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JANUARY 2007

S u rv eyo f Cu r r e n tBu sin e ss




In This Issue . . .
U.S. International Transactions for the Third Quarter o f 2006
An Ownership-Based U.S. Current Account for 1995-2005
State Personal Income for the Third Quarter o f 2006

Q B EA

BU REA U O F ECO N O M IC AN A LYSIS
U.S. D EPA RTM EN T OF COM M ERCE

ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS ADMINISTRATION

U.S. D ep artm ent of C om m erce
Carlos M. Gutierrez, Secretary

E conom ics and S tatistics A dm inistration
Cynthia A. Glassman, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

Bureau of E conom ic A nalysis
J. Steven Landefeld, Director and Acting Chief Economist
Rosemary D. Marcuss, Deputy Director
Dennis J. Fixler, Chief Statistician
Ralph Kozlow, Associate Director for International Economics
Vacant, Chief Information Officer
Brent R. Moulton, Associate Director for National Economic Accounts
Sumiye Okubo, Associate Director for Industry Accounts
Vacant, Associate Director for Regional Economics

BEA A dvisory C om m ittee
The BEA Advisory Committee advises the Director of BEA on matters related to the development and improvement of BEA’s national,
regional, industry, and international economic accounts, especially in areas of new and rapidly growing economic activities arising
from innovative and advancing technologies, and it provides recommendations from the perspective of business economists, academi­
cians, researchers, and experts in government and international affairs.

Dale W. Jorgenson, Chair, Harvard University
Alan J. Auerbach, University of California, Berkeley
Richard B. Berner, Morgan Stanley
Michael J. Boskin, Stanford University
Barry R Bosworth, The Brookings Institution
Susan M. Collins, Georgetown University
Robert J. Gordon, Northwestern University
Maurine A. Haver, Haver Analytics, Inc.
Charles R. Hulten, University of Maryland
Edward E. Learner, University of California, Los Angeles
Therese J. McGuire, Northwestern University
William D. Nordhaus, Yale University
Joel L. Prakken, Chairman, Macroeconomic Advisers, LLC
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Surveyof C urrentB usiness
Jan u ary 2007

1

Volum e 87 • N u m b er 1

G D P and th e Econom y: Final E stim ates fo r th e Third Q u arter of 2006
Real GDP increased 2.0 percent after increasing 2.6 percent, reflecting an acceleration in im ports, a
larger decrease in residential investment, and decelerations in consumer spending for services,
inventory investment, and state and local government spending. Corporate profits picked up.

6 Corporate Profits and the Economy

7

Real Inventories, S ales, and Inventory-S ales R atios for M an ufacturin g and Trade
for th e Third Q u a rter of 2006
The estimates, including the estimates o f inventories for manufacturing by stage o f fabrication,
have been updated.

10

U.S. Intern atio nal Transactions: Third Q u a rter of 2006
The U.S. current-account deficit increased $8.4 billion to $225.6 billion as a result o f increases in
the deficits on goods and income. In the financial account, net financial inflows increased $23.2
billion to $176.4 billion.

44

A n O w n ersh ip -B ased Fram ew ork of th e U.S. C u rre n t A ccoun t, 1 9 9 5 -2 0 0 5
The updated supplement to the international transactions accounts highlights the participation o f
multinational companies in the international markets for goods and services through both crossborder trade and sales by local affiliates.




w w w .bea.gov

January 2007

47

S tate Personal Incom e: Third Q u a rter of 2006
Personal income growth for the Nation accelerated, increasing 1.4 percent after increasing 0.4
percent. Growth in all the regions accelerated.

D -1

B EA C urrent and H istorical D ata

Hi

D ire c to r’s M essage

iv

Taking A cco u n t

B E A ’s W eb S ite and C o n tacts (in sid e back cover)
S ched ule of U pcom ing N ew s R eleases (b ack co ver)

Looking A h ead . . .
Alternative Measures of Personal Saving. In 2005, BEA’s measure o f annual personal
saving turned negative for the first time since 1933. In an upcom ing issue o f the
, alternative measures o f saving will be discussed.

vey




Su r ­

///'

January 2007

Director’s Message_______________




The start o f a new year is always an exciting time, and in 2007, we
intend to build on the progress made in previous years.
During 2006, in keeping with goals identified in our strategic
plan, num erous improvements to our economic accounts were
delivered. One highlight was the release o f the first preliminary
research and development (R&D) satellite account estimates,
which detail the economic effects o f treating R&D as an invest­
ment. We also accelerated the release o f metropolitan area per­
sonal income, enhanced the integration o f our accounts with
other statistical agencies, incorporated real-time data into our
estimates o f consumer spending and investment, expanded quar­
terly balance-of-payments detail from 10 countries and regions
to 37, and completed all annual accounts revisions.
In 2007, we look forward to once again implementing im ­
provements that further our goal o f providing the highest quality
economic data on a timely basis. Our updated strategic plan will
soon be available on the BEA Web site.
This month, the S u r v e y includes an easy-to-read presentation
o f the m ost recent estimates o f gross domestic product (G DP)—
in this case, the “final” estimates o f GDP for the third quarter o f
2006. Please note the accompanying one-page box article, “C or­
porate Profits and the Economy,” which discusses some relevant
aspects o f BEA’s widely watched measure o f corporate profits and
recent trends.
Other articles present state personal income estimates, bal­
ance-of-payments estimates, and real inventory estimates, all for
the third quarter o f 2006. Another article presents an ownershipbased view o f the U.S. current account for 1995-2005.

iv

January 2007

T a k in g A c c o u n t...
Reconciling State-Level
Personal Income Measures
In a recent working paper, BEA
economists Robert L. Brown,
Ann E. Dunbar, and Adrienne
T. Pilot evaluated the feasibility
o f reconciling BEA state per­
sonal income and Internal Reve­
nue Service adjusted gross
income (AGI). BEA publishes a
national reconciliation o f per­
sonal income and AGI annually.
For research purposes, statelevel reconciliations would be
comparably useful to analysts
examining economic, fiscal, and
other issues. The paper looked at
two m ain areas: (1) Wages and
salaries and (2) nonwage com ­
ponents o f income.
The study found that it is fea­
sible to prepare an accurate rec­
onciliation for wages and salaries
and included reconciliations o f
state wages and salaries for 2000.
However, additional research is
required to determine the feasi­
bility and value o f reconciling
state personal income and AGI
for nonwage com ponents— such
as proprietors’ income, personal
current transfer receipts, and
dividends, interest, and rent. The
working paper discussed several
methods and data sources that
could be used to prepare a rec­
onciliation o f nonwage items. A
critical issue is that many non­
wage com ponents o f state per­




sonal income are derived from
IRS data, making reconciliation
o f these components o f limited
use.
The paper is available on the
BEA Web site at < www.bea.gov/
bea/papers/PI-AGI.pdf>. Statelevel wage reconciliations are
available at < www.bea.gov/bea/
papers/IRS AGI.xlsX

County Estimates of
Compensation by Industry
BEA has released county esti­
mates o f compensation by in­
dustry for 2003-2005. The
estimates for 2005 are new; the
estimates for 2003-2004 have
been revised to incorporate
newly available source data.
Com pensation— the sum o f
wage and salary disbursements
and supplements to wages and
salaries— is a key statistic in the
personal income account. The
estimates o f compensation by
industry cover 114 industries
and aggregates for 3,111 coun­
ties. Also, BEA released com ­
pensation by industry for
metropolitan areas, m etropoli­
tan divisions, micropolitan ar­
eas, combined statistical areas,
and BEA economic areas.
Com pensation estimates for
all areas for 1998-2005 are
available at < www.bea.gov/bea/
regional/sqpi/>.
Local area personal income

estimates for 2005 are scheduled
to be released in April.

BEA Digital Library
Enhancements Unveiled
BEA has expanded its Digital Li­
brary, adding 60 articles that
were published in the S u r v e y o f
C urrent
B u s in e s s
during the
1930s and 1940s.
The additions include a 1939
paper by Robert Nathan about
national income by state, enti­
tled “Some Problems Involved in
Allocating Incomes by State.”
These documents will allow
users to m ore deeply explore the
early m otivations behind key
economic policies brought about
by the Great Depression, World
War II mobilization, and the
transition back to a peacetime
economy after the war.
The BEA Digital Library,
which was launched in June
2006, provides a host o f other
historical articles about a range
o f topics, such as the reestablish­
ment o f the alcoholic beverage
industry after the end o f
Prohibition and the state o f
im portant industries, such as the
railroad and electric power
industries.
In addition, the Digital Li­
brary now features a new history
page and a redesigned home
page. The library can be accessed
at <library.bea.gov/>.

1

January 2007

GDP and the Economy
Final Estimates for the Third Quarter of 2006
CO NO M IC growth slowed in the third quarter of
2006, according to the “final” estimates o f the na­
tional income and product accounts (NIPAs).1 Real
gross domestic product (GDP) increased 2.0 percent,
revised down 0.2 percentage point from the “prelimi­
nary” estimate. In the second quarter, GDP increased
2.6 percent (chart 1 and table l) .2
The slowdown reflected an acceleration in imports
(a subtraction in the GDP calculation), a larger de­
crease in residential investment, and decelerations in
consum er spending for services, in inventory invest­
ment, and in state and local government spending.3
The slowdown was m oderated by upturns in equip­
ment and software investment, consumer spending for
durable goods, and Federal Government spending.
• Prices o f goods and services purchased by U.S. resi­
dents increased 2.2 percent, 0.1 percentage point
more than the “preliminary” estimate, following a
4.0-percent increase. Energy prices decelerated
sharply, while food prices accelerated.
• Real disposable personal income (DPI) increased
4.1 percent, 0.4 percentage point more than the
“prelim inary” estimate; it decreased 1.5 percent in
the second quarter.
• Corporate profits increased $61.5 billion (3.9 per­
cent at a quarterly rate) after increasing $22.7 bil­
lion (1.4 percent) in the second quarter. See the box
“Corporate Profits and the Economy” (page 6).
•T h e personal saving rate, personal saving as a per­
centage o f current-dollar DPI, was -1.2 percent; in
the second quarter, it was -1.4 percent.
• Real gross national product (GNP) increased 1.8
percent, com pared with a 2.3-percent increase.

E

1. Each GDP estimate for a quarter (advance, preliminary, and final)
incorporates increasingly comprehensive and improved source data. More
information can be found at <www.bea.gov/bea/about/infoqual.htm> and
<www.bea.gov/bea/faq/national/gdp_accuracy.htm>. Quarterly estimates
are expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates, which show the value of
an activity if the quarterly rate were maintained for a year.
2. “Real” estimates are in chained (2000) dollars, and price indexes are
chain-type measures.
3. In this article, “consumer spending” refers to the NIPA series “personal
consumption expenditures,” “inventory investment” refers to “change in
private inventories,” “Federal Government spending” refers to “Federal
Government consumption expenditures and gross investment,” and “state
and local government spending” refers to “state and local government con­
sumption expenditures and gross investment.”

Chart 1. GDP, Prices, Disposable Personal Income (DPI)
Real GDP: Percent change from the preceding quarter

2002




2004

2006

2005

C o n s u m e r s p e n d ing
N o n re s id e n tia l fjx e d in v e stm e n t
R e s id e n tia l fix e d in v e s tm e n t

I

In v e n to ry in v e s tm e n t

: E x p o rts
Im p o rts
^G overnm ent sp e n d in g

-1

0

1

Percentage points at an annual rate

Prices: Percent change from the preceding quarter

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

DPI: Percent change from the preceding quarter

_
J___ I __ L

2002

Christopher Swann prepared this article.

2003

Contributions to the increase in real GDP in 2006:ll

2003

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

i

2004

i

I

i

i

2005

i

I

i

2006

GDP and the Economy

2

January 2007

Real G D P O verview

Consumer spending accelerated slightly in the third
quarter, contributing 1.96 percentage points to real
GDP growth. Durable-goods spending turned up, re­
flecting an upturn in motor vehicles and parts, espe­
cially light trucks. Nondurable-goods spending accel­
erated, as clothing and shoes turned up.

Table 1. Real Gross Domestic Product and Components
[Seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Share of
currentdollar
GDP
(percent)

Contribution to percent
change in real GDP
(percentage points)

Change from
preceding period
(percent)

2006

2005

2006

2005

III

IV

I

II

III

Gross dom estic p roduct1....

100.0

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

Personal consum ption
expenditures..............................

70.2

2.8

0.8

4.8

2.6

Durable goods.............................
Nondurable goods......................

8.1 -12.3
20.6
3.9

19.8

Services......................................

41.5

2.0

5.9
1.6

-0.1
1.4
3.7

Gross private domestic
investm ent.................................
Fixed investment........................

16.8

16.2

16.3

2.8

7.8
8.2

1.0
-1.6

Nonresidential........................

10.7

5.2

13.7

Structures............................
Equipment and software....

3.2
7.5

12.0
2.8

8.7
15.6

Residential..............................

5.6

-0.9

-0.3 -11.1 - 1 8 7

Change in private inventories....

0.5

IV

2006
I

II

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

0.53

3.38

1.81

Nonresidential fixed investment picked; equipment
and software spending turned up.

III

6.4 -1.08
1.5 0.79
2.8 0.83

1.96/

1.50 -0.01
1.20 0.30
0.67
1.52

0.50
0.32
1.14

0.17 -0.13
1.31
1.34 -0.27 -0.19

-0.8
-1.2

2.51
0.46

4.4

10.0

0.52

1.36

0.45

1.01

20.3
-1.4

15.7
7.7

0.31
0.21

0.25 0.56
1.11 -0.10

0.46
0.55

-0.06 -0.02 -0 ./2
2.05 -0.03

-1 .2 0 /

0.44

0.06

Net exports of goods and
s e rv ic e s ....................................

-6.0

Exports........................................

11.2

9.6

14.0

6.2

6.8

0.97

1.41

0.66

0.73

Goods......................................
Services..................................

7.9
3.2

11.5

6.0
6.7

9.4

5.5

17.3
6.7

0.80
0.17

1.20
0.21

0.45
0.21

0.71
0.03

Imports........................................

17.2

13.2

9.1

1.4

Goods......................................

14.1

9.4

Services..................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investm ent.................................

14.6
2.6

8.3

7.4

-0.1
9.9

19.1

-1.1

4.9

0.8

1.7 -0.21

0.94

0.16

0.32

Federal........................................

7.0

-4.6

8.8

-4.5

1.3 -0.33

0.61 -0.32

0.09

National defense....................
Nondefense.............................
State and local...........................

4.6
2.3
12.1

-9.9
7.1
1.0

8.9
8.5
2.7

-2.0
-9.3
4.0

-1.2 -0.49
6.5 0.16
1.9 0.13

-0.3

5.6

2.1

1.9 -0.28

3.5
3.3

2.7
3.3

4.0
3.3

2.2
1.9

-1.07 -0.04

0.8

Inventory investment slowed, reflecting downturns in
mining, utilities, and construction, in manufacturing,
and in “other” industries.

0.42 -0.19

Exports stepped up. Goods exports accelerated, as au­
tomotive vehicles, engines, and parts turned up. Ser­
vice exports decelerated.

5.6 -2.04 -1.46 -0.24 -0.93
7.1 -1.84 -1.27

0.01 -1.00
-2.6 -0.20 -0.19 -0.25
0.07

Imports accelerated. Petroleum and products and
“nonpetroleum industrial supplies and materials”
turned up; nonautomotive consumer goods acceler­
ated. Imports of services turned down.

0.41 -0.09 -0.06
0.20 -0.23
0.15
0.33 0.48
0.23

Addenda:
Final sales of domestic product
Gross domestic purchases price
index........................................
GDP price index.........................

The decrease in residential investment was larger than
in the previous quarter for the second straight quarter
and was the largest since the first quarter of 1991. The
larger third-quarter decrease reflected a larger de­
crease in single-family structures and a downturn in
“other” structures.

5.61

2.11

1.90

1. The estimates of GDP under the contribution columns are also percent changes.
N o te . Percent changes are from NIPA table 1.1.1, contributions are from NIPA table 1.1.2, and shares
are from NIPA table 1.1.10.

s

Federal Government spending turned up, primarily
reflecting an upturn in nondefense spending.
Real final sales of domestic product (real GDP less in­
ventory investment) slowed, increasing 1.9 percent af­
ter increasing 2.1 percent.

GDP and Gross Domestic Purchases
In addition to gross domestic product (GDP), another
related measure of economic growth—gross domestic pur­
chases—is included in the national income and product
accounts (NIPAs).
GDP measures the market value of final goods and ser­
vices produced by labor and property in the United States,
including the goods that are added to, or subtracted from,
inventories. GDP is defined as the sum of consumer spend­
ing, business and residential investment, inventory invest­
ment, government spending, and exports less imports.
Gross domestic purchases is defined as GDP less exports
plus imports. It measures domestic demand for goods and
services regardless of their origin. Exports represent foreign
demand for U.S. goods and services. Subtracting exports




from GDP yields a measure of expenditures that focuses on
domestic buyers. Imports can be viewed as the value of
goods and services that exceed the domestic supply and that
expand the consumption and investment alternatives for
domestic purchasers.
Differences between GDP and gross domestic purchases
reflect patterns in imports less exports: As imports exceed
exports, gross domestic purchases exceeds GDP.
For annual and quarterly estimates of these measures, see
NIPA tables 1.4.1 and 1.4.3-1.4.6.
For more information on GDP and gross domestic pur­
chases, see also “A Guide to the National Income and Prod­
uct Accounts of the United States” on BEA’s Web site at
< www.bea.gov/bea/an/nipaguid.pdf>.

January 2007

S urvey

of

C u rr e n t B u sin ess

3

R evisions to G DP
Table 2. Preliminary and Final Estimates for the Third Quarter of 2006
[Seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Prelim­
inary

Final
minus
prelim­
inary

Final

Prelim­
inary

2.0

-

0.2

2.2

2.0

2.8

-

0.1

6.0

6.4

1.1

1.5

0.4
0.4

1.99
0.47
0.23

1.96
0.50
0.32

2.8

-0.3

1.29

1.14

0.8

-

0.8

0.01

-0.3

-0.15

0.0

1.01

1.0

0.49
0.52
-1.16

-0.13
-0.19
1.01
0.46
0.55

Services..............................................

3.1

Gross private dom estic investm ent.
Fixed investment.
Nonresidential..............................
Structures.................................
Equipment and software.........
Residential....................................

0.0
-0.9
10.0
16.7
7.2
-18.0

-

1.2
10.0
15.7
7.7
-18.7
-

-

0.5
-0.7

Change in private inventories.........
Net exports of goods and s e rv ic e s .
Exports..............................................
Goods............................................
Services........................................

State and local.
Addenda:
Final sales of domestic product..

-

0.21

6.3
9.4

6.8

0.5

0.68

9.4

0.0

1.0

0.8

1.8

0.71
-0.03

5.3

5.6

0.3

-0.89

-0.93

7.1

0.2
0.1

-0.96
0.07

-

2.6
1.7
1.3
1.2
6.5

-0.5
0.1
-0.3

0.42
0.10
-0.05
0.15

0.32
0.09
-0.06
0.15

1.9

-0 .7

0.32

-

0.2

2.06

6.9
-2.7

-

2.2
-

Inventory investment was also revised down, reflect­
ing revisions to wholesale trade and manufacturing.

0.06
-0.19
0.73
0.71
0.03

-

-

The downward revision to consumer spending for ser­
vices primarily reflected revisions to medical care ser­
vices, specifically hospitals and nursing homes.

1.20

0.16

Imports........................................................
Goods......................................................
Services..................................................
Government consum ption expenditures <
gross investm ent.....................................
Federal.......................................................
National defense................................... .
Nondefense............................................

Final

s

Gross dom estic product (GDP)1
Personal consum ption expenditures
Durable goods....................................
Nondurable goods..............................

The final estimate of a 2.0-percent increase in real
GDP growth is 0.2 percentage point less than the pre­
liminary estimate. The revised growth rate reflects a
downward revision to consumer spending for services,
which contributed 0.15 percentage point less to GDP
growth than previously estimated. For 1978-2005, the
revisions to GDP growth, without regard to sign, aver­
aged 0.3 percentage point from the preliminary to the
final estimates.

Contribution to percent
change in real GDP
(percentage points)

Change from
preceding quarter
(percent)

1.5
1.1
6.8

2.6

-

-

0.2

-

2.1

1.9

Gross domestic purchases price ind

2.1

2.2

1.8

1.9

1.00

0.07

0.1

GDP price index...............................

State and local government spending was revised
down, primarily reflecting a revision to structures in­
vestment.

0.1

1.90

-0.16

1. The estimates of GDP under the contribution columns are also percent changes.

Source Data for the Final Estimates
The final estimates of gross domestic product for
the third quarter of 2006 incorporated the following
source data.
Personal consumption expenditures: Retail sales for August
and September (revised). Quarterly services survey for the
third quarter (new).
Nonresidential fixed investment: Construction put in
place for August and September (revised).
Residential fixed investment: Construction put in place
for August and September (revised).
Change in private inventories: Manufacturers’ and trade




inventories for September (revised).
Exports and imports of goods and services: International
transactions accounts data for the second and third quar­
ters (revised) and goods data for September (revised).
Government consumption expenditures and gross invest­
ment: State and local government construction put in place
for August and September (revised).
GDP prices: Export and import prices for July, August,
and September (revised), unit value index for petroleum
imports for June (revised), and prices of single-family
houses under construction for the third quarter (revised).

4

GDP and the Economy

January 2007

C o rp o rate Profits

Table 3. Corporate Profits
[Seasonally adjusted]
Billions of dollars (annual rate)
Level
2006

2005

III

IV

2006
I

2005

II

Corporate profits from current production increased
$61.5 billion, or 3.9 percent at a quarterly rate, after
increasing $22.7 billion, or 1.4 percent.

Percent change from
preceding quarter
(quarterly rate)

Change from
preceding quarter

2006

IV

III

I

II

III

3.9

Current production measures:
127.2 175.6

22.7

61.5

10.0

12.6

1.4

1,418.7 154.3 145.8

8.9

66.8

14.8

12.2

0.7

4.9

9.4

-1.9

Corporate profits............................... 1 . 653.3
Domestic industries......................

41.7

-

9.1

32.0

13.1

32.8

75.8

8.0

11.7

29.8

13.8

-5.3 -12.1

15.2

6.1

-2.2

15.7

25.7

6.9

4.8

4.4

6.8

1.7

43.7 -14.0

11.9

12.1

36.3

-8.5

7.9

7.5

Financial....................................

474.8

94.7

51.4

Nonfinancial..............................

943.9

59.6

94.5

234.6 -27.1
408.9

16.6

174.2

Rest of the world..........................
Receipts from the rest of the
w orld..................................
Less: Payments to the rest of
the world............................

-

3.6

8.7 -

32.3

19.2

14.5

12.1

7.6

4.2

47.0

9.2

14.8

0.3

4 .2 -

14.7

15.4

19.3

2.9

2.5

2.5

3.1

64.4 128.5 -11.8

27.8

21.2

34.9

-2.4

5.7

30.2

-

0.5

10.2

0.1

2.2

Profits of nonfinancial corporations increased $75.8
billion, or 8.7 percent, after decreasing $32.8 billion,
or 3.6 percent.
Taxes on corporate income increased $14.5 billion, or
3.0 percent.

3 .0 '

3.6

490.6
1,162.7

Net dividends................................

650.4

17.0

Undistributed profits from current
production..............................

512.4

Net cash ftow .................................... 1,380.5

-

81.4 143.2

Less: Taxes on corporate income....
Equals: Profits after tax....................

45.7

-

6.8 125.3

1.1

Note. Levels of these and other profits series are shown in NIPA tables 1.12,1.14,1.15, and 6.16D.




Profits of financial corporations decreased $9.1 bil­
lion, or 1.9 percent, following an increase of $41.7 bil­
lion, or 9.4 percent, in the second quarter.

After-tax profits increased $47.0 billion, or 4.2 per­
cent.
Undistributed corporate profits (a measure of net sav­
ing that equals after-tax profits less dividends) in­
creased $27.8 billion, or 5.7 percent.
Net cash flow with inventory valuation and capital
consumption adjustments (a profits-related measure
of internally generated funds available for investment)
increased $30.2 billion, or 2.2 percent.

January 2007

S urvey

C u rr e n t B u sin ess

of

5

C o rp o rate Profits by Industry

Table 4. Corporate Profits by Industry
[Seasonally adjusted]
Billions of dollars (annual rate)
Change from
preceding quarter

Level
2006

2005

III

IV

I

1,815.8

114.2

Domestic industries............ 1,581.1

141.3

Industry profits with inventory valuation adjustment
increased $63.2 billion, or 3.6 percent at a quarterly
rate. This increase is larger than the increase in profits
from current production ($61.5 billion) because it ex­
cludes the capital consumption adjustment, which de­
creased $1.6 billion.

Percent change from
preceding quarter
(quarterly rate)

2006

2005
IV

2006

II

III

I

II

158.6

34.9

63.2

7.9

10.2

2.0

3.6

128.8

21.1

68.4

11.6

9.5

1.4

4.5
- 1 .6 '

III

Industry profits:
Profits with IVA.......................
Financial.........................

500.1

yb.y

50.6

4 4 .3

-8.1

30.2

12.2

9.5

Nonfinancial....................

1,081.0

45.3

78.3

-23.2

76.5

5.0

8.2

-2.3

Utilities........................

52.8

15.9

1.4

7.1

6.0

71.4

3.7

17.7

Manufacturing.............

331.9

-1.8

41.8

-10.8

42.0

-

0.7

16.1

-3.6

14.5

Wholesale trade.........

125,1

11.8

1.3

-8.9

26.8

12.5

1.1

-8.3

27.2

Retail tra d e.................

-6.1

-1.8

10.1

11.3

-4.7

1.4

Profits of domestic financial industries turned down,
decreasing $8.1 billion, or 1.6 percent.

8.3

7 .6 12.8

131.3

13.2

Transportation and
warehousing

39.6

^t.1

8.3

11.3

1.0

-17.8

43.4

41.4

83.3

5.8

6.2

-3.9

-2.6

7.5

7.4

-4.4

-3.0

Other nonfinancial.....

317.1

4.5

25.5

-16.2

-6.8

1.4

8.1

-4.7

-2.1

Rest of the w orld................

234.6

-27.1

29.8

13.8

-5.3

-12.1

15.2

6.1

122.5

142.3

70.9

42.5

8.3

8.9

4.1

2.3

76.8
-8.3
13.0

110.0
16.3
17.0

51.7
-36.0
-12.2

28.0
20.7
-1.6

7.0

9.4

4.0

2.1

Profits of manufacturing industries turned up, in­
creasing $42.0 billion, or 14.5 percent, reflecting an
upturn in durable-goods manufacturing.

2.7

Information..................

Addenda:
Profits before tax (without IVA
and CCAdj)..................... 1,854.0
Profits after tax (without IVA
and CCAdj)..................... 1,363.4
-38.2
IVA............................................
CCAdj...................................... -162.4

-

-

2.2

Note. Levels of these and other profits series are shown in NIPA tables 1.12,1.14,1.15, and 6.16D.
IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment

Profits of domestic nonfinancial industries turned up,
increasing $76.5 billion, or 7.6 percent.

Profits of wholesale trade industries turned up, in­
creasing $26.8 billion, or 27.2 percent.
Profits of retail trade industries turned up, increasing
$10.1 billion, or 8.3 percent.
Profits from the rest of the world turned down, de­
creasing $5.3 billion, or 2.2 percent.

Chart 2. Corporate Profits With Inventory Valuation Adjustment: Change From the Preceding Quarter, 2006:1
B illio n s o f d o lla rs
7 5 ---------------------

1. Includes warehousing.
2. “Other” nonfinancial corporations include the agriculture, mining, construction, and services industries.
N ote. Based on seasonally adjusted estimates.

D o m e s tic n o n fin a n c ia l

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Corporate Profits by Industry
Industry profits are corporate profits by industry with
inventory valuation adjustment (IVA). The IVA removes
the effect of prices on inventories. The IVA is the difference
between the cost of inventory withdrawals at acquisition
cost and replacement cost. Ideally, BEA would also add the
capital consumption adjustment (CCAdj) for each indus­



try. However, estimates of the CCAdj are only available for
two broad categories: Total financial industries and total
nonfinancial industries. For more information about BEA’s
methodology, see “Corporate Profits: Profits Before Tax,
Profits Tax Liability, and Dividends” at < www.bea.gov/bea/
mp_national.htm>.

GDP and the Economy

6

January 2007

Corporate Profits and the Economy
Corporate profits gauge the general strength of the business
sector. This widely followed statistic provides, among other
things, an indication of future capital investment, a means
to measure rates of return on investment, and a barometer
that gauges the effect of policy changes on corporations.
Corporate profits in the national income and product
accounts (NIPAs) measure profits earned by corporations
from current production only. They do not include profits
earned by corporations in other ways, such as profits asso­
ciated with means of financing. The primary source data
are data from the Internal Revenue Service. BEA also uses
profits data based on company financial reports when taxbased data are not available.
BEA reports corporate profits on a current-dollar, sea­
sonally adjusted, annualized basis. To ensure consistency
with the NIPAs, BEA makes two adjustments. First, to
remove the effects of price changes on inventories valued at
historical cost and of tax accounting for inventory with­
drawals, BEA adds an inventory valuation adjustment that
values inventories at current cost. Second, to remove the
effects of tax accounting rules on measured depreciation,
BEA adds a capital consumption adjustment (CCAdj).
CCAdj is defined as the difference between consumption of
fixed capital (the decline in the value of assets due to wear
and tear, obsolescence, accidental damage, and aging) and
tax return depreciation.
Unlike other NIPA measures, changes in quarterly profits
are reported at quarterly rates, not annual rates. Percent
changes are reported in two ways: The change from the pre­
vious quarter and the change from the year-ago quarter.
Quarter-to-quarter changes in profits are relatively vola­
tile, and comparisons to year-ago quarters can be skewed by
nonrecurring events. For example, profits in the third quar­
ter of 2006 were 31 percent higher than in the third quarter
of 2005; however, profits in the third quarter of 2005 were

restrained by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
In the current economic expansion, profit growth has
been strong:
• Profits as a share of GDP. Profits as a share of currentdollar GDP clearly shows the growth in profits over the
current expansion. Profits as a share of GDP was 12.4 per­
cent in the third quarter of 2006, up 5.4 percentage points
from a trough in the third quarter of 2001 (chart 1).
• Cash flow to fixed investment. The ratio of cash flow to
current-dollar nonresidential fixed investment is consid­
ered an indicator of businesses’ ability to finance invest­
ment internally. The ratio has steadily increased to 0.97 in
the third quarter of 2006 from a trough of 0.69 in the
third quarter of 2000.
• Profit per unit of real gross value added. BEA estimates
the price, costs, and residual profit per unit of real gross
value added in the nonfinancial corporate sector (NIPA
table 1.15). These data indicate how price changes flow to
profits through unit labor and nonlabor costs (chart 2).
Since 2000, unit prices have risen 13.4 percent, from just
under $1 per unit to $1.12. Unit labor costs have risen
mildly, about 5 cents, and unit nonlabor costs have been
relatively flat, reflecting lower interest rate costs. Since
2003, profit per unit of sales has grown from about 10
cents, and an 8-percent share of the per unit price, to 15
cents and a 14-percent share.
• Financial and nonfinancial corporate profits. BEA
reports profits for domestic financial and nonfinancial
industries. Profit levels in the nonfinancial industries
have nearly tripled since the previous low in the fourth
quarter of 2001. Profits in the financial industries have
turned up from levels affected by the hurricanes in the
second and third quarters of 2005.

Chart 2. Price, Costs, and Profit Per Unit
of Value Added

Chart 1. Profits as a Share of GDP
Percent

Unit nonlabor cost (right scale)

,-v

Unit labor cost (left scale)
0 .1 5

Corporate unit profits (right scale)
•N .

0.4

V

.

''
0.1

V

0.2

0 .0 5

1990

92

94

96
98
2000
Seasonally adjusted

N ote . Value added refers to gross value added

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




02

04

06

of nonfinancial domestic corporate business.

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Christopher Swann

7

January 2007

Real Inventories, Sales, and Inventory-Sales Ratios
for M anufacturing and Trade for the Third Q uarter of 2006
ratios o f inventories to final sales o f domestic business,
o f nonfarm business, and o f goods and structures that
are presented in NIPA tables 5.7.5B and 5.7.6B. Table
4B presents estimates o f manufacturing inventories by
stage o f fabrication.
The estimates for 1967 forward are available in
interactive tables on BEA’s Web site at < www.bea.gov>.
Click on “Gross Domestic Product,” and under “Sup­
plemental Estimates,” click on “Underlying detail
tables” and then on “List o f Underlying Detail Tables.”

The quarterly estimates for the second and third quar­
ters o f 2006 and monthly estimates for May to October
2006 are presented in this report.
Tables IB, 2B, 3B, and 4B present chain-weighted
estimates. Table IB presents inventories, and table 2B
presents sales. Table 3B presents the inventory-sales
ratios that can be used to assess the likelihood that
businesses will add to, or reduce, inventories in
response to changes in demand; these ratios supple­
ment the quarterly current-dollar and real estimates o f

Table 1B. Real Manufacturing and Trade Inventories, Seasonally Adjusted, End of Period
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
2006
II

2006
III

May

June

J u ly '

A u gustf

Sept. r

Oct. p

M anufacturing and trade in d u s trie s ............................................................

1,250.3

1,260.8

1,246.8

1,250.3

1,252.9

1,256.9

1,260.8

1,264.9

M anufacturing..............................................................................................................

439.4
266.6
11.3
9.5
18.3
29.9
34.1
63.3
12.7
65.0
7.8
15.9

441.9
268.9
11.1
9.8
19.1
29.9
34.3
64.1

438.6
266.6
11.2

440.0
267.5
11.2
9.6
18.4
29.8
34.1
63.8
12.7
65.4
7.8
16.1

440.3
267.2
11.2
9.6
18.6
29.8
33.9
64.3
12.8
64.4
7.8
16.0

441.9

29.8
34.4
63.3
12.6
64.7
7.8
16.0

439.4
266.6
11.3
9.5
18.3
29.9
34.1
63.3
12.7
65.0
7.8
15.9

268.9
11.1
9.8
19.1
29.9
34.3
64.1
12.6
64.9
7.8
16.1

442.9
270.0
11.0
9.8
19.4
30.0
34.2
64.3
12.6
65.5
7.9
16.1

Nondurable g o o d s ...................................................................................................
Food products........................................................................................................
Beverage and tobacco products...........................................................................
Textile mills.............................................................................................................
Textile product mills................................................................................................
Apparel....................................................................................................................
Leather and allied products...............
Paper products...................................
Printing and related support activities
Petroleum and coal products............
Chemical products............................
Plastics and rubber products............

172.9
32.2
11.9
4.7
3.1
6.5
1.2

172.1
32.1
12.0
4.7
3.1
6.6
1.2

172.9
32.2
11.9
4.7
3.1
6.5
1.2

172.7
32.2
11.9
4.7
3.2
6.5
1.2

173.2
32.2
11.9
4.7
3.1
6.5
1.2

173.1
32.3
11.6
4.8
3.1
6.2
1.2

173.0
32.8
11.8
4.7
3.1
6.2
1.2

15.8
5.8
18.4
53.4
18.3

173.1
32.3
11.6
4.8
3.1
6.2
1.2
15.9
5.8
18.3
53.7
18.6

16.0
5.8
18.1
53.1
18.3

15.8
5.8
18.4
53.4
18.3

15.8
5.8
18.3
53.3
18.4

15.9
5.7
18.5
53.2
18.5

15.9
5.8
18.3
53.7
18.6

15.9
5.8
17.8
53.8
18.6

Merchant wholesale tra d e ..........................................................................................
Durable goods............................................................................................................
Nondurable goods......................................................................................................

342.9
215.0
128.5

350.2
220.7
130.2

341.9
214.4
128.0

342.9
215.0
128.5

344.0
216.1
128.5

347.3
217.6
130.2

350.2
220.7
130.2

353.1
222.3
131.5

Retail tra d e ....................................................................................................................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers................................................................................
Furniture and home furnishings and electronics and appliance stores.................
Building material and garden equipment and supplies stores...............................
Food and beverage stores........................................................................................
Clothing and clothing accessories stores................................................................
General merchandise stores.....................................................................................
Other retail stores......................................................................................................

468.8
163.0
34.3
47.3
32.6
38.5
71.2
82.7

469.3
161.2
34.3
47.3
32.6
38.7
72.4
83.3

467.0
161.9
34.1
47.2

468.8
163.0
34.3
47.3
32.6
38.5
71.2
82.7

469.6
163.8
34.3
47.6
32.6
38.4
71.7
82.0

470.1
162.6
34.3
47.9
32.6
38.4
72.2
82.6

469.3
161.2
34.3
47.3
32.6
38.7
72.4
83.3

469.6
160.6
34.4
46.8
32.7
38.9
73.2
83.4

Durable g oo ds..........................................................................................................
Wood products.......................................................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products................................................................................
Primary metals.......................................................................................................
Fabricated metal products.....................................................................................
Machinery..............................................................................................................
Computer and electronic products.......................................................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components............................................
Transportation equipment......................................................................................
Furniture and related products..............................................................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing................................................................................

p Preliminary
r Revised
Note. Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
Chained (2000) dollar inventory series are calculated to ensure that the chained (2000) dollar change in




12.6
64.9
7.8
16.1

9.5
18.4

32.5
38.4
71.1
82.4

inventories for 2000 equals the current-dollar change in inventories for 2000 and that the average of the 1999
and 2000 end-of-year chain-weighted and fixed-weighted inventories are equal. Because the formula for the
chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar esti­
mates are usually not additive.

8

Real Inventories and Sales

January 2007

Table 2B. Real Manufacturing and Trade Sales, Seasonally Adjusted at Monthly Rate
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
2006

2006
III

II

May

June

July r

A u gust'

S e p t.r

Oct. p

M anufacturing and trade in d u strie s.............................................................

947.5

949.3

951.9

946.3

948.9

953.8

945.1

953.8

M anufactu rin g..............................................................................................................

338.7

334.6

342.1

337.4

336.3

338.7

329.0

333.6

Durable g o o d s .........................................................................................................
Wood products.......................................................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products...............................................................................
Primary metals.......................................................................................................
Fabricated metal products....................................................................................
Machinery...............................................................................................................
Computer and electronic products.......................................................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components............................................
Transportation equipment.....................................................................................
Furniture and related products.............................................................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing...............................................................................

196.4
7.2
7.9
12.3
21.0
24.3
46.0
8.7
52.7
6.4
11.3

195.0
7.1
7.7
12.1
20.6
24.8
46.4
8.5
51.5
6.3
11.6

198.2
7.2
8.0
12.5
21.0
24.3
46.5
8.8
53.8
6.4
11.2

197.3
7.3
8.0
12.4
21.0
24.4
46.2
8.6
53.0
6.4
11.5

194.6
7.0
7.8
12.3
20.6
24.9
46.6
8.6
50.3
6.2
11.6

198.5
7.2
7.7
12.3
20.8
25.0
47.2
8.6
53.6
6.3
11.6

192.0
7.0
7.7
11.7
20.4
24.5
45.3
8.3
50.7
6.3
11.6

194.4
6.9
7.7
11.5
20.4
25.2
46.2
8.4
52.1
6.3
11.6

Nondurable goo ds...................................................................................................
Food products........................................................................................................
Beverage and tobacco products..........................................................................
Textile mills.............................................................................................................
Textile product mills................................................................................................
Apparel...................................................................................................................
Leather and allied products..................................................................................
Paper products......................................................................................................
Printing and related support activities.................................................................
Petroleum and coal products................................................................................
Chemical products.................................................................................................
Plastics and rubber products................................................................................

143.5
36.6
9.0
2.6
2.7
3.4
0.6
12.5
7.3
17.0
37.4
15.3

141.0
36.2
8.9
2.6
2.6
3.2
0.6
12.2
7.3
16.4
37.0
15.2

145.0
36.7
9.2
2.6
2.7
3.5
0.6
12.6
7.3
17.4
37.8
15.3

141.6
36.1
9.1
2.6
2.7
3.3
0.6
12.4
7.4
16.3
37.0
15.6

142.7
36.4
8.8
2.7
2.7
3.2
0.6
12.3
7.4
16.7
37.7
15.4

141.7
36.3
9.3
2.6
2.6
3.2
0.6
12.2
7.4
16.2
37.5
15.4

138.4
35.9
8.6
2.5
2.6
3.2
0.6
12.0
7.3
16.3
35.7
14.8

140.5
36.0
9.1
2.6
2.5
3.3
0.6
12.0
7.2
17.3
36.0
14.6

Merchant wholesale tra d e .........................................................................................
Durable goods...........................................................................................................
Nondurable goods.....................................................................................................

269.4
145.3
125.3

272.6
147.1
126.7

270.3
146.3
125.3

270.3
145.7
125.8

270.4
146.2
125.4

273.4
148.4
126.4

273.8
146.6
128.3

274.8
146.9
128.9

Retail trad e....................................................................................................................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers...............................................................................
Furniture and home furnishings and electronics and appliance stores................
Building material and garden equipment and supplies stores...............................
Food and beverage stores........................................................................................
Clothing and clothing accessories stores................................................................
General merchandise stores....................................................................................
Other retail stores......................................................................................................

342.8
80.2
30.2
35.2
42.3
20.1
52.0
85.1

345.7
81.4
31.0
35.0
42.5
20.7
52.7
85.1

343.0
80.3
30.3
35.2
42.3
20.1
52.0
85.2

341.8
78.3
30.5
34.9
42.4
20.2
52.2
85.5

345.9
81.3
30.7
35.2
42.5
20.7
52.6
85.4

345.1
81.0
30.9
35.2
42.6
20.4
52.6
84.9

346.2
81.9
31.3
34.6
42.3
20.9
53.0
85.0

349.2
82.8
31.2
35.2
42.8
20.9
52.9
86.0

p Preliminary,
r Revised.
N ote. Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
Chained (2000) dollar sales are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000

current-dollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type
quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are
usually not additive.

Table 3B. Real Inventory-Sales Ratios for Manufacturing and Trade, Seasonally Adjusted
[Ratio, based on chained (2000) dollars]
2006
II

2006
III

May

June

July r

A u gustr

S e p t.r

Oct. p

Manufacturing and trade in d u strie s................................................................

1.32

1.33

1.31

1.32

1.32

1.32

1.33

1.33

M anufactu rin g.................................................................................................................
Durable g o o d s .............................................................................................................
Wood products..........................................................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products..................................................................................
Primary metals..........................................................................................................
Fabricated metal products.......................................................................................
Machinery..................................................................................................................
Computer and electronic products..........................................................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components...............................................
Transportation equipment........................................................................................
Furniture and related products................................................................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing..................................................................................

1.30
1.36
1.56
1.20
1.49
1.43
1.40
1.38
1.47
1.23
1.22
1.41

1.32
1.38
1.57
1.26
1.58
1.45
1.38
1.38
1.48
1.26
1.25
1.39

1.28
1.35
1.56
1.19
1.48
1.42
1.41
1.36
1.44
1.20
1.21
1.42

1.30
1.35
1.54
1.20
1.48
1.42
1.40
1.37
1.48
1.23
1.22
1.39

1.31
1.37
1.59
1.23
1.49
1.44
1.37
1.37
1.47
1.30
1.25
1.39

1.30
1.35
1.57
1.25
1.51
1.43
1.36
1.36
1.49
1.20
1.24
1.39

1.34
1.40
1.59
1.27
1.63
1.46
1.40
1.42
1.52
1.28
1.25
1.39

1.33
1.39
1.59
1.28
1.69
1.47
1.36
1.39
1.50
1.26
1.26
1.39

Nondurable g oo ds......................................................................................................
Food products............................................................................................................
Beverage and tobacco products..............................................................................
Textile mills.................................................................................................................
Textile product mills...................................................................................................
Apparel......................................................................................................................
Leather and allied products.....................................................................................
Paper products.........................................................................................................
Printing and related support activities....................................................................
Petroleum and coal products...................................................................................
Chemical products....................................................................................................
Plastics and rubber products...................................................................................

1.21
0.88
1.32
1.81
1.15
1.91
2.13
1.27
0.79
1.08
1.43
1.20

1.23
0.89
1.31
1.84
1.20
1.93
2.05
1.31
0.79
1.12
1.45
1.22

1.19
0.87
1.31
1.79
1.12
1.90
2.12
1.27
0.78
1.04
1.41
1.20

1.22
0.89
1.30
1.81
1.15
1.96
2.05
1.28
0.78
1.13
1.44
1.18

1.21
0.89
1.36
1.78
1.18
2.01
2.01
1.29
0.78
1.09
1.41
1.20

1.22
0.89
1.28
1.83
1.21
2.07
2.07
1.30
0.78
1.15
1.42
1.20

1.25
0.90
1.35
1.88
1.22
1.94
2.00
1.32
0.80
1.12
1.51
1.26

1.23
0.91
1.30
1.82
1.23
1.90
1.99
1.32
0.80
1.03
1.50
1.27

Merchant wholesale tra d e .............................................................................................
Durable goods...............................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................

1.27
1.48
1.03

1.29
1.50
1.03

1.27
1.47
1.02

1.27
1.48
1.02

1.27
1.48
1.03

1.27
1.47
1.03

1.28
1.51
1.02

1.29
1.51
1.02

Retail trad e.......................................................................................................................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers..................................................................................
Furniture and home furnishings and electronics and appliance stores...................
Building material and garden equipment and supplies stores..................................
Food and beverage stores...........................................................................................
Clothing and clothing accessories stores...................................................................
General merchandise stores.......................................................................................
Other retail stores.........................................................................................................

1.37
2.03
1.13
1.34
0.77
1.91
1.37
0.97

1.36
1.98
1.11
1.35
0.77
1.87
1.37
0.98

1.36
2.02
1.13
1.34
0.77
1.91
1.37
0.97

1.37
2.08
1.12
1.35
0.77
1.90
1.37
0.97

1.36
2.02
1.12
1.35
0.77
1.86
1.36
0.96

1.36
2.01
1.11
1.36
0.76
1.88
1.37
0.97

1.36
1.97
1.10
1.37
0.77
1.85
1.37
0.98

1.35
1.94
1.10
1.33
0.76
1.86
1.38
0.97

p Preliminary
r Revised




N ote .

Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

January 2007

S urvey

of

9

C u r r e n t B u sin ess

Table 4B. Real Manufacturing Inventories, by Stage of Fabrication, Seasonally Adjusted, End of Period
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
2006

2006
II

III

May

June

July r

A u gust'

Sept. '

O c t.p

Materials and supplies
M anufacturing...............................................................................................................
Durable g oo ds..........................................................................................................
Wood products.......................................................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products................................................................................
Primary metals.......................................................................................................
Fabricated metal products.....................................................................................
Machinery..............................................................................................................
Computer and electronic products.......................................................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components............................................
Transportation equipment.....................................................................................
Furniture and related products..............................................................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing................................................................................

150.9
90.4
5.2
3.5
6.5
11.3
11.4
22.0
5.0
17.1
3.1
5.2

151.7
91.4
4.9
3.5
7.0
11.2
11.7
22.4
5.0
17.2
3.1
5.3

151.7
90.8
5.0
3.5
6.6
11.2
11.6
21.9
5.1
17.3
3.2
5.3

150.9
90.4
5.2
3.5
6.5
11.3
11.4
22.0
5.0
17.1
3.1
5.2

151.2
90.9
5.0
3.5
6.6
11.2
11.6
22.5
5.1
17.3
3.1
5.2

151.8
91.3
5.0
3.5
6.6
11.2
11.5
22.9
5.1
17.2
3.1
5.2

151.7
91.4
4.9
3.5
7.0
11.2
11.7
22.4
5.0
17.2
3.1
5.3

151.3
91.9
4.9
3.5
6.9
11.2
11.7
22.9
5.1
17.2
3.1
5.2

Nondurable g o o d s ...................................................................................................
Food products........................................................................................................
Beverage and tobacco products...........................................................................
Textile mills.............................................................................................................
Textile product mills................................................................................................
Apparel....................................................................................................................
Leather and allied products...................................................................................
Paper products.......................................................................................................
Printing and related support activities..................................................................
Petroleum and coal products...
Chemical products..................
Plastics and rubber products..

60.4
9.8
5.3
1.6
1.1
1.7
0.4
7.7
2.2
6.2
16.2
7.7

60.4
10.0
5.2
1.6
1.1
1.7
0.4
7.6
2.1
6.2
16.4
7.5

60.9
9.8
5.3
1.5
1.1
1.8
0.4
7.8
2.1
6.5
16.3
7.6

60.4
9.8
5.3
1.6
1.1
1.7
0.4
7.7
2.2
6.2
16.2
7.7

60.3
9.9
5.4
1.6
1.1
1.8
0.4
7.7
2.2
6.0
16.5
7.7

60.5
10.0
5.3
1.6
1.1
1.8
0.4
7.7
2.1
6.0
16.6
7.7

60.4
10.0
5.2
1.6
1.1
1.7
0.4
7.6
2.1
6.2
16.4
7.5

59.5
9.9
5.3
1.6
1.1
1.7
0.4
7.6
2.1
5.6
16.5
7.5

W ork-in-process
M anufacturing..............................................................................................................
Durable g oo ds..........................................................................................................
Wood products.......................................................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products................................................................................
Primary metals.......................................................................................................
Fabricated metal products.....................................................................................
Machinery..............................................................................................................
Computer and electronic products.......................................................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components............................................
Transportation equipment.....................................................................................
Furniture and related products..............................................................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing................................................................................

126.2
97.7
2.2
1.1
5.5
8.6
11.0
25.6
4.2
35.3
1.7
3.6

126.1
97.8
2.3
1.1
5.7
8.5
10.9
25.4
4.2
35.4
1.7
3.6

124.8
97.4
2.4
1.1
5.5
8.6
11.0
25.6
4.2
34.9
1.7
3.6

126.2
97.7
2.2
1.1
5.5
8.6
11.0
25.6
4.2
35.3
1.7
3.6

126.3
97.8
2.3
1.1
5.5
8.5
11.0
25.4
4.2
35.5
1.7
3.7

125.2
96.5
2.3
1.1
5.5
8.6
10.8
25.5
4.3
34.2
1.7
3.7

126.1
97.8
2.3
1.1
5.7
8.5
10.9
25.4
4.2
35.4
1.7
3.6

127.4
98.5
2.2
1.1
5.8
8.6
10.7
25.6
4.1
35.9
1.7
3.6

Nondurable g o o d s ...................................................................................................
Food products........................................................................................................
Beverage and tobacco products...........................................................................
Textile mills.............................................................................................................
Textile product mills................................................................................................
Apparel....................................................................................................................
Leather and allied products...................................................................................
Paper products.......................................................................................................
Printing and related support activities..................................................................
Petroleum and coal products.................................................................................
Chemical products.................................................................................................
Plastics and rubber products................................................................................

28.7
4.4
2.2
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.2
1.4
0.9
3.4
11.2
1.9

28.5
4.4
2.1
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.2
1.4
1.0
3.3
11.4
1.9

27.6
4.3
2.2
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.2
1.4
1.0
2.9
11.1
2.0

28.7
4.4
2.2
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.2
1.4
0.9
3.4
11.2
1.9

28.6
4.4
2.1
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.2
1.4
1.0
3.5
11.0
2.0

28.7
4.4
2.2
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.2
1.4
0.9
3.6
11.0
2.0

28.5
4.4
2.1
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.2
1.4
1.0
3.3
11.4
1.9

29.0
4.8
2.2
1.0
0.6
1.1
0.2
1.5
1.0
3.3
11.4
1.9

Finished goods
M anufacturing..............................................................................................................
Durable g oo ds..........................................................................................................
Wood products.......................................................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products................................................................................
Primary metals.......................................................................................................
Fabricated metal products.....................................................................................
Machinery...............................................................................................................
Computer and electronic products.......................................................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components............................................
Transportation equipment.....................................................................................
Furniture and related products..............................................................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing................................................................................

162.4
78.6
3.8
5.0
6.3
10.0
11.7
15.8
3.5
12.7
3.0
7.1

164.1
79.8
4.0
5.2
6.5
10.1
11.8
16.4
3.5
12.4
3.0
7.3

162.1
78.4
3.8
5.0
6.3
10.0
11.8
15.9
3.3
12.5
2.9
7.1

162.4
78.6
3.8
5.0
6.3
10.0
11.7
15.8
3.5
12.7
3.0
7.1

162.6
78.8
3.9
5.0
6.3
10.0
11.6
15.9
3.5
12.7
3.0
7.2

163.3
79.4
3.9
5.1
6.4
10.0
11.7
15.9
3.5
12.9
3.0
7.2

164.1
79.8
4.0
5.2
6.5
10.1
11.8
16.4
3.5
12.4
3.0
7.3

164.4
79.7
3.9
5.2
6.7
10.1
11.8
15.8
3.4
12.5
3.1
7.3

Nondurable g o o d s ...................................................................................................
Food products........................................................................................................
Beverage and tobacco products...........................................................................
Textile mills..............................................................................................................
Textile product mills................................................................................................
Apparel....................................................................................................................
Leather and allied products...................................................................................
Paper products.......................................................................................................
Printing and related support activities..................................................................
Petroleum and coal products.................................................................................
Chemical products.................................................................................................
Plastics and rubber products................................................................................

83.7
17.9
4.3
2.1
1.5
3.6
0.6
6.7
2.7
8.7
26.0
8.7

84.3
17.9
4.3
2.2
1.5
3.4
0.7
6.8
2.7
8.9
26.0
9.1

83.6
18.0
4.5
2.1
1.4
3.6
0.6
6.7
2.7
8.8
25.7
8.7

83.7
17.9
4.3
2.1
1.5
3.6
0.6
6.7
2.7
8.7
26.0
8.7

83.7
17.9
4.4
2.1
1.5
3.7
0.6
6.7
2.7
8.8
25.7
8.8

83.9
17.8
4.4
2.2
1.5
3.7
0.6
6.7
2.7
9.0
25.7
8.8

84.3
17.9
4.3
2.2
1.5
3.4
0.7
6.8
2.7
8.9
26.0
9.1

84.6
18.1
4.3
2.1
1.5
3.4
0.7
6.8
2.7
9.0
26.0
9.1

p Preliminary,
r Revised.
N ote. Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
Chained (2000) dollar inventory series are calculated to ensure that the chained (2000) dollar change in




inventories for 2000 equals the current-dollar change in inventories for 2000 and that the average of the 1999
and 2000 end-of-year chain-weighted and fixed-weighted inventories are equal. Because the formula for the
chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar
esmates are usually not additive.

10

January 2007

U.S. International Transactions
Third Q u arter o f 2006
By M atthew J. Argersinger an d Erin M. Whitaker

T

HE U.S. current-account deficit— the combined
balances on trade in goods and services, income,
and net unilateral current transfers— increased to
$225.6 billion (preliminary) in the third quarter o f
2006 from $217.1 billion (revised) in the second quar­
ter (table A, chart l ) . 1 The increase resulted from in­
creases in the deficits on goods and on income. These
increases were partly offset by an increase in the sur­
plus on services and a decrease in net unilateral current
transfers to foreigners.
In the financial account, net financial inflows— net
acquisitions by foreign residents o f assets in the United
States less net acquisitions by U.S. residents o f assets
abroad— increased to $176.4 billion in the third quar­
1. Quarterly estimates of U.S. current-account and fmancial-account
components are seasonally adjusted when series demonstrate statistically
significant seasonal patterns. The accompanying tables present both
adjusted and unadjusted estimates.

ter from $153.2 billion in the second quarter. Net ac­
quisitions by foreign residents strengthened more than
net acquisitions by U.S. residents.
The statistical discrepancy— errors and om issions in
recorded transactions— was a positive $49.7 billion in
the third quarter, com pared with a positive $64.9 bil­
lion in the second quarter.
The following are highlights for the third quarter:
• G oods exports increased at a substantial rate for the
fourth consecutive quarter. G oods im ports acceler­
ated as a result o f a sizable pickup in nonpetroleum
products.
• Both receipts and payments o f income on financial
assets other than direct investment increased much
less than in recent quarters.
• Net U.S. purchases o f foreign bonds increased to a
record level, and net U.S. purchases o f foreign
stocks slowed.

Table A. Summary of U.S. International Transactions
[Millions of dollars, quarters seasonally adjusted]
2006

2005
Line

Corresponding lines in tables 1 and 11 are indicated in ()
(Credits +; debits -)

January-September

2005
I

II

III

IV

I

IIr

III »

Change:
2006:ll—III

2005

2006

Change:
2005-2006

Current account
1 Exports of goods and services and income receipts (1)....................
2
Goods, balance-of-payments basis (3)................................................
3
Services (4).........................................................................................
4
Income receipts (12)............................................................................

1,749,892
894,631
380,614
474,647

415,277
214,189
92,391
108,697

429,326
222,591
94,054
112,681

442,935
224,947
95,906
122,081

462,357
232,904
98,261
131,192

484,396
244,512
99,918
139,966

511,983
252,843
103,102
156,038

526,874
262,069
104,014
160,791

5 Imports of goods and services and income payments (18)...............
6
Goods, balance-of-payments basis (20)..............................................
7
Services (21).......................................................................................
8
Income payments (29).........................................................................

-2,455,328
-1,677,371
-314,604
-463,353

-579,764
-397,457
-77,231
-105,076

-599,390
-410,811
-77,892
-110,687

-616,886
-423,693
-78,952
-114,240

-659,290
-445,410
-80,529
-133,351

-678,052
-452,481
-83,089
-142,482

-707,254
-463,441
-85,618
-158,195

-730,974
-480,681
-85,720
-164,573

9 Unilateral current transfers, net (35)....................................................

-86,072

-27,237

-23,194

-9,464

-26,176

-19,542

-21,856

-21,450

406

-59,895

-62,848

-2,953

-4,351

-2,691

-589

-557

-514

-1,756

-1,003

-551

452

-3,837

-3,310

527

11 U.S.-owned assets abroad, net (increase/financial outflow (-)) (40)
12
U.S. official reserve assets, net (41)....................................................
13
U.S. Government assets, other than official reserve assets, net (46)
14
U.S. private assets, net (50)................................................................

-426,801
14,096
5,539
-446,436

-87,391
5,331
2,591
-95,313

-196,376 -132,380
-797
4,766
989
1,501
-196,568 -138,647

-10,656
4,796
459
-15,911

-355,978
513
1,049
-357,540

-211,375
-560
1,765
-212,580

-223,769
1,006
287
-225,062

-12,394
1,566
-1,478
-12,482

-416,147
9,300
5,081
-430,528

-791,122
959
3,101
-795,182

-374,975
-8,341
-1,980
-364,654

15 Foreign-owned assets in the United States, net (increase/financial
inflow (+)) (55)....................................................................................
Foreign official assets in the United States, net (56)............................
Other foreign assets in the United States, net (63).............................

1,212,250
199,495
1,012,755

224,128
18,965
205,163

346,179
74,613
271,566

388,592
33,983
354,609

253,350
71,934
181,416

527,498
75,697
451,801

364,576
75,869
288,707

400,161
80,775
319,386

35,585
4,906
30,679

958,899
127,561
831,338

1,292,235
232,341
1,059,894

333,336
104,780
228,556

18 Statistical discrepancy (sum of above items with sign reversed) (70)

10,410

57,678

44,044

-72,240

-19,071

43,434

64,929

49,709

-15,220

29,482

158,072

128,590

-791,508
785,449

-191,724
136,737

-193,258
149,803

-183,415
256,212

-223,109
242,694

-213,198
171,520

-217,127
153,201

-225,550
176,392

-8,423
23,191

-568,397
542,752

-655,875
501,113

-87,478
-41,639

1,523,253
759,424
307,034
456,795

235,715
97,697
24,683
113,336

-23,720 -1,796,040 -2,116,280
-17,240 -1,231,961 -1,396,603
-102
-234,075
-254,427
-6,378
-330,003
-465,250

-320,240
-164,642
-20,352
-135,247

14,891
9,226
912
4,753

1,287,538
661,727
282,351
343,459

Capital account
10 Capital account transactions, net (39)................................................
Financial account

16
17

Memoranda:
19 Balance on current account (76).............................................................
20 Net financial flows (40 and 55)................................................................
r Revised
p Preliminary




January 2007

S urvey

of

C u r r e n t B u sin ess

• Net foreign purchases o f U.S. securities other than
U.S. Treasury securities picked up as a result o f a
shift to net foreign purchases o f U.S. stocks.

Chart 1. U.S. Current-Account Balance and
Its Components
Billion $
40
20
o

-2 0
-4 0
-6 0
^ B a la n c e on current account

\

-8 0

V

-1 0 0

/A

-1 2 0
-1 4 0
\

-1 6 0

s

-1 8 0

.........

- 2 0 0 .........................................................................................................M
-2 2 0
-2 4 0

; i ! : I M !! I ;

i

I I [ h i i ! : ! ! il i

i

.

40
^

20
o

-2 0

Balance on services

—^ __ Balance onjngpm e,*_________ n / \
------ ---- _ ---- ___________________ _ _ A

-4 0

_
_

A

Unilateral current transfers, net

-6 0

11

Selected econom ic and financial market
developments
In the third quarter, the U.S. dollar depreciated 1 per­
cent on a nominal, trade-weighted, quarterly average
basis against a group o f seven m ajor currencies that are
widely traded in international markets (table B, chart
2). The U.S. dollar depreciated 1 percent against the
euro; it changed little against the Canadian dollar; and
it appreciated 2 percent against the Japanese yen.
In the United States, data releases in the third quar­
ter indicated that U.S. economic growth in the second
quarter slowed substantially. Releases indicated that
the U.S. deficit on trade in goods and services on a
3-month moving-average basis was again increasing
after decreasing for a brief period. U.S. monetary au­
thorities left the target level for the Federal funds rate
at 5.25 percent after steadily raising it over the last 2
years; other U.S. short-term interest rates leveled off or
eased slightly (chart 3). U.S. long-term interest rates
decreased, and U.S. and foreign stock markets re­
bounded.
In Europe, data releases indicated that euro area
economic growth remained moderately strong in the
second quarter. Among countries with the largest
economies, economic activity in Germany and France
strengthened further, and activity in Spain remained

-8 0
-1 0 0

Balance on goods - ► V
V

-1 2 0

sy

—

\

Chart 2. Nominal Indexes of Foreign Currency Price

-1 4 0
-1 6 0
-1 8 0
-2 0 0
-2 2 0
-2 4 0

.......... i i

1995

96

; .............................. i .....................

97

98

9 9 2 0 0 0 01

02

03

04

05

06

S ea so n ally adjusted
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Revisions to the Estimates
The preliminary estimates of U.S. international trans­
actions for the second quarter that were published in
the October 2006 S urvey of C urrent B usiness have
been revised.
The current-account deficit was revised to $217.1
billion from $218.4 billion. The goods deficit was
unrevised at $210.6 billion; the services surplus was
revised to $17.5 billion from $16.8 billion; the deficit
on income was revised to $2.2 billion from $4.1 bil­
lion; and net unilateral current transfers to foreigners
were revised to $21.9 billion from $20.4 billion. Net
financial inflows were revised to $153.2 billion from
$154.1 billion.




12

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

a key policy-controlled interest rate, to 3 percent from
2.75 percent.
In Japan, reports showed that economic growth in
the second quarter slowed. Japanese monetary author­
ities increased their key overnight lending rate to 0.25
percent from zero, which it had been since early in

relatively strong. Euro area monetary authorities raised
the m inim um bid rate on main refinancing operations,

Chart 3. U.S. and Foreign Interest Rates
P ercent

2001 .
In Canada, reported second-quarter economic
growth slowed, and Canadian monetary authorities
left the target level for the overnight rate at 4.25 per­
cent.

C urrent A ccoun t
Goods and services
The deficit on goods and services increased $7.2 billion
to $200.3 billion in the third quarter from $193.1 bil­
lion in the second quarter. The deficit on goods in­
creased $8.0 billion, and the surplus on services
increased $0.8 billion.

Data Availability
The estimates that are presented in tables 1-11 of the
U.S. international transactions accounts are available
interactively on BEA’s Web site at < www.bea.gov>.
Users may view and download the most recent quar­
terly estimates for an entire table, or they may select
the period, frequency, and lines that they wish to view.
The estimates are available in an HTML table, in an
Excel file, or as comma-separated values.

1. Three-month interest rates.
2. Long-term government bonds, 10-year maturities.
Data: Federal Reserve Board, British Bankers' Association, and foreign monetary authorities.
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Table B. Indexes of Foreign Currency Price of the U.S. Dollar
[January 1999=100]
2006

2005
I

II

2005
III

Sept.

Oct.

2006

III

IV

Nominal:1
Broad2....................................................
Major currencies3...............................
Other important trading partners4.......

97.2
89.5
107.1

98.0
90.8
107.1

96.5
89.9
105.1

95.0
87.0
105.5

94.5
86.5
104.9

96.7
88.7
107.1

97.7
90.1
107.5

98.4
91.6
107.1

97.8
90.8
106.6

96.3
89.4
105.3

96.6
90.2
104.8

96.7
90.2
105.2

96.0
89.0
105.2

94.0
85.5
105.0

95.1
86.4
106.4

94.9
86.9
105.2

94.2
86.1
104.8

94.5
86.5
104.8

Real:1
Broad2....................................................
Major currencies3................................
Other important trading partners4.......

99.9
96.6
103.4

100.4
98.2
102.7

98.9
97.5
100.3

98.4
94.9
102.2

98.1
94.8
101.8

100.0
96.2
104.1

100.8
97.9
104.0

100.7
99.0
102.4

99.6
97.7
101.6

98.7
96.8
100.6

98.8
97.9
99.6

99.3
97.9
100.7

99.1
96.9
101.4

97.3
93.3
101.8

98.7
94.6
103.4

98.7
95.4
102.4

98.0
94.5
102.0

97.7
94.6
101.0

Selected currencies: (nominal)5
Canada...................................................
European currencies:
Euro area6.........................................
United Kingdom...................................
Switzerland.........................................
Japan......................................................
Mexico....................................................
Brazil.......................................................

79.1

77.2

76.0

73.9

73.8

77.5

77.5

77.8

76.4

76.2

75.6

76.2

75.3

73.1

73.3

74.3

73.6

73.5

95.1
92.5
92.0
98.2
105.8
154.9

97.5
94.4
93.9
103.5
105.8
148.7

96.4
94.1
93.5
103.1
104.6
145.0

92.2
90.4
89.8
101.0
110.4
144.3

91.0
88.0
89.4
102.7
108.1
143.5

94.7
91.3
91.4
98.2
106.5
151.8

96.4
93.5
93.0
101.4
107.0
149.0

98.3
95.1
94.6
104.6
105.4
146.2

97.7
94.5
94.2
104.6
104.9
150.9

95.6
93.3
92.2
101.9
104.1
149.9

97.1
94.4
94.2
104.0
103.5
142.8

96.4
94.6
94.2
103.5
106.1
142.4

94.4
93.3
92.6
103.3
109.1
140.7

90.8
88.3
88.0
98.6
109.5
143.5

91.5
89.5
88.9
101.2
112.5
148.8

91.4
89.5
89.3
102.2
108.4
144.7

90.5
87.1
88.9
102.3
107.4
142.5

91.1
87.6
89.9
103.5
108.5
143.4

1. For more information on the nominal and real indexes of the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar, see Federal
Reserve Bulletin, vol. 84 (October 1998): 811-18.
2. Weighted average of the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar against the currencies of a broad group of U.S.
trading partners, including the currencies of the euro area countries, Australia, Canada, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland,
United Kingdom, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea,
Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Russia. Data: Federal Reserve Board.
Monthly and quarterly average rates. Index rebased by BEA.
3. Weighted average of the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar against broad-index currencies that circulate
widely outside the country of issue, including the currencies of the euro area countries, Australia, Canada, Japan, Sweden,
Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. The weight for each currency is its broad-index weight divided by the sum of the
broad-index weights for all of the currencies included in the major currency index. Data: Federal Reserve Board. Monthly




Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

and quarterly average rates. Index rebased by BEA.
4. Weighted average of the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar against broad-index currencies that do not circu­
late widely outside the country of issue, including the currencies of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela,
China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Israel, Saudi Arabia,
and Russia. The weight for each currency is its broad-index weight divided by the sum of the broad-index weights for all of
the currencies included in the other important trading partners index. Data: Federal Reserve Board. Monthly and quarterly
average rates. Index rebased by BEA.
5. Data: Federal Reserve Board. Monthly and quarterly average rates. Indexes prepared by BEA.
6. The euro area includes Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Nether­
lands, Portugal, and Spain.

January 2007

S u rvey

of

13

C u rr e n t B u sin ess

Goods

from increases in all the m ajor com m odity categories
(chart 5). Real exports increased 2.3 percent, and

The deficit on goods increased to $218.6 billion in the
third quarter from $210.6 billion in the second quarter.
Exports continued to increase substantially, but im ­
ports increased more than exports as a result o f a siz­
able pickup in im ports o f nonpetroleum products
(chart 4).
Exports. Exports increased $9.2 billion, or 3.6 per­
cent, to $262.1 billion (table C). The increase resulted

Chart 5. U.S.Trade in Goods by Selected End-Use
Categories: Change From Preceding Quarter
Billion $

12
EXPORTS

■ ■ Agricultural products
Nonagricultural industrial supplies and materials
■ ■ Capital go o d s..................................................
W B Automotive vehicles, engines, and parts
M M Consumer goods

IMPORTS

Petroleum products
Nonpetroleum industrial supplies and materials

10

Chart 4. U.S.Trade in Goods: Change in Value From
Preceding Quarter
Billion $
25

20

Automotive vehicles, engines, and parts
Consumer goods

15

10

5

0
2004

2005

2005:ll

2006

2005:lll

2005:IV

2006:1

2006:11

2006:111

Based on seasonally adjusted estimates

B ased on seasonally adjusted estim ates

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Table C. U.S. Trade in Goods in Current and Chained (2000) Dollars and Percent Changes From Previous Period
[Balance-of-payments basis, millions of dollars, quarters seasonally adjusted]
Current dollars

Chained (2000) dollars 1

2005
2004

Agricultural products.................................
Nonagricultural products..........................

807,516
62,939
744,577

2005

2005

2004
I

Exports.........................................................

2006

II

III

IV

I

II

894,631 214,189 222,591 224,947 232,904 244,512 252,843 262,069
64,883 15,610 16,511 16,291 16,471 17,385 18,275 18,947
829,748 198,579 206,080 208,656 216,433 227,127 234,568 243,122

I
773,542
50,891
723,776

2006

2005

III p

II

III

IV

I

II

II| p

831,225 200,713 207,059 208,582 214,757 223,928 228,091 233,394
53,533 13,196 13,495 13,315 13,521 14,261 14,899 14,976
779,150 187,826 193,899 195,651 201,665 210,095 213,583 218,849

Imports......................................................... 1,472,926 1,677,371 397,457 410,811 423,693 445,410 452,481 463,441 480,681 1,430,553 1,530,141 375,402 378,834 380,393 394,902 402,810 402,303 411,457
Petroleum and products...........................
180,459 251,856 53,157 58,261 67,284 73,154 72,129 79,292 84,177
137,841
140,986 36,658 34,543 33,409 36,377 35,931 34,163 34,758
Nonpetroleum products........................... 1,292,467 1,425,515 344,300 352,550 356,409 372,256 380,352 384,149 396,504 1,292,713 1,391,615 338,458 345,238 348,849 358,867 368,330 371,331 380,168
Percent change from previous period (current dollars)
2005
2004

Agricultural products.................................
Nonagricultural products..........................

Imports.........................................................
Petroleum and products...........................
Nonpetroleum products............................

2004
II

III

IV

1

II

2006

2005

III p

I

II

III

IV

1

II

III f

13.2
3.4
14.1

10.8
3.1
11.4

2.2
-1.9
2.6

3.9
5.8
3.8

1.1
-1.3
1.3

3.5
1.1
3.7

5.0
5.4
4.9

3.4
5.1
3.3

3.6
3.7
3.6

9.1
-5.5
10.5

7.5
5.2
7.7

1.1
-3.7
1.5

3.2
2.3
3.2

0.7
-1.3
0.9

3.0
1.5
3.1

4.3
5.5
4.2

1.9
4.5
1.7

2.3
0.5
2.5

16.8
35.6
14.6

13.9
39.6
10.3

1.6
-0.7
2.0

3.4
9.6
2.4

3.1
15.5
1.1

5.1
8.7
4.4

1.6
-1.4
2.2

2.4
9.9
1.0

3.7
6.2
3.2

11.3
6.6
11.8

7.0
2.3
7.7

1.2
1.7
1.1

0.9
-5.8
2.0

0.4
-3.3
1.0

3.8
8.9
2.9

2.0
-1.2
2.6

-0.1
-4.9
0.8

2.3
1.7
2.4

p Preliminary
1. Because chain indexes use weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained dollar estimates are usually not additive.
N ote . Percent changes in quarterly estimates are not annualized and are expressed at quarterly rates.




2005

2005
I

Exports.........................................................

Percent change from previous period (chained (2000) dollars)
2006

14

U.S. International Transactions

export prices increased 1.3 percent.2
Exports increased substantially for the fourth con­
secutive quarter, partly as a result o f strengthened eco­
nomic growth in many foreign countries and the
lagged effect o f the substantial depreciation o f the U.S.
dollar against many foreign currencies since early
2002.
In the third quarter, nonagricultural industrial sup­
plies and materials increased $3.0 billion, considerably
less than in the previous two quarters. The slowdown
largely resulted from slowdowns in nonferrous metals
and in energy products. Prices o f nonferrous metals
increased much less than in the previous two quarters,
and prices o f energy products also moderated (chart
6). Exports o f chemicals increased considerably for the
third consecutive quarter; the third-quarter rise was
mostly in plastic and organic chemicals.
Capital goods increased $1.9 billion. Among high2. Quantity (real) estimates are calculated using a chain-type Fisher for­
mula with annual weights for all years and quarterly weights for all quar­
ters. Real estimates are expressed as chained (2000) dollars. Price indexes
(2000 = 100) are also calculated using a chain-type Fisher formula.

Chart 6. Export and Import Prices of Selected
Industrial Supplies and Materials
2003:1=100

January 2007

technology products, telecommunications equipment
increased strongly for the second consecutive quarter;
in contrast, semiconductors and computers, peripher­
als, and parts decreased. Oil drilling, mining, and con­
struction machinery increased substantially for the
second consecutive quarter; most other types o f m a­
chinery also increased.
Automotive vehicles, parts, and engines jum ped
$1.7 billion after a second-quarter decrease. The re­
bound resulted largely from a strong increase in
passenger cars, mostly to Canada and Germany.
Consum er goods increased $1.4 billion. The rise
was attributable to increases in durable goods— mainly
artwork, antiques, stamps, and collectibles— and in
nondurable goods— mainly medical, dental, and phar­
maceutical preparations.
Agricultural products increased $0.7 billion. A
record increase in soybeans and smaller increases in
several other agricultural com m odities were partly off­
set by a substantial decrease in raw cotton, which may
have partly reflected the termination o f certain U.S. ag­
ricultural trade subsidies on August 1.
Im ports. Imports increased $17.2 billion, or 3.7
percent, to $480.7 billion in the third quarter (table C).
The increase largely resulted from a substantial pickup
in nonpetroleum products, which had slowed in the
previous two quarters. Petroleum and products also
increased. Real im ports increased 2.3 percent, and im ­
port prices increased 1.4 percent.
Petroleum and products increased $4.9 billion,
continuing their strong growth in recent years
(charts 5 and 7). In the last 3 years, these products

Chart 7. Imports of Petroleum and Products:
Indexes of Value, Price per Barrel, and Barrels

Note: Quarterly average indexes prepared by BEA from monthly average indexes
from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




2002

2003

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

2004

2005

2006

January 2007

S urv ey

of

C u r r e n t B u sin ess

have increased 157 percent, mostly as a result o f rising
prices; quantity increased only 8 percent. In the third
quarter, the average price per barrel increased 4 per­
cent, to $66.54, and the average number o f barrels im ­
ported daily increased 2 percent, to 13.86 million. The
largest increases in petroleum im ports were from
m embers o f OPEC, particularly Algeria and Venezuela,
from Angola, and from Canada. U.S. domestic petro­
leum production increased for the third consecutive
quarter, but it remained below the level attained before
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
Consum er goods increased $4.6 billion, consider­
ably more than in recent quarters. The pickup was at­
tributable to a strong upturn in durable goods, largely
resulting from increases in household and kitchen ap­
pliances from China and in television and video receiv­
ers from Mexico. Nondurable goods also increased,
mostly because o f increases in medical, dental, and
pharmaceutical products from Ireland and the United
Kingdom and in textile apparel from China.
Nonpetroleum industrial supplies and materials
also picked up, increasing $3.8 billion. The rise was
mostly attributable to strong rebounds in iron and
steel products and in chemicals and to continued sub­
stantial growth in nonferrous metals.
Capital goods increased $3.6 billion. About half of
the increase was accounted for by increases in com put­
ers, peripherals, and parts, in telecommunications
equipment, and in semiconductors. A sharp rise in
electric generating machinery, apparatus, and parts,
mainly from China, also contributed to the gain in
capital goods.
Foods, feeds, and beverages increased $0.8 billion.
The largest increases were in vegetables, fruits, nuts,
and preparations and in coffee, cocoa, and sugar prod­
ucts.
In contrast, automotive vehicles, parts, and engines
decreased $1.1 billion, the largest decline in 3 years.
The decrease resulted from a downturn in im ports
from Canada, particularly o f passenger cars.
Balances by area. The goods deficit with Asia and
Pacific increased strongly, and the goods deficit with
Africa also increased; the goods deficits with most
other m ajor areas decreased.3 The deficit with Asia and
Pacific increased $11.7 billion, mostly as a result o f a
3. Seasonally adjusted estimates of exports for areas and countries are
derived by applying seasonal factors for total U.S. agricultural and nonagricultural exports to the unadjusted agricultural and nonagricultural exports
for areas and countries and then summing the seasonally adjusted esti­
mates. Seasonally adjusted estimates of imports for areas and countries are
derived by applying seasonal factors for total petroleum and nonpetroleum
imports to the unadjusted petroleum and nonpetroleum imports for areas
and countries and then summing the seasonally adjusted estimates. (The
seasonal factors are derived from the seasonal adjustment of U.S. exports
and U.S. imports by five-digit end-use commodity categories.)




15

surge in im ports from China, which was the top quar­
terly provider o f foreign goods to the United States for
the first time, surpassing Canada. The deficit with Af­
rica increased $1.3 billion, mostly as a result o f higher
im ports o f petroleum products from Algeria.

Services
The surplus on services increased to $18.3 billion in
the third quarter from $17.5 billion in the second
quarter, as services receipts increased more than ser­
vices payments. The services surplus has increased
considerably since falling to a 13-year low in the third
quarter o f 2004.
In the third quarter, travel receipts were virtually
unchanged at $21.5 billion. An increase in receipts
from overseas travelers to the United States was almost
completely offset by a decrease in receipts from travel­
ers from Mexico. Travel payments decreased $0.5 bil­
lion to $18.1 billion. The decline mostly resulted from
decreases in payments to countries overseas and to
Canada as result o f a drop in the number o f U.S. travel­
ers. Passenger fare receipts increased $0.1 billion to
$5.3 billion, and passenger fare payments decreased
$0.4 billion to $6.6 billion.
“Other” transportation receipts were virtually un­
changed at $12.2 billion. Increases in receipts for air
and ocean freight services were mostly offset by a de­
crease in receipts for air port services. “Other” trans­
portation payments increased $0.2 billion to $16.6
billion. The increase resulted from a rise in payments
for ocean freight services, partly reflecting an increase
in the volume o f U.S. goods imports.
“Other” private services receipts increased $1.0 bil­
lion to $45.1 billion. The rise was attributable to in­
creases in receipts for unaffiliated services— m ostly for
financial services and business, professional, and tech­
nical services— and for affiliated services. “Other” pri­
vate services payments increased $0.7 billion to $29.1
b illion. The rise mostly resulted from an increase in
payments for unaffiliated services— mainly for insur­
ance services and business, professional, and technical
services.

Income
The deficit on income increased to $3.8 billion in the
third quarter from $2.2 billion in the second quarter.
In the last 3 years, the balance on income has declined
and has been negative in recent quarters because o f a
strong increase in the deficit on income on financial
assets other than direct investment. In contrast, the
surplus on direct investment income has increased
moderately.
In the third quarter, receipts o f income on U.S. di­
rect investment abroad increased $1.0 billion to $75.9

16

U.S. International Transactions

billion. An increase in the earnings o f manufacturing
affiliates was partly offset by a decrease in the earnings
o f holding company affiliates. M anufacturing com pa­
nies’ earnings were boosted by higher earnings o f affil­
iates in computers and electronic products and in
chemicals.
Payments o f income on foreign direct investment in
the United States increased $3.2 billion to $40.1 billion.
The increase was mostly attributable to increases in
U.S. affiliates’ earnings in finance and insurance,
mostly depository institutions, and in “other” indus­
tries. Finance and insurance earnings have increased
strongly for several quarters, but no single subindustry
has been responsible for m ost o f the growth.
Both receipts and payments o f income on financial
assets other than direct investment increased much less
than in recent quarters. Receipts o f “other” private in­
come increased $3.8 billion to $83.5 billion. The in­
crease reflected increases in interest receipts on bank
and nonbank claims, mostly due to higher average
yields. U.S. Government income receipts were virtually
unchanged.
Payments o f “other” private income increased $2.3
billion to $84.8 billion. Increases in interest payments
on bank and nonbank liabilities were partly offset by a
decrease in interest and dividends paid on foreign
holdings o f U.S. bonds and stocks. Payments o f income
on U.S. Government liabilities increased $0.9 billion to
$37.3 billion as a result o f an increase in average for­
eign holdings o f U.S. Treasury and agency securities.

Unilateral current transfers
Net unilateral current transfers to foreigners were
$21.5 billion in the third quarter, down from $21.9 bil­
lion in the second quarter. The decrease was mostly at­
tributable to a decrease in private remittances and
other transfers.

Capital Account
Net capital account payments (outflows) were $0.6 bil­
lion in the third quarter, down from $1.0 billion in the
second quarter.

Financial Account
Net financial inflows— net acquisitions by foreign resi­
dents o f assets in the United States less net acquisitions
by U.S. residents o f assets abroad— were $176.4 billion
in the third quarter, up from $153.2 billion in the sec­
ond quarter. Net acquisitions by foreign residents
strengthened m ore than net acquisitions by U.S. resi­
dents.

U.S.-owned assets abroad
Net U.S.-owned assets abroad increased $223.8 billion



January 2007

in the third quarter after increasing $211.4 billion in
the second quarter. The pickup was attributable to a
step-up in U.S. direct investment abroad and to a
larger increase in U.S. claims reported by U.S. banks in
the third quarter than in the second quarter.
U.S. official reserve assets. U.S. official reserve as­
sets decreased $1.0 billion in the third quarter after an
increase o f $0.6 billion in the second quarter. The de­
crease resulted from a decrease in the U.S. reserve posi­
tion in the International M onetary Fund (IM F),
reflecting the net repayment o f U.S. dollars to the IMF
by several countries.
Claims reported by banks and by nonbanks. U.S.
claims on foreigners reported by U.S. banks and secu­
rities brokers increased $85.7 billion in the third quar­
ter after an increase o f $80.7 billion in the second
quarter.
Banks’ own claims denominated in dollars in­
creased $46.2 billion after an increase o f $28.0 billion.
In recent quarters, interbank lending has been boosted
by heightened global merger and acquisition activity.
In the third quarter, interbank lending to Asia, mostly
by foreign-owned banks in the United States to their
parent offices in Japan, was substantial. In contrast,
U.S.-owned banks cut back their lending abroad,
partly as a result o f a drop in the funds available from
U.S. domestic deposits. U.S. brokers and dealers lent
funds abroad, mainly in the form o f resale agreements.
Banks’ domestic custom ers’ claims denominated in
dollars increased $49.3 billion after an increase of
$36.7 billion. Negotiable certificates o f deposit, com ­
mercial paper, and “other” short-term instruments all
increased substantially. In contrast, deposits decreased
substantially.
Claims reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns in­
creased $23.3 billion after an increase o f $31.2 billion.
The third-quarter increase was largely accounted for
by increases in resale agreements and in “other” short­
term instruments.
Foreign securities. Net U.S. purchases o f foreign se­
curities were $53.0 billion in the third quarter, down
slightly from $53.9 billion in the second quarter. A de­
crease in net U.S. purchases o f foreign stocks was
mostly offset by an increase in net U.S. purchases of
foreign bonds.
Net U.S. purchases o f foreign stocks were $8.0 bil­
lion, down from $17.0 billion. Net U.S. purchases have
slowed considerably in the last two quarters after
strong net purchases throughout 2005 and in the first
quarter o f 2006. Foreign stock markets underper­
form ed the U.S. stock market in the last two quarters
after outperform ing the U.S. market in earlier quar­
ters. In the third quarter, net U.S. purchases o f stocks
from Europe decreased as a result o f shifts to net U.S.

January 2007

S urvey

of

sales to the Netherlands, Switzerland, and France, and
transactions with Latin America shifted to net U.S.
sales from net U.S. purchases.
Net U.S. purchases o f foreign bonds were a record
$45.1 billion, up from the previous record o f $36.9 bil­
lion in the second quarter. Global bond markets rallied
in the third quarter after falling in the second quarter.
Net U.S. purchases o f bonds from Europe, mostly from
the United Kingdom where the bonds o f many foreign
countries are traded, were very strong for the second
consecutive quarter. In addition, net U.S. purchases
from Canada increased, and transactions with Latin
America shifted to net U.S. purchases from net U.S.
sales.
D irect investment. U.S. direct investment abroad
increased $63.1 billion in the third quarter after an in­
crease o f $46.8 billion in the second quarter. The
pickup was mostly attributable to a shift from a de­
crease to an increase in net intercompany debt invest­
ment abroad. In addition, net equity capital
investment abroad picked up. In contrast, reinvested
earnings decreased.

Foreign-owned assets in the United States
Net foreign-owned assets in the United States in­
creased $400.2 billion in the third quarter after an in­
crease o f $364.6 billion in the second quarter. The
pickup was mostly attributable to larger increases in
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns
and U.S. banks in the third quarter than in the second
quarter and to an increase in net foreign purchases of
U.S. securities other than U.S. Treasury securities.
Foreign official assets. Foreign official assets in the
United States increased $80.8 billion in the third quar­
ter after increasing $75.9 billion in the second quarter.
Assets o f Asian countries increased much more
strongly in the third quarter than in the second quar­
ter. In contrast, assets o f European countries decreased
in the third quarter after an increase in the second
quarter.
Liabilities reported by banks and by nonbanks.
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks and securities
brokers, excluding U.S. Treasury securities, increased
$89.1 billion in the third quarter after an increase of
$79.6 billion in the second quarter.
Banks’ own liabilities denominated in dollars in­
creased $43.9 billion after a decrease o f $3.4 billion.
The increase mainly resulted from substantial borrow­
ing by U.S. brokers and dealers in the form o f repur­
chase agreements, mostly with foreign banks in the
United Kingdom. In contrast, U.S.-owned banks’ bor­
rowing decreased after increasing for several quarters.
The decrease may have been partly related to a cutback
in lending to foreigners by these banks.



17

C u r r e n t B u sin ess

Banks’ customers’ liabilities denominated in dollars
increased $41.4 billion after a particularly large in­
crease o f $84.9 billion. The sizable increases in both
quarters were mostly in the form o f “other” liabilities.
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. nonbanking con­
cerns increased $53.5 billion after an increase o f $25.1
billion. The third-quarter increase was largely ac­
counted for by an increase in financial liabilities to the
United Kingdom.
U.S. T reasury securities. Transactions in U.S. Trea­
sury securities shifted to net sales by foreigners o f $7.2
billion in the third quarter from net purchases by for­
eigners o f $9.8 billion in the second quarter (chart 8).
Prices o f U.S. Treasury securities increased in the third
quarter after decreasing in the previous two quarters.
In the third quarter, net sales o f U.S. Treasury securi­
ties by the United Kingdom and Caribbean financial
centers, where many international investment funds
are located, increased and net purchases by Asia
slowed.

Chart 8.Transactions in U.S. Securities,
2004:1V—2006:IH
B illion $
120

100

80
60
40
20

i Stocks
Corporate bonds
1Federally sponsored agency bonds
i U.S.Treasury securities...............

l

III

ill
-2 0

I I I

Net purchases by foreign
residents (+)

Net sales by foreign residents (-)

1

|

i i I I i i I i i i 1 I i i I 1 ' i

2004:IV—
2006:111

2004:IV-2006:III

2004:IV-2006:III

2004:IV-2006:III

Excludes transactions in foreign official assets.
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
N ote.

O ther U.S. securities. Net foreign purchases o f U.S.
securities other than U.S. Treasury securities were
$138.8 billion in the third quarter, up from $127.3 bil­
lion in the second quarter. The increase resulted from a
shift to net purchases o f U.S. stocks by foreigners from
net sales. In contrast, net purchases o f U.S. corporate
bonds and o f federally sponsored agency bonds by for­
eigners decreased.
Transactions in U.S. stocks by foreigners shifted to
net purchases o f $22.4 billion from net sales o f $1.4 bil­
lion. The U.S. stock market strengthened in the third
quarter as concerns about inflation may have eased
and as U.S. m onetary authorities left monetary policy
unchanged after a period o f tightening. The shift to net

18

U.S. International Transactions

purchases by foreigners was more than accounted for
by a step-up in net purchases from Europe and a shift
to net purchases from net sales from Caribbean finan­
cial centers.
Net purchases by foreigners o f U.S. corporate bonds
remained strong at $90.7 billion, but they were down
from a record $100.6 billion. Conditions that have en­
couraged foreigners to invest heavily in U.S. corporate
bonds in recent quarters remained in place. These con­
ditions include the higher yields available on U.S. cor­
porate bonds than on foreign bonds, healthy U.S.
corporate balance sheets, and low U.S. bond default
rates. In addition, U.S. corporate bond prices increased
in the third quarter. The decrease in net purchases by
foreigners o f U.S. corporate bonds was mostly attribut­




January 2007

able to a decrease in net purchases from Europe.
Net purchases by foreigners o f U.S. federally spon ­
sored agency bonds were $25.7 billion, down from
$28.0 billion. Decreases in net purchases from Asia and
from Europe were largely offset by a shift to net pur­
chases from net sales from Caribbean financial cen­
ters.
Direct investment. Foreign direct investment in the
United States increased $44.1 billion in the third quar­
ter after increasing $45.8 billion in the second quarter.
The small slowdown was mainly attributable to a slow­
down in net intercompany debt investment in the
United States. Net equity capital investment in the
United States and reinvested earnings both changed lit­
tle.

Tables 1 through 11 follow.

January 2007

S u rv ey

of

19

C u r r e n t B u sin e ss

Table 1. U.S. International Transactions
[Millions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted

Not seasonally adjusted
Line

(Credits +; debits - ) 1

2005

2005
I

II

III

IV

1

II r

2006

2005

2006
I II”

I

II

III

IV

I

II'

III p

Current account
1 Exports of goods and services and income receipts........................
2
Exports of goods and services............................................................
Goods, balance-of-payments basis 2..............................................
3
4
Services 3........................................................................................
Transfers under U.S. military agency sales contracts 4................
5
Travel...........................................................................................
7
Passenger fares.........
Other transportation....
8
Royalties and license fees 5........................................................
9
10
Other private services 5..............................................................
U.S. Government miscellaneous services...................................
11
1?
Income receipts...................................................................................
13
Income receipts on U.S.-owned assets abroad...............................
Direct investment receipts.................
14
Other private receipts........................
15
16
U.S. Government receipts.................
Compensation of employees.................
17

fi

18 Imports of goods and services and income payments......................
Imports of goods and services............................................................
19
20
Goods, balance-of-payments basis 2..............................................
Services 3.......................................................................................
21
Direct defense expenditures........................................................
22
?3
Travel..........................................................................................
24
Passenger fares........
Other transportation...
25
Royalties and license fees 5........................................................
26
?7
Other private services 5..............................................................
U.S. Government miscellaneous services...................................
28
29
Income payments................................................................................
30
Income payments on foreign-owned assets in the United States.....
Direct investment payments........................................................
31
32
Other private payments...............................................................
33
U.S. Government payments........................................................
34
Compensation of employees

517,097 521,195 415,277 429,326 442,935 462,357 484,396 511,983 526,874
361,093 306,580 316,645 320,853 331,165 344,430 355,945 366,083
254,332 214,189 222,591 224,947 232,904 244,512 252,843 262,069
106,761 92,391 94,054 95,906 98,261 99,918 103,102 104,014
4,446
4,453
4,226
4,067
4,067
4,679
4,675
5,239
24,219 19,983 20,934 20,389 20,374 20,742 21,443 21,464
5,275
5,326
5,371
5,545
5,664
4,890
5,161
5,508
12,445 10,103 10,353 10,545 11,244 11,588 12,202 12,216
14,993 14,146 13,943 14,397 14,923 15,040 15,567 15,509
45,078 38,316 38,726 39,538 41,643 42,273 44,103 45,137
277
295
291
286
274
262
260
295
160,102 108,697 112,681 122,081 131,192 139,966 156,038 160,791
159,364 107,988 111,952 121,350 130,437 139,238 155,312 160,053
75,182 58,846 60,572 64,476 67,481 68,738 74,923 75,912
83,515 48,437 50,674 56,247 62,279 69,923 79,759 83,515
677
577
630
626
667
627
705
706
726
738
728
738
709
729
731
755
-2,455,328 -559,425 -606,110 -627,388 -662,406 -657,039 -715,048 -739,633 -579,764 -599,390 -616,886 -659,290 -678,052 -707,254 -730,974
-1,991,975 -454,406 -494,629 -512,645 -530,295 -514,631 -556,066 -574,566 -474,688 -488,703 -502,645 -525,939 -535,570 -549,059 -566,401
-1,677,371 -381,441 -414,071 -430,168 -451,691 -436,132 -467,446 -484,922 -397,457 -410,811 -423,693 -445,410 -452,481 -463,441 -480,681
-314,604 -72,965 -80,558 -82,477 -78,604 -78,499 -88,620 -89,644 -77,231 -77,892 -78,952 -80,529 -83,089 -85,618 -85,720
-30,062 -7,542 -7,478 -7,539 -7,503 -7,692 -7,740 -7,865 -7,542 -7,478 -7,539 -7,503 -7,692 -7,740 -7,865
-69,175 -14,860 -19,904 -19,657 -14,754 -15,071 -21,253 -20,834 -17,270 -17,589 -17,181 -17,135 -17,634 -18,639 -18,136
-26,066 -5,771 -7,007 -7,089 -6,199 -6,159 -7,453 -7,130 -6,213 -6,555 -6,654 -6,644 -6,749 -6,948 -6,595
-62,107 -14,959 -15,352 -15,622 -16,174 -15,553 -16,592 -17,056 -15,617 -15,135 -15,205 -16,150 -16,232 -16,377 -16,603

35 Unilateral current transfers, net
U.S. Government grants 4..
36
37
U.S. Government pensions and other transfers..................................
Private remittances and other transfers 6............................................
38
Capital and financial account

1,749,892 411,141 433,516
1,275,245 302,781 319,639
894,631 212,256 227,524
380,614 90,525 92,115
19,038
4,679
4,675
81,680 17,786 21,425
4,664
5,104
20,931
42,245
9,682 10,358
57,410 13,618 13,742
158,223 39,822 36,549
1,087
274
262
474,647 108,360 113,877
471,722 107,650 113,147
251,370 58,427 61,906
217,637 48,437 50,674
567
2,715
786
2,925
709
729

440,364 464,872
318,819 334,007
219,568 235,283
99,251 98,724
5,239
4,446
23,545 18,924
5,933
5,229
10,754 11,451
13,958 16,092
39,531 42,321
291
260
121,545 130,865
120,814 130,110
63,889 67,148
56,247 62,279
678
683
731
755

480,005
340,515
242,020
98,495
4,453
18,781
5,257
11,394
14,632
43,701
277
139,490
138,762
68,195
69,923
644
728

359,681
258,642
101,039
4,226
22,050
5,209
12,091
15,302
41,874
286
157,416
156,690
76,429
79,759
502
726

-24,501 -5,635 -5,737 -6,340 -6,789 -6,552 -6,237 -6,374 -5,880 -6,004 -6,356 -6,261 -6,741 -6,513 -6,383
-98,714 -23,188 -24,118 -25,214 -26,194 -26,476 -28,329 -29,366 -23,699 -24,169 -25,001 -25,845 -27,045 -28,385 -29,119
-996 -1,016 -1,019
-962 -1,016
-991
-962 -1,016
-991
-996 -1,016 -1,019 -1,010
-3,979 -1,010
-463,353 -105,019 -111,481 -114,742 -132,111 -142,408 -158,982 -165,067 -105,076 -110,687 -114,240 -133,351 -142,482 -158,195 -164,573
-454,124 -102,817 -109,299 -112,397 -129,611 -140,126 -156,736 -162,720 -102,817 -108,403 -111,887 -131,018 -140,132 -155,846 -162,217
-116,953 -28,490 -30,416 -24,615 -33,432 -34,437 -37,756 -40,609 -28,490 -29,520 -24,105 -34,839 -34,443 -36,866 -40,106
-223,612 -48,786 -51,490 -58,479 -64,857 -72,813 -82,539 -84,801 -48,786 -51,490 -58,479 -64,857 -72,813 -82,539 -84,801
-113,559 -25,541 -27,393 -29,303 -31,322 -32,876 -36,441 -37,310 -25,541 -27,393 -29,303 -31,322 -32,876 -36,441 -37,310
-9,229 -2,202 -2,182 -2,345 -2,500 -2,282 -2,246 -2,347 -2,259 -2,284 -2,353 -2,333 -2,350 -2,349 -2,356
-86,072 -27,496 -22,509 -10,140 -25,927 -20,323 -20,805 -21,524 -27,237 -23,194
-5,341 -5,529 -9,221 -5,780
-31,362 -9,221 -5,780 -7,270 -9,091 -4,631
-6,303 -1,071 -1,451 -1,909 -1,872 -1,740 -1,277 -1,426 -1,558 -1,569
-48,407 -17,204 -15,278
-961 -14,964 -13,952 -14,187 -14,569 -16,458 -15,845

-9,464 -26,176 -19,542 -21,856 -21,450
-7,270 -9,091 -4,631 -5,341 -5,529
-1,584 -1,592 -1,742 -1,755 -1,710
-610 -15,493 -13,169 -14,760 -14,211

Capital account
39 Capital account transactions, net........................................................

-4,351

-2,691

-589

-557

-514

-1,756

-1,003

-551

-2,691

-589

-557

-514

-1,756

-1,003

-551

Financial account
40 U.S.-owned assets abroad, net (increase/financial outflow (-)).........
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69

U.S. official reserve assets, net...........................................................
G old7 ..
....
........................................................
Special drawing rights.....................................................................
Reserve position in the International Monetary Fund......................
Foreign currencies...........................................................................
U.S. Government assets, other than official reserve assets, net..........
U.S. credits and other long-term assets..........................................
Repayments on U.S. credits and other long-term assets 8..............
U.S. foreign currency holdings and U.S. short-term assets, net.......
U.S. private assets, net.......................................................................
Direct investment
Foreign securities
U.S. claims on unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking
concerns ....................................................................................
U.S. claims reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........
Foreign-owned assets in the United States, net (increase/financial
inflow (+))...........................................................................................
Foreign official assets in the United States, net..................................
U.S. Government securities............................................................
U.S. Treasury securities 9............................................................
Other10.......................................................................................
Other U.S. Government liabilities 11................................................
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere........
Other foreign official assets 12.........................................................
Other foreign assets in the United States, net......................................
Direct investment.............................................................................
U.S. Treasury securities..................................................................
U.S. securities other than U.S. Treasury securities..........................
U.S. currency...................................................................................
U.S. liabilities to unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking
concerns .....................................................................................
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere........

70 Statistical discrepancy (sum of above items with sign reversed).....
Of which: Seasonal adjustment discrepancy......................................
70a
71
72
73
74
75
76

Memoranda:
Balance on goods (lines 3 and 20)..........................................................
Balance on services (lines 4 and 21)......................................................
Balance on goods and services (lines 2 and 19)....................................
Balance on income (lines 12 and 29)......................................................
Unilateral current transfers, net (line 35).................................................
Balance on current account (lines 1,18, and 35 or lines 73,74, and 7 5 )1
3

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




-426,801 -90,729 -201,345 -138,434
-797
14,096
5,331
4,766

3,708 -361,910 -215,352 -227,937 -87,391 -196,376 -132,380 -10,656 -355,978 -211,375 -223,769
-560
1,006
-797
513
-560
1,006
5,331
4,766
4,796
4,796
513

-54
-67
-51
-54
-97
2,976
-81
1,713
-97
-67
-51
1,713
4,511
2,976
-81
729
-351
1,275
729
-351
1,275
3,763
-564
1,951
5,050
10,200
3,763
-564
1,951
5,050
-158
-215
-149
-158
-215
-145
-136
-161
-173
-615
-145
-136
-161
-173
-149
287
1,049
1,765
287
459
5,539
1,765
2,591
989
1,501
2,591
989
1,501
459
1,049
-376
-575
-509 -1,517
-376
-575
-519
-708
-518
-2,255
-519
-706
-518
-509 -1,517
2,147
871
2,558
2,147
871
1,957
977
1,957
977
1,083
1,586
5,603
1,083
1,586
2,558
8
-6
-9
2,027
62
2,027
111
62
-6
-9
111
-9
2,191
-9
8
-446,436 -98,651 -201,537 -144,701 -1,547 -363,472 -216,557 -229,230 -95,313 -196,568 -138,647 -15,911 -357,540 -212,580 -225,062
-9,072 -34,597 -38,926 24,288 40,163 -67,182 -50,746 -67,231 -31,259 -33,957 30,342 25,799 -61,251 -46,769 -63,063
-180,125 -50,367 -45,702 -36.79C -47,266 -53,692 -53,915 -53,034 -50,367 -45,702 -36,790 -47.266 -53,692 -53,915 -53,034
-44,221 -67,170 57,244 -29,483
-213,018 53,483 -174,153 -102,716

-4,812 -46,190 -31,199 -23,302 -67,170 57,244 -29,483
10,368 -196,407 -80,697 -85,663 53,483 -174,153 -102,716

-4,812 -46,190 -31,199 -23,302
10,368 -196,407 -80,697 -85,663

1,212,250 224,714 348,132 390,846 248,558 528,026 367,143 404,417 224,128 346,179 388,592 253,350 527,498 364,576 400,161
199,495 18,965 74,612 33,985 71,934 75,697 75,86S 80,775 18,965 74,612 33,982 71,934 75,697 75,869 80,775
80,137 33,007 36,312 25,926 61,204 66,219 21,553 80,137
156,450 33,007 36,31c 25,926 61,204 66,21 £ 21,55c
71,749
9,226 16,892
8,212 37,416 42,156 -8,905 47,225
9,226 16,892
8,213 37,418 42,156 -8,905 47,225
30,458 32,912
19,421
19,421
17,712 23,786 24,06c
84,701
23,781
17,713 23,786 24,063 30,456 32,912 23,781
37
724
1,073
724
1,072
-740
112
112
37
395
-255
-486
-74C
395
-255
-821
42,241 -7,207
42,241 -7,207 -15,814
34,187
824
34,187
82^
-821
5,076
24,275 -15,814
5,076
6,772
6,772
2,512
5,907 10,262 11,351
4,001
6,838
19,258
2,512
4,001
6,838
5,907 10,262 11,351
1,012,755 205,749 273,519 356,863 176,624 452,329 291,274 323,642 205,163 271,566 354,609 181,416 451,801 288,707 319,386
109,754
8,245 44,459 26,510 45,266 45,843 44,090
31,125 10,196 46,71c
21,716 45,796 48,41 C 48,346 30,539
9,784 -7,202
9,784 -7,202 86,106
14,103 37,239 62,041 -5,212
199,491
86,106
14,101 37.23S 62,041 -5,212
474,14C 77,412 111,806 153,04? 131,871 186.00S 127,285 138,757 77,412 111,806 153,049 131,871 186,009 127,285 138,757
1,127
1,932
1,129
1,127
1,072
4,507
4,679
9,158
19,416
1,072
4,507
4,679
9,158
1,932
1,129
30,105 80,174 -20,035
179,849 -70,142 152,938
10,410

44,486

20,271 -50,305 74,953
94,912
2,141 148,851

48,905 -54,691 -28,291

32,997

25,082
79,586

53,496 80,174 -20,035
89,116 -70,142 152,938

67,968

64,033

57,678
13,192

20,271 -50,305 74,953
94,912
2,141 148,851

44,044 -72,240 -19,071
-4,862 -17,549
9,219

43,434
10,437

25,082
79,586

53,496
89,116

64,929 49,709
-3,040 -14,324

-782,740 -169,185 -186,547 -210,600 -216,408 -194,112 -208,804 -230,590 -183,268 -188,220 -198,746 -212,506 -207,969 -210,598 -218,612
17,733 16,829 17,484 18,294
66,011
17,560
11,557 16,77:
20.12C
19,996 12,419 17,117 15,160 16,162 16.9&
-716,73C -151,625 - 1 74.99C -193,827 -196,286 -174,116 -196,385 -213,473 -168,108 -172,056 -181,792 —194,77^ -191.14C -193,114 -200,318
3,621
1,994
-1,566 -4,965
7,841 -2,159 -2,516 -2,157 -3,782
11,291
3,341
2,396
6,801 -1,246 -2,916
-9,4fr -26,176 -19,542 -21,856 -21,450
-86,072 -27,496 -22,50! —10,14( -25,927 - 20,32: -20,805 -21,52^ -27,237 -23,19'
-791,508 -175,780 -195,103 -197,164 -223,461 -197,357 -218,756 -239,962 -191,724 -193,258 -183,415 -223,109 -213,198 -217,127 -225,550

20

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 2a. U.S. Trade in Goods— Continues
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

2005

2005
II

I

Seasonally adjusted
2006

III

IV

I

II

2005
III p

I

II

2006
III

IV

I

II

II| p

A Balance-of-payments adjustments to Census trade data:
EXPORTS
1 Exports of goods, Census basis 1 including reexports and including
military grant shipments...............................................................................
2
3
4
5
6

Adjustments:
Private gift parcel remittances.........................................................................

Exports transferred under U.S. military agency sales contracts identified in
U.S. documents 3........................................................................................
7
Other adjustments, n e t4.................................................................................
8 Equals: Exports of goods, adjusted to balance-of-payments basis
excluding “ military” (table 1, line 3 ) ............................................................

905,978 214,723 230,550 222,364 238,341 244,679 261,584 257,935 216,657 225,615 227,742 235,964 247,174 255,785 265,672
663

158

160

160

185

173

191

174

158

160

160

185

173

191

174

-8,167
-3,843

-1,729
-896

-2,176
-1,010

-2,066
-890

-2,196
-1,047

-2,012
-820

-2,161
-972

-2,880
-897

-1,729
-896

-2,176
-1,010

-2,066
-890

-2,196
-1,047

-2,012
-820

-2,161
-972

-2,880
-897

894,631 212,256 227,524 219,568 235,283 242,020 258,642 254,332 214,189 222,591 224,947 232,904 244,512 252,843 262,069

IMPORTS
9 Imports of goods, Census basis 1 (general imports).....................................
10
11
12
13
14
15

1,673,455 380,584 413,073 429,129 450,669 435,011 466,344 483,758 396,599 409,813 422,654 444,389 451,358 462,339 479,516

Adjustments:
Electric energy.................................................................................................

756

82

206

269

199

198

210

210

82

206

269

199

198

210

210

Inland freight in Canada..................................................................................

4,693

1,150

1,200

1,124

1,219

1,294

1,357

1,308

1,150

1,200

1,124

1,219

1,294

1,357

1,308

Imports of U.S. military agencies identified in Census documents3................
Other adjustments, n e t56................................................................................

- i ,223

-300
-75

-322
-86

-276
-78

-325
-71

-250
-121

-356
-109

-244
-110

-300

-322
-86

-276
-78

-325
-71

-250
-121

-356
-109

-244
-110

16 Equals: Imports of goods, adjusted to balance-of-payments basis,
excluding “ military” (table 1, line 20)..........................................................

-310

-75

1,677,371 381,441 414,071 430,168 451,691 436,132 467,446 484,922 397,457 410,811 423,693 445,410 452,481 463,441 480,681

B Trade in goods, by area and country, adjusted to balance-of-payments
basis, excluding m ilita ry:7
EXPORTS
1 Total, all countries (A—8)...................................................................................
2
Europe............................................................................................................
European Union......................................................................................
3
4
Euro area................................................................................................
5
Austria.........................................................................................................
Belgium......................................................................................................
6
7
France.........................................................................................................
Germany.....................................................................................................
8
Ireland.........................................................................................................
9
Italy.............................................................................................................
10
11
Netherlands.................................................................................................
12
Norway........................................................................................................
Russia.........................................................................................................
13
14
Spain...........................................................................................................
15
Sweden.......................................................................................................
Switzerland..................................................................................................
16
17
Turkey..........................................................................................................
United Kingdom...........................................................................................
18
Other Europe...............................................................................................
19
Canada 2.........................................................................................................
20

894,631 212,256 227,524 219,568 235,283 242,020 258,642 254,332 214,189 222,591 224,947 232,904 244,512 252,843 262,069
207,891 51,520 53,585 48,515 54,271 56,798 62,297 58,720 52,067 52,287 49,660 53,877 57,415 60,719 60,324
183,466 45,404 47,354 42,682 48,026 49,644 54,436 51,099 45,937 46,158 43,657 47,714 50,223 53,023 52,462
135,712 33,691 34,606 31,376 36,039 36,418 39,171 37,244 34,087 33,729 32,086 35,810 36,877 38,159 38,223
547
730
625
684
692
805
747
712
684
782
2,586
550
640
700
759
4,741
4,532
4,874
4,711
5,356
5,259
4,749
4,542
18,563
4,446
4,589
4,683
4,812
5,215
5,392
6,226
6,347
5,671
5,850
4,821
5,913
5,542
5,753
5,691
4,923
6,307
6,167
5,674
22,255
5,888
8,214
9,387 10,043 10,272
33,584
8,330
8,193
8,847
8,301
8,116
8,368
8,799
9,481
9,782 10,538
1,854
2,618
2,131
1,932
2,642
2,385
1,925
2,651
2,075
1,968
2,629
1,880
1,902
9,323
2,408
2,952
3,324
2,867
2,806
11,245
2,875
2,875
2,506
2,989
2,905
2,569
2,965
3,240
2,956
3,005
6,553
6,715
7,010
8,061
7,564
6,634
6,546
7,864
7,771
26,288
6,105
6,915
6,248
6,860
7,109
562
448
442
549
596
432
457
534
614
449
535
569
1,873
445
538
904
1,032
1,227
1,037
1,017
3,970
1,039
975
1,052
1,178
903
1,013
1,037
1,211
1,230
1,536
1,877
1,704
1,839
1,774
1,648
1,547
1,841
1,703
1,677
6,768
1,651
1,858
1,738
1,699
957
1,069
989
902
797
1,014
3,647
1,021
926
780
920
1,035
913
970
1,041
2,805
2,521
2,574
3,421
3,406
3,305
2,453
2,630
10,646
2,746
2,825
2,738
3,432
3,310
3,385
1,592
1,053
1,043
929
1,056
1,181
1,502
1,042
964
1,030
1,574
1,560
4,081
1,045
1,189
9,187 10,059
9,162
8,955
9,369 10,473 11,909 10,917
9,299
9,799
9,310 10,572 11,591 11,221
37,570
3,940
4,910
4,480
3,581
4,086
3,676
4,149
4,609
15,492
3,556
4,173
3,578
4,185
3,966
4,790
212,192 50,604 55,160 51,420 55,008 56,125 60,484 56,208 51,127 53,951 52,538 54,576 56,720 59,098 57,788

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

Latin America and Other Western Hemisphere..........................................
South and Central America.........................................................................
Argentina.................................................................................................
Brazil.......................................................................................................
Chile........................................................................................................
Colombia.................................................................................................
Mexico.....................................................................................................
Venezuela................................................................................................
Other.......................................................................................................
Other Western Hemisphere.........................................................................

192,387
177,318
4,111
15,174
5,207
5,413
120,264
6,410
20,739
15,069

44,446
41,029
892
3,344
1,127
1,309
28,111
1,465
4,781
3,417

48,494
44,671
1,180
3,782
1,437
1,399
29,859
1,522
5,492
3,823

48,220
44,391
991
3,956
1,332
1,281
30,149
1,683
4,999
3,829

51,227
47,227
1,048
4,092
1,311
1,424
32,145
1,740
5,467
4,000

52,636
48,398
1,045
4,132
1,445
1,464
32,634
1,888
5,790
4,238

55,520
51,362
1,165
4,342
1,764
1,602
34,018
2,164
6,307
4,158

55,791
51,347
1,288
5,066
1,604
1,687
33,125
2,322
6,255
4,444

44,918
41,496
904
3,387
1,133
1,318
28,434
1,486
4,834
3,422

47,454
43,687
1,149
3,673
1,399
1,376
29,221
1,484
5,385
3,767

49,379
45,438
1,014
4,037
1,371
1,317
30,851
1,719
5,129
3,941

50,636
46,697
1,044
4,077
1,304
1,402
31,758
1,721
5,391
3,939

53,275
48,997
1,057
4,201
1,454
1,475
33,038
1,915
5,857
4,278

54,335
50,247
1,133
4,229
1,720
1,571
33,304
2,112
6,178
4,088

57,574
52,976
1,320
5,190
1,664
1,749
34,189
2,393
6,471
4,598

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Asia and Pacific.............................................................................................
Australia......................................................................................................
China..........................................................................................................
Hong Kong ..................................................................................................
India............................................................................................................
Indonesia.....................................................................................................
Japan..........................................................................................................
Korea, Republic of.......................................................................................
Malaysia......................................................................................................
Philippines...................................................................................................
Singapore....................................................................................................
Taiwan.........................................................................................................
Thailand......................................................................................................
Other...........................................................................................................

237,515
15,300
41,799
16,319
7,972
3,049
53,264
27,135
10,386
6,863
20,259
21,453
7,192
6,524

55,803
3,582
9,021
3,857
1,792
884
12,622
6,694
2,275
1,555
5,146
5,227
1,803
1,345

58,935
3,978
10,011
4,092
2,027
780
13,246
6,662
2,513
1,637
4,986
5,596
1,835
1,572

60,449
3,884
10,697
4,341
2,127
653
13,684
6,772
2,780
1,793
4,948
5,496
1,778
1,496

62,328
3,856
12,070
4,029
2,026
732
13,712
7,007
2,818
1,878
5,179
5,134
1,776
2,111

64,022
4,104
12,483
3,984
2,120
691
13,886
7,763
3,104
1,888
5,266
4,928
1,667
2,138

67,237
4,101
13,172
4,480
2,544
804
14,232
7,685
3,363
1,807
5,696
5,926
1,837
1,590

69,605
4,440
14,431
4,601
2,651
767
14,716
8,036
3,102
1,961
5,867
5,563
1,820
1,650

56,170
3,619
9,078
3,883
1,804
879
12,650
6,767
2,301
1,565
5,192
5,263
1,819
1,350

57,777
3,871
9,843
4,000
1,975
784
13,051
6,506
2,449
1,608
4,855
5,495
1,795
1,545

62,066
3,976
11,002
4,438
2,180
679
14,108
6,946
2,839
1,836
5,053
5,642
1,825
1,542

61,502
3,834
11,876
3,998
2,013
707
13,455
6,916
2,797
1,854
5,159
5,053
1,753
2,087

64,519
4,191
12,488
4,013
2,141
693
13,968
7,840
3,108
1,912
5,337
4,968
1,688
2,172

65,866
3,995
12,923
4,373
2,479
810
14,001
7,534
3,278
1,772
5,545
5,800
1,797
1,559

71,909
4,565
14,902
4,733
2,714
810
15,289
8,299
3,190
2,031
6,010
5,764
1,879
1,723

45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53

Middle East...................................................................................................
Israel............................................................................................................
Saudi Arabia................................................................................................
Other...........................................................................................................

29,760
8,608
6,526
14,626

6,301
2,033
1,329
2,939

8,677
2,278
1,562
4,837

8,994
2,400
1,896
4,698

9,021
2,342
2,032
4,647

6,316
2,058
1,338
2,920

7,339
2,194
1,573
3,572

7,459
2,209
1,560
3,690

8,646
2,147
2,055
4,444

8,800
2,316
1,585
4,899

8,781
2,336
1,851
4,594

9,290
2,416
2,092
4,782

14,886
1,161
1,625
3,894
8,206

3,582
272
321
991
1,998

7,260
2,157
1,520
3,583
3,704
400
452
953
1,899

8,691
2,153
2,067
4,471

Africa..............................................................................................................
Algeria.........................................................................................................
Nigeria.........................................................................................................
South Africa.................................................................................................
Other..........................................................................................................

7,508
2,265
1,610
3,633
3,842
247
394
999
2,202

3,758
242
458
951
2,107

3,762
184
438
956
2,184

4,110
335
546
1,034
2,195

4,987
323
645
1,181
2,838

3,591
270
315
1,005
2,001

3,783
244
393
973
2,173

3,845
409
477
975
1,984

3,667
238
440
941
2,048

3,783
188
438
971
2,186

4,044
332
542
1,007
2,163

5,184
336
677
1,212
2,959

Memorandum:
55 Members of OPEC 7............................................................................................

31,308

6,711

7,653

7,774

9,170

8,991

9,741

10,108

6,716

7,517

7,999

9,076

9,105

9,549

10,424

54

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




January 2 0 0 7

S u rvey

of

C u r r e n t B u sin e ss

21

Table 2a. U.S. Trade in Goods— Continues
[Millions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted

Not seasonally adjusted
2005

Line

2006

2005
I

II

III

IV

I

II

2006

2005
HIP

I

II

III

IV

I

II

IIIp

B Trade in goods, by area and country, adjusted to balance-of-payments
basis, excluding m ilita ry :7— Continued:
IMPORTS
56 Total, all countries (A-16).................................................................................. 1,677,371 381,441 414,071 430,168 451,691 436,132 467,446 484,922 397,457 410,811 423,693 445,410 452,481 463,441 480,681
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74

Europe............................................................................................................
European Union.......................................................................................
Euro area.................................................................................................
Austria.........................................................................................................
Belgium..
France....
Germany
Ireland....
Italy..............................................................................................................
Netherlands..................................................................................................
Norway...
Russia....
Spain.....
Sweden..
Switzerland..................................................................................................
Turkey....
United Kingdom............................................................................................
Other Europe

75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

93,479
81,764
60,375
1,702
3,502
8,831
22,534
7,339
7,949
4,198
1,736
3,749
2,334
3,373
3,359
1,250
13,994
7,629

90,294
78,550
58,914
1,790
3,689
9,020
21,627
7,202
7,636
3,780
1,746
3,935
2,148
3,516
3,260
1,286
12,273
7,386

98,839
84,599
62,721
1,867
3,788
9,452
22,519
7,022
8,407
4,520
1,758
5,840
2,672
3,800
3,519
1,396
13,929
8,350

72,814

81,065

78,283

74,894
70,077
1,209
6,202
1,465
2,315
42,671
9,591
6,624
4,817

78,495
73,425
1,198
6,365
1,954
2,446
46,176
8,403
6,883
5,070

80,826
76,200
1,099
6,091
2,441
2,302
48,052
9,231
6,984
4,626

90,387
78,068
57,862
1,521
3,213
8,716
21,233
7,577
7,807
3,580
1,895
4,125
2,175
3,906
3,407
1,290
12,558
7,384

97,499
82,955
61,998
1,931
3,641
9,012
21,882
7,452
8,162
4,818
1,899
6,146
2,409
3,080
3,337
1,366
13,474
8,890

85,923
74,495
55,665
1,408
3,113
8,271
20,402
7,427
7,546
3,282
1,596
3,864
2,171
3,501
3,271
1,297
11,957
6,817

85,987
74,954
55,657
1,502
3,243
8,099
20,817
6,548
7,810
3,786
1,494
3,584
1,970
3,101
3,016
1,364
12,236
7,417

78,711

74,597

70,790

70,896

71,701

84,940
79,820
910
6,250
2,364
2,532
51,173
9,425
7,166
5,120

86,905
82,463
964
7,523
2,593
2,520
50,940
10,399
7,524
4,442

70,028
66,068
1,110
5,922
1,802
2,012
40,795
7,980
6,447
3,960

73,764
69,246
1,105
6,126
1,492
2,131
43,750
8,252
6,390
4,518

73,435
68,708
1,174
6,110
1,438
2,251
42,013
9,218
6,504
4,727

93,367
81,093
60,807
1,832
3,804
9,324
22,303
7,401
7,883
3,941
1,850
4,144
2,231
3,630
3,360
1,331
12,682
7,651

98,095
84,043
62,326
1,861
3,749
9,400
22,438
6,967
8,356
4,457
1,721
5,730
2,646
3,780
3,503
1,393
13,819
8,275

96,875
82,563
61,732
1,929
3,613
8,988
21,838
7,444
8,133
4,736
1,842
5,994
2,387
3,071
3,334
1,360
13,379
8,827

79,927

81,226

78,125

73,932

77,766
72,738
1,194
6,276
1,925
2,455
45,552
8,528
6,808
5,028

84,147
79,323
1,149
6,312
2,520
2,411
49,814
9,860
7,257
4,824

83,927
78,882
898
6,204
2,352
2,491
50,705
9,155
7,077
5,045

85,731
81,357
949
7,460
2,587
2,472
50,474
9,980
7,435
4,374

91,972
80,392
59,340
1,672
3,449
8,681
22,136
7,192
7,803
4,154
1,743
3,733
2,297
3,310
3,289
1,226
13,785
7,502

354,269
307,909
228,524
6,103
13,018
33,767
84,588
28,744
30,966
14,802
6,728
15,306
8,613
13,818
12,983
5,177
50,536
29,120

82,660
71,722
53,617
1,359
2,990
7,962
19,679
7,148
7,272
3,146
1,530
3,678
2,085
3,382
3,152
1,244
11,482
6,551

91,030
78,576
58,229
1,526
3,243
8,778
21,343
7,631
7,851
3,609
1,927
4,190
2,195
3,931
3,425
1,298
12,651
7,432

87,100
75,847
56,303
1,516
3,283
8,196
21,032
6,626
7,894
3,849
1,535
3,689
1,999
3,132
3,047
1,385
12,409
7,508

Canada 2.........................................................................................................

293,314

68,031

71,404

Latin America and Other Western Hemisphere...........................................
South and Central America..........................................................................
Argentina.................................................................................................
Brazil..
Chile...
Colombia
Mexico
Venezuela...............................................................................................
Other..
Other Western Hemisphere.........................................................................

294,993
276,760
4,583
24,434
6,657
8,849
172,110
33,978
26,149
18,233

67,080
63,297
1,053
5,692
1,732
1,926
39,180
7,524
6,190
3,783

74,524
69,961
1,123
6,175
1,506
2,162
44,083
8,460
6,452
4,563

86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99

Asia and Pacific.............................................................................................
Australia......................................................................................................
China.....
Hong Kong ..................................................................................................
India............................................................................................................
Indonesia
Japan ..........................................................................................................
Korea, Republic of........................................................................................
Malaysia......................................................................................................
Philippines...................................................................................................
Singapore
Taiwan....
Thailand.
Other

607,148 137,169 147,398 159,697 162,884 153,058 164,825 182,193 142,657 146,615 158,090 159,786 157,982 164,120 181,866
2,127
2,129
1,600
1,917
1,982
1,807
2,011
1,544
1,925
1,999
1,838
1,826
2,021
1,876
7,306
243,472 51,010 58,177 66,990 67,295 59,816 67,720 78,941 53,240 57,900 66,367 65,965 61,759 67,426 78,840
1,892
1,974
2,201
2,722
2,564
1,746
2,696
2,509
2,018
8,925
1,887
1,752
1,953
1,901
2,203
5,089
5,845
4,502
4,394
4,870
5,037
5,433
4,337
4,413
4,923
5,130
5,265
5,109
5,865
18,803
3,158
3,688
2,967
2,834
3,187
3,026
3,258
12,014
2,849
3,221
3,085
3,158
3,176
3,702
2,859
138,008 33,926 34,555 33,691 35,836 35,460 36,598 36,926 35,127 34,368 33,359 35,154 36,564 36,478 36,881
43,781 11,230 10,898 10,328 11,325 11,210 11,555 11,572 11,675 10,810 10,182 11,114 11,602 11,479 11,514
9,992
8,342
9,117
9,072
8,431
8,930
9,196
9,229
8,170
8,960 10,012
7,155
33,686
6,883
8,378
2,494
2,367
2,335
2,620
2,411
2,357
2,211
2,178
2,430
9,250
2,131
2,189
2,519
2,343
2,623
4,381
4,756
3,675
3,732
3,959
4,148
3,532
3,749
3,779
4,031
4,025
4,399
4,764
3,725
15,091
8,617
8,547
8,791
8,872
9,043
9,483 10,189
34,827
8,894
9,040
8,758
8,291
8,602
9,520 10,211
5,321
6,054
4,593
5,218
5,330
19,889
4,914
5,269
5,280
5,174
5,346
6,063
4,893
5,185
4,426
6,137
7,159
4,997
6,177
5,321
4,961
6,095
5,719
6,090
22,096
6,166
5,820
5,886
7,182
5,113

100
101
102
103

Middle East....................................................................................................
Israel...........................................................................................................
Saudi Arabia................................................................................................
Other...........................................................................................................

62,437
16,824
27,192
18,421

13,276
4,033
5,539
3,704

14,852
4,102
6,528
4,222

17,442
4,565
7,863
5,014

16,867
4,124
7,262
5,481

16,013
4,534
7,148
4,331

19,231
4,941
8,645
5,645

20,094
4,752
8,809
6,533

14,025
4,177
5,919
3,929

14,592
4,080
6,368
4,144

16,915
4,515
7,542
4,858

16,905
4,052
7,363
5,490

16,919
4,678
7,647
4,594

18,795
4,905
8,389
5,501

19,480
4,749
8,438
6,293

104
105
106
107
108

Africa
Algeria.........................................................................................................
Nigeria
South Africa................................................................................................
Other...........................................................................................................

65,210
10,447
24,239
5,883
24,641

13,225
1,828
4,929
1,320
5,148

14,863
2,512
5,620
1,535
5,196

18,221
3,094
6,582
1,446
7,099

18,901
3,013
7,108
1,582
7,198

17,658
2,724
6,910
1,604
6,420

20,900
4,089
7,513
2,000
7,298

23,634
5,325
7,331
1,968
9,010

14,034
1,968
5,252
1,371
5,443

14,557
2,462
5,472
1,526
5,097

17,565
2,977
6,297
1,433
6,858

19,054
3,040
7,218
1,553
7,243

18,840
2,918
7,423
1,651
6,848

20,379
3,967
7,287
1,990
7,135

22,797
5,098
7,030
1,964
8,705

109

International organizations and unallocated...............................................
124,939

25,806

29,956

35,156

34,021

33,148

38,324

41,671

27,416

29,303

33,862

34,358

35,340

37,279

40,090

Memorandum:
110 Members of OPEC 7............................................................................................
See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




22

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 2a. U.S. Trade in Goods— Continues
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

2005

2005
I

II

Seasonally adjusted
2006

III

IV

1

II

2005
Hp
I

I

II

2006
III

IV

I

II

II! p

B Trade in goods, by area and country, adjusted to balance-ofpayments basis, excluding military: ' — Continued:
BALANCE (EXCESS OF EXPORTS +)
111 Total, all countries............................................................................. -782,740 -169,185 -186,547 -210,600 -216,408 -194,112 -208,804 -230,590 -183,268 -188,220 -198,746 -212,506 -207,969 -210,598 -218,612
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129

Europe .......................................................................................... -146,378 -31,140 -37,445 -38,585
European Union...................................................................... -124,443 -26,318 -31,222 -33,165
Euro area................................................................................ -92,812 -19,926 -23,623 -24,927
Austria.
-3,517
-812
-796
-891
Belgium
5,545
1,542
1,631
1,163
-2,291
France.
-11,512
-2,928
-3,375
Germany..................................................................................... -51,004 -11,465 -13,013 -12,839
Ireland......................................................................................... -19,421
-4,530
-4,694
-5,500
Italy ......................................................................................... -19,721
-4,397
-4,976
-5,388
Netherlands
11,486
3,407
3,106
2,256
Norway
-4,855 -1,082
-1,485
-1,090
Russia
-11,336 -2,774 -3,151
-2,714
Spain...,
-1,845
-549
-318
-348
Sweden
-10,171
-2,361
-3,005
-2,352
Switzerland..................................................................................
-2,337
-347
-904
-473
Turkey..........................................................................................
-1,096
-191
-255
-456
United Kingdom........................................................................... -12,966 -2,295
-2,592
-3,454
Other Europe............................................................................... -13,628 -2,995
-3,259 -3,930

130

Canada 2.........................................................................................

131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140

Latin America and Other Western Hemisphere........................... -102,606 -22,634 -26,030 -26,674 -27,268 -28,190 -29,420 -31,114 -25,110 -26,310 -24,056 -27,130 -30,872 -29,592 -28,157
South and Central America......................................................... -99,442 -22,268 -25,290 -25,686 -26,198 -27,802 -28,458 -31,116 -24,572 -25,559 -23,270 -26,041 -30,326 -28,635 -28,381
Argentina.................................................................................
-472
-161
57
324
-218
-150
-54
-206
44
255
-160
-150
-92
235
371
Brazil.......................................................................................
-9,260
-2,348
-2,393 -2,246 -2,273 -1,959 -1,908 -2,457
-2,535 -2,453
-2,111
-2,073 -2,199
-1,975
-2,270
Chile
-1,450
-605
-69
-133
-643
-996
-600
-989
-669
-93
-67
-621
-632
-1,066
-923
Colombia.................................................................................
-617
-3,436
-763
-1,034 -1,022
-694
-838
-930
-833
-755
-934 -1,053
-936
-920
-723
Mexico..................................................................................... -51,846 -11,069 -14,224 -12,522 -14,031 -15,418 -17,155 -17,815 -12,361 -14,529 -11,162 -13,794 -16,776 -17,401 -16,285
Venezuela
-27,568 -6,059 -6,938 -7,908
-6,663
-6,494 -6,768
-7,499
-7,343 -7,261
-8,077
-6,807 -7,945 -7,043 -7,587
Other
-5,410
-1,409
-960
-1,625 -1,416 -1,194
-1,613 -1,005
-859
-1,269
-1,375
-1,417
-1,400
-899
-964
Other Western Hemisphere.........................................................
-3,164
-366
-740
-988 -1,070
-962
-388
2
-538
-751
-786
-1,089
-546
-957
224

141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154

Asia and Pacific............................................................................. -369,633 -81,366 -88,463 -99,248 -100,556 -89,036 -97,588 -112,588 -86,487 -88,838 -96,024 -98,284 -93,463 -98,254 -109,957
Australia......................................................................................
7,994
2,038
2,053
1,885
2,018
2,278
2,019
1,954
2,080
2,311
1,994
2,027
2,315
1,984
2,438
China........................................................................................... -201,673 -41,989 -48,166 -56,293 -55,225 -47,333 -54,548 -64,510 -44,162 -48,057 -55,365 -54,089 -49,271 -54,503 -63,938
Hong Kong ..................................................................................
7,394
1,970
2,340
1,619
1,465
2,031
2,579
2,398
1,909
2,254
1,742
1,489
1,995
2,481
2,532
India ........................................................................................ -10,831
-2,545 -2,386 -2,796 -3,104
-3,145 -2,565 -3,214 -2,698 -2,419
-2,690
-3,024 -3,292 -2,610 -3,131
Indonesia
-8,965
-1,975
-2,069
-2,568 -2,353 -2,467 -2,372 -2,935
-2,088 -2,050 -2,508 -2,319
-2,565 -2,348 -2,878
Japan....
-84,744 -21,304 -21,309 -20,007 -22,124 -21,574 -22,366 -22,210 -22,477 -21,317 -19,251 -21,699 -22,596 -22,477 -21,592
Korea, Republic of....................................................................... -16,646 -4,536
-4,236
-3,556 -4,318 -3,447 -3,870 -3,536
-4,908 -4,304
-3,236
-4,198 -3,762 -3,945 -3,215
Malaysia...................................................................................... -23,300 -4,608 -5,865
-6,416 -6,411
-5,066
-5,597 -6,910
-4,854 -5,893 -6,278
-6,275
-5,323 -5,652 -6,802
Philippines
-2,387
-576
-552
-726
-533
-646
-469
-536
-662
-570
-658
-513
-518
-563
-589
Singatpore....................................................................................
1,614
1,237
5,168
1,169
1,148
1,241
1,297
1,517
1,103
1,130
1,321
1,200
1,189
1,164
1,254
Taiwan......................................................................................... -13,374 -3,064 -3,006
-3,398 -3,906 -3,830
-3,354 -3,052
-3,594 -4,648
-3,149
-3,819
-4,075 -3,683 -4,425
Thailand
-12,697 -2,623
-3,079
-3,491
-3,504 -3,507
-3,509 -4,243 -2,774 -3,098
-3,393 -3,432 -3,642 -3,524 -4,175
Other....
-15,572 -3,768 -3,425
-4,670 -3,709
-3,971
-3,416
-3,632
-3,748 -4,587 -5,532
-4,553
-3,918 -4,578 -5,436

155
156
157
158

Middle East
Israel
Saudi Arabia................................................................................
Other...........................................................................................

-32,677
-8,216
-20,666
-3,795

-6,975
-2,000
-4,210
-765

159
160
161
162
163

Africa
Algeria
Nigeria.........................................................................................
South Atrica.................................................................................
Other...........................................................................................

-50,324
-9,286
-22,614
-1,989
-16,435

-9,643
-1,556
-4,608
-329
-3,150

164

International organizations and unallocated..............................

Memorandum:
165 Members of OPEC 7............................................................................
See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




-39,208
-33,738
-24,336
-1,018
1,209
-2,918
-13,687
-4,697
-4,960
2,717
-1,198
-2,697
-630
-2,453
-613
-194
-4,625
-3,444

-33,496
-28,906
-22,496
-1,098
1,052
-2,794
-12,240
-4,817
-4,684
3,230
-1,184
-2,903
-309
-2,559
161
-105
-1,800
-3,446

-36,542
-30,163
-23,550
-1,062
1,568
-3,105
-12,476
-5,097
-5,083
3,541
-1,209
-4,613
-898
-2,731
-113
196
-2,020
-3,440

-38,779
-31,856
-24,754
-1,184
1,618
-3,470
-11,610
-5,598
-5,295
2,746
-1,303
-4,968
-761
-2,091
-32
136
-2,557
-4,410

-33,856
-28,558
-21,578
-858
1,476
-2,518
-12,101
-4,776
-4,641
3,352
-1,147
-2,961
-624
-2,466
-446
-252
-2,658
-3,236

-38,100
-31,910
-24,133
-809
1,536
-3,025
-13,117
-5,502
-5,001
2,966
-1,463
-3,088
-334
-3,004
-954
-248
-2,759
-3,298

-36,327
-31,297
-23,571
-862
1,299
-3,176
-12,449
-4,580
-5,241
2,462
-1,037
-2,571
-267
-2,304
-386
-400
-3,074
-3,741

-38,095
-32,678
-23,530
-988
1,234
-2,793
-13,337
-4,563
-4,838
2,706
-1,208
-2,716
-620
-2,397
-551
-196
-4,475
-3,353

-81,122 -17,427 -16,244 -21,394 -26,057 -22,158 -18,227 -18,389 -19,663 -16,945 -19,163 -25,351

-93,631

-7,344 -10,182
-1,837
-2,408
-4,918
-6,343
-589
-1,431

-8,176
-1,971
-5,195
-1,010

-7,336 -10,237 -11,073
-2,256 -2,541
-2,410
-5,586
-6,749 -6,777
506
-947 -1,886

-7,709
-2,119
-4,581
-1,009

-7,253
-1,886
-4,795
-572

-9,456
-2,306
-5,982
-1,168

-8,259
-1,905
-5,308
-1,046

-35,952
-30,870
-23,930
-1,132
1,008
-3,017
-12,822
-4,993
-4,878
3,168
-1,281
-3,107
-373
-2,660
72
-142
-2,110
-3,685

-37,376
-31,020
-24,167
-1,079
1,466
-3,233
-12,656
-5,087
-5,116
3,407
-1,187
-4,519
-908
-2,739
-193
181
-2,228
-3,485

-36,551
-30,101
-23,509
-1,170
1,779
-3,314
-11,300
-5,542
-5,177
3,035
-1,228
-4,764
-688
-2,057
51
200
-2,158
-4,218

-24,506 -19,027 -16,144

-8,119 -10,014 -10,190
-2,362 -2,569 -2,333
-6,062 -6,538 -6,346
305
-907 -1,511

-11,021 -14,517 -15,143 -13,896 -16,790 -18,647 -10,443 -10,774 -13,720 -15,387 -15,057 -16,335 -17,613
-2,265
-2,694 -2,771
-3,754 -5,002
-1,698 -2,218 -2,568
-2,540
-2,802
-2,730 -3,635 -4,762
-5,226 -6,130
-6,967 -6,686
-4,937 -5,079
-6,650 -6,472
-5,820
-6,778
-6,985 -6,745 -6,353
-536
-493
-631
-648
-966
-787
-366
-553
-458
-612
-680
-983
-752
-2,994
-5,200 -5,091
-3,442
-2,924
-4,236
-5,103 -6,172
-4,874 -5,195
-4,662
-4,972
-5,746

-19,095 -22,303 -27,382 -24,851

-24,157 -28,583 -31,563 -20,700 -21,786 -25,863 -25,282 -26,235 -27,730 -29,666

January 2007

S u rvey

of

23

C u r r e n t B u sin e ss

Table 2a. U.S. Trade in Goods— Continues
[Millions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted

Not seasonally adjusted
Line

2005

2006

2005
I

II

III

IV

I

II

2005
III”

1

II

2006
III

IV

I

II

IIIp

C Trade in goods, by principal end-use category, adjusted to balance-ofpayments basis, excluding military:
1 Exports of goods, balance-of-payments basis, excluding military (A -8)...... 894,631 212,256 227,524 219,568 235,283 242,020 258,642 254,332 214,189 222,591 224,947 232,904 244,512 252,843 262,069
2
3

Agricultural products.................................................................................... 64,883 16,282 15,359 14,781 18,461 18,033 17,209 16,786 15,610 16,511 16,291 16,471 17,385 18,275 18,947
Nonagricultural products.............................................................................. 829,748 195,974 212,165 204,787 216,822 223,987 241,433 237,546 198,579 206,080 208,656 216,433 227,127 234,568 243,122

4

Foods, feeds, and beverages........................................................................

58,955

14,596

13,723

13,870

16,766

15,848

15,054

15,960

14,195

15,135

14,678

14,947

15,549

16,433

17,526

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Agricultural...................................................................................................
Grains and preparations...........................................................................
Wheat...................................................................................................
Com .....................................................................................................
Soybeans................................................................................................
Meat products and poultry.......................................................................
Vegetables, fruits, nuts, and preparations................................................
Other agricultural foods, feeds, and beverages........................................

52,949
15,595
4,416
5,824
6,626
7,207
11,550
11,971

13,145
3,697
1,040
1,286
2,423
1,560
2,681
2,784

12,490
3,775
960
1,442
1,072
1,854
2,818
2,971

11,980
3,903
1,200
1,451
658
1,803
2,631
2,985

15,334
4,220
1,216
1,645
2,473
1,990
3,420
3,231

14,233
4,256
1,048
1,604
2,208
1,785
2,970
3,014

13,717
4,425
994
2,009
894
1,891
3,121
3,386

14,052
4,600
1,104
2,159
1,116
1,996
2,932
3,408

12,755
3,645
1,104
1,259
1,768
1,675
2,736
2,931

13,626
3,995
1,073
1,494
2,008
1,858
2,841
2,924

13,127
3,931
1,068
1,497
1,500
1,802
2,929
2,965

13,441
4,024
1,171
1,574
1,350
1,872
3,044
3,151

13,993
4,177
1,092
1,575
1,701
1,910
3,026
3,179

14,790
4,667
1,111
2,073
1,759
1,886
3,153
3,325

15,953
4,706
1,002
2,232
2,591
2,002
3,264
3,390

13
14

Nonagricultural (fish, distilled beverages, etc.).............................................
Fish and shellfish.....................................................................................

6,006
4,208

1,451
1,070

1,233
767

1,890
1,412

1,432
959

1,615
1,167

1,337
817

1,908
1,378

1,440
1,023

1,509
1,028

1,551
1,091

1,506
1,066

1,556
1,065

1,643
1,107

1,573
1,063

Industrial supplies and materials................................................................. 233,091

15

56,210

60,410

58,437

58,034

64,018

70,471

70,701

56,355

58,926

58,848

58,962

63,898

68,938

71,398

16
17
18
19
20

Agricultural...................................................................................................
Raw cotton...............................................................................................
Tobacco, unmanufactured........................................................................
Hides and skins, including furskins..........................................................
Other agricultural industrial supplies........................................................

11,591
3,933
984
1,788
4,886

3,043
1,092
335
453
1,163

2,772
1,027
200
460
1,085

2,735
1,056
131
451
1,097

3,041
758
318
424
1,541

3,693
1,558
393
519
1,223

3,388
1,521
206
539
1,122

2,658
841
134
507
1,176

2,776
903
259
443
1,171

2,798
913
226
430
1,229

3,074
1,189
236
449
1,200

2,943
928
263
466
1,286

3,301
1,279
306
495
1,221

3,392
1,376
235
507
1,274

2,892
847
239
522
1,284

21
22
23
24
25

Nonagricultural............................................................................................. 221,500
Energy products....................................................................................... 32,166
Fuels and lubricants............................................................................. 31,109
Coal and related fuels......................................................................
3,715
Petroleum and products................................................................... 22,664

53,167
7,523
7,350
752
5,273

57,638
9,147
8,945
1,115
6,460

55,702
8,021
7,679
926
5,734

54,993
7,475
7,135
922
5,197

60,325
8,939
8,619
862
6,601

67,083
10,460
10,236
1,012
8,024

68,043
10,745
10,503
1,005
8,843

53,579
7,661
7,488
840
5,324

56,128
9,005
8,804
1,064
6,369

55,774
7,976
7,633
892
5,722

56,019
7,524
7,184
919
5,249

60,597
9,008
8,689
942
6,591

65,546
10,333
10,109
971
7,937

68,506
10,894
10,653
982
9,016

26
27
28
29
30

Paper and paper base stocks...................................................................
Textile supplies and related materials......................................................
Chemicals, excluding medicinals.............................................................
Building materials, except metals.............................................................
Other nonmetals.......................................................................................

15,135
12,875
75,969
9,563
22,088

3,693
3,206
18,944
2,279
5,212

3,850
3,455
19,692
2,482
5,644

3,814
3,162
18,915
2,388
5,508

3,778
3,052
18,418
2,414
5,724

3,932
3,273
19,706
2,536
5,990

4,061
3,448
21,895
2,735
6,220

4,165
3,284
22,089
2,654
6,059

3,707
3,278
18,971
2,323
5,232

3,810
3,249
19,174
2,353
5,468

3,839
3,194
19,111
2,410
5,559

3,779
3,154
18,713
2,477
5,829

3,937
3,333
19,654
2,572
6,018

4,023
3,246
21,372
2,598
6,021

4,199
3,329
22,440
2,713
6,133

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

Metals and nonmetallic products..............................................................
Steelmaking materials..........................................................................
Iron and steel products........................................................................
Nonfenrous metals................................................................................
Nonmonetary gold...........................................................................
Other precious metals......................................................................
Other nonferrous metals..................................................................
Other metals and nonmetallic products...............................................

53,704
5,991
11,270
20,797
5,550
3,176
12,071
15,646

12,310
1,188
2,847
4,656
1,380
740
2,536
3,619

13,368
1,504
2,882
5,046
1,378
771
2,897
3,936

13,894
1,734
2,697
5,508
1,338
758
3,412
3,955

14,132
1,565
2,844
5,587
1,454
907
3,226
4,136

15,949
1,522
3,017
7,033
1,899
1,491
3,643
4,377

18,264
1,651
3,183
8,560
2,207
1,893
4,460
4,870

19,047
1,778
3,117
9,169
2,400
1,423
5,346
4,983

12,407
1,271
2,766
4,708
1,380
740
2,588
3,662

13,069
1,395
2,775
5,115
1,378
771
2,966
3,784

13,685
1,685
2,769
5,262
1,338
758
3,166
3,969

14,543
1,640
2,960
5,712
1,454
907
3,351
4,231

16,075
1,602
2,939
7,102
1,899
1,491
3,712
4,432

17,953
1,530
3,074
8,657
2,207
1,893
4,557
4,692

18,798
1,761
3,202
8,805
2,400
1,423
4,982
5,030

39

Capital goods, except automotive................................................................ 362,685

84,658

91,886

89,329

96,812

98,227 104,627 102,779

85,912

90,099

90,602

96,072 100,148 102,332 104,240

40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

Machinery, except consumer-type................................................................ 298,246
Electric generating machinery, electric apparatus, and parts................... 33,383
Nonelectric, including parts and attachments.......................................... 264,863
Oil drilling, mining, and construction machinery..................................
18,985
Industrial engines, pumps, and compressors.......................................
14,935
Machine tools and metalworking machinery........................................
7,663
Measuring, testing, and control instruments........................................
16,720
Other industrial, agricultural, and service industry machinery.............. 58,771

70,579
7,961
62,618
4,632
3,361
1,813
3,912
14,121

74,123
8,382
65,741
4,709
3,719
1,942
4,170
15,110

74,202
8,297
65,905
4,673
3,706
1,859
4,159
14,328

79,342
8,743
70,599
4,971
4,149
2,049
4,479
15,212

79,604
9,337
70,267
4,914
3,808
2,275
4,522
16,051

84,389
10,007
74,382
5,602
4,002
2,379
4,842
17,017

84,097
10,014
74,083
5,827
4,030
2,426
4,871
16,556

71,234
8,048
63,186
4,628
3,462
1,872
3,927
14,176

73,227
8,252
64,975
4,565
3,648
1,898
4,043
14,372

75,384
8,280
67,104
4,730
3,764
1,891
4,271
14,631

78,401
8,803
69,598
5,062
4,061
2,002
4,479
15,592

80,429
9,453
70,976
4,871
3,927
2,344
4,541
16,141

83,290
9,851
73,439
5,463
3,913
2,333
4,697
16,199

85,287
9,969
75,318
5,974
4,076
2,463
4,977
16,903

48
49
50
51
52

Computers, peripherals, and parts.......................................................
Semiconductors...................................................................................
Telecommunications equipment...........................................................
Other office and business machines....................................................
Scientific, hospital, and medical equipment and parts..........................

45,537
47,221
25,666
2,336
27,029

11,060
10,843
5,955
519
6,402

10,973
11,390
6,443
559
6,726

11,206
12,321
6,424
587
6,642

12,298
12,667
6,844
671
7,259

11,686
12,568
6,477
628
7,338

11,542
13,651
7,228
700
7,419

11,515
13,564
7,369
670
7,255

11,068
10,962
6,128
535
6,428

11,411
11,452
6,307
570
6,709

11,613
12,183
6,551
602
6,868

11,445
12,624
6,680
629
7,024

11,743
12,714
6,628
647
7,420

11,949
13,712
7,070
712
7,391

11,845
13,413
7,565
684
7,418

53
54
55

Civilian aircraft, engines, and parts..............................................................
Civilian aircraft, complete, all types..........................................................
Other transportation equipment...................................................................

60,784
29,333
3,655

13,346
5,980
733

16,848
8,919
915

14,263
6,346
864

16,327
8,088
1,143

17,638
9,461
985

19,068
10,555
1,170

17,673
9,063
1,009

13,945
6,416
733

15,957
8,113
915

14,354
6,437
864

16,528
8,367
1,143

18,734
10,387
985

17,872
9,470
1,170

17,944
9,305
1,009

56

Automotive vehicles, parts, and engines.....................................................

98,578

23,270

25,736

23,167

26,405

25,971

28,324

25,219

23,551

23,678

25,224

26,125

26,372

26,166

27,878

57
58
59
60
61

To Canada....................................................................................................
Passenger cars, new and used................................................................
Trucks, buses, and special purpose vehicles...........................................
Engines and engine parts........................................................................
Other parts and accessories....................................................................

53,591
12,096
10,091
6,227
25,177

12,996
2,879
2,347
1,574
6,196

14,572
3,670
2,737
1,625
6,540

12,255
2,439
2,398
1,435
5,983

13,768
3,108
2,609
1,593
6,458

13,746
3,180
2,641
1,486
6,439

15,528
3,778
3,275
1,780
6,695

12,676
2,666
2,887
1,493
5,630

12,909
2,955
2,460
1,507
5,987

12,973
2,948
2,497
1,503
6,025

13,845
3,192
2,618
1,537
6,498

13,864
3,001
2,516
1,680
6,667

13,679
3,248
2,817
1,417
6,197

13,868
3,052
2,976
1,654
6,186

14,726
3,620
3,179
1,632
6,295

62
63
64
65
66

To other areas..............................................................................................
Passenger cars, new and used................................................................
Trucks, buses, and special purpose vehicles...........................................
Engines and engine parts........................................................................
Other parts and accessories....................................................................

44,987
18,397
3,386
5,098
18,106

10,274
4,172
702
1,213
4,187

11,164
4,568
880
1,263
4,453

10,912
4,241
793
1,271
4,607

12,637
5,416
1,011
1,351
4,859

12,225
4,913
904
1,397
5,011

12,796
5,347
825
1,332
5,292

12,543
5,467
717
1,294
5,065

10,642
4,458
762
1,218
4,204

10,705
4,279
838
1,234
4,354

11,379
4,600
853
1,284
4,642

12,261
5,060
933
1,362
4,906

12,693
5,257
994
1,403
5,039

12,298
5,041
782
1,301
5,174

13,152
5,959
777
1,309
5,107

Consumer goods (nonfood), except autom otive........................................ 115,715

67

27,795

29,227

28,403

30,290

30,903

32,493

31,658

28,159

28,411

29,138

30,007

31,213

31,511

32,891

68
69
70
71
72

Consumer nondurable goods, manufactured...............................................
Medical, dental, and pharmaceutical preparations, including vitamins.....
Consumer durable goods, manufactured.....................................................
Household and kitchen appliances and other household goods...............
Unmanufactured consumer goods (gem stones, nursery stock)...................

52,848
27,620
53,619
23,449
9,248

12,812
6,917
12,754
5,382
2,229

13,402
7,174
13,560
5,934
2,265

13,058
6,445
12,876
5,929
2,469

13,576
7,084
14,429
6,204
2,285

13,890
7,354
14,420
6,247
2,593

14,188
7,578
15,532
6,577
2,773

14,521
7,669
14,682
6,479
2,455

13,102
7,063
12,805
5,417
2,252

13,058
6,817
13,104
5,788
2,249

13,088
6,626
13,654
6,077
2,396

13,600
7,114
14,056
6,167
2,351

14,168
7,473
14,492
6,302
2,553

13,835
7,197
14,936
6,423
2,740

14,666
7,953
15,783
6,643
2,442

73

Exports, n.e.c..................................................................................................

25,607

5,727

6,542

6,362

6,976

7,053

7,673

8,015

6,017

6,342

6,457

6,791

7,332

7,463

8,136

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




24

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 2a. U.S. Trade in Goods— Table Ends
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

2005

2005
I

II

Seasonally adjusted
2006

III

IV

I

II

2005
III p

I

II

2006
III

IV

I

II

III p

C Trade in goods, by principal end-use category, adjusted to balance-ofpayments basis, excluding military:— Continued:
74 Imports of goods, balance-of-payments basis, excluding military (A—16).... 1,677,371 381,441 414,071 430,168 451,691 436,132 467,446 484,922 397,457 410,811 423,693 445,410 452,481 463,441 480,681
75
76

Petroleum and products 6............................................................................
Nonpetroleum products...............................................................................

251,856 49,820 59,743 70,131 72,162 67,294 81,749 87,954 53,157 58,261 67,284 73,154 72,129 79,292 84,177
1,425,515 331,621 354,328 360,037 379,529 368,838 385,697 396,968 344,300 352,550 356,409 372,256 380,352 384,149 396,504

77

Foods, feeds, and beverages.......................................................................

68,096

16,097

17,004

16,686

18,309

18,292

18,440

18,271

16,397

16,798

17,250

17,651

18,528

18,306

19,101

78
79
80
81
82
83
84

Agricultural.................
Coffee, cocoa, and sugar........................................................................
Green coffee...........
Meat products and poultry.......................................................................
Vegetables, fruits, nuts, and preparations...............................................
Wine, beer, and related products............................................................
Other agricultural foods, feeds, and beverages.......................................

51,321
4,239
2,502
7,476
13,877
6,939
18,790

12,399
1,107
608
1,628
3,910
1,474
4,280

13,155
1,093
743
1,919
3,642
1,800
4,701

12,300
998
587
1,845
2,825
1,823
4,809

13,467
1,041
564
2,084
3,500
1,842
5,000

14,173
1,275
675
2,026
4,497
1,642
4,733

13,976
1,203
733
1,726
3,807
2,044
5,196

13,507
1,320
734
1,720
3,130
1,966
5,371

12,245
979
522
1,683
3,317
1,701
4,565

12,711
1,021
679
1,895
3,456
1,675
4,664

13,004
1,073
644
1,923
3,521
1,780
4,707

13,361
1,166
657
1,975
3,583
1,783
4,854

13,943
1,155
582
2,074
3,826
1,878
5,010

13,538
1,135
673
1,707
3,622
1,909
5,165

14,458
1,443
832
1,817
3,954
1,943
5,301

85
86
87

Nonagricultural (fish, distilled beverages, etc.)............................................
Fish and shellfish....................................................................................
Whiskey and other alcoholic beverages..................................................

16,775
11,944
4,380

3,698
2,621
965

3,849
2,697
1,037

4,386
3,158
1,116

4,842
3,468
1,262

4,119
2,923
1,067

4,464
3,135
1,224

4,764
3,436
1,211

4,152
2,932
1,108

4,087
2,922
1,049

4,246
3,014
1,120

4,290
3,076
1,103

4,585
3,244
1,212

4,768
3,413
1,250

4,643
3,286
1,240

88

Industrial supplies and m aterials................................................................

524,637 114,204 127,129 136,855 146,449 142,021 158,306 165,328 117,499 123,662 134,654 148,822 146,437 153,879 162,547

89
90
91
92

Agricultural..................................................................................................
Nonagricultural products.............................................................................
Energy products......................................................................................
Fuels and lubricants6.........................................................................

7,302
1,668
1,941
2,070
2,074
1,757
1,979
1,858
1,835
1,925
1,831
1,735
2,009
2,005
2,025
517,335 112,346 125,294 135,187 144,508 139,951 156,232 163,403 115,668 121,905 132,919 146,843 144,428 151,874 160,522
295,790 58,893 68,610 81,163 87,124 79,307 91,022 96,420 61,292 67,519 79,066 87,913 82,976 89,093 93,165
292,445 58,315 67,918 80,047 86,165 78,374 90,243 95,492 60,745 66,791 78,093 86,816 82,081 88,252 92,350

93
94
95
96
97

Paper and paper base stocks..................................................................
Textile supplies and related materials.....................................................
Chemicals, excluding medicinals
Building materials, except metals....
Other nonmetals......................................................................................

13,573
12,795
51,032
34,401
25,921

3,380
3,113
12,408
7,996
5,959

3,366
3,306
12,648
9,153
6,496

3,326
3,185
11,942
8,771
6,656

3,501
3,191
14,034
8,481
6,810

3,465
3,161
14,365
8,703
6,556

3,604
3,359
13,576
9,739
7,132

3,743
3,252
13,288
9,088
7,329

3,427
3,175
11,862
8,583
6,228

3,363
3,137
12,168
8,566
6,325

3,286
3,173
12,591
8,353
6,475

3,497
3,310
14,411
8,899
6,893

3,515
3,205
13,673
9,353
6,818

3,609
3,200
13,120
9,161
6,955

3,705
3,275
14,146
8,721
7,188

98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106

Metals and nonmetallic products.............................................................
Steelmaking materials....
Iron and steel products....
Nonferrous metals..........
Nonmonetary gold...........................................................................
Other precious metals.
Bauxite and aluminum.
Other nonferrous metals.................................................................
Other metals and nonmetallic products...............................................

83,823
6,148
30,780
31,809
4,433
5,424
11,565
10,387
15,086

20,597
1,828
8,095
7,325
958
1,222
2,823
2,322
3,349

21,715
1,574
8,185
8.107
1,011
1,235
3,251
2,610
3,849

20,144
1,320
7,149
7,801
1,102
1,362
2,829
2,508
3,874

21,367
1,426
7,351
8,576
1,362
1,605
2,662
2,947
4,014

24,394
1,474
8,793
9,939
1,430
1,837
3,322
3,350
4,188

27,800
1,584
9,463
11,698
1,539
2,026
4,049
4,084
5,055

30,283
1,811
10,618
12,612
1,389
2,224
3,774
5,225
5,242

21,101
2,032
8,353
7,277
958
1,241
2,742
2,336
3,439

20,827
1,477
7,811
7,865
1,011
1,234
3,031
2.589
3,674

19,975
1,227
7,051
7,873
1,102
1,326
2,933
2,512
3,824

21,920
1,412
7,565
8,794
1,362
1,623
2,859
2,950
4,149

24,888
1,638
9,047
9,916
1,430
1,815
3,296
3,375
4,287

26,736
1,508
9,004
11,395
1,539
2.037
3,761
4,058
4,829

30,322
1,747
10,630
12,724
1,389
2,256
3,846
5,233
5,221

107

Capital goods, except automotive...............................................................

379,227

87,278

95,964

96,640

99,345

97,838 104,474 107,616

90,707

95,256

95,789

97,475 101,107 103,887 107,466

108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115

Machinery, except consumer-type...............................................................
Electric generating machinery, electric apparatus, and parts...................
Nonelectric, including parts and attachments.........................................
Oil drilling, mining, and construction machinery...................................
Industrial engines, pumps, and compressors.......................................
Machine tools and metalworking machinery.......................................
Measuring, testing, and control instruments.......................................
Other industrial, agricultural, and service industry machinery.............

351,083
43,111
307.972
15,634
12,659
8,326
12,197
70,130

80,318
9,786
70,532
3,385
3,043
1,828
2,814
16,645

88,299
10,643
77,656
4,493
3,289
2,084
3,008
18,003

90,007
11,303
78,704
3,853
3,128
2,069
3,136
17,487

92,459
11,379
81,080
3.903
3,199
2,345
3,239
17,995

90,130
11,324
78,806
4,338
3,383
2,343
3,165
18,465

96,701 100,123
12,358 13,296
84,343 86,827
5,138
4,829
3,548
3,568
2,402
2,367
3,329
3,384
19,954 19,232

83,711
10,101
73,610
3,361
2,997
1,921
2,910
16,956

87,662
10,533
77,129
4,187
3,201
2,018
3,002
17,439

89,156
11,156
78,000
3,954
3,199
2,092
3,073
17,635

90,554
11,321
79,233
4,132
3,262
2,295
3,212
18,100

93,375
11,574
81,801
4,313
3,328
2,464
3,270
18,680

96,192
12,224
83,968
4,814
3,457
2,330
3,316
19,415

99,934
13,299
86,635
4,962
3,677
2,379
3,342
19,615

116
117
118
119
120

Computers, peripherals, and parts,,
Semiconductors...................................
Telecommunications equipment.............
Other office and business machines...................................................
Scientific, hospital, and medical equipment and parts.........................

93,310
25,761
37,030
8,575
24,350

21,319
6,182
7,526
1,991
5,799

22,652
6,275
9,710
2,168
5,974

24,338
6,555
9,757
2,180
6,201

25,001
6,749
10,037
2,236
6,376

23,218
6,673
9,143
2,035
6,043

24,675
6,658
9,934
2,238
6,467

26,770
7,216
10,461
2,201
6,799

23,023
6,249
8,036
2,095
6,062

23,206
6,345
9,504
2,164
6,063

23,540
6,498
9,728
2,156
6,125

23,541
6,669
9,762
2,160
6,100

24,881
6,769
9,717
2,130
6,249

25,359
6,741
9,718
2,244
6,574

26,110
7,137
10,422
2,184
6,807

121
122
123

Transportation equipment, except automotive.............................................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and parts.........................................................
Civilian aircraft, complete, all types.....................................................

28,144
25,752
10,699

6,960
6,350
2,746

7,665
7,068
3,294

6,633
6,030
2,280

6,886
6,304
2,379

7,708
7,085
2,821

7,773
6,995
2,674

7,493
6,851
2,394

6,996
6,386
2,746

7,594
6,998
3,294

6,633
6,029
2,280

6,921
6,339
2,379

7,732
7,109
2,821

7,695
6,917
2,674

7,532
6,890
2,394

124

Automotive vehicles, parts, and engines....................................................

239,511

56,957

60,099

57,328

65,127

63,514

66,149

59,824

57,939

58,656

60,309

62,607

64,581

64,551

63,413

125
126
127
128
129

From Canada..............................................................................................
Passenger cars, new and used...............................................................
Trucks, buses, and special purpose vehicles..........................................
Engines and engine parts.......................................................................
Other parts and accessories.....................

70,757
36,077
12,888
4,352
17,440

17,102
8,839
2,709
1,182
4,372

17,584
8,431
3,390
1,143
4,620

16,897
8,333
3,298
1,034
4,232

19,174
10,474
3,491
993
4,216

18,634
10,058
3,025
1,030
4,521

18,976
9,873
3,400
1,142
4,561

15,141
7,598
2,723
887
3,933

17,055
8,974
2,725
1,115
4,241

16,733
8,026
3,212
1,118
4,377

18,065
8,995
3,517
1,098
4,455

18,904
10,082
3,434
1,021
4,367

18,562
10,213
3,048
956
4,345

18,070
9,422
3,211
1,115
4,322

16.466
8,354
2,943
961
4,208

130
131
132
133
134

From other areas..........................................
Passenger cars, new and used.................
Trucks, buses, and special purpose vehicles..........................................
Engines and engine parts.........................
Other parts and accessories.....................

168,754
87,316
9,780
15,410
56,248

39,855
20,565
2,091
3,716
13,483

42,515
21,883
2,548
3,824
14,260

40,431
20,093
2,341
3,903
14,094

45,953
24,775
2,800
3,967
14,411

44,880
23,495
2,715
3,934
14,736

47,173
24,563
3,015
4,113
15,482

44,683
23,016
2,898
3,992
14,777

40,884
21,454
2,245
3,697
13,488

41,923
21,822
2,522
3.725
13,854

42,244
21,577
2,319
3,992
14,356

43,703
22,463
2,694
3,996
14,550

46,019
24,525
2,921
3,895
14,678

46,481
24,415
2,974
4,017
15,075

46,947
24,792
2,867
4,114
15,174

135

Consumer goods (nonfood), except automotive........................................

407,316

93,301

98,843 108,053 107,119

136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144

Consumer nondurable goods, manufactured..............................................
Textile apparel and household goods, except rugs.................................
Footwear of leather, rubber, and other materials.....................................
Consumer durable goods, manufactured....................................................
Household and kitchen appliances and other household goods..............
Toys, shooting, and sporting goods, including bicycles............................
Television and video receivers.................................................................
Radio and stereo equipment, including records, tapes, and disks...........
Unmanufactured consumer goods (gemstones, nursery stock)...................

186,109
79,714
13,708
201,247
97,093
27,083
35,079
12,228
19,960

44,425
18,721
3,399
44,187
21,902
5,757
6,888
2,633
4,689

46,250
18,768
3,238
47,615
23,989
5,878
7,959
2,864
4,978

50,031
23,127
3,841
52,704
25,730
7,699
9,080
3,040
5,318

45,403
19,098
3,230
56,741
25,472
7,749
11,152
3,691
4,975

46,494
18,453
3,620
47,551
24,673
5,152
7,725
2,362
5,312

48,172
19,206
3,456
50,929
25,528
5,864
9,286
2,672
5,439

55,468
24,783
4,095
57,535
27,831
8,051
11,122
2,755
5,227

46,121
19,836
3,347
49,989
23,826
7,231
8,468
3,051
4,654

47,573
20,206
3,381
49,206
23,746
6.740
8,445
2,984
4,998

45,387
19,490
3,446
50,436
24,536
6,626
8,834
3,004
5,134

47,028
20,182
3,534
51,616
24,985
6,486
9,332
3,189
5,174

47,705
19,296
3,554
53,174
26,623
6,457
9,346
2,697
5,267

49,625
20,724
3,627
52,619
25,226
6,757
9,843
2,794
5,435

51,498
21,428
3,709
55,692
26,832
7,026
10,937
2,773
5,107

145

Imports, n.e.c, and U.S. goods returned.....................................................

58,584

13,604

15,032

14,606

15,342

15,110

15,537

15,653

14,151

14,662

14,734

15,037

15,682

15,139

15,857

146
147

U.S. goods returned....................................................................................
Other products, including balance-of-payments adjustments not included
above (minimum value shipments and miscellaneous imports)...............

33,561

7,795

8,718

8,389

8,659

8,492

8,485

8,572

8,109

8,443

8,504

8,505

8,816

8,191

8,742

25,023

5,809

6,314

6,217

6,683

6,618

7,052

7,081

6,042

6,219

6,230

6,532

6,866

6,948

7,115

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




99,357 104,540 118,230 100,764 101,777 100,957 103,818 106,146 107,679 112,297

January 2007

S u rvey

of

25

C u r r e n t B u sin e ss

Table 3. Private Services Transactions
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

2005

2005
I

1 Exports of private services..............................................

II

Seasonally adjusted
2006

III

IV

I

II'

2006

2005
III >
>

I

II

III

IV

I

II r

III »

360,489

85,572

87,178

93,721

94,018

93,765

96,526

102,399

87,438

89,117

90,377

93,555

95,188

98,590

99,652

2
3
4
5
6

Travel (table 1, line 6 )......................................................
Passenger fares (table 1, line 7)......................................
Other transportation (table 1, line 8 ) ................................
Freight.........................................................................
Port services...............................................................

81,680
20,931
42,245
17,340
24,905

17,786
4,664
9,682
4,215
5,467

21,425
5,104
10,358
4,317
6,041

23,545
5,933
10,754
4,307
6,447

18,924
5,229
11,451
4,501
6,950

18,781
5,257
11,394
4,330
7,064

22,050
5,209
12,091
4,561
7,530

24,219
5,664
12,445
4,664
7,781

19,983
4,890
10,103
4,283
5,820

20,934
5,161
10,353
4,257
6,096

20,389
5,508
10,545
4,332
6,213

20,374
5,371
11,244
4,468
6,776

20,742
5,545
11,588
4,402
7,186

21,443
5,275
12,202
4,495
7,707

21,464
5,326
12,216
4,692
7,524

7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Royalties and license fees (table 1, line 9).......................
Affiliated......................................................................
U.S. parents’ receipts..............................................
U.S. affiliates’ receipts.............................................
Unaffiliated..................................................................
Industrial processes ' .............................................
Other2..........

57,410
42,106
37,939
4,167
15,304
6,633
8,671

13,618
10,012
9,317
695
3,606
1,684
1,922

13,742
10,131
9,313
818
3,611
1,544
2,067

13,958
10,105
9,383
722
3,853
1,762
2,091

16,092
11,858
9,926
1,932
4,234
1,643
2,591

14,632
10,550
9,218
1,332
4,082
1,905
2,177

15,302
11,432
9,912
1,520
3,870
1,678
2,192

14,993
10,775
9,320
1,455
4,218
1,997
2,220

14,146
10,540
9,554
986
3,606
1,684
1,922

13,943
10,332
9,343
989
3,611
1,544
2,067

14,397
10,544
9,663
881
3,853
1,762
2,091

14,923
10,689
9,380
1,309
4,234
1,643
2,591

15,040
10,958
9,457
1,501
4,082
1,905
2,177

15,567
11,697
9,947
1,750
3,870
1,678
2,192

15,509
11,291
9,601
1,690
4,218
1,997
2,220

14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

Other private services (table 1, line 10)...........................
Affiliated services........................................................
U.S. parents’ receipts..............................................
U.S. affiliates’ receipts.............................................
Unaffiliated services
Education......
Financial services...................................................
Insurance services..................................................
Telecommunications................................................
Business, professional, and technical services........
Other unaffiliated services 3....................................

158,223
49,389
29,506
19,883
108,834
14,123
29,281
6,831
4,724
39,491
14,384

39,822
11,634
7,090
4,544
28,188
5,830
6,809
1,642
1,157
8,846
3,904

36,549
11,733
7,196
4,537
24,816
1,749
6,924
1,623
1,207
9,612
3,701

39,531
11,863
6,968
4,895
27,668
3,932
7,355
1,714
1,265
10,098
3,304

42,321
14,159
8,252
5,907
28,162
2,612
8,193
1,852
1,095
10,935
3,475

43,701
12,921
7,387
5,534
30,780
5,961
8,415
1,909
1,183
9,930
3,382

41,874
13,619
7,698
5,921
28,255
1,778
8,531
1,966
1,286
11,126
3,568

45,078
13,930
7,790
6,140
31,148
4,057
8,799
2,032
1,254
11,292
3,714

38,316
12,203
7,358
4.845
26,113
3,498
6,809
1,642
1,157
9,019
3,987

38,726
12,075
7,281
4,794
26,651
3,517
6,924
1,623
1,207
9,658
3,723

39,538
12,318
7,307
5,011
27,220
3,549
7,355
1,714
1,265
10,103
3,235

41,643
12,793
7,559
5,234
28,850
3,560
8,193
1,852
1,095
10,712
3,439

42,273
13,553
7,664
5,889
28,720
3,576
8,415
1,909
1,183
10,162
3,475

44,103
14,030
7,787
6,243
30,073
3,592
8,531
1,966
1,286
11,113
3,585

45,137
14,440
8,167
6,273
30,697
3,658
8,799
2,032
1,254
11,308
3,646

25 Imports of private services..............................................

280,563

64,413

72,118

73,922

70,110

69,811

79,864

80,760

68,679

69,452

70,397

72,035

74,401

76,862

76,836

26
27
28
29
30

Travel (table 1, line 23)....................................................
Passenger fares (table 1, line 24)....................................
Other transportation (table 1, line 25)..............................
Freight.........................................................................
Port services...............................................................

69,175
26,066
62,107
44,156
17,951

14,860
5,771
14,959
10,834
4,125

19,904
7,007
15,352
10,896
4,456

19,657
7,089
15,622
10,934
4,688

14,754
6,199
16,174
11,492
4,682

15,071
6,159
15,553
11,068
4,485

21,253
7,453
16,592
11,481
5,111

20,834
7,130
17,056
11,821
5,235

17,270
6,213
15,617
11,373
4,244

17,589
6,555
15,135
10,695
4,440

17,181
6,654
15,205
10,641
4,564

17,135
6,644
16,150
11,447
4,703

17,634
6,749
16,232
11,630
4,602

18,639
6,948
16,377
11,280
5,097

18,136
6,595
16,603
11,503
5,100

31
32
33
34
35
36
37

Royalties and license fees (table 1, line 26).....................
Affiliated......................................................................
U.S. parents’ payments...........................................
U.S. affiliates’ payments..........................................
Unaffiliated..................................................................
Industrial processes 1.............................................
Other2....................................................................

24,501
20,360
3,155
17,205
4,141
2,747
1,394

5,635
4,622
733
3,889
1,013
701
312

5,737
4,708
782
3,926
1,029
677
352

6,340
5,305
811
4,494
1,035
677
358

6,789
5,725
829
4,896
1,064
692
372

6,552
4,869
806
4,063
1,683
689
994

6,237
4,944
818
4,126
1,293
681
612

6,374
5,115
804
4,311
1,259
704
555

5,880
4,867
733
4,134
1,013
701
312

6,004
4,975
782
4,193
1,029
677
352

6,356
5,321
811
4,510
1,035
677
358

6,261
5,197
829
4,368
1,064
692
372

6,741
5,058
806
4,252
1,683
689
994

6,513
5,220
818
4,402
1,293
681
612

6,383
5,124
804
4,320
1,259
704
555

38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48

Other private services (table 1, line 27)...........................
Affiliated services........................................................
U.S. parents’ payments...........................................
U.S. affiliates’ payments..........................................
Unaffiliated services....................................................
Education......
Financial services...................................................
Insurance services..................................................
Telecommunications................................................
Business, professional, and technical services........
Other unaffiliated services3....................................

98,714
38,989
22,245
16,744
59,725
4,029
6,549
28,482
4,658
14,516
1,493

23,188
8,800
5,274
3,526
14,388
755
1,540
7,167
1,109
3,511
306

24,118
9,387
5,513
3,874
14,731
1,002
1,626
6,896
1,159
3,659
390

25,214
9,653
5,457
4,196
15,561
1,318
1,668
7,359
1,259
3,582
375

26,194
11,149
6,001
5,148
15,045
954
1,715
7,060
1,131
3,764
422

26,476
11,169
5,787
5,382
15,307
860
1,811
7,545
1,029
3,711
353

28,329
11,599
6,466
5,133
16,730
1,144
2,051
8,241
1,088
3,859
347

29,366
11,699
6,334
5,365
17,667
1,507
2,137
8,514
1,071
4,098
341

23,699
9,110
5,584
3,526
14,589
956
1,540
7,167
1,109
3,511
306

24,169
9,445
5,571
3,874
14,724
995
1,626
6,896
1,159
3,659
390

25,001
9,734
5,538
4,196
15,267
1,024
1,668
7,359
1,259
3,582
375

25,845
10,700
5,552
5,148
15,145
1,054
1,715
7,060
1,131
3,764
422

27,045
11,509
6,127
5,382
15,536
1,089
1,811
7,545
1,029
3,711
353

28,385
11,667
6,534
5,133
16,718
1,131
2,051
8,241
1,088
3,859
347

29,119
11,793
6,428
5,365
17,326
1,165
2,137
8,514
1,071
4,098
341

Supplemental detail on insurance transactions:
49
50

Premiums received 4.......................................................
Actual losses paid...........................................................

18,409
14,625

4,201
3,242

4,176
3,586

4,675
3,838

5,357
3,959

5,459
3,787

5,332
3,775

5,517
3,802

4,201
3,242

4,176
3,586

4,675
3,838

5,357
3,959

5,459
3,787

5,332
3,775

5,517
3,802

51
52

Premiums paid 4..............................................................
Actual losses recovered..................................................

63,997
43,867

16,000
6,804

15,308
6,967

16,807
22,591

15,882
7,505

15,051
7,783

16,316
8,165

16,569
8,530

16,000
6,804

15,308
6,967

16,807
22,591

15,882
7,505

15,051
7,783

16,316
8,165

16,569
8,530

Memoranda:
53 Balance on goods (table 1, line 71)..................................... -782,740 -169,185 -186,547 -210,600 -216,408 -194,112 -208,804 -230,590 -183,268 -188,220 -198,746 -212,506 -207,969 -210,598 -218,612
54 Balance on private services (line 1 minus line 25)...............
79,926
21,521
20,787
21,728
22,816
21,159
15,060
19,799
23,908
23,954
16,662
21,639
18,759
19,665
19,980
55 Balance on goods and private services (lines 53 and 54).... -702,814 -148,026 -171,487 -190,801 -192,500 -170,158 -192,142 -208,951 -164,509 -168,555 -178,766 -190,985 -187,182 -188,870 -195,796
See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




26

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 4. U.S. Official Reserve Assets and Foreign Official Assets in the United States
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

(Credits +; decrease in U.S. assets or increase in foreign assets.
Debits increase in U.S. assets or decrease in foreign assets.)

2005

2005
II

I

2006
III

IV

I

IIr

III"

Amounts
outstanding
Sept. 30,
2006

A1 U.S. official reserve assets, net (table 1, line 41).............................................................
?
Gold (table 1, line 42)...................................................................................................
3
Special drawing rights (table 1, line 4 3 ).......................................................................
4
Reserve position in the International Monetary Fund (table 1, line 44).........................
5
Foreign currencies (table 1, line 45).............................................................................

14,096

5,331

-797

4,766

4,796

513

-560

1,006

4,511
10,200
-615

1,713
3,763
-145

-97
-564
-136

2,976
1,951
-161

-81
5,050
-173

-67
729
-149

-51
-351
-158

-54
1,275
-215

211,620
156,703
8,655
6,619
39,643

B1 Foreign official assets in the United States, net (table 1, line 56)..................................
By instrument:
2
U.S. Treasury securities (table 1, line 58).....................................................................
3
Bills and certificates.................................................................................................
4
Bonds and notes, marketable....................
Bonds and notes, nonmarketable..............
5
6
Other U.S. Government securities (table 1, line 59).....................................................
7
Other U.S. Government liabilities (table 1, line 60).......................................................
8
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere (table 1, line 61)..........
Banks’ liabilities for awn account' ...........................................................................
9
10
Repurchase agreements......................................................................................
11
Deposits and brokerage balances 2.....................................................................
12
Other liabilities...........................
13
Banks’ customers’ liabilities 1...................................................................................
14
Negotiable certificates of deposit and other short-term instruments.....................
15
Other liabilities......................................................................................................
Other foreign official assets (table 1, line 62)...............................................................
16

199,495

18,965

74,613

33,983

71,934

75,697

75,869

80,775

2,437,395

71,749
-43,336
115,767
-682
84,701
-488
24,275
23,483
3,565
18,768
1,150
792
1,373
-581
19,258

9,226
-9,354
18,549
31
23,781
-740
-15,814
1,223
-2,904
6,305
-2,178
-17,037
-15,702
-1,335
2,512

16,892
-30,933
48,575
-750
19,421
112
34,187
15,537
6,883
6,764
1,890
18,650
14,483
4,167
4,001

8,213
-9,543
17,738
18
17,713
395
824
7,301
6,852
7
442
-6,477
-2,926
-3,551
6,838

37,418
6,494
30,905
19
23,786
-255
5,078
-578
-7,266
5,692
996
5,656
5,518
138
5,907

42,156
13,626
28,511
19
24,063
37
-821
23,555
22,497
-415
1,473
-24,376
-23,252
-1,124
10,262

-8,905
-27,527
18,603
19
30,458
724
42,241
20,279
17,126
6,539
-3,386
21,962
21,920
42
11,351

47,225
-6,339
53,544
20
32,912
1,073
-7,207
3,632
-8,908
8,615
3,925
-10,839
-11,085
246
6,772

1,364,369
181,623
1,181,740
1,006
447,970
17,834
308,861
196,451
125,797
60,166
10,488
112,410
112,121
289
298,361

By area:
Europe.........................................................................................................................
Canada......................
Latin America and Caribbean
Asia...........................
Africa.........................
Other...........................................................................................................................

24,478
249
5,405
166,935
5,288
-2,860

-7,260
-664
-768
26,322
2,733
-1,398

17,354
457
1,373
47,576
929
6,924

266
-4
-1,841
47,426
-3,281
-8,583

14,118
460
6,641
45,611
4,907
197

21,871
124
8,412
43,954
-1,442
2,778

10,667
-451
11,692
46,899
2,735
4,327

-9,165
-335
12,831
81,933
402
-4,891

377,571
6,656
159,989
1,839,820
21,763
31,596

17
18
19
20
21
22

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




January 2007

S u rvey

of

27

C u r r e n t B u sin e ss

Table 5. Selected U.S. Government Transactions
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
2005

Line

U.S. Government grants and transactions increasing Government assets, total....

2006

2005

33,771

9,893

6,478

7,765

9,633

7,360

6,210

6,114

33,707
31,362
9,080
22,282

11,401
9,221
3,777
5,444

5,882
5,780
439
5,341

7,309
7,270
531
6,739

9,115
9,091
4,333
4,758

5,850
4,631
477
4,153

5,!
5,341
393
4,948

5,531
5,529
583
4,946

By category
Grants, net..................................................................................................................
U.S. Government current grants, net (table 1, line 36, with sign reversed)..............
Financing military purchases 1............................................................................
Other grants..................................................................................
Cash contributions received from coalition partners for Persian Gulf operations..
Debt forgiveness (table 1, part of line 39, with sign reversed).................................

2,344

2,180

101

39

24

1,220

....487

Credits and other long-term assets (table 1, line 47, with sign reversed).................................
Capital subscriptions and contributions to international financial institutions, excluding IMF.
Credits repayable in U.S. dollars...........................................................................................
Credits repayable in other than U.S. dollars..........................................................................
Other long-term assets.........................

2,255
1,264
989

519
363
156

708
355
353

518
294

509
252
257

1,517
1,302
215

376
162
214

Foreign currency holdings and short-term assets, net (table 1, line 49 with sign reversed).......
Foreign currency holdings (excluding administrative cash holdings), net..............................
Receipts from:
Sales of agricultural commodities.................................................................................
Interest.........................................................................................................................
Repayments of principal...............................................................................................
Reverse grants.............................................................................................................
Other sources..............................................................................................................
Less currencies disbursed for:
Grants and credits in the recipient’s currency...............................................................
Other grants and credits...............................................................................................
Other U.S. Government expenditures...........................................................................

-2,191

-2,027

-111

-2,184

-2,017

.....- 1 0

.....- 1 0

Assets acquired in performance of U.S. Government guarantee and insurance obligations, net.
Other assets held under Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act, net..................................
Assets financing military sales contracts, n e t2...........................................................................
Other short-term assets (including changes in administrative cash holdings), net......................

2

2

222
2

575
336
238

7

-78
.......

"-16

-25

-5

By program
Capital subscriptions and contributions to international financial institutions, excluding IMF...,
Under Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act and related programs.................
Under Foreign Assistance Act and related programs..............................................................
Under Export-lmport Bank Act..............................
Under Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act
Under other grant and credit programs..................................................................................
Other foreign currency assets acquired (lines A16, A17, and A19).......................................
Less foreign currencies used by U.S. Government other than for grants or credits (line A22).
Other (including changes in administrative cash holdings), net..........................................

1,264
1,468
29,215
446
5
1,383

370
8,752
131

2
289

355
368
5,345
79
4
352

294
267
6,664
175
5
345

2

2

-10

252
464
8,455
61

1,302
400
4,182

1,201

162
413
4,843
398

-6

3
287

396

336
280
5,082
65
9
347

-3

-5

3,564
863
1,977
680
103

397

15

2

By disposition 3
Estimated transactions involving no direct dollar outflow from the United States............................................................
Expenditures on U.S. goods........................................................................................................................................
Expenditures on U.S. services 4.................................................................................................................................
Financing of military sales contracts by U.S. Government5 (line C6)..........................................................................
By long-term credits................................................................................................................................................
By short-term credits 1
By grants ' .................
U.S. Government grants and credits to repay prior U.S. Government credits 14.........................................................
U.S. Government long- and short-term credits to repay prior U.S. private credits 6 and other assets..........................
Increase in liabilities associated with U.S. Government grants and transactions increasing Government assets
(including changes in retained accounts)7 (line C11)..............................................................................................
Less receipts on short-term U.S. Government assets (a) financing military sales contracts ' (b) financing repayment
of private credits and other assets, and (c) financing expenditures on U.S. goods..................................................
Less foreign currencies used by U.S. Government other than for grants or credits (line A22).....................................
Estimated dollar payments to foreign countries and international financial institutions....................................................

22,784
11,064
8,961
2,344
239

7,207
4,075
2,204
763
47

3,704
856
2,150
517
87

4,561
1,310
2,723
526

7,312
4,823
1,883
538
105

4,378
870
1,685
514
58

3,942
997
1,935
494

2,105
2,482
-16

715
2,182
14

431
156
26

526
76
-63

433

456
1,302

....382
508

10

10

....577
31
16

2,051

2,031
2,775

3,204

2,321

2,981

2,268

2,550

Repayments on U.S. Government long-term assets, total (table 1, line 48).................................................................
Receipts of principal on U.S. Government credits...........................................................................................................
Under Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act and related programs......................................................
Under Foreign Assistance Act and related programs...................................................................................................
Under Export-lmport Bank Act............................................................
Under Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act..............................
Under other credit programs...............................................................
Receipts on other long-term assets........................................................

5.603
5.603
629
1,273
1,509
1,918
275

1.083
1.083
54
404
445
170
11

1.586
1.586
140
273
362
811

1.957
1.957
168
358
383
867
180

977
977
267
237
318
71
84

2.558
2.558
145
556
1,791
59
7

2.147
2.147
148
473
1,451
75

871
871

U.S. Government liabilities other than securities, total, net increase (+) (table 1, line 60)..........................................
Associated with military sales contracts 2.......................................................................................................................
U.S. Government cash receipts from foreign governments (including principal repayments on credits financing
military sales contracts), net of refunds 1................................................................................................................
Less U.S. Government receipts from principal repayments.........................................................................................
Less U.S. Treasury securities issued in connection with prepayments for military purchases in the United States......
Plus financing of military sales contracts by U.S. Government5 (line A39).................................................................
By long-term credits................................................................................................................................................
By short-term credits 1............................................................................................................................................
By grants 1..............................................................................................................................................................
Less transfers of goods and services (including transfers financed by grants for military purchases, and by credits)12
(table 1, line 5 ) ........................................................................................................................................................
Associated with U.S. Government grants and transactions increasing Government assets (including changes in retained
accounts)7 (line A45)..................................................................................................................................................
Associated with other liabilities.......................................................................................................................................
Sales of nuclear material by Department of Energy/U.S. Enrichment Corporation 8...................................................
Sales of space launch and other services by National Aeronautics and Space Administration....................................
Other sales and miscellaneous operations.................................................................................................................

-488
-487

-740
-734

112

395
388

-255
-254

37
40

724
724

1.073
1.073

17,432
825
397
2,344
239

3,749
268
298
763
47

4,450
179

5,369
168
100
526

3,864

4,502
231
292
514
58

4,770
315

4,651
192

494
112

....680
103

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




10,989

113

517
87

210
538
105

112

112

379
308
60
12

2,105

715

431

526

433

456

382

....577

19,040

4,679

4,675

5,239

4,446

4,453

4,226

4,067

28

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 6a. Direct Investment: Income, Capital, Royalties and License Fees, and Other Private Services— Continues
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

(Credits +; debits -)

2005

2005
I

II

Seasonally adjusted
2006

III

IV

2005

I

II r

III >
>

I

II

2006
III

IV

I

II'

III p

U.S. direct investment abroad:
1 Income (table 1, line 14)....................................................................
2
Earnings..........................................................................................
3
Distributed earnings....................................................................
4
Reinvested earnings....................................................................
5
Reinvested earnings without current-cost adjustment..............
Current-cost adjustment..........................................................
6
7
Interest............................................................................................
8
U.S. parents' receipts..................................................................
9
U.S. parents’ payments...............................................................

251,370
245,085
256,323
-11,238
-33,023
21,785
6,287
9,696
-3,410

58,427
56,787
25,102
31,684
26,252
5,432
1,641
2,480
-840

61,906 63,889 67,148
60,347 62,321 65,630
33,529 87,058 110,633
26,818 -24,737 -45,003
21,378 -30,187 -50,466
5,440
5,450
5,463
1,560
1,518
1,569
2,384
2,427
2,404
-825
-858
-886

68,195
66,690
16,801
49,889
44,410
5,479
1,504
2,402
-698

76,429
74,808
16,441
58,367
52,870
5,497
1,621
2,576
-955

75,182
73,693
16,370
57,323
51,806
5,517
1,488
2,481
-993

58,846
57,205
28,859
28,346
22,914
5,432
1,641
2,480
-840

60,572 64,476 67,481
59,012 62,907 65,963
37,163 93,698 96,602
21,849 -30,791 -30,639
16,409 -36,241 -36,102
5,440
5,450
5,463
1,560
1,569
1,518
2,384
2,427
2,404
-825
-858
-886

68,738
67,234
23,277
43,957
38,478
5,479
1,504
2,402
-898

74,923
73,302
18,912
54,390
48,893
5,497
1,621
2,576
-955

75,912
74,424
21,268
53,156
47,639
5,517
1,488
2,481
-993

10 Income without current-cost adjustment..............................................
11
Manufacturing..............................................................................
12
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
13
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
14
Holding companies, except bank holding companies...................
Other...........................................................................................
1b

229,587
50,534
27,812
29,293
69,322
52,626

52,995
11,607
6,134
7,621
16,367
11,268

56,466
13,278
7,014
7,307
17,041
11,824

58,439
13,336
6,565
6,900
17,393
14,246

61,685
12,314
8,099
7,466
18,519
15,288

62,716
13,736
6,640
8,305
19,487
14,547

70,932
16,141
7,976
8,050
21,601
17,165

69,665
16,446
7,698
7,235
20,973
17,311

53,414
11,990
6,688
7,100
16,367
11,268

55,132
12,615
7,089
6,561
17,041
11,824

59,026
13,418
6,973
6,995
17,393
14,246

62,018
12,512
7,061
8,638
18,519
15,288

63,259
14,188
7,234
7,804
19,487
14,547

69,426
15,329
8,054
7,279
21,601
17,165

70,395
16,541
8,172
7,398
20,973
17,311

16
17
18
19
20
21

Earnings without current-cost adjustment (line 2 less line 6 )...........
Manufacturing..............................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
Holding companies, except bank holding companies...................
Other...........................................................................................

223,300
48,951
27,337
29,600
68,091
49,321

51,355
11,258
6,017
7,734
15,906
10,441

54,907
12,895
6,893
7,341
16,777
11,001

56,871
12,908
6,455
6,972
17,119
13,418

60,167
11,890
7,972
7,555
18,287
14,463

61,211
13,342
6,516
8,409
19,197
13,746

69,311
15,667
7,837
8,162
21,305
16,340

68,176
15,980
7,583
7,380
20,707
16,525

51,773
11,641
6,572
7,213
15,906
10,441

53,572
12,233
6,967
6,594
16,777
11,001

57,457
12,989
6,863
7,068
17,119
13,418

60,500
12,089
6,934
8,727
18,287
14,463

61,755
13,795
7,110
7,907
19,197
13,746

67,805
14,854
7,915
7,391
21,305
16,340

68,907
16,075
8,057
7,543
20,707
16,525

22
23
24
25
26
2/

Interest............................................................................................
Manufacturing..............................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance 1.........
Holding companies, except bank holding companies...................
Other...........................................................................................

6,287
1,584
475
-308
1,231
3,304

1,641
349
116
-113
461
827

1,560
382
122
-33
265
823

1,569
429
110
-73
274
828

1,518
423
127
-89
231
826

1,504
393
124
-103
290
801

1,621
475
139
-112
296
825

1.488
466
115
-145
266
786

1,641
349
116
-113
461
827

1,560
382
122
-33
265
823

1,569
429
110
-73
274
828

1,518
423
127
-89
231
826

1,504
393
124
-103
290
801

1,621
475
139
-112
296
825

1,488
466
115
-145
266
786

28 Capital (table 1, line 51)..
29
Equity capital................
30
Increases in equity capital...........................................................
31
Decreases in equity capital.........................................................
32
Reinvested earnings (line 4 with sign reversed)..............................
33
Intercompany debt...........................................................................
34
U.S. parents’ receivables.............................................................
35
U.S. parents’ payables

-9,072
-39,706
-67,032
27,326
11,238
19,397
11,782
7,614

-34,597
-10,787
-16,764
5,977
-31,684
7,874
2,857
5,017

36 Capital without current-cost adjustment..............................................
37
Manufacturing..............................................................................
38
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
39
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
40
Holding companies, except bank holding companies...................
41
Other...........................................................................................

12,714 -29,165 -33,486 29,738
-38,765 -18,668 -15,462 -1,854
-17,194 -6,317 -4,649 -6,962
-16,300 -1,866 -17,847 -1,686
118,634
2,482 13,547 50,943
-4,797 -9,075 -10,704
-33,661

42
43
44
45
46
4/

Equity capital...................................................................................
Manufacturing..............................................................................
. Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
Holding companies, except bank holding companies...................
Other...........................................................................................

48
49
60
51
52
63

Reinvested earnings without current-cost adjustment (line 5 with
sign reversed)..............................................................................
Manufacturing..............................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
Holding companies, except bank holding companies...................
Other...........................................................................................

54
55
56
57
58
69

Intercompany debt...........................................................................
Manufacturing..............................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance 2.........
Holding companies, except bank holding companies...................
Other...........................................................................................

19,397
-4,812
-1,754
-2,518
25,778
2,702

60 Royalties and license fees, n e t........................................................
61
U.S. parents’ receipts (table 1, part of line 9 )..................................
62
U.S. parents' payments (table 1, part of line 26)..............................

34,784
37,939
-3,155

8,584
9,317
-733

63 Other private services, n e t...............................................................
64
U.S. parents’ receipts (table 1, part of line 10)................................
65
U.S. parents' payments (table 1, part of line 27)..............................

7,261
29,506
-22,245

1,816
7,090
-5,274

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




-38,926 24,288 40,163 -67,183 -50,746 -67,231 -31,259 -33,957 30,342 25,799 -61,251 -46,769 -63,063
-10,622 -3,274 -15,023 -12,257 -2,057 -4,907 -10,787 -10,622 -3,274 -15,023 -12,257 -2,057 -4,907
-15,501 -10.082 -24,685 -16,936 -10,695 -15,425 -16,764 -15,501 -10,082 -24,685 -16,936 -10,695 -15,425
4,879
6,807
9,662
4,679
8,638 10,518
5,977
4,879
4,679
6,807
9,662
8,638 10,518
-26,818 24,737 45,003 -49,889 -58,367 -57,323 -28,346 -21,849 30,791
30,639 -43,957 -54,390 -53,156
-1,486
2,825 10,183 -5,037
9,678 -5,000
7,874 -1,486
2,825 10,183 -5,037
9,678 -5,000
-458
7,983 -7,043 -7,790 -5,318
1,400
2,857
-458
1,400
7,983 -7,043 -7,790 -5,318
-1,028
2,200
2,007 17,469
1,425
318
5,017 -1,028
2,007 17,469
1,425
2,200
318
-61,704
-10,353
-10,492
-6,196
-21,932
-12,731

-45,249
-10,396
-3,936
-11,110
-10,654
-9,154

-61,714 -25,827 -28,517
-18,309 -18,758 -13,574
-4,752 -6,354 -4,091
-5,959
-523 -15,992
-17,915
3,396 14,566
-14,779 -3,589 -9,426

-39,706 -10,787 -10,622
-19,084 -7,260 -6,421
-1,444
-630
-153
-3,938 -3,446
410
-5,979
-685
-169
1,233 -4,289
-9,261

-3,274 -15,023 -12.257
-754 -4,649
-717
-129
-532
30
-870
-33 -4,536
-1,458 -3,666 -6,221
-63 -6,142
-814

-2,057
189
-304
-2,894
-835
1,786

-4,907 -10,787 -10,622
-3,093 -7,260 -6,421
357
-630
-153
659 -3,446
410
-2,412
-685
-169
-419
1,233 -4,289

33,023 -26,252 -21,378
-14,869 -7,635 -8,255
-13,996 -4,182 -4,646
-9,844 -5,402 -4,562
98,835 -1,088
2,751
-27,102 -7,945 -6,666

30,187
-1,590
-3,850
-3,538
48,531
-9,367

50,466 -44,410 -52,870 -51,806 -22,914 -16,409
2,610 -9,682 -12,939 -12,994 -7,725 -6,366
-1,318 -5,254 -6,448 -6,279 -4,219 -4,088
3,659 -4,539 -6,337 -4,782 -4,059 -2,708
48,641 -15,739 -14,765 -14,454
-174
3,770
-3,125 -9,197 -12,382 -13,298 -6,737 -7,017

36,241
454
-3,294
-2,854
50,070
-8,135

36,102 -38,478 -48,893 -47,639
-1,234 -9,428 -11,205 -11,831
-2,396 -5,476 -6,102 -6,058
-223 -2,935 -4,970 -4,437
45,169 -13,419 -13,778 -13,119
-5,214 -7,220 -12,838 -12,194

2,825
489
-2,982
2,722
3,870
-1,274

10,183
-741
2,584
1,472
6,687
181

-5,037
47
-5,269
2,878
27
-2,720

9,678
2,354
2,816
-1,879
4,946
1,441

-5,000
-2,223
1,170
-1,836
-1,049
-1,062

2,825
489
-2,982
2,722
3,870
-1,274

10,183
-741
2,584
1,472
6,687
181

-5,037
47
-5,269
2,878
27
-2,720

9,678
2,354
2,816
-1,879
4,946
1,441

-5,000
-2,223
1,170
-1,836
-1,049
-1,062

8,531
9,313
-782

8,572
9,383
-811

9,097
9,926
-829

8,412
9,218
-806

9,094
9,912
-818

8,516
9,320
-804

8,821
9,554
-733

8,561
9,343
-782

8,852
9,663
-811

8,551
9,380
-829

8,651
9,457
-806

9,129
9,947
-818

8,797
9,601
-804

1,683
7,196
-5,513

1,511
6,968
-5,457

2,251
8,252
-6,001

1,600
7,387
-5,787

1,232
7,698
-6,466

1,456
7,790
-6,334

1,774
7,358
-5,584

1,710
7,281
-5,571

1,769
7,307
-5,538

2,007
7,559
-5,552

1,537
7,664
-6,127

1,253
7,787
-6,534

1,739
8,167
-6,428

7,874 -1,486
-3,773
-787
-1,505
150
6,982 -13,694
4,255 10,965
1,915
1,880

45,626
-2,781
733
5,098
51,662
-9,086

7,874 -1,486
-3,773
-787
-1,505
150
6,982 -13,694
4,255 10,965
1,915
1,880

35,792 31,262
189 -6,624
-6,405
-344
-1,002
1,216
52,482 48,190
-9,472 -11,175

-55,772 -41,272 -57,546
-10,098 -8,662 -17,147
-10,715 -3,590 -4,531
-4,593 -9,743 -5,614
-19,613 -9,667 -16,580
-10,754 -9,611 -13,675

-3,274 -15,023 -12,257
-754 -4,649
-717
-129
-532
30
-870
-33 -4,536
-1,458 -3,666 -6,221
-814
-63 -6,142

-2,057
189
-304
-2,894
-835
1,786

-4,907
-3,093
357
659
-2,412
-419

January 2007

S u rv ey

of

29

C u r r e n t B u sin e ss

Table 6a. Direct Investment: Income, Capital, Royalties and License Fees, and Other Private Services— Table Ends
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

(Credits +; debits -)

2005

2005
I

II

Seasonally adjusted

III

IV

I

II r

2006

2005

2006
III»

I

-40,609
-36,404
-6,769
-29,634
-27,119
-2,515
-4,205
-5,910
1,706

-28,490
-25,162
-14,506
-10,656
-8,044
-2,612
-3,328
—4,119
790

II

III

IV

I

IIr

III ?

Foreign direct investment in the United States:
-40,106
-35,901
-10,522
-25,379
-22,864
-2,515
-4,205
-5,910
1,706

-116,953
-102,649
-43,743
-58,906
-48,596
-10,310
-14,305
-18,205
3,899

75 Income without current-cost adjustment..............................................
76
Manufacturing.............................................................................
77
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
78
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
79
Other...........................................................................................

-106,643 -25,878 -27,829 -22,050 -30,886 -31,905 -35,234 -38,094 -25,878 -26,933 -21,540 -32,293 -31,911 -34,344 -37,591
-47,202 -10,791 -11,342 -12,502 -12,568 -13,500 -14,231 -13,667 -10,778 -10,417 -11,945 -14,063 -13,484 -13,303 -13,107
-25,704 -6,323 -6,387 -5,486 -7,507 -6,742 -7,015 -7,326 -6,323 -6,387 -5,486 -7,507 -6,742 -7,015 -7,326
-9,575 -4,549 -2,913
795 -2,867 -4,037 -5,898 -7,702
843 -2,956 -4,015 -5,859 -7,644 -4,562 -2,940
-24,162 -4,215 -7,188 -4,904 -7,855 -7,648 -8,128 -9,456 -4,215 -7,188 -4,904 -7,855 -7,648 -8,128 -9,456

-28,490
-25,162
-13,920
-11,242
-8,630
-2,612
-3,328
-4,119
790

-30,416 -24,615 -33,432 -34,437 -37,756
-27,038 -20,978 -29,470 -30,572 -33,698
-3,174 -11,565 -15,083 -4,763 -5,628
-23,864 -9,413 -14,387 -25,809 -28,070
-21,277 -6,848 -11,841 -23,277 -25,548
-2,587 -2,565 -2,546 -2,532 -2,522
-3,378 -3,637 -3,962 -3,864 -4,057
-4,334 -4,621 -5,129 -5,007 -5,421
984
1,167
1,363
958
1,142

-29,520 -24,105 -34,839 -34,443 -36,866
-26,142 -20,468 -30,877 -30,579 -32,809
-4,230 -13,308 -11,698 -5,298 -7,306
-21,912 -7,160 -19,178 -25,281 -25,503
-19,325 -4,595 -16,632 -22,749 -22,981
-2,587 -2,565 -2,546 -2,532 -2,522
-3,378 -3,637 -3,962 -3,864 -4,057
-4,334 -4,621 -5,129 -5,007 -5,421
1,167
1,142
1,363
958
984

66 Income (table 1, line 31)....................................................................
67
Earnings.................
68
Distributed earnings....................................................................
69
Reinvested earnings...................................................................
70
Reinvested earnings wuhoui curreni-cost aajusimem.............
71
Current-cost adjustment..........................................................
72
Interest...............................
73
U.S. affiliates’ payments..
74
U.S. affiliates’ receipts....

80
81
82
83
84

Earnings without current-cost adjustment (line 67 less line 71).......
Manufacturing.............................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
Other...........................................................................................

-92,339 -22,550 -24,451 -18,413 -26,924 -28,040 -31,176 -33,889 -22,550 -23,555 -17,903 -28,331 -28,047 -30,287 -33,386
-39,144 -8,976 -9,488 -10,370 -10,312 -11,492 -12,337 -11,705 -8,963 -8,563 -9,813 -11,807 -11,476 -11,409 -11,145
-25,428 -6,252 -6,331
-5,423 -7,422 -6,644 -6,929 -7,217 -6,252 -6,331 -5,423 -7,422 -6,644 -6,929 -7,217
-8,778 -4,345 -2,728
1,039 -2,743 -3,779 -5,459 -7,288 -4,359 -2,755
991 -2,654 -3,801 -5,498 -7,346
-18,987 -2,976 -5,906 -3,658 -6,448 -6,126 -6,451 -7,678 -2,976 -5,906 -3,658 -6,448 -6,126 -6,451 -7,678

85
86
87
88
89

Interest............................................................................................
Manufacturing.............................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance 1.........
Other..........................................................................................

-14,305
-8,057
-276
-796
-5,175

-3,328
-1,815
-71
-203
-1,239

-3,378
-1,854
-56
-185
-1,282

-3,637
-2,132
-63
-196
-1,246

-3,962
-2,256
-86
-213
-1,407

-4,057
-1,894
-87
-400
-1,677

-4,205
-1,962
-109
-356
-1,778

-3,328
-1,815
-71
-203
-1,239

-3,378
-1,854
-56
-185
-1,282

-3,637
-2,132
-63
-196
-1,246

-3,962
-2,256
-86
-213
-1,407

-4,057
-1,894
-87
-400
-1,677

-4,205
-1,962
-109
-356
-1,778

90 Capital (table 1, line 64)....................................................................
91
Equity capital...................................................................................
92
Increases in equity capital...........................................................
93
Decreases in equity capital.........................................................
94
Reinvested earnings (line 69 with sign reversed).............................
Intercompany debt..........................................................................
95
96
U.S. affiliates’ payables...............................................................
97
U.S. affiliates’ receivables...........................................................

109,754
57,744
70,639
-12,895
58,906
-6.897
6,465
-13,361

31,125 10,198
15,626 10,546
19,917 13,615
-4,292 -3,068
11,242 23,864
4,257 -24,213
3,663 -10,704
595 -13,509

46,713
16,402
18,848
-2,445
9,413
20,897
21,000
-103

21,718 45,796 48,410
15,170 24,220 18,531
18,259 28,058 23,913
-3,090 -3,839 -5,382
14,387 25,809 28,070
-7,838 -4,233
1,809
-7,494
7,199 15,272
-344 -11,432 -13,463

48,346
18,383
20,314
-1,930
29,634
328
8,041
-7,713

30,539
8,245
15,626 10,546
19,917 13,615
-4,292 -3,068
10,656 21,912
4,257 -24,213
3,663 -10,704
595 -13,509

44,459
16,402
18,848
-2,445
7,160
20,897
21,000
-103

26,510 45,268 45,843
15,170 24,220 18,531
18,259 28,058 23,913
-3,090 -3,839 -5,382
19,178 25,281 25,503
1,809
-7,838 -4,233
-7,494
7,199 15,272
-344 -11,432 -13,463

44,090
18,383
20,314
-1,930
25,379
328
8,041
-7,713

98 Capital without current-cost adjustment..............................................
99
Manufacturing.............................................................................
100
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
101
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
102
Other...........................................................................................

99,443
51,738
8,407
13,700
25,599

28,513
10,562
-3,149
9,955
11,145

7,611
5,773
3,186
2,160
-3,508

44,148
25,827
6,472
2,224
9,625

19,172
9,575
1,897
-638
8,338

43,264
17,254
10,449
11,803
3,757

45,888
13,027
5,802
13,682
13,376

45,831
18,132
5,695
10,635
11,370

27,927
10,548
-3,149
9,335
11,192

5,658
4,849
3,186
1,573
-3,949

41,894
25,270
6,472
1,000
9,153

23,964
11,071
1,897
1,792
9,204

42,736
17,239
10,449
11,348
3,699

43,321
12,099
5,802
12,461
12,959

41,575
16,794
5,695
8,690
10,397

103
104
105
106
107

Equity capital...................................................................................
Manufacturing.............................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
Other...........................................................................................

57,744
20,568
1,894
15,972
19,310

15,626
3,224
-21
5,020
7,402

10,546
6,000
358
2,401
1,787

16,402
6,740
1,008
5,134
3,520

15,170
4,604
549
3,416
6,601

24,220
11,618
5,126
7,004
472

18,531
8,872
1,346
5,584
2,728

18,383
5,557
692
4,205
7,930

15,626
3,224
-21
5,020
7,402

10,546
6,000
358
2,401
1,787

16,402
6,740
1,008
5,134
3,520

15,170
4,604
549
3,416
6,601

24,220
11,618
5,126
7,004
472

18,531
8,872
1,346
5,584
2,728

18,383
5,557
692
4,205
7,930

108
109
110
111
112

Reinvested earnings without current-cost adjustment (line 70 with
sign reversed)..............................................................................
Manufacturing.............................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance............
Other...........................................................................................

48,596
23,917
8,931
1,053
14,695

8,630
2,130
1,110
3,203
2,186

21,277
8,682
6,189
1,619
4,788

6,848
8,074
-2,334
-1,770
2,878

11,841
5,031
3,966
-1,999
4,843

23,277
8,691
6,456
2,769
5,361

25,548
10,351
6,687
2,757
5,754

27,119
9,908
4,642
6,037
6,533

8,044
2,117
1,110
2,583
2,234

19,325
7,757
6,189
1,032
4,347

4,595
7,517
-2,334
-2,994
2,406

16,632
6,527
3,966
431
5,708

22,749
8,675
6,456
2,314
5,304

22,981
9,423
6,687
1,535
5,336

22,864
8,570
4,642
4,092
5,560

113
114
115
116
117

Intercompany debt..........................................................................
Manufacturing.............................................................................
Wholesale trade
Finance (including depository institutions) and insurance 2.........
Other...........................................................................................

-6,897
7,252
-2,419
-3,324
-8,405

4,257 -24,213
5,207 -8,908
-4,238 -3,361
1,732 -1,860
1,556 -10,083

20,897
11,013
7,798
-1,140
3,227

-7,838
-60
-2,618
-2,055
-3,105

-4,233
-3,054
-1,133
2,030
-2,077

1,809
-6,196
-2,231
5,342
4,895

328
2,667
361
393
-3,093

4,257 -24,213
5,207 -8,908
-4,238 -3,361
1,732 -1,860
1,556 -10,083

20,897
11,013
7,798
-1,140
3,227

-7,838
-60
-2,618
-2,055
-3,105

-4,233
-3,054
-1,133
2,030
-2,077

1,809
-6,196
-2,231
5,342
4,895

328
2,667
361
393
-3,093

118 Royalties and license fees, n e t........................................................
119
U.S. affiliates’ payments (table 1, part of line 26).............................
120
U.S. affiliates' receipts (table 1, part of line 9).................................

-13,038
-17,205
4,167

-3,194
-3,889
695

-3,108
-3,926
818

-3,772
-4,494
722

-2,964
-4,896
1,932

-2,731
-4,063
1,332

-2,606
-4,126
1,520

-2,856
-4,311
1,455

-3,148
-4,134
986

-3,204
-4,193
989

-3,629
-4,510
881

-3,059
-4,368
1,309

-2,751
-4,252
1,501

-2,652
-4,402
1,750

-2,630
-4,320
1,690

121 Other private services, net...............................................................
122
U.S. affiliates’ payments (table 1, part of line 27).............................
123
U.S. affiliates’ receipts (table 1, part of line 10)................................

3,139
-16,744
19,883

1,018
-3,526
4,544

663
-3,874
4,537

699
-4,196
4,895

759
-5,148
5,907

152
-5,382
5,534

788
-5,133
5,921

775
-5,365
6,140

1,319
-3,526
4,845

920
-3,874
4,794

815
-4,196
5,011

86
-5,148
5,234

507
-5,382
5,889

1,110
-5,133
6,243

908
-5,365
6,273

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




-3,864
-2,008
-99
-236
-1,522

-3,864
-2,008
-99
-236
-1,522

U.S. International Transactions

30

January 2 0 0 7

Table 7a. Transactions in Long-Term Securities
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

(Credits +; debits -)

2005

2005
I

A
1
2
3
4
5
fi
/
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

-180,125
Stocks, gross purchases by U.S. residents...................................................................................................................
2,329,860
Stocks, gross sales by U.S. residents
2,187,726
Stocks, net purchases by U.S. residents
-142,134
New issues in the United States 1
Transactions in outstanding stocks, net....................................................................................................................
Net purchases by U.S. residents, by area:
Europe..............................................................................................................................................................
-54,923
Of which: United Kingdom..............................................................................................................................
-33,623
Canada.............................................................................................................................................................
-4,828
Caribbean financial centers 2..............................................................................................................................
-2,851
Latin America, excluding Caribbean financial centers............................................................................................
-6,178
Asia..................................................................................................................................................................
-66,768
Of which: Japan...
-39,868
Africa....................
-1,853
Other.....................
-4,733
Bonds, gross purchases by U.S. residents....................................................................................................................
1,491,715
Bonds, gross sales by U.S. residents...........................................................................................................................
1,453,724
Bonds, net purchases by U.S. residents
-37,991

II

2006
III




I

II'

III p

-50,367
521,038
480,989
-40,049

-45,702
516,562
491,949
-24,613

-36,790
570,104
535,429
-34,675

-47,266
722,156
679,359
-42,797

-53,692
837,806
796,753
-41,053

-53,915
964,651
947,681
-16,970

-53,034
794,521
786,541
-7,980

-21,395
-17,334
-2,780
-2,594
-179
-11,135
-4,438
-47
-1,919
366,118
355,800
-10,318

-11,965
-4,656
933
-5,802
-491
-6,530
-843
-328
-430
396,028
374,939
-21,089

-8,631
-7,809
800
2,204
-1,580
-26,155
-17,415
-617
-696
353,658
351,543
-2,115

-12,932
-3,824
-3,781
3,341
-3,928
-22,948
-17,172
-861
-1,688
375,911
371,442
-4,469

-11,366
-8,513
-3,347
1,758
-3,063
-22,212
-2,568
-1,107
-1,716
459,055
446,416
-12,639

-14,776
-13,297
-1,116
1,382
-1,211
2,019
6,131
-1,039
-2,229
474,615
437,670
-36,945

-10,522
-14,563
-1,097
1,496
1,727
1,098
330
-179
-503
439,346
394,292
-45,054

-22
1,795
685
-5,867
-1,467
3,470
467
20
-1,288

-9,099
-12,633
-3,816
2,249
-5,429
3,117
74
58
281

-39,813
-21,668
-881
-2,837
1,408
6,465
2,013
-32
-1,255

-43,601
-30,913
-4,592
-2,981
-493
4,716
2,055
641
1,256

131,871
1,185,773
1,162,030
23,743

186,009
1,396,970
1,342,943
54,027

127,285
1,607,562
1,608,952
-1,390

138,757
1,491,237
1,468,860
22,377

11,189
4,687
5,748
4,433
-453
2,358
1,169
-28
496
307,322
216,033
91,289

40,150
25,102
4,391
6,127
1,073
1,822
697
81
383
343,264
253,132
90,132

290
-1,909
2,922
-6,360
751
947
843
161
-101
361,489
260,859
100,630

19,752
15,572
2,268
2,925
-329
-2,559
-716
-95
415
349,026
258,316
90,710

61,851
41,604
1,464
6,902
1,327
18,009
9,540
127
1,609
268,710
251,871
16,839

57,009
44,703
2,195
12,517
2,336
12,145
2,162
90
3,840
287,317
245,467
41,850

63,787
47,345
2,376
16,063
2,345
13,177
731
317
2,565
321,359
293,314
28,045

53,072
35,377
535
21,382
2,695
12,002
3,255
226
798
286,319
260,649
25,670

-8,396
-6,969
3,849
-5,539
1,475
25,581
18,875
-128
-3

6,893
5,727
2,906
9,552
365
21,873
6,036
-5
266

6,445
4,977
2,809
-1,914
439
19,893
10,393
2
371

2,758
1,724
2,256
11,545
763
8,464
7,153
-141
25

63,151
2,113,881
2,050,730

-9,579
2,378,861
2,388,440

11,688
2,472,278
2,460,590

-11,441
2,379,015
2,390,456

33,453
5,988
12,873
1,461
7,445
591
1,340

2,639
6,567
-17,748
2,273
-2,279
513
-1,544

-14,880
6,479
-1,448
-1,314
22,569
416
-134

-28,544
8,705
-6,600
2,293
12,368
438
-101

30,905
23,786
5,651
256

28,511
24,063
8,386
1,876

18,603
30,458
5,609
5,742

53,544
32,912
5,622
1,150

Net purchases by U.S. residents, by area:
21
-30,283
-11,714
-27,360
8,813
??
-9,567
-24,279
-22,446
9,605
23
Canada.............................................................................................................................................................
-1,451
253
-615
-1,774
24
-2,534
Caribbean financial centers 2..............................................................................................................................
-667
8,984
-4,984
25
Latin America, excluding Caribbean financial centers............................................................................................
-17,113
-5,474
-1,651
-8,521
Asia..................................................................................................................................................................
26
22,260
5,256
8,200
5,334
27
Of which: Japan.............................................................................................................................................
7,220
-477
5,427
1,803
28
Africa ...............................................................................................................................................................
217
32
-61
226
29
Other..........
-9,087
-1,734
-4,856
-1,209
B1 U.S. securities, excluding transactions in U.S. Treasury securities and transactions of foreign official agencies, net
purchases (+) or net sales (-) by foreign residents (table 1, line 66 or lines 4 + 16 + 30 below).................................
474,140
77,412
153,049
111,808
2
Stocks, gross purchases by foreign residents...............................................................................................................
1,047,842
4,459,718
1,128,800
1,097,303
3
Stocks, gross sales by foreign residents....
4,373,935
1,029,611
1,115,316
1,066,978
4
Stocks, net purchases by foreign residents
85,783
18,231
13,484
30,325
Net purchases by foreign residents, by area:
5
43,244
9,829
10,611
11,615
6
23,647
Of which: United Kingdom..............................................................................................................................
6,875
7,160
4,925
7
2,901
957
Canada.............................
20,391
10,785
8
Caribbean financial centers :
13,761
3,968
-2,228
7,588
9
Latin America, excluding Caribbean financial centers............................................................................................
-408
-280
-65
390
10
Asia...................................
8,522
1,945
4,738
-519
-24
11
Of which: Japan.............
-100
155
-1,248
12
Africa................................
283
248
-54
117
13
Other.................................
349
-10
-380
-475
14
Corporate bonds, gross purchases by foreign residents.................................................................................................
1,241,755
309,479
320,390
304,564
1b
Corporate bonds, gross sales by foreign residents........................................................................................................
925,750
251,898
241,943
215,876
16
Corporate bonds, net purchases by foreign residents..............................................................................................
316,005
57,581
78,447
88,688
New issues sold abroad by U.S. corporations 1.........................................................................................................
V
18
Net purchases by foreign residents, by area:
19
Europe..............................................................................................................................................................
200,949
32,816
50,879
55,403
140,189
37,199
20
Of which: United Kingdom...............................................................................................................................
20,103
41,283
21
Canada.............................................................................................................................................................
2,023
628
-155
86
22
Caribbean financial centers 2..............................................................................................................................
40,602
7,065
11,836
14,799
23
Latin America, excluding Caribbean financial centers............................................................................................
3,024
1,534
8,586
2,701
24
Asia..................................................................................................................................................................
12,468
55,791
11,583
13,731
25
Of which: Japan.............................................................................................................................................
5,584
26,001
4,285
6,592
26
Africa................................................................................................................................................................
224
623
78
194
27
Other.................................................................................................................................................................
7,431
2,941
1,356
1,525
28
Federally sponsored agency bonds, gross purchases by foreign residents......................................................................
975,222
222,114
227,729
256,669
29
220,514
Federally sponsored agency bonds, gross sales by foreign residents.............................................................................
902,870
207,852
222,633
30
Federally sponsored agency bonds, net purchases by foreign residents
72,352
1,600
19,877
34,036
31
32
Net purchases by foreign residents, by area:
'VI
-1,962
-11,912
-3,949
2,395
34
2,567
-2,403
3,027
-3,778
35
Canada.............................................................................................................................................................
2,724
3,094
12,215
2,548
36
Caribbean financial centers 2..............................................................................................................................
3,122
-1,457
4,530
5,588
37
Latin America, excluding Caribbean financial centers............................................................................................
7,204
504
4,895
330
38
Asia..................................................................................................................................................................
62,450
-139
13,584
23,424
39
Of which: Japan.............................................................................................................................................
-5,664
8,667
13,241
35,119
40
Africa.........
-320
-231
-46
85
Other..........
-407
41
-243
173
-334
C1 U.S. Treasury bonds and notes, excluding transactions of foreign official agencies, net purchases (+) or net sales (-)
by foreign residents (table 1, part of line 65)............................................................................................................
215,363
85,527
14,300
52,385
2
U.S. Treasury bonds and notes, gross purchases by foreign residents............................................................................
9,314,873
2,343,034
2,450,067
2,407,891
3
2,257,507
2,435,767
9,099,510
2,355,506
U.S. Treasury bonds and notes, gross sales by foreign residents....................................................................................
Net purchases by foreign residents, by area:
4
68,350
3,319
9,212
22,366
5
Canada ................................................................................................................................................................
21,766
5,917
5,587
4,274
6
Caribbean financial centers 2.........................
64,172
69,172
-19,047
1,174
7
Latin America, excluding Caribbean financial centers................................................................................................
10,479
875
2,718
5,425
8
Asia.............................................................
46,058
5,645
15,063
17,905
9
-321
Africa...........................................................
1,995
850
875
10
2,543
-251
1,088
366
Memoranda:
Net purchases of marketable long-term U.S. securities by foreign official agencies included elsewhere in the
international transactions accounts, net purchases (+) or net sales (-) (lines in table 4):
1
115,767
18,549
U.S. Treasury marketable bonds and notes (line B4).....................................................................................................
48,575
17,738
23,781
19,421
84,701
17,713
2
Other U.S. Government securities (line B6).........
18,440
2,966
4,229
5,594
3
U.S. corporate and other bonds (part of line B16)..
4
818
-454
1,244
U.S. stocks (part of line B16)..............................
-228
See the footnotes on pages 42-43.

IV

January 2007

Survey

of

31

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 8a. Claims on and Liabilities to Unaffiliated Foreigners Reported by U.S. Nonbanking Concerns Except Securities Brokers1
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
Line

(Credits +; decrease in U.S. assets or increase in U.S. liabilities.
Debits increase in U.S. assets or decrease in U.S. liabilities.)

2005

2006

2005
II

I

IV

III

II '

I

III p

Amounts
outstanding
Sept. 30,
2006

-44,221

-67,170

57,244

-29,483

-4,812

-46,190

-31,199

-23,302

922,040

?
3
4

Financial claims............................
Denominated in U.S. dollars....
Denominated in foreign currencies..........................................................................

-42,927
-55,177
12,250

-67,362
-84,389
17,027

57,772
46,932
10,840

-31,023
-16,580
-14,443

-2,314
-1,140
-1,174

-45,146
-49,942
4,796

-29,880
-27,599
-2,281

-23,857
-16,176
-7,681

885,984
705,036
180,948

5
6
7
8
9
10

By instrument:2
Resale agreements.................................................................................................
Negotiable certificates of deposit.............................................................................
Other short-term instruments (including money market instruments).......................
Deposits..................................................................................................................
Other claims............................................................................................................
Of which: Financial intermediaries’ accounts 3....................................................

7,578
38
-3,343
-43,411
-3,789
-1,168

5,658
9
-2,034
-79,732
8,737
1,639

2,297
-79
3,086
49,940
2,528
-2,451

-427
91
-3,039
-6,676
-20,972
-5,460

50
17
-1,356
-6,943
5,918
5,104

1,903
63
756
-44,747
-3,121
-11,263

-4,328
-16
-397
-34,722
9,583
4,025

-12,246
6
-8,861
-998
-1,758
-2,601

19,530
12
21,630
730,745
114,067
77,296

-18,156

-64,715

72,029

-33,751

8,281

-51,382

-35,275

-45,843

569,573

-555
14,091
-23,940
-831

-46,427
-409
3,007
-5,654

61,332
5,216
-17,663
3,406

-8,174
-279
8,221
-5,493

-7,286
9,563
-17,505
6,910

-33,421
3,013
4,324
1,912

-26,022
4,736
5,849
-454

-39,923
-1,336
23,558
-1,572

333,002
53,726
281,744
34,667

A1 Claims, total (table 1, line 53)...........................................................................................

12
13
14
15

By area:
Europe.....................................................................................................................
Of which:
United Kingdom..............................................................................................
Germany.........................................................................................................
Caribbean financial centers 4...................................................................................
Other.......................................................................................................................

16
17
18

Commercial claims........................................................................................................
Denominated in U.S. dollars.....................................................................................
Denominated in foreign currencies..........................................................................

-1,294
-2,459
1,165

192
-169
361

-528
-739
211

1,540
930
610

-2,498
-2,481
-17

-1,044
-613
-431

-1,319
-1,982
663

555
796
-241

36,056
32,163
3,893

19
20

By instrument:
Trade receivables....................................................................................................
Advance payments and other claims.......................................................................

-320
-974

1,254
-1,062

-901
373

1,037
503

-1,710
-788

-908
-136

-1,503
184

842
-287

31,427
4,629

21
??
?3
24

By area:
Europe.....................................................................................................................
Canada....................................................................................................................
Asia.........................................................................................................................
Other.......................................................................................................................

1,176
-761
-1,244
-465

18
-130
457
-153

177
-16
-852
163

909
138
673
-180

72
-753
-1,522
-295

-2,375
431
887
13

533
-387
-917
-548

-85
358
-167
449

14,139
2,372
10,364
9,181

B1 Liabilities, total (table 1, line 68).......................................................................................

11

30,105

80,174

-20,035

20,271

-50,305

74,953

25,082

53,496

668,683

?
3
4

Financial liabilities........................................................................................................
Denominated in U.S. dollars.....................................................................................
Denominated in foreign currencies..........................................................................

22,048
9,417
12,631

76,115
88,033
-11,918

-26,486
-27,494
1,008

21,123
8,169
12,954

-48,704
-59,291
10,587

71,528
60,572
10,956

23,552
18,224
5,328

56,567
50,226
6,341

625,515
490,055
135,460

5
6
7
8

By instrument:2
Repurchase agreements..........................................................................................
Short-term instruments...........................................................................................
Other liabilities.........................................................................................................
Of which: Financial intermediaries’ accounts 3....................................................

-19,191
1,125
40,114
13,838

-7,743
-2,338
86,196
9,488

-10,609
4,755
-20,632
1,738

-1,938
-1,787
24,848
-1,533

1,099
495
-50,298
4,145

-1,227
-1,296
74,051
12,317

-9,495
340
32,707
-264

9,017
3,507
44,043
1,317

19,109
9,827
596,579
64,085

16,458

73,903

-20,202

6,600

-43,843

93,378

14,404

48,138

560,705

10
11
1?
13

By area:
Europe.....................................................................................................................
Of which:
United Kingdom..............................................................................................
Germany.........................................................................................................
Caribbean financial centers 4...................................................................................
Other.......................................................................................................................

-10,126
2,590
-1,703
7,293

67,045
-28
-3,672
5,884

-27,627
-6,989
-4,663
-1,621

-1,355
5,162
12,733
1,790

-48,189
4,445
-6,101
1,240

80,632
-3,775
-21,785
-65

15,660
4,560
8,537
611

34,818
1,573
6,985
1,444

350,423
80,648
43,787
21,023

14
15
16

Commercial liabilities...................................................................................................
Denominated in U.S. dollars...
Denominated in foreign currencies..........................................................................

8,057
8,260
-203

4,059
4,078
-19

6,451
6,655
-204

-852
-777
-75

-1,601
-1,696
95

3,425
3,340
85

1,530
1,128
402

-3,071
-2,848
-223

43,168
39,923
3,245

17
18

By instrument:
Trade payables........................................................................................................
Advance receipts and other liabilities.......................................................................

5,011
3,046

3,186
873

1,242
5,209

1,293
-2,145

-710
-891

2,833
592

3,019
-1,489

-826
-2,245

28,453
14,715

19
P0
21
22

By area:
-3,295
Europe.....................................................................................................................
4,164
Canada
5,587
Asia....
Other...
1,601

-1,415
2,382
2,153

3,674
-502
2,500
779

-2,000
1,531
-58
-325

-3,554
753
992
208

-273
1,495
2,901
-698

-1,079
71
362
2,176

-162
-2,020
-96
-793

11,679
3,337
20,091
8,061

9

See the footnotes on pages 42— 43.




939

32

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 9a. Claims on Foreigners Reported by U.S. Banks and Securities Brokers1
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
(Credits +; decrease in U.S. assets.
Debits increase in U.S. assets.)

Line

2005

2005
I

II

Amounts
outstanding
Sept. 30,
2006

2006
III

IV

I

I I'

III “

1 Claims reported by U.S. banks and securities brokers, total (table 1, line 54)......................

-213,018

53,483

-174,153

-102,716

10,368

—196,407

-80,697

-85,663

2,835,450

2

Claims for own accounts......................................................................................................

-133,586

76,712

-168,484

-79,361

37,547

-156,318

-24,322

-36,624

2,172,394

3

Denominated in dollars.......................................................................................................

-153,498

66,066

-163,863

-86,814

31,113

-144,701

-28,007

-46,193

2,074,690

4
5
6
7
8

By instrument:2
Resale agreements.....................................................................................................
Negotiable certificates of deposit.................................................................................
Other short-term instruments (including money market instruments)...........................
Deposits and brokerage balances................................................................................
Other claims (including loans)......................................................................................

8,327
1,166
-3,367
-61,822
-97,802

840
-273
-1,390
-2,853
69,742

-48,614
-425
-1,949
-66,955
-45,920

-472
697
-1,785
8,627
-93,881

56,573
1,167
1,757
-641
-27,743

-40,015
125
-2,507
-87,713
-14,591

35,919
107
1,274
-52,777
-12,530

-17,361
-902
834
115
-28,879

521,788
3,474
7,675
898,640
643,113

9
10
11

By foreign borrower:
Claims on:
Foreign banks.........................................................................................................
Foreign nonbanks, excluding foreign official institutions..........................................
Foreign official institutions 3.....................................................................................

-178,690
25,606
-414

57,620
8,737
-291

-139,538
-14,385
-9,940

-90,603
4,303
-514

-6,169
26,951
10,331

-110,539
-33,492
-670

-17,619
1,410
-11,798

-35,858
1,356
-11,691

1,575,113
395,099
104,478

12
13

By type of U.S. reporting institution:4
U.S.-owned banks’ claims on:
Foreign banks.........................................................................................................
Foreign nonbanks and foreign official institutions....................................................

-59,340
-8,036

22,929
-2,445

-63,941
-71

-141
-6,052

-18,187
532

-39,715
-9,472

-46,498
2,796

41,132
-10,154

468,027
86,345

14
15

Foreign-owned banks’ claims on:
Foreign banks.........................................................................................................
Foreign nonbanks and foreign official institutions....................................................

-102,560
-2,764

30,248
4,186

-46,399
-4,289

-82,537
3,792

-3,872
-6,453

-45,827
-4,913

12,385
-11,181

-60,246
6,153

937,114
84,268

16
17

Brokers; and dealers’ claims on:
Foreign banks.........................................................................................................
Foreign nonbanks and foreign official institutions....................................................

-16,790
35,992

4,443
6,705

-29,198
-19,965

-7,925
6,049

15,890
43,203

-24,997
-19,777

16,494
-2,003

-16,744
-6,334

169,972
328,964

18

Denominated in foreign currencies.......................................................................................

19,912

10,646

-4,621

7,453

6,434

-11,617

3,685

9,569

97,704

19
20

By instrument:2
Deposits and brokerage balances................................................................................
Other claims (including loans)......................................................................................

2,387
17,525

2,083
8,563

-1,970
-2,651

4,102
3,351

-1,828
8,262

-4,647
-6,970

3,004
681

8,764
805

39,652
58,052

21

Claims for customers’ accounts...........................................................................................

-79,432

-23,229

-5,669

-23,355

-27,179

-40,089

-56,375

-49,039

663,056

22

Denominated in dollars.......................................................................................................

-52,915

-12,987

1,605

-24,818

-16,715

-30,496

-36,694

-49,304

574,980

23
24
25
26
21

By instrument:2
Commercial paper5....................................................................................................
Negotiable certificates of deposit.................................................................................
Other short-term instruments (including money market instruments)6........................
Deposits and brokerage balances (including sweep accounts)7..................................
Other claims................................................................................................................

344
-4,858
-18,629
-24,338
-5,434

17
4,017
-4,543
-13,595
1,117

-3,049
766
-93
6,714
-2,733

1,270
-8,282
-1,649
-14,071
-2,086

2,106
-1,359
-12,344
-3,386
-1,732

-15,124
-2,550
-3,002
-8,621
-1,199

3,555
-17,737
-1,343
-18,018
-3,151

-16,841
-32,057
-18,915
17,846
663

143,851
141,757
65,252
200,929
23,191

28

Denominated in foreign currencies.......................................................................................

-26,517

-10,242

-7,274

1,463

-10,464

-9,593

-19,681

265

88,076

29
30

By instrument:2
Deposits and brokerage balances................................................................................
Other claims................................................................................................................

-13,648
-12,869

-12,783
2,541

-1,307
-5,967

27
1,436

415
-10,879

-2,698
-6,895

-1,650
-18,031

-8,397
8,662

35,110
52,966

-115,029

45,631

-94,963

-94,836

29,139

-129,690

11,697

-75,959

1,440,186

-39,224
-41,184
-20,259
-38,817
-1,241
-30,719
-9,526
-216
-6,737

42,460
20,806
272
-332
-2,429
7,727
12,594
3
2,611

-37,451
-33,765
-1,729
-66,642
1,413
-7,384
-5,488
-167
-4,681

-40,784
-51,853
-7,989
11,268
2,976
-11,579
3,632
241
-2,797

-3,449
23,628
-10,813
16,889
-3,201
-19,483
-20,264
-293
-1,870

-75,628
-20,112
730
-71,866
-951
9,117
-2,821
-78
-3,669

-15,025
51,057
-15,690
-60,652
-2,424
-14,021
-1,119
-88
481

-29,026
-17,882
6,501
21,807
935
-33,469
-25,572
7
-5,485

779,898
141,203
107,719
955,183
54,737
232,735
138,304
2,142
42,748

-82,764

28,985

-59,363

-45,248

-7,138

-40,223

-9,761

-13,008

511,023

-9,946
-72,818

3,136
25,849

-25,592
-33,771

15,616
-60,864

-3,106
-4,032

-13,550
-26,673

-33,323
23,562

30,604
-43,612

73,156
437,867

Claims, total (line 1), by area:
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40

Europe.....................................................................................................................................
Of which:
United Kingdom...............................................................................................................
Switzerland......................................................................................................................
Canada....................................................................................................................................
Caribbean financial centers 8...................................................................................................
Latin America, excluding Caribbean financial centers..............................................................
Asia.........................................................................................................................................
Of which: Japan...................................................................................................................
Africa.......................................................................................................................................
Other.......................................................................................................................................

Memoranda:
1 International banking facilities’ (IBFs) own claims, denominated in dollars (in lines 1-15 above)
2
3

By bank ownership:4
U.S.-owned IBFs.................................................................................................................
Foreign-owned IBFs............................................................................................................

See the footnotes on pages 4 2-43.




January 2007

Survey

of

C

urrent

33

B u s in e s s

Table 10a. Liabilities to Foreigners, Except Foreign Official Agencies, Reported by U.S. Banks and Securities Brokers1
[Millions of dollars]
Not seasonally adjusted
(Credits +; increase in U.S. liabilities.
Debits decrease in U.S. liabilities.)

Line

2005

2005
I

II

2006
III

IV

IIr

I

III p

Amounts
outstanding
Sept. 30,
2006

1 Liabilities reported by U.S. banks and securities brokers, total (table 1, part of line 65 and table 1,
line 69)................................................................................................................................................

163,977

-69,561

152,741

79,766

1,031

153,218

77,682

93,355

2

U.S. Treasury bills and certificates (table 1, part of line 65)...........................................................

-15,872

581

-197

-15,146

-1,110

4,367

-1,904

4,239

69,567

3

Other U.S. liabilities, total (table 1, line 69)......................................................................................

179,849

-70,142

152,938

94,912

2,141

148,851

79,586

89,116

2,951,442

4

Liabilities for own accounts.........................................................................................................

172,860

-72,866

146,874

88,647

10,205

138,879

-2,156

44,677

2,382,141

5

Denominated in dollars...............................................................................................................

175,548

-70,669

131,709

82,996

31,512

131,335

-3,447

43,900

2,281,633

6
7
8

By instrument:2
Repurchase agreements.....................................................................................................
Deposits and brokerage balances........................................................................................
Other liabilities (including loans)..........................................................................................

32,153
67,874
75,521

4,342
-59,467
-15,544

1,185
94,133
36,391

37,603
44,644
749

-10,977
-11,436
53,925

39,558
56,603
35,174

-16,740
46,921
-33,628

44,805
-10,607
9,702

678,838
1,093,029
509,766

9
10

By foreign holder:
Liabilities to:
Foreign banks.................................................................................................................
Foreign nonbanks, including international organizations.................................................

211,923
-36,375

-50,888
-19,781

146,722
-15,013

50,016
32,980

66,073
-34,561

98,429
32,906

6,140
-9,587

34,994
8,906

1,705,120
576,513

11
12

By type of U.S. reporting institution:3
U.S.-owned banks’ liabilities to:
Foreign banks.................................................................................................................
Foreign nonbanks, including international organizations.................................................

89,116
1,365

-29,675
-2,714

71,276
5,225

13,252
4,645

34,263
-5,791

23,292
2,957

45,247
9,026

-20,685
9,689

666,670
119,662

13
14

Foreign-owned banks’ liabilities to:
Foreign banks.................................................................................................................
Foreign nonbanks, including international organizations.................................................

70,497
1,530

-32,803
139

57,383
342

42,096
-784

3,821
1,833

43,484
477

-43,212
4,071

14,601
602

637,922
70,718

15
16

Brokers’ and dealers’ liabilities to:
Foreign banks.................................................................................................................
Foreign nonbanks, including international organizations.................................................

52,310
-39,270

11,590
-17,206

18,063
-20,580

-5,332
29,119

27,989
-30,603

31,653
29,472

4,105
-22,684

41,078
-1,385

400,528
386,133

17

Denominated in foreign currencies.............................................................................................

-2,688

-2,197

15,165

5,651

-21,307

7,544

1,291

777

100,508

18
19

By instrument:2
Deposits and brokerage balances........................................................................................
Other liabilities (including loans)..........................................................................................

11,877
-14,565

6,994
-9,191

6,804
8,361

5,225
426

-7,146
-14,161

502
7,042

1,056
235

2,764
-1,987

67,143
33,365

20

Liabilities for customers’ accounts..............................................................................................

6,989

2,724

6,064

6,265

-8,064

9,972

81,742

44,439

569,301

21

Denominated in dollars...............................................................................................................

-312

1,665

2,411

3,180

-7,568

9,904

84,926

41,404

553,913

22
23

By instrument:2
Negotiable certificates of deposit and other short-term instruments...................................
Other liabilities (including loans)..........................................................................................

10,936
-11,248

8,215
-6,550

781
1,630

-870
4,050

2,810
-10,378

7,395
2,509

33,020
51,906

11,289
30,115

271,239
282,674

Denominated in foreign currencies..............................................................................................

7,301

1,059

3,653

3,085

-496

68

-3,184

3,035

15,388

Europe.............................................................................................................................................
Canada.................................................
Caribbean financial centers 4................
Latin America, excluding Caribbean financial centers.....................................................................
Asia......................................................
Africa....................................................
Other....................................................

160,773
1,606
5,500
12,604
-103
801
-1,332

40,003
1,042
-88,750
4,279
-28,815
-396
2,495

70,386
-783
79,800
6,303
2,143
-18
-4,893

60,670
6,316
10,052
496
14,095
786
2,497

-10,286
-4,969
4,398
1,526
12,474
429
-1,431

83,110
-2,144
69,843
7,270
-12,184
80
2,876

-31,736
6,054
100,467
1,993
6,393
-1,274
-2,311

-28,958
7,679
100,383
-876
6,605
-392
4,675

1,126,199
48,170
1,474,013
105,128
165,387
7,566
24,979

Memoranda:
1 International banking facilities’ (IBFs) own liabilities, denominated in dollars (in lines 3-14 above).........

78,008

-33,543

72,943

44,256

-5,648

5,659

-19,198

-54,606

379,436

By bank ownership:3
U.S.-owned IBFs.............................................................................................................................
Foreign-owned IBFs........................................................................................................................

25,569
52,439

-3,417
-30,126

30,047
42,896

-8,771
53,027

7,710
-13,358

11,480
-5,821

24,768
-43,966

-29,151
-25,455

109,709
269,727

24

3,021,009

Other U.S. liabilities, total (line 3), by area:
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

2
3

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




34

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 11. U.S. International
[Millions
Europe
Line

(Credits +; debits - ) '

European Union 1
4

2006

Euro area

2006

2005
III»

2006

2005

2005
IIr

Belgium

2006

II'

III "

2005
II r

III p

II r

III p

Current account
1 Exports of goods and services and income receipts...........................................

568,716

174,988

176,628

495,722

151,992

154,123

317,109

94,614

94,562

26,963

7,958

7,451

2

Exports of goods and services...............................................................................

356,721

101,900

101,540

313,377

88,586

88,310

209,257

58,370

58,077

21,742

6,176

6,122

3

Goods, balance-of-payments basis 2.................................................................

207,891

62,297

58,720

183,466

54,436

51,099

135,712

39,171

37,244

18,563

5,356

5,259

4
5

Services 3..........................................................................................................
Transfers under U.S. military agency sales contracts4..................................

148,830
3,016

42,820
1,004

129,911
1,852

34,150
428

37,211
687

73,545
1,196

19,199
291

20,833
340

3,179
49

820
20

863
9

6
7
8

Travel.............................................................................................................
Passenger fares............
Other transportation......

27,220
7,166
15,513

39,603
685
7,029
1,646
4,605

8,248
1,993
4,648

25,163
6,526
13,854

6,450
1,494
4,113

7,647
1,822
4,147

12,605
3,687
8,065

3,091
799
2,381

4,061
1,057
2,394

504
319
517

129
72
138

157
87
140

9
10
11

Royalties and license fees 5...........................................................................
Other private services 5
U.S. Government miscellaneous services......................................................

27,355
68,264
295

7,478
18,087
73

7,637
19,206
84

22,818
59,475
222

5,888
15,720
57

6,075
16,765
68

15,857
31,986
149

4,175
8,431
31

4,264
8,679
38

665
1,123
2

12
13
14
15
16
17

Income receipts.....................................................................................................
Income receipts on U.S.-owned assets abroad..................................................
Direct investment receipts..............................................................................
Other private receipts.....................................................................................
U.S. Government receipts..............................................................................
Compensation of employees..............................................................................

73,088
75,088
74,994
72,995
33,864
33,560
41,105
38,965
166
329
94
93
-718,919 -217,194 -217,312

182,345
182,038
89,488
91,756
794
307

63,406
63,324
28,882
34,288
154
82

5,221
5,209
3,113
2,096

165
296
(*)
1,782
1,777
1,043
734

178
292
(*)
1,329
1,324
612
712

-490,902 -138,725 -137,628

36,244
36,485
36,199
36,440
21,354
20,654
14,691
15,562
154
224
45
45
-633,426 -189,452 -190,284 -411,368 -120,592 -121,254
-425,607 -118,750 -117,522 -299,631
-83,450 -83,335

20
21
22

Goods, balance-of-payments basis 2.................................................................

-354,269

-98,839

-97,499

-307,909

-84,599

Services 3.........................
Direct defense expenditures...........................................................................

-136,633
-11,592

-39,886
-2,859

-40,129
-2,935

-117,698
-10,327

23
24
25

Travel............................
Passenger fares.............................................................................................
Other transportation.......................................................................................

-23,273
-13,310
-23,783

-8,089
-4,028
-6,360

-7,626
-3,848
-6,528

-21,264
-12,445
-20,656

-34,151
-2,525
-7,249
-3,798
-5,542

26
27
28

Royalties and license fees5...........................................................................
Other private services 5.................................................................................
U.S. Government miscellaneous services......................................................

-13,731
-49,047
-1,897

-3,826
-14,228
-496

-4,012
-14,682
-498

-10,318
-41,216
-1,472

Income payments................................................................................................... -228,016
Income payments on foreign-owned assets in the United States........................ -227,481
Direct investment payments...........................................................................
-78,495
Other private payments.................................................................................. -123,696
U.S. Government payments...........................................................................
-25,290
Compensation of employees..............................................................................
-535

-78,469
-78,336
-24,489
-46,135
-7,712
-133

-79,684
-79,560
-26,590
-45,465
-7,505
-124

-8,867
-2,545
-1,837
-4,485

-3,434
-493
-430
-2,511

-810

-208

18 Imports of goods and services and income payments........................................
19

29
30
31
32
33
34

Imports of goods and services

35 Unilateral current transfers, net..............................................................................
36
37
U.S. Government pensions and other transfers.....................................................
38
Private remittances and other transfers 6...............................................................

211,995
211,611
106,753
103,730
1,128
384

65,813
65,730
28,566
36,938
226
83

107,852
107,673
65,148
41,840
685
179

12

5

5

-31,966

-9,403

-9,087

-15,528

-4,532

-4,337

-82,955 -228,524
-34,567 -71,107
-8,419
-2,600

-62,721
-20,729
-2,075

-61,998

-13,018

-3,788

-3,641

-21,337
-2,105

-2,510
-167

-744
-44

-696
-40

-6,919
-3,590
-5,680

-13,040
-7,306
-11,961

-4,643
-2,103
-3,159

-4,409
-2,123
-3,281

-241
-26
-636

-100
-2
-167

-2,656
-12,008
-373

-3,000
-12,403
-375

-7,618
-21,553
-1,210

-1,928
-6,518
-303

-2,293
-6,821
-305

-113
-1,222
-105

-35
-375
-21

-57
-9
-173
-34
-362
-21

-207,818
-207,390
-76,219
-109,947
-21,224
-428

-70,702
-70,592
-23,940
-40,226
-6,426
-110

-72,762 -111,737
-72,658 -111,422
-25,415 -41,464
-41,049 -55,374
-6,194 -14,584
-104
-315

-37,142
-37,059
-14,479
-18,435
-4,145
-83

-37,919
-37,838
-15,576
-18,186
-4,076
-31

-16,438
-16,430
-435
-12,947
-3,048
-8

-4,871
-4,869
-170
-3,869
-830
-2

-4,750
-4,748
-281
-3,655
-812
-2

-3,271
-648
-416
-2,207

-3,831
-61
-1,540
-2,230

-2,813
-22
-398
-2,393

-2,271
-28
-387
-1,856

-7,280

-2,051

-1,870

-137

-5

-27

-1,103
-6,177

-286
-1,765

-285
-1,585

-20
-117

-5
(*)

-5
-22

-218

-463

-119

-124

-316

—80

-82

-22

—6

-6

-137,198 -145,233 -181,001
-504
-167
-118

-19,526
-504

-65,631
-118

-50,061
-167

-10,566

-58

-1,093

-118
212

-167
1

-2

Capital and financial account
Capital account
39 Capital account transactions, net...........................................................................
Financial account
40 U.S.-owned assets abroad, net (increase/financial outflow (-))............................ -177,698
41
-606
42
Gold 7................................................................................................................
43
44
-606
45
2,635
46
-334
47
2,944
48
25
49
50
U.S. private assets, net.......................................................................................... -179,727
51
Direct investment................................................................................................
37,488
52
Foreign securities............................................................................................... -85,206
U.S. claims on unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns....
-16,980
53
54
U.S. claims reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere.............................. -115,029

-99,065 -208,387
-202
-148

-148
214
-136
342
8

-202

-504

-118

-167

-504

155
-113
270
-2

1,231
-244
1,451
24

213
-112
316
9

75
-103
179
-1

152
142
10

203
9

35
1

-2

-137,925 -145,328 -180,909
28,553 -18,579 -27,626
-68,597 -51,873 -56,962
-15,356 -36,214 -45,418
-82,525 -38,662 -50,903

-19,174
41,543
-3,904
-14,006
-42,807

-65,725
-13,009
-17,179
-14,064
-21,473

-49,929
-20,618
-10,729
-2,102
-16,480

-10,567
-6,957
1,321
-2,240
-2,691

-56
-856
-226
5,239
-4,213

-1,093
-338
-7,735
-438
7,418

135,335
(,8)
(18)
(18)
(18)

148,166
(18)
(18)
(18)
(18)

31,893
(18)
n
(18)
(18)

50,506
(18)
(18)
(18)
(18)

14,758
(18)
(18)
(18)
(,8)

-2,269
(18)
(,8)
(18)
(18)

-2,328
(18)
(18)
(18)
(,8)

481
(18)
(18)

-165
n
(18)

120
(18)
(18)

1
n
(18)

-8
(18)
(18)

n
25,516
(18)
17,818

n
23,760
n
19,213

(,8)

(18)

-1,979
n
-174

685
(18)

108
(18)

1,966

-2,584

27,563
-1,035
’“27,255 1-1 0,241
8

12,400
1—4,987
8

12,853
14,057
8

-1,051
1—3,861
8

-1,754
1 1,894
8

-99,131 -208,340
-21,496 -32,331
-54,589 -54,123
-34,743 -45,927
11,697 -75,959

55 Foreign-owned assets in the United States, net (increase/financial inflow (+))

558,246

82,063

87,868

56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Foreign official assets in the United States, net.....................................................
U.S. Government securities................................................................................
U.S. Treasury securities 9...............................................................................
O ther10.........................................................................................................
Other U.S. Government liabilities " ...................................................................
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........................
Other foreign official assets 12............................................................................

63
64
65
66
67
68
69

Other foreign assets in the United States, net........................................................
Direct investment...............................................................................................
U.S. Treasury securities.....................................................................................
U.S. securities other than U.S. Treasury securities............................................
U.S. currency.....................................................................................................
U.S. liabilities to unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........................

24,478
(1 )
7
(” )
(” )
228
H
n
533,768
66,063
61,490
232,281

10,667
(1 )
7
C7
)
(” )
172
(1 )
7
C7
)
71,396
36,025
-16,740
70,522

-9,165
( ,7)
( 1)
7
(1 )
7
-129
( ,7)
n
97,033
28,677
-26,243
75,582

455,112
(18)

108,893
(18)

n
n
(,8)

n
n
(18)

195
n
n

99
H
n
( ,8)

-123
(18)
(18)

n
65,033
n
219,643

28,328
(18)

32,186
(18)

n
31,564
(18)

69,692

69,258

61,303

13,161
160,773

13,325
-31,736

47,975
-28,958

11,628
,8158,613

13,698
48,524
1—2,924 1 -1 4,510
8
8

70 Statistical discrepancy (sum of above items with sign reversed)19.................... -220,668

62,849

164,692

-175,916

76,731

Memoranda:
Balance on goods (lines 3 and 20)............................................................................. -146,378
12,196
Balance on services (lines 4 and 21).........................................................................
Balance on goods and services (lines 2 and 19)....................................................... -134,182
Balance on income (lines 12 and 29).........................................................................
-16,021
-8,867
Unilateral current transfers, net (line 35)....................................................................
Balance on current account (lines 1,18, and 35 or lines 73,74, and 7 5 )13............... -159,070

-36,542
-283
-36,825
-5,381
-3,434
-45,639

-38,779
2,691
-36,088
-4,596
-3,271
-43,955

-124,443
12,212
-112,231
-25,473
-3,831
-141,535

-30,163
-1
-30,164
-7,296
-2,813
-40,272

71
72
73
74
75
76

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




(18)

84,222

35

8
(18)
n
(18)

-26,785

61,847

28,199

970

3,782

5,090

-31,856 -92,812
2,644
2,438
-29,212 -90,374
-6,949
-3,885
-2,271
-7,280
-38,432 -101,539

-23,550
-1,530
-25,080
-898
-2,051
-28,029

-24,754
-504
-25,258
-1,434
-1,870
-28,562

5,545
669
6,214
-11,217
-137
-5,140

1,568
76
1,644
-3,089
-5
-1,449

1,618
167
1,785
-3,421
-27
-1,663

January 2007

Survey

of

35

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Transactions, by Area— Continues
of dollars]
Germany

France
2006

2006

IIr

50,638

15,478

15,253

35,488

9,782

9,325

22,255
13,233
92

6,347

5,542

3,435
6

3,783
10

2,371
727
1,437

554
128
402

778
194
461

2,467
6,095
44

657
1,680
8

15,150
15,110
4,603
10,507

5,696
5,685
1,695
3,990

IIr

326
131
383

1,721
4,378
20

445
1,138
4

27,299
27,283
20,484
6,799

8,637
8,633
5,911
2,722

1,771
75

3,810
1,076
2,939

910
246
877

1,206
292
887

1,594
607
551

349
122
159

620
1,705
15

3,463
8,752
52

770
2,172
11

897
2,496
11

1,293
2,903
9

333
730
3

596
205
153
341
761
3

5,928
5,917
1,738
4,179

5,164
5,148
2,274
2,726
148
16

4,947
4,931
2,022
2,707
202
16

5,765
5,749
2,956
2,793

2,000
1,996
1,145
851

2,194
2,190
1,253
937

7,621
5,609
317

3
4
5

3,082
747
1,079

2,057
640
1,659

579
152
492

601
171
501

6
7
8

1,280
6,082
22

1,388
6,653
26

4,537
8,789
73

1,590
2,367
16

1,562
2,441
16

9
10
11

24,125
24,101
6,166
17,935

26,038
26,013
6,559
19,454

29,650
29,573
17,265
11,974
334
77

9,682
9,671
4,982
4,677
12
11

9,275
9,264
4,994
4,167
103
11

12
13
14
15
1fi
17

8,748
8,744
5,843
2,901

254
85
382

3,324

7,120
163

5,453
257

5,313
22,874
63

1,015
449
1,355

11,245

5,825
36

7,861

469
1,201
4

45,745
396

10,272

5,036
50

18,919
1,164

2,775
644
1,045

37,570

2,599
85

10,043

24,425

10,684
2,780
3,635

7,564

2,344
36

33,584
20,294
202

1
2

13,044
69

8,061

9,140
202

5,014

13,230

11,909

26,288

7,208

5,095

22,505

11,905
57

2,867
2,147
88

7,095

18,365

13,314

23,961
10,917

10,163

24,130

16,097

22,996

49,999

23,814

18,911

10,405

21,044

15,079

72,994

47,939

83,315

19,042

35,428

20,243

43,344

149,300

62,727

70,785

III p

III p

III p

53,878

Line

IIr

I I'

II'

III p

2006
2005

2005

III »

II r

Europe, excluding European Union

2006

2005

2005

III p

United Kingdom

2006

2006

2005

2005

Netherlands

Italy

40

11

11

16,907
16,845
6,760
9,480
605
62

16

4

4

16

4

4

65,985
65,889
20,040
45,791
58
96

-63,895

-18,961

-18,344

-128,781

-36,821

-36,465

-40,507

-11,138

-10,944

-49,094

-15,719

-16,757

-174,442

24
-55,637

25
-56,287

-85,493

-27,742

-27,028

18

-46,705

-13,428

-12,993

-110,141

-29,674

-29,258

-38,303

-10,541

-10,340

-22,858

-6,765

-7,176

-87,374

-24,433

-23,884

-65,295

-19,975

-20,106

19

-33,767

-9,452

-9,012

-84,588

-22,519

-21,882

-30,966

-8,407

-8,162

-14,802

-4,520

-4,818

-50,536

-13,929

-13,474

-46,360

-14,240

-14,544

20

-12,938
-113

-3,976
-25

-3,981
-30

-25,553
-6,458

-7,155
-1,632

-7,376
-1,650

-7,337
-1,007

-2,134
-263

-2,178
-270

-8,056
-227

-2,245
-21

-2,358
-25

-36,838
-1,176

-10,504
-355

-10,410
-355

-18,935
-1,265

-5,735
-334

-5,562
-335

21
22

-2,937
-1,641
-1,900

-1,155
-497
-473

-989
-485
-487

-2,591
-2,424
-4,492

-859
-696
-1,284

-849
-742
-1,294

-2,881
-647
-867

-972
-208
-191

-982
-837
-1,956

-318
-245
-555

-291
-246
-526

-7,133
-4,481
-4,357

-2,173
-1,490
-1,163

-2,122
-1,238
-1,239

-2,009
-865
-3,127

-840
-230
-818

-707
-258
-848

23
24
25

-2,307
-3,722
-318

-526
-1,216
-84

-692
-1,214
-84

-2,476
-6,677
-435

-616
-1,954
-114

-695
-2,032
-114

-94
-1,726
-115

-19
-453
-28

-985
-155
-210
-21
-508
-29

-1,830
-2,153
-71

-511
-580
-15

-643
-612
-15

-1,566
-17,915
-210

-371
-4,896
-56

-389
-5,011
-56

-3,413
-7,831
-425

-1,170
-2,220
-123

-1,012
-2,279
-123

26
27
28

-17,190
-17,096
-11,413
-4,637
-1,046
-94

-5,533
-5,510
-3,355
-1,815
-340
-23

-5,351
-5,328
-3,478
-1,589
-261
-23

-18,640
-18,551
-7,884
-8,137
-2,530
-89

-7,147
-7,125
-3,727
-2,628
-770
-22

-7,207
-7,186
-3,672
-2,717
-797
-21

-2,204
-2,158
-671
-871
-616
-46

-597
-585
-186
-215
-184
-12

-604
-593
-187
-217
-189
-11

-26,236
-26,222
-17,392
-7,231
-1,599
-14

-8,954
-8,951
-5,949
-2,598
-404
-3

-9,581
-9,578
-6,526
-2,656
-396
-3

-87,068
-86,979
-30,592
-52,142
-4,245
-89

-31,204
-31,182
-8,506
-21,058
-1,618
-22

-32,403
-32,382
-8,781
-22,132
-1,469
-21

-20,198
-20,091
-2,276
-13,749
-4,066
-107

-7,767
-7,744
-549
-5,909
-1,286
-23

-6,922
-6,902
-1,175
-4,416
-1,311
-20

29
30
31
32
33
34

-224

-95

-60

-895

-1,031

-585

-400

-88

-91

386

-23

-14

4,206

215

402

-95
-129

-22
-73

-22
-38

-395
-500

-104
-927

-99
-486

-237
-163

-61
-27

-61
-30

-28
414

-7
-16

-7
-7

-261
4,467

-67
282

-66
468

-5,036
-2,484
-297
-2,255

-621
-471
-32
-118

-1,000
-620
-29
-351

35
3fi
37
38

-36

-9

-10

-40

-10

-11

-28

-7

-7

-28

-7

-7

-49

-13

-14

-347

-89

-94

39

-27,378

-30,133

7,473

274

8,065

5,372

-3,506

8

-11,591

26,201

-11,573

-5,767

-105,613

-79,532

-119,578

-40,500
-102

46,168
-30

-27,386
-35

-102

-30

-35

40
41
4?
43
44
45

4

1

3

-1

1

2

-1

-2

-1

92

-1

-1

84
8

-1

-1

1,404
-90
1,493
1

1
-24
26
-1

80
-10
91
-1

46
47
48
49

-105,705
-10,874
-56,069
462
-39,224

-79,531
-4,067
-34,965
-25,474
-15,025

-41,802
8,935
-16,609
-1,624
-32,504

46,197
-2,917
-2,716
1,471
50,359

-27,431
-4,705
2,839
-509
-25,056

50
51
52
53
54

298,473

76,101

-119,577
-5,413
-45,476
-39,662
-29,026
85,978

103,134

-26,830

-47,467

55

(18 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

( 1)
8

56
57
58
59
60
61
62

4

1

3

-1

1

2

-27,382
-859
-5,393
-13,643
-7,487

-30,134
-2,013
-5,776
-10,644
-11,701
-4,304

7,473
-2,353
2,973
353
6,500

271
-7,141
153
13,962
-6,703

8,066
-1,708
3,865
4,540
1,369

5,371
-2,105
5,154
-1,299
3,621

-3,508
267
-903
-1,494
-1,378

1,058

36,943

7,966

6,872

3,175

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

22,245
(1 )
8
(1 8 )

(1 8 )

H

H

39
H

-1
8
-798
743
34
29
63
H

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

24

18

-11

-5

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

H
8,093

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

4,446

3,344

16,166

6,825

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

21,841

3,057

11,708

8,823

-3,307

6,100
(1 )
8
-857

385
n
-1,974

-1,224

-6,022
1 1,941
3

-183
1 5,295
M

-701
'8
-13,311

2,563
19,402
8

4,728
1—275
S

1,343
1 282
8

299
,84,409

18,650

38,024

-5,370

21,714

1,588

3,773

17,136

-11,512
295
-11,217
-2,040
-224
-13,481

-3,105
-541
-3,646
163
-95
-3,578

-3,470
-198
-3,668
577
-60
-3,151

-51,004
-5,259
-56,263
-1,733
-895
-58,891

-12,476
-2,119
-14,595
-1,983
-1,031
-17,609

-11,610
-1,551
-13,161
-2,260
-585
-16,006

-19,721
-217
-19,938
3,561
-400
-16,777

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )




H
H

( 1)
S

-11,591
-1,463
-1,972
-9
-8,147
2,642
(IS )
(1 8 )
(18 )

-2

-1

26,202
28,503
-3,961
-911
2,571

-11,571
-4,665
-542
-3,523
-2,841

8,512

6,157

-5,766
-8,598
4,589
344
-2,101
21,285

( ’8)

(1 8 )

H

(1 8 )

H

(1 8 )

(1S )
(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

4

56

-27

-45

(1 )
8
H
14

30

( 1)
8
-23

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(,8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(I S )

(™)

( 1)
8

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(I S )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

-12
( 1)
S

11

46

33

(")
73

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

H

(1 8 )

H

n

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

( 1)
8
(1 8 )

-6

(18 )

(IB )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

2,939
( ,8)
-376

7,113

6,951

5,248

28,879

3,243

8,353

1,030

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(,8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 ,

(1 8 )

-734

-1,140

519

160,058

50,413

52,673

12,638

7,697
n
830

-3,509

(1 8 )

-342
1 1,465
8

-103
is227

12,322
,8-1 0,203

-1,775
1 2,091
8

13,387
1 2,154
8

-15,434
1 124,982
8

15,202
'87,232

35,424
1 —10,518
8

1,533
1 87,900
8

-373
1 -35,057
8

-549
1 —49,727
S

63
64
65
66
67
68
69

4,067

12,783

-48,704

2,123

-17,651

-171,875

10,927

39,500

-44,752

-13,882

80,470

70

-5,083
-363
-5,446
1,403
-88
-4,131

-5,295
-31
-5,326
1,590
-91
-3,827

11,486
1,084
12,570
1,063
386
14,019

3,541
99
3,640
-317
-23
3,300

2,746
241
2,987
-833
-14
2,140

-12,966
8,907
-4,059
-21,083
4,206
-20,936

-2,020
1,401
-619
-7,079
215
-7,483

-2,557
2,634
77
-6,365
402
-5,886

-21,935
-16
-21,951
9,452
-5,036
-17,535

-6,379
-282
-6,661
1,915
-621
-5,367

-6,923
47
-6,876
2,353
-1,000
-5,523

71
72
73
74
75
76

H
191
(1 8 )

h

6,324

36

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 11. U.S. International
[Millions
Latin America and
Other Western Hemisphere

Canada
(Credits +; debits - ) 1

Line

2006

2006

2005

2006
2005

2005
II '

III p

Argentina

2006

2005
II'

South and Central America

III p

II'

III p

IIr

III p

Current account
1 Exports of goods and services and income receipts...........................................

280,849

81,546

76,384

353,281

106,186

108,191

250,865

72,366

73,106

7,805

2,213

2

Exports of goods and services...............................................................................

244,964

70,142

65,521

254,069

71,546

222,337

63,329

63,789

5,939

1,655

1,814

3

Goods, balance-of-payments basis2.................................................................

212,192

60,484

56,208

192,387

55,520

72,748
55,791

177,318

51,362

51,347

4,111

1,165

1,288

4
5

Services 3..........................................................................................................
Transfers under U.S. military agency sales contracts4..................................

32,772
162

9,658
45

9,313
64

61,682
724

16,026
199

16,957
192

45,019
717

11,967
197

12,442
192

1,828
5

490
2

526
2

6
7
8

Travel.............................................................................................................
Passenger fares............
Other transportation......

18,488
5,562
5,128

5,034
1,403
1,433

5,384
1,489
1,543

15,987
4,715
3,965

4,292
1,200
1,121

130
78
31

1,235
4,115
35

4,350
27,282
148

1,106
6,807
43

1,073
7,235
40

2,876
16,643
116

852
4,271
34

4,445
1,212
1,208
817
4,536
32

461
293
125

Royalties and license fees 5...........................................................................
Other private services 5.
U.S. Government miscellaneous services......................................................

2,895
680
838
1,223
3,947
30

2,277
757
830

9
10
11

8,952
2,634
3,031
4,442
13,448
103

195
741
8

53
194
2

137
81
39
55
209
3

12
13
14
15
16
17

Income receipts.....................................................................................................
Income receipts on U.S.-owned assets abroad..................................................
Direct investment receipts..............................................................................
Other private receipts.....................................................................................

35,885
35,765
22,564
13,201

11,404
11,369
6,841
4,528

10,863
10,827
6,134
4,693

99,212
99,009
39,441
59,314
254
203

34,640
34,590
11,871
22,633
86
50

35,443
35,390
11,734
23,612
44
53

28,528
28,349
19,732
8,376
241
179

9,037
8,993
6,132
2,780
81
44

9,317
9,270
6,459
2,771
40
47

1,866
1,858
1,584
265
9
8

558
556
466
88
2
2

536
534
441
91
2
2

36

2,350

Compensation of employees..............................................................................

120

35

18 Imports of goods and services and income payments........................................

-332,361

-91,508

-89,098 -431,573 -130,572 -134,578 -324,467

-93,878

-96,166

-5,962

-1,331

-1,374

19

Imports of goods and services...............................................................................

-315,863

-85,094

-82,462 -348,858

-99,948 -101,386 -305,030

-87,578

-89,866

-5,397

-1,126

-1,164

20

Goods, balance-of-payments basis 2.................................................................

-293,314

-78,711

-74,597 -294,993

-84,940

-86,905 -276,760

-79,820

-82,463

-4,583

-910

-964

21
22

Services 3..........................
Direct defense expenditures...........................................................................

-22,549
-186

-6,383
-54

-7,865
-55

-53,865
-249

-15,008
-76

-14,481
-75

-28,270
-219

-7,758
-70

-7,403
-69

-814
-6

-216
-3

-200
-3

23
24
25

Travel.............................
Passenger fares............
Other transportation.......................................................................................

-7,002
-348
-4,387

-2,024
-132
-1,209

-3,313
-117
-1,163

-21,888
-3,033
-6,408

-6,394
-798
-1,604

-5,480
-824
-1,732

-17,015
-2,443
-3,037

-4,694
-628
-848

-4,215
-690
-843

-409
-59
-126

-117
-10
-27

-89
-13
-32

26
27
28

Royalties and license fees5...........................................................................
Other private services 5.................................................................................
U.S. Government miscellaneous services......................................................

-814
-9,471
-341

-301
-5,698
-137

-337
-5,896
-137

-54
-1,420
-112

-14
-189
-11

-2
-54
-3

-4
-56
-3

-16,498
-16,067
-7,290
-7,618
-1,159
-431

-82,715
-75,534
-2,139
-61,347
-12,048
-7,181

-30,624
-28,853
-1,922
-23,090
-3,841
-1,771

-33,192
-31,271
-1,897
-25,389
-3,985
-1,921

-183
-4,902
-471
-19,437
-12,357
-2,438
-5,411
-4,508
-7,080

-53
-1,353
-112

Income payments..................................................................................................
Income payments on foreign-owned assets in the United States........................
Direct investment payments...........................................................................
Other private payments...
U.S. Government payments...........................................................................
Compensation of employees

-208
-2,933
-76
-6,636
-6,524
-3,177
-2,566
-781
-112

-1,509
-20,238
-540

29
30
31
32
33
34

-184
-2,705
-75
-6,414
-6,300
-3,176
-2,460
-664
-114

-6,300
-4,549
-793
-2,114
-1,642
-1,751

-6,300
-4,415
-367
-2,280
-1,768
-1,885

-565
-555
(D)
-412
(D)
-10

-205
-203
1
-155
-49
-2

-210
-208
(*)
-160
-48
-2

35 Unilateral current transfers, net..............................................................................
36
37
U.S. Government pensions and other transfers.....................................................
Private remittances and other transfers 6...............................................................
38

26

-198

-61

-592
618

-156
-42

-152
91

-22,963
-2,290
-906
-19,767

-6,534
-647
-185
-5,702

-6,277
-630
-184
-5,463

-22,710
-2,180
-834
-19,696

-5,885
-620
-168
-5,097

-5,863
-588
-166
-5,109

-237
-1
-24
-212

-68
-1
-7
-60

-71
-5
-6
-60

88

30

29

-275

-38

-42

-234

-39

-43

-5

(*)

(*)

-53,671

-22,142

-6,761

-82,767

-63,056

39,244

-36,458

-4,009

-2,570

-292

-1,491

-242

509

420
-339
657
102
-36,878
-11,373
-23,509
-1,056
-940

88
-53
145
-4
-4,097
-2,778
281
573
-2,173

88
-53
149
-8

24
-124
33
115

-1

-2
-2

-2,658
-4,633
1,143
-42
874

-316
-688
33
36
503

-1,491
-752
-665
-1
-73

-240
-382
-129
-81
352

47,424

18,213

18,292

-140

394

160

( 18)
( 18)

( 18)
( 18)
( 18)
( 18)

( 18)
( 18)
( 18)
( 18)

( 18)
( 18)

Capital and financial account
Capital account
39 Capital account transactions, net...........................................................................
Financial account
40 U.S.-owned assets abroad, net (increase/financial outflow (-))............................
41
42
Gold 7 .............................................................................................................
43
44
45

-1

46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

774
104

111
-74
189
-4

-53,671
-16,790
-6,279
-10,343
-20,259

-22,141
-3,459
-1,997
-995
-15,690

-8,761
-7,570
-5,689
-2,003
6,501

-83,276
10,545
-28,676
-25,087
-40,058

-63,167
-4,066
-1,258
5,233
-63,076

103
-53
164
-8
39,141
-7,676
-251
24,326
22,742

88,951

18,087

24,832

156,202

140,346

159,494

-451
( ,7)
( ,7)
(1 )
7
44
(1 )
7
C7
)
18,538
-2,642
(,7)
8,107

-335
n
( ,7)
(")
-27
(,7)
(” )
25,167
4,581
n
5,059

5,404
( ,7)
C7
)
( 1)
7
11
( ’7
)
( ,7)
150,798
-7,605
( ,7)
72,867

11,692
(1 )
7
C7
)
(1 )
7
-44
(1 )
7
n
128,654
5,794
( ,7)
11,324

12,831
C7
)
( ,7)
(1 )
7
-64
(” )
(1 )
7
146,663
5,062
( ,7)
38,981

( , 8)

( 18)

11
n
n

-45
n

-64
(18)

n
3,959
H
15,011

n
1,262
n
3,434

-369
-1
U.S. private assets, net..........................................................................................
Direct investment................................................................................................
Foreign securities...............................................................................................
U.S. claims on unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns....
U.S. claims reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere..............................

55 Foreign-owned assets in the United States, net (increase/financial inflow (+))
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Foreign official assets in the United States, net.....................................................
U.S. Government securities................................................................................
U.S. Treasury securities 9...............................................................................
O ther10.........................................................................................................
Other U.S. Government liabilities 11...................................................................
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........................
Other foreign official assets 12............................................................................

63
64
65
66
67
68
69

Other foreign assets in the United States, net
Direct investment......................................
U.S. Treasury securities............................
U.S. securities other than U.S. Treasury securities............................................

249
(")
n
(1 )
7
“6
( ,7)
(” )
88,702
17,080
C7
)
34,629

U.S. liabilities to unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........................

(” )
1,606

(")
6,054

n
7,679

( ,7)
18,104

( ,7)
102,460

( ,7)
99,507

n
1 28,443
8

70 Statistical discrepancy (sum of above items with sign reversed)19....................

16,118

14,185

-3,325

28,095

-46,333 -166,031

85,580

Memoranda:
Balance on goods (lines 3 and 20).............................................................................
Balance on services (lines 4 and 21).........................................................................
Balance on goods and services (lines 2 and 19).......................................................
Balance on income (lines 12 and 29).........................................................................
Unilateral current transfers, net (line 35)....................................................................
Balance on current account (lines 1,18, and 35 or lines 73,74, and 7 5 )13...............

-81,122
10,223
-70,899
19,387
26
-51,486

-18,227
3,275
-14,952
4,990
-198
-10,160

-31,114
2,475
-28,639
2,251
-6,277
-32,665

-99,442
16,749
-82,693
9,091
-22,710
-96,312

71
72
73
74
75
76

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




-18,389 -102,606
7,817
1,448
-16,941
-94,789
16,497
4,227
-61
-22,963
-12,775 -101,255

-29,420
1,018
-28,402
4,016
-6,534
-30,920

H

( , 8)
( 18)
( , 8)

n

( . 8)

n

( 18)

(«)

( 18)

3

( 18)
( 18)

1

-1
( . 8)
( 18)

n

n

3

n

( 18)

( 18)

( 18)

( 18)

275

-82

-12

( 18)

( 18)

3,174

1,391

2

76

( , 8)

( 18)

,813,562

1 14,907
8

135
1-1 ,587
8

46
1 359
8

-19
,895

13,231

13,244

-1,169

283

-823

-28,458
4,210
-24,248
2,737
-5,885
-27,396

-31,116
5,039
-26,077
3,017
-5,863
-28,923

-472
1,014
542
1,301
-237
1,606

255
274
529
353
-68
814

324
326
650
326
-71
905

( 18)

( 18)

( 18)

5

January 2007

Survey

of

37

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Transactions, by Area— Continues
of dollars]
Brazil

Mexico 1
5
2006

2006

2005

2006

2005
IIr

Other South and
Central America

Venezuela

2005

2005

III >
>

II '

IIr

Line

2006

2006

2005

III»

Other Western Hemisphere

III»

II '

III p

II '

III p

27,329

8,287

9,126

152,469

42,864

42,026

11,627

3,485

3,849

51,635

15,517

15,755

102,416

33,819

35,084

1

21,045

5,912

6,750

140,893

39,662

38,731

9,057

2,789

3,108

45,403

13,311

13,386

31,732

8,216

8,958

2

15,174

4,342

5,066

120,264

34,018

33,125

6,410

2,164

2,322

31,359

9,673

9,546

15,069

4,158

4,444

3

5,871
12

1,570
3

1,684
4

2,647
9

625
1

786
3

14,044
682

3,638
189

3,840
180

16,663
7

4,058
2

448
162
214

1,755
465
458

1,135
354
169

272
75
35

362
116
39

6,023
1,735
1,697

1,652
413
431

1,743
388
458

2,501
847
1,163

742
203
312

4,514
(*)
939
277
335

4
5

417
138
199

5,644
2
1,821
496
425

5,606
3

1,577
624
660

20,629
9
6,791
1,709
1,314

738
2,255
5

227
585
1

205
649
2

1,402
9,387
17

403
2,493
4

394
2,527
4

138
840
2

124
802
27

121
927
23

1,474
10,639
32

254
2,536
9

256
2,699
8

9
10
11

2,375
2,370
1,452
869
49
5

2,376
2,371
1,489
864
18
5

11,576
11,544
8,661
2,871
12
32

3,202
3,194
2,260
931
3
8

3,295
3,287
2,363
920
4
8

2,570
2,563
2,156
399
8
7

42*
224
0
741
738
600
138

403
3,420
84

6,284
6,264
3,543
2,592
129
20

45
197
(*)
696
695
557
134
4
1

6,232
6,120
3,788
2,249
83
112

2,206
2,178
1,397
758
23
28

2,369
2,340
1,566
758
16
29

70,684
70,660
19,709
50,938
13
24

25,603
25,597
5,739
19,853
5
6

26,126
26,120
5,275
20,841
4
6

12
13
14
15
16
17

-28,192

-7,452

-197,907

-58,322

-58,208

-38,412

18

-54,627

-10,577

-14,977

-16,885
-15,371

-36,694

-55,109

-55,866
-51,557

-107,106

-186,972

-10,401
-9,545

-16,371

-6,820

-36,539
-34,572

-10,884

-26,531

-8,815
-8,127

-43,828

-12,370

-11,520

19

-24,434

-6,250

-7,523

-172,110

-51,173

-50,940

-33,978

-9,425

-10,399

-41,655

-12,062

-12,637

-18,233

-5,120

-4,442

20

-2,097
-5

-570
-1

-604
-1

-14,862
-14

-3,936

-3,687
-4

-594
-4

-120
-1

-178
-1

-9,902
-190

-2,915
-61

-2,734
-60

-25,595
-30

-7,250
-6

-7,078
-6

21
22

-674
-317
-393

-181
-70
-113

-10,240
-973
-948

-2,611
-275
-286

-2,318
-315
-262

-280
-63
-135

-52
-16
-26

-4,873
-590
-3,371

-1,700
-170
-756

-1,265
-134
-889

23
24
25

-139
-2,374
-174

-44
-673
-43

-5
-98
-9

-1
-22
-2

-688
-685
35
-213
-507
-3

-10,935
-3,949
-191
-1,654
-2,104
-6,986

-3,213
-1,479
-37
-630
-812
-1,734

-1,967
-1,955
(D)
-876
(D)
-12

-856
-854
(D)
-284
(D)
-2

-307
-305
63
-310
-58
-2

-4,309
-4,254
-1,393
-1,873
-988
-55

-2
-441
-60
-1,514
-1,507
-279
-899
-329
-7

-63,278
-63,177
299
-55,936
-7,540
-101

-248
-4,345
-25
-24,324
-24,304
-1,129
-20,976
-2,199
-20

-283
-4,476
-25
-26,892
-26,856
-1,530
-23,109
-2,217
-36

26
27
28

-632
-629
6
-233
^*02
-3

-3
-405
-60
-1,394
-1,384
(D)
-812
(D)
-10

-1,326
-15,336
-69

-1,661
-1,644
-23
-596
-1,025
-17

-42
-703
-43
-3,581
-1,710
-186
-698
-826
-1,871

-5,412
-1,031
-1,435
-7
-1,566
-261

-1,499
-269
-403

-2
-199
-4

-102
-16
-31
-2
-24
-2

-1,733
-257
-396

-17
-675
-16

-207
-77
-115
-4
-196
-4

29
30
31
32
33
34

-431
-23
-19
-389

-110
-8
-5
-97

-117
-5
-4
-108

-11,063
-58
-262
-10,743

-2,852
-17
-70
-2,765

-2,886
-8
-67
-2,811

-107
-1
-4
-102

-24
-2
-1
-21

-27
-1
-26

-10,872
-2,097
-525
-8,250

-2,831
-592
-85
-2,154

-2,762
-570
-88
-2,104

-253
-110
-72
-71

-649
-27
-17
-605

-414
-42
-18
-354

35
36
37
38

-12

-3

-3

-71

-20

-22

8

2

2

-154

-18

-20

-41

1

1

39

-14,158

1,316

1,358

-12,084

-2,866

2,525

-2,408

-1,150

-2,118

-7,516

182

-4,093

-46,309

-59,047

41,814

40
41
42
43
44
45

109
-141
256
-6

76
-4
84
-4

66
-9
80
-5

20
-16
44
-8

7
-3
12
-2

5
-3
9
-1

8

6

5

5
1

5

259
-58
316
1

-1
-45
44

14
-39
55
-2

89
-30
117
2

23
-21
44

15

8

46
47
48
49

-14,267
-1,183
-11,906
-428
-750

1,240
47
799
-48
442

1,292
332
-324
208
1,076

-12,104
-6,772
-3,874
-472
-986

-2,873
-1,028
743
449
-3,037

2,520
-2,375
4,711
-133
317

-2,416
-1,674
-1,170
-85
513

-1,156
-498
-1,025
78
289

-2,123
-720
-1,066
44
-381

-7,775
-856
-6,592
-107
-220

183
-547
429
95
206

-4,107
-1,488
-2,049
-80
-490

-46,398
21,918
-5,167
-24,031
-39,118

-59,070
-1,288
-1,539
4,660
-60,903

41,799
-3,043
-1,394
24,368
21,868

50
51
52
53
54

10,668

1,165

11,808

16,658

12,170

982

5,057

844

95

15,181

3,640

5,247

108,778

122,133

(IS)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(,8)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

H

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

18
n

-2

-3

-2

5
(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

H
H

(18)

H
40
n

H

(18)

(18)

(16)

(18)

1,458
(1 )
S
488

(18)

-28
,88,710

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)
(18)

(18)

n

H

(18)

3

H

(18)

(18)

(18)

(1 )
»

(18)

(18)

(.8 )

(18)

(18)

(18)

-8

-1

-3

-21

n

(18)

H

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

15

6
7
8

141,202

55

( ’ 8)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

H
-59

H

H

-67

(18)

(18)

(18)

(.8)

(18)

( 18)
(18)

5fi
57
58
59
60
61
62

H

n

(1 )
8

(18)

n

(18)

1
(18)
(18)

H
31

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

498

220

1,217

446

-339

1,018

330

(1 )
®
358

(18)

348

-11,564

4,532

4,787

(18)

(18)

( ’ 8)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(16)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

(18)

456

146

7,207

680

1,638

322

810

562

5,603

1,486

752

57,856

7,890

35,807

184
1 507
8

-177
,811,810

368
1 8,738
8

180
1 10,814
8

-360
1—521
S

264
1 3,262
8

-33
1 —378
S

-15
">-110

(18)

(18)

(18)

,81,883

n
,862,486

(16)

1 8,581
8

n
1 4,204
8

1 109,710
8

1 100,608
8

63
64
65
66
67
68
69

4,796

-3,203

-13,357

51,998

9,026

15,583

22,362

7,244

9,083

7,592

-119

2,758

-57,485

-59,563

-179,275

70

-9,260
3,774
-5,486
4,623
-431
-1,294

-1,908
1,000
-908
1,743
-110
725

-2,457
1,080
-1,377
1,688
-117
194

-51,846
5,767
-46,079
641
-11,063
-56,501

-17,155
1,708
-15,447
-11
-2,852
-18,310

-17,815
1,919
-15,896
-286
-2,886
-19,068

-27,568
2,053
-25,515
603
-107
-25,019

-7,261
505
-6,756
-160
-24
-6,940

-8,077
608
-7,469
434
-27
-7,062

-10,296
4,142
-6,154
1,923
-10,872
-15,103

-2,389
723
-1,666
812
-2,831
-3,685

-3,091
1,106
-1,985
855
-2,762
-3,892

-3,164
-8,932
-12,096
7,406
-253
-4,943

-962
-3,192
-4,154
1,279
-649
-3,524

2
-2,564
-2,562
-766
-414
-3,742

71
72
73
74
75
76

(*)




38

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Table 11. U.S. International
[Millions
Asia and Pacific
(Credits +; debits - ) 1

Line

Australia

2006

China

2006

2005

2006

2005
II r

Hong Kong
2006

2005
II '

III p

I II"

2005
IIr

III ”

II r

III»

Current account
1 Exports of goods and services and income receipts...........................................

417,073

117,877

123,016

32,637

9,582

10,070

55,107

17,072

18,691

26,369

7,530

7,969

2

Exports of goods and services...............................................................................

341,341

94,410

98,994

23,208

6,465

6,794

50,904

15,621

17,199

20,029

5,623

5,812

3

Goods, balance-of-payments basis 2.................................................................

237,515

67,237

14,431

16,319

4,480

4,601

27,173
928

4,440
2,354
88

13,172

103,826
4,103

4,101
2,364
78

41,799

Services 3..........................................................................................................
Transfers under U.S. military agency sales contracts 4...................................

6
7
8

Travel.............................................................................................................
Passenger fares.............................................................................................
Other transportation.......................................................................................

24,022
5,276
14,789

6,237
1,391
4,149

69,605
29,389
731
7,234
1,358
4,276

15,300

4
5

682
136
91

641
125
93

9,105
(*)
1,181
353
1,870

2,449
(*)
347
95
627

2,768
(*)
374
95
671

3,710
n
447
146
452

1,143
(*)
128
34
150

1,211
(*)
141
38
150

9
10
11

Royalties and license fees 5...........................................................................
Other private services 5.................................................................................
U.S. Government miscellaneous services......................................................

18,262
37,013
361

4,750
9,629
89

4,824
10,877
89

1,181
3,055
22

331
1,041
5

317
1,085
5

1,118
4,557
26

327
1,047
6

319
1,302
7

518
2,129
18

141
687
3

137
742
3

12
13
14
15
16
17

Income receipts............................................
Income receipts on U.S.-owned assets abroad..................................................
Direct investment receipts....................
Other private receipts...........................
U.S. Government receipts....................
Compensation of employees....................

75,732
75,367
50,854
24,119
394
365

23,467
23,370
15,118
8,137
115
97

24,022
23,923
15,224
8,589
110
99

9,429
9,405
5,653
3,752

3,117
3,110
1,830
1,280

3,276
3,269
1,913
1,356

7

1,451
1,442
1,207
225
10
9

1,492
1,483
1,200
258
25
9

6,340
6,276
5,072
1,195
9
64

1,907
1,890
1,426
464

24

4,203
4,167
3,333
763
71
36

2,157
2,140
1,633
501
6
17

18 Imports of goods and services and income payments........................................

-792,581

-220,984 -240,064

-18,773

-5,136

-5,335 -273,256

-78,427

-90,413

-18,266

-5,093

-5,537

19

Imports of goods and services...............................................................................

-680,985 -185,106 -202,245

-12,207

-3,213

-3,478 -250,009

-69,688

-80,913

-13,845

-3,289

-3,537

20

Goods, balance-of-payments basis2.................................................................

-607,148 -164,825 -182,193

-7,306

-2,021

-2,129 -243,472

-67,720

-78,941

-8,925

-1,901

-2,203

21
22

Services 3..........................................................................................................
Direct defense expenditures...........................................................................

-73,837
-4,898

-20,281
-1,398

-20,052
-1,309

-4,901
-148

-1,192
-29

-1,349
-35

-6,537
-4

-1,968
-1

-1,972
-1

-4,920
-6

-1,388
-11

-1,334
-11

23
24
25

Travel.............................................................................................................
Passenger fares.............................................................................................
Other transportation.......................................................................................

-14,153
-8,143
-21,899

-3,963
-2,207
-6,010

-3,753
-1,992
-6,162

-1,188
-901
-309

-253
-210
-87

-357
-243
-86

-2,104
-487
-3,036

-665
-144
-889

-635
-136
-912

-1,084
-873
-1,225

-290
-257
-348

-297
-198
-344

26
27
28

Royalties and license fees5.................
Other private services 5.......................
U.S. Government miscellaneous services......................................................

-7,399
-16,654
-691

-1,804
-4,729
-170

-1,774
-4,891
-171

-222
-2,037
-96

-61
-531
-21

-76
-531
-21

-63
-817
-26

-13
-248
-8

-16
-264
-8

-41
-1,646
-45

-9
-463
-10

-11
-463
-10

29
30
31
32
33
34

Income payments.........................................
Income payments on foreign-owned assets in tne unitea States........................
Direct investment payments...........................................................................
Other private payments..
U.S. Government payments...........................................................................
Compensation of employees..............................................................................

-111,596
-110,682
-17,923
-22,142
-70,617
-914

-35,878
-35,685
-5,195
-7,927
-22,563
-193

-37,819
-37,658
-6,038
-8,302
-23,318
-161

-6,566
-6,552
-3,731
-2,055
-766
-14

-1,923
-1,919
-931
-770
-218
-4

-1,857
-1,854
-826
-813
-215
-3

-23,247
-22,899
-11
-2,977
-19,911
-348

-8,739
-8,658
-25
-1,189
-7,444
-81

-9,500
-9,424
-26
-1,342
-8,056
-76

-4,421
-4,406
-500
-1,577
-2,329
-15

-1,804
-1,801
-52
-703
-1,046
-3

-2,000
-1,998
-55
-796
-1,147
-2

35 Unilateral current transfers, net..............................................................................
3fi
U.S. Government grants 4............................
37
U.S. Government pensions and other transfers.....................................................
Private remittances and other transfers 6......
38

-13,735
-2,874
-692
-10,169

-2,793
-918
-195
-1,680

-3,282
-578
-172
-2,532

-245

-87

-56

-1,928

-418

-537

-97

-18

-28

-66
-179

-20
-67

-17
-39

-4
-1,924

-1
-417

-536

-8
-89

-2
-16

-2
-26

-793

-208

-223

-32

-8

-8

-141

-37

-39

-4

-1

-2

-92,369
-10

-16,484
-10

-46,420
-13

-11,249

-4,690

-8,530

-3,945

-1,519

6,013

-13,664

-5,185

-656

-10

-10

-13

876

139
-44
182
1

194
-37
224
7

1

139

22

41

28

1

10

28

1

138
1

7,908
478
2,244
559
369

7

-i

17

Capital and financial account
Capital account
39 Capital account transactions, net...........................................................................
Financial account
40 U.S.-owned assets abroad, net (increase/financial outflow (-))...........................
41
42
Gold 7 .............................................................................................................
4?
44
45
46
47
48
49

U.S. foreign currency holdings and U.S. short-term assets, net..........................

963
55

23
-1

40
1

50
51
52
53
54

U.S. private assets, net..........................................................................................
Direct investment...............................................................................................
Foreign securities...............................................................................................
U.S. claims on unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns....
U.S. claims reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere..............................

-93,235
-12,998
-58,594
9,063
-30,706

-16,613
-14,063
6,387
264
-9,201

-46,601
-11,936
6,014
672
-41,351

-11,250
(D)
-13,905
(D)
-3,731

-4,690
-1,737
-2,338
670
-1,285

-8,530
-1,971
-559
194
-6,194

-4,084
-1,613
3,181
-278
-5,374

-1,541
-1,360
2,502
-30
-2,653

5,972
-713
2,094
310
4,281

-13,692
-4,168
-6,590
-299
-2,635

-5,186
-2,774
19
-74
-2,357

-666
-1,460
-226
354
666

55 Foreign-owned assets in the United States, net (increase/financial inflow (+))

347,166

103,495

117,018

2,717

7,800

-1,024

193,455

65,212

67,910

31,636

14,357

17,918

56
57
58
59
fiO
61
62

35,844
C7
)
(1 )
7
n
400
n
n
67,651
6,110
(,7)
34,544

69,069
C7
)
C7
)
(")
1,214
(1 )
7
(,7)
47,949
6,993
( ,7)
18,191

n
n
n
n
-108
n
n

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

Other foreign assets in the United States, net........................................................
Direct investment...............................................................................................
U.S. Treasury securities.....................................................................................
U.S. securities other than U.S. Treasury securities............................................

161,574
n
( 1)
7
C7
)
-669
C7
)
( 1)
7
185,592
21,683
( ,7)
126,428

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

6,022

2,991

U.S. liabilities to unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........................

n
-7,008

V1)
6,949

(1 )
7
9,877

-1,895
1-5,490
8

52
1 4,181
8

70 Statistical discrepancy (sum of above items with sign reversed)19....................

135,239

19,097

49,955

-5,055

-7,461

Memoranda:
Balance on goods (lines 3 and 20)............................................................................. -369,633 -97,588 -112,588
29,989
6,892
9,337
Balance on services (lines 4 and 21)...............
Balance on goods and services (lines 2 and 19)....................................................... -339,644 -90,696 -103,251
-35,864 -12,411
-13,797
Balance on income (lines 12 and 29)...............
-2,793
-13,735
-3,282
Unilateral current transfers, net (line 35)....................................................................
Balance on current account (lines 1,18, and 35 or lines 73,74, and 7 5 )13............... -389,243 -105,900 -120,330

7,994
3,007
11,001
2,863
-245
13,619

2,080
1,172
3,252
1,194
-87
4,359

63
64
65
66
67
68
69

71
72
73
74
75
76

-142

Foreign official assets in the United States, net.....................................................
U.S. Government securities
U.S. Treasury securities 9...............................................................................
O ther10.........................
Other U.S. Government liabilities 11...................................................................
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........................
Other foreign official assets 12............................................................................

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




n
4,188

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

237
(.8)

(1 )
8

n

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 )
8
(1 8 )

n
n

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

10
i

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

n

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 )
S

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(,8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

1,143

258

(1 8 )

153
(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(,8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

339

459
n
1,178

49

-95

n

(1 8 )

n
-40

(1 8 )
(1 8 )

(")

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

13,130

9,021

1,414

25,661

7,010

289
n
6,295

-114
-1,218
1-2,700 1 181,494
8
S

305
1 55,981
8

-436
166,972
8

148
1 4,684
8

-71
1 7,160
8

437
1 10,897
8

4,883

30,708

-1,883

-1,625

-25,974

-11,590

-19,664

2,311 -201,673
1,005
2,568
3,316 -199,105
1,419 -19,044
-56
-1,928
4,679 -220,077

-54,548
481
-54,067
-7,288
-418
-61,773

-64,510
796
-63,714
-8,008
-537
-72,259

7,394
-1,210
6,184
1,919
-97
8,006

2,579
-245
2,334
103
-18
2,419

2,398
-123
2,275
157
-28
2,404

January 2007

Survey

of

39

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Transactions, by Area— Continues
of dollars]
Japan

India
2006
2005'

II '

III p

II'

2006

2006

2005

2005

III p

Other Asia and Pacific

Taiwan

2006

2006

2005
II r

Singapore

Korea, Republic of
2006

2005
II '

III p

Line

2005 r
II '

III p

III p

II r

III p

15,014

4,786

4,839

118,724

31,404

33,413

43,082

12,060

12,778

37,956

11,009

10,919

32,164

56,018

15,986

15,859

1

4,150

4,206

95,782

24,768

26,457

38,172

10,481

11,240

26,236

7,431

7,437

29,243

8,448
7,824

8,478

13,230

7,722

44,536

12,047

12,127

2

7,972

2,544

2,651

53,264

14,232

5,926

5,563

34,014

9,401

9,300

3

10,536
163

2,796
182

20,259
5,977
193

21,453

42,518
629

8,036
3,204
118

5,867

1,555
6

27,135
11,037
717

5,696

1,606
4

14,716
11,741
123

7,685

5,258
18

1,735
170

1,570
20

7,790
1,392

1,898
220

2,159
277

10,522
675

2,646
111

2,827
99

1,519
98
390

570
248
118

470
8
129

12,719
3,801
4,314

2,837
805
1,102

3,756
1,022
1,067

2,551
57
2,479

664
15
727

821
14
781

412
12
619

127
(*)
196

101
1
204

225
1
676

310
3
680

2,068
238
2,033

657
57
462

620
52
501

198
2,989
46

81
573
12

52
878
12

8,706
12,275
74

2,217
3,392
20

2,238
3,516
19

2,011
3,200
22

514
688
6

584
880
6

2,446
2,261
34

617
616
9

631
604
9

881
12
2,263
1,337
1,886
19

4
5
6
7
8

316
455
5

349
535
5

747
4,661
100

206
1,130
23

197
1,335
23

9
10
11

1,784
1,768
1,097
640
31
16

636
632
433
196
3
4

633
629
421
196
12
4

22,942
22,867
11.381
11,477
9
75

6,636
6,617
2,618
3,989
10
19

6,956
6,936
2,661
4,263
12
20

4,910
4,890
2,655
2,224
11
20

1,579
1,574
865
708
1
5

1,538
1,532
774
756
2
6

11,720
11,700
10,729
971

3,578
3,572
3,274
298

3,482
3,476
3,157
319

2,921
2,905
1,751
1,154

624
619
289
330

20

6

6

16

5

-6,918

-7,610

-218,132

-59,872

-60,881

-57,306

-15,352

-15,652

-23,437

-7,034

-7,265

-47,854

-13,375

3,939
3,914
3,176
647
91
25
-29,777

3,732
3,707
3,029
625
53
25
-33,409

12
13
14
15
16
17

-25,236

11,482
11,388
9,183
1,943
262
5
94
-13,962 -110,321

-23,844

-6,511

-7,187

-161,855

-43,034

-43,340

-51,726

-13,709

-13,659

-19,093

-5,634

-5,853
-4,764

-41,539
-34,827

-11,462

-12,072

-106,867

-28,566

-32,206

19

-9,520

-10,211

-96,935

-26,002

-29,582

20

-6,712
-306

-1,942
-54

-1,861
-70

-9,932
-1,120

-2,564
-378

-2,624
-330

21
22

-885
-1,229
-3,810

-280
-347
-1,090

-222
-304
-1,098

-3,060
-1,617
-2,087

-758
-379
-519

-769
-356
-608

23
24
25

756
751
436
315

18

-18,803

-5,109

-5,865

-138,008

-36,598

-36,926

-43,781

-11,555

-11,572

-15,091

-4,399

-5,041
-5

-1,402
-20

-1,322
-2

-23,847
-1,426

-6,436
-358

-6,414
-360

-7,945
-1,623

-2,154
-406

-2,087
-400

-1,235
-141

-1,493
-187
-302

-377
-39
-68

-266
-45
-83

-2,788
-1,260
-6,585

-838
-341
-1,825

-788
-307
-1,831

-1,002
-1,281
-3,434

-304
-401
-869

-281
-320
-900

-4,002
-260
-549
-308
-1,111

-198
-89
-315

-1,089
-100
-138
-83
-300

-13
-3,021
-20

-8
-885
-5

-6
-915
-5

-6,955
-4,698
-135

-1,675
-1,362
-37

-1,631
-1,460
-37

-23
-564
-18

-10
-159
-5

-10
-171
-5

-24
-1,733
-17

-4
-484
-4

-6
-458
-4

-37
-438
-7

-14
-155
-2

-9
-156
-2

-21
-1,700
-327

-10
-442
-78

-9
-473
-79

26
27
28

-1,392
-1,221
(D)
(D)
-460
-171

-407
-375
-137
-101
-137
-32

-423
-399
-146
-118
-135
-24

-56,277
-56,167
-12,334
-9,669
-34,164
-110

-16,838
-16,815
-3,991
-3,102
-9,722
-23

-17,541
-17,521
-4,605
-3,092
-9,824
-20

-5,580
-5,459
(D)
(D)
-4,373
-121

-1,643
-1,619
79
-321
-1,377
-24

-1,993
-1,975
-245
-374
-1,356
-18

-4,344
-4,337
-8
-2,663
-1,666
-7

-1,400
-1,399
-50
-875
-474
-1

-1,412
-1,411
-52
-896
-463
-1

-6,315
-6,268
-337
-1,197
-4,734
-41

-1,913
-1,904
-68
-417
-1,419
-9

-1,890
-1,884
-67
-417
-1,400
-6

-3,454
-3,373
-113
-1,046
-2,214
-81

-1,211
-1,195
-20
-449
-726
-16

-1.203
-1,192
-16
-454
-722
-11

29
30
31
32
33
34

-1,974
-140
-17
-1,817

-436
-48
-5
-383

-553
-25
-5
-523

739

600

248

-578

-51

-159

-17

-12

-9

-443

-110

-147

-163
902

-50
650

-40
288

-50
-528

-13
-38

-13
-146

-5
-12

-1
-11

-1
-8

-4
-439

-1
-109

-1
-146

-9,192
-2,734
-375
-6,083

-2,261
-870
-102
-1,289

-2,041
-553
-92
-1,396

35
36
37
38

-189

-50

-53

12

3

2

-25

-7

-8

(*)

(*)

-24

-6

-7

-390

-102

-108

39

-1,986

-1,562

-983

-49,466
-10

4,560
-10

-25,576
-13

-2,636

-5,933

-11,304

-2,617

-3,351

-3,459

574

309

-15,269

-112

-2,342

-10

-10

263

23

55

-13
1

40
41
4?
43
44
45

6

8

397

7
-1

8

79
-37
113
3

46
47
48
49

207
56

17
6

53
2

-2,249
-737
-1,562
219
-169

-1,585
-331
-1,394
-178
318
2,371

-1,038
-409
-73
182
-738
-647

3,838
(1 )
8

(18 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

H

(1 8 )

-2

1

47
-2
44
5

546
-9

87
-44
135
-4

-49,454
-7,636
-32,648
355
-9,525

4,570
-2,305
8,144
-150
-1,119

-25,564
-2,188
2,385
-189
-25,572

-2,683
-1,687
48
228
-1,272

-5,939
-844
710
164
-5,969

-11,312
-716
1,096
-309
-11,383

9,305
10,407
924
-505
-1,521

-2,617
-2,471
-191
-165
210

-3,351
-2,681
599
-136
-1,133

-3,462
(D)
-5,036
(D)
1,931

574
-121
-1,326
-244
2,265

309
76
1,824
94
-1,685

-15,666
-4,175
-3,006
-75
-8,410

-199
-2,120
261
271
1,389

-2,421
-1,874
-1,126
172
407

50
51
52
53
54

60,551

13,461

21,284

22,482

-1,949

6,504

4,969

7,289

-4,038

10,763

-1,149

4,166

16,755

-3,897

4,945

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 )
S
(1 )
8

(18 )

(1 )
8
(1 )
8

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

-2

H

(1 )
8

('8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

( 1)
8

9,305

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

3
-140
3

(18 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

H
H

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

67
H

75

-96

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

-8
(1 )
8
(1 )
S

(1 8 )

H
-199

H
(1 )
8

48

45

78

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

H
150

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

726

227

583

-567

207

258

H
22

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(18 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

-183

117

-149

9,692

1,685

677

531

448
H
7,963

55

(1 8 )

4,805
(1 )
S
11,967

815

(1 8 )

14,044
H
61,096

6,308

(1 8 )

1,098

-862

8,981

1,349

(1 8 )

(1 ° )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

n

(1
•)

n

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

29
( 1)
8
187

12

-7

81

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

2,073

314

-95

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

-52
H

-1,165

H

(1 8 )

977

(IS )

47

32

H

(1 8 )

159

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

5

n
619

H

(1 8 )

(18 )

31
(1 8 )

H
H

n
H
(i°)

( ’8)

(1 8 )

(1 8 )

n

n

( i fl)

H
n
(1 8 )

45
1 3,219
8

9
1 2,095
6

101
1—858
8

-16
1 -1 3,408
8

625
1 —3,984
8

-437
1 5,676
8

1,033
1 18,871
8

70
1 -3,284
8

-262
1 6,735
8

n
1 —3,517
S

n
1 6,232
8

1 —3,375
8

535
1 1,188
8

-178
1 —2,389
S

122
’*3,880

,814,051

,8-4,363

1 3,982
3

63
64
65
66
67
68
69

10,533

1,809

5,007

87,572

9,844

31,510

-5,019

11,232

7,841

-28,776

-8,635

3,744

8,853

5,618

1,163

62,399

20,163

17,096

70

-10,831
217
-10,614
392
-1,974
-12,196

-2,565
204
-2,361
229
-436
-2,568

-3,214
233
-2,981
210
-553
-3,324

-84,744
18,671
-66,073
-33,335
739
-98,669

-22,366
4,100
-18,266
-10,202
600
-27,868

-22,210
5,327
-16,883
-10,585
248
-27,220

-16,646
3,092
-13,554
-670
-578
-14,802

-3,870
642
-3,228
-64
-51
-3,343

-3,536
1,117
-2,419
-455
-159
-3,033

5,168
1,975
7,143
7,376
-17
14,502

1,297
500
1,797
2,178
-12
3,963

1,103
481
1,584
2,070
-9
3,645

-13,374
1,078
-12,296
-3,394
-443
-16,133

-3,594
-44
-3,638
-1,289
-110
-5,037

-4,648
298
-4,350
-1,134
-147
-5,631

-62,921
590
-62,331
8,028
-9,192
-63,495

-16,601
82
-16,519
2,728
-2,261
-16,052

-20,282
203
-20,079
2,529
-2,041
-19,591

71
72
73
74
75
76

N ote . Annual and quarterly data for India and Other Asia and Pacific in this table have been corrected by offsetting amounts. Quarterly data for 2005:1 to 2006:1 for these areas have also been corrected and can be found on




(18 )

BEA’s Web site at <www.bea.gov/bea/international/bp_web>.

U.S. International Transactions

40

January 2 0 0 7

Table 11. U.S. International
[Millions
Middle East
Line

(Credits +; debits - ) '

Africa
2006

2006

2005

2005
II '

11 p
1

IIr

llle

Current account
1 Exports of goods and services and income receipts...........................................

55,326

15,835

16,063

30,498

8,635

2

Exports of goods and services...............................................................................

48,824

13,804

23,830

6,448

7,370

3
4
5

Goods, balance-of-payments basis 2.................................................................
Services3..........................................................................................................
Transfers under U.S. military agency sales contracts4..................................

29,760

8,994

13,986
9,021

6
7
8

Travel.............................................................................................................
Passenger fares.............................................................................................
Other transportation.......................................................................................

1,819
250
1,971

4,810
1,942
524
80
552

4,965
1,775
672
58
587

4,110
2,338
394

4,987

19,064
9,285

14,886
8,944
1,504

331
9
182

404
9
232

9
10
11

Royalties and license fees 5...........................................................................
Other private services 5.................................................................................
U.S. Government miscellaneous services......................................................

397
5,228
114

104
1,577
31

104
1,742
27

1,179
42
778
491
4,887
63

144
1,258
20

118
1,351
20

Income receipts.....................
Income receipts on U.S.-owned assets abroad..................................................
Direct investment receipts
Other private receipts....
U.S. Government receipts
Compensation of employees..............................................................................
18 Imports of goods and services and income payments........................................

6,502
6,410
4,670
1,549
191
92

2,031
2,007
1,448
540
19
24

2,077
2,053
1,455
569
29
24

6,668
6,600
5,303
951
346
68

2,187
2,169
1,790
314
65
18

1,985
1,967
1,558
309
100
18

-87,560

-26,715

-27,809

-70,849

-22,614

-25,309

19

Imports of goods and services...............................................................................

-80,664

-23,968

-69,525

-22,147

-24,781

20

Goods, balance-of-payments basis 2.................................................................

-62,437

-19,231

-24,968
-20,094

-65,210

-20,900

-23,634

21
22

Services3...........................................................................................................
Direct defense expenditures...........................................................................

-18,227
-12,837

-4,737
-3,300

-4,874
-3,425

-4,315
-301

-1,247
-53

-1,147
-66

12
13
14
15
1b
17

9,355

2,383
249

23
24
2b

Travel.............................
Passenger fares............
Other transportation......

-1,362
-760
-1,112

-306
-170
-318

-320
-218
-306

-1,497
-472
-295

-477
-118
-74

-342
-131
-87

26
27
28

Royalties and license fees 5...........................................................................
Other private services 5.................................................................................
U.S. Government miscellaneous services......................................................

-111
-1,767
-278

-64
-504
-75

-28
-504
-73

-6
-1,522
-222

-3
-461
-61

-3
-456
-62

29
30
31
32
33
34

Income payments...................................................................................................
Income payments on foreign-owned assets in the United States........................
Direct investment payments...........................................................................
Other private payments..
U.S. Government payments...........................................................................
Compensation of employees

-6,896
-6,838
-616
-3,094
-3,128
-58

-2,747
-2,735
-422
-1,095
-1,218
-12

-2,841
-2,832
-338
-1,238
-1,256
-9

-1,324
-1,214
-180
-622
-412
-110

-467
-444
-30
-235
-179
-23

-528
-508
-54
-255
-199
-20

35 Unilateral current transfers, net
36
U.S. Government grants 4......................................................................................
37
U.S. Government pensions and other transfers.....................................................
38
Private remittances and other transfers 6...............................................................

-16,628
-13,516
-120
-2,992

-2,466
-1,597
-31
-838

-2,462
-1,529
-30
-903

-7,839
-5,179
-25
-2,635

-1,330
-671
-7
-652

-1,153
-430
-5
-718

-2,405

-78

-81

-156

-501

-17

-6,953

-5,713

-1,330

-3,987

-946

-578

Capital and financial account
Capital account
39 Capital account transactions, net...........................................................................
Financial account
40 U.S.-owned assets abroad, net (increase/financial outflow (-))............................
41
4?
Gold 7................................................................................................................
43
Special drawing rights........................................................................................
44
Reserve position in the International Monetary Fund........................................
45
Foreign currencies..............................................................................................
46
47
48
49

U.S. Government assets, other than official reserve assets, net.............................
U.S. credits and other long-term assets.............................................................
Repayments on U.S. credits and other long-term assets 8................................
U.S. foreign currency holdings and U.S. short-term assets, net..........................

2,212
-74
257
2,029

61
-3
65
-1

38
-14
49
3

268
-383
663
-12

1,273
-87
1,369
-9

30
-134
164

50
51
52
53
b4

U.S. private assets, nel
Direct investment....
Foreign securities....
U.S. claims on unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns....
U.S. claims reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere.............................

-9,165
-3,466
384
-540
-5,543

-5,774
-985
-373
-1,069
-3,347

-1,368
-1,156
-804
-345
937

-4,255
-2,066
-1,636
-337
-216

-2,219
-1,180
-1,071
120
-88

-608
-1,045
462
-32
7

55 Foreign-owned assets in the United States, net (increase/financial inflow (+))

18,951

19,225

10,566

9,071

2,710

-120

56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Foreign official assets in the United States, net.....................................................
U.S. Government securities................................................................................
U.S. Treasury securities 9...............................................................................
Other10.........................................................................................................
Other U.S. Government liabilities 11...................................................................
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........................
Other foreign official assets 12............................................................................

63
64
65
66
67
68
69

Other foreign assets in the United States, net........................................................
Direct investment................................................................................................
U.S. Treasury securities............................
U.S. securities other than U.S. Treasury securities............................................
U.S. currency............................................
U.S. liabilities to unaffiliated foreigners reported by U.S. nonbanking concerns
U.S. liabilities reported by U.S. banks, not included elsewhere...........................

2,312
( ,7)
(” )
n
-132
(")
( ,7)
16,639
1,572
( 1)
7
6,346

15,380
( ,7)
(1 )
7
(” )
249
(1 )
7
(” )
3,845
483
( ,7)
2,436

8,113
( 1)
7
( ,7)
C7
)
-35
( ,7)
( 1)
7
2,453
479
( 1)
7
923

5,288
(1 )
7
(,7)
C7
)
-110
( ,7)
( ,7)
3,783
651
n
586

2,735
C7
)
(1 )
7
C7)
-99
(1 )
7
C7)
-25
118
n
480

161
C7
)
(1 )
7
( ,7)
13
( ,7)
n
-281
39
C7
)
-10

C7
)
-1,274

C7
)
-392

(1 )
7
4,683

n
202

n
454

n
801

70 Statistical discrepancy (sum of above items with sign reversed)19....................

39,269

-88

5,053

43,262

14,046

17,822

Memoranda:
Balance on goods (lines 3 and 20).............................................................................
Balance on services (lines 4 and 21).........................................................................
Balance on goods and services (lines 2 and 19).......................................................
Balance on income (lines 12 and 29).........................................................................
Unilateral current transfers, net (line 35)....................................................................
Balance on current account (lines 1,18, and 35 or lines 73,74, and 7 5 ),3...............

-32,677
837
-31,840
-394
-16,628
-48,862

-10,237
73
-10,164
-716
-2,466
-13,346

-11,073
91
-10,982
-764
-2,462
-14,208

-50,324
4,629
-45,695
5,344
-7,839
-48,190

-16,790
1,091
-15,699
1,720
-1,330
-15,309

-18,647
1,236
-17,411
1,457
-1.153
-17,107

71
72
73
74
75
76

See the footnotes on pages 42-43.




January 2007

Survey

of

41

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Transactions, by Area— Table Ends
of dollars]
International organizations and unallocated 1
6

Other Africa

South Africa
2006
2005

2005
II'

Line

2006

2006
2005
IIr

III»

II '

III ”

III f

1
2

6,518

1,854

1,991

23,980

6,781

7,364

44,161

12,030

11,559

5,317

1,460

5,785

5,509

1,430

934

1 034

18,513
10992

4,988

3 894
1,423
2

1,585
1 181

3 076

3 806

404

(*)

7,521
1,502

1,912
392

1,979
249

5,509
256

1,430
32

934
51

314
1
157

426
2
90
0
44

89
0
49

865
41
621

241
9
138

315
9
183

1,035

332

329

305
640
4

105
184
1

73
192
1

186
4,247
59

39
1,074
19

45
1,159
19

2,113
2,101
4

497
569

2
552

(*)

(*)

9
10
11

1,201
1,193
593
595
5
8

394
392
192
195
5
2

406
404
211
193
2

5,467
5,407
4,710
356
341
60

1,793
1,777
1,598
119
60
16

1,579
1,563
1,347
116
100
16

38,653
36,960
21,785
14,773
402
1,693

10,600
10,190
5,497
4,642
51
410

10,625
10,210
5,517
4,638
55
415

12
13
14
15
16
17

-7,073

-2,345

-2,317

-63,776

-20,269

-22,992

-21,487

-5,461

-5,462

18

-6,865

-2,299

-2,248

-62,660

-19,848

-22,533

-5,179

-1,078

-1,095

19

-5 883

-2 000

-1 968

-59 327

-18,900

-21,666

-982
-12

-299

-280
-1

-3,333
-289

-948
-53

-867
-65

-5,179

-1,078

-1,095

21

-264
-177
-72

-102
-48
-16

-279
-86
-65
-2
-323
-47

-4,223

-1,017

-1,078

?3
?4
25

-1
-118
-14

-1 233
-295
-223
-4
-1,119
-170

-375
-70
-58

-2
-403
-52

-63
-45
-22
-1
-133
-15

-931
-15
-10

-55
-2

-11
-4
-2

26
27
28

-208
-199
-10
-149
-40
-9

-46
-44

-1,116
-1,015
-170
-473
-372
-101

-421
-400

-4,383
-4,383
-2,522
-1,597
-264

-4,367
-4,367
-2,515
-1,586
-266

-21

-459
-441
-42
-215
-184
-18

-16,308
-16,308
-10,310
-5,093
-905

-2

-69
-67
-12
-40
-15
-2

29
30
31
32
33
34

-474
-103
-6
-365

-126
-15
-2
-109

-140
-28
-1
-111

-7,365
-5,076
-19
-2,270

-1,204
-656
-5
-543

-1,013
-402
-4
-607

-16,066
-4,958
-2,131
-8,977

-4,050
-1,015
-273
-2,762

-5,019
-1,715
-467
-2,837

35
36
37
38

-4

-1

-1

-152

-500

-16

{*)

(*)

39

-1,601

-1,493

76

-2,386

547

-654

-9,357
14,711

-7,946
-402

-1,705
1,221

4,511
10,200

-51
-351

-54
1,275

40
41
4?
43
44
45

(D)
-43

(D)

-32
-32

-233
-224
-9

46
47
48
49

-2,653
-2,049
131
-320
-415

-683
-940
473
-44
-172

-23,107
-21,785
-118
3
-1,207

-7,512
-5,497
-1,014
-9
-992

-2,693
-5,517
1,357
7
1,460

50
51
52
53
54

-221

9,380

4,967

101

33,663

1,217

4,759

55

(18)
(18)
(18)
H

(18)
(18)
(18)
(18)

(18)
(18)
(18)
(18)

n
(18)
(18)
(18)

190

2

101

-109

-97

13

190

2

101

56
57
58
59
60
61
6?

33,473
10,310

1,215
2,522

4,658
2,515

1
-1,602
-17
-1,767
-17
199

1
-1,494
-294
-1,073
129
-256

1

267
-383
663
-13

75
-105
-11
12
179

-309

-2,257

(18)
(18)
118)
(18)

(18)
(18)
(18)
(18)

-9

-2

75

(D)

-961
-953
2
-10

1

(18)
18)
(18)

-192

-A

7?

29
-134
164
-1

1

-1

(D)

?n

1,272
-87
1,369
-10
-725
-886
2
-9
168

1

(18)
(18)
(18)

-2
-343
-47

3
4
5
fi
7
8

(18\
(18)
(18)
23

(18)

(18)

(18)

32

104

(18)
(18)
(18)

660

(!8)
(18)
(18)
43

H
(18)
(18)
16

(18)

(18)

-72

554

376

62

(18)

(18)

(18)

H

(18)

(*)

n

-128
1,127

63
64
65
66
67
68
69

39
1 —370
S

-132
1-2,302
8

-73
,a-99

1 8,275
8

1 4,645
8

,810

12,744
8

1 —2,306
S

31
1,129
3
1 980
8

2,943

4,368

612

40,319

9,678

17,210

-30,915

4,209

-4,133

70

1 989
441
-1,548
993
-474
-1,029

966
127
-839
348
-126
-617

-787
124
-663
337
-140
-466

-48 335
4,188
-44,147
4,351
-7,365
-47,161

-15,824
964
-14,860
1,372
-1,204
-14,692

-17 860
1,112
-16,748
1,120
-1,013
-16,641

330
330
22,345
-16,066
6,608

352
352
6,217
-4,050
2,519

-161
-161
6,258
-5,019
1,078

71
72
73
74
75
76




1,003
19,416

(18)

42

U.S. International Transactions

January 2007

Footnotes to U.S. International Transactions Tables 1-11
General notes for all tables: p Preliminary. r Revised. * Less than
sonally adjusted data are the sum o f seasonally adjusted five-digit end-use cat­
$500,000 (+ /-). D Suppressed to avoid disclosure o f data o f individual com pa­
egories (see technical Notes in the June 1980 S u r v e y , in the June 1988 S u r v e y ,
nies. Quarterly estimates are not annualized and are expressed at quarterly
and in the June 1991 S u r v e y ) . Prior to 1983, annual data are as published by
rates.
the Census Bureau, except that for 1975-80 published Census data are
Table 1:
adjusted to include trade between the U . S . Virgin Islands and foreign coun­
1. Credits, +: Exports o f goods and services and income receipts; unilateral
tries.
current transfers to the United States; capital account transactions receipts;
2. Adjustments in lines A5 and A13, B20, B75, and B130 reflect the Census
financial inflows— increase in foreign-owned assets (U.S. liabilities) or
Bureau’s reconciliation o f discrepancies between the goods statistics published
decrease in U.S.-owned assets (U.S. claims).
by the United States and the counterpart statistics published in Canada.
Debits,
Imports o f goods and services and income payments; unilateral
These adjustments are distributed to the affected end-use categories in sec­
current transfers to foreigners; capital account transactions payments; finan­
tion C. Beginning in 1986, estimates for undocumented exports to Canada,
cial outflows— decrease in foreign-owned assets (U.S. liabilities) or increase in
the largest item in the U.S.-Canadian reconciliation, are included in Census
U.S.-owned assets (U.S. claims).
basis data shown in line A l.
2. Excludes exports o f goods under U.S. military agency sales contracts
3. Exports of military equipment under U.S. military agency sales
identified in Census export documents, excludes imports of goods under
contracts with foreign governments (line A6), and direct imports by the
direct defense expenditures identified in Census import documents, and
Department o f Defense and the Coast Guard (line A14), to the extent such
reflects various other adjustments (for valuation, coverage, and timing) of
trade is identifiable from Customs declarations. The exports are included in
Census statistics to balance-of-payments basis; see table 2a.
tables 1 and 11, line 5 (transfers under U.S. military agency sales contracts);
3. Includes some goods: Mainly military equipment in line 5; major equip­
the imports are included in tables 1 and 11, line 22 (direct defense expendi­
ment, other materials, supplies, and petroleum products purchased abroad by
tures).
U.S. military agencies in line 22; and fuels purchased by airline and steamship
4. Addition of electric energy; deduction of exposed motion picture film
operators in lines 8 and 25.
for rental rather than sale; net change in stock o f U.S.-owned grains in storage
4. Includes transfers o f goods and services under U.S. military grant pro­
in Canada; coverage adjustments for special situations in which shipments
grams.
were omitted from Census data; deduction of the value of repairs and alter­
5. Beginning in 1982, these lines are presented on a gross basis. The defini­
ations to foreign-owned equipment shipped to the United States for repair;
tion of exports is revised to exclude U.S. parents’ payments to foreign affiliates
and the inclusion o f fish exported outside o f U.S. customs area. Also includes
and to include U.S. affiliates’ receipts from foreign parents. The definition of
deduction of exports to the Panama Canal Zone before October 1, 1979, and
imports is revised to include U.S. parents’ payments to foreign affiliates and to
for 1975-82, net timing adjustments for goods recorded in Census data in one
exclude U.S. affiliates’ receipts from foreign parents.
period but found to have been shipped in another (see July issues o f the S u r v e y
6. Beginning in 1982, the “other transfers” component includes taxes paid
for historical data).
by U.S. private residents to foreign governments and taxes paid by private
5. Coverage adjustments for special situations in which shipments were
nonresidents to the U.S. Government.
omitted from Census data; the deduction o f the value o f repairs and alter­
7. At the present time, all U.S. Treasury-owned gold is held in the United
ations to U.S.-owned equipment shipped abroad for repair; and the adjust­
States.
ment o f software imports to market value. Also includes addition of
8. Includes sales o f foreign obligations to foreigners.
understatement o f inland freight in f.a.s. values o f U.S. imports o f goods from
9. Consists o f bills, certificates, marketable bonds and notes, and nonmarCanada in 1974-81; deduction o f imports from the Panama Canal Zone
ketable convertible and nonconvertible bonds and notes.
before October 1, 1979; and for 1975-82, net timing adjustments for goods
10. Consists o f U.S. Treasury and Export-lmport Bank obligations, not
recorded in Census data in one period but found to have been shipped in
included elsewhere, and o f debt securities of U.S. Government corporations
another (see July issues o f the S u r v e y for historical data).
and agencies.
6. For 1988-89, correction for the understatement o f crude petroleum
11. Includes, primarily, U.S. Government liabilities associated with mili­
imports from Canada.
tary agency sales contracts and other transactions arranged with or through
7. Annual and unadjusted quarterly data shown in this table correspond to
foreign official agencies; see table 5.
country and area data in table 11, lines 3 and 20. Trade with international
12. Consists o f investments in U.S. corporate stocks and in debt securities
organizations includes purchases of nonmonetary gold from the International
of private corporations and state and local governments.
Monetary Fund, transfers of tin to the International Tin Council (ITC), and
13. Conceptually, the sum of line 76 and line 3 9 is equal to “net lending or
sales of satellites to Intelsat. The memoranda are defined as follows: Members
net borrowing” in the national income and product accounts (NIPAs). How­
of OPEC: Venezuela, Ecuador, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, United
ever, the foreign transactions account in the NIPAs (a) includes adjustments
Arab Emirates, Indonesia, Algeria, Libya, Nigeria, and Gabon (excludes Ecua­
to the international transactions accounts for the treatment o f gold, (b)
dor beginning in January 1993 and Gabon beginning in January 1995). Before
includes adjustments for the different geographical treatment o f transactions
1984, complete geographic area detail was not available for some balance-ofwith U.S. territories and Puerto Rico, and (c) includes services furnished with­
payments adjustments. Therefore, the detail shown does not always sum to
out payment by financial pension plans except life insurance carriers and pri­
the values shown for the area aggregates.
vate noninsured pension plans. A reconciliation o f the balance on goods and
Table 3:
services from the international accounts and the NIPA net exports appears in
1. Includes royalties, license fees, and other fees associated with the use of
reconciliation table 2 in appendix A in this issue o f the Su r v e y o f C u r r e n t B u s i ­
intangible assets, including patents, trade secrets, and other proprietary rights,
ness . A reconciliation o f the other foreign transactions in the two sets of
that are used in connection with the production o f goods.
accounts appears in table 4 .3 B o f the full set o f NIPA tables.
2. Includes royalties, license fees, and other fees associated with the use of
Additional footnotes for historical data in July issues o f the S u r v e y :
copyrights, trademarks, franchises, rights to broadcast live events, software
14. For 1974, includes extraordinary U.S. Government transactions with
licensing fees, and other intangible property rights.
India. See “Special U.S. Government Transactions,” June 1974 S u r v e y , p. 27.
3. Other unaffiliated services receipts (exports) include mainly film and
15. For 1978-83, includes foreign currency-denominated notes sold to pri­
television tape rentals and expenditures o f foreign residents temporarily
vate residents abroad.
working in the United States. Payments (imports) include mainly expendi­
16. Break in series. See Technical Notes in the June 1989-90, 1992-95, and
tures o f U.S. residents temporarily working abroad and film and television
July 1996-2006 issues o f the S u r v e y .
tape rentals.
Table 2a:
4. These reflect the amount o f premiums explicitly charged by, or paid to,
1.
Exports, Census basis, represent transactions values, f.a.s. U.S. port ofinsurers and reinsurers.
exportation, for all years; imports, Census basis, represent Customs values
Table 4:
(see Technical Notes in the June 1982 S u r v e y ) , except for 1974-81, when they
1. Complete instrument detail is only available beginning with 2003.
represent transactions values, f.a.s. foreign port o f exportation (see July issues
2. Prior to 2003, includes only demand deposits and nonnegotiable time
o f the S u r v e y for historical data). From 1983 forward, both unadjusted and
and savings deposits.
seasonally adjusted data have been prepared by BEA from “actual” and
Table 5:
“revised statistical” monthly data supplied by the Census Bureau (see Techni­
1.
Expenditures to release foreign governments from their contractual lia­
cal Notes in the December 1985 S u r v e y ) . Seasonally adjusted data reflect the
bilities to pay for military goods and services purchased through military sales
application o f seasonal factors developed jointly by Census and BEA. The sea­
contracts— first authorized (for Israel) under Public Law 93-199, section 4,




January 2007

Survey

of

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

and subsequently authorized (for many recipients) under similar legisla­
tion— are included in line A4. Deliveries against these military sales contracts
are included in line CIO; see footnote 2. O f the line A4 items, part o f these mil­
itary expenditures is applied in lines A43 and A46 to reduce short-term assets
previously recorded in lines A41 and C8; this application of funds is excluded
from lines C3 and C4. A second part o f line A4 expenditures finances future
deliveries under military sales contracts for the recipient countries and is
applied directly to lines A42 and C9. A third part o f line A4, disbursed directly
to finance purchases by recipient countries from commercial suppliers in the
United States, is included in line A37. A fourth part o f line A4, representing
dollars paid to the recipient countries to finance purchases from countries
other than the United States, is included in line A48.
2. Transactions under military sales contracts are those in which the
Department o f Defense sells and transfers military goods and services to a for­
eign purchaser, on a cash or credit basis. Purchases by foreigners directly from
commercial suppliers are not included as transactions under military sales
contracts. The entries for the several categories o f transactions related to mili­
tary sales contracts in this and other tables are partly estimated from incom­
plete data.
3. The identification o f transactions involving direct dollar outflows from
the United States is made in reports by each operating agency.
4. Line A38 includes foreign currency collected as interest and line A43
includes foreign currency collected as principal, as recorded in lines A16 and
A17, respectively.
5. Includes (a) advance payments to the Department o f Defense (on mili­
tary sales contracts) financed by loans extended to foreigners by U.S. Govern­
ment agencies and (b) the contra-entry for the part o f line CIO that was
delivered without prepayment by the foreign purchaser. Also includes expen­
ditures o f appropriations available to release foreign purchasers from liability
to make repayment.
6. Includes purchases o f loans from U.S. banks and exporters and pay­
ments by the U.S. Government under commercial export credit and invest­
ment guarantee programs.
7. Excludes liabilities associated with military sales contracts financed by
U.S. Government grants and credits and included in line C2.
8. Excludes transactions o f the U.S. Enrichment Corporation since it
became a non-government entity in July 1998.
Table 6a:
1. For bank affiliates, includes only interest on permanent debt investment
by their parent companies. Excludes interest between financial parent com pa­
nies and nonbank financial affiliates.
2. For bank affiliates, includes only permanent debt investment by their
parent companies. Excludes intercompany debt between financial parent
companies and nonbank financial affiliates.
Table 7 a:
1. Beginning with 2005, source data for new issue estimates are no
longer separately available. New issues continue to be included in net
purchases.
2. Bahamas, Bermuda, British West Indies (Cayman Islands), and Nether­
lands Antilles.
Table 8a:
1. Prior to 2003, securities brokers’ claims on and liabilities to their foreign
affiliates are included in the estimates. They are excluded beginning in
2003.
2. Complete instrument detail is only available beginning with 2003.
3. Financial intermediaries’ accounts are shown under “other claims
(liabilities)” because the majority o f these claims (liabilities) are in the form
o f intercompany balances. Financial intermediaries’ accounts represent
transactions between firms in a direct investment relationship (that is,
between U.S. parents and their foreign affiliates or between U.S. affiliates and
their foreign parent groups), where both the U.S. and foreign firms are classi­
fied in a finance industry, but the firms are neither banks nor securities
brokers.
4. Bahamas, Bermuda, British West Indies (Cayman Islands), and Nether­
lands Antilles.




43

Table 9a:
1. Beginning with 2003, includes securities brokers’ claims on their foreign
affiliates.
2. Complete instrument detail is only available beginning with 2003.
3. Includes foreign official agencies and international and regional organi­
zations. Prior to 2003, also includes government-owned corporations and
state, provincial, and local governments and their agencies.
4. U.S.-owned banks include U.S.-chartered banks, Edge Act subsidiaries,
and U.S. bank holding companies. Foreign-owned banks include U.S.
branches and agencies o f foreign banks and majority-owned bank subsidiaries
in the United States. Brokers and dealers may be U.S.-owned or foreignowned.
5. Commercial paper issued in the U.S. market by foreign incorporated
entities and held in U.S. customers’ accounts. Excludes commercial paper
issued through foreign direct investment affiliates in the United States.
6. Prior to 2003, includes negotiable certificates o f deposit and other nego­
tiable and transferable instruments.
7 . Prior to 2003, includes only deposits.
8. Bahamas, Bermuda, British West Indies (Cayman Islands), and Nether­
lands Antilles.
Table 10a:
1. Beginning with 2003, includes securities brokers’ liabilities to their for­
eign affiliates.
2. Complete instrument detail is only available beginning with 2003.
3. U.S.-owned banks include U.S.-chartered banks, Edge Act subsidiaries,
and U.S. bank holding companies. Foreign-owned banks include U.S.
branches and agencies of foreign banks and majority-owned bank subsidiaries
in the United States. Brokers and dealers may be U.S.-owned or foreignowned.
4. Bahamas, Bermuda, British West Indies (Cayman Islands), and Nether­
lands Antilles.
Table 11:
For footnotes 1-13, see table 1.
14. The “European Union” includes Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany
(includes the former German Democratic Republic (East Germany) begin­
ning in the fourth quarter of 1990), Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Neth­
erlands, Portugal, Spain, United Kingdom; beginning with the first quarter of
1995, also includes Austria, Finland, and Sweden; and beginning with the sec­
ond quarter o f 2004, also includes Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary,
Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia. The “European
Union” also includes the European Atomic Energy Community, the European
Coal and Steel Community (through the third quarter o f 2002), and the Euro­
pean Investment Bank.
15. Quarterly estimates for Mexico are available beginning with 2004.
16. Includes, as part of international and unallocated, taxes withheld; cur­
rent-cost adjustments associated with U.S. and foreign direct investment; and
net U.S. currency flows. Before 1999, also includes the estimated direct invest­
ment in foreign affiliates engaged in international shipping, in operating oil
and gas drilling equipment internationally, and in petroleum trading. Before
1996, also includes small transactions in business services that are not
reported by country.
17. Details are not shown separately; see totals in lines 56 and 63.
18. Details not shown separately are included in line 69.
19. At the global level, the statistical discrepancy represents net errors and
omissions in recorded transactions. For individual countries and regions, it
may also reflect discrepancies that arise when transactions with one country
or region are settled through transactions with another country or region.
N o t e . Country data are based on information available from U.S. report­
ing sources. In some instances the statistics may not necessarily reflect the ulti­
mate foreign transactor. For instance: U.S. goods export statistics reflect
country o f reported destination; in many cases the goods may be transshipped
to third countries (especially true for the Netherlands and Germany). The
geographic breakdown o f securities transactions reflects the country with
which transactions occurred but may not necessarily reflect the ultimate
sources o f foreign funds or ultimate destination o f U.S. funds.

44

January 2007

An O w nership-Based Fram ework of the U.S. C urrent Account, 1995-2005
The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) annually
updates its supplemental, ownership-based framework of
the current-account portion of the U.S. international
transactions accounts. This report presents new sum ­
mary estimates of the major current-account aggregates
for 2005, more detailed estimates for 2004, and revised
estimates for 1995-2004.1 A technical note that presents
information on the conceptual basis of the ownershipbased framework follows the highlights of this presenta­
tion.2
The following are highlights of the updated estimates:
• Net receipts by U.S. parents of direct investment
income from the sales by their foreign affiliates were
$251.4 billion in 2005, up from $226.2 billion in 2004
(table 1). Net payments to foreign parents of direct
investment income from the sales by their U.S. affili­
ates were $117.0 billion in 2005, up from $102.4 bil­
lion in 2004.
• In 2004 (the latest year for which the detailed esti­
mates are available), the net receipts of $226.2 billion
consisted of $223.6 billion from nonbank foreign affil­
iates and $2.7 billion from bank foreign affiliates. For
the parents of nonbank affiliates, the net receipts
resulted from sales by foreign affiliates of $3,768.7 bil­
lion less deductions of $3,545.1 billion (such as for
labor, capital, and purchased inputs).3 The net pay­
ments of $102.4 billion consisted of $97.7 billion by
nonbank U.S. affiliates and $4.7 billion by bank U.S.
affiliates. For nonbank U.S. affiliates, the net payments
resulted from sales of $2,521.4 billion less deductions
of $2,423.7 billion.
• In 2005, the total value of foreign sales accruing to the
U.S. economy was $1,526.6 billion, which consisted of
U.S. exports of goods and services of $1,275.2 billion
and net income receipts of U.S. parents from the sales
by their foreign affiliates of $251.4 billion. The total
value of U.S. sales accruing to foreign economies was
$2,108.9 billion, which consisted of U.S. imports of
1. The estimates for 1982-2005 are available on BEA’s Web site at
< www.bea.gov>. Under “International,” click on “More,” then look under
“Supplemental Estimates” for “Ownership-Based Framework of the U.S.
Current Account.”
2. For additional information on the sources and methods used to pre­
pare the supplemental estimates, see Obie G. Whichard and Jeffrey H.
Lowe, “An Ownership-Based Disaggregation of the U.S. Current Account,
1982-93,” S u r v e y o f C u r r e n t B u sin e ss 75 (October 1995): 52-61. For a gen­
eral review of the issues relating to ownership relationships in international
transactions, see J. Steven Landefeld, Obie G. Whichard, and Jeffrey H.
Lowe, “Alternative Frameworks for U.S. International Transactions,” S u r v ey
73 (December 1993): 50-61.
3. These detailed estimates can only be provided for nonbank affiliates.

Jeffrey H. Lowe prepared this report.



goods and services of $1,992.0 billion and net income
payments to foreign parents from the sales by their
U.S. affiliates of $117.0 billion.
• The resulting U.S. deficit on goods, services, and net
receipts from sales by affiliates was $582.3 billion in
2005 ($1,526.6 billion minus $2,108.9 billion). This
deficit was $134.4 billion less than the $716.7 billion
deficit on trade in goods and services in the conven­
tional international accounts framework. The owner­
ship-based deficit was smaller because the receipts of
income by U.S. parents from sales by their foreign
affiliates exceeded the payments of income to foreign
parents from sales by their U.S. affiliates.
• The $582.3 billion deficit on goods, services, and net
receipts from sales by affiliates in 2005 was $94.9 bil­
lion more than the deficit in 2004. The increase was
more than accounted for by a $105.4 billion increase
in the deficit on trade in goods and services.
The estimates incorporate the results of the 2006
annual revision o f the U.S. international transactions
accounts that features improved estimating methodolo­
gies, the incorporation of newly available source data,
and the substantial expansion of geographic detail.4 As
part of the annual revision, the 2002-2005 estimates of
foreign direct investment income, financial flows, royal­
ties and license fees, and “other” private services were
improved as a result of the incorporation of the results of
BEA’s 2002 benchmark survey o f foreign direct invest­
ment in the United States; the 2004-2005 estimates of
“other” private services were improved as a result of the
incorporation of the results of BEA’s 2004 benchmark
survey o f financial services transactions with unaffiliated
foreigners; the 2003-2005 estimates of foreign holdings
and transactions in U.S. securities and related dividend
and interest payments were improved as a result of the
incorporation of the results of the U.S. Treasury Depart­
ment’s annual survey of securities liabilities for June 2005
and revisions to its benchmark survey of securities liabili­
ties for June 2004; and the 2003-2005 estimates of U.S.
holdings of foreign securities and related dividend and
interest receipts were improved as a result of the incorpo­
ration of the results o f the U.S. Treasury Department’s
annual survey of securities claims for December 2004. In
addition, the estimates also incorporate the preliminary
results from the 2004 benchmark survey of U.S. direct
investment abroad and the 2004 annual survey of foreign
direct investment in the United States and the final results
from the 2003 annual surveys o f U.S. direct investment
abroad and foreign direct investment in the United
States.
4. See Christopher L. Bach, “Annual Revision of the U.S. International
Accounts, 1995-2005,” S u r v e y 86 (July 2006): 36-48.

January 2007

S urvey

of

C

urrent

B u s in e s s

45

Technical Note
The ownership-based framework was developed in the
early 1990s in response to interest in examining interna­
tional transactions in a way that would reflect the increas­
ing importance of multinational companies in world
economies and, particularly, the growing tendency of
these companies to use locally established affiliates to
deliver goods and services to international markets.5
In the conventionally constructed current account, the
trade balance reflects only the goods and services that are
delivered to international markets through cross-border
exports and imports. This balance is an important indi­
cator of U.S. performance in foreign markets; it reflects
the net value of the transactions in goods and services
between U.S. residents (including companies) and for­
eign residents. Because in the international accounts,
affiliates are treated as resident in their respective coun­
tries o f location rather than in the countries of their own­
ers, the sales of goods and services by foreign affiliates of
U.S. companies to other foreign persons and by U.S. affil­
iates of foreign companies to other U.S. persons are not
regarded as exports and imports and are therefore
excluded from the trade balance.
In the ownership-based framework, a balance is intro­
duced in which net receipts resulting from sales by affili­
ates are combined with cross-border exports and
imports. Specifically, the net receipts that accrue to U.S.
parent companies from the sales by their foreign affiliates
are combined with cross-border sales to foreigners by
U.S. companies (U.S. exports o f goods and services), and
the net payments that accrue to foreign parent companies
from the sales by their U.S. affiliates are combined with
cross-border sales to the United States by foreign compa­
nies (U.S. imports of goods and services). The difference
between these receipts and payments is an indicator of
the net effect of United States-foreign commerce on the
U.S. economy, and it reflects the perspective that both
cross-border trade and sales through affiliates represent
methods of active participation in the international mar­
kets for goods and services.
Only the net receipts that accrue to the U.S. parent
companies, not the gross value of sales by their foreign
affiliates, are included in these calculations, because only
for sales originating in the United States are most of the
costs— such as for labor, capital, and purchased
inputs— incurred domestically and accrued to the benefit
of the U.S. economy. Similarly, only the net payments
that accrue to foreign parent companies, not the gross
value o f sales by their U.S. affiliates, are included, because
only for sales originating abroad are most of the costs

incurred abroad and accrued to the benefit of foreign
economies. This methodology also eliminates the double-counting that would occur if both the total value of
the sales by parents to their affiliates and the subsequent
sales by the affiliates to others were included.
Conceptually, the ownership-based framework is fully
consistent with the current account in the conventional
international transactions accounts, and it can be viewed
as a “satellite” of those accounts.6 (The current-account
balance is the same in both sets of accounts.) The group­
ing o f the income from affiliates with cross-border trade
in goods and services recognizes the active role of parent
companies in managing and coordinating their affiliates’
operations. This direct investment income from affiliates
differs fundamentally from income on other types of
investments. For example, for U.S. direct investment
abroad, direct investment income represents U.S. compa­
nies’ returns on sales that for reasons such as efficiency,
transport costs, or the avoidance of trade barriers are
made by affiliates in foreign countries rather than by U.S.
parent companies; other investment income represents
returns on passive investments, such as on foreign stocks
and bonds.7 Indeed, in many cases, a portion of the
income from affiliates may be regarded as a kind of
implicit management fee that compensates parent com­
panies for undertaking active roles in the operations of
their affiliates.
In addition, the most detailed presentation of the
framework provides information on ownership relation­
ships by disaggregating the trade in goods and in services
into trade between affiliated parties (that is, trade within
multinational corporations) and trade between unaffili­
ated parties. It also shows how receipts and payments of
direct investment income are derived from the produc­
tion and sales by affiliates. To highlight the links between
the income and the activities that produce it, the income
is designated “net receipts” or “net payments” of direct
investment income resulting from sales by affiliates. In
the addenda to table 1, the framework also provides
information on the U.S. content and the foreign content
of affiliates’ sales and on the extent to which such content
results from the affiliates’ own value added.

6. According to the international System of National Accounts, satellite
accounts augment the central national accounts by “expanding the analyti­
cal capacity of national accounting for selected areas...in a flexible manner,
without overburdening or disrupting the central system”; they may intro­
duce additional information, alternative accounting frameworks, or “com­
plementary or alternative concepts,” while maintaining links to the central
accounts. See Commission of the European Communities, International
5. Among those calling for more information on ownership was a Monetary Fund, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Develop­
National Academy of Sciences study panel. See Anne Y. Kester, ed., Behind
ment, United Nations, and World Bank, System of National Accounts, 1993
the Numbers: U.S. Trade in the World Economy, National Research Council,
(Brussels/Luxembourg, New York, Paris, and Washington, DC, 1993): 489.
Panel on Foreign Trade Statistics (Washington, D.C: National Academy
7. Direct investment income consists of net receipts of earnings and of
Press, 1992).
interest by parents from their affiliates.




46

Ownership-Based Framework of the U.S. Current Account

January 2007

Table 1. Ownership-Based Framework of the U.S. Current Account, 1995-2005
[Billions of dollars]
Line

1995

1 Exports of goods and services and income receipts (ITA table 1, line 1)................................

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005 1

1,004.6

1,077.7

1,195.0

1,259.8

1,421.5

1,293.1

1,245.4

1,319.2

1,526.9

1,749.9

1,037.1

1,097.5

1,222.4

1,133.6

1,120.3

1,202.8

1,378.2

1,526.6

2

Receipts resulting from exports of goods and services or sales by foreign affiliates.......

889.6

954.1

1,191.3
1,049.8

3
3a
3b
4
4a
4h
5
5a
5b

794.4
575.2
219.2
541.1
365.3
175.8
253.2
209.9
43.3
187.1
152.7
34.4
66.2
57.2
8.9

851.6
612.1
239.5
581.5
389.5
192.0
270.1
222.6
47.5
198.6
161.8
36.8
71.5
60.8
10.7

934.5
678.4
256.1
633.5
428.8
204.7
300.9
249.6
51.4
226.9
186 5
40.4
74.0
63.0
11 0

933.2
670.4
262.8
645.1
436.5
208.6
288.1
233.9
54.2
218.8
176 3
42.5
69.2
57.6
11 7

965.9
684.0
281.9
675.6
455.2
220.4
290.3
228.8
61.5
218.7
168 9
49.8
71.6
59.9
11.7

1,070.6
772.0
298.6
756.2
523.0
233.2
314.4
248.9
65.4
234.1
182 7
51 4
80.3
66 2
14 1

1,004.9
718.7
286.2
702.6
482.6
220.0
302.3
236.1
66.2
221.7
170 2
51 5
80.6
65 9
147

974.7
682.4
292.3
681.8
462.8
219.0
292.9
219.6
73.3
204.9
150.6
54.3
88.0
69 0
190

1,016.1
713.4
302.7
705.6
481 5
224.1
310.5
232 0
78 5
215 3
156.6
58 6
95.2
75 3
19.9

1,151.9
807.5
344.4
824.1
563 9
260.2
327.9
243 6
84.2
227 8
165.0
62 9
100.0
78.6
21.4

1,275.2
894.6
380.6

95.3
92.0
2,040.7

102.5
99.2
2,233.7

115.3
112.0
2,350.9

104.0
103.2
2,370.0

131.6
130.7
2 611.8

151.8
149.6
2 905 5

128.7
126.3
2,945.9

145.6
144.2
2,945.7

186.8
184.5
3,319.5

226.2
223.6
3,768.7

251.4
250.3

1?
13
14
15
16

Exports of goods and services, total (ITA table 1, line 2).................................................
Goods, balance-of-payments basis (ITA table 1, line 3).................................................
Services (ITA table 1, line 4 ) ..........................................................................................
To unaffiliated foreigners....................................................................................................
Goods........................................................................................................................
Services.......
To affiliated foreigners........................................................................................................
Goods...........
Services.......
To foreign affiliates of U.S. parents.................................................................................
Goods........................................
Services......................................
To foreign parent groups of U.S. affiliates.......................................................................
Goods........................................
Services................................................................................................................
Net receipts by U.S. parents of direct investment income resulting from sales by their
foreign affiliates (ITA table 1, line 14).............................................................................
Nonbank affiliates...............................................................................................................
Sales by foreign affiliates...............................................................................................
Less: Foreign affiliates’ purchases of goods and services directly from the United
States........................................................................................................................
Less: Costs and profits accruing to foreign persons......................................................
Compensation of employees of foreign affiliates........................................................
Other.........................................................................................................................
Less: Sales by foreign affiliates to other foreign affiliates of the same parent.................
Bank affiliates....................................................................................................................

212.3
1,379.3
240.8
1,138.5
357.1
3.2

230.9
1,509.5
252.6
1,256.9
394.1
3.3

260.9
1,556.0
261.4
1,294.6
422.0
3.3

248.9
1,601.2
263.6
1,337.6
416.6
0.7

246.3
1,787.3
295.3
1 492.0
447.5
1.0

260 7
1,989 1
310.8
1 678 4
506.1
2.2

249 5
2,055 2
309.7
1,745.6
514.8
2.3

232 8
2 038 7
311.4
1,727.3
530.0
1.3

242 6
2,246.0
338 1
1 907 9
6464
2.3

254.8
2 548 4
372 1
2,176.3
742 0
2.7

1.0

17
18
19
20

Other income receipts............................................................................................................
Other private receipts on U.S.-owned assets abroad (ITA table 1, line 15).............................
U.S. Government receipts (ITA table 1, line 16).....................................................................
Compensation of employees (ITA table 1, line 17).................................................................

115.0
108.1
4.7
2.2

123.6
116.9
4.6
2.2

141.5
135.7
3.6
2.3

157.9
151.8
3.6
2.4

162.3
156.4
3.2
2.7

199.1
192.4
3.8
2.8

159.6
153.1
3.6
2.9

125.1
118.9
3.3
2.8

116.3
108.8
4.7
2.8

148.7
142.8
3.0
2.9

223.3
217.6
2.7
2.9

21 Imports of goods and services and income payments (ITA table 1, line 18)...........................

fi

fia
6h
7
7a
7h
8
9

m

11

1,080.1

1,159.5

1,286.6

1,355.3

1,509.2

1,778.0

1,630.8

1,654.2

1,777.5

2,110.6

2,455.3

22

Payments resulting from imports of goods and services or sales by U.S. affiliates..........

921.1

988.8

1,085.4

1,136.2

1,282.6

1,585.0

1,865.6

2,108.9

Imports of goods and services, total (ITA table 1, line 19)...............................................
Goods, balance-of-payments basis (ITA table 1, line 20)...............................................
Services (ITA table 1, line 21)........................................................................................
From unaffiliated foreigners................................................................................................
Goods........................................................................................................................
Services.......
From affiliated foreigners....................................................................................................
Goods........................................................................................................................
Services.......
From foreign affiliates of U.S. parents............................................................................
Goods...................................................................................................................
Services................................................................................................................
From foreign parent groups of U.S. affiliates..................................................................
Goods........................................
Services......................................

890.8
749.4
141.4
558.4
435.9
122.5
332.4
313.5
18.9
129.7
122.3
7.4
202.7
191.2
11.4

955.7
803.1
152.6
599.9
468.3
131.6
355.8
334.8
21.0
145.0
137.2
7.8
210.8
197.7
13.1

1,042.4
876.5
165.9
668 8
526.7
142.1
373.6
349.8
23.8
157.8
147.5
10.4
215.8
202.4
13.4

1,097.8
917.1
180.7
709.0
555.6
153.4
388.8
361.5
27.3
168.6
156.4
12.2
220.2
205.2
15.1

1,229.2
1,030.0
199.2
796.8
633.1
163.7
432.3
396.8
35.5
184.8
167.0
17.8
247.6
229.9
17.7

1,380.5
1,367.7
1,145.9
221.8
878 2
697.3
180.9
489.5
448.6
40.9
201.3
182.2
19 1
288.3
266.5
21.8

1,439.0

23
23a
23b
?4
?4a
?4h
?5
?5a
?5h
?fi
?fia
?fih
71
?7a
?7h

1,505.1
1,448.2
1,224.4
223.7
943 7
759.7
184.0
504.5
464.7
39.7
209.9
191.2
187
294.6
273.6
21.0

1,395.8
1,164.7
231.1
891 5
705.0
186.5
504.3
459.8
44.6
201.9
182.0
19 9
302.4
277.7
24.7

1,511.0
1,260.7
250.3
971.9
768.3
203.6
539.1
492 4
46.6
214.1
192.6
21.5
324.9
299 8
25 2

1,763.2
1.472.9
290.3
1.182.9
944.4
238.5
580.4
528 5
51.9
233.2
209.1
24 1
347.1
3194
27 7

1,992.0
1,677.4
314.6

28

Net payments to foreign parents of direct investment income resulting from sales by
their U.S. affiliates (ITA table 1, line 31)..........................................................................
Nonbank affiliates...............................................................................................................
Sales by U.S. affiliates....................................................................................................
Less: U.S. affiliates’ purchases of goods and services directly from abroad..................
Less: Costs and profits accruing to U.S. persons..........................................................
Compensation of employees of U.S. affiliates............................................................

33.1
30.2
1,667.6
281.8
1,355.6
220.6
1,135.0
n.a.
2.9
170.7
97.8
66.6
6.3

43.0
39.3
1,726.3
278.4
1,408.7
233.5
1,1752
n.a.
3.7
201.2
112.9
81.7
6.7

38.4
35.8
1,875.5
307.1
1,532.5
262.1
1,270.4
n.a.
2.6
219.1
128.0
84.2
7.0

53.4
50.5
2,044.4
342.7
1,651.2
292.7
1,358.5
n.a.
3.0
226.6
138.1
80.5
8.0

56.9
53.3
2,334.7
393.1
1,888.2
332.2
1,556.1
n.a.
3.6

43.2
41.7
2,216.5
372.8
1,802.1
341.9
1 460 2
n.a.
1.6
215.2
130.2
76.6
8.4

102.4
97.7
2,521.4
421.0
2,002.7
350 2
1,652.5
n.a.
4.7

117.0
112.1

273.0
180.9
84.5
7.5

12.8
10.8
2,327.1
369.6
1,946.7
344.7
1,601.9
n.a.
2.0
250.3
159.8
82.4
8.1

74.0
71.8
2,323.2
393.3
1,858.0
342 7
1 5153
n.a.
2.2

Other income payments..........................................................................................................
Other private payments on foreign-owned assets in the United States (ITA table 1, line 32)
U.S. Government payments (ITA table 1, line 33)...................................................................
Compensation of employees (ITA table 1, line 34).................................................................

30.3
25.7
1,544.6
262.3
1,256.6
206.4
1,050.2
n.a.
4.6
159.0
97.1
55.6
6.3

192.5
110.1
73.9
8.5

245.0
147.6
88.5
8.9

n.a.
4.9
346.4
223.6
113.6
9.2

41 Unilateral current transfers, net (ITA table 1, line 35)................................................................

-38.1

-43.0

-45.1

-53.2

-50.4

-58.6

-51.3

-63.6

-69.2

-81.6

-86.1

Memoranda:
42
Balance on goods and services (line 3 minus line 23, and ITA table 1, line 73)..........................
43
Balance on goods, services, and net receipts from sales by affiliates (line 2 minus line 22)
44
Balance on current account (line 1 minus line 21 plus line 41, and ITA table 1, line 76).............

-96.4
-31.4
-113.6

-104.1
-34.7
-124.8

-107.9
-35.6
-140.4

-164.6
-99.1
-213.5

-263.3
-185.1
-299.8

-377.6
-282.6
-415.2

-362.8
-246.9
-389.0

-421.1
-318.7
-472.4

-494.9
-382.1
-527.5

-611.3
-487.4
-665.3

-716.7
-582.3
-791.5

4fi
47
48
49

Addenda:
Source of the content of foreign nonbank affiliates’ sales and change in inventories:
Sales to nonaffiliates and change in inventories, total (line 10 minus line 15 plus the change
in inventories)....................................................................................................................
Foreign content..................................................................................................................
Value added by foreign affiliates of U.S. parents............................................................
Other foreign content3..................................................................................................
U.S. content.......................................................................................................................

1,700.0
1,487.7
560.9
926.8
212.3

1,844.4
1,613.6
595.7
1,017.9
230.9

1.933.4
1.672.5
620.8
1,051.7
260.9

1,959.2
1,710.3
608.5
1,101.8
248.9

2,160.6
1,914.3
666.7
1,247.7
246.3

2,406.8
2,146.1
702.9
1,443.1
260.7

2,424.0
2,174.5
683.4
1,491.1
249.5

2 425.9
2,193.1
704.5
1,488.6
232.8

2,692 3
2 449 7
808 4
1 641 3
242 6

3,065 5
28107
959 3
1,851.4
254 8

50

Source of the content of U.S. nonbank affiliates’ sales and change in inventories:4
Sales to nonaffiliates and change in inventories, total (line 30 minus line 35 plus the change

51
5?
53
54

U.S. content.......................................................................................................................
Value added by U.S. affiliates of foreign parents............................................................
Other U.S. content5.......................................................................................................
Foreign content..................................................................................................................

1,551.4
1,289.2
322.6
966.5
262.3

1,671.7
1,390.0
358.1
1,031.9
281.8

1,730.8
1,452.4
389.4
1,063.0
278.4

1,887.2
1,580.1
419.8
1,160.3
307.1

2,056.1
1,713.4
457.7
1,255.7
342.7

2,349 9
1,956.7
516.7
1,440.1
393.1

2,318.9
1,949.3
477.0
1,472.3
369.6

2 214.5
1 841.7
502.7
1 339.0
372.8

2,326.1
1,932.7
519 9
1 412 8
393.3

2.534.3
2.113.3
5636
1 549 7
421.0

29
30
31
3?
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40

45

Less: Sales by U.S. affiliates to other U.S. affiliates of the same parent2......................
Bank affiliates....................................................................................................................

n.a. Not available
1. The estimates in this column are from the international transactions accounts, which are published quarterly. Esti­
mates are not yet available tor the items from BEA's 2005 annual surveys of U.S. direct investment abroad and of foreign
direct investment in the United States, which are processed in the 2 years following the year of coverage. The detailed
preliminary estimates for 2005 will be published in the second half of 2007.
2. Conceptually, sales by U.S. affiliates to other U.S. affiliates of the same foreign parent should be subtracted, but data
on these sales are unavailable. However, because U.S. affiliates are generally required to report to BEA on a fully consoli­
dated basis, most of these sales are eliminated through consolidation, and the remaining amount is thought to be immate­
rial.




3. Line 48, other foreign content— which equals purchases from foreign persons by foreign affiliates— is overstated to
the extent that it includes U.S. exports that are embodied in purchases of goods and services from foreign suppliers.
4. In principle, the sales exclude the affiliates’ sales to other affiliates of their parent. For U.S. affiliates, data on sales to
other affiliates are unavailable, but these sales are thought to be immaterial. (See footnote 2.)
5. Line 53, other U.S. content— which equals purchases from U.S. persons by U.S. affiliates— is overstated to the extent
that it includes U.S. imports that are embodied in purchases of goods and services from U.S. suppliers.
N ote . Details may not add to totals because of rounding.
ITA International transactions accounts

47

January 2007

State Personal Income
Third Q u arter of 2006
By David G. Lenze

P

ERSONAL income growth accelerated in all re­
gions o f the United States in the third quarter, with
growth in the Far West and Mideast regions accelerat­
ing the m ost, according to preliminary estimates re­
leased by the Bureau o f Economic Analysis (BEA).
Growth in all regions exceeded inflation. The national
price index for personal consumption expenditures
rose 0.6 percent in the third quarter, compared with
1.0 percent in the second quarter.
For the United States, personal income grew 1.4
percent, following a 0.8-percent gain.1
The Southwest region grew 1.6 percent, making it
1. Personal income is the income received by all persons from all sources;
it is defined as the sum of net earnings by place of residence, rental income
of persons, personal dividend income, personal interest income, and per­
sonal current transfer receipts. Personal income for the Nation is the sum of
personal income estimates for all states and the District of Columbia.

the fastest growing o f the eight BEA regions in the third
quarter. It has been the fastest growing region in five of
the last seven quarters. Since the fourth quarter of
2005, the Southwest region has grown almost 5 per­
centage points faster than the Nation. The Far West
grew 1.5 percent in the third quarter. The Great Lakes,
Plains, Southeast, and Rocky M ountain regions each
grew 1.4 percent. The Mideast region grew 1.3 percent,
and the New England region grew 1.1 percent (chart 1).

State growth and earnings
In the third quarter, the economies o f seven o f the fast­
est growing states— Arizona, Louisiana, Nevada, New
Mexico, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming— supported con­
tinued earnings growth in the construction sector.
However, in almost all other states, construction earn­
ings declined. The largest decline was in Washington,

Chart 1. Personal Income: Percent Change, 2006:ll-2006:lll
Rocky Mountain

Plains

New England

y Great Lakes
Mideast

Southwest
U.S. growth rate = 1.4 percent

Southeast

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




I I
I I
\ Hj
f Q]
FI

Highest quintile
Fourth quintile
Third quintile
Second quintile
Lowest quintile

State Personal Income

48

D C, because o f an unusually large lum p-sum payment
in the second quarter. Earnings typically account for
the m ajority o f personal income.2
2. Total earnings, or earnings by place of work, is calculated as the sum of
wages and salaries, supplements to wages and salaries, and proprietors’
income.

January 2007

In four o f the fastest growing states— Louisiana,
New Mexico, Texas, and Wyoming— large contribu­
tions to earnings growth were made by mining (in­
cluding oil and gas extraction), a small industry that
has expanded rapidly in the past 4 years (table A).
M ining also made a relatively large contribution to

Table A. Contributions to Percent Change in Earnings by Place of Work, by State and Region, 2006:11-2006:111— Continues
[Percentage points, seasonally adjusted]

Total
earnings1

Forestry,
fishing,
related
activities,
and other2

Farm

United States..............................

1.1

New England
Connecticut......................
Maine..............................
Massachusetts.................
New Hampshire................
Rhode Island....................
Vermont............................

0.03

0.6
0.8
0.8
0.6
0.4
1.0

Mideast
Delaware..........................
District of Columbia..........
Maryland..........................
New Jersey.......................
New York..........................
Pennsylvania....................

0.9
0.6
1.1
0.8
0.9
0.9

Great Lakes
Illinois...............................
Indiana.............................
Michigan...........................
Ohio..................................
Wisconsin.........................

1.0
1.0
1.2
1.0
0.8

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.05

Plains
Iowa..................................
Kansas.............................
Minnesota.........................
Missouri............................
Nebraska..........................
North Dakota....................
South Dakota...................

1,1
1.3
0.9
1.0
1.1
0.9
1.5

Southeast
Alabama...........................
Arkansas..........................
Florida..............................
Georgia............................
Kentucky...........................
Louisiana..........................
Mississippi........................
North Carolina..................
South Carolina.................
Tennessee........................
Virginia.............................
West Virginia....................

00
.0

0.03
0.00

0.0
0
00
.0
0.05

0.10

00
.0
0.0
0
0.01

-0.01

0
.00

-0.03
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01

0.00
-0.05

0
.00

Mining

Utilities

0.05

0.01

0.01

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01

0.00

0.01
0.01

0.0
0
0.01

(3
)
(3
)

0.00
0
.00

0.01

0.00
0.02
0.01

Construction

0.00
-0.09
-0.04
-0.04
-0.10
-0.02
-0.04
(3
)
(3
)

0.00

Durable
goods

0.09

0.10

-0.02

0.04

-0.01
-0.06

0.10
0.07
0.09
0.10
0.06
0.08

0.01
0.02
0.01
0.07
0.01
0.02

0.05
0.07
0.04
0.03
0.04
0.06

0.02
0.03
0.03
0.02
0.01
0.01

-0.03
-0.02
0.02
-0.01

-0.26
0.01
0.07
0.10
0.04
0.09

0.02
0.01
0.01
0.03

0.06
0.01
0.06
0.09
0.08
0.11

0.02
0.08
0.02
0.03
0.05
0.03

-0.03
-0.02
-0.02
-0.05

0.13
0.09
0.07
0.09
0.10

0.03
0.02
-0.02

0.00
0.0
0

0.12
0.11
0.08
0.09
0.13

0.02
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01

-0.02
-0.01
-0.03
-0.03
-0.03

0.05
0.10
0.13
0.10
0.08
0.14
0.15

0.02
0.01
0.02
0.02
0.01
0.05
0.15

0.11
0.06
0.09
0.10
0.13
0.09
0.16

0.01
0.01
0.02
0.03
-0.02
0.05
0.03

-0.01
-0.04
-0.02
0.02
0.01
0.01

0.08
0.09
0.12
0.10
0.08
0.11
0.07
0.10
0.07
0.10
0.08
0.12

0.02
0.03
0.02
0.03
0.01
0.08

0.01
0.04
0.02
0.04
0.02
0.04

0.03
0.01
0.03
-0.01
0.05

0.08
0.15
0.09
0.12
0.15
0.21
0.13
0.09
0.09
0.17
0.05
0.09

0.10
0.07
0.02
0.03

0.09
0.07
-0.05
0.07

0.03
0.05

0.07
0.09
0.10
0.08
0.10

0.07
0.02
0.03
0.08
0.00

-0.04
-0.01
0.01
0.05

0.03
0.06
-0.02
0.01
0.00
2.91

0.01
-0.03
0.02
-0.05
0.02
-0.06

0.03
0.04
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.03
0.06
0.40

-0.03
-0.02
-0.02
-0.02
-0.01
-0.02
-0.01
-0.03

0.00

0.02
-0.01
0.01
0.01

0.19

0.00

0.17
0.21
0.04
0.03
0.32
-0.06
0.39

-0.01
-0.01
0.00
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01

0.01
0.08
0.01
0.02
0.02
0.10
0.01

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.02
0.02
0.02

0.01
-0.06
-0.02
-0.01
-0.05
-0.10
-0.04

0.10
0.14
0.04
0.05
-0.13
-0.02
0.07

0.9
1.2
1.2
0.9
1.0
2.1
1.3
1.0
0.9
0.7
1.1
1.3

0.07
0.15
0.02
0.04
0.05
0.01
0.10
0.06
0.02
(4
)

-0.02
-0.02
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01
-0.02
-0.01
-0.01
0.00

0.04
0.04
0.01
0.01
0.08
0.21
0.05
0.01

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.02
0.01
0.02

-0.06
-0.01
0.01
-0.02
-0.02
0.26
0.02

«

-0.01

0.01
0.02
0.21

0.03
0.01
0.01
0.04
-0.04
0.19
0.10
0.02
-0.01
0.11

Southwest
Arizona.............................
New Mexico......................
Oklahoma.........................
Texas................................

1.6
1.8
1.0
1.4

0.03
0.19
0.09
0.04

-0.01
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01

0.03
0.17
0.39
0.28

Rocky Mountain
Colorado...........................
Idaho................................
Montana...........................
Utah..................................
Wyoming..........................

0.9
0.5
1.2
1.8
1.7

0.05
0.23
0.04
0.04
0.10

Far West
Alaska..............................
California..........................
Hawaii..............................
Nevada.............................
Oregon.............................
Washington......................

1.3
0.9
1.5
1.7
1.1
2.9

0.04
0.02
0.01
0.04
0.03

BEA regions
New England........................
Mideast.................................
Great Lakes..........................
Plains...................................
Southeast.............................
Southwest............................
Rocky Mountain...................
Far West...............................

0.7
0.9
1.0
1.0
1.1
1.4
1.1
1.2

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.11
0.04
0.05
0.07
0.04

See the footnotes at the end of the table.




n

00
.0

0
.00

0.00

-0.04
-0.02

0
.00

-0.01

-0.02
-0.02
0.00

0.0
0

-0.04
-0.03
-0.01
-0.01

0.0
0

-0.01
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01
-0.02

0.12
-0.06
0.14
0.07
0.69
0.27
0.01

0.0
0
0.01
0.02

0.0
0

0
.00

0.00
0.06

0
.00
00
.0

0.02
0.01

0.02

0.00

-0.01
-0.01
-0.01
0.02
0.02
-0.04
-0.02

0
.00

0.01
-0.01
0.01
-0.04
-0.02
-0.03
-0.01
-0.01
-0.01

0.00

0.15
0.14
-0.08
0.13

0.01
0.03
-0.02
0.07

0.00
0
.00
0.00

0.13
0.07
0.09
0.11

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01

-0.14
0.01
0.05
0.19
0.19

0.03
0.03
0.02
0.09
0.02

0.02
0.02
0.01
0.05
0.04

0.07
0.09
0.08
0.07
0.11

-0.07
-0.05

-0.01
0.01

0.01
0.09
0.03
0.09
0.12
0.06

-0.02
0.03
0.07
0.04
0.02

0.24
0.08
0.17
0.12
0.11
0.08

-0.01
-0.03

0.09
0.06
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.11
0.08
0.09

0.02
0.01
0.01
0.03
0.02
0.04
0.01
0.03

0.05
0.08
0.11
0.10
0.11
0.06
0.08
0.09

0
.00

0.06
0.01
0.01

0
.00
0
.00
0
.00

0.21
-0.04
0.05

0.01
0.01
0.02
0.03
0.03
0.24
0.12
0.02

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01

-0.06
-0.02
-0.02
-0.02
0.01
0.11
-0.02
-0.03

0.02
0.01
0.18
0.05
0.03
0.05
0.04
-0.09

0.01
0.01

00
.0

0.00

0.00

0.02

0.01
0.02
0.01

0.00
0.01
0.00
0.05
0.07
-0.85

0
.00

0
.00
0.00

-0.01

-0.01

0.03
-0.04
-0.02
0.04

-0.02
-0.01
-0.01

-0.01
-0.04
-0.04
-0.02

0.02
0.24
0.47
0.16
0.09

0.0
0

0.00

0.02
-0.02
0.01
0.01

-0.04
-0.04
-0.03
-0.04

0.00

Transpor­
Finance and
tation and Information
insurance
warehousing

0.02

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01

0
.00
0
.00
0
.00
0
.00

0.00

Retail trade

0.09

0.04
0.02
0.01
0.01
0.01

00
.0

0.01
0.02

Wholesale
trade

-0.01

-0.03
-0.01
-0.02

0
.00

Nondurable
goods

0.03

0.01

0.01
0.02

0.00
-0.01

Manufacturing

0.0
0
0.00

-0.06
0.01

0
.00
0.0
0
0.0
0
0.02
0
.00

-0.01

00
.0

-0.24
0.05
0.14
0.07

00
.0

0.00

0.03
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.03

00
.0

0.03

-0.07

0.00

00
.0

-0.02

0.00

-0.02
-0.01
-0.01
-0.02
-0.01
0.01
-0.01

0
.00

-0.01
-0.02
-0.02
-0.05

0.01
-0.01
-0.02
-0.03

0.0
0

January 2007

Survey

of

49

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

part o f earnings, which grew 47 percent in the infor­
mation industry in the third quarter. The exercise o f
stock options in this industry has frequently propelled
Washington to first place in the growth rankings and
then dropped the state into last place the following
quarter.

third-quarter earnings growth in Oklahoma, Alaska,
and West Virginia.
Personal income growth in the state o f Washington
(2.6 percent) was the fastest. The growth reflected huge
gains from the exercise o f stock options by employees
in the information industry. The gains are counted as

Table A. Contributions to Percent Change in Earnings by Place of Work, by State and Region, 2006:11-2006:111— Table Ends
[Percentage points, seasonally adjusted]
Other
Health care Arts, enter­ Accommo­
services,
and social tainment, and dation and
except public
assistance
recreation food services
administration

Management
Administrative
Real estate Professional
of companies
Educational
and waste
and rental and technical
and
services
and leasing
services
services
enterprises
United States..............................

-0.03

0.20

0.03

0.05

0.02

0.12

New England
Connecticut......................
Maine...............................
Massachusetts.................
New Hampshire................
Rhode Island....................
Vermont............................

-0.03
-0.03
-0.03
-0.05
-0.01
-0.02

0.18
0.11
0.28
0.14
0.12
0.14

0.04
0.03
0.05
0.04
-0.28

0.03
0.04
0.04
0.03
0.03
0.03

0.03
0.02
0.04
0.01
0.05
0.03

0.13
0.19
0.15
0.14
0.17
0.17

-0.02
-0.03
-0.01
-0.03

0.22
0.30
0.26
0.21
0.30
0.18

0.08
-0.18
0.02
0.07
0.01
0.05

0.04
-0.09
0.05
0.05
0.03
0.04

0.01
0.01
0.03
0.01
0.05
0.05

0.13
0.07
0.13
0.11
0.12
0.17

0.01
-0.01
0.01
0.01

-0.03
-0.03
-0.08
-0.02
-0.02

0.21
0.10
0.22
0.14
0.12

0.06
0.03
0.04
0.06
0.06

0.05
0.03
0.08
0.02
0.04

0.03
0.01
0.01
0.02
-0.01

0.11
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.19

-0.01
-0.03
-0.09
-0.02
-0.01
-0.01
-0.07

0.08
0.14
0.17
0.15
0.15
0.07
0.06

0.02
0.02
-0.06
0.08
0.03
0.02
0.02

0.06
0.03
0.04
0.04
0.03
0.03
0.04

0.03
0.01
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.01
0.03

0.13
0.10
0.17
0.13
0.15
0.19
0.14

-0.02
-0.02
-0.03
-0.02
-0.01
-0.04
-0.03
-0.03
-0.02
-0.04
-0.03
-0.01

0.14
0.11
0.20
0.16
0.11
0.31
0.12
0.13
0.14
0.13
0.30
0.14

0.01
0.08
0.04
0.04
0.04
0.03
0.01
0.06
0.02
-0.07
0.08
0.01

0.03
0.04
0.08
0.06
0.03
0.12
0.03
0.05
0.05
0.06
0.06
0.01

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.03

-0.06
-0.01
-0.10
-0.05

0.17
0.21
0.14
0.22

0.03
0.02
0.00
0.03

-0.08
-0.04
-0,10
-0.02
-0.04

0.24
0.18
0.15
0.27
0.09

Far West
Alaska..............................
California..........................
Hawaii..............................
Nevada.............................
Oregon.............................
Washington......................

-0.02
-0.05
-0.01
-0.02
-0.01
-0.02

BEA regions
New England........................
Mideast................................
Great Lakes..........................
Plains..................................
Southeast.............................
Southwest...........................
Rocky Mountain...................
Far West..............................

-0.03
-0.02
-0.04
-0.04
-0.03
-0.05
-0.06
-0.04

Mideast
Delaware..........................
District of Columbia..........
Maryland..........................
New Jersey......................
New York..........................
Pennsylvania....................
Great Lakes
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Ohic
Wisconsin.........................
Plains
Iowa.................................
Kansas.............................
Minnesota........................
Missouri...........................
Nebraska..........................
North Dakota....................
South Dakota...................
Southeast
Alabama...........................
Arkansas.........................
Florida.............................
Georgia...........................
Kentucky.........................
Louisiana..........................
Mississippi........................
North Carolina..................
South Carolina.................
Tennessee........................
Virginia.............................
West Virginia....................
Southwest
Arizona.............................
New Mexico......................
Oklahoma........................
Texas................................
Rocky Mountain
Colorado..........................
Idaho...............................
Montana...........................
Utah.................................
Wyoming..........................

00
.0
0.0
0

Federal,
civilian

Military

State and
local

0.01

0.05

0.02

0.02

0.00

0.04
0.07
0.05
0.03
0.07
0.08

0.02
0.02
0.02
0.03
0.02
0.03

0.05
-0.04
0.04
0.01
0.05

0.01

0.05
0.04
0.05
0.04
0.05
0.04

0.02
0.03
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02

0.02
0.34
0.12
0.03
0.01
-0.01

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
-0.06

0.05
0.04
0.04
0.04
0.04

0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.03

0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.03

-0.04
0.00
0.01

0.01

0.01
0.01
0.03
0.03
0.02
0.03
0.05

0.03

0.03
-0.08
0.05
0.03
0.03

-0.01
0.09
0.02
0.07

0.00
0.01

0.03
0.04
0.04
0.05
0.03
0.05
0.04

0.0
0

0.01
0.01
0.03
0.01
0.01
0.02
0.02
0.01
0.02
0.02
0.01
0.01

0.04
0.05
0.10
0.06
0.05
0.09
0.10
0.05
0.07
0.06
0.05
0.08

0.03
0.03
0.04
0.02
0.02
0.07
0.03
0.03
0.01
0.03
0.02
0.03

0.05
0.01
0.02
-0.04
0.01
0.02
0.09
0.02
0.03
-0.02
0.07
0.07

0.04
0.03
0.02
-0.02
0.07

0.02
0.01
0.02
0.01
0.01

0.13
0.14
0.15
0.12
0.14
0.21
0.13
0.12
0.09
-0.08
0.10
0.14

0.04
0.03
0.02
0.03
0.05
0.04

0.23
0.21
0.21
0.18
0.22
0.12
0.37
0.19
0.27
0.17
0.20
0.21

0.13
0.11
-0.03
0.04

0.02
0.01
0.02
0.01

0.15
0.19
0.08
0.08

0.03
0.01
0.01
0.01

0.09
0.10

0.00

0.04
0.02
-0.01

0.04

0.00

0.05
0.06
0.05
0.01

0.02
0.06
0.12
0.05

0.31
0.26
0.31
0.22

0.05
-0.23
0.02
0.04
-0.11

0.07
0.04
0.05
0.05
0.04

0.02
0.02
0.01
0.04
0.01

0.09
0.14
0.18
0.10
0.05

0.02
0.01
0.02
0.02
0.02

0.06
0.04
0.10
0.06
0.06

0.01
0.03
0.04
0.08
0.04

-0.01
-0.02
0.02
0.06
-0.05

-0.03
0.02

0.0
0
0.03
0.01

0.21
0.11
0.23
0.23
0.25

0.15
0.18
0.16
0.17
0.15
0.18

0.01
0.02
0.04
0.09
0.05
0.09

0.05
0.04
0.03
0.10

0.13
0.09
0.05
0.09
0.13
0.05

0.02
0.02
0.01
0.04

0.08

0.01
0.02
0.03
0.01
0.03
0.03

0.07
0.06
0.21
0.33
0.04
-0.04

0.04
0.03
0.03
0.06
0.01
0.01

-0.02
0.02
0.04
0.04
-0.01
0.06

0.25
0.02
0.33
0.02
0.01
0.00

0.20
0.23
0.31
0.23
0.40
0.21

0.22
0.25
0.17
0.14
0.18
0.21
0.22
0.18

0.02
0.03
0.05
0.01
0.03
0.03

0.04
0.03
0.05
0.04
0.06
0.05
0.06
0.05

0.04
0.04
0.02
0.02
0.01
0.01
0.02
0.02

0.15
0.13
0.13
0.14
0.11
0.10
0,10
0.09

0.01
0.01

0.05
0.05
0.04
0.04
0.07
0.05
0.06
0.06

0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.03
0.01
0.03
0.03

-0.01
0.03
0.02

-0.01
0.02
-0.01
0.04
0.02
0.05
-0.01
0.03

0.14
0.14
0.16
0.21
0.21
0.24
0.21
0.24

0
.00

0
.00
0.04

0.0
0

1. Earnings by place of work is the sum of wage and salary disbursements (payrolls), supplements to wages
and salaries, and proprietors’ income.
2. “Other” consists of the wage and salary disbursements to U.S. residents employed by international organi-




Government

0.01
0.01
0.02

0.00
0.01

0.00

0.00
0.02
0.02

0.00

0.00
0.00

0.00

0.01
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02

0.00

0.00

zations and foreign embassies and consulates in the United States,
3. Data are suppressed to avoid disclosure of confidential information.
4. Not meaningful.

0.00

0.02
0.02
0.01
0.02

0.02

0.19

-0.03
0.06

0.14
0.19
0.13
0.09
0.19
0.22

0.00
0.0
0

-0.09
0.03

0
.00
0.00
0.07
0.01
0.01
0.01

0
.00
0.01

0.00
0.00
0.05

0.0
0

0.16
0.09
0.21
0.16
0.12
0.15
0.21
0.15
0.10
0.21
0.07
0.24
0.30
0.17
0.19
0.22
0.17
0.14

50

State Personal Income

Louisiana’s personal income growth (1.7 percent)
exceeded national growth, the first time this year that
its recovery from Hurricane Katrina had such a strong
effect. The recovery shows up more clearly in earnings,
which have grown twice as fast in Louisiana as in the
United States over the last 6 months. The strong earn­
ings rebound was offset by weak transfer receipts as di­
saster assistance and unemployment compensation
tapered off.
Michigan’s personal income growth (1.5 percent)
reflected strong growth in earnings in durable-goods
manufacturing. In fact, the state accounted for almost
half o f the national gain in earnings in durable-goods
manufacturing, $1.2 billion out o f $2.6 billion, despite
a job loss o f 3.1 percent. The opposite movements in
earnings and jobs primarily reflected the GM and Del­
phi employee buyouts.
The employee buyouts were also apparent in the
earnings o f other Great Lakes states, such as Indiana
and Ohio, and in Louisiana and Delaware. Excluding
the buyouts, earnings growth in the durable-goods in­
dustry was anemic across the country.

Property income and transfers
Property income (dividends, interest, and rent) grew




January 2007

2.3 percent in the third quarter, compared with 2.4percent growth in the second quarter. Rental income o f
persons grew 2.9 percent in the third quarter; in the
second quarter, it had fallen to its lowest level since the
early 1990s (excluding the third quarter o f 2005, which
was abnorm al because o f Hurricane Katrina).
Transfers grew 1.8 percent after growing 1.2 percent
in the second quarter. The incorporation o f new 2006
data for the Alaska Permanent Fund benefits, a com ­
ponent o f personal current transfer receipts, raised
Alaska’s transfer growth rate to 7.4 percent in the first
quarter, compared with the previously estimated 2.8percent growth rate.

Revised second-quarter growth
Revised second-quarter data revealed weaker personal
income growth, particularly in two regions. Growth in
the M ideast was revised to 0.5 percent from 1.7 per­
cent, reflecting declines in Delaware and New York,
and growth in New England was revised to 0.7 percent
from 1.7 percent, reflecting declines in Connecticut
and Vermont. The slower second-quarter growth rates
stemmed from declining earnings in the finance indus­
try mainly because o f unusually large wage payments
in the first quarter.
Tables 1 and 2 follow.

January 2007

Survey

51

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

of

Table 1. Personal Income by State and Region
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
2002

2004

2003

Percent
change1

2006

2005

Area name
IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I'

II'

II| p

2006:ll2006:111

8,923,886 8,986,340 9,098,741 9,190,913 9,327,639 9,483,599 9,626,515 9,753,508 10,005,070 10,034,020 10,146,966 10,248,460 10,469,598 10,700,889 10,788,179 10,938,084

1.4

528,020 530,375 535,211
541,098 549,835
557,346 565,265 573,071
155,544 156,791
146,643 146,514 148,263 149,429
151,696
159,903
39,047
39,475
36,218
36,938
37,260
37,673
38,481
38,505
249,527 250,196 252,170 255,455 259,004
262,134 266,535 269,199
45,524
43,514
43,789
44,197
44,684
46,255
46,998
47,858
36,924
33,914
34,562
34,713
35,141
35,835
35,915
36,375
18,203
18,376
18,608
18,716
19,296
18,995
19,518
19,713
1,647,032 1,656,086 1,681,950 1,698,386 1,724,258 1,757,698 1,777,872 1,808,141
26,554
26,986
27,318
27,706
27,973
28,651
29,198
29,453
25,924
27,044
29,004
26,615
27,259
27,758
28,561
29,428
200,335 201,716 205,273 207,741
210,750
216,263 219,568 221,759
355,302 359,943 365,832
336,291
336,510 341,860 345,718 349,654
688,992 695,170 706,854 725,042 730,500 745,842
674,818 676,831
383,111
387,428 391,462 394,792 401,269 403,879 409,659 415,827

583,150
163,346
40,228
273,415
48,739
37,394
20,027

584,837
164,426
40,130
274,279
48,657
37,248
20,097

589,641
165,097
40,571
276,771
49,269
37,704
20,229

599,190
167,969
40,874
281,800
49,942
38,049
20,555

606,385
169,737
41,279
285,692
50,376
38,609
20,692

619,086
174,275
42,211
291,013
51,465
39,017
21,106

623,130
174,004
42,712
293,837
51,721
39,781
21,075

630,191
175,728
43,271
297,435
52,218
40,197
21,342

1.1
1.0
1.3
1.2
1.0
1.0
1.3

1,851,145
30,513
30,118
227,544
374,330
763,716
424,923

1,852,217
30,632
30,426
230,107
375,318
759,570
426,164

1,864,467
30,733
30,783
233,004
378,835
760,912
430,199

1,896,216
31,339
31,328
237,110
384,623
776,615
435,201

1,924,070
32,421
31,504
240,561
389,388
789,174
441,021

1,970,116
32,989
32,262
244,803
399,849
811,715
448,497

1,979,415
32,913
32,508
246,765
403,873
810,892
452,465

2,004,365
33,366
32,864
250,125
408,943
820,831
458,235

1.3
1.4
1.1
1.4
1.3
1.2
1.3

Great Lakes.................. 1,396,850 1,411,464 1,423,704 1,429,422 1,452,374 1,453,600 1,468,992 1,483,652
Illinois........................
416,079 421,511
426,677 429,039 432,480
435,978 438,591
442,372
184,214 187,021
188,387
Indiana.......................
174,850 176,454 177,730 178,841
182,863
306,232 310,709 312,394 312,968 318,825
316,314 318,328 321,291
Michigan....................
335,185 337,121
339,326 340,340 346,572 344,716 349,932 353,670
Ohio...........................
Wisconsin..................
164,504 165,668
167,577 168,234 171,633
172,378 175,120 177,933

1,512,798
453,134
191,501
325,740
360,940
181,483

1,513,561
454,080
191,894
326,453
359,760
181,373

1,529,929
458,998
194,370
330,416
363,305
182,840

1,547,714
465,682
196,748
333,008
366,928
185,348

1,564,552
472,668
198,475
335,339
371,284
186,786

1,593,201
484,398
203,756
337,292
376,613
191,142

1,605,809
488,959
204,127
340,311
380,364
192,048

1,627,533
495,615
206,852
345,298
385,297
194,472

1.4
1.4
1.3
1.5
1.3
1.3

636,064
91,690
86,342
185,260
174,002
56,111
18,417
24,240

650,851
94,149
87,869
189,748
177,807
57,425
19,019
24,835

650,459
92,751
88,919
189,238
178,001
57,143
19,445
24,963

655,750
93,455
89,722
189,817
180,396
57,503
19,707
25,149

664,791
94,956
90,830
193,051
182,299
58,201
19,979
25,477

673,357
96,103
92,261
194,165
185,474
59,231
20,402
25,722

686,313
98,388
94,578
198,150
188,369
60,147
20,423
26,257

693,004
99,503
95,428
199,387
190,781
60,759
20,706
26,440

702,580
100,915
96,942
201,762
193,440
61,646
20,941
26,933

1.4
1.4
1.6
1.2
1.4
1.5
1.1
1.9

Southeast..................... 1,989,517 2,007,431 2,027,431 2,050,915 2,086,039 2,129,974 2,166,614 2,194,496
115,220 116,897
123,270 125,829 127,639
Alabama....................
117,716 118,967 120,759
63,887
65,170
65,841
68,074
70,297
Arkansas ...................
66,766
68,928
71,303
501,167 504,546 510,954 518,431
Florida.......................
528,470
549,118 561,557 566,265
246,164 248,364 250,250 252,281
259,055 262,750 266,170
Georgia......................
255,551
Kentucky....................
104,859 104,777
105,654 106,593 108,144
110,029 111,007 112,334
113,955 113,651
115,165 116,521
118,156
119,854 120,972 122,387
Louisiana...................
64,568
65,441
66,571
67,587
68,937
69,869
Mississippi.................
65,761
67,959
229,199 231,189 232,986 235,772 240,615 245,727 249,860 254,374
North Carolina...........
104,682 105,929
106,518 107,427 109,112
110,768 112,812 114,355
South Carolina...........
164,657 165,998 168,829
170,484 173,332 176,033
Tennessee.................
160,463 163,005
Virginia......................
241,686 245,574 248,795 252,183 256,800
260,528 264,269 268,352
44,254
44,992
45,417
43,665
42,888
43,133
43,406
43,943
West Virginia.............

2,253,892
131,080
73,085
588,550
272,820
114,593
124,988
71,048
260,497
116,737
179,057
275,116
46,319

2,271,064
131,839
72,691
589,618
276,353
115,777
124,577
71,594
265,488
117,592
180,333
278,695
46,508

2,302,275
133,920
73,525
600,346
280,105
117,558
125,620
72,388
267,328
119,280
182,905
282,285
47,016

2,272,542
135,287
74,249
613,711
284,531
118,973
63,460
70,551
270,894
120,794
185,880
286,675
47,539

2,379,509
139,024
75,695
622,772
290,928
120,413
131,147
76,703
274,031
122,507
189,148
289,043
48,099

2,423,762
141,027
77,305
638,698
295,631
121,595
131,129
76,259
280,393
125,592
190,917
296,189
49,028

2,448,199
143,059
78,208
645,599
297,823
123,172
132,220
76,818
282,137
126,680
194,735
298,152
49,596

2,482,937
145,072
79,457
655,850
301,690
124,892
134,470
77,858
286,018
128,432
196,925
301,911
50,362

1.4
1.4
1.6
1.6
1.3
1.4
1.7
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.1
1.3
1.5

Southwest....................
Arizona......................
New Mexico...............
Oklahoma..................
Texas.........................

913,517
146,108
45,494
90,754
631,161

919,454
147,464
45,649
90,709
635,632

1,037,627
169,968
52,372
102,940
712,347

1,055,595
173,078
52,728
103,977
725,812

1,071,251
176,955
53,399
104,958
735,938

1,094,349
182,481
54,196
106,645
751,026

1,116,324
183,942
54,980
108,862
768,540

1,147,681
191,401
56,490
112,928
786,862

1,162,534
192,006
57,341
114,214
798,973

1,181,565
195,446
58,538
115,897
811,684

1.6
1.8
2.1
1.5
1.6

Rocky Mountain...........
Colorado....................
Idaho.........................
Montana....................
Utah...........................
Wyoming....................

285,306
153,528
34,385
23,316
58,418
15,658

284,309
152,337
34,149
23,391
58,428
16,004

310,319
164,575
38,352
25,749
63,825
17,818

318,350
169,169
39,274
26,460
65,173
18,274

322,455
171,863
39,687
26,477
65,961
18,468

325,893
173,304
40,127
26,718
66,999
18,745

332,011
176,003
40,912
27,321
68,592
19,183

336,726
177,845
41,608
27,669
70,073
19,530

346,376
183,180
42,908
28,290
71,901
20,098

348,939
183,039
43,729
28,464
72,995
20,713

353,816
185,216
44,231
28,894
74,373
21,102

1.4
1.2
1.1
1.5
1.9
1.9

Far West........................ 1,580,477 1,587,927 1,612,309 1,631,702 1,651,385 1,684,856 1,715,122 1,736,084
Alaska........................
20,733
21,484
21,006
21,109
21,209
21,770
22,014
22,285
California................... 1,155,562 1,160,844 1,177,957 1,191,213 1,207,804 1,234,094 1,254,170 1,269,476
37,097
39,937
41,571
Hawaii........................
37,588
37,915
38,615
40,676
36,773
Nevada......................
69,162
70,215
71,878
73,651
76,531
78,288
80,039
67,615
Oregon......................
108,280 110,151
102,319 102,896
103,859 104,962 106,924
111,131
Washington................
197,201
197,196 201,581
204,525 202,907 204,245 209,822 211,582

1,797,258
22,758
1,299,948
42,527
82,953
113,218
235,853

1,783,831
23,145
1,302,580
43,131
84,191
114,589
216,196

1,807,760
23,351
1,319,130
43,607
86,362
116,053
219,257

1,841,647
23,643
1,344,613
44,194
86,855
118,325
224,017

1,868,676
23,923
1,365,352
44,880
88,202
119,627
226,692

1,914,354
24,351
1,399,380
45,633
90,537
122,138
232,315

1,927,148
24,873
1,406,240
46,123
92,150
123,084
234,678

1,955,097
25,230
1,423,592
46,900
93,853
124,811
240,709

1.5
1.4
1.2
1.7
1.8
1.4
2.6

United States
New England................
Connecticut...............
Maine.........................
Massachusetts..........
New Hampshire.........
Rhode Island.............
Vermont.....................
Mideast.........................
Delaware...................
District of Columbia....
Maryland...................
New Jersey................
New York...................
Pennsylvania.............

Plains............................
Iowa...........................
Kansas ......................
Minnesota..................
Missouri.....................
Nebraska...................
North Dakota.............
South Dakota.............

583,167
83,181
79,498
168,654
162,690
51,010
17,131
21,003

589,293
82,414
80,085
170,323
164,508
52,448
17,554
21,961

595,976
83,305
80,452
173,048
165,663
53,185
18,025
22,298

934,519
149,683
46,398
92,136
646,302
287,641
153,866
34,484
23,959
59,061
16,272

p Preliminary
r Revised
1. Percent change was calculated from unrounded data.




602,902
84,541
81,460
175,394
166,969
53,619
18,379
22,540

609,183
85,959
82,507
176,257
168,560
54,300
18,592
23,008

944,642
151,470
46,814
92,969
653,390

960,645
154,770
47,930
94,549
663,396

291,846
156,630
34,881
24,275
59,511
16,549

293,920
156,716
35,233
24,668
60,469
16,834

619,028
89,329
83,335
180,291
170,118
54,445
18,053
23,457

979,413
159,362
49,514
97,100
673,437
301,684
161,015
36,885
24,981
61,598
17,205

628,208
90,576
84,839
182,987
171,905
55,450
18,377
24,074

996,927 1,011,682
162,546 165,776
50,337
50,946
99,201
100,609
684,843 694,351
307,516
163,587
37,849
25,490
63,007
17,583

N ote . The personal income level shown for the United States is derived as the sum of the state estimates. It differs
from the estimate of personal income in the national income and product accounts because of differences in coverage, in
the methodologies used to prepare the estimates, and in the timing of the availability of source data.

52

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
United States
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4......................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................

Alabama

2005
II

2006
III

IV

I'

ir

2005
III"

I

II

2006
III

IV

lr

llr

II| p

1 10,034,020 10,146,966 10,248,460 10,469,598 10,700,889 10,788,179 10,938,084 131,839 133,920 135,287 139,024 141,027 143,059 145,072
2
3

7,828,197
862,076

7,905,862
870,052

8,047,657
887,060

8,168,169
897,568

8,389,216
935,282

8,419,388
937,395

8,510,066
946,569

96,404
10,583

97,815
10,779

4

438,768

443,024

451,492

456,920

477,280

479,229

484,241

5,485

5,591

5,692

5,815

6,001

6,079

6,127

5
6
7
8
9
10

423,308
-1,225
6,964,896
1,581,744
1,487,380
32,444

427,028
-1,244
7,034,566
1,602,200
1,510,200
30,348

435,568
-1,280
7,159,316
1,520,104
1,569,040
29,940

440,648
-1,306
7,269,294
1,660,556
1,539,748
31,360

458,002
-1,362
7,452,572
1,677,909
1,570,408
27,499

458,166
-1,368
7,480,625
1,717,872
1,589,682
26,723

462,328
-1,387
7,562,109
1,757,230
1,618,745
27,031

5,098
1,423
87,244
20,387
24,209
237

5,188
1,435
88,472
20,827
24,621
230

5,284
1,463
89,609
19,328
26,350
242

5,399
1,499
91,868
21,975
25,181
224

5,536
1,537
93,017
22,297
25,714
191

5,590
1,542
94,041
22,990
26,028
204

5,629
1,560
94,917
23,660
26,495
210

11

1,454,936

1,479,852

1,539,100

1,508,388

1,542,909

1,562,959

1,591,714

23,972

24,391

26,107

24,956

25,523

25,824

26,285

12
13

5,549,592
1,325,704

5,595,560
1,344,232

5,710,068
1,370,216

5,781,964
1,389,160

5,964,883
1,421,878

5,975,710
1,436,049

6,046,420
1,454,516

68,227
17,100

69,207
17,475

70,340
17,804

71,773
18,236

73,157
18,457

73,933
18,816

74,632
19,019

99,122 101,583 103,016 104,169 105,113
10,976 11,214 11,537 11,669 11,756

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements......................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income.......................................

14

902,396

917,204

934,648

948,512

963,876

977,883

992,188

12,001

12,287

12,520

12,836

12,922

13,226

13,390

15
16
17
18

423,308
952,901
34,101
918,800

427,028
966,070
28,742
937,328

435,568
967,373
29,909
937,464

440,648
997,045
28,905
968,140

458,002
1,002,455
18,001
984,454

458,166
1,007,629
13,255
994,374

462,328
1,009,130
15,940
993,190

5,098
11,076
1,314
9,762

5,188
11,134
1,155
9,979

5,284
10,978
1,154
9,824

5,399
11,574
1,197
10,377

5,536
11,402
939
10,463

5,590
11,419
819
10,600

5,629
11,462
893
10,569

Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.........................................................................
Construction................................................................
Manufacturing..............................................................
Durable goods.........................................................
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................
Retail trade..................................................................
Transportation and warehousing.................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

58,057
7,770,140
6,465,378
25,585
88,340
76,174
490,960
1,000,582
634,775
365,807
405,845
507,315
255,370
288,279
587,171
193,453
730,497
174,248
290,108
103,841
728,245
78,346
216,400
224,620
1,304,762
251,079
132,823
920,860

53,019
7,852,842
6,538,614
25,768
88,269
77,508
504,323
1,005,317
637,499
367,818
410,673
516,027
258,274
286,709
579,332
205,953
739,956
172,491
294,673
105,774
741,592
80,547
218,390
227,039
1,314,228
250,924
131,953
931,352

54,359
7,993,297
6,670,006
26,792
94,170
78,450
520,802
1,022,112
652,273
369,839
418,615
522,949
261,945
286,079
605,936
200,461
759,341
175,699
300,626
107,834
754,492
82,054
221,842
229,807
1,323,291
249,763
131,756
941,772

53,396
8,114,772
6,780,482
27,147
96,501
78,631
532,307
1,034,570
660,605
373,964
427,316
525,453
264,483
295,300
616,893
210,129
770,843
178,566
306,521
109,388
764,306
83,228
225,484
233,414
1,334,290
249,470
131,776
953,043

42,661
8,346,555
7,001,252
27,628
102,782
78,342
559,125
1,071,151
687,009
384,142
441,236
540,340
271,790
305,407
641,345
214,142
798,036
183,843
316,285
111,811
782,288
85,621
232,460
237,621
1,345,303
253,983
133,433
957,888

38,135
8,381,253
7,021,186
27,165
107,952
78,952
561,086
1,061,310
683,843
377,468
447,790
542,409
274,980
303,016
624,915
212,938
806,013
186,028
318,432
113,296
794,559
86,865
233,257
240,222
1,360,067
256,658
133,367
970,042

41,026
8,469,040
7,089,338
26,412
112,027
79,695
560,826
1,063,346
686,429
376,917
455,328
544,295
282,427
311,034
623,156
209,995
822,485
188,704
322,413
115,035
804,248
87,898
237,846
242,169
1,379,702
258,298
135,003
986,401

1,488
94,915
75,372
563
949
1,403
5,992
16,927
10,355
6,572
4,801
7,066
3,016
1,843
4,773
1,651
7,390
855
2,796
686
8,957
421
2,220
3,063
19,544
4,620
2,207
12,717

1,332
96,483
76,723
566
929
1,396
6,233
17,073
10,536
6,536
4,842
7,229
3,072
1,837
4,909
1,755
7,444
942
2,874
672
9,182
429
2,249
3,091
19,760
4,676
2,196
12,888

1,333
1,376
1,119
1,001
1,077
97,789 100,207 101,897 103,168 104,036
77,864 79,673 81,344 81,953 82,484
586
596
596
596
580
988
1,017
1,008
1,034
1.071
1,483
1,292
1,466
1,270
1,285
6,442
6,695
6,741
6,917
6,859
17,397 17.901
18,357 18,393 18,383
10,874 11,303 11,657 11,721 11,755
6,524
6,598
6,700
6,672
6,628
4,929
5,124
5.230
5,311
5,394
7,255
7,434
7,632
7,519
7,658
3,097
3,181
3,232
3,354
3,270
1,840
1,861
1,917
1,883
1,889
4,882
5,021
4,952
5,081
5,058
1,509
1,793
1,778
1,769
1,748
7,646
7,579
8,133
8,172
8,317
1,000
996
1,021
1,033
1,043
2,988
3,119
3,071
3,088
3,101
672
711
638
675
725
9,351
9,461
9,556
9,730
9,861
428
436
446
453
459
2,270
2,367
2,388
2,407
2,450
3,133
3,136
3,232
3,247
3,219
19,925 20,533 20,553 21,215 21,553
4,700
4,738
4,828
4,914
4,865
2,206
2,209
2,200
2,183
2,228
13,018 13,586 13,525 14,167 14,410

See the footnotes at the end of the table.




January 2007

Survey

of

53

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1-2006:1111 Continues
—
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Alaska

Arizona

2005
I

II

2006
III

IV

lr

II'

Arkansas
2005

2006

2005
II|p

I

II

III

IV

lr

llr

IM
P

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

Line
II| p

23,145 23,351

23,643

23,923

24,351

24,873

25,230

173,078

176,955

182,481

183,942

191,401

192,006

195,446

72,691

73,525

74,249

75,695

77,305

78,208

79,457

1

19,748 19,964
2,038
2,066

20,327
2,108

20,544
2,129

20,794
2,188

21,322
2,246

21,604
2,275

131,601
14,335

134,914
14,704

140,752
15,348

141,261
15,427

148,461
16,447

147,778
16,358

150,102
16,623

53,728
6,254

54,173
6,330

54,704
6,404

55,768
6,528

57,042
6,727

57,404
6,778

58,071
6,840

2
3

1,030

1,049

1,062

1,090

1,121

1,136

7,247

7,431

7,748

7,784

8,321

8,292

8,432

3,267

3,311

3,351

3,419

3,530

3,564

3,599

4

1,021
1,035
-1,106 -1,119
16,604 16,780
3,138 3,145
3,403
3,426
106
108

1,058
-1,144
17,075
3,147
3,422
98

1,067
-1,147
17,267
3,201
3,455
101

1,097
-1,176
17,430
3,209
3,712
91

1,125
-1,216
17,861
3,256
3,757
85

1,139
-1,236
18,093
3,308
3,829
87

7,088
648
117,914
27,981
27,183
311

7,273
652
120,862
28,323
27,770
286

7,600
629
126,032
28,611
27,838
279

7,643
648
126,483
29,325
28,134
260

8,126
649
132,662
29,579
29,160
201

8,066
667
132,088
30,224
29,694
214

8,192
673
134,151
30,867
30,428
225

2,988
-410
47,063
10,561
15,066
261

3,019
-415
47,428
10,770
15,327
249

3,053
-413
47,887
10,943
15,418
252

3,110
-428
48,811
11,323
15,561
249

3,196
-432
49,883
11,456
15,966
219

3,214
-428
50,199
11,806
16,202
230

3,241
-432
50,800
12,125
16,533
242

5
6
7
8
9
10

1,018

3,297

3,317

3,324

3,354

3,621

3,672

3,743

26,872

27,483

27,559

27,874

28,959

29,480

30,202

14,806

15,077

15,166

15,312

15,747

15,973

16,291

11

13,464
3,990

13,578
4,036

13,815
4,098

13,973
4,158

14,162
4,189

14,532
4,330

14,749
4,403

95,671
21,087

98,012
21,609

102,370
22,494

102,920
22,561

108,663
23,673

108,046
23,662

110,016
24,110

37,560
9,683

37,956
9,830

38,404
9,949

39,170
10,127

39,950
10,280

40,241
10,429

40,689
10,551

12
13

2,969

3,001

3,040

3,091

3,092

3,205

3,264

13,999

14,336

14,894

14,918

15,547

15,596

15,919

6,695

6,811

6,895

7,017

7,083

7,215

7,310

14

1,021
2,294
2
2,291

1,035
2,350
1
2,349

1,058
2,414
2
2,412

1,067
2,413
1
2,412

1,097
2,442
1
2,441

1,125
2,460
0
2,461

1,139
2,452
0
2,452

7,088
14,843
470
14,373

7,273
15,294
379
14,915

7,600
15,887
394
15,494

7,643
15,780
349
15,432

8,126
16,124
318
15,806

8,066
16,070
286
15,784

8,192
15,976
319
15,657

2,988
6,485
976
5,509

3,019
6,387
777
5,611

3,053
6,351
677
5,674

3,110
6,471
642
5,829

3,196
6,812
920
5,893

3,214
6,735
783
5,952

3,241
6,831
865
5,966

15
16
17
18

14
13
19,734 19,951
13,383 13,582
218
224
1,301
1,255
194
201
1,684
1,764
704
716
156
159
548
558
384
383
1,285
1,298
1,295
1,315
448
456
590
591
359
381
1,105
1,127
92
91
490
512
108
111
1,772
1,789
188
194
674
677
490
497
6,351
6,369
1,546
1,532
1,706
1,722
3,099
3,115

14
20,313
13,901
234
1,359
201
1,778
748
161
587
401
1,312
1,330
448
606
409
1,153
95
511
114
1,836
198
677
492
6,412
1,519
1,761
3,132

13
20,531
13,943
230
1,397
195
1,735
780
164
616
394
1,315
1,350
457
606
395
1,156
86
507
117
1,847
198
684
494
6,588
1,520
1,798
3,270

13
20,781
14,264
219
1,445
194
1,809
781
167
614
409
1,363
1.316
475
630
396
1,167
102
518
117
1,917
199
694
517
6,517
1,554
1,855
3,109

12
21,310
14,671
227
1,566
193
1,814
821
168
653
420
1,355
1,409
470
636
397
1,208
94
534
118
1,959
211
719
519
6,639
1,550
1,886
3,203

13
21,592
14,861
223
1,623
193
1,798
819
168
651
423
1,351
1,460
477
637
392
1,239
96
545
119
1,986
216
734
528
6,731
1,545
1,939
3,247

986
130,614
108,293
422
831
1,138
12,044
13,351
11,252
2,099
6,892
10,776
3,909
3,137
8,940
5,116
10,047
1,663
7,487
1,384
12,191
1,271
4,402
3,293
22,321
4,386
2,220
15,716

900
134,015
111,584
438
802
1,161
12,799
13,420
11,286
2,135
7,069
11,169
4,012
3,071
9,157
5,557
10,224
1,733
7,762
1,426
12,581
1,347
4,488
3,367
22,431
4,421
2,204
15,806

916
139,836
116,288
463
772
1,203
13,592
13,816
11,660
2,157
7,289
11,619
4,086
3,142
9,734
6,039
10,643
1,708
8,059
1,492
13,101
1,433
4,633
3,464
23,548
4,450
2,197
16,901

870
140,391
117,942
432
867
1,175
13,952
14,018
11,809
2,209
7,401
11,700
4,194
3,103
9,896
5,823
10,871
1,747
8,334
1,494
13,209
1,385
4,775
3,566
22,449
4,454
2,172
15,824

844
147,617
123,446
436
877
1,166
15,614
14,602
12,339
2,263
7,605
12,260
4,368
3,405
10,169
5,908
11,343
1,821
8,539
1,536
13,742
1,502
4,892
3,661
24,171
4,506
2,172
17,494

816
146,963
123,866
449
943
1,236
15,143
14,569
12,313
2,256
7,818
12,287
4,450
3,167
9,881
5,788
11,568
1,849
8,695
1,573
14,108
1,587
5,011
3,743
23,096
4,626
2,156
16,315

853
149,249
125,585
435
981
1,244
15,365
14,591
12,335
2,256
8,014
12,442
4,584
3,212
9,892
5,706
11,821
1,899
8,887
1,598
14,334
1,627
5,150
3,803
23,665
4,701
2,192
16,772

1,258
52,470
42,371
465
516
553
2,857
9,336
5,081
4,255
2,670
3,654
3,076
1,656
2,059
797
2,703
1,766
1,342
315
5,582
281
1,210
1,533
10,099
1,728
1,052
7,319

1,064
53,110
42,956
474
514
563
2,967
9,360
5,103
4,257
2,688
3,713
3,156
1,620
2,070
852
2,741
1,837
1,363
321
5,670
285
1,225
1,537
10,153
1,727
1,058
7,369

967
53,737
43,538
492
542
603
3,069
9,511
5,236
4,276
2,787
3,680
3,159
1,554
2,094
904
2,804
1,719
1,400
329
5,828
288
1,239
1,536
10,199
1,709
1,061
7,428

933
54,835
44,699
493
568
632
3,250
9,671
5,305
4,366
2,867
3,749
3,194
1,639
2,098
872
2,829
2,079
1,469
336
5,838
293
1,263
1,560
10,136
1,715
1,063
7,358

1,212
55,829
45,307
493
607
523
3,251
9,802
5,460
4,343
2,961
3,805
3,248
1,714
2,147
888
2,911
1,957
1,476
345
5,960
306
1,320
1,593
10,522
1,719
1,064
7,739

1,079
56,326
45,735
500
642
609
3,257
9,693
5,347
4,346
2,945
3,903
3,310
1,739
2,142
881
2,945
2,027
1,485
350
6,065
304
1,317
1,621
10,591
1,742
1,046
7,802

1,163
56,908
46,171
486
667
613
3,251
9,690
5,352
4,337
2,997
3,920
3,397
1,760
2,136
872
3,008
2,072
1,508
357
6,145
308
1,346
1,636
10,737
1,750
1,065
7,923

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




54

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
California
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11).............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)..............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2.......
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance...................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3.........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4....................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts..............................
State unemployment insurance benefits.....................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits...........................

Colorado

2005
II

2006
III

IV

lr

llr

2005
ill"

I

II

2006
III

IV

lr

llr

N
IP

1 1,302,580 1,319,130 1,344,613 1,365,352 1,399,380 1,406,240 1,423,592

171,863

173,304

176,003

177,845

183,180

183,039

185,216

2 1,039,257 1,052,324 1,078,478 1,094,718 1,128,162 1,127,885 1,138,383
121,991
131,767
131,387
3 121,234
124,255
125,936
132,520

141,464
14,541

142,692
14,706

145,652
15,075

146,842
15,155

152,389
15,999

151,337
15,844

152,719
15,983

4

63,113

63,447

64,509

65,345

68,516

69,123

7,258

7,339

7,509

7,547

7,981

7,913

7,990

5
6
7
8
9
10

58,121
-246
917,777
215,596
169,208
4,852

58,543
-238
930,095
217,376
171,660
4,520

59,746
-256
953,967
218,918
171,728
4,207

60,591
-289
968,493
223,866
172,993
4,050

63,250
-312
996,083
225,605
177,692
3,827

62,899
63,397
-264
-245
996,234 1,005,618
234,857
229,960
180,046
183,118
3,808
3,588

7,284
391
127,314
27,428
17,122
346

7,367
398
128,384
27,534
17,386
307

7,565
407
130,984
27,598
17,421
294

7,608
419
132,107
28,162
17,576
292

8,018
430
136,820
28,288
18,071
258

7,930
442
135,936
28,771
18,332
262

7,993
450
137,186
29,335
18,694
267

11

164,356

167,140

167,521

168,943

173,866

176,238

179,530

16,775

17,078

17,127

17,284

17,813

18,070

18,427

12
13

718,672
176,964

726,615
179,105

744,118
182,625

756,837
185,371

783,744
190,838

781,673
191,783

790,023
194,105

95,522
22,058

96,243
22,340

98,424
22,845

98,863
22,991

103,251
23,803

102,151
23,736

103,290
23,990

68,487

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements.....................................
Supplements to wages and salaries................................
Employer contributions tor employee pension and
insurance funds......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance................................................................
Proprietors’ income5......................................................
Farm proprietors' income...........................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income.......................................

14

118,843

120,562

122,878

124,780

127,588

128,884

130,708

14,774

14,974

15,280

15,383

15,785

15,806

15,997

15
16
17
18

58,121
143,621
3,696
139,925

58,543
146,604
3,147
143,457

59,746
151,736
3,976
147,760

60,591
152,510
3,964
148,545

63,250
153,580
3,427
150,153

62,899
154,429
3,195
151,233

63,397
154,255
3,608
150,646

7,284
23,884
413
23,471

7,367
24,108
188
23,920

7,565
24,383
213
24,170

7,608
24,988
156
24,832

8,018
25,336
89
25,246

7,930
25,450
-37
25,487

7,993
25,439
35
25,405

Earnings by industry
Farm earnings....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings...............................................................
Private earnings.............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6............
Mining.........................................................................
Utilities........................................................................
Construction...............................................................
Manufacturing.....
Durable goods........................................................
Nondurable goods..................................................
Wholesale trade..
Retail trade.........
Transportation and warehousing.................................
Information.................................................................
Finance and insurance...............................................
Real estate and rental and leasing..............................
Professional and technical services............................
Management of companies and enterprises...............
Administrative and waste services..............................
Educational services..................................................
Health care and social assistance...............................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation.............................
Accommodation and food services.............................
Other services, except public administration...............
Government and government enterprises.......................
Federal, civilian...........................................................
Military........................................................................
State and local............................................................

10,187
19
9,770
9,309
10,188
9,694
9,519
9,984
20 1,029,487 1,043,015 1,068,292 1,084,530 1,118,467 1,118,366 1,128,399
21
875,084 898,631
862,380
914,880
944,327
942,118
949,138
22
6,207
6,562
6,197
5,865
5,899
6,581
6,013
3,597
3,629
4,184
23
3,609
3,753
3,790
4,333
24
10,471
9,810
9,956
10,165
10,346
10,810
10,938
71,847
25
69,401
75,472
77,369
79,198
78,757
78,175
125,447
26
123,793
128,774
130,552
137,967
134,024
134,270
86,202
94,577
27
85,923
88,975
90,488
97,578
94,455
28
37,869
39,245
39,798
40,064
40,389
39,569
39,693
29
50,152
51,006
52,409
53,569
55,648
56,739
57,783
69,747
74,477
73,284
30
68,640
71,139
71,745
73,653
31
29,079
29,730
31,023
31,166
32,069
29,039
29,406
32
54,890
54,079
53,820
57,185
57,956
56,607
57,248
72,702
78,584
33
73,435
76,958
76,961
78,660
78,305
34
35,340
37,454
36,820
36,253
32,926
36,053
36,895
35
116,451
120,354
122,349
129,221
129,009
131,089
114,473
36
21,798
20,471
20,289
20,553
22,262
21,386
21,659
37
43,412
39,575
40,053
40,381
40,839
43,053
43,899
11,972
12,174
12,512
12,724
13,115
38
11,803
12,933
85,824
89,257
39
81,096
82,998
84,535
88,402
90,254
15,849
16,737
16,947
40
15,298
16,006
16,406
16,433
30,279
30,722
30,872
41
28,259
28,320
29,395
31,525
42
29,250
29,538
29,940
30,650
30,687
31,266
31,609
43
167,107
167,932
169,661
169,649 174,140
176,248
179,261
44
22,450
22,359
22,654
23,108
23,310
22,556
22,549
14,867
14,607
14,621
14,817
45
14,432
14,343
14,683
132,779
46
129,684
130,775
132,948
136,804
138,519
141,134

961
140,503
118,210
200
3,881
920
11,874
10,921
7,666
3,255
6,819
8,307
3,739
11,229
9,211
5,087
16,088
2,971
5,407
1,179
10,375
1,720
4,164
4,117
22,293
4,834
3,151
14,307

742
141,950
119,578
208
3,863
970
12,045
11,030
7,713
3,317
6,919
8,491
3,746
11,096
9,166
5,420
16,344
2,963
5,439
1,205
10,575
1,756
4,191
4,149
22,372
4,824
3,151
14,397

768
144,884
122,386
216
4,142
978
12,708
11,574
8,209
3,365
7,028
8,581
3,836
10,389
9,589
5,778
16,723
2,987
5,485
1,229
10,877
1,783
4,283
4,198
22,498
4,806
3,146
14,545

710
146,132
123,581
210
4,198
1,016
13,046
11,788
8,294
3,493
7,144
8,570
3,843
10,776
9,642
5,533
16,835
2,793
5,610
1,257
10,698
1,952
4,398
4,272
22,551
4,779
3,127
14,644

648
151,741
128,995
218
4,555
991
13,416
11,946
8,482
3,464
7,538
8,807
4,094
11,904
9,982
5,589
17,388
3,127
5,860
1,283
11,352
2,022
4,524
4,401
22,745
4,920
3,143
14,682

527
150,811
128,459
220
4,743
1,061
13,441
11,957
8,485
3,472
7,613
8,879
4,041
11,360
9,845
5,576
17,602
2,983
5,809
1,329
11,172
1,899
4,502
4,426
22,352
4,949
3,114
14,289

603
152,116
129,508
215
4,931
1,075
13,226
12,026
8,527
3,498
7,725
8,879
4,143
11,472
9,782
5,459
17,960
3,058
5,916
1,359
11,315
1,929
4,594
4,445
22,608
4,939
3,064
14,605

See the footnotes at the end of the table.




January 2007

Survey

of

55

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1—2006:1111 Continues
—
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Connecticut

District of Columbia

Delaware

2005

2006
II

2005

2006

2005
IV

I'

II'

H
IP

II

Line

2006
III

IV

\'

ll|p

II'

II

III

IV

lr

llr

II|p

164,426

165,097

167,969

169,737

174,275

174,004

175,728

30,632

30,733

31,339

32,421

32,989

32,913

33,366

30,426

30,783

31,328

31,504

32,262

32,508

32,864

1

127,000
12,719

127,239
12,682

129,758
12,875

130,759
12,943

134,906
13,544

133,958
13,426

134,799
13,508

26,257
2,742

26,138
2,730

26,791
2,797

28,145
2,960

28,542
3,030

28,243
3,003

28,489
3,021

64,501
5,966

65,006
6,008

66,036
6,102

65,941
6,078

67,785
6,330

68,046
6,332

68,459
6,355

2
3

I

III

I

1

6,493

6,477

6,583

6,619

6,948

6,888

6,934

1,365

1,361

1,393

1,470

1,514

1,499

1,509

2,796

2,818

2,861

2,854

2,980

2,991

3,001

4

6,226
5,021
119,301
26,200
18,925
554

6,205
4,928
119,484
26,465
19,148
526

6,292
5,242
122,126
26,668
19,175
522

6,324
5,293
123,109
27,321
19,306
527

6,596
5,693
127,055
27,508
19,712
486

6,537
5,454
125,986
28,096
19,922
482

6,574
5,524
126,816
28,676
20,235
500

1,376
-2,181
21,335
4,938
4,359
103

1,370
-2,136
21,272
5,021
4,440
103

1,404
-2,194
21,800
5,094
4,445
99

1,490
-2,507
22,678
5,246
4,497
109

1,516
-2,447
23,065
5,308
4,616
83

1,504
-2,471
22,769
5,447
4,697
94

1,512
-2,484
22,984
5,584
4,798
99

3,171
-35,856
22,679
4,061
3,686
55

3,190
-36,073
22,924
4,121
3,737
53

3,242
-36,524
23,410
4,169
3,749
55

3,224
-36,422
23,441
4,279
3,785
60

3,349
-37,376
24,079
4,313
3,870
55

3,342
-37,533
24,181
4,415
3,912
53

3,354
-37,718
24,386
4,502
3,976
54

5
6
7
8
9
10

18,371

18,622

18,653

18,779

19,226

19,440

19,736

4,256

4,338

4,346

4,387

4,533

4,603

4,699

3,631

3,684

3,694

3,725

3,815

3,859

3,922

11

89,472
19,782

89,386
19,847

91,176
20,204

91,864
20,327

95,226
20,926

94,203
20,865

94,957
21,035

19,278
4,342

19,169
4,341

19,637
4,468

20,724
4,689

21,076
4,765

20,830
4,714

20,999
4,760

47,441
13,170

47,844
13,207

48,711
13,268

48,672
13,212

50,189
13,479

50,252
13,598

50,489
13,716

12
13

13,556

13,642

13,913

14,003

14,330

14,328

14,461

2,965

2,972

3,064

3,199

3,248

3,210

3,248

10,000

10,016

10,026

9,988

10,130

10,256

10,361

14

6,226
17,745
43
17,702

6,205
18,006
31
17,974

6,292
18,378
40
18,337

6,324
18,568
38
18,530

6,596
18,754
9
18,745

6,537
18,890
2
18,887

6,574
18,807
7
18,800

1,376
2,638
293
2,345

1,370
2,628
251
2,377

1,404
2,686
262
2,424

1,490
2,732
263
2,469

1,516
2,701
193
2,508

1,504
2,700
164
2,536

1,512
2,730
192
2,539

3,171
3,889
0
3,889

3,190
3,955
0
3,955

3,242
4,058
0
4,058

3,224
4,057
0
4,057

3,349
4,117
0
4,117

3,342
4,196
0
4,196

3,354
4,254
0
4,254

15
16
17
18

181
126,818
111,444
42
205
1,261
7,093
18,323
12,803
5,521
5,984
7,577
2,388
3,905
21,065
2,473
12,278
3,732
3,905
2,559
12,354
913
2,374
3,015
15,374
1,692
902
12,780

172
127,066
111,334
43
204
1,237
7,201
18,183
12,696
5,486
6,147
7,633
2,403
3,991
19,923
2,681
12,436
3,715
3,971
2,605
12,600
924
2,398
3,041
15,732
1,667
890
13,174

181
153
154
183
148
129,575 130,578 134,753 133,809 134,645
113,443 115,176 118,776 118,321 119,004
44
45
45
44
43
219
232
250
213
241
1,188
1,184
1,120
1,311
1,112
7,336
7,376
7,321
7,206
7,258
18,635
19,211
18,478
19,190
19,179
13,135
13,422
13,622
13,003
13,573
5,500
5,768
5,589
5,476
5,606
6,412
6,802
6,257
6,844
6,672
7,824
7,929
7,753
8,186
8,196
2,446
2,578
2,423
2,496
2,508
3,667
3,818
3,953
4,043
4,073
20,824
21,840
21,366
22,645
21,462
2,680
2,684
2,818
2,781
2,728
12,664
12,601
13,170
13,135
13,380
3,916
3,878
4,107
4,554
4,611
3,994
4,327
3,999
4,181
4,282
2,675
2,797
2,713
2,771
2,811
12,915
13,115
13,485
12,726
13,309
974
965
1,007
1,011
1,005
2,464
2,437
2,552
2,621
2,566
3,141
3,069
3,173
3,229
3,206
15,402
15,977
15,641
16,133
15,488
1,617
1,662
1,630
1,643
1,658
862
875
880
872
906
12,923
13,628
13,453
12,925
13,108

331
25,925
22,132
20

290
25,848
22,056
22

302
26,489
22,512
22

303
27,842
24,185
21

233
28,309
24,063
23

204
28,039
24,420
21

233
28,257
24,588
20

0
64,501
37,304
997

0
65,006
37,873
985

0
66,036
38,751
988

0
65,941
38,817
1,009

0
67,785
40,084
1,003

0
68,046
40,433
1,002

0
68,459
40,550
969
(D)
254

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

245
(D)
2,737
1,226
1,511
1,186
1,649
551
502
3,833
418
3,084
1,028
768
244
2,537
274
631
704
3,794
417
484
2,893

243
(D)
2,676
1,230
1,446
1,195
1,682
555
501
3,639
425
3,101
1,002
799
246
2,570
268
624
711
3,792
419
473
2,900

238
(D)
2,822
1,290
1,533
1,221
1,696
574
506
3,805
434
3,095
960
824
244
2,585
270
641
719
3,977
408
464
3,105

237

246

248

250

257

251

275

273

258

252

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

(D)

2,913
1,394
1,520
1,336
1,734
596
530
4,408
424
3,112
1,026
880
281
2,759
290
686
774
4,246
422
455
3,369

2,880
1,389
1,491
1,487
1,757
615
500
4,502
431
3,148
1,209
874
282
2,684
278
666
779
3,619
428
443
2,748

2,933
1,443
1,490
1,414
1,762
632
505
4,493
431
3,211
1,232
884
286
2,720
281
680
786
3,669
432
442
2,794

227
93
133
442
625
346
2,738
2,209
1,017
14,394
292
1,758
1,991
3,147
345
1,555
4,128
27,197
22,466
2,056
2,675

229
93
136
454
637
344
2,713
2,304
1,058
14,550
274
1,821
2,006
3,181
460
1,576
4,156
27,133
22,507
2,019
2,608

218
93
126
467
653
346
2,681
2,492
1,106
14,899
252
1,841
2,061
3,247
516
1,633
4,243
27,286
22,463
1,995
2,828

219
94
124
498
646
337
2,727
2,339
1,117
15,043
279
1,868
1,966
3,301
369
1,651
4,354
27,124
22,439
1,988
2,697

195
76
119
496
674
344
2,701
2,686
1,113
15,665
324
1,889
2,094
3,341
395
1,682
4,404
27,701
22,842
2,011
2,848

194
76
118
498
662
348
2,698
2,349
1,130
15,648
473
2,055
2,122
3,365
503
1,685
4,509
27,613
22,996
2,002
2,615

196
77
119
502
667
353
2,753
2,335
1,133
15,854
352
1,994
2,129
3,414
499
1,714
4,532
27,909
23,227
2,004
2,678

2,814
1,307
1,507
1,238
1,707
602
500
5,148
429
3,129
964
856
262
2,654
266
655
732
3,657
412
456
2,789

State Personal Income

56

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
Florida
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance2 ........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4.....................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................

Georgia

2005
II

2006
III

IV

lr

II'

2005
IN'1

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

II|p

1

589,618

600,346

613,711

622,772

638,698

645,599

655,850

276,353

280,105

284,531

290,928

295,631

297,823

301,690

2
3

395,688
43,504

403,116
44,352

415,034
45,737

417,690
46,076

432,956
48,349

434,840
48,498

439,875
49,030

224,177
23,238

226,819
23,300

230,776
23,532

236,198
23,999

240,279
24,728

240,882
24,755

243,099
24,958

4

22,445

22,902

23,609

23,789

25,037

25,157

25,449

11,679

11,726

11,844

12,082

12,486

12,529

12,640

5
6
7
8
9
10

21,059
1,612
353,795
139,599
96,225
984

21,450
1,611
360,376
142,070
97,900
875

22,127
1,635
370,932
144,193
98,586
828

22,287
1,668
373,282
145,781
103,709
854

23,311
1,714
386,321
150,311
102,065
710

23,340
1,705
388,047
153,930
103,621
751

23,582
1,719
392,564
157,540
105,745
770

11,559
-890
200,049
38,991
37,313
540

11,573
-902
202,618
39,450
38,037
552

11,688
-915
206,329
39,809
38,392
552

11,917
-977
211,222
40,940
38,766
560

12,242
-973
214,578
41,278
39,775
505

12,226
-947
215,180
42,292
40,350
504

12,317
-955
217,186
43,314
41,190
520

11

95,241

97,025

97,758

102,855

101,356

102,870

104,975

36,773

37,485

37,840

38,206

39,271

39,847

40,670

12
13

293,191
65,422

298,444
66,729

307,799
68,565

310,154
69,127

322,387
71,348

323,211
72,025

327,410
73,032

160,280
38,495

162,080
38,976

165,079
39,555

169,211
40,404

172,703
41,081

172,910
41,331

174,687
41,744

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements.....................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income........................................

14

44,363

45,279

46,438

46,840

48,037

48,684

49,450

26,936

27,403

27,867

28,487

28,839

29,105

29,426

15
16
17
18

21,059
37,075
935
36,141

21,450
37,943
803
37,140

22,127
38,670
492
38,178

22,287
38,409
481
37,927

23,311
39,221
202
39,019

23,340
39,603
171
39,433

23,582
39,433
237
39,196

11,559
25,402
1,529
23,873

11,573
25,763
1,402
24,361

11,688
26,142
1,472
24,670

11,917
26,583
1,423
25,160

12,242
26,495
1,061
25,433

12,226
26,641
924
25,716

12,317
26,668
1,018
25,650

Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.........................................................................
Construction................................................................
Manufacturing.......
Durable goods...
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade....
Retail trade...........
Transportation and warehousing..................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

2,199
393,488
328,967
1,538
637
2,708
31,344
24,562
16,840
7,722
22,006
31,972
12,111
12,984
26,979
12,937
34,560
6,967
26,883
4,109
40,626
7,256
15,633
13,158
64,521
11,255
7,378
45,888

2,080
401,037
336,154
1,600
630
2,889
32,770
24,904
17,120
7,784
22,546
32,836
12,402
12,909
27,556
13,738
35,464
6,496
27,579
4,184
41,188
7,494
15,650
13,320
64,883
11,191
7,189
46,502

1,772
413,262
347,149
1,776
660
2,790
34,865
25,597
17,517
8,079
23,211
33,429
12,619
12,867
28,548
14,840
36,611
6,796
28,575
4,322
42,210
7,573
16,296
13,564
66,113
11,124
7,086
47,902

1,761
415,928
350,319
1,742
671
2,941
35,530
25,939
17,882
8,056
23,599
33,426
12,794
13,607
28,879
14,130
37,244
7,049
28,375
4,329
42,385
7,556
16,382
13,743
65,609
11,105
7,028
47,476

1,491
431,466
362,901
1,769
650
2,729
37,785
26,775
18,594
8,181
24,267
34,879
13,034
13,683
29,145
14,558
38,661
7,395
29,595
4,555
44,039
8,103
17,016
14,262
68,565
11,287
7,177
50,101

1,471
433,369
366,519
1,789
673
2,902
38,914
26,856
18,708
8,149
24,822
35,006
13,321
13,943
29,295
14,535
38,870
7,925
29,125
4,577
44,627
8,086
17,014
14,238
66,850
11,355
7,227
48,268

1,548
438,327
370,384
1,734
697
2,935
38,956
26,863
18,734
8,128
25,328
35,104
13,730
14,042
29,269
14,410
39,743
8,105
29,480
4,638
45,267
8,232
17,438
14,414
67,943
11,450
7,303
49,190

2,008
222,169
183,563
691
594
2,919
13,486
26,300
12,702
13,599
15,348
14,612
9,664
12,420
13,602
5,601
19,333
4,871
9,860
2,633
17,699
1,602
6,249
6,080
38,605
8,278
6,557
23,770

1,884
224,935
186,005
711
572
2,941
13,792
26,402
12,827
13,575
15,675
14,940
9,492
12,601
13,555
5,909
19,640
4,854
10,071
2,658
18,116
1,678
6,242
6,157
38,930
8,349
6,574
24,006

1,954
228,822
189,564
745
587
3,039
14,399
26,827
13,084
13,743
16,038
15,008
9,590
12,289
13,848
6,325
20,127
5,136
10,227
2,730
18,424
1,706
6,328
6,191
39,258
8,357
6,651
24,250

1,903
234,294
194,476
761
590
2,952
14,714
27,052
13,181
13,871
16,408
15,056
9,678
12,603
13,970
6,181
20,498
7,558
10,595
2,749
18,622
1,731
6,414
6,343
39,819
8,439
6,675
24,705

1,545
238,734
198,389
779
597
3,100
14,964
28,765
14,267
14,498
16,788
15,720
9,701
13,283
14,112
6,269
20,951
5,549
10,671
2,983
19,115
1,732
6,852
6,459
40,345
8,759
6,715
24,871

1,413
239,470
198,788
804
619
2,976
15,364
27,397
13,578
13,819
17,203
15,803
9,663
13,087
14,615
6,306
21,502
5,426
10,880
3,062
19,125
1,744
6,692
6,519
40,682
8,846
6,611
25,225

1,510
241,589
200,606
781
637
3,009
15,326
27,507
13,673
13,834
17,435
15,871
9.948
13,178
14,572
6,247
21,885
5,512
11,030
3,081
19,412
1,775
6,844
6,556
40,983
8,746
6,570
25,667

See the footnotes at the end of the table.




January 2007

Survey

of

C

urrent

57

B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1—2006:1111 Continues
—
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Hawaii
2006
III

IV

Illinois

Idaho

2005
lr

ir

2005
II| p

I

II

43,131

43,607

44,194

44,880

45,633

46,123

46,900

39,687

40,127

40,912

41,608

42,908

34,617 34,982
3,516 3,565

35,575
3,638

36,076
3,697

36,738
3,818

36,974
3,832

37,513
3,883

29,419
3,411

29,690
3,465

30,439
3,550

30,935
3,613

32,123
3,810

I

II

2006
III

IV

lr

Line

2006

2005
U|p

I

II

III

IV

I'

llr

III?

43,729

44,231

454,080

458,998

465,682

472,668

484,398

488,959

495,615

1

32,767
3,898

32,913
3,900

360,246
39,425

363,659
39,913

370,178
40,735

374,883
41,339

386,301
43,173

388,100
43,308

392,074
43,707

2
3

llr

1,786

1,821

1,852

1,916

1,926

1,953

1,723

1,750

1,792

1,825

1,925

1,974

1,977

19,763

20,016

20,403

20,705

21,653

21,769

21,989

4

1,780
1,756
0
0
31,101 31,416
6,507 6,583
5,522 5,607
85
92

1,817
0
31,937
6,640
5,617
86

1,846
0
32,378
6,840
5,661
84

1,903
0
32,920
6,894
5,820
78

1,906
0
33,142
7,073
5,908
88

1,929
0
33,630
7,252
6,018
90

1,688
595
26,603
7,164
5,921
148

1,715
606
26,830
7,269
6,028
141

1,759
625
27,514
7,369
6,029
130

1,789
631
27,952
7,575
6,081
123

1,885
643
28,956
7,670
6,281
118

1,923
643
29,512
7,854
6,363
101

1,923
672
29,685
8,055
6,491
94

19,662
-1,525
319,296
74,100
60,685
1,930

19,897
-1,483
322,263
75,307
61,429
1,731

20,331
-1,514
327,929
76,234
61,519
1,688

20,634
-1,524
332,020
78,644
62,005
1,691

21,520
-1,626
341,502
79,338
63,558
1,578

21,539
-1,615
343,177
81,559
64,223
1,439

21,718
-1,632
346,735
83,533
65,346
1,447

5
6
7
8
9
10

5,522

5,531

5,578

5,742

5,820

5,928

5,772

5,887

5,899

5,958

6,164

6,262

6,397

58,754

59,698

59,832

60,313

61,980

62,784

63,899

11

24,813 25,034
6,916
6,985

25,463
7,043

25,852
7,149

26,419
7,234

26,506
7,354

26,913
7,493

19,798
4,944

20,088
5,026

20,589
5,125

20,981
5,230

21,864
5,393

22,371
5,555

22,433
5,580

260,101
60,604

261,329
62,086

265,282
63,791

268,485
65,096

277,293
66,743

278,167
67,462

281,357
68,241

12
13

1,760

5,430

5,160

5,205

5,226

5,303

5,332

5,449

5,564

3,256

3,311

3,367

3,442

3,509

3,632

3,657

40,942

42,189

43,459

44,463

45,224

45,923

46,523

14

1,756
2,888
-4
2,892

1,780
2,963
-10
2,973

1,817
3,069
13
3,056

1,846
3,074
11
3,063

1,903
3,085
-1
3,086

1,906
3,114
-5
3,119

1,929
3,106
-1
3,106

1,688
4,676
609
4,068

1,715
4,576
413
4,163

1,759
4,725
430
4,295

1,789
4,724
408
4,316

1,885
4,866
422
4,444

1,923
4,840
372
4,468

1,923
4,900
443
4,457

19,662
39,541
349
39,192

19,897
40,244
321
39,923

20,331
41,105
264
40,841

20,634
41,302
88
41,213

21,520
42,264
124
42,140

21,539
42,471
-40
42,511

21,718
42,476
-55
42,531

15
16
17
18

211
209
34,406 34,773
23,409 23,749
54
53
51
53
267
286
2,494 2,630
907
900
335
340
564
566
1,007
1,016
2,270 2,320
1,411
1,361
700
711
1,214
1,228
1,016
1,075
2,023 2,072
738
638
1,401
1,460
494
485
2,990 3,028
441
446
2,915
2,880
1,052
1,073
10,997 11,024
2,686
2,661
4,095 4,048
4,241
4,291

234
35,341
24,348
53
53
277
2,737
900
339
561
1,029
2,359
1,469
708
1,223
1,143
2,146
533
1,511
496
3,158
456
3,009
1,087
10,993
2,678
3,992
4,323

233
35,843
24,672
54
54
283
2,827
911
344
567
1,080
2,345
1,467
751
1,234
1,123
2,235
572
1,534
504
3,066
460
3,057
1,115
11,170
2,710
4,009
4,452

222
36,516
25,313
52
57
274
2,866
943
358
585
1,066
2,469
1,515
773
1,274
1,118
2,244
583
1,564
516
3,235
462
3,170
1,132
11,203
2,759
4,030
4,413

220
36,754
25,336
51
53
296
2,935
943
351
593
1,105
2,452
1,498
818
1,270
1,128
2,314
572
1,594
526
3,013
466
3,154
1,147
11,418
2,791
4,103
4,524

226
37,286
25,616
50
54
298
2,934
945
352
593
1,116
2,452
1,562
809
1,279
1,122
2,375
588
1,605
536
3,030
472
3,232
1,157
11,670
2,805
4,225
4,640

1,167
28,253
22,755
397
152
229
2,368
3,829
2,678
1,150
1,343
2,472
878
511
1,170
567
2,629
625
1,054
240
2,602
262
730
696
5,497
1,070
552
3,876

974
28,715
23,213
399
155
237
2,496
3,876
2,725
1,151
1,359
2,519
895
515
1,195
612
2,673
605
1,066
246
2,642
275
741
708
5,503
1,049
539
3,914

993
29,446
23,982
396
177
249
2,607
3,956
2,781
1,175
1,405
2,667
916
534
1,281
663
2,743
598
1,085
252
2,684
294
751
723
5,464
1,023
536
3,905

971
29,964
24,299
405
165
240
2,666
3,983
2,823
1,160
1,442
2,695
925
540
1,304
659
2,781
610
1,114
267
2,740
252
776
735
5,665
1,021
528
4,116

988
31,135
25,561
427
169
242
3,053
4,256
2,978
1,278
1,510
2,763
950
536
1,340
644
2,884
695
1,216
245
2,782
289
798
760
5,574
1,039
526
4,010

943
31,823
25,950
431
219
250
3,023
4,063
2,863
1,199
1,505
2,921
975
536
1,373
663
2,931
850
1,196
247
2,879
299
814
777
5,873
1,041
519
4,313

1,019
31,894
25,985
418
200
252
3,024
4,080
2,873
1,207
1,534
2,843
1,004
543
1,369
651
2,990
775
1,210
253
2,923
301
826
787
5,909
1,035
526
4,348

988
359,259
310,062
343
3,140
3,043
21,696
49,871
30,396
19,475
22,655
20,104
14,140
10,815
32,093
8,984
40,352
10,665
13,892
5,143
30,946
2,924
8,480
10,775
49,197
7,928
2,903
38,366

972
362,687
312,373
345
3,154
2,995
22,045
49,413
29,896
19,517
22,825
20,404
14,314
10,593
32,141
9,515
40,787
10,626
14,003
5,241
31,367
3,090
8,623
10,891
50,314
7,927
2,845
39,542

922
369,256
318,220
370
3,307
3,124
22,261
50,552
31,000
19,552
23,187
20,484
14,488
10,461
32,934
10,222
41,582
10,742
14,209
5,356
31,930
3,202
8,771
11,037
51,036
7,877
2,840
40,319

749
374,134
322,336
371
3,415
2,984
22,638
51,299
31,388
19,911
23,670
20,576
14,556
10,777
33,442
9,770
42,414
10,619
14,552
5,451
32,165
3,419
8,892
11,327
51,797
7,885
2,782
41,131

789
385,511
333,824
382
3,548
3,231
24,826
53,126
33,161
19,965
24,313
20,990
15,434
11,164
35,196
10,576
43,105
10,705
14,750
5,615
33,035
3,240
9,217
11,372
51,687
7,961
2,855
40,871

631
387,469
335,285
377
3,721
3,127
24,198
52,977
32,742
20,235
25,238
21,319
15,529
11,241
34,341
9,708
43,922
11,144
15,106
5,648
33,242
3,413
9,394
11,640
52,184
7,950
2,893
41,341

622
391,452
338,528
368
3,859
3,164
24,204
53,008
32,824
20,184
25,736
21,436
16,002
11,335
34,251
9,581
44,736
11,381
15,286
5,772
33,664
3,466
9,577
11,700
52,924
8,026
2,744
42,155

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




58

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
Indiana
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4.....................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts...............................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................

Iowa

2005
II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

2005
II|p

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

II| p

1

191,894

194,370

196,748

198,475

203,756

204,127

206,852

92,751

93,455

94,956

96,103

98,388

99,503

100,915

2
3

146,653
16,013

148,511
16,278

150,747
16,561

151,418
16,662

156,349
17,460

155,289
17,327

156,808
17,477

70,036
7,857

70,424
7,955

71,857
8,125

72,509
8,218

74,569
8,519

75,193
8,625

76,026
8,702

4

8,192

8,337

8,481

8,535

8,968

8,918

9,002

4,090

4,144

4,232

4,283

4,447

4,509

4,553

5
6
7
8
9
10

7,820
3,586
134,226
27,961
29,707
720

7,941
3,613
135,846
28,375
30,149
673

8,081
3,666
137,851
28,694
30,202
646

8,127
3,712
138,468
29,560
30,447
647

8,491
3,791
142,681
29,812
31,263
607

8,408
3,872
141,835
30,605
31,687
615

8,475
3,912
143,243
31,332
32,277
627

3,767
890
63,070
15,610
14,071
311

3,810
892
63,361
15,841
14,252
287

3,893
895
64,627
16,042
14,287
295

3,936
913
65,203
16,492
14,408
313

4,072
935
66,985
16,663
14,740
279

4,115
930
67,498
17,073
14,932
295

4,149
932
68,256
17,478
15,182
302

11

28,987

29,476

29,556

29,800

30,656

31,072

31,650

13,760

13,965

13,992

14,095

14,461

14,637

14,880

12
13

105,034
27,358

105,983
28,069

107,318
28,632

107,683
28,874

111,752
29,842

110,881
29,705

112,074
30,053

49,508
12,148

49,967
12,327

50,977
12,571

51,556
12,732

52,872
12,981

53,494
13,162

54,090
13,316

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements.....................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors' income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income.......................................

14

19,538

20,128

20,552

20,747

21,351

21,296

21,578

8,382

8,517

8,678

8,796

8,909

9,047

9,167

15
16
17
18

7,820
14,261
519
13,741

7,941
14,459
424
14,035

8,081
14,797
416
14,381

8,127
14,861
324
14,537

8,491
14,754
78
14,676

8,408
14,703
-43
14,746

8,475
14,681
-23
14,704

3,767
8,380
2,111
6,269

3,810
8,130
1,761
6,369

3,893
8,309
1,767
6,542

3,936
8,220
1,634
6,586

4,072
8,716
1,967
6,749

4,115
8,537
1,609
6,928

4,149
8,620
1,728
6,892

Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.........................................................................
Construction................................................................
Manufacturing......
Durable goods..
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade
Retail trade..........
Transportation and warehousing.................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

861
145,792
124,534
182
706
1,505
9,407
38,726
28,465
10,261
7,285
9,474
5,701
2,407
6,541
2,626
7,303
2,174
4,810
1,547
14,514
1,720
3,498
4,408
21,258
3,059
875
17,324

770
147,741
126,070
186
690
1,543
9,594
38,915
28,628
10,288
7,377
9,567
5,788
2,387
6,587
2,794
7,402
2,300
4,853
1,593
14,863
1,661
3,534
4,438
21,671
3,026
891
17,753

764
149,983
128,429
195
708
1,592
9,817
39,599
29,081
10,518
7,509
9,629
6,011
2,400
6,616
2,961
7,637
2,285
4,923
1,640
15,113
1,705
3,582
4,507
21,554
3,020
909
17,625

672
150,746
129,539
201
707
1,605
10,086
39,929
29,404
10,525
7,634
9,688
6,068
2,419
6,624
2,837
7,674
2,143
5,019
1,648
15,365
1,733
3,619
4,541
21,207
3,016
920
17,271

428
155,921
134,237
207
749
1,575
10,250
42,583
30,920
11,663
7,888
9,830
6,331
2,462
6,766
2,836
7,758
2,275
5,113
1,707
15,651
1,851
3,754
4,652
21,684
3,080
902
17,702

311
154,978
133,364
205
780
1,659
10,010
40,851
30,108
10,743
8,032
9,946
6,303
2,495
6,838
2,843
7,936
2,442
5,245
1,737
15,861
1,781
3,724
4,676
21,615
3,127
870
17,618

333
156,475
134,617
200
808
1,678
9,953
41,225
30,483
10,742
8,173
9,974
6,480
2,518
6,818
2,800
8,099
2,488
5,292
1,751
16,061
1,794
3,788
4,714
21,858
3,152
862
17,845

2,717
67,319
55,820
239
159
745
4,436
13,414
8,534
4,879
3,820
4,969
2,726
1,720
5,614
922
2,960
736
1,758
852
6,712
553
1,547
1,938
11,499
1,381
569
9,550

2,378
68,046
56,444
235
154
713
4,562
13,526
8,564
4,962
3,874
4,979
2,784
1,695
5,648
977
3,006
792
1,779
866
6,802
548
1,566
1,938
11,602
1,367
578
9,657

2,390
69,466
57,639
250
161
698
4,752
13,682
8,625
5,056
3,946
4,993
2,843
1,756
5,840
1,025
3,086
854
1,817
890
6,929
574
1,587
1,958
11,828
1,347
589
9,892

2,260
70,248
58,476
261
164
761
4,786
13,924
8,819
5,106
3,999
4,958
2,849
1,786
5,972
988
3,095
939
1,850
900
7,069
570
1,609
1,995
11,773
1,340
596
9,837

2,597
71,972
59,934
270
164
672
5,269
14,267
9,079
5,188
4,085
5,134
2,990
1,796
6,037
970
3,182
864
1,933
916
7,107
596
1,656
2,027
12,037
1,365
597
10,075

2,245
72,948
61,123
265
170
752
5,831
14,045
8,879
5,166
4,162
5,176
2,974
1,873
6,259
1,014
3,261
926
1,960
910
7,236
601
1,651
2,057
11,825
1,388
545
9,892

2,369
73,657
61,631
258
177
756
5,836
14,135
8,953
5,182
4,203
5,193
3,059
1,878
6,255
1,003
3,324
940
2,006
931
7,333
608
1,675
2,062
12,025
1,414
539
10,072

See the footnotes at the end of the table.




January 2007

Survey

of

59

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1-2006:111’— Continues
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Kansas

Kentucky

2005
1

II

2005

2006
III

IV

r

llr

Louisiana

II|p

2005

2006

I

II

III

IV

I'

II'

li|p

I

II

Line

2006
III

llr

IV

II| p

88,919 89,722

90,830

92,261

94,578

95,428

96,942

115,777

117,558

118,973

120,413

121,595

123,172

124,892

124,577

125,620

63,460

131,147

131,129

132,220

134,470

1

69,006 69,494
7,574 7,725

70,571
7,916

71,489
8,043

73,900
8,462

74,040
8,456

74,987
8,532

88,958
9,866

90,379
10,025

91,717
10,153

92,474
10,224

93,336
10,574

94,274
10,676

95,222
10,763

93,185
8,844

93,643
8,887

75,736
8,924

93,509
8,942

95,898
9,307

97,420
9,466

99,449
9,666

2
3

3,964

4,056

4,122

4,338

4,348

4,390

5,053

5,140

5,205

5,247

5,438

5,503

5,552

4,624

4,654

4,683

4,673

4,867

4,951

5,055

4

3,689 3,760
809
836
62,241 62,605
13,876 14,121
12,802 12,997
271
260

3,859
829
63,485
14,317
13,027
265

3,921
887
64,332
14,800
13,129
262

4,125
751
66,189
14,954
13,436
203

4,108
824
66,409
15,396
13,623
215

4,142
831
67,285
15,803
13,854
203

4,813
-1,606
77,486
15,710
22,580
416

4,885
-1,673
78,680
15,966
22,912
380

4,948
-1,705
79,859
16,149
22,965
381

4,977
-1,685
80,565
16,677
23,171
400

5,136
-1,738
81,025
16,805
23,765
342

5,173
-1,796
81,802
17,293
24,077
340

5,212
-1,811
82,648
17,709
24,535
362

4,220
-152
84,189
15,760
24,628
252

4,234
-145
84,611
15,966
25,043
254

4,241
-126
66,686
-68,586
65,360
491

4,269
-108
84,459
16,595
30,092
1,729

4,441
-112
86,478
16,739
27,912
651

4,515
-126
87,828
17,218
27,174
260

4,611
-144
89,639
17,655
27,175
204

5
6
7
8
9
10

12,737

12,763

12,867

13,233

13,408

13,651

22,164

22,532

22,584

22,771

23,423

23,737

24,173

24,376

24,788

64,869

28,363

27,261

26,914

26,972

11

46,849 47,254
13,112 13,304

48,001
13,498

48,561
13,731

50,473
14,083

50,476
14,339

51,037
14,547

63,499
16,464

64,302
16,896

65,019
17,215

65,476
17,430

67,024
17,694

67,671
18,033

68,365
18,233

65,965
16,423

66,192
16,543

66,615
16,710

66,456
16,592

68,352
16,860

69,379
17,178

70,936
17,531

12
13

9,543

9,639

9,810

9,959

10,231

10,405

11,651

12,012

12,267

12,454

12,558

12,861

13,022

12,203

12,309

12,470

12,324

12,419

12,663

12,920

14

4,241
-7,590
188
-7,777

4,269
10,461
355
10,105

4,441
10,685
289
10,397

4,515
10,863
227
10,636

4,611
10,982
238
10,744

15
16
17
18

374
75,362
55,902
451
5,006
812
5,995
10,405
4,538
5,867
3,794
6,155
4,261
1,821
3,756
-13,203
5,671
1,673
2,618
1,087
9,126
1,389
2,238
2,847
19,460
2,857
2,366
14,237

542
92,967
74,610
448
5,508
1,008
6,951
10,451
4,554
5,896
4,313
6,423
4,438
1,917
4,110
2,174
5,667
1,375
3,350
1,045
8,710
1,327
2,623
2,772
18,356
2,815
2,361
13,180

477
95,421
77,159
461
5,780
918
7,743
10,882
4,938
5,944
4,553
6,709
4,514
1,948
3,832
2,225
6,100
1,325
3,578
1,100
8,726
1,191
2,735
2,840
18,262
2,839
2,354
13,069

417
97,002
78,921
453
6,063
962
8,213
10,826
4,959
5,867
4,558
6,769
4,759
1,951
3,797
2,254
6,317
1,295
3,659
1,101
9,064
1,202
2,763
2,916
18,082
2,836
2,316
12,929

430
99,019
80,807
441
6,270
970
8,464
11,019
5,142
5,877
4,662
6,845
4,963
1,986
3,806
2,212
6,621
1,325
3,776
1,126
9,271
1,218
2,851
2,982
18,212
2,854
2,315
13,044

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

3,885

12,531

9,423
3,689
9,045
985
8,060

3,760
8,936
751
8,184

3,859
9,072
768
8,305

3,921
9,196
739
8,457

4,125
9,344
693
8,650

4,108
9,225
463
8,762

4,142
9,403
611
8,792

4,813
8,995
1,135
7,860

4,885
9,180
1,161
8,019

4,948
9,483
1,289
8,195

4,977
9,568
1,291
8,277

5,136
8,618
218
8,400

5,173
8,569
106
8,463

5,212
8,624
148
8,476

4,220
10,796
352
10,444

4,234
10,908
329
10,579

1,421
67,585
53,901
219
1,283
673
3,651
11,440
6,830
4,610
3,672
4,340
2,479
3,327
3,615
1,087
4,377
722
2,311
521
6,294
271
1,636
1,983
13,684
2,068
1,895
9,721

1,194
68,300
54,574
223
1,279
695
3,743
11,607
7,020
4,587
3,742
4,361
2,480
3,345
3,654
1,163
4,423
681
2,384
521
6,380
274
1,648
1,968
13,726
2,056
1,881
9,789

1,214
69,357
55,629
229
1,350
715
3,862
11,847
7,227
4,620
3,816
4,345
2,502
3,285
3,712
1,236
4,570
706
2,534
527
6,487
277
1,655
1,975
13,728
2,038
1,873
9,818

1,187
70,302
56,104
228
1,406
677
3,851
11,737
7,133
4,604
3,873
4,365
2,510
3,422
3,759
1,183
4,614
737
2,605
553
6,631
278
1,678
1,996
14,198
2,056
1,911
10,231

1,144
72,756
58,764
227
1,483
691
4,143
12,563
7,629
4,934
4,026
4,613
2,572
3,365
3,878
1,187
4,960
972
2,824
520
6,716
295
1,715
2,014
13,992
2,132
2,018
9,842

918
73,122
58,425
224
1,572
664
4,094
12,454
7,666
4,788
3,978
4,586
2,560
3,507
3,748
1,176
4,885
781
2,771
527
6,799
297
1,751
2,051
14,697
2,152
2,074
10,471

1,070
73,917
58,928
219
1,628
669
4,053
12,558
7,770
4,787
4,054
4,596
2,605
3,512
3,742
1,155
4,990
798
2,796
537
6,873
299
1,782
2,061
14,989
2,156
2,143
10,690

1,431
87,527
70,246
359
1,811
529
4,945
16,006
10,459
5,548
4,574
6,158
4,866
1,539
4,184
1,131
4,745
1,433
2,525
712
9,388
550
2,396
2,396
17,281
2,872
3,357
11,052

1,462
88,916
71,404
360
1,834
544
5,154
16,223
10,636
5,587
4,583
6,232
4,924
1,536
4,245
1,195
4,805
1,461
2,561
730
9,593
566
2,423
2,434
17,512
2,885
3,454
11,173

1,593
90,125
72,540
375
1,928
568
5,232
16,594
10,976
5,618
4,639
6,245
4,986
1,524
4,345
1,248
4,907
1,421
2,610
733
9,726
569
2,438
2,450
17,585
2,893
3,557
11,135

1,596
90,878
72,877
385
1,946
549
5,204
16,633
10,941
5,692
4,714
6,284
4,844
1,533
4,394
1,207
4,948
1,444
2,671
729
9,890
565
2,440
2,498
18,001
2,858
3,601
11,541

525
92,811
74,935
421
2,062
568
5,351
17,158
11,399
5,759
4,804
6,359
4,916
1,659
4,531
1,210
5,110
1,578
2,830
731
9,960
585
2,552
2,551
17,876
2,887
3,643
11,346

416
93,858
75,505
400
2,169
572
5,236
17,180
11,366
5,814
4,884
6,542
5,010
1,645
4,566
1,218
5,173
1,527
2,833
732
10,105
586
2,536
2,591
18,353
2,953
3,687
11,713

460
94,762
76,127
388
2,242
577
5,213
17,138
11,331
5,807
4,964
6,554
5,152
1,661
4,556
1,208
5,276
1,566
2,864
745
10,235
594
2,587
2,608
18,635
2,960
3,752
11,923

533
92,652
73,394
435
5,151
990
6,269
10,379
4,458
5,921
4,212
6,165
4,294
1,875
3,674
2,020
6,077
1,435
2,836
1,102
9,189
1,415
2,939
2,936
19,258
2,870
2,425
13,962

514
93,129
74,062
446
5,081
996
6,419
10,418
4,549
5,870
4,239
6,410
4,404
1,857
3,656
2,112
6,109
1,347
2,894
1,121
9,322
1,366
2,946
2,920
19,068
2,866
2,393
13,808




60

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
Maine
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4.....................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................
Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements......................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income.......................................
Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.........................................................................
Construction................................................................
Manufacturing....
Durable goods
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade.
Retail trade........
Transportation and warehousing..................................
Information........
...................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services................
Health care and social assistanc e
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian.........................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................
See the footnotes at the end of the table.




Maryland

2005
II

2006
III

IV

lr

llr

2005
II|p

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

II|p

1

40,130

40,571

40,874

41,279

42,211

42,712

43,271

230,107

233,004

237,110

240,561

244,803

246,765

250,125

2
3

28,768
3,092

29,031
3,129

29,286
3,158

29,467
3,183

30,209
3,307

30,473
3,336

30,727
3,361

160,212
17,650

162,114
17,763

165,660
18,080

168,220
18,314

170,954
18,854

171,714
18,912

173,664
19,110

4

1,652

1,676

1,693

1,707

1,778

1,796

1,810

8,855

8,921

9,082

9,205

9,500

9,547

9,651

5
6
7
8
9
10

1,440
770
26,445
5,664
8,022
123

1,453
779
26,681
5,726
8,164
115

1,465
799
26,927
5,766
8,180
116

1,475
806
27,090
5,932
8,257
116

1,528
830
27,732
5,965
8,514
103

1,540
826
27,963
6,115
8,634
95

1,551
832
28,198
6,253
8,820
103

8,795
24,977
167,539
36,992
25,577
468

8,842
25,136
169,488
37,510
26,005
449

8,998
25,461
173,042
38,002
26,067
443

9,109
25,421
175,327
38,942
26,292
437

9,354
26,281
178,381
39,387
27,036
396

9,365
26,292
179,094
40,239
27,433
413

9,459
26,452
181,006
41,139
27,979
431

11

7,899

8,049

8,065

8,141

8,411

8,539

8,717

25,109

25,556

25,624

25,855

26,640

27,020

27,548

12
13

20,436
5,173

20,558
5,250

20,670
5,280

20,788
5,319

21,384
5,429

21,547
5,512

21,751
5,574

116,007
28,418

117,268
28,701

120,014
29,099

121,997
29,506

124,345
29,883

124,684
30,243

126,220
30,682

14

3,733

3,797

3,815

3,844

3,901

3,972

4,023

19,623

19,860

20,101

20,397

20,529

20,878

21,223

15
16
17
18

1,440
3,158
30
3,128

1,453
3,223
21
3,202

1,465
3,336
37
3,299

1,475
3,359
32
3,328

1,528
3,396
28
3,368

1,540
3,414
20
3,394

1,551
3,402
28
3,374

8,795
15,787
261
15,526

8,842
16,145
217
15,928

8,998
16,547
233
16,315

9,109
16,717
216
16,501

9,354
16,725
11
16,714

9,365
16,786
-14
16,801

9,459
16,762
5
16,757

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

118
28,650
23,116
333
12
200
1,913
3,800
1,887
1,913
1,223
2,574
725
613
1,692
487
1,772
461
756
418
4,139
278
948
772
5,533
1,212
581
3,740

110
28,920
23,303
340
12
205
1,965
3,825
1,877
1,947
1,229
2,595
730
625
1,663
524
1,798
397
774
424
4,183
283
952
781
5,618
1,208
580
3,829

128
29,158
23,545
349
13
208
2,047
3,829
1,884
1,944
1,245
2,577
739
615
1,703
556
1,802
345
795
430
4,256
287
961
788
5,613
1,202
571
3,840

123
29,344
23,744
355
14
210
2,064
3,863
1,886
1,977
1,266
2,601
750
641
1,648
532
1,816
339
811
446
4,331
299
955
806
5,600
1,210
574
3,816

120
30,089
24,331
363
15
198
2,139
3,896
1,897
1,998
1,300
2,653
770
643
1,747
526
1,881
358
831
450
4,428
300
1,033
800
5,759
1,228
581
3,950

112
30,360
24,676
365
15
203
2,158
4,035
1,945
2,090
1,320
2,697
766
651
1,724
528
1,924
393
854
458
4,462
307
1,007
808
5,684
1,240
580
3,865

121
30,606
24,834
357
16
204
2,146
4,015
1,944
2,071
1,342
2,704
787
659
1,723
519
1,957
403
866
463
4,521
310
1,027
815
5,772
1,254
597
3,922

403
159,809
122,771
126
163
2,756
12,554
10,961
6,570
4,391
6,943
10,062
3,561
4,572
9,811
4,275
20,987
1,151
5,959
2,790
15,194
1,394
4,431
5,079
37,038
16,077
3,442
17,519

361
161,753
124,227
130
164
2,766
12,891
10,843
6,552
4,291
7,058
10,210
3,647
4,604
9,773
4,458
21,233
1,201
6,025
2,851
15,485
1,357
4,447
5,085
37,526
16,152
3,443
17,931

379
165,282
128,085
136
170
2,808
13,399
10,886
6,469
4,418
7,268
10,481
3,782
4,735
10,661
4,750
21,984
1,169
6,156
2,935
15,750
1,369
4,488
5,159
37,197
16,191
3,396
17,610

363
167,857
130,014
136
172
2,762
13,555
10,883
6,443
4,440
7,500
10,379
3,750
4,991
11,149
4,701
22,382
1,174
6,172
2,941
16,216
1,407
4,503
5,242
37,843
16,243
3,369
18,231

159
170,794
132,586
135
177
2,761
14,204
11,170
6,502
4,668
7,589
10,757
3,864
4,976
10,674
4,709
23,076
1,967
6,350
2,976
16,162
1,494
4,217
5,330
38,208
16,508
3,431
18,269

135
171,579
132,835
135
176
2,796
14,092
11,030
6,544
4,486
7,716
10,792
3,864
5,005
10,117
4,636
23,181
1,771
6,418
2,951
16,968
1,448
4,358
5,381
38,744
16,614
3,559
18,572

155
173,509
134,082
131
183
2,824
14,091
11,051
6,575
4,476
7,841
10,803
3,973
5,044
10,085
4,608
23,620
1,813
6,497
2,995
17,192
1,472
4,450
5,411
39,427
16,816
3,680
18,931

January 2007

Survey

of

61

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1—2006:lll1 Continues
—
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Michigan

Massachusetts
2005

Minnesota

2005

2006

2006

2005

Line

2006

III

IV

I'

II'

lllp

I

II

III

IV

I'

II'

II| p

I

II

III

IV

I'

II'

II| p

274,279 276,771

281,800

285,692

291,013

293,837

297,435

326,453

330,416

333,008

335,339

337,292

340,311

345,298

189,238

189,817

193,051

194,165

198,150

199,387

201,762

1

220,328 221,922
23,899 23,999

227,228
24,504

229,922
24,756

234,926
25,687

236,185
25,730

238,172
25,933

254,212
28,906

257,204
29,194

259,250
29,332

259,753
29,372

260,594
29,882

261,779
29,965

264,903
30,318

151,273
17,707

151,220
17,759

154,618
18,189

154,821
18,223

158,768
19,089

159,097
19,129

160,451
19,263

2
3

I

II

12,084

12,335

12,488

12,954

13,028

13,141

14,627

14,795

14,865

14,898

15,199

15,270

15,455

8,891

8,926

9,143

9,165

9,626

9,665

9,738

4

11,888 11,915
-4,931 -4,951
191,498 192,972
43,830 44,282
38,951 39,516
1,296
1,391

12,170
-5,117
197,606
44,630
39,564
1,262

12,267
-5,191
199,975
45,796
39,921
1,284

12,733
-5,332
203,907
46,131
40,974
1,162

12,701
-5,337
205,119
47,175
41,543
1,168

12,791
-5,409
206,830
48,231
42,374
1,219

14,280
1,267
226,573
48,374
51,506
1,778

14,399
1,274
229,284
48,984
52,148
1,713

14,467
1,309
231,227
49,465
52,316
1,789

14,474
1,335
231,716
50,903
52,720
1,833

14,683
1,418
232,130
51,338
53,823
1,684

14,695
1,413
233,227
52,634
54,450
1,708

14,863
1,420
236,004
53,918
55,375
1,798

8,816
-1,226
132,340
33,580
23,318
670

8,833
-1,197
132,264
33,884
23,669
627

9,046
-1,233
135,197
34,165
23,689
597

9,058
-1,206
135,391
34,847
23,927
636

9,463
-1,254
138,425
35,132
24,594
601

9,464
-1,244
138,724
35,738
24,925
597

9,525
-1,251
139,936
36,411
25,415
620

5
6
7
8
9
10

38,220

38,302

38,636

39,812

40,375

41,155

49,728

50,434

50,527

50,887

52,140

52,742

53,577

22,648

23,042

23,091

23,291

23,992

24,328

24,794

11

161,872 162,771
35,295 35,552

166,488
36,299

168,723
36,810

172,846
37,476

173,452
37,911

175,200
38,291

182,436
44,574

183,625
45,716

184,183
46,363

184,366
46,839

185,759
46,792

186,208
47,417

188,733
48,208

111,949
25,740

111,616
25,865

113,960
26,403

113,993
26,453

118,249
27,211

118,463
27,464

119,521
27,755

12
13

23,407

23,637

24,129

24,543

24,743

25,210

25,500

30,295

31,318

31,896

32,365

32,109

32,722

33,345

16,924

17,032

17,357

17,395

17,748

18,000

18,230

14

11,888
23,162
5
23,156

11,915
23,599
0
23,599

12,170
24,441
13
24,428

12,267
24,388
11
24,378

12,733
24,604
-48
24,652

12,701
24,822
-52
24,874

12,791
24,680
-50
24,730

14,280
27,202
376
26,826

14,399
27,863
308
27,555

14,467
28,705
381
28,324

14,474
28,549
344
28,205

14,683
28,044
-382
28,426

14,695
28,154
-453
28,607

14,863
27,963
-430
28,393

8,816
13,584
1,332
12,252

8,833
13,739
1,229
12,510

9,046
14,254
1,438
12,817

9,058
14,375
1,510
12,865

9,463
13,308
215
13,093

9,464
13,170
-33
13,203

9,525
13,175
32
13,142

15
16
17
18

114
117
220,211 221,808
194,854 196,146
524
537
551
552
1,410
1,395
12,663 12,852
26,060 25,386
18,437 17,723
7,622
7,663
11,264 11,308
12,553 12,710
3,932
4,000
8,454
8,596
24,071 23,840
5,326
5,656
29,630 30,002
6,179
6,161
7,411
7,303
7,310
7,423
24,349 24,877
2,045
2,092
5,634
5,670
5,618
5,659
25,358 25,662
4,700
4,753
1,027
1,026
19,578 19,936

129
227,099
201,247
558
571
1,436
13,131
26,276
18,539
7,737
11,577
12,871
4,059
8,790
24,518
6,045
30,787
6,557
7,529
7,530
25,385
2,134
5,757
5,736
25,853
4,618
1,030
20,205

126
229,795
203,052
486
584
1,460
13,208
26,313
18,675
7,638
11,652
12,949
4,005
8,989
25,186
5,697
31,329
6,384
7,679
7,578
25,915
2,144
5,728
5,765
26,743
4,566
1,041
21.136

68
234,858
208,878
512
613
1,405
13,415
27,182
19,147
8,035
13,427
12,855
4,068
9,138
25,087
5,786
32,484
6,686
7,780
7,775
26,555
2,197
6,029
5,886
25,980
4,782
1,058
20,139

66
236,120
208,935
517
635
1,443
13,454
26,901
18,904
7,996
12,482
12,816
4,115
9,333
25,139
5,821
32,460
6,930
8,067
7,734
27,018
2,204
5,927
5,938
27,185
4,816
1,034
21,334

69
238,103
210,676
502
660
1,460
13,359
26,932
18,941
7,991
12,700
12,847
4,208
9,407
25,074
5,740
33,112
7,047
8,157
7,840
27,380
2,233
6,036
5,984
27,427
4,732
1,044
21,651

868
253,344
217,402
322
986
2,810
14,591
55,573
44,513
11,060
12,445
15,757
7,115
4,977
12,140
6,813
25,112
7,252
10,693
2,126
24,246
2,128
5,494
6,822
35,942
4,600
940
30,402

811
256,394
220,189
327
976
2,835
14,684
56,287
45,230
11,057
12,520
15,901
7,170
4,886
12,044
7,391
25,635
7,255
10,772
2,260
24,616
2,211
5,516
6,906
36,205
4,565
942
30,698

890
258,360
222,412
331
1,003
2,765
14,638
56,773
45,941
10,832
12,534
16,025
7,200
4,886
12,476
7,892
25,539
7,149
10,955
2,261
25,076
2,351
5,608
6,947
35,949
4,519
953
30,477

856
258,898
222,362
336
1,036
2,869
14,520
57,049
46,005
11,044
12,722
15,639
7,187
4,941
12,306
7,379
25,694
7,239
11,025
2,223
25,413
2,281
5,494
7,007
36,535
4,512
962
31,061

133
260,461
224,242
330
1,076
2,816
14,678
56,858
45,817
11,040
12,797
16,148
7,154
5,334
12,428
7,334
25,975
6,612
11,079
2,303
26,203
2,335
5,679
7,104
36,220
4,596
969
30,655

67
261,712
224,748
328
1,115
2,891
14,576
57,301
46,297
11,004
12,953
16,111
7,205
5,103
12,547
7,297
25,941
7,029
10,973
2,203
26,042
2,360
5,674
7,099
36,964
4,651
1,007
31,305

94
264,809
227,495
320
1,147
2,918
14,477
58,575
47,530
11,045
13,147
16,058
7,422
5,139
12,473
7,087
26,506
7,122
11,175
2,227
26,385
2,390
5,779
7,149
37,314
4,708
1,041
31,566

1,887
149,386
128,560
295
539
1,290
9,502
23,367
15,699
7,669
9,982
9,120
5,224
4,247
12,641
3,105
11,760
7,015
4,248
1,703
15,611
1,274
3,299
4,338
20,826
2,838
975
17,013

1,789
149,430
128,547
301
528
1,388
9,518
23,370
15,653
7,716
9,987
9,210
5,195
4,235
12,595
3,244
11,832
6,456
4,295
1,753
15,657
1,273
3,339
4,370
20,884
2,812
993
17,079

2,000
152,618
131,244
315
518
1,363
9,501
23,544
15,651
7,893
10,238
9,307
5,174
4,473
12,862
3,429
11,997
6,772
4,372
1,812
16,414
1,266
3,400
4,487
21,374
2,788
1,012
17,574

2,073
152,748
131,696
317
524
1,372
9,408
23,854
15,867
7,988
10,265
9,363
4,975
4,419
12,916
3,260
12,179
6,828
4,629
1,878
16,447
1,121
3,442
4,499
21,052
2,780
1,023
17,248

782
157,986
135,975
323
543
1,291
10,024
24,195
16,170
8,024
10,620
9,497
4,852
4,370
13,297
3,412
12,819
6,776
4,811
1,942
17,777
1,292
3,553
4,582
22,011
2,806
1,012
18,193

539
158,559
137,319
324
570
1,351
10,058
24,674
16,555
8,119
10,906
9,650
4,831
4,481
12,960
3,599
12,747
7,437
4,892
1,878
17,458
1,367
3,540
4,594
21,240
2,832
1,018
17,389

609
159,842
138,253
316
591
1,368
10,030
24,720
16,612
8,107
11,115
9,687
4,969
4,518
12,900
3,455
13,012
7,346
4,960
1,904
17,722
1,393
3,612
4,636
21,589
2,876
1,050
17,663

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

12,011

37,560




62

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
Mississippi
Item

Line

2005
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4......................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................
Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements.....................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income.......................................
Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.....
Construction
Manufacturing..............................................................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
Transportation and warehousing.................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................
See the footnotes at the end of the table.




Missouri

II

2006
III

IV

I'

ir

2005
H
IP

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

II|p

1

71,594

72,388

70,551

76,703

76,259

76,818

77,858

178,001

180,396

182,299

185,474

188,369

190,781

193,440

2
3

51,058
5,546

51,421
5,566

49,466
5,613

53,419
5,728

53,690
5,882

54,047
5,923

54,763
5,990

138,149
14,878

139,895
15,160

141,583
15,410

144,017
15,707

146,105
16,166

147,422
16,302

148,909
16,444

4

2,935

2,954

2,983

3,047

3,138

3,165

3,203

7,623

7,771

7,895

8,048

8,300

8,390

8,468

5
6
7
8
9
10

2,611
1,894
47,406
8,105
16,083
146

2,612
1,923
47,778
8,247
16,364
136

2,630
1,958
45,811
-2,625
27,365
187

2,681
1,973
49,664
8,648
18,391
416

2,744
2,016
49,823
8,704
17,731
224

2,758
2,068
50,192
8,989
17,636
154

2,787
2,089
50,862
9,221
17,774
115

7,254
-3,910
119,361
28,037
30,602
496

7,389
-3,985
120,751
28,553
31,092
463

7,516
-4,008
122,165
28,970
31,164
455

7,659
-4,120
124,190
29,901
31,383
405

7,866
-4,041
125,898
30,207
32,265
370

7,912
-4,147
126,974
31,071
32,737
398

7,976
-4,187
128,278
31,830
33,332
376

11

15,937

16,228

27,178

17,975

17,507

17,483

17,659

30,107

30,629

30,709

30,978

31,895

32,339

32,956

12
13

35,177
9,510

35,447
9,603

35,914
9,674

36,758
9,866

37,382
9,913

37,622
10,047

38,122
10,202

99,866
24,233

100,989
24,724

102,170
25,101

103,874
25,631

105,796
25,962

106,709
26,425

107,857
26,737

14

6,899

6,991

7,044

7,185

7,169

7,290

7,415

16,978

17,335

17,585

17,972

18,096

18,513

18,761

15
16
17
18

2,611
6,371
1,211
5,160

2,612
6,371
1,121
5,250

2,630
3,878
970
2,908

2,681
6,795
1,101
5,693

2,744
6,395
656
5,738

2,758
6,377
536
5,841

2,787
6,438
588
5,850

7,254
14,050
494
13,556

7,389
14,182
362
13,821

7,516
14,312
317
13,996

7,659
14,511
270
14,241

7,866
14,346
-132
14,478

7,912
14,289
-273
14,562

7,976
14,315
-226
14,541

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

1,396
49,662
37,381
494
664
576
2,636
8,498
5,656
2,841
1,990
3,805
1,960
843
1,795
694
2,342
614
1,152
406
4,863
413
2,125
1,510
12,281
2,084
1,897
8,300

1,308
50,112
37,723
488
647
589
2,745
8,453
5,606
2,847
2,012
3,886
1,983
837
1,816
742
2,376
601
1,189
417
4,884
423
2,115
1,520
12,389
2,111
1,892
8,386

1,159
48,307
36,002
496
646
633
2,900
8,491
5,634
2,858
1,979
3,897
1,963
838
1,870
-1,276
2,355
628
1,215
412
5,016
418
2,013
1,507
12,305
2,108
1,845
8,352

1,292
52,128
39,745
506
721
691
3,443
8,650
5,720
2,929
2,130
4,097
2,049
905
1,972
756
2,450
638
1,417
407
4,914
343
2,099
1,554
12,383
2,124
1,772
8,487

848
52,842
40,454
520
758
593
3,404
8,764
5,863
2,902
2,202
4,232
2,073
901
1,924
757
2,549
750
1,446
428
5,271
334
1,972
1,578
12,387
2,168
1,726
8,493

729
53,318
40,869
507
803
633
3,569
8,683
5,814
2,870
2,281
4,267
2,100
883
1,964
771
2,592
751
1,508
417
5,176
350
2,015
1,598
12,449
2,183
1,698
8,567

783
53,980
41,260
494
833
642
3,581
8,716
5,868
2,849
2,316
4,266
2,170
883
1,961
757
2,654
757
1,522
419
5,244
361
2,067
1,616
12,720
2,232
1,719
8,768

811
137,338
115,287
297
551
1,016
9,396
19,068
12,266
6,802
7,759
9,471
5,239
5,193
8,057
2,504
10,567
5,847
4,434
2,355
13,605
1,736
3,810
4,383
22,051
4,652
1,950
15,450

683
139,212
117,088
294
491
1,049
9,703
19,273
12,475
6,797
7,860
9,668
5,258
5,120
8,087
2,632
10,696
6,102
4,484
2,394
13,916
1,820
3,832
4,408
22,124
4,638
1,964
15,522

641
140,942
118,702
309
593
1,100
9,750
19,527
12,668
6,859
7,995
9,647
5,208
4,967
8,305
2,778
11,057
6,292
4,543
2,461
14,012
1,782
3,920
4,455
22,240
4,599
2,040
15,601

596
143,421
120,827
320
592
1,128
9,939
19,951
12,992
6,959
8,161
9,749
5,311
5,193
8,425
2,697
11,330
6,318
4,665
2,473
14,290
1,904
3,894
4,488
22,594
4,622
2,051
15,921

196
145,908
123,264
284
721
1,075
10,435
20,453
13,249
7,204
8,313
9,895
5,471
5,386
8,677
2,675
11,396
6,326
4,691
2,546
14,432
1,859
4,029
4,600
22,644
4,887
2,053
15,704

58
147,364
124,229
313
681
1,119
10,295
20,658
13,436
7,223
8,428
10,079
5,567
5,460
8,562
2,687
11,579
6,155
4,699
2,604
14,756
1,905
4,020
4,659
23,135
4,932
2,032
16,171

107
148,802
125.400
305
705
1,130
10,285
20,724
13,513
7,211
8,574
10,115
5,710
5,510
8,537
2,662
11,805
6,266
4,758
2,639
14,944
1,931
4,101
4,698
23,401
4,817
2,131
16,453

January 2007

Survey

of

63

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1—2006:1111 Continues
—
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Montana

I

II

26,477 26,718

2006
III

27,321

IV

27,669

Nevada

Nebraska

2005
I'

II1

2006

2005
llle

28,894

I

57,143

II

57,503

III

58,201

IV

59,231

V

60,147

II'

60,759

2005
lllp

61,646

I

84,191

II

86,362

28,290

28,464

21,129
2,707

44,654
4,888

44,833
4,967

45,476
5,061

46,301
5,183

47,048
5,314

47,367
5,382

47,866
5,415

65,454
6,600

67,466
6,828

Line

2006
III

IV

I'

88,202

90,537

67,694
6,852

68,654
6,958

70,792
7,262

86,855

II'

II|p

93,853

1

71,996
7,388

73,233
7,517

2
3

92,150

19,391
2,461

19,496
2,456

20,103
2,520

20,309
2,549

20,872
2,669

20,871
2,672

1,288

1,289

1,322

1,337

1,403

1,408

1,427

2,540

2,582

2,629

2,692

2,767

2,808

2,829

3,294

3,409

3,408

3,461

3,622

3,692

3,759

4

1,173
1,167
31
32
16,961 17,071
5,083 5,143
4,432
4,504
63
61

1,198
31
17,613
5,197
4,511
60

1,212
31
17,791
5,326
4,551
63

1,267
31
18,234
5,377
4,679
59

1,264
33
18,232
5,492
4,740
56

1,280
33
18,455
5,614
4,825
54

2,348
-962
38,804
10,331
8,008
121

2,386
-975
38,891
10,491
8,121
116

2,432
-987
39,428
10,641
8,132
111

2,490
-1,019
40,100
10,948
8,183
103

2,547
-1,043
40,690
11,085
8,372
84

2,573
-1,061
40,923
11,362
8,473
86

2,586
-1,067
41,384
11,656
8,606
81

3,306
-520
58,334
16,724
9,132
241

3,419
-557
60,081
16,964
9,317
233

3,444
-528
60,314
17,188
9,352
236

3,498
-535
61,160
17,599
9,442
227

3,640
-542
62,988
17,790
9,758
206

3,697
-574
64,034
18,160
9,955
238

3,758
-593
65,123
18,539
10,191
246

5
6
7
8
9
10

4,369

4,443

4,451

4,488

4,621

4,684

4,771

7,888

8,005

8,021

8,080

8,287

8,387

8,525

8,891

9,084

9,116

9,215

9,553

9,717

9,945

11

12,787
3,484

12,842
3,483

13,246
3,569

13,437
3,612

13,921
3,715

13,939
3,742

14,150
3,797

31,113
7,468

31,405
7,590

31,873
7,713

32,567
7,885

33,062
7,955

33,478
8,120

33,766
8,191

48,625
10,599

50,173
10,948

50,169
10,958

50,925
11,141

52,639
11,436

53,534
11,714

54,584
11,955

12
13

2,311

2,316

2,371

2,401

2,448

2,478

2,517

5,121

5,205

5,281

5,395

5,408

5,547

5,605

7,293

7,529

7,515

7,643

7,796

8,017

8,196

14

1,173
3,120
316
2,804

1,167
3,170
286
2,885

1,198
3,287
288
2,998

1,212
3,260
267
2,993

1,267
3,236
195
3,041

1,264
3,190
138
3,052

1,280
3,182
145
3,037

2,348
6,072
1,461
4,612

2,386
5,838
1,145
4,693

2,432
5,891
1,081
4,810

2,490
5,849
990
4,859

2,547
6,031
1,118
4,914

2,573
5,769
816
4,952

2,586
5,909
964
4,945

3,306
6,230
44
6,186

3,419
6,345
25
6,320

3,444
6,567
27
6,540

3,498
6,587
21
6,566

3,640
6,717
20
6,698

3,697
6,748
12
6,736

3,758
6,695
20
6,675

15
16
17
18

532
503
18,860 18,993
14,463 14,637
191
195
665
657
320
304
1,571
1,591
1,099
1,105
632
634
467
471
793
803
1,643
1,662
760
743
387
399
854
846
656
725
1,171
1,182
57
57
451
461
103
106
2,257 2,297
212
218
677
682
584
615
4,396 4,356
1,092
1,082
460
456
2,844 2,818

506
19,596
15,178
202
717
339
1,681
1,129
653
476
822
1,678
745
394
888
787
1,245
59
481
110
2,390
227
695
590
4,418
1,077
455
2,886

484
19,825
15,398
203
755
319
1,736
1,169
681
489
851
1,706
766
404
900
753
1,264
62
498
114
2,349
234
714
602
4,427
1,085
456
2,886

414
20,458
15,937
205
775
332
1,857
1,177
685
493
859
1,756
800
430
908
737
1,278
75
535
123
2,524
242
728
595
4,521
1,115
460
2,946

359
20,513
16,002
213
794
311
1,807
1,198
695
503
870
1,776
796
423
930
745
1,326
68
547
129
2,484
252
742
590
4,511
1,115
457
2,938

368
20,761
16,198
208
824
313
1,818
1,205
700
505
886
1,786
816
430
931
724
1,357
72
557
132
2,522
257
762
598
4,563
1,120
458
2,985

1,981
42,673
34,657
176
173
740
2,825
5,040
2,391
2,649
2,320
2,913
3,160
1,202
3,055
553
2,728
1,031
1,355
501
4,423
230
956
1,277
8,017
1,270
954
5,792

1,670
43,162
35,163
183
171
758
2,833
5,138
2,452
2,687
2,330
2,953
3,200
1,174
3,128
583
2,757
1,104
1,377
513
4,473
235
965
1,287
7,999
1,274
941
5,784

1,609
43,867
35,831
194
177
765
2,914
5,235
2,545
2,689
2,368
2,917
3,221
1,231
3,313
612
2,829
1,076
1,405
520
4,541
239
965
1,309
8,036
1,270
926
5,840

1,519
44,782
36,723
192
182
771
2,902
5,360
2,595
2,765
2,397
2,917
3,262
1,280
3,518
599
2,870
1,276
1,412
533
4,689
251
979
1,333
8,059
1,264
919
5,876

1,650
45,398
37,224
206
185
753
2,995
5,483
2,709
2,774
2,492
3,034
3,317
1,202
3,355
594
3,010
1,341
1,470
540
4,648
253
1,017
1,331
8,173
1,280
926
5,967

1,354
46,013
37,782
204
190
791
2,990
5,652
2,834
2,818
2,478
3,045
3,332
1,256
3,443
590
3,109
1,207
1,479
562
4,855
252
1,009
1,338
8,231
1,289
904
6,037

1,506
46,360
38,005
199
198
799
2,964
5,584
2,771
2,813
2,516
3,049
3,392
1,249
3,452
586
3,179
1,222
1,495
571
4,924
254
1,025
1,346
8,355
1,311
902
6,142

129
65,325
55,867
31
900
559
8,002
2,934
2,116
818
2,503
4,792
1,953
1,224
4,058
1,871
4,403
2,105
2,723
228
4,488
1,234
10,460
1,399
9,457
1,470
945
7,043

110
67,355
57,830
29
907
573
8,335
2,990
2,157
833
2,485
4,911
2,024
1,465
4,068
2,004
4,438
2,580
2,767
230
4,601
1,238
10,742
1,443
9,525
1,445
932
7,148

112
67,582
57,965
34
949
531
8,773
2,954
2,113
841
2,599
5,029
2,091
1,090
4,197
2,118
4,638
1,681
2,810
240
4,662
1,250
10,851
1,470
9,616
1,423
918
7,275

106
68,547
58,795
33
939
600
8,895
3,055
2,185
870
2,612
5,068
2,126
1,107
4,165
2,085
4,729
1,629
2,889
243
4,697
1,325
11,085
1,514
9,752
1,414
913
7,425

105
70,686
60,655
30
1,004
538
9,528
3,154
2,255
899
2,756
5,252
2,235
1,104
4,045
2,125
4,980
1,782
2,998
254
4,868
1,319
11,109
1,575
10,032
1,420
929
7,682

99
71,897
61,749
32
1,071
576
9,525
3,236
2,309
927
2,792
5,275
2,289
1,125
4,013
2,178
5,153
1,837
3,141
255
4,924
1,355
11,367
1,607
10,148
1,451
926
7,772

107
73,126
62,776
31
1,114
578
9,675
3,269
2,342
927
2,854
5,328
2,374
1,135
3,979
2,165
5,273
1,904
3,213
261
4,987
1,380
11,605
1,651
10,349
1,477
937
7,935

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




64

January 2007

State Personal Income

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
New Hampshire
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4......................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................

New Jersey

2005
II

2006
III

IV

lr

II'

2005
IIIp

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

IIIp

1

48,657

49,269

49,942

50,376

51,465

51,721

52,218

375,318

378,835

384,623

389,388

399,849

403,873

408,943

2
3

35,984
3,839

36,476
3,881

37,027
3,922

37,207
3,932

38,131
4,089

38,144
4,083

38,370
4,106

274,099
31,201

276,735
31,485

280,669
31,915

282,605
32,091

291,174
33,491

294,112
33,796

296,445
34,040

4

1,991

2,016

2,037

2,044

2,131

2,132

2,146

16,092

16,250

16,461

16,556

17,316

17,514

17,651

5
6
7
8
9
10

1,848
3,958
36,103
6,869
5,685
93

1,866
3,957
36,551
6,943
5,774
89

1,884
4,066
37,171
6,998
5,773
77

1,888
4,124
37,399
7,162
5,816
73

1,958
4,239
38,281
7,204
5,979
69

1,951
4,247
38,308
7,354
6,059
69

1,961
4,295
38,558
7,490
6,171
71

15,109
28,715
271,613
57,216
46,489
1,837

15,236
28,204
273,453
58,336
47,046
1,698

15,455
29,452
278,207
59,270
47,147
1,711

15,535
30,087
280,601
61,294
47,493
1,706

16,175
31,560
289,243
62,017
48,590
1,562

16,282
30,553
290,869
63,886
49,117
1,494

16,389
30,865
293,270
65,596
50,077
1,631

11

5,592

5,686

5,696

5,743

5,910

5,990

6,100

44,652

45,348

45,435

45,787

47,028

47,623

48,446

12
13

25,755
5,757

26,060
5,834

26,396
5,903

26,507
5,943

27,292
6,092

27,246
6,126

27,462
6,176

198,733
42,814

200,328
43,263

203,129
43,774

204,382
44,123

211,117
45,446

213,049
46,112

215,016
46,555

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements......................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income.............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income........................................

14

3,909

3,968

4,018

4,055

4,134

4,175

4,215

27,705

28,027

28,319

28,589

29,271

29,830

30,166

15
16
17
18

1,848
4,472
7
4,465

1,866
4,583
5
4,578

1,884
4,729
11
4,718

1,888
4,757
10
4,747

1,958
4,748
-12
4,760

1,951
4,772
-15
4,787

1,961
4,732
-13
4,745

15,109
32,552
72
32,480

15,236
33,144
57
33,087

15,455
33,767
76
33,691

15,535
34,099
70
34,030

16,175
34,612
-20
34,631

16,282
34,951
-20
34,972

16,389
34,874
-14
34,888

Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.....
Construction
Manufacturing..............................................................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Wholesale trade..........................................................
Retail trade..................................................................
Transportation and warehousing..................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

46
35,938
31,556
110
50
315
2,587
5,771
4,372
1,399
2,284
3,437
652
1,012
2,532
896
2,832
812
1,097
899
3,814
353
1,073
1,030
4,382
725
167
3,491

45
36,431
32,001
113
50
328
2,636
5,685
4,323
1,363
2,279
3,500
656
1,025
2,637
969
2,894
852
1,127
910
3,859
354
1,073
1,055
4,430
718
169
3,543

51
36,976
32,491
117
49
341
2,692
5,803
4,436
1,367
2,352
3,550
656
1,050
2,584
1,024
2,956
794
1,155
934
3,976
350
1,066
1,040
4,486
703
171
3,612

51
37,157
32,698
115
50
339
2,770
5,996
4,582
1,413
2,317
3,529
663
1,046
2,559
957
2,958
789
1,157
961
4,005
355
1,077
1,055
4,459
701
177
3,581

29
38,103
33,462
115
51
320
2,745
6,121
4,643
1,478
2,535
3,589
669
1,069
2,565
963
3,105
755
1,216
964
4,135
356
1,120
1,069
4,641
709
196
3,735

27
38,117
33,526
115
56
316
2,745
6,078
4,633
1,445
2,474
3,633
688
1,080
2,534
967
3,233
695
1,234
980
4,123
365
1,120
1,091
4,591
726
195
3,670

29
38,341
33,702
113
58
320
2,705
6,066
4,629
1,438
2,512
3,658
701
1,087
2,526
947
3,286
711
1,247
985
4,176
371
1,132
1,101
4,639
742
194
3,703

276
273,823
233,612
119
258
2,148
14,558
30,456
11,860
18,596
20,009
18,280
9,678
11,477
24,836
6,792
30,385
8,584
10,910
3,374
25,758
1,964
7,029
6,998
40,212
5,705
1,344
33,163

265
276,470
235,699
125
262
2,125
14,857
30,359
11,884
18,475
20,027
18,505
9,763
11,276
24,677
7,036
30,644
8,956
11,118
3,470
26,076
2,115
7,128
7,181
40,770
5,695
1,331
33,744

287
280,383
239,685
128
262
2,160
15,459
30,376
11,864
18,511
20,135
18,928
9,986
10,912
25,371
7,253
31,393
9,012
11,174
3,491
26,942
2,165
7,197
7,341
40,698
5,637
1,334
33,727

281
282,324
240,300
120
257
2,202
15,265
30,870
12,030
18,840
20,272
18,606
9,960
11,418
25,060
6,974
32,062
8,885
11,313
3,511
26,841
2,166
7,192
7,325
42,024
5,576
1,328
35,120

193
290,981
249,751
124
283
2,183
16,201
33,116
12,316
20,800
20,698
19,386
10,302
11,906
26,475
7,097
33,002
8,736
11,187
3,602
27,911
2,397
7,594
7,553
41,230
5,637
1,330
34,263

194
293,918
250,770
120
276
2,178
16,299
32,479
12,729
19,751
21,152
19,194
10,402
12,457
25,910
7,260
33,726
8,874
11,290
3,708
27,963
2,397
7,441
7,642
43,148
5,673
1,313
36,162

203
296,242
252,511
117
286
2,196
16,201
32,287
12,662
19,625
21,447
19,292
10,679
12,533
25,766
7,166
34,332
9,073
11,427
3,736
28,281
2,418
7,565
7,710
43,732
5,756
1,343
36,632

See the footnotes at the end of the table.




January 2007

Survey

of

65

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by industry, 2005:1—2006:1111 Continues
—
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
New Mexico

New York

2005
I

II

2006
III

IV

ir

II'

North Carolina

2005
ll|p

2006

2006

2005

Line

I

II

III

IV

I'

llr

IM
P

I

II

III

IV

I'

II'

III"

52,728 53,399

54,196

54,980

56,490

57,341

58,538

759,570

760,912

776,615

789,174

811,715

810,892

820,831

265,488

267,328

270,894

274,031

280,393

282,137

286,018

1

39,054 39,459
3,948 4,014

40,179
4,088

40,617
4,140

41,871
4,313

42,342
4,367

43,111
4,437

621,914
67,347

618,552
66,845

636,329
68,685

645,944
69,547

669,747
72,961

661,911
71,986

667,680
72,542

203,688
22,855

204,602
23,071

208,304
23,576

210,218
23,858

215,966
24,962

216,201
24,967

218,326
25,185

2
3

2,037

2,074

2,111

2,137

2,231

2,262

2,299

33,693

33,387

34,389

34,836

36,795

36,229

36,522

11,637

11,751

11,997

12,142

12,736

12,765

12,885

4

1,910
1,940
274
277
35,380 35,722
7,863
8,006
9,486
9,671
126
122

1,977
292
36,383
8,124
9,690
117

2,003
295
36,772
8,426
9,782
113

2,081
307
37,865
8,526
10,099
92

2,105
302
38,277
8,799
10,265
97

2,137
305
38,979
9,065
10,494
102

33,655
-37,337
517,230
112,220
130,120
2,509

33,458
-36,676
515,031
113,893
131,989
2,362

34,296
-38,378
529,266
115,186
132,162
2,292

34,711
-38,998
537,400
118,533
133,242
2,348

36,166
-41,219
555,568
119,512
136,634
2,147

35,757
-39,854
550,071
122,592
138,229
2,021

36,021
-40,264
554,873
125,349
140,609
2,016

11,218
-795
180,037
42,906
42,545
789

11,320
-773
180,758
43,306
43,264
706

11,579
-780
183,949
43,634
43,311
637

11,716
-787
185,573
44,684
43,773
688

12,226
-829
190,175
45,023
45,195
697

12,201
-829
190,405
45,956
45,776
597

12,300
-839
192,303
46,949
46,767
640

5
6
7
8
9
10

9,549

9,573

9,669

10,006

10,168

10,391

127,611

129,627

129,870

130,894

134,487

136,208

138,593

41,756

42,558

42,674

43,085

44,497

45,179

46,127

11

27,577 27,929
6,860 6,953

28,381
7,060

28,691
7,115

29,589
7,293

29,935
7,406

30,465
7,542

446,731
94,918

442,751
94,793

457,205
97,298

463,747
98,819

483,758
101,592

475,256
101,270

479,765
102,313

147,425
36,403

147,781
36,759

150,324
37,425

151,777
37,852

157,233
38,848

157,244
39,123

158,934
39,554

12
13

9,360

4,950

5,012

5,083

5,112

5,212

5,301

5,404

61,263

61,335

63,002

64,108

65,426

65,512

66,293

25,185

25,440

25,846

26,136

26,623

26,921

27,254

14

1,910
4,616
496
4,120

1,940
4,577
384
4,193

1,977
4,738
411
4,327

2,003
4,811
417
4,394

2,081
4,988
485
4,504

2,105
5,002
435
4,567

2,137
5,104
514
4,590

33,655
80,265
599
79,666

33,458
81,008
499
80,510

34,296
81,826
568
81,258

34,711
83,379
576
82,803

36,166
84,397
50
84,348

35,757
85,385
-19
85,404

36,021
85,601
26
85,576

11,218
19,860
2,144
17,716

11,320
20,061
1,939
18,122

11,579
20,555
2,017
18,537

11,716
20,589
1,921
18,668

12,226
19,884
896
18,989

12,201
19,834
704
19,130

12,300
19,838
825
19,014

15
16
17
18

772
662
38,281 38,797
26,963 27,466
127
126
1,697
1,686
322
331
2,652
2,729
2,273
2,282
1,705
1,716
568
566
1,213
1,235
2,923 2,997
1,052
1,067
787
781
1,395
1,405
635
671
3,540 3,626
314
325
1,453
1,480
297
290
3,661
3,740
282
284
1,275
1,297
1,076
1,101
11,318 11,331
2,561
2,568
1,158
1,132
7,598
7,631

691
39,488
27,955
126
1,829
341
2,891
2,324
1,749
575
1,254
3,008
1,073
775
1,453
718
3,498
332
1,491
311
3,808
295
1,312
1,116
11,533
2,578
1,102
7,853

696
39,921
28,579
132
1,922
330
2,985
2,415
1,814
601
1,279
3,060
1,082
788
1,468
718
3,626
315
1,518
305
3,863
297
1,337
1,140
11,341
2,589
1,084
7,668

766
41,105
29,455
143
1,995
327
3,226
2,516
1,895
621
1,316
3,088
1,117
882
1,475
719
3,597
325
1,541
324
4,015
296
1,387
1,165
11,650
2,665
1,095
7,890

718
41,624
30,149
133
2,123
324
3,255
2,584
1,957
628
1,350
3,173
1,141
860
1,465
716
3,900
335
1,598
321
3,988
301
1,394
1,187
11,475
2,698
1,086
7,690

800
42,310
30,673
129
2,193
327
3,314
2,596
1,969
627
1,381
3,203
1,170
879
1,459
710
3,990
345
1,645
324
4,069
305
1,438
1,197
11,637
2,723
1,113
7,801

1,066
620,849
530,490
1,195
1,794
5,579
25,344
44,801
25,196
19,606
28,205
30,842
12,667
36,096
107,572
16,275
70,001
17,038
19,311
13,394
62,831
8,025
13,525
15,996
90,359
11,128
3,091
76,140

976
617,576
525,903
1,212
1,801
5,712
25,586
44,706
24,777
19,929
28,536
31,285
12,839
35,169
100,121
17,140
70,124
16,682
19,690
13,544
63,610
8,191
13,786
16,168
91,673
10,996
3,133
77,543

1,052
635,277
544,041
1,208
1,896
5,746
26,072
45,088
25,473
19,615
29,078
32,003
12,995
34,443
111,135
17,620
72,251
17,782
20,017
13,819
64,328
8,344
13,928
16,289
91,237
10,870
3,212
77,155

1,062
644,883
551,243
1,183
1,964
5,723
26,223
45,059
25,100
19,959
29,377
31,936
13,029
36,794
113,160
17,145
73,403
17,451
20,407
14,179
65,382
8,491
13,924
16,413
93,640
10,767
3,253
79,620

539
669,208
579,120
1,237
2,052
5,602
27,505
45,686
25,809
19,877
30,006
32,979
13,408
39,005
128,986
17,881
75,083
18,397
20,570
14,258
66,234
8,654
14,573
17,004
90,088
10,873
3,295
75,920

475
661,436
567,496
1,262
2,147
5,743
27,739
45,427
25,802
19,625
30,670
33,157
13,630
38,096
115,620
17,052
75,909
17,869
20,584
14,623
67,453
8,805
14,705
17,005
93,941
10,910
3,310
79,721

524
667,156
572,297
1,223
2,227
5,755
27,655
45,268
25,887
19,382
30,910
33,187
14,137
38,438
115,622
17,003
77,889
17,962
20,813
14,947
68,259
8,831
15,022
17,149
94,859
10,967
3,395
80,497

2,822
200,866
161,427
606
312
1,294
12,960
33,935
18,297
15,638
10,966
13,826
5,856
6,134
12,552
4,084
13,265
6,148
6,933
2,344
17,836
1,542
5,178
5,654
39,439
4,990
8,665
25,784

2,625
201,977
162,330
623
299
1,347
13,279
34,060
18,383
15,676
11,031
14,168
5,875
6,026
11,716
4,366
13,522
5,877
6,973
2,392
18,201
1,687
5,206
5,683
39,647
4,972
8,700
25,976

2,707
205,597
165,244
631
345
1,370
13,633
34,456
18,606
15,850
11,111
14,315
5,933
6,103
12,196
4,666
13,846
6,048
7,165
2,435
18,269
1,704
5,291
5,727
40,353
4,872
8,784
26,698

2,611
207,606
166,999
636
379
1,379
13,829
34,565
18,772
15,793
11,398
14,387
5,997
6,492
12,399
4,479
14,063
5,787
7,197
2,473
18,665
1,735
5,368
5,771
40,608
4,865
8,776
26,966

1,591
214,375
173,201
665
404
1,288
14,715
35,575
19,586
15,990
11,783
14,677
6,120
6,584
13,465
4,561
14,735
6,334
7,421
2,561
18,912
1,850
5,632
5,918
41,174
4,939
8,861
27,375

1,405
214,796
173,374
635
363
1,348
14,861
35,272
19,638
15,634
11,932
14,896
6,105
6,624
12,894
4,557
14,587
6,237
7,530
2,575
19,484
1,963
5,540
5,972
41,421
5,027
8,770
27,624

1,531
216,795
174,847
618
375
1,358
14,856
35,260
19,677
15,583
12,150
14,952
6,306
6,693
12,889
4,491
14,873
6,358
7,629
2,615
19,740
1,988
5,654
6,040
41,948
5,062
8,842
28,043

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




66

January 2007

State Personal Income

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
North Dakota
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3...........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4......................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................
Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements......................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income.......................................
Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings
Private earnings
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.........................................................................
Construction
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Wholesale I rade
Retail trade
Transportation and warehousing..................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................
See the footnotes at the end of the table.




Ohio

2005
II

2005

2006
III

IV

lr

II'

II|p

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

ll|e

1

19,445

19,707

19,979

20,402

20,423

20,706

20,941

359,760

363,305

366,928

371,284

376,613

380,364

385,297

2
3

15,941
1,969

16,152
1,988

16,406
2,000

16,789
2,043

16,800
2,102

17,046
2,153

17,193
2,172

278,778
30,337

281,020
30,540

284,472
30,876

287,090
31,142

291,442
32,089

293,117
32,228

295,945
32,488

4

1,005

1,016

1,022

1,045

1,076

1,104

1,115

15,268

15,404

15,564

15,713

16,209

16,315

16,462

5
6
7
8
9
10

965
-575
13,397
3,039
3,009
44

972
-588
13,577
3,084
3,047
46

978
-590
13,817
3,117
3,045
39

998
-614
14,132
3,207
3,062
39

1,027
-633
14,064
3,232
3,127
38

1,049
-661
14,231
3,315
3,159
39

1,057
-669
14,352
3,388
3,202
39

15,070
-1,437
247,003
51,248
61,509
1,171

15,136
-1,420
249,060
51,855
62,389
1,095

15,312
-1,429
252,167
52,263
62,498
1,077

15,428
-1,464
254,484
53,780
63,020
1,115

15,880
-1,448
257,906
54,105
64,602
1,001

15,912
-1,459
259,430
55,480
65,454
1,036

16,026
-1,466
261,991
56,732
66,574
1,024

11

2,965

3,001

3,005

3,024

3,089

3,120

3,163

60,338

61,294

61,421

61,905

63,602

64,418

65,550

12
13

10,695
2,812

10,821
2,844

10,914
2,857

11,171
2,919

11,362
2,947

11,638
3,034

11,766
3,067

204,336
48,933

205,380
49,734

207,371
50,490

209,223
51,201

213,149
51,662

214,071
52,308

216,298
52,926

14

1,848

1,872

1,880

1,921

1,920

1,986

2,010

33,863

34,597

35,178

35,773

35,783

36,396

36,900

15
16
17
18

965
2,434
843
1,591

972
2,488
871
1,616

978
2,635
982
1,653

998
2,699
1,021
1,678

1,027
2,491
767
1,723

1,049
2,373
630
1,743

1,057
2,360
618
1,742

15,070
25,509
443
25,065

15,136
25,906
353
25,553

15,312
26,610
383
26,227

15,428
26,665
303
26,362

15,880
26,631
-145
26,776

15,912
26,739
-241
26,980

16,026
26,722
-213
26,935

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

1,036
14,905
11,328
82
366
341
994
1,375
876
499
987
1,128
615
419
800
169
680
191
313
91
1,884
69
378
447
3,577
703
747
2,126

1,067
15,085
11,502
86
364
349
1,002
1,405
898
506
1,006
1,148
612
418
793
180
694
184
325
93
1,937
70
382
454
3,583
704
731
2,147

1,180
15,227
11,668
88
404
362
1,020
1,409
910
500
1,016
1,159
618
429
786
192
720
197
336
94
1,934
71
381
453
3,559
701
720
2,137

1,219
15,570
11,954
90
417
376
1,041
1,454
933
522
1,051
1,180
621
430
793
190
738
208
345
101
1,996
72
386
464
3,616
701
711
2,203

967
15,833
12,222
93
454
310
1,172
1,487
960
527
1,065
1,194
649
424
786
187
784
243
350
101
1,988
72
398
465
3,611
706
723
2,181

831
16,214
12,540
86
464
347
1,179
1,496
946
551
1,070
1,241
652
434
829
187
793
240
356
106
2,120
73
402
465
3,674
719
720
2,235

820
16,372
12,663
84
480
352
1,162
1,496
941
555
1,094
1,249
666
443
831
185
804
243
360
108
2,152
73
410
470
3,709
724
721
2,264

824
277,953
234,588
233
1,354
2,114
15,176
54,291
38,173
16,117
15,315
18,442
9,676
5,998
16,877
4,941
20,661
9,538
9,938
2,988
29,971
2,227
6,634
8,214
43,365
7,011
1,990
34,364

741
280,279
236,486
235
1,362
2,122
15,417
54,191
38,036
16,156
15,402
18,582
9,829
5,955
16,797
5,190
20,843
9,678
9,931
3,067
30,733
2,242
6,668
8,243
43,793
6,955
2,000
34,838

776
283,696
240,159
247
1,426
2,202
15,591
55,291
39,088
16,203
15,558
18,607
10,065
5,958
17,214
5,534
21,217
9,863
10,095
3,032
31,000
2,283
6,704
8,272
43,537
6,880
1,999
34,658

698
286,392
242,495
245
1,424
2,078
15,651
56,226
39,676
16,550
15,778
18,512
10,133
6,095
17,115
5,334
21,475
9,918
10,248
3,086
31,610
2,395
6,752
8,419
43,897
6,861
1,990
35,046

252
291,190
247,675
248
1,447
2,284
16,403
56,452
39,873
16,579
16,221
18,735
10.584
6,141
17,703
5,330
22,070
10,369
10,557
3,208
31,966
2,447
7,017
8,492
43,515
6,931
1,976
34,608

160
292,958
249,095
238
1,531
2,200
16,184
56,711
40,352
16,359
16,306
18,782
10,665
6,196
17,753
5,287
22,387
10,292
10,624
3,202
32,780
2,478
6,937
8,541
43,862
6,962
1,946
34,955

191
295,755
251,230
233
1,572
2,226
16,086
57,168
40,821
16,347
16,562
18,787
10,932
6,236
17,679
5,216
22,788
10,463
10,696
3,248
33,171
2,500
7,066
8,601
44,525
7,009
1,955
35,560

January 2007

Survey

of

67

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1-2006:111’—Continues
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Oklahoma

1

II

103,977 104,958

Pennsylvania

Oregon
2005

2006

2005

2005

2006

2006
I'

II'

Line
III p

III

IV

I'

II'

III p

I

II

III

IV

I'

II'

III p

I

II

III

IV

106,645

108,862

112,928

114,214

115,897

114,589

116,053

118,325

119,627

122,138

123,084

124,811

426,164

430,199

435,201

441,021

448,497 452,465

458,235

1

79,871
8,496

81,523
8,640

85,502
9,257

86,070
9,291

86,961
9,354

89,621
11,429

90,739
11,468

93,133
11,660

93,934
11,696

96,559
12,244

96,927
12,253

97,987
12,370

318,375
37,134

321,176
37,684

326,028 329,930 336,032 337,577
38,426 38,979
40,246
40,379

340,731
40,720

2
3

20,828

21,016

4

19,527
18,691
18,963
19,551
4,239
4,575
4,575
4,401
291,841 295,353 300,361 301,773
68,887
65,092 66,819
67,311
78,268 78,850
80,826
81,805
2,041
1,908
1,884
2,025

19,704
4,618
304,630
70,351
83,255
1,945

5
6
7
8
9
10

79,921

81,309

11

231,783 234,425 239,650 240,378
54,932 55,756
56,651
57,235

242,880
57,831

12
13

77,875
8,303

78,323
8,338

4,269

4,295

4,378

4,455

4,776

4,804

4,838

5,720

5,748

5,843

5,867

6,152

6,171

6,234

19,083

19,368

4,033
1,148
70,721
15,670
17,586
180

4,042
1,163
71,148
15,940
17,869
165

4,118
1,180
72,554
16,172
17,919
163

4,185
1,206
74,089
16,704
18,070
160

4,481
1,224
77,469
16,901
18,558
133

4,488
1,238
78,016
17,385
18,813
135

4,516
1,255
78,862
17,860
19,175
147

5,708
-2,081
76,111
21,149
17,329
546

5,720
-2,104
77,167
21,278
17,607
567

5,817
-2,152
79,322
21,385
17,618
546

5,829
-2,168
80,070
21,841
17,716
513

6,092
-2,289
82,026
21,985
18,126
463

6,081
-2,276
82,398
22,381
18,305
423

6,135
-2,276
83,342
22,844
18,626
439

18,051
4,102
285,343
63,692
77,129
2,214

18,316
4,091
287,583
64,485
78,131
2,042

17,406

17,704

17,756

17,910

18,426

18,678

19,029

16,783

17,041

17,073

17,203

17,663

17,882

18,187

74,915

76,089

48,917
13,247

49,340
13,393

50,521
13,648

51,538
13,928

54,563
14,587

54,758
14,779

55,227
14,974

61,897
18,013

62,642
18,207

64,214
18,558

64,780
18,757

67,090
19,139

67,149
19,367

67,927
19,658

227,009
53,364

228,491
54,112

9,214

9,351

9,530

9,743

10,107

10,291

10,458

12,304

12,487

12,741

12,928

13,048

13,286

13,523

35,312

35,796

36,240

36,794

37,124

37,684

38,127

14

4,033
15,711
736
14,975

4,042
15,589
510
15,079

4,118
15,702
474
15,228

4,185
16,057
451
15,606

4,481
16,352
343
16,008

4,488
16,533
207
16,327

4,516
16,760
285
16,475

5,708
9,711
261
9,450

5,720
9,890
212
9,678

5,817
10,361
360
10,001

5,829
10,397
358
10,039

6,092
10,330
151
10,179

6,081
10,411
114
10,297

6,135
10,402
148
10,253

18,051
38,002
910
37,093

18,316
38,573
749
37,824

18,691
39,313
776
38,537

18,963
39,749
775
38,974

19,527
39,731
135
39,597

19,551
39,964
47
39,917

19,704
40,019
126
39,893

15
16
17
18

1,058
76,818
60,315
187
6,038
1,271
3,645
12,055
5,150
6,905
3,120
5,156
2,763
1,970
3,050
1,353
4,320
885
2,900
548
6,795
344
1,746
2,171
16,503
3,839
2,426
10,238

837
77,486
60,959
182
6,087
1,248
3,739
12,121
5,203
6,918
3,120
5,331
2,820
1,972
3,080
1,395
4,358
800
2,898
559
6,926
360
1,773
2,191
16,526
3,831
2,392
10,303

804
79,067
62,569
193
6,594
1,315
3,867
12,155
5,334
6,821
3,281
5,324
2,881
1,991
3,156
1,471
4,490
831
2,967
562
7,073
370
1,808
2,241
16,498
3,804
2,381
10,313

781
80,741
63,854
192
6,838
1,264
3,972
12,380
5,393
6,988
3,315
5,434
2,994
2,071
3,179
1,419
4,534
873
3,073
573
7,215
384
1,845
2,297
16,887
3,792
2,368
10,727

676
84,826
67,916
204
9,002
1,308
4,172
12,929
5,758
7,171
3,502
5,496
2,893
2,112
3,344
1,442
4,659
1,047
3,161
575
7,334
502
1,913
2,321
16,910
3,860
2,424
10,626

542
85,528
68,353
195
8,953
1,243
4,122
12,962
5,814
7,148
3,510
5,608
3,157
2,053
3,244
1,556
4,714
949
3,176
583
7,568
476
1,930
2,353
17,174
3,905
2,480
10,790

624
86,338
68,753
191
9,293
1,261
4,049
12,941
5,792
7,149
3,586
5,629
3,115
2,056
3,225
1,467
4,831
952
3,152
599
7,635
488
1,934
2,348
17,585
3,944
2,581
11,060

1,200
88,420
71,327
1,397
171
632
5,674
13,625
10,754
2,870
5,505
6,215
2,932
2,308
4,241
1,994
5,759
2,281
2,925
850
9,050
659
2,550
2,558
17,093
2,569
569
13,955

1,157
89,582
72,389
1,411
166
651
5,871
13,466
10,572
2,893
5,581
6,342
2,984
2,336
4,331
2,161
5,856
2,328
2,975
862
9,203
695
2,591
2,578
17,193
2,557
576
14,060

1,306
91,827
74,489
1,428
176
657
6,145
13,910
10,997
2,913
5,821
6,471
3,032
2,393
4,515
2,262
6,022
2,354
3,079
875
9,382
702
2,651
2,613
17,339
2,523
585
14,231

1,302
92,632
74,940
1,442
180
639
6,311
13,822
10,841
2,981
5,845
6,442
3,031
2,419
4,530
2,206
6,122
2,321
3,100
894
9,582
691
2,716
2,648
17,693
2,531
585
14,576

1,101
95,458
77,929
1,486
186
672
6,701
14,427
11,408
3,019
5,971
6,834
3,306
2,617
4,704
2,210
6,189
2,526
3,298
923
9,700
690
2,772
2,716
17,529
2,585
577
14,367

1,073
95,854
77,931
1,465
194
649
6,899
14,146
11,125
3,021
5,897
6,718
3,134
2,541
4,685
2,204
6,335
2,520
3,236
939
10,079
737
2,801
2,752
17,922
2,586
569
14,767

1,115
96,872
78,563
1,428
202
653
6,861
14,160
11,196
2,964
6,017
6,761
3,243
2,542
4,703
2,191
6,478
2,569
3,235
969
10,203
742
2,841
2,766
18,310
2,576
582
15,151

1,393
316,982
274,268
417
2,160
3,493
19,081
47,773
27,669
20,104
16,366
20,723
11,487
8,866
21,937
6,503
30,388
8,271
9,715
8,377
39,268
2,679
7,182
9,582
42,714
9,103
1,894
31,717

1,243
319,933
276,843
424
2,113
3,425
19,585
47,911
27,970
19,941
16,575
20,916
11,584
8,959
22,145
6,956
30,173
8,087
9,899
8,549
39,834
2,736
7,241
9,731
43,090
9,095
1,892
32,103

1,277
640
557
1,276
324,752 328,653 335,392 337,020
281,529 285,144 291,801 292,944
446
444
450
444
2,209
2,301
2,343
2,193
3,513
3,584
3,296
3,233
19,947 20,250
21,356
21,178
50,741
50,572
48,410 49,702
28,665 29,580
29,651
29,786
21,090
20,786
19,745 20,122
17,706
17,764
16,969 17,319
21,142 21,255
21,544
21,551
12,168
12,236
11,663 11,811
8,706
8,816
9,153
9,140
22,117 22,376
23,465
22,935
7,364
7,144
7,055
7,115
31,621
32,624
32,856
31,693
8,209
8,253
8,194
8,491
10,352
9,986 10,339
10,638
8,771
8,933
9,112
8,800
41,771
42,556
40,418 41,019
2,809
2,834
2,935
2,992
7,634
7,340
7,616
7,410
9,845 10,048
10,036
10,155
44,076
43,223 43,509 43,590
9,104
9,102
9,366
9,500
1,917
1,929
1,936
1,919
32,202 32,471
32,306
32,647

641
340,090
295,536
433
2,424
3,265
21,110
50,553
29,828
20,725
18,078
21,623
12,602
9,229
22,871
7,009
33,460
8,652
10,768
9,283
43,126
3,030
7,784
10,235
44,555
9,451
1,963
33,141

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




19,734

76,227

20,016

76,824

20,719

78,918

68

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
Rhode Island
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4.....................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................
Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements......................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income........................................
Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.........................................................................
Construction................................................................
Manufacturing..............................................................
Durable goods.........................................................
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................
Retail trade..................................................................
Transportation and warehousing..................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................
See the footnotes at the end of the table.




South Carolina

2005
II

2006
III

IV

lr

II'

2005
lllp

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

III?

1

37,248

37,704

38,049

38,609

39,017

39,781

40,197

117,592

119,280

120,794

122,507

125,592

126,680

128,432

2
3

26,576
3,283

26,909
3,333

27,138
3,365

27,497
3,411

27,651
3,472

28,280
3,548

28,396
3,558

87,095
9,814

88,269
9,929

89,671
10,061

90,721
10,167

93,416
10,633

93,674
10,643

94,524
10,729

4

1,767

1,796

1,813

1,840

1,875

1,921

1,928

5,015

5,081

5,149

5,206

5,458

5,474

5,522

5
6
7
8
9
10

1,516
1,357
24,650
5,831
6,768
214

1,537
1,349
24,925
5,919
6,860
199

1,552
1,417
25,189
5,994
6,866
190

1,571
1,435
25,522
6,170
6,918
189

1,597
1,512
25,691
6,233
7,093
176

1,627
1,469
26,201
6,393
7,186
179

1,630
1,498
26,337
6,549
7,311
177

4,799
1,554
78,835
16,795
21,961
345

4,848
1,550
79,889
17,007
22,384
352

4,912
1,578
81,189
17,158
22,447
354

4,961
1,607
82,162
17,687
22,658
350

5,175
1,654
84,438
17,817
23,338
299

5,169
1,658
84,690
18,295
23,696
303

5,207
1,678
85,473
18,748
24,212
328

11

6,554

6,660

6,676

6,730

6,917

7,008

7,134

21,617

22,033

22,092

22,308

23,038

23,392

23,884

12
13

19,173
4,773

19,385
4,849

19,537
4,880

19,798
4,951

19,929
4,940

20,375
5,088

20,473
5,108

63,217
16,040

63,962
16,324

64,892
16,555

65,647
16,813

67,976
17,190

68,023
17,368

68,712
17,555

14

3,257

3,312

3,328

3,380

3,343

3,461

3,478

11,240

11,476

11,643

11,852

12,015

12,200

12,348

15
16
17
18

1,516
2,629
6
2,623

1,537
2,674
5
2,669

1,552
2,721
6
2,715

1,571
2,748
4
2,744

1,597
2,782
1
2,781

1,627
2,818
1
2,817

1,630
2,816
1
2,814

4,799
7,838
374
7,464

4,848
7,983
337
7,646

4,912
8,224
364
7,860

4,961
8,261
347
7,914

5,175
8,251
202
8,049

5,169
8,283
153
8,130

5,207
8,258
173
8,085

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

21
26,555
21,756
49
23
270
1,550
3,359
2,192
1,167
1,207
1,712
437
910
2,004
446
1,939
887
836
847
3,439
250
817
774
4,799
958
514
3,328

21
26,888
22,030
49
23
274
1,600
3,312
2,155
1,157
1,237
1,733
440
1,021
2,015
469
1,927
855
845
867
3,502
256
818
783
4,858
951
516
3,391

21
27,117
22,220
50
25
278
1,608
3,314
2,149
1,165
1,241
1,760
453
902
2,038
501
1,991
898
851
883
3,544
259
832
793
4,896
950
506
3,441

20
27,477
22,453
50
26
282
1,606
3,255
2,097
1,158
1,265
1,739
456
997
2,062
493
2,060
879
857
894
3,631
265
833
802
5,024
951
496
3,577

17
27,634
22,807
51
27
280
1,662
3,385
2,156
1,230
1,264
1,789
469
952
2,063
489
2,082
946
870
907
3,649
275
844
803
4,827
958
505
3,364

17
28,263
23,219
51
27
279
1,713
3,355
2,143
1,212
1,309
1,774
479
946
1.996
498
2,144
1,120
884
913
3,784
280
851
814
5,044
955
504
3,585

18
28,379
23,304
50
28
281
1,708
3,355
2,146
1,209
1,326
1,776
491
949
2,002
496
2,179
1,042
893
928
3,832
280
869
820
5,075
959
477
3,639

533
86,562
68,239
352
111
1,052
6,103
15,630
7,845
7,785
3,924
6,975
2,458
1,685
4,136
1,915
5,133
716
4,098
676
6,831
705
3,043
2,697
18,324
2,335
3,332
12,657

498
87,771
69,211
353
107
1,086
6,259
15,547
7,914
7,633
4,009
7,095
2,507
1,723
4,144
2,050
5,219
735
4,191
689
6,984
718
3,069
2,727
18,560
2,327
3,313
12,920

527
89,144
70,629
362
109
1,093
6,512
15,759
8,174
7,585
4,138
7,132
2,565
1,716
4,321
2,182
5,383
723
4,223
702
7,093
723
3,129
2,766
18,515
2,290
3,305
12,920

510
90,211
71,363
363
109
1,116
6,675
16,141
8,452
7,689
4,226
7,170
2,569
1,688
4,183
2,112
5,488
745
4,265
713
7,144
716
3,149
2,791
18,848
2,311
3,254
13,283

366
93,051
74,324
372
111
1,106
7,151
16,129
8,601
7,528
4,514
7,332
2,692
1,959
4,726
2,130
5,657
956
4,328
720
7,537
732
3,335
2,837
18,726
2,357
3,320
13,049

319
93,356
74,268
372
112
1,177
7,318
16,041
8,537
7,504
4,571
7,400
2,705
1,804
4,404
2,155
5,791
993
4,278
731
7,509
749
3,310
2,848
19,087
2,382
3,320
13,385

340
94,184
74,806
361
116
1,194
7,342
16,006
8,525
7,481
4,638
7,413
2,788
1,819
4,399
2,139
5,918
1,013
4,329
737
7.595
763
3,377
2,861
19,379
2,406
3,338
13,634

January 2007

Survey

of

69

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1-2006:111’—Continues
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

2006

2005
1

II

III

IV

Texas

Tennessee

South Dakota

V

llr

2005

2006

2005
III?

Line

2006

I

II

III

IV

lr

IIr

IIIP

I

II

III

IV

I'

II'

IM
P

24,963 25,149

25,477

25,722

26,257

26,440

26,933

180,333

182,905

185,880

189,148

190,917

194,735

196,925

725,812

735,938

751,026

768,540

786,862

798,973

811,684

1

18,081 18,122
1,802
1,816

18,388
1,851

18,451
1,866

18,880
1,940

18,876
1,953

19,163
1,977

144,322
15,124

146,172
15,260

149,072
15,489

151,610
15,739

152,736
16,129

155,825
16,473

156,869
16,568

602,035
58,089

610,337
58,920

624,533
60,336

639,295
61,784

658,533
64,485

667,983
65,346

677,261
66,175

2
3

966

985

993

1,036

1,045

1,058

7,897

7,982

8,106

8,243

8,468

8,666

8,720

29,387

29,807

30,485

31,225

32,636

33,154

33,597

4

845
850
-231
-232
16,048 16,074
5,499
5,395
3,520 3,576
30
31

866
-238
16,299
5,604
3,573
22

872
-238
16,347
5,773
3,601
22

904
-253
16,686
5,871
3,700
21

908
-253
16,670
6,023
3,747
22

919
-258
16,928
6,193
3,811
21

7,227
-1,410
127,788
20,842
31,703
449

7,278
-1,429
129,483
21,160
32,261
447

7,384
-1,463
132,120
21,374
32,386
440

7,496
-1,512
134,359
22,107
32,681
435

7,661
-1,513
135,094
22,261
33,562
379

7,808
-1,588
137,763
22,933
34,038
386

7,849
-1,586
138,715
23,516
34,694
384

28,703
-1,598
542,347
90,240
93,225
1,478

29,113
-1,635
549,782
91,300
94,857
1,333

29,851
-1,701
562,496
91,003
97,527
1,314

30,559
-1,769
575,742
94,623
98,175
1,274

31,850
-1,834
592,214
95,417
99,231
1,083

32,192
-1,878
600,759
97,633
100,582
1,064

32,578
-1,907
609,179
99,865
102,639
1,110

5
6
7
8
9
10

3,546

3,551

3,579

3,678

3,725

3,790

31,254

31,814

31,946

32,246

33,183

33,653

34,310

91,747

93,524

96,212

96,901

98,147

99,517

101,530

11

11,736 11,798
2,896 2,926

12,021
2,971

12,114
3,001

12,479
3,065

12,555
3,107

12,734
3,154

99,117
23,469

100,143
23,873

101,898
24,343

103,726
24,854

105,242
25,023

107,454
25,738

108,273
25,996

395,830
92,183

401,069
93,827

410,828
95,963

421,097
98,374

434,669
100,922

440,593
102,989

447,091
104,656

12
13

957

3,490

2,051

2,076

2,105

2,129

2,161

2,199

2,236

16,242

16,595

16,960

17,358

17,362

17,930

18,147

63,480

64,714

66,112

67,815

69,073

70,797

72,077

14

845
3,450
1,274
2,176

850
3,398
1,168
2,230

866
3,396
1,106
2,290

872
3,336
1,040
2,296

904
3,336
1,011
2,325

908
3,214
870
2,345

919
3,275
943
2,332

7,227
21,736
146
21,590

7,278
22,157
136
22,021

7,384
22,830
184
22,647

7,496
23,030
197
22,833

7,661
22,471
-654
23,125

7,808
22,633
-736
23,369

7,849
22,600
-723
23,323

28,703
114,022
2,779
111,243

29,113
115,441
2,306
113,134

29,851
117,742
2,263
115,478

30,559
119,824
2,132
117,692

31,850
122,942
2,418
120,524

32,192
124,400
2,035
122,366

32,578
125,515
2,299
123,216

15
16
17
18

1,452
1,348
16,629 16,774
13,155 13,286
87
89
68
67
179
196
1,095
1,116
1,940
1,961
1,279
1,293
661
668
913
925
1,370
1,387
542
543
357
357
1,252
1,219
400
441
608
631
220
213
360
358
200
197
2,307
2,323
206
212
497
500
556
550
3,474 3,487
840
841
458
449
2,176 2,197

1,288
17,101
13,616
93
73
202
1,152
2,001
1,318
683
949
1,384
548
360
1,285
476
659
229
364
206
2,375
216
497
548
3,485
831
440
2,214

1,222
17,229
13,694
94
70
200
1,166
2,029
1,335
694
974
1,386
553
360
1,295
450
659
216
375
208
2,372
217
513
559
3,535
828
436
2,272

1,194
17,685
14,159
99
74
201
1,224
2,139
1,397
742
1,013
1,409
604
381
1,308
442
682
212
384
213
2,456
219
519
578
3,526
851
439
2,236

1,055
17,821
14,262
96
78
191
1,236
2,110
1,406
703
1,038
1,427
600
376
1,352
441
688
225
403
212
2,462
221
533
575
3,559
856
437
2,266

1,129
18,034
14,432
94
80
194
1,229
2,127
1,420
707
1,067
1,456
630
383
1,353
427
699
229
410
217
2,489
223
542
583
3,602
863
446
2,293

342
143,980
123,510
309
306
314
8,117
25,276
15,453
9,823
8,226
11,000
8,047
3,074
8,227
3,416
9,582
1,705
6,880
1,997
16,773
1,458
4,415
4,387
20,470
4,311
1,048
15,111

335
145,838
125,490
313
298
310
8,374
25,404
15,540
9,864
8,302
11,246
8,260
3,058
8,158
3,646
9,676
1,695
6,929
2,057
17,332
1,518
4,454
4,461
20,348
4,298
1,054
14,996

384
148,688
128,215
328
311
333
8,722
25,840
15,795
10,045
8,427
11,395
8,725
2,984
8,320
3,952
9,995
1,699
7,175
2,122
17,278
1,565
4,503
4,542
20,474
4,265
1,064
15,144

398
151,212
130,329
339
319
317
9,131
26,344
16,049
10,295
8,642
11,412
8,630
3,068
8,517
3,797
10,118
1,656
7,255
2,191
17,678
1,685
4,614
4,616
20,883
4,234
1,069
15,580

-452
153,189
132,554
337
348
326
9,414
26,690
16,436
10,254
8,738
11,634
8,761
3,314
8,623
3,766
10,302
1,891
7,374
2,199
17,788
1,653
4,743
4,653
20,635
4,307
1,061
15,266

-532
156,357
134,900
333
324
320
9,524
26,623
16,522
10,101
9,018
11,809
8,877
3,390
8,679
3,792
10,424
2,236
7,483
2,282
18,596
1,655
4,773
4,761
21,457
4,385
1,083
15,988

-517
157,386
135,637
326
336
324
9,455
26,782
16,698
10,084
9,175
11,852
9,135
3,418
8,642
3,722
10,634
2,120
7,578
2,316
18,476
1,679
4,869
4,800
21,749
4,361
1,129
16,258

3,982
598,053
507,874
1,487
36,375
11,106
37,958
77,233
43,958
33,275
36,135
38,039
26,469
20,502
37,220
16,951
51,997
4,724
22,555
4,743
49,057
3,802
15,478
16,044
90,178
15,701
11,284
63,193

3,523
606,814
516,121
1,429
36,672
11,475
39,187
77,838
44,154
33,684
36,398
38,782
26,807
20,307
37,720
18,054
52,881
5,016
22,785
4,835
50,140
3,865
15,687
16,243
90,693
15,682
11,223
63,787

3,487
621,046
529,915
1,487
39,959
11,313
40,426
79,471
45,856
33,615
37,235
39,535
27,236
19,969
38,480
19,198
54,439
5,446
23,735
4,926
50,633
4,029
15,915
16,486
91,131
15,676
11,188
64,267

3,356
635,938
542,120
1,533
40,722
11,421
42,203
80,234
46,590
33,645
38,574
40,586
28,198
20,780
39,188
18,460
55,467
6,019
24,494
5,100
51,864
4,121
16,269
16,887
93,818
15,684
11,388
66,746

3,651
654,882
561,261
1,584
42,376
11,615
45,676
84,733
49,222
35,510
39,361
40,998
28,735
22,136
40,073
18,679
57,476
5,709
26,116
5,037
52,445
4,324
16,937
17,250
93,621
15,947
11,585
66,089

3,279
664,704
568,768
1,496
45,172
11,570
45,595
83,506
49,303
34,203
40,351
41,528
29,676
21,921
40,508
18,788
58,467
5,581
26,008
5,296
54,468
4,388
16,961
17,486
95,937
16,202
11,743
67,991

3,553
673,708
575,950
1,455
47,024
11,644
46,453
83,944
49,747
34,197
41,116
41,747
30,117
22,122
40,298
18,477
59,951
5,784
26,283
5,332
54,998
4,484
17,238
17,482
97,758
16,264
12,047
69,447

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




70

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
Utah
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4......................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................

Vermont

2005
II

2006
III

IV

\'

llr

2005
IIIp

I

II

2006
IV

III

r

IIIP

II'

1

65,961

66,999

68,592

70,073

71,901

72,995

74,373

20,097

20,229

20,555

20,692

21,106

21,075

21,342

2
3

55,069
6,283

56,071
6,407

57,841
6,615

59,232
6,784

61,088
7,093

62,003
7,189

63,141
7,321

15,088
1,678

15,164
1,693

15,515
1,736

15,542
1,740

15,923
1,822

15,754
1,797

15,907
1,813

4

3,099

3,160

3,258

3,341

3,499

3,554

3,621

882

891

914

916

962

950

959

5
6
7
8
9
10

3,184
43
48,829
9,492
7,639
135

3,247
43
49,708
9,529
7,762
121

3,357
39
51,265
9,556
7,772
113

3,444
34
52,482
9,753
7,839
110

3,594
36
54,031
9,806
8,064
91

3,635
35
54,849
9,974
8,172
82

3,700
33
55,854
10,181
8,339
87

796
301
13,712
3,040
3,345
82

802
304
13,776
3,058
3,395
76

823
309
14,088
3,068
3,400
75

824
316
14,118
3,140
3,433
80

859
319
14,421
3,152
3,533
78

847
325
14,282
3,216
3,577
75

854
327
14,420
3,280
3,642
74

11

7,504

7,641

7,660

7,729

7,972

8,089

8,252

3,263

3,319

3,325

3,353

3,454

3,502

3,569

12
13

38,724
9,850

39,425
10,065

40,702
10,350

41,758
10,631

43,194
10,869

43,772
11,119

44,659
11,349

10,675
2,627

10,715
2,646

10,958
2,700

10,963
2,710

11,378
2,774

11,208
2,774

11,329
2,808

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements......................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income.......................................

14

6,666

6,818

6,993

7,188

7,275

7,484

7,649

1,831

1,844

1,878

1,886

1,914

1,926

1,953

15
16
17
18

3,184
6,495
124
6,371

3,247
6,581
73
6,509

3,357
6,788
78
6,710

3,444
6,843
70
6,773

3,594
7,025
81
6,944

3,635
7,111
53
7,058

3,700
7,133
77
7,057

796
1,787
158
1,629

802
1,803
137
1,666

823
1,856
139
1,718

824
1,869
138
1,731

859
1,772
28
1,745

847
1,773
17
1,755

854
1,771
25
1,745

Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.....
Construction
Manufacturing..............................................................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................
Retail trade
Transportation and warehousing..................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

292
54,777
44,167
49
806
372
4,326
6,632
4,385
2,247
2,464
4,166
2,313
1,684
3,109
1,201
4,708
1,197
1,891
808
4,276
472
1,417
2,276
10,610
2,780
935
6,894

242
55,829
45,128
50
806
407
4,506
6,719
4,462
2,257
2,536
4,211
2,369
1,706
3,140
1,298
4,802
1,207
1,950
839
4,360
467
1,440
2,314
10,701
2,817
930
6,955

248
57,592
46,810
56
906
435
4,744
6,862
4,588
2,273
2,580
4,316
2,402
1,827
3,286
1,402
5,025
1,259
2,050
861
4,479
490
1,474
2,353
10,782
2,843
931
7,008

240
58,992
47,952
57
948
391
4,960
6,947
4,596
2,351
2,674
4,372
2,476
2,220
3,308
1,391
5,090
1,275
2,130
885
4,408
506
1,510
2,403
11,040
2,861
931
7,249

252
60,836
49,951
60
985
408
5,443
7,485
5,005
2,480
2,736
4,648
2,486
1,831
3,366
1,389
5,337
1,290
2,167
892
4,812
559
1,588
2,471
10,885
2,923
933
7,028

226
61,777
50,431
60
1,039
423
5,693
7,251
4,807
2,444
2,830
4,652
2,504
1,862
3,450
1,403
5,475
1,296
2,178
937
4,699
554
1,584
2,541
11,346
2,968
911
7,466

251
62,891
51,345
59
1,084
431
5,810
7,335
4,862
2,473
2,875
4,738
2,555
1,909
3,482
1,393
5,644
1,319
2,211
961
4,761
567
1,624
2,589
11,546
3,005
930
7,611

221
14,867
12,130
65
45
199
1,108
2,359
1,783
576
604
1,279
348
335
714
233
1,055
23
325
436
1,832
127
615
430
2,737
505
166
2,066

202
14,963
12,262
66
44
202
1,141
2,376
1,791
586
608
1,291
353
331
714
248
1,079
24
328
443
1,838
126
621
429
2,700
506
169
2,026

204
15,311
12,534
68
44
209
1,187
2,376
1,786
590
624
1,313
353
337
728
258
1,125
22
332
459
1,904
126
631
438
2,776
498
172
2,106

204
15,338
12,569
69
44
232
1,200
2,404
1,799
605
602
1,323
359
338
691
250
1,133
23
340
446
1,924
131
627
434
2,769
498
174
2,098

94
15,829
13,016
70
46
200
1,218
2,427
1,825
602
629
1,349
358
343
759
245
1,308
22
343
490
1,980
135
639
453
2,813
504
170
2,139

84
15,670
12,866
70
50
216
1,224
2,432
1,834
597
642
1,346
362
345
718
251
1,175
25
341
454
1,993
138
641
445
2,804
505
173
2,125

93
15,814
12,964
68
52
218
1,218
2,432
1,836
596
655
1,350
372
347
716
247
1,197
25
346
459
2,020
140
654
449
2,851
513
177
2,161

See the footnotes at the end of the table.




January 2007

Survey

of

71

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1—2006:lll1 Continues
—
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Virginia

Washington
2006

2005
I

lr

2005

Line

2006
IV

II

III

IV

lr

II'

III?

298,152

301,911

216,196

219,257

224,017

226,692

232,315

234,678

240,709

46,508

47,016

47,539

48,099

49,028

49,596

50,362

1

239,901
25,580

242,445
25,836

170,745
22,642

173,479
22,919

178,517
23,483

180,325
23,688

185,841
24,737

187,304
24,911

192,682
25,583

32,803
5,219

33,059
5,247

33,514
5,299

33,782
5,328

34,576
5,538

34,847
5,575

35,303
5,639

2
3

12,817

12,952

11,057

11,199

11,484

11,568

12,096

12,205

12,584

2,602

2,621

2,649

2,662

2,774

2,794

2,827

4

12,783
7,760
221,596
42,368
32,224
299

12,763
7,900
222,221
43,243
32,688
299

12,883
7,878
224,488
44,072
33,351
318

11,585
2,551
150,654
36,100
29,442
853

11,720
2,575
153,134
36,317
29,806
763

11,999
2,625
157,659
36,491
29,866
766

12,120
2,651
159,287
37,321
30,084
749

12,640
2,790
163,895
37,572
30,849
707

12,706
2,797
165,190
38,287
31,201
671

12,999
2,775
169,873
39,132
31,704
637

2,617
902
28,486
5,781
12,240
156

2,626
916
28,728
5,870
12,418
151

2,650
944
29,158
5,928
12,453
162

2,665
965
29,420
6,117
12,562
178

2,764
984
30,022
6,154
12,852
143

2,781
980
30,252
6,329
13,015
149

2,812
986
30,650
6,471
13,241
158

5
6
7
8
9
10

30,969

31,925

32,389

33,033

28,589

29,043

29,100

29,334

30,141

30,529

31,067

12,084

12,267

12,291

12,384

12,709

12,866

13,083

11

167,949
42,534

168,990
42,741

175,208
43,861

175,260
44,236

177,364
44,800

122,034
30,256

123,998
30,838

127,805
31,608

129,109
31,920

133,331
32,846

134,227
33,280

138,597
34,309

22,689
6,862

22,859
6,922

23,156
6,988

23,304
7,058

23,979
7,185

24,096
7,279

24,414
7,385

12
13

278,695 282,285

286,675

289,043

296,189

223,943 226,814
23,629 23,900

231,095
24,308

232,357
24,428

239,404
25,568

11,916

12,115

12,178

12,784

11,859 11,985
7,759
7,737
208,073 210,650
40,213 40,693
30,409 30,942
353
340

12,194
7,782
214,569
41,089
31,018
330

12,250
7,774
215,703
42,044
31,296
327

30,602

30,688

162,897 164,845
41,466 41,977

IIr

I

II

III

I'

ir

1I|p

I

IV

30,056

2006

II|p

III

11,769

II

West Virginia

2005

29,607

29,992

30,340

30,491

31,078

31,472

31,917

18,671

19,117

19,609

19,800

20,206

20,575

21,310

4,245

4,297

4,338

4,393

4,422

4,498

4,573

14

11,859
19,580
400
19,180

11,985
19,991
319
19,672

12,194
20,613
318
20,295

12,250
20,626
274
20,351

12,783
20,336
-287
20,622

12,763
20,405
-337
20,742

12,883
20,281
-308
20,589

11,585
18,455
381
18,074

11,720
18,643
244
18,399

11,999
19,104
329
18,775

12,120
19,296
272
19,024

12,640
19,664
390
19,274

12,706
19,796
330
19,465

12,999
19,776
385
19,392

2,617
3,252
-41
3,293

2,626
3,278
-62
3,339

2,650
3,370
-66
3,436

2,665
3,420
-69
3,489

2,764
3,411
-157
3,568

2,781
3,472
-169
3,641

2,812
3,504
-162
3,666

15
16
17
18

650
573
223,293 226,240
169,533 172,225
283
288
1,005
991
1,664
1,765
14,925 15,256
17,595 17,937
10,158 10,519
7,437
7,418
8,303
8,472
12,797 13,067
5,820
5,914
9,600
9,513
12,733 12,592
5,656
6,069
33,312 34,065
7,644
7,439
6,989
7,071
2,295
2,354
15,386 15,644
1,302
1,368
5,249
5,319
6,976
7,102
53,760 54,016
16,755 16,907
13,537 13,391
23,468 23,718

575
230,520
176,129
298
1,045
1,750
15,881
18,085
10,584
7,500
8,654
13,304
6,054
9,999
12,824
6,364
34,696
7,450
7,310
2,391
15,981
1,328
5,424
7,293
54,391
16,902
13,384
24,105

532
231,825
177,191
299
1,049
1,661
16,125
18,047
10,534
7,513
8,694
13,174
6,041
9,730
13,357
6,125
35,236
7,454
7,395
2,430
16,235
1,343
5,505
7,292
54,633
16,863
13,322
24,448

-28
239,432
183,887
308
1,114
1,920
16,836
18,496
10,808
7,687
9,111
13,763
6,191
10,266
13,120
6,198
37,113
8,051
7,674
2,464
16,571
1,427
5,718
7,548
55,545
17,125
13,587
24,833

-76
239,976
183,766
305
1,136
1,731
16,816
18,390
10,807
7,583
9,129
13,801
6,138
9,928
12,910
6,164
37,532
8,032
7,646
2,452
16,896
1,490
5,734
7,535
56,211
17,290
13,499
25,422

-44
242,489
185,498
298
1,175
1,751
16,780
18,380
10,815
7,565
9,317
13,784
6,255
9,971
12,860
6,089
38,250
8,217
7,781
2,485
17,129
1,523
5,864
7,587
56,991
17,465
13,621
25,905

1,733
169,012
135,565
1,892
319
562
12,001
20,310
14,864
5,446
8,522
11,985
5,582
10,814
9,457
3,930
13,985
2,971
6,025
1,344
15,025
1,721
4,365
4,755
33,447
6,046
5,512
21,889

1,608
171,871
138,362
1,862
307
589
12,303
21,346
15,884
5,461
8,589
12,102
5,612
11,528
9,182
4,265
14,113
2,866
6,212
1,356
15,231
1,669
4,450
4,782
33,509
6,030
5,409
22,069

1,699
176,818
143,351
1,898
313
582
12,718
21,109
15,477
5,632
8,793
12,459
5,613
13,624
9,857
4,433
14,389
3,078
6,412
1,381
15,597
1,683
4,583
4,829
33,467
5,974
5,309
22,184

1,641
178,684
144,768
1,881
321
578
13,357
21,831
16,206
5,625
9,214
12,656
5,685
11,472
10,168
4,312
14,891
3,164
6,328
1,434
15,941
1,751
4,830
4,955
33,916
5,959
5,418
22,539

1,769
184,072
149,950
1,972
331
619
13,875
23,740
17,812
5,928
9,428
13,106
5,832
11,552
10,640
4,347
14,997
3,327
6,765
1,446
16,123
1,895
4,958
4,996
34,122
5,964
5,499
22,658

1,722
185,582
151,129
1,986
342
588
14,160
23,750
18,029
5,721
9,583
12,918
5,995
11,632
10,116
4,393
15,462
3,658
6,605
1,462
16,378
1,799
5,211
5,091
34,453
6,077
5,486
22,891

1,787
190,895
155,936
1,931
355
589
14,251
22,174
16,443
5,731
9,686
12,951
6,147
17,086
10,004
4,356
15,797
3,818
6,757
1,510
16,479
1,799
5,131
5,115
34,958
6,185
5,485
23,288

-6
32,809
25,350
112
2,302
524
1,985
3,947
2,225
1,723
1,301
2,466
1,158
597
1,016
356
1,797
216
824
197
4,287
345
910
1,010
7,459
1,889
429
5,141

-26
33,085
25,614
115
2,308
540
2,029
3,923
2,200
1,723
1,319
2,509
1,181
593
1,016
376
1,805
213
834
200
4,358
349
915
1,031
7,472
1,894
435
5,142

-30
33,544
26,059
117
2,402
563
2,102
3,906
2,196
1,709
1,330
2,483
1,192
599
1,045
395
1,875
233
861
207
4,491
351
921
986
7,485
1,890
441
5,154

-33
33,815
26,191
118
2,440
521
2,200
3,954
2,207
1,746
1,358
2,515
1,211
604
1,047
384
1,856
230
885
215
4,356
366
938
993
7,624
1,897
437
5,290

-121
34,696
27,120
122
2,564
604
2,369
4,011
2,263
1,748
1,401
2,563
1,216
629
1,063
394
1,912
232
894
215
4,626
361
945
1,000
7,576
1,926
421
5,229

-132
34,978
27,322
122
2,578
483
2,487
4,063
2,265
1,798
1,455
2,636
1,237
635
1,095
405
1,948
246
905
214
4,507
359
970
977
7,656
1,949
411
5,296

-125
35,428
27,662
119
2,650
492
2,500
4,082
2,287
1,794
1,497
2,653
1,269
647
1,078
403
1,997
248
908
217
4,554
364
997
987
7,766
1,972
424
5,370

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




72

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
Wisconsin
Item

Line

2005
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance2 ........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3...........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4......................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................

Wyoming

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

2005
III”

I

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

III”

1

181,373

182,840

185,348

186,786

191,142

192,048

194,472

18,468

18,745

19,183

19,530

20,098

20,713

21,102

2
3

138,378
15,437

139,168
15,583

141,440
15,850

141,743
15,890

145,776
16,627

145,414
16,588

146,636
16,702

13,290
1,425

13,482
1,449

13,898
1,493

14,135
1,521

14,664
1,604

15,208
1,671

15,467
1,697

4

7,824

7,909

8,046

8,069

8,468

8,463

8,526

743

755

777

792

837

873

887

5
6
7
8
9
10

7,613
3,181
126,123
29,606
25,644
818

7,674
3,179
126,764
30,083
25,993
777

7,805
3,242
128,832
30,473
26,043
777

7,821
3,271
129,124
31,421
26,241
777

8,159
3,383
132,532
31,738
26,871
712

8,125
3,408
132,234
32,606
27,207
715

8,176
3,443
133,377
33,423
27,672
718

682
2
11,867
4,251
2,351
38

694
1
12,034
4,322
2,390
36

716
1
12,406
4,386
2,390
32

729
0
12,614
4,506
2,411
32

768
-2
13,057
4,560
2,481
27

798
-10
13,527
4,669
2,517
28

809
-11
13,759
4,777
2,565
28

11

24,826

25,216

25,266

25,464

26,159

26,492

26,954

2,312

2,354

2,358

2,379

2,453

2,489

2,537

12
13

100,909
25,450

101,423
25,737

102,942
26,209

103,078
26,298

106,840
27,131

106,535
27,158

107,478
27,427

8,899
2,157

9,036
2,194

9,318
2,250

9,501
2,294

9,916
2,371

10,325
2,481

10,507
2,522

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements......................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income.............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income........................................

14

17,837

18,063

18,404

18,477

18,972

19,033

19,252

1,475

1,500

1,535

1,564

1,604

1,683

1,713

15
16
17
18

7,613
12,020
630
11,390

7,674
12,008
426
11,582

7,805
12,289
460
11,829

7,821
12,367
411
11,956

8,159
11,805
-335
12,140

8,125
11,721
-494
12,215

8,176
11,730
-422
12,152

682
2,234
104
2,131

694
2,252
76
2,176

716
2,330
67
2,263

729
2,340
58
2,282

768
2,377
23
2,353

798
2,402
-7
2,409

809
2,437
8
2,429

Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.........................................................................
Construction
Manufacturing..............................................................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
Transportation and warehousing..................................
Information
Finance and insurance.................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

1,353
137,026
116,378
334
275
1,172
8,821
31,196
19,917
11,279
7,359
8,904
4,969
3,105
8,868
1,908
7,539
3,555
3,688
1,539
15,098
1,015
3,168
3,866
20,648
2,307
765
17,576

1,162
138,006
117,481
344
264
1,125
8,906
31,160
19,893
11,267
7,503
9,083
5,077
3,043
8,842
2,028
7,645
3,617
3,737
1,555
15,396
1,059
3,200
3,899
20,525
2,288
758
17,479

1,205
140,235
119,245
360
274
1,197
9,004
31,611
20,211
11,400
7,613
9,057
5,107
3,115
8,947
2,154
7,867
3,735
3,762
1,586
15,653
1,075
3,211
3,918
20,990
2,258
770
17,962

1,159
140,583
119,952
341
269
1,124
9,082
31,872
20,340
11,532
7,718
8,904
5,112
3,207
8.983
2,045
7,850
3,759
3,810
1,636
15,953
1,084
3,231
3,972
20,631
2,240
777
17,615

419
145,358
123,246
342
289
1,112
9,518
32,812
21,125
11,686
8,011
9,193
5,226
3.256
9,397
2,086
8,125
3,838
3,930
1,646
15,969
1,110
3,363
4,025
22,112
2,274
733
19,105

266
145,148
123,983
343
296
1,099
9,463
32,715
21,050
11,665
8,001
9,239
5,285
3,226
9,335
2,100
8,202
3,918
4,016
1,690
16,415
1,235
3,337
4,069
21,165
2,311
711
18,143

345
146,291
124,963
335
307
1,113
9,411
32,861
21,180
11,681
8,148
9,234
5,471
3,236
9,290
2,069
8,374
4,005
4,078
1,680
16,691
1,154
3,397
4,107
21,329
2,356
725
18,248

224
13,066
9,946
43
2,278
204
1,092
603
243
360
443
850
641
176
387
380
617
70
212
49
921
147
510
324
3,120
584
371
2,165

197
13,285
10,154
45
2,283
210
1,137
613
250
363
455
871
657
173
386
428
630
80
220
50
930
151
510
326
3,132
581
367
2,183

188
13,710
10,531
48
2,406
219
1,206
615
253
362
469
874
671
176
398
448
653
98
228
51
959
154
522
338
3,179
568
360
2,251

179
13,956
10,732
50
2,483
212
1,246
642
262
380
491
899
685
180
408
425
654
59
231
56
972
155
538
347
3,224
562
355
2,306

145
14,519
11,275
49
2,651
221
1,395
654
270
384
507
916
726
188
408
425
682
67
239
59
990
163
557
377
3,243
587
357
2,299

117
15,091
11,760
43
2,859
231
1,453
677
279
398
524
950
736
189
424
428
707
119
252
59
997
158
550
403
3,331
583
353
2,395

133
15,334
11,971
42
2,963
233
1,482
686
282
404
541
960
751
189
424
421
720
103
258
61
1,005
161
560
409
3,363
575
355
2,433

See the footnotes at the end of the table.




January 2007

Survey

of

73

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1-2006:111’— Continues
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Mideast

New England
2005

I

Line

2006

2005

2006

IV

V

IIIp

III

IV

r

llr

IIIp

584,837

589,641

599,190

606,385

619,086

623,130

630,191

1,852,217

1,864,467

1,896,216

1,924,070

1,970,116

1,979,415

2,004,365

1

453,744
48,511

456,740
48,717

465,953
49,561

470,394
49,964

481,747
51,921

482,794
51,920

486,371
52,279

1,465,359
162,040

1,469,721
162,516

1.501,514
166,005

1,520,786
167,969

1,564,234
174,912

1,561,604
174,408

1,575,468
175,788

2
3

II

III

II'

II

1

24,797

24,939

25,375

25,615

26,648

26,716

26,919

81,884

82,104

83,920

84,938

88,824

88,607

89,350

4

23,714
6,476
411,709
91,432
81,696
2,456

23,778
6,367
414,390
92,394
82,857
2,302

24,186
6,715
423,107
93,125
82,958
2,242

24,349
6,783
427,213
95,521
83,651
2,269

25,272
7,262
437,088
96.193
85,805
2,074

25,204
6,985
437,859
98,349
86,923
2,069

25,360
7,066
441,159
100,479
88,554
2,144

80,156
-17,580
1,285,738
279,119
287,360
7,185

80,411
-17,453
1,289,752
283,367
291,348
6,707

82,086
-17,943
1,317,566
286,814
291,837
6,640

83,031
-18,018
1,334,799
295,112
294,159
6,686

86,088
-18,626
1,370,696
297,848
301,572
6,151

85,801
-18,438
1,368,758
305,466
305,192
5,959

86,438
-18,531
1,381,149
312,522
310,694
6,177

5
6
7
8
9
10

79,239

80,555

80,716

81,382

83,731

84,854

86,410

280,175

284,642

285,197

287,473

295,421

299,233

304,517

11

327,385
73,406

328,875
73,978

335,226
75,266

338,643
76,061

348,054
77,637

348,030
78,275

351,172
78,991

1,055,200
237,025

1,055,851
238,416

1,080,479
242,838

1,093,948
246,105

1,130,135
251,816

1,124,450
253,171

1,135,370
255,857

12
13

49,692

50,200

51,080

51,712

52,365

53,071

53,631

156,869

158,005

160,752

163,074

165,728

167,370

169,418

14

23,714
52,953
249
52,704

23,778
53,888
199
53,689

24,186
55,461
246
55,215

24,349
55,690
232
55,458

25,272
56,057
5
56,051

25,204
56,489
-26
56,515

25,360
56,208
-1
56,209

80,156
173,133
2,134
170,999

80,411
175,453
1,773
173,680

82,086
178,197
1,916
176,282

83,031
180,734
1,900
178,834

86,088
182,283
369
181,914

85,801
183,983
157
183,826

86,438
184,241
334
183,907

15
16
17
18

704
453,040
394,856
1,136
886
3,639
26,913
59,673
41,476
18,198
22,565
29,131
8,481
15,229
52,078
9,860
49,506
12,076
14,222
12,469
49,926
3,965
11,461
11,639
58,184
9,845
3,356
44,983

664
456,077
397,076
1,133
886
3,656
27,394
58,768
40,566
18,202
22,807
29,463
8,581
15,590
50,792
10,547
50,136
12,022
14,457
12,671
50,859
4,034
11,533
11,748
59,000
9,750
3,351
45,900

716
465,236
405,479
1,188
916
3,784
27,923
60,075
41,797
18,279
23,296
29,822
8,683
15,362
52,395
11,201
51,261
12,494
14,661
12,949
51,792
4,130
11,684
11,864
59,757
9,601
3,324
46,832

705
469,689
409,693
1,120
937
3,711
28,184
60,465
42,175
18,291
23,515
29,965
8,679
15,829
53,986
10,608
51,960
12,330
14,837
12,999
52,720
4,158
11,684
12,004
59,997
9,542
3,324
47,130

481
481,266
421,270
1,156
983
3,587
28,556
62,201
43,091
19,110
26,000
30,165
8,830
16,097
54,865
10,790
54,030
12,873
15,221
13,383
53,863
4,269
12,217
12,183
59,996
9,826
3,390
46,781

455
482,339
421,543
1,163
1,024
3,568
28,616
61,979
43,033
18,946
24,898
30,452
8,918
16,397
53,574
10,793
54,071
13,718
15,662
13,309
54,689
4,298
12,111
12,302
60,796
9,900
3,392
47,504

483
485,888
424,484
1,133
1,063
3,604
28,342
62,011
43,117
18,895
25,337
30,531
9,136
16,521
53,407
10,631
55,111
13,838
15,836
13,486
55,413
4,346
12,339
12,398
61,404
9,861
3,360
48,183

3,468
1,461,890
1,220,576
2,875
4,418
14,478
74,053
136,955
72,614
64,341
73,150
82,180
38,290
64,251
170,197
35,280
169,240
36,365
48,420
30,171
148,735
14,680
34,353
42,486
241,314
64,896
12,310
164,107

3,135
1,466,586
1,222,602
2,898
4,380
14,521
75,550
136,724
72,506
64,218
73,844
83,234
38,733
63,222
162,659
37,073
169,827
36,203
49,352
30,666
150,755
15,127
34,802
43,031
243,984
64,864
12,292
166,828

3,295
1,498,219
1,254,602
2,927
4,584
14,740
77,520
137,800
73,853
63,948
75,138
84,902
39,346
61,983
175,582
38,525
175,243
37,428
49,998
31,320
153,271
15,473
35,227
43,595
243,617
64,674
12,317
166,626

3,286
1,517,500
1,269,704
2,912
4,632
14,781
78,044
139,546
74,554
64,992
76,204
84,530
39,489
65,246
179,233
37,421
177,711
36,947
50,956
31,659
155,414
15,532
35,333
44,115
247,796
64,538
12,330
170,927

1,765
1,562,469
1,317,406
2,972
4,857
14,347
82,083
143,821
75,747
68,074
77,831
87,075
40,682
68,271
196,694
38,367
182,562
38,659
51,228
32,143
158,178
16,164
36,369
45,101
245,064
65,647
12,441
166,976

1,566
1,560,038
1,308,896
2,983
4,988
14,450
82,258
142,582
76,326
66,256
79,287
87,114
41,095
67,895
181,433
37,625
184,468
38,687
51,859
32,798
160,989
16,423
36,490
45,472
251,142
66,121
12,556
172,465

1,754
1,573,713
1,319,564
2,893
5,169
14,543
81,976
142,289
76,472
65,817
80,192
87,334
42,376
68,501
181,171
37,350
188,365
39,085
52,383
33,376
162,992
16,531
37,215
45,824
254,150
66,650
12,826
174,673

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




74

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and
[Millions of dollars,
Great Lakes
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance 2........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4.....................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................
Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements.....................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5.......................................................
Farm proprietors’ income.............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income.......................................
Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6.............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities....
Construction................................................................
Manufacturing..............................................................
Durable goods.........................................................
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade.
Retail trade.........
Transportation and warehousing.................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military....
State and local.............................................................
See the footnotes at the end of the table.




Plains

2005
II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

2005
II|p

I

II

2006
III

IV

r

II'

ill»

1 1,513,561 1,529,929 1,547,714 1,564,552 1,593,201 1,605,809 1,627,533

650,459

655,750

664,791

673,357

686,313

693,004

702,580

2 1,178,268 1,189,562 1,206,087 1,214,886 1,240,462 1,243,700 1,256,367
134,404
3 130,118
131,508
139,231
140,692
133,355
139,415

507,141
56,675

510,139
57,369

518,900
58,551

524,376
59,283

536,068
61,593

539,041
61,999

544,594
62,506

71,434

28,991

29,369

29,961

30,347

31,590

31,870

32,151

5
64,445
65,047
66,483
68,733
65,995
68,679
69,258
5,071
6
5,162
5,274
5,519
5,330
5,618
5,676
7 1,053,221 1,063,217 1,078,006 1,085,812 1,106,751 1,109,903 1,121,351
8 231,289 234,604 237,128 244,308 246,332
252,884 258,938
9 229,051
232,108 232,580 234,432 240,118
243,022
247,244
10
6,418
5,989
5,976
6,063
5,582
5,514
5,614

27,684
-5,205
445,261
109,868
95,330
1,942

27,999
-5,248
447,522
111,474
96,754
1,830

28,590
-5,331
455,018
112,856
96,917
1,784

28,935
-5,398
459,696
115,968
97,693
1,779

30,003
-5,539
468,937
117,143
100,232
1,597

30,130
-5,612
471,430
119,978
101,596
1,652

30,354
-5,669
476,420
122,759
103,402
1,643

4

65,673

66,461

67,360

67,921

70,498

70,736

11

222,634

226,119

226,603

228,369

234,537

237,508

241,629

93,388

94,924

95,132

95,914

98,635

99,944

101,759

12
13

852,816
206,919

857,741
211,342

867,096
215,485

872,834
218,309

894,793
222,171

895,863
224,050

905,940
226,855

361,716
88,409

363,850
89,580

369,915
91,115

373,837
92,353

384,293
94,204

386,812
95,652

390,771
96,767

14

142,474

146,295

149,490

151,825

153,438

155,371

157,598

60,726

61,580

62,525

63,417

64,200

65,522

66,413

15
16
17
18

64,445
118,532
2,317
116,215

65,047
120,480
1,832
118,648

65,995
123,506
1,904
121,602

66,483
123,743
1,470
122,273

68,733
123,498
-660
124,158

68,679
123,788
-1,271
125,058

69,258
123,571
-1,143
124,715

27,684
57,015
8,500
48,515

27,999
56,710
7,286
49,424

28,590
57,870
7,457
50,413

28,935
58,187
7,206
50,981

30,003
57,572
5,640
51,932

30,130
56,577
4,083
52,494

30,354
57,056
4,671
52,386

4,894
4,455
4,557
2,022
19
4,133
1,435
1,584
20 1,173,374 1,185,107 1,201,530 1,210,752 1,238,441 1,242,265 1,254,782
21 1,002,964 1,012,600 1,028,465 1,036,685 1,063,223 1,066,475 1,076,832
22
1,414
1,437
1,494
1,503
1,508
1,491
1,455
6,462
6,445
23
6,718
6,852
7,109
7,442
7,692
24
10,643
10,620
10,879
10,659
11,018
11,099
10,976
69,691
70,645
75,674
25
71,312
71,978
74,431
74,132
26 229,657 229,967 233,826
236,376 241,831
240,555 242,838
27
161,682
161,465
165,322
166,813
170,896
170,548
172,838
28
68,192
68,285
68,504
69,563
70,935
70,007
70,000
29
65,059
65,626
67,521
69,230
71,767
66,400
70,531
30
72,680
73,536
73,802
73,319
74,897
75,396
75,490
42,177
31
41,601
42,871
43,056
44,729
46,307
44,988
28,357
32
27,303
26,866
26,822
27,438
28,464
28,261
33
76,519
76,411
78,186
78,470
81,489
80,813
80,511
34
25,271
26,918
28,762
27,365
28,161
26,752
27,235
100,967
110,504
35
102,311
103,842
105,106
107,033
108,388
33,184
33,476
33,799
36
33,775
33,678
34,825
35,460
37
43,021
43,295
43,944
44,653
45,429
45,964
46,528
38
13,343
13,716
14,044
14,479
14,677
13,876
14,480
114,774
116,974
39
118,772
120,507
122,823
124,339
125,973
40
10,015
10,263
10,617
10,912
10,983
11,267
11,303
27,274
41
27,541
27,989
29,030
27,876
29,066
29,608
42
34,086
34,377
34,682
35,645
36,271
35,266
36,026
170,409
172,508
175,217
43
173,066
174,068
175,790
177,950
44
24,760
24,841
24,905
24,554
24,513
25,002
25,250
7,437
45
7,473
7,470
7,431
7,435
7,426
7,326
46
138,032
141,042
145,374
140,311
142,123 142,941
143,362

11,304
495,836
412,709
1,394
3,139
4,983
31,898
75,644
47,874
27,770
29,453
33,311
19,985
16,464
35,035
8,740
33,680
15,761
14,778
6,222
50,836
4,338
12,123
14,922
83,128
13,751
7,549
61,828

10,130
500,010
416,605
1,411
3,056
5,149
32,476
76,279
48,355
27,924
29,724
33,708
20,072
16,345
35,124
9,220
34,039
15,533
15,003
6,338
51,489
4,433
12,232
14,975
83,405
13,693
7,537
62,175

10,322
508,577
424,328
1,477
3,276
5,205
32,950
77,245
48,944
28,301
30,328
33,753
20,115
16,500
36,101
9,748
34,917
16,127
15,372
6,511
52,693
4,424
12,405
15,183
84,250
13,575
7,599
63,075

10,077
514,299
429,473
1,502
3,355
5,286
33,093
78,309
49,673
28,636
30,719
33,919
20,082
16,888
36,678
9,367
35,485
16,522
15,881
6,645
53,493
4,413
12,502
15,334
84,826
13,592
7,646
63,588

8,530
527,538
441,544
1,502
3,623
4,992
35,262
80,586
51,193
29,393
31,613
34,777
20,455
16,924
37,337
9,468
36,834
16,734
16,462
6,778
55,124
4,586
12,889
15,597
85,994
14,027
7,768
64,199

7,000
532,042
445,680
1,512
3,725
5,216
35,683
81,089
51,721
29,368
32,059
35,205
20,516
17,388
37,153
9,694
37,062
16,971
16,560
6,799
55,686
4,716
12,906
15,738
86,362
14,169
7,731
64,462

7,611
536,983
449,312
1,475
3,860
5,268
35,559
81,344
51,981
29,363
32,623
35,345
21,032
17,492
37,071
9,473
37,814
17,043
16,786
6,907
56,437
4,782
13,146
15,856
87,671
14,160
7,932
65,579

January 2007

Survey

of

75

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Earnings by Industry, 2005:1-2006:1111 Continues
—
seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Southwest

Southeast
2005
I

2,271,064

II

2,302,275

III

2,272,542

IV

2,379,509

I'

2,423,762

II'

2,448,199

2006

2005

2006
III”

2,482,937

I

1,055,595

II

III

IV

II'

r

Line
II| p

1,071,251

1,094,349

1,116,324

1,147,681

1,162,534

1,181,565

1

902,696
89,990

934,367
94,502

944,174
95,363

957,435
96,589

2
3

1,695,047
184,476

1,716,282
186,647

1,728,212
190,072

1,769,328
192,230

1,812,316
199,933

1,823,483
201,001

1,843,060
202,960

850,564
84,675

863,033
85,976

885,334
88,268

94,408

95,630

97,382

98,503

102,719

103,463

104,529

42,940

43,607

44,722

45,601

47,964

48,512

49,166

4

90,068
9,880
1,520,451
375,650
374,964
4,929

91,017
9,835
1,539,470
381,331
381,474
4,673

92,690
9,958
1,548,098
288,395
436,049
4,857

93,727
9,989
1,587,088
394,579
397,842
6,412

97,214
10,067
1,622,449
401,214
400,099
4,659

97,538
10,139
1,632,621
411,277
404,302
4,175

98,431
10,143
1,650,243
420,981
411,713
4,251

41,734
472
766,362
141,753
147,480
2,094

42,369
458
777,514
143,569
150,167
1,907

43,546
399
797,465
143,910
152,973
1,874

44,389
380
813,085
149,077
154,162
1,807

46,538
346
840,210
150,423
157,048
1,510

46,850
329
849,140
154,041
159,353
1,511

47,423
325
861,171
157,657
162,737
1,584

5
6
7
8
9
10

370,035

376,801

431,193

391,430

395,440

400,127

407,461

145,386

148,260

151,100

152,355

155,538

157,843

161,152

11

1,219,244
297,337

1,233,220
301,907

1,257,390
307,317

1,272,441
311,100

1,310,594
317,741

1,317,045
321,603

1,332,537
325,602

567,995
133,376

576,351
135,781

592,100
139,165

604,246
141,978

627,484
146,476

633,331
148,836

642,798
151,282

12
13

207,269

210,890

214,626

217,373

220,526

224,065

227,171

91,642

93,413

95,619

97,588

99,938

101,986

103,859

14

90,068
178,466
10,473
167,993

91,017
181,156
9,417
171,738

92,690
163,505
9,059
154,447

93,727
185,787
9,162
176,625

97,214
183,981
4,284
179,697

97,538
184,835
3,182
181,653

98,431
184,921
3,794
181,127

41,734
149,193
4,481
144,711

42,369
150,900
3,579
147,321

43,546
154,069
3,543
150,526

44,389
156,472
3,348
153,124

46,538
160,406
3,564
156,842

46,850
162,006
2,962
159,044

47,423
163,355
3,417
159,938

15
16
17
18

14,654
1,680,393
1,359,353
6,206
14,358
14,525
111,617
208,392
119,528
88,864
88,323
120,496
62,327
54,249
95,729
40,258
140,238
34,371
73,118
17,471
157,417
17,291
51,567
51,400
321,040
63,987
51,884
205,169

13,649
1,702,633
1,379,897
6,338
14,209
14,966
115,278
209,704
120,932
88,771
89,717
123,332
63,171
54,109
95,431
42,810
142,866
33,496
74,527
17,795
160,473
17,880
51,812
51,982
322,737
64,203
51,649
206,885

13,315
1,714,897
1,388,834
6,657
14,570
15,036
119,753
212,868
123,213
89,655
91,037
124,300
64,143
54,134
98,051
27,905
145,916
34,527
76,366
18,105
162,792
18,041
52,091
52,542
326,063
63,967
51,752
210,344

13,423
1,755,905
1,428,473
6,686
15,307
15,060
123,747
215,346
124,901
90,445
93,472
125,127
64,626
55,648
99,946
44,012
147,977
37,012
77,995
18,288
163,898
18,094
53,162
53,069
327,433
63,964
51,568
211,900

8,573
1,803,742
1,471,574
6,842
16,011
15,142
129,723
221,403
129,870
91,533
96,352
129,193
65,697
57,857
101,638
44,733
154,134
37,039
80,376
18,976
168,059
18,720
55,208
54,470
332,168
65,141
52,131
214,896

7,510
1,815,973
1,481,920
6,816
16,518
14,983
132,476
219,417
129,261
90,156
98,109
130,463
66,496
57,513
101,443
44,808
155,851
37,730
80,403
19,203
170,883
18,941
55,072
54,796
334,052
65,815
51,852
216,386

8,158
1,834,903
1,496,288
6,627
17,068
15,151
132,582
219,825
129,857
89,967
99,874
130,871
68,467
57,947
101,226
44,298
159,176
38,337
81,506
19,462
172,931
19,263
56,344
55,335
338,614
66,172
52,307
220,136

6,798
843,766
703,446
2,223
44,940
13,836
56,299
104,913
62,066
42,847
47,361
56,894
34,193
26,390
50,605
24,055
69,905
7,585
34,394
6,965
71,705
5,699
22,901
22,584
140,320
26,488
17,088
96,745

5,922
857,111
716,130
2,175
45,246
14,215
58,454
105,661
62,358
43,303
47,822
58,280
34,705
26,137
51,361
25,676
71,089
7,874
34,925
7,117
73,388
5,857
23,246
22,902
140,981
26,502
16,951
97,528

5,897
879,437
736,727
2,268
49,153
14,172
60,776
107,766
64,598
43,168
49,059
59,485
35,275
25,877
52,823
27,426
73,071
8,317
36,252
7,289
74,614
6,127
23,667
23,307
142,710
26,507
16,869
99,333

5,704
896,992
752,496
2,288
50,349
14,190
63,112
109,048
65,606
43,442
50,568
60,780
36,469
26,742
53,731
26,421
74,498
8,955
37,419
7,471
76,151
6,188
24,226
23,890
144,496
26,519
17,012
100,964

5,937
928,430
782,078
2,367
54,251
14,417
68,688
114,780
69,214
45,565
51,783
61,841
37,114
28,535
55,062
26,748
77,075
8,902
39,357
7,471
77,536
6,625
25,129
24,398
146,352
26,979
17,276
102,098

5,355
938,819
791,136
2,274
57,192
14,373
68,116
113,621
69,386
44,235
53,030
62,597
38,424
28,001
55,098
26,848
78,650
8,715
39,477
7,773
80,131
6,753
25,297
24,769
147,682
27,432
17,465
102,786

5,830
951,605
800,961
2,211
59,491
14,476
69,182
114,072
69,843
44,229
54,096
63,021
38,986
28,270
54,873
26,361
80,593
8,980
39,967
7,852
81,036
6,904
25,760
24,831
150,644
27,632
17,933
105,079

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46




76

State Personal Income

January 2007

Table 2. Personal Income by Major Source and Earnings by Industry, 2005:1-2006:1111 Table Ends
—
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Rocky Mountain
Item

Line
I

Income by place of residence
Personal income (lines 2-11)..............................................
Derivation of personal income..................
Earnings by place of work (lines 12-18 or 19-46)...............
Less: Contributions for government social insurance2.........
Employee and self-employed contributions for
government social insurance....................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.........................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent4.....................................
Plus: Personal current transfer receipts................................
State unemployment insurance benefits......................
Personal current transfer receipts excluding state
unemployment insurance benefits............................

Far West

2005
II

2006
III

IV

r

V

2005
IIIp

1

II

2006
III

IV

I'

II'

III p

1

322,455

325,893

332,011

336,726

346,376

348,939

353,816 1,783,831 1,807,760 1,841,647 1,868,676 1,914,354 1,927,148 1,955,097

2
3

258,634
28,122

261,430
28,483

267,932
29,253

271,453
29,622

281,136
31,176

282,186
31,273

285,369 1,419,441 1,438,954 1,473,725 1.494,250 1,538,886 1,542,407 1,561,401
167,459
31,608
168,837
171,995
174,105
182,015
182,016
184,148

4

14,111

14,293

14,658

14,841

15,644

15.722

5
6
7
8
9
10

14,011
1,062
231,574
53,417
37,464
731

14,190
1,080
234,028
53,797
38,069
666

14,595
1,103
239,782
54,106
38,123
629

14,781
1,115
242,946
55,322
38,458
620

15,532
1,139
251,099
55,701
39,576
554

15,551
1,143
252,055
56,761
40,123
530

11

36,733

37,403

37,494

37,838

39,023

39,593

40,385

12
13

175,730
42,494

177,634
43,109

182,279
44,141

184,540
44,759

192,145
46,151

192,559
46,633

195,038
47,239

15,902

85,962

86,620

88,114

89,154

93,393

93,603

94,790

81,497
15,706
82,218
83,881
88,622
84,951
88,413
89,358
1,177
-1,401
-1,443
-1,455
-1,529
-1,488
-1,532
-1,575
254,938 1,250,581 1,268,674 1,300,274 1.318,656 1,355,342 1,358,860 1,375,678
57,963 299,215
301,664
303,769 310,669 313,055 319,116 325,931
40,916 234,035 237,423
237,604 239,351
245,957 249,172 253,487
6,689
531
6,275
5,939
5,724
5,372
5,313
5,088
227,346

231,148

231,665

233,627

240,585

243,858

248,400

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
Wage and salary disbursements......................................
Supplements to wages and salaries.................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds.......................................................
Employer contributions for government social
insurance.................................................................
Proprietors’ income5........................................................
Farm proprietors’ income.............................................
Nonfarm proprietors’ income........................................

14

28,483

28,919

29,546

29,978

30,620

31,082

31,533

165,240

167,901

171,009

173,546

177,061

179,416

182,565

15
16
17
18

14,011
40,410
1,565
38,844

14,190
40,687
1,035
39,652

14,595
41,513
1,077
40,436

14,781
42,154
958
41,196

15,532
42,839
811
42,029

15,551
42,994
520
42,474

15,706
43,092
708
42,384

81,497
183,199
4,381
178,818

82,218
186,796
3,620
183,176

83,881
193,252
4,708
188,544

84,951
194,277
4,628
189,649

88,622
195,818
3,988
191,831

88,413
196,958
3,647
193,311

89,358
196,685
4,161
192,525

Earnings by industry
Farm earnings.....................................................................
Nonfarm earnings................................................................
Private earnings..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, related activities, and other6..............
Mining..........................................................................
Utilities.........................................................................
Construction................................................................
Manufacturing....
Durable goods
Nondurable goods...................................................
Wholesale trade.
Retail trade........
Transportation and warehousing..................................
Information..................................................................
Finance and insurance
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Professional and technical services.............................
Management of companies and enterprises................
Administrative and waste services...............................
Educational services...................................................
Health care and social assistance................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation..............................
Accommodation and food services..............................
Other services, except public administration................
Government and government enterprises........................
Federal, civilian............................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and local.............................................................

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

3,176
255,458
209,543
881
7,782
2,045
21,231
23,084
15,604
7,479
11,862
17,437
8,330
13,998
14,732
7,891
25,214
4,921
9,015
2,380
20,431
2,813
7,499
7,998
45,916
10,361
5,469
30,086

2,658
258,772
212,710
896
7,764
2,128
21,775
23,344
15,785
7,559
12,072
17,754
8,410
13,877
14,732
8,484
25,631
4,912
9,136
2,447
20,805
2,867
7,564
8,112
46,063
10,352
5,443
30,267

2,704
265,228
218,887
918
8,349
2,220
22,946
24,136
16,485
7,651
12,304
18,115
8,571
13,320
15,442
9,077
26,389
5,001
9,330
2,503
21,388
2,948
7,725
8,203
46,342
10,318
5,429
30,595

2,584
268,869
221,962
925
8,549
2,178
23,655
24,529
16,656
7,873
12,601
18,243
8,695
14,118
15,562
8,761
26,624
4,799
9,583
2,578
21,167
3,099
7,936
8,359
46,907
10,308
5,397
31,202

2,448
278,688
231,720
959
9,134
2,195
25,165
25,519
17,419
8,099
13,150
18,889
9,056
14,888
16,005
8,784
27,569
5,254
10,018
2,602
22,460
3,275
8,195
8,604
46,968
10,585
5,418
30,965

2,171
280,014
232,601
968
9,654
2,275
25,417
25,147
17,130
8,017
13,340
19,179
9,052
14,370
16,022
8,816
28,041
5,316
9,983
2,702
22,231
3,162
8,192
8,736
47,413
10,658
5,355
31,401

p Preliminary,
r Revised.
D Not shown to avoid disclosure of confidential information, but the estimates for this item are included in the total.
1. The estimates of earnings are based on the 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
2. Contributions for government social insurance are included in earnings by type and industry, but they are excluded
from personal income.
3. The adjustment for residence is the net inflow of the earnings of interarea commuters. For the United States,
it consists of adjustments for border workers: Wage and salary disbursements to U.S. residents commuting to Canada




989,505 1,002,039 1,025,583 1,041,476 1,077,385 1,077,621 1,092,793
246,737 250,119
254,890
258,497 265,683 267,829 271,923

13,057
2,373
12,407
13,552
13,484
12,905
12,645
13,232
282,996 1,406,384 1,426,547 1,460,172 1,480,766 1,525,981 1,529,763 1,548,169
235,006 1,161,931 1,180,995 1,212,685 1,231,998 1,272,438 1,272,934 1,286,890
9,457
942
9,480
9,856
10,220
10,323
9,958
9,676
10,002
6,355
6,603
6,283
6,520
6,813
7,410
7,681
2,304
12,024
12,413
12,767
12,255
12,643
13,112
13,250
99,257
25,360
102,750
107,622
110,494
113,975
114,090 113,695
25,331
162,265
164,871
168,395
170,950
181,011
176,920
175,637
114,149
17,244
118,062
115,315
120,227
129,578
126,437
125,078
8,087
48,116
49,556
50,333
50,724
51,433
50,483
50,559
68,072
13,560
69,062
71,052
72,715
75,278
76,536
77,879
19,206
95,186
96,720
98,769
99,571
103,501
102,003 102,496
9,269
42,162
42,424
42,941
43,389
45,227
45,492
46,854
14,543
70,395
72,083
70,563
73,391
74,476
73,192
79,296
92,276
92,821
98,254
15,988
97,356
99,287
99,380
98,909
42,097
8,649
47,818
45,226
46,175
47,091
47,119
46,480
141,747
28,672
144,057
148,702
151,482
158,799
159,482
162,250
5,327
29,985
28,975
28,030
30,582
28,325
30,067
30,634
10,152
53,140
54,704
53,978
55,196
58,195
58,523
59,254
2,765
14,819
15,024
15,280
15,979
15,703
16,232
16,509
114,421
22,526
116,849
119,169
120,957 124,245
125,610
126,940
3,214
19,546
20,086
20,293
20,831
20,999
21,305
21,555
49,223
8,366
49,660
51,166
52,651
53,423
54,123
55,068
8,827
39,505
39,911
40,431
41,376
41,623
42,382
42,826
47,990 244,452
245,552 247,487 248,768 253,543 256,829 261,279
36,847
10,674
36,799
36,567
36,937
36,493
37,562
37,898
5,334
27,695
26,996
27,067
27,293
27,573
27,591
27,985
31,982
179,911
183.924
181,459
185,209 189,033 191,676
195,396

less wage and salary disbursements to Canadian and Mexican residents commuting into the United States.
4. Rental income of persons includes the capital consumption adjustment.
5. Proprietors’ income includes the inventory valuation adjustment and the capital consumption adjustment.
6. “Other” consists of the wage and salary disbursements of U.S. residents employed by international organizations
and foreign embassies and consulates in the United States.
N ote. The personal income level shown for the United States is derived as the sum of the state estimates. It differs
from the estimate of personal income in the national income and product accounts because of differences in coverage, in
the methodologies used to prepare the estimates, and in the timing of the availability of source data.

D-1

January 2007

BEA Current and Historical Data
A selection of estimates from the national, industry, international, and regional accounts of the Bureau o f Economic
Analysis (BEA) are presented in this section. BEA’s estimates are not copyrighted and may be reprinted without BEA’s
permission. Citing the S u r v e y o f C u r r e n t B u s in e s s and BEA as the source is appreciated.
More detailed estimates from BEA’s accounts are available on BEA’s Web site at < www.bea.gov>. These estimates are
available in a variety o f formats. In addition, news releases, articles, and other information, including methodologies
and working papers, are available.
The tables present annual [A], quarterly [Q], and monthly [M] data.

N ational Data
A. Selected NIPA tables [A,Q]
1. Domestic product and income...............................D-2
2. Personal income and outlays.................................D-18
3. Government current receipts and expenditures .. D-21
4. Foreign transactions..............................................D-33
5. Saving and investment...........................................D-37
6. Income and employment by industry................. D-42
7. Supplemental tables...............................................D-43

B. NIPA-related table
B.l Personal income and its disposition [A, M ]..... D-46

C. Historical measures [A, Q]
C.l GDP and other major NIPA aggregates............ D-47

D. Charts
Selected NIPA series.................................................. D-51

Industry Data
E. Industry table
E.l Value added by industry [A]...............................D-57

International Data
F. Transactions tables
F.l U.S. international transactions in goods
and services [A, M ]........................................... D-58
F.2 U.S. international transactions [A, Q ]............... D-59
F.3 U.S. international transactions by area [Q]....... D-60
F.4 Private services transactions [A].........................D-63

G. Investment tables [A]
G.l U.S. international investment position............. D-64




G.2 USDIA: Selected items.........................................D-65
G.3 Selected financial and operating data of foreign
affiliates of U.S. companies............................D-66
G.4 FDIUS: Selected items......................................... D-67
G.5 Selected financial and operating data of U.S.
affiliates of foreign companies...................... D-68

H. Charts
The United States in the international economy.....D-69

R egional Data
I. State and regional tables
1.1 Personal income [Q ].............................................D-70
1.2 Personal income and per capita
personal income [A].........................................D-71
1.3 Disposable personal income and per capita
disposable personal income [A ]..................... D-72
1.4 Gross domestic product by state [A]................... D-73

J. Local area table
J. 1 Personal income and per capita personal income
by metropolitan area [A]..................................D-74

K. Charts
Selected regional estimates......................................... D-79

A ppendixes
A. Additional information about the NIPA estimates
Statistical conventions................................................ D-81
Reconciliation table [A, Q ]........................................D-82
B. Suggested reading ............................................... D-83

D-2

January 2007

National Data
A. S elected N IP A T ables
The selected set o f NIPA tables presents the m ost recent estimates o f gross domestic product (GDP) and its
com ponents that were released on December 21, 2006. These estimates include the “final” estimates for the third
quarter o f 2006.
The selected set presents quarterly estimates that are updated monthly. Annual estimates are presented in m ost
o f the tables.
The GDP news release is available on BEA’s Web site within minutes after the release. To receive an e-mail noti­
fication o f the release, go to < www.bea.gov> and subscribe. The “ Selected NIPA Tables” are available later that day.

1. Domestic Product and Income
Table 1.1.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real
Gross Domestic Product

Table 1.1.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real
Gross Domestic Product

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006
IV

I

II

Line

2004

2005

III

2005
III

Gross domestic product. ..

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

2
3
4
5

3.9
6.4
3.6
3.5

3.5
5.5
4.5
2.6

3.9
9.0
3.4
3.2

0.8
-12.3
3.9
2.0

4.8
19.8
5.9
1.6

2.6
-0.1
1.4
3.7

2.8
6.4
1.5
2.8

6
7
8
9
10
11
1?

9.8
7.3
5.9
2.2
7.3
9.9

5.4
7.5
6.8
1.1
8.9
8.6

5.2
6.3
5.9
-7.0
11.0
7.1

16.2
2.8
5.2
12.0
2.8
-0.9

7.8
8.2
13.7
8.7
15.6
-0.3

1.0
-1.6
4.4
20.3
-1.4
-11.1

-0.8
-1.2
10.0
15.7
7.7
-18.7

Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports....................................
Goods..................................
Services..............................
Imports...................................
Goods..................................
Services..............................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

9.2
9.0
9.7
10.8
10.9
10.0

6.8
7.5
5.1
6.1
6.7
2.8

3.2
3.7
2.1
2.5
2.7
1.2

9.6
11.5
5.5
13.2
14.1
8.3

14.0
17.3
6.7
9.1
9.4
7.4

6.2
6.0
6.7
1.4
-0.1
9.9

6.8
9.4
0.8
5.6
7.1
-2.6

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal...................................
National defense..................
Nondefense.........................
State and local.........................

20
21
22
23
24

1.9
4.3
5.9
1.2
0.5

0.9
1.5
1.7
1.1
0.5

3.4
9.6
11.2
6.2
-0.1

-1.1
-4.6
-9.9
7.1
1.0

4.9
8.8
8.9
8.5
2.7

0.8
-4.5
-2.0
-9.3
4.0

1.7
1.3
-1.2
6.5
1.9

II

III

Percentage points at annual
rates:

Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...

I

IV

Percent change at annual rate:

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services.................................

2006




Gross domestic product....

Personal consumption
expenditures.........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services..................................
Gross private domestic
investment.............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Residential..........................
Change in private inventories...
Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports...................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................
Imports....................................
Goods..................................
Services..............................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Nondefense........................
State and local.........................

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

2
3
4
5

2.71
0.54
0.73
1.45

2.44
0.45
0.90
1.09

2.76
0.74
0.70
1.32

0.53
-1.08
0.79
0.83

3.38
1.50
1.20
0.67

1.81
-0.01
0.30
1.52

1.96
0.50
0.32
1.14

6
7
8
9
10
11
12

1.49
1.11
0.58
0.06
0.52
0.53
0.38

0.87
1.17
0.67
0.03
0.64
0.50
-0.30

0.84
1.02
0.59
-0.20
0.78
0.43
-0.18

2.51
0.46
0.52
0.31
0.21
-0.06
2.05

1.31
1.34
1.36
0.25
1.11
-0.02
-0.03

0.17
-0.27
0.45
0.56
-0.10
-0.72
0.44

-0.13
-0.19
1.01
0.46
0.55
-1.20
0.06

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

-0.65
0.88
0.60
0.28
-1.53
-1.29
-0.24

-0.26
0.68
0.52
0.16
-0.94
-0.87
-0.07

-0.06
0.33
0.27
0.06
-0.39
-0.36
-0.03

-1.07
0.97
0.80
0.17
-2.04
-1.84
-0.20

-0.04
1.41
1.20
0.21
-1.46
-1.27
-0.19

0.42
0.66
0.45
0.21
-0.24
0.01
-0.25

-0.19
0.73
0.71
0.03
-0.93
-1.00
0.07

20
21
22
23
24

0.36
0.30
0.27
0.03
0.06

0.17
0.11
0.08
0.03
0.06

0.64
0.66
0.52
0.14
-0.01

-0.21
-0.33
-0.49
0.16
0.13

0.94
0.61
0.41
0.20
0.33

0.16
-0.32
-0.09
-0.23
0.48

0.32
0.09
-0.06
0.15
0.23

January 2007

Survey

D-3

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

of

Table 1.1.3. Real Gross Domestic Product, Quantity Indexes

Table 1.1.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

2005

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2006

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services..................................
Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...

IV

I

113.223

113.719

115.274

116.004 116.569

Gross domestic product....

2 112.430 116.349 117.152 117.373 118.761
3 125.753 132.666 136.207 131.799 137.893
4 111.913 116.924 117.481 118.608 120.313
5 110.055 112.925 113.379 113.945 114.398

119.521 120.355
137.868 140.019
120.742 121.204
115.440 116.234

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services..................................

1 109.031

112.546

6 102.026 107.537 106.938
7 102.080 109.708 111.032
8 92.995
99.326 100.025
9 79.418
80.302
78.903
10
98.400 107.180 108.889
11 125.281 136.050 138.821
1?

II

111.034 113.143 113.429
111.811 114.033 113.570
101.308 104.606 105.738
81.174
82.893
86.819
109.653 113.704 113.313
138.495 138.391 134.368

2005

Net exports of goods and

2006
IV

I

II

III

112.744

113.139

114.048

114.967

115.905

116.446

2 108.373 111.493
3 90.845
90.198
4 107.617 111.530
5 112.863 116.529

112.067
89.908
113.016
116.858

112.873
89.606
113.177
118.281

113.445 114.573 115.241
88.967
89.385
89.206
113.484 115.769 116.442
119.194 120.059 120.960

III

113.215
113.240
108.292
90.044
115.434
127.601

2005
III

III
Gross domestic product . ..

2004

Gross private domestic
investment.............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures........................
Equipment and software
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...

1 109.429

6
7
8
9
10
11
1?

106.645 110.284 110.675 111.853 112.860
106.811 110.542 110.946 112.194 113.238
100.834 103.428 103.607 104.510 105.471
120.951 134.647 136.089 141.476 145.684
93.754
93.887
94.134
93.983
94.503
120.618 126.714 127.573 129.536 130.765

113.717 113.895
114.074 114.224
106.266 106.501
149.432 151.372
93.704
93.920
131.696 131.655

Net exports of goods and

Exports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................
Imports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................

1S
14
15
16
17
18
19

102.201
100.002
107.667
115.962
116.786
112.051

109.105
107.507
113.118
123.007
124.640
115.170

109.503
108.050
113.158
122.520
124.159
114.652

112.054
111.027
114.693
126.377
128.331
116.954

115.783
115.535
116.564
129.146
131.236
119.055

117.536
117.228
118.463
129.608
131.218
121.896

119.495
119.898
118.712
131.378
133.503
121.100

Exports...................................
Goods.................................
Services...............................
Imports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.............................
Federal...................................
National defense.................
Nondefense........................
State and local........................

20
21
22
23
24

112.720
123.813
128.374
115.606
107.094

113.731
125.701
130.593
116.896
107.660

114.358
127.545
133.423
116.939
107.674

114.048
126.053
130.002
118.971
107.954

115.423
128.728
132.808
121.411
108.682

115.657
127.262
132.141
118.488
109.762

116.136
127.669
131.740
120.370
110.277

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Nondefense.........................
State and local.........................

1M
14
15
16
17
18
19

105.151
104.392
106.985
104.678
102.962
113.786

108.949
107.628
112.115
111.268
109.622
119.933

109.341
107.846
112.918
112.919
111.383
120.945

20 114.718 121.183 122.029
21 115.249 120.726 121.353
22 115.954 121.855 122.467
23 113.963 118.606 119.261
24 114417 121.463 122438

110.108
108.450
114.080
114.117
112.790
120.913

110.737
109.192
114.430
113.918
112.331
122.242

112.400
110.852
116.098
116.608
115.197
123.890

113.631
112.286
116.815
118.143
116.824
124.876

123.444 124.791
121.479 123.721
122.760 124.752
119.059 121.787
124.620 125.434

126.262
124.871
126.006
122.736
127.095

127.150
125.482
126.714
123.154
128.147

Table 1.1.5. Gross Domestic Product

Table 1.1.6. Real Gross Domestic Product, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2006

2005
III

Gross domestic product . ..

Line

IV

I

II

2004

2005
III

III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,322.6

Gross domestic product....

2006

2005
IV

I

II

III

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,443.5

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services.................................

2
3
4
5

8,211.5
986.3
2,345.2
4,880.1

8,742.4
1,033.1
2,539.3
5,170.0

8,847.3
1,057.3
2,584.9
5,205.1

8,927.8
1,019.6
2,613.5
5,294.7

9,079.2
1,064.1
2,658.2
5,356.8

9,228.1
1,061.8
2,721.4
5,444.9

9,346.7
1,075.5
2,747.7
5,523.5

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services..................................

2
3
4
5

7,577.1
1,085.7
2,179.2
4,323.9

7,841.2
1,145.3
2,276.8
4,436.6

7,895.3
1,175.9
2,287.6
4,454.5

7,910.2
1,137.9
2,309.6
4,476.7

8,003.8
1,190.5
2,342.8
4,494.5

8,055.0
1,190.3
2,351.1
4,535.4

8,111.2
1,208.8
2,360.1
4,566.6

Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...

6
7
8
9
10
11
12

1,888.0
1,830.6
1,155.3
300.8
854.5
675.3
57.3

2,057.4
2,036.2
1,265.7
338.6
927.1
770.4
21.3

2,052.6
2,067.9
1,276.7
336.3
940.4
791.2
-15.3

2,154.5
2,105.8
1,304.3
359.7
944.7
801.5
48.6

2,214.8
2,167.7
1,359.2
378.2
981.0
808.5
47.2

2,237.1
2,174.8
1,384.3
406.3
977.9
790.6
62.3

2,235.5
2,171.4
1,420.8
426.9
994.0
750.5
64.2

Gross private domestic
investment.............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures........................
Equipment and SoftwareResidential...........................
Change in private inventories...

6
7
8
9
10
11
12

1,770.6
1,713.9
1,145.8
248.7
904.2
559.9
53.4

1,866.3
1,842.0
1,223.8
251.5
984.9
608.0
19.6

1,855.9
1,864.2
1,232.4
247.1
1,000.6
620.4
-12.7

1,927.0
1,877.3
1,248.2
254.2
1,007.6
618.9
43.5

1,963.6
1,914.6
1,288.8
259.6
1,044.8
618.5
41.2

1,968.5
1,906.8
1,302.8
271.9
1,041.2
600.5
53.7

1,964.8
1,901.3
1,334.2
282.0
1,060.7
570.3
55.4

Net exports of goods and
services
Exports
Goods.................................
Services..............................
Imports
Goods.................................
Services.............................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

-€13.2
1,178.1
818.8
359.3
1,791.4
1,495.2
296.2

-716.7
1,303.1
907.5
395.6
2,019.9
1,699.0
320.9

-728.8
1,312.4
913.9
398.5
2,041.2
1,719.1
322.1

-775.4
1,352.4
944.3
408.1
2,127.8
1,799.3
328.5

-765.2
1,405.4
989.3
416.0
2,170.6
1,832.6
338.1

-781.8
1,448.1
1,019.1
429.0
2,229.8
1,879.0
350.8

-801.7
1,488.3
1,055.8
432.5
2,290.1
1,938.8
351.3

Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports...................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................
Imports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

-590.9
1,120.4
784.4
335.9
1,711.3
1,452.2
260.3

-€19.2
1,196.1
843.2
352.9
1,815.3
1,549.9
267.5

-607.6
1,200.5
847.5
353.0
1,808.1
1,543.9
266.3

-636.6
1,228.4
870.8
357.8
1,865.0
1,595.8
271.7

-€36.6
1,269.3
906.2
363.6
1,905.9
1,631.9
276.6

-624.2
1,288.5
919.5
369.5
1,912.7
1,631.7
283.2

-628.8
1,310.0
940.4
370.3
1,938.8
1,660.1
281.3

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.............................
Federal...................................
National defense..................
Nondefense........................
State and local........................

20
21
22
23
24

2,226.2
825.9
551.2
274.7
1,400.3

2,372.8
878.3
589.3
289.0
1,494.4

2,402.4
895.8
605.0
290.7
1,506.6

2,423.6
886.2
590.9
295.3
1,537.4

2,479.6
921.7
613.5
308.2
1,557.9

2,513.9
919.7
616.5
303.2
1,594.2

2,542.1
927.2
618.1
309.0
1,614.9

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Nondefense.........................
State and local.........................
Residual......................................

20
21
22
23
24
25

1,940.6
716.6
475.4
241.0
1,223.9
0.4

1,958.0
727.5
483.6
243.7
1,230.4
-10.5

1,968.8
738.2
494.1
243.8
1,230.5
-17.0

1,963.5
729.6
481.4
248.0
1,233.7
-8.8

1,987.1
745.1
491.8
253.1
1,242.0
-23.7

1,991.2
736.6
489.3
247.0
1,254.4
-20.8

1,999.4
738.9
487.8
250.9
1,260.3
-28.7




N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the differ­
ence between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

D-4

National Data

Table 1.1.7. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Prices for
Gross Domestic Product

January 2007

Table 1.1.8. Contributions to Percent Change in the Gross Domestic Product
Price Index

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
11
1

Gross domestic product ....

1

2.8

3.0

Line

2004

2005

2006
I

IV

3.3

3.3

II

2005
III

III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Percent change at annual rate:
1

2.8

3.0

3.3

3.3

3.3

3.3

1.9

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services..................................

2
3
4
5

1.85
-0.14
0.67
1.33

2.02
-0.06
0.73
1.35

2.87
-0.25
1.78
1.33

2.04
-0.11
0.12
2.03

1.44
-0.08
0.23
1.29

2.80
-0.06
1.66
1.21

1.64
-0.09
0.48
1.25

Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures.......................
Equipment and software...
Residential..........................
Change in private inventories...

6
7
8
9
10
11
12

0.52
0.52
0.12
0.16
-0.03
0.39
0.00

0.56
0.56
0.26
0.29
-0.03
0.30
0.00

0.61
0.64
0.22
0.33
-0.11
0.42
-0.03

0.72
0.75
0.36
0.43
-0.07
0.39
-0.03

0.62
0.62
0.38
0.34
0.04
0.24
-0.01

0.52
0.49
0.32
0.31
0.01
0.18
0.03

0.11
0.09
0.09
0.16
-0.07
-0.01
0.02

4.5
5.3
2.5
5.4
5.8
3.2

Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports...
Goods.
Services...............................
Imports....
Goods.
Services...............................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

-0.37
0.36
0.25
0.10
-0.73
-0.60
-0.12

-0.61
0.37
0.22
0.15
-0.98
-0.84
-0.14

-1.29
0.27
0.10
0.17
-1.57
-1.46
-0.11

-0.40
0.30
0.17
0.13
-0.70
-0.70
0.00

0.37
0.25
0.21
0.04
0.12
0.23
-0.11

-0.92
0.65
0.47
0.19
-1.57
-1.43
-0.14

-0.41
0.48
0.40
0.08
-0.89
-0.81
-0.08

4.8
3.8
4.1
3.2
5.4

2.8
2.0
2.3
1.4
3.4

3.3

3.3

1.9

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Nondefense.........................
State and local........................

20
21
22
23
24

0.84
0.32
0.22
0.11
0.51

1.06
0.33
0.24
0.09
0.73

1.10
0.24
0.16
0.07
0.86

0.89
0.03
0.05
-0.02
0.86

0.84
0.52
0.31
0.22
0.32

0.90
0.26
0.19
0.07
0.64

0.54
0.14
0.11
0.03
0.40

3.3

1.9

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services..................................

2
3
4
5

2.6
-1.6
3.3
3.2

2.9
-0.7
3.6
3.2

4.1
-2.9
9.0
3.2

2.9
-1.3
0.6
5.0

2.0
-1.0
1.1
3.1

4.0
-0.8
8.3
2.9

2.4
-1.1
2.3
3.0

Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...

6
7
8
9
10
11
1?

3.3
3.4
1.2
6.2
-0.4
7.3

3.4
3.5
2.6
11.3
-0.4
5.1

3.7
4.0
2.2
13.2
-1.5
6.9

4.3
4.6
3.5
16.8
-1.0
6.3

3.7
3.8
3.7
12.4
0.6
3.8

3.1
3.0
3.0
10.7
0.1
2.9

0.6
0.5
0.9
5.3
-0.9
-0.1

Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................
Imports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

3.7
3.7
3.5
5.0
5.0
5.1

3.6
3.1
4.8
6.3
6.5
5.4

2.6
1.3
5.6
10.2
11.3
4.3

2.8
2.3
4.2
4.3
5.1
-0.1

2.3
2.8
1.2
-0.7
-1.6
4.5

6.1
6.2
6.0
9.8
10.6
5.5

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Nondefense.........................
State and local.........................

20
21
22
23
24

4.4
4.7
4.7
4.7
4.3

5.6
4.8
5.1
4.1
6.2

5.9
3.3
3.4
3.2
7.4

4.7
0.4
1.0
-0.7
7.3

4.4
7.6
6.7
9.5
2.6

Addendum:
Gross national product............

25

2.8

3.0

3.3

3.2

3.3

Gross domestic product....
Percentage points at annual
rates:

Table 1.1.9. Implicit Price Deflators for Gross Domestic Product

Table 1.1.10. Percentage Shares of Gross Domestic Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted

2005
Line

Line

2004

2005

2005

II

III

114.034

114.951

115.887

116.420

112.865 113.436
89.610
89.389
113.158 113.466
118.273 119.185

114.564
89.210
115.750
120.051

115.232
88.970
116.423
120.953

110.243 110.601 111.807 112.797
110.542 110.927 112.175 113.219
103.428 103.596 104.499 105.459
134.647 136.087 141.478 145.685
93.987
93.756
93.889
94.134
126.714 127.533 129.496 130.724

113.644
114.056
106.255
149.434
93.922
131.654

113.777
114.205
106.490
151.374
93.706
131.613

Gross domestic product . ..

1 109.426

112.737 113.121

2 108.373
90.844
3
4 107.617
5 112.863

111.493
90.198
111.531
116.529

Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...

6 106.628
7 106.811
8 100.834
9 120.951
10
94.503
11 120.618
12

Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports...................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................
Imports....................................
Goods
Services..............................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

105.152
104.393
106.985
104.678
102.962
113.786

108.950
107.628
112.114
111.269
109.622
119.933

20
21
22
23
24

114.719
115.249
115.954
113.962
114.417

25

109.416

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Nondefense.........................
State and local.........................
Addendum:
Gross national product............




III

I

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services..................................

112.058
89.912
112.998
116.850

109.324 110.091
107.832 108.435
112.906 114.069
112.890 114.090
111.347 112.756
120.944 120.914

112.383
110.836
116.087
116.581
115.162
123.892

113.614
112.271
116.803
118.116
116.789
124.877

121.183 122.022
120.726 121.346
121.855 122.461
118.606 119.257
121.463 122.434

123.437 124.784 126.254
121.472 123.715 124.865
122.753 124.746 125.999
119.056 121.783 122.733
124.615 125.428 127.090

127.143
125.475
126.707
123.151
128.142

112.726

114.025

116.414

113.113

110.720
109.176
114.420
113.890
112.297
122.243

114.942

115.879

2006

2005

2006
IV

III

2004

IV

II

III

Gross domestic product....
Personal consumption
expenditures.........................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable goods...................
Services..................................

1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

2
3
4
5

70.1
8.4
20.0
41.7

70.2
8.3
20.4
41.5

70.4
8.4
20.6
41.4

70.1
8.0
20.5
41.6

69.8
8.2
20.4
41.2

69.9
8.0
20.6
41.3

70.2
8.1
20.6
41.5

Gross private domestic
investment.............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Residential..........................
Change in private inventories...

6
7
8
9
10
11
12

16.1
15.6
9.9
2.6
7.3
5.8
0.5

16.5
16.3
10.2
2.7
7.4
6.2
0.2

16.3
16.4
10.2
2.7
7.5
6.3
-0.1

16.9
16.5
10.2
2.8
7.4
6.3
0.4

17.0
16.7
10.4
2.9
7.5
6.2
0.4

17.0
16.5
10.5
3.1
7.4
6.0
0.5

16.8
16.3
10.7
3.2
7.5
5.6
0.5

Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports...................................
Goods..................................
Services...............................
Imports....................................
Goods..................................
Services...............................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

-5.2
10.1
7.0
3.1
15.3
12.8
2.5

-5.8
10.5
7.3
3.2
16.2
13.6
2.6

-5.8
10.4
7.3
3.2
16.2
13.7
2.6

-6.1
10.6
7.4
3.2
16.7
14.1
2.6

-5.9
10.8
7.6
3.2
16.7
14.1
2.6

-5.9
11.0
7.7
3.3
16.9
14.2
2.7

-6.0
11.2
7.9
3.2
17.2
14.6
2.6

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Nondefense........................
State and local.........................

20
21
22
23
24

19.0
7.1
4.7
2.3
12.0

19.0
7.1
4.7
2.3
12.0

19.1
7.1
4.8
2.3
12.0

19.0
7.0
4.6
2.3
12.1

19.1
7.1
4.7
2.4
12.0

19.0
7.0
4.7
2.3
12.1

19.1
7.0
4.6
2.3
12.1

I

January 2007

Survey

of

D-5

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 1.2.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Gross Domestic Product
by Major Type of Product

Table 1.2.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real
Gross Domestic Product by Major Type of Product
[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

2006

III
Gross domestic product......
Final sales of domestic
product...........................
Change in private

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

IV

I

Line

II

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

2

3.5

3.5

4.4

-0.3

5.6

2.1

1.9

4.9
3.7

4.6
5.6

6.7
7.3

3.1
-3.4

12.8
13.1

3.6
2.2

3.8
3.6

6.0
4.7

6.1
7.1

13.4
11.5

4.1
-5.4

9.0
16.0

2.3
-0.2

8.9
6.7

Nondurable goods......................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories 1

4.0
2.9

3.4
4.4

1.6
4.1

2.3
-1.8

16.1
10.8

4.7
4.1

-0.1
1.2

4
5
6
7
8
q
10
11
1?

Services 2......................................

13

3.2

2.3

3.5

0.8

2.4

2.4

2.8

Structures.....................................

14

5.2

4.6

0.7

3.1

2.9

0.3

-7.4

15

3.5

5.9

22.6

-19.1

3.8

-9.4

27.4

16
1/

3.9
8.2

3.1
24.5

3.6
11.6

2.6
33.8

5.6
9.5

3.0
6.7

1.2
11.7

Addenda:
Motor vehicle output...................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3..........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers...............................
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers..............................

2005

2005

18

3.9

3.1

4.1

1.6

5.6

2.5

1.9

19

4.2

3.1

3.9

2.5

5.1

1.9

2006
IV

III

3
Goods............................................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods............................
Final sales..............................

2004

III

I

III

II

Percent change at annual rate:
Gross domestic product......
Percentage points at annual
rates:
Final sales of domestic
product...........................
Change in private
inventories......................

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

2

3.53

3.52

4.36

-0.28

5.61

2.11

1.90

3

0.38

-0.30

-0.18

2.05

-0.03

0.44

0.06

G oods...........................................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods...........................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods......................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories 1

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

1.56
1.18
0.38
0.85
0.66
0.18
0.71
0.52
0.20

1.43
1.73
-0.30
0.84
0.96
-0.12
0.58
0.76
-0.18

2.07
2.26
-0.18
1.79
1.56
0.23
0.28
0.70
-0.42

0.97
-1.08
2.05
0.58
-0.77
1.35
0.39
-0.31
0.70

3.86
3.89
-0.03
1.26
2.11
-0.85
2.60
1.78
0.82

1.12
0.67
0.44
0.31
-0.03
0.34
0.80
0.70
0.10

1.17
1.10
0.06
1.19
0.89
0.30
-0.02
0.21
-0.23

Services 2.....................................

13
14

1.84

1.31

2.02

0.46

1.39

1.40

0.51

0.49

0.09

0.33

0.33

0.04

1.63
-0.84

Structures.....................................
Addenda:
Motor vehicle output...................
Gross domestic product excluding
motor vehicle output...............
Final sales of computers3..........
Gross domestic product excluding
final sales of computers..........

15

0.12

0.20

0.70

-0.71

0.12

-0.31

0.76

16
17

3.79
0.06

3.03
0.16

3.48
0.08

2.47
0.20

5.46
0.07

2.87
0.04

1.20
0.07

18

3.85

3.07

4.10

1.56

5.52

2.51

1.89

1.9

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Indus­
trial Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

Table 1.2.3. Real Gross Domestic Product by Major Type of Product,
Quantity Indexes

Table 1.2.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product
by Major Type of Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross domestic product......
Final sales of domestic
product...........................
Change in private

Line

2006
IV

I

II

1 109.031

112.546

113.223 113.719

115.274

116.004

116.569

2

112.958

113.965

115.455

116.060

116.609

109.096

113.883

Gross domestic product
Final sales of domestic
product...........................
Change in private

Structures....................................
Addenda:
Motor vehicle output...................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3..........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers..............................
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers..............................

112.515
113.689

113.448
115.696

114.326
114.689

117.831
118.277

118.877 119.983
118.917 119.978

105.478
105.719

111.888
113.219

113.586
116.131

114.743
114.523

117.231
118.845

117.887
118.780

120.422
120.724

109.703
109.497

113.386
114.342

113.690
115.616

114.342
115.095

118.691
118.096

120.058
119.302

'120.019
119.664

13 110.477

112.963

113.513

113.738

114.408

115.094

115.905

Goods...........................................
Final sales.............................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods............................
Final sales.............................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods......................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories 1
Services 2.....................................

14 106.297 111.235

111.852

112.698

113.518

113.612

111.462

Structures.....................................

fi

15 111.420

118.006

122.582

116.260

117.341

114.487

16
17

108.947
153.070

112.359
190.534

112.907
192.596

113.626
207.153

115.197
211.907

116.043 116.398
215.393 221.455

18 108.699

112.053

112.722

113.162

114.703

115.421

115.966

110.114

113.571

114.095

114.796

116.235

116.787

117.327

19

121.621

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.




1 109.429

112.744 113.139

2

112.783

2006
IV

II

III

114.048 114.967

I

115.905

116.446

113.181

114.101

115.025

115.961

116.498

4 100.063 100.162 100.248
5 100.102 100.206 100.299
6
7 92.651
92.090
92.214
8 92.650
92.186 92.063
9
10 106.851 107.452 107.738
11 106.940 107.574 107.872
12

99.734
99.811

100.237
100.325

100.768
100.841

100.723
100.781

91.803
91.789

91.830
91.824

91.650
91.652

91.243
91.223

107.008
107.181

107,963
108.149

109.165
109.319

109.467
109.610

13 113.413

117.810 118.273

119.744

120.745

121.811

122.673

14 119.911

128.721

132.758 134.749

136.479

137.374

109.455

3

4 107.604
5 107.656
7
8
q
10
11
1?

2005

2005
III

s
Goods...........................................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods............................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods......................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories 1
Services 2.....................................

2004

III

Addenda:
Motor vehicle output...................
Grass domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3..........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers..............................

129.859

15

97.041

97.656

96.976

96.857

97.636

97.564

96.460

16
17

109.910
49.625

113.332
41.430

113.772
40.421

114.721
38.476

115.646
37.234

116.624
35.362

117.228
33.799

18

110.215

113.724

114.144 115.107

116.067

117.060

117.643

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

D-6

National Data

January 2007

Table 1.2.5. Gross Domestic Product
by Major Type of Product

Table 1.2.6. Real Gross Domestic Product
by Major Type of Product, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005

2006
IV

III

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

I

II

Line

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,322.6

Gross domestic product
Final sales of domestic
product...........................
Change in private
inventories......................

2 11,655.1 12,434.6 12,588.8 12,681.9 12,961.2 13,135.1 13,258.4
3

Goods...........................................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods............................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods......................
Final sales..............................
Change in private inventories 1

57.3

21.3

-15.3

48.6

47.2

62.3

64.2

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

3,713.7
3,656.3
57.3
1,651.0
1,619.4
31.6
2,062.7
2,036.9
25.8

3,886.5
3,865.3
21.3
1,742.9
1,725.6
17.3
2,143.6
2,139.7
4.0

3,921.9
3,937.2
-15.3
1,767.0
1,767.7
-0.8
2,155.0
2,169.5
-14.5

3,932.6
3,883.9
48.6
1,779.6
1,738.1
41.6
2,152.9
2,145.9
7.0

4,073.2
4,026.1
47.2
1,818.6
1,804.3
14.3
2,254.6
2,221.7
32.9

4,131.0
4,068.7
62.3
1,825.1
1,800.0
25.1
2,305.9
2,268.7
37.2

4,166.7
4,102.5
64.2
1,856.1
1,820.9
35.2
2,310.6
2,281.7
28.9
7,713.8
1,442.1

Services 2.....................................

13

6,798.0

7,220.4

7,283.6

7,388.9

7,494.5

7,606.0

Structures.....................................
Addenda:
Motor vehicle output...................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3..........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers...............................

14

1,200.8

1,348.9

1,368.0

1,409.1

1,440.6

1,460.3

15

394.6

420.5

433.3

411.8

418.0

408.2

2004

2005

III

428.0

16 11,317.9 12,035.3 12,140.2 12,318.8 12,590.4 12,789.1 12,894.6
17
83.5
86.8
85.9
87.9
87.0
84.0
82.6

18 11,629.0 12,369.1 12,487.6 12,642.6 12,921.3 13,113.3 13,240.0

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

2005

2006
IV

III

I

II

III

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,443.5

Gross domestic product
Final sales of domestic
product...........................
Change in private
inventories.....................
Residual.............................

2 10,648.3 11,025.2 11,123.5 11,115.5 11,269.0 11,328.0 11,381.6
3
4

53.4
1.8

19.6
3.8

-12.7
4.3

43.5
4.8

41.2
6.2

53.7
6.4

55.4
6.5

G oods..........................................
Final sales.............................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods...........................
Final sales.............................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods.....................
Final sales.............................
Change in private inventories 1

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

3,711.6
3,652.6
53.4
1,781.9
1,747.9
30.7
1,930.7
1,904.7
23.1

3,913.2
3,925.4
-12.7
1,918.9
1,920.0
-0.5
2,000.9
2,011.2
-11.6

3,943.5
3,891.2
43.5
1,938.4
1,893.4
39.2
2,012.4
2,002.1
6.4

4,064.4
4,013.0
41.2
1,980.5
1,964.9
13.4
2,088.9
2,054.3
27.1

14

5,994.0

6,158.7

6,170.9

6,207.3

4,100.5
4,034.7
53.7
1,991.5
1,963.8
23.1
2,113.0
2,075.3
30.3
6,244.5

4,138.6
4,070.7
55.4
2,034.4
1,995.9
31.9
2,112.3
2,081.6
24.1

Services 2....................................

3,881.0
3,857.3
19.6
1,890.2
1,871.9
16.4
1,995.6
1,989.0
3.9
6,128.9

Structures....................................
Residual........................................

15
16

1,001.4
1.7

1,047.9
-9.4

1,053.7
-16.4

1,061.7
-9.9

1,069.4
-20.0

1,070.3
-19.2

1,050.0
-28.5

17

406.6

430.7

447.4

424.3

428.3

417.8

443.9

Addenda:
Motor vehicle output..................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers3
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers..............................

6,288.5

18 10,297.7 10,620.2 10,672.0 10,739.9 10,888.4 10,968.4 11,001.9
209.5
211.7
227.7
233.0
19
168.3
236.8
243.5

20 10,551.4 10,877.0 10,942.0 10,984.7 11,134.3 11,204.0 11,256.9

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Indus­
trial Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar
value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of
more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line following change in
private inventories is the difference between gross domestic product and the sum of final sales of domestic product and of
change in private inventories; the residual line following structures is the difference between gross domestic product and the
sum of the detailed lines of goods, of services, and of structures.

Table 1.3.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Gross
Value Added by Sector

Table 1.3.3. Real Gross Value Added by Sector,
Quantity Indexes

[Percent]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
IV

III

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2006
I

II

2004

2005

2005

2006

III

IV

I

113.223
114.542
114.545
114.172

113.719

115.274

116.004

116.569

115.057
115.044
116.415

116.942
116.911
120.316

117.735
117.700
121.458

118.281
118.257
120.861

5 108.826 111.086 111.349
6 109.250 112.605 112.658

111.972
113.798

113.180
115.853

114.028
116.985

114.631
117.788

109.982

110.484

110.842

11
1
Gross domestic product....

1
2
3
4

109.031
109.596
109.547
114.112

112.546

II

III

Gross domestic product....
Business 1..................................
Nonfarm 2...............................
Farm..

1
2
3
4

3.9
4.4
4.3
7.4

3.2
3.8
3.8
1.0

4.2
4.9
4.9
11.3

1.8
1.8
1.8
8.1

5.6
6.7
6.7
14.1

2.6
2.7
2.7
3.9

2.0
1.9
1.9
-2.0

Households and institutions....
Households.............................
Nonprofit institutions serving
households 3.......................

5
6

4.2
6.9

2.1
3.1

2.6
2.3

2.3
4.1

4.4
7.4

3.0
4.0

2.1
2.8

7

0.9

0.8

3.0

0.0

0.6

1.8

1.3

Households and institutions....
Households.............................
Nonprofit institutions serving
households 3.......................

108.391

109.294

109.815

109.805

General governm ent4...............
Federal....................................
State and local.........................

8
9
10

0.6
1.0
0.5

0.9
0.6
1.0

0.8
-0.4
1.4

0.9
1.5
0.7

-0.7
-3.5
0.6

0.8
-0.1
1.2

2.4
3.2
2.1

General government4...............
Federal....................................
State and local.........................

8 105.732
9 106.265
10 105.491

106.666
106.947
106.536

106.731
106.726
106.726

106.982 106.795
107.121 106.167
106.915 107.065

107.014 107.659
106.148 106.997
107.389 107.944

Addendum:
Gross housing value added.....

11

5.6

2.7

1.9

2.8

7.1

4.0

2.8

Addendum:
Gross housing value added

11

107.857

107.927

108.674

111.642

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and
used by nonprofit institutions serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing owned by
nonprofit institutions.
4. Equals compensation of general government employees plus general government consumption of fixed capital.




Business 1.................................
Nonfarm 2...............................
Farm.......................................

7

104.980

113.706
113.690
115.266

110.563

112.421

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and
used by nonprofit institutions serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing owned by
nonprofit institutions.
4. Equals compensation of general government employees plus general government consumption of fixed capital.

January 2007

Survey

C

of

urrent

D-7

B u s in e s s

Table 1.3.4. Price Indexes for Gross Value Added by Sector

Table 1.3.5. Gross Value Added by Sector

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted
2004

Line

2005

Line

2006

2005
III

IV

I

II

2004

2005
III

III

2006

2005
IV

I

II

III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,322.6
9,007.6 9,613.4 9,717.7 9,837.9 10,065.4 10,210.4 10,287.7
8,893.0 9,517.5 9,624.7 9,745.0 9,973.6 10,124.8 10,194.0
91.8
93.7
93.0
92.9
85.6
114.6
95.9

Gross domestic product . ..

1 109.429

112.744

113.139

114.048

114.967 115.905

116.446

Gross domestic product....

Business 1.................................
Nonfarm 2................................
Farm.......................................

2 107.243
3 106.924
4 140.433

110.324 110.720
110.268 110.690
116.270 113.998

111.581
111.582
111.773

112.325
112.379
106.945

113.179
113.320
98.811

113.518
113.561
109.258

B usiness' .................................
Nonfarm 2...............................
Farm.......................................

2
3
4

Households and institutions....
Households.............................
Nonprofit institutions serving
households 3.......................

5 115.057
6 112.530

117.960
114.495

118.146
114.683

119.389
115.448

120.628 122.104
116.397 118.148

123.536
119.842

5
6

118.278

122.437

122.618

124.508

128.292

/

599.6

625.8

629.7

639.4

648.8

657.4

665.0

General governm ent4...............
Federal....................................
State and local.........................

8 119.235
9 122.817
10 117.747

124.718
129.479
122.735

125.330
130.093
123.347

126.142 127.233
126.237 128.170 129.182
129.782 133.763 134.390
124.764 125.844 127.015

Households and institutions....
Households..............................
Nonprofit institutions serving
households 3 .......................

130.338
134.579
128.572

General government4...............
Federal....................................
State and local.........................

8
9
10

1,348.4
411.6
936.8

1,422.9
436.7
986.2

1,430.7
437.9
992.9

1,444.5
438.4
1,006.0

1,464.0
447.9
1,016.2

1,478.6
449.9
1,028.7

1,500.8
454.1
1,046.7

Addendum:
Gross housing value added....

11

114.694

114.898

115.764

120.032

Addendum:
Gross housing value added

11

938.7

982.6

984.9

999.2

1,025.0

1,049.6

1,071.8

7

112.580

116.716

118.361

1,419.6
793.7

1,425.1
795.4

1,448.2
808.8

Table 1.3.6. Real Gross Value Added by Sector, Chained Dollars
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2006

2005
IV

III

I

II

III

11,048.6

Households and institutions
Households.....................................................................
Nonprofit institutions serving households 3......................

5
6
7

8,402.4
8,320.3
81.6
1,176.1
672.6
504.1

General government4.......................................................
Federal............................................................................
State and local.................................................................
Residual...............................................................................

8
9
10
11

1,130.9
335.1
795.6
-5.8

Addendum:
Gross housing value added.............................................

12

833.8

11,316.4

11,388.1

11,443.5

8,781.6
8,699.9
81.7

8,821.0
8,737.8
83.3

8,965.6
8,879.6
86.1

9,026.4
8,939.5
86.9

9,068.2
8,981.8
86.4

1,203.4
693.6
510.7

1,210.1
700.6
510.7

1,223.1
713.2
511.5

1,232.3
720.2
513.8

1,238.8
725.2
515.5

1,140.9
337.3
803.5
-11.0

2
3
4

11,163.8

1,200.5
693.2
508.3

10,703.5

Business 1........................
Nonfarm 2......................
Farm.............................

11,115.1

8,717.5
8,634.9
82.4

1

Gross domestic product...........................................

1,141.6
336.6
805.0
-12.4

1,144.3
337.8
806.4
-12.8

1,142.3
334.8
807.5
-16.3

1,144.6
334.8
810.0
-17.1

1,151.5
337.4
814.1
-16.9

856.7

857.2

863.2

878.2

886.8

892.9

4.
Equals compensation of general government employees plus general
government consumption of fixed capital.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chaintype quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar value of the corresponding
series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes
uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar esti­
mates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between the
first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households
and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value
added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental
value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and used by nonprofit institutions
serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing
owned by nonprofit institutions.

Table 1.4.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross
Domestic Purchases, and Real Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers
[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

1,479.0
830.2

1,508.3
850.9

1,534.0
869.0

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and
used by nonprofit institutions serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing owned by
nonprofit institutions.
4. Equals compensation of general government employees plus general government consumption of fixed capital.

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and
used by nonprofit institutions serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing owned by
nonprofit institutions.
4. Equals compensation of general government employees plus general government consumption of fixed capital.




1,356.5
756.9

2004

2005

2006

2005
IV

III

I

Gross domestic product...................................................
Less: Exports of goods and services..................................
Plus: Imports of goods and services....................................
Equals: Gross domestic purchases.................................
Less: Change in private inventories.....................................

1
2
3
4
b

3.9
9.2
10.8
4.4

3.2
6.8
6.1

4.2
3.2
2.5

1.8
9.6
13.2

3.3

4.0

2.7

Equals: Final sales to domestic purchasers....................

6

4.0

3.6

4.2

0.7

Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product.......................................

7

3.5

3.5

4.4

-0.3

II

III

5.6
14.0
9.1

2.6
6.2
1.4

2.0
6.8
5.6

5.3

2.0

2.0

5.4

1.6

2.0

5.6

2.1

1.9

D-8

National Data

January 2007

Table 1.4.3. Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross Domestic Purchases,
and Real Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers, Quantity Indexes

Table 1.4.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product, Gross Domestic
Purchases, and Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

2005
IV

III
Gross domestic product...........
Less: Exports of goods and
services..................................
Plus: Imports of goods and
services...................................
Equals: Gross domestic
purchases...............................
Less: Change in private
inventories..............................
Equals: Final sales to domestic
purchasers............................
Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product

1 109.031

Seasonally adjusted

2006
I

Line

II

112.546 113.223 113.719 115.274 116.004 116.569
109.105

109.503

112.054

115.783

117.536

119.495

3 115.962

123.007

122.520

126.377

129.146

129.608

131.378

4 110.691

114.351

114.889

115.657

117.161

117.746

118.341

5
6 110.761
7

109.096

114.755
112.958

115.610
113.965

115.825
113.883

117.345
115.455

2005

III

102.201

2

2004

2005
III

Gross domestic product...........
Less: Exports of goods and
services...................................
Plus: Imports of goods and
services..................................
Equals: Gross domestic
purchases...............................
Less: Change in private
inventories...............................

2006
IV

I

II

III

1 109.429

112.744 113.139

114.048

114.967

115.905

116.446

2

105.151

108.949

109.341

110.108

110.737

112.400

113.631

3

104.678

111.268

112.919

114.117

113.918

116.608

118.143

4 109.210

112.981

113.572

114.541

115.313

116.455

117.080

5

117.810 118.390

Equals: Final sales to domestic
purchasers..............................

6 109.235 113.021

113.614

114.594

115.371

116.510

117.133

116.060

Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product

7

113.181

114.101

115.025

115.961

116.498

116.609

109.455

112.783

Table 1.4.5. Relation of Gross Domestic Product, Gross Domestic Purchases,
and Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers

Table 1.4.6. Relation of Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross Domestic
Purchases, and Real Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross domestic product...........
Less: Exports of goods and
services..................................
Plus: Imports of goods and
services...................................

IV

I

II

2004

2005

2

1,178.1

1,303.1

1,312.4

1,352.4

1,405.4

1,448.1

1,488.3

3

1,791.4

2,019.9

2,041.2

2,127.8

2,170.6

2,229.8

2,290.1

2005
III

III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,322.6

Gross domestic product...........
Less: Exports of goods and
services...................................
Plus: Imports of goods and
services..................................

2006
IV

I

II

III

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,443.5
2

1,120.4

1,196.1

1,200.5

1,228.4

1,269.3

1,288.5

1,310.0

3

1,711.3

1,815.3

1,808.1

1,865.0

1,905.9

1,912.7

1,938.8

6 12,268.4 13,151.3 13,317.6 13,457.3 13,726.4 13,916.8 14,060.1

Equals: Gross domestic
purchases..............................
Less: Change in private
inventories..............................
Equals: Final sales to domestic
purchasers..............................

6 11,231.1 11,636.1 11,722.8 11,744.6 11,898.7 11,945.9 12,004.7

7 11,655.1 12,434.6 12,588.8 12,681.9 12,961.2 13,135.1 13,258.4

Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product

7 10,648.3 11,025.2 11,123.5 11,115.5 11,269.0 11,328.0 11,381.6

Equals: Gross domestic
purchases..............................
Less: Change in private
inventories...............................

5

Equals: Final sales to domestic
purchasers............................
Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product




Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2006

4 12,325.7 13,172.5 13,302.3 13,505.9 13,773.6 13,979.1 14,124.3
57.3

21.3

-15.3

48.6

47.2

62.3

64.2

4 11,286.5 11,659.7 11,714.6 11,792.9 11,946.3 12,005.9 12,066.6
5

53.4

19.6

-12.7

43.5

41.2

53.7

55.4

Note. Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive.

January 2007

Survey

of

D-9

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 1.5.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Gross Domestic Product,
Expanded Detail

Table 1.5.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real
Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail
[Percent]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
ine

2004

2005

Gross domestic product....
Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
Other...................................
Nondurable goods...................
Food....................................
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods...................
Other...................................
Services..................................
Housing..............................
Household operation...........
Electricity and gas...........
Other household operation
Transportation......................
Medical care........................
Recreation...........................
Other...................................
Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software...................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment...........
Software 1...............
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment...............
Other equipment.........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...
Farm....................................
Nonfarm...............................

Line

2006

2005
III

IV

I

2005

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

3.9
6.4
1.9

3.5
5.5
0.6

3.9
9.0
10.5

0.8
-12.3
-34.9

4.8
19.8
18.9

2.6
-0.1
-1.2

2.8
6.4
8.6

12.1
6.8
3.6
3.4
5.0

10.0
8.7
4.5
5.4
6.2

13.7
-2.0
3.4
6.4
3.0

11.6
6.1
3.9
4.1
10.3

22.8
16.3
5.9
6.7
8.6

3.3
-3.7
1.4
2.0
-3.8

6.7
1.6
1.5
-0.7
5.5

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

1.0
4.3
3.5
3.8
2.6
1.6
3.3
1.2
3.1
4.8
4.2

-0.5
4.1
2.6
2.8
2.1
2.6
1.8
0.1
3.6
2.7
2.0

-5.8
2.9
3.2
2.3
2.4
2.1
2.7
-1.7
4.4
1.8
4.6

-2.3
3.6
2.0
1.7
0.3
2.0
-0.8
-0.2
3.7
1.5
1.7

-1.3
6.4
1.6
2.3
-14.0
-29.7
-0.1
4.0
4.3
3.1
3.2

0.7
3.4
3.7
2.4
8.4
15.8
3.4
1.7
2.6
0.8
6.1

5.0
2.0
2.8
2.6
9.7
21.9
1.6
1.3
2.1
3.0
1.6

21
22
23
24
25

9.8
7.3
5.9
2.2
7.3

5.4
7.5
6.8
1.1
8.9

5.2
6.3
5.9
-7.0
11.0

16.2
2.8
5.2
12.0
2.8

7.8
8.2
13.7
8.7
15.6

1.0
-1.6
4.4
20.3
-1.4

-0.8
-1.2
10.0
15.7
7.7

26

10.1

8.5

7.3

7.0

21.8

-1.1

10.0

27
28
29
30

14.2
10.0
8.1
-4.1

17.9
5.8
7.2
8.1

8.6
4.6
9.9
20.1

27.1
2.8
3.0
16.2

24.9
12.2
31.6
-3.6

4.7
4.2
-9.0
13.6

22.0
6.0
9.3
0.2

31
32
33
34
35
36

13.2
5.6
9.9

12.9
7.0
8.6

23.0
2.0
7.1

-21.8
6.6
-0.9

27.7
8.5
-0.3

-22.8
7.4
-11.1

13.6
3.8
-18.7

I

II

III

Percentage points at annual
rates:

5
6
7
8
9

IV

Percent change at annual rate:

2
3
4

2006

2005
III

Gross domestic product....

Net exports of goods and
services..................................
Exports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................
Imports...................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................

37
38
39
40
41
42
43

9.2
9.0
9.7
10.8
10.9
10.0

6.8
7.5
5.1
6.1
6.7
2.8

3.2
3.7
2.1
2.5
2.7
1.2

9.6
11.5
5.5
13.2
14.1
8.3

14.0
17.3
6.7
9.1
9.4
7.4

6.2
6.0
6.7
1.4
-0.1
9.9

6.8
9.4
0.8
5.6
7.1
-2.6

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Consumption expenditures
Grass investment........
Nondefense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..........
State and local......................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

1.9
4.3
5.9
5.4
9.5
1.2
1.3
1.2
0.5
1.0
-1.6

0.9
1.5
1.7
1.2
5.5
1.1
0.1
8.1
0.5
0.9
-0.9

3.4
9.6
11.2
11.1
11.7
6.2
4.0
22.8
-0.1
1.4
-6.4

-1.1
-4.6
-9.9
-10.8
-3.1
7.1
2.4
43.8
1.0
1.0
1.4

4.9
8.8
8.9
9.1
7.9
8.5
8.1
10.8
2.7
1.7
7.0

0.8
-4.5
-2.0
-4.1
14.1
-9.3
-5.0
-32.9
4.0
2.1
12.5

1.7
1.3
-1.2
-0.9
-3.1
6.5
6.5
6.7
1.9
3.1
-3.1

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.




2004

III

II

Personal consumption
expenditures.........................
Durable goods.........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
Other...................................
Nondurable goods...................
Food....................................
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods...................
Other
Servk es
Housing...............................
Household operation...........
hedncity and gas...........
Other household operation
Transportation......................
Medical care........................
Recreation...........................
Other...................................
Gross private domestic
investment.............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software...................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment............
Software 1
................
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment................
Other equipment..........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...
Farm...................................
Nonfarm..............................
Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports...................................
Goods.................................
Services...............................
Imports....................................
Goods..................................
Services...............................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment........
Nondefense...................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..........
State and local......................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

2
3
4

2.71
0.54
0.07

2.44
0.45
0.02

2.76
0.74
0.38

0.53
-1.08
-1.51

3.38
1.50
0.60

1.81
-0.01
-0.04

1.96
0.50
0.28

5
6
7
8
9

0.35
0.11
0.73
0.33
0.14

0.29
0.14
0.90
0.51
0.17

0.40
-0.03
0.70
0.61
0.08

0.33
0.10
0.79
0.39
0.27

0.65
0.26
1.20
0.64
0.23

0.10
-0.06
0.30
0.19
-0.10

0.20
0.03
0.32
-0.07
0.15

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

0.02
0.24
1.45
0.40
0.10
0.02
0.08
0.03
0.37
0.14
0.41

-0.01
0.23
1.09
0.30
0.08
0.04
0.04
0.00
0.43
0.08
0.20

-0.15
0.16
1.32
0.24
0.09
0.03
0.06
-0.04
0.53
0.05
0.44

-0.06
0.19
0.83
0.18
0.01
0.03
-0.02
0.00
0.44
0.04
0.16

-0.03
0.36
0.67
0.24
-0.58
-0.58
0.00
0.10
0.52
0.09
0.31

0.02
0.19
1.52
0.25
0.31
0.23
0.08
0.04
0.31
0.02
0.58

0.14
0.11
1.14
0.27
0.35
0.32
0.04
0.03
0.25
0.08
0.15

21
22
23
24
25

1.49
1.11
0.58
0.06
0.52

0.87
1.17
0.67
0.03
0.64

0.84
1.02
0.59
-0.20
0.78

2.51
0.46
0.52
0.31
0.21

1.31
1.34
1.36
0.25
1.11

0.17
-0.27
0.45
0.56
-0.10

-0.13
-0.19
1.01
0.46
0.55

26

0.36

0.30

0.26

0.25

0.74

-0.04

0.35

27
28
29
30

0.10
0.15
0.11
-0.05

0.12
0.09
0.10
0.10

0.06
0.07
0.13
0.23

0.16
0.04
0.04
0.19

0.15
0.18
0.40
-0.05

0.03
0.07
-0.14
0.16

0.13
0.09
0.13
0.00

31
32
33
34
35
36

0.14
0.07
0.53
0.38
0.07
0.31

0.15
0.09
0.50
-0.30
-0.06
-0.24

0.27
0.03
0.43
-0.18
0.28
-0.46

-0.31
0.08
-0.06
2.05
0.14
1.90

0.31
0.11
-0.02
-0.03
-0.01
-0.02

-0.32
0.09
-0.72
0.44
-0.09
0.54

0.15
0.05
-1.20
0.06
0.02
0.05

37
38
39
40
41
42
43

-0.65
0.88
0.60
0.28
-1.53
-1.29
-0.24

-0.26
0.68
0.52
0.16
-0.94
-0.87
-0.07

-0.06
0.33
0.27
0.06
-0.39
-0.36
-0.03

-1.07
0.97
0.80
0.17
-2.04
-1.84
-0.20

-0.04
1.41
1.20
0.21
-1.46
-1.27
-0.19

0.42
0.66
0.45
0.21
-0.24
0.01
-0.25

-0.19
0.73
0.71
0.03
-0.93
-1.00
0.07

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

0.36
0.30
0.27
0.22
0.05
0.03
0.03
0.00
0.06
0.10
-0.04

0.17
0.11
0.08
0.05
0.03
0.03
0.00
0.02
0.06
0.08
-0.02

0.64
0.66
0.52
0.45
0.07
0.14
0.08
0.06
-0.01
0.14
-0.15

-0.21
-0.33
-0.49
-0.47
-0.02
0.16
0.05
0.11
0.13
0.09
0.03

0.94
0.61
0.41
0.37
0.05
0.20
0.16
0.03
0.33
0.17
0.16

0.16
-0.32
-0.09
-0.17
0.08
-0.23
-0.10
-0.12
0.48
0.20
0.28

0.32
0.09
-0.06
-0.04
-0.02
0.15
0.13
0.02
0.23
0.30
-0.08

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.

D-10

January 2007

National Data

Table 1.5.3. Real Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail, Quantity Indexes

Table 1.5.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

Seasonally adjusted

2006

2005

Line

III
Gross domestic product....
Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
Other..................................
Nondurable goods...................
Food...................................
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods...................
Other..................................
Services..................................
Housing..............................
Household operation...........
Electricity and gas...........
Other household operation
Transportation......................
Medical care........................
Recreation...........................
Other..................................
Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software
Information processing
equipment and
software...................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment...........
Software 1...............
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment...............
Other equipment.........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...

IV

I

II

112.546

113.223

113.719

115.274

116.004

116.569

2 112.430
3 125.753
4 116.518

116.349
132.666
117.173

117.152
136.207
122.801

117.373
131.799
110.286

118.761
137.893
115.158

119.521
137.868
114.799

120.355
140.019
117.179

5 142.541
6 119.370
7 111.913
8 109.273
9 117.869

156.790
129.696
116.924
115.191
125.195

159.059
130.021
117.481
116.189
125.581

163.472
131.958
118.608
117.349
128.686

172.097
137.039
120.313
119.265
131.367

173.496
135.754
120.742
119.853
130.113

176.324
136.292
121.204
119.631
131.876

104.727
116.072
110.055
108.459
104.922
104.569
105.147
97.510
118.550
113.618
107.403

104.204
120.838
112.925
111.540
107.145
107.317
107.016
97.652
122.799
116.727
109.540

103.288
121.368
113.379
111.918
107.506
107.443
107.543
97.376
123.437
117.009
110.176

102.679
122.432
113.945
112.394
107.598
107.963
107.320
97.330
124.563
117.445
110.634

102.348
124.356
114.398
113.035
103.628
98.875
107.289
98.298
125.887
118.336
111.521

102.532
125.409
115.440
113.713
105.735
102.566
108.190
98.722
126.690
118.581
113.175

103.795
126.016
116.234
114.436
108.203
107.770
108.629
99.044
127.347
119.448
113.622

21 102.026
22 102.080
92.995
23
24
79.418
98.400
25

107.537
109.708
99.326
80.302
107.180

106.938
111.032
100.025
78.903
108.889

111.034 113.143 113.429
111.811 114.033 113.570
101.308 104.606 105.738
81.174
82.893
86.819
109.653 113.704 113.313

113.215
113.240
108.292
90.044
115.434

26

108.905

118.169

119.268

121.307

127.437

127.088

130.156

27
28
29
30

138.489
110.703
95.076
83.354

163.269 163.804
117.072 118.092
101.880 103.171
90.147 90.994

173.913
118.920
103.947
94.468

183.839
122.383
111.339
93.602

185.956
123.658
108.753
96.640

195.437
125.468
111.205
96.691

90.382
112.290
136.050

89.030
115.224
138.495

94.635
117.597
138.391

88.698
119.702
134.368

91.571
120.837
127.601

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

80.063
31
32 104.902
33 125.281
34
M
S

94.682
113.399
138.821

Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
Other...................................
Nondurable goods...................
Food....................................
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods...................
Other...................................
Services..................................
Housing..............................
Household operation...........
Electricity and gas...........
Other household operation
Transportation......................
Medical care........................
Recreation...........................
Other...................................
Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software...................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment............
Software 1
................
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment................
Other equipment..........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...
Nonfarm..............................

Exports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................
Imports....................................
Goods..................................
Services..............................

'V
38
39
40
41
42
43

102.201
100.002
107.667
115.962
116.786
112.051

112.054 Ti 5.783
111.027 115.535
114.693 116.564
126.377 129.146
128.331 131.236
116.954 119.055

117.536
117.228
118.463
129.608
131.218
121.896

119.495
119.898
118.712
131.378
133.503
121.100

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
Nondefense.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
State and local.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.................

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

112.720 113.731 114.358 114.048 115.423
123.813 125.701 127.545 126.053 128.728
128.374 130.593 133.423 130.002 132.808
127.006 128.551 131.236 127.544 130.343
138.370 145.920 149.882 148.703 151.544
115.606 116.896 116.939 118.971 121.411
116.431 116.593 116.675 117.362 119.666
110.674 119.670 119.443 130.801 134.201
107.094 107.660 107.674 107.954 108.682
106.736 107.655 107.817 108.074 108.536
108.488 107.563 106.963 107.335 109.177

115.657
127.262
132.141
128.981
156.631
118.488
118.137
121.448
109.762
109.095
112.448

116.136
127.669
131.740
128.681
155.397
120.370
120.006
123.427
110.277
109.944
111.558

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
Nondefense.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
State and local.........................
Consumption expenditures...
Gross investment.................

109.105
107.507
113.118
123.007
124.640
115.170

109.503
108.050
113.158
122.520
124.159
114.652

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.

2005

2006

III
Gross domestic product....

Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports...................................
Goods.................................
Services...............................
Imports....................................
Goods.................................
Services..............................

Net exports of goods and




2005

III

1 109.031

2004

IV

I

II

III

1 109.429

112.744

113.139

114.048

114.967

115.905

116.446

2 108.373
3
90.845
97.242
4

111.493
90.198
98.967

112.067
89.908
98.607

112.873
89.606
98.906

113.445
89.385
99.460

114.573
89.206
99.532

115.241
88.967
99.631

5
6
7
8
9

79.929
98.044
107.617
110.270
92.655

76.884
97.688
111.530
112.732
91.706

76.315
98.189
113.016
113.012
91.265

75.435
98.005
113.177
113.642
91.101

74.671
97.567
113.484
114.414
90.870

73.894
98.351
115.769
114.905
91.651

73.046
98.950
116.442
115.727
91.342

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

124.064
106.139
112.863
113.234
109.943
117.821
105.374
108.373
114.660
112.059
113.086

151.423
107.775
116.529
116.165
115.554
129.900
107,233
112.663
118.438
115.168
116.625

167.157
107.930
116.858
116.453
115.498
129.526
107.364
113.621
118.752
115.535
116.985

163.612
108.619
118.281
117.279
120.579
142.169
108.047
114.970
119.949
116.702
117.959

161.126
109.301
119.194
118.269
122.403
145.582
108.977
115.411
120.482
117.311
119.116

182.632 185.621
109.737 110.041
120.059 120.960
119.717 121.055
121.019 121.383
140.799 140.318
109.447 110.285
116.826 117.675
121.332 122.180
118.582 119.425
119.970 120.711

21
22
23
24
25

106.645
106.811
100.834
120.951
94.503

110.284
110.542
103.428
134.647
94.134

110.675 111.853 112.860 113.717 113.895
110.946 112.194 113.238 114.074 114.224
103.607 104.510 105.471 106.266 106.501
136.089 141.476 145.684 149.432 151.372
93.754
93.887
93.704
93.983
93.920

26

84.741

82.218

81.863

81.313

80.940

80.737

80.438

2/
28
29
30

58.599
94.503
91.294
104.249

51.407
94.067
90.492
108.064

50.407
94.012
90.369
108.373

48.634
94.009
90.343
108.973

47.125
94.430
90.186
109.659

45.443
95.005
90.523
110.544

43.889
95.354
90.737
111.715

31 109.923
32 103.914
33 120.618
34
M
S
3fi

108.882
108.174
126.714

108.351
108.742
127.573

107.933
109.100
129.536

108.867
109.841
130.765

109.257
109.608
131.696

106.894
110.339
131.655

108.949
107.628
112.115
111.268
109.622
119.933

109.341
107.846
112.918
112.919
111.383
120.945

110.108
108.450
114.080
114.117
112.790
120.913

110.737
109.192
114.430
113.918
112.331
122.242

112.400
110.852
116.098
116.608
115.197
123.890

113.631
112.286
116.815
118.143
116.824
124.876

122.029 123.444
121.353 121.479
122.467 122.760
125.833 126.061
101.370 102.026
119.261 119.059
122.127 121.810
102.051 102.470
122.438 124.620
123.079 125.365
119.954 121.716

124.791
123.721
124.752
128.327
102.438
121.787
124.944
103.035
125.434
126.112
122.799

126.262
124.871
126.006
129.681
103.109
122.736
125.958
103.623
127.095
127.916
123.893

127.150
125.482
126.714
130.375
103.880
123.154
126.422
103.780
128.147
128.838
125.462

‘
M
38
39
40
41
42
43

105.151
104.392
106.985
104.678
102.962
113.786

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

114.718 121.183
115.249 120.726
115.954 121.855
118.472 125.071
99.911 101.628
113.963 118.606
116.274 121.381
100.007 101.913
114.417 121.463
115.388 122.177
110.587 118.679

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.

January 2007

Survey

D-11

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

of

Table 1.5.5. Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail

Table 1.5.6. Real Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005
III

Gross domestic product . ..
Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
Other...................................
Nondurable goods...................
Food....................................
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods...................
Other...................................
Services..................................
Housing...............................
Household operation...........

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

2005
IV

I

II

Line

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,322.6

Gross domestic product....

8,742.4
1,033.1
448.2

8,847.3
1,057.3
468.1

8,927.8
1,019.6
421.6

9,079.2
1,064.1
442.7

9,228.1
1,061.8
441.7

5
6
7
8
9

356.5
191.8
2,345.2
1,114.8
325.1

377.2
207.7
2,539.3
1,201.4
341.8

380.0
209.2
2,584.9
1,214.7
341.3

386.0
212.0
2,613.5
1,233.7
349.1

402.3
219.1
2,658.2
1,262.3
355.4

401.3
218.8
2,721.4
1,274.0
355.1

10
11
12
13
14
IS
16
17
18
19
20

248.8
656.5
4,880.1
1,236.1
450.0
176.6
273.5
307.8
1,395.7
341.6
1,148.9

302.1
694.0
5,170.0
1,304.1
483.0
199.8
283.2
320.4
1,493.4
360.6
1,208.4

331.0
698.0
5,205.1
1,311.7
484.3
199.4
285.0
322.3
1,505.0
362.6
1,219.1

322.1
708.6
5,294.7
1,326.6
506.1
219.9
286.2
325.9
1,534.0
367.7
1,234.4

316.2
724.2
5,356.8
1,345.4
494.8
206.2
288.6
330.4
1,557.2
372.4
1,256.5

359.1
733.3
5,444.9
1,370.1
499.1
206 9
292.2
335.9
1,578.2
377.2
1,284.3

21
22
23
24
25

1,888.0
1,830.6
1,155.3
300.8
854.5

2,057.4
2,036.2
1,265.7
338.6
927.1

2,052.6
2,067.9
1,276.7
336.3
940.4

2,154.5
2,105.8
1,304.3
359.7
944.7

2,214.8
2,167.7
1,359.2
378.2
981.0

2,237.1
2,174.8
1,384.3
406.3
977.9

2,235.5
2,171.4
1,420.8
426.9
994.0

26

431.6

454.3

456.6

461.3

482.4

479.9

software...................

'?/
28
29
30

82.3
184.3
164.9
138.4

85.1
194.0
175.2
155.1

83.9
195.6
177.2
157.0

85.9
196.9
178.4
163.9

88.0
203.6
190.8
163.4

equipment and
489.6
Computers and
peripheral
87.2
85.9
207.0
210.8
191.7
187.1
170.1
172.0

31
32
33
34
35
36

141.6
143.0
675.3
57.3
8.4
49.0

158.3
159.4
770.4
21.3
0.3
21.0

165.0
161.8
791.2
-15.3
1.3
-16.6

154.6
164.9
801.5
48.6
5.8
42.8

165.7
169.4
808.5
47.2
5.4
41.8

155.9
172.1
790.6
62.3
2.3
59.9

Software 2................
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment................
Other equipment..........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...
Farm...................................
Nonfarm..............................

Net exports of goods and
services.................................
Exports....................................
Goods..................................
Services..............................
Imports....................................
Goods..................................
Services..............................

3/
38
39
40
41
42
43

-613.2
1,178.1
818.8
359.3
1,791.4
1,495.2
296.2

-716.7
1,303.1
907.5
395.6
2,019.9
1,699.0
320.9

-728.8
1,312.4
913.9
398.5
2,041.2
1,719.1
322.1

-775.4
1,352.4
944.3
408.1
2,127.8
1,799.3
328.5

-765.2
1,405.4
989.3
416.0
2,170.6
1,832.6
338.1

-781.8
1,448.1
1,019.1
429.0
2,229.8
1,879.0
350.8

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
Nondefense.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
State and local.........................
Consumption expenditures...
Gross investment.................

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

2,226.2
825.9
551.2
483.7
67.5
274.7
240.7
33.9
1,400.3
1,130.3
270.0

2,372.8
878.3
589.3
516.9
72.4
289.0
251.7
37.4
1,494.4
1,207.2
287.3

2,402.4
895.8
605.0
530.9
74.2
290.7
253.4
37.4
1,506.6
1,217.8
288.7

2,423.6
886.2
590.9
516.9
74.1
295.3
254.2
41.1
1,537.4
1,243.4
294.0

2,479.6
921.7
613.5
537.7
75.8
308.2
265.9
42.4
1,557.9
1,256.2
301.7

2,513.9
919.7
616.5
537.7
78.8
303.2
264.6
38.6
1,594.2
1,280.7
313.5

I

II

III

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,443.5
2
3
4

7,577.1
1,085.7
450.4

7,841.2
1,145.3
452.9

7,895.3
1,175.9
474.6

7,910.2
1,137.9
426.3

8,003.8
1,190.5
445.1

8,055.0
1,190.3
443.7

8,111.2
1,208.8
452.9

5
6
7
8
9

446.0
195.6
2,179.2
1,011.0
350.9

490.6
212.6
2,276.8
1,065.7
372.7

497.7
213.1
2,287.6
1,074.9
373.9

511.5
216.3
2,309.6
1,085.7
383.1

538.5
224.6
2,342.8
1,103.4
391.1

542.9
222.5
2,351,1
1,108.8
387.4

551.7
223.4
2,360.1
1,106.8
392.6

10
11
12
13
14
1^
16
17
18
19
20

200.5
618.5
4,323.9
1,091.6
409.3
149.8
259.5
284.0
1,217.3
304.8
1,016.0

199.5
643.9
4,436.6
1,122.6
418.0
153.8
264.1
284.4
1,260.9
313.1
1,036.2

197.8
646.7
4,454.5
1,126.4
419.4
154.0
265.4
283.6
1,267.5
313.9
1,042.2

196.6
652.4
4,476.7
1,131.2
419.8
154.7
264.9
283.5
1,279.0
315.1
1,046.5

196.0
662.6
4,494.5
1,137.6
404.3
141.7
264.8
286.3
1,292.6
317.5
1,054.9

196.3
668.3
4,535.4
1,144.5
412.5
147.0
267.0
287.5
1,300.9
318.1
1,070.6

198.7
671.5
4,566.6
1,151.7
422.1
154.4
268.1
288.5
1,307.6
320.4
1,074.8

21
22
23
24
25

1,770.6
1,713.9
1,145.8
248.7
904.2

1,866.3
1,842.0
1,223.8
251.5
984.9

1,855.9
1,864.2
1,232.4
247.1
1,000.6

1,927.0
1,877.3
1,248.2
254.2
1,007.6

1,963.6
1,914.6
1,288.8
259.6
1,044.8

1,968.5
1,906.8
1,302.8
271.9
1,041.2

1,964.8
1,901.3
1,334.2
282.0
1,060.7

26

509.3

552.6

557.7

567.3

595.9

594.3

608.6

'?!
28
29
30

195.0
180.7
132.7

206.2
193.6
143.5

208.0
196.0
144.9

209.5
197.5
150.4

215.6
211.6
149.0

217.8
206.7
153.9

221.0
211.3
153.9

31
32
33
34
35
36

128.8
137.6
559.9
53.4
6.1
47.0

145.4
147.3
608.0
19.6
0.2
19.6

152.3
148.8
620.4
-12.7
1.1

143.2
151.2
618.9
43.5
4.8
38.6

152.2
154.3
618.5
41.2
4.3
36.8

142.7
157.1
600.5
53.7
1.9
52.2

147.3
158.6
570.3
55.4
2.5
53.3

Net exports of goods and
-801.7
services.................................
1,488.3
Exports...................................
1,055.8
Goods.................................
Services..............................
432.5
2,290.1
Imports....................................
1,938.8
Goods.................................
351.3
Services...............................

3/
38
39
40
41
42
43

-590.9
1,120.4
784.4
335.9
1,711.3
1,452.2
260.3

-619.2
1,196.1
843.2
352.9
1,815.3
1,549.9
267.5

-607.6
1,200.5
847.5
353.0
1,808.1
1,543.9
266.3

-636.6
1,228.4
870.8
357.8
1,865.0
1,595.8
271.7

-636.6
1,269.3
906.2
363.6
1,905.9
1,631.9
276.6

-624.2
1,288.5
919.5
369.5
1,912.7
1,631.7
283.2

-628.8
1,310.0
940.4
370.3
1,938.8
1,660.1
281.3

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.............................
2,542.1
927.2
Federal....................................
618.1
National defense..................
539.3
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
78.8
Nondefense.........................
309.0
269.8
Consumption expenditures
39.3
Gross investment.............
1,614.9
State and local.........................
1,300.0
Consumption expenditures...
315.0
Gross investment.................
Residual......................................

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55

1,940.6
716.6
475.4
408.3
67.5
241.0
207.0
33.9
1,223.9
979.6
244.1
-17.6

1,958.0
727.5
483.6
413.3
71.2
243.7
207.3
36.7
1,230.4
988.0
242.1
-42.6

1,968.8
738.2
494.1
421.9
73.2
243.8
207.5
36.6
1,230.5
989.5
240.7
-47.1

1,963.5
729.6
481.4
410.0
72.6
248.0
208.7
40.1
1,233.7
991.9
241.6
-53.7

1,987.1
745.1
491.8
419.0
74.0
253.1
212.8
41.1
1,242.0
996.1
245.7
-78.7

1,991.2
736.6
489.3
414.7
76.5
247.0
210.1
37.2
1,254.4
1,001.2
253.1
-77.6

1,999.4
738.9
487.8
413.7
75.9
250.9
213.4
37.8
1,260.3
1,009.0
251.1
-88.3

157.5
174.9
750.5
64.2
2.5
61.6

Gross private domestic
investment.............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures.......................
Equipment and software...
Information processing

T

Software 1...............
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment...............
Other equipment.........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...
Farm....................................
Nonfarm...............................

IV

O

8,211.5
986.3
437.9

2006

2005
III

2
3
4

Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software...................
Computers and
peripheral

2005

III

Personal consumption
9,346.7
expenditures..........................
1,075.5
Durable goods.........................
451.3
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
403.2
221.0
Other...................................
2,747.7
Nondurable goods...................
1,280.7
Food....................................
358.7
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
369.4
energy goods...................
738.9
Othei
5,523.5
Services
1,394.2
Housing...............................
512.3
Household operation...........
216 6
295.7
Other household operation
339.5
Transportation......................
1,597.5
Medical care........................
382.7
Recreation...........................
Other...................................
1,297.3

Other household operation
Transportation......................
Medical care........................
Recreation...........................
Other..................................

2004

1. Excludes software “embedded,” rbund ed, in comr uters and ther equiprnent.




1. The quantity index for computers can be used to accurately measure the real growth of this component. However,
because computers exhibit rapid changes in prices relative to other prices in the economy, the chained-dollar estimates
should not be used to measure the component’s relative importance or its contribution to the growth rate of more aggregate
series; accurate estimates of these contributions are shown in table 1.5.2 and real growth rates are shown in table 1.5.1.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
N ote. The residual line is the difference between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

D-12

National Data

January 2007

Table 1.6.4. Price Indexes for
Gross Domestic Purchases

Table 1.6.7. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Prices for
Gross Domestic Purchases

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

2005

2006
IV

III
Gross domestic purchases...
Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
Other..................................
Nondurable goods...................
Food....................................
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods...................
Other..................................
Services..................................
Housing..............................
Household operation...........
Electricity and gas...........
Other household operation
Transportation......................
Medical care........................
Recreation..........................
Other..................................

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

I

II

Line

1 109.210

112.981

113.572 114.541

115.313 116.455

117.080

2 108.373
3 90.845
4
97.242

111.493
90.198
98.967

112.067
89.908
98.607

112.873
89.606
98.906

113.445
89.385
99.460

114.573
89.206
99.532

115.241
88.967
99.631

5 79.929
98.044
6
7 107.617
8 110.270
9
92.655

76.884
97.688
111.530
112.732
91.706

76.315
98.189
113.016
113.012
91.265

75.435
98.005
113.177
113.642
91.101

74.671
97.567
113.484
114.414
90.870

73.894
98.351
115.769
114.905
91.651

73.046
98.950
116.442
115.727
91.342

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

124.064
106.139
112.863
113.234
109.943
117.821
105.374
108.373
114.660
112.059
113.086

151.423
107.775
116.529
116.165
115.554
129.900
107.233
112.663
118.438
115.168
116.625

167.157
107.930
116.858
116.453
115.498
129.526
107.364
113.621
118.752
115.535
116.985

163.612
108.619
118.281
117.279
120.579
142.169
108.047
114.970
119.949
116.702
117.959

161.126
109.301
119.194
118.269
122.403
145.582
108.977
115.411
120.482
117.311
119.116

182.632
109.737
120.059
119.717
121.019
140.799
109.447
116.826
121.332
118.582
119.970

185.621
110.041
120.960
121.055
121.383
140.318
110.285
117.675
122.180
119.425
120.711

21
22
23
24
25

106.645
106.811
100.834
120.951
94.503

110.284
110.542
103.428
134.647
94.134

110.675 111.853 112.860 113.717
110.946 112.194 113.238 114.074
103.607 104.510 105.471 106.266
136.089 141.476 145.684 149.432
93.754
93.983
93.887
93.920

113.895
114.224
106.501
151.372
93.704

26

84.741

82.218

81.863

81.313

80.940

80.737

80.438

Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software...................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment...........
Software 1...............
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment...............
Other equipment.........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...

27
28
29
30

58.599
94.503
91.294
104.249

51.407
94.067
90.492
108.064

50.407
94.012
90.369
108.373

48.634
94.009
90.343
108.973

47.125
94.430
90.186
109.659

45.443
95.005
90.523
110.544

43.889
95.354
90.737
111.715

31
32
33
34

109.923
103.914
120.618

108.882
108.174
126.714

108.351
108.742
127.573

107.933
109.100
129.536

108.867
109.841
130.765

109.257
109.608
131.696

106.894
110.339
131.655

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
Nondefense.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
State and local.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............

3 / 114.718
38 115.249
39 115.954
40 118.472
41
99.911
42 113.963
43 116.274
44 100.007
45 114.417
46 115.388
47 110.587

121.183
120.726
121.855
125.071
101.628
118.606
121.381
101.913
121.463
122.177
118.679

122.029
121.353
122.467
125.833
101.370
119.261
122.127
102.051
122.438
123.079
119.954

123.444 124.791
121.479 123.721
122.760 124.752
126.061 128.327
102.026 102.438
119.059 121.787
121.810 124.944
102.470 103.035
124.620 125.434
125.365 126.112
121.716 122.799

Addenda:
Final sales of computers to
domestic purchasers 2 ........
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers...........................
Food.......................................
Energy goods and services.....
Gross domestic purchases
excluding food and energy....
Gross domestic product..........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers...................
Food................................
Energy goods and
services.......................
Gross domestic product
excluding food and
energy.........................
Final sales of domestic product
Final sales to domestic
purchasers...........................




126.262 127.150
124.871 125.482
126.006 126.714
129.681 130.375
103.109 103.880
122.736 123.154
125.958 126.422
103.623 103.780
127.095 128.147
127.916 128.838
123.893 125.462

48

51.421

44.424

43.470

41.803

40.388

38.697

37.407

49
50
51

110.188
110.211
121.649

114.210
112.598
144.830

114.838
112.842
153.098

115.873
113.482
158.485

116.704
114.220
157.543

117.922
114.697
168.404

118.601
115.555
168.668

52
53

108.555
109.429

111.638
112.744

111.939
113.139

112.758
114.048

113.605
114.967

114.420
115.905

115.034
116.446

64
55

110.215
110.929

113.724
112.925

114.144
113.269

115.107
113.749

116.067
114.442

117.060
114.970

117.643
115.919

56

116.292

126.526

129.409

131.589

135.113

140.609

136.890

57
58

109.047
109.455

112.298
112.783

112.624
113.181

113.545
114.101

114.417
115.025

115.272
115.961

115.890
116.498

59

109.235

113.021

113.614

114.594

115.371

116.510

117.133

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
2. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

2004

2005

III

2005

2006

III
Gross domestic purchases. ..
Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
Other...................................
Nondurable goods...................
Food....................................
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods...................
Other...................................
Services..................................
Housing..............................
Household operation...........
Electricity and gas...........
Other household operation
Transportation......................
Medical care........................
Recreation...........................
Other...................................
Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential......................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software...................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment............
Software 1
................
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment................
Other equipment..........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...
Farm...................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal....................................
National defense..................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
Nondefense.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
State and local.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
Addenda:
Final sales of computers to
domestic purchasers2.........
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers...........................
Food........................................
Energy goods and services.....
Gross domestic purchases
excluding food and energy....
Gross domestic product...........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers....................
Food................................
Energy goods and
services.......................
Gross domestic product
excluding food and
energy.........................
Final sales of domestic product
Final sales to domestic
purchasers..........................

I

IV

II

III

1

3.1

3.5

4.4

3.5

2.7

4.0

2.2

2
3
4

2.6
-1.6
-0.4

2.9
-0.7
1.8

4.1
-2.9
-2.7

2.9
-1.3
1.2

2.0
-1.0
2.3

4.0
-0.8
0.3

2.4
-1.1
0.4

5
6
7
8
9

-4.1
0.1
3.3
3.1
-0.4

-3.8
-0.4
3.6
2.2
-1.0

-6.7
3.9
9.0
1.4
-3.2

-4.5
-0.7
0.6
2.2
-0.7

-4.0
-1.8
1.1
2.7
-1.0

-4.1
3.3
8.3
1.7
3.5

-4.5
2.5
2.3
2.9
-1.3

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

17.5
0.9
3.2
2.5
2.1
3.9
1.0
2.3
4.1
2.6
3.7

22.1
1.5
3.2
2.6
5.1
10.3
1.8
4.0
3.3
2.8
3.1

91.6
2.0
3.2
2.2
6.2
13.6
1.3
6.2
2.9
3.5
2.9

-8.2
2.6
5.0
2.9
18.8
45.1
2.6
4.8
4.1
4.1
3.4

-5.9
2.5
3.1
3.4
6.2
10.0
3.5
1.5
1.8
2.1
4.0

65.1
1.6
2.9
5.0
-4.4
-12.5
1.7
5.0
2.9
4.4
2.9

6.7
1.1
3.0
4.5
1.2
-1.4
3.1
2.9
2.8
2.9
2.5

21
22
23
24
25

3.3
3.4
1.2
6.2
-0.4

3.4
3.5
2.6
11.3
-0.4

3.7
4.0
2.2
13.2
-1.5

4.3
4.6
3.5
16.8
-1.0

3.7
3.8
3.7
12.4
0.6

3.1
3.0
3.0
10.7
0.1

0.6
0.5
0.9
5.3
-0.9

26

-3.6

-3,0

-3.2

-2.7

-1.8

-1.0

-1.5

2/
28
29
30

-7.3
-2.3
-3.1
2.6

-12.3
-0.5
-0.9
3.7

-13.7
-0.8
-0.6
1.2

-13.3
0.0
-0.1
2.2

-11.8
1.8
-0.7
2.5

-13.5
2.5
1.5
3.3

-13.0
1.5
0.9
4.3

31
32
33
34
35
36

5.7
0.7
7.3

-0.9
4.1
5.1

-3.2
2.6
6.9

-1.5
1.3
6.3

3.5
2.7
3.8

1.4
-0.8
2.9

-8.4
2.7
-0.1

3/
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

4.4
4.7
4.7
5.1
1.9
4.7
5.2
0.8
4.3
4.2
4.6

5.6
4.8
5.1
5.6
1.7
4.1
4.4
1.9
6.2
5.9
7.3

5.9
3.3
3.4
3.9
-0.4
3.2
3.5
1.3
7.4
7.1
8.4

4.7
0.4
1.0
0.7
2.6
-0.7
-1.0
1.7
7.3
7.6
6.0

4.4
7.6
6.7
7.4
1.6
9.5
10.7
2.2
2.6
2.4
3.6

4.8
3.8
4.1
4.3
2.6
3.2
3.3
2.3
5.4
5.8
3.6

2.8
2.0
2.3
2.2
3.0
1.4
1.5
0.6
3.4
2.9
5.2

48

-9.1

-13.6

-15.6

-14.5

-12.9

-15.7

-12.7

49
50
51

3.2
3.1
11.9

3.7
2.2
19.1

4.6
1.2
54.1

3.7
2.3
14.8

2.9
2.6
-2.4

4.2
1.7
30.6

2.3
3.0
0.6

52
53

2.7
2.8

2.8
3.0

2.5
3.3

3.0
3.3

3.0
3.3

2.9
3.3

2.2
1.9

54
55

2.9
3.3

3.2
1.8

3.4
1.5

3.4
1.7

3.4
2.5

3.5
1.9

2.0
3.3

56

5.9

8.8

25.7

6.9

11.2

17.3

-10.2

5/
58

2.7
2.8

3.0
3,0

2.8
3.3

3.3
3.3

3.1
3.3

3.0
3.3

2.2
1.9

59

3.1

3.5

4.4

3.5

2.7

4.0

2.2

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
2. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

January 2007

S urvey

of

D-13

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 1.6.8. Contributions to Percent Change in the Gross Domestic
Purchases Price Index

Table 1.7.1. Percent Change from Preceding Period in Real Gross Domestic
Product, Real Gross National Product, and Real Net National Product
[Percent]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
ine

2004

2005

2005
III

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006
IV

I

II

Line

III

2004

2005
III

Percent change at annual rate:
Gross domestic purchases...

1

3.1

3.5

4.4

3.5

2.7

4.0

2.2

Percentage points at annual
rates:
Personal consumption
expenditures..........................
Durable goods.........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment........................
Other...................................
Nondurable goods...................
Food....................................
Clothing and shoes..............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods...................
Other...................................
Services..................................
Housing...............................
Household operation...........
Electricity and gas...........
Other household operation
Transportation......................
Medical care........................
Recreation...........................
Other..................................
Gross private domestic
investment..............................
Fixed investment......................
Nonresidential.....................
Structures........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software...................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment...........
Software 1...............
Other.......................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment...............
Other equipment.........
Residential...........................
Change in private inventories...
Farm....................................
Nonfarm..............................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment..............................
Federal...................................
National defense..................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
Nondefense.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment.............
State and local.........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..........
Addenda:
Final sales of computers to
domestic purchasers 2.....
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers.......................
Food....................................
Energy goods and services...
Gross domestic purchases
excluding food and energy,

2
3
4

1.76
-0.14
-0.02

1.92
-0.06
0.06

2.74
-0.23
-0.10

1.93
-0.10
0.04

1.35
-0.07
0.07

2.66
-0.06
0.01

1.55
-0.08
0.01

5
6
7
8
9

-0.12
0.64
0.28
-0.01

-0.11
-0.01
0.70
0.20
-0.03

-0.20
0.06
1.70
0.13
-0.08

-0.13
-0.01
0.11
0.20
-0.02

-0.12
-0.03
0.21
0.25
-0.03

-0.12
0.05
1.58
0.16
0.09

-0.13
0.04
0.46
0.26
-0.03

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

0.32
0.05
1.27
0.25
0.08
0.06
0.02
0.06
0.46
0.07
0.34

0.44
0.08
1.28
0.26
0.19
0.15
0.04
0.10
0.37
0.08
0.29

1.55
0.10
1.27
0.22
0.22
0.19
0.03
0.15
0.33
0.10
0.26

-0.21
0.13
1.92
0.28
0.65
0.59
0.05
0.12
0.46
0.11
0.31

-0.14
0.13
1.22
0.33
0.22
0.15
0.07
0.04
0.20
0.06
0.36

1.24
0.09
1.15
0.48
-0.16
-0.20
0.04
0.12
0.32
0.12
0.27

0.17
0.06
1.18
0.44
0.04
-0.02
0.06
0.07
0.32
0.08
0.23

21
22
23
24
25

0.50
0.49
0.12
0.15
-0.03

0.53
0.53
0.25
0.27
-0.03

0.59
0.62
0.21
0.32
-0.11

0.68
0.71
0.34
0.41
-0.07

0.58
0.59
0.36
0.32
0.04

0.50
0.47
0.30
0.29
0.01

0.10
0.08
0.09
0.15
-0.06

26

-0.13

-0.11

-0.11

-0.09

-0.06

-0.03

-0.05

27
28
29
30

-0.05
-0.04
-0.04
0.03

-0.09
-0.01
-0.01
0.04

-0.09
-0.01
-0.01
0.01

-0.09

0.03

-0.08
0.03
-0.01
0.03

-0.09
0.04
0.02
0.04

-0.09
0.02
0.01
0.05

31
32
33
34
35
36

0.06
0.01
0.38

-0.01
0.05
0.28

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.04
0.03
0.40
-0.03
-0.01
-0.03

-0.02
0.02
0.37
-0.03

0.04
0.03
0.23
-0.01

0.02
-0.01
0.17
0.03

0.00

0.00

0.00

-0.03

-0.01

0.03

-0.10
0.03
-0.01
0.02
0.01
0.01

37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

0.80
0.31
0.21
0.20
0.01
0.10
0.10
0.00
0.49
0.39
0.10

1.01
0.32
0.23
0.22
0.01
0.09
0.08
0.01
0.69
0.53
0.16

1.05
0.23
0.15
0.16

0.84
0.03
0.04
0.03
0.01
-0.01
-0.02

0.00

0.00
0.81
0.69
0.13

0.86
0.25
0.18
0.17
0.01
0.07
0.06
0.01
0.61
0.53
0.08

0.51
0.13
0.10
0.08
0.02
0.03
0.03

0.82
0.64
0.18

0.79
0.49
0.29
0.28
0.01
0.20
0.20
0.01
0.30
0.22
0.08

48

-0.10

-0.16

-0.17

-0.16

-0.14

-0.17

IV

I

II

III

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.0

2

18.4

21.3

29.6

27.1

26.8

38.8

11.0

3
4
5
6
7
8

26.3

28.2

8.6

76.3

13.8

47.1

15.8

3.8
4.9
5.4
2.5
2.3

3.1
8.1
8.8
4.2
2.6

4.9
152.7
185.2
28.7
2.3

0.5
-55.8
-60.4
-18.5
2.3

6.1
-4.9
-6.4
3.0
3.4

2.3
2.3
2.2
3.0
2.8

1.8
2.3
2.1
3.2
3.1

-0.13

0.00

9

3.9

12.7

243.8

-69.1

1.4

3.5

3.6

Equals: Net national product....

10

3.6

2.4

-8.5

14.4

7.7

2.3

1.7

Addenda:
Gross domestic income 1........
Gross national income 2..........
Net domestic product...............
Net domestic income 3............

11
12
13
14

3.8
3.7
3.8
3.6

3.2
3.1
2.5
2.5

4.4
5.1
-9.3
-9.2

2.1
0.8
16.1
16.7

10.2
10.7
7.1
12.4

-0.5
-0.7
2.6
-0.8

3.2
3.0
1.9
3.4

1. Gross domestic income deflated by the implicit price deflator for gross domestic product.
2. Gross national income deflated by the implicit price deflator for gross national product.
3. Net domestic income deflated by the implicit price deflator for net domestic product.

Table 1.7.3. Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross National Product, and
Real Net National Product, Quantity Indexes
[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

0.00
0.07
0.07

0.00
0.00

0.00
0.38
0.27
0.11

Line

49
50
51

3.16
0.29
0.47

3.61
0.20
0.79

4.55
0.12
2.08

3.61
0.22
0.70

2.86
0.24
-0.11

4.19
0.16
1.37

2.30
0.28
0.03

52

2.30

2.46

2.18

2.54

2.59

2.49

1.85

2004

2005

2006

2005
III

Gross domestic product...........
Plus: Income receipts from the
rest of the world.......................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the world..............................

IV

I

II

III

1 109.031

112.546

113.223

113.719

115.274

116.004

116.569

2

98.438

119.374

122.075

129.623

137.541

149.298

153.247

3

96.969

124.286

122.148

140.747

145.380

160.106

166.093

Equals: Gross national product
Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private.........................
Government.................
General government
Government
enterprises..........

4 109.039
5 116.601
6 117.814
7 110.561
8 110.062

112.399
125.998
128.179
115.240
112.885

113.252
148.411
154.123
120.608
113.225

113.390
121.012
122.285
114.612
113.863

115.085
119.495
120.271
115.475
114.812

115.753
120.187
120.931
116.321
115.621

116.260
120.869
121.564
117.236
116.506

113.234

127.575

159.062

118.606

119.022

120.063

121.131

Equals: Net national product....

10 108.018

110.597

108.658 112.366

114.475

115.140

115.625

Addendum:
Net domestic product...............

11

110.755

108.604

114.687

115.421

115.971

9

108.004

112.733

Table 1.7.4. Price indexes for Gross Domestic Product, Gross National
Product, and Net National Product
[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted
Line

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
2. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.




Gross domestic product...........
Plus: Income receipts from the
rest of the world.......................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the world.............................
Equals: Gross national product
Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private.........................
Government.................
General government
Government
enterprises..........

2006

2005

2004

2005

2006

2005
III

Gross domestic product...........
Plus: Income receipts from the
rest of the world.......................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the world.............................
Equals: Gross national product
Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private.........................
Government.................
General government
Government
enterprises..........

IV

I

II

III

1 109.429

112.744

113.139

114.048

114.967

115.905

116.446

2 108.894

112.377

112.934

113.959

114.707

115.839

116.432

3 109.180

112.704

113.221

114.269

115.000

116.124

116.677

4
5
6
7
8

109.419 112.733 113.131 114.038 114.958 115.897
103.694 107.229 107.709 108.746 109.110 110.216
103.261 106.498 106.933 107.959 108.207 109.363
105.956 111.117 111.852 112.953 113.936 114.778
105.231 110.292 111.007 112.121 113.134 113,965

116.440
110.235
109.170
115.902
115.085

9

109.825

115.495

116.338

117.373

118.200

119.101

120.248

Equals: Net national product....

10 110.250

113.529

113.915

114.800

115.800

116.716

117.333

Addendum:
Net domestic product...............

11

113.546

113.929

114.814

115.814

116.729

117.344

110.266

D-14

January 2007

National Data

Table 1.7.5. Relation of Gross Domestic Product, Gross National Product, Net
National Product, National Income, and Personal Income

Table 1.7.6. Relation of Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross National
Product, and Real Net National Product, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005
III

Gross domestic product..............
Plus: Income receipts from the rest
of the world.................................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the world.................................

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

2005
IV

I

II

Line

2005

III

2005
III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,322.6
2

410.2

513.3

527.2

564.9

603.3

661.4

682.3

3

363.9

481.5

475.0

552.4

574.3

638.6

665.7

4 11,758.7 12,487.7 12,625.7 12,743.0 13,037.4 13,220.1 13,339.2
5 1,436.2 1,604.8 1,898.0 1,562.5 1,548.0 1,572.8 1,582.0
6 1,205.4 1,352.6 1,632.3 1,307.5 1,288.9 1,309.8 1,314.4
7
969.5 1,059.1 1,197.6 1,044.4 1,035.1 1,050.4 1,053.0

Equals: Gross national product...
Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private............................
Domestic business.....
Capital consumption
allowances.........
Less: Capital
consumption
adjustment.........
Households and
institutions..............
Government....................
General government....
Government
enterprises.............
Equals: Net national product.......

14 10,322.6 10,882.9 10,727.7 11,180.5 11,489.4 11,647.3 11,757.3

Less: Statistical discrepancy......

15

Equals: National income..............
Less: Corporate profits with
inventory valuation and capital
consumption adjustments...........
Taxes on production and
imports less subsidies....
Contributions for
government social
insurance........................
Net interest and
miscellaneous payments
on assets........................
Business current transfer
payments (net)...............
Current surplus of
government enterprises
Wage accruals less
disbursements................
Plus: Personal income receipts on
assets........................................
Personal current transfer
receipts...........................

16 10,255.9 10,811.8 10,643.2 11,106.2 11,551.3 11,611.5 11,762.6

8

1,155.9

953.1

1,019.7

941.5

960.7

964.3

968.3

9

186.4

-106.1

-177.9

-102.9

-74.4

-86.1

-84.7

10
11
12

235.9
230.8
192.7

293.5
252.2
207.2

434.7
265.7
209.1

263.1
255.0
212.4

253.8
259.1
216.1

259.5
262.9
219.2

261.4
267.6
223.1

13

38.0

45.1

56.6

42.6

43.0

43.7

Gross domestic product...........
Plus: Income receipts from the
rest of the world.......................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the world.............................
Equals: Gross national product
Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private.........................
Government.................
General government
Government
enterprises..........

2006
IV

I

II

III

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,443.5
2

376.7

456.9

467.2

496.1

526.4

571.4

586.5

3

333.3

427.2

419.9

483.8

499.7

550.3

570.9

4 10,746.8 11,077.9 11,162.0 11,175.6 11,342.7 11,408.5 11,458.5
5 1,385.0 1,496.6 1,762.9 1,437.4 1,419.4 1,427.6 1,435.7
6 1,167.4 1,270.1 1,527.1 1,211.7 1,191.7 1,198.2 1,204.5
7
237.6
225.8
217.8
227.0
227.5
229.1
230.9
8
188.4
189.5
192.4
183.1
187.8
191.0
193.9

44.5

66.7

71.0

84.5

74.3

-61.9

35.8

-5.3

17

1,182.6

1,330.7

1,266.3

1,393.5

1,569.1

1,591.8

1,653.3

18

819.4

865.1

872.1

874.2

897.4

914.0

19

826.4

880.6

888.5

898.9

936.7

938.8

485.1

483.4

482.9

490.0

514.8

513.2

34.6

39.0

48.7

36.3

36.4

10

9,363.1

9,586.6

9,418.5

9,740.0

9,922.8

Addenda:
Gross domestic income 1........
Gross national income 2..........
Net domestic product...............
Net domestic income 3............

11 10,642.6 10,985.6 11,040.4 11,098.7 11,370.3 11,357.2 11,448.1
12 10,685.9 11,014.9 11,087.3 11,110.5 11,396.5 11,377.7 11,463.0
13 9,319.8 9,557.2 9,371.6 9,727.9 9,896.5 9,959.8 10,007.3
14 9,259.3 9,494.7 9,297.4 9,663.2 9,949.9 9,929.2 10,011.8

36.7

37.1

9,980.4 10,022.5

1. Gross domestic income deflated by the implicit price deflator for gross domestic product.
2. Gross national income deflated by the implicit price deflator for gross national product.
3. Net domestic income deflated by the implicit price deflator for net domestic product.
N ote . Except as noted in footnotes 1,2 and 3, chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type
quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the
chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not
additive.

948.9

20

9

Equals: Net national product....

916.8

498.6

Table 1.8.3. Command-Basis Real Gross National Product, Quantity Indexes

21

85.5

74.2

0.2

99.1

93.8

93.1

-5.0

-15.4

-27.7

-13.3

-9.2

-9.4

-15.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

24

1,427.9

1,519.4

1,532.7

1,580.2

1,602.3

1,647.7

1,683.6

25

1,569.0 1,539.8 1,570.4 1,589.7 1,618.6
9,731.4 10,239.2 10,262.7 10,483.7 10,721.4 10,807.3 10,964.5

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

-10.2

23

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

92.8

22

Equals: Personal income.............

26

Addenda:
Gross domestic income..............
Gross national income................
Gross national factor income '....
Net domestic product.................
Net domestic income..................
Net national factor income 2,

27
28
29
30
31
32

1,426.5

1,526.6

11,645.8
11,692.0
10,792.2
10,276.3
10,209.6
9,356.1

12,384.8
12,416.6
11,492.7
10,851.0
10,780.0
9,887.9

12,489.0
12,541.2
11,696.6
10,675.5
10,591.0
9,798.7

12,656.2
12,668.7
11,708.6
11,168.0
11,093.8
10,146.2

13,070.3
13,099.3
12,117.4
11,460.3
11,522.2
10,569.3

13,161.6
13,184.3
12,186.5
11,624.6
11,588.8
10,613.7

13,327.9
13,344.6
12,345.1
11,740.6
11,745.9
10,763.1

1. Consists of compensation of employees, proprietors’ income with inventory valuation adjustment (IVA) and capital
consumption adjustment (CCAdj), rental income of persons with CCAdj, corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj, net interest and
miscellaneous payments, and consumption of fixed capital.
2. Consists of gross national factor income less consumption of fixed capital.




2004

2005

2006

III
Gross national product.............
Less: Exports of goods and
services and income receipts
from the rest of the world.........
Plus: Command-basis exports of
goods and services and income
receipts from the rest of the
world 1....................................
Equals: Command-basis gross
national product.....................
Addendum:
Percent change from preceding
period in command-basis
real gross national product...

IV

I

II

III

1 109.039

112.399

113.252

113.390

115.085

115.753

116.260

2

101.276

111.906

112.914

116.793

121.636

126.043

128.530

3

101.813

110.121

110.147

113.619

119.044

122.488

124.638

4

109.120

112.131

112.837

112.914

114.696

115.219

115.676

5

3.6

2.8

4.1

0.3

6.5

1.8

1.6

1.
Exports of goods and services and income receipts deflated by the implicit price deflator for imports of goods and
services and income payments.

Table 1.8.6. Command-Basis Real Gross National Product, Chained Dollars
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross national product.............
Less: Exports of goods and
services and income receipts
from the rest of the world.........
Plus: Command-basis exports of
goods and services and income
receipts from the rest of the
w orld' ....................................

2006
IV

I

II

III

1 10,746.8 11,077.9 11,162.0 11,175.6 11,342.7 11,408.5 11,458.5

2

1,497.8

1,655.0

1,669.9

1,727.3

1,798.9

1,864.1

1,900.9

3

1,505.8

1,628.6

1,629.1

1,680.4

1,760.6

1,811.6

1,843.4

Equals: Command-basis gross
national product.....................

4 10,754.7 11,051.5 11,121.1 11,128.7 11,304.4 11,356.0 11,401.0

Addendum:
Terms of trade 2......................

5

100.531

98.406

97.552

97.286

97.872

97.183

96.975

1. Exports of goods and services and income receipts deflated by the implicit price deflator for imports of goods and
services and income payments.
2. Ratio of the implicit price deflator for exports of goods and services and income receipts to the corresponding implicit
price deflator for imports divided by 100.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive.

January 2 0 0 7

S urvey

of

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 1.10. Gross Domestic Income by Type of Income
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Gross domestic incom e...........................................................................................................

1

11,645.8

12,384.8

12,489.0

12,656.2

13,070.3

13,161.6

13,327.9

Compensation of employees, paid..................................................................................................
Wage and salary accruals...............................................................................................................
Disbursements......
To persons........
To the rest of the world............................................................................................................
Wage accruals less disbursements..............................................................................................
Supplements to wages and salaries................................................................................................

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

6,656.3
5,383.2
5,398.2
5,389.2
8.9
-15.0
1,273.2

7,036.6
5,671.1
5,671.1
5,661.9
9.2
0.0
1,365.5

7,100.1
5,721.7
5,721.7
5,712.2
9.4
0.0
1,378.4

7,190.7
5,793.3
5,793.3
5,784.0
9.3
0.0
1,397.4

7,406.6
5,976.4
5,976.4
5,967.2
9.2
0.0
1,430.3

7,431.8
5,987.2
5,987.2
5,978.0
9.2
0.0
1,444.5

7,524.4
6,060.8
6,060.8
6,051.5
9.2
0.0
1,463.6

Taxes on production and im ports.....................................................................................................

9

864.0

922.4

930.2

966.4

968.6

10

44.7

57.3

58.1

937.3
63.1

952.5

Less: Subsidies.................................................................................................................................
Net operating surplus.......................................................................................................................
Private enterprises..........................................................................................................................
Net interest and miscellaneous payments, domestic industries...................................................
Business current transfer payments (net)....................................................................................
Proprietors' income with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.....................
Rental income of persons with capital consumption adjustment.................................................
Corporate profits with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments, domestic
industries................................................................................................................................
Taxes on corporate income.....................................................................................................
Profits after tax with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.......................
Net dividends......................................................................................................................
Undistributed corporate profits with inventory valuation and capital consumption
adjustments....................................................................................................................
Current surplus of government enterprises.....................................................................................

55.1

52.3

51.8

11
12
13
14
1b
16

2,733.9
2,738.9
609.0
85.5
911.1
127.0

2,878.2
2,893.6
642.3
74.2
970.7
72.8

2,618.9
2,646.6
647.7
0.2
967.3
-11.5

3,028.8
3,042.1
667.5
99.1
996.8
81.5

3,218.2
3,227.4
705.5
93.8
1,008.3
76.8

3,243.0
3,252.3
724.0
93.1
1,011.9
71.4

3,304.7
3,314.9
710.2
92.8
1,014.8
78.3

17
18
19
20

1,006.3
300.1
706.2
492.7

1,133.7
399.3
734.4
338.7

1,042.9
378.9
664.0
237.9

1,197.2
424.6
772.6
234.9

1,343.0
456.9
886.1
528.1

1,351.9
476.1
875.9
549.4

1,418.7
490.6
928.1
569.8

21
22

213.6
-5.0

395.7
-15.4

426.1
-27.7

537.7
-13.3

357.9
-9.2

326.5
-9.4

358.3
-10.2

Consumption o f f ixed capital...........................................................................................................
Private.............................................................................................................................................
Government....................................................................................................................................

23
24
25

1,436.2
1,205.4
230.8

1,604.8
1,352.6
252.2

1,898.0
1,632.3
265.7

1,562.5
1,307.5
255.0

1,548.0
1,288.9
259.1

1,572.8
1,309.8
262.9

1,582.0
1,314.4
267.6

Addendum:
Statistical discrepancy....................................................................................................................

26

66.7

71.0

84.5

74.3

-61.9

35.8

-5.3




D-16

National Data

January 2007

Table 1.12. National Income by Type of Income
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

National income .......................................................................................................................
Compensation of employees
Wage and salary accruals
Government.............
Other.......................
Supplements to wages and salaries................................................................................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and insurance funds............................................
Employer contributions for government social insurance.............................................................

1

10,255.9

10,811.8

10,643.2

11,106.2

11,551.3

11,611.5

11,762.6

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

6,650.3
5,377.1
941.8
4,435.3
1,273.2
866.1
407.1

7,030.3
5,664.8
977.7
4,687.1
1,365.5
933.2
432.3

7,093.6
5,715.2
980.6
4,734.6
1,378.4
942.1
436.3

7,184.4
5,787.0
988.1
4,798.9
1,397.4
956.1
441.3

7,400.3
5,970.1
998.1
4,972.0
1,430.3
971.6
458.7

7,425.5
5,980.9
1,005.9
4,975.0
1,444.5
985.7
458.9

7,518.1
6,054.5
1,020.5
5,033.9
1,463.6
1,000.1
463.5

Proprietors’ income with IVA and CCAdj.........................................................................................
Farm................................................................................................................................................
Nonfarm..........................................................................................................................................

9
10
11

911.1
36.2
874.9

970.7
30.2
940.4

967.3
29.7
937.7

996.8
28.7
968.1

1,008.3
23.9
984.4

1,011.9
17.5
994.3

1,014.8
21.7
993.2

Rental income of persons with CCAdj.............................................................................................

12

127.0

72.8

-11.5

81.5

76.8

71.4

78.3

Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj..
Taxes on corporate income.................
Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj
Net dividends.................................
Undistributed profits with IVA and CCAdj.....................................................................................

13
14
15
16
17

1,182.6
300.1
882.5
539.5
343.0

1,330.7
399.3
931.4
576.9
354.5

1,266.3
378.9
887.5
584.0
303.5

1,393.5
424.6
968.9
601.0
367.9

1,569.1
456.9
1,112.1
615.7
496.4

1,591.8
476.1
1,115.7
631.1
484.6

1,653.3
490.6
1,162.7
650.4
512.4

Net interest and miscellaneous payments

18

485.1

483.4

482.9

490.0

514.8

513.2

498.6

Taxes on production and imports

19

922.4

930.2

937.3

952.5

966.4

968.6

Less: Subsidies....................................

20

864.0
44.7

57.3

58.1

63.1

52.3

51.8

Business current transfer payments (net)
To persons (net).................................... .........................................................................................
To government (net)........................................................................................................................
To the rest of the world (net)............................................................................................................

21
22
23
24

85.5
28.1
49.8
7.5

74.2
45.7
30.1
-1.6

0.2
79.8
-34.3
-45.4

99.1
39.0
49.4
10.7

55.1
93.8
34.5
55.6
3.7

93.1
35.0
56.7
1.4

92.8
35.5
57.9
-0.6

Current surplus of government enterprises....................................................................................

25

-5.0

-15.4

-27.7

-13.3

-9.2

-9.4

-10.2

Cash flow:
Net cash flow with IVA and CCAdi...................................................................................................
Undistributed profits with IVA and CCAdj.....................................................................................
Consumption of fixed capital........................................................................................................
Less: Inventory valuation adjustment
Equals: Net cash flow..............

26
27
28
29
30

1,139.2
343.0
796.2
-39.8
1,178.9

1,211.3
354.5
856.8
-32.6
1,243.9

1,230.7
303.5
927.2
-30.9
1,261.5

1,223.9
367.9
856.0
-39.2
1,263.2

1,349.2
496.4
852.8
-22.9
1,372.1

1,350.3
484.6
865.6
-58.9
1,409.2

1,380.5
512.4
868.2
-38.2
1,418.8

Addenda:
Proprietors’ income with IVA and CCAdj..........................................................................................
Farm............................................................................................................................................
Proprietors’ income with IVA...................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment..............................................................................................
Nonfarm..............................
Proprietors’ income (without iVA ana CCAau..........................................................................
Inventory valuation adjustment................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment..
Rental income of persons with CCAdj..
Rental income of persons (without CCAdj)..................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment
............................................................................................
Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj..
Corporate profits with IVA...............
Profits before tax (without IVA and CCAdj)..............................................................................
Taxes on corporate income..................................................................................................
Profits after tax (without IVA and CCAdj).............................................................................
Net dividends..................................................................................................................
Undistributed profits (without IVA and CCAdj).................................................................
Inventory valuation adjustment................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment.................

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

911.1
36.2
42.0
-5.8
874.9
750.3
-5.2
129.8
127.0
142.7
-15.7
1,182.6
1,104.5
1,144.3
300.1
844.2
539.5
304.7
-39.8
78.1

970.7
30.2
36.8
-6.5
940.4
866.2
-5.1
79.3
72.8
96.2
-23.4
1,330.7
1,486.1
1,518.7
399.3
1,119.4
576.9
542.5
-32.6
-155.5

967.3
29.7
36.3
-6.6
937.7
887.8
-5.5
55.3
-11.5
36.5
-48.0
1,266.3
1,444.9
1475.8
378.9
1,096.9
584.0
513.0
-30.9
-178.6

996.8
28.7
35.4
-6.7
968.1
887.7
-6.2
86.5
81.5
98.6
-17.1
1,393.5
1,559.1
1,598.3
424.6
1,173.7
601.0
572.7
-39.2
-165.6

1,008.3
23.9
30.5
-6.6
984.4
891.1
-2.4
95.7
76.8
91.6
-14.8
1,569.1
1,717.7
1,740.6
456.9
1,283.7
615.7
668.0
-22.9
-148.6

1,011.9
17.5
24.3
-6.7
994.3
904.7
-6.9
96.5
71.4
86.5
-15.1
1,591.8
1,752.6
1,811.5
476.1
1,335.4
631.1
704.3
-58.9
-160.8

1,014.8
21.7
28.2
-6.6
993.2
897.7
-3.7
99.1
78.3
93.1
-14.8
1,653.3
1,815.8
1,854.0
490.6
1,363.4
650.4
713.0
-38.2
-162.4

IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment




January 2007

Survey

of

D-17

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 1.14. Gross Value Added of Domestic Corporate Business in Current Dollars and Gross Value Added of Nonfinancial
Domestic Corporate Business in Current and Chained Dollars
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005
III

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Gross value added of corporate business 1............................................................................
Consumption of fixed capital....
Net value added......................
Compensation of employees
Wage and salary accruals
Supplements to wages and salaries............................................................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies
Net operating surplus.................................
Net interest and miscellaneous payments...................................................................................
Business current transfer payments........
Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj.....
Taxes on corporate income................
Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj....
Net dividends......................................................................................................................
Undistributed profits with IVA and CCAdj.............................................................................

6,873.2
796.2
6,077.1
4,354.6
3,558.9
795.7
567.0
1,155.4
78.3
70.8
1,006.3
300.1
706.2
492.7
213.6

2006

2005
IV

II

I

7,357.0
856.8
6,500.2
4,612.5
3,761.0
851.5
604.9
1,282.7
56.3
92.7
1,133.7
399.3
734.4
338.7
395.7

7,424.5
927.2
6,497.3
4,658.7
3,799.2
859.4
610.1
1,228.6
54.3
131.4
1,042.9
378.9
664.0
237.9
426.1

7,539.4
856.0
6,683.4
4,723.2
3,850.6
872.6
614.8
1,345.4
57.1
91.2
1,197.2
424.6
772.6
234.9
537.7

7,823.0
852.8
6,970.2
4,884.1
3,989.3
894.8
625.0
1,461.1
60.9
57.1
1,343.0
456.9
886.1
528.1
357.9

III

7,865.8
865.6
7,000.2
4,894.9
3,991.7
903.1
634.4
1,470.9
62.8
56.1
1,351.9
476.1
875.9
549.4
326.5

7,995.0
868.2
7,126.8
4,953.9
4,039.0
914.9
635.7
1,537.3
62.6
56.0
1,418.7
490.6
928.1
569.8
358.3

Gross value added of financial corporate business 1............................................................

16

940.3

987.3

1,034.9

1,075.8

1,075.5

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

5,932.9
686.2
5,246.7
3,873.4
3,158.4
714.9
522.9
850.4
137.8
60.0
652.6
185.3
467.4
366.9
100.5

6,369.7
739.7
5,630.1
4,099.7
3,335.1
764.6
558.1
972.2
156.6
51.4
764.2
251.4
512.9
228.5
284.4

998.8
6,425.7
804.9
5,620.8
4,140.7
3,369.0
771.7
562.9
917.3
159.3
11.1
746.8
255.8
491.0
126.3
364.7

1,004.5

Gross value added of nonfinancial corporate business 1......................................................
Consumption of fixed capital.................................................
Net value added....................................................................
Compensation of employees.............................................
Wage and salary accruals.............................................
Supplements to wages and salaries..............................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies................
Net operating surplus......................................................................................................................
Net interest and miscellaneous payments
Business current transfer payments
Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj
Taxes on corporate income.....
Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj
Net dividends.....................
Undistributed profits with IVA and CCAdj

6,534.8
737.2
5,797.6
4,198.0
3,414.5
783.5
567.2
1,032.4
165.1
60.9
806.4
266.4
540.0
120.1
419.9

6,788.2
733.7
6,054.5
4,341.0
3,537.5
803.5
576.7
1,136.8
175.1
60.9
900.9
280.9
620.0
377.7
242.3

6,790.0
744.4
6,045.7
4,350.6
3,539.7
811.0
585.3
1,109.7
180.0
61.7
868.1
283.3
584.8
392.8
192.0

6,919.5
746.3
6,173.2
4,403.1
3,581.6
821.5
586.5
1,183.7
177.2
62.5
943.9
299.6
644.3
407.5
236.8

Corporate business:
Profits before tax (without IVA and CCAdj)..................................................................................
Profits after tax (without IVA and CCAdj)
Inventory valuation adjustment...
Capital consumption adjustment.

32
33
34
35

968.0
667.9
-39.8
78.1

1,321.7
922.4
-32.6
-155.5

1,252.4
873.5
-30.9
-178.6

1,402.0
977.4
-39.2
-165.6

1,514.6
1,057.6
-22.9
-148.6

1,571.6
1,095.6
-58.9
-160.8

1,619.3
1,128.7
-38.2
-162.4

Nonfinancial corporate business:
Profits before tax (without IVA and CCAdj)..................................................................................
Profits after tax (without IVA and CCAdj).....................................................................................
Inventory valuation adjustment...................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment.................................................................................................

36
37
38
39

623.8
438.6
-39.8
68.6

932.6
681.3
-32.6
-135.8

935.0
679.2
-30.9
-157.3

988.7
722.3
-39.2
-143.0

1,050.6
769.7
-22.9
-126.8

1,063.5
780.2
-58.9
-136.5

1,119.2
819.6
-38.2
-137.1

Gross value added of nonfinancial corporate business 2......................................................
Consumption of fixed capital3.................................................................................................
Net value added 4...................................................................................................................

40
41
42

5,630.0
650.9
4,979.2

5,852.9
681.6
5,171.2

6,069.0
669.2
5,399.8

6,177.3
672.0
5,505.3

Addenda:

Value added, in billions of chained (2000) dollars
5,875.8
738.9
5,136.9

5,927.8
670.5
5,257.3

6,111.2
666.1
5,445.0

1. Estimates for financial corporate business and nonfinancial corporate business for 2000 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are
based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
2. The current-dollar gross value added is deflated using the gross value added chain-type price index for nonfinancial industries from the GDP-by-industry accounts. For periods when this price index is not available,
the chain-type price index for GDP goods and structures is used.
3. Chained-dollar consumption of fixed capital of nonfinancial corporate business is calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar value of the corresponding series, divided by
100.

4. Chained-dollar net value added of nonfinancial corporate business is the difference between the gross product and the consumption of fixed capital.
IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment

Table 1.15. Price, Costs, and Profit Per Unit of Real Gross Value Added of Nonfinancial Domestic Corporate Business
[Dollars]
Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2006

2005

2005
III

IV

I

II

III

Price per unit of real gross value added of nonfinancial corporate business 1...........................

1

1.054

1.088

1.094

1.102

1.111

1.119

1.120

Compensation of employees (unit labor cost)................................................................................

2

0.688

0.700

0.705

0.708

0.710

0.717

0.713

Unit nonlabor c o s t............................................................................................................................
Consumption of fixed capital............................................................................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies plus business current transfer payments..............
Net interest and miscellaneous payments.......................................................................................

3
4
5
6

0.250
0.122
0.104
0.024

0.257
0.126
0.104
0.027

0.262
0.137
0.098
0.027

0.258
0.124
0.106
0.028

0.253
0.120
0.104
0.029

0.260
0.123
0.107
0.030

0.255
0.121
0.105
0.029

Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj (unit profits from current production)...............................
Taxes on corporate income..............................................................................................................
Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj.................................................................................................

7
8
9

0.116
0.033
0.083

0.131
0.043
0.088

0.127
0.044
0.084

0.136
0.045
0.091

0.147
0.046
0.101

0.143
0.047
0.096

0.153
0.049
0.104

1. The implicit price deflator for gross value added of nonfinancial corporate business divided by 100. Estimates for nonfinancial corporate business for 2000 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard
Industrial Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
N ote . The current-dollar gross value added is deflated using the gross value added chain-type price index for nonfinancial industries from the GDP-by-industry accounts. For periods when this price index is not avail­
able, the chain-type price index for GDP goods and structures is used.
IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment




D-18

January 2007

National Data

2. Personal Income and Outlays
Table 2.1. Personal Income and Its Disposition
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

9,731.4
6,665.3
5,392.1
4,450.3
941.8
1,273.2
866.1
407.1
911.1
36.2
874.9
127.0
1,427.9
890.8
537.1
1,426.5
1,398.4
791.4
36.0
34.3
18.4
518.4
28.1
826.4

10,239.2
7,030.3
5,664.8
4,687.1
977.7
1,365.5
933.2
432.3
970.7
30.2
940.4
72.8
1,519.4
945.0
574.4
1,526.6
1,480.9
844.9
31.3
36.8
18.3
549.4
45.7
880.6

2005
III

Personal income................................................................................................................................
Compensation of employees, received............................................................................................
Wage and salary disbursements
Private industries..................
Government..........................
Supplements to wages and salaries
Employer contributions for employee pension and insurance funds........................................
Employer contributions for government social insurance.........................................................
Proprietors’ income with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.........................
Farm............................................................................................................................................
Nonfarm......................................................................................................................................
Rental income of persons with capital consumption adjustment......................................................
Personal income receipts on assets.................................................................................................
Personal interest income............
Personal dividend income.........
Personal current transfer receipts...
Government social benefits to persons........................................................................................
Old-age, survivors, disability, and health insurance benefits....................................................
Government unemployment insurance benefits.......................................................................
Veterans benefits..................
Family assistance 1...............
Other.......................................................................................................................................
Other current transfer receipts, from business (net).....................................................................
Less: Contributions for government social insurance.......................................................................

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

2006
IV

10,262.7
7,093.6
5,715.2
4,734.6
980.6
1,378.4
942.1
436.3
967.3
29.7
937.7
-11.5
1,532.7
951.2
581.5
1,569.0
1,489.2
848.5
30.2
37.0
18.4
555.1
79.8
888.5

I

10,483.7
7,184.4
5,787.0
4,798.9
988.1
1,397.4
956.1
441.3
996.8
28.7
968.1
81.5
1,580.2
981.7
598.5
1,539.8
1,500.8
854.6
31.6
37.2
18.5
558.8
39.0
898.9

II

10,721.4
7,400.3
5,970.1
4,972.0
998.1
1,430.3
971.6
458.7
1,008.3
23.9
984.4
76.8
1,602.3
989.1
613.2
1,570.4
1,536.0
909.9
27.8
39.1
18.6
540.6
34.5
936.7

III

10,807.3
7,425.5
5,980.9
4,975.0
1,005.9
1,444.5
985.7
458.9
1,011.9
17.5
994.3
71.4
1,647.7
1,019.2
628.5
1,589.7
1,554.7
928.1
27.0
39.8
18.8
541.0
35.0
938.8

10,964.5
7,518.1
6,054.5
5,033.9
1,020.5
1,463.6
1,000.1
463.5
1,014.8
21.7
993.2
78.3
1,683.6
1,035.8
647.8
1,618.6
1,583.1
936.7
27.3
40.2
18.9
560.0
35.5
948.9

Less: Personal current taxes...........................................................................................................

25

1,049.8

1,203.1

1,215.0

1,247.6

1,332.6

1,361.0

1,366.2

Equals: Disposable personal incom e..............................................................................................

26

8,681.6

9,036.1

9,047.7

9,236.1

9,388.8

9,446.2

9,598.3

Less: Personal outlays.....................................................................................................................
Personal consumption expenditures................................................................................................
Personal interest payments 2..........................................................................................................
Personal current transfer payments
To government..........................
To the rest of the world (net)......

27
28
29
30
31
32

8,507.2
8,211.5
186.0
109.7
66.8
42.9

9,070.9
8,742.4
209.4
119.2
72.0
47.1

9,180.3
8,847.3
214.6
118.5
72.7
45.8

9,264.5
8,927.8
214.9
121.8
74.2
47.6

9,418.5
9,079.2
218.5
120.9
75.7
45.2

9,577.0
9,228.1
222.9
126.0
77.3
48.7

9,710.0
9,346.7
235.5
127.8
79.0
48.8

Equals: Personal saving.................

33

174.3

-34.8

-132.6

-28.5

-29.7

-130.8

-111.7

34

2.0

-0.4

-1.5

-0.3

-0.3

-1.4

-1.2

35

8,010.8

8,104.6

8,074.1

8,183.3

8,276.8

8,245.4

8,329.6

36
37
38

29,536
27,254
293,933

30,458
27,318
296,677

30,461
27,183
297,027

31,020
27,484
297,748

31,470
27,743
298,340

31,595
27,578
298,982

32,025
27,792
299,716

39
40

6.4
3.6

4.1
1.2

3.5
-0.6

8.6
5.5

6.8
4.6

2.5
-1.5

6.6
4.1

Personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income............................................
Addenda:
Disposable personal income:
Total, billions of chained (2000) dollars 3.....................................................................................
Per capita:
Current dollars........................................................................................................................
Chained (2000) dollars............................................................................................................
Population (midperiod, thousands)..................................................................................................
Percent change from preceding period:
Disposable personal income, current dollars.........................................................................
Disposable personal income, chained (2000) dollars.............................................................

1. Consists of aid to families with dependent children and, beginning with 1996, assistance programs operating under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.
2. Consists of nonmortgage interest paid by households.
3. Equals disposable personal income deflated by the implicit price deflator for personal consumption expenditures.

Table 2.2B. Wage and Salary Disbursements by Industry
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

5,664.8
4,687.1
1,101.3
704.7
3,585.8
937.2
2,648.5
977.7

2005
III

Wage and salary disbursements...............................................................................................

1

5,392.1

Private industries...............................................................................................................................
Goods-producing industries.............................................................................................................
Manufacturing.....
Services-producing industries.........................................................................................................
Trade, transportation, and utilities.................................................................................................
Other services-producing industries 1..........................................................................................
Government...............

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

4,450.3
1,050.8
688.0
3,399.5
899.2
2,500.3
941.8

2006
IV

I

II

III

5,715.2

5,787.0

5,970.1

5,980.9

6,054.5

4,734.6
1,113.9
709.7
3,620.7
945.5
2,675.2
980.6

4,798.9
1,124.9
715.0
3,673.9
954.9
2,719.0
988.1

4,972.0
1,177.3
742.8
3,794.7
983.6
2,811.0
998.1

4,975.0
1,173.0
732.8
3,802.0
990.8
2,811.2
1,005.9

5,033.9
1,182.3
735.9
3,851.7
1,003.0
2,848.7
1,020.5

1. Other services-producing industries consists of information; finance and insurance; real estate and rental and leasing; professional, scientific, and technical services; management of companies and enterprises,
administrative and support and waste management and remediation services; educational services; health care and social assistance; arts, entertainment, and recreation; accommodation and food services; and other
services.
N ote . Estimates in this table are based on the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).




January 2007

Survey

D-19

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

of

Table 2.3.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Personal
Consumption Expenditures by Major Type of Product

Table 2.3.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Personal
Consumption Expenditures by Major Type of Product
[Percent]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

Personal consumption
expenditures..................
Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and parts.........
Furniture and household
equipment............................
Other.......................................

Line

2006

2005
IV

III

I

II

2006

2005

2005
III

I

IV

III

II

Percent change at annual rate:
1

3.9

3.5

3.9

0.8

4.8

2.6

2.8

2
3

6.4
1.9

5.5
0.6

9.0
10.5

-12.3
-34.9

19.8
18.9

-0.1
-1.2

6.4
8.6

4
5

12.1
6.8

10.0
8.7

11.6
6.1

22.8
16.3

3.3
-3.7

6.7
1.6

3.9
4.1
10.3

5.9
6.7
8.6

1.4
2.0
-3.8

1.5
-0.7
5.5

Nondurable goods.....................
Food........................................
Clothing and shoes..................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.......................
Gasoline and oil...................
Fuel oil and coal..................
Other.......................................

6
7
8

3.6
3.4
5.0

4.5
5.4
6.2

13.7
-2.0
3.4
6.4
3.0

9
10
11
12

1.0
1.5
-5.1
4.3

-0.5
0.0
-6.2
4.1

-5.8
-5.2
-12.2
2.9

-2.3
-0.8
-20.9
3.6

-1.3
0.0
-17.6
6.4

0.7
-0.8
25.1
3.4

5.0
6.9
-18.4
2.0

Services.....................................
Housing..................................
Household operation...............
Electricity and gas...............
Other household operation...
Transportation..........................
Medical care............................
Recreation...............................
Other.......................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

3.5
3.8
2.6
1.6
3.3
1.2
3.1
4.8
4.2

2.6
2.8
2.1
2.6
1.8
0.1
3.6
2.7
2.0

3.2
2.3
2.4
2.1
2.7
-1.7
4.4
1.8
4.6

2.0
1.7
0.3
2.0
-0.8
-0.2
3.7
1.5
1.7

1.6
2.3
-14.0
-29.7
-0.1
4.0
4.3
3.1
3.2

3.7
2.4
8.4
15.8
3.4
1.7
2.6
0.8
6.1

2.8
2.6
9.7
21.9
1.6
1.3
2.1
3.0
1.6

22

1.3

0.8

-2.8

-0.7

-13.8

6.2

10.9

23

4.1

3.3

4.0

0.3

6.0

2.4

2.8

Addenda:
Energy goods and services 1...
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy...........................

2004

III

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.

Personal consumption
expenditures..................

1

3.9

3.5

3.9

0.8

4.8

2.6

2.8

Durable goods............................
Motor vehicles and parts.........
Furniture and household
equipment............................
Other.......................................

2
3

0.76
0.10

0.65
0.03

1.05
0.54

-1.54
-2.15

2.14
0.85

-0.01
-0.06

0.72
0.40

4
5

0.51
0.16

0.42
0.20

0.56
-0.05

0.47
0.14

0.92
0.37

0.14
-0.09

0.28
0.04

Nondurable goods.....................
Food........................................
Clothing and shoes..................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.......................
Gasoline and oil...................
Fuel oil and coal..................
Other.......................................

6
7
8

1.03
0.46
0.20

1.28
0.73
0.24

1.00
0.86
0.12

1.12
0.55
0.38

1.71
0.92
0.33

0.42
0.27
-0.15

0.46
-0.10
0.21

9
10
11
12

0.03
0.04
-0.01
0.34

-0.02

-0.09
-0.03
-0.06
0.28

-0.05

-0.02
0.33

-0.21
-0.18
-0.03
0.23

0.03
-0.03
0.05
0.27

0.19
0.25
-0.05
0.15

Services.....................................
Housing...................................
Household operation................
Electricity and gas...............
Other household operation...
Transportation..........................
Medical care............................
Recreation..............................
Other.......................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

2.06
0.57
0.15
0.03
0.11
0.05
0.53
0.20
0.58

1.55
0.43
0.12
0.06
0.06
0.01
0.61
0.11
0.28

1.87
0.34
0.13
0.05
0.09
-0.06
0.75
0.07
0.63

1.18
0.25
0.02
0.05
-0.03
-0.01
0.62
0.06
0.23

0.96
0.34
-0.84
-0.83
0.15
0.74
0.13
0.45

2.17
0.36
0.44
0.34
0.11
0.06
0.44
0.03
0.83

1.64
0.38
0.51
0.46
0.05
0.05
0.36
0.12
0.22

22

0.06

0.04

-0.16

-0.04

-0.88

0.36

0.65

23

3.33

2.71

3.22

0.25

4.77

1.95

2.27

Percentage points at annual
rates:

Addenda:
Energy goods and services 1....
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy...........................

0.00

0.00
-0.05
0.51

0.00

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.

Table 2.3.3. Real Personal Consumption Expenditures by Major
Type of Product, Quantity Indexes

Table 2.3.4. Price Indexes for Personal Consumption Expenditures by Major
Type of Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Personal consumption
expenditures..................
Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and parts.........
Furniture and household
equipment............................
Other.......................................

Line

2006
IV

I

II

119.521
137.868
114.799

4 142.541
5 119.370

156.790
129.696

159.059
130.021

163.472
131.958

172.097
137.039

173.496 176.324
135.754 136.292

6 111.913
7 109.273
8 117.869

116.924 117.481
115.191 116.189
125.195 125.581

118.608
117.349
128.686

120.313
119.265
131.367

120.742
119.853
130.113

121.204
119.631
131.876

102.679
104.683
81.167
122.432

102.348
104.696
77.338
124.356

102.532
104.481
81.795
125.409

103.795
106.227
77.738
126.016
116.234
114.436
108.203
107.770
108.629
99.044
127.347
119.448
113.622

120.355
140.019
117.179

Nondurable goods.....................
Food.......................................
Clothing and shoes..................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.......................
Gasoline and oil...................
Fuel oil and coal..................
Other.......................................

9 104.727
10 105.861
11
92.479
12 116.072

104.204
105.824
86.762
120.838

Services.....................................
Housing..................................
Household operation...............
Electricity and gas...............
Other household operation...
Transportation..........................
Medical care...........................
Recreation..............................
Other......................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

110.055
108.459
104.922
104.569
105.147
97.510
118.550
113.618
107.403

112.925 113.379 113.945 114.398 115.440
111.540 111.918 112.394 113.035 113.713
107.145 107.506 107.598 103.628 105.735
107.317 107.443 107.963
98.875 102.566
107.016 107.543 107.320 107.289 108.190
97.652
97.376
98.298
98.722
97.330
122.799 123.437 124.563 125.887 126.690
116.727 117.009 117.445 118.336 118.581
109.540 110.176 110.634 111.521 113.175

22

104.676

105.473

104.963

104.786

100.967

102.498

105.192

23

113.455

117.255

118.125

118.216

119.953

120.674

121.521

Addenda:
Energy goods and services '...
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy..........................

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.




2005

2006

2005
III

III

1 112.430 116.349 117.152 117.373 118.761
2 125.753 132.666 136.207 131.799 137.893
3 116.518 117.173 122.801 110.286 115.158

103.288
104.887
86.060
121.368

2004

Personal consumption
expenditures..................
Durable goods............................
Motor vehicles and parts.........
Furniture and household
equipment............................
Other.......................................

1 108.373
2 90.845
3 97.242

111.493
90.198
98.967

IV

I

II

III

112.067
89.908
98.607

112.873
89.606
98.906

113.445
89.385
99.460

114.573
89.206
99.532

115.241
88.967
99.631

74.671
97.567
113.484
114.414
90.870

73.894
98.351
115.769
114.905
91.651

116.442
115.727
91.342

161.126
160.254
172.031
109.301

182.632
182.620
180.783
109.737

185.621
185.352
187.495
110.041

Nondurable goods....................
Food........................................
Clothing and shoes..................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.......................
Gasoline and oil...................
Fuel oil and coal..................
Other.......................................

6 107.617
7 110.270
8 92.655

111.530
112.732
91.706

75.435
98.005
113.016 113.177
113.012 113.642
91.265
91.101

9 124.064
10 123.925
11 125.377
12 106.139

151.423
150.760
159.465
107.775

167.157
167.116
166.678
107.930

Services.....................................
Housing...................................
Household operation................
Electricity and gas...............
Other household operation ...
Transportation..........................
Medical care...........................
Recreation..............................
Other.......................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

112.863 116.529 116.858 118.281 119.194 120.059 120.960
113.234 116.165 116.453 117.279 118.269 119.717 121.055
109.943 115.554 115.498 120.579 122.403 121.019 121.383
117.821 129.900 129.526 142.169 145.582 140.799 140.318
105.374 107.233 107.364 108.047 108.977 109.447 110.285
108.373 112.663 113.621 114.970 115.411 116.826 117.675
114.660 118.438 118.752 119.949 120.482 121.332 122.180
112.059 115.168 115.535 116.702 117.311 118.582 119.425
113.086 116.625 116.985 117.959 119.116 119.970 120.711

22

121.376

142.141

150.861

154.420

154.467

164.836

166.327

23

107.314

109.559

109.732

110.418

110.983

111.738

112.337

Addenda:
Energy goods and services '....
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy...........................

4
5

79.929
98.044

76.884
97.688

76.315
98.189

163.612
162.470
178.440
108.619

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.

73.046
98.950

National Data

D-20

January 2007

Table 2.3.5. Personal Consumption Expenditures by Major
Type of Product

Table 2.3.6. Real Personal Consumption Expenditures by Major
Type of Product, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Personal consumption
expenditures..................
Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and parts.........
Furniture and household
equipment...........................
Other......................................

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006
IV

I

II

Line

1

8,211.5

8,742.4

8,847.3

8,927.8

9,079.2

9,228.1

9,346.7

2
3

986.3
437.9

1,033.1
448.2

1,057.3
468.1

1,019.6
421.6

1,064.1
442.7

1,061.8
441.7

1,075.5
451.3

4
5

356.5
191.8

377.2
207.7

380.0
209.2

386.0
212.0

402.3
219.1

401.3
218.8

403.2
221.0

2005

2005

III

2006

III
Personal consumption
expenditures..................
Durable goods............................
Motor vehicles and parts.........
Furniture and household
equipment............................
Other.......................................

IV

I

II

III

1

7,577.1

7,841.2

7,895.3

7,910.2

8,003.8

8,055.0

8,111.2

2
3

1,085.7
450.4

1,145.3
452.9

1,175.9
474.6

1,137.9
426.3

1,190.5
445.1

1,190.3
443.7

1,208.8
452.9

4
5

446.0
195.6

490.6
212.6

497.7
213.1

511.5
216.3

538.5
224.6

542.9
222.5

551.7
223.4

Nondurable goods.....................
Food........................................
Clothing and shoes..................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.......................
Gasoline and oil...................
Fuel oil and coal..................
Other.......................................

6
7
8

2,179.2
1,011.0
350.9

2,276.8
1,065.7
372.7

2,287.6
1,074.9
373.9

2,309.6
1,085.7
383.1

2,342.8
1,103.4
391.1

2,351.1
1,108.8
387.4

2,360.1
1,106.8
392.6

9
10
11
12

200.5
186.0
14.6
618.5

199.5
185.9
13.7
643.9

197.8
184.2
13.6
646.7

196.6
183.9
12.8
652.4

196.0
183.9
12.2
662.6

196.3
183.5
12.9
668.3

198.7
186.6
12.3
671.5

5,523.5
1,394.2
512.3
216.6
295.7
339.5
1,597.5
382.7
1,297.3

Services.....................................
Housing....................................
Household operation................
Electricity and gas...............
Other household operation...
Transportation..........................
Medical care............................
Recreation...............................
Other.......................................
Residual......................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

4,323.9
1,091.6
409.3
149.8
259.5
284.0
1,217.3
304.8
1,016.0
-18.9

4,436.6
1,122.6
418.0
153.8
264.1
284.4
1,260.9
313.1
1,036.2
-31.9

4,454.5
1,126.4
419.4
154.0
265.4
283.6
1,267.5
313.9
1,042.2
-36.4

4,476.7
1,131.2
419.8
154.7
264.9
283.5
1,279.0
315.1
1,046.5
-36.7

4,494.5
1,137.6
404.3
141.7
264.8
286.3
1,292.6
317.5
1,054.9
-53.0

4,535.4
1,144.5
412.5
147.0
267.0
287.5
1,300.9
318.1
1,070.6
-50.6

4,566.6
1,151.7
422.1
154.4
268.1
288.5
1,307.6
320.4
1,074.8
-52.1

566.0

586.1

23

350.4

353.1

351.4

350.8

338.0

343.1

352.2

7,388.1

7,479.9

Addenda:
Energy goods and services1....
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy...........................

24

6,216.7

6,424.9

6,472.6

6,477.6

6,572.7

6,612.3

6,658.7

Nondurable goods.....................
Food.......................................
Clothing and shoes..................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.......................
Gasoline and oil...................
Fuel oil and coal..................
Other.......................................

6
7
8

2,345.2
1,114.8
325.1

2,539.3
1,201.4
341.8

2,584.9
1,214.7
341.3

2,613.5
1,233.7
349.1

2,658.2
1,262.3
355.4

2,721.4
1,274.0
355.1

2,747.7
1,280.7
358.7

9
10
11
12

248.8
230.4
18.4
656.5

302.1
280.2
21.9
694.0

331.0
308.2
22.8
698.0

322.1
299.1
23.0
708.6

316.2
295.1
21.1
724.2

359.1
335.6
23.5
733.3

369.4
346.3
23.2
738.9

Services.....................................
Housing..................................
Household operation...............
Electricity and gas...............
Other household operation...
Transportation..........................
Medical care............................
Recreation..............................
Other......................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

4,880.1
1,236.1
450.0
176.6
273.5
307.8
1,395.7
341.6
1,148.9

5,170.0
1,304.1
483.0
199.8
283.2
320.4
1,493.4
360.6
1,208.4

5,205.1
1,311.7
484.3
199.4
285.0
322.3
1,505.0
362.6
1,219.1

5,294.7
1,326.6
506.1
219.9
286.2
325.9
1,534.0
367.7
1,234.4

5,356.8
1,345.4
494.8
206.2
288.6
330.4
1,557.2
372.4
1,256.5

5,444.9
1,370.1
499.1
206.9
292.2
335.9
1,578.2
377.2
1,284.3

22

425.3

501.9

530.4

542.0

522.4

23

6,671.4

7,039.1

7,102.2

7,152.1

7,294.4

Addenda:
Energy goods and services 1...
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy..........................

2004

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.




1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the differ­
ence between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

January 2007

Survey

of

C

urrent

D-21

B u s in e s s

3. Government Current Receipts and Expenditures




Table 3.1. Government Current Receipts and Expenditures
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Current receipts................................................................
Current tax receipts....................................................................
Personal current taxes............................................................
Taxes on production and imports...........................................
Taxes on corporate income....................................................
Taxes from the rest of the world.............................................
Contributions for government social insurance............................
Income receipts on assets..........................................................
Interest and miscellaneous receipts.......................................
Dividends................................................................................
Current transfer receipts.............................................................
From business (net)................................................................
From persons.........................................................................
Current surplus of government enterprises.................................

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

3,244.5
2,211.1
1,049.8
864.0
287.6
9.7
826.4
95.4
93.0
2.4
116.6
49.8
66.8
-5.0

3,586.3
2,520.7
1,203.1
922.4
384.4
10.8
880.6
98.3
95.8
2.4
102.1
30.1
72.0
-15.4

3,518.4
2,520.8
1,215.0
930.2
364.2
11.4
888.5
98.4
95.9
2.4
38.4
-34.3
72.7
-27.7

3,712.5
2,604.8
1,247.6
937.3
408.4
11.4
898.9
98.5
96.1
2.5
123.6
49.4
74.2
-13.3

3,895.1
2,736.2
1,332.6
952.5
440.7
10.4
936.7
100.0
97.5
2.5
131.4
55.6
75.7
-9.2

3,961.6
2,796.5
1,361.0
966.4
458.2
10.9
938.8
101.6
99.0
2.6
134.1
56.7
77.3
-9.4

3,997.7
2,818.8
1,366.2
968.6
472.7
11.3
948.9
103.3
100.7
2.6
136.9
57.9
79.0
-10.2

Current expenditures.......................................................
Consumption expenditures.........................................................
Current transfer payments
Government social benefits....................................................
To persons...........
To the rest of the world.......................................................
Other current transfer payments to the rest of the world (net)..
Interest payments.......................................................................
To persons and business........................................................
To the rest of the world...........................................................
Subsidies....................................................................................
Less: Wage accruals less disbursements..................................

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

3,639.4
1,854.8
1,427.2
1,401.4
1,398.4
3.0
25.9
312.7
224.2
88.5
44.7
0.0

3,898.8
1,975.7
1,517.8
1,484.0
1,480.9
3.1
33.9
348.0
234.4
113.6
57.3
0.0

3,933.8
2,002.1
1,523.9
1,492.3
1,489.2
3.1
31.6
349.6
232.4
117.2
58.1
0.0

3,993.3
2,014.5
1,542.8
1,504.0
1,500.8
3.2
38.9
372.9
247.6
125.3
63.1
0.0

4,029.3
2,059.7
1,561.2
1,539.2
1,536.0
3.2
22.0
353.3
218.5
134.8
55.1
0.0

4,098.6
2,083.0
1,581.2
1,558.0
1,554.7
3.3
23.2
382.0
236.9
145.1
52.3
0.0

4,173.5
2,109.1
1,610.2
1,586.2
1,583.1
3.1
24.0
402.4
253.8
148.6
51.8
0.0

-394.9
57.8
-452.7

-312.5
65.4
-377.9

-415.4
71.2
-486.6

-280.8
75.3
-356.0

-134.3
62.3
-196.6

-136.9
48.4
-185.3

-175.8
51.3
-227.1

Total receipts........................................................................
Current receipts..................................................................
Capital transfer receipts

30
31
32

3,274.8
3,244.5
30.3

3,616.5
3,586.3
30.2

3,548.5
3,518.4
30.1

3,744.0
3,712.5
31.4

3,928.8
3,895.1
33.7

3,994.1
3,961.6
32.5

4,028.9
3,997.7
31.1

Total expenditures..
Current expenditures
Gross government investment............. ..............................
Capital transfer payments...................................................
Net purchases of rionproduced assets..............................
Less: Consumption of fixed capital....................................
Net lending or net borrowing ( - ) ........................................

33
34
35
36
37
38
39

3,807.9
3,639.4
371.4
16.8
11.1
230.8
-533.1

4,072.8
3,898.8
397.1
18.3
10.9
252.2
-456.3

4,093.8
3,933.8
400.3
16.1
9.3
265.7
-545.3

4,175.5
3,993.3
409.1
16.1
11.8
255.0
-431.5

4,223.6
4,029.3
419.9
21.3
12.2
259.1
-294.8

4,294.4
4,098.6
430.9
18.1
9.8
262.9
-300.3

4,368.8
4,173.5
433.0
16.8
13.1
267.6
-339.9

Net government saving....................................................
Social insurance funds...............................................................
Other.........................................................................................
Addenda:

D-22

January 2007

National Data

Table 3.2. Federal Government Current Receipts and Expenditures

Table 3.3. State and Local Government Current Receipts and Expenditures

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2005
III

Current receipts......................
Current tax receipts..........................
Personal current taxes..................
Taxes on production and imports...
Excise taxes.............................
Customs duties.........................
Taxes on corporate income..........
Federal Reserve banks............
Other.......................................
Taxes from the rest of the world....
Contributions for government social
insurance......................................
Income receipts on assets................
Interest receipts............................
Rents and royalties.......................
Current transfer receipts...................
From business..............................
From persons...............................
Current surplus of government
enterprises..................................

2005

Line

2004

2006
IV

I

II

2,001.0
1,150.2
801.4
94.6
71.4
23.3
244.5
18.1
226.4
9.7

2,246.8
1,366.2
927.9
101.1
75.8
25.3
326.4
21.5
304.9
10.8

2,182.4
1,364.2
941.0
102.4
77.0
25.4
309.5
21.7
287.8
11.4

2,349.8
1,428.4
968.4
101.6
75.9
25.7
347.1
24.6
322.5
11.4

2,490.9
1,524.9
1,039.2
101.1
75.4
25.7
374.3
25.0
349.3
10.4

2,523.2
1,553.2
1,049.9
103.0
75.9
27.1
389.4
27.3
362.1
10.9

2,564.7
1,582.9
1,068.4
101.3
73.9
27.4
401.8
29.0
372.8
11.3

11
12
13
14
15
16
17

802.2
22.1
15.5
6.6
27.7
15.2
12.5

855.3
22.9
15.9
7.1
7.1
-6.6
13.8

863.2
22.8
15.7
7.1
-61.7
-75.7
14.0

873.8
22.3
15.3
6.9
30.6
16.3
14.3

911.9
23.3
15.0
8.3
32.2
17.5
14.7

914.1
24.2
15.3
8.9
32.8
17.7
15.2

924.2
25.4
16.1
9.3
33.6
18.0
15.6

18

-1.2

-4.9

-6.0

-5.4

-1.4

-1.1

2,383.0
724.5
1,393.3
1,018.4
1,015.4
3.0
374.9

2,555.9
768.6
1,476.7
1,081.7
1,078.6
3.1
395.0

2,578.5
784.3
1,481.3
1,087.8
1,084.7
3.1
393.5

2,613.3
771.1
1,502.4
1,096.7
1,093.5
3.2
405.7

2,637.9
803.6
1,522.0
1,148.8
1,145.5
3.2
373.3

2,686.2
802.3
1,546.6
1,166.4
1,163.1
3.3
380.3

26
27
28
29
30
31

349.0
25.9
220.9
132.4
88.5
44.3

361.1
33.9
253.8
140.3
113.6
56.9

361.9
31.6
255.2
137.9
117.2
57.7

366.8
38.9
277.1
151.8
125.3
62.7

351.3
22.0
257.5
122.7
134.8
54.7

357.0
23.2
285.4
140.3
145.1
51.9

32

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

33
34
35

-382.0
50.3
-432.3

-309.2
58.1
-367.3

-396.0
64.0
-460.0

-263.6
68.5
-332.0

-147.0
56.2
-203.2

-163.1
42.6
-205.7

-165.6
45.8
-211.4

Total receipts.............................
Current receipts........................
Capital transfer receipts............

36
37
38

2,025.6
2,001.0
24.6

2,271.7
2,246.8
25.0

2,207.3
2,182.4
24.9

2,376.1
2,349.8
26.3

2,519.7
2,490.9
28.8

2,550.9
2,523.2
27.7

2,591.1
2,564.7
26.5

Total expenditures......................
Current expenditures................
Gross government investment...
Capital transfer payments.........
Net purchases of nonproduced
assets...................................
Less: Consumption of fixed
capital...................................
Net lending or net borrowing (-)

39
40
41
42

2,453.4
2,383.0
101.4
63.1

2,633.0
2,555.9
109.8
67.0

2,653.2
2,578.5
111.5
65.3

2,692.7
2,613.3
115.1
64.8

2,725.8
2,637.9
118.2
72.0

2,766.9
2,686.2
117.4
69.2

2,814.1
2,730.2
118.1
70.1

43

0.0

-0.6

-2.3

0.0

0.2

-2.3

0.8

44
45

94.1
-427.8

99.0
-361.3

99.8
-445.9

100.7
-316.6

102.4
-206.1

103.7
-216.0

105.1
-222.9

To persons................................
To the rest of the world.............
Other current transfer payments....
Grants-in-aid to state and local
governments.........................
To the rest of the world (net).....
Interest payments.............................
To persons and business..............
To the rest of the world.................
Subsidies.........................................
Less: Wage accruals less
disbursements..............................
saving.................................
Social insurance funds.....................
Other...............................................

-1.5

2,730.2
809.1
Current expenditures..............
1,564.8
1,175.2
Consumption expenditures................
Government social benefit payments
1,172.1
to persons.....................................
3.1
389.6
Interest payments..............................
Subsidies
..........................................
Less: Wage accruals less
365.6
disbursements...............................
24.0
304.9
156.3
government saving..............
148.6
Social insurance funds.......................
51.4
Other.................................................

Addenda:




Current receipts.......................
Current tax receipts...........................
Personal current taxes...................
Income taxes.............................
Other.........................................
Taxes on production and imports....
Sales taxes................................
Property taxes...........................
Other.........................................
Taxes on corporate income............
Contributions for government social
insurance......................................
Income receipts on assets.................
Interest receipts.............................
Dividends......................................
Rents and royalties........................
Current transfer receipts....................
Federal grants-in-aid......................
From business (net).......................
From persons.................................
Current surplus of government

II

III

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

1,592.6
1,060.9
248.4
225.1
23.4
769.4
370.3
329.8
69.3
43.1

1,700.6
1,154.4
275.2
250.9
24.4
821.2
394.1
350.4
76.7
58.0

1,697.8
1,156.6
274.0
249.5
24.4
827.9
397.9
353.0
76.9
54.7

1,729.6
1,176.3
279.3
254.3
25.0
835.7
397.2
358.1
80.5
61.3

1,755.4
1,211.3
293.4
268.3
25.1
851.4
407.9
363.2
80.3
66.4

1,795.5
1,243.3
311.1
285.6
25.5
863.3
413.2
368.6
81.5
68.8

1,798.7
1,235.9
297.8
272.4
25.4
867.2
415.0
371.3
81.0
70.9

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

24.2
73.3
62.1
2.4
8.7
438.0
349.0
34.7
54.3

25.3
75.3
63.4
2.4
9.5
456.1
361.1
36.7
58.3

25.3
75.6
63.6
2.4
9.6
462.0
361.9
41.4
58.8

25.2
76.3
64.0
2.5
9.8
459.8
366.8
33.1
59.9

24.8
76.7
64.1
2.5
10.1
450.5
351.3
38.2
61.0

24.7
77.4
64.5
2.6
10.3
458.3
357.0
39.1
62.2

24.7
77.9
64.8
2.6
10.6
468.8
365.6
39.9
63.3

2006

2005
III

19
20
21
99
23
24
25

Current expenditures.............
Consumption expenditures...............
Current transfer payments................

2005

III

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

2004

IV

I

20

-3.8

-10.5

-21.7

-7.9

-7.8

21
22

1,605.5
1,130.3

1,703.9
1,207.2

1,717.2
1,217.8

1,746.8
1,243.4

1,742.7
1,256.2

-8.2
1,769.4
1,280.7

1,808.9
1,300.0

23
24
2b

382.9
91.8
0.4

402.3
94.2
0.4

404.5
94.5
0.4

407.3
95.8
0.4

390.4
95.8
0.4

391.7
96.6
0.4

411.0
97.5
0.4

26

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

71
?8
29

-12.9
7.5
-20.4

-3.3
7.3
-10.6

-19.3
7.2
-26.6

-17.2
6.8
-24.0

12.7
6.2
6.5

26.1
5.8
20.4

-10.2
5.5
-15.7

Total receipts................................
Current receipts.........................
Capital transfer receipts.............

30
31
32

1,644.5
1,592.6
51.9

1,754.6
1,700.6
53.9

1,752.3
1,697.8
54.4

1,783.4
1,729.6
53.8

1,811.1
1,755.4
55.6

1,851.5
1,795.5
56.0

1,856.6
1,798.7
58.0

Total expenditures.......................
Current expenditures.................
Gross government investment....
Capital transfer payments..........
Net purchases of nonproduced
assets...................................
Less: Consumption of fixed
capital...................................
Net lending or net borrowing (-)

33
34
as
36

1,749.8
1,605.5
270.0

1,849.6
1,703.9
287.3

1,851.7
1,717.2
288.7

1,898.3
1,746.8
294.0

1,899.7
1,742.7
301.7

1,935.8
1,769.4
313.5

1,973.6
1,808.9
315.0

-8.7

Addenda:

37

11.0

11.6

11.6

11.8

12.0

12.2

12.3

38
39

136.7
-105.3

153.2
-95.0

165.9
-99.4

154.3
-114.9

156.7
-88.7

159.2
-84.3

162.5
-117.0

January 2007

Survey

of

D-23

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 3.9.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Government Consumption
Expenditures and Gross Investment

Table 3.9.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Government
Consumption Expenditures and Gross Investment
[Percent]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005
III

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment........................
Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investment2.............
Structures.......................
Equipment and software

IV

1
2
3
4
5

1.9
2.1
0.5
-3.1
7.2

0.9
0.9
1.1
-2.0
6.4

3.4
4.2
-0.9
-7.2
10.8

Federal...........................................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

6
7
8
9
10

4.3
4.0
6.6
-9.1
9.7

1.5
0.9
6.4
-1.6
7.7

National defense.......................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

11
12
13
14
15

5.9
5.4
9.5
-8.5
11.3

Nondefense...............................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

16
17
18
19
20

State and local..............................
Consumption expenditures.........
Gross investment........................
Structures...............................
Equipment and software.........

21
22
23
24
25

Line

2004

2005

2006

2005
I

II

III

4.9
4.4
7.6
5.5
11.1

1.7
2.5
-2.3
-4.5
1.7

9.6
8.8
15.3
14.6
15.4

-1.1
-2.1
4.0
4.3
3.5
-4.6
-6.7
11.1
69.9
3.5

8.8
8.7
8.9
-17.0
14.2

0.8
-0.5
7.4
10.3
2.6
-4.5
-4.4
-4.9
-40.9
2.5

1.7
1.2
5.5
-3.5
6.2

11.2
11.1
11.7
0.4
12.6

-9.9
-10.8
-3.1
11.3
-4.1

8.9
9.1
7.9
-19.0
10.2

-2.0
-4.1
14.1
-10.7
16.1

-1.2
-0.9
-3.1
4.6
-3.6

1.2
1.3
1.2
-9.5
6.0

1.1
0.1
8.1
-0.6
11.7

6.2
4.0
22.8
22.9
22.8

7.1
2.4
43.8
108.3
24.6

8.5
8.1
10.8
-16.1
23.9

-9.3
-5.0
-32.9
-51.4
-24.5

6.5
6.5
6.7
-3.2
10.3

0.5
1.0
-1.6
-2.7
3.1

0.5
0.9
-0.9
-2.0
4.2

-0.1
1.4
-6.4
-8.4
3.0

1.0
1.0
1.4
0.9
3.7

2.7
1.7
7.0
7.4
5.6

4.0
2.1
12.5
14.8
2.9

1.9
3.1
-3.1
-4.7
4.7

1.3
1.5
0.0
-0.6
0.1

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
(construction and software).
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

2006

2005
IV

III

I

II

III

Percent change at annual rate:
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.........................

1

1.9

0.9

3.4

-1.1

4.9

0.8

1.7

Percentage points at annual
rates:
Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investment2.............
Structures.......................
Equipment and software

2
3
4
5

1.78
0.09
-0.34
0.43

0.72
0.18
-0.21
0.39

3.50
-0.14
-0.78
0.65

-1.74
0.66
0.44
0.22

3.65
1.26
0.59
0.67

-0.41
1.22
1.06
0.16

2.06
-0.39
-0.50
0.11

Federal..........................................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

6
7
8
9
10

1.56
1.26
0.29
-0.07
0.36

0.56
0.28
0.28
-0.01
0.30

3.44
2.78
0.66
0.08
0.58

-1.73
-2.23
0.49
0.36
0.13

3.17
2.76
0.42
-0.13
0.55

-1.69
-1.45
-0.24
-0.34
0.10

0.47
0.47

National defense.......................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

11
12
13
14
15

1.40
1.13
0.27
-0.02
0.29

0.43
0.26
0.16
-0.01
0.17

2.70
2.36
0.34
0.34

-2.57
-2.47
-0.10
0.02
-0.12

2.15
1.91
0.24
-0.05
0.28

-0.50
-0.91
0.41
-0.02
0.43

-0.30
-0.20
-0.10
0.01
-0.11

0.84
0.25
0.59
0.33
0.26

1.02
0.85
0.18
-0.09
0.26

-1.19
-0.55
-0.65
-0.31
-0.33

0.77
0.67
0.10
-0.01
0.11

0.66
0.49
0.17
0.09
0.08

1.74
0.89
0.85
0.72
0.13

2.50
1.05
1.46
1.39
0.06

1.20
1.59
-0.39
-0.50
0.10

0.00

Nondefense...............................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

16
17
18
19
20

0.15
0.14
0.02
-0.05
0.06

0.14
0.02
0.12
0.12

0.74
0.42
0.32
0.08
0.24

State and lo ca l..............................
Consumption expenditures.........
Gross investment........................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software .......

21
22
23
24
25

0.32
0.52
-0.20
-0.27
0.07

0.33
0.44
-0.10
-0.20
0.10

-0.08
0.72
-0.80
-0.87
0.07

0.00

0.00
0.00
0.01

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
(construction and software).
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

Table 3.9.3. Real Government Consumption Expenditures and
Gross Investment, Quantity Indexes

Table 3.9.4. Price Indexes for Government Consumption Expenditures and
Gross Investment

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment........................
Consumption expenditures '
Gross investment2.............
Structures.......................
Equipment and software

114.358
114.298
114.517
103.781
135.523

Line

2006
IV

114.048
113.700
115.649
104.881
136.707

I

II

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.........................
Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investment2.............
Structures.......................
Equipment and software
Federal..........................................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software.....

131.740
128.681
155.397
80.239
164.911

National defense.......................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

121.411 118.488 120.370
119.666 118.137 120.006
134.201 121.448 123.427
111.254 92.885
92.137
144.679 134.864 138.220

Nondefense..............................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

16 113.963 118.606
17 116.274 121.381
18 100.007 101.913
19 113.512 121.819
94.902
20
95.009

113.731
113.564
114.431
104.770
133.146

115.423
114.925
117.777
106.305
140.345

Federal..........................................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software.....
National defense.......................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software.....

11
12
13
14
15

123.813
123.279
127.622
96.691
134.445
128.374
127.006
138.370
88.381
144.478

125.701 127.545 126.053 128.728
124.339 126.115 123.952 126.577
135.726 138.068 141.739 144.796
95.106
91.922 104.947 100.160
144.848 148.557 149.824 154.873
130.593 133.423 130.002 132.808
128.551 131.236 127.544 130.343
145.920 149.882 148.703 151.544
85.263
86.045
81.631
83.766
153.436 158.129 156.470 160.333

Nondefense..............................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software.....

16
17
18
19
20

115.606 116.896 116.939 118.971
116.431 116.593 116.675 117.362
110.674 119.670 119.443 130.801
96.771 116.262
101.631 100.972
114.658 128.100 129.796 137.125

State and local.............................
Consumption expenditures.........
Gross investment........................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.........

21
22
23
24
25

107.094 107.660 107.674 107.954 108.682 109.762
106.736 107.655 107.817 108.074 108.536 109.095
108.488 107.563 106.963 107.335 109.177 112.448
107.653 105.501 104.672 104.901 106.780 110.517
112.239 116.965 117.464 118.538 120.176 121.051

110.277
109.944
111.558
109.185
122.449

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account invest­
ment (construction and software).
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

State and lo c a l.............................
Consumption expenditures.........
Gross investment........................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.....

2006

2005
III

III

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10




2005

116.136
115.495
119.209
107.690
141.859
127.669
125.614
142.986
87.685
155.865

112.720
112.595
113.210
106.884
125.107

115.657
114.784
119.898
108.939
141.261
127.262
125.156
142.979
87.820
155.821
132.141
128.981
156.631
79.347
166.443

2004

IV

I

114.718 121.183 122.029 123.444 124.791
116.248 122.768 123.614 125.034 126.480
107.736 113.947 114.798 116.192 117.085
115.179 125.497 127.072 129.603 131.056
96.467
96.566
95.994
96.580
96.399
115.249 120.726 121.353 121.479 123.721
117.695 123.792 124.548 124.594 127.152
99.994 101.776 101.650 102.226 102.693
114.151 121.970 123.055 125.790 127.651
98.721
97.495
98.436
98.160
98.446
115.954 121.855 122.467 122.760 124.752
118.472 125.071 125.833 126.061 128.327
99.911 101.628 101.370 102.026 102.438
115.424 122.288 123.410 126.785 128.116
98.529
99.901
99.558 100.044 100.399

21 114.417
22 115.388
23 110.587
24 115.249
93.789
25

II

126.262 127.150
128.065 128.869
118.041 119.305
132.477 134.631
97.027
96.915
124.871 125.482
128.391 129.007
103.336 103.905
129.602 131.073
99.660
99.199
126.006 126.714
129.681 130.375
103.109 103.880
129.674 130.641
101.016 101.772

119.261 119.059 121.787 122.736
122.127 121.810 124.944 125.958
102.051 102.470 103.035 103.623
122.873 125.301 127.394 129.531
94.783
94.603
94.703
94.861

121.463 122.438
122.177 123.079
118.679 119.954
125.737 127.344
93.793
93.956

124.620
125.365
121.716
129.860
93.282

III

125.434 127.095
126.112 127.916
122.799 123.893
131.283 132.670
93.263
93.389

123.154
126.422
103.780
131.261
94.619
128.147
128.838
125.462
134.866
92.900

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
(construction and software).
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

D-24

National Data

January 2007

Table 3.9.5. Government Consumption Expenditures and
Gross Investment

Table 3.9.6. Real Government Consumption Expenditures and Gross
Investment, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

Seasonally adjusted at annua! rates

2006

2005

Line

III

IV

I

II

2004

III

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investm ent.........................
Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investment2..............
Structures........................
Equipment and software...

1
2
3
4
5

2,226.2
1,854.8
371.4
233.1
138.3

2,372.8
1,975.7
397.1
248.9
148.1

2,402.4
2,002.1
400.3
249.7
150.6

2,423.6
2,014.5
409.1
257.3
151.8

2,479.6
2,059.7
419.9
263.7
156.1

2,513.9
2,083.0
430.9
273.2
157.7

2,542.1
2,109.1
433.0
274.5
158.6

Federal...........................................
Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment.....................
Structures............................
Equipment and software......

6
7
8
9
10

825.9
724.5
101.4
14.7
86.7

878.3
768.6
109.8
15.4
94.4

895.8
784.3
111.5
15.0
96.5

886.2
771.1
115.1
17.5
97.6

921.7
803.6
118.2
17.0
101.2

919.7
802.3
117.4
15.1
102.3

927.2
809.1
118.1
15.3
102.8

National defense........................
Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment.....................
Structures............................
Equipment and software......
Nondefense................................
Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment.....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software......

11
12
13
14
15

551.2
483.7
67.5
5.1
62.4

590.9
516.9
74.1
5.4
68.6
295.3
254.2
41.1
12.1
29.0

616.5
537.7
78.8
5.1
73.7

274.7
240.7
33.9
9.6
24.3

605.0
530.9
74.2
5.1
69.0
290.7
253.4
37.4
9.9
27.5

613.5
537.7
75.8
5.2
70.6

16
17
18
19
20

589.3
516.9
72.4
5.2
67.2
289.0
251.7
37.4
10.2
27.1

308.2
265.9
42.4
11.8
30.6

State and local..............................
Consumption expenditures..........
Gross investment.........................
Structures................................
Equipment and software..........

21
22
23
24
25

1,400.3
1,130.3
270.0
218.4
51.6

1,494.4
1,207.2
287.3
233.5
53.8

1,506.6
1,217.8
288.7
234.6
54.1

1,537.4
1,243.4
294.0
239.8
54.2

1,557.9
1,256.2
301.7
246.8
54.9

2005

2005

2006

III
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.........................
Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investment2.............
Structures.......................
Equipment and software

IV

I

II

III

1
2
3
4
5

1,940.6
1,595.6
344.7
202.4
144.1

1,958.0
1,609.3
348.5
198.4
153.4

1,968.8
1,619.7
348.7
196.5
156.1

1,963.5
1,611.2
352.2
198.6
157.5

1,987.1
1,628.6
358.6
201.3
161.7

1,991.2
1,626.6
365.1
206.2
162.7

1,999.4
1,636.7
363.0
203.9
163.4

Federal..........................................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software.....

6
7
8
9
10

716.6
615.6
101.4
12.9
89.0

727.5
620.8
107.9
12.6
95.8

738.2
629.7
109.7
12.2
98.3

729.6
618.9
112.6
14.0
99.1

745.1
632.0
115.1
13.3
102.5

736.6
624.9
113.6
11.7
103.1

738.9
627.2
113.6
11.7
103.1

618.1
539.3
78.8
5.2
73.6

National defense.......................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

11
12
13
14
15

475.4
408.3
67.5
4.4
63.3

494.1
421.9
73.2
4.2
69.3

481.4
410.0
72.6
4.3
68.6

491.8
419.0
74.0
4.1
70.3

489.3
414.7
76.5
3.9
73.0

487.8
413.7
75.9
4.0
72.3

303.2
264.6
38.6
10.0
28.6

309.0
269.8
39.3
10.1
29.2

Nondefense...............................
Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment....................
Structures...........................
Equipment and software.....

16
17
18
19
20

241.0
207.0
33.9
8.5
25.6

483.6
413.3
71.2
4.2
67.3
243.7
207.3
36.7
8.4
28.6

243.8
207.5
36.6
8.1
29.0

248.0
208.7
40.1
9.7
30.6

253.1
212.8
41.1
9.3
32.3

247.0
210.1
37.2
7.7
30.1

250.9
213.4
37.8
7.7
30.9

1,594.2
1,280.7
313.5
258.1
55.4

1,614.9
1,300.0
315.0
259.2
55.8

State and lo ca l..............................
Consumption expenditures.........
Gross investment........................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.........
Residual.........................................

21
22
23
24
25
26

1,223.9
979.6
244,1
189.5
55.0
-0.6

1,230.4
988.0
242.1
185.7
57.3
-2.1

1,230.5
989.5
240.7
184.3
57.6
-2.6

1,233.7
991.9
241.6
184.7
58.1
-3.1

1,242.0
996.1
245.7
188.0
58.9
-3.7

1,254.4
1,001.2
253.1
194.5
59.3
-3.3

1,260.3
1,009.0
251.1
192.2
60.0
-3.8

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
(construction and software).
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures tor fixed assets; (construction and software).
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar
value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more
than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between
the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.




January 2007

Survey

of

D-25

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 3.10.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Government Consumption Expenditures and
General Government Gross Output
[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2006

2005
III

IV

I

ill

II

Government consumption expenditures 1..........................................................................
Gross output of general government...................................................................................
Value added....................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees......................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2....................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3................................................................
Durable goods............................................................................................................
Nondurable goods
Services.......
Less: Own-account investment4.........................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..............................................................................................

1
2
3
4
b
6
/
8
9
10
11

2.1
2.0
0.6
0.3
2.3
4.2
6.8
3.6
4.2
-0.7
1.0

0.9
1.1
0.9
0.6
2.6
1.3
2.5
1.2
1.3
1.4
2.3

4.2
4.1
0.8
0.6
2.3
9.5
9.8
3.5
11.8
-0.8
3.8

-2.1
-1.5
0.9
0.7
2.3
-5.3
6.1
0.8
-8.4
5.0
1.6

4.4
3.9
-0.7
-1.4
3.4
11.5
-5.2
3.8
16.3
3.7
1.0

-0.5
0.2
0.8
0.5
2.8
-0.9
0.0
-0.4
-1.1
8.9
3.6

2.5
2.4
2.4
2.3
3.1
2.3
16.2
4.3
0.4
-0.1
1.8

Federal consumption expenditures 1
Gross output of general government
Value added.....................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods..............
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4
Sales to other sectors

12
13
14
15
16
U
18
19
20
21
22

4.0
3.9
1.0
0.7
1.8
7.9
10.2
9.6
7.5
-3.7
5.5

0.9
1.1
0.6
0.1
2.6
1.8
3.1
0.7
1.8
-0.2
37.2

8.8
9.7
-0.4
-1.2
2.6
23.8
16.4
16.4
25.7
7.3
158.6

-6.7
-6.7
1.5
1.2
2.6
-16.0
9.3
-1.4
-20.4
4.0
-17.0

8.7
8.1
-3.5
-5.1
2.6
24,4
-10.2
2.2
32.6
-8.8
-33.1

-4.4
-3.9
-0.1
-0.7
2.3
-8.3
-2.0
-22.3
-7.1
2.5
60.9

1.5
1.3
3.2
3.5
2.1
-1.1
27.3
5.9
-4.8
8.1
-19.2

Defense consumption expenditures 1
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added...........................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3
Durable goods....................................
Nondurable goods..............................
Services.............................................
Less: Own-account investment4............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..........

23
24
2b
26
2/
28
29
30
31
32
33

5.4
5.3
1.8
1.8
1.8
9.7
10.0
12.7
9.3
-7.6
-1.6

1.2
1.3
0.8
0.3
2.5
1.8
2.4
-3.0
2.2
-5.5
21.7

11.1
11.4
0.5
-0.2
2.5
25.5
16.3
4.8
29.6
1.8
60.1

-10.8
-11.5
0.9
0.4
2.4
-24.0
9.8
-22.7
-28.6
5.5
-81.3

9.1
9.8
-4.7
-6.9
2.4
29.6
-12.3
-0.6
42.1
-3.9
316.1

-4.1
-3.3
-0.7
-1.6
2.1
-€.2
-1.1
-29.8
-4.1
2.1
195.8

-0.9
-1.4
3.7
4.3
1.9
-6.9
29.8
7.1
-12.9
4.1
-46.2

Nondefense consumption expenditures 1
Gross output of general government
Value added................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.........................

1.3
1.4
-0.5
-1.0
1.8
4.3
13.1

0.1
0.9
0.3
-0.2
2.7
1.7
11.8

4.0
6.5
-1.8
-2.7
2.9
19.9
17.9

2.4
3.6
2.7
2.6
2.9
5.0
3.1

8.1
4.7
-1.2
-2.1
3.3
13.6
17.8

-5.0
-4.9
1.1
0.8
3.0
-12.9
-11.7

6.5
6.7
2.4
2.4
2.6
13.0
1.1

Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change........................................................
Other nondurable goods.....
Services.................................
Less: Own-account investment4....
Sales to other sectors.........

34
3b
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

12.6
3.7
0.0
11.1

2.2
0.8
4.3
48.1

-21.5
17.6
11.8
272.6

10.9
0.2
2.9
71.8

15.5
14.9
-12.6
-74.5

-18.9
-13.1
2.8
-1 9

6.3
14.9
11.4
16.9

State and local consumption expenditures 1
Gross output of general government
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.............
Nondurable goods........
Services......................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors
Tuition and related educational charges..................................................................
Health and hospital charges....................................................................................
Other sales.............................................................................................................

47
48
49
50
b1
b2
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

1.0
1.0
0.5
0.2
2.7
2.0
2.4
2.6
1.6
0.0
0.9
-2.1
0.7
3.5

0.9
1.0
1.0
0.8
2.6
1.0
1.7
1.3
0.9
1.8
1.5
-0.1
0.8
4.0

1.4
1.3
1.4
1.3
2.1
1.3
1.1
1.2
1.4
-2.7
1.3
1.2
0.4
2.8

1.0
1.3
0.7
0.5
2.0
2.2
1.8
1.3
2.8
5.3
2.2
4.6
0.1
3.8

1.7
1.9
0.6
0.1
4.0
4.2
2.2
4.1
4.4
7.0
2.1
2.0
2.0
2.4

2.1
2.3
1.2
0.9
3.3
4.1
2.8
4.1
4.1
10.4
2.4
2.4
2.4
2.5

3.1
2.9
2.1
1.8
3.9
4.4
2.2
4.0
4.8
-1.9
2.4
2.4
2.4
2.4

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in soft­
ware in table 3.9.5.




D-26

National Data

January 2007

Table 3.10.3. Real Government Consumption Expenditures and
General Government Gross Output, Quantity Indexes
[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Government consumption expenditures 1..........................................................................
Gross output of general government...................................................................................
Value added....................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees......................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2....................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3................................................................
Durable goods.............................................................................................................
Nondurable goods.......................................................................................................
Services......................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.........................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..............................................................................................

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

112.595
112.198
105.732
105.000
110.062
124.301
118.990
117.204
127.301
107.331
110.131

113.564
113.382
106.666
105.633
112.885
125.958
121.957
118.582
128.934
108.787
112.623

114.298
114.052
106.731
105.654
113.225
127.769
123.603
118.717
131.429
108.900
112.945

113.700
113.618
106.982
105.844
113.863
126.054
125.453
118.964
128.568
110.242
113.391

114.925
114.712
106.795
105.475
114.812
129.540
123.777
120.087
133.507
111.243
113.676

114.784
114.756
107.014
105.601
115.621
129.256
123.767
119.971
133.128
113.632
114.697

115.495
115.431
107.659
106.206
116.506
129.989
128.501
121.238
133.250
113.615
115.203

Federal consumption expenditures 1...............................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods..................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods............................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

123.279
122.671
106.265
106.798
104.590
150.650
128.212
148.512
154.361
115.710
80.240

124.339
124.079
106.947
106.928
107.277
153.353
132.188
149.585
157.103
115.435
110.081

126.115
125.916
106.726
106.551
107.636
158.882
135.100
149.459
163.780
116.551
117.265

123.952
123.736
107.121
106.867
108.320
152.088
138.132
148.933
154.720
117.699
111.937

126.577
126.160
106.167
105.465
109.028
160.611
134.476
149.736
166.028
115.007
101.235

125.156
124.925
106.148
105.274
109.659
157.173
133.782
140.591
163.015
115.717
114.020

125.614
125.317
106.997
106.196
110.238
156.732
142.107
142.615
161.011
117.980
108.103

Defense consumption expenditures 1.....................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

127.006
126.979
107.144
109.051
102.268
160.172
126.772
145.555
169.398
151.975
108.080

128.551
128.619
108.048
109.389
104.858
163.094
129.812
141.149
173.189
143.678
131.580

131.236
131.402
107.976
109.180
105.202
170.916
132.649
147.394
182.313
143.760
152.501

127.544
127.446
108.206
109.277
105.838
159.574
135.799
138.197
167.614
145.681
100.221

130.343
130.460
106.903
107.336
106.467
170.275
131.412
137.986
182.994
144.245
143.135

128.981
129.366
106.707
106.895
107.024
167.587
131.040
126.313
181.077
145.007
187.707

128.681
128.921
107.674
108.014
107.539
164.630
139.881
128.497
174.913
146.455
160.775

Nondefense consumption expenditures 1...............................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods............................................................................................................
Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change........................................................
Other nondurable goods..............................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
4?
43
44
45
46

116.431
114.982
104.712
103.363
111.132
133.055
146.541

116.593
115.974
104.998
103.165
114.097
135.352
163.760

116.675
116.099
104.511
102.520
114.500
136.611
167.703

117.362
117.140
105.200
103.184
115.322
138.297
168.987

119.666
118.495
104.874
102.635
116.260
142.770
176.035

118.137
117.004
105.173
102.838
117.111
137.929
170.628

120.006
118.914
105.810
103.451
117.875
142.201
171.082

178.567
129.965
96.177
68.422

182.531
131.001
100.285
101.312

175.346
133.715
101.973
102.681

179.923
133.788
102.699
117.558

186.530
138.511
99.301
83.558

177.024
133.728
99.986
82.507

179.729
138.457
102.713
85.783

State and local consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods............................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................
Tuition and related educational charges..................................................................
Health and hospital charges....................................................................................
Other sales..............................................................................................................

47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

106.736
107.542
105.491
104.326
115.264
111.493
108.138
112.658
111.166
105.541
111.028
105.618
113.121
111.762

107.655
108.625
106.536
105.152
118.215
112.652
109.924
114.080
112.139
107.398
112.737
105.537
113.985
116.208

107.817
108.777
106.726
105.327
118.538
112.730
110.095
114.247
112.160
107.281
112.864
105.352
114.112
116.581

108.074
109.116
106.915
105.468
119.137
113.354
110.576
114.608
112.945
108.670
113.474
106.533
114.140
117.672

108.536
109.622
107.065
105.499
120.303
114.528
111.177
115.776
114.163
110.519
114.077
107.065
114.711
118.381

109.095
110.234
107.389
105.748
121.272
115.678
111.953
116.955
115.323
113.298
114.768
107.709
115.399
119.112

109.944
111.034
107.944
106.231
122.433
116.940
112.553
118.112
116.696
112.758
115.453
108.354
116.092
119.817

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in soft­
ware in table 3.9.5.




January 2007

Survey

of

D-27

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 3.10.4. Price Indexes for Government Consumption Expenditures and
General Government Gross Output
[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Government consumption expenditures 1..........................................................................
Gross output of general government...................................................................................
Value added....................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees......................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2....................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3................................................................
Durable goods............................................................................................................
Nondurable goods......................................................................................................
Services......................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.........................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..............................................................................................

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

116.248
116.454
119.235
121.865
105.231
111.778
102.208
113.758
112.219
114.279
117.920

122.768
122.760
124.718
127.425
110.292
119.320
104.161
130.408
117.323
119.227
122.970

123.614
123.534
125.330
128.016
111.007
120.341
104.345
133.343
117.798
119.819
123.303

125.034
125.031
126.237
128.881
112.121
122.728
104.587
138.589
119.469
120.962
125.310

126.480
126.402
128.170
130.995
113.134
123.245
105.113
136.627
120.800
122.470
126.196

128.065
127.905
129.182
132.042
113.965
125.475
106.044
144.244
121.416
123.723
127.211

128.869
128.809
130.338
133.203
115.085
125.998
106.642
143.337
122.398
124.714
128.726

Federal consumption expenditures 1...............................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.................................................................................................

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

117.695
117.666
122.817
129.376
103.803
110.752
101.277
109.625
112.235
119.837
112.767

123.792
123.761
129.479
137.416
106.480
116.145
102.688
127.253
116.691
124.946
118.928

124.548
124.486
130.093
138.198
106.616
116.999
102.783
132.557
117.122
125.697
117.072

124.594
124.640
129.782
137.540
107.295
117.673
102.780
133.584
117.848
125.626
126.346

127.152
127.083
133.763
142.519
108.456
118.384
103.098
131.526
118.935
128.460
118.459

128.391
128.312
134.390
143.102
109.199
120.254
104.131
139.058
120.289
129.596
118.899

129.007
128.927
134.579
143.038
110.085
121.333
104.650
139.961
121.461
130.047
119.483

Defense consumption expenditures 1.....................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.................................................................................................

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

118.472
118.475
124.019
132.100
104.718
111.334
102.127
111.656
113.246
120.112
117.603

125.071
125.063
131.671
141.713
107.623
116.727
103.728
137.758
117.386
126.127
122.661

125.833
125.822
132.233
142.466
107.730
117.692
103.845
145.561
117.881
127.102
122.866

126.061
126.044
132.009
141.844
108.456
118.382
103.896
148.658
118.490
127.119
121.976

128.327
128.300
135.894
146.796
109.818
118.923
104.288
144.162
119.505
130.097
122.008

129.681
129.649
136.388
147.173
110.581
121.112
105.421
156.904
121.022
131.602
122.699

130.375
130.343
136.686
147.120
111.688
122.204
106.015
158.739
122.144
131.987
123.573

Nondefense consumption expenditures 1...............................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................

116.274
116.213
120.762
125.333
101.430
109.583
91.890

121.381
121.351
125.685
130.947
103.518
114.981
91.303

122.127
122.013
126.391
131.776
103.726
115.586
91.174

121.810
122.035
125.929
131.059
104.285
116.232
90.620

124.944
124.838
130.080
136.088
104.924
117.305
90.214

125.958
125.836
130.937
136.985
105.616
118.476
90.280

126.422
126.298
130.937
136.904
105.932
119.526
90.040

Other nondurable goods.............................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
4?
43
44
45
46

108.213
110.499
119.529
109.934

115.953
115.631
123.897
116.681

118.310
115.928
124.473
113.980

117.371
116.899
124.336
127.844

117.844
118.138
127.055
116.921

120.175
119.148
127.901
117.159

120.132
120.430
128.402
117.501

State and local consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................
Tuition and related educational charges..................................................................
Health and hospital charges....................................................................................
Other sales.............................................................................................................

47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

115.388
115.879
117.747
119.234
106.538
112.459
103.349
114.432
112.174
112.918
118.031
133.203
117.214
109.789

122.177
122.293
122.735
123.913
113.684
121.419
106.072
130.870
117.817
117.826
123.047
143.186
121.443
113.066

123.079
123.091
123.347
124.437
114.904
122.549
106.383
133.343
118.328
118.379
123.446
144.423
121.631
113.284

125.365
125.267
124.764
125.841
116.399
126.080
106.986
139.407
120.797
119.808
125.236
146.403
123.593
114.703

126.112
126.097
125.844
126.948
117.285
126.468
107.816
137.466
122.333
121.008
126.372
148.838
124.394
115.580

127.916
127.740
127.015
128.157
118.192
128.939
108.600
145.093
122.317
122.287
127.402
151.492
125.142
116.090

128.838
128.788
128.572
129.745
119.517
129.097
109.313
143.859
123.139
123.398
128.944
154.238
126.441
117.288

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in soft­
ware in table 3.9.5.




D-28

National Data

January 2007

Table 3.10.5. Government Consumption Expenditures and General
Government Gross Output
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Government consumption expenditures 1..........................................................................
Gross output of general government...................................................................................
Value added....................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees......................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2....................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3................................................................
Durable goods............................................................................................................
Nondurable goods......................................................................................................
Services......................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.........................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..............................................................................................

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

1,854.8
2,172.0
1,348.4
1,155.7
192.7
823.6
53.6
193.7
576.3
22.2
295.0

1,975.7
2,313.8
1,422.9
1,215.7
207.2
890.9
56.0
224.7
610.2
23.5
314.6

2,002.1
2,342.1
1,430.7
1,221.6
209.1
911.4
56.9
230.0
624.5
23.6
316.4

2,014.5
2,361.4
1,444.5
1,232.1
212.4
917.0
57.8
239.5
619.6
24.1
322.8

2,059.7
2,410.3
1464.0
1,247.9
216.1
946.3
57.4
238.4
650.5
24.7
325.9

2,083.0
2,439.9
1,478.6
1,259.4
219.2
961.3
57.9
251.4
652.0
25.4
331.5

2,109.1
2,471.6
1,500.8
1,277.8
223.1
970.8
60.4
252.5
657.9
25.6
336.9

Federal consumption expenditures 1...............................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

724.5
734.9
411.6
323.0
88.6
323.4
31.2
30.8
261.4
4.5
6.0

768.6
781.9
436.7
343.5
93.2
345.2
32.6
36.0
276.6
4.7
8.7

784.3
798.1
437.9
344.2
93.6
360.2
33.4
37.5
289.4
4.7
9.1

771.1
785.2
438.4
343.6
94.8
346.8
34.1
37.6
275.1
4.8
9.4

803.6
816.3
447.9
351.4
96.5
368.5
33.3
37.3
297.9
4.8
7.9

802.3
816.1
449.9
352.2
97.7
366.3
33.5
37.0
295.8
4.8
9.0

809.1
822.6
454.1
355.1
99.0
368.5
35.7
37.8
295.0
5.0
8.6

Defense consumption expenditures 1.....................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

483.7
488.3
264.7
200.2
64.5
223.6
28.8
16.9
177.9
2.1
2.5

516.9
522.1
283.4
215.4
68.0
238.7
30.0
20.3
188.5
2.1
3.1

530.9
536.6
284.4
216.1
68.3
252.2
30.7
22.3
199.3
2.1
3.6

516.9
521.4
284.5
215.4
69.1
236.9
31.4
21.3
184.1
2.1
2.4

537.7
543.2
289.3
218.9
70.4
253.9
30.5
20.6
202.8
2.1
3.4

537.7
544.4
289.9
218.6
71.3
254.5
30.8
20.6
203.2
2.2
4.5

539.3
545.4
293.1
220.8
72.3
252.3
33.0
21.2
198.1
2.2
3.9

Nondefense consumption expenditures 1...............................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change........................................................
Other nondurable goods..............................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

240.7
246.7
146.9
122.8
24.1
99.7
2.4
13.9
-1.0
14.8
83.5
2.4
3.5

251.7
259.8
153.3
128.1
25.2
106.5
2.6
15.7
-0.5
16.3
88.1
2.6
5.5

253.4
261.5
153.5
128.1
25.4
108.0
2.7
15.2
-0.8
15.9
90.1
2.7
5.4

254.2
263.9
153.9
128.2
25.7
109.9
2.7
16.3
0.1
16.2
90.9
2.7
7.0

265.9
273.1
158.5
132.4
26.1
114.6
2.8
16.6
-0.3
16.9
95.1
2.6
4.5

264.6
271.8
160.0
133.6
26.4
111.8
2.7
16,4
0.1
16.4
92.6
2.7
4.5

269.8
277.2
161.0
134.3
26.7
116.3
2.7
16.6
0.0
16.6
96.9
2.8
4.7

State and local consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................
Tuition and related educational charges..................................................................
Health and hospital charges....................................................................................
Other sales.............................................................................................................

47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

1,130.3
1,437.1
936.8
832.7
104.1
500.3
22.4
162.9
314.9
17.7
289.0
62.3
139.9
86.8

1,207.2
1,531.9
986.2
872.3
113.9
545.7
23.4
188.7
333.6
18.8
306.0
67.0
146.1
92.9

1,217.8
1,544.0
992.9
877.4
115.5
551.1
23.5
192.5
335.1
18.9
307.3
67.4
146.4
93.4

1,243.4
1,576.2
1,006.0
888.5
117.6
570.1
23.7
201.9
344.5
19.4
313.4
69.1
148.8
95.5

1,256.2
1,594.0
1,016.2
896.5
119.6
577.8
24.0
201.1
352.6
19.9
318.0
70.6
150.6
96.8

1,280.7
1,623.8
1,028.7
907.2
121.5
595.0
24.4
214.4
356.2
20.6
322.5
72.3
152.4
97.8

1,300.0
1,649.0
1,046.7
922.7
124.1
602,3
24.7
214.7
362.8
20.7
328.3
74.1
154.9
99.4

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the sen/ices of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in soft­
ware in table 3.9.5.




January 2007

Survey

of

D-29

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 3.10.6. Real Government Consumption Expenditures and General Government
Gross Output, Chained Dollars
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2006

2005
III

IV

I

II

III

Government consumption expenditures 1..........................................................................
Gross output of general government...................................................................................
Value added....................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees......................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2....................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3................................................................
Durable goods............................................................................................................
Nondurable goods......................................................................................................
Services......................................................................................................................
Less; Own-account investment4.........................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..............................................................................................

1
2
3
4
b
6
7
8
9
10
11

1,595.6
1,865.1
1,130.9
948.4
183.1
736.8
52.5
170.3
513.5
19.4
250.2

1,609.3
1,884.8
1,140.9
954.1
187.8
746.7
53.8
172.3
520.1
19.7
255.9

1,619.7
1,896.0
1,141.6
954.3
188.4
757.4
54.5
172.5
530.2
19.7
256.6

1,611.2
1,888.8
1,144.3
956.0
189.5
747.2
55.3
172.9
518.6
20.0
257.6

1,628.6
1,906.9
1,142.3
952.7
191.0
767.9
54.6
174.5
538.6
20.1
258.3

1,626.6
1,907.7
1,144.6
953.8
192.4
766.2
54.6
174.3
537.0
20.6
260.6

1,636.7
1,918.9
1,151.5
959.3
193.9
770.6
56.7
176.2
537.5
20.6
261.7

Federal consumption expenditures 1...............................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

12
13
14
15
16
M
18
19
20
21
22

615.6
624.6
335.1
249.7
85.3
292.0
30.8
28.1
232.9
3.7
5.3

620.8
631.8
337.3
250.0
87.5
297.2
31.8
28.3
237.0
3.7
7.3

629.7
641.1
336.6
249.1
87.8
307.9
32.5
28.3
247.1
3.8
7.8

618.9
630.0
337.8
249.8
88.4
294.8
33.2
28.2
233.4
3.8
7.4

632.0
642.4
334.8
246.5
89.0
311.3
32.3
28.3
250.5
3.7
6.7

624.9
636.1
334.8
246.1
89.5
304.6
32.1
26.6
245.9
3.7
7.5

627.2
638.1
337.4
248.2
90.0
303.8
34.1
27.0
242.9
3.8
7.2

Defense consumption expenditures 1.....................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.................................................................................................

23
24
2b
26
2/
28
29
30
31
32
33

408.3
412.1
213.4
151.5
61.6
200.9
28.2
15.2
157.1
1.7
2.1

413.3
417.5
215.2
152.0
63.2
204.5
28.9
14.7
160.6
1.6
2.6

421.9
426.5
215.1
151.7
63.4
214.3
29.5
15.4
169.0
1.6
3.0

410.0
413.7
215.5
151.8
63.7
200.1
30.2
14.4
155.4
1.7
2.0

419.0
423.4
212.9
149.1
64.1
213.5
29.3
14.4
169.7
1.6
2.8

414.7
419.9
212.5
148.5
64.5
210.2
29.2
13.2
167.9
1.6
3.7

413.7
418.4
214.5
150.1
64.8
206.5
31.1
13.4
162.2
1.7
3.1

Nondefense consumption expenditures 1...............................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change........................................................
Other nondurable goods.............................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors..................................................................................................

34
3b
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

207.0
212.3
121.7
98.0
23.8
91.0
2.6
12.7
-1.0
13.7
75.6
2.0
3.2

207.3
214.1
122.0
97.8
24.4
92.6
2.9
13.4
-0.6
14.0
76.2
2.1
4.7

207.5
214.3
121.4
97.2
24.5
93.4
3.0
12.7
-0.8
13.5
77.8
2.1
4.8

208.7
216.2
122.2
97.8
24.6
94.6
3.0
13.9
0.1
13.8
77.8
2.2
5.5

212.8
218.7
121.9
97.3
24.8
97.7
3.1
14.1
-0.2
14.3
80.5
2.1
3.9

210.1
216.0
122.2
97.5
25.0
94.3
3.0
13.7
0.1
13.6
77.8
2.1
3.9

213.4
219.5
122.9
98.1
25.2
97.3
3.0
13.8
0.0
13.8
80.5
2.2
4.0

State and local consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................
Gross output of general government.......................................................................................
Value added........................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees...........................................................
Consumption of general government fixed capital2........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....................................................................
Durable goods.................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................................................................
Services..........................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4.............................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.................................................................................................
Tuition and related educational charges..................................................................
Health and hospital charges....................................................................................
Other sales.............................................................................................................
Residual..............................................................................................................................................

47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61

979.6
1,240.2
795.6
698.4
97.7
444.8
21.7
142.4
280.7
15.7
244.9
46.8
119.4
79.1
-1.6

988.0
1,252.7
803.5
703.9
100.2
449.5
22.1
144.2
283.2
16.0
248.7
46.8
120.3
82.2
-2.1

989.5
1,254.4
805.0
705.1
100.5
449.8
22.1
144.4
283.2
15.9
248.9
46.7
120.4
82.5
-2.8

991.9
1,258.3
806.4
706.0
101.0
452.3
22.2
144.9
285.2
16.2
250.3
47.2
120.4
83.2
-2.3

996.1
1,264.2
807.5
706.3
102.0
456.9
22.3
146.3
288.3
16.4
251.6
47.4
121.0
83.7
-4.1

1,001.2
1,271.2
810.0
707.9
102.8
461.5
22.5
147.8
291.2
16.8
253.1
47.7
121.8
84.3
-4.0

1,009.0
1,280.4
814.1
711.2
103.8
466.6
22.6
149.3
294.7
16.8
254.6
48.0
122.5
84.8
-4.0

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in
software in table 3.9.5.
Note. Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type
quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between the first line and the sum of the most detailed
lines.




D-30

National Data

January 2007

Table 3.11.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real National Defense Consumption
Expenditures and Gross Investment by Type
[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

National defense consumption expenditures and gross investment...................................

2006
IV

I

II

III

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

5.9
5.4
5.3
1.8
1.8
1.1
3.3
1.8
9.7
10.0
4.3
7.3
8.4
-4.2
17.8
18.9
12.7
5.5
31.2
11.4
9.3
10.9
-0.3
14.3
17.4
-11.8
20.3
-7.6
-1.6

1.7

11.2
11.1
11.4
0.5
-0.2
-1.7
3.2
2.5
25.5
16.3
-2.6
-15.5
51.8
143.8
85.7
1.4
4.8
-2.7
30.1
5.7
29.6
13.5
22.2
105.7
54.5
-16.5
-29.5
1.8
60.1

8.9
9.1
9.8
-4.7
-6.9
-8.5
-3.5
2.4
29.6
-12.3
-22.9
-37.8
89.5
21.5
-17.0
5.6
-0.6
1.0
-14.8
7.5
42.1
94.8
6.8
71.3
28.6
10.2
5.0
-3.9
316.1

-1.2

1.2
1.3
0.8
0.3
-0.6
2.3
2.5
1.8
2.4
-10.2
24.0
-5.9
37.7
26.1
-1.7
-3.0
-4.7
5.6
-5.8
2.2
-0.9
-0.8
-0.1
8.4
-2.2
11.1
-5.5
21.7

-9.9
-10.8
-11.5
0.9
0.4
1.3
-1.6
2.4
-24.0
9.8
14.4
100.3
-67.6
12.8
7.7
-0.9
-22.7
-37.1
-2.9
-0.5
-28.6
-40.5
-17.2
-49.5
-23.1
9.4
7.2
5.5
-81.3

-2.0

Consumption expenditures 1...........................................................................................................
Gross output of general government................................................................................................
Value added
Compensation of general government employees...................................................................
Military................................................................................................................................
Civilian
Consumption of general government fixed capital2................................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3............................................................................
Durable goods
Aircraft
Missiles...............................................................................................................................
Ships
Vehicles...............................................................................................................................
Electronics
Other durable goods...........................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...................................................................................................................
Petroleum products
Ammunition.........................................................................................................................
Other nondurable goods.....................................................................................................
Services
Research and development................................................................................................
Installation support.............................................................................................................
Weapons support
Personnel support
Transportation of material....................................................................................................
Travel of persons.................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4....................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.........................................................................................................

-4.1
-3.3
-0.7
-1.6
-2.3
-0.1
2.1
-6.2
-1.1
-15.8
25.2
4.7
-0.9
5.4
3.1
-29.8
-20.0
-42.3
-37.1
-4.1
0.4
-16.2
-22.7
7.4
-1.3
-5.4
2.1
195.8

-0.9
-1.4
3.7
4.3
5.0
2.6
1.9
-6.9
29.8
26.8
-21.9
85.0
62.6
70.6
20.0
7.1
6.2
41.9
-11.3
-12.9
-21.3
-7.6
-33.3
-4.2
3.8
5.2
4.1
-46.2

Gross investment5
Structures
Equipment and software.................................................................................................................
Aircraft
Missiles
Ships..
Vehicles
Electronics and software.............................................................................................................
Other equipment

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

9.5
-8.5
11.3
24.1
16.1
-3.2
-9.6
10.0
15.7

5.5
-3.5
6.2
21.6
6.4
-8.5
44.9
13.5
-2.9

11.7
0.4
12.6
23.5
-54.3
57.6
28.9
33.2
-4.4

-3.1
11.3
-4.1
-4.9
314.3
-50.0
-44.9
7.8
0.1

7.9
-19.0
10.2
18.0
-38.2
15.5
33.2
-6.9
24.8

14.1
-1 0 .7
16.1
0.9
83.7
64.8
38.5
9.8
-1.4

-3.1
4.6
-3.6
-14.6
-80.7
-24.5
81.4
32.8
12.3

1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account
investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in
software.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets; inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.




January 2007

S urvey

of

D-31

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 3.11.3. Real National Defense Consumption Expenditures
and Gross Investment by Type, Quantity indexes

Table 3.11.4. Price Indexes for National Defense Consumption
Expenditures and Gross Investment by Type

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005
III

National defense
consumption
expenditures and gross
investment........................
Consumption expenditures 1......
Gross output of general
government............................
Value added...........................
Compensation of general
government employees...
Military............................
Civilian............................
Consumption of general
government fixed capital2
Intermediate goods and
services purchased 3.........
Durable goods....................
Aircraft............................
Missiles..........................
Ships..............................
Vehicles..........................
Electronics......................
Other durable goods.......
Nondurable goods..............
Petroleum products........
Ammunition....................
Other nondurable goods
Services.............................
Research and
development...............
Installation support.........
Weapons support...........
Personnel support..........
Transportation of material
Travel of persons............
Less: Own-account investment4
Sales to other sectors....
Gross investm ent5.......................
Structures...................................
Equipment and software.............
Aircraft....................................
Missiles...................................
Ships
Vehicles.................................
Electronics and software........
Other equipment.....................

2006

2005
IV

I

II

Line

1 128.374

130.593

133.423

130.002

132.808

132.141

131.740

128.551

131.236

127.544

130.343

128.981

128.681

126.979
107.144

128.619
108.048

131.402
107.976

127.446
108.206

130.460
106.903

129.366
106.707

128.921
107.674

b 109.051
6 112.829
7 102.068

109.389
112.152
104.400

109.180
111.478
105.118

109.277
111.842
104.682

107.336
109.385
103.765

106.895
108.738
103.732

108.014
110.082
104.407

102.268

104.858

105.202

105.838

106.467

107.024

107.539

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

160.172 163.094 170.916
126.772 129.812 132.649
116.020 104.160 102.940
103.597 128.465 125.010
103.945
97.810 111.454
104.373 143.721 162.361
159.330 200.845 221.019
151.612 149.019 148.117
145.555 141.149 147.394
142.708 135.949 148.565
188.553 199.202 208.667
131.042 123.436 119.782
169.398 173.189 182.313

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

186.412
131.545
183.997
190.028
172.084
143.334
151.975
108.080

159.574 170.275 167.587 164.630
135.799 131.412 131.040 139.881
99.736
95.525 101.369
106.450
148.713 132.061 139.700 131.345
98.650
99.789 116.386
84.079
167.311 175.653 175.243 197.899
225.152 214.920 217.765 248.880
147.784 149.794 150.949 157.981
138.197 137.986 126.313 128.497
132.296 132.636 125.420 127.331
207.138 198.988 173.415 189.258
119.627 121.802 108.465 105.273
167.614 182.994 181.077 174.913

184.690 194.216 170.603 201.544 201.760
130.523 135.776 129.517 131.661 125.960
183.742 205.583 173.265 198.225 185.876
205.921 220.458 206.460 219.853 223.795
168.245 163.098 166.799 170.900 170.331
159.254 149.686 152.315 154.189 152.072
143.678 143.760 145.681 144.245 145.007
131.580 152.501 100.221 143.135 187.707

30 138.370 145.920 149.882 148.703
31
88.381
85.263
83.766
86.045
32 144.478 153.436 158.129 156.470
33 165.043 200.755 211.065 208.420
34 142.652 151.840 132.654 189.261
35 137.456 125.840 137.614 115.745
36 149.871 217.174 255.464 220.092
37 124.579 141.432 148.380 151.179
38 150.486 146.192 143.964 144.000

190.054
123.485
167.976
221.404
171.928
154.025
146.455
160.775

151.544 156.631 155.397
79.347
81.631
80.239
160.333 166.443 164.911
217.205 217.708 209.271
167.819 195.380 129.540
120.001 135.964 126.726
236.426 256.475 297.657
148.485 151.980 163.158
152.199 151.670 156.150

1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of
production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services
of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account invest­
ment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related
expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in software.
5. Grass government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.




2005

2006

2005
III

III

2 127.006
3
4

2004

National defense
consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.........................

IV

I

II

III

1 115.954
2 118.472

121.855
125.071

122.467

122.760
126.061

124.752
128.327

126.006

126.714

125.833

129.681

130.375

3
4

118.475
124.019

125.063
131.671

125.822
132.233

126.044
132.009

128.300
135.894

129.649
136.388

130.343
136.686

5
6
7

132.100
135.002
126.513

141.713
146.516
132.396

142.466
147.164
133.353

141.844
146.573
132.675

146.796
151.951
136.805

147.173
152.024
137.760

147.120
152.005
137.643

8 104.718

107.623

107.730

108.456

109.818

110.581

111.688

111.334 116.727
102.127 103.728
103.859 104.937
103.611 105.609
104.453 106.894
114.848 117.881
93.937
93.768
101.205 104.060
111.656 137.758
121.590 184.637
106.422 111.615
104.981 107.787
113.246 117.386

117.692
103.845
105.151
105.523
106.693
116.940
93.849
104.495
145.561
205.241
111.450
108.107
117.881

118.382
103.896
104.933
105.262
107.871
118.410
93.767
104.730
148.658
214.186
112.270
108.830
118.490

118.923
104.288
105.222
106.187
108.235
118.073
93.899
105.365
144.162
199.547
114.872
109.264
119.505

121.112
105.421
106.750
107.151
109.735
118.643
94.873
106.211
156.904
229.490
119.216
110.729
121.022

122.204
106.015
107.422
108.008
110.506
116.532
95.720
106.830
158.739
232.587
121.128
111.252
122.144

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

110.808
114.787
110.892
113.986
119.954
116.423
120.112
117.603

115.975
119.578
114.430
116.705
124.019
121.155
126.127
122.661

116.403
119.778
114.951
116.979
125.720
123.459
127.102
122.866

117.453
120.566
115.459
117.355
125.491
122.998
127.119
121.976

118.530
121.821
116.397
118.523
124.984
123.160
130.097
122.008

120.063
123.346
117.528
119.528
128.077
127.507
131.602
122.699

121.138
124.895
118.027
120.527
129.539
129.096
131.987
123.573

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

99.911 101.628
115.424 122.288
99.901
98.529
86.839
89.015
100.981 102.142
111.408 118.372
99.263
98.482
89.167
90.678
102.485 105.822

101.370
123.410
99.558
85.693
102.520
117.161
98.719
88.934
106.207

102.026
126.785
100.044
85.933
101.402
120.674
99.866
88.413
106.590

102.438
128.116
100.399
85.092
102.223
123.783
99.343
88.472
107.120

103.109
129.674
101.016
85.464
100.889
127.160
99.159
88.727
107.688

103.880
130.641
101.772
86.101
101.904
131.255
96.964
88.708
108.387

Consumption expenditures 1 ......
Gross output of general
government............................
Value added............................
Compensation of general
government employees...
Military............................
Civilian............................
Consumption of general
government fixed capital2
Intermediate goods and
services purchased 3..........
Durable goods....................
Aircraft............................
Missiles...........................
Ships...............................
Vehicles..........................
Electronics......................
Other durable goods.......
Nondurable goods..............
Petroleum products.........
Ammunition.....................
Other nondurable goods
Services.............................
Research and
development...............
Installation support.........
Weapons support...........
Personnel support..........
Transportation of material
Travel of persons.............
Less: Own-account investment4
Sales to other sectors.....

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

Gross investm ent5.......................
Structures..................................
Equipment and software.............
Aircraft...................................
Missiles..................................
Ships......................................
Vehicles..................................
Electronics and software.........
Other equipment.....................

1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of
production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services
of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account invest­
ment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related
expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in software.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

D-32

January 2007

National Data

Table 3.11.5. National Defense Consumption Expenditures and
Gross Investment by Type

Table 3.11.6. Real National Defense Consumption Expenditures
and Gross Investment by Type, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

National defense
consumption expenditures
and gross investment.......
Consumption expenditures 1.......
Gross output of general
government.............................
Value added............................
Compensation of general
government employees....
Military.............................
Civilian.............................
Consumption of general
government fixed capital2
Intermediate goods and
services purchased 3..........
Durable goods.....................
Aircraft............................
Missiles...........................
Ships..............................
Vehicles...........................
Electronics.......................
Other durable goods........
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum products.........
Ammunition.....................
Other nondurable goods...
Services..............................
Research and
development................
Installation support..........
Weapons support............
Personnel support...........
Transportation of material
Travel of persons.............
Less: Own-account investment4
Sales to other sectors.....
Gross investm ent5........................
Structures....................................
Equipment and software..............
Aircraft.....................................
Missiles...................................
Ships......................................
Vehicles..................................
Electronics and software.........
Other equipment......................

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006
IV

I

II

Line

2005

III

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

National defense
1

551.2

589.3

605.0

590.9

613.5

616.5

618.1

2

483.7

516.9

530.9

516.9

537.7

537.7

539.3

3
4

488.3
264.7

522.1
283.4

536.6
284.4

521.4
284.5

543.2
289.3

5
6
7

200.2
136.2
63.9

215.4
146.9
68.4

216.1
146.7
69.4

215.4
146.6
68.8

218.9
148.6
70.3

8

64.5

68.0

68.3

69.1

70.4

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

223.6
28.8
11.8
2.6
1.4
0.9
4.4
7.6
16.9
7.0
3.6
6.3
177.9

238.7
30.0
10.7
3.3
1.4
1.3
5.5
7.7
20.3
10.2
4.0
6.1
188.5

252.2
30.7
10.6
3.2
1.6
1.5
6.1
7.7
22.3
12.2
4.2
5.9
199.3

236.9
31.4
11.0
3.8
1.2
1.5
6.2
7.7
21.3
11.2
4.2
5.9
184.1

253.9
30.5
10.3
3.4
1.4
1.6
5.9
7.8
20.6
10.4
4.1
6.1
202.8

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

54.3
37.6
19.6
49.7
8.9
7.8
2.1
2.5

56.3
38.9
20.2
55.2
9.0
9.1
2.1
3.1

59.4
40.5
22.6
59.2
8.8
8.7
2.1
3.6

52.7
38.9
19.2
55.6
9.0
8.8
2.1
2.4

62.8
40.0
22.1
59.8
9.2
8.9
2.1
3.4

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

67.5
5.1
62.4
11.4
3.9
10.1
2.7
11.4
22.9

72.4
5.2
67.2
13.5
4.2
9.8
3.9
12.8
23.0

74.2
5.1
69.0
14.0
3.7
10.6
4.6
13.3
22.7

74.1
5.4
68.6
13.9
5.2
9.2
4.0
13.5
22.8

75.8
5.2
70.6
14.3
4.6
9.8
4.3
13.3
24.3

consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.........................

Consumption expenditures 1......
544.4
545.4
Gross output of general
289.9
293.1
government.............................
Value added............................
Compensation of general
218.6
220.8
147.8
149.6
government employees...
Military............................
70.8
71.2
Civilian............................
Consumption of general
71.3
72.3
government fixed capital2
254.5
252.3
Intermediate goods and
30.8
33.0
services purchased 3..........
10.7
Durable goods....................
10.0
3.7
Aircraft............................
3.5
1.4
1.7
Missiles...........................
1.6
1.8
Ships...............................
6.0
7.0
Vehicles..........................
8.0
8.4
Electronics......................
Other durable goods.......
20.6
21.2
11.3
11.7
Nondurable goods..............
3.7
4.2
Petroleum products.........
Ammunition.....................
5.5
5.3
203.2
198.1
Other nondurable goods
Services..............................
21
157.1
63.7
Research and
60.5
development...............
38.7
38.4
Installation support.........
20.9
19.0
61.4
61.2
Weapons support...........
9.4
9.6
Personnel support..........
Transportation of material
9.1
9.3
2.2
2.2
Travel of persons.............
Less: Own-account investment4
4.5
3.9
Sales to other sectors.....
78.8
78.8
5.1
73.7
14.4
5.3
11.4
4.7
13.6
24.3

5.2
73.6
14.0
3.6
11.0
5.3
14.6
25.2

1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of
production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services
of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account invest­
ment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related
expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in software.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.




2004

Gross investm ent5.......................
Structures..................................
Equipment and software.............
Aircraft....................................
Missiles..................................
Ships......................................
Vehicles..................................
Electronics and software.........
Residual.........................................

1

475.4

483.6

494.1

481.4

491.8

489.3

2

408.3

413.3

421.9

410.0

419.0

414.7

413.7

3
4

412.1
213.4

417.5
215.2

426.5
215.1

413.7
215.5

423.4
212.9

419.9
212.5

418.4
214.5

5
6
7

151.5
100.9
50.5

152.0
100.3
51.7

151.7
99.7
52.1

151.8
100.0
51.8

149.1
97.8
51.4

148.5
97.2
51.4

150.1
98.4
51.7

487.8

8

61.6

63.2

63.4

63.7

64.1

64.5

64.8

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

200.9
28.2
11.4
2.5
1.4
0.8
4.7
7.5
15.2
5.8
3.4
6.0

204.5
28.9
10.2
3.2
1.3
1.1
5.9
7.4
14.7
5.5
3.6
5.6
160.6

214.3
29.5
10.1
3.1
1.5
1.3
6.5
7.4
15.4
6.0
3.8
5.5
169.0

200.1
30.2
10.5
3.6
1.1
1.3
6.6
7.3
14.4
5.4
3.8
5.5
155.4

213.5
29.3
9.8
3.2
1.3
1.4
6.3
7.4
14.4
5.4
3.6
5.6
169.7

210.2
29.2
9.4
3.4
1.3
1.4
6.4
7.5
13.2
5.1
3.1
4.9
167.9

206.5
31.1
10.0
3.2
1.5
1.5
7.3
7.9
13.4
5.2
3.4
4.8
162.2

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

49.0
32.8
17.6
43.6
7.4
6.7
1.7
2.1

48.5
32.5
17.6
47.3
7.2
7.5
1.6
2.6

51.0
33.8
19.7
50.6
7.0
7.0
1.6
3.0

44.8
32.3
16.6
47.4
7.2
7.1
1.7
2.0

53.0
32.8
19.0
50.5
7.3
7.2
1.6
2.8

53.0
31.4
17.8
51.4
7.3
7.1
1.6
3.7

49.9
30.8
16.1
50.8
7.4
7.2
1.7
3.1

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39

67.5
4.4
63.3
12.8
3.8
9.0
2.7
12.6
22.4
-2.1

71.2
4.2
67.3
15.6
4.1
8.3
4.0
14.3
21.7
-4.0

73.2
4.2
69.3
16.4
3.6
9.1
4.7
15.0
21.4
-5.2

72.6
4.3
68.6
16.2
5.1
7.6
4.0
15.3
21.4
-4.8

74.0
4.1
70.3
16.8
4.5
7.9
4.3
15.0
22.6
-6.1

76.5
3.9
73.0
16.9
5.3
9.0
4.7
15.4
22.6
-6.8

75.9
4.0
72.3
16.2
3.5
8.3
5.4
16.5
23.2
-6.4

1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of
production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services
of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account invest­
ment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related
expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in software.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar
value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more
than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between
the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

January 2007

S urvey

of

D-33

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

4. Foreign Transactions
Table 4.1. Foreign Transactions in the National Income and Product Accounts
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2006

2005
III

IV

I

1,588.3

1,839.6

1,917.3

2,008.7

1,178.1
818.8
561.8
257.1
359.3

1,303.1
907.5
625.6
281.9
395.6

1,312.4
913.9
631.0
282.8
398.5

1,352.4
944.3
662.5
281.8
408.1

7
8
9
10
11
12

410.2
2.9
407.3
105.3
116.7
185.4

513.3
2.9
510.4
172.4
320.0
18.0

527.2
2.9
524.3
180.3
437.7
-93.7

564.9
3.0
561.9
201.3
453.3
-92.8

Current receipts from the rest of the w orld.............................................................................
Exports of goods and services
Goods 1........................
Durable....................
Nondurable..............
Services 1.......................................................................................................................................

2
3
4
5
6

Income receipts..............
Wage and salary receipts
Income receipts on assets
Interest.....................
Dividends....................................................................................................................................
Reinvested earnings on U.S. direct investment abroad...............................................................

III

II

1,816.5

1

2,170.7

1,405.4
989.3
689.1
300.3
416.0

2,109.5
1,448.1
1,019.1
705.0
314.1
429.0

603.3
2.9
600.4
224.1
150.7
225.6

661.4
2.9
658.5
256.5
150.8
251.2

682.3
2.9
679.4
270.5
162.2
246.6

1,488.3
1,055.8
726.8
329.0
432.5

Current payments to the rest of the world...............................................................................

13

2,237.4

2,587.9

2,554.5

2,785.4

2,824.8

2,952.0

3,037.6

Imports of goods and services........................................................................................................
Goods 1........................
Durable....................
Nondurable..............
Services 1....................

14
15
16
17
18

1,791.4
1,495.2
929.9
565.3
296.2

2,019.9
1,699.0
1,017.5
681.5
320.9

2,041.2
1,719.1
1,020.8
698.3
322.1

2,127.8
1,799.3
1,049.9
749.4
328.5

2,170.6
1,832.6
1,095.8
736.8
338.1

2,229.8
1,879.0
1,112.2
766.8
350.8

2,290.1
1,938.8
1,143.7
795.1
351.3

Income payments...........
Wage and salary payments
Income payments on assets
Interest.....................
Dividends.................
Reinvested earnings on foreign direct investment in the United States.......................................

19
20
21
22
23
24

363.9
8.9
355.0
229.2
69.8
56.0

481.5
9.2
472.2
331.2
81.8
59.2

552.4
9.3
543.1
378.9
87.3
77.0

574.3
9.2
565.1
414.8
63.1
87.1

638.6
9.2
629.4
467.3
69.0
93.1

665.7
9.2
656.4
482.2
81.6
92.6

Current taxes and transfer payments to the rest of the world (net)..............................................
From persons (net)..........................................................................................................................
From government (net)...................................................................................................................
From business (net)........................................................................................................................

25
26
27
28

82.1
42.9
19.2
20.0

86.6
47.1
26.1
13.3

475.0
9.4
465.6
345.1
91.6
28.9
38.4
45.8
23.3
-30.7

105.2
47.6
30.6
26.9

79.9
45.2
14.9
19.9

83.5
48.7
15.6
19.3

81.9
48.8
15.8
17.3

Balance on current account, NIPAs.........................................................................................

29

-649.1

-771.4

-714.9

-868.2

-816.1

-842.6

-867.0

Addenda:
Net lending or net borrowing (-), NIPAs...........................................................................................
Balance on current account, NIFWs..............................................................................................
Less: Capital account transactions (net)2...................................................................................

30
31
32

-651.3
-649.1
2.3

-775.8
-771.4
4.4

-717.2
-714.9
2.2

-870.2
-868.2
2.1

-823.1
-816.1
7.0

-846.1
-842.6
3.5

-868.7
-867.0
1.7

1. Exports and Imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclas­
sified from goods to services.
2. Consists of capital transfers and the acquisition and disposal of nonproduced nonfinancial assets.




D-34

National Data

Table 4.2.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Exports and in
Real Imports of Goods and Services by Type of Product

January 2007

Table 4.2.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Exports and in Real
Imports of Goods and Services by Type of Product

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Exports of goods and
services..........................
Exports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials..............................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts................................
Other...................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other......................................

.ine

IV

I

II

2005
ill

III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Percent change at annual rate:

1

9.2

6.8

3.2

9.6

14.0

6.2

6.8

2
3

9.0
-6.3

7.5
5.6

3.7
-13.1

11.5
11.8

17.3
15.8

6.0
20.7

9.4
13.2

4
5
6

6.4
4.5
7.3

2.6
8.0
-0.2

-5.2
20.9
-16.7

-10.3
11.1
-20.6

26.5
8.0
38.9

14.4
4.8
20.3

3.1
4.3
2.4

7

13.0

9.2

3.0

28.3

16.3

6.6

5.6

8

2.9

16.7

-36.0

69.9

55.2

-20.9

0.1

9
10

8.8
16.1

15.3
6.6

17.8
12.6

3,9
24.8

9.8
9.0

12.0
14.1

-0.1
7.9

11

9.8

9.3

27.6

13.6

2.7

-4.6

26.9

12
13
14
15

13.6
16.3
10.7
0.9

11.0
15.1
6.6
8.9

10.8
18.6
2.3
18.9

11.7
9.1
14.8
0.2

15.7
16.8
14.5
20.5

1.1
12.5
-11.2
-19.7

15.2
9.5
22.8
24.0

16

9.7

5.1

2.1

5.5

6.7

6.7

0.8

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

18.8
12.0
8.9
13.7
8.6
7.5
7.5

19.4
5.3
3.0
-0.8
5.9
5.9
-2.7

48.8
-16.6
22.8
-10.2
9.0
6.7
3.9

-53.3
-3.6
10.5
1.2
11.3
20.8
-5.8

2.5
4.4
11.9
28.8
1.1
4.1
7.2

-14.7
8.7
-24.4
12.8
11.3
9.7
4.1

-20.5
-1.8
-4.4
-2.4
-3.5
7.1
5.1

imports of goods and
services..........................

24

10.8

6.1

2.5

13.2

9.1

1.4

5.6

Imports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum and products..........
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts................................
Other..................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts.............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other.......................................

25
26

10.9
5.7

6.7
3.7

2.7
14.5

14.1
1.9

9.4
16.5

-0.1
-4.8

7.1
10.4

27
28
29
30

15.6
20.6
10.8
6.6

6.8
7.5
6.1
2.3

4.8
-5.4
16.7
-12.5

15.6
29.1
4.3
40.6

1.9
25.2
-17.4
-4.8

-1.2
-6.8
6.0
-18.3

14.2
24.6
2.1
7.1

31

17.4

11.2

5.9

9.7

16.1

11.6

13.5

32

-2.7

2.4

-46.9

19.7

50.1

-14.1

-3.9

33
34

23.8
17.4

14.3
11.0

19.6
8.6

9.3
9.0

34.3
7.6

17.0
12.7

18.4
13.6

35

6.8

3.9

11.2

15.6

14.3

-1.3

-8.3

36
37
38
39

10.9
15.5
6.2
-0.7

8.2
10.9
5.1
3.0

-2.6
12.3
-17.5
27.8

12.1
9.0
15.9
-22.4

8.4
10.9
5.5
44.1

5.7
-4.2
18.6
1.9

15.2
16.3
14.0
-28.6

Imports of services 1.................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel.......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services.............
Other......................................

40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

10.0
3.8
6.7
15.1
10.8
18.5
11.1
5.6

2.8
-5.9
-1.4
5.5
5.2
2.3
6.9
0.7

1.2
-4.2
-11.7
3.1
-10.1
20.4
15.4
6.7

8.3
1.5
11.9
-6.3
17.8
-9.2
11.9
1.6

7.4
-2.7
-5.4
1.1
12.4
37.7
12.0
0.7

9.9
-11.0
15.4
25.0
8.7
-2.8
14.4
-0.6

-2.6
-1.5
-18.6
-21.2
14.1
-9.2
6.0
-0.2

48
49
50

11.3
4.1
-5.5

9.6
3.0
5.2

10.8
-10.3
-5.1

20.5
-6.8
6.4

13.2
27.4
23.8

4.1
10.4
19.1

9.4
9.6
2.1

51
52
53
54

10.3
13.7
6.5
11.5

7.7
8.5
4.0
7.4

4.5
7.8
-4.4
5.7

11.9
11.7
17.8
9.7

16.8
16.8
-0.5
12.3

5.1
2.0
-3.0
3.9

10.0
8.1
5.8
7.2

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.




2005

2006

Exports of services 1................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts........
Travel.......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services.............
Other.......................................

Addenda:
Exports of durable goods........
Exports of nondurable goods...
Exports of agricultural goods 2
Exports of nonagricultural
goods...................................
Imports of durable goods.........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

2004

Exports of goods and
services..........................

1

9.2

6.8

3.2

9.6

14.0

6.2

6.8

2
3

6.25
-0.34

5.20
0.26

2.60
-0.62

7.94
0.52

11.92
0.69

4.22
0.86

6.58
0.59

4
5
6

1.06
0.26
0.81

0.45
0.47
-0.02

-0.97
1.18
-2.14

-1.86
0.68
-2.54

4.36
0.52
3.83

2.48
0.32
2.16

0.58
0.29
0.29

Percentage points at annual
rates:
Exports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials..............................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...............................
Other...................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts.............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other........................................
Exports of services 1.................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts........
Travel......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services..............
Other.......................................

7

3.59

2.55

0.82

7.24

4.59

1.85

1.58

8

0.13

0.71

-2.08

2,54

2.40

-1.21

0.00

9
10

0.33
3.14

0.53
1.31

0.58
2.31

0.14
4.56

0.34
1.85

0.38
2.67

0.00

11

0.75

0.69

1.86

1.02

0.22

-0.35

1.81

12
13
14
15

1.16
0.71
0.45
0.03

0.95
0.68
0.27
0.30

0.92
0.83
0.09
0.60

1.02
0.44
0.58
0.01

1.39
0.80
0.59
0.68

0.10
0.57
-0.47
-0.72

1.29
0.46
0.83
0.73

1.58

16

2.94

1.55

0.62

1.71

2.07

1.97

0.25

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

0.22
0.74
0.14
0.42
0.39
0.93
0.11

0.24
0.34
0.05
-0.03
0.26
0.73
-0.04

0.58
-1.15
0.34
-0.35
0.38
0.78
0.05

-1.04
-0.23
0.17
0.04
0.48
2.36
-0.08

0.03
0.27
0.19
0.90
0.05
0.53
0.09

-0.18
0.50
-0.42
0.41
0.47
1.14
0.05

-0.25
-0.10
-0.07
-0.08
-0.15
0.84
0.06

24

10.8

6.1

2.5

13.2

9.1

1.4

5.6

Imports of goods 1.....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products........................
Durable goods....................
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum and products...........
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...............................
Other...................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other.......................................

25
26

9.10
0.21

5.62
0.13

2.28
0.46

11.88
0.07

7.90
0.54

-0.05
-0.16

5.98
0.33

27
28
29
30

1.82
1.19
0.64
0.63

0.87
0.49
0.38
0.26

0.58
-0.38
0.96
-1.67

2.03
1.74
0.28
4.85

0.27
1.55
-1.29
-0.67

-0.15
-0.50
0.35
-2.78

1.77
1.65
0.12
1.01

31

3.24

2.08

1.10

1.82

2.88

2.05

2.41

32

-0.04

0.03

-0.82

0.23

0.53

-0.19

-0.05

33
34

1.12
2.16

0.66
1.39

0.84
1.08

0.43
1.17

1.38
0.96

0.72
1.53

0.78
1.68

35

0.91

0.48

1.27

1.81

1.65

-0.15

-0.97

36
37
38
39

2.32
1.69
0.64
-0.04

1.66
1.17
0.49
0.14

-0.53
1.26
-1.80
1.08

2,38
0.98
1.40
-1.06

1.64
1.15
0.49
1.61

1.07
-0.45
1.52
0.08

2.80
1.60
1.20
-1.38

Imports of services 1.................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services..............
Other.......................................

40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

1.67
0.06
0.25
0.20
0.32
0.23
0.57
0.03

0.46
-0.10
-0.05
0.07
0.16
0.03
0.34

0.19
-0.06
-0.43
0.04
-0.32
0.23
0.70
0.03

1.32
0.02
0.39
-0.08
0.52
-0.11
0.58
0.01

1.15
-0.04
-0.18
0.01
0.37
0.40
0.58

1.49
-0.16
0.46
0.29
0.25
-0.04
0.69

-0.40
-0.02
-0.66
-0.30
0.39
-0.12
0.30

0.00

0.00

0.00

Percent change at annual rate:
Imports of goods and
services..........................
Percentage points at annual
rates:

0.00

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.

January 2007

Survey

of

D-35

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 4.2.3. Real Exports and Imports of Goods and Services by
Type of Product, Quantity Indexes

Table 4.2.4. Price Indexes for Exports and Imports of Goods and Services
by Type of Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Exports of goods and
services..........................
Exports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials..............................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts................................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts................................
Other...................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts.............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other.......................................
Exports of services 1................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts........
Travel......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services.............
Other.......................................
Imports of goods and
services..........................
Imports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum and products..........
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...............................
Other..................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts.............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other......................................
Imports of services 1.................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services.............
Other......................................
Addenda:
Exports of durable goods........
Exports of nondurable goods...
Exports of agricultural goods 2
Exports of nonagricultural
goods..................................
Imports of durable goods.........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

1 102.201

Line

2006
IV

I

II

117.536

2 100.002
3
96.066

109.105 109.503 112.054 115.783
107.507 108.050 111.027 115.535
101.447 99.827 102.645 106.488

117.228 119.898
111.621 115.124

4 105.125
5
91.591
6 113.692

107.833
98.919
113.494

108.578
101.543
113.052

105.673
104.254
106.719

112.078
106.269
115.851

115.906
107.520
121.333

116.792
108.645
122.064

7

95.131

103.891

103.797

110.480

114.725

116.563

118.157

119.495

8

88.738

103.567

97.640

111.470

124.414

117.316

117.334

9
10

88.326
98.334

101.824
104.790

104.890
105.529

105.896
111.535

108.409
113.977

111.517
117.807

111.492
120.078

11

108.457

118.503

121.209

125.128

125.976

124.494

132.129

12 114.592
13 114.430
14 114.793
15
84.415

127.235
131.759
122.322
91.957

128.214
134.398
121.489
94.202

131.801
137.358
125.763
94.244

136.707
142.791
130.094
98.749

137.093
147.050
126.284
93.488

142.043
150.435
132.931
98.661

16 107.667

113.118 113.158

114.693

116.564

118.463

118.712

Exports of goods and
services.........................
Exports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials..............................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...............................
Other...................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other.......................................

136.148 149.600 123.654
90.829
89.715
88.889
73.532
75.745
77.656
113.820 111.450 111.794
118.215 118.015 121.215
134.469 134.081 140.579
102.887 103.664 102.124

124.407
89.850
79.862
119.089
121.551
142.014
103.914

119.562
91.735
74.462
122.718
124.840
145.332
104.960

112.900
91.331
73.631
121.982
123.746
147.856
106.281

24 115.962

123.007

122.520

126.377

129.146 129.608

131.378

Imports of goods and
services.........................

25 116.786
26 125.491

124.640
130.080

124.159
132.425

128.331
133.045

131.236
138.226

131.218 133.503
136.554 139.972

27
28
29
30

116.566
120.472
112.677
114.691

124.516
129.471
119.572
117.307

124.135
126.209
121.965
111.191

128.729
134.534
123.254
121.068

129.337
142.299
117.500
119.584

128.956
139.807
119.216
113.702

133.316
147.703
119.846
115.680

31

108.414

120.594

122.186

125.060

129.823

133.442

137.738

32

84.088

86.106

80.208

83.894

92.853

89.382

88.490

33
34

135.875
102.473

155.319
113.789

158.741
115.859

162.326
118.385

174.749
120.560

181.738
124.213

189.578
128.241

35

113.679

118.057

118.838

123.221

127.403

126.991

124.286

121.100
141.642
83.245
89.751
127.482
140.211
163.618
109.436

114.039
86.251
71.415
114.782
111.585
126.922
105.777

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

134.128
137.067
131.024
99.822
112.051
155.867
86.964
84.818
111.040
129.503
135.966
108.373

145.091
152.070
137.669
102.828
115.170
146.715
85.774
89.466
116.843
132.485
145.354
109.179

143.921
153.181
134.085
106.287
114.652
146.838
83.367
91.317
112.610
136.824
147.409
109.043

148.093
156.529
139.130
99.746
116.954
147.388
85.753
89.837
117.312
133.554
151.602
109.471

151.104 153.195
160.621 158.898
140.995 147.147
109.283 109.807
119.055 121.896
146.392 142.187
84.568
87.650
90.088
95.250
120.798 123.349
144.675 143.654
155.946 161.263
109.667 109.496

48
49
50

97.700
106.614
96.382

107.101
109.802
101.382

108.099
109.286
100.906

113.262
107.389
102.485

116.815
114.084
108.099

117.999
116.936
112.931

120.666
119.646
113.519

51
52
53
54

100.439
115.688
119.478
117.067

108.165
125.519
124.267
125.768

108.798
126.302
121.908
126.357

111.899
129.834
126.999
129.327

116.323
134.971
126.830
133.131

117.765
135.633
125.883
134.425

120.609
138.309
127.656
136.767

158.709
165.001
152.034
100.942

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.




2005

2006

2005
III

Exports of services 1.................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts........
Travel......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services..............
Other.......................................

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

2004

III

Imports of goods 1.....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum and products...........
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...............................
Other...................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts.............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other.......................................
Imports of services 1.................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services..............
Other.......................................
Addenda:
Exports of durable goods.........
Exports of nondurable goods....
Exports of agricultural goods 2
Exports of nonagricultural
goods..................................
Imports of durable goods.........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

IV

I

II

III

109.341

110.108

110.737

1 105.151

108.949

112.400

113.631

2 104.392
3 123.011

107.628 107.846 108.450 109.192 110.852
121.396 122.908 121.758 122.087 123.100

112.286
127.294

4 113.905
5 116.348
6 112.480

126.641
126.819
126.371

127.123
125.841
127.612

130.596
129.080
131.214

132.748
134.752
131.308

138.162
142.545
135.386

141.774
146.149
138.993

97.626

97.788

97.792

97.423

97.800

98.357

98.838

7

8 117.106

122.042

122.317

123.363

125.280

126.753

127.244

9
10

87.257
95.838

80.519
96.557

79.663
96.692

77.761
96.393

77.934
96.507

77.094
97.172

76.435
97.885

11

102.365

103.523

103.603

103.941

104.215

104.636

105.038

12 100.640
13 100.587
14 100.676
15 106.826

101.755
101.606
101.901
111.135

101.708
101.710
101.674
111.421

101.892
101.771
102.007
112.368

102.184
101.689
102.747
113.279

102.867
102.405
103.388
115.170

103.633
103.188
104.132
116.790

16 106.985

112.115

112.918

114.080

114.430

116.098

116.815

105.137 105.674 106.575
111.265 111.833 114.587
133.733 132.775 138.013
134.803 131.495 133.436
113.908 114.658 115.796
108.404 109.532 110.600
123.267 122.703 123.341

107.503
115.205
140.918
134.401
116.385
111.271
122.373

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

100.918
104.891
127.600
109.435
108.855
104.257
114.447

103.662
109.135
137.593
124.536
112.332
107.635
120.959

103.935
110.323
140.606
126.829
112.873
107.910
120.575

24 104.678

111.268

112.919

114.117

113.918

116.608

118.143

25 102.962
26 107.701

109.622
113.852

111.383
113.336

112.790
115.427

112.331
116.617

115.197
116.628

116.824
118.729

27
28
29
30

111.786
111.904
111.450
130.918

123.104 122.042 132.065 128.709 129.290 131.928
117.748 116.368 117.929 121.580 128.973 132.998
128.925 128.244 147.671 135.882 127.928 128.778
178.639 201.397 201.102 200.744 232.096 242.182

31

91.300

90.618

90.350

89.830

89.758

89.726

89.921

32

109.560

113.386

113.960

114.529

116.052

117.306

118.023

33
34

72.672
97.447

66.928
99.027

66.024
99.020

64.567
98.925

63.393
99.326

62.125
99.885

61.319
100.604

35

102.481

103.575

103.640

103.762

103.519

103.810

104.197

98.625
96.423
101.065
104.085
113.786
139.523
116.848
115.223
117.737
108.832
103.845
112.166

99.547
99.495
96.665
96.433
102.810 102.982
107.658 107.667
119.933 120.945
152.087 152.454
124.639 127.402
120.026 120.082
128.305 130.292
112.299 112.834
106.084 105.981
118.239 119.887

99.432
96.437
102.830
109.418
120.913
151.195
123.525
121.874
132.827
113.869
106.530
119.141

99.636
96.739
102.909
109.308
122.242
152.061
125.440
123.509
130.301
114.618
109.626
120.155

99.696
97.117
102.571
110.088
123.890
160.023
128.249
125.759
128.846
115.755
110.908
121.986

100.359
97.960
103.011
111.011
124.876
163.267
131.302
126.988
126.378
116.345
112.115
123.018

48 101.010
49 112.086
50 123.675

102.620
119.357
121.201

102.552
120.280
122.347

102.754
121.961
121.817

103.628
122.325
121.904

104.959
124.843
122.663

105.811
127.810
126.512

51 102.874
97.943
52
53 111.910
54
99.981

106.494
98.771
129.722
102.436

106.647
98.474
135.490
102.167

107.323
98.531
139.572
103.731

108.107
98.920
137.406
103.264

109.825
99.915
144.084
103.452

111.091
100.753
147.322
104.297

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.

D-36

National Data

January 2007

Table 4.2.5. Exports and Imports of Goods and Services by
Type of Product

Table 4.2.6. Real Exports and Imports of Goods and Services by
Type of Product, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005

2006

III
Exports of goods and
services..........................
Exports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials..............................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts................................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...............................
Other..................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other......................................
Exports of services 1................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts........
Travel.......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services.............
Other......................................
Imports of goods and
services..........................
Imports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum and products..........
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts................................
Other...................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts.............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other.......................................
Imports of services 1.................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel.......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services.............
Other......................................
Addenda:
Exports of durable goods........
Exports of nondurable goods...
Exports of agricultural goods 2
Exports of nonagricultural
goods..................................
Imports of durable goods.........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

IV

I

II

Line

1

1,178.1

1,303.1

1,312.4

1,352.4

1,405.4

1,448.1

1,488.3

2
3

818.8
56.6

907.5
59.0

913.9
58.7

944.3
59.8

989.3
62.2

1,019.1
65.7

1,055.8
70.1

4
5
6

199.5
67.8
131.7

227.5
79.8
147.7

230.0
81.3
148.8

230.0
85.6
144.5

248.0
91.1
156.9

266.9
97.5
169.5

276.0
101.0
175.0

7

331.6

362.7

362.4

384.3

400.6

409.3

417.0

8

50.0

60.8

57.4

66.1

74.9

71.5

71.8

9
10

42.8
238.8

45.5
256.4

46.5
258.5

45.8
272.4

47.0
278.7

47.8
290.0

47.4
297.8

11

89.2

98.6

100.9

104.5

105.5

104.7

111.5

12
13
14
15

103.1
53.8
49.3
38.9

115.7
62.5
53.2
44.1

116.6
63.8
52.7
45.2

120.0
65.3
54.7
45.6

124.9
67.8
57.0
48.2

126.0
70.3
55.7
46.4

131.6
72.5
59.1
49.7

16

359.3

395.6

398.5

408.1

416.0

429.0

432.5

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

14.8
74.5
18.9
37.4
52.5
144.7
16.6

18.1
81.7
20.9
42.2
57.4
158.2
17.0

19.9
81.6
22.0
42.2
57.6
158.1
17.1

16.7
81.5
21.5
45.0
59.7
166.6
17.2

16.9
82.8
21.9
46.7
60.3
170.0
17.4

16.3
86.6
21.3
48.9
62.5
175.7
17.7

15.6
86.7
21.5
48.9
62.3
179.8
17.8

24

1,791.4

2,019.9

2,041.2

2,127.8

2,170.6

2,229.8

2,290.1

25
26

1,495.2
62.1

1,699.0
68.1

1,719.1
69.0

1,799.3
70.6

1,832.6
74.1

1,879.0
73.2

1,938.8
76.4

27
28
29
30

225.2
119.2
105.9
180.5

264.9
134.8
130.0
251.9

261.6
129.9
131.7
269.1

293.6
140.4
153.2
292.6

287.5
153.1
134.4
288.5

287.9
159.6
128.4
317.2

303.7
173.8
129.9
336.7

31

343.5

379.2

383.2

389.9

404.4

415.6

429.9

32

24.3

25.8

24.1

25.4

28.4

27.7

27.6

33
34

88.6
230.6

93.3
260.2

94.2
264.9

94.2
270.4

99.5
276.5

101.4
286.4

104.4
297.9

35

228.2

239.5

241.2

250.4

258.3

258.2

253.7

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

373.1
197.6
175.4
82.7

403.8
220.9
182.9
91.1

296.2
29.3
65.8
23.7
54.2
23.2
90.4
9.6

407.3
219.8
187.5
88.1
320.9
30.1
69.2
26.1
62.1
24.5
98.7
10.2

48
49
50

561.8
257.1
62.9

51
52
53
54

755.9
929.9
565.3
1,314.8

424.6
232.4
192.2
95.1

430.7
230.8
199.9
96.2

449.2
241.7
207.5
89.2

322.1
30.2
68.7
26.6
60.8
25.4
100.0
10.4

415.3
225.7
189.5
86.9
328.5
30.0
68.5
26.6
64.6
25.0
103.4
10.3

338.1
30.0
68.6
27.0
65.3
27.3
109.4
10.4

350.8
30.6
72.7
29.1
65.9
27.4
114.5
10.6

351.3
31.1
70.7
27.7
66.8
26.9
117.4
10.7

625.6
281.9
64.9

631.0
282.8
65.2

662.5
281.8
65.9

689.1
300.3
69.5

705.0
314.1
73.1

726.8
329.0
75.8

842.7
1,017.5
681.5
1,447.1

848.7
1,020.8
698.3
1,449.9

878.4
1,049.9
749.4
1,506.7

919.8
1,095.8
736.8
1,544.0

946.0
1,112.2
766.8
1,561.9

980.0
1,143.7
795.1
1,602.1

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.




2004

2005

III

2005
III

Exports of goods and
services..........................
Exports of goods 1....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials..............................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts 2..............................
Other....................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts.............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other.......................................

2006
IV

I

II

III

1
2
3

1,120.4
784.4
46.0

1,196.1

1,200.5

1,228.4

847.5
47.8

870.8
49.1

1,269.3
906.2
51.0

1,288.5

843.2
48.6

919.5
53.4

1,310.0
940.4
55.1

4
5
6

175.2
58.3
117.1

179.7
62.9
116.9

180.9
64.6
116.5

176.1
66.3
109.9

186.7
67.6
119.3

193.1
68.4
125.0

194.6
69.1
125.7

7

339.6

370.9

370.6

394.4

409.6

416.1

421.8

8

42.7

49.8

47.0

53.6

59.8

56.4

56.4

9
10

249.1

265.5

267.4

282.6

288.8

298.5

304.2

11

87.2

95.2

97.4

100.5

101.2

100.0

106.2

12
13
14
15

102.4
53.4
49.0
36.4

113.7
61.5
52.2
39.6

114.6
62.8
51.8
40.6

117.8
64.2
53.7
40.6

122.2
66.7
55.5
42.6

122.5
68.7
53.9
40.3

127.0
70.3
56.7
42.5

Exports of services 1.................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts........
Travel......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services..............
Other.......................................
Residual......................................

16

335.9

352.9

353.0

357.8

363.6

369.5

370.3

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

14.6
71.1
14.8
34.2
48.2
138.7
14.5
-4.0

17.5
74.8
15.2
33.9
51.1
147.0
14.1
-6.3

19.2
73.9
15.7
33.2
51.0
146.6
14.2
-7.5

15.9
73.2
16.1
33.3
52.4
153.7
14.0
-9.5

16.0
74.0
16.5
35.5
52.5
155.2
14.2
-7.3

15.3
75.6
15.4
36.6
54.0
158.9
14.4
-8.2

14.5
75.3
15.2
36.4
53.5
161.6
14.5
-9.1

Imports of goods and
services..........................

25

1,711.3

1,815.3

1,808.1

1,865.0

1,905.9

1,912.7

1,938.8

26
27

1,452.2
57.7

1,549.9
59.8

1,543.9
60.9

1,595.8
61.2

1,631.9
63.6

1,631.7
62.8

1,660.1
64.4

28
29
30
31

201.4
106.5
95.1
137.8

215.2
114.5
100.9
141.0

214.5
111.6
102.9
133.6

222.4
119.0
104.0
145.5

223.5
125.8
99.1
143.7

222.8
123.6
100.6
136.7

230.4
130.6
101.1
139.0

32

376.2

418.5

424.0

434.0

450.5

463.1

478.0

33

22.2

22.7

21.2

22.1

24.5

23.6

23.3

Imports of goods 1.....................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum and products...........
Capital goods, except
automotive...........................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...............................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts2..............................
Other...................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts.............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive...........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Other........................................
Imports of services 1.................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel......................................
Passenger fares.......................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees.......
Other private services..............
Other.......................................
Residual......................................
Addenda:
Exports of durable goods.........
Exports of nondurable goods....
Exports of agricultural goods 3
Exports of nonagricultural
goods...................................
Imports of durable goods.........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

34
35

236.6

262.7

267.5

273.3

278.4

286.8

296.1

36

222.7

231.2

232.8

241.4

249.6

248,7

243.4

37
38
39
40

378.3
205.0
173.6
79.5

409.2
227.4
182.4
81.9

405.9
229.1
177.6
84.6

417.6
234.1
184.3
79.4

426.1
240.2
186.8
87.0

432.0
237.6
194.9
87.4

447.6
246.7
201.4
80.3

41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49

260.3
21.0
56.3
20.6
46.0
21.3
87.0
8.6
-8.2

267.5
19.8
55.5
21.7
48.4
21.8
93.1
8.6
-17.5

266.3
19.8
53.9
22.2
46.7
22.5
94.4
8.6
-24.3

271.7
19.9
55.5
21.8
48.6
22.0
97.1
8.7
-18.6

276.6
19.7
54.7
21.9
50.0
23.8
99.8
8.7
-28.3

283.2
19.2
56.7
23.1
51.1
23.7
103.2
8.7
-38.8

281.3
19.1
53.9
21.8
52.8
23.1
104.7
8.7
-41.8

50
51
52

556.1
229.3
50.9

609.7
236.2
53.5

615.3
235.1
53.3

644.7
231.0
54.1

665.0
245.4
57.1

671.7
251.5
59.6

686.9
257.4
59.9

53
54
55
56

734.8
949.4
505.1
1,315.0

791.3
1,030.1
525.4
1,412.7

795.9
1,036.5
515.4
1,419.4

818.6
1,065.5
536.9
1,452.7

850.9
1,107.7
536.2
1,495.4

861.5
1,113.1
532.2
1,510.0

882.3
1,135.1
539.7
1,536.3

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. The quantity index for computers can be used to accurately measure the real growth of this component. However,
because computers exhibit rapid changes in prices relative to other prices in the economy, the chained-dollar estimates
should not be used to measure the component's relative importance or its contribution to the growth rate of more aggregate
series; accurate estimates of these contributions are shown in table 4.2.2. and real growth rates are shown in table 4.2.1.
3. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.
N ote. Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. For exports and for imports, the
residual line is the difference between the aggregate line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

January 2007

Survey

of

D-37

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

5. Saving and Investment
Table 5.3.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Private Fixed
Investment by Type

Table 5.1. Saving and Investment
[Billions of dollars]

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005
III

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

2005
I

IV

II

Line

III

Gross saving.........................

1

1,543.7

1,612.0

1,653.5

1,621.2

1,880.5

1,789.7

2
3
4

107.5
502.4
174.3

7.2
319.7
-34.8

-244.5
170.9
-132.6

58.7
339.5
-28.5

332.4
466.7
-29.7

216.9
353.9
-130.8

224.9
400.7
-111.7

8

78.1

-155.5

-178.6

-165.6

-148.6

-160.8

-162.4

9
10
11
12

-15.0
-394.9
-382.0
-12.9

0.0
-312.5
-309.2
-3.3

0.0
-415.4
-396.0
-19.3

0.0
-280.8
-263.6
-17.2

0.0
-134.3
-147.0
12.7

0.0
-136.9
-163.1
26.1

0.0
-175.8
-165.6
-10.2

Consumption of fixed capital......
Private.......................................
Domestic business.................
Households and institutions....
Government...............................
Federal..................................
State and local........................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

1,436.2
1,205.4
969.5
235.9
230.8
94.1
136.7

1,604.8
1,352.6
1,059.1
293.5
252.2
99.0
153.2

1,898.0
1,632.3
1,197.6
434.7
265.7
99.8
165.9

1,562.5
1,307.5
1,044.4
263.1
255.0
100.7
154.3

1,548.0
1,288.9
1,035.1
253.8
259.1
102.4
156.7

1,572.8
1,309.8
1,050.4
259.5
262.9
103.7
159.2

1,582.0
1,314.4
1,053.0
261.4
267.6
105.1
162.5

20
21

1,610.3
2,259.4

1,683.1
2,454.5

1,737.9
2,452.9

1,695.4
2,563.6

1,818.6
2,634.7

1,825.5
2,668.0

1,801.6
2,668.5

22
23
24

1,888.0
371.4
2.3

2,057.4
397.1
4.4

2,052.6
400.3
2.2

2,154.5
409.1
2.1

2,214.8
419.9
7.0

2,237.1
430.9
3.5

2,235.5
433.0
1.7

25

-651.3

-775.8

-717.2

-870.2

-823.1

-846.1

-868.7

26

66.7

71.0

84.5

74.3

-61.9

35.8

-5.3

27
28
29
30
31

1,707.8
-164.1
-287.9
123.8
823.2

1,672.3
-60.2
-210.1
149.9
849.7

1,803.2
-149.7
-296.2
146.6
554.9

1,647.0
-25.8
-162.9
137.1
1,001.1

1,755.7
124.8
-44.6
169.4
1,086.7

1,663.7
126.0
-59.4
185.4
1,095.2

1,715.1
91.8
-60.5
152.3
1,086.5

32

13.2

13.0

13.2

12.8

14.4

13.6

13.5

33

0.9

0.1

-1.9

0.5

2.5

1.6

1.7

2005

Gross domestic investment,
capital account
transactions, and net
lending, NIPAs..................
Gross domestic investment............
Gross private domestic
investment.............................
Gross government investment....
Capital account transactions (net)1
Net lending or net borrowing (-),
NIPAs.........................................
Statistical discrepancy........
Addenda:
Gross private saving...................
Gross government saving...........
Federal..................................
State and local........................
Net domestic investment............
Gross saving as a percentage
of gross national income.....
Net saving as a percentage of
gross national incom e.........

5
6

343.0
304.7

354.5
542.5

303.5
513.0

367.9
572.7

496.4
668.0

484.6
704.3

512.4
713.0

7

-39.8

-32.6

-30.9

-39.2

-22.9

-58.9

-38.2

1. Consists of capital transfers and the acquisition and disposal of nonproduced nonfinancial assets.




2005

2006
IV

III

1,806.9

Net saving.....................................
Net private saving.......................
Personal saving......................
Undistributed corporate profits
with inventory valuation and
capital consumption
adjustments........................
Undistributed profits...........
Inventory valuation
adjustment......................
Capital consumption
adjustment......................
Wage accruals less
disbursements....................
Net government saving...............
Federal...................................
State and local........................

2004

II

I

III

Private fixed investment....

1

7.3

7.5

6.3

2.8

8.2

-1.6

-1.2

Nonresidential...........................

2

5.9

6.8

5.9

5.2

13.7

4.4

10.0

Structures..............................
Commercial and health care
Manufacturing......................
Power and communication....
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells..........................
Other structures 1................

3
4
5
6

2.2
2.6
5.1
-12.6

1.1
-0.8
21.1
-6.7

-7.0
-3.7
17.8
-25.2

12.0
3.2
32.0
12.4

8.7
7.1
-1.7
14.3

20.3
11.7
28.0
4.9

15.7
25.6
11.3
16.0

7
8

13.2
3.1

11.0
-5.2

-9.0
-6.8

22.4
11.1

2.0
23.6

28.0
35.1

10.0
7.3

Equipment and software
Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment....................
Software 2.......................
O ther3............................
Industrial equipment............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipment4...............

9

7.3

8.9

11.0

2.8

15.6

-1.4

7.7

10

10.1

8.5

7.3

7.0

21.8

-1.1

10.0

11
12
13
14
15
16

14.2
10.0
8.1
-4.1
13.2
5.6

17.9
5.8
7.2
8.1
12.9
7.0

8.6
4.6
9.9
20.1
23.0
2.0

27.1
2.8
3.0
16.2
-21.8
6.6

24.9
12.2
31.6
-3.6
27.7
8.5

4.7
4.2
-9.0
13.6
-22.8
7.4

22.0
6.0
9.3
0.2
13.6
3.8

Residential.................................

17

9.9

8.6

7.1

-0.9

-0.3

-11.1

-18.7

Structures..............................
Permanent site.....................
Single family....................
Multifamily........................
Other structures 5................

18
19
20
21
22

9.9
11.5
11.9
7.8
7.4

8.6
10.6
10.3
14.1
5.3

7.1
10.6
9.8
17.9
1.5

-1.1
5.6
4.8
12.5
-11.6

-0.5
0.8
-1.8
25.7
-2.7

-11.2
-17.6
-19.2
-2.6
1.1

-18.9
-25.0
-28.6
7.8
-7.5

Equipment..............................

23

10.8

5.0

2.1

9.9

13.6

-2.9

-2.2

24

7.4

6.3

2.6

2.8

2.4

-1.8

-8.0

25

7.3

8.9

10.9

2.9

15.6

-1.4

7.6

26
27
28

6.4
2.0
8.8

6.1
1.0
8.9

3.2
-7.1
8.8

7.9
11.9
5.9

3.9
8.6
1.5

-1.7
20.2
-12.3

-6.2
15.6
-17.7

Addenda:
Private fixed investment in
structures.............................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6..........................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures..........

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures,
2. Excludes software “embedded," or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers'
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6. Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.

D-38

National Data

Table 5.3.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Private Fixed
Investment by Type

January 2007

Table 5.3.3. Real Private Fixed Investment by Type, Quantity Indexes
[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Line

2006
IV

I

II

7.3

7.5

6.3

2.8

8.2

-1.6

IV

I

II

III

109.708

111.032

111.811

114.033

113.570

113.240

Nonresidential............................

2

92.995

99.326

100.025

101.308

104.606

105.738

108.292

Structures...............................
Commercial and health care
Manufacturing......................
Power and communication....
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells..........................
Other structures 1................

3
4
5
6

79.418
76.507
50.993
76.571

80.302
75.875
61.759
71.479

78.903
75.296
61.647
67.615

81.174
75.888
66.082
69.626

82.893
77.193
65.797
71.989

86.819
79.366
69.992
72.859

90.044
84.017
71.895
75.619

7
8

120.793
78.836

134.078
74.770

132.582
72.821

139.450
74.755

140.128
78.828

149.062
84.988

152.640
86.500

Nonresidential...........................

2

3.82

4.28

3.65

3.19

8.30

2.72

6.16

Structures..............................
Commercial and health care
Manufacturing......................
Power and communication...
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells.........................
Other structures 1................

3
4
5
6

0.37
0.18
0.05
-0.35

0.19
-0.06
0.22
-0.15

-1.19
-0.25
0.19
-0.57

1.92
0.21
0.34
0.23

1.50
0.46
-0.02
0.27

3.34
0.74
0.32
0.10

2.79
1.61
0.15
0.31

7
8

0.37
0.11

0.36
-0.18

-0.34
-0.22

0.81
0.33

0.09
0.71

1.16
1.03

0.48
0.25

Equipment and software.......
Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment...................
Software2 .......................
Other3............................
Industrial equipment............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipment4...............

9

3.45

4.09

4.84

1.27

6.80

-0.62

3.36

10

2.40

1.95

1.60

1.50

4.52

-0.24

2.13

11
12
13
14
15
16

0.63
1.01
0.75
-0.35
0.96
0.45

0.75
0.57
0.63
0.62
0.98
0.55

0.35
0.44
0.82
1.41
1.67
0.16

0.98
0.26
0.25
1.16
-1.89
0.50

0.94
1.12
2.46
-0.28
1.90
0.66

0.18
0.39
-0.82
0.98
-1.91
0.56

0.79
0.56
0.78
0.02
0.92
0.30

Residential.................................

17

3.51

3.19

2.68

-0.36

-0.11

-4.33

-7.31

Structures..............................
Permanent site....................
Single family....................
Multifamily.......................
Other structures 5................

18
19
20
21
22

3.46
2.46
2.29
0.17
1.00

3.17
2.44
2.12
0.31
0.74

2.67
2.46
2.06
0.40
0.21

-0.40
1.30
1.02
0.29
-1.70

-0.17
0.19
-0.39
0.58
-0.36

-4.32
-4.46
-4.39
-0.07
0.14

-7.30
-6.28
-6.47
0.19
-1.02

Equipment..............................

23

0.05

0.02

0.01

0.04

0.06

-0.01

-0.01

24

3.82

3.36

1.49

1.52

1.33

-0.98

-4.51

25

3.50

4.11

4.85

1.31

6.86

-0.63

3.35

26
27
28

3.00
0.33
2.67

2.98
0.18
2.81

1.61
-1.19
2.79

3.76
1.90
1.87

1.98
1.48
0.50

-0.85
3.31
-4.16

-3.18
2.76
-5.94

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6. Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers' commissions on the sale of structures.




1 102.080

-1.2

Percentage points at annual
rates:

Addenda:
Private fixed investment in
structures.............................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6..........................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures..........

2006

III
Private fixed investment....

1

2005

2005

III

Percent change at annual rate:
Private fixed investment....

2004

Equipment and software.......
Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment....................
Software 2........................
Other3.............................
Industrial equipment............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipment4...............

9

98.400

107.180

108.889

109.653

113.704 113.313

115.434

10

108.905

118.169

119.268

121.307

127.437

127.088

130.156

11
12
13
14
15
16

138.489
110.703
95.076
83.354
80.063
104.902

163.269
117.072
101.880
90.147
90.382
112.290

163.804
118.092
103.171
90.994
94.682
113.399

173.913
118.920
103.947
94.468
89.030
115.224

183.839
122.383
111.339
93.602
94.635
117.597

185.956
123.658
108.753
96.640
88.698
119.702

195.437
125.468
111.205
96.691
91.571
120.837

138.821

138.495

138.391

Residential.................................

17 125.281

136.050

134.368

127.601

Structures..............................
Permanent site....................
Single family....................
Multifamily........................
Other structures 5................

18 125.330
19 128.052
20 128.786
21 121.575
22 121.081

136.160 138.967
141.681 144.340
142.013 144.686
138.770 141.299
127.527 130.562

138.599 138.440 134.378
146.307 146.598 139.692
146.396 145.741 138.160
145.525 154.078 153.066
126.591 125.738 126.070

127.535
129.985
127.013
155.956
123.635

Equipment..............................

23

122.148

128.239

128.186

131.261

135.523

134.514

133.778

24

106.071

112.707

113.715

114.497

115.170

114.647

112.280

25

98.593

107.352

109.046

109.829

113.882

113.485

115.582

109.841
78.891
135.406

111.947
81.141
137.357

112.543
86.729
133.419

110.754
89.924
127.079

Addenda:
Private fixed investment in
structures.............................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6..........................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures..........

26
27
28

103.100
79.472
122.551

109.439
80.287
133.472

113.031
82.832
137.880

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6. Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.

January 2007

Survey

of

D-39

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 5.3.4. Price indexes for Private Fixed Investment by Type

Table 5.3.5. Private Fixed Investment by Type

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2006

2005

Private fixed investment....
Nonresidential...........................
Structures..............................
Commercial and health care
Manufacturing......................
Power and communication...
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells.........................
Other structures 1................
Equipment and software.......
Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment...................
Software 2 .......................
Other3.............................
Industrial equipment............
Transportation equipment
Other equipment4...............
Residential.................................

1 106.811

Line

7
8

IV

110.946

112.194

113.238

114.074 114.224

103.607 104.510

105.471

106.266

1,830.6

2,036.2

2,067.9

2,105.8

2,167.7

2,174.8

2,171.4

1,155.3

1,265.7

1,276.7

1,304.3

1,359.2

1,384.3

1,420.8

134.647 136.089 141.476 145.684 149.432 151.372
127.001 128.421 131.210 133.482 135.627 137.311
122.924 123.944 126.615 129.037 131.133 132.536
123.233 123.340 124.987 126.637 128.151 129.733

Structures...............................
Commercial and health care
Manufacturing......................
Power and communication....
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells..........................
Other structures 1................

3
4
5
6

300.8
122.3
18.5
41.7

338.6
132.5
24.1
41.2

336.3
133.0
24.3
39.0

359.7
137.0
26.6
40.7

378.2
141.7
27.0
42.7

406.3
148.1
29.2
43.7

426.9
158.7
30.3
45.9

7
8

54.9
63.5

76.8
63.1

96.0
70.8

107.9
77.4

112.3
79.6

213.626 236.244 252.697 267.060 271.460
124.092 126.442 128.550 130.395 131.753

854.5

940.4

89.3
66.1
944.7

981.0

977.9

994.0

10

431.6

454.3

456.6

461.3

482.4

479.9

489.6

11
12
13
14
15
16

82.3
184.3
164.9
138.4
141.6
143.0

85.1
194.0
175.2
155.1
158.3
159.4

83.9
195.6
177.2
157.0
165.0
161.8

85.9
196.9
178.4
163.9
154.6
164.9

88.0
203.6
190.8
163.4
165.7
169.4

85.9
207.0
187.1
170.1
155.9
172.1

87.2
210.8
191.7
172.0
157.5
174.9

Residential.................................

17

675.3

770.4

791.2

801.5

808.5

790.6

750.5

Structures..............................
Permanent site.....................
Single family....................
Multifamily........................
Other structures 5................

18
19
20
21
22

666.8
417.5
377.6
39.9
249.3

761.3
481.7
433.5
48.2
279.6

782.0
493.1
443.6
49.5
288.9

792.1
507.3
455.5
51.8
284.8

798.7
513.7
458.2
55.4
285.0

780.8
492.4
437.0
55.4
288.4

740.7
457.3
401.0
56.3
283.5

Equipment..............................

23

8.5

9.1

9.2

9.4

9.8

9.8

9.8

24

967.7

1,099.9

1,118.3

1,151.8

1,176.9

1,187.1

1,167.6

25

863.0

936.2

949.6

954.1

990.8

987.7

1,003.7

26
27
28

873.9
300.3
573.6

992.4
337.9
654.5

1,003.2
335.6
667.6

1,046.5
358.9
687.6

1,074.8
377.4
697.4

1,085.7
405.3
680.4

1,073.7
425.8
647.9

93.887

93.920

93.704

80.940

80.737

80.438

11
58.599
12
94.503
13
91.294
14 104.249
15 109.923
16 103.914

51.407
50.407
94.067
94.012
90.492
90.369
108.064 108.373
108.882 108.351
108.174 108.742

48.634
94.009
90.343
108.973
107.933
109.100

47.125
45.443
94.430
95.005
90.186
90.523
109.659 110.544
108.867 109.257
109.841 109.608

43.889
95.354
90.737
111.715
106.894
110.339

Equipment and software.......
Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment....................
Software 2........................
Other3.............................
Industrial equipment............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipment4...............

17 120.618

126.714

129.536

130.765

131.696 131.655

82.218

127.573

18 121.052 127.205 128.069 130.063 131.293 132.236
19 123.013 128.285 128.944 130.869 132.247 133.034
20 123.810 128.918 129.493 131.398 132.782 133.572
21 116.268 122.984 123.881 125.973 127.300 128.058
22 118.016 125.627 126.832 128.948 129.920 131.133

Equipment..............................

23

96.852

129.651

97.378

130.690

97.347

133.679

98.518

135.796

98.710

137.602

132.182
132.781
133.318
127.814
131.404
99.454

138.195

25

94.496

94.156

94.012

93.785

93.928

93.962

93.755

26
27
28

121.579
121.057
121.561

130.078
134.842
127.366

131.059
136.290
128.109

134.145
141.714
130.072

136.448
145.953
131.433

138.434
149.726
132.510

139.107
151.683
132.478

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6. Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers' commissions on the sale of structures.




9

76.4
64.3
927.1

81.313

121.199

III

1

93.754

24

II

2

81.863

94.223

I

IV

Private fixed investment....

Structures.............................
Permanent site....................
Single family....................
Multifamily.......................
Other structures 5................
Addenda:
Private fixed investment in
structures............................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6.........................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures..........

2006

2005

Nonresidential............................

167.286 209.732
115.251 123.118
94.134
94.503
84.741

2005
III

93.983

9
10

2004

III

106.501

110.542

2 100.834 103.428
3 120.951
4 116.235
5 113.985
6 116.231

I

II

III

Addenda:
Private fixed investment in
structures.............................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6..........................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures..........

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded," or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6. Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.

D-40

January 2007

National Data

Table 5.3.6. Real Private Fixed Investment by Type, Chained Dollars

Table 5.6.5B. Change in Private Inventories by Industry

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]

[Billions of dollars]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

Line

IV

I

II

Private fixed investment....

1

1,713.9

1,842.0

1,864.2

1,877.3

1,914.6

1,906.8

1,901.3

2

1,145.8

1,223.8

1,232.4

1,248.2

1,288.8

1,302.8

1,334.2

Structures..............................
Commercial and health care
Manufacturing......................
Power and communication...
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells.........................
Other structures1................

3
4
5
6

248.7
105.2
16.2
35.8

251.5
104.4
19.6
33.5

247.1
103.6
19.6
31.6

254.2
104.4
21.0
32.6

259.6
106,2
20.9
33.7

271.9
109.2
22.3
34.1

282.0
115.6
22.9
35.4

7
8

32.8
55.1

36.4
52.2

36.0
50.9

37.9
52.2

38.1
55.1

40.5
59.4

41.5
60.4

9

904.2

984.9

1,000.6

1,007.6

1,044.8

1,041.2

1,060.7

10

509.3

552.6

557.7

567.3

595.9

594.3

608.6

11
12
13
14
15
16

195.0
180.7
132.7
128.8
137.6

206.2
193.6
143.5
145.4
147.3

208.0
196.0
144.9
152.3
148.8

209.5
197.5
150.4
143.2
151.2

215.6
211.6
149.0
152.2
154.3

217.8
206.7
153.9
142.7
157.1

221.0
211.3
153.9
147.3
158.6

Residential.................................

17

559.9

608.0

620.4

618.9

618.5

600.5

570.3

Structures..............................
Permanent site....................
Single family....................
Multifamily.......................
Other structures 6................

18
19
20
21
22

550.9
339.4
305.0
34.4
211.3

598.5
375.5
336.3
39.2
222.5

610.8
382.6
342.6
39.9
227.8

609.2
387.8
346.6
41.1
220.9

608.5
388.6
345.1
43.5
219.4

590.6
370.2
327.1
43.3
220.0

560.6
344.5
300.8
44.1
215.7

Equipment..............................
Residual.....................................

23
24

9.0
-6.2

9.4
-13.1

9.4
-13.4

9.7
-17.3

10.0
-26.6

9.9
-25.8

9.8
-35.3

25

798.4

848.4

856.0

861.9

866.9

863.0

845.2

26

913.2

994.3

1,010.0

1,017.3

1,054.8

1,051.2

1,070.6

27
28
29

718.8
248.1
471.8

762.9
250.6
513.9

765.7
246.2
521.3

780.4
253,3
528.8

788.0
258.6
530.8

784.6
270.7
513.7

772.1
280.7
489.3

Addenda:
Private fixed investment in
structures.............................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 7..........................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures..........

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. The quantity index for computers can be used to accurately measure the real growth rate of this component. However,
because computers exhibit rapid changes in prices relative to other prices in the economy, the chained-dollar estimates
should not be used to measure the component’s relative importance or its contribution to the growth rate of more aggregate
series; accurate estimates of these contributions are shown in table 5.3.2 and real growth rates are shown in table 5.3.1.
3. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
4. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
5. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
6. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
7. Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers' commissions on the sale of structures.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the differ­
ence between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.




2005

III

Nonresidential...........................

Equipment and software.......
Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment2.................
Software 3.......................
Other4.............................
Industrial equipment............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipment5...............

2004

2005

Change in private
inventories......................
Farm...........................................
Mining, utilities, and construction
Manufacturing.............................
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries....
Wholesale trade...........................
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries ....
Retail trade.................................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers
Food and beverage stores
General merchandise stores ..
Other retail stores....................
Other industries..........................
Addenda:
Change in private inventories...
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries
Nonfarm industries..................
Nonfarm change in book
value 1.............................
Nonfarm inventory valuation
adjustment2....................
Wholesale trade.......................
Merchant wholesale trade .
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods
industries.....................
Nonmerchant wholesale
trade...............................

2006
IV

III

I

II

III

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

57.3
8.4
1.0
-0.7
-0.1
-0.6
19.1
16.9
2.2
22.2
7.2
0.5
4.3
10.2
7.4

21.3
0.3
1.8
-3.2
1.2
-4.3
17.1
14.3
2.8
5.4
-2.7
0.0
2.9
5.2
-0.1

-15.3
1.3
-1.5
-14.5
0.5
-15.0
11.0
7.9
3.1
-9.8
-13.1
-1.7
3.2
1.8
-1.8

48.6
5.8
-0.4
0.1
-1.5
1.6
14.7
18.8
-4.1
27.6
19.5
1.5
1.2
5.4
0.9

47.2
5.4
-3.1
9.2
-0.2
9.4
16.8
6.8
10.0
13.5
5.5
1.1
-4.9
11.8
5.5

62.3
2.3
7.7
13.9
6.5
7.4
22.0
16.5
5.5
8.3
1.0
1.2
-0.5
6.7
8.0

64.2
2.5
2.3
12.8
11.0
1.8
38.7
30.3
8.4
2.3
-7.0
0.2
5.2
3.8
5.5

16
17
18
19

57.3
31.6
25.8
49.0

21.3
17.3
4.0
21.0

-15.3
-0.8
-14.5
-16.6

48.6
41.6
7.0
42.8

47.2
14.3
32.9
41.8

62.3
25.1
37.2
59.9

64.2
35.2
28.9
61.6

20

107.7

72.3

35.8

115.7

47.1

117.6

103.0

21
22
23
24

-58.7
19.1
18.4
16.5

-51.3
17.1
16.7
13.7

-52.4
11.0
12.9
7.7

-72.9
14.7
16.4
19.7

-5.3
16.8
14.0
7.4

-57.7
22.0
22.5
18.0

-41.4
38.7
33.1
25.3

5.1

-3.2

6.6

4.5

7.7

-1.9

-1.7

2.8

-0.5

5.6

25

1.9

3.0

26

0.7

0.4

1. This series is derived from the Census Bureau series “current cost inventories."
2. The inventory valuation adjustment (IVA) shown in this table differs from the IVA that adjusts business incomes. The IVA
in this table reflects the mix of methods (such as first-in, first-out and last-in, first-out) underlying inventories derived primarily
from Census Bureau statistics (see footnote 1). This mix differs from that underlying business income derived primarily from
Internal Revenue Service statistics.
N ote . Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

Table 5.6.6B. Real Change in Private Inventories by Industry, Chained Dollars
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Change in private
inventories......................
Farm...........................................
Mining, utilities, and construction
Manufacturing..............................
Durable goods industries.........
Nondurable goods industries....
Wholesale trade...........................
Durable goods industries.........
Nondurable goods industries....
Retail trade.................................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers
Food and beverage stores.......
General merchandise stores....
Other retail stores....................
Other industries..........................
Residual......................................
Addenda:
Change in private inventories...
Durable goods industries.....
Nondurable goods industries
Nonfarm industries..................
Wholesale trade.......................
Merchant wholesale trade....
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods
industries.....................
Nonmerchant wholesale
trade...............................

2006
IV

I

II

III

1
2
3
4
b
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

53.4
6.1
0.7
-0.4
-0.2
-0.2
18.2
16.4
2.3
21.9
7.5
0.4
4.2
9.9
7.4
-1.1

19.6
0.2
1.2
-2.4
1.1
-3.3
15.7
13.5
2.6
5.2
-2.7
0.0
2.7
4.9
-0.1
-0.5

-12.7
1.1
-1.1
-12.2
0.6
-11.8
10.2
7.5
2.8
-9.2
-13.3
-1.5
3.1
1.8
-1.6
-0.3

43.5
4.8
-0.5
0.5
-1.3
1.5
13.3
17.8
-3.3
26.4
19.8
1.3
1.1
5.1
0.8
-3.6

41.2
4.3
-2.0
7.6
-0.1
7.1
15.0
6.4
8.2
12.8
5.5
1.0
-4.7
10.8
5.2
-0.5

53.7
1.9
5.4
11.1
5.7
5.2
19.3
15.3
4.5
7.8
1.0
1.0
-0.5
6.1
7.4
0.7

55.4
2.5
1.6
10.1
9.4
1.1
33.7
27.7
6.9
2.2
-7.2
0.2
4.8
3.6
5.1
-0.3

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

53.4
30.7
23.1
47.0
18.2
17.6
16.0

19.6
16.4
3.9
19.6
15.7
15.4
12.9

-12.7
-0.5
-11.6
-14.0
10.2
11.9
7.3

43.5
39.2
6.4
38.6
13.3
15.0
18.6

41.2
13.4
27.1
36.8
15.0
12.6
6.9

53.7
23.1
30.3
52.2
19.3
20.0
16.7

55.4
31.9
24.1
53.3
33.7
29.3
23.1

24

1.9

2.7

4.6

-2.7

5.6

3.8

6.7

25

0.7

0.5

-1.5

-1.4

2.3

-0.4

4.4

Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
Chained (2000) dollar series for real change in private inventories are calculated as the period-to-period change in
chained-dollar end-of-period inventories. Quarterly changes in end-of-period inventories are stated at annual rates. Because
the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar esti­
mates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.
N ote .

January 2007

S urvey

of

D-41

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 5.7.6B. Real Private Inventories and Real Domestic Final Sales
by Industry, Chained Dollars

Table 5.7.5B. Private Inventories and Domestic Final Sales by Industry
[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted quarterly totals
Line

2005
III

Seasonally adjusted quarterly totals

2006
IV

I

II

Private inventories 1..........................................
Farm............................................................................
Mining, utilities, and construction.................................
Manufacturing..............................................................
Durable goods industries.........................................
Nondurable goods industries...................................
Wholesale trade..............
Durable goods industries.........................................
Nondurable goods industries...................................
Retail trade.....................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers..............................
Food and beverage stores.......................................
General merchandise stores...................................
Other retail stores....................................................
Other industries...........................................................

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

1,780.3
160.4
80.1
509.2
293.4
215.8
423.7
244.4
179.2
478.7
154.4
36.0
76.0
212.3
128.3

1,817.0
165.6
89.8
515.6
296.3
219.3
430.6
250.9
179.8
486.4
157.6
36.8
76.7
215.3
128.9

1,839.2
173.1
82.1
523.9
301.4
222.5
437.8
255.0
182.8
492.0
159.7
36.7
75.9
219.7
130.2

1,896.9
175.7
80.6
550.0
316.1
233.9
456.7
265.1
191.6
499.2
160.5
37.4
76.4
224.9
134.7

1,919.1
186.1
81.0
552.3
321.7
230.6
463.6
273.3
190.3
499.0
157.1
38.0
78.1
225.8
137.1

Addenda:
Private inventories...................................................
Durable goods industries.....................................
Nondurable goods industries...............................
Nonfarm industries.....
Wholesale trade.........
Merchant wholesale trade...................................
Durable goods industries.................................
Nondurable goods industries...........................
Nonmerchant wholesale trade..............................

16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

1,780.3
795.1
985.2
1,619.9
423.7
363.5
215.2
148.2
60.2

1,817.0
810.5
1,006.5
1,651.4
430.6
370.8
221.7
149.0
59.9

1,839.2
823.8
1,015.4
1,666.2
437.8
377.0
225.8
151.2
60.8

1,896.9
850.7
1,046.2
1,721.2
456.7
392.5
235.7
156.9
64.2

1,919.1
862.4
1,056.7
1,733.0
463.6
400.4
242.5
157.9
63.2

Final sales of domestic business 2...................

25

720.0

724.3

741.4

751.1

756.4

Final sales of goods and structures of
domestic business 2.....................................

26

442.1

441.1

455.6

460.8

462.1

Ratios of private inventories to final sales of
domestic business:
Private inventories to final sales..............................
Nonfarm inventories to final sales...........................
Nonfarm inventories to final sales of goods and
structures.............................................................

27
28

2.47
2.25

2.51
2.28

2.48
2.25

2.53
2.29

2.54
2.29

29

3.66

3.74

3.66

3.74

3.75

1. Inventories are as of the end of the quarter. The quarter-to-quarter change in inventories calculated from current-dollar
inventories in this table is not the current-dollar change in private inventories component of GDR The former is the difference
between two inventory stocks, each valued at its respective end-of-quarter prices. The latter is the change in the physical
volume of inventories valued at average prices of the quarter. In addition, changes calculated from this table are at quarterly
rates, whereas, the change in private inventories is stated at annual rates.
2. Quarterly totals at monthly rates. Final sales of domestic business equals final sales of domestic product less gross
output of general government, gross value added of nonprofit institutions, compensation paid to domestic workers, and space
rent for owner-occupied housing. It includes a small amount of final sales by farm and by government enterprises.
N ote . Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

Table 5.7.9B. Implicit Price Deflators for Private Inventories by Industry
[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted
Line

2006

2005
III

IV

1

II

III

Private inventories 1..........................................
Farm............................................................................
Mining, utilities, and construction.................................
Manufacturing................
Durable goods industries.........................................
Nondurable goods industries...................................
Wholesale trade.............
Durable goods industries.........................................
Nondurable goods industries...................................
Retail trade...................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers..............................
Food and beverage stores
General merchandise stores...................................
Other retail stores......
Other industries...........................................................

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

112.835 114.369
123.857 126.709
144.613 162.533
117.161 118.596
110.501 111.721
127.422 129.193
111.427 112.278
105.078 105.825
121.113 122.137
104.745 104.909
97.666
98.748
113.448 114.670
105.236 105.842
107.836 108.676
106.060 106.444

115.022 117.640 118.005
131.303 132.816 140.014
150.009 143.636 143.332
119.993 125.162 124.982
113.688 118.579 119,635
129.701 135.299 133.205
113.052 116.485 115.751
106.870 109.330 109.560
122.471 127.453 125.155
105.399 106.496 106.323
98.522
98.143
97.509
113.712 114.876 116.498
106.366 107.262 107.817
109.397 111.133 111.084
106.386 108.340 109.188

Addenda:
Private inventories...................................................
Durable goods industries.....................................
Nondurable goods industries...............................
Nonfarm industries................
Wholesale trade....................
Merchant wholesale trade..
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries............................
Nonmerchant wholesale trade.............................

16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

112.835
105.881
119.046
111.833
111.427
109.814
105.297
116.886
122.160

115.022
107.808
121.467
113.548
113.052
111.585
107.126
118.562
122.809

114.369
106.541
121.377
113.248
112.278
110.761
106.067
118.131
122.378

117.640
110.493
124.020
116.264
116.485
114.482
109.629
122.103
129.926

1. Implicit price deflators are as of the end of the quarter and are consistent with inventory stocks.
Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

N ote .




Line

III

118.005
110.862
124.381
116.020
115.751
114.332
109.863
121.304
125.140

2006

2005
III

IV

I

II

III

Private inventories 1.........................................
Farm...........................................................................
Mining, utilities, and construction................................
Manufacturing.............................................................
Durable goods industries........................................
Nondurable goods industries..................................
Wholesale trade.....................
Durable goods industries....
Nondurable goods industries
Retail trade............................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers.............................
Food and beverage stores..
General merchandise stores
Other retail stores...................................................
Other industries..........................................................
Residual......................................................................

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

1,577.8
129.5
55.4
434.6
265.5
169.4
380.2
232.6
148.0
457.0
156.4
31.7
72.2
196.8
120.9
-0.6

1,588.7
130.7
55.3
434.7
265.2
169.8
383.5
237.1
147.2
463.6
161.3
32.1
72.5
198.1
121.1
-1.7

1,599.0
131.8
54.8
436.6
265.1
171.5
387.3
238.7
149.2
466.8
162.7
32.3
71.3
200.8
122.4
-1.6

1,612.4
132.3
56.1
439.4
266.6
172.9
392.1
242.5
150.4
468.8
163.0
32.6
71.2
202.3
124.3
-1.8

Addenda:
Private inventories..................................................
Durable goods industries....................................
Nondurable goods industries..............................
Nonfarm industries.................................................
Wholesale trade......................................................
Merchant wholesale trade...................................
Durable goods industries................................
Nondurable goods industries..........................
Nonmerchant wholesale trade.............................

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

1,577.8
751.0
827.6
1448.5
380.2
331.0
204.4
126.8
49.3

1,588.7
760.8
829.2
1,458.2
383.5
334.7
209.1
126.1
48.9

1,599.0
764.1
836.0
1,467.4
387.3
337.9
210.8
127.5
49.5

1,612.4
769.9
843.6
1,480.4
392.1
342.9
215.0
128.5
49.4

1,626.3
777.9
849.6
1,493.7
400.5
350.2
220.7
130.2
50.5

Final sales of domestic business 2..................

26

657.2

656.6

667.5

671.8

674.7

Final sales of goods and structures of
domestic business 2.....................................

27

413.0

411.1

421.4

423.1

423.8

28
29

2.40
2.20

2.42
2.22

2.40
2.20

2.40
2.20

2.41
2.21

30

3.51

3.55

3.48

3.50

3.52

Ratios of private inventories to final sales of
domestic business:
Private inventories to final sales.................................
Nonfarm inventories to final sales................................
Nonfarm inventories to final sales of goods and
structures................................................................

1,626.3
132.9
56.5
441.9
268.9
173.1
400.5
249.4
152.1
469.3
161.2
32.6
72.4
203.2
125.6
-1.6

1. Inventories are as of the end of the quarter. The quarter-to-quarter changes calculated from this table are at quarterly
rates, whereas the change in private inventories component of GDP is stated at annual rates.
2. Quarterly totals at monthly rates. Final sales of domestic business equals final sales of domestic product less gross
output of general government, gross value added of nonprofit institutions, compensation paid to domestic workers, and space
rent for owner-occupied housing. It includes a small amount of final sales by farm and by government enterprises.
N ote . Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
Chained (2000) dollar inventory series are calculated to ensure that the chained (2000) dollar change in inventories for
2000 equals the current-dollar change in inventories for 2000 and that the average of the 1999 and 2000 end-of-year chainweighted and fixed-weighted inventories are equal.

D-42

National Data

January 2007

6. Income and Employment by Industry
Table 6.1 D. National Income Without Capital Consumption Adjustment by Industry
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

National income without capital consumption adjustment...............................................

1

10,069.5

10,917.9

10,821.1

11,209.1

11,625.7

11,697.6

11,847.3

Domestic industries..........................................................................................................................

2

10,023.2

10,886.0

10,768.9

11,196.6

11,596.6

11,674.8

11,830.6

Private industries..........................................................................................................................
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.....................................................................................
Mining.........................................................................................................................................
Utilities...
Construction................................................................................................................................
Manufacturing.............................................................................................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods...................................................................................................................
Wholesale trade..........................................................................................................................
Retail trade..................................................................................................................................
Transportation and warehousing..................................................................................................
Information......................................................
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing.....................................................................
Professional and business services 1..............
Educational services, health care, and social assistance............................................................
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services...........................................
Other services, except government.................

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

8,763.1
95.3
123.7
155.9
522.8
1,211.0
674.6
536.4
625.0
766.0
280.8
359.6
1,797.4
1,327.3
876.1
366.0
256.2

9,574.6
87.6
158.9
176.7
604.2
1,365.8
746.0
619.8
689.3
825.3
306.3
417.1
1,832.9
1,510.4
938.2
394.2
267.6

9,463.4
85.8
154.8
168.7
612.7
1,374.0
751.5
622.5
688.4
829.6
309.2
420.2
1,685.0
1,532.1
939.8
394.1
268.9

9,865.6
86.9
184.4
187.5
628.1
1,392.2
759.9
632.3
713.8
852.6
310.4
430.8
1,897.2
1,560.2
954.4
394.2
272.9

10,245.2
87.4
188.0
192.1
652.5
1,472.8
815.7
657.0
732.9
866.1
327.0
447.8
1,975.5
1,623.4
981.7
420.7
277.5

10,311.4
82.2
187.2
201.0
650.3
1,457.4
790.8
666.6
733.0
869.2
341.7
443.2
2,002.6
1,635.5
1,000.4
426.3
281.2

10,448.2
87.2
201.6
207.2
638.6
1,504.9
833.9
671.0
767.5
881.7
348.8
447.0
1,983.1
1,667.5
1,005.5
425.2
282.4

Government.......................................................
Rest of the w orld...............................................................................................................................

20
21

1,260.2
46.3

1,311.4
31.9

1,305.5
52.2

1,331.1
12.5

1,351.4
29.1

1,363.4
22.7

1,382.3
16.7

1. Consists of professional, scientific, and technical services; management of companies and enterprises; and administrative and waste management services.
Estimates in this table are based on the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

N ote .

Table 6.16D. Corporate Profits by Industry
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

1

1,182.6

1,330.7

1,266.3

1,393.5

1,569.1

Domestic industries..........................................................................................................................
2
Financial'...
3
353.7
Nonfinancial
4

1,006.3
369.4
652.6

1,133.7
764.2

1,042.9
296.1
746.8

1,197.2
390.8
806.4

5
6
7

176.3
302.0
125.8
1,104.5
928.2
344.2
20.0
324.1
584.0
16.2
150.2
31.3
12.3
7.0
-6.7
0.2
-11.2
29.7
118.9
22.4
49.3
23.8
23.4
69.9
89.3
11.8
37.7
208.8
176.3

223.4
344.0
120.5
1,444.9

196.3
360.6
164.2

8

197.0
338.0
141.0
1,486.1
1,289.1
389.0
26.6
362.5
900.1
30.3
254.8
73.8
20.6
13.8
3.9
5.7
-17.9
47.7
181.0
28.5
70.4
45.3
36.8
97.6
113.7
21.0
77.5
305.2
197.0

1,221.5
317.4
26.9
290.6
904.1
22.4
260.7
75.4
22.8
14.5
6.7
6.7
-19.8
44.5
185.2
29.3
74.2
43.3
38.4
94.1
115.9
23.1
77.8
310.1
223.4

III
Corporate profits with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.............

Rest of the world
Receipts from the rest ot the world..................................................................................................
Less: Payments to the rest of the world...........................................................................................
Corporate profits with inventory valuation adjustment..........................................................

Domestic industries..........................................................................................................................
9
Financial..........................................................................................................................................
10
11
Federal Reserve banks................................................................................................................
12
Other financial2.
13
Nonfinancial..........
Utilities..............
14
Manufacturing....
15
Durable goods
16
Fabricated metal products...................................................................................................
17
Machinery..
18
Computer and electronic products.......................................................................................
19
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components.............................................................
20
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts.....................................................................
21
Other durable goods 3........................................................................................................
22
Nondurable goods....................................................................................................................
23
Food and beverage and tobacco products...........................................................................
24
Petroleum and coal products
25
Chemical products..............................................................................................................
26
Other nondurable goods 4...................................................................................................
27
Wholesale trade..........................................................................................................................
28
29
Retail trade ...
Transportation and warehousing.................................................................................................
30
Information ..............................................................................................................................
31
Other nonfinancial5
32
Rest of the w orld...............................................................................................................................
33

2006
IV

I

II

III
1,653.3

1,343.0
442.2
900.9

1,591.8
1,351.9
483.9
868.1

226.1
376.3
150.2

239.9
402.0
162.1

234.6
408.9
174.2

1,559.1
1,717.7
1,362.8
1,491.6
413.3
463.9
30.4
30.9
382.9
433.0
949.4
1,027.7
38.3
39.7
258.9
300.7
72.9
102.2
25.7
21.2
15.0
19.1
8.0
12.3
8.4
5.6
-18.2
-25.3
54.9
48.5
186.0
198.5
28.6
29.6
76.0
74.5
44.4
54.1
40.1
37.0
107.2
105.9
129.1
123.0
19.0
27.3
83.6
89.8
340.1
314.6
196.3
226.1

1,752.6
1,512.7
508.2
33.7
474.4
1,004.5
46.8
289.9
78.7
24.1
18.3
13.1
6.8
-25.4
41.9
211.2
29.5
92.4
53.6
35.7
98.3
121.2
38.6
85.9
323.9
239.9

1,815.8

1,418.7
474.8
943.9

1,581.1
500.1
35.8
464.3
1,081.0
52.8
331.9
115.9
24.8
18.5
13.2
10.3
-16.6
65.7
216.0
34.4
101.1
46.6
33.9
125.1
131.3
39.6
83.3
317.1
234.6

1. Consists of finance and insurance and bank and other holding companies.
2. Consists of credit intermediation and related activities; securities, commodity contracts, and other financial investments and related activities; insurance carriers and related activities; funds, trusts, and other finan­
cial vehicles; and bank and other holding companies.
3. Consists of wood products; nonmetallic mineral products; primary metals; other transportation equipment; furniture and related products; and miscellaneous manufacturing.
4. Consists of textile mills and textile product mills; apparel; leather and allied products; paper products; printing and related support activities; and plastics and rubber products.
5. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; real estate and rental and leasing; professional, scientific, and technical services; administrative and waste management services; educa­
tional services; health care and social assistance; arts, entertainment, and recreation; accommodation and food services; and other services, except government.
N ote . Estimates in this table are based on the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).




January 2007

S urvey

of

D-43

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

7. Supplemental Tables
Table 7.1. Selected Per Capita Product and Income Series in Current and
Chained Dollars

Table 7.2.1 B. Percent Change from Preceding Period in Real
Motor Vehicle Output

[Dollars]

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Current dollars:
Gross domestic product..........
Gross national product............
Personal income......................
Disposable personal income....
Personal consumption
expenditures........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Services..............................
Chained (2000) dollars:
Gross domestic product..........
Gross national product............
Disposable personal income....
Personal consumption
expenditures........................
Durable goods.....................
Nondurable goods...............
Services..............................
Population (midperiod, thousands)




Line

2006
IV

I

II

2004

2005

1
2
3
4

39,847
40,005
33,108
29,536

41,984
42,092
34,513
30,458

42,331
42,507
34,551
30,461

42,756
42,798
35,210
31,020

43,602
43,700
35,937
31,470

44,141
44,217
36,147
31,595

44,451
44,506
36,583
32,025

b
6
7
8

27,937
3,355
7,979
16,603

29,468
3,482
8,559
17,426

29,786
3,560
8,703
17,524

29,985
3,424
8,777
17,783

30,432
3,567
8,910
17,955

30,865
3,551
9,102
18,211

31,185
3,588
9,168
18,429

9
10
11

36,415
36,562
27,254

37,241
37,340
27,318

37,421
37,579
27,183

37,494
37,534
27,484

37,931
38,019
27,743

38,090
38,158
27,578

38,181
38,231
27,792

12 25,778
26,567
26,430
26,581
26,828
26,941
27,063
13
3,694
3,861
3,959
3,822
3,990
3,981
4,033
14
7,702
7,757
7,414
7,674
7,853
7,864
7,874
14,997
15
14,710
14,954
15,035
15,065
15,237
15,170
16 293,933 296,677 297,027 297,748 298,340 298,982 299,716

2005
III

III
Motor vehicle output......
Auto output...................
Truck output..................
Final sales of domestic product
Personal consumption
expenditures.......................
New motor vehicles..............
Autos.................................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks.........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............

2006
IV

I
3.8
-6.7
10.7

II
-9.4
-12.5
-7.5

III
27.4
7.3
40.3

1
2
3

3.5
-0.6
5.7

5.9
14.1
1.8

22.6
20.0
24.1

-19.1
9.4
-31.9

4

5.1

7.1

24.2

-44.1

19.9

-4.0

31.1

5
6
7

1.3
1.2
1.1

-0.5
-1.7
5.2

12.3
15.4
9.2

-40.1
-54.1
-28.5

20.7
20.6
6.1

1.0
2.1
21.6

12.3
13.0
-2.6

8

1.3

-5.8

19.5

-66.5

32.9

-10.9

26.9

9
10

1.6
-0.4

2.2
2.1

5.5
0.6

6.4
-3.8

20.8
17.9

-0.9
-1.3

11.1
4.9

11

3.8

2.4

10.7

17.5

23.7

-0.6

17.2

12
13
14
15

18.1
12.5
1.8
19.5

20.9
12.7
7.5
15.6

35.1
30.2
35.3
27.7

-11.8
-4.5
0.4
-6.9

14.2
28.9
-1.5
47.4

-16.6
-24.6
-23.5
-25.1

18.8
11.9
7.6
14.0

16
17

14.9
35.4

13.5
21.5

38.3
2.7

-16.6
23.9

59.2
21.2

-32.0
-4.7

19.9
0.8

18
19

4.3
4.3

-1.5
-0.4

20.3
17.4

12.3
26.3

62.5
14.8

-37.7
-36.1

-0.6
19.8

20

4.3

-2.6

23.2

0.0

125.3

-39.0

-16.1

21
22
23

0.6
-1.7
1.4

4.2
7.4
3.3

95.4
14.6
127.8

-34.0
-27.4
-35.7

62.1
-13.4
90.0

8.2
64.4
-2.1

11.4
-0.5
14.6

Net exports
Exports..
Autos..
Trucks
Imports..
Autos..
Trucks...............................

?4
25
26
27
28
29
30

10.8
2.9
18.3
5.0
0.2
10.3

18.6
23.0
15.0
1.0
-3.6
5.6

28.3
26.8
29.6
8.9
12.4
5.7

7.5
23.5
-4.7
25.6
22.9
28.1

30.8
36.5
25.8
23.3
11.8
34.5

-14.5
-14.9
-14.2
-6.7
-4.8
-8.2

69.6
81.3
59.3
-10.6
24.2
-34.2

Change in private inventories....
Autos........................................
New.......
Domestic...........................
Foreign..............................
Used.....
Trucks.......
New.......
Domestic...........................
Foreign..............................
Used 1.................................
Addenda:
Final sales of motor vehicles to
domestic purchasers............
Private fixed investment in new
autos and new light trucks....
Domestic output of new autos 2
Sales of imported new autos 3

31
3?
33
34
35
38
37
38
39
40
41

Private fixed investment.........
New motor vehicles..............
Autos.................................
Trucks...............................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..........
Other.............................
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks.........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............
Gross government
investment...........................
Autos....................................
Trucks....

42

4.6

4.5

19.6

-33.4

20.0

-3.8

13.9

43
44
45

8.9
-2.9
3.7

11.0
12.5
2.9

37.1
13.7
27.0

-9.9
26.1
-12.4

30.7
-1.7
-6.5

-28.7
-21.9
17.9

14.8
7.6
14.5

1. Consists of used light trucks only.
2. Consists of final sales and change in private inventories of new autos assembled in the United States.
3. Consists of personal consumption expenditures, private fixed investment, and gross government investment.

D-44

National Data

January 2007

Table 7.2.3B. Real Motor Vehicle Output, Quantity Indexes

Table 7.2.4B. Price Indexes for Motor Vehicle Output

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Motor vehicle output......
Auto output...................
Truck output..................
Final sales of domestic product
Personal consumption
expenditures.......................
New motor vehicles..............
Autos...............................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............

IV

I

II

116.260
104.537
124.609

117.341
102.738
127.804

114.487
99.360
125.338

121.621
101.135
136.403

4

121.646

113.029

118.267

117.064

125.261

b
6
7

113.606
118.040
126.304
98.182

117.472
124.212
103.256

130.742
124.076
134.944
108.266

109.174
111.062
99.558

114.425
116.382
101.054

114.718
116.974
106.108

118.101
120.591
105.401

8

152.721

143.876

160.031

121.728

130.703

126.993

134.786

9
10

102.477
92.401

104.778
94.308

103.754
93.767

105.366
92.857

110.474
96.765

110.219
96.455

113.163
97.617

11

114.716

117.501

115.875

120.631

127.222

12 89.800
13 94.384
14 85.316
15 100.250

108.561
106.399
91.722
115.885

114.416
110.980
94.880
121.391

110.868
109.710
94.982
119.228

114.600
116.892
94.629
131.380

127.035 132.180
109.501 114.308
108.923 112.018
90.134
88.508
122.206 126.268

16
17

103.588
90.592

117.601
110.045

125.979
108.496

120.404
114.464

135.256
120.090

122.829
118.653

128.535
118.901

18
19

100.182
92.732

98.660
92.350

100.708
92.135

103.676
97.672

117.049
101.093

103.996
90.369

103.849
94.538

20

108.623

105.785

110.447

110.442

135.307

119.581

21 111.690
22 94.333
23 118.269

116.428
101.294
122.206

128.760
101.898
138.799

116.072
94.066
124.313

130.972
90.752
145.957

133.593
102.756
145.172

156.912
159.191
154.709
109.052
96.653
123.581

160.763 '163705
160.873 169.585
160.371 158.442
108.677 115.048
96.340 101.435
123.134 130.993

175.063
183.291
167.800
121.243
104.294
141.060

168.320
176.051
161.487
119.170
103.020
138.060

Net experts
Exports................................
Autos................................
Trucks...............................
Imports
Autos................................
Trucks...............................

?4
2b 132.298
26 129.451
27 134.481
28 107.932
29 100.226
30 116.986

2005

1
2
3

97.041
97.161
96.815

97.656
98.771
96.914

4

96.994

b
6
7

96.006
95.842
96.022

2005
III

Motor vehicle output......
Auto output...................
Truck output..................
Final sales of domestic product
Personal consumption
expenditures.......................
New motor vehicles..............
Autos.................................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks.........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............

2006
IV

I

II

III

96.976
97.852
96.373

96.857
99.077
95.507

97.636
100.179
96.097

97.564
99.370
96.441

96.460
99.759
94.528

97.644

96.977

96.883

97.690

97.617

96.572

97.623
96.320
96.921

97.113
95.491
96.412

97.295
95.863
97.201

97.827
96.251
97.886

97.633
95.913
97.570

97.441
95.734
97.974

8

95.674

95.884

94.840

94.921

95.087

94.731

94.112

9
10

96.068
98.006

100.329
102.345

100.580
102.446

100.330
102.573

101.157
103.002

101.256
102.702

101.035
102.797

11

99.221

99.683

99.180

94.062

98.241

98.636

12 107.616
13 97.212
14 96.019
15 97.929

105.085
97.191
96.927
97.410

104.358
97.271
96.425
97.786

98.032
103.785
96.446
97.206
96.131

104.628 104.842 102.154
96.863
97.368
95.979
97.895
97.577
97.991
96.415
97.308
95.072

16
17

95.970
104.561

94.063
108.306

94.367
108.896

91.988
109.465

92.264
109.773

92.871
111.536

89.784
111.778

18
19

83.907
84.868

87.784
88.761

89.293
90.166

88.006
88.914

87.753
88.808

88.739
89.771

89.495
90.354

88.437

87.117

86.728

87.731

88.642

103.906 104.798
101.473 100.253
104.687 106.113

104.223
101.572
105.036

114.445

Private fixed investment.........
New motor vehicles..............
Autos.................................
Trucks...............................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..........
Other.............................
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks.........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............

20

82.967

86.829

137.236
102.631
150.194

Gross government investment
Autos....................................
Trucks..................................

21
22
23

101.952
99.228
102.789

103.257
99.679
104.358

103.534 103.713
99.330 101.697
104.823 104.385

192.073
204.292
181.418
115.884
108.757
124.335

Net exports..............................
Exports.................................
Autos................................
Trucks...............................
Imports.................................
Autos.................................
Trucks...............................

?4
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
3?
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

105.714
103.984
107.436
103.819
103.081
104.659

107.262
104.802
109.627
104.770
103.680
105.954

107.275
104.733
109.713
104.834
103.710
106.031

107.646
105.266
109.945
105.188
103.942
106.499

107.711
105.298
110.042
105.064
103.642
106.531

107.799
105.298
110.214
105.095
103.742
106.502

107.895
105.428
110.278
105.195
103.742
106.698

42

98.336

99.002

98.467

98.456

99.055

98.999

98.175

43
44
45

96.051
97.365
96.023

95.314
98.174
96.924

95.293
97.713
96.417

94.196
98.431
97.203

94.637
98.976
97.887

94.886
98.660
97.574

93.150
98.989
97.980

31
3?
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

Change in private inventories....
Autos........................................
New.......................................
Domestic...........................
Foreign..............................
Used....................................
Trucks......................................
New......................................
Domestic...........................
Foreign..............................
Used 1.................................

42

110.859

115.830

122.441

110.610

115.758

114.641

118.442

43
44
45

94.937
82.473
108.382

105.345
92.758
111.560

111.238
92.528
116.991

108.382
98.050
113.186

115.889
97.627
111.314

106.489
91.765
115.981

110.221
93.468
119.971

1. Consists of used light trucks only.
2. Consists of final sales and change in private inventories of new autos assembled in the United States.
3. Consists of personal consumption expenditures, private fixed investment, and gross government investment.




2004

III

118.006 122.582
101.241 102.226
130.020 137.182

Gross government investment
Autos...................................
Trucks..................................

Addenda:
Final sales of motor vehicles to
domestic purchasers............
Private fixed investment in new
autos and new light trucks....
Domestic output of new autos 2
Sales of imported new autos 3

Line

1 111.420
2
88.713
3 127.680

Private fixed investment........
New motor vehicles..............
Autos...............................
Trucks..............................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..........
Other...........................
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............

Change in private inventories....
Autos.......................................
New.....................................
Domestic..........................
Foreign.............................
Used....................................
Trucks......................................
New.....................................
Domestic..........................
Foreign.............................
Used 1.................................

Seasonally adjusted

2006

Addenda:
Final sales of motor vehicles to
domestic purchasers............
Private fixed investment in new
autos and new light trucks....
Domestic output of new autos 2
Sales of imported new autos 3

1. Consists of used light trucks only.
2. Consists of final sales and change in private inventories of new autos assembled in the United States.
3. Consists of personal consumption expenditures, private fixed investment, and gross government investment.

January 2007

Survey

of

D-45

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 7.2.5B. Motor Vehicle Output

Table 7.2.6B. Real Motor Vehicle Output, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

Line

2006
IV

394.6
130.2
264.4

420.5
151.0
269.5

433.3
151.0
282.2

411.8
156.5
255.3

418.0
155.4
262.5

408.2
149.1
259.1

428.0
152.3
275.6

Final sales of domestic product

390.6

421.0

449.4

388.1

409.5

405.0

428.7

Private fixed investment........
New motor vehicles..............
Autos...............................
Trucks...............................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..........
Other............................
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............
Gross government
investment...........................
Autos...................................
Trucks..................................

368.9
259.3
97.7

373.3
256.3
103.7

392.2
276.1
108.1

345.7
228.1
100.2

364.4
240.0
102.5

364.6
240.4
107.3

374.6
247.4
107.0

161.7

152.7

168.0

127.9

137.5

133.1

140.4

109.5
54.9

116.9
58.5

116.1
58.3

117.6
57.8

124.3
60.5

124.2
60.1

127.2
60.9

54.6

58.4

57.8

64.1

66.3

134.9
200.0
67.9
132.1

141.3
208.8
69.9
138.9

59.9
136.1
204.6
70.5
134.1

63.9

114.3
177.4
62.6
114.8

141.9
219.0
70.8
148.2

135.8
205.1
66.0
139.1

138.1
207.9
67.5
140.5

85.6
29.3

95.2
36.9

102.4
36.5

95.4
38.7

107.5
40.8

98.2
40.9

99.4
41.1

-63.1
-31.4

-65.1
-32.7

-67.5
-33.1

-68.5
-34.6

-77.1
-35.8

-69.3
-32.3

-69.8
-34.1

-31.8

-32.4

-34.4

-33.9

-41.3

-37.0

-35.7

14.1
3.2
10.9

Net exports..............................
Exports................................
Autos...............................
Trucks..............................
Imports................................
Autos...............................
Trucks..............................

-106.7
36.5
16.5

Change in private inventories....
Autos.......................................
New......................................
Domestic..........................
Foreign.............................
Used.....................................
Trucks.......................................
New.....................................
Domestic..........................
Foreign.............................
Used 1..................................

4.0
-1.5

Addenda:
Final sales of motor vehicles to
domestic purchasers............
Private fixed investment in new
autos and new light trucks....
Domestic output of new autos 2
Sales of imported new autos 3

20.1

143.2
71.7
71.5

-

2.0

- 1.1

-0.9
0.5
5.5
5.1
5.2

-

102.1

16.9
3.1
13.7

17.3
3.5
13.8

17.7
3.6
14.2

100.6

-108.7
46.0

-113.6
49.3
23.6
25.6
162.8
75.0
87.8

-112.7
47.4
22.7
24.7
160.1
74.2
85.9

-101.7
54.1
26.4
27.8
155.8
78.3
77.5

8.5
5.8
5.4
3.7
1.6
0.4
2.7

-0.8
-0.5
2.3
2.2
0.1
-2.8
-0.2
5.5
2.3
3.2
-5.8

45.1

20.6

21.8

24.4
145.6
69.4
76.3

24.2
154.7
73.2
81.5

-0.5
-0.7
0.5
0.3

-16.1
-6.9
-5.4
-4.3

0.2

- 1.1

1.2

-1.4
-9.2
-9.1
-9.9

0.8

23.6
10.6
9.7
10.0
-0.3
0.9
13.0
15.2
13.8
1.3

0.2

-

-

0.5

497.3

523.1

148.1
88.7
87.3

163.1
100.6
90.7

0.1

-

14.9
3.3
11.6

44.0
20.4
23.6
146.1
69.6
76.5

0.3
1.7
1.1
0.7
-1.5

-

16.5
3.5
13.1

14.9
3.4
11.4

2.2

2.5

3.2
-3.9
1.0
0.7
0.3
-4.9
7.1
10.7
11.9
-1.2
-3.6

550.0

496.8

523.1

517.7

530.4

172.3
99.8
94.6

165.9
106.6
92.3

178.2
106.7
91.4

164.2
100.0
94.9

166.8

-

0.1

-1.4

1.6

1. Consists of used light trucks only.
2. Consists of final sales and change in private inventories of new autos assembled in the United States.
3. Consists of personal consumption expenditures, private fixed investment, and gross government investment.




2005

2006

2005
IV

Motor vehicle output......
Auto output...................
Truck output..................
Personal consumption
expenditures.......................
New motor vehicles..............
Autos................................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............

2004

I!

102.1
98.6

Motor vehicle output......
Auto output...................
Truck output..................
Final sales of domestic product
Personal consumption
expenditures.......................
New motor vehicles..............
Autos.................................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks.........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............
Private fixed investment.........
New motor vehicles..............
Autos.................................
Trucks...............................
Light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..........
Other.............................
Net purchases of used autos
and used light trucks.........
Used autos.......................
Used light trucks (including
utility vehicles)..............

406.6
134.0
273.1

430.7
153.0
278.1

447.4
154.4
293.4

424.3
157.9
266.5

428.3
155.2
273.3

417.8
150.1
268.1

443.9
152.8
291.7

402.7

431.1

463.4

400.6

419.2

414.9

444.0

384.2
270.6
101.7

382.4
266.1
107.0

403.9
289.1
112.1

355.4
237.9
103.1

372.4
249.3
104.7

373.4
250.6
109.9

384.4
258.4
109.2

169.0

159.2

177.1

134.7

144.6

140.5

149.2

114.0
56.0

116.6
57.2

115.4
56.9

117.2
56.3

122.9
58.7

122.6
58.5

125.9
59.2

58.0

59.5

58.6

61.0

64.4

64.3

66.9

106.2
182.5
65.2
117.3

128.4
205.7
70.1
135.6

135.3
214.6
72.5
142.0

131.1
212.2
72.6
139.5

135.5
226.0
72.3
153.7

129.5

135.2
216.6
68.9
147.7

89.2
28.0

101.2
34.0

108.4
33.5

103.6
35.4

116.4
37.1

105.7
36.7

-75.2
-37.0

-74.1
-36.8

-75.6
-36.7

-77.9
-38.9

-87.9
-40.3

-78.1
-36.0

-78.0
-37.7

-38.3

-37.3

-38.9

-42.1

-40.3

15.9
3.5
12.5

-38.9
14.4
3.2
11.2

-47.7

13.8
3.2

16.2
3.1
13.1

16.5
3.5
13.0

17.0
3.5
13.5

210.6
67.6
143.0

110.6
36.8

10.6

14.4
3.5
11.0

Net exports...........................
Exports..............................
Autos..............................
Trucks...
Imports....
Autos...
Trucks...

-103.4
34.6
15.8
18.7
138.0
69.6
68.3

-98.4
41.0
19.5
21.5
139.4
67.1
72.2

-96.9
42.0
19.7
22.3
138.9
66.9
71.9

-104.3
42.8
20.7
22.0
147.1
70.4
76.5

-109.3
45.7
22.4
23.3
155.0
72.4
82.4

-108.4
44.0
21.5
22.4
152.3
71.5
80.7

-98.0
50.2
25.0
25.2
148.1
75.5
72.6

Change in private inventories..
Autos......................................
New....................................
Domestic........................
Foreign...........................
Used.................................
Trucks....................................
New...................................
Domestic........................
Foreign...........................
Used 1...............................
Residual....................................

4.0
-1.6
-2.0
-1.1
-0.9
0.6
5.1
4.3
4.4
-0.1
0.5
1.0

-0.4
-0.7
0.5
0.3
0.2
-1.3
0.3
1.5
0.9
0.6
-1.6
1.3

-15.7
-7.1
-5.4
-4.4
-1.1
-1.6
-8.5
-7.8
-8.5
0.7
-0.2
-0.2

23.4
11.2
9.9
10.4
-0.3
1.0

3.0
-4.3
1.0
0.7
0.3
-5.4
6.4
9.2
10.4
- 1.2
-3.9
3.6

0.8
-0.7
2.3
2.3
0.1
-3.1

13.2
11.9
1.3
-2.4
3.3

8.5
6.1
5.5
3.9
1.6
0.5
2.6
0.2
-1.3
1.5
2.8
2.0

505.7

528.4

558.5

504.5

528.0

522.9

540.3

154.2
91.1
90.9

171.1
102.5
93.6

180.7
102.2
98.1

176.1
108.3
94.9

188.3
107.9
93.4

173.0
101.4
97.3

179.1
103.3

Gross government investment
Autos....................................
Trucks...................................

Addenda:
Final sales of motor vehicles to
domestic purchasers...........
Private fixed investment in new
autos and new light trucks....
Domestic output of new autos 2
Sales of imported new autos 3

12.0

-

-

0.2

5.1
1.9
3.1
-6.4
4.1

100.6

1. Consists of used light trucks only.
2. Consists of final sales and change in private inventories of new autos assembled in the United States.
3. Consists of personal consumption expenditures, private fixed investment, and gross government investment.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the differ­
ence between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines, excluding the lines in the addenda.

D-46

January 2007

B. N IP A -R elated T ab le
Table B .l presents the m ost recent estimates o f personal income and its components and the disposition o f
personal income. These estimates were released on December 22, 2006.

Table B.1 Personal Income and Its Disposition
[Billions of dollars; monthly estimates seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
2005
2004

Oct.
Personal income................................................................
Compensation of employees, received.................................
Wage and salary disbursements.........................................
Private industries.............................................................
Goods-producing industries............................................
Manufacturing..............................................................
Service-producing industries...........................................
Trade, transportation, and utilities................................
Other services-producing industries.............................
Government.....................................................................
Supplements to wages and salaries....................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and
insurance funds...........................................................
Employer contributions for government social insurance
Proprietors’ income with IVA and CCAdj..............................
Farm................................................................................
Nonfarm...........................................................................

2006

2005
Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July'

Aug.r

Sept.r

Oct.r

N ov . p

9,731.4 10,239.2 10,452.6 10,472.4 10,526.1 10,664.9 10,721.9 10,777.4 10,784.3 10,795.3 10,842.2 10,906.7 10,965.3 11,021.7 11,057.4 11,091.2
6,665.3 7,030.3 7,169.6 7,173.1 7,210.6 7,342.5 7,407.2 7,451.3 7,434.9 7,406.8 7,434.7 7,484.2 7,512.4 7,557.7 7,593.7 7,620.5
5,392.1 5,664.8 5,777.3 5,776.5 5,807.2 5,919.8 5,976.6 6,013.8 5,993.6 5,963.5 5,985.7 6,026.7 6,049.1 6,087.6 6,116.7 6,137.8
4,450.3 4,687.1 4,791.8 4,788.2 4,816.6 4,924.5 4,977.9 5,013.4 4,990.4 4,958.1 4,976.4 5,012.1 5,028.6 5,061.1 5,087.7 5,105.9
1,050.8 1,101.3 1,125.9 1,121.9 1,127.0 1,164.0 1,179.5 1,188.4 1,174.3 1,170.4 1,174.2 1,179.3 1,182.7 1,184.9 1,190.5 1,191.8
704.7
719.2
688.0
711.9
713.9
734.7
744.3
749.6
736.2
730.9
731.2
734.8
736.4
736.5
739.8
739.5
3,399.5 3,585.8 3,665.9 3,666.3 3,689.6 3,760.5 3,798.4 3,825.0 3,816.1 3,787.7 3,802.2 3,832.9 3,845.9 3,876.2 3,897.2 3,914.2
899.2
937.2
951.1
954.9
958.7
975.3
984.8
990.8
992.7
987.1
992.6 1,001.5 1,001.3 1,006.3 1,009.4 1,011.9
2,500.3 2,648.5 2,714.8 2,711.4 2,730.9 2,785.3 2,813.7 2,834.2 2,823.4 2,800.6 2,809.6 2,831.4 2,844.6 2,870.0 2,887.8 2,902.2
941.8
977.7
985.5
988.3
990.6
995.3
998.7 1,000.4 1,003.2 1,005.4 1,009.2 1,014.6 1,020.5 1,026.5 1,029.0 1,031.9
1,273.2 1,365.5 1,392.2 1,396.5 1,403.4 1,422.7 1,430.7 1,437.4 1,441.3 1,443.3 1,449.0 1,457.4 1,463.3 1,470.1 1,477.1 1,482.7
866.1
407.1

933.2
432.3

951.3
441.0

956.0
440.5

960.9
442.5

967.4
455.3

971.6
459.1

975.7
461.7

981.4
460.0

985.6
457.7

990.1
458.9

995.6
461.8

1,000.2
463.1

1,004.5
465.6

1,009.5
467.5

1,013.8
468.9

911.1
36.2
874.9

970.7
30.2
940.4

993.5
29.2
964.3

995.4
28.7
966.7

1,001.4
28.1
973.2

1,006.6
24.6
982.0

1,005.7
23.9
981.8

1,012.5
23.2
989.3

1,010.1
20.5
989.6

1,014.8
17.5
997.3

1,010.7
14.6
996.1

1,009.9
17.1
992.9

1,017.2
21.5
995.7

1,017.4
26.4
991.0

1,023.2
29.2
994.0

1,024.3
30.1
994.3

Rental income of persons with CCAdj..................................

127.0

72.8

80.1

83.9

80.5

78.0

75.9

76.4

74.2

71.8

68.2

73.4

78.1

83.4

79.5

77.3

Personal income receipts on assets.....................................
Personal interest income.................................................
Personal dividend income................................................

1,427.9
890.8
537.1

1,519.4
945.0
574.4

1,561.3
968.5
592.8

1,580.3
981.8
598.5

1,599.1
994.9
604.2

1,600.8
992.0
608.8

1,602.1
989.1
613.0

1,603.9
986.2
617.8

1,625.4
1,002.7
622.7

1,647.3
1,019.2
628.2

1,670.2
1,035.6
634.6

1,676.7
1,035.7
641.0

1,683.5
1,035.8
647.7

1,690.6
1,035.9
654.6

1,701.3
1,039.7
661.6

1,712.2
1,043.4
668.8

Personal current transfer receipts.........................................
Government social benefits to persons............................
Old-age, survivors, disability, and health insurance
benefits....................................................................
Government unemployment insurance benefits...........
Other...........................................................................
Other current transfer receipts, from business (net).........
Less: Contributions for government social insurance...........

1,426.5
1,398.4

1,526.6
1,480.9

1,546.1
1,500.0

1,537.3
1,501.8

1,536.0
1,500.5

1,566.3
1,531.9

1,568.7
1,534.3

1,576.3
1,541.7

1,580.2
1,545.4

1,591.1
1,556.1

1,597.8
1,562.6

1,608.0
1,572.6

1,622.5
1,587.0

1,625.5
1,589.8

1,617.6
1,581.7

1,617.5
1,581.4

791.4
36.0
571.0
28.1
826.4

844.9
31.3
604.6
45.7
880.6

851.6
34.3
614.1
46.1
897.8

852.2
30.5
619.2
35.4
897.5

860.1
30.1
610.3
35.5
901.5

901.4
28.6
601.9
34.4
929.3

910.3
27.4
596.6
34.5
937.8

917.9
27.4
596.4
34.6
943.0

920.8
27.0
597.6
34.8
940.5

927.9
27.0
601.2
35.0
936.6

935.8
27.0
599.9
35.2
939.4

931.4
27.3
613.8
35.4
945.5

938.9
27.3
620.7
35.5
948.4

939.7
27.3
622.8
35.7
952.9

937.2
27.0
617.6
35.9
957.9

937.1
27.3
617.0
36.1
960.6

Less: Personal current taxes............................................

1,049.8

1,203.1

1,236.4

1,245.1

1,261.5

1,317.8

1,333.9

1,346.2

1,357.5

1,358.1

1,367.5

1,363.1

1,365.4

1,370.1

1,384.5

1,391.4

Equals: Disposable personal income...............................

8,681.6

9,036.1

9,216.3

9,227.3

9,264.6

9,347.1

9,388.1

9,431.3

9,426.8

9,437.2

9,474.6

9,543.5

9,599.9

9,651.6

9,672.8

9,699.8

Less: Personal outlays......................................................

8,507.2

9,070.9

9,248.1

9,253.1

9,292.5

9,371.3

9,418.6

9,465.7

9,522.3

9,587.5

9,621.2

9,696.0

9,716.0

9,718.1

8,211.5
986.3
2,345.2
4,880.1
186.0
109.7
66.8
42.9

8,742.4
1,033.1
2,539.3
5,170.0
209.4
119.2
72.0
47.1

8,911.6
996.5
2,652.1
5,263.0
215.1
121.3
73.7
47.6

8,916.4
1,023.3
2,594.2
5,299.0
214.9
121.8
74.2
47.6

8,955.5
1,039.1
2,594.1
5,322.3
214.7
122.3
74.7
47.6

9,034.4
1,069.8
2,655.7
5,308.9
216.6
120.4
75.2
45.2

9,079.2
1,055.7
2,654.5
5,369.0
218.5
120.9
75.7
45.2

9,123.8
1,066.9
2,664.5
5,392.5
220.4
121.4
76.3
45.2

9,175.2
1,064.1
2,703.9
5,407.2
221.6
125.5
76.8
48.7

9,238.6
1,057.9
2,728.3
5,452.4
222.9
126.0
77.3
48.7

9,270.5
1,063.5
2,732.0
5,475.0
224.2
126.5
77.9
48.7

9,338.9
1,085.2
2,755.9
5,497.8
229.9
127.2
78.4
48.8

9,352.6
1,068.9
2,761.1
5,522.6
235.5
127.8
79.0
48.8

9,348.5
1,072.3
2,726.2
5,550.0
241.2
128.3
79.5
48.8

9,744.3
9,374.7
1,079.1
2,711.0
5,584.6
240.7
128.9
80.1
48.8

9,794.8

Personal consumption expenditures....................................
Durable goods.................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................
Services..........................................................................
Personal interest payments' ...............................................
Personal current transfer payments.....................................
To government.................................................................
To the rest of the world (net)............................................
Equals: Personal saving...................................................

174.3

-34.8

-31.8

-25.8

-27.8

-24.2

-30.6

-34.4

-95.5

-150.3

-146.6

-152.4

-116.1

-66.5

-71.4

-95.0

Personal saving as percentage of disposable personal
income............................................................................

2.0

-0.4

-0.3

-0.3

-0.3

-0.3

-0.3

-0.4

-1.0

-1.6

-1.5

-1.6

-1.2

-0.7

-0.7

-1.0

8,253.6

9,425.2
1,091.8
2,729.2
5,604.2
240.1
129.5
80.6
48.8

Addenda:
Disposable personal income:
Billions of chained (2000) dollars2...................................
Per capita:
Current dollars.................................................................
Chained (2000 dollars)....................................................
Population (midperiod, thousands)3 ....................................

8,010.8

8,104.6

8,144.5

8,185.4

8,220.1

8,283.8

8,292.9

8,251.4

8,232.0

8,252.8

8,287.8

8,314.8

8,386.2

8,422.7

8,445.4

29,536
27,254
293,933

30,458
27,318
296,677

30,976
27,373
297,534

30,990
27,490
297,756

31,094
31,351
31,468
27,589
27,683
27,767
297,954 298,144 298,337

31,591
27,778
298,539

31,554
27,620
298,753

31,565
27,534
298,979

31,665
27,582
299,213

31,869
27,676
299,459

32,030
27,742
299,716

32,175
27,957
299,972

32,218
28,054
300,233

32,280
28,106
300,485

Personal consumption expenditures:
Billions of chained (2000) dollars.....................................
Durable goods.................................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................................
Services..........................................................................
Implicit price deflator, 2000= 100......................................

7,577.1
1,085.7
2,179.2
4,323.9
108.370

7,841.2
1,145.3
2,276.8
4,436.6
111.490

7,875.3
1,109.6
2,312.9
4,461.7
113.159

7,909.6
1,142.2
2,305.3
4,476.9
112.729

7,945.8
1,161.8
2,310.5
4,491.6
112.707

7,977.5
1,195.2
2,343.3
4,465.4
113.249

8,011.3
1,181.0
2,346.4
4,505.3
113.330

8,022.6
1,195.2
2,338.6
4,512.8
113.727

8,031.2
1,191.7
2,347.3
4,515.3
114.244

8,058.7
1,184.9
2,352.1
4,542.1
114.640

8,075.0
1,194.2
2,353.9
4,548.9
114.805

8,110.1
1,218.0
2,360.9
4,558.1
115.151

8,100.7
1,199.0
2,357.4
4,566.4
115.455

8,122.8
1,209.5
2,362.1
4,575.4
115.089

8,163.1
1,216.8
2,379.7
4,591.5
114.843

8,206.4
1,235.7
2,404.1
4,595.8
114.852

Personal income, current dollars.....................................

6.2

5.2

0.5

0.2

0.5

1.3

0.5

0.5

0.1

0.1

0.4

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.3

0.3

Disposable personal income:
Current dollars.....................................................................
Chained (2000) dollars........................................................

6.4
3.6

4.1
1.2

0.5
0.3

0.1
0.5

0.4
0.4

0.9
0.4

0.4
0.4

0.5
0.1

0.0
-0.5

0.1
-0.2

0.4
0.3

0.7
0.4

0.6
0.3

0.5
0.9

0.2
0.4

0.3
0.3

Personal consumption expenditures:
Current dollars.....................................................................
Chained (2000) dollars........................................................

6.6
3.9

6.5
3.5

0.3
0.1

0.1
0.4

0.4
0.5

0.9
0.4

0.5
0.4

0.5
0.1

0.6
0.1

0.7
0.3

0.3
0.2

0.7
0.4

0.1
-0.1

0.0
0.3

0.3
0.5

0.5
0.5

p Preliminary
r Revised
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment
IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
1. Consists of nonmortgage interest paid by households.




2. Equals disposable personal income deflated by the implicit price deflator for personal consumption expenditures,
3. Population is the total population of the United States, including the Armed Forces overseas and the institutionalized
population. The monthly estimate is the average of estimates for the first of the month and the first of the following month;
the annual estimate is the average of the monthly estimates.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.

D-47

January 2007

C. Historical Measures
This table is derived from the “Selected NIPA Tables” that are published in this issue and from the “GDP and Other
Major NIPA Series” tables that were published in the August 2006 issue. (The changes in prices are calculated from
indexes expressed to three decimal places.)
Table C.1. GDP and Other Major NIPA Aggregates— Continues
[Quarterly estimates are seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Billions of chained (2000) dollars

Year and quarter

Percent change from
preceding period

Chain-type price indexes
[2000=100]

Implicit price deflators
[2000=100]

Percent change from preceding period
Chain-type price index

Gross
domestic
product

Final sales of
domestic
product

Gross
national
product

Gross
domestic
product

Final sales of
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
purchases

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
national
product

Implicit price deflators

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
purchases

Gross
national
product

1959

....................

2,441.3

2,442.7

2,457.4

7.1

6.2

20.754

20.365

20.751

20.727

1.2

1.2

1.2

1.2

1960
1961
1962
1963
1964

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

2,501.8
2,560.0
2,715.2
2,834.0
2,998.6

2,506.8
2,566.8
2,708.5
2,830.3
2,999.9

2,519.4
2,579.3
2,736.9
2,857.2
3,023.6

2.5
2.3
6.1
4.4
5.8

2.6
2.4
5.5
4.5
6.0

21.044
21.281
21.572
21.801
22.134

20.646
20.865
21.139
21.385
21.725

21.041
21.278
21.569
21.798
22.131

21.018
21.255
21.547
21.777
22.111

1.4
1.1
1.4
1.1
1.5

1.4
1.1
1.3
1.2
1.6

1.4
1.1
1.4
1.1
1.5

1.4
1.1
1.4
1.1
1.5

1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

3,191.1
3,399.1
3,484.6
3,652.7
3,765.4

3,173.8
3,364.8
3,467.6
3,640.3
3,753.7

3,217.3
3,423.7
3,510.1
3,680.0
3,792.0

6.4
6.5
2.5
4.8
3.1

5.8
6.0
3.1
5.0
3.1

22.538
23.180
23.897
24.916
26.153

22.102
22.724
23.389
24.380
25.580

22.535
23.176
23.893
24.913
26.149

22.516
23.158
23.874
24.893
26.127

1.8
2.8
3.1
4.3
5.0

1.7
2.8
2.9
4.2
4.9

1.8
2.8
3.1
4.3
5.0

1.8
2.9
3.1
4.3
5.0

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

3,771.9
3,898.6
4,105.0
4,341.5
4,319.6

3,787.7
3,893.4
4,098.6
4,315.9
4,305.5

3,798.2
3,927.8
4,136.2
4,383.6
4,367.5

0.2
3.4
5.3
5.8
-0.5

0.9
2.8
5.3
5.3
-0.2

27.538
28.916
30.171
31.854
34.721

26.964
28.351
29.619
31.343
34.546

27.534
28.911
30.166
31.849
34.725

27.512
28.889
30.145
31.830
34.699

5.3
5.0
4.3
5.6
9.0

5.4
5.1
4.5
5.8
10.2

5.3
5.0
4.3
5.6
9.0

5.3
5.0
4.3
5.6
9.0

1975
1976
1977
1978
1979

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

4,311.2
4,540.9
4,750.5
5,015.0
5,173.4

4,352.5
4,522.3
4,721.6
4,981.6
5,161.2

4,348.4
4,585.3
4,800.3
5,064.4
5,240.1

-0.2
5.3
4.6
5.6
3.2

1.1
3.9
4.4
5.5
3.6

38.007
40.202
42.758
45.762
49.553

37.761
39.938
42.634
45.663
49.669

38.002
40.196
42.752
45.757
49.548

37.976
40.175
42.731
45.737
49.527

9.5
5.8
6.4
7.0
8.3

9.3
5.8
6.8
7.1
8.8

9.4
5.8
6.4
7.0
8.3

9.4
5.8
6.4
7.0
8.3

1980
1981
1982
1983
1984

....................
...................
....................
....................
....................

5,161.7
5,291.7
5,189.3
5,423.8
5,813.6

5,196.7
5,265.1
5,233.4
5,454.0
5,739.2

5,227.6
5,349.7
5,249.7
5,482.5
5,869.3

-0.2
2.5
-1.9
4.5
7.2

0.7
1.3
-0.6
4.2
5.2

54.062
59.128
62.738
65.214
67.664

54.876
59.896
63.296
65.515
67.822

54.043
59.119
62.726
65.207
67.655

54.015
59.095
62.699
65.184
67.631

9.1
9.4
6.1
3.9
3.8

10.5
9.1
5.7
3.5
3.5

9.1
9.4
6.1
4.0
3.8

9.1
9.4
6.1
4.0
3.8

1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

6,053.7
6,263.6
6,475.1
6,742.7
6,981.4

6,042.1
6,271.8
6,457.2
6,734.5
6,962.2

6,093.4
6,290.6
6,500.9
6,775.2
7,015.4

4.1
3.5
3.4
4.1
3.5

5.3
3.8
3.0
4.3
3.4

69.724
71.269
73.204
75.706
78.569

69.760
71.338
73.527
76.043
78.934

69.713
71.250
73.196
75.694
78.556

69.695
71.227
73.181
75.679
78.549

3.0
2.2
2.7
3.4
3.8

2.9
2.3
3.1
3.4
3.8

3.0
2.2
2.7
3.4
3.8

3.1
2.2
2.7
3.4
3.8

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

7,112.5
7,100.5
7,336.6
7,532.7
7,835.5

7,108.5
7,115.0
7,331.1
7,522.3
7,777.8

7,155.2
7,136.8
7,371.8
7,568.6
7,864.2

1.9
-0.2
3.3
2.7
4.0

2.1
0.1
3.0
2.6
3.4

81.614
84.457
86.402
88.390
90.265

82.144
84.836
86.828
88.730
90.583

81.590
84.444
86.385
88.381
90.259

81.589
84.440
86.375
88.382
90.262

3.9
3.5
2.3
2.3
2.1

4.1
3.3
2.3
2.2
2.1

3.9
3.5
2.3
2.3
2.1

3.9
3.5
2.3
2.3
2.1

1995
1996
1997
1998
1999

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

8,031.7
8,328.9
8,703.5
9,066.9
9,470.3

8,010.2
8,306.5
8,636.6
8,997.6
9,404.0

8,069.8
8,365.3
8,737.5
9,088.7
9,504.7

2.5
3.7
4.5
4.2
4.5

3.0
3.7
4.0
4.2
4.5

92.115
93.859
95.415
96.475
97.868

92.483
94.145
95.440
96.060
97.556

92.106
93.852
95.414
96.472
97.868

92.114
93.863
95.420
96.475
97.869

2.0
1.9
1.7
1.1
1.4

2.1
1.8
1.4
0.6
1.6

2.0
1.9
1.7
1.1
1.4

2.1
1.9
1.7
1.1
1.4

2000
2001
2002
2003
2004

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

9,817.0
9,890.7
10,048.8
10,301.0
10,703.5

9,760.5
9,920.9
10,036.5
10,285.1
10,648.3

9,855.9
9,933.6
10,079.0
10,355.3
10,746.8

3.7
0.8
1.6
2.5
3.9

3.8
1.6
1.2
2.5
3.5

100.000
102.402
104.193
106.409
109.429

100.000
101.994
103.583
105.966
109.210

100.000
102.399
104.187
106.404
109.426

100.000
102.396
104.179
106.396
109.416

2.2
2.4
1.7
2.1
2.8

2.5
2.0
1.6
2.3
3.1

2.2
2.4
1.7
2.1
2.8

2.2
2.4
1.7
2.1
2.8

2005

....................

11,048.6

11,025.2

11,077.9

3.2

3.5

112.744

112.981

112.737

112.726

3.0

3.5

3.0

3.0




D-48

National Data

January 2007

Table C.1. GDP and Other Major NIPA Aggregates— Continues
[Quarterly estimates are seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Billions of chained (2000) dollars

Year and quarter

Percent change from
preceding period

Chain-type price indexes
[2000=100]

Implicit price deflators
[2000=100]

Percent change from preceding period
Chain-type price index

Gross
domestic
product

Final sales of
domestic
product

Gross
national
product

Gross
domestic
product

Final sales of
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
purchases

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
national
product

Implicit price deflators

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
purchases

Gross
national
product

V.

2.392.9
2,455.8
2,453.9
2,462.6

2,396.9
2,440.3
2,471.1
2,462.3

2,408.1
2,471.1
2,470.3
2,479.8

7.9
10.9
-0.3
1.4

8.1
7.4
5.1
-1.4

20.680
20.711
20.770
20.853

20.296
20.326
20.379
20.460

20.704
20.704
20.753
20.840

20.680
20.681
20.730
20.817

1.8
0.6
1.1
1.6

2.1
0.6
1.0
1.6

0.9
0.0
1.0
1.7

0.9
0.0
1.0
1.7

Il"
V.

2,517.4
2,504.8
2,508.7
2,476.2

2,488.1
2,511.5
2,507.9
2,519.8

2,534.1
2,521.8
2,526.5
2,494.9

9.2
-2.0
0.6
-5.1

4.3
3.8
-0.6
1.9

20.903
20.995
21.093
21.186

20.505
20.598
20.694
20.787

20.931
21.004
21.084
21.146

20.909
20.982
21.061
21.122

1.0
1.8
1.9
1.8

0.9
1.8
1.9
1.8

1.8
1.4
1.5
1.2

1.8
1.4
1.5
1.2

Il"
V.

2,491.2
2,538.0
2,579.1
2,631.8

2,522.0
2,549.1
2,568.9
2,627.3

2,510.8
2,556.7
2,598.3
2,651.4

2.4
7.7
6.6
8.4

0.4
4.4
3.1
9.4

21.210
21.249
21.305
21.360

20.807
20.831
20.887
20.933

21.192
21.237
21.303
21.375

21.169
21.214
21.280
21.352

0.5
0.7
1.1
1.0

0.4
0.5
1.1
0.9

0.9
0.9
1.2
1.4

0.9
0.9
1.3
1.4

IL
V.

2,679.1
2,708.4
2,733.3
2,740.0

2,659.5
2,704.5
2,725.6
2,744.5

2,698.6
2,729.7
2,754.8
2,764.5

7.4
4.4
3.7
1.0

5.0
6.9
3.2
2.8

21.482
21.538
21.596
21.671

21.041
21.109
21.163
21.241

21.501
21.533
21.585
21.653

21.479
21.511
21.564
21.632

2.3
1.0
1.1
1.4

2.1
1.3
1.0
1.5

2.4
0.6
1.0
1.3

2.4
0.6
1.0
1.3

IL
V,

2,775.9
2,810.6
2,863.5
2,885.8

2,762.8
2,809.7
2,859.4
2,889.5

2,799.4
2,833.3
2,886.6
2,909.6

5.3
5.1
7.7
3.1

2.7
7.0
7.3
4.3

21.732
21.754
21.794
21.923

21.308
21.335
21.382
21.514

21.702
21.745
21.788
21.951

21.681
21.724
21.768
21.930

1.1
0.4
0.7
2.4

1.3
0.5
0.9
2.5

0.9
0.8
0.8
3.0

0.9
0.8
0.8
3.0

II".
V.

2,950.5
2,984.8
3,025.5
3,033.6

2,952.7
2,988.1
3,025.4
3,033.2

2,976.3
3,009.6
3,051.1
3,057.5

9.3
4.7
5.6
1.1

9.0
4.9
5.1
1.0

22.001
22.073
22.180
22.282

21.596
21.674
21.769
21.860

22.016
22.073
22.160
22.270

21.995
22.053
22.140
22.250

1.4
1.3
2.0
1.9

1.5
1.5
1.8
1.7

1.2
1.0
1.6
2.0

1.2
1.1
1.6
2.0

II".
V.

3,108.2
3,150.2
3,214.1
3,291.8

3,081.0
3,136.6
3,195.5
3,282.4

3,135.2
3,178.0
3,240.0
3,315.7

10.2
5.5
8.4
10.0

6.5
7.4
7.7
11.3

22.380
22.479
22.578
22.717

21.940
22.037
22.140
22.292

22.383
22.480
22.563
22.707

22.363
22.460
22.544
22.688

1.8
1.8
1.8
2.5

1.5
1.8
1.9
2.8

2.0
1.7
1.5
2.6

2.0
1.7
1.5
2.6

Il"
V.

3,372.3
3,384.0
3,406.3
3,433.7

3,337.0
3,352.4
3,380.2
3,389.6

3,396.9
3,408.7
3,430.4
3,458.9

10.1
1.4
2.7
3.3

6.8
1.9
3.4
1.1

22.857
23.071
23.293
23.498

22.416
22.629
22.831
23.018

22.855
23.048
23.291
23.505

22.837
23.029
23.272
23.486

2.5
3.8
3.9
3.6

2.2
3.9
3.6
3.3

2.6
3.4
4.3
3.7

2.7
3.4
4.3
3.7

Il”
V.

3,464.1
3,464.3
3,491.8
3,518.2

3,424.2
3,460.2
3,477.8
3,508.2

3,489.0
3,488.5
3,518.5
3,544.1

3.6
0.0
3.2
3.1

4.1
4.3
2.0
3.5

23.611
23.759
23.977
24.242

23.109
23.254
23.469
23.723

23.612
23.741
23.975
24.241

23.593
23.722
23.955
24.221

1.9
2.5
3.7
4.5

1.6
2.5
3.7
4.4

1.8
2.2
4.0
4.5

1.8
2.2
4.0
4.5

Il"
V.

3,590.7
3,651.6
3,676.5
3,692.0

3,581.7
3,617.7
3,669.4
3,692.2

3,617.2
3,678.7
3,704.4
3,719.6

8.5
7.0
2.7
1.7

8.6
4.1
5.8
2.5

24.503
24.777
25.017
25.367

23.979
24.230
24.483
24.826

24.506
24.763
25.008
25.362

24.487
24.743
24.988
25.342

4.4
4.5
3.9
5.7

4.4
4.3
4.2
5.7

4.4
4.3
4.0
5.8

4.5
4.2
4.0
5.8

Il"
V.

3,750.2
3,760.9
3,784.2
3,766.3

3,730.5
3,748.6
3,767.6
3,768.1

3,778.0
3,787.7
3,810.0
3,792.1

6.5
1.1
2.5
-1.9

4.2
2.0
2.0
0.1

25.622
25.966
26.345
26.678

25.062
25.402
25.764
26.093

25.626
25.958
26.332
26.675

25.605
25.937
26.310
26.652

4.1
5.5
6.0
5.2

3.9
5.5
5.8
5.2

4.2
5.3
5.9
5.3

4.2
5.3
5.9
5.3

Il"
V.

3,760.0
3,767.1
3,800.5
3,759.8

3,778.0
3,771.0
3,804.6
3,797.2

3,786.3
3,794.3
3,827.4
3,784.5

-0.7
0.8
3.6
-4.2

1.1
-0.7
3.6
-0.8

27.051
27.437
27.655
28.009

26,474
26.841
27.093
27.449

27.056
27.428
27.647
28.004

27.034
27.406
27.624
27.982

5.7
5.8
3.2
5.2

6.0
5.7
3.8
5.4

5.8
5.6
3.2
5.3

5.9
5.6
3.2
5.3

Il"
V.

3,864.1
3,885.9
3,916.7
3,927.9

3,844.7
3,871.3
3,905.2
3,952.5

3,893.1
3,916.4
3,944.4
3,957.1

11.6
2.3
3.2
1.1

5.1
2.8
3.5
4.9

28.429
28.809
29.097
29.329

27.854
28.230
28.539
28.779

28.425
28.798
29.089
29.322

28.403
28.777
29.069
29.300

6.1
5.5
4.1
3.2

6.0
5.5
4.5
3.4

6.2
5.4
4.1
3.2

6.2
5.4
4.1
3.2

Il"
V.

3,997.7
4,092.1
4,131.1
4,198.7

4,006.9
4,073.0
4,109.6
4,204.8

4,028.1
4,122.1
4,163.5
4,231.0

7.3
9.8
3.9
6.7

5.6
6.8
3.6
9.6

29.814
29.989
30.264
30.620

29.234
29.437
29.728
30.078

29.781
29.959
30.250
30.652

29.759
29.937
30.229
30.631

6.8
2.4
3.7
4.8

6.5
2.8
4.0
4.8

6.4
2.4
3.9
5.4

6.4
2.4
4.0
5.4

Il"
V.

4,305.3
4,355.1
4,331.9
4,373.3

4,296.4
4,317.4
4,322.6
4,327.3

4,342.5
4,394.6
4,377.8
4,419.5

10.6
4.7
-2.1
3.9

9.0
2.0
0.5
0.4

31.025
31.542
32.147
32.703

30.478
31.052
31.625
32.218

31.020
31.500
32.114
32.750

31.000
31.481
32.095
32.731

5.4
6.8
7.9
7.1

5.4
7.7
7.6
7.7

4.9
6.3
8.0
8.2

4.9
6.4
8.0
8.2

Il"
V.

4,335.4
4,347.9
4,305.8
4,288.9

4,322.7
4,328.7
4,316.3
4,254.5

4,389.4
4,399.1
4,352.4
4,329.3

-3.4
1.2
-3.8
-1.6

-0.4
0.6
-1.1
-5.6

33.371
34.110
35.164
36.240

33.068
34.007
35.045
36.062

33.376
34.162
35.166
36.218

33.354
34.137
35.141
36.188

8.4
9.2
12.9
12.8

11.0
11.9
12.8
12.1

7.9
9.8
12.3
12.5

7.8
9.7
12.3
12.5

Il"
V.

4,237.6
4,268.6
4,340.9
4,397.8

4,287.8
4,331.0
4,370.1
4,421.1

4,271.5
4,302.8
4,377.7
4,441.7

-4.7
3.0
6.9
5.4

3.2
4.1
3.7
4.8

37.077
37.622
38.324
39.005

36.849
37.412
38.060
38.724

37.050
37.614
38.313
38.987

37.022
37.586
38.288
38.961

9.6
6.0
7.7
7.3

9.0
6.3
7.1
7.2

9.5
6.2
7.6
7.2

9.5
6.2
7.7
7.2

1959:

1960:

1961:

1962:

1963:

1964:

1965:

1966:

1967:

1968:

1969:

1970:

1971:

1972:

1973:

1974:

1975:




January 2007

Survey

of

D-49

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table C.1. GDP and Other Major NIPA Aggregates— Continues
[Quarterly estimates are seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Billions of chained (2000) dollars

Year and quarter

Chain-type price indexes
[2000=100]

Percent change from
preceding period

Implicit price deflators
[2000=100]

Percent change from preceding period
Chain-type price index

Gross
domestic
product

Final sales of
domestic
product

Gross
national
product

Gross
domestic
product

Final sales of
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
purchases

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
national
product

Implicit price deflators

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
purchases

Gross
national
product

1976:

I ...................
II..................
Ill.................
IV.................

4,496.8
4,530.3
4,552.0
4,584.6

4,482.1
4,496.3
4,523.7
4,587.1

4,539.3
4.574.6
4.596.7
4,630.4

9.3
3.0
1.9
2.9

5.6
1.3
2.5
5.7

39.443
39.866
40.405
41.096

39.163
39.595
40.168
40.828

39.418
39.840
40.385
41.122

39.396
39.818
40.365
41.101

4.6
4.4
5.5
7.0

4.6
4.5
5.9
6.7

4.5
4.4
5.6
7.5

4.5
4.4
5.6
7.5

1977:

I ...................
II
II I
I V

4.640.0
4.731.1
4,815.8
4,815.3

4,631.5
4,705.5
4,755.2
4,794.1

4,692.2
4.782.3
4.866.4
4.860.4

4.9
8.1
7.4
0.0

3.9
6.5
4.3
3.3

41.781
42.452
43.036
43.762

41.591
42.306
42.950
43.688

41.796
42.401
42.917
43.852

41.773
42.381
42.899
43.831

6.8
6.6
5.6
6.9

7.7
7.1
6.2
7.1

6.7
5.9
5.0
9.0

6.7
6.0
5.0
9.0

1978:

I ...................
II..................
II I
I V

4,830.8
5,021.2
5,070.7
5,137.4

4,799.5
4,989.9
5,036.0
5,100.6

4,882.9
5,064.7
5,118.2
5,191.9

1.3
16.7
4.0
5.4

0.5
16.8
3.7
5.2

44.493
45.350
46.133
47.074

44.410
45.266
46.048
46.928

44.505
45.321
46.072
47.047

44.483
45.301
46.052
47.027

6.9
7.9
7.1
8.4

6.8
7.9
7.1
7.9

6.1
7.5
6.8
8.7

6.1
7.6
6.8
8.7

1979:

I ...................
I I
II I
IV.................

5,147.4
5.152.3
5.189.4
5,204.7

5.117.8
5.117.9
5,192.3
5.216.9

5,203.1
5,214.9
5,263.8
5,278.6

0.8
0.4
2.9
1.2

1.4
0.0
5.9
1.9

47.929
49.092
50.102
51.088

47.828
49.044
50.289
51.515

47.876
49.058
50.115
51.117

47.857
49.034
50.093
51.093

7.5
10.1
8.5
8.1

7.9
10.6
10.5
10.1

7.2
10.2
8.9
8.2

7.2
10.2
8.9
8.2

1980:

I ...................
II..................
Ill.................
IV.................

5,221.3
5,115.9
5,107.4
5,202.1

5,227.3
5,126.2
5,193.5
5,239.7

5,296.5
5.185.5
5,173.0
5.255.6

1.3
-7.8
-0.7
7.6

0.8
-7.5
5.4
3.6

52.209
53.362
54.572
56.105

52.930
54.220
55.446
56.907

52.195
53.349
54.560
56.071

52.172
53.324
54.534
56.043

9.1
9.1
9.4
11.7

11.4
10.1
9.4
11.0

8.7
9.1
9.4
11.5

8.7
9.1
9.4
11.5

1981:

I ...................
II..................
Ill.................
IV.................

5,307.5
5,266.1
5,329.8
5,263.4

5,261.7
5,272.8
5,278.5
5,247.4

5,364.5
5.319.8
5.386.8
5,327.3

8.4
-3.1
4.9
-4.9

1.7
0.8
0.4
-2.3

57.566
58.582
59.661
60.704

58.397
59.434
60.355
61.400

57.517
58.598
59.641
60.729

57.492
58.571
59.616
60.706

10.8
7.2
7.6
7.2

10.9
7.3
6.3
7.1

10.7
7.7
7.3
7.5

10.8
7.7
7.3
7.5

1982:

I ...................
II..................
Ill.................
IV.................

5,177.1
5,204.9
5,185.2
5,189.8

5,232.9
5,230.5
5,196.6
5,273.3

5,237.7
5,272.8
5,242.9
5,245.3

-6.4
2.2
-1.5
0.4

-1.1
-0.2
-2.6
6.0

61.563
62.330
63.193
63.866

62.213
62.883
63.717
64.372

61.555
62.302
63.182
63.863

61.530
62.276
63.155
63.837

5.8
5.1
5.7
4.3

5.4
4.4
5.4
4.2

5.6
4.9
5.8
4.4

5.5
4.9
5.8
4.4

1983:

I ...................
I I
II I
IV.................

5,253.8
5.372.3
5.478.4
5,590.5

5,329.2
5,404.6
5,505.1
5,577.0

5,308.8
5,430.9
5,538.0
5,652.4

5.0
9.3
8.1
8.4

4.3
5.8
7.7
5.3

64.413
64.881
65.542
66.020

64.768
65.213
65.849
66.231

64.388
64.853
65.517
66.012

64.363
64.831
65.495
65.991

3.5
2.9
4.1
2.9

2.5
2.8
4.0
2.3

3.3
2.9
4.2
3.1

3.3
2.9
4.2
3.1

1984:

I ...................
II..................
Ill.................
IV.................

5.699.8
5.797.9
5,854.3
5,902.4

5.614.4
5.717.5
5,770.2
5,854.6

5,757.1
5,855.5
5,911.3
5,953.2

8.1
7.1
3.9
3.3

2.7
7.5
3.7
6.0

66.838
67.439
67.989
68.392

67.052
67.647
68.114
68.476

66.837
67.414
67.953
68.385

66.815
67.392
67.930
68.359

5.0
3.6
3.3
2.4

5.1
3.6
2.8
2.1

5.1
3.5
3.2
2.6

5.1
3.5
3.2
2.6

1985:

I ...................
II
II I
IV.................

5,956.9
6,007.8
6,101.7
6,148.6

5,953.0
5,998.5
6,095.8
6,121.2

5.997.4
6,050.8
6.137.4
6,188.2

3.8
3.5
6.4
3.1

6.9
3.1
6.6
1.7

69.180
69.542
69.876
70.299

69.137
69.537
69.907
70.459

69.155
69.550
69.838
70.289

69.127
69.529
69.827
70.276

4.7
2.1
1.9
2.4

3.9
2.3
2.1
3.2

4.6
2.3
1.7
2.6

4.6
2.3
1.7
2.6

1986:

I ...................
II..................
Ill.................
IV.................

6.207.4
6,232.0
6,291.7
6.323.4

6,184.1
6,230.5
6,317.8
6,355.0

6,242.5
6.257.3
6,320.1
6,342.8

3.9
1.6
3.9
2.0

4.2
3.0
5.7
2.4

70.660
71.001
71.455
71.960

70.851
70.985
71.493
72.025

70.652
71.015
71.426
71.893

70.635
70.993
71.401
71.866

2.1
1.9
2.6
2.9

2.2
0.8
2.9
3.0

2.1
2.1
2.3
2.6

2.1
2.0
2.3
2.6

1987:

I ...................
II
II I
I V

6.365.0
6.435.0
6,493.4
6,606.8

6.344.4
6.431.4
6,510.8
6.542.5

6.386.8
6.461.8
6,519.5
6,635.4

2.7
4.5
3.7
7.2

-0.7
5.6
5.0
2.0

72.514
72.904
73.450
73.948

72.728
73.229
73.819
74.332

72.487
72.882
73.425
73.958

72.465
72.870
73.412
73.944

3.1
2.2
3.0
2.7

4.0
2.8
3.3
2.8

3.3
2.2
3.0
2.9

3.4
2.3
3.0
2.9

1988:

1...................
II..................
Ill.................
IV.................

6,639.1
6,723.5
6,759.4
6,848.6

6,637.2
6,716.4
6,749.5
6,835.1

6,675.0
6,756.2
6.788.9
6.880.9

2.0
5.2
2.1
5.4

5.9
4.9
2.0
5.2

74.564
75.296
76.178
76.786

74.975
75.706
76.406
77.086

74.587
75.300
76.141
76.712

74.571
75.285
76.124
76.700

3.4
4.0
4.8
3.2

3.5
4.0
3.8
3.6

3.4
3.9
4.5
3.0

3.4
3.9
4.5
3.1

1989:

1...................
II
II I
I V

6,918.1
6,963.5
7,013.1
7,030.9

6.873.3
6,933.6
7.015.3
7,026.8

6.950.1
6,993.9
7.046.2
7,071.4

4.1
2.6
2.9
1.0

2.3
3.6
4.8
0.7

77.588
78.342
78.913
79.433

77.937
78.764
79.227
79.807

77.580
78.324
78.879
79.425

77.566
78.316
78.875
79.422

4.2
3.9
2.9
2.7

4.5
4.3
2.4
3.0

4.6
3.9
2.9
2.8

4.6
3.9
2.9
2.8

1990:

1...................
II
II I
IV.................
1...................
II
II I
IV.................

7,112.1
7,130.3
7,130.8
7,076.9

7,110.6
7,103.8
7.118.3
7.101.3

7.150.0
7.169.9
7.163.9
7.137.1

4.7
1.0
0.0
-3.0

4.9
-0.4
0.8
-1.0

80.389
81.326
82.053
82.689

80.878
81.629
82.531
83.536

80.375
81.311
82.031
82.646

80.376
81.301
82.028
82.652

4.9
4.7
3.6
3.1

5.5
3.8
4.5
5.0

4.9
4.7
3.6
3.0

4.9
4.7
3.6
3.1

7,040.8
7,086.5
7,120.7
7,154.1

7.071.5
7,120.2
7.134.6
7,133.8

7.087.0
7.119.1
7,149.3
7,191.8

-2.0
2.6
1.9
1.9

-1.7
2.8
0.8
0.0

83.662
84.194
84.772
85.200

84.197
84.533
85.058
85.556

83.626
84.165
84.762
85.206

83.623
84.164
84.758
85.202

4.8
2.6
2.8
2.0

3.2
1.6
2.5
2.4

4.8
2.6
2.9
2.1

4.8
2.6
2.9
2.1

1991:




D-50

National Data

January 2007

Table C.1. GDP and Other Major NIPA Aggregates— Table Ends
[Quarterly estimates are seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Billions of chained (2000) dollars

Year and quarter

1992:

Percent change from
preceding period

Chain-type price indexes
[2000=100]

Implicit price deflators
[2000=100]

Percent change from preceding period
Chain-type price index

Gross
domestic
product

Final sales of
domestic
product

Gross
national
product

Gross
domestic
product

Final sales of
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
purchases

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
national
product

Implicit price deflators

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
product

Gross
domestic
purchases

Gross
national
product

V.

7,228.2
7,297.9
7,369.5
7,450.7

7,239.3
7,284.3
7,360.5
7,440.3

7,265.5
7,334.5
7,402.6
7,485.0

4.2
3.9
4.0
4.5

6.0
2.5
4.2
4.4

85.766
86.212
86.587
87.042

86.093
86.588
87.098
87.531

85.721
86.190
86.580
87.029

85.710
86.181
86.567
87.019

2.7
2.1
1.8
2.1

2.5
2.3
2.4
2.0

2.4
2.2
1.8
2.1

2.4
2.2
1.8
2.1

if
V.

7,459.7
7,497.5
7,536.0
7,637.4

7,431.2
7,483.7
7,540.6
7,633.7

7,502.4
7,532.8
7,577.7
7,661.5

0.5
2.0
2.1
5.5

-0.5
2.9
3.1
5.0

87.729
88.204
88.599
89.030

88.076
88.595
88.916
89.331

87.707
88.190
88.570
89.038

87.705
88.189
88.574
89.048

3.2
2.2
1.8
2.0

2.5
2.4
1.5
1.9

3.2
2.2
1.7
2.1

3.2
2.2
1.8
2.2

II.
V.

7,715.1
7,815.7
7,859.5
7,951.6

7,677.5
7,737.2
7,814.3
7,882.3

7,747.2
7,843.7
7,886.8
7,979.2

4.1
5.3
2.3
4.8

2.3
3.1
4.0
3.5

89.598
89.980
90.525
90.958

89.800
90.271
90.921
91.340

89.578
89.954
90.530
90.952

89.583
89.963
90.527
90.953

2.6
1.7
2.4
1.9

2.1
2.1
2.9
1.9

2.4
1.7
2.6
1.9

2.4
1.7
2.5
1.9

7,973.7
7,988.0
8,053.1
8,112.0

7,918.7
7,962.3
8,055.0
8,104.8

8,014.3
8,032.0
8,081.0
8,152.0

1.1
0.7
3.3
3.0

1.9
2.2
4.7
2.5

91.554
91.891
92.281
92.734

91.877
92.329
92.662
93.065

91.530
91.859
92.289
92.733

91.534
91.868
92.299
92.743

2.6
1.5
1.7
2.0

2.4
2.0
1.5
1.8

2.6
1.4
1.9
1.9

2.6
1.5
1.9
1.9

8,169.2
8,303.1
8,372.7
8,470.6

8,175.4
8,285.8
8,319.9
8,444.7

8,213.3
8,337.6
8,402.7
8,507.6

2.9
6.7
3.4
4.8

3.5
5.5
1.7
6.1

93.302
93.615
94.064
94.455

93.602
93.897
94.286
94.796

93.328
93.659
93.951
94.450

93.338
93.671
93.962
94.458

2.5
1.3
1.9
1.7

2.3
1.3
1.7
2.2

2.6
1.4
1.3
2.1

2.6
1.4
1.2
2.1

8,536.1
8,665.8
8,773.7
8,838.4

8,507.3
8,574.6
8,705.7
8,758.6

8,566.0
8,707.0
8,808.7
8,868.1

3.1
6.2
5.1
3.0

3.0
3.2
6.3
2.5

94.963
95.291
95.541
95.864

95.189
95.296
95.494
95.781

95.054
95.206
95.534
95.846

95.058
95.212
95.542
95.851

2.2
1.4
1.1
1.4

1.7
0.5
0.8
1.2

2.6
0.6
1.4
1.3

2.6
0.6
1.4
1.3

8,936.2
8,995.3
9,098.9
9,237.1

8,821.1
8,948.7
9,038.4
9,182.2

8,965.5
9,022.2
9,112.2
9,255.2

4.5
2.7
4.7
6.2

2.9
5.9
4.1
6.5

96.096
96.284
96.620
96.901

95.773
95.881
96.141
96.444

96.089
96.249
96.600
96.934

96.091
96.254
96.604
96.932

1.0
0.8
1.4
1.2

0.0
0.5
1.1
1.3

1.0
0.7
1.5
1.4

1.0
0.7
1.5
1.4

9,315.5
9,392.6
9,502.2
9,671.1

9,239.7
9,353.7
9,453.5
9,569.3

9,346.7
9,429.1
9,532.7
9,710.4

3.4
3.4
4.8
7.3

2.5
5.0
4.3
5.0

97.274
97.701
98.022
98.475

96.761
97.317
97.790
98.356

97.328
97.674
98.013
98.432

97.330
97.675
98.014
98.433

1.5
1.8
1.3
1.9

1.3
2.3
2.0
2.3

1.6
1.4
1.4
1.7

1.7
1.4
1.4
1.7

9,695.6
9,847.9
9,836.6
9,887.7

9,668.8
9,748.4
9,780.4
9,844.3

9,729.0
9,885.3
9,867.8
9,941.6

1.0
6.4
-0.5
2.1

4.2
3.3
1.3
2.6

99.292
99.780
100.241
100.687

99.275
99.714
100.283
100.727

99.317
99.745
100.259
100.666

99.311
99.741
100.262
100.672

3.4
2.0
1.9
1.8

3.8
1.8
2.3
1.8

3.6
1.7
2.1
1.6

3.6
1.7
2.1
1.6

9,875.6
9,905.9
9,871.1
9,910.0

9,883.2
9,908.7
9,899.9
9,992.3

9,913.6
9,949.8
9,887.7
9,983.1

-0.5
1.2
-1.4
1.6

1.6
1.0
-0.4
3.8

101.507
102.290
102.690
103.122

101.403
101.974
102.223
102.378

101.478
102.252
102.675
103.191

101.480
102.248
102.671
103.183

3.3
3.1
1.6
1.7

2.7
2.3
1.0
0.6

3.3
3.1
1.7
2.0

3.2
3.1
1.7
2.0

9,977.3
10,031.6
10,090.7
10,095.8

9,986.8
10,028.4
10,063.5
10,067.3

10,004.1
10,048.6
10,119.7
10,143.8

2.7
2.2
2.4
0.2

-0.2
1.7
1.4
0.1

103.553
103.944
104.347
104.926

102.755
103.385
103.816
104.374

103.568
103.938
104.328
104.907

103.552
103.928
104.321
104.903

1.7
1.5
1.6
2.2

1.5
2.5
1.7
2.2

1.5
1.4
1.5
2.2

1.4
1.5
1.5
2.3

10,126.0
10,212.7
10,398.7
10,467.0

10,100.9
10,213.7
10,385.9
10,440.0

10,163.8
10,266.9
10,449.9
10,540.5

1.2
3.5
7.5
2.7

1.3
4.5
6.9
2.1

105.742
106.076
106.616
107.204

105.435
105.587
106.170
106.671

105.724
106.062
106.611
107.190

105.718
106.053
106.602
107.180

3.1
1.3
2.1
2.2

4.1
0.6
2.2
1.9

3.2
1.3
2.1
2.2

3.1
1.3
2.1
2.2

10,566.3
10,671.5
10,753.3
10,822.9

10,528.7
10,596.1
10,700.1
10,768.2

10,632.2
10,709.4
10,796.3
10,849.3

3.9
4.0
3.1
2.6

3.4
2.6
4.0
2.6

108.190
109.172
109.744
110.610

107.803
108.880
109.588
110.567

108.183
109.162
109.728
110.601

108.177
109.154
109.717
110.592

3.7
3.7
2.1
3.2

4.3
4.1
2.6
3.6

3.8
3.7
2.1
3.2

3.8
3.7
2.1
3.2

V.

10,913.8
11,001.8
11,115.1
11,163.8

10,856.5
11,005.3
11,123.5
11,115.5

10,946.0
11,028.2
11,162.0
11,175.6

3.4
3.3
4.2
1.8

3.3
5.6
4.4
-0.3

111.558
112.229
113.139
114.048

111.449
112.362
113.572
114.541

111.539
112.219
113.121
114.034

111.525
112.209
113.113
114.025

3.5
2.4
3.3
3.3

3.2
3.3
4.4
3.5

3.4
2.5
3.3
3.3

3.4
2.5
3.3
3.3

if

11,316.4
11,388.1
11,443.5

11,269.0
11,328.0
11,381.6

11,342.7
11,408.5
11,458.5

5.6
2.6
2.0

5.6
2.1
1.9

114.967
115.905
116.446

115.313
116.455
117.080

114.951
115.887
116.420

114.942
115.879
116.414

3.3
3.3
1.9

2.7
4.0
2.2

3.3
3.3
1.9

3.3
3.3
1.9

1993:

1994:

1995:
if

V.
1996:
if

V.
1997:
if

V.
1998:
if

V.
1999:
if

V.

2000:
if

V.

2001:
if

V.
2002:
if

V.
2003:
if

V.
2004:
if

V.
2005:
if

2006:




D-51

January 2007

D. C harts
The percent changes shown are based on quarter-to-quarter changes and are expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates.
The levels o f series are also expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates as appropriate.

SELECTED NIPA SERIES
Chained (2000) dollars
40,000

40,000

35,000-

-35,000

30,000-

-30,000

25,000-

-25,000

20 ,0 0 0 -

-

15,000-

-15,000

20,000

10,000

10,000

Percer‘
20

59

61

63

65

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




67

69

71

73

75

77

79

81

83

85

87

89

91

93

95

97

99

01

03

05

D-52

National Data

January 2007

SELECTED NIPA SERIES
P ercent
Apr Feb

Dec Nov

Nov

Mar

Jan Jly Jly

Nov

Jly Mar

Mar Nov

SHARES OF FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RECEIPTS

50 _

- 50

Personal current taxes

\

40 _

I

I

I

M-ss&L

*

\

V

A

w

a

I I —
v-

a

.........

v " -

- 40

-----------------

Contributions for government social insurance

30-

2 0 -

v

- 30

•*»
-

20

Taxes on corporate income

f j

10-

-

.... ........................................................... •
Taxes on production and imports

Percen t

/\pr peb

Dec Nov

Nov

Mar

Jan Jly Jly

Nov

Jly Mar

Mar Nov

70
SHARES OF FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CURRENT EXPENDITURES

60 -

Current transfer p a y m e n t^ *"*

•a

-60

50 -

-50

40 -

-40

30 -

Consumption expenditures

-30

20 -

-2 0
Interest payments

-10

10 -

P ercent

Apr Feb

Dec Nov

Nov

Mar

Jan Jly Jly

Nov

Jly Mar

Mar Nov

RATIO, NET GOVERNMENT SAVING TO GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT

Net government saving

-

-2

Federal
-6

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




—6

January 2007

Survey

D-53

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

of

SELECTED NIPA SERIES
P e rc e n t Apr Feb

Dec Nov

Nov

Jan Jly Jly

Mar

Nov

Mar Nov

Jly Mar

RATIO, SAVINGS TO GROSS NATIONAL INCOME

20 -

-

20

-

10

-

20

-

10

\
W

10 -

Gross business saving*

s
Personal t aving

Gross government saving
'Gross saving less personal saving and gross government saving
1
59
P e rc e n t

61

I
63

I

I

I

65

I
67

I

I
69

Apr Feb

25

I

I
71

Dec Nov

....

I

11

I
75

I

I
77

I

I
81

I
I
83

Jan Jly Jly

Mar

I
79

I

Nov

11

I
I
85

I
I
87

.............. —

I
I
89

T
I
91

l
l
93

I
l
95

Jly Mar

—

l
l
97

l
l
99

l T
01

I
I
03

I
I
05

Mar Nov

................

PRODUCT

RATIO, INVESTMENT TO GROSS
y

I
73
Nov

1

»A
20 -

I

/A \-

—

\

^

'

Gross domesSc investment plus balance on current account (NIPAs)
UIU5& uunnj^nv/inve&uiieiii piua ucucuicts mi uuiiem acwmiii \m rn a ;

/^ v

/ '

V '»

’’
'
'f jf
Gross private domestic investment
10 Gross government investment

Balance on current account

P e rc e n t Apr Feb

Dec Nov

6 0 ----"

Nov

Mar

Jan

Nov

Mar Nov

Jly Mar
.......... ...

50-

- 50

40-

- 40

- 30

- 20

-

I
59

I

I
61

I

I
63

I
I
65

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




I

I
67

I

I
69

I

I
71

I

I
73

I

I
75

I

I
77

I

I
79

I

I
81

I

I
83

I

I
85

I

I
87

I

I
89

I

I
91

I

I
93

I

I
95

I

I
97

I

I
99

I

I
01

I
I I
I
03
05

10

D-54

National Data

January 2007

SELECTED NIPA SERIES

SHARES OF NATIONAL INCOME

2005

1959
Supplements to wages
Wage and salary

salaries, 4.6%

accruals, 57.0%

Supplements to wages

accruals, 52.5%

Wage and salary

and salaries, 12.7%

Proprietors’ income, 11.1%
Proprietors’ income,
6%
Rental income
of persons, 3.6%

Rental income
of persons, 0.7%

Corporate profits, 12.4%

Corporate profits, 12.2%

t interest and misc. payments, 2.1%
OtheTt) 4%

Taxes on production and imports, 9.0%

SHARES OF GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT BY SECTOR

Net interest and misc. payments,
Other, 0.1 %

1959

4.6%
Taxes on production and imports, 8.3%

2005
Business, 77.3%

Business, 80.6%

Households, 6.3%

Households, 5.9%
Nonprofit institutions serving

Nonprofit institutions

households, 2.0%

serving households,
5.2%

General government,

General government,

Federal 6.3%

Federal, 3.4%
General government,
General government,

state and local 5.2%

state and local, 7.8%

SHARES OF GROSS DOMESTIC PURCHASES

2005

1959

Personal consumption

Personal consumption
expenditures, 66.2%

expenditures, 62.7%
Private nonresidential
investment, 10.0%

Private residential
investment, 5.6%

Private nonresidential
investment, 10.2%

Private residential
investment, 5.7%

Federal Government,*
6.6%
Federal Government,* 12.9%

State and local government,* 8.8%
‘ Consumption expenditures and gross investment

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




and local government,* 11.2%

January 2007

Survey

of

D-55

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

SELECTED NIPA SERIES
Percent

Apr Feb

Dec Nov

Nov

Mar

JanJIyJly

Nov

P e rc e n t

18

Apr Feb

Dec Nov

Nov

Mar

JanJIyJly

Nov

Mar Nov

Jly Mar

Jly Mar

60 -----------

....................................... .........

Mar Nov

.....

18
- 16
- 14
-

-

Percent
70

Apr Feb

Dec Nov

Nov

Mar

J a ru J w J ty N o v

Jlv Mar

SHARES OF PERSONAL CONSUMPTION EXPENDITU RES BYTYPE OF PRO

60
Services

50 40 Nondurable goods

30 -

Durable goods
.

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




B

Mar Nov

12

10

D-56

National Data

January 2007

SELECTED NIPA SERIES
Percent
Dec Nov

20

Nov

Mar

Jan Jly Jly

Nov

Jly Mar

Mar Nov

PROFIT MARGIN, DOMESTIC NONFINANCIAL CORPORATIONS*

Before tax
12-

'Ratio of corporate profits per unit to cost and profit per unit

R atio

Apr Feb

Dec Nov

5

Nov

Mar

Jan Jly Jly

Nov

Jly Mar

Mar Nov

INVENTORY/SALES RATIOS, CURRENT DOLLAR*
Ratio of private nonfarm inventories to
final sales of goods and structures

\
Ratio of private inventories to
final sales of domestic business

V

* '* ..........
*

/ f v . - — •_

Ratio of private nonfarm inventories to
final sales of domestic business

IS
'Based on current-dollar estimates of inventories and sales

i
59

i

i T T T 1!

61

63

65

i

i

67

i

i

I

69

i
71

i

I

I

73

i
75

i

i
77

i
79

81

83

85

87

89

i

91

r t i
93

i
95

i

i
97

i

i
99

i

i
01

i

i

03

i

r

05

INVENTORY/SALES RATIOS, REAL*

Ratio of private nonfamn inventories to
final sales of goods and structures
.

"V
Ratio of private inventories to
final sales of domestic business

.....................

................................................... ..

Ratio of private nonfarm inventories to
final sales of domestic business

1
III

’ Based on chained (2000) dollar estimates of inventories and sales

n i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i I i i i i i i i i i i i i i i I i'"i" r i.I1 I I I I
59

61

63

65

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




67

69

71

73

75

77

79

81

83

85

87

89

91

93

95

97

99

01

03

05

D-57

January 2007

Industry Data
E. Industry T ab le
The estimates in this table were published in tables 1 and 4 in “Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Estimates for
2003-2005” in the December 2006 S u r v e y .
Table E.1. Current-Dollar and Real Value Added by Industry for 2003-2005
Billions of dollars
2003

2004

2003

2004

Gross domestic product.

10,960.8

11,712.5

12,455.8

10,301.0

9,542.3

10,221.5

10,892.2

9,050.9

9,434.5

9,748.8

114.4
88.3
26.1

142.0
114.6
27.4

123.1
95.9
27.2

104.1
76.0
28.0

110.5
81.6
28.4

110.6
82.4
27.5

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and
hunting..............................................
Farms.................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities.
Mining....................................
Oil and gas extraction..........
Mining, except oil and gas....
Support activities for mining.

10,703.5 11,048.6

143.3
93.8
27.2
22.3

172.1
116.4
29.3
26.5

233.3
159.6
31.5
42.2

106.7
78.1
24.0
8.0

107.6
77.2
23.5
9.1

104.8
73.6
22.7
9.7

U tilities.........

220.0

235.2

248.0

200.6

205.5

207.9

Construction.

496.2

541.0

611.1

419.3

425.6

442.3

1,359.3
771.8
32.1
45.1
38.4
106.3
94.3
124.0

1,434.8
819.6
38 3
49.5
54.3
118.4
104.4
129.5

1,512.5
854.3
39 0
53.3
61.1
130.5
111.1
135.3

1,400.1
849.4
304
45.2
42.3
104.6
91.6
214.6

1,490.7
914.4
31 4
48.6
48.7
113.6
104.7
258.5

1,523.1
959.0
32 4
48.4
48.3
119.1
109.0
309.9

Manufacturing..........................................
Durable goods.......................................
Wood products..................................
Nonmetallic mineral products.............
Primary metals..................................
Fabricated metal products..................
Machinery..........................................
Computer and electronic products.....
Electrical equipment, appliances, and
components...................................
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers,
and parts.......................................
Other transportation equipment.........
Furniture and related products...........
Miscellaneous manufacturing.............
Nondurable goods.................................
Food and beverage and tobacco
products........................................
Textile mills and textile product mills...
Apparel and leather and allied
products........................................
Paper products..................................
Printing and related support activities
Petroleum and coal products.............
Chemical products.............................
Plastics and rubber products.............

48.8

45.7

47.8

50.1

46.7

47.5

124.1
62.4
33.4
62.9
587.5

109.8
65.7
36.7
67.4
615.2

95.4
71.1
37.1
72.6
658.2

137.0
55.5
31.4
59.1
551.2

128.8
57.0
35.6
64.7
578.4

125.1
59.2
34.8
70.1
571.1

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental,
and leasing..........................................
Finance and insurance........................
Federal Reserve banks, credit
intermediation, and related
activities........................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and
investments....................................
Insurance carriers and related
activities........................................
Funds, trusts, and other financial
vehicles.........................................

2004

2005

2003

2004

2005

2,244.6

2,408.7

2,160.3

2,224.1

917.3

2,536.1
957.7

2,071.7

864.6

817.9

835.0

853.5

445.0

444.5

474.7

398.7

385.1

397.3

145.9

156.8

167.4

178.2

189.4

205.1

255.0

295.6

296.1

224.5

243.1

236.6

18.7

20.4

19.5

14.1

16.2

17.3

Real estate and rental and leasing.....
Real estate........................................
Rental and leasing services and
lessors of intangible assets............

1,380.0
1,274.2

1,491.4
1,386.3

1,578.4
1,472.6

1,254.3
1,152.0

1,325.2
1,225.7

1,370.4
1,273.9

105.8

105.1

105.8

101.8

98.5

95.0

Professional and business services......

1,248.9

1,346.4

1,458.8

1,181.4

1,242.7

1,312.2

733.1
154.2

794.9
169.1

864.1
180.9

695.3
135.1

749.6
139.8

800.9
141.0

124.3

131.1

140.8

127.3

137.7

148.1

454.6

494.6

542.5

433.0

472.9

514.4

195.5

210.6

225.8

190.5

195.7

198.5

320.3
290.9

341.0
310.1

368.8
336.6

295.5
269.1

298.0
272.3

313.7
286.0

Professional, scientific, and technical
services...........................................
Legal services....................................
Computer systems design and related
services........................................
Miscellaneous professional, scientific,
and technical services...................
Management of companies and
enterprises......................................
Administrative and waste
management services.....................
Administrative and support services...
Waste management and remediation
services........................................

156.2
23.4

175.7
23.8

151.4
23.6

145.9
23.5

152.9
24.0

18.3
50.3
45.2
39.1
179.5
64.0

17.1
52.8
46.4
53.8
198.4
67.1

16.8
54.6
46.9
63.5
209.2
67.7

18.5
52.1
43.5
30.7
169.6
63.0

17.7
56.3
45.3
38.1
183.6
68.1

17.7
57.5
45.9
30.0
180.5
67.1

Wholesale trade ..

637.0

688.2

743.2

653.1

660.5

670.2

Retail trade.........

751.5

781.2

823.5

752.2

771.3

810.0

Transportation and warehousing..
Air transportation.........................
Rail transportation.......................
Water transportation.....................
Truck transportation.....................
Transit and ground passenger
transportation..........................
Pipeline transportation................
Other transportation and support
activities..................................
Warehousing and storage...........

316.6
51.7
28.1
8.7
98.4

330.1
44.9
30.2
9.0
108.0

344.6
41.0
32.3
9.0
114.1

306.2
67.2
25.7
5.4
88.9

322.3
71.1
26.9
5.9
95.8

335.2
75.6
26.0
6.6
100.1

16.1
9.9

16.6
9.6

17.1
9.3

14.3
9.3

14.3
9.3

14.4
11.1

75.4
28.3

81.7
30.1

89.1
32.7

70.3
26.9

72.1
28.7

73.0
31.5

Information...............................................
Publishing industries (includes software)
Motion picture and sound recording
industries...........................................
Broadcasting and telecommunications....
Information and data processing
services.............................................

489.1
123.5

529.2
133.6

555.2
150.2

501.5
123.8

558.7
139.4

608.9
157.3

38.3
277.9

39.9
301.4

40.5
304.1

36.1
294.4

36.7
329.0

37.1
353.3

49.3

54.2

60.4

46.5

53.2

60.6

29.4

30.8

32.3

26.4

25.7

27.7

Educational services, health care, and
social assistance................................

857.3

914.7

975.3

761.6

786.5

813.9

Educational services...........................
167.9
23.1

100.1

108.2

115.8

84.0

86.0

87.6

Health care and social assistance.....
Ambulatory health care services.......
Hospitals and nursing and residential
care facilities.................................
Social assistance..............................

757.2
385.7

806.4
409.3

859.6
441.9

677.7
359.0

700.7
372.8

726.6
394.7

303.9
67.6

326.1
71.0

342.2
75.4

255.3
63.9

261.5
67.2

263.0
71.1

398.9

424.0

444.6

364.6

375.7

380.9

107.2

110.8

114.1

96.5

97.0

96.6

49.6

52.1

54.0

43.9

44.5

43.9

57.6
291.7
90.7
201.0

58.6
313.2
99.1
214.0

60.1

52.6

52.5

52.6

330.5
104.6
225.9

268.1
87.1
180.8

278.8
90.4
188.2

284.4
91.1
193.1

Arts, entertainment, recreation,
accommodation, and food services. ..
Arts, entertainment, and recreation. ..
Performing arts, spectator sports,
museums, and related activities....
Amusements, gambling, and
recreation industries......................
Accommodation and food services....
Accommodation.................................
Food services and drinking places
Other services, except government
Government
Federal.....................................................

1. Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses
weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The value of not
allocated by industry reflects the difference between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines, as well as the
differences in source data used to estimate GDP by industry and the expenditures measure of real GDP
2. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.




2003

2005

Private industries...................

Billions of chained (2000) dollars

Billions of dollars

Billions of chained (2000) dollars
2005

Government enterprises........................
State and lo c a l........................................
General government..............................

265.3

274.1

282.8

230.5

229.4

227.8

1,418.4

1,490.9

1,563.6

1,254.4

1,262.7

448.6
383.9
64.7

478.4
411.6
66.8

498.8
436.7
62.1

1,248.1
389.2
331.9
57.5

392.8
335.1
58.0

392.2
337.3
54.9

969.8
896.2
73.7

1,012.6
936.8
75.7

1,064.8
986.2
78.6

858.8
791.9
67.0

861.4
795.6
65.9

870.5
803.5
67.1

-17.2

-27.2

-52.3

Not allocated by industry1.........................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries2..........
Private services-producing industries3
Information-communications-technologyproducing industries4.............................

2,113.3
7,429.1

2,289.9
7,931.6

2,480.1
8,412.2

2,027.4
7,022.5

2,125.7
7,308.0

2,169.8
7,578.5

421.2

448.5

486.7

507.3

576.8

653.7

3. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis­
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
4. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.
N ote . Estimates in this t