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MONTHLY SUPPLEMENT TO COMMERCE REPORTS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
WASHINGTON

SURVEY OF
CURRENT BUSINESS
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

COMPILED BY
BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE

:

BUREAU OF STANDARDS

1922

JULY

No. 11

CONTENTS
Summary for May
Business indicators (diagrams and table)
Wholesale price comparisons (diagrams and table)
Business conditions in May (text and diagrams)
Index of crop marketings
Trend of business movements (table)

Page.
1
2
4
6
17
22

Prices
Lumber and
Employment agency operations
Transportation
Miscellaneous
Sources of data

flooring

Page.
41
42
44
45
46
47

SUMMARY FOR MAY.
In spite of the prolonged coal strike and the possibility of a railroad strike in the near future, business
has continued to gain in volume and in stability. All
of the basic industries increased their output during
May, compared with April. Pig-iron production
increased more than 11 per cent during the month,
with a total of 2,306,679 tons. This figure has not
been equaled since January, 1921. Steel-ingot production totaled 3,099,155 tons, compared to 2,794,000
tons in April, and 1,388,000 tons in May a year ago.
The unfilled orders of the U. S. Steel Corporation
increased 157,000 tons, making the total 5,254,288
tons at the end of May.
Building activity continued to increase, making
another new high record in May. The value of the
contracts awarded in the 27 northeastern states totaled
$362,590,000, or nearly $10,000,000 more than in
April.
A new record was established in the automobile
industry in May, with a total production of 231,699
passenger cars, compared to 197,221 in April. Truck
production increased from 22,237 in April to 23,694 in
May. The output of petroleum and of gasoline continued to increase, according to latest figures.
There was a pronounced increase in the mill consumption of cotton over the low figure reported for
April. The silk and woolen industries have also shown
improvements.
Car loadings have shown a progressive increase in
recent weeks, even in spite of the coal strike. Employment is increasing and business failures in May
showed the first substantial decrease in many months.
112000—22




1

A matter of importance is the distinct upward trend
in prices. The revised wholesale index of the Department of Labor rose from 143 to 148. This indicates a
much firmer demand than has heretofore existed.
Activity on the New York Stock Exchange continued
to be marked, although the volume of sales was somewhat less than a few weeks back. Prices of all classes
of securities continued to advance.
Bills discounted by the Federal Reserve Board
have continued to decline, reaching a low point of
$538,000,000 at the middle of June, compared with
$1,180,000,000 at the beginning of this year. Member
bank loans, however, have been increasing recently,
indicating a slightly greater demand for money. Interest rates continued to decline, as evidenced by the
recent reduction of the New York Federal Reserve
Board rediscount rate to 4 per cent.
The picture which business now presents is that of
prosperity. Fundamental conditions in this country,
including the agricultural outlook, are for the most
part favorable to a continuation of this period of the
business cycle. On the other hand, business men must
realize that all the economic ills caused by the war
have not been cured. There is a possibility of business developing too rapidly, in which case a set-back
will be sure to follow. It is believed that care should
be exercised in placing large forward orders for raw
materials on which there has been a marked increase
in price. With due care in the exercise of business
judgment the period of prosperity can be prolonged
without the excesses so characteristic of 1919 and the
early part of 1920.

BUSINESS INDICATORS.
(1913 monthly average = lCO. See explanation on inside front cover.)
PIG-IRON PRODUCTION.
1920

1922

1921

1.000

BITUMINOUS COAL PRODUCTION.

COTTON CONSUMPTION.

922

1920

1.000

800

1922

1921

800

600
400

NUMBERS

8

NUMBERS

1

400

X
Ol
Z

—__^

\

RO
80

60

//

\

60

\ J

40

^

on

Z

\

\

v

x

" \

\

/

V

40

20

20

10

10

FREIGHT TON-MILES.
1920

1922

1921

BANK CLEARINGS OUTSIDE NEW YORK
CITY (VALUES).

EXPORTS ^VALUES).
1920

1000

1921
-r

600

1,000

1920

1921

1922

600

400

1922
_

800

400

1

\

r
it
u

y

Z 100

?m

M 80
Q

UJ

I

1 ^ ^

x „.

Z

60

40

20

20

10

60

40

10

40




1922

000

1920

1921

1920

1922

1921

1922

1 000

600

—

400

§

- " " " " - " - - ^
^
\
" ^ - ^

—

D
Z
X

100

Z

fio

g 8

1921

8

1920

PRICE OF 25 INDUSTRIAL STOCKS.

WHOLESALE PRICES.

DEFAULTED LIABILITIES (VALUES).

INDEX

INDE

800

y) 200

8 I 8

NUMBERS

800

40

40

20

20

10

10

^

^

BUSINESS INDICATORS.
The following table gives comparative index numbers for a selected list of important business movements. It is believed that this
table will prove useful, because it separates out from the large mass of material a comparatively small number of items which are often
regarded as indicative of business in general.
The table has been divided into two parts, the first containing those items for which index numbers can be calculated using 1913 as
a base. The second part contains items for which comparable data back to 1913 are not available. This latter group of index numbers
is calculated by letting the 1919 monthly average equal 100. Care should therefore be exercised in comparing the absolute value of the
two sets of data. In either group, however, the upward or downward trend of the index numbers, compared to previous months, does
reflect the present tendency in each item and will give a basis for business judgment.
1921

MONTHLY AVERAGE.

1922

Commodity.
1919 i 1920 1921

Apr. ' May. Juno. ; July.

Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov. Dec.

Jan.

Feb. j Mar. ! Apr. i May

1 9 1 3 m o n t h l y average = 1OO.

Production:
Pig iron
Steel ingots
Copper
Anthracite coal
Bituminous coal
Crude petroleum
Wool (consumption)
Cotton (consumption)
Beef
Pork
Stocks:
Crude petroleum
Cotton (mills and warehouses)
Prices:
Wholesale index, all commodities
(Dept. Labor)
Retail food (Dept. Labor)
Retail coal, bitum. (Dept. Labor)..
Farm crops (Dept. Agriculture)!. - Farm live stock (Dept. Agriculture).
Business finances:
Defaulted liabilities
Price 25 industrial stocks
Price 25 railroad stocks
Banking:
Bank clearings, New York City
Bank clearings, outside N. Y. City..
Commercial paper interest rate
Distribution:
Imports (value)
Exports (value)
Sales, mail-order houses
Transportation :
Freight, ton-miles

100
111
105
96
96
154
142
108
131
120

119
135
99
97
116
181
118
117
121
111

39
95
85
189
135
85
109
116

47
57
50
101
71
193
132
85
101
108

48
55
24
101
83
203
141
91
101
116

42
45
19
108
85
195
145
96
104
128

34
36
17
92
76
194
132
85
101
110

37
52
21
94
87
198
145
97
118
94

38
53
21
93
88
178
155
101
119

49
73
24
99
110
172
168
103
125
99

55
75
22
90
90
183
163
109
114
118

64
65
18
78
77
203
159
106
99
133

64
72
25
82
94
208
153
109
111
144

64
79
37
89
103
197
158
98
98
123

79
107
61
115
126
225
176
108
119
118

81
111
75

90
123
87

40
216
130
93
106
105

51
224

109
155

150
183

138
205

147
194

153
178

159
156

160
145

163
172

164
206

168
223

175
223

187
203

199
188

211
171

224
151

233

206
ISO
147
236
198

226
203
207
244
168

147
153
197
111
107

148
152
195
101
112

145
145
191
109
109

142
144
191
106
104

141 ' 142 141
148 ! 155 153
193 ! 193 193
109
109 111
109
113 101

142 ! 141 140
153
150
152
192
189
190

138
142
182
100
95

141

142

143

148

142

139

139

139

179

179

177

175

112

114

117

120

108

117

115

118

108
184
68

230
137
64

170
147
62

251
148
65

152
131
61

1S8
189 163
127 ! 121 128
64
64
65

234
130
64

235
135
66

385
140
66

325
143
65

320

315

322

195

182
75

149

154

162

166

70

74

75

249
228
94

257
258
127

205
199
113

197
181
131

201
188
120

214
196
117

195
188
111

185
189
103

199
196
102

203
209
97

213
201
90

234
212
89

219
189
85

195

237

238

244

166

200

191

204

84

83

79

74

218
319
264

294
331
264

140
181
188

170 ; 137 124
164 | 159 163
159
203 160

119
157
133

130
177
159

120
157
188

126
166
222

141
142
211

159
143
217

145
135
175

144

171

145

170

121

156

150

149

161

211

196

194

121

137

105

113 | 134 107

94

99

104

120

94

103

103

104 I 111

I

98

; 92

103

128

1919 m o n t h l y average = 1OO.
Production:
Lumber»
Building contracts (floor space)
Stocks:
Beef
Pork
Business finances:
Bond prices (40 issues)
Banking:
Debits to individual accounts, outside New York City
Federal Reserve, bills discounted...
Federal Reserve, total reserves

I
100
100
100
100

100
72

85
70

70
97

44
85

51
105

87

91
91
122

100

100
100
100

118
132
97

92
77

85
68

94
76

92
90

97
87

90

95

103

107

127

82

76

65

65

112

125

129

46
108

40
110

36
100

27
85

25
61

27
45

33
43

35
51

33

31 I

29

27

24

67

74

76

83

86

86

84

85

86

87

90

93

102

102

104

107

108

90
107
114

88
97
117

89
92
120

85
85
123

85
77
127

95

85
66
137

100
61
137

95

84

99

94

92

44

37

33

30

29

140

141

142

143

143

89
72
131

134

i Monthly prices are for the first of the month following.
• Based on the total computed production reported by 5 associations. Includes southern pine, Douglas fir, western pine, North Carolina pine, and Michigan hardwoods. The total production of these associations in 1919 was equal to 11,190,000,000 board feet, compared with a total lumber production for the country of 34,552,000,000
board feet reported by the census.
8
Less than 1.







COMPAEISON OF PRESENT WHOLESALE PRICES WITH PEAK AND PRE-WAR.
(Relative prices 1913=100.)
I N D E X NUMBERS
300
400
WHEAT
CORN
POTATOES
COTTON
COTTON SEED
WOOL
CATTLE. BEEF
HOGS
LAMBS
WHEAT. SPRING
WHEAT. WINTER
CORN. NO. 2
OATS
BARLEY
RYE. NO. 2
TOBACCO.BURLEY
COTTON. MIDDLING
WOOL. OHIO. UNWASHED
CATTLE. STEERS
HOGS. HEAVY
SHEEP. EWES
SHEEP. LAMBS
FLOUR. SPRING
FLOUR. WINTER
SUGAR. RAW
SUGAR. GRANULATED
COTTONSEED OIL
BEEF

CARCASS

BEEF. STEER. ROUNDS
PORK. LOINS
COTTON YARN
COTTON PRINT CLOTH
COTTON SHEETING
WORSTED YARN
WOMEN'S DRESS GOODS
SUITINGS
SILK. RAW
HIDES. PACKERS
HIDES. CALFSKINS
LEATHER. SOLE
LEATHER. CHROME
BOOTS AND SHOES
COAL. BITUMINOUS
COAL. ANTHRACITE
COKE
PETROLEUM
PIG IRON. FOUNDRY
PIG IRON. BESSEMER
STEEL BILLETS
COPPER
LEAD

TIN
ZINC
LUMBER. PINE. SOUTHERN
LUMBER. DOUGLAS FIR
BRICK. COMMON. NEW YORK
BRICK. COMMON. CHICAGO
CEMENT
STEEL BEAMS
RUBBER. CRUDE
SULPHURIC ACIO

AK PRICE

• • • • P R I C E IN MAY 1922
• PEAK PRICE SAME AS MAY

WHOLESALE PRICE COMPARISONS.—MAXIMUM PRICE COMPARED TO PRICE IN RECENT MONTHS.
NOTE.—Prices to the producer on farm products are from U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Markets and Crop Estimates. All other prices are from U. S.
Departmentof Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, except market price of wool compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.

As far as possible all quotations represent prices to the producer or at the mill. See diagram on opposite page.

COMMODITIES.

Date and maximum
relative price.

Mar.,
1922.

Apr.,
1922.

Percent
increase
(+) or de— : ; crease (-)
i in April
from May.

May,
1922.

Relative price.
(1913 average= 100.)

Farm products—Average price to producer:
Wheat
Corn
Potatoes
Cotton
Cotton seed
Wool
Cattle, beef

June, 1920
July, 1920
June, 1920
July, 1920
May, 1920
July, 1918
May, 1919
July, 1919
Apr., 1920

326
300
706
312
321
344
183
256
239

148
92
190
133
150
150
93
121
167

153
97
175
133
187
149
94
118
173

147
100
174
156
185
174
97
121
170

- 3.9
+ 31
.
- 0.6
+ 17.3
- 1.1
+ 16.8
+ 3.2
+ 2.5
- 1.7

May, 1920
May, 1920
Sept., 1917
June, 1920
Mar., 1918
Mar., 1918
Mar., 1919
Apr., 1920
Mar. 1920
Mar., 1919
July, 1919
Apr., 1918
Feb., 1920

354
302
331
296
325
451
352
331
350
218
266
319
263

148
138
92
105
103
160
208
143
177
H33
124
151
187

152
141
94
104
102
164
208
142
173
99
122
149
170

158
138
99
107
109
166
208
163
186
101
125
126
160

+
+
+
+
+

3.9
2.1
5.3
2.9
6.9
12
.
0.0
+ 14.8
+ 7.5
+ 2.0
+ 2.5
-15.4
- 5.9

May,
May,
May,
May,
July,
Sept.,
July,
Sept.,

1920
1917
1920
1920
1919
1920
1920
1919

328
363
598
526
374
201
211
254

170
176
112
121
159
112
101
133

178
176
114
122
158
112
110
159

176
174
116
123
162
112
116
160

+
+
+

May,
Apr.,
May,
Jan.,
Oct.,
July,
Jan.,
Aug.,
Aug.,
Mar.,
Nov.,
Mar.,

1920
1920
1920
1920
1918
1920
1920
1919
1919
1917
1919
1920

348
478
427
289
292
291
466
283
490
211
473
308

143
173
157
1(31
145
184
166
76
72
124
158
213

141
173
148
167
145
184
179
73
69
124
1J4
209

149
185
151
174
145
198
198
79
71
124
154
209

+
+
+
+

Sept.,
Oct.,
Aug.,
Mar.,

1920
1921
1920
1920

323
201
637
375

164
200
133
241

164
201
183
241

214

+ 30.5

246
241

+34.4
0.0

July, 1917
Pig iron, foundry No. 2, northern (Pittsburgh)
Sept. 1920
Pig iron, basic, valley furnace
July, 1917
Steel billets, bessemer (Pittsburgh)
Mar., 1917
Copper ingots, electrolytic, early delivery (New York)
June, 1917
Lead, pig, desilverized, for early delivery (New York)
May, 1918
Tin, pig, for early delivery (New York)
June, 1915
Zinc, slab, western, early delivery (New York)
Building materials and miscellaneous:
Lumber, pine, southern, yellowflooring,1 x 4, " B " and better (Hattiesburg district) Feb., 1920
Jan., 1920
Lumber, Douglas fir, No. 1, common, s 1 s, 1 x 8 x 10 (State of Washington)
Feb., 1920
Brick, common red, domestic building (New York)
Oct., 1920
Brick, common building, salmon, run of kiln (Chicago)
Sept., 1920
Cement, Portland, net without bags to trade, f. o. b. plant (Chicago district)
June, 1917
Steel beams, mill (Pittstnirgh)
Jan., 1913
Rubber, Para Island, fine (New York)
Sulphuric acid, 66 degrees (New York)
j Feb., 1916

346
330
388
230
261
224

131
122
109
81
107
65
86

142
136
114
80
116
68
90

161
167
132
84
126
69

+ 13.4
+22.8
+ 15.8
+ 5.0
+ 8.6
+ 15
.
+ 44
.

455
407
381
251
195
331
124
250

178
125
248
173
148
96
20

180
125
255
173
148
99
21

184
147
302
177
149
106
122
80

+ 22
.
+ 17.6
+ 18.4
+ 21
.
+ 07
.
+ 7.1
+ 4.8
- 4.8

Lambs
Farm products—Market price:
Wheat, No. 1, northern, spring (Chicago)
Wheat, No. 2, red, winter (Chicago)
Corn, contract grades, No. 2, cash (Chicago)
Oats, contract grades, cash (Chicago)
Barley, fair to good, malting (Chicago)
Rye, No. 2, cash (Chicago)
Tobacco, burley, good leaf, dark red (Louisville)
Cotton, middling upland (New York)
Wool, unwashed, fine (Ohio)
Cattle, steers, good to choice, corn fed (Chicago)
Hogs, heavy (Chicago)
Sheep, ewes (Chicago)
Sheep, lambs (Chicago)
Food:

Flour, standard patents (Minneapolis)
Flour, winter straights (Kansas City)
Sugar, 96* centrifugal (New York)
Sugar, granulated, in barrels (New York)
Cottonseed oil, prime summer yellow (New York)
Beef, fresh carcass good native steers (Chicago)
Beef, fresh steer rounds No. 2 (Chicago)
Pork, loins, fresh (Chicago)

1.1
1.1
18
.
0.8
2.5
00
.
+ 55
.
+ 06
.

Clothing:

Cotton yarns, carded, white, northern, mule spun, 22-1 cones (Boston)
Cotton, print cloth, 27 inches, 64 x 60-7.60 yards to pound (Boston)
Cotton, sheeting, brown, 4/4 Ware Shoals L. L. (New York)
Worsted yarns: 2/32's crossbred stock, white, in skein (Philadelphia)
Women's dress goods, storm serge, all-wool, double warp, 50 inches (New York)
Suitings, wool, dyed blue, 55-56 inches, 16-ounce, Middlesex (Boston)
Silk, raw Japanese, Kansai No. 1 (New York)
Hides, green salted, packer's, heavy native steers (Chicago)
Hides, calfskins, No. 1, country, 8 to 15 pounds (Chicago)
Leather, sole, hemlock, middle, No. 1 (Boston)
Leather, chrome calf, dull or bright, " B " grades (Boston)
Boots and shoes, men's black calf, blucher (Massachusetts)

57
.
69
.
20
.
42
.
00
.
+ 76
.
+ 10 6

+ 82
+ 2.9
0.0
00
0.0

Fuels:

Coal, bituminous, Pittsburgh, mine run—Kanawha (Cincinnati)
Coal, anthracite, chestnut (New York tidewater)
Coke, Connellsville (range of prompt and future) furnace—at ovens
Petroleum, crude, Kansas-Oklahoma—at wells
Metals:




COMPARISON OP MAY PRODUCTION WITH

( ' o u n s E OF COMMODITY STOCKS SINCE

PRE-WAR.

NDEX

1910.

(Relative stocks 1019 = 100.)

(Relative rroductioi 1913—100.)
NUMBERS
300

INDEX NUMBERS
400

400

FOODSTUFFS

WHEAT FLOUR

BEEF PROOUCTS

BEEF PRODUCTS

LAMB AND MUTTON

PORK PRODUCTS
SUGAR (RAW)

PORK PRODUCTS

COTTONSEED OIL

LAMB AND MUTTON

WHEAT (VI8IBLE)
WHEAT FLOUR

OLEOMARGARINE

CORN (VISIBLE)
CORN
(CONSUMPTION)

BUTTER

WOOL
(CONSUMPTION)

EGGS

COTTON

COFFEE

CHEESE

APPLES,
(CONSUMPTION)
ANTHRACITE COAL

FUELS

RICE (DOMESTIC)

i

COTTON(TOTAL)

BITUMINOUS COAL

CRUDE PETROLEUM
GASOLINE
KEROSENE

BY-PRODUCT COKE

GAS AND FUEL OIL
CRUDE PETROLEUM

LUBRICATING OIL
PIG IRON

PIQ IRON

ZINC
STEEL-INGOTS

TIN

COPPER

YELLOW PING
OAK FLOORING

ZINC

SILICA BRICK
FACE BRICK

SILVER

CEMENT
GOLD

BATHS (ENAMEL)

CIGARS

SINKS (ENAMEL)

CIGARETTES

ROSIN

MANUFACTURED
TOBACCO

MECHANICAL WOOD PULP

LAVATORIES (ENAMEL)

TURPENTINE

CHEMICAL WOOD PULP
NEWSPRINT
NORTHERN
HARDWOODS

BOOK PAPER
WRAPPING PAPER

OAK FLOORING

PAPER BOARD

CEMENT

FJNE PAPER

BATHS (ENAMEL)

TOBACCO (TOTAL)

LAVATORIES
(ENAMEL)
SINKS(ENAMEL)

FLAX SEED

1

1
M A X I M U M SINCE I9!9

TRANSPORTATION

MAY

LOCOMOTIVES

M I N I M U M SINCE 1919

•k APRIL

AUTOMOBILES
(PA8SENGER)

I N D E X OF M I N E R A L

* Production for April; Mayfiguresnot available for chart.

I N D E X OF MARKETINGS OF ANIMAL

PRODUCTION.

(Relative production 1°09-1013-100.)

PRODUCTS.

(Relative marketings 1919-100.)

1819 AVEF AGE

y*

^ ^

rv
/ \

V

A*.

to

\
\ /

— TOTA OUT EIGGS
WITH

AND

POUL" R Y

i i i i nmmmmimikimtiii
MONTHLY
AVERAGE




,920

1921

1920

1921

1922

BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN MAY.
The following pages present a review by industries
of the more important statistics shown in the detailed
tables, with summaries of production, stocks, sales
and prices.
PRODUCTION.

Production in May made the greatest advance of
any month reported this year. Out of 55 commodities
for which May production figures are now available
on a 1919 base, there were 49 increases over April and
only 6 decreases—-2 of these were in the food-stuff
group. Lumber, metals, tobacco, brick, paper, and
vehicles all showed good increases in production.
Compared with a year ago there were 42 increases, 9
decreases and 1 unchanged. Metals, brick, and building equipment showed the greatest relative increases.

Compared with the 1919 average, there were 31 increases and 24 decreases, the largest relative increase
again occurring in the building equipment group. In
comparison with the 1920 average, there were 25 increases and 29 decreases, with lumber and building
materials the chief gainers and fuels and metals the
chief losers. Compared with the 1921 average, there
were 44 increases and only 10 decreases, 3 of which
occurred in the fuels group and 4 in foodstuffs.
New high production records since 1919 were made
in sugar meltings, southern pine, western pine, redwood, Douglas fir, oak flooring, face brick, cement and
all classes of enamel ware, while for beehive coke, passenger automobiles and motor trucks, new high records
were made for the short period during which monthly
statistics have been collected.

COURSE OF PRODUCTION SINCE 1919.
RELATIVE PRODUCTION (1919=100).

RELATIVE PRODUCTION (1919=100).

Maxi- Minimum mum 1920 1921 Apr.j May, Apr., May,
aversince since
1921. 1922. 1922.
age. 1921.
end of end of
1919. 1919.

Maxi- Mini-j
I
m u m mum: 1920 1921
since since \ aver- j aver- Apr., May, A p r . , ! May,
endofendof; age. ' age. 1921. 1921. 1922. 1922.
1919. 1919. I
LUMBER:

FOODSTUFFS:

Wheat flour
Beef products
Pork products
Lamb and mutton
Sugar (meltings)..
Oleomargarine *...
Cottonseed oil
Condensed m i l k . . .
Butter
Cheese
Ice cream
Corn p r o d u c t s . . . .

CLOTHING:

Cotton (consumption)
Wool (consumption)
Sole leather
Boots and shoes
FUELS:

Anthracite coal
Bituminouscoal
Beehive coke
By-product coke
Crude petroleum
Gasoline
Kerosene
Gas and fuel oil
Lubricating oil
Electric power

125
109
151
110
178
126
340
121
177
169
468
135
114
126
95
3
108
119
I 137
127
149
141
110
136
135
119

82

64
67
58
58
40
26
7

92
93
80
104
103
100
76
99
86
111
93

20
64
41
42
38

57
109
42
83
63
82
286 !

84
91
77
83
97 | 90
94 | 94
92 ! 107
60
63
164
122
71
86
118
111
83
153
90
79
93
76

85
99
83

105
74
21
73
127
129
80
128
108
100

102
87
25
76
133
136
74
129

87
95
79

99 i
;
101
121
89 I
110 | 30 i
122
79 !
117
124 !
123
130
99
83
146
127
124
104
113 ! 105 l
|

()
41
11
<62
104
98
71
93
S9

76
77
97
85
104
42
72
113
160
130
415
87

88
67
164
47
42

78 ;

178
44
19

87

86
96
92
71 '""70
99 '
98
41
33
106
142
143
97
125
103
111

(3)
54
27
121
14S

METALS:

Pig iron
Steel ingots
Copper
Zinc
Silver
Gold (receipts)

132
140
83
126
129
181

34
33
17
38
80

|
I
|
|
!

119
121
94
105
100

54 ! 47 ;
l
57 ii
52
37 ii
48
47 \\ 43
95 ii
94
1 1 3 | 100
!

48
81 i
100 j
49
23
71 !
67 |
47
88 :
91
94 : ioi :

91

no
83
72
90
115

TOBACCO:

128
Cigars 1 l
116
Cigarettes
Manufactured tobacco i . . . I 119
1

112
64 ! 84
50 : 94

96 i!
96
91 !

As represented by tax-paid withdrawals.
Since November,'1921.




93
86
SS

94
93
89 ;

85 !
78 :

97
104
101

Yellow pine
Western pine..
North Carolina pine
California white and sugar
pine.
California redwood
Douglas fir
Michigan hardwoods
Michigan softwoods
Northern hardwoods
Hemlock
Oak flooring
Maple flooring

126
145
158
204
174
124
122
120
161
120
217
125 |

8
57
44
27
28
21
33
42
47

121
122
102
89
82
105
91
106
103

138 i
114
126
130
135
121
129
142

64
69
64
77
65
55
30
18

109
117
110
121
120
119
113
104
104

130 '
127 !
121 •
167;
124 !

13
43
34 ;
61
48 i

106
120
100
125
104

237
235
200
129

PAPER:

69 |
94 '
20 I 121 i
33 |
98 ;

65
86
SO '
30

149
112
110

143 I

Mechanical wood pulp
Chemical wood pulp
Newsprint
Book paper
Wrapping paper
Paper board
Fine paper
Corrugate 1 paper boxes s5 ..
Solid fiber paper boxes . .
STONE, CLAY, AND SAND PRODUCTS:

Silica brick
Clay fire brick
Face brick
Cement
Glass bottles

BUILDING EQUIPMENT:

Baths, enamel
Lavatories, enamel
Sinks, enamel
Buildings (contracted for)

TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES:

Automobiles, passenger..
Motor trucks
Locomotives
Ships

3 Less than 1.
< Since January 1, 1921.

6

168
•51
93 I 6 32
135
79

6

114
102
89
67

99
67
88

96
67
84

109
79
60
59
88
57
123;
S3 i

19
96
74
100
84
155
57
101
74

;
|
'
;
:
!

87 I
79 [
89
79
94
85
71
65

132 !
68 !
101 I
67 I
89 !
79
55 I
53 i
93 I

102
98
79

111
36 !
126 ! 130
86 | 113 i
79 i 63 ,
79 i
85
140
90 ;
82 ;
65
197
125
91 J
83
81
73
69
69
92
76
61
53
89

122 1
93 ;
98 !
92 ;
106 !
101
96 !
109 :

I
40 ! 24 | 17
70 i
63 ! 52
49
82 |
100 I 63
84
104 I
122
129
139 i 138 '
68
60
79 |
|
120
100 I 101
226 :
127 ! 129 114
222 ;
122
123 ; 124
181 ;
70
74 I 77
125 ;
93 :
46 i
50
30 !

|
I
S3 I
34 i

143 !
S4 j
34
31

* Relative to last 6 months of 1919.
Since July 1, 1921.
6

104
97
158 ;

126
145
155
120
174
124
69
87
95
90
217
100
138
102
113
108
124
109
105
113

121
l<>7
82

200
129
168
03

COURSE OP PRODUCTION SINCE 1919.
(Relative production 1919=100.)
I N D E X NUMBERS
100
WHEAT FLOUR
BEEF PRODUCTS
PORK PRODUCTS
LAMB A N D M U T T O N
SUGAR ( M E L T I N G S )
OLEOMARGARINE
COTTONSEED OIL
CORN PRODUCTS
COTTON (CONSUMPTION)
WOOL (CONSUMPTION)
SOLE LEATHER
BOOTS A N D SHOES
A N T H R A C I T E COAL
BITUMINOUS COAL
BEEHIVE COKE

200

INDEX OF MINING PRODUCTION.

The increase in bituminous coal production and the
seasonal advance in iron-ore operations were chiefly
responsible for the advance in the index number of
mining production from 67.7 in April to 79.6 in May.
All the minerals showed a gain in output except lead.
In spite of the advance from April to May, which
was almost the same as the advance from April to
May last year, the May index number was the lowest,
excepting April, recorded since the war, due to the
coal strike.
The following table compares recent figures with
corresponding months of 1921, some of the March and
April figures being revised. The complete table will
be found in the May issue of the Survey (page 22).

BY-PRODUCT COKE

INDEX OF MINING PRODUCTION.

CRUDE PETROLEUM
GASOLINE

(Relative production 1909-1913 = 100.)

KEROSENE
GAS A N D F U E L OIL

1921

L U B R I C A T I N G OIL

1922

ELECTRIC POWER

May.

April.

PIG IRON

February.

March.

April.

May.

STEEL INGOTS
COPPER

Total

SILVER
GOLD (RECEIPTS.)
CIGARS
CIGARETTES
MANFD. TOBACCO
YELLOW PINE

87.5

Petroleum
Bituminous coal
Anthracite coal
Iron ore
Copper . . .
Lead
Zinc
Gold
Silver

ZINC

221.5
77.6
107.0
2.5
53.4
86.7
90.0
46.0
87.9

T o t a l , excluding
lead, gold, and silver

WESTERN PINE
NORTH CAROLINA PINE

91.1

97.7

99.1

120.7

67.7

79.6

232.6
93.8
103.9
70.8
25.3 |
91.3
96.4
43.2
84.7

225.8
115.3
93.9

258.0
141.3
121.7

39. i
125.2
95.2
42.9
76.8

64.7
124.5
112.1
45.5
82.9

246.9
444
0.4
2.1
80.1
119.0
108.0
46.3
82.0

257.1
57.7
0.5
35.6
92.8
116.8
116.1
52.7
84.4

102.8

103.9

128.0

68.2

81.0

CALIFORNIA WHITE PINE
CALIFORNIA REDWOOD
DOUGLAS FIR

INDEX OF MARKETING OF ANIMAL PRODUCTS.

MICHIGAN mRDWOOD

Continuing the index of the marketings of animal
products begun in the June issue, the table below
presents the May figures. These show a rise from
106.9 to 119.6 and make by far the highest mark
recorded. All the commodities made large gains,
except eggs, which made a seasonal decline, and all
but sheep were marketed in much larger volume than
in May, 1921. Milk receipts made a new high record.
The following table compares recent figures with
corresponding months of 1921:

NORTHERN HARDWOODS
HEMLOCK
OAK FLOORING
MECHANICAL WOOD PULP
CHEMICAL WOOD PULP
NEWSPRINT
BOOK PAPER
WRAPPING PAPER
PAPER BOARD
FINE PAPER
CORRUGATED PAPER BOARD
SOLID FIBER PAPER BOARD
SILICA BRICK
CLAY FIRE BRICK

I N D E X OF MARKETING OP ANIMAL PRODUCTS.

FACE BRICK
CEMENT

(Relative marketings 1919 = 100.)

GLASS BOTTLES
BATHS. ENAMEL

1921

1922

LAVATORIES. ENAMEL
SINKS. ENAMEL

April.

BUILDINGS (CONTRACTED)

May.

February.

March.

April.

May.

AUTOMOBILES, PASSENGER

Total

MOTOR TRUCKS
LOCOMOTIVES
SHIPS




MAXIMUM
MAY
MINIMUM
it APRIL

102.2

102.6

87.8

102.5

106.9

119.6

Wool
Cattle and calves
Hogs
Sheep
Eggs
Poultry
Fish
Milk

31.9
72.8
86.4
74.0
210.3
51.5
57.9
112.7

44.0
75.1
88.9
84.6
176.9
54.1
68.7
122.2

75.2
69.0
96.7
61.8
86.4
75.8
123.7
101.9

61.1
79.0
91.3
64.7
163.9
66.6
107.3
117.9

54.2
71.6
82.1
54.2
245.0
56.5
75.8
115.1

93.8
91.5
100.0
74.7
217.8
73.5
87.4
132.4

New high records were again made by stocks of
crude petroleum and of gasoline (the latter being an
Further reductions in commodity stocks took place
April figure), while new low records since the end of
in May, on almost as large a scale as in April. Of 43
1919 were made by beef products and fish. In addicommodities for which May reports are now available
tion to coffee, pig iron, and flaxseed, stocks of zinc
relative to 1919, there were 29 decreases, 13 increases,
have now been reduced below the 1913 average, and
and 1 unchanged. Six of the increases occurred stocks of tin, cement, cotton, and wheat came down
in the foodstuff group, due largely to seasonal condi- to within a relatively short distance of the 1913
tions, and four came in the paper group.
average.
Compared with May, 1921, increases occurred in
STOCKS OF COMMODITIES COMPARED WITH PRE-WAR.
the stocks of 11 commodities, while 30 commodities
(Taken at end of each month.)
decreased and 2 were unchanged. All of the increases except petroleum and cement were in the
RELATIVE STOCKS (1913= 100).
foodstuff or paper groups. The largest relative declines took place in the metals.
1920
1921 ! AprH, May,
April, May,
STOCKS.

average. average.

1921.

1921.

1922.

1922.

STOCKS OP COMMODITIES SINCE 1919.

(Taken at end of each month.)
RELATIVE STOCKS (1919 =100).
Maxjnum
since
1919.
FOODSTUFFS:
124
Beef products -.
129
Pork products
928
Lamb and mutton
332
Sugar (raw)
321
Cottonseed oil
184
Wheat (visible)
149
Wheat flour ..
1,482
Corn (visible)
316
Oats (visible)
. .174
Butter.
1.56
Cheese
186
Eggs..
156
Poultry
110
Fish i .
177
Coffee
391
Apples
360
Rice (domestic) .
....
CLOTHING MATERIALS:
Cotton (total)
. . . 136
106
^V^ool (commercial)
FUELS:
223
Crude petroleum
189
Gasoline..
153
Kerosene
173
Gas and fuel oil
.
162
Lubricating oil
METALS:
146
Pic iron (merchant)
247
Zinc
528
Tin .
CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL:
143
Yellow pine
108
Michigan hardwoods
152
Michigan softwoods
277
Oak flooring
222
Maple flooring
115
Silica brick
181
Face bnck
276
Cement *
301
Baths (enamel)
95
Lavatories (enamel)
122
Sinks (enamel).
175
Rosin *
4
215
Turpentine
PAPER:
143
Mechanical wood pulp
138
Chemical wood pulp
175
Newsprint (at mills)
Book paper .
. . . . 127
125
Wrapping paper
132
Paper board
112
Fine paper
OTHER A G R I C U L T U R A L
PRODUCTS:
132
Tobacco (total)
1,578
Flaxseed

!
Min- 1920 1921
imum aver- aver- Apr., May, Apr., May,
since age. age. 1921. 1921. 1922. 1922.
1919.

1

30
27
89
12
65

70
97
183
110
127
89
95
174
69
89
99
82
70
73
146
181
159

44
85
324
157
158
93
76
622
211
81
79
101
72
72
145
162
159

51
105
298
258
194
57
63
740
152
12
35
120
72
46
177
64
196

46
27
76
108
25
189
332
276
53
120
120
36
60
54
514 1,147
138
290
6
33
49
24
114
167
76
53
28
42
89
175
54
26
165
184

24
83
27
285
40
92
58
905
250
20
62
197
58
27
99
22
120

61
83

95
88

111

125

118

92

78

101
61
109
75
81

104
98
126
89
85

145
134
134
151
143

133
158
153
137
155

141
169
151
151
162

213
189
108
167
147

223

39
72
130

60
108
332

132
212
232

146
217
240

144
229
253

93
138
269

69
108
189

102
67
80
59
55
81
107
102
29
21
34
41
13

127
72
105
161
103
103
140
170
50
31
53
104
109

129
98
141
234
199
107
153
193
179
78
89
164
149

133
102
152
258
206
106
137
240
271
84
85
157
91

130
93
152
248
206
99
136
237
236
84
84
163
124

124
76
94
184
208
87
162
275
143
75
107
133
36

119
77
92
163
186
91
136
245
113
56
82
131
15

55
64
71
66
36
70
74

78
63
97
75
48
79
79

108
99
125
115
101
117
101

141
106
147
- 121
107
130
109

147
112
130
125
109
125
112

104
99
104
118
125
128
97

119
92
104
125
121
130
100

132
1,455 1,347

129
127

83

?A
38
25
44
23
28
54
108
16
6
28
(i)

92
29

102
117
550 1,242

1
Index number less than 1.
» On 15th of month.
* Relative to stocks at end of 1919.
* Relative to season beginning April 1, 1919.

112000—22




2

Wheat (visible)
Corn (visible)
Oats (visible)..
Coffee
Cotton (total)..
Crude petroleum
Pig iron (merchant) 1
Zinc
Tin
Oak flooring...
Cement 8
Tobacco
FlaxsmL-,
Relative to 1914.

127
71
89
89
155
109
38
99
IS?
258
80
114
33

134
255 i
270 i
89
183
150
84
195
127
375
91
131
74 !

82
303
177
109
205
138
93
200
132
413
112
147
87

52
211
173
108
194
147
91
211
139
397
111
81

173
470
321
55
151
224
59
127
148
296
129
145
8

132
371
275
61
128
233
44
99
104
261
115
5

2 Relative to stocks at end of 1913.

PRICES.

Farmers' prices of crops and live stock each rose
about 2\ per cent in May. The revised wholesale
price-index number of the Department of Labor advanced from 143 to 148, the largest gain since the
violent price declines. Fuel and lighting rose to more
than double the 1913 price. The Federal Reserve
Board's compilation of the Department of Labor
prices showed increases in all groups except forest
products, which had the greatest gain over 1913.
The index for international price comparison increased
from 149 to 158, with both imported goods and exported goods exhibiting considerable gains. Dun's
and Bradstreet's index numbers made slight increases.
The retail food price remained unchanged and so did
the cost of living. A slight increase*in clothing was
the only change in any group in this compilation.
Wholesale prices in May rose in England, France,
Germany, Canada, and India, but declined in Italy and
Japan.
The individual wholesale prices (see table and chart
on pages 4 and 5) showed increases in all groups in
May. The farmers' prices showed the most declines—four, as against five increases. Wheat and sheep made
the only declines in the market prices of farm products,
and flour the only decline among the food products.
No other declines occurred except sulphuric acid.
The largest increases were in bituminous coal and coke,
followed by pig iron. Sheep showed the greatest
relative decrease.

10
SALES.

Sales of individual commodities continued to increase. Of 11 products on which May sales figures are
available, most of which are related to the building
industry, there were 9 increases and only 2 decreases,
both in iron and steel. The distribution movement
through wholesale, mail-order, and chain stores declined
slightly, as did advertising sales, while postal sales
increased. Sales of securities declined, but life-insurance sales made a slight gain.
Compared with a year ago, all individual commodities connected with the building industry showed
doubled sales. All other items for which May figures
are available also increased over last year. New high
records since the end of 1919 were made by 6 individual commodities in May and also by sales of
stocks in May and telephone receipts in April.

May than at any time since the latter part of 1920.
Smaller price increases occurred in worsted yarns and
men's suitings, but dress goods remained unchanged.
Cotton consumption increased in May but was still
below the March level. Stocks made a seasonal decline greater than in May, 1921, and, except at mills,
the amount of cotton on hand was smaller than a year
ago. Imports declined slightly, while exports fell off
23 per cent and were also slightly less than a year ago.
Cloth exports continued their steady increase and
were double the January exports. Spindle activity in
cotton mills increased. Prices of raw cotton advanced about 3 cents per pound over April both to
the producer and on the market. Yarns, print cloths,
and sheetings advanced slightly.
COTTON CONSUMPTION IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN MILLS.
400

COMPARISON OF SALES IN DIFFERENT LINES OF BUSINESS.

I

900
Max- Minmum i m u m 1920 1921
Apr., M a y ,
Apr.,
since since aver- aver- 1921. May, 1922. 1922.
1921.
2nd of end of age. age.
1919. 1919.

DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT:
2

Wholesalers
Mail-order housesl
Chain storesl
SERVICES:
Postal receiptsl
Telephone receiptsl
Telegraph tolls1
Railroad revenues—
Passengersl
Freight^
Advertising—
Magazine
Newspaper
SECURITIES:
Stocks
Bonds
Municipal bonds (new) l ..
Life insurance
1
i

351
178
215
262
222
124
260
135
157
174
129
148
129
147
168
143

14
27
12
27
25
7
23
17
21
33
35
40
25
71
106
47

97
101
53
73
65
34
54
36
77
120
98
111
87
127
148
114

34
24
66
58
59
47
77
67
73
69
43
32
119
119
63
61
74
70
45
38
42
41
65
69
81 . 83
89
83
121
122
73
89

27
53
51
63
72
32
11
0
72
71
41
43
65
78
71
113
83

107
136
242

62
50
82

99
102
118

87
71
124

82
77
112

145
163
125

95
114
98

113
123
120

113
147
106

135
162

84
91

109
122

144
129

58
85

110
178
489
122

35
67
61
87

186
172
154
188
160
81
254
98
113
89

91
153
215
262
222
95
260
135
157
99
44

% /A
%/

V

\\

r

V

1

v

100

A/
V\

r-'

A

•

"164"
77
122
140
86

87

80
61
112

88
74
135

85
73
130

112
148
103

106
148
107

120
163
102

121

98
110

92
103

95
106

85
97

122
114

78
103

91
107

83
115

97
116

87
116

72
105
100
120

55
94
180
102

59
74
147
110

68
78
120
113

117
145
228
119

111
122
192
121

1920

1921

EXPORTS AND CONSUMPTION OF COTTON.
1.000

Items based on value.
Relative proportion of orders to total transactions.

900

Imports of wool declined slightly in May but were
more than twice as large as the imports in May, 1921.
Receipts of domestic wool at Boston showed a large
increase. Machinery activity in woolen mills increased all along the line, except carpet looms, which
remained almost the same as in April. The price of
raw wool increased considerably, both to the producer
and in the Boston market: both prices were higher in

\

700

\
600

TEXTILES.




V

200

INDIVIDUAL COMMODITIES:

Pig iron (merchant)...
Structural steel
Baths, enamel
Lavatories, enamel
Sinks, enamel
Sanitary pottery
Oak flooring
Maple flooring
Redwood lumber
Clay firebrick
Leather belting
Abrasive paper and cloth .
Elastic webbing
Paper
Printing!
Optical goodsl

*\
—

RELATIVE SALES (1919 = 100).

=

)
/
sf

A

200

m
M

1
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V /
VJ

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V

2 5 o S 5 •
2
*
5 2 1 • •• S
>
MQNTHUY_ AVERAGE

1921

1922

Silk imports increased considerably and consumption gained 37 per cent. Stocks of raw silk increased
slightly and prices advanced about 10 per cent.

11
METALS.

FUELS.

The movement of iron ore in May was only half as
great as during May, 1921. Production of both pig
iron and steel ingots increased 11 per cent over April
and made new high records since the beginning of
1921. Production and shipments of merchant pig
iron increased slightly, but sales declined from the
April record and stocks also declined, especially at
steel plants. Imports and exports of iron and steel
both increased slightly. Unfilled orders of the U. S.
Steel Corporation continued to increase. Prices of
pig iron and steel billets rose about 15 per cent over
April, but finished steel products showed only slight
advances.

Bituminous coal production increased somewhat in
May but was only half of normal. Anthracite production remained practically nothing. Beehive coke
production continued to decline, while by-product
coke continued to advance, reaching the highest mark
recorded since 1920. Exports of all coal and coke
again made heavy declines. Wholesale prices of bituminous coal and coke advanced over 30 per cent
over April; anthracite was not quoted. Retail prices
of all coal and coke, however, underwent a slight
decline.
PRODUCTION OF BITUMINOUS COAL.
u

1

60

PRODUCTION OF PIG IRON AND STEEL INGOTS, AND UNITED STATES
STEEL CORPORATION'S UNFILLED ORDERS.

j

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——

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19 13 19 14 1915 1910 19 7 1918 1919 I9120 192
MONTHLY

MONTHLY AVERAGE^

i®

NOV.

e»a»a»e»e»5a»SS

1020

:1sid!
1921

Ift22

AVERAGE

m\

IS
192

(Si
19

S APR
MAY
JUNC

MILLION S OF TO

Z

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I

1
1

OCT.

CO

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AUO.

g

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DEC.

>
1/ \

\

\
\
ft

OCT.

II
1
0

\
I \
\
\
/

1920

PRODUCTION OF ANTHRACITE COAL.

Shipments of locomotives made a decided increase
in May, reflecting the increased unfilled orders at the
\
A
end of April. Domestic unfilled orders for locomotives declined in May, while the foreign balance continued to increase. Production and shipments of
sheets increased while sales, unfilled orders and unsold stocks declined. Structural steel sales were 11
per cent less than in April.
Copper production continued to increase and was
the largest since March, 1921. Exports declined
somewhat. The price of copper advanced slightly.
Zinc production advanced to the highest point
since December, 1920, while stocks were reduced
heavily and stood at the lowest point since August,
1920. Receipts and shipments at St. Louis increased
considerably and prices rose slightly.
Imports of tin declined in May, and stocks were reduced also. A slight advance took place in the tin
price.
Petroleum production increased again and almost
Receipts and shipments of lead at St. Louis made reached the record figures for March. Stocks conmarked gains over April and the price advanced.
tinued to increase and again made a new high record.




ft *\

917

MONTHLY

1918 1919 1920

AVERAGE

12
Shipments from Mexico continued their steady upward movement, while the price of crude petroleum
remained unchanged. Exports of gasoline declined
slightly in May.

STOCKS OF CATTLE HIDES (PACKER) AND PRODUCTION AND STOCKS
OF LEATHER (SOLE AND BELTING).
400 1

r

350

{

PRODUCTION, CONSUMPTION, IMPORTS, AND STOCKS OF PETROLEUM.
300

4
iT
It

•o 250
Q

i

D

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J—

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CO

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^

so

STOCKS 1

V

1

s

I

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—^-*
1

too

\

50

SOLE-LEATHER PRODUCTION
n

The April gasoline report showed stationary production, but increased stocks and consumption.
Kerosene production and stocks increased, gas and
fuel oil showed a considerable loss in production and
larger stocks, while lubricating oil showed little change
from March.
PAPER.

Production and shipments of newsprint paper made
a marked increase in May, both rising to a point not
equalled since the middle of 1920. Stocks increased,
due to a larger amount in transit to publishers.
Consumption of newsprint by publishers was somewhat smaller than in April. Prices showed little
change.
Purchases of paper by printers and sales of printing
declined sharply in April, while printing activity
underwent a smaller decrease. Exports of printing
paper again increased to the highest mark since
January, 1921.
AUTOMOBILES.
Passenger-car production for May totaled 231,699
cars and truck output totaled 23,694, thus continuing
the steady increase in this industry. Shipments
of automobiles also increased considerably over April.
HIDES AND LEATHER.
Imports of hides and skins increased somewhat in
May, but stocks continued to decline and again made
a new low record. Prices of hides increased.
Production of leather increased slightly in May,
while stocks declined. Prices remained stationary,
and exports declined. Production of boots and shoes
again declined, but exports made a slight increase.
There was no change in the price in May.




_ -• — T ! T
1
1
i i s i i
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5
:
I92C
>

I
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- —. •

1 1 1 1 1
5

i.

192i

i

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n

(

DEC.

AVERAGE

SEPT

MONTHLY

C

S!
\

•—•

\

\

1922

BUILDING OPERATIONS.

Construction costs showed a slight increase in May,
especially the concrete factory cost. All the cost indices ranged from 59 to 76 per cent above the pre-war
average and almost 10 per cent less than a year ago.
VOLUME OF BUILDING CONTRACTS AWARDED, BY CLASSES.
M I L L I O N S OF SQUARE F E E T
1919 M O N T H L Y
AVERAGE
1920 M O N T H L Y
AVERAGE
1921 M O N T H L Y

AVERAGE
JANUARY
FEBRUARY
MARCH
APRIL
MAY
| JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER
JANUARY
FEBRUARY
MARCH
APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER

13

Production and shipments of all kinds of lumber
thus far reported showed large increases in May except
North Carolina pine production, which declined 2 per
cent. Stocks of hardwoods in Michigan increased
but Michigan softwoods and Southern pine declined.
The price of Southern pine rose slightly, while Douglas
fir increased $2 per thousand feet. Exports of lumber
increased slightly.
Production, shipments, new orders, and unfilled
orders for both oak flooring and maple flooring
exhibited gains over April, while stocks of both kinds
of flooring were reduced about 10 per cent.
Greatly increased production occurred in all classes
of brick in May, in most cases exceeding any month
since 1920. Shipments and unfilled orders also
gained. Stocks of clay fire and silica brick increased
very slightly, while face-brick stocks declined over
15 per cent. Prices of brick rose considerably.
Cement production increased 21 per cent in May and
made a new high record, while shipments, with a gain
of 48 per cent over April, also attained record heights.
Stocks declined and the price was unchanged.
Shipments of all kinds of enamel sanitary ware increased, all making new high records, while new orders
increased almost 40 per cent and exceeded shipments,
as well as making new high records. Stocks were reduced about 25 per cent in most lines. Orders for
sanitary pottery continued to increase and, except for
last January, exceeded any previous month since
January, 1920.
CEREALS.
The crops of both winter and spring wheat were
estimated in July to exceed the 1921 crops, with a
total forecast for 1922 of 817,000,000 bushels. Exports of wheat and flour for May showed a good increase
but were less than half as large as a year ago. The
visible supply made the usual seasonal decline and
exceeded last year's visible by 40,000,000 bushels.
Receipts and shipments made seasonal increases and
were slightly larger than a year ago. Wheat prices
were irregular, while flour prices declined slightly.




MEATS.
Receipts, shipments, and slaughter of cattle made
large increases in May. Exports of beef products
were the largest since January, 1921, and cold-storage
holdings continued their seasonal decline, reaching the
lowest mark recorded since the end of the war. Prices
of cattle and round steak advanced, while carcass beef
remained unchanged.
INSPECTED SLAUGHTER, CONSUMPTION, AND GOLD-STORAGE HOLDINGS OF BEEF PRODUCTS.
1

V

1

i

460

/
400

8

BUILDING MATERIALS.

Corn exports declined in May from the huge outpourings in pievious months. The visible supply declined seasonally but was almost double last year's
visible. Receipts and shipments made a seasonal increase and were slightly larger than a year ago.
Grindings into glucose and starch increased slightly
and equalled the May grindings last year. The price
of corn continued to advance. The crop was estimated at 2,860,000,000 bushels in July, a considerable
decline from last year.
The production of oats was estimated at 1,187,000,000 bushels in the July report, exceeding last year's
crop by 126,000,000 bushels. The visible supply continued to decline in May, wThile receipts increased and
exports were the largest since March, 1920. The
price of oats increased.
Barley production was estimated at 182,000,000
bushels in July, an increase of 30,000,000 bushels over
last year. Exports showed little change from April,
but the price of barley increased.
Rye production forecast in July was 82,000,000
bushels, an increase of 24,000,000 bushels over last
year, while exports in May rose to the highest point
since January, 1921. The price of rye continued to
increase.
Total grain exports declined slightly in May and
were smaller than a year ago. Car loadings of grain
and grain products exceeded both March and April
figures and were larger than in May, 1921.

;£

S

A

y

k

f

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200

150

r

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The building volume index increased 19 per cent
in May. Contracts awarded in the 27 northeastern
states amounted to 59,639,000 square feet in May,
again making a new record. Declines occurred in
business, residential and educational buildings, but
the other groups showed large increases; industrial
buildings increased 16 per cent over April contracts.
May also witnessed an increase in the value of building projects, which reached $362,590,000, the highest
figure recorded on these monthly reports. Declines
occurred among the business and industrial buildings
and in public works and utilities, while the other classes
showed good gains. Fire losses again declined but
were still higher than a year ago.

SLA

1

\
\

100

\ i

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19 19

A
V

—

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JO

MONTHLY

V

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1 13 19 \A 1916 1916 19 17 1918

A i

UGHTER

1920 1921
zo

AVERAGE
1920

i s is (lit
1921

M
i

1

1
1922

14
The movement and slaughter of hogs also showed a
good increase in May. Exports of pork products increased slightly and cold-storage holdings made a
seasonal advance, but were considerably less than in
May, 1921. Prices of hogs and pork advanced
slightly.

May, but exports increased and stocks in Cuba continued to gain.
IMPORTS, MELTINGS, AND STOCKS OP RAW SUGAR.

1

V
\
|

WO

INSPECTED SLAUGHTER, CONSUMPTION, EXPORTS, AND COLDSTORAGE HOLDINGS OF PORK PRODUCTS.

600

460

l

1

I
I

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A
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1
\

400

\
360

\
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1920

!92« z ( b 0 : •

AVERAGE
>

* • 5 Sf 5 "
192

y

•

/

11 V
\v
\ 1 ** * 1.

I

I

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1

-

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y

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60
1922

Rice receipts made a seasonal decline and shipments
from mills were also less. Stocks also declined with
the season, and exports were the smallest since October, 1920.
The fish catch increased in May over both the
previous month and the corresponding month last year.
Cold-storage holdings continued to decline and were
the lowest recorded.
Receipts of poultry increased and cold-storage
holdings made a seasonal decline.
Exports of condensed milk declined. Receipts of
butter and cheese made seasonal increases, but eggs
declined. Cold-storage holdings of butter, cheese,
and eggs increased with the season, while prices of
butter and cheese continued to decline.
Domestic cane sugar receipts continued at a low
level in May and imports declined. Meltings were
slightly larger and made a new high record since 1919.
Stocks were reduced and exports of refined sugar also
made a new high record since 1919. Wholesale prices
of both raw and refined sugar advanced but the retail
price declined. Cuban crop receipts declined in

L
U
O

AON

OTHER FOODSTUFFS.

1919 1920 1921
MONTHLY
AVERAGE

•oaa

Advances were recorded in the movement and
slaughter of sheep in May, but these movements were
somewhat smaller than a year ago. Cold-storage
holdings increased from the low mark made in April.
Prices of sheep declined.




s

100

i

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11
XI
»

192 I

APR.

MONTHLY

T

1

I

MAY

9

It

V

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F' 1 ?•'

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DEC.
JAN.
— FEB.

—

fn

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1

Imports of coffee increased in May and so did the
visible supply, but the world visible declined. Receipts and clearances in Brazil made a seasonal
decline. Imports of tea were about the same as in
April.
TOBACCO.

Large increases in production occurred in all tobacco
products in May, in most cases reaching the highest
mark since last October. Exports of unmanufactured
leaf tobacco declined slightly and the price was again
unchanged.
RELATIVE PRODUCTION OF CIGARS, CIGARETTES, AND MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.
(Relative production 1913== 100.)
40»

/

360

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/

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300

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0

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!?I4 I9I» I9I« t9IT 1918 1919 I9?9
MONTHLY AVERAQf

I«^-«K>
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192 I

OCT.
NOV.
DEC.

—

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160

1
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APR.

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OCT.
NOV.

/

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JAN.
FEB.
MAR.
APR.

JUU

#

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1

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AUQ.
SEPT
OCT.

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DEC.

V

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AUQ.

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ANDS OF TONS

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(922

15
WATER TRANSPORTATION.

Traffic through the Sault Ste. Marie Canal in May
was much smaller than in May, 1921, but canal traffic
in New York State showed an increase. Panama
Canal traffic for April showed another increase,
attaining the highest mark since March, 1921.
Increases in entrances and clearances of vessels in
foreign trade in May were very marked, especially for
American vessels. Another increase occurred in the
number of vessels under construction.
ENTRANCES AND CLEARANCES OF VESSELS IN U. S. FOREIGN
TRADE, AND SHIPS UNDER CONSTRUCTION.

-p
$

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u-

Bad-order cars again increased, attaining the highest
point since last October. Loadings were 8 per cent
greater than in April, due especially to larger grain,
ore, and merchandise movements, though all classes
showed a gain.
LABOR.

Employment in representative factories throughout
the United States was 3 per cent greater than in April
and the highest since these statistics were established
in January, 1921. Employment in New York State
also increased. The accompanying chart shows that
the gain was well distributed in each section of the
country although the Middle West continued to gain
at a far greater rate than the other sections. Unemployment in Pennsylvania was reduced by 22 per
cent during the month. Immigration increased and
emigration declined.
RELATIVE TREND OF EMPLOYMENT, BY DISTRICTS.

2

«
JUNE
JULY
AUQ.
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.

! 11

1 fit I I it I
2

AVERAGE

2

/
Q -> u. 5 < 2

1920

i

i

120

/

1922

S
_

MONTHLY

DEC

19 3 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918' 19 9 1920 I92l z a

...

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION.

\

BAD-ORDER, AND TOTAL LOADINGS OF
FREIGHT CARS.
\

NEW ENG LAND

to

BOO

fc

850

s

\ \\

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A

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660

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750

I

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80

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III

700

l
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1022

1921

3

660

MAY

SURPLUS,

i

/

8

SHORTAGE,

.CENT

i

Freight-car surplus was again reduced and for box
cars was the smallest since last October. Car shortage
was the largest since last October.

§

§

IMMIGRATION, EMIGRATION AND IMMIGRATION QUOTA.
——J

j

250

/

1
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A

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150

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§

1920

AVERAGE




192 1^
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APR.
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUO.
MPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC

1919

OCT.

4918

MONTHLY

FEB.
MAR

1917

SH DRTAGE
JAN.
FEB.

1 \

0

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MONTHLY

1919

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MONTHLY
QUOTA

I'

AVERAGE,

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rw

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192 I

NOV.

/

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§

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OCT

8

/

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16
DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT.

The influence of seasonal trend was noted in the
declines in May sales in mail-order and chain stores.
In all cases, however, the sales were greater than a
year ago. For the year to date, mail-order sales were
less than a year ago, while chain-store sales increased.
American Wholesale Corporation sales declined both
from April, 1922, and May, 1921.

incorporations increased over April. Credit reports
in the wholesale trade showed another decline in the
proportion of orders but increases in indebtedness and
in payments.
LOANS, DISCOUNTS, AND INVESTMENTS OF FEDERAL RESERVE
MEMBER BANKS COMPARED WITH BILLS DISCOUNTED BY FEDERAL
RESERVE BANKS.
18

LOANS- J ' S C . !

s

/

16

SALES OF MAIL-ORDER HOUSES AND CHAIN STORES.

NTS

14
12
10
3
4

\

f
2

\
\

1

\

AVERAGE

\ I
\

Magazine advertising declined 10 per cent from
April, while newspaper advertising remained about
the same. Postal receipts increased slightly and were
larger than a year ago.

c

C\\
MON THL>f
AVEIRAGE
D

192

MAY

0

NOV.
DEC^
JAN.
FEB.
MAR.
APR.
•MAY
00 JUNE
12 JULY
AUQ.
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.

r»

AUQ.
SEPT.

MONTHLY

1922

NUMBER OF BUSINESS FAILURES AND AMOUNT OF DEFAULTED
LIABILITIES.

PUBLIC FINANCE.

The outstanding debt of the United States increased
somewhat in May, although a slight reduction was
made in Liberty and Victory bonds. Ordinary
receipts of the Government gained, largely on account
of increased customs receipts, while disbursements
declined. The year to date shows an excess of
receipts as against an excess of disbursements last
year.

craw P

i s if 3 i < m i 5 1
3.000 T W




1920
> O UJ
i Z O

o 5a >
m

^ Q.

-2,100- - 70

-1,800- - 6 0

hi

- o-J~o

^

It! 5 < 5

2,400- - 8 0

L

4922

1921

>6

-2^00- -90

BANKING AND FINANCE.

Debits to individual accounts and bank clearings in
New York City both increased in May, while outside
New York debits declined but clearings increased.
Discounts and note circulation of the Federal Reserve
banks continued to decline, while reserves and deposits
increased. The reserve ratio for May declined slightly.
Member bank loans again showed an opposite trend to
the reserve banks, increasing $300,000,000, while
demand deposits made an even larger gain. Both
time and call money rates declined. A slight decrease
occurred in postal savings deposits, while in the Chicago Federal reserve district increased savings deposits were noted in savings and commercial banks.
Life insurance sales continued to increase. Failures made another decline and the amount of defaulted
liabilities fell almost 40 per cent. Dividend and
interest payments were somewhat less than a year ago.
New capital issues of corporations declined, while

5

a
st h > 6
M

n o 11
1

c o z a
o

17
fell below par, thus making the United States again the
possessor of the highest valued currency.
Exports for May again declined, while imports rose.
The excess of exports is the smallest, with the exception of last February, since before the war.
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF THE UNITED STATES.
\
/
700

1

U

<

\

1

A
V\
0.1

r
tj

7

\

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i

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100

0

'1

19 13 10 4

1916 18)6 19 17 1918 1919
MONTHLY

I

A
/

-

—

j 300

FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND TRADE.

Dutch and British exchange rose in May, but the
other important European exchanges declined. Rates
on American countries and India also increased, and
the general index remained stationary. Swiss francs

—'

/

T~

i

\ \[

I P20 1921

AVERAGE

•IV

i

i

>

N

/

„.

OCT.'
•NOV.
DEC.

Prices of both railroad and industrial stocks and
both corporation and municipal bonds rose in May,
although railroad bonds did not participate in the
rise.
Domestic gold receipts at the United States Mint
increased in May and the Rand production of gold rose
considerably but was still below last year's figures.
Imports of gold declined to the lowest point since
February, 1920, and exceeded exports by only
$5,600,000.
Silver production for May showed a slight increase.
Both imports and exports increased, with the latter
very slightly larger. The price of silver continued to
rise.

1920

N _

-S
?=

ill

1921

922

i
s

MONTHLY INDEX OF CROP MARKETINGS.
A monthly index of the production of crops is not,
strictly speaking, an index of production, because
generally the crop is a yearly, not a monthly, affair.
But we can indicate monthly the relative output of agricultural products by the amounts which are shipped
into market. Thus the index, while indicating the
movement of production, is really an index of the
marketing of the crops. For this purpose statistics
are now available monthly showing the movement to
market of crops which represented 95 per cent of the
total value of all crops, excluding forage, in 1909, and
94 per cent in 1919. These statistics include every
crop representing more than one-half of 1 per cent of
the total in 1909.
In this index we are not able, as in the mineral
production index, to go back to a pre-war base, as the
greater part of these marketing statistics, like those on
animal products, were developed during the war. It
has been necessary to use the year 1919 as a base because (1) it was the first peace year since the war?
(2) a few of the individual series do not go back of that
year, and (3) it was a year for which the census of crops
was taken, thus giving a base for weighting. The
various crops are weighted arithmetically by total
value produced as reported by the Census for 19195
with an adjustment based on the percentage marketed,
or by actual quantities marketed, as reported by the
Census. In this manner, the large amounts of some
crops that remain on the farm for feeding live stock
and other purposes, and never reach the market, are
excluded from the weighting, which gives a more
nearly proper weighting for marketing.
112000—22




3

SOURCES OF MATERIAL.

The individual series of data in most cases represent
either receipts at markets or shipments from points of
production, and thus represent about the same point
in every case in the movement from the farm. In the
case of cotton, a figure even closer to the point of production could have been taken—ginnings instead of
receipts—but it was felt that the latter series more
nearly coincided with the point at which the other
crop statistics were taken. Explanations of the individual sources follow:
Corn, wheat, and oats.—These data represent receipts of these grains at the principal interior markets
as compiled by the Chicago Board of Trade. The corn
receipts cover about 10 per cent of the total corn crop
but about half of what is marketed. Oats receipts
comprise about 15 per cent of the total crop of oats
but about 60 per cent of the marketed portion. Wheat
receipts represent about 45 per cent of the total crop
and over half of the amount marketed.
Barley and rye.—-These data represent receipts of
these grains at 17 principal interior markets as compiled by the Federal Reserve Board. The barley receipts cover about one-fourth of the total barley crop,
but about three-fourths of the amount marketed. The
rye receipts cover about 55 per cent of the total crop
and over 90 per cent of the amount marketed.
Rice.—These data are compiled by the Rice Millers'
Association and represent receipts at the mills of rough
rice from Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas, forming
practically the entire rice marketings in the United

18
States outside of^California, or about two-thirds of |
the crop.
Flaxseed.—These data are compiled by the Northwestern Miller and represent receipts at Minneapolis
and Duluth. The receipts at these two points have
totaled in the aggregate more than the total crop of
flaxseed in the United States each year since 1919,
probably due to duplications in receipts and also to
receipts of Canadian flaxseed.
Cotton.—These data are compiled by the New Orleans Cotton Exchange and represent the amount of
cotton brought into sight (i. e., from the plantation)
throughout the United States. These figures cover
practically the entire cotton crop.
Cottonseed.—These data are compiled by the Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and represent
receipts of cottonseed at the crushing mills. They form
about 80 per cent of the total cottonseed production.
Cane sugar.—These data are compiled by the Statistical Sugar Trade Journal and represent the receipts
at New Orleans of domestic cane sugar. These
receipts cover about half of the Louisiana cane crop.
Although technically a product of manufacture, cane
sugar has been included because no figures of sugar
cane are available and the movement is almost identical with the cane movement.
Tobacco.—These data are compiled by the Federal
Reserve Board, Division of Analysis and Research,
from reports of the state authorities of Kentucky,
North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. They
represent sales of loose-leaf tobacco from the warehouses of those states, which grow about 75 per cent
of the total tobacco crop of the United States and the
sales themselves comprise about 60 per cent of the
total tobacco crop. The 1919 figure is partly estimated, as the Kentucky crop was not reported on a
monthly basis prior to July, 1919. For the first halt
year the combined total of the other states is doubled,
as the Kentucky sales usually form half of the total.
Fruits and vegetables.—The data on white potatoes,
sweet potatoes, onions, apples, peaches, citrus fruit
(oranges, lemons, and grapefruit), strawberries, grapes,
pears, tomatoes, cabbage, celery, watermelons, and
cantaloupes are compiled by the U. S. Department of
Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, and
represent railroad shipments in car lots from growing sections throughout the United States. The percentage of each crop represented in these figures varies
greatly, owing to the different methods of distribution
of the various crops. The shipments on citrus fruit
represent as high as 90 per cent of the total crop, while
for sweet potatoes only 10 per cent of the crop is marketed in this manner. In general, the car-lot shipments represent from 25 to 60 per cent of the crop of a
particular fruit or vegetable. Figures for white potatoes represent about 30 per cent of the total crop and
about 50 per cent of the amount sold by farmers, ac-




cording to the 1919 census. Figures for apples represent about 30 per cent of the total crop and about
40 per cent of the amount sold by farmers.
Hay.—These data are compiled by the Hay Trade
Journal and represent receipts at 11 markets—New
York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Boston, St.
Louis, Kansas City, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Milwaukee, and Peoria. These data form only about 2
per cent of the total hay crop but over 11 per cent
of the amounts sold by farmers, according to the 1919
census.
WEIGHTING FACTORS.

The census reports of the value of crops grown in
1919 have been used as weighting factors in preparing
this index, adjusted by deducting the estimated
amounts retained on the farm for feeding live stock,
etc.
In the case of some fruits and vegetables the census
does not report the value of the total crop grown
but only the amounts raised for sale in 1919. These
figures are taken without adjustment for weighting the
marketing index.
The percentages marketed of each crop have been
chosen in accordance with investigations near the
year 1919 on some of the principal crops by various
authorities. These are shown in the table below.
PERCENTAGE OF CROP MARKETED.
(According to various sources.)
Corn. Wheat. Oats. Barley.
!
Census of agriculture:
1909
i
1919
!
U. S. Grain Corporation, report '
of marketings, 1918 crop..
Shipped from county where •
grown (Dept. of Agriculture): \
1918crop
1919crop
;
1920 crop
;
1921crop
I
Estimated marketings, Depart- j
ment of Agriculture:
;
1918crop
!
:
1919 crop

14.5
16.7! 6 1 . 1 .
22. 0 ! 59. 0
19.2 ; 61.6
j
i
16.4
84.1
14. 0
85. 7

27.4
26.4
28. 8
23.8

Final percentage used

20.0

25.0

|

18.0
19.7
11.5

25.9
26.3
79.1

85.0

31.8

Rye.

43.4
36.8 ;
48.7 •

Hay

12.2
14.5
61.0

39.i ;
34.5 j.
36.3 |

36.1 I......
I

.

27.3
26.4
35.0 !

60.0 •

15J0

For the other crops where an adjustment has been
made, the percentage is based on unpublished reports
of sales collected through the 1919 census, except
apples and potatoes, for which the figures of 1919
sales have been published.
The final weighting figures are gathered together in
the table that follows, which indicates the values of
the total and marketed portions of the crops taken
for this index in the census year 1919. There is also
shown the estimated percentage of the crop marketed.
Continental United States alone is represented in these
crop figures. The crops are divided into groups, for
which separate index numbers have been obtained in
accordance with the weights of the individual crops.
No attempt has been made to eliminate the seasonal
variation in the marketing.

19
WEIGHTS FOR INDEX OF CROP MARKETINGS.
! Value of
crop, 1919 Per cent
mar(millions
keted.
of Jol1 lars).

CROP.

Corn
Wheat
Oats . .
Barley
Rye
Rice

3,508
2 074
855
160
116
97

i
. .

.

.

19

Total vegetables
Apples
Peaches
Citrus fruit
Grapes
Pears
Watermelons
Cantaloupes
Strawberries

...

639
125
1
39
1
21
1
22

.

. .

702
214
56
70
97

.

Total fruit

241
96
110
96
26
1

10
ill
36

2,902

290

383
25
39

38
3
4

100
100
100

21
22

2

499

50

75
60
100
50
70
100

181
58
110
48
18
10

18
6
11
5
2
I

465

47

100
100

2,007

348

Total cotton products

444
29
59

Total miscellaneous
Total for index
Total all crops
1 Amount raised for sale only.

348

201
35
236

293
444
29
59
825

The crop-marketing index shows a decline similar to
the animal-products index in 1920 as compared with
1919, but in 1921 the upward rebound was very much
greater, carrying the total index 12 per cent above the
1919 average. All groups except fruit participated in
the increase, and all but the miscellaneous group
stood at over 15 per cent above the 1919 base.
Seasonal variation accounts for a large part of the
monthly changes in this index. As most of the crops
move in the fall, the index shows extremely heavy
movement in the last few months of the year, while the
low point is usually reached in April. Each of the five
groups of commodities in this index displays this same
general trend.
The monthly index numbers for 1922 have been
consistently higher than the corresponding months of
1920 since January. The first four months of this
year were lower than the corresponding months of
1921, but May showed an increase. This was due to
the much heavier movement of all groups except the
cotton and miscellaneous.

29
44
3
6
82

15
100
100
100

2,485
13,131
2 14,755

1
3

2,355

2,355
1,953

Hay
Tobacco.
Flaxseed
Cane sugar

11
29

100
80

646

2,007

Cotton..
Cotton seed

70
176
21
6
7
10

1,763

Sol

. .

.

Value marketed. 1919 Final
(m illions weight.
of dollars).

60
20
100

6.810

Total grains
Potatoes (white)
Sweet potatoes
Tomatoes
Onions..?
.
Cabbage
Celery

20
85
25
35
60
100

RESULTS.

7,046

I N D E X OF CROP MARKETINGS.

(Relative marketings 1919 = 100.)

200

705

180

' Excluding forage, $14,185,000,000.

/




/

160

COMPARISON WITH OTHER INDICES.

This index can be compared only with the index
recently published by the Federal Reserve Board on
agricultural marketings, which also included animal
products. Only two groups can be compared with the
Federal Reserve Board groupings. The grains run
consistently higher in the Department of Commerce's
index in 1921, apparently on account of the higher
weighting given to corn. In the fruit group the
results are totally different, as the Federal Reserve
index used only citrus fruits, whose movement is
greatest in the spring, while the inclusion of other
fruits in the Department of Commerce index, notably
apples, shows the heaviest fruit movement to be in the
fall.

200

/
/

140

f

w
D
C

£ 120
D
Z 100
80
60

1919

/

A V E R AGE

/

t
9
$
$
f

180

{
/ \

$

160

\\ \
140
\ %
%
%
\
120

s

100 z

1920 i
» m *

v#
._-

X

80

*

60
40

20
20
0
>
<

g

z

40

Q.

QC
m

D

4
$

/

CO

z
D

<

Q.
Hi

O

o

>
o

z

o

UJ

o

20
INDEX NUMBERS OF MARKETING OF CROPS.
Prepared by the Department of Commerce.
(Relative to monthly average for 1919 taken as 100.)

Y E A R AND MONTH.

1913 monthly average..
1914 monthly average..
1915 monthly average..
1916 monthly average..
1917 monthly average..
1918 monthly average.
1919 monthly average..
1920 monthly average.
1921 monthly average.

•»»•

Corn* Wheat. Oats.

141.1
116.4

59.9
68.6

107.4 117.0
115.2
96.0
117.6 I 108.3
141.7 i 121.8
129.0 I 89.2

32.4
41.3
45.4
48.5
47.9

[Table continued on opposite page.

White: OnCane
Toseed. j sugar.! bacco. toes.

Rice.

Flaxseed.

Cotton.

76.8

261.4
145.8
132.0
176.6
111.4

114.4
98.5
119.6
112.9
91.3

91.8

172.3
117.1

114.9

88.6

101.7

89.4

105. a

97.0

165.2
103.3 147.1 | 79.0
69.6
104.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 I 100.0 100.0 100.0
119.9
85.9
93.1 104.9
92.4 |
49.3
189.5 115.5
64.5 130.7
92.8 i
42.9
I

Ap- Peach- Citrus
ples.
es. :truit.

198.5 !
124.0 ;
104.3 I

76.0
80.3

102.3
70.0

94.0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

74.9
91.7
105.5 j

84.4

74.7
88.1
66.0 |

63.3

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 I 100.0 100.0

127.3
109.8

89.5
96.9

86.5
96.0

57.7 •
108.1

79.5 ; 97.5 124.3
90.4 j 119.1 ! 109.5

1920.
January..
February.
March....
April

143.0 I
167.6 I
141.4 !
70.4!

68.3
43.1
43.8
48.3

108.5
94.2
85.2
48.7

39.1
31.8
37.5
28.8

109.8
81.8
89.0
73.1

149.7
60.4
45.4
37.0

56.5
61.3
68.4
36.3

150.7
100.0
75.0
52.6

132.6
79.7
50.6
17.7

24.9

7.1

167.6
148.9
63.2
16.5

May....
June
July....
August.

74.8 ! 58.1
164.2
59.4
170.7 1 87.7
61.2
125. 7

34.5
35.1
34.3
38.8

94.3
79.7
77.6
80.0

20.0
24.1
9.7
46.0

48.5
150.9
177.5
87.5

34.3
25.3
34.5
29.3

7.8
7.3
2.1
6.5

3.5

8.1

64.2
86.6
137.2

2.8

5.3

September..
October
November..
December..

134.9
123.1
67.4
120.7

135.6
141.6
118.2
100.3

156.7
101.9
71.6
64.2

85.6
74.8
85.4
65.3

139.7
111.7
93.0
87.3

106.9
220.5
366.6
173.2

155.5
78.3
326.9 | 149.0
184.5 | 184.1
174.9 160.3

71.7
276.2
228.6
157.2

0.4

January...
February..
March
April
,

262.4
174.7
226.6
77.0

92.0
67.3
71.6
74.1

58.7
79.2
50.5

48.5
26.8
40.2
27.6

55.2
35.1
32.7
38.7

106.2
77.6
135.4
159.7

59.4 | 116.9
49.5 | 75.5
63.4 | 56.1
73.6
57.8

118.6
123.3
96.6
35.8 |

May....
June
July....
August.

142.2 ! 85.7
235.0 | 95.8
117.8 | 196.9
195.9 218.0

66.7
106.8
115.0
211.2

32.9
49.8
39.7
82.5

34.3
36.7
64.1
155.7

187.8
72.1
63.2
160.9

134.7
130.8
118.9
84.4

80.5
62.8
57.8
59.0

21.8 |

8.2

22.5 j

September..
October
November..
December..

243.8
230.1
103.1
264.9

195.0
132.0
81.2
76.1

98.7
114.2
56.3
69.7

65.7
51.8
27.1
22.0

137.6
75.4
49.8
58.8

126.0
193.3
140.4
145.3

126.6
225.5
154.8
95.1

January..
February.
March....
April

347.4
389.0
207.0
97.0

55.4
72.1
64.2
49.6

85.6
93.0
79.6
48.6

29.2
30.4
42.5
24.3

31.8
39.8
81.6
35.5

158.6
162.9
213.6
50.7

May..
June.

180.6

92.3

101.5

37.9

114.4

14.9

126.3
113.9

87.2 j 110.7
86.5
139.2

98.7
58.)

64.6
65.0
64.4
32.8

141.3
142.7
166.2
116.1

134.9
125.4
147.9
58.1

1.7
61.7
267.1
243.9

152.2
94.4
67.4
45.0

83.1
94.1
93.8
87.6

162.5 | 407.8
63.6
548.6
339.7
0.1
130.6

33.5
58.3
142.8
168.3

103.9
80.4
85.0
92.1

183.5
172.1
208.2
199.6

82.2
79.2
66.7
53.9

i
9.5
3.5

83.5 I

66.6

80.4 | 57.4
53.0 j 111.4
]

19.2 ;
80.4 !

2.6

78.6

56.5 I

45.3 ! 243.8
98.4 j

34.9

18.8
3.9
27.3
56.8

104.1 i

59.2

90.5

110.2

70.6
120.3
134.7 j 208.1
132.7 ! 165.6
106.5 ! 64.1

211.2
282.2
167.7
68.2

162.4 '
258.2 ;
173.2
26.3

92.4
79.2
107.2
98.9

117.1
101.7
99.1
144.3

89.0
98.6
83.8 |

17.8
37.0

12.7
54.7
49.4

98.8
117.5
14.9 ; 113.5
64.4 ! 106.8

147.1
47.4
85.1
117.4

21.7
5.9
17.2
49.8

55.5
154.6
354.9
275.8

161.5
143.5
93.8
66.9

47.0
46.4
48.1
57.8

109.4
187.0
163.5
141.7

157.2
271.9
171.4
77.6

25.3
99.7
458.6
486.6

58.9
169.7
76.4 ; 276.7
138.6 ! 104.1
65.2
97.8 |

185.0
141.7
67.9
60.6

187.5
480.5
206.3
84.8

195.8
1.0

67.8
92.8
112.0
169.1

51.4
64.8
54.5
53.6

55.2
35.7
49.8
32.1

84.8
44.3
49.9
41.3

37.0
38.5
18.5
6.1

98.6
35.5
11.1
14.8

97.5
91.0
23.9
5.6

102.6
90.6
147.3
128.0

96.1
59.0
42.0
177.6

59.7
69.6
44.0
26.2

157.7
123.8
155.1
133.8

69.3
60.6
56.9
54.0

11.5

56.5

3.9

14.6

1.6

131.9

122.7

17.1

107.4

53.8

0.1

2.4

222.0
411.4

1921.
52.5
15.3
19.7
15.0

4.1 1

!

1922.




9.4 i

25.5

21

INDEX NUMBERS OF MARKETING OF CROPS.
Prepared by the Department of Commerce.
(Relative to monthly average for 1919 taken as 100.)

Table continued from opposite page.]

GROUP SUMMARIES.
YEAR \ N D MONTH.

1913 monthly
1914 monthly
1915 monthly
1916 monthly
1917 monthly
1918 monthly
1919 monthly
1920 monthly
1921 monthly

average . . .
average
average
average.
average. .

potatoes.

64.9
67.5
100.0
118.5
133.9

average.
average
average.
average

Strawberries. Grapes. Pears.

200.4
185.9
104.3
100.0
104.9
129.3

54.6
70.5
68.9
100.0
129.2
114.5

83.1
113.0
101.5
100.0
147.3
122.2

Tomatoes.

Cabbage.

101.7
95.9

53.7
76.8

80.4
102.0

102.3
102.1

77.2
79.0

88.0
85.4

81.4

106.6
100.0
104.2
117.2

114.7
100.0
124.2
123.9

115.1
100.0
144.5
189.2

66.1
100.0
127.2
148.4

63.1
100.0
101.5
113.8

120.1
100.0
94.3
129.5

95.1
100.0
102.4
121.1

76.6
100.0
113.9
118.4

90.5
100.0
89.1
96.8

100.0
86.4
81.0

100.0
93.5
111.6

22.0
39.0
110.8
38.7

92.7
120.9
159.8
189.0

152.0
195.0
224.6
131.8

92.5
77.9
71.4
53.5

82.3
62.5
89.2
62.3

57.8
58.3
64.0
48.1

148.0
97.0
71.4
47.4

141.5
127.2
89.0
31.3

113.7
87.6
74.2
49.1

141.3
72.4
29.4
52.6

59.6

0.7

3.9

12.8
27.9

249.5
785.3
400.4

63.5
83.8
103.6
105.3

57.7
99.9
97.8
90.0

76.8
77.6
100.7
116.1

30.4
22.6
29.7
25.9

35.8
41.9
50.2
77.3

49.7
59.2
72.0
75.1

86.0
259.3
221.3
65.1

78.4
233.9
337.2
276.2

84.5
2.5
0.7
2.5

135.0
151.6
8.3 > 134.9
109.8
104.1

142.3
211.8
162.9
69.6

202.6
331.8
179.3
90.3

77.3
167.9
190.7
159.8

80.3
112.9
124.3
126.2

114.4
161.9
147.0
122.0

0.3

131.5
91.3
110.2
74.2

97.5
85.5
111.6
107.3

77.4
78.6
87.2
81.6

117.2
82.6
62.1
54.5

122.2
169.5
120.3
37.0

119.6
96.2
93.8
66.1

34.7 ; 99.1
434.1 , 127.0
450.2
160.8
325.3
205.9

109.0
124.4
101.7
106.6

111.5
90.4
108.9
125.9

71.8
56.8
51.9
55.7

27.2
24.3
33.3
61.7

83.1
88.9
102.1
126.5

193.4
153.5
84.8
122.1

176.7
251.3
103.3
72.3

203.3
270.1
114.3
72.4

116.5
199.6
164.7
132.2

56.3
79.5
132.9
110.5

151.2
175.2
120.4
117.3

103.0
93.8
153.6
140.2

60.0
56.7
55.5
64.4

77.7
43.4
45.2
36.1

86.1
74.2
35.6
24.4

101.0
96.0
77.0
53.9

141.2

158.3

48.7.

21.4

85.0

WaterCelery. melon. Cantaloupe.

VegeGrains. tables.

Fruit.

Cotton Miscelprod- lane- Total.
ucts.
ous.

91.4

1920.
119 7
83 9
100.6
71.5

January
Fobruarv
March
April

40.2

Mav
June
julv
August

3.8
8.0

60.0

September .
October
November
December

....

245.0
292.0
232.5
164 7

6.5
131.4
520.2
514.5
59.7
16.6
8.6
0.3

0.9
0.4

0.5

2.7

14.5
183.7

285.7
366.9

52.5
256.8
180.1
132.6

474.5
765.4
111.0
0.5

573.3
429.5
92.1
18.7

284.4
121.7
9.8
1.8

25.9
369.1
289.5
373.8

1921.
178 0
142.1
103.1
69.3

Janu&rv
ITebruarv
March
April

37.9

1.5

5.8

2.7

5.9

3.4
2.4

22.6
77.6
139.5

137.0
110.1
140.7
196.7

311.9
325.1
326.6
161.3

227.8
363.3
155.2
88.6

164.7
82.4
22.0
67.3

47.5
19.6
25.5
49.0

42.2
437.0
757.3
467.3

231.5
63.9
30.0

92.2
320.5
251.4
340.0

75.3
1.9

4.3

126.0
241.5
111.2
87.4

44.3
216.5
230.7

158.6
147.7
201.3
192.7

268.3
255.9
327. 7
211.4

0.4

0.4

130.5
151.6
104.9
60.1

303.1

185.6

71.3

114.4

6.4

111.0

97.5
298.8
887.0
254.5

May
June
July
August

21.1
166.7

2.7

September
October
November
December

249.4
285.3
160.4
160.7

1.9
1.3

6.6

1.3

0.2

0.1

15.3
113.0

178.6
634.1

626.3
545.5
73.8
0.2

465.7
139.6
27.8
8.6

|

114.0
6.3
0.7

1

1922.

March
April
May




150 2
133 6
134.5
91.3
49.4

2.5

15.6
36.4
361.3
1,891.9

01

1.3
0.6
0.1

22
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS.
The following table contains a summary of the monthly figures, designed to show the trend in important industrial and commercial
movements. The numerical data for the latest months are given and in addition index numbers for the last four months and for two
corresponding months of a year ago. In many lines the figures do not lend themselves readily to statistical uniformity, due to lateness
of their publication or publication at other than monthly intervals; therefore the following explanations of the various headings are offered
to make clear such distinctions and in general to facilitate the use of the table:
April, 1922.—This column gives the April figures corresponding to those for May shown in the next column—in other words, cover
the previous month, and in some cases, where indicated by a footnote, refer to the previous quarter; that is, ending December
31, 1921.
May, 1922.—In this column are given the figures covering the month of May, or, as in the case of stocks, etc., the situation on May
30 or June 1. In a few cases (usually where returns are reported quarterly only) the figures are for the quarter ending March 31
or the condition on that date. Where this column is left blank, no figures for May were available at the time of going to press
(July 6).
Corresponding month, April or May, 1921.—Thefiguresin this column present the situation exactly a year previous to those in the
"May, 1922," column (that is, generally, May, 1921), but where no figures were available for May, 1922, the April, 1921, figures
have been inserted in this column for comparison with the April, 1922, figures. In the case of quarterly figures, this column shows
the corresponding quarter of 1921.
Cumulative total through latest month—These columns set forth, for those items that can properly be cumulated, the cumulative total
for the first five months of the calendar years 1921 and 1922, respectively, except where the May, 1922, figures are lacking, in
which case the cumulative total for four months in each year is given.
Percentage increase ( + ) or decrease ( —) cumulative 1922 from 1921.—This column shows the per cent by which the cumulated total for
the first five months of 1922 is greater ( + ) or less ( —) than the total for the corresponding period of 1921.
Base year or period.—For purposes of comparison with a previous more or less normal period, all items, so far as possible, are related to
such a period by index numbers. The period taken for each item, called the base, is the monthly average of the year or period
stated in this column. Wherever possible, the year 1913 is taken as a base, and if no prewar figures are available, 1919 is usually
taken to avoid using a war year as a basis. In some cases it will be noted that figures were not available prior to 1920 or even 1921
and that sometimes a month, or an average of a few months, has to be used rather than a year's average. Also, for some industries, 1919 would not be a proper base on account of extraordinary conditions in the industry and therefore some more representative year has been chosen.
Index numbers.—In order to visualize the trend of each movement, index or relative numbers are given for the last four months and
for two corresponding months of a year ago. These index numbers are computed by allowing the monthly average for the base
period, usually 1913 or 1919, to equal 100. If the movement for a current month is greater than the base the index number will
be greater than 100. If the converse is true the index number will be less than 100. The difference between 100 and any index
number gives at once the per cent increase or decrease compared with the base period. Index numbers may also be used to
compute the approximate per cent increase or decrease from one month to the next.
Percentage increase ( + ) or decrease ( —) May from April.—The last column shows the per cent increase or decrease of the figure for the
last month compared with the preceding month.
!j

NUMERICAL DATA.
N O T E . — I t e m s m a r k e d with a n asterick (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed tables were
given in the J u n e n u m b e r (No. 10). For detailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY ( N O . 9).

ApriL,
1922

May,
1922

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

1921

INDEX NUMBERS.

j Per
!centage
! increase

1922

!l (+)

or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1922
from
1921.

BASE
YEAR ||
OR
ij
PERIOD. S

•! Per•
centa g e increase

1922

1921

(

V

or dej"
li crease
i May
j A p r . May.! F e b . M a r . \ A p r . M a y . from
April.

TEXTILES.
Wool.
Consumption by textile mills

i
thous. of l b s . .

57,164

52,720

1913

132 i 141 158 176 130

1913
1913
1913
1913

42
860
272
516

Receipts a t Boston:
Domestic

thous. of l b s . .

9,655

16,717

t h o u s . of l b s . .

24,539

24,255

12,193

Total

thous. of l b s . .

34,194

40,972

20,044

t h o u s . of l b s . .

38,988

32 956

14,745

Looms, wide

per ct. of hours a c t i v e . .

58.4

62.4

80.1 |

Looms, narrow

per ct. of hours a c t i v e . .

53.4

55.2

27, 189
177,765
204, 954
242,239

7,851

Foreign

69.9 I

Imports, unmanufactured
Machinery a c t i v i t y :

64, 503
102, 741
167,244
165,001

+
-

137.2
42.2
18.4
31.9

58 j
231 I
107 |
117 !

99
224
135
220

81 I 72 j 124 :,+ 73.1
550 465 ; 460 '- 1.2
213 ! 182 | 218 + 19.8
340 ! 308 i 261 ! - 15.5
!

1

Looms,carpet and rug.per ct. of hours a c t i v e . .

74.8

75.5

44.1

H920-21 1 113
1
11920-21 1 82
1

Sets of cards

per ct. of hours a c t i v e . .

86.2

89.7

80.2 I

11920-21 i

Combs

per ct. of hours a c t i v e . .

72.7

79.2

98.6

11920-21 I 123

96 ! 102
108 103
122 114 | 96 | 99
95 | 166 169 162 ! 163
128 I 134 141 I 137 ! 143
94 | 103
128 ! 126 107

Woolen.

per ct. of hours a c t i v e . .

'84.8

88.6

81.4

Worsted

per ct. of hours a c t i v e . .

62.1

65.3

89.6

11920-21
11920-21

122
121

129 j 129 136
125 ! 115 99

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

99
118
100
97
68

103
122
108
103
69

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

107
150
155
157
198

149 ! 174
96 134 150
146 | 173 177 j 173 ! 186
161 j 167 161 | 167 I 174
145 | 145
157 ! 145 145
184 I 198
189 184 184

i
j

1920-21 |

120 i 131
!
125

119

;;+

6.3

!:+

3.1

j

| +

0.6

ij +

4.4

;i+

9.6

140 ;! +

4.5

Spinning s p i n d l e s 134

87 I

91 j!+ 4 . 6

Looms and spindles:
Woolen spindles

per c t . of active t o t o t a l . .

86

79 |

Worsted s p i n d l e s . . .per c t . of active to t o t a l . .

62

67

90 i

Wide looms

per ct. of active to t o t a l . .

60

63

80 !

Narrow looms

per c t . of active to t o t a l . .

64

65

75 I

Carpet looms

per c t . of active to t o t a l . .

79

78

47 !

dolls, per l b . .

Unwashed, fine Ohio, B o s t o n . . .dolls, per l b . .

0.248

0.290

.38

.41

.32

1.30

1.35

1.25

0.160

Worsted yarn

dolls, per l b . .

Wool dress goods

dolls, per y d . .

.815

.815

.885 i

Men's suitings

dolls, per y d . .

2.835

3.060

2.925 I

1

Twelve months' average, November, 1920, to October, 1921, inclusive.




108 |

112 |'+

88

100
99
116 116

3.7

+ 8.3
+ 4.9
+ 1.1
116

115

-

0.

i

Prices:
R a w wool t o producer

104 j 109
101
116

| + 16.9
|j+
! +

7.9
3.8
0.0

+

7.9

23
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
INDEX NUMBERS.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (t) detailed tables were
given in the June number (No. 10). For detailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

Percentage increase

1922

(

-y

or decrease
(-)
May. May
from
April.

TEXTILES—Continued.
Cotton.
Consumption by textile mills
bales..
Stocks, end of month:
Mills
thous. of bales..
Warehouses
thous. of bales..
Visible supply
thous. of bales..
Imports, unmanufactured
bales..
Exports, unmanufactured
bales..
Manufactured goods:
Cotton cloth exports
thous. of sq. yds.. a 51,615 a 60,448 i 39,767
j
Fabric consump. by tire mfrs... thous. of lbs..
8,624
10,161 ' 7,864
Elastic webbing sales
thous. of yds.. 11,815
i 12,040
j
Machinery activity:
SpindlesActive
thousands.. 31,389
Total activity
mills, of hours..
6,636
Activity per spindle
hours..
180
Prices:
Raw cotton to producer
dolls, per l b . .
0.159
Raw cotton, New York
dolls, per l b . .
181
Cotton yarn
dolls, per l b . .
350
Print cloth
dolls, per yd..
060
Sheeting
dolls, per yd..
091
Knit Underwear.
Production
Orders received
Shipments
Cancellations
Unfilled orders, end of month
thous.
Silk.
Imports, raw
Consumption, raw
Stocks, raw, end of month.
Prices, raw, Japanese, N. Y

+ 10.9

1
106
145
98
71

65

-2.6
- 20.3
- 11.7
- 5.3
I - 23.4

+
163 !

17.1

152 + 17.8
I

doz.. 744,300 |
j
doz.. 411,300 j 814,500 j 472,500 2,260,800 I 3,274,200 i + 44.
doz.. 535,500 | 500,400 i 437,400 ; 1,561,500 j 3,012,300 j + 92.9
doz.. 22,500 | 18,900 ! 9,000'
29,700 |
78,300 1+163.0
of doz..
1,607 I 1,316

thous. of lbs..
bales..
bales..
dolls, per l b . .

+ 1.
11

2,574 | 4,217

4,435

14,531

24,247 | 33,284 ,

27,209

120,395

140,131 •+ 16.4

19,268 : 20,826

20,541

203,573

7.203

5.635

37,200 | 56,007
15,212 | 22,120

43,513

214,577

23,486

124,016

1,380

2,747

2,843

2,307
3,099 ;

1,221

8,363

1,388

9,149

149

970
479
813

16,144

6.517 I

Burlap a n d Fiber.
Imports:
Burlap
Fiber (unmanufactured)

thous. of lbs..
long tons..

- 5.1
98,280 - 26.2

METALS.
Iron and Steel.
Iron ore movement
Production:
Pig iron
Steel ingots
Merchant pig iron:
Production
Sales
Shipments
Unfilled orders
Stocks, merchant
furnaces
Stocks, steel plants
Exports (comparable)t
Imports

thous. of short tons..
thous. of long tons..
thous. of long tons..
thous.
thous.
thous.
thous.

of long tons..
of long tons..
of long tons.. \
of long tons..!
!
thous. of long tons.. j
thous. of long tons..!
thous. of long tons..
thous. of long tons..'

81
2,072
2,794 j
|
247 |
792 |
379 j
1,484 |
445
154
185
19

|
i
|
j

250 i
387 |
408 I
1,421 j
334 j
131 |
188 |.
23

114.

179

1,460

- 48.6

9,682 '+ 15.8
12,420 + 35.8
1,171

+ 20.7

2,172

+353.4

1,620

+ 99.3

1,103

693
210
143
13

1,477

43

804 - 45.6
81 + 88.4

+
+

11 3
10.9

+ 12
- 51 1
.
+ 77
- 42
+
+

24 9
14 9
16
21 1

a Beginning with January, 1922, figures are in square yards. For the present these are compared directly with linear yards in earlier months, Stated in square yards,
the total will probably average slightly less than in linear yards.
2
Six months' average, July to December, inclusive.
3
Eleven months' average, February to December, inclusive,




24
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (t) detailed tables were April,
given in the June number (No. 10). For de- 1922
tailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

MET ALS—Continued.
Iron a n d Steel—Continued.
Unfilled orders, Steel Corp.,
end of month
thous. of long tons.
Foundry production, Ohio
per ct. of normal.
Wholesale prices:
Pig iron—
Fdry. No. 2, Northern.dolls, per long ton.
Basic,Valley furnacef -dolls, per long ton.
Steel billets, Bessemer
dolls, per long ton.
Iron and steel
dolls, per long ton.
Composite pig iron
dolls, per long ton.
Composite steel
dolls, per 100 lbs.
Composite finished steel
dolls, per 100 lbs.
Structural steel beams
dolls, per 100 lbs.

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

May,
192*

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

1921

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage
increase

1922

or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1922
from
1921.

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

1921

Percentage increase

1922

or decrease
(-)
May
Apr. May. I Feb. Mar. Apr. May. from
April.

76
193

5,482
19.34

1913
1921

79

93
93

25.76
24.60
34.00
36.51
23.91
2.18
2.11
1.60

25.36
22.00
37.00
43.32
24.47
2.93
2.76
2.20

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

167
156
145
167
107
170
165
147

158
150
144
165
159
170
166
146

21
13

70
54
16

75
57
18

1913
1920
1920

60
125
53

515

497

102

124 !

167
121

1920
1920

22
20

29 I
17

41.8
38.2
25.3
96.4
19.0

1920
1920
1920
1920
1920

47
49
61
38
713

89,610
16.1

1921
1921
U921
1913

111
118

+ 3.1

13
32 i
4 I

5,097
48.40

5,254

22.71
20.00
29.50
34. 42
20.77
2.16
2.08
1.50

70
151

131
122
109
125
125
122
122
96

234

142
136
114
131
135
126
125

161
167
132
139
155
127
127
106

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

13.4
23.0
15.3
6.1
15.1
0.9
1.4
6.7

Locomotives.
Shipments :f
Total
Domestic
Foreign
Unfilled orders:f
Domestic
Foreign

number..
number..
number..
number..
number..

818
563
255

248 - 69.7
153 - 72.8
- 62.7

23 + 233.3
49 +315.4
18 + 100.0
-

3.

+
+
-

15.5
17.2
16.4
10.9
37.4

Finished Iron and Steel.
Sheets, blue, black, and galvanized:
Production
per ct. of capacity..
75.2
86.6
Shipments
per ct. of capacity..
84. 2 i
72.3
Sales
per ct. of capacity..
107.7
69. 8 |
Unfilled orders
per ct. of capacity..
161.0
144. 2 i
Unsold stocks
per ct. of capacity..
13.9
8. 7 !
Steel barrels:
Shipments
barrels.. 200,214 225,372 ,
Production
per ct. of capacity..
36.1
42.2 I
Unfilled orders
barrels.. 350,445 j 416,477 j
Structural steel, sales
long tons.. 165,900 146,900

+178.1

94
84
183
44
813

103
99
177
55
604

119
116
148
49
378

91
97
106
88

150
159
120
156

179
207
149
185

201
243
178
164

57
53
42
33
826

I + 12.6
I + 17.4
| + 18.8
! - 11.5

50,823

216,755 j

602,900

76,601
70,145
.126

88,714 I 24,235

326,906
229,,c09 I

290,434 ; ! - 11.2
319,881 + 39.2

1913
1913
1913

50
59
79

24
46
82

37
75
82

61
115
81

75
100
80

87 + 15.8
S9 - 10.3
84 + 4.8

thous. of lbs.. I 51,012
thous. of lbs.. 103,456
thous. of lbs.. 15,854
thous. of lbs.. 13,132
dolls, per l b . .
.052

54,838
36,052
80,818 171,624
27,065 jl 8,594
24,323 ! 18,985
.055
.054

188,004 |

251,352

93,218 + 35.0
122,143 + 20.7

57
200
33
62
90

62
211
31
67
92

78
158
39
110
83

92
148
73

?8
127
57
46
90

95

69,043
101,162

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

53,197 +245.7

1913
1913
1913

132

15,388

139
21
72

97
68

167
165
65

148
110

104 - 48.5
89 - 19.3
+ 1.3

87,114 + 90.8
39,590 + 63.3

1913
1913
1913

163
62
97

243
78
113

212
78
107

369
84
107

282
70
116

372 + 31.8
124 + 77.7
126 + 7.8

+ 1.2
- 42.1
- 17.0
+ 17.2

1913
1913
1913
1913

71
101
12
143

83
101
11
150

103
89
20
169

126
115
26
202

40
19
210

+
+
15 240 +

18,497 ' + 11.4

1919

100

101

107

118

111

117 + 5.5

62

1

ij

Copper.
Production
Exports
Wholesale price, electrolytic

thous. of lbs..
thous. of lbs..
dolls. per l b . .
I

Zinc.
Production
Stocks, end of month
Receipts, St. Louis
Shipments, St. Louis
Price, slab, prime western
Tin.
Stocks, end of month
Imports
Wholesale price, pig tin

62,891
.132

32,259 \
.128 :

I

long tons..
thous. of lbs..
dolls, per l b . .

3,731
10,526
. 305

1,921
8,490
.309

2,571
2,022
.322

Lead.
Receipts, St. Louis
thous. of lbs.. 15,434
Shipments, St. Louis
thous. of lbs.. 6,108
Wholesale price, pig, desilverized... dolls, per l b . . j .051

20,344
10,856
.055

13,308
6,819
.050

45,660
24,244

20,501
35
432
2,537

33,255
7,479
390
1,590

163,078
37,699
3,296
9,047

3,264

16,606

+ 33.7

+

7.5
21.9
+ 70.7
+ 85.2
+ 5.8

FUEL AND POWER.
Coal a n d Coke.
Production:
Bituminous coal
Anthracite coal
Beehive coke
By-product coke
Public-utility
electric power
a

thous. of short tons..
thous. of short tons..
thous. of short tons..
thous. of short tons..

15,780
26
528
2,227

mills, of kw. hours..

Six months' average, July to December, inclusive.




3,800 1
]
4

165,025
21,838
2,737
10,599

Ten months' average, March to December, inclusive,

6

51

Index number less than one.

29.9
34.6
18.2
13.9

25
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA
N O T E . — I t e m - m a r k e d witli an ast risk (*) have
not boon p u b l i - h e d p i w i o u - d v hi he S U R V E Y or
are repoate-1 fur >p<vial TV\.-<-'U^: •tailed fable.,
covering back l i g ' h ^ for !hfw> ionis will be
found a' t h e e u u of i h i - b;illr>;i . For items
i a b l e . Yore
m a r k e d w i i h a dagger
g i \ e n in the .June'number > .V>. 10; For <!,..
tailed tables covering other Hems, see the la~t
quarterly is-ue of the SUR\ EY ( N O . 9;.

CUMLLATIVi: TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST M^XTH.

( oireSpolN.tApril,

May.
192-2'

j 0*22

month
April
or
May.
1921.

INDEX

Per•'Mitage

joo.>

.

huive
1922

Per, centag© increase

•

19-21

RASE
YEAR
•••iimu-

1921

NUMBERS.

rj

or decrease

___

j
,
•
May
A n r . ' M a v . F e b . Mar. A p r . M a w f rom
*
j
*
.
.April.

from
1921.

FUEL A M ) POWER- Coafinued.
Coal and. Coke
S; orage, anthracite

Co if inutd.
t hous. of long to

1921

133

125

104

Exports:
Bituminous

t^ous. of long t o n s . .

Anthracite

thous. of long tons..

Coke

l hous. of long t o n s . .

i 15
K -9
2s

olls, per short t o n . .

3.00 ;

d"lls. per long ton . .
ton

o.oo

2, 500
434

8,610

22

10

125

V'91

3,TOO

57.0

1909-1913

228

74

108

05 .

904

340
01

43.0

1909-1913

151

95

102

38

21 — 44.0

137

9.0

1909-1913

21

44

34

3^

30 - 21.4
214 -f 30.0

31 - 52.4

Wholesale prices:
Bitumino;:Anthracite, chestnut
Coke, Connelsvillc

olls, per short ton..

4.S5

4.48:

221

221

104

104

164

1913

191

193

2011

200

201

3.33

0.00 :

1913

10.24

4.70
(f<)

1913

152

130 ;

125

J33

1-3 • 246 + 33.9

Retail prices:
olls, per short t o n . .

Bituminous

10.39

191

Anthracite —
Stove

dolls, per short ton

14.V9

14.84

Chestnut

dolb. per short ton

14.94

14.91

14.79

101.3

191

193

193

193

192 -

1M)

192

1913

1^9

1*9

1>:N - 0.2

I). 3

216

Petroleum.
Crude petroleum:
Production

thous. of b b l s . .

44,035

40,473

41,9*5

Stocks end of m o n t h . .

thous. of b b l s . . 234,800

245,030

155,207 ;

1913

221,097

193

203

197

225

1913

190,255

139

148

199

211 , 224

224 4-

4.1

233 • — 4.3

Consumption

thous. of b b l s . .

42,093

49,572

41,391 i

217,*] 2

223,275

2.5

1913

195

190

182

210 i 193

227 ~ 17.8

Imports

thous. of b b l s . .

11,059

14,018

9,14S

50,132

04,705

15.4

1913

osi

010

814

944 ' 7Sf>

945

S h i p m e n t s from Mexico

thous. of b b l s . .

IV'03

18, "J^7

> 1,252

S9,152

1913

744

050

781.

800 ' S37

S01 -L.

Price, Kansas-Oklahoma

dolls, per b b l . .

2. 250

2.250

1.500 ;

1913

161

241

241

241

1,442

1,511 ,

1,405 |

1913

S8

72

Oil wells completed

number..

14,020

7,4-SO

0,570

420,215 j 1,094,030

- J2.2

S3 :

241
91

r

20.2
2.9

0.0

95 -f

4.8

Gasoline:
Production

thous. of g a l s . . 472,920

Exports

thous. of gals..

Dome-tic consumption
Stocks, end of m o n t h

121

143 i 143

124

172 ; 189

J24

88

133 ; 135

158

109

173

181 i 189
i

74

SO

1919

153

151

Ill

107 : 108

1919

128

129

120

134 ; 125

1919

137

151

171

102

1919
1919

108

1,7S8,O44

•- 5.5
•

1919

129

136

248,437

254,071

- 2.5
f

1919

185

130

thous. of gals.. 3;<5,5fi4

333,291 I 1, 190,402

1,300,447

4 S. 7
-

1919

116

t h o u s . of g a l s . . £92,208

747,223 \

1919

58,007

55,824

39,859 [

(

Kerosene oil:
Production

thous. of gals.. 18^809

150,157 j

Stacks

thous. of gals.. 325,^30

45«,007 |

093,802

707,731

•r

2.0

1919

92

182 — 3.8

97

I

Gas and fuel oil:
Production

thous. of gals.. 791,04:;

Stocks

thous. of gals..

813,444; 3,141,005

.282.S01 :

3,259,945

3.8

!

1,050,485 ;

167

Lu.bricai.ing oil:
Production

thous. of gals..

72,945

Stocks

thous. of gals..

237,230

' 70,457 j
!

307,801

2S9,773
;

249,593 ;

98 • 104 ' 103
101 ' 147 : 147

PAPER AND PRIXTIXG.
Wood Pulp.
Mechanical:
Production

short tons.. 147,00* ; 107,107 | 97,903 J

059,138

600.31* ' + 1.1

1919

132

81

Consumption and shipment

short tons.. 127,280

144.042 ' 89,182 j
'

562,681

001 ,.531 !-f

1919

74

Stocks, end of month

:
short tons.. 159,712 i iS2,867 : 220,089 '
11,020
7,072
short tons.. 11,797

103
141

32,794

65,900

h 101.0

607 251

787,005

29.7

1919

590,147

789,922

33.9

1919

Imports

6.9

;

1919

147

82 : 119 122
81 ' 108 i 105
104
82 : 90

138

+ 13.3

119

+ 13.2

119

+ 14.5

71

- 1.4

42

56 ;

OS i

73

90 '

106

93

102 , + 9.8

70 I

72

89 j

104

96

105

100 ! 112

99 |

106

99

92

80

200 |

190

1909-1913

Chemical:
Production

short tons.. 149,859 , 104,497

Consumption and shipment

short tons.. 153,542 i 108.095 [] 114,995 :

Stocks, end of month

short tons..

53,184 ; 49.580 ' 00,127
,

Imports

short tons..

05,140 | 51,05S

Newsprint Paper.
Productiont
Shipments!
Importsf
Exportsf

113,138 '

1919
109,952

20,322

|
;
;
short tons.. j 111,S01 129,950 : 7:>,S0s
short tons..! 115,107 ; 130,043 ; >2,770 ,
short t ons.. | 77,307 I 81,352 | 44,238 j
short tons..
3,345 \ 2,570 ., 1,854 I
'
|

Stocks, end of month:!

i|

At mills

52*,678

502,912 ( -j- 6.5

1919

101

69

85 I 103

522,243

5''»2,00"> : -f

1919

100

72

84 |

304,148

401,022 | f 32.0
-

19J 3

351

241

9, 230

12,0-5

7. 0

- 30.9

1909-1913

51

1913

450 i 420

422

4^4

93

72

23 '

7*

+

5.2

- 23.0

93

138

+

1.9

130 110 ! U S

104

104

-

0.4

08 I 05 65

1919
1919

•

78 S 72
138 I 125

1919

!

73 | 58




113 + 1 2 . 9

111 102 ; 100

5,438 1 0,198
!

4

113 -I- 10.2

100

147 |

short t o n s . .

112000—22

98

102

125 !

j
short tons.. 151,643 ] 150,443 | 193,436
short tons.. 30,243 | 35,776 i 23,804

• No quotation.

6.8

- 20.7

1919

Publishers
In transit to publishers

202

19! 9

Jobbers

5,008 !

25

i

short t o n s . . 212,427 ! 210,438 \\ 254,030 ;
short t o n s . . 24,874 | 24,7X1 / 31,198 '

Total

327,142 ;-j-197.5

+ 9.5
-

112 j 108
66 I

67

63

-

4.1

9i

97

-

0.8

74

87

+ 18. ii

26
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed tables were
given in the June number (No. 10). For detailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

April,
1922

May,
1922

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage
increase

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
or deLATEST MONTH.
I crease

cumulative
1922
from
1921.

1921

1922

731,870

827,240 -}- 13.0

1921

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

Percentage increase

1922

(+)
or decrease

May
Apr. ! M a y . Feb. Mar. Apr. ! May. from
April.

PAPER AND PRINTING- Continued.
Newsprint Paper- Continued.
Consumption!
Prices :f
Contract, domestic
Contract, Canadian
Spot market, domestic

short tons.. 176,801
dolls, per 100 lbs..
dolls, per 100lbs..
dolls, per 100 lbs..

174,670

152,278

3.541

5.248
5.497
5.056

3.570
3.497
3.548

3.501
3.548

1919

1919 j 145 i 141
1919
151 | 151
1919 | 121 | U S j

96
96
S3

97
95
84

1.2

-

0.8

:

+

01
.
0.0

I

Printing.
Activity, weighted
Paper purchases, quantities
Paper purchases, value
Sales

123 -

| 104 [ 107

index
index
index
index

number
number
number..
number

Sept. ,1920
1918
1918
1918

Other Paper.
Book:f
Production
short tons.. 70,507
82,574
Stocks
short tons.. 37,367
39,491
Paperboard:f
Production
short ton3.. 164,327 176,790
Stocks
short tons.. 69,756
65,702
Wrapping :f
Production
short tons.. 61,562
71, 494
Stocks
short tons.. 68,401 70,906
Fine:f
Production
short tons.. 27,420
30,129
36,985
Stocks
short tons.. 35,806
Total, all grades (including newsprint): t
Production
short tons.. 528,461 589,971
Stocks
short tons.. 284,862 285,729
Exports (total printing)
short tons..
4,512
3,893

52,642

284,923

373,844 i+ 31.2

39,639
122,801

620,348

832,327 jj+ 34.2

67,979

53,084
59,503

245,648

17,485
41,143

94,172

331,023 + 34.8

140,963 ij-f 49.7

383,995 2,075,218 2,720,304 j! + 31.1
291,089
23,558
17,004 !|- 27.8
2,894

75
79
92
152

1919
1919

67
121

69
125

91
124

1919
1919

79
130 J 125

118

1919
1919

89
107

107
10S

1919
1919

55 ! 61 ; 93
97
109 112

1919
1919
1919

82
124
21

74
123
17

53

|
;
!
i

57 } 85
67 j 104
77 i 91
141 133

88
101

91
116

t
95 -- 8.0
116 1+ 14.9

£9 ' 102 ||+ 14.6

103

139

175

157 j|+ 12.9

92

121

118

125

+

5.7

118

92
109

102

101

109

+

7.6

132

128

121

-

5.8

121

106

124

+ 16.1

119

125

130

+

3.7

105

+

9.9

100

+

3.3

102 I
i

95 i
115 ! 102

97

108 j + 17.1

114 j;+ 11.6

121 I 119 I 120 :+

115

23 I

10

29 j

0.3

25 !- 13.7

Paper Boxes.
Corrugated board: f
Production (Container Club)., thous. of sq.ft.. 116,198
Production o
thous. of sq. ft.. 34,916
Machinery activity, t
per cent of normal..
60
Solid fiber board:f
Production (Container Club), .thous. of sq. ft.. 55,625
Production o
thous. of sq. ft.. 14,659
Machinery activity
per cent of normal
RUBBER.
Crude:
Imports
Consumption by tire mfrs
Wholesale price, Para, N. Y
Tires:
ProductionPneumatic
Solid
Innertubes
Domestic shipments—
Pneumatic
Solid
Inner tubes
Stocks, end of m o n t h Pneumatic
Solid
Inner tubes

120,972
41,156
64

56,438

44,154

45,071

240,508

510,528 + 112.3
173,359

1919

53

182,043

255,065 + 40.1
61,762 !
|
,

1919

93

264,105 + 112.4
119,613 + 84.7

1913
1921
1913

38

8,809

thous. of lbs..
thous. of lbs..
dolls, per l b . .

43,407
24,125
.171

35,727
29,068
.176

23,891
21,051
.179

124,332
64,766

thousands..
thousands..
thousands..

2,401
47
2,651

2,722
58
2,971

2,101
35
2,210

6,439
137
6,976

11,908 + 84.9
233 + 70,1
13,579 + 94.7

thousands..
thousands..
thousands..

2,087
52
2,329

2,639
2,086
61
40
2,939 . 2,343

7, 526
185
8,142

9,959 + 32.3
231 1+ 24.9
10,951 ! + 34.5

thousands..
thousands..
thousands..

5,464 j

89 |i

100 ! 116

I:

i

100

- 20.6
- 39.9

87

i

247

691

665

449

96

117 ij

103

149

135

22

22

20

20

21

1921
1921
1921

116

115

146

132

99

112

140

132

115

134

117

1921
1921
1921

94 ! 109

82

109

110

96

91

84

110

119

87

102

74

91

102

107

106

111

123

130

117

115

79

79

75

104

134

270

113 + 4.1
+ 17.9
+ 6.7

370 ! | - 17.7
162 ||+ 20.5
22 !|+ 2.9

150 ||+ 13.4
163 !'+ 23.4
132 !'+ 12.1

|l
138 !j+ 26.4
138 !j+ 17.3
128 j!+ 26.2

il

5,523 i
174 I
171 |
7,230 | 7,190 :

4,452
265
4,752

o Figures furnished by the National Association of Corrugated and Fiber Box Manufacturers,




96 ; 109

1921
1921
1921

108

153 I 158

jl

131 ii+

1.1

74

-

1.7

157

-

0.6

27
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE,—Items marked with an asterisk (.*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed tables weie April,
given in the June number (No. 10). For de- 19-22
tailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue ( f the SURVEY ( N O . 9).

AUTOMOBILES.
Production:
Passenger cars
Trucks
Shipments:

.number..
number..

By railroad

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

May,
1922

197,221 ; 231,699 jl
22,237 [ 23.094 ||
•
'
i!
j
'

'

(+)

or decrease
i Apr. May.' Feb. : Mar. Apr. May. from
April.

79
50

111

143
84

168 J + 17.5
90 j| + 6.6

94
20
4

133 ! 150
43! 57

'
i
164 ||+ 9.5
73 |j+ 28.5
157 l + 148.9
i

772,742
88,087 ;'

1919
1919

128,404 'i+ 79.5
85,710 + 71.4
11,209 +159.3

1920
1920
1920

89
39
51

00 ! 81

May. 1921
May,1921
May,1921

34..324

18,608 '

71,553

Driveav/ays

number of machines..

22,381

28.700 j

15,193 j

50,021 j

Byboat

number of machines..

7,360 j

2,381 '

I

j
j
|

4,20

100 I 98
100 j 138
100 i 136

j
'

12S

|

|
j

i
43.4
41.1

1922

1919

31,334

GLASS AND OPTICAL GOODS.
Bottles, production
index number
Illuminating glassware:
Net orders
p e r c t . of capacit y . .
Actual production
p e r c t . of capacity..
Shipments billed
p e r c t . of capacity..
Spectacle frames and mountings:
Sales (value).
index n u m b e r . .
Unfilled orders (value)
index n u m b e r . .

1921

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

Percentage increase

|

carloads..

VJG0 j

INDEX NUMBERS.

Per- I
centagej
increase 1
CUMULATIVE TOTAL
(+)
THROUGH
I or deLATEST MONTH.
crease
(-)
cumulative
1922
1922
1921
from
1921.

45.5
45.3
41.1

37.0 !
31.9 j
30.8 I

265

1913
1919

248 j 233
54 ; 45

82 j,

67
116
106
145136
129133

123 r + 16.0
142 ! + 4.4
j
131 ||- 1.5

257
44

;

3.1

|

0.8

37 !- 15.9

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION.
Building Costs.

Building materials:
F r a m e house
Brick house
Building costs
Concrete factory costs
Hotel buildingcosts
Loft ofiice building costs
Subdivided office building costs..

index
index
index
index
index
index
.index

numl >er..
number..
number..
number..
number..
number..
number..

1913
1913
1913
1914
1914
1914
1914

213
176
179
183
179

1913

80

.;i 171
.j 174
162
211
152
172
158
176
160
181
156
177

177
174
165
152
159
162
157

170
172
165
157
160
164
158

176 |
172 |

3.5
0.0
1.2
7.6
0.6
1.2
0.6

167 I
169
161
166
159

!
|
|
'

Construction and Losses.
Building volume
index number
Contracts awarded, floor space:
Business buildings
thous. of s'j. ft.. 10,419
Industrial buildings
thous. of sq.ft..
5,130
Residential buildings
thous. of sq. ft.. 31,606
Educational buildings
thous. of sq. ft..
7,277
Hospitals and institutions
thous. of sq.ft..
805
Public buildings.
thous. of sq. ft..
249
Social and recreational bldgs.. .thous. of sq. ft..
1,432
Religions and memorial bldgs. .thous. of sq. ft..
1,092
Grand total
thous. of sq.ft.. 58,140
Contracts awarded, value:
Business buildings
thous. of dolls.. 58,711
Industrial buildings
thous. of dolls.. 24,312
Residential buildings
thous. of dolls.. 132,478
Educational buildings
thous. of dolls.. 36,719
6,584
Hospitals and institutions
thous. of dolls..
1,380
Public buildings
thous. of dolls..
Public works and utilities
thous. of dolls.. 75,251
Social and recreational bldgs...thous. of dolls..
9,317
Religious and memorial bldgs. thous. of dolls..
8,288
Grand total
thous. of dolls.. 353,162
Fire losses
thous. of dolls.. 31,010
Sulhernplne:
Lumber.
Production
M ft. b. m . . 397,553
Stocks, end of month
M ft. b. JR.. 1,159,422
Price, "B" and better..dolls, per M ft. b . m . . 41.35
Douglas fir:
Production (computed)
M ft. b. m . . 422,157
Shipments (computed)
M ft. b. m . . 439,109
11.50
Price, No. 1 common.. .dolls, per M ft. b. m . .




9 841
,
5,032
5,941
3,543
31,604
18,804
6,101
4,068
045
1,179 |
273
480 j
1,451
2,381
1,952
715
59,639
35,731
57, 515
23,893
140,933
32,925
8, 437
2,506
63,817
20,260
11,966
302, ,'90
29,869

24, 494
20, 404
82, 982
24, 4«2j
3, 288
1 846
64, 999
9, 975
4, 497
242, 094
23, 957

| 477,898

387,736

jl,111,878

1,223,441 j

42.48

90 , 100 202 !
1

150 179 ji+ 19.3

21,679
13,526
66,177
13,847
2,768
1,316
7,016
2,707
129,036

40,288 f 85.8
20,086 + 52.9
128,191 f 93.7
22,835 + 64.9
4,570 ' + 65.1
1,370 + 4.1
0,876 - 2.0
4,923 + 81.9
230,064 + 78.3

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

55
27
89
174
179
234
215

61
28
93
244
175
158
115
101
77

68
19
82
121
270
53
62
142
05

97 I
33 ;
151 j
205 \
218 I
219 I
108
179 '
112

113,

228,920
102,903

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

80
30
106
227
137
249
115
280
196
103
99

87
48
117
246
101
105
155
143
144
113
107

116
25
107
132
237
63
51
57
156
83
131

147 ! 174
57 ' 57
.
172 ' 187
257 309
160 202
170
123
124
180
118
134
156 265
137
164
178
138

08,
2*5,
81,
16,
10,
189,
48,
17.
839.
135

1,764,564

•1-100.8
+• 50.4

546,418 | + 91.2

120,396
33,351
7,435
230,993
48,102
33,383
1,353,182
168,757

+ 47.4

i + 103.4
!- 28.9
!+ 21.7
j - 1.0
|+ 89.3
' 61.2
+ 24.2

2,073,300 j-f 17.5
:

'\

31.78

464,680 320,515 1,228,790 | 2,043,185 j+ 06.3
487,518 358,505 1,339,807 1,972,006 i+ 47.2
13. .50 j 11.50

1917
1917
1913
1917
1917
1913

1

;
|
I
!
I
|
i

92
87
88 101
89
91
133 138 i 189
178

i
! *>
98
136

113
40
157
380
235
145
113
246
125

107| - 5 . 5
47 !+ 15.8
157 I - 0 . 2
322 I- 15.3
320 ;+ 36.3
279 i+ 92.8
188 !+ 66.3
440 |+ 78.8
129 |+ 2.6

i
170
56
199
331
258
224
153
383
291
169
133

- 2.0
I- 1 . 7
!+ 6.4
- 10.3
+ 28.1
+ 81.6
- 15.2
+ 117.5
i|+ 44.4
i|+ 2.7
; - 3.7

113 |+ 20.2
81

!

-

4.1

184
180 |l+ 2.7

92

116

115

HI

107

114 ; 136

125

136 ; 124 \ 125 1 147 |j+ 17.4

121

133 li+ 10.1
151 ||+ 11.0

28
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
.NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Tterns marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special rea-solis; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked wiih a dagger (f) detailed tables were
given in the June number (No. 10). For detailed tables covering oilier items, sec the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

BUILDING AND C O N S T R U C T I O N

April,
1922

i 1;22

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

Percentage!
increase
(+)
j or dei crease
YEAR
OR
(—)
PERIOD.
cumulative
| 1922
i from
! 1921.

!
|
|

INDEX NUMBERS.

1921

| Per
| centi agein!
| crease
i

1922

! (+)
!

I j or dei crea e
i

Apr. May.

i ft

1921

1922

178,672
118,449 !
117,009 |

229,179 + 28.3
204,300 |+ 72.5
232,930 + 99.0

1918

93

126

169

1918

108

81 I 132
!

150

126

184 i|+ 45.9

1918

100

98 | i ;
; ;5

109

147

218 ; || 48.2
--

77,111 j
99,014 |

117,030
149,115 + 50.6

1918

17

102

1918

72

95

1918

128

122

1917

70
21

41 1

52

21

29 J

38

71

55 |
I

58

18 '
34 j

24 |
48 j

57 i|+ 10.6
54 + 17.0
40 ' - 1.8

Feb.

Mar. | Apr. May, ! from
I April.
!

Con.

Lumber—Continued.
California redwood:
Production
Shipments
Orders received
California white pine:
Production
Shipments
Stocks
Michigan hardwoods:*
Production
Shipments
Stocks
Michigan soft woods:*
Production
Shipments
Stocks
Western pine:
Production
Shipments
North Carolina pine:
Production
Shipments
Northern hemlock:
Production
Shipments
Northern hardwood:
Production
Shipments
Exports, planks, scantling, joists
flooring: Flooring.
Production
Shipments
Orders booked
Stocks, end of month
Unfilled orders, end of month
Maple flooring:*
Production
Shipments
Orders booked
Stocks, end of month
Unfilled orders, end of month

M ft. b. m .
M ft. b. m .
M ft. b. m .
M ft. 1). m .
M ft. b. m .
M ft. b. m .

47,099 ; 03,102 |j 45,799
35,888 ! 52,378 |j 23,051
42,479 ! 02,945 II 28,394
19,149 ! 00,951
32,730 i 37, 878
287,452 '

53,423
30,273
325,209

M ft. b . i n . . 13,402 | 14,479 I 10,780
M ft. b. m . . 10,790 i 11, S * ; 0,740
O»
M ft. b. m . . 127,900 ! 130,444 j 157,938

89,020
34,107

M ft. b. m . .
M ft. b. m . .
M ft. b. m . .

9,559
0,5(38
8O,72S

37,212

109,200

293,088

73,942

302,917

8,893 !
8,157 !
49,710 I

9,S32 |i
9,540 ||

M ft. b. m . . 108,180 i 101,180
M ft. b. in.. 132,001 ;

07,042 - 25.2
51,297 + 49.1

1917
1917

19,727

30,028 j - 17.7
35,009 |+ 80.5

1917

122 I
:

00

55

1917

87 | 130

18

14 i

75 !

95 | 103

30

142 ! 118 | 108

40

34 j

+ 34.1

110 jj+218.3
119 !:+ 15.7
84 !- 22.4

+ 80
.
+ 94
.
+ 19
.

1917

M ft. b. m . .
M ft. b. m . .

54,180

52,990 I 20,999

112,875

50,330

57,890 1 23,001
1

100,527

M ft. b . m . .
M ft. b. m . .

24,793 | 27,187

19,038

88,010

21,913 ! 35,030

18,234

01,109

M ft. b. in.. 29,404 ; 30,932
M ft. b. m... 27,228 ! 27,971
M ft. b. m . . 132,807 ;135,953

45,902

212,083

10,715

C>0, 012

79,005

401,927

76

51 I

413,500 + 40.8
588,259 );+ 94.2

1917

60

1917

07

37 j 59 I 96
81 ! 106 i 120

142 !|+ 49.0
152 jj + 26.9

252,840 + 124.0
231,030 + 130.4

1919

84

149

153

158

1919

08

128 i 150

150

155 \\— 2.2
180 V 15.0

100,271
104,392

19.9
70.8

1913

45

1913

47

154,093 - 27.5
131,774 +117.4
703,277 + 75.0

1913

179

102

84 | 137 | 104

109

1913

03

00

75 | 125 | 107

110 ||+ 2.7

1909-13

54

45

71

98,717

1913

153

189

259

101,593

1913

199

211

274

33

J

72
98

54 I
I
08 i

90 |

i

74

62.6
+

5.2

76 j!+ 2.4

Oak

M ft.
M ft.
M ft.
M ft.
M ft.

b. m._
b. m . .
b.m..
b. m . .
b. m . .

19,892 ;

21,914

12,009

41,072

22,227

25,251

12,702

45,305

29,951 I 30,008
23,534

11,809

49,185

1913

229

194

203

385

491

'35,704

1913

413

397

321

312

296

33,501 ! 40,417

9,240

1913

84

127

288

344

462

20,015

M ft.
M ft.
M ft.
M ft.
M ft.

b. m...
b. m . .
b.m..
b. m . .
b. m . .

+ 45.3
64.2
60,008 + 65.4

8,311

33,934

49,310

1919

74

7,903

31,217

51,205

1919

57

30,291

92
07

91

67

90

13,853

19,070

10,102

1919

61

72

57

84

32,174

28,793

31,890

1919

206

200

222

218

17,839

25,098

9,097

1919

21

31

37

1919

52

49

08

84

82

1919

51

45

59

76

76

1919

97

99

106

107

108

1919

38

41

70

84

89

1919

38

30

32

34

42

1919

24

17

30

37 i

47
52

6o |

1919
1919

106

99

86

88 I

Ten months average, March to December, inclusive.




305 I 298
370

378

i

f
9,093 ! 10,701
13,000
10,031

Clay
firebrick:
Brick.
Production
:
thousands.. 41,440 i 40,794 | 24,958
188,311
Shipments
thousands.. 38,458 ! 44,120 ! 22,791
101,550
Stocks, end of month
thousands.. 150,292 !152,259 ! 137,178
i
New orders
thousands.. 45,851 ; 51,041 j| 21,075
98,535
Unfilled orders
thousands.. 39,402 | 45,300
33,830
Silica brick:
Production
thousands..
9,830
34,880
12,233 j 2,442
Shipments
thousands.. 10,485 | 10,704 '[\ 5,101
27,729
Stocks, end of month
thousands.. 36,310 37,845 i 41,385
j
Face brick:
Production
thousands.. 40,707 54,807 i 37,734
118,095
Stocks, in sheds and kilns
thousands.. 144,223 121,540 121,185
,
Unfilled orders
thousands.. 09,038 87,620 :| 41,298 !
Shipments
thousands.. 47,320 50,433 i 30,474
100,551
Prices:
Common red, New York
dolls, per thous..
14.50
10.75
8.74
Common salmon, Chicago.. .dolls, per thous..
8.70 i
8.52
4

+ 140.4
+ 124.2
113,707 + 131.2

182,016

+ 3.9
+ 13.0

207,153

+ 110.2

195,070

44,427 + 27.4
44,535 + 60.6

192,024 j + 02.0

1919

63

84

51

1919

137

130

170

+ 74.1

41

52

*1920

78

57

93
176
69
116

1913

229

221

1913

186

177

170

248
173

+
+
+
+

10.2
13.6
2.2
11.0
20.6

ioo
115
135
180
00

!:+ 17.;
|:+ 28.0
||+ 37.7
|— 10.5
ji-f- 40. T

92
87
110
99
48

!:+
|+
;!+
|'+
1+

12.9
14.7
1.3
11.3
15.0

+ 24.4
+ 2.1
+ 4.2

56 !

1919
175,044

98

328
420
501
261
557

104
162
81
146

121 |
136
15.7
102 + 25.8
102 + 19.2

255
173

302 + 18.3
177 + 2.1

29
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed tables were
given in the June number (No. 10). For detailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

Correspondin^
A

-1

1922

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

At

1922J

April
or
May,
1921.

1921

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage
ncrease
or decrease
(—)
cumulative

1922

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

1922

1921

or decrease
Apr. May.

from
1921.

Perage increase

Feb.

Mar. Apr. May.

May
from
April.

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION—Con.
Cement.
Production
thous. of bbls..
Shipments
thous. of bbls..
Stocks, end of month
... thous. of bbls..
Price, Portland
dolls, per bbl..

11,176
12,749
12,897
1.50

9,281
9,488
12,450
1.70

33,172
29,498

78 130 82 100
number
60 260 47,694
number
number.. 107,566 150,475

35 011
99,525
35,717

143,684
135,444

429,410 +217.0
433,930 + 55.2

9,243
8,592
14,498
1.50

35,673 + 7.5
34,559 + 17.2

1913
1913
1913
1913

113

121

56

87

120

146

107

128

44

95

116

172

112

111

126

123

129

+ 20.9
+ 48.4
115 - 11.0

170

170

148

148

148

149

0.0

Sanitary Ware.
Baths, enajnel:
Orders shipped
Stocks
Orders received
Lavatories, enamel:
Orders shipped
Stocks
Orders received
Sinks, enamel:
Orders shipped
Stocks
Orders received
Miscellaneous, enamel:
Orders shipped
Storks
Orders received
Sanitary pottery:
Orders received

326 473 + 127 2

100

101

152

189

226

237

271

236

135

167

143

113

47

51

70

91

154

+ 5.1
- 20.9
215 + 39.9

1919
1919
1919

129

114

154

199

222

235

84

84

73

90

75

56

67

63

93

130

188

1919
1919
1919

123

124

135

166

181

85

84

103

122

107

69

72

81

108

160

+ 10.6
- 23.9
222 + 39.0

130

103

125

158

174

178

121

115

101

108

107

97

71

68

84

115

153

1919
1919
1919

number.. 101,482
number.. 104,543
number.. 138,757

107,708
78,062
192,546

52,323
117,422
46,686

279,634
245,095

575,732 + 134.9

number.. 98,905
number.. 135,071
number.. 140,620

109,377
102,747
195,503

67,487
105,916
63,250

297,411

446,583 + 50.2

275,511

587,485 + 113.2

number
number
number..

49,402
85,528
63,910

50,644
77 788
80,341

29,341
91,737
28,661

160,330

219,235 + 36.7

135,352

282,098 +108.4

1919
1919
1919

number pieces per kiln..

347

409

137

573

1,738 +203.3

1919

32

32

52

52

81

47,538
5 958

148,142
16 876

264,111 + 78.3
26 233 + 55 4

1919
1919

70

68

87

110

107

65

43

60

82

84

33,505
5,383
17,343
3,762
6,108

119,634
15,677
70,603
11,797
16,972

163,420
11,582
90,383
33,937
20,179

1909-13
1909-13
1909-13
1909-13
1909-13

52

78

82

71

75

51

79

44

29

25

+ 6.1
- 25.3
262 + 38.8
200

82

+ 2.5
- 9.0
192 + 25.7
95

+ 17.9

89

+
+
104 +
88 121 +

19.4
54.2
21.8
17.0
68.7
1.8
2.9
7.1
5.9

9.0
2.3

Abrasive Paper and Cloth.
Domestic sales
Foreign sales

reams..
reams..

72,930
7 745

H I D E S AND LEATHER.
Hides.
Imports:
Total hides and skins
thous. of lbs . 31,935 38,118
1,702
2,624
Calfskins
..
thous. of l b s . .
19,907
Cattle hides
thous. of l b s . . 16,348
8,708
7,228
Goat skins
thous. of l b s . .
3,780
6,375
Sheep skins
thous. of lbs
Stocks, end of month:
Total hidps and skins
thous of lbs 346 277 339,977
Cattle hides
thous of lbs
269,828 261,935
Calf and kip skins
thous. of l b s . . 46 858 50 187
29,591
27,855
Sheep and lamb skins
thous of lbs
Prices:
Green salted, packer's heavy
.146
134
native steers
dolls, per l b . .
.134
Calfskins poimtrv No 1
dolls ner lb
131
Leather.
Production:
Sole leather
Skivers
Oak and union harness
Finished sole and belting
Finished upper
Stocks, end of month:
Snip and bpltincr
Upper
Stocks, in process of tanning:
SOIP and bpltinc
Ui)per
Exports:
Sole
Upper




+ 36.6
-

26.1

+ 28.0
+187.7
+ 18.9

85

84

106

74

115

43

85

71

107

82

81

80

109

109

82

81

79

100

103

78

79

80

99

101

99

91

90

86 +
85 -

.119
.169

1913
1913

55
72

65

87

76

90

73

72

73
69*

79
71

+
+

- 0 . 4

199 177
thous of lbs
thous. ofsq. ft.. 477,709

196,639
452 651

100,258
170,179

99,609
164,434

6,704
73,071
296,803
118,393
222,779

7,241
87,586
388,398
121,953
356,344

204,137
420,712
111,662
162,498

1,070
6,578

78

68

107

1,561
14,909
57,480
25,242
53,532

thous. of lbs.
thous. of sq. ft.

122

46

1921
1921
1921
1921

1,321
16,099
90,813
22,576
67,275

thous of lbs
thous of sq ft

91

462,512
369,268
59,909
33,335

1,327
16,065
94,598
22,416
66,700

thous. of sides..
doz..
stufTed sides..
thous. of lbs..
thous. of sq. ft..

61
33

39

2,450
455
7,981 1 1,574

+ 8.0 | I
+ 19.9
+ 30.9
+ 3.0
+ 60.0

1919
1919
1919
1921
1921

79
77

76

83

78

78

71

70

90

96

113

129

107

107

73

60

68

82

99

94

99

87

92

121

134

115

98

105

106

103

103

102

99

99

102

106

113

107

1921
1921
6,977 + 25.0
32,635 +153.0

98

1921
1921

5,580
12,900

94
87

+
95 88 +
116 +

0.2
4.0
0.7
0.9

-

1.3
5.2

101

100

90

90

99

1 93
111

90

96

107

104

100

-

0.6
3.4

1913
1913

32

17

40

35

18

63

55
91

41
74

94
90

+ 129.0
+ 21.3

30
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (t) detailed tables were April,
given in the June number (No. 10). For de- 1922
tailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (No. 9).

May,
1922

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

1921

I N D E X NUMBERS.

Per
centage
increase

1922

(+)

or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1922
from
1921.

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

1921

Percentage increase

1922

or decrease
Apr. May.

Feb.

Mar. Apr. May.

ft
from
April.

H I D E S AND LEATHER—Continued.
Leather—Continued.
Prices:
Sole, hemlock, middle No. 1
dolls, per lb..
Chrome calf,"B " grades
dolls, per sq. ft..
Leather Products.
Belting sales:
Quantity
thous. of lbs..
Amount
thous. of dolls..
Boots and shoes:
Production
thous. of pairs..
Exports
thous. of pairs..
Price, wholesale, men's black
calf, blucher
dolls, per pair..

.350 j
.415 I

.350
.415

.370
.525

1913
1913

376
613

309

1919
1919

572

27,194
463

26,902
515

538

6.50

6.50

7.00

131
195

131
195

124
173

2,145 - 58.6

0.0
0.0

124 ! 124
154
154

44
42

1919
1913

146

64

1913

5,177

124
158

225

225

217

1920
1920
1920
1920

32
30
90
14
87

108

1.1
+ 11.2

213

209

209

0.0

66
70
63
111

117

65
67
59
106

59
61
57
105

- 9.3
- 9.1
-3.5
- 0.7

104
54

118

44

60 - 49.4
149 +114.5

CHEMICALS.
Production:
Acetate of lime
thous. of lbs..
7,836
7,107
Wood alcohol
galls.. 418,271 380,237
Consumption, wood, carbonized
.cords.. 44,451 42,917
Stocks, wood
cords.. 898,529 892,602
Imports:
Potash
long tons.. 24,883
12,585
Nitrate of soda
long tons.. 29,891 64,130
Exports:
Sulphuric acid
thous. of lbs..
1,991
2,148
Dyes and dyestuf?s
thous. of dolls..
346
307
Total fertilizer
long tons.. 87,311 158,149
Price index numbers:
Crude drugs
index number..
Essential oils
index number..
Drugs and pharmaceuticals...index number..
Chemicals
weighted index number..
Price, sulphuric acid 66° N. Y
dolls, per lb..
.008

3,489
201,579
22,521
762,013

25,088
1,692,593
189,739

3,007
37,778

27,035
223,626

97,777 +261.7
146,103 - 34.7

1909-13
1909-13

788
397
54,518 ;

6,996
3,370
367,200

6,497 - 7.1
2,146 - 36.3
430,693 + 17.3

128 ; 102 163 324 350 + 7.9
1909-13
219
1909-13 1,286 1,370 111, 167 1,722 1,194 1,061 - 11.3
1909-13
53 i 50
!
64
53 + 81.1
64
84

42,513 + 69.5
2,272,160 + 34.2
247,092 + 30.2

Aug.,1914
Aug.,1914
Aug.,1914
U914
1913

.009

138
168
135
140
95

NAVAL STORES.
Turpentine: t
Net receipts
Stocks.
Rosin:f
Net receipts
Stocks

barrels..
barrels..

13,139
11,081

28,659
4,601

barrels.. 58,015
barrels.. 255,326

93,019
251,823

58,293
312,507

168,325

25,768 j

62,627

55,393 -

11.6

38,418 :

294,845 + 75.2

U920
8 1920

136 | 139
165 j 136
129 I 115
148
143
90
SO
I
I

124

155
135
116
156
80

177
135
117
158
84

177
135
116 159 +
£0

0.0
0.0
0.9
0.6
4.8

86
36

21
107

188 +118.1
- 58.5

8 1920
•1920

52
150

104
156

149

79
141

104
127

166 + 60.3
131 - 1.4

12 - 29.5
+ 2.3

FATS AND OILS.
Total vegetable oils:
Exports
Imports
Oleomargarine:
Production
Consumption

thous. of l b s . .
thous. of l b s . .

4,785
64,363

3,373
65,851

19,613
13,967

189,509
126,464

40,556 - 78.6
310,552 +145.6

1913
1913

74
213

65

34
234

36
380

16
301

thous. of l b s . .
thous. of l b s . .

13,930
13,686

12,765

19,507
12,317

88,143
97,477

63,847 - 27.6
70,795 - 27.4

1913
1913

161
175

116
104

147
103

132
129

115
115

tons..

45,970

23,319

129,624

1919

37

25

50

21

thous. of l b s . .
thous. of l b s . .
dolls, per l b . .

31,682
27,610
.115

23,801
12,389
.117

71,782
47,291
.072

- 49.9

1919
1919
1913

194
122

117

607,092

117
140
139

100
110
159

thous. of bushs
thous. of bushs..

198
45

290
87

598
422

1,991
891

1,251 - 37.2
434 - 51.3

1913
1913

45
147

73
730

300
1,050

465 + 55.0
542 - 48.4

1913
1913

108 -

6.7

-

49.3

Cottonseed.
Cottonseed stocks
Cottonseed oil:
Stocks
Production
Price, New York

304,263

53
42
158

40 - 24.9
19 - 55.1
162 + 1.7

22

21
4

+ 46.5
+ 93.3

7
7

34

- 15.1
13 +182.7

Flaxseed.
Receipts:
Minneapolis
. Duluth
Shipments:
Minneapolis
Duluth




thous. of bushs..
thous. of bushs

7 Average for fiscal year ending June 30.

• Average for fiscal year ending April 30.

5

31
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have •
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be !
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed tables were j April,
given in the June number (No. 10). For de- | 1922
tailed tables covering other items, see the last |
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

! CUMULATIVE TOTAL

Corre- I
THROUGH
spond- ! LATEST MONTH.
ing
month
April
or
May
1921
1922
1921.

May,
1922

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage
increase

(+)

or decrease
(—)
cumulative

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

1922

1921

1922
from
1921.

Apr. I

Percentage increase

(

-y

or decrease
(-)
May. Feb. Mar. Apr. May. May
from
April.

!

FATS AND OILS—Continued.

Flaxseed—Continued.
Stocks:
Minneapolis
thous. of bushs..
Duluth
thous. of bushs.. j
Linseed oil:
!
Shipments from Minneapolis.. .thous. of lbs..
Linseed-oil cake:
Shipments from Minneapolis.. .thous. of lbs..
FOODSTUFFS.

j

Wheat.

52

418 j

1913
1913

993 ;
81

1,419 !

59
38,294

8,357

34,357

-

10.3

79,890 j

10,869

48,995! -

38. 7j

-f 30.8
-

54.0

40

44

61 I 55
1913

4,159

29

3

52

1913

6,069
4,452

22 (

58 | 38
5 |

176
7,952

426

41

131

130
96
118
266
52
86
113

1914
1919
1919

97

1913
1913

160

31

52 ji+ 31.0

14 |

15 +

7.0

36

1909-13
1909-13
1909-13
1913
1913
1919
1919

j
51 I

|

Production, monthly estimate:
i
Winter
thous. of bushs. .js607,333 "> 569,000 10 573,930
Spring
thous. of bushs.. p 247,175 10 248,000 ! io 235,482
Total
thous. of b u s h s . . 9 854,508 10 817,000 j|i0S09,412
14,267 •i
31,624
127,358 ! 64,858 E xports, including
flour
thous. of bushs.. 10,244
67,853 !
26,875
Visible supply
thous. of bushs.. 88,772
29,070
27,000 , 123,OS9 | 105,078 ! i Receipts, principal markets
thous. of bushs.. 15,630
25,474
22,517
90,464 ! 73,164 Shipments, principal markets... thous. of bushs.. 10,684
Wheat
flour:
j
8,073 ;
42,864
44,782 ! +
8,406
Production
thous. of bbls..
7,823 '
7,245 |i
7,989
37,279 ! 40,747 !+
Consumption
thous. of bbls..
6,898
5,500 1
1 5,100
Stocks
thous. of bbls..
5,700
Prices:
1.446 ]t
1.600
No. 1, northern, Chicago
dolls, per bush..
1.386
1.356
1.568
No. 2, red winter, Chicago.. .dolls, per bush..
1.391
Flour, standard patents,
8.060 j
8.745 i
Minneapolis
dolls, per bbl..
8.144
Flour, winter straights,
6.675
7.625
Kansas City
dolls, per bbl..
6.785
Corn.

49.1
14.6
19.1
4.5
9.3

1913

103
121
208
82
74
91

129
101
124 ! 119
120
86
132
173

j - 6.3
||+ 0.3
j _ 4.4
;+ 39.3
I 1 - 23.6
92 |+ 86.0
50
54 ! 128 + 138.4

138 |

101 |

92
210
72
58

121
194
64
71

+
+
58 83

3.2
5.0
3.5

87
98
54

100 100
97 119
80 ! 64

81

175
159

153 ; 148

152

158

+

140 I 138

141

138

- 2 . 5

j 173 191
|

174 i 170

178

176 I -

1.0

174

176

176

174 ! ; -

1.6

527 | 543

446

268

-

39.9

533 : 607

470

371

-

21.1

98
63

141

85 ,
60

4.3

jj
1913

!

181 198

|

Exports, including meal
thous. of bushs..
Visible supply
thous. of bushs..
Receipts, principal markets
thous. of bushs..
Shipments, principal markets.. .thous. of bushs..
Grindings (starch and glucose)., thous. of bushs..
Prices, contract grades,
No. 2, Chicago
dolls, per bush..

18,817
39,502
14,552
12,019
4,211

11,306 i
31,170 J
27,083 j
23,691
4,705

. 588

8,694
17,708
21,319
21,282

| 47,247 | 94,750 i|+ 100.5,
'
.
j 132,377 i 183,097 j,+ 38.3
| 86,827 | 120,836 ; + 39.2

4,696 j

.618

19,124

26,726

+ 39.8

1913
1913
1919
1919
1913

250
303
77
154

99 i

1913

.616 I.

206
211
142
241
112

97 , 181 :+ 86.1

359 I 207
360 ! 270

136 I 268

142 I 159

100

;

!

112

+

5.1

115

105 i -

9.1

45
321

275

67

103

+ 108.6
- 14.1
+ 52.5

104

107

+

2.5

105

91

100

-

4.8

94

92

99

+ 97.1
+ 11.7

Other Grains.
Oats:
Production, monthly est
Receipts, principal
markets t
Visible supply
Exports, including meal
Prices, contract grades,
Chicago
Barley:
Production, monthly est
Receipts, principal
markets t
Exports.
Price, fair to good, malting.
Chicago
Rye:
Production, monthly est
Receipts, principal
markets t
Exports, including flour
Price, No. 2, Chicago....




1909-13 i
i

thous. of bushs.. »l,304,664 101,187,000' ioi;328,937|.
thous. of bushs..
thous. of bushs..
thous. of bushs..
dolls, per bush..

19,544

. 393

thous. of bushs.. 9191,246
'
thous. of bushs..! 1,881
thous. of bushs..
1,002
dolls, per bush..

. 640

12,855 I

47,950

9,371
55,837
2,035

30,114 |.

3,104

619 i

78,649 : + 19.4

3,044

8,856 j +190.9

182,000

2,551 |

| 177 I 173

1913

i

1909-13
13,628 '
6,971

1,015

;

1913

io 184,288

2,933

1913
1913

.392

.403

1

65,872

124 117

12,728 | 3,739

-

6.6
46.4

47 |

16 | 21

101 !
!

62

105

74
87
405 ; 371
1 4 '<

104 106

105

101
26

57

101

103

32

36

32

1913
1913

;

94

+ 55.9
+ 1.3

458 j
.679

]

1913

102

105

102

109

+

6.1

231

235

+

1.5

.657 i .

thous. of bushs.. 980,815

1909-13 ; 203 j 200

10 82,000 [
0 69,956

thous. of bushs..
thous. of bushs..
dolls, per bush..
8

1,417
3,945
1.043

As of June 1.

4,564
5,491
1.056 i

j
1,369 i
2,055 j
1.467

7,818
15,263

12,091 ; + 54.7
12,753 j -

16.4

1913
1913
1913
io A s of

I 119 j 106 123
780
1,376 1,329
I 211 i 231 156
July 1.

251

+322.1
+ 39.2
164 j 166 i + 1.2

110 : 353

615 2,545 3,543
160

32
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (t) detailed tables were April,
given in the June number (No. 10). For de- 1922
tailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

May,
1922

Corresponding,
month
April
or
May,
1921.

(+)

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

1921

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage
increase

i 1922

1921

BASE
YEAR
OR

or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1922
from
1921.

1 Per1 centage increase

1922

'\ or de; crease

PERIOD.

i May
Mar. Apr. May. i from
I April.

Apr. j May. Feb.

FOODSTUFFS—Continued.
Total Grains.
Total production, estimate - -. .millions of bushs.. 9 6.146
Total grain exports, incl. flour.. .thous. of bushs.. 36,043
Car loadings of grain and grain products.... cars.. 32,874

105,945 | 105,515 1
35,183 j 43,450 j 187,574
42,720
38,214 | 185,870

1909-13

118

116:,

1

j 130

|
186 209 | 170 I 202 j 174
! 86
98 j| 131 ! 106 I 84

184,956 | j - 1.4

1913

1
1

218,437 j + 17.5
j

1919

3,662 j!- 9.9

1919
1919

160

1919

136

125 ] . - 3.3
170 1;- 2.4
110 + 30.0

Other Crops.
Rice:
309
91 I 1,144
Receipts at mills (rough)
thous. of bags..
48,181 | 142,026
Shipment total from mills
thous. oflbs.. 49,948
Shipments, through New
20,020 : 38,423
Orleans
thous. of lbs.. 16,154
Stocks, end of monthDomestic, at mills and
97,242 j 149,321
dealers
...thous. oflbs.. 133,590
17,691 j 11,743
Foreign, in warehouses .. .thous. oflbs.. 11,712
4,900
8,858 | 7,618
Imports
...thous. oflbs..
24,892 ! 52,425
'
Exports
...thous. oflbs.. 36,334
Apples:
Production, monthly est.. thous. of bushs.. 179,810 10190,000 | 10102,190 '
944
..thous. of bbls..
384 '
Cold-storage holdings
445
1,780 j 1,160 I j 1,476
Car-lot shipments
carloads..
Potatoes, car-lot shipments
carloads.. 19,203 I 19,795 i' 14,818
2,135
3,090!
Onions, car-lot shipments
carloads..
2,559
5,798 [
7,225
Citrus fruit, car-lot shipments
carloads..
8,720

4,063
582,608

406,235 ''- 30.3

182,772

!

130,415

- 28.6

1S8 ! 163 I 214 I

- 70.6

232 ; 167 ! 196 I
j

-3.5

151 1 131 ! 166 !

196 184

1919

j

1919

46
56 j 56
| 188 ! 167
j

30,630

32,017 ;j+ 4.5

1919

235,847

191,886 j - 18.6

1919

l 42
!

204
61
39
128

190
38
31
213

63

79

165

120

- 27.2

46

69

+ 51.1

36

65

+ 80.8

116

79

+ 23.9

- 31.5
|
i

22,734
71,507
10,601
49,923

14,713
90,101
8,654
36,591

j | - 35.3
I + 26.0
| | - 18.4
I - 26.7

7,435
2,883
1,060
4,487
82,476

8,014
3,232
1,358
4,727
72,201

jj + 7.8
j| + 12.1
i| + 28.1
!|+ 5.3
i l - 12.5

1909-13
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

61 ;
64
41

58
26
22

+ 5.7

102

178
70

111
44

103

54

22

- 59.3

26

17

- 34.8

91

147

128

13-7 +

144

147 !
|

59

42

178

123

- 30.9

200

162 ' 124

155

134

107

- 19.8

99

3.1

Cattle a n d Beef.
1,470
Receipts, primary markets
thousands..
562
Shipments, primary markets
thousands..
235
Shipments, stocker and feeder
thousands..
898
Slaughter
thousands..
Exports of beef products
thous. oflbs.. 13,735
Cold-storage holdings of beef
..thous. oflbs., 64,507
Inspected slaughter production. ..thous. oflbs.. 363,071
Apparent consumption
..thous. oflbs.. 356,787
Prices, Chicago:
8.41
Cattle, corn-fed
dolls, per 100 lbs..
14.50
Beef, fresh native steers
dolls, per 100 lbs..
14.40
Beef, steer rounds, No. 2 . . .dolls, per 100 lbs..

1,878
780
365
1,086
19,145
56,892

8.62
14.50
15.10

1,542
597
214
924
15,911
109,553
347,567
351,725

1,414,402
1,378,032

1,489,460 jj
1,461,565 j|

5.3
6.1

8.43
16.50
15.80

1919
1919
1919
1919
1913
1919
1913
1919
1913
1913
1913

73

75

69 |

79

72

68

67

66 !

71

54

49

55 I

64
87

87 j +
83 +
95 +
141 +
24 -

38.8
55.3

72 |

63
53
79
101
27
106
80
99
112
110

101 +
112
116 +

2.5

78

81

107

117

51 \

46

101 i 101
79

77

103

99

127

127

122

120

91 | 131
31 j

29

98 | 119

74 j
102 j 103

mj

112

97 !

Hogs and Pork.

101

91 I + 27. 8

20.9
39.4

11.8

0.0
4.9

i

Receipts, primary markets
thousands..
3,067
3,737
1,067
Shipments, primary markets
thousands..
1,149
56
70
Shipments, stocker and feeder
thousands..
2,000
2,571
Slaughter
thousands..
99,440
Exports, pork products
thous. oflbs.. 90,132
Inspected slaughter production
thous. of lbs.. 508,909
Apparent consumption
thous. of lbs.. 405,764
Cold-storage holdings,
pork products
thous. of lbs.. 690,296 I 758,515
Prices:
Hogs, heavy, Chicago
dolls, per 100 lbs.. 10.206
10.425
Pork, loins, fresh, Chicago..dolls, per 100 lbs..
23.60
23.80

3,328
18,649
1,045
6,499
39 j
271
2,270 i
12,122
141,041 • 715,431
521,521 I 2,466,710
420,270 ! 1,526,621

18,105
6,511
289
11,587
579,661
2,364,156
1,656,622

i - 2.9
|+ 0.2
! + 6.6

44

I-- 19.0
'
j

! - 4.2
j | + 8.5

1919
1919
1919
1919
1913
1913
1919

89
95

88

97
111

76

52

83

99
89

83

89

90

144

172

168 I

108

116

123

150

140

141 !

82 ; 100 j + 21.8

91
99

89 I

96 I +

75 I

93

152
118

7. 7

I + 25.0

79 ! 101 |+ 28.6
121 I + 10.3

1101
105 I

134 145 I

983,379

1919

105 I

67

74

8.195
22.30

1913
1919

118
182 j 150 : 114

124

122 i 125 j|+ 2.1

133

159 I 160 !!+ 0.8

108

76

Sheep and Mutton.
Receipts, primary markets
thousands..
Shipments, primary markets
thousands..
Shipments, stocker and feeder
thousands..
Slaughter
thousands..
Inspected slaughter production
thous. of lbs..
Cold-storage holdings,
lamb and mutton
thous. oflbs..
Prices:
Sheep, ewes, Chicago
dolls, per 100 lbs..
Sheep, lambs, Chicago
dolls, per 100 lbs..




9

1,227 j
564 I
97 I
678 I
29,299 !

1,692
832
145
852

2,071 I 2,312

5.900
13.219
12.475
As of June 1.

1,916 !
926 !
123 !
1,015 I
41,282
15,877
4.125 I
11.790

8,651
3,598
468
5,092
169,162

7,618
3,616
737
3,995
131,224

I

+
+
I

11.9
0.5
57.5
21.5
22.4

1919
1919
1919
1919
1913

74 I

85

58 !

77

18 j
94 !
79!

21 ;

1919
j!
94;
1913 1 132
1
As of July 1.

1913

i+ 37.9

75
69
25
81

71

54
47
17
64
56

189

25

27 + 11.6

%

88 ; 130 I

151 149

151 I 182 j
;

187 170

+ 47.5
+ 49.5
+ 25.7

126 j - 15.6
160 - 6. t>

33
TREND OF BUSINESS

MOVEMENTS—Continued.

NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed tables were
given in the June number (No. 10). For detailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
(+)
THROUGH
or deLATEST MONTH.
I crease

| (-)
; cumu| lative

April,
1922
1921

INDEX NUMBERS.

Perj centage
I increase

1922

BASE
YEAR i|
OR
PERIOD.

1922

| or de! crease
i May
Apr. I M a y . ; Feb. i Mar.
Apr. May. • from
April.

1922

•

1921

Percentage increase

from
1921.

FOODSTUFFS—Continued.
Fish.
Total catch

thous. of lbs..I 13,160

15,168
16,675

11,920
26,346

62,702 i

14,552 !
38,664 |

10,719
35,408

70,656

15,711

9,186

109,623

103,254 - 5.8

1919

68,893
18,809
2,587

60,208
19,567
2,101

193,577
69,048
8,392

237,097 | + 22.5
71,155 |!+ 3.1
9,276 ;+ 10.5

1919
1919
1919

85
87
210

131
120
177

13,125
24,096
8,043

21,682
28,453
6,843

1916-20
1916-20
1916-20

14
36
133

38
48
186

.360
.175

.316
.152

1919
1919

74
85

53
49

1,206
473,137
531,962
316,973
122,516

1,187
446,678
577,330
271,890
146,454

671
i 381,651
1 339,850
1
| 263,539
| 60,197

1913
1913
1919
1919
1909-13

8
219
107
258

. 040
. 052

.041
.053

.049
.063

1913
1913
1913

155
170
176

140
148
153

107
115
116

112
121
118

114
122
122

116 + 2.5
123 + 1 9
.
120 - 1 6
.

1919
1919
1919

193
114
191

144
75
215

154
61
64

261
157
124

218
158
155

168 J- 22.9
174 + 10.3
162 4- 4.6

1909-13

215

163

141

133

+ 21.5

75
109
108

74
108
104

106

76
55
86

75 - 0.8
61 + 10.3
£0 - 6.8
- 34.4
- 49.5

Cold-storage holdings, 15th of mo., .thous. of lbs.. j 17,485
Poultry.
Receipts at five markets f
Cold-storage holdings t

81,962 + 30.7

1919
1919

58
69
46 ! 43

124 i 107
61 ! 41

76
87 i- 15.3
'f
28 j 27 ; - 4. 6

76
133

67
103

57
76

73 jj-f 30.0
58 - 23.9

28

35

34

22 i- 35.2

90
164

93
97
245

150 + 61.4
116 + 19.4
218 - 11.1

16
29
26

7
51
126

+242.7
65 + 27.0
218 + 73.0

;
thous. of lbs..
thous. of lbs..

11,196
50,840

76,812 |.+ 8.7

1919
1919

Dairy Products.
Condensed and evaporated milk:
Exports
thous. of lbs..
Receipts of 5 markets:
Butter
thous. of lbs..
Cheese
thous. of lbs..
Eggs
thous. ofcases..
Cold-storage holdings:
Creamery butter
thous. of lbs..
American cheese
thous. of lbs..
Caseeggs
thous. ofcases..
Wholesale prices at 5 markets:
Butter
dolls, per lb.
Cheese
dolls, per lb..
Sugar.
Receipts, Louisiana crop
long tons..
Imports, raw
long tons..
Meltings, raw
long tons..
Stocks, raw
long tons..
Exports, refined
long tons..
Prices:
Wholesale, 96 ° centrifugal, N. Y.. dolls, per lb..
Wholesale, refined, N. Y
dolls .per lb..
Retail, average 51 cities
index number.
Cuban jnovement:t
Receipts at Cuban ports
long tons.
Exports
long tons.
Stocks
long tons.

24,234
42,694
15,757
2,911
3,830
18,980
4,648

.183

9,026
14,236 + 57.7
1,520,336 2,254,911 + 48.3
1,512,831 2,351,973 + 55.5
127,733

501,593 +292.7

720,509 555,852 474,426 3,016,014 2,843,998 - 5.7
512,430 565,350 244,109 2,451,680 1,910,627 - 22.1
997,291 1,043,420 1.383,036

28 I 13

40
40
(»)

61 - 0 . 8
56 - 4.4

64

7
4
6
18
254
166
255 326
178
104
128 165 164
285
276
172 287 332
2,039 2,045 3,673 4,149 4,959

- 1.6
-5.6
+ 8.5
- 14.2
19.5

Coffee.
Imports
Visible supply:
World
United States
Receipts, total, Brazil
Clearances:
Total, Brazil, for world
Total, Brazil, for U. S

thous. of lbs.

100,455

122,093

123,191

thous. of bags,
thous. of bags,
thous. of bags.

8,944
1,039
821

8,872
1,146
765

8,720
2,037
994

4,821

4,572 -

5.2

1913
1913
1913

thous. of bags,
thous. of bags.

1,072
667

703
337

727
218

4,910
2,707

5,161 + 5.1
2,294 - 15.3

1913
1913

97
128

73
55

83

118

108
170

thous. of lbs.

5,593

5,634

4,383

20,439

29,840 + 46.0

1909-13

57

53

61

80

68

501
3,453
31,376
40,704

569
4,601
35,846
39,844

555
4,136
31,351
40,220

2,624
20,429
155,045
217,572

- 5.1
- 9.3
+ 10.9
- 21.2

1913
1913
1913
1909-13

87
293
84
138

319
85
128

71
241

84
280
103
105

79
266
85
130

27.50

27.50

28.75

1913

246

218

208

208

544,880 - 18.5

Tea.
Imports

+ . 0.7

TOBACCO.
Production (tax-paid withdrawals):
Large cigars
millions.
Small cigarettes
millions.
Manufactured tobacco and snuff .thous. of lbs.
Exports, unmanufactured leaf
thous. of lbs.
Price, wholesale, Burley good leaf,
dark red, Louisville
dolls, per 100 lbs.
• Index number less than 1.




2,490
18,522
172,013
171,415

90

+ 13.6

355

+ 33.2

97
127
208

+ 14.2
-

2.1
0.0

34
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be :
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (t) detailed tables were April,
given in the June number (No. 10). For de1922
tailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY ( N O . 9).

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

Mav,
1922

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

1921

1922

Percentage
increase
(+)
or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1922
from
1921.

I N D E X NUMBERS.

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

Percentage increase

1922

1921

or decrea.se
Apr

May

Feb. Mar. Apr. May.

Mav
from

TRANSPORTATION—WATER.
Cargo Traffic.
Panama Canal:
In American vessels
thous. of long
In British vessels
thous. of long
Total cargo traffic
thous. of long
Sault Ste. Marie Canal
thous. of short
New York State canals
thous. of short
Mississippi River:
Receipts at St. Louis*
short
Shipments from St. Louis*
short

tons..
tons..
tons..
tons..
tons..

499
297
1,046
639

3,317
157

1915
1915
1915
1913
1913

6,155
105

203
169
223
10

; 228 208 252
157
; 120 151
! 195 206 236
j 62
,
! 28

274
162
257
6

33
42

-419 1

tons..
tons..

Vessels i n F o r e i g n T r a d e .
Entered in U. S. ports:
American
Foreign
Total
Cleared from U. S. ports:
American
Foreign
Total

thous. of net tons..
thous. of net tons..
thous. of net tons..

2,168
2,459
4,627

2,S70
2,601
5,471

2,463
2, £61
5,324

12,125
11,673
23,799

10,960 - 9 6 1
11,912 + 2 0
22,872 - 3 9

1913
1913
1913

212
73
107

1>1
>O
.
107

185
75
104

244 4 32.4
SO + 5.8
123 ; + 18.2
'

thous. of net tons..
thous. of net tons..
thous. of net tons..

2,389
2,495
4,884

2,621 j
2,554
5,175 ;

2,114
2,910
5,024

10,950
12,384
23,341

11)09S + 1 3
11,837 - 4 4
22,934 - 1 7

1913
1913
1913

203 ' 162 : 148 174
67
74
83
90
112 112 i 90 :: 10S

191
77
109

210 4 9 7
- .
79 4 2.4
115 -- 6.0
f

n B0

1920
1919

64
34

Ship Construction.
Vessels under construction.. thous. of gross tons..
New vessels completed
thous. of gross tons..

212 !
34

221
21

645 '
.
109

696

153

210
88
120

i
1
56 '
31

156
70
93

12
11

17
2

18
10

19 4 4.2
38.2
6

116
129
129

108
96
109

115
311
196

85 - 26.3
259 - 16.9
161 - 17.9

TRANSPORTATION-RAIL.
Freight Cars.
Surplus:
Box
Coal
Total
Shortage:
Box
Coal
Total
Bad-order cars, total
Car loadings:
Total
Grain and grain products
Live stock
Coal
Forest products
Ore
Merchandise and miscellaneous
Freight carried
mills, of

number.. 94,653
number.. 235,077
number.. 371,538

69,714 \ 155,040 !
195,439 j 165,102 \
305,198 ; 394,040 j

1919
1919
1919

217
303
255

189
218
20^

369
number..
number..
374
842
number..
number.. 327,704

1,094 |
263 j
50
423 '
339
1,714
340,822 341,337

1919
1919
1919
1913

(5)
3
1
205

1
1
1
226

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

87
86
82
74
84
15
95

95
9S
81
89
87
63

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
7 1913

172
158
170
207
49
186
118

cars.. 727,488 782,670
cars.. 32,874
42,186
cars.. 27,114
29,550
cars.. 72,528
82,494
cars.. 56,052
60,714
cars..
9,654
18,3S4
cars.. 521,106 540,546
ton-miles..

Railroad Operations.
Revenue
Freight
thous. of dolls.. 288,849
Passengers
thous. of dolls.. 83,461
Total, operating
thous. of dolls.. 416,869
Operating expense
thous. of dolls.. 336,178
Net operating income
thous. of dolls.. 50,272
Receipts per ton-mile
index number..
2,461
Pullman passengers carried
thousands..
LABOR.
Number employed:
United States (1,428
firms)
thousands..
New York State
thousands..
Wisconsin
index number..
6

Index n u m b e r less than 1.




1,617
478

75^,438 3,521,960
38,214
185,870
139,826
26,652
744,447
157,122
246,256
49, 463
53,830
23,684
455,605 2,112,510

3,840,741
217,903
136,437
644,984
268,584
41,849
2,464,775

91
.
4- 17.2
- 2.4
- 13.4
4- 9.1
' - 22.3
4- 16.7

304,774 1,234,700 j 1,213,703 - 1.7
j 90,649
381,628
321,297 - 1 5 . 8
. . 4 3 3 , 3 9 8 1,769,331 1,687,907 - 4.6
375,697 • 1,602,650 1,358,876 - 15.2
'
; 29,857
57,025
211,030 4-270.1

1,669
482
7

1,574
461
Average for fiscal year ending June 30.

1921
1914
U915

2
222
96
131
88
108
88
11
92

1
2
2
9
2
3
212 j 217

6
10
7
226

4-196.5
+ 13.1
4-103.6
4- 4.0

103
106
55
74
93
14
105

108
90
47
107
49
114

4- 7.6
4- 28. 3
4- 9.0
4- 13.7
+ 8.3
+ 90.4
4- 3.7

91
84
82
41
99
26
110

177 • 166 i 200 163
' 163 ! 128
140
145
\ 174
157
163
186
179
209
185
199
, 62
80
84
139
160
174
167
! 123
102
114
119

101 101
99 1 96
92
i 93
11

2;
2

100
103 ; 104 : 107 4- 3.:
100
101 100 101 4- O.i
97 i 100 102 i 105 4- 2,!

First quarter of year.

35
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed tables were
given in the June number (No. 10), For detailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

April,
1922

May,
1922

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

1921

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage!
increase

1922

(+)

or decrease
(-)
cumulative

Percentage increase

1922

1921

(+)

YEAR |i
OR
!|
PERIOD. I',"

1922
from
1921.

or decrease
(-)
May
from
April.

Apr. May. |! Feb. I Mar. Apr.

LAB OR—Cont inued.
Total pay roll:
11,929
New York State
thous. of dolls.. 11,546 ; 11,857
Wisconsin
index number..
Av. weekly earnings, Wisconsin, .index number..
Unemployment, Pennsylvania
number.. 215,410 167,405 232,520
36,880
Immigration
number.. 29,166
82,648
23,147 ; 30,029
Emigration
number.. 24,962

62,847

1914

195
185
191
117
15
28 ;

194
193
190
82
25
49

200
206
197
63
31
45

114 j 117
115
117

120
118

2.6
2.6

129
137
171
194
113
156
124
175
116
143

132
138
175
216
119
160
122
176
116
148

2.3
0.7
2.3
11.3
5.3
2.6
1.6
0.6
0.0
3.5

118
207
176
153
128
153

143
115
206
181
154
128
151

116
203
192
159
132
154

110
142
146
140
126
142

111
144
147
137
125
139

115
144
149
139
127
139

119 |4- 3.5
155 j|+ 7.6
158 !|4- 6.0
140 ||+ 0.7
129 \ + 1. 6
139
00
.
|

142

139
165
154
174
174
155

139
165
155
174
174
155

139 | 0.0
165 ! 0.0
|

211
198
243

196
185
222

194 1.0
182 1.6
193 - 13.3

1913

208
201
216
91
60
64

201 :
192
209 !
88
69
59 !
|

1913
1913

104
112

109 112
109 [ 108

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

117
144
176
205
138
167
135
216
130
148

118
139
173
200
138
165
134
209
126
145

131
135
174
191
110
156
123
177
117
141

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

126
106
205
189
149
143
159

131
104
205
188
149
140
153

139
116
207
176
153
127
153

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

109
125
146
138
117
152

105
129
145
137
115
145

Jy., 1914
Jy., 1914
Jy.,1914
Jy.,1914
Jy.,1914
Jy.,1914

58,197

156
171
169
179
185
168

152
171
168
178
185
166

" 1915
11 1915
12 1921

370,442
147,974

121,125 - 67.3
86,386 !- 41.6

1913

200
187
188
106
12
16 ;

! +
i +
! +
! j +
:-

2.7
6. 7
3. 7
22. 3
26. 4
7.3

PRICE INDEX NUMBERS.
Farm prices:
Crops
index number..
Live stock
index number..
Wholesale prices:
Department of LaborFarm products*
index number..
Food, etc*
index number..
Cloths and clothing*
index number..
Fuel and lighting*
.index number..
Metalsandmetalproducts.index number..
Building material*
index number..
Chemicals and drugs*
index number..
House-furnishing goods*.-index number..
Miscellaneous*
index number..
All commodities*
index number..
Fed. Reserve Board (Dept. Labor prices)—
Agricultural products
index number..
Animal products
index number..
Forest products
index number..
Mineral products
index number..
Total raw products
index number..
Producer's goods
index number..
Consumer's goods
index number..
Federal Reserve Board I n d e x Goods imported
index number..
Goods exported
index number..
All commodities
index number..
Dun's
index number..
Bradstreet's
index number..
Ketail prices, food
index number..
Cost of living;
National Industrial Conference BoardFood
index number..
Shelter
index number..
Clothing
index number..
Fuel and light
index number..
Sundries
index number..
All items weighted
index number..
Foreign wholesale prices:
United Kingdom
index number..
France
index number..
Italy
index number..
Germany
index number..
Canada
index number..
Australia
index number..
India
index number..
Japan
index number..

169
156
177
177
158

182 i 158
183
1913
329
306
347
1913
547
562
584
1913
Jy.,1914 1,483 1,438 4,888
183 ' 169
187
1913
166
147
171
Jy., 1914
184
179
183
Jy.,1914
191
204
190
1913

130
137 I
172
191 |
109 i
155 :
125 j
175 j
117 |
142 j
141

151 14
1|i4' i +
! +

5.6
0.9
1.5
6.1
3.2
3.1
2.0

I

156 114- 0.6
174 j 0.0
j

174 ! 0.0
155 | 0.0
I
160
159
162 | j 4- 1.9
314
307
317 j| + 1.0
533
527
524 jj- 0.6
5,899 6,573 i,809 ||+ 3.6
167 ||+ 0.6
166
166
146
148
ji
182
182
187 ||4- 2.7
194 l i - 1.5
201
197

DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT.
Mail-order houses, total sales
Sears, Roebuck & Co
Montgomery Ward & Co




thous. of dolls..
thous. of dolls..
thous. of dolls..

22,071
14,713
7,358

First quarter of year.

21,855
14,478
6,377

18,060
12,239
5,321

109,186
78,321
30,364

105,738 - 3.2
71,593
33,145 + 9.2

1913
1913
1913

203
206
195

160
154
176

161
156
175

« Nine months' average, April to December, inclusive.

36
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk' (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed tables were i April,
given in the June number (No. 10). For de- ! 19'22
tailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

INDEX NUMBERS.

Per! centage
j increase

!

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
Corre- j
THROUGH
I. or deSpondLATEST MONTH.
crease

May,
1922

ing I
! month ',
April
or
May,
1921.

,
1921

1922

BASE
!
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

cumulative
! 1922
from
, 1921.

Percentage increase

1922

1921

Apr. May.

(+)

or decrease
()
May
Feb.Mar. Apr. M a y . from
April.

DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT—Continued.
Chain stores, total sales c
thous. of dolls..
F. W. Woolworth Co
thous. of dolls..
S. S. KresgeCo
thous. of dolls..
McCrory Stores Corp
thous. of dolls..
S. H. Kress & Co
thous. of dolls..
J. C. Penney Co
thous. of dolls..
United Cigar Stores Co
thous. of dolls..
Owl Drug Co
thous. of dolls..
American Wholesale Corporation,
total sales
thous. of dolls..
Magazine advertising
thous. of lines..
Newspaper advertising
thous. of lines..
Postal receipts
thous. of dolls..

22,429
13,439
5,208
1,386
2,396
3,943
6,012
825

21,540 j | 18,572
12,884 !| 11,203
4,903 |i 4,232
1,001
1,242
2,110
2,511
3,806
4,067
6,309
6,226
810
848

2,107 j

1,750 ;

1,830 I

1,644 I 1,574

2,057

97,160 i 97,086 j 96,516
22,098 I 22,317 |

19,504

22,954

86,926
51,471
19,949
5,137
10,368
16,755
30,898
4,180

96,115
57,7-5
21,953
5,869
10,508
15,723
27,943
4,097

13,241
9,664
438,066
101,948

11,022
9,201
448,595
109,894

281
233 233
247
270
244
199 203
215
233
471
398 353
406
444
308
239 228
270
276
267
241
238
2S0
244
1,433 1,792 1,849
L,696 1,732 1,089
244 I 244 253
263
256
194
265 i 254 261
258
249
236

+ 10.6
+ 12.3
+ 10.0
+ 14.2
+ 1.4
-6.2
- 10.6
- 2.0

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

- 16.8
- 4.8
+ 2.4
|+ 7.8

.1913
1913
1919
1919

165
140
107
112

151
129
106
106

132
124
90
111

163
140
111
132

1919

94

94

92

91

| 97 96
: 152 96
|
' 491 371
ii 868

92
127
291
320

152
913
573

23,710

I
|
j
j

154
150
116 ;
120

128
134
116
121

- 4.0
- 4.1
-5.9
- 10.4
+ 4.8
+ 3.1
+ 3.5
+ 2.8
+

16.9
10.2
0.1
10
.

PUBLIC FINANCE.
U. S. interest-bearing debt
mills, of dolls.
Liberty and Victory Loans and
War Saving securities
mills, of dolls.
Customs receipts
thous. of dolls.
Ordinary receipts
thous. of dolls.
Ordinary disbursements
thous. of dolls.
Money held outside U. S. Treasury
and Federal Reserve System:
Total
mills, of dolls.
Per capita
dollars.

23,139

19,995
18,405 18,361
25,485
142,184
33,804 | 35,578
170,573 + 20.0
197,920 ! 206,376 223,706 1,907,397 i1,321,706 - 30.7
242,561 ; 237,961 ; 368,451 2,138,299 j 1,219,930 - 42.9

1919
1913
1913
1913

4,449 i 4,418
40.69 I 40.36

5,020
46.57

20,717 | 21,654
16,482
16,167

17,297
15,348

86,162 |
81,223 j

98,356 i + 14.2
81,388 + 0.2

1919

18,759
11,681

19,215
12,501

15,847
11,520

81,167 |
59,926 j

89,330 ! + 10.1
58,182 - 2.9

1913

5S3
2,158
3,125
1,833
78.3

556
2,141
3,130
1,870
78.0

91

92 + 0.8

89
127 134
328 ! 342
426 j 418

+
+
—

0.2
5.2
4.3
1.9

102
101

90

91

90 - 0.7
88 - 0.8

85

81
84

100 102
99 ! 94

106 + 4.5
92 !- 1.9

201
188

103
102

1919
1919

195
166

237 ! 238 244
200 191 204

2.4
7.0

97
104
117
88 I
116 !

37
84
141
94
156

53
30 ;
83 | 82
142 j 143
95
156 156

29
82
143
97
155

-4.6
- 0.8
+ 0.2
+ 2.Q
-0.6

BANKING AND FINANCE.
Banking.
Debits to individual accounts:
New York City
mills, of dolls.
Outside New York City
mills, of dolls.
Bank clearings:
New York City
mills, of dolls.
Outside New York City
mills, of dolls.
Federal Reserve Banks:
Bills discounted
mills, of dolls.
Notes in circulation
mills, of dolls.
Total reserves
mills, of dolls.
Total deposits
mills- of dolls.
Reserve ratio
per cent.
Federal Reserve member banks:
Total loans, rediscounts, and
investments
mills, of dolls.
Net demand deposits
mills, of dolls.
Interest rates:
New York call loans
per cent.
Commercial paper, 60-90 days
per cent.
Savings deposits (balance to credit of depositors):
Philadelphia Federal Reserve
district
thous. of dolls.
Chicago Federal Reserve
district
thous. of dolls.
San Francisco Federal
Reserve district*
thous. of dolls.
U. S. Postal Savings
thous. of dolls.

1919

1913

197
181

1,870
2,735
2,558
1,706
58.1

1919
1919
1919
1919
1919

107
108
114
89
109

14,711
15,029
10,67& • 11,049

15,346
10,153

1919
1919

103 I
96

3.97
4.25

6.81
6.94

1913
1913

i

203 214
131 120

415,886

1920

i

107 107

750,133

1920

j

103 103 ! 101

1919
1913

! 123
398

1913
1913
1913
1913

j 246 227 i 193 i 226 ; 218 228 + 5.0
164 + 9.1
133 172
150 | 180 151
(13)
+ 52.5
152 181
157
187 i 161 j 175 + 8.2

4.35
4.58

427,104 423,582
735,153

737,848

I

742,928 747,296 j 714,574
143,000 i 140,750 I 155,395

I
|
|
|
I

96 97
99 + 2.2
97 j 101 104 + 3.5

101

155 j 137 I 137 ; 125 !;- 8.8
84 i 83 ! 79 ! 74 !- 6.3

109

128
123
391 ; 365

110 110
101

109 - 0.8

101 i 101 + 0.4

128 128 : 129 + 0.6
364 360 354 - 1.6

Life Insurance.
Policies, new:
Ordinary
Industrial
Group
Total insurance




thous.
thous.
number
thous.

of policies.
of policies.
of policies.
of policies.

161
572
40
733

624
61
793

168
652
44
820

832
2,751
218
3,582

«Includes Woolworth, Kresge, McCrory, and Kress only.

767
2,987
231
3,753

+
+
+

7.8
8.6
6.0
4.8
18

Index numbers not computed.

37
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
N O T E . — I t e m s m a r k e d w i t h an asterisk (*) h a v e
not been published previously in t h e S U R V E Y or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will b e
found a t t h e e n d of t h i s bulletin. For i t e m s
m a r k e d w i t h a dagger (f) detailed tables were
given in t h e J u n e n u m b e r (No. 10). For detailed tables covering other items, see t h e last
quarterly issue of t h e SURVEY ( N O . 9),

BANKING AND

April,
1922

Corresponding
month
April

Mav,
1922

May,
1921.

CUMULATIVE iuiAL,
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

1921

1922

I

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage
increase
(+)

1922

1921

BASE
or de- !
crease j YEAR
'•
OR
(—)
cumu- i | PERIOD.
lative
j 1922
from
1921.

Percentage increase
or deCFG£IS6

Apr.

Feb.

May.

Mar.

Apr.

(--)
May
from
April.

May.

FINANCE—Continued.

Life Insurance—Continued.
Amount of new insurance:
Ordinary
thous. of dolls.. 409,361
Industrial
thous. of dolls.. 123,208
Group
thous. of dolls.. 24,379
Total insurance
thous. of dolls.. 555,948

i

429,236

395,445

1,902,029

1,924,535

125,084

125,232

524,692

595,804

1.2

1913

311

300

274

318

310

326

4-

4- 13.6

1913

184

241 j

214

256

237

241

4- 97.3 i
4- 5.2 i

1913

464

555

513 1,053 1,687

689

4- 1.5
- 59.1

1913

277

285

259

300

305

4-

4-

9,962

8,023

35,611

70,263

564,282

528,699

2,462,331

2,590,603

2,167

1,960

1,356

7,715

11,644

+ 50. 9 i

1913

111

101

174

184

162

147

—

73,059

44,403

57,066

276,032

335,474

+ 21.5 j

1913

170

251

320

322

286,951

292,168

1,686,346

1,682,498

-

1913

161

197

189

195
194

-

242,451

315
232

307

5.1

1.5

Business Finances.
Business failures:
Firms
number..
Liabilities
thous. of dolls..
Dividend and interest payments d. thous. of dolls..
New capital issues:
Corporations
thous. of dolls..
States and municipalitiesPermanent loans
thous. of dolls..
Temporary loans
thous. of dolls..
New incorporations
thous. of dolls..
Telephone earnings:
Total operating revenue
thous. of dolls..
Total operating income
thous. of dolls..
Telegraph earnings:
Commercial telegraph tolls
thous. of dolls..
Telegraph and cable operating
revenue
thous. of dolls..
Operating income
thous. of dolls..
Credit conditions:
Orders
per ct. of total transactions..
Indebtedness.... per ct. of total transactions..
Payments
per ct. of total transactions..

1
0.2

164

9.6
39.2

4- 18.4
|

445,196

400,700

177,638

1,263,138

146,860

123,007

76,961

387,530

4,940

14,720

70,007

402,045

792,372

938,195

001,044

4,441,475

+ 22.1 ;

1913

285

130 ! 148

207

325

292

-

10.0

558,796

1913

276

225 ; 256

366

-

16,2

1913

310

173

120

162

431
12

361

146,276

4-198.0

1913

573

349 |

343

425

460

37
545

1913

1,542,031

+ 44.2 |
— 63. 6
3,897,490 - 12.2

36,398

139,648

153,632

300

305

29,635

34,564

1913

277
232

282

8,599

4- 10.0 i
4- 16.6 !

.278

9,272

223

218

244

250

7,766

7,823

31,953

30,284

— 5.2 i

1919

103

107

91

107

102

9,808

10,163

40,872

38,628

-

5.5

1919

j 101

102;

88

102

97

1,275

1,228

4,040

4,843

+ 19.9

1919

75

76

54

100

4- 18.4

78

40,058

i

|

j

24.8

24.1

22.7

1916

84

87

—

3.3

38.3

1916

93

93
102

90

44.8

82
99

97

41.9

98

108

115

4-

6.5

46.4

49.6 !

55.0

1916

99

100

87

90

84

90

4-

7-1

148 ' 149
65 ; 68

154

162

166

4-

2.2

70

74

75

4-

1.6

254

234

328

440

418

-

5.1

Stocks and Bonds.
Stock prices, closing:
25 industrials, average

dolls per share

94.44

96.53

86.32

1913

147

25 railroads, average

dolls, per s h a r e . .

61. 59

62.57

54.19

1913

62

Stock sales (N. Y. Stock Exch.) .thous. of shares.. 30,468
Bond sales:
Miscellaneous
thous. of dolls.. 264,341
Liberty-Victory
thous. of dolls.. 182,582
Total
thous. of dolls.. 440,923
Bond prices:
84.60
Highest-grade rails
per ct. of par..
72.20
Second- grade rails
per ct. of par..
Public utility
per ct. of par..
66.58
Industrial
per ct. of par..
73.59
Combined price index
per ct. of par..
73.09
4.15
Municipal bond yield
DOT cent

28,911

17,601

74,904

113,692

+ 51.8

1913

j 221

229,460

113,177
128,023
241,200

475,897
729,805
1,205,702

1,110,237
858,782

4-133.3 :

1919
1919

•

129
57

159
54

263
52

333
76

371
77

322
61

— 13.2
- 20.6

1919

1

74

78

100

136

145

122

— 16.2
0.0

|
144,967
374,427

1,969,019

4- 17.7 i
4- 63.3 :

i
84.80 |

72.25

1915

81

80

92

93

94

94

72.83

59.84

1915

78

79

93

96

96

C8. 05 '
74.42

52 SS

1915

72

72

91
84

4-

1915

80

80

102

90
104

93

56.16

88
102

106

4-

1.9

74. 72 |

59.40

1915

!

77

77

92

94

96

4-

1.0

4.18 i

5.18

1913

'

115

116

99

98

93

97
94

1+ 1.1

48

48

55

j+ 14.0
4- 23.3

Gold a n d Silver.
Gold:
Domestic receipts at mint
fine ounces..
Rand output
thous of ounces
Imports
thous. of dolls..
Exports
thous. of dolls..
Silver:
Production
thous. of fine oz..
Imports
thous. of dolls..
Exports
thous. of dolls..
Price at New York
dolls perfineoz
Price at London
pence per standard oz..
d All figures are for m o n t h s following




0.0
3.3

i
j

71,708

81,839

67,052

342,116

366,763

511

630

688

3,250

1,781

12,244

8,994

58,117

308,391

109,998

1,579

3,407

1,063

5,918

8,567

4- 7.2 1

1913

— 45.2

1913

93

94

45
11

31

70

86

-

1913

1,538

1,097

541

631

231

169

1913

5

14

23

13

21

44

4-120.8

64.3 I

4- 44.8

4,139

4r2oS

4,277

25,163

20,399

-

!

1913

4.S0O

5,512

6,950

23,823

28,534

1913

5,109

5,077

2,3-53

19,619

27,162

4- 19.8 |
4- 38.4 |

.660

.712

.598

34.080

36.073

34.105

48

month stated.

18.9

45^

-

26.5

so

77

70

75

74

76

|+ 2.9

110

233

160

233

161

184

4- 14.8

44

45

136

101

98

109

1913

99

100

109

108

111

4- 11.1
119 J4- 6.9

1913

124

124

123

121

124

131

1913

;
;

4-

5.8

38
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMERICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not leen published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed talles
covering back figures for these items will t e
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed talles were
given in the June number (No. 10). For detailed taT les covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

April,
1922

May,
1922

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

Percentage increase
(+)
or decrease

(+)

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

1921

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage
increase
or decrease
(-)
cumulative
1922
from
1921.

1922

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

1922

1921

May

Apr. May. Feb. Mar. Apr. ! Vay. from

April.

FOREIGN EXCHANGE BATES.
Europe:
England
France
Italy
Belgium
Germany
Netherlands
Sweden
Switzerland
Asia:
Japan
India
Americas:
Canada
Argentina
Brazil
Chile

dolls, per £ sterling.
dolls, per franc.
dolls, per lire.
dolls, per franc.
dolls, per mark.
dolls, per guilder.
dolls, per krone.
dolls, per franc.

4.41
.092
.054
.085
.003
.379
.260
.194

4.45
.091
.053
.084
.003
.387
.258
.192

3.98
.084
.053
.084
.016
.356
.235
.179

Par. val.
Par. val.
Par. val.
Par. val.
Par. val.
Par. val.
Par. val.
Par. val.

.dolls, per yen.
dolls, per rupee.

.474
.278

.474
.288

.485
.265

dolls, per Can. doll.
dolls, per gold peso.
dolls, per milreis.
dolls, per paper peso.

.978
.807
.136
.113

.824
.137
.119

.897
.718
.137
.119

thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.

65,669
10,742
8,497
3,598
22,124

73,949
11,591
8,520
5,584
25,439

60,804
11,823
6,456
7,131
19,374

321,167
59,204
30,082
23,243
108,959

365,058
57,668
42,774
22,453
128,229

13.7
2.6
42.2
3.4
17.7

1913
1913
1013
1913
1913

thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.

63,320
21,296

71,721
28,249

69,603
26,143

394,361
155,749

322,463 - 18.2
120,833 - 22.4

1913
1913

264

thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.

22,889
4,440

33,029
6,079

23,358
4,854

143,837
29,658

127,580 - 11.3
26,668 - 10.1

1913
1913

185
251

58,725 69,831
18,990 29,693
4,287
6,470
217,025 252,817

48,871
22,760
2,275
204,911

256,401
77,725
19,018
1,134,786

312,002 4- 21.7
118,387
52.3
31,903 4- 67.8
1,158,958 + 2.1

1913
1913
1913
1913

232
287
208
170

186
276
115
137

thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.

182,474
22,076
31,048
11,028
72,072

168,721
20,117
26,105
9,473
74,455

176,799
9,863
20,485
22,527
80,287

1,115,229
99,299
157,770
108,440
446,933

27.4
4.3
12.2
61.3
24.5

1913
1913
1913
1913
1913

140

thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.

71,373
43,412

71,087
44,287

89,647
50,483

549,948
247,191

333,885 - 39.3
200,082 - 19.1

1913
1913

188

thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.

18,418
8,411

18,158
8,064

18,036
7,690

167,609
67,870

81,736 - 51.2
35,895 - 47.1

1913
1913

170

82 :
43
27
43
7

91
47
27
44
1
96
96

95
57

95
57

0.0
95
59 + 3.6

9G
86
41
53
58

97
86
42
58
56

84
42
58
53

84 | 99
102 i 101
i
58
42
69
155
117
85

119
112
63
119
147

91
93
55
78

214 I 178
221 ! 170

225
219

195
180

152

144
222

139

200 + 44.3
285 + 36.9

209
272
318
144

239
235
523
171

223
230
327
145

18.9
265
360 + 56.4
217 - 33.7

141
77
70
344
163

103
125
75
86
108

144
149
122
100
148

146
172
106
168
146

135

179
150

119
105

147
132

142
129

148
168

115
136

141
152

151
184

234
236
193
159

252
361
180
120

312
439
218
156

242
270
164
154

90
47
26
44
2
94
98
101

Par. val.
Par. val.

95
58

Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.

General index of foreign exchange.index number.

0.9
1.1
1.9
1.2
0.0
2.1
0.8
1.0

91 I
48 !
28 j
44|
1
94 !
97 |

90
45
25
43
2
94
97
101

val.
val.
val.
val.
val.

'
|
!
i

99
85
42
61 +
53

1.0
2.1
0.7
5.3
0.0

U. S. FOREIGN TRADE*
Imports by Grand Divisions.
Europe:
Total
France
Germany
Italy
United Kingdom
North America:
Total
Canada
South America:
Total
Argentina
Asia and Oceania:
Total
Japan
Africa, total
Grand total

thous.
thous.
thous.
thous.

of dolls.
of dolls.
of dolls.
of dolls.

+
+
+

96

100
43

117
115
276

228j 291
|

103
12.6
100
7.9
56 + 0.3
121 + 55.-2
112 + 15.0
+ 13.3

239 + 32.6

+ 16.5

Exports by Grand Divisions.
Europe:
Total
France
Germany
Italy
United Kingdom
North America:
Total
Canada
South America:
Total
Argentina
Asia and Oceania:
Total
Japan
Africa, total
Grand total




thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. of dolls.
thous. ot dolls.

41,875
43,189
14,041
16,051
3,959
6,534
318,100 307,689

40,586
319,485
12,297
85,730
4,642
45,208
329,710 2,197,479

809,211
95,057
138,533
41,962
337,563

237,529
99,717
23,338
1,478,887

-

+
-

25.7
16.3
48.4
32.7

1913
1913
1913
1913

106
65

208
171

146

160
256
233
240
164

89

- 7.5
- 8.9
- 15.9

144

- 14.1

151

+

3.3

142

-

0.4

132

+

2.0

-

4.1

157

149
176

1.4

+ 31
.
+ 14.3
271 + 65.0
149 '- 3.3
249

308

39
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
N U M E R I C A L DATA.
N O T E . - I t e m s marked with a n asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in t h e SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed t a l l e s
covering I ack figures for these items will t e
found at the end of this lulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (f) detailed talles wrere
given in the June numler (No. 10). For detailed talles covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of t h e SURVEY ( N O . 9).

April,
1922

May,
1922

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,
1921.

INDEX NUMBERS.

Percentage

CUMULATIVE TOTAT
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

increase
or decrease

BASE
YEAR

Percentage increase

1922

1921

or decrease

OR

cumulative
1922
from
1921.

PERIOD.
Apr. May. Feb.

Mar. Apr. May.

1921

1922

484,071

403,117

- 16.7

1913

250,798
113,506
118,497

194,662
113,642

+ 22.4
-f

0.1

93,764

-

20.9

1913
1913
1913

-

9.4
4.6
62.1

1913
1913
1913

50

-

15.6

1913

153

+ 10.2
+ 5.0
+ 14.4

1913
1913
1913
1913

93
191
72

79
147
64

87

75

1920

50
46
39
10

39
34

1913

7

2

35

46

46

1913
1913
1920

11
24
77

1

86

84

65
81
37

102
28

63
74
27

1913

84

79

85

85

85

+ 1.5
+ 7.2
+ 17.4

1913
1913
1915

254
258
215

223
277

-

30.9

1913

363

168
330

263
255
276
235

275
305
244
338

290
239
234

+ 2.1
- 21.8
+ 6.7
+ 3.0

1913
1913
1913
1913

237
252
302
370

288
217
268
311

323
220
289
359

328
187
295
370

-

12.0
11.1

1919
1919

83
93

71
80

65
73

77
96

+ 6.7
+ 17.2
~ 24.8
+ 99.2

1913
1913

64

73
84
102

40
68
66
7

55
72

May
from
April.

TRADE AND INDUSTRY OF FOREIGN
COUNTRIES.
United K i n g d o m .
Imports (values):
Total

thous. of £ sterling..

Food, drink, and tobacco.thous. of £ sterling..
Raw material
thous of £ sterling

80,661
40,097
21,404

thous. of £ sterling..

18,961

t h o u s . of £ sterling..

Manufactured articles
Exports (values):
Total

55,507
3,011

Food, drink, and tobacco.thous. of £ sterling..
Raw matrial
.
thous of £ sterling
Manufactured articles
Reexports (values):

thous. of £ sterling..

Total

thous. of £ sterling

Food, drink, and tobacco.thous. of £ sterling..
Raw material
thous of £ sterling
Manufactured articles
t h o u s . of £ sterling..
E x p o r t s of key commodities (quantities):

7,376
44,336
9,200
2,323
4,704
2,168

88,814
43,075
25,358
20,207

86,308
50,094
16,711
19,282

58,045
3,045
8,757

43,088
2,101
1,437

330,743
15,654

299,616
14,941

23,754

45,073

38,662

285,573

3«,499
240,993

8,965
2,152

7,232

42,603
11,064
20,626
10,852

46,952

1,059,223
51,466
819
6,018

1,540,476
73,452

+ 45.4
+ 42.7

1,305
22,390

+ 59.3
+272.1

1,566

1,780
2,158

+ 13.7
+ 52.7

101,914

+ 91 0

4,548
2,264

1,958
3,418
1,850

Cotton piece goods
thous. of sq. y d s . . 302,598
Woolen and worsted tissues.thous. of sq. yds.. 14,002
258
Iron and steel.. .
thous of long tons
4,097
Coal
thous of long tons
Production:
394
Pig iron
thous of long tons
404
Steel ingots
thous of long tons

341,959
16,585
273
5,057

145,769
7,566
102

408
462

14
6

thous of metric tons
short tons

18,049
6,795

21,366
5,9:3

60
21,280

per cent employed

11,615
23,605
11,720

-

8.0

83.0

Coal
Stocks zinc
Employment:
Trade-unions

14

1,413
53,347

1920
1913
1913

11

140
219
70
126
137
137

137
187

126
166

139
178

94
126

91
118

108
125

+ 7.4
+ 18.5
+ 6.6

148

127

120
145
151

111
127

133
112

+
+

129

150
131

+ 18.7
+ 1-7

111

111

171

204
94

101
175

98
162

-2.6
7.4

99

88
88

85
92

+

82

82

68
71

63
62
67

92
75
66
83

+ 13.0
+ 18.4

48
72

+ 3.6

88
23

+ 18.4

256
334
242

+ 3.2
+

1.4

225

-

4.0

342
194
297
392

332
189
321
356

+
+

3.2
2.9
8.0

-

9.3

71
79

82
92

+ 15.9
+ 16.9

64
75
75 . 82
22
7

80
131
77
2

+ 24.4
+ 73.1
5.4
- 70.0

126

+ 4.0
+ 4.4
+ 16.5

135
207
71

108

120

103

98
77
25

133
101
118

113

140

25

24

133
86

100
105
68
54
54
66

85

+ 10.1

4.6
1-1

3.3
4.4

+ 5.4
+ 23.5

+ 14.4
-

11.9

France.
Imports (values):
mills, of francs..

Foodstuffs
Raw material
Manufactured articles

.

E x p o r t s (values):
Total, all commodities
Foodstuffs
Raw materials
Manufactured articles

1,744
438
9S3
323

1,800
504
997
310

1,566

mills, of francs
mill, of francs...
mills of francs

419
691
456

8,684
1,998
4,268
2,418

8,811
2,141

mills, of francs..
mills, of francs..
mills, of francs..
mills of francs

Total, all commodities

1,963
136
461
1,365

1,900
132
498
1,238

1,649
152
415
1,082

9,049
863
2,176
6,020

9,232

194,080
108,424

168,115
93,819

962,357
546,635

847,024
485,898

2,466
7,171
4,578

2,245
4,593

8,565
19,432

9,943
22,774

6,033

42

5

28,306
492

21,287
980

5,010
1,671

675
2,322
6,202

248

+ 15.1

The Netherlands.
Total trade (values):
167,452
Imports... .
.
t h o u s . of guilders
Exports
thous. of guilders.. 92,730
Exports of key commodities (quantities):
1,982
Butter
metric tons..
4,143
Cheese
metric tons..
4,837
Margarine
.
. . metric tons..
140
Flower bulbs
metric tons..

1913

75
119

1913

2

Germany.
Total trade (values):
Imports

thous. of dolls..

97,712

1913

42

Exports
Production:
Coal
T jprrijfp

thous. of dolls..

79,380

1913

37

27
35

38
38

46
40

75
143

55
129

72
139

85
169

71
146

1920

62

62

127

121

1913

90

84

92

103

91

1913

46

37

44

57

54

31

41

57
52

55

1913

47

55

thous of metric tons
thons of metric tons

11,906
10,374

11,289
10,634

47,384

4,806
1,712

31,043

40,360

48,329
43,964

+
+

2.0
8.9

1913
1913

Belgium.
Production:
Zinc
Coal

short tons..
thous of metric tons

9,359

Pig ironf

thous. of metric tons..

1 726
114

Steel ingotst

thous. of metric tons..

97

i Nine months' average, April to December, inclusive.




9,733

7,331

46,593 + 50.1 |
0.1
7,326 -

119

96

495

537

113

no

493

480

+ ,8.-5
2.6

no

40
TREND OF BUSINESS MOVEMENTS—Continued.
NUMEHICAL DATA.
NOTE.—Items marked with an asterisk (*) have
not been published previously in the SURVEY or
are repeated for special reasons; detailed tables
covering back figures for these items will be
found at the end of this bulletin. For items
marked with a dagger (t) detailed tables were
given in the June number (No. 10). For detailed tables covering other items, see the last
quarterly issue of the SURVEY (NO. 9).

April,
1922

May,
1922

Corresponding
month
April
or
May,

CUMULATIVE TOTAL
THROUGH
LATEST MONTH.

1921

I N D E X NUMBERS.

Percentage
increase

Percentage increase

(+)

or decrease
(-)
cumulative

BASE
YEAR
OR
PERIOD.

1922
from
1921.

1922

192*1.

1921

1922

or decrease
Apr.

May. Feb.

Mar. Apr. May.

May
from
April

TRADE AND INDUSTRY OF FOREIGN
COUNTRIES—Continued.
Canada.
Total trade:
Imports
thous. of dolls..
Exports
thous. of dolls..
Exports of key commodities (quantities):
Canned salmon
thous. of pounds..
Paper, printing
thous. of pounds..
Cheese
thous. of pounds..
Wheat
thous. of bushs..
Production:
Pig iron
thous. of long tons..
Steel ingots
thous. of long tons..
Bank clearings
mills, of dolls..
Bond issues:
Government and provincial...thous. of dolls..
Municipal
thous. of dolls..
Total
thous. of dolls..
Corporation
thous. of dolls..
Employment:
Trade-union employment.per cent employed.
Applications
number.
Vacancies
number.
PlacementsRegular
number.
Casual
number.
Business failures:
Firms
number.
Liabilities
thous. of dolls.
Building contracts awarded*
thous. of dolls.

47,861
32,652

66,121

68,502

370,637

299,089

70,459

60,734

322,527

258,060

1,089

775

122,905

151,566

88,356

1,080

3,156

5,178

1,740

14,207

8,112

7,225
555,184
18,485
41,208

33

23

56

22

17

52

1,165

1,442

1,466

118,000

6,234

21,980

17,925

11,878
18,112
16,765

4,700

135,925
6,475

26,680
1,000

254
231
6,867
63,570
28,989
92,559
26,550

- 19.3
- 25.0

1913

117

1913

140

7,134

1.3
+ 33.6
13,997 - 24.3
33,694 - 18.2

1913

58

741,722

1913

388

- 35.4
- 37.7
8.0

1913

46

1913

31

1913

183

147,854

1913

290

45,472

1913

33

164
144
6,319

+ 132.6
+ 56.9
93,326 + 0.8
43,603 + 64.2

1913

2

1913

59

1913

114

1913

170

122
193

97
150

142
194

86
104

118 + 38.2
224 + 115.8

44
361
40
97

72
578
36
67

106
778
27
72

56
502

62
620
24
170

67
60
189

40
48
143

50
34
167

497
49
190
16

110
123
107

51 (2,668
29 i 186
36 966
158
105

21

25
150

+ 11.1
+ 23.3
+ 192.2
+716.5

27 - 30.3
20 - 22.7
186 + 23.8
(13)
141
123 - 33.7
129 - 86.7
272 +158.9

83.0
39,432 !
36,452 !

1919

87

1920

108

102

89
90
56

94
101
76

87
95
91

21,778 !
4,391 I

1920

85

1920

100

75
117

35
137

54
139

71
112

95
249
84

207
664
33

139
320
42

126
340
92

175 + 38.5
423 + 24.4
109 + 18.3

112
43
38
82

223
48
86

321
28
50
80

219
22
35
68

+
[29 109 +

329
137
824

272
57
302

186
46
385

385

247 - 35.7

247
200

323
192

338
218

311
246

8.0
286 295 + 19.9

1920

192 i
266
4,724
5,877
.29,428 ! 34,827

145
3,459
26,860

804
18,418
85,328

+ 63.4
+ 64.7
96,831 + 13.5

39,362
26,375
11,944
18,874

84,977

1,314

1913

91

30,334

1913

177

1913

68

1913

157

1913

11

Argentina.
Grain shipments:
Wheat
Corn
Oats
Flaxseed
Visible supply:
Wheat
Corn
Flaxseed

thous.
thous.
thous.
thous.

of
of
of
of

bushs.
bushs.
bushs.
bushs.

18,852 ! 11,782
3,398 | 8,491
1,789 j 1,461
2,271
3,627

9,655
6,782
1,969
2,720

29,765
12,416

+ 115.9
+ 12.9
5.0
- 27.1

37.5
149.9
18.3
59.7

1913

49

1913

153

1913

255

1913

thous. of bushs.
thous. of bushs.
thous. of bushs.

17

1914

13,759

549

+ 44.9
+ 26.0

1913

229

1913

219

- 17.8
+ 35.0

1913

193

155
95

141
108

160
135

133
116

142 + 6.8
133 + 14.4

160
173

139
198

133
203

155
166

140 177 +

1,800

6,000

173,788
155,474

149,883
105,370

650,774

942,986

466,766

588,324

178,400 190,600
238,600 273,000

207,853
194,258

1,277,055

1,049,301

918,894

1,240,410

9,310
11,580

10,661
11.354

66,011

46,290

-

29.1

1913

176

57,914

58,360

+ 0.!

1913

183

Japan.
Total trade (values):
Imports
Exports

thous. of yen.. 188,891
thous. of yen.. 129,679

British India.
Total trade (values):
Imports
Exports

thous. of rupees.
thous. of rupees.

1913

Australia.
Total trade (values):
Imports
Exports
13

Very large decrease.




thous. of £ sterling.
thous. of £ sterling.

10,280
10,900

9.4
6.2

41
PRICES.
INDEX NUMBERS.
Based on data from Government sources.1
[Base year in bold-faced type.]
WHOLESALE PRICE INDEX NUMBERS (Revised).*
(Compiled by U. S. Department of Labor.)
YEAR AND
MONTH.

Farm
products.

Food,
etc.

1913 m o . av..

100

100

1914 m o . av..

103

102

1915 mo. av..

104

105

1916 m o . av..

123

121

1917 m o . av..

190

1918 m o . av..

218

1919 m o . av..

Cloths
Fuel
and
and
clothing. lighting.

Metal
and
metal
products.

RETAIL
FOOD
House
Building Chemi- furnish- Miscel- ! All com- PRICES.*
mate- cals and
ing
laneous. ! modirials.
drugs.
ties.
goods.
100

100

1OO

98

102

108

103

101

101

111

95

106

127

114

123

111

202

125

148

177

146

206

164

215

153

156

194

167

226

192

169

184

175

206

186

236

198

264

200

254

196

226

203

244

168

165

136

195

128

147

153

111

107

239

194

233

201

241

173

242

197

232

200

252

177

205

242

200

234

200

255

178

210

242

206

245

211

271

181

293

213

247

208

247

215

294

177

275

212

248

205

243

219

309

175

202

269

212

275

203

241

219

304

176

202

265

209

274

199

231

207

268

172

281

200

255

205

273

195

226

203

239

174

280

191

240

198

271

188

211

198

202

166

176

215

181

260

179

196

193

163

147

160

204

164

242

166

179

178

135

121

192

153

217

154

170

172

129

120

180

149

217

147

160

158

123

117

140

173

143

216

139

155

156

120

123

205

138

167

135

216

130

148

152

113

112

173

200

138

165

134

209

126

145

145

104

109

137

172

191

133

163

133

196

125

142

144

109

104

119

141

172

186

124

160

129

180

123

141

148

106

109

123

146

171

184

117

156

129

179

119

142

155

109

113

100
92
94

100
101
134

100

127

126

162

120

181

167

175

169

231

157

188

228

170

187

172

231

207

253

181

162

201

1920 m o . av.

218

220

295

241

192

1921 m o . av.

124

144

180

199

129

1920.
January
February...
March
April

247

231

339

194

175

274

237

222

346

199

190

293

195

237

220

344

208

197

297

243

238

336

231

203

300

May....
June
July....
August.

241

248

328

239

202

237

243

314

250

200

233

238

300

259

218

221

286

269

September.
October
November..
December..

210

215

266

187

201

245

173

190

226

264

152

170

215

254

143

162

196

247

153

133

151

188

225

147

127

151

183

212

117

144

176

118

139

114

September.
October
November..
December..
1922.
January...
February..
March
April
May..
June.

Live
stock.

100

100
85
99

May....
June
July....
August.

Crops.

100
95
95
121

100
93
88

1921.
January..
February.
March
April

FARM PRICES.*

100

100
100

124

142

178

181

116

156

131

179

118

141

153

109

101

124

140

180

189

116

159

131

180

118

142

153

111

98

121

139

180

197

114

163

129

178

119

141

152

92

120

136

180

199

113

158

127

178

121

140

150

91

122

131

176

195

112

157

124

178

117

138

142

131

135

174

191

110

156

123

177

117

141

142

100

108

130

137

172

191

109

155

125

175

117

142

139

112

117

129

137

171

194

113

156

124

175

116

143

139

114

115

132

138

175

216

119

160

122

176

116

148

139

117

118

95

120

1 Wholesale prices and retail food prices from the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics; farm prices from the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau
of Markets and Crop Estimates.
2
The revised wholesale price index number of the U. S. Deparment of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, is based on quotations of 404 commodities. These commodities
are arranged in 9 groups as given in the table. In computing this index, the price of each commodity ir weighted by multiplying it by the estimated quantity of that
article marketed in the census year 1919.
8
The retail food price index compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics represents the changes in the price of 22 articles of foods as reported by retail dealers in 51 of
the larger cities as of the 15th of the month.
* Farm prices of crops represent the relative average prices to farmers of the 10 leading crops on the first of each month. The live stock farm price index is computed
as of the 15th of each month.




42
LUMBER AND FLOORING.
INDEX NUMBERS.
Based on data from commercial and trade sources,1
[Base year in bold-faced type; numerical data on opposite page.]
MICHIGAN HARDWOODS.
Production.

YEAR AND MONTH.

Shipments.

MICHIGAN SOFTWOODS.

Stocks,
end of
month.

Production.

Shipments.

Stocks,
end of
month.

MAPLE FLOORING.
Production.

Shipments.

100
78
76
67
46

100
69
75
50
30

65
73
74
93

63
54
61
53

July
August

68
71
76
66

September
October .
November
December

2

100
2
90
2
75
3
55
74

Unfilled
Orders
booked. orders, end
of month.

Relative to 1919.

Relative to 1917.
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average

Stocks,
end of
month.

100
67
65
53
39

100
74
72
37
40

51
54

52
48
49
58

57
60
66
55

51
54
55
53

51
67
53
52

44
38
25
19

54
60
71
76

1

100

May
June

100
103
83

1OO
70
69

100
103
199

1OO
36
63

1OO
70
27

47
44
37
47

40
45

114
108
125
122

86
78
92
86

55
61
73
83

87
49
46
62

134
126
112
109

36
52
66
71

38
43
37
48

43
45
48
54

88
100
105
107

89
80
79
68

68
74
78
95

33
28
27
22

84
73
57
45

54
56
57
63

78
57
40
33

35
31
21
12

56
60
62
69

110
107
87
67

52
53
39
33

125
154
178
196

22
17
19
19

38
26
19
15

22
16
28
21

65
71
73
77

28
31
46
55

10
13
27
24

70
72
75
76

53
47
81
74

36
42
62
57

200
198
203
206

30
42
51
61

13
16
17
21

60
56
37
34

21
27
26
26

71
81
81
80

55
46
27
37

37
50
34
41

76
75
71
74

83
90
77
84

67
69
66
80

206
209
209
202

72
57
49
75

25
27
23
28

25
21
21
31

1920.
January..
February .
March
April

* 79
50
»52
70

31
48
55
36

79
74
69
67

31
26
48
31

62
74
64
41

71
63
60
61

75
108
113
117

80
93
94
76

187
185
184
200

68
105
102
49

28
38
46
36

54
46
41
48

35
28
29
34

66
58
55
57

26
18
24
51

32
34
34
46

56
51
48
47

110
92
92
91

72
67
89
90

216
222
218
208

50
57
84
98

32
31
37
47

52

38

58

57

54

46

100

115

186

135

66

!

!

s

1921.
JfVnil&ry - -

r- - -

February
March
April
May
June
July

-.. . ...

September
October .
November
December. .
1922.
January .
March
April
May
June




,

See footnotes on opposite page.

43

LUMBER AND FLOORING.
NUMERICAL DATA.
From commercial and trade sources.1
[Base year in bold-faced type; index numbers on opposite page.]
MICHIGAN HARDWOODS.

Y E A R AND M O N T H .

Production.

Shipments.

month.

MICHIGAN SOFTWOODS.

tion.

Shipments.

Stocks,
end of
month.

MAPLE FLOORING.

Shipments.

Stocks,
end of
month.

10,039

11,848

15,448

14,163

38,289

8,259
8,121

15,963

74,724

10,383
8,378

30,749

5,106
8,991

26,723
10,176

11,459
10,882
12,571
12,226

10,191
9,246
10,935
10,238

8,440
9,450
11,347
12,838

12,390
6,980
6,452
8,809

51,255
48,405
42,901
41,819

10,068
10,526

10,561
9;514
9,370

10,790

8,083

10,511
11,371
12,058
14,649

4,702
3,980
3,869
3,183

32,122
28,044
21,729
17,054

Production.

Unfilled
Orders
booked. orders end
of month.

Thousands of feet, board measure.
27,763
21,573
21,119
18,699
12,652

31,396
21,576
23,427
15,564
9,356

1920.
January..
February.
March
April

17,999
20,276
20,476
25,798

May....
June
July....
August.

17,288
11,661
11,294
9,207
6,658

17,741

• 106,216

201,053
'169,080
3122,468
165,984

13,200
12,857
6,494
7,034

* 84,180
«52,994
3
55,518

19, 810
16,951
19,109
16,563

113,889
121,551

8,923
8,263
8,466
10,050

8,278
7,820
6,515
8,296

42,196
47,388

18,779
19,764
21,017
18,356

17, 752
18,895
20, 820
17,314

114,082
120, 253
122,328
119,387

6,283
8,909
11,427
12,225

6,749
7,609
6,501
8,527

45,981
48,301
51,390
56,897

September..
October
November..
December..

14,263
18,539
14,774
14,343

13,754
11,968

13,549
9,895
6,830
5,666

6,274
5,566
3,702
2,095

59,580
63,992
66,230
73,227

11,027
10,782
8,707
6,693

6,135
6,274
4,634
3,928

19,306
23,807
27,520
30,255

3,079
2,456
2,632
2,736

14,726

7,874
5,956

119,949
126,437
126,731
140,074

1921.
January
February
March
April

15,119
16,660
19,837
21,224

7,003
5,168
8,897
6,593

145,861
159,161
162,564
172,757

4,842
5,380
7,974
9,457

1,729
2,333
4,773
4,324

74,772
76,563
79,568
80,587

5,289
4,754
8,101
7,479

4,250
4,963
7,300
6,741

30,886
30,620
31,314
31,896

4,299
5,947
7,253
8,630

5,113
6,112
6,392
8,150

May....
June
July....
August.

16,786
15,551
10,160
9,382

6,746
8,450
8,092
8,013

157,938
182,474
182,283
179,029

9,559
8,021
4,752

6,568
8,823
6,006
7,217

80,728
80,129
75,722
78,229

8,311
9,038
7,721
8,438

7,963

10,162
8,100
6,968

9,469

31,896
32,271
32,268
31,180

10,564

9,697
10,311
8,961
10,541

6,815
5,750
5,959
8,586

9,708
15,078
17,195
11,330

177,676
166,369
154,948
150,747

5,403
4,519
8,245
5,386

11,048
13,086
11,277
7,219

75,431
66,576
63,677
64,703

7,510
10,851
11,329
11,713

9,472
11,066
11,141
9,042

28,893
28,516
28,383
30,865

9,632
14,897
14,517
6,927

10,868
14,597
17,481
13,894

January
February
March
April

14,896
12,787
11,478
13,402

10,881
8,647
9,173
10,790

148,631
129,070
123,330
127,966

4,575
3,117
4,211
8,893

5,720
6,083
6,103
8,157

59,475
54,605
50,752
49,716

11,024
9,274
9,218
9,093

8,533
7,947
10,548
10,631

33,329
34,248
33,632
32,174

7,051
8,105
11,923
13,853

12,226
11,818
14,282
17,839

May..
June..

14,479

11,806

130,444

9,832

9,546

48,807

10,701

13,606

28,793

19,076

25,098

1917 monthly
1918 monthly
1919 monthly
1920 monthly
1921 monthly

average
average
average
average
average

September..
October
November..
December..

* 223,961
s

8,234
7,813

9,790
7,266
5,570

1922.

i Data on Michigan hardwoods (chiefly maple, birch, basswood, and beech) and Michigan softwoods (chiefly hemlock) are actual figures reported by about 40 mills
each month to the Michigan Hardwood Manufacturers' Association. The number of mills varies from 35 to 62, but 44 is the highest number reporting since the beginning of
1920. Data on maple flooring (including also birch and beech) are reports of 20 identical mills each month to the Maple Flooring Manufacturers1 A ssociation, said to represent
about 70 per cent of the industry.
8
Quarterly average.
8
Ten months' average.




44
EMPLOYMENT AGENCY OPERATIONS.
(A) INDEX NTJMBEES AND (B) NUMERICAL DATA.
Based on data from Government sources.1
[Base year In bold-faced type.]
JOBS REGISTERED.

WORKERS REGISTERED.

WORKERS PLACED.

Total
workEast- Cen- South- West-!
East- i Cen- South- West- j I
East- Cen- j South- Western
tral
ern I em i Total.
ern | tral
ern
ern ||
tral
Total.
ern
ern
ern
Total.
States. States. States. States.
States. States. States. States.
! States. States. States. States.! Job.
I

YEAR AND MONTH.

Relative to 6 months' average, July-December, 1921.
A . - I N D E X NUMBERS.

6 months' average, 1921..
1921.
July
August
September
October
November
December
1922.
January
February
March
April
May
June

100

1OO

100

100

1OO

97
102
101
109
97
94

109
100
105
104
97
85

»94
3 104
«96
110
101

MOO

«94

102
115
105
130

55
98
112
109
187

92
102
117
106
114

1OO

1OO

95

97

! 1OO

I 100

^94

101

101

! 1OO

104

I

122

112

115

105

101

94

i

122

120

105

119

145

85

!

85

92

98

94

84

«84
98
128
131
83

124 \ 79

79

84

78

70

81

93

85

85

119

125

120

138

139

149

186

165

215

85
100
114
142
146

116
115
111
115
164

108
119
102
93
111

85
113
136

»106

101

4

NUMBER OF JOBS.

NUMBER OF WORKERS.

1OO

1OO

i 1OO

95
101
114
108
98
85

95
109
106
103
90

2
97
•103
<105
116
98
81

87
129
128
177

95
103
134
124
157

85
79
127
135
195

1OO

1OO

99
117
109
98
91

«90
104
137
91
93
85

102
101
90
91
105
119

95
106 :
133 i
144
159

131
81
129
113
167

99
110
97
76
70

NUMBER OF WORKERS.

YEAR AND MONTH.

1OO

Workers
per
job.

B.-NUMERICAL DATA.
6 months' average, 1921.. 202,132
July
August
September
October
November
December

196,306
206,368
204,940
| 220,052
!
195,322
! 189,806

1922.
January
February
March
April
May..
June.

|
\ 172,838
! 206,405
j 231,981
| 213,167
262,025

94,478 ! 23,941
,

116,866

29,967 | 53,068

42,913
39,149
41,215
40,942
38,137
33,437

111,353
118,415
131,359
139,953
107,802
92,315

30,353 1*51,694 »8,080 «21,226
89,600
95,427
28,935 |
8,646 24,621
34,446 | 55,874
8,680 32,359 107,354
31,412 J 63,120 12,446 ! 32,975 101,662
29,407 50,138
92,696
7,237 ; 21,020
80,128
25,247 i 41,371
6,505 j 19,192

21,515
38,465
47,040
42,829
73,396

' 114,492
j 127,344
i 146,298
; 132,202
142,727

26,087
28,625
24,655
22,267
26,771

100,599
108,163
139,055
161,768
217,382

14,066

10,744
11,971
13,988
15,869
19,131

8,599

25,232

24,068

i
1116,713 14,028 «22,652
3 130,234 13,062 23,923
;«119,919 14,559 29,247
j 136,597 13,240 29,273
124,780 12,022 20,383
119,958 17,483 18,928

39,299 | 124,700

1921.

43,072

6,835 | 20,630

1.73

23,464 Ml,745 6 5,924 «18,467 j 1.76
22,707 3 44,531 6,760 j 21,429 | 1.74
26,029 45,091 7,969 | 28,265 j 1.56
1.57
7,460 !18,875
25,341 49,986
6,667 t 19,211 ; 1.81
24,568 42,250
21,537 34,828
6,230 17,533 ! 2.06

1 21,022 | 43,004 7,301 ; 29,272 j 92,924 22,821
1
I 25,379 i 45,139 j 8,630 ' 29,015
82,513 24,616
37,445 j 63,776 j 9,840 \ 27,994 122,227 31,979
29,684
| j 41,673 i 78,938 j 12,247 \ 28,910 j| 120,763
| 49,365 114,100 i 12,552 i 41,365 \ 165,75737,544
|

36,608
34,026
54,640
58,006
83,813

6,524 26,971
7,257 16,614
9,084 26,524
9,854 23,219
10,879 34,521

1.72
1.91
1.67
1.32
1.21

1
Compiled from weekly reports to the XT. S. Department of Labor, Employment Service, by state and municipal employment agencies. Eastern states included in the
report are Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island (Delaware, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, now reporting, are
excluded to show true comparison). Central states are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota,
and Wisconsin. Southern states include Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas, and Virginia. Western states include Arizona,
California, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington; Montana is included beginning with March, itsfiguresbeing so small as not to affect the total.
•One week in July estimated for South Dakota.
» One week in August estimated for Iowa and Michigan.
* Month of September for South Dakota and one week for Iowa estimated.
» First two weeks in July estimated for Arkansas.
s First two weeks in July estimated for Washington.




45

TRANSPORTATION.
(A) INDEX NUMBERS AND (B) NUMERICAL DATA.
From Government and non-Government sources.1
[Base year in bold-faced type.]
MISSISSIPPI
RIVER CARGO
TRAFFIC.

YEAR AND MONTH.

Shipments
from
St.
Louis.

Receipts
at St.
Louis.

Relative to 1913.

EXPRESS
EARNINGS.

CANADIAN
RAILROAD
OPERATIONS.

Total
operat- Operating
ing
reve- Income,
nues.

Net
Freight operating
carried
reve1 mile.
nue.

Relative to 1919.

Relative to 1913.

CANADIAN RAILROAD
OPERATIONS.

Receipts
at St.
Louis.

Shipments
from
St.
Louis.

{ Total I Operat| operating
ing
[ revenues, j income.

Tons.

B.—NUMERICAL
•;

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917

monthly average..
monthly average.,
monthly average..
monthly average..
monthly averFge..

100
50 i

100
103

100
96

86

8,738

42

!

112

77

70

7,414

45

|

120

122

111

39 !

141

135

118

1918
1919
1920
1921

monthly average..
monthly average..
monthly average.
monthly average.

29

145

135

75

59

231

100

100

117

43

84

349

129

173

136

17

71

609

124

12

114 ,

48

101

207

115

28

155

102

301

110

66

237

112

99

127

11,620

59

294

97

173

122

j

!

:

1,919,413

3,96-5

Thousands
of dollars.

DATA.

I

4,078

17,594

Thousands
of tons.

Thousands of dollars.

A.—INDEX NUMBERS.
100

Net operat! ^ g revenue.

S6,224,251
5,342,357

4 437

1,471,776

4,342,664

7 883

4 750

2 349 614

6 915 408

6 923
'<

1,838,608

5 609

2,598,892

7 323 404

5,754
9,174

§12,613

14,827
12,548

13, 845

16,306

24,133

15,640

10,390

!

5,038
10,449

2,585,756

3,075
6,155
9,380
11,655

12,748
12,843
14,146
12,279

15,230
21,770
24,975
16,645

23,965
29,790
10,280
20,530

14,875
15,509
14,669
15,463

13,800
17,500
7,580
6,430

21,217
21,002
20,570
20,345

4,688,726

$2,092

2,245,883

2,650,772

3,615

2,605,416

1,040,158

2,184,524

2,972,480

260 •

1920.
January..
February.
March
April
May....
June
July....
August.
September..
October
November..
December..

34

5,965
4,900

(*)

87

604

118

117

118

26

124

751

123

398

118

9

142

411

116

350

128

95

518

123

380

131

128

348

168

13

146

24

131

441

167

13

179

120

74

191

163

12

175

90

45

162

161

10*

159

11

22,525
23,020
13,000
7,885

66

140

62

286

135

41

619

143

87

603

138

22
21

1,400
10,970
7,140
15,300

2,625
11,340
24,550
23,890

17,704
16,992
18,023
17,403

15,745
20,175
14,155
23,050

15,665
18,725
33,310
37,050

16,929
16,779
16,767
11,431

6,985
10,535
16,480
8,575

38,785
30,420
27,155
26,085

15,127
14,951
14,801
10,770

4,338

2,198,078

* 2,667,296

6,294

2,113,338

1

2,065

2,444,311

187,388

3,626

2,349,752

1,069,330
1,592,562

3,319,206

2,453

2,265, 816

8,321

2,264,430

581,949

7,326

2,457,062

'684,071

7,948

2,516,057

488,342

281

2,803,247

1,507,281

269

3,439,898

7,452

246

3,358,029

5,589,908

211

3,054,974

682, 808

177

2,195,008

» 2,072,166

195

2,002,311

*1,431,832

221

2,122,115

1,367,768

277

1,749,308

1,276,419
1,535,229

1921.
January..
February..
March....
April
May
June
July
August

114
9
11
13

104

83

111
91

89

134

1

472

133

9

30

80

840

133

5

37

131

September...
October
November...
December.. .

395

115

934

91

7

98

87

120

9

137

100

40
GO

767

119

10

178

157

94

685

117

4

153

101

658

85

62

133

53

18

1,592,306

184

1,538,356

1,852,984

107

1,685,591

2,281,377

154

1,890,5-49

5,428,943

186

2,624,671

6,204,662

202

3,414,313

9,803,135

88

2,930,344

6,277,760

1,305

2,545,408

3,309,134

1922.
January..
February.
March
April

104

99

104

105

107

127

13,131
13,132
13,440

95

1,900,310

1

113

2,011,226

M 40,316

103

2,436,149

3,568,803

827.619

May..
June.
1
Receipts and shipments of cargo by river at St. Louis (almost ail by Mississippi River) from Mcrchants Exchange of St. Louis; express earnings aro reports to the Interstate Commerce Commission by the American Railway Ezpress Co., and, beginning with May, 1921, by the Southeastern Express Co. also; Canadian railroad operations from
Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, covering annual reports of all railroads in Canada and monthly reports of all railroads with
annual operating revenues of $500,000 or over, which include 98 per cent of the total revenues.
a Deficit.




46

MISCELLANEOUS.
(A) INDEX NUMBERS AND (B) NUMERICAL DATA,
Front Government and non-Government sources.1
[Bade year in bold-faced type.]
SAVINGS
DEPOSITS.

MILK*

YEAR AND MONTH.

! Receipts Receipts
! at Greater at Boston
(including
New
York.2
cream).3

Relative
to 1913.

CANADIAN
BUILDINGS.

Balance
Receipts at Receipts at Production |
to credit
ProducMinneapBoston
tion Min- I of deposi- Contracts Greater
New
olis-St.
(including
neapolis- i tors, San awarded.
York.2
St. Paul.< Francisco
Paul.<
cream).s
District.

Relative
to 1913.

Relative to 1919.

Thousands
of cans, 40
quarts
each.

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

average..
average..
average..
average.
average.

100
101

100

106

22

1918
1919
1920
1921

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

average.
average.
average.
average.

118

93

80

125

1OO

1OO

136

106

143

100

January..
February.
March
April

124

95

118

89

97

131

104

130

May....
June
July....
August.

63
26

10S
90

Thousands of quarts.

CANADIAN
BUILDINGS.

Balance
to credit
of depositors, San
Francisco
District.

Contracts
awarded.

Thousands of dollar;

B.-NUMERICAL DATA.

A.—INDEX NUMBERS.

110

SAVINGS
DEPOSITS.

MILK.

22

1,496
1,513
1,590
1,613
1,652

11,727
12,193
13,059
13,865
13,010

5,715
7,145
7,786
12,141

8580,743
673,382
715,883

12,345
11,594
13,560
13,467

6,389
6,934
7,989
7,777

641,470
6.50,170
655,347
655,661

16.066

9,216
10,581
9,310
7,618

661,774
681,349
673,533
677,118

28,702

20,820

20,163
6,993
8,276
7,070

109

100
116

67

170

123

63

1,763
1,873
2,036
2,142

110

50

1,853

112

57

1,761

112

113

66

1,961

103

109

113

97

1,946

143

111

129

114

90

2,213

150

118

148

117

91

2,249

151

120

130

116

76

2,256

143

113

107

117

73

2,146

14,476
15,348
15,690
14,758

September..
October
November..
December..

135
139
131
133

107
112
101
103

89
89
91
112

118

13,935
14,586
13,201
13,421

6;32S
6,336
6,486
8,012

6S3,574
690,619
696,801
713,168

1921.
January...
February..
March
April

132
124
143
141

101
94
110
106

May....
June
July....
August.

15-3
161

September.
October
November..
December..

26
49

8,320
15,836
21,301
20,011

1920.
18,337
21,278
31,0~2

29,283
24,258
23,475

120

48

123

27

2,027
2,075
1,953
1,992

139
153
183
182

123

28 :
55
32 ''
68

1,978
1,854
2,143
2,111

13,180
12,321
14,334
13,857

9,934
10,898
13,100
13,023

711,973
715,769
716,871
712,190

119

225

123

229

125

162

118

179

123

119

110

165

122

84
83
55
113

2,289
2,414
2, 427
2,229

15,525
16,054
15,383
14,311

16,098
16,375
12,758
11,773

714, 574
726,318
714,928
711,145

26,860

123

151

108

137

122

140

123

122

100

136

123

131

103

171

126

14,045
13,786
13,115
13,484

9,767
9,996
9,739
12,266

709,498
711,457
712,653
733,220

19,506

105

61
59
52
60

2,262

144

137

113

192

126

104

182

128

118

103

207

128

26
33
42

2,050

128
144

110

192

128

14,743
13,523
13,438
14,428

13,698
13,031
14,812
13.687

734,089
741.565
744,599
742,928

16,287

16,114

747,2%

J

119

123
123
123

2,155
1,826
2,012

18,170
15,399
8,747

8,948
17,6U
10,257
21,622

26, 437
17,741
36,307

18,997
16,640
19,119

1922.
January..
February.
March
April
May..
June..

129

1,908
2,209
2,156

109
111

8,393
10,718
13,465
29,428
34,827
35,020

1
Milk receipts at Greater New York from the Milk Reporter; at Boston from Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities; milk production in Minneapolis-St. Paul district from Twin Cities Milk Producers Association; savings deposits in San Francisco Federal Reserve district from Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisa; Canadian building contracts from McLean Building Reports (Ltd.).
1
Receipts of milk, excluding cream, in the metropolitan area around New York City, including many large cities in New Jersey.
1
Receipts of milk by rail, including cream.
4
Production of whole milk by members of the Twin City Milk Producers' Association including most of the area within a 40-mile radius of Minneapolis and. St. Paul.




47
SOURCES OF DATA.
SOl'liCE.

CURRENT PUBLICATION.1

DATA.

DATE Of PUBLICATION.

-REPORTS FROM GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS, FEDERAL, STATE, AND FOREIGN.
A USTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH'S Bu- I Price index for Australia
REAU OF CENSUS AND STATISTICS.

I

! Federal Reserve Bulletin

Second week of month.

| Federal Reserve Bulletin

Second week of month.

!

BANK o r JAPAN

Price index for Japan

CANADIAN DEPARTMENT or LABOR

Price index for Canada
j Labour Gazette (Canadian)
Employment in Canadian trade unions
I Employment
Operations of Canadian employment service...' Employment.

Monthly.
Semimonthly.
Semimonthly.

CANADIAN DEPARTMENT
AND INDUSTRY.

Foreign trade of Canada.
Canadian railroad operations

Monthly.
Monthly.

OF TRADE

Foreign trade of Canada..
j Operating Revenues, etc.," of" Railways *.

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF CHICAGO. Savings deposits in Seventh Federal Reserve j Business Conditions

Monthly.

District.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF N E W Foreign exchange rates and index
YORK.

i Federal Reserve Bulletin and daily state- i Daily and monthly.
I ment.
Savings deposits in Third Federal Reserve | Business and Financial Conditions
Monthly.
District.
}
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF SAN j Savings deposits in Twelfth Federal Reserve Business Conditions
j Monthly.

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF PHILADELPHIA.
FRANCISCO.
FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD

J

District.
Foreign exchange index numbers..

Federal Reserve Bulletin
! Monthly (second week of month).
Federal Reserve Bulletin and weekly press Sunday newspapers and monthly.
releases.*
Condition of Federal Reserve banks
Federal Reserve Bulletin and weekly press j Friday morning newspapers and
releases.*
| monthly.
i Condition of reporting member banks
j Federal Reserve Bulletin and weekly press ! Friday afternoon newspapers and
!
| releases.*
! monthly.
Money held outside U. S. Treasury and j Federal Reserve Bulletin
(Monthly.
i Federal Reserve Systems.
i
j
| Wholesale price index numbers
I Federal Reserve Bulletin
j Monthly.
i Department store trade; in cooperation with Federal Reserve Bulletin
.! Monthly.
! National Retail Dry Goods Association.
j
I
: Index numbers of department store and gro- [ Federal Reserve Bulletin
| Monthly.
| eery trade.
i Barley and rye receipts
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Monthly.
i Debits to individual accounts

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION

! Paper and wood pulp production, prices, e t c . . Monthly press releases *...

INDIAN DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS. . . ! Price index for India

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION--! Railway revenues and expenses

MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC UTILITIES.

j Telephone operating revenue and income
; Telegraph operations and income
! Express operations and income
OF j Milk receipts at Boston

Newsprint, 20th to 25th of the month,
other paper and wood pulp, 1st >,{
following month.
Second week of month.

Federal Reserve Bulletin

| Preliminary statement of operations of I Monthly..
Class I roads.
Not published..
Not published..
Not published.
Not published

N E W YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ; New York State factory employment and j Labor Market Bulletin and rress releases*.' Monthly.
LABOR.

J

earnings.

j

N E W YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF j New York State canal traffic
PUBLIC WORKS.

[ Yearly.

I

I

PANAMA CANAL
i Panama Canal traffic
PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF LA- | Unemployment in Pennsylvania
BOR AKD INDUSTRY.

j The Panama Canal Record
Semimonthly report*
j

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE— Beef, pork, and lamb production
BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY.

!

Annual report

j

J

j Market Reporter »
j

• Last weekly issue of month.
I Semimonthly.
j Last weekly issue of month or firs;

s

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE— j Prices of farm products to producer
| Monthly Crop Reporter
BUREAU OF MARKETS AND CROP i Wool consumption and stocks
j Market*Reporter»
ESTIMATES.<
j Crop production
Monthly Crop Reporter 3
j
releases.*
Market Reporter'
! Cold storage holdings and fish frozen
- . . . - . .
,
.. Market Reporter»
I Movement of cattle, hogs, and sheep
Receipts of butter, cheese, eggs and poultry...; Market Reporter*
1
Production of dairy products
j Market Reporter J
I Car lot shipments of fruits and vegetables
J Market Reporter 2
i Farm labor, wages, supply, etc.
j Monthly Crop Reporter 3

!

of next month.

i Monthly.
i First weekly issue of month.
and press I Releases about 1st of month (cotton)
! and 10th (other crops).
], Fourth weekly issue of 'month.
Third weekly'issue of month.
Weekly.
I Quarterly.
! Third weekly issue of month.
' Monthly.

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF C O M M E R C E - ; Cotton ginned
I Cotton consumed and on hand
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS.

I Preliminary report on gin n ings *
' Semimonthh' during season.
Preliminary report on cotton consumed... | 15th of month.
I Reports on wool machinery and on cotton j 20th of month.
;
I spindles.*
j
Leather, hides and shoes, production and I Census of hides, skins, and leather *
First week of month.
stocks.
j
JFth of month.
Cotton seed and cottonseed oil
j Preliminary report on cotton seed
Stocks of tobacco held by manufacturers and , Statement on stocks of leaf tobacco
Quarterly (one month after end of
dealers.
quarter).
Fats and oiJs, production, consumption, and Statistics of fats and oils *
Quarterly (one month after end of
stocks.
quarter).
Stocks of coal, in cooperation with Geological Commercial stocks of coal *
Bimonthly hereafter.
Survey.
15th of month.
Fabricated struc. steel sales from April, 1922.. Press release *
1 Monthly statement
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF C O M M E R C E - Fish catch
Active textile machinery.

BUREAU OF FISHERIES.

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—

Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce. Last week of month.
(Part I.) »
Tonnage of vessels, entered and cleared in Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce. Middle of next month.
United States foreign trade.
(Partll.)
Data on trade, employment and coal and iron Various foreign sources
production of foreign countries.
Wholesale price of wool
Wholesale Prices.
Yearly.
Warehouse stocks of rice
Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce. I Monthly.
(Part II.)
I
;
• Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.
1
This is not necessarily the source of the figures published in the SURVEY as many of them are obtained direct from the compilers prior to publication in the respective Journals. This column and the right-hand column have been added to assist readers in obtaining current statistics between publication dates of the SURVEY.
• Beginning Jan. 7,1D22, combined into new publication called Weather, Crops, and Markets, issued weekly.
1
Imports and exports of gold and silver in Part II.
4
Beginning July 1, 1922, merged into Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE.




All imports and exports

48
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued.
DAT! OF PUBLICATION.

CURRENT PUBLICATION.

I.—REPORTS FROM GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS, FEDERAL, STATE, AND FOREIGN—Continued.
Vessels under construetlon and vessels com- Commerce Reports.
pleted.
Building material price indices
Not published

U. 8. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCEBUREAU OF NAVIGATION.
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCEBUREAU OF STANDARDS.

I First weekly iisue of month (Mondays).

Wheatflourproduction, prior to July, 1920

U. S. GRAIN CORPORATION
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF MINES.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORGEOLOGICAL SURVEY.

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.

1

No longer published.
Refined petroleum products, production, etc.. Refinery Statistics*.,

Report on Portland cement output *..
Weekly report on production of coal *.
Preliminary statistics on petroleum * .
Production of electric power *
Number on pay roll—United States factories.. Industrial Survey *
Beport of Activities of State and MuniciEmployment agency operations
pal Employment Agencies.

Portland cement, production, etc..
Coal and coke production
Crude petroleum, production, etc..
Electric power production

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION.

Immigration and emigration statistics

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Wholesale prices of commodities, including i Not published
farm products, food, clothing, metals, etc. '
Wholesale price index
Monthly Labor Review.
Retail price index of foods
Monthly Labor Review.
Retail coal prices
Monthly Labor Review.
| Postal Savings News Bulletin..
United States postal savings.
Postal receipts
j Statement of Postal Receipts *.

U. S. POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT.
U, S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT—BUREAU OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

Second week of month.
20th of month.
Second or third weekly igsue of
month (Saturdays).
25th of month.
End of month.
First week of month.
Every 4 or 5 weeks.

j Not published..

Government debt, receipts and disbursements.
Oleomargarine production
Consumption of manufactured tobacco, snuff,
cigars, cigarettes, and oleomargarine.
Iron ore movement
Sault Ste. Marie Canal traffic

Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
i

Daily Statement of the U. S. Treasury

Last day of month.

Not published
Statement of tax-paid products *..

First week of month.

Not published
Not published
WISCONSIN INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION.. . Wisconsin factory earnings and employment.. Bulletin on Wisconsin labor market *
U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT—ENGINEER
CORPS.

12th of month.
7th of month.

15th of month.

n.—REPORTS FROM TRADE ASSOCIATIONS AND PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS.
(Excluding individual firms reporting data to be combined with other firms or trade associations.)
ABERTHAW CONSTRUCTION C O .

Building costs

Construction trade papers.

ABRASIVE PAPER AND CLOTH MANUFACTURERS' EXCHANGE.

Sales of abrasive paper and cloth

N ot published

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF MANUFACTURERS OF PRODUCTS FROM CORN.

Corn ground into starch, glucose, etc

Not published

AMERICAN BUREAU OF METAL STATISTICS.

Copper production
Zinc production in Belgium
Zinc stocks in United Kingdom

Not published
Not published
Not published

AMERICAN FACE BRICK ASSOCIATION,

Face brick production, stocks, etc

AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE

Steel ingot production

j Press release to trade papers • .

AMERICAN PIG IRON ASSOCIATION

Merchant pig iron production, etc

!

AMERICAN

Freight car surplus

Car loadings
Bad-order cars

i Summary of Car Surplusages and Short< ages.*
, Summary of Car Surplusages and Short| ages.*
; Information Bulletin *
j Information Bulletin •

Stockholders in the company

: Financial papers

RAILWAY

(Car Service Division).

AMERICAN TELEPHONE
GRAPH Co.

ASSOCIATION

Freight car shortage

AND TELE-

AMERICAN WRITING PAPER COMPANY. Purchases and sales of paper

Not published
7th of month.

Not published
Weekly.
Weekly.
Weekly.
Third week of month.
Quarterly.

Not published

AMERICAN ZINC INSTITUTE

Production and stocks of zinc

ANTHRACITE BUREAU OF INFORMATION

Anthracite shipments and stocks

ASSOCIATION OF
PRESIDENTS.

New life insurance business

Not published

BOSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Receipts of wool at Boston

Trade papers

BRIDGE BUILDERS AND STRUCTURAL
SOCIETY.

Fabricated structural steel sales before April, Press release to trade papers * . . .
1922.
;

LIFE

INSURANCE

Press release io trade papers *
: Statement of anthracite shipments *.

BUREAU OF RAILWAY ECONOMICS . . . Number of tons carried 1 mile

; Summary of operating statistics.
' Not published
' Summary of operating statistics.

CALIFORNIA REDWOOD ASSOCIATION. . Redwood lumber production, etc

15th of month.
15th of month.

Daily.
15th of month.

\ Not published

Average receipts per ton-mile
Passengers carried 1 mile

CALIFORNIA WHITE AND SUGAR PINE
ASSOCIATION.

Sugar pine lumber production, etc
Receipts and shipments of wheat and corn

Trade papers

CONTAINER CLUB

Production of paper box board
Not published
• Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.

Monthly.

Not published

CHICAGO BOARD OF T R A D E .

Monthly.




Daily.

49
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued.
DATE O f PUBLICATION.

CURRENT PUBLICATION.

II.—REPORTS FROM TRADE ASSOCIATIONS AND PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS—Continued.
CRIDIT CLEARING HOUSE

Credit conditions

Credit

F. W.

Building statistics—Contracts awarded

Statement on Building Statistics

ENAMELED SANITARY MANUFACTURERS
ASSOCIATION.

Enameled sanitary ware

Not published

FEDERATION

British iron ati'd steel production

Trade papers

GEORGE A. FULLER COMPANY

Hotel and office building costs

Not published..

ILLUMINATING GLASSWARE GUILD

Illuminating glassware production, orders, etc. N ot published.

JACKSONVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Turpentine and rosin receipts

| Naval Stores Review..

Weekly.

KNIT GOODS
AMERICA.

Knit underwear production, etc

' Monthly report *

Monthly.

DODGE CO

OF

IRON

AND

STEEL

MANUFACTURERS (British).

MANUFACTURERS

OF

Weekly
| Monthly.

Second week of month.

,

Monthly report (not published).

LEATHER BELTING EXCHANGE

Sales of leather belting.

MAPLE FLOORING
ASSOCIATION.

Maple flooring production, etc

I Not published

MCLEAN BUILDING REPORTS, L T D . . .

Cannadian building contracts

! Canadian Building Review

MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS.

Receipts and shipments of lead and zinc

MANUFACTURES'

Monthly.
3d of month.

Receipts and shipments at St. Louis.

Mississippi River traffic
MICHIGAN HARDWOOD
ERS' ASSOCIATION.

MANUFACTUR-

j Not published
j
Hardwood and softwood lumber, production j N ot published
and shipments.
|

MINNEAPOLIS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE .

Linseed oil and oil-cake shipments

j Monthly statements

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CORRUGATED AND FIBER BOX MANUFACTURERS.

Production of paper-box board

j Not published

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SHEET AND
TIN PLATE MANUFACTURERS.

Sheet-metal production and stocks

j Not published.

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
MANUFACTURERS.

1913 figures for active textile machinery.

N o longer published.,

NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE.

Production and shipments of passenger cars
and trucks.

Traffic bulletin * (production figures not j Second week of month,
published).
i

NATIONAL BOTTLE
ASSOCIATION.

Glass bottle production index

Not published

Cost of living.

Monthly press release

NATIONAL RETAIL DRY GOODS ASSOCIATION.

Department store trade (see Federal Reserve
Board).

Federal Reserve Bulletin

NATIONAL WOOD CHEMICAL ASSOCIATION.

Production of wood alcohol and acetate of lime. Not published.

NATIONAL
BOARD.

OF

WOOL

MANUFACTURERS'

INDUSTRIAL

CONFERENCE

N E W ORLEANS BOARD OF TRADE

Rice distribution through New Orleans
Canadian newsprint production, etc

Monthly bulletin

N E W YORK COFFEE AND SUGAR E X CHANGE.

Coffee receipts, stocks, etc

Monthly statement

N E W YORK METAL EXCHANGE

Stocks of tin

Trade papers

NORTH CAROLINA PINE ASSOCIATION.

North Carolina pine, production, etc.

Not published

NORTHERN HEMLOCK AND HARDWOOD
MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.

Hemlock and hardwood lumber production, etc Not published

OAK
FLOORING
ASSOCIATION.

MANUFACTURERS'

Oak flooring, production, etc.

Not published

OHIO FOUNDRYMEN'S ASSOCIATION. .

Ohiof oundry iron production

Monthly report * (not published).

OPTICAL
TION.

Spectacle frames and mountings, sales, etc

Monthly.

Monthly report

NEWS PRINT SERVICE BUREAU

! 21st of month.

Not published

MANUFACTURERS'

ASSOCIA-

;

First week of month.
| First week of month.
j
j

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO

Stockholders in the company

; Financial papers

Quarterly.

PENSACOLA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Turpentine and rosin receipts

: Naval Stores Rewew

Weekly.

PULLMAN COMPANY

Pullman passenger traffic

j Not published

REFRACTORIES MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.

Fire-clay brick production, etc

j Not published

Silica brick production, etc

j Not published

RICE MILLERS' ASSOCIATION

Rice receipts, stocks, etc

j Monthly report

RUBBER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA...

Automobile tires, tubes, and raw material

j Monthly reports (not published).

SANITARY POTTERS' ASSOCIATION

Sanitary pottery orders

SAVANNAH BOARD OF TRADE

Turpentine and rosin receipts

SAVINGS BANKS ASSOCIATION OF STATE
OF N E W YORK.

Savings banks deposits in New York State.... j Not published

SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA .

Raw silk consumption, etc
Monthly press release to trade papers • — 5th of month.
• Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.




Not published
i

Naval Stores Review

Weekly.

50
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued.
CURRENT PUBLICATION'.

DATE OF PUBLICATION.

I I . - R E P O R T S FROM TRADE ASSOCIATIONS AND PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS—Continued.
SOUTHERN PINE ASSOCIATION

Yellow pine production and stocks

Not published

STEEL,

Steel barrel shipments

Monthly reports • (not published)..

BARREL

MANUFACTURERS'

ASSOCIATION.
TANNERS' COUNCIL

Not published..

i Leather production

TWIN CITY MILK PRODUCERS' ASSOCIATION.
U. S. STEEL CORPORATION

;

Milk production, Minnesota

Not published.

Unfiliedorders
I Earnings
i Stockholders
Wages of common labor

Press release *
Press release *
Financial papers
Special reports •

10th of month.
Monthly.
Quarterly.
Occasionally.
Monthly.

UNITED TYPOTDETAE OF AMERICA

Printing activity

Typothetae Bulletin

WEST COAST LUMBERMEN'S ASSOCIATION.

Doudas fir lumber production, etc

Not published

WEBBING

MANUFACTURERS'

CHANGE.
WE.-*TERN
PINE
ASSOCIATION.

E X - Sales of elastic webbing

MANUFACTURER:-?'

Not published

Western pine lumber production, etc.

Not published.

DATE OF PUBLICATION.

HI.—REPORTS FROM TECHNICAL PERIODICALS.
AMERICAN METAL MARKET

Composite pig iron and steel prices.

First or second week of month (dally).

THE

ANNALIST

New York stock sales
New York closing stock prices

First wockly issue of month (Mondays).
Weekly (Mondays).

THE

BOND BUYER.

Stale and municipal bond issues..
Muncipal bond yields

First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).

Visible supply of wheat and corn
Bank clearings, United States and Canada.
Price index

Weekly (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays').

BRADSTREET'S

Business failures, Canada
BULLETIN DE LA STATISTIQUE GENERALS
CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL E N G I N E E R I N G . . .
COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL CHRONICLE
Dow, JONES A Co. (WALL STREET JOURNAL).
DUN'S REVIEW

Monthly.

Price index for France

.. Chemical price index.

Weekly (Wednesdays).

.. Cotton (visible supply)
, Interest rates
.
"
Mail order and chain store sales

j Weekly (Saturdays).
| Weekly (Saturdays).
j Second or third weekly Issue of month (Saturdays).
First week of month (daily).
First week of month (daily).

. . New York bond sales
New York bond prices..

First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).

Business failures.

Price index

Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays).

ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL-PRESS

Rand gold production.

ENGINEERING NEWS RECORD

Silver prices
Construction cost and volunio index

FINANCIAL POST

Canadian bond issues

Weekly (Thursdays).

FRANKFURTER ZEITUNG.

Price Index for Germany

Monthly.

IRON AGE

Pig iron production

First weekly issue of month (Wednesdays)
Weekly (Wednesdays).

| Composite finished steel price
IRON TRADE REVIEW

Iron and steel prices

LONDON ECONOMIST

Price index for United Kingdom

MILK REPORTER

Milk receipts at Greater New York

MODERN MILLER

Argentine visible supply of wheat and corn.

NAVAL STORES REVIEW

Turpentine and rosin, receipts and stocks..

NEW

YORK JOURNAL OF COMMERCE

NEW

YORK EVENING POST.

NORTHWESTE RN MlLLER

OIL, PAINT, AND DRUG REPORTER
OIL TRADE JOURNAL
PRINTERS' INK
RUSSELL'S COMMERCIAL NEWS
STATISTICAL SUGAR TRADE JOURNAL




First weekly issue of month.

Weekly (Thursdays).
10th of month.

Dividend and interest payments

New capital
corporations..
New losses.. issues
Fire

Newspaper advertising

Weekly.
Weekly.
Weekly.
First week of month (daily).
First week of month (daily).
First week of month (daily).
10th of month (daily).
' Not published.

Flaxsecd, receipts, etc
Argentine grain shipments
Wheat flour production for 1917
j Price indices of drugs, oils, etc
Argentine shipments and supply of flaxseed.
Mexican petroleum shipments

Weekly.
Weekly.
Weekly (Mondays).
Weekly (Mondays).
10th of month (monthly).

Magazine advertising

Second week of month.

Wheat flour production, from July, 1920

Weekly compilation (daily).

Sugar stocks, receipts, meltings, and Cuban statistics... Weekly (Fridays).
* Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.

O