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Wage C hronolog y:

In te r n a tio n a l H a rv e s te r C o ., 1 9 7 0 -7 3
Ratification of a new 3-year contract between the
International Harvester Co. and the Auto Workers
(UAW) was completed on January 31, 1971, ending a
2%-week companywide work stoppage affecting nearly
40,000 workers. Talks had begun before the September
30, 1970 scheduled expiration date of the previous
contract. That contract subsequently was extended and
bargaining was suspended pending settlements in the
auto industry.
Bargaining was resumed in early January; the union
sought a contract patterned after the General Motors
settlement of November 11, 1970, and the Caterpillar
settlement, which was reached on December 12, 1970.
Harvester offered to meet the economic benefit levels
provided for in the General Motors contract, but refused
to bargain on matching the cents-per-hour cost of the
GM settlement or on the best of the GM or Caterpillar
approaches. The chief union negotiator stated that the
company had suggested renegotiation of some previously
won union contract gains. Against this background, the
first national strike against International Harvester since
1958 (except for a brief 1-day walkout in 1968) began
on January 13 (the union’s strike deadline).
Negotiations continued, and on January 24, the
parties reached tentative agreement on a pact similar to
the auto pattern,1 plus an innovative dental care
program. The contract was quickly ratified by all but six
union locals which refused to sign because of local issue
disputes. The company in turn announced that general
production would not be resumed until all locals had
ratified the contract. The last local ratified on January
31, and production was restarted the following day.
The settlement, covering about 35,000 production
and maintenance employees, provided for an increase in
basic wage rates ranging from 49 to 61 cents an hour
retroactive to October 19, 1970, of which 26 cents was
retroactive to September 15, 1970, but not added to
base rates until October 19. The 26 cents was the
amount that would have been payable under the
escalator clause over the term of the 1968 agreement
had there been no ceiling on cost-of-living adjustments.
Two deferred annual improvement-factor increases of 3
1 See Wage Chronology: Ford Motor Company, 1941-73
(BLS Bulletin 1787).
Supplem ent to Bulletin 1678
U.S. D E P A RTM E N T OF L A B O R
Bureau o f L abor Statistics
1973




percent were to be effective in November of 1971 and
1972. The escalator clause was revised to provide
“no-ceiling” adjustments, beginning in December 1971
and quarterly thereafter, of 1 cent for each 0.4-point
change in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price
Index. (See table A for details.) Additional increases
were provided for some jobs as inequity adjustments
effective February 1, 1971; they ranged from 6 to 20
cents an hour. Computation of the shift premium was
changed to allow 6 percent of the employee’s wage rate.
(Since 1959, the premium had been frozen at 10 percent
of the average wage rate prior to the 1959 agreement.)
The Christmas shutdown period consisting of 2
holidays and 3 shutdown days with pay during the week
in which Christmas fell, which was provided under the
previous contract, was revised to provide an unbroken
Christmas-New Year’s holiday period of 6 workdays off
with pay to begin the day before Christmas (unless that
day fell on a weekend—
then the following Monday). Six
of the previous 9 other holidays were continued, but
New Year’s Day was not maintained as a regular holiday
except to the extent that it was a holiday as a result of
the scheduling of the Christmas-New Year’s shutdown
(under this formula, New Year’s Day was a holiday only
during the shutdown period beginning in 1972). As a
result of the holiday revisions, the previous 3 Christmas
shutdown days became holidays, however, the total
number of days off with pay in each year remained at
12. Eligibility for jury-service pay also was extended to
prejury examination by the court.
Improvements in the health-security program
included the addition of three brackets of benefits to the
group life and disability schedule for employees in the
higher wage brackets, long-term disability benefit eligibi­
lity for employees who received 52 weeks of weekly
disability benefits before 1967, elimination of the
reduction in weekly disability benefits for similar social
security benefits payable for the same period, and in­
creased transition and bridge survivor’s income benefits
(the eligibility requirement for bridge benefits was re­
duced to age 48). The maximum duration o f either
hospitalization, nursing home, or medical care benefits
was to be renewable 60 days after the end of confine­
ment, instead of 90 days, and the hospitalization

60 in 1967. In addition, the “30-and-out” concept was
established on October 1, 1971, through means of the
supplemental allowance which, when added to the early
or disability pension benefit, allowed an employee with
30 years of service who retired after September 30, 1971
to receive $500 a month until age 62, at which time he
received $450 until age 65. The amount was reduced for
each year he was under age 58 (age 56 starting in 1972)
at retirement. An employee with less than 30 years of
service received the same amounts ($500 .or $450)
reduced for each year under 30 years of service, and the
resulting amount was reduced further for those who
retired under age 60. The supplemental allowance also
was increased for those who retired before October 1,
1971. Reduction factors for earlier retirement ages were
added under regular early retirement to facilitate the
“30-and-out” concept and the regular early pension was
to be redetermined at age 65.

period was not to be reduced because of nursing home
care for the same disability. Provision also was made for
home treatment of kidney diseases; payment for medi­
cal emergencies; and extension of the prescription drug
plan to retired employees, surviving spouses, and their
eligible dependents. Prescription drug benefits also were
upgraded. A comprehensive no deductible dental plan
was established for employees and dependents with a
maximum payment of $750 per year per family member
and a separate additional $500 lifetime maximum per
family member for orthodontic care. Dental benefits were
100, 75, or 50 percent of the usual and customary dental
charge according to a schedule of covered expenses. The
company’s reimbursement for Medicare Part B was in­
creased to $5.30 a month, and benefits under the hospitalsurgical-medical-drug-dental plan were coordinated with
benefits provided under other employer-financed plans,
so that benefits would be supplemented rather than
duplicated^_
Pension improvements were substantial and included
an increase in the basic benefits, effective April 1, 1971,
of $1 a month for each year of credited service for those
retired before October 1, 1970 and $1.75 for each year
of service for retirement after September 30, 1970.
Other pensions were increased accordingly. Credited
service was liberalized for layoff and sick leave. The
temporary benefit, payable under special early or
disability retirement, was increased for current and
future retirees, and the survivor’s option was made
available at an earlier age for disability retirement.
Restoration of the full pension benefit was allowed in
the case of death or divorce for retirees who had elected
the survivor’s option, and the special survivor’s option
was extended to disability retirees who were under age




Other changes included liberalized eligibility
requirements under the SUB plan; an increased regular
SUB maximum for employees who did not receive a
State system benefit because of exhaustion of State
benefit rights when their option to refuse a company
offer of work was exercised; that only the amount in
excess of $10 or 20 percent (previously $10) of pay
from other employers would be charged against the
SUB; and increased moving allowances.
The contract is scheduled to remain in effect until
October 1, 1973, with no provision for a reopening. The
following tables bring the International Harvester Co.
Wage Chronology up to date, except for possible
cost-of-living adjustments, through the expiration date
of the contract.

2

Table A. General wage changes1
Effective date

Provisions

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Sept. 15, 1970 (agreement
dated Jan. 29, 1971).

26 cents an hour payable retroactive
from 1970 agreement but not
added to base rates until Oct. 19,
1970.2 3
Amount added to base rates which
included a general wage increase
ranging from 23 to 35 cents an
hour and the 26-cent payment
that was retroactive to Sept. 15,
1970, but not added to base rates
until Oct. 19, 1970. 4

Amount available under letter of agreement dated Feb. 6,
1968, concerning the cost-of-living allowance.2

Oct. 19, 1970 (agreement
dated Jan. 29, 1971).

Feb. 1, 1971 (agreement dated
Jan. 29, 1971).
Nov. 22, 1971 (agreement
dated Jan. 29, 1971).

Dec. 6, 1971..............................

3-percent increase, ranging from 12
to 19 cents an hour,7 which
amounted to 13.5 cents an hour
when averaged over the entire
bargaining unit.
14-cent-an-hour increase.

Mar. 1972, first full pay
period in month.

2-cent-an-hour increase.

June 1972, first full pay
period in month.

3-cent-an-hour increase.

Sept. 1972, first full pay
period in month.

3-cent-an-hour increase.

Nov. 20, 1972 (agreement
dated Jan. 29, 1971).

3-percent increase, ranging from 12
to 20 cents an hour,7 which
amounted to 13.9 cents an hour
when averaged over the entire
bargaining unit.
3-cent-an-hour increase.

Dec. 1972, first full pay
period in month.
Mar. 1973, first full pay
period in month.

3-cent-an-hour increase.

June 1973, first full pay
period in month.

7-cent-an-hour increase.

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table




3

Agreement also: (1) Provided two deferred improvement
factor increases effective Nov. 22, 1971 and Nov. 20,
1972; (2) incorporated 16 cents of the 21-cent
accumulated cost-of-living allowance into base rates,
effective Oct. 19, 1970 but following application of the
general increases;5 (3) provided inequity adjustments
for certain jobs ranging from 6 to 20 cents an hour
effective Feb. 1, 1971; (4) revised the escalator formula
to provide “no-ceiling” adjustments commencing (a) the
first pay period beginning in December 1971 based on
the 3-month average of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
Consumer Price Index (1957-59=100) for August,
September, and October 1971, and (b) quarterly
thereafter beginning in March 1972 (up to June 1973),
based respectively on the 3-month averages of the
indexes for November and December 1971 and January
1972 and averages for 3-calendar-month intervals
thereafter (the adjustments were to be 1 cent for each
0.4-point increase in the 3-month averages of the
Indexes).6
Inequity adjustments provided for certain jobs ranging from
6 to 20 cents an hour.
Annual improvement factor increase.

Adjustment in cost-of-living allowance based on average of
BLS Consumer Price Indexes for August, September,
and October 1971.6
Adjustment in cost-of-living allowance based on average of
BLS Consumer Price Indexes for November and
December 1971 and January 1972.6
Adjustment in cost-of-living allowance based on average of
BLS Consumer Price Indexes for February, March, and
April 1972.6
Adjustment in cost-of-living allowance based on average of
BLS Consumer Price Indexes for May, June, and July
1972.6
Annual improvement factor increase.

Adjustment in cost-of-living allowance based on average of
BLS Consumer Price Indexes for August, September,
and October 1972.6
Adjustment in cost-of-living allowance based on average of
BLS Consumer Price Indexes for November and
December 1972 and January 1973.6
Adjustment in cost-of-living allowance based on average of
BLS Consumer Price Indexes for February, March, and
April 1973.6

1 General wage changes are construed as upward or dow nw ard adjustments affectin g a substantial num ber o f w orkers at on e tim e.
Not included within the term are adjustments in individual rates (p rom otion s, merit increases, etc.) and m inor adjustments in wage
structure that do n ot have an im m ediate and n oticeable e ffe ct on average wage levels.
The general changes listed in this c h ro n o lo g y were the m ajor changes affectin g wage rates during the p eriod cov ered . Because o f
om ission o f nongeneral changes in rates and other fa ctors, the total o f the general wage changes w ill not necessarily coin cid e w ith the
m ovem ent o f straight-tim e hou rly earnings.
2 See term s o f letter under O ct. 16, 19 6 7 , listing in BLS Bulletin 1678, table A , p p. 9-10.
3 F or the period beginning Sept. 15, 1970 until O ct. 19, 1970, the 26 cents was n ot to be taken into accou n t fo r incentive pay
calculations and not added to hou rly base rates used fo r purposes o f the insurance or retirem ent plans. F or SUB purposes, the base
rates were not adjusted until Feb. 1, 19 71.
4 The increase, w h ich included the 26 cents m ade retroactive to Sept. 15, 19 70, available under the letter o f agreement dated F eb.
6, 19 6 8 , applied to straight-time rates (exclud ing cost-of-living allowance in effect and shift prem ium s) as fo llo w s :
Base rate
b efo re increase

A m o u n t o f increase
(in cents)

Less than $ 3 . 5 0 ..................................................................................................................................................................................................49
$ 3 .5 0 - 3.83 ...............................................................................................
50
$ 3 .8 4 - 4 .1 6 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 51
$ 4 .1 7 - 4 .4 9 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 52
$ 4 .5 0 - 4 .8 3 ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 53
$ 4 .8 4 - 5 .1 6 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 54
$ 5 .1 7 - 5 .4 9 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 55
$5 .5 0 - 5.79 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................56
$ 5 .8 0 - 5.9 3 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................57
$ 5 .9 4 - 6.0 6 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 58
$ 6 .0 7 - 6 .1 9 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 59
$ 6 .2 0 - 6.3 3 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................60
$ 6 .3 4 and over ..................................................................................................................................................................................................61
5 F or incentive calculations, the 16 cents was p rovided as a cents-per-hour additive, not subject to change as a result o f incentive
effort.
6 The agreement p rovided that cost-of-living adjustments beginning in D ecem ber 1971 and quarterly thereafter be determ ined as
fo llo w s :
3 -m onth average*
C onsum er Price In dex

H o u rly cost-of-living
allowance
(in cents)

(1957-59 = 100)

1 3 4 . 8 o r l e s s ..........................................................................................................................0
134.9 - 135.2

........................................................................................................................ 1

135.3 - 135.6

........................................................................................................................ 2

1 3 5 . 7 - 1 3 6 . 0 .........................................................................................................................3
1 3 6 . 1 - 1 3 6 . 4 .........................................................................................................................4
136.5 - 136.8

......................................................................................................................... 5

136.9 - 137.2

.........................................................................................................................6

1 3 7 . 3 - 1 3 7 . 6 .........................................................................................................................7
1 3 7 . 7 - 1 3 8 . 0 .........................................................................................................................8
1 3 8 . 1 - 1 3 8 . 4 .........................................................................................................................9

and so forth with a 1-cent adjustment fo r each 0.4-p oint change in the average Index (roun ded to the nearest 0.1 Index p oin t) fo r the
appropriate 3 m onths.
*T he cost -of-living review in D ecem ber 1971 was to be based on the 3-m onth average o f the Bureau o f L abor Statistics C onsum er
Price Indexes fo r August, Septem ber, and O ctob er 19 71, and the quarterly reviews, beginning in March 1972 and at 3-calendar-m onth
intervals thereafter, were to be based on the 3-m onth averages o f the Indexes fo r N ovem ber and D ecem ber 1971 and January 1972 and
averages fo r 3-calendar-m onth intervals thereafter, respectively.
7
The 3-percent increases effectiv e in 1971 and 19 72, applied to straight-time hou rly rates (exclu d in g the cost-of-living allow ance
in e ffe ct and shift prem ium s) as fo llo w s:
Annual im p ro vem en t
fa cto r increase
(in cents)

Base rate
b efo re increase

Less than $4 .1 7 .................................................................................................................................................................................................12
$4 .1 7 - 4 . 4 9 .........................................................................................................................................................................................................13
$ 4 .5 0 - 4 .8 3 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 14
$ 4 .8 4 - 5 . 1 6 .................................................................................................
15
$5 .1 7 - 5 . 4 9 .........................................................................................................................................................................................................16
$ 5 .5 0 - 5 .8 3 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 17
$ 5 .8 4 - 6 . 1 6 ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18
$ 6 .1 7 - 6 . 4 9 .........................................................................................................................................................................................................19
$ 6 .5 0 - 6 .8 3 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 20
$ 6 . 8 4 - 7 . 1 6 .........................................................................................................................................................................................................21
$ 7 .1 7 - 7 . 4 9 .........................................................................................................................................................................................................22




4

Table B-2. Hourly rate ranges for dayworkers, by labor grade 1

Oct. 19, 19702
Minimum
Maximum

Labor
Grade
1 .............................................
2 .............................................
3 .............................................
4 .............................................
5 .............................................
6 .............................................
7 .............................................
8 .............................................
9 .............................................
1 0 .............................................
1 1 .............................................
1 2 .............................................
1 3 .............................................
1 4 .............................................
1 5 .............................................

$3.84
3.87
3.94
3.99
4.02
4.10
4.17
4.21
4.29
4.46
4.64
4.87
5.04
5.22
5.38

Code Group
A
B
C
D
E
F

...............................................
...............................................
...............................................
...............................................
...............................................
...............................................

Nov. 22,1971
Minimum
Maximum

$3.90
3.95
4.02
4.07
4.12
4.20
4.27
4.33
4.41
4.59
4.78
5.01
5.20
5.40
5.58

$3.96
3.99
4.06
4.11
4.14
4.23
4.30
4.34
4.42
4.60
4.78
5.02
5.20
5.38
5.55

$4.02
4.07
4.14
4.19
4.24
4.33
4.40
4.46
4.54
4.73
4.92
5.16
5.36
5.56
5.75

Nov. 20, 1972
Maximum

Minimum
$4.08
4.11
4.18
4.24
4.27
4.36
4.43
4.47
4.56
4.74
4.93
5.17
5.36
5.55
5.72

$4.14
4.19
4.26
4.32
4.37
4.46
4.53
4.59
4.68
4.87
5.07
5.31
5.52
5.73
5.92

Groups rated out of regular rate range structure3
$5.17
5.27
5.40
5.51
5.47
6.11

$5.31
5.43
5.58
5.71
5.79
6.41

$5.33
5.43
5.57
5.68
5.64
6.30

$5.47
5.59
5.75
5.88
5.96
6.60

$5.49
5.60
5.74
5.86
5.82
6.50

$5.63
5.76
5.92
6.06
6.14
6.80

1 The 1970 agreement continued partial autom atic progression from m inim um to m axim um in a grade as fo llo w s: Grade 1, after
30 days; grades 2 and 3, after 30 and 60 days; grades 4 through 7, after 30 and 90 days; grades 8 through 11, after 30, 90 , and
180 days. Progression fo r grades 12 through 15 was autom atic to the m id-point o f the rate-range after 30 and 120 days; further
progression to the m axim um was to be based on merit range.
2 Rates show n reflect in corporation o f 16 cents o f the existing cost-of-living allowance into basic rates as w ell as the general wage
increases as sh ow n in table A (w h ich included the 26-cent increase determ ined under provisions o f the letter o f agreement dated Feb.
2, 19 68, and m ade retroactive to Sept. 15, 1970 by the 1970 agreem ent). Rate structures at the tw o California plants (San Leandro
and S to ck to n ) differ from those show n here.
3 A u tom a tic progression from m inim um to m id-point in all c o d e groups was after 30 and 120 days; further progression to the
m axim um was to be based on merit range.




5

Table C-2. Selected jo b classifications by labor grade,1 February 1,1 9 7 1

Labor grade
1 .....................................

Job classification
Janitors; laborers, shop.

2 .....................................

Checkers, departmental (minor); operators, freight-elevator;packers, service parts (minor); washers.

3 .....................................

Attendants, stock (assembly department); drivers, work-saver finger lift truck; helpers, stockman’s
production); laborers, foundry (requiring tools and mechanical equipment), shop (heavy, rough);
loaders, c o n v e y o r (gen era l);op era tors, flo o r cleaning m achine, transporter (high lift, walking ty p e , p ow er

driven); warehousemen (general).
4 .................................

Assemblers (minor); attendants, tool crib department (windowman); bench hands; checkers, departmental
(major); groundmen, crane; laborers, foundry (heavy, rough); loaders, conveyor (durable sheet metal
subject to damage), shipping dock; operators, sand or shot blast machine; packers, service parts (major);
painters, dip; unloaders, stores department.

5 .................................

Attendants, storeroom (production stores); checkers, core, service parts (minor); drivers, low level
elevating-industrial truck (shop mule, tractor), power floor cleaner, wheel and crawler type tractor,
Harvester thresher (end of assembly); heat treaters, production work (minor); inspectors, production
work (minor); loaders, conveyor (durable sheet metal by production sequence); operators, crane
(electric bridge, ground operated), crane-electric traveling mono-rail (foundry), mill-tumbling;
orderfillers (major work); packers, domestic and export, export (prepack); repairmen, salvage materials,
production parts; salvagemen, grey iron castings; stockkeepers, production parts; tenders, core oven;
testers, hydraulic valves; washers and maskers, completed vehicles; painters, brush (plant machine).

6 .................................

Assemblers (major); checkers, receiving materials, loading and shipping; chippers, hand, electric and
pneumatic; drivers, auto truck, industrial finger-lift and crane-type trucks, auto truck with boom
attachment; helpers, carburizer’s, electrician’s, millwright’s, plumber’s and steamfitters; oilers, plant
and foundry; packers and checkers, service and shipping; sand-mixers, core sand; sanders, hand;
stockkeepers, tools and supplies; stockmen, production; warehousemen (in charge).

7 ...........................

Attendants, tool crib department (in charge); benders, tubing (hand or hand operated equipment); drivers,
semitractor type truck, industrial truck-gas or electric (molten metal-foundry); inspectors, production
work (major, not requiring final decision), foundry castings; layout men, sheet metal; mixers, paint;
operators, crane (bridge type-shop or yard), sand-blast hose; packers, export; painters, spray (finished
production); patchers, core; pourers, molten metal; repairmen, ladle; verification men, stock status;
helper, cupola liner and repair.

8 .................................

Assemblers (major, requiring maximum accuracy); beltmen; checkers, gear-manufacturing department
(minor), service parts (major); checkers and setters, gauge, operators, crane-electric-traveling bridge
(foundry), induction hardening machine; repairmen, chassis-assembly lines, cab and cowl (trim) (minor);
stockkeepers, tools and supplies (in charge).

9 ..............................

Carburizers, gas furnace operators; heat treaters, production work (major); inspectors, production work
(major, requiring final decision), performance test or final test (trucks and tractors), engine assembly;
maintenance men, jig and fixture (machining departments); mechanics, repair (diesel and gasoline
engine); operators, crane (crawler type, clam shell or Crane-Kar), grinders-perishable tools (medium);
painters, all around maintenance (hand), spray (repair); repairmen, wheel tractor, chassis final, Harvester
thresher and corn picker (machine and attachments), motor and transmission subassembly, construction
equipment (self propelled); reworkmen-crawler type tractor; salvagemen, production material; welders,
production parts (minor).

10 .....................................

Operators, boiler, punch press (major); tenders, cupola; layout men, production work (minor); liners and
repairmen, cupola; mechanics, construction equipment (major).

11 .....................................

Checkers, gear-manufacturing department (major);repairmen, air tools, paint mixers, and spray equipment;
painters, all around maintenance (spray); setup men, sheet metal, bar and plate (shears, punch presses,
forming rolls, brakes and special machines), machine tool (all around), forge shop (all around), arc or
gas welding; finisher and repair (dies).

12 .....................................

Inspectors, product machine (initial setup) (hay baler or cotton picker assembly line run-in function
inspector), statistical investigator and instructor; layout men, sheet metal (requiring development work);
mechanics, setup-experimental engineering department, industrial engineering department only;
operators, shaper (metal, toolroom); repairmen, foundry equipment (medium), salvage material,
(productionparts-major), cab and cowl (major); utility men, production work (not assembly); welders,
production parts (major), setup and try out (arc or gas welding); repairmen-welders (M.I.G.).

13 .....................................

Inspectors, perishable tools; mechanics, experimental engineering department; operators, lathe hand engine
all around (toolroom), grinder (toolroom, experimental engineering department), milling machine
toolroom, experimental engineering, and machine repair); pyrometer tenders and maintenance men;
repairmen, instrument and gauge, auto and gas electric trucks, tractors, switch engines, cranes, road
graders, sweepers, gas electric portable equipment, transmission; setup men, automatic screw machine;
grinder-perishable tools (major).




6

Table C-2. Selected jo b classifications by labor grade,1 February 1 ,1 9 7 1 — continued

Labor group
14 ................................

Job classification
Inspectors, experimental department only — layout inspection finished parts, layout (major); trouble
shooters, perishable tools; checkers, gear-manufacturing department (development and pre-production).

15 ........................

Hardeners, tools, dies.

Code group2
A ..........................

Bricklayers, all around; carpenters; machinists, toolroom or machine repair; millwrights; plumber and
steamfitter; refrigeration service and repair men; repairmen (steam drop hammer), foundry (major),
production heating and ventilating equipment; sheet metal workers, maintenance; welders, tool
reclamation-gas-oxy-acetylene-low temperature, arc and/or gas-complicated maintenance work, gas or
electric (tool or die) (toolroom only), research, arc and/or gas - experimental engineering department.

B ..................................

Blacksmiths; electricians, plant; engineers, stationary; repairmen, welding equipment.

C ..................................

Inspectors, tool and gauge; instrument men, maintenance and building; machinists, experimental
department, foundry and pattern shop, toolroom or machine repair (machine tool builders); operators,
boring machine (jig borer - toolroom, machine tool repair and experimental engineering department),
boring mill (horizontal precision- Giddings and Lewis or Lucas types - toolroom, machine tool repair,
experimental engineering department), mill (rotary head - tool and die - experimental engineering);
sheet metal development workers, experimental models; tool and die makers.

1 On O ct. 16, 1967, the form er labor grades 10 through 14 were revised upward 1 grade creating a new grade 10 and a 15 labor
grade structure.
2 C ode groupings were established in the agreement o f O ct. 16, 19 6 1 , as a result o f the restructure o f several c o d e job s that existed
in earlier agreements. O ccupation al titles were not available for c o d e groups D, E, and F. As o f July 1967, on ly a small num ber o f
em ployees in the bargaining unit held jo b s in these 3 co d e groups.




7

Table D.

Supplementary compensation practices

Effective date

Applications, exceptions,
and other related matters

Provisions
Shift premium pay

Feb. 1971, first full pay
period in month (agree­
ment dated Jan. 29,1971).

Changed: To 6 percent of employee’s
wage rate for work on second and
third shifts (under the previous
formula, which was initiated in
1959, the night shift bonus was
frozen at 10 percent of the
average rate in effect before the
1959 agreement).
Holiday pay

Feb. 1, 1971 (agreement dated
Jan. 29, 1971).

Changed: Holiday provisions were
revised so that in addition to 6
basic paid holidays, employees
would receive an unbroken
Christmas-New Year’s holiday
shutdown period of 6 workdays
off with pay resulting in a total of
12 paid holidays.

See footnotes at end of table.




8

The 6 basic holidays, continued from the previous contract,
were Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day,
Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and the day after
Thanksgiving Day; and the unbroken Christmas-New
Year’s holiday period (to begin the day before
Christmas unless that day fell on a weekend-then the
following Monday) during the life of the 1971 contract
was as follows:
1st period-Dec. 24 (Fri.), 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31,1971.
2nd period-Dec. 25 (Mon.), 26, 27, 28, and 29,1972, and
Jan. 1, 1973.
In addition, by supplemental company letter dated Jan. 16,
1971, it was agreed that the same pattern of holidays
would be continued in the event of an extension of the
1971 contract. (The pattern of holidays and the
Christmas shutdown under the 1969 contract were
continued during that contract extension by
supplemental agreement dated Sept. 30,1970.)
The Christmas-New Year’s shutdown was applicable to all
employees who passed their probationary period and
performed work in workweek in which Christmas
holiday period began unless such holiday period began
on a Monday; or the workweek before the workweek in
which the holiday period began if such holiday period
began on a Monday. (Previously, the employee had to
have 1 year of service, have 500 compensated hours in
current calendar year, and be actively at work after
December 1 to qualify for 3 of the shutdown days. The
other 2, Day before Christmas, and Christmas Day, were
holidays as such and were subject to normal holiday
eligibility rules.)
Added: Employee entering active military duty entitled to
a Christmas bonus for the ensuing year if he would have
qualified for the vacation and Christmas bonuses had he
continued in employ of company after Jan. 1 of the next
year.
Added: Employee returning from active military duty was
entitled to Christmas bonus provided he qualified for a
vacation bonus or acquired 500 hours and was actively at
work after December 1 of the year in which he returned.
Changed (language only): Employee who qualified for a
Christmas bonus or had at least 1 year of continuous
vacation service on, or had 500 compensated hours in the
current calendar year before, Monday of the workweek
in which Christmas holiday period began and was
actively working on or after December 1 was entitled to
Christmas bonus.

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—
continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provisions

Paid vacations
Added: Employee entering active military duty entitled to
a vacation for the ensuing year if he would have
qualified for the vacation and holiday bonuses had he
continued in the employ of the company after January
1 of the next year.
Added: Employee returning from active military duty was
eligible for vacation bonus provided he had at least 1
year of service on or before July 1 and qualified for a
vacation in the year of his re-employment.

Feb. 1, 1971 (agreement dated
Jan. 29, 1971).

Jury service
Feb. 1,1971 (agreement dated
Jan. 29, 1971).

Added: Paid leave for employee who
reported for prejury duty exami­
nation by court or administrative
governmental agency.

Bereavement pay
Feb. 1, 1971 (agreement dated
Jan. 29, 1971).

Added: Requirement that employee attend funeral, waived
if burial did not occur because body of deceased
donated to medical study or cause of death physically
destroyed body.

Tuition refund program
July 30,1956

Jan. 29, 1971 (supplemental
company letter dated Jan.
12, 1971).

Established: Plan which provided
100-percent tuition refund (no
fees or books) upon successful
completion of job related courses
or courses required for a degree
approved in advance at fully
accredited colleges or secondary
schools.
Expanded: To cover courses to
com plete requirem ents for
grammar school certificate or high
school diploma; basic courses for
elementary level of competence in
reading, writing, and numerical
skills; and instruction for qualifi­
cation as an apprentice in a skilled
trade.

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




9

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—continued

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provisions
Military-duty pay

Sept. 15, 1955 (agreement of
same date).

Feb. 1, 1971 (agreement dated
Jan. 29, 1971).

Established: Employee who was
required to attend training duty
as a member of the U.S. Armed
Forces Reserves for the purpose
of maintaining his active reserve
status was provided up to 2
weeks’ paid leave in a calendar
year if he had at least 1 year of
company service and employee
who was called to perform
emergency duty by Federal or
State authorities was provided up
to 15 working days’ paid leave in
a calendar year.

Increased: Up to 30 days’ paid leave
provided for employee who per­
formed emergency military duty.

Payment was equal to difference between base military pay
(including extra pay for hazardous or sea duty, etc.) and
his regular earnings (excluding overtime and premium
pay).

Company also provided for 4 hours’ paid leave for
employee who served on an honor guard for funeral of a
war veteran who was returned to the United States for
burial.

Relocation allowance
Feb. 1, 1971 (agreement dated
Jan. 29,1971).

Increased: Allowance of $220 to
$475 for a single employee and
$570 to $1,020 for a married
employee, depending on distance
between plants.1

Health-security plan
Jan. 1, 1971 (agreement dated
Jan. 29, 1971).

Added: 3 brackets of benefits on the
group life and disability insurance
schedule for employees in higher
wage brackets.2
Increased: Maximums on (1) life
insurance for (a) employees under
age 6 5-to $14,500 and (b) at or
after age 65 with (i) 10 years of
service— $2,175 and (ii) 20
to
years-to $4,3 50 ;2 (2) accidental
death and dismemberment
benefits-to $7,250;2 (3) total
an d p erm anent d isability
benefits-to $290 a month;2 (4)
weekly disability (sickness and
accident) benefits— to $155 a
week;2 and (5) long-term dis­
ability benefits-to $590 a
month.2
Changed: Layoff disability benefitreplaced by reinstated weekly dis­
ability benefit to enable laid-off
employee to qualify for long-term
disability benefit if he continued
to be disabled.

See footnotes at end of table.




10

Applicable to employees who worked on or after Nov. 23,
1970.

Added: Weekly disability benefit not payable for any day
that employee received holiday pay.

Added: If State paid unemployment compensation during a
period of disability, such benefit was supplemented in
same manner as a workman’s compensation benefit.
(Language change only.)
Added: Employee who returned from active military duty
provided immediate long-term disability coverage.

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—
continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, a d oth
n
er
related m
atters

P
rovision
s
Health-security plan—

Jan 1, 1971 (agreem dated
.
ent
J . 29, 1971)—
an
continued.

Survivor income benefits:
Increased: Transition benefits—

to $175 a m
onth (m
axim
um 24
m
onths) for su
rvivors of an em
­
ployee w w s at w
ho a
ork on or
after J . 1, 1971 (continued to
an
be $100 for any m
onth in w
hich
an eligible su
rvivor w eligible for
as
an unreduced old-age su
rvivor’s,
or disability benefit under the
Federal Social Security Act).
Increased: Bridge ben efits- to
$175 a m
onth for su
rvivors of a
m
em
ployee w w at w on or
ho as
ork
after Jan 1, 1971, if spouse w
.
as
age 48 (w 50) on date of em
as
­
ployee’s death.
Apr. 1, 1971 (agreem dated
ent
J . 29, 1971).
an

C
hanged: D
efinition of d
isability to qualify for long-term
disability benefits clarified by m
aking the test of
disability sam a that un er pension plan except th
e s
d
at
d
isability need not be perm
anent.
Elim
inated: R
estriction that long-term d
isability benefit
w
ould not be payable to em
ployee w drew 52 w
ho
eeks
of w
eekly d
isability benefits before 1967.
Added: Em
ployee allow to w
ed
aive eligibility for long-term
disability benefits to qualify for d
isability payout of life
in ran du to total an perm
su ce e
d
anent disability.
Added: Em
ployee allow to w
ed
aive w
eekly d
isability
benefits in ord to qualify for other benefits.
er
Added: An u
ninsu
red em
ployee retirin betw
g
een a 55
ge
an 65 w pension beginning on or after J . 1,1971
d
ith
an
w
ithout return g from layoff or leave of absen
in
ce
(w
hose continuation group life coverage h elapsed a a
ad
s
resu of a long layoff or leave of absence) w to be
lt
as
in red u
su
nder group life if he w then u d a e 65, the
as
n er g
1st d
ay of m
onth follow
ing m
onth seniority w
as
canceled because of retirem
ent, for coverage he other­
w could h
ise
ave continued a retirem in am
t
ent
ount he
h in force w ile last w
ad
h
orking (reduced appropriately
at age 65).
Added: Em
ployee on leave of absen requested by local
ce
union to perm him to w full-tim for international
it
ork
e
union could continue life, accidental death an dism ­
d
em
berm
ent, an su
d rvivor incom benefit in ran by
e
su ce
contributing 60 cen a m
ts
onth p $1000 of life
er
in ran
su ce, but no longer could continue m
edical
in ran
su ce.
Added: Com
pany continued life, accidental death an
d
dism berm
em
ent, an su
d rvivor incom benefit in ran
e
su ce
for em
ployee w becam totally disabled w
ho
e
hile on
layoff an a a resu unable to respond to recall
d s
lt
(m
axim period equal to h m
um
is onths of seniority at
layoff).
Added: Em
ployee on regu or special early retirem to
lar
ent
h
ave transition an brid benefits coverage to a e 55.
d
ge
g
C
hanged: Em
ployee retired on disability pension to h
ave
life, accidental death an dism berm
d
em
ent, an tran
d
si­
tion an bridge benefits coverage to a e 65, un h
d
g
less e
elected m
onthly total an perm
d
anent disability benefits,
in w
hich case h accidental death an dism berm
is
d
em
ent
coverage w
ould term
inate but h tran
is
sition an bridge
d
benefits coverage w
ould continue.
Added: A Qass A or B su
rvivor of a em
n ployee w w at
ho as
w on or after J . 1, 1971 could w
ork
an
aive transition or
bridge benefits in ord to receive other benefits.
er

Added: W
eekly disability benefit payable for aperiod equ
al
to em
ployee’s continuous vacation serv for m
ice
axim
um
of 52 w
eeks if he w h
as ired on or after Apr. 1, 1971.
H ever, if he w hospitalized, o in th case of a
ow
as
r
e
n
occupational disability he w receivin w
as
g orkm
en’s
com
pensation paym
ents because of em
ploym
ent w
ith
th com
e
pany, for th sam disability at date of
e
e
expiration of m
axim period of w
um
eekly benefits an
d
su benefits w paid for less than 52 w
ch
ere
eeks, benefits

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




continued

11

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—
continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, an other
d
related m
atters

P
rovision
s
Health-security p la n-cotitinued

Apr. 1,1971 (agreem dated
ent
J . 29, 1971)-continued.
an

w
ere continued d rin confinem
u g
ent, o w
r hile he
continued to receive w
orkm
en’s com
pensation,
w ich
h ever applicable, u to end of 52 w period.
p
eek
Added: W
eekly disability benefit coverage w effective 1st
as
day of m
onth follow afull calen ar m
ing
d
onth after h
ire
for em
ployees h
ired on or after Apr. 1,1971.
Elim
inated: Reduction in w
eekly d
isability benefit because
of an sim benefits payable un er social security for
y
ilar
d
em
ployees w w
ho orked on or after N 23, 1970.
ov.
Added: Any in
creases in social secu disability in ran
rity
su ce
benefits not to be ch
arged again long-term disability
st
benefits.
C
hanged: Em
ployee h
ired on or after Apr. 1,1971 covered
for h
ealth in ran 1st day of m
su ce
onth follow full
ing
calen ar m
d
onth after hire.
Added: B
enefits provided u
nder th hospital-m
e
edicalsu
rgical-d g (and effective Ju 1, 1971, dental)
ru
ly
program for em
ployees an dependents w
d
ere co­
ordinated w benefits available u
ith
nder other em
ployerfinanced p s so that benefits w
lan
ould be supplem
ented
rath than duplicated.
er
H
ealth security plan coverage w continued at option of
as
su
rvivin spouse on self-pay b
g
asis for dependent w
ho
w enrolled at em
as
ployee’s death.
Added: R
etired em
ployee considered em
ployee in deter­
m
ining eligibility for an sponsored dependent.
y
C
hanged: The 365-day m
axim
um
period of hospitalization expense
benefits not to be reduced
because of ca in approved con­
re
valescent facility d rin sam
u g
e
period of disability (previous
reduction for a n t ca cen
igh re
ter
w continued).
as
Changed: The 365-day hospital
benefit period renew
able after
patient had been outside of
hospital or n
ursin hom for 60
g
e
days (w 90).
as
C
hanged: The 730-day convalescent
an long-term illn
d
ess (n rsin
u g
hom ca benefit period renew
e) re
­
able after patient had been
outside of hospital or n rsin
u g
hom for 60 days (w 90).
e
as
Added: Em
ployee hom hem
e
odial­
ysis expense benefits for kidney
treatm
ent for reasonable an
d
custom ch
ary arge for sam service
e
provided on in-patient o in
r
out-patitne departm
ent of a
hospital b (including n
asis
ecessary
related expenses).
Added: M
edical services-physician’s
services related to hem
odialysis in
patient’s hom p for.
e aid
Changed: Medical-maximum
num
ber of doctors’ visits renew
­
able after at least 60 d (w
ays as
90) after last confinem
ent.

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




12

Increased: R bursem
eim
ent for $5.30 a m
onth tow
ard
M
edicare P rt B fee for em
a
ployees, retirees, su
rvivin
g
spouses, an th eligible dependents.
d eir
Added: H
ealth in ran extended to cover servicem
su ce
en
returning from active m
ilitary duty w h insufficient
ho ad
seniority an w put on layoff (prem s paid for
d ere
ium
su coverage for period stipulated by th SU credit
ch
eir B
units).

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—
continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, an other
d
related m
atters

P
rovision
s
Health-security p la n - continued

Apr. 1, 1971 (agreem dated
ent
J . 29,1971)-continued.
an

Ju 1, 1971 (agreem dated
ly
ent
J . 29,1971).
an

Added: M
edical— u to $15 paid for
p
m
edical em
ergencies (sudden an
d
unexpected onset of conditions
requiring m
edical care).
Increased: M
edical-m
axim
um for
psychological testing to $50
(member co-payment w
as
elim
inated).
Added: P
rescription d g coverage
ru
for conditions of pregnancy an
d
obesity.
C
hanged: P
rescription d g benefits
ru
provided for 100-unit d
oses
(tablet or capsu of specified
le)
m
aintenance legen drugs3 if
d
greater than 34-day su
pply
required.
Added: P
odiatrists an doctors of
d
dental su
rgery eligible for paym
ent
for diagnostic X-ray services.
E
stablished: A com
prehensive d tal
en
p
lan w no deductible for a
ith
ll
em
ployees an th dependents
d eir
w m
ith axim
um benefit of $750
p year for fam m ber (in
er
ily em
addition to dental su
rgery serv
ice
provided u d su
n er rgical-m
edical
plan) an a sep
d
arate additional
lifetim m
e axim
um of $500 p
er
fam m ber for orthodontia
ily em
(teeth straightening). The p
lan
required pre-determ
ination of
benefits for w costing $100 o
ork
r
m (except for em
ore
ergencies).

See footnotes a end of table.
t




13

Included h
eart attacks, cardiovascu accidents, poisonings,
lar
loss of consciousness or respiration, or other su acute
ch
conditions.

P
rescrip
tion d g coverage w m
ru
as ade availab to retired
le
em
ployee an su
d rvivin spou an th
g
se
d eir eligible
dependents.

P ent w m for covered expenses a follow
aym
as ade
s
s:
(1) 100 percent of reason
able an custom ch
d
ary arge
(not ch
arged again $750 m
st
axim ) for excision of
um
p
artially or fully unerupted teeth; excision tooth root
w
ithout extraction of en
tire tooth; other incision or
excision on gum an tissu of m
s
d
es
outh not in
connection w extraction or rep of teeth (but not
ith
air
treatm
ent of peridontal and other d
iseases of sam
e
covered elsew ere by plan); m
h
ultiple extractions for bed
patients in hospital w
hen concurrent hazardous m
edical
condition exists; gingevectom procedures in
y
connection w d
ith iseased gum an oral exam
s; d
inations
including scalin an clean g of teeth lim
g d
in
ited to once
every 6 m
onths (th last item w ch
is
as arged again
st
m
axim ).
um
(2) 75 percent of reasonable an custom ch
d
ary arge
for topical application of radium or stannous flouride;
dental, an supplem
d
ental bitew
ing X-rays(subject to
lim
itations) an other diagnostic X-rays; extractions;
d
oral su
rgery; fillings; gen
eral an
esthesia; treatm
ent of
peridontal or other d
iseases of gum an m
s d outh but
not su
rgical procedures covered in (1) above (bridge
w
ork in connection w su treatm
ith ch
ent subject to
50-percent rate of paym
ents in (3) below); endodontic
treatm
ent in
cluding root can therapy; injection of
al
antibiotics; rep or recem
air
enting of crow inlays,
ns,
bridgew
ork or dentures, or relin g of dentures; sp
in
ace
m
aintainers, inlays, gold fillings; crow (including
ns
precision attachm
ents for dentures).
(3) 50 percent of reasonable an custom ch
d
ary arge
for in
itial installation of fixed bridgew
ork (including
in
lays an crow
d
ns to form abutem
ents); in
itial
installation (including 6 m
onths period afterw
ards) of
p
artial or full rem
ovable dentures; replacem
ent of
existing partial or full rem
ovable dentures or fixed
bridgew by new denture or bridgew or addition
ork
ork
of teeth to an existing p
artial rem
ovable denture or to
bridgew
ork (subject to lim
itations); orthodontic
treatm
ent consisting of su
rgical therapy, applian
ce
therapy, an functional/m
d
yo-functional therapy.

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—
continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, an other
d
related m
atters

P
rovision
s
Health-security plan-continued

Ju 1, 1971 (agreem dated
ly
ent
J . 29, 1971)—
an
continued.

There w additional lim
ere
itations or exclusions to som of
e
th above dental benefits.
e
Increased: Em
ployee-paid m
onthly prem
ium w required
hen
for continuation of hospital-surgical-m
edical-drug-dental
coverage (required only for certain periods of absence
from active w su a layoff or leave of absence).4
ork ch s
Pensions

Apr. 1, 1971 (agreem dated
ent
Jan 29,1971).
.

Increased:

Normal monthly retirement benefits -(1) by $1 per year

of credited service for em
ployee
(a)
after Aug. 31, 1955 but before
Oct. 1, 1961-to $5.95 p year
er
of service; (b) after Sept. 30,
1961 but before Oct. 1, 1967-to
$6.25 p year of service; (c) after
er
Sept. 30, 1967 but before Oct. 1,
1970-to $6.50, $6.75, or $7 p
er
year of serv
ice depending on
benefit class code;5 an (2) by
d
$1.75 p year of credited serv
er
ice
for em
ployee retired with benefits
beginning after Sept. 30, 1970-to
$7.25, $7.50, o $7.75 (rem
r
ained
at $5.50, $5.75, or $6 for su
ch
em
ployees for m
onths until Apr.
1, 1971) p year of service,
er
depending on benefit class code.5
Increased: Early monthly retirement
retired with benefits beginning

at own option (regular early
retirement) -benefit for em
ployee
r e tir e d
(1) before Oct. 1,

1964— $1 p each year of
by
er
credited service, reduced by 0.6
percent for each com
plete
calen
dar m
onth em
ployee w s
a
u
nder a e 65 a retirem
g
t
ent; (2)
after Sept. 30, 1964 but before
Oct. 1, 1967— $1, to $6.25 p
by
er
year of service, reduced by
schedule for each year u
nder a e
g
62;6 (3) after Sept. 30, 1967 but
before Oct. 1, 1970-by $1, to
$6.50, $6.75, o $7 p year of
r
er
service, depending on benefit cla
ss
code,5 reduced for each year
u
nder a e 62;6 (4) after Sept. 30,
g
1970-by $1.75, to $7.25, $7.50,
o $7.75 (rem
r
ained a $5.50,
t
$5.75, or $6 for su em
ch ployees
for m
onths until Apr. 1, 1971)
p year of service, depending on
er
benefit cla code,5 reduced for
ss
each year u
nder ag 62.6
e

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




14

C
hanged: Em
ployee w seniority after Sept. 30, 1967
ith
w had less th num of hours required for full
ho
an
ber
year of pension serv could receive future service
ice
credit, provided h received at least 170 hours’ pay
e
du g year (1) for period of absence d rin th year
rin
u g e
du to layoff or com
e
pany-approved sick leave, provided
that, if su layoff or sick leave continued after that
ch
year, he could be credited w (beginning J . 1,1971)
ith
an
up to a m
axim of 1,530 hours for all su absence
um
ch
related to receipt of pay for first year, or (2) in the
event of a pregnancy leave for a m
axim of the lesser
um
of the duration of leave or 6 w
eeks.
Added: M
onthly pension benefit reduced, u less prohibited
n
by law by am
,
ount of w
orkm
en’s com
pensation
paym
ents (including com
prom
ise or redem
ption
settlem
ents) to the extent that su com
ch
pensation w
as
provided by prem s, taxes, or other paym
ium
ents paid
by or at expense of com
pany, except that no deduction
w m for:
as ade
(1) W
orkm
en’s com
pensation paym
ents allocated for
hospitalization or m
edical expenses, fixed statutory
paym
ents for th loss or 100 percent loss of u of
e
se
an bodily m ber, o paym
y
em
r
ents for loss of
in u
d strial vision;
(2) com
prom
ise or redem
ption settlem
ents payable
before start of pension benefits; or
(3) w
orkm
en’s com
pensation paym
ents paid u
nder claim
filed not later th 2 years after breaking of
an
seniority.

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices-continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, an other
d
realted m
atters

P
rovision
s
Pensions-continued

Apr. 1, 1971 (agreem dated
ent
J . 29, 1971)—
an
continued.

Increased:

Monthly early retirement
at company option or under
mutually satisfactory conditions
(special early retirement) and
total and permanent disability
retirement -employee retired with
benefits payable beginning (1)

after J n 31, 1959 (after Aug.
a.
31, 1955 for d
isability retire­
m
ent) but before Oct. 1, 1961-to
$5.95 p year of credited serv
er
ice
(plus, for d
isability retirem
ent
only, a tem
porary benefit of
$5.95 per year of service,
m
axim
um $168.75 a m
onth); (2)
after Sept. 30, 1961 but before
Oct. 1, 1964-to $6.25 p year
er
of service (plus, for disability
retirem
ent only, a tem
porary
benefit of $6.25 p year of
er
service, m
axim
um $168.75 a
m
onth); (3) after Sept. 30, 1964
but before Oct. 1, 1967-a life
incom benefit of $6.25 p year
e
er
of service, plu a tem
s
porary
benefit of $7 p year, u to 25
er
p
years (m
axim
um $175 a m
onth);
(4) after Sept. 30, 1967 but
before Oct. 1, 1970-a life incom
e
benefit of $6.50, $6.75, or $7 p
er
year of service, depending on
benefit class code,5 p s a
lu
tem
porary benefit of $7 p year
er
of service, u to 25 years
p
(m
axim
um $175 a m
onth); (5)
after Sept. 30, 1970-a life
incom benefit of $7.25, $7.50,
e
or $7.75 p year of service,
er
depending on benefit cla code,5
ss
p s a tem
lu
porary benefit of $7.50
p year of service, up to 25 years,
er
m
axim
um $187.50 a m
onth (for
benefits payable before Apr. 1,
1971 for su em
ch
ployees th
ere
w a life incom benefit of
as
e
$5.50, $5.75, or $6 p year of
er
service, depending on benefit cla
ss
code5 plu a tem
s
porary benefit of
$6 p year of service, u to 25
er
p
years, m
axim $150 a m
um
onth).
B
enefits applicable to special
early retirement in cases (1) an
d
(2) above w no longer to be
ere
redeterm
ined to one-half of th
e
p
revious am
ount upon em
ployee’s
attaining age 65, or if earlier, a e
g
at w
hich he becam or could h
e
ave
becom eligible for an unreduced
e
F
ederal social security benefit for
a e or disability (because all su
g
ch
em
ployees w at least a e 65 a
ere
g
s
of April 1, 1971).
See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




15

Tem
porary benefit continued to be payable only u a
ntil ge
65 or, if earlier, a e retiree becam or could h been
g
e
ave
eligible for a unreduced F
n
ederal social secu benefit
rity
for a e o d
g r isability (provision h been in effect sin
as
ce
J n 1, 1965).
a.
Em
ployee w retired on special early retirem w
ho
ent ith
benefits beginning before Oct. 1, 1964 no longer to h
ave
benefit redeterm
ined to one-half am
ount previously in
effect at age 65 or, if earlier, at age he becam or could
e
h becom eligible for F
ave
e
ederal social securitybenefits.
Em
ployee retired on d
isability w benefits beginning
ith
before Oct. 1, 1964 now received tem
porary benefit
payable only until a e 65 or, if earlier, age he becam or
g
e
could h
ave becom eligible for an u
e
nreduced F
ederal
social security benefit.

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices-continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, a d other
n
related m
atters

P
rovision
s
Pensions-con tinued

Apr. 1, 1971 (agreem dated
ent
Jan 29, 1971)-continued.
.

Increased: Vested rights —
eligible
em
ployee w broke serv after
ho
ice
effective date of 1970 agreem
ent
to receive am
ount according to
h benefit class code5 a u d
is
s n er
norm retirem
al
ent, applicable to
him at h break in service.
is
Increased: Automatic monthly retire­
ment benefits (for certain eligible
em
ployees w retired at a e 68
ho
g
w 5 but less th 10 years of
ith
an
service)-for em
ployee w retired
ho
(1) before Sept. 1, 1961-to
$59.50; (2) after Aug. 31, 1961
but before Oct. 1, 1967-to
$62.50; (3) after Sept. 30, 1967
but before Oct. 1, 1970-to $65;
and (4) after Sept. 30, 1970-to
$72.50. (Benefit for em
ployee
w retired at a 68 w 10
ho
ge
ith
years of service or m is based
ore
on h appropriate benefit cla
is
ss
code.)

C
orrection: The w
ords “p month” should be substituted
er
for “for each year of credited service” after am
ounts of
Automatic Retirement Benefits show effective for J .
n
an
1,1965 on p 40 of B B
age
LS ulletin 1678.

C
hanged: Supplem
ental allow
ance-benefits payable on or
after Apr. 1, 1971, for em
ployee w retired a ow
ho
t n
option un er early retirem reduced for an m
d
ent
y onth
before a e 65 for w
g
hich he w
ould be eligible for an
unreduced social security benefit a follow If
s
s:
em
ployee retired (1) on or after Oct. 1,1965 but before
Oct. 1, 1967, by $7 a m
onth per year of credited service
(m
axim
um $175) for those w becam eligible for an
ho
e
unreduced social security benefit on or after Apr. 1,
1971; (2) on or after Oct. 1, 1967 but before Oct. 1,
1970, by $7 a m
onth per year of credited service
(m
axim
um $175) for any m
onth on or after Apr. 1,
1971; an (3) on or after Oct. 1, 1970, by $7.50 a
d
m
onth p year of credited service (m
er
axim $187.50)
um
for any m
onth on o after Apr. 1, 1971.
r
Increased: M
axim
um earn gs perm
in
itted before penalty
applied again supplem
st
ental allowance-to $1,680 in
an calen ar year after retirem
y
d
ent, w
hich w am
as ount
perm
itted w
ithout reduction in benefits u d F
n er ederal
Social Security Act.
C
hanged: Survivors’ option-employee w retired w
ho
ith
benefits that began after Sept. 30, 1970 could elect
survivor’s option to becom effective first day of m
e
onth
follow m
ing onth in w
hich h had been m
e
arried 1 year if
h w m
e as arried w
hen election w
ould otherw h
ise ave
becom effective but su m
e
ch arriage h been in effect
ad
less th 1 year at that date (previously, em
an
ployee w
ho
retired after Sept. 30,1967 could design spouse only
ate
if they w m
ere arried for 1 year or m before election
ore
of option).
Added: B
enefits payable to su
rvivin spouse u
g
nder pension
p not com
lan
puted on basis of eligibility of m th
ore an
one em
ployee or retiree, an if m th one benefit
d
ore an
w
ould otherw h been payable, the su
ise ave
rvivin spouse
g
w to elect one of the benefits payable.
as

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




16

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices-continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, an oth
d er
related m
atters

P
rovision
s

Pensions-contim led

Apr. 1, 1971 (agreem d
ent ate
J n 29, 1971)-continued.
a.

Expanded: S p ecia l s u r v iv o r ’s
option -employee w
ho retired on
disability retirem w benefits
ent ith
w
hich began before J n 1, 1962
a.
an w h not attained a e 60
d ho ad
g
before M 1, 1968 could elect
ar.
sp
ecial su
rvivor’s option.
Oct. 1, 1971 (agreem dated
ent
J . 29, 1971).
an

Added:

Early monthly retirement at
own option (regular early retire­
ment) — ployee w
em
ith 30 years of

credited service w in rred a
ho cu
break in seniority after Sept. 30,
1971 before reach g a e 55, con­
in g
sid
ered to be retired em
ployee
an eligible for regu
d
lar early
retirem benefit.
ent
Increased: Early monthly retirement
at own option (regular early
retirement) -employee retired a
t

ow option w 30 years or m
n
ith
ore
of service after Sept. 30, 1971, to
receive benefit according to h
is
benefit class code,5 a u d
s n er
norm retirem
al
ent, reduced by
schedule for each year u d a e
n er g
62,6 u til a e 65 at w
n
g
hich tim
e
See fo o tn o te s at end o f tables




17

Added: Em
ployee w m election of su
ho ade
rvivor’s option
after Sept. 30, 1970 (revised option) w benefits to
ith
start after Sept. 30, 1970 h to m
ad
ake election (a)
d rin m
u g onth in w
hich h becam a e 55 if h becam
e
e g
e
e
55 w ile eligible for an receivin a disability pension or
h
d
g
(b) on o before Apr. 1, 1971 or m
r
onth in w
hich h
e
becam a e 60 if ea
e g
rlier th Apr. 1, 1971 for d
an
isability
pensioner a e 55 but not 60 a of Oct. 1, 1970.
g
s
C
hanged: No su
rvivor’s option benefit w payable for an
as
y
m
onth a transition or bridge survivor’s incom benefit
e
w payable to su
as
rvivin spou of pensioner or re­
g
se
em
ployed pensioner (previously applied only to
su
rvivin spouse of re-em
g
ployed penioner).
Added: R
etiree w elected su
ho
rvivor’s option could h
ave
full life incom benefit restored to him if spouse
e
predeceased him
.
Added: Em
ployee w retired w benefits beginning after
ho
ith
Sept. 30, 1970 could revoke su
rvivor’s benefit option
an receive full pension benefit if divorced (those retired
d
w
ith benefits beginning before Oct. 1, 1970 could
receive full benefit in
crease if divorced).
B
enefit to be reduced for su retiree by $1 for each year
ch
of credited service effective on effective date of h
is
election.
The retiree m h
ust ave m
ade election after Sept. 30, 1970
but before Apr. 1, 1971 if he attained a 60 before
ge
Apr. 1, 1971 an d rin m
d u g onth before m
onth in w
hich
h becam 60 if he h not reach a e 60 before Apr.
e
e
ad
ed g
1,1971.
Added: Em
ployee w elected su
ho
rvivor’s option after Sept.
30, 1967 (revised option) w benefits to sta after
ith
rt
Sept. 30, 1970 h to m
ad
ake election in m
onth h
e
becam a e 55 if h h 30 years of service or m an
e g
e ad
ore d
becam a e 55 w
e g
hile eligible for an receivin pension
d
g
benefits.
C
hanged: Survivor’s option-in th ca of em
e se
ployee retired
at ow option after Sept. 30, 1971 w 30 years of
n
ith
serv or m
ice
ore, th am
e
ount of reduction in retiree’s
benefit before a e 65 because of su
g
rvivor’s benefit
revised option election, w based on am
as
ount payable to
su em
ch ployee after a e 65. S e base u for spouse’s
g
am
sed
(of above retirees) benefits.

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—
continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, a d other
n
related m
atters

P
rovision
s
Pensions-continued

Oct. 1, 1971 (agreem of
ent
dated J . 29, 1971)—
an
continued.

am
ount otherw payable to him
ise
after a e 65 w s to be re­
g
a
determ
ined on th b
e asis of a
reduction in th benefit according
e
to h benefit class code5 of 1/3
is
of 1 percent for each calen ar
d
m
onth by w
hich em
ployee w
as
under a e 62 w
g
hen pension
began.6
C
hanged: Supplemental allowance for em
ployee retirin on early o
g
r
total an perm
d
anent disability
retirem w
ent hich w
hen added to
early or d
isability benefits w
ould
brin total benefits to (1) for
g
retirem
ent w
ith benefits com
­
m
encing after Sept. 30, 1965 but
before Oct. 1, 1971—
$400, an
d
after Sept. 30, 1971-$450, w
ith
th latter being (a) reduced for
e
retirem betw
ent
een a es 60 an
g
d
65, by $1.50 for each tenth of a
year th h credited serv a
at is
ice t
retirem
ent w un er 30 years,
as d
an (b) further reduced for retire­
d
m
ent before a e 60 by m
g
ulti­
plying a am
n ount a com
s
puted in
(a) above by a fraction of w
hich
the num
erator is 60 an th
d e
denom
inator is th num
e
ber of
m
onths the em
ployee w s u d
a n er
a e 65 at retirem
g
ent; or (2) for
retirem
ent w
ith benefits com
­
m
encing after Sept. 30, 1971-(a)
if em
ployee h 30 years or m
ad
ore
of serv (i) $500 for m
ice
onths
before a e 62, an (ii) $450 after
g
d
age 62 through m
onth h becam
e
e
a e 65, w both (2) (a) (i) a d
g
ith
n
(2) (a) (ii) above reduced by 2/3
of 1 percent for each m
onth
em
ployee w s u
a nder a e 58 a
g
t
retirem
ent (reduction not appli­
cable for disability an regu
d
lar
early retirem
ent if on layoff for
12 consecutive m
onths, or less a
t
com
pany’s discretion, becau of
se
plant closing or discontinuance of
operations an su
d itable w w
ork as
not availab from th com
le
e
pany
in sam area); or (b) if em
e
ployee
h less than 30 years of serv
ad
ice
(i) $500 for m
onths before a e
g
62, reduced by $1.66 2/3 for each
1/10 of a year h reduced serv
is
ice
at retirem
ent w less than 30
as
years, an (ii) $450 after a 62
d
ge
through m
onth he becam a e 65
e g
reduced by $1.50 for each ten
th
of a year h credited serv a
is
ice t
retirem
ent w under 30 years
as
w both (2) (b) (i) an (2) (b)
ith
d
(ii) above further reduced for

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




18

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—
continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, an other
d
related m
atters

P
rovision
s
Pensions-continited

Oct. 1, 1971 (agreem of
ent
dated J . 29, 1971)—
an
continued.

Oct. 1,1972 (agreem dated
ent
J . 29, 1971).
an

em
ployee w h not reach
ho ad
ed
a e 60 at retirem
g
ent by m
ulti­
plying th am
e ount by a fraction,
of w
hich the num
erator is 60 an
d
th denom
e
inator is the num of
ber
m
onths the em
ployee w u d
as n er
age 65 a retirem
t
ent.
C
hanged: Supplemental allowanceemployee w
ho retired w
ith
benefits com encing after Sept.
m
30, 1972 w 30 years of serv
ith
ice
or m to receive a reduction for
ore
each m
onth h w u
e as nder a e 56
g
at retirem (previously w a e
ent
as g
58).
Supplemental unemployment benefit plan

M 4, 1968 (agreem d
ar.
ent ated
Feb. 6, 1968).

M
ar. 29, 1971 (agreem
ent
dated J . 29, 1971).
an

Added: Eligibility -employee eligible
for aregu benefit if d
lar
isqualified
for State unemployment
com
pensation because h w on
e as
short-term active m
ilitary duty of
2 w
eeks or less for requ
ired
m
ilitary train g.
in
Added: Eligibility-employee eligible
for regu benefit if disqualified
lar
for State systembenefit because of
full-tim em
e
ploym
ent w
ith a ­
n
other em
ployer; it w a w for
as eek
w
hich he w not eligible for an
as
d
not claim a disability benefit
ing
(except abenefit w
hichh received
e
or couldh received w ile w
ave
h
ork­
in fulltim or any com
g
e)
pany pen
­
sion or retirem benefit w
ent
hich
existed for only part of w of
eek
unem
ploym
ent under applicable
State system or short-term active
;
m
ilitary duty of 30 days or less
because of public em
ergency.
Changed: E lig ib ilit y -employee
eligible for regu
lar benefit if
disqualified for State system
benefit because he w
as on
short-term active m
ilitary duty of
30 days or less (w 2 w
as
eeks) for
required m
ilitary train g.
in
Increased: R eg u la r b e n e f i t maximum to $80 (w $75) for
as
an w
y eek em
ployee did not
receive State system benefit
because of exhaustion of State
benefit righ an h exercised h
ts d e
is
option to refuse w
ork.

See footnotes a end of table.
t




19

C
hanged: Com
pany required to contribute to SU fund for
B
autom
atic sh w benefits paid for scheduled sh
ort eek
ort
w
orkw
eeks w cred u it cancellation base fell below
hen
it n
$430 per em
ployee (w $300).
as

Added: R lar benefit payable to a eligible em
egu
n
ployee for
a w of layoff for w
eek
hich h received only holiday pay
e
from com
pany if he w not eligible for an autom
as
atic
sh w benefit for su w
ort eek
ch eek.
C
hanged: Com
pany required to contribute to SU fund for
B
autom
atic sh w benefits paid for scheduled sh
ort eek
ort
w
orkw
eeks w
hen cred u it cancellation base w
it n
as
below $495 p em
er ployee (w $430).
as
In effect an continued: Com
d
pany’s contribution to SU
B
fund w
ould be offset by (1) autom
atic sh w
ort eek
benefits, other th benefits p for scheduled sh
an
aid
ort
w
orkw
eeks in pay periods in w
hich the cred u it
it n
cancellation base w below $495, effective M 29,
as
ar.
1971, an (2) am
d
ount of any benefits or lum
p-sum
paym
ents for sep
arated em
ployees w
hich specifically
provided that they be used a offsets. The d
s
ollar am
ount
in (1) above w $430 before M 29, 1971.
as
ar.

Added: Am
ount a com
s
puted for a autom sh w
n
atic ort eek
benefit based on num of h
ber
ours by w
hich em
ployee
w
ould regu
larly h
ave been com
pensated exceeded h
is
com
pensated o availab hours (w respect to that
r
le
ith
p of w before date h seniority w broken), paid
art
eek
is
as
for a em
n
ployee w broke seniority du g w
ho
rin eek
because of death or retirem an w eligible for a
ent d as
n

Table D. Supplementary compensation practices—
continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, an other
d
related m
atters

P
rovision
s

Supplemental unemployment benefit plan— continued

M
ar. 29, 1971 (agreem
ent
dated J . 29, 1971)—
an
continued.

C
hanged: O
nly am
ount in excess of
the greater of $10 or 20 percent
of pay from other em
ployers
(continued to be am
ount over
$10 for m
ilitary pay) ch
arged
again SU
st B.
Added: State benefit an other
d
com
pensation to include an
y
Social Security disability benefits
of a type em
ployee could h
ave
receivedw ile w
h
orkingfull tim in
e
excess of the greater of $10 or 20
percent of pay from other
em
ployers (am
ount over $10 for
m
ilitary pay).
C
hanged: Accrual o f credit units credit u its credited at rate of 1/2
n
cred u for each w
it nit
ork w
eek
for w
hich a em
n
ployee (a)
received any p from com
ay
pany,
(b) w on m
as
ilitary leave of
absence, an (c) w absen from
d
as
t
w
ork because of occupational
injury or d
isease in rred d rin
cu
u g
em
ploym
ent a d on account of
n
su absence received w
ch
orkm
en’s
com
pensation w ile on com
h
panyapproved leave of absence.
Changed: E lig ib ilit y -employee
eligible for autom
atic sh w
ort eek
benefit if du g w he had less
rin eek
than 40 com
pensated or availab
le
hours and: (1) he w
orked for
com
pany som of w
e
eek o
r
received som jury-duty pay,
e
m
ake-up pay for m
ilitary train g
in
or em
ergency duty, or bereave­
m
ent pay from com
pany, or for
w
eek he received only holiday
pay from com
pany an for
d
previous w he eith received
eek
er
a autom
n
atic sh w
ort eek benefit
or h 40 o m
ad
r ore com
pensated
or available hours; (2) he h a
ad t
least 1 year of seniority a of la
s
st
day of w (or du g som p
eek
rin
e art
of su w
ch eek h h a least 1
e ad t
year of seniority w
hichw broken
as
by deathor retirem
ent); (3) he w
as
on a qualifying layoff for som
e
part of w
eek, or w in
as eligible for
pay from com
pany for a or p
ll
art
of a period of. short-term active
m
ilitary duty of 30 days or less
an d rin all or p
d u g
art of su
ch
period h otherw w
e
ise ould h
ave
been on a qualifying layoff.

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




20

autom
atic sh w
ort eek benefit w respect to certain
ith
hours of layoff du g w p
rin eek rior to w seniority w
eek
as
broken.
C anged (lan age only): Em
h
gu
ployee w
ho received a
reinstated disability benefit under the health-security
plan for a w h SU credit un cancelled a if he
eek ad B
its
s
h received a regu benefit for su w
ad
lar
ch eek. If a
reinstated d
isability benefit w paid for part of a w
as
eek
an a regu benefit w not paid for an part of su
d
lar
as
y
ch
w
eek, th num of credit u
e
ber
nits cancelled w one-half
as
of the above. If a reinstated d
isability benefit w p
as aid
for p of a w an for su w a regu benefit
art
eek d
ch eek
lar
w
as paid, th
ere w no additional credit unit
as
cancellation for th reinstated disability benefit for that
e
w
eek. (The 1971 agreem
ent substituted reinstated
disability benefit for th origin
e
al la yoff disability
benefit lan age initiated under the 1968 agreem
gu
ent.)
Elim
inated: P
rovision th no cred u
at
it nits w
ould be
cancelled w
hen em
ployee received regu benefit w
lar
hen
on layoff out of lin of seniority until he exhausted or
e
becam disqualified for State system benefit or 6
e
m
onths from layoff, w
hichever first.
Added: Em
ployee w h credit u d ring part of w
ho ad
nits u
eek
but forfeited them by breakin seniority because of
g
death or retirem deem to h credit units for all
ent
ed
ave
of the w
eek.
C
hanged: Em
ployee w entered Arm S
ho
ed ervices directly
from em
ploy of com
pany, w in su service, deem
hile
ch
ed
for purposes of plan, to be on leave of absence an not
d
entitled to an benefit, an (a) a credit u
y
d
ll
nits credited
to him a entry into Arm S
t
ed ervices, plus (b) any credit
u
nits he w entitled to be credited w respect to
as
ith
period of m
ilitary leave of absence, or (c) an credit
y
units earn before or w respect to period of m
ed
ith
ilitary
leave of absen th w
ce at ould h been credited to him
ave
on or after date he attained 1 year of seniority if h h
e ad
been in active service on or after su date (notw
ch
ith­
stan g other cred unit accru provisions) w to be
din
it
al
ere
credited to him upon reinstatem a of em
ent s
ploym
ent.
C
hanged: Layoff for all or any p w
art eek deem to be
ed
qualifying for SU purposes only if w respect to
B
ith
w
eek he w not in m
as
ilitary service (other th
an
short-term active m
ilitary train g duty of 30 days or
in
less).
C
hanged: If em
ployees w on short-term active m
as
ilitary
train g duty for 30 days or less an w ineligible for
in
d as
pay from com
pany for all or part of su period solely
ch
because h w
e ould be on a qualifying layoff but for su
ch
duty, he w to be deem to be on a qualifying layoff
as
ed
for th determ
e
ination of eligibility for not m than 2
ore
regu
lar benefits in a calen ar year (the 2-benefit
d
lim
itation d not apply for em
id
ergency m
ilitary duty).

1

R e location allow an ce w as as fo llo w s:

Amount
Miles between plants

Single
employees

5 0 b u t le ss t h a n 1 0 0 .....................................................................
1 0 0 b u t le s s t h a n 3 0 0 ..................................................................
3 0 0 b u t le s s t h a n 5 0 0 ..................................................................
5 0 0 b u t le ss t h a n 1 , 0 0 0 ............................................................
1 , 0 0 0 o r o v e r ....................................................................................
2

Married
employees

$220
260
320
410
475

$

570
630
730
895
1,020

B e n e f i t s f o r g r o u p li fe a n d d i s a b i l i t y w e r e a s f o l l o w s :
A fter age 65
c o n t i n u e d li fe i n s u r a n c e

Before age 65

B ase h ou rly rate

L e s s t h a n $ 3 . 4 0 ...........................
$ 3 . 4 0 b u t le s s t h a n $ 3 . 6 5 . . .
$ 3 . 6 5 b u t le s s t h a n $ 3 . 9 0 . . .
$ 3 . 9 0 b u t le s s t h a n $ 4 . 1 5 . . .
$ 4 . 1 5 b u t l e ss t h a n $ 4 . 4 0 . . .
$ 4 . 4 0 b u t l e ss t h a n $ 4 . 6 5 . . .
$ 4 . 6 5 b u t le ss t h a n $ 4 . 9 0 . . .
$ 4 . 9 0 b u t l e ss t h a n $ 5 . 1 5 . . .
$ 5 . 1 5 b u t l e ss t h a n $ 5 . 4 0 . . .
$ 5 . 4 0 b u t less t h a n $ 5 . 6 5 . . .
$ 5 . 6 5 b u t le s s t h a n $ 5 . 9 0 . . .
$ 5 . 9 0 b u t le s s t h a n $ 6 . 1 5 . . .
$ 6 . 1 5 b u t le ss t h a n $ 6 . 4 0 . . .
$ 6 . 4 0 b u t le s s t h a n $ 6 . 6 5 . . .
$ 6 . 6 5 a n d o v e r ..............................

Life
insurance

A ccid ental
death and
dism em ber­
m e n t (princi­
p al s u m )

Total for
death fro m
accid en tal
cause

Total and
perm anent
d isability
ben efits*

W eekly
disability
b en efits

M onthly
long-term
d isability
ben efits* *

F r o m (w ith
10 years of
credited
service) * * *

T o (w ith
20 years of
credited
service) * * *

$ 7 ,500
8 ,0 0 0
8 ,5 0 0
9 ,0 0 0
9 ,5 0 0
1 0 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,5 0 0
1 1 ,0 0 0
1 1 ,5 0 0
1 2 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,5 0 0
1 3 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,5 0 0
1 4 ,0 0 0
1 4 ,5 0 0

$ 3 ,7 5 0
4 ,0 0 0
4 ,2 5 0
4 ,5 0 0
4 ,7 5 0
5 ,0 0 0
5 ,2 5 0
5 ,5 0 0
5 ,7 5 0
6 ,0 0 0
6 ,2 5 0
6 ,5 0 0
6 ,7 5 0
7 ,0 0 0
7 ,2 5 0

$ 1 1 ,2 5 0
1 2 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,7 5 0
1 3 ,5 0 0
1 4 ,2 5 0
1 5 ,0 0 0
1 5 ,7 5 0
1 6 ,5 0 0
1 7 ,2 5 0
1 8 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,7 5 0
1 9 ,5 0 0
2 0 ,2 5 0
2 1 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,7 5 0

$150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290

$ 87
90
95
100
105
110
115
120
125
130
135
140
145
150
155

$280
305
330
350
370
395
415
435
460
480
500
525
545
565
590

$ 1 ,5 0 0
1,500
1,500
1 ,5 0 0
1 ,5 0 0
1 ,5 0 0
1 ,5 7 5
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 2 5
1 ,8 0 0
1 ,8 7 5
1 ,9 5 0
2 ,0 2 5
2 ,1 0 0
2 ,1 7 5

$ 2 ,2 5 0
2 ,4 0 0
2 ,5 5 0
2 ,7 0 0
2 ,8 5 0
3 ,0 0 0
3 ,1 5 0
3 ,3 0 0
3 ,4 5 0
3 ,6 0 0
3 ,7 5 0
3 ,9 0 0
4 ,0 5 0
4 ,2 0 0
4 ,3 5 0

* A n e m p l o y e e w i t h 1 0 y e a r s o f c r e d i t e d s e r v i c e c o u l d e l e c t p a y m e n t o f li fe i n s u r a n c e in 5 0 m o n t h l y i n s t a l l m e n t s ( b u t n o t
b e y o n d ag e 6 5 ) fo llo w in g w aiver o r c e ssa tio n o f m o n t h ly lon g-term disab ility b e n e fit p erio d. M in im u m o f $ 5 0 0 paid at d e a th .
* * N o t t o e x c e e d 5 0 p e rcen t o f e m p lo y e e 's m o n th ly b a se p a y at b egin n in g o f disability.
* * * C r e d i t e d se rv ic e u n d e r n o n c o n t r i b u t o r y r e t ir e m e n t plan.
3

T h e m a i n t e n a n c e l e g e n d d r u g s , if g r e a t e r t h a n a 3 4 - d a y s u p p l y r e q u i r e d , w e r e :
Peritrate
Inderal
Q uinedex
D i g i t o x i m - D i g o x i n - D i g i t a l is
N itroglycerin
D iu r il
Esid rix, H y dro-D iuril
S erpasil
Colchicine, C ol-B en em id

4

D ym elor
D iabinese
DBI
O rinase
P roloid, C y to m e l
Dilantin
B utazolid in
D i-lsopacin, P A S -C

M onthly co n trib u tio n s w ere as follow s:
S e p t . 1, 1 9 7 1

Ju ly 27, 1972

$ 1 9 .6 2
53.9 7

$ 2 1 .2 3
58.0 9

E m p lo y e e s (un der age 6 5 ):
S i n g l e .........................................................................................................................................................................
F a m i l y ......................................................................................................................................................................

2 5 .1 4
6 8 .5 7

2 6 .7 5
7 2 .6 9

Surviving sp o u se and d e p e n d e n t ch ildren (w ith o u t d en tal):
O f a c t i v e e m p l o y e e ( u n d e r a g e 6 5 ) ........................................................................................................
O f r e t i r e d e m p l o y e e ( o v e r a g e 6 5 ) .......................................................................................................

2 9 .7 5
1 6 .2 5

2 7 .1 0
15.07

In it ia l p r e m i u m
Em ployees:
S i n g l e ................................................................................................
F a m i l y .............................................................................................
Full p r e m iu m




21

T h e b e n e fit class c o d e w as d e te rm in e d as fo llo w s:

Benefit
class
code

Job
classification

Life income benefit rate for employee retired —
With benefits beginning
After
after Sept. 30, 1970 —
Sept. 30. 1967
For months
For months
but before
before
after
Oct. 1. 1970
Apr. 1971
Mar. 1971

A

D a y w o r k 1-7
P i e c e w o r k 1 -4
S a l a r i e d 1 -5

$ 6 .5 0

$ 5 .5 0

$ 7 .2 5

B

D a y w o r k 8-9
P i e c e w o r k 5 -7
S alarie d 6

6.75

5 .75

7 .5 0

C

D a y w o r k 10 -1 7
P iecew ork 8 -2 5
S a l a r i e d 7-1 5
R ate ranges R A -R M

7 .00

6 .0 0

7 .7 5

^ R e d u c t io n fa c t o r s * w ere as follow s:

Age when pension began

Age when pension began
(added effective Oct. 1, 1971)

Percent**

5 4
53
52
5 1
50
49
48
47

6 2 o r o v e r ..................................................................................................... 1 0 0 . 0
6 1 ...................................................................................................................... 9 3 . 3
6 0 ...................................................................................................................... 8 6 . 7
5 9 ...................................................................................................................... 8 0 . 8
5 8 ...................................................................................................................... 7 5 . 2
5 7 ..................................................................
6 9 .4
5 6 ...................................................................................................................... 6 3 . 5
5 5 ..................................................................................................................... 5 7 . 9

Percent**

.......................................................................................................... 5 3 . 2
.......................................................................................................... 4 8 . 9
.......................................................................................................... 4 5 . 0
............................................................................................................. 4 1 . 5
.......................................................................................................... 3 8 . 3
.......................................................................................................... 3 5 . 4
.......................................................................................................... 3 2 . 8
.......................................................................................................... 3 0 . 4

* A t ag e 6 5 p e n sio n fo r e m p l o y e e w h o retired w ith 3 0 years o f service o f m o r e a fte r S e p t . 3 0 , 1 9 7 1 w a s re d e t e r m in e d o n t h e basis
o f a red u ction of 1 /3 o f 1 p ercen t fo r each m o n th e m p lo y e e w as under age 6 2 w hen pension began.
* * C o n tin u ed t o be p ro ra ted fo r in term ed iate ages as previously c o m p u te d .




22

BU R EA U O F LA B O R S T A T IS T IC S
R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)

Region II
1515 Broadway
New York, N .Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region III
P. O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)

Regions V II and V III *
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Regions IX and X **
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)




**

Regions V II and V III are serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

TH IR D CLASS M AIL

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
W ASH ING TO N, D. C. 20212

POSTAGE AN D FEES PAID

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
O F F IC IA L BUSINESS
P E N A L TY FOR P R IVA TE USE, $300




LAB - 441


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102