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MONTHLY SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS

UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
WASHINGTON

SURVEY OF
CURRENT BUSINESS
SEPTEMBER, 1924
No. 37

COMPILED BY

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
BUREAU OF STANDARDS
IMPORTANT NOTICE
In addition to figures given from Government sourcesy there are also incorporated for completeness of
service figures from other sources generally accepted by the trades, the authority and responsibility for
which are noted in the "Sources of data" at the end of this number
Subscription price of the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS is $1.50 a year; single copies (monthly), 10 cents, quarterly
issues, 20 cents. Foreign subscriptions, $2.25; single copies (monthly issues) including postage, 14 cents, quarterly
issues, 31 cents. Subscription price of COMMERCE REPORTS is $4 a year; with the Survey, $5.50 a year. Make
remittances only to Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C , by postal money order, express order, or New
York draft. Currency at sender's risk. Postage stamps or foreign money not accepted.




WASHINGTON { GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1824

INTRODUCTION
The SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS is designed to
present each month a picture of the business situation
by setting forth the principal facts regarding the various lines of trade and industry. At quarterly intervals
detailed tables are published giving, for each item,
monthlyfiguresfor the past two years and yearly comparisons, where available, back to 1913. In the intervening months the more important comparisons only
are given in the table entitled " Trend of business
movements" (p. 29).
In the quarterly numbers (see issue for August,
1924, No. 36) blank lines covering the next three
months have been left at the bottom of each detailed
table which will enable those who care to do so to
enter new figures as soon as they appear.
ADVANCE SHEETS

Realizing that current statistics are highly perishable and that to be of use they must reach the business
man at the earliest possible moment, the department
has arranged to distribute advance leaflets almost
every week, whenever sufficient material is available,
to those subscribers who request them. The leaflets
are usually mailed on Thursdays, and give such information as has been received during the preceding
week. The information contained in these leaflets is
also reprinted in " Commerce Reports," issued weekly
by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce,
'the complete bulletin is distributed as quickly as it
can be completed and printed.

period has been chosen. In & few cases other base
periods are used for special reasons. In all cases the
base period is clearly indicated.
The relative numbers are computed by allowing the
monthly average for the base year or period to equal
100. It the movement for a current month is greater
than the base, the relative number will be greater than
100, and vice versa. The difference between 100 and
the relative number will give at once the per cent
increase or decrease compared with the base period.
Thus a relative number of 115 means an increase of 15
per cent over the base period, while a relative number
of 80 means a decrease of 20 per cent from the base.
Relative numbers may also be used to calculate the
approximate percentage increase or decrease in a movement from one period to the next. Thus, if a relative
number at one month is 120 and for a later month it
is 144 there has been an increase of 20 per cent.
INDEX NUMBERS

When two or more series of relative numbers are
combined by a system of weightings the resulting
series is denominated an index number. The index
number, by combining many relative numbers, is
designed to show the trend oi an entire group of industries or for the country as a whole, instead of for
the single commodity or industry which the relative
number covers. Comparisons with the base year or
with other periods are made in the same manner as in
the case of relative numbers.

BASIC DATA

BUSINESS INDICATORS

Thefiguresreported in the accompanying tables are
very largely those already in existence. The chief
function of the department is to bring together these
data which, if available at all, are scattered in hundreds of different publications. A portion of these
data are collected by Government departments, other
figures are compiled by technical journals, and still
others are reported by trade associations,

The diagrams on page 2 have been prepared to
facilitate comparisons between a few of the more
important business movements. The lines are plotted
on what are known as ratio charts (logarithmic scale).
These charts show the percentage increase and allow
direct comparisons between the slope of one curve and
that of any other curve regardless of its location on
the diagram; that is, a 10 per cent increase in an
item is given the same vertical movement whether its
curve is near the bottom or near the top of the chart.
The difference between this and the ordinary form
of a chart can be made clear by an example. If a
certain item, having a relative number of 400 in one
month, increases 10 per cent in the following month,
its relative number will be 440, and on an ordinary
chart would be plotted 40 equidistant scale points
higher than the preceding month. Another movement with a relative number of, say, 50, also increases
10 per cent, making its relative number 55. On the
ordinary (arithmetic) scale this item would rise only 5
equidistant points, whereas the previous item rose 40
points, yet each showed the same percentage increase.
The ratio charts avoid this difficulty and give to each
of the two movements exactly the same vertical rise
and hence the slopes of the two lines are directly
comparable. The ratio charts compare percentage
changes, while the arithmetic charts compare absolute
changes.

RELATIVE NUMBERS

To facilitate comparison between different items and
render the trend of a movement more apparent, relative numbers (often called " index numbers," a term
referring more particularly to a special kind of number
described below) have been calculated. The relative
numbers enable the reader to see at a glance the
general upward or downward tendency of a movement which can not so easily be grasped from the
actual figures.
In computing these relative numbers the last prewar year, 1913, or in some instances a five-year average, 1909-1913, has been used as a base equal to 100
wherever possible. In many instances comparable
figures for the prewar years are not available, and in
such cases the year 1919 has usually been taken as
the base. For some industries 1919 can not be
regarded as a proper base, due to extraordinary conditions in the industry, and some more representative

This issue presents practically complete data for the month of July and also, on page 23, items covering August received
up to September 14. As most data covering a particular month's business are not available until from 15 to 30 days after
the close of the month, a complete picture of that month's operations, including relative numbers, cumulative totals,
text, and charts, can not be presented in printed form under 45 days after its close, but the advance leaflets described above
give considerable information as early as 15 days after its close and present almost every week the latest data available*
Summary for August based upon early items is given on page !•




CORRECTION IN SEPTEMBER ISSUE - "SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS11
On page 49 of the September issue (No. 37), in the table of life insurance,
the titles of T^he following columnar headings under "New Business11 should be changed
ae follows;
1, The second column under "Group," now reading "number of persons covered,"
should be changed to read "number of certificates/* Although the number of
certificates issued under group policies is stated to correspond fairly closely
with the number of persons covered, the two terras are not synonymous.
2, The first column under "Total," now reading "thousands of contracts," should
be changed to read "thousands of policies and contracts," as it totals these
items in the individual classes of insurance.
3, The second column under "Total," now reading "number of persons covered,"
should be changed to read "number of policies and certificates." In addition
to the difference between certificates and persons covered in group insurance,
as given above, there is stated to be a marked difference between the number
of policies issued and the number of persons covered in ordinary and industrial
insurance, owing to many pepole having more than one policy. Therefore, the
total of policies and certificates, although probably indicating the trend of
number of persons covered, can not be used to give the actual number at
all accurately.
To correspond with the second correction above, the first column under "total
insurance" on page 48,. giving the relative numbers, should also be changed to read
"number of policies and contracts.11

Indexes of business (production, prices, sales, etc.—
table)
Trend of business movements:
Textiles.Metals.
-Nonferrous metals and fuels—
Automobiles
Rubber and hides and leather
.-„ — ..-

25
29
31
32
33
34

Banking and
finance
,--Foreign exchange and tradeTrade and industry of foreign countries
Detailed tables:
Life insurance
-~
World production of principal crops
Farm prices and Pullman Company earnings-,.
Sources of data
-

43
45
46
48
50
52
53

PRELIMINARY SUMMARY FOR AUGUST
Early reports from Basic industries indicate larger
Production in August than in July, with increases
aoted in the output of pig iron, steel ingots, and Portland cement, and the volume of building construction
and mill consumption of cotton. Compared with
August, 1923, building volume and the output of Portland cement were larger. Unfilled orders on the books
of the United States Steel Corporation on August 31
called for greater tonnage than at the end of the preceding month, while unfilled orders on the books of
leading locomotive manufacturers showed a decline.
The volume of building construction increased over
the previous month and a year ago both in point of
value and aggregate floor space. Increases in the
industrial, public, andresidentialgroups accounted for
the increase in the total, despite declines for commercial and educational types.
Sales of merchant pig iron increased over July and
a
year ago. Stocks at merchant furnaces declined from
the end ;of July but were larger than a year ago.
Stocks of Portland cement declined from the end of
the previous month but were larger than a year ago,
9251—24+-




while stocks of zinc declined from July but were about
twice as large as holdings on August 31, 1923.
Sales of mail-order houses and leading 10-cent chains
increased over the previous month and August of last
year. Car loadings during August were in greater
number than in the previous month but were less than
a year ago. Wholesale prices increased during August.
Check transactions recorded less volume in August
than in July but were larger than in August, 1923.
Interest rates continued to decline while stock prices
increased. Bond prices increased slightly. Total investments of Federal reserve banks increased but bills
discounted declined. ~ The reserve ratio at the end of
. August stood at 82.3 per cent, as against 83 per cent
at the end of July and 77.5 per cent a year ago.
The number offirmsfailing in August was less than
in July but aggregate liabilities were larger.
The gross debt of the Federal Government was
further reduced, standing on August 31 at 4 per cent
below August 31, 1923, Total expenditures chargeable against ordinary receipts declined from July and
a year ago.

MONTHLY SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
WASHINGTON

SURVEY OF
CURRENT BUSINESS
COMPILED BY

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

No. 37

: : BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE

: : BUREAU OF STANDARDS

SEPTEMBER

1924

CONTENTS
Preliminary summary for August. __
Business-indicators (diagrams and table)
Comparison of wholesale prices (diagram and table)
ng iron production and unfilled steel orders (diagram) - .
Course of business in JulyRelative production, stocks and unfilled orders (diagram)..
Meat products, production, consumption, etc. (diagram).
Employment by major industrial groups (diagram)
debits to individual accounts (table)
August d a t a . . . .
..
Indexes of business (production, prices, sales, etc.—
table)
Trend of business movements:
Textiles-,
Metals
_
_
_Nonferrous metals and fuels
Automobiles
Rubber and hides and leather
--— - —

Page
1
2
4
6
7
8

16
19
21
23
25

29
31
32
33
34

Trend of business movements—Continued.
Paper and printing
Buttons
Building construction
Chemicals
Naval stores and fats and oils
Foodstuffs
Tobacco
Transportation
-Public utilities and employment
Distribution movement
Banking and finance
Foreign exchange and trade
r
Trade and industry of foreign countries.
Detailed tables:
Life insurance
World production of principal crops
Farm prices and Pullman Company earnings.
Sources of data
--

Pago

34
35
35
37
38
38
40
41
42
42
43
45
40
48
50
52
53

PRELIMINARY SUMMARY FOR AUGUST
Early reports from Basic industries Indicate larger
Production in August than in July, with increases
toted in the output of pig iron, steel ingots, and Porte d cement, and the volume of building construction
ai
*d mill consumption of cotton. Compared with
^gust, 1923, building volume and the output of Porte d cement were larger. Unfilled orders on the books
°* the United States Steel Corporation on August 31
ca
Ued for greater tonnage than at the end of the preceding month, while unfilled orders on the books of
fading locomotive manufacturers showed a decline.
The volume of building construction increased over
^ previous month and a year ago both in point of
yalue and aggregate floor space. Increases in the
j&dustrial, public, and residential groups accounted for '
. e increase in the total, despite declines for commerC
1
*d and educational types.
Sa
les of merchant pig iron increased over July and
^ year ago. Stocks at merchant furnaces declined from
^ end 6f Jul y : but were larger than a year ago.
_tocks of Portland cement declined from the end of
e
previous month but were larger than a year ago,



while stocks of zinc declined from July but were about
twice as large as holdings on August 31, 1923.
Sales of mail-order houses and leading 10-cent chains
increased over the previous month and August of last
year. Car loadings during August were in greater
number than in the previous month but were less than
a year ago. Wholesale prices increased during August.
Check transactions recorded less volume in August
than in July but were larger than in August, 1923.
Interest rates continued to decline while stock prices
increased. Bond prices increased slightly: Total investments of Federal reserve banks increased but bills
discounted declined.-The reserve ratio at the end of
August stood at 82.3 per cent, as against 83 per cent
at the end of July and 77.5 per cent a year ago.
The number of firms failing in August was less than
in July but aggregate liabilities were larger.
The gross debt of the Federal Government was
further reduced, standing on August 31 at 4 per cent
below August 31, 1923; Total expenditures chargeable against ordinary receipts declined from July and
a year ago.

BUSINESS INDICATORS: 1920-1924
(1913 monthly averages-100.

PIGHRON

See explanation on inside front cover.

Except for "net freight ton-miles" latest month plotted is July, 1924)

COPPER PRODUCTION

UNFILLED STEEL ORDERS

PRODUCTION

400
300

200

100
80
60

\ J
%

40

/

/

^-\—

—

—

^

^

-Vr-

V

20

10
COTTON CONSUMPTION

NET FREIGHT TON-MILES

BANK CLEARINGS-0UT51M NEWYORK CITY ( VALUE* >

DEFAULTED LIABILITIES

BITUMINOUS COAL PRODUCTION
400
300

—\F

-i-

,

f

¥

k

J

—444—

¥ w
,—--1 —

f
SALES, MAIL-ORDER HOUSES <vAtu«,
400

WHOLESALE PRICES

PRICE OF 25 INDUSTRIAL STOCKS^

300
?nn

A. i"%

1

^

100

^
—

\\\\\

80
60
40

-*
70

10




1920 1921 1922 1923 1924

1920 1921 1922 I923J9Z4

^

BUSINESS INDICATORS
The following table gives comparative relative numbers for a selected, list of important business movements. It is believed
that this table will prove useful, because it separates out from the large mass of material a comparativelv email number of items
which are often regarded as indicative of business in general.
The table has been divided into two parts, the first containing those items for which relative numbers can be calculated, using
1913 as a base. The second part contains items for which comparable data back to 1913 are not available. This latter group of
relative numbers is calculated by letting the 1919 monthly average equal 100. Care should therefore be exercised in comparing the
absolute value of the two sets of data. In either group, however, the upward or downward trend of the relative numbers, compared
to previous months, does reflect the present tendency in each item and will give a basis for business judgment.
Where available at the time of going to press, September 14, August indicators have been included, thus bringing
this table up to date. It should be noted that the charts on page 2 show July data as the latest plotted.
1923

MONTHLY AVERAGE

•

1924

COMMODITY

1920

1931

1922

1923

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May Juno

July

Aug.

1913 m o n t h l y average" 100
Production:
Pig Iron
Steel ingots
Copper
„
Cement (shipments)..
Anthracite c o a l . . . . . . .
Bituminous coal
Electric energy (gross
revenue sales)
Crude petroleum
Cotton (consumption)
Beef
Pork
'
Unfilled orders: .
U. S. Steel Corp
Stocks:
Crude petroleum
Cotton (total)
Prices:1
Wholesale Index
Retail food
Retail coal, bitum
Farm products
Business finances:
Defaulted liabilities-.
Price 25 ind. stocks,..
Price 25 R. R. stocks.
Banking:
Clearings, N. Y. City.
Clearings, outside
Com'l paper int. rate..
Distributions
Imports (value)
Exports (value). . . .
/ Sales, mail-order
Transportation:
Freight, net ton-miles.
i

120
135
99
108
93
119

54
64
39
107
99
87

87
114
81
131
58
85

130
144
121
153
104
114

144
149
123
180
114
114

144
140
124
186
109
113

135
146
129
203
116
123

122
133
122
185
38
116

123
142
129
193
114
123

113
124
125
139
102
108

114
113
127
87
105
100

118
144
131
70
104
127

120
151
129
SO
100
115

135
166
128
122
106
100

126
132
129
173
89
74

102
104
129
197
102
78

79
81
125
203
101
76

70
74
127
225
102
81

283
178
105
119
113

312
189
97
113
117

349
224
109
126
130

407
292
117
130
160

381
301
116
126
157

375
315
99
123
147

379
318
106
138
134

398
312
104
134
116

420
323
116
156
149

452
313
114
139
183

466
284
99
123

488
273
124
137
205

472
268
109
114
177

443
2S8
104
115
160

429
287
103
121
145

416
298
89
135
151

400
236
75
116
154

295
75
132
153

170

90

96

102

108

100

92

85

79

74

81

83

81

71

61

55

54

56

127
155

152
198

234
153

287
125

283
83

291
66

298
64

304
95

312
149

329
169

321
149

323
132

327
113

331
92

334
74

339
59

343
45

44

226
203
207
205

147
153
197
116

149
142
188
124

154
146
190
134

153
144
185
133

151
147
185
130

150
146
183
128

154
149
184
130

153
150
186
132

152
151
185
133

322
167
151
150
183
135

151
149
180
134

152
147
180
134

150
144
175
128

148
141
168
128

147
lil
163
127

145
142
163
128

147
143
16$
130

150
144
159
137

108
184
67

229
136
64

228
169
75

197
185
72

126
182
73

157
176
70

150
177
68

126
177
69

348
175
69

217
181
70

226
187
70

225
193
73

158
192
73

423
139
74

214
183
75

160
183
75

149
187
78

161
195
82

242
205
86

257
275
134

205
212
118

230
231
SO

226
264
90

237
280
88

211
268
89

187
254
92

191
254
93

225
296
93

229
277
92

247
301
90

262
292
S3

230
256
87

249
280
83

253
278
84

263
275
77

253
266
71

268
282
64

258
265
69

294
331
264

140
181
188

177
154
204

212
168
259

214
155
221

192
146
109

184
150
198

170
1S4
231

206
193
335

195
194
306

193
206
318

193
191
271

223
177
270

215
164
279

217
168
300

204
161
243

183
148
239

186
134
196

181
160
211

137

105

115

139

139

141

148

144

154

140

122

126

132

133

117

124

117

121

74
101
228

77

205
75

1919 m o n t h l y average-100
^oductlon:
Lumber *
fcldg. contracts
Stocks:
Beef..
Pork.
B
«islaess finances:
B
ondprices(40issues).
Banking.
Debits outside N. Y
City..
Federal ReserveBills discounted..
Total reserves
Ratio..

100
• 72

85
69

114
102

126
106

137
99

127
90

138
85

131
83

137
116

132
111

103
102

113
107

125
103

129
147

131
136

131
124

124
103

112
83

90

66
98

42
S3

29
70

32
91

24
112

19
110

19
95

20
74

27
59

39
67

45
82

43
93

41
103

39
110

33
109

28
111

25
111

21
104

21
91

86

87

104

104

103

104

103

102

103

103

105

104

105

105

106

108

no

110

107

114

97

107

111

104

99

98

113

106

116

111

100

109

103

106

104

106

101

91

132
97
87

91
122
122

28
144
154

39
146
152

40
146
153

39
146
156

42
146
154

45
145
152

46
146
152

41
146
152

44
143
146

27
149
162

27
147
161

25
147
161

23
147
163

22
147
165

18
149
165

15
149
165

14
146
164

»y the census.




COMPARISON OF JULY WHOLESALE PRICES WITH PEAK AND PRE-WAR
(Relative prices 1913=*100. July prices latest plotted)
I N D E X NUMBERS
30O

400

PRODUCTS. AVERAGE PRICE TO PRODUCER
WHEAT
CORN
POTATOES
COTTON
COTTON SEED
CATTLE. BEEF
HOGS
LAMBS
FARM PRODUCTS, M A R K E f PRICE
WHEAT. SPRING
WHEAT. WINTER
CORN. NO.2
OATS
BARLEY
RYE NO.2
TOBACCO. BURLEY
COTTON
WOOL % GREASE (BOSTON)
CATTLE

STEERS

HOGS. HEAVY
SHEEP. EWES
SHEEP. LAMBS
FLOUR. SPRING
FLOUR. WINTER
SUGAR. RAW
SUGAR. GRANULATED
COTTONSEED OIL
BEEF. CARCASS
BEEF, STEER ROUNDS
HAMS, SMOKED (CHICAGO)
COTTON YARN
COTTON. PRINT CLOTH
COTTON. SHEETING
WORSTED YARN
WOMEN'S DRESS GOODS
SUITINGS
SILK, RAW
HIDES. PACKER'S
HIDES. CALFSKINS
LEATHER. CHROME (BOSTON)
LEATHER. SOLE OAK
BOOTS AND SHOES (BOSTON)
BOOTS AND SHOES (ST. LOUIS) )
COAL. BITUMINOUS
COAL. ANTHRACITE
COKE
PETROLEUM
PIG IRON. FOUNDRY
PIG IRON. BASIC
STEEL BILLETS. BESSEMER
COPPER
LEAD
TIN
ZINC
LUMBER. PINE. SOUTHERN
LUMBER. DOUGLAS FIR
BRICK. COMMON (NEW YORK)
CEMENT
STEEL BEAMS
RUBBER, CRUDE
SULPHURIC




ACID

5

WHOLESALE PRICE COMPARISONS-MAXIMUM PRICE COMPARED TO PRICE IN RECENT MONTHS

May, 1924 June, 1924 July, 1921
COMMODITIES

Date and maximum
relative price

August,
1924

Per cent
Increase
(+) or
decrease
(-) In
August
from
July

+0.7
+9.4
+1.6
+1.8

Relative price
(1913 average=lOO)

Farm products—Average price to producers:
Wheat
Corn
_
Potatoes,,
._
_
Cotton
._„_.
Cottonseed
*.___„.
Cattle, beef.....
"„_"_
Hogs.......
Lambs
—....._„
Farm products—Market price
Wheat, No. 1, northern, spring (Chicago)
Wheat, No. 2, red, winter (Chicago)
Corn, contract grades, No. 2, cash (Chicago)
Oats, contract grades, cash (Chicago)
Barley, fair to good, malting (Chicago)....
Rye, No. 2, cash (Chicago)....
.„„...._..
Tobacco, burley, good leaf, dark red (Louisville).
Cotton, middling upland (New York)
Wool, £ blood combing, Ohio and Pennsylvania fleeces (Boston)
Cattle, steers, good to choice, corn fed (Chicago)
*
Hogs, heavy (Chicago)...
.......
..'
Sheep, ewes (Chicago)
.
Sheep, lambs (Chicago).
Food:
Flour, standard patents (Minneapolis)
Flour, winter straights (Kansas City)
Sugar,96° centrifugal (New York)
Sugar, granulated, in barrels (New York)
Cottonseed oil, prime summer yellow (New York)
Beef, fresh carcass good native steers (Chicago)
Beef, fresh steer rounds No. 2 (Chicago)Pork, smoked hams (Chicago)
Clothing:
Cotton yarns, carded, white, northern, mule spun, 22-1 cones (Boston)
Cotton, print cloth, 27 inches, 64 x 60-7.60 yards to pound (Boston).
Cotton, sheeting, brown, 4/4 Ware Shoals L. L. (New York)...
Worsted yarns, 2/32's crossbred stock, white, in skein (Boston)
Women's dress goods, storm serge, all-wool, dbl. warp, 50 in. (N. Y.)
Suitings, wool, dyed blue, 55-56 inches, 16-ounce Middlesex (New York)..
Silk, raw Japanese, Kansas No. 1 (New York)
Hides, green salted, packer's heavy native steers (Chicago)
*
Hides, calfskins, No. 1, country, 8 to 15 pounds (Chicago)
Leather, chrome calf, dull or bright "'B M grades (Boston)
Leather, sole, oak, scoured backs, heavy (Boston)
Boots and shoes men's black calf, blucher (Massachusetts)
Boots and shoes, men's dress welt tan calf (St. Louis)...*
Fuel:
Coal, bituminous, mine run lump, Kanawha (Cincinnati)
Coal, anthracite, chestnut (New York tidewater)
Coke, Connellsville (range of prompt and future) furnace—at ovens
Petroleum, crude, Kansas-Oklahoma—at wells
Metals:
Pig Iron, foundry No. 2, northern (Pittsburgh)
Pig iron, basic, valley furnace....
Steel billets, Bessemer (Pittsburgh).......
----Copper ingots, electrolytic, early delivery (New York)
—~
^ a d , pig, desilvered, for early delivery (New York)
Tin, pig, for early delivery (New Y o r k ) . . .
nlUQt sIab » w e s t e m , early delivery (New York)
—•u d i g materials a n d miscellaneous:
Lumber, pine, southern, yellow flooring, 1 x 4, " B " and better (Hattlesburg district)...
„.
Lumber, Douglas fir, No. 1, common, s 1 s, 1 x 8 x 10 (Washington)
Brick, common red, domestic building (New Y o r k ) ^ement, Portland, net without bags to trade, f. o. b., plant (Chicago dist.)
Steel beams, mill (Pittsburgh)
-Rubber, p a r a island, fine (New York)
BulDhui
id. 66° CNew York)




June,
July,
June,
July,
May,
May,
July,
Apr.,

1920
1&0
1920
1920
1920
1919
1919
1920

326
300
706
312
321
183
256
239

122
127
153
234
186
101
89
187

124
131
169
232
163
98
87
184

134
159
183
228
179
96
88
172

147
174
186
232
176
96
114
106

May, 1920
May, 1920
Sept., 1917
June, 1920
Mar., 1918
Mar., 1918
Mar., 1919
Apr., 1920
Apr., 1918
Mar., 1919
July, 1919
Apr., 1918
Feb., 1920

354
302
331
296
325
451
352
331
308
218
266
319
263

129
108
126
130
122
106
212
247
196
121
89
141
182

138
114
134
133
124
115
192
235
176
113
87
103
189

153
127
169
150
133
135
186
248
176
112
98
103
176

140
133
187
140
136
144
186
229
192
111
115
127
170

-7.7
+9.1
-0.9
+17.3
+23.3
-3.4

May, 1920
May, 1917
May, 1920
May, 1920
July, 1919
Sept., 1920
July, 1920
July, 1919

328
363
598
526
374
201
211
231

145
142
161
170
135
131
129
117

150
145
145
152
144
129
134
118

163
152
145
153
167
127
130
123

164
162
154
153
100
127
129
134

+0.6
+6.6
+6.2
CO
+13.8
0.0
-0.8
+8.9

May, 1920
Apr., 1920
May, 1920
Jan., 1920
Oct., 1918
July, 1920
Jan., 1920
Aug., 1919
Aug., 1919
Nov., 1919
Aug., 1919
Mar., 1920
Aug., 1919

348
478
427
289
292
291
466
283
490
43
7
230
303
292

192
192
177
212
184'
239
132
65
88
171
103
201
153

191
198
177
206
184
233
137
68
91
160
95
201
153

190
197
15
7
200
184
233
148
71
95
160
95
201
153

189
202
189
206
184
233
167
85
103
171
98
201
153

-a 5
+2.5
+8.0
+3.0
0.0

Sept., 1922
Nov., 1923
Aug., 1920
Mar., 1920

336
216
637
375

154
208
140
186

154
210
132
166

154
212
121
166

154
214
123
147

July, 1917
Sept., 1920
July, 1917
Mar., 1917
June 1917
May, 1918
June, 1915

346
330
388
230
261
224
386

141
139
149
81
166
98
106

134
134
147
79
161
95
106

130
129
147
79
162
103
107

131
129
140
85
182
115
114

-0.7
+7.6
+12.3
+11.7
+6.5

Feb.,
Jan.,
Feb.,
Sept.,
June,
Jan.,
Feb.,

455
407
381
195
31
3
124
250

181
190
305
173
157
21
70

172
179
305
173
151
20
70

167
179
244
173
146
21
70

172
174
206
173
142
26
70

+3.0
-2.8
-15,6
ao
-2.7
+23.8
ao

1920
1920
1920
1920
1917
1913
1916

-1.7

0.0

+29.5
-3.5
-2.6
+4.7
+HX7
-6.7
+2.3
+6.7
0L0

ao

+12.8
+19.1
+8.4
+6.9
+3.2
0.0
0.0

ao
+0.9
+1.7
-11.4

+O.8

ao

PIG-IRON PRODUCTION AND UNFILLED STEEL ORDERS/AT THE END OF EACH MONTH




(UNFILLED ORDERS FROM UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION)

Cfc

1924

BUSINESS SUMMARY
uy average as iw-«xcept unfll ed orders which are based on tbo 1920 average-enable comparisons to bo made of the
ffi. The use of index and relative numbers is more fully explained on the inside front cover, and details of this suminsitnAssL" beginning o n p . 25.)

1933

May

June

1924

July

March

April

May

Juno

July

PRODUCTION:

Manufacturing (64 commodities)
Raw materials, total
Minerals
.
; _ ...
Animal products
Crops
'„ _ _ _
Forestry
__ „ „
. .
Electric power
_ -„.
Building construction (contracts awarded)

135
97
140
127
55
135
143
129

126
95
145
119
54
133
139
99

114
98
148
128
54
124
140
90

123
93
120
107
71
118
154
147

118
87
106
118
54
126
146
136

112
95
124
124
60
130
148
124

100
90
122
117
56
120
140
103

100
98
125
117
73
111
142
88

104
111
87

103
115
77

102
114
68

147
136
61

135
137
54

129
143
47

126
133
43

123
131
44

98
154
81
128

86
154
79
127

74
143
79
89

105
163
79
115

114
178
77
132

90
174
76
127

89
162
75
119

69
163
77
91

76
77
93
94

74
77
93
94

73
79
94
93

73
77
95
89

72
76
94
88

71
76
94
84

70
76
94
81

71
77
94
79

120
113
98

115
143
28

117
113
40

110
132
150

97
100
199

103
105
205

97
128
216

97
101
195

STOCKS OP COMMODITIES (45 commodities):

Unadjusted index. - - - - - - - Corrected for seasonal variation 2
. ~
UNFILLED ORDERS (relative t o 1920)
SALES (based on value):

Mail-order houses (4 houses)
Ten-cent chains (5 chains)
Wholesale trade
Department stores (333 stores)
PRICES (recomputed to 1919 base):

Wholesale, all commodities--.Retail food , -

!.

:
-

COST OF LIVING (recomputed to 1919 base)
FACTORY EMPLOYMENT (recomputed to 1919 base) 3
TRANSPORTATION:

Net freight ton-mile operation-,
-Car loadings (monthly total)
.
Net available car surplus (end of m o n t h ) - - - J Subject t o r e v i s i o n .

.

.,

.

• •

•!&&Vd»^
published by the XT. S. Department of Labor,

* 0 PP. UMB, AprU, !«•. JfeOI), Lator
:

COURSE OF BUSINESS FOR JULY
SUMMARY

Production of manufactured goods during July, in
general, showed activity sustained at the June level.
Increases were noted for petroleum, automobiles,
rubber tires, and cement, and in the mill consumption
of silk, while declines occurred in the production of
pig iron, steel ingots, locomotives, and lumber and
the mill consumption of cotton. The output of both
bituminous and anthracite coal increased over June
but declined from July, 1924. Stocks of commodities were further reduced and unfilled orders rose
slightly in spite of a further decline in steel. Awards
for building construction declined from June and from
a
year ago, in both floor space and value. Factory
^ployment continued to decline.
Sales of mail-order houses made a seasonal decline
from June and decreased from a year ago. Sales of




ten-cent chains, however, increased over both periods.
Business failures increased over June in both number
and liabilities and increases also occurred over a year
ago. Loadings of freight cars were less than in July,
1923. Wholesale prices increased over Juno while
the cost-of-living index was unchanged.
The volume of July check transactions as measured
by debits to individual accounts declined from June
for New York City but increased for the rest of the
country while increases over a year ago occurred both
for New York City and outside. Interest rates again
declined for both call money and commercial paper.
The Federal reserve ratio increased slightly during
July. Imports during July increased over the previous
month but were below July of last year and equalled
the July exports which declined from both comparative
periods.

8
RELATIVE PRODUCTION, STOCKS, AND UNFILLED ORDERS IN BASIC INDUSTRIES
(Monthly averages 1920=100)
160
160

1920

PRODUCTION

Manufacturing production as measured by the index
based on 1919 production as 100, remained unchanged
from June at 100 and may be compared with 114 in
July, 1923. Increases in the production index over
June occurred in all groups except iron and steel,
lumber, paper, and leather. Compared with a year
ago, declines occurred in these same groups, and,
besides, in the textile group.
The mineral production index at 125 for July compares with 122 for June and 148 a year ago. Except
for an increase of almost 40 per cent in the mint receipts of gold and a decline of almost 15 per cent in
silver production, most of the changes from June were
comparatively small.
Crop marketing stood at 73 in July as against 54 a
year ago, all groups except cotton products and miscellaneous crops showing a decided increase. In
grains, the large increase in receipts of rye largely
accounted for the rise from 68 a year ago to 104, while
potatoes chiefly influenced the rise in vegetable marketings from 96 to 141.
The index of animal products marketings was the
same as in June at 117, comparing with 128 a year ago.
Marketings for wool, sheep, eggs, poultry and fish
increased over a year ago, while cattfe, hogs and milk
decreased.
With forest products marketings standing at 111
in July as against 120 in June and 124 a year ago,



1924,

the total index of marketings of raw materials stood
at 98 in July, the same as a year ago and comparing
with 90 in June, based on 1919 as 100.
COMMODITY STOCKS

The index of commodity stocks, allowing for seasonal variations, declined from 133 on June 30 to 131
at the end of July, while a year ago the index stood at
114, all based on: 1919 average stocks as 100. Declines occurred! from June but advances over a year
ago in the stock index numbers for three of the four
principal groups, the manufactured foodstuff group
remaining unchanged as compared with both periods.
The stock index before adjustment for seasonal corrections also declined, from 126 at the end of June to
123 in July, comparing with 102 a year ago.
SALES

f

Sales by manufacturers tended to increase in Jdj,
gains over June being shown in bookings of fabricated
structural steel, tubular plumbing, architectural terra
cotta, freight cars, flooring, clay fire brick, abrasives,
stokers, southern pine lumber, and cotton finishing*
while declines took place in sales of merchant pig ^
and steel castings. In general sales were helovrtbfi
July sales a year ago. The index of unfilled orders
turned upward to 44 based on 1920 as 100, as compare
with 43 at the end of June and 68 a year ago.

The wholesale trade index stood at 77 in July, based
on 1919 as 100, as compared with 75 in June and 79 a
year ago. All groups increased in sales over June
except hardware and shoes, while dry goods, hardware,
and shoes made declines from a year ago.
Sales of mail-order houses declined seasonally from
June and were less than a year ago. Except for seasonal declines in the shoe, cigar, and music groups, all
types of chain-stores increased their sales over June.
Compared with a year ago, increases occurred'in all
groups except music chains. Sales of department
stores made a seasonal decline and were larger than a
year ago. The value of department-store inventories
also declined in a seasonal movement from June but
was above last year.
PRICES

The prices received by producers of farm products
during July were generally higher than in June, the
new monthly index number of the Department of
Agriculture standing at 130 as compared with 128 in
June and 130 a year ago, based on average prices for
the years 1909 to 1914 as 100. The principal increase
occurred in grains, with an advance from 116 in June
to 130 in July and the unclassified group also advanced,
while declines took place in the fruit and vegetable,
meat, and cotton and cottonseed groups, and the dairy
and poultry group remained unchanged.
The wholesale price index of the Department of
Labor rose from 145 in June to 147 in July, based on
1913 prices as 100, comparing with 151 a year ago.
The principal increase over June occurred in the farm
products group, with the foodstuffs, clothing, and miscellaneous groups also showing increases, while declines
occurred in fuels, metals, building materials, and house
furnishings, and no change occurred in the chemical
group. Compared with a year ago, the farm-products
group alone was higher. As regrouped by the Federal
Reserve Board, increases were noted in raw products
and consumers' goods, the former group being advanced through the rise in agricultural and animal
products, in spite of declines in forest and mineral
products. Dun's index number advanced from 153 to
15
5, based on 1913 as 100, and Bradstreet's from 133
to 137.
M compared with the advance from 154 to 156 in
*e Federal Reserve Board's index of prices for the
nitd States for international comparison, British
showed no change according to two indexes and
advance of 3 per cent according to another, and
numbers of French prices varied in direction,
in Italy, Canada, and India moved upward
from June and prices in Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan
declined.
Retail food prices, according to the index number
based
on 1913 as 100, rose from 142 in June to 143 in
9251—24f



2

July and comparo with 147 a year ago. The cost of
living index remained unchanged both from June and
from a year ago at 162 per cent of 1913 costs, increases
in food, shelter, and fuel compensating for declines in
clothing and sundries.
TEXTILES

Receipts of wool at Boston woro largor than in Juno
and also exceeded a yoar ago, although foroign wool
receipts declined from both periods. Imports of raw
wool were less than half of the importations in Juno
or in July, 1923. The consumption of wool by tcxtilo
mills showed a little change from Juno, but the activity
of woolen machinery declined. Pjrices of wool and
woolens showed little change from tho Juno averages.
Both exports and imports of raw cotton dcclinod
from June but were largor than a year ago. Tho
consumption of cotton in toxtilo mills at 346,071 bales
in July compares with 350,277 bales in Juno and shows
a decline of over 100,000 bales from July, 1923.
Stocks of cotton in mills and warehouses on July 31
were about 640,000 bales less than a yoar ago, although
total world visible supply of American cotton was
reported as larger than a year ago.
EXPORTS AND CONSUMPTION OF COTTOX

f I -S S it
|

1920

|

i i f ! is I Si 5 I I \
1991

I

l«3

|

>923

| .1924

The activity of cotton spindles was less than in Juno,
and fewer spindles were activo, the activity running
at 60.6 per cent of capacity for July as against 64.G
per cent for June and 87.3 por cent a year ago. Exports of cotton cloth woro less than in Juno but largor
than in July, 1923. There was little change in tho
prices of cotton and cotton goods as compared with
the June average.
Imports of raw silk increased over June but declined
from a year ago. Deliveries from warehouses also
increased and wore largor than a year ago. Stocks of
raw silk declined but were slightly larger than a year
ago. Raw silk prices averaged higher than in June.
Imports of burlap declined both from the previous
month and a year ago, while imports of unmanufactured fibers in July exceeded those in the two
previous periods.

10
IRONJAND STEEL

Shipments of iron ore from the mines were considerably less in July than a year ago. Consumption
or.iron ore also declined both from June and from
July, 1923, while stocks at furnaces and on Lake Erie
docks at the end of July were larger than at both
comparative periods.
The output of pig iron declined in July to 1,785,000
tons as compared with 3,678,O(Jo tons a year ago.
The number of furnaces in blast was also reduced from
June and declined by one-half from a year ago, both
in number and capacity. Production and sales of
merchant pig iron declined from June, unfilled orders
increased and almost no change occurred in shipments
and stocks. Compared with a year ago, all items
except stocks and sales declined. Prices of pig iron
declined from the June average.
The output of steel ingots declined to 1,869,000 tons
in July, comparing with 3,531,000 tons a year ago.
Bookings of commercial steel castings declined from
both the previous month and a year ago. Unfilled
orders of the United States Steel Corporation showed
a slight decline from June. Exports and imports of
iron and steel products declined from both June and
a year ago. The production of steel sheets increased
in July to 48.7 per cent of capacity as compared with
40.9 per cent in June. Shipments and sales also increased, butiinfilled orders and stocks declined. Compared with a year ago, sales and unsold stocks increased,
but the other items declined. Prices of steel were
slightly lower than in June.
The shipments of railroad locomotives from manufacturing plants declined slightly from June and were
also less than a year ago. Unfilled orders for locomotives also declined from both periods. Freightcar orders increased over June but were less than a
year ago. Less tonnage was involved in vessels
completed in July than in June, but an increase was
shown over a year ago. The tonnage of vessels under
construction on July 31 exceeded by a slight margin
the similar figures for the previous month and a year
ago.
Shipments of steel furniture declined from both the
previous month and a year ago, while sales of fabricated structural steel increased over both periods,
attaining 70 per cent of capacity in July as against 66
per cent in June and 50 per cent a year ago. Shipments stood at 82 per cent of capacity for July as
against 77 per cent for June. Comparisons for earlier
periods, as reported to the Department of Commerce
by 189 identical firms (and seven additional firms now
out of business) with a present capacity of 245,990
tons per month, are shown below, based on a total
capacity of 250,000 tons per month in 1922 and 260,000
in 1923 and 1924.




BOOKINGS AND SHIPMENTS OP FABRICATED STRUCTURAL STEEL

BOOKINGS

Actual
tonnage

mz
April..
May..
June
July....:...
August
SeptemberOctober
November..
December-.
January
February
March*
April
May
June.
July.
August
SeptemberOctober
November..
December—
January. ___
February...
March
April
May
June
July.
1
1

Per
cent
of
capacity

SHIPMENTS

Computed
tonnage

Per
cent
of
capacity

Computed
tonnage

205,573
191,218
175,498
164,389
163,791
153,353
138,791
118,493
145,230
179,337
192,270
229,733
193,639
140,558
125,531
125,105
143,402
129,999
121,298
132,666
195,607

1921

187,200
200,200
239,200
202,800
145,600
130,000
130,000
148,200
135,200
127,400
140,400
208,000

205,400
182,000
174,200

175,639
179,866
174,465
159,254
145,430
1161,182
U65,240

1923

212,500
197,500
182,500
170,000
170,000
160,000
145,000
122,500
150,000

187,200
189,800
184,600
169,000
153,400
171,600
182,000

163,800
156,000
169,000
184,000
184,600
200,200
213,200

Reported by 184 firms with a capacity of 244,615 tons.
Reported by 161 firms with a capacity of 236,345 tons.

The following table shows statistics of steel barrels
reported to the Department of Commerce by 29 manufacturers operating 34 plants, in number of barrels:
STEEL BARRELS (IN NUMBER OF BARRELS)

On hand Manufacfirst of
tured
month

MONTH

January
February
March.
April
May.
:::
June

:

.

Shipped

On hand
end of
month

307,189
370,966
394,478
416,628
418,381
385,158

303,668
362,725
394,756
420,129
425,397
382,550

49,109
57,350
57,072
53,571
46,555
49,163

45,588
49,109
57,350
57,072
53,571
46,555

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month
615,485
608,660
601,663
614,102
582,022
4211870
—-

Sales of mechanical stokers increased over June in
both number and horsepower but declined from a
year ago.
NONFERROUS METALS

The output of copper by mines increased in July
over both the previous month and a year ago. Exports declined from June but exceeded July, 1923Copper prices averaged the same as in June. Tu ular plumbing sales increased over June and also over
a year ago, in both quantity and value.
Zinc production declined from June and f r o ? \
year ago and retorts in operation at the end of o y
were less than in either previous period. StocKs
creased during July and were larger than a year ag •
Zinc prices remained unchanged from June.

XI
COPPER PRODUCTION AND EXPORTS
ISO

Exports increased over June but declined from last
year. The price of furnace coke declined from June.

165

PRODUCTION OF BITUMINOUS AND ANTHRACITE COAL

150

g!35
z

- p IOC

r

uc

•

V

OI20
O>05

/«

t

. . .
j
-j

2 75

.4 1

—L

!

\

#
1

60

\ \

45

•

15

J
•V

,^*

V
\

,JBj

\

/

\
-\

1
/

0 90

t

\r t\

-E> PO ITS

0

5 * I
1921

i S-l i I I

? 1 1 is
I

1922

1923

<
E

5i

E 5 3
1924

Stocks of tin increased over the end of June, both
for the United States and the world, and increases
also occurred over a year ago. Deliveries from warehouses declined from both periods, while imports increased over June but were less than a year ago. The
price of tin advanced over June.
Lead production declined less than 1 per cent from
June but was about 17 per cent greater than a year
ago. Lead prices remained unchanged from June
but increased over July, 1923.
Data for June reported by 11 manufacturers of
collapsible tubes to the Department of Commerce
follow (including one company not reporting orders).
These 11 companies reported 18,054 hours operated
out of a total of 28,199 hours capacity or 64 per cent.

ITEM

^rnomh ° r d e r s b e g i n n i n * o f
C&i^^^^month.""
ggS^ations during month..._
T j a ^ t s during month
W f i d orders end of month....
deduction during month

Establishments
reporting

COLLAPSIBLE

10
10
10
11
10
11

TUBES

Total

Tin

Lead

Composition

277,410
114,513
238
134,191
274,194
137,272

24,485
8,399
450
19,912
24,244
14,742

20,929
1,516
3,021
19,424
3,252

FUELS

Both production and exports of bituminous coal
sed over June but declined from a year ago.
Was little change in bituminous prices.
Anthracite production also increased slightly over
L
&e and declined from a year ago. Exports of
a
^thracite declined from both periods, and prices
advanced over June.
Declines occurred in the output of both beehive and
y-produet coke from June and from a year ago.



X
\

i
n j

IIW

AUTOMOBILES AND RUBBER

Gross

322,824
124,428
698
157,124
317,862
155,266

PRODUCTION OF BEEHIVE AND BY-PRODUCT COKE

The output of passenger automobiles was larger
than in June but truck production declined, and
compared with a year ago declines occurred in both
classes of cars. Shipments of automobiles from
factories increased over June by each method of
shipment, but declined from a year ago.
Crude rubber imports were less than in June and
also less than a year ago. The price of rubber increased slightly over June.
HIDES AND LEATHER

Imports of hides and skins increased over the
previous month but were about 47 per cent smaller
than a year ago. The increase over June was shared
by all classes of hides and skins except goat and sheep
skins. Prices of packers' heavy hides and calfskins

12
increased over the June average. Exports of sole
leather increased about 40 per cent over both the
previous month and July of last year while exports
of upper leather declined slightly from the same
comparative periods. Prices of leather were unchanged from June.
July production of boots and shoes showed a seasonal decline from the previous month but was below
the July, 1923, level. Shoe prices remained stationary
during the month at the level observed for the past
half year.
The following table shows the number of leather
gloves and mittens cut in July with comparison with
July, 1923, as reported to the Department of Commerce by 229 identical establishments:

Operating activity of paperboard box manufacturers
represented 64 per cent of normal in July as compared with 67 in June and 79 per cent a year ago.
Domestic sales of abrasive paper and cloth were
higher than in the previous month but were below
July of last year, while foreign sales declined from
both periods.

LEATHER GLOVES AND MITTENS CUT (IN DOZEN PAIRS)

Industrial construction costs were approximately
1 per cent below the June average and 5 per cent
below July, 1923. The cost of building materials
entering into the construction of a six-room house
averaged lower in July than in either the preceding
month or a year ago. The combined price index
of six standard plumbing fixtures averaged 3 per cent
lower in July than in June and 9 per cent below July,
1923. Building contracts awarded in 27 Northeastern States duringfJul^declined^fron^theJprevious
month and a year ago in point^offcontemplated expenditure. Public and semipublic construction alone
showed an increase in point of square feet over both
comparative periods, although awards for business
buildings exceeded the figure for^ the same period last
:
year.
'"~~
"
The following monthly statistics covering the
awards for construction in 36 States represent seveneighths of the total awards in the United States:

JULY, 1923

JULY, 1924

Men's Women's Men's Women
and boys' and chil- and boys' and children's
dren's
Dress and street gloves, etc
Imported. . . . . . . - ......
Domestic . .
.
.
Work gloves, mittens, etc

-.
..

47,274
23,367
23,907
108,023

9,149
7,672
1,477
332

54,700
28,366
26,334
117,468

13,448
9,883
3,565
438

PAPER

Production and shipments of newsprint paper were
less than in the preceding month and in July, 1923,
while mill stocks, reported as of July 31, were less
than in the previous month but larger than the inventory a year ago. The accompanying diagram gives a
comparison of newsprint production and mill stocks
since January, 1920. The output of paperboard
shipping boxes increased over the June total but was
less than in July of last year in the case of solid fiber
boxes and at the same level in the case of corrugated.

BUTTONS

The output of fresh-water pearl buttons averaged
17 per cent of capacity in July as contrasted with
30 per cent in June and 32 per cent last year. Stocks
of buttons in manufacturers' hands showed practically
no change from the preceding month but were about
4 per cent higher than last year.
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

STATES 1

CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED IN 36

1923

1924
NEWSPRINT PAPER PRODUCTION AND MILL STOCKS

CHARACTER OF CONSTRUCTION

June
Grand total:
Value
thousands of dollars.
Floor space
thousands of sq. ft.
Number of projects

IA
V




\

STOCKS , kT

MILLS

f*-\
\/sf

1831

1802

1833

Business: l
Value
thousands of dollars.
Floor space
thousands of sq. ft.
Number of projects
—
Industrial:
Value
thousands of dollars.
Floor space
thousands of sq. ft.
Number of projects
Residential:
Value
thousands of dollars.
Floor space
thousands of sq. ft.
Number of projects
Educational:
Value
thousands of dollarsFloor space
...thousands of sq. ft.
Number of projects
....
Other public and semipublic: *
Valuethousands of dollars.
Floor space
thousands of sq. ft.
Number of projects
Public works and utilities:
Value
thousands of dollars.
Number of projects.
1
1

July

July

387,521
57,754
11,491

347,184
50,522
10,821

315,024
8fl71

56,556
9,308
1,274

49,346
8,993
1,248

24,968
3,294
295

19,664

161,443
34,101
7,798

128,072
25,474
7,005

34,807
5,262
446

39,511
6,150
527

37,963
4,734
527

38,875

71,784
1,151

As compiled from data furnished by the F. W. DodL
Includes hospitals and institutions, public buildings,
buildings, and religious and memorial buildings.

1,191

3,017

275

6

$

124,171

27,356

13
It should be noted in connection with the accompanying chart showing building volume distributed by
classes that the data from which the chart was drawn
represent the awards in 27 states only and may be
found in detail on pages 108-110 of the August issue

(No. 36). Current data appear in the present issue
on page 35. It should be further noted that the chart
designation "Public and semipublic" includes educational buildings, data for which arc shown separately
in the statistical tables.

VOLUME OF BUILDING CONTRACTS AWARDED, BY CLASSES

1923

BUILDING MATERIALS

Lumber-production figures show increases over June
for Southern pine and California white and sugar pine,
while decreases were noted in Douglas fir, Western
pine, North Carolina pine, and Northern pine. Compared with July of last year, production declines were
general, while in the case of shipments increases over
last July were reported for Southern pine, California
^hite and sugar pine, Western pine, and Northern
pine. Xiumber exports; increased over June but were
about 1 per cent less than last July. Lumber prices
11
1
general declined from the previous month.
Production, shipments, new orders, and unfilled
orders for oak flooring increased over both the previous month and July, 1923, new orders in July more
&an doubling the figure for July of last year. Stocks
^ere reduced but were about 20 per cent above the
inventory at the same time last year. Maple flooring
data show increases in July for production, shipments,
and orders booked, but, except for orders booked,
these items were less than a year ago. Unfilled orders
^ere about 5 per cent lower than at the end of June
**& stocks showing practically no change from the
fi
ame period.
Production and shipments of clay fire brick declined
to
a position below the corresponding month last year,
w
Wle new orders increased over June, although aggregating less than a year ago. Unfilled orders as of
*™y 31 were about 5 per cent below the total unfilled




1034

a year ago. Production and shipments of silica brick
increased over June but were less than in July, 1923,
while stocks declined from the June inventory but
were higher than holdings last year. Production of
face brick measured by the activity of 32 mills declined from June but was larger than a year ago, while
stocks on yards increased over the previous month
but were less than last year. Unfilled orders declined
from both comparative periods.
Paving brick manufactured in July represented 81
per cent of the total plant capacity as against G8 per
cent in June and 81 per cent last year. Shipments
and new orders increased over both comparative
periods while stocks declined. Prices of common red
brick in the New York City district were reduced.
Production and shipments of Portland cement increased over both the previous month and a year ago.
Stocks declined during July but were higher than last
year. The price quoted by mills in the Chicago district remained unchanged. Contracts awarded .during
July for concrete paving contemplated greater yardage
than awards in either;the preceding month or July, 1923.
Shipments of enameled baths and new orders were
larger than in either June or a year ago, while for
all other classes of enameled sanitary ware except sinks
the same items, although larger than in the previous
month, were below last year. Stocks were uniformly
higher when contrasted with both periods except in
the case of miscellaneous ware, which showed a decrease from June. Unfilled orders declined from both
comparative periods.

PRODUCTION, SHIPMENTS, AND STOCKS OF PORTLAND CEMENT
20

18

/•
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1

1920

FV /
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IA

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ON—

N

1921

\ si 1922 !i.
i

CHEMICALS AND OILS

Exports of dyes and dyestuffs increased oyer the
previous month but were less than a year ago. A
report of the United States Tariff Commission just
made available shows domestic production of dyes by
88 domestic firms in 1923 aggregating 93,667,524
pounds as against 64,632,187 pounds produced in
1922 by 89 firms. Total sales during 1923 aggregated
86,567,446 pounds with a value of $47,223,161. In
1914 a total of 6,619,729 pounds valued at $2,470,096
was produced by seven firms. The average sales
price of all dyes for 1923 was $.545 per pound as contrasted with $.60 in 1922, $.83 in 1921 and $1.26 in
1917.
Exports of sulphuric acid were less than in the
previous month and a year ago while exports of
fertilizer increased over June but declined from




J

—t—
\
\
\

—PRC)DUCT
%

V

\

ii

Jill

%

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rr -«/ \ if »/
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5

1923

>

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OCT.

UJ
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1 \

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JULY

U

t
1
1
f

1924

July, 1923. The price indexes of crude drugs and
essential oils averaged lower than in either the previous month or July, 1923, while prices of drugs and
Pharmaceuticals averaged less than in June but
were higher than a year ago. The index of chemical
prices increased over the previous month but was
less than a year ago. New York quotations on sulphuric acid remained unchanged from June but were
less than in July, 1923.
Exports of vegetable oils were larger than in the
previous month but less than a year ago: while the
inward movement of oils declined from both comparative periods.
Cottonseed oil production and stocks declined in
seasonal movement to a point below last year's leve •
Stocks of cottonseed, although less than at the end
June, were nearly double the holdings a year ago.

15
PBODUCTION OF EXPLOSIVES AND GENERAL MANUFACTURING
PRODUCTION
(Explosives include only permissible and other high explosives; general production
index based on 64 commodities.)
(1922 monthly average=100.)

PRO DUC TION OF EXP .OSI ^ES-

150
i

1
I A,, A
IK'

g!20
hi

1
o

1 Mi

S

i

7 ll

1

V

O

INDEX

NUN

a

i

•

L

r>r

1
Kl

PFlODU CTIC N

w

IK irMT V
li>JDcX

A<f 1 ^

fiokf

701

60

^ '5 S 5 &
1922

5
< 3
o
1923 o
" " I ~
1924
CEREALS

Receipts of wheat were larger than in either the
previous month or July, 1923. Shipments also
^creased over June but were slightly less than a year
a
go. Exports, including flour, declined from both
comparative periods while the visible supply on July
31
was 9,000,000 bushels larger than a year ago in
toe United States and 17,000,000 bushels larger in
Canada. Both wheat and flour prices increased over
the previous month and July, 1923.
WHEAT FLOUR PRODUCTION
Percent
of
capacity
operated

Wheat
Flour
ground
produced
(thous. of
(thous. of
bushels) < - bushels)

Grain offal
produced
(thous. of
pounds)

35,871
. 44,179
44,969
£0,810
43,606
37,799

M0NTH

7,805
9,642
9,760
10,983
9,403
8,137

772,774
796*325
908,311
783,669
678,576

54,7
62.1
62.0
58.8
4913

41,833
39,180

8,970
8,433
8,355
7,682
7,896
7,797
8,219

746,010
705,402
698,911

51.9
53.0
48.9
45.0
46.6
47.8
50.9

1923

1924




35,680
36,688
36,293
38,124

660,271
651,632
676,152

The preceding table shows the output of wheat
flour reported by over 1,000 mills, each month, which
made about 84 per cent of the flour produced in 1921,
according to the census of manufactures:
Receipts and shipments of corn were about the
same as a year ago. Grindings increased over both
June and a year ago. The visible supply in Canada
and the United States, east of the Rockies, on July 31
was more than double the holdings a year ago. Prices
of contract corn increased over the June average and
also over July of last year.
Receipts of oats were smaller than in July, 1923,
and the visible supply was 46 per cent less than a year
ago. Exports increased over June but were considerably smaller than a year ago. The price of oats
increased over both comparative periods.
Barley receipts declined from the previous month
and July, 1923, while exports increased over the same
comparative periods. Barley prices averaged higher
than in either the previous month or July of last year.
Receipts of rye tripled the total for July, 1923, while
exports were less than half as large. Prices were higher
than in July, 1923, or the preceding month. Total
grain exports, including flour reduced to grain equivalent, declined from the previous month and from July,
1923. Visible supplies of wheat, corn, and flaxsecd
in Argentina were reported as larger than a year ago.
The movement of paddy rice to mills was considerably smaller than a year ago, while shipment
from mills, maintaining the same level as in June
represented less than half the volume moving at this
time last year. Stocks of cleaned rice at mills and in
dealers' hands continued to decline, being on July 31,
less than one-fourth of the holdings last year. Exports
in July were much less than the volume moving outward a year ago while imports were slightly larger
than a year ago. Car-lot shipments of apples, potatoes, and onions were larger than last year, but shipments of citrus fruits were less.
MEATS AND DAIRY PRODUCTS

Receipts at primary markets, total shipments, and
local slaughter of cattle and calves increased over
June while stocker and feeder shipments declined.
Exports of beef products totaled larger than in June,
attaining the same level as July of last year, while
cold-storage holdings were larger than last year.
Prices of cattle, carcass beef and steer rounds were
lower than in June and, except in the case of carcass
beef, averaged lower than last year.
Movement of hogs and local slaughter were about
the same as a year ago, but receipts, and local slaughter
made declines'from the previous month while total
shipments increased. Stocker and feeder shipments
declined from both comparative periods. Exports
were larger than in either the previous month or July
of last year, while cold-storage holdings declined from
the same periods. Hog prices averaged higher than
in either the previous month or July, 1923.

INSPECTED SLAUGHTER, CONSUMPTION, COLD STORAGE, AND EXPORTS OF MEAT
(,600
WOO




TOTAL MEAT PRODUCTS

I
I
TOTAL PORK PRODUCTS

17
Movement of sheep and lambs and local slaughter
were larger than in the previous month and a year
ago. Cold-storage holdings declined during the month
and were less than last year. Prices for lambs at
Chicago averaged lower than in June and a year ago.
Prices for ewes also declined from a year ago but were
slightly higher than in June.
Receipts of dressed poultry at principal markets
were larger than in either the preceding month or
July, 1923, while cold-storage holdings declined from
the same comparative periods.
SUGAR

Meltings of raw sugar by refiners increased over June
and were nearly twice as large as meltings in July, 1923,
Refiners7 stocks declined from the end of June but
were larger than a year ago, while imports increased
over both comparative periods. Exports of refined
sugar were about the same as in June, but several
times larger than a year ago. Wholesale prices for
both raw and refined sugar were practically stationary at the June level, but were lower than the average for July, 1923. The movement of raw sugar in
Cuba showed increases in receipts and exports over
the previous month and July, 1923. Stocks in Cuba
declined from June holdings, but were larger than a
year ago.

crease in the number of cars in need of repairs. Shortages of cars, though larger than at the and of June,
were negligible when contrasted with the shortage a
year ago. The accompanying chart compares cumulative carloadings at the end of specified periods for
the past three years. This chart is based on the now
series of data published in the August issue of the
Survey (No. 36) pp. 1G8-1G9. The monthly figures
include four weeks each except March, June, September, and December, which include live weeks. In
comparing current data in the present issue, it should
be noted that June and July do not permit of exact
comparison since June represents a total of five weeks
and July only four weeks. Loadings generally wore
below July of last year while the number of bad order
cars increased over June and a year ago. The number of locomotives in need of repair on July 31 was
larger than at the end of the previous month, but
less than a year ago.
SHIPMENTS AND UNFILLED ORDERS OF FREIGHT CAHS

COFFEE AND TEA

Imports of coffee increased over the June total and
^ere practically twice as large as a year ago. The
world visible supply was lower than at the end of the
previous month and a year ago, while United States
holdings were larger than in either comparative
period. Receipts in Brazil and clearances for the
United States declined from the previous month and
* year ago.
Imports of tea increased over June, but were lower
a year ago.
WATER TRANSPORTATION

The total tonnage of vessels engaged in foreign
ade entering and clearing United States ports increased over the preceding month, and in the case of
Vessels of American registry was larger than a year
*8°- The average of ocean freight rates between our
Atlantic ports and the United Kingdom, also Europe
as a whole, was lower than in June and above the
* l for the same period last year. Cargo traffic on
Ohio River between Pittsburgh and Wheeling
i d from June and a year ago.
tr

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION

^ surplus of idle freight cars was reduced by inleased loadings late in the month and a further in9251—23f



3

SHORTAGE, SURPLUS, AND BAD-ORDER FREIGHT CARS

18
CUMULATIVE RAILWAY CAR LOADINGS AT THE END OF
SPECIFIED PERIODS

EMPLOYMENT

The index of factory employment for the United
States based on 1923 as 100, stood at 85 in July as
against 88 in June and 100 a year ago. The leather
and food products groups alone remained at the previous month's level. State and city reports showed
increases over June for Wisconsin and the city of
Detroit, and declines for New York, Illinois, and
Massachusetts, but declines from July, 1923, were
general. Except in New York State, average weekly
earnings declined from both comparative periods.
Earnings in New York State factories declined fractionally from June, but were on a par with July of
last year.
DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT

The sales of two leading mail-order houses declined about 18 per cent from June, and were about
2 per cent below July, 1923. Sales of four principal
ten-cent chains were larger than in June, and about
14 per cent over last July* The number of stores
operating at the end of July totaled 1,902, as contrasted with 1,758 stores operating a year ago. Newspaper advertising declined in a seasonal movement
from June, but in a greater degree than last year.
Postal receipts in 50 selected cities declined from June
in the usual seasonal movement, while receipts in 50
industrial cities increased over June and a year ago.
SALES OP MAIL-ORDER HOUSES AND CHAIN

TEN-CENT

STORES

The following figures show the current conditions
of freight-car equipment on Class I railroads :
EQUIPMENT, FREIGHT CARS
INSTALLED DURING
MONTH

OWNED (END OF MONTH)
YEAR AND MONTH

Number
1923
December
1924
January. _
February.
March
April
May.
June
July

Aggregate
capacity
(pounds)

Number

2,307,997

201,055,000,000

18,690

1,762,000,000

2,310,032
2,310,570
2,311,405
2,312,074
2,312,237
2,314,798
2,322,963

201,288,000,000
201,535,000,000
202,331,000,000
202,447,783,106
202,606,400,427
203,139,187,427
204,777,305,883

15,589
11,386
9,562

1,415,000,000
1,109,000,000
892,000,000
731,956,198

RETIRED DURING MONTH
YEA.R AND MONTH

Number

December,
January..
February.
March....
April....,
May......
June
J
July

Aggregate
capacity
(pounds)

Aggregate capacity (pounds)

8,718

9,199
10,909

16,583

879,032,000

1,076,236,000
2,302,604,000

Unfilled Building
in
orders end
of month railroad
shops
(number)
(number)

1933

14,411

1,098,000,000

24,379

1,515

12,329
10,466
8,726
8,026
9,059
8,347
8,413

1,033,000,000
822,000,000
705,000,000
612,577,857
720,424,679
642,189,000
633,855,544

21,696
40,030
62,340
59,550
67,266
57,735
51,156

2,417
2,715
2,697
2,739
2,467
2,269
4,602

1924




! ! 1 i 1
I

1920

|

The value of money orders paid in 50 cities declined
seasonally, but was about 10 per cent larger than m
July, 1923.
LIFE INSURANCE

New business of life insurance companies
in a seasonal movement from the previous month,
was in a larger volume than a year ago. Group in
ance, however, increased over both comparative
periods. Premium collections for all classes of n^
insurance except industrial increased over June an
year ago.

19
EMPLOYMENT IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES BY MAJOR INDUSTRIAL GROUPS
(Drawn from data compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor and representing weighted indexes based upon the number of wag© earners fn the respectivo industries
v
in 1919. Detailed data may be found in the August issue (No. 36), page 176)
(Average monthly employment 1923-»100)

GENERAL INDEX OF EMPLOYMENT

1

1915

1914 '

1916 '

'

1917

1U i 11 i . ..

> 1918

|9|9
TEXTILES AND THEIR
PRODUCTS

FOOD AND KINDRED
PRODUCTS

130

I

|920 t

T
I

1921

1924

1922 > 1923
LUMBER AND ITS
REMANUFACTURES

IRON AND STEEL AND THEIR
PRODUCTS

120
110 - G

1
c

100-

J

1

SLAUGHTERING

g "

AND MEAT PACKING

GR OUf TC TAl
\

\

90- 4

80

!4AR n u / Km

GR DUF TC T A l

P * OT

V
JPI

:IMI

\

3H! UG--\

[TEXTILES

i

\

V me UP TO FAL

\ \
\

f

—

• f '

- F t RN TUI I E -

1

•
LEATHER AND ITS FINISHED
PRODUCTS

PAPER AND PRINTING

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED
PRODUCTS

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS
PRODUCTS

"120

no
100
90

?LE

m

G l OU

GR( (UP TO TAl

s

T 3T*

p<
RO IP

*
—*

OTAL

PAI ER ANI i PL LP^

\

r rR( LEI )M

IEF NIN o'

PE

80
70
60
kOTHER

130

ENAMELED WARE
THAN IRON AND STEEL

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES

VEHICLES FOR LAND
TRANSPORTATION

MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES
DRE!

ISO

CHE' VJNG AND SMOKING
TOBACCO-

AUTOMOBILI

110

100

T

90

GROUP TOTAL

GROUP T O T A L /

80
70
60

Hi

ill

19221 1923



i i I
1924

19221 1923 I 1924I 19221 1923* I 1924 I 19221 1923 I 1924

20
BILLS DISCOUNTED AND TOTAL INVESTMENTS OF FEDERAL
RESERVE BANKS
28
/
. 24

1-/

• > ^

\

MILLIONS OF DOLU

A new series of life-insurance data appears on page
48 of this issue. These data, supplementing the
former series carried in the Survey, include reports
from five additional companies, making a total of 45
companies who had in force 81 per cent of the total
legal reserve life insurance outstanding in the United
States, as of December 31, 1923. Beginning with
January, 1924 data have been compiled showing the
number of persons insured. This item appears in
the new tabulation.

)

L8 Ol

»coo IT£t>

\

\

\

BANKING AND FINANCE

Check transactions in New York City as measured by
debits to individual accounts declined about 2 per cent
from the previous month, but were 17 per cent larger
than a year ago, while for the country outside New
York, the volume was 2 per cent larger than in June,
and 3 per cent in excess of the volume last July. The
accompanying table compares debits in July with June
and a year ago for 141 clearing house centers; a comparison is also given by Federal reserve districts with
data adjusted for seasonal variation.
During July discounts and note circulation of the
Federal reserve banks declined, while investments
other than discounted bills, total reserves, and deposits increased, the reserve ratio at the end of the
month standing at 83.0 percent as against 82.8 percent
at the end of the previous month and 78.2 per cent a
year ago.
Reports of member banks of the Federal reserve
system show increases over the preceding month and
July, 1923, for total investments, total loans and discounts, and net demand deposits.




V

*

£ 8

r

- • %

\

\

rOTAl . INV
- >

4

—

1

0

1

\

1920

. 3

i;

1921

?
1922

i

I ii i s i ii i
i
1923

124

Interest rates on the New York market made a further decline during July, call money averaging 2*10
per cent for the month and commercial paper averaging 3.53 per cent. The accompanying chart compares
the yield from corporation bonds, municipal bonds,
and call and commercial loans, over a period of years.
Business failures increased over the preceding
month and a year ago, both in number and liabilities.
Liabilities of failing concerns increased generally over
June except in the case of trade establishments, while
the number of failing concerns increased over the same
period except in the case of ag'ents and brokers, and
manufacturing establishments. In the agricultural
credit field, repayments exceeded advances by the War
Finance Corporation and the outstanding loans with
all farming enterprises were reduced.

COMPARISON OF INTEREST RATES AND BOND YIELDS

21
Bond prices continued to increase during the month,
the average price of 40 corporation bonds, reduced to a
comparable basis, being 2 per cent higher than in June
and 7 per cent higher than a year ago. Government
issues shared the general increase.

Stock prices increased in oven groat or moasuro than
bonds, especially railroad issues. Stock transfers on
the New York oxchange increased over the previous
month and were double tho volume for the corresponding period last year.

DEBITS TO INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTS AT PRINCIPAL CLEARING-HOUSE CENTERS
GROUPED BY FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICTS
[Relative numbers based on 1919 as 100]
1024

1923

1924

DISTRICTS

July
UNITED STATES, 141 clearing-house centers.—.

August

August

July

107.2

103.3

119.3
123 8
142.4
95.8
133.3

112.5
118.6
115.2
92.3
115.3

106.1
136.7
118.6
135.8
105.5

103.1
125.2
104.9
120.0
102.8

Total, 5 centers..
Louisville-.
100.2
St. Louis
99 7 •
Memphis
108 7
Little Kock
93 0
122.2 MINNEAPOLIS DISTRICT:
Total, 9 centers
Duluth
80 5
Minneapolis
106.9
St. Paul
112.2
Helena
Billings
112.5
79.5

117.1
114 4
147.2
151 2

107.6
105.5
128.3
130.3

106.6
101 4
134.0
127.9

109.0
84.4
128.4
95 5
114 2
105 0
145.7
113.8
140.0

100.9
73.3
114.6
87.4
107.3
86.7
141.4
106.9
122.0

106.1
77.8
114.6
95 8
106 5
98.4
130.2
128.0

94.2
92.1
85 7
106.0
62.2

93.9
96.5
71.4
106.0
56.8

93.2
91.1
76.2
105.2
70.3

98.5
101.6
188.1
100.3
116.6
76.3
62.2

91.5
100.0
178.0
87.8
116.6
74.2
54.1

85.3
94.1
167.8
76.3
100.0
72.0
52.8

119.6
106.3
126.1
114.0
106.7
126.5
86.6
125.4

105.3
102.3
124 4
105.1
100.4
114.5
85.3
120.6

100.0
94.5
12a 1
109.6
108.2
88.0
90.6
112.7

BOSTON DISTRICT:

Total, 11 centers
Boston.. _.
Hartford. _ . ._
Providence^
-_ „
New Haven
NEW

1923

DISTRICTS

YORK DISTRICT:

Total, 7 centers . . ._ .
Albany
Buffalo
Rochester
New Y o r k . . . . . . . .

.

.

89.5

August

August

ST. LOUIS DISTRICT:

103.0
107.0
102 4
80 1

101.9
100.0
71 3
152 8

90 6
91.7
97 4
70 G
111 5

77.8

IK). 4
87.8
91.0
92.0
81. S
00.7

85.0
107.4
00.9
88.9

87.0
111.0
83.3
68.6
64.7
108.0
90.8

8S.1
113.7
8U.8
71.0
fiO. 4
103.0
83.0

80,8
111.0
88.9
70.5
C7.0
110.3
92.0

87.5
91.3
70.1
71.7

80.4
90.1
81.9
OS. 5

SO. 2
87.0
81.9
GS.6

125.2
223.9
84.5
106.3
88.3
190.8

122.3
212.4

120.3
2110
85.1
07.4
82.5
177.7

155 6

.

. .
. *..

»

...

*...

90.3
95.5
95.2
102. r>

90.9

90,7
78.9

KANSAS CITY DISTRICT:
PHILADELHFIA DISTRICT;

Total, 10 centers
Philadelphia
Scranton
Trenton
CLEVELAND DISTRICT*

Total, 13 centers .
Akron.
_
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Younsstown
Toledo
Columbus
Dayton

.

.

.

.

'-

RICHMOND DISTRICT;

Total, 7 centers
Baltimore
Norfolk
Richmond
Charleston..

*

ATLANTA DISTRICT:

Total, 15 centers
Atlanta.
Birmingham „
New Orleans..
Jacksonville
Nashville
Augusta

!

.„..„.
. ....
.

CHICAGO DISTRICT:

Total, 21 centers
Chicago
Detroit
Indianapolis
Milwaukee. „
Des Moines
Grand Rapids
Sioux City

...___

~
. -

..

Total, 14 centers

PUBLIC FINANCE

The gross debt of the Federal Government increased
slightly over the previous month, but showed a reduction of about 5 per cent from July 31, 1923. Customs
receipts increased about 2 per cent over both June and
a
year ago. Total ordinary receipts were less than
a year ago. Expenditures chargeable against ordinary
receipts decreased from both comparative periods.
GOLD AND SILVER

Domestic receipts of gold at the mint increased over
the previous month but were less than a year ago.
Imports and exports of gold were reported in less



„ „

Kansas City, Mo

-.

St. Joseph, Mo . .
Oklahoma City
Tulsa

.- .-

*

DALLAS DISTRICT:

Total, 11 centers
Dallas
Fort Worth
SAN FRANCISCO DISTRICT:

Total, 18 centers
San Francisco
Seattle
Oakland, Calif
DISTRICT TOTALS CORRECTED FOR SEASONAL
VARIATION:

United States, total
Boston district....
New York district
Philadelphia district
Cleveland district
Richmond district
Atlanta district
Chicago district
St. Louis district

Kansas City district
Dallas district
San Francisco district

- -

-

-

-

10S.2
118.0
107.7
116.4
105.6
93.6
103.9
118.1
100.0
101.2
S6.7
97.7
12G. 7

IO3! 4
207.9

112.2
127.7
1118
J13.5

mo
tut n
101.4
108.0
109.1
015
86.3
96.1
126.0

97.2
113.7
S9.6
112.4
111.4
ryt n

916
102.6
105.8
918
SS.0
95.9

volume than in July, 1923, but in the case of exports
an increase was made over the previous month.
Net imports of gold in July aggregated 818,507,000
as against §24,912,000 in June and $27,406,000 in
July* 1923. Production of the Rand mines totaled
829,437,000 fine ounces as compared with 733,000,000
in the preceding month and 754,306,000 fine ounces
a year ago.
Silver production declined from June and a year
ago. Both imports and exports increased over the
movement in the previous month. Exports were
about 47 per cent larger than in July of last year,
while imports declined 29 per cent from the same
period.

22
CENSUS

FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND TRADE
Except for the French franc, Chile pesos, and the
Brazilian milreis, which declined, and Belgian francs
and Italian lire, which remained unchanged, the principal foreign exchanges averaged higher than in June.
Except for Sweden, Switzerland, India, and Canada,
exchange rates were lower than a year ago. The
weighted index of foreign exchange ratesA relative to
par, declined from 60 in June to 59 for July and may
be compared with 63 a year ago.
Imports into the United States during July were
about 1 per cent larger than in June and about
4 per cent less than in July of last year, while July
exports declined 10 per cent and 8 per cent, respectively, from the same comparative periods. The
volume of exports and imports during July were practically equal, as against an export excess of approximately $32,000,000 in both May and June.

OF MANUFACTURES:
REPORTS

The Bureau of the Census has announced preliminary figures on 29 additional manufacturing industries collected pursuant to the census of manufactures
for the year 1923. The following table summarizes
the more important data made available since those
published in the August issue, and as further similar
reports are released they will be correspondingly
summarized for the readers of the SURVEY. More
details can be obtained with respect to each of the
industries above outlined from the bureau's complete
preliminary statement for each industry in connection
with the census of manufactures for 1923.
CENSUS OP MANUFACTURES RETURNS:

INDUSTRY CLASSIFICATION

1933

CIVIL-SERVICE APPLICATIONS, EXAMINATIONS, APPOINTMENTS,
AND SEPARATIONS *

NUMBER OF
APPLICATIONS
RECEIVED
YEAR AND
MONTH

NUMBER OP
PERSONS
EXAMINED

NUMBER OF
PERSONS
APPOINTED

NUMBER OP
PERSONS
SEPARATED

Depart- Field Depart- Field DepartDepartmental
mental
mental Field mental Field
service service service service service service service service

1933
June
July
August
September...
October
November...
December. _.

3,930 9,898
4,175 13,948
3,875 15,218
2,980 18,538
2,415 19,263
2,953 15,511
2,410 12,887

3,515
2,320
1,817
1,793
3,038
2,478
1,397

11,051
12,660
11,770
16,824
16,893
15,664
9,710

509
599
618
702
552
509
366

5,629
6,787
5,791
7,514
6,612
8,059
6,021

876
523
545
937
823
604
475

6,990
8,373
6,159
7,743
6,338
6,960
5,747

1924
January _ „ _ .
February....
March
April
May.
June

8,129
6,865
2,293
1,535
2,706

3,120
7,536
2,063
2,638
1,893

13,534
14,749
22,851
14,435
42,743

212
390
399
422
371

7,045
5,745
7,271
8,686
8,957

240
479
451
544
520

5,687
4,134
6,298
5,909
6,171

15,304
20,639
24,250
42,910
22,114

i By departmental service is meant service in Washington, D . C , exclusive of the
jurisdiction of the fourth civil-service district with offices in Washington. B y
field service is meant all service outside of the District of Columbia and includes
the service in Washington under the jurisdiction of the fourth civil-service district




Drug grinding
Watches and watch
movements
Watchcases
Engraving and diesinking
Haircloth..
Cane sugar refining
Stereotyping and electrotyping
Baking powders and
yeast
Card cutting and designing
Washing m a c h i n e s ,
clothes wringers, and
dryers
Engravers' materials
Ammunition and related
products
Envelopes
Saws

1921

Quantity
Per
cent principal
increase product

stones
Graphite, ground and

PER CENT
MINIMUM
TO MAXIMUM EMPLOYMENT

Average

mi

earners employed

81.2

$12,294,934 $10,085,691

21.9

11.8

30,630,265 24,396,516
17,472,075 13,805,957

25.6
26.6

-5.0
16.4

9,242,056 4,849,882
3,733,969 2,618,319
726,241,577 466i 602; 352

90.6
42.6
55.6

49.1
65.8
-1.3

92.9 70.8
85.7 71.1
91.1
82.2 52.3
67.2 71.8

20,596,208 17,358,994

18.6

13.2

96.3 97.0

51,691,123 52,885,888 - 2 . 2

-1.4

92.8 94.5

5,950,962 4,557,834

2,096,131

1,498,897

39.8

2,184,609

1,456,864

49.9

i A minus sign ( - ) denotes decrease.

17.5

86.1

57.5

65.7
121.8
55.2

92.3

48.2
21.7

30.

56,814,588 30,198,566 88.1
2,302,627 1,816,873 26.7
51,508,622 32,350,445 59.2
49,918,447 43,910,409 13.7
30,641,858 18,185,297 68.5
Files
I..ZZZII 11,618,568 7,647,252 51.9
Boot and shoe cut stock. 99,261,911 72,691,564 36.6
107,276,240 98,212,784 9.2
Phonographs
40,953,386 36,255,601 13.0
Paper bags
24,366,097 21,342,004 14.
Glue and gelatin...
16,708,207 9,529,779 75.3
Bicycles
Motorcycles.
.__. 15,508,802 13,567,970 14.3
Gas machines and gas
and water meters.
34,250,414 21,956,424 56.0
Steel and copper plate
engraving and plate
printing
32,132,811 28,778,665 11.7
Lithographing
91,050,585 79,472,260 14.6
Boot and shoe findings.. 49,429,739 39,116,538 26.4
Cast-Iron pipe and fit92,674,088 44,321,548 109.1
Leather beitlngZZrilli; 37,845,830 19,168,255 97.4
Grindstones and DUID-

1923

PER CENT
INCREASE *
OVEE 1921
IN —

VALUE OP PRODUCTS

CIVIL-SERVICE EMPLOYEES

The following monthly figures reported by the
"United States Civil Service Commission give a com.parative summary of the operations of the civilservice system:

1923—PRELIMINARY

89.3 65.6
92.2 82.4

25.1
14.6
42.4
14.9
1.2
14.3
22.7
25.2
90. G
29A

86.0
96.5
94.6
88.2
82.3
79.1
93.4
85.6
84.2
81.6

43.2

86.5 79.2

66.3
87.5
67.6
58.0
60.5
72.0
63.5
68.5
52.5
35.6

92.2
3.4
15.8 95.6 91.6
80.4 73.5
29.1
72.7 89.3 72.8
90.8 86.4
39.6
58.3
28.6
85.1 46.8
60.5

23
AUGUST DATA
The following table gives such August data as have been received to and including Sept. 14,1924, Text matter covering August data is given on p. 1
1924

1921
August,
1923

July

ITEM

August

July

bales..

6,597

4,136

3,420

bales.bales..

211,533
346,671

277,641
357,455

244,415
491,604

of bales.*
of bales..
of bales..
of bales,.

1,394
720
674
933

1,364
553
811
823

1,986
807
1,179
914

„..bales..
bales..

30,952
23,213

29,518
30,075

33,547
25,459

Pig iron, production
thous. of long t o n s . .
Furnaces in blast:
Furnace. - ...._.. . . . . . . .
........number..
Capacity."_."."."._."."..—".
long tons per d a y . .
Merchant pig iron:
Production
thous. of long tons..
Sales
thous. of long tons..
Shipments
thous. of long tons..
Unfilled orders
thous. of long tons..
Stocks, merchant
furnaces
thous. of long tons..
Stocks, steel plants
. . . . . t h o u s . of long tons..
Steel ingots, production
thous. of long tons..
Unfilled orders, U. S. Steel Corp.,
end of month
thous. of long tons..
Wholesale price, composite
rtrt
I*finished steel
dolls, per 100 l b s . .
Wholesale price:
Composite pig iron
dolls, per t o n Iron and steel
dolls, per t o n . .
Composite steel
dolls, per 100 l b s . .
Locomotives:
Shipments—
,
Total
number..

1,785

1,891

3,449

144
55,350

151
63,000

270
106,590

267,125
274,237
267,039
790,861

256,705
370,350
308,169
873,979

500,122
303,276
410,196
805,939

052,898
209,966

,001,612
190,340

705,421
170,111
3,696

1,869

2,542

3,187

3,290

IRON AND STEEL

5,415
2.78
2.25

20.11
39.79
2.81

20.22
39.33
2.76

number..
number..

-

2.56

140
130
10

139
121
18

272
259
13

number..
number..
number..
numberthous. of dolls..

483
416
67
886
1,116

361
306
55
5,984
1,185

1,497
1,406
91
2,780
1,345

71,827
85,826
105,410
15,036
18,629

72,195
83,550
101,844
15,883
18,030

75,325
83,250
52,942
21,183
21,550

8,516

Si 836

13,099
10,958

10,792
7,858

4,805

5,510

20,161
5,059

21,302
3,454

18,754
2,887

26.10
44.87
3.03

KONFERROUS METALS

Zinc:.
Retorts in operation, end of m o n t h . . . . n u m b e r Production
thous. of lbs..
Stocks end of month
thous. o f l b s Receipts at St. Louis
thous. of lbs..
Shipments from St. Louis
thous. of lbs.:
Lead:
Receipts at St. Louis
thous. of lbs..
Shipments from St. Louis
thous. of lbs..
Tin:
Consumption
long tons..
StocksWorld
long t o n s .
United States
long tons.
BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION

Contracts awarded, floor space (27 States):
Business buildings
thous. of sq. ftIndustrial buildings
thous. of sq. ft.,
Residential buildings
thous. of sq. ft.
Educational buildings
thous. of sq. ft.
Other public and semipublic
buildings
.thous. of sq. ft.
Grand total
thous. of sq. ftContracts award~e"d\ value (27 States):
Business buildings
thous. of dollsIndustrial buildings
thous. of dollsResidential buildings
thous. of dolls.
Educational buildings
thous. of dolls.

SSJC

- . - f t o u s . of dolls.

Grand total" " I " " "
thous. of dolls.
Constructionrelativeto 1913, Engineering News
Hecord:

Cost (1st of following month)
index number.
Northern pine:
Lumber—
Production
M ft. b. m.
Shipments
- —
Mft. b. m.
LathProduction
thousands.
„
Shipments
thousands.
composite lumber prices (1st of following month):
Hardwoods
dolls, per M ft. b. m..
Softwoods
dolls, per M ft. b. m.
XT




URUSt,
11)23

CEMENT

TEXTILES

Cotton:
Imports, unmanufactured
Exports, unmanufactured (including
Writers)
Consumption b y textile mills
Stocks, end of month—
Total, mills and warehouses-thous.
Mills
...thous.
"Warehouses
thous.
World visible, American
thous.
Silk:
Consumption
.
Stocks

DomestIc_.I"II~I
Foreign
_„...
Unfilled ordersTotal
Domestic""
Foreign.."."i:.I
Freight cars, orders, domestic
Steel furniture, shipments

August

7,436
2,416
20,891
4,846

6,854
2,703
24,548
3,453

6,245
3,367
24,106
3,285

4,711
41,179

4,143
41,853

2,782
39,786

41,866
14,475
108,507
34,667

23,865
133,033
27,859

27,169
17,717
114,317
21,036

31,493
289,834

32,981
299,507

21,670
253,106

196

196

206

52,267
45,758

54,068
46,403

83,862
49,041

13,328
14,&i9

14,675
16,515

20,076
15,091

42.04
29.1

41.03
30.74

45.02
31.39

thous. of bbls..
thous. of bbls..
.thous. of bbls..

14,021)
10,014
12,319

15,123
10,855
10,603

12,967
14,071
6,080

thous. of b u s h . .
thous. of bush..
thous. or bush..

35,074
18,225
10,510

92,987
19,340
27,501

65,315
21,i>22
28,179

....thous. of bush..
thous. of bush..

10,302
11,205

52,82(1
10,749

26,387
13,009

thous. of bush..
thous. of bush..
thous. of bush..

43,779
5,987
3,080

70, M7
6,624
11,403

63,922
1,966
10,111

thous. of bush..
thous. of bush..
thous. of bush..

6,000
13,200
3,000

7,400
16,000
3, G O
O

3,700
4,800
1,000

thous. of bbls.,
thous. of pockets..
thous. of pockets-

6
135
165

345
131
399

410
543

503,482
321,238

448,493
220,408

316,729
209,798

158,812
300,293
670,802

164,990
315,283
432,123

04,878
148,237
429,688

151
133
207

150
134
206

142
130
203

22.8
22.1

23.
22.3

20.1
20.0

3,527
174
118
578
239
221
2,197

3,623
23G
120
f>27
273
207
2,301

4,116
202
132
813
305
324
2,331

22,069
13,416
8,653
27,319
15,950
6,371
3,099
1,899

23,809
13,470

10f333
28,789
16,927
6,802
3,000
2,060

22,334
13,909
8,425
25,551
14,964
6,333
2,527
1,722

276,819
276,734

270,600
331,000

275,438
310,066

105.8
98.3
109.0
27.3
39.07
5.65
6.60
10.50

116.8
107.4
111.3
5S.44
5.67
8.54
10.15

&4.2
87.4
122.7
23.5
37.47
5w60
6,85
9.96

1.397
1.253

1.356
1.31.

1.072
1.017

1.055
.563

1.171
.528

.875
.387

.821
.86

.85!
.911

,623
.671

9.563
8.18S
4.84

9.48
9.6
5.969

10.875
7.994
5.750

Production
Shipments
Stocks
FOODSTUFFS

Grain movement:
ReceiptsWheat
Corn
Oats
ShipmentsWheat
Corn
Visible s u p p l y Wheat
Corn
.•
Oats
Argentine grain:
Visible s u p p l y Wheat
Corn
Flaxseed
Rice:
Receipts at mills
Shipments from mills
Stocks, domestic
Sugar, raw:
Meltings
Stocks at refineries
Sugar, Cuban movement:
Receipts, Cuban ports
Exports
Stocks, end of month

long tons..
long tons.,
long tons.
ongtons.
long tons.

CHEMICALS AND DEUGS

aoiesaie pnwa.
Drugs and Pharmaceuticals
Essential oils
Crude d r u g s . . . .
.

index numberindex number.,
index number.,

TRANSPORTATION

Index of ocean rates, Atlantic ports to:
"United Kingdom
weighted index number..
All Europe
weighted index number.
Car loadings (monthly totals):
Total
tbous. of cars.
Grain and grain products
thous. of cars.
Livestock....
thous. of cars.
Coal and coke
thous. of cars.
Forest products
thous. of cars.
Ore
thous of cars.
Merchandise and miscellaneous...thous. of cars..
DISTRIBUTION

Mail-order houses, total sales
Sears, Roebuck & Co
Montgomery Ward & Co
Ten-cent stores, total sales
F. W. Woolworth Co
S. S. Kresge Co
S. H . Kress Co
McCrory Stores Corp
U. S. foreign trade:
Imports
Exports

thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
. . . t h o u s . of doll3..
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.,
thous. of dolis.
thous. of dolls.

WHOLESALE FEICE3

Farm product*—Average price
Wheat
Corn
Potatoes
Cotton
Cottonseed
Cattle, beef
Hogs
Lambs
Farm products—Market

to producers
cents per bush.
cents per bush.
cents per bush.
cents per l b .
..dolls, per ton.
cents per l b .
cents per lb..
cents per lb.,
price

Wheat, No. 1, northern, spring
(Chicago)
...dolls, per bush.
Wheat, No. 2, red,winter(Chicago). .dolls, per bush.
Corn, contract grades, No. 2, cash
(Chicago)
dolls, per bush,
Oats, contract grades, cash (Chicago)dolls. per bush
Barley, fair to good, malting
(Chicago)
dolls, per bush
Rye, No. 2, cash (Chicago)
dolls, per bush.
Cattle, steers, good to choice, corn
fed (Chicago)
dolls, per 100 lbs.
Sheep,
Hogs, heavy (Chicago)
dolls, per 100 lbs.
- - /^uj
^
--dolls, tier 100lbs.

13,760 1

27.8

13.28

12.813

24
AUGUST DATA—Continued
1924

1924
August,
1923

July

August

July

Food

Building materials and
7.490
5.831

7.538
6.225

6.100
4.900

.051

.054

.061

.066

.066

.076

.121
.165
.170

.139
.165
.169

.104
.158
.184

Clothing
Cotton yarns, carded, white, northern, mule spun,
22-1 cones (Boston)
dolls, p e r l b . .
Cotton, print cloth, 27 inches, 64x60-7.60 yards
to pound (Boston)
dolls, per yd..
Cotton, sheeting, brown, 4/4 Ware Shoals, L. L.
(New York)
dolls. per yd..
Worsted yarns, 2/32's crossbred stock, white, in
skein (Boston)__
•„„•
dolls, perlb..
Women's dress goods, storm serge, all-wool, dbl.
warp, 50 inch (New York)
dolls, per yd..
Suitings, wool, dyed blue, 55-56 inches, 16-ounce
Middlesex (New Y o r k ) . .
dolls, per yd..
Silk, raw, Japanese, Kansai No. 1
(New York)
dolls, per lb..
Hides, green salted, packer's, heavy native steers
(Chicago)
dolls, perlb..
Hides, calfskins, No. 1, country, 8 to 15 pounds
(Chicago)
dolls, perlb..
Leather, chrome calf, dull or bright " B " grades
(Boston)
dolls, persq. ft.
Leather, sole, oak, scoured backs, heavy
(Boston)
dolls, per lb.,
Boots and shoes, men's black calf, blucher
(Massachusetts)
dolls, per pairBoots and shoes, men's dresswelt tan calf
(St. Louis)
dolls, per pair.

.471

.469

.432

.068

.070

.064

.108

.116

.111

1.550

1.600

1. 750

1.035

1.035

1.035

3.600

3.600

3.690

5.390

6.076

7.350

.131

.156

.147

.180

.194

.147

.430

.460

.400

.425
6.25
4.85

.440
6.25
4.85

.515
6.50
4.85

Fuels
Coal, bituminous, mine run lump, Kanawha
(Cincinnati)
dolls, per short'ton.
Coal, anthracite, chestnut (New York
tidewater)
dolls, per long ton..
Coke, Connellsville (range of prompt and future)
furnace—at ovens
dolls, per short ton.,
Petroleum, crude, Kansas-Oklahoma—
at wells
dolls, per bbl..

3.39

3.39

3.89

11.28

11.38

10.63

2,96

3.00

4.56

1.550

1.375

1.450

Metals
Pig Iron, foundry No. 2, northern
(Pittsburgh).
dolls, per long ton..
Pig iron, basic, valley furnace. _.dolls, per long ton..
Steel billets, Bessemer
(Pittsburgh)
dolls, per long ton..
Copper ingots, electrolytic, early delivery
(New York)
dolls, per l b . .
Lead, pig, desilvered for early delivery
(New York)
dolls, per l b . .
Tin, pig, for early delivery (New York).dolls. per l b . .
Zinc, slab, western, early delivery
(New York)
dolls, p e r l b . .

20.76
19.00

20.89
19.00

26.52
24.75

30.00

37.75

42.50

.124

.133

.139

.071
.462

.080
.518

.067
.393

.062

.066

.067

Building materials and miscellaneous
Lumber, pine, southern, yellow flooring,
1x4, " B " and better (Hattiesburg
district)
dolls, per M ft. b. m . .
Lumber, Douglas fir, No. 1, common
(Washington)
dolls, per M ft. b. m . .




August,1923

WHOLESALE PEICES—continued

"WHOLESALE PRICES—continued

Flour, standard patents
^ (Minneapolis)
dolls, per bbl._
Flour, winter straights (Kansas City)-dolls, per bbl._
Sugar, 06° centrifugal (New York)
dolls. p e r l b - .
Sugar, granulated, In barrels
(New York)
dolls, per lb__
Cottonseed oil, prime summer yellow
(New York)
dolls, per lb__
Beef, fresh carcass good native steers
(Chicago)
dolls, per lb._
Beef, fresh steer rounds No. 2 (Chicago) .dolls, per lb_.

August

38.51

39.56

44.85

16.500

16.000

18.500

miscellaneous—Continued

Brick, common red, domestic building
(New York)
dolls, per t h o u s Cement, Portland, f. o. b . plant
(Chicago district) __
dolls, per bbl..
Steel beams, mill (Pittsburgh).
dolls, per cwt_.
Rubber, Para Island, fine
(New York)
dolls, per Ib_.
Sulphuric acid, 66° (New York)...dolls, per 100 lbs..

16.00

13.50

20.39

1.75
2.20

1.75
2.15

1.75
2.50

.170
.70

.211
.70

.238
.75

20,991
21,254
43,945
195, 704

20,981
21,245
45,621
185,763

21,902
22,201
42,500
235,505

207,995

196,892

234,49S

21,127
16,240

20,342
15,247

14,778
14,596

531
294
1,762
3,260
2,165
83.0

593
263
1,741
3,202
2,150
82.3

267
816
2,225
3,201
1,908
77.5

12,265
4,987
12,233

12,434
5,091
12,419

11,703
4,537
10,8SO

2.10

2.00

4.95

36,813
20,022
12,421
4,370

55,154
29,924
16,361

34,335
15,988
13,125
5,222

1,615
416
1,124
75

1,520
414
1,024
82

1,319
385
88S
46

75.81
87.22
73.58
70.93
73.48
24,226

75.93
86.09
73.52
71.57
74.14
22,427

71.86
83.66
67.81
66.35
72.02
13,126

113.53
68.39

119.18
71.06

102.95
56.24

dolls, per fine ozpence per standard ozthous. of dollars..
thous. of dollars-

.672
34.509
7,128
9,190

34. 213
7,042
8,632

30.952
6,466
7,032

. . . t h o u s . of dollarsthous. of dollars..

18,834
327

18,150
2,397

32,856
2,201

PUBLIC FINANCE

TJ. S. interest-bearing debt.
. . . . . . m i l l s , of dolls..
Gross debt
jmills, of dolls..
Customs receipts
_
thous. of dolls..
Ordinary receipts
thous. of dolls..
Total expenditures chargeable against
ordinary receipts..
thous. of dolls..
BANKING AND FINANCE

Bank clearings:
New York City
„ „ . m i l l s , of dolls..
Outside New York C i t y . . . .
mills, of dolls..
Federal reserve banks:
Total investments
A . . . . m i l l s , of dolls..
Bills discounted
_
mills, of dolls..
Notes in circulation....
mills, of dolls..
Total reserves
mills, of dolls..
Total deposits
mills, of dolls..
Reserve ratio
per cent-.
Member banks:
Total loans and discounts
mills, of dolls..
Total investments
mills, of dollsNet demand deposits
mills, of dolls..
Interest rates:
New York call loans
per cent..
BUSINESS FAILURES

Liabilities:
Total commercial
thous. of dolls..
Manufacturing establishments._.thous. of dolls..
Trade establishments
thous. of dolls..
Agents and brokers
thous. of dolls..
Firms:
Total commercial
number..
Manufacturing establishments
numberTrade establishments
number..
Agents and brokers
_
number..
STOCKS AND BONDS

Bond price indexes:
Combined index, 40 bonds p . ct. of par. 4% bond..
10 highest grade rails
p . ct. of par. 4% bond..
10 second grade rails
p . ct. of par. 4% bond..
10 public utility b o n d s . r . p . ct. of par. 4% b o n d 10 industrial bonds
p . ct. of par. 4% b o n d Stock sales
, . .thous. of sharesStock prices:
25 industrials
,
dolls, per share25 railroads
dolls, per share..
GOLD AND SILVER

Silver:
Price at New York
Price at London
Imports
:
Exports
Gold:
Imports
Exports. _

.685

25

INDEXES OF BUSINESS
The index numbers presented in this table are designed to show the trend in production, prices, trade,
etc., in various groups of industry and commerce. They consist in general of weighted combinations of series
of individual relative numbers; often the individual relative numbers making up the series are also given. The
base year of all the index and relative numbers is 1919, except prices which are on a 1913 base, and unfilled
orders, on a 1920 base. The function of index and relative numbers is explained on the inside front cover.
A condensed form of this table is given on page 7.
w

1923

EXPLANATION
Maximum Minimum
All index numbers are relative to 1919 as 100, except since Jan. since Jan.
prices, which are relative to 1913, and unfilled
1,1920
1,1920
orders, which are relative to 1920

June

July

April

Mny

June

Per cent
fruro.'ist1 (+) or
decrease (—),
July from June

July

PRODUCTION
(Relative to 1919)

157

73

95

98

87

95

90

OS

+ K.9

209
137
„_ . . . 121
241
124
164

105
41

198
118
118
212
117
147
114
71
108
145

207
116
113
232
118
139

189
76
93
4
123
143

196
81
106
152
122
157

194
83
106
172
121
162

-1-3. 2
+ (>. 4
+ 1. 0
-5. 0

119
80
97
106

126
SO
124
123

188
78
105
1S1
119
163

RAW MATERIALS, TOTAL
MINERALS:

Petroleum ~
Bituminous coal
Anthracite coal
Iron ore*

131

Copper

Lead
Zinc
Gold
Silver

0

o
17
74
38
57

145
154

80
83

133

Total

_

114
94
115
148

ANIMAL PRODUCTS (marketings):

Wool
Cattle a n d calves
Hogs _ _ ~ _
Sheep.
. .
. Eggs*
«
Poultry*
.

Fish

. ._

Milk (New York)
Total
-_ _

61
32
49

58
73

93
353

_ . _

30
21
45
94
80

124
80
113
64
174
84
98
147
119

389
218
211

__--_
, - _ .
__
_ » _ _ _ _ _
._

227
143
167
153
245
382
135
190
130

19
24
1
54

19
58
64

54

+ 1.7

— 0. 6
- 0. 9
-{-39.4
-14.4

115
66
111
122

114
92
95
125
201
S8
110
74
122
100
130
143
117

— 20. S

+ 5.2
+ 113.5

-t-2. 5
+ 38. 6

112
73
113
84
121
190
12S

56
85
117
60
209
79
95
128
118

64
88
116
59
220
90
100
138
124

145
82
115
OS
154
90
103
141
117

121
107
84

117
32
72

108
49
71

122
111

36
24

29
62

110
52
73

2

2

63

67

1
104

i)
486

153
23
200

56

118

+110. 7
+ 91.7
+ 161.5
+ 063.4
-47.6

146

93

+ 7.3
-3.3

+ 8.8

+ 11. 1
+ 2(5.2
+ 1.4
0. 0

CROPS (marketings):

Grains—
Corn*

Wheat*
Oats* Barley*
Rve*

~

- - - -

Rice*

- -

Total*

Vegetables—

Potatoes (white)*

277
314
497

Swpet Potatoes*

Tomatoes*. .
Onions* - - _ _ _ _
Cabbage* - - - Celery*
- ~

total*

367
206

- - _

-

282

316
501
254

Cotton products—

Cotton*
Cottonseed*
Total*
Miscellaneous crops—
Hay*
_
- -.
Tobacco*
Flaxseed* Cane sugar*
Total*
- -Grand total, crops _-

67

68

132
7
339
39
108
16

106
15
122

123
18
120

80

131
156
267
121

117
2
241
158
185
121
124

13
71
145
*
*
u
29
244
630
881
124

34
512
306
975
441
90
153

+ 955.2
+ 299. 6
-30.0
-80.8
+ 23. 4
+ 14.3

134




4

34
37
96

114
24
150

+ 195.2
— 50. 0

+ 55. 2
+ 12.5
-58. 8 '

42
46
141

46
408
86
20
396
575
307
44
131

50
0
235
0
1
0
0
202
87

32
1
200
0
0
2
69
1,475
155
39
17
35

21
6
19

58
6
67
4
27
60

63
2
51
4
26
56

51
1
51
S
21
73

-ao

24
3
21

21
2
19

26
7
23

28

4

38
13
35

148
258
566
810
170
195

46
0
28
0
21
49

50
0
134
7
23
54

56
0
62
13
23

54
6
41
2
24
54

' Fluctuations between maximum and minimum largely due to seasonal variations.

9251—24f

-24. 7
-62. 7

13
55

225
276
232

35

55
19
124

26
37
17

7
87
136
2
0
212
519
642
102

4
0

51
42

28
64
30

oooooo

Fruits—
655
Apples*
532
Peaches*
235
Citrus fruit*
1,049
Grapes*
799
Pears*
_ -_ __-_
974
Watermelons* __ _ „
630
Cantaloupes* _ __
Strawberries* _ -_
- „_ 1,925
405
Total*

45
0
2
35
22
4
58

95

24

54

70

!

+10. 5
;

1,

-19.0
-50.0
0.0
+100. 0
-19. 2

+30.4
—

26
INDEXES OF BUSINESS—Continued
1921

1923

EXPLANATION

Maximum Minimum
All index numbers are relative to 1919 as 100, except since Jan. since Jan.
1,1920
1,1920
prices, which are relative to 1913, and unfilled
orders, which are relative to 1920

June

July

April

May

Juue

July

Per cent
!
increase (+) or
decrease (—),
July from June

PRODUCTION—Continued
FOREST PRODUCTS:

133
135
267
151
135

59
51
20
24
61

132
107
232
122
133

122
90
247
111
124

127
134
103
105
126

127
118
216
95
130

115
107
227
96
120

108
82
264
70
111

-6.1
-23.4
+ 16.3
+27.1
-7.5

137
126
178
280
207
169
160
145
122
233
126

75
64
40
41
64
41
20
38
29
22
77

112
75
122
262
219
163
159
98
46
57
121

107
94
80
281
205
151
133
75
43
57
119

104
86
131
114
153
106
125
119
67
77
106

112
88
133
184
183
132
145
93
58
50
116

107
84
144
252
213
148
160
104
50
22
121

112
91
155
280
205
140
150
108
1
60
22
126

+4.7
+8.3
+7.6
+ 11.1
-3.8
-5.4
+20.0
+3.8
-6.2
0.0

127
138
130

60
42
54

110
114
112

94
101
96

97
96
97

84
79
82

71
67
70

70
73
71

-1.4
+ 9.0
+ 1.4

Pig iron
Steel ingots
Locomotives
Total

152
149
150
147

34
33
9
32

144
134
104
134

144
126
107
127

127
119
33
115

103
94
50
92

70
67
63
67

-12.5
-8.2
-3.1
-9.5

Lumber
Flooring
Total

135V
232

59
51
57

132
223
148

122
203
136

126
218
142

127
229
146

80
73
65
74
115
201
131

108
207
126

-6.1
+3.0
-3.8

Sole leather
Boots and shoes
Total._

95
130
115

57
81
63

87
102
96

88
92
90

63
98
84

61
91
80

57
81
72

61
78
72

+7.0
-3.7
0.0

121

69

117

110

112

117

105

100

-4.8

Coke
Petroleum products
Cottonseed oil*
Turpentine and rosin*^__
Wood distillation
Total

141
183
188
269
118
157

40
96
3
21
21
92

134
153
9
230
97
135

131
.160
8
245
86
139

111
176
38
104
89
141

141
182
28
215
79
154

81
173
15
224
58
137

173
3
264
50
137

77

-4.9
0.0
-80.0
+ 17.9
-13.8
0.0

Brick
Cement*
Total

124
209
139

53
61
69

94
185
132

97
188
135

97
175
129

92
206
139

79
202
130

75
209
131

-5.1
+3.5
+0.8

Copper smelting and refining
Zinc smelting and refining
Enamel ware
Lead
Total

126
130
314
167
195

23
38
86
79
71

93
112
212
147
150

95
113
207
139
148

100
118
270
143
176'

103
125 ,
255 i
151
174

99
114
223
163
158

98
112
225
162
158

-1.0
-1.8
+0.9
-0.6
0.0

Manufactured
and snuff
Cigars
Cigarettes
Total.

50
75
64
70

101
100
132
113

95
100
132
111

93
85
120
100

99
94
144
114

05

_.

119
128
149
125

146
115

97
101
149
119

+2.1
+5.2
+2.1
+3.5

Shipbuilding
Automobiles
Rubber tires
Prepared roofing.
Total
Grand total, 64 commodities. _

79
239
221
163
145
133

1
29
20
58
37
68

15
230
149
120
128
126

3
199
99
110
100
114

10
227
173
113
131
118

8
190
165
120
115
113

7
149
145
112
95
100

5
loo
152
125
100
100

-28.6
+ 7.4
+4.8
+ 11.6
+ 5.0
0.0

ELECTBICAL POWER
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION "(total)*]]

154
147

98
30

139
99

140
90

146
136

148
124

140
103

142
88

-14.6

Lumber
Pulpwood
Gum (rosin and turpentine) —
Distilled wood
Total

M ANUF ACTURING:

Foodstuffs—

Meats
Wheat flour
Sugar
Ice cream
Butter
Cheese
Condensed milk
Glucose and starch
Oleomargarine
Rice
Total
TextilesCotton (consumption)
Wool (consumption)
Total
Iron and steel—

Lumber—

Leather—

Paper and printing—

•

Total

Chemicals, etc.—

Stone, clay, and glass—

Metals, excepting iron and steel—}

Tobacco—

tobacco

Miscellaneous—

'Subject to revision. -Fluctuations between maximu^o"minimum largely



^ o ^ o ^

9i
C

+ 1.4

27
INDEXES OF BUSINESS—Continued
EXPLANATION

1933

Maximum Minimum
All index numbers are relative to 1919 as 100, except since Jan. since Jan.
prices, which are relative to 1918, and unfilled
1, 1920
1,1920
orders, which are relative to 1920

June

July

April

May

June

July

Per cent
increase (+) or
decrease (—)f
July from June

STOCKS
(Corrected for seasonal variation)

91
73

115
146

114
134

136
164

143
185

133
157

131
153

-2. 5

189
115
169

89
5S
86

95
88
121

94
87
128

110
86
163

105
86
169

98
87
167

95
87
161

-2. 1
0.0
-3.0

152
232

84
70

103
110

102
93

135
176

129
154

126
137

123
121

-2.4
-11.7

175
115
168

68
56
89

82
86
121

78
94
129

97
73
165

91
74
168

84
87
167

82
100
163

-2.4
4-13.8
-1.2

116

40

77

68

54

47

43

44

+2.3

62

84

78

77

76

75

77

4-2.7

117

58
154
158
152
i 72
39
i 40
131
135
147
62
16O
1 62
1 56
177
88
185
1 75
174
1 99
64
1
71
1 45.
153
1 67
43

114
109
95
120
125
64
56
61
65
81
88
83
80
84
108
107
111
94
101 <
125
88
109
71
88
95
65

100
92
88
106
109
51
46
49
52
69
81
78
81
70
107
106
113
92
95
132
88
108
75
106
99
64

106
108
98
110
107
68
73
65
59
68
78
74
80
67
94
115
126
100
101
145
81
85
63
83
92
61

102
105
91
99
111
55
50
62
42

-4.2
-4.3
4-6.4
-4.2

44

-8.3
-11. 5
-11.9

80
76
84
68
92
111
125
98
97
135
73
78
53
72
92
63

95
92
78
96
103
48
52
42
35
66
81
73
79
73
101
106
120
92
92
131
70
78
49
71
S3
64

91
88
83
92
104

73

:_•-

Raw foodstuffs
Raw materials for manufacture
Manufactured foodstuffs
Manufactured commodities

148
233

98

Total

134

49

86

74

114

90

89

69

331
214
205
185
192
220
17S

84
55
119
109
106
108
72

154
97
183
149
136
176
144

143
82
177
141
128
176
102

178
88
208
145
130
208
178

174
82
211
150
143
189
150

162
75
197
143
131
176
140

163
72
207
151
129
195
111

202
154

80
101

127
122

89
119

132
140

127
134

119
127

91
122

(Unadjusted index)

TotaLRaw foodstuffs
.
Raw materials for manufacture
Manufactured foodstuffs
Manufactured commodities

UNFILLED ORDERS
Iron, steel, and building materials

Total (8 commodities; 1920= 100) __

WHOLESALE TRADE
(Distributed by Federal reserve districts)

Grand total, all classes
Hardware, total 10 districts New York
-Richmond
._~
~_
Chicago
San Francisco
Shoes, total 6 districts—.-_
New York
-_RichmondChicago..
San Francisco

i 115
1
116
i 120
i 125
78
182
199
i 101
198
99
> 103
197
»84
*124
129
i 135
i 117
i 112
i 161
123
i 135
i 119
i 131
i 136

•-•-_
•«

Groceries, total 10 districts.
New York_Richmond
Chicago
--~
San Francisco
Drugs, total 7 districts
New York
Richmond
*- Chicago.San Francisco
Dry goods, total 9 districts_
New York
„ — ™.
Richmond
Chicago
San Francisco
Meats, total 2 districts

74

+10
.

46
37
35
54
82
76
77
69
95
111
121
98
94
160
74
84
62
81
94
68

0.0
-18.2

+ 12
.
+41
.
-2.5
-5.5
-6.9

+4.7
+0.8
+6.5
+2.2
+22,1
+5.7
+ 7.7
+26.5
+ 14 1
+ 13.3
+6.3

RETAIL TRADE
(Value)
MAIL-ORDER HOUSES (4 houses)
CHAIN STORES:

Ten-cent (5 chains)
Music (4 chains)
Grocery (28 chains)
Drug (10 chains)
Cigar (3 chains)-Candy (4 chains)
Shoe (6 chains)

—

DEPARTMENT STORES:

Sales (333 stores)
Stocks (286 stores)

-—
... „ —
"~!
,„ 'Moxixcu* and minimum BumtMy indexes for the ^ S ^ S ^ T
thefluctuationsin the group totals which cover the period since January, ltfau.




7~

-22.5

+0.6
-4.0

+ 5.1
+ 5.6
-1.5

+ 10.8
-20.7
|
,

-23.5
-3.9

IZTcriP* hPffinnfaTi! Januarv, 1921, and nonce are not to be compared with

.28
INDEXES OF BUSINESS—Continued
EXPLANATION
All index numbers are relative to 1919 as 100, except Maximum Minimum
prices, which are relative to 1913, and unfilled since Jan. since Jan.
1,1920
1,1920
orders, which are relative to 1920

1924

1923
June

July

April

May

June

July

Per cent
increase (+) or
decrease {-),
July from June

PRICE INDEX NUMBERS
FARM PRICES (Eel. to 1909-14):

235
283
373
186
215
304
180

110
88
114
91
111
76
80

133
119
161
103
135
207
107

130
112
165
105
133
199
99

128
113
128
106
114
226
98

127
114
132
107
111
222
94

128
116
146
105
111
219
95

130
130
142
103
111
215
101

+ 1.6
+ 12.1
-2.7
-1.9
0.0
-1.8
+ 6.3

Farm products.
243
Food, etc
! 248
Cloths and clothing.
i 346
Fuel and lighting
281
Metals and metal products.
203
Building material.-i 300
Chemicals
213
House-furnishing goods.- _ 275
Miscellaneous
208
248
All commodities

114
131
171
178

138
142
198
186

135
141
193
183

139
137
189
179

136
137
187
177

134
136
188
175

141
139
188
173

+ 5.2
+ 2.2
0.0
-1.1

109
155
121
173
114
138

148
194
131
187
123
153

145
190
129
187
121
151

139
182
128
175
113
148

134
180
127
173
112
147

132
173
127
172
111
145

130
169
127
171
112
147

-1.5
-2.3
0.0

249
311
218
375
272
244
249
247

135
122
103
152
168
118
146
138

158
165
119
215
184
144
155
153

153
154
120
209
179
141
154
151

154
166
119
195
174
135
151
148

152
168
115
195
171
133
150
147

147
165
109
1.82
168
130
151
145

152
176
114
175
167
130
153
147

+ 3.4
+ 6.7
+ 4.6
-3.8
-0.6
0.0
+ 1.3
+ 1.4

All groups

Grain
Fruits and vegetables
Meat animals
Dairy and poultry
Cotton and cottonseed
Unclassified
WHOLESALE PRICES (ReL to 1913):
Department of Labor—

Federal Reserve Board (Depart-

ment of Labor prices)—
Total raw products
Agricultural products
Animal products
Forest products
,_
Mineral products .1
Producers' goods
Consumers' goods
All commodities

Federal Reserve Board

Index-

™0.6

+ 0.9
+ 1.4

Goods imported
Goods exported...
All commodities
Dun's (1st of following mo.)...
Bradstreet's (1st of following
month)
.__

246
272
267
218

102
125
142
134

148
182
164
156

141
170
159
154

140
182
158
153

133
183
156
152

129
179
154
153

132
180
156
155

+ 2.3
+ 0.6
+ 1.3
+ 1.3

227

115

142

139

136

133

133

137

RETAIL PRICES, FOOD (Rel. to 1913)

219

139

144

147

141

141

142

143

+3. 0
+0.7

139
143
153
149
171
155

144
172
169
178
173
160

147
175
170
176
173
162

141
185
177
168
174
162

141
185
176
165
174
161

142
185
174
165
174
162

143
186
171
166
173
162

154
155
163

159
160
171

157
155
168

165
172
181

164
168
177

163
168
174

163
173
174

306
283
504
152
160

409
394
568
160
180

407
396
566
157
175

450
428
579
156
181

459
428
571
151
178

465
442
566
149
173

481
438
567
148
171

263
279
236
218 l

162
143
146
170

167
153
178
175

166
151
180
170

164
143
166
174

163
143
165
176

163
145
163
176

164
147

321
313

183
171

198
186

192
183

207
201

205
200

199
189

COST OF LIVING, National Indus-

trial Conference Board (Rel. to
1914) :
Food
219
Shelter
185
Clothing. __
288
Fuel and light
200
Sundries
192
All items weighted
205
FOREIGN WHOLESALE PRICES:
United Kingdom—
British Board Trade
333
London Economist
310
U.S. Fed. Res. Bd
340
France—
Gen. Stat. Bureau
588
U. S. Fed. Res. Bd
537
Italy (Bachi)
.
670
Sweden
366
Switzerland
326
Canada—
Canadian Dept. Labor

U. S. Fed. Res. Bd
Australia
India (Calcutta)
Japan—
Bank of Japan
U. S. Fed. Res. Bd__~.~




1

January, 1920; no other figures for 1920 available.

2

Since January, 1921.

+ 0.7
+ 0.5
— 1.7
+0.6
-0.6

0.0
0.0

+ 3.0

0.0

+3.4
-0.9

+0.2

-0.7
-1.2

+0.6

-2.0

TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS
The following table contains a summary of the-monthly figures, designed to show the trend in important industrial and commercial movements. The numerical data for the latest months are given and in addition relative numbers for the last four months
and for two corresponding months of a year ago. In many lines thefiguresdo not lend themselves readily to statistical uniformity,
due to lateness of their publication or publication at other than monthly intervals; therefore the following explanations of the
various headings are offered to make clear such distinctions and in general to facilitate the use of the table:
June, 1924.—This column gives the June figures corresponding to those for July shown in the next column—in other words,
cover the previous month.
'
'July, 1924.—In this column are given the figures covering the month of July or, as in the case of stocks, etc., the situation
on July 31 or August 1.
.
.
,
,
.
.
Corresponding month, June, 1928, or July, 1928.—The figures in this column present the situation exactly a year previous
to those in the "July, 1924," column (that is, generally July, 1923), but where nofiguresare available for July, 1924,
the June, 1923, figures have been inserted in this column for comparison with the June, 1924, figures.
Cumulative total from January 1 through latest month.—These columns set forth, for those items that properly can be cumulated,
the cumulative totals for the seven months ending July, 1923 and 1924, respectively, except where the July, 1924, figures
are lacking, in which case the cumulative totals for the first six months of 1923 and 1924 are given.
Percentage increase (+) or decrease (-) cumulative, 1924 from 1923.—This column shows the per cent by which the cumulated
total for the seven months ending July, 1924, is greater (+) or less (-) than the total for the corresponding period ended
Base yelr or period.—For purposes of comparison with a previous more or less normal period, all items, so far as possible, are
related to such a year by relative numbers. The period taken for each item, called the base, is the monthly average of
t t y e a r or periodystated in this column. Wherever possible, the year 1913 is taken as a base and if "<> Pre-wai-figures
are available, 1919 is usually taken to avoid using a war year as a basis. In some cases it will be noted that figures ere
not available prior to 1920 or even 1921, and that sometimes a month, or an average of a few months has to be used
rather than a year's average. Also, for some industries, 1919 would not be a proper base on account of extraordinary
* therefore some more representative year has been chosen.
. ., * *
\
Relative numbers.—In order to visualize the trend of each — . _ . relative numbers (see explanation on inside front cover)
_
movement,
are given for the last four months and for two corresponding months of a year ago
by allowing the monthly average for the base period, usually 1913 or 191Mo ^ - - ---• h rclative mimber

month last year.
RELATIVE NUMBERS

Per cent
increase (4*)
or decrease (—)

(+)

Corresponding
month,
- June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FKOM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1924
from
1923

BASE
TEAR
OB
PERIOD

+ 26.7

1924

1923

June

July

| Apr.

' i many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
increase

N U M E R I C A L DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, m a y be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY ( N O . 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p . 1

a

25,918
2,207
28,125
16,397

35,864
3,577
37,441
6,061

26,081
7,762
33,843
13,422

88,970
253,446
342,416
344,901

112,737
75,010
187,747
182,162

- 70.0
- 45.2
- 47.2

1913
1913
1913
1913

74
132
90
233

84
145
101
150

30,972

33,778

46,347

399,212

297,726 - 25.4

1921

101

83

9.1 - 27.1

95
82

99
97

5.6 - 27.4
11.2 - 31.3

1923

TEXTILES
Wool
Receipts at Boston:
Domestic
_
thous. of lbs.
foreign
thous. of lbs.
.Total
thous. of lbs_
"nports, u n m a n u f a c t u r e d thous. of lbs.
Consumption b y t e x t i ] e m i ] ] s
grease equivalent.
. . . t h o u s . of l b s .
Machinery activity hourly:
^ooms, wide
per ct. of hours active.
ijOoms, narrow
per et. of hours active.
Looms,
carpet and r u g . . p e r ct. of hours active.
sets of c a r d s . . .
per ct. of hours active.
^ombs.......^
p e r c t . of hours active.
spinning spindles—
Woolen
per ct. of hours active.
Worsted
per ct. of hours active.
ne ry
spindles.. ...per ct. of active to total..
j activity (percentage of total):
» orsted
V
spindles..
per ct. of active to total>vide looms
per ct. of active to total..
harrow looms...per ct. of active to total.,
looms
es^*
- — P e r c t - o f a c t i v e t 0 total..
W t Ohio,
Pi blood, unwashed.. ...dolls, per lb._
«aw, territory fine, •
\ v S c ° V r d dyarn..._
S
dolls: per U x .
_
\Vorsted yarn..._
_
dolls, per lb_.
vvool, dress goods
vvool d
d d o l l s , per y d . .
Men's suitings..
...dolls, per yd..

38.4
28.5
33,1
63.0

+
+
-

37.5
79.7
10.6
54.8

61.6
56.7

58.4
50.2

80.7
73.8

1921
1921

48.9
84.5
52.6

51.6
76.8
53.4

74.1
94.2
97.2

1921
1921
1921

125
127
87

105
125
69

79.0
48.1

71.5
44.1

90.3
89.7

1921
1921

123
82

115
69

1913

106 103

-

5.0 - 14.3

1913
1913
1913
1913

97
96
108
109

-

5.1
5.6
0.0
6.4

.51

1913

212 196

0.0 - 13.7

1913
1913
1913
1913

239
212
184
239

1.6 - 9.7
3.1 - 13.9
0.0
0.0
0.0 - 2.4

.44

.44

1.28
1.600
1.035
3.600

1.30
1.550
1.035
3.600

1.44
1.800
1.035
3.690

220
13,641

254
6,597

292
6,356

+

6.3 - 2 9 . 9
9.3 - 18.9
1.7 - 45.1
10.0 - 21.4
8.5 - 50.9

88
93
107
96

+

233
212
184
239

-

39.8
24.3
12.3
20.6

Cotton
2,982
305,260

3,471
222,907

+ 16.4
- 27.0

1913
U913

34
199

34
79

171,469 1,957,975
211, 533
230,979
462,654 4,003,423
350,277 346,671
Twelve m o n t h s ' average, J u l y to June, inclusive, ending the year indicated.

2,450,210
3,159,055

+25.1
-21.1

U913
1913

44
103

45
89

sight

-

^manufactured
m a f t d

1




thous

- ° f bales
bates.
.bales. _

32

75

29
75

+ 15.5 | - 13.0
- 51.6 | + 3.8
-8.4
-1.0

+23.4
-25.0

30
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.

in many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23
TEXTILES-Continued
Cotton—Continued
Stocks, end of month:
Total at mills and
warehouses
thous. of bales. Mills
thous. of bales..
Warehouses
thous. of bales..
World visible,
American
thous. of bales-.
Cotton finishing:
Orders received; gray yardageWhite goods
thous. of yds.
Dyed goods
thous. of yds..
Printed goods
thous. of yds..
Total
thous. of yds..
Billing, finished goods (as produced)—
White goods
thous. of yds
Dyed goods
thous. of yds..,
Printed goods
thous. of yds.
Total
thous. of yds.
Shipments, finished goodsWhite goods
cases.
Dyed goods
cases.
Printed goods
cases.
Total
cases.
Stocks, finished goodsWhite goods
Dyed goods
Printed goods
cases.
Total
....cases.
Operating capacity
per ct. of capacity.
Machinery activity of spindles:
Active spindles
thousands.
Total activity
millions of hours.
Activity per spindle
hours.
Per cent of capacity
_
per cent.
Manufactured goods:
Cotton cloth exports
thous. of sq. yds.
Fabric consumption
by tire manufacturers
thous. of lbs.
Elastic webbing sales
thous. of yds.
Fine cotton goods:
Production
pieces.
Sales
pieces.
Prices:
Raw cotton to producer'_...dolls, per lb.
Raw cotton, New York
dolls, per lb.
Cotton yarn
dolls, perlb.
Print cloth
dolls, per yd.
Sheeting
_
dolls, per yd.,
Fall River mill dividends (quarterly): &
Total
thous. of dolls..
Ratio to capitalization
per cent..

Per ct.
Increase

N U M E R I C A L DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1022, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1

Corresponding
month
June
or July,

1924

cumulative

RELATIVE NUMBERS
BASE
TEAR
OR
PERIOD

1923

Percent
increase (+)
or decrease (-)

1924
July
from
June

1,833
951
882

1,394
720
674

2,033
1,094

1913
1913
1913

1,223

933

865

1913

26,445
22,561
5,930
59,514

23,484
26,231
5,581
61,451

24,154
6,852
55,955

40

-23.7

+7.9

+26.5 +12.6
-8.3 -14.0
-13.5 +6.3

199,248
213,907
53,072
510,477

-12.8
-21.2
-37.0
-21.4

a 1921
a 1921
2 1921

+6.4

-3.2

-12.6
-21.6
-42.2
-21.5

2 1921
21921
»1921
U921

-2.0
-16.7
-7.7
-9.9

-2.3
-26.0
-23.4
-17.8

-0.1
-21.9
-29.6
-16.2

21921
»1921
3 1921
21921

+21.4
-8.2
-18.7

+22.7
+1.3
-26.0
-5.2

-5.2
-15.8
-9.5
-2.8
-2.2

24,126
26,723
6,660
64,761

23,652
22,261
6,145

24,208
30,088
8,022
70,931

239,608
269,320
96,687
691.917

11,745
6,977
1,243
33,397

14,254
6,407
1,011
33,514

11,616
6,324
1,366
35,361

114,174
70,692
15,166
353.918

114,116
55,216
10,671
296,732

10,764
8,069
2,522

10,207
6,797
2,282
42,378
45

10,209
7,786
3,108
50,279
51

U921
U921
2 1921
U921
U921

29,216
5,336
141
64.6

28,710
5,158

1913
1922
1922

60.6

34,244
7,136
191
87.3

39,349

37,390

30,288

270,959

241,978

10,067
8,620

9,424

10,999

78,746
104,176

284,726
215,566

293,015
464,194

.378,326
222,122

.278
.300
.474
.068
.108

.273
.317
.471
.068
.10S

.235
.259
.437
.066
.117

742

-31.4
-34.2
-28.2

228,573
271,498
84,236
649,556

209,453
211,110
55,859
543,080

136

July.
1924.
from
July,
1923

-23.9
-24.3
-23.6

1924
from
1923

1033

July

June

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

(+)
or de-

+0.4

67

0.0
—12.7

-26.6
-15.7
-11.8

-1.7
—3.3
-3.5
-6.2

-16.2
-27.7
-28.8
-30.6

U913

-5.0

+23.4

79,206
74,121

-10.7
+0.6
-28.9

1921
1919

-2.8
+9.3

+43.2
3lt3

3,050,113 2,418,076
2,264,722 1,675,825

-20.7
-26.0

1919
1919

74

+2.9 , - 2 2 . *
+115.3 1+100.0

567,358
13,281

'604,764
45,948

1913
1913

+16.2

+12.5
+12.4

+23.2

+6.0
-65.8

678
1.575

-1.8
+5.7
-0.6
0.0
0.0

-6,2

+8.5

835
1.898

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

-34.3

a?

Clothing
Men's and boys' garments cut:
Men's suits, wool
number.. »535,057
Men's suits, other
_
number..
38,859
Men's separate trousers,
wool
n u m b e r - 419,339
Men's separate trousers,
other
number,. 232,575
Men's overcoats
. . n u m b e r . . 263,637
Boys' suits and separate
pants
_
number,- 476,250
Boys' overcoats and reefers
number..
72,332
Work clothing:
Cut
dozens__ 107,122
Sales
dozens- 123,995
Cancellations
dozens.
2,383
Stocks, end of month
dozens.
265,685
Raw Silk
Imports
_
thous. oflbs—
3,616
Deliveries (consumption)
_
bales
23,164
Stocks, end of month
bales..
24,843
Price, Japanese, New York
dolls, p e r l b . .
4.998

Burlap and Fiber
Imports:
Burlap
thous. oflbs._
Fiber (unmanufactured)
long tons..
Pyroxylin Coated Textiles
Pyroxylin spread
Shipments billed:

tbous. of lbs..

455,028
275,023
301,202

366,466
347,217

+18.3 -25.0
+14.2 -13.3

457,891
82,055

640,741
60,222

-3.9
+13.4

-2S.5
3

108,287
118,417
1,214
240,188

139,228
119,678
4,935
210,552

+1.1
-4.5
-49.1
-9.6

-22.2
-1.1
-75.4
+141

4,572
30,952
23,213
5.390

28,573
22,914
7.154

223,525

29,142
197,645

19.7
11.6

41,817
23,498

34,728
27,781

43,950
20,055

368,006
200,034

362,404
183,333

-1.5
-8.3

1,471

1,602

1,917

..linear yds.-

613,506
654,036

479,972
745,274
278,314
849,835

1913
*1920
1920
1913

1909-13
1909-13

514,061
,245,256

317,046
771,802

Light goods

408,054
,511,890

+26.4
+33.6
-&6
+7.8
-17.0 -2L0
+18.2 +3S.5
+8.0
-21.8
+13.9




endin

S

Ju

« e 30,

> September 30, 1924, and September 30,1923, appear in the columns designated June, 1924, July, 1924,
, inclusive.

m S r c ^ v e m e reported as of the ist °f the •*»*•

- 6 -5

-4ft*
-12.2 -31.8
+10.1 -43.8

• Revised.
pec?ivdy eQdS fOr t h ° q u a r t e r s
1
Eleven months*

i

and Jul^

31
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS-Continued
NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE —Data on t h e following i t e m s for t h e
period January, 1922, t o J u n e , 1924, m a y b e
found in t h e August q u a r t e r l y issue of t h e
SURVEY ( N O . 36). Detailed t a b u l a t i o n s of
several new items a p p e a r a t t h e e n d of this
issue. See Contents, p . 1
In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

1924

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

Per ct.
increase
<"#
orde- ;
creusc \

(-)

'

cumu- j
lative t
1924
from
1923 i

RELATIVE NUMBERS
DASE
YEAR
OR
TEKIOD

Per cent
increase (-f)
or d e a euso ( - )

im
July
from

July,
JU24,
from
July,
1923

4*19. fl
+22.5
+H.4
-13.fi

+ 14.W
+ 14.0
+ 10.1
-fAO

June

June

July

26,410
21,102
5,308
2,793

31,596
25,842
5,754
2,415

27,503
22,647
4,957
5,747

38,408

28,699

-25.3

7,890

7,501

10,094

25,398

22,196

-12.6

1913

-4.9

7,584

7,280

10,411

26,597

22,041

-17.1

1913

-4.0

-30.1

5,421
2,009
2,026

5,431
1,953
1,785

7,682
2,428
3,678

19,119
5,899
24,520

15,254
5,914
19,199

-20.2
+0.3
-21.7

1913
1913
1913

I l 119
l

-0.2
-2.H
-11.9

-29.3
-19.fi
-61.6

164
65,200

1913
1913

1
120 1 1
146 136

-12.2
-16.1

-61.7
-61.5

313
391
268
763

144
55,350
267
274
267
791

-14.7

-2V.9
-0.4

+3.7

-CO, 9
+26.1
-31.9
-8.9

"1,054
215

1,053
210

626
129

1914
1921

0.0
-2.3

+«8.2
+62. H

21.51
19.63
21.20

20.76
19.00
20.11

27.27
25.10
26.98

1913
1913
1913

-3.6
-3.2
-5.1

-23.9
-24.3
-25,5

20,251
72.00
24,586
14,583

18,658
62.50
25,414
14,681

25,183
85.32
28,354
10,950

1922
1922
1922
1922

-7.9
-12.9
+3.4
+0.7

- 2 f t . t>

29,954
33,766
19,985
32.1

27,061
31,464
26,908
28.9

64,433
55,922
39,131
57.4

1923

5 2

METALS
Iron Ore and Fig Iron

Iron ore:
StocksTotal
__
thous. of tons.
At furnaces
_„ thous. of tons_
On Lake Erie docks thous. of tons_
Consumption
..thous. of tons.
Shipments from minesThrough Sault
Ste. Marie
thous. of short tons.
Through upper
lake ports
thous. of short tons.
ReceiptsLake Erie ports and
furnaces
...thous. of long tons.
, Other ports
thous. of long tons.
Pig iron production
thous. of long tons.
Furnaces in blast:
Furnaces
number.
Capacity
.....long tons per day.
Merchant pig iron:
Production
thous. of long tons.
Sales
thous. of long tons..
Shipments
_>thous. of long tons..
Unfilled orders
thous. oflong tons..
Stock, merchant
furnaces
thous. oflong tons..
....Stock, steel plants
thous. oflong tons..
wholesale prices;
Foundry No. 2,
Northern
dolls, per long ton..
Basic valley furnace...dolls, per long ton.,
Composite pig iron dolls, per long ton..
Ohio gray-iron foundries:
Meltings
_
long tons..
Meltings
per cent of normal..
Stocks
_
long tons-.
Receipts
_„..
long tons-.
Malleable castings:
Production
tons-.
Shipments
tons..
r
Orders booked
—tons..
operating activity
per ct. of capacity..
Crude Steel
Steel ingots, production...thous. of long tons..
Steel castings:
Total bookings
short tons..
Hallway n e o u s
specialties
short tons..
ceUa
bookings
short tons..
1 T t ,^r^
Unfilled orders, U. S. Steel Corp.,
end of month
.thous. of long tons,.
"Ports (comparable).....thous. oflong tons..
sports (total)
thous. of long tons..
Shorts-.
thous. oflong tons..
eets, blue, black, and galvanized:
production (actual)
. „ „ s h o r t tons,.
production
per ct. of capacity..
ompments
short tons..
Sffcf--u nfliied orders
StocksTotal

order?„_,.„




544
219
392
868

153,066

151,953

-0.7

123,684

110,314

-10.8

26,868

21,518

-19.9

3,187
110
139
25

5,911
141
170
52

924
1,162
560

920
1,132
269

-0.4
-1.7
-52.0

174,910 1.086,070 1,497,662
69.6
192,262 1,710,361 1,465,668
92,358 1,522,735 I 1,229,431
404,868

38.00
40.61
2.84
2.61
2.30

38.00
39.78
2.81
2.56
2.20

145
134
11

140
130
10

239
211
28

631
462
69
433

483
416
67

1,738
1,652
86
1,450

295,050
288,563
613,001

215,438
277,342
430,694

144 I 120
60 I 30
U S 119

-10.0

3,263
118
165
53

70,798
39, G21

1914
1914
1914
1914

116

+316

-34.8
-28.7
-40.0

128,241
45,776

130 147
144 144

-as

435,502
217,970
217,632

114,807
-40.9
141,176

1919 | 75
•1919
82
1913 i GO
6
1919
145

-U.7

668,153
305,576
362,677

short tons..

dollars.dollars..
dollars..
• Revised,

-24.7
-27.4
-19.9

54,316
17,390
36,926

246,810

-

2,748
2,070
2,613

37,339
15,761
21,578

short tons-.
short tons..

number

3,650
2,850
3,263

48,718
26,170
22,648

144,291
48.7
151,255
135,998
203,440

unsold
.short tons..
-Sale prices:
Steel billets, Bessemer-dolls, per long ton..
jron and steel....
dolls, per long ton..
Composite steel..._
dolls, per 100 lbs..
Composite finished steeLdolls. per 100 lbs.,
structural steel beamsl-dolls. per 100 lbs..
Iron and Steel Products
motives:
Shipments—
Total
number..
Domestic
number..
_
number..
TT Foreign
Unfilled orders™al
number..
gomestic.
number..
l?rejgn
number..

%SSdomestic

114,200

3,631

2,056

5

-11.2
-14.3
-19.3

1,644
l f 543
101

82,035

851
787
64

74,735

-47,1

74
CO
81

-31.3
-9.4
-41.6

71
46
79
165

54
\b
S3
90

-2.3
-6,8
-fiZ8

-46.1
-22.0
-18.2
-51.9

130
127 i
109
no ! 112 i| 137
135 t 66 i 130
123 I 59 j! 53
73 I
130 126 j| 83
531 574 !i 876
!|
ii 165
I 177 165 j | 155
!i 176
I' 16S
lG'J

84
67
88
97
29

+25.7 -17.5
+ 19.fi -30.2
+7.1 -21.3
+ 25.1 +47.3
-17.fi -40. H

i

1013
1913
1913
1913
1913

80 115 I 63
775 j 819 | 7U9

-44.8
-13.4

-49.8
+23. H

! 147 !
| 154
I 165
157
151

0.0
-2.0
-1.1
-1.9
-4.3

-10. G
-12.4
-7.3
-7.9
-12.0

149
157
166
159
157

147
151
163
154 !
146

-48.2
-49.0 :
-36.6

1913 ! 76
1920 ll 201
1920 } 12
j

36 i 47 46!
85 I 122 118 li
U li
20 12

-8.9

1920 i U S
1920 207
24
1920
17
1913

49 40
66 52
13 I 16
5 ' 4

1922
355,778 3,160,8S3 2,402,709 -24.0
1922
442,981 2,904,201 2,389,856 -17.7
1922
610,344
5
Twelve months' average, June, 1919,

-49.7

-9.1

149 | 140
I
1913
175 I 108
1913
183 73
1913
168 I 138
108 ! 100 jj
1913
1913 | 69
103
1922
j
250
1913

1920
1920

141,130 L
32,062 ]..
42.50
45.39
3.03
2,78
2.50

-60.3
-43.7
-31.2

-23.4
-39. b
-4.3

1913

1920
1920
1920
1920
1920

-30.7
-10.4
+34.1

j 160
I 156
I 192 165 1' 141
to May, 1920.

36
47
16
8

-3.4
-3.0
-9.1

ii - 9 . 0
ii -10.0
i -2.9
+102.3

-41.4
-38.4
-64.3
-72.2
-74.8
-22.1
-38.9

78 -27.0 I - 3 9 . 4
107
112 , 108 ji - 3 . 9 } - 3 7 . 4
|
139 i 111 li -19.0 - 3 2 . 7

32
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued
Per ct.
[increase

NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY (No. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1

1924

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

June

July

22,951
15,724

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

18,070
10,484

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

(+)
or de-

RELATIVE NUMBERS

Percent
increase (+)
or decrease (-)

crease
(-)
cumulative
1924
from1923

BASK
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

-21.3
+27.6

1916
1916
1910

+2.5

+0.6

1,237,600 || +0.2

1913
1913

+6.1
+6.1
+6.5
+6.5
-12.2

+40.0
+40.0

1923

1921

179,273
71,376

141,015
91,111

1923

1921
July
from

July,
1924,
from
July,
1923

METALS-Continued
I r o n a n d Steel Products—Continued
Vessel construction:
Completed during m o n t h Total
gross tons.
Steel seagoing
gross tons.
Building or under contract, end of m o Merchant vessels.thous. of gross tons.
Structural steel, fabricated:
Sales (prorated)
short tons.
Sales
J
per ct. of capacity.
Shipments (prorated)
short tons.
Shipments
per ct. of capacity.
Steel furniture, shipments
thous. of dolls.

161

165

171,600
«G6
200,200
a 77

182,000
»70
213,200
»82
1,116

9,960
93
164
1

130,000

1,235,000

1,248

i6,"655

10,409

+3.5

1919

-21.3 +81.4
-33.3 +1,027

154 | 137 183

166

140

123

-10.6

I

Machinery
Stokers:
Sales.
-.
number.
Sales—.
horsepower.
Steam, power, and centrifugal pumps:
New orders..
thous. of dolls.
Shipments..
thous. of dolls.
Unfilled orders
thous. of dolls.
Patents issued:
Total, all classes
...number.
Agricultural implements.
..number.
Internal-combustion engines
number.
Washing-machine sales:
Total
I
number.
T
Electric
number.
Gas and power
number.
Waterpower
number.
Hand.
number.

102
35,549

115
37,759

129
52,518

1,006
1,315
2,369

1,015
1,065
2,269

1,384
1,765
5,987

12,105
10,410

3,346
45
42

4,137
62
85

3,421
50
61

660 ; - 3 5 . 2
1,019 ;
516,933 I 318,896 j - 3 8 . 3

1919
1919

+12.7
+6.2

-10.9
-28.1

8,065
8,373

-33.4
-19.6

1919
1919
1919

+0.9
-19.0
-4.2

-26.7
-39.7
-62.1

23,420
375
403

24,465
339
371

+4.5
-9.6
-7.9

1913
1913
1913

«45,168
"1,617
2657
c
6,907

367,234
274, 248
12,253
15,110
66,128

300,279
8,104
8,755
42,639

-2.1
+9.5
-33.9
-42.1
-35.5

1920
1920
1920
1920
1920

570
182
83

1,093
81
9

73,057
1,671
1,850

77,827
1,185
829

+6.5
-29.1
-55.2

129,486
78,040
.124

126,142
63,167
.144

831,780
438,311

915,056
624,618

+10.0
+42.5

1913
1913
1913

307,400
345,306

227,701
421,819

3,745,844
4,220,201

2,613,955
2,824,949

-30.2
-33.1

1923
1923

-18.0

125,914
118,855
751

94,381
100,755
815

1,526,940
1,581,690
4,068

1,657,730
1,485,210
3,700

+8.6
-6.1
-9.0

1923
1923
1922

+11.0 +33.4
+18.9 +18.0
+0.5 -7.9

71,827
85,826
105,410
15,036
18,629
.062

82,075
86,130
42,480
27,628
25,838
,064

602,580
635,218

546,867
640,774

-9.2

164,983
136,113

144,665
140,119

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

9,167
427

5,059
20,161
3,930
10,826
462

2,037
20,019
5,305
12,616
386

11,983
7,781
.071

S, 516
5,836
.071

30,447
1,514

32,284
1,631

53,031
44,494
1,251
1,183
6,193

+23.6 +20.9
+37.8 +24.0
1+102.4 +39.3

Domestic Orders for Railway Kqulpmen
Railway Age—prorated
Freight cars
Passenger cars

number.
number.

Locomotives

number.

414
38
1

NONFKRROUS METALS
Copper a n d Brass
-127,506
Copper:
92,740
Production
thous. of lbs.
.124
Exports
thous. of lbs.
Wholesale price, electrolytic.dolls per 1b.
283,996
Brass faucets:
421,115
Orders received
number of pieces.
Orders shipped
_ _ number of pieces.
113,426
Tubular plumbing sales:
99,982
Quantity
number of pieces.
747
Value
....dollars.
Lightning rods, shipments
thous. of ft.
Zinc
Retorts in operation, end of mouth..number
75,155
Production
..thous. of lbs.
86,884
Stocks end of month.
_
thous. of lbs.
99,3.68
Receipts, St. Louis
',
thous. of lbs"
14,544
Shipments, St. Louis
...thous. of lbs
17,013
Price, slab, prime western
dolls, per lb.
.062

x

+0.9-12.3
+2.9

+1.6
-15.9
0.0

+2.7
+23.5
-13.9

+8.2 +35.0

-4.4

-18.1

-12.5

-1.2
-a4
+6.1 +148.1
+3.4 1 -45.6
+9.5 - 2 7 .
0.0 - 3 . 1

Tin
Stocks, end of month:
United States
World visible supply
Deliveries (consumption)
Imports
_
Wholesale price, pig tin

..long tons..
...long tons..
long tons
thous. of lbs..
dolls, per lb_.

4,067
20,094
4,310

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

42,969
95,615

39,370
95,509

-8.4
-0.1

7,083
5,630
.064

80,275
43,298

84,727
58,729

+5.5
+35.6

1921
1913
1913
1913

45,126
2,278

318,396
11,449

-18.4
-23.7

+24.4 +148.4
+0.3 T +a7
^8.8 -25.9
+18.1 -14.2
+8.2 +19.7

224
154
207
239
111

1913
1909-13

Lead
Production
_index number.
Receipts, St. Louis
thous. of l b s .
Shipments, St. Louis
_„_thous. of l b s .
Wholesale price, pig, desilverized.dolls. per lb_

- 0 . 6 +16.8
-28 9 +20t2
-25.0 +3.7
0.0 +10.9

161

FUELS
Coal a n d Coke
Bituminous:
Production
'..thous. of short tons
ETnnrt*
..thous. of long tons.
Mine average,
spot_
dolls, per short t o n .
Wholesale, Kanawha, f. o. b.
Cincinnati
dolls, per short t o n .
Betail, Chicago..dolls, per short t o n .




2.03

1

3.39
7.85
Revised.

259,919
8,741

149

2.38
3.39
7.85

1913

207

3.89
8.81

1913
1913

188
184

June, 1923.

+6.0
+7.7 ,28.4
-2.5
0.0
0.0

-16.3

33
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued
RELATIVE N U M B E R S
! Incrrnst! (-f)
or decrease {—)

(

1921

June

July

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

1923

V
or de-

crease

(-)

cumu*
lative
1924
from
1923

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

I
July.

1923

j July

JL

h3
*
•-i

1 Apr. J

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
increase

N U M E R I C A L DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found In the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p . 1

- .. I front
..
t* i June

3

from
July,
1023

FUELS—Continued
Coal a n d Coke—Continued
Anthracite:
Production
thous. of short tons.
Stocks, distrib. points-thous. of long tons.
Exports
-thous, of long tonsPrices—
Wholesale, chestnut
New York
dolls, per long tonRetail, chestnut
New York
dolls, per short ton.
Coke:
Production, beehive.thous. of short tons.
Production;
by product
thous. of short tons.
Exports
thous. of long tons.,
Price, furnace,
Connellsville
dolls, per short ton.

7,704
2,677
349

7,782
3.198
290

8,320
898
455

53,701
2,828

-9.7

2,052

-27.T

1913
1921
1909-13

114
20
145

109
34
158

11.16

10.62

1913 ; 200 200

13.70

13.83

1913

555

466

1,581

11,641

6,569

-43.6

2,416
4S

2,352
49

3,267
60

22,133
736

19,871
403

-10.2
-45.2

3.23

9

11.28

13.63

2.96

•4.72

1913 i

196 19S

89
70
85

102 ' 101
j ioo
05 i 121

+1.0
-flD.5
-10.0

207 208 210 212 +1.1
104
107
+0.5

-0. A
-30.' ;j
+0.2
-0.9

56

39

27

-1G.0

-70.5

1913
299 303
S3 82
1909-13

2S4
C2

204
55

-2.0
+2.1

-28.0
-18.3

-8.4

-37.3

+3.1
+1.2
+2.0
+ 1.4

+ 18.1
+20.5

03

1913

213 103

155 140

132 1 1
2

Petroleum
Crude petroleum:
Petroleum
thous. of bbls,.
Stocks, end of month—
Total (comparable)
thous. of bbls..
Days'supply
numberTank farms and pipe
lines
thous. of bbls..
Refineries
thous. of bbls,.
Imports
thous. of bbls..
ConsumptionTotal
thous. of bbls..
Run to stills
thous. of bbls..
Shipments from Mexico..-thous. of bbls..
Price, Kansas-Oklahoma__,dolls. per bbL.
Oil wells completed,.—,.number..
Gasoline:
Production.^
thous. of gals..
Exports
. . . . t h o u s . of gals..
Domestic consumption
thous. of gals_.
Stocks, end of m o n t h . . . . . . . t h o u s . of gals..
,
Price, motor, New York....dolls. per gal.,
Kerosene oil;
Production.
thous. of gals..
Domestic consumption
thous. of gals..
Stocks
thous. of gals..
_. Price, 150° water white
dolls, per gal..
Gas and fuel oil:
Production.
thous. of gals..
Domestic consumption
thous. of gals..
Stocks
thous. of gals.,
Price, Pa., 36*40 at refln
dolls, per galLubricating oil:
Production
thous. of gals.,
Domestic consumption.
thous. of gals.,
Stocks.
thous, of galsPrice, Pa., 600° fi]., " D "
at refineries
dolls, per gal.,

a 59,292

61,143

0 65,925

0356,360
171

360,485
176

351,218
40,500
6,660

356,240
39,970
6,502

209,368
33,581
6,015

a 59,943
52,436
a 10,910
1,550
a 1,521

61,215
52,877
10,885
1,550
1,593

0 62,057
50,920
12,119
1,450
1,733

737,031
741,975
110,164
86,246
686,674
794,031
,598,858 1,466,559
.200
.195

636,912
80,693
674,019
, 165,389
.213

194,201
105,548
301,157
.215

+1.2

305,182
a 146

413,159

1913

304 318

287 208

1013
1919

403,239

2S3 291
130 120

331 334
140 144

1919
1913

212
404

223
4GC

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

253
159
553
155
115

285
109
601
155
109

402
2S3 2SG
183 182
G2G 677
ISO 180
00 104

193
230
221
207
128

193
203
235
247
126

229 236
373 307
212 235
344 3-19
119 119

235
281
277
310
110

2ns

271
408

43S

-1.3
-2.4

281
170
6M
160
100

+2.1
+0.8
-0.2
00
.

47,087

49,257

+4.6

399,170
329,894
84,398

419,977
309t 137
82,819

+5.2
+11.9
-1.9

10,505

8,966

-14.7

4,347,470
481,878
3,659,297

5,129,334
671,801
4,124,265

+18.0
+39.4
+12.7

1919
1919
1919
1919
1913

188,226
123,257
269,460
.205

1,321,949
866,608

1,395,153
854,626

+5.5
-1.4

1919
1919
1919
1919

02
106
88
105

06
106
00
103

104
134
00
107

102
01
101
103

100
01
100
103

6,829,875
6,335,518

7,684,924
7,036,207

+12.5
+11.1

1919
1919
1919
1910

153
143
170
100

166
157
180
96

176 182
173 186
107 200
112 112

174
177
200

+7.4

65,348
245,626

03,961
71,030
224,952

641,064
435,506

1919
1919
1919

136
123
139

133
149
139

137
129
155

.298

.225

1910

64

62

84

262,876
237,652
25,224

0328,105
«297,413
a30,G92

2,359,238
2,128,369

2,261,040
2,044,173
216,867

-4.2
-4.0
-6.1

1019
1919
1019

230
244
156

* 28,055
26,090
7,500

0 32,837
o 46,946
0 10,135

281,187
365,605
44,973

290,884
247,430
29,261

-32.3
-34.9

+3.4

1920
1920
1920

103
151
2S7

157
120
216

230
06
8S

11,703
9,946
1,757
5,316
5,581

14,022
11,817
3,105
9,056
5,023

91,443
76,758
14,685
67,410
34,593

106,572
90,235
16,337
70,817
48,186

+16.5
+17.6
+11.2
+5.1
+39.3

1910
1919
1919
1923
1916

211
221
164
117
130

4.5

4.5

7.606

13,501

+19.0
+ 19.0
-0.0

+2.7

•, 106,712 1,102,786 1,053,243
901,770
946,508 1,016,598
,618,564 1,603,643 1,400,814
.050
.056

-7.3

183,141
111,401
293,323
.215

.305

_
AUTOMOBILES
Production:
Total
n u m b e r - ^245,817
Passenger cars_
number.. 0 217,943
Trucks
number.. a 27,874
Shipments:
By railroads
carloads.. a 26,046
Driveways
number of machines.. 0 25,205
o7 f 321
By b o a t —
number of machines..
p
Exports:
Assembled—
12,341
Total
number of cars.,
10.142
Passenger cars
number of cars..
2,199
Trucks
._.
number of cars.,
11,872
foreign assembly
.number of cars..
8,560
Accessories and parts
thous. of dolls..
•Ratio of total exports to
5.0
Tnt Production,
per centinternal revenue taxes collected on:
•Passenger automobiles and
8,425
motor cycles
thous. of dolls..
Automobile trucks and
917
wagons.
thous. of dolls.,
Automobile accessories
2,603
and parts
thous. of dolls.,

+0.7 +16. r,
-21.7 i +0.0
+15.0 I +17.8
- 8 . 3 ! +2.1.8
-2.5
-8.5
+0.0 i +.12
- 5 . 3 -14.4
+11.8
+4.9
0.0

-10.7

+4.7
+12.7
+14.5
0.0

14S
137
151

-0.8
+11.*

-0.0
-8.0
+9.2

88

-2.3

+32.4

199 227 100
215 244 202
116. 137 127

+6.0
+0.0
-9.5

-19.0
-2a i
-17.8

170
83
177

+7.7
+3.5
+2.4

-14. C
-414
-20.0

216
211
239
102
142

269 248
2S5 257
213 211
128 145
215 157

-5.2
-1.9
-20.1
-55.2
-14.9

-21.6
-15.8
-42.4
-41.3
+11.1

1919

00 107

119 131

107 j -10.0

0.0

11
.

1020

166 101

137 1G0

109

-9.7

-43.7

+2.1

1920

OS 108

87

87

71

-1.6

-33.7

77

77

55

71

70

+13.9

-9.2

820
179
31

462
119
30

SSI
208
21

644
103
21

•9*°

96,995
58,668
"248,586

+4.7

-1.4

+3.S
-10.2
+fi.9
-8.1

675,377
433,855

+5.4
-0.4

-0.4
-0.0

-1.2

p

Crude:

002

1,360

64,459
6,762

65,154
6,903

2,966

3,265

23,528

18,257

-22.4

1920

43,623
32,625
170

44,635
21,367
.239

482,801
249,404

407,069
244,726

-15.7
-1.9

1913
1921
1913

BUBBEB

* m Ports
thous. of lbs.,
consumption b y tire mfrs.. .thous. of lbs.,
Wholesale price, Para, N . Y..dolls. per Jb_,
•Revised.




50,132
31,229
.164

-13.0
+4.2
+3.7

-2,3
+52.7
-2S.0

34
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued
NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p . 1
In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table o n page 23

June

July

Corresponding
month,
June
or J u l y ,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FEOM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

1923

iru

Per ct.
increase |
HO
orde*
cumulative
1924
from

RELATIVE NUMBERS
BASE
YEAS
OB
PERIOD

Percent
Increase (+)
>r decrease (-)

1924

1923

July
from
June

July,
1924,
froDi
My,

RUBBER—Continued
Pneumatic tires:
Production
*
Stocks, end of month...
Shipments, domestic

1fi»^_
1fi

thousandsthousands..
—thousands.,

m

Stocks, end of month
thousands..;
Shipments, domestic*
thousands., i
Solid tires: •
Production.
thousands..
Stocks, end of month
thousands..
Shipments, domestic..-,
thousands..
HIVES AND LEATHER

22,360

21,455

-4.0

19,671

20,235

+2.9

1921
1921
1921

- 3 . 0 +28.0
-16,5 —20.6
+30.8 +37.2

27,659

27,305

25,052

26,482

-L3
+5.7

1921
1921
1921

+10.4
-18.8
+37.8

+46.9
-10.3
+34.8

-31.9
-29.5

1921
1921
1921

-18.4
-6.2
-13.0

-26.2
-37.5
-11.1

-48.6
-27.9
-56.8
-44.2
-33.1

1909-13
1909-13
1909-13
1909-13
1909-13

+14.0
+53.4
+66.7
-15.0
-43.9

-46.7
-16.6
-46.4
-64.2
-48. S

-3.1
-5.1
+9.3
-1.1

-31.8
-30.5
-37.6
-34.7

2,630
6,156
2,663

2,552
5,138
3,484

1,993
6,471
2,539

3,493
8,166
3,858

3,857
6,634
5,318

2,625
7,396
3,942

176
46

31
165
40

42
264
45

438

28,603
4,353
15,759
3,715
3,403

53,515
5,212
29,384
10,382
6,643

245,155
197,071
32,453
15,631

359,636
283,682
52,021
23,934

1921
1921
1921
1921

.131
.180

.146
.149

1913
1913

73,787
20,793
53,579

1,647
32,129
126,718
20,231
72,894

Hides
Imports:
Total hides and skins
thous. of Ibs__| 24,997
2,838
Calfskins..„«
thous. of lbs..
0,451
Cattle hides
thous. of lbs.,
4,372
Goatskins
- ...thous.oflbs.,
Sheepskins
—.
thous. of lbs..
Stocks, end of month:
Total hides and skins
thous. oflbs.
253,107
Cattle hides
....thoua. oflbs.
207,609
Calf and kip skins
thous. of lbs.
Bheep and lamb skins..
thous. oflbs.
IS, 803
Prices:
Green salted, packer's heavy native
steers
dolls, per lb.
.125
Calfskins, country No. 1
dolls, per lb.
.171
LEATHER
Production;
SOIP leather-..thous. of bks., bends, sides..
1,064
Skivers
-.
^
doz.
26108
,08
Oak and union harness
stufied sides76,274
Finished sole and belting....thous. of lbs.
20,261
Finished upper
thous* of sq. ft.
53,866
Stocks, end of month:
Bole and belting..
__thous. oflbs.
151,399
Upper
.thous. of sq. ft.
381,085
Stocks, in process of tanning:
Sole and belting
..
thous. oflbs.,
87,204
Upper.
^...thous. of sq. ft*, 120,666
Exports:
Sole
thous. of lbs.,
1,551
Upper...
.*
thous* of sq* ft..
6,880
Prices;
Sole, oak, scoured backs,
heavy Boston
-dolls, perlb..
.425
Chrome calf* *'B'f grades.dolls. per sq. ft,.
.430

160,273

342

393,871
32,096
226,957
60,261

11,429
200,550
565,979

202t516
23,143
08,025
33,649

8,337
150,22
458,15

-25.1
-19.1

134

+4.8 -10.3
+5.3 +20.8

91

81

+8.0 -30.2
+2.0 -17.1

1919
1919
1919
1921
1921

173,124
391,058
112,101
160,555
1,598
6,466

.425
.430

.540
.440

504

320
540

461
877

3,392
6,303

2,605
4,458

22t444
512

21,271
457

25,256
627

213,204
4,497

178,172
3,705

6*25

6.25

6.50

10,660
45,674

12,665
49,850

+18.8
+9,1

—38-0

-0.7
-3.3

1921
1921

2,242
6,148

-41.8

-26.5

90

1913
1913

78

70

-13.2

+1.0
-L3

1921
1921

125i 049

-3.3
+2.6
-0.5

-21.4
-22.1

+44.6 +40.3
-10.6 -4.9

1913
1913

0.0
0.0

-21.3
-2,3

-23.2

1919
1919

+10.7
+7.1

-30.6
-38.4

-16.4
17.6

1919
1913

-5.3
-10.7

-15.8
-27.1

0.0

-3.8

Leather P r o d u c t s
Belting sales: ,
Quantity
.thous. of lbs__
Value
tbous. of dolls..
Boots a n d shoes:
,
Production
thous. of pairs. .
Exports..
. . , t h o u s . of p a i r s Wholesale p r i c e s M e n ' s black calf,
blucher
.'
dolls, per p a i r Men's dress welt, t a n
calf, St. L o u i s . . . . . . . d o l l s , per p a i r Women's black kid, Goodyear
welt, St. L o u i s . . . . . . d o l l s , per pair..|

1913

4.85

4.85

185

1913

3.85

3.85

4.25

1913

13,180
87,649

18,042
114,631

17,376

tonstons.tons,
tons.*
tons,.

120,723
122,229
139,426
116,547
1,890

125,768

tons. '

0.0

ao

142

-9.4

PAPER AND PRINTING
Wood-pulp Imports
Mechanical*
Chemical

^

short tons.
„.,„
short tons.
Newsprint Paper

Production
^
snort
Shipments...
_
short
Consumption.
„
..short
Imports
. —
...short
f ^ ^ ^ end of month: \ s _ h short
^ o ^r t
Stocks,
A t mills.
^..._
short
At p u b l i s h e r s . . . . .

*

156,412
622,760

120,793

-22.8
+3.9

113,052
117,916
120,582
112,173
997

886,404
881,998
120; 970 1,170,271
103,130
744,338
980
9,850

864,290
858,313
957,073
786,761
10,280

-2.5
-2.7

1919
1919
1919
1913
1913

33,428
161,931

28,427
178,324

21,237
173,984

499
117
11,725

477
94
9,877

387
97

81

1909-13
1009-13

+5.7

+4.4

+36.9 +3.8
+30.8 +39.0

112

-5.2
^0.3
+8.8
+L7

-15.0
1919
1919

-5.6
-3.5
-13.4
-3.8
-47.2

+33.9
+15

ai

short t o n s -

Printing
Book publication:
i
American m a n u f a c t u r e . . . . . . n o . of titles..
Imported
„
no. of titles—
files books, shipments
.thous. of books..
Printing activity
weighted index n u m b e r . .
• E e vised.




f,703

4,215
657
77,908

3,843
974
76,916

-8*8
+4S.2
-1.3

1913
1913
1919
1920

4.
-19.7
-15.S
0.0

35
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.

In many cases August figure* are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Perct
increase

NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1934, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SUEVEY (No. 36), Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p . 1

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

June

July

255,561
193,800
61f761

269,108
205,723
63,385

290,754
205,725
85,029

€7
66
70

64
64
63

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FBOM JANUABY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

or decrease

(-)

RELATIVE NUMBERS

Per cent
Increase (+)
decrease ( - )

BASK
YEAR
OB
PERIOD

192*

3,097,653
1,504,166
593,487

2,104,971
1,659,322
545,649

+0.3
+3.7
-8.1

July
from
June

+5.3
+6.2
+2,6

79
80
77

-7,4
0.0
25,5
19,0
20.0
18.2

+2,0
0.0

-8,3

+4.8

III

uly,
024,
'rom
uly.
923

-16
»3.0
-10.0

1923

cumulative
1924
from
1923

23.7
-29.6

PAPER AND PBINTING—Continued
Paperboard Shipping Boxed
Production:
Total
—
_thous, of sq. ft..
Corrugated
_._
tbous. of sq. ft,.
Solid
fiber
thous. of sq. ft..
Operating activity:
Total
..
per cent of normal..
Corrugated
-^
per cent of normal..
Solid
fiber....
per cent of normal..
Price index numbers:
Finished b o a r d Corrugated..index number..
Solid
fiber.*
index number..
Raw materials—
85 test liners-.--index number..
Chip.l
index numberStraw„
index number..

1922
1922
1922

1922
1922

100

1922
1G22
1922

ao

-5.4

in

•20.4

ao

Other Paper Products
Folding boxes, orders—-per cent of capacity..
Labels, orders
per cent of capacityRope paper sacks, shipments..index number..
Abrasive paper and cloth:
Domestic sales
reamsForeign sales
„
—.reams..

1921
1921
U922

64.7
81.8

76.6
63.1
60,069
12,815

63,553
7,777

79,016
11,765

30.4
14,193

16.7
14,083

560,113

31.9
13,556

75,326

-16,2
-6.1

45

+17,9

85

+12
-39.3

-19.6
-33.9

-0.8

-47.6
+3.9

-45.1
+8.7

n
o

+18.9

42.3
-68.7

-1.0

1919
1919

-9.3
-7.9

BUTTONS
Fresh-water pearl buttons:
Production...
-.-per ct, of capacity..
Stocks, end of month
thous. of gross.,

1922
1922

108

113

GLASS AND OPTICAL GOODS
Spectacle frames and mountings:
Sales (shipments)
_^_-indes number..
Unfilled orders (value)
index number..
BUILDING

90

1919
1919

CONSTRUCTION

Building Costs (Index N u m b e r s )
Building materials:
Frame house, 8-room, 1st of fol'g m o . .
Brick house, 6-room, 1st of fol'g m o . . .
Building costs (Engineering News R
i, 1st
of following month
———,
Concrete factory costs (Aberthaw), 1st of following month
**
»- ^_...__,
Plumbing fixtures^ articles
dollars.

1013
1913
1913

222

-as

-4.1

1914
1913

130

-3,3

-19
-9.2

Construction and Losses
Contracts awarded (27 States):
7,827
Business buildings
thous. of sq. ft.Industrial buildings
tnous. of sq. ft..
2,891
Residential buildings
thous. of sq, ft..1 28,346
gducatlonal buildings—.thous. of sq. ft..
4,183
Other public and semipublic
4,073
buildings «.
„
thous. of sq, ft..
48,064
Grand total
thous, of sq.ft..
n
Contracts awarded, value (27 States):
49,601
Business buildings
thous, of dolls,.
19,026
Industrial buildings*
thous. of dolls .
Residential buildings
thous. of dolls.. 130,679
29,006
Educational buildings
thous. of dolls._
Other public and semipublic
33,717
buildings •
..thous, of dolls—
Grand total
thous. of dolls., 331,147
-,sses:
20,350
United States and Canada.thous. of dolls.,
Great Britain
thous. of £ sterling..

7,436
2,416
20,891
4,846

7,094
3,861
23,698
4,131

57,601
40,680
208,998
27,883

67,073
24,591
232,793
31,272

-a 9
-39.6
+11.4
+12.2

1919
1919
1919
1919

-5.0
-16,4
-26.3
+15.7

+18
-37.4
-11.8
+17.3

4,711
41,179

3,179
42,021

23,412
358,800

27,397
376,627

+17.0
+5.0

1919
1919

+15.7
-14.3

+4S.2
-2.0

41,866
14,475
108,507
34,667

35,267
21,197
111, 133
27,512

280,602
228,669
924,841
168,920

315,758
164,112
1,101,742
200,937

+12,5
-2812
+19.1
+19.0

1919
1919
1919
1919

-15. G +18.7
-23.9 -31.7
-2.4
-20.6
+19.5 +26.0

154,439
23,240
274,225 2,110,448

192,816
2,312,705

+24.8
+9,6

1919
1919

-6,6
-12.5

249,543
6,31$

205,065
6,021

-17,8
-20.5

1919
1919

+17,8

Southern pine:
452,243 3,153,348 3,196,090
Production (competed)
M ft, b. m.. 426,171 439,967
440,257 3,319,768 3,162,157
shipments (computed)
M ft. b. m J 406,809 468,576
372,779 3,123,818 3,178,664
408,454 615,336
Orders (computed)
__M ft. b. m_
end of mo. (computed) -M ft, b. m_ ,153,376 1,124,717 1,065,674
82,660 ""5267367
89,707
67,173
" "~ •' timber)
_M ft. b. m..
and
46.67
38.51
39.61
—__dotts* per M ft, b. m._

+L4

1917
1917
1917
1917
1919

113 114 101 104
102 110 92 106
106 99 91 115
82 82 84 82
133 142 132 176

1913

189

171

1917
1917
1919
1922
1913

145 142 135
174 158 156
174 21: 144
361 182 241
190 190 179

31,493
23,969

27,491
711

461,632 3,433,600. 3,389,610
Production (computed)
M ft. b. m_. 472,902 371,634
466,904 3,716,767 3,566,263
448,514
*- (computed)
M ft. b. m__ 502,806
394,466
283,730
42,150
43,519
1161
M
36,213
IP
**• *>• * » 148,100
44,858
34,237
34,686
19.50
timber
M ft. b. m..
16.50
16,50
o. 1 common dolls, per M ft. b. m.J ending the year indicated.
ft tiS 1 ??™? av erage, July to June, inclusive,
«Jime 1Q23 ° 5 p i t i U s ' p u b l i c b u i l d i D g s ' s o c l f l 1 ' ]




-4.7
+1.8

-1.3
-40
+39.6

181

Survey of Current Business,

+35. $
+5.7

+3,..
+15.2
+26.2
-2,5
+33, i

-2.7
+6,4
+38.3
+5.6
+8.5

167

-2.

-17.3

106
139
173
238
178

-21.
-10.
+20,

-19.6
-3.9

0.

-23.2
-15.4

+3.2

36
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
^increase

N U M E R I C A L DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for thi
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of thf
SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations oi
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1

1924

June

July

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMtTLATIVE
TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH
LATEST

MONTH

1923

(+)
or de-

crease
(-)
cumulative
1924
from
1923

KELATIVE NUMBERS
BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

1923

Per cent
increase (+)
i decrease (-)
r

1924
July
from
June

July,
1924,
from
July,
1923

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION—Con.
Lu mber—Continued
California redwood:
46,2&
34,303
358,234
Production (computed)
M ft. b.
46,385
339,986
29,525
25,099
Shipments (computed)..
M ft. b. rn.
40,712
363,102
260,219
28,484
24,622
Orders received (computed)_.M ft. b. m
28,14!
359,754
253,788
California white pine:
133,741
136,497
140,679
619,423
Production
M ft. b. m.
618,585
64,04!
79,035
Shipments
M ft. b. m.
67,931
413,881
449,672
538,991
608,260
Stocks, end of month
M ft. b. m.
507,764
Western pine:
161,66?
146,082
Production (computed)
M ft. b. m.
179,098
992,338
985,935
124,38;
Shipments (computed)
M ft. b. m.
124,873
114,813
928,385
914,619
Stocks, end of mo. (computed) -M ft. b. m 1,057,52? 1,075,099
947,445
North Carolina pine:
Production (computed)
M ft. b. m
43,OSC
38,843
46,620
329,770
332,285
42,39$
Shipments (computed)
M ft. b, m
45,335
40,110
346,646
341,488
Northern pine:
LumberProduction
M ft. b. m.
58,66!
52,267
69,978
377,683
333,544
40,036
Shipments
M ft b. m.
45,758
40,658
329,771
307,086
LathProduction
M ft. b. .
14,62J
13,328
19,229
100,712
81,406
Shipments
M ft. b. m.
14,849
14,105
90,954
16,05C
91,670
Northern hemlock:
Production
M ft. b. m
27,377
25,177
30,344
191,974
148,443
Shipments
M ft. b. m
2325f
17,505
26,364
183,383
136,329
Northern hardwood:
Production
M ft. b. m.
35,181
27,392
33,608
304,655
299,476
Shipments
_
M ft. b. m.
25,328
22,475
33,364
254,439
198,973
Walnut lumber:
Production
M ft. b. m.
,3
3,736
2,785
17,726
22,803
r
Shipments
M ft. b. m
2,G4
2,409
1,889
17,498
20,671
Stocks, end of month
. . . M ft. b. m,
10, IK
12,885
8,450
Walnut logs:
Purchases
M ft. log measure
2,441
2,256
2,190
17,278
17,593
Made into lumber and
veneer
M ft. log measure.
2,57J
2,52:
2,501
14,898
17,685
Stocks, end of month __M ft. log measure.
3,694
2,910
2,934
All lumber:
Production, 10 species
M ft. b. m. [2,384,297 [2,237,722 2,523,128 17,330,469 17,055,858
Exports, planks, joists, etc
M ft. b. m,
138,792
156,81
158,937 1,017,829 1,133,421
Retail yards, MinneapolisSales
M ft. b. m,
16,277
16,823
17,924
96,666
77,884
Stocks, end of month
M ft. b. m.
119,488
114,523
134,748
Composite lumber prices: *
Hardwoods...
dolls, per M ft. b. m
42.20
42.04
45.75
Softwoods
dolls, per M ft. b. m.
29.45
29.12
32.25
Wooden Furniture
Shipments
dolls., average per firm..
Unfilled orders
dolls., average per firm..
Fiano Benches a n d Stools
New orders..
dollars.
Unfilled orders
_
dollars.,
Shipments:
Value
dollarsQuantity
pieces.
Flooring
Oak flooring:
Production
M ft. b . m .
Shipments
M ft. b. m .
Orders booked
M ft. b . m .
Stocks, end of month.
M ft. b . m_,
Unfilled orders, end of m o n t h . M ft. b . m..
Maple flooring:
Production
_ . . . M ft. b. in.Shipments
. . . _ M ft. b. m_.
Orders booked
M ft. b. m._
Stocks, end of m o n t h . . M ft. b . m._
Unfilled orders, end of m o n t h . M ft. b. m_.
Brick
Clay fire brick (computed):
Production
_
thousands..
Shipments
_
thousands..
Stocks, end of month
thousands.New orders
thousands..
„ , Unfilled orders, end of month.thousands..
Silica brick (computed):
Production
.„
thousands
Shipments
thousands..
Stocks, end of month
thousands
Face brick (32 identical plants):
Production
thousands

Stocky at yards*

I/.IthSat:

Unfilled orders, end of month.thousands
Shipments
thousands"
• June, 1923.
f Prices are averages of^quotations re;




26,820
31,741

'35,328
•54,496

223,023

194,705

-5.1
-28.3
-29.5

1918
1918
1918

-25.9
-15.0
-13.6

-26.0
-38.3
-12.5

+8.6

-0.1

1918
1918
1918

+2.1
+23.4
+12.9

-3.0
+16.3
+19.8

-0.6
-1.5

1917
1917
1920

+0.4
+1.7

-18.4
+8.8
+13.5

+0.8

1919
1919

-9.8

-1.5

+6.9

-16.7
+13.0

-11.7
-6.9

1920
1920

147
81

-10.9
+14.3

-25.3
+12.5

-19.2
+0.8

1920
1920

147
181

-8.9
-7.5

-30.7
+5.3

-22.7
-25.7

1913
1913

61
57

-8.0
-24.7

-17.0
-33.6

-1.7
-21.8

1913
1913

133
97

-22.1
-11.3

-18.5
-32.6

+28.6
+18.1

1922
1922
1922

202
126
92

+10.7
-9.0
+26.7

+311
+27.5
+52.5

229

-7.7

+3.0

217

-2.1
-21.2

+0.8

120

-6.1
+13.0

-11.3
-1.3

97

+1.8

1922

+18.7

1922
1922

-1.6
+11.4

1913
1909-13

-19.4

1920
1920

+3.4
-4.1

-6.1
-15.0

1921
1920

-0.4
-1.1

-8.1
-9.7

35

-15.0
-13.8

-26.6
-78.6

35

-25.6
-21.9

-41.0
-31.6

-12.7

1920
1920

150

115

43

-0.8

47

65,152
22,360

55,360
19,264

75,376
90,176

745,184

549, 732

-26.2

1919
1919

68,624
10,497

51,040
8,194

86,443
11,975

716,094
110,957

562,370
83,842

-21.5
-24.4

1919
1922

32,935
33,713
30,824
50,189
36,093

34,057
36,814
43,080
48,842
41,852

30,489
22,501
17,924
40,708
32,000

214,303
184,216

230,516
233,222
227,204

+7.6
+17.3
+23.3

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

514
467
247
375
531

7,492
7,425
6,436
25,406
9,596

7,604
7,546
7,331
25,557
9,074

10,590
10,515
5,671
18,829
21,715

71,585
89,680
89,051

63,392
55,661
54,127

-11.4
-37.9

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

105
93
35
122
74

50,734
45,015
227,233
37,101
62,920

45,199
44,510
227,954
44,990
80,334

60,074
57,575
166,526
47,623
84,271

443,222
430,988

399,193
371,080

-9.9
-13.9

445,053

374,732

-15.8

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

100
89
164
72
GS

9,612
10,475
43,349

11,555
12,720
42,184

14,497
14,578
41,437

106,035
109,474

105,930
104,253

-0.1
-4.8

1919
1919
1919

68
75
104

+20.2

25,947
50,895
43,653
25,213

25,605
51,503
31,334
20,527

25,494
67,787
51,826
23,767

158,871

163,595

+3.0

154,843

-2,8

166
207
159
181

-1.3
+1.2

159,305

1919
1919
1919
•1920

77

+3.4 +11.7
+9.2 +63.6
+39.8 !+140.3
- 2 . 7 +20.0
+16.0 +30.8

566
635
505
552
568

+1.5
5
+6
+1.6 - 2 8 . 2
+13.9 +29.3
+139
+0.6 +35.7
- 5 . 4 -58.2

-10.9 - 2 4 . 8
- 1 . 1 -22.7
+0.3 +36.9
+21.3
+27.7

2

i1

-3s. 9

-18.6

I month indicated.
...
jk in kilns as reported prior to September, 1923; current data therefore are no
, are strictly comparable, having been computed on a chain-relative basis.

+0.4
-24.0
-39.5
-13.6

37
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued
NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE.—Data on tne following items for the

period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the

RELATIVE NUMBERS
[
percent
—
_.,
_... I] increase (+)
or fJccruiso C—)

(+)

SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations of

several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1
In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
increase

1024

June

July

Corresponding
month,
June
or July*
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL'
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

1923

1924

or decrease
(-)
cumu*
lative
1924
from
1923

BASE
YEAR
OR

July,
1021,
from
July,
11/23

July
from
Juno

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION— Con.
Brick—Continued
Paving brick:
ProductionActual :
_
thousands.. 24,998
68
Kelation to capacity
per cent._
Shipments
thousands.. 27,786
Stock, end of month
thousands.. 111,637
Orders received
..thousands.. 23,240
1,304
Cancellations
thousands..
Unfilled orders, end of month .thousands- 99,314
Prices, common brick:
Wholesale, red, New York-dolls, per thous. 20,000
Portland Cement
Production
13,638
thous. of bbls_
Shipments
15,036
thous. of bbls.
Stocks, end of month- ...thous. of bbls.
14,903
Price, Portland:
Chicago district
1.75
dolls. perbbL,
Lehigh Valley
1.75
dolls, perbbl.
Concrete paving contracts:
Total:.....!
8,948
-thous. of sq. yds.,
Roads
4,939
.thous. of sq. yds..
Roofing
Preparing roofing:
Shipments
thous. of roof squares..
Roofing felt:
Production, dry felt
tons—
, Stocks, end of monthTotal
tons..
Dry felt-.
tonsReceipts—
Rags
tonsPaper
tons..
Miscellaneous
tons..
Sanitary Ware
Baths, enamel:
Orders shipped
„
number..
Stocks, end of month
number..
Orders received
-.number...
Lavatories, enamel:
Orders shipped
number..
Stocks, end of month
_ number-.
Orders received-..
number..
bints, enamel:
Orders shipped
number..
Stocks, end of month
number..
Orders received....
*
.
number..
Miscellaneous, enamel:
Orders shipped
number..
Stocks, end of month
number..
Orders received..
number..
Unfilled orders, end of month:
Baths „
., .number
Small ware
_„number..

2,331
17,593

31,452
81
31,300
110,286
28,747
2,855
92,237

30,529
81
27,092
78,835
23,688
5,340
100,444

16.00

21.00

14,029
16,614
12,319

12,620
13,712
8,081

1.75
1.75

1.75
1.90

10,025
6,214

6,407
3,242

. 45,795
29,764

58,253
38,516

+27.2
+29.4

2,596

2,279

17,209

17,628

+2.4

1919

17,597

15,276

116,506

+4.4

Jan.,'23
Jan.,'23
Jan.,'23

-6.9
75 -15.3
74 '\ -3S.8

—44,3

13,001
2,878

16,237
2,813
18,476
4,417

15,501
6,042
1,507

1913

75,342
76,274

80,816
79,110

+7.3

309

320

305

305

305

244

+

+21.4
-if,. 5

-a 2

-20.0

-3.S

+3.6 + 11.2
+10.5 +21.2
-17.3 +62.4

111, 612

108,540
42,144
8,609

115,327
39,480
9,655

+6.3
-6.3
+12.1

1913
1913
1913

101
180
82

1913
1913

4-3.7

14,447
3,923

19,840
5,216
1,371

+3.0
(10

+25. S
+10.1
+12. 6
-1.2
+ 23.
+ 118.9
-7.1

173
214

0.0
0.0

1919
1919

172
150-

+12.0
+25.'8

+»

+11. 4

+13.9

0.0

+ 15.2

+213
-2.3

+12.4
-2S.3

0.0
0.0

+60.5

+ 19.2
-26.0

120

Jan.,»23
Jan.,*23
Jan.,'23

i

620,741

697,018

723450

840,941

1919
1919
1919

+18.8

1919
1919
1919

-5.0
-0.8
+17.0 ;-2-R8
-5.5 | -5.4

1919
1919
1919

202 | - l . S j +5.S
124 | +19.7 +2W.2
102 !i +7.7 +11. B

1919
1919
1919

138 i - 2 , 3 i +27.7
132 j - 0 . 7 i+121.1
-8.9
10S -14.3

730,336

708,128

+12.3

!
i
i +15.0 j +20.1
I +4.2 +150.3
i +27.7 +37.5

84,665
65,093
72,978

97,376
67,848
93,163

81,082
27,107
67,770

97,963
140,810
78.185

93,008
164,702
73,890

99,903
47,763
80,649

908,570

112,062
129,862
83,507

110,070
155,483
£9,930

104,053
48,715
80,430

769,145

911,952

+18.6

939,640

850,716

-9.5

69.186
106,031
52,917

67,622
105,321
45,332

52,946
47,642
49,745

385,822

532,539

+38.0

"470,178'

*482*284"

~+2.T

181,907
458,182

169,394
395,697

245,568
931,910

9,396
Acetate of lime:
8,840
Production
thous. oflbs— 32,291
Shipments or use
thous. of lbs..
Stocks, end of month
—thous. of lbs._ 492,902
Methanol:
Production
.
.
gallons.. 449,232
Shipments or use
.
gallons.. 368,760
Stocks, end of month
gallons.. 53,594
wood at chemical plants:
821,242
Consumption (carbonized)
cords..
5,405
btocks, end of month
cords..
37,440
Imports:
fotash
long tons..
957
._ Nitrate of soda
long tons..
440
Exports:
70,846
Sulphuric acid
tbous. of lbs..
Dyes and dyestufls ».>._.thous. of dolls..
., . Total fertilizer
long tons..
Price index numbers:
Crude drugs
index numberEssential oils
index numberDrugs and Pharmaceuticals
index number..
nz—: i c a l s
m
19
p^j^ 8emonths' average, May to December, inclusive.
weighted..index number..
•f rice, sulphuric acid 66° N. Y..index number..

7,479
6,314
22,657

13,180
13,145
9,767

-15.T

415 j - 6 , 9
306
-13.6

<»1920
1U920

-31.0
-57.5

CHEMICALS




100,291
106,334

652,955 5,317,238
396,902
514,279 4,617,956
417,422
,779,147 2,069,895

-184
-41. S

1922
1922
1922

110 ! 90
59
65
95 | 90

72
40
63

4,348,692. -18.2
4,047,052 -12.4

1922
1922
1022

110
100
95

S7

70- -19.5
-7.1
66
65 -24,9

81,764
61,856

71
86

-20.4
-28.6
-29.8

43.3
-52.0
+132.0
-39.2
-18.8
-33.4

-18.6
-33.1

-44.3
-31.0

49

+89.9
+34.6

-46.8
-13.4

156 104
,522 2097
69
95

-33.0
+38.0
+39.0

-19.6
-27.4
-17.5

43,617
549,516

78,244
796,413

604,553

470,742

-22.1

1922
1922

106
92

83
87

68

10,266
50,400

19,303
53,196

134,857
605,806

109,431
659,397

-18.9
+8.8

1903-13
1903-13

45
170

20
87

641
607
98,503

797
836
119,423

4,556
3,960
670,376

6,529
3,411
634,683

+43.3
-13.9
-5.3

1903-13
1903-13
1903-13

130 167 307
2S89 1337 1292
116
91 122

58

Aug.'H
Aug.'H

219
141

230
137

219
136

207
133

-5.5
-2.3

-5.5
-5.7

Aug.'H
1913
1913

143
169 j
75 I

156
153
70

153
154

151
159
70

-1.3

+5.6

+3.2
0.0

-5.9
-6.7

38
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued

In many cases August figures are now
available
and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct
increas

NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following Items for thi
period January, 1922, t o June, 1024, may b<
found in t h e August quarterly Issue of thi
SURVEY ( N O . 36). Detailed tabulations o
several new items appear a t the end of thi:
Issue. See Contents, p . 1

1921

June

July

barrels.
..barrels

39,621
32,491

45,440
34,200

barrels
barrels.

110,081
241,101

thous. of lbs:
thous. of lbs,

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

(+>
or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1924
from
1923

RELATIVE NUMBERS
BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

1923

Percent
„ increase (+)
or decrease ( - )

1924
July
from
June

July,
1024,
from
July,
1923

1923

1921

40,58C
21,28:

151,662

156,996

+3.5

1919
1919

+14.7
+5.2

+12.0
+60.7

129,907
270,218

127,095
219,135

677,74C

553,035

-4.3

1919
1919

+18.0
+12.1

+2.2
+23.3

1,94;
58,31'

2,365
34,856

2,536
48,34f

34,795
437,42<

23,875
509,428

-31.4
+16.5

1913
1913

163

thous. of lbs.
thous. of lbs

15,32:
14,01;

15,095

"14,244
•U,6ir

109,886
122,44:

123,595
137,483

+12.5
+12.3

1913
1913

127

Cottonseed stocks, end of month
tons.
Cottonseed oil:
Stocks, end of month
thous. of lbs
Production..
...thous. of lbs
Price, New York
dolls, per lb

29,285

21,534

12,031

23,33)
17,92;
.10-

4,558
6,637
.121

5,103
8,659
.102

387,086

392,621

267
119

353
110

2,751
1,199

57
109

52
116

450
1,126

NAVAL STORES
Turpentine (3 principal ports):
Net receipts
Stocks, end of month
Rosin (3 principal ports):
Net receipts
Stocks, end of month
FATS AND OILS
Total vegetable oils:
Exports
Imports
Oleomargarine:
Production
Consumption

+21.8 - 6 . 7
-40.2 -27.9
+7.7

+30.0

1919

-26.5

+79.0

+1.4

1919
1919
1913

-80.5
-63.0
+16.3

-10.6
»23.4
+18.6

1,938
895

-29.6
-25.4

1913
1913

-9.8
+28.0

-25.4
+8.2

819
1,092

+82.0
-3.0

1913
1913

-25.0
-18,0

+9.6
-6.0

-88.9
-13.5

-94,3
-73.8

Cottonseed

Flaxseed
Receipts:
Minneapolis;
Duluth
Shipments:
Minneapolis
Duluth
Stocks, end of month:
Minneapolis
Duluth
Linseed oil:
Shipments from
Minneapolis
Linseed-oil cake:
Shipments from
Minneapolis

thous. of bushs.
thous. ofbushs,
thous. of bushs,
thous. of bushs

133

thous. ofbushs.
thous. of bushs.

%
lft

thous. of lbs.

6,481

6,286

6,129

thous. of lbs.

10,241

10,466

12,905

53
343

31

35

1913
1913

58,601
97,520

30

28

11

11

65,092

+11.1

1913

49

40

59

41

43

41

-3.1

+2.6

92,965

-4.7

1913

42

43

29

23

34

35

+2.2

-18.9

65,292

-23.8

1913

-23.8

-39.0

1913
1913
1919
1919

76
191
49
84

1914
1919
1919

110
111
68

+8.3
+12.3
+8.8

-2.9
+3.3
-9.8
+37.4
+23.9

FOODSTUFFS
Wheat
Exports, including
flour
thous. ofbushs.
Visible supply:
United States
thous. of bushs.
Canada
thous. ofbushs.
Receipts, principal markets.-thous. ofbushs^
Shipments, prin. markets*.... thous. ofbushs.
Wheat flour:
Production
thous. of bbls..
Consumption
thous. of bbls..
Stocks, all positions
thous. of bblsPrices:
No. 1, northern, Chicago..dolls, per bush.,
No. 2, red winter, Chicago.dolls. per b u s h .
Flour, standard patents,
Minneapolis
dolls, per b b l .
Flour, winter straights,
Kansas City
dolls, per b b l .

10,257

7,817

12,822

36,496
44,932
16,410
13,714

43,793
31,306
35,074
16,302

32,648
13,84^
33,804
17,586

9,332
7,759
6,800

10,105
8,717
7,400

10,408
8,442
8,200

L120
1.122

1.397
1.253

1.017
1.011

1913
1913

129
108

+24.7
+11.7

6.856

7.490

6.025

1913

145

+9.2

+24.3

+4.5

+20.2

5.581

5.831

654
5,987
18,225
11,205
5,835

1,329
2,346
18,184
11,661
4,080

.839

1.055

14,003
5,264
177

10,510
3,086
233

16,130
5,710
857

.501

.563

3,972
513

1,498
1,054

2,018
816

.776

.829
4,954
1,332
.861

1,458
3,352
647

66,834
59,157

70,687
61,735

+5.5
+4.4

.653

1,674
3,732

-23.9
-23.6

.422

Receipts, principal
Fets
thous. of bushs..
f-.-y
thous. of bushs..
fair to good, malting,
a
*°
--dolls, per bush..

130,650
92,515

.857

Oats:
Receipts, principal
markets
thous. of bushs__
Visible supply
thous. of bushs..
Exports, including meaL.thous. of bushsPrices, contract grades, .dolls, per bush..

171,646
121,117

4.850

1,017
9,247
17,415
14,505
5,621

85,735

61

+20.0 , +34.1
, -30.3 1+126.1
+113.7 +3.8
-7.3
+18.9

142

1913

Corn
Exports, including meal
thous. of b u s h s .
Visible supply
thous. of bushs.
Receipts, principal markets—thous. of bushs..
Shipments, prin. markets
thous. of bushs..
Orindings (starch, glucose).-thous. ofbushs..
Prices, contract grades,
No. 2, Chicago
dolls, per bush..

16,350

-57.5

117,390
44,665

+12.0
+8.3
+19.0

1913
1913
1919
1919
1913

-35.7 , -50.8
-35.3 1+155.2
+0.2
+4.7
-3.9
-22.8
+ 3 . 8 +43.0

1913

38,438
155,132
108,368
37,525

+25.7

+23.1

1913
1913
1913

-24.9
-41.4
+31.6

-34.8
-46.0
-72.8

+12.4

+33.4

Other grains

ttye:

€

Receipts, principal
-afkets
...

.729

• June, 1923.




117,816

103,776

-11.9

6,079

2,179

-64.2

133

1913
18,221
5,115

19,672
4,602

+8.0

-10.0

1913
26,014
24,914

15,498
10,798

-40.4
-56.7

1913
1913
1913

- 6 2 . 3 -25.8
[+105.5 +29.2
+6.8 +27.0
r

1913
1913
104

122

124
129
2408
115

133

+239.8
-60.3
+18.1 +33.1

39
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS-Coniinued

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
Increase

NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SUEVEY (No. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
Issue, See Contents, p, 1

1924

June

July

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

orde*

1923

1924

cumulative
1924
from
1923

160,331
1,191,624

99,221
1,255,872

-38.1
+5.4

RELATIVE NUMBERS
BASE
YEAB
OR
PERIOD

1933

I Per cent
j increase (+)
or decrease (-)

1921
July
from
June

July,
Ittt4,
from
July,
1023

FOODSTUFFS—Continued
Total Grains
Total grain exports, incl. flour.thous. of bushs..
Car loadings of grain and grain products-cars..

15,696
188,260

11,090
174,337

19,176
170,919

7,030
10,800
2,400

6,660
13,200
3,000

4,810
8,000
2,000

1913
1919

Kl : - 2 a 3 -42.2
i
103 -7.4
+ 2.0

1913
1913
1913

257 ! - f i . 3
378
+22.2
412 ) + 2 5 . 0
il

Argentine Grain
Visible supply, end of month:
Wheat
_thous. of bushs__
Com
thous. of bushs..
Flaxseed
thous. of bushs...
Bice
Total movement to mills
sacks or bbls..
Paddy at California warehouses:
Shipments
sacks..
Stocks, end of month
sacks._
Southern paddy, receipts at mills
bbls.Shipments:
Total from mills
pockets (100 lbs.)..
New Orleans
.-..pockets (100 lbs.)..
Stocks, end of month:
Mills and dealers
pockets (100 lbs.) ~
Imports
pockets (100 lbs.)—
Exports
pockets (100 lbs.) ~

86,494

+ 38. A
+ fifl.O

+:o. o

'774,087

77,028
293,890
9,466

5,633

135,094
34,646

135,259
43,056

345,583 4,203,506
163,448 1,675,190

302,640
60,364
36,908

165,241
16,814
23,234

744,481
393,092
15,427
388,867 2,490,814

866
20,470
981
7,811
76,090

2,312
22,938
2,057
4,100
61,671

3,154
15,853
1,396
4,654
67,066

1,673
631
201
1,030

1,798
641
169
1,141

1,903
747
223
1,104

382,667
379,054
11,909

435,299
431,223
14,029

405,013
403,123
14,229

59,343

49,615

45,893

'589,403
«S04,607
103,938

2,695,112 2,134,453

-20.8

1019

-40.4

3,897,167
853,906

-7.3
-49.0

1919
1919

+0.1
21.3

-7.1 7

271,093
914,363

-31.0
-63.3

1919
1919
1919

-45.4
-GG.6
-37.0

-77.8
+ 9.0
U

27,640
225,000
10,648
65,653
505,727

30,870
140,256
14,461
69,087
558,425

+11.7
-37.7
+35.8
+5.2
+10.4

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

107.0
12.1
H09.7
-ib.9

-26.7
+44.7
+47.3
-11.9
-SO

11,914
4,549
1,681
7,266

11,919
4,446
1,471
7,481

0.0
-2.3
-12.5

1919
1919
1919
1919

+7.6
+1.6
-15.9
+10.8

-5.5
-14.2
-24.2
+3.4

2,852,172 2,869,491
2,831,016 2,845,354
88,164
94,062

+0.6
+0.5

1913
1919
1913

+13.8
-13.8
+17.8

+7.0
-1.4

1919

-16.4

+8.1

1913
1913
1913

-0.3
-1.8
-2.9

+4.4
-S. 1

1919
1919
1919
1919

-4.8
+4.2
-20.7
-8.7

-2.2
-1,3
-32.4
0.0

+10
J3

-a 7

+4.2
+10.5
+4.6

1919

-6.1

-4,9

1919
1919

+5.9
+6.4

+8.2
+4.9

-M.0

Other Crops
Carlot shipments:
Apples
Potatoes
Onions
"Citrus fruits
Hay, receipts..

_

carloadscarloadscarloads—
carloads.tons..

-47.6

50

Cattle a n d Calves
Cattle movement, primary markets:
'Receipts
thousandsShipments, total
thousands—
Shipments, stocker and feeder.thousands..
Local slaughter
thousandsBeef products:
Inspected slaughter produc.-thous. of lbs.Apparent consumption
thous. of lbs.-.
Exports
thous. of lbs..
Cold-storage holdings
(end of month)
thous. of lbs..
Prices, Chicago:
Cattle, corn-fed
dolls, per 100 lbs-.
Beef, fresh native steers
dolls, per lb—
Beef, steer rounds, No. 2
dolls, per lb._

9.595
.168
.175

9.663
.165
.170

4,181
1,496
34
2,652

-6.3

10.590
.158
.185

4,091

+3.0

+7.:,

Hogs and Pork
Hog movement, primary markets:
4,296
Receipts, primary market
thousands1,417
Shipments, primary markets, .thousands—
29
Shipments stocker and feeder-thousands..
2,852
Local slaughter
thousands..
to
^ork products, total:
Inspected slaughter produc. .thous. of lbs— 737,102
Apparent consumption
thous, of lbs.. 622,880
Exports
thous. of lbs.. 109,369
^old-storage holdings
emi
T Ai
of month)
thous.of lbs._ 1,022,670
Lard (included in pork products):
Production
thous. of l b s . . 166,836
59,475
j^Pprts
thous. of lbs..
^old-storage holdings
p r f (end of month)..
thous.of lbs.. 152,685
Hogs, heavy, Chicago...dolls, per 100 lbs..
Hams, smoked, Chicago—dolls, per l b Lard, prime contract, N. Y__dolls, per lb._

S

31,956
11,001
439
20,912

33,553
12,239
304
21,220

2,605
702,630 5,428,634 6,467,086
731,931
580,811 3,867,248 4,135,473
641,679
141,665 1,148,015 1,100,685
148,208
960,501 1,009,738
1,107,238
615,530

+5.0
+11.3
-30.8

+1.6
+0.7

-4.5
-0.5

1913
1919
1913

151 154
]53 162
140 133

176,707
86,706

163,300
69,478

150,243

143,579

1919

+45.8

+4.6

7.245
.196
.111

8.188
.204
.126

7.210
.217
.113

1913
1913
1913

+13.0
+4.1
+13.5

+13. G
-6.0
+11.5

1,550
650
153
903

1,672
712
226
950

1,661
710
188
936

10,786
4,863
1,057
5,901

10,390
4,724
940
5,666

-3.7
-2.9
-11.1
-4.0

1919
1919
1919
1919

35,097
34,504

37,539
37,908

35,138
35,592

260,584
264,092

256,973
257,479

-1.4
-2.5

1913
1919

2,919

2,254

2,752

4.825
14.725

4.844
13.750

5.050
13.975

1,183,695
618,785

Sheep a n d L a m b s
Sheei movement, primary markets:
ep
receipts, primary markets. thousands..
bmpments, primary markets..thousands..
Shipments, stocker and feeder.thousands..
Lft^v, C a l s l a U 8 n t e r
thousands..
i.ainb and mutton:
inspected slaughter produe.thous. of lbs..
^PParent consumption
thous. of lbs..
^old^storage holdings
mon h
tb£
Prices- S P I o?fwes » tChicago.-dolls, >us-100lbs..
>
RS
per of lbs.
Sheep, lambs, Chicago..dolls, per 100 lbs..
*June, 1923




+7.9
+9.5
+47.7
+5.2

+0.7
+0.3
+20.2
+1.5

94

+7.0
+9.9

+6.8
+6.5

1919

27

-22.8

-18.1

1913
1913

141
182

+0.4

-4.1
-11.3

61

-6.6

40
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
increase

N U M E R I C A L DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June. 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1

RELATIVE NUMBERS

(+)

Corresponding
month,

1924

June

July

June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

1923

1921

143, 604

153,209

or decrease

(-)

cumulative
1924
from
1923

BASE
TEAR
OR
PERIOD

1923

Per cent
increase (+)
or decrease {-)

1924
July
from
June

July,
1924,
from
July,
1923

FOODSTUFFS—Continued
Poultry
tbous.of lbs..;

17,824

19,780

16,696

thous. of lbs. J

34,832

33,542

Total catch, prin. fishing ports..-thous. of l b s . .
Cold-storage holdings, 15th of mo.thous. of lbs..
Canned salmon, shipments
cases..

17,792
26,986
337,809

22,592
56,042

20,991
27,237
• 445,127

103,484

114,323

2,684

c 17,906
2,562

92,189
16,623

280,644
13,601

194,350
10,569

+6.7

41,250

Receipts at five markets
Cold-storage holdings
(end of month)

1919

+11.0

+18.5

1919

-3.7

-18.7

+10.5

1919
1919

+27.0
+107.7

+7.6
+5.8

94,875
17,363

+2.9
+4.5

1919
1913
1919

+1.8

+4.8

121,451

+22.6

-1.9
+18.7

+44.4
+28.7

1919

+3.1

+25.5

1916-20
1919

+79.3
-1.2

+31.1
-0.3

Fish

Dairy Products
Fluid milk:
Receipts17,31'
Boston (includ. cream) ..thous. of qts__
2,637
Greater New York
thous. of cans.
Production, Minneapolis
thous. of lbs,
Condensed and evaporated milk:
Stocks
thous. of lbs_. 286,107
11,461
Exports (case goods)
thous. of l b s . .
Butter:
Receipts, 5 markets
thous. of l b s . . 92,155
Cold-storage holdings, creamery
(end of month)
thous. of l b s . . 74,416
.401
Wholesale price, 5 markets-dols. per lb__
Cheese:
Receipts, 5 markets
thous. of lbs
21,639
Cold-storage holdings, American
(end of month)
thous. of l b s . . 45,51
Wholesale price, 5 markets...dolls, per lb__
.195
Eggs:
Receipts, 5 markets
. . . . t h o u s . of lbs_.
1,823
Cold-storage holdings (case).thous. of l b s . .
Sugar
Raw:
Imports
long tons..
Meltings, 8 ports.!
long tons..
Stocks at refineries
(end of month)
long tons..
Refined, exports
long tons..
Cane, domestic:
Receipts at New Orleans
long tons..
Prices:
Wholesale, 96° centrifugal,
N. Y
dolls, per lb__
Wholesale, refined, N . Y....dolls. per lb..J
Retail, average 51 cities....index number.
Cuban movement:
Receipts at Cuban ports
long tons..
Exports
_
long tons..;
Stocks, end of month
long tons..

94,977

75,692

133,402
.396

101,774
.397

25,544

25,312

65,716
.195

55,839
.234

1,445
9,264

1,338
10,509

419,330

127,160

436,458

126,085

-0.8

176

1920
1919

1919

+18.0

156

1916-20
1919
12,533

11,273

-10.1

1919
1916-20

+9.3
+8.3

1913
1919

377,399
503,482

214,462 '2,348,848 2,566,264
259,654 2,721,017 2,946,995

367,971
22,32?

321,238
22,054

228,840
3,181

183,641

124,873

-32.0

672

1,076

39,353

25,707

-34.7

.051
.065

.051
.066

.009
.085

141,668
291,008
788,141

168,812
366,293
570,802

90,088
154,726
523,687

...thous. of lbs.

110,101

136,627

69,541

thous. of bags.
thous. of bagsthous. of bags.

5,020
760
1,110

4,351
873
540

5,524
1,031

4,795

7,252

thous. of bags.
thous. of bags.

1,039
634

997
406

773
339

6,416
3,338

7,150
3,685

+51.2
+11.4
+10.4

thous. of lbs.,

6,344

7,929

9,609

44,369

43,456

-2.1

1909-13

81 117

563
6,455

595
6,583

5S9
5,840

3,930
36,958

3,731
41,134

-5.1
+11.3

1913
1913

33,565

34,407

33,637

246,052

244,177

-0.8

+15.4 +76.0
+7.3 +93.0

93

33:

+44.4
+0.5
-20.7 +8.0
+6.5 -11.8

72

326,913
468,314

122
SO

1919
307
1909-13 1072

+0.9
+17.7
-16.2

-12.7 , +40.4
- 1 . 2 1+593.3

354
1018

240
108

+103.0

-37.5

0.0

1913

+26.1

1913
1913
1913
3,205,101 3,461,423
2,719,627 2,896,474

+1.5 +22.4
+1.3 +19.9

+8.0
+6.5

1919
1919
1919

+26.1 +08.3
+25.9 +57.8
-27.6 +9.0

+11.3

1909-13

Coffee
Imports
Visible supply:
World—
United States
Receipts total, Brazil
Clearances:
Total, Brazil, for world
Total, Brazil, for U. S

768,629

855,447

798

146

+87.4

42
41
116

1913
1913
1913

+24.1
-13.3
+14.9
-51.4

-21.2
+9.4
-47.6

-4.0
-36.0

+29.0
lift 8

105]
161

1913
1913

Tea
Imports

72

51

77

96

+25.0

TOBACCO
Consumption (tax-paid withdrawals):
Large cigars
millions..
Small cigarettes-millions..
Manufactured tobacco
and snuff
thous. oflbs»
Exports:
Unmanufactured leaf.
thous. of lbs..
Cigarettes
millions
Sales of loose-leaf warehouses
thous. of lbs
Price, wholesale, Burley good leaf,
dark red, Louisville
dolls, per 100 lbs..

55,854
1,216
1,698

33,813
745
591

46,866
1,308
247

25.38

24.50

28.00

2,023
1,159
533

2,097
1,196
538

2,338
1,556
401

268,197
7,127
120,860

356,265
6,568
161,000

+32.8
-7.8
+33.2

+5.7 +1.0
+0.4 +12.7

88

450

+2.5

1913
91
1909-13
1913
1919

212

-39.5
-38.7
-65.2 1+139.3

149
677

1913

+2.3
-27.9
. -43.0

212

192

-3.5

-12.5

TRANSPORTATION
River and Canal Cargo Traffic
Panama Canal:
T ^

thous. of long tons.
^ l s - . t h o u s . of long tons..
vessels
thous. of long tons..
'June, 1923.




13,980
8,741
3,002

15,576
9,112
3,826

+11.4
+4.2
+27.4

1915
1915
1915

+3.7 -10.3
-23.1
+3.2 +34.2
+0.9

41
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS- Continued
NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations of

several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1
In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
increase
CUMULATIVE TOTAL or deIUSE
Correcrease
FROM JANUARY 1
YCAIl
sponding
<-)
TIIROUGII LATEST
OR
month,
cumu- PERIOD
MONTII
June
lative
or July,
1924
1923
from
1923
1924
1923

N U M E R I C A L DATA

period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
1934

June

July

RELATIVE NUMIIKKS

IVr ceni
fmxeruw (i-)
or decrcmio (—)

July
Crom
June

TBAXSPORTATION-Continued
Elver and Canal Cargo Traffic—Con.
SaultSte. Marie Canal..thous. of short tons.
11,077
Cape Cod Canal
tonsSuez Canal
thous. of metric tons. " T 743
Ohio River, Pittsburgh, Pa., to
Wheeling, W. Va..._.
.....short tons.. 601,075

14,389

38,784

33,699

-13.1

1913

13S

144

10

"c~l,*668

"ii,*286"

127414

+i6*o

"im"

143

11
7

193

-7.4

1922

210

215

138 203

+3.0
+ 10.9
-2.3
+2.8
+10.1
-2.3

1913
11*13

134

115
1U7
85

1913
1V13
1913'

137
212
107

155 i 118
201>
134 j 88

1920
1020

11,139

21

439,861

641,431

6,311
2,625
3,687

6,637
2,820
3,817

6,843
2,460
4,378

36,959
14,995
21,967

38,086
16,020
21,462

6,060
2,489
3,572

6,629
2,724
3,905

6,960
2,612
4,348

37,209
15,127
22,0S0

38,235
16, CGI
21,576

3,265,746 3,023,830

112

147

-22.fi

-12.2

Ocean Transportation
Entrance, vessels in foreign trade:
Total
thous. of net tons.*
American
..
thous. of net tons..
Foreign
...thous. of net tons..
Clearances, vessels in foreign trade:
Total
thous. of net tons.
American
thous. of net tons.
Foreign
thous. of net tons.,
Freight rates, Atlantic ports to:
United Kingdom .weighted index number.
All Europe.-.!...weighted index number-

15*
210
102 134

+5.2
+7.4
+3.5
lift

Im

20
20

28
25

22

- 4 . 3 j +10.0

j

Freight Cars
Surplus (daily av. last week of month):
Box
number..
Coal-_.
.number.,
Total
_
number..
Shortage (daily av. last week of month):
Box
__
number..
Coal
numberTotal
number..
Cars in bad order:
Total
cars..
Ratio to total in use
percent..
Car loadings (monthly totals): I2
• Total..
thous. of carsGrain and grain products.-.thous. of cars..
Livestock
-thous. of cars..
•:• Coal and coke
..thous. of cars..
Forest products
..thous. of cars..
Ore
thous. <f cars.,
5
Merchandise and misc
thous. of cars..
_
Railroad Operations
Revenue:
Freight
thous. of dolls..
Passenger
thous. of dolls.,
Total operating
thous. of dolls.,
Operating expenses
..thous. of dolls..
Net operating income:
"
Total
thous. of dollsFreight carried......
mills, ton-miles..
Locomotives in bad order, per cent to total use:
Total end of mo..
Per ct. in total use......
•„
P a s s e n g e r Travel
Railroads:
Pullman passengers carried... .thousands..
National parks:
Visitors
_
number..
Automobiles entered
..number..
Arrivals from abroad:
Aliens
...
number..
United States citizens...
number..
Departures abroad:
Athens
number..
United States citizens....
number..
s s o r t s issued
number..

153,550
162,343
356,389

138,734
146,840
322,530

55,063
6,546
76,453

1919
1019
1919

42
6
31

40

64

94
13
150

2,733
4,774
9,570

1919
1919
1019

11
190
49

14
114
40

(ii)

194,869
8.5

202,864
8.9

189,014
8.3

1913
1913

125
135

124
122

118
110

4,445
188
148
725
341
204
2,750

3,527
174
108
578
239
221

3,944
171
122
797
280
331
2,244

2,197

387,343
102,851
'541,266
•417,011

95,970
465,655
364,174
65,529
31,950

33f 157

»87,624
38,518

67
n

124
255
174
(U)
2

-tt.fi j + 1 5 1
-s>!6 '+32i"y
+333.3

-DC 6

+£ i -9S.4
l
+4.1
+4.h

<")

-30.7 -10. C
-7.4 ! +l.h
-27.0 I - l l . f t
- 2 0 . 3 j -27.5
-H.fi
- 2 * , b i -33.2

26,713
1,256
032
4/J73
2,159
911
16,472

-4.4
+5.4
-0.5
-15.4
-0.9
-22.9
-0.0

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

143
101
105
133
150
242
143

113
101
85
107
113
204
11
1

100 105
£7
82
72
123
43
115

2,271,723 2,068,495
529,013
339,203
3,098,000 2,870,931
2,445,461 2,273,226

-8.9
+58.9
-7.3
7.0

1913
1913
1913
1913

219
179
212
229

214
187
210
22S

194
14S
180
208

-12.4
-9.9

1913
1913

146
139

141
141

103
117

+3.S

-

74
75

74
74

+0.0
+0.G

-3.9
-5.0

-0.7

-1.0

27,947
1,192
937
5,881
2,179
1,181
16,478

445,988
263,996

390.718
237,795

1919
1919

74
75

11,034
17.1

11,105
17.2

11,555
18.1

3,118

3,097

3,157

19,320

19,428

+0.6

1913

153

152

129

903,491
111,054

+20.6
+64.4

1920
1920

234
244

613
817

85
29

S3
&4

-30.1 i

150

149

305 GO4 +9S.0
417 894 +100.0

210,196
32,330

416,121
64,654

422,185
59,044

749,181
67,548

55,370
21,320

22,773
20,927

98,581
20,637

419,390
147,781

316,874
149,052

-24,4
+0.9

1913
1913

©9

47
87

21,322
33,504
22,207

24,240
43,822
12,536

22,254
30,808
11,074

101,300
166,737
91,861

120,776
188,072
106,773

+19.2
+12.7
+16.2

31
1913
35 44
69
1913 100 133
567 1001
1913 - 95S

42
111
1136

47,546
10,006

47,656
8,346

42,999
8,328

304,151
72,378

328,771
68,099

+&1
-5.1

1913
1913

335
252

327
224

35$
279

8,808
10,992
1,459

8,910
11,160
l r 3S0

8,580
10,700
1,142

62,409
65,731
10,940

61,549
76,492
9,834

-1.4
+16.4
-10.1

1919
1919
1919

120
112
100

113
106
70

116
108
88

4,553
1,705
2,847

4,599
1,615
2,984

4,536
1,653
2,854

31,992
11,922
20,040

33,692
12,082
21,611

+5.3
+1.3
+7.8

1919
139
1919 jj 144
1919 i 136

140
136
142

140
153
142

140
160
141

2,692
1,341
4,285

2,778
1,391
5,038

3,037
1,174
3,170
'99,150

22,061
7,775
17,261
621,550

21,410
9,880
23,360

-3.0
+27.1
+35.3
+1.0

104
127
178
375

99
134
15S
429

92
146
240
400

4
7

-2. 1

19 I1 -58.9
85 j| -1.8

-76.9
+1.4

48 ji +13.7
146
642 j

+30.8 +8
0
-43.6 +13.2

PUBLIC UTILITIES
Telephone companies:
» Operating revenues
..thous. of dolls..
Operating income
thous. of dolls..
•telegraph companies:
Commercial telegraph tolls.thous. of dolls..
Operating revenues
thous. of dolls..
Operating income
thous. of dolls..
Central electric stations:
Production, electric p o w e r Total
mills, of kw, hours..
By water power.-mills. of kw. hours.,
„ By fuels
mills, of kw. hours..
Consumption of fuels—
Coal
thous. of short tons..
Od
thous. of barrels..
r, G a s millions of cu. ft..
Gross revenue, sales..
thous. of dolls..

104,020

•June, 1923.
" Relative number less than 1.
June loadings include five weeks while July loadings include only four weeks.



69C,050

1919
1919
1919
1913

101
j 112
i 160
1 381

+0.2 +10.8
-16.6 +0.2
+1.2 +3.8
+1.5 +4.3
-5.6 +20. S

+3.2
+3.7
+17.6

42
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued
NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SUE VET (No. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1
In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
increase

NUMERICAL DATA

RELATIVE NUMBERS

(+)

1921

Jifne

I

July

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH
192S

1921

or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1924
from
1923

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

1923

Per cent
, increase (+)
or decrease (-)

1924
July
from
June

July,
1924,
from
July,
1923

EMPLOYMENT
(Index numbers relative to 1923)

Number employed, by industries:
Total, all classes
Food products
---.
Textiles
Iron and steel—
1
Lumber
•
Leather
Paper and printing
-.•
Chemicals—Stones, clay, and glass...
Metals, exc. iron and steel
i Tobacco products
Vehicles
•
Miscellaneous
Number employed, State and city reports:
New York State
thousands.
Detroit
..thousands.
Wisconsin
index number.
Illinois
index numberMassachusetts
index numberTotal pay roll:
New York State
thous. of dolls.
Wisconsin
index number.
Average weekly earnings:
New York State..—.
dolls.
Illihois_....Index number.
Wisconsin
index number.
Massachusetts.----.
..index number.
Earnings and Hours of Labor

1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923

95
93
91
94
98
92
101
101
102
100
92
95
94

-3.4
0.0
-6.0
-5.9
-2.1
0.0
-1.0
-1.2
-5.1
-6.9
-1.2
-3.5

-15.0
-6.0
-19.4
-21.6
-9.7
-13.5
-2.0
-14.3
-8.7
-19.8
-5.1
-16.8
-18.0

-3.9

-14 7

+1.1

4S9
196

470
197

551
220

1914
1920
1915
1922
1922

110
130
123
107
92

+0.5 -10.5
+4.5 -7.9
-5.0 - 1 1 3

13,317

12,741

15,184

1914
1915

245
276

-15.3 -16.1
-2.5 -11.6

27.21

27.1!

27.54

1914
1915
1922
1922

223
112
226
219

25.44
28.52
30.19
22.94
15.95

26.66
28.52
30.35
23.04
17.44

1914
1914
1914
1914
1914

49.4
45.4

25.12
27. o;
28.62
21.95
15.76
49.6
44.8

49.9
49.5

1914
1914

26,978
13,939
13,039

22,069
13,416
8,653

22,453
14,961
7,492

193,665
121,737
71,928

202,713
118,334
84,379

-2,8

+17.3

1913
1913
1913

27,210
15,485
1,316
6,478
240
1,877
170
3,370
157

27,319
15,950
1,32S

23,920
14,002
1,225
5,746
220
1,619
166
2^533
147

165,096
95,705

185,307
107,235

+12.2
+1210

1913
1913

-0.3
-2.7
-6.4

0.0
-0.9
-1.9

213
214
214
215
223,

-1.3
-5.1
-5.2
-4.3
-1.2

-5.8
-5.1
-5.7
-4.7
-9.6

91
96

-0.6
-1.3

-0.6
-9.5

-18.2
-3.8
-33.6

-1.7
-10.3
+15.5

(National Industrial Conference Board)

Average weekly earnings:
Grand total (both sexes)
dollars.
Total, male
dollars.
Skilled, male
dollars.
Unskilled, male
dollars.
Total, women
dollars.
Average weekly hours:
Nominal (both sexes)
hours,
Actual (both sexes)
hours,
DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT
Mail-order houses:
Total sales
thous. of dolls.
Sears, Roebuck & Co
thous. of dolls,
Montgomery Ward & Co..thous. of dolls.
Ten-cent stores:
Total sales
thous. of dolls,
F. W. Woolworth & Co...thous. of dolls.
Number of stores operated
S. S. Kresgc Co
thous. of dolls.
Number of stores operated...
McCrory Stores Corp
tbous. of dolls.
Number of stores operated
S. H. Kress <fc Co
thous. of dolls.
Number of stores operated
Restaurant chains:
Total sales, 2 chains
thous. of dolls.
Stores operated
number.
Child's Co
thous. of dolls.
Waldorf system
thous. of dolls.
Chain stores:
J. C. Penney Co
thous. of dolls..
Number of stores..
United Cigar Stores Co.. .thous. of dolls.,
Number of stores
,
A. Schulte (Inc.)
thous. of dolls..
Number of stores
Owl Drug C o . . . .
thous. of dolls..
Number of stores
Magazine advertising (for
following month)
thous. of lines
Newspaper advertising.-...-.thous. of lines"
Postal receipts, 50 selected
cities......
...thous. of dolls..
Postal receipts, 50 industrial
cities..
thous. of dolls..
Money orders:
Domestic paid (50 cities)—
Quantity..
—.number..
^ v ah?e
thous. of dolls..
Domestic, issued (50 cities)—
Quantity...
number..
Value...
thous. of dolls..
Foreign issued.......
thous. of dolls. J
< Revised.
*



2,866
221
1,820
1,040

"•in
3,099
158
2,940
221
1,900
1,010

2,955
208
1,852
1,103

5,627
500
5,914
2,508
1,766
250
1,390
85

4,748
501
5,741
2,495
1,800
251
1,439

1,658
97,663

1,408

1,505

76,408

»82,185

22,728

21,046

2,597

2,350

10,659
77,450

9,712
72,940

8,865
67,862

2,894
28,405
3,050

2,724
28,018
3,225

23,524
2,433

•

84

3,888
384
5,929
2,496
1,555
245
1,423
73

41,358

45,727

"l6,"692

"l2,"623

+4.7

20,820

20,841
"13,-236'
7,605

7,720

34,400
41,327

"16,-558

+18.T

1913"
"1913"

+0.1

+

—1.5
+20.2

-41*212
12,305

•-L5
"•+L2 +17.1
"-§.'6' +22J

+I6.T "lolf

~19,"727

~13,"I6o

+0.4 +14.2
+3.0 +13.9

+2.6
116 109 112
"+2.*6
268' +
266" 267* 256" 132
-0.6
136 144 132
+221
1913 2382 [1767 2705 |2792 2558 2158 -15.6
•-2.-9 " - £ 2
'1913" 257" 24T 240* 263" 240" 233"
0.0
+1.9
1919
•+3.*5
1920

112

1913
1920

113

259" '261
139 140

"8,-335

+16.5
+36.-4"

"15,038
676,414

"16,081
672,386

+6.9
-0. 6

1913
1919

170,011

177,843

+4.6

1919

+7.9

113

1922

17,643

19,036

72,3k

73,765
581,808

1919
+2.0
1919
+9.6
2,535
20,818 +12.6
1919
134 162
18*485
26,680
192,378
207,792
1919
+8.0
123 140
3,371
19,108
21,413 +12.1
1919
111 J1 108
13
Cumulatives for 8 months' period, January to August, inclusive.
530,840

a4

-15.1
-21.8

-7.0

-3.4

+S.0

+6.7 +10.$
-8.9
-5.8
-5.9
-1.4

+5.7

+7.5

43
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
Increase

N U M E R I C A L DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following Items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, m a y be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SUSVEY (No. 30). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear a t the end of this
issue. See Contents, p . 1

RELATIVE N U M B E R S

Per cent
crpjuso (-4-)
or decrease (—)

<+)

1924

June

July

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE
TOTAL
FBOM JANUARY 1
THROUGH
LATEST

MONTH

1923

1934

or decrease !
!
(-)
cumulative
1924
from
1923

RASE
YE Alt
OK

tm
July
from
Juno

PERIOD

July,
ltfM,
from
July,
1023

-4S.4

DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT—Con.
Internal-revenue taxes collected:
Firearms and shells
thous. of dolls._
Jewelry, watches, and .
clocks
thous. of dolls._
Bonds and stocks issued and
conveyances
thous. of dolls__
Capital stock transfers
thous. of dolls..

265

321

622

2,423

1,234

-49.1

1919

+21.1

1,414

1,588

1,550

14,196

14,970

+5.5

1919

+12.3

+2.3

3,016
536

2,405
629

3,842
672

28,811
5,873

24,494
5,113

-15.0
-12.9

1919
1919

-20.3
+17.4

-37.4
-6.4

208
674

187
596
114

194
609
99

1,380
4,816
1,121

4,846
748

+3.3
+0.6
-33.3

1913
1913
1913

275
182
9120

-10.6
-11.6
+15.2

-3.0
-2.1
+15.2

803

6,200

6,274

+1.2

1913

199

-11.3

-2.5

BANKING AND FINANCE
Life I n s u r a n c e
(Association of Life Insurance

Presidents)1*

Policies, new (45 companies):
Ordinary
thous. of policies.,
Industrial
;
thous. of policies.
Group
. . . . . . . n u m b e r of contracts.
Total insurance.___thous. of policies and contracts.,
Number of persons insured;
Total
number*.
Group i n s u r a n c e - . . .
numberAmount of new insurance (45 companies):
Ordinary
„
thous. of dolls..
Industrial.:.
i
thous. of dolls-,
Group
-.._._^_
thous. of dolls.
Total insurance
.thous. of dolls.
Premium collections (45 companies):
Ordinary
—thous. of dolls..
Industrial
thous. of dolls.
Group
„„
thous. of dolls.
. Total.
thous. of dolls..
Admitted life insurance assets:
Grand total (41 companies) .mills, of dolls.
Mortgage loans—
Total
_
mills, of dolls.
Farm
-..L
mills, of dolls.
Allother
_
mills, of dolls.

883

783

896,096
13,217

536,897
135,015
31,343
703,255

134,071
32,744
2,281
169,096

144,580
30,758
2,897
178,217

8,063

8,133

3,120
1,396
1,724

270
'0
SO 200
2240 2220

800,887
17,878

573,508
154,495
21,519
749,521

1,426

-10.0
4-35.3
3,618,743 3,923,982
1,015,962 1,101,906
216,682
201,721
4,851,387 5,227,607

+8.4
^$5
-6.9
+7.8

1913
1913
1913
1913

402 355
284 256
3164 1243
395 336

400 374
405
305 334 298 208
J550 »16 1210 1805
10 3J>0 357
398

-6.4
-12.6
+45.7
-0.2

885,070

+27.0
+11.7
+23.5
+23.6

1913
1913
1913
1913

257 250
271 268
4919 5361
263 258

332
271

rooo

349 344 371
306 304 285
6764 6336 7W7
340 353

+7,8
-0.1
+20.2
+5.4

7,429

1923

100

324

109

110

3,162
1,416
1,745

2,725
1,281
1,444

1923
1923
1923

101
102
101

116
111
120

117
112
122

3,413
1,111
1,845
360
97

3,424
1,103
1,855
370
97

3,335
1,215
1,758
282
79

1923
1923
1923
1923
1923

100
100
101
101
103

107
113
110
116
102
93
104
123
119

103
91
105
128
125

103
90
.06
31

996
534

1,004
543

930
440

1923
1923

100

106
113

107
116

515,271
208,688
113,596
73,178
72,375
47,434

591,346
232,179
125,260
97,648
73,245
63,014

534,075
191,717
119,248
92,920
69,925
60,265

3,863,359
1,496,121
839,994
636,457
509,524
381,263

4,160,675
1,708,652
903,772
622,713
510,983
414,555

+7.7
+14.2
+7.6
-2.2
+0.3
+8.7

1921
1921
1921
1921
1921
1921

21,469
18,662

18,321
18,184

144,191
132,952

148,901
130,563

+3.3

1919
1919

21,127
16,240

16,646
15,395

12S,873
110,376

140,592
110,900

+9.1
+0.5

294
1,762
531
3,260
2,165
83.0

+5.5
+1.7
+413
+0.1
+48.4
+6.f»
+49. 2

+0.9

508,757
132,798
21,570
663,125
1

97,406
28,877
1,930
128,213

697,102
195,602
13,870
905,570

218,582
17,128
1,120,779

Bonds and stocks (book values):

Total
mills, of dolls.
Government
mills, of dolls.
Railroad
^
..mills, of dolls.
Public utilities
. . . . . m i l l s , of dolls.
All others.
mills, of dollsPolicy loans a n d premium
notes
_
mills, of dolls.
Other admitted assets
mills, of dolls.

170

200

+y o

+9.5
+1.3 +16.0
+1.4 +10.5
+1.2 +20.8
+0.3 +2.7
-0.7
-8.2
+0.5
+5.5
+ 1 8 +31.2
0.0 + 22.8
+G.S +8.0
+1.9 +23.4

(Life Insurance Sales Research Bureau)
Sales of ordinary life insurance (81 companies):
United States total
w.thous. of dolls..
Eastern manuf. d i s t r i c t . - . t h o u s . of dolls..
Western manuf. district...thous. of dolls..
Western agric. district
thous. of dolls..
Southern district
thous. of dolls..
Far Western district
thous. of dolls..

+14.8
+11.3
+10.3
+33.4
+1.2
+32.8

+ 10.7
+21.1
+5.0
+5.1
+4.7
+4,6

108
1CM

-2.1
+2.0

+ 17.2
+2.6

1913
1913

253
266

+5.9
+6.4

+20.9
+S.5

761
2,195
273
3,200
1,897
78.2

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

IS
70
SO
149
100
105

12,265
4,987
12,233

11,716
4,528
11,078

1921
1921
1919

102
143
112

2.10
3.53

5.00
4.94

1913
1913

68

7,070,720 6,625,604
1,256,927 1,192,585
1,974,972 1,854,810
461,876
489,816
430,014
479,171
289,348
317,903
218,777
228,026
858,068
902,603
129,740
138,176
SS.S20
90,656
105,136
108,921
60,306
66,824
936,123
1,016,725

1920
1920
1920
1920
1920
1920
1920
1920
1920
1920
1920
1920
1920

Banking
Debits to individual accounts:
21,926
New York City
mills, of dolls..
18,304
Outside N e w York C i t y . . . m i l l s , of dolls..
Bank clearings:
19,958
New York C i t y . .
mills, of dolls.,
15,264
^ Outside N e w York C i t y . . . m i l l s . of dolls.,
•federal reserve banks:
350
Bills discounted
mills, of dolls..
1,844
Notes in circulation
mills, of dolls..
476
Total investments
mills, of dolls.
3,271
Total reserves
mills, of dolls.
2,108
Total deposits
mills, of dolls..
82.8
Reserve r a t i o . . .
per c e n t . .
-* ederal reserve member banks:
12,142
Total loans and discounts..mills, of dolls..
4,827
Total investments
mills, of dolls..
11,837
Net demand deposits
mills, of dolls..
Interest rates:
2.25
New York call loans
per cent—
3.91
Commercial paper, 60-90 days,..per c e n t . .
Savings deposits, b y Federal reserve districts
(balance to credit of depositors):
Total, 843 banks
thous. of dolls.. 7,089,775
Boston, 64 b a n k s . . . . . . t h o u s . of dolls.. 1,256,624
N e w York, 30 b a n k s . . t h o u s . of dolls.. 1,981,700
Philadelphia, 78 banks-thous. of dolls.. 488,816
Cleveland, 18 b a n k s . ^ t h o u s . of dolls.. 467,618
Richmond, 91 b a n k s . _thous. of dolls.. 315,352
Atlanta, 96 banks
thous. of dolls.. 234,474
Chicago, 209 b a n k s . . . . t h o u s . of dolls.. 916,257
St. Louis, 32 b a n k s . . . . t h o u s , of dolls.. 138,550
90,892
Minneapolis, 15 banks.thous. of dolls..
Kansas City, 56 banks.thous. of dolls.. 111,942
68,035
Dallas* 85 banks
thous. of dolls..
San Francisco, 72 banks.thous. of dolls. 1,019,515
• June,
 1923.
14
See detailed tabulation, page 48.



-1.8

122
115
121
117
125
129
130
115
143
124
132
134
133

122
115
121
119
125
128
130
114
143
124
130
135
134

129
120
127
125
135
137
135
120
152
130
135
14'
143

129
121
127
125
136
137
130
120
154
125
136
147
143

130
121
12*
125
135
140
139
122
153
127
13

-10.0 -61.4
-4.4 -19.7
+11.6 +9i. 5
-0.3 +1.9
+2.7 +14.1
ao +5.8
+1.0 +4.7
+3.3 + 10.1
+3.3 + 10.4
-5.9 -57.9
-9.9 -28.1
130
121
129
126
139
141
135
120
153
126
135
149
14

-0.3
0.0

-0.3
+0.2
+2.5

+0.8

-2.7
-1.5
-0.3
-0.3
-2.7
-1.8
-0.3

+6.7
+5.3
+0.5
+6.0
+11.4
+9.9
+4.2
+5.2
+6.5
+2.1
+3.6
+10.8
+S.6

44
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued
NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY ( N O . 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUABY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

1923

Per ct.
increase
(+)
or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1924
from
1923

RELATIVE NUMBERS
BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

June

July

132,655

132,756

131,726
3,040,789

1923
July
from
Jne

1913

thous. of dolls.. 3,267,717 3,267,064

Per cent
Increase (+)
or decrease (-)

1913

July,
1924
from
July,
1923

BANKING A N D FINANCE—Continued
Banking—Continued
U. S. Postal Savings
New York State savings
banks

thous. of dolls..

331

334

335

+0.1

+0.8

0.0

186

Public Finance
Government debt:
Interest-bearing
Total gross debt
Short-term debt
Customs receipts
Total ordinary receipts
Expenditures chargeable to
ordinary receipts
Money in circulation:
Total
Per capita

of dolls..
of dolls..
of dolls..
of dolls..
of dolls..

20,981
21,251
7,953
43,276
601,580

20,991
21,254
7,963
43,945
195,704

21,959
22,271
5,436
43,225
205,742

356,230
2,341,828

319,823
2,238,301

-10.3
-4.4

" 1919
" 1919
»1919
H913
U913

thous. of dolls..

288,055

207,995

242,222

2,085,210

1,839,360

-11.8

U913

mills, of dolls..
dollars..

4,755
42.20

4,665
41.36

4,696
42.16

34,099

36,813

35,721

295,101

341,273

16,646
14,810
2,643

20,022
12,421
4,370

19,139
10,701
5,881

144,133
122,657
28,311

195,753
117,659
27,860

+15.6
+35.8
-4.1
-1.6

1,607
439
1,054
84

1,615
416
1,124
75

1,231
350

10,955
2,771
7,818

12,400.
3,187
8,513
570

+15.0
+8.9
+55.7

396,880

198,370

187,550

106,440
54,260
29,175
3,895

. 79,870
43,900
31,175
4,795

mills,
mills,
mills,
thous.
thous.

189
1046

84
85
103
171
316

-67.5

-4.4
-4.6
+46.5
+1.7
-4.9

581

423

-27.8

-14.1

-2.0

-0.7
-1,9

87

L* 1919

« 1919

100
95

93

0.0
0.0

+0.1
+1.5

93

Business Failures

Liabilities:
Total commercial
thous. of dolls..
Manufacturing establishments
thous. of dolls..
Trade establishments
thous. of dolls..
Agents and brokers
thous. of dolls..
Firms:
Total commercial
number..
Manufacturing establishments..number..
Trade establishments
number..
Agents and brokers
number..

828

53

+13.2

+3.1
+4.6
- 1 6 . 1 +16.1
+65.3 -25.7

+8.0
+20.3

1913

157

160

1913
1913
1913

185
112
205

171
160
122

1913
1913
1913
1913

92

136
144
131
174

1913

127

-50.0

+5.8

1913
1913
1913
1913

111
111
124
87

-25.0
-19.1

+3.0
+2.8
+1.«
+12.8

+0.5

+31.2

+18.9
+35.7
-10.7 +41.5
-5.2

+6.6

Dividend and Interest Payments
(For following month)
Grand total
. . . t b o u s . of dolls..
Dividend payments:
Total
thous. of dolls..
Indus, and misc. corp
thous. of dolls..
Steam railroads
..thous. of dolls..
Street railways
thous. of dolls..

3

2,395,351 "2,526,530

77,550 "679,330
42,700 "363,415
30,600 "205,605
4,250 "53,370

"709,556
"376,970
"212,845
"53,086

+5.5
+4.4
+3.7
+3.5
-a 5

+6.9

+23.1

New Capital Issues
Total corporations (Commercial and
Financial Chronicle):
Purpose of i s s u e New capital
..thous. of dolls.. 252,854
Refunding
thous. of dolls..
63,221
Kind of issue—
Stocks
thous. of dolls..
30,884
Bonds and notes
thous. of dolls.. 285,191
Bond issues classified—
RailroadsNew capital
thous. Of dolls.. 106,342
Refunding
thous. of dolls..
43,000
Public utilities—
New capital
thous. of dolls..
95,486
Refunding
thous. of dolls..
50,021
Industrials—
New c a p i t a l thous. of dolls..
14,019
Refunding
thous. of dolls..
200
Total corporations (Journal of
Commerce)
thous. of dolls.. 290,053
States and municipalities:
Permanent loans
thous. of dolls.. 285,637
Temporary loans
thous. of dolls..
52,391
New incorporations
thous. of dolls.. 455,022
Agricultural Loans
B y land banks:
Total closed
. . . t h o u s . of dolls..
Federal farm loan b a n k s . , t h o u s . of dolls..
Joint-stock land banks
thous. of dolls..
B y War Finance Corporation:
With banks and livestock loan
companiesAdvancements
thous. of dolls..
Repayments
thous. of dolls..
Balance
thous. of dolls..
w
With cooperative market associations—
Advancements
thous. of dolls..
Repayments
thous. of dolls..
aalance
thous. of dolls..
• June, 1923.




198
223

-22.8 +93.
-37.7 +169.9

279
157

+29.1 +83.6
- 1 6 . 1 +116.7

195,118
43,184

130,530
130,530
" "~
1,600

1,670,529
'---'-•
406,033

1,904,920
257,516

+14.0
-36.6

1920
1920

39,876
239,302

21,715
110,415

470, 111
1,607,450

553,917
1,639,395

+17.8
.+2.0

1920
1920

60,829
-15,200

16,780
0

252 788
26 073

412,360 +63.1
109,239 +319.0

1919
1919

175

202

851 1279
1453 1466

-52.2 +202.9
0.0
-64.7

73,736
18,177

24,780
300

385 523
159 528

799,071 +107.3
120,303 - 2 4 . 6

1919
1919

697

254

2841

979
1058

-22.8 +197.6
- 6 3 . 7 , +505.9

9,763
10,807

43,635
800

-49.3
-43.6

1919
1919

409
517

481
456

132
21

-30.4
+440.4

-77.6
+35.1

275,834

237,258

-25.1

1920

238

132

211

-4.9

+16.3

+36.4
+53,7
-27.0

1913
1913
1913

502
101
814

353
201
302

839
130
264

-63.3
+30.5
+25.8

+55.2
+9.8
-21.1

-8.0
-7.5
-9.3

-35.4
-18.2
-56.5

+6.0

+16.6
-52.0
-34.8

104,850
68,353
572,196

67,548
62,203
724,920

419 331
79 043
'
2,370,935
'
683 648
3O8',317
6,062,965

18,203
12,891
5.312

16,745
11,928
4,817

25,930
14,586
11,344

272,801
119,981
152,820

151,760
109,459
42,301

-44.4
-8.2
-72.3

1919
1919
1919

448
1,576
62,488

422
1,671
61,239

362
3,478

10,848
53,622
757,732

7,413
14,075
448,593

-31.7
-73.8
-40.8

1922
1922
1922

0
6
1,293

0
23
1,270

0
1409
7,347

7,325
11,756
71,279

149
1,127
11,305

-98.0
-90.4
-84.1

1922
1922
1922

tine, inclusive, ending the year Indicated.
i* period January to August, inclusive.

212,541
44,582
1,776,149
932,239
473,760
4,424,650

141

120
116
133

0.0
0-0 -98.4

j

-82.7

45
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS-Continued
NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
Issue. See Contents, p. 1
In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
increase

NUMERICAL DATA

RELATIVE NUMBERS

<+)

1924

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST

MONTH

or do*
crease

(-)

cumulative
1924
from i
1923

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

1923

Per cent
increase ( + )
ar decrease (—)

1924

July
from
Juno

June

July

thous. of dolls.,
tbous. of dolls..

2,919
27,286

3,498
28,246

+10.8

thous. of dolls..
thous. of dolls-.

3,713
20,712

2,918
21,279

-21.4
+2.7

108.93
65.07
84.83

113.53
68.39
88.44

July,
1024,
from
July,
1923

1923

mi

BANKING AND FINANCE-Con.
Federal Intermediate Credit Banks
Direct loans:
Closed
Balance end of month
Bediscounts:
Closed
Balance end of month

Stocks a n d Bonds
Stock prices, closing:
25 industrials, average. dolls, per share..
25 railroads, average
dolls, per share..
103 stocks, average
dolls, per share..
Stock sales:
N. Y. Stock Exchange..-thous. of shares..
Bond sales:
Miscellaneous
.
.thous. of dolls
Liberty-Victory
thous. of dolls..
„ Total
thous. of dolls..
Bond prices:
Highest-grade rails.p. ct. of par, 4% bond..
Second-grade rails-.p. ct. of par, 4% bond..
Public utility
p. ct. of par, 4% bond..
Industrial
p. ct. of par, 4% bond..
Comb, price indes_.p. ct. of par, 4% bond_.
5 Liberty bonds
p. ct. of par.
16 foreign governments ana
and
D ~ o « , wnmenx5
city........
city—.
p. ct. of par..
m
Comb, price index,
•—*
- yield..
Municipal bond • -— eebonds.p. ct. of par..
..per cent.,
Gold a n d Silver
Gold:
Domestic receipts at mint fine ounces..
Rand output
thous. of ounces..
Imports.....
thous. of dolls..
Exports.....
tbous. of dolls..
Silver:
,
Production...
thous. of fine oz_.
Imports
thous. of dolls..
Exports
thous. of dolls..
Price at New York
dolls, per fine oz_.
Price at London pence per standard oz..

102.52
58.07
82.87

+4.2
+5.1

1913
1913
1921
138,868

-4.8

1913

1,235,583 1,563,896
497,250
573,639
1,732,833 2,137,535

+26.6
+15.4
+23.4

1919
1919
1919

16,803

24,226

12,668

287,519
102,855
390,374

273,131
68,014
341,145

123,068
61,747
184,815

85.84
72.49
69.08
73.01
74.59
102.49

87.22
73.58
70.93
73.48
75.81
102.97

82.78
67.70
65.70
71.68
71.40
98.95

1915
1915
1915
1915
1915
1921

102.05
96.35
4.15

102.41
96.91
414

100.52
93.54
4.29

1921
1921
1913

65,443
733,000
25,181

90,089
829,437
18,834
327

92,535
754,306
27,929
523

513,069
5,270,855
159,861
22,813

559,265
5,492,496
245,076
4,182

+9.0
+4.2

+53.3
-81.7

1913
1913
1913
1913

+37.7
+112
-25,2
+22.0

5,228
4,870
8,648
.667
34.758

4,492
9,190
.672
34.509

6,406
10,066
6,233
.630
30.923

39,987
39,098
31,493

36,552
41,647
60,768

-8.6
+6.5
+93.0

1013
1913
1913
1913
1913

-14.1
+46.4
+6.3
+O.7
-0.7

4.32
.053
.043
.046
.374
.265
.177

4.37
.051
.043
.046
.379
.266
.182

4.58
.059
.043
.049
.392
.265
.176

Par
Par
Par
Par
Par
Par
Par

+1.2

.411
.305

.414
.313

.488

Par
Par

.984
.739
.108
.106

.993
.741
.099
.101

.974
.777
.104
.126

Par
Par
Par
Par
Par

274,015

276,819

287,434

2,375,054

2,126,504

-10.5

1913

80,189
10,611
4,832
24,480

82,040
10,720
12,502
5,049
23,050

83,171
9,818
13,166
5,729
28,152

694,956
86,183
90,924
52,070
263,768

602,352
81,676
75,883
39,056
196,351

-13.3
-5.2
-16.5
-25.0
-25.6

80,019
33,031

81,137
32,115

77,486
36,038

637,370
234,857

635,9S9
232,205

38,368
7,108

41,368
6,494

32,105
10,670

301,381
92,051

70,605
21,529
4,834

69,326
26,755
2&47

90,582
30,179
4,089

676,584
202,570
64,763

7,128

145,870

+10.7
+ 17.8

+4.3 +C.7
+412 +01.2

-fl.O +121.9
-33.9 +10.1
-12.6 +S4.G

127

+1.0
+1.0
+2.1
0.0

+2.1
0.0
+0.0
+0.9
0.0

+5.4
+7.8
+7.9
+2.0
+6. 5
+3.8
+1.3
+3.0
-2.1

i
+10.0
-32.6
-37.5
-10.9
-29.2
+47.4
+6.7
+ 11.6

FOREIGN EXCHANGE RATES
Europe:
England
dolls, per £ sterling..
France
.dolls, per franc.
Italydolls, per lire..
Belgium
dolls, per franc.
Netherlands
dolls, per guilder..
Sweden
dolls, per krone..
Switzerland
dolls, per franc.
Asia:
Japan.._._„
dolls, per yen..
India....
..dolls, per rupee..
Americas:
Canada.........dolls, per Canadian doll..
Argentina
dolls, per gold peso..
Brazil
dolls, per milrels..
Chile
dolls, per paper peso..
n
General index foreign exch
index number..
U. S. FOREIGN TRADE
Imports
grand total
. . . . . . . t h o u s . of dolls..
By grand divisions:
EuropeTotal
thous. of dolls..
France
thous. of dolls..
Germany.
thous. of dolls..
Italy
thous. of dolls..
United Kingdom
thous. of dolls..
North AmericaTotal
thous. of dolls..
Canada
thous. of dolls..
South AmericaTotal
..thous. of dolls..
Argentina
thous. of dolls..
Asia and Oceania—
Total
thous. of dolls..
Japan
thous. of dolls..
Africa, total
thous. of dolls..




-3.8
0.0
0.0
+1.3
+0.4

+2.8
+O.7
+2.6

64

-15.2
+L0

+0.8
+0.3

91

-4.6
-13.6
0.0
-6.1
-3,3
+0.4
+3.4

+2.0
-4.6
-4.8
-19.8
-6.3

-8.3
-4.7
-1.7

217

203

183

185

+1.0

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

117

117
97
64
107
115

111
81
69
105
108

114
93
81
110
102

+ 14.1
+17.8
+4.5
-5.8

+9.2
-5.0
-11.9
-18.1

-0.2
-1.1

1913
1913

291
2S0

2S6
282

246
279

250
271

+1.2
-2.8

+4.7
-10.9

272,828
50,023

-9.5
-45.7

1913
1913

200
349

235
352

232
334

250
305

+7.8
-8.6

+28.9
-39.1

£68,346
177,545
46,989

-16.0
-12.4
-27 4

1913
1913
1913

397
300
356

317
330
162

268
261
244

263
324
149

-1.8
+24.3
-39.0

-25.1
-11.3
-27.9

214

102

no
03
156
127

+2.3

-3.7
-1.4

46
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
{increase

NUMERICAL DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following Hems for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY ( N O . 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. Bee Contents, p. 1

1924

June

July

88,625

89,171

34,234

39,145

41,734
48,420

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE

FROM

TOTAL

JANUA'BY

THROUGH

MONTH

(+)
or de-

1

LATEST

.

crease
C-)
cumulative
1924
from
1923

RELATIVE NUMBERS
BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

Per cent
, increase (+)
or decrease (-)

1923
July
from
June

July,
1924,
from
July,
1923

1923

1924

107,047

923,721

717,380

-22.3

1913

+0.6

-16.7

23,783

205,640

243,674

+18.5

1913

+14.3

+64.6

40,389

37,590

351,960

355,611

+1.0

1913

-3.2

+7.4

45,270

56,169

449,887

377,765

1913

-6.5

-19.4

60,587
416

62,108
736

62,492
353

437,716
6,130

422,811
9,263

-16.0
-3.4
+51.1

1913
1913

306,475

276,739

302,186

2,247,745

2,366,468

+5.3

1913

141,949
21,321
18,033
12,042
51,778

126,071
13,179
12,836
8,142

127,295
16,578
24,935
9,148
45,006

1,075,789
136,663
168,734
85,606
425,591

1,183,154
141,499
218,118
92,391
452,528

+10.0
+3,5
+29.3
+7.9
+6.3

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

-11.2
-38.2
-28.8
-32.4

84,427
47,762

83,337
45,213

95,371
58,856

634,509
388,312

579,740
324,865

-8.6
-16.3

1913
1913

-1.3
-5.3

-12.6
-23.2

25,860
8,987

8,778

23,604
9,604

158,838
68,408

170,726
61,491

-10.1

+7.5

1913
1913

-9.7
-2.3

-1.1
-8.6

48,913
9,563
5,325
298,682

8,423
4,956
270,697

50,358
18,220
5,559
295,725

341,889
128,748
36,720
2,202,123

392,674
137,979
40,174
2,310,396

+14.9
+7.2
+9.4
+4.9

1913
1913
1913
1913

-20.2
-11.9
-6.9
-9.4

-22.5
-53.8
-10.8
-8.5

62,387

55,972

60,531

512,433

608,293

+18.7

1913

-10.3

-7.5

15,021

12,673

19,510

155,327

94,378

-39.2

1913

-15.6

-350

34,035

37,367

37,517

334,552

312,962

-6.5

1913

+9.8

-0.4

50,462

46,340

49,337

327,060

355,809

1913

-8.2

-6.1

136,450
327

118,126
319

128,640
190

-8.2
+67.9

88,501
40,421
25,810

108,115
47,534
31,693

76,818
35,188
20,991

615,576
289,942

21,823

28,190

20,272

3,814
7,800

71,283
4,646
8,286

49,458
10,024
1,715
5,813

U. S. FOREIGN TRADE— Continued
Imports—Continued
By class of commodities:
Crude materials for use in
manufacturing
thous. of dolls.
Foodstuffs in crude condition
and food animals
thous. of dolls.
Foodstuffs, partly or wholly
manufactured
thous. of dolls.
Manufactures for further use
In manufacturing
thous. of dolls.
Manufactures ready for
consumption
..thous. of dolls.
Miscellaneous
thous. of dolls.

+2.5
-0.6
+77.3 i+108.5

Exports
Grand total, including
reexports
thous. of dolls.
By grand divisions:
EuropeTotal
thous. of dolls.
France
thous. of dolls.
Germany
thous. of dolls.
Italy
thous. of dolls.
United Kingdom
thous. of dolls.
North AmericaTotal
thous. of dolls.
Canada
thous. of dolls.
South AmericaTotal
thous. of dolls.
Argentina
thous. of dolls.
Asia and Oceania—
Total
thous. of dolls.
,
Japan
thous. of dolls.
Africa, total
.-thous. of dolls.
Total, domestic exports only, .thous. of dolls.
By classes of commodities:
Crude materials for use in
manufacturing
thous. of dolls.,
Foodstuffs in crude condition
and food animals
thous. of dolls..
Foodstuffs partly or wholly
manufactured
thous. of dolls.
Manufactures for further use
in manufacturing
thous. of dolls.
Manufactures ready for
consumption
thous. of dolls.
Miscellaneous
thous. of dolls.
TRADE AJSD INDUSTRY OP FOREIGN
COUNTRIES
United Kingdom
Imports (value):
Total
_
thous. of £ sterling.
Food, drink, tobacco.thous. of £ sterling.
Raw material
thous. of £ sterling..
Manufactured
articles
thous. of £ sterling.
Exports (value):
Total
thous. of £ sterling.
Food, drink, tobacco.thous. of £ sterling..
Raw material
thous. of £ sterling..
Manufactured
articles
thous. of £ sterling..
Reexports (values):
Total
thous. of £ sterling..
Food, drink, tobacco.thous. of £ sterling..
Raw material
thous. of £ sterling..
Manufactured
articles
thous. of £ sterling..
Exports of key commodities (quantities):
Cotton piece goods
thous. of sq, yds..]
Woolen and worsted
tissues
thous. of sq. yds..
Iron and steel
thous. of long tons..
Coal
„
thous. of long tons..
Production:
Pig iron
thous. of long tons..
Steel ingots
thous. of long tons..
osi
o.

v 't

Stocks, zinc
Employment:
Trade-unions

thous. of metric t o n s . .

short tons..!




146

168

161

148

134

-9.7

-8.4

-1.0
-20.5
-48.5
-11.0
+9.3 +25.8

935,644
3,510

+7.7
-3.1

1913
1913

-13.4
-2.4

706,559
310,830
223,785

+14.8
+7.2
+27.1

1913
1913
1913

+22.2 +40.7
+17.6 +35.1
+22.8 +51.0

146,854

168,267

+116

1913

+29.2 +39.1

59,503
3,131
10,835

442,178
22,346
78,503

459,744
29,962
64,110

+4.0
+34.1
-18.3

1913
1913
1913

+14.9 +19. &
+21.8 +48.4
+&2

57,172

44,734

334,385

+7.2

1913

+15.6 +27.8

10,174
2,299
4,890

7,799
1,711
4,619

71,661
12,439
44,612

+17.6
+35.5
+7.0

1913
1913
1913

3,623

r

84,300
16,854
47,724

2,494

2,968

2,464

15,570

347,208

384,428

316,601

2,426,515

2,610,687

19,274
325
4,882

26,489
341
5,488

20,543
308
6,767

122,474
2,529
46, 611

131,920
2,369
36,619

657
22,856
751

616
693
21,891
393

655
624
21,812
1,342

4,459
5,096
165,600

4,411
5,151
164,706

19,675

92.8

+26.4
+7.6
+7.7
-6.3
-21.4
-1.1

+1.1
-0.5

+1.5 +30.5
+34.1 +34.4
+5.9

+20.5

1913
1920
1920
1913
1913

79
80

82
90

1913
1913
1913

71
03
94
3

72
108
90
2

1913 " 91 ' 91 II 94 I 95 I 95
15

p. c t. employed..
« June 1923.

+8.8

155

Nine months average, April to December, inclusive.

+19.0
+10.7 +21.4
+37.4 +28.9
+4.9 +10.7
+12.4
+1.3 -6.0
^55 +11.1
^5
-4.2
-47.7

-70.7

TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued

In many cases August figures are now
available and may be found in the
special table on page 23

Per ct.
Increase

N U M E R I C A L DATA

NOTE.—Data on the following items for the
period January, 1922, to June, 1924, may be
found in the August quarterly issue of the
SURVEY (NO. 36). Detailed tabulations of
several new items appear at the end of this
issue. See Contents, p. 1

(

1924

June

July

14,010

15,544

Corresponding
month,
June
or July,
1923

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
FROM JANUARY 1
THROUGH LATEST
MONTH

i?

or decrease
(-)
cumu>
1 stive
1924
from
1923

RELATIVE NUMI1EKS
BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD

1923

1024

13,183

92,263

103,983

+12.7

1920

72,631
88,221

77,074
84,478

539,473
513,161

486,912
563,680

-9.7
+9.8

2,079
19,929
16,135

1,362
13,297
12,665

16,838
27,194
75,452

26,894
30,227
125,061

+59.7
+11.2
+65.7

1,404

1,281

8,753

8,926

+2.0

1913
1913
1913

4,750
7,476
3,025

42,036
6,598
6,324

None....

61,240
71,358
79,311

83,511
57,826
83,180

+36.4
-19,0
+4.9

113,479
109,831
18,920

104,932
103,545
14,927
•92,852
30,842

724,841
714,893

788,628
783,754

+8.8
+9.6

650,765
196,161

• 685,158
152,540

+24.4
-22.2

+10.0

+17.9

-G.8
+4.4

-27.2
+520.1
-32.0

1913
1913
1913

July,
\\ri\,
from
July,
1923

-0.1

1913
1913
1913

1,210

July
from
June

1913
1913

2,855
3,214
24,075

mz

Per cent
increase (+)
or decrease (~)

+27.'4

TRADE AND INDUSTRY OF FOBEIGN
COUNTRIES—Continued
Belgium
Production: Zinc

short tons..

171 170

1S4

189

181 201

Canada

Total trade:
Imports
...thous. of dolls..
Exports
__...thous. of dolls,.
Exports of key commodities (quantities):
Canned salmon
thous. of pounds^.
Cheese
...thous. of pounds..
Wheat
thous. of bushs_.
Production:
Pig iron
thous. of long tons..
Steel ingots
thous. of long tons..
Bank clearings
mills, of dolls..
Bond issues:
Govt. and provincial
thous. of dolls..
Municipal
thous. of dolls..
Corporation.
..thous. of dolls..
Employment:
Total (1st of following
month)
index number..
Newsprint paper:
Production
„
short tons..
Shipments
short tons..
Stocks
short tons..
Exports (total printing)
short tons..
Building contracts awarded.--thous. of dolls..
Railroad operations:
Freight carried......mills, of ton-miles..
Net operating revenue
thous. of dolls..
17

Relative to January, 1920.




3,477
4,350

+S2.6

+16.0

+9.0

+785.0
-11.7
+109.1

+80.8
+45.4

+ r>.4
-3.0
+23-4

178

+8.1
+6.1
+20.8

-9.0

-22.8

"1920
107,667
113,212
15,336
95,717
26,185

23,818

1919
1919
1919
1919
1913

74

48

LIFE INSURANCE

r

[Relative numbers for base year in bold-faced type; numerical data on opposite page]
PREMIUM COLLECTIONS
(new and renewals)

NEW BUSINESS

ORDINARY
INSURANCE

INDUSTRIAL
INSURANCE

GROUP
INSURANCE

TOTAL
INSURANCE

ORDI- INDUSNARY TRIAL GROUP TOTAt
INSUR- INSUR- INSUR- INSURANCE
ANCE
ANCE ANCE

YEAR AND MONTH

Number
of
policies

Value

Number
of
policies

Value

Number
of
contracts

Value

Number
of
contracts

Value

Value .

Relative to 1913

102
127
149

100
108
113
109
109

100
106
112
113
118

100
120
220
620
1,620

100
219
227
378
857

100
106
111
111

100
100
106
125
147

140
226
259
208
210
246

155
271
330
273
299
359

114
122
132
145
153
174

127
150
179
202
228
276

1,420
3,280
3,800
1,180
1,920
3,180

1,186
2,044
2,044
535
1,327
2,498

118
141
154
156
163
167

January...
FebruaryMarch
April

174
188
221
214

244
270
314
306

142
150
180
151

200
214
256
237

1,080
1,160
1,520
980

837
687
1,028
1,442

May....
June
July....
August-

228
226
211
199

323
321
302
287

164
152
143
135

241
223
213
198

1,340
1,360
1,300
1,060

September..
October
November..
December..

189
203
213
259

256
283
295
3S8

126
164
161
172

187
256
243
265

200
214
223
251

299
310
404
363

144
145
176
250

June
July....
August.

264
275
243
230

390
402
355
338

September..
October
November..
December..

221
240
246
299

January...
February..
March
April
May....
June
July....
August.

1913 monthly
1914 monthly
1915 monthly
1916 monthly
1917 monthly

average..
average..
average..
average..
average.*

100
99
105
120
146

100

1918 monthly
1919 monthly
1920 monthly
1921 monthly
1922 monthly
1923 monthly

average..
average..
average..
average..
average..
average..

100
104
108
117
130

100
107
115
123
134

100
144
269
397
856

100
105
110
119
131

157
254
305
257
289
356

140
165
194
209
229
256

147
168
189
210
239
279

1,489
2,753
4,161
4,292
4,503
5,811

143
168
196
212
234
265

147
156
187
162

237
259
305
298

212
226
254
231

228
206
234
212

6,772
4,164
3,761
3,922

220
225
252
229

602
1,088
686
1,066

175
165
155
146

304
302
282
271

234
230
225
215

233
235
239
242

4,597
3,681
4,303
3,739

237
233
231
223

1,140
1,340
1,360
948

1,042
904
1,003
5,544

137
171
170
187

245
281
288
401

197
221
225
281

220
245
230
343

3,881
4,328
4,744
6,133

229
229
299

217
221
266
401

1,980
1,920
2,620
2,180

1,050
929
1,440
2,021

154
157
194
250

284
292
376
388

241
240
279
259

260
239
266
259

5,697
7,031
5,186
5,658

249
245
280
263

210
182
160
149

313
284
256
245

2,620
9,120
1,980
1,500

2,635
3,164
1,243
1,266

219
199
175
163

395
336
322

263
257
250
247

254
271
268

4,675
4,919
5,361
5,347

264
263
258
255

307
342
359
437

146
176
173

241
293
283
295

1,540
1,760
9,760

1,232
566
1,085
13,339

160
187
186
200

298
331
346
513

218
252
255

254
285
271
453

4,708
6,039
6,514
8,592

229
263
263
345

216
231
293
270

343
352
443
405

202
171
183
186

346
277
302
305

2,040
1,780
2,420
2,240

1,102
888
2,018
2,550

204
181
202
200

351
337
420

272
291
313
332

277
280
304
271

7,594
7,139
4,678
7,069

279
294
314

279
260
234
216

418
400
374

200
177
157
160

334
298
260
273

2,220
1,980
2,280
1,420

2,016
1,240
1,805
1,322

213
192
170
170

410
380
357
329

349
344
371

306
304
285

6,764
6,336
7,997

344
340
358

97

;

1922

m

1933
January...
February..
' March
April
May

September..
October
November..
December..




(See footnotes on opposite page)

49

LIFE INSURANCE x
tBase year In bold-faced type; relative numbers on opposite page]
NEW
Ordinary

Industrial

BUSINESS

PREMIUM t COLLECTIONS
(new a n d renewal}

Group

ThouThousands Thousands sands Thousands Num Number Thou- Thousands
berof
of
of
of
of
of
sands of
of
conpoll
dollars poiidollars tracts persons
dollars
con*
covered
tracts
1913 monthly average..
1914 monthly average..
1915 monthly a v e r g e . . .
1916 monthly average..
1917 monthly average..

80
79
84
96
117

143,470
138,519
146,878
181,569
213,193

380
410
429
416
414

51,909
55,217
58,128
58,645
61,484

1918 monthly
1919 monthly
1920 monthly
1921 monthly
1922 monthly
1923 monthly

112
181
207
166
168
197

221,940
473,417
392,315
429,113
514,884

433
465
500
550
582
662

66,099
77,901
93,044
104,813
118,234
143,338

1922
January.
February..
March
April.!,...

139
150
177
171

349,407
387,956
450,311
438,863

538
569
684
572

May....
June
July....
August.

182
181
169
159

463,912
461,075
432,750
412,109

September..
October....
November..
December..

151
162
170
207

1993
January.
February.
March
April
,

Ordinary! Industrial

Total

YEAR AND M O N T H

Number
of

persons
covered

Thousands
of
dollars

Group

Total

Thousands of dollars

1,736
3,795
3,941
6,565
14,873

460
489
512
511
526

197,115
197,531
208,946
246,780
289,550

38,953
40,606
42,262
45,721
50,485

10,778
11,580
12,421
J3,2S0
14,440

36
52
07
143
30S

62,138
64,780
69,144
65,233

164
190
59
96
159

20,582
35,487
35,490
9,281
23,0-13
43,357

545
647
707
716
750
860

308,621
501,648
601,950
506,410
570,389
701,579

54,579
64,348
75,4C2
81,424
89,242

15,807
18,088
20,342
22,687
25,751
30,057

530
991
1,408
1,545
1,021
2,092

70,922
83,427
07,302
105,550
110,614
131,779

103,725
110,954
132,833
123,208

54
58
76
49

14,533
11,920
17,843
25,029

676
719
861
743

4G7,C65
510,830
600,987
587,101

82,413
88,056
98,7M
89,983

24,500
22,201
25,195
22,805

2.438
1,499
1,354
1,412

109,411
111,750
125,303
114,200

579
542
512

125,084
115,959
110,423
102,901

67
68
65
53

10,444
18,885
11,916
18,508

806
759
711
671

599,440
595,919
555,089
533,518

91,159
S9,420
87,4C4
83,002

25,150
25,318
25,717
20,128

1,655
1,325
1,540
1,346

117,099
110,003
114,729
111,076

367,855
405,369
423,636
556,109

480
623
611
653

97,257
132,790
125,960
137,707

57
67
68
474

18,086
15,692
17,415
96,245

631
785
780
861

483,198
553,851
567,011
790,061

76,637
86,138
87,629
109,625

23,709
26,456
24,813
36,957

1,397
1,558
l,70S
2,208

101,743
114,162
114,151
148,789

160
171
223
201

428,441
444,463
578,986
521,499

547
551
669
950

112,678
. 114,758
137,853
208,105

99
96
131
109

18,223
16,126
25,005
35,089

708
722
893
1,152

559,342
975,347
741,844
764,693

93,945
93,534
108,752
101,031

28,002
25,700
28,G40
27,SG9

2,051
2,531
1,867
2,037

123,997
121,771
139,200
130,938

June....
July.._
August.

211
220
194
184

559,389
577,208
508,757
485,448

797
693
609
567

162,326
147,444
132,798
127,090

131
456
99
75

45,738
54,931
21,570
21,980

1,008
914
803
751

767,453
779,583
663,125
634,517

102,252
100,182
97,406
96,209

27,339
29,109
2S,S77
29,006

l,0S3
1,771
1,930
1,925

131,275
131,122
128,213
127,140

September..
October....
November..
December..

177
192
197
239

490,360
515,700
627,385

556
668
657
682

124,905
152,061
146,882
153,154

49
77
88
488

21,391
9,828
18,838
231,568

734
860
854
921

587,264
652,249
681,420
1,012,108

84,838
98,241
99,377
119,800

27,378
30,697
29,195
48,803

1,095
2,174
2,345
3,093

113,911
131,112
130,917
171,097

173
185
234
216

492,559
504,553
635,192
530,949

767
649
694
705

179,656
143,762
156,792
158,557

102
89
121
112

16,415
10,650
20,489
24,758

19,127
15,421
35,040
44,269

940
834
928
922

955,823
844,730
948,390
946,448

691,341
663,736
827,021
783,775

106,045
113,423
121,843
129,272

29,808
30,200
32,814
29,235

2,734
2,570
1,684
2,545

13S,640
146,193
156,341
101,052

223
208
187
173

600,324
573,508
536,897
484,966

761
674
596
610

173,629
154,495
135,015
141,525

111
99
114
71

20,006
13,217
17,878
14,828

35,002
21,519
31,343
22,949

9S4
883
783
783

1,004,127
896,096
800, SS7
797,910

80S, 955
749,521
703,255
649,439

135,836
134,071
144,5S0

32,963
32,744
30,758

2,435
2,281
2,876

171,234
169,090
178,217

average..,
average..,
average...
average...
average...
average...

1924
January.
February.,
March

July....,
August..

n
31
81
71

40,7(7

September..
October,...
November..
December..

and ^ md p n d d b y the Association of Life Insurance Presidents. The data on new business represent only new business that has been paid for, exclusive of revivals, increases
%
r£w7 e
additions. Premium collections show the amount of money actually invested in life insurance each month, and include total premium collections, new and
S t e considerations for annuities and for supplementary contracts involving and not involving life contingencies. The 45 companies whose new business is in"uaed In this table had in force 81 per cent of the total legal reserve life insurance outstanding in the United States as of Dec. 31,1923.




50
WORLD PRODUCTION OF CANE SUGAR AND FLAXSEED*
FLAXSEED

CANE S U G A R

Java

United
States t

Brazil

May

Oct.

Oct.

World

YEAR

Hawaii

Porto
Rico

Cuba

Nov.

Dec.

Dec.

World
total

total

Dec.

1923 latest estimates
1924 latest estimates. ~

9,971
11,293
12,776
13,442
14,508
13,324
13,799
13,656
14,563
14,711

1,976

,

311247
139
311
246
284
122
176
328
295

138
344
486
413
493
440
496
680
651
»667

567
646
593
645
577
600
556
622
592
•537

363
346
484
603
464
406
486
490
408
»379

166

1,514
1,054
1,797
2,009
1,960
1,478
1,473
1,579
1,906
1,993

15,466

.__.._.

India

United
States

Canada

Apr.

Aug.

Aug.

Thousands of bushels

Thousands of short tons
1909-1913 average
1914
1915
1916 .
1917..
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922

Argentina
Jan.*

India

476

640

445

2,295
2,967
3,437
3,442
3,957
4,597
4,209
4,408
4,517
»4,083
4,536

2,614
2,757
2,950
3,058
3,708
2,617
3,361
2,826
2,925
•3,409

110,992
94,559
103,287
82,151
41,063
61,821
. 61,692
87,964
83,288
94,000

31,989
36,928
45,040
39,289
4,032
19,688
30,776
42,033
60,470
47,578

19,870
15,448
15,880
19,040
21,040
20,600
9,400
16,760
10,800
17,443

19,505
13,749
14,030
14,296
9,164
13,369
7,256
10,774
8,029
10,375

12,040
7,175'
10,628
8,260
5,935
6,055
5,473
7,998
4,112
5,009

3,658

127,000

68,684

21,320
18,480

17,400
25,900

7,140
6,135

3 From private sources.
* New crop available in January of the year indicated; January, 1924, estimate is 03,225,000 bushels.

* Louisiana and Texas.
»Exports.

WORLD PRODUCTION OF BEET SUGAR*
World
total i

United
States

Germany

Czechoslovakia

Russia

Poland

Netherlands

Belgium

France

Italy

Denmark

Spain

Sweden

YEAB

Thousands of short tons
'

J

8,432
8,331
6,056
5,808
5,208
4,592
3,490
4,997
5,443
>5,732

610
722
374
821
765
761
726
1,089
* 1,074
«7H

2,296
2,721
1,678
1,721
1,726
1,404
808
1,212
1,416
1,605

1,017
1,004
812
805
584
688
559
770
726
*8U

1,726
1,879
1,824
1,457
1,134
312
86
55
61
V245

6,468

1909-1913 average
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922

927

1,246

1,084

398

1923 latest estimates
1
1

Crops in all countries here given are harvested beginning in September.
From private sources.

•

239
293
263
240
106
195
198
1347

246
316
264
286
215
182
263
314
412
304

276
215
120
140
136
78
152
268
315
3 293

759
334
160
204
221
121
171
370
* 319
515

457

275

336

546

279

209
166
166
160
162
120
185
150
234
300

116
112
117
139
154
169
91
104
80
*176

128
168
143
124
149
156
149
168
156
94

154
170
140
151
144
141
141
181
250
179

353*

187

115

165

3

Includes Ukraine; data from private sources.
< Refined sugar in terms of raw on the b asis of 95 per cent of the raw.

WORLD PRODUCTION OF RICE*
Country

New crop available.

India

Egypt

United
States

Italy

Spain

Japan

Dutch
East
Indiesl

Philippines

Apr.

World
total 3

_„.

Apr.

Aug.

Sept.

Sept.

Nov.

Dec.

Dec.

Millions of pounds (cleaned)
Normal consumption (1909-1913)
1909-1913
1914
1915..!
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922

67 891

14,602

518

-

110,780
116,000
126,000
131,000
134,000
109,000
128,000
118,000
129,000
131,000

72,950
61,109
73,315
78,521
80,638
54,526
71,743
61,963
74,446
75,524

553
61
551
230
487
692
244
283
472

481
657
804
1,135
965
1,072
1,166
1,446
1,045
1,150

646
741
763
708
716
712
662
614
641
632

297
337
320
329
322
283
412
394
366
373

14,009
17,909
17,569
18,360
17,143
17,184
19,106
19,849
17,336
19,067

7,349
7,826
7,964
7,912
8,323
8,433
9,179
* 7,716
6,943
6,324

1,124
1,404
1,100
1,289
1,745
2,213
2,089
2,247
2,565
2,681

118,000

'

1923 latest estimates
1924 latest estimates

eceedby

Corrected


375

63,388
251

*270

924
914

709

330

17,425

6,718

2,703
2,684

v e of C h i n a : C h m e s e
3 E x c l u s i v e of C h i n a

1&24?'

* ° P estimated at 52,788,000,000 pounds i a 1920 and 70,218,667,0

reau
°( 4*?*%"*, Bure of Agricultural Economics, and corrected monthly in accordance with latest
, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Countries are placed in the order m whi
°f Commerce

Dtpartment

51

WORLD PRODUCTION OF COTTON*
World total

N e w crop available

Peru

United
States

Mexico

India

Brazil

Esypt

June

Country

August

August

November

September

September

Thousands of bales (478 pounds net)
1909-1913 average
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919.._
1920
1921
1922

20,660
24,630
18,470
18,970
18,370
18,580
19,925
20,940
15,391
18,900

:_

1923, latest estimates
1924, latest estimates

106
129
113
127
125
142
155
164
157
203

13,033
16,135
11,192
11,500
11,302

322
387
282
281
345

1,453
1,337
989
1,048
1,304

203
199
188
147
i 178

3,328
4,853
3,013
3,748
14,247

339
384
451
505
553

999
1,155
1,251
902
1,170

10,128
12,144

19,125

3,584
4,354
3,128
3,759
3,393

12,041
11,421
13,440
7,954
9,762

.

193
10S
95
103
135

138

4,247

719

1,213
i

1

1

From private sources.

1922 acreage 12,490,000 compared with 11,970,000 in 1921.

WORLD PRODUCTION OF WHEAT*
World total

New crop available

Argentina

Australia

India

United
States

Spain

Italy

France

January

Country^„ .

January

March

July

August

August

August

Germany Rumania
August

August

Canada
September

Millions of bushels
!

Normal consumption

64

(1909-1913)

37

, 301

i

1909-1913 average
1914
1915-...
1916.. .
1917

3,577
3,586
4,199
12,609
12,288

157
105
169
169
SO

85
103
25
179
152

351
312
377
323
382

690
391
1,026
636
637

1918.. .
1919..
1920...
1921
1922

12,804
l 2,743
12,863
»3/069
i 3,096

224
180
217
156
191

115
76
46
146
129.

370
230
378
250
367

921
963
833
815
868

196
247

109
126

369
364

•..

1923, latest estimates
1924, latest estimates

' m&toAjS&tSSESr
* Data compiled by

'^S^par^SotApiculture,

136

581

'
,

786
S14

'

236

361

221

31

116

130
116
139
152
143

183
170
171
177
140

318
283
*223
205
135

152
140
142

87
49
89
78

197
161
394
2*53
234

136 •
129
139
145
125

183
170
141
194
162

226
*182
'237
*323
<243

186
ISO
«83
<10S
172

MS
*G6
*61
<79
«92

189
193
263
301
400

225
176

276

106

102

474
2S2

157
136

*no
*82

'• Forme? W m , , Bessarabia and Bukowlm,
• Forme? W m Bessarabia a d B

Bureau of ^fcfura* £ — , , a < ^ ^

by that department or by V. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Countries we piacea in mo raw m »u.c
Corrected to August 20, 1924.




u

,

52

FARM PRICES AND PULLMAN COMPANY EARNINGS
PULLMAN COMPANY EARNINGS*

FARMS PRICES *

YEAR AND M O N T H

Grain

Cotton
Dairy
Fruits
Unclasand
and
Meat
and
sified
vegeta- animals poultry cottonproducts seed
ble

All
groups

Revenue

fielative
to 1913

Relative to 1909-19H

Dollars

Expenses

Eelatlve
to 1913

Dollars

1909-1914 monthly average1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average

100
92
103
120
126
217

100
92
100
83
123
202

100
108
112
104
120
173

100
100
101
99
106
133

100
97
85
78
119
187

100
94
95
95
100
130

100
100
102
100
117
176

100
95
101
107
125

$3,444,935
3,283,532
3,482,567
3,683,551
4,310,557

100
98
95
110
126

$2,344,509
2,294,098
2,233,637
2,573,210
2,954,073

1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923

226
231
231
112
105
114

162
189
249
148
152
136

202
206
173
108
113
106

160
182
197
151
135
142

245
247
248
101
156
216

157
162
152
90
94
109

200
209
205
116
124
134

121
167
175
156
159
176

4,163,929
5,755,962
6,011,659
5,369,897
5,465,191
6,048,019

144
173
.198
230
188
199

3,382,756
4,051,521
4,637,393
5,395,317
4,419,117
4,657,091

January...
February.
March
April

91
102
111
114

159
173
181
190

95
108
118
117

149
136
129
125

129
128
131
135

84
80
80

114
118
123
123

157
122
149
145

5,423,399
4,216,373
5,150,156
4,995,646

200
207
228
218

4,691,677
4,857,069
5,335,321
5,101,764

May..,.
June
July
August-

115
111
105
100

206
197
174
129

119
121
120
114

123
124
123
125

144
160
166
166

84
85
86

127
128
126
120

151
187
158
173

5,212,242
6,452,534
5,438,778
5,957,687

234
231
159
143

5,474,469
5,405,566
3,719,693
3,358,339

September .
October
November.,
December..

97
101
106
111

109
101
101
104

112
113
108
107

132
142
152
161

160
168
186
195

90
97
94
103

119
123
126
131

172
164
142
183

5,912,209
5,654,154
4,877,862
6,291,252

141
149
155
199

3,297,714
3,491,987
3,631,334
4,664,484

January...
FebruaryMarch
April

113
114
117
121

117
122
130
146

110
110
110
110

157
151
144
139

203
215
224
222

104
108
105
101

134
136
136
137

162
148
167
162

5,572,223
5,101,273
5,769,034
5,574,904

195
185
207
208

4,561,299
4,337,726
4,862,965
4,865,579

May...,
June..,,
July.....
August.,

123
119
112
109

157
161
165
151

108
103
105
104

136
135
133
138

211
207
199
190

102
107
99
101

135
133
130
128

174
193
190
207

5,984,480
6,551,419
7,129,529

210
225
218
215

4,919,021
5,272,443
5,114,758
5,040,228

September.
October....
November.
December..

111
113
110
108

131
123
114
114

112
106
100

130
141
151
152

204
221
238
253

100
94

130
132
133
135

202
171
156
176

6,941,959
5,878,590
5,384,030
6,052,427

206
218
223
74

4,821,329
5,119,562
5,231,521
1,

January...
February..
March
April

110
113
114
113

118
123
128
128

101
102
104
106

140
138
123
114

255
247
219
226

99

134
134
128
128

174
162
163
171

5,981,746
5,567,657
5,609,417
5,878,099

222
215
219
221

5,215,495
5,035,050
5,123,349
5,174,507

May....
June
July
August..

114
116
130
141

132
146
142
138

107
105
103
116

111
111
111
112

222
219
215
219

94
95
101
103

127
128
130
137

169
195

5,831,201
6,716,770

220
197

5,158,264

monthly average..
monthly average,.
monthly average.
monthly average.
monthly average..
monthly average.
1922

1923

1924

September.
October
November..
December,.
jrices, compiled by the Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, supplant the two series, formerly published fa the g m ^
?^^ e ( ? " F a r m Crops/' and "Livestock," respectively. The weights used are the average annual marketings by farmers for tne pe" u
",VuiY*u c u ^ s p i a i i a u o n o f t h i s m d e x s e e August monthly supplement to " C r o p s and Markets" published by the Department of Agriculture.
Pullman Company earnings as reported by the Interstate Commerce CommUsion.




53

SOURCES OF DATA
DATE OF I'UIIUCATION

I.—REPORTS FROM GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS—FEDERAL, STATE, AND FOREIGN
ARGENTINE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE
AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH'S BUREAU OF CENSUS AND STATISTICS.
BANK OF JAPAN
BRITISH BOARD OF TRADE
CANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
CANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF TRADE
AND COMMERCE.
FEDERAL FARM LOAN BOARD
__.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF ATLANTA
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF BOSTON.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF CHICAGO.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF CLEVELAND.
•
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLAS..]
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF KANSAS
CITY.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF MINNEAPOLIS.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF N E W
YORK.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF PHILADELPHIA.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF RICHMOND.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF SAN
FRANCISCO.

Cereal exports from Argentina
Price index for Australia

Estadistica Agro-Pccuaria.
Federal Reserve Bulletin...

Price index for Japan
Price Index for United Kingdom.......
Price index for Canada
Employment in Canadian trade-unions
Operations of Canadian employment service.
Foreign trade of Canada
Canadian railroad operations
Canadian iron and steel production
Agricultural loans by land banks
Wholesale trade
Savings deposits in First Fed. Res. Dist
Savings deposits in Seventh Fed. Res. Dist-.
Agricultural pumps
Savings deposits in Fourth Fed. Res. Dist...

Federal Reserve Bulletin
British Board of Trade Journal
,
Labour Gazette (Canadian)
Labour Gazette (Canadian)
Labour Gazette (Canadian)
,
Foreign trade of Canada
Operating Revenues, etc. of Railways •
Pressreleases*
Not published
Business Conditions
,
Monthly Review
,
Business Conditions
•
Business Conditions
,
Business Review
Business Conditions.
Business Conditions.
Business Conditions.

Wholesale trade
Wholesale trade
Retail sales of lumber by rural yards

Foreign exchange rates and index
Savings deposits in Second Fed. Res. Dist
Savings deposits in Third Fed. Res. Dist
Wholesale trade
,
Savings deposits in Fifth Fed. Res. Dist
Wholesale trade
Savings deposits in Twelfth Fed. Res. Dist..
Wholesale trade
Automobile registrations
FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD..Foreign exchange index numbers
Debits to individual accounts
Condition of Federal reserve banks
Condition of reporting member banks
Money held outside U.S. Treasury and Federal reserve system to July 1,1922.
Wholesale price index numbers
Department store trade; in cooperation with
National Retail Dry Goods Association.
Index numbers of department store, mailorder, and chain-store trade.
Barley and rye receipts
Sales of loose leaf tobacco
Index of ocean freight rates
Index numbers of production
..
,
Wholesale trade
^..
FRENCH MINISTRY OF LABOR AND Price index for France

SOCIAL WELFARE.
ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
INDIAN DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION. _

Employment in Illinois,
Price index for India...
Railways revenues and expenses. ~
Telephone operating revenue and income
Telegraph operations and income
Express operations and income
DEPARTMENT OF Massachusetts employment

• MASSACHUSETTS
LABOR AND INDUSTRIES.
MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF
v PUBLIC UTILITIES.
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF
LABOR.
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF
PUBLIC WORKS.
PANAMA CANAL
PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND INDUSTRY.
p . S. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
u. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE:
BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY—
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS.

Fed. Res. Bull, and daily statement*
Monthly Review
Business and Financial Conditions
Business and Financial Conditions
Business and Agricultural Conditions
Busjaess and Agricultural Conditions
Business Conditions.
Business Conditions
Business Conditions
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve BulletinFederal Reserve Bulletin..
Federal Reserve BulletinFederal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Buleltin
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Bulletin de la Satlsque Gcneralo.
The Employment Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin....
Preliminary statement Class I roads
Operations of largo telephone companies.
Not published..
Not published
Monthly statement*

Monthly.
Second week of month.
Second week of month.
Monthly.
Semimonthly.
Semimonthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Daily nnd monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly (second week of month).
Sunday papers and monthly.
Fri. morning papers and monthly.
Frl. afternoon papers and monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Second week of month.
Monthly.
Monthly.

Milk receipts at Boston
Not published
New York State factory employment and Labor Marker Bulletin and press releases*. Monthly.
earnings.
Yearly.
Annual re port
New York State canal traffic
Last weekly issue of month.
The Panama Canal Record
Panama Canal traffic
Semimonthly.
Semimonthly report*—
Unemployment in Pennsylvania
Not published
Government employment
Monthly supplement.
Crops and Markets
Monthly supplement.
Crops and Markets
Beef, pork, and lamb production
Monthly supplement.
Crops and Markets
Prices of farm products to producers...
Releases about 1st of month (cotton)
Crops and Markets and press releases*
Wool stocks in dealers' hands
and 10th (other crops).
Crop production
Monthly supplement.
Crops and Markets
Cold-storage holdings and fish frozen
Monthly supplement.
Crops and Markets
Movement of cattle, hogs, and sheep
Weekly.
*
Receipts of butter, cheese, eggs, and poultry.. Crops and Markets
Quarterly.
Crops and Markets
Production of dairy products
Monthly supplement.
Crops and Markets
Car lot shipments of fruits and vegetables
Monthly supplement.
Crops and Markets
Farm labor, wages, supply, etc
Weekly.
Foreign crops and markets*
World crop production
Annually.
Crops and Markets
Livestock on farms
Yearly.
Total lumber production from 1913 to 1920.... Production of Lumber, Lath, and Shingles. Yearly.
Pulp Wood Consumption and Wool-Pudp
Wood pulp production, 1914 and 1916
FOREST SERVICE
Production.
• S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE:
Semimonthly during season.
Preliminary report on ginnings*
Cotton ginned..
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS. _
Preliminary report on cotton comsuned. 15th of month.
Cotton consumed and on hand
20th of month.
Wool machinery and cotton spindles*
Active textile machinery...
First week of month.
Census of hides, skins, and leather*
Leather, hides, shoes, production, and stocks. Preliminary report on cottonseed*
18th of month.
Cottonseed and cottonseed oil
30th of month.
Pressrelease*
Hosiery statistics
30th of month.
Pressrelease*
Men's and boys' clothing
30th of month..
Pressrelease*.Malleable castings
30th of month.
Press release*_.
Wheat flour production from May/1923
30th of month.
Pressrelease*
Pyroxylin coated textiles
20th of month.
Pressrelease*
..
Stokers, sales from January, 1923
One month after end of quarter.
Statement on stocks of leaf tobacco
Stocks of tobacco held
30th of month.
Pressrelease*
Wool consumption
'One month after end of quarter.
Pressrelease*
..
Wool stocks
30th of month.
Pressrelease*
Work clothing
—
'—
30th of month.
Pressrelease*
,.
Floor and wall tile
20th of month.
Pressrelease*
Enameled sanitary ware
>ilers prior to publication in the respective
iThis T hnot necessarily the source of the figures published In the SURVEY
is i s
* ^
riication dates of the SURVEY.
fi&
column and the right-hand column had beon added to assist readers
Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.



SOURCES OF DATA—Continued

L—REPORTS FROM GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS, FEDERAL, STATE, AND FOREIGN—Continued
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE:
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS (Con,). - .

Produc. indexes of raw materials and manfrs..
Fats and oils, production, consumption, and
stocks.
Fabricated struc. steel sales from Apr., 1922....
Automobile production from July, 1921
Wood chemical operations
Steel casting sales
Steel furniture shipments
Locomotive shipments and unfilled orders
Earnings of public utilities
Plumbing goods price index
Architectural terracotta
Fish catch at principalfishingports
BUREAU OF FISHERIES
BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DO- All imports and exports
Fuel loaded for consumption by vessels at
MESTIC COMMERCE.
principal clearing ports.
Tonnage of vessels, entered and cleared in
United States foreign trade.
Data on trade, employment and coal and iron
production of foreign countries.
Wholesale price of wool
Warehouse stocks of rice
Vessels under construction completed, and lost.
BUREAU OF NAVIGATION
Building material price indexes
BUREAU OF STANDARDS
Wheatflourproduction, prior to July, 1920....
U. S. GRAIN CORPORATION..
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR:
Refined petroleum products, production, etc..
BUREAU OF MINES
Explosives, production, shipments, etc
Portland cement, production, etc
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY..
Coal and coke production
Crude petroleum, production, etc
Electric power production
Consumption of fuel by public utility plants..
Figures on nonferrous metal production
U. S. PATENT OFFICE
Patents granted
Visitors to National Parks
DIVISION OF NATIONAL PARKS.
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR:
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

17. S. POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
IT. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE...
U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENTBUREAU OF THE MINT
BUREAU OP INTERNAL REVENUE.

TJ. S. WAR DEPARTMENT:
ENGINEER CORPS

Number on pay roll—United States factories.
Employment agency operations
Immigration and emigration statistics
Wholesale prices of commodities, including
farm products, food, clothing, metals, etc.
Wholesale price index
Retail price index of foods
Retail coal prices
United States Postal savings
Postal receipts
Passports issued
_
Government debt, receipts and disbursements.
Money in circulation from July 1,1922
Domestic receipts of gold at mint
Oleomargarine production
Consumption of manufactured tobacco, snuff,
cigars, cigarettes, and oleomargarine.
Internal Revenue taxes on specified articles...

Iron ore movement
Sault Ste. Marie Canal traffic
Ohio River cargo traffic
MISSISSIPPI-WARRIOR SERVICE... Barge traffic on Mississippi River
WAR FINANCE CORPORATION
Agricultural loans
WISCONSIN INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION. Wisconsin factory earnings and employment..

Survey of Current BusinessStatistics of fats and oils *__.

Monthly.
Quarterly^ (one month after end of
15th of month.
20th of month.
30th of month.
20th of month.
20th of month.
lOthof month.
Monthly.
10th of month.
15th of month.

Press release *
Press release *
_
•
Press release *
Press release *
;
_
Press release *
.
_
Press release *
Survey of Current Business
Press release
Press release *
Monthly statement
Monthly Sum. Foreign Commerce (Pt. I) 1 . Last week of month.
Not published

Monthly Sum. Foreign Commerce (Pt. II) Middle of next month.
Various foreign sources
Yearly.
Wholesale Prices
Mon. Sum. Foreign Commerce (Pt. II)._. Monthly.
First weekly issue of month (MonCommerce Reports
days).
Not published
No longer published
_
_.
Second week of month.
Refinery statistics *
Monthly.
Explosive statistics •
20th of month.
Report on Portland cement output *
Second or third weekly issue of mo.
Weekly report on production of coal *
25th of month.
Preliminary statistics on petroleum *
End of month.
Production of electric power *
End of month.
Production of electric power *
Annually.
Mineral Resources
Not published
_.
Not published
_
, Monthly.
Industrial Survey *
_
_. First week of month.
Report of Activities of State and Munici- Every 4 or 5 weeks.
pal Employment Agencies.
Not published
Wholesale Prices of Commodities
Monthly.
Monthly Labor Review
_
Monthly Labor Review
, Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly Labor Review
12th of month.
Postal Savings News Bulletin
7th of month.
Statement of Postal Receipts *
10th of month.
Not published
Daily Statement of the U. S. Treasury—_, Last day of month.
Monthly.
Circulation of money
_.
Not published
Not published
First week of month.
Statement of tax-paid products *
Classified collections of Internal Revenue. 25th of month.
Monthly during season.
Monthly statistical reportMonthly during season.
Monthly statistical reportMonthly.
Not published
Not published in form used.15th of month.
Bulletin on Wisconsin labor market *

H.-REPORTS FROM TRADE ASSOCIATIONS AND PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS
(Excluding individual firms reporting data to be combined with other firms or trade associations)
ABERTHAW CONSTRUCTION CO
ABRASIVE PAPER AND CLOTH MANUFACTURERS' EXCHANGE.
ASSOCIATED CORN PRODUCTS MANUFACTURERS.
AMERICAN BUREAU OF METAL STATISTICS.
AMERICAN FACE BRICK ASSOCIATION..
AMERICAN NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS'
ASSOCIATION.
AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE.
AMERICAN PETROLEUM INSTITUTE—
AMERICAN PIG IRON ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN RAILWAY ASSOCIATION

(Car Service Division).

AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH Co.
AMERICAN WALNUT MANUFACTURERS'
ASSOCIATION.
AMERICAN WASHING MACHINE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION.
AMERICAN WRITING PAPER COMPANY.
AMERICAN ZINC INSTITUTE
ANTHRACITE BUREAU OF INFORMATION.
ASSOCIATED KNIT UNDERWEAR MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
ASSOCIATION OF LIFE INSURANCE
PEESIDENTS.

Building costs
Sale of abrasive paper and cloth
Corn ground into starch, glucose, etc.
Copper, silver, and lead production..
Zinc production in Belgium
Zinc stocks in United Kingdom.......
Face brick production, stocks, etc
Stocks of newsprint paper
....
Steel ingot production
Gasoline and kerosene consumption
,
Merchant pig iron production, etc
Freight car surplus and shortage
Car loadings and bad-order cars
Stockholders in the company
v

Not published.
Not published
„_._.-..„.
Not published
„
Not published.
„
Trends in the Face Brick IndustryMonthly report

Monthly.
Monthly.
7th of month.

Press release to trade papers Bulletin
Not ,
published.
awy>
Car Surplusages and Shortages •_
Information Bulletin *
Financial papers
_-~

Weekly.
Weekly.
4.
Third week of month.

Walnut lumber and logs.

Not published.

Quarterly.

Washing machine sales...

Not published.

Purchases and sales of paper
Produc. and stocks zinc, retorts operating
Anthracite shipments and stocks
Knit underwear production

New life insurance business
Premium collections
Distribution of assets...
AUTOMOBILE MANUFACTURERS* ASSO- Automobile accessory sales
CIATION.

BOSTON, CAPE COD AND NEW YORK
CANAL CO.

Construction trade papersNot published

Cape Cod Canal traffic

* Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.



Not published
I Press release to trade papers *
Statement of anthracite shipments *

13th of month.
15th of month.

Monthly report *
.__.

Monthly.

Not published
Not published
'.[ Not published
I " No longer published..
_.! Not published

Monthly.

* Imports and exports of gold and silver in Part II.

55
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued

II.-REPORTS FROM TRADE ASSOCIATIONS AND PRIVATE ORGANlZATIONS-ConOnued
(Excluding individual firms reporting data to bo combined with otherfirmsor trade association*)
BOSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
BRIDGE BUILDERS AND STRUCTURAL
SOCIETY.
BUREAU OF RAILWAY ECONOMICS

CALIFORNIA REDWOOD ASSOCIATION. _
CALIFORNIA WHITE AND SUGAR PINE
ASSOCIATION.
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
CHILDS CO
CLEVELAND TRUST CO
COMPAGNIE TJNIVERSELLE DU CANAL
MARITIME DE SUEZ.
CONTAINER CLUB._______
CREDIT CLEARING HOUSE
,
DAIRYMEN'S LEAGUE COOPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION, INC.
F. W. DODGE CORP
EMPLOYERS' ASSOCIATION OF DETROIT.
ENAMELED
SANITARY
MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
FEDERATION OF IRON AND STEEL

MANUFACTURERS (British).

Receipts of wool at Boston
Fabricated structural steel sales before,April,
1922
Number of tons carried 1 mile
Average receipts per ton-mile
Passengers carried 1 mile.
Railway employment
Locomotives in bad order
Per cent of earnings on valuation
Redwood lumber production, etc
Sugar pine lumber production, etc

Trade papers
No longer published
,
Summary of operating statistics.,
Not published
,
Summary of operating statistics.,
Not published
Not published
,
Not published
Not published
Not published
Wheat, corn and oats, receipts, etc
Trade papers
Restaurant sales
Monthly report
Automobile production, monthly, January, Not published currently.
1920, to June, 1921.
Suez Canal traffic....
Le Canal de Suez

Daily.
Monthly.
Monthly.

Daily.
Monthly.
tb, 15th, and 25th of month.

Production of paper box board through April, Not published
1923.
Credit conditions
Credit
Milk deliveries to milk plants
Not published
Building statistics—Contracts awarded
Statement on Building Statistics.
Detroit factory employment
Weekly press release
Enameled sanitary ware
Not published
;—
British iron and steel production
Trade papers

FELT MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION.. Roofing felt production, stocks, etc..
FINE COTTON GOODS EXCHANGE
Fine cotton goods production and sales
FIRE EXTINGUISHER EXCHANGE
Shipments offireextinguishers
FOUNDRY EOUIPMENT MANUFAC- Foundry equipment production
TURERS1 ASSOCIATION.
HARDWOOD MANFRS. INSTITUTE
Stocks and unfilled orders hardwood lumber-.
HAFFARDS, G. M., & Co
Fall River Mill dividends
HYDRAULIC SOCIETY
Hydraulic machinery shipments, etc
ILLUMINATING GLASSWARE GUILD
Illuminating glassware production, orders, etc.
IOWA-NEBRASKA CANNERS' ASSOCN_. Unsold stock of sweet corn....
JACKSONVILLE CHAMBER OF COM- Turpentine and rosin receipts
MERCE.
JONES BROS. TEA CO
_ Sales..
LAKE SUPERIOR IRON ORE ASSOCN... Consump., stocks, and shipments, iron ore—
LEATHER BELTING EXCHANGE
Sales of leather belting
LIFE INSURANCE SALES RESEARCH Life insurance sales..
BUREAU.
MAPLE FLOORING MANFRS. ASSOCN.. Mapleflooringproduction, etc.
MCLEAN BUILDING REPORTS, LTD
Canadian building contracts
MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. Receipts and shipments of lead and zinc

Weekly.
Monthly.
Second week of month.

Not published
Trade papers
Not published

Monthly.

Monthly report
Bradstreets
Not published
Not published
Weekly report *
Naval Stores Review..

Quarterly.
Weekly.
Weekly.

Financial papers
Monthly report *
Monthly report (not published)
Monthly release

Monthly.
- [&th of month.

Not published—
Canadian Building Review
Receipts and shipments at St. Louis
Not published
Mississippi River traffic
MICHIGAN HARDWOOD MANUFACTUR- Hardwood and softwood lumber, production Not published
ERS' ASSOCIATION.
and shipments.
MINNEAPOLIS CHAMBER OF COM- Linseed oil and oil-cake shipments
Monthly statements..

MERCE.
NATIONAL ALLIANCE OF CASE GOODS
ASSOCIATION.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BRASS
MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL- ASSOCIATION OF BUTTON
MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHAIR
MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CORRUGATED AND FIBER BOX MANFRS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FARM
EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FINISHERS
OF COTTON FABRICS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HAT MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PIANO
BENCH AND STOOL MANUFACTURERS
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STEEL
FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SHEET AND
TIN PLATE MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION* OF WOOL
MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE.
NATIONAL BOTTLE MANFRS. ASSOCN..
NATIONAL CONTAINER ASSOCIATION...
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CREDIT ASSOCIATION.
NAT. INDUS. CONFERENCE BOARD
NATIONAL MACHINE TOOL BUILDERS'
ASSOCIATION.
H 0 N A X PAYING BRICK MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION,
RATIONAL RETAIL DRY GOODS ASSO..
RATIONAL WOOD CHEMICAL ASSO.—
££w ORLEANS BOARD OF TRADE
ORLEANS COTTON EXCHANGE,..
NEWS PRIKT SERVICE BUREAU

Unfilled orders and shipments of furniture

Not published

-

Button stocks, activity, etc

Weekly report

-

Chair shipments and unfilled orders

Monthly.
3d of month.

Not published in form used

Brass faucets, orders and shipments

•

Not published in form used

Weekly.

Production of paper box board through April, Not published
1923.
Business conditions (Chicago Federal Monthly.
Agricultural pumps
Reserve).
...
Finished cotton goods, billings, orders, ship- Not published
ments, and stocks.
Notpublished
-.
Hat production, etc., and stocks of fur.
Production, shipments, and unfilled orders of
piano benches and stools.
Steel furniture shipments...

Not published

Sheet-metal production and stocks

Notpublished

1913figuresfor active textile machinery

No longer published

Production and shipments of passenger cars
and trucks.
Glass bottle production index.._._.—.—----Production of paper box board since April,
1923.
Credit conditions
Cost of living
Machine-tool orders, etc
Paving-brick production, etc..

Department store trade (see Fed. Res. Bd.)...
Production of wood alcohol and acetate of lime.
Rice distribution through New Orelans
Cotton receipts into sight..Canadian newsprint production, etc..•—-—United States newspri data since June, 1923.
newsprint
ORK
KIZ v
COFFEE AND SUGAR EX._ Coffee receipts, stocks, etc.0 R KM E
*AL EXCHANGE
EXCHANG
Stocks of tin
----EZ
TRXJST
C
?? K T R X J S T COMPANY
Indexes of stock and bond prices..
•
P
WORTH CAROLINA PINE ASSOCIATION. North Carolina pine, production, etc-.—.-.-.
2K5J?1? HEMI-OCK AND HARD- Hemlock and hardwood lumber production,
WOOD MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIAetc.
NORTHERU PINE MANFRS. ASSOCN....
Northern pine lumber and lath

' Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.


-

Not published
.-

•

TraflBc bulletin* (productionfiguresnot Second week of month.
published).
Notpublished
Notpublished
Notpublished
2lst of month.
Monthly press release
Not published
Monthly report
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Notpublished
Monthly report
Monthly report
Monthly bulletin
Monthly bulletin
Monthly statement
Trade papers
The index
Notpublished
Notpublished
Not published.

—-

Monthly.
First week of month.
-- First week of month.
First week of month.
First week of month.
Monthly.

-.

-

56
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued

II.—REPORTS FROM TRADE ASSOCIATIONS AND PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS—Continued.
(Excluding individual firms reporting data to be combined with other firms or trade associations)
OAK FLOORING MANFRS. ASSOCN
OHIO FOUNDRYMAN'S ASSOCIATION
OPTICAL MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCN...
PACIFIC CANNED FISH BROKERS' ASSOCIATION.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO
PENSACOLA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE..
PHILADELPHIA MILK EXCHANGE
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
PREPARED ROOFING MANFRS. ASSOCN.
PULLMAN COMPANY
RAILWAY AGE
REFRACTORIES MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
RICE MILLERS' ASSOCIATION
ROPE PAPER SACK MANFRS. ASSOCN.
RUBBER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
RUBBER GROWERS* ASSOCIATION
SALES BOOK MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
SAVANNAH BOARD OF TRADE
SAVINGS BANK ASSOCIATION OF STATE
OF N E W YORK.
SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
SOUTHERN FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
SOUTHERN PINE ASSOCIATION
STEEL BARREL MANFRS. ASSOCN
STEEL FOUNDERS' SOCIETY
STOKER MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCN...
STRUCTURAL STEEL SOCIETY
TANNERS' COUNCIL
TUBULAR PLUMBING GOODS ASSOCN..
TWIN CITY MILK PRODUCERS'ASSOCN.
U . S . STEEL CORPORATION

UNITED TYPOTHETAE OP AMERICA—.
WALDORF SYSTEM, INC
WEST COAST LUMBERMEN'S ASSOCN.
WEBBING MANUFACTURERS' E X C H . WESTERN PINE MANUFACTURERS'
ASSOCIATION.

Oak flooring, production, etc
Ohio foundry iron production
Spectacle frames and mountings, sales, etc
Shipments of canned salmon

Not published
Monthly report* (not published)
Not published
Not puHished

Stockholders in the company
Turpentine and rosin receipts
Milk receipts at Philadelphia
Cement paving contracts
Shipments of prepared roofing
Pullman passenger traffic
Railway equipment orders
Fire-clay brick production, etc
Silica brick production, etc
Rice receipts, stocks, etc.
'.
Shipments of rope paper sacks
Automobile tires, tubes, and raw material
Rubber stocks in England
Shipment of sales books

Financial papers
Naval Stores Review
Not published
Concrete Highway Magazine
Not published
Not published
Railway Age
Not published
Not published
Monthly report
Not published
Monthly reports (not published)
Bulletin of Rubber Growers Association..
Not published

Turpentine and rosin receipts
Savings banks deposits in New York State

Naval Stores Review
Not published
J
Monthly press release to trade papers*
Not published in form used

Raw silk consumption, etc
Furniture shipments and unfilled orders...
Yellow pine production and stocks
Steel barrel shipments, orders, etc
Sales of steel castings
Sales of stokers through December, 1922
Sales of fabricated structural steel
Leather production through May, 1922
Tubular plumbing sales
Milk production, Minnesota
Unfilled orders
Earnings
Stockholders
Wages of common labor
Printing activity.
_
Restaurant sales
Douglas fir lumber production, etc
Sales of elastic webbing
Western pine lumber production, etc

Not published in form used
Monthly reports* (not published)
Not published
;
•
_
No longer published
Not published
Not published
Semiweekly reports
Not published
Press release*
Pressrelease*
Financial papers
_•_'
Special reports*
Typothetae BulletinMonthly press release*
Not published
Not published
Not published

SOURCE:

_
Monthly.
Quarterly.
Weekly.
Monthly.
Monthly.

Monthly.
Weekly.
5th of month.

i

10th of month.
. . . Monthly.
Quarterly.
. . . Occasionally.
Monthly.

DATE OF PUBLICATION

.—REPORTS FROM TECHNICAL PERIODICALS
AMERICAN METAL MARKET .
THE ANNALIST
THE BOND BUYER.
BRADSTREET'S

. BULLETIN DE LA STATISTIQUE GENERALE
CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING..
COAL AGE
COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL CHRONICLE
Dow,

JONES & Co. (WALL STREET JOURNAL).

DUN'S REVIEW
ELECTRICAL WORLD
ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL-PRESS
ENGINEERING NEWS RECORD
FINANCIAL POST
FRANKFURTER ZEITUNG
HAY TRADE JOURNAL
IRON AGE
;
IRON TRADE R E V I E W .
LONDON ECONOMIST
*„,
LUMBER
MANUFACTURERS' RECORD
MILK REPORTER
MODERN MILLER
NAVAL STORES REVIEW
,
NEUE ZURICHER, ZEITUNG
N E W YORK JOURNAL OP COMMERCEI!
N E W YORK EVENING POST.
NORTHWESTERN MILLER
OIL, PAINT, AND DRUG R E P O R T E R . . . .
On. TRADE JOURNAL
PRINTERS' INK
I
PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY"
RUSSELL'a C O M M E R C U T N E W S " " " " "
STATISTICAL SUGAR TRADE JOURNAL"
SVENSK HANDELSTIDNING

* Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.



,

Composite pig iron and steel prices..
New York stock sales
New York closing stock prices
Foreign exchange rates, 1914 to 1918
State and municipal bond issues
Municipal bond yields
"
Visible supply of wheat and corn
"
Bank clearings, United States and Canada
Wholesale price index
Business failures, Canada
Price index for France
Chemical price index
"
Mine price of bituminous coal
Cotton (visible supply) and interest rates.I
Mail order and chain store sales-.
New corporate securities
New York bond sales and prices
Mexican petroleum shipments
Business failures and wholesale price indexl
Sales of electrical energy, central stations
Rand gold production and silver prices
Construction cost and volume index
Canadian bond issues
Price index for Germany
Hay receipts
Pig-iron prod
Composite finished steel price.
Iron and steel prices
Railway freight car orders
Price index for United Kingdom
Price indices of lumber
IIIIII..I
Southern construction and southern bond issues
Milk receipts at Greater New York
.IIIIIIII
Argentine visible supply of wheat and corn
Turpentine and rosin, receipts and stocks
Price index for Switzerland
IIIIIIIJ
Dividend and interest payments
_I_
New capital issues and new corporations..II. I
Ill
Fire losses....
Newspaper advertising
Ill"
IIII
Flaxseed, receipts, etc
Wheat flour production for 1917
•
Price indices of drugs, oils, etc
Argentine visible supply of flaxseed
Mexican petroleum shipments
Magazine advertising
Book production
.
Wheat flour production, from July, 1920
Sugar stocks, receipts, meltings, and Cuban statistics. _.
Price index for Sweden

O

First or second week of month (daily).
First weekly issue of month (Mondays).
Weekly (Mondays).
Weekly (Mondays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Weekly (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
week
Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays)
First weekly
k
Monthly.
Weekly (Wednesdays).
Weekly (Thursdays).

K d o8t h i f d ^ e k i y issue of month (Saturdays).
r

K issuef month.
Last
of ^

First week of month (daily).
20th of month (daily).
,
,
/rt .
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month.
Weekly (Thursdays).
Monthly.
First weekly isstte'of month (Thursdays).
Weekly (Thursdays).
Weekly (Thursdays).
. .
First weekly issue of month (Thursdays).
10th of month.
„ ..
.
First weekly issue of month (Fridays).
Monthly.
Weekly.
Weekly.
Weekly (Saturdays).
First week of month (daily).
First week of month (daily).
10th of month (daily).
Not published.
Weekly (Wednesdays).
Weekly (Mondays).
Weekly (Mondays).
10th of month (monthly).
Second week of month.
Third week of month.
Weekly compilation (daily).
Weekly (Fridays).

PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Recent publications of the Department of Commerce having the most direct interest to readers of the SURVEY OF CURRENT
are listed below. A complete list may be obtained by addressing the Division of Publications, Department of Commerce,
at Washington. Copies of the publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing
Office, Washington, at the prices stated. If no price is mentioned, the publication is distributed free.
BUSINESS

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Property Accounting.—Department Circular No. 204*(Third
edition), June 4, 1924.
Laws and Regulations for Protection of Fisheries of Alaska.—
Department Circular No. 251 (tenth edition), June 21, 1924.
Simplified Practice Recommendation No. 1: Paving Bricks
(third revision).—Tm"s pamphlet is a revision of a former
edition and contains further recommendations of the brick
industry toward standardization and elimination of waste.
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
(For circulars giving plan of publication and distribution of census publications,
address the Director of tfte Census.) -

State compendiums, 1920.—Georgia, 183 pages, price 35£;
Illinois, 225 pages, price 40^; New Hampshire, 80 pages,
price 156; District of Columbia, 49 pages, price 10j£; Massachusetts, 176 pages, price 30^. Each compendium contains detailed statistics of population, agriculture, manufactures, and
mining for the State named. A summary for, the United
States is also given, with a map showing the centers of population, agricultural products, and manufactures.
Bulletin—Cotton Production in the United States.—Crop
of 1923. Showing cotton ginned from the crop of 1923, for
the United States, the several States, and individual counties,
with comparativefiguresfor previous years. 37 pages, price 5j5.
Report—Census of Electrical Industries: Telegraphs, 1922.—
Statistics of commercial and land telegraph systems, commercial cable systems, government telegraph and cable lines, and
commercial wireless systems. 29 pages, price 5 L
*
Preliminary reports.—Statements summarizing statistics for
numerous industries, census of manufactures, 1923; "Assessed
valuation of property and tax levies, 1922'';,"Taxes, 1922";
"Public debt of Federal, State, city, and all local governments,
1922"; "Estimated value of national wealth, 1922."
Statistics of production for a number of industries are issued
each month.
BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce of the United States,
May, 1924,—Parts I and II. Owing to the advanced cost of
printing it has been necessary to advance the subscription price
of the Monthly Summary from $1 to $1T25 a year. The singlecopy price of Part I will be 10#, and of Part II, 50.
Commerce Reports.—A weekly survey of foreign trade,
cable summaries of world conditions, and articles on situation
in various commodities in foreign countries. Quarto, 72 pages.
Price 10 cents per copy; $3 per year ($5 for foreign).
Trade and Economic Reviews, 1923.—These reviews are
based on annual reports of trade and industries submitted by
American consular officers. The following have been issued
since the July announcement: No. 8, Sweden; No. 9, British
Guiana; No, 10, United Kingdom; Bradford.
Shoes, Leather, and Hides in Great Britain, by Norman
Herz, American trade commissioner. Special Agents Series
No. 226; 201 pages.
Shipment of Samples and Advertising Matter to Latin
America and the West Indies, prepared in the Division of
Foreign Tariffs.—Trade Information Bulletin No. 250; 54
pages.
Marketing Canadian Wheat, by Theo. D. Hammatt, special
agent.—Trade Information Bulletin No. 251; 123 pages. In
this bulletin, which is No. 8 of the survey of world trade in
agricultural products, the Canadian method of marketing is
described in detail.
World Trade in Chromite, by H. M. Hoar.—Trade Information Bulletin No. 252; 33 pages. This report constitutes a
part of the investigation of essential raw materials authorized
by Congress.
French Dyestuffs Industry, by Frank B. Gorin, special
agent. Trade Information Bulletin No. 253; 21 pages. The
French since the war have been endeavoring to build up a




self-sufficient dyestuff industry. In this report the development of the industrv is outlined, and statistics of trade in coaltar dyes are given for 1920 and 1921.
Nicaragua, a Review of Commerce and Industries, 1918-1923,
prepared in the Latin-American Division.—Trade Information
Bulletin No. 255, 16 pages.
Trade of the United States in 1923 according to Interaction
Statistical Classification, prepared in the Division of Statistics.
—Trade Information Bulletin No. 256; 9 pages.
The Republic of Panama, prepared in the Latin American
Division.—Trade Information Bulletin No. 257; 15 pages.
The Brazil Nut or Castanha Industry, by A. Ogdon Pierrot,
special agent.—Trade Information Bulletin No. 259; 14 pages.
BUREAU OF FISHERIES
' Fisheries of Key West and the Clam Industry of Southern
Florida, by William C. Schroeder, scientific assistant. Document No. 962; 74 pages.
BUREAU OF STANDARDS
American Logging and Sawmill Safety Code.—Handbook No.
5 (October, 1923) 140 pages with 58 illustrations. Price, 60^.
Nickel and Its Alloys.—Second edition, revised. Circular No.
100; 162 pages with illustrations and tables. Price, 400.
National Standard Petroleum Oil Tables (May 29, 1924).—
Circular No. 154; 175 pages. Price, 300.
United States Government Specifications:
Turpentine, Circular No. 86.
Olive-drab paint (semipaste and ready-mixed). Circular No. 165.
Tent duck, grey. Circular No. 167.
Hoofing—Type 4AWS, Circular No. 170; type 3ACS, Circular No. 172; type
4ACS, CircularNo. 173; type 5ACS, Circular No. 174; type 3TCS, Circular
No. 178; type 5TWS^Circular No. 179.
Installation of metal flashings and other metal fittings with built-up bituminous
roofing. Circular No. 180.
Installation of plastic flashings with built-up bituminous roofing. Circular
No. 181.
The above specifications have been officially adopted by the Federal Specifications
Board as a standard in purchasing materials for use by Government departments
and other Government establishments.

BUREAU OF NAVIGATION
American Documented Seagoing Merchant Vessels of 500
Gross Tons and Over, August 1, 1924. SerialNo. 81. This
list contains the names of all American steam and sailing
merchant vessels of 500 gross tons and over, with tonnage,
year built, name of owner, and home port. Price, 10 cents a
copy; annual subscription price, 750.
Radio Service Bulletin, August 1, 1924.—No. 88. Contains
list of new stations, changes in preceding lists, and information
concerning radio regulations, current publications, and other
matters. Price, 50 a copy; annual subscription price, 250.
NOTE.-—All orders for radio publications listed by the Bureau of Navigation and
inquiries concerning these publications .should be addressed to the Superintendent of
Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. Do not make remittances to the Bureau of Navigation or to radio inspectors.

COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY
United States Coast Pilot, 1924.—Atlantic Coast, Section C.
Sandy Hook to Cape Henry, including Delaware and Chesapeake Bays. Second edition; 31 pages, with map. Price, 750.
Manual of the Harmonic Analysis and Prediction of Tides,
by Paul Schureman.—Special Publication No. 98; 416 pages,
with numerous tables and illustrations. Price, $1.
Geodetic Operations in the United States and Outlying
Possessions, January 1, 1922, to December 31, 1923, by
William Bowie.—Special Publication No. 104; 28 pages, with
illustrations.
LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE
Buoy Lists, 1924.—First District, Maine and New Hampshire (corrected to June 5). Seventeenth District, Oregon and
Washington (corrected to June 25). Price, 200 each.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
HERBERT HOOVER, Secretary of Commerce

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WILLIAM

M. STETTABT, Director
Chief Junctions

The taking of the decennial census covering population, agriculture, manufactures, mines and quarries, and forest products.
m Decennial report of national wealth, public debt, and taxation, including principal financial statistics of Federal, State,
county, city, and township governments.
Annual financial statistics of State and municipal governments, including sources of revenue, objects of payments, debt,
tax levies.
Decennial statistics relating to inmates of institutions, including paupers, insane, prisoners, and juvenile deliquents.
A quinquennial census of agriculture, a biennial census of
manufactures, a quinquennial census of electrical public utilities,
including electric railways, light and power stations, telephones,
telegraphs, etc.
Annual statistics of births, deaths, marriages, and divorces.
Quarterly statistics of leaf tobacco stocks and of production,
stocks, and consumption of fats and oils.
Monthly or semimonthly statistics of cotton ginning; cotton
stocks and consumption; the production, stocks, and consumption of hides and leather; the production of shoes; and statistics of active textile machinery and of production in an increasing number of other industries.
The compilation and publication, in the "Survey of Current
Business," of monthly commercial and industrial statistics.

BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
JULIUS KLEIN, Director
Chief functions

BUREAU OF FISHERIES
HENRY O' MALLEY, Commissioner
Chief functions

The propagation of useful food fishes, including lobsters,
oysters, and other shellfish, and their distribution to suitable
waters.
Investigations of fish culture, fish diseases, and for the conservation of fishery resources and the development of commercial fisheries.
The study of the methods of thefisheriesandfisheryindustries
and the utilization of fishery products.
The collection of statistics of fisheries.
The administration of the Alaska salmonfisheries,the fur-seal
herd on the Pribilof Islands, and the law for the protection of
sponges off the coast of Florida.

BUREAU OF LIGHTHOUSES
GEORGE

R. PUTNAM, Commissioner
Chief functions

The establishment and maintenance of lighthouses, lightships, buoys, and other aids to navigation on the sea and the
lake coast and on the rivers of the United States, including
Alaska, Hawaiian Islands, and Porto Rico.
The publication of Light Lists, Buoy Lists, and Notices to
Mariners, including information regarding all aids to navigation
maintained by the Lighthouse Service.

COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY
E. LESTER JONES, Director

Chief functions
The compilation of timely information concerning world
The survey of the coasts of the United States and the publimarket conditions and openings for American products in foreign countries secured through commercial attache's and trade cation of charts needed for the navigation of the adjacent
commissioners of the Department of Commerce and the foreign waters, including Alaska, the Philippine Islands, Hawaii, Porto
service of the Department of State. The distribution of such Rico, the Virgin Islands, and the Canal Zone.
A comprehensive geodetic system, extending into the interior,
information to American business through weekly "Commerce
reports," special bulletins, confidential circulars, the news and connects and coordinates the surveys of the coasts, and is designed to furnish accurately determined points and elevations
trade press, correspondence, and personal contact.
The maintenance of commodity, technical, and geographical in all parts of the country. These are available as a basis for
divisions to afford special service to American export industries. Federal, State, and municipal surveys, and engineering projects
The compilation and distribution of names of possible buyers of every kind. The magnetic declination has been determined
and agents for American products in all parts of the world and at a large number of stations throughout the country, and the
publication of weekly lists of specific sales opportunities abroad. results are available for the use of surveyors and engineers.
The technical operations include base measures, triangulaThe maintenance of district and cooperative offices in 33 cities
in the United States to expedite delivery of market information tion, traverse, precise leveling, the determination of latitude and
to business men and to keep the department adivsed as to azimuth, the determination of difference of longitude by telegraph or radio, magnetic observations and researches, the
the urgent requirements of American trades and industries.
The publication of official statistics on imports and exports. preparation of magnetic maps, the determination of the force
The study of the processes of domestic trade and commerce, of gravity, topography, hydrography, deep-sea soundings, water
with a view to their improvement and the dissemination of temperatures, tidal and current observations.
The results are published in the form of charts on various
information obtained for the benefit of the public, as well as of
scales, annual reports, coast pilots, tide tables (published annuthose directly concerned.
ally in advance), current tables, digests of geodetic publications,
BUREAU OF STANDARDS
and special publications.
GEOKGE K. BURGESS, Director
Chief functions

Custody of standards of measurement, quality, performance,
or practice adopted or recognized by the Government. Development and construction of such standards when necessary.
Testing and calibration of apparatus and comparison of standards used by scientific or other institutions with those in the
custody of the bureau.
Determination of physical constants and properties of
materials.
The testing of materials and establishment of standards and
processes in cooperation with commercial firms or organizations.
Industrial researches covering structural, engineering, and
miscellaneous materials, radio, radium, mechanical appliances,
sugar technology, leather, paper, rubber, and textiles; clay
products, glass, and refractories, metals and metallurgy, and
similar groups of subjects.
The collection and dissemination of information showing approved methods in building, planning, and construction, including building materials and codes and such other matters as may
encourage, improve, and cheapen construction and housing.
Studies on simplified commercial practices and establishment
of such practices through cooperative business organizations.
The bureau publishes six series of scientific and technical
publications, reporting the results of its researches and giving
technical data fundamental to industry.
The Director has supervision of the preparation of technical
specifications through the Federal Specifications Board.



BUREAU OF NAVIGATION
D, B. CARSON, Commissioner
Chief functions

General superintendence of commercial marine and merchant
seamen.
t
Supervision of registering, enrolling, licensing, numbering,
etc., of vessels under the United States flag, and the annual
publication of a list of such vessels.
The enforcement of the navigation and steamboat inspection
laws and the laws governing radio communication, as well as
duties connected with fees, fines, tonnage taxes, refunds, etc.,
originating under such laws.

STEAMBOAT INSPECTION SERVICE
GEORGE UHLER,

Supervising Inspector General
Chief functions

The inspection of vessels, the examination and licensing of
the officers of vessels, and the administration of laws relating
to such vessels and their officers. The certification of able seamen who form the crews of merchant vessels.
The inspection of vessels, including the types of boilers; the
testing of all materials subject to tensile strain in marine boilers;
the inspection of hulls and of life-saving equipment.
The investigation of violations of the steamboat-inspection
laws.