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Wage Chronology:
Ford Motor Co. ~
and the Auto Workers,
Volume 11,1973-79
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1978




Wage Chronology:
Ford Motor Co.
and the Auto Workers,
Volume 11,1973-79
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
October 1978
Bulletin 1994







For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C . 20402
Stock No, 029-001-02223-9

Preface
This wage chronology is one o f a series prepared by the Bureau o f Labor Statistics that traces
changes in wage rates and related benefits negotiated by individual employers or combinations
o f employers with a union or group o f unions. Benefits unilaterally introduced by an employer
generally are included. The information is obtained largely from collective bargaining
agreements and related documents voluntarily filed with the Bureau. Descriptions of the course
o f collective bargaining are derived from the news media and confirmed and supplemented by
the parties to the agreement. Wage chronologies deal only with selected features of collective
bargaining or wage determination. They are intended primarily as a tool for research, analysis,
and wage administration. References to job security, grievance procedures, methods of piece-rate
adjustment, and similar matters are omitted.
This volume summarizes changes in wage rates and related benefits negotiated by the Ford
M otor Co. with the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural
Implement Workers o f America from October 1973 to September 1979. The bulletin
incorporates information for 1973-76 originally published as a supplement to Volume I, W a g e
C h r o n o lo g y :F o r d M o t o r C o ., J u n e 1 9 4 1 -S e p te m b e r 1 9 7 3 , BLS Bulletin 1787. If still in print,
copies o f Bulletin 1787 are for sale by the Superintendent of Docum ents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, W ashington, D.C. 20402, or by the regional offices of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics listed on the inside back cover. Microfiche and photo copies are for sale by the
National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Va. 22161. Specify
Accession Number PB 224 126/AS. All chronology publications may be available for reference
in leading public, college, and university libraries and at the Bureau’s regional offices.
The Bureau has introduced new job titles to eliminate those that denote sex stereotypes. For
purposes o f this chronology, however, old titles have been retained w7
here they refer specifically
to contractual definitions. Titles used in the generic sense and not to describe a contract term
have been changed to eliminate the sex stereotype.
Material in this publication is in the public domain and may be reproduced without
permission o f the Federal Government. Please credit the Bureau of Labor Statistics and cite
W a g e C h r o n o lo g y , F o r d M o t o r C o . a n d th e A u t o W o rk e rs , V o lu m e I I , 1 9 7 3 -7 9 , BLS Bulletin
1994.
This volum e was prepared in the D ivision of Trends in Employee Compensation by Richard
E. Schumann and John J. Lacombe II.




ill




Contents
Page
Introduction .........................................................................................................................................................................................

1

Summary o f contract negotiations ...........................................................................................................
October 1973-September 1976 .............................................................................................................................................
October 1976-September 1979 .............................................................................................................................................

3
3
5

Tables:
1. General wage c h a n g e s ........................................................................................................................................................
2. Hourly job rates, selected occupations, 1973-78 ........................................................................... ............................
3. Supplementary com pensation p r a c tic e s.......................................................................................................................
Premium pay for Saturday and Sunday work ...............................................................................................
Holiday pay ...........................................................
Paid vacations ...........................................................................................................................
Bereavement pay ......................................................................................................................................................
Educational pay ........................................................................................................................................................
Moving allowance ..............................
Insurance benefits ....................................................................................................................................................
Retirement benefits .................................................................................................................................................
Supplemental unemployment benefit p l a n ........................................................................................................

7
14
15
15
15
17
17
18
18
18
25
37




v




Introduction

Auto Workers.3 The union was suspended from the
AFL shortly thereafter because of this action4 and in
May 1938 was expelled along with other ClO-member
unions. The UAW and the other expelled unions then
formed the Congress of Industrial Organizations in
November 1938.
A major chapter in the union’s history was the use of
the sit-down strike to secure recognition from the major
auto producers. Its first success among the major
automakers came at General Motors when the UAW
reached agreement with that company on February 11,
1937, following sit-down strikes which had begun in late
1936. The same tactics were quickly employed success­
fully at Chrysler and, within 6 months o f the automotive
sit-down strikes, the union’s membership had climbed to
about 300,000. It was not until 1941, however, when
most of the rest of the industry was under exclusive
contracts, that Ford agreed to bargaining with the
union. In June 1941, an agreement was reached at Ford
following an 11-day strike, which was the first among the
major producers to establish the union shop.
The union’s affiliation with the AFL-CIO (merged in
December 1955) continued until July 1, 1968, when it
became independent. The UAW currently is the second
largest union in the United States. The union represents
1.4 million laborers and production, skilled, and office
workers in the automobile, aerospace, construction and
agricultural equipment, parts, and machine shop in­
dustries in the United States and Canada.
Despite the similarity of contract provisions among
the major companies, the producers have always
bargained separately rather than on a multi-employer or
industrywide basis. Typically, the union selects one of
the “Big 3” as a “target.” After an agreement is reached
with that company, similar contract terms usually are
negotiated with the remaining two. The pattern
settlement then generally spreads throughout the
industry and, to a lesser extent, to farm and construc­
tion equipment makers. Aerospace pacts also are
influenced by the auto agreements. Collective bargaining
agreements negotiated by the large multi-plant com­
panies do not cover all areas of bargaining, but leave

Ford Motor Co. was incorporated in Delaware on
July 9, 1919, and subsequently acquired all of the assets
of Ford Motor Co. which had been organized in
Michigan on June 16, 1903. The company’s principal
business in the United States is the manufacture, assem­
bly, and sale o f cars and trucks. The company also
makes tractors, agricultural implements, industrial
equipment, recreational vehicles, chemical products, and
substantial portions o f its steel, iron, and glass
requirements. Flat glass and specialty steel items also are
sold to others.
Through its subsidiaries, Ford also is involved in
aerospace, electronics, credit, insurance, and real estate
ventures. Foreign operations are carried on by a number
of subsidiaries—the three largest produce cars, trucks,
and buses in Great Britain, Germany, and Canada.
Despite the large volume o f production, the
automobile industry is dominated by the so-called “Big
3”— General M otors Corp., Ford, and Chrysler Corp.
The number four firm is American M otors Corp., fol­
lowed by several manufacturers o f specialized vehicles
and trucks. M otor vehicle production is concentrated in
the Great Lakes region, although plants making vehicles
or parts are scattered throughout the country.
Collective bargaining agreements for the “Big 3” are
negotiated with the International Union, United
Autom obile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement
Workers o f America (U A W ).1 The union held its
founding convention, the 1st Constitutional Conven­
tion, commencing August 26, 1935, at which it accepted
a charter from the craft-oriented American Federation
of Labor (AFL), with the provision that the charter’s
jurisdictional lim itations2 be removed at the next AFL
convention. The organization which emerged from the
founding convention represented only 20,000 workers
and had written agreements only with small parts
manufacturers. In July 1936, the union joined the
Committee for Industrial Organization (CIO), formed
within the AFL, whose goals coincided with those of the

'Known as the International Union, United Automobile, Aircraft and
Agricultural Implement Workers of America before May 8, 1962.
2As outlined by the charter, union jurisdiction included only
“employees directly engaged in the manufacture of parts (but not tools,
dies, or machinery) and assembling of those parts into completed
automobiles, but not including job or contract shops manufacturing
parts or any other employees engaged in such automobile plants.”



3The CIO was formed in November 1935 to promote organization of
workers in mass production industries on an industrial basis and to
encourage their affiliation with the AFL.
4The AFL suspended ClO-member unions in late 1936 after charging
the CIO with “dual unionism.”

1

certain matters, such as work rules, for local plant nego­
tiations within the general framework o f the master
agreement.
Agreements in the auto industry are ratified by vote of
the membership. In 1957, the constitution was amended
to provide for separate votes by production and skilled
workers, but it did not necessarily require separate ap­
proval by each group.5
Union bargaining goals for each industry are set by
convention approval following extensive consultation
throughout the union. Constitutional conventions cur­
rently are held every 3 years to discuss wide-ranging
issues affecting workers and their families. When the
convention falls in the same year that auto contracts
expire, it also sets goals for the upcoming negotiations in
the industry. Otherwise, a special bargaining conven­
tion is scheduled for the expiration year to finalize
contract demands. Before designation o f goals by
convention, various regional and area meetings are held
throughout the United States and Canada at which local
union leaders present issues affecting their member5See page 3 for details of the 1973 ratification controversy.




2

ships. Locals also transmit resolutions and contract pro­
posals to the convention for consideration.
The UAW represents about 99 percent of the hourly
employees at Ford’s automotive operations. Several
other unions represent a small number of employees
such as plant guards and cafeteria workers, not covered
by this chronology. Wages of nearly all of the 160,000
production and related workers are on a time basis.
Incentive wage systems are largely confined to the
Canton forge plant and a portion of the Rouge steel
operations. Except for workers in the toolroom and
skilled maintenance trades who have spread-rated
classifications, wages of time-related workers are
determined by a formalized system providing single rates
for specific jobs.
This bulletin describes the major contract changes
since the 1973 collective bargaining agreement. Agree­
ments apply to all production and maintenance workers
in the company’s production and assembly plants and
parts depots.
Information on earlier negotiations can be found in
W age C h ro n o lo g y: F o rd M o to r Co., June 1941 —
S e p te m b e r 1973, Bulletin 1787.

Summary of Contract Negotiations

October 1973-September 1976

contract extensions on September 10 and workers at
those companies remained on the job. Agreement at the
national level for Chrysler hourly employees was reached
on September 178 and work resumed after the contract
ratification on September 23.
Ford then became the focal point of bargaining with
the union seeking to improve on the Chrysler package by
gaining “25-and-out” retirement benefits for about
12,000 forge and foundry workers. At Chrysler, adoption
of “25-and-out” was to be dependent on results of a future
study of the incidence of illness and longevity of such
workers. Ford forge and foundry retirement and
voluntary overtime were the subjects of hard bargaining
until agreement at the national level was reached on
October 26.9 Agreement on retroactivity of the initial
wage increase was the last item to be resolved. On
November 12, the union announced that the pact had
been approved by other-than-skilled-trades employees,
but had been rejected by skilled trades workers—the two
groups had voted separately.10 Skilled trades workers
objected to voluntary overtime provisions which allowed
the company to upgrade production workers or use
outside help to perform overtime work refused by the
trades workers. The union announced on November 14
that it considered the pact ratified, but that it would seek
renegotiation of the disputed overtime sections.1 The
1
company said that it would explore the problem. On
November 29, 1973, the parties negotiated a supplemental
agreement concerning overtime assignments for skilled
trades workers. Most local agreements were reached in
October and November. The last local agreement was
reached on June 19, 1974.
The agreement provided for a general wage increase
retroactive to September 15, 1973, ranging from 22 cents
to 33.5 cents an hour, as well as for two deferred annual
improvement factor increases ranging from 11.5 cents to
23.5 cents in the second year and 12 cents to 24 cents in
the third year o f the contract. The merit spread for skilled

On October 26, 1973, the Auto Workers (UAW ) and
Ford M otor Co. reached tentative agreement on a 3-year
national pact for 185,000 workers (which was subse­
quently accepted by the union), along the lines of a
pattern-setting agreement reached at Chrysler Corp. on
September 17.6 The Chrysler pact had incorporated a
number o f innovative features which had been adopted
as bargaining goals for the industry by a UAW Special
Collective Bargaining Convention held March 22-23.
In that convention, a discussion of “noneconom ic”
issues had preceded “econom ic” matters, emphasizing the
union membership’s concern for an end to mandatory
overtime, eased production standards, limits on
subcontracting o f work, expanded job transfer rights,
and improved health and safety standards.7 The union’s
wage goals included substantial wage hikes, a revised
cost-of-living escalatore formula, “full-wage parity” for
workers in the United States and Canada, and increased
overtime premiums. Other goals included additional
holidays, liberalized vacations and a vacation bonus,
improved health benefits and the establishment of a
dental program, improved pensions, with emphasis on
benefits for those already retired and “30 [years]and-out” retirement (with “special consideration” for
forge and foundry workers) regardless of age. Also
discussed were increased supplemental unemployment
benefits (SUB) plan financing, and an attendance
incentive program.
Although talks had begun in mid-July at each of the
“Big 3” auto companies, little negotiating progress was
made until the union selected a “target” company with
which it could achieve a pattern settlement. Chrysler was
so selected on August 21 and the bargaining pace at that
company quickened, with negotiating teams at Ford and
General M otors awaiting the results. An impasse was
reached at Chrysler, however, primarily over voluntary
overtime, and when agreement could not be reached by
the September 14 contract termination date, workers
went on strike. Ford and General M otors, which also had
a September 14 expiration date, had agreed to day-to-day

H agreement for Chrysler salaried employees represented by the
An
UAW was reached several days later.
9General Motors and UAW reached tentative agreement on
November 19.
I0The ratification tally showed that skilled workers had rejected the
contract by 20,089 to 5,943, while other workers had accepted it by
105,843 to 38,684.
!1On Apr. 10, 1974, the union’s Public Review Board upheld the
right of the International Executive Board to consider the contract
ratified.

6See details of Chrysler settlement in Current Wage Developments,
October 1973.
7
“Noneconomic” issues (primarily production standards) had
resulted in a number of “ministrikes” at various General Motors
facilities in late 1972.




3

trades workers was modified, allowing the maximum rate
of the spread rate to be reached within 3 months after
attainment of seniority or being reclassified, whichever
was later. The pact also provided for special increases for
certain truck drivers and related workers and a provision
for resolving local wage claims.
On November 19, 1973, 35 cents o f the 40-cent
accumulated cost-of-living allowance was to be incor­
porated into base rates. The escalator clause was revised
to provide 1-cent adjustments for each 0.3-point change
in consecutive 3-month averages o f a Combined United
States-Canadian Consumer Price Index. To obtain a
Combined Index, the Consumer Price Index for Canada
was multiplied by 0.1 and the Consumer Price Index for
the United States was multiplied by 0.9. This ratio
approximated the proportion of auto production and
employment in each country. As the Canadian Index
was published on a 1961 base, a conversion factor of
0.8665511 was used to convert the Canadian Index to a
1967 base consistent with that o f the U.S. Index; the
previous formula for U.S. workers had been based on the
U.S. Index (1957-59=100). The first quarterly escalator
adjustment was to be made in December 1973 (through
June 1976). One cent o f each net quarterly increase in the
allowance was to be diverted to finance fringe items
beginning in March 1974, up to a maximum o f 10 cents
over the contract term.
With certain exceptions, voluntary overtime provi­
sions allowed workers to decline work (1) after 9 hours a
day for those in manufacturing plants and after 10 hours
a day for those in assembly plants (after 8 hours on
Saturdays at assembly plants); (2) one o f every 3
Saturdays if the previous 2 had been worked for those in
manufacturing plants, and Saturdays in excess of 6
designated 8-hour Saturdays during a model year (out­
side the model changeover period)12 for those in assembly
plants, provided workers in either type o f plant were not
absent during the week before the Saturday; and (3) Sun­
days for workers not absent during the week before the
Sunday except for a Saturday declined as allowed under
(2) above. The 1973 agreement, and supplemental agree­
ments reached November 29, 1973, permitted skilled
employees in a given plant to elect, as a group, to have
overtime assignments guided by (1) provisions negotiated
before the 1973 agreement, (2) provisions o f the 1973
agreement as appropriate for other employees, or (3)
special local arrangements having the approval of the
company and the UAW International staff.
The day after Thanksgiving was added as a paid
holiday in 1974 and the unbroken Christmas-New Year’s
1 The model-year period begins at the end of the model-launch
2
period (the week frames for the first unit of a new model are launched
plus 3 weeks or else until line speed reaches scheduled production,
whichever is later; it ends 2 weeks before the announced model build­
out date (the date the last unit of the old model is scheduled to be
completed).




holiday period was extended by 1 paid holiday in the
period that began in 1973 and by 2 paid holidays in the
periods that were to begin in 1974 and 1975.
Additionally, shift premium pay was to be included in
holiday pay beginning with Thanksgiving Day in 1975,
but not for December 14, 1975, or for holidays falling
within the Christmas-New Year’s period.
The definition of “immediate family” for bereavement
pay purposes was expanded and educational pay
increased to $700 per year for tuition and compulsory
fees.
Insurance program improvements included the
addition o f three brackets o f benefits to the group life and
disability insurance plan for employees in higher wage
brackets. Also, for employees at work on or after October
1, 1975, all brackets for life insurance and for accidential
death and dismemberment benefits were to be increased
by $1,000 and $500, respectively. Survivors’ income
benefits also were increased. Hospital-medical-surgicaldrug benefits were improved and a reciprocity program
was established to assure prompt payment o f expenses
incurred away from home. A dental program was
established, as well, for employees and their dependents.
The pension agreement, negotiated for a 6-year duration
provided for retirement at unreduced benefit rates after
30 years o f service regardless of age (“full 30-and-out”).
Foundry workers in specified job classifications who
had 25 years of service or more were to be given a 20percent-of-service credit premium, allowing them to
retire on a full benefit after only 25 years o f service on
specified job classifications, regardless of age. The union
stated in a letter to the company dated October 26, 1973,
that the same retirement for forge workers would be the
subject o f bargaining in 1976 if a study should prove that
forge work had an adverse effect on longevity. The
principle of a “lifetime level benefit” was established to
end the “cliff effect” caused by the drop in an early
retiree’s income at age 65 when the supplemental
allowance ceased. Pensions for past and future retirees
were to be increased in each year o f the pension
agreement. A fourth benefit class code was established to
provide higher pension benefits for skilled trades workers
and those to equivalently rated jobs. The Special Age 65
benefit was increased to $6.30 a month with provision for
payment of the benefit to retirees and survivors enrolled
in Medicare.
Contributions to the SUB fund for straight-time hours
were increased in the first and third years o f the contract
and contributions for overtime hours were established in
the second year and increased in the third year. Certain
insurance premiums for laid-off employees that had
previously been financed from SUB funds were to be paid
directly by the company, as were short workweek benefit
costs in excess o f 3 cents per hour in any year.
More worker participation in resolving problems
involving health and safety was agreed to and a joint

4

for full holiday and vacation benefits. N o mention was
made of increased time off the job.
The union rejected the offer as inadequate and the
members voted 87,453 to 4,530 in favor o f a walkout if a
settlement could not be reached by midnight September
14, when the contract was scheduled to expire.
On September 10, Ford made a new offer to the union,
which included “folding” 84 cents of the $1.14 cost-ofliving allowance into base rates, diverting money from
negotiated wage and cost-of-living increases toward
hospital-medical premium costs rather than copayment,
and restructuring (without additional cost) certain
provisions of the SUB plan to give more protection to
workers with higher seniority. The union rejected the
proposal as inadequate. Negotiations continued with
little progress toward a settlement, until September 13,
when Ford made a last-minute offer which included a
reduced worktime proposal that gave employees 20 to 40
hours off each year, depending on seniority and
attendance; “folding” in $1.02 of the cost-of-living
allowance; extending the current dental-care plan to
cover retirees; and restructuring SUB fund financing with
some increases in the rates of company contribution and
a liberalized formula for determining how quickly
workers exhausted their benefits. The union rejected the
offer, and at midnight September 14, 170,000 workers
struck Ford plants in 22 States.

committee was to be set up to study and attempt to
improve the work enviroment.
The contract was scheduled to remain in effect until
11:59 p.m. September 14, 1976, except for the pension
plan, which was to remain in effect until midnight
September 14, 1979.

October 1976-September 1979

A Special Collective Bargaining Convention of the
U AW, held in Detroit on March 18-20,1976, set the goals
for the upcoming negotiations with the automobile
manfuacturers. UAW goals included: “Substantial” wage
and salary increases; retention of U.S.-Canada wage
parity; reduced worktime to provide more leisure time
and greater job security; improved funding of the SUB
plan to insure that the fund would not be depleted
during prolonged and heavy layoffs; insured SUB
payments, especially to high seniority workers; financial
relief for those already retired, outside of the pension
plan; improvements in the annual improvement factor
and cost-of-living formula; more union control over
subcontracting o f jobs traditionally done by company
workers; a prepaid vision care program for workers,
retirees and dependents; improved group insurance, and
sickness and accident programs; inclusion of pregnancy
under extended disability plan; expanded bridge and
transition benefits and joint company-union develop­
ment of cost containment provisions for health
insurance; improvement of the tuition refund plan; a
rebate plan for the purchase o f company products;
increased overtime pay and limitations on the scheduling
of overtime during layoffs; inclusion o f shift premium in
jury duty and bereavement pay; establishment of a stock
purchase and a profit-sharing program; and conversion
from a wage to a salary system.
Negotiations between the UAW and Ford began on
July 20, 1976, and on August 24 the union designated
Ford as the target for the pattern settlement in the
industry.
The company’s initial proposal, on August 31,
included: Wage increases of 3 percent per year (range of
38 to 77 cents), and additional increases for skilled trades
workers; a hiring rate $1 below the regular rate with 25cent increases every 3 months until the regular rate was
attained; employee assumption of part o f the cost of the
hospital-surgical-medical-dental plan; alterations in the
method of funding the SU B plan, at no additional cost to
the company, which would insure payments to long
seniority employees when they were laid-off; reduced
fringe benefits during the first year o f employment; a
diversion o f future cost-of-living increases to pay for
fringe benefits; reductions in coverage under the dental
plan; and stricter attendance requirements for eligibility



Bargaining resumed on September 20 and a settlement
was reached on October 5. Ratification of the 3-year
national contract was completed on October 12.
Production workers approved it by a vote of 35,192 to
22,029, while the skilled trades approved it by 8,957 to
8,468. Under new ratification procedures announced
before the settlement, both production and skilled
workers had to approve the pact separately before the
union considered it ratified. At the time the national
contract was ratified, local agreements had been reached
at 70 of the 99 bargaining units, and Ford began to
reopen its plants on October 13. The final local
agreement was reached on November 20.
The national contract provided for wage increases of 3
percent (of base rates) plus 20 cents (ranging from 32.5
to 45 cents an hour) on October 18, 1976, 3 percent (16.5
to 30 cents an hour) on September 19,1977, and 3 percent
(17 to 31 cents an hour) on September 18, 1978. Skilled
workers received additional increases of 15 to 25.5 cents
an hour (depending on their pay group) on October 18,
1976 and 10 cents an hour on September 19, 1977. Of the
existing $1.14 cost-of-living allowance, $1.09 was
incorporated into base rates immediately after computa­
tion of the 3-percent plus 20-cent wage increase, and the
existing cost-of-living formula was continued, providing
quarterly adjustments of 1 cent for each 0.3-point
movement in the composite Consumer Price Index
(1967=100) derived from the official indexes issued by the
U.S. and Canadian governments.
5

The agreement established a Scheduled Paid Personal
Holiday Plan, which provided all employees who had 1
year or more o f seniority with 5 additional days off in the
second contract year and 7 in the third year. These days
were to be scheduled in single-day units throughout the
week and outside the summer vacation season. The
employees would be required to work the day before and
the day after to be paid for the day off. The agreement
also provided for a nonrecurring holiday, July 3, 1978,
which brought the number o f regular holidays to 37,
compared with 40 in the previous contract period. (The
lower total resulted because o f year-to-year fluctuations
in the number o f paid holidays required to comply with
an existing provision that employees receive unbroken
paid time off from Christmas Eve Day through New
Year’s Day.)
Several changes were made in the financing of
Supplemental Unemployment Benefits. The employer’s
payment into the fund was to be increased to a range of 12
to 22 cents (from 9 to 14 cents) an hour, depending on the
level o f the fund, on January 1, 1977, o f 13 to 23 cents an
hour on January 1, 1978, and o f 14 to 24 cents an hour on
January 1, 1979. The agreement also established a
“backup” SU B fund that would provide benefits to
employees with 10 years or more of seniority if the regular
fund for all workers dropped below the level required for
payments to continue.
The contract further provided for a one-time lump­
sum payment, outside the existing pension plan, to be
paid in December 1977,13 o f $200 to $600 to employees
retired prior to September 14, 1976, depending on length
of service, and $110 to $330 to certain surviving spouses.
The bonus would be financed by a withholding on a
cumulative basis o f 1 cent from the cost-of-living
allowance paid to employees for each quarter from June
6, 1977 through December 3, 1978, for a total reduction
o f 6 cents. The allowance would be restored to its proper
level beginning December 4, 1978.
Other provisions included: Establishment o f a

company-financed vision program, effective October 1,
1977, for employees with at least 1 year o f seniority and
their eligible dependents, which provided for eye
examinations and prescription glasses at minimum
intervals o f 2 years with the program paying up to 80
percent o f the cost; establishment o f a hearing aid
program, effective October 1, 1977, to cover most
expenses for hearing aids and related services for
employees with at least 1 year of seniority, retirees,
eligible surviving spouses, and eligible dependents;
changes in the hospital-surgical-medical-drug program,
including liberalized outpatient psychiatric and home
care benefits, provisions for cost containment programs
and an increase in the employee co-payment for each
prescription drug purchase from $2 to $3; $250 a month
(was $200) Transition Survivor Income Benefits for
survivors receiving reduced social security benefits ($150
for those who were eligible for full social security
benefits) and $250 Bridge Survivor Income Benefits (was
$200) effective October 1, 1977; increased moving
allowances for employees who relocated to other Ford
plants after their jobs were terminated; improvements in
the tutition refund program; extension to certain skilled
trades foundry workers o f a provision under which
production foundry workers with 25 years or more of
foundry service received 1.2 years’ service credit for each
year o f foundry service; a 20-cent-an-hour premium (was
10) paid on all 7-day-a-week operations outside the Steel
Operations o f the Steel Division (Steel Operations
remained at 10 cents); the inclusion o f shift premium in
the computation o f vacation and holiday pay; and estab­
lishment o f a wage inequity fund.
The contract, which established the pattern for later
settlements at Chrysler, General Motors, and the
automotive parts industry, and, to a lesser extent, for the
“Big 3” agricultural and construction equipment
companies— Deere & Co., Caterpillar Tractor and Co.,
and International Harvester C o.—was to remain in effect
through September 14, 1979, with no provision for
reopening. Except for possible cost-of-living adjust­
ments, the following tables are up to date through the
expiration date o f the contract.

,3The pension agreement negotiated in 1973 was not scheduled to
expire until 1979.




6

Table 1.

General wage changes1
Effective date

Sept. 15, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision

22- to 33.5-cent-an-hour increase
depending on base h ou rly
rate.2

Agreem ent also:
(1) Provided 2 deferred improvement factor in­
creases effective Sept. 23, 1974 and Sept. 22,
1975;
(2) incorporated 35 cents of the 40-cent accu­
mulated cost-of-living allowance into base
rates effective Nov. 19, 1973;
(3) revised the escalator form ula to provide quar­
terly adjustments of 1 cent for each 0.3-point
change in the 3-m onth average Com bined
Bureau of Labor Statistics Consum er Price
Index (1967=100) and Statistics Canada Con­
sumer Price Index (1961=100) beginning Dec.
3, 1973 (through June 1976), based on the 3month averages of the Com bined Consumer
Price Indexes for Aug., Sept., and Oct. 1973
and the averages for 3-calendar-month periods
thereafter (1 cent of each of the adjustments
of Mar. 1974 through June 1976 was to be
diverted to finance fringe items, provided that
the allowance had increased above the level
attained in any previous 3-month period, allow­
ing a possible diversion of up to 10 cents over
the contract term );3
(4) provided that other than skilled trades em ­
ployees hired or rehired on or after Nov. 19,
1973, were to receive a hiring rate 45 cents
below the job rate for 1st 4 weeks and then 25
cents below the job rate until regular rate was
reached after 8 additional weeks (such hires or
rehires, upon attaining 6 months’ seniority,
were to receive an additional payment equal
to 25 cents plus any shift or overtime premium
for each hour worked during the 1st 4 weeks
of employment and 15 cents plus shift and
overtime premium for each hour worked during
the 5th through 12th weeks of employment;
(5) provided for a special adjustm ent of 50 cents
an hour for certain truck drivers and other re­
lated workers effective Sept. 15, 1973; and
(6) provided that any claims arising under provi­
sions of the wage claims settlement agree­
ment dated Oct. 31, 1973 would be effective
Sept. 23, 1974.
35 cents of the 40-cent accumulated cost-of-living
allowance was incorporated into base rates.

Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).
Dec. 3, 1973 ...............

12-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance.

Mar. 4, 1974

8-cen t-an-ho u r increase.

Quarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent was diverted from the allowance
to finance fringe benefits.

June 3, 1974

13-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 2) was diverted from the
allowance to finance fringe benefits.

Sept. 2, 1974

13-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustm ent in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 3) was diverted from the
allowance to finance fringe benefits.

Sept. 23, 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Increases ranging from 11.5 to
23.5 cents an hour, depending
on base hourly rate,4 aver­
aging about 16 cents an hour.

Annual improvement factor. In addition to the improve­
ment factor increase, 1,284 skilled trades and other
than skilled trades workers received additional in­
creases as a result of the wage claims settlement
agreement dated Oct. 31, 1973.

Dec. 2, 1974

15-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 4) was diverted from the
allowance to finance fringe benefits.

See footnotes at end of table.




7

Table 1.

General wage changes1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Mar. 3, 1975

11-cent-an-hour increase.

June 2, 1975

7-cen t-an-ho u r increase.

Sept. 1, 1975

9-cen t-an-ho u r increase.

Sept. 22, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Increases ranging from 12 to 24
cents an hour, depending on
base hourly rate,4 averaging
about 17 cents an hour.

Dec. 1, 1975

10-cent-an-hour increase.

Mar. 1, 1976

7-cen t-an-ho u r increase.

June 7, 1976

4-cen t-an-ho u r increase.

Oct. 18, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

32.5 to 45-cen t-an-ho ur increase
depending on base hourly
rate,5 averaging about 40.2
cents an hour.6

Quarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 5) diverted from the allowance
to finance fringe benefits.
Quarterly adjustm ent in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 6) diverted from the allowance
to finance fringe benefits.
Q uarterly adjustm ent in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 7) diverted from the allowance
to finance fringe benefits.
Annual improvement factor,

Quarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 8) diverted from the allowance
to finance fringe benefits.
Q uarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 9) diverted from the allowance
to finance fringe benefits.
Q uarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent (total 10) diverted from the allowance
to finance fringe benefits.
Agreem ent also:
(1) Provided 2 deferred improvement factor in­
creases effective Sept. 19, 1977 and Sept. 18,
1978;
(2) incorporated $1.09 of the current $1.14 cost-ofliving allowance into base rates;
(3) continued the escalator formula to provide
quarterly adjustments of 1 cent for each 0.3point change in the 3-month average Com­
bined U .S-C anada Consumer Price Index
(1967=100), beginning Dec. 6, 1976 (through
June 4, 1979), based on the 3-m onth averages
of the Com bined Consum er Price Indexes for
Aug., Sept., and Oct. 1976 and the averages for
3-calendar-m onth periods thereafter,
and also agreed, “if the Com pany makes lump-sum pay­
ments to certain retirees and surviving spouses as
provided in a letter dated Oct. 5, 1976 from the
Union to the Com pany, the following provisions
shall become effective: In each adjustm ent period
during the six 3-m onth periods beginning June 6,
1977, and ending Dec. 3, 1978, the am ount of
allow ance due in each 3-m onth period shall be
reduced by 1 cent, up to a cum ulative reduction
during the sixth 3-m onth period of 6 cents. With
respect to adjustments on or after Dec. 4, 1978, the
am ount of cost-of-living allowance would be com ­
puted in accordance with the Cost-of-Living Allow ­
ance section of the agreem ent without regard to the
reductions provided therein; ”
(4) provided that other than skilled trades em­
ployees rehired within 1 year of probationary
layoff or of the date seniority was broken
would have their hiring-in rate determ ined by
the num ber of weeks of employm ent they had
previously com pleted. Such com pleted em ­
ploym ent would apply toward progressions to
the negotiated rate of the job to which em ­
ployees were assigned. Such employees who
had not previously attained a negotiated clas­
sification rate were to be paid an additional
wage paym ent for hours worked during the
weeks of em ploym ent previously com pleted as
well as for all hours worked until they attained

See footnotes at end of table.




8

Table 1.

General wage changes1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters
the negotiated rate of the classification to
which they were assigned;
(5) provided special skilled trade adjustments of
25 to 35.5 cents per hour based on schedule
providing increases of 15 to 25.5 cents8 effec­
tive Oct. 18, 1976, and 10 cents effective
Sept. 19, 1977; and
(6) established a 0.5-cent wage inequity fund to
settle wage inequity claims submitted before
Aug. 15, 1976 with adjustments effective Sept.
19, 1977, before application of the improve­
ment factor increase.

Dec. 6, 1976 ......................................
Mar. 7, 1977 ......................................
June 6, 1 9 7 7 ....................... ..

8-cent-an-hour increase.
6-cent-an-hour increase.
12-cent-an-hour increase.

Sept. 5, 1977 ..................................

11-cent-an-hour increase.

Sept. 19, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

16.5- to 30.5-cent-an-hour increase
depending on base hourly
rate,9 averaging about 23.2
cents an hour.6

Dec. 5, 1977 ........ .............................

7-cent-an-hour increase.

Mar. 6, 1978 ..................................

7-cent-an-hour increase.

June 5, 1 9 7 8 ......................................

11-cent-an-hour increase.

Quarterly adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent of allowance (total 3) diverted to
finance cost of special one-time lump-sum payment to
certain retirees and surviving spouses.
Quarterly adjustment in cost-of-iiving allowance. An
additional 1 cent of allowance (total 4) diverted to
finance cost of special one-tim e lump-sum payment
to certain retirees and surviving spouses.

Sept. 4, 1978 ....................................

Sept. 18, 1978
(agreement dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Q uarterly adjustm ent in cost-of-living allowance.
Quarterly adjustm ent in cost-of-living allowance.
Quarterly adjustm ent in cost-of-living allowance.
An additional 1 cent of allowance was diverted to
finance cost of special one-tim e lump-sum payment
to certain retirees and surviving spouses.
Quarterly adjustm ent in cost-of-living allowance.
An additional 1 cent of allowance (total 2) was
diverted to finance cost of special one-tim e lump­
sum payment to certain retirees and surviving
spouses.
Annual improvement factor.
Skilled trades workers received an additional 10 cents
an hour. Inequity adjustments also effective this date.

17- to 31-cent-an-hour increase,
depending on base hourly
rate,9 averaging about 22.4
cents an hour.

Quarterly adjustm ent in cost-of-living allowance. An
additional 1 cent of allowance (total 5) diverted to fi­
nance cost of special one-tim e lump-sum payment to
certain retirees and surviving spouses.
Possible adjustment in cost-of-living allowance. One
cent of allowance (total 6) could be diverted to
finance cost of special one-tim e lump-sum payment
to certain retirees and surviving spouses.
Annual improvement factor.

Dec. 4, 1978 ......................................

Possible adjustment in cost-of-living allowance.

Mar. 5, 1979 ............................... ..

Cost-of-living allowance restored to level that would
prevail had no diversions been made to finance one­
time lump-sum payment to certain retirees and sur­
viving spouses (see above).
Possible adjustment in cost-of-living allowance.

June 4, 1 9 7 9 ......................................

Possible adjustment in cost-of-living allowance.

See footnotes on following page.




9

Footnotes to table 1:
’General wage changes are upward or downward adjustments affecting a substantial number of workers. Not included are adjustments in individual
rates (promotions, merit increases, etc.) and minor adjustments in wages structure that do not have an immediate and noticeable effect on the average
wage level.
The general changes listed were the major changes affecting wage rates during the period covered. Because of the omission of nongeneral changes
in rates, and other factors, the total of the general wage changes will not necessarily coincide with the movement of straight-time average hourly earnings.
2The increase applied to base hourly rates (excluding the cost-of-living allowance in effect and shift premiums) as follows:
Amount of increase
(in cents)

Base rate before Sept. 15, 1973

Less than $3.42.........................................................................
$3.42 but less than $3.585.......................................................
$3,585 but less than $3.75.......................................................
$3.75 but lessthan $3.92 ..........................................................
$3.92 but lessthan $4.085........................................................
$4,085 but less than $4.25.......................................................
$4.25 but less than $4.42..........................................................
$4.42 but less than $4.585........................................................
$4,585 but less than $4.75.......................................................
$4.75 but less than $4.92 ..........................................................
$4.92 but less than $5.085........................................................
$5,085 but less than $5.25 .......................................................
$5.25 but lessthan $5.42..........................................................
$5.42 but less than $5.585........................................................
$5,585 but less than $5.75.......................................................
$5.75 but less than $5.92..........................................................
$5.92 but less than $6.085........................................................
$6,085 but less than $6.25.......................................................
$6.25 but less than $6.42.......................................................
$6.42 but less than $6.585........................................................
$6,585 but less than $6.75.......................................................
$6.75 but lessthan $6.92........ .............. .................................
$6.92 but less than $7,085 .......................................................
$7,085 through $7,245 ..............................................................

22
22.5
23
23.5
24
24.5
25
25.5
26
26.5
27
27.5
28
28.5
29
29.5
30
30.5
31
31.5
32
32.5
33
33.5

3
The agreement provided that cost-of-living adjustments be determined as follows:
Combined Consumer Price Index,
United States and Canada,
3-month average*

130.2
130.4
130.8
131.1
131.5
131.8
132.2
132.5
132.8
133.1
133.4
133.7
134.0
134.3
134.6
134.9
135.2
135.5
135.8
136.1
136.4

or le s s ........................................................................
to 130.7.........................................................................
to 131.0.........................................................................
to 131.4.........................................................................
to 131.7.........................................................................
to 132.1.........................................................................
to 132.4.........................................................................
to 132.7.........................................................................
to 133.0.........................................................................
to 133.3.........................................................................
to 133.6.........................................................................
to 133.9.........................................................................
to 134.2.........................................................................
to 134.5.........................................................................
to 134.8.........................................................................
to 135.1.........................................................................
to 135.4.........................................................................
to 135.7.........................................................................
to 136.0.........................................................................
to 136.3.........................................................................
to 136.6.........................................................................

Hourly cost-of-living
allowance**
(in cents)

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

and so forth, with a 1-cent adjustment for each 0.3-point change in the average Combined Index (rounded to the nearest 0.1 Index point) for the appro­
priate 3 months.




10

*A 3-month average Combined Consumer Price Index was calculated as shown in the following example (calculations used to determine the Mar. 1974
cost-of-living adjustment):
Example: To obtain the Combined Consumer Price Index, the Consumer Price Index for Canada was multiplied by 0.1 and the Consumer Price Index
for the United States was multiplied by 0.9. This ratio approximated the proportion of auto production and the employment in each country. As the
Canadian Index was published on a 1961 base, a conversion factor of 0.8665511 was used to convert the Canadian Index to a 1967 base consistent with
that of the U.S. Index.
Consumer Price Index,
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Consumer Price Index,
Statistics Canada

(1967=100)

(1961=100)

.

November 1973..............................................155.5
December 1973 ............................................... 156.4
January 1974................................................. 157.6

.

137.6
138.5.
139.7

(137.6 X .9) + (155.5 X .8665511 X .1) =
(138.5 X .9) + (156.4 X .8665511 X .1) =
(139.7 X .9) + (157.6 X .8665511 X .1) =

137.31
138.20
139.39
3)414.90
Combined Consumer Price Index, 3-month average_ ........... 138.3,
_
**One cent of each of the March 1974 though June 1976 adjustments was to be diverted to finance fringe items provided that the allowance increased
above the highest level attained in any previous 3-month period. This would allow for a maximum possible diversion of 10 cents over the contract term.
The allowance shown in the above schedule would therefore be reduced by any accumulated diversions.
4The Sept. 23,1974, and Sept. 22,1975, improvement factor increases applied to base hourly rates (excluding cost-of-living allowance in effect and shift
premiums) as follows:




Base rate before increase

Less than $ 3 .9 2 .....................................................................
$3.92 but less than $4,085 ...................................................
$4,085 but less than $4.25................................................. .
$4.25 but lessthan $4.42.....................................................
$4.42 but lessthan $4,585 ....................................................
$4,585 but less than $4.75...................................................
$4.75 but lessthan $4.92.....................................................
$4.92 but lessthan $5,085 ....................................................
$5,085 but less than $5.25...................................................
$5.25 but lessthan $5.42.....................................................
$5.42 but lessthan $5,585 ....................................................
$5,585 but less than $5.75................................................. .
$5.75 but lessthan $5.92.....................................................
$5.92 but lessthan $6,085 ...................................................
$6,085 but less than $6.25...................................................
$6.25 but lessthan $6.42.....................................................
$6.42 but lessthan $6,585 ...................................................
$6,585 but less than $6.75..................................................
$6.75 but lessthan $6.92 .....................................................
$6.92 but lessthan $7,085 ...................................................
$7,085 but less than $7.25..................................................
$7.25 but lessthan $7.42.....................................................
$7.42 but lessthan $7,585 ...................................................
$7,585 but less than $7.75..................................................
$7.75 but less than $7.92 .....................................................
$7.92 through $ 8 .0 8 ..............................................................

n

Hourly improvement
factor increase
(in cents)

11.5
12
12.5
13
13.5
14
14.5
15
15.5
16
16.5
17
17.5
18
18.5
19
19.5
20
20.5
21
21.5
22
22.5
23
23.5
24

5The increase applied to base hourly rates (excluding the cost-of-living allowance in effect and shift premiums) as follows:
Amount of increase
(in cents)

Base rate before O ct 18, 1976
Up through $4,245 ........................... ...........................................
4.25 to 4.415........................................... .....................................
4.42 to 4.58 ...................................................................................
4.585 to 4.745 ...........................................................................
4.75 to 4 .9 1 5 ............................. ...................................................
4.92 to 5.08 ........................... .........................................................
5.085 to 5.2 4 5 ......................... ............ ................................ .
5.25 to 5 .4 1 5 ...... ..........................................................................
5.42 to 5.58 ............................. ........................................................
5.585 to 5.7 45..................... .........................................................
5.75 to 5 .9 1 5 .................... ............................................................
5.92 to 6.08 ............................. .......................................................
6.085 to 6.2 4 5 ................... ........................................... ................
6.25 to 6 .4 1 5 ............................. ............ ........................................
6.42 to 6.58 ....................................................................................
6.585 to 6.7 4 5 ................. ..............................................................
6.75 to 6 .9 1 5 ............................................................
6.92 to 7 .0 8 ...................................................................................
7.085 to 7 .2 4 5 .. ................................................ ..........................
7.25 to 7 .4 1 5 ....................................... .............. ..........................
7.42 to 7.58 ....................... ...........................................................
7 585 to 7.745 ................................................................................
7.75 to 7 .9 1 5 .....................
7.92 to 8 .0 8 ......................................................... .........................
8.085 to 8.2 45......................... ................................. ....................
8.25 to 8 .4 1 5 .................................................................................

32.5
33
33.5
34
34.5
35
35.5
36
36.5
37
37.5
38
38.5
39
39.5
40
40.5
41
41.5
42
42.5
43
43.5
44
44.5
45

5
Average includes a weighted average for the special skilled trades increase.
7
The agreement provided that cost-of-living adjustments be determined as follows:
Combined Consumer Price Index,
United States and Canada,
3-month average*

169.0
169.1
169.4
169.7
170.0
170.3
170.6
170.9
171.2
171.5

Hourly cost-of-living
allowance**
(in cents)

or less ..........................................................................
to 169.3 ........................................................................
to 169.6.............
to 169.9........................................................................
to 170.2 ........................................................................
to 170.5 .........................
to170.8 ........................................................................
to171.1...................................
to 171.4......................
to 171.7.................................................

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

and so forth, with a 1-cent adjustment for each 0.3-point change in the average Combined Index (rounded to the nearest 0.1 Index point) for the appro­
priate 3 months.
*A 3-month average Combined Consumer Price Index was calculated as shown in the following example (calculations used to determine the Dec. 1976
cost-of-living adjustment):
Example: To obtain the Combined Consumer Price Index, the Consumer Price Index for Canada was multiplied by 0.1 and the Consumer Price
Index for the United States was multiplied by 0.9. This ratio approximated the proportion of auto production and employment in each country.
As the Canadian Index was published on a 1971 base, a conversion factor of 1.15607 was used to convert the Canadian Index to a 1967 base
consistent with that of the U.S. Index.
Consumer Price Index,
U,S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Consumer Price Index,
Statistics Canada
(1971=100)

(1967=100)

171 .9 ....... ................. August 1976.............................150.0
172.6..
................ September 1976 ..................... 150.7
173 .3 .......................... October 1976 ........................... 151.7
(171.9 X
(172.6 X
(173.3 X

.9) + (150.0 X 1.15607 X .1) = 172.0
.9) + (150.7 X 1.15607 X .1) = 172.8
.9) + (151.7 X 1.15607 X .1) = 173.5
3)518.3
Combined Consumer Price Index,3-month average.......... .. 172.8
**Onecent of the allowance could be diverted on each adjustment date from June 1977 through September 1978 (total 6 cents) to finance the cost of the
special one-time lump-sum payment to certain retirees and surviving spouses. The allowance was to be restored to its proper level on December 4,1978.




12

'Skilled trade adjustments, effective Oct. 18, 1976, were determined as follows:
Ma x i m u m

h o u r l y rate b e f o r e 1 9 7 6

Adjustment

generaI w a g e increase

(in c e n t s )

Up through $6,745 ...............................................................................
10
$6,845 ....................................................................................................
6
$6,905 ...............................................................................................
10,5
$6,935 ...............................................................................................
7.5
plus
M a x i m u m h o u r l y r ate after a p p l i c a t i o n o f a b o v e i n c r e a s e , t h e
1 9 7 6 g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e a n d t r ansfer o f $ 1 . 0 9 o f t h e c o s t - o f -

Adjustment

living a l l o w a n c e i n t o b a s e r a t e s

(in c e n t s )

Up through $8,505 ...........................................................................
$8.51 or more...................................................................................

10
15

•The Sept. 19,1977, and Sept. 18,1978, improvement factor increases applied to base hourly rates (excluding the cost-of-living allowances in effect and
shift premiums) as follows:




Hourly improvement
factor i n c r e a s e
B a s e rate b e f o r e i n c r e a s e

Up through $ 5.58 ................................................................
$ 5.585 to $ 5.745.................................................................
$ 5.75 to $ 5.915.................................................................
$ 5.92 to $ 6.08...................................................................
$ 6.085 to $ 6.245.................................................................
$ 6.25 to $ 6.415.................................................................
$ 6 .4 2 to $ 6 .5 8 ...................................................................
$ 6.585 to $ 6.745 .................................................................
$ 6.75 to $ 6.915.................................................................
$ 6 .9 2 to $ 7 . 0 8 . . . ..............................................................
$ 7.085 to $ 7 .2 4 5 ...;........
$ 7.25 to $ 7.415.................................................................
$ 7 .4 2 to $ 7.58 ...................................................................
$ 7.585 to $ 7.745 .................................................................
$ 7.75 to $ 7.915.................................................................
$ 7 .9 2 to $ 8.08........................................... ......................
$ 8.085 to $ 8.245 .................................................................
$ 8.25 to $ 8.415.................................................................
$ 8 .4 2 to $ 8.58...................................................................
$ 8.585 to $ 8.745.................................................................
$ 8.75 to $ 8.915.................................................................
$ 8 .9 2 to $ 9 .0 8 ...................................................................
$ 9.085 to $ 9.245 .................................................................
$ 9.25 to $ 9.415.................................................................
$ 9 .4 2 to $ 9 58 ...................................................................
$ 9.585 to $ 9.745.................................................................
$ 9.75 to $ 9.915.................................................................
$ 9.92 to $10.08................... ..............................................
$10,085 to $10,245 .................................................................
$10.25 to $10.415.................................................................

13

(in c e n t s )

16.5
17
17.5
18
18.5
19
19.5
20
20.5
21
21.5
22
22.5
23
23.5
24
24.5
25
25.5
26
26.5
27
27.5
28
28.5
29
29.5
30
30.5
31

Table 2.

Hourly job rates,1 selected occupations,2 1973-78
Occupation

Sept. 15, 1973

Janitors4 .............................................................
Assemblers, major4 ........................................
Pipefitters ...........................................................
Toolm akers ......................................................

$4,505
4.765
6.010
6.255

Nov. 19, 19733
$4,855
5.115
6.360
6.605
Oct. 18, 19766

Janitors4 5 .............................................................
Assemblers, major4 5 ........................................
Pipefitters .............................................................
Toolm akers .........................................................

$6,595
6.885
8.440
8.660

1
The rates shown include only that portion of the cost-of-living
allowance incorporated into base rates on stipulated dates. Except for
assemblers (major) and janitors which are flat rate classifications, rates
shown are the maximum of the rate range for each occupation.
2
These basic hourly rates generally applied to all of the company’s
plants.
Reflects incorporation on this date of 35 cents of the existing 40-cent
cost-of-living allowance into base rates.
4 nonskilled workers have flat rates and are hired or rehired at 45 cents
AII
an hour (20 cents before Nov. 19, 1973) below this rate. These workers
receive a 20-cent-an-hour (10 cents before Nov. 19,1973) adjustment after
4 weeks. Their wages are increased to the job rate after a total of 12 weeks




14

Sept. 23, 1974
$5,000
5.270
6.550
6.805
Sept. 19, 1977
$6,795
7.090
8.795
9.020

Sept. 22, 1975
$5,150
5.430
6.745
7.010
Sept. 18, 1978
$7,000
7.305
9.060
9.290

(8 weeks before Nov. 19, 1973). Effective with the 1973 agreement, upon
attaining 6 months of seniority, such hires or rehires are to receive an
additional payment of 25 cents an hour plus shift or overtime premium for
hours worked during first 4 weeks of employment and 15 cents an hour plus
shift or overtime premium for hours worked during 5th through 12th weeks
of employment.
Employees rehired within 1 year of probationary layoff or date seniority
was broken had hiring-in rate determined by number of weeks of
employment previously completed.
includes incorporation on this date of $1.09 of the existing $1.14 costof-living allowance into base rates.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision

Premium pay for Saturday and Sunday work
Oct. 18, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Changed: Employees working on 40-hour rotating
schedules on necessary continuous 7-day operations
whose occupations involved work on Saturdays, Sun­
days, or holidays, except Steel Division to receive
double time for work on 2d regularly scheduled day
off in workweek. Previous requirement that employee
had to work first regularly scheduled day off no longer
applicable.
Increased: Bonus for employees outside of Steel O pera­
tions who worked on 40-hour rotating schedules on
necessary continuous 7-day operations whose occu­
pations involved work on Saturdays, Sundays, or
holidays— to 20 cents an hour for hours worked; not
included in com puting vacation, incentive, and
afternoon- and night-shift pay, or any other payment
for hours not worked.
Holiday pay

Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Added: O ne basic holiday (day
after Thanksgiving) beginning
in 1974 and to the unbroken
Christm as-New Year’s holiday
period, 1 additional day off
with pay in the period that
began in 1973 and 2 additional
days off with pay in each of the
periods that began in 1974 and
1975. (See opposite paragraph
for schedule of paid holidays.)

The holidays consisted of (1) 5 basic holidays in the 1st
contract year and 6 basic holidays in each of the next 2
contract years— Good Friday, M em orial Day, 4th of
July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and beginning
Nov. 29, 1974, the day after Thanksgiving— and (2) a
holiday period during the Christm as-New Year’s sea­
son (plus additional days of holiday pay for Sunday,
Dec. 16, 1973; Sunday, Dec. 15, 1974; and Sunday,
Dec. 14, 1975) with the following days off with pay:
(a)
(b)
(c)

1st period— Dec. 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 31,
1973, and Jan. 1, 1974;
2d period— Dec. 2 3 ,2 4 ,2 5 ,2 6 ,2 7 ,3 0 , and 31,
1974, and Jan. 1, 1975; and
3d period— Dec. 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, and 31,
1975, and Jan. 1, and 2, 1976.

Changed (only as to Saturdays and Sundays involved):
Days on which employee could be called to work only
in em ergency (not applicable to 7-day operations;
Steel Operations; 5-day operations in support of 7day operations at Dearborn and Nashville glass
plants; and Sunday work which was part of No. 1 shift
on Monday):
Sat.-Dec. 22, 1973
Sun.-Dec. 23, 1973
Sat.-Dec. 29, 1973
Sun.-Dec. 30, 1973
Sat.-Dec. 21, 1974
Sun.-Dec. 22, 1974
Sat.-Dec. 28, 1974
Sun.-Dec. 29, 1974
Sat.-Dec. 27, 1975
Sun.-Dec. 28, 1975
Sat.-Jan. 3, 1976
Sun.-Jan. 4, 1976
If otherwise eligible, employee not disqualified for
holiday pay if em ployee declined work assignment on
1 or more of the above days.
Changed: In the case of holiday pay for the ChristmasNew Year’s holiday period, a seniority employee
absent without excuse on both (1) the last scheduled
workday before and (2) the next scheduled workday
after the holiday period, was to be ineligible for holi­
day pay for all the holidays within the period. A senior­
ity employee absent without excuse on only one of
either (1) or (2) above was to be ineligible for 2 of the

See footnotes at end of table.




15

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Holiday pay— Continlued
Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued.

Nov. 27, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Oct. 18, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

holidays, but could receive pay for the rem aining holi­
days, if otherwise eligible.
Changed: A seniority em ployee laid off during the second
workw eek before w eek in which 1 holiday or more in
C hristm as-New Y ear’s holiday period fell and who
worked last scheduled w orkday before layoff was, if
otherwise eligible, to recieve pay for holidays in
Christm as-New Year’s period. A seniority em ployee
on layoff or sick leave absence w hen holiday occurred
and who returned to work following holidays but dur­
ing w eek in which holiday fell, was to receive pay for
such holidays.
Prior adm inistration policy incorporated into contract: A
seniority em ployee on a personal leave of abserice
which expired during Christm as-New Year’s holiday
period, was, if otherwise eligible, to receive pay for
holidays in the period which fell (1) after the final day
of such leave, or (2) on or after date em ployee notified
plant of availability for work, w hichever was later. A
seniority em ployee whose vacation included either
(1) the last scheduled day before or (2) the first sched­
uled day after the Christm as-New Y ear’s holiday
period was, if otherwise eligible, to receive pay for
holidays during the period if the em ployee w orked the
scheduled workdays im m ediately before and after the
vacation when such workdays w ere within the w ork­
weeks that included w hat w ould have been either
0 ) or (2).
Changed: For employees working on necessary continu­
ous 7-day operation whose work involved work on
holidays— if a designated holiday fell on one of em ­
ployee’s regularly scheduled days off, the employee,
in addition to his holiday pay, was paid double tim e for
tim e worked.
Added: Effective with the Thanks­
giving Day holiday in 1975,
shift premium to be included in
holiday pay (except for Dec.
14,1975, and holidays falling in
the Christm as-New Year’s holi­
day period).
Added: Shift premium to be in­
cluded in holiday pay for all
holidays, including days off
under Scheduled Paid Personal
Holiday Plan.

T he holidays consisted of (1) 6 basic holidays— G ood Fri­
day, M em orial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving Day and the day after Thanksgiving, (2)
July 3 ,1 9 7 8 on a nonrecurring basis and (3) a holiday
period during the C hristm as-New Year’s season (plus
additional days of holiday pay for Sunday, Dec. 19,
1976; Sunday, Dec. 18, 1977; and Sunday, Dec. 17,
1978) with the following days off with pay:
(a)
(b)
(c)

1st period— Dec. 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31,
1976;
2d period— Dec. 26, 27, 28, 29, and 3 0 ,1 9 7 7
and Jan. 2, 1978;
3d period— Dec. 25, 26, 27, 28, and 2 9 ,19 7 8
and Jan. 1, 1979.

Changed (only as to dates involved and inclusion of
Tulsa Glass plant): Em ployees could be called to work
only in em ergencies on the following Saturdays and
Sundays, which w ere not paid holidays (not
applicable to 7-day operations, Steel Operations, 5day operations in support of 7-day operations at the
Dearborn, Nashville and Tulsa Glass Plants, and
Sunday work which was part of No. 1 shift on M on­
day):

See footnotes at end of table.




16

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision

Holiday pay—-Continued
S at,-D ec.
S u n.-D ec.
Sat.-Jan.
Sun.-Jan.
S at.-D ec.
S un.-D ec.
S at.-D ec.
Sun.-Jan,
S at.-D ec.
S u n.-D ec.
S at.-D ec.
S un.-D ec.

Oct. 1, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Established: Schedule Paid Per­
sonal Holiday Plan which pro­
vided a maximum of 12 per­
sonal holidays over the term of
the contract for employees
with 1 or more years of senior­
ity on the first day of a schedul­
ing period and who were at
work or were reinstated to ac­
tive em ploym ent after the first
day but during the scheduling
period.

25, 1976
26. 1976
1 ,1 9 7 7
2, 1977
24, 1977
25. 1977
3 1 ,1 9 7 7
1, 1978
23, 1978
24, 1978
30, 1978
31, 1978

If otherwise eligible, employee not disqualified for
holiday pay if em ployee declined work assignment on
1 or more of the above days.
Personal holidays provided as follows:
(1) one during Oct. through Dec. 1977;
(2) four during Jan. through M ay 1978;
(3) three during Sept. 1978 through Feb. 1979; and
(4) four during Mar. through June 1979.
June, July and August 1978, and July and August
1979 were excluded.
Basic features of the plan included: (1) M andatory level
scheduling of personal holidays during designated
scheduling periods; (2) impartial selection of em ploy­
ees for available days off; and (3) a fair opportunity for
paid personal holidays on available M ondays and Fri­
days in each calendar year. To be paid for personal
holiday, em ployee had to work the day before and the
day after holiday regardless of workweek. Mandatory
Saturdays or Sundays imm ediately following a
personal holiday occurring on Friday or preceding a
personal holiday occurring on Monday were traded
for subsequent voluntary Saturdays or Sundays in
order to maximize long weekend opportunities.
Pay in lieu of time off not available except in case of (1) el­
igible employees who were not at work on scheduled
personal holiday for other reasons, (2) em ployee re­
assignments which would disturb established personal
holiday schedules, (3) employees affected for speci­
fied periods by a major rearrangement of operations,
the addition orelim ination of a shift, a major line speed
change, or a model launch. An employee could be
called in to work on scheduled personal holidayonlyin
case of true emergency (worker would have right to
refuse) and would receive the applicable holiday
premium for those hours.

Paid vacations
Oct. 18, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Added: Shift premium included in
com putation of vacation pay.

Changed: Excused Absence Allow ance — em ployee would
be eligible for excused absence for any personal rea­
son provided (a) employee made written request on
com pany form at least one week in advance of day re­
quested; and (b) there would be no adverse impact on
operations. If more employees working for the same
supervisor requested the same day off than could be
accommodated, employee who requested first would
be granted day off.

Bereavement pay
Added: To definition of imm ediate fam ily— grandparent,
grandparent of current spouse, half-brother, and halfsister.

Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 11, 1973).

See footnotes at end of table.




1
7

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued

Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Bereavement p ay --C o n tin u e d
Changed: Em ployee hired or rehired on or after Nov. 19,
1973, had to have acquired seniority to be eligible for
bereavem ent pay.

Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated Oct. 11, 1973)
— Continued
Education pay
Nov. 19, 1973
(com pany Setter dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Increased: To $700 a year for tui­
tion and compulsory fees for
seniority em ployee on active
rolls taking approved courses
at accredited college when
such courses were success­
fully com pleted.

Oct. 18, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Increased: Tuition refund to pro­
vide active seniority employees
who successfully completed
courses: (1) $900 maximum
per calendar year for approved
courses at an accredited uni­
versity or college or (2) $450
maximum per calendar year
for courses taken at all other
approved educational institu­
tions.
Moving allowance

Oct. 18, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Increased: Depending on distance
between new and old plants,
both transfer and layoff mov­
ing allowances— to ranges of
$385 to $650 for single em ploy­
ees and $865 to $1,355 for
married employees.2
Insurance benefits

Group insurance.
Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Increased: Three brackets of bene­
fits added to group life and
disability insurance schedule
for employees in higher wage
brackets,3 resulting in (1) $7,500
to $16,000 life insurance be­
fore age 65; (2) $1,500 to
$2,400 life insurance at age 65
and over with 10 but less than
20 years under the retirement
plan, and $2,250 to $4,800 with
20 years or more under the
plan; (3) $3,750 to $8,000 acci­

dental death and dismember­
ment benefits', (4) $85 to $170
weekly sickness and accident
benefits; (5) $150 to $320
monthly total and permanent
disability benefits', and (6) $285
to $655 monthly extended dis­
ability benefits. Deleted lowest
2 brackets under previous pro­
gram.

See footnotes at end of table.




1
8

Added: For “short-service” em ployee hired or rehired on
or after Nov. 19, 1973, the w eekly accident and sick­
ness benefits, during a continuous disability begin­
ning in 1st 4 months after accident and sickness in­
surance was in force, were to be the following
percentages of the w eekly am ount determ ined from

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Insurance benefits— CContinued
the schedule of benefits:3 (1) 50 percent during dis­
ability beginning 1st and 2d month that em ployee had
coverage or 75 percent beginning any week in which
3d day of hospital confinem ent occurred within 14
consecutive days and for succeeding week ending in
same month as month in which 3d day of confinement
occurred and (2) 75 percent during disability begin­
ning in 3d and 4th months of coverage.
Changed: Uninsured employee retiring before age 65 (was
between ages 55 and 65) without returning to work
from layoff or ieave of absence with pension benefits
beginning on or after Nov. 19, 1973. to be insured if
under age 65, for same coverages for group life and
disability that otherwise could have been continued at
time of retirement for the amount in force while em­
ployee was last working.

Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued

Changed: Three brackets added
to contributions for group life
and disability insurance for
employees in higher wage
brackets under age 65 who
stopped working for any rea­
son.4
Added: Com pany com m itm entto pay premiums, taxes, or
contributions that employee may be required to pay as
a result of National Health Insurance; com pany to
retain any “savings.”
Added: Employees eligible for extended disability bene­
fits, including those who qualified for extended disa­
bility benefits but were not eligible for payment of such
benefits because benefits from other sources
exceeded extended disability benefit amount, and who
were enrolled in M edicare Part B to receive $6.30 per
month while so eligible (unless receiving same amount
under pension plan).

Mar. 1, 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Hospital-surgical-medical-drugdental benefits.
June 1, 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Added: National Blue Shield Reci­
procity Program to assist em ­
ployees and retirees (and their
dependents
or
surviving
spouses) in receiving prompt
p a y m e n t fo r e x p e n s e s
incurred outside the local Blue
Shield area. Amounts are
based on usual, reasonable,
and custom ary charges.

Covered expenses included surgery; anesthesia; radia­
tion therapy; diagnostic X-ray; diagnostic laboratory
and pathology; in-hospital medical care for general
conditions, TB, mental treatm ent, drug addiction, and
chronic alcoholism; outpatient and physicians’ office
em ergency treatment; and consultations.

Oct. 1, 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Established: Dental program for
employees with at least 1 year
of s e n io r ity
and th e ir
dependents which provided
(1) 100 percent of reasonable
and custom ary charge for
most preventative services and
em ergency palliative treat­
ment; (2) 85 percent of reason­
able and custom ary charge for
most X-rays, extractions and
oral surgery, except for ortho­
dontic work; periodontal treat­
ment;
general
anesthetics
when
medically
necessary
with oral or dental surgery;
root canal treatment; restora­
tion fillings; or in certain cases,

Com pany-paid dental coverage not provided while on
leave, layoff, or for retirees or surviving spouses, or
sponsored dependents. Dental coverage provided at
em ployee’s expense while on local union leave or ap­
proved medical leave, but not to exceed period equal
to seniority when absence began.

See footnotes at end of table.




19

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Insurance benefits— Continued
Oct. 1, 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)—-Continued.

crowns, inlays, onlays and
gold fillings; antibiotic injec­
tions by dentist; repairs to
bridgework, dentures; relining
or rebasing of dentures; or (3)
50 percent for (a) initial fixed
bridgework, including inlays
or crowns to install it; initial re­
movable dentures; replace­
ment of some existing fixed
b rid g e w o rk o r re m o v a b le
dentures or addition of teeth to
either; and (b) orthodontic di­
agnostic and treatm ent serv­
ices for children under age 19.
The program provided for a
maximum of $750 per person
per year except in the case of
(3) (b) which had a lifetime
maximum of $500.

Group insurance.
Changed: Survivor income bene­
fits coverage for early and spe­
cial early retirees who retired
before Oct. 1,1 97 4 provided to
age 55.

Oct. 1, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Increased: Insurance before age
65 for employees . who had
been at work on or after Oct. 1,
1975;3 (1) life insurance— by
$1,000 for each bracket; (2)

The increased life and accidental death and dism em ber­
ment benefits w ere not to be payable until 6 months
after death when it occurred before age 65.

monthly total and permanent
disability benefits— by $20 for
each bracket; and (3) acciden­
tal death and dismemberment
benefits— by $500 for each
bracket.
Increased: Life insurance at or
after age 65 for employees who
had been at work on or after
Oct. 1 ,1 97 5 ,3by (1) increasing
minimum am ount for 10-year
employees to $2,000; (2) elim i­
nating the 30-percent maxi­
mum; and (3) counting years of
service under retirem ent plan
up to age 68 in determ ining
amount of continuing life
insurance. (See opposite para­
graph for calculation of con­
tinuing life insurance.)

See footnotes at end of table.




20

Changed: For employees who were at work on or after
Oct. 1, 1975, the life insurance was reduced at and
after age 65 by 2 percent per month until (1) for
employees with 10 years or more service under retire­
ment plan, face value decreased to IV 2 percent of in­
surance value on 65th birthday times years of service
under retirem ent plan at end of month em ployee at­
tained age 68 (m inim um $2,000) and (2) for those with
less than 10 years of service under retirem ent plan,
face value decreased to 11/2 percent of insurance value
on 65th birthday times years of service under
retirem ent plan at end of month em ployee attained
age 68 (m inim um $500). Reduced insurance con­
tinued until death for em ployee with 10 years of serv­
ice under the retirem ent plan, and until the earlier of
dates when seniority was broken or after 25 months of
continuous layoff for em ployee with less than 10 years
of service under retirem ent plan, except that such
em ployee if at work on or after Oct. 1, 1975 and at­
tained 10 years of service after 65th birthday, was to
have life insurance in force at end of month in which
he attained age 65, reduced and continued as for 10years-or-m ore employees.
Added: For em ployee who was at work on or after Oct. 1,
1975, definition of total and permanent disability for
such benefits was expanded to include inability for

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits—-Continued
rest of life to perform work in plant where w orker had
seniority.
Added: For em ployee who was at work on or after Oct. 1,
1974, with extended disability benefit that would
begin on or after Oct. 1, 1975, definition of total dis­
ability for extended disability benefits was expanded
to include prevention by bodily injury or disease from
performing regular work in plant in which em ployee
had seniority. If em ployee were to no longer satisfy re­
quirem ent but, within 2 weeks after end of benefits,
again became so disabled, benefits were to be re­
sumed.
Changed: For employee who was at work on or after Oct.
1,1 97 4 with extended disability benefit that would be­
gin on or after Oct. 1,1975, military service connected
disability was not to disqualify the em ployee for ex­
tended disability benefit (previously qualified only if
10 years elapsed since separation from military).
Changed: For employee who was at w ork on or after Oct.
1,1974, with extended disability benefit that would be­
gin on or after Oct. 1,1975, extended disability bene­
fit was not to be reduced by benefits for total disability
due to pneumoconiosis as defined as of Nov. 19,1973,
under Federal Black Lung Benefits Act of 1972.
Changed: For em ployee laid off on or after Oct. 1,1975,
coverage for life, accidental death or dismemberment,
and survivors insurance benefits provided for the
greater of (a) 1 month (up to 12) for each 4 weeks of
regular SUB to which employee was entitled at layoff
or (b) the number of months (up to 12) to which em­
ployee would be eligible on basis of years of seniority
as of last day worked before layoff (or date placed on
layoff for returning veteran) as follows (previously
form ula (a) above only):

Oct. 1, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued.

Years
of
seniority

Maximum number
of months without
cost to employee

Less than 1 .............................
0
1 but less than 2 ...................... 2
2 but less than 4 .........
4
4 but less than 6 .................. ... 6
6 but less than 8 ...................... 8
8 but less than 10 .................... 10
10 or m o r e ...................................... 12

Survivor income benefit insurance.
Increased: Transition benefit— For
survivor of em ployee who had
been at work on or after Oct. 1,
1975, to $200 for any month for
which no eligible survivor of
deceased em ployee was eligi­
ble for an unreduced old-age.
survivors or disability benefit
under the Federal Social Secu­
rity Act, otherwise $125
Increased' Bridge benefit— For
survivor of em ployee who had
been at work on or after Oct. 1,
1975, to $200 a month paid to
eligible spouse of deceased
employee, if spouse was age
45 (was 48) or more on date of
employee's death, paid after
termination of transition bene­
fit.

See footnotes at end of table.



2 1

Added: A class A or Class B survivor of employee who
had been at work on or after Oct. 1,1975, was allowed
to revoke waiver of survivor benefits.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Insurance benefits— Continued
Oct. 1, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued.

Oct. 18, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Hospital-medical-surgical-drugdental benefits.
Prescription drugs:
Expanded: To provide addi­
tional m aintenance “legend”
drugs.
Hospital-m edical-surgical bene­
fits were to be improved effec­
tive Oct. 1,1975, after selection
in M ay 1975 from an agreed
upon list which included bene­
fits for alcoholism and drug ad­
diction treatm ent (em ployees
only); prosthetic aids (except
hearing aids); durable medical
equipment; outpatient psychi­
atric treatment; organ tissue
transplant evaluation; home
care from extended care facil­
ity; pap smear and lab tests;
c h e m o th e ra p y ; e m e rg e n c y
first aid and em ergency medi­
cal care; obstetrical lab; and
outpatient physiotherapy.

Changed: Hospital-m edical-surgical-drug (but not
dental) coverage for employees laid off on or after
Oct. 1,1975, to be provided on the basis of the greater
of (a) as previously continued (based on SUB credit
units) or (b) the num ber of months (up to 12) to which
em ployee would be eligible on basis of years of
seniority on last day worked before layoff as follows:

Years
of
seniority

Maximum number
of months without
cost to employee

Less than 1 ............. ................... 0
1 but less than 2 .. ................... 2
2 but less than 4 . . ................... 4
4 but less than 6 . ................... 6
6 but less than 8 .. ................... 8
8 but less than 10 . ................... 10
10 or m o r e ................. ................... 12

Group insurance.
Increased: Five brackets of bene­
fits added to group life and dis­
ability insurance schedule for
employees in higher wage
brackets,? resulting
in (1)
$ 1 2 ,5 0 0 to $ 2 2 ,5 0 0 life
insurance before age 65; (2)
$6,250 to $11,250 accidental

Benefit bracket ranges widened from 25 to 35 cents be­
tween each benefit level.
Lowest 8 brackets w ere deleted.

death and dismemberment
benefits; (3) $125 to $240
weekly accident and sickness
benefits; (4) $250 to $450
monthly total and permanent
disability benefits; and (5) $460
to $860 Schedule I and $480 to
$945 Schedule II monthly ex­

tended disability benefits.
Increased: Minimum Continuing
Group Life Insurance to $2,000
for current retirees, $2,500 for
active em ployees (future re­
tirees).5

Eliminated: 6-m onth delay on paym ent of life and acci­
dental death and dism em berm ent benefits for death
before age 65.

Changed: Alternate seniority-based table (other table
based on SUB eligibility) for continuation of life, acci­

dental death and dismemberment insurance and
survivor income benefit coverage for laid-off em ­
ployees as follows:

Years of seniority

Months continued

Less than 1 .................................... 0
1 but less than
2 .................. 2
2 but less than
3 .................. 4
3 but less than
4 .................. 6
4 but less than
5 .................. 8
5 but less than 6 ............................ 10
6 and over ....................................... 12
Changed: Accident and sickness and extended disability
benefits insurance—-to begin first of third month
following hire or rehire.

See footnotes at end of table.




22

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision

Insurance benefits— Continued
Changed: Dismemberment benefit paid for accidental
injury if loss of bodily mem ber occurred within 2 years
of accident.
Changed: Reinstated accident and sickness benefits paid
to eligible em ployee on layoff who (1) was receiving
reinstated accident and sickness benefits prior to re­
call and was disabled upon recall or (2) was found dis­
abled by plant physician or certified disabled by per­
sonal physician upon recall. Revised interpretation
was retroactive to Nov. 19, 1973.
Changed: Accident and sickness benefits not paid for
any day in which em ployee received 8 or more hours’
pay. If employee received less than 8, accident and
sickness benefits were payable to fill difference be­
tween am ount paid and 8 hours’ pay, but not to exceed
maximum daily accident and sickness benefit.
Changed: Employee could not waive accident and sick­
ness benefits or extended disability benefits prior to
exhaustion of full tim e-for-tim e disability period in
order to com m ence total and permanent disability
payout.
Increased: Extended disability benefit paym ent to quali­
fied employees enrolled in M edicare Part B to $7.20
per month.
Changed: Extended disability benefit pension offset
frozen at original am ount for future recipients and to
Sept. 30, 1976, am ount for current recipients.

Oct. 18, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976)— Continued.

Hospital-surgical-medical-drugdental-vision benefits.
Changed: Delayed effective date of hospital-surgicalm edical-drug coverage for hires and rehires to first
day of third month following month of employment.
Jan. 1, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Increased: Hospitalization (room
and board)— In nonparticipat­
ing general acute care hospital,
actual charges up to $70 a day
for maximum of 365 days.
Increased: Prescription drug plan
copaym ent to $3.
Increased: Dental program— 90
percent of reasonable and
customary charge for most Xrays, extractions, and oral sur­
gery.
Lifetime
orthodontic
maximum increased to $650.

Im p ro v e d : H o s p it a l- s u r g ic a lmedical benefits to include (1)
expanded home care which no
longer required prior hospital
or extended care facility ad­
mission; (2) liberalized em er­
gency
medical
care
with
uniform criteria for coverage of
related hospital and physi­
cians’ charges; (3) extension of
substance abuse benefits to
retirees and surviving spouses;
(4) a maximum of 140 lifetime
ambulatory visits for substance
abuse: (5) an annual maximum
of $1,000 for outpatient psychi­
atric care, and hospital-based
day care now charged against

See footnotes at end of table.




23

Copaym ent was applied to each separate prescription
order or refill.
Added: Dental program extended to retirees and surviv­
ing spouses.
Changed: Em ployee and spouse under 19 years of age
eligible for orthodontic coverage on same basis as
dependents.
Changed: Dental coverage permitted on a self-pay basis
for discharged em ployee with pending grievance, to
be reimbursed if em ployee was reinstated.
Changed: Alternate seniority based table (other table
based on SUB eligibility) for continuation of hospitalsurgical-m edical-dental coverages for laid-off em­
ployees, revised as follows:

Years of seniority

Months continued

Less than 1 .................................... 0
1 but less than 2 .......................... 2
2 but less than 3 .......................... 4
3 but less than 4 .......................... 6
4 but less than 5 .........................
8
5 but less than 6 .......................... 10
6 and over ................... .................. 12
Changed: List of m aintenance drugs provided under pre­
scription drug program in quantities greater than a
34-day supply.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

insurance benefits— Continued
Jan. 1, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976)—
Continued

Oct. 1, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

45-day inpatient mental days
allowance; (6) liberalized dura­
ble medical equipment and
prosthetic applicance benefits;
(7) removal of 180-day limit on
outpatient physical therapy
and coverage for chem o­
therapy when given at home.
E s ta b lis h e d : Vision expense
benefits for active employees
with 1 or more years of senior­
ity and their eligible depend­
ents which provided (1) to p a r­
ticipating providers (a) reason­
able and customary charges
less a 20-percent copayment
for examinations, (b) acquisi­
tion cost plus dispensing fee
less 20-percent copaym ent for
le n s e s in c lu d in g c o n ta c t
lenses when required to cor­
rect vision to 20/70 in best eye,
(c) acquisition cost (maximum
$12.50 or, in later years,
greater adjusted amounts)6
plus a dispensing fee less a 20p e rc e n t c o p a y m e n t fo r
frames, (d) acquisition cost of
contact lenses other than pro­
vided in (b) above, plus
dispensing fees for lenses and
frames, less a 20-percent co­
payment, with benefit payment
not exceeding $35; or (2) to
nonparticipating providers (a)
75 percent of reasonable and
custom ary charges after 20percent copaym ent for exam i­
nation, (b) the lesser of 50 per­
c e n t o f n o n p a r t ic ip a t in g
providers’ charges
or 75
percent of average vision ex­
pense benefits paid to partici­
pating providers for lenses and
frames.
Established: Hearing aid expense
benefits program for active
employees with 1 or more
years of seniority, retirees and
eligible surviving spouses and
th e ir e lig ib le d e p e n d e n ts
which provided (1) reasonable
and customary charges for
audiom etric examinations, (2)
reasonable and customary
charges for hearing aid evalua­
tion tests (not to exceed $40 or,
in later years, greater adjusted
am ounts)7, and (3) acquisition
cost of hearing aids, and
dispensing fees associated
therewith.

Survivor income benefit insurance.
Increased: Transition benefits—tor
survivor of employee who had
been at work on cr after Oct, 1,

See footnotes at end of table.




24

Benefits for vision testing exam ination, lenses, and
frames payable for each covered individual once for
each 24-consecutive-m onth period.
Benefits as in (1 )(a) or (2)(a), as appropriate, provided for
an additional exam ination by an ophthalm ologist upon
referral after exam ination by an optometrist, if second
examination occurred within 60 days of referring op­
tom etrist’s exam ination.

Benefits for one audiom etric examination, one hearing
aid evaluation test, and one hearing aid, payable for
each covered individual for each 36-consecutivemonth period.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1 Continued
—
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Insurance benefits— Continued
Oct. 1, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976)— Continued

1975, to maximum of $250 a
month; minimum $150.
Increased: Bridge benefit
to $250 a month.
Retirement benefits

Oct. 1, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Increased: Normal monthly retire­
m ent b e n e fits — em p lo y e e
retired (1) before Oct. 25,1967,
by 75 cents per year of credited
service; or (2) on or after Oct.
25,1967, by 75 cents to amount
ranging from $7.25 to $8.50 per
year
of
credited
service,
depending on benefit class
code and date of retirem ent.8
Increased: Early and disability

monthly retirement benefits.
For retirement at company op­
tion or under mutually satis­
factory conditions (special
early retirement) or for total
and permanent disability
(disability retirement)
(1) before Sept. 1,1964, (a)
special
early
retire­
m e n t-in c re a s e d by 75
cents in life income,
benefit rates and (b) dis­
ability
retirem ent— in­
creased by 75 cents in
life income benefit rates
plus $1 in tem porary
benefit rates;9
(2) on or after Sept. 1,1964
but before Oct. 25,1967,
to $7 per year of credited
service, plus tem porary
benefit of $7.75 per year
of service up to 25; and
(3) on or after Oct. 25,
1967, to amount ranging
from $7.25 to $8.50 per
year of credited service,
depending on benefit
class code and date of
retirem ent8 plus tem po­
rary
benefit ranging
from $8 to $8.50 per year
of service up to 25, de­
pending on date of re­
tirem ent.1
0

For retirement at own option
(regular early retirement)—
employee retired
(1) before Sept. 1,1964, in­
creased by 75 cents per
year of credited service,
as previously reduced;
(2) on or after Sept. 1,1964
but before Oct. 25,1967,
to $7 per year of credited
service, times percent­
age for age when bene­
fits began;1
1

See footnotes at end of table.




25

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1 Continued
-—
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Retirement benefits— Continued
Oct. 1, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued.

(3) on or after Oct. 25,1967
but before Oct. 1, 1971,
to amount ranging from
$7.25 to $8.50 per year of
credited
service, de­
pending on benefit class
code and date of retire­
m ent,8 times percentage
for age when benefits
began;1
1
(4) on or after Oct. 1, 1971,
to amount ranging from
$8 to $8.50 per year of
service, depending on
benefit class code8 times
p e r c e n ta g e fo r a g e
when benefits began,1
1
and upon attaining age
65 for retiree who had 30
years of credited service,
such retiree was to be
paid life income benefit
rate for his benefit class
code,8
reduced
by
amount equal to onethird of 1 percent times
num ber of months from
date benefits began to
month of 62d birthday
until Oct. 1,1974 if he re­
tired before Sept. 15,
1973, or Mar. 1, 1974 if
he retired on or after
Sept. 15, 1973, after
which no reduction in
the benefit would be
made because of retire­
ment before age 62.
In c re a s e d : V e s tin g — d e fe rre d
monthly benefit for break in
seniority on or after Nov. 19,
1973, ranging from $8 to $8.50
per year of credited service,
depending on benefit class
code.1
2

Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

See footnotes at end of table.




26

Changed: Supplem ental allowance — benefit payable on
or after Oct. 1, 1973, for em ployee retired at own
option under regular early retirem ent reduced for any
month before age 65 for which em ployee would be
eligible for an unreduced social security benefit on or
after Oct. 1, 1973 as follows:
(1) On or after Sept. 1, 1965, but before Oct. 25,
1967, reduced by $7.75 a month per year of
credited service up to 25;
(2) on or after Oct. 25, 1967, but before Sept. 15,
1970, reduced by $8 a month per year of service
up to 25;
(3) on or after Sept. 15, 1970, reduced by $8.50 a
month per year of service up to 25.
Added: Em ployee with 5 years of seniority as of Nov. 19,
1973, who was laid off during any calendar year after
1950 and before 1956, was credited with 40 hours for
each com plete calendar week of such absence during
which w orker had seniority, multiplied by percentage
as follows:

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision

Retirement benefits— CcDntinued

Employee seniority on
Nov. 19, 1973

Nov. 19, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973) —
Continued.

Percent

20 years or more ............................................
100
15-20 y e a r s .........................................................
75
10-15 y e a r s .........................................................
50
5-10 y e a r s ............................................................. 25
Changed: Eligibility requirement for disability retirem ent
liberalized to require 5 years (form erly 10) seniority
between separation from military service and onset of
disability resulting from service in Armed Forces for
employees with seniority on or after Nov. 19, 1973.

Mar. 1, 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

increased: Normal monthly retire­
m ent b e n e fits — e m p lo y e e
retired on or after Mar. 1,1974,
by 75 cents to amount ranging
from $8.75 to $9.25 per year of
credited service, depending on
benefit class code.8
Increased: Special early and dis­

ability monthly retirement
bene fits— em ployee retired on
or after Mar. 1,1974, to amount
ranging from $8.75 to $9.25 per
year of credited service, de­
pending
on
benefit class
code,8 plus tem porary benefit
of $9.50 per year of service up
to 25.1
0
Increased: Regular early monthly
re tir e m e n t b e n e fits — e m ­
ployee retired on or after Mar.
1, 1974, to amount ranging
from $8.75 to $9.25 per year of
service, depending on benefit
class code,8 times percentage
for age when benefit began.1
1
U p o n a tta in in g
a g e 65,
employee with 30 years of
credited service was to be paid
life income benefit rate for
proper benefit class code,8
with no reduction because of
retirem ent before age 62.
In c re as e d : Vesting — d e fe rr e d
monthly benefit for break in
seniority on or after Mar. 1,
1974, ranging from $8.75 to
$9.25 per year of credited serv­
ice, depending on benefit class
code.1
2
Increased: Supplemental allow­
ance for employee retiring on
early or total and permanent
disability retirem ent on or after
Mar. 1, 1974 with 30 years of
credited service which, when
added to early or disability
benefit, would bring total
benefit to (a) $550 for months
before age 82 and (b) $395
after 62nd birthday through
month retiree attained age 65
($320 for months before Oct 1,
1975 for retirements begin­
ning on or after Mar. 1, 1974,
but before Oct. 1, 1 974).1
3

See footnotes at end of table.




27

Changed: For em ployee retired on special early or dis­
ability retirem ent on or after Mar. 1 ,1974, tem porary
benefit continued until age 62 or prior date when re­
tiree became or could have become eligible for an
unreduced social security benefit.

Changed: Supplemental allowance— benefit payable on
or after Mar. 1,1974, for employee retiring at own op­
tion under regular early retirem ent on or after Mar. 1,
1974, reduced for any month before age 62 for which
retiree would be eligible for an unreduced social
security benefit, by $9.50 a month per year of credited
service, up to a maximum of 25.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Continued
Retirement benefits— C
Mar. 1. 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued.

Oct. 1, 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Added: Supplemental allowance
“interim supplem ent” ranging
from $3.50 to $7.50 per year of
credited service, depending on
age at retirem ent,1 payable
4
through month age 62 attained
for
employee
retiring
on
regular early retirem ent on or
after Mar. 1,1974 with less than
30 years of service and before
month age 62 attained. (The in­
terim supplem ent was not pay­
able for any month he was eli­
gible for unreduced social
security benefit.)
Increased: Special age 65 bene­
fit— to $6.30 a month.
Increased: Normal monthly retire­
ment benefits for em ployee re­
tired
(1) before Oct. 25, 1967, by
amounts
ranging
from
$1.25 to $1.70, to $8.25 per
year of credited service:
(2) on or after Oct. 25,1967, by
varying amounts ranging
from 25 cents to $1, to
am ount ranging from $8.25
to $10 per year of credited
s e rv ic e , d e p e n d in g on
benefit class code and date
of retirem ent.8
Increased: Special early and dis-

bility monthly retirement bene­
fits for employees who retired
(1) before Sept. 1 ,1 9 6 4 (a) on
special early retirem ent— to
$8.25 per year of credited
service, or (b) on disability
retirement, to $8.25 per
year of credited service
plus previous tem porary
benefit ranging from $6.60
to $7.25 per year of service
up to 25, depending on date
of retirem ent;9
(2) on or after Sept. 1, 1964
but before Oct. 25, 1967, to
$8.25 per year of credited
service, plus previous tem ­
porary benefit of $7.75 per
year of service up to 25;
(3) on or after Oct. 25, 1967,
to amount ranging from
$8.25 to $10 per year of
credited service depending
on benefit class code and
date of retirem ent,8 plus
tem porary benefit ranging
from $8 to $9.50 per year
of service up to 25 depend­
ing on date of retirem ent.1
0

See footnotes at end of table.




28

Changed: Supplemental allowance— in computing amount
of allowance for em ployee retired under special early
or disability retirem ent (except for such retirement on
or after Mar. 1,1974 with less than 30 years of service)
pension to include tem porary benefit payable for such
retirement whether or not pension actually included
such amount.

Added: Special age 65 benefit applicable to pensioner or
spouse if under age 65 and enrolled in voluntary M edi­
care by making contributions.
No change in life income benefit rates for those who re­
tired on normal, early, or disability pensions on or
after Mar. 1, 1974 but before Oct. 1, 1974.
Added: New benefit class code for skilled classifications
and certain high-rated other-than-skilled trades
classifications.8

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1 Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision

Retirement benefits—Continued
Oct. 1, 1974
(agreement dated
Oct. 31, 1973)—Continued.

Increased: Regular early monthly
retirement
benefits—em­
ployee retired
(1) before Sept. 1, 1964, to
$ 8 .2 5 as p re v io u s ly
reduced;
(2) on or after Sept. 1,1964 but
before Oct. 25, 1967, to
$8.25 per year of credited
service, times percentage
for age when benefits be­
gan;1
1
(3) on or after Oct. 25, 1967
but before Oct. 1, 1971, to
amount ranging from $8.25
to $8.75 per year of credited
service depending on
benefit class code and date
of retirement,8 times per­
centage for age when
benefits began;1 and
1
(4) on or after Oct. 1,1971 to
amount ranging from $8.25
to $10 per year of service,
depending on benefit class
code and date of retirement,8
times percentage for age
when benefits began,1 and
1
upon attaining age 65 for a
retiree who had 30 years of
credited service, the full life
income benefit to be paid
with no reduction because
of retirement before age62.
Increased: Vesting— deferred
monthly benefit for break in
seniority on or after Oct. 1,
1974 ranging from $9.25 to $10
per year of credited service,
depending on benefit class
code.1
2

Increased: Supplemental a//owance for employee retired on
early or disability retirement
on or after Oct. 1,1974 with 30
years of credited service
which, when added to early or
disability benefit would bring
total benefit to (a) $625 for
months before age 62 and (b)
$395 after 62nd birthday
through month retiree attained
age 65.1
3
Increased: Special survivorship
option— base amount to $3 per
year of retiree’s credited serv­
ice.
Added: Survivors benefit payable
to surviving spouse of em­
ployee who died before age 55
on or after Oct. 1,1974, with 30
years of credited service or
See footnotes at end of table.




29

The supplemental allowance as calculated according to
age and date of retirement was to be redetermined on
each date that life income benefit rates were
increased on or after Oct. 1,1974 (Oct. 1 of 1974,1975,
1976, 1977, and 1978).

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Provision

Retirement benefits— Continued
Oct. 1, 1974
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued.

Oct. 1, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

more (provided employee had
seniority at time of death or
had broken seniority by retire­
ment but before start of retire­
ment benefits).
Increased: Normal monthly retire­
ment benefits— em ployee re­
tired
(1) before Sept. 15,1970, by 35
cents, to $8.60 per year of
credited service;
(2) on or after Sept. 15, 1970,
by varying amounts rang­
ing from 35 to 50 cents, to
am ount ranging from $8.60
to $10 per year of credited
service,
depending
on
benefit class code and date
of retirem ent.8
Increased: Special early and dis-

bility monthly retirement bene­
fits—for employee who retired
(1) before Sept. 1,1964, (a) on
special early retirem ent— to
$8.60 per year of credited
service or (b) for disability
retirem ent— to $8.60 per
year of credited service,
plus previous tem porary
benefit ranging from $6.60
to $7.25 per year of service
up to 25 depending on date
of retirem ent;9
(2) on or after Sept. 1,1964 but
before Oct. 25, 1967, to
$8.60 per year of credited
service,
plus
previous
tem porary benefit of $7.75
per year of service up to 25;
(3) on or after Oct. 25, 1967, to
am ount ranging from $8.60
to $10 per year of credited
service
depending
on
benefit class code and date
of retirem ent,8 plus previ­
ous
tem porary
benefit
ranging from $8 to $9.50 per
year of service depending
on date of retirem ent.1
0
Increased: Regular early monthly

retirement benefits—employee
retired
(1) before Sept. 1, 1964, to
$8.60 per year of credited
se rv ic e
as
p re v io u s ly
reduced;
(2) on or after Sept. 1,1964 but
before Sept. 15, 1970, to
$8.60 per year of credited
service, times percentage
for age when
benefits
began;1
1
(3) on or after Sept. 15, 1970,
but before Oct. 1, 1971, to
am ount ranging from $8.60
to $9.10 per year of credited
service depending on bene-

See footnotes at end of table.




30

No change in life income benefit rates for those who re­
tired on normal, early, or disability pensions on or
after Oct. 1, 1974.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Retirement benefits— Continued
Oct. 1, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued.

fit class code,8 times per­
centage for age when
benefits began;1
1
(4) on or after Oct. 1, 1971, to
amount ranging from $8.60
to $10 per year of service
depending on benefit class
code and date of retire­
m ent,8 times percentage for
age when benefits began,1
1
and upon attaining age 65
for retiree with 30 years of
credited service, the full life
income benefit was to be
paid with no reduction be­
cause of retirement before
age 62.
Added: Supplemental allowance
“lifetime supplem ent” of $75
payable monthly upon attain­
ing age 65 to employee retired
on normal, early, or disability
retirem ent on or after Mar. 1,
1974, with 30 years of credited
service.1
3
Added: Supplemental allowance
“age-service supplem ent ” of
$2 per year of service reduced
for early or disability retirem ent
by 1/36 for each month from
start of benefit to 65th birth­
day for employee retired on or
after Mar. 1, 1974, with less
than 30 years of credited
service if em ployee retired on
(a) early or disability retire­
ment after age 62 plus 1 month
or (b) normal retirem ent with at
least 10 years of service (ex­
cept employee who would
receive normal benefit after
age 65 while retired on disability).
Changed: Maxim um earnings permitted before penalty
applied against supplem ental allow ance— to $2,100
(or amount permitted without reduction in benefits
under Federal Social Security Act) in any calendar
year after retirem ent and before age 65.
Added: “Interim ” and “age-service” supplemental allow­
ances in determ ination of maximum total monthly
benefit (which was not to exceed 70 percent of em­
ployee’s final base pay including cost-of-living allow­
ance).
Changed: Supplemental allowance not applicable to em­
ployee discharged for cause before age 65 unless
com pany or impartial umpire had determined the dis­
charge should not result in form er em ployee’s being
ineligible for supplemental allowance.
Changed: Supplemental allowance payable until earlier
of (1) retiree’s death, (2) reem ploym ent by the
company, (3) his retirem ent benefit ceased, (4) age 62
in the case of the “interim ” supplemental allowance,
or (5) age 65 in the case of the regular supplemental
allowance.
Added: Grey iron foundry workers in certain job classifi­
cations with 25 years of service, all of which were on
classifications specifically identified as foundry jobs,

See footnotes at end of table.




31

Table 3. Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Retirement benefits—Continued
and retired on or after Oct. 1,1975, to receive foundry
service premium (additional foundry service) of 20
percent of past and future service in foundry so that
years of credited service consisted of (a) foundry
service, (b) additional foundry service, and (c) any
service not attributable to foundry jobs.

Oct. 1, 1975
(agreement dated
Oct. 31,1973)—Continued.

O ct 1, 1976
(agreement dated
O c t 31,1973).

Increased: Normal monthly retire­
ment benefits—employee re­
tired
(1) before Sept. 15,1970, by 50
cents to $9.10 per year of
credited service;
(2) on or after Sept. 15,1970,
by varying amounts rang­
ing from 25 to 50 cents to
amount ranging from $9.10
to $10.50 per year of cred­
ited service, depending on
benefit class code and date
of retirement.8
Increased: Special early and dis­
ability monthly retirement bene­
fits— employee who retired

(1) before Sept. 1,1964, on (a)
special early retirement—to
$9.10 per year of credited
service and (b) disability re­
tirement—to $9.10 per year
of credited service, plus
previous temporary benefit
ranging from $6.60 to $7.25
per year of service up to 25,
depending on date of retire­
ment,9
(2) on orafterSept. 1,1964 but
before Oct. 25, 1967, to
$9.10 per year of credited
service,
plus
previous
temporary benefit of $7.75
per year of service up to 25;
(3) on or after Oct. 25,1967, to
amount ranging from $9.10
to $10.50 per year of cred­
ited service, depending on
benefit class code and date
of retirement,8 plus tempo­
rary benefit ranging from $6
to $10 per year of service up
to 25 depending on date of
retirement.1
0
Increased: Regular early monthly
retirement benefits— employee
retired
(1) before Sept. 1, 1964, to
$9.10 per year of credited
service as previously re­
duced;
(2) on or after Sept 1,1964 but
before Sept. 15, 1970 to
$9.10 per year of credited
service, times percentage
for age when benefits be­
gan;1
1
(3) on or after Sept. 15, 1970
but before Oct. 1, 1971, to
amount ranging from $9.10

See footnotes at end of table.



32

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1— Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Retirement benefits—Continued
Oct. 1, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31,1973)— Continued.

Nov. 1, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

See footnotes at end of table.




to $9.60 per year of credited
service depending on bene­
fit class code,8 times per­
centage for age when
benefits began;
(4) on or after Oct. 1, 1971, to
amount ranging from $9.10
to $10.50 per year of service
depending upon benefit
class code and date of re­
retirem ent,8, times percent­
age for age when benefits
began,1 and upon attaining
1
age 65 for retiree with 30
years of credited service,
the full life income benefit
was to be paid with no re­
duction because of retire­
ment before age 62.
Increased:
Vesting
deferred
monthly benefit for break in
service on or after Oct. 1,1976
ranging from $9.75 to $10.50
per year of credited service,
depending on benefit class
cod e.5
2

Increased: Supplem ental allow ­
ance for em ployee retired on
early or disability retirem ent
on or after Oct. 1 ,1 97 6 with 30
years of credited service which
when added to early or disabil­
ity benefit would bring total
benefit to (a) $650 for months
before age 62 and (b) $400
after age 62 through month
retiree attained age 65.1
3
Increased: Supplem ental allow ­
ance “lifetime supplem ent” of
$80 a month payable upon at­
taining age 65 for employee
retired on normal, early, or dis­
ability retirem ent on or after
Oct. 1, 1976 with 30 years of
credited service or more.
Increased: Special age 65 benefit—
to $7.20 a month.
Increased: Survivors benefit — to
60 percent of retiree’s monthly
life income benefit reduced
due to survivorship election.
Extended: Creditable service at­
tributable to most skilled trade
jobs in grey iron foundries in­
creased by 20 percent for em ­
ployees on such jobs with 25
years or more of such foundry
credit.

Changed: Supplem ental allowance — benefit payable for
employee retired at own option under regular early
retirem ent on or after Oct. 1, 1976 reduced for any
month before age 62 for which he would be eligible for
unreduced Social Security benefit, by $10 a month per
year of credited service up to 25.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Provision

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Retirement benefits— Continued
Oct. 1, 19 77
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Increased: Normal monthly retire­

m ent

b e n e fits — em p lo yee

retired (1) before Sept. 15,
1970, by 25 cents to $9.35 per
year of credited service; (2) on
or after Sept. 15, 1970, by 25
cents to amount ranging from
$9.35 to $10.50 per year of
credited service, depending on
benefit class code and date of
retirem ent.8
Increased: Special early and dis­

ability monthly retirement
b e n e fits — e m p lo y e e w h o
retired
(1) before Sept. 1,1964 on— (a)
special early retirement to
$9.35 per year of credited
service, or (b) disability re­
tirem ent— to $9.35 per year
of credited service, plus
previous tem porary benefit
ranging from $6.60 to $7.25
per year of service up to 25,
depending on date of retire­
ment;9
(2) on or after Sept. 1, 1964,
but before Oct. 25,1967, to
$9.35 per year of credited
service,
plus
previous
tem porary benefit of $7.75
per year of service up to 25;
(3) on or after Oct. 25,1967, to
amount ranging from $9.35
to $10.50 per year of
credited service, depending
on benefit class code and
date of retirem ent,8 plus
previous tem porary benefit
ranging from $8 to $10 per
year of service up to 25, de­
pending on date of retire­
m ent.1
0
Increased: Regular early monthly
retirement benefits— employee
retired
(1) before Sept. 1, 1964, to
$9.35 per year of credited
service as previously re­
duced;
(2) on or after Sept. 1,1964 but
before Sept. 15, 1970, to
$9.35 per year of credited
service times percentage of
age when benefits began;1
1
(3) on or after Sept. 15, 1970
but before Oct. 1, 1971, to
amount ranging from $9.35
to $9.85 per year of cred­
ited service, depending on
benefit class code,8 times
percentage for age when
benefits began;1
1
(4) on or after Oct. 1, 1971, to
am ount ranging from $9.35
to $10.50 per year of service

See footnotes at end of table.




34

No change in life income benefit rates for those who re­
tired on normal, early, or disability pensions on or
after Oct. 1, 1976.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Retirement benefits— C ontinued
Oct. 1, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued

Dec. 19, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Oct. 1, 1978
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

depending on benefit class
code and date of retire­
ment,8 times percentage for
age when benefits began,1
1
and upon attaining age 65
for retiree with 30 years of
credited service, the full life
income benefit was to be
paid with no reduction be­
cause of retirement before
age 62.
Added: O ne-tim e lump-sum pay­
ment, based on years of cred­
ited service, of $200 to $600 for
retirees who retired prior to
Sept. 14,1976 and $110 to $330
for certain surviving spouses
to compensate retirees for in­
creases in the cost-of-living.
Increased: Normal monthly retire­
ment benefits— em ployee who
retired
(1) before Sept. 1, 1970, by 60
cents to $9.95 per year of
credited service;
(2) on or after Sept. 15, 1970,
by varying amounts rang­
ing from 50 cents to $1, to
amount ranging from $9.95
to $11.50 per year of cred­
ited service, depending on
benefit class code and date
of retirem ent.8
Increased: Special early and dis­

ability monthly retirement
benefits— em ployee who re­
tired
(1) before Sept. 1 ,1 9 6 4 on (a)
special early retirem ent— to
$9.95 per year of credited
service and (b) disability re­
tirem ent— to $9.95 per year
of credited service plus
previous tem porary benefit
ranging from $6.60 to $7.25
per year of service up to 25,
depending on date of retire­
ment;9
(2) on or after Sept. 1,1964 but
before Oct. 25, 1967, to
$9.95 per year of credited
service, plus previous tem ­
porary benefit of $7.75 per
year of service up to 25;
(3) on or after Oct. 25,1967, to
am ount ranging from $9.95
to $11.50 per year of cred­
ited service, depending on
benefit class code and date
of retirem ent,8 plus tem po­
rary benefit ranging from $8
to $11 per year of service up
to 25, depending on date of
retirem ent.1
0

See footnotes at end of table.




35

Payment financed by diversion of one cent each quarter
on a cum ulative basis (total 6 cents) from cost-ofliving allow ance from J u n e 6 ,1977 through December
3, 1978 (see table 1).

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Retirement benefits— Continued
Oct. 1, 1978
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)— Continued.

Increased: Regular early monthly

retirement benefits—employee
retired
(1) before Sept. 1, 1964, to
$9.95 per year of credited
service as previously re­
duced;
(2) on or after Sept. 1,1964 but
before Sept. 15, 1970, to
$9.95 per year of credited
service, times percentage
for age when benefits be­
gan;1
1
(3) on or after Sept. 15, 1970
but before Oct. 1, 1971, to
amount ranging from $9.95
to $10.45 per year of cred­
ited service, depending on
benefit class code,8 times
percentage for age when
benefits began;1
1
(4) on or after Oct. 1, 1971, to
amount ranging from $9.95
to $11.50 per year of service
depending on benefit class
code and date of retire­
ment,8 times percentage for
age when benefit began,1
1
and upon attaining age 65
for retiree with 30 years of
credited service, the full life
income benefit was to be
paid with no reduction be­
cause of retirement before
age 62.
In c re a s e d : Vesting— d e fe rre d
monthly benefit for break in
service on or after Oct. 1,1978
ranging from $10.75 to $11.50
per year of credited service,
depending on benefit class
code.1
2
Increased: Supplemental allow­
ance “lifetime supplem ent” of
$100 a month payable upon at­
taining age 65 for em ployee re­
tired on normal, early, or dis­
ability retirem ent on or after
Oct. 1, 1978 with 30 years of
credited service or m ore.1
3
Increased: Supplemental allow­
ance for em ployee retired on
early or disability retirement
on or after Oct. 1,1978, with 30
years of credited service which
when added to early or disabil­
ity benefit would bring total
benefit to (a) $700 for months
before age 62 and (b) $430
after age 62 through month he
attained age 65.1
3

See footnotes at end of table.




36

Changed: Supplemental allowance— benefit payable on
or after Oct. 1,1978 for em ployee retired at own option
under regular early retirem ent on or after Oct. 1,1978,
reduced for any month before age 62 for which he was
eligible for an unreduced social security benefit, by
$11 a month per year of credited service up to 25
years.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1 Continued
—
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Supplemental unemploymentI: benefit plan
Dec. 31, 1973
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Jan. 1, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Jan. 6, 1975
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973).

Increased: Regular benefit— maxi­
mum to $90 for any week
employee exercised option to
refuse work and did not receive
State system benefit because
of such refusal or refusal which
occurred after exhaustion of
State benefit rights.
Added: E lig ib ility— laid off em ­
ployee who received lost time
benefit under a w orker’s com ­
pensation law or other law pro­
viding benefit for occupational
injury or disease, while not
totally disabled and while in­
eligible
for accident
and
sickness benefit under com ­
pany’s insurance plan, was
deemed to be on a qualifying
layoff if em ployee met other
requirements for a qualifying
layoff.
In c r e a s e d : C o n t r ib u t io n s —
amount to range of 7 to 12
cents per hour depending on
percentage relationship of the
asset value of fund to maxi­
mum funding.1
5
Changed: Contributions for short
w orkweeks— if market value of
the assets of fund as of last Fri­
day preceding first Monday in
January each year was less
than 100 percent of maximum
funding, the com pany to con­
tribute amount, if any, by
which (a) total amount of auto­
matic short week benefits paid
for
layoffs that
occurred
during pay periods that began
in previous calendar year, ex­
ceeded (b) 3 cents times total
number of hours employees
received pay for pay periods
begun in such calendar year,
minus (c) totai of contributions
for months credit unit cancel­
lation base fell below specified
level ($495 effective Dec. 28,
1970) but not in excess of maxi­
mum funding.
Changed: Contributions— with re­
spect to each pay period which
began within a month for
which the current market value
of the fund was less than the
maximum amount, the com ­
pany to contribute the lesser of
the following amounts:
(1) The amount required to in­
crease the value of the fund
to 100 percent of maximum
funding; or

See footnotes at end of table.




37

Changed: C om pany’s SUB contributions not offset by
contributions for hospital-m edical-surgical-drug cov­
erage for laid-off employees and continuation of
group life and disability coverage for laid-off em ­
ployees.

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Provision

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Supplemental unemployment benefit plan—Continued
Jan. 6 ,1 9 7 5
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 31, 1973)—-Continued

Nov. 1, 1976
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

( 2)

an amount determ ined by
multiplying (a) the number
of straight time hours, time
and one-half hours, and
double time hours, respec­
tively, for which employees
received pay from the com ­
pany (excluding hours for
which benefits under SUB
plan were payable) during
such period, by (b) a num­
ber of cents per hour (7 to
24 cents effective Jan. 6,
1975 and 9 to 26 cents effec­
tive Jan. 5, 1976) depending
on percentage relationship
of the asset value of fund to
maximum funding and type
of hour paid for.1
5

Added: Advance Credit A c c o u n tcompany to advance contribu­
tions to fund to insure payment
of benefits to employees with
less than 10 years seniority
when value of assets in fund
fell below level necessary to
continue payments to such
employees.
Added: Guaranteed Benefit Ac­
count-com pany to make ad­
ditional contributions to fund
to provide benefits for em ­
ployees with 10 or more years’
seniority when value of contri­
butions and assets in fund
w ere insufficient to pay bene­
fits otherwise due.
Eliminated: 20-percent reduction
in benefit amount for em ­
ployees with 20 or more years’
seniority when fund level was
low.

The maxim um amount advanced limited to $100 times
num ber of employees used in determ ining maximum
funding for Sept. 1976. Avanced contributions recov­
ered at rate of 5 cents per hour when fund reached 70
percent of maxim um funding. Account eliminated
when Trust Fund Position reached 70 percent of maxi­
mum funding regardless of w hether or not any contri­
butions had been made based upon account.
The maximum amount of contribution to be $200 times
num ber of covered employees used in determ ining
maximum funding for Sept. 1976.

Changed: Credit Unit Cancellation Base trigger points
increased by 50 percent, resulting in an increased rate
of credit unit exchange at higher fund levels.1
6
Changed: Credit unit exchange rates reduced at lower
funding levels for employees with 10 to 20 years’
seniority, with a maximum exchange rate of 2 to 1 for
employees with 10 to 15 years of seniority and 1.43 to
1 for employees with 15 to 20 years’ seniority. The
credit exchange rate for employees with 20 or more
years of seniority to be 1 to 1 regardless of the fund
level.1 Employees with 10 or more years of seniority
6
would be eligible, depending upon the num ber of their
credit units, for up to the following num ber of weeks of
benefits even if the fund was below the level at which
no benefits would have been payable under the prior
schedule:

Seniority Group
(in years)
10-15
15-20
20 or more
Jan. 1, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Changed: Contributions— amount
to a range of 12 to 22 cents per
hour depending on percentage
relationship of the asset value
of fund to maximum funding.1
7

See footnotes at end of table.




38

Maximum number of weeks
of benefits at low fund levels
26
37
52

Table 3.

Supplementary compensation practices1
—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other related matters

Supplemental unemployment benefits plan—Continued
Jan. 1, 1977
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976)— Continued.

Jan. 1, 1978
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Jan. 1, 1979
(agreem ent dated
Oct. 5, 1976).

Changed: Maximum funding—
multiplier used in formula re­
duced to 12 times average full
benefit rate. Employees on
active employm ent rolls but
not receiving pay no longer in­
cluded in calculation of full
benefit rate.
Changed: Deduction from benefit
for work-related expenses not
incurred increased to $12.50.
Changed: Short week benefits— if
notice of intent to work over­
tim e not given prior to layoff,
only first two hours of overtime
worked or available to be con­
sidered com pensated or avail­
able hours. All overtime hours
worked or available prior to
layoff and all overtime hours
worked or available after layoff
but scheduled prior to layoff
considered com pensated or
available hours.
Changed: Contributions — amount
to a range of 13 to 23 cents per
hour depending on percentage
relationship of the asset value
of fund to maximum funding.1
7
Increased: Maxim um annual limit
on offsets to contributions for
shortweek benefits to 4 cents.
Changed: C ontributions — amount
to a range of 14 to 24 cents per
hour depending on percentage
relationship of the asset value
of fund to maximum funding.1
7

See footnotes on following page.




39

Com pensated or available hours w ere used to determ ine
am ount of shortweek benefit by offsetting hours lost
during layoff to reduce shortweek benefit.

Changed: C redit Unit Cancellation Base trigger points
increased by 10 percent resulting in an increased rate
of credit unit exchange at higher fund levels.1
8

Changed: Credit Unit Cancellation Base trigger points
increased by 10 percent resulting in an increased rate
of credit unit exchange at higher fund levels.1
9

Footnotes to table 3:
1
Last entry under each item represents the most recent change.
2Moving allowances for both transfer and layoff were as follows:
Miles between plants

Allowance
Single
employee

50
100
300
500
1,000

Married
employee

$385
430
465
565
650

$ 865
955
1,000
1,180
1,355

but less than 100 .................................................
but less than 300 ..................................................
but less than 500 ..................................................
but less than 1,000.................................................
or more....................................................................

3Schedule of insurance benefits was as follows:
Insurance before age do m
s u ia itc e u e iu r e a y e 65
Monthly total
and permanent
disability benefit"

Life insurance

Base hourly
rate*
Up to but less than $3.40..................
$3.40 but less than $ 3.65..................
$3.65 but less than $3 .90 ..................
$3.90 but less than $ 4 .15 ..................
$4.15 but less than $4 .40 ..................
$4.40 but less than $4 .65 ..................
$4.65 but less than $4 .90 ..................
$4.90 but less than $5 .15 ..................
$5.15 but less than $ 5 .40 ..................
$5.40 but less than $ 5 .65 ..................
$5.65 but less than $ 5 .90 ..................
$5.90 but less than $6 .15..................
$6.15 but less than $ 6 .40..................
$6.40 but less than $6 .65 ..................
$6.65 but less than $ 6 .9 0 ..................
$6.90 but less than $ 7 .15 ........... .
$7.15 but less than $ 7 ,40 ..................
$7.40 and o v e r.....................................

For those at
work before
Oct. 1, 1975

For those at
work on or
after
Oct. 1, 1975

For those at
work before
Oct. 1, 1975

For those at
work on or
after
Oct. 1, 1975

For those at
work before
Oct. 1, 1975

For those at
work on 6r
after
Oct. 1, 1975

$ 7,500
8,000
8,500
9,000
9,500
10,000
10,500
11,000
11,500
12,000
12,500
13,000
13,500
14,000
14,500
15,000
15,500
16,000

$ 8,500
9,000
9,500
10,000
10,500
11,000
11,500
12,000
12,500
13,000
13,500
14,000
14,500
15,000
15,500
16,000
16,500
17,000

$150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290
300
310
320

$170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290
300
310
320
330
340

$3,750
4,000
4,250
4,500
4,750
5,000
5,250
5,500
5,750
6,000
6,250
6,500
6,750
7,000
7,250
7,500
7,750
8,000

$4,250
4,500
4,750
5,000
5,250
5,500
5,750
6,000
6,250
6,500
6,750
7,000
7,250
7,500
7,750
8,000
8,250
8.500

Insurance before
age 65

Weekly
sickness and
accident
benefit"'
Up to but less than $3.40..........................
$3.40 but less than $3.65 ..........................
$3.65 but less than $3.90 ..........................
$3.90 but less than $4.15 ..........................
$4.15 but less than $4.40 ..........................
$4.40 but less than $4.65 ..........................
$4.65 but less than $4.90 ..........................
$4.90 but less than $5.15 ..........................
$5.15 but less than $5.40 ..........................
$5.40 but less than $5.65 ..........................
$5.65 but less than $5.90 ..........................
$5.90 but less than $6.15 ..........................
$6.15 but less than $6.40 ..........................
$6.40 but less than $6 65 ..........................
$6.65 but less than $6.90 ..........................
$6.90 but less than $7.15 ..........................
$7.15 but less than $7.40 ..........................
$7.40 and over..............................................

Monthly
extended
disability
benefit*"

$ 85
90
95
100
105
110
115
120
125
130
135
140
145
150
155
160
165
170

$285
305
330
350
370
395
415
435
460
480
500
525
545
565
590
610
630
655

'Insurance based on average straight-time hourly earnings under the
incentive plan.
"Benefits were payable for a maximum of 50 months for employees
with 10 years of service under plan. Disability had to begin before age 60.




Accidental death
and dismemberment
benefit

40

Life insurance at age 65 and after
Minimum
(10 years in re­
tirement plan)
For those at
work on or
For those at
work before
after
Oct. 1, 1975
Oct. 1, 1975
$1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
1,575
1,650
1,725
1,800
1,875
1,950
2,025
2,100
2,175
2,250
2,325
2,400

$2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,025
2,100
2,175
2,250
2,325
2,400
2,475
2,550

M axim um ""
(20 years in re­
tirement plan)
For those at
work before
Oct. 1. 1975
$2,250
2,400
2,550
2,700
2,850
3,000
3,150
3,300
3,450
3,600
3,750
3,900
4,050
4,200
4,350
4,500
4,650
4,800

"'Subject to reduction for other benefits as detailed under accident and
sickness or extended disability sections of the insurance plan.
""M axim um of 30 percent of life insurance in effect at age 65, with 20 or
more years ot creditable service, was eliminated for employees at work
on or after Oct. 1, 1975.

‘Employee contributions were as follows:

Contribution rate
II**
/*

Basic hourly rate
Up to but lessi than $3.40....... ............... .
$3.40 but less than $3.65.............................
$3.65 but less than $3.90.......................... .
$3.90 but less than $4.15.............................
$4.15 but less than $4.40.............................
$4.40 but less than $4.65............................
$4.65 but less than $4 .90.............................
$4.90 but less than $5.15....... .....................
$5.15 but less than $5.40.............................
$5.40 but less than $5.65 ..............................
$5.65 but less than $5.90............................
$5.90 but less than $6.15.............................
$6.15 but less than $6.40.................... .
$6.40 but less than $6.65.............................
$6.65 but less than $6.90 ..............................
$6.90 but less than $7.15.............................
$7.15 but less than $7.40............................
$7.40 and over —

. . . ................
......................
......................
......................
....................
......................
....... .............
......................
......................
....... .............
......................
.................. .
......................
......... ............

$ 5.20
5.63
6.07
6.50
6.93
7.37
7.80
8.23
8.67
9.10
9.53
9.96
10.40
10.83
11.26
11.70
12.13
12.57

$3.75
4.00
4.25
4.50
4.75
5.00
5.25
5.50
5.75
6.00
6.25
6.50
6.75
7.00
7.25
7.50
7.75
8.00

‘ Schedule I was applicable for leave of absence (excluding medical and union
leave) during any period for which employer was not required to pay.
“ Schedule II was applicable to those terminated between ages 60 and 65
(excluding retirement); while a grievance was pending; medical leave of absence
for any period for which employer was not required to pay; and layoff for any
period for which employer was not required to pay.
5
Revised schedule of insurance benefits, effective Oct. 18, 1976:

Base hourly
rate
Up to but less than $5.20.................
$5.20 but less than $ 5 .55 .................
$5.55 but less than $ 5 .90 ............. ..
$5.90 but less than $ 6 .25 .................
$6.25 but less than $ 6 .60 .................
$6.60 but less than $ 6 .95 ....... . —
$6.95 but less than $ 7 .30 .................
$7.30 but less than $ 7 .65 .................
$7.65 but less than $ 8 .00 .................
$8.00 but less than $ 8 .35 .................
$8.35 but less than $ 8 .70 .................
$8.70 but less than $ 9 .05 .................
$9.05 but less than $ 9 .40 .................
$9.40 but less than $ 9 .75 .................
$9.75 and o v e r...................................

Monthly extended
disability benefits*

Life
insurance

Monthly
total and
permanent
disability
insurance

Accidental
death and
dismemberment
benefit

Schedule
1

Schedule
II

Weekly
accident and
sickness
benefits

$12,500
13,000
13,500
14,000
15,000
15,500
16,500
17,000
18,000
19,000
19,500
20,500
21,500
22,000
22,500

$250
260
270
280
300
310
330
340
360
380
390
410
430
440
450

$ 6,250
6,500
6,750
7,000
7,500
7,750
8,250
8,500
9,000
9,500
9,750
10,250
10,750
11,000
11,250

$460
480
500
525
555
585
615
650
680
710
740
770
800
830
860

$480
510
545
580
610
645
680
710
745
780
815
845
880
915
945

$125
130
135
145
155
165
170
180
190
195
205
215
220
230
240

‘ Schedule I applicable to employees with less than 10 years’ credited service or participation.
Schedule II applicable to employees with 10 years or more of credited service under the retirement plan or 10 or more years of participation under
Group Life and Disability Insurance on the last day worked preceding a period of continuous disability.
6
The maximum acquistion cost of $12.50 was to be adjusted on a yearly basis beginning Oct. 1, 1978, depending on the percentage change in a
cost index developed on a representative sample of frames with a wholesale cost of $12.50 or less on Oct. 1, 1977.
7
The maximum was to be adjusted on October 1 of each year, beginning in 1978, by the immediately preceding July-to-July percentage increase in
the Combined Consumer Price Index.




41

3Life income benefits based on benefit class codes were determined as follows:

(a) Job classification maximum hourly rate* (which determined benefit class code) as ofBenefit
Class
Code
A
B
C
D

Oct. 25, 1967
through
Nov. 24, 1968

Nov. 25, 1968
through
Nov. 23, 1969

Nov. 24, 1969
through
Nov. 1, 1970

Nov. 2, 1970
through
Nov. 21, 1971

Nov. 22, 1971
through
Nov. 19, 1972

Nov. 20, 1972
through
Nov. 18, 1973

$3,410 or less
3.415 — 3.450
3.545 and over
—

$3,510 or less
3.515 — 3.645
3.650 and over
—

$3,615 or less
3.620 — 3.755
3.760 and over
—

$4,275 or less
4.240 — 4.420
4.425 and over
—

$4,405 or less
4.410 — 4.555
4.560 and over
—

$4,535 or less
4.540 — 4.690
4.695 and over
—

On or
after
Nov. 19, 1973
$4,535
4.540
4.695
5.350

or less
— 4.690
— 5.345
and over

(b) Monthly life income benefit rates (per year of service) for months commencing—
Benefit
Class
Code

O ct 1973
through
Feb. 1974

Mar. 1974
through
Sept. 1974

Oct. 1974
through
Sept. 1975

Oct. 1975
through
Sept. 1976

Oct. 1976
through
Sept. 1977

Oct. 1977
through
Sept. 1978

Oct. 1978
and
after

On or after
Oct. 25, 1967
but before
Sept. 15, 1970

A
B
C

$7.25
7.50
7.75

$7.25
7.50
7.75

$ 8.25
8.25
8.25

$ 8.60
8.60
8.60

$ 9.10
9.10
9.10

$ 9.35
9.35
9.35

$ 9.95
9.95
9.95

On or after
Sept. 15, 1970
but before
Sept. 15, 1973

A
B
C

8.60
8.85
9.10

9.10
9.35
9.60

9.35
9.60
9.85

9.95
10.20
10.45

On or after
Sept. 15, 1973
but before
Mar. 1, 1974

A
B
C&D

8.00
8.25
8.50

8.00
8.25
8.50

8.25
8.50
8.75

8.60
8.85
9.10

9.10
9.35
9.60

9.35
9.60
9.85

9.95
10.20
10.45

On or after
Mar. 1, 1974
but before
Oct. 1, 1974

A
B
C &D

—
—
—

8.75
9.00
9.25

8.75
9.00
9.25

9.25
9.50
9.75

9.50
9.75
10.00

9.75
10.00
10.25

10.25
10.50
10.75

On or after
Oct. 1, 1974
but before
Oct. 1, 1976

A

9.25

D

—
—
—
—

9.25
9.50
9.75
10.00

9.50
9.75
10.00
10.25

9.75
10.00
10.25
10.50

10.25
10.50
10.75
11.00

On or after
Oct. 1, 1976
but before
Oct. 1, 1978

A

—

B

—

C

—
—

9.75
10.00
10.25
10.50

9.75
10.00
10.25
10.50

10.50
10.75
11.00
11.25

Date of
retirement
under plan

On or after
Oct. 1, 1978

B

C

D

A
B

C
D

8.00
8.25
8.50

—
—
—
—

8.00
8.25
8.50

8.25
8.50
8.75

_
—

9.50
9.75
10.00

—
—
—
—
—

_
—
—
—

—
—

—
—

_

_

_

_

_

—
—

_
__
—

—
_

—
—
—

—
—
—

‘ Incentive job classifications also were assigned benefit class codes.
9Monthly temporary benefits for those who retired before Sept. 1, 1964 on disability were as follows:




Date of
retirement
under plan

Monthly temporary
benefit per year of
credited service

Before
Sept. 1, 1958 . . . . .................. $6.80
Sept. 1, 1958
through
Aug. 31,1961

Sept. 1, 1961
through
Aug. 31.1964

Maximum monthly
temporary
benefit

$193.75

. . . . .................. 6.85
(for service before
Jan. 1, 1958);
6.88
(for service in
1958); and
6.95
(for service after
Dec. 31, 1958).

193.75

... ............... .

193.75

42

7.25

10.75
11.00
11.25
11.50

57 ................................................
5 6 .........................
5 5 ............................................... ............................. ............ . • • • .........
5 4 ......................................................................................
53 ..................................................................................................................
5 2 ............................................
5 1 ................................................................................. .................. •
50 ..................................................................................................................
4 9 ..................................................................................................................

1 Temporary benefit rates for those who retired on early retirement or on
0
disability were as follows:
Date of
retirement
under plan

Monthly temporary benefit
per year of credited
service up to 25

Maximum monthly
temporary
benefit

Sept. 1964
through
Oct. 24, 1967 .......................... $ 7.75

$193.75

Oct. 25, 1967
through
Sept. 14, 1970 ............................. 8.00

4 8 ..................................................................................................... .. • • .............

32.8

47 ..................................................................................................................
4 6 ..................................................................................................................
4 5 ............................................
4 4 .......................................................................
43 ..................................................................................................................
4 2 .............................................................................................. ..................

200.00

Sept. 15, 1970
through
Feb. 1974 ....................

69.4
63.5
57.9
53.2
48.9
45.0
41.5
38.3
35.4
30.4
28.2
26.1
24.3
22.6
21.0

212.50

8.50

Mar. 1974
through
Sept. 1976 ............................... 9.50

For each additional full month of age when benefits began, the
applicable percent was to be determined by straight-time interpolation
from percentage applicable to next higher age in above schedule, rounded
to the nearest 1/10 of 1 percent.

237.50

Oct. 1976
through
Sept. 1978 .............................. 10.00

250.00

Oct. 1978
or after .................................. 11.00

275.00

‘ Reduction factors for retirement of ages below 55 applicable only to
those who retired on or after Oct.1, 1971, with at least 30 years of credited
service (25 years for foundry workers effective Oct. 1, 1975).

1 Percentages were as follows:
1
Age when benefit began*

Percent

62 or o v e r.......................
100.0
6 1 ..................................................................................
86.7
6 0 ..............................................................................................
5 9 ........................................................................................................
80.8
58 ........................................................................................................
75.2

93.3

1 Vested benefits were determined as follows:
2
Life income benefit rates for breaks in seniority (with
eligibility for a deferred vested pension) commencing—
Job classifica­
tion maximum
hourly rate*
(on or after
Nov. 19, 1973)
$4,535
4.540
4.695
5.350

or less
— 4.690
— 5.345
and over

Benefit
class
code

Nov. 19, 1973
through
Feb.1974

Mar. 1974
through
Sept. 1974

Oct. 1974
through
Sept. 1976

Oct. 1976
through
Sept. 1978

Oct. 1978
and
after

A
B
C
D

$8.00
8.25
8.50
8.50

$8.75
9.00
9.25
9.25

$ 9.25
9.50
9.75
10.00

$ 9.75
10.00
10.25
10.50

$10.75
11.00
11.25
11.50

‘ Incentive job classifications also were assigned benefit class codes.




43

^Supplemental allowance and lifetime supplement were determined as follows:

Amount of total monthly benefits for determining
supplemental allowance
Date of
retirement
under plan

Through month in
which retired employee
attains age 62

After month in which retired
employee attains age 62 and
through month in which he
attains age 65

Amount of monthly lifetime
supplement after month in
which retired employee
attains age 65

Mar. 1974
through
Sept. 1974 . . . .

$550

$395*

$ 75**

Oct. 1974
through
Sept. 1975 _
_

625

395

75**

Oct. 1975
through
Sept. 1976 . . . .

625

395

75

Oct. 1976
through
Sept. 1978 . . . .

650

400

80

Oct. 1978
or after .........

700

430

100

*$320 for any month before October 1975.
**Not payable for any month before October 1975.
1 lnterim supplement rates were as follows:
4
Attained age when
benefits began

Amount of interim supplement'
per year of credited service

61
60
59
58
57
56
55

$7.50
7.50
6.70
5.90
5.10
4.30
3.50

*For each additional full month of attained age when benefits began, the applicable rate was determined by adding 6-2/3 cents for each such additional
month to the amount shown for attained age at last birthday (not to exceed $7.50 for retirement after age 60).
^Relationship was as follows:
Effective date
Dec. 31,
1973

Jan. 6,
1975

Jan. 5,
1976

If the percentage
relationship of the
value of the assets
of the fund to
maximum funding
was—

The applica­
ble number
of cents
per hour
was—

The applica­
ble number
of cents per
straighttime hour
was—

The applica­
ble number
of cents per
time and onehalf hour
was—

The applica­
ble number
of cents per
double time
hour
was—

The applica­
ble number
of cents per
straighttime hour
was—

The applica­
ble number
of cents per
time and onehalf hour
was—

The applica­
ble number
of cents per
double time
hour
was—

87.5 but less than 100.0 ..................
75.0 but less than 87.5......................
62.5 but less than 75.0......................
50.0 but less than 62.5....... ! ............
37.5 but less than 50.0......................
Lpss than 3 7 .5 ...................................

7
8
9
10
11
12

7
8
9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18

19
20
21
22
23
24

9
10
11
12
13
14

15
16
17
18
19
20

21
22
23
24
25
26

If for any such pay period, total number of hours employees re­
ceived pay from company when multiplied by applicable number
of cents per hour was more than number of hours required to in­
crease value of assets of fund to next higher percentage of maxi­
mum funding, only number of hours required to reach next such
higher percentage was to be multiplied by applicable cents per




44

hour in above table. The remaining hours (the difference be­
tween total number of hours and lesser number of hours required
to reach next higher percentage level) was to be multiplied by
applicable lesser cents per hour set forth in above table for next higher
percentage.

1 Credit union cancellation schedule was as follows:
6
Credit units cancelled when employee’s seniority as of last day of the week
for which benefit was paid was equal to—
10 to 15
Years

Years

1.00
1.00
1.11
1.00
1.25
1.11
1.43
1.25
1.67
1.43
1.67
2.00
2.50
2.00
3.33
2.50
3.33
5.00
10.00
5.00
No benefit payable

$573.75 or more........................................
513.00 to 573 .7 4 .......................................
452.25 to 512.99......................................
391.50 to 452.24........................................
330.75 to 391.49........................................
270.00 to 330.74........................................
209.25 to 269.99........................................
148.50 to 2 0 9 . 2 4 . . . . . . . . . ........................
87.75 to 148.49........................................
27.00 to 87.74........................................
Under $27.00 ...........................................

15 to 20
Years

20 to 25
Years

25 Years
and Over

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.11
1.25
1.43
1.67
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00

5 to 10

1 to 5
Years

CUCB* applicable to week for
which benefit was paid

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.11
1.25
1.43
1.43
1.43
1.43
1.43

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

*Untii the relationship of Fund assets to Maximum Funding first reached 70 percent on or after November 1,1976, the amount determined was to be
added to the market value of the assets of the Fund in determining the CUCB for this purpose only.
^Contributions schedule was as follows:
Percent of
maximum
funding

Contribution rate (in cents)
applicable to all compensated
hours including overtime hours
1/1/77

1/1/78

1/1/79

12
13
14
15
16
17
18

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

77.5 to 100.0.................................
70.0 to 7 7 .5 .................................
62.5 to 7 0 .0 .................................
55.0 to 6 2 .5 .................................
47.5 to 5 5 .0 .................................
40.0 to 4 7 .5 .................... ...........
32.5 to 40.0 ................................
25.0 to
17.5 to 25.0 .................................
10.0 to 17.5.................................
Less than 1 0 .................................

20
21
22

The additional contributions for overtime hours—6 cents for each overtime hour compensated at time and one-half and 12 cents for each overtime hour
compensated at double time—continued in effect.
1 Credit unit cancellation schedule was as follows:
8
Credit units cancelled when employee’s seniority as of last day of the week
for which benefit was paid was equal to—
CUCB* applicable to week for
which benefit was paid

$631.25 or more ...........................................
564.50 to 631.24........................................
497.75 to 564.49........................................
431.00 to 497.74....... ................................
364.25 to 430.99......... ..............................
297.50 to 364.24........................................
230.75 to 297.49................................. .
164.00 to 230.74....... ................................
97.25 to 163.99........................................
30.50 to 97.24.................. .....................
Under $30.50 ........... .............................

1 to 5
Years

Years

1.00
1.00
1.11
1.00
1.11
1.25
1.25
1.43
1.67
1.43
1.67
2.00
2.00
2.50
3.33
2.50
3.33
5.00
5.00
10.00
No benefit payable

10 to 15
Years

15 to 20
Years

20 to 25
Years

25 Years
and Over

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.11
1.25
1.43
1.67
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00

5 to 10

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.11
1.25
1.43
1.43
1.43
1.43
1.43

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

‘ Until the relationship of Fund assets to Maximum Funding first reached 70 percent on or after November 1,1976, the amount determined was to be
added to the market value of assets of the Fund in determining the CUCB for this purpose only.




45

1 Credit unit cancellation schedule was as follows:
9

Credit units cancelled when employee’s seniority as of last day of the week
for which benefit was paid was equal to—
CUCB* applicable to week for
which benefit was paid

$694.50 or more..........................................
621.00 to 694.49................ ......................
547.50 to 620.99........................................
474.00 to 547.49....................... ...............
400.50 to 473.99.............................. .
327.00 to 400.49.................. .....................
253,50 to 326.99............................... .
180.00 to 253.49........................................
106.50 to 179.99.......................................
33.00 to 106.49........................................
Under $33.00 ...........................................

1 to 5
Years

5 to 10

1.00
1.00
1.11
1.00
1.25
1.11
1.43
1.25
1.67
1.43
1.67
2.00
2.50
2.00
3.33
2.50
5.00
3.33
10.00
5.00
No benefit payable

10 to 15
Years

15 to 20
Years

20 to 25
Years

25 Years
and Over

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.11
1.25
1.43
1.67
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00

Years

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.11
1.25
1.43
1.43
1.43
1.43
1.43

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

*Until the relationship of Fund assets to Maximum Funding first reached 70 percent on or after November 1,1976, the amount determined was to be
added to the market value of the assets of the Fund in determining the CUCB for this purpose only.




46

Wage Chronologies Available
The following wage chronologies are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from the regional offices of the Bureau of Labor Statistics listed on the inside
back cover. Some publications are out of print and not available from the Superintendent of Documents but may be
obtained, as long as supplies are available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or from the
Bureau’s regional offices. O ut-ofprint items also may be available for reference in leading public, college, or
university libraries.
Before July 1965, basic wage chronologies and their supplements were published in the Monthly Labor Review and
released as Bureau reports. Wage chronologies published later are available only as bulletins (and their supplements).
Summaries of general wage changes and new or changed working practices are added to bulletins as new contracts
are negotiated.
Aluminum Company of America with United Steelworkers of America and Aluminum Workers
International Union—
November 1939—January 1974, BLS Bulletin 1815.
February 1974—May 1977, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1815.
The Anaconda Co. (Montana Mining Division) and the Steelworkers—
1941—77, BLS Bulletin 1953.
Armour and Company—
1941—72, BLS Bulletin 1682.
September 1973—August 1976, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1682.
A.T.&T,—Long Lines Department and Communications Workers of America (AFL-CIO)—
October 1940—July 1974, BLS Bulletin 1812.
July 1974—August 1977, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1812.
Atlantic Richfield and the Oil Workers (Former Sinclair Oil Facilities)—
1941—77, BLS Bulletin 1915.
1977—79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1915.
Berkshire Hathaway Inc. and the Textile Workers—
June 1943—April 1975, BLS Bulletin 1849.
1975—78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1849.
Bethlehem Steel Corp. (Shipbuilding Department) and the IUMSW—
June 1941—August 1975, BLS Bulletin 1866.
1975—78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1866.
Bituminous Coal Mine Operators and United Mine Workers of America—
October 1933—November 1974, BLS Bulletin 1799.
1974—77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1799.
The Boeing Co. (Washington Plants) and the International Association of Machinists—
June 1936—September 1977, BLS Bulletin 1895.
Commonwealth Edison Co. and the Electrical Workers (IBEW)—
October 1945—March 1974, BLS Bulletin 1808.
1974— 79, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1808.
Dan River Inc. and the Textile Workers (UTWA)—
1943—76, BLS Bulletin 1934.
FMC Corp., Chemical Group—Fiber Division and the TWUA—
1945—77, BLS Bulletin 1924.
Federal Employees under the General Schedule Pay System—
July 1924—October 1974, BLS Bulletin 1870.
1975— 76, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1870.
Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. and B.F. Goodrich Co. (Akron Plants)—
1937—73, BLS Bulletin 1762.
April 1973—April 1976, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1762.




Ford Motor Co. and the Auto Workers—
Volume I, June 1941—September 1973, BLS Bulletin 1787.
Volume II, 1973—79, BLS Bulletin 1994.
International Harvester Co. and the Auto Workers—
February 1946—September 1976, BLS Bulletin 1887.
International Paper Co., Southern Kraft Division—
December 1937—May 1973, BLS Bulletin 1788.
June 1973—May 1977, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1788.
International Shoe Co. (a division of Interco, Inc.)—
1945—74, BLS Bulletin 1718.
October 1974—September 1976, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1718.
Lockheed—California Company (a division of Lockheed Aircraft Corp.) and Machinists’ Union—
March 1937—October 1977, BLS Bulletin 1904.
Martin Marietta Aerospace and the Auto Workers—
March 1944—November 1975, BLS Bulletin 1884.
1975—78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1884.
Massachusetts Shoe Manufacturers and the Shoe Workers—
1945—79, BLS Bulletin 1993.
New York City Laundries and the Clothing Workers—
November 1945—November 1975, BLS Bulletin 1845.
1975—78, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1845.
North Atlantic Longshoremen—
1934—71, BLS Bulletin 1736.
1971— 77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1736.
Pacific Coast Shipbuilders and Various Unions—
1941—77, BLS Bulletin 1982.
Pacific Gas and Electric Co.—
1943—72, BLS Bulletin 1761.
1972— 76, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1761.
Pacific Maritime Association and the ILWU—
1934—78, BLS Bulletin 1960.
Railroads—Nonoperating Employees—
1920—62, BLS Report 208.1
Rockwell International (Electronics, North American Aircraft/Space Operations) and the Auto
Workers—
May 1941—September 1977, BLS Bulletin 1893.
United States Steel Corporation—
March 1937—April 1974, BLS Bulletin 1814.
May 1974—July 1977, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1814.
Western Greyhound Lines—
1945—67, BLS Bulletin 1595.1
1968—77, Supplement to BLS Bulletin 1595.
Western Union Telegraph Co. and the Telegraph Workers and the Communications Workers—
1943—76, BLS Bulletin 1927.
‘Out of print. See Directory o f Wage Chronologies, 1948 - June 1977 for Monthly Labor Review issue in which reports and supplements pub­
lished before July 1965 appeared.




<HJ.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1978 261-017/106 1-3

Keep up to date with:

MAJOR
CO
LLECTIV
E
RARGANNG
AGREEM
ENTS
The Bureau of Labor Statistics has published a series of 16 bulletins dealing with key
issues in collective bargaining The bulletins are based on analysis of about 1800 major
agreements and show how negotiators in different industries handle specific problems.
The studies are complete with illustrative clauses identified by the company and union
signatories, and detailed tabulations on the prevalence of clauses.
ORDER

FORM

Title (Check Publication Desired)

Bulletin
Number

Date of
Publication

Price

1425-1
1425-2

1964
1965

$ 1 45
1 80

1425-3
1425-4
1425-5
1425 6
1425-7
1425-8
1425-9
1425-10
1425-1 1

1965
1966
1966
1966
1969
1969
1969
1969
1970

1 80
1 10
1 35
2 40
1 05
1 10
1 90
1 55
1 25

1425-12
1425-13
1425-14
1425-15
1425-16

1970
1972
1972
1974
1976

1 00
1 75
1 25
1 45

M a /o r C o lle c tiv e B a rg a in in g A g re e m e n ts

Grievance Procedures
__ Severance Pay and Layoff Benefit Plans
— Supplemental Unemployment Benefit Plans and
Wage Employment Guarantees
__ Deferred Wage Increase and Escalator Clauses
_
Management Rights and Union Management Cooperation
__ Arbitration Procedures
_ Training and Retraining Provisions
_Subcontracting
__ Paid Vacation and Holiday Provisions
__ Plant Movement Transfer and Relocation Allowances
_ Seniority in Promotion and Transfer Provisions
_ Administration of Negotiated Pension Health, and
insurance Plans
__ Layoff Recall, and W orksharing Procedures
_ Administration of Seniority
_Hours. Overtime and Weekend Work
_ Safety and Health Provisions
—

Total for ail 16 Bulletins

To order check the bulletins wanted
above, and mail the list with payment, to
your nearest Bureau of Labor Statistics regional office
MAKE CHECK PAYABLE TO
SUPERINTENDENT OF
DOCUMENTS




$23 50

Regional Office
Bureau of Labor Statistics
U.S. Department of Labor
1603 Federal Building. Boston. Mass 02203
1515 Broadway New York, N Y 10036
3535 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pa 19101
1371 Peachtree Street, N E . Atlanta. Ga 30309
230 S Dearborn Street. Chicago. Ill 60604
911 Walnut Street Kansas City, Mo 64106
555 Griffin Square Building. Dallas, Texas 7 5 2 0 2
450 Golden Gate Ave . San Francisco. Calif 94102

1.30

Bureau of Labor Statistics
Regional Offices

AMERICAN

Region I

1603 JFK Federal B uilding
G overnm ent Center
Boston. Mass. 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761

Region IV

1371 Peachtree Street. NE
Atlanta. Ga 30309
Phone: (404) 881-4418
Region V

Region II

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York. N Y 10036
Phone: (212) 399-5405
Region III

3535 M arket Street
P O Box 13309
Philadelphia. Pa 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154




9th Floor
Federal O ffice B uilding
230 S Dearborn S treet
Chicago, III 60604
Phone: (312) 353-1880

Regions VII and V III*

911 Walnut S treet
Kansas City. Mo. 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481
Regions IX and X **

450 G olden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678

Region VI

Second Floor
555 G riffin Square B uilding
Dallas. Tex 75202
Phone (214) 749-3516

# Regions VII and VII are serviced
by Kansas City
"Regions IX and X are serviced
by San Francisco

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300




Lab-441