
7
7
8
7
5
4
4
4
7
5
2
1

7
7
7
7
6

5
9
10

4

2

1

2 100

100

0)

1

2
1
1

2
1
2

6

6
6

6

2 100

ICO

3
4
5

3
4
4
8
6
8
8
6

5
5
4
4
4
5

2
2
2

1
1

2 100
300

0)
(»)
0)

46
53
61
68

72
76
81
85
92
97
99
2 100

2 100

2 100

3
4

6
8

8
9
7
7

6

10

10
5
4

2

0)

79
88

94
97
2100
100

1
2
1
2
2
2
3
4
5
7
9
8
8
7
5
6
10
31
5
3
1
0)
0)

1
3
4
6
8
10

0)

1
1
2

0)

2
3
2
3
4

2
3
5

6
8

12

17
22
29
37
45
53
60
65
70
80
92
96
99
2 300
2 100

100

3
7
8

9
9

8
8
6

10

10
7
7
7
6
9
8
4
3
1
0)

2
3
3
3
4
5
5

5
5
4
4

74

8
4
2
1

3 100

100

0)
0)

6

7
7
67
73
77
81
85
93
97
99
99
2100
100

6

6

6

5
5
4
7
5
4
3
3
0)
0)
0)
0)

2
5
7
11

15
19
25
31
37
44
50
57
62
68

73
77
85
90
94
97
99
2 100
2 100
2 100
100

(0

2
3
4
5

6

7
9
10

12
15
18
22
25
29
33
43
51
59

66

79
89
94
97
98
99
99
2 100
2 100

100
1 Le ss than one-half of 1 per cent.

2 This percentage, entered as 100, is between 99.5 and 100.

1
3
5

8

11

15
19
25
31
37
44
51
58
65
71
76
85
92
96
2 100

2100
2100
100

E A R N IN G S




2

CLASSIFIED

Under $5................. .
$6 and under $10___
$10 and under $15._.
$15 and under $20___
$20 and under $25...
$25 and under $30...
$30 and under $35...
$35 and under $40...
$40 and under $45.. _
$45 and under $50. . .
$50 and under $55...
$55 and under $60...
$60 and under $65...
$65 and under $70...
$70 and under $75...
$75 and under $80...
$80 and under $90...
$90 and under $100..
$100 and under $110.
$110 and under $120.
$120 and under $140.
$140 and under $160.
$160 and under $180.
$180 and under $200.
$200 and under $220.
$220 and under $240.
$240 and under $280.
$260 and under $280.
$280 and under $300.
$300 and over...........

16

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

AVERAGES FOR MINERS AND LOADERS, BY STATES
Average starts, or calendar days, in the half month, average hours
in half month and per start, average earnings per hour, per start, and
in the half month, average days of operation in 1926, and estimated
possible average annual earnings are presented in Table 8 for miners
and loaders of each of the 11 States included in the 1926 study and for
all of the 11 States combined.
Miners and loaders, as here used, include 66,414 hand loaders,
20,594 hand or pick miners, 6,055 machine miners, 1,065 gang
miners, 882 machine miners’ (cutters’), helpers, 694 contract loaders,
and 806 machine loaders, or a total of 96,010.
Average starts, or calendar days, in the half month in 1926 for
each State were obtained by dividing the total number of starts
made in the half month by all miners and loaders by the number
of such miners and loaders. All States combined average 9.5 starts
or days, in the half month, and the averages by States range from 8.5
for Tennessee to 10.2 for Colorado.
Average hours in the half month for each State were obtained by
dividing the total number of hours at face or places of work in the
mines, including time for lunch, or the total number of hours in mine,
including time for lunch and time of travel, of all miners and loaders
by the total number of such miners and loaders. All States com­
bined, based on time at face including time for lunch, average 75.4
hours, and the averages by States range from 67.2 hours for Tennessee
to 80.4 hours for Pennsylvania.
Average hours per start or day for each State were obtained by
dividing the total number of hours at face including time for lunch
or the total number of hours in mine including time for lunch and time
of travel of all miners and loaders by the total number of starts made
by them in the half month. All States combined based on time at face
including time for lunch average 7.9 hours per start, and the averages
by States range from 7.2 hours per start for Indiana, Kansas, and
West Virginia to 8.6 hours per start for Alabama.
Average earnings per hour for each State were obtained by dividing
the total earnings of all miners and loaders in the half month by the
total number of hours at the face, including time for lunch, or by the
total hours in mine including time for lunch and time of travel in the
half month. All States combined based on time at face including
lunch average 81.7 cents per hour and the averages by States range
from 44.1 cents for Tennessee to $1,134 for Indiana.
Average earnings in the half month for each State were obtained by
dividing the total earnings of all miners and loaders by the number of
such miners and loaders. All States combined average $61.61, and the
averages by States range from $29.63 forTennessee to $84.76 for Illinois.
Average earnings per start for each State were obtained by dividing
the total earnings of all miners and loaders in the half month by the
total number of starts made by them in the half month. All States
combined average $6.46 per start or day, and the averages by States
range from $3.49 for Tennessee to $8.90 for Illinois.
The days of operation in the calendar year 1926 for all mines in
each State are the days as reported by the United States Bureau of
Mines for that year, weighted by the total number of employees in
all occupations of each mine. The 11 States combined average 214




IN D E X

NUM BEK

17

OF T O N N AG E RATES

days in the calendar year. The averages for the States range from 158
days for Kansas to 266 days for Alabama. The method of computing
the aggregate average (214 days) is explained in footnote 3 to Table 8.
The average for all bituminous mines in the United States as reported
by the Bureau of Mines for the calendar year 1926 is 215 days.
The estimated possible average annual earnings of miners and
loaders based on average earnings per start and average days of
operation in 1926, for the 96,010 miners and loaders of the 556 mines
in the 11 States included in this report are $1,382, and the averages
by States range from $817 for Tennessee to $1,531 for Illinois.
8.— Number of miners and loaders, average starts, average hours in half
month and per start, average earnings, per hour, per starty and per half month pay
period, days of operation in year of dll mines} and estimated possible annual
earnings, 1926, by States
Estimated
possible average
yearly earnmgs o miners and
f
loaders, all mines i State2
n

Average days of operation in
year, all mines i State1
n

Per start

month
period
half

Timeinmine

Time a face,
t
including
lunch

Timeinmine

Time a face,
t
including
lunch

Timeinmine

Time a face,
t
including
lunch

In half
Per hour,
Per start,
month,
based on— based on— based on—

pay

Average earnings—

I
n

Average hours—

i

Miners an loaders
d

State

Mines covered b bureau
y

Number of—

Average starts i half month
n
covered

T a b le

Alabama..............
Colorado..............
Illinois..................
Indiana..............
Kansas.................
Kentucky............
Ohio.....................
Pennsylvania.......
Tennessee............
Virginia................
West Virginia___
Total..........

3e! 5,230
17! 2,318
39 16,945
17, 3,052
11 1,749
86 11,762
45 7,600
151 29,821
14i 1,271
22! 2,227
118! 14,035
5561 96,010

9.0
10.2
9.5
9.7
9.4
9.1
9.4
9.9
8.5
9.2
9.6
9.5

77.2
79.8
77.1
70.2
67.4
71.8
72.9
80.4
67.2
73.6
69.1
75.4

85.1
87.8
84.8
75.4
71.7
76.5
79.1
88.1
72.5
78.9
75.3
82.2

8.6
7.9
8.1
7.2
7.2
7.9
7.8
8.2
7.9
8.0
7.2
7.9

9.5 $0,530 $0,481 $40.92 $4.57
8.6 .804 .730 64.12 6.31
8.9 1.100 .999 84.76 8.90
7.8 1.134 1.055 79.61 8.20
7.7 .809 .761 54.53 5.83
8.4 .656 .616 47.09 5.18
8.5 .861 .793 62.77 6.71
8.9 .759 .693 61.03 6.18
8.5 .441 .409 29.63 3.49
&6 .629 .587 46.30 5.04
7.9 .811 .743 56.00 5.85
8.6 .817 .749 61.61 6.46

266 $1,216
202 1,275
172 1,531
173 1,419
158 921
230 1,191
159 1,067
224 1,384
234
817
263 1,326
247 1,445
*214 1,382

1The figures for each State are as reported by the United States Bureau of Mines.

2 Computed by multiplying the average earnings per start by the average days of operation.

8 This average is for the States included in this table, with the days of operation in each State weighted
by the number of miners and loaders shown in the table.

INDEX NUMBERS OF TONNAGE RATES OF HAND LOADERS
AND HAND OR PICK MINERS IN HOCKING VALLEY
DISTRICT
In number of employees and in work performed hand loaders and
hand or pick miners are the basic occupations in bituminous mining.
The 66,414 hand loaders and 20,594 hand or pick miners together
represent 58.7 per cent of the total of 148,155 employees of the 556
mines covered in the 1926 study.
Hand loaders and hand or pick miners are paid on the tonnage
basis, and practically no data are available either as to hours per
day or as to earnings per hour. The employees in these two occu­
pations as a rule pay for the explosives used by them in blasting the
coal from the seams and for the sharpening of their tools. Index
numbers based on average net earnings per hour for a period of years
could not, therefore, be computed for these occupations.
Loading rates per ton of 2,000 pounds in rooms with hand drilling
and hand or pick mining rates per ton of 2,000 pounds of run of mine
for each of the years 1902 to 1924, as given in the Thirty-Two Years'



18

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING*

Record of Hocking Valley Mining in the 1926 agreement between
the miners and operators of the Hocking Valley district of Ohio, have
been used in computing index numbers for these two occupations,
with the 1902 rate as the base or 100. “ Run of mine” is coal as it
comes from the mines, including the various sizes of “ lump” and
“ slack.” The Hocking Valley district is subdistrict No. 1 of district
No. 6 of the United Mine Workers of America. The rates entered
in Table 9 for hand or pick mining are, as stated in the “ New York,
N. Y., March 31, 1920, interstate agreement between the miners and
the operators of western Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois,
for the thin-vein district of western Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio,
Hocking, Cambridge, and Amsterdam-Bergholz district of Ohio.”
Inasmuch as loaders and hand or pick miners have usually paid
for explosives and tool sharpening from the amounts earned by them
at their tonnage rates, and as the cost of such explosives may not have
changed in the same proportion as the tonnage rates have changed,
the index numbers in Table 9 do not represent exact net average earn­
ings per hour. They do, however, show the exact trend of tonnage
rates in the Hocking Valley district, and it is believed that they also
represent very nearly the trend in average earnings per hour.
T a b l e 9. — Periods of wage agreements, tonnage rates, and index numbers thereof for

hand loaders and hand or pick miners, 1902 to 1927
[1902 rate=lG0.00.]

Period of wage agreement

Hand loaders’ tonnage
rate in rooms with
hand drilling
Amount

Apr 1,1902, to Mar. 31, 1903............................ ...... ........
Apr. 1,1903, to Mar. 31, 1904............... ...... .....................
Apr. 1, 1904, to Mar. 31, 1905............... ......... ..................
Apr. 1,1905, to Mar. 31,1906...........................................
Apr. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 1907___________________ ____
Apr. 1,1907, to Mar. 31, 1908.......................... ...............
Apr. 1, 1908, to Mar. 31, 1909..........................................
Apr. 1, 1909, to Mar. 31,1910..........................................
Apr. 1,1910, to Mar. 31,1911...........................................
Apr. 1,1911, to Mar. 31,1912...........................................
Apr. 1,1912, to Mar. 31,1913...........................................
Apr. 1,1913, to July 15,1914.......... .................................
July 16,1914, to Mar. 31,1915.........................................
Apr. 1,1915, to M r . 31,1910..........................................
Apr. 1,1916, to Apr. 15, 1917..........................................
Apr. 16,1917, to Oct. 29,1917.......... ............................. .
Oct. 29,1917, to Mar. 31,1918..........................................
Apr. 1,1918, to Mar. 31,1919.........................
Apr. 1,1919, to Dec. 1,1919.............................................
Dec. 1,1919, to Mar. 31,1920........................................ .
Apr. 1, 1920, to Mar. 31,1921...........................................
Apr. 1,1921, to Mar. 31, 1922............................. ............
Apr. 1,1922, to Mar. 31,1923...........................................
Apr. 1,1923, to Mar. 31,1924................. .........................
Apr. 1, 1924, to Mar. 31, 1925..........................................
Apr. 1, 1925, to Mar. 31, 1926...........................................
Apr. 1, 1926, to Mar. 31, 1927___________ _____ _____ _

$0.4400
. 5100
. 48G0
.4800
.5135
. 5135
.5135
.5135
.5470
.5470
.5850
. 5850
.4000
.4000
.4280
.5110
.5960
. 5960
.5960
.6900
. 8000
. 8C00
. 8000
.8000
l. 8000
K8000
*. 8000

Index
number
100.00
115.91
109.09
109.09
116. 70
116. 70
116. 70
116. 70
124.32
124.32
132. 95
132. 95
90. 91
90. 91
96.82
116.14
135.45
135.45
135.45
156. 82
181.82
181. 82
181. 82
181.82
1181. 82
1181.82
1181. 82

Hand or pick miners'
tonnage rate for run
of mine
Amount
$0.5714
.6429
.6071
.6071
.6429
.6429
.6429
.6429
.6785
.6785
. 7143
. 7143
.6760
.6760
.6764
.7764
.8764
.8764
.8764
.9864
1.1164
1.1164
1.1161
1.11C4
11.1164
11.1164
11.1164

Index
number
100.00
112.51
106.25
106.25
112.51
112.51
112.51
112. 51
118. 74
118. 74
125.01
125.01
118. 31
118.31
118.38
135. 88
153.38
153. 38
153.38
172. 63
195. 38
195. 38
195. 38
195.38
1195.38
1195.38
1195.38

1 Renewed by Jacksonville agreement.

CLASSIFIED STARTS (DAYS) IN HALF MONTH
The number of starts, or calendar days, on which employees were
on duty or did any work in the half month were obtained for each
of the 148,155 bituminous mine workers covered by the 1926 study
and are presented by percentages in Table 10. If a man were on



Cl a s s i f i e d

starts

19

(d a y s )

duty any part of a day he was reported as having made a start or
worked on that day. The table shows for each occupation the average
number of starts, or days, per man and the per cent of employees who
were reported as having worked each specified number of starts or
days in the half month. For similar classification of employees in
each occupation and in each State see Table G (p. 50).
The officials of nearly every mine reported some employees as
having worked on fewer than the number of days the mine was in
operation in the half month in 1926 for which data were reported
and as having lost one or more days of work on account of sickness
or other disability, voluntary absence, leaving the service, or of
mine disability, slack business, or other causes. The starts, or days,
so lost account in part for the per cent of employees who are shown
as having worked less than 11, 12, 13, or 14 days.
A record of hours per day or in the half month of tonnage workers
is kept by only a very small per cent of the companies in the coal
industry. It was therefore not possible to obtain data as to days and
hours from all companies for an iden tical half month. It should, there­
fore, be borne in mind in studying the figures that the week days in
the different half months taken were 11, 12, 13, or 14. While in
nearly all occupations some employees are shown as having made
more, this is because they worked on Sunday as well as week days.
T a b le

10. — Per cent of employees making each specified number of starts (days) in
half-month, 1926, by occupation

Occupation

Per cent of employees whose starts (days on which they
Num- Averworked) in the half month were—
Num- ber of
Der oi em­ ber of
mines ploy­ starts
ees
(days) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

INSIDE WORK

Brakemen............
Bratticemen and
timbermen____
Cagers.........
Drivers_________
Laborers________
Loaders, contract.
Loaders, hand___
Loaders, machine.
Miners, gang____
Miners, hand or
pick................. .
Miners, machine
(cutters).......... .
Miners’ , machine
(cutters’), helpers
Motormen______
Pump men_____
Trackmen............
Trappers (boys)..
Other employees..
Total..
OUTSIDE WORE'

Blacksmiths........
Carpenters and
car-repair men..
Engineers............
Laborers..............
Other employees..

518

4,368

484 2,800
414
188
320 4,530
8,823
500
61
694
488 66,414
23
306
32
1,065
254 20,594

9.9

4

6

8

10

13

18 20

2 4
2 2
2 5
4 4
4 4
4 6
3 6
3 6

4
6
5
6
6
8
11
13

6
7
7
7
11
10
7

9
9
10
8
13
13
14
18

11
11
14
11
18
15
14
12

17
18
18
15
15
18
16
17

5

7

12

15

17

18

13

1 0) . . .

4

6

7

10

14 22

24

1 (9 —

2
2
1
2
4
2

5
2
2
3
6
3

8
4
1
5
6
4

6
6
2
6
7
4

11
9
4
7
9
7

12 16 16
13 19 28
5 9 19
13 18 26
13 21 20
10 14 32

2

3 !4

5

7

9

12

14

18

16

2

1

16

2

2

3 3

10.8 2 1
11.1 0) 1
10.2 3 2
9.4 6 4
10.1 1 1
9.4 2 2
9.9 1 1
9.5 1 2

2
2
2
3
1
2
3
2

2
2
2
3
2
3
2
2

1 2

2

2 2

4

2

2

1 3 2

9.8

3

2
0)

2
3
3
4
4
2

464

6,055

10.3

2

151
520
402
554
207
522

882
4,239
1,081
4,246
693
5,745

8.8
10.8
12.7
10.8
9.9
11.3

9 4
2 2
2 1
2 2
2 2
2 1

3 3 4
1 1 2
2 1 1
2 2 2
2 2 3
1 1 2

556 132,949

9.8

2

2

2

1

===== = = = = = — 1
—

540

909

11.9

1

1

1

484
320
550
540

1,545
674
7,877
4,201

11.4
13.3
10.7
12.1

1 1 1
1 0) (0
2 2 2
1 1 1

4

2

10

3

5

9

37

13

6

1

4
2
5
3

5
1
6
3

6
3
8
5

11
6
12
7

17 33
8 24
19 27
12 33

8
9
6
9

5
35
3
15

1
9
1
4

16

7

8

2

2

2 0)

556

1

1

1 2

2

2

4

4

6

10

2

2

4

5

7

8

11

14




1 <9

3

556 148,155 | < u T ~2~ 2
~

* Less than one-half of 1 per cent.

0)

3 0)
10 31 10
7 5 Q)
1 1 C)
1
8 8
1

(il

1 2

Grand total.

2

1 (0

1 2 2
0) (0 1 1
2 2 3 3
1 1 1 2

Total..........

15,206 | 11.3

3

27
7 4 (l)
25
1
8 4
22
3 2 0)
19 4 2 0)
21
0)
12 T ) " 0)
14 5
1 —
11

3

30

18 1 18

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

20

NUMBER OF MINES, PRODUCTION, AND WAGE EARNERS,
1926
Bituminous or soft coal is mined in 31 States and Alaska. Table
11 shows for each of the 11 States covered in this study and for all
States combined the number of mines, the number of net tons of coal
produced, and the number of wage earners in the bituminous industry
in 1925, mid the number of wage earners for which 1926 data are
presented in this report. Approximately 93 per cent of the total
production and nearly 91 (90.8) per cent of the total number of wage
earners were in the 11 States. The 156,798 wage earners in the 1,974
mines in Pennsylvania produced 136,928,019 net tons of coal in 1925,
and 1926 data are presented in this report for 43,693 Pennsylvania
wage earners.
11.— Number of bituminous mines {exclusive of wagon mines), production,
number of employees, and number of employees covered in 1926, by States

T a b le

Number of wage earners
State

Number Total production
of
(tons)1
mines1

Pennsylvania..............
West Virginia.............
Illinois........................
Kentucky.................. .
Olro........................... .
Alabama.................... .
Indiana...................... .
Virginia.......................
Colorado.................... .
Tennessee.................. .
sas....................... .
Total, 11 States.
Total, all States.

Total1

For which
data are
presented
in this
report

136,928,019
122,380,959
66,909,359
65,068,670
28,034,112
20,004,395
21,224,966
12.799,443
10,310,551
5,454,011
4,524,251
6,018
7,144

156,798
110,189
77,823
57,024
39,658
27,097
22,732
13,677
13,203
8,314
7,800

43,693
24,604
23,555
20,024
10,817
9,078
4,469
4,034
3,616
2,092
2,173

483,638,736
520,052,711

534,315
588,493

148,155

i United States Bureau of Mines figures, 1925.

IMPORTANCE OF BITUMINOUS COAL MINING, 1914 TO 1925
Table 12, compiled from Coal in 1924 1 and from the 1925 prelimi­
nary reports as published by the United States Bureau of Mines,
indicates the importance and growth of bituminous mining in number
of employees, net tons (2,000 pounds) of coal produced value of total
production, and value per net ton at mines in each of the years 1914
to 1925. Index numbers based on these figures with the 1914 figures
taken as the base or 100 per cent are also shown in the table.
The number of employees decreased from 583,506, or an index of
100, in 1914 to 557,456, or an index of 95.5, in 1915; increased each
year to a maximum of 704,793, or an index of 120.8, in 1923; and
then dropped to 619,604 in 1924, and to 588,493 employees, or an
index of 100.9, in 1925.
The average number of days mines were in operation during the
period ranged from 142 days in 1922 to 249 in 1918. The very low
average in 1922 was due largely to the strike of 603,031 men who,
* United States. Department of Commerce. Bureau of Mines.




Coal, 1924. Washington, 1927.

21

OCCUPATIONS IN THE INDUSTRY

because of the strike, were idle an average of 122 days per man.
The average of 149 days in 1921 was caused by the depression in the
coal industry in that year when production was 415,921,950 tons, or
less than in any other year from 1914 to 1925.
The value of coal at the mines increased from an average of $1.17
per net ton, or an index of 100, in 1914, to $3.75 per ton, or an index
of 320.5, in 1920; decreased to $2.89 in 1921; increased to $3.02 in
1922; decreased to $2.68 in 1923, to $2.20 in 1924, and to $2.04, or an
index of 174.4 in 1925.
T a b l e 12.— Number of employees, average number of days in operation, net tons

minedr and value of total production and per ton at mines, and index numbers
thereof, 1914 to 1925, by year
[1914 average=100]

Year

1914..
1915..
19161917..
1918..
1919..
1920..
1921..
1922 1
.
19231.
1924 2
.
1925».

Aver­
age
num­
Number ber of
days
of em­
ployees mines
were
in
opera­
tion

583,506
557,456
561,102
603,143
615,305
621,998
639,547
663,754
687,958
704,793
619,604
588,493

195
203
230
243
249
195
220

149
142
179
171
195

Index numbers of—

Value at mine

Net tons pro­
duced

Total production

422,703,970
442,624,426
502.519.682
551,790,563
579,385,820
465,860,058
568.666.683
415,921,950
422,268,099
564,564,662
483,686,538
520,052,741

i Including wagon mines.

$493,309,244
502,037,688
665,116,077
1,249,272,837
1,491,809,940
1,160,616,013
2.129.933.000
1,199,983,600
1.274.820.000
1.514.621.000
1.062.626.000
1,060,402,000

Aver­
Value at
age
mine
num­
Num­ ber of Net
Per ber of days tons
emton ploy- mines pro­ Total
were duced pro­ Per
in
duc­ ton
tion
opera­
tion
n. 17
1.13
1.32
2.26
2.57
2.49
3.75
2.89
3.02

100.0

95.5
96,2
103.4
105.4
106.6
109.6
113.8
117.9

2.68 120.8

2.20 106.2
2.04 100.9

100.0 100.0 100.0
104.7 101.8

104.1
117.9
124.6
127.7
100.0

112.8

76.4
72.8
91.8
87.7
100.0

118.9 134.8
130.5 253.2
137.1 302.4
110.2 235.3
134.5 431.8
1 243.3
.4
1 258.4
.9
133.6 307.0
114.4 215.4
123.0 215.0

100.0
96.6
112.8

193.2
219.7
212.8

320.5
247.0
258.1
229.1
188.0
174.4

3 Excluding wagon mines.

OCCUPATIONS IN THE INDUSTRY
The occupations for which data are presented in this bulletin are
listed below. For definitions see Bulletin No. 416, pages 90 to 92.
Inside work:
Brakemen.

Brattice men and timber men.
Cagers.
Drivers.
Laborers.
Loaders, contract.
Loaders, hand.
Loaders, machine.
Miners, gang.
Miners, hand or pick.
Miners, machine (cutters).
Minersmachine (cutters'), helpers.




Inside work— Continued.

Motormen.
Pumpmen.
Trackmen.
Trappers (boys).
Other employees.
Outside work:

Blacksmiths.
Carpenters and car-repair men.
Engineers.
Laborers.
Other employees.

22

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

GENERAL TABLES
In addition to the text tables already shown, seven general tables
are presented, as follows:
T able A.— Average number of starts (days) and average hours
and earnings of miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by occupa­
tion and State.
T a b le B.— Average number of starts (days) and average hours
and earnings of employees other than miners and loaders, 1922, 1924,
and 1926, by place of work, occupation, and State.
T able C.— Number of miners and loaders in each State whose
average earnings per hour were within each classified amount* 1926,
by occupation.
T able D.— Number of employees other than miners and loaders
in each State whose average earnings per hour were within each
classified amount, 1926.
T able E.— Number of employees in each specified occupation in
each State who worked each classified number of hours in half
month, 1926.
T able F.— Number of employees in each specified occupation in
each State whose earnings in half month were within each classified
amount, 1926.
T able G.— Number of employees making each specified number
of starts (days) in half month, 1926, by place of work, occupation,
and State.




23

GENERAL TABLES

T a b l e A . — Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by occupation and State
[The data in this table are for employees who are usually paid rates per ton or per mine car based upon
contents]

Occupation and
State

Average hours
Average earnings
Aver­
age
In half
Per start
Per hour
num­
month
based on—
based on—
Num­ Num­
Year ber of ber of ber of based on—
starts
em­
In half Per
mines ployees (days) Time
Time
Time
in at face, Time at face, Time at face, Time month start
half includ­ in includ­ in includ­ in
month ing mine ing mine ing
mine
lunch
lunch
lunch

LOADERS, HAND

Alabama................. 1922
1924
1926
Colorado................. 1922
1924
1926
Illinois.................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana.................. 1922
1924
1926
Kentucky............... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio........................ 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania......... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee............... 1924
1926
Virginia.................. 1924
1926
West Virginia......... 1922
1924
1926
Total............. 11922
1924
1926

1,535
3,060
3,070
445
1,178
1,099
4,257
10,079
11,511
1,436
2,470
1,602
2,540
7,266
9,904
3,119
6,832
6,747
5,650
19,046
19,065
860
625
1,006
1,894
2,979
10,139
10,897
22,560
61,936
66,4J4

8.4
7.6
8.5
9.1
8.0
10.0
8.9
7.6
9.4
8.3
6.0
10.3
8.6
8.1
9.0
8.7
7.7
9.2
8.8
8.9
9.7
7.5
8.3
8.2
9.0
8.6
8.2
9.4
8.7
8.1
9.4

69.8 74.9
64.8 70.4
74.2 81.4
69.9 77.5
62.3 66.8
81.2 88.3
70.7 75.1
60.8 66.2
77.0 85.1
61.7 64.6
45.3 47.4
72.8 78.1
63.4 67.7
63.2 67.8
69.7 74.2
65.0 70.9
59.1 64.3
71.6 77.8
68.5 75.4
72.3 78.7
78.7 85.9
56.5 60.1
63.5 68.2
61.6 65.4
70.9 76.1
60.2 64.7
56.4 61.4
67.1 73.3
66.2 71.5
63.3 68.6
73.7 80.3

8.3
8.5
8.7
7.7
7.8
8.1
8.0
8.0
8.2
7.5
7.5
7.1
7.3
7.8
7.8
7.5
7.7
7.8
7.8
8.1
8.1
7.6
7.7
7.5
7.8
7.0
6.8
7.1
7.7
7.8
7.8

8.9 $0,497 $0,464 $34.73
9.3
.492
.454 31.93
9.6
.478
.436 35.47
8.5
.837 64.84
.927
.799 53.41
7.9
.858
8.8
.789
.726 64.07
8.5 1.197 1.127 84.58
8.7 1.092 1.003 66.40
.976 83.07
9.0 1.078
7.8 1.146 1.094 70.65
7.9 1.083 1.034 49.05
7.6 1.116 1.040 81.25
7.8
.704 47.64
.752
8.4
.693
.646 43.78
8.3
.579 42.98
.617
8.2
.893 63.32
.973
.791 50.87
8.4
.860
8.4
.752 58.48
.817
.739
.672 50.64
8.6
.682 53.68
8.9
.743
8,8
.711
.651 55.94
.478 28.73
8.1
.508
8.3
.406 27.68
.436
.604
.569 37.24
8.0
8.4
.597
.556 42.33
.841 54.40
.904
7.5
7.4
.764 46.91
.831
7.8
.776
.710 52.05
8.3
.902
.836 59.75
8.5
.811
.748 51.29
8.6
.779
.715 57.48

$4.12
4.20
4.16
7.13
6.65
6.39
9.53
8.76
8.80
8.54
8.17
7.90
5.51
5.40
4.78
7.29
6.63
6.35
5.79
6.05
5.75
3.85
3.35
4.53
4.68
6.33
5.69
5.51
6.90
6.32
6.12

785
8
18 1,477
1,537
17
564
6
11
1,146
13
1,103
11
1,864
28 3,921
13 3,155
7
542
799
12
8
1,146
9
1,474
1,749
11
223
5
654
14
418
10
3
47
2
15
5
89
2,898
42
105 8,010
110 8,766
869
14
7
544
13
1
25
1
34
972
77
3,046
59
2,062
127 8,429
291 21,424
254 20,594

8.8
8.3
9.7
10.2
7.9
10.2
10.3
8.1
9.8
8.0
7.1
8.9
9.8
9.4
8.7
8.5
10.2
9.8
5.5
9.9
9.1
8.7
9.9
8.0
8.7
(2
)
(2
)
8.1
8.5
9.8
9.2
8.5
9.8

66.2 74.8
69.5 75.7
81.8 90.8
81.3 90.1
57.4 62.9
77.4 86.4
80.3 86.2
62.9 67.6
77.4 84.1
55.8 59.3
49.9 53.5
65.4 70.7
64.0 69.6
67.4 71.7
64.5 69.3
70.9 77.8
85.0 91.5
79.9 86.7
38.9 44.6
73.5 79.6
72.2 79.7
70.7 76.9
81.2 89.6
62.1 67..0
69.6 75.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
55.4 59.4
61.6 67.4
69.5 75.7
71.0 77.5
65.6 71.2
77.0 84.3

7.5
8.4
8.4
8.0
7.3
7.6
7.8
7.8
7.9
7.0
7.0
7.3
6.5
7.2
7.4
8.3
8.5
8.1
7.1
7.4
8.0
8.1
8.2
7.7
8.0
(2
)
(2
)
6.8
7.2
7.1
7.7
7.7
7.9

8.5
.485 36.28
.548
9.2
.577
.529 40.07
9.3
.540
.486 44.12
8.8
.993
.896 80.69
8.0
.929
.847 53.31
.705 60. 95
8.4
.787
8.4
.865
.806 69.45
.849 57.38
8.4
.912
.923
.850 71.47
8.6
7.4
.827
.779 46.19
7.5 1.087 ! 1.014 54.28
7.9 1.047
.969 68.50
7.1
.901
.829 57.70
7.7
.809
.761 54.53
.768 53.21
8.0
.825
9.1
.707 55.00
.776
9.1
.647
.601 54.99
8.8
.844 73.18
.916
8.2 1.041
.910 40.54
8.0
.813 64.67
.879
8.8
.767
.695 55.38
8.8
.714 54.91
.777
9.0
.768
.696 62.39
8.3
.502 33.60
.541
8.7
.436
.402 30.37
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
<)
2
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
7.3 1.019
.950 56.45
7.9
.831
.760 51.18
7.7 •.794
.730 55.21
.769 59.62
8.4
.840
.745 53.06
8.4
.809
.715 60.31
.783
8.6

4.11
4.84
4.53
7.90
6.76
5.95
6.77
7.12
7.32
5.75
7.60
7.68
5.90
5.83
6.12
6.45
5.47
7.46
7.42
6.54
6.10
6.31
6.27
4.18
3.49
(2
)
(2
)
6.95
5.99
5.65
6.47
6.27
6.18

8
32
29
7
15
15
17
35
33
8
15
9
20
78
86
25
55
45
41
128
130
17
10
12
21
42
127
110
176
514
488

MINERS, HAND OR
PICK

Alabama................. 1922
1924
1926
Colorado.......... ...... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois.................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana................... 1922
1924
1926
Kansas.................... 1924
1926
Kentucky............... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio........................ 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania......... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee............... 1924
1926
Virginia.................. 1924
1926
West Virginia......... 1922
1924
1926
U922T o ta l...........
1924
1926

3
Includes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.




3 Included in total.

24

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

T a b l e A . — Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by occupation and State— Contd.
Average hours

Occupation and
State

Average earnings

Aver­
In half I
age
Per start
Per hour
month
num­
based on—
Num­ ber of based on— based on—
Num­ ber of
starts
Year ber of em­
In half Per
mines ployees (days) Time
Time
Time
month start
in
half at face, Time at face, Time at face, Time
month includ­ in includ­ in includ­ in
ing mine ing mine ing mine
lunch
lunch
lunch

MINERS, M
ACHINE
(CUTTERS)
Alabama................. 1922
1924
1926
Colorado................. 1922
1924
1926
Illinois.................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana................... 1922
1924
1926
Kentucky.............. 1922
1924
1926
Ohio........................ 1922
1924
1926
1922
Pennsylvania.........
1924
1926
Tennessee............... 1924
1926
Virginia.................. 1924
1926
West Virginia......... 1922
1924
1926

6
27
28
6
15
13
15
35
33
8
15
10
19
75
86
25
57
44
41
126
128
16
10
12
20
35
107
92

146
342
149
85
119
109
369
1,196
1,326
136
260
206
268
797
805
354
740
700
703
1,852
1,800
125
38
93
97
271
975
825

9.5
8.4
10.2
9.3
8.8
10.5
10.0
7.8
9.7
8.8
6.5
9.6
9.7
8.8
9.7
9.9
8.8
10.5
9.3
9.7
10.9
8.2
9.8
9.9
10.9
9.3
9.0
10.7

79.6 83.8
75.8 81.6
91.8 100.5
71.4 79.3
72.3 77.5
88.8 95.4
76.4 81.5
60.0 65.5
74.5 82.4
66.1 69.3
49.4 51.7
74.8 79.7
73.6 78.7
78.5 83.3
84.6 89.3
78.2 85.1
71.1 77.1
83.6 90.7
76.7 84.3
81.4 88.3
94.2 102.5
68.5 73.1
85.3 91.8
92.2 96.7
99.4 105.3
74.7 80.1
73.3 78.7
89.5 96.9

8.4
9.0
9.0
7.7
8.2
a4
7.6
7.7
7.7
7.5
7.7
7.8
7.6
8.9
8.7
7.9
8.1
7.9
8.2
8.4
8.6
8.3
8.7
9.4
9.1
8.1
8.1
8.4

8.8 $0,611 $0.580 $48.64
.836
.775 63.29
9.7
.832 83.61
9.8
.911
8.5 1.493 1.344 106.59
8.8 1.336 1.246 96.56
9.1 1.071
.997 95.12
8.1 1.500 1.407 114. 68
8.4 1.500 1.376 90.10
8.5 1.501 1.358 111. 89
7.9 1.832 1.748 121.06
8.0 1.684 1.609 83.15
8.3 1.614 1.514 120.68
8.1 1.166 1.091 85.83
9.4
.874 72.79
.927
9.2
.956
.905 80.83
8.6 1.395 1.282 109.12
8.7 1.274 1.175 90.62
8.6 1.202 1.108 100.49
.991 83.55
9.0 1.090
9.1 1.142 1.053 92.95
9.4 1.133 1.041 106.70
.514 37.56
8.9
.549
9.3
.518
.482 44.20
9.8
.657
.626 60.53
.821
9.7
.775 81.60
8.6 1.379 1.287 103.06
8.7 1.134 1.055 83.09
9.1 1.200 1.108 107.39

Total............. 31922
1924
1926

161
485
464

2,371
6,499
6,055

9.5
8.8
10.3

75.4
72.9
86.0

81.5
78.6
93.3

7.9
8.3
8.3

8.6
8.9
9.0

1.274
1.163
1.195

1.180 96.14
1.079 84.79
1.101 102.68

10.10
9.65
9.93

LOADERS, CO TRACT
N
Alabama....... ......... 1924
1926
Colorado................. 1926
Kentucky............... 1924
1926
Tennessee............... 1926
Virginia................... 1924
1926
West Virginia......... 1924
1926

10
17
1
8
26
1
2
9
4
7

72
291
1
85
244
7
4
103
9
48

8.3
9.4
(2
)
10.2
10.8
(2
)
10.5
10.5
11.8
9.9

70.3 73.8
83.5 91.8
(2
)
(2
)
85.4 90.5
88.5 94.3
(2
)
(2
)
90.3 93.8
86.2 92.9
100.4 106.5
75.0 82.1

8.4
8.8
(2
)
8.4
8.2
(2
)
8.6
8.2
8.5
7.6

8.8
9.7
(2
)
8.9
8.8
(2
)
8.9
8.9
9.0
8.3

.954
.717
(2
)
.878
.883
(2
)
1.129
.988
1.127
1.210

.909 67.06
.652 59.89
(2
)
(2
)
.828 74.94
.828 78.11
(2
)
(2
)
1.087 101.88
.917 85.17
1.063 113.14
1.106 90.83

8.03
6.35
(2
)
7.36
7.25
(2
)
9.70
8.11
9.61
9.20

T otal............ 1924
1926

24
61

170
694

9.5
10.1

79.9
85.3

84.3
92.4

8.4
8.4

8.9
9.1

.929
.849

1924
1926
1926
1926
1924
1926
1926
1924
1926
1924
1926
1924
1926

1
3
1
4
2
1
6
1
1
1
2
5
5

17
34
27
23
15
17
39
19
18
5
36
46
112

(2
)
9.9
(2
)
8.8
11.6
(2
)
10.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
8.2
10.8
10.2

(2
)
(2
)
84.9 92.6
(2
)
(2
)
88.6 93.9
98.1 102.4
(2
)
(2
)
88.5 97.7
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
82.9 87.9
99.1 106.7
89.8 95.8

(2
)
8.6
(2
)
10.1
8.5
(2
)
8.5
(/)
(2
)
(2
)
10.1
9.2
8.7

(2
)
9.4
(2
)
10.7
8.8
(2
)
9.3
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
10.7
9.9
9.3

(2
)
1.043
(2
)
.686
1.179
(2
)
.704
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
.551
.681
.717

Total............. 1924
1926

10
23

90.4
93.7

9.0
8.8

9.6
9.5

.690
.788

LOADERS, M
ACHINE
Alabama.................
Illinois.................
Indiana...................
Kentucky...............
Ohio........................
Pennsylvania.........
Tennessee...............
Virginia...................
West Virginia.........




102 i
306 !

* Pata included in total.

9.4
9.9

84.3
87.3

.881
.784

$5.13
7.56
8.17
11.48
11.01
9.03
11.46
11.57
11.57
13.73
12.88
12.53
8.88
8.25
8.34
10.99
10.27
9.55
8.94
9.61
9.75
4.58
4.49
6.14
7.49
11.13
9.20
10.05

74.26
72.43

7.82
7.16

(2
)
(2
)
.957 88.57
(2
)
(2
)
.647 60.81
1.130 115.75
(2
)
(2
)
.638 62.32
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
.519 45.68
.633 67.48
.671 64.32

(2
)
8.96
(2
)
6.92
9.98
(2
)
5.96
(2
)
(2
)
(*)
5.57
6.23
6.26

.644
.735

* Includes data for Utah and Wyoming.

58.20
68.80

6.20
6.96

25

GENERAL TABLES

T a b l e A . — Average number of stai'ts (days) and average hours and earnings of

miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by occupation and State— Contd.
Average hours

Occupation and
State

A verage earnings

Aver­
age
In half
Per start
Per hour
month
num­
based on—
Num­ ber of based on— based on—
Num­ ber of
Year ber ol em­ starts
mines ployees (days)
In half Per
month start
Time
Time
in
Time
half at face, Time at face, Time at face, Time
month includ­ in includ­ in includ­ in
ing mine ing mine ing
mine
lunch
lunch
lunch

MINERS, GANG
Alabama................. 1926
Colorado................. 1924
Illinois.................... 1924
1926
Indiana__________ 1924
1926
Kentucky............... 1926
Ohio........................ 1924
1926
Pennsylvania......... 1924
West Virginia......... 1924

1
1
18
21
6
5
2
1
3
8
6

13
5
573
919
98
71
15
35
47
282
43

(*)
(2
)
7.7
9.6
7.0
9.4
9.1
(2
)
11.2
9.2
10.1

(2
)
(2
)
63.4
79.6
53.7
71.2
75.0
(2
)
88.8
76.2
70.9

(2
)
(2
)
68.8
87.1
55.8
75.8
82.9
(2
)
97.9
83.5
76.6

(2
)
(2
)
8.3
8.3
7.7
7.6
8.3
(2
)
7.9
8.3
7.0

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
9.0 $1,361 $1.254 $86.23 $11.25
9.1 1.411 1.289 112.28 11.73
8.0 1.318 1.269 70.82 10.15
8.1 1.335 1.254 95.11 10.14
9.1
.619 51.34
.685
5.66
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
8.8 1.084
.982 96.22
8.61
7.16
9.1
.865
.789 65.90
7.6 1.031 1.000 79.00
7.81

Total............. 1924
1926

40
32

1,036
1,065

8.1
9.5

65.6
78.7

71.1
86.0

8.1
8.2

8.8
9.0

1.187
1.377

1926
1926
1926
1926
1926
1926
1926

24
3
53
22
9
16
24

170
6
353
151
39
72
91

8.1
10.7
8.4
10.6
6.4
8.6
9.3

72.0 79.4
89.2 99.3
74.7 79.0
94.8 102.2
60.8 64.2
83.6 87.8
86.0 90.9

8.8
8.4
8.9
8.9
9.4
9.8
9.3

9.7
9.3
9.4
9.6
10.0
10.2
9.8

.597
.939
.718
.839
.371
.489
.620

.541
.843
.679
.778
.351
.465
.586

42.96
83.70
53.64
79.54
22.55
40.87
53.30

5.28
7.85
6.41
7.47
3.50
4.77
5.73

Total............. 1926

151

882

8.8

84.5

9.0

9.6

.681

.637

53.77

6.14

1.094 77.79
1.260 108.33

9.66
11.36

MINERS’ , MACHINE
(CUTTERS’) , HELPERS

Alabama.................
Colorado.................
Kentucky...............
Pennsylvania. .
Tennessee...............
Virginia..................
West Virginia.........

*Data included in total




79.0

26

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

T a b l e B .— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

employees other than miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by place of work,
occupation, and State
[The data in this table are for employees who are usually paid rates per hour, day, or week]

Place of work, occupation,
and State

Average
number
Num­ Num­ of starts
Year ber of ber of
(days)
em­
mines ployees made in
half
month

INSIDE MINE
Brakemen:
Alabama............................ 109,9
1924
1926
Colorado........................... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois................ .............. 1922
1924
1926
Indiana............................. 1922
1924
1926
Kansas.............................. 1924
1926
Kentucky......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee............ ............ 1924
1926
Virginia............................ 1924
1926
West Virginia__________ 1922
1924
1926
Total.............................. 21922
1924
1926
Bratticemen and timbermen:
Alabama........................... 1922
1924
1926
Colorado........................... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana............................. 1922
1924
1926
Kansas.............................. 1924
1926
Kentucky.......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania.................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee.......................... 1924
1926
Virginia............................. 1924
1926
West Virginia................... 1922
1924
1926
Total.............................. *1922
1924
1926

8
24
23
6
16
14
20
43
39
10
19
14
9
5
19
75
84
22
48
45
44
147
147
20
12
12
21
45
134
114
181
547
518

139
220
200
29
79
58
216
764
669
88
135
108
26
16
143
539
791
65
161
188
319
979
981
85
71
82
193
306
1,189
1,093
1,333
4,259
4,368

7.8
8.6
9.4
10.9
8.8
11.8
10.4
8.1
10.0
9.6
6.6
10.4
10.7
10.4
9.2
8.9
8.9
8.9
8.8
10.0
19.5
9.9
10.5
9.1
8.8
8.4
9.7
9.3
9.0
10.1
19.4
8.9
9.9

9
24
32
7
17
15
21
43
37
11
18
16
6
11
17
63
77
24
44
44
40
131
129
18
9
10
16
41
110
98
181
484
484

19
89
148
33
100
84
197
542
520
53
80
90
14
42
58
245
393
139
237
267
268
703
719
36
29
21
66
155
454
442
986
2,521
2,800

9.9
9.2
10.2
11.6
9.8
13.0
10.9
9.1
10.7
9.3
8.2
11.5
11.9
11.2
9.8
9.5
10.2
10.3
9.S
10.3
*10.6
10.7
10.9
9.0
10.7
9.3
10.0
9.8
9.6
11.1
3 10.4
9.8
10.8

Average hours
worked
In half
month

Per
start
(day)

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

Per
hour

61.8
78.1
75.3
87.6
70.9
96.1
85.8
66.6
84.1
76.9
52.7
83.8
85.2
83.6
75.0
75.5
73.5
71.3
71.1
81.1
81.0
84.1
92.3
72.5
70.1
71.3
83.8
76.0
75.7
85.9
77.3
75.0
83.8

8.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.1
8.3
8.2
8.4
8.0
8.0
8.1
7.9
8.1
8.2
8.5
8.3
8.0
8.1
8.1
18.4
8.5
8.8
7.9
8.0
8.5
8.7
8.2
8.4
8.5
18.2
8.4
8.5

$22.89
29.99
32.55
83.32
64.70
64.38
80.04
62.14
78.92
72.24
49.72
78.04
73.65
78.49
49.04
43.01
40.70
66.79
64.77
73.91
65.24
69.24
70.64
30.58
26.71
31.27
38.19
54.71
44.10
49.65
60.18
53.25
57.61

$2.95
3.47
3.45
7.65
7.33
5.44
7.76
7.70
7.93
7.52
7.51
7.51
6.86
7.57
5.34
4.85
4.59
7.51
7.35
7.38
16.84
6.99
6.72
3.35
3.05
3.73
3.95
5.91
4.88
4.93
16.41
5.96
5.82

$0,370
.384
.432
.952
.912
.670
.937
.935
.939
.939
.944
.931
.865
.939
.654
.570
.554
.936
.911
.912
.806
.823
.765
.422
.381
.439
.456
.720
.583
.578
.779
.710
.687

80.5
8.1
79.8
8.7
88.9
8.7
92.7
8.0
79.2
8.1
8.3
108.8
87.7
8.0
73.0
8.0
86.7
8.1
71.4
7.7
65.3
7.9
93.9
8.1
99.1
8.3
91.2
8.1
8.2
79.9
81.3
8.5
8.4
84.9
82.1
8.0
80.3
8.2
78.0
7.6
91.3 *8.4
8.4
89.7
92.1
8.5
75.3
8.3
‘ 8.2
87.8
8.5
79.1
83.2
8.3
8.2
80.5
8.4
81.1
94.2
8.5
85.7 38.1
8.3
81.1
89.2
8.3

34.16
34.74
39.99
91.09
73.98
76.68
82.23
68.44
81.36
67.31
61.19
85.84
93.13
85.75
55.33
50.36
50.95
76.87
74.89
76.66
64.05
71.69
68.73
34.42
37.87
38.61
41.88
61.12
49.76
57.90
70.26
63.04
66.20

3.43
3.78
3.93
7.87
7.53
5.88
7.54
7.50
7.60
7.25
7.45
7.45
7.81
7.65
5.65
5.30
5.02
7.50
7.63
7.47
86.13
6.69
6.33
3.81
3.54
4.16
4.20
6.25
5.16
5.20
36.81
6.44
6.16

.424
.436
.450
.983
.934
.705
.938
.937
.938
.942
.937
.915
.940
.941
.693
.619
.600
.937
.932
.983
.701
.799
.746
.457
.431
.488
.503
.759
.613
.614
.820
.778
.742

1Not including data for 8 employees whose starts were not reported.
* Includes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
* Not including data for 79 employees whose starts were not reported.




Average earnings

27

GENEBAL TABLES

T a b l e B .— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

employees other than miners and loaders, 1922> 1924) and 1926, by place of work,
occupation} and State— Continued

Place of work, occupation,
and State

Average
number
Num­ Num­ of starts
Year ber of ber of
(days)
em­
mines ployees made in
half
month

Average hours
worked

Average earnings

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

Per
hour

in s i d e m i n e — c o n t i n u e d

Cagers:
Alabama.................... ...... 1922
Colorado........................ . 1922
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana............................. 1902
1924
1926
Kansas.............. - .............. 1924
1926
Kentucky______________ 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania.................... 1922
1924
1926
Virginia............................ 1926
West Virginia__________ 1922
1924
1926

1
5
9
9
22
46
39
12
22
17
9
11
2
12
16
10
26
22
21
56
57
1
8
18
16

6
13
20
22
62
109
103
22
47
32
20
17
4
42
45
27
45
46
35
96
115
4
12
31
30

<0
11.8
9.4
11.0
lO 6
.
9.7
11.6
10.5
8.4
10.2
11.1
10.9
8.5
8.3
10.4
8.8
9.7
10.1
*10.3
10.6
11.2
(<)
9.7
8.5
13.1

(*)
91.4
75.1
95.5
94.7
85.4
106.1
88.9
€9.4
90.3
104.9
99.7
72.9
69.0
89.6
71.9
80.9
85.2
92.4
93.9
103.3
(*)
80.9
76.8
113.5

(0
7.7
8.0
8.6
8.9
8.8
9.2
8.4
8.2
7.9
9.5
9.2
8.6
8.3
8.6
8.2
8.4
8.5
*8.9
8.8
9.3
(<)
8.4
9.1
8.7

(0
$90.97
72. 28
72.42
88. 71
80.22
99.85
82.81
65.03
83. 06
98.36
93.11
61.14
41.16
45.29
67.11
74.23
78.41
70.29
77.91
82.04
<*)
65.54
50.48
68.63

(<)
$7.68
7.69
6.56
8.35
8.30
8.64
7.85
7.70
8.13
8.90
8.56
7.19
4.94
4.36
7.61
7.68
7.77
* 6.82
7.32
7.35
(«)
6.78
5.95
5.25

(«)
$0.995
.962
.759
.937
.940
.941
.931
.937
.920
.937
.934
.839
.597
.506
.933
.917
.920
.761
.829
.794
(*)
.810
.657
.605

Total_________________ «1922
1924
1926

83
198
188

185
410
414

*10.3
9.6
11.1

89.4
83.2
99.5

*8.6
8.7
9.0

77.82
71.53
80.73

*7.53
7.46
7.29

.871
.860
.811

1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
3926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926

7
34
29
8
17
17
19
35
26
9
20
12
8
10
8
40
35
20
47
35
23
78
79
18
6
5
8
22
80
63

125
486
413
131
259
255
403
599
493
139
214
175
112
104
174
469
492
281
467
439
472
1,115
1,273
127
65
34
58
257
721
763

9.1
7.5
8.8
10.5
8.7
11.3
10.4
8.8
10.2
8.3
7.0
9.7
11.1
11.9
9.6
8.5
10.0
9.6
8.8
9.7
79.5
9.7
10.7
8.2
9.1
9.8
10.8
9.1
8.9
9.9

75.7
63.1
76.0
83.0
69.8
91.7
86.7
74.1
88.4
65.2
55.1
77.7
89.0
94.0
80.1
70.0
84.2
75.6
70.5
77.7
82.5
80.5
89.5
64.1
73.8
77.3
86.7
73.4
71.8
80.6

8.4
8.4
8.6
7.9
8.0
8.1
8.3
8.4
8.7
7.8
7.8
8.0
8.0
7.9
8.3
8.2
8.4
7.9
8.0
8.0
78.3
8.3
8.3
7.9
8.1
7.9
8.0
8.1
8.1
8.1

29.15
22.09
27.11
79.37
65.59
64.70
83.17
69.53
82.79
61.40
51.99
70.90
83.66
88.63
57.48
44.56
47.02
70.86
65.77
72.72
58.10
62.72
67.96
26.50
29.18
35.76
36.03
58.83
45.66
46.15

3.22
2.94
3.07
7.59
7.52
5.72
8.00
7.80
8.13
7.37
7.40
7.32
7.56
7.48
5.99
5.23
4.71
7.40
7.49
7.51
76.04
6.45
6.33
3.25
3.21
3.64
3.32
6.49
5.14
4.66

.385
.350
.356
.956
.939
.706
.960
..938
.936
.942
.944
.912
.940
.943
.718
.637
.558
.938
.932
.936
.704
.779
.760
.414
.396
.463
.416
.801
.636
.573

Total_________________ 21922
1924
1926

125
377
320

2,080
4,603
4,530

?9.5
8.8
10.2

78.7
72.3
84.4

78.2
8.2
8.3

64.84
54.08
59.80

76.82
6.12
5.88

.824
.748
.708

Drivers:
Alabama...........................
Colorado....................... .
Illinois........................... .
Indiana.............................
Kansas.............................
Kentucky..........................
Ohio..................................
Pennsylvania....................
Tennessee.........................
Virginia.............................
West Virginia...................

2Includes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
* Data included in total.
1 Not including data for 2 employees whose starts were not reported.
6Includes data for Washington and Wyoming.
7Not including data for 89 employees whose starts were not reported.




28

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

T a b l e B . — Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

employees other than miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1923, by place of work,
occupation, and State— Continued

Place of work, occupation,
and State

inside mine—continued
Laborers:
Alabama...........................

Colorado...........................
Illinois..............................
Indiana.............................
Kansas..............................
Kentucky.........................
Ohio..................................
Pennsylvania....................
Tennessee..........................
Virginia................. ...........
West Virginia...................
Total..............................
Motormen:
Alabama...........................
Colorado...........................
Illinois................... ..........
Indiana.............................
Kansas..............................
Kentucky..........................
Ohio..................................
Pennsylvania....................
Tennessee..........................
Virginia.............................
West Virginia...................
Total..............................

Average
number
Num­ Num­ of starts
Year ber of ber of
(days)
em­
mines ployees made in
half
month

Average hours
worked
In half
month

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

Per
hour

1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
a
924
1926
2 1922
1924
1926

9
35
33
7
7
8
20
39
39
11
18
15
7
7
20
69
80
21
36
33
42
131
144
18
11
12
18
40
130
112
181
502
500

354
736
965
57
69
61
444
1,097
1,122
145
167
151
21
21
326
1,017
1,661
152
213
505
923
2,012
2,081
126
111
98
345
461
1,672
1,800
2,967
7,228
8,823

9.7
8.5
8.5
12.1
8.9
12.5
10.4
8.6
9.9
9.7
7.5
9.2
10.7
8.9
9.4
8.4
8.3
8.6
8.9
8.2
*10.3
9.8
It. 7
7.8
7.6
7.6
8.4
9.4
8.8
9.8
«9.9
8.9
9.4

78.5
75.0
74.3
96.3
71.1
100.5
85.1
69.0
79.7
78.7
60.5
73.7
85.4
71.4
66.4
71.5
70.5
68.3
73.3
63.2
87.5
81.5
89.1
62.8
59.5
61.5
7u. 4
76.8
73.5
83.1
80.8
74.2
78.7

8.1
8.8
8.7
8.0
8.0
8.1
8.2
8.0
8.1
8.1
8.1
8.0
8.0
8.1
7.1
8.5
8.5
8. t
>
8.3
7.7
88.2
8.3
8.4
8.1
7.9
8.1
8.4
8.1
8.4
8.5
8 8.0
8.3
8.4

$28.49
28.73
29.55
90.98
65.46
66.73
77.33
63.08
72.64
73.72
56.89
68.76
80.37
61.22
48.59
38.02
35.77
62.81
63.48
54.27
56.18
60.58
60.18
24.90
22.15
23.84
29.97
47.91
39.89
44. 51
56.30
48.74
48.82

$2.94
3.38
3.46
7.53
7.36
5.36
7.45
7.32
7.36
7.59
7.59
7.47
7.53
6.91
5.18
4.54
4.32
7.33
7.17
6.58
8 5. 63
6.16
5.65
3.2u
2.93
3.12
3.58
5.08
4.54
4.54
8 5.73
5.47
5.18

$0.363
.383
.398
.945
.921
.664
.909
.915
.911
.937
.940
.934
.941
.857
.731
.532
. 5t>
7
.919
.866
.859
.642
.744
.676
.396
.372
.388
.426
.624
.543
.536
.697
.657
.620

1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1824
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1824
1826
1822
1924
1926
*1922
1924
1926

7
21
22
6
11
11
19
43
39
10
20
16
7
7
20
76
85
25
57
45
42
148
143
19
13
12
21
46
134
118
183
548
520

110
158
177
17
57
41
169
532
557
72
108
135
18
20
177
486
697
90
221
229
314
965
1,028
79
71
77
173
307
1,050
1,111
1,296
3,751
4,239

9.7
10.1
10.9
10.2
8.9
12.4
10.5
8.7
10.5
10.8
6.5
11.1
10.9
10.5
9.7
9.9
10.4
10.1
9.6
10.7
•10.0
10.3
11.1
9.6
10.6
10.4
10.9
9.8
10.0
10.9
•10.1
9.7
10.8

77.6
91.9
98.3
81.9
73.6
103.0
89.5
73.4
90.6
86.7
51.2
90.3
88.4
84.2
81.2
86.1
91.0
84.2
79.4
87.8
86.3

8.0
9.1
9.0
8.0
8.3
8.3
8.5
8.4
8.6
8.0
7.9
8.1
8.1
8.1
8.4
8.7
8.8
8.3
8.2
8.2
•8.4
8.6
8.9
8.0
8.5
8.6
8.9
8.5
8.6
8.8
•8.4
8.6
8.7

33.31
43.00
44.57
79.73
71.61
73.65
90.20
74.38
91.76
87.67
52.00
91.58
88.32
84.25
56.04
53.46
55.02
79.11
73.19
79.93
71.48
75.70
75.88
37.82
41.02
45.65
50.27
64.68
53.83
59.21
68.62
62.89
67.97

3.42
4.27
4.09
7.79
8.05
5.96
8.59
8.54
8.70
8.09
8.03
8.24
8.07
8.06
5.77
5.39
5.29
7.80
7.59
7.49
•7.03
7.38
6.85
3.95
3.86
4.37
4.47
6.62
5.38
5.42
•6.82
6.46
6.27

.429
.468
453
.973
.974
.715
1..008
1.013
1.012
1.012
1.016
1.014
.999
1.001
.690
.621
.604
.940
.922
.811
.929
.854
.766
.494
.454
.508
.502
781
.623
.619
.815
.752
.718

i

8a 6

89.0
76.6
90.4
89.8
100.1

82.8

86.4
95.6
84.2
83.6
94.7

1 Includes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
•Not including data for 237 employees whose starts were not reported.
* Not including data for 6 employees whose starts were not reported.




Per
start
(day)

Average earnings

29

GENERAL TABLES

T a b l e B .— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

employees other than miners and loaders, 1923 , 1924, and 1926, by place of workf
occupation, and State— Continued

Place of work, occupation,
and State

Average
number
Num­ Num­ of starts
ber of
Year ber of em­
(days)
mines ployees made in
half
month

inside mine—continued
Pumpmen:
Alabama........................... 1922
1924
1926
Colorado........................... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana.............................. 1922
1924
1926
Kentucky.......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania.................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee.......................... 1924
1926
Virginia............................. 1924
1926
West Virginia................... 1922
1924
1926
Total.............................. *1922
1924
1926
Trackmen:
Alabama........................... 1922
1924
1926
Colorado........................... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana.............................. 1922
1924
1926
Kansas.............................. 1924
1926
Kentucky......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania.................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee......................... 1924
1926
Virginia............................. 1924
1926
West Virginia................... 1922
1924
1926
Total.............................. *1922
1924
1926

9
32
32
7
15
11
13
17
18
9
17
12
16
47
65
21
41
34
41
127
127
10
8
6
U
32
90
84
157
402
402

62
105
127
10
27
27
23
40
45
28
33
31
39
89
154
43
87
69
152
352
341
16
19
26
30
79
240
238
452
1,015
1,081

10.9
10.2
11.0
14.4
12.3
14.2
13.0
13.1
13.2
12.7
12.2
13.5
12.6
11.6
11.9
14.0
12.3
14.1
13.9
12.2
13.8
9.8
9.6
1,0.6
8.0
11.9
11.4
12.5
13.0
11.7
12.7

10
37
36
8
17
17
22
46
39
11
22
17
9
10
19
77
86
25
64
45
44
151
151
20
14
12
22
47
142
117
198
587
654

58
131
141
38
90
101
301
670
674
108
153
125
30
31
159
579
736
111
213
228
287
895
996
63
42
83
161
274
1,119
1,011
1,393
4,026
4,246

10.4
9.6
10.5
12.2
10.6
13.0
10.8
9.0
10.7
10.3
7.1
11.1
. 11.6
11.8
10.5
9.6
10.5
10.7
10.3
10.1
1011.0
10.6
11.4
9.0
10.5
9.8
10.5
10.0
9.7
10.7
1010.7
9.7
10.8

Average hours
worked
In half
month

92.5
100.1
111.0
114.6
103.9
115.8
109.0
108.8
115.3
107.8
99.2
115.1
110.9
102.7
116.2
115.7
101.0
116.4
117.1
105.5
124.6
91.6
86.4
98.0
73.4
105.3
103.7
124.6
110.2
103.4
118.3




8.5
9.9
10.1
8.0
8.4
8.2
8.4
8.3
8.8
8.5
8.1
8.6
8.8
8.9
9.8
8.3
8.2
8.2
8.4
8.7
9.0
9.4
9.0
9.3
9.1
8.8
9.1
9.9
8.5
8.8
9.3

84.5
8.1
84.1
8.8
93.7
9.0
97.2
8.0
85.2
8.0
108.7
8.3
87.8
8.1
71.8
8.0
86.8
8.1
82.9
8.1
57.1
8.0
91.4
8.3
91.1
7.9
94.8
8.0
87.7
8.4
81.8'
8.5
88.4
8.4
8.1
86.8
84.1
8.1
82.1
8.2
91.2 1 8.2
0
89.1
8.4
8.5
97.0
8.2
73.6
84.4
8.1
78.9
8.1
89.2
8.5
81.2
8.2
82.7
8.5
8.4
90.0
87.3 1 8.2
0
81.2
8.3
8.4
91.0

1 Includes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
* Not including data for 30 employees whose starts were not reported.
•

62411°—27----- 3

Per
start
(day)

Average earnings

In half
month

$32.70
36.67
40.19
111.66
96.54
82.28
101.46
100.91
105.80
102.07
93.65
106.85
73.59
54.36
60.56
106.27
92.04
105.17
86.70
83.82
89.26
39.86
34.66
34.15
29.60
73.92
59,73
67.55
80.90
70.38
74.04
39.55
38.84
42.15
94.51
81.66
77.90
82.36
67.47
81.36
77.89
53.58
85.12
85.38
88.85
62.30
50.11
50.76
81.20
78.26
75.19
68.34
71.95
72.14
34.79
37.01
39.44
43.67
63.31
50.89
54.81
72.05
59.83
64.15

Per
start
(day)

Per
hour

$3.01 $0,353
3.61
.366
3.66
.362
7.75
.974
7.83
.930
6.80
.711
7.80
.931
7.73
.928
8.04
.918
8.05
.947
7.69
.944
7.94
.929
5.86
.663
4.70
.529
5.09
.521
7.62
.919
7.50
.911
7.45
.904
6.23
.740
6.88
.795
6.45
.717
4.09
.435
3.60
.401
3.23
.348
3.«68
.403
6.21
.702
5.25
.576
5.39
.542
6.24
.734
6.02
.681
5.84
.626
3.80
4.05
4.03
7.76
7.70
5.97
7.62
7.49
7.60
7.58
7.53
7.69
7.38
7.63
5.94
5.22
4.84
7.57
7.57
7.48
»6.29
6.77
6.35
3.86
3.54
4.03
4.15
6.38
5.23
5.12
«6.77
6.14
5.92

.468
.462
.450
.972
.958
.716
.938
.940
.937
.939
.938
.931
.938
.937
.710
.612
.574
.935
.931
.916
.749
.807
.744
.473
.439
.500
.489
.780
.616
.609
.826
.737
.705

30

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

T a b l e B .— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

employees other than miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by place of work,
occupation, and State— Continued

Place of work, occupation,
and State

Average
number
Num­ Num­ of starts
ber of
(days)
Year ber of em­
mines ployees made in
half
month

Average hours
worked

Average earnings

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

In half
month
(day)

Per
start

Per
hour

inside mine—continued

Trappers (boy):
Alabama
........................... 1922
1924
1926
Colorado........................... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana............................. 1922
1924
1926
Kentucky.......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania.................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee......................... 1924
1926
Virginia............................ 1924
1926
West Virginia................... 1922
1924
1926

5
18
12
4
9
9
16
25
21
9
16
8
6
34
34
22
36
26
12
37
22
15
6
8
12
29
75
57

29
60
39
12
31
21
72
132
109
41
65
35
15
126
107
84
125
77
36
77
51
49
25
30
50
104
230
179

8.3
7.5
9.5
11.2
8.1
11.1
8.6
7.4
9.2
6.6
6.0
10.2
10.5
8.4
10.1
9.2
8.3
10.0
10.5
10.2
10.3
7.4
8.9
9.0
9.9
9.7
9.2
10.2

66.9
64.4
77.3
89.3
64.8
89.1
68.3
54.2
72.7
52.4
47.6
80.8
79.6
67.6
81.1
72.1
64.7
77.7
85.5
84.3
86.3
58.4
71.5
72.4
81.1
76.8
75.7
81.9

8.1
8.6
8.2
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
7.3
7.9
7.9
7.9
7.9
7.6
8.0
8.0
7.8
7.8
7.8
8.2
8.3
8.4
7.9
8.1
8.0
8.2
7.9
8.2
8.1

$15.44
14.05
19.70
50.65
32.66
35.98
34.45
30.04
37.29
26.34
23.65
41.83
37.75
20.29
22.88
36.96
32.58
34.26
34.44
42.95
37.19
14.92
19.51
18.43
20.45
37.24
28.76
29.96

Total.............................. 1922
1924
1926

103
273
207

393
925
693

9.1
8.3
9.9

72.3
66.7
79.7

7.9
8.0
8.0

34.09
27.24
30.17

3.75
3.27
3.04

.472
.408
.379

1922
1924
1926
Colorado........................... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana............................. 1922
1924
1926
Kansas.............................. 1924
, 1926
Kentucky.......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922?
1924
1926
Pennsylvania................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee......................... 1924
1926
Virginia....... ...... .............. 1924
1926
West Virginia................... 1922
1924
1926

8
33
35
8
17
16
22
46
39
12
22
17
9
11
20
76
85
21
47
39
44
137
143
18
11
11
20
41
122
106

144
414
440
54
74
115
376
689
820
105
129
185
60
57
283
701
967
169
254
305
791
1,593
1,835
97
82
55
170
219
720
769

10.7
9.6
11.0
12.3
10.7
13.1
11.5
10.4
11.5
10.8
9.3
11.9
10.8
11.2
10.1
10.1
10.5
9.6
10.7
10.9
" 11.1
11.2
11.7
9.9
9.9
9.2
10.9
10.6
10.5
11.5

87.8
84.9
98.1
98.6
87.0
110.5
94.7
85.8
97.6
86.5
74.7
100.7
88.9
96.3
87.1
88.5
93.0
77.1
87.8
90.8
95.3
94.6
100.9
81.5
81.5
76.6
97.6
88.3
92.6
100.4

8.2
8.8
8.9
8.0
8.1
8.4
8.2
8.3
8.5
8.0
8.0
8.5
8.3
8.6
8.6
8.8
8.9
8.0
8.2
8.3
ii 8.4
8.5
8.6
8.2
8.3
8.3
9.0
8.4
8.8
8.7

38.81
46.75
53.27
95.22
84.06
81.57
95.93
85. 93
97. 52
88.42
78.58
104.09
103.08
114.93
61.86
65.39
62.44
71.00
78.62
80.00
72.36
82.00
80.46
48.94
43.02
50.53
54.98
72.18
63.70
68.26

3.61
4.86
4.84
7.77
7.84
6.22
8.33
8.27
8.49
8.21
8.45
8.75
9.57
10.25
6.14
6.50
5.97
7.39
7.36
7.33
ii 6.64
7.35
6.86
4.93
4.37
5.48
5.04
6.83
6.08
5.95

.442
.551
.543
.966
.966
.738
1.013
1.002
.999
1.022
1.052
1.033
1.159
1.193
.710
.739
.671
.921
.895
.881
.759
.867
.797
.601
.528
.660
.563
.818
.688
.680

Total.............................. 21922
1924
1926

188
538
522

2,294
4,786
5,745

» 10.9
10.5
11.3

91.4
89.7
98.0

H8.3
8.5
8.7

75.49
73.32
75.96

ii 6.97
6.97
6.71

.826
.817
.775

Other employees:
Alabama...........................

J Includes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
1 Not including data for 137 employees whose starts were not reported.
1




$1.87 $0,231
.218
1.86
2.08
.255
.567
4.54
4.03
.504
3.24
.404
4.02
.504
4.04
.554
4.04
.513
3.98
.503
3.93
.497
4.10
.518
3.58
.474
2.40
.300
2.27
.282
4.02
.512
3.94
.504
3.42
.441
3.29
.403
4.22
.509
3.61
.431
2.02
.255
2.20
.273
2.04
.254
2.07
.252
3.84
.485
3.11
.380
2.95
.366

G en era l

31

ta b le s

T a b l e B .— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

employees other than miners and loaders, 1922, 1924, and 1926, by place of work,
occupation, and State— Continued

Place of work, occupation,
and State

Average
number
Num­ Num­ of starts
Year ber of ber of
(days)
em­
mines ployees made in
half
month

Average hours
worked

Average earnings

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

Per
hour

11.7
95.1
9.7
86.0
12.1 . 107.9
12.5
114.8
11.3
98.3
13.4
120.8
116.2
13.1
10.5
86.8
12.9
111.2
113.4
12.6
74.1
8.4
104.2
11.6
11.7
109.3
12.9
109.8
94.4
11.2
92.2
10.9
103.6
12.1
12.0
100.0
10.2
85.3
84.5
10.2
w 11.0
100.2
98.1
11.2
11.7
106.8
10.7
86.7
80.5
9.8
90.4
10.9
102.1
11.9
90.0
10.6
10.9
93.6
107.9
12.1
« 11.7
102.0
92.0
10.7
11.9
104.8

8.2
8.9
8.9
9.2
8.7
9.0
8.9
8.3
8.6
9.0
8.8
9.0
9.3
8.5
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.3
8.4
8.3
12 8.8
8.9
9.1
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.6
8.5
8.6
8.9
1 8.6
2
8.6
8.8

$51.90
43.77
55.71
104.66
89.21
83.75
112.38
84.06
107.61
99.93
65.20
91.62
107.98
108.50
72.18
57.32
61.02
96.00
81.79
79.23
78.73
80.85
80.95
43.19
36.91
54.13
56.90
76.12
64.50
74.91
87.42
71.75
77.94

$4.45
4.51
4.60
8.37
7.89
ft 24
8.57
8.00
8.37
7.96
7.77
7.92
9.21
8.40
6.44
5.26
5.05
8.02
8.03
7.79
12 7.16
7.32
6.91
4.05
3.77
4.99
4.77
7.17
5.92
6.20
12 7.47
6.72
6.56

$0,546
.509
.516
.912
.908
.693
.967
.968
.968
.881
.880
.879
.988
.989
.765
.622
.589
.960
.959
.938
.786
.824
.758
.498
.459
.599
.557
.846
.689
.694
.857
.780
.743

9.7
9.7
10.6
12.2
9.9
12.2
12.3
10.2
12.0
10.3
7.8
11.8
13.0
(4
)
11.5
10.1
11.3
11.2
9.7
11.0
u 10.9
10.9
11.5
10.2
10.8
9.4
11.1
10.9
10.7
11.4
1 11.1
3
10.4
11.4

8.5
33.98
9.0
34.88
37.61
8.7
8.9
99.07
74.42
8.8
73.95
9.1
98.14
8.5
77.80
8.2
93.24
8.5
75.72
8.2
59.57
8.8
85.50
8.6
8.5
102.94
(4
)
(4
)
64.67
8.1
49.71
8.4
8.4
53.24
8.2
83.75
8.2
71.80
8.0 . 80.09
i» 8.5
67.15
8.8
70.90
67.94
8.9
41.61
8.2
38.52
8.3
8.0
40.91
48.39
8.6
69.77
8.3
57.12
8.6
60.37
8.6
1 8.4
3
71.23
8.6
61.96
8.6
64.28

3.52
3.58
3.55
8.14
7.51
6.06
7.99
7.59
7.80
7.33
7.67
7.27
7.92
(4
)
5.64
4.94
4.72
7.49
7.43
7.27
i* 6.18
6.51
5.93
4.07
3.58
4.36
4.37
6.41
5.35
5.27
1 6.42
3
5.93
5.64

.416
.399
.409
.917
.850
.669
.943
.922
.915
.889
.876
.850
.932
(4
)
.693
.588
.562
.917
.908
.910
.694
.740
.668
.498
.432
.548
.508
.769
.625
.615
.752
.691
.654

OUTSIDE MINE

Blacksmiths:
Alabama...........................

1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
21922
1924
1926

10
36
35
8
17
17
22
45
39
12
22
17
9
11
18
75
83
25
56
44
41
151
147
20
14
12
22
43
138
111
191
581
540

18
49
45
14
20
21
56
119
109
18
41
32
11
12
29
113
123
43
88
76
84
285
267
24
20
14
30
61
205
174
339
969
909

Carpenters and car-repair
men:
Alabama----------------------- 1922
1924
1926
Colorado........................... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana............................. 1922
1924
1926
Kansas.............................. 1924
1926
Kentucky......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania.................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee......................... 1924
1926
Virginia............................. 1924
1926
West Virginia................... 1922
1924
1926
T ota l...______________ 21922
1924
1926

8
32
30
3
12
13
20
38
37
6
8
14
3
1
18
61
78
17
37
35
37
138
138
15
11
11
20
38
119
107
157
474
484

33
83
122
6
34
39
40
143
162
12
13
29
4
2
40
178
214
28
59
69
166
431
501
30
35
24
57
74
355
315
427
1,354
1,545

Colorado.............. ............
Illinois...............................
Indiana.............................
Kansas...................... ........
Kentucky.........................
Ohio..................................
Pennsylvania....................
Tennessee..........................
Virginia.............................
West Virginia...................
T o ta l.............................

81.7
87.4
9^.0
108.0
87.6
110.6
104.1
84.4
101.9
85.2
68.0
100.6
110.5
(4
)
93.3
84.5
94.7
91.3
79.1
88.0
96.7
95.8
101.6
83.6
89.1
74.7
95.2
90.7
91.4
98.2
94.7
89.6
98.3

JIncludes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
4 Data included in total.
u Not including data for 0 employees whose starts were not reported.
1 Not including data for 22 employees whose starts were not reported*
1




32

BITTJMINOtJS COAL MINING

T a b l e B .— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of

employees other than miners and loaders, 1922, 1924t and 1926, by place of work,
occupation, and State— Continued

Place of work, occupation,
and State

Average
number
Num­ Num­ of starts
ber of
Year ber of em­
(days)
mines ployees made in
half
month

Average hours
worked

Average earnings

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

In half
month

11.5
10.2
21.1
13.6
11.4
12.9
15.0
14.6
14.7
15.4
13.9
14.5
12.1
12.3
12.8
13.1
13.0
12.5
12.6
13.2
112.4
12.6
13.3
11.3
10.4
11.8
15.0
12.8
12.7 |
» 13.9
12.9
13.3

96.8
81.5
110.1
117.5
99.8
110.8
122.1
120.6
123.1
135.5
126.9
135.1
116.6
119.9
108.2
123.7
126.2
111.3
111.4
117.4
106.6
112.8
120.8
99.3
92.9
109.2
165.1
123.0
120.2
121.3
114.4
119.6

8.4
8.0
9.1
8.6
8.7
8.6
8.1
8.3
8.3
8.8
9.1
9.4
9.7
9.8
8.5
9.5
9.7
8.9
8.9
8.9
18.5
8.9
9.1
8.8
8.9
9.3
11.0
9.6
9.4
18.7
8.9
9.0

$47.87
43.71
49.41
107.02
87.01
76.82
116.63
116.87
118.49
121.34
110.71
113.31
104.70
106.35
84.24
69.99
71.35
95.29
103.91
107.60
80.35
91.96
97.24
49.48
42.15
53.90
100.88
72.60
74.91
99.50
91.56
91.17

9.1
8.1
9.5
11.6
8.9
12.0
10.3
9.2
11.0
9.4
7.1
10.7
10.1
11.2
10.2
9.1
10.4
9.3
9.1
10.0
“ 10.8
10.2
11.0
8.8
8.8
8.4
9.6
9.6
9.9
10.9
1*10.1
9.5
10.7

73.9
71.9
83.5
101.0
77.6
108.6
85.8
75.7
94.1
77.6
57.2
88.0
88.8
91.8
83.5
78.3
90.3
74.1
73.6
80.2
95.5
89.8
97.9
70.2
69.7
68.9
84.4
80.0
84.8
95.2
84.8
81.2
92.6

8.1
8.9
8.8
8.7
8.8
9.1
8.3
8.2
8.5
8.2
8.0
8.2
8.8
8.2
8.2
8.6
8.6
8.0
8.1
8.0
h 8.8
8.8
8.9
8.0
8.0
8.2
8.8
8.4
8.6
8.8
n 8.4
8.6
8.7

24.21
20.39
24.09
77.40
55.53
56.41
73.69
65.36
80.77
65.88
48.64
72.90
76.77
76.29
43.82
36.55
39.44
63.24
63.24
67.97
54.03
56.20
55.11
26.64
23.64
25.33
30.49
46.16
40.44
45.93
55.06
46.73
50.53

Per
start
(day)

Per
hour

outside mine—continued

Engineers:
Alabama......... .................. 1922
1924
1926
Colorado........................... 1922
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana.............................. 1922
1924
1926
1924
Kansas......................... .
1926
Kentucky......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio................................... 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania.................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee.......................... 1924
1926
Virginia............................. 1926
West Virginia................... 1922
1924
1926
Total.............................. U922
1924
1926
Laborers:
Alabama........................... 1922
1924
1926
1922
Colorado........................
1924
1926
Illinois............................... 1922
1924
1926
Indiana............................. 1922
1924
1926
Kansas.............................. 1924
1926
Kentucky.......................... 1922
1924
1926
Ohio.................................. 1922
1924
1926
Pennsylvania.................... 1922
1924
1926
Tennessee.......................... 1924
1926
Virginia............................. 1924
1926
West Virginia____
. j 1922
1924
1926
Total.............................. *1922 !
1924 !
1926 1

7
24
26
8
17
17
22
45
3%
8
22
16
9
11
7
38
30
18
28
21
32
103
95
5
7
6
16
42
52
129
333
320

11
38
66
20
60
57
68
147
137
16
41
31
13
15
8
64
42
23
38
30
71
246
204
7
9
9
28
78
74
267
732
674

10
39
36
8
17
17
21
45
39
12
21
17
9
11
20
78
83
24
56
45
42
152
149
20
13
12
22
46
142
118
195
591
550

203
580
620
97
210
234
337
765
778
115
192
162
37
53
198
999
1,190
227
441
474
573
2,017
2,098
157
146
136
292
498
1,980
1,830
2,407
7,514
7,877

1 Not including data for 8 employees whose starts were not reported.
* Includes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
1 Not including data for 51 employees whose starts were not reported.
4




$4.15 $0,495
.537
4.29
4.09
.449
7.90
.914
7.61
.872
5.94
.693
7.75
.955
.969
8.02
8.04
.963
7.86
.895
7.98
.872
7.84
.839
8.67
.898
8.67
.887
6.61
.779
5.36
.566
5.47
.565
7.61
.856
8.26
.933
8.13
.917
16.50
.754
7.27
.816
7.30
.805
4.38
.498
4.04
.454
4.58
.493
6.71
.611
5.66
.590
5.88
.623
17.21
.820
7.09
.801
6.83
.762
2.66
2.53
2.54
6.64
6.27
4.71
7.13
7.07
7.31
6.98
6.81
6.82
7.62
6.82
4.29
4.00
3.77
6.80
6.92
6.77
“ 5.17
5.51
4.99
3.03
2.70
3.02
3.16
4.82
4.08
4.23
K 5.49
4.93
4.74

.328
.284
.288
.766
.716
.519
.859
.863
.858
.849
.850
.829
.865
.831
.525
.467
.437
.853
.859
.847
.566
.626
.563
.379
.339
.367
.361
.577
.477
.482
.649
.575
.546

33

GENERAL TABLES

B.— Average number of starts (days) and average hours and earnings of
employees other than miners and loaders, 1922,1924, and 1926, by place of work,
occupation, and State— Continued

T a b le

Place of work, occupation,
and State

o u t s id e m in e —

Average
number
Num­ Num­ of starts
(days)
Year ber of ber of
em­
mines
made in
ployees
half
month

Average hours
worked

Average earnings

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

In half
month

Per
start
(day)

Per
hour

$36.85
38.13
44.79
97.53
71.93
71.41
90.15
69.64
88.94
93.16
60.19
73.40
95.51
83.28
59.46
54.28
57.58
73.94
72.81
71.65
66.26
72.06
70.61
34.33
41.27
41.42
49.66
70.70
59.02
63.45

$3.32
3.74
3.85
7.56
6.55
5.58
7.24
6.68
7.01
7.32
6.24
6.12
7.96
6.69
5.38
4.98
4.99
6.36
6.44
6.27
w5.65
6.08
5.67
3.72
3.77
4.12
4.45
6.14
5.29
5.20

$0,393
.408
.414
.847
.711
.602
.863
.793
.817
.873
.724
.726
.888
.792
.635
.558
.549
.777
.775
.774
.631
.676
.628
.449
.455
.475
.485
.703
.582
.580

70.02 i* 5.96
5.64
62.73
5.41
65.31

.691
.633
.604

continued

Other employees:
Alabam a.........................

1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926
1924
1926
1924
1926
1922
1924
1926

10
38
33
7
17
17
21
44
38
12
23
17
7
11
20
73
83
25
54
41
42
151
150
20
14
12
22
44
139
114

185
348
345
68
189
162
247
502
312
87
91
96
18
34
258
501
650
160
228
215
713
1,596
1,382
125
96
107
169
371
1,118
740

11.1
10.2
11.6
12.9
11.0
12.8
12.5
10.4
12.7
12.7
9.6
12.0
12.0
12.4
11.1
10.9
11.5
11.6
11.3
11.4
i* 11.9
11.9
12.5
9.2
11.0
10.1
11.2
11.5
11.2
12.2

93.7
93.5
108.1
115.2
101.2
118.6
104.5
87.8
108.8
106.7
83.2
101.2
107.5
105.2
93.7
97.3
104.9
95.1
93.9
92.6
104.9
106.7
112.5
76.5
90.7
87.3
102.4
100.5
101.4
109.3

8.5
9.2
9.3
8.9
9.2
9.3
8.4
8.4
8.6
8.4
8.6
8.4
9.0
8.5
8.5
8.9
9.1
8.2
8.3
8.1
»8 .8
9.0
9.0
8.3
8.3
8.7
9.2
8.7
9.1
9.0

Total.............................. U922
1924
1926

193
578
540

2,242
4,823
4,201

i» 11.8
11.1
12.1

101.3
99.1
108.1

i«8.5
8.9
8.9

Colorado............................
Illinois...............................
Indiana. ...........................
Kansas..............................
Kentucky.........................
Ohio..................................
Pennsylvania....................
Tennessee.........................
Virginia.............................
West Virginia..................

* Includes data for Utah, Washington, and Wyoming,
u Not including data for 75 employees whose starts were not reported.




T a b le C.— Number of miners and loaders in each State whose average earnings per hour were within each classified amount, 1926, by occupation

C
O

Number of employees whose average hourly earnings, based on time at face and time in mine, were within each classified amount
Occupation and classified
earnings per hour

Alabama

Colorado

In
In
At
At
face mine face mine
LOADERS,

Illinois
At
face

In
mine

19
30
88
185
343
721
1,257
1,728
1,852
1,834
1,458
942
545
276
114
59
20
12
23
4
1

22
42
148
395
749
1,189
1,732
1,847
1,914
1,512
980
551
261
85
38
17
10
8
10
1

Indiana

Kentucky

Ohio

In
In
In
At
At
At
face mine face mine face mine

Pennsylvania
At
face

In
mine

Tennessee
At
face

Virginia

In
mine

At
face

West Virginia

m
mine

Total

At
face

In
mine

At
face

In
mine

168
338
851
1,534
1,745
1,649
1,351
1,091
871
522
306
186
117
50
40
24
17
9
17
7
4

237
546
1,240
1,835
1,935
1,576
1,270
944
575
320
197
100
48
23
19
7
4
4
13
4

1,704
4,021
7,088
8,461
; 8,867
j 8,146
;
1 7,302
!
' 6,103
5,006
3,801
2,555
1,548
856
438
224
107
61
43
63
15
5

2,452
5,535
8,345
9,678
9,539
8,343
6,952
5,361
4,177
2,726
1,642
864
420
159
83
50
27
18
37
6

HAND

1
1

1

4
3
7
9
36
209
219
277
355
248
122
59
24
14
2
4
5
5

1
4
5
7
24
144
232
237
392
293
149
63
23
13
3
4
4
2
2

448
1,041
2,132
1,939
1,531
1,034
709
483
258
156
74
39
16
21
3
6
5
2
5
2

577
1,398
2,342
1,885
1,383
948
609
358
197
96
49
17
20
6
7
3
2
2
4
1

22
75
260
| 679
1,073
1,321
1,170
963
638
330
130
52
17
8
5

37
131
; 415
932
1,337
1,413
1,131
756
373
139
51
19
5
4
1

627
916
1,196 1,625
1,991 2,587
i 3,034 3,672
3,404 3,444
, 2,888 2,681
i 2,317 1,772
1,452 1,069
577
1 954
317
501
293
193
182
96
90
53
47
21
12
38
14
18
1
5
13
1
1
12
3
2
6
10
2
1
____

Total....................... ‘3,070 i3,070 1,099 !l, 099 11,511 11,511 1,602 1,602 9,904 9,904 6,747 6,747 19,065 19,065
Average earnings, in I
cents, per hour.............. 47.8 43.6 78.9 72.6 107.8
97.6 111.6 104.0 61.7 57.9 81/7 75.2
71.1
66.1




123
154
186
81
46
18
7
5
2
2

153
216
133
66
28
16
7
3
1
1

1

1

104
275
463
313
262
190
106
60
55
18
15
10
8
7
5
2
1

625

625

1,894

43.6

4a 6

59.7

150
339
472
327
240
154
78
49
35
14
10
12
6
5
2
1

1,894 10,897 10,897 66,414 66,414
55.6

77.6

71.0

77.9

71.5

M INING

19
60
116
180
204
173
100
87
106
30
13
5
4
1

CO L
A

11
37
79
146
198
178
138
90
91
75
30
13
4
4
3

BITUMINOUS

Under 30 cents_________
182
340
80 and under 40 cents
871 1,174
40 and under 50 cents
887
1,035
50 and under 60 cents
379
543
60 and under 70 cents. .
256
195
70 and under 80 cents
49
111
80 and under 90 cents. .. .
21
38
90 cents and under $1......
12
11
$1 and under $1.10............
8
7
$1.10 and under $1.20.......
8
4
1
$1.20 and under $1.30.......
1
$1.30 and under $1.40.......
2
$1.40 and under $1.50.......
1
1
$1.60 and under $1.60.......
1
$1.60 and under $1.70____
1
$1.70 and under $1.80____
$1.80 and under $1.90____
1
$1.90 and under $2______
$2 and under $2.50______
$2.50 and under $3______
$3 and over_____________

Number of employees whose average hourly earnings, based on time at face and time in mine, were within each classified amount
Kentucky

West Vir­
ginia

Colorado

At
At
In
At
In
In
In
At
At
At
In
In
In • At
In
At
In
At
At
In
face mine face mine face mine face mine face mine face mine face mine face mine face mine face mine

Illinois

Indiana .

Kansas

Pennsyl­
vania

Alabama
In
At
face mine

Occupation and classi­
fied earnings per hour

Ohio

Tennessee

Virginia

Total
At
face

In
mine

MINERS, HAND OR PICE

Under 30 cents_______
30 and under 40 cents.
40 and under 50 cents.
60 and under 60 cents.
60 and under 70 cents.
70 and under 80 cents.
80 and under 90 cents.
90 cents and under $1.
$1 and under $1.10......
$1.10 and under $1.20..
$1.20 and under $1.30—
$1.30 and under $1.40..
$1.40 and under $1.60..
$1.50 and under $1.60..
$1.60 and under $1.70
$1.70 and under $1.80
$1.80 and under $1.90
$1.90 and under $2.......
$2 and under $2,60.......
$2.50 and under $3.......

101
197
411
375
255
116
38
27
6
4
2
1

3
1

141
316
471
367
134
62
27
7
4
3
2
2
1

27
66
115
158
170
141
108
101
71
54
35
25
18
11
7
3
3

42
88
154
176
180
140
106
75
58
35
23
12
7
4
3

16
64
122
199
258
358
494
535
390
263
184
126
74
27
21
8
6
5
4
1

24
82
173
253
322
488
601
428
300
196
156
64
29
20
10
3
2
1

3

3
7
28
73
101
104
120
150
122
no
95
98
52
44
18
12
3
3
2

3
11
48
80
115
126
156
155
121
117
83
56
44
15
10
2
2

17
59
105
172
243
324
288
221
132
94
42
20
15
7
5
2

25
69
134
208
308
348
255
173
109
63
20
18
9
5
3

1

1
1

2

2

26
44
53
74
115
65
25
8
4
3

1
2
8
16
6

15
16
11
11
1

1

1
6
11
12
9
19
15
12
3
1

2

1

1

Total.................. 1,537 1,637 1,103 1,103 3,155 3,155 1,146 1,146 1,749 1,749
Average earnings, in
cents, per hour......... 64.0 48.6 78.7 70.5 92.3 85.0 104.7 96.9 80.9 76.1




22
29
40
71
101
93
32
17
6
3
3

181
337
701
1,148
1,463
1,329
1,2C7
860
585
380
272
148
71
37
21
14
4

260
98
453
129
158
1,047
1,530
92
1,558
54
1,393
9
957
3
660
424
1
245
130
46
34
13
6
3 i__ __
!_____
1
1
2
6
5

130
150
152
78
27
5
1
1

1
1
6
5
1
1

2
2
4
1
1

1
2
5
1
6

3
2
4
2

1

418

418

89

64.7

60.1

87.9

1

89 8,766 8,766
8-1.3

76.8

16
59
170
256
299
309
289
200
151
111
54
56
27
23
13
7
9
7
5

69.6

544 . 544

25

40.2

81.5

43.6

482
24
939
101
220 1,858
322 2,552
313 2,965
324 2,790
278 2,595
172 2,129
114 1,477
77 1,034
42
688
27
477
19
261
8
150
12
86
5
46
1
•26
16
2
19
1
4

676
1,317
2,463
3,100
3,089
2,960
2,428
1,695
1,151
742
457
227
14465
44
13
6
4
12
1

25 2,062 12,062 20,594 20,594
76.5

79.4

73.0

78.3

7L5

CO
T a b l e C .— N umber of miners and loadersin each State whose average earnings per hourwere withineach classified amount, 1926, by occupation—

05

Continued
Number of employees whose average hourly earnings, based on time at face and time in mine, were within each specified amount
Occupation and classified
earnings per hour

Alabama
At
face

Colorado

In
At
In
mine face mine

Indiana

Illinois
At
face

In
mine

Kentucky

Ohio

In
At
At
In
In
At
face mine face mine face mine

At
face

In
mine

West Virginia

Virginia

Pennsylvania
At
face

In
mine

At
face

In
mine

At
face

In
mine

Total
At
face

In
mine




6

12

81
82
68
147
9
4

33
53
95
123
137
159
140
123
110
90
74
69
44
48
2
2

1,326

1,326

206

805

150.1

135.8 161.4 151.4

95.6

11
36
58
81
116
129
128
129
122
111

149

109

83.2 107.1

109
99.7

206

5
31
78
309
3Q
8
435
471
485
565
587
574
423
351
307
285
197
164
138
297
33
12

19
68
39
47
92
84
100
53
57
37
37
23
18
4
7
4

5
10
12
49
127
171
198
185
219
153
158
115
77
81
60
50
28
30
56
13
3

700

1,800

1,800

38

38

97

97

113.3

104.1

51.8

48.2

82.1

77.5

120.0

12

13
9
6
5
4
3

805

700

14
27
102

168
198

202

244
165
160
121
80
87
59
53
30
29
21
22

110.8

8
43
160
366
430
454
528
656
557
652
469
384
318
277
215
161
129
96
128
18
6

6,055

825

90.5 120.2 110.8

11
50
130
87
75
90
76
64
110
36
24

6,055

119.5

110.1

M INING

149
Total..................
Average earnings, in cents,
per hour....................
91.1

7

7
32
123
77
86
83
72
67
105
54
32
15
16
10
10
6

1
2
9

C AL
O

Under 30 cents................
B and under 40 cents___
O
40 and under 50 cents—
50 and under 60 cents...
60 and under 70 cents...
70 and under 80 cents...
80 and under 90 cents___
90 cents and under $1____
$1 and under $1.10______
$1.10 and under $1.20___
$1.20 and under $1.30___
$1.30 and under $1.40___
$1.40 and under $1.50___
$1.50 and under $1.60___
$1.60 and under $1.70___
$1.70 and under $1.80___
$1.80 and under $1.90___
$1.90 and under $2.......... .
$2 and under $2.50...........
$2.50 and under $3______
$3 and over.......................

BITUMINOUS

MINERS, MACHINE
(CUTTEBS)

37

GENERAL TABLES
T a b l e D .— Number

of employees other than miners and loaders in each State
whose average earnings per hour were within each classified amount, 1926

Place of work, occupation,
and classified earnings
per hour

Number of employees in each occupation whose average hourly earnings
were within each classified amount
Ala- Colo- Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio Penn­ Ten- Vir- West
syl­ nes- ginia Vir­
tucky
rado nois ana
vania
ginia

INSIDE MINE

Brakemen:
Under 30 cents............ .
30 and under 40 cents ..
40 and under 50 cents..
50 and under 60 cents..
60 and under 70 cents..
70 and under 80 cents..
80 and under 90 cents..
90 cents and under $1..
$1 and under $1.10____
Total.........................
Average earnings, in
cents, per hour..........

1
123
76
1
5
657

Laborers:
Under 30 cents...........
30 and under 40 cents. .
40 and under 50 cents..
50 and under 60 cents. _
60 and under 70 cents .
70 and under 80 cents. _
80 and under 90 cents.
90 cents and under $1.
$1 and under $1.10___
$1.30 and under $1.40.

58

108

67.0

339
52

84

90

94.1

188

981
76.5

232
1

1
34
318
77
8
277
4

267
60.0

74.6

1
492

30
144
1

104

413

255

493

175

70.6

93.6

91.2

94.3

79
453
348
69
15
1

1 Worked part time as machine miner.

1
9
1,112

151

91.1

93.4

50.3

61.4

1
48
605
36
62
11

554
4
1,273

65

58

763

55.8

76.0

39.6

41.6

57.3

301
794
203
26
230
89
15

5
5
138
2
»1

1,122

442
43.1

617
54
434
2

57.8

252
73

32

104

35.6

59

45.6

719

98.3

15
60
351
7

1
164

130
737
66
99
28

422
1

91.2

42

91.5

520

7
4
163
1

1
68
372

791

2
2
30
253
21
4
40
37
1
2
1

517

70.5

13

55.4

93.1

Total........................ . 965
Average earnings, in
cents, per hour.......... 39.8




16

200

Total........................ . 148
Average earnings, in
cents per hour______ 45.0

Total______________
Average earnings, in
cents, per hour..........

16

43.2

Bratticemen and timbermen:
Under 30 cents.............
30 and under 40 cents. .
40 and under 50 cents.
50 and under 60 cents. .
60 and under 70 cents. _
70 and under 80 cents. .
80 and under 90 cents
90 cents and under $1
$1 and under $1.10___
$1.20 and under $1.30.
$1.30 and under $1.40.

Drivers:
Under 30 cents_______
30 and under 40 cents..
40 and under 50 cents..
50 and under 60 cents..
60 and under 70 cents..
70 and under 80 cents..
80 and under 90 cents..
90 cents and under $1..
$1 and under $1.10____

101
1

24
448
150
12
14
143

1
92
924
275
70
245
473
1

21 1,661
85.7

50.7

281

505 2,081
85.9

67.6

47
60
235 430
50 1,049
86
146
36

111
37.2

345 1,800
42.6

53.6

38

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

D.— Number of employees other than miners and loaders in each State
whose average earnings per hour were within each classified amount, 1926— Con.

T a b le

Place of work, occupation,
and classified earnings
per hour

Number of employees in each occupation whose average hourly earnings
were within each classified amount
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio Penn­ Ten- Vir- West
syl­ nes- ginia Vir­ Total
tucky
bama rado nois ana
vania
ginia

inside mine —continued

Motormen:
30 and under 40 cents__
40 and under 50 cents__
50 and under 60 cents__
60 and under 70 cents.
70 and under 80 cents.
80 and under 90 cents.
90 cents and under $1.
$1 and under $1.10___
$1.10 and under $1.20.
$1.30 and under $1.40.
$1.40 and under $1.50.
T ota l-......................
Average earnings, in
cents, per hour..........

179
378

177
45.3

OUTSIDE

135

20

141

101

5
1
117
2

31

26
140
7

18
482
99
418
3
1

229
91.1

41

2
671
1

45.0

14
4
197
1

71.5 101.2 101.4 100.1

Trackmen:
Under 30 cents..............
30 and under 40 cents__
40 and under 50 cents...
50 and under 60 cents...
60 and under 70 cents...
70 and under 80 cents...
80 and under 90 cents...
90 cents and under $1...
$1 and under $1.10.........
$1.10 and under $1.20—.
Total.........................
Average earnings, in
cents, per hour_____

7
118
4

557

4
49
460
32
5
57
84

71
76.6

21
86
494
3
26
22
83
1

8
3
198
1

45.4

173 1, 111

68
226
1,332
779
281
86
939
517
8
2
1
4,239

56
484
68
9
377
2

125

31

736

228

996

42

93.7

57.4

91.6

74.4

43.9

50.2

61.9

71.8

39
118
4

93.1

674

71.6

64
604
235
146
11
51

55
636
148
126
2
43
1

3
71
265
1,365
700
274
39
1,520
8
1

161 1,011

4,246

48.9

60.9

70.5

MINE

Carpenters and car-repair
men:
30 and under 40 cents__
40 and under 50 cents__
50 and under 60 cents...
60 and under 70 cents...
70 and under 80 cents...
80 and under 90 cents...
90 cents and under $1...
$1 and under $1.10.........
$1.20 and under $1.30—

11
144
7

T o ta l........................ 122
Average earnings, in
cents, per hour.......... 40.9
Laborers:
Under 30 cents..............
30 and under 40 cents__
40 and under 50 cents__
50 and under 60 cents__
60 and under 70 cents__
70 and under 80 cents__
80 and under 90 cents__
90 cents and under $1__
$1 and under $1.10.........
Total. ...................
Average earnings, :
cents, per hour___




19 I........
4 I
1
2
1

162

85.0

14
4
6
667
84
3

226
6
2

29

91.5

3
4
6
2
145
1
1
162

620

234

778

28.8

51.9

85.8

2
54
108
13
8
20
9

2 ! 214
i
95. 9 i 56.2

5

40
464
499
70
100

53 1,190
83.1

43.7

2
51
122
125
69
73
53
6
35

57

315

1,545

50.8

61.5

65.4

1
206
670
801
125
24
2
1

492
1,455
1,794
1,669
365
191
1,617

292 1,830

7,877

48.2

54.6

30
271
393
6G
0
179
40
489
35
1

474
84.7

57
244
387
288
135
140
276
17
1

43.2

501
91.0

6
23
10
9
265
161

21
119
108
51
14
2

146
56.3

33.9

36.1

39

GENERAL TABLES
T a b le

E .— Number of employees in each specified occupation in each State who
worked each classified number of hours in half month, 1926
Number of employees in each occupation whose hours were within each
classified group

Place of work, occupation,
and classified hours in
half month

Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio Penn­ Ten­ Vir­ West Total
syl­ nes­
Vir­
tucky
bama rado nois ana
vania see ginia ginia

inside mine

Brakemen:1
Under 8 h ou rs.............
8 and under 16 hours. . .
16 and under 24 hours..
24 and under 32 hours..
32 and under 40 hours.
40 and under 48 hours..
48 and under 56 hours..
66 and under 64 hours..
64 and under 72 hours.
72 and under 80 hours..
80 and under 88 hours..
88 and under 96 hours..
96 and under 104 hours.
104 and under 112 hours.
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128 and under 136 hours.
136 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.
160 and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
176 and under 184 hours.
Total........................
200
Average hours worked
in half month............ 75.3

58 I 669

84
148
T o ta l.......................
Average hours worked
in half month............ 88.9 108.8

25
134
95
111
115
119
148
184
228
264
412
569
644
624
340
155
109
47
21
12
9

791

188

981

71

193 1,093

4,368

73.5

108

81.1

92.3

70.1

85.9

83.8

5
5
11
10
12
17
20
23
29
54
76
111
81
38
20
3
3
1
1

9
49
39
58
43
56
66
109
116
170
242
315
468
486
275
144
72
42
15
16
6
1
2
1

16
10
12
10
37
31
45
64
74
106
143
70
39
17
16
8
7
1

520

90

42

393

267

719

29

442

2,800

86.7

93.9

91.2

84.9

78.0

92.1

87.8

94.2

89.2

hours tor this occupation are hours actually worked.




4
26
21
25
32
40
35
45
51
73
89
137
168
161
87.
28
35
13
11
5
4
2
1

i

96.1 ! 84.1

Bratticemen and timbermen: 1
Under 8 hours...............
8 and under 16 hours...
16 and under 24 hours.
24 and under 32 hours..
32 and under 40 hours..
40 and under 48 hours..
48 and under 56 hours.
56 and under 64 hours..
64 and under 72 hours.
72 and under 80 hours.
80 and under 88 hours..
88 and under 96 hours..
96 and under 104 hours.
104 and under 112 hours.
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128 and under 136 hours.
136 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.
160 and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
176 and under 184 hours.
184 and under 192 hours.

i The

5
22
12
19
15
10
18
40
48
35
78
119
149
183
100
56
39
18
8
3
4

8
51
30
34
33
30
35
39
37
47
73
93
105
84
45
20
16
6
1
3
1

14
12
12
18
17
20
29
43
55
84
100
91
87
51
21
5
6
1

40

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

T a b l e E .— Number

of employees in each specified occupation in each State who
worked each classified number of hours in half month, 1926— Continued
Number of employees in each occupation whose hours were within each
>
classified group

Place of work, occupation,
and classified hours in
half month

in s id e

Penn­ Ten­ Vir­ West
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan­ Ken­
syl­ nes­
Vir­
bama rado nois ana sas tucky Ohio vania see ginia ginia Total

m in e — co n tin u e d

Drivers:1
Under 8 hours.............
8 and under 16 hours...
16 and'under 24 hours.
24 and under 32 hours.
32 and under 40 hours.
40 and under 48 hours.
48 and under 56 hours.
56 and under 64 hours.
64 and under 72 hours..
72 and under 80 hours
80 and under 88 hours..
88 and under 96 hours..
96 and under 104 hours.
104 and under 112 hours.
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128 and under 136 hours.
136 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.
160 and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
176 and under 184 hours.
184 and under 192 hours.
192 hours and over.

4
24
25
18
14
13
18
16
15
20
24
53
70
62
16
13
4
2
1

1
12
6
10
6
7
11
36
20
38
39
52
90
73
54
24
9
4
1

3
6
4
2
4
9
3
10
4
34
24
40
42
37
22
7
3
1

1

Total........................ . 413
Average hours worked
in half month............ 76.0
Laborers:1
8
Under 8 hours............. .
62
8 and under 16 hours...
57
16 and under 24 hours..
40
24 and under 32 hours..
42
32 and under 40 hours..
34
40 and under 48 hours..
44
48 and under 56 hours..
56 and under 64 hours..
53
64 and under 72 hours..
37
72 and under 80 hours..
52
80 and under 88 hours..
81
91
88 and under 96 hours..
96 and under 104 hours. 127
104 and under 112 hours. 109
112 and under 120 hours.
88
19
120 and under 128 hours.
12
128 and under 136 hours.
3
136 and under 144 hours.
4
144 and under 152 hours.
1
152 and under 160 hours.
1
160 and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
176 and under 184 hours. i
184 and under 192 hours.
192 hours and over....... i

2
4
5
2
7
8
7
9
9*
16
21
31
28
14
5
5
2

2
18
18
11
7
11
8
25
17
39
61
63
62
72
40
24
5

6
15
18
10
23
20
7
4
1

5
i

.........i..........
175
104

65

1
3
4
3
6
10
12
11
3
1

1

7
26
17
13
18
22
24
35
39
72
98
120
118
91
27
17
8
4
4
2
1

i

22
129
109
93
77
99
121
221
228
323
443
616
755
709
314
148
64
29
20
2
3
2
1
1
1

58

763

4,530

77.7

89.5

73.8

86.7

80.6

84.4

13
58
33
25
24
35
27
18
22
40
45
37
45
44
20
9
6

7
36
45
42
38
38
62
68
84
135
166
233
331
387
181
104
67
32
15
4
2
2

7
15
6
5
5
7
4
4
5
8
7
9
10
14
5

5
15
12
15
14
14
18
28
32
41
24
34
41
34
12
4

________ i________

52
167
92
65
60
64
58
65
75
135
109
157
165
168
92
54
34
22
13
8
2
2
1

_____i_____

1

2

151 | 21 1,661

505 2,081

111

63.2 j 89.1

59.5

493

91.7

88.4

77.7

5
28
24
1 32
' 20
2
30
2
41
1
62
2
84
4
50
162
1 170
9 215
17
118
9
48
9
18
5
9
4
2

2
21
6
4
2
3
3
5
5
7
14
23
21
12
13
6
2
2

94.0

492

2
2
2

1
2
2
2
4
3
1

73.7 |71.4

t The hours for this occupation are hours actually worked.




439 1,273

2
2

84.2

255

Total..........................I 965
61 1,122
.
Average hours worked I
.! 74.3 100.5 79.7

1
4
1
1
1
1
3
3
4
12
14
10
1
8

1
1
1
1

!

:

1
19
20
19
13
19
28
54
70
68
90
178
234
280
109
31
23
10
5
2

4
19
9
13
9
14
12
37
34
36
38
65
77
36
16
7
4
6
3

70.5

2
1
1

2

22
121
69
473
60
337
295
65
52
257
275
48
309
50
91
395
81
428
572
98
747
137
201
958
202 1,170
240 1,146
162
630
321
97
193
58
90
27
58
20
21
7
11
6
3
8
3
2
1
1
1
4

345 1,800

8,823

83.1

78.7

70.4

41

GENERAL TABLES

E.— Number of employees in each specified occupation in each State who
worked each classified number of hours in half month, 1926— Continued

T a b le

Number of employees in each occupation whose hours were within each
classified group
Place of work, occupation,
and classified hours in
half month

in s id e

Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio Penn­ Ten- Vir- West
syl­
Vir­
tucky
bama rado nois ana
ginia ginia Total
vania

m in e — c o n t in u e d

Loaders, hand: *
Under 8 hours.............
8 a n d u n d e r 16 h o u r s . . .
16 a n d u n d e r 24 h o u r s . .
24 a n d u n d e r 32 h o u r s . .
32 a n d u n d e r 40 h o u r s . .
40 a n d u n d e r 48 h o u r s . .
48 a n d u n d e r 66 h o u r s . .
66 a n d u n d e r 64 h o u r s . .
64 a n d u n d e r 72 h o u r s . .
72 a n d u n d e r 80 h o u r s —
80 a n d u n d e r 88 h o u r s . .
88 a n d u n d e r 96 h o u r s . .
96 a n d u n d e r 104 h o u r s .
104 a n d u n d e r 112 h ou rs.
112 a n d u n d e r 120 h o u r s .
120 a n d u n d e r 128 h o u r s .
128 a n d u n d e r 136 h o u r s .
136 a n d u n d e r 144 h o u r s .
144 a n d u n d e r 152 h o u r s .
162 a n d u n d e r 160 h o u r s .
160 a n d u n d e r 168 h o u r s .
168 a n d u n d e r 176 h o u r s .
176 a n d u n d e r 184 h ou rs.
184 a n d u n d e r 192 h ou rs.
192 h o u r s a n d o v e r _____

26
96
110
96
96
131
115
175
181
221
288
384
217
398
289
173
9
65
1

6
11
27
26
24
23
37
33
35
65
83
199
203
129
162
35
2

28
132
152
159
266
572
240
500
1,199
932
1,046
1,686
1,870
1,179
805
665

12
15
14
24
35
42
67
76
145
227
327
356
257
5

102
302
358
407
396
492
644
939
1,042
933
1,008
846
602
206
116
14
4
2
2

2
25
28
33
31
34
44
60
77
119
130
172
177
251
158
110
24
60
1
1

4
23
42
37
21
31
74
30
30
41
58
113
169
227
169
34

131
233
654
488
296
481
468
49
70
10

3
8
16
39
63
36
78
106
171
170
287
145
27
5
2

74.2

77.8

68.2

79.6

476
1,378
1,665
1,866
2,073
2,864
3,129
3,899
5,191
6,019
6,578
8,054
8,053
6,829
4,895
2,591
620
163
27
19
15
6
1
2
2

544
75.6

76.1

73.3

80.3

25
32
46
34
79
94
137
169
196
241
263
287
210
131
61
31
13
7
1
5

1
11
12
27
20
31
19
25
53
69
34
100
83
34
25

8,766

418
91.6

140
274
320
420
449
575
775
801
971
1,115
1,210
1,186
1,101
762
493
225
46
18
6
1
6
2
1
1

625 1,894 10,897 6,414

85.9
48
152
155
172
225
186
225
348
542
506
676
971
1,174
1,344
1,226
669
99

146
294
486
134
248
144
4

Total......................... 1,537 1,103 3,155 1,146 1,749
Average hours worked
in half month............ 90.8
1.4 84.1 70.7 71.7

24
57
72
81
65
85
85
120
135
181
172
228
221
163
155
29
13
6

419
458
462
517
613
963
1,204
1,590
1,683
2,271
2,368
2,560
1,961
1,104
338
60
16
12

>,904 5,747 19,C65

Total........................ . 3,070 1,099 11,511 1,602
Average hours worked
in half month............ 81.4
86.1 78.1
Miners, hand or pick:9
Under 8 hours..........
8 and under 16 hours . . .
16 and under 24 hours..
24 and under 32 hours..
32 and under 40 hours..
40 and under 48 hours..
48 and under 56 hours..
56 and under 64 hours..
64 and under 72 hours..
72 and under 80 hours..
80 and under 88 hours..
88 and under 96 hours..
96 and under 104 hours.
104 and under 112 hours.
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128 and under 136 hours
136 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.

167
177
248
375
508
492
509
678
652
761
755
756
404
148
14
1

97
304
364
412
529
559
761
1,052
1,623
2,321
2,118
2,387
2,531
2,555
1,748
941
169
105
10

25 2,062 20,594
86.0

75.7

84.3

* The hours for this occupation are total hours in mine, including hours actually worked, travel time in
mine, and lunch time.




42

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING
E .— Number of employees in each specified occupation in each State who
worked each classified number of hours in half month, 1926— Continued

T a b le

Number of employees in each occupation whose hours were within each
classified group
Place of work, occupation,
and classified hours in
half month

in s id e

Penn­ Ten- ! Vir- West
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan­ Ken­
Vir­ Total
syl­
bama rado nois ana sas tucky Ohio vania
ginia

m in e — c o n t in u e d

Miners, machine:2
Under 8 hours...............
8 and under 16 hours...
16 and under 24 hours.
24 and under 32 hours..
32and under 40 hours..
40 and under 48 hours.
48 and under 56 hours..
56 and under 64 hours..
64 and under 72 hours..
72 and under 80 hours.
80 and under 88 hours.
88 and under 96 hours..
96 and under 104 hours
104 and under 112 hours.
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128and under 136 hours.
186 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.
160and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
176 and under 184 hours.
184 and under 192 hours.
192 hours and over..

Total........................ .
149 ! 109 1,326
Average hours worked
in half month............ 100.5 ! 95.4
!. 4
Motormen:1
Under 8 hours..........
8 and under 16 hours...
16 and under 24 hours..
24 and under 32 hours.
32 and under 40 hours.
40 and under 48 hours.
48 and under 56 hours..
56 and under 64 hours..
64 and under 72 hours.
72 and under 80 hours.
80 and under 88 hours.
88 and under 96 hours.
96 and under 104 hours.
104 and under 112 hours
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128 and under 136 hours.
136 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.
160 and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
176 and under 184 hours.
184 and under 192 hours.

12
37
23
16
17
16
16
37
35
27
52
73
87
151
81
66
31
10
7

1
18
15
15
18
78
34
57
158
178
134
201
177
130
56
50

3
10
12
16
4
21
33
32
34
52
61
46
69
141
102

39
13
5
5
2

206

805

700 1,800

79.7

89.3

90.7 102.5

1
28

15
5
15
10
12
18
16
34
47
65
104
181
190
128
85
48
27
17
5
3
2
1

20

17
14
13
12
18

3
3
2
1
10
19
18
35
28
30
9
7
2
1
2
1

41
Total........................ .
177
Average hours worked
in half month............. 98.3 103.0

20

29
49
73
101

107
82
54
29
14
7
5

557

135

20

90.6

90.3

84.2

229 !1,023 j
91.0

87.8

1
7
21
11
14
15
23
27
31
42
55
107
76

28
109
103
93
90
169
145
194
325
407
461
617
696

120

2
14
23
26
24
27
25
32
50
86
114
118
182
286
333
244
103
54
25
19
7
3
1
2

886

91
90
41
24
7
5
6

7
4

38 | 97
i
91.8 105.3

825

757
535
208
108
46
37
19
12

7
2
1

6,055

96.9

24
26
12
20

14
25
33
38
51
71
115
159
201

114
77
49
34
24
10

5
3

3
85
70
54
59
63
92
103
156
215
345
487
666
711
472
291
160
97
56
24
14
6

1
71 | 173 1, 111

99.0 i 90.4 100.1

95.6

94.7

i The hours for this occupation are hours actually worked.
* The hours for this occupation are total hours in mine, including hours actually worked, travel time in
mine, and lunch time.




43

GENERAL TABLES

Number of employees in each specified occupation in each State who
worked each classified number of hours in half month, 1926— Continued

T a b l e E. —

Number of employees in each occupation whose hours were within each
classified group
Place of work, occupation,
and cla s sifie d hours in
hal lmonth

in s id e

Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio Penn­ Ten- Vir- West Total
Vir­
syl­
tucky
ginia ginia
bama rado nois ana
vania

m in e — c o n tin u e d

Trackmen:1
Under 8 hours..............
8 and under 16 liours._.
16 and under 24 hours..
24 and under 32 hours..
32 and under 40 hours..
40 and under 48 hours..
48 and under 56 hours..
56 and under 64 hours..
64 and under 72 hours..
72 and under 80 hours..
80 and under 88 hours..
88 and under 96 hours..
96 and under 104 hours.
104 and under 112 hours.
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128 and under 136 hours.
136 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.
160 and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
184 and under 192 hours.
192 hours and over____
Total.........................
Average hours worked
in half month...........

2
18
13

10

10

16
13
17
12

12

15
9
26
24
34
44
59
103
122
114

10

22
14
29
31
36
62
96
163
91
52
26
7

11

46
51
75
111
150
179
117
90
46
18
16

68

S
O
17
16

3
2
3
2
11
12
5
1

3
4
1
12
9
12
22
21
30
19
5
7
1

5
18
16
19
24
30
26
39
43
48
58
106
142
147
129
64
46
25
12
7
6
1

1
101

674

125

31

736

228

93.7 108.7

86.8

91.4

94.8

88.4

82.1

141

996 1 42
97.0

84.4

161 1,011
B9.2

90.0

10
75
66
73
132
194
218
313
521
713
651
467
261
144
75
42
21
10

2
1
4
4,246
91.0

OUTSIDE MINE

Carpenters and car-repair
men1
____ _________
Under 8 hours............. .
8 and under 16 hours. ..
16 and under 24 hours..
24 and under 32 hours..
32 and under 40 hours..
40 and under 48 hours..
48 and under 56 hours..
56 and under 64 hours..
64 and under 72 hours..
72 and under 80 hours..
80 and under 88 hours..
88 and under 96 hours..
96 and under 104 hours.
104 and under 112 hours.
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128 and under 136 hours.
136 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.
160 and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
176 and under 184 hours.
192 hours and over____
Total..................... .
122
162
29
39
Average hours worked
in half month............ 92.0 110.6 101.9 100. 6

1
15
18
24
19
19
31
44
44
61
95
153
233
285
218
127
75
34
25
13
4
5
1
1
2

214

501

57

315

1,545

92.0

94.7

88.0 101.6

95.2

98.2

98.3

* The hours for this occupation are hours actually worked.




44

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING
E .— Number of employees in each specified occupation in each State who
worked each classified number of hours in half month, 1926— Continued

T a b le

Number of employees in each occupation whose hours were within each
classified group
Place of work, occupation,
and classified hours in
half month

o u t s id e m in e —

Penn­ Ten- Vir- West
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ KanVir­
syl­
tucky Ohio vania nes- ginia ginia Total
bama rado nois ana

continued

Laborers:1
Under 8 hours............. .
8 and under 16 hours...
16 and under 24 hours..
24 and under 32 hours..
32 and under 40 hours..
40 and under 48 hours..
48 and under 56 hours..
56 £uid under 64 hours.
64 and under 72 hours..
72 and under 80 hours..
80 and under 88 hours..
88 and under 96 hours.
06 and under 104 hours.
104 and under 112 hours.
112 and under 120 hours.
120 and under 128 hours.
128 and under 136 hours.
136 and under 144 hours.
144 and under 152 hours.
152 and under 160 hours.
160 and under 168 hours.
168 and under 176 hours.
176 and under 184 hours.
184 and under 192 hours.
192 hours and over___
Total........................ .
Average hours worked
in half month............

8
37
25
26
16

9
5
3
14

22

20
10

35
36
40
71
116
113
160
205
121
64
42

27
38
50
73
104
149
84
73
51
23
22
8

100

38
29
6
5
3

8
26
40
44
22
31
53
58
63
75
103
185
340

22
26
39
21
60
48
57
63
76
128
212
237
310
190
129
98
49
24
21
7
4
1

177
143
152
119
184
214
250
293
429
586
813
1,200

3

8

20
20
6

2

3
4

3

1,197
835
499
348
165
94
72
28
19
9
5
8

292 1,830

7,877

156

121

54
32
28

2

234
3.5 108.6

2
162 j

94.1

53 1,190

88.0 ! 91.8

i The hours for this occupation are hours actually worked.




7
14
8
7
10
25
25
21
31
31
36
77

90.3

474
80.2

146
97.9

1.7 84.4

95.2

92.6

45

GENERAL TABLES
T a b l e F .— Number

of employees in each specified occupation in each State whose
earnings in half month were within each classified amount, 1926
Number of employees in each occupation whose earnings in half month were
within each classified group

Place of work, occupation,
and classified earnings in
half month

Penn­
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio sylva­ Ten- Vir- West
Vir­
tucky
bama rado nois ana
ginia ginia Total
nia

INSIDE MINE

Brakemen:
Under $5...................
$5 and under $10___
$10 and under $15...
$15 and under $20...
$20 and under $25._.
$25 and under $30...
$30 and under $35...
$35 and under $40. - .
$40 and under $45...
$45 and under $50...
$50 and under $55...
$55 and under $60...
$60 and under $65...
$65 and under $70...
$70 and under $75...
$75 and under $80...
$80 and under $90...
$90 and under $100..
$100 and under $110.
$110 and under $120.
$120 and under $140.
$140 and under $160.

12
5
11
8
8
10

15
8
17
11
21
36
24
48
56
116
139
79
34

43
37
41
42
40
34
59
74
97
101

72
21
32
20
13
12
22
20

6

21

11
8
13
12
11
23
16
30
58
67
113
99
83
70
111

119
68

24
15
3

11

27
22
22
33
41
45
50
77
83
129
152
122

69
48
55
39
34
32
7
5
1

94
122

98
118
144
151
198
254
274
364
338
255
279
220

227
206
359
370
187
74
32
41

Total........................ . 200
188 981
16 791
58 I 669
108
71 I 193 1,093 4,368
Average earnings in
half month............... . $32.55 $64.38 $78.92 $78.04 $78.49 $40.70 $73.91 $70.64 $26. 71 $38.19 $49.65 $57.61
Bratticemen and timbermen:
Under $5.......................
$5 and under $10..........
$10 and under $15.........
$15 and under $20.........
$20 and under $25.........
$25 and under $30.........
$30 and under $35.........
$35 and under $40_____
$40 and under $45.........
$45 and under $50.........
$50 and under $55.........
$55 and under $60.........
$60 and under $65.........
$65 and under $70.........
$70 and under $75.........
$75 and under $80.........
$80 and under $90.........
$90 and under $100.......
$100 and under $110___
$110 and under $120___
$120 and under $140___
$140 and under $160___

4
4
4

4
1
5
9

48
23
40
57
53
77
99
109
172
223
175
227
213
163
173
308
398

6
10

12
6
15
18
27
51
51
74
107
75
44
96
72
25
14
4

2

9
9
4
16

20

1
23
18
10

53
79
183
42
24

121

58
29
4

Total........................ .
442 2,800
148
42 j 393
267 719
29
84 I 520
90
Average earnings in
half month............... . $39.99 $76.68 $81.36 $85.84 $85.75 $50.95 $76.66 $68.73 17.87 $41.88 $57.90 $66.20
Drivers:
Under $5...............
$5 and under $10..
$10 and under $15.
$15 and under $20.
$20 and under $25.
$25 and under $30.
$30 and under $35.
$35 and under $40.
$40 and under $45.
$45 and under $50.
$50 and under $55.
$55 and under $60.
$60 and under $65..

62411°— 2 7 -




2

29

18
18
15
18
13
13
24
41
36
78
96
148

24
13
21
24
16
26
43
49
80
124
107
117
41

78
134
78
108
105
151
194
240
285
281
312
322

46

BITUMINOUS COAL MINItfG

T a b l e F . — Number

of employees in each specified occupation in each State whose
earnings in half month were within each classified amount, 1926— Continued
Number of employees in each occupation whose earnings in half month were
within each classified group

Place of work, occupation,
and classified earnings in
half month

Penn­
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio sylva­ Ten- Vir- Vir­ Total
nestucky
ginia ginia
bama rado nois ana
nia

in s id e m in e — c o n t in u e d

Drivers—Continued.
$65 and under $70.
$70 and under $75...
$75 and under $80...
$80 and under $90...
$90 and under $100..
$100 and under $110.
$110 and under $120.
$120 and under $140.
$140 and under $160.

301
254

169

27
24
26
65

120

108
20

121

69
46
13
1

82
181
135
49
8

220

400
463
184
77

58
763 4,530
Total.........................
175
104 492 439 1,273
65
413
255 493
Average earnings in
half month................. $27.11 $64.70 $82.79 $70.90 $88.63$47.02j$72.72 $67.96 $29.18 $36.03 $46.15 $59.80
Laborers:
445
73
210
26
Under $5...................
75
4
429
$5 and under $10___
67
38
119
82
23
345
$10 and under $15...
75
37
63
79
24
312
87
37
$15 and under $20_
_
56
73
5
350
$20 and under $25___
68
40
76
86
27
430
$25 and under $30...
84
115
34
90
18
$30 and under $35___
108
492
130
103
63
7
606
130
71
$35 and under $40___
108
157
27
657
$40 and under $45_
_
173
182
73
123
25
577
197
$45 and under $50__
161
103
59
19
726
$50 and under $55___
223
269
83
64
59
65
240
596
$55 and under $60___
175
8
67
115
194
406
41
$60 and under $65___
9
22
177
74
376
$65 and under $70___
26
16
42
371
64
117
$70 and under $75___
37
2
118
107
380
$75 and under $80_
_
42
52
1
128
155
45
624
67
$80 and under $90___
265
134
24
$90 and under $100..
412
22
144
$100 and under $110..
62
186
72
61
27
$110 and under $120..
14
38
17
$120 and under $140..
12
3
1
$140 and under $160..
1
$180 and under $200.
1
Total.........................
Average earnings in
half m onth...............
Loaders, hand:
Under $5...................... .
$5 and under $10......... .
$10 and under $15____
$15 and under $20.........
$20 and under $25.........
$25 and under $30.........
$30 and under $35_____
$35 and un er $40_____
$40 and under $45.........
$45 and under $50.........
$50 and under $55.........
$55 and under $60.........
$60 and under $65.........
$65 and under $70.........
$70 and under $75.........
$75 and under $80.........
$80 and under $90.........
$90 and under $100____
$100 and under $110___
$110 and under $120___
$120 and under $140___
$140 and under $160....
$160 and under $180___
$180 and under $200___
$200 and under $220___

345 jl, 800 8,8!
505 2,081
21 1,661
965
151
111
61 1,122
!
29.55 ► $72.64 68.76 $61. 22 $35. 77 $54.27 $60.18 $22.15 $29.97'$44.51 $48. i
6.73
129
149
171
227

223
257

350
403
307

241
184

144
91
61
46
31
29
9
7
2
2

31
20
20
32
34
45
46
74
49
59
74
66
81
81
68
108
71
61
37
25
3

107
97
93
133
136
160
10
262
366
394
495
529
604
829
765
1,542
1,249
1,176
966
1,185
151
19
3
1

14
13
11
12
18
25
25
42
38
48
61
•82
S9
98

112
250
278
211

81
75
6

Total.......................... 3,070 1,099 11,5111,602
Average earnings in
half month................. $35.47 $64.07 $83.07 $81.25




326
440
496
526
065
730
813
932
850
789
665
525
447
350
285
226
343
218
144
71.
49
9
3

42
126

122

152

228

288
347
422
447
462
526
492
489
458
407
343
546
400
235
113
86
16

9,904 6,747 19,065

75

100

83
105
108
145
163
168
191
147
127
92
73
53
58
50
63
43
24
9
13
4

1,213
1,804
1,862
2,253
2,660
3,019
3,600
4,157
4,374
4,347
4,212
4,090
3,834
3,526
3,482
2,952
686 4,971
439 3,643
217 2,578
115 1,661
102 1,796
20
280
79
13
3

221
303
327
412
448
525
634
800
832
878
859
800
667
653
524
427

625 1,894 10,897 66,414

$42.98 $58.48 $55; 94 $27.68 $42.33 $52.05 $57.48

47

GENERAL TABLES

F.— Number of employees % each specified occupation in each State whose
n
earnings in half*month were within each classified amount, 1926— Continued

T a b le

Number of employees in each occupation whose earnings in half month were
within each classified group
Place of work, occupation,
and classified earnings in
half month

in s id e

m in e —

Penn­
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio sylva­ Ten- Vir- West
nes- ginia Vir­ Total
tucky
bama rado nois ana
nia
ginia

continued

Miners, hand and pick:
Under $5...................
$5 and under $10----$10 and under $15-..
$15 and under $20...
$20 and under $25.. $25 and under $30...
$30 and under $35...
$35 and under $40. _.
$40 and under $45...
$45 and under $50...
$50 and under $55...
$55 and under $60...
$60 and under $65...
$65 and under $70...
$70 and under $75. . .
$75 and under $80...
$80 and under $90...
$90 and under $100..
$100 and under $110.
$110 and under $120.
$120 and under $140.
$140 and under $160.
$160 and under $180.
$180 and under $200.
$200 and under $220.

29
47
53
66
75
107
123
146
160
163
132
99
100

82
55
35
39
22
4

10
40
24
39
32
65
94
109
126

134

225
245
264
249
432
293
174
97
93
38
13
2

10
19
24
36
52
50
55
43
57
54
71
69
51
62
76
105
91
97
57
50
9
2

131
165
163
187
226
309
326
380
473
550
580
590
633
634
594
503
855
654
418
204
167
17
5
1
1

11
35
36
43
55
78
77
115
125
155
173
172
129
131
112
75
112

61
33
14
5
2

28
262
410
36
37
403
57
508
65
601
90
852
111
944
141 1,087
143
224
150
347
182
425
170
423
147
408
153
134
316
135
122
145 1,813
77 1,305
40
824
17
428
14
367
3
90
23
3
1

544
418
,766
062 20,594
25
Total........................ . 1,537 1,103 3,155 j1,146 1,749
Average earnings in
$44.121$60.95*$71.47 $68.50 $54.53 $54.99 $64.67 82.39 $30.37 $65.83 $55.21 $80,31
half month.................
Miners, machine (cutters):
Under $5..................... .
$5 and under $10.........
$10 and under $15.........
$15 and under $20____
$20 and under $25____
$25 and under $30.........
$30 and under $35____
$35 and under $40.........
$40 and under $45.........
$45 and under $50____
$50 and under $55.........
$55 and under $60____
$60 and under $65....... .
$65 and under $70.........
$70 and under $75.........
$75 and under $80.........
$80 and under $90.........
$90 and under $100___
$100 and under $110___
$110 and under $120___
$120 and under $140___
$140 and under $160___
$160 and under $180..
$180 and under $200..
$200 and under $220..
$220 and under $240..
$240 and under $260..
$260 and under $280..
$280 and under $300..
$300 and over.______

10

25
29
38
54
106
127
109
120
233
189
75
51
12
7

149
Total.........................
109 1,326 ! 206
Average earnings in
half month............... $83.61 $95.12 $111.89 $120.68




25
78

1
11
11
17
14
18
17
26
22
29
43
39
71
80
75
74
176
157
139
135
261
175
86
48
35
15
2
13
2
8
805

700 1,800

80
61
91
87
119
192
171
199
206
242
268
554
484
483
469
794
581

280

184
106
50
11
17
7
11

38

97

825

6,055

$80. 83$] 100.49 $106.70 $44.20 $81.60j$107-39!$102.68
1

48

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

T able F. — Number of employees in each specified occupation in each State whose
earnings in half month were within each classified amount, 1926— Continued
Number of employees in each occupation whose earnings in half month were
within each classified group
Place of work, occupation,
and classified earnings in
half month

in s id e

m in e —

Penn­
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan- Ken- Ohio sylva­ Ten- Vir- West
nes- ginia Vir­ Total
tucky
bama rado nois ana
nia
ginia

continued

Motormen:
Under $5.......................
$5 and under $10......... .
$10 and under $15.........
$15 and under $20.........
$20 and under $25.........
$25 and under $30____
$30 and under $35........
$35 and under $40........
$40 and under $45........
$45 and under $50........
$50 and under $55........
$55 and under $60........
$60 and under $65.........
$65 and under $70...
$70 and under $75...
$75 and under $80...
$80 and under $90.. _
$90 and under $100..
$100 and under $110.
$110 and under $120.
$120 and under $140.
$140 and under $160.

15
24
17
16
20
19
33
34
57
74
108
125
157
91
105

13
3
7
10
12
14
3
6
28
37
60
77
123
112
115
143
135
60
42
25

1
3
2
2
1
3
13
2
13
8
19
22
24
30
88
104
90

84
43
50
64
55
95
111

177
275
325
343
361
311
314
265
428
407
224
152
105
12

Total........................ . 177
71
173 1,111 4,239
20 697
229 1,028
41
557 135
Average earnings in
half month............... . $44.57 $73.65:$91.76 '1.58 $84.25 $55.02 $79.93 $75.88 $41.02 $50.27 $59.21 $67.97
Trackmen:
Under $5............ ...........
$5 and under $10_____
$10 and under $15.........
$15 and under $20.........
$20 and under $25.........
$25 and under $30.........
$30 and under $35.........
$35 and under $40.........
$40 and under $45.........
$45 and under $50.........
$50 and under $55.........
$55 and under $60.........
$60 and under $65.........
$65 and under $70_____
$70 and under $75.........
$75 and under $80.........
$80 and under $90.........
$90 and under $100____
$100 and under $110___
$110 and under $120___
$120 and under $140___
$140 and under $160___
$180 and under $200._.
Total...................
Average earnings
half month—




14
16
14
15
25
19
38
43
64
118
94
73
59
29
26
21
39
19
8
2

8
2
9
6
5
6
20
4
13
25
5
29
32
6
54
115
234
58
30
13

141

101 | 674

125

31

l
6
7
9
12
14
11
16
25
30
49
72
S 109
I
8 ; 114
4 I 95
7 I 76
31
135
53 I 100
26 | 57
14 ! 40
6 i 17
i ;
1

736

228 j 996

14
18
21
29
25
28
29
48
56
84
127
133
105
82
53
45
62
29
16

5
4
5
3
4
1
4
8
2 i
10
18 !

42

44
66
55
72
87
91
113
179
208
304
363
319
338
301
204
236
434
483
193
111
42
2
1

161 1,011

4,246

$42.15 $77.90$81.36 $85.12 $88.85 $50.76;$75.19 $72.14,$37.01 $43.6:7$54.81 $64.15
1

G tfE A T B E
E B ti A L S

49

T a b le P.— Number of employees in each specified occupation in each State whote
earnings in half month were within each classified amount, 1986— Continued
Number of employees in each occupation whose earnings in half month were
within each classified group
x^iaw oi worn, occupdiioii;
and classified earnings in
half month

Penn­ Ten­ Vir­ West
Ala­ Colo­ Illi­ Indi­ Kan­ Ken­
bama rado nois ana sas tucky Ohio sylva­ nes­ ginia Vir­ Total
nia see
ginia

OUTSIDE MINE

Carpenters and car-repair
men:
Under $5_____________
$5 and under $10______
$10 and under $15_. . . .
$15 and under $20_____
$20 and under $25_____
$25 and under $30.........
$30 and under $35.........
$35 and under $40.........
$40 and under $45.........
$45 and under $50.........
$50 and under $55.........
$55 and under $60.........
$60 and under $65.........
$65 and under $70.........
$70 and under $75_____
$75 and under $80_____
$80 and under $90_____
$90 and under $100____
$100 and under $110
$110 and under $120
$120 and under $140
$140 and under $160

2
6
5
6
2
5
18
12
25
22
10
6
3

1
1

3
1

5
4

2
5

1

4

1
1
1
1
2
4

2
4

10
7
2
1

3
2
2
8
9
11
11
24
30
25
21
10
5

1
3
8
4
7
2

1

1

8
8
26
26
49
17
17
8
8
6
9
8
4

1

1
1
1
1
1
1
3
5

1

5
3
3
15
16
10
2

1
3
6
4

6

2
1
3

4

1

5
6
19
36
46
66
42
51
38
29
47
49
16
20
5

4

6
5
4
8
1

1
1
1
2
4
6

9
7
8
8

5
4
1
1

1
2
2
9
7
5
6
7
17
18
27
45
41
25
34
34
22
8
3
1
1

3
20
22
26
23
22
47
48

103
110
154
158
109
107
101
88

135
122
68
47
17

1

2

162
2 214
Total.......................... 122
39
57
315 1,545
69 501
35
29
Average earnings in
half month................. $37.61 $73.95 $93.24 $85.50 $88.25 $53.24,,$80.09 $67.94$38.52 $48.39 $60.37 $64.28'
Laborers:
46
Under $5_____________
42
$5 and under $10______
32
$10 and under $15_____
$15 and under $20_____
75
95
$20 and under $25_____
$25 and under $30_____ 129
$30 and under $35_____ 118
$35 and under $40_____
56
17
$40 and under $45_____
5
$45 and tinder $50.........
2
$50 and under $55_____
3
$55 and under $60- _ —
$60 and under $65
$65 and under $70_____ ]_____
$70 and under $75_____ 1
..........
$75 and under $80_____ i.........
$80 and tinder $90_____ !_____
$90 and under $100____
$100 and under $110____
$110 and under $120____
$120 and under $140____
$140 and under $160____

3
2
1
4

7
6

2

2
7

2
19
15
7
15
9
23

2
2
1
4
7
12

7

12
10
22
36

1

24

22

31
23
18

29
53
36
91
184

16
12

3
1

110

75
36
31
7

4

1

4
8

10
10

18

44

21
10
1
1

1
1

2
1

1
4
4
1

5
5
3
7
8
6
4

42

42
29
38
64
94
138
168
167
126
92
44
47
37
21
14
25
2

6
14
6
4
8
7
20
14
14
21
19
19
16
27
39
47
113
54
19
4

3

20
35
42

19
11

11
8
13
33
21
19
10
1

15
12
6

23
40
22
53
42
72
77
60
156
50
37
179
14
208
241
10
175
160
1
120
104
1
80
1
179
97 .........!.........
.........1
..........
47
!
11
2
i

19
32
40
49
84
83
135
213
226
198
205
169
131
79
72
44
41
6
3
1

170
202
175
243
346
488
594
696
679
612
644
464
423
355
305
313
605
301
161

57
37
7

146 1 292 1,830 7,877
234
Total______________ 620
778
162
53 1,190 474 2,098
Average earnings in
half month____ . . . . . . i$24.09 $56.41 $80.77 $72.90 $76.29:$39.44 $67.97 $55.11 $23.64 $30.49 $45.93j$50.53
1
1




T a b l e G . — Number of employees making each specified number @f start’ (days} in half month, 1926, by place of work, occupationr and State
s

Place of work, occupation, and
State

Or

Number of employees whose starts (days on which' they worked) m the half month were—

Average
Num­ Num­ number
ber of ber of of starts
em­
(days)
mines ployees in half
month

10

IS

13

16

INSIDE MINE

12
21

200
58
669
108
16
791
188
981
71
193
1,093

Total__
Gagers:
Colorado.
Illinois__
Indiana__
Kentucky.
Ohio--------




32
15
37
16
11

77
44
129

148
84
520
90
42
393
267
719
29

66

11
2

8.8

9.7
10.1

7
30

28
139

106

120

118

158

262

22

103
32
17
45

46

11.0
11.6
10.2
10.9
10.4
10,1

2

22

129
33
220

36

17
179

95

114
4
157

8

12
1
137
29
236
17
54

2C0
144

22
8
13
9
67
47
122
7

12

31
30
105
25
7
103
49
206

6

59

11.1
10.8

2

20
18
124
29

110

10.0

2,800

36
3
90
20

579

10.2
13.0
10.7
11.5
11.2
10.2
10.3
10.9
10.7

442
484

25
3
105
15
4
70
17
92
9
9
92

40
3

9.9

114

Total..
Bratticemen and timbermen:
Alabama.............................
Colorado.............................
Illinois.................................
Indiana...............................
Kansas........................ .......
Kentucky...........................
Ohio....................................
Pennsylvania.....................
Tennessee.......................... .
Virginia..............................
West Virginia...... ........... .

9.4
11.8
10.0
10.4
10.4
8.9
10.0
10.5

51

41

53

56

67

117

115

166

257

C O A l,

Kentucky........
Ohio.................
Pennsylvania..
Tennessee........
Virginia...........
West Virginia.

23
14
39
14
5
84
45
147

BITUM IN OU S

Brakemen:
Alabama.
Colorado.
Illinois-. .
Indiana..

15
175

476

752

182

107

Pennsylvania...................
Virginia............................
West Virginia..................

57
1
16

115
4
30

11.2
0)
13.1

1

2

2

1

3

3

10
(0

6

2
0)

13

20

39

10

3

2

10

7

6

5

Total________________

188

414

11.1

2

3

9

7

1

10

10

25

30

38

46

75

103

35

16

Drivers:
Alabama................ .........
Colorado........... ..............
Illinois..............................
Indiana............................
Kansas.............................
Kentucky........................
O hio................. ..............
Pennsylvania...................
Tennessee........................
Virginia...........................
West Virginia..................

29
17
26
12
10
35
35
79
6
8
63

413
255
493
175
104
492
439
1,273
65
58
763

8.8
11.3
10.2
9.7
11.9
10.0
9.7
10.7
9.1
10.8
9.9

26
2
12
6

20
7
6
4

21
4
10
4

17
2
7
6

12
3
8
2

20
10
6
11

16
2
44
9

17
21
20
4

14
9
21
1
2
16

9
11
16
2

9
9
18
1

10
11
25
2

24

16

35
30
41
24
18
67
50
84
14
4
88

60
28
82
28
13
73
56
170
8
6
115

70
42
113
30
22
79
72
250
6
10
132

51
45
69
24
33
119
69
409
8
24
158

5
26
9
4
1
2
9
7

16

21
26
53
3
3
29

26
4
47
13
6
36
33
68
U
4
61

10
33
20
5
10
7
18
35

29

15
9
16
1
2
17

24
12
19
5
1
14
36
81
4
3
40

Total.............................

320

4,530

10.2

137

97

102

86

86

111

206

239

309

71

5

Laborers:
Alabama........... ..............
Colorado...... ...................
Illinois............. ................
Indiana...........................
Kansas............ ...............
Kentucky........................
O h io ........................... .
Pennsylvania...................
Tennessee................... .
Virginia............................
West Virginia..................

33
8
39
15
7
80
33
144
11
18
112

965
61
1,122
151
21
1,661
505
2,081
111
345
1,800

8.5
12.5
9.9
9.2
8.9
8.3
8.2
10.7
7.6
8.4
9.8

67

53

42

51

28
7
2
99
41
44
6
12
57

30
3
2
73
22
41
5
16
66

23
3

27
2
29
2

54
2
38
4

45

26
22
2
195
52
41
20
19
89

59
24
39
7
15
46

62
17
53
3
20
56

68
20
68
2
26
81

80
4
49
5
3
143
32
135
7
32
112

1
5
2

63
21
38
6
14
50

60
3
92
6
1
87
24
96
6
53
82

Total.............................

500

8,823

9.4

533

349

300

269

250

309

369

510

Loaders, contract:
Alabama_______________
Colorado........ ..................
Kentucky........................
Tennessee........................
Virginia.............................
West Virginia...................

17
1
26
1
9
7

291
1
244
7
103
48

8.3
(0
10.8
0)
10.5
9.9

2

7

1

7

11

18

1

1

3

6

5

8

13
(i)
7

j

1

1
1

1
2

Total............................. .

61

694

10.1

!
7 I

14

18

29

8

8 -------

455

639

826

1,009

152

99

US
39
142
5
18
138

114
1
164
16
2
157
52
247
13
27
190

103
10
210
32
3
321
62
403
11
41
236

123
18
164
20
4
253
61
535
14
43
464

23
7
34
11
1
45
32
126
6
7
87

23
9
28
8
1
18
5
67

1
6

2
35

11

602

717

983

1,332

1,699

379

196

26

22

39

48

69

25

28

12

11

25

29

7

5
3

7
22

13
1

22
3

62
0)
11
7

74
(i)
31
8

28

42

79

87

124 I

106

.........
146 1

56
3

149
9

(i)

TABLES

5

3

5

GENERAL

2

14

4

1

1

i Data included in total.




Of

T a b le G .— Number of employees making each specified number of starts (days) in half month, 1926, by place of work, occupation, and State—
Continued

Place of work, occupation, and
State

Average
Num­ Tiiimhftr
Num­ ber of of starts
ber of
(days)
em­
mines ployees in half
month

Cg

Number of employees whose starts (days on which they worked) in the half month were—

8

6

7

173
37
341
53
509
496
735
47
66
531

231
39
939
35
578
455
926
46
102
552

1,103 |1,493 i 1,633 |1,899 i 2,610 ! 2,988

3,903

1

2

3

4

5

106
14
128
14
215
61
314
22
44
185

109
26
159
19
314
136
390
26
75
239

102
23
157
19
346
141
475
22
66
282

151
118
22
31
252
581
26
38
360
398
206
335
552
444
28 | 39
81 j
87
362 | 398

9

10

11

12

13

298
58
1,237
68
819
568
1,432
49
147
841

366
73
857
136
1,140
738
1,791
76
161
983

421
185
1,922
153
1,305
748
2,219
93
239
1,448

430
206
1,825
288
1,349
940
2,879
73
306
1,832

323
139
2,119
752
1,546
1,332
3,810
61
279
1,649

239
202
994
1
1,023
577
3,088
37
235
1,448

2
13
9
6
5
147

5,517 j 6,321

8,733

10,128

12,010

7,844

15

14

227

16

inside mine—continued

Total.....................................

Ohio.................... .....................
Total................... .................
Miners, hand or pick:
AtflhftTTlA
rVtlnrario
Illinois_____________________




488 |66,414

9.4

3
1
4
1
6
1
2
5
23 I

34
27
23
17
39
18
36
112
306

i
21
5
2
3
32

13
919
71
15
47
1,065

17
13
13

1,537
i, las
3,155

I
9.9 i
i.......... i
2
8.8 1
1
(l)
10.5
0)
8.2
10.2
2
4 1
9.9
0)

0)

9.6
9.4
9.1
11.2
9.5

8

8

9.7
10.2
9.8

23
20
25

i
1
I
2
* J
1 1
1 ! ( ,) i i
i
1
A
; (1
)
1
■
1
1
1
0)
o
1,
i
1
1 1 (,)>
2 i
2
5i
1
i
6 i
I
8
n !
3 i
8
1
1I
I

0)
13

|
1 !

1

1 j

2

!

0)
12

19 |
1

21 I
i
2 I
.......... !
23 1
19

25
36
30

31
38
29

34
27
26

7

1

7
17

21
3
1
25

25
6
2
1
34

56
2
5
2
65

46
34
46

56
70
67

.83
37
118

21 1
10 I
33 i
i
129 1
6

0)

1
8
20

10
0)
2

2
0)

4

3

1

5

1
5 .........

3

5

0)
6
(‘>7
0)
0)
1
2
23
11
14
49
44 i
1
42 |
8

0)

0)
10
0

.........
2
1 .........1
2 !.........
14
11
2 !.........
44 1 15

116
6
5
5
132

144
19
2
. 16
181

144
44
699

212
60
647

260
113
538

273
200
620

234
266
93

1
1
....... 1
.........
11
!

103

2
2 !
137 | 109

183
8
1
5
197

115
29
214

1
1

j

1
0)

1
1

2
43

88
19

M INING

Loaders, machine:
Illinois
TH
ti iqtia
TTontnplrv
Ohio
pATin^vlvftTiift
T ati
Virrinift
West Virginia..........................
Total......................................
Miners, gang:
AldKomo
Illinois
TndiftiiA

8.5
10.0
9.4
10.3
9.0
9.2
9.7
8.3
9.0
9.4

C A
OL

Indiana
Kentucky
Ohio
. .
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Virginia
West Virginia..........................

3,070
1,099
11,511
1,602
9,904
6,747
19,065
625
1,894
10,897

29
15
33
9
86
45
130
10
21
110

BITUMTNOXJS

Loaders, hand:

13
116
129
1

1

Indiana...................................
Kansas....................................
Kentucky...............................
Ohio........................................
Pennsylvania.........................
Tennessee...............................
Virginia..................................
West Virginia........................

8
11
10

59

1,146
1,749
418
89
8,766
544
25
2,062

Total...................................
Miners, machine (cutters):
Alabama.................................
Colorado.................................
Illinois....................................
Indiana...................................
Kentucky........... ...................
Ohio........................................
Pennsylvania.........................
Tennessee...........................
Virginia..................................
West Virginia_________ ____

254

20,594

Total....................................

5

110
7

1

Total....................................
1 Data included in total.




9.9
9.9
8.7
9.8

92

10.2
10.5
9.7
9.6
9.7
10.5
10.9
9.8
10.9
10.7

464

6,055

10.3

44
128

10
20

170

6

353
151
39
72
91
151

22
11
39
16
7
85
45
143
13

20

156

8

151
13

30

29

1

324

(*)

2.

0)

230
16

22

45
53
9

12

304
18

(l)

78
89
16
19
399
34

50

45
504

728

112
985

3
15
4
25

8
14

2

125
136
16

161
420
55

537
69

655
74

2

0)

140

1,534
92

1,788
35

32
1,633
25

2

12

20
66

C)
1

(l)

0)

1,387

2,454

3,051

3,480

3,614

2,772

12

20

87
53

27
13
242
25
117
60

110

220

29
14
237
103
170
227
435
4
13
113

167
170
610
14
48
274

1,345

1,476

199

379

5
79
18
56
54
119

16
244

4
50

5
78

2

95

81

162

151

12

1

218

376

399

10

12

24

5
9
115

626

12

8.1

410

26

256

34
128

1

16
27
4
17
19

8.6
9.3
25

81

28

40

73

53

106

140

10.9
12.4
10.5

16

32

18

11.1

14

95
25
4
90
31
123
7
27
132

107
19
3
119
45
277
13
28
172

567

811

1

10.5
10.4
10.7

118

697
229
1,028
71
173
1 , 111

10.6
10.9
10.9

520

4,239

10.8

21

46
136
90

(*)

166
5
34
28
91

12
21
1
1
101

249
231
78

0)

143

18
117

2

292
407
48
4
979
114

6
1

33

1

9
18
14
44

186
24

31
52
13
3
210

10.7
8.4
10.6
6.4

8.8
177
41
557
135

31
9

284

0)

149
109
1,326
206
805
700
1,800
38
97
825

Miners’ , machine (cutters'), help­
ers:
Alabama.................................
Colorado.................................
Kentucky..............................
Pennsylvania.........................
Tennessee...............................
Virginia..................................
West Virginia........................
Total...................................
Motormen:
Alabama.................................
C olorad o..............................
Illinois....................................
Indiana........ .........................
Kansas.............. .....................
Kentucky...............................
Ohio.......................... ............
Pennsylvania...... ..................
Tennessee...............................
Virginia..................................
West Virginia.........................

8.9
9.4

10.2

11.1

73

62

63

64

90

189

261

391

144

10
25

"m

50
278

21

75

1,193

T a b l e G .—

Number of employees making each specified number of starts (days) in half month, 1926, by place of work, occupation, and State—

Cn

Continued

Place of work, occupation, and
State

Average
Num- Niim- number
ber of ber of of starts
em­
(days)
mines
ployees in half
month

Number of employees whose starts (days on which they worked) in the half month were—

1

2

3

4

5

7

6

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

inside mine —continued

11.0
14.2
13.2
13.5
11.9
14.1
13.8
9.6
8.0
12.5

2
3
2
1

2

Total_____________________

402

1,081

12.7

Trackmen:
Alabama____ ______________
Colorado___________________
Illinois_________________ ___
Indiana___________ ____ ____
Kansas................................... .
Kentucky__________________
Ohio..........................................
Pennsylvania_______________
Tennessee............................... .
Virginia....................................
West Virginia.......................

36
17
39
17
10
86
45
151
14
22
117

141
101
674
125
31
736
228
996
42
161
1,011

10.5
13.0
10.7
11.1
11.8
10.5
10.1
11.4
10.5
10.5
10.7

16
9
6
3
5
19

554

4,246

10.8

74

12
9
21
8
34
26
22

39
21
109
35
107
77
51

9.5
11.1
9.2
10.2
10.1
10.0
10.3

Total____________________
Trappers (boys):
Alabama...................................
Colorado...................................
Illinois_____________
Indiana____________________
Kentucky__________________
Ohio_______ __________ _____
Pennsylvania...........................




7

3

7

1
1
2

6

2

3

5

i

1

4
1
1

21
3
8
6
33
6
49
3
5
68

13
1
13
7
13
6
44

5
15

3
1
18
10
15
4
2
32

2

I
6

4

5

8

11

21

10

22 |

40

55

101

202

111

332

104

1
1
22

3
1
14
3

2

12
1
32
3

15
7
17

21
8
14

30

2
25

18
6
100
23
1
116
32
101
10
26
100

19
14
155
27
10
152
24
167
12
18
155

31
27
116
20
7
180
41
307
7
51
317

5
13
52
11
5
29
24
76

3
16

15
2
57
10
4
55
15
81
2
10
67

9
74

9
29
26
10
1
11
12
63
1
2
28

1
4

14
2
12

12
1
38
7
1
44
6
63
2
10
50

2

69

64

74

234 | 318

533

753

1,104

298

192

10

1

3
2
1

7

2

7
2
14

1
1

7

1
3

3
2

8
2
16
13
28
26
10

1

5

1

1

5

3
1
3
3

1
2
1

3
3

2
2

3

3
3

22

15

17

10

4
1
8
3

3

15
7
9

1
1
9
2
1
13
4
14

5

11
1

5
18

1
2
2

8
3

1
1
2
1

5
1
5

5
23

26
2
1
21
22
16
2
1
39

34
15
47
3
14
48

90

92

132

209

1

2

7

2
1
18

1
1
4

3
4
1

5
2
6
4
1

3
4
8
2
7
7

3

5
2
4

2
1
12
4
7
5

2
1
13
7
10
1
3

10
2
9
2
12

10
6
11
6
11

16

22
5
17
3
1
14
13
33
13
23
18
153
44
4
2
51 ” "20

10
1
2
1
7
2
4
1
2
10

1

22
16
14

14

3

1
1

MINING

127
27
45
31
154
69
341
19
30
238

CA
OL

32
11
18
12
65
34
127
8
11
84

BITUMINOUS

Pumpmen:
Alabama...................................
Colorado........ ..........................
Illinois________________ ____
Indiana........ ........ ................ .
Kentucky_____________ ____
Ohio..........................................
Pennsylvania_______________
Tennessee.................................
Virginia____ _______________
West Virginia______________

Virginia.................................
West Virginia.................. —.

6
12
57

25
50
179

8.9
9.9
10.2

5

1
3
4

4

4
2

1
5

2
8

2
2
8

11

8
2
7

7
3
13

3
14
24

7
35

1
12
50

3

21

29

44

42

48

60

92

145

138

7

7

1

6

19
1
13
6

13
1
32
1

18
5
37
7

30

38
5
74
9
12
63
18
112
6
8
36

41
2
98
28
6
87
22
145
9
29
81

63
8
138
28
11
147
49
256
7
12
100

117
37
182
49
14
314
65
716
25
74
240

27
13
67
13
3
57
33
148
5
5
87

27
36
102
31
2
33
28
145

15
5
8

4
64

12

819

1,833

458

472

69

6

19
8
30
4
4
51
15
99
5
15
89

8
8
22
6
4
10
7
27
1
3
22

2
22
2
1
6
1
13

1

2

3

3

339

118

50

6

8
8
27
3

7
9
20
6

3
1

9
4
34
4
8
21

5
4
19
2
1
9

3

126

82

10

1

1

693

9.9

11

15

16

17

35
16
39
17
11
85
39
143
11
20
106

440
115
820
185
57
967
305
1,835
82
170
769

11.0
13.1
11.5
11.9
11.2
10.5
10.9
11.7
9.9
10.9
11.5

9
1
5
2

3

8

15

3
2

6
1
2
1

50
12
18
3
3
14

2
22
9
9
2
1
12

22
5
21
1
4
10

19
2
20
2
5
9

23
5
17
4
6
13

28
12
24
6
2
21

21
6
52
5
4
12

35
14
71
2
6
19

28
8
7
43
16
64
5
7
39

Total..................................

522

5,745

11.3

117

75

76

67

.90

132

147

214

247

381

548

Blacksmiths:
Alabama__________ ____
Colorado___________ ______
Illinois______ ____ ________
Indiana___________ _______
Kansas_____________ _____
Kentucky________ ______
Ohio........ ........................ .
Pennsylvania....... ........... .
Tennessee..........................
Virginia........... ....................
West Virginia____________

35
17
39
17
11
83
44
147
14
22
111

45
21
109
32
12
123
76
267
20
30
174

12.1
13.4
12.9
11.6
12.9
12.1
10.2
11.7
9.8
11.9
12.1

1

2

1

1
1

1

1
1
2
2

1

1
1

4
1

6
1
8
5

Total..................................

540

909

11.9

Kentucky_____
Ohio__________
Pennsylvania...
Tennessee_____
Virginia............
West Virginia..

30
13
37
14
1
78
35
138
11
20
107

122
39
162
29
2
214
69
501
35
57
315

10.6
12.2
12.0
11.8
0
11.3

T©ta3________

484

1,545

11.4

16

3
9
17

OUTSIDE MINE

Carpenters and car-repair men:
Alabama....................... .......
Colorade-------------------------Illinois______ _____ _______
Indiana____________ ______




1 .0
1

11.5
10.8
11.1
11.4

1
1
1
2
5
1

1
1
1
1

2
2
1

5
3

3

2

10

6

8

6

7

2

3
3

3

5

2
1
3

3
1
3

3
1
5
2

2

10

1

1

12

18

1

2

1

1
1

5

1
5
2
1
3

1
4
5
12
1
1
3

4
6
10
1
2
2

8
4
16
1
2
6

6
8
22
4
4
16

17
9
2
30
16
49
2
2
16

11

15

30

31

43

80

149

3

2

1

4

6
1
7

9
1
11
1

23
3
13
1

20
1
22
5

9
4
8
1
2
7

6
6
19
1
6
10

7
6
17
4
6
12

4
1
15
2
0)
10
4
34
3
5
21

24
4
55
5
35

37
12
95
5
4
57

22
10
38
8
(!)
88
21
180
10
17
118

37

62

74

100

163

258

513

2
3

3

3
1
4
1
2
11

4

7
1
9
2
1
3

18

27

18

27.

6

TABLES

207

GENERAL

Total..................................
Other employees:
Alabama...............................
Colorado...............................
Illinois...................................
Indiana.................................
Kansas..................................
Kentucky.............................
Ohio......................................
Pennsylvania........................
Tennessee................ ............
Virginia.................................
West Virginia.................. .

1

1

2
Ol

T a b l e G .— Number

of employees making each specified number of starts (days) in half month. 1926, by place of work, occupation, and State—
Continued

Average
number
Place of work, occupation, and Num­ Num­ of starts
ber of ber of
State
(days)
mines
em­
in half
ployees month

Cjj

'

Number of employees whose starts (days on which they worked) in the half month were—

2

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

10

9

12

11

13

14

15

16

outside mine—continued

320 |

12.1
12.9
14.7
14.5
12.3
13.0
13.2
13.3
10.4
11.8
12.7

1

1

674

13.3

5

2

1

2

1

8

5

28
1
5
2

19
5
14
1
1
23
6
29
8
5
40

13
1
* 21
4

22
4
10
3

23
23
32
3
6
44

30
23
44
4
8
62

17
3
15
7
2
31
20
61
3
18
46

151

170

210

223

1

1
1

1
1
1
1

2
2

1

2
I

---------1

Laborers:
Alabama___________________
Colorado___________________
Illinois_____________________
Indiana___________ ____ ____
Kansas_____________________
Kentucky__________________
Ohio............. ..........................
Pennsylvania_______________
Tennessee................ ................
Virginia____________________
West Virginia__ ____________

36
17
39
17
11
83
45
149
13
22
118

620
234
778
162
53
1,190
474
2,098
146
292
1,830

9.5
12.0
11.0
10.7
11.2
10.4
10.0
11.0
8.8
9.6
10.9

30
4
8
4
1
39
17
26
17
9
22

28
9
35
7
11
23

17
1
3
1
3
21
6
41
5
6
39

Total.....................................

550

7,877

10.7

177

149

143




3
3
1

1
1

11
6

6

7

1

2

2

7
1
19

5
8
2
1
1
6
2
25
1

10
15
97
23
6
9
14
54

1
3
2

3
1
6

2
1
14
2
4
8

10

12
22
5
5
3
15
6
60
3
4
25

7

10

5

11

8

19

40

56

160

58

238

60

39
5
45
9
43
33
80
3
45
76

61
12
53
7
3
69
26
105
10
17
76

60
17
79
18
6
117
32
126
12
11
128

75
7
112
20
4
148
50
205
26
44
229

93
32
152
49
13
221
97
490
11
25
275

117
78
140
18
10
327
102
632
30
84
628

19
35
79
13
5
44
18
118
6
2
96

10
26
38
6
2
25
10
68
1
1
25

378

439

606

920

1,458

2,166

435

212

2
1
1
1
2
2
2

2

6
26
2
2
19

3
4
3
1
2
6
21
40
■!.ja

MINING

66
57
137
31
15
42
30
204
9
9
74

CA
OL

Total_____________________

26
17
39
16
11
30
21
95
7
6
52

BITUMINOUS

Engineers:
Alabama.___
__
_____ _
Colorado.
Illinois___
Indiana___________________ _
Kansas__ _
Kentucky___
___________
O h io .......................................
Pennsylvania_____ . _______
Tennessee. >
Virginia. ____
__
__
West Virginia____________ _

Other employees:
Alabama____
Colorado........
Illinois...........
Indiana-------Kansas...........
Kentucky___
Ohio...............
Pennsylvania.
Tennessee___
Virginia.........
West Virginia.
Total..........
* Data included in total.




345
17
38
17
11
83
41
150
14

m

11.6
12.8

114

12.4
11.5
11.4
12.5
11.0
11.2
12.2

540

4,201

12.1

22

4

1

12.7

312
96
34
650
215
382
96
169
740

2
2

3

12.0

1
19
4
6

" 2"
5

“I i "

5
13

1
2
2

43

26

21

53

10

10

17

4

“ 9'

"26"

8
2

20

9
43

6
4

4
42
5

36
14
3
107
27
172

12

27

13
8
5
56
14
84
5
24
72

9
70

106
47
76
30
13
229
55
464
37
76
265

216

308

512

1,398

4

14

1

1
•11"

2

5

3

5

10

5

5

12
4

1

13
3
4
13

42

61

5

2
40

8
2

41

22

7

1

2

2

40
3

66

6

11

21

116

10

127

6

10

11

27
19
44
3
3
37
33

126

4
9
75

380

44
47
72

20
5
65
29
243
7
4
87

9

8

18

...

12
6

40
160

APPENDIX

AGREEMENT BETWEEN BITUMINOUS MINERS AND OPERATORS
T h e a g r e e m e n t b e tw e e n th e U n it e d M i n e W o r k e r s o f A m e r ic a a n d
th e c o a l o p e r a to rs o f th e H o c k in g d istric t o f O h io , e ffe c tiv e fr o m
A p r il 1, 1 9 2 3 , to M a r c h 3 1 , 1 9 2 4 , a n d c o n tin u e d in fo rc e d u r in g th e
p e rio d o f th is s t u d y b y th e J a c k so n v ille a g r e e m e n t is g iv e n b e lo w .
T h i s is th e b a sin g d istric t o f O h io a n d p a r t o f th e c e n tra l c o m p e t i­
t iv e fie ld , c o n sistin g o f Illin o is, In d ia n a , O h io , a n d w e ste r n P e n n s y l­
v a n ia .
S U B D IS T R IC T NO. 1
D etailed M in in g S cale

for

H ocking V alley (S ubdistrict 1

of

D istrict 6)

(Effective from April 1, 1923, to March 31, 1924)

This agreement, by and between the respective duly authorized representatives
of the coal operators and miners of the Hocking district of Ohio.
Witnesseth, That pursuant to the agreement entered into at New York, N. Y .,
January 24, 1923, the following shall be the prices, rates of wages, rules and con­
ditions to govern the production of coal in the Hocking district.
W e, the members of the scale committee representing the operators and miners
of the Hocking district, submit the following prices and conditions as the wage
scale for said district for the period beginning April 1, 1923, and ending March
31, 1924:
Pick mining
Run of mine_________________________________________ per ton__ $1. 1164
Entries, dry________________________________________ per yard__ 3. 6217
Break throughs in entries______________________________do____
3. 6217
Break throughs in rooms______________________________ do____
2. 5110
Room turning_____________________________________ per room__ 5 .4 896
Inside day labor
Tracklayers_________________________________________ per day__
Tracklayers’ helpers------------------------------------------------------ do------Trappers________________________________________________ do------Trappers (where old men are employed)_____________ do_____
Bottom cagers, drivers, trip riders____________________ do_____
Water haulers, machine haulers_______________________ do____
Snappers on gathering locomotives___________________ do_____
Timbermen_____________________________________________ do------Pipemen for compressed-air plants____________________do------Wiremen______________________________ _________________ do------Motormen______________________________________________ do------Motormen (minimum)_________________________________ do------Other inside day labor-------------------------------------------------do------Spike team drivers, extra----------------------------------------------do-------

7. 50
7. 25
4. 00
5. 41
7. 50
7. 50
7. 50
7. 50
7. 42
7. 50
7. 50
7. 50
7. 25
.2 5

Machine cutting
By
By
By
By

Jeffrey machine in room------------------------------------- per ton__
.
Jeffrey machine in entry___________________________ do------- -----.
punching machines in room------------------------------------do------- -----.
punching machines in entry----------------------------------- do------- ---- .

58




14
1790
1744
1905

AGREEMENT BETWEEN MINERS AND OPERATORS

59

Loading

In rooms with hand drilling______________
In entry with hand drilling______________
Break throughs in entries (entry price) _ -.
Break throughs in rooms_________________

per ton— $0. 80
.__do____
.9290
.-_d o ____
.9290
do-----(i)

Outside day labor

First blacksmith__________________________
Second blacksmith________________________
Blacksmith helpers.
Mine carpenters_
_
Dumpers_____________
Trimmers____________
Greasers and couplers

per day__ 7. 77
— .d o_____7.45
- _ d o ______7.25
- _ d o ____ _7.45
- _ d o ____ __7. 25
- _ d o ____ __7. 25
_ do____ __5.06
_

When engineers and firemen are employed by the day, the minimum rate
shall be $7.25 for 8 hours’ work. This shall not apply to men employed at a
monthly rate. This rule shall also apply to coal washers.
First. That the 8-hour day of 48 hours of 6 days per week is hereby reaffirmed.
The following holidays are recognized:
New Year’s Day.
Lincoln’s Birthday.
Washington’s Birthday.
April 1.
Decoration Day.
Fourth of July.
August primary day.
Labor Day.
November general election day.
Thanksgiving Day.
Christmas.
Second. That an 8-hour day means 8 hours’ work in the mines at usual working
places for all classes of inside day labor. This shall be exclusive of the time
required in reaching such working places in the morning and departing from same
at night.
(AT Regarding drivers, they shall take their mules to and from the stables and
the time required in so doing shall not include any part of the day’s labor, their
work beginning when they reach the change at which they receive empty cars,
but in no case shall the driver’s time be docked while he is waiting for such car
at the point named.
(B)
The company shall harness and unharness all stock. Drivers shall
unhalter and bridle stock in the morning and halter them in the evening at
quitting time. At mines having 15 head of stock or less the stable boss shall
harness and unharness all stock, and at mines having over 15 head of stock the
company shall have the privilege of employing a regular employee 1 hour extra
each morning and 1 hour extra each evening to assist the stable boss in harnessing
and unharnessing stock. Night drivers shall unharness their stock when taken in
stable at night.
Third. That when the men go into the mine in the morning they shall be
entitled to 2 hours’ pay whether or not the mine works the full 2 hours. But
after the first 2 hours the men shall be paid for every hour thereafter by the
hour for each hour’s work or fractional part thereof. If for any reason the
regular routine work can not be furnished the labor for a portion of the first 2
hours, the operators may furnish other than the regular labor for the unexpired
time.
INTERPRETATION

The interpretation’of this rule is that day men working on idle days or extra
time are entitled to their regular wage, unless called upon to perform work
carrying a higher rate, for which such rate shall apply.
TURNS

S e c. 4. The operators shall keep a square turn, and it shall be the duty of

the superintendent to see that this rule is properly carried out and that at least
each 2 weeks the turn for all sections of the mine shall be made uniform.
* Entry price.




60

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

There shall be no free turns allowed to either rooms or entries. The entries
shall be driven as fast as operators desire or conditions permit, but in no case
shall entry miners be allowed more cars per week than room miners. If, however,
the regular turn will not allow cars enough to drive the entries as fast as desired,
the operators shall increase the number of miners in each entry, so that by
giving to each the regular turn the entries shall be driven as fast as two miners
could drive them with full work. But should the room men decline to take
their places in the entries when requested to do so by the operators, then the
entry men shall have free turns until the entries are driven the required length.
Nothing in the foregoing to prevent fast turns.
This rule shall apply to the machine men as well as loaders and the company
agrees to use every effort to the end that the number of men on each machine
will be equalized.
p r e p a r a t io n

of

coal

Sec. 5. Both miners and operators recognizing the importance of getting
clean and merchantable coal to insure the sale of the same, it is understood and
agreed that the miners will produce their coal in such a way as not to increase
the percentage of fine coal, either by carelessness or reckless shooting, and will
load clean and merchantable coal free from impurities.
In order to secure the above results it is agreed as follows:
(A) When necessary to snub coal, snubbing must be done in a practical and
workmanlike manner so as to keep the quality of the output uniform and pro­
duce the largest amount of lump coal.
(B) The loader or loaders shall not drill any hole on the solid of the rib, nor
deeper than the undercut.
(C) Unless otherwise required by operator, the fine coal and cuttings must
not be loaded out separately, but must be loaded and distributed throughout
the balance of the coal in order to keep the product of the mine uniform.
(D) Any loader or loaders found breaking up the loading bone, soft coal, or
other impurities with his coal, shall be laid off 5 days for the first offense and 10
days for each succeeding offense.
DOCKING

Sec. 6. The operator may designate one man at each mine, who shall be
recognized as inspector, and whose duty it shall be to inspect the coal. The
miners may also designate one man at each mine to inspect the cleaning of the
coal and the weighing of the impurities. Should a loader willfully, carelessly,
or otherwise fail to load clean, merchantable coal, the inspector shall estimate
or cause to be weighed the impurities, and when 100 to 150 pounds of dirty
coal has been loaded, 10 cents shall be taken for the 100 or 150 pounds.
For from 150 pounds to 250 pounds of dirty coal 20 cents shall be taken.
For from 250 to 500 pounds of dirty coal, 30 cents shall be taken.
For the third car of dirty coal from any one working place in any one day,
or where 500 or more pounds of dirty coal is found in any one car, 50 cents shall
be checked off.
If upon investigation by the mine boss and committee, the man or men are
found to have an average working place, he or they shall be suspended 1 or 2
days, at the discretion of the mine boss and mine committee. But should a
place be found below an average working place then the above penalties shall
not apply.
Whenever the provisions of this contract are not observed the operator has
the right to close down the mine until the miners will observe the contract to
produce clean, merchantable coal.
It is understood that the operators have a right to clean the coal before
weighing.
The moneys checked off shall be placed in the burial fund and shall not be
refunded and shall only be used by miners and operators for the purpose for
which such fund was created.
clay

v e in s

Sec. 7. Where clay veins, rolls in bottom, or horsebacks exist, the price for
removing the same shall be determined between the loader and mine boss. If
loader and mine boss fail to agree, the same to be referred to loader, mine boss,
and mine committee.




AGREEMENT BETWEEN MINERS AND OPERATORS

61

SLATE

Sec. 8. The company shall remove the slate from the working places of the
miners; and if the company fails after being notified, the miners shall be employed
to remove such slate and be paid therefor at the price agreed upon between the
mine boss and the miner, based on the price of inside day labor. This refers to
all kinds and conditions of roof only and not to bone coal.
BOTTOM, SPRAGS, ETC.

Sec. 9. All machines shall be fitted with suitable skids, and machine men
must cut coal level and close to bottom; and in no case shall thickness of bottom
exceed 4 inches, except in case of pots or other extreme variations. Machine
men leaving more bottom than above, and when upon investigation it is proven
that the machine men are at fault, must lift the same, or it shall be lifted at
their expense. Where the bottom is sulphurous and unmarketable, the miner
may call the attention of the mine boss to it and endeavor to arrive at an agree­
ment for its removal or retention. If the mine boss and miner fail to reach an
agreement as to compensation or otherwise, the matter shall be submitted to
the superintendent and mine committee for adjustment. In case of sprags
being left by machine men they shall be notified by the loader, and if they refuse
to remove the same the loader shall remove the same and be allowed 50 cents
for so doing, the said 50 cents being deducted from machine men. When machine
men leave six or more sprags in one pay, they shall be removed from machine
and their services be dispensed with.
The company shall provide shields for covering cutter head of machine. The
machine men shall be required to remove the bits from the chain on cutter head,
or place the shield over cutter head to make the machine safe to be moved.
Any machine men failing to carry out this rule may be removed from machine
without question.
Where machine men are required to repair or replace parts on machines they
shall be compensated for the same.
STICKY BOTTOMS

The question of what constitutes sticky bottom shall be determined by the
mine boss and loader in the following manner: When the bottom has been sheared
along the rib, to the face, and is open on the end, and two wedges are driven
through the bottom coal (wedges to be driven 18 and 36 inches from shearing
and 18 inches from the front of the bottom coal), and the coal still clings and
adheres to the floor, it shall be termed sticky bottom and the loader shall not be
required to lift same without compensation based on tracklayers ’ wage scale.
This, however, shall not prevent the mine boss and loader from making a mutual
agreement to lift same, or in case of their failure to agree to have it lifted by any­
one by paying the tracklayers’ wage scale, nor shall it prevent the mine com­
mittee and superintendent from making investigation in case of disagreement
under the above rule.
WIDE ROOMS

Sec. 10. All rooms shall be 24 feet wide or over, except under river bottoms,
where the same may be driven 20 feet wide without extra compensation. All
other rooms from 24 to 18 feet $2.76 extra shall be paid. Rooms under river
bottoms where necessary to be driven from 20 feet to 18 feet, $2.76 extra shall be
paid. Rooms less than 18 feet wide shall be paid for at entry price. WTiere
rooms are driven 30 feet wide, same shall have two tracks if practical. Each two
men shall be given two rooms where practicable. Slabs to be left to men and
mine boss.
The operators shall designate the width of all working places and same shall
be paid for at the width ordered cut.
In working pillars and stumps, all places over 15 feet wide shall be paid for at
wide price to cutter and loader. Fifteen feet or less with two tight ends, entry
price. Fifteen feet or less open end shall be paid for at entry price to cutter ana
wide price to loader.

62411°— 27-------5




62

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING
INTERPRETATION

Wherever a place is closed in by a fall or an excessive gob to such an extent
that one can not walk or work around the same conveniently, it shall be considered
a tight end.
PUTTING ON CARS

S e c . 103^. When the miner has properly laid his track and a car jumps the
track, the same shall be put on by the company, and the miner shall not be dis­
criminated against in the way of regular turn.
c l e a r in g

track

S e c . 11. Men other than drivers and trappers, motormen and motormen
helpers, cagers and incline men, employed to gather up coal along working roads
and cleaning up track shall receive pay for such work at narrow-work prices per
ton, with cutting added.

Any such man found taking down or loading other than the coal already down
and along track shall be removed from his position. In the event that no other
class of labor is available, the company shall have the right to employ day men
to clean up tracks.
BLACKSMITHING

S e c . 12. Blacksmithing shall be three-fourths of 1 cent on the dollar for pick
mining.

All tools of machine miners, including axes, shall be sharpened without charge.
PICK MINE NECKS

Sec. 13. In opening rooms in pick mines where narrow work exceeds 18 feet
before widening rooms, all in excess of 18 feet shall be paid for at entry price.
LOST COAL

S e c . 14. If the company insists upon the machine men cutting places, then
the company shall pay for all coal lost by places falling in. Coal so lost shall
be paid for within 30 days.
W ET PLACES

S e c . 15. Where the mine boss and miners fail to agree as to whether the work­
ing place is wet and entitled to extra pay, it shall be referred to the committee
and mine boss or superintendent; if judged wet, 3.60 cents per ton additional
shall be paid.

Fifteen cents per barrel shall be paid for bailing water; sufficient barrels to be
furnished to miners to keep their places dry. The said barrels shall be common
oil barrels. In the event of the management failing to provide empty barrels
as required by miners, then 3.60 cents per ton extra shall be paid for wet places.
Where a place is decided wet, all the coal that comes out of the place shall be
paid for at wet price so long as the place remains wet.
It shall be optional with the company to work wet places. It is agreed and
understood that in wet places the miner to be entitled to wet price must first
take the matter up with the mine boss for adjustment.
E NTRIES REGULAR AND DEFICIENT

S e c . 16. It is understood and agreed that in entries of regular height and where
no horseback, clay vein, or other foreign substance exists, no average will be paid.
In deficient entry, where it is necessary to take down slate for height of road­
way, the loader will shoot and load'the same.
Where rock is encountered, the same shall be drilled and shot down by the
company and loaded by the loader. Where such deficient entry is driven and
rock or slate is handled by the loader, the established average tonnage of said
entry of mine will be paid.
Each crossing shall be cut full width and depth, unless otherwise ordered by
the company; and the manner of counting said crossing shall be the regular
depth of machine as determined by tape measure.




AGREEMENT BETWEEN MINERS AND OPERATORS

63

The coal to be mined in a workmanlike manner, so as to produce the greatest
amount of lump coal, and each car shall be checked with a check of the man
doing the work.
Where the company wishes to drive deficient entry by the day, the price per
day to be $8.70; the company to have the right to select their men, but the man
working the place is to have the preference.
It is understood and agreed that in isolated territory where not more than
six men can be employed, when necessary, men shall be permitted to cut, load,
and haul their coal; cutting and loading to be paid for at tonnage rates, the
men doing the work to agree with mine boss on pay for hauling.
Where rock drilling and shooting in. deficient entries is done by hand, the rate
per day shall be $8.70. Where done by electric drill, the minimum rate per day
shall be $7.50.
In working deficient wet entry by the average, the wet price shall apply to the
average tonnage paid the loaders. When paid by the day, the equivalent of the
average tonnage per cut, wet price, shall be paid day men driving deficient entry
by the day.
ENTR IE S, DOUBLE-SHIFT

Sec. 17. Forty-eight cents per yard shall be paid for driving double-shift en­

tries and break throughs between entries.
DAY LABOR ON IDLE DAYS

Sec. 18. When necessary day men shall work on idle days, or, in case of
emergency, overtime; but such work shall be distributed as equally as possible
among employees entitled to said extra work. The operators reserve the right
to work skilled labor upon days when mine is idle, or, in case of emergency, extra
shift.
DAY LABOR TRANSFERRED

Sec. 19. Drivers and other day men shall work under the direction of the mine
boss or superintendent and shall perform such labor as may be required by mine
boss or superintendent; provided that the scale of wages is paid for such labor
required to be performed.
U N W ARRAN TED ABSENCE OF EMPLOYEES

Sec. 20. When any employee absents himself from duty for two days except

in case of sickness, and without giving advance notice to the mine boss, if possible,
he forfeits his position.
W AITIN G ON CARS

Sec. 21. Where cars are promised and are on the way between the yards and
mine at starting time in the morning, the men shall wait up to and not less than
30 minutes; provided, however, that where satisfactory local arrangements exist
for waiting for cars, the same shall remain in force and be observed.
INTERPRETATION

When the men go to work in accordance with the above rule, the mine com­
mittee have the right if they so elect to call up the railroad yards to ascertain
if cars will be at the mine within the provisions of the rule. Should they be in­
formed that cars are on the way and will be there on time, then the men will go
into the mine and all inside daymen will be paid for or furnished at least 2 hours'
work. The outside daymen will take their regular positions, and should cars
fail to come on time they will be paid at least 1 hour's pay, whether they perform
any labor or not.
NOON HOUR VARIATION

Sec. 22. In case of emergency, the company shall have the right to vary the

noon hour to one-half hour earlier. All daymen affected shall be notified in
advance of such variation in noon hour.
MEETINGS AT MINE

Se c . 23. Where necessary to hold meetings at mine where miners so desire,
one afternoon each month shall be allowed for the purpose of holding such meet­




64

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING

ings. Such afternoon to be agreed upon between the management and miners
at the different mines.
No other meetings than as herein provided shall be held at any mine during
working hours.
LOCAL RULES AND ORDERS

S ec . 24. No local rules or orders shall be made or given by either miners or
operators, or their agents, that interfere with the provisions of this contract.
DRIV ER ’ S,

d a y m e n ’s,

OR MACHINE MEN’ S ABSENCE

Sec. 25. In case a machine man, driver, or other dayman fails to appear for
duty, a man may be taken from a working place; the man taking either’s place
to get such turn for one day each pay.
OUT OF CUTTING

S e c . 26. Under normal conditions, if 4 men are out of cutting or rails on any

one territory at work time in the morning and upon investigation by mine boss
and committee it shall be found to be the fault of the company, the men shall
be furnished work by the operator, but in no case shall a breakdown or un­
avoidable accident be considered the fault of the company. It is understood,
however, that all mine superintendents and mine bosses shall make every effort
to have all working places in working condition at starting time in the morning
and no man shall be required to lose two days’ work in succession.
SETTLEMENT OF DISPUTES

Sec. 27. It is agreed that in case of any local grievance at any mine the
aggrieved party or parties and mine boss shall first make an earnest effort to
adjust the dispute.

In case they fail to agree, the matter in dispute shall be referred to the mine
foreman or superintendent and mine committee. If they fail to agree, it shall
then be referred to the general manager of the company involved, or his rep­
resentative, and the president of subdistrict 1, of district 6, U. M. W. of A.,
or his representative. In case they fail to agree the matter shall be referred to
the president of district 6, of U. M. W . of A., or his representative and the rep­
resentative of the Southern Ohio Coal Exchange, or the operators affected
thereby.
All controversies arising under the terms of this agreement shall be taken up
for adjustment as herein provided without delay.
STOPPING OF MINES

Sec. 28. No strike or stoppage of work shall occur at any mine except for
failure to pay upon regular pay day without explanation, or breakdown of
weight scales, until the matter has been taken up with the subdistrict officers
of subdistrict No. 1 of district No. 6, of U. M. W . of A., and the company
affected, and they have taken the matter up as provided in section 27.
(A) Should any local officer, or officers of any local union or any member
thereof, employed at any mine cause the mine to shut down in violation of this
rule, each member of the United Mine Workers of America employed at said
mine, except those who continue at work, shall have deducted from his earnings
the sum of one dollar ($1) per day for each day or part of day he remains idle.
(B) Should any operator or his representative lock the men out for the pur­
pose of forcing a settlement of any grievance, or cause the mine to shut down in
violation of this rule, he shall be fined one dollar ($1) per employee so idle, for
each day or part of a day the mine is thus thrown idle. It is agreed that the
stoppage of the mine as provided for in section 6 of this contract shall not con­
stitute a violation of this rule.
(C) All moneys assessed against the employees under this rule shall be col­
lected from the pay for the half month in which the violation of the rule occurs,
or from the first moneys due thereafter, and said moneys so collected shall be
turned over to the proper officers of subdistrict No. 1, district No. 6, U. M. W.
of A. All moneys assessed against the operators for violation of this rule shall
be paid over to the Southern Ohio Coal Exchange; provided that money as­
sessed against operators not members of the above-named exchange shall be
paid to the secretary-treasurer of the subdistrict.




AGREEMENT BETWEEN MINERS AND OPERATORS

65

Under no circumstances shall the money so paid be refunded by either the
subdistrict or the Southern Ohio Coal Exchange.
The company shall furnish the local secretary a list of money so collected and
paid over. It is understood that the collection of all fines shall take precedence
over all other collections.
BOYS

S e c. 29. Sons of members of the United Mine Workers of America, when
becoming of proper age, shall be allowed the preference of going into the mines.
LIM IT ON MINE CARS

S e c . 30. No limit of weight shall be placed on loading mine cars, and, in case

of loss in transit, the company shall not be held responsible except where cars
are broken by employees, or where a wreck occurs, the average weight shall be
made good by the company. In order that miners can not take advantage
of this cause, the mine manager and committee of any mine where complaint
is made of loading cars over their capacity shall mutually agree on a standard
height of loading cars.
ENGINEERS AND FIREMEN

S e c. 31. In case of local or general suspension of mining, either at the expira­

tion of this contract or otherwise, the engineers, firemen, pumpers, fire bosses,
and other men necessary to keep mines in shape, shall not suspend work but
shall, when mine is suspended, fully protect and keep in repair all of the com­
pany’s property under their care, and operate fans and pumps, and lower and
hoist such men or supplies as may be required to keep up steam at the company’s
coal plant; but it is understood and agreed that the operators will not ask
them to hoist any coal produced by nonunion labor for sale on the market. The
rates to be paid for such work to be those in effect at the time of suspension,
subject to any subsequent settlement.
CHECK OFF

S e c. 32. The system of checking off for the United Mine Workers’ organiza­

tion remains in force and must be observed; the same to be checked off by per
cent of earnings. The above to include all dues and assessments for burial fund
and United Mine Workers’ organization.
No fines shall be collected except it is ordered by a majority vote of the mem­
bers present at a regularly called local meeting.
However, should either the operator, the local union, or the party upon whom
the fine is imposed object to such fine, each of them shall have the right to appeal
to the subdistrict officers and the operator or the operators’ commissioner for
final ruling.
In order to be honored, check-off figures must be furnished to the company
by noon of the 1st and by noon of the 16th of each month.
DIVISION OF W ORK

Sec. 33. It is understood that companies operating two or more mines will

work all mines on turn as near as possible or as near as market conditions will
permit. When it is necessary for any one company to close one or more mines
down on account of market conditions it is agreed that the men employed at
said mines shall be entitled to work at mines remaining in operation and the
company shall distribute the men proportionately to the mines remaining in
operation. It is understood that all classes of labor agreed upon by the mine
foreman and committee shall under these circumstances share their work. Noth­
ing in the foregoing to interfere with or affect the efficiency of the mine or the
quality of the output.
FIRE BOSSES

Sec . 34. We agree that fire bosses shall be entitled to a full day’s pay for
inspecting the mines on Sundays and all holidays.
CONTRACT W ORK IN MINES

S e c . 35. There shall be no contract work in any mine in this subdistrict.




66

BITUMINOUS COAL MINING
HOUSE COAL

In keeping with the award of the Coal Commission, 27 per cent shall be added
to the price of house coal, prevailing October 31, 1919.
POWDER

The price of powder to be $2.30 per keg delivered as provided for in contract.
SPECIAL CONDITIONS AND LOCAL CONCESSIONS

Sec . 36. Conditions governing all employees in and about the mines prevailing
during the years 1916 and 1917 and not specifically covered in the above rules
and conditions shall remain unchanged, but any local concession made hereto­
fore by any miner or operator at any mine shall be open to him for adjustment.




LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
The following is a list of all bulletins of the Bureau of Labor Statistics published since
July, 1912, except that in the case of bulletins giving the results of periodic surveys of the
bureau only the latest bulletin on any one subject is here listed.
A complete list of the reports and bulletins issued prior to July, 1912, as well as the bulle­
tins published since that date, will be furnished on application. Bulletins marked thus (*)
are oat of print.
C onciliation and A rb itration (in clu ding strikes and lockouts).
♦No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York.
[1913.]
♦No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board o f Trade on its in­
quiry into industrial agreements. [1913.]
♦No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
No. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City.
[1914.]
No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dr^ss and waist industry
o f New York City. [1914.]
♦No. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal industry. [1916.]
♦No. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry. [1916.]
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
No. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
No. 283. History o f the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287. National War Labor Board: History of its formation, activities, etc.
[1921.]
No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement of railway labor disputes. [1922.]
No. 341. Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of New York City. [1923.)
No. 402. Collective bargaining by actors. [1926.]
No. 419. Trade agreements, 1925.
Cooperation.
No. 313. Consumers’ cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies in America and in foreign countries. [1922.]
No. 437. Cooperative movement in the United States in 1925 (other than agricul­
tural).
E m ploym ent and Unem ploym ent.
♦No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work o f employment offices in the
United States. [1913.]
No. 172. Unemployment in New York City, N. Y. [1915.]
♦No. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment industries.
[1915.]
♦No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
No. 196. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis,
Minn., January, 1916.
♦No. 202. Proceedings of the conference of Employment Managers' Association,
Boston, Mass., held May 10, 1916.
No. 206. The British system o f labor exchanges. [1916.]
♦No. 227. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa.,
April 2 and 3, 1917.
No. 235. Employment system o f the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
♦No. 241. Public employment offices in the United States. [1918.]
No. 247. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y., May
9-11, 1918.
No. 310. Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes.
[1922.]
No. 409. Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.




(I)

F oreign Labor Law s.
♦No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain ’European
countries. [1914.]
Housing?.
♦No. 158. Government aid to home owning and housing o f working people in foreign
countries. [1914.]
No. 263. Housing by employers in the United States. [1920.]
No. 295. Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
No. 368. Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [ 1921 to]
1923.
No. 424. Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [1924 and]
1925.
No. 449. Building permits in the principal cities in the United States in [1925 and]
1926.
In du strial Accidents and Hygiene.
♦No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary
ware factories. [1912.]
No. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade. [1913.]
♦No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods o f protection.
[1913.]
♦No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining o f lead. [1914.]
♦No. 157. Industrial accident statistics. [1915.]
♦No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914.]
♦No. 179, Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
No. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of lead
in the painting of buildings. [1916.]
♦No. 201. Report of committee on statistics and compensation-insurance cost of the
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commis­
sions. [1916.]
♦No. 207. Causes of death by occupation. [1917.]
♦No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.]
No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives.
[1917.]
No. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
No. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts).
[1918.]
No. 234. Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
•No. 236. Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
No. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of Muni­
tion Workers Committee. [1919.]
•No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
No. 276. Standardization of industrial-accident statistics. [1920.]
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in the making of coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates.
[1921.]
No. 291. Carbon-monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
No. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
No. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 1910 to
1919.
No. 306. Occupational hazards and diagnostic signs: A guide to Impairments to be
looked for in hazardous occupations. [1922.]
No. 339. Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States. [1923.]
No. 392. Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]
No. 405. Phosphorus necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and the preparation
of phosphorus. [1926.]
No. 425. Record of industrial accidents in the United States to 1925.
No. 426. Deaths from lead poisoning. [1927..]
No. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
No. 428. Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at
Washington, D. C., July 14-16, 1926.




(II)

Industrial Relation* and Labor Conditions.
No. 237. Industrial unrest in Great Britain. [1917.]
No. 340. Chinese migration, with special reference to labor conditions. [1923.]
No. 349. Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.]
No. 361. Labor relations in the Fairmount (W. Va.) bituminouss-coal field. [1924.]
No. 380. Postwar labor conditions in Germany. [1925.]
No. 383. Works council movement in Germany. [1925.]
No. 384. Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920 to 1924.
No. 399. Labor relations in the lace and lace-curtain industries in the United States.
[1925.]
Labor Laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating; to
labor).
No. 211. Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. [1917.]
No. 229. Wage-payment legislation in the United States. [1917.]
No. 285. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States. [1921.]
No. 321. Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
No. 322. Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
No. 343. Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]
No. 370. Laws of the United States, with decisions o f courts relating thereto
[1925.]
No. 408. Labor laws relating to the payment of wages. [1926.]
No. 434. Labor legislation of 1926.
No. 444. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1926.
Proceedings of Annnal Conventions of the Association of Governmental Labor
Officials of the United States and Canada.
No. 266. Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920.
No. 307. Eighth, New Orleans, La., May 2-6, 1921.
♦No. 323. Ninth, Harrisburg, Pa., May 22-26, 1922.
No. 352. Tenth, Richmond, Va., May 1-4, 1923.
No. 389. Eleventh, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924.
No. 411. Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925.
No. 429. Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926.
Proceedings of Annnal Meetings of International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions.
♦No. 210. Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916.
No. 248. Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25. 1917.
No. 264. Fifth, Madison, Wis., September 24-27, 1918.
•No. 273. Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 1919.
No. 281. Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920.
No. 304. Eighth, Chicago, 111., September 19-23, 1921.
No. 333. Ninth, Baltimore, Md„ October 9-13, 1922.
No. 359. Tenth, St. Paul, Minn., September 24-26, 1923.
No. 385. Eleventh, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924.
No. 395. Index to proceedings, 1914-1924.
No. 406. Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 17-20, 1925.
No. 432. Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.
Proceedings o f Annnal M eetings o f International Association o f Public
E m ploym ent Services.
No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20, 1913; Second, Indianapolis, Sep­
tember 24 and 25, 1914; Third, Detroit, July 1 and 2, 1915.
No. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N. Y., July 20 and 21, 1916.
No. 311. Ninth, Buffalo, N. Y., September 7-9, 1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D. C., September 11-13, 1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto, Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924. ‘
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N. Y., September 15-17, 1925.
Productivity o f Labor.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs o f shoes. [1924.]
No. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper bozboard industry. [1925.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.]




(in)

R etail Prices and Cost of L M n g .
♦No. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer. [1913.]
♦No. 130. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer. [1913.]
♦No. 164. Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
No. 170. Foreign food prices as affected by the war. [1915.]
No. 357. Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
No. 369. The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. [1925.]
No. 445. Retail prices, 1890 to 1926.
Safety Codes.
No. 331. Code of lighting factories, mills, and other work places.
No. 336. Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
No. 350. Specifications of laboratory tests for approval of electric headlighting
devices fcrr motor vehicles.
No. 351. Safety code for the construction, care, and use of ladders.
No. 364. Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus.
No. 375. Safety code for laundry machinery and operation.
No. 378. Safety code for woodworking plants.
No. 382. Code of lighting school buildings.
No. 410. Safety code for paper and pulp mills.
No. 430. Safety code fo£ power presses and foot and hand presses.
No. 433. Safety codes for the prevention of dust explosions.
No. 436. Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.
No. 447. Safety code for rubber mills and calenders.
No. 451. Safety code for forging and hot-metal stamping.
V ocation al and W o r k e r s’ Education.
♦No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment.
[1915.]
♦No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va. [1915.]
No. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, Minn. [1916.]
No. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States.
[1920.]
W a g e s and Honrs o f Labor.
♦No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in
the dress and waist industry of New York City. [1914.]
♦No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry.
[1914.]
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
No. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam-railroad
cars, 1907 to 1913.
•No. 190. Wages and hours of labor In the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907 to
1914.
No. 204. Street-railway employment in the United States. [1917.]
No. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture indus­
tries, 1915.
No. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
No. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry, 1920.
No. 348. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile industry, 1922.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes. [1924.]
No. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
No. 374. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1924.
No. 376. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industry, 1907 to
1924.
No. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines, 1924.
No. 407. Labor cost o f production, and wages and hours of labor in the paper boxboard industry. [1925]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 413. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States, 1925.
No. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and
1924.
No. 421. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry,
1925.
No. 422. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1925.
No. 431. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1926.
No. 435. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, 1911 to 1926.




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Wages and Hours of Labor— Continued.
No. 438. Wages and hours of labor in the motor-vehicle industry, 1925.
No. 442. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1925.
No. 443. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing,
1910 to 1926.
No. 446. Wages and hours of labor in cotton goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1926.
No. 450. Wages and hours o f labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1926.
[In press.]
No. 452. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industries, 1907
to 1926. [In press.]
W elfare W ork.
♦No. 123. Employers’ welfare work. [1913.]
No. 222. Welfare work in British munition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 250. Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United
States. [1919.]
Wholesale Prices.
No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign coun­
tries. [1921.]
No. 440. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1926.
No. 453. Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, 1923 to July, 1927.
Women and Children in Industry,
No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in
selected industries in the District of Columbia. [1913.]
♦No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]
♦No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee. [1913.]
No. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile
establishments and garment factories. [1914.]
♦No. 167. Minimum wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries.
[1915.]
♦No. 175. Summary of the report on conditions of woman and child wage "earners in
the United States. [1915.]
♦No. 176. Effect o f minimum-wage determinations in Oregon. [1915.]
♦No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women.
[1915.]
♦No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of
Boston, Mass. [1916.]
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.]
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
♦No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of in­
dustrial employment of women and children. [1918.]
No. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war.
[1917.]
No. 253. Women in lead industries. [1919.]
Workmen’s Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto).
♦No. 101. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
♦No. 102. British national insurance act. [1911.]
♦No. 103. Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzerland. [1912.]
No. 107. Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
♦No. 155. Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]
No. 212. Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by the Inter­
national Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions
Washington, D. C., December 5-9, 1916.
No. 243. Workmen’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign coun^
tries, 1917 and 1918.
No. 301. Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration.
[1922.]
No. 312. National health insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1920.
No. 379. Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of
January 1, 1925.
No. 423. Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada.
[1926.]




(V)

Miscellaneous Series.
*No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor
Statistics up to May 1, 1915.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
No. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
No. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
No. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washington,
D. C. [1921.]
No. 299. Personal research agencies: A guide to organized research in employment
management, industrial relations, training, and working conditions.
[1921.]
No. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization.
[1922.]
No. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics. [1923.]
No. 342. International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and prob­
lems. [1923.]
No. 346. Humanity in government. [1923.]
No. 372. Convict labor in 1923.
No. 386. The cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
No. 398. Growth of legal-aid work in the United States. [1926.]
No. 401. Family allowances in foreign countries. [1926.]
No. 420. Handbook o f American trade-unions. [1926.]
No. 439. Handbook of labor statistics, 1924 to 1926.
No. 448. Trade agreements, 1926.




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