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Wage Chronology

BETHLEHEM ATLANTIC
SHIPYARDS

1941-65

llllltil N . 101
O

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W . Willard W irtz, Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STA TISTIC S
Ewan Clague, Commissioner




Wage Chronology

BETHLEHEM ATLANTIC
SHIPYARDS

1941-65

Bulletin No. 1454
July 1965

UNITED STA TES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W . Willard W irtz, Secretary

BUREA U O F LABO R S TA TIS TIC S
Ewan Cloaue, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price 25 cents










Preface

This bulletin is one of a series that traces the
changes in wage scales and related benefits, contained in
collective bargaining agreements, made by individual em­
ployers or combinations of employers with a union or
group of unions. Benefits unilaterally provided by an em­
ployer are generally reported. The chronology series is
intended primarily as a tool for research, analysis, and
wage administration. The series deals only with selected
features of the varied history of collective bargaining or
wage determination. References to job security, grievance
procedure, methodology of piece-rate adjustment, and sim­
ilar matters are omitted.
This chronology summarizes the changes in wage
rates and related wage practices in the Atlantic Coast ship­
building division of the Bethlehem Steel Company that have
been negotiated with the Industrial Union of Marine and
Shipbuilding Workers of America from 1941 to 1965. This
report includes materials previously published in five
parts— as Wage Chronology No. 18, covering the period
1941—
51; Supplement No. 1, 1952—
53; Supplement No. 2,
1954 — ; Supplement No. 3, 1956—
55
62; and Supplement No. 4,
1963-65.
The basic chronology and first three supplements
were published in 1962 in a consolidated report and cov­
ered the years 1941—
62. The present edition incorporates
Supplement No. 4. No additional or revised information
is provided.
The wage chronology program is directed by Lily
Mary David, Chief of the Division of Wage Economics,
under the general direction of L. R. Linsenmayer, Assist­
ant Commissioner for Wages and Industrial Relations. This
chronology was prepared under the supervision of Albert A.
Belman. The analysis for the period 1963— was prepared
65
by Willmon Fridie.

iii

Contents
Page
Introduction______________________________________________________________________
1941-51________________________________________________________________________

1
1

1954-55________________________________________________________________________

3

1963-6 5 ~ _____ I_____________________ _________________________________________

4

Tables:
A— General wage changes.
B— Basic wage rates by grade and class at Bethlehem East
Coast Shipyards in Boston, New York City, and
Baltimore, 1941—
65_____________________________________
C— Related wage practices___________________________________
Shift premium pay__________________________
Overtime pay_______________________________
Premium pay for weekend w ork___________
Holiday pay_________________________________
Travel pay.,
Premium pay for dirty work__________________________________________
Pay for trial trips_____________________________________________________
Death and sickness benefits_________ _________________________________
Pension plan___________________________________________________________




iv

5
8

9
9
9
9
10

10
11
12
12

13
13
13
14
18

Wage Chronology:

Bethlehem Atlantic Shipyards, 1941—
65
Introduction

1941—511

Conference established a Nation-wide wage rate6
for standard first-class mechanics and provided
uniform coastwide provisions regulating certain
other working practices. The conferences were
attended, and the resulting zone standards were
agreed to, by representatives of Federal procure­
ment agencies, labor, and management.

L a r g e s t s i n g l e - c o m p a n y o p e r a t i o n and a major
segment of the E ast Coast shipbuilding and shiprepair industry are the combined facilities of the
Bethlehem Steel Co. E igh t of the 11 yards of
the company and its affiliate are located on the
Atlantic Coast.l Two of the Eastern Seaboard
2
yards are located in the Boston harbor area
(Quincy and B oston3) ; four are situated in the
New York harbor area (Brooklyn-27th Street,
Brooklyn-56th Street, Hoboken, and Staten I s ­
land), while the Baltimore and Sparrows Point
yards are in the vicinity of Baltimore.4 This
chronology traces the major changes in wage rates
and related wage practices put into effect by Beth­
lehem at these yards starting June 23, 1941, the
effective date of the Atlantic Coast Zone Ship­
building Stabilization Agreement.

Separate Zone Standards were established for
the Atlantic, G ulf, and Pacific Coasts, and for the
Great Lakes area. The Atlantic Coast Zone Stand­
ards became effective Ju n e 23, 1941. Later, in
Ju ly 1942, the basic wage rate was increased, ef­
fective June 29, 1942, and certain working prac­
tices were revised at a Chicago National Ship­
building Conference. The Zone Standards were
further amended in 1945. Provisions of the Zone
Standards and the initial master agreement do not
necessarily indicate changes in prior conditions of
work since some of the company’s working prac­
tices were continued.

Production employees at these eight yards (ex­
cept for patternmakers at six of the yards) are
represented by the Industrial Union of Marine
and Shipbuilding Workers of America (C IO ).
Organizational activities started in the middle
1930’s and culminated in certification by the N a­
tional Labor Relations Board of the union as col­
lective-bargaining agent at the Boston yard in
1937, at the Brooklyn and Hoboken yards in 1939,
and at the Fairfield,5 Baltimore, Sparrows Point,
and Staten Island yards in 1941. I t was not until
1945 that the union won an election entitling it to
act as collective-bargaining agent for Quincy pro­
duction employees. On September 18, 1942, the
first master agreement was signed by the parties.

A large proportion of the workers in Bethle­
hem’s 8 Atlairtic Coast yards were paid under
piecework or group incentive plans. The changes
reported in this chronology relate to these em­
ployees as well as those paid on a straight hourly
basis. Special provisions concerning the applica­
tion of the general wage changes to incentive
l For purpose and scope of the wage chronology series, see
M onthly Labor Review, December 1948.
2 The Bethlehem Steel Company (Shipbuilding D ivision) oper­
ates all of the Bethlehem A tlantic coast yards except the Spar­
rows Point yard, which is operated by the Bethlehem-Sparrows
Point Shipyard, Inc.
3 The Quincy yard is also known as the Fore River yard.
4 The Baltim ore yard is also known as the Key H ighway yard.
5 Not now in operation.
6The rate established was $1.12 an hour on the A tlantic and
Pacific Coasts and on the Great Lakes. M echanics in Gulf Coast
yards were paid $1.07; but in 1942, when rates were changed
to $1.20, the Gulf rates were also increased to that level. Rates
below the first-class rate were not established by the conference.
Provision, however, was made in 1941 to increase the lower rates
in the same proportion as first-class rates and in 1942 to increase
the lower rates by the same amount as the first-class rates.

Wages and related conditions o f employment
in the industry on a Nation-wide basis were stabil­
ized before our active participation in W orld War
I I — long before this action was taken in other in­
dustries. In 1941, Zone Stabilization Conferences
were convened by the Shipbuilding Stabilization
Committee o f the War Production Board; the




1

2

workers 'are omitted as are provisions of the con­
tracts dealing with other procedural aspects of
the day-to-day administration of the bonus plans.
The company’s employment on the Atlantic
Coast as in other shipyards, and hence the coverage
of the master agreement, has fluctuated widely
during the period covered by this report. W ar­
time employment of production workers reached
a peak of 139,000; in 1950, an average of 15,000
production workers were employed at the yards.
The existing agreement was originally effective
on November 10,1947, and was to continue in effect
until June 23, 1949. B y agreement of Ju ly 23,
1948, the agreement was extended to June 23,1950,
with provision for wage and insurance reopening
in June 1949. On Jan u ary 31, 1950, this reopen­
ing resulted in amending the company’s pension
plan, agreement on insurance benefits, and exten­
sion of the agreement to December 31,1951. Pro­
vision was made in this extension for a wage re­
opening in December 1950 and for continuation of
the insurance and pension plans to October 31,
1954, if the company does not change the pension
plan prior to that date.

1952-53
n d e r
a n
o p t i o n provided in the contract be­
tween the Bethlehem Steel Co. (Shipbuilding
Division) and the Industrial Union of Marine and
Shipbuilding Workers of America (IUMSW -CIO)
the agreement due to expire December 31, 1951,
was extended to March 1, 1952. The negotiators
met first on December 18, 1951; no further discus­
sions followed until February 19, 1952. In the
meantime, the union had authorized a strike if no
agreement was reached by March 1.

U

On February 26 the union agreed to postpone
strike action until March 30 to allow for continua­
tion of bargaining. Again, on March 28, action
was postponed until April 29, and a third post­
ponement, until June 13, was agreed to on April 25.
Finally, on June 11, the union announced an
indefinite postponement, with the reservation that
it Would give only 7 days’ notice of a strike. Such
a strike notice was served on August 18, to be
effective any time after midnight of August 25.



Meanwhile the Federal Mediation and Concilia­
tion Service sought to bring about a settlement.
Although no strike was officially authorized, there
were work stoppages at some yards on August 25
and 26.
Agreement by company and union negotiators
was reached as of August 27. The new contract,
subject to ratification by the union membership
and to review by the Wage Stabilization Board,
provided for wage increases retroactive to April 14,
1952, and for additional holiday, vacation, and
other benefits effective August 27, 1952.
The company and the union presented a joint
petition to the W SB. Before action was taken on
the parties’ petition, the Board was re-formed as
the Wage Stabilization Committee. The Com­
mittee began consideration of the petition on
December 18, but on December 24 deferred action,
at the request of both parties, to allow for further
study of the case as rare and unusual on the basis
of manpower shortage. Again at the request of
the company and the union, deliberations were
resumed on January 19, 1953.
On January 22 the Committee released its
opinion, granting approval of all items of the
proposed agreement except the establishment of a
consolidated wage schedule. Action on this was
deferred pending the filing of further data by the
parties. However, the Executive Order of Febru­
ary 6, 1953, which ended controls on wages, auto­
matically validated contract clauses then awaiting
the Committee’s approval, and the schedule was
placed in effect.
The new contract, currently covering about
20,000 production and maintenance workers, will
be effective through June 23, 1954. Provision
was made for a reopening, on general and uniform
wage-rate changes, in April 1953. Negotiations
were begun on M ay 21, 1953, and continued until
June 26, when agreement on an across-the-board
increase was announced. The increase, effective
June 24, 1953, was the only contract provision
discussed during the reopening proceedings. A
second reopening, after April 23,1954, may include
negotiations on wages, pensions, and insurance.
Stipulation is made, however, that any new agree­
ment regarding pensions and insurance shall not
become effective before November 1, 1954.

3

1954-55
negotiations for a new agreement
between the Bethlehem Steel Co. (Shipbuilding
Division) and the Industrial Union of Marine and
Shipbuilding Workers of America culminated in
a settlement on September 18, 1954. Formal
negotiations began June 3. When agreement was
not reached by June 23, the expiration date of the
existing contract, the union agreed not to strike
prior to Ju ly 23 and work continued on a day-today basis thereafter.

E xtended

The contract provided for a 3-cent-an-hour
general wage increase effective September 20,
1954. The parties also agreed to an additional
2-cent wage increase and liberalization of pension
and insurance plans effective November 1, 1954.
The agreement was made effective from September
20, 1954, through Ju ly 31, 1956, with provision for
a reopening on general and uniform wage-rate
changes in June 1955. The insurance agreement
runs to October 31, 1956, and the pension agree­
ment to October 31, 1957.
Under the wage reopening provision, agreement
was reached on Ju ly 23, 1955, for an hourly in­
crease ranging from 11.5 to 19 cents; the rate for
standard first-class mechanics was increased by
15 cents.

1956-62
N e g o t i a t i o n s between the Industrial Union of
Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America and
the Bethlehem Steel Co. Shipbuilding Division
for a new agreement began on July 13, 1956, after
the unions notification of its intent to reopen the
existing contract, which was to expire on Ju ly 31.
When agreement on new terms seemed unlikely
by the expiration date of the contract, the union
notified the company on Ju ly 16 that it would not
strike prior to August 26.

the period from August 1 through August 26,
when the union's no-strike pledge had been in
effect), additional increases averaging 8.5 cents an
hour effective on August 1 of both 1957 and 1958,
and two cost-of-living wage escalator reviews.
Changes in supplementary benefits, effective at
various dates throughout the contract period,
included a seventh paid holiday and liberalized
vacation, insurance, and pension benefits.
The contract was to be in force from Novem­
ber 3, 1956, through July 31, 1959.

Negotiations on union proposals for revisions
in the existing agreement began on July 7, 1959.
The company presented counterproposals the
following day. With agreement unlikely by the
expiration date, the union proposed a 30-day con­
tract extension. The company rejected this pro­
posal and, on August 1, the day the agreement
expired, discontinued some union-security con­
tract provisions. On August 13, the company
put into effect the terms and conditions of employ­
ment it had proposed as modifications of the
previous contract. Although union members
authorized a strike call, work continued and
negotiations proceeded with the assistance of the
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service follow­
ing the expiration of the contract.
An authorized work stoppage at two of the
company's yards began on January 22, 1960, and
by the 28th of the month, the strike had spread
to all eight Bethlehem E ast Coast shipyards.
Among the issues were rates of pay, seniority,
call-in pay, grievance machinery, and other con­
ditions of work.7
Hearings on union charges that the company
had engaged in unfair labor practices began on
February 8, 1960, before the National Labor
Relations Board.

Work continued on a day-to-day basis after this
date, with the Federal Mediation and Conciliation
Service assisting in the negotiations, and agree­
ment on the terms of a 3-year contract was reached
by the parties on November 3, 1956.

In the interval between the initiation of the
strike and the final agreement, the company's
request for an injunction against mass picketing
was rejected by the Massachusetts State courts,
but a Federal district court, on April 11, enjoined
the union from resuming mass picketing and re­
quired the company to bargain in good faith.

The November settlement provided for wagerate increases averaging 16 cents an hour effective
October 29, 1956 (with retroactive payment for

7 Discussion of bargaining regarding seniority, grievance machinery, work
assignments, etc., is outside the scope of the chronology series; these have
been mentioned here only because they were among the major issues in
dispute.




4

After the Federal injunctions had been issued,
negotiations continued, and tentative agreement
was reached on June 20—21 weeks after the strike
started. By June 23, following ratification of the
contract by union members, work had resumed
at all eight yards.
On October 25, 1961, the National Labor Rela­
tions Board ruled that,x with one exception relating
to grievance procedures, the company was not
guilty of unfair labor practices and that there was
insufficient evidence to show that the company
failed to bargain in good faith. Early in Decem­
ber 1961, the union asked the Board to reconsider
its decision, and on December 8, the NLRB Gen­
eral Counsel asked the Board for clarification of
its ruling. At press time, the Board had not
ruled on either motion.
The new 3-year contract, effective through
May 31, 1963, provided for a wage package of
25 cents an hour to be spread over the term of
the agreement. The parties also agreed to incor­
porate the existing 17-cent cost-of-living allowance
into basic rates and to discontinue the escalator
clause. The employment and operating provi­
sions of the new agreement were similar to those
in the previous contract. In addition, separate
agreements provided for a number of improve­
ments in the pension plan, effective January 1,
1960, and liberalized insurance benefits as of
June 23 of that year.
A joint Human Relations Research Committee
was established to plan and oversee studies and
to recommend solutions of problems relating to
wage incentives and such other overall problems
as the parties by agreement might refer to the
committee.

1963—65
1962, the Industrial Union of Marine and
Shipbuilding Workers of America and the Beth­

I n J uly




lehem Steel Co. (Shipbuilding Division) amended
their pension plan to conform to the benefits pro­
vided by the company’s steelmaking divisions.8
The amendments liberalized early retirement eligi­
bility requirements for employees whose service
was broken by disability, closure of a yard or de­
partment, or retirement by mutual agreement.
Benefits were made available to employees who
met these conditions and were at least 55 years old
with a minimum of 15 years’ service, when the two
totaled 75. Age and years of service for employees
under 55 had to total 80.
Negotiations to replace the 3-year basic contract
expiring May 31, 1963, began on May 3 of that
year. In lieu of specific wage demands, the union
proposed that the parties consider methods of as­
suring employees a reasonable annual income. It
also proposed revisions in clauses governing incen­
tive pay, overtime, shift premium pay, paid holi­
days, vacations, and pay for dirty work, and
requested establishment of supplemental unem­
ployment benefits and severance pay plans. The
company did not make an immediate counterpro­
posal, but agreed to study the union’s demands and
on May 11, discussions were recessed until June 4
for this purpose. To avoid “deadline bargaining,”
the parties agreed to extend the contract to
August 1, with provision for an additional 30-day
extension if agreement on a new contract had not
been reached within that period. When settle­
ment was not reached by August 1, the union noti­
fied the company that it was terminating the con­
tract effective September 1.
8 In a letter to the union dated June 23, 1963, the company
agreed that any changes in pension benefits at the company’s
basic steel plants prior to June 1, 1963, by agreement w ith the
United Steelworkers of America, would be made applicable sim ul­
taneously to employees in the A tlantic Coast Shipyards Division.
The Steelw orkers’ pension benefits were changed effective July 1,
1962; for details of the settlem ent, see “Wage Chronology:
United States Steel Corp., Supplem ent No. 9, 1960-64,” M o n t h l y
L a b o r R e v i e w , February 1965, pp. 178-189.

5

Agreement on terms of a 3-year contract was
reached on August 12. Wage increases and the
cost of fringe benefit improvements were valued at
29 cents an hour by the union. Hourly rates of
pay were increased by 6 cents, retroactive to
August 1, with 5-cent increases effective August 1
of 1964 and 1965. Two additional paid holidays
raised the total to 9. In addition, the agreement
liberalized vacation eligibility provisions and in­
creased life insurance, weekly sickness and acci­
dent, arid hospitalization benefits.
The issues of supplemental unemployment bene­
fits, severance pay, and subcontracting of work
were referred to the shipyard’s joint Human
Relations Research Committee for further study.

The new contract covered about 15,000 em­
ployees at six yards9 and was to remain in effect
through July 31, 1966, with no reopening pro­
visions. The following tables bring the Bethlehem
Atlantic Shipyards chronology up to date through
July 1966.

9 Although the company’s Staten Island yard in Staten Island,
N.Y., w as closed on Oct. 31, 1960, the foundry and propeller
plant continued operating.
Other yards subsequently closed were the 27th Street yard in
Brooklyn, N.Y., on Feb. 28, 1962; the 56th Street yard in Brook­
lyn, N.Y., on June 30, 1963; and the Quincy yard in Quincy,
M ass., on Dec. 31,1963.

A — General Wage Changes1
Effective date

Provisions

June 23, 1941 (by Atlantic Coast
Zone Stabilization Agreement).

Increases averaging approxi­
mately 10 cents an hour.

June 23, 1942 (by Atlantic Coast
Zone Stabilization Agreement).
Mar. 3, 1943 (by Directive Order of
National War Labor Board, July
6, 1943).
June 23, 1943 (by Directive Order of
National War Labor Board, Apr.
13, 1944).

8 cent an hour increase

Dec. 4, 1945 (by agreement of Na­
tional Shipbuilding Conference,
approved by National Wage Sta­
bilization Board, Feb. 27, 1946).
Nov. 10, 1947 (by agreement of
Nov. 10, 1947).
Julv 24, 1948 (by agreement of July
23, 1948).
Jan. 1, 1951 (bv agreement of Feb.
18, 1951).

18 cent an hour increase.

Apr. 14, 1952 (by agreement of
Aug. 27,1952).
June 24, 1953 (by agreement of
June 26,1953).
See footnote at end of table.




Increases averaging approxi­
mately 2 cents an hour.

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters
Agreement established rate of $1.12 an hour for
standard first-class mechanics and provided for
corresponding increases to employees in other
grades and classes.
10 occupations increased to standard first-class
rate of $1.20 an hour. Intermediate classifi­
cations increased accordingly.
Result of zone-wide review by Shipbuilding
Commission of the NWLB, which established
approvable job rates in order to eliminate
gross intraplant inequities and to adjust spe­
cific wage rates to the minimum of the going
wage rate bracket.

12 cent an hour increase_____
7 cent an hour increase______
18% to 31 cent increase, aver­
aging 22% cents an hour.

Approved by Wage Stabilization Board, June
7, 1951.

Increases ranging from 12% Approved by Wage Stabilization
to 24 cents, and averaging Committee Jan. 22, 1953.
18 cents an hour.
7 cents an hour increase--------

6

A—General Wage Changes1— Continued
Provision

Effective date

Sept. 20, 1954 (by agreement of same date).
Nov. 1, 1954 (by agreement of Sept. 20, 1954).
July 23, 1955 (by agree­
ment of same date).

Oct. 29, 1956 (agreement
dated Nov. 3, 1956).

Aug. 1, 1957 (agreement
dated Nov. 3, 1956).
July 1958 (first pay period
beginning in month).
Aug. 1, 1958 (agreement
dated Nov. 3, 1956).
January 1959 (first pay
period
beginning
in
month).
June 23, 1960 (agreement
of same date).

Aug. 1, 1960 (agreement
dated June 23, 1960).
Aug. 1, 1961 (agreement
dated June 23, 1960).
Aug. 1, 1962 (agreement
dated June 23, 1960).

3 cents an hour increase___________ _
2 cents an hour increase______

____

11.5 to 19 cents an hour increase______

15-cent increase for first-class mechanics,
applicable to a majority of the covered
employees. Specialists7 rates were in­
creased by amounts up to 19 cents an
hour.
9 to 22 cents an hour increase, averag- 18 cents an hour increase for first-class me­
chanics, applicable to a majority of the covered
ing 16 cents.
employees. Specialists7 rates were increased
by amounts up to 22 cents an hour.
Retroactive for the period Aug. 1 through Aug.
26, 1956.
Deferred increases ranging from 7 to 10 cents an
hour effective Aug. 1 of 1957 and 1958.
New agreement provided for cost-of-living ad­
justments, effective July 1958 and Jan. 1959,
of 1 cent an hour, added to straight-time
hourly earnings, for each alternating 0.4- and
0.5-point change in the Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics Consumer Price Index above a level of
116.2 (1947-49=100). No reduction in costof-living allowance unless decline in the index
warranted wage decrease of at least 2 cents.2
7 to 10 cents an hour increase, averag­ Deferred increase.
9 cents an hour increase for first-class mechanics.
ing 8.5 cents.
Specialists7 rates increased by amounts up to
10 cents an hour.
16 cents an hour increase_____________ First semiannual adjustment of cost-of-living
allowance.
7 to 10 cents an hour increase, averag­ Deferred increase.
9 cents an hour increase for first-class mechanics.
ing 8.5 cents.
Specialists7 rates increased by amounts up to
10 cents an hour.
1 cent an hour increase____ ________ __ Second semiannual adjustment of cost-of-living
allowance.
4 cents an hour increase___ ______ __ _ Deferred increases of 5, 11, and 5 cents an hour
effective Aug. 1 of 1960, 1961, and 1962, re­
spectively.
Previous 17-cent cost-of-living allowance incor­
porated into basic hourly rates and escalator
clause discontinued.
5 cents an hour increase______________ Deferred increase.
11 cents an hour increase_____________

Do.

5 cents an hour increase______________

Do.

See footnotes at end of table,




Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

7

A—General Wage Changes1—Continued

Provision

Effective date
Aug. 1, 1963 (agreement of same date)

6 cents an hour increase.

Aug. 1, 1964 (agreement dated Aug. 1, 1963).. 5 cents an hour increase.
Aug. 1, 1965 (agreement dated Aug. 1, 1963).. 5 cents an hour increase.

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters
Deferred increases effective August 1
of 1964 and 1965. Additional inequity adjustments for certain
occupations.
Deferred increase.
Deferred increase.

1 General wage changes are construed as upward or downward adjustments affecting an entire establishment, bargaining unit or plant at one time. Th ey
do not include adjustments in individual rates (promotions, merit increases, etc.) and minor adjustments in wage structure (such as changes in individual job
rates or incentive rates) that do not have an immediate or noticeable effect on the average wage level.
The wage changes listed above were the major adjustments in the general wage level made during the period covered. Because of fluctuations in incentive
earnings, changes in types of vessels constructed, the omission of nongeneral changes in rates and other factors, the sum of the general changes listed will not
necessarily coincide with the amount of change in average hourly earnings over the same period.
2 The new agreement provided that cost-of-living adjustments be based on
the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price Index for M a y and Novem ber
1958 to be effective in July 1958 and January 1959, respectively, as follows:




Consumer Price Index (1947-49=100)

Cost-of-living allowance

116.5 or less_____________________________ _____ None.
116.6 to 117.0-------- --------------------------------------1 cent an hour.
117.1 to 117.4----------------------------------------------- 2 cents an hour.
117.5 to 117.9----------- ------------------- ---------------- 3 cents an hour.
118.0 to 118.3----------------------------------------------- 4 cents an hour.
and so forth, with 1-cent adjustments in straight-time hourly earnings for
alternating 0.4- and 0.5-point changes in the index and with downward adjust­
ments occurring only when the index declines sufficiently to warrant a 2-cent
decrease.

8
B--- Basic Wage Rates by Grade and Class a Bethlehem East Coast Shipyards in Boston,
it
New York City, and Baltimore, 1941—
651
Job c l a s s i f ic a t io n 2
E ffe c t iv e date and a r e a

S ta n d a rd m e c h a n ic s 3
C la s s 11 C la s s 2 5 C la s s 3
4
3
2

June 23, 1941:
B o s to n -------- __ - _ _
N e w Y o r k — — ---------- B a l t i m o r e 9 -----June 23, 1942:
B o s t o n ________________
N e w Y o r k ----------------------------B a lt im o r e 9 ------------------------June 23, 1943:
B o s ton______ _ _______ ______
_
N e w Y o r k ----------------------------B a l t i m o r e ---------D e c . 4, 1945:
B o s to n — — _
N e w Y o r k ----------------------------B a l t i m o r e ----------- N o v . 10, 1947:
B oston ------------—
— _
N e w Y o r k ----------------------------B a l t i m o r e -----— —
Ju ly 24, 1948:
B o s to n — _____
N ew Y ork —
___
B a l t i m o r e ---------------------------Jan. 1, 1951:
B o s to n — .
_
—
N e w Y o r k _____________________
B a l t i m o r e ---------------------------A ll a reas:
A p r . 14, 1952--------------------June 24, 195 3 ......................
Sept. 20, 1954.....................
N o v . 1, 1 9 5 4 - - Ju ly 23, 1955..................
O ct. 29, 195 6 ......................
A u g . 1, 1 957________________
A u g . 1, 1958 10------------------ 1
June 23, I 9 6 0 1
1_____________
A u g . 1, I 9 6 0 1 ..................
1A u g . 1, 1961 1 ______________
1
A u g . 1, 1 96 2 1
1______________
A u g . 1, 1 9 6 3 " ______________
A u g . 1, 1 96 4 1
1______________
A u g . 1, 1 96 5 1 .........
1

H an dym en

L a b o re rs

H e lp e r s

F i r s t 90
d a ys 6

T h e r e a ft e r 7

F i r s t 60
days 6

T h e re a fte r 7

F i r s t 30
days 8
9

T h e r e a ft e r 7

$ 1. 12
1. 12
1. 12

$ 0. 93
1.01
1 .0 5

$ 0 .8 7
. 88
1.0 0

_
$ 0 .8 0

$ 0 .8 0
.8 4
.8 5

$ 0 ,7 2 5
.7 4
.7 2 5

$ 0 .7 5
.7 8
.7 5

_

$ 0 .7 5
.7 2 5
. 725

1. 20
1. 20
1. 20

1.01
1. 09
1. 13

.9 5
.9 6
1. 08

_
_
. 88

.8 8
.9 2
.9 3

.8 0 5
.8 2
.8 0 5

.8 3
.8 6
.8 3

_
_

. 83
. 805
. 805

1. 20
1. 20
1. 20

1. 12
1. 12
1. 14

1 .0 4
1. 04
1. 04

.9 2
.9 2
.9 3

.9 8
.9 8
.9 8

.8 4
.8 4
.8 0 5

.8 8
.8 8
.8 4

$ 0. 78
_

. 83
. 805
. 805

1.38
1. 38
1.3 8

1 .3 0
1 .3 0
1 .3 0

1. 22
1.22
1.22

1. 10
1. 10
1. 10

1. 16
1. 16
1. 16

1 .0 2
1 .0 2
.9 8 5

1.06
1. 06
1.02

.9 6
_

1. 50
1. 50
1. 50

1.4 2
1.4 2
1.42

1. 34
1 .3 4
1 .3 4

1. 22
1.2 2
1. 22

1 .2 8
1.2 8
1.2 8

1. 14
1 .1 4
1. 105

1. 18
1. 18
1. 14

1.08
_

1. 57
1. 57
1. 57

1.4 9
1.4 9
1 .49

1.41
1.41
1.41

1.2 9
1.2 9
1.2 9

1.3 5
1. 35
1. 35

1.21
1.21
1. 175

1.25
1. 25
1. 21

1. 15
1. 15

1. 20
1. 175
1. 175

1. 80
1. 80
1 .80

1.72
1.72
1.72

1 .64
1. 64
1. 64

1 .4 8
1.48
1.48

1 .5 6
1.56
1. 56

1.3 95
1 .395
1 .3 6

1.44
1.44
1. 395

1.31
1. 31
1.31

1. 385
1.36
1. 36

2. 00
2. 07
2. 10
2. 12
2. 27
2. 45
2. 54
2. 63
2 .8 4
2. 89
3. 00
3. 05
3. 11
3. 16
3. 21

1.91
1 .98
2. 01
2 .0 3
2. 17
2. 33
2 .4 2
2. 51
2 .7 2
2.7 7
2 .8 8
2. 93
2 .9 9
3 .0 4
3. 09

1.8 2
1 .89

1.63
1.7 0
1.73
1.75
1.87
1.98
2. 05
2. 12
2. 33
2. 38
2. 49
2. 54
2. 60
2 .6 5
2 .7 0

1 .7 2
1 .7 9
1.8 2
1 .8 4
1.97
2. 09
2. 17
2 .2 5
2 .4 6
2.51
2. 62
2 .6 7
2. 73
2 .7 8
2 .8 3

1. 535
1 .605
1.6 35
1.655
1.7 75
1 .865
1.9 35
2 .0 0 5
2 .2 1 5
2. 265
2 .3 7 5
2 .4 2 5
2 .4 8 5
2 .5 3 5
2 .5 8 5

1.59
1.66
1.69
1.71
1.83
1 .94
2. 01
2. 08
2. 29
2. 34
2.4 5
2. 50
2. 56
2. 61
2 .6 6

1.435
1.505
1.535
1. 555
1.67
1. 82
1. 89
1.96
2. 17
2. 22
2. 33
2. 38
2. 44
2 .4 9
2. 54

1.49
1. 56
1 .59
1.61
1. 73
_

1.92

1 .9 4
2. 07
2. 21
2. 29
2. 37
2. 58
2 .6 3
2 .7 4
2. 79
2. 8.5
2 .9 0
2 .9 5

1941
4

-

. 78

.9 6

1.08

. . 01
. 985
. 985
1. 13
1. 105
1. 105

-

_
-

-

1
8
sh ip y a r d s w e r e in o p e ra tio n d u rin g m o st o f the p e r io d f r o m
to the se c o n d h a lf o f I960. The r a t e s show n
h e re f o r those y e a r s w e r e p a id to w o r k e r s in 2 y a r d s in the B o s to n h a r b o r a r e a (d u r in g the p e r io d 1941 th rou gh 1945, 1 o f
th ese— the Q u in cy y a r d — w a s not c o v e r e d b y the E a s t C o a s t M a s t e r A g r e e m e n t );
y a r d s in the N e w Y o r k h a r b o r a re a ; and 2 in
the B a lt im o r e h a r b o r a r e a . On O ct. 31, I9 60 , the c om p a n y c lo s e d the Staten Is la n d y a r d in Staten Islan d , N . Y . (the fo u n d ry
and p r o p e l le r plants con tin ued o p e r a tin g ); on F e b . 28, 1962, the 27th S tre et y a r d in B r o o k ly n , N . Y . , w a s c lo s e d ; on June ,30, 1963,
the 56th S tre e t y a r d in B r o o k ly n , N . Y ., w a s c lo s e d ; and on D e c .
the Q u in c y y a r d in Q uincy, M a s s ., w a s c lo s e d .
E m p lo y e e s p a id u n d er e x is tin g g ro u p in c e n tiv e o r p ie c e w o rk p la n s g e n e r a lly e a r n m o r e than the b a s ic h o u rly ra t e . The b a s ic
h o u rly r a t e , h o w e v e r, s e r v e s a s a g u a ra n te e d m in im u m to th e se w o r k e r s .
2
G e n e r a lly , the o c c u p a tio n a l s t ru c tu r e at th ese sh ip y a r d s i s c o m p r is e d o f 5 m a jo r g r a d e s , 4 o f w h ic h a r e p r e s e n te d
h e r e . W ith in the sta n d a rd m e c h a n ic g ra d e a r e 3 c la s s e s w h ic h , in e ffe c t, a r e f o r d iffe r e n t d e g r e e s of s k ill. O ccup ation s that
at th e ir h ig h e st le v e l r e q u ir e l e s s s k ill than m e c h a n ic s but m o r e than h andym en a r e p a id e ith e r c la s s 2 o r c la s s 3 r a t e s ,
w h ile s k ille d m e c h a n ics a r e p a id c la s s 1 r a t e s . In 2 o f the o th er g r a d e s , th e re a r e 2 s te p s , w ith the lo w e s t c la s s g e n e r a lly
the s ta rtin g r a t e f r o m w h ic h s a t is fa c t o r y e m p lo y e e s p r o g r e s s to the oth er r a te a ft e r a s p e c ifie d p e rio d .
The in fo rm a tio n in this ta b le d o es not in clu d e p r e m iu m r a t e s p a id to la b o r e r s e n g a g e d in s c a lin g o r
w i r e b r u s h in g o r
e m p lo y e e s w o r k in g on g ro u n d b lo w n g la s s o r oth er h a z a rd o u s types o f in s u la tio n , sa n d b la s t in g , e t c . '
H ig h e r r a t e s p a id to s p e c ia lis t s a r e not sh ow n in this t a b le . S p e c ia lis t s in c lu d e a n g le s m ith s (h e a v y f i r e ), b la c k s m ith s
(h e a v y f i r e ), c o p p e rs m it h s , c o r e m a k e r s , c ra n e
o p e r a t o r s (s p e c i a l), p o w e r e n g in e e r s , layou^ m en , lo ftsm e n ,
m o ld e r s ,
p a t te r n m a k e rs , r iv e t t e s t e r s , s h e e t -m e t a l sk e tc h e rs , sig n p a in te r s , tool and d ie m a k e r s , an d t o o ls m ith s, a s w e ll a s s p e c ia lis t s
in a ll m e c h a n ic s ' t r a d e s .
3
The occup ation s in c lu d e d v a r y a m on g the y a r d s . T h e fo llo w in g oc c u p a tion s a r e c la s s e d in the sta n d a rd m e c h a n ic
g ra d e at a ll o f the y a r d s : A n g le s m ith s (lig h t f i r e ) , b la c k s m it h s (lig h t f i r e ) , b o i le r m a k e r s , b u r n e r s , c a r p e n t e r s , c a u lk e r s (w o o d ),
c h ip p e rs and c a u lk e r s , c o m p r e s s o r m en , dock h an ds, d r i l l e r s , e le c t r ic ia n s , jo in e r s , la u n ch o p e r a t o r s , layo ut m en , lo c o m o tiv e
e n g in e e r s ,
m a c h in is ts , m a r k e r s (w e ld in g ), m a s o n s , ou tsid e m a c h in is ts , p a in t e r s , pipe c o v e r e r s , p ip e fitt e rs , p r e s s m e n and
r o llm e n , r i g g e r s , r iv e t e r s , s h e e t -m e t a l w o r k e r s , s h ip fit t e r s , to o l r e p a ir m e n , an d w e ld e r s . E r e c t o r s w e r e c la s s i f ie d in the
s ta n d a rd m e c h a n ic g ra d e e x c ep t in N e w Y o r k y a r d s an d auto m e c h a n ic s in th is g ra d e e x c ep t at the Q u in cy y a r d .
4
In 1941 and 1942, the B o s to n y a r d s a ls o had a c la s s l b w ith a r a te o f
in 1941 and $ 1 .1 0 in 1942.
5
In 1943, the B a lt im o r e y a r d s a ls o had a c la s s 2b w ith a r a t e o f $ 1 .0 9 .
6 P r i o r to 1945, c la s s 2.
7
P r i o r to 1951, c la s s 1.
8
P r i o r to 1952, th e re w a s a c la s s 2 g ra d e at B o sto n ; r a t e s w e r e the s a m e a s f o r c la s s 1 at N e w Y o r k and B a lt im o r e .
A sin g le r a te f o r
l a b o r e r s , r e g a r d le s s o f s e r v ic e , w a s e s t a b lis h e d on O c t. 29, 1956.
9
R a te s show n a r e fo r the B a lt im o r e (K e y H ig h w a y ) y a r d on ly. A t the S p a r r o w s P o in t and F a i r f i e ld y a r d s , the r a t e s f o r
s ta n d a rd m e c h a n ic s r a n g e d f r o m $ 0 .9 0 to $ 1 .1 2 in 1941 and $ 0 .9 8 to
in
10 R a te s do not in clud e the 1 6 -cen t c o s t - o f - li v i n g adju stm e n t then in e ffe c t.
1 R a te s in clu d e the 17-c e n t c o s t - o f - li v i n g a llo w a n c e , w h ic h w a s in c o r p o ra t e d into b a s ic h o u rly r a t e s on June 23, I960.
1




31, 1963,

$1.02

$1.20

1942.

9

C—Related Wage Practices1
Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Provisions

Effective date

Shift Premium Pay
June 23, 1941_______ 7 percent of established base rate for work on
2d or 3d shift.
Dec. 15, 1943...........

In accordance with Atlantic Coast Zone Stand­
ards. Applicable to piecework or incentive
payments but not to overtime.
Night premium in addition to overtime paid day
shift employees who worked beyond regular
shift on premium days or holidays.

Overtime Pay
June 23, 1941....... __
Sept. 18, 1942______

Time and one-half for work in excess of 8
hours a day or 40 hours a week.

Dec. 15, 1943...........

May 6, 1946............

In accordance with company practice and Atlan­
tic Coast Zone Standards.
Premium rate also paid for work performed dur­
ing hours outside employee’s regular shift,
provided employee is not transferred from one
regular shift to another.
Time and one-half for 8 hours paid employees
transferred from 1 shift to another during
regular workweek unless 48 hours’ notice is
given.
Premium rate paid for work during regularly
scheduled lunch hour.

Premium Pay for Weekend Work
June 23, 1941______
July 19, 1942 2_____
Oct. 6, 1945________

Time and one-half for work on Saturday as
such, double time on Sunday.
Changed in new construction yards to: time
and one-half for work on 6th consecutive
day, double time on 7th consecutive day.
Changed back to: time and one-half for work
on Saturday as such, double time on Sun­
day.

See footnotes on p. 21



In accordance with company practice and Atlan­
tic Coast Zone Standards.
In accordance with 1942 Chicago amendments to
Zone Standards.
In accordance with amendments to 1942 Chicago
agreement.

10

C—Related Wage Practices 1—Continued
Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Provisions

Holiday Pay
June 23, 1941--------

Double time for work on specified holidays.
No pay for holidays not worked.

July 19, 1942 2______ Changed to: time and one-half for work on
specified holidays.
Oct. 6, 1945........... Changed back to: double time for work on
specified holidays. No pay for holidays not
worked.
Aug. 27, 1952______ Six paid holidays established for which
worker received 8 hours1 straight-time
pay.
Double time (total) for holidays
worked.
Nov. 3, 1956 (agree­
ment of
same
date).
July 1, 1957 (agree­
ment dated Nov.
3, 1956).
July 1, 1958 (agree­
ment dated Nov.
3, 1956).
Aug. 1, 1963
(agreement of
same date).

Added: 7th paid holiday_________________

In accordance with company practice and At­
lantic Coast Zone Standards, which did not
specify the holidays for which the premium
would be paid. Holidays previously recog­
nized by company practice continued to be
those for which premium was paid. The holi­
days differ from yard to yard.
In accordance with 1942 Chicago amendments to
Zone Standards.
In accordance with amendments to 1942 Chi­
cago agreement.
Holidays were: New Year's Day, Memorial Day,
Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving,
and Christmas. Holiday pay allowed in
addition to vacation pay if a holiday fell
within a vacation.
Holiday was Washington's Birthday.

Increased to: Double time and one-tenth
(total) for all work performed on 7 speci­
fied holidays.
Increased to: Double time and one-fourth
(total) for all work performed on 7 speci­
fied holidays.
Added: 2 paid holidays (total 9)_________

Columbus Day and Veterans Day.
Continued:
Holidays falling on Sunday to be observed
on Monday.
To receive holiday pay, employee must have
(1) worked 240 hours of more within any
period of 90 days after the date of employ­
ment; (2) been entitled to minimum pay
for any day in either the calendar week
in which holiday was observed or the pre­
ceding week; and (3) worked all hours
required or have been entitled to minimum
pay on first scheduled workday both fol­
lowing and preceding the holiday, unless
he failed to work for good cause.

Travel Pay
June 23, 1941______

Sept. 18, 1942______

Allowance to cover travel time and expenses
paid employee required to travel between
yard or home and an outside job before or
after regular working hours.

See footnotes on p. 21,



In accordance with company practice. Provision
generally applicable to company's repair yards.
Travel pay to be at overtime rate if travel occurs
during periods employee is entitled to premium
rates.

1
1

C—Related Wage Practices1—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Provisions

Effective date

Paid Vacations
June 23, 1941

1 week vacation after 3 years service, 2 weeks
after 15 years.

May 1, 1943

Changed to: 1 week vacation after 1 year of
service, 2 weeks after 5 years.

Jan. 1, 1948

Added: 3 weeks vacation after 25 years serv­
ice.

Jan. 1, 1952...........
Jan. 1, 1957 (agree­
ment dated Nov.
3, 1956).

Changed to: 3 weeks* vacation after
15 years* service.
Added: Minimum of 40 hours’ base rate
vacation pay for each week of vacation
after 1,000 hours’ work in preceding cal­
endar year.

Jan. 1,1958 (agree­
ment dated Nov.
3, 1956).

Added: Additional half week’s vacation
pay (1 percent of earnings) for 3 but less
than 5, 10 but less than 15, and 25 or
more years’ service.3

Aug. 1, 1963
( agreement of
same date).

Changed: Minimum work requirement in
preceding calendar year reduced to 950
hours.

See footnotes on p, 21



In accordance with company practice. Rate of
pay to equal average of earnings and hours
during 10 weeks immediately preceding vaca­
tion period with minimum allowance of 40
hours and maximum of 48 hours.
In accordance with Directive Order of National
War Labor Board dated Sept. 14, 1943, which
provided the 1-week provision was to become
effective in 1943 and the 2-week provision
in 1944.
Pay for each vacation week to equal 2 percent
of earnings during 12 consecutive months pre­
ceding Jan. 1. Proportionate pay given em­
ployee laid off.
Period for computing vacation pay increased by
1 month (through Dec. 1 of any year).
No change in length of vacation period.
In effect and continued: Eligible employee
laid off or granted leave of absence after
January 1 of any calendar year and before
taking vacation to receive allowance equal
to vacation pay computed as if vacation
had begun on date of layoff or leave of
absence. Amount of allowance to be de­
ducted from pay for any subsequent vaca­
tion taken in that year.
For purposes of computing vacation pay,
earnings to include (a) temporary total
disability payments under workmen’s com­
pensation law and (b) sickness and acci­
dent insurance benefits, in addition to
compensation for work performed.
Added: Minimum of 20 hours’ base rate pay
for each half week of vacation pay.

12

C—Related Wage Practices1—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Provisions

Effective date

Call-in Pay
June 23, 1941______
Sept. 18, 1942______

Dec. 15, 1943
May 6, 1946
Aug. 27, 1952.
Nov. 3, 1956 (agree­
ment of
same
date).

Employee notified to report but not put to In accordance with company practice at some
work guaranteed 2 hours pay at regular
yards.
rate.
Added: employee put to work guaranteed 4 Not applicable if employee quits before the end
hours pay at regular rate.
of the 4-hour period or is laid off because of
bad weather, machinery breakdowns or other
causes beyond the control of the company.
Added: 2-hour guarantee extended to employ­
ees reporting to work without contrary no­
tification by company and not put to work.
Employee laid off because of weather, etc., guar­
anteed 2 hours pay.
Employee entitled to call-in pay received holiday
pay in addition if called on a holiday.
Not applicable if employee did not (1) report
Added: 4 hours’ pay guarantee extended to
for work or (2) complete 4 hours’ work
employees called in or reporting to work
because of (a) a labor dispute, (b) utility
without contrary notification by company.
failure beyond the control of management,
(c) an act of God (other than bad weather),
or (d) personal reasons.

Premium Pay for D irty Work
June 23, 1941_______ Time and one-half the regular rate paid em­
ployees required to perform unusually dirty
work.
T )o a

IK

1 Q4.2

Aug. 27, 1952_______

Aug. 1, 1963
(agreement of
same date).

See footnote on p. 21.



In accordance with company practice at repair
yards. Dirty work defined as work in un­
cleaned oil tanks and Diesel crank pits and
similar work.
Dirty work redefined as (1) working in oil in oil
tanks, Diesel crank pits, tank tops under engine
and boiler room floors, bilges, fore and aft wells,
forepeak and afterpeak tanks, and double
bottoms, (2) arranging chain in chain lockers
when chain or locker has been coated with oil
or similar substances, and (3) work in applying
hot Bitumastic Enamel manually within con­
fined tanks where adequate ventilation is not
provided.
Dirty work definition
expanded to include
working in grease. Nine shipboard areas and
one shop area added to the list of locations
where premium pay applied.
Added: Dirty work definition expanded to
include work inside sanitary sewage dumps
at Quincy yard.

13

C—Related Wage Practices1—Continued
Effective
date

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Provision

Call-Back Pay
June 23, 1941- Employee returning to work less than 6 hours In accordance with company practice.
after quitting time to be paid time and onehalf for all hours worked until a 6-hour
break occurs.
May 6, 1946__ Period increased to 8 hours.

Pay for Trial Trips
Aug. 27, 1952- Standardized payment for trial trips
of more than 24 hours, formerly in
effect in Quincy Yard, extended to
cover all yards.

June 23, 1960
(agreement of
same date).

Pay for each day4 to be as follows: (1) on nonpremium
days, flat payment of 12 times regular hourly rate of pay
or straight time for 8 hours and double time thereafter;
or (2) on Saturday, 12 times regular hourly rate of pay
and double time for work in excess of 8 hours; or (3) on
Sunday or a holiday, either (a) 16 times regular hourly
rate of pay or (b) double time for hours worked, which­
ever was greater.
Changed to: Pay for a holiday to be the
greater of (a) 16 hours at regular hourly
rate, or (b) 2 times regular hourly rate on
holiday other than 1 of 7 specified "holidays,
or (c) 2}i times regular hourly rate on 1 of
7 specified holidays.

Jury-Duty Pay
Nov. 3, 1956 Employee to receive difference between 8
hours’ average straight-time earnings and
(agreement of
payment for jury service for each day of
same date).
service on which he otherwise would have
worked.
June 23, 1960 Changed to: Employee to receive difference
(agreement of
between" 8 times regular hourly base rate
of pay and payment for jury service for
same date).
each day of service on which he other­
wise would have worked.
Added: Employee to receive holiday pay
in addition to jury pay for each day of
jury service on which he would have been
entitled to holiday pay.

See footnotes on p. 21.



Employee to present proof of service and
amount of pay received.

14
C
C — Related Wage P r a c t i c e s 1 ontinued
Effective
date

Provisions

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Death and Sickness Benefits
June 23, 1941

Employees with 90 days continuous service
In accordance with company practice. The plan,
could participate in plan providing:
which was inaugurated in 1926, became avail­
Life Insurance .— $500 to $1,500, depending on
able to shipyard employees at time of inaugura­
hourly rate.
tion or as the yards were acquired or estab­
Sickness benefits—$10 to $12 a week for 13 to
lished by the company. Death benefits were
208 weeks, depending on length of service.
limited to $200 if participant had subscribed
Cost to employee ranged from $1 to $2 a
to the plan less than 90 days prior to death.
month, depending on earnings. Administra­
Not included in union agreement.
tive costs borne by company.
Feb. 1, 1950— New,plan established providing participating
Effective date and provisions modified by pro­
employees with:
vision of New York and New Jersey State dis­
Life Insurance — $1,750 to $4,500, depending
ability laws for employees working in those
on hourly rate.
jurisdictions.
Sickness benefits— $24 and $26 a week for 26
weeks. Sickness benefits start on 8th day;
accident benefits on first day.
Hospitalization —Blue Cross plan providing
hospital care for 70 days and related bene­
fits. Available to employees’ dependents.
Employee contributions range from $2.70 to
$4.40 monthly for single employees and from
$3.95 to $5.65 for married employees. Com­
pany pays 2% cents a man-hour toward ben­
efits, including administrative costs.
Life insurance .— Revised schedule of group term in­
Sept. 1, 1951
(by agree­
surance based on higher wage scales— minimum insur­
ment
of
ance changed from $1,750 to $2,000; maximum remained
1951).6
$4,500.
Sickness benefits.— Changed to $26 for 26 weeks for all
employees.
Surgical benefits.— Added: Blue Shield surgical benefits If point was reached where
for employees and dependents, with a maximum benefit current contributions were
insufficient to pay for the
of $200.
Minimum employee contribution changed from $2.70 to additional benefits, surgical
$2.90 for single employees and from $3.95 to $4.15 for benefits were to be con­
married employees. All other contributions remained tinued for dependents of em­
ployees only if they elected
the same.
to pay an additional sum.
Nov. 1, 1954
Life insurance .— Revised schedule of group term insur­ In case of layoff, life insurance
(by agree­
ance based on higher wage scales had effect of increasing continued for 6 months (in­
ment dated
each employee’s life insurance at least $1,000. Mini­ stead of 3 months) if em­
Sept. 20,
mum insurance increased from $2,000 to $3,000; max­ ployee paid monthly pre­
1954).
mium of 60 cents per $1,000.
imum from $4,500 to $5,500.
Sickness benefits.—Increased by $14 a week, to $40.
Added: Benefits to apply to occupational disability.
Employees to receive difference between workmen’s
compensation payments and the $40 weekly accident
and sickness benefit.
Hospitalization .— Blue Cross plan maximum increased by
50 days, to 120. Allowance for private room and board
increased by $4 a day, to $10.
Surgical benefits.— Increased for a number of surgical pro­
cedures; $200 maximum retained.
Employee contributions increased to $6.25 to $7.75
monthly for single employees and $7.50 to $9 for mar­
ried employees.
Company contributions increased to 4*4 cents a man­
hour, plus administrative costs.

See footnotes on p. 21.



15

C—Related Wage Practices 1—Continued
Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Provision

Effective date

Death and Sickness Benefits— Continued
Nov. 1, 1956 (agreement
dated Nov. 3, 1956).

Changed to: Contributions — Employee
monthly contributions increased to $7.50$9 for employees without dependents and
$9.50-$ll for employees with dependents.
Company to match employee contribu­
tions 6 instead of limiting payment to
4.5 cents per man-hour, plus administra­
tive costs.

T

Life insurance:

New schedule of group term
insurance based on higher wage scales—
minimum insurance increased from $3,000
to $3,500 and maximum from $5,500 to
$ 6,000.7

Accident and sickness benefits: Changed from

a flat benefit of $40 a week to graduated
benefits ranging from $42 to $57 a week.7
Hospitalization (room and board): Benefits
under Blue Cross plan improved and
allowance for private room and board
increased to $12 a day. Benefits up to
30 days during any 12-month period for
mental or nervous disorders or pulmonary
tuberculosis. Benefits up to $25 for the
first day and $10 for up to 119 additional
days’ hospitalization provided in non­
member hospitals not covered under Blue
Cross arrangement.

Surgical benefits:

Benefits under Blue Shield
plan increased to a maximum of $300
during any one period of hospitalization.

See footnotes on p. 21



Benefits applicable to participating employ­
ees actively at work on or after Nov. 1,
1956. Benefits of the plan in effect prior
to that date were continued for partici­
pating employees not actively at work on
Nov. 1 1956, until their return to active
,
employment.
Any increase in cost of insurance program
during period of agreement to be shared
equally by employees and employer.
All insurance continued for employees
disabled because of (a) nonoccupational
disability (excluding pregnancy)—up to 6
months following month last worked; (b)
occupational sickness or injury—up to 1
month following end of month in which
statutory compensation payments termi­
nated, except sickness and accident cover­
age, wrhieh continued up to 6 months
following month last worked.
Face value of policy (a) reduced to $1,300$1,550 for employees retiring at or after
age 65, and continued without cost to
employee; (b) continued to age 65 for
employees retiring between ages of 60 and
65; (c) continued to age 65 with no em­
ployee contribution, for employees totally
disabled more than 6 months if disability
began prior to age 60.
Same benefits to be provided for employees
insured under New Jersey and New York
temporary disability insurance laws.
Added: Hospital benefits for (a) dental care
if hospitalization certified as necessary;
and (b) inpatient diagnostic study w'hen
directed toward diagnosis of definite con­
dition of disease or injury, and the follow­
ing diagnostic services w
^hen provided by
outpatient department of hospital: radia­
tion therapy, diagnostic X-ray examina­
tions with films, basal metabolism tests,
electrocardiograms and electroencephalo­
grams, when directed toward a definite
condition of disease or injury.
Changed to: Hospital benefits for emergency
outpatient treatment as a result of non­
occupational accident, within 48 hours (was
24); maximum of $25 (wras $18) in non­
member hospital.
Benefits not available for sickness or injury
covered by workmen’s compensation or
other liability law, convalescent or rest
cures, ambulance service, doctor’s or
special nurse’s charges, blood or blood
plasma: services not furnished by hospital,
or hospitalization primarily for diagnostic
study or dental processes, not specifically
provided for in the plan.
Added: Oral surgery and doctor’s charges,
as follows: (a) anesthesia services—min­
imum $15, maximum 20 percent of pay­
ment for surgical procedures; (b) radiation
therapy benefits—up to $7.50 per treat­
ment, maximum $200; (c) diagnostic

16
C—Related Wage Practices1—Continued
Provision

Effective date

Applications, exceptions, and other related
matters

Death and Sickness Benefits— Contiilued
Nov. 1, 1956 (agreement
dated Nov. 3,1956)— Con­
tinued

June 23, 1960 (agreement
of same date).

X -ray services, in or out of hospital,
required in diagnosis of disease or injury—
up to $40 per treatment, maximum $75 in
any 12-month period; and (d) certain
diagnostic examinations, in or out of hos­
pital, made or ordered by licensed doctor—
maximum $75 for all examinations during
any 12-month period.
Benefits not available for doctor’s services
covered by workmen’s compensation or
other liability law; hospital or laboratory
services; plastic surgery for cosmetic or
beautifying purposes except as a result of
injury or accident sustained while cover­
age was in effect; payment to assistants;
and nonsurgical or dental treatment or
X -ray services not specifically mentioned.
Radiation therapy, diagnostic X-ray, and
examination benefits not available for
examinations covered by hospitalization
benefits and those in connection with preg­

Maternity benefits—
Added: Hospital benefits up to 120 days
for complications arising out of pregnancy.
Changed to: Obstetrical benefits, maxi­
mum $150 (was $100).
In effect and continued: Sickness benefits:
6 weeks at regular rate.
Hospital room and board: Maximum 10
days for normal delivery.
Changed to: Revised plan providing ben­
efits previously in effect plus the follow­
ing changes, at no additional cost to
employee:

Life insurance:

Increased by $500, raising
minimum from $3,500 to $4,000 and maxi­
mum from $6,000 to $6,500.1
0

Accident and sickness benefits:

Increased
$11 a week, minimum from $42 to $53
and maximum from $57 to $68 a week.1
0

See footnotes on p. 21,



nancy, dental care, research studies, screen­
ing, routine physical examinations or
checkups, premarital examinations, hos­
pital admission procedures, and fluoros­
copy without films.
In effect: Retiree could authorize deduction
of premiums for converted policy from
policy check.

Revised benefits applicable upon return to
work, to employees actively at work, or
absent because of layoff, leave of absence,
or disability, on day prior to beginning
of strike at their respective yards.
Benefits and contributions of prior plan con­
tinued until return to work for employees
absent on June 23, 1960, because of layoff,
leave of absence, or disability.
Employees to pay contributions advanced
for insurance coverage while on strike
in 1960.8
In event of strike after May 31, 1963, in­
surance, except sickness and accident
benefits, to continue for 30 days at em­
ployeesJ expense and parties to discuss
arrangement for further continuation.9
Existing optional benefits continued at ex­
pense of employees.
Insurance upon retirement remained at
$1,300 to $1,550.
Same benefits to be provided for employees
insured under New Jersey and New York
temporary disability insurance laws.

17

C—Related Wage Practices1—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and other
related matters

Death and Sickness Benefits— Continued
Increased: Anesthesia services—minimum to
$20; radiation therapy benefits—to $10 a
treatment.

June 23, 1960 (agreement
of same date).
Sept. 1, 1963 (agreement of
same date).

Increased:

Life insurance: By '$500, raising minimum
to $4,500 and maximum to $7,000.1
1
Accident and sickness benefits: By $10 a
week, raising minimum to $63 and maxi­
mum to $78 a week.1!
1
Hospitalization (room and board): Maxi­
mum by 245 days, to 365.

See footnotes on p. 21



Same benefits to be provided employees in­
sured under New Jersey and New York
temporary disability insurance laws.

18

C —Related Wage Practices1—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

P e n s io n P la n

Jane 23,1941 (estab­
lished 1923).

M ay 1, 194? ■
Mar. 1, 1950

N ov. 1, 1954 (by agreement
of Sept. 20, 1954).

Non contributory pension providing annuities
to employees at 65 after 25 years continuous
service. Disability benefits provided em­
ployee wholly incapacitated for work
through any unavoidable cause at any age
after 15 years continuous service. Annuity
or disability benefits to equal 1 percent of
average monthly earnings during 120
months preceding retirement multiplied by
years of service, but not less than $180 a
year including public benefits. Entire cost
borne by company.
Minimum annual pension increased to $600
Amendments to pension plan negotiated tc
provide pensions to employees at 65 or
older after 15 years of continuous service.
Minimum pension— $100 a month, including
Federal Old Age Benefits and other public
pensions, to employees retiring at age 65 or
older with 25 or more years of service. Em­
ployees with 15 or more years continuous
service to receive proportionately reduced
payments.
Disability benefits provided employees wholly
incapacitated for work through any un­
avoidable cause at any age after 15 years
continuous service. Minimum
benefits
$600 a year. Entire cost borne by company.

Annuity formula of previous
plan retained for computing
pensions above minimum
and disability benefits. In ­
cluded in union agreement.

Minimum monthly pension at age 65 increased to com­ Revised plan not applicable to
employees pensioned before
pany payment of $55 plus primary social security
Novem ber 1, 1954.
benefits (a total of at least $140*2 after 30 years*
)
Added: Optional forms of pen­
service in place of a total of $100, including primary
sions; reduced benefits pay­
social security benefits, after 25 years* service; for each
able until employee*s death
year's service less than 30, new minimum company
with continued specified ben­
pension reduced by $2 a month to $25 for 15 years*
efits, until joint annuitant’s
service (or a total of at least $110 including social
death.
security benefits). Company pension benefits as com­
puted by the basic 1-percent formula reduced by a flat
$85 a month (the maximum payable under Federal Old
Age and Survivors Insurance at time of agreement)
rather than actual O A SI benefit. A worker aged 65
after 30 years* service receiving the minimum company
pension might have a total retirement income in excess
of $140 since O ASI primary benefits could exceed $85.1
3
Minimum monthly pension for permanent incapacity Dropped: Deduction of work­
increased to $75 until age 65, after which regular mini­
men’s compensation p ay­
mum applies. Amount of pension calculated under 1ments from disability pen­
percent formula no longer reduced because of absence
sions before age 65.
from work in last 6 months preceding retirement on
disability.

See footnotes on p. 21



N ot included in union agree­
ments; established by com­
pany.

19

C—Related Wage Practices1—Continued

P e n s io n P l a n —

N ov. 1, 1957 (agreement
dated N ov. 3, 1956).

Jan. 1, 1960 (agreement
dated June 23, I960).1
5

Continued

Minimum monthly pension of employees who
retired prior to Feb. 29, 1948, changed to
$1.75 for each year of service up to 30; for
those retired under the 1949 plan,1 changed
4
to $2 for each year of service up to 30; for
those under the 1954 plan, changed to
$2.25 a month per year of service up to 30
(plus social security benefits).
Monthly pension prior to age 65 for perma­ Minimum monthly pension for pensioners
already retired for disability as follows:
nent incapacity changed to the larger of
Those entitled to social security disability
(1) $90 a month less any social security
benefits to receive minimum pensions speci­
disability benefits payable; (2) minimum
fied in preceding entry ; those ineligible
pension specified in preceding entry; or
for social security disability benefits, $50 a
(3) amount under basic 1-percent formula
month if retired prior to Feb. 29, 1948, $60
less flat $85 offset for social security or, in
a month if retired under the 1949 plan,1
4
workmen’s compensation cases, actual so­
and $80 a month if retired under the 1954
cial security if less than $85. Normal
minimum after age 65.
plan.
Added: E a r ly retirem ent — Employees aged
60 but less than 65 with 15 years’ contin­
uous service permitted to retire at own op­
tion: could elect (1) deferred normal pen­
sion starting at age 65 or (2) an immediate
pension, actuarially reduced.
Added: D eferred vested rights — Employees
laid off for more than 2 j^ears or termi­
nated as a result of a permanent shutdown
of a plant, department, or a subdivision
and who at the end of such 2 years or upon
such termination had reached age 40 with
at least 15 years’ continuous service to
receive deferred monthly pension at age
65 based on years of continuous service
and on average monthly compensation
during the 120 months pripr to the expira­
tion of such 2 years or such termination.
Minimum monthly pension at age 65 in­ Company increased pensions for retired
creased to company payment of $2.50 a
employees by amounts up to $5 a month. ^
month for each year of service prior to
Jan. 1, 1960, and $2.60 a month for each
year of service thereafter, up to 35 years—
plus social security benefits.1
6
Amount deducted for social security bene­
fits from pension benefits as computed by
basic 1-percent formula, reduced to $80.
Minimum monthly pension prior to age 65
for permanent incapacity increased to
$100 less any social security disability
benefits payable. Alternatives of mini­
mum normal pension or amount under
1-percent formula continued.
In case of pensions based on 1-percent for­
E a r ly retirem en t: Added— full pension based
mula, $80 to be deducted as for normal
on continuous service to date of retire­
ment for (1) employees aged 60 but less
retirement.
Employee must have reached age 53 with
than 65 with 15 year’s, continuous service,
18 years’ continuous service on date of
retired under mutually satisfactory con­
shutdown, layoff, or disability.1 Com­
8
ditions, and (2) employees aged 55 with
pany could at its option grant a pension
20 or more years’ service, terminated
prior to the date absence due to layoff or
because of permanent shutdown, layoff,
or sickness resulting in break in service*1 .
6
physical disability would otherwise result
Amount of pension either minimum
in break in service if in its judgment there
normal pension or amount under 1-perwas little likelihood that employee would
cent formula.
be recalled to work.
N ot applicable to those receiving disability
or deferred vested pensions.

Minimum monthly pension at age 65 in­
creased to company payment of $2.40 a
month for each year of service prior to
N ov. 1, 1957, and $2.50 a month for each
year of service thereafter, up to 30 years—
plus social security benefits.

See footnotes on p. 21.



Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

Provision

Effective date

C—Related Wage Practices 1—Continued
Effective date

Provision

Applications, exceptions, and
other related matters

P e n s io n P l a n — Continued

Jan. 1, 1960 (agreement
dated June 23, I960).1
5
— Continued

July 1, 1962 (pension
agreem ent dated June23,
1962, amended July 1,
1962).

Added: S p ecia l retirem ent benefit , providing
lump-sum payment equal to 13 weeks’
vacation pay reduced by pay for vacation
previously taken in calendar year in which
retirement occurred or, if employee was
not eligible for vacation in the year of
retirement, by pay for vacation in last
year in which he was eligible.

Changed: E a r ly retirem ent 1 — Full pension
9
based on continuous service to date of re­ Benefits payable for disability— no earlier
than month after last month in which
tirement for employee with 15 years or
employee was eligible for company sickness
more of service, either (a) age 55 whose
and accident benefits or statutory noncombined age and years of service equaled
occupational disability benefits.
75 or (b) younger, whose combined age
and years of service equaled 80, and (1) For employee whose employment would have
been terminated because of yard closure
whose continuous service was broken by
but for election to be placed on layoff
permanent shutdown of a yard, depart­
status— provision not applicable until the
ment, or subdivision thereof, layoff, or
later of (a) date at which age and years of
disability, or (2) whose continuous service
service equaled 75 or 80, or (b) 1 year after
was not broken but who was not at work
closure. Employee terminated by closure
because of (a) election of layoff status
at age 53 with 18 years or more of service
under contract terms relating to perma­
considered to have elected layoff status and
nent shutdown or (b) physical disability
provided pension under (a) unless em­
or nonelective layoff and whose return toj
ployed at another company yard within 2
work was considered unlikely by em-|
years .2
o
ployer, or (3) who retired under mutually
Changed: Regular pension not to be reduced
satisfactory conditions.
by eligibility for or receipt of actuarially
reduced public pension. When employee
reached age at which public pension was
not actuarially reduced, company pension
to be reduced by amount of public pension.
Changed: $80 deduction from early retire­
ment pension based on 1 percent formula
eliminated until age 65 for employee age
55 with 20 years or more of service, whose
employment was terminated by perma­
nent shutdown, layoff, or sickness result­
ing in break in service.
D e ferred vested rights — Continuous service
after reemployment not to be included in
calculation of pension for employee who
was eligible, but had not applied, for de­
ferred vested pension.

See footnotes on p. 21..



Regular monthly pension payments to com­
mence after 3 months. Employee who has
not taken vacation in calendar year not
required to take vacation and not en­
titled to vacation pay in that yearns

21
Footnotes:
1 The last entry under each item represents the most recent change.
2
Since the Zone Standards were substantially iden tical to the provisions o f Executive Order
9240, the industry was exem pt from the terms o f the order.
^ V acation provisions e ffe c tiv e Jan. 1, 1958, were as follows:

Years o f service

Duration o f vacation

Extra vacation pay

1 w eek
1 w eek
2 weeks
2 weeks
3 weeks
3 weeks

1 but less than 3-------------------3 but less than 5-------------------5 but less than 10-------------------10 but less than 15------------------15 but less than 25------------------25 or m o r e ----------------------------

None.
*/z week.
None.
V 2 w eek.
None.
*/2 w eek.

4
A "d a y ” , for trial trip purposes, was considered to be the period from midnight to midnight.
® This change should have been included in the origin al chronology published in M onthly Labor
R e v ie w , Septem ber 1951 (p. 287).
6 Excluded amount o f em p loyee's contribution toward cost o f additional benefits under the
N ew York State D isability Benefits Law and the New Jersey Tem porary D isability Benefits Law for
em ployees working in those jurisdictions.
7 Schedule o f benefits— in addition to the national Blue Cross 120-day hospitalization plan and
national Blue Shield surgical plan— and em ployee contributions revised as follows:

L ife insurance
Em ployee's hourly base r a te *

Before
retire­
ment

Less than $ 1 .9 4 -------------------- $3,500
$1. 94 but less than $2. 32-----4, 000
$2. 32 but less than $2. 70-----4?500
$2. 70 but less than $ 3 .1 4 -----$3.14 but less than $3. 52-----$3. 52 and over----------------------

5,000
5, 500
6,000

A fte r
retire­
ment

W eek ly
accident
and
sickness
ben efit

$1,300
1,350
1,400
1,450
1,500
1,550

$42
45
48
51
54
57

Em ployee's
monthly contri______butions * *
No
depend­
ents

$7. 50
7.80
8.10
8.4 0
8 .7 0
9.00

With
depend­
ents

$9. 50
9 .80
10.10
10.40
10. 70
11.00

* On basis o f N ov. 1, 1956, wage scale, excluding incentive earnings.
* * Contributions o f em ployees in N ew York and N ew Jersey included amounts
required by State laws, resulting in monthly contributions higher by 30 cents in
N ew York and 15 cents in N ew Jersey than those paid by em ployees in other States.
The company assumed approxim ately on e-h alf o f the cost o f the accident and
sickness coverage for these em ployees.

^

In accordance w ith letter o f understanding betw een the parties dated Feb. 13,
This provision was included in an insurance agreem ent dated June 23, 1960.




1960.

22

10 Schedule o f benefits— in addition to the national Blue Cross 120-day hospitalization plan and
national Blue Shield surgical plan— revised as follows:

Em ployee’ s
L ife insurance
Em ployee's hourly base r a te *

Less than $2. 2 9 ---------------------$2. 29 but lessthan $ 2.71 -------$2. 71 but lessthan $3.1 1 -------$3.11 but lessthan $3.5 5 -------$3.55 but lessthan $ 3 .9 3 -------$3.93 and over-----------------------

Before
retire­
m ent

$4,000
4, 500
5,000
5,500
6,000
6, 500

A fte r
retire­
ment

$ i, ,300
i , ,350
i, ,400
i, ,450
i. ,500
i, ,550

W eek ly
accident
and
sickness
ben efit

$53
56
59
62
65
68

monthly contri_____ butions * *
No
depend­
ents

$7. 50
7.80
8.10
8.40
8. 70
9.00

With
depend­
ents

$9.50
9 .80
10.10
10.40
10.70
11.00

* On basis o f July 1, 1960, wage scale, excluding incentive earnings.
* * For contributions o f em ployees in N ew Jersey and N ew Y ork , see fo o tn o te **
under footnote 7.
Schedule o f benefits— in addition to the national Blue Cross 365-day hospitalization plan and
national Blue Shield surgical plan— revised as follow s:

L ife insurance
Em ployee's hourly base rate*

Before
retire­

ment

Less than $2. 5 6 -------------------$2. 56 but less than $2.98 ------$2.98 but less than $3. 38------$3. 38 but less than $3.8 2 ------$3.82 but less than $ 4 .2 0 ------$4.20 and o v e r - - -------------------

A fte r
retire­
ment

$4, 500
5,000
5, 500
6,000
6,500
7,000

$1,300
1,350
1,400
1,450
1,500
1,550

W eek ly
accident
and
sickness
ben efit

$63
66
69
72
75
78

Em ployee' $
monthly contri______bu tions**
No
depend­
ents

$7.50
7.80
8.10
8.40
8.70
9.00

W ith
depend­
ents

$9.50
9 .8 0
10.10
10.40
10.70

11.00

* On basis o f Sept. 1, 1963, wage scale, excluding incentive earnings.
* * Employees contributed 30 cents more in N ew York and 15 cents more in
N ew Jersey in accordance with State tem porary disability laws. The company
assumed approxim ately on e-h alf the cost o f accident and sickness coverage for these
em ployees.

12

A t tim e o f agreem ent, some em ployees m ight have been e lig ib le for OASI benefits o f less
than $85 and thus would have received total monthly retirem ent incom e o f less than $140 but this
number would have been sm all.
13
Under 1954 amendments to the law , m axim um OASI benefits had increased to $98.50 by
N ov. 1, 1954, and were to rise further, to $108.50, by July 1, 1956.




23
14

Amendments becam e e ffe c tiv e Mar, 1, 1950.
15 In a letter to the union from the company dated June 23, 1960, it was agreed than in the
event pension benefits in e ffe c t at the company's basic steel plants w ere changed prior to June 1, 1963,
pursuant to agreem ent between the company and the United Steelworkers o f A m erica , the same
changes in benefits would be made applicable simultaneously to em ployees in the company's A tlan tic
coast shipyards division.
1 ^ D efin ition o f continuous service was changed to extend the period which could elapse before
a break in service up to 5 years (was 2 years) after la y o ff, depending on length o f service. Previous
p ractice o f crediting up to 2 years o f la y o ff as years o f service for purposes o f computing retirem ent
benefits continued.
17
Included in a letter to the union from the company dated June 23, 1960. The $5 increase was
provided for a ll pensioners except those electin g to receive a reduced amount under a pension option,
for whom the increase was prorated accordingly.
18
Included in a letter to the union from the company dated June 23, 1960.
19
E ffective N ov. 1, 1957, im m ediate pension payable to em ployee who voluntarily retired at
age 60 or after with at least 15 years o f continuous service was based on—

A g e at retirem ent

Percent
of
pension

60---------------------------------------- $67.18
6.1---------------------------------------72.36
62---------------------------------------78. 14

A g e at retirem ent
63
64
65

------------------------------- $84.60
----------------------------91.84
------------------------------ 100.00

Included in a letter to union from company dated July 1,




Percent
of
pension

1962.

W age Chronologies
The following list constitutes all wage chronologies published to date.
Those for which a price is shown are available from the Superintendent of Docu­
ments, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or from
any of its regional sales offices. Those for which a price is not shown may be
obtained free as long as a supply is available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D.C., 20212, or from any of the regional offices shown on the inside
back cover.
Aluminum Company of America, 1939—
61. BLS Report 219.
American Viscose, 1945—
63. BLS Report 277 (20 cents).
The Anaconda Co., 1941—
58. BLS Report 197.
Anthracite Mining Industry, 1930—
59. BLS Report 255.
Armour and Co., 1941—
63. BLS Report 187.
A. T. & T .— Long Lines Department, 1940—
64. BLS Bulletin 1443 (40 cents).
Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (formerly Northern Cotton Textile Associations),
1943—
64. BLS Report 281 (20 cents).
A
Big Four Rubber Companies, Akron and Detroit Plants, 1937—
55.
1Bituminous Coal Mines, 1933—
59.
The Boeing Co. (Washington Plants), 1936—
64. BLS Report 204 (20 cents).
Carolina Coach Co., 1947—
63. BLS Report 259.
Chrysler Corporation, 1939—
64. BLS Report 198 (25 cents).
Commonwealth Edison Co. of Chicago, 1945—
63. BLS Report 205
(20 cents).
Federal Classification Act Employees, 1924—
64. BLS Bulletin 1442(35 cents).
Ford Motor Company, 1941—
64. BLS Report 99 (30 cents).
General Motors Corp., 1939—
63. BLS Report 185 (25 cents).
International Harvester Company, 1946—
61. BLS Report 202.
International Shoe Co., 1945—
64. BLS Report 211.
Lockheed Aircraft Corp. (California Company), 1937—
64. BLS Report 231
(25 cents).
2Martin—
Marietta Corp., 1944—
64. BLS Bulletin 1449.
Massachusetts Shoe Manufacturing, 1945—
64. BLS Report 209 (20 cents).
2New York City Laundries, 1945—
64. BLS Bulletin 1453.
North American Aviation, 1941—
64. BLS Report 203 (25 cents).
North Atlantic Longshoring, 1934—
61. BLS Report 234,
1Pacific Gas and Electric Co., 1943—
59.
lPacific Longshore Industry, 1934—
59.
Railroads— Nonoperating Employees, 1920—
62.

BLS Report 208 (25 cents).

Sinclair Oil Companies, 1941—
66. BLS Bulletin 1447 (25 cents).
Swift & C o., 1942-63.
BLS Report 260 (25 cents).
United States Steel Corporation, 1937—
64. BLS Report 186 (30 cents).
Western Greyhound Lines, 1945—
63. BLS Report 245 (30 cents).
Western Union Telegraph Co., 1943—
63. BLS Report 160 (30 cents).1

1 Out o f print. See Directory o f Wage Chronologies, 1948-Qctober 1964, for Monthly Labor Review issue in
which basic report and supplements appeared.
2 Study in progress; price not available.







BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES