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Wage Chronology

NEW YORK CITY
LAUNDRIES,

1945-64

Bulletin No. 1453

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard W irtz, Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STA TISTIC S
Ewan Clague, Commissioner




Wage Chronology

NEW YORK CITY
LAUNDRIES,

1945-64
Bulletin No. 1453
July 1965

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard W irtz, Secretary




BUREA U O F LABOR S TA TIS TIC S
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price 20 cents




Preface
T h is bulletin is one of a s e r ie s that t r a c e s the
change in w a g e s c a le s and in r e la te d b e n e fits , u su ally
em b odied in c o lle c t iv e b argain ing a g r e e m e n t s , m ade by
s p e c ific e m p lo y e r s or com binations o f e m p lo y e r s . T h e
c h r o n o lo g y s e r ie s is intended p r i m a r i l y as a to o l fo r r e ­
s e a rc h , a n a ly s is , and w a g e a d m in istration . A s such, the
s e r ie s deals only w ith s e le c te d fe a tu re s o f the v a r i e d
h is t o r y o f c o l le c t iv e bargain in g o r w a g e d e te rm in a tio n .
R e f e r e n c e to job s e c u r ity , g r ie v a n c e p r o c e d u r e , m eth od o lo g y of p i e c e - r a t e adjustm ent, and s im ila r m a tte r s a re
om itted. F o r purpose and scope o f the w a g e c h ro n o lo g y
s e r i e s , see M onthly L a b o r R e v i e w , D e c e m b e r 1948.
T h is c h r o n o lo g y s u m m a r iz e s the changes in w a g e
ra te s and r e la te d p r a c t ic e s in N ew Y o r k C ity laundries
that have been negotia ted w ith the A m a lg a m a te d Lau n d ry
W o r k e r s Joint B o a rd o f G r e a t e r N ew Y o r k (a f f ilia t e d w ith
the A m a lg a m a te d Clothing W o r k e r s o f A m e r i c a ) since 1945.
T h e study includes m a t e r i a l p r e v io u s ly published as W age
C h ro n o lo g y No. 33, c o v e r in g the p e r io d 1945—53, Supple­
ment No. 1, c o v e r in g 1953—58, and in fo rm a tio n not p r e ­
v io u s ly published w hich b rin gs the c h ro n o lo g y up to date
through 1964.
T h e w a g e c h ro n o lo g y p r o g r a m is d ir e c t e d by L i l y
M a r y D avid , C h ie f o f the D iv is io n of W a ge E c o n o m ic s ,
under the g e n e r a l d ir e c tio n o f L. R. L in s e n m a y e r , A s s i s t ­
ant C o m m is s io n e r f o r W a ge s and Ind ustrial R e la tio n s . T h is
c h r o n o lo g y w as p r e p a r e d under the s u p e rv is io n o f A lb e r t A.
B elm an . T h e an alysis f o r the p e r io d 1958— was p r e p a r e d
64
by P a t r i c i a B. Smith.







Contents
Page
Introduction_______________________________________________________________________________
1945-53________________________________________________________________________________
1 953-58______________________________________________________________________
1959-64________________________________________________________________________________
T a b le s :
A — G e n e r a l w a g e c h a n g e s __________________________________
B— M in im u m plant h ou rly w age r a t e s _____________________________________________
C— M in im u m w e e k ly g u aran te e s , s e le c te d occu p ation s_________________________
D— R e la te d w a g e p r a c t i c e s __________________________________________________________
O v e r t im e p a y ___________________________________________________________________
Shift p r e m iu m p a y ____________________________________________________________
P r e m i u m pay f o r w eeken d w o r k ____________________________________________
V acation p a y ___________________________________________________________________
H o lid a y p a y ____________________________________________________________________
P a id sick l e a v e ________________________________________________________________
C a l l - i n p a y _____________________________________________________________________
D o w n -tim e p a y _________________________________________________________________
P a i d r e s t p e r i o d _______________________________________________________________
U n ifo r m a llo w a n c e ____________________________________________________________
T r a v e l - e x p e n s e p a y _________________________________________________ :
________
F u n e r a l l e a v e __________________________________________________________________
S e v e r a n c e p a y __________________________________________________________________
H ealth and w e l f a r e b e n e f i t s _________________________________________________
P e n s io n s ________________________________________________________________________




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1
1
2
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4
7
8
10
10
11
11
11
12
13
14
14
14
15
15
15
15
15
17




Wage Chronology:

New York City Laundries, 1945—64
Introduction
1945—
53

own, launder, and rent uniforms, table and bed
linen, and other items to restaurants, hotels,
barber and beauty shops, industrial organizations,
and similar commercial users. Flatwork estab­
lishments are relatively few in number and do not
owm or rent, but only launder items owned by
commercial
customers.
Hand laundries-— the
third major division receive work from retail
customers and sort, finish, and deliver it. Finally,
diaper services own, launder, and rent diapers.
Three of the four divisions are represented by
more than
one association.1 Approximately
12,500 of the union members are employed by
companies in the family and wholesale division,
5,000 by linen supply and flatwork establish­
ments, 2,000 by hand laundries, and 750 by
diaper-service companies.
This chronology traces the changes in provisions
affecting production and maintenance workers and
the commissioned and noncommissioned drivers
and their helpers employed by the Family and
Wholesale, and Linen Supply and Flatwork
laundry divisions. Since the chronology starts
with the 1945 agreements, the provisions reported
under that date do not necessarily indicate
changes from prior conditions of employment.
The changes reported here relate to employees
paid piece rates or commissions as well as to those
paid on a straight hourly or weekly basis. Special
provisions of the contracts dealing with the dayto-day administration of the incentive plans are
omitted.
The current agreements, effective March 3,
1952, continue until March 1, 1955, with provi­
sion for reopenings during March 1953 and March
1954.

T h e Laundry Workers Joint Board of Greater
New York represents 90 percent of the 23,000
employees in New York City's laundries for col­
lective-bargaining purposes. Some two-thirds of
these organized workers are women. The Joint
Board, a division of the Amalgamated Clothing
Workers of America (C IO ), bargains for changes in
wage rates and related working conditions with
14 associations representing employers in the
industry.
The Amalgamated Clothing Workers became
active in organizing the laundry industry in New
York City as the result of a strike in March 1937
for recognition and higher wages by 1,000 laundry
workers in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn.
When the employers offered recognition to the
strikers if they had the endorsement of the Amal­
gamated, a committee comprised of officials of
that union and representatives of the striking
employees was formed to negotiate a contract.
An A C W A charter was granted the laundry work­
ers on August 12, 1937, and the first contract with
the employers, covering 100 shops, was signed on
the same day. Originally the union was desig­
r
nated as Local 300; in June 1938, the present name
was adopted. After 1 year of existence, the Joint
Board had organized 90 percent of the laundryindustry workers in the area. From 1937 through
1952, no authorized strikes have been called and
all disputes have been settled by arbitration.
Commercial laundries in the New York area
are classified into four major divisions according
to their functions, as follows: family and whole­
sale; linen supply and flatwork; hand; and diaper
service. Family laundries offer a variety of serv­
ices, including wet wash, rough dry, and finished,
to individual families. The major operation of
wholesale laundries, which process the work of
small neighborhood hand laundries, is washing;
the hand laundries sort and finish the wash.
The second division is composed of linen-supply
and flatwork establishments. Linen suppliers




1 The associations representing the employers in the various groups are as
follows: F a m i l y a n d W h o l e s a l e —Family Laundryowners’Association, Laundryowners’ Association of Brooklyn, Inter-Borough Laundry Board of Trade,
Cash and Carry Laundry Association, Wholesale Laundry Board of Trade,
and Wholesale Shirt Launderers’ Association; L i n e n S u p p l y a n d F l a t w o r k —
Linen Supply Institute, Towel Service Bureau and Mutual Organization;
Hand Laundries—New York Hand Laundrymen’s Association, Long Island
Hand Laundry Association, Brooklyn Hand Laundrymen’s Association,
and United Hand Laundry Association; D i a p e r S e r v i c e —Diaper Service
Association. In addition, several major independent laundries and a large
number of small laundries sign individual agreements with the UDion.
l

2

1953—58
Two wage reopenings were permitted by the 3year agreements dated March 3, 1952, between, the
fam ily and wholesale laundries and linen sup­
pliers and flatwork laundries and the Laundry
W orkers Joint Board o f Greater New York (an
affiliate of the Amalgamated Clothing W orkers of
A m erica).2 The first reopening, to be no later
than January 1953, was limited to wage rates,
while the second, to be no later than January 1,
1954, and to become effective March 1 o f that year,
could include wages, hours, and working condi­
tions. The one series of negotiations held under
these reopening provisions took place in the fall
of 1953 but did not result in agreement. In ac­
cordance with contract provisions, the matters
under consideration were referred to the impartial
arbitrator.
The arbitrator’s award issued on December 1,
1953, for the linen supply and flatwork division
increased wage rates (including fninimum rates
of p a y ), improved vacation benefits, and changed
the method of computing overtime pay for non­
commission routemen. The award for the fam ily
and wholesale division issued on January 21,1954,
made some changes in minimum rates but left
other rates unchanged. It also established paid
sick leave benefits and, like the other award, im­
proved vacation benefits, and revised the method
of computing overtime for wholesale routemen
and helpers. Both awards extended the agree­
ments to December 1, 1957, with provision for a
reopening on wages no later than October 1, 1954,
and for reopenings on wages, hours, or working
conditions by October 1, 1955, or any subsequent
year of the agreement.
No contract changes were introduced until 1956.
However, in October 1954, the Amalgamated
Laundry Workers Health Center was opened.
Financed out of welfare fund reserves, it provided
out-patient diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic
services for union members. Services of the center
were extended to non working dependent wives o f
members late in 1955 and to pensioners and their
spouses in A pril 1956.
W hen negotiations in the fall of 1955 did not
result in an agreement, the matters in dispute were
again referred to an arbitrator. The resulting
awards, effective in January 1956 for both in­



dustry divisions, provided general wage increases,
including increases in minimum rates, as well as
improved rest periods.
The contracts were not reopened in 1956, but on
November 29,1957, the parties agreed to new con­
tracts to extend from December 1,1957, to Decem­
ber 1962. These agreements provided wage in­
creases in January and September 1958 and in
January 1960, with provision for an additional
cost-of-living increment at the latter date. In ad­
dition, provision was made for a reopening on
wages (if warranted by the B L S Consumer Price
Index) and on contributions to the welfare fund
by December 1, 1960. A further reopening on
wages, hours, or working conditions is permitted
by November 4, 1961. In addition to changing
wage rates, the new contracts improved health and
welfare benefits.

1959-64
T h e 5- year agreements of December 1957, nego­
tiated by the Amalgamated Laundry Workers
Joint Board (affiliated with the Amalgamated
Clothing Workers of America), provided two
wage increases in 1958 for employees of New York
City family and wholesale laundries and linen sup­
ply and flatwork laundries. The agreements also
specified a wage increase in January I960, supple­
mented by a cost-of-living increment if warranted
by the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Consumer Price
Index for New York City. The agreements could
be reopened in 1960, to consider increases in wage
rates, based on changes in the cost-of-living, and
contributions to the welfare fund, and again in
1961 on wages, hours, or working conditions.
The deferred wage increase effective Jan u ary 4,
I960, including the cost-of-living adjustment spec­
ified in the 1957 agreements, ranged from 5 to 10
cents for hourly paid workers and from $3 to $4
a week for office workers, routemen, and their help­
ers. Improvements in health benefits were made
effective by trustees of the welfare fund on June 1,
1960.

2 The Laundry Workers Joint Board o f Greater New York
changed its name to the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint
Board in June 1957.

3

Wage rates were unchanged in the December 1,
1060, reopening. Increased employer contribu­
tions to the health and welfare fund became effec­
tive on A pril 3, 1961, and again on September 3,
1961, when the employers- contribution to the pen­
sion fund was also increased. Further improve­
ments were made in the health benefits plan.
When the parties failed to agree on contract
changes under the second reopening on November
4, 1961, the issues were submitted to arbitration
under terms of the agreement. The arbitrator's
award of January 9, 1962, provided increases of
5 to 10 cents in hourly wages and minimum guar­
antees, and $3 to $5 in the weekly pay of office
workers, routemen, and their helpers. Vacation
provisions were also liberalized. The award be­
came effective on January 22, 1962, for the linen
supply and flatwork division and on January 29,
1962, for the family and wholesale division.
Negotiations on the terms of a new contract in
the industiy began on August 21, 1962, with the
union seeking a 20-percent wage increase, a re­
duced workweek, and improved holiday and vaca­
tion plans. Higher wage rates based on the in­
crease in the cost of living since the date of the last
increase were offered by the employers.
hen a
stalemate in late November threatened an indus­
trywide strike, which would have been the first
in the long history of labor relations in the indus­
try, the State Mediation Board entered the negotia­




tions. Continuous bargaining sessions resulted in
a 4-year agreement on December 1,1962, that was
ratified by the workers by December 15,1962.
The settlement, covering 16,000 employees, pro­
vided general wage increases of 15 cents an hour
over a 2-year period for production workers and
increased hourly and weekly wages and minimum
guarantees for these workers and for engineers,
maintenance men, routemen and helpers, and office
workers. The workweek for all noncommission
routemen was reduced to 45 hours, including a
daily 1-hour lunch period, in two steps between
March 4, 1963, and November 30, 1964. Fam ily
commission routemen received an additional paid
holiday, and the vacation plan was liberalized.
Improvements were made in the paid sick leave
provisions for commission routemen in the fam ily
division. Fam ily routemen also received paid
leave in the event of death in the immediate family.
Severance pay for employees displaced by new
machinery was guaranteed by the agreement.
The agreement was to remain in effect until No­
vember 30, 1966, with provision for a reopening
by September 1, 1965 for negotiations on wages,
horn's, and working conditions, or, at any time
during the term of the agreement, in the event of
an increase in the statutory minimum wage. The
following tables bring up (o date through Novem­
ber 1964 changes in wages and supplemental bene­
fits*

4

A—General Wage Changes 1
Provision 3

Effective date 2
Dec. 24, 1945 (by agree­
ment of Nov. 1,1945).
Family and wholesale
division.
Feb. 4, 1946 (by agree­
ment of same date).
Linen supply and
flatwork division.
Nov. 4, 1946 (by agree­
ment of Oct. 10,1946).
Both divisions.
Nov. 1,1948 (by arbitra­
tion award of Oct. 29,
1948). Both divisions.
Dec. 4, 1950 (by agree­
ment of same date).
Linen supply and flatwork division.
Dec. 18, 1950 (by agree­
ment of same date).
Family and wholesale
division.

Inside employees4
Production workers: 10 percent increase,
averaging 7 cents an hour.
Engineers and maintenance men: 10 per­
cent increase.
Production workers: 12 percent increase,
averaging 8 cents an hour.
Engineers and maintenance men: 12 per­
cent increase.
Production workers: 10 percent increase,
averaging 7.5 cents an hour.
Engineers and maintenance men: 10 per­
cent increase in minimum hourly rates.
Production workers: 10 percent increase,
averaging 8 cents an hour.
Engineers and maintenance men: 10 per­
cent increase, maximum of 7.5 cents an
hour.
Production workers: 7.5 cents an hour in­
crease.
Engineers and maintenance men: 12 cents
an hour increase.
Production workers: 7.5 cents an hour in­
crease.
Engineers and maintenance men: 12 cents
an hour increase.

Outside employees

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Nonoommission drivers and helpers: $4 a Increase applicable to all inside employees
week increase.
not to exceed 10 cents an hour. Not ap­
plicable to workers during first 4 weeks of
employment.
Noncommission drivers: $5 a week in­ Increase applicable to all inside employees
not to exceed 1? cents an hour. Not ap­
crease.
Helpers: $4 a week increase.
plicable to workers during, first 4 weeks
of employment.
Nonoommission drivers, helpers, etc.: 5 In addition, weekly hours reduced, with no
percent increase.
loss in pay, as follows: wholesale, from 52
to 50; linen supply and flatwork, from 51
to 49; office towel, from 47 to 45. Daily
lunch period included.
Weekly hours reduced from 48 to 44 with
no loss in pay
Wholesale and linen-supply drivers: $5.6u
a week increase; helpers: $4.32.
Office towel drivers: $5.10 a week increase;
helpers: $4.16.
Noncommission drivers: $5 a week in­
crease.
Helpers: $4 a week increase.

Commission drivers: $4 a week increase.
Guaranteed increase, for family division,
calculated on basis of specified formula.
Noncommission drivers: $5 a week in­ Applicable to wholesale division.
crease.
Helpers: $4 a week increase.
Production workers: 5 cents an hour in­ Nonoommission drivers: $4 a week in­
March 3,1952 (by agree­
crease.
ment of same date). crease.
Engineers and maintenance men: $4 a Helpers: $3 a week increase.
Both divisions.
week increase for engineers; $3 for main­
tenance men.
Production workers: 5 cents an hour
Nov. 30, 1953
increase.
(arbitration
Engineers: 10 cents an hour increase.
aw
ard of Dec, 1 > Maintenance men: 7.5 cents an hour
increase.
1953), linen
supply and
flatwork
division.

Noncommission routemen (drivers)
and helpers; $4 a week increase.
Commission routemen (drivers): $3 a
week increase in wages and $4 a week
increase in minimum rate.

Minimum weekly guarantee for women pro­
duction workers increased by $3.

Jan. 25, 1954
(arbitration
aw of
ard
Jan 21, 1954),
family and
wholesale
division.
Jan. 23, 1956
(arbitration
aw
ards of
Jan. 9, 1956),
both divisions.

Minimum weekly guarantee
for women production
w
orkers increased by $1.

Production workers: 6 centa an hour
increase.
Engineers and maintenance men: 7.5
cents an hour increase.

Wholesale and linen supply and flatwork noncommission routemen and
special delivery routemen, and linen
supply and flatwork helpers: $5 a
week increase.
Linen supply and flatwork trailer
routemen: $6 a week increase.
Wholesale regular routemen’s helpers:
$4 a week increase.
Wholesale routemen's helpers em­
ployed by the day: $1 a day increase.

No general wage Increase for commission routemen. Minimum weekly guarantees Increased: $10 for first 17 weeks of employment
of newly hired fomlly routemen; $2 for women
production workers in linen supply and flatwork division; and $1 for women production
workers in family and wholesale division.

..
See footnotes at end ot table




5

A—General Wage Changes1—Continued
Provision 3

Effective date2
Inside employees4

s

A pplications, exceptions, and other
related m atters

Outside employees

J&q. 6, 1958 (agreements of Production workers: 7.6 cents an hour Noncommission routemen and helpers: No general wage increase for commission
route men. Family commission routemen:
Deo. 1, 1957), both divi- increase.
$5 a week increase.
$65 established as guarantee of weekly earn­
sions.
Engineers and maintenance men: 10
ings, effective Feb. 2,1958.
cents an hour increase.
Linen supply and flatwork commission routeOfficeworkero: $4 a week increase.
men: $5 a week increase in minimum rate.
Minimum weekly guarantee for women pro­
duction workers increased by $2.
In addition, agreements provided for—
(a) Deferred increases as follows:
Inside production workers, 6 cents an hour on
Sept. 22,1958, and 2.5 cer ts on Jan. 4,1960.
Engineers and maintenance men, 10 cents an
hour on Sept. 22, 1958, and 5 cents on Jan. 4,
1960.
Noncommission routemen and helpers, $3 A
week on Sept. 22,1958, and $2 a week on Jan.
4,1960.
(b) Effective Jan. 4, I960, a cost-of-living in
crease equal to the percentage increase in the
BLS Consumer Price Index for New York
City between Nov. 15, 1958, and Nov. 15,
1959.
Sept. 22, 1968 (agreements Production workers: 5 cents an hour Noncommission routemen and help­ No general wage increase for commission routemen, but increaso in weekly guarantee of $3
ers: $3 a week increase.
of Dec. 1, 1957), both di- increase.
for linen supply and flatwork routemen and
visions.
Engineers and maintenance men: 10
$6 for family routemen.
cents an hour increase.
Minimum weekly guarantee for women pro­
Officeworkers: $2 a week increase.
duction workers increased by $4.
Jucream s for:

Jan. 4,1960 (agreement
Production workers—5 cents and hour Noneommission routemen—$4 a week
dated Dee. 1, 1957), bot h Engineers—10 cents an hour.
All routemen’s helpers—$4 a week.
divisions.
Maintenance men—8 cents an hour.
Office workers—$3 a week.

Inerei ses for:

Jfin- 22, 1962, linen supply
and flatwork division,
and
Jail. 29, 1962, family and
wholesale divisions (arbi­
tration award dated
Jan. 9,1962).

Production workers—5 cents an hour
Engineeis—10 cents an hour.
Maintenance men—7 >2 cents an hour.
Office workers—$3 a week.

general increase for commission routemen.
Minimum'weekly guarantee increased by $2
in family division and $4 in linen supply and
flatwork divisions.
All increases, except for family commission
routemen, included an amount iii excess of
the cost-of-living increment that would have
resulted fiom the percentage rise in the BLS
Consumer Price Index for Now York City
(1947-49=100) between Nov. 15, 1958, and
Xov. 15, 1959.

Nq

Noncommission and special delivery Mbjimqm weekly guarantees increased by $6
routemen—$5 a week!
for noneommission and special delivery
Commission routemen linen supply
routemen and linen supply and flatwork
and flatwork—$3 a week.
commission routemen ami by $8 for family
All routemen’s helpers—$4 a week.
com mission routeim •n.
Minimum weekly guarantee for women pro­
duction workers increased by $2 in linen
sijpply and flatwork division, and $1 in the
family and wholesale division, except in­
experienced workers for first 30 days.

Increaiies for:

Production workers—5 cents an hour Noneommission routemen (except
Dec. 3,1962 (agreement
dated Dec. 1,1962), both Engineers and maintenance men—10 trailer routemen in linen supply
cents an hour.
divisions.
and flatwork division) and helpers—
Qflice workers—$3 a week.
$4 a week.
Trailer routemen, linen supply and
flatwork division—$5 a week.
Commission routemen, linen supply
and flatwork division—$3 a week in
base pay.

See iootnotes at end of table



Minimum weekly guarantee for women pro­
duction workers increased by $2.
In addition, agreements provided for deferred
increases, effective Dec. 2, 1963, and Nov. 30,
1964.

6
A— General Wage Changes1
—Continued

Effective date 2

Provision 3

Inside employees 4

Outside employees

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

I n c r e a s e s for;

Mar, 4, 1963 (agreement
dated Dec. 1, 1962), linen
supply and flatwork
division.

------ Noncommission routemen and helpers Amount necessary to maintain weekly earnings
in linen supply and flatwork divi­ when workweek was reduced from 47 to 46
hours.
sion—2.2 percent.
I n c r e a s e s far.

Pec. 2, 1963 (agreement
tinted Dec. 1, 196*2), both
divisions.

Production workers, engineers, and Noncommission routemen and all
maintenance men—5 cents an hour helpers in linen supply and flatwork division—$2 a week
pfiicg workers—$3 a week,
Trailer routemen—$2.50 a week.
Commission routemen, linen supply
and flatwork division—$1.50 a week
in base pay.
Noncommission routempp and helpers
in both divisions—2.2 percent.

Deferred increases.
Minimum weekly guarantee for women pro­
duction workers increased by $1.

Apiount necessary to maintain weekly earnings
when workweek was reduced from 46 to 45
hours in linen supply and flatwork division,
and from 47 to 46 in family and wholesale
division.

I n c r e a s e s f or:

Npv, 30, J964 (agreement
dated Dec. 1, 1962), both
divisions!

production workers—(j cents an hour Noncommission routemen and helpers Deferred increase.
Engineers and maintenance men—10 in family apd wholesale division—$4 Minimum weekly guarantee for women pro­
a week; in linen supply and flat- duction workers increased by $1.
cents an hour.
work division (except trailer routeOffice workers—$3 a week.
men), and all helpers—$2 a week.
Trailer routemen—$2.50 a week.
Commission routemen, linen supply
and flatwork division—$1.50 a week
in' base pay.
Noncummission routemen and helpers Amount necessary to maintain weekly earnings
in fafnily and wholesale division— when workweek was reduced from 46 to 45
2.2 percent
hours.

1General wage changes are construed as upward or downward adjustments
that affect an entire establishment, bargaining unit, or substantial group
of employees at one time. Not included within the term are adjustments in
individual rates and minor adjustments in wage structure (such as changes
in classification and incentive rates) that go not have an immediate effect on
the general plant wage level.
The changes listed above were the major adjustments in wage rates made
during the period covered. Because of fluctuations in earnings occasioned
by nongeneral and incentive rate changes, payment of premium and special
rates, and other factors, the total of the general changes listed will not neces­
sarily coincide with the change in average hourly earnings over the period.
2 Previous increases were:
Oct. 1937-Wholesale and family division, 10 percent but not more than
$3 a week.
1937-Linen supply and flatwork division, inside workers: 10 per­
cent increase, with maximum- of $2 a week; outside workers:
10 percent increase, with maximum of $3 a week except office
towel service, where increase was 10 percent with no maxi­
mum stipulated.
Nov. 1941-Wholesale and family division, 10 percent increase for women;




10 percent increase for men production workers and in addi­
tion, weekly hours reduced from 48 to 44 with no loss in pay;
$6 a week increase for noncommission drivers; varying in­
creases for commission drivers.
Feb. 1942-Weekly hours for men inside workers reduced from 46 to 44
with no loss in pay. In addition, $4 a week increase for wash­
ers; $3 for other washroom workers; 5 to 6 cents an hour for
other inside workers. $5 a week increase for drivers; $4 for
helpers.
Nov. 1942-Both divisions, 3 to 7 cents an hour increase for inside workers
and noncommission drivers and helpers; $2 a week for com­
mission drivers if their earnings had not increased that much
in a given period.
Sept. 1943-Both divisions, 4 to 6.5 cents an hour increase.
June 1945-Both divisions, 3 cents an hour increase, except those earning
51 cents an hour (4 cents) and those earning 50 cents an hour
(5 cents). This established a 55-cent minimum hourly rate.
3 Unless otherwise stated, changes in provisions applied to both wages and
minimum rates.

4 Inside employees include piece- and tune-rated production workers,
engineers, and maintenance men.

7

B — Minimum Plant Hourly Wage R a tes *

Minimum hourly rates

Minimum hourly rates
Effective date

Dec.
Feb.
Nov.
Nov.
Feb.
Dec.
Dec.
Mar.
Nov.

24, 1945-------4, 1946 ---------4, 1946---------1, 1948---------1, 1950 ---------4, 1950— —18, 1950-------3, 1952---------30, 1953--------

Family and
wholesale
division

Linen supply
and flatwork
division

$0. 605
-

.665
.730
.750
.825
.850

$0. 620
.680
.750
.750
.825
-

.850
.900

Effective date

Jan. 23, 1956-------Jan. 6, 1958---------Sept. 22, 1958------Jan. 4, 1960— —
Jan. 22, 1962—Jan. 29, 1962-------Dec. 3, 1962-------Dec. 2, 1963-------Nov. 30, 1964 - -

Family and
wholesale
division
$0. 900
.975
1.025
2 1.075
-

1. 150
1.250
1.300
1.350

Linen supply
and flatwork
division
$0. 950
1.025
1.075
2 1. 125
1.200
-

1.275
1.325
1.375

* Minimum plant wage rates effective Dec. 24, 1945, through Mar. 3, 1952, applied after the
first 3 m
onths of employment.
The minimum plant rates effective Nov. 30, 1953, through Jan. 29, 1962, applied after the
first m
onth of employment for employees with 3 m
onths or m
ore of experience in the industry, and
after 3 m
onths of employment for other employees. Effective Dec. 3, 1962, the rates applied only
to inexperienced w
orkers for the first 2 m
onths of employment.
The 5-cent increase included an am
ount in excess of the cost-of-living increment that would
have resulted from the percentage increase in the B S Consum Price Index for New York City
L
er
(1947—
49=100) between Nov. 15, 1958, and Nov. 15, 1959, as provided in the December 1957
agreements.




8

C — Minimum Weekly Guarantees, S elected O ccupations

December February
1945
1946
Occupation

July 1947

Family
and
wholesale

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

Family
and
wholesale

40 hours
$24.20

40 hours
$24.80

40 hours
$25.25

February 1950

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

December 1950

March 1952

Family
and
wholesale

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

Family
and
wholesale

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

Family
and
wholesale

40 hours
$26.50

40 hours
$28.00

40 hours
$28.00

40 hours
$30.00

40 hours
$29.00

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

Inside em ployees

Production workers:
M en.....................
Women...............

40 hours
$25.80

40 hours
$33.00

Outside em ployees

52.82
41.14
42.14
62.82
48.56
39.58
41.58
50.85
37.40
42.20
1 2 40.00

52.82
41.14
42.14
52.82
48.56
39.58
41.58
50.85
37.40
42.20
1 240.00

61.00
47.50
48.60
61.00
56.10
45.80
48.10
58.70
43.20
48.70
l 240.00

66.00

51.50
53.60

61.10
49.80
53.10
67.70
50.20
57.70
‘ 50.00
2 44.00

^S O. 00

240.00
Nov. 30,
1953

Family
and
wholesale

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

54.
57.
70.
65.10
62.80
57.10

66.00

63.70
47.20
53.70

Jan. 25,
1954

§8S§

Linen supply and flatwork:
Routemen, noncommission.
H elpers................................
Special delivery routemen..
'Routemen, commission___
Office towel:
Routemen, noncommission.
Helpers......................... .........
Special delivery routemen..
Wholesale:
Drivers, noncommission___
Helpers...................................
Special delivery drivers___
Family:
Drivers, commission............

Jan. 23,1956
Family
and
wholesale

Jan. 6,1958

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

Family
and
wholesale

Linen
supply
and
flatwork

IN8IDB EMPLOYEES

Production workers:
M en__________
Women_______
Officeworkers_____

40 hours* 40 hours* 40 hours* 40 hours* 40 hours* 40 hours*
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
work.
$32.00
$34.00
$33.00
$36.00
$35.00
$38.00
3 40.00
3 40.00

OUTSIDE EMPLOYEES

Linen supply and flatwork:4
Routemen, noncommission.
Helpers--------------------------8pecial delivery routemen .
Routemen, commission___
Office towel:4
Routemen, noncommission.
Helpers_________________
Special delivery routemen..
Wholesale:
Routemen (drivers), non­
commission ____________
Helpers_________________
8pecial delivery routemen
(drivers)_______________
Family:
Routemen (drivers), com­
mission—

See footnotes at end of table,




74.00
58.50
61.60
74.00

79.00
63.50
66.60
79.00

84.00
68.50
71.60
84.00

69.10
|56.80
61.10

74.10
61.80

79.10
66.80
71.10

66.10

5fl 20

72.70
54.20

77.70
59.20

57.70

62.70

67.70

5a 00

‘ 60.00
2 44.00

s65.00

67.70

44.00

9

C — Minimum W eekly G uarantees, Selected O ccupations— Continued

Sept. 22,1953
Occupation

Jan. 4, I9606

Jan. 29, Jam 22,
1962
1962

Dec. 3,1982

Dec. 2,1963

Nov. 30,1964

Family Linen Family Limn Family Linen Family Linen Family Linen Family Linen
and
and
and
supply
supoly
and
supply
and supply
supply
and
supply
and
wholeand
and
and
and
whole­
whole­
whole­
wholeand
whole­
sale flat,work sale fkiwoik sale flat work sale flat work sale flatwork sale flat work

I nside E mployees

Production workers:
M ui................................
Women...........................
Office workers..................

40
hours’
work.
$39.00
42.00

40
hours’
work.
$42. 00
42.00

O utside E m h o t e l s

1

40
hours’
work.
$42.00
45.00

40
hours’
work.
$42.00
48.00

40
hours’
work.
$46.00
48. C
O

40
hoars’
work.
$44.00
53.00

40
hours’
work.
$48.00
53.00

40
hours’
work.
$45.00
58.00

40
hours’
work.
$19.00
58.00

40
hours’
work.
$40. (.0
63.00

40
hours*
work.
$50. C
O
63.00

j
87.0;) i '
71 Hi
74. rit)
87.00

91.00
75. 5U

97.00
78.50

101.00
82. 50

103.00
84.50

105.
86.

78.00
91.00

84. 60
97.00

88. 60
101.00

90. 60
103.00

92.
105.

82.10
69.80

86.10
73.30

92.10
76.80

96.10
80.80

9y. 10
82.80

100.10

74.10

78.10

84.10

88.10

90.10

92.10

84.70
66.20

90. 70
69.20

94.70
73.20

94.70
73.20

70.70

74.70

80.70

84.70

72.00

80.00

80.00
7 70.00

80.00
7 72..50

84.80

84.70

70.00

S'g

80.70
62.20

SS

Linen supply ami tLiwoik:*
' KouR-uicii, noneomniission................... ............
Helpprg............................
Special delivery routemen...................
Routemen, commission .
Office towel: *
Rouiemcn, noneomniission.................................
Helpers---------------------Special delivery routemen_______________
Wholesale:
Routemcn (drivers), non­
commission................
Helpers..............................
Special delivery routemen (drivers)................
Family:
Routemen (drivers),
commission5.................

40
hours’
work.
$39.00
45.00

98.70
77.20

80.00
7 75.00

Effective for first 17 weeks of employment.
Effective during July and August of each year.
3 Rates for officeworkers added to contract at this tim e, although these workers were previously covered
by the agreement.
4 Rates apply after 30 days for employees with prior experience in the industry and after 90 days for
inexperienced employees.
5 Effective Feb. 2, 1958, a year-round guarantee of $65 a week was extended to all family commission
routemen, applicable to earnings averaged over a 6-month interval.
^ Except for family commission routemen, the rates include an amount in excess of the cost-of-living
increment prescribed in the December 1957 agreements.
7
Effective Dec. 3, 1962, an additional weekly guarantee was extended to family commission routemen
during the industry1 traditionally low earnings months of July and August to supplement the year-round
s
guarantee.




10
D—
Related Wage Practices
Provision

Effective date

Overtime P ay
Inside employees

Outside employees

Family and wholesale
'All employees: Time and one-half for work
in excess of 11 hours on scheduled long
Nov. 1, 1945 (Family days.i Work schedule limited to 2 long
and wholesale divi­ days a week.
Production employees: Time and onesion).
Feb. 4,1946 (Linen sup­ half for work in excess of 44 hours a week
ply and flatwork divi­ for women and 46 hours for men.
sion).
Engineers and maintenance men: Time
and one-half for work in excess of 50
hours a week.
Nov. 1, 1946 (Both Changed to—
Production employees: Time and one-half
divisions).
for work in excess of 40 hours a week for
women, 42 hours for men.
Engineers and maintenance men: Time
and one-half for work in excess of 44
hours a week
Nov. 1, 1947 (Family Changed to—
and wholesale divi­ Production employees: Time and onehalf for work in excess of 40 hours a week
sion).
for men and women.
Engineers and maintenance men: Time
and one-half for work in excess of 42
hours a week.
Feb. 2. 1948 (Linen
supply and flatwork
division).
Feb. 1,1950 (Both divi­
sions).

Linen supply and flatwork

Wholesale: Time and one-half for work in Office towel: Time and one-half for work in
excess of 12 hours on long days or 52 excess of 12 hours on long days or 48
hours a week.
hours a week, including a daily lunch
period.
Linen and flatwork: Time and one-half for
work in excess of 12 hours a day or 63
hours a week, including a daily lunch
period.
Changed to—
Changed to—
Wholesale: Time and one-half for work in Office towel: Time and one-half for work in
excess of 50 hours a week.
excess of 44 hours a week, including a
daily lunch period.
Linen supply: Time and one-half for work
in excess of 49 hours a week, including a
daily lunch period.
Wholesale: Time and one-half for work in
excess of 48 hours a week, including a
daily lunch period.
Changed to—
Office towel: Time and one-half for work
in excess of 43 hours a week, including
a daily lunch period.
Linen and flatwork: Time and one-half for
work in excess of 47 hours a week, includ­
ing a daily lunch period.
Changed to—
Changed to—
All employees: Time and one-half for All employees: Time and one-half for work
work m excess of 11 hours on long days. in excess of 11 hours on long days. Work
Work schedule limited to 2 long days schedule limited to 1 long day a week.
a week.

Feb. 5,1951 (Both divi­ Changed to—
All employees: Time and one-half for work in excess of 10 hours on long days.
sions).
Jan. 25, 1954 (arbitra­
tion of award of Jan.
21, 1954), family and
Changed to—All noncommission em­ Changed to—All noncommission em­
wholesale division.
ployees except office towel service: Time
ployees: Time and one-half for work in
Nov. 30, 1953 (arbitra­
and one-half for work in excess of 47
excess of 47 hours a week, including a
tion award of Dec. 1,
hours a week, including a daily 1-hour
daily 1-hour lunch period; overtime
1953), linen supply
lunch period; overtime rate to be com­
rate computed on basis of 42-hour week.
and flatwork division.
puted on basis of 42-hour week. Office
towel employees: Time and one-half for
work in excess of 43 hours a week; over­
time rate computed on basis of 38-hour
week.
Dec. 1.1957 (agreements Holiday to be considered as time 1
Same.
Same-..
worked in computing overtime, j
of same date), both
divisions.

Mar. 4,1963 (agree­
ment dated Dec. 1,
1962).

Dec. 2,1963 (agree­
ment dated Dec. 1,
1962).

Changed: Noncommission employees—
Time and one-half for work in excess of
46 hours a week, including a daily 1-hour
lunch period; overtime rate computed on
basis of 41-hour week.

Nov. 30, 1964 (agree­
ment dated Dec. 1,
1962).

Changed: Noncommission employees—
Time and one-half for work in excess of
45 hours a week, including a daily 1-hotir
lunch period* overtime rate computed
on basis of 40-hour week.

See footnote at end of table,



Changed: Noneommission routemen and
helpers, excluding office towel—Time and
one-half for work in excess of 46 hours a
week, including daily 1-hour lunch
period: overtime rate computed on basis
of 41-hour week.
Changed: Noncommission routemen and
helpers, excluding office to wel—Time ancl
one-half for work in excess of 45 hours a
week, including daily 1-hour lunch
period overtime rate computed on basis
of 40-hour week.

1
1

D—Related Wage Practices—Continued,
Provision

Effective date

Linen supply and flatwork

Family and wholesale

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Shift Premium Pay

employees: 5 percent premium
Feb. 4,1946 (Linen sup­ All employees: No provision for shift All insidework before midnight, lOpercent Premium pay for individual employees not
pay for
working on an established shift was nego­
ply and flatwork divi­ premium pay.
for work after midnight.
tiated by parties. When agreement could
sion).
not be reached, the matter was sub­
mitted to arbitration.
M a r.

Z,

19 5 2 (a g re e ­

m e n t o f sa m e d a te ).

C o r re c tio n :
p re m iu m

In s id e

e m p lo y e e s

5

P r e m iu m

p e rc e n t

p a y

r e g u la r ly

p a y fo r w o r k b e fo re m id n ig h t ,

on

a d d itio n a l

10 p e r c e n t fo r w o r k a fte r m i d n i g h t .

fo r

in d iv id u a l

n ig h t

s h ift h a d

w o rk
been

fo r

e m p lo y e t
w h ic h

e s ta b lis h e d

no
to

b e n e g o tia te d b y p a rtie s .

Dec. 1,

A d d e d :

19 6 2 (a g r e e m e n t

S h ift

w orke d b y

o f sam e d a te ), b o th

d e fin e d

to

in c lu d e

tim e

o n e e m p lo y e e o r m o re .

d iv is io n s .

Premium Pav for Weekend Work

Nov. 1, 1945 (Family All emDlovees: Time and one-half for work on Saturdav and Sundav as such
and wholesale divi­
sion); Feb. 4, 1946
(Linen supply and
flatwork division).

Except as otherwise agreed upon by parties.

Vacation Pay
#

Nov. 1, 1945 (Family All employees: One week’s vacation with pay after one and less than five years’ con­ Vacation pay for inside employees to equal
and wholesale divi­ tinuous service; two weeks after five years’ continuous service.
average weekly earnings during months
sion); Feb. 4, 1946
of October through March preceding
(Linen Supply and
vacation.
flatwork division).
Noncommissioned drivers paid regular

weekly rate. Linen supply commis­
sioned drivers paid average earnings on
route during 26 weeks preceding vacation.
Family commissioned drivers paid earn­
ings of route during vacation period. To
be eligible for vacation pay, employee
must not have been absent from job
without reasonable excuse for more than
135 hours during year.

C, hanged to—
Feb. 1,1950 (Linen sup­
All employees: Two weeks’ vacation with
ply and flatwork divi­
pay after 4 years of continuous service.
sion).
Tan. 25, 1954 (arbitra­
tion award of Jan. 21,
1954), family and
wholesale division.
1
1
Nov. 30, 1953 (arbitra­ Changed to—All employees:less week’s Changed to—All employees:less week’s
for 1 but
vacation with pay for 1 but
tion award of Dec. 1, years’ continuous service and 2 than 4 vacation with pay service and 2 than 3
weeks years’ continuous
weeks
1953), linen supply
after 3 or more years’ service.
and flatwork division. after 4 or more years’ service.
Added—All employees: Pro rata vacation
Dec. ltJ957 (agreements
pay for employees with 1 or more years*
o f same date), both
service upon termination of employment.
divisions.
Vacation pay for inside employees no less
than minimum weekly guarantee; and
for routemen, their helpers, and office
employees to be based on regular pay for
full workweek.




12
D—Related Wage Practices—Continued
Provision

Effective date
Family and wholesale

Linen supply and flatwork

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Vacation Paw— Continued

Jan. 22,1962, linen
Added: All employees—3 weeks of vacation with pay for 15 years or more of continuous
supply and fiatwork
division, and Jan. 29,
1962, family and
wholesale division
(arbitration award
dated Jen. 9,1962).
Changed: routemen and helpers—3 weeks
Dec. 3, 1962 (agreement
of vacation with pay for 13 years or more
dated Dec. 1,1962).
of continuous service.
Dec. 2, 1963 (agreement Changed: All employees: 3 weeks of va­ Changed: Inside employees -3 weeks of
cation with pay for 13 years or more of vacation with pay for 13 years or more
dated Dec. 1, 1962).
of continuous sendee; routemen and
continuous service.
helpers—3 weeks for 12 years or more of
continuous service.

Holiday Pay

Nov. 1, 1945 (Family 5 holidays for which employees not re- 7 holidays for which employees not re­
quired to work were paid as follows:
and wholesale divi­ quired to work were paid as follows:
sion); Feb. 4, 1946
(Linen supply and Inside hourly workers: Straight-time rate times hours scheduled on same day in week
preceding holiday;
network division).
Inside piece workers: Average straight-time daily earnings for days worked during week
of holiday;
All workers paid by the week: Regular weekly salary, without deduction for the holiday;
’
~ ------* * ’ ’------^
Commission drivers: $7 for the day. * Commission drivers: Paid amount earned
In­
side employees: Double time and one- on same day of week preceding holiday.
half (total) for work on a holiday if no Inside employees: Double time and onemake-up time was worked.2 Double half (total) for work on holiday if no
time (total) for holiday or Sunday work make-up time was worked.2 Double
if make-up time was worked during time and one-half (total) for holiday or
Sunday work in a 5-day plant if make-up
week or Saturday.
Time and one-half for holiday make-up time was worked during week or Satur­
day; double time (total) in a 6-day plant.
work during the week or on Saturday.
Commission drivers: $5 flat sum paid for Time and one-half for holiday make-up
Saturday make-up time during aholiday work during the week and on Saturday
week.
dutside employees: Full day's pay in
addition to weekly wages for make-up
work.
July 24, 1947 (Family Added—
and wholesale divi- All employees: One paid holiday (total 6).
sion).
Feb. 1,1950 (Both divi­ Changed to—
Inside employees: Holiday pay for piece workers to equal average straight-time daily
sions).
earnings during week preceding holiday week. Double-time rate (total) paid for work
on holiday or Sunday preceding or succeeding the holiday when make-up time was
worked during the week. Double time and one-half (total)- paid for work on holiday
or Sunday preceding or succeeding holiday when make-up time was not worked.
Changed to—
Mar. 3.1952 (Both divi- Changed to—
Double time and one-half (total) for work Inside employees: Double time and oneslons).
on a holiday or a Sunday preceding or half (total) for work on a holiday or on a
succeeding a holiday when make-up Sunday preceding or succeeding a holi­
time was not worked. Double time day if no make-up time was worked and
(total) for work on a holiday or Sunday for make-up work during the week in a
preceding or succeeding *a holiday when 6-day plant or for make-up work during
make-up time was worked during the the week or on Saturday in a 5-day plant.
week or on Saturday. Time and one-half Outside employees: Full day's pay and
(total) fo r holiday make-up time during time and one-half after $ hours paid to
6-day plant employee lor Saturday or
the week or on Saturday.
day-off make-up time.

See footnote at end of table




Paid holidays for family and wholesale divi­
sion were: New Year's Day, July 4, Labor
Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas.
Decoration Day was an unpaid holiday.
Paid holidays for linen supply and flatwork division were same as those above
plus Decoration Day and Washington's
Birthday.
Family and wholesale: Double time for
work on Decoration Day, and time and
one-half for make-up time required by
time lost on this holiday.
Linen supply and flatwork: Provision to he
effective until Nov. 1, 1948. After that,
full day's pay in addition to weekly
wages for first 6 hours or fraction thereof,
then time and one-half.

Holiday added was Decoration Day.
Employees paid for holidays regardless of
whether they fell on scheduled workday.
When holiday occurred during vacation
period, employee paid for holiday in
addition to vacation pay.

13

D—Related Wage Practices— Continued
Provision

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Linen supply and flatworv

Family and wholesale

Holiday Pay — Continued

Jan. 23, 1956 (arbitra­ Added—All employees: 8 hours' pay for holidays falling on Saturday.
tion award of Jan. 9, Changed to—Inside employees: Holiday pay for pieceworkers to be based on earnings
during workweek in which the holiday occurred divided by number of days worked
1956), both divisions.
during week.
Dec. 1,1957 (agreements Changed to—Inside employees: Tikne and one-half for makeup work during the week
of same date), both and on Saturday of holiday wedk; double time (total) for work on paid holiday if
makeup performed in week or on Saturday; and double time and one-half (total) for
divisions.
work on holiday or Sunday if no makeup during week or on Saturday.
Commission drivers: Increased to flat sum
of $10 tor the holiday and $7 for Saturday
makeup time during holiday week.
D e c . 3 , 19 6 2 ( a g r e e m e n t
d a te d

D e c , 1 ,1 9 6 2 ) .

A d d e d :

C o m m is s io n

h o lid a y

ro u te m e n — 1

Holiday was Washington’s Birthday.

p a id

(to ta l— 7 ) .

In c re a s e d :
S a tu rd a y

C o m m is s io n
m a ke u p

d riv e r s — p a y

tim e

d u rin g

fo r

h o lid a y

w e e k — to $ 10 .
D e c . 2 , 19 6 3 (a g r e e m e n t
d a te d

D e c , 1 ,1 9 6 2 ) .

A d d e d :

R o u te m e n

o ff w it h

p a y

each

an d

h e lp e rs — 1

year

in

o th e r

d a y

th a n

a

h o lid a y w e e k o r v a c a t io n p e r io d .

Paid Sick Leave*
2

Feb. 4,1946 (Linen sup­ All employees: No provision for sick-leave
ply and flatwork divi­ pay.
sion) .

All employees: 5 days’ sick leave for em­ Unused sick leave could be used as addi­
ployees with one or more years of service. tional vacation with pay, unless employee
was already entitled to full 2 weeks’ vaca­
tion. In that case employer had option
of granting additional vacation with pay
or paying for unused sick leave.
Jan. 25, 1964 (arbitra­ Established—All employees: 5 days’ sick
Unused sick leave to be used as additional
tion award of Jan. 21, leave for employees with 1 or more years
vacation time or paid for in cash, at
1954), family and of service.
employer’s option.
wholesale division.
Dec. 1,1957 (agreements Added—All employees: pro rata sick Added—All employees: Pro rata sick Family and wholesale: (1) No employee to
of same date), both leave pay for employees with 1 or more
leave pay for employees with 1 or more be required to take time off In lieu of
divisions.
years of service upon termination of
years of service upon termination of payment for accumulated sick leave.
employment.
employment.
(2) Payment for sick leave for inside em«
ployees to be on same basis as vacation
pay; for routemen, on the basis of the
average earnings for 52 weeks.




14
D—Related Wage Practices—Continued

Provision

Effective date

P a id

Dec. 31,1958 (agree­
ment dated Dec. 1,
1857).
Dec. 3, 1962 (agreement
Dec. 1, 1862),
family and wholesale
division.

Linen supply and flatwork division

Family and wholesale division

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

iS k Ijp.aup Continued
in
,—

Added: Family commission routemen with
1 year or more service—Earnings reduc­
tion in case of absence for illness limited
to $7 a day (weekly guarantee $70) for
first 5 days of absence in year.
Added: Family commission routemen
with 5 years or more of service—Earnings
reduction in case of absence for illness
limited to $7 a day (weekly guarantee—
$80) for first 7 days of absence in year.
Increased: Family commission routemen
wdth 5 years or more of service—Earn­
ings reduction in case of absence for illness
extended to first 8 days of absence in
year.
Increased: Family commission routemen
with 5 years or more of service—Earn­
ings reduction in case of absence for ill­
ness, extended to first 10 days of absence
in year.

Correction: 5 days of sick leave cumu­
lative annually for employee with at
least 2 years of service on Dec. 31, 1968,
or for employee hired thereafter on sec­
ond anniversary date' of employments

d a te d

Dec. 2, 1S63 (agreement
dated Dec. 1, 1962),
family and wholesale
division.
Nov. 30,1964 (agree­
ment dated Dec. 1,
1962), family and
wholesale division.

Call-In Pay

Nov. 1, 1945 (Family Engineers and maintenance men: Minimum of 4 hours’ pay guaranteed at double-time Doable time paid for actual hours worked
and wholesale divi­ for emergency work on Sunday.
when called in on Sunday for purpose of
sion); Feb. 4, 1946 Other employees: No provision for call-in pay.
heating plant.
(Linen supply and
flatwork division).
iDown-Time Pay

------------------------------------------------ .a __
Nov. 1, 1945 (Family Inside employees: Regular rates paid for all waiting time caused by machinery break­ Applied to all inside employees requested
and wholesale divi­ downs.
to remain in plant after breakdown.
sion); Feb. 4, 1946 Other employees: No provision for down-time pay.
(Linen supply and
flatwork division).

[

Paid Rest Period

Nov. l, 1945 (Family Inside employees: One daily 15-minute paid rest period provided during months of Not applicable to employees working less
and wholesale divi­ July and August.
than 5 hours a day.
sion); Feb. 4, 1946 Other employees: No paid rest period provision.
(Linen supply and
flatwork division).




IS
D—Related Wage Practices— Continued

Effective date

Provision
Linen supply and Artwork

Family and wholesale

Applications, exceptions, and other related
niattlri

Paid Rest Period — Continued
Jan. M» IMS (arbitra­ Changed to—Inside employees: Daily summer rest period extended. New period to
tion awards of Jut. 9, be from June 15 to Sept. 16 of eaoh year.
1956), both divisions.

Uniform Allowance
Nov. 1, IMS (Family Outside employees: Minimum of 50 per­ Outside employees: Full cost and mainte­
and wholesale divi­ cent of cost and maintenance of uniforms nance of uniforms paid by employers.
sion); Feb. 4, 1946 paid by employers.
(Linen supply and Other employees: No uniform allowance Other employees: No uniform allowance
natwork division).
provision.
provision.

Travel-Expense P ay
Nov. 1, 1945 (Family All employees: In the event the plant was n oved to a location beyond the 10-oent traveland wholesale divi­ fare radius, additional travel expense pah Lby employer.
sion); Feb. 4, 1946
(Linen supply and
flatwork division).

Funeral Leave
Family defined as mother, father, wife, or
child.

Pj!C. 3,1862 (agreement Established: Family routeman received
' dated Dec. 1,1962).
3 days of paid leave in the event of death
in family.

Severance P a y
M ir. 3 ,19f*2 (agreement In effect: Arbitrator to determine if severance pay was due, and its amount, if employ­
ees are displaced by installation of new' machinery and not provided equivalent em­
of same date).
ployment.
D 'c. 3, 1862 (agreement Changed: Arbitrator to determine only the amount of severance pay due employees
dated Dec. 1,1962).
displaced by installation of new machinery.

Health and W elfare Benefits ( Revised ) — Both D ivisions
Nov. 10,1941................... Established: Noncontributory group insurance plan for employees with minimum of 6 Employer paid 1 percent of payroll into
trust fund administered by union-ap­
months of service.
pointed trustees.
July 1,1942 (agreement Plan provided—
L ife insurance—$ 100.
” dated Feb. 1, 1942).
Sickness and accident disability benefits—All workers: $6 a week for up to 13 weeks,
beginning on 8th day of sickness and 1st day o^ accident.
M aternity benefits—$25 for normal delivery.
N jv. 1,1943...................... Increased: Life insurance—to $250.
Sickness and accident disability benefits—&11 workers—-to $8 a week.
M aternity benefits— to $57 for normal delivery.




1
6

D — Related W age Practices— Continued
P ro v is io n

E ffe c tiv e d a te

A p p lic a t io n s , e x c e p tio n s , a n d o th e r r e la te d
m a tte rs

'

H e a lth a n d W e lfa re B e n e fits (R e v is e d ) — B o th D iv is io n s — C o n tin u e d

Jail. 2,1946.

F u n d

to

bo

p lo y e r
F o b

1 5 , 1 9 4 6 . . .............................................I n c r e a s e d :

To

Life i n s u r a n c e —

C h a n g e d :

$ 5 0 0 * _______________________________________________________________________

S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t disability be n e f i t s — $ & a w e e k f o r w o m e n . $ 1 2 a w e e k

fo r

a d m in is te r e d

an d

In c r e a s e d :

u n io n

jo in tly

b y

em ­

re p r e s e n ta tiv e s .

E m p lo y e r

c o n trib u tio n

to

fu n d

to 2 p e rc e n t o f p a y ro ll.

m e n.
A d d e d :

D a i l y h o s p i t a l bene f i t s— $ 3 f o r u p t o 3 1 d a y s .

S p e c i a l hospital e x p e n s e s —

U p

to $ 15 fo r a n y o n e d is a b ilit y .

A u g . 1 . 1 9 4 6 ________________ _________________________ __________________________________________________________________________ _________ ________

L ife

in s u r a n c e

c o ve ra g e

e x te n d e d

fo r .s u c ­

c e s s iv e p e r io d s fo r t o t a l l y o r p e r m a n e n t l y
d is a b le d e m p lo y e e .
p e t . 1 , 19 4 7.

I n c r e a s e d : D a i l y h o spital benefits— T o

Ju ly

In c r e a s e d :

1 . 19 4 8 .

Special hospital e x p e n s e s — T o

S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t disability benefits.— T o

fo r m e n .

D a i l y h o s p i t a l b e nefits— T o

R e d u c e d : M a t e r n i t y b e nefits—

T o

A d d e d :

$6.

$25.

$ 10 a w e e k fo r w o m e n , $ 15 a w e e k

S p e c i a l hospital e x p e n s e s — T o

$30;

to $ 15 0 .

U p

S u r g i c a l b e n efits—

J a n . 1 , 1 9 5 0 _________________

In c re a s e d :

Ju ly

C h a n g e d :

1 , 1 9 5 0 ________________

$5.

$50 fo r n o r m a l d e liv e r y .

Spec i a l hospital e x p e n s e s — T o

$50.

S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t d isability benef i t s— T o

e a r n e d in

8 w e e k s p rio r to d is a b ility — m in im u m

o n e -h a lf o f a v e ra g e w e e k ly w a g e

$ 10 .

m a x im u m

$26

a w ee k,

u p

A p p lic a b le

to m e n

and

w om e n .

to

13 w e e k s .
D

c . 1 . 1 9 5 0 __________ , _____

In c r e a s e d :

Sickness a n d

a c c i d e n t b e n e fids— M a x i m u m

to

$50 a w e e k .

A p r . 1 . 19 5 1

A d d e d :

$500

tire e s .

p ro v id e d
O c t . 1 , 19 5 4

E s ta b lis h e d :

N o v . 1 , 19 5 5 .

A d d e d :

Medical

P a tie n ts

benefits—

.p r o v id e d

p r e v e n tiv e m e d ic a l c a re a t A m a lg a m a t e d
M e d i c a l benefits— H e a l t h

fre e

La u n d ry

d ia g n o s tic ,

th e r a p e u tic ,

W o rk e rs H e a lth

p a id -u p

H o s p ita l

life

an d

d u r in g

in s u r a n c e
s u r g ic a l

to

re ­

c o ve ra g e

fir s t y e a r o f r e tir e m e n t.

and

C e n te r.

C e n te r c a re e x te n d e d t o d e p e n d e n t u n e m p lo y e d w iv e s

o f e m p lo y e e s .
A d d e d :

M a r . 2 9 , 19 5 6 .

c a re
A p r . 2 , 19 5 6 .

In c r e a s e d :
fits—

Ju ly

1 , 19 5 6 .

U p

A d d e d :

insurance— T o

Life

Daily

hospital

benefits — T o

$9.

Surgical

th e

$ 10

and

accident

disability b e n efits— S p e c i f i c

m in im u m

a m o u n ts

p a y a b le

m i n i m u m .3
A d d e d :

In c re a s e d :

and

accident

disability bene f i ts— M i n i m u m

IfusnitalizaHon.

surgical

and

Sickness

a m o u n ts

to

v a ry

benefits— H e a l t h

Medical

c a re e x te n d e d
1 , 1 9 5 7 _________________

C e n te r

r e tire e s .

bene­

A n g . 3 0 , 19 5 6 .

Ju ly

H e a lth

benefits—
to

to $200.

Sickness

above

$1 0 0 0 .

Medical

e x te n d e d

C e n te r

t o r e t i r e e 's s p o u s e .

w ith

w e e k ly p a y .4
F e b . 1 , 1 9 5 8 ___________ _____ A d d e d :

e m p lo y e d

maternity

benefits— E x t e n d e d

to

d ep en den t

u n ­

spouses.

C h a n g e d :

B e n e fits

d e p e n d e n tTh e se ,

as

fo r

e x te n d e d

w e ll

to

year

1

r e tire m e n t.

as

a fte r

w e e k ly

re tire e ’s

s ic k n e s s

a c c id e n t b e n e f i t s , a ls o e x t e n d e d
d u r in g
th e

a n y

re tire m e n t
Ju n e

1 , 1 0 5 8 _______

C h a n g e d :
as a

S * p t . 2 2 , 1 9 5 8 ______

C h a n g e d :
lo r

S u r g i c a l a n d si ckness a n d ac c i d e n t benefits— E l i g i b i l i t y

c ove re d

$ 3 ,0 0 0

in

w h ic h

m ade

h im

e a rn in g s

in e lig ib le

in
fo r

b e n e fits .

r e q u ire m e n t to 4 w e e k s

e m p lo y e e .

Life i n s u r a n c e —

w o rke rs

p e r io d

in d u s try

and

to r e tire e

e a r n in g

fo r e m p lo y e e s

F o r e m p lo y e e s

$ 2 ,9 0 0 b u t
e a r n in g

le s s t h a n

w ith

3 ye a rs

$ 3 ,9 0 0

$ 3 ,9 0 0 o r m o r e .

o f c o ve re d

d q v in g

e m p lo y m e n t:

p re c e d in g

c a le n d a r

$ 2 ,0 0 0

year

an d

$ 1 ,0 0 0

life

in s u r a n c e

p lo y e e s

e a r n in g

c o n tin u e d

le s s

th a n

fo r

$ 2 600

p re c e d in g c a le n d a r y e a r o r w it h
3

ye a rs

of

cove re d

em ­

d u r in g !

le s s t h a n

e m p lo y m e n t.

W o rk

as a c o v e re d e m p lo y e e in e a c h o f 40 w e e k s
d u rin g
year
of

a

c a le n d a r

o f c ove re d

life

in s u r a n c e

an n u al
and

e a r n in g s

a n n u a lly

A fte r

10

a m o u n t

ye a rs

year

a d ju s te d
p rio r

to

in

on

to

o f c o ve re d

1

A m o u n t
b a s is

S e p t.

th e r e a fte r

o f in s u r a n c e

be re du ce d b y

c o n s titu te d

e m p lo y m e n t.

22,

of

19 5 8 ,

Ja n u a ry

1.

e m p lo y m e n t,

e ffe c t c o u ld

a s u b s e q u e n t r e d u c tio n

n ot
in

e a r n in g s .
Fac e

v a lu e

d u r in g

See footnotes at end of table



of

life

in s u r a n c e

fir s t 6 m o n t h s

c o n tin u e d

o f r e tire m e n t.

1
7

D — Related W age .Practices— Continued,
E ffe c tiv e

P r o v is io n

d a te

A p p lic a t io n s , e x c e p tio n s , a n d o th e r r e la te d
m a tte rs

H e a lth a n d W e lfa re B e n e fits (R e v ise d ) — B o th D iv is io n s —Continued
I , 1 0 6 0 _________________ I n c r e a s e d : D a i l y

Ju n e

benefits— T o

hospital

$ 13 .

M a te r n ity

b e n e fits — T o

$ 75

fo r

n o rm a l

d e liv e r y .
A p r . 3 , 1 9 6 1 _________________

In c re a s e d :
to

E m p lo y e r

2 .7 5

p e rc e n t

c re a s e e ffe c tiv e
Ju ly

1 , 1 9 6 1 ___ _ ______ __
_

C h a n g e d :

D a i l y h o s p i t a l bene f i t s— T o

In c re a s e d :

$ 16 t o $ 2 0 d e p e n d i n g o n a v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s .5

S p e c i a l hospital e x p e n s e s —

T o

$ 75 .

benefits — T o

Maternity

$ 10 0

fo r

A d d e d :

n o rm a l

d e liv e r y .

to

fu n d

d e fe rre d

in ­

S e p t. 3 , 19 6 1.

H o s p i t a l i s a t i o n , sur g i c a l , a n d m a t e r ­

th ro u g h

In c re a s e d :
to

p a y ro ll:

benefits — e x t e n d e d

nity

c h ild r e n

S ' p t . 3 , 1 9 6 1 ________________

c o n trib u tio n

o f

to

dependent

age 18 .

E m p lo y e r c o n trib u tio n

to

fu n d

2 .8 4 p e r c e n t o f p a y r o l l .

P e n s io n s (R e v ise d ) — B o th D iv is io n s
A u r .

l,

1 9 5 1 _________________

N o n c o n trib u to r y
c o n tin u o u s
u n io n , w ith

p la n

s e rv ic e

in

c s ta b lis n e d
th e

to

in d u s try

p ro v id e
and

10

e m p lo y e e s , a t
ye a rs

age

65. w ith

o f c o n tin u o u s

20 y e a r s

m e m b e rs h ip

a n n u i t y o f $25 a m o n t h , e x c lu s iv e o l S o c ia l S e c u r it y

in

of
th e

b e n e fits .

P la n

e s ta b lis h e d

F e b . 1 . 19 5 0 .
p a y ro ll
Ju ly

th ro u g h

in to

tru s t

fo r fe ite d

fo r

a n n u ita n t e a rn e d
B e n e fits

p a y a b le

to ta lly

J j n .
D ? c

fu n d

c o m m e n c in g

3 1 , 19 5 0 .

B e n e fit

A iy
L

n e g o tia tio n ,

E m p l o y e r p a id 1 p e rc e n t o f

a n y

at

d is a b le d

m o n th

in

w h ic h

$50 o r m o r e .
age

a fte r

65

fo r

A p r .

e m p lo y e e s

1 ,

19 4 6 ,

and

a fte r re a c h in g a g e 60 .
1 , 1 9 5 2 ______ __________

1

,

1C
57

L im ita tio n

on

m o n th ly

e a rn in g s

r a is e d

to

o il m o n t h l y

e a rn in g s

r a is e d

to

$ 75 .
A d d e d :

Red uced

b e n e fits

fo r w o m e n

e m p lo y e e s r e tir in g

a t age 62 a n d

p rio r to

65.

1 , 1 9 5 8 _________________

L im ita tio n
$ 10 0 .

S . - p t . 3 . 1 9 6 1 _______________

In c re a s e d :

E m p lo y e r

fu n d — to
J a n . 1 , 19 6 2 .

_

In c re a s e d :
A d d e d :

m o n th ly

R e d uce d

a n n u ity

c o n trib u to u

to

1 .4 1 p e r c e n t o f p a y r o l l .

to $33

b e n e f i t s f o r m e n e m p l o v e c s r e t i r i n g a t a g e 6 2 a n d p r i o r t o 6 5 ____________

C h a n g e d :
fo r

J a n . 1 . 1 9 6 5 _________________

B e n e fits

e m p lo y e e s

a v a ila b le

d is a b le d

a fte r

at

age

age

60.

G2

B e n e fits r e d u c e d b y $1 fo r e a c h $2 o f e a r n e d
in c o m e

in

e x c e s s o f $ 1 ,2 0 0 a y e a r , a n d

fo r

e a c h $ 1 o f e a r n e d i n c o m e o f $ 1 ,7 0 0 o r m o r e .

1 Contracts provided for regularly scheduled long days, not to exceed 2
days a week, for which premium rate was to be paid after a stated number of
hours. Otherwise premium pay for overtime paid only after work in excess
of regular weekly schedule of hours.
2 Make-up time was time worked outside regular schedule because of time
lost through observance of a holiday.
3Average weekly earnings

A m o u n t o f benefit
($50 m a x i m u m )

$40 but less than $48_______________________________
$30 but less than $40_________________________________________ $17. 50
$20 but less than $30________________________




4 A v e r a g e w eekly earnings
$ 4 4 a n d o v e r _____________
$ 4 0 b u t lo s s t h a n

$44___

$ 2 0 b u t le s s t h a n

$ 4 0 _ __

Le s s th a n

$ 2 0 ____________

A m o u n t o f b e n t fit
50 p e r c e n t o f w e e k ly e a r n in g s .
$
.

22 00
$20 . 00

A ve ra g e

w e e k ly e a rn in g s

($ 10 m i n i m u m ) .
5 Average weekly earning*
$ 7 5 a n d o v e r ______________

$22.00

A m o u n t

o f b e n e lit

-------------------------------------------------- J $ 2 0 .0 0

$ 5 0 b u t le s s t h a n $ 7 5 .

------------------------------------------------------------------ $ 1 8 . 0 0

L e s s t h a n $ 5 0 _____________

---------------------------------------- ------------------------- $ 1 6 . 0 0

$12.50

Wage Chronologies
The follow ing lis t constitutes all wage chronologies published to date.
Those for which a p rice is shown are available from the Superintendent of D ocu­
m ents, U .S . Government Printing Office, W ashington, D .C ., 20402, or from
any of its regional sa les o ffices. Those for which a p rice is nui shown m ay be
obtained free as long as a supply is available, from the Bureau of Labor S tatistics,
Washington, D. C., 20212, or from any of the regional o ffices shown on the inside
back cover.
Aluminum Company of A m erica, 1939—
61. BLS Report 219.
A m erican V isco se, 1945—
63. BLS Report 277 (20 cents).
The Anaconda C o., 1941—58. BLS Report 197.
A nthracite Mining Industry, 1930—59. BLS Report 255.
Arm our and C o., 1941—
63. BLS Report 187.
A .T . & T.— Long Lines D epartm ent, 1940—
64. BLS B ulletin 1443 (40 cents).
B erkshire Hathaway Inc. (form erly Northern Cotton T extile A ssociation s),
1943—
64. BLS Report 281 (20 cents).
1 B ethlehem A tlantic Shipyards, 1941—65. BLS B ulletin 1454.
2 Big Four Rubber Com panies, Akron and D etroit Plants, 1937—55.
2Bitum inous Coal M ines, 1933—59.
The B oeing Co. (W ashington Plants), 1936—
64. BLS Report 204 (20 cents).
C arolina Coach C o., 1947—
63. BLS Report 259.
C hrysler Corporation, 1939—
64. BLS Report 198 (25 cents).
Commonwealth Edison Co. of Chicago, 1945—63. BLS Report 205
(20 cents).
F ederal C lassification Act E m ployees, 1924—
64. BLS B ulletin 1442 (35 cents).
Ford Motor Company, 1941—
64. BLS Report 99 (30 cents).
G eneral M otors C orp ., 1939—
63. BLS Report 185 (25 cents).
International H arvester Company, 1946—
61. BLS Report 202.
International Shoe C o., 1945— BLS Report 211.
64.
Lockheed A ircraft Corp. (C alifornia Company), 1937—64. BLS Report 231
(25 cents).
1 M artin-M arietta C orp., 1944—
64. BLS B ulletin 1449.
M assachusetts Shoe Manufacturing, 1945—
64. BLS Report 209 (20 cents).
North A m erican Aviation, 1941— BLS Report 203 (25 cents).
64.
North A tlantic Longshoring, 1934— BLS Report 234.
61.
2 P acific Gas and E lectric C o., 1943—59.
2 P acific Longshore Industry, 1934—
59.
R ailroads— Nonoperating E m ployees, 1920—
62. BLS Report 208 (25 cents).
1Sinclair Oil Com panies, 1941—
66. BLS B ulletin 1447.
Swift & C o., 1942—63. BLS Report 260 (25 cents).
United States S teel Corporation, 1937—64. BLS Report 186 (30 cents).
W estern Greyhound L ines, 1945—
63. BLS Report 245 (30 cents).
W estern Union Telegraph C o., 1943—
63. BLS Report 160 (30 cents). 1
1 Study in progress; price not available.
2 Out of print. See Directory of Wage Chronologies, 1948—
October 1964, for Monthly Labor Review issue in
which basic report and supplements appeared.



☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1965 O - 780-618




R e g io n

III—

S o u th e rn

1 3 7 1 P e a c h tre e S tr e e t, N E .
A tla n ta , G a .
30309
T e l .: T R in it y 6 -3 3 1 1