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Wage Chronology:
North Atlantic Shipping
Associations and the
International Longshoremen’s
Association (I LA), 1934-80
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Wage Chronology:
North Atlantic Shipping
Associations and the
International Longshoremen’s
Association (I LA), 1934*80
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner
June 1980
Bulletin 2063

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents. U.S. Government P rinting Office, W ashington, D.C. 20402







Preface

al Longshoremen’s Association since 1934. This bulle­
tin replaces Wage Chronology: North Atlantic Longshore­
men, 1934-71, published as BLS Bulletin 1736 and in­
corporates the supplement covering the 1971-77 peri­
od. Materials previQusly published have been supple­
mented in this bulletin by contract changes negotiated
for the 1977-80 period. Except for a revised introduc­
tion and other minor changes, earlier texts generally
are included as they were originally published.
Job titles used in the generic sense and not to de­
scribe a contract term have been changed to eliminate
the sex stereotype. For purposes of this chronology,
however, old titles have been retained where they re­
fer specifically to contractual definitons.
Material in this publication is in the public domain
and may be reproduced without permission of the Fed­
eral Government. Please credit the Bureau of Labor
Statistics and cite Wage Chronology: North Atlantic Ship­
ping Associations and the International Longshoremen's
Association, 1934-80, Bulletin 2063.
The analysis for the 1962-80 period was prepared in
the Division of Trends in Employee Compensation by
John J. Lacombe II.

This bulletin is one of a series prepared by the Bu­
reau of Labor Statistics that traces changes in wage
rates and related benefits negotiated by individual em­
ployers or combinations of employers with a union or
group of unions. Benefits unilaterally introduced by an
employer generally are included. The information is
obtained largely from collective bargaining agreements
and related documents voluntarily filed with the Bu­
reau. Descriptions of the course of collective bargain­
ing are derived from the news media and confirmed
and supplemented by the parties to the agreement. Wage
chronologies deal only with selected features of collec­
tive bargaining or wage determination. They are in­
tended primarily as a tool for research, analysis, and
wage administration. References to job security, griev­
ance procedures, methods of piece-rate adjustment, and
similar matters are omitted. For a detailed explanation
of the purpose and scope of the chronology program,
see “Wage Chronologies and Salary Trend Reports,”
BLS Handbook of Methods, Bulletin 1910 (Bureau of
Labor Statistics, 1976), chapter 22.
This chronology summarizes changes in wage rates
and related compensation practices negotiated in the
major North Atlantic Coast ports with the Internation­




ill

Contents

Page
Introduction..........................................................................................................................................

1

Summary of contract negotiations........................................................................................................
October 1934-September 1951 ..................................................................................................
October 1951-September 1952 ..................................................................................................
October 1952-September 1953 ..................................................................................................
October 1953-September 1962 ...................................................................................................
October 1962-September 1964 ...................................................................................................
October 1964-September 1968 ..................................................................................................
October 1968-September 1971 ..................................................................................................
October 1971-September 1974 ..................................................................................................
October 1974-September 1977 ..................................................................................................
October 1977-September 1980 ...................................................................................................

5
5
5
5
5
8
9
10
12
15
17

Tables:
1. General wage changes.............................................................................................................
2. Basic hourly rates for longshoremen in North Atlantic Coast ports, 1934-79 ...................
3. Supplementary compensation practices...................................................................................
Premium pay for nightwork............................................................................................
Daily overtime pay ..........................................................................................................
Premium pay for Saturday and Sunday...........................................................................
Call-in pay .......................................................................................................................
Mealtime premium p a y ............................................................. •.....................................
Travel pay.........................................................................................................................
Holiday pay .....................................................................................................................
Paid vacations .................................................................................................................
Containerization fund ......................................................................................................
LASH and SEABEE fund................................................................................................
Job security program.......................................................................................................
Guaranteed annual income p lan s....................................................................................
Pension p la n s...................................................................................................................
Welfare and insurance plans............................................................................................

19
21
26
26
26
26
26
27
28
28
30
32
32
32
33
35
45

Wage chronologies available...............................................................................................................

77




iv

Introduction

Scope o f chronology. This chronology describes the ma­
jor changes in wage rates and supplementary compen­
sation practices put into effect since 1934 for “long­
shoremen” in the ports of New York, Baltimore, Bos­
ton, Hampton Roads, and Philadelphia. It deals with
provisions of General Cargo agreements covering long­
shoremen, negotiated by the International Longshore­
men’s Association (ILA) and the employer associations
in the five major North Atlantic Coast ports. Long­
shoremen generally are defined as those engaged in
moving all cargoes (including ships’ stores, mail, and
baggage) from the vessel to the first place of rest on
the dock or to the vessel from the last place of rest and
in physically receiving and delivering cargoes on the
piers and in terminals.1 Because of port requirements,
jurisdictional considerations, and tradition, duties of
longshoremen may vary slightly from port to port.2
Other categories of workers engaged in ancillary long­
shore work are not covered by this chronology, such
as cargo repairmen, checkers, clerks, general mainte­
nance workers, mechanical and miscellaneous workers,
marine carpenters, and port watchmen; they are not
covered in the General Cargo agreements. Provisions
shown for Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI), pension,
and health and welfare benefits are applicable uniform­
ly among all categories of workers in a given port, ex­
cept for port watchmen, who are not represented by
the ILA.

er from sailor to teamster. The union’s leadership con­
tinued organizing crafts not directly related to long­
shore work, and by 1905, claimed to have 100,000 mem­
bers; half of them on the Great Lakes and the rest scat­
tered around the country. The AFL ordered the union
to drop “Marine and Transport Workers” from its title
and halt its industrial-type organizing. In 1908, the un­
ion reluctantly complied and readopted its previous
name. Later that same year, a new administration took
control of the union which then represented more than
40 crafts, and eliminated from the union those crafts
furthest removed from longshore work and embarked
on an organizing policy more in line with AFL thinking.
In 1908, the union established, after a number of un­
successful attempts, a local in the Port of New York—
the Nation’s largest port—and won jurisdictional
control there by 1914. Locals in Hampton Roads and
Baltimore had been established before 1908, and the
union dominated these ports by 1917. The union quick­
ly gained jurisdiction over longshore workers in Bos­
ton after establishing a local there in 1912. Philadelphia
longshore workers were won over to the ILA in 1926
after a prolonged struggle with a rival group. By 1914,
the ILA had become the Nation’s dominant longshore
union on all coasts, including the Great Lakes.
Jurisdictional control, however, did not mean that
the union had become a strong bargaining power. Many
workers were still unorganized and any improvements
in compensation were largely the result of unilateral
employer actions. The union’s influence grew rapidly
largely because employers tended to accept the ILA as
an opposing force to more radical influences and in
1914, the war produced a greater demand for longshore
workers.3 United States entry into the war further
strengthened the union’s position due to the govern­
ment’s concern for unimpeded shipping operations. A
tripartite National Adjustment Commission was estab­
lished to deal with wartime manpower needs. In 1918,

The union, the ILA dates back to 1877 when a small
longshoremen’s local was established in Chicago. It ex­
panded rapidly by recruiting workers in major Great
Lakes ports and small shore towns. In 1892, delegates
from 11 Great Lakes ports held a longshore convention
in Detroit and established the National Longshoremen’s
Association of the United States. A year later, it affil­
iated with the American Federation of Labor (AFL).
The union was renamed the International Longshore­
men’s Association in 1895 after chartering some Cana­
dian locals.
The ILA launched a campaign of organizing various
categories of maritime workers on the Great Lakes, in
addition to longshore workers—a policy contrary to
the craft-oriented philosophy of the AFL. The union
again changed its name, in 1902, to the International
Longshoremen, Marine and Transport Workers’ Asso­
ciation of North and South America and the Island
Possessions—a title encompassing every type of work­



1The term “longshoreman” is derived from “alongshoreman” which
evolved from calls in colonial times for “men along the shore” to
help load and unload ships. For an informative history o f work on
the docks in the United States, see Men Along the Shore, by Maud
Russell (N ew York, Brussel & Brussel, Inc., 1966).
2For example, longshoremen in the Port o f N ew York handle lines
to dock and undock vessels, but a separate category o f workers called
“line handlers” perform this function in the Port o f Boston.
3See Levinson, Rehmus, Goldberg, and Kahn, Collective Bargaining
and Technological Change in American Transportation (Transportation
Center at Northwestern University, 1971).

1

the ILA sought a uniform wage scale over broad geo­
graphic districts to meet government requirements for
shifting workers among ports. The Commission accept­
ed the proposal and established uniform rates for each
of three districts—North Atlantic, South Atlantic, and
Gulf. During the recession after the war, the ILA was
able to maintain its recognition in North Atlantic ports
through concessions, but elsewhere, the union’s strength
was sharply reduced, even to the point of a return to
employer determination of wages and working condi­
tions. During the depression beginning in 1929, the ILA
maintained wage rates in North Atlantic ports by giv­
ing in on work rules. The union regained its strength
in South Atlantic and Gulf ports in the 1930’s due to
government legislation promoting union organization
and representation. After 1934, radical influences again
assisted the conservative ILA in maintaining and im­
proving its dealings with East Coast employers.
In 1937, however, about 35,000 Pacific Coast dockworkers broke away from the ILA and affiliated with
the newly formed Committee for Industrial Organiza­
tion (renamed the Congress of Industrial Organizations,
CIO, in 1938) and obtained a charter as the Interna­
tional Longshoremen’s and Warehousemen’s Union
(ILWU).4This left the ILA with a membership of about
62,000 workers.
In August 1953, the ILA was suspended from the
AFL after unfavorable publicity regarding scandals
within the union, and the AFL formed a new union to
supplant the ILA—the International Brotherhood of
Longshoremen (IBL). The ILA eventually defeated at­
tempts by the IBL during the 1950’s to gain control of
dockworkers. The ILA made formal application in Jan­
uary 1959 to rejoin the AFL-CIO (merged in Decem­
ber 1955). In August 1959, a committee of labor lead­
ers recommended that the ILA be readmitted. This rec­
ommendation was the final blow to the IBL, which
held its last convention in October and voted to merge
with the ILA. The IBL’s leader later was made presi­
dent of the ILA’s Great Lakes District.
The ILA currently represents about 77,000 workers
along the waterfronts of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts,
Great Lakes, and Puerto Rico. Its members perform
work done directly and indirectly in connection with
the loading and unloading of vessels, encompassing op­
erations that are located on vessels, on docks, or in ma­
rine warehouses. The five major ports covered by this
chronology, plus all other ports north of Cape Hatteras
(North Carolina) through Canada, constitute a district
of the union for the North Atlantic. Other districts cov­
er workers on the South Atlantic and Gulf Coasts (in­
cluding Puerto Rico), the Great Lakes and their tribu­
taries on both sides of the border, and workers in sev­
eral locals in the State of Washington. Each district
deals with matters and conditions affecting the locals
and their members within the confines of the district.




The decisions of the district organizations, however,
are subject to review by the ILA’s Executive Council
which is composed of the union’s international officers
and representatives from the districts.
Employers' associations. Cooperation among employ­
ers in each port dates back to the early 1900’s. There
are records at the New York Shipping Association
(NYSA) indicating agreements with union labor in the'
port on hourly wages dating back to 1916. The em­
ployers initially functioned through informal commit­
tees of ocean carriers and stevedores in dealings with
labor which, essentially, was represented by the ILA.
A more formal employer structure developed in the
wake of Federal legislation in the 1930’s which estab­
lished the right of workers to negotiate collectively
with employers.
Today, employer organizations in each port repre­
sent ocean carriers, contracting stevedores, marine ter­
minal operators, and other employers engaged in the
movement o f passengers and ocean freight requiring
waterfront labor represented by the ILA. Associations
covered by this chronology are the New York Ship­
ping Association, Inc., Steamship Trade Association of
Baltimore, Inc., Philadelphia Marine Trade Association,
Hampton Roads Shipping Association, and Boston Ship­
ping Association, Inc. On behalf of their memberships,
the associations negotiate the terms of labor contracts
and arrange for the collection and administration of
funds (both unilaterally and in conjunction with the
ILA) covering contracted benefits for union workers.
Bargaining pattern. A pattern of uniform bargaining
has developed over the years in contract negotiations
between the ILA and employers in the major North
Atlantic Coast ports. New York, the largest seaport in
the nation, has played a leading role in employer-union
relations, particularly in the North Atlantic area. Be­
fore 1957, the terms of agreements negotiated by the
NYSA and the Port of New York ILA locals general­
ly were adopted by employer associations and union
locals in ports from Maine to Virginia, and also set the
pattern for negotiations in South Atlantic and Gulf
Coast ports. Although Boston had no written agree­
ment from 1935 to 1950, the terms under which em­
ployees worked were the same or substantially similar
to those in other ports. The union practice before 1957
was to take the New York contract and attempt to
achieve the same conditions in all of the other ports.
4 The National Labor Relations Board certified the ILW U as the
exclusive representative o f Pacific Coast longshore workers in 1938.
Exceptions were made for longshore workers in the Puget Sound
ports o f Tacoma, Anacortes, and Port Angeles and checkers and
foremen in Seattle (longshoremen in Seattle were represented by the
ILW U) where ILA rights continud to be recognized. Most o f these
workers, however, subsequently joined the ILWU.

2

Although similar agreements were reached, the results
of piecemeal negotiations were confusion, bitterness,
and recurring strikes throughout ports from Maine to
Texas.
In an attempt to reduce these difficulties, the NYSA
was authorized in 1957 by employer associations in Bal­
timore, Boston, Hampton Roads, and Philadelphia to
negotiate on their behalf on five contract items. In 1957,
the NYSA and ILA first signed an agreement that pro­
vided uniform basic wages, hours of work, length of
contract, and employer contributions to the local health
and welfare and pension plans (but not the benefits) for
the five ports. Settlement of these items became known
as the “master agreement.’’ Bargaining for the ILA on
these items was and is conducted by a committee com­
posed of officers of the International including repre­
sentatives from each port. The committee is headed by
the union’s President. Each port, however, has negoti­
ated separate agreements between the management as­
sociation and union bargaining committee for that port
on such issues as holidays, vacations, working condi­
tions, and other local issues. Master agreement terms
are incorporated into the local agreements. Union bar­
gaining goals are framed at meetings held prior to ne­
gotiations by International officials and union officials
from each port for master contract items and by local
officials for local issues. These goals are submitted to
the union membership for approval.
The establishment of the master agreement, howev­
er, proved to be of little help in avoiding strikes. There
also was dissatisfaction with master contract terms ne­
gotiated by the NYSA and ILA among employers in
other North Atlantic ports. This led to efforts by em­
ployers to unify negotiations among the North Atlan­
tic ports or to at least include all of the North Atlantic
port associations in negotiations that the NYSA had
been conducting on their behalf.
The efforts were successful in 1971 when the Coun­
cil of North Atlantic Shipping Associations (CONASA)
was established to bargain on the master contract items
for employers in the ports previously under the master
agreement, and also Providence, Rhode Island.
CONASA encountered opposition from the ILA be­
cause, initially, it refused the union demand to expand
the number of items in the master contract. Negotia­
tions in the summer of 1971 also were complicated by
the wage-price freeze ordered by President Nixon and
a dispute between the NYSA and New York locals of
the ILA over continuing the existing program of Guar­
anteed Annual Income (GAI) in the Port of New York.
As a result, North Atlantic ports were struck by the
ILA on October 1, 1971, as were South Atlantic and
Gulf Coast ports as far west as the Mississippi River.
Ports in west Louisiana and Texas covered by the West
Gulf Maritime Association were not struck.
Between October 1 and November 26, 1971, negoti­
ations produced no resolution of the dispute and a Taft-




Hartley court injunction was obtained by the Federal
Government when the strike was 56 days old. The ILA
agreed to bringing in CONASA as a bargaining agent
when CONASA agreed to extend the master contract
items to cover rules for containerization and for ocean­
going barge vessels, referred to as LASH (lighter abroad
ship). The parties continued to negotiate while work
was resumed in all of the ports, and in February 1972,
the first master contract was reached between
CONASA and the ILA.
On October 22, 1977, however, the NYSA announced
its resignation from CONASA, basically because of dis­
agreement between NYSA members and employers in
other ports over how to respond to an ILA demand
for job security in the 1977 negotiations.
The dispute stemmed from a 1975 decision by the
National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) which held
that the Rules on Containers (a master contract item)
in the Port of New York violated Federal labor law.
The rules were designed to prevent the escape of con­
tainer-handling work from the docks to inland ware­
houses that did not use ILA labor. The NLRB’s deci­
sion was upheld in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the
Second Circuit. This paved the way for challenges in
other ports. Subsequent NLRB rulings affected the rules
in Baltimore and Hampton Roads.
Since the introduction of highly efficient cargo han­
dling techniques in the 1950’s, mainly involving con­
tainerization—shipping freight in standardized, easy-tohandle boxes—the conflict between job security and
economic efficiency has been the dominant factor in
longshore labor relations. The ILA reluctantly accept­
ed the containerization concept but insisted that the
consolidation of small shipments into a single contain­
er (stuffing) and also deconsolidation (stripping) be per­
formed by ILA labor. Factors such as decentralized
bargaining, a large surplus labor force, and interport
variations in dock facilities and trade composition com­
plicated attempts to reach a coastwide approach to
technological change. Over the years, however, a com­
plex system of rules on containers involving jurisdic­
tion, penalties, etc. resulted from trade-offs between la­
bor and management. As compensation for loss of work,
Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI) programs were es­
tablished in the last half of the 1960’s in the five major
North Atlantic Coast ports on a port-by-port basis
which guaranteed eligible workers a specified number
of hours of pay per year, varying by port, at an em­
ployee’s straight-time rate.
A major part of the ILA’s contract with management
was negated by the 1975 NLRB ruling and the union
in turn demanded a new form of job security in the
1977 round of bargaining unless the rules on containers
could be reinstated legally. A proposal surfaced to es­
tablish a coastwise GAI “feeder” fund which prompt­
ed employer associations outside New York to demand
that GAI not be discussed in any way in master con3

provided a financial backup in the event of a shortfall
in the GAI, pension, and welfare funds. If a carrier
moved from port to port, it continued to pay into the
same (JSP) fund which helped stabilize GAI, pension,
and welfare funds. A master contract, agreed to by the
ILA and North Atlantic Coast employers on Novem­
ber 13, 1977, permitted the ILA to refuse to handle
ships or cargoes of ocean carriers which did not sub­
scribe to JSP.
The legal situation with respect to Rules on Contain­
ers was clouded in 1979, when the U.S. Court of Ap­
peals for the District of Columbia Circuit overturned
NLRB rulings which had invalidated container rules
affecting the ports of New York, Baltimore, and Hamp­
ton Roads. The case was remanded to the NLRB for
any further action it deemed appropriate.

tract talks since it was not a master contract item. Fund­
ing costs for GAI varied from port to port, being high­
est in New York, and employer associations outside
New York preferred to fund their programs independ­
ently. New York’s high GAI benefits coupled with loss
of work due to that port’s high level of container op­
erations accounted for the higher costs. Since other em­
ployer associations refused to discuss GAI in master
contract talks, the NYSA voted to resign from
CONASA on 30 days’ notice as provided by CONASA
by-laws in order to allow itself greater freedom to ne­
gotiate on the demand for job security by the ILA. The
NYSA announced, however, that it would not act on
the resignation and would continue to negotiate joint­
ly with other CONASA members beyond the 30-day
period as long as prospects for a settlement of the dis­
pute over job security remained, and this position held
for more than 60 days.
On October 1, 1977, when the previous port agree­
ments expired, ILA members along the Atlantic and
Gulf Coasts began a partial strike directed against containerships and other forms of automated vessels.
The NYSA announced its resignation from CONASA
on October 22, after other CONASA members refused
to be parties to a job security offer made to the union
by ocean carriers. The NYSA and CONASA resolved
their differences over job security several weeks later,
but the NYSA remained independent. The resolution
of the job security dispute involved the establishment
of a Job Security Program (JSP) for ports from Maine
to Texas subscribed to by individual employer associ­
ations outside their normal agreements with the ILA.
JSP involved only ocean carriers and the union and




Method o f pay. Longshoremen are paid a basic rate
and receive 8 hours’pay at their straight-time (basic)
hourly rate of pay for a normal day. Penalty premiums
for handling specified cargoes (usually because they are
dangerous, onerous, or uncomfortable to handle) are
applied to the basic rate of pay. In some ports, skill
premiums now exist which also are added to basic rates.
In earlier years, nonsupervisory longshoremen in most
of the ports received the same rate of pay regardless of
the function performed. When penalty differentials or
skill differentials (where applicable), or both, are paid,
the overtime rate is one and one-half the basic rate and
differential(s). Some differentials may vary from port
to port. As mentioned earlier, guaranteed annual in­
come plans provide employees with minimum amounts
of pay.

4

Summary of Contract
Negotiations

October 1934-September 1951

the union factions. Findings of the Board included a
statement that “the collective (New York) agreement
was validly ratified and should remain in full force and
effect.” Further, the Board recommended the continu­
ation of the present system of having the entire Atlan­
tic Coast District vote on the Port of New York agree­
ment. The Regional Wage Stabilization Board approved
the contract on January 10, 1952.

The terms of the agreements negotiated since 1934
by the New York Shipping Association (NYSA) and
the New York locals of the International Longshore­
men’s Association (ILA) generally were adopted by
employers and union locals in the major North Atlan­
tic Coast ports. Each port, however, maintained its own
bargaining committees, which negotiated separate
agreements. In Boston, there was no written agreement
from 1935 to 1950, but terms under which men worked
were the same or substantially similar to those in other
ports.
During the October 1934-September 1951 period,
workers received 11 general wage increases, paid va­
cations were established and improved, and pension
plans were established in each port. Improvements also
were made in call-in pay and in premium pay for work
on Saturday and during mealtime.
Agreements, which became effective October 1,1949,
were to continue in force until September 30, 1951. One
reopening, on wages only, was permitted on or before
September 1, 1950. The pension agreements were to
continue in effect for 5 years.

October 1952-September 1953

The 2-year agreement between the ILA-AFL and
the NYSA was reopened in August 1952 for discussions
on general wage changes and other matters. When the
parties were unable to reach agreement, the matter was
referred to arbitration.
On November 25, 1952, the arbitrator released his
award which allowed a general wage increase, main­
tained overtime at time and one-half the applicable gen­
eral or penalty cargo rate, and raised most penalty rates
by the same amount as the general increase. Much of
the award was subject to Wage Stabilization Board
(WSB) approval. When the President of the United
States abolished the board on February 6, 1953, the
parties’ petition had not been acted on, but the order
ending controls permitted the immediate institution of
the changes that had been awaiting WSB action. There­
upon, the increase was put into effect in the New York
Harbor area as well as in the North Atlantic Coast ports
which followed the New York pattern.

October 1951-September 1952

Negotiations for a new contract to replace the agree­
ment scheduled to expire September 30, 1951, were be­
gun early in that month by the NYSA and the ILA.
Although the contract expired before negotiations were
completed, it was extended to prevent interruption in
dock operations.
By October 8, 1951, the Union Wage Scale Commit­
tee for the Atlantic Coast District and representatives
of the NYSA (comprised of about 175 operators) had
reached agreement on the terms of a 2-year contract to
be effective as of October 1, 1951. The new contract
provided for one wage reopening, in September 1952.
Ratification by the union membership was voted on
October 11. As in previous years, the New York agree­
ment established a pattern that was accepted by oper­
ators and local unions from Portland, Maine, to Hamp­
ton Roads, Virginia.
Subsequently, dissident local groups challenged the
validity of the contract, and the ensuing work stoppage
led to the appointment of a New York State Board of
Inquiry to investigate the claims and counterclaims of




October 1953-September 1962

For the ILA, this period was one of uncertainty,
characterized by the regulation of hiring activities by
the bistate Waterfront Commission of New York Har­
bor, strikes, legal actions, and representation elections.
Collective bargaining, particularly with the NYSA, was
influenced by developments ordinarily outside the scope
of industrial relations. The period was also highlighted
by expulsion of the union from the AFL in 1953, con­
ditional reaffiliation with the merged American Feder­
ation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations
(AFL-CIO) in 1959, and unconditional affiliation with
the AFL-CIO in January 1961.
In the fall of 1953, when the existing agreement was
scheduled to terminate, a representation challenge by
the newly chartered AFL International Brotherhood
5

of Longshoremen and other problems made negotia­
tions in the New York area impossible. However, ne­
gotiations proceeded in the other North Atlantic Coast
ports, and by early 1954, new 1-year agreements had
been reached in Baltimore, Boston, Hampton Roads,
and Philadelphia5 They provided an 8-cent-an-hour
.
general wage increase and an additional 2 cents an hour
for the welfare and insurance funds. In August 1954,
the ILA was certified as the collective bargaining agent
for the New York dockworkers after a long contest for
representation and a repeat election. In October, the
New York locals settled for an 8-cent-an-hour increase,
retroactive to October 1, 1953. The employers also
agreed to a 2-cent-an-hour increase in welfare payments,
effective April 1, 1954, in return for a 45-day no-strike
pledge, pending negotiations on a new contract.
On November 25, 1954, negotiations for a new 2-year
agreement were concluded by the NYSA, the other
port stevedoring associations, and the ILA. The tenta­
tive agreement, retroactive to October 1, 1954, provid­
ed for a 17-cent-an-hour package, the union shop, vir­
tual elimination of the shapeup,6 a no-strike no-lockout
clause, and grievance and arbitration machinery. The
agreement was rejected by the union membership on
December 10, primarily because of the no-strike and
arbitration clauses. By December 31, the union’s wage
scale committee approved a new 2-year agreement that
was essentially similar to the one rejected, but with
modifications in the controversial provisions and a guar­
antee that existing port practices would remain un­
changed. The agreement was ratified by the members,
on January 5, 1955, and signed on February 24, 1955.
The major deterrent to agreement in the 1956 nego­
tiations was the union’s insistence on a master contract
for all Atlantic and Gulf Coast ports. Earlier agree­
ments had been on a port-by-port basis, with the New
York contract setting the pattern. After prolonged ne­
gotiations and two contract extensions, some 60,000
longshoremen, in ports from Portland, Maine, to
Brownsville, Texas, went on strike November 16 to
protest the employers’ refusal to agree to an industry­
wide contract. The national emergency provisions of
the Labor Management Relations Act were invoked,
and 6 days after the strike began, a Board of Inquiry
was appointed. The November 24 report of the threeman board concluded that the union’s demand for an
industrywide contract had prevented agreement. How­
ever, paid holidays, improved vacations, an 8-hour work
guarantee, and limitations on sling loads were also listed
as disputed issues. By November 26, all longshoremen
were back at work under a 10-day Federal court re­
straining order, later extended to the full 80-day statu­
tory period and modified to provide that any negoti­
ated increases in wages, pensions, and welfare contri­
butions would be retroactive to October 1. In mid-De­
cember 1956, the same court, at the request of the Na­




tional Labor Relations Board (NLRB), issued a tempo­
rary injunction barring the union from industrywide
bargaining for Gulf and Atlantic Coast ports. With the
expiration of the 80-day injunction on February 12,

5Settlement was also reached at a number o f smaller ports not cov­
ered by this chronology.
6With the establishment o f the Waterfront Commission o f New
York Harbor by concurrent action o f the N ew York and N ew Jer­
sey legislatures in 1953, the longstanding “shape” system for hiring
longshoremen was modified. The need for reform was dramatically
pointed up by the findings o f a special committee appointed by the
Governor o f N ew York on the misuse o f hiring authority. The “shape”
continued to be used in other North Atlantic Coast ports except
Baltimore.
Although the commission’s responsibility was limited to the
elimination o f unsavory practices in the port area, the accomplish­
ment o f this objective required some regulation o f the individual
workers and o f hiring practices. Many o f the problems in the area ex­
isted only because o f the large excess o f workers over available jobs.
The commission’s approach to the problem was to require registration
o f all longshoremen and to refuse certification to individuals with
serious criminal records or with only irregular attachment to the in­
dustry.
In 1953, after the initial registration and some reduction in the
available labor force, the commission established a prevalidation hir­
ing system. Under this system, employers were required to submit ad­
vance lists o f permanent workers needed for a week and to inform the
commission o f needs for casual workers for the following day.
Employers were also required by their contract with the union to
notify the men on the day prior to commencement o f employment.
This applied to both the weekly and daily lists. Under the
commission’s rules, the list o f permanent employees could be extend­
ed from week to week and the daily list from day to day. Only workers
applying for fill-in jobs were required to report to the port employ­
ment offices.
By permitting hiring agents and others to expand the lists until ex­
cessive numbers o f men were eligible for jobs, the employers largely
invalidated the advantages o f the system.
A somewhat different approach, designed to rectify the deficiences
o f the prevalidation method, was instituted by the commission in
1955. Regulations issued by the commission required stevedores to
certify the names o f regular workers; these were posted at the pierhead
and in the employment center for the area. Stevedores hired men from
day to day at the pierhead and reported hiring information daily to the
area employment center where it was recorded. At the end o f each
month, stevedores removed from their lists the names o f workers who
had not been hired regularly. Regular gangs not employed at their own
pier, extra gangs, apd casuals were hired for fill-in work through the
commission’s employment centers.
Despite these measures, primary responsibility for fair employment
procedures rested on the representatives o f labor and management. A
measure o f this responsibility was met by the negotiation o f a quasiseniority system in 1955 that implemented the commission’s regula­
tions. Gangs or individuals who were attached to a particular pier or
who received preferred employment at locations where gangs were not
regularly used were designated as “ regulars” and given preferential
job rights. Gangs and individuals without such attachments were
designated as “ extras” and could be hired by a stevedore only after
the supply o f regular gangs and individuals had been exhausted.
“ Regulars” became “ extras” when work was not available at their
pier and they sought employment at other locations. “ Regulars”
working away from their home pier were obligated to return when
needed.

6

19577 the strike resumed in Middle and North Atlantic
,
ports; settlements had been reached in southern ports.
Five days later, the NYSA and the ILA signed an
agreement providing that all ports from Maine to Vir­
ginia would have uniform wages, hours, and employer
contributions to the welfare and pension funds. The
contract, which was to run to September 30, 1959, in­
creased wage rates 32 cents an hour over the 3-year
period and included a “one-shot” escalator provision.
Employer welfare contributions were increased 5 cents
an hour. Under the terms of the new agreement, local
negotiations were to deal with working conditions, va­
cations, holidays, and welfare and pension benefits. In
the negotiation for this agreement, the NYSA acted for
the industry under authorizations from the associations
in the other North Atlantic ports.
Late in 1958, a dispute arose between the NYSA and
the ILA, when union members refused to handle con­
tainers loaded away from the pier by non-ILA labor.
The dispute was referred to the port arbitrator when
the union extended its ban to all shipper-loaded con­
tainers handled by companies not using this system pri­
or to October 1,1956. A temporary solution was reached
when the NYSA assured the arbitrator that no loss of
jobs would result from the use of the containers during
the term of the contract. With this assurance, the union
agreed to handle containers for all companies using
them on November 12, 1958; however, companies not
using containers were to notify the union if they con­
templated such operations.
Since it was evident that the stevedoring industry
was changing, the parties also agreed on the need to
direct the course of automation and containerization in
the port so as to increase productivity without materi­
ally depressing the economic status of the longshore­
men. In addition, future expansion of containerization
was made the subject of negotiations to begin early in
1959.
In the negotiations which began January 5, 1959, the
union continued to be concerned with the direct effect
of containerization on the number of jobs and earning
power of its members, as well as its indirect effect on
the pension and welfare funds. The NYSA agreed in
principle that regular employees should be given some
indemnification for loss of job opportunities because of
containerization but demanded unrestricted use of con­
tainers and the sole right to determine the size of the
working force. The parties were unable to resolve their
differences, and containerization became a major issue
in bargaining for a new contract.
Negotiations on a new agreement, to replace the con­
tract due to expire September 30, 1959, began on Au­
gust 10. With the approach of the expiration day, it be­
came evident that a work stoppage was imminent. In
attempts to forestall a strike, the Secretary of Labor,
the Governor of New York, and the Mayor of New
York City each requested the parties to continue nego­



tiations. On September 30, the ILA and NYSA agreed
to a 15-day contract extension with the understanding
that adjustments in wage rates and contributions to the
welfare and pension funds would be retroactive to Oc­
tober 1.
On October 1, Gulf Coast ports were struck when
employers refused to agree to retroactivity; later in the
day, the walkout spread to the entire Atlantic Coast.
Some 70,000 workers were affected.
Six days later, a Taft-Hartley Board of Inquiry was
appointed by the President of the United States. On
October 7, the board reported that the unresolved is­
sues were “wage rates, procedures for installing me­
chanical devices and effecting containerization, gang
size, and certain fringe benefits, including pension,
health and welfare.” The following day, on application
of the NLRB, a Federal district court issued a tempo­
rary order restraining the union from striking, and on
October 17, this was extended for the full statutory
period.
The parties resumed negotiations on October 19,1959,
with a new employer proposal relating to containeriza­
tion which the union labeled inadequate. By November
4, the union had proposed royalty payments on con­
tainers and the NYSA had restated its earlier proposal
for a 25-cent-a-ton payment on containerized cargo
loaded off the doqks. Coupled with this, shippers wanted
the right to regulate the size of gangs. Both offers were
rejected.
On December 10, the ILA and the NYSA agreed on
a 3-year contract covering North Atlantic Coast ports.
It provided a 46-cent-an-hour package over the con­
tract period, with rates for handling general cargo in­
creased 12 cents an hour, retroactive to October 1, 1959,
and 5 cents more on October 1 of 1960 and 1961. A
paid holiday was to be added in each contract year,
bringing the total to 8 from 5. Eligibility requirements
for vacations were liberalized, and pension and welfare
contributions were increased.
On the issue of containerization, the parties agreed
to retain the standard gang size, to use ILA members
when containers were loaded and unloaded at the pier,
and to discuss further the question of penalty payments
for shipments loaded or unloaded off the pier. It was
agreed that the question of these penalty payments
would be submitted to arbitration if the parties could
not settle the problem.
In August 1960, when negotiations failed to produce
agreement, the issue was submitted to a board of arbi­
tration consisting of one member each representing la­
bor and management and an impartial chairman. The
board, on November 22, I960, handed down an award
that would indemnify ILA members for loss of work
resulting from the movement of containerized cargo
7 After extended legal proceedings, the NLRB on Jan. 15, 1961, or­
dered the case closed.

7

through the Port of New York. The award required
employers to pay into a jointly administered fund a
royalty for each ton of containerized cargo shipped,
with tha amount ranging from 35 cents to $1 per gross
ton, depending on the proportion of ship capacity fit­
ted for vans or containers. Payments into the fund were
made retroactive to July 1, 1960, and were to continue
for the duration of the existing collective bargaining
agreement, with the provision that either party could
seek adjustments on October 1, 1961. The method of
distributing the fund among the work force was to be
agreed upon by the parties. Although the award cov­
ered only the New York Shipping Association, all oth­
er associations and locals were urged to study the award
because of its effect on waterfront operations.8

and the Governors of New Jersey and New York that
negotiations were deadlocked and that a strike appeared
likely. The next day, September 12, both industry and
union officials sent telegrams to the President of the
United States alerting him of the impending strike.
On September 24, the FMCS proposed a 1-year ex­
tension of the 1959 contract coupled with a recommen­
dation of joint study of the disputed manpower utiliza­
tion and job security issues. The NYSA agreed to the
proposal on the same day, stipulating, however, that
any issues that could not be agreed to by the parties
after the study were to be settled by arbitration. The
proposal was rejected by the union. When the contracts
expired on October 1, 1962, some 50,000 ILA members
stopped work at Atlantic and Gulf Coast ports.
Hours after the strike started, President Kennedy ap­
pointed a three-member Board of Inquiry to review the
issues and to report to him by October 4. The board
reported that the parties were deadlocked over the is­
sue of gang size and that almost no progress had been
made toward an agreement. A 10-day Taft-Hartley re­
straining order was issued October 4, and longshore­
men in all ports returned to work October 6. A perma­
nent injunction issued on October 10, for the full stat­
utory period of 80 days deferred the stoppage until De­
cember 23.
Union members voted overwhelmingly on Decem­
ber 19, to reject the Shipping Association’s last contract
offer, which called for a reduction in the size of work
gangs by one man a year during the following 3 years
and a total wage increase of 27 cents an hour over a
3-year period.
On December 23, the injunction expired, and the
strike was resumed after the union had rejected a last
minute presidential request for a 90-day extension of
the strike deadline, and a special study of the disputed
issues by two committee—one, under the direction of
the Secretary of Labor, to study manpower utilization,
job security, and related issues, and another to recom­
mend settlements on all other matters.
Negotiations resumed on December 26. When agree­
ment was not reached by January 16, the President ap­
pointed a three-member special board to mediate the
dispute, and, if no contract settlement was reached by

October 1962-September 1964

Bargaining positions of the ILA Atlantic Wage Scale
Committee and the NYSA were established when ne­
gotiating sessions opened on June 13,1962.9The NYSA
had been authorized to represent the employers in oth­
er North Atlantic Coast ports during these negotiations
on the five points covered by the master agreement.
On June 13, the union demands included a key propo­
sal to reduce the workday from 8 to 6 hours with no
loss in pay. Other demands were for annual wage re­
openers, increases in pensions from $85 to $125 a month,
and an additional $2 an hour for all longshoremen who
moved cargoes on pallets.1 The total proposed increase
0
in wages and benefits was estimated by the union at 50
cents an hour over a 2-year period.
On June 16, the association presented its counterpro­
posals, including a wage increase of 22 cents an hour
and pension and welfare plan improvements in a 2-year
contract. All improvements were to be conditioned on
various changes in work rules, including flexibility in
switching gangs from one ship to another and a reduc­
tion in the size of gangs working general cargo.
On August 1, the association revised its wage offer
to include three 9-cent-an-hour wage increases to be
effective on September 30 of 1963, 1964, and 1965. The
proposal was rejected by union negotiators. By late Au­
gust, negotiations were concerned solely with the size
of work gangs. At this stage, the employers’ association
was asking a reduction from the standard 20-man gangs
to flexible ones ranging from 8 to 16 men. Throughout
August, the union refused to discuss the association’s
other proposals until the question of reduction of gang
size was withdrawn.
On August 23, the Director of the Federal Mediation
and Conciliation Service (FMCS) appointed a special
panel in an attempt to resolve the economic issues from
all East Coast ports from Maine to Virginia. The New
York City Department of Labor appointed representa­
tives to work with the panel. Negotiations resumed on
September 4, under the auspices of the FMCS. One
week later, the union notified the Secretary of Labor



8 Management in Boston and Baltimore accepted the principle o f a
containerization fund but did not agree on the details with the ILA.
Agreements in Hampton Roads and Philadelphia made no provisions
for a containerization fund.
’ After the 1959 contracts were signed, the Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service maintained continuous liaison with the parties
in an effort to avoid a crisis in 1962. In Jan. 1962, Federal mediators
met with top union and industry representatives and suggested that
bargaining get underway early. At that time, both sides undertook
studies in order to support their positions on several key bargaining
issues.
10At no time did the union open negotiations on the containeriza­
tion fund, although it had the right to do so under the provisions o f
the Nov. 22, 1960, arbitration award.

8

January 20, to propose action to Congress. On January
20, the board presented its recommendations to the par­
ties, and the union’s Atlantic Wage Scale Committee
accepted the board’s proposal. The NYSA accepted the
proposal 2 days later, and the union’s New York mem­
bership ratified the agreement on January 23. Long­
shoremen in other North Atlantic ports voted between
January 24 and 26 to accept agreements embodying
benefits similar to those provided in the New York set­
tlement. The 39-day strike, the longest in the history of
the North Atlantic longshore industry, officially ended
January 26 when the New York port workers returned
to their jobs. By January 28, all North Atlantic ports
had resumed operations.
The 2-year contracts included a 15-cent-an-hour gen­
eral wage increase retroactive to October 1, 1962, and
a 9-cent increase effective October 1, 1963. An addi­
tional paid holiday was to be observed beginning with
the second year of the contract, bringing the total to
nine. After 25 years of service, vested pension rights
were established and pension, health and welfare con­
tributions were increased. Both parties agreed to a U.S.
Department of Labor study of manpower utilization
and job security, after which they were to bargain on
disputed issues in the light of the findings. The parties
were to select an impartial board to make recommen­
dations for resolving any differences remaining on July
31, 1964. The parties also agreed to a study during the
first contract year to determine the feasibility of pro­
viding more comprehensive medical service with exist­
ing employer contributions.

to assist the parties in resolving the work practices issue.
At the second negotiating session on July 7, compa­
ny representatives proposed that talks be based on the
Labor Department report, but union negotiators refused
to proceed until they received a counteroffer from the
employers. One week later, the employers presented a
counteroffer of a 5-year agreement that included a wage
reopener after the third year, elimination of royalty
payments on containerized cargo, and the formation of
a joint committee to study the Labor Department re­
port. The union agreed to a joint committee study of
the Labor Department report.
Near the end of July, the Secretary of Labor select­
ed a three-man neutral board, as authorized by the Jan­
uary 1963 agreement between the parties, to help re­
solve issues in dispute. The board met with each party
and held joint sessions in the 2 months that followed.
Size of work gangs was one of the major issues; the
union indicated it might accept a reduction in gang size
in return for a guaranteed annual wage.
In the third month of negotiations, the NYSA pro­
posed that all unresolved issues be submitted to final
and binding arbitration, but ILA members rejected that
proposal. The neutral board then presented the parties
with its recommendations including a phased reduction
in the size of work gangs, a guaranteed annual wage
plan, greater flexibility in the assignment of work, and
curtailment of new entrants into the longshore labor
force.
On September 30, the last day of the agreement, the
union served notices that it would not work without a
contract. Negotiations ceased and the President appoint­
ed a three-man Board of Inquiry under the Taft-Hartley Act to investigate the situation. The next day, 60,000
ILA members at Atlantic and Gulf Coast ports went
on strike. The President obtained a 10-day restraining,
order which was subsequently extended to an 80-day
injunction to halt the the strike. Work practices consti­
tuted the major area of disagreement; two of the key
issues were employer demands for greater flexibility in
the assignment of work to cargo checkers and union
demands for retention of the standard 20-man gangs.
The Assistant Secretary of Labor suggested in late
November that the parties agree on a 1-year contract
covering wages and wage-related benefits and contin­
ue negotiations on unresolved manpower issues. Union
negotiators accepted the proposal, but the companies
rejected it.
Four days before the expiration of the 80-day injunc­
tion on December 20, the NYSA and ILA reached
agreement subject to a vote of the ILA membership on
January 8, 1965. The 4-year contract was to provide
for wage increases of 10 cents an hour retroactive to
October 1, 1964, 10 cents in 1965, and 8 cents in 1966
and 1967. Other improvements included the addition of
3 paid holidays, 4 weeks’ vacation after 12 years’ serv­
ice, increased company contributions to the health and

October 1964-September 1968

Proposals for a new agreement were drafted at an
ILA conference convened in New York City on June
16, 1964. Delegates supported three major demands, a
guaranteed annual wage, return of hiring halls to joint
union-management control from the Waterfront Com­
mission, and abolishment of the register used for licens­
ing of additionsl dockworkers.
On June 25, union negotiators formally presented the
demands to the NYSA. Economic provisions in the
proposed 3-year agreement included wage increases of
15 cents in the first year and 10 cents in the second and
third years, three additional paid holidays, increased
vacation time, a guaranteed 8-hour day for 9 hours’
pay, liberalized pension benefits, and increased employ­
er contributions to provide improved health benefits.
The parties then recessed for 2 weeks to allow the em­
ployers time to study the proposals.
During the recess, the parties met with the Assistant
Secretary of Labor for Labor-Management Relations
to receive the manpower utilization and job security
study of the Port of New York prepared by the U.S.
Department of Labor as a result of the settlement of
January 1963. Similar reports were to be issued for all
major ports, the intention being to provide a useful tool



9

wages, hours, employer contributions to the welfare
and pension funds (but not the benefits to be provided
by the different welfare and pension plans), and the
length of the contract. Settlement on these issues, gen­
erally referred to as the master agreement, then were
incorporated into local agreements. Negotiations on
working conditions, holidays, vacations, and other mat­
ters were conducted at the local level.
On August 7, the NYSA offered a 48-cent-an-hour
wage increase over the term of a 4-year contract and
stated that it was authorized to bargain only on provi­
sions of the master agreement for the North Atlantic
district, and on a container provision for Baltimore.
Bargaining continued through September 20 on
wages, pensions, and a guaranteed income. Little head­
way was made on any of the issues, and the Executive
Board of the ILA voted to strike on October 1, if agree­
ment was not reached by September 30. The President
of the United States, on September 24, directed the Un­
der Secretary of Labor to assist in mediating the dispute.
On September 26, the international president of the
ILA stated that the employers, represented by the
NYSA, either had to agree to let the union load and
unload containers or had to pay a royalty that was ad­
equate to finance a pension and welfare plan considered
satisfactory by the union. Because of the considerable
savings in man-hours possible with containerships, the
union maintained that hourly pension and welfare con­
tributions would have to be much higher to finance
these benefits at current levels. The NYSA had pro­
posed earlier that the ILA load and unload containers
consolidated within the port area, but the union rejected
this offer fearing that container consolidating operations
would be opened outside of the port area.
With a strike imminent, the President of the United
States declared on September 30, that a stoppage would
imperil the national health and safety, and he appoint­
ed a three-member Board of Inquiry under the provi­
sions of the Labor Management Relations Act. This
marked the seventh time that Atlantic Coast longshore­
men were involved in a “national emergency” dispute.
Last minute efforts to avoid a strike failed, and work­
ers in New York began leaving their jobs before the
September 30 midnight deadline.
On October 1, about 46,000 longshoremen in Atlan­
tic and Gulf Coast ports were on strike, and the Board
of Inquiry met in New York with employer and union
representatives. The board reported to the President
that there were “...two overriding issues, and the fail­
ure to resolve these has prevented the parties from
reaching agreement on other items.” The two issues
were unionwide collective bargaining and the problems
of containerization. The President then requested that
the Attorney General seek to end the strike, and a tem­
porary restraining order was obtained from the U.S.
District Court for the Southern District of New York.

welfare and clinic funds, and liberalized pension bene­
fits. Of major importance was the agreement on reduc­
tion of general cargo gang size from 20 men to 18 on
April 1, 1966, and to 17 men on October 1, 1967, and
agreement on the establishment of a guaranteed work
year to provide eligible workers with 1,600 hours of
work or pay each year.
In the days that followed the expiration of the TaftHartley injunction, sporadic walkouts took place at sev­
eral major ports. On January 8, 1965, the ILA mem­
bership voted to reject the agreement reached in late
December and 3 days later went on strike for the sec­
ond time. ILA officials saw confusion and incomplete
information among members as reasons for rejection of
the agreement. After a period of informational meet­
ings, a second vote was held on a port-by-port basis.
New York dockworkers accepted the contract on Jan­
uary 28, 1965. The other major North Atlantic ports
resumed operations by the end of February, subsequent
to local negotiations which modified the agreement pre­
viously rejected.
The contracts were to remain in effect through Sep­
tember 30, 1968.
October 1968-September 1971

A 2-month longshore strike in the Port of New York,
the longest in its history, was ended on February 14,
1969, when members of the ILA ratified a 3-year agree­
ment that had been reached tentatively about a month
earlier with the NYSA. A ratification vote was delayed
pending ILA contract settlements at other ports in an
attempt to obtain uniformity of collective bargaining
agreements throughout the North Atlantic district, but
this tactic was enjoined by a Federal district court. The
NYSA—ILA contract set the pattern for Atlantic and
Gulf Coast ports and was a key factor in ending strikes
which involved about 46,000 workers from Maine to
Texas.
Bargaining began on July 10, 1968, when negotiations
to replace the contract expiring on September 30 were
opened by the ILA and NYSA. The union proposed a
2-year agreement, the provisions of which were to ap­
ply uniformly to the five major North Atlantic Coast
ports. The uniform demands included the elimination
of simultaneous loading and unloading of containerships; granting of exclusive rights to pack and unpack
containers away from piers, except those with a man­
ufacturer’s label; and the establishment of 17-man work
gangs, the size of gangs in New York. The demands
also included a total wage increase of $2.38 an hour
over the contract term, a 6-hour workday, a $125 in­
crease in the monthly pension benefit, a guaranteed an­
nual income of 2,080 hours at straight-time rate, and
improved welfare benefits.
In previous contract talks, the NYSA had been au­
thorized to bargain for employers in New York, Balti­
more, Boston,1 Hampton Roads, and Philadelphia on
1



11A written agreement had not been signed in Boston since 1959.

10

would be forced to reject a contract if other employer
associations were to do the same.
Talks were reopened in New York on December 23,
and the ILA demanded that the master agreement spec­
ify that a reasonable guaranteed annual income be ne­
gotiated in other ports. A day later, the Boston Ship­
ping Association notified mediators that it would nego­
tiate only a local contract.
After failure of the NYSA and ILA to reach agree­
ment on the jurisdiction of the ILA in stripping and
loading of containers and hiring practices under the
guaranteed income plan, the NYSA appealed to the
President on January 8 to refer the dock strike to Con­
gress as provided for under the Taft-Hartley Act.
A major breakthrough in bargaining occurred on Jan­
uary 10, when top labor and management officials
reached agreement on the'container clause and hiring
practices under the guaranteed income plan. Several
days later, the total contract was reviewed by all New
York parties, and ILA approval was given to the new
container clause, which protected local ports from the
threat of losing work to New York.
On January 14, tentative agreement was reached on
a 3-year agreement for the Port of New York, but rat­
ification by the workers was deferred pending settle­
ment at other ports. Terms of the pact included a gen­
eral wage increase retroactive to October 1, 1968, of
38 cents an hour and deferred increases of 25 cents in
1969 and 35 cents in 1970; an additional paid holiday
in 1970 and eased eligibility requirements for holidays;
and fifth and sixth weeks of vacation in 1968 and 1969,
respectively. Pension improvements included an in­
creased basic benefit of $300 a month; a $25-a-month
increase in the basic benefit for those already retired;
allowance for early retirement if the employee elected
to retire within 1 of 2 option periods at $250 a month
at age 55 and 20 years of service, the amount to be in­
creased to $300 at age 62; and an increase in the dis­
ability benefit to $180 a month plus $12 a month for
each year o f service over 15, up to a maximum total
benefit of $300. Pensions for widows were increased
and employer contributions to the pension and health
and welfare plans were to be increased in three stages.
In addition, the guaranteed annual income plan was im­
proved to provide a minimum of 2,080 hour’ pay. Trav­
el pay was eliminated for those hired in the industry
after September 30, 1968.
Bargaining was continued for other ports and the
ILA demanded the full New York package for Phila­
delphia. Employers in Philadelphia agreed to the same

October 9 was the date set for a hearing on a TaftHartley injunction.
Longshoremen returned to work at all ports on Oc­
tober 3, and on October 9, the restraining order was
extended. An injunction was obtained on October 16
to be effective until 7:05 p.m., December 20.
Negotiations were reopened on October 30 with ILA
demands for uniform basic containerization and job se­
curity provisions for all Atlantic and Gulf Coast ports.
The NYSA, speaking for New York employers, previ­
ously had made an offer of a 2,080-hour guaranteed an­
nual income, but employers at other ports said that they
could not afford such an offer. On November 1, the
NYSA proposed a 3-year package estimated at $1.01
an hour over the contract term for wages, and liberal­
ized pension and welfare benefits, as well as an im­
proved income guarantee, but the ILA disapproved the
offer. The union was dissatisfied with the failure to ne­
gotiate a single North Atlantic district agreement, the
size of the money package, and the retirement
provisions.
The Board of Inquiry reported to the President on
November 30 that the positions of the parties had not
changed since its first report, and that none of the is­
sues had been resolved.
Talks continued in mid-December after the union
membership rejected the NYSA’s November 1 offer in
a ballot conducted by the NLRB. A tentative oral agree­
ment reportedly was reached for the North Atlantic
district providing about a $1.60-an-hour wage and benefit package1 increase over 3 years, the right to pack
2
and unpack containers with cargoes consolidated with­
in 50 miles of New York, and a guaranteed annual in­
come of 2,080 hours. The union rejected this offer,
however, primarily because the container provision did
not prevent freight forwarders in other ports from ship­
ping through New York, thereby causing a decrease in
employment in these ports. Philadelphia and Boston
longshoremen representatives also stated their disap­
proval of a provision that would end a policy of “one
port down, all ports down.”
Negotiations centering on containerization and sup­
plemental benefit provisions continued. Employers in
the ports of Philadelphia and Boston would not offer
the same provisions as New York, Baltimore, and Hamp­
ton Roads, contending that improved supplemental ben­
efits would have to be paid for by increased produc­
tivity through automation.1
3
On December 20, the talks ended without agreement,
and the strike by some 46,000 workers was resumed
when the injunction expired.
A day later, employers in Philadelphia and Boston
stated that they could commit their support to only a
part of the total money package offered by the NYSA,
and that the NYSA and ILA were overstepping their
authority. Employers in Baltimore indicated that they




1 This was the figure for N ew York which included an amount re­
2
quired to grant additional holiday and vacation benefits. Since terms
o f holidays and vacations were negotiated locally, the package
amounts would vary by port.
1 Container facilities were established in Apr. 1969 in Philadelphia
3
when full container ships began using port facilities.

11

October 1971-September 1974

wage increases and pension and health and welfare ben­
efit contributions as in New York, but objected to the
increased vacation costs and guaranteed annual income
plan.
On January 23, the union was warned by the NYSA
that it might be in violation of the Taft-Hartley Act by
not submitting the New York contract to the workers
for a vote. At this time, employers in Philadelphia of­
fered three contract packages, but these were declined
by the union.
Agreement on holiday and vacation benefits was
reached in Baltimore on January 26, but the union turned
down a guaranteed annual income of 1,800 hours. Set­
tlement was reached in Hampton Roads several days
later on a guaranteed income.
Members of the NYSA agreed on February 4 to with­
draw their unratified contract if longshoremen did not
return to work. In the meantime, negotiators in Phila­
delphia agreed on wage and most supplementary issues,
and container provisions, but agreement could not be
reached on eligibility for a fifth and sixth week of va­
cation and work schedules.
In an attempt to get the New York contract ratified,
the NYSA filed an unfair labor practice suit against the
ILA on February 7. The NLRB then petitioned the
U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New
York to order longshoremen back to work in the Port
of New York. The court denied the request, however,
and instead ordered the ILA to hold an election by
February 14. New York longshoremen ratified the con­
tract on February 14 and returned to work the follow­
ing day.
Settlements were ratified by the workers for the ports
of Baltimore and Hampton Roads on February 21, and
for Philadelphia 2 days later. The pacts were similar to
the NYSA—ILA agreement, except for the amount al­
lowed under the guaranteed annual income plan, that
they did not allow for the early retirement newly-es­
tablished in New York, and other modifications. The
minimum income was set at 1,800 hours’ pay effective
April 1, 1969, in Philadelphia and October 1, 1969, in
Baltimore, and 1,600 and 1,700 hours’ pay in Hampton
Roads effective October 1, 1969, and 1970, respective­
ly. (The guarantee was new to Baltimore and Hampton
Roads.) Longshoremen returned to work shortly after
ratification in each case.
A late agreement was reached in Boston on April 2,
1969, where employers demanded concessions in work
rules in exchange for higher wages, benefits, guaran­
teed annual wage, and a container clause. The Boston
contract also was similar to the one for New York and
included the guaranteed wage of 2,080 hours’ pay. Work
was resumed on April 2.1
4
The contracts were scheduled to remain in effect
through September 30, 1971.




Bargaining goals for new contract talks for North
Atlantic and also South Atlantic and Gulf ports were
approved by representatives of all port ILA locals at a
National Wage Scale Conference held in Washington,
D.C., in May 1971. A list of tentative demands previ­
ously had been circulated to the union membership,
management, government, and other interested parties.
The approved demands, while calling for substantial
wage and benefit improvements, emphasized job secu­
rity and income maintenance to ease the impact of re­
duced work opportunities due to the increasing mech­
anization of freight handling. The union also expressed
hope that some progress could be made towards its
continuing goal of establishing a national agreement
covering all ports from Maine to Texas, and extending
to Puerto Rico and, eventually, the Great Lakes.
During the ILA’s convention in Miami Beach in midJuly, ILA President Gleason said that money issues
would not prevent an early settlement if job security
items could be agreed to. This concern over declining
work opportunities was voiced against a backdrop of
similar problems on the West Coast which had led to
a strike by 15,000 members of the International Long­
shoremen’s and Warehousemen’s Union (ILWU) after
the July 1 expiration of their coastwise pact-1
5
Talks for a new master agreement for the ports of
Baltimore, Boston, Hampton Roads, New York, and
Philadelphia began in mid-August. In addition, for the
first time, Providence longshore workers were to be
brought under the master contract.1 A new employer
6
group, the Council of North Atlantic Shipping Associ­
ations (CONASA), was established in 1970 to bargain
for management in the six ports on items such as wages,
hours, length of contract, containerization, LASH
(lighter aboard ship), and employer contributions to the
welfare and pension plans (but not welfare and pension
benefits).1 Both parties had expressed a desire that lo­
7
cal bargaining on holidays, vacations, working condi­
tions, and other local issues be completed swiftly to al­
low a peaceful settlement.
1 See U.S. Department o f Labor, Bureau o f Labor Statistics, N a­
4
tional Emergency Disputes, Bulletin 1633 (1969), for a more detailed
account o f the issues that resulted in work stoppages in Atlantic and
Gulf Coast ports and efforts made by the parties and Federal officials
to resolve these disputes.
1 See Wage Chronology: Pacific Maritime Association and Internation­
5
al Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, 1934-78, BLS Bulletin
1960 (1977), for difficulties encountered in negotiating an agreement
covering longshore workers on the West Coast as well as for terms
o f the resulting 1972 settlement.
16This chronology, however, relates specifically to the five ports
previously covered by the master agreement.
17The NY SA previously had been authorized to bargain for the
other four North Atlantic District ports (not Providence) on these
master contract items (except container rules) after which such terms
were incorporated into local agreements.

12

The start of local talks was delayed by the ILA’s in­
sistence that the guaranteed annual income plan (GAI)
be considered as an item under the master agreement,
while the CONASA wanted it to continue to be nego­
tiated locally. Management, in turn, wanted the union
to end its policy of “one port down, all ports down”
in the case of local disputes over local issues, including
the GAI. The parties did not press these demands fur­
ther and local bargaining began in early September.
As the September 30 expiration date neared, ILA
President Gleason told delegates to meetings of the At­
lantic Coast District Wage Scale Committee in New
York City that the union’s members should continue
working until after the end of the Federal Government’s
90-day wage-price-rent freeze (in effect since August
15) if the steamship carriers would agree to extend the
agreements until after the freeze. The NYSA, howev­
er, refused a contract extension because it would have
meant continuance of the GAI plan which employers
considered too expensive. Specifically, the NYSA
wanted the plan modified so that longshore workers
who repeatedly refused work would be made ineligible
for guarantee benefits. After refusal of the NYSA to
extend the pact, the ILA ordered its members to strike.
The strike began in New York on October 1 and
quickly spread to other ports from Maine to Texas and
to the Great Lakes; 45,000 longshore workers were in­
volved, 28,000 in CONASA ports. This strike, com­
bined with the West Coast walkout, created the first
coast-to-coast longshore strike in the Nation’s history.
The tie-up prompted President Nixon to seek injunc­
tions to end the West Coast and Great Lakes disputes,
the latter on the grounds that it would have an untime­
ly effect on grain shipments.1 It was hoped that the
1
East and Gulf Coast disputes could be resolved through
collective bargaining since they were less than a week
old at the time the requests for injunctive relief were
made. A five-member Board of Inquiry, appointed on
October 4 by the President under authority of the TaftHartley Act, had recommended this course of action.
A temporary restraining order was obtained on Oc­
tober 6 to halt the ILWU strike pending hearings on
the full 80-day injunction, which was subsequently ob­
tained, to expire December 25.1 An injunction to end
9
the Great Lakes walkout was denied. East and Gulf
Coast longshore workers also were enjoined on No­
vember 26 from striking under a Taft-Hartley injunc­
tion which would expire on February 14, 1972.
On January 6, tentative agreement on a new 3-year
master contract was reached between the ILA, its At­
lantic Coast District, and CONASA which became the
pattern for South Atlantic and Gulf ports. The pact
was subject to approval by the Pay Board under Phase
II of the Federal economic stabilization program, and
would be retroactive to November 14, 1971, with a 70cent-an-hour general wage increase on that date and
deferred increases of 40 cents each in both 1972 and




1973. Over the term of the pact, employer contributions
would be increased for the pension and welfare plans
by 47 cents and 30.5 cents an hour, respectively. A sec­
ond container royalty of 35 cents, 70 cents, or $1 per
ton of container cargo (depending upon the proportion
of ship capacity fitted for vans or containers) was es­
tablished to finance pension and welfare benefits (as de­
termined locally) other than supplemental cash pay­
ments. This royalty was in the same amounts as the ex­
isting container royalty. Shippers who violated terms
of the container provisions would be assessed a fine of
$1,000 per container (was $250).
Tentative agreement for about 17,500 workers was
reached on local issues by the ILA and NYSA on Feb­
ruary 3. A key element in this pact was the revision of
eligibility requirements for GAI benefits so that those
who repeatedly refused work would ultimately be dis­
qualified for such benefits. The annual pledge to the
GAI fund was reduced, but trustees of the fund would
be allowed to borrow from banks to cover any short­
fall in funds required for GAI payments. A guarantee
of $2 million a year towards supplemental income pay­
ments was to be paid by management into the Royalty
Fund in lieu of travel pay.
Pensions were improved by increasing the basic ben­
efit to $400 and the disability benefit to $240 plus $16
for each year of service over 15 (to a combined maxi­
mum of $400). Benefits for those already receiving pen­
sions also were increased. The pact also provided for
a “one-shot” early retirement pension for eligible work­
ers who applied for such retirement by a specified date.
This early retirement was expected to reduce what em­
ployers considered an excessive number of longshore
workers in relation to the amount of work available. In
addition to the pension and welfare contributions set
by the ILA-CONASA master agreement, the second
container royalty was to be allocated to the pension
fund in the second and third contract years and to the
welfare and clinic funds in the first year.
The NYSA-ILA Fringe Benefits Escrow Fund was
established, into which all assessments would be depos­
ited for welfare and clinics, GAI, $2 million in lieu of
travel time, and vacation and holiday payments. This
was a “feeder” fund without legal status and was to be
liquidated at the end of each benefit year. Pension con­
tributions would be deposited directly into the NYSAILA Pension Trust Fund. To maintain the current lev­
el of benefits, a special work-hour/tonnage assessment
(less any container royalties collected) was to be put

“The President had indicated earlier that the need for an injunction
would be questionable as long as the strike was confined to the West
Coast.
1
9 The ILWU and Pacific Maritime Association later agreed to a
contract extension until Jan. 17 at which time their strike resumed.
An agreement for these workers was ratified in mid-Feb., and they
returned to work.

13

into the Fringe Benefits Escrow Fund to be allocated
as needed, except that portion of the assessment marked
as pension contributions.
A formal agreement would not be signed for New
York, however, until negotiations could be completed
for the other five CONASA ports, where the major is­
sue was the GAI. With the approaching expiration of
the Taft-Hartley injunction, ILA President Gleason an­
nounced that the union would agree to continue work­
ing until March 14 under extension of the old contracts.
A March 8, ratification vote was held for all Atlan­
tic and Gulf Coast ports. New York, Boston, and Hamp­
ton Roads longshore workers ratified their pacts but
workers in Philadelphia and Baltimore rejected theirs,
chiefly because of dissatisfaction over the local GAI
levels. Local issues were resolved in Baltimore on
March 15 just before a strike deadline, but workers
were off the job the next day until 7 p.m. for a union
briefing on settlement terms. In Philadelphia, a 2-week
strike that began March 15 ended with the March 29
ratification of an agreement reached March 24.
In Baltimore, the GAI was increased to 1,900 hours
per contract year with payments to be made quarterly
in the first contract year and twice a month beginning
in the second contract year. In Hampton Roads, GAI
was to be paid biweekly beginning in 1971 and was to
be increased to 1,800 hours effective August 1972. In
Philadelphia, the GAI payments were to be made
monthly beginning October 1972.
During the term of the agreements (November 14,
1971, through September 30, 1974), basic and disability
pensions were increased in Baltimore (for those meet­
ing qualifications established April 1, 1969), Hampton
Roads, and Philadelphia, to the same amounts as agreed
to in New York (increases were smaller for basic and
disability benefits in Baltimore for those who retired
with the qualifications in effect before April 1969), and
spouses’ benefits also were increased. For these ports,
various increases were made in benefits for those al­
ready receiving pensions. Additionally, in Baltimore ef­
fective January 1, 1973, early retirement would allow
a benefit of either $350 a month until age 62 and $400
thereafter, or $300 for life, depending upon which set
of age and service requirements was met.
On May 8, the Pay Board pared the first-year wage
increase for the 45,000 Atlantic and Gulf Coast long­
shore workers by 15 cents an hour, to 55 cents. Ap­
proval of a second-year increase was conditional upon
implementation of work rules that resulted in higher
productivity. Labor and management then requested
reconsideration of the Board’s May 8 decision, assert­
ing that the savings resulting from increased produc­
tivity would allow the increase without violating the
Pay Board’s guidelines of 5.5 percent. This appeal, how­
ever, was rejected on June 6.
ILA President Gleason, and CONASA and NYSA
President Dickman, on June 26, 1972, requested ap­




proval of the CONASA-ILA agreement, also dated
June 26, 1972, which was modified to comply with the
earlier Pay Board objections. The parties agreed to
modify the first-year wage adjustment to 55 cents an
hour; the second-year adjustment was kept at 40 cents.
It was subsequently agreed that the retroactive pay­
ments would be paid in a lump sum.
In mid-May 1974, following expiration of Federal
wage-price controls on April 30, the ILA and CONASA
agreed to a wage increase of 15 cents an hour, to be
effective June 1, 1974. This increase was the same
amount cut by the Pay Board in 1972.
Rules on containers. During the 1971 contract negoti­
ations, the ILA had been very much concerned with
adopting methods which would assure compliance with
the Rules on Containers. The rules, which were first
codified in the NYSA-ILA collective bargaining agree­
ment in 1968, had been developing since 1958. The rules
basically provided that:
(A) ILA longshoremen shall have the right to stuff
and strip, at the piers and terminals, containers made
up of goods of more than one shipper (LTL or con­
tainer loads) which come from or go to points within
50 miles of a port, to or from persons who are not the
beneficial owners of the cargo, and
(B) All other containers shall be moved without re­
striction, i.e., all containers which come or go to a point
more than 50 miles from a port or which contain the
goods of one shipper who is the beneficial owner of
the cargo may come on to the docks and go off the
docks without being stuffed or stripped by ILA
longshoremen.2
0
In the 1971 negotiations, the NYSA rules were adopt­
ed as the CONASA-ILA Rules on Containers with
some modifications. Even after the agreement was
signed, however, the ILA continued to protest that the
rules were being violated because of the growing num­
ber of off-pier consolidators who were taking away,
traditional ILA work. The ILA took the position that
all of these contract violations would cease if the car­
riers would not supply their containers to the consoli­
dators, and in November 1972, the ILA took the firm
position that supplying containers to consolidators was
a violation of the contract.
The CONASA-ILA Committee on Containers met
in Dublin, Ireland, in January 1973, to discuss propo­
sals for the enforcement of the Rules on Containers.
The resulting document—Interpretive Bulletin No. 1,
known as the “Dublin Rules’’—was adopted. The par­
ties agreed that the Dublin Rules were the means nec­
essary to prevent violations of the contract.
The contracts were scheduled to remain in effect
through September 30, 1974.
20 Containers consisting entirely o f U.S. mail, household furniture,
or military effects and containers loaded by a producer’s own em­
ployees were exempted.

14

of $450. Pensions were increased by $25 a month for
those who retired before October 1, 1974.
Discussions in other North Atlantic ports continued.
In Baltimore and Hampton Roads, workers sought 2,080
hours’ guaranteed annual pay. In Boston, workers
sought to continue a GAI of 2,080 hours; employers
wanted the GAI structured so that payments would be
reduced if the funding level, based on a tonnage con­
tributions, fell below a certain amount. Employers also
wanted greater control of work assignments.
In a ratification vote held August 21, workers in
North Atlantic ports ratified their contracts, except Bal­
timore and Boston where the GAI remained at issue.
Baltimore workers ratified their pact about 2 weeks
later. In Baltimore and Hampton Roads, the existing
GAI levels were continued. All of the approved agree­
ments added Christmas Eve as a paid holiday. Employ­
ers in Boston still were reluctant to meet the union’s
GAI demand because there reportedly were as many
pensioners as workers, and therefore, all container roy­
alties had to be allocated to pension financing.
In Boston, when agreement on the GAI could not
be reached by a strike deadline there of May 30, 1975,
workers went on strike. The walkout ended a month
later when workers approved, on June 29, an agree­
ment which provided for a GAI of 1,500 hours’ pay.2
1
The pact also allowed shippers to schedule around-theclock container terminal operations with shifts begin­
ning as late as 11 p.m. Funding of the GAI was “openended” in that a fixed royalty was not set, but rather
enough sums per long ton (2,240 pounds) sufficient to
keep the fund solvent. As indicated earlier, management
had wanted the GAI structured so that payments would
be reduced if the funding level, based on tonnage con­
tributions, fell below a certain amount, while the union
wanted the GAI maintained regardless of the tonnage
handled.
During the contracts’ term, pensions were increased
in Philadelphia to the same amounts as for New York
and were also improved in Hampton Roads and Bos­
ton. Baltimore pensions were to be increased substan­
tially in 1976.

October 1974-September 1977

On June 21, 1974, agreement was reached on a 3-year
master contract between CONASA employers and the
ILA. This settlement enabled parties in the various ports
to concentrate bargaining on local issues. The
CONASA-ILA pact covered about 25,000 workers and
became the nucleus for bargaining for another 15,000
workers in South Atlantic and Gulf Coast ports.
Bargaining for the master contract had begun on
March 27, 1974, well in advance of the contract expi­
ration date of September 30. It was hoped that an ear­
ly agreement on master contract items would allow am­
ple time for negotiating local settlements before the ex­
piration date. The union sought a 1-year pact which
would raise the basic wage rate to $8 an hour and es­
tablish a cost-of-living escalator clause. Contributions
to the welfare and pension funds would be increased.
A major union concern was job security. The union
said that 16,000 ILA jobs had been lost over the last 6
years due to increased use of laborsaving methods of
freight handling, primarily containerization, and it
sought to tighten work rules on handling container and
other types of cargo loading operations as well, to help
offset this trend.
Terms of the master agreement provided for increases
in the basic wage rate of 70 cents an hour on October
1, 1974, 60 cents on October 1, 1975, and 60 cents Oc­
tober 1, 1976, bringing the rate to $8 an hour. Employ­
ers’ contributions to the welfare and pension funds were
increased over the life of the contract by 33 and 49
cents per hour worked, respectively. The Rules on Con­
tainers were expanded and spelled out in greater detail.
A tentative agreement on local issues for the Port of
New York’s 14,000 workers was reached on July 10.
Shippers had sought a cut in the guaranteed annual in­
come (GAI) because of its high cost, which shippers
said was diverting cargo to other ports and areas. Over
700 employees reportedly were regularly receiving GAI
benefits. Although the 2,080 hours’ GAI was main­
tained, changes were made to reduce the cost. One such
innovation was a lump-sum payment to induce GAI-eligible workers who were age 65 as of October 1, 1974,
and eligible for a pension to retire. This same opportu­
nity was offered to workers eligible for the GAI who
were age 65 as of October 1, 1975, and also eligible for
a pension at this time. In both cases, if such individuals
did not retire, they would no longer be eligible for GAI
payments. In addition, disqualification for GAI benefits
would be swifter for those who did not make them­
selves available for work or refused work.
Christmas Eve was added as a paid holiday. For new
retirees, the regular pension benefit was increased to
$450, $475, or $500 a month, for 25, 30, and 35 years
of service, respectively, and the disability benefit was
increased to $270 for 15 years of service plus $18 for
each year of service over 15 to a combined maximum




Rules on containers. The ILA announced on March
26, 1975, that it wanted to reopen negotiations on the
Rules on Containers which were a crucial part of the
6-month-old CONASA-ILA agreement, as permitted
by Rule 8 of the container rules, because of continuing
“violations” by some containership operators. Of key
concern to the union was the diversion of cargo from
North Atlantic Coast ports by the increasing use of
2
1 The new guarantee was to apply to all workers who were paid
for 700 hours in the 1973-74 contract year, although subsequent de­
cisions on an individual basis extended G A I eligibility to some other t
workers.

15

stuffing and stripping, thus bypassing ILA longshore
workers. An Administrative Law Judge of the NLRB
found that the ILA had a valid work preservation ob­
ject, and therefore, there was no violation of the Na­
tional Labor Relations Act as charged. Upon appeal to
the NLRB, however, this decision was reversed, and
both the NYSA and the ILA were ordered to cease
and desist from maintaining the rules in their agree­
ments with respect to all off-pier facilities.
The NLRB’s decision was affirmed and ordered en­
forced by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second
Circuit on June 29, 1976. A petition for a rehearing by
the full court (en banc) was denied on August 6, 1976.
The NYSA and the ILA then filed a petition for a writ
of certiorari seeking review by the Supreme Court of
the United States, on October 22, 1976. There were
several other similar or related charges pending before
regional offices of the NLRB in various stages of ad­
ministrative and judicial processing or litigation.
The ILA and CONASA later agreed to review their
master agreement with the key intention of revising
portions of the pact relating to the container work rules
that were upset by the NLRB decision and court rul­
ing.2 A joint statement issued by the parties on August
3
20 declared that “both sides have worked too hard for
stability and peace to let it be undermined by uncer­
tainties created by the court decision,” and that the pact
should be renegotiated.
Such negotiations began on August 24 and an “ad­
dendum” to the master agreement, designed to stimu­
late work and job opportunities, was announced on Oc­
tober 6, 1976. The addendum built upon provisions of
an interim agreement to channel more cargo to the
docks and to provide surveys and other data to gauge
the impact of the court ruling on longshore workers.
A legal remedy would, however, still be pursued
through the Supreme Court.
The addendum called on employers to encourage
movement of “all mini-bridge LTL (less-than-trailerload) container cargo through waterfront facilities in
each CONASA port” and use workers covered by
CONASA-ILA agreements for work “which histori­
cally and regularly has been and currently is performed
by workers covered by CONASA-ILA agreements.”

“mini-bridge.”2 The increasing use of mini-bridge car­
2
go movements employed by some CONASA containership operators and the impact of the recession com­
bined to reduce tonnage in all the North Atlantic ports.
The rules included provisions relating to the over­
land movement of containers from a CONASA port
zone (a 50-mile radius extending from the geographic
center of the port) to a non-CONASA port for the pur­
pose of evading container rules, and a penalty was as­
sessed for such an evasion. The union contended that
the use of mini-bridge by some CONASA members was
an effort to circumvent container rules in violation of
the agreement. In addition, the ILA and CONASA had
placed the mini-bridge issue before the Federal Mari­
time Commission, arguing that the practice violated
several sections of the Shipping Act, but an initial de­
cision was not expected until summer or fall of 1976.
Negotiations on container rules were reopened but,
because of lack of progress, the union unilaterally sus­
pended container rules of the 1974 contract as was its
right under Rule 8. In April, the union implemented a
policy of stuffing and stripping all containers destined
for or originating within a 50-mile radius of the port
unless a manufacturer’s label was displayed (indicating
the container was loaded by employees of the producer).
The 2-month dispute over work rules between the
ILA and CONASA ended in June when the parties
agreed to set up a Council of Container Carriers which
would bring CONASA members into more direct con­
tact with the ILA to “head off trouble before it erupts.”
The Council was to assist in all matters related to ne­
gotiation, interpretation, and administration of the Rules
on Containers.
There were also legal developments affecting the
Rules on Containers provision of the agreement. Cer­
tain companies had been performing consolidation work
(i.e., containerizing less-than-full containers, also known
as stuffing) and deconsolidation (also known as strip­
ping) of loads not coming from or to manufacturers or
single consignees at off-pier facilities within a 50-mile
radius of New York (defined as the jurisdictional zone
by the CONASA-ILA pact) using empty containers
supplied by some NYSA members. The CONASA-ILA
Rules—incorporated into the NYSA agreement—pro­
vided that this was ILA work.
In mid-1973, charges were filed by two off-pier con­
solidating companies with the NLRB. These charges
were confined to New York. Similar challenges to con­
tainer work rules were pending in other ports. The
charges alleged that (1) the rules violated the “hot car­
go” provisions of Section 8(e) of the National Labor
Relations Act, and (2) the ILA was engaging in a sec­
ondary boycott against the consolidating companies.
Their immediate complaint was directed to the Dublin
Rules that prohibited the vessel carriers from furnish­
ing their containers to off-pier container stations for




22’’Mini-bridge” is a method by which container cargoes originat­
ing in the Orient for ultimate destination to East and Midwest loca­
tions, which historically were transported by sea from the Orient for
discharge at East Coast ports, are now discharged instead at West
Coast ports and then transported by truck or rail to East and Mid­
west locations. “Mini-bridge” also involves the converse method by
which container cargoes destined for the Orient, and historically
shipped from East Coast ports, are transported by truck or rail from
East and Midwest locations to West Coast ports instead, for ultimate
transport by sea to the Orient.
23 The legal test o f the container work rules was applied to the Port
o f N ew York, but the outcome could affect other ports covered by
the master agreement.

16

act on the resignation as long as prospects for settle­
ment remained.
Negotiations for a master contract continued sporad­
ically, without success, and were broken off on Sep­
tember 27 after failure to reach agreement on job secu­
rity. On October 1, the union initiated a limited strike
against containerships and LASH cargoes in ports from
Maine to Texas. Some container operations also were
affected on the Pacific Coast where dockworkers re­
presented by the International Longshoremen’s and
Warehousemen’s Union respected lines of pickets sent
by the ILA.
The NYSA finally announced its resignation from
CONASA on October 22, when other CONASA mem­
bers refused to be part of a Job Security Program offer
made by ocean carriers. Under the program, ocean car­
riers would pay into a coastwise pool to assure local
GAI, pension, and welfare benefits. CONASA mem­
bers outside of New York felt that uniform contribu­
tion rates would lead to uniform GAI benefits and to
a competitive disadvantage to their ports. The two man­
agement factions attempted to negotiate separately with
little success. Several weeks later, NYSA and a restruc­
tured CONASA organization resolved differences over
a contract proposal, which included the job security
offer, and a master contract covering about 35,000 work­
ers was reached with the ILA on November 13 and
signed on the 18th. The NYSA, however, continued to
function as an independent association. This settlement
paved the way for agreements on local issues in the
North Atlantic ports and also for agreements covering
another 15,000 ILA-represented workers in South At­
lantic and Gulf ports.
The CONASA-ILA and NYSA-ILA settlement pro­
vided for a 3-year pact with an increase in the basic
wage rate of 80 cents an hour retroactive to June 1,
1977, and 80-cent deferred increases on October 1 of
1978 and 1979. Pension and welfare contributions were
increased by 54 and 37 cents an hour, respectively, over
the life of the contract. Integral to settlement of the
master contract, but not part of it, was the establish­
ment of the Job Security Program (JSP) to fund any
shortfalls in local GAI, pension, and welfare funds.
The JSP Agency, Inc., was created to administer the
JSP contract. The JSP was a separate document from
those normally existing between the ILA and employ­
er organizations in that it involved only ocean carriers
and the ILA. An eighth . item was added to the
CONASA-ILA and NYSA-ILA master contract per­
mitting the ILA to refuse to load and unload ships of
any carrier refusing to subscribe to the JSP. The ocean

The minimum size of a container gang on a ship was
set at 18 workers. The parties also agreed to encourage
the development of a single collective bargaining agree­
ment for master contract items for all ports from Maine
to Texas and begin formal negotiations to replace the
existing master pact by April 1, 1977.
The agreements were scheduled to expire September
30, 1977.
October 1977-September 1980

A 2-month strike aimed at containerized cargo in
ports from Maine to Texas was ended after members
of the ILA ratified agreements with various associa­
tions of ocean carriers, stevedoring companies, and ter­
minal operators along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts on
November 29, 1977. Dockworkers had continued to
load and unload conventional ships, except for brief pe­
riods in Baltimore and New Orleans when all shipping
was struck.
The dispute stemmed from the 1975 NLRB decision
which negated Rules on Containers in the Port of New
York. A similar work stoppage had been called in April
of 1977 against seven major domestic and foreign containership lines to protest the NLRB ruling and attract
the Carter administration’s attention.2 Although the le­
4
gal test was applied to New York, later NLRB rulings
affected the rules in Baltimore and Hampton Roads (and
subsequently in Philadelphia in 1979).
In talks which began in June 1977, as a condition for
a new master agreement with CONASA, the union em­
phasized and demanded a new form of job security,
unless the Rules on Containers could be reinstated le­
gally. The existing pact was scheduled to expire at 12:01
a.m. on October 1. Initially, the union had sought a
coastwise Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI) plan as
an eighth master contract item,2 instead of having it
5
negotiated locally, but this demand later was revised to
one for a new form of job security. A management ne­
gotiator stated that “The issue is containerization and
the consolidation of cargo. Everything hangs on that.”
In an attempt to respond to the ILA job security de­
mand, in August, a proposal surfaced to establish a
coastwise feeder fund for locally-negotiated GAI plans,
although never formally demanded by the union or of­
fered by CONASA negotiators. This proposal found
favor with the NYSA. Because GAI was not a master
contract item and benefits and costs varied from port
to port, being highest in the Port of New York,
CONASA members outside of New York demanded
that GAI not be discussed in any way in master con­
tract talks.
The NYSA subsequently tendered notice of resigna­
tion from CONASA on 30-days’ notice, as provided
for by CONASA bylaws, in order to have greater free­
dom to negotiate the job security demand. The NYSA
also announced, however, that it would continue to ne­
gotiate jointly with other CONASA members and not



24The 5-day “selective strike” ended when the U.S. Department of
Labor agreed to ask the NLRB for a “clarification” o f its 1975 ruling.
25The existing seven master contract items were wages, hours, length
o f contract, containerization, LASH (lighter aboard ship), and em­
ployer contributions to pension and welfare plans (but not pension
and welfare benefits).

17

carriers were to be assessed specified amounts per long
ton (2,240 pounds) of cargo handled, varying accord­
ing to the type of cargo (automated, etc.), and the as­
sessments were to be uniform from port to port. The
money would be placed into a common pool to fund
shortfalls only in the three types of benefits mentioned.
The assessment rates were to be periodically revised
based on funding needs. GAI, pension, and welfare
funds themselves continued to be locally controlled,
negotiated, and funded.
Prior to settlement on a new master agreement, by
addendum dated May 12, 1977, payments to one of the
employers’ container royalty funds were doubled effec­
tive May 1, 1977, with the additional money to be al­
located to finance supplemental cash payments.
Discussions in the five major North Atlantic Coast
ports resulted in local agreements in late November
which incorporated terms of the master agreement.
Workers ratified the packages on November 29.2 All
6
of these local agreements provided for an additional




paid holiday. Vacation requirements were liberalized in
Philadelphia and Boston. The GAI benefit was in­
creased to 1,900 hours in Philadelphia and 1,700 hours
in Boston.
During the contracts’ terms, pensions were increased
in New York and Philadelphia. Pension benefits also
were increased in Baltimore, Boston, and Hampton
Roads. (See table 3 for details.)
On September 25, 1979, the legal situation with re­
spect to container rules was clouded when the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
overturned NLRB rulings which had invalidated con­
tainer rules affecting the ports of New York, Baltimore,
and Hampton Roads. The case was remanded to the
NLRB for any further action it considered appropriate.
The following tables are complete to the October 1,
1980, scheduled expiration date of the contracts.
“ Contracts for other North Atlantic ports and for South Atlantic
and G ulf Coast ports also were ratified by the IL A ’s membership on
Nov. 29.

18

Table 1.

General wage changes1
Effective date

Oct. 1, 1934 ................................................
Oct. 1, 1936 ................................................
Oct. 1, 1937 ................................................
Jan. 1, 1940..................................................
Oct. 1, 1941 ................................................
Oct. 1, 1942 ................................................
Oct. 1, 1945 ................................................
Oct. 1, 1946 ................................................
Oct. 1, 1947 ................................................
Aug. 22, 1948 ..............................................
Oct. 1, 1950 ................................................
Oct. 1, 1951 ................................................
Oct. 1, 1952 (by arbitration award of
Nov. 25, 1952).
Oct. 1, 1953 (agreements dated Oct. 6,
1954— New York; Feb. 11, 1954—
Baltimore and Boston; Mar. 4, 1954—
Hampton Roads; and Mar. 12, 1954—
Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1954 (agreements dated Feb. 24, "
N
1955— New York; Jan. 18, 1955—
j
Boston; Feb. 4, 1955— Philadelphia); V
,
Feb. 1, 1955 (agreement dated Feb. 3, /
1955— Hampton Roads); and
1
Mar. 7, 1955 (agreement of same date— /
Baltimore).
Oct. 1, 1955 (agreement dated Feb. 24,
1955— New York; Mar. 7, 1955—
Baltimore; Sept. 28, 1955— Boston;
Feb. 3, 1955— Hampton Roads; Feb.
4, 1955— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1956 (agreement dated Dec. 17,
1957— all North Atlantic ports).2

Increase

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

10 cents an hour.
5 cents an hour.
5 cents an hour.
5 cents an hour.
10 cents an hour.
5 cents an hour.
25 cents an hour.
15 cents an hour.
10 cents an hour.
13 cents an hour.
12 cents an hour.
10 cents an hour.
17 cents an hour.

10 cents at Hampton Roads.

Arbitration award Dec. 31, 1945.

Made retroactive by agreement of the parties. Retroactive payment made after
Executive Order of Feb. 6, 1953, abolished Wage Stabilization Board.

8 cents an hour.

7 cents an hour.

10 cents an hour increase in Hampton Roads.

6 cents an hour.

3 cents an hour increase in Hampton Roads.

18 cents an hour.

7 cents an hour.

Damaged cargo and explosive penalty rate increased to double general cargo
rate.3
Agreement provided for 1 wage review based on change in BLS Consumer
Price Index, with 1-cent-an-hour increase for each 0.6-point increase in excess
of a 6-point rise in the index between Oct. 1956 and Aug. 1958.
Deferred increases of 7 cents an hour effective Oct. 1 of both 1957 and 1958.
Deferred increase.

7 cents an hour.

Deferred increase. No increase warranted by change in CPI.

12 cents an hour.

Deferred increases of 5 cents an hour effective Oct. 1 of both 1960 and 1961.
Baltimore, bulldozer operators received additional 5 cents an hour.

5 cents an hour.

Deferred increase.

5 cents an hour.

Deferred increase.

Oct. 1, 1957 (above agreement— all
North Atlantic ports).
Oct. 1, 1958 (above agreement— all
North Atlantic ports).
Oct. 1, 1959 (memorandum o f agreement
dated Dec. 3, 1959— all North Atlantic
ports).
Oct. 1, 1960 (above agreement— all
North Atlantic ports).
Oct. 1, 1961 (above agreement— all
North Atlantic ports).
Oct. 1, 1962 (memoranda of agreement of
Jan. 20, 1963— New York; Jan. 25,
1963— Baltimore and Hampton Roads;
Jan. 28, 1963— Boston; Jan. 26, 1963
— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1963 (above agreements).

15 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase effective Oct. 1, 1963.

9 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase.

O ct. 1, 1964 ( a g re e m e n ts o f A p r. 13,

10 c e n ts a n h o u r.

D e fe rre d in c re a se s e ffe c tiv e O c t. 1, 1 9 6 5 , 1 9 6 6 , a n d 19 6 7 .

1965— New York; of 1965— Balti­
more; oral agreement only— Boston;!
Apr. 20, 1965— Hampton Roads; Feb.
13, 1965— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1965 (above agreements).
Oct. 1, 1966 (above agreements).
Oct. 1, 1967 (above agreements).
Oct. 1, 1968 (agreement of Feb. 14, 1969
— New York; Feb. 19, 1969— Baltimore; Apr. 2, 1969— Boston; Feb. 20,
1969— Hampton Roads; Feb. 22, 1969
— Philadelphia).

10 cents an hour.
8 cents an hour.
8 cents an hour.
38 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase.
Deferred increase.
Deferred increase.
In addition, deferred increases were to be effective Oct. 1, 1969, and Oct. 1,
1970.

25 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase.

35 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase.

Oct. 1, 1969 (agreement of Feb. 14, 1969
— New York; Feb. 19, 1969— Balti­
more; Apr. 2, 1969— Boston; Feb. 20,
1969— Hampton Roads; Feb. 22, 1969
— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1970 (agreement of Feb. 14, 1969
— New York; Feb. 19, 1969— Baltimore; Apr. 2, 1969— Boston; Feb. 20,
1969— Hampton Roads; Feb. 22, 1969
— Philadelphia).
See footnotes at end of table.




19

Table 1.

General wage changes1— Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Increase

Nov. 14, 1971 (CONASA-ILA agreement
dated Jan. 6, 1972).

55 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Oct. 1, 1972 (CONASA-ILA agreement
dated Jan. 6, 1972).
Oct. 1, 1973 (CONASA-ILA agreement
dated Jan. 6, 1972).
June 1, 1974 (CONASA-ILA agreement
dated May 13, 1974).
Oct. 1, 1974 (CONASA-ILA agreement
dated June 21, 1974).
Oct. 1, 1975 (CONASA-ILA agreement
dated June 21, 1974).
Oct. 1, 1976 (CONASA-ILA agreement
dated June 21, 1974).
June 1, 1977 (CONASA-ILA and
NYSA-ILA agreement dated Nov. 18,
1977).
Oct. 1, 1978 (CONASA-ILA and
NYSA-ILA agreement dated Nov. 18,
1977).
Oct. 1, 1979 (CONASA-ILA and
NYSA-ILA agreement dated Nov. 18,
1977).

40 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Agreement originally provided for a wage increase of 70 cents, but the Pay Board
reduced this amount by 15 cents in its ruling of May 8, 1972.
In addition, deferred increases were to be effective Oct. 1, 1972, and Oct. 1,
1973.
Deferred increase.

40 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase.

15 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

To match the amount cut by the Pay Board.

70 cents an hour in basic wage rates.
60 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

In addition, deferred increases were to be effective Oct. 1, 1975, and Oct. 1,
1976.
Deferred increase.

60 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase.

80 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

In addition, deferred increases were to be effective Oct. 1, 1978, and Oct. 1,
1979.

80 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase.

80 cents an hour in basic wage rates.

Deferred increase.

1General wage changes are upward or downward adjustments that affect an entire
establishment, bargaining unit, or substantial group of employees at one time. Not
included within the term are adjustments in individual rates (promotions) and minor
adjustments in wage structure that do not have an immediate effect on the general
wage level.
The changes listed were the major adjustments in wage rates made during the
period covered. Because of fluctuations in earnings occasioned by premium and
penalty rates and other factors, the total of the general changes listed will not neces­
sarily coincide with the changes in average hourly eamfngs over the period of the
chronology.
2This represented the first agreement jointly negotiated and signed by major
employer associations in North Atlantic Coast ports with the ILA. The agreement
dealt with wages, hours, the amount of contributions for welfare and pension bene­




fits (but not the benefits provided), and the period of the agreement. Since it applied
to longshoremen and related labor classifications, stevedoring as well as other wa­
terfront associations and organizations were signatories. The employer groups repre­
sented were (a) New York Shipping Association, Inc; Deepwater Steamship Lines
and Contracting Stevedores; Cargo Repairmen Contractors; Checking and Clerking
Contractors; General Maintenance Contractors; and Contracting Marine Carpenters;
(b) Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, Inc.; and Deepwater Steamship
Lines and Contracting Stevedores in the Port of Baltimore; (c) Boston Shipping
Association, Inc.; Contracting Stevedores; and Deepwater Lines; (d) Hampton
Roads Maritime Association, Inc.; (e) Philadelphia Marine Trade Association; (f)
Portland Shipping Association, Inc.; and (g) Rhode Island Shipping Association,
Inc.
E ffective Nov. 21, 1957, in Boston.

20

Table 2.

Basic hourly rates for longshoremen in selected North Atlantic Coast ports, 1934-791
Effective date
Cargo classification and port

General cargo
All ports:
Basic r a te .............................................................................................
Overtime ra te .......................................................................................
P enalty carg oes3
New York:
Bulk cargo, ballast, and coal cargoes4 ............................................
Cement and lime in bags5 ................................................................
Damaged cargo6 .................................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Kerosene, gasoline, and naphtha8 ..................................................
Refrigerator space cargo9 ..................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stowage10...........................
Wet hides, creosoted poles, ties and shingles,
cashew oil, soda ash in bags, and naphthalene in
bags;1 barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal12 .....................
1
Bulldozer operator, discharging bulk sugar in hold13 ...................
Baltimore:1
4
Cement and lime in bags and b u lk ..................................................
Chrycillic acid stowed under d e c k ....................................................
Damaged cargo6 .................................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Old coal, restricted spaces................................................................
Manganese, iron, and chrome ore in bulk .....................................
Refrigerator space cargo9 ..................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stowage .............................
Soda ash, toxaphene (cotton dust), red oxide,
naphthalene and calcium cyanamide in bags, raw
bones in bulk, and chrycillic acid in drums, bar­
basco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal12 .........................................
Damp hides, creosoted lumber and lumber products,
and copra 15.....................................................................................
Bulldozer operator13...........................................................................
Boston:16
Bulk cargo and ballast4 ......................................................................
Cement and lime in bags and b u lk ..................................................
Damaged cargo6 ...............................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Grain in bulk17.....................................................................................
Naphthalene in bags .........................................................................
Pickled skins in casks from New Zealand and Australia .............
Refrigerator space cargo9 ..................................................................
Scrap m ica...........................................................................................
Wet hides, creosoted products, cashew oil, soda ash,
carbon black, cottonseed meal in bags, and gasoline19 ..........
Hampton Roads (including Newport News and Norfolk):
Damaged cargo6 .................................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Grain, creosoted products, and soda ash in bags20 .....................
Coal cargoes, bulk cargoes, lime in bags, and ores2 .................
1
Refrigerator space cargo9 ..................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stowage10...........................
Cement and lime in bags, iron ore when moved by
hand, sulphur and steel dust in bulk or bags,
pitch in bulk or barrels....................................................................
Wet hides, cashew oil, caustic soda, kerosene,
barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal22 ...................................
Philadelphia:
Distress cargo (damaged)6 ................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Grain17 .................................................................................................
Oil, kerosene, gasoline, grease, naphtha in barrels, drums,
cases, or other containers; fishmeal, and bonemeal23.............
Sulphur, bulk cargoes, and bog ore in bulk.....................................
Wet hides.............................................................................................
Tallow, vegetable oil, asphalt, and pitch in barrels and drums25..
Naphthalene in bags, inbound only..................................................
Chrycillic acid in drums, inbound only ............................................
Refrigerator space cargo,9 licorice root26........................................

Oct. 1,
1934

Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Jan. 1 Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Aug. 22 Oct. 1,
1936 1937 1940 1941
1942 1945 1946 1947 1948 1950

2$0.95
z1.35

$1.00
1.50

$1.05
1.60

$1.10
1.65

$1.20
1.80

$1.25
1.875

$1.50
2.25

$1.65
2.475

$1.75
2.625

$1.88
2.82

$2.00
3.00

1.00
1.00
1.90
1.90
1.15
1.15

1.05
1.05
2.00
2.00
1.20
1.20

1.10
1.10
2.10
2.10
1.25
1.25

1.15
1.15
2.20
2.20
1.30
1.30

1.25
1.25
2.40
2.40
1.40
1.40

1.30
1.30
2.50
2.50
1.45
1.45

1.55
1.55
3.00
3.00
1.70
1.70

1.70
1.70
3.30
3.30
1.85
1.85

1.80
1.80
3.40
3.40
1.95
1.95

1.93
1.93
3.66
3.66
2.08
2.08

2.05
2.05
3.90
3.90
2.20
2.20

'

1.10

1.20

1.25

1.35

1.40

1.65

1.80

1.90

2.03

2.15

1.10

1.15

1.25

1.30

1.55

1.70

1.80

1.93

2.05

2.15
2.15
1.625
1.15
1.30

2.40
2.40
1.725
1.25
1.40

2.50
2.50
1.775
1.30
1.45

3.00
3.00
2.025
1.55
1.70

3.30
3.30
2.175
1.70
1.85

3.40
3.40
2.275
1.80
1.95

3.66
3.90
3.66
3.90
2.405
1.93
2.05
2.08
2.20

1.90
1.90
1.425

2.00
2.00
1.525

1.15

1.20

2.10
2.10
1.575
1.10
1.25

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.35

1.40

1.65

1.80

1.90

2.03

1.00
1.00
1.90
1.90
1.15

1.05
1.05
2.00
2.00
1.20

1.10
1.10
2.10
2.10
1.25

1.15
1.15
2.20
2.20
1.30

1.25
1.25
2.40
2.40
1.40

1.30
1.30
2.50
2.50
1.45

1.55
1.55
3.00
3.00
1.70

1.70
1.70
3.30
3.30
1.85

1.80
1.80
3.40
3.40
1.95

1.93
1.93
3.53
3.53
2.08

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.40

1.45

1.70

1.85

1.95

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.35

1.40

1.65

1.80

1.90

2.03

2.15

1.80
1.80
1.05

2.00
2.00
1.15

2.10
2.10
1.20

2.15
2.15
1.25

2.40
2.40
1.35

2.50
2.50
1.40

3.00
3.00
1.65

3.30
3.30
1.80

3.40
3.40
1.90

3.66
3.66
2.03

4.00
4.00
2.20

1.10

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.40

1.45

1.70

1.85

1.95

2.08

2.20

.95

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.25

1.30

1.55

1.70

1.80

1.93

2.05

1.05

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.35

1.40

1.65

1.80

1.90

2.03

2.15

1.75
1.75
1.05

1.80
1.80
1.10

1.85
1.85
1.15

1.95
1.95
1.20

2.05
2.05
1.30

2.10
2.10
1.35

3.00
3.00
1.60

3.30
3.30
1.75

3.40
3.40
1.85

3.76
3.76
1.93

4.00
4.00
2.10

241.10 241.15 241.20 241.25 241.35 241.40
1.05
1.10
1.25
1.30
1.10
1.15
1.20
1.25
1.35
1.40

1.65
1.55
1.65

1.80
1.70
1.80

1.90
1.80
1.90

2.03
1.93
2.03

2.15
2.05
2.15

See footnotes at end of table.




1.15

. ...

21

2.15

2.05
2.05
3.90
3.90
2.20
182.75
182.50
2.08
2.20
182.25

Table 2.

Basic hourly rates for longshoremen in selected North Atlantic Coast ports, 1934-791— Continued
Effective date
Cargo classification and port

Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1,
1951
1952 1953

General cargo
All ports:
Basic r a te ............................................................................................. $2.10
Overtime rate....................................................................................... 3.15
P enalty carg oes3
New York:
Bulk cargo, ballast, and coal cargoes4 ............................................
Cement and lime in bags5 ................................................................
Damaged cargo6 .................................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Kerosene, gasoline, and naphtha8 ..................................................
Refrigerator space cargo9 ..................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stowage1 0 ...........................
Wet hides, creosoted poles, ties and shingles,
cashew oil, soda ash in bags, and naphthalene
in bags;1 barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal1 2 .................
1
Bulldozer operator, discharging bulk sugar in hold13.....................
Baltimore:1
4
Cement and lime in bags and b u lk ..................................................
Chrycillic acid stowed under d e c k ....................................................
Damaged cargo6 .................................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Old coal, restricted spaces................................................................
Manganese, iron, and chrome ore in b u lk ........... .......................
Refrigerator space cargo9 ..................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stowage ............... .............
Soda ash, toxaphene (cotton dust), red oxide,
naphthalene and calcium cyanamide in bags, raw
bones in bulk, and chrycillic acid in drums, bar­
basco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal1 2 .........................................
Damp hides, creosoted lumber and lumber products,
and copra15 .....................................................................................
Bulldozer operator13...........................................................................
Boston:1
6
Bulk cargo and ballast4 .....................................................................
Cement and lime in bags and b u lk ..................................................
Damaged cargo6 .................................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Grain in bulk17.....................................................................................
Naphthalene in bags .........................................................................
Pickled skins in casks from New Zealand and Australia .............
Refrigerator space cargo9 ..................................................................
Scrap m ica...........................................................................................
Wet hides, creosoted products, cashew oil, soda ash,
carbon black, cottonseed meal in bags, and gasoline19 ..........
Hampton Roads (including Newport News and Norfolk):
Damaged cargo6 .................................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Grain, creosoted products, and soda asfi in bags20 .....................
Coal cargoes, bulk cargoes, lime in bags, and ores2 .................
1
Refrigerator space cargo9 .................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stowage10 ...........................
Cement and lime in bags, iron ore when moved by
hand, sulphur and steel dust in bulk or bags, pitch
in bulk or barrels.............................................................................
Wet hides, cashew oil, caustic soda, kerosene,
barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal22 ...................................
Philadelphia:
Distress cargo (damaged)6 ................................................................
Explosives7 .........................................................................................
Grain17 ................................................................................................
Oil, kerosene, gasoline, grease, naphtha in barrels, drums,
cases, or other containers; fishmeal, and bonemeal23...............
Sulphur, bulk cargoes, and bog ore in bulk.....................................
Wet hides.............................................................................................
Taliow, vegetable oil, asphalt, and pitch in barrels and drums25..
Naphthalene in bags, inbound only........................................ .........
Chrycillic acid in drums, inbound only ............................................
Refrigerator space cargo,9 licorice root26........................................

$2.27
3.405

$2.35 28$2.42
3.525 293.63

$2.48
3.72

$2.66
3.99

$2.73
4.095

$2.80
4.20

$2.92
4.38

$2.97
4.455

$3.02
4.53

2.15
2.15
4.10
4.10
2.30
2.30

2.32
2.32
4.44
4.44
2.47
2.47

2.40
2.40
4.60
4.60
2.55
2.55
2.45

2.47
2.47
4.74
4.74
2.62
2.62
2.52

2.53
2.53
4.86
4.86
2.68
2.68
2.58

2.71
2.71
5.32
5.32
2.86
2.86
2.76

2.78
2.78
5.46
5.46
2.93
2.93
2.83

2.85
2.85
5.60
5.60
3.00
3.00
2.90

2.97
2.97
5.84
5.84
3.12
3.12
3.02

3.02
3.02
5.94
5.94
3.17
3.17
3.07

3.07
3.07
6.04
6.04
3.22
3.22
3.12

2.25

2.42

2.50

2.57

2.63

2.81

2.88

2.95

3.07
3.07

3.12
3.12

3.17
3.17

2.15
4.10
4 10
4.10
2.625

2.32
4.44
4.44
4.44
2.795

2.40
4.60
4.60
4.60
2.875

2.47
4.74
4.74
4.74
2.945

2.53
4.80
4.80
4.80
3.005

2.71
2.78
2.85
5.32
5.46
5.60
5.32
5.46
5.60
5.32
5.46
5.60
3.185 3.255 3.325

2.97
5.84
5.84
5.84
3.445

3.02
5.94
5.94
5.94
3.495

3.07
6.04
6.04
6.04
3.545

2.30
2.20

2.47
2.37

2.55
2.45

2.62
2.52

2.68
2.58

2.86
2.76

2.93
2.83

3.00
2.90

3.12
3.02

3.17
3.07

3.22
3.12

2.25

2.42

2.50

2.57

2.63

2.81

2.88

2.95

3.07

3.12

3.17

2.25

2.42

2.50

2.57

2.63

2.81
2.81

2.88
2.88

2.95
2.95

3.07
3.12

3.12
3.17

3.17
3.22

2.15
2.15
4.10
4.10
2.30
2.85
2.60
2.30
2.35

2.32
2.32
4.44
4.44
2.47
(30)
2.77
2.47
2.52

2.40
2.40
4.52
4.52
2.55
(30)
2.85
2.55
2.60

2.47
2.47
4.66
4.66
2.62
(30)
2.92
2.62
2.67

2.53
2.53
4.78
4.78
2.68
(30)
2.98
2.68
2.73

2.71
2.71
5.32
5.32
2.86
5.14
3.16
2.86
2.91

2.78
2.78
5.46
5.46
2.93
5.14
3.23
2.93
2.98

2.85
2.85
5.60
5.60
3.00
5.14
3.30
3.00
3.05

2.97
2.97
5.84
5.84
3.12
5.26
3.42
3.12
3.17

3.02
3.02
5.94
5.94
3.17
5.31
3.47
3.17
3.22

3.07
3.07
6.04
6.04
3.22
5.36
3.52
3.22
3.27

2.25

2.42

2.50

2.57

2.63

2.81

2.88

2.95

3.07

3.12

3.17

4.10
4.10
2.30

4.44
4.44
2.47

2.30

2.47

4.52
4.52
2.55
2.40
2.55
2.45

4.62
4.62
2.65
2.50
2.65
2.55

4.68
4.68
2.68
2.53
2.68
2.58

5.32
5.32
2.86
2.71
2.86
2.76

5.46
5.46
2.93
2.78
2.93
2.83

5.60
5.60
3.00
2.85
3.00
2.90

5.84
5.84
3.12
2.97
3.12
3.02

5.94
5.94
3.17
3.02
3.17
3.07

6.04
6.04
3.22
3.07
3.22
3.12

2.15

2.32

2.50

2.60

2.63

2.81

2.88

2.95

3.07

3.12

3.17

2.25

2.42

2.50

2.60

2.63

2.81

2.88

2.95

3.07

3.12

3.17

4.20
4.20
2.30

4.54
4.54
2.47

4.70
4.70
2.55

4.84
4.84
2.62

4.96
4.96
2.68

5.32
5.32
2.86

5.46
5.46
2.93

5.60
5.60
3.00

5.84
5.84
3.12

5.94
5.94
3.17

6.04
6.04
3.22

2.25
2.15
2.25
2.25
2.35
2.60

2.42
2.32
2.42
2.42
2.52
2.77
312.47

2.50
2.40
2.50
2.50
2.60
2.85
2.55

2.57
2.47
2.57
2.57
2.67
2.92
2.62

2.63
2.53
2.63
2.63
2.73
2.98
2.68

2.81
2.71
2.81
2.81
2.91
3.16
2.86

2.88
2.78
2.88
2.88
2.98
3.23
2.93

2.95
2.85
2.95
2.95
3.05
3.30
3.00

3.07
2.97
3.07
3.07
3.17
3.42
3.12

3.12
3.02
3.12
3.12
3.22
3.47
3.17

3.17
3.07
3.17
3.17
3.27
3.52
3.22

See footnotes at end of table.




Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1,
195427 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961

22

Table 2.

Basic hourly rates for longshoremen in selected North Atlantic Coast ports, 1934-791— Continued
Effective date
Cargo classification and port

General cargo
All ports:
Basic rate.................................................................................................
Overtime rate .........................................................................................
Penalty cargoes3
New York:
Bulk cargo, ballast, and coal cargoes4 ................................................
Cement and lime in b a g s ......................................................................
Damaged cargo6 ...................................................................................
Explosives7 .............................................................................................
Kerosene, gasoline, and naphtha8 ......................................................
Refrigerator space cargo9 ......................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stow age.............................
Wet hides, creosoted poles, ties and shingles,
cashew oil, soda ash and naphthalene in bags,
barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal...........................................
Bulldozer operator, discharging bulk sugar in h o ld ...........................
Baltimore:14
Cement and lime in bags and bulk......................................................
Chrycillic acid stowed under deck........................................................
Damaged cargo® ...................................................................................
Explosives7 .............................................................................................
Old coal, restricted spaces....................................................................
Refrigerator space cargo9 ......................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stowage32 .............................
Soda ash, toxaphene (cotton dust), red oxide,
naphthalene and calcium cyanamide in bags, raw
bones in bulk, and chrycillic acid in drums, barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal ..............................................
Damp hides, creosoted lumber and lumber products,
and copra .............................................................................................
Bulldozer operator.................................................................................
Boston:1
6
Bulk cargo and ballast4 ..........................................................................
Cement and lime in bags and bulk......................................................
Damaged cargo6 ...................................................................................
Explosives7 .............................................................................................
Grain in bulk17.........................................................................................
Pickled skins in casks from New Zealand and Australia.................
Refrigerator space cargo9 ......................................................................
Scrap mica .............................................................................................
Wet hides, creosoted products, cashew oil, carbon
black and cottonseed meal in bags, gasoline, and
soda ash in bags33.............................................................................
Hampton Roads (including Newport News and Norfolk):34
Damaged cargo6 ...................................................................................
Explosives7 .............................................................................................
Grain, creosoted products, and soda ash in bags.............................
Coal cargoes, bulk cargoes, lime in bags, and ores2 1 ......................
Refriqerator space cargo9 ......................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stow age.................................
Wet hides, cashew oil, caustic soda, kerosene,
steel dust and cement in bags, pitch and sulfur
in bulk or bags, barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal.............
Philadelphia:
Distress cargo6 .......................................................................................
Explosives7 .............................................................................................
Grain.........................................................................................................
Oil, kerosene, gasoline, grease, naphtha in barrels, drums,
cases, or other containers; fishmeal, and bonemeal23 .................
Sulfur, bulk cargoes, and bog ore in b u lk ...........................................
Wet hides.................................................................................................
Tallow, vegetable oil, asphalt, and pitch in barrels and drums25 . . .
Naphthalene in Dags, uiD O unu only......................................................
Chrycillic acid in drums, inbound o n ly ................................................
Refrigerator space cargo,9 licorice ro o t............. ................................

Oct. 1 Oct. 1, Oct. 1, Oct. 1 Oct. 1, Oct. 1 Oct. 1 Oct. 1 Oct. 1, Nov. 14 , Oct. 1,
1971
1964
1967 1968
1972
1962 1963
1966
1965
1969 1970

$3.17 $3.26
4.755 4.89

£3.46
5.19

$3.54
5.31

$3.62
5.43

$4.00
5.00

$4.25 $4.60
6.375 6.90

$ 5.15 $ 5.55
7.725
8.325

3.22
3.22
6.34
6.34
3.37
3.37
3.27

3.31
3.31
6.52
6.52
3.46
3.46
3.36

3.41
3.41
6.72
6.72
3.56
3.56
3.46

3.51
3.51
6.92
6.92
3.66
3.66
3.56

3.59
3.59
7.08
7.08
3.74
3.74
3.64

3.67
3.67
7.24
7.24
3.82
3.82
3.72

4.05
4.05
8.00
8.00
4.20
4.20
4.10

4.30
4.30
8.50
8.50
4.45
4.45
4.35

4.65
4.65
9.20
9.20
4.80
4.80
4.70

5.20
5.20
10.30
10.30
5.35
5.35
5.25

5.60
5.60
11.10
11.10
5.75
5.75
5.65

3.32
3.32

3.41
3.41

3.51
3.51

3.61
3.61

3.69
3.69

3.77
3.77

4.15
4.15

4.40
4.40

4.75
4.75

5.30
5.30

5.70
5.70

3.22
6.34
6.34
6.34
3.695
3.37
3.27

3.31
6.52
6.52
6.52
3.785
3.46
3.36

3.41
6.72
6.72
6.72
3.885
3.56
3.46

3.51
6.92
6.92
6.92
3.985
3.66
3.56

3.59
7.08
7.08
7.08
4.065
3.74
3.64

3.67
7.24
7.24
7.24
4.145
3.82
3.72

4.05
8.00
8.00
8.00
4.525
4.20
4.10

4.65
4.30
9.20
8.50
9.20
8.50
9.20
8.50
4.775 5.125
4.80
4.45
4.70
4.35

5.20
10.30
10.30
10.30
5.675
5.35
5.25

5.60
11.10
11.10
11.10
6.075
5.75
5.65

3.32

3.41

3.51

3.61

3.69

3.77

4.15

4.40

4.75

5.30

5.70

3.32
3.37

3.41
3.46

3.51
3.56

3.61
3.66

3.69
3.74

3.77
3.82

4.15
4.20

4.40
4.45

4.75
4.80

5.30
5.35

5.70
5.75

3.22
3.22
6.34
6.34
3.37
5.51
3.67
3.37
3.42

3.31
3.31
6.52
6.52
3.46
5.60
3.76
3.46
3.51

3.41
3.41
6.72
6.72
3.56
5.70
3.86
3.56
3.61

3.51
3.51
6.92
6.92
3.66
5.80
3.96
3.66
3.71

3.59
3.59
7.08
7.08
3.74
5.88
4.04
3.74
3.79

3.67
3.67
7.24
7.24
3.82
5.96
4.12
3.82
3.87

4.05
4.05
8.00
8.00
4.20

4.30
4.30
8.50
8.50
4.45

4.65
4.65
9.20
9.20
4.80

5.20
5.20
10.30
10.30
5.35

5.60
5.60
11.10
11.10
5.75

4.50
4.20
4.25

4.75
4.45
4.50

5.10
4.80
4.85

5.65
5.35
5.40

6.05
5.75
5.80

3.32

3.41

3.51

3.61

3.69

3.77

4.15

4.40

4.75

5.30

5.70

6.34
6.34
3.37
3.22
3.37
3.27

6.52
6.52
3.46
3.31
3.46
3.36

6.72
6.72
3.56
3.41
3.56
3.46

6.92
6.92
3.66
3.51
3.66
3.56

7.08
7.08
3.74
3.59
3.74
3.64

7.24
7.24
3.82
3.67
3.82
3.72

8.00
8.00
4.20
4.05
4.20
4.10

8.50
8.50
4.45
4.30
4.45
4.35

9.20
9.20
4.80
4.65
4.80
4.70

10.30
10.30
5.35
5.20
5.35
5.25

11.10
11.10
5.75
5.60
5.75
5.65

3.32

3.41

3.51

3.61

3.69

3.77

4.15

4.40

4.75

5.30

5.70

6.34
6.34
3.37

6.52
6.52
3.46

6.72
6.72
3.56

6.92
6.92
3.66

7.08
7.08
3,74

7.24
7.24
3.82

8.00
8.00
4.20

8.50
8.50
4.45

9.20
9.20
4.80

10.30
10.30
5.35

11.10
11.10
5.75

3.32
3.22
3.32
3.32
3.42
3.67
3.37

3.41
3.31
3.41
3.41
3.51
3.76
3.46

3.51
3.41
3.51
3.51
3.61
3.86
3.56

3.61
3.51
3.61
3.61
3.71
3.96
3.66

3.69
3.59
3.69
3.69
3.79
4.04
3.74

3.77
3.67
3.77
3.77
3.87
4.12
3.82

4.15
4.05
4.15
4.15
4.25
4.50
4.20

4.40
4.30
4.40
4.40
4.50
4.75
4.45

4.75
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.85
5.10
4.80

5.30
5.20
5.30
5.30
5.40
5.65
5.35

5.70
5.60
5.70
5.70
5.80
6.05
5.75

See footnotes at end of table.




$3.36
5.04

23

Table 2.

Basic hourly rates for longshoremen In selected North Atlantic Coast ports, 1934-791— Continued
:.

Effective date

i
Cargo classification and port

Oct. 1,
1973

June 1,
1974

Oct. 1,
1974

Oct. 1,
1975

Oct. 1,
1976

June 1,
1977

Oct. 1,
1978

Oct. 1,
1979

General cargo
All ports:
Basic ra te ..........................................................................................................
Overtime rate ...................................................................................................

$ 6.10
9.15

$ 6.80
10.20

$ 7.40
11.10

$ 8.00
12.00

$ 8.80
13.20

$ 9.60
14.40

$10.40
15.60

6.00
6.00
11.90
11.90
6.15
6.15
6.05

6.15
6.15
12.20
12.20
6.30
6.30
6.20

6.85
6.85
13.60
13 60
7.00
7.00
6.90

7.45
7.45
14.80
14.80
7.60
7.60
7.50

8.05
8.05
16.00
16.00
8.20
8.20
8.10

8.85
8.85
17.60
17.60
9.00
9.00
8.90

9.65
9.65
19.20
19.20
9.80
9.80
9.70

10.45
10.45
20.80
20.80
10.60
10.60
10.50

6.10
6.10

6.25
6.25

6.95
6.95

7.55
7.55

8.15
8.15

8.95
8.95

9.75
9.75

10.55
10.55

6.00
11.90
11.90
11.90
6.475
6.15
6.05

6.15
12.20
12.20
12.20
6.625
6.30
6.20

6.85
13.60
13.60
13.60
7.325
7.00
6.90

7.45
14.80
14.80
14.80
7.925
7.60
7.50

8.05
16.00
16.00
16.00
8.525
8.20
8.10

8.85
17.60
17.60
17.60
9.325
9.00
8.90

9.65
19.20
19.20
19.20
10.125
9.80
9.70

10.45
20.80
20.80
20.80
10.925
10.60
10.50

6.10

6.25

6.95

7.55

8.15

8.95

9.75

10.55

6.10
6.15

6.25
6.30

6.95
7.00

7.55
7.60

8.15
8.20

8.95
9.00

9.75
9.80

10.55
10.60

6.00
6.00
11.90
11.90
6.15
6.45
6.15
6.20

6.15
6.15
12.20
12.20
6.30
6.60
6.30
6.35

6.85
6.85
13.60
13.60
7.00
7.30
7.00
7.05

7.45
7.45
14.80
14.80
7.60
7.90
7.60
7.65

8.05
8.05
16.00
16.00
8.20
8.50
8.20
8.25

8.85
8.85
17.60
17.60
9.00
9.30
9.00
9.05

9.65
9.65
19.20
19.20
9.80
10.10
9.80
9.85

10.45
10.45
20.80
20.80
10.60
10.90
10.60
10.65

6.10

6.25

6.95

7.55

8.15

8.95

$ 5.95
8.925

Penalty Cargoes3
New York:35
Bulk cargo, ballast, and coal cargoes4 ........................................................
Cement and lime in bags ...............................................................................
Damaged cargo6 .............................................................................................
Explosives7 ................................................................
Kerosene, gasoline, and naphtha®................................................................
Refrigerator space cargo9 i ............................... ............................................
Rubber, where talc has been used stowage ..............................................
Wet hides, creosoted poles, ties and shingles,
cashew oil, soda ash and naphthalene in
baqs, barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal.........................................
Bulldozer operator, discharging bulk sugar in hold.......................................
Baltimore:14
Cement and lime in bags and b u lk................................................................
Chrycillic acid stowed under d e ck..................................................................
Damaged cargo6 .............................................................................................
Explosives7 .......................................................................................................
Old coal, restricted spaces.............................................................................
Refrigerator space cargo9 .............................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stowage32 .......................................
Soda ash, toxaphene (cotton dust), red oxide,
naphthalene and calcium cyanamide in bags, raw
bones in bulk, and chrycillic acid in drums, barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal ........................................................
Damp hides, creosoted lumber and lumber products,
and copra (and graphite and plumbago effective June 1, 1977)............
Bulldozer operaioi ...........................................................................................
Boston:16
Bulk cargo and ballast4 ...................................................................................
Cement and lime in bags and b u lk................................................................
Damaged cargo6 .............................................................................................
Explosives7 .......................................................................................................
Grain in bulk17 .................................................................................................
Pickled skins in casks from New Zealand and Australia ..........................
Refrigerator space cargob .............................................................................
Scrap m ica........................................................................................................
Wet hides, creosoted products, cashew oil, carbon
black and cottonseed meal in bags, gasoline, and
soda ash in bags33 .....................................................................................
Hampton Roads (including Newport News and Norfolk):34
Damaged cargo6 .............................................................................................
Explosives7 .......................................................................................................
Grain, creosoted products, and soda ash in bags .......................................
Coal carqoes, bulk cargoes, lime in bags, and ores2 ...............................
1
Refrigerator space cargo9 .............................................................................
Rubber, where talc has been used in stow age...........................................
Wet hides, cashew oil, caustic soda, kerosene,
steel dust and cement in bags, pitch and sulphur
in bulk or bags, barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal.......................
Philadelphia:
Distress cargo®.................................................................................................
Explosives7 .......................................................................................................
G rain ..................................................................................................................
Oil, Kefosene, gasoline, grease, naphtha in barrels, diums,
cases, or other containers: fishmeal, and bonemeal23 ...........................
Sulphur, bulk cargoes, and bog ore in b u lk ..................................................
Wet hides..........................................................................................................
Tallow, vegetable oil, asphalt, and pitch in barrels and drums25 ..............
Naphthalene in bags, inbound only ..............................................................
Chrycillic acid in drums, inbound only ..........................................................
Refrigerator space cargo,7 licorice r o o t........................................................

10.55

i

11.90
11.90
6.15
6.00
6.15
6.05

13.60
13.60
7.00
6.85
7.00
6.90

14.80
14.80
7.60
7.45
7.60
7.50

16.00
16.00
8.20
8.05
8.20
.8.10

17.60
17.60
9.00
8.85
9.00
8.90

19.20
19.20
9.80
9.65
9.80
9.70

20.80
20.80
10.60
10.45
10.60
10.50

6.25

6.95

7.55

8.15

8.95

9.75

10.55

11.90
11.90
6.15

12.20
12.20
6.30

13.60
13.60
7.00

14.80
14.80
7.60

16.00
16.00
8.20

17.60
17.60
9.00

19.20
19.20
9.80

20.80
20.80
10.60

6.10
6.00
6.10
6.10
6.20
6.45
6.15

24

12.20
12.20
6.30
6.15
6.30
6.20

6.10

See footnotes at end of table.




9.75 !

6.25
6.15
6.25
6.25
6.35
6.60
6.30

6.95
6.85
6.95
6.95
7.05
7.30
7.00

7.55
7.45
7.55
7.55
7.65
7.90
7.60

8.15
8.05
8.15
8.15
8.25
8.50
8.20

8.95
8.85
8.95
8.95
9.05
9.30
9.00

9.75
10.55
9.65
10.45
9.75
10.55
9775 : 10.55
9.85 , 10.65
10.10 I 10.90
9.80
10.60

Footnotes to table 2:
partition.
18Rates established for first time. Prior practice was usually to pay
damaged cargo rate.
“ Gasoline added Oct. 1, 1951.
20 Rate applicable on grain trimming when work continues for V2 hour
or more. Between Oct. 1, 1950, and Sept. 30, 1953, rates for creosoted
products and soda ash were 5 cents below grain rates.
21 Effective Oct. 1, 1953. Rate established first time. Penalty rate
applies to coal cargoes only when worked at other than coal piers.
22Caustic soda and kerosene added Oct. 1, 1951; barbasco root,
fishmeal, and bonemeal added Oct. 1, 1956.
23 Rate applicable if cargo was handled by a gang for 2 hours or more
a day (not applicable to fishmeal and bonemeal which were added
Sept. 30, 1957).
24Daily rates paid during this period for kerosene, gasoline, and
naphtha in barrels, drums, or cases.
25 Rate applicable if cargo was handled by a gang for 2 hours or more
a day.
26 Licorice root added Oct. 1, 1953.
27 Effective Mar. 7, 1955, in Baltimore.
28$2.45 at Hampton Roads, effective Feb. 1, 1955.
29$3.675 at Hampton Roads, effective Feb. 1, 1955.
30No scheduled rate: actually, the “distress rate” for damaged cargo
and explosives was paid.
31 Rate approved late in Dec. 1952 by the Regional W age Stabiliza­
tion Board and was effective as of Nov. 1, 1952.
32 Continued to be applicable while discharging only.
“ Effective Oct. 1, 1968, also included any cargo in bags that
created a bad dust condition (e.g., naphthalene in bags).
“ Effective Nov. 14, 1971, hatch bosses and dock foremen paid an
additional 30 cents an hour; gangwaymen, 20 cents; and dock headers,
15 cents. Effective Nov. 1, 1974, differentials of 50 cents were paid to
hatch bosses and dock foremen and 25 cents to gangwaymen, dock
headers, and 30-ton forklift operators^ Effective June 1, 1977, forklift
stacker operator was substituted for 30-ton forklift operator and hold
driver was added to the list with both categories receiving a 25-cent
differential.
“ Effective June 1, 1977, container crane operators paid an addi­
tional 75 cents an hour; straddle, hustler, top loader, and stacker (25
tons or over) operators and mechanics paid an additional 30 cents; and
hatch foremen paid an additional 25 cents.

’ Except in the ports noted, contrary to the practice on the Pacific
Coast, nonsupervisory longshoremen received the same rate of pay
regardless of the function performed. After Oct. 1, 1936, the overtime
rate for longshoremen was exactly 1 1 times the basic hourly rate ex­
/2
cept for the period Oct. 1937 to Dec. 1939.
290 cents an hour basic rate and $1.25 overtime rate at Hampton
Roads.
3 Effective Oct. 1, 1951, overtime work handling these cargoes was
paid for at 1 1 times the penalty rate.
/2
in clu d in g loading and trimming coal for ship’s own bunker.
5 Lime added Oct. 1, 1947.
6 Premium rate not paid for handling sound cargo in same or sepa­
rate compartment as damaged cargo; in Philadelphia, rate to apply
only in compartment where condition exists.
7When handled in the bay and/or stream, pay to start when men
leave pier.
8 In cases and barrels, when loaded by case-oil gang with a fly.
9When transported at temperature of freezing or below, rate paid
entire gang.
10 Effective Oct. 1, 1953. Rate established for first time.
1 Soda ash in bags and cashew oil added Oct. 1, 1947. Naphthalene
1
in bags added Feb. 15, 1950.
12Barbasco root, fishmeal, and bonemeal added Oct. 1, 1956.
13Occupation added to rate schedule on date shown.
14Rates applicable to holdmen and wharfmen. Winchmen, deckmen,
and leaders paid an additional 5 cents an hour and gang carriers, an
additional 10 cents.
15 Copra added Oct. 1, 1951.
16 Until Oct. 1, 1968, gangwaymen, winchmen, and tractor operators
paid an additional 5 cents an hour and chisel and forklift operators, a
10-cent differential. Effective Oct. 1, 1968, gangway bosses and forklift
operators paid a 10-cent differential and signalmen, winch operators,
and tractor operators, a 5-cent differential. Effective Nov. 14, 1971,
gangway bosses paid a 35-cent differential; signalmen and winch
operators a 25-cent differential; and the list of mechanical equipment
operators was revised to provide differentials of 25 cents for operators
of yard hustlers and up to and including 12Vi-ton forklifts, 58 cents for
operators of over 1 2 12-ton forklifts, dock cranes, car pushers, and un­
/
licensed operators of standby cranes, and $1 for licensed operators of
cranes and standby cranes.
’ 'R a te applicable to men in next hatch when there is no bulkhead or




25

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1
E ffective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Premium pay for nightwork
Oct. 1, 1934 ..............................................

Overtime rate paid for work between 5
p.m . and 8 a.m. on week d ays.2

Oct. 1, 1977 (agreement of D ec. 5,
1977— Hampton Roads).

Added: Hampton Roads— workers ordered for 5 a.m . start on
straight-time day pay received overtime rate (time and one-half) for all time
worked excluding meal hour (then double tim e), and resuming overtime
rate until finished or relieved.
Daily overtime pay

Oct. 1, 1934 ................................................

Overtime rate paid for work in excess
o f 8 hours between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m.
Premium pay for Saturday and Sunday

Oct. 1, 1934 ................................................

Oct. 1, 1945 ..............................................

Overtime rate paid for work between
12 noon on Saturday and 8 a.m. on
Monday.
Added: Overtime rate paid for all
Saturday work.

In accordance with arbitration award o f D ec. 31, 1945.

Call-in pay3
Oct. I, 1934

2 hours’ pay guaranteed em ployees
selected to work.

Oct. 1, 1935

Added: 4 hours’ pay guaranteed em ­
ployees ordered out on Sundays and
holidays.

Oct. 1, 1937
Oct. 1, 1938

Oct. 1, 1945

Oct. 1, 1951 (agreements dated Oct.
11, 1951 — New York; Oct. 1,
1951 — Baltimore; Jan. 14,
1952— Philadelphia; Aug. 5,
1952— Hampton Roads); and e f­
fective
Oct. 1, 1953 (agreement dated Feb.
11, 1954— Boston).

Added: 2 hours’ pay guaranteed for
2nd call to work if employed in the
forenoon and reemployed in the af­
ternoon and if employed on a w eek­
day afternoon and reemployed at 7
p.m .; 4 hours’ pay guaranteed if
employed on Saturday afternoon, if
employed at 5 or 6 p.m . or if
employed at 7 p.m. without pre­
vious work during the day.
Changed to: 4 hours’ pay at the ap­
propriate rate guaranteed for the 1st
call to work. 2 hours’ pay at the ap­
propriate rate guaranteed for the
2nd call to work during a day.

^Changed to: 4 hours’ pay at the ap­
propriate rate guaranteed for 1st call
to work during morning hours re­
gardless o f any conditions; 4 hours’
pay guaranteed, with some excep<
tions, for 1st call during weekday
afternoons and 2nd call to work.
Added: New York5— cancellation
permitted on Monday at 7:30 a.m.
without penalty if vessel not in
^ berth.

See footnotes at end o f table.




26

4 hours guaranteed in Baltimore for Sunday nightwork^ in New York when
employed at 7 p.m . on ship which had not previously been worked e x ­
cept to discharge mail and baggage on passenger vessels when the
minimum guarantee is 2 hours; in Boston when employed at 5 p.m. on
ship which had not previously been worked.
Guarantees not applicable to employees who worked through the supper
hours, on premises during afternoon, or on a passenger vessel to dis­
charge mail or baggage.
Guaranteed minimum not paid when weather conditions made work im pos­
sible.
4 hours guaranteed when employed at 7 p.m . to discharge mail and bag­
gage on passenger vessels.
2-hour guarantee not applicable when steamer or hatch com pletes dis­
charging in less time.
Guarantee paid for 2nd call to work regardless of weather conditions but
not if ship is completed before guaranteed period is over.
1 hour straight time and 1 hour overtime on weekdays and 2 hours over­
time on Sunday and holidays paid employees ordered out at 7 a.m.
but prevented from working before 8 a.m . by weather conditions. Pay to
cover period from 7 to 9 a.m.
2 hours straight time and 1 hour overtime on weekdays and 3 hours over­
time on Sunday and holidays paid employees ordered out at 7 a.m.

but prevented from working between 8 and 10 a.m.
On weekdays, 4-hour guarantee applies regardless o f weather except for
ship arrivals or departures or on com pletion of work in less than the
guaranteed period.
On Saturday, Sunday, or holidays, guarantees apply when work is not pre­
vented by weather conditions.
6 hours’ pay at overtime rate guaranteed when em ployees are called out to
dock or undock vessels or handle mail between 12 midnight and 6 a.m . 1
hour’s pay at the overtime rate guaranteed when called out at 7 a.m . but
prevented from working by weather conditions before 8 a.m .4
Employees reemployed at 1 or 7 p.m . or 1 a.m . (2nd call) guaranteed 2
hours’ pay if (1) ship or hatch was completed in less tim e, (2) ship was
moved to drydock or another terminal, or (3) weather made work impos­
sible.
Employees first hired at 1 ,5 , 6, or 7 p.m., Monday through Friday,
guaranteed 4 hours’ pay except for conditions noted above.
Employees first hired at 1 , 5 , 6, or 7 p.m . on Saturday, Sunday, or legal
holiday guaranteed 4 hours’ pay regardless of weather.
Philadelphia— employees (1) first hired at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sunday, or
legal holiday guaranteed 4 hours’ pay; (2) first hired at 5, 6, or 7 p.m .,
Monday through Sunday, paid to 11 p.m.; (3) employed 8 a.m. to
12 noon, who work through meal hour and are ordered back at 2 p.m.
guaranteed 3 hours’ straight-time pay or 2 hours if weather made work
impossible or ship or hatch was completed in less time.
New York— workers employed 8 a.m. to 12 noon who work through
meal hour and are ordered back at 2 p.m . guaranteed 4 hours’ straighttime pay to 6 p.m. at appropriate rates, or 2 hours if weather made work
im possible or ship or hatch was completed in less time.

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
E ffective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision
Call-in Pay3— Continued

Boston— workers 1st hired at 8 a.m. or 1 p .m ., Monday through Friday,
guaranteed 2 hours’ pay if ship or hatch was completed in less time or
ship was moved to drydock or another terminal regardless of weather.

Oct. 1, 1951 (agreements dated Oct.
11. 1951—New York; Oct. 1, 1951—
Baltimore; Jan. 14, 1952— Philadel­
phia; Aug. 5, 1952— Hampton Roads;
and effective Oct. 1, 1953 (agreement
dated Feb. 11, 1954—Boston)—Continued.
Oct. 1, 1953 (agreement dated Mar.
12, 1954— Philadelphia);

4 hours’ pay guaranteed for 2nd call to work at 1 p.m. unless ship or hatch
was completed in less time.

Feb. 11, 1954 (agreement o f same
date— Baltimore).
Jan. 11, 1955 (agreement dated Feb.
24, 1955 — New York);
Mar. 1, 1957 (agreement dated Mar.
7, 1957— Baltimore);
Mar. 18, 1957 (agreement o f same
date— Philadelphia);
Mar. 29, 1957 (agreement o f same
date— Hampton Roads); and
Nov. 21, 1957 (agreement o f same
date— Boston).

^Changed to: 4 hours’ pay at appropri­
ate rate guaranteed for 1st call to
work at any time o f the day, re­
gardless o f any conditions; 4 hours’
4
pay guaranteed with some excep­
tions, for 2nd call to w ork.6

Feb. 22, 1969 (agreement of Feb. 20,
1969— Hampton Roads).

Nov. 14, 1971 (agreement of Mar. 4,
1972— Hampton Roads).

2 hours’ pay guaranteed for 2nd call to work when ship or hatch was com ­
pleted in less than 2 hours’ time.
New York— 6 hours’ pay guaranteed to workers called to dock or undock
vessels between 12 midnight and 6 a.m.
Boston— workers employed and ordered out the follow ing day but unable
to work because of weather or breakdown guaranteed 4 hours’ pay if
ordered out again the next follow ing day and unable to work; paid 2
hours’ pay for forenoon and 2 hours if returned in afternoon.
Hampton Roads— 2 hours’ pay guaranteed for 2nd call to work when ship
or hatch was completed in less time or vessel was shifted to drydock or
another terminal.
Philadelphia— 2 hours’ pay guaranteed for 2nd call to work at 7 p.m. or 1
a.m. if ship or hatch was completed in less time or weather made work
im possible, and at 7 p.m . if vessel was shifted to drydock or another
terminal.
Baltim ore— 5 hours’ pay guaranteed if ordered to work at 7 a.m.
Added: Worker to receive a 2-hour guarantee upon returning to work on
any period or day o f the week when 2 hours' work or less remain in a
hatch after a worker has completed 2 guarantee periods, and he volun­
tarily quits work for the day.
Added: When an em ployee worked a full night and work was not com ­
pleted, a new gang was to be supplied at 8 a.m. with a 4-hour guarantee.

Eliminated: Hampton Roads—
provision o f new gang at 8 a.m.
with 4-hour guarantee when a gang
had worked a full night without
completing task.
Added: Hampton Roads— gangs that
worked through 6 p.m . to 7 p.m.
meal hour to receive 4-hour
guarantee between 8 p.m . and mid­
night except when finishing hatch
or ship, or shifting o f ship.
Changed: Baltim ore— gang carriers o f regularly constituted 15-worker
cargo gangs and regularly constituted Amstar gangs to receive guarantee
of 8 hours’ pay when employed between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Oct. 1, 1977 (agreement of Nov. 29,
1977— Baltimore).

Mealtime premium pay
Oct. 1, 1934 ..............................................

■Overtime rate paid for entire meal hour, if part of hour is worked.

Overtime rate paid for work during
meal hour.

Oct. 1, 1935 ..............................................
Oct. 1, 1945 ............................................

Oct. 1, 1951 ..............................................

If entire meal hour is worked, overtime continues in effect until workers
are relieved.
Changed to: Double time paid for
work during meal hours other than
noon meal hour.
Added: Double time paid for work
during the noon meal hour on
Saturdays, Sundays, and recognized
holidays.

Changed: Hampton Roads— double time for work through noon meal hour
(other than Monday-Friday) continued until relieved (previously re­
verted to time and one-half at end o f meal hour).
Added: Hampton Roads— workers given 5 minutes of paid time before
meal hour to go eat.

Nov. 14, 1971 (agreement o f Mar. 4,
1972— Hampton Roads).

See footnotes at end o f table.




In Baltimore, the appropriate overtime rate (whether time and one-half or
double) continued to apply until the workers were relieved, with a
minimum o f 2 hours.

27

T#ble 3. Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
E ffective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision
Travel pay

Oct. 1, 1934

Oct. 1, 1959 (agreement o f same
date— Hampton Roads).

Oct. 1, 1964 (agreement o f Apr. 20,
1965 — Hampton Roads).
Oct. 1, 1968 (agreement o f 1969—
New York).
Feb. 25, 1969 (agreement o f Feb. 22,
1969— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1969 (agreement o f Feb. 19,
1969— Baltimore; Feb. 20,
1969— Hampton Roads).

Nov. 14, 1971 (agreements o f Feb.
24, 1972— New York; Mar. 24,
1972— Philadelphia).

Workers required to report to speci­
fied piers or locations in or about
the port area compensated for extra
travel expenses and, in specific
situations, for time spent in travel.
In effect: When no public transporta­
tion was available, em ployees or­
dered to work or released between
12 midnight and 6 a .m ., to be pro­
vided transportation or paid 25
cents, at option o f employer.
Increased: Transportation allowance
to 50 cents.

Not applicable to Boston because of compact pier area.

Travel pay not applicable to employees hired by industry on or after Oct. 1,
1968.
Changed: $1.50 for travel to Camden
for longshoremen, carloaders, car­
penters, and ship cleaners.
Changed: Hampton Roads— an
amount of $ 2 .5 0 per round trip for
tunnel and bridge tolls was substi­
tuted for previous travel pay provi­
sions.
Changed: Philadelphia— travel pay of
$2 per day for workers assigned to
work in Camden or Gloucester.
Eliminated: New York— travel pay
for all em ployees (previously had
been eliminated for those who had
entered industry on or after Oct. 1,
1968).

Baltimore— travel pay not applicable to em ployees hired in industry on or
after Oct. 1, 1969.

New York shippers agreed to contribute $2 million per year in supplem en­
tary income payments in lieu o f travel pay.

Holiday pay
Oct. 1, 1934

Overtime rate paid for work on legal
holidays. No pay for holidays not
worked.

Oct. 1, 1937 ..............................................
1957 (agreements dated Mar. 25,
1957— New York; Mar. 1, 1957—
Baltimore; Nov. 21, 1957— Boston;
Mar. 29, 1957— Hampton Roads;
Mar. 18, 1957— Philadelphia).

Established: 2 paid holidays for which
workers received 8 hours’ pay at
straight-time hourly rate.

See footnotes at end o f table.




28

Holidays were: New Year’s Day, W ashington’s Birthday, Decoration Day,
Independence Day, Labor Day, Armistice Day, Thanksgiving D ay,
Christmas Day. In addition:
Baltimore recognized Good Friday and Easter Sunday;
Hampton Roads recognized Lee’s Birthday, Jefferson Davis Day, and
Election Day;
New York recognized Good Friday (on the Jersey shore), Election Day,
Lincoln’s Birthday, Columbus Day; Armistice Day (on the Jersey
shore), and such other National or State holidays as may be proclaimed
by Executive authority;
Philadelphia recognized Good Friday, Election Day, Lincoln’s Birthday,
and Columbus Day;
Boston recognized Patriots’ Day, Bunker Hill Day, and Columbus Day.
Added: In Philadelphia, Flag Day; in Baltimore, L incoln’s Birthday; in
New York and vicinity, Armistice Day.
Holidays were: New York and B oston— Fourth of July and Labor Day;
Baltim ore— Good Friday and Memorial Day; Hampton Roads— Good
Friday and Jefferson D avis Day; Philadelphia— Christmas Day and
Labor Day.
New York, Boston, and Hampton Roads— to qualify, em ployee must have
received pay for 700 or more hours in previous fiscal year and worked
16 hours during holiday week. Holiday pay also provided in New York,
if em ployee received 1 w eek’s vacation pay after work record review
and worked 16 hours in holiday week. Baltim ore— 1,000 hours’ work in
previous fiscal year required to qualify; Philadelphia— 700 hours.
New York— up to 700 hours’ credit toward eligibility in previous year
granted for periods (1) compensated under a Federal or State occupa­
tional disability law, and (2) served in the Armed Forces if employed in
industry a minimum o f 700 hours in year prior to service and honorably
discharged.
Holidays observed without pay in all ports were: New Year’s D ay, Wash­
ington’s Birthday, V eterans’ Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas
Day.
In addition, the follow ing holidays were observed without pay: New
York— L incoln’s Birthday, Good Friday, Memorial D ay, Columbus
Day, Election Day; Baltim ore— L incoln’s Birthday, Columbus Day,
Election Day, Easter Sunday, Fourth of July, Labor Day, D efenders’
Day; Boston— Good Friday, Memorial Day, Columbus Day, Patriots
Day, Bunker H ill Day; Hampton Roads— Election Day, Memorial Day,
Fourth of July, Labor Day, L ee’s Birthday; Philadelphia— L incoln’s
Birthday, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Columbus Day, Election Day,
Fourth of July, and Labor Day.

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision
Holiday pay— Continued

1958 (1957 agreements noted on proceed­
ing page)

Added; 1 paid holiday.

Holiday was: New York— Good Friday; Baltimore— New Year’s Day;
Boston— W ashington’s Birthday; Philadelphia— Fourth of July;
Hampton Roads— "New Year’s Day and W ashington’s Birthday (Good
Friday deleted— observed without pay).
B oston— up to 700 hours’ credit toward eligibility in previous year
granted for periods served in the Armed Forces if employed in industry a
minimum o f 700 hours in year prior to service and honorably dis­
charged.
Holidays were: New York— Lincoln’s Birthday and Christmas Day:
B oston— Memorial Day and Veterans’ Day; Philadelphia— New d ear’s
Day and Memorial Day; Baltim ore— L incoln’s Birthday and W ashing­
ton’s Birthday; Hampton Roads— Election Day and Veterans’ Day.
Holiday was: New York— W ashington’s Birthday; Baltim ore—
Thanksgiving Day; B oston— Patriots’ Day; Hampton Roads— L ee’s
Birthday; Philadelphia— W ashington’s Birthday. Baltim ore—
qualifying hours for paid holidays reduced to 800.

1958 (agreement dated July 31,
1958 — Boston).

1959 (1957 agreements noted above).

Added: 2 paid holidays.

1960 (agreements dated D ec. 3, 1959
— New York; Dec. 5, 1959— B os­
ton; N ov, 25, 1960— Baltimore;
Dec. 10, 1959— Hampton Roads;
Dec. 23, 1959— Philadelphia).
1961 (agreements noted above).

Added; 1 paid holiday.

Added: 1 paid holiday.

1962 (agreements noted above).

Added: 1 paid holiday.

1964 (memoranda o f agreement of
Jan. 20, 1963— New York; Jan. 25,
1963— Baltimore and Hampton Roads;
Jan. 28, 1963— Boston; Jan. 26, 1963
— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1964 (agreements o f Apr. 13,
1965— New York; 1965— Balti­
more; oral agreement only, Feb.
13, 1965— Boston; Apr. 20, 1965—
Hampton Roads; Feb. 13, 1965—
Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1965 (above agreements).

Added: 1 paid holiday.

Added: 1 paid holiday.

Holiday was: New York— New Year’s Day; Baltim ore— Fourth o f July;
B oston— Thanksgiving Day; Hampton Roads— Thomas Jefferson’s
Birthday; Philadelphia— Flag Day.

Added: 1 paid holiday.

Oct. 1, 1966 (above agreements).

Added: 1 paid holiday.

Holiday was: New York— Memorial Day; Baltimore — Labor Day;
B oston— Christmas Day; Hampton Roads and Philadelphia— L incoln’s
Birthday.
Holiday was: New York— Election Day; Boston— St. Patrick’s Day;
Baltimore— Christmas Day; Hampton Roads— Columbus Day;
Philadelphia— Veterans’ Day.
Changed: Eligibility to— 800 hours worked during current year, 700 hours
worked during previous year.
Holiday was: Boston— L incoln’s Birthday; Baltim ore— Maryland Day;
New York, Hampton Roads, and Philadelphia— Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr.’s Birthday.
Changed: Hampton Roads— e ligib ility— em ployee must have received pay
for at least 700 hours in year preceding holiday; those who worked such
hours in such year were to be paid for all holidays granted after return to
work on or about Feb. 22, 1969.
Changed: New York— e ligib ility— em ployee must have had at least 700
hours’ credit in previous year and worked 16 hours or more in holiday
week or made him self available for work in holiday week.
Changed: Hampton Roads— Christmas Day, Labor Day, and Independence
Day substituted for L incoln’s Birthday, Columbus D ay, and Thomas
Jefferson’s Birthday as paid holidays.
Changed: Baltim ore— Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday substituted for
Maryland Day as a paid holiday.
Changed: New York— requirement that em ployee work 16 hours in a holi­
day week not applicable for those on vacation who provided advance
notice for vacation, on welfare fund sickness or accident, or on
industry-connected accidental injury compensation.
Holiday was Christmas Eve.

Oct. 1, 1967 (agreement of Feb. 13,
1965 — Boston).
Oct. 1, 1970 (agreement o f Apr. 2,
1969— Boston; Feb. 19, 1969—
Baltimore; Feb. 20, 1969—
Hampton Roads; Feb. 14, 1969—
New York; Feb. 22, 1969 —
Philadelphia).

Holiday was: New York— Thanksgiving Day; Baltimore and B oston—
Columbus Day; Hampton Roads— Thanksgiving Day; Philadelphia—
Good Friday.
Holiday was: New York— Columbus Day; Baltim ore— Veterans’ Day;
B oston— New Year’s Day; Hampton Roads— Good Friday;
Philadelphia— Thanksgiving Day.
Holiday was: New York— Veterans’ Day; Baltim ore— Defenders’ Day;
Philadelphia— Columbus Day; Boston— Bunker Hill Day; and Hampton
Roads— Memorial Day.

Added: 1 paid holiday.

Nov. 14, 1971 (agreements o f Mar.
15, 1972— Baltimore; Mar. 4, 1972
— Hampton Roads; Feb. 24, 1972—
New York).

Oct. 1, 1974 (agreements o f Aug. 20,
1974— Baltimore; June 27, 1975—
Boston; Aug. 19, 1974— Hampton
Roads and Philadelphia; July 24,
1974— New York).
Oct. 1, 1977 (agreements o f Nov. 18,
1977— New York; Nov. 29, 1977
— Baltimore; Nov. 30, 1977— B os­
ton; Dec. 5, 1977— Hampton
Roads; Nov. 27, 1977— Philadel­
phia).

Added: 1 paid holiday.

Added: 1 paid holiday.

Holiday was: New York and Baltim ore— New Year’s Eve; Boston—
Assumption Feast Day (A ug. 15); Hampton Roads— Columbus Day; and
Philadelphia— Richard L. Askew's Birthday (Apr. 6), which was also
added as a legal holiday.
Reduced: B oston— eligibility requirement to 700 hours’ worked during
current year, 600 hours worked during previous year.
Changed: Boston— up to 600 hours’ credit toward eligibility in previous
year granted for periods of service in Armed Forces if employed in in­
dustry a minimum o f 600 hours in year prior to military service and if
honorably discharged.

See footnotes at end o f table.




29

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
E ffective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters
Paid vaca ions

Oct. 1, 1934
jOct. 1, 1945

Oct. 1, 1948

Oct. 1, 1951

No provisions for paid vacation.
40 hours’ vacation pay at straight time
to em ployees who worked 1,350
hours or more in year.
Changed to: 800 but less than 1,350
hours of work— 40 hours’ pay;
1,350 hours or more— 80 hours’
pay.
Changed to: 40 hours’ pay for 700 but
less than 1,200 hours paid for dur­
ing the year; 80 hours’ pay for
1,200 hours or more.

Oct. 1, 1953 (agreements dated Feb.
11, 1954— Boston; action o f trus­
tees, date unavailable— Hampton
Roads; Mar. 12, 1954— Philadel­
phia).

Oct. 1, 1954 (agreement dated Feb.
24, 1955— New York).
Mar. 7, 1955 (agreement o f same
date— Baltimore).
Oct. 1, 1956 (agreements dated Mar.
25, 1958— New York; Mar. 1, 1957
— Baltimore; Nov. 21, 1957— B os­
ton; Mar. 29, 1957— Hampton
Roads; Mar. 18, 1957— Philadel­
phia).

Added: 120 hours’ pay for em ployees
with 1,500 or more hours o f work
during the year who had received
vacation pay in 5 o f the 6 im ­
mediately preceding years.

July 31, 1958 (agreement o f same
date— Boston).

Oct. 1, 1959 (agreements dated Dec.
3, 1959— New York; N ov. 25, 1960
— Baltimore; Dec. 10| 1959—
Hampton Roads; Dec. 23, 1959—
Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1964 (agreements o f Apr. 13,
1965— New York; 1965— Bahimore; oral agreement only— Feb.
13, 1965— Boston; Apr. 20, 1965—
Hampton Roads; Feb. 13, 1965—
Philadelphia).

Oct. 1, 1968 (agreement o f Apr. 2,
1969— Boston; Feb. 19, 1969—
Baltimore; Feb. 20, 1969—
Hampton Roads; Feb. 14, 1969—
New York; Feb. 22, 1969—
Philadelphia).

Eligibility requirements decreased to
MOBhours’ work for 80 hours’
paid vacation, and to 1,300 hours
for 120-hour vacation.
Added: 160 hours’ paid vacation for
em ployees who received 1,500
hours or more (Baltim ore— 1,300
hours or more) o f pay during the
contract year.

Changed: 200 hours’ paid vacation for
em ployees who received 1,500
hours or more (1 ,6 0 0 hours or more
in Philadelphia) of pay during the
contract year.

See footnotes at end o f table.




30

In accordance with arbitration awards o f D ec. 31, 1945. D etails o f plan
negotiated by parties,

Boston— up to 400 hours’ credit at rate of 20 hours a week, toward vaca­
tion eligibility provided em ployee incapacitated 8 or more days by occu­
pational disability and receiving statutory compensation for temporary
total disability.
Hampton Roads and Philadelphia— up to 400 hours’ credit at rate of 20
hours a week, toward vacation eligibility provided em ployee disabled by
compensable occupational illness or injury.
New York— vacation pay provided men within 50 hours of eligibility re­
quirements, if approved by joint committee after review o f work record.
Baltim ore— eligibility requirements reduced to 675 hours for 40 hours of
vacation pay, 1*175 for 80 hours.
New York— up to 700 hours’ credit toward eligibility in each of preceding
6 years granted for periods: (1) Compensated under an occupational dis­
ability law , (2) served in the Armed Forces if employed in the industry
at least 200 hours in year prior to service and honorably discharged, and
(3) employed as a loader before Feb. 1, 1958, in New York Foreign
Trade Zone or at Army base in 1954 w hile under civil service.
Baltim ore— eligibility requirements of 1,550 hours in previous year and
vacation pay in 2 o f 3 previous years.
B oston— vacation pay provided em ployees within 50 hours o f eligibility
requirements for 40 to 80 hours’ vacation if approved by joint committee
after review o f work record.
Hampton Roads— vacation pay provided em ployees within 10 hours of
eligibility requirements for 40 hours’ vacation if approved by joint
committee after review o f work record. Up to 1,000 hours’ credit a year,
for 2 years, toward eligibility granted em ployees for military service if
eligible for benefits in year prior to induction.
Boston— vacation review extended to em ployees within 30 hours o f e lig i­
bility requirements for 120-hour vacation.
Up to 700 hours’ credit in any 6-year period prior to claim for 120-hour
vacation granted em ployee for service in Armed Forces if employed in
industry a minimum o f 700 hours in year prior to service and honorably
discharged.
Baltim ore— not less than 675 hours’ work required in 2 o f the 3 preceding
fiscal years for 120-hour vacation.

Eligibility: B enefits provided em ployee who:
New York and Hampton Roads— (1) had worked in each of the immediately
preceding 12 years, and (2) had received pay for 700 hours or more or 1
week’s vacation pay in 10 of the 12 years;
Baltimore— received credit for 675 hours or more in 5 of the 6 immediately
preceding fiscal years;
Boston— qualified for a vacation in 10 of the 12 immediately preceding years;
and
Philadelphia— received pay for 700 hours or more in each of the immediately
preceding 12 years or received 1 week’s vacation pay or more in 10 of the 12
years.
Changed: Philadelphia— 20 hours a week credit toward vacation eligibility
provided for em ployees eligible for 120- and 140-hour vacations for
time lost because o f military service or disability covered by the welfare
plan or workmen’s compensation.
Changed: Baltim ore— eligibility-— benefits provided any em ployee who
received credit for 675 hours or more in 10 o f the 12 immediately pre­
ceding years.
Added: Philadelphia— e ligib ility— em ployee eligible for 200 hours’ paid
vacation provided 20 hours a week credit towards vacation eligibility for
time lost because o f military service or disability covered by the welfare
plan or workmen’s compensation. This provision also was to be appli­
cable to those eligible for the 240 hours of paid vacation that was to go
into effect on Oct. 1, 1969.

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1 Continued
—
E ffective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Paid vacations—-Continued
Oct. 1, 1969 (agreement o f Apr. 2,
1969— Boston; Feb. 19, 1969—
Baltimore; Feb. 20, 1969—
Hampton Roads; Feb. 14, 1969—
New York; Feb. 22, 1969—
Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1974 (agreements o f Aug. 19,
1974— Hampton Roads and
Philadelphia).

Changed: 240 hours’ paid vacation for
em ployees who received 1,500
hours or more (1 ,6 0 0 hours or more
in Philadelphia) o f pay during the
contract year.

Oct. 1, 1977 (agreements o f Nov. 30,
1977— Boston; Nov. 27, 1977—
Philadelphia)

Reduced: Philadelphia— eligibility
requirements to 1,200 hours of pay
in contract year for 120 hours’ vac­
ation pay; 1,300 hours o f pay for
160 hours’ vacation pay; 1,400
hours o f pay for 200 hours’ vacation
pay; and 1,500 hours o f pay for 240
hours’ vacation pay.

Added: Hampton Roads— workers who would have qualified for vacation
except for disability received credit toward qualifying 700 hours for 1
week of vacation at rate o f 20 hours per week (maximum o f 700 hours
for each eligibility year). When such disability was in fiscal year, a 2nd,
3rd, or 6th week's vacation pay was claimed, the hours credited toward
eligibility for additional vacation was at rate of 20 hours per week
(maximum 400 hours in eligibility year).
Added: Hampton Roads— contract board could provide 1 week o f vacation
pay to workers with 675 but less than 700 hours’ credit upon review o f
work record. Some approval could be given for 2nd week o f vacation for
worker 25 hours short of eligibility for 2 weeks o f vacation.
Added: Philadelphia— workers who maintained registration eligibility for
at least 5 years and disabled by compensable occupational injury, cred­
ited with 700 hours per year for 2-year period after year o f disability to
maintain registration for eligibility period. In addition, such workers
who maintained registration eligib ility, either 5 years or more or 10
years or more, were eligible for 1 week o f vacation pay or 2 w eeks of
vacation pay, respectively, for each o f 2 years after year o f disability.
Added: Philadelphia— em ployee who qualified for vacation pay in pre­
vious 5 contract years and received pay for 650 to 699 hours in current
year could receive 40 hours’ vacation pay upon review o f work record.
Employee who received pay for 1,000 hours in current year and received
vacation pay in 2 o f 3 preceding contract years would receive 80 hours’
vacation pay.
Changed: Philadelphia— workers who maintained registration eligibility
for at least 5 years and disabled by compensable occupational injury,
credited with 700 hours per year for 2-year period after year o f disability
to maintain registration for eligibility period. In addition, such workers
who maintained registration eligibility, either 5 years or more or 10
years or more, were eligible for 40 hours’ and 80 hours’ vacation pay,
respectively, for year o f disability and subsequent year and also, if
longshoreman, qualified for vacation benefits in year of disability,
worker would also receive such benefits for that year and each o f the 2
years succeeding year o f disability. Workers who maintained registra­
tion eligibility for 15 years or more and were disabled by compensable
or noncompensable occupational injury or sickness would receive same
credits for eligibility for registration and same vacation pay as for 5-year
or 10-year em ployees above; and in addition, in year o f disability, they
would receive any vacation pay in excess o f 2 weeks over that received
in year prior to disability.
Reduced: Boston— eligibility requirement for 40 hours’ vacation pay to
600 hours’ pay in contract year (existing provision for vacation upon
review o f work record if within 50 hours of required hours’ pay con­
tinued).
Changed: Boston— 600 hours substituted for 700 hours as required num­
ber earned in 5 out of 6 years as part of 120 hours’ vacation pay eligibility
and 10 out o f 12 years as part of 240 hours’ vacation pay eligibility. The
respective 1,300 hours and 1,500 hours’ pay required in qualifying year
were continued.
Changed: Boston— prorata allowance for service in Armed Forces limited
to 600 hours (w as 700) for 120 hours’ and 240 hours’ vacation pay.

Containerization fund
July 1,
Nov.
ment
Nov.

1960 (arbitration award dated
22, 1960— New York; agree­
of Oct. 13, 1961— Baltimore;
14, 1960— Boston).

New York, Baltimore, and
B oston— fund established to which
employers were to contribute the
follow ing royalty payments per
flross ton o f containerized cargo:
(1) Conventional ships, 35 cents;
(2) partially automated ships with
not more than 2 hatches and not
more than 40 percent of bale cube
space area fitted for handling
containers, 70 cents; and
(3) automated or containerized ships
with more than 2 hatches or more
than 40 percent of the bale cube
space cargo area fitted for han­
dling containers, $1.

See footnotes at end o f table.




31

Fund to be used to indemnify employees for loss of work resulting from
containerization (original intent in Baltimore as discussed during
1959-60 negotiations).
Baltimore— the container fund was established as an escrow fund pending
a decision as to the disposition of the escrow money.
New York— method o f distributing fund among em ployees to be deter­
mined by negotiation.
New York— royalties limited to boxed general cargo moving in overseas
export and import trade and in trade between New York and Puerto
Rico.
Baltim ore— royalties limited to containers dravo size or larger and did not
include containers in which household goods were packed.
Boston— the parties accepted the arbitration award in general; specific
details were to be determined by further negotiation.
Hampton Roads and Philadelphia— current contracts did not provide for
the establishment o f a containerization fund.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
E ffective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision
Containerization fund— Continued

Oct. 1, 1962 (agreement of same
date).

Changed: Baltimore — all money in
the containerization fund and all
royalty payments to be paid to the
pension trust fund.
Added: Baltimore— employers to
contribute 28 cents per gross ton of
containerized cargo loaded or un­
loaded for coastwise or intercoastal
trade.

Transfer o f funds and future contributions contingent on approval o f U .S .
tax authorities. (Such approval was obtained by letter from IRS dated
July 7, 1964.)

May 22, 1967 (memorandum o f
agreement dated May 19, 1967—
Hampton Roads).

Hampton Roads — containerization
fund established. Contributions per
gross ton o f cargo were (1) conven­
tional ships, 35 cents; (2) partially
automated ships, 70 cents; and (3)
fully automated ships, $1.

Distribution and administration of funds to be determined by union, sub­
ject to approval by the U .S . and Virginia tax authorities and the U .S .
Department of Labor.

D ec. 1, 1967 (agreement o f Nov. 8,
1967).

Philadelphia— containerization fund
established. Contributions identical
to New York. (See above.)

Royalties limited to containers dravo size or larger.

Apr. 1, 1969 (agreement dated Feb.
22, 1969— Philadelphia).
Jan. 28, 1970 (agreement o f same
date— Hampton Roads).

Royalty payments temporarily discontinued until Oct. 1, 1970.
Changed: Hampton R oads— distribution and administration to be deter­
mined by joint em ployer-em ployee Board o f Trustees. The trustees
could use the funds for group insurance, training programs or
supplementary income payments.
Temporary suspension of royalty payments was extended until Oct. 1,
1971.
Boston— parties agreed on dispersal o f fund with 90 percent o f fund to be
allocated to the pension fund and 10 percent to be allocated to the ILA
for costs incurred in negotiation o f fund.

Oct. 1, 1970 (Philadelphia).
Aug. 14, 1971 (agreement o f same
date— Boston).
Nov. 14, 1971 (CONASA-ILA agree­
ment o f Jan. 6, 1972).

May 1, 1977 (CONASA-ILA agree­
ment o f May 12, 1977).

Established: 2nd container royalty fund
into which CONASA employers
were to contribute royalty, equal to
the existing 35 cents, 70 cents, or
$1 container royalty. Such container
royalty was to be allocated to fi­
nance fringe benefits other than
supplemental cash payments, as
determined locally.
Increased: 1st container royalty fund
assessments were doubled (to 70
cents, $1.40, and $2, depending on
type of cargo handling). The addi­
tional container royalty payments
were to be used exclusively for sup­
plemental cash payments. The
original amount o f 1st container
royalty continued to be allocated as
determined locally.
LASH and SEABEE fund

Oct. 1, 1974 (CONASA-ILA agree­
ment o f June 21, 1974).

Established: Royalty o f $2 per gross
ton of cargo paid in port where
LASH or SEABEE cargo loaded or
discharged by non-ILA labor.

Oct. 1, 1977 (CONASA-ILA and
NYSA-ILA agreement o f Nov. 18,
1977).

No royalty paid on large loads of bulk cargoes, such as grain, fertilizers,
chem icals, scrap metals, waste materials, or other cargoes not subject to
load or count.
Added: $1 o f royalty to be used exclusively for supplemental cash pay­
ments and $1 for fringe items (other than supplemental cash payments).

Job security program (JSP)
Dec. 1, 1977

July 1, 1978 (JSP Agency letter dated
June 29, 1978).

Established: Financial backup program to
meet any shortfalls (not strike related)
in GAI, pension, and welfare funds in
each port. Initial assessments were
made on ocean carriers in the amounts
per weight ton of 20 cents for auto­
mated cargo, 12 cents for break-bulk
cargo, and 2 cents for bulk cargo.
Reduced: Assessment amounts per weight
ton to 5 cents for automated cargo, 3
cents for break-bulk cargo, and 0.5
cent for bulk cargo.

See footnotes at end of table.




32

The JSP contract, administered by the JSP Agency, Inc., was a separate agree­
ment involving only ocean carriers and the ILA. Employer associations on At­
lantic and Gulf Coasts subscribed to JSP. Assessments were to be adjusted or
suspended based on shortfall experience of GAI, pension, and welfare funds.
Resulting revised assessments for break-bulk cargo would be 60 percent of the
revised assessment for automated cargo, and bulk cargo would be 10 percent of
the automated assessment.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Guaranteed annual incc>me (GAI) plans
Apr. 1, 1966 (agreements o f Apr. 13,
1965— New York; oral agreement
only; Feb. 13, 1965— Boston; Feb. 13,
1965— Philadelphia).

Established: Plan to guarantee eligible
employees a minimum annual income
equal to 1,600 (Philadelphia— 1,300)
times the straight-time hourly earnings
at the rate applicable during the
guarantee year.
Size of benefits: Employees working less
than 1,600 hours (Philadelphia— 1,300)
in a contract year to receive the differ­
ence between 1,600 (Philadelphia—
1,300) times the straight-time hourly
rate applicable during the guarantee
year and hours paid for or worked.

Eligibility: Benefits provided for employ­
ees who were paid for at least 700
hours (Philadelphia— worked 700
hours) in year preceding guarantee
year.

Oct. 1, 1967 (agreement of Feb. 13,
1965— Philadelphia).

Apr. 1, 1969 (agreement of Feb. 22,
1969— Philadelphia; Feb. 14,
1969— New York).

Increased: Size of benefits—employees
working fewer than 1,500 hours in a
contract year to receive the difference
between 1,500 times the straight-time
hourly rate applicable during the year
and hours worked.
Increased: Size of benefits— New
York— to minimum o f 2,080 hours
times straight-time rate in a contract
year; Philadelphia— to minimum of
1,800 hours times straight-time rate in
a contract year.

July 1, 1969 (agreement of Feb. 22,
1969— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1969 (agreement of Apr. 2,
1969— Boston; Feb. 19, 1969—
Baltimore; Feb. 20, 1969— Hampton
Roads).

Oct. 1, 1970 (agreement of Feb. 20,
1969— Hampton Roads).
Oct. 1, 1971 (agreement of Mar. 15,
1972— Baltimore).

Increased: Size of benefits— Boston— to
minimum of 2,080 hours times
straight-time rate in a contract year.

Established: Baltimore and Hampton
Roads— plans to guarantee minimum
income of 1,800 hours in Baltimore
and 1,600 hours in Hampton Roads
times straight-time rate in a contract
year.
Eligibility: Baltimore— benefits provided
employee who worked 700 hours in
contract years 1966-67 and 1967-68
for benefits in contract years 1969-70
and 1970-71, respectively; Hampton
Roads— benefits provided employee
who worked 700 hours in contract
years in 1967-69 and 1968-69 for
benefits in contract years 1969-70 and
1970-71, respectively.
Increased: Size of benefits— to minimum
of 1,700 hours times straight-time rate
in a contract year.
Increased: Size of benefits—
Baltimore— to minimum of 1,900
hours times straight-time rate in a con­
tract year.

Nov. 14, 1971 (agreements o f Mar. 4,
1972— Boston and Hampton Roads;
Feb. 24, 1972— New York).

Changed: New York— payments to be made biweekly with employee to maintain
a bank of 200 hours reserve in final adjustment.

Changed: Philadelphia— payments to be made quarterly with employee to receive
75 percent of amount due each quarter except in last quarter in which balance
of amount due in contract year was to be paid.
Changed: Boston— employee hired by industry after Oct. 1, 1968, not eligible for
benefits under the guaranteed annual income plan.
Changed: Boston— deductions from guarantee for each day an employee was not
available, did not report, or refused work, to be accumulative (in a contract
year only) as follows: 1 day (8 hours) deducted for 1st offense; 2 days for 2nd
offense; 3 days for 3rd offense; and 4 days for 4th and each subsequent offense.
Payment was to be made annually in Baltimore and quarterly in Hampton Roads.
Baltimore and Hampton Roads— deductions were similar to those for New York
and Philadelphia except that in Hampton Roads, deductions for each day em­
ployee was unavailable, did not report, or refused work, were cumulative (in a
contract year only) as follows: 1 day each for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd offenses; and 3
days each for 4th and 5th offense.
Baltimore and Hampton Roads— computation of qualifying hours similar to other
ports, except that (1) an employee who worked 700 hours in either of 2 years
preceding induction into Armed Forces and was not able to qualify in a qual­
ifying year because of service in Armed Forces was to be credited with 20
hours each week spent in Armed Forces in computing 700 hours if employee
returned to work within a reasonable period of time (90 days in Baltimore) after
honorable discharge; and (2) full-time union officers for whom union made
contributions to pension-welfare fund during qualifying years, retained eligibil­
ity for payment (not to receive payment while in office).

Changed: Baltimore— payments made quarterly with employee receiving 75 per­
cent of amount due each quarter with balance of amount due paid last quarter of
contract year.
Changed: Boston— the 2,080-hour guarantee was applicable to those employed in
industry as of Nov. 14, 1971, who worked or had credit for 700 hours in
previous year. For 1st year of 1971 contract the GAI program was treated as if
it began Apr. 1, 1972, with workers receiving guarantee of 1,040 hours for
such year (for such year only, one-half payments of holidays and vacations
during previous year were deducted from 1,040-hour guarantee). Those who
entered industry after Nov. 14, 1971, were not eligible for a guarantee.

See footnotes at end of table.




From the effective date through Sept. 30, 1966, guaranteed minimum for New
York was 800 hours and Philadelphia 650 hours. After the initial 6-month
period, payments to be on an annual basis. Employees to receive 75 percent of
the minimum guarantee at the end of each one-fourth of a year for the 1st 3
quarters, and a final settlement of all income due at the end of the last quarter
of the contract year;
Philadelphia— payments to be semiannual.
Gross earnings received and payments for holidays, vacations, and unemployment
compensation to be deducted from guaranteed income each period.7
For each day employee was not available, did not report, or refused work, 8 hours
to be deducted from guarantee (4 hours if he did not report, but only 4 hours
were worked, or if he reported in the initial period, but did not return in the
following period).
New York— guarantee payments to be included in computing eligibility for holi­
days, vacation, pensions, welfare, and clinic services (clinic services at New
York only).
In the computation of qualifying hours, up to 20 hours credited for each week of
absence because of sickness, injury, or disability, in which employee received
welfare plan benefits, workman’s compensation, or disability benefits under a
Federal or State law.
Credit prorated for employees who returned from (1) the Armed Forces and had
worked 700 hours in the year preceding induction, and (2) serving as an officer
or employee of the union or a member of management, and had worked 700
hours or more before assuming the union or management position.

33

Table 3.

Supplementary compenaatlon practices1— Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters.

JAI) plans— Continued
Guaranteed annual income (C

Nov. 14, 1971— Continued

Aug. 7, 1972 (agreement of Mar. 4, 1972
— Hampton Roads).

Increased: Size of benefits— Hampton
Roads— to minimum of 1,800 hours
times straight-time rate in a contract
year (for qualification in previous
year).

Oct. 1, 1972 (agreements o f Mar. 15,
1972— Baltimore; Mar. 24, 1972—
Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1974 (agreements of Aug. 19,
1974— Hampton Roads; July 24,
1974— New York).

July 1, 1975 (agreement of June 27,
1975— Boston).

Changed: Size of benefits— Boston— to
minimum of 1,500 hours times
straight-time rate in a contract year
(375 hours times straight-time rate for
the 1st contract year which was treated
as if it began July 1, 1975, and ended
Sept. 30, 1975).
Changed: Eligibility— Boston— benefits
provided employee who worked 700
hours during the period that began Oct.
1, 1973, and ended Sept. 30, 1974, and
who met certain other requirements as
described in contract.

Oct. 1, 1976 (agreement of July 24,
1974— New York).

Oct. 1, 1977 (agreements of Nov. 30, 1977
—Boston; Nov. 27, 1977—
Philadelphia; Nov. 29, 1977—Balti­
more).

Increased: Size of benefits— Boston— to
minimum of 1,700 hours times
straight-time rate in a contract year
(1,426 hours times straight-time rate
for 1st contract year which was treated
as if it began Nov. 30, 1977).
Changed: Eligibility— Boston— benefits
provided employees on GAI eligibility
list dated Oct. 1, 1974, as amended
Nov. 21, 1977, providing certain other
requirements in contract were met.

See footnotes at end of table.




34

Changed: New York (effective Oct. 1, 1968)— employee debited 1 day for 1st
offense, 2 days for 2nd offense, 3 days for 3rd offense, and 4 days for 4th and
subsequent offenses (cumulative only in a contract year) for each day worker
refused to be available, to accept assignment, or to work in category or
categories either on a list, prior day order, or hiring center assignment. Em­
ployee continuously failing to be available for employment was disqualified for
GAI for remainder of contract year.
Added: New York— employee disqualified from receiving further GAI for 12month period if (1) working regularly on another job requiring attendance be­
tween 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday; (2) refused to accept list
position; (3) left employer list position except when accepting another list posi­
tion; or (4) continuously unavailable for work.
Changed: Hampton Roads— payments made biweekly with employee receiving 80
percent of amount due biweekly with balance of amount due paid for last
biweekly payment of contract year.
Changed: Hampton Roads— employee was debited 1 day for each of 1st 5 of­
fenses and 3 days for each subsequent offense for each refusal to be available,
to accept assignment, or to work in category or categories either on a list,
prior day order, or hiring center assignment.
Changed: Hampton Roads— 30-day limit given honorably discharged veteran of
Armed Forces to return to work for receipt of 20 hours per week credit for each
week in Armed Forces in computation of 700 hours.

Changed: Baltimore— payments made on a twice-a-month basis under previous
allocation formula.
Changed: Philadelphia— payments made monthly (75 percent due each month
with balance paid in last month of contract year).
Changed: Hampton Roads— employee was debited 1 day for each of 1st 6 of­
fenses; thereafter eligibility for GAI benefit was suspended for remainder of
contract year, for each refusal to be available, to accept assignment, or to
work in category or categories either on a list, prior day order, or hiring center
assignment.
Changed: Hampton Roads— hours earned during guarantee period deducted from
benefit. Payments for holidays and vacations also deducted. Welfare, compen­
sation, and container royalty payments excluded from gross earnings. When
employee was receiving welfare or compensation payments, guarantee reduced
8 hours for each day (except Saturday, Sunday, and legal holidays).
Changed: New York— employee ineligible for further GAI benefit for 12-month
period who failed to accept employment as ordered either by employer or for
any prior day order assignment or the morning shape-up on 3 or more occa­
sions.
Added: Boston— employee disqualified for GAI benefit for a 12-month period (1)
if employed at another job requiring attendance between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. on
any day of week from Monday through Friday, except on a casual basis where
job is obtained on same day after 9 a.m., or (2) for failure to accept employ­
ment, except for approved medical reasons, as ordered by regular or any other
employer on 3 or more occasions, or (3) when earnings are less than State
Unemployment Compensation benefits and employee failed to produce evi­
dence of receipt of unemployment compensation payments, if eligible. Other
debiting procedures as previously reported were continued.
Changed: Boston— GAI funded solely by joint GAI fund obtained by assessing all
manifested cargo discharged or loaded in the Port of Boston on a long-ton
(2,240 pounds) basis at the rates of $1, 25 cents, 10 cents, and 10 cents per
long ton for general cargo, lumber, tallow, and scrap metal, respectively.
Changed: Boston— payments made monthly with employee receiving 75 percent
of amount due each month with balance of amount due paid last month of
contract year. The period July 1, 1975, through Sept. 30, 1975, was treated for
payment purposes as if it were 1 month.
Added: New York— employee ineligible for GAI benefit who remained in indus­
try after Jan. 1, 1976, and would have received $2,500 lump-sum payment
from GAI fund had employee retired after reaching age 65, as shown under
pension plan section.
Established: Job Security Program effective Dec. 1, 1977, to fund any shortfalls
in GAI benefit, pension, and welfare plans. (See Job Security Program section
of this table.)

S3 !

!'-) !

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Guaranteed annual income (GAI) plans— Continued
Oct. 1, 1977— Continued

Increased: Size of benefits—
Philadelphia— to minimum of 1,900
hours times straight-time rate in a contract year.

Changed: Philadelphia— payments made every 2 weeks with employee receiving
75 percent of amount due each 2 weeks with balance of amount due paid in
final 2-week period of contract year.
Added: Philadelphia— employee eligible for GAI for 5 successive years and failed
to qualify because of occupational or nonoccupational injury or sickness to
receive 1-year waiver of eligibility requirements.
Changed: Baltimore— payments made under GAI were to be counted in calculat­
ing payments to pension and benefits trust funds up to (1) 700 hours if received
total of 700 hours in any combination of hours worked, hours paid for under
GAI, workers’ compensation credit hours to pension fund, and workers’ com­
pensation hours to benefits fund; or (2) to a total not to exceed 1,100 hours if
employee qualified for maximum benefits under benefits fund for last 5 years
and received total of 1,100 hours in any combination of hours worked, hours
paid under GAI, workers’ compensation credit hours to pension fund, and
workers' compensation hours to benefit fund.

Pension plans
Jan. 1, 1950 (agreements dated Oct. 1,
1949— New York, Boston, Baltimore,
Philadelphia, and Hampton Roads).
Jan. 1, 1951..................................................

Nov. 1, 1951 (action of trustees of same
date).
Aug. 1, 1952 (action of trustees, date not
available— New York; action of trus­
tees, Nov. 21, 1952— Baltimore).
Oct. 1, 1952 (action of trustees, June 18,
1952).
Apr. 29, 1953 (amendment of same date).

Sept. 1, 1953 (action o f trustees, date not
available).
Oct. 1, 1953 (action of trustees, Feb. 17,
1954).
Jan. 1, 1954 (action of trustees, Apr. 9,
1954— Baltimore; Mar. 1, 1955—
Boston).
May 1, 1954 (agreement dated May 21,
1954— New York).

Pension plans established; financed by
employer contribution of 5 cents per
man-hour worked.
Pension plan effective providing:
Eligibility— continuous employment from
Jan. 1, 1937, with average of 800
hours of work a year, required of em­
ployees retiring before Jan. 1, 1962.
Basic benefits— monthly pension of $35
in New York, Boston, and Philadel­
phia, $30 in Baltimore, and $25 in
Hampton Roads, exclusive of Federal
old-age benefits, to employees aged 65
or over with 25 years’ continuous
service in industry and average of 800
hours worked per year.
Disability benefits— basic benefits re­
duced by statutory payments to em­
ployees totally and permanently dis­
abled on the job at age 45 or over with
15 years’ continuous service in industry
and average of 800 hours worked per
year.
Increased to; Basic benefits— Hampton
Roads, $32.
Increased to: Basic benefits— New York,
$50; Baltimore, $45.

Not applicable to employees disabled by criminal activity, habitual drunkeness,
self-inflicted injury, addiction to narcotics, or while in military service. Con­
tinuous employment from Jan. 1, 1937, with average of 800 hours of work a
year, required of employees applying for disability benefits prior to Jan. 1,
1952.
Benefits terminated on reemployment in industry for (1) term of employment, or
(2) 1 year, whichever is greater.

Increased to: Basic benefits —
Philadelphia, $45.
Added: New York— disability benefits applicable to employees (1) permanently
and totally disabled on or after Jan. 1, 1944, but before Jan. 1, 1950, by injury
incurred on the job; and (2) employed in the industry at the time of injury and
at the time of application for pension.
Hours credited for temporary-total occupational disability extended to temporaryand permanent-partial (for maximum of 5 years) disability. Hours credited plus
hours worked in industry not to exceed 800.
Credit for military service limited to 3 years; board of trustees permitted to credit
up to 2 additional years.
Increased to: Basic benefits— New York,
$65.
Increased to: Basic benefits—
Philadelphia, $50.
Increased to: Basic benefits— Baltimore,
$55; Boston, $50.
Added: Death benefits: New York— $500
to designated beneficiary on death of
retiree.

See footnotes at end of table.




Continuity of employment broken when employee worked fewer than 400 hours a
year for more than 2 years, except that employees unable to work for the fol­
lowing reasons were given credit for the periods stipulated: Nonoccupational
illness or injury— up to 3 years; temporary-total occupational injury— 800
hours a year; military service after May 1, 1940, and reemployment in
industry— 1,000 hours a year.

35

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters
Pension plans— Continued

Jan. 1, 1955 (action of trustees, July 28,
1955— New York;
Mar. 1, 1955— Boston;
Mar. 20, 1957— Philadelphia;
July 16, 1955— Baltimore); and effective
Jan. 1, 1956 (action of trustees, Feb. 3,
1955— Hampton Roads).

Feb. 1, 1955 (action of trustees, Feb. 2,
1955).
Oct. 26, 1955 (agreement of same
date— New York); and
Jan. 1, 1955 (action o f trustees, May 1,
1956— Boston).

Changed: Employer contribution increased to 7 cents an hour.
Eligibility— annual hours o f work required to qualify for pension and credit
in case of disability reduced to 700, except at Hampton Roads.
Increased to: Basic benefits—
Philadelphia, $58.
Death benefits: Boston— $500 to desig, nated beneficiary on death of retiree.
Increased to: Basic benefits— Hampton
Roads, $35.
'Added: New York and Boston—
employee receiving State or Federal
compensation for disabling occupational injury and eligible for plan bene­
fits (1) if age 65 or over, to receive
regular pension; and (2) if under age
65, to receive regular benefits less
compensation awarded for temporaryi total or temporary-partial disability.

June 1, 1956 (action of trustees, May 1,
1956).
Jan. 1, 1957 (action of trustees, Apr. 16,
1957).
Jan. 23, 1957 (action of trustees of same
date).
Nov. 1, 1957 (action of trustees, Oct. 29,
1957).
Jan. 1, 1959 (action o f trustees, o f same
date).

July 1, 1959 (action of trustees, June 5,
1959).
Oct. 1, 1959 (agreements dated Dec. 28,
1959— New York;
Dec. 10, 1959— Baltimore and
Hampton Roads; Dec. 23, 1959—
Philadelphia; and Aug. 30, 1961 —
Boston).
Oct. 1, 1959 (action o f trustees, May 1,
1960).
Jan. 1, 1960 (action of trustees, date not
available— New York; action of trustees, Dec. 28, 1959— Hampton
Roads).
Apr. 6, 1960 (action of trustees of same
date).
June 1, 1960 (action of trustees, July 22,
1960).
Oct. 1, 1960 (action of trustees, Jan. 23,
1961).

Added: New York— deferred benefits
available at age 65 for employees age
60 or more with required period of em­
ployment but unable to continue work­
ing.
Increased to: Death benefits— Boston,
$750 to whomever incurred funeral ex­
penses of retiree.
Increased to: Basic benefits— Baltimore,
$60.

Employee who received benefits under (2) to receive regular pensions upon
reaching age 65.

Baltimore— $25 a month to widow of pensioner age 50 or over and married 10 or
more years, provided husband had been receiving basic benefits.
Added: New York— continuity of employment not broken during periods of intemment or civil detention in a foreign country by order of foreign government
during an “ international political crisis.”

Increased to: Basic benefits— Hampton
Roads, $55.
Added: Philadelphia— deferred benefits at
age 65 for employees with 25 years’
continuous service.
Employee receiving State or Federal
compensation for disabling occupa­
tional injury and eligible for plan bene­
fits (1) if age 65 or over, to receive
regular pension; or (2) if under age 65,
to receive regular benefits less compensation awarded for temporary-total or
temporary-partial disability.
Increased to: Basic benefits— Hampton
Roads, $60.
Changed: Employer contribution increased to 14 cents an hour.
■s

Increased to: Basic benefits— Boston,
$75.
Increased to: Basic benefits— New York,
$85; Hampton Roads, $65.

Increased to: Death benefits— Boston,
$1,000.
Increased to: Basic benefits—
Philadelphia, $75.
Increased to: Basic benefits— Baltimore,
$75.
Changed to: Baltimore— disability benefits, $60 a month to employees totally
and permanently disabled at age 45 or
over, with an additional $1 for each
year of service over 15, maximum $75.

See footnotes at end of table.




Applicable to employees already retired.

Added: New York— continuity of employment not broken for employees working
less than 400 hours a year in 1942 or 1943 because of war conditions or, in
1944-46, as a result of War Manpower Regulations, provided continuity was
not terminated before or after such years.

Jan. 12, 1956 (action of trustees of same
date).

May 23, 1956 (action of trustees of same
date).

Changed to: Baltimore— continuity of employment broken when employee
worked fewer than 400 hours a year for more than 5 years.

36

’. y e s - ”
■■
■

v

'... ■

Baltimore— widows to receive benefits regardless of the basis on which husband
retired.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision
Pension plans— Continued

Oct. 1, 1960— Continued
Oct 1, 1962 (memorandum of agreement
of Jan. 20, 1963— New York; Jan. 25,
1963— Baltimore and Hampton Roads;
Jan. 28, 1963— Boston; Jan. 26,
1963— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1962 (action of trustees— 1963).

Jan. 1, 1963 (action of trustees, July 30
and Aug. 29, 1963).
July 1, 1963 (action of trustees, Jan. 25,
1963).

July 1, 1963 (action of the pension board
and Board of Trustees, Aug. 9,
1963— Baltimore; action of trustees
June 28, 1963— Hampton Roads).
Oct. 1, 1963 (memoranda of agreement of
Jan. 20, 1963— New York; Jan. 25,
1963— Baltimore and Hampton Roads;
Jan. 28, 1963— Boston; Jan. 26, 1963
— Philadelphia).

Jan. 1, 1964 (action of trustees, Dec. 30,
1963— Hampton Roads).
(Morse memorandum of settlement of
Jan. 20, 1963).
Apr. 1, 1965 (agreement of Apr. 13,
1965— New York; Oct. 1, 1964—
Baltimore; oral agreement only Nov.
2, 1965— Boston; action of trustees,
Aug. 24, and Nov. 19, 1965—
Hampton Roads).
Sept. 10, 1965 (action of trustees of same
date— Hampton Roads).
Oct. 1, 1965 (agreement of Apr. 13,
1965— New York; Oct. 1, 1964—
Baltimore; oral agreement only Feb.
13, 1965— Boston; Feb. 18, 1965—
Hampton Roads; Feb. 13, 1965—
Philadelphia).
Jan. 1, 1966 (agreement of Oct. 1,
1964— Baltimore).

Increased to: Basic benefits—Hampton
Roads, $75.
Increased: Employer contribution to 18
cents an hour.

Changed: Eligibility— Baltimore—
minimum average annual hours of work
required to qualify for basic and dis­
ability pension, 600.
Added: Deferred benefits—Baltimore— at
age 65 for employees with 25 years’
continuous service leaving industry be­
cause of closing facilities or for em­
ployment in another industry.
Increased to: Basic benefits— Boston,
$ 100 .
Added: Early retirement— Baltimore—
employees age 62 or over, with 25
years’ or more credited service could
receive 80 percent of basic benefits.
Increased: Basic benefits— Baltimore and
Hampton Roads, to $90.
Increased: Disability benefits—
Baltimore— $60, plus $3 for each year
of service over 15, maximum $90.
Increased: Employer contribution to 23
cents an hour.
Increased: Basic benefits—New York and
Philadelphia, to $100.
Increased: Death benefits— New York,
$ 1, 000.

Added: Deferred benefits— New
York— at age 65 for employees with 25
years’ continuous service.
Increased: Basic benefits— Hampton
Roads, $100.
Added: Deferred benefits— Hampton
Roads— at age 65 for employees with
25 years’ employment in the industry.
Increased: Basic benefits— New York,
Baltimore, Boston, and Hampton
Roads— to $125.
Increased: Disability benefits—
Baltimore— to $85, plus $4 for each
year of service over 15, maximum
$125.
Changed: Eligibility— Hampton
Roads— minimum annual hours of
work required for pension credit, 700.
Increased: Employer contribution to 47
cents an hour.

Changed: Eligibility— minimum annual
hours of work required for pension
credit for (1) basic benefits— to aver­
age 700 hours for the preceding 25-year
period, with no more than 5 years in
which fewer than 400 hours were
worked, and (2) disability benefits— to
average 700 hours for the preceding
15-year period with no allowance for a
year in which fewer than 400 hours
were worked.

See footnotes at end of table.




37

Additional increase effective Oct. 1, 1963.

Added: Baltimore— credit for work outside industry limited to 5 years.
In effect: Baltimore— continuity of employment not broken for time lost because
of occupational accident occurring in industry, military service, or employment
in shipyards in Baltimore area during the years 1942 through 1946.

Increased: Baltimore— $35 a month to widow of pensioner.

Applicable to pensioners and future retirees.
Applicable only to employees terminated after Oct. 1, 1963.
Added: Philadelphia— continuation of deceased pensioners monthly benefits to
widow until the earliest of 50 monthly installments, death, or remarriage.
Dependent mother received payments if pensioner was widower, or the balance
of the 50 monthly payments in the event of death or remarriage of widow
before benefits terminated. Fifteen payments of $100 each provided eligible
widow or dependent mother of deceased employee. Continuation benefits were
not payable if the pensioner or employee had full life insurance coverage under
the welfare plan.
Monthly benefits to be the same as those prevailing on the employees’ termination
date.
Applicable to pensioners and future retirees.
Monthly benefits to be the same as those prevailing on the employees’ termination
date.
Increased: Baltimore— widow’s monthly benefit to 50 percent of pensioner’s
benefits. Minimum benefit— $42.50 a month. To be eligible, widow must have
been married to pensioner for 10 years and reached age 50 before his death.

Pension credit was given for absence because of injury or military service.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters
Pension plans— Continued

Jan. 1, 1966 (agreements o f Apr. 13,
1965— New York; Oct. 1, 1964—
Baltimore; oral agreement only—
Nov. 2, 1965— Boston; Feb. 15,
1965— Hampton Roads; Feb. 13,
1965— Philadelphia).

Oct. 1, 1968 (agreement of Feb. 14,
1969— New York; Apr. 2, 1 9 6 9 Boston; Feb. 19, 1969— Baltimore;
Feb. 20, 1969— Hampton Roads; Feb.
22, 1969— Philadelphia).
Jan. | , 1969 (agreement dated Feb. 22,
1969— Philadelphia).

Increased: Basic benefits— to $175 a
month for employees 62 years of age
and older with 25 years or more of
service.

Increased: Disability benefits— New
York, Baltimore, and Boston, to $125,
plus $5 for each year of service over
15, maximum $175.
Increased: Employer contributions to 57
cents an hour.

Increased: Basic benefits— to $300.
Increased: Disability benefits— to $180,
plus $12 for each year of service over
15 (maximum $300).

Apr. 1, 1969 (agreement of Feb. 14,
1969— New York; Feb. 19, 1969—
Baltimore; Feb. 20, 1969— Hampton
Roads).

June 1, 1969 (agreement of Feb. 14,
1969— New York; Feb. 20, 1969—
Hampton Roads).

Increased: Basic benefits— to $300 ($200
in Baltimore).
Added: Basic benefits— Baltimore— of
$300 if employee met new eligibility
requirements. Employees must have
retired at or after age 62 with 25 years
of service immediately before his ap­
plication with at least 700 hours in each
o f 20 of the previous 25 years, with a
minimum of 17,500 hours for the 25year period.
Increased: Disability benefit— New York
and Hampton Roads— to $180, plus
$12 for each year of service over 15
(maximum $300).
Increased: Disability benefit—
Baltimore— to $150, plus $5 for each
year of service over 15 (maximum
$ 200).
Added: Disability benefit— Baltimore— of
$180, plus $12 for each year of service
over 15 (maximum $300) for employ­
ees who met new eligibilty require­
ments. Employee must have worked at
least 700 hours in each of the 15 years
before his application, except that for
each additional year of 700 hours he
may have 1 year in the 15-year period
under 700 hours, with a maximum of 5
years under 700 hours in the 15-year
qualifying period.
Added: Early retirement benefits—
Baltimore— employee age 55 with 20
years of service with no year under 700
hours worked could elect monthly
benefit of $250, until age 62 at which
time amount was increased to $300 (if
at time of retirement, he met qualifica­
tions for retirement at age 62).
Added: Early retirement benefits—
employee age 55 with 20 years of
service could elect monthly benefit of
$250 until age 62 at which time amount
was increased to $300.

See footnotes at end of table.




38

Benefit increase applicable to those retiring on or after Jan. 1, 1966.
Increased: New York and Boston— for the widow of (1) an employee with 25
years or more of service, at death, to $87.50 a month, beginning when the
employee would have become 62 years of age; and (2) a pensioner whose death
occurred after Jan. 1. 1965. to 50 Dercent of his monthlv benefit.
Added: Baltimore and Hampton Roads— $87.50 a month to widow of an em­
ployee with 25 years or more of service at death, beginning when employee
would have become 62 years of age.
Added: Hampton Roads— 50 percent of a pensioner's monthly benefit to his
widow provided his death occurred after Jan. 1, 1965.
Increased: Philadelphia— to $87.50 a month to the widow of a pensioner or de­
pendent mother of an unmarried pensioner.

Applicable to those who retired on or after Jan. 1, 1969.
Employees retired before Jan. 1, 1969, to receive basic benefit of $200.
Surviving widow of pensioner who died on or after Jan. 1, 1965, to receive
monthly pension of $100 until remarriage or death. If pensioner did not leave a
surviving widow, the benefit was payable to his dependent mother for life.
Surviving widow of employee not a pensioner and who did not leave industry
before his death and who died on or after Jan. 1, 1965, to receive monthly
pension of $100 unitl remarriage or death beginning month employee would
have reached age 62 but not before Jan. 1, 1969, if employee had 25 years of
service in industry or elected to continue working in the industry after age 62
when qualified for pension even though he had worked less than 400 hours a
year for more than 2 years. If employee did not leave a surviving widow, the
benefit was payable to his dependent mother for life.
Applicable to those who retired on or after Apr. 1, 1969. Employee who retired
before Apr. 1, 1969, to receive $25-a-month increase in basic benefits.
Changed: New York and Baltimore— widow’s benefit to 50 percent of pen­
sioner’s benefit with a maximum of $100 a month with a proportionate increase
for widows of disability pensioners. Those widowed before Apr. 1, 1969, to
receive a proportionate increase to maximum o f $100.
Changed: Hampton Roads— widow’s benefit to 50 percent of pensioner’s benefit
with a maximum of $100 a month for the widow of a pensioner who retired on
or after Apr. 1, 1969. Widow of a pensioner who retired before Apr. 1, 1969,
to receive an increase of $12.50 in the monthly benefit to a maximum of $100.

Election for early retirement had to be made before July 1, 1969 (1st option
period) and before July 1, 1970 (2nd option period).
Baltimore— widow o f early retirees to receive monthly pension of $100.

Election for early retirement had to be made before June 1, 1969 (1st option
period) and before June 1, 1970 (2nd option period).
New York— widow of early retiree to receive monthly pension of $100.
New York— early retirement was to be funded on a 40-year basis.
Hampton Roads— widow o f early retiree to receive amount as computed for
widow of regular retiree.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision
Pension plans--Continued

Aug. 1, 1969 (agreement of Apr. 2,
1969— Boston).

Increased: Basic benefit— to $300.

Increased: Disability benefits— to $180,
plus $12 for each year of continuous
service over 15 (maximum $300).

Oct. 1, 1969 (agreement of Feb. 14, 1969
— New York; Apr. 2, 1969—-Boston;
Feb. 19, 1969— Baltimore; Feb. 20,
1969— Hampton Roads; Feb. 22, 1969
— Philadelphia).
Oct. 1, 1970 (agreement of Feb. 14, 1969
— New York; Feb. 19, 1969— Balti­
more; Apr. 2, 1969— Boston; Feb. 20,
1969— Hampton Roads; Feb. 22, 1969
— Philadelphia).
Nov. 14, 1971 (agreements of Jan. 6,
1972— CONASA-ILA; Feb. 24,
1972— New York; Mar. 24, 1972—
Philadelphia; Mar. 4, 1972— Boston
and Hampton Roads; Mar. 15,
1972— Baltimore).

Increased: Employer contribution to 70
cents an hour.

Increased: Employer contribution to 75
cents an hour.

Increased: Employer contribution to 87
cents an hour (all ports).

Increased: Basic benefit— Hampton Roads
— to $400
Increased: Disability benefit— Hampton
Roads— to $240, plus $16 for each
year of continuous service over 15
(combined maximum $400).

Jan. 1, 1972 (agreements of Nov. 6,
1972— Baltimore; Nov. 17, 1971, Oct.
18, 1972, and Jan. 17, 1973—
Philadelphia).

Increased: Basic benefit— Baltimore and
Philadelphia— to $400 (at Baltimore,
this full basic benefit applied to those
who met eligibility requirements estab­
lished effective Apr. 1, 1969).

See footnotes at end of table.




Applicable to those who retired on or after Oct. 1, 1968.
Employee who retired before Oct. 1, 1968, to receive a $25-a-month increase in
basic benefit.
Eligible widow of pensioner who retired on or after Oct. 1, 1968, to receive $100
a month.
Eligible widow of pensioner who retired before Oct. 1, 1968, to receive $12.50a-month increase in pension.
There was to be no retroactivity under any of the above provisions for Boston.
Applicable to those who retired on or after Oct. 1, 1968.
Pensioner who retired on basis of disability before Oct. 1, 1968, to receive an
increase of $2.50 a month for each year of service over 15, up to a maximum
of $25 for 25 years of service.
Eligible widow of pensioner who retired on basis of disability on or after Oct. 1,
1968, to receive $90, plus $6 a month for each year o f continuous service over
15 (maximum $100).
Eligible widow of pensioner who retired on basis of disability before Oct. 1,
1968, to receive an increase of $1.25 a month for each year of service over 15,
up to a maximum o f $12.50 for 25 years of service.
There was to be no retroactivity under any of the above provisions for Boston.
Widow of a member who died on or after Aug. 1, 1969, before the retirement age
of 62 with 25 years of service to receive $100 a month beginning 1st of the
month following month in which member died. Widow o f member who died
before Aug. 1, 1969, still to have benefit deferred to time that member would
have reached age 62 (maximum $100).
Reimbursement for funeral expenses was increased to $1,500 for death of a pen­
sioner who retired on or after Aug. 1, 1969, and who was not covered under
BSA-ILA Health Welfare Clinic Fund. Remained $1,000 for such retirees who
died before Aug. 1, 1969.

39

Changed: New York— employers guaranteed contribution level of 31, 34, and 37
million dollars in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd years of contract, respectively. (A 40million-man-hour guarantee had been provided in each year of the previous
contract.)
Changed: Hampton Roads employers guaranteed 1.5, 1.75, and 1.75 million
work-hours in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd years of the contract. (The previous con­
tract had provided a guarantee of 1.8 million work-hours in its 2nd year and 2
million in its 3rd year.)
Philadelphia— employers guaranteed 13 million hours for pension and welfare
funds combined over the term of the contract. (The same guarantee was pro­
vided by the previous agreement.)
Baltimore— employers guaranteed contribution of 12 million hours over term of
contract for pensions and welfare combined.
Added: Boston— to provide pension security, employers paid $1 per 2,000
pounds cargo (“ Boston Dollar” ) on all house-to-house containerized cargo
loaded or unloaded in Port of Boston regardless of whether the vessel is a
feeder-vessel or whether the cargo is in intercoastal or offshore trade, with the
exception that the levy was not to apply to container cargo which has or will be
transhipped at another East Coast port moving to or from Puerto Rico or in the
domestic and/or intercoastal trade.
Applicable to those retired on or after Nov. 14, 1971.
Increased: Hampton Roads— basic benefit by $25 a month for those retired before
Nov. 14, 1971.
Applicable to those retired on or after Nov. 14, 1971.
Increased: Hampton Roads— widow o f pensioner retired on or after Nov. 14,
1971, received maximum benefit of $125 (based on 50 percent of pensioner’s
benefit).
Increased: Hampton Roads— widow of employee who died on or after Nov. 14,
1971, while on active rolls with 25 years of service, received monthly pension
of $125 (was $100 on Apr. 1, 1969) beginning when employee would have
reached age 62.
Increased: Hampton Roads— widows (of either pensioner or employee) receiving
a pension benefit before Nov. 14, 1971, received increase of $12.50 in monthly
benefit to a maximum of $125.
Applicable to those who retired on or after Jan. 1, 1972.
Increased: Baltimore— all pensioners retired before Jan. 1, 1972, received in­
crease in benefit of $50 a month.
Increased: Philadelphia— pensioners who retired before Jan. 1, 1969, received
increase in benefit of $25 a month (except for those retired on disability before
Jan. 1, 1969).

Tabfe 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters
Pension plans— Continued

Jan. 1, 1972— Continued

Increased: Disability benefit— Baltimore
and Philadelphia— to $240, plus $16
for each year o f service over 15 to
combined maximum o f $400 (at Balti­
more, this full disability benefit applied
to those who met eligibility require­
ments established effective Apr. 1,
1969).
Added: Death benefit— Philadelphia—
$ 2 , 000.
Added: Reduced basic benefit— Baltimore
— $250.

Added: Reduced disability benefit—
Baltimore— $200, plus $5 per year of
service over 15 (combined maximum,
$250).

Apr. 1, 1972 (agreement of Feb. 24,
1972— New York).

Increased: Basic benefit— New York— to
$400.
Increased: Disability benefit— New
York— to $240 plus $16 for each year
of continuous service over 15 (com­
bined maximum $400).
Changed: Early retirement benefit— New
York— to $300 for life for employee
with 20 years of industry service and
age 50 as of Dec. 31, 1972; and to
$350 for life for employee with 25
years of industry service and age 55 as
o f Dec. 31, 1972.

See footnotes at end of table.




40

Applicable to those retired on or after Jan. 1, 1972.
Changed: Philadelphia— eligibility for disability liberalized to allow benefit to
worker age 40 on or after Jan. 1, 1972, if employed in industry for continuous
period of at least 15 years with an average of at least 700 hours a year and
permanently and totally disabled on or after Jan. 1, 1972, while employed in
industry.
In effect and continued: Baltimore— for full disability benefit, only years in which
at least 700 hours were worked counted as years of service in determining
eligibility and amount of pension.
Financed from pension plan (previously financed by welfare and insurance plan).
$500 of amount could be used for expenses in connection with last illness,
death, or burial of pensioner.
Applicable to pensioner retired on or after Jan. 1, 1972, under eligibility require­
ments in effect before Apr. 1, 1969, which required that worker at age 62 had
(1) an annual average of 700 hours worked (minimum 17,500 hours) in the 25
years of continuous service immediately before application, and (2) worked at
least 400 hours in 20 or more of the 25 years.
Applicable to pensioner retired on or after Jan. 1, 1972, under eligibility require­
ments in effect before Apr. 1, 1969, which required that worker had (1) an
annual average of 700 hours worked (minimum 10,500 hours) in the 15 years
of continuous service immediately before application, and (2) worked at least
400 hours in each of the 15 years or in at least 15 of the last 20 years. Only
years in which 400 hours were worked and in which an average of 700 hours
were worked were counted as years of service for determining eligibility and
amount of pension.
Increased: Baltimore— maximum spouse’s benefit, based on 50 percent of pen­
sioner’s benefit, to $125 for spouse of pensioner or active employee (applied to
spouse of active employee eligible for full or reduced basic pension except for
age) who died on or after Jan. 1, 1972.
Increased: Baltimore— spouse’s benefit by $25 a month for those receiving a
widow’s benefit before Jan. 1, 1972 (applicable to widow of pensioner or ac­
tive employee).
Changed: Baltimore— spouse’s benefit for spouse of employee who died on or
after Jan. 1, 1972, while eligible for a full or reduced basic benefit (except for
age) to begin month after employee’s death if spouse was age 50 or more,
otherwise month after attainment of age 50 (previously began when deceased
employee would have attained age 62).
Increased: Baltimore— employee previously retired under early retirement who
met, at retirement, requirements for full basic benefit, except age, received
increase in benefit of $50 a month upon attaining age 62.
In effect and continued: Baltimore— vested pension payable at age 62 for em­
ployee who left industry with 25 years of continuous service and average of 700
hours of work per year over the 25 years.
Changed: Philadelphia— surviving widow of worker who did not leave industry
before death which occurred on or after Oct. 1, 1963, received monthly pension
beginning when employee would have reached age 62 of $100 until remarriage
or death, if worker had 25 years in the industry. If no surviving widow, benefit
paid to dependent mother for life.
Eliminated: Philadelphia— $100 monthly benefit for surviving widow of worker
who did not leave industry before death which occurred on or after Jan. 1,
1965, and who had elected to continue working in industry after age 62 when
qualified for pension.
Added: Philadelphia— surviving widow of worker who did not leave industry be­
fore death which occurred on or after Jan. 1, 1965, received monthly benefit of
$100 until remarriage or death, beginning month worker would have reached
age 62 if employee was eligible for disability pension at death. If no surviving
widow, benefit payable to dependent mother for life. (This provision was
eliminated by an agreement dated Jan. 17,1973.)
Applicable to those who retired on or after Apr. 1, 1972.
Pensioners who had retired before Apr. 1, 1972, to receive increase in benefit of
$25 a month.
Applicable to those who retired on or after Apr. 1, 1972.

Such early retirees had to have (1) worked for a signatory employer, (2) been
eligible for guaranteed annual income benefits as of Apr. 1, 1972, and (3)
applied for early retirement by June 1, 1972.
New York: Widow o f early retiree qualified for widow’s pension when early
retiree would have reached normal retirement age (age 62).

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices ’ — Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters
Pension plans—-Continued

Oct. 1, 1972 (CONASA-ILA agreement
of Jan. 6, 1972).
Jan. 1, 1973 (agreement of Nov. 6,
1972— Baltimore).

Apr. 3, 1973 (agreement of Nov. 29,
1972— Boston).
Oct. 1, 1973 (CONASA-ILA agreement
of Jan. 6, 1972).
Oct. 1, 1974 (agreements of June 21,
1974— CONASA-ILA; July 24, 1974
— New York; Aug. 19, 1974 and June
25, 1975— Philadelphia; June 27, 1975
— Boston; Aug. 19, 1974— Hampton
Roads; Aug. 20, 1974— Baltimore).

Increased: Employer contributions to
$1.05 an hour (all ports).
Added: Early retirement benefit—
Baltimore— employee who retired (1)
at age 55 and met eligibility require­
ments for full basic benefit (except age)
to receive $350 a month until age 62
and $400 thereafter; or (2) at age 50
with 20 years o f continuous service and
at least 700 hours worked in each of the
20 years (or in 20 out of the last 25
years) to receive $300 a month for life.
Eliminated: Death benefit— Boston.
Increased: Employer
$1.22 an hour (all
Increased: Employer
$1.37 an hour (all

contributions to
ports).
contributions to
ports).

Increased: Basic benefit— New York— to
$450 with 25 years o f service, plus $25
for each additional 5 years of service
(combined maximum $500).
Increased: Disability benefit— New
York— to $270, plus $18 for each year
of continuous service over 15 (com­
bined maximum $450).
Increased: Death benefit— New York— to
$1,500.

Jan. 1, 1975 (agreement of Nov. 20,
1974— Philadelphia).

Feb. 19, 1975 (agreement of same
date— Philadelphia).
Mar. 1, 1975 (agreement of Jan. 29,
1975— Hampton Roads).
May 1, 1975 (agreement of Apr. 3,
1975— Hampton Roads).

Aug. 1, 1975 (agreement— Hampton
Roads).
Oct. 1, 1975 (agreements of June 21,
1974— CONASA-ILA; July 24,
1974— New York).

Increased: Basic benefit— Boston— to
$350.
Increased: Disability benefit—
Boston— to $210, plus $14 for each
year of continuous service over 15
(combined maximum $350).
Increased: Basic benefit—
Philadelphia— to $450 with 25 years of
service, plus $25 for each additional 5
years of service (combined maximum
$500).
Increased: Disability benefit—
Philadelphia— to $270, plus $18 for
each additional year of continuous
service over 15 (combined maximum
$450).

Increased: Basic benefit— Hampton
Roads— to $425.
Increased: Disability benefit— Hampton
Roads— to $265, plus $16 for each
year of continuous service over 15
(combined maximum $425).
........................................................................

Increased: Employer contribution to $1.53
an hour (all ports).

See footnotes at end of table.




41

Applicable to those who retired on or after Jan. 1, 1973.

Changed: New York— guarantee to $36 million for each year of contract.
Philadelphia— employers guaranteed 13 million work hours to pension and wel­
fare funds combined over term of contract.
Hampton Roads— employers guaranteed 5.5 million work hours over term of
contract.
Boston— Boston Dollar contributions continued for term of agreement.
Baltimore— employers guaranteed 12 million hours over term of contract for pen­
sions and welfare combined.
Applicable to those who retired on or after Oct. 1, 1974.
Increased: New York— pensioners who retired before Oct. 1, 1974, received in­
crease in benefit of $25 a month.
Applicable to those who retired on or after Oct. 1, 1974.
Changed: New York— definition of total and permanent disability for pension
purposes same as used by Social Security Administration.

New York: On a one-shot basis only, worker who reached age 65 as of Oct. 1,
1974, paid $2,500 lump sum from GAI fund, if worker retired before Dec. 31,
1975, while eligible for GAI.
Added: Philadelphia— continuity of service broken if worker not eligible for pen­
sion on Oct. 1, 1974, and in contract year Oct. 1, 1974— Sept. 30, 1975, failed
to work 500 hours in industry, unless 1,000 hours worked in a contract year
after Oct. 1, 1975. Not applicable to those with 25 years of service and certain
other exceptions.
Applicable to those who retired on or after Oct. 1, 1974.
Applicable to those who retired on or after Oct. 1, 1974.

Applicable to those who retired on or after Jan. 1, 1975.
Increased: Philadelphia— pensioners retired before Jan. 1, 1975, received increase
in benefit of $25 a month.

Applicable to those who retired on or after Jan. 1, 1975.

Changed: Philadelphia— $1,000 of death benefit could be allocated for expenses
for last illness, death, or burial of pensioner.
Changed: Hampton Roads— the $100 monthly benefit was to be paid to widow
whose husband’s retirement application was approved before Jan. 1, 1965.
Applicable to those who retired on or after May 1, 1975.
Applicable to those who retired on or after May 1, 1975.

Changed: Hampton Roads— $100 minimum and $125 maximum monthly benefit
paid to widow whose husband’s pension application was approved on or after
Jan. 1, 1965 (based on 50 percent of benefit payable at death).
New York: On a one-shot basis only, worker who had not reached age 65 on Oct.
1, 1974, but did so by Oct. 1, 1975, paid $2,500 lump sum out of GAI fund if
worker retired before Dec. 31, 1975, while eligixpe for GAL

Table 3.

Supplementary compenaatlon practices1— Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision
Pension plans— Continued

Jan. 1, 1976 (agreement of Nov. 18,
1976— Baltimore).

Baltimore pension plan revised as fol­
lows:
Pension credits— full pension credit pro­
vided each year employee credited with
700 hours and reduced pension credit
provided each year credited with 400699 hours prior to Oct. 1, 1975.
Normal monthly pension— for employee
retiring at age 62 with 20 pension cred­
its, $25 for each full pension credit plus
$15 for each reduced pension credit
(maximum $500 for 20 full pension
credits and $300 for less than 20 full
pension credits), plus $10 for each full
pension credit over 25 (maximum $50).
Regular early monthly pension— for em­
ployee retired at age 55 but less than 62
with 20 full previous credits, $25 for
each full pension credit with maximum
of $437.50 and upon attaining age 62,
maximum increased to $500.
Reduced early monthly pension— for em­
ployee retired at age 50 but less than 55
with 20 full pension credits, $25 for
each full pension credit (maximum
$325).
Disability monthly pension— for em­
ployee totally and permanently disabled
who had 15 pension credits, $25 for
each full pension credit plus $15 for
each reduced pension credit (maximum
$500 if employee had at least 15 full
pension credits and $300 for less than
15 full pension credits).
Spouse option annuity— employee could
elect to receive actuarially reduced
benefit (no actuarial reduction on 1st
$250 if married for at least 10 years
before becoming pensioner) to provide
spouse an annuity equal to one-half of
pensioner's benefit or amount em­
ployee would have received had retire­
ment been on day before death. No
other payment under pension plan was
to be made to surviving spouse receiv­
ing a spouse option annuity.
Added: Vested pension— Baltimore— for

those with 10 years “ vesting service”
but not eligible for retirement under
other plan provisions, amount calcu­
lated under normal retirement formula,
if employee had 20 or more pension
credits; as follows if employee had
less than 20 pension credits: (1) 1.5
percent times maximum normal retire­
ment pension times pension credits
earned before Oct. 1, 1975, plus (2) 3
percent times maximum normal retire­
ment pension times pension credits
earned after Sept. 30, 1975, plus (3) 3
percent times amount calculated in (1)
above times pension credits earned
after Sept. 30, 1975. Maximum same
as for normal pension.
Jan. 1, 1976 (agreement of New York).

June 16, 1976

Changed: Vested benefit— New York—
service requirement to 10 years’ vested
service to meet ERISA standards.
Increased: Death benefit—
Philadelphia— $3,000.

See footnotes at end o f table.




42

If employee was not vested under plan and had a 1-year break in service, em­
ployee lost any accumulated credits and vesting service. A 1-year break in
service was any year in which employee was credited with less than 501 hours
(400 hours before Oct. 1, 1975). If employee returned to work before perma­
nent break in service, prior pension credits and vesting service could be re­
stored. Pension credits and vesting service restored for employee who returned
to employment before permanent break in service if (1) a year of vesting serv­
ice was earned after return, (2) consecutive years of break in service were less
than prior vesting service, and (3) at least 1 of the years of break in service
occurred after Sept. 30, 1975. Permanent break in service defined as: (1) For
those who left employment before Oct. 1, 1975— six 1-year breaks in service
before leaving employment, and (2) for those who left employment before
being vested on or after Oct. 1, 1975— when consecutive 1-year breaks were
equal to, or greater than, prior vesting service. A permanent break prevented
restoration of pension credits and vesting service.

Surviving spouse had to be married on effective date of pension, at time of death,
and at least 1 year before participant died.
Election could not be revoked after pension benefits payable.
Existing spouse annuities were continued for those not covered by spouse option
annuity.

New vesting provisions added to comply with ERISA standards.
Vesting service determined right to receive vested {tension, but not used to com­
pute amount of benefit. For contract years from Oct. 1, 1945, employee re­
ceived 1 year of vesting service for each contract year in which credited with
400 hours or more (no credit for vesting service provided before Jan. 1, 1971,
unless 3 years of vesting service earned since that date).
Vested pension payable on normal retirement date unless employee did not com­
plete 10 years of vesting service until after such date. Then pension payable
earlier of 1st calendar month after application for pension approved or 60 days
after end of plan year in which employment terminated.

$1,000 of amount could be used for expenses in connection with last illness,
death, or burial of pensioner.

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
E ffective date

Provision

A pplications, exceptions, and other related matters
Pension plans—-Continued

Oct. 1, 1976 (agreements of June 21,
1974— CONASA-ILA; Nov. 18, 1976
— Baltimore; Dec. 29, 1977—Hampton
Roads; and Apr. 30, 1977— Boston).

Increased; Employer contributions to
$1.71 an hour (all ports).

Increased: Basic benefit—Hampton
Roads— to $425 with 25 years of serv­
ice, plus $7.50 for each additional year
(maximum $500).
Revised: Hampton Roads— pension cal­
culation for those retired on or after
Oct. 1, 1976, regardless of type of re­
tirement to $12 for each year credited
with 500 but less than 1,000 hours and
$24 for years credited with 1,000 hours
or more (maximum 35 years and $840).
Added; Deferred benefits— Boston—
employee entitled to deferred vested
benefit upon attaining age 62, if em­
ployee had 25 years’ vested service at
termination and upon attaining age 65,
if employee had 10 but less than 25
years' vested service. Benefit equal to
that accrued at termination.
Oct. 1, 1977 (agreements o f Nov. 18,
1977— CONASA-ILA and
NYSA-1LA; Nov. 27, 1977—
Philadelphia; Nov. 30, 1977 and
June 28, 1978— Boston; Dec. 5,
1977— Hampton Roads; and Dec.
19, 1978— Baltimore).

Increased; Employer contribution to
$1 .9 0 an hour (all ports).

Established: Added normal monthly
pension— Baltim ore— an amount of
$20 a month for each full pension
credit earned beginning with the
21st through 25th full pension
credit, maximum $300, which was
added to amount o f normal monthly
pension with a maximum for the
normal pension plus added normal
pension o f $800.
Established: Added disability monthly
pension— an amount o f $20 a
month for each full pension credit
earned beginning with the 21st
through the 25th full pension credit,
maximum $100, which was added to
amount o f disability monthly pen­
sion with a maximum for the dis­
ability pension plus added disability
pension o f $600.
Changed: Vested pension—
Baltim ore— calculation o f benefit
to the amount o f (1) the normal plus
added normal benefit (as constituted
on date eligible for vested pension)
computed the later o f date partici­
pant would attain age 62 or date
would have earned 20 full pension
credits (assuming a full pension
credit would be earned each year
between year o f termination and
year including later o f date would
attain age 62 or date would have
earned 20 full credits) times;




Applicable to those retired on or after Oct. 1, 1976. The $12 and $24 amounts
were retroactive to Oct. 1, 1976.

Changed: Boston— benefit to surviving spouse not to terminate upon remarriage.
Eliminated: Boston— $ 100 maximum on surviving spouse benefit.

Changed: New York— guarantee to $42.5 m illion per contract year.
Changed: Baltim ore— employers guaranteed 4 m illion hours per contract
year (less hours lost due to strike) for pensions and welfare combined.
Changed: Hampton Roads— em ployers’ guarantee to 2 m illion work hours
per contract year.
Changed: Philadelphia— employers’ guarantee to 4 ‘ million work hours
A
per contract year (13 million over contract term) for pensions and welfare
combined.
B oston— Boston Dollar contributions continued for term o f contract.
Established: Job Security Program effective Dec. 1, 1977, to fund
shortfalls in pension, welfare, and GAI plans. (See Job Security Pro­
gram section of this table.)
Applicable to those retired on or after Oct. 1, 1977.

Increased: Basic benefit— Boston— to
$410.
Increased: D isability benefit—
Boston— to $246, plus $1 6.40 for
each year o f continuous service
over 15 (maximum $410).

See footnotes at end o f table.

Changed: Baltimore— full pension credit and also year of vesting service provided
for each contract year employee credited with 1,000 hours. Reduced pension
credit (for 400-699 hours) no longer provided for years beginning Oct. 1,
1976.
Applicable to those retired before Oct. 1, 1976.

43

Applicable to those retired on or after Oct. 1, 1977.
Eliminated: B oston— age 45 requirement for disability pension.
Changed: Boston— surviving spouse to receive 50 percent of amount dis­
ability pensioner had been receiving and 50 percent of amount active
worker with at least 15 years’ credited service would have received.
Applicable to those retired on or after Oct. 1, 1977.

Applicable to those retired on or after Oct. 1, 1977.

Table 3. Supplementary compenaatlon practices1— Continued
E ffective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters
Pension plans— Continued

Oct. 1, 1977— Continued

(2) the ratio o f (a) to (b) as follows:
(a) Full and reduced pension credits
earned before termination, and (b)
full and reduced pension credits
earned before termination plus full
credits that could have been earned
each year between year o f termina­
tion and year including later o f date
would attain age 62 or date would
have earned 20 full credits.

Nov. 1, 1977 (agreement o f Oct 28,
1977— Hampton Roads).

Jan. 1, 1978 (agreements o f Nov. 18,
1977—
New York and May 17,
1978—
Philadelphia).

Mar. 1, 1978 (agreement for Philadel­
phia).
Oct. 1, 1978 (agreement of Nov. 18,
1977— CONASA-ILA and NYSAILA).
July 1, 1979 (agreement of Dec. 19, 1978
— Baltimore).
Oct. 1, 1979 (agreement of Nov. 18,
1977— CONASA-ILA and
NYSA-ILA).

Increased: Hampton Roads— pensioners retired before Oct. 1, 1976, re­
ceived $10 increase in monthly benefit (not applicable to widow’s of
pensioners).
Increased: Basic benefit— New
York— to $500 with 25 years of
service, plus $25 for each additional
5 years o f service (maximum $550).
Increased: Disability benefit— New
York— to $285, plus $19 for each
year o f service over 15 (maximum
$475).

Increased: Basic benefit—
Philadelphia— to $500 with 25
years of service, $525 for 30 years,
and $550 for 33 years.
Increased: Disability benefit—
Philadelphia— to $300, plus $20 for
each year of service over 15
(maximum $500).
Increased: Death benefit—
Philadelphia— to $3,000
Increased: Employer contribution to
$2.05 an hour (all ports).

Applicable to those retired on or after Oct. 1, 1977.
Increased: New York— pensioners who retired before Oct. 1, 1977, re­
ceived an increase in benefit o f $25 a month.
Added: New York— in addition to meeting Social Security Act definition
for disability, had to be examined by doctor appointed by trustees cer­
tifying total and permanent disability.
Applicable to those retired on or after Jan. 1, 1978.
Increased: Philadelphia— pensioners who retired before Jan. 1, 1978, re­
ceived an increase in benefit of $25 a month.
Increased: Philadelphia— w idow ’s pension benefit to $125 a month.
Increased: Philadelphia— ERISA vesting rate for those with 10 years ves­
ting service to $16.50, maximum $550 (from $15,maximum $500) per year of
service.

Increased: Baltim ore— pensions o f those retired before Oct. 1, 1977, by
$25 a month.
Increased: Employer contribution to
$ 2 .25 an hour (all ports).

See footnotes at end o f table.




Applicable to those retired on or after Oct. 1, 1977.

44

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Contributions
Plans to be financed by employer contributions of following cents per work hour:
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Apr.

1, 1948
1, 1949
1, 1951
1, 1953
1, 1954

....
....
....
___
....

2.5 cents
3.75 cents
5 cents

2.5 cents
3.75 cents
5 cents
7 cents

3 cents
3.75 cents
5 cents
7 cents

2.5 cents
3.75 cents
5 cents

2.5 cents
3.75 cents
5 cents
7 cents

7 cents

•
Oct. 1, 1954 . . . .
Jan. 1, 1955 .........

9 cents

9 cents

9 cents

Oct. 1, 1956 . . . .

14 cents

14 cents

14 cents

New York—employers unilaterally increased contribu­
tions 2 cents an hour; change included in agreements
of Feb. and Oct. 1964.

9 cents
9 cents
14 cents
bution to secure clinical services and/or to construct
and administer health centers. Trustees set allocation
at 3 cents.

Oct. 1, 1959 . . . .

21 cents

21 cents

21 cents

14 cents
21 cents

21 cents

Oct. 1, 1962 . . . .

23 cents

23 cents

23 cents

23 cents

23 cents

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Oct.

....
....
....
....
....

25.5 cents

23.5 cents

23.5 cents

23.5 cents

23.5 cents

23.5 cents

Oct. 1, 1964 . . . .

28.5 cents

28.5 cents

28.5 cents

28.5 cents

28.5 cents

Oct. 1, 1968 . . . .
Oct. 1, 1969 . . . .
Oct. 1, 1970 . . . .

36.5 cents
41.5 cents
49.5 cents

36.5 cents
41.5 cents
49.5 cents

36.5 cents
41.5 cents
49.5 cents

36.5 cents
41.5 cents
49.5 cents

36.5 cents
41.5 cents
49.5 cents

Nov. 14, 1971 . . .

55 cents

55 cents

55 cents

55 cents

55 cents

Oct. 1, 1972 . . . .
Oct. 1, 1973 . . . .
Oct. 1, 1974 . . . .

70 cents
80 cents
90 cents

70 cents
80 cents
90 cents

70 cents
80 cents
90 cents

70 cents
80 cents
90 cents

70 cents
80 cents
90 cents

20, 1963
25, 1963
26, 1963
28, 1963
1, 1963

Clinic fund established with employer contribution of 3
cents a man-hour worked in all ports except Philadel­
phia. Contribution totaled 6 cents an hour in New
York.
Contribution to clinic fund increased to 5 cents a manhour worked in all ports except Philadelphia. Contri­
bution to 8 cents an hour in New York.8

25.5 cents
25.5 cents

25.5 cents

See footnotes at end of table.




45

Eliminated: Two cents of employer contribution to clinic
fund.
Increased: Contribution to clinic fund to 6 cents a manhour worked; 6 cents in New York.
New York— employers guaranteed a payment of 40 million man-hours a year and special assessments had to
be made if less than 40 million man-hours were
worked to make up the difference.
Changed: New York— employers’ guarantee changed
from tonnage to dollar amount of $21,186,000,
$22,572,000, and $23,958,000, in the 1st, 2nd, and
3rd years of the contract, respectively.
Hampton Roads— guaranteed contributions to 1.5 million work-hours in 1st contract year and 1.75 million
in each of 2nd and 3rd contract years.
Philadelphia— guaranteed 13 million work-hours to
welfare and pension plans combined over term of
contract. (Same guarantee had been provided from
Oct. 1, 1968, to Sept. 30, 1971.)
Baltimore— guaranteed contributions of 12 million hours
over term of contract for welfare and pensions com­
bined.

Changed: New York— guarantee to $22 million for each
year of 1974 contract.
Changed: Hampton Roads— guarantee to 5.5 million
hours over term of contract.
Philadelphia— guaranteed 13 million work-hours to
welfare and pension plans combined over term of
contract.
Baltimore— guaranteed contributions of 12 million hours
over term of contract for welfare and pension plans
combined.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Hampton
Roads

Boston

Baltimore

Philadelphia

Contributions—Continued
Oct. 1, 1975 . . . .
Oct. 1, 1976 . . . .
Oct. 1, 1977 . . . .

$1.01
$1.13
$1.25

$1.01
$1.13
$1.25

$1.01
$1.13
$1.25

$1.01
$1.13
$1.25

$1.01
$1.13
$1.25

Oct. 1, 1978 . . . .
Oct. 1, 1979 . . . .

$1.35
$1.50

$1.35
$1.50

$1.35
$1.50

$1.35
$1.50

$1.35
$1.50

Changed: Hampton Roads— guarantee to 2 million hours
each contract year.
Changed: Philadelphia— guarantee to 4 ‘ million hours
A
to welfare and pension plans combined each contract
year.
Changed: Baltimore— guarantee to 4 million hours to
welfare and pension plans combined each contract
year (less hours lost due to strike).
Changed: New York— guarantee to $28 million per con­
tract year.
Established: Job Security Program to fund any shortfalls
in welfare, pension, and GAI benefit plans. (See Job
Security Program section of this table.)

Status of plans
Oct. 1, 1948 . . . .
Jan. 1, 1 9 5 0 .........

Welfare and insurance plans established........................
pendents
coverage.

pendents
coverage.

pendents
coverage.

Oct. 1, 1951 . . . .
pendents
coverage.
Jan. 1, 1952 .........
sioners
coverage.

sioners
coverage.

Feb. 1, 1952 . . . .
sioners
coverage.
Apr. 1, 1954 . . . .
pendents
coverage.
May 1, 1954 . . . .
si oners
coverage.
eral dependents coverage.

eral dependents coverage.

May 31, 1956 . . .
Pensioners
coverage.
eral dependents coverage.
Jan. 1, 1958 .........
sioners
coverage.
Mar. 1, 1963 . . . .
Pensioners
coverage.
May 1, 1973 . . . .
continued:
Collateral
dependents
coverage.
See footnotes at end of table.




46

continued:
Collateral
dependents
coverage.

Philadelphia—collateral dependent defined as dependent
mother of unmarried employee without children.
Hampton Roads— collateral dependent defined as de­
pendent parent of unmarried employee without chil­
dren.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Hampton
Roads

Boston

Baltimore

Philadelphia

Eligibility requirements
Oct. 1, 1948
Oct. 1, 1951

Reduced to 700
hours.

Reduced to 700
hours.

Reduced to 700
hours.

Jan. 1, 1954 .........

Jan. 1, 1955 .........

Reduced to 700
hours.

Reduced to 700
hours.

Oct. 1, 1956

Jan. 1, 1957 .........
Jan. 1, 1962 .........

Jan. 1, 1963

Oct. 1, 1968

Nov. 14, 1971

Jan. 1, 1973

Jan. 1, 1974

Apr. 1, 1977

See footnotes at end of table.




47

Baltimore— employees receiving workmen’s compensa­
tion credited with equivalent hours.
Baltimore— employees with 650 but less than 700 hours
of work in previous contract year could, on review of
work record, be declared eligible by trustees.
Hampton Roads— employees with 690 but less than 700
hours of work in previous fiscal year could, on review
of work record, be declared eligible by trustees.
New York— employees with 650 but less than 700 hours
of work in previous contract year could, on review of
work record, be declared eligible by trustees.
Boston— same as New York.
Changed to: Baltimore—employee with 600 but fewer
than 700 hours of work in previous contract year
could be declared eligible by trustees on review v
of
work.
Added: Baltimore— employee age 60 and over who
worked at least 200 hours in previous contract year
could be declared eligible by trustees.
Added: Baltimore— full group insurance coverage ex­
tended to 2 additional calendar years, for employee
unable to meet work requirements because of continu­
ous (occupational or nonoccupational) disability.
Changed: Philadelphia—employees who worked be­
tween 650 and 700 hours could be declared eligible by
trustees after review of work record.
Added: Philadelphia—employee credited with 20 hours
for each week lost due to compensable accident
(maximum 400 hours). Employee who was credited
with 10,000 hours during 10 contract years preceding
compensable occupational disability or non­
occupational disability due to illness or accident es­
tablishing eligibility for weekly welfare benefits to be
credited with 20 hours for each week of disability
(maximum 700 hours).
In effect and continued: Boston— those returning from
Armed Forces could be declared eligible for benefits
by trustees upon review of work record.
New York— eligible employee for 1973 calendar year
included those who became pensioners during period
from Apr. 1 to Sept. 30, 1972, with 500 hours worked
in contract year that began Oct. 1, 1971 (such pen­
sioners not eligible for nonoccupational disability
benefits).
Baltimore— certain specified benefits were to be higher
for employees who worked 1,100 hours (and their de­
pendents) in previous contract year.
New York— eligible employee for 1974 calendar year
included pensioners retired under terms of 1971
agreement. Such pensioners were covered for full
welfare benefits, excluding life, accidental death and
dismemberment, and nonoccupational disability bene­
fits.
Added: New York— employee retired on or after Apr. 1,
1977, covered only if had insured status at retirement
and not covered by other medical or surgical coverage
(including Medicare or Medicaid), not on social secu­
rity disability pension entitled to medical or surgical
coverage, and not employed in any other industry.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Life insurance and maximum accidental death
and dismemberment benefits
Jan. 1, 1949 .

$1,000

Jan. 1, 1951 .
Jan. 1, 1952 .
Jan. 1, 1955 .
Jan. 1, 1956.
Jan. 1, 1957 .
Aug. 1, 1957
Jan. 1, 1958 .
Jan. 1, 1960.

$1,500
$2,000
$2,500
$3,000
$3,500

Not available to dependents. Accidental death and dis­
memberment benefits available for occupational and
nonoccupational death and dismemberment in New
York, Philadelphia, and Boston; occupational and
nonoccupational death and nonoccupational dismem­
berment in Baltimore; and nonoccupational death and
dismemberment in Hampton Roads.
$1,500
$2,000
$2,500

Jan. 1, 1964,
Jan. 1, 1965
Jan.
Apr.
Jan.
Jan.

1, 1966
1, 1966
1, 1967 .
1, 1968 .

$2,250
$2,000
$3,000

$3,000
$4,000
Life insur­
ance—
$6,000.
Eliminated:
Accidental
death and
dismember­
ment bene­
fits.

$6,000

Added: Baltimore— $500 to employee on death of wife
if funds were available.9

$3,500
Reinstated:
Dismember­
ment bene­
fits— $3,000.

Dependents life
insurance— ,
Wife, $1,000;
children, $500.

Hampton Roads— wife and children must have been de­
pendent upon and living with employee.

$4,000
$5,000; Elimi­
nated: Acci­
dental death
and dis­
memberment
benefits.
$6,500
$5,000

Added: Baltimore— $500 payment from welfare fund to
pensioner upon death of his dependent wife.
$5,000

lu$6,000
$6,000
Life insurance
and acci­
dental dis­
memberment
and/or loss
of sight (no
accidental
death)—
$7,000.

*

Jan. 1, 1969

$3,000

$3,000

May 1, 1960 . . . .
Jan. 1, 1961........

Jan. 1, 1962 .
Mar. 1, 1963

$1,500
$2,000

$1,500

Life insur­
ance— legal
spouse—
$1,500.

May 1, 1972 . . . .
*

Employee life
and acci­
dental death
and dismem­
berment in­
surance—
$6,000

See footnotes at end of table.




48

Hampton Roads— $2,000 if employee was age 62 and
continued under total and permanent disability.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision
Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Life insurance and maximum accidental death
and dismemberment benefits—Continued
Jan. 1, 1974

Life insur­
ance—
$10,000 for
employees
with 1,100
hours in pre­
vious con­
tract year.

Nov. 1, 1974

Jan. 1, 1975

Life insurance
for wife—
$2,000.
$10,000

Life insur­
ance—
$13,000 for
employees
with 1,100
hours in pre­
vious con­
tract year.

$8,000

$8,000

Jan. 1, 1978 .........
Feb. 1, 1978 . . . .

Mar. 1, 1978 . . . .
Jan. 1, 1979 .........

Baltimore— remained $6,000 for employees with less
than 1,100 hours in previous contract year.

Dependent life
insurance—
wife,
$2,500; chil­
dren, $1,000
(maximum).
$12,500

$10,000
Dependent life
insurance—
$1,000.

Life insur­
ance—
$20,000 for
employees
with 1,100
hours in pre­
vious con­
tract year.
Dependent
spouse life
insurance—
$1,000.
Employee life
and acci­
dental death
and dismem­
berment in­
surance
(nonoccupational)—
$10,000.

July 1, 1979

Weekly sickness and accident benefits
Jan. 1, 1949

Mar. 1, 1949 . . . .

Jan.
Jan.
Oct.
Jan.

1,
1,
1,
1,

1950 .........
1951.........
1951 . . . .
1952 .........

$25 for max­
imum of 13
weeks.

$25 for max­
imum of 13
weeks in
New York
and 26
weeks in
New Jersey.

$25 for max­
imum of 13
weeks.

$25 for max­
imum of 13
weeks.

$25 for max­
imum of 13
weeks.
$26

$26

Not available to dependents. Payable only when work­
men’s compensation or unemployment benefits were
not paid. Sickness benefits started on 8th day, acci­
dent on 1st day.
$26
$26
$30

$30

$30

See footnotes at end of table.




Not available to dependents. Payable only when work­
men's compensation or unemployment insurance
benefits were not paid. Sickness benefits started on
8th day, accident on 1st day. In New Jersey section of
New York port, all benefits started on 8th day.

49

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision
Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Boston

Baltimore

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Weekly sickness and accident benefits— Continued
July
952 .........
Jan. I, 1954.........
July 1, 195 4 .........

$30
$30
$33 in New
York.

Jan. 1, 1955 .........
Aug. 1, 1955
July 1, 1956 .........

Maximum of
20 weeks.

$40

May 1, 1960
July 1, 1 960.........
July 1, 1 9 6 1.........
Jan. 1, 1965 .........
July 1, 1965 .........
Jan.
June
Dec.
Jan.

1, 1966 .........
1, 1966
1, 1967 . . . .
1, 1968 .........

July 1, 1968
July 1, 1969

Sept. 1, 1969 . . . .
Jan. 1, 1 970.........

Jan. 1, 1971

Jan. 1, 1972

May 1, 1972 . . . .
July 1, 1972 .........
Jan. 1, 1973 .........

Jan. 1, 1974

July 1, 1974

$36 for max­
imum of 26
weeks.

$40

$45 in New
York.

Jan. 1, 1958

June 1, 1958

Maximum of
26 weeks.

$33

$35
$40 for maxiumum o f 20
weeks in
New York.

Jan. 1, 1957

July 1, 1957

$35

Maximum of
26 weeks.

Employee with 700 or more hours’ credit in year of ac­
cident whose disability continued into next calendar
year to receive up to maximum benefits in 2nd year .

Maximum of
26 weeks in
New York.
$40
$50 in New
York.
$50 in New
Jersey.
$50
New York resi­
dents, $55.
$50
$50
$55
New Jersey
residents,
$62.
New York resi­
dents, $65.
New Jersey
residents,
$65.
$65
New Jersey
residents,
$69.
New Jersey
residents,
$72.
New Jersey
residents,
$76.

Hampton Roads— weekly benefit payable from 1st day
if hospitalized.

$75

$60
$75
New Jersey
residents,
$81.

$70 for em­
ployees with
1,100 hours
in previous
contract
year.

Baltimore— remained $50 for employees with less than
1,100 hours in previous contract year.

New York resi­
dents, $85;
New Jersey
residents,
$85.
New York resi­
dents, $95.

See footnotes at end of table.




50

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Weekly sickness and accident benefits—Continued
Jan. 1, 1975 .

Jan. 1, 1976 .

New Jersey
residents,
$96.
New Jersey
residents,
$104.
New Jersey
residents,
$110.

Jan. 1, 1977 .

Jan. 1, 1978 .

$85

$100 for em­
ployees with
1,100 hours
in previous
contract
year.

New Jersey
residents,
$90.

$100 for
maximum o f
26 weeks.
$75

Feb. 1, 1978
Mar. 1, 1978

Jan. 1, 1979 .

New York resi­
dents, $117;
New Jersey
residents,
$117.

$100 for
maximum of
40 weeks.
$110

$150 for em­
ployees with
1,100 hours
in previous
contract
year.

Hospitalization11— daily benefit and duration (room and board)
Jan. 1, 1949

Employees—
$7, up to 31
days per dis­
ability.

Employees—
$6, up to 31
days and $3,
up to addi­
tional 180
days per dis­
ability.

Employees—
up to $251
per disabil­
ity.

Employees—
$5, up to 31
days per dis­
ability.

Mar. 1, 1949

Apr. 15, 1949 . . .
$5, up to 31
days per dis­
ability.
Jan. 1, 1950

Employees and
dependents—
$8, up to 31
days.

Employees— $8;
dependents—
$6, up to 31
days.

Benefits available only to employees’ wives and chil­
dren. Hospitalization not provided dependents in
maternity cases.

Employees and
dependents—
$8, up to 31
days.

Employees and
dependents
— $10, up to
31 days.

Apr. 1, 1954

July 1, 1954 .........

Jan. 1, 1955 .........

Employees—
$10; depend­
ents— $8.
Employees—
$12; depend­
ents— $10;
collateral de­
pendents—
$5, up to 31
days.

Employees and
dependents
— $12; col­
lateral de­
pendents—
lifetime limit
of $372.

Employees—
$8.

See footnotes at end of table.




New York— supplemental room and board: Fund could
pay from surplus as authorized by trustees (1) amounts
in excess of $8 a day for semiprivate accommoda­
tions, and (2) up to 170 additional days of hospitali­
zation at 50 percent of standard rate.

Employees—
$6; depend­
ents— $5, up
to 31 days.

Jan. 1, 1952

51

Employees and
dependents
— up to
$1,000 in­
cluding hos­
pital extras.

Collateral dependents were parents wholly dependent on
an unmarried eligible employee with no other depend­
ents covered by fund.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

61 '
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Hospitalization"— daily benefit and duration (room and board)— Continued
Jan. 1, 1956
Jan. 1, 1957

Employees and
dependents
— $8, up to
70 days;
collateral de­
pendents— $8,
up to 31 days
per calendar
year.

Dependents—
$8.
Employees and
dependents
— $10, up to
70 days.

pendents—
$10.

Aug. 1, 1957

Employees and
dependents
— $18, up to
50 days;
collateral de­
pendents—
lifetime limit
of $900.

Jan. 1, 1958

Employees,
collateral and
other de­
pendents—
$14, up to 70
days.

see major
medical.

Jan. 1, 1959

Employees and
dependents
— $16, up to
70 days.
Employees,
collateral and
other de­
pendents—
$16.

Jan. 1, 1960

May 1, 1960

Jan. 1, 1962

Employee and
dependents
— $20, up
to 70 days;
collateral de­
pendents—
lifetime limit
of $1,400.
Employees—
$22; depend­
ents— $18;
collateral de­
pendents—
$18, up to 70
days.

Collateral dependents were parents wholly dependent on
eligible employee.
For dependents of deceased eligible employee— benefits
provided for balance of insured year.

Employees and
all depend­
ents— $18 a
day.

Employees and
dependents
— $18 a day.

Jan. 1, 1964 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $20.

Jan. 1, 1965 .........

Apr. 1, 1966

New York— supplemental room and board: Additional
hospitalization that trustees could authorize at 50 per­
cent of standard rate reduced to maximum of 131
days.

Employees—
$24, depend­
ents— $20.

Nov. 1, 1966

Employees and
dependents
— $23.
Employees and
dependents
— $25.
Employees and
dependents
— $28.

Mar. 1, 1969

Employees and
dependents
— $30.

See footnotes at end of table.




52

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision
Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Hospitalization11— daily benefit and duration (room and board)— Continued

Sept. 1, 1969

Employees and
dependents
— $45 (max­
imum 70
days).

Jan. 1, 1 97 0.........

Boston— $3,150 maximum benefit was lifetime
maximum for collateral dependents.

Employees and
dependents
— $35.
Employees and
dependents
— $50.

Jan. 1, 197 1 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $40 a day.
Employees and
dependents
— $60 a day.
Employees and
dependents
— semipri­
vate room
rate paid in
full (up to 70
days).

July 1, 1972 .........

Jan. 1, 1974 .........

Jan. 1, 1975 .........

Employees
with 1,100
hours in pre­
vious con­
tract year
and their de­
pendents—
$70 a day.
Employees and
dependents
— highest
semiprivate
rate for 70
days.

Jan. 1, 1979

Hospital extras11— maximum benefit (nonmatemity)
Jan. 1, 1949 .........

Employees—
$70 per dis­
ability.

Employees—
sum based
on length of
confinement.

Mar. 1, 1949 ___

Employees—
sum based
on length of
confinement.

Employees—
$75 per dis­
ability.

Apr. 15, 1949 . ..
$75 per dis­
ability.
Jan. 1, 1950 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $248 per
disability.

Employees—
$248; de­
pendents—
$186.

Employees and
dependents
— $248.

Jan. 1 1952 .........

Employees—
$80 per dis­
ability.
Employees—
$100; de­
pendents—
$75.

Apr. 1, 1954

July 1, 1954 .........

Jan. 1, 1955 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $100.
Employees—
$310; de­
pendents—
$248.
Employees—
$372; de­
pendents—
$310; collat­
eral depend­
ents— $50.

Employees and
dependents
— $372.

Dependents—
$100.

See footnotes at end of table.




53

Employees and
dependents
— see hos­
pitalization,
Jan. 1, 1955.

Baltimore— remained $50 a day for employees with less
than 1,100 hours in previous contract year, their de­
pendents, and all collateral dependents.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Hospital extras11— maximum benefit (nonmatemity)— Continued
Collateral de­
pendents—
lifetime limit
of $372.

Jan. 1, 1956

Jan. 1, 1957

Employees and
dependents
— $400 plus
75 percent in
excess of
$400; collat­
eral depend­
ents— $248
per calendar
year.

Employees and
dependents
— $400 plus
75 percent in
excess of
$400; collat­
eral depend­
ents— life­
time limit of
$400 plus 75
percent in
excess of
$400.

Aug. 1, 1957

Jan. 1, 1958

Employees and
dependents
— $ 200.

Collateral de­
pendents—
$310.

Eliminated—
see major
medical.

Employees,
collateral and
other de­
pendents—
$980.

Employees and
dependents

Jan. 1, 1959

— $ 320 .

Jan. 1, 1960

Employees,
collateral and
other de­
pendents—
$

1, 120.
Employees and
dependents
— $500 plus
75 percent in
excess of
$500; collat­
eral depend­
ents— life­
time limit of
$500 plus 75
percent in
excess of
$500.

May 1, 1960

Jan.l, 1962

Employees and
dependents

Jan. 1, 1964

Employees and
dependents

— $ 360 .

— $ 400 .

Jan. 1, 1965

Employees and
dependents
— $1,610.

See footnotes at end of table.




54

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision
Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Hospital extras11— maximum benefit (nonmatemity)— Continued
Apr. 1, 1966

Employees and
dependents
— $1,750.

New York— collateral dependent— $248 per benefit
period which was single period of hospital confine­
ment due to same or related causes. Successive con­
finements due to same or related causes was single
period unless separated by 3-month interval. This
definition of benefit period also applied to maximum
for employees and dependents except that 3-month
interval not applicable for employee who recovered
completely from previous disability and returned to
full-time work.
Employees and
dependents
— $500.

Jan. 1, 1974

Employees
with 1,100
hours in pre­
vious con­
tract year
and their de­
pendents—
$3,500.

Jan. 1, 1975

Baltimore— remained $1,750 for employees with less
than 1,100 hours in previous contract year, their de­
pendents, and all collateral dependents.

Medical
Added: Baltimore— cost of 1 physical examination or
checkup a year at designated hospital.8
Changed: Baltimore— up to $60 for 1 physical examina­
tion or checkup a year at designated hospital.

Apr. 16, 1962 . . .
Jan. 1, 1964 .........
Employees—
$50 (in doc­
tor's office).

Jan. 1, 1967 .........

Surgery11— maximum benefit (nonmatemity)
Jan. 1, 1949 .........

Employees—
$150 per dis­
ability.

Mar. 1, 1949

Employees—
$150 per dis­
ability.

Apr. 15, 1949 . . .

Jan. 1, 1 95 0.........

Employees—
$300.

Employees—
$300.

Employees—
$300.

Jan. 1, 1952 .........

Employees—
$300.
Dependents—
$150.

Jan. 1, 1 95 1.........
July 1, 1 9 5 1 .........

Employees—
$150 per dis­
ability.

Employees—
$150 per dis­
ability.

Employees—
$150 per dis­
ability.

Dependents—
$150.
Dependents—
$210.

Employees—
$200.

Dependents—
$200.

Dependents—
$300.

Apr. 1, 1954
Jan. 1, 1955 .........
Jan. 1, 1956 .........

Dependents—
$250.

Collateral de­
pendents—
$200.

Jan. 1, 1957 .........

Collateral de­
pendents—
$250 per
calendar
year.

Dependents—
$300.
Collateral de­
pendents—
lifetime limit
of $300.

Dependents—
$200.

Dependents and
collateral de­
pendents—
$300.

Jan. 1, 1958

Employees,
collateral and
other de­
pendents—
$400.

Eliminated—
see major
medical.

See footnotes at end of table.




55

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Surgery11— maximum benefit (nonmaternity)— Continued
Employees,
collateral and
other de­
pendents—
$500.

Jan. I, I960 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $400.

Jan. 1, 1964 .........

Apr. 1, 1966

Employees and
dependents
— $400.
Employees and
dependents
— $400.

Nov. 1, 1966

Boston— $400 lifetime maximum for collateral depend­
ents.

Jan. 1, 1974 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $900.

Jan. 1, 1977 .........

Employees,
collateral and
other de­
pendents—
$1,000.
Outpatient hospital services— maximum benefit
Payable only for services within 24 hours of accident.

Jan. 1, 1949

Jan. 1, 1950 .........
Apr. 1, 1954

$7.25 toward
emergency
first aid and
use of
operating
room.
Eliminated.
Employees and
dependents
— $100.
Employees and
dependents
— $100.
Eliminated—
see major
medical.

Jan. 1, 1957

Jan. 1, 1958

Apr. 1, 1966
Jan. 1, 1974 .........

New York— emergency room charges paid in full.
Employees and
dependents
— $200.
Employees and
dependents
— $200 any
one sickness
or accident
and $300 all
causes per
calendar
year.

Mar. 1, 1978

Jan. 1, 1979

See footnotes at end of table.




Employees and
dependents
— $200 a
year (not due
to surgery or
accident).

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision
Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

X-rays and laboratory tests— maximum benefit
Jan. 1, 1955

Apr. 1, 1955

Jan. 1, 1956

Jan. 1, 1957 .........

Employees—
$50 per 12
consecutive
months.
Employees—
$50 per
calendar
year.
Dependents—
$50.

Dependents—
$50.

Employees and
dependents
— $75

Employees and
dependents
— $100.

Jan. 1, 1958 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $50 per
disability.
Eliminated—
see major
medical.

Employees and
dependents
— $150.

May 1, 1960

July 15, 1961

Employees—
$25 for each
accident and
$25 for
treatment of
diseases in
12-month
period.

Boston— for dependents of deceased eligible employees,
benefits provided for balance of insured year.

Employees and
dependents
— $50.

New York— X-ray costs paid from fund to extent clinics
could not provide service.

Eliminated.

Jan. 1, 1965 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $200.
Employees and
dependents
— $400.

Apr. 1, 1966

Nov. 1, 1966

Employees and
dependents
— $100.

Jan. 1, 1977 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $800
($400 per
calendar
year).

Jan. 1, 1978 .........

Employees and
dependents
— $200.

July 1, 1978 .........

Employees and
dependents
— 75 percent
of reasonable
cost.
Emergency care— maximum benefit

Apr. 1, 1966

Established: New York— emergency X-ray and labora­
tory expense benefits.

Employees and
dependents
— $75.

Nov. 1, 1966

Jan. 1, 1972 .........

Established: Boston— emergency hospital treatment
benefits.

Employees and
dependents
— $100.
Employees and
dependents
— $300.

Jan. 1, 1975

Employees and
dependents
— $50 in a
calendar
year.

See footnotes at end of table.




57

Philadelphia— $10 in hospital and $25 in doctor’s office.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Emergency care— maximum benefit— Continued
Employees and
dependents
— full rea­
sonable cost.

July l, 1978

Doctor’s v isits" — maximum benefit
Jan. I, 1954

Employees—
$50 per dis­
ability.
Employees and
dependents
— $95.

Jan. 1, 1956

Jan. 1, 1957
Jan. 1, 1958

Jan. 1, 1961
July 1, 1965

Jan. 1, 1974

Jan. 1, 1979

Employees—
$100.
Employees—
$150.

For in-hospital medical services.

Eliminated—
see major
medical.

Employees—
$200.
Employee’s
spouse—
$100.
Employees
with 1,100
hours in pre­
vious con­
tract year
and their
spouses—
$400 and
$200, respec­
tively.
Employees
with less
than 1,100
hours and
their depend­
ents— $400
and $200,
respectively.

Baltimore— remained $200 and $100, respectively, for
employees with less than 1,100 hours and their
spouses.

Poliomyelitis 11— maximum benefit
Employees and
dependents
— $5,000.

Jan. 1, 1955 ,

Jan. 1, 1957 ,

Employees and
dependents
— $1,000 in
a 2-year
period.

Jan. 1, 1958 .

Employees and
dependents
— $5,000.

Baltimore— maximum for 2 consecutive years after reg­
ular insurance coverage was exhausted. Coverage also
to include tuberculosis, cardiac disease, brain tumor
(nonmalignant neoplasm), spinal meningitis, tetanus,
undulant fever, encephalitis, active rheumatic fever,
multiple sclerosis, progressive muscular dystrophy,
and cancer.
Eliminated—
see major
medical.

Jan. 1, 1963 .

Jan. 1, 1979 .

Baltimore— increased to 5 consecutive years (from 2
years) after regular insurance benefits have been
exhausted. Extended coverage continued to include
the same 12 diseases reported earlier.
Employees and
dependents
— $10,000

See footnotes at end of table.




58

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Maternity— maximum benefit

Jan. 1, 1952

Hospitalization
and extras—
$80; obstet­
rical proced­
ures— $140.

Hospitalization
— $60; ob­
stetrical pro­
cedures—
$140.

Available only to wife of eligible employee.

Hospitalization
— $80;
obstetrical
procedures—
$75.

Jan. 1, 1954

Boston— the same as above.

Lump-sum al­
lowance—
$100.

Philadelphia— the same as above.

Lump-sum al­
lowance—
$100.

Lump-sum al­
lowance—
$150.

Hampton Roads— the same as above.

Lump-sum al­
lowance—
$150.

Lump-sum al­
lowance—
$200.

Apr. 1, 1954

July 1, 1954 .........
Jan. 1, 1955 .........

Hospitalization
and extras—
$125;
obstetrical
procedures—
$140.

Hospitalization
— $80.
Hospitalization
— $100.

Hospitalization
— $120;
obstetrical
procedures—
$150.

Sept. 1, 1955

Jan. 1, 1957

Obstetrical pro­
cedures—
$150.

Obstetrical pro­
cedures—
$150.
Hospitalization
— $160.

Aug. 1, 1957
Jan. 1, 1958 .........

Jan. 1, 1960

Jan. 1, 1962 .........
Jan. 1, 1965 .........

Hospitalization
— $140;
obstetrical
procedures—
$250.
Hospitalization
— $160;
obstetrical
procedures—
$312.50.
Hospitalization
— $180.
Hospitalization
— $230.

Nov . 1, 1966 . .. .

Eliminated—
see major
medical.

New York— effective Apr. 1, 1966, hospitalization and
extras— $150 for normal delivery; $175 for Caesarian
section, including delivery.
Hospitalization
— $200.

Jan. 1, 1968 .........

$200.
Hospitalization
— $300.

Sept . 1, 1969 . . . .
Jan. 1, 1 970.........
Jan. 1, 1 971.........

Hospitalization
— $300.
Hospitalization
— $400.

July 1, 1972 .........

$300.

Obstetrics up to
$200.

Jan. 1, 1974 .........
Jan. 1, 1975 .........

Jan. 1, 1977 .........

Hampton Roads— previously shown under major medi­
cal.

Lump-sum al­
lowance—
$300.
$400.
Lump-sum al­
lowance—
$400.

Obstetrical pro­
cedures—
$583.50.

See footnotes at end of table.




59

In effect and continued: Baltimore— available to em­
ployees and dependent wives.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Hampton
Roads

Boston

Philadelphia

Maternity— maximum benefit— Continued
$900.

May 1, 1977
Mar. 1, 1978 . . . .

Lump-sum al­
lowance—
$600.
Philadelphia—-same benefits for maternity as hospital
room and board, hospital extras, doctor fees up to
$200 for normal delivery, and excess benefits under
major medical.

Jan. 1, 1979

Eliminated: See
major medi­
cal.

Apr. 29, 1979 .. .

Dental13— maximum benefit
July 1, 1965

Employees—
$50.

Established: Baltimore— benefits provided for any serv­
ice connected with examination, extraction, filling,
cleaning, and other services for natural or artificial
teeth. Maximum benefit applicable for 2 calendar in
sured years.
Established: Hampton Roads— employees— (1) 80 per­
cent, less $25 deductible,13 of reasonable charges in ­
curred for general dental services excluding dentures
and orthodontia— maximum of $300 during any 1
benefit period; (2) 80 percent of reasonable charges
for dentures required because of tooth extraction—
maximum of $300 during any 1 benefit period; (3) 80
percent of reasonable charges to repair or remove
bridgework— maximum of $200 each for upper and
lower plate during 3 consecutive years.
Hampton Roads— coverage extended to employee’s
legal spouse.
Added: Hampton Roads— employee denture benefit pro
vided where on effective date of becoming insured,
employee has no natural teeth.
Baltimore— a separate dental program was established
for employees with 1,100 hours in previous contract
year and their dependents, with a $10 deductible per
year (maximum $25 per year per family) that paid full
cost of charges by participating dentist (or nonpar­
ticipating dentist outside of Maryland) and 75 percent
of charges by nonparticipating dentist in Maryland.
Covered charges included exams, X-rays, cleaning,
emergency treatment, fillings, extractions, etc. Addi­
tional services were provided on an 80/20 coinsurance
basis for inlays and crowns (not part of a bridge),
space maintenance, oral surgery, surgical extractions,
etc.
Baltimore— employees with less than 1,100 hours con­
tinued to receive previous benefits.
Baltimore— for employees with 1,100 hours in previous
contract year and their dependents— the additional
services previously provided on an 80/20 coinsurance
basis changed to provide 100 percent of usual, cus­
tomary, and reasonaable (UCR) charges; the following
coverages (on the 100 percent UCR charges) for
prosthetic services (with some limitations), periodon­
tic services, and orthodontic services have been
added;and orthodontic services are restricted to de­
pendents under age 19 and to a maximum payment of
$ 1, 000.
Established: Philadelphia— dental plan for employees
and dependents that paid (1) 100 percent of reasonable
charge for preventative, diagnostic, and emergency
treatment; (2) 85 percent after deductible of $28 for
general dental expenses; (3) 60 percent after $25 de­
ductible for special dental expenses; and (4) 50 per­
cent after $25 deductible for orthodontia. Maximum
benefit was $750 per person per year, except for or­
thodontia which was $750 per person per lifetime.
Only 3 $25 deductibles charged to family per year.

Jan. 1, 1966

Jan. 1, 1967
Jan. 1, 1970

Jan. 1, 1974

Jan. 1, 1976

Jan. 1, 1978

See footnotes at end of table.




60

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Hampton
Roads

Boston

Philadelphia

Optical12— maximum benefit
July 1, 1965

Employees—
$50.

Established: Baltimore— benefits provided for any serv­
ice connected with examination of eyes and fitting of
glasses. Maximum benefit applicable for 2 insured
calendar years.
Baltimore— previous optical maximum benefit was
eliminated and in its place benefits were provided for
employees and their dependents, pensioners and their
wives, and pensioners widows as follows: (1) Eye
examination by (a) ophthalmologist, $15 maximum, (b)
optometrist, $10, once every 2 insured years; (2)
lenses (a) single, $8; (b) bifocal, $15; (c) trifocal,
$20; (3) case hardened (employees and dependent
children only) 1 set every 2 insured years; and (4)
frames, $12, 1 set every 2 years.
Established: Hampton Roads— provided benefits for
employees only as follows:

Jan. 1, 1967

Jan. 1, 1970

$45

Vision analysis..............................................
Lenses— sin g le ..............................................
bifocal ............................................
trifocal............................................
Frame .............................................................

No payment was to be made for more than one (1) com­
plete vision analysis, including refraction and all
necessary procedures to assess ocular functions, (2)
pair of lenses, or (3) set of frames in any 3 consecu­
tive years.
Baltimore— case-hardened lenses were extended to pen­
sioners, their wives, and collateral dependents.

Jan. 1, 1972 .........
May 1, 1972

Lenses—
single, $8;
bifocal, $11;
trifocal, $13.

Jan. 1, 1974

Jan. 1, 1977

Feb. 1, 1978 . . . .

$15.00
5.00
7.50
10.00
10.00

Vision analy­
sis, $20;
lenses—
single, $10,
bifocal, $15,
trifocal,
$20; frames,
$20.

Mar. 1, 1978 . . . .

Baltimore— for employees with 1,100 hours in previous
contract year and their dependents, benefits were as
follows: (1) Eye examination by (a) ophthalmologist,
$20 maximum, (b) optometrist, $10 maximum every 2
insured years; (2) lenses (a) single, $12, (b) bifocal or
trifocal, $20; (3) case-hardened, 1 set every 2 insured
years; and (4) frames, $18, 1 set every 2 insured
years.
Baltimore— employees with less than 1,100 hours con­
tinued to receive previous benefits.
Baltimore— for employees with 1,100 hours in previous
contract year and their dependents, benefits in a 2year benefit period were as follows: (1) Eye exam by
(a) ophthalmologist, $30, (b) optometrist, $10; (2)
lenses (a) single, $17, (b) bifocal or trifocal, $27, (c)
plus an additional $3 for case-hardened lenses; and (3)
frames, $25.
In effect and continued: Hampton Roads— for those age
45 or over, no payment made for more than 1 vision
analysis, pair of lenses, or set of frames in any 2 con­
secutive years (3 consecutive years for those under
age 45).

Established: Philadelphia— provided benefits to employ­
ees and dependents as follows:
Vision analysis ..................................................
Lenses— single.....................................................
b ifocal...................................................
trifocal...................................................
contact..................................................
Fram es..................................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




61

$10
13
21
25
25
12

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Optical12— maximum benefit— Continued
No payment to be made for more than 1 eye exam or set
of lenses and frames in any 2 consecutive years.
Baltimore— for employees with 1,100 hours in previous
contract year and their dependents, benefits in a 2year period were as follows: (1) Eye exam by (a)
ophthalmologist, $35, (b) optometrist, $15; (2) lenses
(a) single, $27, (b) bifocal or trifocal, $37, (c) plus an
additional $3 for case-hardened lenses; (3) frames,
$35; and (4) in place of 1 set of lenses and frames,
contact lenses, $75.
Baltimore— for eligible employees with less than 1,100
hours and their dependents, benefits in a 2-year period
were as follows: (1) Eye exam by (a) ophthalmologist,
$20, (b) optometrist, $15; (2) lenses (a) single, $18,
(b) bifocal, $25, (c) trifocal, $30, (d) plus an addi­
tional $3 for case-hardened lenses; (3) frames, $35;
and (4) in place of 1 set of lenses and frames, contact
lenses, $55.

Mar. 1, 1978—
Continued
Jan. 1, 1 9 7 9 . . .

Drugs— maximum benefit
Jan. 1, 1973

Jan. 1, 1975

Baltimore— prescription limited to 34-day supply but
100-unit dose quantity allowed for chronic conditions.
Refills not provided beyond 1 year unless number of
refills specified in prescription order.

Established:
For employ­
ees and de­
pendents—
plan provid­
ing 100 per­
cent of cost
of prescrip­
tion drugs or
injectible in­
sulin less $2
deductible if
obtained
from par­
ticipating
provider or
nonpartici­
pating pro­
vider outside
service area
or 75 percent
of difference
between cost
and $2 de­
ductible if
obtained
from non­
participating
provider.
Changed: For
employees
and depend­
ents— 100
percent of
cost of pre­
scription drug
or injectible
insulin less
50-cent de­
ductible.

Baltimore— prescriptions limited to 7-, 14-, 30-, 60-day
supply or more up to $15 ingredient cost (insurance
carrier consultation required over $15). Refills not
provided beyond 1 year unless specified in prescrip­
tion order.

Established:
Prescription
drug plan for
employees
and depend­
ents with
$300
maximum
per person.

Sept. 1, 1979

See footnotes at end of table.




62

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Hearing aid— maximum benefit

Jan. I, 1979

Employee and
dependent—
paid 80 per­
cent of cost
up to $500.

Baltimore— must be recommended by physician and
limited to 1 device in 5-year benefit period (batteries
not included).

Major medical

Apr. 1, 1957

Employees and
dependents
— 90 percent
of charges
above reg­
ular plan
benefits to
maximum of
$5,000 for
each disabil­
ity.
Employees and
dependents
— all reason­
able hospital,
surgical, and
medical
charges up to
$10,000 for
each disabil­
ity as fol­
lows:
Hospital— 1st
$500 in full
plus 80 per­
cent in ex­
cess of $500.
Surgical— 80
percent of
charges.
Other— 1st $25
paid by em­
ployees, 80
percent of
remainder by
plan.
Maternity— flat

Jan. 1, 1958

$ 200.

Jan. 1, 1959
Jan. 1, 1960

May 1, 1960

Eliminated.
Hospital — 1st
$200 in full
plus 80 per­
cent in ex­
cess of $200;
maternity—
flat $150.
Employees—
80 percent,
less $100
deductible,
of charges
above reg­
ular plan
benefits to
maximum of
$5,000 in
any benefit
period.

Full benefits available for mental illness when confined
to hospital; 50 percent of maximum when not con­
fined.

See footnotes at end of table.




63

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Hampton
Roads

Boston

Philadelphia

Major medical— Continued
Oct. I, 1963

Employees and
dependents
— 80 percent, less
$100 deduc­
tible, of
charges
above reg­
ular plan
benefits to
maximum of
$5,000 per
cause.
Employees and
dependents
— 75 percent,
less $100
deductible
for single
person or
$300 deduc­
tible for
family, of
reasonable
charges
above reg­
ular plan
benefits, to
maximum of
$10,000 in
any benefit
period.

July 1, 1965

Hospital— 1st
$500 in full,
plus 80 per­
cent of
charges in
excess of
$500; Mater­
nity— flat

Jan. 1, 1966

$

Nov. 1, 1966 ___

Jan. 1, 1969

Hampton Roads— maternity benefit provided independ­
ently of major medical benefits. (See Maternity—
maximum benefits.)

200.

Maximum
$10,000 in
any benefit
period.
Employees and
dependents
— 80 per­
cent, less
$100 deduc­
tible, of
charges
above reg­
ular plan
benefits to
maximum of
$10,000 per
insured indi­
vidual during
his lifetime.

Jan. 1, 1967

July 1, 1968

Philadelphia— 50 percent of reasonable charges, less the
applicable deductible, payable for outpatient psy­
chiatric treatment— maximum of $500 a person in
each 12-month period. Maximum benefit could be
reinstated after employee or dependent collected
$1,000 or more in benefits, provided medical evi­
dence of insurability was satisfactory to the insurance
company.

Hampton Roads— employees and dependents subject to
Medicare received major medical supplement up to
$5,000 o f 80 percent of covered expenses above $150;
no payment for charges payable by Medicare.

Eliminated;
$100 deduc­
tible for hos­
pital con­
finement.
Maximum
$12,000 for
any one
cause.

Hampton Roads— for employees and dependents subject
to Medicare, major medical supplement deductible re­
duced to $75.

See footnotes at end of table.




64

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision
Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Hampton
Roads

Boston

Philadelphia

Major medical— Continued
Maternity
benefits
added under
major medi­
cal.

Jan. I, 1970

Jan. 1, 1971

Maximum to
$20,000 in
any benefit
period.
Maximum
$25,000 in
any benefit
period (per
lifetime for
collateral de­
pendents).

Jan. 1, 1972

Hampton Roads— plan paid 50 percent of covered
charges for nervous or mental disorder when not con­
fined in hospital.
Hampton Roads— for employees and dependents subject
to Medicare, major medical supplement maximum in­
creased to $10,000.

Hospital— 1st
$1,000 in
full plus 80
percent of
charges over
$1,000; de­
ductible re­
mained $25.

May 1, 1972

July 1, 1972

Jan. 1, 1974

Maximum
$30,000 per
cause.

Jan. 1, 1975

Maximum
$40,000 per
cause.

Jan. 1, 1976

Maximum
$20,000 in
any benefit
period.
Maximum
$100,000 per
person per
lifetime.

Philadelphia— 100 percent less deductible payable after
member spent over $1,000 in unreimbursed major
medical covered charges. Remained 50 percent for
nervous or mental disorder when not confined in hos­
pital.
Baltimore— for employees with 1,100 hours and their
dependents, after 1st $1,000 out-of-pocket expenses
per year, 20 percent coinsurance paid up to maximum
of major medical benefit.
Baltimore— employees with less than 1,100 hours, their
dependents, and all dependent parents continued to re­
ceive previous benefits.
Philadelphia— after $10,000 benefits paid, full $100,000
maximum could be restored by submitting evidence of
good health.
Philadelphia— paid 50 percent for psychiatric treatment
outside hospital (maximum $60 a week).

Maximum
$60,000 per
cause.

May 1, 1976
»

Maximum to
$20,000 for
employees
with 1,100
hours in pre­
vious con­
tract year
and their de­
pendents
with plan
paying 80
percent of
1st $5,000
expenses and
100 percent
thereafter.

Maximum to
$50,000 per
disability.

Maximum
$250,000 per
disability
($10,000 per
lifetime for
mental and
nervous dis­
order) and,
after $50 de­
ductible per
individual or
family per
benefit
period, plan
paid as fol­
lows:

See footnotes at end of table.




65

Paid 75 percent
of 1st $3,600
expenses and
100 percent
thereafter in
a calendar
year (up to
$100,000
lifetime
maximum).
$100 deduc­
tible per year
(maximum
$200 per
year per
family).

Hampton Roads— benefit period defined as 2 years or 6
months after last expense, whichever first.
Hampton Roads— plan continued to pay 50 percent for
mental and nervous disorder while not hospital con­
fined.
Hampton Roads— for employees and dependents subject
to Medicare, major medical supplement maximum in­
creased to $20,000.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Hampton
Roads

Boston

Philadelphia

Major medical— Continued

Hospital— 85
percent of
1st $4,000 in
benefit
period and
100 percent
of excess (50
percent of
excess for
mental and
nervous dis­
order);
Surgery and
medical— 85
percent for
outpatient
treatment
relating to
surgery or
accident and
50 percent
for outpatient
treatment for
sickness (no
deductible);
and

May 1, 1976—
Continued

Other— 85 percent of
charges.
Jan. 1, 1978

Maximum
$250,000
lifetime
($25,000 for
mental and
nervous dis­
order with
$1,000 an­
nual
maximum)
and after $25
deductible
per indi­
vidual or
family per
year, plan
paid 80 per­
cent of 1st
$2,000 in
year and 2
months of
preceding
year and 100
percent
thereafter for
rest of year
(50 percent
paid for all
mental and
nervous dis­
order) of
charges
above reg­
ular plan
benefits.

In effect and continued: Boston— employee and de­
pendent spouse subject to Medicare, eligible for
major medical supplement up to $25,000 lifetime
which paid 50 percent of covered expenses over $50
deductible for nursing services and $50 deductible for
prescription drugs.

*

See footnotes at end o f table.




66

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision
Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Hampton
Roads

Boston

Philadelphia

Major medical— Continued
Jan. 1, 1979

Maximum to
$50,000 for
exployees
with 1,100
hours in pre­
vious con­
tract year
and their de­
pendents
with plan
paying 80
percent of
1st $2,500
expenses and
100 precent
thereafter
($50 deduc­
tible).
Maximum to
$20,000 for
eligible em­
ployees with
less than
1,100 hours
and their
dependents
with plan
paying 80
percent of
1st $2,500
and 100 per­
cent thereaf­
ter ($50 de­
ductible).

Baltimore— paid 50 percent for psychiatric outpatient
treatment up to $2,000 a year (up to $40 a day) after
deductible.

Apr. 29, 1979

Maternity
coverage
consistent
with major
medical pro­
visions.
Electroshock therapy

May 1, 1960

Employees and
dependents
— 75 percent
of expenses
in excess of
regular
benefits
during hos­
pitalization.

May 22, 1968

New York— $15 per treatment (maximum 10 per year)
under basic plan (additional payments under major
medical and comprehensive plans).
Clinical services

Sept. 18, 1957

Employees—
complete
dental care
and treat­
ment; em­
ployees and
dependents
— diagnostic
medical

Clinics established for Brooklyn locals, Sept. 18, 1957;
Jersey City, Apr. 1, 1959; Hoboken, Apr. 16, 1960;
Manhattan, June 5, 1961; Newark, Sept. 11, 1961.
In addition, Brooklyn clinic provides eye examinations
and glasses.

See footnotes at end of table.




67

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Clinic al services— Continued
Jan. 1, 1979

In effect and
continued:
For employ­
ees and de­
pendents—
centers pro­
vided com­
plete dental
services (ex­
cept or­
thodontia or
services re­
quiring gen­
eral anes­
thesia); eye
exams, pre­
scriptions,
and glasses;
hearing tests
and hearing
aids; and
prescription
drugs.
Comprehensive (not major medical)

Apr. 1, 1967

Established: New York— comprehensive health plan
with maximum o f $7,500 per benefit period for em­
ployees and dependents who enroll in NYSA— ILA
Medical Center and agree to confinement in a “ con­
tract” hospital and use surgical and medical services
of “ panel” physicians with benefits in lieu o f benefits
and amounts under hospital, surgical, emergency
X-ray and laboratory, and major medical expense
benefits. The plan provided for room and board, gen­
eral nursing care, and routine supplies while in con­
tract hospital (but not above average daily room and
board charge for semiprivate room); miscellaneous
charges for contract hospital’s services and supplies,
and intensive care surcharges (not normally included
in room and board charge); surgical fees of panel
physician; professional ambulance services to and
from hospital; X-ray, drugs, and laboratory expense
for X-rays and laboratory tests, similar examinations,
drugs and medicines identified by prescription number
and dispensed by pharmacist, blood and blood deriva­
tives, and other medical supplies and prosthetic
appliances prescribed while inpatient in contract hos­
pital (not otherwise available from NYSA— ILA
Medical Center); nursing and physiotherapist expenses
incurred subsequent to hospitalization for services of
legally licensed physiotherapist (where patient physi­
cally unable to visit NYSA— ILA Medical Center)
and charges for private-duty nursing by graduate reg­
istered nurse or licensed practical nurse; doctor’s fees
of panel physician for visits to contract hospital or
home following discharge (if patient physically unable
to visit NYSA— ILA Medical Center); and complica­
tions incident to pregnancy under certain conditions.
Benefits reduced by those paid under Medicare.
Benefit period begins 1st day of hospital confinement
and continues until 12 months following end of such
confinement. Successive periods of hospital confine­
ment for same or related causes and separated by
intervals of less than 3 months considered as 1 period
of hospital confinement.

See footnotes at end of table.




68

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Effective date
Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Comprehensive (not major medical)— Continued
Jan. 1, 1969
Jan. 1, 1974
Jan. 1, 1975
Jan. 1, 1976

Maximum
$20,000.
Maximum
$30,000.
Maximum
$40,000.
Maximum
$60,000.
Pensioners— maximum 1
>enefit

Jan. 1, 1952 .

Life insurance
— $500.

Feb. 1, 1954
May 1, 1954

Life insurance
— $500.
Life insurance
— $500.

May 31, 1956 .
Jan. 1, 1957

Nov. 1, 1957 .

Life insurance
— $ 100.

Eliminated.
Hospitalization
— $10 a day
for 31 days;
hospital
extras—
$310 lifetime
payment;
surgical—
$300.
Pensioners and
dependents:
hospitaliza­
tion— $10 a
day for 31
days; hospi­
tal extras—
$150; surgi­
cal— $250.

Jan. 1, 1958

Life insurance
—

$

1, 000.

Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Hospitaliza­
tion— $14 up
to 70 days;
hospital
extras—
$980; surgi­
cal— $400.

Life insurance
— $750.
Pensioners
and depend­
ent wives:
Hospitaliza­
tion— $12 a
day up to 31
days; hospi­
tal extras—
$150; outpa­
tient services
— $150; sur­
gical— $250.

See footnotes at end of table.




69

Life insurance
—

$

1, 000 .

Pensioners and
dependent
wives: Hos­
pitalization
— $ 1,000
within con­
finement
period, up to
70 days in­
cluding
therapeutic
allowances;
outpatient
service—
$100 per
person;
maternity
benefits—
$200; major
medical—
$5,000 for
each insured
person.

Baltimore— also available to widows entitled to benefits
from pension fund.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Pensioners— maximum benefit— Continued
Pensioners and
dependents:
Hospitaliza­
tion— $16 a
day up to 70
days; hospi­
tal extras—
$320; major
medical—
eliminated.

Jan 1, 1959

Jan. 1, 1960 .

Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Hospitaliza­
tion— $16;
hospital
extras—
$1,120; sur­
gical— $500;
doctor’s vis­
its (male
pensioners
only)— $100
for any dis­
ability.

Jan. 1, 1961

Jan. 1, 1962

Jan. 1, 1963

Mar. 1, 1963 . ..

Jan. 1, 1964

Dependent
wives: Life
insurance—
$375.
Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Hospitaliza­
tion— $18
per day.
Male pension­
ers:
Doctor’s visits
— $200 in
calendar
year.
Pensioners and
dependents
not eligible
for Federal
Medicare:
Benefits in
calendar year
— hospitali­
zation— $10
a day for 31
days; hospi­
tal extras—
$150; surgi­
cal— $250.
Pensioner and
dependent
wives: Inhospital
doctor’s vis­
its— $93.

See footnotes at end of table.




70

Life insurance
— $1,500.
Pensioners
and depend­
ent wives:
Hospitaliza­
tion— $20;
hospital
extras—
$400; surgi­
cal— $400.

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Effective date
Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Pensioners—maximum benefit—Continued
Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Hospitaliza­
tion— $23;
hospital
extras—
$1,610.

Jan. 1, 1965

Jan. 1, 1966
— (1) pensioners—
$1,500 and
(2) depend­
ent wives—
$750.
Apr. 1, 1966

Life insurance
— $ 1, 000.
Pensioners and
dependent
wives: Sur­
gical— $260.

New York— life insurance benefit payable from pension
trust fund.

dependent
wives:14
Hospitaliza­
tion— $25;
hospital
extras—
$1,750.

New York— for pensioners and dependents not eligible
for Medicare— hospitalization, $310; hospital extras,
$150; surgical, 65 percent of surgical fee schedule.
Hampton Roads— pensioners and dependents subject to
Medicare received major medical supplement, up to
$5,000, of 80 percent of covered medical expenses
above $150; no payment made for charges reimbursed
under Medicare.

July 1, 1966

Jan. 1, 1967

Jan. 1, 1969

Jan. 1, 1970 ,

Pensioners and
dependents
eligible for
Medicare:14
1st $44 for
hospitaliza­
tion, plus
$ 11 a day for
61st through
70th day.
Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Hospital ization— $35.
Hospital confinement for
those eligible
for Medicare14— 1st
$52 o f hospital expense
plus $13 a
day for 61st
through 70th
day.

dependent
wife (in­
cluding de­
pendent chil­
dren to age
25) not sub­
ject to Medi­
care: Hos­
pitalization
— $18; hos­
pital extras
— $300; sur­
gical— $300;
in-hospital
doctor’s vis­
its $155.
Pensioners and
dependents
eligible for
Medicare:
Deductible to
$75.

$ 2 , 000.

Pensioners and
dependent
wives not
eligible for
Medicare:
Hospital ization— $30;
hospital
extras—
$600; medical— $490;
surgical—
$1,000.

See footnotes at end o f table.




Pensioners and
dependent
wives: Hos­
pitalization
— $30 a day.
Pensioner: Life
insurance—

71

Baltimore— welfare benefits for pensioners and depend­
ents (also employees and dependents) coordinated
with Medicare since July 1, 1966, to prevent duplica­
tion of benefits. At that time, for those eligible for
Medicare, benefits paid 1st $40 of hospital expense,
plus $10 a day for 61st through 70th day and 1st $50
of Medical expenses. Plan paid covered expenses
above these amounts less any Medicare benefits (total
benefit could not exceed maximum entitled to if not
eligible for Medicare).

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Pensioners— maximum benefit— Continued
Jan. 1, 1971

Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Hospitaliza­
tion— $50.
Hospital con­
finement for
those eligible
for Medi­
care:14 1st
$60 of hos­
pital expense
plus $15 a
day for 61st
through 70th
day.
Pensioners and
dependent
wives eli­
gible for
Medicare:14 '
1st $68 of
hospital ex­
pense plus
$ 17 a day for
61st through
70th day.
Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Case hard­
ened lenses
with $3
maximum in
2-year
period.

Jan. 1, 1972

Eliminated:
$2,000 life
insurance for
pensioner
under this
plan (such
amount paid
under pen­
sion plan).

July 1, 1972

Jan. 1, 1973

Pensioners and
dependent
wives: Hos­
pitalization
— $40 a day;
maternity
benefit—
$300.
See eligibility
requirements
effective Jan.
1, 1973.

Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Drug bene­
fits as for
active em­
ployees. (See
drug bene­
fits.)
For those eli­
gible for
Medicare:14
1st $72 of
hospital ex­
pense plus
$18 a day for
61st through
70th day.

Pensioner and
dependent
spouse: Vi­
sion care
benefits as
for active
employees.
(See optical
benefits.)
Pensioners and
dependents
eligible for
Medicare to
receive
major Medi­
care supple­
ment up to
$ 10, 000 .
Pensioners life
insurance—
$ 2 , 000.

See footnotes at end of table.




72

Hampton Roads— $250 of retiree or dependent life in­
surance could be paid to any person for expenses for
illness or burial.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Pensioners— maximum benefit—Continued
Jan. 1, 1974 .

See eligibility
requirements
effective Jan.
1, 1974.

dependent
wives;14
Hospital
preadmission
testing—
$100.
For those eligible for
Medicare14
— 1st $84 of
hospital ex­
pense plus
$21 a day for
61st through
70th day.

Pensioners and
dependent
wives not
eligible for
Medicare to
receive same
major medical expense
benefits as
for active
employees.
(See major
medical.)

dependent
wives: Hospitalization
— $60 a day;
hospital
extras—
$500; outpatient services
— $200; surgical— $900.

Hampton Roads— major medical coverage replaced
former hospital, surgical, medical benefits for those
covered.

Apr. 1, 1974
insurance—
$2,000.
Jan. 1, 1975 .
dependent
wives:14
X-ray and
laboratory
expenses—
$400; major
medical—
same as for
active employees with
less than
1,100 hours
in previous
contract year
(see major
medical.)
drug benefits
— same as
for active
employees
(See drug
benefits.)
For those eligible for
Medicare14
— covered
hospital ex­
pense
charges not
payable by
Medicare
and Part B
deductible.

dependent
wives not
eligible for
Medicare:
Pregnancy
expense—
$400.

May 1, 1976
dependents
not eligible
for Medicare:
See footnotes at end of table.




73

dependent
wives: Hospitalization
— semiprivate room
rate
(maximum
70 days);
pregnancy
expense—
$400; emergency physician’s benefit
— $50 a
calendar
year.

Baltimore— for pensioners and dependent wives eligible
for Medicare, major medical benefits coordinated with
Medicare to prevent duplication of benefits.
New York— comprehensive plan benefits provided pen­
sioners who retired on or after Apr. 1, 1972, if not
covered by another plan or Medicare, nor on social
security disability pension entitled to medical or surgi­
cal coverage, nor employed in another industry.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans—Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Pensioners— maximum benefit— Continued
Major medical
benefits con­
tinued to be
same as for
active em­
ployees (See
major medi­
cal) except
deductible
was $100
and paid for
outpatient
treatment of
sickness on
85 percent
basis.

May l, 1976—
Conti nued

Jan. 1, 1977

May 1, 1977

Pensioners and
dependent
wives:14
Surgical and
X-ray and
laboratory
expenses—
same as for
active em­
ployees.
Pensioners and
dependent
spouse not
eligible for
Medicare:
Pregnancy
expense—
$900 (same
as for active
employees).

Jan. 1, 1978

Feb. 1, 1978 . . . .

Dependent
wives: Life
insurance—
$ 1, 000 .

Pensioners and
dependents
eligible for
Medicare:
Major medi­
cal supple­
ment
maximum—
$

20, 000.

See footnotes at end of table.




74

Boston— pensioners and dependents subject to Medicare
eligible for supplemental benefit up to $25,000
lifetime of 80 percent of covered expenses after yearly
deductibles of $50 for nursing services and $50 for
prescription drugs.
Hampton Roads— $500 of retiree or dependent life in­
surance could be paid to any person for illness or
burial.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

Welfare and insurance plans— Continued
New York

Baltimore

Boston

Hampton
Roads

Philadelphia

Pensioners— maximum benefit—Continued
Pensioners and
dependent
wives: Out­
patient serv­
ices— $200
for any 1
sickness or
accident and
$300 per
year; preg­
nancy ex­
pense—
$600; physi­
cian’s benefit
— full rea­
sonable
charge (all
of these
same as for
active em­
ployees).

Mar. 1, 1978 . . . .

Jan. 1, 1979

In effect and
continued:
Pensioner
life insurance
— $1,500

Pensioners and
spouses:14
Life insur­
ance— pen­
sioner,
$3,000,
spouse,
$1,000; hos­
pitalization,
outpatient
hospital care,
doctor’s vis­
its, hearing
aid— same
as for active
employees
and their
spouses; vi­
sion care—
same as for
active em­
ployees with
less than
1,100 hours.

Baltimore— $1,000 for pensioned spouse burial ex­
pense.
New York— pensioner life insurance payable under pen­
sion plan.

Sept. 1, 1979




Philadelphia— for those retired after age 62 as normal
retiree and dependent wife covered by major medical
to age 65.

Established:
Prescription
drug plan for
retirees and
dependent
wives—
same as for
active em­
ployees.

75

Footnotes to table 3
AThe last item under each entry represents the most recent change.
2This and subsequent agreements made no provision for additional pay for
nightwork (between 5 p.m. and 8 a.m.) in excess of 40 hours a week. Under an
amendment to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, approved on July 20,
1949, and made retroactive .to the effective date o f this act, the liability of
employers to pay for work in excess o f 40 hours a week at the rate of time and
one-half the regular rate was removed in cases where the rate paid was already
a premium rate equal to time and one-half.
3Longshoremen seeking work at North Atlantic Coast ports are hired as re­
quired by foremen stevedores o f shipping lines and stevedoring companies.
The system o f employing labor in these ports, as differentiated from the
hiring hall common to most maritime trades, is termed the “ shape.” Under the
shape, longshoremen congregate and are hired at the pier on which work is
available. Although employers o f longshore labor do not ordinarily maintain
permanent staffs, longshoremen tend to seek work at a specific pier or for an
individual employer. Over a period o f years, this practice has established a
precedent which entitles regular workers to employment preference at their
chosen piers. The 1949 contracts acknowledged this right by providing that
workers “ who regularly work” on a pier must be given “ preference in hir­
in g.”
During the early 1900’s, workers seeking longshore work were required to be
available at the piers all day. Since then, the union and the employers have
established fixed periods during which employers may hire labor. The 1949
agreement provided shaping periods as follows: (1) From Monday to Friday at
7:55 a.m. for work between 8 a.m. and 12 noon; at 12:55 p.m. for work be­
tween 1 p.m. and 5 p.m ., and for work starting at 5, 6, or 7 p.m.; (2) on
Saturday, Sunday, or legal holidays, additional workers at the 12:55 p.m. shape
of the previous day, if a ship was worked at the pier on the previous day.
Longshoremen working on the previous day receive their orders before leaving
work; (3) on a Saturday or legal holiday preceded by a day on which no ship
was worked at the pier at 7:55 a.m.; and (4) on a Sunday preceded by a day on
which no ship was worked at the pier before 12 noon of the preceding Satur­
day.
4In Boston, longshoremen did not work before 8 a.m.
*In New York and New Jersey, a single “ shape-up,” at 7:55 a.m. each day
instead o f 2, as in the past, with special arrangements for the employment of




workers after 5 p.m ., was provided for in the 1951 contract. Each o f the other
ports continued to have 3 or more shape-ups.
6With the modificaton o f the shape (text footnote 6), the parties to the New
York Port agreement also negotiated ordering procedures. These procedures
specified the day and hour gangs were to be provided with work assignments.
They required notice for work on (1) Sunday, by 3 p.m. on Friday, unless the
gang worked on Saturday in which case notice was required by 3 p.m. on that
day; (2) Monday, by 4 p.m. on Friday; and (3) Tuesday through Saturday, by 4
p.m. the previous day. Gangs needed for nightwork from Monday through
Saturday were to be notified not later than 3 p.m. of the day to be worked; on
Sunday, by 3 p.m. Friday. Provisions for work on the day following a legal
holiday were similar to those for Sunday-Monday callouts— notice was re­
quired before the day of rest. Because of the uncertainty connected with
maritime scheduling, provision was made for cancellation of the job orders
before specified hours on the days to be worked.
7This was the only agreement reached at Boston. All other details of the
plan were to be worked out at a later date.
8The clinic fund at Boston was combined with the welfare fund on Oct. 31,
1963; Boston no longer has clinics or a clinic fund.
9Unfunded benefits available through Dec. 31, 1963 (not paid through the
Group Insurance Plan but paid directly by the fund).
10 Amounts for life insurance and accidental death and dismemberment made
retroactive from trustee action dated May 28, 1969.
"E ffective Jan. 1, 1958, or thereafter, provision also applicable to widow
and dependent children of deceased employee (medical benefits for widow
only) for the remainder of the insured year; like coverage extended for the next
calendar year if deceased employee had at least 700 hours to his credit prior to
his death.
"C om plete clinical services for dental and optical care were provided in
NYSA— ILA Medical Centers for employees and dependents.
"The deductible was to be satisfied within 6 consecutive months.
" A ls o applicable to widows of pensioners, if they were entitled to w idow s’
benefits from the pension fund, and widows and dependent children of de­
ceased employees for the balance of the insured year, with like coverage ex­
tended for the next calendar year if deceased employee had at least 700 man­
hours credit prior to his death.

76

Wage Chronologies Available

Bituminous Coal Mine Operators and United Mine
Workers of America—
October 1933-November 1974, BLS Bulletin 1799.
1974-77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1799.
The Boeing Co. (Washington Plants) and the Interna­
tional Association of Machinists—
June 1936-September 1977, BLS Bulletin 1895.
1977-80, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1895.
Commonwealth Edison Co. and the Electrical Workers
(IBEW)—
October 1945-March 1974, BLS Bulletin 1808.
1974- 79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1808.
Dan River Inc. and the Textile Workers (UTWA)—
1943-79, BLS Bulletin 2048
FMC Corp., Chemical Group—Fiber Division and the
TWUA—
1945-77, BLS Bulletin 1924.
1977-79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1924.
Federal Employees under the General Schedule Pay
System—
July 1924-October 1974, BLS Bulletin 1870.
197578, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1870.
Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. and B.F. Goodrich Co.
(Akron Plants) and the Rubber Workers—
1937-79, BLS Bulletin 2011.
Ford Motor Company—
Volume I, June 1941-September 1973, BLS Bulle­
tin 1787.
Volume II, September 1973-September 1979, BLS
Bulletin 1994.
International Harvester Co. and the Auto Workers—
February 1946-September 1976, BLS Bulletin
1887.
197679, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1887.
International Paper Co., Multiple Mill Group, and the
Paperworkers and the Electrical Workers (IBEW),
1937-79, Bulletin 2023.
International Shoe Co., the Shoe Workers, and the Boot
and Shoe Workers—
1945-78, BLS Bulletin 2010.
Lockheed-Califomia Co. (a division of Lockheed Air­
craft Corp.) and Machinists’ Union—
March 1937-October 1977, BLS Bulletin 1904.
1977- 80, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1904.
Martin Marietta Aerospace and the Auto Workers—
March 1944-November 1975, BLS Bulletin 1884.
1975-78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1884.

The following wage chronologies are available from
the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from the
regional offices of the Bureau of Labor Statistics listed
on the inside back cover. Some publications are out of
print and not available from the Superintendent of
Documents but may be obtained, as long as supplies are
available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Wash­
ington, D.C. 20212, or from the Bureau’s regional of­
fices. Out-of-print items also may be available for refer­
ence in leading public, college, or university libraries.
Before July 1965, basic wage chronologies and their
supplements were published in the Monthly Labor Re­
view and released as Bureau reports. Wage chronologies
published later are available only as bulletins (and their
supplements). Summaries of general wage changes and
new or changed working practices are added to bulletins
as new contracts are negotiated.
Alumj num Company of America with United
Steelworkers of America and Aluminum Workers In­
ternational Union—
November 1939-January 1974, BLS Bulletin 1815.
February 1974-May 1980, Supplement to BLS
Bulletin 1815.
The Anaconda Co. (Montana Mining Div.) and the
Steelworkers—
1941-77, BLS Bulletin 1953.
1977-80, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1953.
Armour and Company and the Meat Cutters—
1 9 4 1 - 7 2 , B L S B u lle tin 1 6 8 2 .

1973-79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1682.
A.T.&T.-Long Lines Department and Communications
Workers of America (AFL-CIO)—
October 1940-July 1974, BLS Bulletin 1812.
July 1974-August 1977, Supplement to BLS Bul­
letin 1812.
Atlantic Richfield and the Oil Workers (former Sinclair
Oil Facilities)—
1941-77, BLS Bulletin 1915.
1977-79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1915.
Berkshire Hathaway Inc. and the Clothing and Textile
Workers (ACTWU)—
June 1943-April 1980, BLS Bulletin 2061.
Bethlehem Steel Corporation (Shipbuilding Department)
and the IUMSW—
June 1941-August 1975, BLS Bulletin 1866.
1975-78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1866.




77

Massachusetts Shoe Manufacturers and the Shoe
Workers—
1945-79, BLS Bulletin 1993.
New York City Laundries and the Clothing Workers—
November 1945-November 1975, BLS Bulletin
1845.
1975-78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1845.
North Atlantic Shipping Associations and the Interna­
tional Longshoremen’s Association—
1934-80, BLS Bulletin 2063.
Pacific Coast Shipbuilders and Various Unions—
1941-77, BLS Bulletin 1982.
Pacific Gas and Electric Co.—
1943-72, BLS Bulletin 1761.
1972-79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1761.
Pacific Maritime Association and the ILWU—
1934-78, BLS Bulletin 1960.
Railroads—Nonoperating Employees—
1920-77, BLS Bulletin 2041.




Rockwell International (Electronics, North American
Aircraft/Space Operations) and the Auto Workers—
May 1941-September 1977, BLS Bulletin 1893.
United States Steel Corporation—
March 1937-April 1974, BLS Bulletin 1814.
May 1974-July 1980, Supplement to BLS Bulletin
1814.
Western Greyhound Lines—
1945-67, BLS Bulletin 1595.1
1968-77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1595.
Western Union Telegraph Co. and the Telegraph Work­
ers and the Communications Workers—
1943-76, BLS Bulletin 1927.
1976-79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1927.

‘Out-of-print. See Directory o f Wage Chronologies, 1948-June
1977, for Monthly Labor Review issue in which reports and sup­
plements published before July 1965 appeared.

S-U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1980-311-416/4012

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U.S. Department of Labor,
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U.S. Government Printing Office
Superintendent of Documents

Washington, D.C. 20402
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

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Bureau o f Labor Statistics
Regional O ffices

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761

Region IV
1371 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30367
Phone: (404) 881-4418

Region V
Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 944-3121

Region III
3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154




9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: (312) 353-1880

Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 767-6971

Regions VII and VIII
911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678