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Wage Chronology:
New York City Laundries
and the Clothing Workers,
November 1945— November 1975
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1975
Bulletin 1845




Wage Chronology:
New York City Laundries
and Amalgamated Service and
Allied Industries Joint Board,
an Affiliate of the
Amalgamated Clothing Workers
of America,
November 1945- November 1975
U.S. Department of Labor
John T. Dunlop, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1975
Bulletin 1845

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402
GPO Bookstores, or BLS Regional Offices listed on inside back cover. Price 85 cents
Make checks payable to Superintendent of Documents
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Preface
This bulletin is prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as part of a series that traces
changes in wage scales and related benefits negotiated by individual employers or combinations
of employers with a union or group of unions. Benefits unilaterally introduced by an employer
generally are included. The information is obtained largely from collective bargaining agreements
and related documents voluntarily filed with the Bureau. Descriptions of the course o f collective
bargaining are derived from the news media and confirmed and supplemented by the parties to the
agreement. Wage chronologies deal only with selected features of collective bargaining or wage
determination and are intended primarily as a tool for research, analysis, and wage administration.
References to job security, grievance procedures, methods of piece-rate adjustment, and similar
matters are omitted. For a detailed explanation of the purpose and scope of the chronology pro­
gram, see “Wage Chronologies and Salary Trend Reports,” BLS Handbook o f Methods, Bulletin
1711 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1971), pp. 209-212.
This wage chronology summarizes changes in wage rates and related compensation practices
negotiated by the New York City laundry industry with the Amalgamated Service and Allied
Industries Joint Board (affiliated with the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America) since 1945.
This bulletin replaces Wage Chronology: New York City Laundries, 1945-64, published as BLS
Bulletin 1453, and incorporates the supplement covering the 1965-72 period. Materials previously
published have been supplemented by contract changes negotiated in 1972. Except for a revised
introduction and other minor changes, earlier texts are included as they were originally published.
The section for 1965-75 was prepared in the Division of Trends in Employee Compensation
by William M. Davis.
The U. S. Bureau of the Census has introduced new job titles in its Occupational Classification
System to eliminate those that denote sex stereotypes. For purposes of this bulletin, however,
such titles have been retained where they refer specifically to contractual definitions. Where
titles are used in the generic sense, and not to describe a contract term, they have been changed
to eliminate the sex stereotype.




m

Contents
Page
Introduction

..................................................................................................................................

1

Summary of contract negotiations:
November 1945-February 1952 ............................................................................................
March 1952-November 1957 .................................................................................................
December 1957-November 1962
.......................................................................................
December 1962—
November 1965
.......................................................................................
December 1965—
November 1966 .. . . ................................................................................
December 1966-November 1969 ........................................................................................
December 1969-November 1972 ........................................................................................
December 1972-November 1975 ........................................................................................

2
2
2
3
3
3
4
5

Tables:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

General wage changes, December 1945-November 1964 .........................................
General wage changes, December 1965-December 1974 .........................................
Minimum hourly wage rates for plantw orkers.............................................................
Minimum weekly guarantee, selected o ccu p atio n s......................................................
Supplementary compensationpractices .........................................................................
Overtime pay .........................................................................................................
Shift premium p a y .................................................................................................
Premium pay for weekend w o rk .........................................................................
Vacation pay .........................................................................................................
Holiday pay ...........................................................................................................
Paid sick le a v e .........................................................................................................
Call-in pay .................................................................................................................
Down-time pay ......................................................................................................
Paid rest p e r io d .........................................................................................
Uniform allowance ...............................................................................................
Travel expense pay ...............................................................................................
Funeral leave .........................................................................................................
Severance p a y .........................................................................................................
Health and welfare b e n e f its ..................................................................................
P en sio n s...................................................................................................................

6 -9
10
11
12-16
17-29
17-18
18
19
19-20
20-22
22-23
23
23
23—
24
24
24
24
24
25-27
27-29

Wage chronologies available ......................................................................................................... 30-31




Introduction
The unionized portion of the commercial laundry
industry in the New York City area, including Long
Island and parts of Westchester, consists of about
175 power laundries and 175 hand laundries. These
laundries employ about 8,500 workers and are under
contract with the Amalgamated Service and Allied
Industries Joint Board, an affiliate of the Amalgamated
Clothing Workers of America (ACWA), AFL-CIO. The
industry is classified into three major divisions, accord­
ing to their function (1) Family and wholesale; (2)
linen and flatwork, including towel, industrial, and
diaper service; and (3) hand laundry.
Family laundries are self-contained retail laundries
which offer a variety of services including wet wash,
rough dry, and finishing to individual families. Whole­
sale laundries perform the wash function for small
neighborhood hand laundries, which then sort, finish
and deliver to retail customers. Linen, flatwork, towel,
and industrial service establishments either launder only,
or own, launder, and rent uniforms, tablecloths, bed
linens, and other items to restaurants, hotels, barber
and beauty shops, industrial organizations, and similar
commercial users. Diaper services own, launder, and rent
diapers to families and institutions.
Commercial laundries in New York City, as well as
nationwide, have been in decline lately. This is due
principally to the increased use of home washers and
dryers and coin-operated laundries, the extensive use of
paper substitutes for linens by restaurants, hotels and
other commercial users, and growing public acceptance
and use of drip-dry and permanent press synthetic
fabrics. In New York City, approximately 18,000
workers were employed by laundries under contract
with the union in 1952 compared with 8,500 in 1974.
The family and wholesale division employs 12 percent
of the 8,500 workers; 80 percent are in linen, flatwork,
towel, industrial, and diaper service establishments; and
8 percent are in hand laundries.
Most laundries in the New York City Area are
members of any one of 10 employer associations1 but
there are several major and a large number of smaller
independent firms. Although each independent signs
an individual contract with the union, wage and benefit
terms are the same as for association members because
the associations and the independents bargain jointly
with the union.
Approximately 98 percent of the workers in the
industry in New York City are represented by the




Amalgamated Service and Allied Industries Joint Board.
The ACWA became active in organizing the laundry
industry in New York as the result of a strike in March
1937 for recognition and higher wages by 1,000 laundry
workers in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn. When
the employers offered recognition to the strikers if they
had the endorsement of the Amalgamated, a committee
comprised of officials of that union and representatives
of the striking employees was formed to negotiate a
contract. An ACWA charter was granted the laundry
workers on August 12, 1937, and the first contract
with the employers, covering 100 shops, was signed the
same day. Originally the union was designated as Local
300; in June 1938, the name was changed to the
Laundry Workers Joint Board of Greater New York.
After 1 year of existence, the Joint Board had organ­
ized 90 percent of the laundry workers in the area.
The name Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board
was adopted in June 1957 and changed to Amalgamated
Service and Allied Industries Joint Board in March 1973.
From the beginning, a h arm o n io u s relationship
existed between the negotiating parties. Although nego­
tiation disputes often are settled by arbitration, a strike
has not occurred since the inception of collective bar­
gaining in 1937.
This chronology traces the changes in provisions
affecting p ro d u c tio n , maintenance workers, office
workers, and the com m ission and noncommission
route workers and route salesworkers and their helpers
employed by the family and wholesale, and linen
supply and flatwork divisions. The chronology starts
with the 1945 agreements, but the provisions reported
under that date do not necessarily indicate changes
from earlier conditions of employment.
The changes reported here relate to employees paid
piece rates or commissions as well as to those paid on a
straight hourly or weekly basis. Special provisions of
the contracts dealing with the day-to-day administra­
tion of the incentive plans are omitted.
1
The associations representing employers are as follows:
Family and Wholesale-VsiriiXy Laundry owners Association, Inc.;
Wholesale Laundry Board of Trade, Inc.; and City Wide Whole­
sale Laundry Association, Inc.; Linen Supply and FlatworkTowel Service Bureau, Inc.; and Linen Service Council of New
Jersey; Family and Wholesale, Linen Supply and FlatworkBluestone Group; Hand Laundry-New York Hand Laundrymen’s Association, Inc.; Brooklyn Hand Laundrymen’s Associa­
tion, Inc.; Long Island Hand Laundrymen’s Association, Inc.;
and Westchester Hand Laundrymen’s Association, Inc.

Summary of contract negotiations
November 1945—
February 1952

During this period, four wage agreements were signed
both in the family and wholesale division and the linen
supply and flat work division; each of the contracts
provided for wage increases. In addition, from 1945 to
1952 improvements were made in overtime pay, holiday
pay, and health and welfare benefits, and a companyfinanced pension plan was established.
March 1952-November 1957

Two wage reopenings were permitted by the 3year agreements dated March 3, 1952, between the
family and wholesale laundries and linen suppliers
and flatwork laundries and the Laundry Workers Joint
Board of Greater New York. The first reopening, to be
no later than January 1953, was limited to wage rates,
while the second, to be no later than January 1,
1954, and to become effective March 1 of that year,
could include wages, hours, and working conditions.
The one series of negotiations held under these reopen­
ing provisions took place in the fall of 1953 but did
not result in agreement. In accordance with contract
provisions, the matters under c o n sid e ra tio n were
referred to the impartial arbitrator.
The arbitrator’s award issued on December 1, 1953,
for the linen supply and flatwork division increased
wage rates (including minimum rates of pay), improved
vacation benefits, and changed the method of comput­
ing overtime pay for noncommission routemen. The
award for the family and wholesale division issued
on January 21, 1954, made some changes in minimum
rates but left other rates unchanged. It also established
paid sick leave benefits and, like the other award,
improved vacation benefits, and revised the method of
computing overtime for wholesale routemen and helpers.
Both awards extended the agreements to December 1,
1957, with provision for a reopening on wages no
later than October 1, 1954, and for reopenings on
wages, hours, or working conditions by October 1,
1955, or any subsequent year of the agreement.
No contract changes were introduced until 1956.
However, in October 1954, the Amalgamated Laundry
Workers Health Center was opened. Financed out of



welfare fund reserves, it provided out-patient diagnostic,
preventive, and therapeutic services for union members.
Services of the center were extended to nonworking
dependent wives of members late in 1955 and to
pensioners and their spouses in April 1956.
When negotiations in the fall of 1955 did not result
in an agreement, the matters in dispute were again
referred to an arbitrator. The resulting awards, effective
in January 1956 for both industry divisions, provided
general wage increases, including increases in minimum
rates, as well as improved rest periods.
December 1957—
November 1962

The contracts were not reopened in 1956, but on
November 29, 1957, the parties agreed to new con­
tracts to extend from December 1, 1957, to December
1962. These agreements provided wage increases in
January and September 1958 and in January 1960,
with provision for an additional cost-of-living incre­
ment at the latter date. In addition, provision was
made for a reopening on wages (if warranted by the
BLS Consumer Price Index) and on contributions to
the welfare fund by December 1, 1960. A further
reopening on wages, hours, or working conditions was
permitted by November 4, 1961. In addition to chang­
ing wage rates, the new contracts improved health
and welfare benefits.
The deferred wage increase effective January 4,
1960, including the cost-of-living adjustment specified
in the 1957 agreements, ranged from 5 to 10 cents
for hourly paid workers and from $3 to $4 a week
for office w o rk e rs, routemen, and their helpers.
Improvements in health benefits were made effective
by trustees of the welfare fund on June 1, 1960.
Wage rates were unchanged in the December 1,
1960, reopening. Increased employer contributions to
the health and welfare fund became effective on April
3, 1961, and again on September 3, 1961, when the
employers’ contribution to the pension fund was also
increased. Further improvements were made in the
health benefits plan.
When the parties failed to agree on contract changes
under the second reopening on November 4, 1961,
the issues were submitted to arbitration under terms

of the agreement. The arbitrator’s award of January
9, 1962, provided increases of 5 to 10 cents in hourly
wages and minimum guarantees, and $3 to $5 in the
weekly pay of office workers, routemen, and their
helpers. Vacation provisions were also liberalized. The
award became effective on January 22, 1962, for the
linen supply and flatwork division and on January 29,
1962, for the family and wholesale division.

December 1962—
November 1965

Negotiations on the terms of a new contract in
the industry began on August 21, 1962, with the
union seeking a 20-percent wage increase, a reduced
workweek, and improved holiday and vacation plans.
Higher wage rates based on the increase in the cost of
living since the date of the last increase were offered
by the employers. When a stalemate in late November
threatened an industrywide strike, which would have
been the first in the long history of labor relations
in the industry, the State Mediation Board entered
the negotiations. Continuous bargaining sessions resulted
in a 4-year agreement on December 1, 1962, that was
ratified by the workers by December 15, 1962.
The settlement, covering 16,000 employees, pro­
vided general wage increases of 15 cents an hour
over a 2-year period for production workers and in­
creased hourly and weekly wages and minimum guaran­
tees for these workers and for engineers, maintenance
workers, routemen and helpers, and office workers.
The workweek for all noncommission routemen was
reduced to 45 hours, including a daily 1-hour lunch
period, in two steps between March 4, 1963, and
November 30, 1964. Family commission routemen
received an additional paid holiday, and the vacation
plan was liberalized. Improvements were made in the
paid sick leave provisions for commission routemen in
the family division. Family routemen also received paid
leave in the event of death in the immediate family.
Severance pay for employees displaced by new machin­
ery was guaranteed by the agreement.
The agreement was to remain in effect until Novem­
ber 30, 1966, with provision for a reopening by Sep­
tember 1, 1965 for negotiations on wages, hours, and
working conditions, or, at any time during the term
of the agreement, in the event of an increase in the
statutory minimum wage.




An arbitration award, rendered on October 29, 1965,
ended a stalemate in negotiations between the Amalga­
mated Laundry Workers Joint Board and New York
City family and wholesale laundries, and linen supply
and flatwork laundries.
Negotiations had begun in August, under a reopen­
ing provision of the 4-year contract scheduled to expire
November 30, 1966. Union demands, submitted to the
industry on September 23, 1965, included a 10-percent
increase in wages and minimums, and a reduction in
the workweek for engineers and maintenance workers
to 40 hours, and another for officeworkers to 35
hours, without reduction in weekly earnings. It included
also an additional paid holiday, and an increase to
7 percent in employers’ contributions to the insurance
fund, with accompanying increases in insurance and
retirement benefits.
When agreement could not be reached after a series
of negotiations, however, the parties submitted their
differences to the industry’s impartial chairperson in
mid-October. His award, effective December 1, 1965,
and covering approximately 15,000 workers, increased
employer contributions to the welfare fund from 4.25
to 5.26 percent of gross payroll, with accompanying
increases in benefits. Maximums were raised on life
insurance, sickness and accident benefits, and hospitalsurgical benefits, as well as on life insurance for retirees.
“Good Health Day” was an added paid holiday, and the
daily rest-period provision was improved. The work­
week for engineers and maintenance workers was re­
duced from 42 to 41 hours without loss in weekly
earnings, resulting in a 2.4-percent increase in hourly
rates. Wage rates for others remained unchanged for
the duration of the contract.

December 1966—
November 1969

Negotiations in 1966 began with union demands for
a 3-year contract providing for increases in wages and
minimum rates of 18 percent in December 1966 and
12 percent in December 1967, plus improvements in
supplementary benefits. The employers offered a 1-year
contract which would increase wages 3 percent across
the board, but representatives of the approximately
15,000 workers rejected the increase. The State Media­
tion Board entered the negotiations on November 17,

in an attempt to avert a threatened industrywide strike,
but on November 19, 450 officials and the negotiating
committee of the union voted authorization to strike at
midnight on November 30, 1966.
The threatened strike, which would have been the
first in the New York industry’s history, was avoided
when the parties agreed to a 3-year contract on Novem­
ber 30, after a 27-hour marathon bargaining session.
Wage increases under the agreement, scheduled to
expire November 30, 1969, were: 7% to 25 cents an
hour for hourly paid workers, and $5 to $12.50 a
week for officeworkers, routemen, and their helpers
effective December 5, 1966; 7% to 12% cents an hour
for hourly paid workers, and $4 to $7.50 a week for
officeworkers, routemen, and their helpers, effective
December 4, 1967; and 5 cents or 10 cents an hour
for hourly paid workers, and $3 to $5 a week for officeworkers, routemen, and their helpers, effective Decem­
ber 2, 1968. In addition, on December 5, 1966,
engineers and maintenance workers received an added
2%-percent wage increase (the amount necessary to
maintain weekly earnings when the workweek was
reduced from 41 to 40 hours), and officeworkers an
additional 3.9-percent increase in hourly rates (resulting
from a workweek reduction from 40 to 38% hours
without loss in weekly pay). Effective December 4,
1967, officeworkers received another 2.67-percent in­
crease in hourly rates (resulting from a further reduc­
tion in the workweek to 37% hours). Minimum hourly
plant rates and weekly guarantees also were increased
in each of the 3 years.
Overtime rates of time-and-one-half were provided
for engineers and maintenance workers and officeworkers for work over the reduced number of hours
in their respective workweeks. Vacations were improved
for office workers, and it was agreed that during
February 1967 the question of a fourth week of vaca­
tion with pay after 20 years of employment for com­
mission family routemen would be submitted to arbi­
tration.2 One additional holiday was provided both for
noncommission routemen and helpers in the family
and wholesale division and also for all routemen and
helpers in the linen supply and flatwork division. Paid
funeral leave provisions for routemen and helpers were
improved in the family and wholesale division, and
these benefits were added for the first time in the
linen supply and flatwork division.
The 3-year contract was to remain in effect until
November 30, 1969, with no provisions for reopening.




Another 3-year agreement between the Amalgamated
Laundry Workers Joint Board and the industrywide
multiemployer group was reached on November 30,
1969. The signing averted a strike set for midnight of
November 30, the expiration date of the old contract,
concluding 6 weeks of negotiations in many respects
like the negotiations which led to the 1966 agreement.
Talks were opened on October 14 with a presentation
of the union’s demands, which included increases in
wages and minimum rates, a reduction in hours, and
improvements in vacations, holidays, sick leave, be­
reavement pay, jury-duty pay, insurance, retirement,
and other benefits.
The parties continued to negotiate over the next
several weeks but failed to produce an agreement
acceptable to both sides. When the last industry offer
was rejected by the union 2% weeks before the contract
expiration date, the union negotiating committee voted
unanimously to authorize a strike. The State Mediation
Board was called upon at this point, and assisted during
the final week. Agreement was reached shortly before
the strike deadline, climaxing a 2-day marathon bar­
gaining and mediation session.
Under the new contract, wages were increased 20 to
35 cents an hour for hourly paid workers and $5 to $16
a week for those paid weekly, beginning December 1,
1969; 10 to 20 cents an hour and $3 to $9 a week,
respectively, beginning November 30, 1970; and 10
or 15 cents an hour and $5 to $8 a week, respectively,
beginning November 29, 1971. Benefit improvements
included: The extension of George Washington’s Birth­
day as a paid holiday to all employees (in effect earlier
only in the linen supply and flatwork divisions and for
routemen and helpers in the family and wholesale
divisions); a reduced service requirement for 3 weeks
of paid vacations, to 10 years by November 29, 1971;
improved health and welfare benefits; and liberalized
provisions for paid sick leave and funeral leave. In
addition, a supplemental pension plan was established
for route salesmen, routemen, route salesmen’s helpers,
engineers, and maintenance workers.
The contract was scheduled to expire November 30,
1972, with no provisions for reopening.

2
The arbitrator’s award, dated March 30, granted these em­
ployees the 4th week of vacation.

The 1972 negotiations between representatives of
the laundries and the union opened on October 10,
1972. The union’s demands included increases in wages
and in minimum rates and guarantees, a 35-hour week
for office employees, additional shift provisions for all
employees, improved paid vacation provisions, two
additional paid holidays, two additional days of paid
sick leave, bereavement pay for all employees, improved
severance pay, paid jury-duty leave, and increased con­
tributions to the welfare fund. The employers’ initial
response was a demand for a 1-year moratorium. Though
narrowing the field of differences, subsequent meetings
failed to resolve the situation.
As required by law, the parties notified the Federal
Mediation and Conciliation Service and the New York
State Mediation Board. From November 22, 1972 on,
bargaining continued with the participation of the
New York State Mediation Board, and a settlement
was reached on December 1, 1972. The 3-year con­
tract was ratified during the following week, main­
taining the union’s strike-free bargaining relationship
with the industry.




The agreement stipulated wage increases of 15 to
25 cents an hour for workers paid hourly and $3 to
$11 a week for workers paid weekly, on December
4, 1972; 10 to 20 cents and $0 to $9, respectively,
on December 3, 1973; and 10 to 15 cents and $3 to
$9, respectively, on December 2, 1974.
Effective December 4, 1972, employers were to
pay into the union’s insurance fund an amount equal
to 5.97 percent (was 5.26 percent) of employees’
gross earnings. The rate was to be raised to 6.47 percent
on December 3, 1973. Employees terminated from an
existing establishment as a result of mergers, consoli­
dations, or sale were to receive 1 day’s pay for each
year of continuous employment (excluding the first
5 years), to a maximum of 20 days’ pay. Previously,
the amount of severance pay was determined by
an arbitrator.
There was no provision for reopening in the agree­
ment, which was to expire on November 30, 1975.
The following tables update changes in wages and
supplementary benefits through the contract expira­
tion date.

Provision3
Effective date2
Inside employees4

Outside employees

Dec. 24, 1945 (by Production workers: 10-percent in- Noncommission drivers and helpcrease, averaging 7 cents an ers: $4-a-week increase.
agreement of
Nov. 1, 1945),
hour.
family a n d Engineers and maintenance workers:
wholesale divi­
10-percent increase.
sion.

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters
Increase applicable to all inside em­
ployees not to exceed 10 cents an
hour. Not applicable to workers
during first 4 weeks of employ­
ment.

Feb. 4, 1946 (by
agreement of
sam e date),
linen supply
and flatwork
division.

Production workers: 12-percent increase, averaging 8 cents an
hour.
Engineers and maintenance workers: 12-percent increase.

Noncommission drivers: $5-a-week
increase.
Helpers: $4-a-week increase.

Increase applicable to all inside em­
ployees not to exceed 12 cents an
hour. Not applicable to workers
during first 4 weeks of employ­
ment.

Nov. 4, 1946 (by
agreement of
Oct. 10, 1946),
both divisions.

Production workers: 10-percent increase, averaging 7.5 cents an
hour.

Noncommission drivers, helpers,
etc.: 5-percent increase.

In addition, weekly hours reduced,
with no loss in pay, as follows:
wholesale, from 52 to 50; linen
supply and flatwork, from 51 to
49; office towel, from 47 to 45.
Daily lunch period included.
Weekly hours reduced from 48 to 44
hours with no loss in pay.

Engineers and maintenance work­
ers: 10-percent increase in min­
imum hourly rates.
Nov. 1, 1948 (by Production workers: 10-percent in­ Wholesale and linen-supply drivers:
$5.60-a-week increase; helpers:
arbitration acrease, averaging 8 cents an
$4.32.
hour.
ward of Oct.
29,
1948), Engineers and maintenance work­ Office towel drivers: $5.10-a-week
increase; helpers: $4.16.
ers: 10-percent increase, maxi­
both divisions.
mum of 7.5 cents an hour.
Production workers: 7.5-cents-anhour increase.
Engineers and maintenance work­
ers: 12-cents-an-hour increase.

Noncommission drivers: $5-a-week
increase.
Helpers: $4-a-week increase.

Dec. 18, 1950 (by Production workers: 7.5-cents-anhour increase.
agreement of
same
date),
fam ily
and Engineers and maintenance work­
ers: 12-cents-an-hour increase.
wholesale divi­
sions.
March 3, 1952 (by Production workers: 5-cents-anhour increase.
agreement of
same
date), Engineers and maintenance work­
both divisions.
ers: $4-a-week increase fdr en­
gineers; $3 for maintenance
workers.
Nov. 30, 1953 (ar­ Production workers: 5-cents-anhour increase.
bitration award
of Dec. 1, Engineers: 10-cents-an-hour in­
1953), linen
crease.
supply
and Maintenance workers: 7.5-centsan-hour increase.
flatwork divi­
sion.

Commission drivers: $4-a-week in­
crease.

Dec. 4, 1950 (by
agreement of
same
date),
linen
supply
and flatw ork
division.




Noncommission drivers: $5-a-week
increase.
Helpers: $4-a-week increase.
Non commission drivers: $4-a-week
increase.
Helpers: $3-a-week increase.

Noncommission routemen (drivers)
and helpers: $4-a-week <
increase.
Commission routemen (drivers): $3a-week increase in wages and
$4-a-week increase in minimum
rate.

Guaranteed increase for family divi­
sion, calculated on basis of speci­
fied formula.
Applicable to wholesale division.

Minimum weekly guarantee for wo­
men production workers increased
by $1.

Provision3
Effective date2
Inside employees4

Outside employees

Jan. 25, 1954 (ar­
bitration award
of Jan. 21,
1954), family
and wholesale
division.

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters
Minimum weekly guarantee for wo­
men production workers
in­
creased by $3.

Jan. 23, 1956 (ar­
bitration award
of Jan.
9,
1956),
both
divisions.

Production workers: 5-cents-an- Wholesale and linen supply and
hour increase.
flatwork noncommission routemen and special delivery routeEngineers and maintenance work­
men, and linen supply and flaters: 7.5-cents-an-hour increase.
work helpers: $5-a-week in­
crease.
Linen supply and flatwork trailer
routemen: $6-a-week increase.
Wholesale regular routemen’s help­
ers: $4-a-week increase.
Wholesale routemen’s helpers em­
ployed by the day: $l-a-day in­
crease.

No general wage increase for com­
mission routemen. Minimum
weekly guarantees increased:
$10 for first 17 weeks of em­
ployment of newly hired family
routemen; $2 for women produc­
tion workers in linen supply and
flatwork division; and $1 for wo­
men production workers in fami­
ly and wholesale division.

Jan. 6, 1958 (agreements of
Dec. 1, 1957),
both divisions.

Production workers: 7.5-cents-an- Noncommission routemen and
helpers: $5-a-week increase.
hour increase.
Engineers and maintenance work­
ers: 10-cents-an-hour increase.
Offlceworkers: $4-a-week increase.

No general wage increase for com­
mission routemen. Family com­
mission routemen: $65 estab­
lished as guarantee of weekly
earnings, effective Feb. 2, 1958.
Linen supply and flatwork commis­
sion routemen: $5 a week in­
crease in minimum rate.
Minimum weekly guarantee for wo­
men production workers increased
by $2.
In addition, agreements provided for
(a) deferred increases as follows: In­
side production workers, 5 cents
an hour on Sept. 22, 1958, and
2.5 cents on Jan. 4, 1960. Enigineers and maintenance workers,
10 cents an hour on Sept. 22,
1958, and 5 cents on Jan. 4,
1960. Noncommission routemen
and helpers, $3 a week on Sept.
22, 1958, and $2 a week on Jan.
4, 1960.
(b) Effective Jan. 4,1960, a cost-ofliving increase equal to the per­
centage increase in the BLS Con­
sumer Price Index for New York
City between Nov. 15, 1958, and
Nov. 15, 1959.
No general wage increase for commis­
sion routemen, but increase in
weekly guarantee of $3 for linen
supply and flatwork routemen
and $5 for family routemen.
Minimum weekly guarantee for wo­
men production workers in­
creased by $4.

Sept. 22, 1958 (a- Production workers: 5-cents-an- Noncommission routemen and
helpers: $3-a-week increase.
hour increase.
greements of
Dec. 1, 1957), Engineers and maintenance work­
ers: 10-cents-an-hour increase.
both divisions.
Offlceworkers: $2-a-week increase.




Provision3
Effective date2
Inside employees4
Jan. 4, 1960 (agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1957),
both divisions.

Jan. 22, 1962,
linen
supply
and flatwork
division, and
Jan. 29, 1962,
fam ily
and
wholesale divi­
sion (arbitra­
tio n
award
dated Jan. 9,
1962).

Dec. 3, 1962 (agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1962),
both divisions.

Mar. 4, 1963 (agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1962),
linen
supply
and flatwork
division.

Outside employees

Increases for:
Production w orkers-5 cents an Noncommission routem en-$4 a
hour.
week.
Engineers-10 cents an hour.
All routemen’s helpers— a week
$4
Maintenance workers-8 cents
hour.
Office w orkers-$3 a week.

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters
No general increase for commission
routemen. Minimum weekly
guarantee increased by $2 in
family division and $4 in linen
supply and flatwork divisions.
All increases, except for family com­
mission routemen, included an
amount in excess of the cost-ofliving increment that would have
resulted from the percentage rise
in the BLS Consumer Price Index
for New York City (1947-49=
100)between Nov. 15, 1958, and
Nov. 15,1959.

Increases for:
Production workers-5 cents an Noncommission and special deliv­ Minimum weekly guarantees in­
hour
creased by $6 for noncommission
ery routemen-$5 a week.
Engineers-10 cents an hour.
Commission routemen linen supply
and special delivery routemen and
linen supply and flatwork com­
Maintenance workers-7V2 cents an
and flatw ork-$3 a week.
mission routemen and by $8 for
All routemen’s helpers-$4 a week.
hour.
family commission routemen.
Office w orkers-$3 a week.
Minimum weekly guarantee for wo­
men production workers in­
creased by $2 in linen supply and
flatwork division, and $1 in the
family and wholesale division,
except inexperienced workers for
first 30 days.
Increases for:
Production workers-5 cents an Noncommission routemen (except Minimum weekly guarantee for wo­
trailer routemen in linen supply
men production workers in­
hour.
and flatwork division) and help­
creased by $2.
Engineers and maintenance work­
e rs -$4 a week.
In addition, agreements provided for
e rs -10 cents and hour.
Trailer routemen, linen supply and
deferred increases, effective Dec.
Office w orkers-$3 a week.
flatwork division-$5 a week.
2, 1963, and Nov. 30, 1964.
Commission routemen, linen sup­
ply and flatwork division-$3 a
week in base pay.
Increases for:
Noncommission routemen and Amount necessary to maintain week­
helpers in linen supply and flatly earnings when workweek was
work division-2.2 percent.
reduced from 47 to 46 hours.

Increases for:
Dec. 2, 1963 (a- Production workers, engineers, and Noncommission routemen and all Deferred increases.
maintenance workers-5 cents
helpers in linen supply and flat- Minimum weekly guarantee for wo­
greement dated
an hour.
men production workers in­
Dec. 1, 1962),
work division-$2 a week.
both divisions. Office w orkers-$3 a week.
Trailer routemen-$2.50 a week.
creased by $1.
Commission routemen, linen sup­
ply and flatwork division-$1.50
a week in base pay.
Noncommission routemen and Amount necessary to maintain week­
helpers in both divisions-2.2
ly earnings when workweek was
percent.
reduced from 46 to 45 hours in
linen supply and flatwork divi­
sion, and from 47 to 46 in family
and wholesale division.




Provision3
Effective date2
Inside employees4
Nov. 30, 1964 (agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1962),
both divisions.

Outside employees

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Increast?s for:
Production workers— cents an Noncommission routemen and Deferred increase.
5
hour.
helpers in family and whole­ Minimum weekly guarantee for wo­
men production workers in­
Engineers and maintenance work­
sale division-$4 a week; in
e rs -10 cents and hour.
creased by $1.
linen supply and flatwork divi­
Office w orkers-$3 a week.
sion (except trailer routemen),
and all helpers-$2 a week.
Trailer routemen—
$2.5 0 a week.
Commission routemen, linen sup­
ply and flatwork division - $ 1.50
a week in base pay.
Noncommission routemen and Amount necessary to maintain week­
ly earnings when workweek was
helpers in family and wholesale
reduced from 46 to 45 hours.
division-2.2 percent.

1 General wage changes are upward or downward adjust­
ments that affect an entire establishment, bargaining unit, or
substantial group of employees at one time. Not included are
adjustments in individual rates and minor adjustments in wage
structure (such as changes in classification and incentive rates)
that do not have an immediate effect on the general wage level.
The changes listed above were the major adjustments in wage
rates made during the period covered. Because of fluctuations in
earnings occasioned by nongeneral and incentive rate changes,
payment of premium and special rates, and other factors, the
total of the general changes listed will not necessarily coincide
with the change in average hourly earnings over the period.
2 Previous increases were:
Oct. 1937 - Wholesale and family division, 10 percent
but not more than $3 a week.
1937 - Linen supply and flatwork division, inside
workers: 10 percent increase, with maxi­
mum of $2 a week; outside workers: 10
percent increase, with maximum of $3 a
week except office towel service, where in­
crease was 10 percent with no maximum
stipulated.
Nov. 1941 - Wholesale and family division, 10 percent
increase for women; 10 percent increase for
men production workers and in addition
weekly hours reduced from 48 to 44 with




no loss in pay; $6 a week increase for non­
commission drivers; varying increases for
commission drivers.
Feb. 1942 - Weekly hours for men inside workers re­
duced from 46 to 44 with no loss in pay.
In addition, $4 a week increase for washers;
$3 for other washroom workers; 5 to 6
cents an hour for other inside workers. $5
a week increase for drivers; $4 for helpers.
Nov. 1942 - Both divisions, 3 to 7 cents an hour increase
for inside workers and noncommission driv­
ers and helpers; $2 a week for commission
drivers if their earnings had not increased
that much in a given period.
Sept. 1943 - Both divisions, 4 to 6.5 cents an hour
increase.
June 1945 - Both divisions, 3 cents an hour increase,
except those earning 51 cents an hour (4
cents) and those earning 50 cents an hour
(5 cents). This established a 55-cent mini­
mum hourly rate.
3 Unless otherwise stated, changes in provisions applied to
both wages and minimum rates.
4 Inside employees included piece- and time-rated produc­
tion workers, engineers, and maintenance workers.

Occupation

Dec. 1,
1965

Dec. 5,
19661
2

Dec. 2,
19683

Dec. 4,
19673

Dec. 4,
19726

Dec. 3,
19737

Dec. 2,
19747

Increases in cents per hour

Inside employees
Production workers (except
washroom employees) . . .
Washroom employees ............
Porters, elevator operators,
and watchmen .................
Oilers, and auto and plant
mechanics’ h e lp e r s ............
Machinists, electricians, carpenters, firemen, auto and plant
mechanics, auto body and
fender mechanics, and auto
sprayers and painters . . . .
Engineers..................................
Retail outlet employees . . . .
Truck and car w ash e rs...........

Dec. 1, Nov. 30, Nov. 29,
1971s
19694
1970s

_____
—

—
—
—

$0,075
.100

$0,075
.075

$0.05
.05

$0.20
.25

$0.10
.15

$0.10
.10

$0,150
.200

$0,100
.125

$0,100
.100

.100

.075

.05

.20

.10

.10

.150

.100

.100

.250

—

—

.125

.10

.20

.15

.15

.175

.125

.125

.250
.250
.100
.250

.125
.125
.100
.125

.10
.10
.05
.10

.30
.35
.20
.20

.15
.20
.10
.15

.15
.15
.10
.10

.200
.250
.150
.175

.150
.200
.100
.125

.150
.150
.100
.100

Increases in percent
Engineers and maintenance
workers .............................
Officeworkers .......................

82.4

92.5
103.9

_____

_____

_____

_____

_____

_____

_____

_____

$5.00

$8.00

$5.00

$5.00

112.67
Increases per week

Officeworkers..........................

—

$5.00

$4.00

$3.00

$10.00

Increases per week

Outside employees
Linen and flatwork division:
Routemen, noncommission
(except trailer,
utility
Jand route r id e r ) ................. 1
Trailer, utility and route
rider1...................................
Routesalesmen, commission
Delivery helpers.................
Wholesale division:
Routemen, noncommission
Delivery helpers.................
Family division:
Routesalesmen, commission
Delivery helpers.................

$10.00

$5.00

$5.00

$15.00

$6.50

$6.00

$10.00

$7.50

$7.50

12.50

7.50

5.00

7.00

4.00

4.00

16.00
10.00
10.00

9.00
5.00
5.00

8.00
5.00
5.00

11.00
8.00
7.00

9.00
5.00
5.00

9.00
5.00
5.00

—
—

10.00
7.00

5.00
4.00

3.00
3.00

12.00
10.00

6.00
5.00

6.00
5.00

8.00
7.00

7.00
5.00

6.50
5.00

—
—

—
7.00

—
4.00

—
3.00

5.00
10.00

3.00
5.00

—
5.00

3.00
7.00

—
5.00

3.00
5.00

___
—

1 General wage changes are upward or downward adjust­
ments that affect an entire establishment, bargaining unit, or
substantial group of employees at one time. Not included are
adjustments in individual rates and minor adjustments in wage
structure (such as changes in classification and incentive rates)
that do not have an immediate effect on the general wage level.
The changes listed above were the major adjustments in
wage rates made during the period covered. Because of fluctua­
tions in earnings occasioned by nongeneral and incentive rate
changes, payment of premium and special rates, and other
factors, the total of the general changes listed will not neces­
sarily coincide with the change in average hourly earnings over
the period.
2 By agreement dated Dec. 1, 1966.
3 Deferred increases under agreement dated Dec. 1, 1966.




$5.00

4 By agreement of same date.
5 Deferred increases under agreement dated Dec. 1, 1969.
6 By agreement dated Dec. 4, 1972.
7 Deferred increases under agreement dated Dec. 4, 1972.
8 Amount necessary to maintain weekly earnings when
workweek was reduced from 42 to 41 hours - by arbitration
award dated Oct. 29, 1965.
9 Amount necessary to maintain weekly earnings when
workweek was reduced from 41 to 40 hours. This increase was
in addition to the 25-cent increase listed above.
1° Amount necessary to maintain weekly earnings when
workweek was reduced from 40 to 38V2 hours. This increase
was in addition to the $5-a-week increase listed below.
11 Amount necessary to maintain weekly earnings when
workweek was reduced from 38V2 to 37J2 hours. This increase
/
was in addition to the $4-a-week increase listed below.

Minimum hourly rates
Effective date

Dec. 24, 1945 ...........................................
Feb. 4, 1946 .................................................
Nov. 4, 1946 .................................................
Nov. 1,1948 ..............................................
Feb. 1, 1950 ..............................................
Dec. 4,1950 ..............................................
Dec. 18, 1950 ...........................................
Mar. 3, 1952 .................................................
Nov. 30, 1953 ...........................................
Jan. 23, 1956
...........................................
Jan. 6,1958 .................................................
Sept. 22, 1958 ...........................................
Jan. 4, I960 .................................................
Jan. 22, 1962 ..............................................
Jan. 29, 1962 ..............................................
Dec. 3, 1962 .................................................
Dec. 2, 1963 .................................................
Nov. 30,1964 ...........................................
Dec. 5, 1966 .................................................
Dec. 4, 1967 .................................................
Dec. 2, 1968 .................................................
Dec. 1, 1969 .................................................
Nov. 30, 1970 ...........................................
Nov. 29, 1971 ...........................................
Dec. 4, 1972 .................................................
Dec. 3, 1973 .................................................
Dec. 2, 1974 .................................................

Family and
wholesale
division
$0,605
_
.655
.730
.750
_
.825
.850
—
.900
.975
1.025
21.075
—
1.150
1.250
1.300
1.350
1.525
1.625
1.700
1.900
2.000
2.100
2.250
2.350
2.450

Linen supply
and flatwork
division
_

$0,620
.680
.750
.750
.825
_
.850
.900
.950
1.025
1.075
21.125
1.200
—
1.275
1.325
1.375
1.525
1.625
1.700
1.900
2.000
2.100
2.250
2.350
2.450

1 Minimum plant wage rates, effective Dec. 24, 1945, through Mar. 3, 1952, applied after
first 3 months of employment; effective Nov. 30, 1953, through Jan. 29, 1962, after the first
month of employment for employees who had 3 months or more experience in the industry,
and after 3 months of employment for other plant employees; and beginning Dec. 3, 1962, effec­
tive immediately for experienced workers, and after 2 months of employment for inexperienced
workers.
2 The 5-cent increase included an amount over the cost-of-living increment that would have
resulted from the percentage increase in the BLS Consumer Price Index for New York City
(194749=100) between Nov. 15, 1958, and Nov. 15, 1959, as provided in the December 1957
agreements.




Family
and
wholesale
Occupation

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

December
1945

February
1946

40 hours
$24.20

40 hours
$24.80

Family
and
wholesale

Linen Family
Linen
Family
Family
Linen
Linen
supply and
supply
supply
and
supply
and
and wholesale and
wholesale
and wholesale
and
flatwork
flatwork
flatwork
flatwork

July 1947

February 1950

December 1950

March 1952

Inside employees

Production workers:
M en.................
Women . . . .

40 hours
$25.25

40 hours 40 hours 40 hours 40 hours 40 hours 40 hours 40 hours
$25.80 $26.50 $28.00 $28.00 $30.00 $29.00 $33.00

Outside employees
Linen supply and flatwork:
Routemen, non­
commission . .
Helpers . . . .
Special delivery
routemen
Routemen, com­
mission . . .
Office towel:
Routemen, non­
commission .
Helpers ...........
Special delivery
routemen
Wholesale:
Drivers, non­
commission .
Helpers ...........
Special delivery
drivers
. . .
Family:

52.82
41.14

52.82
41.14

61.00
47.50

66.00

51.50

70.00
54.50

42.14

42.14

48.60

53.60

57.60

52.82

52.82

61.00

66.00

70.00

48.56
39.58

48.56
39.58

56.10
45.80

61.10
49.80

65.10
52.80

41.58

41.58

48.10

53.10

57.10

50.85
37.40

50.85'
37.40
42.20

Nov. 30,
1953

l 2

40.00

Jan. 23,1956

63.70
47.20

48.70

42.20
12

Drivers, commission l 240.00

Jan. 25,
1954

58.70
43.20

53.70

40.00

*50.00
240.00

Jan. 6,1958

67.70
50.20
............

57.70
*50.00
2 44.00

Sept. 22,1958

Jan. 4, I9603

Inside employees
Production workers:

Men

..................

Women
Officeworkers

...........
...........

40 hours’ 40 hours’
work.
work.
$32.00
$34.00

40 hours’ 40 hours1 40 hours’ 40 hours1 40 hours’ 40 hours’ 40 hours' 40 hours’
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
$36.00 $35.00 $38.00 $39.00 $42.00 $39.00 $42.00
$33.00
42.00
45.00
45.00
440.00 440.00
42.00

Outside employees
Linen supply and flatwork:5
Routemen, non­
commission .
Helpers ...........
Special delivery
routemen
Routemen,
commission . .
Office towel:5
Routemen, non­
commission .
Helpers ...........
Special delivery
routemen




74.00
58.50

79.00
63.50

84.00
68.50

87.00
71.50

91.00
75.50

61.60

66.60

71.60

74.60

78.60

74.00

79.00

84.00

87.00

91.00

69.10
56.80

74.10
61.80

79.10
66.80

82.10
69.80

86.10

61.10

66.10

71.10

74.10

78.10

73.80

Family
and
wholesale
Occupation
Jan. 25,
1954

Linen
supply
and
flatwork
Nov. 30,
1953

Family
and
wholesale

Linen
Linen
Linen Family
Family
Linen
Family
and
supply
and
supply
supply
and
supply
and
and wholesale
wholesale
and wholesale
and
flatwork
flatwork
flatwork
flatwork

Jan. 23,1956

Jan .6,1958

Sept. 22, 1958

Jan. 4, I9603

Outside employeescontinued
Wholesale:
Routemen (drivers)
noncommission
Helpers ...........
Special delivery
routemen
(drivers) . . .
Family:
Routemen (drivers)
commission .

$67.70
50.20

$72.70
54.20

$77.70
59.20

$80.70
62.20

$84.70

57.70

62.70

67.70

70.70

74.70

*50.00
244.00

*60.00
244.00

665.00

70.00

72.00

Jan. 29,
1962

Jan. 22,
1962

Dec. 3,1962

Dec. 2,1963

66.20

Nov. 30,1964

Inside employees
Production workers:
Men . . . .
Women . .
Offlceworkers . . .

40 hours'
work.
$42.00
48.00

40 hours1 40 hours1 40 hours’ 40 hours140 hours1 40 hours’ 40 hours’
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
$44.00
$46.00
$48.00 $45.00 $49.00 $46.00 $50.00
63.00
63.00
53.00
53.00
58.00
48.00
58.00

Outside employees
Linen supply and flatwork:5
Routemen, non­
commission .
Helpers ...........
Special delivery
routemen
Routemen,
commission .
Office towel:5
Routemen, non­
commission .
Helpers ...........
Special delivery
routemen
Wholesale:
Routemen (drivers)
noncommission
Helpers ...........
Special delivery
routemen
(drivers) . . .
Family:
Routemen (drivers),
commission .




97.00
78.50

101.00

82.50

103.00
84.50

105.00
86.50

84.60

88.50

90.60

92.60

97.00

101.00

103.00

105.00

92.10
76.80

96.10
80.80

98.10
82.80

100.10
84.80

84.10

88.10

90.10

92.10

90.70
62.90

94.70
73.20

94.70
73.20

98.70
77.20

80.70

84.70

84.70

88.70

80.00

80.00
770.00

80.00
772.50

80.00
775.00

Family and
wholesale

Linen supply
and flatwork

Family and
wholesale

Occupation
1

Dec. 5,1966

Linen supply
and flatwork

Family and
wholesale

Linen supply
and flatwork

Dec. 2, 1968

Dec. 4,1967

Inside employees
Production workers:
Engineers, main­
tenance workers,
porters, elevator
operators, watch­
men, washroom
employees, wash­
room truck han­
dlers, linen sup­
ply soil em­
ployees, heavy
bulk handlers,
and linen supply
dry tumblers . . 40 hours’ work.
Other production
workers 8 . . . .
$53.50
Officeworkers ..............
68.00

40 hours’ work.
$53.50
68.00

40 hours’ work. 40 hours’ work. 40 hours’ work. 40 hours’ work.
$57.00
72.00

$57.00
72.00

$59.00
75.00

$59.00
75.00

Outside employees10
Linen and flatwork:
Routemen, non­
commission . .
H elpers.................
Routemen, special
delivery
Routemen, com­
mission-linen . .
Routemen, commissionflatwork . . . .
Office towel:
Routemen, non­
commission . .
Helpers ..............
Routemen, special
delivery . . . .
Wholesale:
Routemen, non­
commission . .
Delivery helpers . .
Routemen, special
delivery . . . .
Family:
Routemen, com­
mission . . . .




115.00
93.50

—

—

120.00
97.50

—

125.00
101.50

102.60

107.60

112.60

115.00

120.00

125.00

115.00

120.00

110.10
91.80

—

—

102.10
108.70
84.20

—

98.70
n 90.00

115.10
95.80

—

107.10
113.70
88.20

—

103.70
-

-

1295.00

125.00
120.10
99.80
112.10

116.70
91.20

—

106.70
-

13100.00

-

Occupation

Family and
wholesale

Linen supply
and flatwork

Family and
wholesale

Dec. 1, 1969

Linen supply
and flatwork

Family and
wholesale

Linen supply
and flatwork

Nov. 29, 1971

Nov. 30, 1970

Inside employees
Production workers:
Engineers, main­
tenance workers,
porters, elevator
operators, watch­
men, washroom
employees, wash­
room truck han­
dlers, linen sup­
ply soil em­
ployees, heavy
bulk handlers,
and linen sup­
ply dry tumblers 40 hours’ work.
Other production
workers8 . . . .
$66.50
Offlceworkers ..............
985.00

40 hours’ work.
$66.50
985.00

40 hours’ work.
$70.00
985.00

40 hours’ work 40 hours’ work. 40 hours’ work.
$70.00
985.00

$73.50
985.00

$73.50
985.00

Outside employees10
Linen and flatwork:
Routemen, non­
commission . .
Helpers ..............
Routemen, special
delivery...........
Routemen, com­
mission-linen . .
Routemen, commissionflatwork . . . .
Office towel:
Routemen, non­
commission . .
Helpers ..............
Routemen, special
delivery . . . .
Wholesale:
Routemen, non­
commission . .
Delivery helpers . .
Routemen, special
delivery . . . .
Family:
Routemen, com­
mission . . . .




—

142.50
113.50
130.10

—

_____

149.00
118.50
136.60

142.50

140.00

_____

155.00
123.50
142.60
142.50

142.50

140.00

—

-

140.00
150.10
121.80

137.60
111.80

—

144.10
116.80

_____

129.60

_____

136.10

___

142.10

130.20
102.70

—

136.20
107.70

—

142.20
112.70

—

126.20

___

132.20

_____

102.50

-

102.50

-

—

120.20
102.50

-

—

Dec. 4, 1972

Occupation

Dec. 3, 1973

Dec. 2, 1974

40 hours’ work.
$82.25
1495.00

40 hours’ work.
$85.75
1495.00

Inside employees
Production workers:
Engineers, maintenance workers, porters, elevator operators, watch­
men, washroom employees, washroom truck handlers, linen supply
soil employees, heavy bulk handlers, and linen supply dry tumblers 40 hours’ work.
$78.75
Other production workers8 ..................................................................
1493.00
Office workers .....................................................................................................
Outside employees10
Linen and flatwork:
Routemen, noncommission
..................................................................
Helpers ....................................................................................................
Routemen, special delivery
..................................................................
Routesalesmen, commission .............................................. ...................
Routemen, trailer ...................................................................................
Office towel:
Routemen, noncommission
..................................................................
Helpers ...................................................................................................
Routemen, special delivery
..................................................................

165.00
130.50
152.60
150.00
189.50

172.50
135.50
160.10
155.00
198.50

180.00
140.50
167.60
160.00
207.50

160.10
128.80
152.10

167.60
133.80
159.60

175.10
138.80
167.10

Wholesale:
Routemen, noncommission
..................................................................
Delivery helpers.........................................................................................
Routemen, special delivery
..................................................................
Routemen, shirt ......................................................................................

150.20
119.70
140.20
144.70

157.20
124.70
147.20
151.70

163.70
129.70
153.70
158.20

Family:
Routesalesmen, commission

105.00

107.50

110.00

..................................................................

1 Effective for first 17 weeks of employment.
2 Effective during July and August of each year.
3 Except for family commission routemen, the rates include
an amount in excess of the cost-of-living increment prescribed
in the December 1957 agreements.
4 Rates for officeworkers added to contract at this time,
although these workers were previously covered by the
agreement.
5 Rates applied after 30 days for employees with prior
experience in the industry and after 90 days for inexperienced
employees.
6 Effective Feb. 2, 1958, a year-round guarantee of $65 a
week was extended to all family commission routemen, appli­
cable to earnings averaged over a 6-month interval.
7 Effective Dec. 3, 1962, an additional weekly guarantee
was extended to family commission routemen during the
industry’s traditionally low earnings months of July and August
to supplement the year-round guarantee.




8 Rates applied after 2 months from date of hire for inex­
perienced employees.
9 Rates applied immediately for workers employed as of
Dec. 1, 1969, and after 6 months for workers employed after
Dec. 1, 1969.
10 Rates applied after 30 days for employees who had
previous experience in the industry and after 90 days for inex­
perienced employees (not effective in the family and wholesale
division until Dec. 1, 1969).
11 Effective Jan. 2, 1967. Guarantees were to be calculated
at 3-month instead of 6-month intervals.
12 Effective Jan. 1, 1968.
13 Effective Dec. 30, 1968.
14 Rates applied immediately for workers employed as of
Dec. 1, 1972, and after 3 months for workers employed after
Dec. 1, 1972.

Effective date

Provision
Overtime pay
Inside employees

Outside employees
Family and wholesale

Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­
ily and wholesale
division).
Feb. 4, 1946 (Linen
supply and flatwork division).

Nov. 1, 1946 (Both
divisions).

All employees: Time and one-half Wholesale: Time and one-half for
work in excess of 12 hours on
for work in excess of 11 hours
long days or 52 hours a week.
on scheduled long days.1 Work
schedule limited to 2 long days
a week.
Production employees: Time and
one-half for work in excess of
44 hours a week for women and
46 hours for men.
Engineers and maintenance workers:
Time and one-half for work in
__ excess of 50 hours a week.
Changed to Changed to:
Production employees: Time and Wholesale: Time and one-half for
one-half for work in excess of
work in excess of 50 hours a
week.
40 hours a week for women, 42
hours for men.
Engineers and maintenance workers:
Time and one-haif for work in
excess of 44 hours a week.

Linen supply and flatwork
Office towel: Time and one-half for
work in excess of 12 hours on
long days or 48 hours a week,
including a daily lunch period.
Linen and flatwork: Time and onehalf for work in excess of 12
hours a day or 53 hours a week,
including a daily lunch period.

Changed to Office towel: Time and one-half for
work in excess of 44 hours a
week, including a daily lunch
period.
Linen supply: Time and one-half for
work in excess of 49 hours a
week, including a daily lunch
period.

Wholesaie: Time and one-half for
Nov. 1, 1947 (Fam­ Changed to:
work in excess of 48 hours a
ily and wholesale Production employees: Time and
one-half for work in excess of
week, including a daily lunch
division).
40 hours a week for men and
period.
women.
Engineers and maintenance workers:
Time and one-half for work in
excess of 42 hours a week.
Feb. 2, 1948 (Linen
Changed to supply and flatOfflce towel: Time and one-half for
work division).
work in excess of 43 hours a
week, including a daily lunch
period.
Linen and flatwork: Time and onehalf for work in excess of 47
hours a week, including a daily
lunch period.
. Changed to Changed to Feb. 1, 1950 (Both
All employees: Time and one-half All employees: Time and one-half
divisions).
for work in excess of 11 hours
for work in excess of 11 hours
on long days. Work schedule
on long days. Work schedule
limited to 2 long days a week.
limited to 1 long day a week.
Feb. 5, 1951 (Both Changed to divisions).
AU employees: Time and one-half for work in excess of 10 hours on long
days.
Jan. 25, 1954 (arbi­
Changed to-A ll noncommission Changed to-A ll noncommission
tration
award
employees: Time and one-half
employees except office towel
of Jan. 21,1954),
for work in excess of 47 hours
service: Time and one-half for
family and whole­
a week, including a daily 1-hour
work in excess of 47 hours a
sale division; and
lunch period; overtime rate com­
week, including a daily 1-hour
puted on basis of 42-hour week.
Nov. 30, 1953 (arbi­
lunch period; overtime rate to be
tration award of
computed on basis of 42-hour
Dec. 1, 1953),
week. Office towel employees:
linen supply and
Time and one-half for work in
flatwork. division
excess of 43 hours a week; over­
time rate computed on basis of
38-hour week.




Effective date

Provision
Overtime pay— Continued
Inside employees

Outside employees
Family and wholesale

Dec. 1, 1957 (agree­ Holiday to be considered as time
ments of same
worked in computing overtime.
both divisions.
Mar. 4, 1963 (agree­
ment dated Dec.
1, 1962).

}

Same.

Dec. 2, 1963 (agree­
ment dated Dec.
1, 1962).

Changed: Noncommission em­
ployees-Time and one-half for
work in excess of 46 hours a
week, including a daily 1-hour
lunch period; overtime rate com­
puted on basis of 41-hour week.

Nov. 30, 1964 (agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1962).

Linen supply and flatwork
Same.
Changed: Noncommission routemen
and helpers, excluding office
towel-Time and one-half for
work in excess of 46 hours a
week, including daily 1-hour
lunch period; overtime rate com­
puted on basis of 4 1-hour week.
Changed: Noncommission routemen
and helpers, excluding office
towel-Time and one-half for
work in excess of 45 hours a
week, including daily 1-hour
lunch period; overtime rate com­
puted on basis of 40-hour week.

Changed: Noncommission em­
ployees-Time and one-half for
work in excess of 45 hours a
week, including a daily 1-hour
lunch period; overtime rate com­
puted on basis of 40-hour week.

Dec. 1, 1965 (arbi­ Changed: Engineers and mainte­
tration award
nance workers-time and onehalf for work over 41 hours a
dated Oct. 29,
week.
1965), both divi­
sions.
Dec. 5, 1966 (agree­ Changed: Engineers and mainte­
nance workers—
time and onement dated Dec.
half for work over 40 hours a
1, 1966), both
week.
divisions.
Officeworkers-time and one-half
for work over 38 Vi hours a week.
Dec. 4, 1967 (agree­ Changed: Officeworkers-time and
one-half for work over 37V2
ment dated Dec.
hours a week.
1, 1966), both
divisions.
Shift premium pay
Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters
All employees: No provision for All inside employees: 5 percent Premium pay for individual em­
ployees not working on an estab­
premium pay for work before
shift premium pay.
lished shift was negotiated by
midnight, 10 percent for work
parties. When agreement could
after midnight.
not be reached, the matter was
submitted to arbitration.
Correction: Inside employees 5 per­
Premium pay for individual em­
cent premium pay for work
ployee regularly on night work
before midnight, 10 percent for
for which no additional shift had
work after midnight.
been established to be nego­
tiated by parties.
Added: Shift defined to include
time worked by one employee
or more.
Family and wholesale

Feb. 4, 1946 (Linen
supply and flatwork divisions).

Mar. 3, 1952 (agree­
ment of same
date).

Dec. 1, 1962 (agree­
ment of same
date), both divi­
sions.




Linen supply and flatwork

Provision
Effective date
Family and wholesale

Linen supply and flatwork

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Premium pay for weekend work
Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­
ily and wholesale
division); Feb. 4,
1946 (Linen sup­
ply and flatwork
division).

All employees: Time and one-half for work on Saturday and Sunday
as such.

Except as otherwise agreed upon by
parties.

Vacation pay
Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­
ily and wholesale
division); Feb. 4,
1946 (Linen sup­
ply and flatwork
division).

All employees: One week’s vacation with pay after one and less than Vacation pay for inside employees
five years’ continuous service; two weeks after five years’ contin­
to equal average weekly earnings
during months of October
uous service.
through March preceding vaca­
tion.
Noncommissioned drivers paid regu­
lar weekly rate. Linen supply
commissioned drivers paid aver­
age earnings on route during 26
weeks preceding vacation. Fam­
ily commissioned drivers paid
earnings of route during vacation
period. To be eligible for vaca­
tion pay, employee must not
have been absent form job with­
out reasonable excuse for more
than 135 hours during the year.

Feb. 1, 1950 (Linen
supply and flatwork division).

Changed to All employees: Two weeks’ vacation
with pay after 4 years of con­
tinuous service.

Jan. 25, 1954 (arbi­
tration award of
Jan. 21, 1954),
family and whole­
sale division.
Changed to-A ll employees: 1 week’s Changed to - All employees: 1
week’s vacation with pay for 1
Nov. 30, 1953 (arbi­
vacation with pay for 1 but less
but less than 3 years’ contin­
than 4 years’ continuous service
tration award of
Dec. 1, 1953).
uous service and 2 weeks after
and 2 weeks after 4 or more
3 or more years’ service.
linen supply and
years’ service.
flatwork divisioa
Dec. 1, 1957 (agree­
ments of same
date), both divi­
sions.

See footnotes at end of table.




Added-All employees: Pro rata
vacation pay for employees with
1 or more years’ service upon
termination of employment.
Vacation pay for inside em­
ployees no less than minimum
weekly guarantee; and for routemen, their helpers, and office
employees to be based on regu­
lar pay for full workweek.

Provision
Effective date
Family and wholesale

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Linen supply and flatwork
Vacation pay— Continued

— — -------- “—■—----------- ------------------------------------------------------------t------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------r
1

1

1

Jan. 22, 1962, linen Added: All employees-3 weeks of vacation with pay for 15 years or
supply and flatmore of continuous service,
work division, and
Jan. 29, 1962,
family and whole­
sale division (ar­
bitration award
dated Jan. 9,
1962).
Dec. 3, 1962 (agree­
Changed: routemen and helpers-3
ment dated Dec.
weeks of vacation with pay for
1, 1962).
13 years or more of continuous
service.
Dec. 2, 1963 (agree­ Changed: All employees: 3 weeks Changed: Inside employees-3 weeks
ment dated Dec.
of vacation with pay for 13 years
of vacation with pay for 13
or more of continuous service;
1, 1962).
years or more of continuous
routemen and helpers-3 weeks
service.
for 12 years or more of contin­
uous service.
Dec. 1, 1966 (agree­ Changed: Officeworkers-2 weeks
ment of same
of vacation with pay after 1
date).
year of service.
1967 (arbitration a- Added: Commission route salesmen
ward dated Mar.
in family division- 4 weeks of
30, 1967).
vacation with pay, after 20 years
of continuous service.
Dec. 1, 1969 (agree­ Changed: All employees, except Changed: Routemen—3 weeks after
ment of same
routemen in linen supply and
11 years of continuous service.
date).
flatwork divisions-3 weeks of
vacation with pay after 12 years
of continuous service.
Nov. 30,1970 (agree­ Changed: All employees, except Changed: Routem en-3 weeks after
routemen in linen supply and
10 years of continuous service.
ment dated Dec.
flatwork divisions-3 weeks of
1, 1969).
vacation with pay after 11 years
of continuous service.
Nov. 29,1971 (agree­ Changed: All employees, except
routemen in linen supply and
ment dated Dec.
flatwork divisions- 3 weeks of
1, 1969).
vacation with pay after 10 years
of continuous service.
Holiday pay

Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­ 5 holidays for which employees not 7 holidays for which employees not Paid holidays for family and whole­
ily and wholesale
sale division were: New Years’
required to work were paid as
required to work were paid as
division); Feb. 4,
follows:
Day, July 4, Labor Day, Thanks­
follows:
1946 (Linen sup­ Inside hourly workers: Straight-time rate times hours scheduled on
giving and Christmas. Decora­
same day in week preceding holiday;
ply and flatwork
tion Day was an unpaid holiday.
Inside piece workers: Average straight-time daily earnings for days
division).
Paid holidays for linen supply
worked during week of holiday;
and flatwork division were same
as those above plus Decoration
Day and Washington’s Birthday.




Provisions
Effective date

Family and wholesale

Linen supply and flatwork

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Holiday pay-—Continued
All workers paid by the week: Reg liar weekly salary, without deducI tion for the holiday;
(Commission drivers: $7 for the day Commission drivers: Paid amount
earned on same day of week
■ Inside employees: Double time
preceding holiday.
! and one-half (total) for work on
a holiday if no make-up time Inside employees: Double time and
one-half (total) for work on
was worked.2 Double time (total)
holiday if no make-up time was
for holiday or Sunday work if
worked.2 Double time and onemake-up time was worked during
half (total) for holiday or Sun­
week or Saturday.
day work in a 5-day plant if
Time and one-half for holiday make­
up work during the week or on , make-up time was worked dur­
ing week or Saturday; double
Saturday.
Commission drivers: $5 flat sum I time (total) in a 6-day plant.
paid for Saturday make-up time Time and one-half for holiday make­
up work during the week and on
during a holiday week.
Saturday preceding and succeed­
ing a holiday.
Outside employees: Full day’s pay
in addition to weekly wages for
make-up work.
July 24, 1947 (Fam­ Addedily and wholesale All employees: One paid holiday
al 6)................................................
division).
Feb. 1, 1950 (Both Changed to Inside employees: Holiday pay for piece workers to equal average
divisions).
straight-time daily earnings during week preceding holiday week.
Double-time rate (total) paid for work on holiday or Sunday pre­
ceding or succeeding the holiday when make-up time was worked
during the week. Double time and one-half (total) paid for work
on holiday or Sunday preceding or succeeding holiday when make­
up time was not worked.
Changed to Mar. 3, 1952 (Both Changed to Double time and one-half (total) Inside employees: Double time and
divisions).
for work on a holiday or a Sun­
one-half (total) for work on a
day preceding or succeeding a
holiday or on a Sunday preced­
holiday when make-up time was
ing or succeeding a holiday if
not worked. Double time (total)
no make-up time was worked
for work on a holiday or Sun­
and for make-up work during
day preceding or succeeding a
the week in a 6-day plant or for
holiday when make-up time was
make-up work during the week
worked during the week or on
or on Saturday in a 5-day plant.
Saturday. Time and one-half Outside employees: Full day’s pay
(total) for holiday make-up time
and time and one-half after 6
during the week or on Saturday.
hours paid to 6-day plant em­
ployee for Saturday or day-off
make-up time.
Jan. 23, 1956 (arbi­ Added-All employees: 8 hours’ pay for holidays falling on Saturday.
Inside employees: Holiday pay for pieceworkers to be
tration award of Changed to—
based on earnings during workweek in which the holiday occurred
Jan. 9, 1956),
divided by number of days worked during week.
both divisions).
Dec. 1, 1957 (agree­ Changed to-Inside employees: Time and one-half for makeup work
ments of same
during the week and on Saturday of holiday week; double time
date), both divi­
(total) for work on paid holiday if makeup performed in week or
on Saturday; and double time and one-half (total) for work on
sions.
holiday or Sunday if no makeup during week or on Saturday.
Commission drivers: Increased to
flat sum of $10 for the holiday
and $7 for Saturday makeup
time during holiday week.

Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­
ily and wholesale
division); Feb. 4,
1946 (Linen sup­
ply and flatwork
division)Continued




Family and wholesale: Double time
| for work on Decoration Day,
I and time and one-half for make| up time required by time lost on
this holiday.
Linen supply and flatwork: Provi­
sion to be effective until Nov. 1,
1946. After that, full day’s pay
in addition to weekly wages
for first 6 hours or fraction
thereof, then time and one-half.

Holiday added was Decoration Day.
Employees paid for holidays re­
gardless of whether they fell on
scheduled workday. When holi­
day occurred during vacation
period, employee paid for holi­
day in addition to vacation pay.

Provision
Effective date

Linen supply and flatwork

Family and wholesale

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Holiday pay— Continued
Dec. 3, 1962 (agree­ Added: Commission routem en-1
Holiday was Washington’s Birthday.
ment dated Dec.
paid holiday (total-7 ).
1, 1962).
Increased: Commission drivers-pay
for Saturday makeup time dur­
ing holiday w eek-to $10.
Dec. 2, 1963 (agree­
Added: Routemen and helpers-1
ment dated Dec.
day off with pay each year in
1, 1962).
other than a holiday week or
vacation period.
Dec. 1, 1965 (arbi­ Added: All employees-1 paid holi­
Holiday was “Good Health Day,”
tration aw ard
day.
a day mutually agreed upon be­
dated Oct. 29,
tween the union and employer
1965).
for employees’ annual health
checkup; paid only after proof
of attendance furnished employ­
er by the Amalgamated Laundry
Workers Health Center.
Dec. 1, 1966 (agree­ Added: Noncommission routemen
Holiday was Washington’s Birthday.
ment of same
and helpers-1 paid holiday (to­
date).
tal 8).
Added: Routemen and helpers-1
day off with pay each year
(total 9); to be taken in other
than a holiday week or vacation
period.
Washington’s Birthday, previously
Dec. 1, 1969 (agree­ Added: 1 paid holiday (total 8) for
in effect for employees in the
ment of same
all employees except routemen
linen supply and flatwork divi­
date).
and helpers.
sions and for routemen and help­
ers in the family and wholesale
divisions, extended to all em­
ployees.
Paid sick leave
All employees: 5 days’ sick leave Unused sick leave could be used as
for employees with one or more
additional vacation with pay,
years of service.
unless employee was already en­
titled to full 2 weeks’ vacation.
In that case employer had option
of granting additional vacation
with pay or paying for unused
sick leave.
Established-All employees: 5 days’
Unused sick leave to be used as
sick leave for employees with 1
additional vacation time or paid
or more years of service.
for in cash, at employer’s op­
tion.

Feb. 4, 1946 (Linen All employees: No provision for
supply and flatsick-leave pay.
work division).

Jan. 25, 1954 (arbi­
tration award of
Jan. 21, 1954),
fam ily
and
wholesale divi­
sion.
Dec. 1, 1957 (agree­ Added-All employees: pro rata Added-All employees: Pro rata sick Family and wholesale: (1) No em­
leave pay for employees with 1
ployee to be requred to take
sick leave pay for employees
ments of same
or more years of service upon
time off in lieu of payment for
with 1 or more years of service
date), both divi­
termination of employment.
upon termination of employ­
accumulated sick leave. (2) Pay­
sions.
ment for sick leave for inside
ment.
employees to be on same basis
as vacation pay; for routemen,
on the basis of the average earn­
ings for 52 weeks.




Provision

Effective date
Family and wholesale

Linen supply and flatwork

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Paid sick leave— Continued
Dec. 31,195 8 (agree­ Correction: 5 days of sick leave
cumulative annually for employee
ment dated Dec.
with at least 2 years of service
1, 1957).
on Dec. 31, 1958, or for em­
ployee hired thereafter on sec­
ond anniversary date of em­
ployment.
Dec. 3,1962 (agree­
ment dated Dec.
1, 1962), family
and
wholesale
division.
Dec. 2, 1963 (agree­
ment dated Dec.
1, 1962), family
and
wholesale
division.
Nov. 30,1964 (agree­
ment dated Dec.
1, 1962), fam­
ily and wholesale
division.
Dec. 31, 1970 (a- Increased: 6 days of paid sick leave Increased: All employees-6 days of
cumulative annually for emplo­
paid sick leave after 1 year of
greement dated
yee with at least 2 years of
service.
Dec. 1, 1969).
service on Dec. 31, 1970, or for Added: Beginning with second year
of employment, sick leave pay
employee hired thereafter on
pay could be prorated at rate
second anniversary date of em­
of 1 day for each 2 months of
ployment.
employment. ______________

Added: Family commission routemen with 1 year or more service
-Earnings reduction in case of
absence for illness limited to $7
a day (weekly guarantee $70)
for first 5 days of absence in
year.
Added: Family commission routemen with 5 years of more of service-Earnings reduction in case
of absence for illness limited to
$7 a day (weekly guarantee $80) for first 7 days of absence
in year.
Increased:
Family
commission
routemen with 5 years or more
of service-Earnings reduction in
case of absence for illness ex­
tended to first 8 days of absence
in vear.
Increased:
Family
commission
routemen with 5 years or more
of service-Earnings reduction
in case of absence for illness,
extended to first 10 days of ab­
sence in year.

Call-in pay
Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­
ily and wholesale
division); Feb. 4,
1946 (Linen sup­
ply and flatwork
division).

Engineers and maintenance workers: Minimum of 4 hours’ pay guaran­
teed at double-time for emergency work on Sunday.
Other employees: No provision for call-in pay.

Double time paid for actual hours
worked when called in on Sun­
day for purpose of heating plant.

Down-time pay
Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­
ily and wholesale
division); Feb. 4,
1946 (Linen sup­
ply and flatwork
division).

Inside employees: Regular rates paid for all waiting time caused by
machinery breakdowns.
Other employees: No provision for down-time pay.

Applied to all inside employees re­
quested to remain in plant after
breakdown.

Paid rest period
Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­ Inside employees: One daily 15-minute paid rest period provided during
ily and wholesale
months of July and August.
division); Feb. 4, Other employees: No paid rest period provision.
1946 (Linen sup­
ply anf flatwork
division).




Not applicable to employees work­
ing less than 5 hours a day.

Provision
Effective date
Linen supply and flatwork division

Family and wholesale division

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Paid rest period— Continued
Jan. 23, 1956 (arbi­ Changed to-Inside employees: Daily summer rest period extended. New
tration awards of
period to be from June 15 to Sept. 15 of each year.
Jan. 9, 1956),
both divisions.
Dec. 1, 1965 (arbi­ Changed: Inside production employees-one daily 10-minute rest
period provided year-round.
tra tio n award
dated Oct. 29,
1965).
Uniform allowance
Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­ Outside employees: Minimum of Outside employees: Full cost and
maintenance of uniforms paid
ily and wholesale
50 percent of cost and main­
by employers.
division); Feb. 4,
tenance of uniforms paid by
1946 (Linen sup­
employers. Other employees: No
Other employees: No uniform al­
ply and flatwork
uniform allowance provision.
division).
lowance provision.
Travel expense pay
Nov. 1, 1945 (Fam­
ily and wholesale
division); Feb. 4,
1946 (Linen sup­
ply and flatwork
division).

All employees: In the event the plant was moved to a location beyond
the 10-cent travel-fare radius, additional travel expense paid by
employer.

Funeral leave
Dec. 3, 1962 (agree­ Established: Family routemen re­
ment dated Dec.
ceived 3 days of paid leave in the
1, 1962).
event of death in family.

Family defined as mother, father,
wife, or child.

Dec. 1, 1966 (agree­ Changed: All routemen and helper:s received 3 days of paid leave if a
death occurred in family.
ment of same
date).

Changed: Definition of “family”
expanded to include brother and
sister.

Dec. 1, 1969 (agree­ Changed: Up to 3 days of paid leave if a death occurred in family for
ment of same
(1) routemen, route salesmen, and delivery helpers employed before
date).
Dec. 1, 1969; (2) routemen, route salesmen, and delivery helpers
hired on or after Dec. 1, 1969, after 5 years of service; and (3)
engineers, maintenance workers and office employees, after 5 years
of service.

Changed: Definition of “family”
expanded to include mother-inlaw and father-in-law.

Severance pay
Mar. 3, 1952 (agree­
ment of same
date).

In effect: Arbitrator to determine if severance pay was due, and its
amount, if employees are displaced by installation of new machinery
and not provided equivalent employment.

Dec. 3, 1962 (agree­ Changed: Arbitrator to determine only the amount of severance pay
ment dated Dec.
due employees displaced by installation of new machinery.
1, 1962).
Dec. 4, 1972 (agree­ Changed: Severance pay in event of a merger, consolidation or sale of
ment of same
employer’s business in whole or in part, to be paid as follows:
date).
(1) Under 5 years of continuous employment-no severance pay;
or (2) 5 years or more-1 day’s pay for each year of continuous
employment (excluding first 5 years) to maximum of 20 days’ pay.




There was to be no portability of
continuous employment after
severance pay was received by
employee.

Established: Noncontributory group insurance plan for employees
with minimum of 6 months service.

Nov. 10, 1941

July 1, 1942 (agree­ Plan provided ment dated Feb.
Life insurance-$100.
1, 1942).
Sickness and accident disability benefits-M l workers: $6 a week
for up to 13 weeks, beginning on 8th day of sickness and 1st
day of accident.
Maternity benefits- $25 for normal delivery.
Nov. 1, 1943
Increased: Life insurance-to $250.
Sickness and accident disability benefits- All workers-to $8 a week.
Maternity benefits - to $57 for normal delivery.
January 2,1946 . .
February 15, 1946 .

August 1,1946 . . .

October 1,1947

..

July 1, 1948 ...........

January 1, 1950 . . .
July 1, 1950 ...........
December 1,1950 .
April 1, 1951 . . . .

October 1, 1954

. .

November 1, 1955 .
March 29,1956 . . .
April 2, 1956
July 1, 1956 ...........
August 30, 1956 . .
July 1, 1957 ...........

Employer paid 1 percent of payroll
into trust fund administered by
union-appointed trustees.

Fund to be administered jointly by
employer and union representa­
tives.
Increased: Employer contribution
Increased: Life insurance-to $500.
Changed: Sickness and accident disability benefits-$8 a week for
to fund to 2 percent of payroll.
women, $12 a week for men.
Added: Daily hospital benefits-$3 for up to 31 days.
Special hospital expense-Up to $15 for any one disability.
Life insurance coverage extended
for successive periods for totally
or permanently disabled em­
ployees.
Increased: Daily hospital benefits-to $5. Special hospital expenses-to
$25
Increased: Sickness and accident disability benefits-To $10 a week for
for women, $15 a week for men. Daily hospital benefits-to $6.
Special hospital expenses- to $30.
Reduced: Maternity benefits-to $50 for normal delivery.
Added: Surgical benefits-up to $150.
Increased: Special hospital expenses-to $50.
Applicable to men and women.
Changed: Sickness and accident disability benefits-to one-half of aver­
age weekly wage earned in 8 weeks prior to disability-minimum
$10, maximum $26 a week, up to 13 weeks.
Increased: Sickness and accident benefits-maximum to $50 a week.
Added: $500 paid-up life insurance
to retirees. Hospital and surgical
coverage provided during First
year of retirement.
Established: Medical benefits-Patients provided free diagnostic, thera­
peutic, and preventive medical care at Amalgamated Laundry
Workers Health Center.
Added: Medical benefits-Health Center care extended to dependent
, unemployed wives of employees.
Added: Medical benefits-Health
Center care extended to retirees.
Increased: Life insurance-to $1,000. Daily hospital benefits-to $9.
Surgical benefits-up to $200.
Added: Sickness and accident disability benefits-Specific minimum
amounts payable above the $10 minimum.3
Added: Medical benefits-Health
Center care extended to retiree’s
spouse.
Increased: Sickness and accident disability benefits-Minimum amounts
to vary with weekly pay .4




February 1, 1958

Added: Hospitalization, surgical and maternity benefits-Extended to Changed: Benefits extended to re­
tiree’s dependents for 1 year
dependent unemployed spouses.
after retirement. These, as well
as weekly sickness and accident
benefits, also extended to retiree
during any period in which earn­
ings in the industry made him
ineligible for retirement benefits.
Changed: Surgical and sickness and accident benefits-Eligibility require­
June 1, 1958 ...........
ment to 4 weeks as a covered employee.
September 22, 1958. Changed: Life insurance-Yox employees with 3 years of covered em­ $1,000 life insurance continued for
employees earning less than
ployment: $2,000 for workers earning $2,600 but less than $3,900
$2,600 during preceding calen­
during preceding calendar year and $3,000 for employees earning
dar year or with less than 3
$3,900 or more.
years of covered employment.
Work as a covered employee in
each of 40 weeks during a calen­
dar year constituted 1 year of
covered employment. Amount
of life insurance adjusted on
basis of annual earnings prior to
Sept. 22, 1958, and annually
thereafter to January 1. After 10
years of covered employment,
amount of insurance in effect
could not be reduced by a sub­
sequent reduction in earnings.
Face value of life insurance contin­
ued during first 6 months of
retirement.
June 1, 1960
Increased: Daily hospital benefits- to $13. Maternity benefits-to $75
for normal delivery.
Increased: Employer contribution
April 3, 1961
to fund to 2.75 percent of pay! roll; deferred increase effective
! Sept. 3, 1961.
July 1, 1961
Changed: Daily hospital benefits—to $16 to $20 depending on average Added: Hospitalization, surgical,
and maternity benefits-extendweekly earnings.5
ed to dependent children through
Increased: Special hospital expenses- to $75. Maternity benefits- to
j age 18.
$100 for normal delivery.
September 3, 1961 .
[Increased: Employer contribution
i to fund to 2.84 percent of pay; roll.
Increased: Employer contribution
December 1, 1965 (ar­
to health and welfare and retire­
bitration award
ment funds to 5.26 percent,
dated Oct. 29,
i from 4.25 percent, of gross pay­
1965).
roll.
Changed: Life insurance-$2,000 insurance for employees earning less 1Increased: Life insurance for rethan $3,380 during preceding calendar year or with less than 3 years
tirees-to $750.
of covered employment. For employees who have 3 years or more
of covered employment: $3,000 insurance for workers earning
$3,380 but less than $3,900 during preceding calendar year and
$4,000 for employees earning $3,900 or more.
Increased: Sickness and accident benefits-maximum to $55 a week.
Increased: Daily hospital benefits-to $24 to $28 depending on average
weekly earnings.6
Special hospital expenses- to $250.
Surgical benefits-to $300.
[




December 1, 1969
(agreement of same
date).

December 4, 1972
(agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1972).

Increased: Sickness and accident benefits-weekly minimum to $20 and
maximum to $65, and benefit period extended to 20 weeks.
Daily hospital benefits-to $45 for up to 60 days (from 31).
Incidental hospital expenses- to $350.
Surgical benefits-maximum on fee schedule to $400.
Maternity benefits-to $150 normal delivery, $200 Caesarean sec­
tion, and $50 miscarriage.

January 1, 1973 . . . Increased:
Life insurance-to $5,000 for employees earning more than $7,800
during preceding calendar year, and to $1,000 for retirees.
Sickness and accident benefits-maximum to $75 a week, and bene­
fit period extended to a maximum of 26 weeks.
Daily hospital benefits-to maximum $85.
Incidental hospital expenses- to maximum $500.

Surgical benefits-maximum on fee schedule to $500.
Obstetrical benefits-to $300 normal delivery, $400 caesarean sec­
tion, and $100 miscarriage.
Added: $100 obstetrical benefits for an abortion requiring the services
of a legally qualified physician.
December 3, 197 3,
(agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1972).

Coverage extended to dependents.
Increased: Employer contribution
to the health and welfare and
retirement funds to 5.97 per­
cent, from 5.26 percent, of gross
payroll.
Applied to deaths occurring on or
after Jan. 1, 1973.
Applied to claims submitted on or
after Jan. 1, 1973.
Applied to hospitalization on or
after Jan. 1, 1973.
Applied to confinements for which
room and board benefits were
paid under the plan.
Applied to surgical procedures per­
formed on or after Jan. 1, 1973.
Applied to pregnancies terminated
on or after Jan. 1, 1973.

Increased: Employer contribution
to health and welfare and retire­
ment funds to 6.47 percent,
from 5.97 percent of, gross pay­
roll.
Pensions-both divisions

April 1, 1951

Noncontributory plan established to provide employees, at age 65,
with 20 years of continuous service in the industry and 10 years of
continuous membership in the union, with annuity of $25 a
month, exclusive of Social Security benefits.

May 1, 1952 .....................................................................................................................................
January 1, 1957 . . .

Added: Reduced benefits for women employees retiring at age 62 and
prior to 65.

December 1, 1958 .
September 3, 1961 .
January 1, 1962 . . . .

Plan established through negotia­
tion, Feb. 1, 1950. Employer
paid 1 percent of payroll into
trust fund commencing July 31,
1950.
Benefit forfeited for any month in
which annuitant earned $50 or
more.
Benefits payable at age 65 for em­
ployees totally disabled after
Apr. 1, 1946, and after reaching
age 60.
Limitation on monthly earnings
raised to $75.

Increased: Monthly annuity to $33.
Added: Reduced benefits for men employees retiring at age 62 and
prior to 65.




Limitation on monthly earnings
raised to $100.
Increased: Employer contribution
to fund-to 1.41 percent of pay­
roll.
Changed: Benefits available at age
62 for employees disabled after
age 60.

Provision

Effective date

——
— —------------ ------ 1 —
— ----------------------- -—
■
January 1, 1965 . . .

December 1, 1965 (ar-!
bitration awards
dated Oct. 29, |
1965).
January 1, 1966 .

i

April 1, 1967 . .

j
|
S
I
(
!
]

January 1, 1968 . . .

j

Pensions-both divisions- Continued
■

■ ~1
Benefits reduced by $1 for each $2
of earned income in excess of
$1,200 a year, and for each $1
of earned income of $1,700 or
more.
Increased: Employer contribution
to health and welfare and retire­
ment funds to 5.26 percent,
from 4.25 percent, of gross pay­
roll.
Changed: Allowable earnings before
reduction in pensions for retirees
raised to $1,500 a year.
Increased: Monthly annuities: (1) to $40 for retirement before 12/1/66;
and (2) for retirement after 12/1/66, (a) to $50 for former employees whose average wages were less than $100 a week, and (b)
to $65 for former employees whose average wages were $100 a
week or more.

Changed: Allowable earnings before
reduction in pensions for retirees
raised to $1,680 a year.
Established: Supplemental pension plan for route salesmen, route- Han financed by employer payment
men, route salesmen’s helpers, engineers and maintenance workers,
of 40 cents per employee per
employee per day to fund.

November 30, 1970
(supplemental agreement dated
Dec. 1,1969).
December 7, 1970................................................................................................................................

November 29, 1971
(supplemental agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1969).
December 4, 1972 (agreement dated
Dec. 1, 1972).
January 1, 1973 . . .




Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Increased: Employer contribution
to health and welfare and retire­
ment funds to 5.47 percent of
gross payroll, to insure adequate
funding of the unfunded accrued
past service liability of the Re­
tirement Fund of the Amalga­
mated Laundry Workers Insur­
ance Fund, pursuant to actuarial
study made in accordance with
provisions of December 1, 1969,
agreement.
Increased: Employer payment to
pension fund covering route
salesmen, routemen, route sales­
men’s helpers, engineers and
maintenance workers-to 80
cents per employee per day.
Increased: Employer contribution
to health and welfare and retire­
ment funds to 5.97 percent, from
5.26 percent, of gross payroll.
Changed: Allowable earnings before
reduction in pensions for re­
tirees under age 72 raised to
$2,100 a year( (was $1,680).
Retirees age 72 and older were
permitted unlimited earnings
without reduction in their pen­
sions.

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision
Pensions-both divisions- Continued

April 1, 1973 . . . .

Increased: Monthly annuities: (1) to $48 for retirement before 12/1/66;
and (2) for retirement after 12/1/66, (a) to $60 for former em­
ployees whose average wages were less than $100 a week, and (b)
to $75 for former employees whose average wages were $100 a
week or more.

December 3, 1973 (agreement dated
Dec. 1,1972).

1 Contracts provided for regularly scheduled long days, not
to exceed 2 days a week, for which premium rate was to be paid
after a stated number of hours. Otherwise premium pay for over­
time paid only after work in excess of regular weekly schedule
of hours.
2 Make-up time was time worked outside regular schedule
because of time lost through observance of holiday.
Amount o f benefit
3 Average weekly earnings
($50 maximum)
$40 but less than $48
$22.00
$30 but less than $40 ........................................ $17.50
$20 but less than $30
$12.50




4 Average weekly earnings
$44 and over
$40 but less than $44 .
$20 but less than $40 .
Less than $20 ...........
5 Average weekly earnings
$75 and over.................
$50 but less than $75 .
Less than $50 ............
6 Average weekly earnings
Less than $65 ............
$65 but less than $75 .
$75 and over
...........

Increased: Employer contributions
to health and welfare and retire­
ment funds to 6.47 percent, from
5.97 percent, of gross payroll.
Changed: Allowable earnings before
reduction in pensions for re­
tirees under age 72 raised to
$2,400 a year (was $2,100).
Amount o f benefit
50 percent of weekly earnings.
......................
$22.00
......................

. . .

$20.00

Average weekly earnings
($10 minimum)
Amount o f benefit

......................

$20.00

............................. $18.00
............................. $16.00
Daily benefit
............................. $24.00
............................. $26.00
............................. $28.00

Wage chronologies
The following wage chronologies are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from the regional offices of the Bureau of Labor Statistics listed on the inside
back cover. Some publications are out of print and not available from the Superintendent of Documents but may be
obtained, as long as supplies are available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or from the
Bureau’s regional offices. Out-of-print items also may be available for reference in leading public, college, or university
libraries.
Before July 1965, basic wage chronologies and their supplements were published in the Monthly Labor Review and
released as Bureau reports. Wage chronologies published later are available only as bulletins (and their supplements).
Summaries of general wage changes and new or changed working practices are added to bulletins as new contracts are
negotiated.
Aluminum Company of America—
November 1939-January 1974, BLS Bulletin 1815.
American Telephone and Telegraph Co—
Long Lines Dept.—
1940- 74, BLS Bulletin 1812.
American Viscose (a division of FMC Corp.)—
1945- 67, BLS Bulletin 1560.1
June 1968-June 1974, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1560.
The Anaconda Co.—
194158, BLS Report 197.1
Armour and Company1941-72, BLS Bulletin 1682.
Atlantic Richfield Co. (former Sinclair Oil Companies’ facilities)—
1941-72, BLS Bulletin 1771.
January 1973-January 1975, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1771.
Berkshire Hathaway Inc. and the Textile Workers (TWUA)—
January 1948—
April 1975
Bethlehem Atlantic Shipyards—
1941-68, BLS Bulletin 1607.
1969- 72, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1607.
Bituminous Coal Mine Operators and United Mine Workers of America—
October 1933-November 1974, BLS Bulletin 1799.
The Boeing Co. (Washington Plants)—
1936- 67, BLS Bulletin 1565.1
Commonwealth Edison Co. of Chicago and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers—
April 1945-March 1974, BLS Bulletin 1808.
Dan River Inc.—
May 1943-January 1972, BLS Bulletin 1767.
Federal Classification Act Employees—
1924-68, BLS Bulletin 1604.
August 1968-October 1973, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1604.
Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. and B. F. Goodrich Co. (Akron Plants)—
1937- 73, BLS Bulletin 1762.
Ford Motor Company—
June 1941-September 1973, BLS Bulletin 1787.
International Harvester Company—
1946- 70, BLS Bulletin 1678.
1970- 73, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1678.



International Paper Co., Southern Kraft Division—
1937-73, BLS Bulletin 1788.
International Shoe Co. (a division of Interco, Inc.)—
1945-74, BLS Bulletin 1718.
Lockheed-California Company (a division of Lockheed Aircraft Corp.)—
1937-67, BLS Bulletin 1522.1
Martin-Marietta Corp.—
1944- 64, BLS Bulletin 1449.1
1965-68, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1449.
Massachusetts Shoe Manufacturers and United Shoe Workers of America (AFL-CIO)—
January 1945-January 1975, BLS Bulletin 1800.
North American Rockwell Corp.—
1941-67, BLS Bulletin 1564.1
1967- 70, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1564.
North Atlantic Longshoremen—
1934-71, BLS Bulletin 1736.
Pacific Coast Shipbuilding—
194167, BLS Bulletin 1605.1
Pacific Gas and Electric Co.—
1943-73, BLS Bulletin 1761.
Pacific Longshore Industry19 34-70, BLS Bulletin 1568.1
August 1969-July 1975, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1568.
Swift & Co.—
1942- 73, BLS Bulletin 1773.
United States Steel CorporationMarch 1937-April 1974, BLS Bulletin 1814.
Western Greyhound Lines—
1945- 67, BLS Bulletin 1595.1
1968- 72, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1595.
Western Union Telegraph Co.—
1943- 67, BLS Bulletin 1545.1
1968-71, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1545.
1 Out of print. See Directory o f Wage Chronologies, 1948-72, for Monthly Labor Review in which reports and supplements issued
before July 1965 appeared.




☆

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1975

O

583-675(155)

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region I

Region V

1603 J F K Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)

Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
N e w York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Co de 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5416 (Area Co de 404)




9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-1880 (Area C o de 312)

Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas. Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Co de 214)

Region* VII and VIII *
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region* IX and X **
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Co de 415)

Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102