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W age Chronology

United States
Steel Corporation
and United Steelworkers
of America (AFL-CIO)
March 1937-April 1974
Bulletin 1814
U S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1974

W age Chronology

United States
Steel Corporation
and United Steelworkers
of America (AFL-CIO)
March 1937-April 1974
Bulletin 1814

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1974

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, GPO Bookstores, or
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Make checks payable to Superintendent of Documents.







Preface
This bulletin is prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as part of a series that traces changes
in wage scales and related benefits negotiated by individual employers or combinations of employers
with a union or group of unions. Benefits unilaterally introduced by an employer generally are
included. The information is obtained largely from collective bargaining agreements and related
documents voluntarily filed with the Bureau. Descriptions of the course of collective bargaining are
derived from the news media and confirmed and supplemented by the parties to the agreement.
Wage chronologies, dealing only with selected features of collective bargaining or wage
determination, are intended primarily as a tool for research, analysis, and wage administration.
References to job security, grievance procedures, methods of piece-rate adjustments, and similar
matters are omitted. For a detailed explanation of the purpose and scope of the chronology
program, see “Wage Chronologies and Salary Trend Reports ” BLS Handbook o f Methods, Bulletin
1711 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1971), pp. 209-212.
This wage chronology summarizes changes in wage rates and related compensation practices
negotiated by the United States Steel Corporation with the United Steelworkers of America
(AFL-CIO) since 1937. This bulletin replaces Wage Chronology: United States Steel Corporation,
1937-67, published as BLS Bulletin 1603, and incorporates the supplement covering the 1966-70
period. Materials previously published have been supplemented by contract changes negotiated in
1971. Except for a revised introduction and other minor changes, earlier texts are included as they
were originally published.
The section for 1966-74 was prepared in the Division of Trends in Employee Compensation by
William M. Davis and Diane L. Bayless.




in




Contents
Page
In tro d u c tio n .......................................................................................................................................
1
Summary of contract n eg o tiatio n s...................................................................................................
3
January 1947-December 1 9 5 1 ...................................................................................................
3
December 1951-June 1954
3
July 1954-June 1956
4
July 1956-June 1959
4
July 1959Ju n e 1962
5
July 1962-May 1965
8
May 1965-July 1968
10
August 1968-July 1971 ................................................................................................................ 11
August 1971-April 1974 ......................................................................................................... 13
Experimental negotiating agreement ..........................................................................................14
Tables:
1. General wage ch an g es..............................................................................................................16
2a. Schedule of standard hourly rates, by job class
and title, and department, 1948-55
24
2b. Schedule of standard hourly rates, by job class,
1956-61 ............................................................................................................ ...
27
2c. Schedule of standard hourly rates for nonincentive
jobs, by job class, 1965-73 ..............................................
. . 28
2d. Schedule of hourly wage rates and additives for
incentive jobs, by job class, 1965-73 .................................................................
29
3a. Selected classifications by job class,
January 1968
30
3b. Selected classifications by job class,
1969-74
32
4. Minimum plant rates, by division,
1937-55
34
5. Supplementary compensation p ractices...............................................................................35
Shift premium pay ......................................................................................................... 35
Overtime p a y ...................................................................................................................35
Pay for Sunday w o r k ......................................................................................................35
Holiday p a y ...................................................................................................................... 3g
Paid v acations...................................................................................................................37
Reporting t i m e ................................................................................................................39
Jury-duty p a y ...................................................................................................................39
Funeral l e a v e ...................................................................................................................4 q
Relocation allo w an ce..................................................................................................... 4 q
Savings and vacation p l a n ...............................................................................................41
Insurance benefits p l a n ..................................................................................................47
Pension plan ...................................................................................................................37




Contents—Continued
Page
Supplemental unemployment benefits p l a n .........................................................................64
Severance allowance .............................................................................................................68
Earnings protection plan ...................................................................................................... 68
Wage chronologies available




................................................................................................................76

Introduction
This chronology summarizes changes over the years in
wages and related benefits in steel-producing operations
of U.S. Steel Corp. that have resulted from collective
bargaining with the United Steelworkers of America
(USA) and, when it was in existence, from orders of the
National War Labor Board (NWLB). To put these
developments in perspective, this introduction discusses
briefly the histories of the company and union, early
company-union relations, and pertinent aspects of the
current collective bargaining process.
Brief history o f the company. U.S. Steel Corp.—
formed
through a combination of a number of existing major
steel producers—
was incorporated in New Jersey on
February 25, 1901 as one of the world’s largest
manufacturing operations. Since that time, it has
maintained its position as America’s leading steel
producer. The company, which is a fully integrated
producer of steel, manufactures and sells virtually all
types of semi-finished and finished iron and steel mill
products. Operations include the mining and transporta­
tion of iron ore, limestone and coal, and the production
of coke, coke oven gas, and tar. The company has long
been engaged in other fields as well, and has diversified
into activities such as the production and selling of
agricultural and industrial chemicals, cement, copper
wire and cable, and into oilwell products distribution,
structural steel fabrication and erection, general
financing, real estate development and engineering
consulting. In addition to its domestic operations, U.S.
Steel also is involved in related activities in many foreign
countries.
This study is limited to the steel-producing
operations. Present-day plants are located in the
Pittsburgh, Pa. area; Fairless Hills in eastern
Pennsylvania; Gary, Ind.; South Chicago, 111.; Lorain and
Youngstown, Ohio; Fairfield, Ala.; Geneva, Utah;
Baytown, Tex.; and Pittsburg and Torrance, Cal.
Brief history o f the union. In 1936, the Committee for
Industrial Organization (CIO) formed the forerunner of
the present United Steelworkers of America (AFL-CIO)
which was named the Steel Workers’ Organizing
Committee (SWOC). This organization resulted from




talks between the CIO and a craft-oriented union, the
Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin
Workers of North America (AAISTW—
AFL), which had
represented some U.S. Steel employees on an open shop
basis since the company was formed. Composed of
representatives of both the CIO and the Amalgamated,
the SWOC was organized as an industrial union for all
steelworkers and was designed to eliminate the
Employee Representation Plans (ERP’s)—
“inside”
unions. These unions expanded rapidly throughout the
steel industry following passage of the National
Industrial Recovery Act of 1933, which specified the
right of workers to organize. After 1936, even though
the AAISTW, under terms of the agreement with the
CIO, maintained its identity and technically all new
members became its members, the SWOC, headed by
Philip Murray, had the exclusive right to direct the
unionization drive and to control revenues.
Early company-union relations. The first contract, a
recognition agreement, between a subsidiary of U.S.
Steel Corp. (Carnegie-Illinois Steel Corp.) and the
SWOC, was entered into on March 2, 1937 and a full
agreement was signed on March 17. It referred to the
SWOC as the agent of the Amalgamated. Within a short
time, agreements also were reached with the four other
steel-producing subsidiaries of the corporation. The
SWOC continued to be referred to as the agent of the
AAISTW until May 22, 1942, wnen, at a convention, the
name was changed from SWOC to United Steelworkers
of America (CIO) and the AAISTW merged with the new
union. During this same period, the demise of the ERP’s
was brought about by their questionable legality under
the Wagner Act of 1935 and by the progress of the
SWOC in organizing and in collective bargaining.
Separate agreements with the steel-producing sub­
sidiaries were continued until these subsidiaries, in 1950,
were merged into a single wholly-owned operating
company under the name U.S. Steel Co. In 1952, the
U.S. Steel Co. merged into the parent U.S. Steel Corp. to
make the corporation primarily an operating company
for the first time. Today, a single agreement for the
steel-producing operations of U.S. Steel Corp. is
negotiated.

Before 1942, the collective bargaining agreements at
U.S. Steel excluded all plant protection and clerical
workers. Since that time, the contract has been extended
to cover, in addition to the production and maintenance
workers, hourly and salary rated nonconfidential clerical
employees in steel plants. Confidential clerical
employees and supervisors at the foreman level and
higher are not covered; thus, data in the chronology do
not reflect changes affecting these employees. The
fabrication of steel products, coal mining and transport,
and other operations carried on by the subsidiaries of
U.S. Steel, that are covered by separate agreements,
likewise are excluded from the scope of the chronology.
Since this chronology begins with the 1937
agreements, provisions reported in effect then do not
necessarily indicate changes from previous conditions of
employment.

“
Industry” bargaining. During the 1940’s and early
1950’s, the union negotiated with each steel company
individually, but in 1956, a committee of four (of whom
two were U.S. Steel officials), represented the 12 major
companies, known as the Coordinating Committee Steel
Companies, in negotiations on major issues at a national
level. Although companies making up the committee
have changed on occasion, an industry committee has
continued to bargain with the union to the present time.
U.S. Steel is one of 10 firms currently represented by
the industry committee. From 1959 when the Kaiser
Steel Corp. left the Committee until 1968, 11 firms were
in the group. However, Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corp.
and the CF&I Steel Corp. did not participate in the 1971
national talks; Wheeling-Pittsburgh has rejoined since
1971.

The Steelworkers' contract negotiating procedures. In
recent years, the Steelworkers have contended that,
because of the proximity of the industries, contract
negotiations with the steel, aluminum, metal container,
and nonferrous industries should be coordinated. Before
negotiations in these industries, the Steelworkers’ Wage
Policy Committee drafts a Wage Policy Statement which




contains the goals of the union in the forthcoming
bargaining year. In recent years, these meetings generally
have been held immediately after the USA Constitu­
tional Convention.
Until 1966, the Wage Policy Committee was solely
responsible for setting goals, recommending strikes, and
ratifying or rejecting contract or strike settlements. At
that time the union changed its bargaining structure by
creating separate conferences for each of the major
industries organized by the USA. The new conferences
involve more rank and file members in the negotiations
and allow separate groups to adapt the union-wide Wage
Policy Statement to individual industry needs.
The Basic Steel Industry Conference includes a
representative, generally the president, from each of the
local steel unions (whether or not they are involved in
bargaining with the industry committee), plus district
directors and presiding officers designated by the
International president who acts as chairman. In
addition, the conferences have assumed the afore­
mentioned role of the Wage Policy Committee
concerning strikes and contract ratifications. A strike
can be called by the conferences only if authorization is
received in advance by a vote of the industry
membership. A membership vote is not required for
contract ratification; the conferences have full authority
to ratify a new contract.
Since the Basic Steel Industry Conference included
locals not directly involved in the main steel
negotiations, the 1966 Constitutional Convention
established an 11-Company Negotiating Advisory Com­
mittee, composed of at least five local union
representatives from each of the companies plus district
directors and staff. The Committee was to serve as an
advisor to those who had the responsibility for
negotiating with such eleven companies. This group
became active after approval of the International
Executive Board on March 18, 1968.
Also recommended in 1966 and put into effect in
1968 was the concept of “lead time.” It was felt that
some of the pressures encountered in the national round
of bargaining could be alleviated if company level talks
on grievances and other local issues were initiated before
the start of the main bargaining.

Summary of contract negotiations
January 1947-December 1951

An agreement dated January 13, 1947, established a
new job classification program according to a War Labor
Board directive of November 25, 1944. The plan was put
into effect in February 1947 after almost 2 years of
study and negotiation by the company and union. The
agreements, dated July 16, 1948, amended and extended
privisions of the previous contracts until April 30, 1950.
However, 60 days before July 16, 1949, either party
could serve notice on the other of its desire to negotiate
(1) a general and uniform change in rates of pay and/or
(2) life, accident, health, medical, and hospital insurance
benefits. Negotiations were to start within 30 days after
such notice.
The agreements of July 1948 between U.S. Steel,
other major steel producers, and the United Steel­
workers were reopened for discussion of wages and
social insurance in May 1949. At the same time, the
union requested the companies to negotiate on pensions.
Failure of the parties to reach agreement led to the
appointment of a Presidential fact-finding board to
inquire into the dispute, and the board issued a report
on September 10. When subsequent negotiations by the
Steelworkers and various companies failed to produce
agreement, a strike beginning October 1 idled most of
the industry. Following conclusion of settlements with
some other companies, the union and U.S. Steel reached
agreement on November 11 on a noncontributory
pension plan and a contributory insurance plan. Existing
wage scales and wage related practices were continued
without change.
Basic agreements in the industry were extended to
December 31, 1951, with a provision permitting either
party to open the contracts for wage negotiations 60
days before December 31,1950. The agreement covering
pensions and social insurance continued in effect until
December 31, 1951. The company was free, thereafter,
to take any action it deemed advisable for pension
provisions. As long as no modification or change was
made, the agreement would continue in effect until
October 31, 1954. The steel agreements were reopened
in October 1950 for wage discussions, somewhat before



the formal reopening date. A wage increase settlement
was announced on November 30.

December 1951-June 1954

Negotiations for new contracts were started late in
November 1951. After collective bargaining, mediation
and conciliation had failed to resolve the differences
between the major steel companies and the union, the
President of the United States referred the dispute to the
Wage Stabilization Board (WSB) on December 22, 1951.
Strike action announced by the union for December 31
was delayed; a special convention of the union on
January 4 then postponed such action for 45 days from
the start of WSB hearings.
On January 10, 1952 a special panel appointed by
WSB opened hearings which were continued inter­
mittently until February 16. On February 21, the union
deferred its strike deadline to March 23 to allow the
board to study the case and make recommendations.
Early in March the panel made its report. Recom­
mendations issued by the board on March 20 were
accepted by the union on March 21 but not by the
industry.
After complying with a Government request to
continue work until April 4, the union gave a 96-hour
strike notice on that date, when further negotiations
were unsuccessful. On April 8, the President seized the
basic steel industry and appointed the Secretary of
Commerce as Administrator, with power to set
conditions of employment. Work was continued while
the Government operated the mills. When a U.S. District
Court ruled on April 29 against the validity of the
seizure, the mills were turned back to private operation.
Thereupon, the Steelworkers refused to work, claiming
that “no contract and therefore no obligation to work
for a private employer” existed. The mills were idle from
April 29 until May 3, when the strike was called off at
the President’s request.
When the U.S. Supreme Court, on June 2, affirmed
the order of the lower court against seizure, the workers
again left their jobs. From then on, the union and the
industry made several attempts to reach agreement, but

it was not until July 24 that six large steel companies,
including the U.S. Steel Corp., and the union reached an
interim settlement.
The major economic terms of the interim settlement,
which the union membership ratified on the following
day, provided for retroactive wage increases to be
effective from March 1, 1952; paid holidays, shiftdifferential improvements, and a reduction in southern
and other area differentials effective as of the end of the
strike; and improved vacation benefits effective from
January 1, 1952. The United States Steel Corp. and the
union on August 23,1952 reached final agreement on all
points that had been under discussion. The new
contracts, dated August 15, 1952, were to remain in
force until June 30, 1954, with one reopening, on wages
only, on June 30, 1953.
The agreements were reopened for wage negotiations
at the end of April 1953. Negotiations began May 15
and a general wage increase was announced on June 12.
In addition, the parties agreed to eliminate the remaining
North-South wage differential by July 1, 1954.

July 1954-June 1956

In 1954, negotiations for new collective bargaining
agreements began on May 18, to replace the basic
contracts scheduled to expire on June 30. On June 29,
agreement was reached on a general wage increase,
liberalized insurance and pension plans, and other
contract changes.
Existing insurance and pension agreements were not
due to expire until October 31, but the parties agreed to
discuss these issues at the same time as other contract
issues to avoid two negotiating periods within a year.1
These agreements were to be in force from November 1,
1954, for 2 and 3 years, respectively.
Under terms of the new basic contracts which
remained in effect for a 2-year period starting July 1,
1954, provision was made for a wage reopening a year
later. Actual negotiations under the reopening provision
began on June 7, 1955, but were not concluded until
after the midnight, June 30 strike deadline. The resulting
suspension of work, the first general stoppage since
1952, was brief; agreement on a general wage increase,
supplemented by increases in increments between job
classifications, was reached by midmorning of July 1.
July 1956-June 1959

Negotiations between the Steelworkers and a
committee representing 12 basic steel companies for new
contracts in the industry began on May 28, 1956.



Earlier, the companies and the union had served 60-day
notices terminating their contracts on June 30, 1956.
In the initial meeting with the companies, the union
presented a list of 23 proposed contract changes
formulated by its Wage Policy Committee. Proposals
included a “substantial” wage increase, premium pay for
work on Saturday and Sunday as such, a supplemental
unemployment benefit plan, an improved health and
welfare plan, and a variety of other contract changes.
Bargaining sessions were recessed at the end of May to
permit the companies to study the union’s proposal. On
June 15, the union rejected a counterproposal advanced
by the companies. This proposal included a 5-year
contract (reopenable only in a national emergency), with
an annual general wage increase averaging 7.3 cents an
hour; a cost-of-living provision; a supplemental unem­
ployment benefit plan; an improved insurance plan; and
other improvements to become effective during the life
of the contract.
When it became evident that a settlement would not
be reached by June 30, 1956, the expiration date of the
agreements, unsuccessful efforts were made to extend
the contracts wliile negotiations continued. The
companies requested an indefinite contract extension
(without provision for making new benefits retroactive),
subject to a 72-hour termination notice; the union
proposed a 2-week contract extension, with new benefits
retroactive to July 1. The parties failed to resolve their
difference on contract extension. On July 1, a work
stoppage idled most of the industry and bargaining was
discontinued.
With the assistance of the Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service, bargaining was resumed in midJuly, and a memorandum of agreement with U.S. Steel
Corp. and 11 other basic steel producers on new 3-year
contracts, subject to union ratification, was signed on
July 27. However, a return to work was delayed until
early August to allow the parties to work out details
(e.g., for supplemental unemployment benefit plan
provisions and incentive inequity problems) and to sign
individual contracts.
The settlement provided for a general increase in
basic rates averaging about 9.5 cents an hour (about 10.5
cents in hourly earnings, including incentive pay),
effective August 3, 1956; deferred increases averaging
8.3 cents an hour (about 9.1 cents when incentive pay
was included), effective on July 1 of both 1957 and
1958; and a semiannual cost-of-living escalator formula.
Changes in supplementary benefits, effective at various
dates throughout the contract period, included a
1 Details putting into effect some of the decisions reached
in June regarding insurance were incorporated in an agreement
dated September 1, 1954.

supplemental unemployment benefit plan, premium pay
for nonovertime Sunday work, an additional paid
holiday (Good Friday), increased pay for holiday work,
an improved insurance program, increased pension
benefits, increased shift premiums, additional vacation
pay after specified periods of service, and pay for jury
duty. The agreement also established joint committees
to review job classifications and the existing wage
incentive system.
The agreements, which were to be in force from
August 3, 1956 through June 30, 1959, made no
provision for wage reopenings—
the first long-term
agreements without reopenings in basic steel’s collective
bargaining history. (Pension and insurance agreements
were to be in force through October 31, 1959.)
July 1959-June 1962

Formal negotiations between the U.S. Steel Corp. and
the USA for revisions in the contracts that were to
terminate on June 30, 1959, began on May 5, 1959.
Agreement was not reached until January 4, 1960, 2
days before submission to the President of the final
report of a Board of Inquiry appointed by him under the
Labor Management Relations Act of 1947. In the
interim there had been a 116-day strike, suspended by
issuance of an injunction under the national emergency
provisions of that act.
Most of the company’s bargaining was conducted
jointly with 11 other major steel producers through a
committee of four representing the companies. In April,
before the first meeting of the parties’ representatives
and again when formal negotiations opened, the
companies had proposed the continuation for 1 year of
conditions under the existing contracts without change
except for elimination of future cost-of-living
allowances. The union proposed contracts, that within
the framework of the industry’s price structure,
productivity, and profits, would “protect real wages and
contain increases in wage rates and other benefits.” On
May 5, the union made a detailed statement to serve as a
basis for discussion.
On June 10, the companies proposed an 8-point
program calling for contractual changes including
modification of “ambiguous and restrictive language” so
as to enable management to make operating improve­
ments, stronger penalties for those engaging in unlawful
strikes, recognition of the functions of management to
develop wage incentives and establish sound standards,
greater flexibility in changing work schedules, elimina­
tion of overlapping and duplication in existing benefit
programs, simplification of the procedures for
establishing seniority units, scheduling of vacations




throughout the year along with changes in eligibility
provisions, and clarification of contract language. The
companies’ position on economic questions remained
the same as it had been in April. The proposal was
rejected by the union.
When it became evident that a settlement would not
be reached by June 30, efforts were made to extend the
contracts while negotiations continued. The companies
requested an indefinite contract extension, without
provision for making any changes retroactive, subject to
a 10-day termination notice. An extension to July 15,
with new benefits retroactive to July 1, was proposed by
the union.
Following the suggestion of the President of the
United States that negotiations continue without
interruption of production, the union proposed, and the
industry agreed to, a 2-week extension of the existing
contracts (without any commitment on retroactivity)
through July 14.
During the truce period, the union made a 2-year
contract proposal calling for wage and “fringe”
improvements. The details were not made public and the
proposal was rejected by the companies. In a press
release on July 11, the companies expressed willingness
to negotiate improvements in the pension and insurance
plans in the first year of a 2-year contract and a
“modest” increase in wages in the second year,
conditioned on union acceptance of the industry’s
“8-point” program.
Most publicized of the industry’s “8-point” proposal
was revision of Section 2-B of the contracts, entitled
“Local Working Conditions,” to give management
“latitude to change work rules in the absence of changes
in basic conditions. 2 Management already had the right
to make such changes when the basis for the existence of
the local working conditions was changed (e.g., when
technological changes were made). The union contended
that these contractual changes would permit the
companies unilaterally to eliminate benefits and to make
changes in working conditions already provided under
local agreements and practices. The parties met regularly
during the truce period, but made no progress toward
agreement.
Developments during the strike. On July 15, a work
stoppage idled over four-fifths of the industry, including
the U.S. Steel Corp., and despite the assistance of the
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, negotiations
^ Bargaining over this as well as over issues of union
security, seniority, etc., is outside the scope o f the chronology
series; this and related issues have been mentioned in the
introduction only because of their importance in the contract
dispute.

broke off on September 25. On October 1, the union
proposed a 3-year contract, the details of which were
not made public, and the companies made a 2-year
contract proposal. The company offer, their first to
contain specific proposals for increased “economic”
benefits, included increased cash contributions to the
Supplemental Unemployment Benefit (SUB) fund and
improved insurance and pension benefits in the first
year, and an increase in wage rates in the second year.3
The offer also provided for elimination of the
cost-of-living clause and required union acceptance of
several provisions of the “8-point” program. The union
rejected the offer.
On October 9, the President, by Executive Order
issued under the Labor Management Relations Act,
created a Board of Inquiry to report on the issues in
dispute. During October, while the Board was discussing
the issues with the parties and conducting public
hearings, the parties made new settlement offers. The
union’s contract proposal of October 12 included
wage-rate increases and changes in supplementary
benefits during each year of a 1-, 2-, or 3-year contract.
The revised offers made during the hearings left the
parties far apart. The union’s next proposal, on October
15, was for a contract, to terminate June 30, 1961, with
general wage increases ranging among job classes from 7
to 13 cents, effective July 1, 1960; a maximum
permissible increase of 3 cents in the cost-of-living
allowance with no January 1960 adjustment and with a
waiver of the 2 cents an hour already due under the
existing formula, which the union stated was for the
purpose of helping pay for assumption by the company
of the employees’ insurance contributions. The proposal
would also have required, effective November 1, 1959,
company payment of all costs of an improved insurance
plan, including increased life insurance and sickness and
accident benefits and insurance coverage during layoff;
liberalized pension benefits, including an increase from
30 to 40 in the years of service to be credited for
minimum benefits, an increase in the minimum benefit
per year of service, an increase in pensions of those
already retired, and a special retirement payment equal
to 3 months’ full pay.
On October 17, the companies offered a 3-year
contract conditioned on amendment of the basic labor
^ Estimates of employment costs and values of company
and union offers are detailed in the Report to the President
submitted by the Board of Inquiry under Executive Orders
10843 and 10848, October 19, 1959, and the Final Report to
the President, The 1959 Labor Dispute in the Steel Industry,
submitted by the Board of Inquiry under Executive Order
10843, January 6, 1960. Excerpts from the Final Report were
published in the Monthly Labor Review, March 1960, pp.
262-269.




agreements in regard to work rules. The new company
proposal included increased minimum pensions for both
normal and disability retirement; liberalized early
retirement provisions; company-paid comprehensive
major medical expense insurance in lieu of existing
contributory hospitalization and surgical coverage; other
insurance benefit increases; increases in wage rates
ranging from 6 cents an hour for the lowest job class to
12 cents for the highest job class, effective October 1,
1960, and again on October 1, 1961; and a maximum
total cost-of-living adjustment of 20 cents, including the
existing 17 cents. The allowance would increase only if
and to the extent that the allowance as computed under
the formula of the previous contract rose more than 6
cents by October 1, 1960, and more than 12 cents by
October 1, 1961. This October 17 offer also included
increased cash contributions to the SUB fund, improved
maximum financing, replacement of the canceled
contingent liability under this plan by a “financial
factor” that would assure a benefit level of 100 percent
at the beginning of a new agreement, and advance
contributions to assure availability of cash for benefit
payments.
The Board of Inquiry’s report to the President, dated
October 19,4 concluded that the “major roadblocks to
settlement are in the general areas of ‘economics’ and
‘work rules’.” Based on the Board’s report that a
settlement did not seem likely, the Government, on
October 20, sought an injunction under the national
emergency provisions of the LMRA requiring the
Steelworkers to return to their jobs for 80 days.5 After
court stays during an appeal by the union, the injunction
went into effect on November 7, when the U.S. Supreme
Court decided that the 116-day “strike imperils the
national safety.” During the interval between the
injunction and December 28, when the Board again held
hearings, the parties continued to bargain. Further offers
were made by the industry on November 15, and by the
union on December 17.
The Board of Inquiry reconvened on December 28 to
hold hearings on which to base its report to the
President on the current position of the parties, the
companies’ last offers, and the efforts that had been
made for settlement.6 Testimony and exhibits presented
by industry spokesmen indicated some revision of their
October 17 offer of a 3-year contract. The provision for
cost-of-living adjustments was restated to specify that no
increase in the existing allowance would be made unless
^ For substantial excerpts from the report, see Monthly
Labor Review, December 1959, pp. 1333-1341.
^ On October 26, 1959, the union had concluded an
agreement with the Kaiser Steel Corp. See Monthly Labor
Review, December 1959, pp. 1345-1346 and 1378-1379.

the BLS Consumer Price Index rose more than 3.1 index
points between September 15, 1959, and August 15,
1960, or more than 3.1 index points between August 15,
1960, and August 15, 1961, and to permit a maximum
increase in the allowance of 4 cents in each year rather
than the total 3 cents of its October 17 proposal. The
company withdrew its proposal to substitute a
company-paid comprehensive major medical benefit plan
for existing contributory hospital and surgical benefits
but offered to assume the full cost of the contributory
basic life insurance and sickness and accident benefit
programs. It also offered to increase from 30 to 35 the
number of years of service to be counted for minimum
pension benefits. The union proposals reinstated
demands it had omitted from its October 15 offer,
including extension of hospitalization and surgical
coverage to retired employees and dependents at no cost
to them, and continuation of the provisions for future
cost-of-living adjustments without limitation on the
amount of possible adjustment. The Board concluded
that “although the companies had improved their offers
somewhat, the parties’ positions as stated to this Board
were farther apart than they were at the time of the
Board’s earlier report.”
On December 24, the union petitioned the court that
had issued the Labor Management Relations Act
injunction to require the companies to pay the
4-cent-an-hour cost-of-living adjustment that would
become due the first pay period in January 1960 under
the previous agreements. The court decision was not
issued until late in January,7 after agreement had been
reached by the parties.
The final settlement On January 4, 1960, while the
Board of Inquiry was preparing its report, a memoran­
dum of agreement with the union was signed by the U.S.
Steel Corp. and 10 other basic steel producers. The
agreement followed the recommendations of the Vice
President and the Secretary of Labor, who had been
engaged in mediation with the parties for several weeks.8
The new settlement, to be in force through December
31, 1962,9 on pension, insurance, and supplementary
unemployment benefits, and through June 30, 1962, on
^ As required by the Labor Management Relations Act, the
report was to be submitted 60 days after the injunction became
effective. Within 15 days after the report was submitted, the
National Labor Relations Board was to take a secret ballot of the
employees of each employer involved in the dispute on the
question of whether they wished to accept the final offer of
settlement made by their employer.
^ In officially ending the injunction on January 26, the
court ruled that workers who had resumed work under the
injunction, would be entitled to the cost-of-living adjustment
“unless new agreements were entered into providing otherwise.”




other matters, provided for wage increases averaging an
estimated 9.7 cents an hour (including effects on
incentive pay but excluding indirect effects on overtime,
holiday pay, and other elements of employment cost)
effective December 1, 1960, and 8.9 cents an hour
effective October 1, 1961, at U.S. Steel plants.10
The existing 17-cent cost-of-living allowance con­
tinued in effect and a limit was established on further
increases in the allowance. The formula contained in the
previous contract was continued but the allowance could
be increased on only two dates: December 1, 1960, and
October 1, 1961, and the maximum increase permitted
was to be 6 cents by October 1, 1961, of which no more
than 3 cents could become effective on December 1,
1960. There was, however, provision to use part or all of
any increase in the cost-of-living allowance to offset
costs of insurance above a specified amount.
Effective January 1, 1960, insurance and pension
provisions were liberalized. All costs of the formerly
contributory basic insurance plan were assumed by the
companies; life insurance and sickness and accident
benefits were liberalized; hospital and surgical benefits
were continued up to 6 months for laid-off employees
with 2 years or more of continuous service at date of
layoff and life insurance for all laid-off employees was
continued for up to 2 years (from 6 months), with
employees paying 60 cents per month per $1,000 for life
insurance after the first 6 months of layoff. The
provision for retired employees to convert their hospital
and surgical benefits to an individual policy was
continued and a new provision was added permitting
them to authorize deduction from their pension checks
of the premiums required for such coverage. Pension
changes included an increase in the maximum number of
o

° The Secretary, as a part of his intensive efforts
throughout the strike to bring about a settlement within the
framework of free collective bargaining, had assumed responsi­
bility within the administration for keeping the President and
the people advised. Shortly after the strike began, he had
announced that he was conducting two types of fact finding
related to the strike: a day-to-day collection of information on
the effect of the strike on the economy, to keep the President
“advised periodically as to the facts” ; and an “exhaustive study
in depth of collective bargaining in the steel industry . . . to
determine the underlying causes” of the frequent recurrence of
steel strikes. In addition, in mid-August, he had issued a booklet
of Background Statistics Bearing on the Steel Dispute
(reproduced in the October 1959 issue of the Monthly Labor
Review, pp. 1089-1107), which he said “may serve to indicate
the area which exists for a settlement in which the public’s
interest is taken fully into account.”
^ Negotiations on pensions, insurance, and SUB could be
opened on June 30, 1962.
Cost estimates for the basic steel industry as a whole were
9.4 cents in 1960 and 8.7 cents in 1961.

years of service to be credited in computing minimum
pensions, an increase in minimum monthly benefits per
year of service, liberalization of the formula for pensions
above the minimum, increased minimum disability
pensions, a special initial lump-sum payment on
retirement, liberalization of early retirement eligibility
provisions, and provisions governing breaks in service.
The pensions of those already retired were increased by
amounts up to $5 per month.
The contingent liability of the companies to the
Supplementary Unemployment Benefit fund which had
accumulated under the previous agreement and which
had been canceled on July 14, 1959 under the terms of
that agreement, was restored effective November 30,
1959. The Supplemental Unemployment Benefit agree­
ment, providing a 3-cent cash contribution and 2-cent
contingent liability, was renewed as of January 1, 1960.
Further negotiations on SUB, provided in the memoran­
dum of agreement, resulted in no other changes in the
plan or in the prior agreement.
A joint Human Relations Research Committee was
established to study and recommend solutions of mutual
problems relating to equitable wage and benefit
adjustments, job classification, incentive pay, protection
of long-service employees against layoffs, medical care,
and other problems. Questions of local working
conditions were to be referred to a joint study
committee headed by a neutral chairman, which was to
report by November 30, 1960.
July 1962-May 1965

In contrast to difficulties experienced in reaching
agreement after expiration of the 1956-59 contract, the
U.S. Steel Corp., together with 10 other major steel
companies and the USA initialed a memorandum of
understanding on March 31, 1962— months before the
3
1960 agreement was scheduled to expire.11 Unlike the
1959-60 negotiations, there was virtually no publicity
until final agreement had been reached. Much of the
success of this approach to collective bargaining was
attributed by the parties to discussions of major issues
by the joint Human Relations Research Committee,
established by the 1960 agreement.
Discussion between the 11 companies and the union
began in Pittsburgh in mid-February12 after President
John F. Kennedy had asked that agreement on contract
terms be reached by March 1. During the opening days,
the Human Relations Research Committee reviewed the
work of its subcommittees. Members of the committee
who declined to discuss details of the meetings stated
that they could arrive at “sound decisions as soon as
possible” by avoiding public debate.




After more than 2 weeks, meetings were recessed on
March 2. Specific proposals were not disclosed, but the
companies’ chief negotiator said that employment
security had been the major subject of discussion and
that the cost of the proposals the union considered to be
minimum would be so great as to reduce employment
security. The union felt continued talks at that time
would serve no useful purpose and suggested that
negotiations be recessed until sometime after May 1.
At the request of the President, talks were resumed
on March 14. Again the parties declined to discuss
details of the meetings. On March 28, however, the
companies’ chief negotiator said that the parties,
working within the Human Relations Research Com­
mittee, had defined the area within which they hoped to
reach agreement. Three days later, the parties initialed a
memorandum of understanding.
The memorandum, ratified on March 31, 1962 by the
union’s 34-member executive board and its 170-member
wage policy committee, became effective July 1, but did
not provide for a wage increase during the first year of
the 2-year agreement.
Contract improvements which emphasized job and
income security included liberalized vacation benefits, a
new savings and vacation plan designed to spread work
and encourage early retirement, changes in pension
benefits also designed to encourage retirement, and
improved supplemental unemployment benefits (SUB).
The agreement suspended the cost-of-living escalator
clause; the accumulated cost-of-living allowance was
continued but not incorporated into the wage structure.
Until maximum financing was reached, the settlement
obligated the companies to pay to the SUB plan, starting
July 1, 1962, an additional 4.5 cents per man-hour
worked. This payment brought the total liability to 9.5
cents.13 Regular weekly benefits were liberalized and
substantial changes were made in the table for the
reduction of benefits according to the financial position
of the SUB plan. The greatest change allowed payment
of full benefits when the financial position was as low as
35 percent; previously, reduced benefits had been paid
when the position fell below 75 percent. The SUB plan,
11 The 11 major steel companies that initialed
memorandum were parties to the settlement of 1960.

the

12 This was the earliest date, relative to the scheduled
expiration of an existing contract, on which collective bargaining
had started since the first agreement was reached between a
United States Steel Corp. subsidiary and the union in March
1937.
12 Of this total, the company was to pay up to 4.5 cents
directly into the fund; the remaining 5 cents was to be a
contingent liability. When the total amount (fund plus
contingent liability) equaled the previous maximum financing
figure, all obligations were in the form of contingent liability.

which was liberalized in other ways, added short-week
benefits and extended benefits to laid-off workers who
became disabled, after their sickness and accident
insurance coverage had been discontinued. A moving
allowance was established for long-service employees
who accepted job transfers under an interregional
preferential hiring program.
Minor changes liberalized holiday pay and increased
regular vacations for workers with 3 but less than 5, 10
but less than 15, and 25 years or more of service.
A savings and vacation plan was established to
provide supplemental vacation-retirement benefits. The
new plan was to be financed by company contributions
of 3 cents a man-hour, effective July 1,1962; additional
amounts— to 4.5 cents an hour—
up
could be transferred
to the plan from the SUB finances, to the extent that
this money was not necessary to maintain maximum
financing. The program, effective until December 31,
1965, provided retirement benefits based on retirement
units (one unit for each 5 years of continuous service
before January 1, 1961) to workers with continuous
service for pension purposes, including employees who
retired without a pension after age 65 because of
insufficient service for pension eligibility.
To encourage retirement, eligible employees 65 years
old and over would have their retirement benefits under
the new program reduced by 10 percent for each quarter
year they continued to work after June 30, 1963, or
after they reached 65, whichever was later. Thus, these
retirement benefits would be eliminated for such
employees who continued to work for 2Vi years beyond
retirement age.
The plan also credited— the extent of the funds
to
remaining each quarter—
one vacation unit to employees
for each 2 years of service after December 31, 1960, but
before age 65. These benefits, available according to
seniority, could be used for vacation or deferred until
the employee was retired or incapacitated by illness or
other hardships.
Effective with retirements on or after June 30, 1962,
the agreement liberalized eligibility for employees who
had a break in service because of disability, permanent
plant or departmental shut-downs, or retirement under
mutually satisfactory conditions. Revisions in eligibility
requirements for early retirement provided annuities to
employees 55 years old or over with at least 15 years of
service when their age and years of service totaled 75
years; for other eligible employees, age and years of
service (also with a minimum of 15 years of service) had
to total 80 years. The application of the $80 offset
against social security for those retiring early under the
basic 1-percent formula was deferred until they reached
age 65 or became eligible for disability benefits under




social security.
The Human Relations Research Committee was
continued as the Human Relations Committee. It was to
study problems in the general area of employment
stabilization, such as subcontracting, overtime and
vacation scheduling, and work assignments. Committee
recommendations were due by the end of the first year,
with any unresolved issues subject to bargaining on or
after May 1, 1963.
The 1962 agreement was to remain in effect through
June 30, 1964, but could be terminated after that date
on 90 days’ written notice. On or after May 1, 1963,
either party could serve 90 days’ notice to open
negotiations on wage rates, insurance, or pensions. The
savings-vacation and SUB plans were to remain in effect
through December 31, 1965, unless either party gave 90
days’ notice on or after April 1, 1965, to terminate these
plans.
In mid-March 1963, the parties began informal talks
under the reopening provision. The union announced
that the joint Human Relations Committee would
extend the subject matter of its discussions to resolve
problems “within the next few weeks.” Both parties
emphasized that the committee was not negotiating but
merely discussing all matters on which the contract
could be reopened on May 1.
Without formal contract reopening, the parties
announced on June 20 that agreement had been reached
on contract revisions to be effective August 1. For the
second consecutive year, wage rates were not changed,
but new provisions were adopted to improve income and
job security.
A memorandum of agreement, signed by the parties
on June 29, called for extended “sabbatical” vacations
for workers with the highest seniority and for improved
insurance benefits.
The new extended vacation plan, effective January 1,
1964, increased contributions to the savings and
vacation plan by 9.5 cents a man-hour and brought the
total contribution to 12.5 cents an hour for a 5-year
period. Limitations were placed on the amounts that
could be diverted from the SUB finances.
Employees in the upper half of the seniority list (the
senior group)14 received a total of 13 weeks of vacation
once in every 5-year period. (In other years, they
received their usual vacation.)
Provision was also made for an additional week’s
vacation pay, to be credited in cycles; the length of the
cycles depended on the level of the savings and vacation
I 4 At the time the extended vacation provision was
negotiated, the senior group at the U.S. Steel Corp. included
workers with approximately 17 years of service.

finances. Employees in the junior group participated in
each cycle; those in the senior group, only in the first
and cycles subsequent to the third. The level of the
savings and vacation finances would determine whether a
fourth cycle was reached. With cancellation of the
provision in the 1962 agreement for 1 week’s vacation
pay for each 2 years of service after January 1961,
workers who had not received a week’s pay under this
provision were the first to benefit under the new
arrangement.
Hospitalization, weekly sickness and accident
benefits, and life insurance were liberalized.
The 1963 agreement, covering about 105,000 U.S.
Steel Corp. employees in steelmaking operations, was to
be in effect through May 1, 1965, and could be
terminated after that date on 120 days’ written notice.
Notice of intent to terminate after 120 days could be
served on or after September 3, 1965, for the SUB and
pension plan and on or after September 3, 1968, for the
savings and vacation plan.
May 1965-July 1968

Well before contracts with the U.S. Steel Corp. and
other major steel producers expired on May 1, 1965, the
USA adopted guidelines for a collective bargaining
program at its 12th Constitutional Convention at Atlantic
City, N.J., in September 1964. The bargaining resolution
approved by convention delegates emphasized a program
of greater prosperity, dignity and justice on the job, and
total job security. Included in the category of total job
security were demands for continuation of income in
periods of economic downswing, illness, accident or
disability, and an adequate insurance income for the
family of a deceased steelworker.
In early December, the union’s Wage Policy
Committee met to formalize the demands to be
presented to company negotiators on December 15,
1964. The broad collective bargaining program included
demands for a substantial wage increase, incorporation
of the remaining cost-of-living allowance into base rates,
and establishment of a new cost-of-living clause,
additional paid holidays, longer vacations, and increased
overtime and premium pay. Other demands included
liberalization of health insurance and pension plan
benefits. Additional nonwage demands were for
improved provisions for work scheduling, safety,
grievance procedure, discipline, and vacation scheduling.
Many of these demands related to local plant problems.
After presentation of demands, the parties met on a
company-by-company basis until December 18, when a
recess was called for the holidays. Negotiations resumed
in early January but were suspended on January 7,



1965, because of the union presidential election
scheduled for February 9.
Bargaining resumed shortly after the election
although unofficial returns indicated defeat of the
incumbent president. He led the union in the
presentation of a revised set of demands to company
negotiators on March 17. These demands, which the
union called minor, included a streamlined grievance
procedure or the right to strike on important grievances,
stronger controls on contracting out of work and
elimination or change of job duties because of
technological change, penalty pay for employees who
did not work because of violations of scheduling or
posting provisions in the contract, and inclusion of
penalty pay and holiday pay in the computation of
overtime. These were to be followed by major demands
of the union.
Negotiations on working conditions at the plant level
continued until March 28 and 29, when the union
presented its major demands which included substantial
increases in wages and benefits. Key demands were a
wage increase of 12.5 to 28 cents an hour in the first and
third years of the agreement, plus an additional 10
percent for workers not covered by an incentive
program, a workweek of 32 hours every fourth week,
double time for overtime, retirement benefits more than
double the existing monthly benefit, and an increase in
the maximum duration of SUB benefits beyond 52
weeks. Company negotiators countered with a 3-year
wage and benefit package estimated by them to be equal
to the 2 percent annual rate of productivity gain
experienced during the 1957-63 period.
In mid-April, the company proposed an unusual type
of interim agreement to end the existing strike threat.
Union negotiators favored some type of settlement
because it would allow the union time to resolve the
uncertain political situation within the union.15 On
April 28, the parties formally signed an interim
agreement to extend the contract to August 1, when the
union could reopen the contract and strike 30 days later.
During the extension, the company was to accrue a total
obligation of 11.5 cents for each man-hour worked.
When the parties agreed on a new contract, the accruals
under the extension were to be used for wages or
benefits agreed to by the parties. The union’s Wage
Policy Committee approved the extension.
Negotiations resumed June 2, led by the newly
^ At this point apparently I.W. Abel had defeated
incumbent president David J. McDonald, but the election results
were not official and the incumbent president’s term would not
expire until June 1, 1965. It appeared that a political struggle
might develop, with McDonald asking for a recount of the
ballots.

installed president of the union. Both parties expressed
dissatisfaction a few days later when the President of the
United States suggested that wages could be increased by
3 percent without raising steel prices. The President also
suggested a cut in steel prices.
In the 2 months that followed, the parties remained
far apart on nearly all issues. At the end of July the
union served notice of its intention to strike September
1, if agreement was not reached by that date.
On August 24, the company offered a 35-month
compromise settlement with improvements it valued at 3
percent per year. Union negotiators rejected the offer.
The union had been attempting to pattern its demands
after the aluminum industry agreement.
Two days after the union rejected the company offer,
the President telephoned chief negotiators of the
company and union. Once again he appealed to the
parties to reach a responsible noninflationary settlement.
One day before the union intended to strike, the
President called the parties to Washington, D.C. After
meeting with the President, the parties agreed to extend
the strike deadline 8 days.
On August 28 union demands were modified, and on
September 1, the company added to its previous offer.
Agreement on a 35-month contract was reached
September 6, 1965. Improvements included a wage
increase of 10 to 19 cents an hour in the first year, 6 to
12 cents an hour in the third year, and incorporation
into base rates of the lS^-cent-an-hour allowance
remaining from the previous cost-of-living escalator.
After-retirement insurance and sickness and accident
benefits for all employees were increased as were days of
hospital benefits for employees with 10 years or more of
service. Eligibility requirements for hospital-surgicalmedical benefits for dependents were liberalized.
Major improvements in pension benefits included a
minimum pension benefit of $5 a month per year of
service up to 35 years, and a special early retirement
supplement for certain retirees. An employee could
retire at any age with a full pension after 30 years or
more of service, and survivors options were liberalized.
Funds accumulated as a result of the extension
agreement of April 28, 1965 were distributed to
employees in December 1965 as a lump-sum cash
payment. The allocation was based on hours worked
plus credit for apecified hours not worked but
compensated during the period of that agreement.
The contract was to remain in effect until August 1,
1968, except for the pension, insurance, savings and
vacation plan, and the supplemental unemployment
benefit plan. These provisions were to continue until
120 days after written notice by either party to
terminate served on or after September 3, 1968, but




subject to renegotiation at the same time as the basic
agreement.
August 1968-July 1971

Early in 1968, bargaining began between the USA
and the 11 major companies in the basic steel industry
whose contracts expired August 1, 1968. The negotia­
tions, conducted on an 11-company basis were
characterized by three new procedures: (1) Involvement
of the Basic Steel Industry Conference, as authorized by
the union’s 13th Constitutional Convention of 1966; (2)
inclusion in negotiations of an Eleven Company
Negotiating Advisory Committee, set up by the union’s
International Executive Board; and (3) lead time added
for the resolution of local issues.
The 800-member Basic Steel Industry Conference
met for the first time March 21. The conference
encompassed local unions not directly involved in
bargaining as well as representatives of bargaining units
in the 11 major companies, because all USA members in
the Basic Steel Industry ultimately were affected by
negotiations conducted with the 11 companies in the
Coordinating Committee Steel Companies. Since the
Basic Steel Industry Conference included non­
negotiating as well as negotiating locals, a separate
advisory committee was established on March 18 con­
sisting of worker representatives from the 11 companies
negotiating as a group. The 200-member Eleven Com­
pany Negotiating Advisory Committee, which was com­
posed of at least five local union representatives from
each company plus district directors and staff, repre­
sented a cross section of thought and facilitated greater
participation in the negotiations. The committee met for
the first time during the June 3 bargaining talks.
The third innovating factor in the negotiations was
the implementation of lead time for local bargaining,
equal to the time provided for the negotiation of
contract issues. Plant-by-plant discussion of local matters
began April 15 and incentive pay assumed a position of
primary importance. At issue were the distribution and
levels of incentive pay and extension of incentives to
cover a greater proportion of workers. Other issues
under consideration were working conditions, safety
programs, and seniority. From May 15-31, discussion of
unresolved local issues was continued on the company
level.
Negotiations of the basic economic issues began in
New York City on June 3; both sides presented general
background material for bargaining. Guarded by a news
blackout by both sides to facilitate open bargaining and
insure secrecy, bargaining was moved to the headquarter
cities for each company where it continued on a

company basis from June 10-23. Incentive pay was
discussed widely and other issues were added, including
the review and revision of job classifications to reflect
technological change and earnings protection for
workers displaced or demoted as a result of automation.
Also discussed were vacation bonuses and the increasing
of supplemental unemployment benefits to 75 percent
of weekly earnings. Secret negotiations then were
centered in Pittsburgh for further discussion of
economic terms but it was assumed the union was
seeking a settlement comparable to those won in the can
and aluminum industries.
As negotiations continued into the latter part of July,
neither side seemed to want a strike or government
intervention; yet neither side appeared willing to
sacrifice any ground, particularly on incentive pay. Upon
the recommendation of the Basic Steel Industry Con­
ference and the Eleven Company Negotiating Advisory
Committee, a strike vote was taken on July 23. Union
officials were authorized to call a strike at the expiration
of the contracts at midnight, July 31. As a result of the
threatened strike and previous strike-hedge buying,
several plants began the costly shutdown process to
protect their mills.
As both sides prepared for a possible strike, the Basic
Steel Industry Conference reached a settlement with the
companies on the evening of July 30; some specific
details and wording were to be worked out the following
day. The contract between the U.S. Steel Corp. and the
USA, which was signed on August 3, 1968, was
retroactive to August 1.
The pact provided general wage increases of 20 cents
an hour in 1968, and deferred increases of 12 cents an
hour for both 1969 and 1970. Also added was a total of
1 cent an hour over the 3 years of the contract in
widened increments between job classifications. In
addition, a joint committee was established to review
and set guides for wage incentives. The committee report
was due August 1, 1969, or if agreement could not be
reached, the issue was to be submitted to arbitration. In
either case, according to the findings of the deciding
body, employees working on jobs not previously covered
by incentives but found to be deserving of such, would
be paid 10 cents an hour worked, retroactive to August
1, 1968.
Improvements in the pension plan provided increased
monthly allowances and initiated a surviving spouse’s
benefit. For future retirees, minimum monthly pensions
were increased to $6.50 for each year of continuous
service up to 35 years. For pensioners whose benefits
were calculated on the 1-percent formula, the $60 social
security deduction was eliminated. An added feature of
the plan was the surviving spouse’s benefit, providing




monthly payments to the surviving eligible spouse of an
employee or certain retirees if specified qualifications
were met. Benefits were continued in reduced amounts
after the surviving spouse reached 62. All changes in the
pension plan were effective July 31, 1969, and, except
for the surviving spouse’s benefits, also were applied to
those retiring on or after July 31, 1968, effective August
1, 1969. Pensioners retiring before July 31, 1968,
received a monthly pension increase of $10.
Weekly supplemental unemployment benefits were
increased from 24 to 26 times an employee’s average
straight-time hourly earnings, effective January 1, 1969.
Maximum benefits for single employees were increased
to $52.50 if unemployment compensation was received,
and $80 in the absence of unemployment compensation.
In addition, a plan was to be developed to protect the
level of earnings of employees, particularly those dis­
placed by technological advances. The earnings protec­
tion plan, initiated on August 1, 1969, provided a
quarterly income benefit equal to th at amount necessary
to maintain at least 85 percent of a:i employee’s average
straight-time earnings of the previous quarter, if he was
subjected to a wage decrease. The plan was financed by a
company obligation of not more than 2 cents an hour
worked, to the extent that such benefits did not interfer
with the regular provisions under the SUB plan.
Effective August 1, 1968, hospitalization benefits
were changed to provide full payment for treatment in
an intensive care unit and private room allowance equal
to the most common semiprivate room rate. Increased
life insurance and a new major medical plan effective
August 1, 1970, were also part of the new settlement.,
The $1,000 increase in life insurance was applicable to
active employees. The major medical plan provided
benefits of 80 percent of the covered expenses after a
deduction of $50 an individual and $100 a family each
year. The maximum benefit was $10,000 a year for each
individual and a lifetime maximum of $20,000 for a
single illness or injury.
Improved benefits were provided for both regular and
extended vacations. Beginning January 1, 1969, junior
employees—
those in the bottom h alf of the seniority
list—
were granted an extended vacation of 3 weeks, once
every 5 years, in addition to their regular vacation. The
13 weeks’ extended vacation for senior group employees
was extended for another 5-year period. For those years
in which an employee did not receive an extended
vacation, he was given a $30 vacation bonus for each
week of vacation. On the other hand, the company won
a new method of vacation pay calculation and the right
to schedule vacations throughout the year.
Other provisions included increased shift differentials
of 10 cents for the afternoon shift and 15 cents for the

night shift, effective August 1, 1970. The day before
Christmas was added as the eighth paid holiday,
beginning in 1970. Also effective in 1970, employees
were granted up to 3 days’ funeral leave when a death
occurred in the immediate family. Effective August 1,
1968, employees subpoenaed as witnesses were to be
paid according to the jury-duty pay provision.
The agreement, which covered approximately
107,000 employees of U.S. Steel was to remain in effect
until 60 days after either party had given written notice
of termination, but in any event would not terminate
before August 1, 1971. The supplemental unemploy­
ment benefit plan, insurance plan, and pension plan were
to remain in effect until December 31, 1971, or for 120
days after notice of termination served by either party
on or after September 3, 1971. The savings and vacation
plan was to remain in effect until December 31, 1973, or
120 days after either side served notice of termination
on or after September 3, 1973.
As agreed to during the negotiations, an 11-company
joint committee began to study problems surrounding
the incentive pay issue, including the amount of pay and
the extent of coverage. The union reportedly was
seeking incentive pay for all workers to include a bonus
rate floor of 35 percent for direct incentive production
workers and 26% percent for indirect workers. On the
other hand, the industry, reportedly, was seeking to
limit the extent of incentive coverage and the level of
incentive earnings. No agreement had been reached by
mid-June 1969, and the issue was submitted to arbitra­
tion. The 3-member arbitration panel reviewed the issue,
and made its award on August 1, 1969.
According to the decision of the panel, each company
was to provide incentive coverage to at least 85 percent
of its production and maintenance employees on a
companywide basis, and not less than 65 percent of such
employees in each plant. The effect of the decision,
depending on the existing level of coverage, would vary
from company to company. Companywide coverage at
U.S. Steel was about 80 percent at the time. The award
defined three categories and the percent of each
category above the contractual incentive earnings
opportunities of the incentive jobs: Namely, direct, 35
percent; indirect, 23 percent; and secondary indirect, 12
percent. Implementation of the award, decisions about
specific jobs to be covered under the new definitions,
and upward and downward adjustments of existing
incentive earnings were to be carried out on a company
and plant basis. To comply with the 1968 agreement,
employees whose nonincentive jobs were reclassified as
incentive under the award were to be paid 10 cents for
each hour worked on such jobs from August 1, 1968, to
the actual date of incentive coverage. Each company was



to submit a proposal to implement the award by
November 1, 1969. The unions had 60 days thereafter to
submit a counterproposal, followed by negotiation and
arbitration, if necessary. The award was to be imple­
mented at the “earliest practicable date.”
Although the panel set no specific deadline, progress
was slow. Disagreement centered around interpretation
of the language of the arbitration award. The company
contended the minimum percentage guides for incentive
coverage handed down by the panel were goals rather
than minimum requirements. The union rejected a
company offer to raise incentive coverage to 82.9
percent on a companywide basis; 15 plants were left
below the 65-percent mark. Negotiations continued
throughout the spring. As gains were made in many
companies—
Inland Steel was the first to comply with the
arbitrators’ award in May— impasse remained at U.S.
an
Steel. The issue again was submitted to arbitration at the
end of May and a second award, limited to U.S. Steel,
was made June 8, 1970. The company was given until
June 23 to submit a realistic proposal, and both parties
were to reach full agreement by July 20. No settlement
was reached, however, and the issue was resubmitted for
a third round of arbitration in August. The third award,
announced November 18, 1970, extended incentive
coverage to over 90 percent of the employees at U.S.
Steel. The awards granted coverage to an additional
10,000 employees.
August 1971-April 1974

On March 29, 1971, the Steelworkers’ Basic Steel
Industry Conference met in Washington, D.C. to
examine the overall Wage Policy Statement drafted by
the union’s Wage Policy Committee in light of local steel
industry problems and the agreement just concluded in
the metal container industry. Although the conference
did not draft a separate steel statement, it did authorize
a committee composed of the chairman, secretaries, and
technicians of the union’s negotiating committees to
draft for forthcoming negotiations proposals that
reflected the Wage Policy Statement and to prepare a
transcript of suggestions made by delegates during the
Basic Steel Conference.
As a prelude to the 1971 negotiations, union
representatives of the basic steel industry had attended
the 15th Constitutional Convention of the Steelworkers
(USA) held September 28-O ctober 2, 1970, in Atlantic
City, N.J. Discussions focused on the bargaining program
the USA would adopt for its 1970-71 negotiations with
the steel, can, aluminum, and copper industries. Shortly
after the conclusion of the convention, the Wage Policy
Committee issued its general Wage Policy Statement.

Included in the statement were proposals of a substantial
wage increase, restoration of a cost-of-living escalator
clause, liberalization of pension requirements and
benefits, expansion of surviving spouse benefits, and
improvements in the various group health plans. Special
attention was given to broader mental health treatment,
to a more comprehensive paid prescription drug
program, and to coverage for dental care.
The first general meeting between the USA and the
Steel Industry Coordinating Committee occurred on
May 18, 1971. During the 2-day session company and
union officials laid out their overall positions and gave
economic arguments to support them. The following
week talks were held at the company level and issues
were discussed in general terms. At the plant level,
formal bargaining on local issues started June 1 and was
scheduled to continue through July 31, although indus­
trywide negotiations were to resume in Washington, D.C.
on July 7.
By the time negotiations resumed in Washington, the
Steelworkers had agreed on new contracts with major
aluminum producers, and union officials publicly
stressed their determination not to accept smaller gains
in steel than had been reached earlier in the aluminum
and metal container agreements.
As the July 31 contract expiration date approached,
many companies began banking their furnaces. On the
night of the 31st, industry bargainers submitted a
proposal that union representatives felt was generally
adequate but would require further negotiations on
details. The Basic Steel Industry Conference voted a
24-hour contract extension, and on August 1 a strike
was averted when settlement was reached. Three-year
contracts, which closely resembled the can and
aluminum agreements, were signed August 2.
Summary o f 1971 contract terms. The pact with U.S.
Steel, which was essentially the same document as that
signed by the other members of the basic steel industry,
provided general wage increases of 50 cents an hour in
the first year and deferred increases of 12% cents an
hour in the second and third years. Also added was a
total of 1.3 cents an hour over 3 years in widened
increments between jobs classifications. A cost-of-living
clause, which had been terminated in 1962, was re­
established in the second year. The clause provided for a
1- cent-per-hour increase for each 0.4-point increase in
the BLS Consumer Price Index (1957-59=100), reviewed
quarterly beginning August 1, 1972. The first review was
to be based on a 1-month change, the second on a
2- month change, and subsequent reviews on 3-month
changes in the Index. In addition, employees were
guaranteed a cost-of-living allowance of at least 12%



cents per hour by August 1, 1973, and, by May 1, 1974,
an amount equal to the greater of 25 cents an hour or
12% cents plus the amount payable on August 1, 1973.
Adjustments, which were to be paid as an adder, would
apply only to hours worked and certain allowed time
hours.
Improvements in the pension plan increased the
minimum monthly benefit to $8 for each of the first 15
years of service, $9 for each of the next 15 years, and
$10 for each year over 30. Previously, the minimum rate
was a flat $6.50 and credited service was limited to 35
years. The alternate 1-percent formula also was
improved. For disability pensioners not eligible for
unreduced Social Security disability pensions, the mini­
mum benefit was increased to $150 a month, and
minimum benefits under the surviving spouse provision
were increased to $100 a month for those under age 62
and to $50 for those 62 and over.
Before retirement, the basic life insurance policy was
increased by $2,500 in each earnings class. Medical care
insurance coverage was expanded to include, among
other things, medical care costs for donors of organs;
abortions and sterilization procedures; and a physician’s
charge for covered oral surgical procedures even when
surgery was performed in his office. The annual maxi­
mum on psychiatric care was increased to $1,500 and
maximum benefits for major medical insurance were
increased to $15,000 for a calendar year and to $25,000
for lifetime.
Among other improvements, maximum Supplemental
Unemployment Benefits were increased by $30 a week;
a paid holiday was added; and vacation bonus pay was
increased to $40 and $50 for selected periods. Bonus
pay varied in different months to encourage employees
to take their vacations in less desira 3le months and thus
to reduce summer work-force problems.
The contract, which covered 103,000 workers, was to
remain in effect until August 1, 1974, with no provision
for reopening.

Experimental negotiating agreement

In anticipation of contract expiration in the summer
of 1974, the parties agreed in early 1973 upon a new
approach to future contract negotiations when they
signed an “Experimental Negotiating Agreement.” The
agreement was ratified on March 29, 1973, by 600
delegates to a Steelworkers’ Basic Steel Industry Con­
ference and signed by the Steelworkers and the
Coordinating Committee Steel Companies (10 of the

Nation’s major steel producers)16 a few days later. A
joint announcement of details of the agreement was
made at that time. This unprecedented agreement was
not a replacement for the existing 3-year contracts, but
rather a foundation for contract negotiations in 1974 to
help stabilize steel operations, production, and employ­
ment.
The 3-year Experimental Negotiating Agreement,
covering about 350,000 workers, guaranteed un­
interrupted production in the industry through July
1977, by establishing voluntary final and binding arbitra­
tion of unresolved issues in the 1974 negotiations.
Additionally, the parties agreed not to call a general
strike or employ the lockout in support of their
respective bargaining positions.
The parties emphasized the need for a new approach
in settling bargaining differences. They pointed out that
“cyclical swings in operations and employment reflected
by accumulation and liquidation of inventories by steel
consumers have had a devastating economic impact not
only on the steelworkers and companies, but also on the
communities where steel operations are located.. . . ”
The joint announcement also stated that
. the
periodic potentiality of a shutdown of steel operations—
in spite of a history of harmonious settlements since
1959—
has been largely responsible for attracting large
volumes of foreign steel.”
Under the new procedure, employees in the basic
steel industry would be assured of minimum wage
increases of 3 percent on August 1, 1974, 1975, and
1976. These pay increases would be added to both
incentive and nonincentive wage scales. The cost-ofliving wage adjustment provisions in effect on July 31,
1974 were to be continued.




“Because economic advantages could accrue to the
companies by elimination of the effects of hedge-buying
and shutdowns,” it was announced that the agreement
also provided for a one-time uniform bonus of $150 for
those who had employee status on August 1, 1974.
The union retained a right to strike at a particular
operation over local issues unique to that operation, but
the parties emphasized that if such local plant strikes
materialized, the likelihood of any significant disruption
of domestic steel production would be minimal.
Under the new bargaining arrangement, the parties
were to begin negotiations for new agreements no later
than February 1, 1974. Discussions would encompass all
matters of wages, hours, and working conditions, as
usual.
The parties agreed to refer, by April 15, 1974,
unresolved contract issues to an Impartial Arbitration
Panel for decision on or before July 10, 1974. The Panel
would have the authority to decide all issues referred to
it and to settle any questions about the implementation
of its decisions which the parties could not resolve, no
later than midnight, July 31, 1974.
The following tables bring the U.S. Steel Wage
Chronology up to date through April 30, 1974.17
Allegheny Ludlum Industries, Inc., Armco Steel Corp.,
Bethlehem Steel Corp., Inland Steel Co., Jones & Laughlin Steel
Corp., National Steel Corp., Republic Steel Corp., U.S. Steel
Corp., Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corp., and The Youngstown
Sheet and Tube Co.
17
In, April 1974, the parties agreed on a new 39-month
contract, 3V2 months in advance of the August 1, 1974 expira­
tion date of the old agreement. Details of the negotiations and
the resulting terms of the agreement, effective May 1, 1974,
will be published in a supplement to this bulletin.

Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions,
and other related matters
Except at operations of Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad
Co., the southern subsidiary, where hourly increases
were as follows:

Mar. 16, 1937 (agreements dated
Mar. 2 and 17, 1936 -Carnegie
Illinois Steel and Mar. 17,
1936-other subsidiaries).

10-cent-an-hour increase.

Apr. 1, 1941 (agreement of same
date).

10-cent-an-hour increase.

Feb. 15, 1942 (agreement dated
Sept. 1,1942).

5.5-cent-an-hour increase.

According to Aug. 26, 1942, award of National War Labor
Board, retroactive to Feb. 15, 1942.

Feb. 15, 1946 (agreement dated
Feb. 15,1946).

18.5-cent-an-hour increase.

Also provided retroactive payment for all time worked
from Jan. 1, 1946, to Feb. 15, 1946, inclusive, at 9.25
cents an hour.

Feb. 1, 1947 (agreement dated
Jan. 13, 1947—
retroactive to
Jan. 4, 1944).

Average increase (corporation­
wide) resulting from establish­
ment of job classification pro­
gram amounted to 5.18 cents
an hour; retroactive payments
averaged 3-5/8 cents a man­
hour over all units.

The job classification program was established in
accordance with the NWLB directive of Nov. 25, 1944,
calling for correction of intraplant inequities in wage
rates. After almost 2 years of study and negotiation
between company and union, agreement was reached on
January 13, 1947, and plan was put into effect in
February 1947. In addition to intraplant inequities, plan
also d ealt w ith interplant and intercompany
differentials. Inequities concerning major groups of
incentive workers were left for future consideration.




Hourly earning
Increases
54.5 cents or less ..................................................7.0 cents
55.0 to 60.0 cen ts..................................................7.5 cents
60.5 to 80.0 cen ts..................................................8.0 cents
Over 80.0 cen ts..................................................10 percent

The plan grouped all jobs into 30 classes with rates starting
at plant “base common labor rate” for job class 1 and
proceeding upward to class 30 with increments of 3.5
cents between classes. It also provided special classifica­
tion for maintenance workers according to qualifica­
tions and rate progressions for apprentices. Workers
being paid more than the newly adopted standard
hourly wage scale were not rec.uced in pay while on
present jobs. (Out-of-line differentials were reduced in
subsequent negotiations.)
Retroactive payments were provided for all hours worked
between Jan. 4, 1944, and Jan. 31, 1947, at a rate equal
to 70 percent of difference between rates effective Feb.
1, 1947, less general wage increases made subsequent to
Jan. 4, 1944, and lower hourly wage rates (average
hourly earnings for incentive workers) actually received.
Cost of program varied among plants covered. These
inequity adjustments were not applicable to Geneva,
Utah, plant of Geneva Steel Co., until April 1948,
retroactive in full to March 9, 1947.

Effective date

Provision

Apr. 1, 1947 (agreement dated
Apr. 22, 1947).

12.5-cent-an-hour increase, plus
in c r e a s e in in crem en ts
between standard job class
rates resulting in added in­
creases up to 14.5 cents for
the top classification. Total
increase averaged approxi­
mately 15 cents.

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters
General increase was 15 cents an hour at Duluth, Minn.,
plant o f American Steel and Wire Co., and 15.5 cents an
hour at Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Co.
Increments between the job classes in the standard hourly
wage rate scale in effect at all plants (except Geneva
operation of Geneva Steel Co.) were increased from 3.5
to 4 cents, thus providing additional increases ranging
from 0.5 cents an hour in class 2 to 14.5 cents an hour
in class 30. The general increase of 12.5 cents was added
to earnings of incentive workers.

July 16, 1948 (supplemental agreement of same date).

9.5-cent-an-hour increase, plus increase in increments between
standard job class rates result­
ing in added increases up to
15.5 cents for the top classifi­
cation. Total increase averaged
approximately 13 cents.

Increments between job classes, now numbering 32, were
increased from 4 to 4.5 cents, thus providing additional
increases ranging from 0.5 cents an hour for jobs in class
2 to 15.5 cents an hour for jobs in class 32. The total
adjustment for each job class was added to earnings of
incentive workers covered by plans in effect on April
22, 1947.

Dec. 1,1950 (supplemental agreement dated Nov. 30, 1950).

12.5-cent-an-hour increase, plus
in c r e a s e in in crem en ts
between standard job class
rates resulting in added in­
creases up to 15.5 cents for
the top classification. Total
increase averaged approxi­
mately 16 cents.

Increments between job classes were increased from 4.5
cents to 5 cents an hour, thus providing additional
increases ranging from 0.5 cents for jobs in class 2 to
15.5 cents for jobs in class 32. The total adjustment for
each job class was added to earnings of incentive
workers covered by plans in effect on April 22, 1947.
At operations of Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Co.,
general increase and classification adjustments were
uniformly 4.5 cents higher.

Mar. 1, 1952 (agreement dated
Aug. 15, 1952).

12.5-cent-an-hour increase, plus
in c r e a s e in in crem en ts
between standard job class
rates resulting in added in­
creases up to 15.5 cents for
the top classification. Total
i n c r ease averaged ap proximately 16 cents.

Increments between job classes were increased from 5 cents
to 5.5 cents an hour, thus providing additional increases
ranging from 0.5 cents for jobs in class 2 to 15.5 cents
for jobs in class 32. The total adjustment for each job
class was added to earnings of incentive workers covered
by plans in effect on April 22, 1947.

July 26, 1952
above date).

(agreement of

June 12, 1953 (supplemental
agreement of same date).

5-cent-an-hour increase at operations of Tennessee Coal and
Iron Division.
8.5-cent-an-hour increase.

Jan. 1, 1954 (agreement of above
date).

2.5-cent-an-hour increase at operations of Tennessee Coal
and Iron Division.

July 1, 1954 (agreement o f same
date).

5-cent-an-hour increase.

According to agreement o f June 12, 1953, previous 2.5
cents an hour North-South differential eliminated on
July 1, 1954.

July 1, 1955 (memorandum of
agreement dated June 30,
1955).

11.5-cent-an-hour increase, plus
in c r e a s e in in crem en ts
between standard job class
rates resulting in added in­
creases up to 15.5 cents for
the top classification. Total
increase averaged approxi­
mately 15.2 cents.

Increments between job classes were increased from 5.5
cents to 6 cents an hour, thus providing additional
increases ranging from 0.5 for jobs in class 2 to 15.5
cents for jobs in class 32. The total adjustment for each
job class was added to earnings of incentive workers
covered by plans in effect on Apr. 22, 1947.




Aug. 3, 1956 (agreement of same
date).

7.5-cent-an-hour increase plus in­
creases in increments between
standard job class rates result­
ing in added increases up to 9
cents for the top classification.
T o ta l in crease averaged
approximately 9.5 cents an
hour in base rates or 10.5
cents when effect on incentive
pay is included.

January 1957-first pay period
beginning in month (agree­
ment dated Aug. 3,1956).

3-

July 1, 1957 (agreement dated
Aug. 3, 1956).

7-cent-an-hour increase, plus in­
crease in increments between
standard job class rates,
resulting in added increases up
to 6 cents for the top classifi­
cation. Total increase averaged
approximately 8.3 cents an
hour in base rates or 9.1 cents
when the effect on incentive
pay is included.

July 19 57-first pay period
beginning in month (agree­
ment dated Aug. 3,1956).

4-

Jan. 1958-first pay period begin­
ning in month (agreement
dated Aug. 3,1956).

5-cent-an-hour allowance added
to straigh t-tim e h ou rly
earnings.

Semiannual adjustment of cost-of-livin %allowance.

July 1, 1958 (agreement dated
Aug. 3, 1956).

7-cent-an-hour increase plus in­
creases in increments between
standard job class rates, result­
ing in added increases up to 6
cents for the top classification.
T otal in crease averaged
approximately 8.3 cents an
hour in base rates, or 9.5 cents
when the effect on incentive
pay was included.

Increments between job classes were increased from 6.5 to
6.7 cents an hour, thus providing additional increases
ranging from 0.2 cent in job class 3 to 6 cents in job
class 32. Proportionate increase :n incentive earnings
under pay plans in effect on Apr. 22, 1947, as well as
under subsequent plans.




Included in computing total was additional 6 cents an hour
for employees formerly in job class 1 which was
eliminated and combined with job class 2.
Increments between job classes were increased from 6 to
6.3 cents an hour, thus providing additional increases
ranging from 0.3 cent in job class 3 to 9 cents for job
class 32. (See schedule of standard hourly rates.)
Proportionate increase in incentive earnings under pay
plans in effect on April 22, 1$>47, as well as for
subsequent plans. (Previously cents per hour increases
added to incentive earnings under pay plans in effect on
Apr. 22, 1947.)
Deferred increases of 7 cents an hour, plus 0.2-cent
increases in increment between job classes effective July
1, 1957, and July 1, 1958.
The new agreement provided for semiannual cost-of-living
adjustments of 1 cent an hour, added to straight-time
hourly earnings, for alternating 0.4- and 0.5-point
changes in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer
Price Index above a level of 116.2. No reductions in the
cost-of-living allowance unless the decline in the index
warrants a wage decrease of at least 2 cents.2

cent-an-hour allowance added
Semiannual adjustment of cost-of-living allowance.
to straigh t-tim e h ou rly
earnings.
Increments between job classes were increased from 6.3 to
6.5 cents an hour, thus providing additional increases
ranging from 0.2 cent in job class 3 to 6 cents for job
class 32. Proportionate increase in incentive earnings
under pay plans in effect on Apr. 22, 1947.

cent-an-hour allowance added
Semiannual adjustment of cost-of-living allowance.
to stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly
earnings.

July 1958—
first pay period begin­
ning in month (agreement
dated Aug. 3, 1956).

4-cent-an-hour allowance added
to straigh t-tim e h ou rly
earnings.

Semiannual adjustment o f cost-of-living allowance.

Jan. 1959-first pay period begin­
ning in month (agreement
dated Aug. 3, 1956).

1-cent-an-hour allowance added
to straigh t-tim e hourly
earnings.

Semiannual adjustment o f cost-of-living allowance.

Dec. 1, 1960 (agreement dated
Jan. 4, 1960).

7-cent-an-hour increase plus in­
crease in increments between
standard job class rates, result­
ing in added increases up to 6
cents for top classification.
Total increase estimated to
average 8.3 cents an hour in
base rates, or 9.7 cents when
the effect on incentive pay
was included.

Increments between job classes to be increased from 6.7 to
6.9 cents an hour, thus providing additional increases
ranging from 0.2 cent in job class 3 to 6 cents in job
class 32. Proportionate increase in incentive earnings
under pay plans in effect on Apr. 22, 1947, as well as
under subsequent plans.
Another deferred increase of 7 cents an hour plus 0.1-cent
increase in increment between job classes to be effective
Oct. T, 1961. Cost estimated at 7.7 cents an hour in
base rates or 8.9 cents when the effect on incentive pay
was included.
New agreement continued existing 17 cents an hour
cost-of-living allowance and provided that it could not
be reduced during the new contract period.
Cost-of-living escalator clause provided for review on Dec. 1,
1960, and Oct. 1, 1961; existing formula continued but
base revised to 123.8 (freezing the existing 17-cent
cost-of-living allowance) and maximum permissible
increase in allowance established at 6 cents by Oct. 1,
1961, of which maximum o f 3 cents could be effective
on Dec. 1, I960.3 Part or all o f increase in cost-of-living
allowance due on these dates was to offset any increase
in net insurance cost above specified amount.4

No change.

Cost-of-living review. The escalator clause would have
increased cost-of-living allowance 3 cents; however, the
parties estimated that insurance costs would rise
sufficiently by the second quarter of 1961 to offset this
amount.

1.5-cent-an-hour allowance added
to straigh t-tim e h ou rly
earnings.

Cost-of-living adjustment. The escalator clause would have
increased cost-of-living allowance 3 cents; however, the
parties estimated that insurance costs would rise
sufficiently by the fourth quarter of 1962 to offset half
of the permissible amount (3 cents) remaining under the
1960 agreement.4
Deferred increase. Increments between job classes increased
from 6.9 to 7 cents an hour, providing additional
increases ranging from 0.1 cent in job class 3 to 3 cents
in job class 32. Proportionate increase in incentive
earnings under pay plans in effect on Apr. 22, 1947, as
well as under subsequent plans.

Oct. 1, 1961 (agreement dated
Jan. 4, 1960).

7-cent-an-hour increase plus in­
crease in increments between
standard job class rates, result­
ing in added increases up to 3
cents for top classification.
Total increase estimated to
average 7.7 cents an hour in
base rates, or 8.9 cents when
the effect on incentive pay
was included.
July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6, 1962).




Escalator clause discontinued; 18.5-cent-an-hour cost-ofliving allowance in effect continued during term of
agreement.

Continued: 18.5-cent-an-hour cost-of-living allowance in
effect during term of agreement.

June 29, 1963 (agreement dated
Apr. 6, 1962, as amended
June 29,1963).
Sept. 1, 1965 (agreement of same
date).

10-cent-an-hour increase plus
0.3-cent increase in increments
between job classes, resulting
in added increases up to 9
cents for top classification.
Total increase estimated to
average 12.2 cents an hour in
base rates.

Agreement also provided: (1) For existing 18.5 cents an
hour cost-of-living adjustment to be included in
standard hourly wage rates effective Sept. 1, 1965;
(2) that all incentive earnings be calculated on the basis
of standard hourly wage rates in effect before Sept. 1,
1965; (3) an inequity adjustment for skilled crafts and
trade employees effective Jan. 1, 1966, and (4) a
deferred general wage increase effective Aug. 1,
1967.

Jan. 1, 1966 (agreement dated
Sept. 1,1965).

All existing trade and craft jobs
increased by two full job
classes; jobs o f millwright and
motor inspector given craft
status, raised two job classes
and given schedule of appren­
ticeship training and rate
schedules.

Such increase in job classification was not to be used for
any incentive pay purposes; instead, each trade or craft
employee on incentive work was to receive 14.6 cents
an hour added to all other earnings.

Aug. 1, 1967 (agreement dated
Sept. 1, 1965).

6-cent-an-hour increase plus
0.2-cent increase in increments
between job classes, resulting
in added increases up to 6
cents for top classification.
Total increase estimated to
average 7.5 cents an hour in
base rates.
20-cen t-an -h ou r increase plus
0.5-cent increase in increments
between job classes, resulting
in additional increases o f up to
15 cents an hour for job
class 32. T o ta l increase
estimated to average 23.8
cents an hour in base rates.

Deferred increase. Incentive earnings continued to be calcu­
lated on the basis of standard hourly wage rates in effect
before Sept. 1, 1965.

Aug. 1, 1968 (agreement o f same
date).

Increased: Trade or craft incentive additive-to 15 cents an
hour.

Job class 33 added to top of rate structure.
Joint committee established to recommend guides, by Aug.
1, 1969, for: (1) types of jobs properly subject to
incentive pay coverage; (2) the definition of equitable
incentive earning opportunities; and (3) the adjustment
o f incentive standards. Employees in jobs brought under
incentive pay coverage were to receive 10 cents an hour
for each hour worked on such job from Aug. 1, 1968, to
the date incentive was applied to the job, if such work
continued for 2 pay periods or more during this time.
Increased: Trade or craft incentive adclitive-to 16 cents an
hour.

Aug. 1, 1968 5 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968; and arbitration
awards dated Aug. 1, 1969,
Aug. 8, 1970, and Nov. 11,
1970).




Extended: Incentive pay of 10
cents an hour retroactive to
Aug. 1, 1968,5 to newlycovered employees.

Applicable only to steel producing operations.
Coverage extended to at least 90 percent6 of production
workers on a companywide basis and 65 percent of
employees in each plant which employed at least 100
workers. Employees directly contributing to rate of
output were eligible to receive 35 percent above their
base pay. Employees contributing indirectly were
eligible to receive 67 percent of ejimings opportunities
of related direct incentive jobs or 2 3 percent above their
base rate. Employees providing secondary indirect con­
tributions were eligible to receive 33 percent o f the
earnings opportunities of related direct incentive jobs,
50 percent of related indirect incentive jobs, or 12
percent above their base rate.

Deferred increase.

Aug. 1, 1969 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968).

12 -cent-an-hour increase plus
0.3-cent increase in increments
between job classes, resulting
in additional increases of up to
9.3 cents an hour for job class
33. Total increase estimated to
average 14.2 cents an hour in
base rates.

Aug. 1, 1970 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968).

1 2 -cent-an-hour increase plus
0.2-cent increase in increments
between job classes, resulting
in additional increases of up to
6.2 cents an hour for job class
33. Total increase estimated to
average 13.5 cents an hour in
base rates.

Deferred increase.

Aug. 1, 1971 (agreement o f same
date).

50-cent-an-hour general increase
and 0 .5 -cent increase in
increments between job classes
resulting in additional in­
creases up to 15.5 cents an
hour for job class 33.
Additional increase to in­
centive employees averaging
11 cents an hour resulting
from incorporation o f the
50-cent increase into incentive
base rates rather than being
paid as an hourly additive. The
combined incentive and non­
incentive increases in base
rates were estimated to
average 64.8 cents an hour.

Agreement also re-established a cost-of-living escalator
clause with quarterly reviews, beginning Aug. 1, 1972
through May 1, 1974 and providing for adjustments7 of
1 cent for each 0.4-point change in the BLS-CPI
(1957-59=100). Except for the first review, which was
to be based on a 1-month index change (between the
June 1972 base month and July 1972), and the second
review, which was to be based on a 2-month change
(between July and September 1972), reviews for
quarterly changes from the base used indexes for Sept.,
Dec., March, and June, with the allowance guaranteed
to be 12.5 cents beginning with the Aug. 1, 1973
adjustment date and 25 cents (or 12.5 cents more than
the August 1973 allowance, whichever was greater)
commencing May 1, 1974. No adjustment was to be
made if the CPI fell below the base index; deferred wage
increases were provided, effective Aug. 1, 1972 and
Aug. 1, 1973.

Increased: Trade or craft incentive additive— 16.6 cents
to
an hour.

Increased: Trade or craft incentive additive-to 17 cents an
hour.

Increased: Trade or craft incentive additive-to 18 cents an
hour.
12.5-cent-an-hour general increase
and 0.4-cent increase in incre­
ments between job classes
r e s u ltin g in ad d itio n a l
increases up to 12.4 cents an
hour for job class 33. The
combined incentive and non­
incentive increases in base
rates were estimated to
average 15.5 cents an hour.

Deferred increase. Incentive earnings to be calculated on
the basis of the standard hourly wage scale in effect
Aug. 1, 1971 and supplemented by the appropriate Aug.
1, 1972 hourly additive as specified in table 2d.

1-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment of cost-of-living allowance.

Nov. 1, 1972 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1971).

2-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment o f cost-of-living allowance.

Feb. 1, 1973 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1971).

3-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment of cost-of-living allowance.

Aug. 1, 1972 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1971).




Increased: Trade or craft incentive additive-to 18.8 cents
an hour.

Provision

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

May 1, 1973 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1971).

7-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment of cost-of-living allowance.

Aug. 1, 1973 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1971).

12.5-cent-an-hour general increase
and 0.4-cent increase in incre­
ments between job classes
resulting in additional in­
creases up to 12.4 cents an
hour for job class 33. The
combined incentive and non­
incentive increases in base
rates estimated to average 15.5
cents an hour.

Deferred increase. Incentive earnings continued to be
calculated on the basis of the Aug. 1, 1971 standard
hourly wage scale and supplemented by the appropriate
Aug. 1, 1973 hourly additive as specified in table 2d.

8-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment of cost-of-living allowance.

Nov. 1, 1973 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1971).

9-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment of cost-of-living allowance.

Feb. 1, 1974 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1971).

9-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment o f cost-of-living allowance.

Increased: Trade or craft incentive additive-to 19.6 cents
an hour.

1 General wage changes are construed as upward or downward adjustments affecting a substantial number of workers at one time.
Not included within the term are adjustments in individual rates (promotions, merit increases, etc.) and minor adjustments in wage
structure (such as changes in individual job rates or incentive rates) that do not have an immediate and noticeable effect on the average
wage level.
The changes listed above were the major adjustments in wage rates made during the period covered. Because of fluctuations in
incentive earnings, the omission o f nongeneral changes in rates, and other factors, total general changes will not necessarily coincide
with the change in average hourly earnings over the same period.
2 The agreement provided that semiannual cost-of-living adjustments be based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price
Index (1947-49=100) for the index months of May and November as follows:

Consumer Price Index
116.5
116.6
117.1
117.5
118.0

Cost-of-living allowance

or less ............................................. None
to 117.0 ............................................1 cent an hour
to 117.4 ............................................2 cents an hour
to 117.9 ............................................3 cents an hour
to 118.3 ........................................... 4 cents an hour

and so forth, with 1-cent adjustments in straight-time hourly earnings for alternating 0.4- and 0.5-point changes in the index, and with
downward adjustments occurring only when the index declines sufficiently to warrant a 2-cent decrease.




Footnote 2— Continued:
Examples of changes in the cost-of-living allowance are shown in the following tabulation:
Changes in cost-of-living
allowance in cents
according to table

Actual cost-of-living
adjustment

+4 c e n t s ...........................................4 cents an hour
+3 c e n t s ...........................................7 cents an hour
- 2 c e n t s .......................................... 5 cents an hour
- 1 c e n t............................................. 5 cents an hour
- 1 c e n t............................................. 3 cents an hour
+2 c e n t s ...........................................5 cents an hour
- 1 c e n t............................................. 5 cents an hour
+1 c e n t............................................. 5 cents an hour
- 1 c e n t............................................. 5 cents an hour
+2 c e n t s ...........................................6 cents an hour
- 3 c e n t s ...........................................3 cents an hour
- 1 c e n t.............................................3 cents an hour
- 1 c e n t............................................. 1 cent an hour
— c e n t s ...........................................None
3
+2 c e n t s ...........................................None
3 The agreement provided cost-of-living adjustments effective Dec. 1, 1960, and Oct. 1, 1961, based on the Bureau of Labor
Statistics Consumer Price Index for the months of October 1960 and August 1961, respectively, as follows:
Consumer Price Index
(1947-49 = 100)

Increase in cost-of-living
alio wan ce

124.2 or l e s s ............................................. None
124.3-124.6 ............................................. 1 cent (18 cents total)
124.7-125.1 ............................................. 2 cents (19 cents total)
125.2-125.5 ............................................. 3 cents (20 cents total)
125.6-126.0 ............................................. 4 cents (21 cents total)
126.1-126.4 ............................................. 5 cents (22 cents total)
126.5-126.9 ............................................. 6 cents (23 cents total)
4 The agreement provided that 0.1 cent was to be deducted from the cost-of-living escalator adjustment for each 18 cents that
projected average monthly net insurance costs exceeded $20.16 a month per active employee. Cost computations were to be based on
estimated projections of insurance costs during the quarters ending June 30,1961, and Dec. 31, 1962, respectively. Contracts with, and
quotations supplied by, insurance companies were to be used to determine insurance costs. If the parties’ actuaries were unable to agree
on net insurance costs by 30 days before the effective date of any cost-of-living adjustment, a neutral actuary selected by the parties’
actuaries would make the determination.
5 Depending on the actual date of implementation o f the award at the plant level, the effective date of the incentive award varied
from plant to plant.
6 The original award, made Aug. 1, 1969, extended coverage to 85 percent of the production and maintenance workers. The award
made Nov. 11, 1970, extended this to 90 percent, applicable only to steel-producing operations at the U.S. Steel Corp.
7 The cost-of-living allowance was to be paid as an adder and applied only to hours worked and certain allowed time hours.




Standard hourly rate2

Typical jobs

Job
class

Title

Department

0-1 Sweepers and ja n ito rs................ All departments...........................
Tube finishing
Pipe-cap man

July 16,
1948

Dec. 1,
1950

Mar. 1,
1952

June 12,
1953

July 1,
1954

July 1,
1955

$1,185

$1.31

$1,435

$1.52

$1.57

$1,685

2

General labor (unassigned) . . . .
Bloom butt scrapman
Painter’s helper

All departments...........................
Billet mill
Paint shop

1.23

1.36

1.49

1.575

1.625

1.745

3

Labor (assigned) such as pig
machine labor, gas washer
labor, and wharfman
Bricklayer’s helper

All departments...........................

1.275

1.41

1.545

1.63

1.68

1.805

4

Track la b o r ..................................
Stock unloader
Stenciler
Hand stamper

Transportation ...........................
Blast furnaces
Bloom, slab and billet mills
Bloom, slab and billet mills

1.32

1.46

1.60

1.685

1.735

1.865

5

Assorter (tin) .............................
Crane hooker
Stopper maker
Carpenter’s helper

Strip and sheet fin ish in g...........
All departments
Open hearth
Carpentry and pattern shop

1.365

1.51

1.655

1.74

1.79

1.925

6

Sand-mixer operator.................. Foundry ......................................
Rigger helper
Maintenance
Open hearth
Third helper

1.41

1.56

1.71

1.795

1.845

1.985

7

Conditioning scarfer.................. Bloom and billet m ills................
Conditioning chipper
Bloom and billet mills
Tin mill cold reduction
Tractor operator (scrap)

1.455

1.61

1.765

1.85

1.90

2.045

8

Truckdriver.................................. Autom otive..................................
Wire mill
Bench-wire drawer
Blast furnaces
Craneman, ladle house

1.50

1.66

1.82

1.905

1.955

2.105

9

Mill craneman.............................
Center-lathe operator

Hot strip m ill................................
Axle mill

1.545

1.71

1.875

1.96

2.01

2.165

B ottom m a k e r ..................................

Soaking pits ..................................
Blast furnaces
Merchant mill

1.59

1.76

1.93

2.015

2.065

2.225

Paint s h o p ....................................
Strip and sheet finishing
160” plate mill

1.635

1.81

1.985

2.07

2.12

2.285

Cranes...........................................
Foundry
Blast furnaces
Merchant mill

1.68

1.86

2.04

2.125

2.175

2.345

1.725

1.91

2.095

2.18

2.23

2.405

1.77

1.96

2.15

2.235

2.285

2.465

10

Operator, skip and larry cars
Shearman, hot
11

Painter ..............................................

Galvanize potman
Shearman
12

L ocom otive cra n em a n ..................

Coremaker
Ore-bridge operator
Strander
13

14

Masonry

Carpenter .................................... Carpentry and pattern
s h o p ...........................................
Transfer tableman
Rail mill
Merchant mill
Finisher
Welder (a rc-a cety len e)..................

Moulder
Keeper
Millwright




Maintenance ................................
Foundry
Blast furnaces
Maintenance

Job
class

Standard hourly rate

Typical jobs
Title

Department

2

July 16,
1948

Dec. 1,
1950

Mar. 1,
1952

June 12,
1953

July 1,
1954

July 1,
1955

1.815

2.01

2.205

2.29

2.34

2.525

15

Boilermaker ................................ Boilershop....................................
Masonry
Bricklayer
Roll shop
Roll turner
Hot strip mill
Rougher

16

Machinist ....................................
Axle maker (forger)
Layout man
Charging-machine operator

Machine shop .............................
Axel mill
Boilershop
Open hearth

1.86

2.06

2.26

2.345

2.395

2.585

17

Layout man (m achinist)...........
Patternmaker

Machine shop .............................
Carpentry and pattern shop

1.905

2.11

2.315

2.40

2.45

2.645

18

Toolmaker .................................. Machine shop .............................
Coke plant
Heater

1.95

2.16

2.37

2.455

2.505

2.705

19

Melter, electric tilt furnace . . . .
Assistant roller
Welder

1.995

2.21

2.425

2.51

2.56

2.765

20

Roller (mechanical mills) ......... Hot strip pack m ills....................
Plate mills
Heater

2.04

2.26

2.48

2.565

2.615

2.825

21

Billet mill roller...........................
Hi mill roller, seamless
tubing
First helper, arc fu rn a c e...........
Tandem mill roller

Bar m ill.........................................

2.085

2.31

2.535

2.62

2.67

2.885

Hot mill
Electric furnaces.........................
Cold reducing mill

2.13

2.36

2.59

2.675

2.725

2.945

Heater...........................................

80” hot strip and
finishing....................................
Open hearth

2.175

2.41

2.645

2.73

2.78

3.005

2.22

2.46

2.70

2.785

2.835

3.065

22
23

First helper (making bottom)
24

First helper (No. 1 open
hearth)......................................
Rotary roller

Foundry ......................................
Strip mill
Butt weld

Open hearth ................................
Seamless piercing and
rolling

25

R o lle r ........................................... Blooming m i l l .............................
First helper (No. 5 open
Open hearth
hearth)

2.265

2.51

2.755

2.84

2.89

3.125

26

Blower ......................................... Bessem er......................................
Tin mill cold reduction
Roller (wide tandem)

2.31

2.56

2.81

2.895

2.945

3.185

27

Roller, s la b .................................. 36” slab m iU ................................
160” plate mill
Roller
Bloom and structural
Screwman
No. 1 finishing mill

2.355

2.61

2.865

2.95

3.00

3.245

28

R o lle r ........................................... 4 2 ” hot str ip ................................
Bloom and structural
Roller 28/32
No. 1 finishing mill

2.40

2.66

2.92

3.005

3.055

3.305

2.445

2.71

2.975

3.06

3.11

3.365

2.49

2.76

3.03

3.115

3.165

3.425

2.535

2.81

3.085

3.17

3.22

3.485

2.58

2.86

3.14

3.225

3.275

3.545

29
30

R o lle r ........................................... 80” hot strip (Gary) ..................
100” plate mill
Roller

31
32

R o lle r ........................................... 80” hot strip mill
(Irvin).........................................




Footnotes Table 2a.
* Workers paid on an incentive basis, under existing incentive plans, generally earned more than the standard hourly rate which
served as their guaranteed minimum.
2
Hourly rates for each job class at the Tennessee Coal and Iron Division were uniformly 14.5 cents an hour lower on July 16,
1948, 10 cents lower on Dec. 1, 1950, and Mar. 1, 1952, 5 cents lower on July 26, 1952, and June 12, 1953, and 2.5 cents an hour
lower on Jan. 1,1954. This differential was eliminated as of July 1,1954 (by agreement dated June 12, 1953).




Job
class1
2

Aug. 3,
1956

July 1,
1957

July 1,
1958

Dec. 1,
1960

Oct. 1,
1961

1-23 ...........................................
3 ..................................................
4 ..................................................
5 ..................................................
6 ..................................................
7 ..................................................
8 ..................................................
9 ..................................................
1 0 ..................................................
1 1 ..................................................
1 2 ..................................................
1 3 .................................................
1 4 ..................................................
1 5 ..................................................
1 6 ..................................................
1 7 ..................................................
1 8 ..................................................
1 9 .................................................
2 0 ..................................................
2 1 ..................................................
2 2 ..................................................
2 3 ..................................................
2 4 ..................................................
2 5 ..................................................
2 6 ..................................................
2 7 ..................................................
2 8 ..................................................
2 9 ..................................................
3 0 ..................................................
3 1 ..................................................
3 2 ..................................................

$1,820
1.883
1.946
2.009
2.072
2.135
2.198
2.261
2.324
2.387
2.450
2.513
2.576
2.639
2.702
2.765
2.828
2.891
2.954
3.017
3.080
3.143
3.206
3.269
3.332
3.395
3.458
3.521
3.584
3.647
3.710

$1,890
1.955
2.020
2.085
2.150
2.215
2.280
2.345
2.410
2.475
2.540
2.605
2.670
2.735
2.800
2.865
2.930
2.995
3.060
3.125
3.190
3.255
3.320
3.385
3.450
3.515
3.580
3.645
3.710
3.775
3.840

$1,960
2.027
2.094
2.161
2.228
2.295
2.362
2.429
2.496
2.563
2.630
2.697
2.764
2.831
2.898
2.965
3.032
3.099
3.166
3.233
3.300
3.367
3.434
3.501
3.568
3.635
3.702
3.769
3.836
3.903
3.970

$2,030
2.099
2.168
2.237
2.306
2.375
2.444
2.513
2.582
2.651
2.720
2.789
2.858
2.927
2.996
3.065
3.134
3.203
3.272
3.341
3.410
3.479
3.548
3.617
3.686
3.755
3.824
3.893
3.962
4.031
4.100

$2.10
2.17
2.24
2.31
2.38
2.45
2.52
2.59
2.66
2.73
2.80
2.87
2.94
3.01
3.08
3.15
3.22
3.29
3.36
3.43
3.50
3.57
3.64
3.71
3.78
3.85
3.92
3.99
4.06
4.13
4.20

1 Rates do not include cost-of-living allowance in effect on the respective dates.
2 For typical occupations in each job class, see table 2a.
3 Under the agreement of Aug. 3, 1956, workers who were formerly in job class 0-1 were moved up and combined with job class 2.
Employees in former job class 0-1 received an extra 6 cents an hour increase (the old increment) in addition to the general increases for
all workers.




Job class
1 - 2 ..........................................................................
3 .............................................................................
4 .............................................................................
5 .............................................................................
6 .............................................................................
7 .............................................................................
8 .............................................................................
9 .............................................................................
10 ............................................................................
11 .............................................................................
12 .............................................................................
13 ............................................................................
14 .............................................................................
15 ............................................................................
16 ............................................................................
17 ............................................................................
18 .............................................................................
19 ............................................................................
20 .............................................................................
21 ............................................................................
22 .............................................................................
23 .............................................................................
24 ............................................................................
25 .............................................................................
26 .............................................................................
27 .............................................................................
28 .............................................................................
29 ............................................................................
30 .............................................................................
31 ............................................................................
32 .................... , ......................................................
333 ..........................................................................

Aug. 1,
1968

Aug. 1,
1969

Aug. 1,
1970

Aug. 1,
1971

Aug. 1,
19722

Aug. 1,
19732

$2,645
2.725
2.805
2.885
2.965
3.045
3.125
3.205
3.285
3.365
3.445
3.525
3.605
3.685
3.765
3.845
3.925
4.005
4.085
4.165
4.245
4.325
4.405
4.485
4.565
4.645
4.725
4.805
4.885
4.965
5.045
1 5.125
________ 1

$2,765
2.848
2.931
3.014
3.097
3.180
3.263
3.346
3.429
3.512
3.595
3.678
3.761
3.844
3.927
4.010
4.093
4.176
4.259
4.342
4.425
4.508
4.591
4.674
4.757
4.840
4.923
5.006
5.089
5.172
5.255
5.338

$2,885
2.970
3.055
3.140
3.225
3.310
3.395
3.480
3.565
3.650
3.735
3.820
3.905
3.990
4.075
4.160
4.245
4.330
4.415
4.500
4.585
4.670
4.755
4.840
4.925
5.010
5.095
5.180
5.265
5.350
5.435
5.520

$3,385
3.475
3.565
3.655
3.745
3.835
3.925
4.015
4.105
4.195
4.285
4.375
4.465
4.555
4.645
4.735
4.825
4.915
5.005
5.095
5.185
5.275
5.365
5.455
5.545
5.635
5.725
5.815
5.905
5.995
6.085
6.175

$3,510
3.604
3.698
3.792
3.886
3.980
4.074
4.168
4.262
4.356
4.450
4.544
4.638
4.732
4.826
4.920
5.014
5.108
5.202
5.296
5.390
5.484
5.578
5.672
5.766
5.860
5.954
6.048
6.142
6.236
6.330
6.424

$3,635
3.733
3.831
3.929
4.027
4.125
4.223
4.321
4.419
4.517
4.615
4.713
4.811
4.909
5.007
5.105
5.203
5.301
5.399
5.497
5.595
5.693
5.791
5.889
5.987
6.085
6.183
6.281
6.379
6.477
6.575
6.673

Sept. 1,
19651

Aug. 1,
1967

$2,385
2.458
2.531
2.604
2.677
2.750
2.823
2.896
2.969
3.042
3.115
3.188
3.261
3.334
3.407
3.480
3.553
3.626
3.699
3.772
3.845
3.918
3.991
4.064
4.137
4.210
4.283
4.356
4.429
4.502
4.575

$2,445
2.520
2.595
2.670
2.745
2.820
2.895
2.970
3.045
3.120
3.195
3.270
3.345
3.420
3.495
3.570
3.645
3.720
3.795
3.870
3.945
4.020
4.095
4.170
4.245
4.320
4.395
4.470
4.545
4.620
4.695

1 Includes 18.5 cents cost-of-living allowance incorporated into standard hourly rates on Sept. 1, 1965.
2 Does not include cost-of-living escalator adjustments or guarantees in effect on these dates.
3 Job class 33 established Aug. 1, 1968.




Job class

Hourly
wage rate
(incentive
calculation
rates)

1 -2 .........................
3 ...........................
4 ...........................
5 ...........................
6 ...........................
7 ...........................
8 ...........................
9 ...........................
1 0 ...........................
1 1 ...........................
1 2 ...........................
1 3 ...........................
1 4 ...........................
1 5 ...........................
1 6 ...........................
1 7 ...........................
1 8 ...........................
1 9 ...........................
2 0 ...........................
21 ...........................
2 2 ...........................
2 3 ...........................
2 4 ...........................
25 ...........................
2 6 ...........................
2 7 ...........................
2 8 ...........................
2 9 ...........................
3 0 ...........................
31 ...........................
3 2 ...........................
334 .........................

$2.10
2.17
2.24
2.31
2.38
2.45
2.52
2.59
2.66
2.73
2.80
2.87
2.94
3.01
3.08
3.15
3.22
3.29
3.36
3.43
3.50
3.57
3.64
3.71
3.78
3.85
3.92
3.99
4.06
4.13
4.20
-

Hourly additives1
Sept. 1,
1965 2

Aug. 1,
1967

Aug. 1,
1968

Aug. 1,
1969

Aug. 1,
1970

$0,285
.288
.291
.294
.297
.300
.303
.306
.309
.312
.315
.318
.321
.324
.327
.330
.333
.336
.339
.342
.345
.348
.351
.354
.357
.360
.363
.366
.369
.372
.375
-

$0,345
.350
.355
.360
.365
.370
.375
.380
.385
.390
.395
.400
.405
.410
.415
.420
.425
.430
.435
.440
.445
.450
.455
.460
.465
.470
.475
.480
.485
.490
.495
-

$0,545
.555
.565
.575
.585
.595
.605
.615
.625
.635
.645
.655
.665
.675
.685
.695
.705
.715
.725
.735
.745
.755
.765
.775
.785
.795
.805
.815
.825
.835
.845
.855

$0,665
.678
.691
.704
.717
.730
.743
.756
.769
.782
.795
.808
.821
.834
.847
.860
.873
.886
.899
.912
.925
.938
.951
.964
.977
.990
1.003
1.016
1.029
1.042
1.055
1.068

$0,785
.800
.815
.830
.845
.860
.875
.890
.905
.920
.935
.950
.965
.980
.995
1.010
1.025
1.040
1.055
1.070
1.085
1.100
1.115
1.130
1.145
1.160
1.175
1.190
1.205
1.220
1.235
1.250

Hourly
wage rate
(incentive
calculation
rates)
$2.60
2.67
2.74
2.81
2.88
2.95
3.02
3.09
3.16
3.23
3.30
3.37
3.44
3.51
3.58
3.65
3.72
3.79
3.86
3.93
4.00
4.07
4.14
4.21
4.28
4.35
4.42
4.49
4.56
4.63
4.70
4.77

Hourly additives1
Aug. 1,
1971

Aug. 1,
19723

Aug. 1,
1973 3

$0,785
.805
.825
.845
.865
.885
.905
.925
.945
.965
.985
1.005
1.025
1.045
1.065
1.085
1.105
1.125
1.145
1.165
1.185
1.205
1.225
1.245
1.265
1.285
1.305
1.325
1.345
1.365
1.385
1.405

$0,910
.934
.958
.982
1.006
1.030
1.054
1.078
1.102
1.126
1.150
1.174
1.198
1.222
1.246
1.270
1.294
1.318
1.342
1.366
1.390
1.414
1.438
1.462
1.486
1.510
1.534
1.558
1.582
1.606
1.630
1.654

$1,035
1.063
1.091
1.119
1.147
1.175
1.203
1.231
1.259
1.287
1.315
1.343
1.371
1.399
1.427
1.455
1.483
1.511
1.539
1.567
1.595
1.623
1.651
1.679
1.707
1.735
1.763
1.791
1.819
1.847
1.875
1.903

1 Before Sept. 1, 1965, employees on jobs covered by an incentive plan in effect on Apr. 22, 1947 received percentage increases in
total earnings (excluding overtime, shift and Sunday premiums, and cost-of-living adjustments) equal to the percentage increases in
standard hourly wage rates for such jobs.
2 Includes 18.5 cents cost-of-living allowance incorporated into the hourly additive.
3 Does not include cost-of-living escalator adjustments or guarantees in effect on these dates.
4 Job class 33 established Aug. 1, 1968.




Typical job classifications

Job class
1 -2 ..................................

Helpers, cold saw; janitors; laborers.

3 ....................................

Baggers; bonders, coil; cleaners, die; coaters, pipe; handlers, material; helpers, bar bending, bricklayer,
charger, circle sketch shearmen, coder, cold saw, gas washer, ladle line; laborers, vessel; pilers; scalemen;
scrapmen (billet shears); skidmen; straighteners; wharfmen; wrenchers.

4 ....................................

Attendants, oil house; bailers; bundlers; cindermen; daymen; cleaners, pipe; feeders, yoder mill; greasers;
hammermen, pneumatic; handstraighteners; helpers, bonderizer, chipping machine, corrugating machine,
gas washer, heater leveler, nail galvanizer, oiling machine, shearman, shot blaster, sintering machine,
straightener, streine shearman; hookers; mixers, refractory; operators, ingot buggy, sweeper;
rod-welders; samplers; scalemen; screenmen; sorters; stencilers; topmen; unloaders, stock; wrappers;
wrenchers (hot bed).

5 ....................................

Bundlers; burners; car blockers; chippers; cleaners, boiler, nail; conveyormen; depilers; descalers;
dischargers; dumpers, refuse car; grinders, end, pipe; feeders, rotary mill; helpers, armature winder,
charger, draw bench, galvanize (outlet), gun operator, hydrostatic tester, machinists, patcher, pump
station, shear, slitter, store room attendant, wireman; hookers; laborers, hot work; lidmen; mixers, sinter
materials; operators, bed, cold saw, hoist, oiling machine; shot-blasters; straighteners, hand; scrap-bailers;
stampers; stopper-makers; shearmen, welded fabric; rewinders; reelers.

6 ....................................

Chargers; convey ormen; cranemen, skull-cracker; coders; drivers, hammer; feeders, coil; helpers, blacksmith,
boilermaker, galvanize (inlet), heat treater, millwright, motor inspector, motor room tender, nail
machine, pickier, pipefitter, rigger, rotary heater, setup man; oilers, mill; operators, leveler, polishing
machine, scrap press, table, transfer car; inspectors, drop test; raggers, roll; reelers; Stockers, slab;
strippers, coil; tenders, lubrication system.

7 ....................................

Blockers; chargers; chippers; cleaners, door, nail; cranemen, mould preparation, stockyard, sulphate;
crusherman; drillers, rail; feeders, temper mill; helpers, nozzle setter; inspectors, loaders; operators, cold
saw, coremaking machine, drill press, gun, nail galvanize, quencher car, sizing mill, transfer car; pointers;
scarfers; screenmen; shot-blasters; spoolers, wire; stencilers; stockers-batch pickier; straighteners (gag
press); wheel-handlers; wipers.

8 ....................................

Builders, roll; burners; coders, rod mdl; cranemen, charging, cold saw, conditioning yard, forging, ladle
house, lathe shop, leveler, machine shop, mobde, pickle, saturator, slab yard tractor, tractor, yard;
cutter, wire rope; feeders, tandem mill; grinders, end; helpers, heater, rotary plugger; operators, burning
machine, fence machine, finishing machine, hot saw, marking machine, milling machine, rod shop, table,
tractor; inspectors, drop test, rail drilling, strip; pluggers, rotary mill; pointers, scarfers (hot); shearmen,
circle sketch; straighteners; wire-drawers (block).

9 ....................................

Cleaners, sheet; cranemen, blooming mdl, mdl, mixer, pickling, rod mdl, shovel; divers, fire truck; feeders,
tandem mill; finishers, strip; flask-makers; helpers, keeper, lead-burner, wheel press; inspectors, final,
finishing end, loaders, slab; liners, ladle; open coders; operators, bar bending, bonderizer, chipping
machine, corrugating machine, draw bench, drill press, lathe, table, welded fabric machine; nozzlemen;
repairmen, mechanical (open hearth), (axle mdl); shearmen, flying, resquare; stitcher-welders; stillmen,
ammonia; straighteners; washers, gas.

10 ..................................

Babbittmen; cranemen, hot top, pig machine; drawers, wire (continuous machine); feeders, temper mill;
helpers, rougher; inspectors, final; larrymen; loaders, by-product; naphthalenemen; nozzle-setters;
operators, agitator, assistant box annealer, bonderizer, burning machine, mdling machine, piercer bar,
pig machine, plate leveler, pump station, scarfing machine, sintering machine, staple machine, upsetter;
patchers, oven; reamers, die (round); repairmen, mechanical (ore yard); shearmen, end; spark testers;
straighteners; tenders, motor room, sub-station.

11 ..................................

Coders; helpers, benzol stillmen; larrymen; levermen, finishing; operators, boilerhouse, cambering machine,
car dumper, charing machine, door machine, drid press, keysetter, nail machine, reeling machine, speed
(roughing), yoder mdl; picklers, batch; potmen, galvanizing; repairmen, refrigeration, scale; setup-men;
shearmen, electrolytic line, resquare, slab, streine.

12 ..................................

Catchers, bar; cranemen, hot metal, stripper; finishers, strip; gaugers; inspectors, scale, shear; layerout,
plate; levermen, roughing; operators, annealing, boderhouse, galvanizing, hot saw, pusher, scarfing
machine; picklers; power engineers, first; repairmen, electrical, gauge, larry car; rod finishers, assistant;
shearmen, blooming mdl, flying; washers, gas.




Typical job classifications

Job class
13 ..................................

Cranemen, hot metal; finishers, strip; heat treaters; heaters, assistant, rotary mill, soaking pit; inspectors,
hot mill; manipulators; operators, charging crane, furnace-heat treat, transfer table, unloader, wheel
press; painters;repairmen, air conditioning; roll setters; setup men.

14 ..................................

Coremakers; finishers, strip; inspectors, crane, motor; keepers; operators, box annealer, screw down;
repairmen, automobile, lubrication equipment; roughers; setters, guide; tenders, motor room, stove;
welders, arc.

15 ..................................

Carpenters; cranemen, soaking pit, forgers, gaugers; operators, hi-mill, rotary mill, speed-finishing;
pipefitters; rollers, tandem mill-assistant; setup men (upset machine); template maker.

16 ..................................

Cranemen, ladle; electricians (armature winder), (shop); finishers; rod; heaters; layerout; millwrights;
moulders, operators, charging machine, electrolytic tinning line; pourers; riggers; rollers, tandem
mild-assistant; roughers, welders.

17 ..................................

Attendants, automatic reversing rougher; blacksmiths; boilermakers; bricklayers; heaters; operators,
continuous annealing line; sheet metal workers; turners, roll.

18 ..................................

Burners, roll; checkers, pattern; electricians (linemen), (wiremen); heaters, soaking pit; machinist;
repairmen, instrument; rollers, temper mill, assistants (rail mill); stillmen, benzol.

19 ..................................

Patternmakers; rollers, assistant.

20 ..................................

Heaters, slab, billet; repairmen, electronic; toolmakers; rollers, 4-hi reversing, assistant (merchant).

21 ..................................

Rollers, bar-mill, hi-mill.

22 ..................................

Rollers (train set), temper; welders.

23 ..................................

Heaters; rollers, billet.

24 ..................................

Helpers, first; rollers, rotary heater.

25 ..................................

Rollers, mechant, blooming mill.

26 ..................................

Rollers, bloom, slab, plate.

27 ..................................

Rollers, bar, blooming mill, plate, rail.

28 ..................................

Rollers, blooming mill, slab mill, structural, tandem mill.

29 ..................................

Rollers, bar, hot strip, primary, tandem.

30 ..................................

Rollers, tandem mill.

31 ..................................

Rollers, plate, strip.

32 ..................................

Rollers.




Typical job classifications

Job class
1 -2 ..................................

Helpers, cold saw;janitors; laborers.

3 ....................................

Baggers; bonders, coil; cleaners, die; coaters, pipe; handlers, material; helpers, bar bending, bricklayer,
charger, circle sketch shearmen, coder, cold saw, gas washer, ladle line; laborers, vessel; pilers; scalemen;
scrapmen (billet shears); skidmen; straighteners; wharfmen; wrenchers.

4 .........

.........

Attendants, oil house; bailers; bundlers; cindermen; daymen; cleaners, pipe; feeders, yoder mill; greasers;
hammermen, penumatic; handstraighteners; helpers, bonderizer, chipping machine, corrugating machine,
gas washer, heater leveler, nail galvanizer, oiling machine, shearman, shot blaster, sintering machine,
straightener, streine shearman; hookers; mixers, refractory; operators, ingot buggy, sweeper;
rod-welders; samplers; scalemen; screenmen; sorters; stencilers; topmen; unloaders, stock; wrappers;
wrenchers (hot bed).

5 .........

.........

Bundlers; burners; car blockers; chippers; cleaners, boiler, nail; conveyormen; depilers; descalers;
dischargers; dumpers, refuse car; grinders, end, pipe; feeders, rotary mill; helpers, armature winder,
charger, draw bench, galvanize (outlet), gun operator, hydrostatic tester, machinists, patcher, pump
station, shear, slitter, store room attendant, wireman; hookers; laborers, hot work; lidmen; mixers, sinter
materials; operators, bed, cold saw, hoist, oiling machine; shotblasters; straighteners, hand; scrap-bailers;
stampers; stoppermakers; shearmen, welded fabric; rewinders; reelers.

6 .........

.........

Chargers; convey ormen; cranemen, skull-cracker; coders; drivers, hammer; feeders, coil; helpers, blacksmith,
boilermaker, galvanize (inlet), heat treater, millwright, motor inspector, motor room tender, nail
machine, pickier, pipefitter, rigger, rotary heater, setup man; oilers, mill; operators, leveler, polishing
machine, scrap press, table, transfer car; inspectors, drop test; raggers, roll; reelers; stockers, slab;
strippers, coil; tenders, lubrication system.
Blockers; chargers; chippers; cleaners, door, nail; cranemen, mould preparation, stockyard, sulphate;
crusherman; drillers, rail; feeders, temper mill; helpers, nozzle setter; inspectors, loaders; operators, cold
saw, coremaking machine, drill press, gun, nail galvanize, quencher car, sizing mill, transfer car; pointers;
scarfers; screenmen; shot-blasters; spoolers, wire; stencilers; stockers-batch pickier; straighteners (gag
press); wheel handlers; wipers.

8 .........

.........

Builders, roll; burners; coders, rod mill; cranemen, charging, cold saw, conditioning yard, forging, ladle
house, lathe shop, leveler, machine shop, mobde, pickle, saturator, slab yard tractor, tractor, yard;
cutter, wire rope; feeders, tandem mdl; grinders, end; helpers, heater, rotary plugger; operators, burning
machine, fence machine, finishing machine, hot saw, marking machine, milling machine, roll shop, table,
tractor; inspectors, drop test, rail drilling, strip; pluggers, rotary mill; pointers, scarfers (hot); shearmen,
circle sketch; straighteners; wiredrawers (block).

9 .........

..............

Cleaners, sheet; cranemen, blooming mill, mdl, mixer, pickling, rod mill, shovel;drivers, fire truck; feeders,
tandem mdl; finishers, strip; flask-makers; helpers, keeper, lead burner, wheel press; inspectors, final,
finishing end, loaders, slab; liners, ladle; open coders; operators, bar bending, bonderizer, chipping
machine, corrugating machine, draw bench, drill press, lathe, table, welded fabric machine; nozzlemen;
repairmen, mechanical (open hearth), (axle mill); shearmen, flying, resquare; stitcher-welders; stillmen,
ammonia; straighteners; washers, gas.

1 0 .........

.........

Babbittmen; cranemen, hot top, pig machine; drawers, wire (continuous machine); feeders temper mill;
helpers, rougher; inspectors, final; larrymen; loaders, by-product; naphthalenemen; nozzlesetters;
operators, agitator, assistant box annealer, bonderizer, burning machine, milling machine, piercer bar,
pig machine, plate leveler, pump station, scarfing machine, sintering machine, staple machine, upsetter;
patchers, oven; reamers, die (round); repairmen, mechanical (ore yard); shearmen, end; spark testers;
straighteners; tenders, motor room, sub-station; scrap tin man (basic oxygen).

11 . . . .

.........

Coders; helpers, benzol stillmen, larrymen; levermen, finishing; operators, boilerhouse, cambering machine,
car dumper, charing machine, door machine, drid press, keysetter, nail machine, reeling machine, speed
(roughing), yoder mdl; picklers, batch; potmen, galvanizing; repairmen, refrigeration, scale; setup-men;
shearmen, electrolytic line, resquare, slab, streine; furnace man, 2d(basic oxygen).

12 .........

.........

Catchers, bar; cranemen, hot metal, stripper; finishers, strip; gaugers; inspectors, scale, shear; layerout,
plate; levermen, roughing; operators, annealing, boilerhouse, galvanizing, hot saw, pusher, scarfing
machine; picklers; power engineers, first; repairmen, electrical, gauge, larry car; rod finishers, assistant;
shearmen, blooming mdl, flying; washers, gas.




Job class

Typical job classifications

13

Cranemen, hot metal; finishers, strip; heat treaters; heaters, assistant, rotary mill, soaking pit; inspectors,
hot mill; manipulators; operators, charging crane, furnace-heat treat, transfer table, unloader, wheel
press; painters; repairmen, air conditioning; roll setters; setup men.

14

Coremakers; finishers, strip; inspectors, crane, motor; keepers; operators, box annealer, screw down;
repairmen, automobile, lubrication equipment; roughers; setters, guide; tenders, motor room, stove;
welders, arc.

15

Carpenters; cranemen, soaking pit; forgers; gaugers; operators, hi-mill, rotary mill, speedfinishing;
pipefitters; rollers, tandem mill-assistant; setup men (upset machine); template maker; furnace man,
lst(basic oxygen).

16

Cranemen, ladle; electricians (armature winder), (shop); finishers; rod; heaters; layerout; millwrights;
moulders, operators, charging machine, electrolytic tinning line; pourers; riggers; rollers, tandem
mild-assistant; roughers, welders.

17

Attendants, automatic reversing rougher; blacksmiths; boilermakers; bricklayers; heaters; operators,
continuous annealing line; sheet metal workers; turners, roll.

18

Burners, roll; checkers, pattern; electricians (linemen), (wiremen); heaters, soaking pit; machinist;
repairmen, instrument; rollers, temper mill, assistants (rail mill); stillmen, benzol.

19

Patternmakers; rollers, assistant.

20

Heaters, slab, billet; repairmen, electronic; toolmakers; rollers, 4-hi reversing, assistant (merchant).

21

Rollers, bar-mill, hi-mill.

22

Rollers (train set), temper; welders.

23

Heaters; rollers, billet; operator, basic oxygen furnace.

24

Helpers, first; rollers, rotary heater.

25

Rollers, merchant, blooming mill.

26

Rollers, bloom, slab, plate.

27

Rollers, bar, blooming mill, plate, rail.

28

Rollers, blooming mill, slab mill, structural, tandem mill.

29

Rollers, bar, hot strip, primary, tandem.

30

Rollers, tandem mill.

31

Rollers, plate, strip.

32

Rollers.

33

Rollers, 84-mill inch.




Table 4. Minimum plant rates, by division, 1937-55
Hourly rates (in cents)
Tennessee
Coal and Iron
Division3

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Effective date

Northern
divisions1
2

Mar. 16,1937 .............................................
Apr. 1, 1 9 4 1 ...............................................
Feb. 15,1942 .............................................

62.5
72.5
78.0

45.0
55.0
60.5

Jan. 1,1946 ...............................................

87.25

69.75

In accordance with retroactive provision of general wage
increase effective February 16, 1946.

Feb. 16,1946 .............................................

96.5

79.0

In accordance with general wage increase (18.5 cents an
hour) effective February 16, 1946, providing for
retroactive payment of one-half of the increase (9.25
cents) to January 1, 1946.

Apr. 1,1947 ...............................................

109.0

94.5

Previous differential of 2.5 cents an hour for Duluth plant
was eliminated and former 17.5 cents an hour
differential for operations of Tennessee Coal, Iron and
Railroad Co. was narrowed by 3 cents.

July 16, 1948 .............................................
Dec. 1, 1950 ...............................................

118.5
131.0

104.0
121.0

Mar. 1,1952 ...............................................
July 26,1952 .............................................

143.5
143.5

133.5
138.5

June 12,1953 .............................................
Jan. 1,1954 ...............................................

152.0
152.0

147.0
149.5

July 1, 1954 ...............................................

157.0

157.0

July 1, 1955 ...............................................

168.5

168.5

In accordance with August 26, 1942, award of the NWLB,
retroactive to February 15, 1942. Award also
established common labor rates as guaranteed minimum
rates, effective August 26, 1942 (not applicable to
apprentices, learners, etc.).

Previous differential of 14.5 cents an hour for operations of
Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Co. was reduced to
10 cents.
Previous differential of 10 cents an hour for operations of
Tennessee Coal and Iron Division was reduced to 5
cents.
Previous differential of 5 cents an hour for operations of
Tennessee Coal and Iron Division was reduced to 2.5
cents.
Previous differential of 2.5 cents an hour for operations of
Tennessee Coal and Iron Division was eliminated.

1 Minimum plant rates (until February 1947, common plant rate) paid by the U.S. Steel Corp. have long been recognized as key
rates in the industry’s wage structure. Before 1942, some job rates were below the minimum common labor rates, but the War Labor
Board’s directive order, effective August 26, 1942, raised all lower rates to the common labor level (except for apprentices, learners,
etc.). Thereafter, until the job classification plan was introduced in February 1947, the common labor rates constituted the minimum
plant rates. Under the job classification plan, rates paid to common laborers depended on classification o f common labor jobs, most of
which were higher than the lowest level.
2 Before April 1947, rates at the Duluth, Minn, plant of American Steel and Wire Co. were 2.5 cents an hour lower than the rates
listed.
3 Rates not applicable to Holt, Ala. blast furnace operated by this subsidiary between 1942 and 1944.




Effective date

Applications, exceptions,
and other related matters

Provision

Shift premium pay
Mar. 16, 1937 ................................

No provision for shift premium
pay.

Jan. 4, 1944 (agreement dated
Mar. 13, 1945).

Afternoon (second) shift- 4 cents
an hour; night (third) shift- 6
cents an hour.

July 25, 1952 ................................

Increased to: 6 cents an hour for
work on afternoon (second)
shift; 9 cents an hour on night
(third) shift.

July 1, 1958 (agreement dated
Aug. 3,1956).

Increased to: 8 cents an hour for
work on afternoon (second)
shift; 12 cents an hour on
night (third) shift.

Aug. 1, 1970 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968).

Increased to: 10 cents an hour for
work on the afternoon (second)
shift; 15 cents an hour on the
night (third) shift.

According to Nov. 25, 1944, award of NWLB.

Overtime pay
Mar. 16, 1937 . . ...........................

Time and one-half for all work
over 8 hours a day or 40 hours
a week.

Apr. 1, 19411..................................

Time and one-half for all work
over 5 workdays within the
workweek.

Employees who failed to complete average hours worked in
their department (up to 40 hours in 5 workdays within
workweek) were permitted, if work was available in that
department, to make up on 6th or 7th day the time lost
(up to a maximum o f 40 hours), at regular straight-time
rates of pay.

Sept. 1 ,1 9 4 2 1 .............................

Time and one-half paid for all
work on 6th and 7th day o f a
consecutive
7-day
period
during which first 5 days were
worked, whether or not all
such days fell within same
workweek.

Except when, upon agreement between company and
union, schedules departing from normal workweek were
established.

Time and one-half pay for 6 th and 7th day extended in
some circumstances to employees laid off on any day
within previous 5-day period because of changes in work
schedules.

Apr. 22, 1947 ................................

Pay for Sunday xvork
Sept. 1, 1956 (agreement dated
Aug. 3,1956).

Time and one-tenth for hours
worked on Sunday not paid
for on an overtime basis.

July 1, 1957 (agreement dated
Aug. 3, 1956).

Increased to: Time and one-fifth.




Sunday premium also paid for reporting allowance hours.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision
Pay for Sunday work-Continued

July 1, 1958 (agreement dated
Aug. 3,1956).

Increased to:
fourth.

Time

and one-

Aug. 1, 1973 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1971).

Increased to: Time and one-half.

Holiday pay
Mar. 17, 1937 ................................

No provision for paying premium
wages for work performed on
recognized holidays.

Agreement specified that no work was to be performed on
July 4, Labor Day, and Christmas Day, except in
continuous operation.

Apr. 1,1941 ..................................

Time and one-half for all work
required to be performed on 3
sp e c ifie d
holidays
by
employees not engaged in
continuous operations.

July 4, Labor Day, and Christmas.

Sept. 1, 19421 ................................

In

accordance with Executive
Order 9240 all employees paid
time and one-half for work on
6 holidays.

Before the national emergency, no regular production work
required on specified holidays except in continuous
operations (for which payment was made at regular
straight-time rates). For noncontinuous operations, days
in employee’s normal work schedule that were not
worked because o f holiday were counted as workdays
for purposes of 6th day overtime pay.

Nov. 25, 1944 (agreement dated
Mar. 13, 1945).

Time and one-half for all work
performed on 6 specified
holidays.

New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, July 4, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. (Substitute
holiday for Memorial Day permitted in 1947 agree­
ment.) Holidays, whether worked or not, were counted
as days worked to determine whether an employee had
worked 6 days in his regularly scheduled workweek.
In accordance with November 25, 1944, award of the
NWLB.

Aug. 15, 1952 .................. .............

6 paid holidays established for
which
workers
received
straight-time pay. Double time
(total) for work on paid
holidays.

Holidays were: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day (by local
agreement another day could be chosen provided such
agreement was reached before April 1 of each year),
July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.

Aug. 3, 1956 (agreement of same
date).

Added: Seventh paid holiday.

Good Friday.

July 1, 1957 (agreement dated
Aug. 3,1956).

Increased to: Double time and
one-tenth (total) for work on
7 specified holidays.

July 1, 1958 (agreement dated
Aug. 3, 1956).

Increased to: Double time and
one-fourth (total) for work on
holidays.

July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6, 1962).




Added: Employee on layoff in payroll period with holiday
to receive holiday pay if he worked or was on vacation
in the prior and subsequent payroll periods.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Holiday pay-Continued
July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6, 1962).-Continued

In effect and continued:
To be eligible for holiday pay, employee must have (1)
worked 30 turns since last hired, (2) worked or been on
vacation in payroll period with holiday, and (3) worked
on scheduled workdays before and after holiday unless
unable to do so because of sickness, death in immediate
family, or other good cause.
Employee to be paid for holiday that fell in scheduled
vacation period. Applicable to employee who (1) took
previously scheduled vacation during layoff or (2) was
recalled but on layoff during scheduled vacation.

Jan. 1, 1970 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968).

Added: Eighth paid holiday.

Holiday was the day before Christmas.

Aug. 1, 1972 (agreement of Aug.
1, 1971).

Added: Ninth paid holiday.

Holiday was the day after Thanksgiving Day.

Paid vacations
Mar. 17, 1937 ................................

Employees with 5 years or more
of service- 1 week.

1 week’s vacation pay computed on basis of average hourly
earnings and average weekly hours worked during 2 pay
periods preceding vacation period (not less than 40
hours nor more than 48 hours).

Apr. 1,1941 ..................................

Employees consistently employed
during year: 3 years and less
than 15 years of service- 1
week; 15 years or more- 2
weeks.

Method of computing vacation pay same as above.
Consistent employment defined as receiving earnings for
60 percent of the pay periods during the year preceding
an established eligibility date.

Jan. 4, 1944 (agreement dated
Mar. 13, 1945).

Employees consistently employed
during the year: 1 year and
less than 5 years of service—
1
week; 5 years or m ore-2
weeks.

According to Nov. 25, 1944, award o f the NWLB,
retroactive to Jan. 4, 1944.

Mar. 13,1945 ................................

Apr. 22, 1947 ................................




Minimum time used in computing vacation pay, as outlined
above, was 40 hours or the scheduled weekly hours of
work, whichever was larger; maximum time was 48
hours or scheduled weekly hours if larger.
Vacation allowance in lieu of vacation permitted in interest
of war effort. Allowance was computed on basis of
average hourly earnings and average weekly hours
worked during first 13 pay periods (26 if on weekly
basis) of calendar year, but for same maximum or
minimum hours on which vacation pay for those
employees actually taking vacations was computed.

Added: 25 years or more of
service— weeks.
3

Continuation of vacation allowance in lieu of vacation
during 1947. Such allowance applicable to only 1 week
of vacation periods of 2 or 3 weeks.
Vacation allowance in lieu of vacation was to be
discontinued after 1947, but a partial continuance of
this practice was permitted in 1948.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Paid vacations-Continued
Jan. 1, 1952 (agreement dated
Aug. 15, 1952).

Changed to: 15 or more years of
service- 3 weeks.

Jan. 1, 1958 (agreement dated
Aug. 3,1956).

Added: An additional half week’s
vacation pay for 3 but less
than 5, 10 but less than 15,
and 25 or more years’ ser-

July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6,1962).

Jan. 1, 1963 (agreement dated
Apr. 6, 1962).

Added: Calculation of service for vacation eligibility
included only first 2 years of continuous period of
absence because of layoff or noncompensable physical
disability.
Changed: 1 week for employee
with 1 but fewer than 3 years
of service, 2 weeks for 3 but
fewer than 10 years, 3 weeks
for 10 but fewer than 25
years, and 4 weeks for 25
years or more.

Jan. 1, 1966 (agreement dated
Sept. 1, 1965).

Aug. 1, 1968 (agreement of same
date).

Jan. 1, 1969 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968).




No change in length of vacation period.
Eliminated: Requirement that workers receive earnings for
60 percent of pay periods during preceding year and
work during calendar year to be eligible for vacation.
Added: Employees absent at least 6 consecutive months in
preceding year disqualified for benefits.

Pay based on average hours worked in first two of four pay
periods immediately preceding vacation. Minimum time
used in computing vacation pay was 40 hours a week or
scheduled plant workweek, whichever was greater;
maximum was 48 hours a week or scheduled plant
workweek, whichever was greater.
Added: With consent of employee, company could grant
vacation pay in lieu of time off for weeks of vacation
over two in a calendar year in which extended vacation
was not scheduled.

Added: Vacation bonus of $30
for each week of regular
vacation in 1969, 1970, and
1971, to be paid in addition to
regular vacation pay.

Not applicable to years in which regular vacation was
included within an extended vacation except for
employees receiving extended vacations allocated under
prior plan.
Changed: Employees entitled to regular vacations were paid
at their average rate of earnings per hour for the prior
calendar year.
Average rate o f earnings computed by totaling (1) pay
received for all hours worked (including overtime pay,
holiday, Sunday and shift premium), (2) vacation pay
(including pay in lieu of vacation excluding vacation
bonus), (3) pay for unworked holidays and other
paid leave, and (4) hours excused but not paid for
because of union business; and dividing such earnings by
total o f (1) hours worked, (2) vacation hours paid
(including hours paid in lieu of vacation), and (3) paid
but unworked holiday hours. Average rate of earnings to
reflect general wage changes, adjusted apprentice rate of
pay, and retroactive pay adjustments. Any weeks not
having at least 32 hours’ actual work excluded from
calculation. Employee was paid for not fewer than 40
nor more than 48 hours for each week o f vacation. Any
employee not working in prior year was to have his
vacation pay computed on the basis of last calculated
vacation rate and hours.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Paid vacations—
Continued
Jan. 1, 1972 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1971).

Increased: Vacation bonus to $40
for each week of regular
vacation that started in a
payroll week that began in
April, May, Sept, or Oct., and
to $50 for each week of
regular vacation starting in a
payroll week that began in
Feb., March, Nov., Dec. or
Jan. (excluding the four con­
secutive
payroll
weeks
beginning with the week
which included December 17).

Bonus to remain at $30 a week for vacation during four
consecutive payroll weeks beginning with the week
which included December 17, and during June, July,
and August.

Reporting time
Mar. 17, 1937 ................................

No provision for pay for reporting
time.

Apr. 1,1941 ..................................

Workers scheduled or notified to
report for work paid for
minimum of 2 hours if no
work at their regular job or
other employment provided.

Not applicable for strikes, breakdowns, acts of God,
reasonable notice by management, or employee fault.

Any employee scheduled to and
starting work at beginning of a
turn (shift) paid for minimum
of 4 hours.
Apr. 22, 1947 ................................

Minimum payment for workers
scheduled or notified to report
for work, and for whom no
work was provided, increased
to 4 hours.

Same exceptions as above, except that failure of utilities
beyond control of management substituted for breakdowns.

Jury-duty pay
Aug. 3, 1956 (agreement of same
date).

Employee to receive difference
between 8 hours’ average
straight-time earnings and pay­
ment for jury service for each
day of jury duty on which he
would have otherwise worked.

Employee to present proof of service and amount of pay
received.

Sept. 1, 1965 (agreement o f same
date).

Added: Payment defined to include those days on which
employee reported for as well as served on jury.

Aug. 1, 1968 (agreement o f same
date).

Added: Jury-duty pay to include employees subpoenaed as
witnesses provided employee presented proof of service
and amount o f pay received.




Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Funeral leave
Aug. 1, 1970 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1968).

Established: Funeral leave of up
to 3 days for employee attend­
ing funeral of member of
immediate family.

Aug. 1, 1971 (agreement of same
date).

Immediate family was defined as employee’s legal spouse,
mother, father, mother-in-law, father-in-law, son,
daughter, brother or sister. Employee must establish he
attended the funeral.
Pay to be computed the same as for jury duty.
Added: To definition of immediate family-stepfather,
stepmother, stepchildren, stepsister, or stepbrother
when they lived with the employee in an immediate
family relationship.

Relocation allowance
July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6,1962).

Established:
Allowances of $55 to $215 for
single employee and $180 to
$580 for married employee,
depending
on
distance
between home plant and
another plant in same geo­
graphic
region3
provided
transferred employee had 2
years or more o f continuous
service, on layoff for 60 days
or more, and was not eligible
for pension and social security
benefits. Benefit provided
employee who (1) transferred
to plant 50 miles or more
from former place of work,
(2 )
changed
permanent
residence, and (3) applied for
allowance (interregional trans­
fers permitted for employee
under 60 with 10 years or
more of service who could not
qualify for immediate pension
and who had no recall rights in
plant where employed or was
not likely to be recalled within
2 years).

Sept. 1, 1965 (agreement of same
date).

Increased: Allowance to range
from $130 to $350 for single
employees and from $380 to
$940 for married employees,
depending on miles between
plant locations.3




The allowance was to be deducted from monies owed by
the company for pay, vacation benefits, SUB, pensions,
or other benefits if employee quit or was discharged
within 12 months of start of new job. The amount was
to be reduced by any relocation allowance or its
equivalent payable under Federal or State law.
Only one allowance was to be paid to member of a family
living in the same residence.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Savings and vacatio n plan
July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6,1962).




Established: Plan to provide
retirement,
savings,
and
su p p le m e n ta l
vacation
benefits.
Contributions: Company to pay
into
“financial availability
account,”
per
man-hour
worked by covered employees,
3 cents
plus thedifference
between
9.5cents and the
hourly contribution required
to raise
the SUB plan to
maximum financing, up to
maximum of 4.5 cents to
extent required for payment
of benefits.
Retirement benefits:
Accrual o f credit units-one unit
for each 5 years of continuous
service before Jan. 1, 1961,
credited to employee with
continuous service for pension
purposes on Mar. 1, 1962.
Benefits (for employee retiring
after Mar. 1, 1962)-Lumpsum payment on retirement4
of 1 week at 1960 vacation
rate of pay5 for each retire­
ment
unit
credited
to
employee, reduced by 10
percent for each full 3 months
after the latest of (a) June 30,
1963,6 (b) end of month in
which employee reached age
65, or (c) end of month in
which
employee
became
eligible to retire on pension,
plus accumulated vacation
benefits.
Eligibility -T o employee who (1)
retired at age 65 or after (with
or without a pension), (2)
retired on immediate (early or
disability) pension, or (3)
elected a deferred early
pension.

Monthly supplement to basic 3-cent contribution limited to
amount necessary for benefits then due workers who (1)
were retiring or (2) had at least 1 vacation credit unit.

Proportionate vacation pay provided for fractional units.
When finances were not available to pay all benefits due,
payments to be made in order of retirement and, if
necessary, years of continuous service. If all fund
obligations were not paid by Jan. 31, 1963, the
provision for 10-percent benefit reduction was not to be
made effective for 3 months or until all benefits due
were paid, whichever was later.

Benefits not to be included in calculating average earnings
for pension plan purposes.
If savings and vacation plan was terminated, any earned
income (except that earned on retirement benefits) not
previously added to finances to be prorated to credit of
participating employees.7

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Savings and vacation plani-Continued
July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6, 1962).-Continued

Savings and vacation benefits:
Accrual o f credit u n its-From
Dec. 31, 1960 to Jan. 1, 1963:
(1) 1 unit for 2 years or more
of continuous service or (2) V
*
unit for each 6 months of
continuous
service
for
employee with fewer than 2
years of service or employee
retiring between Mar. 1, 1962,
and Dec. 31, 1962.
For period beginning Jan. 1,
1963: V credit unit for each
4
15 weeks in which employee
was credited with 1 SUB unit
or more, up to maximum of 1
unit in a 2-calendar-year
period.

No units credited to employee 65 years old or over and
eligible for a pension.

Jan. 31, 1963 (agreement dated
Apr. 6, 1962).

Benefits - 1 week at last regular
vacation rate of pay for each
vacation unit credited to
employee.

Benefits not payable until sufficient funds accumulated to
reach employee in order of seniority.
Options -Employee could elect (1) current vacation in year
1 full unit was accumulated or in succeeding year, or (2)
retirement benefits, to be increased by interest at rate
earned by fund, but not more than 3 percent, from date
of election o f option to earliest of (a) termination of
employment, or (b) withdrawal because of hardship.8
Any benefits to which employee was entitled to be paid on
application (1) in lump sum for break in service
(payment to be made to beneficiary in case of
employee’s death), or (2) the entire amount or some
part in installments for unemployment after exhaustion
o f SUB, serious illness, or other major hardship.
Company could, in lieu of paying 3-percent interest,
invest in and provide employee with U.S. Government
Series E Bonds on retirement.
Added: Employee who would have been entitled to
vacation benefits as of Apr. 30, 1963, but died between
Jan. 31, 1963, and Apr. Q29, 1963, was considered to be
entitled to such benefits.

Jan. 1, 1964 (agreement dated
June 29, 1963).

Discontinued: Accrual o f vacation
and retirement credits under
previous savings and vacation
plan.

Up to 1 unused vacation credit, earned under prior plan,
cancelled for each single-week vacation allocated under
new plan; any remaining credits used for retirement
benefits under prior plan.

Increased:
Contributions—
To
12.5 cents (from 3 cents) per
man-hour worked by covered
employees.

Additional funds, up to the lesser of 4.5 cents or the excess
o f 9.5 cents over the amount per hour required to raise
the SUB finances to maximum financing, available in
any month when the amount required to raise SUB
position to maximum financing was less than company’s
maximum monthly SUB obligation.10




Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Savings and vacation planl ontinued
-C
Jan. 1, 1964 (agreement dated
June 29, 1963).—
Continued




Changed: Plan to provide speci­
fied vacation and retirement
benefits in successive 5-year
periods for senior and junior
groups of employees. Senior
group to include half o f work
force with longest continuous
service, junior group to
include all other employees.11
Added:
/. Extended vacation benefits for
senior group:
Basis o f selection -Vacations
credited to approximately
equal numbers of employees
every 3 months, based on
descending years of con­
tinuous service, so that each
employee received extended
vacation during a 5-year
period if sufficient funds were
available.12 13

First period to run from Jan. 1, 1964, to Dec. 31, 1968.
If all employees with identical service could not be placed
in senior group, placement to be based on age.
Employee with service at least equal to that of lowest
member of senior group to be put in that group when
(1) he was permanently transferred to groups covered
by plan, (2) break in his continuous service was
removed, or (3) his continuous service was restored on
return to work.

Employee entitled to vacation the day after calculation
date if he was actively at work on calculation date14 or
the day he returned to work if he returned before break
in service. Employee who returned to work after break
in service not entitled to benefit.

Benefit -1 3 weeks minus regular
vacation to which employee
was entitled, for years of
service, determined on basis of
earlier of (1) end of year in
which number of weeks was
determined, or (2) date of
termination.15

Extended vacations to be scheduled, insofar as possible, for
time requested by employee during year of entitlement
or during following calendar year, subject to final
decision by company to insure orderly operation of
plants.

Weekly benefit to equal 40 times
average hourly earnings, as
computed for regular vacation,
excluding premium pay for
overtime and Sunday work
but including any general wage
changes put into effect after
vacation computation and
before payment o f benefit.

Any benefit to which employee was entitled to be paid
immediately on break in service or to beneficiary in case
o f the employee’s death.
Option —
employee 63 years old, but under 65, on or before
calculation date of extended vacation could (1) take
vacation immediately before retirement or (2) postpone
benefit until retirement.16 17
For employee exercising option to defer extended vacation
until retirement, benefits not increased by any general
wage changes put into effect after vacation was
allocated.
Benefits deferred until retirement reduced 10 percent for
each full 3 months by which employee delayed
retirement after latest of (a) June 30, 1963, (b) end of
month in which he reached 65, or (c) end of month in
which he completed 15 years of continuous service.
Employee laid off before scheduled extended vacation
could request vacation start during layoff.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Savings and vacation plan -Continued
Jan. 1, 1964 (agreement dated
June 29, 1963).-Continued




Eligibility -Employee under age
65 or older employee with less
than 15 years of continuous
service.13
II. Single-week vacation benefits
for both groups:
Basis o f selection -Priority based
on years of continuous service.

Benefit -Equivalent to week of
regular vacation pay as last
calculated before employee
was allocated benefit, plus any
subsequent
general
wage
changes if last regular vacation
was in previous calendar year;
available to both groups in
first, fourth, and subsequent
cycles, limited to junior group
during second and third cycles
in 5-year period.

Eligibility -Employee with 2
years of continuous service (a)
under age 65 or (b) older with
less than 15 years of con­
tinuous service.

Employee who had received vacation benefits under prior
plan put at end o f priority list for first cycle.
Benefit cycle began in quarter when funds were available
after financing retirement and extended vacation
benefits for 1/20 of senior work force and ended when
all employees on priority list for that cycle had been
allocated a benefit.18
Employee entitled to vacation the day after calculation
date if he was actively at work on calculation date, or
the day he returned to work if he returned before break
14
in service.
Employee not to receive second benefit
unless he returned to work before his name was reached
second time on priority list. Employee who returned to
work after break in service not credited with vacation.
Options -Senior employee to receive deferred retirement
benefits16 17 for first benefit and pay in lieu of
vacation for additional benefits in a 5-year period.
Junior employee to choose vacation or deferral of benefits
until retirement16 for first 3 benefits and to receive pay
in lieu of vacation for additional benefits in a 5-year
period.
Any benefit employee would have become entitled to at
retirement, other than (1) single-week vacation for
employee in senior group who retired after Jan. 1, 1964,
before becoming entitled to single-week vacation, or (2)
the portion o f a retirement benefit based on uncanceled
vacation units accrued under prior plan was reduced by
10 percent for each full 3 months by which employee
delayed retirement after latest of (a) June 30, 1963, (b)
end of month in which he reached 65, or (c) end of
month in which he completed 15 years of continuous
service.
Any benefits to which employee was entitled to be paid
immediately on break in service or to beneficiary in case
of employee’s death; benefits could be paid in lump sum
or installments in case of unemployment after
exhaustion of SUB, serious illness, or other major
hardship.
Vacations limited to 2 weeks, which could be continuous
with regular vacation, in any calendar year.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Savings and vacation plani—
Continued
Jan. 1, 1964 (agreement dated
June 2 9 ,1963).-Continued




III. Retirement benefits:
A. Senior group to receive—
1. Extended vacation retire­
ment
benefits13
17 Employee retiring after
becoming
entitled
to
extended vacation in the
5-year period in which he
retired, to receive extended
vacation
benefit
plus
partial retirement benefit
(an
additional
week’s
benefit) for each full 6
calendar months between
the date of allocation of
the extended vacation and
the earlier o f (a) his retire­
ment date or (b) the end of
the month in which he
becomes 65
and has
completed 15 years of
c o n t in u o u s
service,
maximum 9 weeks.
Employee retiring before be­
coming entitled to an
extended vacation in the
5-year period in which he
retired, to receive extended
vacation benefit calculated
by using the base period
used in calculating the
special payment under the
noncontributory pension
plan.19
2. Single week vacation retire­
ment benefits13 16 17 —
Employee retired after Jan.
1, 1964, before being en­
titled to single week vaca­
tion benefit to receive
benefit on retirement.
B. Junior group.............................

Those retiring in the 5-year period starting Jan. 1, 1964, to
receive “prior retirement benefits” (retirement benefit
under prior plan, calculated at employee’s 1960
vacation rate of pay, plus any vacation benefits under
prior plan not canceled before retirement calculated at
the rate used in determining single-week vacation
benefits at date of retirement) if prior retirement
benefit exceeded the benefits calculated under the new
plan.
Any benefit employee would have received at retirement,
other than (1) single-week vacation for employee in
senior group who retired after Jan. 1, 1964, before
becoming entitled to single-week vacation or (2) portion
of retirement benefit based on uncanceled vacation
units accrued under prior plan, was reduced by 10
percent for each full 3 months by which employee
delayed retirement after latest of (a) June 30, 1963, (b)
end of month in which he reached 65, or (c) end of
month in which he completed 15 years of continuous
service.

Employee who retired would be entitled to benefit under
provisions o f plan in effect prior to Jan. 1, 1964, that is,
a week of vacation pay as calculated for employee’s
1960 vacation5 for each 5 years of service prior to Jan.
1, 1961, plus 1 week for 2 years of service between Jan.
1, 1961, and Dec. 31, 1963, if these units had not been
canceled by entitlement to vacation benefits.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Savings and vacation pkm-Continued
Jan. 1, 1964 (agreement dated
June 29, 1963).-Continued

IV. Extra benefits for both
17
groups:
Funds available after completion
of third single-week vacation
cycle in 5-year period, to be
used as follows: (1) for senior
group-to increase number of
extended vacations (a) by
number o f senior employees
who had not received ex­
tended vacation retirement
benefit because of break in
service, and (b) by number
necessary to bring senior
group up to 50 percent of
expanded work force (if work
force had increased since
beginning of 5-year period);
(2) for both groups— pro­
to
vide additional single-week
vacation cycles or partial
cycles.

Jan. 1, 1966 (agreement dated
Sept. 1, 1965).

When extra extended vacation benefits were allocated,
employees transferred from junior to senior group on
basis of continuous service to increase number of senior
employees to half the enlarged work force; their
extended vacation or extended vacation retirement
benefits to be reduced by any single week vacation
benefits to which they had become entitled during
5-year period when they were transferred and which
were in excess of those they would have received if they
had been in senior group at beginning of period.

Added: With consent of employee, company could (1)
grant vacation pay in lieu o f 3 weeks of extended
vacation, or (2) split an extended vacation and schedule
a portion o f it to coincide with a plant shutdown
period. With consent of company, employee could elect
to use up to 3 weeks separately from balance of
extended vacation, if unaffected by (1) or (2) above.
A Senior Group Death Benefit was added to the Plan
effective Jan. 1, 1964, payable to the surviving spouse,
child, grandchild, or parent of Senior Group employees
who died after Dec. 31, 1963, but before becoming
entitled to an EV or an EV Retirement Benefit.

Aug. 1, 1968 (agreement of same
date).

Increased: Rate of pay for a
single-week vacation or an
extended vacation allocated
after Aug. 1, 1968, under the
1963 Plan (Revised) to adjust
to the general wage increase.

Based on employee’s earnings record, or the percentage
relationship of the increase for the average job
classification to the average straight-time earnings of
employees covered by the Saving and Vacation Plan
(Revised).

Jan. 1, 1969 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968, and memoran­
dum of understanding, dated
Oct. 21,1968).

Changed:
Plan
to
provide
additional vacation, savings,
and other specified benefits
for a second 5-year period.
Decreased:
Company
con­
tribution to 12.3 cents per
man-hour worked by covered
employee.
Increased: Junior Group extended
vacation benefits to 3 weeks.
Changed: Weekly benefit to equal
pay as calculated for a week of

Second 5-year period to run from Jan. 1, 1969 to Dec. 31,
1973.
Benefits were not dependent upon availability of accrued
funds. If the cost of the Extended Vacation Plan was
greater than the amount stated, that amount equal to
such excess to be deducted from the Additional
Collateral Liability under the 1969 SUB Plan. If benefits
cost less than the amounts stated in preceding section,
an amount equal to such differences to be added to the
Additional Collateral Liability.
Options regarding extended vacations for all employees
were (1) to take entire allotted extension or (2) to elect




Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Savings and vacation plan—
Continued
Jan. 1, 1969 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968, and memoran­
dum of understanding, dated
Oct. 21,1968).— Continued

regular vacation pay, adjusted
for any general wage change
not otherwise reflected in such
regular vacation pay.

Aug. 1, 1969 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968, and memoran­
dum of understanding, dated
Oct. 21, 1968).

Increased: Company contribution
to 12.8 cents per man-hour
worked by covered employee.

Aug. 1, 1970 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968, and memoran­
dum of understanding, dated
Oct. 21,1968).

Increased: Company contribution
to 13.3 cents per man-hour
worked by covered employee.

Dec. 31, 1973 (agreement of Aug.
1, 1971).

Extended: Plan for 5 more
years-to Dec. 31,1978.

deferment of up to 3 weeks’ benefits until retirement;
and for Senior Group employees who were age 60 or
older before the end of the vacation benefit year, to
defer receipt of the extended vacation until retirement.
Extended: Group Death Benefit to apply to Senior and
Junior Group employees with at least 2 years’
continuous service.
Added:
I. Senior Group employees who discontinued employ­
ment except by death or retirement before becoming
entitled to an extended vacation but more than 5 years
after being allocated such under the 1963 Plan (Revised)
were entitled to receive such benefit.
II. Senior Group employees, who discontinued employ­
ment other than by quitting or discharge before
becoming entitled to an extended vacation and who
would not otherwise receive such benefit, were to
receive a Junior extended vacation benefit.

Changed: The arrangement to add or deduct amounts to
the Additional Collateral Liability Fund under the SUB
Plan, depending on the cost of benefits in the Savings
and Vacation Plan, was continued from July 31, 1971.
Until Dec. 31, 1971, the 15.1 (was 13.3) cents
for each hour worked formula was used. Effective
Jan. 1, 1972, the Savings and Vacation Plan was funded
on a straight-cost basis.

Insurance benefits plan
Mar. 1, 1950 (agreement dated
Nov. 11,1949). 20




Program of contributory socialinsurance
benefits
established.
Total cost including
administrative expenses, 5
cents a man-hour. One-half
cost to be borne by company;
amount of each employee’s
contribution to depend on
insurance provided.2
The plan provided:
Life insurance -Group term insur­
ance from $2,000 to $4,500.
Reduced to $1,250 upon
retirement after age 65 and

Benefits applied only during active employment. For
layoff, accident, sickness, and hospitalization coverage
continued until end of month following month in which
layoff occurred; life insurance continued in force for 3
months if employee paid share of premiums.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits plan-Continued
Mar. 1, 1950 (agreement dated
Nov. 11, 1949).20 Continued

continued without cost to
employee. No reduction until
age 65 for total disability
before age 60 or retirement on
disability pension between
ages 60 and 65.
Accident and sickness bene­
fits -$ 2 6 a week up to 26
weeks for any 1 disability
caused by nonoccupational
accident or sickness. Benefits
for accident started on 1st
day, for sickness on 8th day.
Benefits for maternity dis­
ability limited to 6 weeks.
Hospitalization -National Blue
Cross 70-Day Plan covering
employees and dependents.

Aug. 1, 1951 (agreement o f July
24, 1951).

Mar 1 1954

Added:
Surgical
benefitsNational Blue Shield Plan for
employees and dependents
with a maximum benefit of
$200.

Surgical benefits— Point was reached where and additional 50
cents a month was required to continue dependent
surgical benefits under the Blue Shield Plan.

................................

Nov. 1, 1954 (agreement dated
July 1, 1954 and Sept. 1,
1954).




No change in employee and employer contributions unless
current contributions were insufficient to pay for
additional benefits. In such case, surgical benefits to be
continued for dependents of employees who elected to
pay an additional sum.

Total cost increased to 9 cents a
man-hour.
One-half of cost
to be borne by company;
amount of each employee’s
contribution to depend on
insurance provided.2

For layoff, life insurance continued for 6 months if
employee paid monthly premium of 60 cents per
$1,000.

Changed: Company to pay cost of
administering plan.
Life insurance-New schedule of
group term insurance based on
higher wage scales-minimum
insurance
increased
from
$2,000 to $3,000; maximum
from $4,500 to $5,500.
Accident and sickness ben efitsIncreased $14 a week to $40.
Added: Benefits to apply to
disability caused by accidents
on the job or by occupational
disease. Employees to receive
difference between workmen’s
compensation payments and
the $40 weekly accident and
sickness benefit.

No change in $1,250 insurance upon retirement after age
65.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits plan--Continued
Nov. 1, 1954 (agreement dated
July 1, 1954 and Sept. 1,
1954).-Continued

Hospitalization -Increased by 50
days to 120 days. Allowance
for private room and board
increased to $10 a day.

Sept. 1, 1954 (memorandum of
understanding of June 29,
1954).

Surgical benefits- 5 0 cents a month additional employee
contribution for dependent coverage discontinued; thus,
Blue Shield benefit restored for dependents as a basic
benefit.

Mar. 15,1956

Hospitalization
and
surgical
benefits improved without
additional contributions.

Sept. 1, 1956 (agreement dated
Aug. 3,1956).

Changed to: Total cost based on
an initial average of $19 a
man-month.25 Company to
match employees’ monthly
contribution estimated to
average $9.50 per worker
instead of limiting payment to
a fixed amount per man-hour;
amount of each employee’s
contribution to depend on
insurance provided.26

Any increase in cost of insurance during period of
agreement to be shared equally between employees and
employer.

Life insurance: New schedule of
group term insurance based on
higher wage scales-minimum
insurance
increased
from
$3,000 to $3,500; maximum
from $5,500 to $6,000.26
Accident and sickness benefits:
Changed from a flat benefit of
$40 a week to benefits gradu­
ated from $42 to $57 a
week.26
Hospitalization:
Benefits
im­
proved and allowance for
private room and board in­
creased to $12 a day.
Added: Diagnostic benefits for
employees and dependents.
Surgical benefits: Increased to a
m axim um
of
$300.27
In-hospital oral surgery, diag­
nostic X-ray, and diagnostic
medical
services
(electro­
cardiogram, electroencephalo­
gram and basal metabolism)
added.

Insurance upon retirement after age 65 changed from flat
$1,250 to benefits graduated from $1,300 to $1,550.




Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits-Con turned
Jan. 1, 1960 (agreement dated
Jan. 4,1960).

Changed
to :
Company-paid
plan28 providing benefits pre­
viously in effect plus changes
described below:

Life insurance: Increased by
$500.
Minimum increased
from $3,500 to $4,000; maxi­
mum
from
$6,000
to
$6,500.29
Accident and sickness benefits:
Increased $11 a week. Mini­
mum increased from $42 to
$53; maximum from $57 to
$68 a week.29

Aug. 1, 1963 (agreement dated
June 29,1963).




Life insurance: Increased by
$500-minimum to $4,500,
maximum to $7,000.31
Accident and sickness benefits:
Increased
$10
a w eek minimum to $63, maximum
to $78.31
Hospitalization: Maximum in­
creased to 365 days.

Reserves and funds accrued under the prior contributory
insurance program (other than those accrued for
optional benefits) to be applied toward cost of benefits
provided under prior program and any balance to be
applied toward cost of future benefits provided
participants in prior program.
Benefits of revised plan applicable to participating
employees actively at work on or after Dec. 31, 1959.
Benefits o f prior plan continued for those not actively
at work on Dec. 31, 1959, until their return to active
employment, subject to maximum periods provided in
prior plan.
Any insurance contributions as of Dec. 31, 1959, to
continue during employee’s layoff, leave of absence, or
retirement according to provisions of prior program.
Insurance during absence because o f occupational or
nonoccupational disability continued without contribu­
tion
Employees to pay contributions advanced for them for
insurance coverage while on strike in 1959.
For strike after June 30, 1962, insurance, except sickness
and accident benefits, to continue for 30 days at
employee expense and parties to discuss arrangement
for further continuation.
Existing optional benefits continued at expense of
employees.
Insurance upon retirement remained at $1,300 to $1,550.
Insurance to continue during layoff up to 2 years, with
employees paying 60 cents per month per $1,000 after
first 6 months.
Same benefits to be provided for employees insured under
State temporary disability laws.30
Hospitalization and surgical coverage to continue for 6
months for employees with 2 years’ continuous service
at date of layoff.
Added: Retiree could authorize deduction of premiums for
converted policy from pension checks. As in the past,
hospitalization and surgical coverage could be converted
to individual policy at retirement, with retiree paying
full premium.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits-C ontinued
Aug. 1, 1967 (agreement dated
Sept. 1,1965).




Plan in effect for hourly paid
employees represented by
USA and eligible depend­
ents:32

Company pays entire cost o f employee insurance benefits
(except optional life insurance) and of dependents’
hospital, medical, and surgical benefits.

For employees only: Basic life
insurance before retirement—
$4,500 to $7,000 depending
on standard hourly wage

Optional life insurance of $1,500 to $2,750 depending on
standard hourly wage rate, available for employees who
paid the entire cost.33
For employees under age 60 totally disabled for more than
6 months, full amount of life insurance continued
during period of disability until age 65. Reduced at age
65 depending on employee’s coverage before
retirement.33
Life insurance continued in reduced amount for employees
at or after age 65, who retire under company
noncontributory pension plan. After-retirement life
insurance ranged from $1,800 to $2,050 depending on
employee’s coverage before retirement.33
Benefits terminate (1) immediately upon retirement at
employee’s sole option under the company noncon­
tributory pension plan at any age with 30 years or more
of continuous service, and (2) after the initial 26 weeks
of benefits for any type of retirement under the pension
plan.
Employees eligible for 52 weeks of benefits have benefits in
the second 26-week period reduced by amount received
under the Social Security Act.
Benefits of California and New Jersey employees reduced
by amount received pursuant to State disability law.
Benefits reduced for occupational sickness or accident by
any weekly benefits payable pursuant to any workmen’s
compensation law or occupational disease law.
Dependent defined as spouse and unmarried children (1)
under age 19, (2) at any age if fully dependent because
of disability or sickness, or (3) to age 25 if a full-time
student.34
Hospitalization benefits for employees or dependents age
65 or over reduced to extent benefits are provided
under Medicare Part A; physicians’ services benefits
payable at 20 percent of benefits otherwise payable.
Company pays charge for Medicare Part B coverage up
to $3 per month for each such employee or dependent
unless Part B charge for dependent is deducted from
Social Security or Railroad Retirement benefit.
Maximum of 30 days in 12-month period for mental or
nervous disorders or pulmonary tuberculosis.
Plan provided $12 a day toward cost o f private room.
Benefits were available for extraction of teeth (impacted or
not) and dental processes if hospitalization was certified
as necessary to safeguard health of patient by a licensed
physician or dental surgeon.
Full benefits available following 90 days from previous
hospitalization.

Accident and sickness benefits$70 to $102 a week33 for 26
weeks, plus an additional 26
weeks for employees with 2
years or more of continuous
service. Up to 6 weeks of
benefits for disability due to
pregnancy or resulting child­
birth. Payable the 1st day of
accident and 8th day of
sickness when under care of a
licensed physician.

Hospital-Medical-Surgical:
F or
em ployees
and
eligible
dependents:

Hospitalization -U p to semi­
private room rate and hospi­
tal’s regular service for 365
days, plus, for employees with
10 years or more of con­
tinuous service, an additional
365 days, reduced by hospital
benefits paid under California
Unemployment Compensation
Disability Benefits Act.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits-C ontinued
Aug. 1, 1967 (agreement dated
Sept. 1, 1965).-Continued




Maternity —
Semiprivate room
rate and hospital’s regular
service for up to 10 days.
R egular
h o sp ita liza tio n
benefits applied if complica­
tions resulted from pregnancy.
Emergency c a r e ln
full for
emergency outpatient care and
treatment
in a member
hospital within 48 hours of
nonoccupational accident.
Outpatient treatm ent- In full for
surgical treatment, radiation
therapy, and specified diag­
nostic services.35
Surgical benefits:
Surgical schedule -Payment in full
on a prevailing fee basis.36

Benefits available 9 months after effective date of coverage.

Up to $150 per 12-month period provided for a series of
recurrent or related surgical procedures performed in
the home, physician’s office, or hospital outpatient
department for treatment of the same disease or injury.
Benefits provided in or out of a hospital for services of
licensed physician; also covers licensed podiatrist acting
within the scope of his license and certain oral surgery
by doctor of dental surgery. Inpatient surgery benefits
also provided if a licensed physician actively assisted
operating surgeon, if patient and type of service
required such assistance, and if hospital did not employ
interns, residents, or house staff.

Obstetrical benefits -Payment in
full on a prevailing fee basis36
including prenatal and post­
natal care.
Medical benefits: D octors’ ser­
vices-Payment in full on a
prevailing fee basis36 up to
120 days during inpatient
confinement.

Benefit payable for services in or out of hospital by
physician in charge of case.

Anesthesia -Payment in full on a
prevailing fee basis36 in or out
of a hospital when admin­
istered and billed by a licensed
physician other than the
operating surgeon or his assist­
ant who is not an employee of
or compensated by the hospi­
tal, laboratory
or other
institution.

Benefit not applicable to local infiltration anesthetics.

Benefits provided concurrent with surgical, obstetrical, and
radiation therapy services when necessary because a
separate and complicated condition existed that
required skills not possessed by the physician
performing the above services.
Benefits for mental, tubercular, and venereal disease cases
limited to 30 days in a 12-month period.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits—
Continued
Aug. 1, 1967 (agreement dated
Sept. 1. 1965).-Continued

Radiation therapy -Payment in
full on a prevailing fee basis36
for treatment by X-ray,
radium, external radiation or
radioactive isotopes in or out
of hospital.

Benefit included cost of materials unless provided by a
hospital.
Benefits payable in conjunction with medical, surgical, or
obstetrical services when required and performed by a
physician other than the one providing the above named
services.

Diagnostic X-ray -Payment in full
on a prevailing fee basis up to
a maximum of $75 in any
12-month period for the diag­
nosis o f any disease or injury,
in or out of hospital, which is
customarily billed by the
physician who made such
examination.
Diagnostic examination -Payment
in full on a prevailing fee basis
up to a maximum of $75 in
any 12-month period for elec­
troencephalograms,
electro­
cardiograms, basal metabolism
tests, and radioactive isotope
studies in or out of hospital,
necessary in the diagnosis of a
disease or injury when made
or ordered by a licensed
physician and customarily
billed by him.
N o n d u p lic a tio n
provision—
Hospitalization benefits not
payable to extent provided
under any other group plan if
other plan includes coordina­
tion of benefits or non­
duplication provision and is
the primary plan; physicians’
services benefits not payable
to extent provided under any
other group plan if other plan
does not include coordination
o f benefits or nonduplication
provision or includes such
provisions and is the primary
plan.
Aug. 1, 1968 (agreement o f same
date, and letter dated Aug. 8,
1968).




Changed: Hospital benefits-fox
employees and dependents.

Private room allowance changed to amount equal to the
hospital’s charge for the most common semiprivate
room. Covered hospital expenses also payable for
services provided under an approved preadmission
testing program if employee or covered dependent
voluntarily scheduled for such services before admission
for surgery. Also covered full hospital charges for
treatment in an intensive care unit.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits—
CContinued
Aug. 1, 1970 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1968).




Life Insurance -Increased
by
$ 1 ,0 0 0
fo r
a c tiv e
employees.37

Employees retiring before age 65 were entitled to the full
amount o f life insurance, including optional insurance
until age 65. At age 65, basic life insurance continued in
reduced amounts. 37

Added: Major medical expense
benefits-HO
percent
of
covered medical costs after a
deductible of $50 per in­
dividual but not more than
$100 per family in any
calendar
year.
Maximum
benefits of $10,000 per in­
dividual per calendar year, and
$20,000 lifetime maximum,
increased each January 1 by
$1,000 less any benefits paid
in previous year, so remaining
lifetime maximum available on
any January 1 was not less
than $1,000 nor more than
$20,000.

Initial calendar year was Aug. 1, 1970, through Dec. 31,
1971.
If employee and one dependent or more or two dependents
or more incurred covered medical expenses as a result of
the same accident, only one $50 was to be deducted
during such calendar year. Any part of the deductible
amount applied against covered medical expenses for
sickness or accident incurred during the last 3 months of
any calendar year was to be subtracted from the
deductible amount for the ensuing calendar year.
Neither hospital nor home confinement, nor surgical
operation was necessary to be eligible for benefits.
Covered medical expenses included: Services of licensed
physician or podiatrist; services of dentist when
necessary to correct damage incurred in an accident;
room and board in an accredited hospital at the
hospital’s most common semiprivate room rate; other
hospital services required for medical or surgical care;
anesthetics and administration thereof; diagnostic X-ray
and radium treatments; oxygen and administration
thereof; blood transfusions, including cost o f blood and
blood plasma over 3 pints when a charge is made for it;
services of qualified physiotherapist; services of a
registered graduate nurse; services o f a licensed practical
nurse provided in hospital only, when a registered nurse
was not available, and when certified as necessary by
attending physician; prescription drugs and medicines
dispensed by licensed pharmacists; local professional
ambulance services; rental of iron lung or other durable
equipment; and artificial limbs or other prosthetic
appliances, except replacement of such appliances.
Covered medical expenses also included care in an approved
convalescent nursing home when care immediately
followed prior inpatient hospitalization involving
surgery or 3 days’ inpatient hospitalization without
surgery and was ordered by physician. Included
expenses were room and board up to the most common
semiprivate room rate and services of professional and
practical nursing personnel for up to 365 days.
Benefits were not payable for normal pregnancy care; care
in homes or other facilities primarily for care of
alcoholics, drug addicts, the blind, the deaf, the
mentally deficient or retarded, or persons suffering from
tuberculosis or mental or nervous conditions; or care
furnished by any governmental body.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits—
Gontinued
Aug. 1, 1970 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968).




Changed: Effective date o f
coverage—
AM coverage effec­
tive on the date on which
employee started active work.

Also included were benefits for the treatment of mental
and nervous conditions only when such conditions or
illnesses are amenable to favorable modification.
Maximum benefits—
$1,000 per individual for each
calendar year for covered medical expenses listed above,
except for convalescent nursing home care, and for the
reasonable and customary charges for the following: (1)
Visits to physician for individual or group psychothera­
peutic treatment in physician’s office or in an approved
outpatient psychiatric facility; (2) counseling for
patient’s family; (3) psychological testing when
prescribed by physician; (4) professional and other
necessary auxiliary services when provided through day
or night care program; (5) drugs and medications
dispensed and charged for by hospital or other facility
as part o f regular institutional care programs; and (6)
electroshock therapy and anesthesia related thereto.
Services for mental deficiency or retardation were not
covered.
The following expenses were not covered: (1) Dental care
except for an accident; (2) eyeglasses or contact lenses
except for one pair of eyeglasses or contact lenses and
the examination and fitting thereof, following a cataract
operation, hearing aids, and examinations or fitting
thereof; (3) routine health examinations; (4) cosmetic
surgery except where necessitated by accident or injury;
(5) services for injury or illness due to war; (6)
treatment of disorders o f the feet except when surgery
is performed; (7) services of any unlicensed practitioner
unless specifically provided for in the program or as
required by law; (8) any services for which there was no
charge, which were covered under workmen’s compensa­
tion or provided by any governmental body, or were
reimbursed through legal action or settlement; (9)
services o f surgical assistants; (10) expenses incurred
because of pregnancy, Caesarean section, prenatal or
postnatal care except additional expenses resulting from
medical or surgical complications.
Covered medical expenses for employees or dependents age
65 or over did not include any expense to the extent
that benefits were provided under either Medicare Part
A or Part B.
Dependent coverage became effective on the same date as
employee’s coverage except that if, on that date, a
dependent was confined in a hospital or other
institution for care or treatment or was confined at
home under the care of a physician because of a
disabling physical or mental illness or injury, major
medical expense coverage for that dependent was not
effective until the dependent was no longer confined in
a hospital or other institution or confined at home
under the care o f a physician.

Effective date

Provision

Insurance benefits-Ccmtinued
Aug. 1, 1970 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1968).-Continued

C hanged:
Termination
of
coverage-A ll coverage term­
inates on date employment
terminates.

Aug. 1, 1971 (agreement o f same
date).

Increased: Basic life insurance by
$2,500 in each earnings class
for active employees and by
$300 in each class for retirees
age 65 and over who retired
on or after July 31, 1971.38




Improved Medical care as follows:
Added: Physician’s charges for
emergency treatment in
hospital, clinic, or office.
Added: Medical care costs of
donors of kidneys and
other organs.
Added: Abortions and sterili­
z a tio n
p r o c e d u r e s,
including vasectomies.
Added: Physician’s charges for
oral surgical procedures
when performed in his
office.
Increased: Number of days of
in-hospital medical care
benefits—
to
365
for
employees with fewer than
10 years of service and 730
for those with more than
10 years.
Increased: Maximum duration of
hospital benefits and inhospital medical benefits in
psychiatric and tuberculosis
cases to 60 days in any
12-month period.
Increased: Limits on annual diag­
nostic X-rays and examinations- t o $150 each.
Increased: Major m edical-Maxi­
mum for an individual-to
$15,000 per calendar year, and
to $25,000 for lifetime.
Increased: Annual maximum on
psychiatric ca re-to $1,500.

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits-Continued
Aug. 1, 1971 (agreement of
same date).-Continued

Aug. 1, 1973 (agreement of Aug.
1,1971).

Increased:
Accident and
sickness benefits — range
to
from $78 to $115 a
week.38

Changed: Reduced social security benefits no longer to be
subtracted from accident and sickness benefits, but
unreduced social security benefits to be subtracted
during first 26 weeks for employees under age 65.
Added: To receive accident and sickness benefits, employee
must have submitted a written claim to company within
21 days after disability began, or show good reason why
he was unable to furnish such notice.
Changed: Duplication o f accident and sickness benefits and
pensions eliminated in all circumstances.
Added: Donors of kidneys and other organs entitled to
accident and sickness benefits.
Changed: Maximum duration o f accident and sickness
benefits for newly hired employees not to exceed their
length of service before disability began.
Changed: Accident and sickness coverage to terminate upon
date of layoff.

Increased: Accident and sickness
benefits - t o range from $87 to
$129 a week.38

Pension plan
Mar. 1, 1950 (agreement dated
Nov. 11,1949).




Established:
Noncontributory
pension plan-All employees
with at least 15 years of
continuous service eligible for
pensions upon reaching 65 and
thereafter or upon being per­
manently incapacitated before
age 65. Amount of monthly
payment: 1 percent
of
employee’s average monthly
earnings during 120 calendar
months immediately preceding
retirement
multiplied
by
number of years of continuous
service. Pension payments as
computed by formula reduced
by primary benefits to which
employee entitled
under
Federal
Old-Age
and
Survivors’ Insurance, other
public pensions, and payments
for disability under Federal or
State laws (except fixed
statutory payments for loss of
a bodily member).

Pension payments could be reduced by any severance
allowance paid at time o f retirement.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision
Pension plan-Cont inued

Mar. 1, 1950 (agreement dated
Nov. 11, 1949).-Continued

Minimum
pension
including
public pension-$100 a month
after 25 or more years’ service;
pro rata amount for from 15
to 25 years’ service. Minimum
pension
upon
permanent
incapacitation-$50 a month
up to age 65 and standard
minimum thereafter. Entire
cost borne by company.

Sept. 1, 1954 (memorandum of
understanding of June 29,
1954).
Nov. 1, 1954 (agreement dated
July 1,1954).




Pensions for employees retired before Oct. 31, 1954, not to
be reduced by the amount of future increases in social
security benefits.
Minimum monthly pension at age
65 increased to company pay­
ment of $55 plus primary
social security benefits (a total
of at least $140)39 after 30
years’ service in place of a
total
of
$100 including
primary
social
security
benefits after 25 years’ service;
for each year’s service fewer
than 30, a new minimum
company pension reduced by
$2 monthly to $25 for 15
years’ service (ora total of
$110 including social security
benefits). Company pension
benefits as computed by the
basic
1-percent formula
reduced by a flat $85 a month
(the maximum payable at time
of agreement under Federal
Old-Age
and
Survivors’
Insurance) rather than actual
OASI benefit. A worker
receiving
the
minimum
company pension might have a
total retirement income over
$140 since OASI primary
benefits could exceed $85.40

Revised plan not applicable to employees retired before
October 31, 1954, except those retired on disability
prior to age 65 and receiving workmen’s compensation.

Minimum monthly pension for
permanent
incapacity
in­
creased to $75. Amount of
pension calculated under the
1-percent formula no longer
reduced because of absence
from work in last 6 months
preceding
retirement
on
disability.

Dropped: Deduction of workmen’s compensation payments
from disability pensions before age 65.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Pension plan-Continued
March 7, 1956 (letter of agree­
ment dated March 7,1956).

Added:
Survivors’
optionsEmployee could elect reduced
pension during lifetime and,
after death, monthly pay­
ments to beneficiary of (1)
same amount or (2) half the
am ount
employee
had
received.

Nov. 1, 1957 (agreement dated
Aug. 3,1956).

Minimum monthly pension at age
65 increased to company pay­
ment o f $2.40 a month for
each year of service before
Nov. 1, 1957, and $2.50 a
month for each year of service
thereafter, up to 30 yearsplus social security benefits.

Minimum monthly pension of employees who retired under
the 1949 plan changed to $2 for each year of service up
to 30; for those who retired under the 1954 plan
changed to $2.25 a month per year of service up to 30
(plus social security benefits).

Minimum monthly pension before
age 65 for permanent incapa­
city changed to the larger of
(1) $90 a month less any
social
security
disability
benefits payable; (2) minimum
pension
described
above
($2.40 or $2.50 times years of
service); or (3) amount under
basic 1-percent formula less
flat $85 offset for social
security or, in workmen’s
compensation cases, actual
social security if less than
$85. Normal minimum there­
after.

Minimum monthly pensions for pensioners already retired
for disability as follows: Those entitled to social
security disability benefits minimum pension described
above ($2 or $2.25 times years of service); those
ineligible for social security disability benefits $60 a
month if retired under the 1949 plan and $80 a month
if retired under the 1954 plan.




A dded:
E arly
retirem en t:
Employees aged 60 but less
than 65 with 15 years’
continuous service permitted
to retire at own option; could
elect (1) deferred normal
pension starting at age 65 or
(2) an immediate pension,
actually reduced.41
Added: Deferred vested rights:
Employees who have been laid
off for more than 2 years or
terminated as a result of a
permanent shutdown of a
plant, department, or a sub­
division and who at the end of
such 2 years or upon such
termination had reached age
40 with at least 15 years’
continuous service to receive

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Pension plan-Con tinued
Nov. 1, 1957 (agreement dated
Aug. 3 ,1 9 5 6 ).-Continued

Jan. 1, 1960 (agreement dated
Jan. 4 ,1960).




deferred monthly pensions at
age 65 based on years of
continuous service and on
average monthly compensa­
tion during the 120 months
before the expiration o f such
2 years or such termination.
Minimum monthly pension at age
65 increased to company pay­
ment o f $2.50 a month for
each year of service before
Jan. 1, 1960, and $2.60 a
month for each year of service
thereafter, up to 35 yearsplus social security benefits.42
Amount deducted for social
security benefits from pension
benefits, as computed by basic
1-percent formula, reduced to
$80.
Minimum monthly pension before
age 65 for permanent incapa­
city increased to $100 less any
social
security
disability
benefits payable. Alternatives
of minimum normal pension
or amount under 1-percent
formula continued.
Early retirement: Added—
full
pension based on continuous
service to date of retirement
for (a) employees age 60 but
less than 65 with 15 years’
continuous service, retired
under mutually satisfactory
conditions, and (b) employees
age 55 with 20 years or more
of service, terminated because
of
permanent
shutdown,
layoff, or sickness resulting in
break in service.42 Alterna­
tives of minimum normal
pension or amount under
1-percent formula continued.
A d d ed:
Special
retirem en t
benefit, providing lump-sum
payment equal to 13 weeks’
vacation pay reduced by pay
for vacation previously taken
in calendar year in which
retirement occurs.

Company increased pensions for retired employees by
amounts up to $5 a month. 43

For pensions based on 1-percent formula, $80 to be
deducted as for normal retirement.
Employee must be at least age 53 with 18 years’ continuous
service on date of shutdown, layoff, or disability.
Company could at its option grant a pension before the
date of absence, due to layoff, would otherwise result
in break in service if employee’s return to work was
considered unlikely by employer.

Not applicable to those receiving disability or deferred
vested pensions.
Regular monthly pension payments to commence after 3
months. Employee who has not taken vacation in
calendar year not to be entitled to vacation pay in that
year.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Pension plan-Con tinued
July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6,1962).

Changed: Early retirement41 Full pension based on con­
tinuous service to date of
retirement for employee with
15 years or more of service,
who was either age 55 and his
combined age and years of
service equaled at least 75, or
any age and his combined age
and years of service equaled at
least 80, and (1) whose con­
tinuous service was broken by
permanent shutdown, layoff,
or disability, (2) whose con­
tinuous service was not broken
but who was not at work
because of (a) election of
layoff status under contract
terms relating to permanent
shutdown or (b) physical dis­
ability or nonelective layoff
and whose return to work was
considered
unlikely
by
employer, or (3) who retired
under mutually satisfactory
conditions.

Benefits payable not earlier than month after last month in
which employee was eligible for company sickness and
accident benefits or statutory nonoccupational
disability benefits.
Changed: Regular pension not to be reduced by eligibility
for or receipt of actuarially reduced public pension.
When employee reached age at which public pension
was not actuarially reduced, company pension to be
reduced by amount of public pension.
Changed: Deferred vested rights-Continuous service after
reemployment not to be included in calculation of
pension for employee who was eligible for, but had not
applied for, deferred vested pension.
Changed: $80 deduction from early retirement pension
based on 1 percent formula eliminated until employee
reached earlier of (1) age 65 or (2) eligibility for
disability benefit under social security, for employee 55
years old with 20 or more years of service whose
employment was terminated because of permanent
shutdown, layoff, or sickness resulting in break in
service.

July 31,1966 (agreement o f Sept.
1,1965).

Increased: Minimum monthly
pension— $5 times years of
to
continuous service (up to 35
years maximum).

Added: Employee with 30 years or more continuous service
could retire at his sole option with a full pension (less
applicable deductions) at any age.

Increased: Pension payable under
basic
1-percent
formula,
through reduction to $60 of
amount deductible therefrom
for social security benefits.
Added: Monthly pension payable
for special early retirement
increased by $75 until eligible
for full social security pay­
ments.

Company increased pensions (other than deferred vested)
for retired employees by $15 per month—
actuarially
reduced when appropriate.




Changed: Survivor’
s op tion Election or change of option
to be made (1) without
evidence of good health (a)
before retirement and before
age 60 for regular benefits at
any age with 30 years or more
continuous service, 60/15 (age

Added: New right to deferred vested pension if service
broken due to disability and pension commencement
eligibility reduced to age 60 (at reduced rate). Also
provision that severance allowance payments would not
be deducted from or charged against such pension.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Pension plan—
Continued
July 31,1966 (agreement o f Sept.
1, 1965).-Continued

and service) retirement, or
disability
retirement
(b)
before or after retirement, but
before age 63 for normal,
deferred vested, or 75/80 (age
plus service) retirement, (2)
with evidence of good health
of employees and/or co­
pensioner at company option
(a) before retirement and after
age 60 for regular benefits, at
any age with 30 years or more
continuous service, 60/15
retirement or disability retire­
ment (b) before or after
retirement and after age 63
but before age 65, or before
retirement and after age 65 for
normal, 75/80, or deferred
vested retirement, or (3) in
any case, the later of retire­
ment or age 65, with company
consent.

July 31, 1969 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1968).

Changed: Eligibility for special
early retirement to total of 70
years (was 75), age plus years
of continuous service at or
after age 55.

Applicable to employees who were eligible to retire on or
after July 31, 1969. Also applicable to employees who
applied for retirement pension between July 31, 1968,
and July 31, 1969, but who, at that time, were eligible
only for a deferred vested pension; or who became
eligible for immediate or deferred vested pension during
such period but whose continuous service had been
broken.

Eliminated: $60 monthly social
security
deduction,
when
pension was computed as 1
percent of average monthly
earnings for last 10 years of
continuous service times all
years of continuous service.

Applicable to employees retired on immediate pension on
or after July 31, 1968.




Increased: Minimum monthly
pension to $6.50 for each year
of
continuous
service;
maximum 35 years.
Increased: Monthly benefits by
$10 for employees retiring
before
jaly
31,
1968,
actuarially reduced where
applicable.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Pension plan—
Continued
July 31, 1969 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1968).-Continued

Added:
Surviving
spouse’s
benefit. Monthly payments of
(1) higher of $75 or 50
percent o f employee’s regular
pension to eligible spouse
between ages 50 and 62; (2)
higher of $25 or 50 percent of
employee’s regular pension
less 65 percent o f the amount
of social security widow’s (or
widower’s) benefit for spouse
age 62 or over; or (3) for
spouse under age 50, higher of
$75 or 50 percent o f employ­
ee’s regular pension less Vi
percent per year under 50.

July 31, 1972 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1971).

Increased: For surviving spouse
under age 62, minimum
benefit to $100 a month; for
spouse age 62 or over, benefit
to minimum o f $50 a month
or, if higher, 50 percent o f
employee’s regular pension
less 50 percent o f the amount
of social security widow’s (or
widower’s) benefit.
Changed: Employees eligible for
70/80 pension when electing
layoff under plant shutdown
rules retain right to retire on
70/80 pension within 90 days
after recall.




Benefits payable to surviving spouse of participant age 55
or over who was eligible for a monthly benefit, but who
died on or after July 3 1,1969, if death occurred before
retirement o f participant with at least 15 years’
continuous service; or after retirement and before age
65 for participant who retired on or after July 31, 1969,
after reaching age 50 on a 30 year, 60/15, permanent
incapacity, or 70/80 retirement plan. Participant’s
regular pension was defined as: (1) For a participant
who died before retirement, his regular pension before
reductions as if he had retired on the date of death and
had been age 65; or (2) for a participant who died after
retirement, his regular pension before reductions, but
including the $75 addition.

Increased: Minimum monthly
pension to $8 for each of the
first 15 years, $9 for each of
the next 15 years, and $10 for
each year of service over 30,
with no upward limit (was 30
years).44
Increased: Percentage used in
basic
pension
calculation
formula-to 1.1 percent for
each of first 30 years of
service and 1.2 percent for
each year over 30.
Increased: Minimum disability
pension for those not eligible
for unreduced social security
disability pensions-to $150
per month.

Changed: Employee who met basic 45/15 requirement
entitled to a deferred vested pension if he was
terminated for any reason (including quitting) except
discharge.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Pension plan-Continued
July 31, 1972 (agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1971).-Continued

Increased: The supplement for
disability pensioners and those
who were retiring under the
70/80 retirement plan but
who were not eligible for
unreduced social security-to
$105 a month.
Increased: Normal retirement
benefits by $15.00 per month
for pensioners retired before
July 31, 1971 (except on
deferred vested pensions).
Employees retired on reduced
early retirement or under
joint-and-survivor option to
receive proportionate increase.
Increased: Payments to eligible
survivors by $7.50 a month.

Changed: Employee’s pension could not be reduced by any
compensation received by him for 100 percent loss of
use of any member.

Supplemental unemployment benefits plan
Aug. 3, 1956 (agreement of same
date).




Plan established to supplement
benefits paid under State
unemployment systems.

Company’s contributions to be paid into a fund which with
“contingent liability’' will eventually be built up to a
“maximum financing” of 10.5 cents for each man-hour
worked in the first 12 of the 14 months that precede
the month for which the calculation is made.45 This
would be about $200 per employee, assuming an
average workyear of about 1,900 hours.

Contributions:
Company
to
contribute 3 cents per man-hour actually worked, with a
“contingent liability” of an
additional 2 cents if needed to
pay benefits provided by the
plan.

Company contributions to fund and increase in contingent
liability to cease when fund reached 100 percent
“maximum financing.” Payments would be resumed
only as necessary to restore this level.

Size o f benefits: An amount
which when added to State
unemployment benefits and
other compensation will be
the smaller of (1) 65 percent
of the employee’s (after tax)
weekly straight-time wages for
40 hours of work, or (2) $25 a
week for the maximum dura­
tion of State unemployment
b e n e fits
and
$ 4 7 .5 0
thereafter, with $2 additional
for each dependent, up to 4.
Benefits to continue for a
maximum of 52 weeks.
Benefits will be reduced by 25

Plan contingent on obtaining rulings (1) that company
contributions are deductible for Federal income tax
purposes; (2) that such contributions would be excluded
in computation of overtime pay under the Fair Labor
Standards Act. If these rulings were not obtained by
September 1, 1957, the company’s obligation to
contribute to the plan would cease. If the plan was
terminated in this manner, the company and the union
were to negotiate about modifying the plan or use of
the money the company has contributed or would
otherwise be obligated to contribute to the fund; if no
agreement was reached within 60 days, either party
could thereafter resort to a strike or a lockout.49

Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Supplemental unemployment benlefits plan-Continued
Aug. 3, 1956 (agreement of same
date).-Continued

to 85 percent depending on
trust fund position in any
month in which the financial
position is less than 75 percent.16 If such position is less
than 10 percent, no benefits
are payable.47 Benefits to be
first
payable
for weeks
beginning September 1, 1957,
to employees laid off on or
after July 1,1957, if favorable
rulings from State48 and
Federal
Governments
are
obtained.
Eligibility: Laid-off employees
with at least 2 years’ con­
tinuous service (who meet
certain other requirements)
and with credit units will be
eligible for benefits after
waiting 1 week within the
benefit year. To obtain a week
of benefits, employees will
surrender 1 credit unit until
the financial position of the
fund declines below 52.5 per­
cent, when the number of
credits surrendered will vary
from 1 to 5, depending on
length of service and financial
position o f the fund.47
Accrual o f credit units: Em­
ployees will accumulate credit
units at the rate of 1/10 unit
for each 8 credited hours
beginning on or after August
1, 1955. A maximum of 52
credit units can be accumu­
lated by a worker at any one
time.

Nov. 30, 1959 (agreement dated
Jan. 4 and memorandum of
understanding dated Apr. 1,
1960).
July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6,1962).




Once an employee has been credited with units, he cannot
earn more than 26 credit units in any 12-month period.

“Contingent liability” o f 2 cents per man-hour, accumu­
lated under previous contract, and cancelled at its
expiration, restored.
Increased: Contributions: Com­
pany to contribute amount
necessary to raise fund to
maximum financing, up to
maximum of 9.5 cents per
man-hour actually worked.50

Increased: Maximum financing, to the lesser of (1) 12.5
cents for each man-hour worked in the first 12 of the 14
months that preceded the month for which the
calculation was made or (2) 1-2/3 times benefits paid in
first 60 of preceding 62 months. Balance of contingent
liability under prior plan to be continued.

Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Supplemental unemployment benefits plan-Continued
July 1, 1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6, 1962).-Continued




Changed: Size o f benefits: 24
times
employee’s average
straight-time hourly earnings
plus $1.50 for each dependent
up to four, reduced by State
unemployment compensation
(including dependency allow­
ance) and other compensation
over amount disregarded in
determining State unemploy­
ment benefits:51 52

Straight-time hourly earnings defined as last hourly earnings
calculated for vacation purposes excluding overtime and
Sunday premiums but including any general wage
increases since employee’s last vacation.
Proportionate benefit paid employee with fractional credit
units. One-half credit unit to be cancelled when
employee received reduced benefit because of earnings
from another employer or self-employment.

Maximum weekly
benefits f o r -

When
employee

Employee
with 4
Single
depenemployee dents

Received
unemploy­
ment in­
surance. . .
$37.50 $43.50
Did not
receive
unemploy­
ment in­
surance. . . 60.00
66.00
Benefits to be reduced 40 or 70
percent depending on financial
position of SUB plan in any
month in which the position
was less than 35 percent.53
No benefits payable if fin­
ancial position was less than
15 percent.

Employee ineligible for State benefit because of earnings or
receipt in same benefit year of State benefit for weeks
he was ineligible for weekly or short week benefit, to
receive maximum plan benefit for employee receiving
unemployment compensation.

In effect: Eligibility—
Employee
with 2 or more years of
continuous service laid off by
reduction
in
force
or
permanent shutdown of plant,
department, or subdivision of
department who, after waiting
a period of 1 week within the
benefit year, (1) applied in
person for weekly benefit; (2)
received a State unemploy­
ment insurance benefit unless
such benefit was denied
because employee (a) had
exhausted State benefit, (b)
received other compensation
that disqualified him for State
benefit, (c) had insufficient
employment to be covered by

Plan benefits to be paid to employee ineligible for State
benefit because o f layoff during plant vacation
shutdown, provided employee was not eligible for a
vacation.
Benefit not provided (1) employee who (a) quit work, (b)
was suspended or discharged, (c) became unemployed
because o f a labor dispute, (d) was unemployed because
of refusal of suitable work offered by company, (e)
claimed and was eligible for public or private sickness
and accident or total disability benefit (except as noted
above) or a pension or retirement benefit financed by
company, or (f) was eligible for similar benefits from
another employer with whom employee had longer
service, or (2) for period that layoff coincided with
scheduled paid vacation.
Added: Benefit extended to employee ineligible for State
benefit because of disability occurring during layoff
after his sickness and accident insurance was dis­
continued.

Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Continued
Supplemental unemployment benefits plan—
July 1,1962 (agreement dated
Apr. 6 , 1962).-Continued

State system, (d) was unable
to work because of disability,
or (e) was participating in a
Federal training program; (3)
was available for work and
maintained an active registra­
tion with State employment
system; and (4) applied for,
accepted,
and
did
not
voluntarily
leave
suitable
employment with another em­
ployer.54
Accrual o f credit units : V unit for
2
each week in which employee
had any credited hours. Pre­
vious 52 credit unit maximum
retained.

Allowance to be reduced by any Government payment for
same purpose.
If employee quit (for other than proper cause) or was
discharged for cause in first year on new job, company
obligation for employee earnings, vacation benefits,
SUB, pension, etc., to be reduced by amount of
allowance.

Added: Short week benefit: Size
of
benefits52 -Employee’s
standard hourly wage rate
times difference between 32
and sum of hours (1) worked,
(2) not worked but paid for,
or (3) not worked for reasons
other than lack of work.
Eligibility -Employee with 2
years or more of continuous
service who had worked some
time but fewer than 32 hours
in any week. Employees to
surrender V credit unit for
2
each short workweek benefit.

Employee to be credited with units earned under prior plan
but not used.
Short week benefit to be reduced by one-seventh o f State
benefit for each day in workweek for which both types
o f payments were made.
Standard hourly wage rate defined as average rate during
week for which benefit was paid.

Jan. 25,1963 (letter of agreement
o f same date).

Added: Short week benefit: To
sum of hours not paid for,
hours not worked because
employee (1) quit, (2) was
suspended or discharged, or
(3) was engaged in or unable
to work because of a labor
dispute.

Part-time employee to be eligible when sum o f hours
worked and the specified hours not worked fell below
80 percent of regular weekly hours.

Jan. 1, 1969 (agreement dated
Aug. 1,1968).

Increased: Size o f benefits - to 26
times
employee’s average
straight-time hourly earnings
plus $1.50 for each dependent
up to 4. Maximum weekly
benefits ranged from $52.50
for single employee receiving
State unemployment com­
pensation to $86 for employee
with
4
dependents
not
receiving such insurance.55

Benefits for part-time employees were calculated in
proportion to the number o f hours in employee’s
normal workweek. Short week benefits were payable to
part-time employees who worked less than 80 percent
of normal workweek.
Changed: Benefit calculation for employees on a Great
Lakes vessel to be the same as for all other applicants;
seasonal disqualification eliminated when employee was
ineligible for State unemployment insurance.




Credited hours to include all hours (1) worked, (2) not
worked but paid for, and (3) not worked or paid for but
lost because o f (a) specified union activities or (b)
work-connected compensable disability.

i
Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Effective date

Supplemental unemployment benefits plan-Continued
Aug. 1, 1971 (agreement of same
date).

Increased: Benefits by $30. 56

Severance allowance

Mar. 17,1937 ................................

No

provision
allowance.

for

severance

Apr. 22,1947 ................................

Workers separated because of
permanent discontinuance of
plant, department, or sub­
stantial part thereof, paid
severance
allowance
as
follows:
3 and under 5 years’ service, 4
weeks’ pay.
5 and under 7 years’ service, 6
weeks’ pay.
7 and under 10 years’ service,
7 weeks’ pay.
10 years’ service or more, 8
weeks’ pay.

Severance allowance calculated in same manner as vacation
pay.

Sept. 1, 1957 (agreement dated
Aug. 3,1956).

Employees eligible for severance
allowance to have option
within 30 days after shutdown
either to be treated as on
layoff (and hence eligible for
supplemental unemployment
benefits) or to accept the
severance allowance.

Employee electing severance allowance to have any
supplemental unemployment benefit payments received
during the 30-day period deducted from the allowance
to which he would otherwise have been eligible at the
beginning of the period.

Earnings protection plan
Aug. 1, 1969 (memorandum of
understanding dated Aug. 1,
1968, and agreement dated
Aug. 1,1969).

See footnotes at end of table.



Established: Earnings Protection
Plan, financed from accrued
additional collateral liability
or collateral liability under the
SUB Plan; however, benefits
were limited to 2 cents per
man-hour worked by all
covered employees on or after
Jan. 1, 1969. Plan provided a
quarterly
income
benefit
payable to employees whose
benefit quarter rate (average
hourly earnings for the benefit
quarter) was less than 85
percent of his base period
rate.57

Plan to protect level of earnings for all employees.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Earnings protection plari-Continued
Aug. 1, 1969 (memorandum of
understanding dated Aug. 1,
1968, and agreement dated
Aug. 1, 1969).-Continued

Eligibility: Hourly paid em­
ployees having 2 years’ or
more continuous service and
who had worked 160 or more
hours
during
the
base
periods.58
Benefits:
Quarterly
income
benefit equal to an amount
which, when added to em­
ployee’s benefit quarter rate,
increased such earnings to 85
percent of his base period rate.

Employees assigned lower paying jobs at their own request
or due to their own fault were ineligible for quarterly
income benefits.

Quarterly income benefit was calculated by multiplying:
(1) Employee’s total hours worked (plus 1.5 times
overtime hours worked) during the benefit quarter by
(2) the amount, if any, by which his benefit quarter was
less than 85 percent o f his base period rate.
Rates were adjusted to neutralize the effects of any general
wage increases. Quarterly income benefits were not paid
when such payment duplicated other compensation.
Quarterly income benefits were payable in full when the
benefit ratio59 was 100 percent or more; benefits were
reduced or cancelled when the ratio was less than 100
percent.60
Quarterly Income Benefits were cancelled for any benefit
quarter, if for the first month of such quarter, the
financial position of the SUB Plan was less than 70
percent. Benefits were to remain cancelled until the first
benefit quarter for which the financial position of the
SUB Plan was 75 percent or more during the first
month.

Jan. 1, 1972 (agreement o f Aug.
1,1971).

Changed: Base periodforEarnings
Protection Plan to be the
previous calendar year; effect
was to roughly double the
length of the period during
which employees received
Earnings Protection
Plan
benefits.

1 During period covered by Executive Order 9240 (Oct. 1, 1942, to Aug. 21, 1945) this provision was modified in practice to
conform to that order.
2 Vacation provisions effective January 1, 1958, can be summarized as follows:




Years o f service
1 or more ........
3 or more ...........
5 or more ...........
10 or more .........
15 or more .........
25 or more .........

Duration o f vacation Extra vacation pay
1 w e e k ...................
1 w e e k ......................
2 w e e k s ....................
2 w e e k s .................. .
3 w e e k s....................
3 w e e k s.................

0
Vi week

0
Vi week

0
Vi week

3

Relocation allowances were as follows:
Allowance
M les

July 1, 1962__________S ep t 1, 1965

between plants

Single
Marrie'd
Single
Married
employees employees employees employees

50-99 ................
100-299 ...........
300-499 ...........
500-999 ...........
1,000-1,999 . . .
2,000 or more .

$ 55
75
105
155
215
215

$180
220
290
420
580
580

$130
150
180
230
290
350

$380
420
490
620
780
940

Although no formal time limit was set, it was expected that application for an allowance would be made within a reasonable length
of time after change in permanent residence.
4 The plan initially provided employee with the option of withdrawing benefits the year after retirement rather than taking them in a
lump sum on retirement. This provision was removed, by letter of agreement dated Nov. 21, 1962, to meet objections of the Internal
Revenue Service.
5 Pay for an employee who was not entitled to a 1960 vacation was based on latest year before 1960 in which he was entitled to
a vacation, adjusted for any general wage changes between earlier year and 1960.
6 Originally Dec. 31, 1962; provision changed to meet objections of the Internal Revenue Service.
7 Added by letter of Nov. 21,1962.
8 The plan initially provided employee with the option of delaying vacation at least 2 years after entitlement to the benefit. This
provision was removed, by letter of agreement dated Jan. 30, 1963, to meet objections of the Internal Revenue Service.
9 Added by letter of Jan. 30, 1963.
10 Maximum available spillover from SUB and 12.5 cent contribution for extended vacation benefits to be 15.625 cents an hour,
unless (1) the first cycle of the single-week vacation benefit in any 5-year period was not completed on the 10th calculation date (the
date on which vacations were allocated) in that period or (2) the second cycle had not been completed on the 15th calculation date. In
these cases, the spillover could be increased until the third cycle was completed. After completion of the third cycle, the spillover was
to be reduced with the objective of limiting total accruals from direct contributions for extended vacation benefits and the spillover
from SUB to the smaller of 15.625 cents for each hour worked or 125 percent of the amount for each hour worked required to
provide an extended vacation benefit and three cycles of single-week vacations; the minimum company contribution for extended
vacation and single-week vacation benefits was to be 12.5 cents an hour.
11 Employee covered by plan in effect before Jan. 1, 1964, who retired after June 1, 1963, and on or before Jan. 1, 1964, was
entitled to retirement benefit equal to excess of extended vacation retirement benefit over retirement benefit received under prior plan
if he had continuous service on date of retirement at least equal to continuous service of any employee placed in senior group on Jan.
1,1964.
12 The quota of benefits allocated on a calculation date was 5 percent o f employees in senior group on starting date. The quota
was reduced by number of employees who had become entitled to retirement benefit by retiring before being entitled to benefit and
was increased by (a) number o f benefits not allocated on preceding calculation date because of insufficient funds, (b) number of
benefits allocated on preceding calculation date to which entitlement did not occur on day after calculation date, and (c) number of
employees put in senior group (since the later of beginning of a 5-year period or last calculation date) through transfer or
reinstatement.
13 Senior group employee whose continuous service was broken before he was entitled to an extended vacation or to an extended
vacation retirement benefit was paid single-week vacation benefits to make total benefits received in a 5-year period equal to number
he would have received as member of junior group from date he was placed in senior group until break in service.
14 Employee was “actively at work on calculation date” if he (1) worked during pay period including that date or, if on vacation
on that date, during immediately preceding or following period or (2) was officially excused or absent because o f legally compensable
disability.
15 Deduction of regular vacation did not affect computation of special pension plan payment that would have been made if this
savings and vacation plan had not been in effect.
16 If employee elected to postpone benefits until retirement, company could (1) deposit benefit funds in trust fund to be
increased at rate fund increased or (2) invest benefit funds in U.S. Government Series E bonds or their equivalent. At date of payment,
bonds (or cash redemption value if employee chose) were turned over to employee with any uninvested cash in his account.
Any amount deposited in trust fund because employee elected to defer benefits until retirement could be paid for unemployment
after SUB was exhausted, serious illness, or other major hardship.
17 Payment for benefits other than vacation time off was not included in computing earnings for (1) the pension plan, (2) regular
vacations, or (3) any other purpose.




18 Employee who was allocated vacation benefit during first cycle beginning after Dec. 31, 1963, but was not actively at work on
applicable calculation date was entitled to benefit if he had one uncanceled vacation unit accrued under plan in effect before Jan. 1,
1964.
19 The base period for this special payment was the year used in computing the last vacation to which the employee was or would
have been entitled.
20 Company contributions began Feb. 1,1950.
21 A contributory group life insurance plan and various voluntary plans financed by employees were previously in effect.
22 Schedule of benefits and employee contributions, in addition to the National Blue Cross 70-Day Hospitalization Plan:
A cciden t
Em ployee’
s
and sickness
monthly cost
insurance -------------------------Life
(weekly
With
No
insurance
benefits)
dependents dependents

E m ployee’ standard
s
hourly wage rate
Less than $ 1 .2 9 ......................... . .
$1.29 but less than $ 1 .5 7 .........
$1.57 but less than $ 1 .8 6 .........
$1.86 but less than $ 2 .1 5 .........
$2.15 but less than $ 2 .4 3 ......... . .
$2.43 and o v e r ...........................

$2,000
2,500
3,000
3,500
4,000
4,500

$26
26
26
26
26
26

$2.90
3.15
3.35
3.60
3.80
4.05

$4.15
4.40
4.60
4.85
5.05
5.30

23 Benefits o f the revised plan applied to participating employees actively at work on or after Nov. 1, 1954. Benefits of the plan in
effect before that date were continued for participating employees not actively at work on Nov. 1, 1954, until they return to active
employment.
24 Schedule of benefits and employee contributions, in addition to the National Blue Cross 120-Day Hospitalization Plan and
National Blue Shield Surgical Plan revised as follows:
A cciden t
Em ployee’
s
and sickness
monthly cost
insurance -------------------------Life
With
(weekly
No
insurance
benefits)
dependents dependents

E m ployee’ standard
s
hourly wage rate*
Less than $ 1 .7 3 ......................... . .
$1.73 but less than $ 2 .0 6 .........
$2.06 but less than $ 2 .3 9 ......... . .
$2.39 but less than $ 2 .7 8 .........
$2.78 but less than $ 3 .1 1 .........
$3.11 and o v e r ...........................

$3,000
3,500
4,000
4,500
5,000
5,500

$40
40
40
40
40
40

$6.25
6.50
6.70
6.95
7.15
7.40

$7.50
7.75
7.95
8.20
8.40
8.65

*On basis of Nov. 1, 1954 wage scale, excluding incentive earnings.
25 Benefits of the revised plan were applicable to participating employees actively at work on or after September 1, 1956. Benefits
of the plan in effect before that date were continued for participating employees not actively at work on September 1, 1956, until
they return to active employment.
26 Schedule of benefits— addition to the National Blue Cross 120-Day Hospitalization Plan and National Blue Shield Surgical
in
Plan-and employee contributions revised as follows:

E m ployee’ standard
s
hourly wage rate*

Life insurance
-------------------Before After
retire­ retire­
ment
ment

Less than $ 1 .9 4 ................ . $3,500 $1,300
$1.94 but less than $2.32 . . 4,000
1,350
1,400
$2.32 but less than $2.70 . . 4,500
$2.70 but less than $3.14 . . 5,000
1,450
$3.14 but less than $3.52 . . 5,500
1,500
$3.52 and o v e r.................. . 6,000
1,550

Accident
Employee's
and sickness
monthly cost
insurance
(weekly
No
With
benefits)
dependents dependents
$42
45
48
51
54
57

$7.50
7.80
8.10
8.40
8.70
9.00

*On basis of Sept. 1, 1956, wage scale, excluding incentive earnings.



$ 9.50
9.80
10.10
10.40
10.70
11.00

27 In addition, for steelworkers in the State of Pennsylvania who are married and earn $6,000 a year or less and single employees
who earn $4,000 or less, the schedule of surgical benefits will provide full payment for the procedure.
28 As indicated earlier, all or part of any increase due Dec. 1, 1960, and Oct. 1, 1961, under the cost-of-living escalator clause will
be used to offset any increase in insurance costs above a state amount instead o f being paid out to cash to the employees.
29 Schedule of benefits-in addition to the National Blue Cross 120-day Hospitalization Plan and National Blue Shield Surgical
Plan-revised as follows:

Before
retirement

A fter
retirement

Accident
and sickness
insurance
(weekly
benefits)

$4,000
4,500
5,000
5,500
6,000
6,500

$1,300
1,350
1,400
1,450
1,500
1,550

$53
56
59
62
65
68

Life insurance
Employee’ standard
s
hourly wage rate*
Less than $ 2 .0 9 ....................................
$2.09 but less than $ 2 .4 9 ....................
$2.49 but less than $ 2 .8 9 ....................
$2.89 but less than $ 3 .3 6 ....................
$3.36 but less than $ 3 .7 6 ....................
$3.76 and o v e r ......................................

*On basis of Jan. 1, 1960 wage scale, excluding incentive earnings.
30 Employee to pay cost o f benefits provided under law in certain States in excess o f program benefits.
31 Schedule of benefits— addition to the National Blue Cross 120-day Hospitalization Plan and National Blue Shield Surgical
in
Plan-revised as follows:

Employee's
standard hourly
wage rate*

Before
retirement

A fter
retirement

Accident
and sickness
insurance
(weekly
benefits)

Less than $ 2 .2 4 .................................. ___
$2.24 but less than $ 2 .6 6 ..................
$2.66 but less than $ 3 .0 8 ..................
$3.08 but less than $ 3 .5 7 ..................
$3.57 but less than $ 3 .9 9 .................. ___
$3.99 and o v er.................................... ___

$4,500
5,000
5,500
6,000
6,500
7,000

$1,300
1,350
1,400
1,450
1,500
1,550

$63
66
69
72
75
78

Life insurance

*On basis of Aug. 1, 1963 wage scale, excluding incentive earnings.
32 The benefits listed consistute the entire plan in effect on Aug. 1, 1967, including provisions in effect prior to Aug. 1, 1967
(some of which were not previously reported).
33 Schedule o f life and accident insurance benefits was as follows:

Employee ’ standard
s
hourly wage rate*

Before
retirement

After
retirement

Accident
and sickness
insurance
(weekly
benefits)

Less than $2.59 ......................................
$2.59 but less than $ 3 .0 4 .......................
$3.04 but less than $ 3 .4 9 .......................
$3.49 but less than $ 4 .0 2 .......................
$4.02 but less than $ 4 .4 7 .......................
$4.47 and o v e r ...........................................

$4,500
5,000
5,500
6,000
6,500
7,000

$1,800
1,850
1,900
1,950
2,000
2,050

$ 70
76
83
89
96
102

Basic life insurance

Optional life insurance
(at employee cost)
Monthly
Life
cost to
employee
insurance
$1,500
1,750
2,000
2,250
2,500
2,750

$1.44
1.68
1.92
2.16
2.40
2.64

*On basis of Aug. 1, 1967 wage scale as shown in table 2c.
**Amount applicable for employees retired (other than deferred vested) at or after age 65, or upon attainment of age 65 if retired
earlier; before age 65, the full amount of life insurance in force before retirement is continued.
34
Dependent children included (1) blood descendant of employee, (2) children legally adopted and/or awaiting adoption,
(3) stepchildren who reside with employee, and (4) children permanently residing with and dependent for sole support on the
employee as head o f household if employee was related to children by blood, or marriage, or as legal guardian.




35 Specified diagnostic services included X-ray examinations with films, basal metabolism tests, radioactive isotope studies,
electrocardiograms, and electroencephalograms, but excluded work-up procedures in the outpatient department when the patient is to
be admitted as an inpatient.
36 Prevailing fee for a particular service or medical procedure was determined by the insurance carrier taking into consideration
(1) the fee usually charged by a doctor, (2) the customary fee charged in a given locality by most doctors of similar training and
experience in the performance of the service or medical procedure, and (3) recognition of unusual circumstances or medical
complications that required additional time, skill, or experience.
37 Schedule of life and accident insurance benefits were as follows:

E m ployee’ standard
s
hourly wage rate *

Before
retirement

After
retirement**

Accident
and sickness
insurance
(weekly
benefits)

Less than $3.05 ......................................
$3.05 but less than $ 3 .5 6 .......................
$3.56 but less than $ 4 .0 7 .......................
$4.07 but less than $ 4 .6 7 .......................
$4.67 but less than $ 5 .1 8 .......................
$5.18 and o v e r .........................................

$5,500
6,000
6,500
7,000
7,500
8,000

$1,800
1,850
1,900
1,950
2,000
2,050

$ 70
76
83
89
96
102

Basic life insurance

Optional life insurance
(at employee cost)
----------------------------------Monthly
Life
cost to
insurance
employee
$1,500
1,750
2,000
2,250
2,500
2,750

$1.44
1.68
1.92
2.16
2.40
2.64

*Based on nonincentive standard hourly wage rate in effect on Aug. 1,1970.
**If the employee retired under the company noncontributory pension plan (other than deferred vested) before age 65 and his life
insurance was not being continued according to the provisions relating to total disability, the full amount of his life insurance,
including any optional life insurance, would be continued until the end of the month in which he attained age 65. At the end of the
month in which he attained 65, any optional life insurance would terminate and the amount o f his basic life insurance would then
be reduced to the amount in the above schedule as life insurance after retirement.
38 Schedule of life and accident insurance benefits was as follows:

Basic life insurance

Before
retirement

Employee’ standard
s
hourly wage rate
Less than $3,565 ....................................
$3,565 but less than $4,105 ................
$4,105 but less than $4,645 ................
$4,645 but less than $5,275 ................
$5,275 but less than $5,815 ................
$5,815 and over.......................................

After
retirement

$ 8,000
8,500
9,000
9,500
10,000
10,500

$2,100
2,150
2,200
2,250
2,300
2,350

Accident
and sickness
insurance
(weekly
benefits)
Aug. 1,
Aug. 1,
1973
1971
$ 78
85
93
100
108
115

$ 87
95
104
112
121
129

Optional life insurance
(at employee cost)
Monthly
U /> U

IV

Life
insurance

employee

$1,500
1,750
2,000
2,250
2,500
2,750

$1.44
1.68
1.92
2.16
2.40
2.64

39 At time o f agreement, some steel employees with 30 years’ service might be eligible for OASI benefits of less than $85 and thus
receive total monthly pensions of less than $140 but this number would be small. According to the company, arrangements were made
whereby these employees actually received total pension (including social security) of $140.
40 Under 1954 amendments to the law, maximum OASI benefits had increased to $98.50 by Nov. 1, 1954, and were to rise
further to $108.50 by July 1, 1956.
41
Effective Nov. 1, 1957, amount of immediate pension payable to employee who voluntarily retired at age 60 with at least 15
years of continuous service was based on following percentage:




Age
of
retirement
60
61
62
63
64
65

...............................................................................................
...............................................................................................
...............................................................................................
...............................................................................................
..............................................................................................
................................................................................................

Percent
o f pen­
sion
67.18
72.36
78.14
84.60
91.84
100.00

42 Definition of continuous service was changed to extend the period before service was broken up to 5 years (was 2 years) after
layoff. Previous practice of crediting up to 2 years of layoff as years of service for computing retirement benefits continued.
43 This provision was included in a letter to the union from the company dated Jan. 5, 1960. The $5 increase was provided for all
pensioners except those receiving a reduced amount under an option election, who received the appropriate portion of the increase.
44 Differences in minimum monthly pension payment between old plan and new for selected years of service were as follows:
Monthly
1968
1971
Agreement Agreement increase

Years
15
20
25
30
35
40
45

......................................
......................................
......................................
......................................
......................................
......................................
................. ....................

$ 97.50
130.00
162.00
195.00
227.50
227.50
227.50

$120.00
165.00
210.00
255.00
305.00
355.00
405.00

$ 22.50
35.00
47.50
60.00
77.50
127.50
177.50

45
Beginning in November 1958, maximum financing will be revised downward according to the following scale, if during the first
12 o f the last 14 months the average weekly benefit payment falls below $16:
The adjusted
maximum
financing for
the month
will be the
following per­
centage o f the
maximum
financing

I f the average weekly benefit is $16 or m o r e .........................................................
$12 to $ 1 5 .9 9 ......................................................
$8 to $ 1 1 .9 9 .........................................................
Less than $ 8 .........................................................

100
80
60
40

46 In September 1957, the financial position o f the fund (for purposes o f determining benefit levels) will be considered to be 100
percent if total finances equal 5 cents times hours worked in the applicable 12-month period. Subsequently, until normal maximum
financing is first reached (but no later than July 1959), the maximum will be computed on the basis of 5 cents times hours worked in
the applicable 12-month period plus on-fourth of 1 cent for each month after September 1957.
47 The amount of weekly benefit and number of credit units to be canceled for a week o f benefits is summarized as follows:
The
weekly
benefit
I f the financial position applicable to the shall
beweek for which the weekly benefit is
paid is—

And if the continuous service
o f the applicant is 2 to 8
8 to 15
15 years
years
and over
years
The credit units canceled for
such benefits shall b e -

Percent
75.0 percent or m o r e ...........................
67.5 but less than 75.0 p e r c e n t.........
60.0 but less than 67.5 p e r c e n t.........
52.5 but less than 60.0 p e r c e n t.........
45.0 but less than 52.5 p e r c e n t.........
38.0 but less than 45.0 p e r c e n t.........
31.0 but less than 38.0 p e r c e n t.........
24.0 but less than 31.0 p e r c e n t.........
17.0 but less than 24.0 p e r c e n t.........
10.0 but less than 17.0 percent .........
Less than 10.0 percent.........................

100.0
75.0
67.5
60.0
52.5
45.0
37.5
30.0
22.5
15.0
0

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.25
2.00
2.00
2.00
5.00

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.25
2.00
2.00

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25

48
If there was any State in which supplementation was not permitted, the parties were by August 1957 to negotiate an alternative
arrangement for providing benefits to workers in such States. If possible, this arrangement was to provide for payment of benefits in a
lump sum at the termination o f periods of layoff or of State benefits, with further payments in the latter case to be made on a weekly
basis.




49 Necessary rulings were obtained so that plans went into effect as scheduled.
50 Agreement also provided for the usual Government rulings which were obtained.
51 In Pennsylvania, earnings in excess of $6 or 3/10 o f unemployment insurance weekly benefit amount.
52 Maximum benefits were:
Number o f dependents
None

1

2

3

4 or more

When receiving unemployment
insurance......................................... . .$37.50 $39.00 $40.50 $42.00 $43.50
When not receiving unemployment
insurance......................................... . . 60.00 61.50 63.00 64.50 66.00
53 Benefits to be reduced (1) 40 percent when trust fund position was 25 percent but less than 35 percent, (2) 70 percent when
fund was 15 percent but less than 25 percent.
54 Agreement provided that the company was to revise arrangements in States that did not permit supplementations to the extent
necessary to conform to the revisions in April 1962 agreement and called for installation of alternate arrangements in any State that
did not permit supplementation in the future and for installation of the SUB plan in any State that removed its ban against SUB.
5 5 Maximum benefits were:
Number o f dependents
None

1

2

3

When receiving State
unemployment compensation . . . . .$52.50 $54.00 $55.50 $57.00
When not receiving State
unemployment compensation . . . . . 80.00 81.50 83.00 84.50

4 or more
$58.50
86.00

56 Maximum SUB benefits were:
Number o f dependents
None

1

2

3

When receiving State
unemployment compensation . . . . .$82.50 $84.00 $85.50 $87.00
When not receiving State
unemployment compensation . . ...1 1 0 .0 0 111.50 113.00 114.50

4 or more
$88.50
116.00

57 Base period rate was the average earnings for the base period (footnote 58) plus the amount per straight-time hours worked of
any quarterly income benefit earned during the base period.
58 Base period was defined as the 4 calendar quarters immediately preceding the benefit quarter. During the initial year (1969),
April, May, June, and July were considered a calendar quarter: August and September were also considered a calendar quarter.
59 The benefit ratio was equal to the lesser of 125 percent or the percentage that the available balance of funds at the end of the
benefit quarter was of the total quarterly income benefits for which employees had become eligible.
60 Payment o f quarterly income benefits otherwise payable was dependent on the benefit ratio as follows:
Benefit ratio for
benefit quarter
100 percent or m ore......................................................
75 percent or more, but less than 100 p ercen t.........
Less than 75 percent ....................................................

Quarterly income benefits
for quarter were
Payable in full
Reduced by 50 percent
Cancelled

If the QIB’s for a benefit quarter were reduced or cancelled, for each succeeding benefit quarter until the first benefit quarter
following a benefit quarter as to which the benefit ratio was 125 percent, all Quarterly Income Benefits otherwise payable to
employees were payable as follows:
Benefit ratio for
benefit quarter
125 percent ....................................................................
75 percent or more, but less than 125 p ercen t.........
Less than 75 percent ....................................................




Quarterly income benefits
for quarter were
Payable in full
Reduced by 50 percent
Cancelled

Wage chronologies available
The following wage chronologies are currently being maintained. Bulletins or reports for which a
price is indicated are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from the regional offices of the Bureau of Labor Statistics listed
on the inside back cover. (Order by check or money order; do not send cash or stamps.)
Publications for which no price is indicated and those designated as out of print are not available
from the Superintendent of Documents but may be obtained, as long as supplies are available, from
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or from the Bureau’s regional offices.
Out-of-print items also may be available for reference in leading public, college, or university
libraries.
Before July 1965, basic wage chronologies and their supplements were published in thn Monthly
Labor Review and released as Bureau reports. Wage chronologies published later are available only as
bulletins (and their supplements). Summaries of general wage changes and new or changed working
practices are added to bulletins as new contracts are negotiated.




Aluminum Company of America with United Steelworkers of America and
Aluminum Workers International Union—
Nov. 1939-May 1974, BLS Bulletin 18152
American Viscose (a division of FMC Corp.)—
1945-67, BLS Bulletin 1560.1
June 1968-June 1974, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1560 (free).
The Anaconda Co.—
1941-58, BLS Report 197.1
Armour and Company1941-72, BLS Bulletin 1682 (90 cents).
A. T. & T.—
Long Lines Department—
1940- 64, BLS Bulletin 1443.1
1965-70, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1443 (free).
Atlantic Richfield Co. (former Sinclair Oil Companies’ facilities)—
1941- 72, BLS Bulletin 1771 (85 cents).
January 1973-January 1975, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1771 (free).
Berkshire Hathaway Inc.—
1943-69, BLS Bulletin 1541.1
1969-71, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1541 (free).
Bethlehem Atlantic Shipyards—
1941-68, BLS Bulletin 1607.1
1969-72, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1607 (free).
Bituminous Coal Mine Operators and United Mine Workers of America—
Oct. 1933-Nov. 1974, Bulletin 1799 (70 cents).
The Boeing Co. (Washington Plants)—
1936-67, BLS Bulletin 1565.1
Commonwealth Edison Co. of Chicago and International Brotherhood
of Electrical Workers—
Oct. 1945-Mar. 1974, BLS Bulletin 1808 (85 cents).

Dan River Inc.—
May 1943-January 1972, BLS BuUetin 1767 (55 cents).
Federal Classification Act Employees—
1924-68, BLS Bulletin 1604.1
Aug. 1968-Oct. 1973, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1604 (free).
Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. and B.F. Goodrich Co. (Akron Plants)—
1937-73, BLS Bulletin 1762 (85 cents).
Ford Motor Company—
June 1941-September 1973, BLS Bulletin 1787 ($1.25).
International Harvester Company—
1946-70, BLS Bulletin 1678 (1.10 cents).
1970-73, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1678 (free).
International Paper Co., Southern Kraft DivisionDec. 1937-May 1973, BLS BuUetin 1788 (55 cents).
International Shoe Co. (a division of Interco, Inc.)—
1945-74, BLS BuUetin 1718 (60 cents).
Lockheed-CaUfornia Company (a division of Lockheed Aircraft Corp.)—
1937-67, BLS Bulletin 1522.1
Martin-Marietta Corp.—
1944- 64, BLS BuUetin 1449.1
1965-68, Supplement to BLS BuUetin 1449 (free).
Massachusetts Shoe Manufacturers and United Shoe Workers of America (AFL—
CIO)—
January 1945-January 1975, BLS BuUetin 1800 (60 cents).
New York City Laundries—
1945- 64, BLS BuUetin 1453.1
1965-72, Supplement to BLS BuUetin 1453 (free).
North American Rockwell Corp.—
1941-67, BLS BuUetin 1564.1
1967- 70, Supplement to BLS BuUetin 1564 (free).
North Atlantic Longshoremen—
1934-71, BLS BuUetin 1736 (90 cents).
Pacific Coast ShipbuUding—
194167, BLS BuUetin 1605.1
Pacific Gas and Electric Co.—
1943-73, BLS BuUetin 1761 (90 cents).
Pacific Longshore Industry—
1934-70, BLS BuUetin 1568.1
RaUroads—
Nonoperating Employees—
1920-62, BLS Report 208.1
Swift & Co.—
1942- 73, BLS BuUetin 1773 1
Western Greyhound Lines—
1945-67, BLS BuUetin 1595.1
1968- 72, Supplement to BLS BuUetin 1595 (free).



Western Union Telegraph Co.—
1943-67, BLS Bulletin 1545.1
1968-71, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1545 (free).
1 Out of print. See Directory o f Wage Chronologies, 1948-72, for Monthly Labor Review in which reports and supplements issued
before July 1965 appeared.
2 Price not yet available.




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region V

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Governm ent C enter
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (A rea Code 617)

Region II

8th Floor, 300 South W acker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (A rea Code 312)

Region VI

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
N ew York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (A rea Code 212)

1100 Com m erce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
* Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions VII and VIII *
Region III
P.O. Box 13309
P hiladelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (A rea Code 215)

Regions IX and X **

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 P eachtree St., NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (A rea Code 404)




Federal Office Building
911 W alnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (A rea Code 816)

450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Regions VI! and V III are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102