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DECEMBER 2 0 0 6

S u r v e y o f C u r r e n t B u s in e s s




In T h i s

Is s u e

B E A ’s 2 0 0 6

. . .
R e se a rch

and

D e v e lo p m e n t S a t e llit e A c c o u n t

A n n u a l In d u s t r y A c c o u n t s fo r 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 5

a BEA

B U R E A U O F E C O N O M IC A N A L Y S IS
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F C O M M E R C E

ECO M AND STATISTICS ADM
NO ICS
INISTRATION

U.S. Department of Commerce
C a rlo s M . G u tierrez, Secretary

Economics and Statistics Administration
C y n th ia A . G lassm an, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

Bureau of Economic Analysis
J. Steven Landefeld, Director
R o sem ary D. M arcuss, Deputy Director and Acting Chief Economist
D e n n is J. Fixler, Chief Statistician
R a lp h Kozlow , Associate Director for International Economics
A la n C . L o rish , Jr., Chief Information Officer
Bren t R . M o u lto n , Associate Director for National Economic Accounts
Sum iye O k u b o , Associate Director for Industry Accounts
Vacant, Associate Directorfor Regional Economics

BEA Advisory Committee
The BEA Advisory Committee advises the Director of BEA on matters related to the development and improvement of BEA’s
national, regional, industry, and international economic accounts, especially in areas of new and rapidly growing economic
activities arising from innovative and advancing technologies, and it provides recommendations from the perspective of
business economists, academicians, researchers, and experts in government and international affairs.

Dale W. Jorgenson, Chair, Harvard University
Alan J. Auerbach, University of California, Berkeley
Richard B. Berner, Morgan Stanley
M ichael J. Boskin, Stanford University
Barry R Bosworth, The Brookings Institution
Susan M. Collins, Georgetown University
Robert J. Gordon, Northwestern University
M aurine A. Haver, Haver Analytics, Inc.
Charles R. Hulten, University of Maryland
Edward E. Learner, University of California, Los Angeles
Therese J. M cGuire, Northwestern University
W illiam D. Nordhaus, Yale University
Joel L. Prakken, Chairman, Macroeconomic Advisers, LLC
James Kim, E d ito r-in -C h ief
M. Gretchen Gibson, M an agin g E ditor
Kristina L. Maze, Production M anager
Wm. Ronnie Foster, G raphic D esigner
Dan Seidov, E ditor
Cindy M. Staudt, Editor
Robert E. Wehausen, P roduction E ditor
Danielle M. Wittenberg, E ditor
The Survey of Current Business (ISSN 0039-6222) is published
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partment of Commerce. Send editorial correspondence to
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Survey op C urrent Business
D ecem b er 2006

Volum e 86 • N u m b er 12

G D P and th e Econom y: P relim in ary E stim ates for th e Third Q u a rter o f 2006
Real GDP increased 2.2 percent after increasing 2.6 percent, reflecting an acceleration in imports,
a larger decrease in residential investment, and decelerations in inventory investment, consumer
spending for services, and state and local government spending. Corporate profits picked up.

11

G overnm en t R eceipts and E xpenditures: E stim ates for th e Third Q u a rter of 2006
Net government saving decreased $34.8 billion to -$171. 7 billion. Net Federal Government saving
decreased $6.6 billion to -$169.7 billion. Net state and local government saving decreased $28.1
billion to -$2.0 billion.

14

B E A ’s 2006 R esearch and D evelop m ent S atellite A ccount: P relim in ary E stim ates
for 1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 2 and E ffect on G D P and O th er M easures
The 2006 R&D satellite account marks another milestone in BEA’s efforts to explore the effects of
R&D on the economy. This article summarizes the key findings and discusses the key concepts
behind the account.
19 Previous NIPA Improvements Related to R&D

45

A nnual Industry A ccounts: R evised E stim ates fo r 2 0 0 3 -2 0 0 5
Real economic growth continued to be strong in 2005, mainly reflecting strong growth in the
services-producing sector. Thirty-one of the thirty-six services-producing industries expanded in
2005. The goods sector also expanded in 2005.
48 Domestic Supply and Use of Oil and Gas Extraction and Petroleum and Coal Products




www.bea.gov

ii

88

December 2006

S u b ject G u id e for 2006
T h is g u id e lists the article s that w ere p u b lis h e d in the S u r v e y in 2006.

90

S ched ule of B EA N ew s R eleases in 2007

D -1

B EA C u rrent and H istorical Data

###

D ire cto r’s M essage

iv

Taking A cco u n t

B E A ’s W eb S ite and C o n tacts (in sid e back cover)
S ched ule of U pcom ing N ew s R eleases (b ack cover)

Looking A h ead . . .
State P e rs o n a l In c o m e . E stim a te s fo r the th ird q u a rte r o f 200 6 w ill be p u b lish e d in
the Ja n u a ry S u r v ey .
In te g ra te d M a c ro e c o n o m ic A c c o u n t s . B E A a n d the F e d e ra l R eserve B o a rd have
d e veloped a cco u n ts that relate U .S . e co n o m ic a ctiv ity to chan ges in net w o rth fo r
m a jo r sectors. A n article a b o u t the a cco u n ts w ill be p u b lish e d in an u p c o m in g S u r v e y .




D ecem b er

/'//

2006

D i r e c t o r ’s




M e s s a g e _________________________________
In th is m o n t h s S u r v e y o f C u r r e n t B u sin es s , we are pleased to
present an a rticle d e s c rib in g the B u re a u o f E c o n o m ic A n a ly s is ’
2006 research a n d d e ve lo p m e n t ( R & D ) satellite a cco u n t. T h is a c­
c o u n t w as developed in p a rtn e rsh ip w ith the N a tio n a l Scie n ce
F o u n d a tio n , a n d a fu ll re p o rt a b o u t the a cco u n t w as released in
Septem ber. T h e a rticle in c lu d e d in th is issue su m m a rize s the k ey
p o in ts a n d fin d in g s.
T h e 2006 R & D satellite a cco u n t m a rk s a n o th er m ilesto n e in
B E A ’s o n g o in g efforts to adapt its a cco u n ts to the d y n a m ic e co n ­
om y. In ta n g ib le s su ch as R & D are im p o rta n t c o n trib u to rs to e co ­
n o m ic gro w th . A s the a rticle describes, the new R & D satellite
a cco u n t p ro vid e s p r e lim in a ry estim ates o f R & D in ve stm e n t a c ­
tivity. T h e a cco u n t also details h o w R & D , treated as an in ve st­
m e n t rath er th a n as c o n s u m p tio n , w o u ld affect k ey aggregates,
s u ch as gro ss d o m e stic p ro d u c t, in ve stm e n t, a n d sa vin g . T h e se
a cco u n ts w ill h e lp in better u n d e rsta n d in g the re la tio n sh ip b e ­
tw een in n o v a tio n a n d e co n o m ic gro w th .
T h is m o n th ’s issue also in c lu d e s an a rticle d e s c rib in g th is
year’s upd ate o f B E A ’s a n n u a l in d u s tr y acco u n ts. T h e a n n u a l u p ­
date in clu d e s m o re detailed, re vise d estim ates fo r 2005 that are
in tegrate d w ith the m o st recent in p u t-o u tp u t a cco u n ts.
A s the year closes, I ’d lik e to m e n tio n that we a im to co n tin u e
o u r efforts to im p ro v e the S u r v e y . W e h o pe to create easie r-to read article s in new fo rm a ts d e sign e d fo r b u s y users o f o u r data.
In that ve in , please take a lo o k at the new d e sig n o f the o n lin e
v e rsio n o f the S u r v e y at < w w w .b ea.go v/scb /in d e x.h tm > .

iv

December 2006

Taking Account...
BEA Releases New RIMS II
Online Ordering System
B E A has released a n e w o n lin e
o rd e rin g a n d d e liv e ry system to
m ake it easier fo r users to
p u rch a se the R e g io n a l In p u tO u tp u t M o d e lin g System ( R IM S
I I ) M u ltip lie rs. T h e m u ltip lie rs
are w id e ly used b y researchers
a n d g o v e rn m e n t o fficia ls to e sti­
m ate the e c o n o m ic im p a c t o f
v a rio u s p ro je cts a n d events o n
state a n d lo ca l e co n o m ies.
T h e n e w o n lin e o rd e rin g sys­
tem w as d e sig n e d to m ake it eas­
ie r a n d faster fo r users to
p u rch a se R IM S I I p ro d u cts. T h e
tim e re q u ire d to co m p lete p u r ­
chases— fro m w h e n an o rd e r is
received to w h e n it is delivered—
has been re d u ce d to ju st a few
days. T h e la u n c h o f the system
fu lfills a m a jo r g o al set fo rth in
B E A ’s strate gic p la n .
A fte r a o n e -tim e re g istratio n ,
users can o rd e r m u ltip lie rs b y
p la c in g selected re g io n s a n d
in d u strie s in to an o n lin e s h o p ­
p in g cart. D u r in g the ch e ck o u t
p rocess, users ca n p a y b y cred it
ca rd (V is a , M a ste rC a rd , A m e r i­
ca n E xp re ss, D isco v e r, a n d D i n ­
ers C lu b are accepted) o r b y
ch e ck u s in g an E -c h e c k feature.
A fte r p a y m e n t is ap proved, it
w ill take ju st a few b u sin e ss days
before the o rd e r is fille d . C u s ­
to m ers w ill receive an e -m a il n o ­
tific a tio n w h e n the m u ltip lie rs




are ready fo r d o w n lo a d .
T h e files available fo r d o w n ­
lo a d in c lu d e m u ltip lie rs tables
(e ig h t tables p e r b e n c h m a rk
series, fo u r tables p e r a n n u a l
series) a n d the n a tio n a l d is t rib u ­
tio n costs tables. T h e files ca n be
accessed th ro u g h the R IM S I I
V iew er, w h ic h can also be d o w n ­
lo a d e d v ia the system . In a d d i­
tio n , the P D F files that co n ta in
su m m a ry -le v e l m u ltip lie r tables
(tw o tables per b e n c h m a rk
series, one table p e r a n n u a l
series) are available.
T h e new o rd e rin g system ca n
be accessed at < w w w .bea.gov/
re g io n a l/ rim s/rim sii/ > .
T h o s e w h o do n o t w ish to
use the o n lin e system ca n still
m ake p u rch a se s b y co n ta ctin g
the R IM S staff b y p h o n e at
2 0 2 - 6 0 6 -5 3 4 3 o r b y e -m a il at
< R IM S R E A D @ b e a .g o v > .

New 1-0 Handbook
Available on BEA Web Site
B E A re ce n tly released a new
h a n d b o o k — Concepts and M eth­

ods o f the U.S. Input-O utput
Accounts — that de scrib e s the
u n d e rly in g stru ctu re used to
prepare the b e n c h m a rk in p u to u tp u t ( I - O ) a cco u n ts o f the
U n ite d States.
T h e h a n d b o o k presents the
b asics o f 1 - 0 a c co u n tin g , b a c k ­
g ro u n d o n the d e ve lo p m e n t a nd
uses o f the a cco u n ts, a n d an

in tro d u c tio n to the p rocess o f
p re p a rin g the 1 - 0 estim ates a n d
tables. It also p ro v id e s in fo r m a ­
tio n fo r m o re e xp e rie n ce d users
that is d e sig n e d to b ro a d e n th e ir
u n d e rs ta n d in g o f ce rta in aspects
o f the 1 - 0 a cco u n ts.
T h e h a n d b o o k does n o t p r o ­
v id e detailed d e sc rip tio n s o f
m e th o d o lo g y o r o f database o p ­
era tio n s. It does, how ever, in ­
clu d e
so m e
d e scrip tio n s
of
m e th o d o lo g y th at is m a in ly
based o n the 1997 b e n c h m a rk
a cco u n ts. In a d d itio n , som e u p ­
dates a n d in d ic a tio n s o f fu tu re
ch a n ge s are d iscussed .
In general, the h a n d b o o k ,
w h ic h is available o n the B E A
W eb site, is in te n d e d to be a “liv ­
in g reference,” on e that w ill be
fre q u e n tly upd ated.
T h e h a n d b o o k o p en s w ith a
table o f co ntents that p ro vid e s
b r ie f o u tlin e s o f the m a in to p ics
co vered in each o f the 12 c h a p ­
ters. A g lo s sa ry o f 1 - 0 term s a n d
a b ib lio g ra p h y o f selected re fer­
ences are in clu d e d .
M a rk A . P la n tin g a n d K a re n J.
H o ro w itz , fo rm e rly se n io r B E A
e co n o m ists, served as the p r i­
m a r y au th o rs. S ig n ific a n t c o n t ri­
b u tio n s w ere m a d e b y G e ra ld F.
D o n a h o e a n d D o u g R . F o x , b o th
also fo rm e r B E A e co n o m ists.
T h e h a n d b o o k ca n n o w be
accessed at < w w w .bea.gov/bea/
p a p e rs/ 1 0 m a n u a l_ 0 9 2 9 0 6 .p d f> .

1

December 2006

GDP and the Economy
Preliminary Estimates for the Third Quarter of 2006
E A L gro ss d o m e stic p ro d u c t ( G D P ) slow ed a n d
in fla tio n abated in the th ird q u arte r o f 2006, a c­
c o rd in g to the “p r e lim in a ry ” estim ates o f the n a tio n a l
in co m e a n d p ro d u c t acco u n ts ( N IP A s ) .1 R eal G D P in ­
creased 2.2 p e rcent after in cre a sin g 2.6 p e rce n t in the

R

se co n d q u arte r (ch a rt 1 a n d table l ) . 2
T h e slo w d o w n p r im a r ily reflected an a cce leratio n in
im p o rts (su b tra cte d in the d e riv a tio n o f G D P ) , a la rg e r
decrease in re sid en tial in ve stm e n t, a n d de ce le ration s in
in v e n to ry in vestm ent, co n su m e r sp e n d in g fo r services,
an d state a n d lo ca l g o ve rn m e n t sp e n d in g . Th e se
ch an ge s w ere p a rtly offset b y u p tu rn s in in ve stm e n t in
e q u ip m e n t a n d softw are, c o n su m e r sp e n d in g fo r d u ra ­
ble g o o d s, a n d Fe d era l G o v e rn m e n t s p e n d in g .3
• C o rp o ra te p ro fits in creased $66.2 b illio n in the
th ird quarter, co m p a re d w ith an increase o f $22.7
b illio n in the se co n d quarter.
• P rice s o f g o o d s a n d services p u rch a se d b y U .S . re si­
dents in creased 2.1 percent, fo llo w in g a 4 .0 -p e rce n t
increase. E n e rg y p rice s decelerated sharp ly, b u t fo o d
p rice s accelerated.
• R eal d isp o sab le p e rso n a l in co m e ( D P I ) in crea sed
3.7 p ercent; in the seco n d quarter, it decreased 1.5
p e rce n t (re vise d ).
• T h e p e rso n a l sa v in g rate, p e rso n a l sa v in g as a p e r­
centage o f c u rre n t-d o lla r D P I, w as - 1 . 3 percent; in
the se co n d quarter, it w as - 1 . 4 p e rce n t (re vise d ).

1. Each GDP estimate for a quarter (advance, preliminary, and final)
incorporates increasingly comprehensive and improved source data. More
information can be found at <www.bea.gov/bea/about/infoqual.htm> and
<www.bea.gov/bea/faq/national/gdp_accuracy.htm>. Quarterly estimates
are expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates, which show the value that
would be registered if the rate of activity that is measured for a quarter were
maintained for a year.
2. “Real” estimates are in chained (2000) dollars, and price indexes are
chain-type measures.
3. In this article, “consumer spending” refers to the NIPA series “personal
consumption expenditures,” “inventory investment” refers to “change in
private inventories,” “Federal Government spending” refers to “Federal
Government consumption expenditures and gross investment,” and “state
and local government spending” refers to “state and local government con­
sumption and investment.”

Chart 1. GDP, Prices, Disposable Personal Income (DPI)
Real GDP: Percent change from the preceding quarter
10
S easonally adjusted annual rates

2003

2004

2005

onsum er spending
Nonresidential fixed investment
Residential fixed investment

I
Inventory investment
Exports
Imports
;Government;spending

-1

-2

0
1
Percentage points at an annual rate

Prices: Percent change from the preceding quarter
Prices of gross dom estic purchases

2003

2004

2005




2006

DPI: Percent change from the preceding quarter
8

ll.lu l
J ____I____ I____ I____ I____L B L L
2005
2003
2004

C hristopher Swann prepared this article.

2006

Contributions to the 2.2-percent increase in real GDP in 2006:lll

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

II I
2006

2

GDP and the Econom y

December 2006

Real G DP O verview
Table 1. Real Gross Domestic Product and Components
[S e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d a t a n n u a l rates ]
S h a r e of
c u rre n td o lla r
GDP
(p e rc e n t)

C h a n g e fro m
p r e c e d in g p e rio d
(p e rc e n t)

C o n trib u tio n to p e rc e n t
c h a n g e in rea l G D P
(p e r c e n ta g e po in ts )

2006

2005

III

IV

I

II

III

Gross dom estic prod uct1....

100.0

1.8

5.6

2 .6

2 .2

Personal consumption
expenditures.................................

70.2

0.8

4.8

2.6

8.1 - 1 2 . 3

1 9 .8

D u ra b le g o o d s .......................................

2006

2005

2006

IV

II

III

1.8

5.6

2 .6

2 .2

2.9

0.53

3.38

1.81

1.99

6 .0

-0 .1

I

-1 .0 8

1 .5 0

-0 .0 1

0 .4 7

Consum er spending accelerated slightly and contrib­
uted 1.99 percentage points to third-quarter real G D P
growth. A n upturn in motor vehicles and parts, espe­
cially light trucks, led to an upturn in durable goods.
Nondurable goods decelerated, m ainly because of a
downturn in spending for food. Services also deceler­
ated.

N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ..............................

2 0 .6

3 .9

5 .9

1 .4

1.1

0 .7 9

1 .2 0

0 .3 0

0 .2 3

S e r v ic e s ....................................................

4 1 .5

2 .0

1 .6

3 .7

3.1

0 .8 3

0 .6 7

1 .5 2

1 .2 9

Gross private dom estic
investm ent....................................

16.8

16.2

7.8

1.0

0.0

2.51

1.31

0.17

0.01

F ix e d in v e s tm e n t.................................

1 6 .3

2 .8

8 .2

-1 .6

-0 .9

0 .4 6

1 .3 4

-0 .2 7

-0 .1 5

N o n r e s id e n tia l.................................

10.7

5 .2

13.7

4 .4

1 0 .0

0 .5 2

1 .3 6

0 .4 5

1.0 1

S tr u c tu r e s ......................................

3 .2

1 2 .0

8 .7

2 0 .3

1 6 .7

0 .3 1

0 .2 5

0 .5 6

0 .4 9

1 5 .6

-1 .4

7 .2

0 .2 1

1.11

-0 .1 0

0 .5 2

- 0 . 3 - 1 1 .1

- 1 8 .0

-0 .0 6

-0 .0 2

-0 .7 2

-1 .1 6

2.05 - 0 . 0 3

0 .4 4

Nonresidential fixed investment accelerated, reflecting
an upturn in equipment and software. Transportation
equipment and inform ation processing equipment
and software turned up.

E q u ip m e n t a n d s o ftw a r e ......

7 .4

2 .8

R e s id e n tia l.........................................

5 .6

-0.9

C h a n g e in p riv a te in v e n to rie s ......

0.5

Net exports of goods and
s e rv ic e s ........................................

-6 .0

-1 .0 7 -0 .0 4

0 .1 6 -

0.42 -0.21

E x p o rts .......................................................

1 1 .2

9 .6

1 4 .0

6 .2

6 .3

0 .9 7

1.41

0 .6 6

G o o d s ....................................................

7 .9

1 1 .5

1 7 .3

6 .0

9 .4

0 .8 0

1 .2 0

0 .4 5

0 .7 1

S e r v ic e s ..............................................

3 .2

5 .5

6 .7

6 .7

-1 .0

0 .1 7

0 .2 1

0 .2 1

-0 .0 3

Im p o rts .......................................................

1 7 .2

13.2

9 .1

1 .4

5 .3

-2.04 - 1 . 4 6 - 0 . 2 4 - 0 . 8 9

G o o d s ....................................................

1 4 .5

14.1

9 .4

-0 .1

6 .9

-1 .8 4

-1 .2 7

0.0 1

2 .6

8 .3

7 .4

9 .9

-2 .7

-0 .2 0

-0 .1 9

-0 .2 5

0 .0 7

Governm ent consumption
expenditures and gross
investm ent....................................

19.1

-1.1

4.9

-0.21

0.94

0 .1 6

0.42

7 .0

-4 .6

8 .8

0.8
-4.5

2 .2

F e d e r a l.......................................................

1 .5

-0 .3 3

0 .6 1

-0 .3 2

N a tio n a l d e f e n s e ............................

4 .6

-9 .9

8 .9

-2 .0

-1 .1

-0 .4 9

0 .4 1

-0 .0 9

N o n d e fe n s e .......................................

2 .3

7 .1

8 .5

-9 .3

6 .8

0 .1 6

0 .2 0

-0 .2 3

0 .1 5

S ta te a n d lo c a l......................................

12.1

1 .0

2 .7

4 .0

2 .6

0 .1 3

0 .3 3

0 .4 8

0 .3 2

Inventory investment decelerated, prim arily reflecting
downturns by m ining, utilities, and construction in ­
dustries and by “other” industries and a larger de­
crease by retail motor vehicle and parts dealers.

-0 .9 6

S e r v ic e s ..............................................

Residential investment decreased 18.0 percent, follow­
ing an 11.1-percent decrease, prim arily reflecting a
larger decrease in single-fam ily structures.

0 .6 8

0 .1 0 ,
-0 .0 5

1. T h e e s tim a te s o f G D P u n d e r th e c o n trib u tio n c o lu m n s a re a ls o p e rc e n t c h a n g e s .
Note. P e rc e n t c h a n g e s a re fro m N IP A ta b le 1 .1 .1 , c o n trib u tio n s a re fro m N IP A ta b le 1 .1 .2 , a n d s h a re s
a re fro m N IP A ta b le 1 .1 .1 0 .

Exports growth was virtually unchanged. A n accelera­
tion in goods exports was largely offset by a downturn
in services exports.
Im ports accelerated, reflecting upturns in petroleum
and products and in nonpetroleum industrial supplies
and materials and an acceleration in nonautomotive
consumer goods. Im ports o f services turned down.
Federal Governm ent spending turned up, the result of
an upturn in nondefense spending and a smaller re­
duction in defense spending.
State and local government spending decelerated, p ri­
m arily reflecting a deceleration in structures.

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by Type of Product
[S e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d a t a n n u a l rates ]
S h a r e of
c u rre n td o lla r
GDP
(p e rc e n t)

C h a n g e fro m
p re c e d in g p e rio d
(p e rc e n t)

2006

2005

III

IV

C o n trib u tio n to p e rc e n t
c h a n g e in rea l G D P
(p e rc e n ta g e poin ts )

2006

2005

I

II

III

IV

2006
I

II

III

5 .6 1

2.6
2.11

2 .0 6

Gross dom estic prod uct1 ..................

100.0

1.8

5.6

9 9 .5

-0 .3

5 .6

2.6
2.1

2.2

F in a l s a le s of d o m e s tic p ro d u c t...

2 .0 5 - 0 . 0 3

0 .4 4

0 .1 6

3 .7

0 .9 7

1 .1 2

1 .1 5
1 .7 3

C h a n g e in p riv a te in v en to rie s

1.8
2.1 -0 .2 8

0 .5

Real final sales o f domestic product, real G D P less in ­
ventory investment, increased 2.1 percent, the same as
in the second quarter.

5.6

2.2

G o o d s ................................................................

3 1 .3

3.1

1 2 .8

3 .6

S e r v ic e s ...........................................................

5 7 .9

0 .8

2 .4

2 .4

3 .0

0 .4 6

1 .3 9

1 .4 0

S tru c tu re s .........................................................

1 0 .8

3.1

2 .9

0 .3

-5 .9

0 .3 3

0 .3 3

0 .0 4 - 0 . 6 6

3 .8 6

Motor vehicle output turned up sharply, prim arily re­
flecting a strong upturn in light trucks. (See FAQ
num ber 323 on BEA ’s Web site.)

Addenda:
3.2 - 1 9 .1

3.8

-9 .4

G D P exc lu d in g m o to r v eh ic le o u tp u t

9 6 .8

2 .6

5 .6

3 .0

1 .5

2 .4 7

5 .4 6

2 .8 7

1 .4 5

Fin a l s a le s o f c o m p u te r s .......................

0 .6

33.8

9.5

6 .7

15.8

0 .2 0

0.07

0 .0 4

0 .0 9 -

G D P e x c lu d in g fin a l s a le s of
c o m p u te r s .................................................

9 9 .4

1 .6

5 .6

2 .5

2.1

1 .5 6

5 .5 2

2 .5 1

2 .1 2

M o to r v e h ic le o u tp u t..................................

2 1 2 -0 ./1

0 .1 2 - 0 .3 1

0 ./6

1. T h e e s tim a te s o f G D P u n d e r th e c o n trib u tio n c o lu m n s a re a ls o p e rc e n t c h a n g e s .

Note. P e rc e n t c h a n g e s a re fro m N IP A ta b le 1 .2 .1 , c o n trib u tio n s a re fro m N IP A ta b le 1 .2 .2 , a n d s h a re s
a re c a lc u la te d fro m N IP A ta b le 1 .2 .5 .




Final sales o f computers accelerated sharply, increas­
ing 15.8 percent after increasing 6.7 percent.

December 2006

3

Survey of C urrent B usiness

C on sum er Spending
Table 3. Real Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE)
[S e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d a t a n n u a l rates ]
S h a r e of
c u rre n td o llar
PCE
(p e rc e n t)

C h a n g e fro m
p re c e d in g p e rio d
(p e rc e n t)

2006
III
P C E 1................................................
D u r a b le g o o d s ....................................

2005
IV

100.0

C o n trib u tio n to p e rc e n t
c h a n g e in re a l P C E
(p e rc e n ta g e poin ts )

2006
I

II

2005
III

IV

2006
I

II

4.8

III

0.8

4.8

2.6

2.6

2.9

11.5 -12 .3

19.8

-0.1

6.0 -1 .5 4

2.14 -0.01

0.68

-1 .2

8 .8

-2 .1 5

0 .8 5

0 .4 1

2.9

0.8

Consum er spending for durable goods turned up, re­
flecting a sharp upturn in m otor vehicles and parts,
especially light trucks. Spending for furniture and
household equipment accelerated, and “other” dura­
ble goods turned up.

M o to r v e h ic le s a n d p a rts

4 .8

- 3 4 .9

1 8 .9

F u rn itu re a n d h o u s e h o ld
e q u ip m e n t......................................

4 .3

1 1 .6

2 2 .8

3 .3

5 .6

0 .4 7

0 .9 2

0 .1 4

0 .2 4

O t h e r 2 ................................................

2 .4

6.1

1 6 .3

-3 .7

1 .0

0 .1 4

0 .3 7

-0 .0 9

0 .0 2

N o n d u r a b le g o o d s ..........................

29.4

3.9

5.9

1.4

1.1

1.12

1.71

0.42

0.33

Spending for nondurable goods decelerated slightly,
m ainly reflecting a downturn in spending for food.
Spending for clothing and shoes turned up.

-0 .0 6

F o o d .......................................................

1 3 .7

4.1

6 .7

2 .0

-1 .2

0 .5 5

0 .9 2

0 .2 7

-0 .1 7

C lo th in g a n d s h o e s ......................

3 .8

1 0 .3

8 .6

-3 .8

5 .3

0 .3 8

0 .3 3

-0 .1 5

0 .2 0

G a s o lin e , fu e l oil, a n d o th e r
e n e rg y g o o d s ..............................

4 .0

-2 .3

-1 .3

0 .7

4 .9

-0 .0 9

-0 .0 5

0 .0 3

0 .1 9

O t h e r 3 ................................................

7 .9

3 .6

6 .4

3 .4

1 .5

0 .2 8

0 .5 1

0 .2 7

0 .1 2

S e r v i c e s ...................................................

59.2

2.0

1 .6

3 .7

3 .1

1 .1 8

0.96

2 .1 7

1.85

H o u s in g ................................................

1 4 .9

1 .7

2 .3

2 .4

2 .6

0 .2 5

0 .3 4

0 .3 6

0 .3 8

H o u s e h o ld o p e r a t io n ...................

5 .5

0 .3

- 1 4 .0

8 .4

1 0 .7

0 .0 2

-0 .8 4

0 .4 4

0 .5 6

E le c tric ity a n d g a s ...................

2 .3

2 .0

- 2 9 .7

1 5 .8

2 2 .7

0 .0 5

-0 .8 3

0 .3 4

Spending for services decelerated, prim arily reflecting
a downturn in net foreign travel.

0 .4 7

3 .2

-0 .8

-0 .1

3 .4

2 .7

-0 .0 3

0 .0 0

0 .1 1

0 .0 9

T r a n s p o r ta tio n .................................

O th e r h o u s e h o ld o p e ra tio n

3 .6

-0 .2

4 .0

1 .7

1.1

-0 .0 1

0 .1 5

0 .0 6

0 .0 4

M e d ic a l c a r e ......................................

17.1

3 .7

4 .3

2 .6

2 .9

0 .6 2

0 .7 4

0 .4 4

0 .5 0

R e c r e a t io n ..........................................

4.1

1 .5

3.1

0 .8

3 .0

0 .0 6

0 .1 3

0 .0 3

0 .1 2

O t h e r 4 ...................................................

1 3 .9

1 .7

3 .2

6.1

1 .8

0 .2 3

0 .4 5

0 .8 3

0 .2 5

1. T h e e s tim a te s u n d e r th e c o n trib u tio n c o lu m n s a re a ls o p e rc e n t c h a n g e s .
2 . In c lu d es je w e lry a n d w a tc h e s , o p h th a lm ic p ro d u c ts a n d o rth o p e d ic e q u ip m e n t, b o o k s a n d m a p s,
b ic yc les a n d m o to rc yc le s, g u n s a n d sp o rtin g e q u ip m e n t, p h o to g rap h ic e q u ip m e n t, b o a ts , a n d p le a s u re
a irc raft.
3 . In c lu d e s to b a c co , to ile t a rticle s, d ru g p re p a ra tio n s a n d s u n d ries , s ta tio n e ry a n d w ritin g s u p p lies ,

Chart 2. Real Personal Consumption Expenditures

toys, film , flo w e rs, c le a n in g p re p a ra tio n s a n d p a p e r prod u cts, s em id u ra b le h o u s e fu rn is h in g s, a n d m a g a ­
zin e s a n d n e w s p a p e rs .
4 . In c lu d es p e rs o n a l c a re , p e rs o n a l b u s in es s , e d u c a tio n a n d re s e a rc h , relig io u s a n d w e lfa re a ctivities,
a n d n e t fo re ig n travel.

Note.

Percent change from the preceding quarter
8
Based on seasonally adjusted annual rates

P e rc e n t c h a n g e s a re fro m N IP A ta b le 2 .3 .1 , a n d c o n trib u tio n s, fro m N IP A ta b le 2 .3 .2 ; s h a re s a re

c a lc u la te d fro m N IP A ta b le 2 .3 .5 .




2003

2004

2005

Contributions to the 2.9-percent increase in PCE in 2006:lll

1

2

Percentage points at an annual rate
U.S. Bureau ot Economic Analysis

2006

GDP and the Economy

4

December 2006

Private Fixed Investm ent

Table 4. Real Private Fixed Investment (PFI)
[Seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Share of
currentdollar
PFI
(percent)

Contribution to percent
change in real PFI
(percentage points)

Change from
preceding period
(percent)

2006
III

IV

2006

2005
I

2006

2005

II

III

IV

I

I
I

III

Private fixed investm ent1....

100.0

2.8

8.2

-1 .6

-0 .9

2.8

8.2

-1 .6

-0 .9

N onresidential.................................

65.4

5.2

13.7

4.4

10.0

3.19

8.30

2.72

6.14

S tructures....................................

19.7

12.0

8.7

20.3

16.7

1.92

1.50

3.34

2.97

Commercial and health care
Manufacturing.......................
Power and communication....
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells...........................
Other structures2.................

7.4
1.4
2.1

3.2
32.0
12.4

7.1
-1.7
14.3

11.7
28.0
4.9

29.1
7.7
13.8

0.21 0.46
0.34 -0.02
0.23 0.27

0.74
0.32
0.10

1.81
0.10
0.27

5.2
3.7

22.4
11.1

2.0
23.6

28.0
35.1

10.0
9.0

0.81
0.33

0.09
0.71

1.16
1.03

0.48
0.31

E quipm ent and s o ftw a re........

45.7

2.8

15.6

-1 .4

7.2

1.27

6.80 -0 .6 2

3.17

22.5

/. 0

21.8

-1.1

y.b

1.50

4.52 -0.24

2.03

26.5 0.98 0.94 0.18
3.2 0.26 1.12 0.39
9.5 0.25 2.46 -0.82
0.3 1.16 -0.28 0.98
11.8 -1.89 1.90 -1.91
4.1 0.50 0.66 0.56

0.94
0.30
0.79
0.02
0.80
0.32

Information processing
equipment and software....
Computers and peripheral
equipment.....................
Software3.........................
Other4..............................
Industrial equipment.............
Transportation equipment.....
Other equipment5................

4.1 27.1
9.6
2.8
8.8
3.0
7.9 16.2
7.2 -21.8
8.1
6.6

4.7
24.9
12.2
4.2
31.6 -9.0
-3.6 13.6
27.7 -22.8
7.4
8.5

R esidential........................................

34.6

- 0 .9

34.2

-1.1

0.8 -17.6 -24.0 1.30 0.19 -4.46 -5.99
-1.8 -19.2 -27.7 1.02 -0.39 -4.39 -6.24
25.7 -2.6 10.0 0.29 0.58 -0.07 0.25
1.1 -7.6 -1.70 -0.36 0.14 -1.03
-2.7

Investment in equipment and software turned up, re­
flecting upturns in inform ation processing equipment
and software, notably in com m unications equipment,
and in transportation equipment.
Residential investment decreased more in the third
quarter than in the second, prim arily reflecting a
larger decrease in single-fam ily structures and a
downturn in “other” structures.

-0 .5 -1 1 .2 -1 8 .2 -0 .4 0 -0 .1 7 -4 .3 2 -7 .0 3

21.1
5.6
4.8
18.5
2.6 12.5
13.0 -11.6

Investment in nonresidential structures decelerated
somewhat. Decelerations in m ining exploration,
shafts, and wells and in “other” structures were offset
somewhat by an acceleration in com m ercial and
health care structures.

-0 .3 -11.1 -1 8 .0 -0.3 6 -0.11 -4 .3 3 -7 .0 4

S tructures....................................

Private nonresidential investment accelerated, m ainly
reflecting a sharp upturn in business investment in
equipment and software.

Permanent site.....................
Single family.....................
Multifamily.........................
Other structures6.................
E q u ip m en t...................................

0.5

9.9

13.6

-2 .9

-3.1

0.04

0.06 -0.01 -0.01

1. The estimates of fixed investment under the contribution columns are also percent changes.
2. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and
recreational structures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of struc­
tures.
3. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
4. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments,
photocopy and related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
5. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining
and oilfield machinery, service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
6 Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used struc­
tures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of residential structures.
Note. Percent changes are from NIPA table 5.3.1, contributions are from NIPA table 5.3.2, and shares
are calculated from NIPA table 5.3.5.




C hart 3. Real Private Fixed Investm ent
Percent change from the preceding q ua rter
1 5 -------------------------------:--------------------------------

Based on seasonally adjusted annual rates

2003
2004
2005
2006
C ontributions to the 0.9-percent decrease in real private fixed
investm ent in 2 00 6 :lll

Nonresidential structures

Nonresidential equipment and software

; Residential investment
-8

-6

-4

-2

0

2

4

Percentage points at an annual rate
U . B o E n m A alysis
.S ureau f co o ic n

6

8

December 2006

5

Survey of C urrent B usiness

Inventory Investm ent
Table 5. Real Change in Private Inventories by Industry

Inventory investment slowed, increasing $4.3 billion,
compared with an increase o f $12.5 billion in the sec­
ond quarter.

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars; seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

.1

Change from
preceding quarter

Level
2005
III

C hange in private inventories1 .. -1 2 .7

2006

2005

2006

IV

I

I
I

III

IV

I

I
I

III

43.5

41.2

53.7

58.0

56.2

-2 .3

12.5

1.1

4.8

4.3

1.9

2.4

3.7

-0.5

-2.4

0.5

-1.1

-0.5

-2.0

5.4

1.6

0.6

-1.5

7.4

-3.8

Manufacturing..................................... -1 2 .2
0.5
7.6
0.6 -1.3 -0.1
Durable-goods industries................
Nondurable-goods industries.......... -11.8
1.5
7.1
Wholesale trade................................. 10.2 13.3 15.0
Durable-goods industries................
7.5 17.8
6.4
Nondurable-goods industries..........
2.8 -3.3
8.2

11.1
5.7
5.2

11.5
9.6
2.2

12.7
-1.9
13.3

7.1
1.2
5.6

3.5
5.8
-1.9

0.4
3.9
-3.0

19.3
15.3
4.5

35.9
28.3
8.5

1.7
3.1
10.3 -11.4
-6.1 11.5

4.3
8.9
-3.7

16.6^
13.0
4.0

5.5
1.0
-4.7
10.8

7.8
1.0
1.0
-0.5
6.1

1.1
-7.4
0.3
4.6
2.9

35.6 -13.6
33.1 -14.3
2.8 -0.3
-2.0 -5.8
3.3
5.7

-5.0 —
6.7
-4.5 -8.4
0.0 -0.7
4.2
5.1
-4.7 -3.2

Inventory investment in the m ining, utilities, and con­
struction industries turned down, decreasing $3.8 b il­
lion after increasing $7.4 billion.

Farm....................................................
Mining, utilities, and construction.

Retail trade.......................................... -9.2
Motor vehicle and parts dealers
-13.3
Food and beverage stores............... -1.5
General merchandise stores...........
3.1
Other retail stores............................
1.8

26.4
19.8
1.3
1.1
5.1

12.8

4.3

Other industries...................................

-1.6

0.8

5.2

7.4

5.1

2.4

4.4

2.2

-2.3

Residual2............................................

-0.3

-3.6

-0.5

0.7

-0.1

-3.3

3.1

1.2

-0.8

2.40
2.20

2.42
2.22

2.40
2.20

2.40
2.20

3.55

3.48

3.50

Inventory investment in wholesale trade accelerated,
reflecting upturns in nonmerchant wholesale and in
nondurable-goods industries.

2.41
2.21

3.51

Inventory investment in m anufacturing slowed, re­
flecting a deceleration in inventory investment in durable-goods industries and a larger decrease in
nondurable-goods industries.

3.53

Addenda: Ratios of private
inventories to final sales of
dom estic business:3

Private inventories to final sales
Nonfarm inventories to final sales....
Nonfarm inventories to final sales of
goods and structures...................

1. The levels are from NIPA table 5.6.6B.
2. The residual is the difference between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines. It reflects
that chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive, because they are based on quantity indexes that
use weights of more than one period.
3. The ratios are from NIPA table 5.7.6B.

Inventory investment in retail trade decreased more
than in the second quarter, prim arily reflecting a
larger decrease in investment by retail motor vehicle
dealers.

Chart 4. Real Private Inventory Investment
Billions of chained (2000) dollars
80

Based on seasonally adjusted annual rates
60
40

Inventory Investment
The real change in private inventories, often called real p ri­
vate inventory investment, represents the change in the
physical stock o f goods held by businesses. It includes fin­
ished goods, goods at various stages o f production, and raw
materials.
The change in private inventories is a key component o f
gross domestic product (G D P ), w hich aims to measure out­
put derived from current production. To include the value
o f currently produced goods that are not yet sold and to
exclude the value o f goods produced in previous periods,
change in private inventories must be included in the G D P
calculation.
Thus, G D P can also be seen as the sum o f final sales o f
domestic product and the change in private inventories
(table 2).
For most industries, the estimates o f change in private
inventories are prepared by revaluing book-value estimates
o f inventories from the Census Bureau to a replacementcost basis and calculating the change over a quarter or year.
B E A does not always have complete data for every industry.




20
0
-2 0

I

J l i l ,

1

I.

I. .I

I, _

■

-4 0
-6 0
-8 0

-I— L

J ____ L

2003

2004

2005

2006

C om position of inventory investm ent in 2006:111

Mining, utilities, and construction

I
Manufacturing
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
-1 0

-5

U . B o E n m A alysis
.S ureau f co o ic n

0

10

15

2 0

6

GDP and the Econom y

December 2006

Exports and Im ports

Table 6. Real Exports and Imports of Goods and Services
[Seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Share of
currentdollar
exports
and
imports
(percent)

Change from
preceding period
(percent)

2006

2005

III
Exports of goods and
services1.......................

Contribution to
percent change in
real exports and imports
(percentage points)

IV

2006
1

I
I

2005
III

100.0

9.6

14.0

6.2

6.3

71.0
4.7

11.5
11.8

17.3
15.8

6.0
20.7

9.4
12.3

18.6 -10.3

26.5

14.4

28.1

16.3
2.7

Exports of goods2...................
Foods, feeds, and beverages..
Industrial supplies and
materials.............................
Capital goods, except
automotive..........................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..........................
Other......................................

7.5

13.6

8.9
3.4

11.7
0.2

Exports of services2...............

29.0

5.5

Imports of goods and
services1.......................

28.3

IV

9.6

2006
I

I
I

III

14.0

6.2

7.94 11.92
0.52 0.69

4.22
0.86

6.56
0.55

6.3'

2.9 -1.86

4.36

2.48

0.55

6.6

5.6

7.24

4.59

1.85

1.59

-4.6

26.7

1.02

0.22 -0.35

1.79

15.7
1.1
20.5 -19.7
6.7
6.7

15.6
25.5

1.02
0.01

1.39 0.10
0.68 -0.72

1.31
0.77

-1.0

1.71

2.07

5.3

13.2

100.0

13.2

9.1

1.4

Imports of goods2...................
Foods, feeds, and beverages..
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products......................
Petroleum and products.........
Capital goods, except
automotive..........................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts............................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..........................
Other......................................

84.7
3.3

14.1
1.9

9.4
16.5

-0.1
-4.8

13.3
14.7

15.6
40.6

1.9 -1.2
-4.8 -18.3

18.8

9./

16.1

11.1

15.6

14.3

19.6 12.1
3.9 -22.4

8.4
44.1

Imports of services2 ...............
Addenda:
Exports of agricultural goods3
Exports of nonagricultural
goods .................................
Imports of nonpetroleum
goods .................................

15.3

6.9 11.88
9.9 0.07

9.1

1.97 -0.29
1.4

Exports o f goods accelerated, increasing 9.4 percent,
compared with a 6.0-percent increase in the second
quarter. The acceleration reflected upturns in auto­
motive vehicles, engines, and parts, in “other” goods,
and in civilian aircraft, engines, and parts. A n acceler­
ation in nonautomotive consum er goods also contrib­
uted to real export growth.
Exports o f services turned down, prim arily reflecting
a downturn in travel, a deceleration in “other” private
services, and a larger decrease in transfers under U.S.
m ilitary agency sales.
Real im ports accelerated, increasing 5.3 percent after a
1.4-percent increase.

5.3'

7.90 -0.05
0.54 -0.16

5.75
0.32

13.4
7.0

2.03 0.27 -0.15
4.85 -0.67 -2.78

1.67
1.00

11.6

13.6

1.82

2.88

2.42

-1.3

-8.6

1.81

1.65 -0.15 -1.02

5.7 14.9 2.38
1.9 -28.8 -1.06

1.64
1.61
1.15

8.3

7.4

9.9

-2.7

5.1

6.4

23.8

19.1

11.9

16.8

5.1

9.7

12.3

3.9

Im ports o f services turned down, m ainly reflecting
downturns in travel and in passenger fares.

10.1

70.0

1.07 2.74
0.08 -1.39
1.49 -0.42

Im ports o f goods turned up, reflecting upturns in pe­
troleum and products and in nonpetroleum industrial
supplies and materials and an acceleration in nonau­
tomotive consumer goods. Im ports o f “other” goods
turned down and automotive vehicles, engines, and
parts decreased more than in the second quarter.

1.4

65.9

1.32

2.0b

6.8

1. The estimates under the contribution columns are also percent changes.
2. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the
Federal Government, are included in services.
3. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and
of nondurable nonautomotive consumer goods.
Note. Percent changes are from NIPA table 4.2.1, contributions are from NIPA table 4.2.2, and shares
are calculated from NIPA table 4.2.5.




Real export growth increased 6.3 percent, slightly
more than in the second quarter.

Chart 5. Real Exports and Imports of Goods
and Services
Percent change from the preceding quarter

24

■ Exports
■ Imports

18

12

J ill11 1III

6

1

o

—
6

J ____ I
____ I
____ I
____ I
____ L

2003

U . B o E n m A alysis
.S ureau f co o ic n

2004

J____ I________ I____ L

2005

2006

December 2006

7

Survey of C urrent B usiness

G overnm en t Spending
Table 7. Real Government Consumption Expenditures
and Gross Investment (CEGI)
[Seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Share of
currentdollar
CEGI
(percent)

Contribution to percent
change in real CEGI
(percentage points)

Change from
preceding period
(percent)

2006
III

IV

2006

2005
I

II

2005
III

IV

2006
I

I
I

III

/

Real government spending accelerated, increasing 2.2
percent after increasing 0.8 percent.

/
G overnm ent consum ption expen­
ditures and gross investm ent1...

100.0

-1.1

4.9

0.8

82.9 -2.1
17.1
4.0

4.4 -0.5
7.6 7.4

F e d e ra l....................................................

36.5

-4 .6

8.8

National d e fe n s e ............................

24.3

-9 .9

8.9

Consumption expenditures
Gross investment......................

Consumption expenditures
Gross investment......................
N ondefense.......................................

Consumption expenditures
Gross investment......................

-1.1

4.9

0.8

2 .2 '

2.5 -1.74
0.8 0.66

3.65 -0.41 2.07
1.26 1.22 0.14

-4 .5

1.5 -1 .7 3

3.17 -1 .6 9

-2 .0

-1.1 -2 .5 7

2.15 -0.5 0 -0 .2 7

21.2 -10.8
3.1 -3.1

9.1 -4.1
7.9 14.1

-1.0 -2.47
-1.8 -0.10

1.91 -0.91 -0.21
0.24 0.41 -0.06

12.2

8.5

7.1

10.6 2.4
1.5 43.8

-9 .3

8.1 -5.0
10.8 -32.9

63 5

Consumption expenditures...........
Gross investment.........................

2.2

10

27

40

51.1
12.4

1.0
1.4

1.7
7.0

2.1
12.5

0.54

0.84

1.02 -1.1 9

0.80

7.4 0.25
3.2 0.59

0.85 -0.55
0.18 -0.65

0.76
0.05

26

0 66

1 74

2 50

1 6 7 ------ —

3.0 0.49
1.2 0.17

0.89
0.85

1.05 1.52
1.46 0.15

Federal Governm ent spending turned up, reflecting an
upturn in nondefense spending that was due to up­
turns in consum ption expenditures and in gross in ­
vestment. Defense spending decreased 1.1 percent,
following a decrease o f 2.0 percent in the second quar­
ter.

6.8

State and local government spending decelerated,
m ainly reflecting a sharp deceleration in investment in
structures.

1. The estimates under the contribution columns are also percent changes.
Note. Percent changes are from NIPA table 3.9.1, contributions from NIPA table 3.9.2, and shares are
calculated from NIPA table 3.9.5.

Chart 6. Real Government Consumption Expenditures
and Gross Investment_________________________
Government Spending
“Governm ent consum ption expenditures and gross invest­
ment,” or “government spending,” consists o f two main
components: (1) Consum ption expenditures by Federal
and by state and local governments and (2) gross invest­
ment by government and government-owned enterprises.
Governm ent consum ption expenditures consists o f the
goods and services that are produced by general govern­
ment (less any sales to other sectors and investment goods
produced by government itself). Governments generally
provide services to the general public without charge. The
value o f government production— that is, government’s
gross output— is measured as spending for labor and capi­
tal services and for intermediate goods and services.1
Gross investment consists of new and used structures
(such as highways and dams) and equipment and software
purchased or produced by government and governmentowned enterprises.
Governm ent consum ption and gross investment excludes
current transactions o f government-owned enterprises,
current transfer payments, interest payments, subsidies,
and transactions in financial assets and nonproduced assets,
such as land.
1. Capital services is also known as consumption of fixed capital (depre­
ciation) and represents a partial measure of the services provided by gov­
ernment-owned fixed capital.




Percent change from the preceding quarter
8

Based on seasonally adjusted annual rates

4

1
1 |.
I l ■1II J 1 1
1

-2

1

2003

1

1

!

2004

M

\

2005

2006

Contributions to the 2.2-percent increase in 2006:111

■

National defense spendin 9

Nondefense spending

State and local goverriment spending

-2

0

2

Percentage points at an annual rate

U . B o E n m A alysis
.S ureau f co o ic n

4

8

GDP and the Econom y

December 2006

Prices

Table 8. Prices for Gross Domestic Purchases
[Percent change at annual rates; based on seasonally adjusted index numbers (2000=100)]
Contribution to percent
change in gross domestic
purchases prices
(percentage points)

Change from
preceding period
(percent)
2005

2006

2005

2006

IV
Gross dom estic purchases1 ......................

I

I
I

III

IV

I

I
I

III

3.5

2.7

4.0

2.1

3.5

2.7

4.0

2.1

2.4

1.93

1.35

2.66

1.60

Inflation, as measured by the price index for gross do­
mestic purchases, was 2.1 percent, the slowest rate of
inflation since the fourth quarter o f 2003. In the sec­
ond quarter, it was 4.0 percent.
Consum er prices decelerated, prim arily reflecting a
sharp deceleration in prices paid for gasoline, fuel oil,
and other energy goods.

Personal consum ption exp end itures...........

2.9

2.0

4.0

Durable goods............................................
Nondurable goods......................................
Services.....................................................

-1.3
0.6
5.0

-1.0
1.1
3.1

-0.8
8.3
2.9

Gross private dom estic investm ent.............

4.3

3.7

3.1

Fixed investment........................................
Nonresidential........................................
Structures...........................................
Equipment and software.....................
Residential.............................................
Change in private inventories.....................

4.6
3.5
16.8
-1.0
6.3

3.8

3.7
12.4
0.6
3.8

3.0
3.0
10.7
0.1
2.9

G overnm ent consum ption expenditures
and gross investm ent...................................

4.7

4.4

4.8

2.1

0.84

0.79

0.86

0.38

Federal.......................................................
National defense....................................
Nondefense............................................
State and local...........................................

0.4
1.0
-0.7
7.3

7.6
6.7
9.5
2.6

3.8
4.1
3.2
5.4

1.6 0.03
2.1 0.04
0.6 -0.01
2.4 0.81

0.49
0.29
0.20
0.30

0.25
0.18
0.07
0.61

0.10
0.09
0.01
0.27

Energy prices increased 0.6 percent after increasing
30.6 percent. Food prices accelerated.

2.3
14.8

2.6
-2.4

1.7
30.6

3.0
0.6

0.22 0.24
0.70 -0.11

0.16
1.37

0.28
0.04/

Excluding food and energy prices, inflation was 2.0
percent, slower than the 2.9 percent registered in the
second quarter.

2.54

2.49

1.74-

-1.1 -0.10 -0.07 -0.06 -0.08
2.3 0.11 0.21 1.58 0.46
3.1 1.92 1.22 1.15 1.22
0.5

0.68

0.58

0.4 0.71 0.59
0.8 0.34 0.36
5.2 0.41 0.32
-1.0 -0.07 0.04
-0.3 0.37 0.23
-0.03 -0.01

0.50

0.08

0.47 0.07'
0.30 0.08
0.29 0.15
0.01 -0.07
0.17 -0.02
0.03 0.02

Addenda:

Gross domestic purchases:
Food...........................................................
Energy goods and services........................

Prices o f fixed investment decelerated, reflecting a de­
celeration in the prices paid for nonresidential struc­
tures and downturns in the prices paid for equipment
and software and for residential investment.
Prices paid by government slowed, reflecting decelera­
tions in the prices paid by the Federal Governm ent
and by state and local governments.

Excluding food and energy.........................
Personal consumption expenditures (PCE):
Food...........................................................
Energy goods and services........................
Excluding food and energy.........................
“Market-based” PCE..................................
Excluding food and energy.....................

3.0

3.0

2.9

2.0

2.2
9.8
2.5
2.5
1.9

2.7
2.1

2.9
3.7
2.2
2.2
1.9

Consum er prices excluding food and energy, a mea­
sure o f the “core” rate o f inflation, increased 2.2 per­
cent, following a 2.7-percent increase.

1.6

1.7
29.7
2.7
4.2
2.7

Gross domestic product.................................

3.3

3.3

3.3

1.8

The “market-based” P C E price index increased 2.2
percent; excluding food and energy, it increased 1.9
percent.

0.1
1./

2.59

1. The estimates under the contribution columns are also percent changes.
Note. All the percent changes except those for PCE for food and energy goods and services and for
PCE excluding food and energy are from NIPAtable 1.6.7; the changes for PCE are calculated from index
numbers in NIPA table 2.3.4. The contributions are from NIPA table 1.6.8.

Note on Prices
BEA ’s gross domestic purchases price index is the most com ­
prehensive index o f prices paid by U.S. residents for all
goods and services purchased in the United States. It is
derived from prices o f consumer spending, private invest­
ment, government spending, all o f which include prices of
imports.
The G D P price index measures the prices paid for all the
goods and services produced in the United States, and it
includes the prices o f goods and services that are exported.
The difference between the gross domestic purchases
price index and the G D P price index reflects the differences
between the im ports prices (included in the gross domestic
purchases index) and the exports prices (included in the
G D P price index).




Chart 7. Gross Domestic Purchases Prices
Percent change from the preceding quarter
® ■ Total 1 Less food and energy

2003

2004

2005

2006

Note. Percent change at annual rate from preceding quarter; based on seasonally adjusted
index numbers (2000=100).

U . B o E n m A alysis
.S ureau f co o ic n

December 2006

Survey of C urrent B usiness

9

R evisions
Table 9. Advance and Preliminary Estimates for the Third Quarter of 2006
[Seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Contribution to percent
change in real GDP
(percentage points)

Change from
preceding quarter
(percent)

Prelim­
Prelim­
inary
inary
Ad­ Prelim­
Ad­ Prelim­
minus
minus
vance inary
vance inary
ad­
ad­
vance
vance

1.6

2.2

1.6

2.2

Personal consum ption exp end itures..................

3.1

2.9

-0 .2

2.13

1.99

-0 .1 4

Durable goods.................................................
Nondurable goods...........................................
Services..........................................................

8.4

6.0
1.1
3.1

-2.4
-0.5
0.3

0.66
0.33
1.15

0.47
0.23
1.29

-0.19
-0.10
0.14

Gross private dom estic inve s tm e n t....................

-2 .0

0.0

2.0

-0 .3 4

0.01

0.35

Fixed investment..............................................
Nonresidential..............................................
Structures................................................
Equipment and software...........................
Residential...................................................
Change in private inventories...........................

-1.4
8.6
14.0
6.4
-17.4

-0.9
10.0
16.7
7.2
-18.0

0.5
1.4
2.7
0.8
-0.6

-0.24 -0.15
0.88
1.01
0.41
0.49
0.46 0.52
-1.12 -1.16
-0 .1 0
0.16

0.09
0.13
0.08
0.06
-0.04
0.26

Exports............................................................
Goods..........................................................
Services.......................................................
Imports............................................................
Goods..........................................................
Services........................................................

6.5
10.0
-1.5
7.8
9.5
-1.0

6.3
9.4
-1.0
5.3
6.9
-2.7

-0.2
-0.6
0.5
-2.5
-2.6
-1.7

Governm ent consumption expenditures and
gross investm ent....................................................

2.0

2.2

0.2

Federal............................................................
National defense..........................................
Nondefense.................................................
State and local................................................

1.7
-0.7
6.9
2.1

1.5
-1.1
6.8
2.6

-0.2
-0.4
-0.1
0.5

1.7
2.0
1.8

2.1
2.1
1.8

0.4
0.1
0.0

Gross dom estic product (G D P )' ..................

1.6
2.8

0.6

-0.21

0.37

0.70 0.68
0.75 0.71
-0.05 -0.03
-1.28 -0.89
-1.31 -0.96
0.03 0.07

-0.02
-0.04
0.02
0.39
0.35
0.04

-0.5 8

Net exports of goods and s erv ic e s .....................

0.6

The 2.2-percent prelim inary estimate o f real G D P
growth is 0.6 percentage point more than the advance
estimate. The upward revision prim arily reflected a
downward revision to im ports of goods and upward
revisions to inventory investment and to consumer
spending for services; these changes were partly offset
by a downward revision to consumer spending for du­
rable goods. For the period 1978-2005, the revisions,
w ithout regard to sign, averaged 0.5 percentage point
from the advance to the prelim inary estimates.

0.37

0.42

0.05

0.12 0.10
-0.03 -0.05
0.15 0.15
0.25 0.32

-0.02
-0.02
0.00
0.07

Addenda:

Final sales of domestic product........................
Gross domestic purchases price index............
GDP price index...............................................

1.68

2.06

0.38

The downward revision to consumer spending for du­
rable goods was widespread; the largest contributor
was motor vehicles and parts.
The upward revision to consum er spending for ser­
vices was prim arily due to upward revision to electric­
ity and gas services.
The upward revision to inventory investment was
m ainly due to an upward revision to wholesale trade
inventories.
The downward revision to im ports o f goods was w ide­
spread; the largest contributor was nonpetroleum in ­
dustrial supplies and materials.

1. The estimates for GDP under the contribution columns are also percent changes.

Source Data for the Preliminary Estimates

Personal Income for the Second Quarter

Personal consumption expenditures: Retail sales for August

W ith the release o f the prelim inary estimates o f G D P , B E A
also releases revised estimates o f various income-related
series for the previous quarter. T h is revision reflects the
incorporation o f newly available, second-quarter tabula­
tions from the quarterly census o f employment and wages
from the Bureau o f Labor Statistics.
Wages and salaries increased $10.8 billion in the second
quarter, a downward revision o f $100.3 billion. Personal
current taxes increased $28.4 billion, a downward revision
o f $17.6 billion. Contributions for government social insur­
ance— a subtraction in calculating personal incom e— in ­
creased $2.1 billion, a downward revision o f $14.1 billion.
As a result o f these revisions
• Personal income increased $85.9 billion, a downward revi­
sion o f $93.7 billion.
• Disposable personal incom e increased $57.4 billio n, a
downward revision o f $76.2 billion.
• Personal saving decreased $101.1 billion, a downward revi­
sion o f $76.2 billion.
• The personal saving rate was -1 .4 percent, a downward
revision o f 0.8 percentage point.

and September (revised). M otor vehicle registrations for
July and August (revised) and for September (new).
Retail electricity and natural gas sales for August (new).
Nonresidential fixed investment: Construction put in
place for July and August (revised) and for June (new).
M anufacturers’ shipments o f m achinery and equipment
for August and September (revised). Exports and
im ports for August (revised) and for September (new).
Residential investment: Construction put in place for
July and August (revised) and for September (new).
Change in private inventories: M anufacturers’ invento­
ries for August and September (revised) and trade inven­
tories for August (revised) and for September.
Exports and imports of goods and services: International
transactions accounts for August (revised) and for Sep­
tember (new).

Government consumption expenditures and gross invest­
ment: State and local government construction put in
place for July and August (revised) and for September
(new).




GDP and the Economy

10

D ecem ber 2006

C o rp o ra te P ro fits

Table 10. Corporate Profits

P r o f its f r o m c u r r e n t p r o d u c t i o n i n c r e a s e d $ 6 6 . 2 b i l­

[Seasonally adjusted]

li o n , o r 4 . 2 p e r c e n t a t a q u a r t e r l y r a t e , in th e th ir d

Billions of dollars (annual rate)

Percent change from
preceding quarter
(quarterly rate)

Change from
preceding quarter

Level
2006

2005

III

IV

II

C o m p a r e d w i th t h e s a m e q u a r t e r a y e a r a g o , p r o f its
in cre a s e d

2006
I

q u a r t e r a f te r in c r e a s i n g $ 2 2 . 7 b i lli o n , o r 1 .4 p e r c e n t.

2005
III

IV

2006
I

3 0 .9

p e rc e n t.

The

s tro n g

y e a r-o v e r-y e a r

g r o w t h r e f le c te d th e e f fe c ts o f H u r r i c a n e s K a t r i n a a n d

II

III

R ita , w h ic h r e d u c e d t h i r d - q u a r t e r 2 0 0 5 p r o f its a b o u t
$ 1 6 5 b illio n .

Current production measures:
Corporate protits................................ 1,658.0 127.2 175.6
Domestic industries....................... 1,420.9 154.3 145.8

22.7
8.9

66.2
69.0

10.0
14.8

12.6
12.2

1.4
0.7

4.2
5.1

Financial.....................................

481.7

94.7

51.4

41.7

-2.2

32.0

13.1

9.4

-0 .4 -

Nonfinancial...............................

939.2

59.6

94.5 -32.8

71.1

8.0

11.7

-3.6

-2.8 -12.1

15.2

6.1

$ 2 . 2 b i lli o n , o r 0 . 4 p e r c e n t .

8 .2 -

29.8

P r o f its o f d o m e s t i c f in a n c i a l c o r p o r a t i o n s d e c r e a s e d

Rest of the world...........................
Receipts from the rest of the
world...................................
L ess : Payments to the rest of
the world............................
L ess :Taxes on corporate income....

237.1 -27.1

-1.2

P r o f its

of

d o m e s tic

n o n fin a n c ia l

co rp o ra tio n s

in ­

c r e a s e d $ 7 1 .1 b i lli o n , o r 8 . 2 p e r c e n t .
407.5

16.6

15.7

25.7

5.5

4.8

4.4

6.8

1.4

170.5

43.7 -14.0

11.9

8.4

36.3

-8.5

7.9

5.1

491.1

45.7

32.3

19.2

15.0

12.1

7.6

4.2

3.2-

650.4

81.4 143.2
17.0 14.7

3.6
15.4

51.1
19.3

9.2
2.9

14.8
2.5

0.3
2.5

4.6
3.0

516.5

64.4 128.5 -11.8

31.9

21.2

34.9

-2.4

6.6

-6.8 125.3

34.5

-0.5

10.2

0.1

2.6

67.9
7.9
70.8 11.6
-1.1 30.2
71.9
5.0
-2 .8 -12.1

10.2
9.5
12.2
8.2
15.2

E q u a ls: Profits after tax..................... 1,166.8

Net dividends.................................
Undistributed profits from current
production...............................

13.8

Net cash flow..................................... 1,384.8

1.1

T a x e s o n c o r p o r a t e i n c o m e in c r e a s e d $ 1 5 . 0 b i lli o n , o r
3 . 2 p e r c e n t , c o m p a r e d w i th a n in c r e a s e o f $ 1 9 . 2 b i l­
li o n , o r 4 . 2 p e r c e n t .
A f t e r - t a x p r o f its in c r e a s e d $ 5 1 .1 b i llio n , o r 4 . 6 p e r c e n t
a f te r i n c r e a s i n g $ 3 . 6 b i lli o n , o r 0 . 3 p e r c e n t .
U n d i s t r i b u t e d c o r p o r a t e p r o f its ( a m e a s u r e o f n e t s a v ­

Industry profits:
Profits with IVA............................... 1,820.5 114.2 158.6 34.9
Domestic industries.................. 1,583.5 141.3 128.8 21.1
Financial................................. 507.1 95.9 50.6 44.3
Nonfinancial........................... 1,076.4 45.3 78.3 -23.2
237.1 -27.1 29.8 13.8
Rest of the world.......................

2.0
3.9
1.4
4.7
9.5 -0.2
-2.3
7.2
6.1 -1.2

Addenda:
Profits before tax (without IVA and
CCAdj)............................................ 1,857.8 122.5 142.3 70.9
Profits after tax (without IVA and
CCAdj)............................................ 1,366.6 76.8 110.0 51.7
IVA....................................................... -37.2 -8.3 16.3 -36.0
CCAdj................................................. -162.6 13.0 17.0 -12.2
N ote . Levels of these and other profits series are
shown in NIPA tables 1 .1 2 ,1 .1 4 ,1 .1 5 , and 6.16D.

in g t h a t e q u a ls a f t e r - t a x p r o f its less d i v id e n d s )

in ­

c r e a s e d $ 3 1 . 9 b i lli o n , o r 6 . 6 p e r c e n t , in c o n t r a s t t o a
d e c r e a s e o f $ 1 1 . 8 b i llio n , o r 2 . 4 p e r c e n t .
N e t c a s h flo w f r o m c u r r e n t p r o d u c t i o n , a p r o f i t s - r e -

46.3

8.3

8.9

4.1

31.2
21.7
-1.8

7.0

9.4

4.0

2.6
2.3

la t e d m e a s u r e o f in t e r n a l l y g e n e r a t e d f u n d s a v a ila b le
f o r i n v e s tm e n t, i n c r e a s e d $ 3 4 . 5 b i llio n , o r 2 . 6 p e r c e n t
a f te r i n c r e a s i n g $ 1 . 1 b i llio n , o r 0 .1 p e r c e n t .

IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment

Measuring Corporate Profits
C o r p o r a t e p r o f its is a w id e ly f o llo w e d e c o n o m i c i n d i c a t o r

i n f o r m a t i o n f r o m th e I n t e r n a l R e v e n u e S e r v i c e ; B E A u s e s

u s e d to g a u g e c o r p o r a t e h e a l t h , a s se s s in v e s t m e n t c o n d i ­

ta x a c c o u n tin g m e a su re s as a s o u rc e o f in fo rm a tio n o n

t i o n s , a n d a n a ly z e th e e f fe c t o n c o r p o r a t i o n s o f e c o n o m i c

p r o f its f o r tw o r e a s o n s : T h e y a r e b a s e d o n w e l l-s p e c if ie d

p o lic ie s a n d c o n d i t i o n s . I n a d d i t i o n , c o r p o r a t e p r o f its is a n

a c c o u n t i n g d e f in iti o n s , a n d t h e y a r e c o m p r e h e n s i v e , c o v e r ­

i m p o r t a n t c o m p o n e n t in k e y m e a s u r e s o f i n c o m e .

in g all i n c o r p o r a t e d b u s in e s s e s — p u b l ic ly t r a d e d a n d p r i ­

B E A ’s m e a s u r e o f c o r p o r a t e p r o f its a im s t o c a p t u r e th e

v a t e ly h e ld — in all i n d u s t r ie s . B E A a ls o u s e s o t h e r s o u r c e s

in c o m e e a rn e d b y c o r p o r a tio n s fro m c u r re n t p ro d u c tio n

o f i n f o r m a t i o n t o e s t i m a t e p r e t a x p r o f its , in c l u d in g i n f o r ­

in a m a n n e r t h a t is fu lly c o n s i s t e n t w i th

m a t i o n f r o m th e C e n s u s B u r e a u .

th e

n a tio n a l

i n c o m e a n d p r o d u c t a c c o u n t s ( N I P A s ) . T h e m e a s u r e is
d e f in e d a s r e c e i p ts a r is in g f r o m

S e c o n d , t o r e m o v e t h e e f fe c ts o f p r i c e c h a n g e s o n in v e n ­

c u r r e n t p r o d u c t i o n less

to r i e s v a l u e d a t h i s t o r i c a l c o s t a n d o f t a x a c c o u n t i n g f o r

a s s o c i a t e d e x p e n s e s . R e c e ip t s e x c lu d e i n c o m e in th e f o r m

in v e n t o r y w i th d r a w a ls , B E A a d d s a n i n v e n t o r y v a l u a t i o n

o f d iv id e n d s a n d c a p i t a l g a in s , a n d e x p e n s e s e x c lu d e b a d

a d j u s t m e n t t h a t v a lu e s in v e n t o r ie s a t c u r r e n t c o s t .

d e b ts , n a t u r a l r e s o u r c e d e p le ti o n , a n d c a p i t a l lo s s e s .

T h i r d , t o r e m o v e t h e e f fe c ts o f t a x a c c o u n t i n g o n d e p r e ­

B e ca u s e d ire c t e s tim a te s o f N IP A -co n s is te n t c o r p o r a te
p r o f its

a r e u n a v a il a b le , B E A

d e r iv e s th e s e

e s tim a te s

in

t h r e e s te p s .

c ia tio n ,

BEA

add s

a

c a p ita l

c o n s u m p tio n

a d ju s tm e n t

( C C A d j ) , w h ic h is d e f in e d a s th e d if f e r e n c e b e t w e e n c o n ­
s u m p t i o n o f f ix e d c a p i t a l ( t h e d e c li n e in th e v a l u e o f th e

F i r s t , B E A m e a s u r e s p r o f its b e f o r e t a x e s t o r e f le c t c o r p o ­

s t o c k o f a s s e ts d u e t o w e a r a n d te a r , o b s o l e s c e n c e , a c c i d e n ­

r a t e i n c o m e r e g a r d le s s o f a n y r e d i s t r i b u t i o n s o f i n c o m e

ta l d a m a g e , a n d a g i n g ) a n d c a p i t a l c o n s u m p t i o n a ll o w ­

t h r o u g h ta x e s . T h i s m e a s u r e is p a r t l y b a s e d o n t a x r e t u r n

a n ce s (ta x re tu rn d e p re c ia tio n ).




D ece m ber 2006

11

Government Receipts and Expenditures
E s t im a t e s fo r t h e T h ir d Q u a r t e r o f 2 0 0 6
ET government saving, the difference between
current receipts and current expenditures of the
Federal Government and state and local governments,
was -$171.7 billion in the third quarter of 2006, de­
creasing $34.8 billion from -$136.9 billion in the sec­
ond quarter.
Net Federal Government saving was -$169.7 billion
in the third quarter, decreasing $6.6 billion from
-$163.1 billion in the second quarter (see page 12).
Current receipts accelerated, and current expenditures
decelerated.
Net state and local government saving was -$2.0 bil­
lion in the third quarter, decreasing $28.1 billion from
$26.1 billion in the second quarter (see page 13). Cur­
rent receipts decelerated, and current expenditures ac­
celerated.
Net borrowing was $338.1 billion in the third quar­
ter and $300.3 billion in the second quarter. Federal
Government net borrowing was $227.1 billion in the
third quarter and $216.0 billion in the second quarter.
State and local government net borrowing was $111.0
billion in the third quarter and $84.3 billion in the sec­
ond quarter.

N

Chart 1. Government Fiscal Position
Current Receipts, C urrent Expenditures, and Net G overnm ent Saving
B illio n s o f d o lla r s

Net Saving
B illio n s o f d o lla r s
100

-1 0 0
-2 0 0
-3 0 0
-4 0 0

w

w

r

n

r

I Federal ■ State and local

-5 0 0
-6 0 0

2003
2004
2005
2006
Total R eceipts,Total Expenditures, and Net Lending o r B orrow ing

B illio n s o f d o lla r s
5 ,00 0

Total expenditures.

4 .0 0 0

Table 1. Net Government Saving and Net Lending or Net Borrowing
[Billions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

3 .00 0

Total receipts
2 .00 0

Level

Change from preceding quarter

2006

2005

III

IV

1,000

2006

Net lending or borrowing .

0

I

II

III

Current receipts.................................
Current expenditures.........................
Net governm ent s a vin g ..................
Federal............................................
State and local................................

4,001.6
4,173.3
-171.7
-169.7
-2.0

194.1
59.5
134.6
132.4
2.1

182.6
66.5
36.0
69.3
146.5 -2.6
116.6 -16.1
29.9
13.4

40.0
74.7
-34.8
-6.6
-28.1

Net lending or net borrowing (-)...
Federal............................................
State and local................................

-338.1
-227.1
-111.0

113.8
129.3
-15.5

136.7
110.5
26.2

-37.8
-11.1
-26.7

-5.5
-9.9
4.4

-1 ,0 0 0

2003
2004
Net Lending or Net Borrow ing

2005

2006

B illio n s o f d o lla r s
100
0
-1 0 0
-2 0 0
-3 0 0
-4 0 0
-5 0 0
-6 0 0

A n dre w P. Cairns prepared this article.




■ Federal ■ State and local
_____i_____I_____ i_____ i_____

2003

2004

2005

Note. All estimates are seasonally adjusted at annual rates.
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

2006

12

Government Receipts and Expenditures

December 2006

F e d e ral G o v e rn m e n t

Table 2. Federal Government Current Receipts and Expenditures
[Billions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Level

Change from preceding quarter

2006

IV

2006

2005

III
Current re c e ip ts ................................. 2,562.2
Current tax receipts..................................... 1,581.7
Personal current taxes............................. 1,067.0

I

II

III

167.4
64.2
27.4

141.1
96.5
70.8

32.3
28.3
10.7

39.0
28.5
17.1

Taxes on production and im ports...........
Taxes on corporate incom e....................
Taxes from the rest of the w orld .............
Contributions for government social
insurance..................................................
Income receipts on assets..........................
Current transfer receipts.............................
Current surplus of government enterprises

100.9
402.1
11.7

-0.8
37.6
0.0

-0.5
27.2
-1.0

1.9
15.1
0.5

-2.1
12.7
0.8

923.3
25.1
33.6
-1.5

10.6
-0.5
92.3
0.6

38.1
1.0
1.6
4.0

2.2
0.9
0.6
0.3

9.20.9
0.8
-0.4

Current expenditures.........................
Consumption expenditures.........................
National defense......................................
Nondefense..............................................
Current transfer payments..........................
Government social benefits....................
To persons.............................................
To the rest of the world.........................
Other current transfer payments.............
Grants-in-aid to state and local
governments......................................
To the rest of the world.........................
Interest payments........................................
Subsidies......................................................
Less: Wage accruals less disbursements
Net Federal Government saving.............
Social insurance fu nds...............................
Other.............................................................
Addenda:
Total re ce ip ts..........................................
Current receipts....................................
Capital transfer receipts......................
Total expenditures.................................
Current expenditures............................
Gross government investment............
Capital transfer payments...................
Net purchases of nonproduced assets
Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Net lending or borrowing ( - ) ..............

2,731.9
808.8
539.0
269.8
1,566.7
1,175.6
1,172.2
3.4
391.1

34.8
-13.2
-14.0
0.8
21.1
8.9
8.8
0.1
12.2

24.6
32.5
20.8
11.7
19.6
52.1
52.0
0.0
-32.4

48.3
-1.3
0.0
-1.3
24.6
17.6
17.6
0.1
7.0

45.7
6.5
1.3
5.2
20.1
9.2
9.1
0.1
10.8

365.6
25.5
304.9
51.6
0.0
-169.7
44.7
-214.4

4.9
7.3
21.9
5.0
0.0
132.4
4.5
128.0

-15.5
-16.9
-19.6
-8.0
0.0
116.6
-12.3
128.8

5.7
1.2
27.9
-2.8
0.0
-16.1
-13.6
-2.5

8.62.3
19.5
-0.3
0.0
-6.6
2.1
-8.7

2.588.7
2,562.2
26.5
2.815.8
2.731.9
117.9
70.1
0.8
105.0
-227.1

168.8
167.4
1.4
39.5
34.8
3.6
-0.5
2.3
0.9
129.3

143.6
141.1
2.5
33.1
24.6
3.1
7.2
0.2
1.7
110.5

31.2
32.3
-1.1
41.1
48.3
-0.8
-2.8
-2.5
1.3
-9.9

Personal current taxes accelerated, reflecting an accel­
eration in withheld income taxes.
Taxes on production and imports turned down, re­
flecting a downturn in telephone excise taxes that re­
sulted from the elimination of the long-distance
telephone excise tax that took effect in August.
Contributions for government social insurance accel­
erated, reflecting an acceleration in contributions by
employers, employees, and the self-employed for so­
cial security.
Nondefense consumption expenditures turned up.
The upturn was accounted for by an upturn in spend­
ing for hurricane relief.
Government social benefits to persons decelerated, re­
flecting decelerations in benefits for social security
and for the Medicare prescription drug program.
Grants-in-aid to state and local governments acceler­
ated, reflecting an acceleration in Medicaid grants.
Interest payments decelerated. The deceleration was
attributable to a slowdown in interest payments on the
public debt; in the second quarter, interest payments
were boosted by an upturn in interest paid on Trea­
sury Inflation Protected Securities.

37.8
39.0
-1.2
48.9
45.7
0.5
0.9
3.1
1.3
-11.1

Federal Government Estimates
Estimates of Federal Government current receipts, current tions by component are published annually in NIPA tables
expenditures, and net Federal Government saving are based 3.4-3.8, 3.12, and 3.13. Detailed quarterly estimates are
on data from the Federal budget, from the M onthly Trea­ available in underlying NIPA tables at <www.bea.gov/bea/
sury Statement and other reports from the Department of dn/nipaweb/nipa_underlying/Index.asp>.
the Treasury, and from other Federal Government agencies.
Each year, BEA prepares an article that compares NIPA
Total receipts, total expenditures, and net lending or net estimates and the Federal budget.1 For a historical time
borrowing, which are alternative measures of the Federal series of this comparison, see NIPA table 3.18B.
fiscal position, are based on these same sources.
Quarterly and annual estimates are published monthly in
1. See Benjamin A. Mandel and Mary L. Roy, “Federal Budget Estimates
NIPA table 3.2. Detailed annual estimates of these transac­ for Fiscal Year 2007,” S u r v e y o f C u r r e n t B u sin e ss 86 (March 2006): 12-22.




December 2006

S urvey

of

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

13

S ta te an d Lo cal G o v e rn m e n t

Table 3. State and Local Government Current Receipts and Expenditures
[Billions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Level

Change from preceding quarter

2006

2005

III

2006

IV

I

II

Current receipts.................................... 1,805.0
Current tax receipts........................................ 1,241.9
Personal current taxes...............................
298.6

31.8
19.7
5.3

25.8
35.0
14.1

40.1
32.0
17.7

9.5
-1.4
-12.5

Taxes on production and imports..............
872.3
Taxes on corporate income........................
70.9
Contributions for government social
insurance....................................................
24.7
Income receipts on assets.............................
78.1
Current transfer receipts................................
468.8
Federal grants-in-aid..................................
365.6
Other............................................................
103.2
Current surplus of government enterprises
-8.5
Current e xpenditures........................... 1,807.0
Consumption expenditures............................ 1,298.0

7.8
6.6

15.7
5.1

11.9
2.4

9.0
2.1

-0.1
0.7
-2.2
4.9
-7.2
13.8
29.6
25.6

-0.4
0.4
-9.3
-15.5
6.3
0.1
-4.1
12.8

-0.1
0.7
7.8
5.7
2.0
-0.4
26.7
24.5

0.0
0.7
10.5
8.6
2.0
-0.3
37.6
17.3

2.8
1.3
0.0
0.0
2.1
-0.4
2.6

-16.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
29.9
-0.6
30.5

1.3
0.8
0.0
0.0
13.4
-0.4
13.9

19.3
1.0
0.0
0.0
-28.1
-0.3
-27.9

31.1
31.8
-0.6
46.6
29.6
5.3

27.7
25.8
1.8
1.4
-4.1
7.7

40.4
40.1
0.4
36.1
26.7
11.8

0.2
-11.6
-15.5

0.2
2.4
26.2

0.2
2.5
4.4

Personal current taxes turned down. The downturn
was attributable to a downturn in state income taxes.

11.5
9.5
2.0
38.2
37.6
2.6
0.1
2.2
-26.7

Government social benefits...........................
411.0
Interest payments...........................................
97.6
0.4
Subsidies.........................................................
Less: Wage accruals less disbursements....
0.0
Net state and local government saving....
-2.0
5.5
Social insurance funds..................................
O ther...............................................................
-7.5
Addenda:
Total receipts............................................. 1.863.0
Current receipts...................................... 1.805.0
Capital transfer receipts..........................
58.0
Total expe nd iture s................................... 1.974.0
Current expenditures.............................. 1.807.0
Gross government investment...............
316.1
Capital transfer payments......................
Net purchases of nonproduced assets
12.3
Less: Consumption of fixed capital
161.4
Net lending or borrowing ( - ) .................. -111.0

III

Taxes on production and imports decelerated, reflect­
ing a deceleration in sales taxes.
The acceleration in Federal grants-in-aid reflected an
acceleration in Medicaid grants.
Consumption expenditures decelerated, reflecting a
slowdown in spending for nondurable goods. The
slowdown can be attributed to a deceleration in
spending for petroleum products.
Government social benefits accelerated sharply, re­
flecting an acceleration in Medicaid spending.

Estimates of State and Local G overnm ent Receipts and Expenditures
The estimates of state and local government current re­ annually in NIPA tables 3.4-3.8, 3.12, and 3.13. Detailed
ceipts and expenditures and total receipts and expenditures quarterly estimates are available in underlying NIPA
are mainly based on compilations of data for state and local tables at <www.bea.gov/bea/dn/nipaweb/nipa_underlying/
government finances. The Census Bureau produces the pri­ Index.aspX For a historical time series of reconciliations of
mary source data: The quinquennial census of governments the NIPA estimates with the Census Bureau data from
in years that end in a 2 or a 7 and the Government Finances Government Finances, see NIPA table 3.19.
series of surveys for the other years. In addition, other
BEA now prepares annual estimates of receipts and
sources of Census Bureau data are from the Quarterly Sum­ expenditures of state governments and of local
mary o f State and Local Government Tax Revenue and the governments.1 These estimates are available annually in
monthly Value o f Construction Put in Place. Data sources NIPA table 3.20 (state government receipts and expen­
from the Bureau of Labor Statistics include the Quarterly ditures) and in NIPA table 3.21 (local government receipts
Census of Employment and Wages and employer cost for and expenditures); see “Newly Available NIPA Tables” in
employee compensation.
the October 2006 S u r v e y .
Quarterly and annual estimates are available monthly in
NIPA table 3.3. Detailed annual estimates of state and
1. Bruce E. Baker, “Receipts and Expenditures of State Governments and
local government transactions by component are available of Local Governments,” S u r v e y 85 (October 2005): 5-10.




December 2006

14

B E A ’s 2 0 0 6 R e s e a r c h a n d D e v e lo p m e n t S a te llite A c c o u n t
P relim in ary E stim ates o f R & D fo r 1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 2
Effect on G D P and O th er M easu res
By Sumiye Okubo, Carol A. Robbins, Carol E. Moylan, Brian K. Sliker, Laura I. Schultz, and
Lisa S. Mataloni
HE Bureau of Economic Analysis has been work­
ing on a research and development (R&D) satel­
lite account since 2004 to help economists gain a better
understanding of R&D activity and its effect on eco­
nomic growth. This article introduces the 2006 satellite
account, which provides preliminary estimates of R&D
investment and the impact of R&D investment on such
measures as gross domestic product (GDP), invest­
ment, and saving.
The full 2006 satellite account, released in Septem­
ber and accessible via <www.bea.gov/bea/newsrelarchive/2006/rdspend06.htm>, modifies the accounting
conventions used in the national income and product
accounts (NIPAs) in order to explore the impact of
“capitalizing” R&D—that is, treating R&D spending as
an investment rather than as an expense. The new ac­
count does not affect the official measure of GDP.
Rather, the satellite account provides a framework to
explore new methodologies and provide regularly up­
dated estimates of R&D in preparation for future in­
corporation into the input-output (I-O) accounts and
the NIPAs.
The R&D satellite account was developed in part­
nership with the National Science Foundation (NSF),
the Federal agency that is responsible for producing
R&D-related statistics for the United States. NSF pro­
vided funding for the R&D satellite account project,
and its staff reviewed account methodologies and re­
sults. Using R&D expenditure data from the NSF, BEA
developed estimates of R&D investment, the R&D, and
the resulting macroeconomic effects for 1959-2002.1
Revised estimates are scheduled to be released in Sep­
tember 2007.
The 2006 account measures the direct effect of R&D

T

1. The NSF’s Division of Science Resources Statistics annually publishes
National Patterns o f Research and Development Resources, which includes
data based primarily on two annual NSF surveys: The Survey of Industrial
R&D (SIRD or RD-1) and the Survey of Research and Development
Expenditures at Universities and Colleges. Two additional annual surveys
provide information on outlays and obligations by the Federal Government
for R&D: The Survey of Federal Funds for R&D and the Survey of Federal
Science and Engineering Support to Universities, Colleges, and Nonprofit
Institutions. The biennial Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities
Survey provides information on construction plans and capital spending.




investment on final demand only; it does not include
spillover effects. Spillovers—the economic benefits of
R&D available to entities that did not pay to create the
R&D—are not included in the national accounts
framework because the national accounts value assets
at their market value. This treatment is consistent with
the treatment of other types of spillovers in the na­
tional accounts.
The new account makes clear that treating R&D as
an investment would have a substantial impact on
GDP and other measures. Highlights from the new sat­
ellite account include the following:
• Current-dollar investment in R&D totaled $276.5
billion in 2002.
• Recognizing R&D as investment would increase the
level of current-dollar GDP by an average 2x per­
h
cent per year in 1959-2002 (chart l).2
2. The results reported in the conclusions of this report are based on esti­
mates that value real (inflation-adjusted) R&D at prices of products pro­
duced by R&D-intensive industries.

Chart 1. Current-Dollar R&D Investment as a Percent

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• Businesses’ investment in commercial and all other is not necessarily the owner. Often, the original recipi­
types of buildings would account for just over 2 per­ ent of R&D funds may subcontract to others.
cent of real GDP growth in 1995-2002.
• R&D investment and the income flows arising from Measuring R&D as investm ent
accumulated R&D capital would account for about Measuring the output of R&D activity presents well4Vi percent of real GDP growth in 1959-2002. In known estimation challenges. Foremost among these
1995-2002, R&D investment would account for challenges is the lack of market transactions for most
R&D. Like other types of intangible investment, R&D
about 6V percent of growth.
2
• R&D investment would increase current-dollar investment is mainly created by firms and institutions
gross private domestic investment in 2002 more for internal use; it is rarely sold on the open market.
than 1 1 percent, or $178 billion. The national sav­ Therefore, for most of the R&D conducted in the
ing rate in 2002 would be 16 percent, instead of 14 United States, there is neither an observable market
percent.
price nor a product that can be used to measure out­
• Business investment in R&D as a percentage of GDP put.4
BEA’s standard approach to estimating nonmarket
surpassed government investment as a percentage
of GDP in 1981.
activity—such as the output of government and non­
• Business investment accounted for just under 2 per­ profit entities as well as goods that businesses create for
cent of current-dollar GDP in 2000, compared with their own use—is to measure the activity as the sum of
just over 1 percent in 1960.
input costs. In the case of R&D, this approach is made
The release of the satellite account in September possible by detailed, 50-year time-series data collected
marks another step in BEA’s efforts to adapt its mea­ by the NSF. However, the input-cost approach raises a
sures of economic activity to structural changes in the critical issue: How to adjust this proxy measure of
economy (see the box “Previous NIPA Improvements R&D output to account for changing prices? One of
Related to R&D”), particularly in the field of intangible the methods conventionally used for nonmarket out­
assets. BEA plans several additional enhancements to put is to apply input price indexes to these costs,
the R&D satellite account in the near future: An im­ thereby producing a measure of real output. Unfortu­
proved treatment of the international aspects of R&D, nately, this approach seems ill-suited for measuring
improved measures of prices for R&D, and new indus­ R&D: Deflation using input prices assumes that the
try-based estimates of R&D. Current plans, subject to output prices are changing at exactly the same rate as
available funding, call for the incorporation of R&D input costs, which precludes productivity gains that
into the 1-0 accounts in 2012 and into the NIPAs in stem from R&D. In other words, this approach cannot
2013.
account for multifactor productivity growth.
The 2006 satellite account builds on the earlier work
As a result, an input-price method would not reflect
at BEA.3 In 1994, BEA introduced the elements needed the dynamism of R&D activity. Products that embody
to translate R&D expenditures into investment, deflate a high level of R&D, such as computers and communi­
investment, and develop R&D stock measures. In 2005, cation equipment, tend to have relatively short life cy­
BEA went a step further and presented the general cles, paced by the rapid introduction of new, R&Dstructure of the account along with rough estimates of driven technologies. This relatively fast obsolescence
the impact on GDP, gross domestic income (GDI), and means that the time period during which the costs of
national saving. The 2006 satellite account extends R&D must be recovered is short. In order to earn high
these previous efforts by exploring alternative scenar­ rates of return, companies in R&D-intensive industries
ios that take into account the notable characteristics of must raise the productivity of new products by lower­
R&D activity and by developing a more complete na­ ing costs and increasing sales.
tional accounts framework to estimate R&D activity.
To account for these market dynamics, the 2006
In addition, BEA now recognizes the funder of R&D R&D satellite account provides estimates for four R&D
as the owner of R&D, that is, the entity that benefits scenarios— scenarios A, B, C, and D. The scenarios dif­
from the activity; earlier versions focused on the per­ fer in their assumptions in these areas: Price indexes,
former of R&D. The change stems from the need to as­ depreciation, rates of return to businesses, and rates of
sign income flows to the economic sectors included in return to government and nonprofit institutions
the national economic accounts. Assigning ownership serving households.
from performer data is difficult because the performer
----------------------------4. Census Bureau data for the R&D services industries provide estimates
3. See Carson, Grimm, and Moylan (1994). See also Fraumeni and Okubo
of market R&D, but this R&D is a relatively small share of total domestic
(2005).
R&D activity.




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2006 R&D Satellite Account

The rest of this article is organized as follows:
• The first section presents the new estimates of R&D
investment activity and details the impact of R&D
on such measures as real GDR It introduces the four
scenarios through which R&D is measured.
• The second section presents future initiatives to
enhance the R&D satellite account.
• The third section discusses key conceptual and
methodological issues that underlie the account.
This article also includes a list of references and ta­
bles of estimates from the 2006 R&D satellite account.

R & D a n d th e E c o n o m y
This section discusses the current treatment of R&D in
the NIPAs; new estimates of current-dollar R&D activ­
ity, the treatment of R&D in the 2006 satellite account,
and the effect of R&D on key economic measures un­
der the four scenarios.

Current treatm ent of R&D in BEA’s accounts
Domestic R&D expenditures are currently only partly
identifiable in BEA’s accounts.
In the 1-0 accounts, the identifiable portion is based
on data from the Census Bureau on establishments
classified in the scientific research and development
services industry. In BEA’s GDP-by-industry accounts,
estimates for the value added of this industry are in­
cluded in a broader sector: Miscellaneous professional,
scientific, and technical services. While Federal Gov­
ernment purchases of R&D are included in the 1-0 ac­
counts, they are not separately identified.
In the NIPAs, Federal purchases of R&D are treated
as government consumption, and spending on R&D
by foundations and nonprofit institutions serving
households are included in personal consumption ex­
penditures (consumer spending). In addition, BEA’s

December 2006

estimates of international trade in services provide
measures of exports and imports of R&D services. BEA
separately estimates royalties and licensing fees, which
include transactions for the use of R&D protected by
patents, considered payments for intermediate inputs.

Estim ates of current-dollar R&D
To provide a more complete picture of R&D activity,
the satellite account provides new R&D investment es­
timates derived from data from NSF (table A). The
preliminary estimates shows that current-dollar invest­
ment in R&D totaled $276.5 billion in 2002, account­
ing for 2.6 percent of GDP (adjusted to include R&D as
investment). Historically, the ratio of current-dollar
R&D investment to current-dollar GDP rose in the
mid-1960s, as the U.S. invested more in space-related
technologies, and fell in the 1970s. The ratio trended
upward again the early 1980s. Since 1990, the ratio has
averaged 2.5 percent (chart 1).
Business and government. During the early era of
space exploration in the mid-1960s, the R&D invest­
ment by government (Federal, state, and local govern­
ments) amounted to more than 2 percent of currentdollar GDP. Since 1960, Government R&D as a per­
centage of GDP has declined steadily since the 1960s,
falling to a 0.8 percent of GDP in 2000. In that year,
business-sector R&D investment equaled 1.8 percent
of GDP.
Government’s contribution to total R&D invest­
ment was also at its highest in the middle of the 1960s,
when it funded almost three-quarters of all R&D in­
vestment (chart 2). By 1981, business funded more in­
vestment in R&D than government.
Funders and performers. The satellite account
shows R&D activity by both funders and performers
(table B). In the satellite account, government includes

Table A. NSF Survey Data on Expenditures and Methods Used for Current-Dollar R&D Investment
Steps

Method

Impact on investment

1 Align the survey data on expenditures for labor,
material, and supplies with Frascaf/'-defined R&D

Add expenditures for R&D in social sciences and the humanities.
Subtract expenditures for commercialization

Increases
Decreases

2 Adjust the survey data for consistency with the NIPAs

Convert data from a fiscal year to a calendar year
Subtract expenditures for foreign performers

Increases or decreases
Decreases

3 Adjust the data for the double-counting of capital

Subtract capital expenditures for purchase of structures, equipment, and software

Decreases

4 Adjust the data to move from expenditures to the full
value of investment

Add the consumption of fixed capital on structures, equipment, and software
Add other taxes on production less production-related subsidies

Increases
Increases

5 Adjust the data for imports of R&D

Add imported R&D to domestic investment

Increases

6 Adjust the data for exports of R&D

Subtract exported R&D from domestic investment

Decreases

NIPAs National income and product accounts
NSF National Science Foundation




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public universities and colleges, and nonprofit insti­
tutions serving households includes private universi­
ties and colleges. The 2006 satellite account shows
the marked decline in government-funded R&D,
compared with business- and nonprofit-funded R&D
in 1960-2002; government-funded R&D accounted for
35.5 percent of total R&D in 2002, compared with 57
percent in 1960. In contrast, the performer-based share
of total R&D investment by business and government
has not changed nearly as much.
Investment and saving. R&D investment has had a
progressively greater impact on gross private domestic
investment since 1960. In 2002, domestic investment
would have been 11.3 percent higher if R&D were in­
cluded, compared with 9.8 percent in 1990 and 7.5

Chart 2. Nominal R&D Investment Funded by
Business and Government as a Percent of GDP

percent in 1960 (table C). The national saving rate
would have been 2.1 percentage points higher in 2002.
Table C. Impact on Gross Private Domestic Investment and the
Saving Rate When R&D is Treated as Investment
National saving r a te 2

Gross private dom estic inve stm en t1
Unadjusted
(billions)

Im pact
(percent)

Adjusted
(billions)

Unadjusted
(percent)

Im pact
(percentage
points)

Adjusted
(percent)

1 9 6 0 ..................

7 8 .9

84.8

7 .5

21 .0

23.1

2.1

1 9 7 0 ..................

152.4

163.1

7.1

18.6

20 .5

1.9

1 9 8 0 ..................

4 7 9 .3

5 12.0

6.8

19.7

21 .6

1.9

1 9 9 0 ..................

8 61.0

9 45.4

9.8

16.3

18.5

2.2

2 0 0 2 ..................

1,582.1

1 ,76 0.4

11.3

14.2

16.3

2.1

1. Applies to all scenarios.
2. Calculated as the ratio of the sum of gross saving (from NIPA table 5.1) to the sum of gross
national income expressed as a percent. Implemented using assumptions in scenario D.

P ro p o s e d tre a tm e n t to c a p ita liz e R & D
in v e s tm e n t
Treating R&D as an investment, rather than as an ex­
pense, in the calculation of GDP and other accounts
would require significant changes to current NIPA
concepts and methodologies (table D). The estimated
impact is largest in the business sector, but nonprofit
institutions serving households and general govern­
ment are also affected.
Business sector. Reclassifying business R&D expen­
ditures as investment would lead to an increase in GDP
equal to the value of the R&D expenditures. Currently,
business expenditures on R&D are considered inter­
mediate input expenditures, which are not included in
GDP. The recognition of R&D as investment also af­
fects business income and private consumption of
fixed capital (CFC), both components of gross domes­
tic income (GDI). Because R&D would no longer be
considered an expense, gross business income (pro­
prietors’ income and corporate profits) would increase

Percent

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Table B. Selected Summary Measures of R&D
[Percent based on current-dollar m easures]
1 960

1965

1970

1975

1 980

1985

1990

1995

1998

1999

2000

2001

2 002

F u n d e r-b a s e d R & D in v e s tm e n t as a p e rc e n t o f a d ju s te d G D P
B u sin ess.........................................................................................................

1.1

0.7

1.0

0.9

1.1

1.4

1.6

1.7

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.5

2 .0

1.5

1.2

1.1

1.5
1.2

1.4

G o ve rn m en t...................................................................................................

1.2

1.0

0.9

0 .9

0.8

0.9

0.9

Nonprofit institutions serving households..........................................

0.0

0 .0

0 .0

0.0

0.0

0 .0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

42 .0
5 7 .0

25 .4

38.9

42 .4

4 8 .4
4 9 .9

35 .7

6 4 .2
3 3 .4

61.8

56 .0

56 .3
41.1

65.1

59.6

52.5
45.2

66 .7

7 3.3

55.1
4 3 .2

6 1 .8

G o ve rn m en t...................................................................................................

30 .8

3 2 .4

35.5

Nonprofit institutions serving households..........................................

1.0

1.3

1.5

1.6

1.7

1.7

2 .3

2 .5

2 .5

2 .5

2.4

2.5

2 .7

B usin ess.........................................................................................................

76 .8

67 .6

6 9 .9

7 3 .6

71.2

71 .4

7 4 .3

74 .8

75.2

73.3

70 .9

17.2
6 .0

70 .0
2 1 .4
8.7

68.8

G o ve rn m en t...................................................................................................
Nonprofit institutions serving h ouseholds..........................................

22 .3
8 .8

23 .8
8.6

20 .8
9.3

18.4
8.0

19.3
9 .5

18.5
10.0

16.6
9.1

16.0
9.2

15.3
9.5

16.5
10.2

18.2
11.0

F u n d e r-b a s e d R & D in v e s tm e n t as a p e rc e n t o f to ta l R & D ......
B u sin ess.........................................................................................................

P e rfo rm e r-b a s e d R & D in v e s tm e n t a s a p e rc e n t o f to ta l R & D

Notes. Calculations are based on tables 1.2,2 .1, and 3.1.
Implemented using assumptions defined in Scenario D.
Numbers do not sum to 100 because of rounding.




18

2006 R&D Satellite Account

by the elimination of the deduction for R&D expendi­
tures.
Nonprofit institutions serving households and
general government. In these two sectors, R&D ex­
penditures would be reclassified from consumption
expenditures to investment; because consumption ex­
penditures are already part of GDP, this shift alone
would not change the measure of GDP. However, rec­
ognizing these expenditures as investment would in­
crease the measure of consumption by nonprofit
institutions and general government by an amount
equal to the value of the CFC (depreciation) of the
R&D. Thus, GDP and GDI would increase corre­
spondingly. This treatment is consistent with the cur­
rent NIPA treatment of government and nonprofit
investment in which the CFC of those assets serves as a
partial measure of the services they provide. The fea­
tured estimates for this account also include a net re­
turn to government and nonprofit R&D capital in
addition to CFC. Therefore, GDP would rise by an
amount equal to the value of CFC plus the net return
for government and nonprofit R&D investment.
T h e fo u r s c e n a rio s
To further explore the effect of R&D activity on the
economy, BEA constructed four R&D scenarios—sce­

December 2006

narios A, B, C, and D. Each scenario adopts the sectorspecific methodological changes outlined above, but
each also attempts to capture some specific character­
istics of R&D activity, such as relatively high produc­
tivity, rapid depreciation, and high rates of return.
The scenarios differ in regard to assumptions in
four areas: Price indexes, depreciation, rates of return
to businesses, and rates of return to government and
nonprofit institutions (table E).
Price indexes. R&D investment is difficult to mea­
sure largely because most R&D is not bought and sold
in markets. Typically, the companies that conduct the
R&D are also the companies that use the R&D to pro­
duce new and/or better goods and services. Conceptu­
ally, the value of R&D to a company is equal to the
discounted present value of the future benefits that the
company derives from the R&D.
However, this value is embedded in the value of all
the goods and services the company sells, and there is
no direct measure of either the contribution of R&D to
those sales or the market price underlying R&D assets.
Companies can normally report what they spent on
wages, salaries, contractors, and other costs of con­
ducting R&D but not the market price of R&D. For
computers, communications equipment, and other
assets that are bought and sold in final goods markets,

Table D. Effects of Treating R&D as Investment in the National Accounts
Gross domestic product (GDP)
Sector

Treatment in GDP

Gross domestic income (GDI)

Adjusted G D P 1

Change in GDP

Adjusted G D I2

Change in GDI

Business..................................................... Intermediate consumption

Reclassify to investment

Increase

Increase in business income
equal to R&D investment
less CFC
Increase in CFC

Increase

Nonprofit institutions serving households PCE

Reclassify to investment

Increase

Increase in returns to R&D
capital

Increase

General government................................. Government consumption

Reclassify to investment

Increase

Increase in returns to R&D
capital

Increase

1. Adjusted GDP incorporates the impact of treating R&D as investment.
2. Adjusted GDI incorporates the impact of treating R&D as investment.
Note. This table applies to all scenarios.

CFC Consumption of fixed capital
PCE Personal consumption expenditures

Table E. Assumptions for the Scenarios in the R&D Satellite Account
Parameter

Depreciation of R&D

Price index

Net return to government
and nonprofit R&D

Net return to business R&D

Scenario A .........................

15 percent

Input cost-component based

Same as other fixed assets

None

Scenario B .........................

Before 1987: Change in private fixed
investment in nonresidential equipment
and software depreciation.
After 1987: Information processing
equipment depreciation.

Input price index adjusted with BLS
multifactor productivity to proxy highproductivity growth in manufacturing.

Average net rate of 15 percent

Estimated net return based on long­
term average in the 10-year real
Treasury rate, plus a higher premium
for R&D investment.

Scenario C .........................

Same as scenario B

Composite price index based on the
value added of five high-productivity
service industries.

Same as scenario B

Same as scenario B

Scenario D .........................

Same as scenario B

Composite price index based on the
value added of the four manufacturing
industries that perform the most R&D.

Same as scenario B

Same as scenario B

B L S B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t i c s




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companies know the market price of the asset and its
share of sales as well as the share of profits that came
from the difference between the sales price and the cost
of producing such assets. For these assets, it is straight­
forward to estimate real (inflation-adjusted) values by
simply dividing the current-dollar value of these assets
by a price index based on their sales.
However, for R&D, the value of the assets and their
contribution to sales are indistinguishably bundled
with those of the companies’ overall assets. Therefore,
the only available current-dollar value is the cost of
their production. The issue then becomes how to de­
flate this current-dollar value to produce an estimate of
real investment. Each scenario embodies a different de­
flations method:
• Scenario A. This scenario is perhaps the most
straightforward way to estimate real R&D. It bases
the measure of current-dollar R&D output on input
costs and then deflates this output measure with the
price index created from information on the cost
components for R&D. This method is currently

19

used by BEA to measure the value of real investment
that companies create for their own use. The obvi­
ous drawback to this approach is that it necessarily
implies zero productivity growth because real out­
put, by definition, grows at the same rate as real
inputs. Thus, this approach seems particularly inap­
propriate for measuring a dynamic sector like R&D.
• Scenario B. This scenario assumes that the value of
real R&D output is higher than the value of real
R&D inputs by the amount of productivity growth
recorded in higher productivity industries. The
price index used to calculate real output is calcu­
lated by subtracting average multifactor productiv­
ity (MFP) growth for a group of manufacturing
industries with the highest MFP growth from the
increase in the price indexes used in scenario A.
This adjustment provides a cost-based index that
reflects the high productivity growth of R&D.
• Scenario C. This scenario assumes that the value of
real R&D output is proportional to the output
prices of the most productive services industries.

Previous NIPA Im provem ents Related to R&D
The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) continues to in this article, largely mirrors BEA’s current treatment of
update the U.S. economic accounts to better reflect the software. The inclusion of computer software as an
evolving economy, with a focus on high-technology-ori- investment has helped economists better explain the
ented goods and services. This box summarizes two pre­ resurgence in economic growth in the last decade.
Between 1995 and 2002, software’s average contribution
vious important improvements.
to the growth in real GDP was 5.0 percent. Between 1973
H edonic indexes
and 1994, its average contribution was 2.7 percent.
These innovations have provided the basis for better
In the mid-1980s, BEA introduced hedonic, or qualityadjusted, price indexes for computers and peripherals measures of IT-related industries and their contributions
into the national income and product accounts (NIPAs). to economic growth. Indeed, Triplett and Bosworth have
Since then, it has gradually introduced quality-adjusted used improved BEA data on real industry output (GDP
indexes for other goods, including semiconductors and by industry) to show that services-producing industries
digital telephone equipment. Currently, approximately “have emerged as the dominant engines of U.S. economic
20 percent of real gross domestic product (GDP) is growth” over the past decade (Triplett and Bosworth
deflated using quality-adjusted price indexes that rely at 2004).
Improved measures of IT have also been useful to
least partly on hedonic methods. Use of such methods
has improved the estimates of real GDP and the value of researchers analyzing multifactor productivity—the
real output of services industries that use information unexplained portion of economic growth that remains
after the contributions of labor, capital, and intermediate
technology (IT).
inputs have been measured. Improvements in both con­
Intan gibles
cepts and measurement have helped to both lower the
BEA has long recognized that so-called intangible assets unexplained portion of economic growth and to explain
play a significant role in the economy. Like tangible the contributions of information technology to the
assets, intangible assets are created from production pro­ increase in growth and multifactor productivity in the
cesses and tend to be used in other processes of produc­ last decade.
Because intangible assets are increasingly important
tion. Examples include R&D, software, business pro­
components of the knowledge economy, BEA has begun
cesses, and business-specific training.
In 1999, BEA capitalized spending on computer soft­ preliminary research on prototype accounts for health
ware, treating it as investment in its calculation of GDP. care, human capital, and education.
BEA’s proposed treatment of R&D investment, outlined




20

2006 R&D Satellite Account

While services industries traditionally have lower
productivity growth and higher inflation than the
industries in the goods sector, key industries have a
good record of producing high-productivity, declin­
ing relative prices and ever-increasing real output
per unit of input. In this scenario, real R&D output
is estimated using a weighted average of BEA’s GDPby-industry value-added price indexes of these
high-productivity services industries: Air transpor­
tation, broadcasting and telecommunications,
securities and commodity brokers, and informa­
tion-processing and data-processing services.5
• Scenario D. This scenario assumes that the value of
real R&D output is proportional to the output
prices of R&D-intensive products. The prices of
such products may be the best proxies for the value
of the R&D embodied in these products. This index
is calculated from price indexes for the largest R&Dperforming manufacturing industries. Based on
NSF industry performer data, these industries are
chemicals, computer and electronic products,
machinery, and aerospace and defense.
Depreciation. R&D capital does not wear out the
way tangible goods do, but it clearly loses value over
time because of obsolescence. It loses value as new in­
novations appear and as earlier R&D becomes rela­
tively less effective in the production process. An
additional loss could stem from the gradual leakage of
information to competitors and the expiration of intel­
lectual property protection.
For tangible assets, BEA typically uses empirical
studies of markets for used assets to determine depre­
ciation rates. This type of information is not available
for R&D, but economists have estimated the range of
average annual depreciation rates for business R&D to
be between 12 and 25 percent.6 For government and
public universities and colleges, the depreciation rate is
likely to be lower because the R&D is often concen­
trated in basic research, which is likely to obsolesce
more slowly.
The assumed depreciation rate for scenario A, the
most straightforward scenario, is 15 percent a year.
Scenarios B, C, and D incorporate an alternative meth­
5. These indexes were used instead of producer price indexes from the
Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) because, in most cases, the timespan for
industry coverage by BLS is not long enough to enable the use of BLS pro­
ducer price indexes as deflators. For example, the BLS producer price index
for broadcast and telecom equipment— an industry that appears in the top
five productive services index— is only available for 1991 forward. The
R&D work requires an index that covers 1959 forward.
6. Pakes and Schankerman (1984) found the average annual decay rate of
R&D to be 25 percent; Nadiri and Prucha (1996) estimated the annual
depreciation rate of industrial R&D capital stock to be 12 percent. In 1996,
Lev and Sougiannis estimated decay rates of R&D in six industries, finding
a range of 12 to 20 percent and an average depreciation rate of 15 percent.
Most recently, Bernstein and Mamuneaus (2004) calculated a 25-percent
depreciation rate for the manufacturing sector.




December 2006

od that proxies the effect of a more rapid pace of tech­
nological change in recent years and thus an accelerat­
ing rate of depreciation. This faster rate of
obsolescence is consistent with the work of Caballero
and Jaffe (1993), whose work with patents found an
accelerating rate of obsolescence in the 1990s, com­
pared with earlier decades. Scenarios B, C, and D as­
sume a depreciation rate before 1987 that is equal to
the depreciation rate of overall investment in equip­
ment and software. After 1987, the rate is assumed to
be equal to the depreciation rate for information-pro­
cessing equipment and software.7 The resulting depre­
ciation series starts at about 16 percent in 1959 and
reaches about 23 percent in 2002.
Business rates of return. Studies have shown a
fairly wide range of estimates of the rate of return for
R&D (table F). Despite the wide range, the private
rates of return are high relative to other investments.
The total returns, which include spillovers, are higher
still—about twice the corresponding private returns to
the originators of the R&D. Many of these studies were
performed in the late 1970s and 1980s. More recently,
higher returns have been necessary to offset the in­
creasing rates of technical obsolescence, faster depreci­
ation, volatility, and risk that have occurred for
products that embody R&D, such as computers, soft­
ware, and other information-communications-technology products.
Table F. Summary of Estimated Gross Private
and Total Rates of Return to R&D
[Rate of return, percent]

Source
Sveikauskas 1981.................................................
Bernstein and Nadiri 1988...................................
Bernstein and Nadiri 1991...................................
Nadiri 1993............................................................
Mansfield et al. 1977............................................
Goto and Suzuki 1989..........................................
Terleckyj 1974........................................................
Scherer 1982,1984...............................................

Gross
private rates
of return
7-25
10-27
15-28
20-30
25
26
29
29-43

Total rates of
return, including
spillovers
50
11-111
20-110
50
56
80
48-78
64-147

Note. The gross private rate of return to R&D includes depreciation.
Source. Table 8.1 in Fraumeni and Okubo (2005).

Scenario A, the most straightforward of the scenar­
ios, assumes an average rate of return to business R&D
investment of 11 percent in 1959-2002, the same re­
turn earned by other private fixed assets. However, sce­
narios B, C, and D assume a higher average net rate of
return, 15 percent.
Returns to government and nonprofit institu­
tions. The current NIPA treatment does not include
any net returns to fixed assets owned by governments
7. Table I compares this faster depreciation rate to the 15-percent depreci­
ation rate used in scenario A.

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of

and nonprofit institutions serving households. It treats
CFC (depreciation) of those assets as a partial measure
of the services they provide; thus, the net return is zero
by construction.
Scenario A adopts the current treatment; it does not
account for any net returns to R&D investment by gov­
ernments and nonprofit institutions serving house­
holds. However, scenarios B, C, and D assume a net
return to R&D spending by government and nonprofit
institutions equal to the average real rate on 10-year
Treasury securities, adjusted to reflect a higher return
to R&D relative to other types of investments. The ad­
ditional returns in scenarios B, C, and D were deflated
with a price index created for scenario B, the high-productivity services-sector industries.

Im pact of R&D on key NIPA measures
BEA reports the estimates based on scenario D as the
preliminary estimates for the 2006 R&D satellite ac­
count. These estimates approximate a midrange of the
three high-productivity options. Estimates based on
scenario D for real GDP, current-dollar GDP, real GDI,
and the saving rate are presented in tables 1.1-1.4.

Scenario com parison
For analytical purposes, a look at each scenario’s esti­
mates is instructive, especially estimates of contribu­
tions to real GDP and real GDP growth.
Scenario A, which assumes no productivity growth,
produces the smallest impact on GDP of the alterna­
tives tested; in 1959-2002, R&D boosted current-dol­
lar GDP by an annual average 2.3 percent (table G).
Table G. Impact on Current-Dollar GDP When R&D is Treated as
Investment

1960

1970

1980

1990

2002

Average in
1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 2

5 26

1,039

2 ,7 9 0

5,80 3

10,4 70

G D P in scenario A .,

5 36

1,064

2 ,8 5 2

5 ,9 4 4

5 37
5 38

1,069
1,067

2 ,8 5 9
2,85 6

5 ,9 6 3
5,9 6 2

5 38

1,069

2 ,8 5 7

5,9 6 2

Table H. Average Percent of Real GDP Growth Attributed to Treating
R&D as Investment Selected Periods
1 9 5 9 -7 3

1 9 7 4 -9 4

1 9 9 5 -2 0 0 2

1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 2

S cenario A ................................................

2.3

1.8

2.7

2 .2

Scenario B ................................................

4.5

4.7

6.8

4 .9

Scenario C ................................................

3.9

3.9

6.3

4.3

Scenario D ................................................

4 .0

4.3

6 .7

4.6

N otes. Scenario A uses an input price index.
Scenario B uses a multifactor productivity-adjusted price index.
Scenario C uses a high-productivity service industries price index.
Scenario D uses a top four R&D performers price index.

In scenarios B, C, and D—the high-productivitygrowth scenarios—the average increase in the level of
current-dollar GDP was 2.6 percent each. Scenarios B,
C, and D also produce a relatively tight range of contri­
butions to the growth in real GDP (table H). The larg­
est contribution to growth (4.9 percent) in 1959-2002
comes from scenario B, which uses the high-MFP in­
dex. In scenario C, which uses the composite price in­
dex from the high-productivity services industries, the
contribution in 1959-2002 averages 4.3 percent, and
the contribution in 1995-2002 is 6.3 percent. Scenario
D, which uses a composite price index for R&D per­
forming industries, yields a similar overall contribu­
tion, 4.6 percent, and a similar contribution in
1995-2002, 6.7 percent.

Step-by-step com parisons
To get a clearer picture of the step-by-step impact of
specific assumptions in each scenario, table I provides
a decomposition of R&D’s contribution to average real
GDP growth for each scenario for 1995-2002 and
1959-2002. By looking down the columns and across
the rows, the cumulative impact of each assumption
can be seen.

10,751
10,7 44

G D P in scenario D..

p e r c e n t ( t a b le H ) .

1 0,7 34

G D P in scenario B „
G D P in scenario C „

T h e a v e r a g e c o n t r i b u t i o n t o r e a l G D P g r o w t h w a s 2 .2

Table I. Average Percent of Real GDP Growth Attributed to Treating
R&D as Investment Decomposition, Selected Periods

Billions of dollars
GDP.

21

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

10,7 47

Depreciation
and net return

Depreciation
1 9 9 5 -2 0 0 2
Scenario A ................................................
S cenario A with accelerated
depreciation rate1...........................
Scenario B ................................................

Percent change in G D P

2 .7

1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 2

1 9 9 5 -2 0 0 2

1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 2

2.2

n.a.

n.a.

2 .8

2 .4

n.a.

n.a.

6.5

4 .4

6 .8

4.9

Scenario A ....................

1.8

2 .5

2.3

2 .4

2.5

2.3

Scen ario C ................................................

6.1

3.8

6.3

4 .3

Scenario B ....................

2 .9

2 .8
2 .7

2.6

Scenario D ................................................

6.5

4.1

6.7

4 .6

2.8

2.5
2.4

2.7

Scenario C ....................

2.1
2.2

2.6

2 .6

Scenario D ....................

2.2

2.9

2.4

2 .7

2.7

2 .6

N otes. Scenario A uses an input price index.
Scenario B uses a multifactor productivity-adjusted price index.
Scenario C uses a high-productivity service industries price index.
Scenario D uses a top four R&D performers price index.
Source: Table 1.2.




n.a. Not available
1. Scenario A with accelerated depreciation is presented as an intermediate step to scenarios B, C,
and D.
N otes. Scenario A uses an input price index.
Scenario B uses a multifactor productivity-adjusted price index.
Scenario C uses a high-productivity service industries price index.
Scenario D uses a top four R&D performers price index.

2006 R&D Satellite Account

22

Table I shows the contribution of R&D to real GDP
growth for scenario A in two cases: (1) When the de­
preciation rate is assumed to be 15 percent and (2)
when the depreciation rate is accelerated. Accelerating
the depreciation rate results in a higher contribution to
the average contribution to GDP growth in 1959-2002
and 1995-2002.
Scenarios B, C, and D also assume an accelerated
depreciation rate; however, they include other changed
assumptions as well: (1) Different output price indexes
for deflation purposes and (2) a return for government
and nonprofit institution capital services. The return
for capital services includes both CFC and a net return,
which are both deflated with the high-productivity ser­
vices industries price index.
The average contributions for scenarios B,C, and D,
given all assumptions, are shown in table I in the far
right columns.
For scenario D, the featured estimates of the average
R&D-related contributions to the average real GDP
growth rate combine (1) the price-index impact that
raises the contribution of R&D from 2.4 percent (sce­
nario A) to 4.1 percent and (2) the impact of the net
return component of capital services that raises the es­
timate from 4.1 percent to 4.6 percent in 1959-2002.
Thus, the total increase in the contribution of R&D,
2.2 percentage points, is largely due to the selection of
the output price index.

F u tu re In itia tiv e s
In the near future, BEA intends to explore a variety of
issues related to R&D investment. These issues include
international flows of R&D transactions, improved
output measures, improved input deflators, the treat­
ment of R&D spillovers, the ownership of R&D assets,
and improved estimates of capital services for R&D.
In te rn a tio n a l flo w s o f R & D tra n s a c tio n s
There are two dimensions of international transactions
for R&D and a related category of payments for the use
of R&D: International trade in research, development,
and testing services; business funding of foreign-performed R&D; and royalties and licensing fees for the
use of industrial processes.
BEA’s R&D satellite account presents estimates of
the stock of R&D located in the United States, regard­
less of the residence of the owner. The satellite account
treats all domestically performed business R&D as pro­
ducing U.S. assets and excludes R&D performed
abroad by foreign affiliates of U.S. companies. This
treatment implicitly assumes that the private benefits
of R&D are obtained in the country where the R&D is
performed. The stock estimates presented in this arti­




December 2006

cle are not adjusted for R&D investment by U.S. and
foreign multinational companies or the exports and
imports of research, development, and testing services.
Adjustment for exports and imports of research, devel­
opment, and testing services is planned for the 2007
R&D satellite account. Including R&D investment by
multinationals requires data not currently available
and remains a longer-term project.
Im p ro v e d o u tp u t m e a s u re s , in p u t d e fla to rs
In 2007, BEA plans to refine its methodology for mea­
suring real R&D output. In particular, BEA intends to
develop a methodology for weighting the relative im­
portance of high R&D-performing industries. BEA
also plans to develop improved R&D price deflators for
the largest input cost: Compensation of R&D person­
nel in business. (These price deflators were used in sce­
nario A.)
Over the longer term, a framework for including
R&D in the U.S. industry accounts needs to be con­
structed. The goal is to develop a more detailed look at
the composition of R&D costs across industries and to
develop improved R&D deflators for compensation
and the other input costs, with an emphasis on certain
key industries such as computer manufacturing, elec­
tronic products, and pharmaceuticals. For example,
the makeup of R&D personnel (scientists, engineers,
technicians, and administrative support) or the nature
of R&D physical capital investment and its deprecia­
tion may vary significantly across industries. The com­
position of an industry’s R&D funding may also be
used to develop improved R&D deflators, especially for
those industries that have a high portion of their R&D
funded by the Federal Government.
T re a tm e n t o f R & D s p illo v e rs
Spillovers (externalities) exist when the social benefit
(or cost) of an economic activity exceeds the private
benefit (or cost). These spillovers are not currently in­
cluded within the existing framework of the U.S. na­
tional accounts or the System of National Accounts
(SNA), the internationally accepted national-accounts
guidelines issued by the United Nations.
However, a satellite account—because it allows for
the adjustment of national accounting conventions
without changing the core accounts—can provide a
means of exploring the effects of spillovers. Any poten­
tial experimental estimates of R&D spillovers will be
included in the R&D satellite account—not the core
GDP accounts.
Explicit identification of spillovers have not been in­
cluded in the national accounting framework, because
those accounts value assets at their private value, that

December 2006

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of

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

is, the value of the asset to the owner.8 The effects of
spillovers are implicitly reflected in those market
prices, but the national accounts do not attempt to es­
timate, for example, what share of economic growth is
determined by the market value of computers. It does
not include the efficiencies and value added (over and
above the price paid for the computers) that accrue to
the financial and other industries that use the comput­
ers. These spillovers form part of the unexplained mul­
tifactor residual in economic growth. Nonetheless,
national economic accounting agencies, including
BEA, recognize the interest in the value of R&D to so­
ciety as a whole.
Although no attempt has been made to estimate the
total impact of R&D, including spillovers, on eco­
nomic growth, it is possible to infer the relative impact
using studies of rates of return. If, as earlier studies
have suggested, spillovers to other industries (and
other firms in the same industry) are at least as large as
the returns to the original investor, then R&D might
account for a fifth of the 33 percent of economic
growth between 1995 and 2002 that cannot be ac­
counted for by conventional inputs and is described as
multifactor or total factor productivity.
BEA’s role in growth accounting continues to be to
provide the data that other economists use to analyze
the sources of economic growth. BEA intends to con­
tinue to explore the issue within the satellite account
framework.

23

ness of the R&D capital stocks for productivity analysis
purposes, but preliminary capital services estimates
would likely be somewhat speculative because of the
limited availability of price data for the use of R&D.
Given the efforts to harmonize BEA statistics with
those of the productivity program of BLS, developing
capital services estimates for R&D is a high priority.

O th e r lo n g -te rm im p ro v e m e n ts
R&D stocks by type. Estimating R&D stocks by basic
research, applied research, and development of new
products and processes would enhance the usefulness
of the R&D satellite account. If BEA were able to create
consistent time series of these stocks, an improved set
of estimates could include depreciation rates that differ
by type of R&D asset. BEA is exploring the issue.
Enhanced source data. Several long-term improve­
ments to the R&D satellite accounts require improved
survey data. For example, the estimates of CFC used in
the production of R&D would be greatly improved by
survey data on expenditures for structures, equipment,
and software used in the production of R&D. Similarly,
better data on the nature of the transaction between
the funder and the performer of R&D would improve
the assignment of R&D to sectors and the separation of
domestic R&D investment from foreign R&D invest­
ment.
Alignment of data. As BEA considers incorporating
R&D as investment in the NIPAs, an immediate chal­
lenge will be the alignment of NSF data and data from
O w n e rs h ip o f R & D a s s e ts
other sources with the industry classification systems
The estimates presented in this satellite account as­ used for enterprise and establishment data at BEA.
sume that the funder of R&D owns the R&D. BEA BEA is currently working on developing an industry
plans to develop guidelines that can be applied to the framework for R&D that will lead to industry-based
existing survey data and that would use available infor­ estimates for R&D.
Timing. Currently, R&D surveys are conducted an­
mation about the assignment of intellectual property
rights—who has the right to patent and collect royal­ nually or less frequently, and the publication lag is usu­
ties—to refine its funder-based estimates of ownership ally between 1 and 2 years. For the NIPAs, quarterly
of R&D. BEA also intends to refine the definition of estimates with a lag of 1 month after the end of the
quarter are required.
R&D as an asset.
In the longer term, BEA will work with its data pro­
C o n c e p tu a l a n d M e th o d o lo g ic a l Is s u e s
viders to align survey questions to the economic con­
cepts necessary to identify ownership and location of For a more detailed discussion of the methodology, see
use. Although some R&D produced by governments, “R&D Satellite Account: Preliminary Estimates” on
nonprofits, and academic institutions may not be con­ BEA’s Web site at <www.bea.gov/bea/newsrelarchive/
sidered an economic asset in the final analysis, it is 2006/rdreport06.pdf>. Various highlights are dis­
likely to have a measurable impact on economic activ­ cussed in this section.
ity; it is important that this type of R&D be reported
C h a n g e s fro m p re v io u s v e rs io n s
separately.
The methodologies used for the 2006 satellite account
E s tim a te s o f c a p ita l s e rv ic e s fo r R & D
extend the methodologies used in the R&D estimates
Capital services estimates would enhance the useful­ published in 1994 and the prototype account pub­
lished in 2005. The 2006 satellite account includes
8. Spillovers are not included in the value of investment in the NIPAs.
R&D capital stocks and places R&D investment flows
However, their effects on production are captured in GDR




2006 R&D Satellite Account

24

and the income it generates within the accounts for
GDP and the NIPA sectors.
Important methodological changes to real estimates
over the period include the following:
• Chain-type price measures of real output and prices
have been implemented, eliminating the overstate­
ment of real R&D growth for periods after the base
year and the understatement of real R&D growth
for periods before the base year.
• For the input price index approach (scenario A), a
new methodology for deflating business R&D has
been developed; it uses price measures based on
unpublished BEA industry accounts data from the
scientific research and development services indus­
try (NAICS 5417) instead of price measures for each
industry. Also, a new methodology for deflating
academic R&D has been developed; it uses an
academic R&D price index developed by the
National Center for Education Statistics.9
• Real R&D investment by source of funding is now
presented.
Important changes to the capital stock measures in­
clude the following:
•A new measure of R&D capital stocks has been
developed; it is based on the funder of the R&D that
is performed, and it better approximates the owner­
ship assumed for R&D capital.
•A geometric rate of depreciation is now used; it
replaces the depreciation pattern based on a
straight-line perpetual inventory method.

D ece m ber 2006

tem of National Accounts (SNA) and the Organisation
for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Fras­
cati M anual. BEA selected the Frascati definition of
R&D as currently implemented by NSF in its R&D sur­
veys mainly because BEA relies on NSF source data. In
addition, the Frascati definition is closely related to the
new proposed international standard, making it easier
to compare BEA’s estimates with other countries’ esti­
mates. The quality that distinguishes the Frascati defi­
nition from the SNA definition is the requirement that
R&D include “an appreciable element of novelty and
the resolution of scientific and/or technical uncer­
tainty” (OECD 2002). Innovative activity that does not
involve novelty or technological uncertainty is not
considered R&D in this definition.
F u n d e rs a n d p e rfo rm e rs
The aggregated investment measures for R&D are pre­
sented in the tables by major performer and major
funder. The stocks of R&D are presented by funders.
The data are disaggregated into two major institu­
tional categories: Private and government (“public”)
organizations. Several subcategories are also included.
Private organizations consist of businesses; private
universities and colleges; private hospitals, charitable
foundations, and other nonprofit institutions serving
households; and most Federally funded research and
development centers (FFRDCs).1 Government
0
organizations consist of the Federal Government, state
and local governments excluding universities and

S c o p e o f R & D in v e s tm e n t
To define the scope of R&D investment, BEA evaluated
two international standards: The United Nations Sys-

10. FFRDCs are R&D organizations financed almost entirely by the Fed­
eral Government. They are shown separately and grouped with the entities
that administer them in the performer-based presentation of investment
(table 4.1). Grouping FFRDCs in the performing sector that administers
them is consistent with the NIPAs. However, NSF reports that all FFRDC
activities are more similar to Federal Government laboratories and classifies
9. This series ends in 1995; BEA extrapolates this academic R&D price them as such. Since these institutions are by definition Federally funded,
index with NIPA personal consumption expenditures for education and
they are included with the government-funded investments and stocks of
research in 1996-2002 as the indicator.
R&D.

Acknowledgm ents
Sumiye Okubo, Associate Director for Industry Grimm, Charles Ian Mead, and William J. Zeile provided
Accounts, and Carol A. Robbins, directed the preliminary valuable comments throughout the project. Ann M. Law­
R&D satellite account project. Carol E. Moylan, Chief of son provided comments on the tables and drafts.
the National Income and Wealth Division, supervised the Lawrence P McNeil and Yvon Pho contributed to the
.
preparation of the estimates. Brian K Sliker prepared the early stages of the project. John E. Jankowski, Director,
.
macroeconomic estimates.
R&D Statistics Program, and Francisco A. Moris of the
John W Drewry, Lisa S. Mataloni, Jose Rodriguez- National Science Foundation contributed guidance and
.
Solis, Andrew G. Schmidt, and Laura I. Schultz prepared support throughout the project, prepared supplementary
data analysis and other review materials. David B. data and analysis, and provided a detailed methodologi­
Wasshausen, Erich H. Strassner, and Gabriel W Medeiros cal and data review of the satellite account. R&D data and
.
provided additional technical assistance with the esti­ discussion and consultation were provided by the mem­
mates. Claudia M. Molinar provided research assistance. bers of the Division of Science Resources Statistics (SRS)
J. Steven Landefeld, Rosemary D. Marcuss, Dennis J staff at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Funding
.
Fixler, Ralph H. Kozlow, Brent R. Moulton, Bruce T. for this project was provided by NSF/SRS.




December 2006

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C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

colleges, public universities and colleges, and FFRDCs
administered by state and local governments, primarily
public universities and colleges.
All estimates of current-dollar R&D investment are
prepared by first compiling data available from the
various NSF surveys and then by adjusting these data
to be statistically and conceptually consistent with BEA
definitions in the NIPAs. Performer-based estimates of
real R&D expenditures are derived by deflating the
most detailed current-dollar expenditures by appro­
priate price indexes. BEA develops real R&D capital
stocks by treating the R&D expenditures as investment
and aggregating them based on methodologies that
BEA uses for other types of fixed assets.

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26

2006 R&D Satellite Account

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T a b l e s 1 .1 t h r o u g h 4 . 2 f o l l o w .

28

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 1.1 Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and Real GDP with R&D Adjustment, 1959-2002
1959

1960

1962

1961

1964

1963

1965

1967

1966

1968

1969

Millions of chained (2000) dollars
G D P ................................................................
G D P in scenario A .................................
G D P in scenario B.................................
G D P in scenario C ................................
G D P in scenario D ................................

2,441,284
2,502,659
2,420,604
2,445,880
2,433,272

2,501,756
2,565,662
2,483,638
2,508,464
2,495,636

2,559,971
2,625,397
2,542,362
2,566,699
2,553,750

2,715,177
2,783,699
2,697,952
2,722,588
2,709,405

2,833,963
2,904,051
2,820,469
2,845,305
2,831,435

2,998,593
3,075,350
2,989,212
3,014,490
2,999,995

3,191,104
3,273,862
3,185,433
3,211,437
3,196,455

3,399,126
3,488,592
3,399,490
3,425,506
3,410,207

3,484,631
3,581,411
3,490,303
3,516,609
3,501,384

3,652,698
3,757,836
3,665,215
3,692,356
3,677,109

3,765,397
3,878,390
3,786,821
3,813,249
3,798,474

2.6
-0 .2
0.6
0.2

2.6
0.0
0.8
0.3

2.8
0.2
0.9
0.5

2.9
0.3
1.1
0.7

3.0
0.6
1.3
0.9

Percent change in GDP
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A ...............................................
B...............................................
C ..............................................
D ..............................................

2.5
-0 .8
0.2
-0 .3

1970

2.6
-0 .7
0.3
-0 .2

1971

2.6
-0 .7
0.3
-0 .2

1972

2.5
-0 .6
0.3
-0 .2

2.5
-0 .5
0.4
-0.1

1974

1973

2.6
-0 .3
0.5
0.0

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Millions of chained (2000) dollars
G D P ................................................................
G D P in scenario A .................................
G D P in scenario B.................................
G D P in scenario C ................................
GDP in scenario D ................................

3,771,876
3,884,122
3,794,770
3,821,081
3,806,630

3,898,613
4,010,468
3,917,134
3,946,060
3,929,155

4,104,966
4,221,217
4,122,556
4,153,281
4,134,402

4,341,456
4,459,915
4,360,936
4,392,222
4,372,442

4,319,565
4,437,032
4,343,362
4,372,838
4,353,132

4,311,220
4,426,896
4,334,079
4,364,135
4,344,582

4,540,937
4,658,709
4,562,387
4,594,468
4,573,782

4,750,529
4,870,337
4,773,152
4,805,887
4,784,281

5,014,999
5,138,778
5,041,454
5,074,523
5,051,619

5,173,444
5,301,841
5,208,956
5,241,918
5,218,489

5,161,664
5,293,226
5,204,844
5,237,989
5,214,164

2.6
0.5
1.2
0.7

2.5
0.5
1.2
0.7

2.5
0.5
1.2
0.7

2.5
0.7
1.3
0.9

2.5
0.8
1.5
1.0

Percent change in GDP
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A...........................................
B...........................................
C ..........................................
D ..........................................

2.9
0.5
1.2
0.8

3.0
0.6
1.3
0.9

1982

1981

2.7
0.4
1.2
0.7

2.8
0.4
1.2
0.7

1984

1983

2.7
0.6
1.2
0.8

1985

2.7
0.5
1.2
0.8

1987

1986

1988

1989

1990

1991

Millions of chained (2000) dollars
G D P ................................................................
G D P in scenario A .................................
G D P in scenario B.................................
GDP in scenario C ................................
GDP in scenario D ................................

5,291,739
5,427,980
5,342,129
5,376,220
5,351,827

5,189,250
5,331,796
5,247,277
5,280,726
5,256,969

5,423,777
5,574,518
5,488,282
5,521,588
5,497,665

5,813,609
5,973,632
5,886,756
5,919,172
5,895,716

6,053,732
6,221,370
6,132,559
6,161,986
6,141,307

6,263,619
6,432,311
6,341,916
6,367,610
6,350,228

6,475,076
6,643,641
6,563,368
6,586,516
6,571,094

6,742,687
6,913,975
6,840,134
6,861,026
6,847,327

6,981,436
7,154,928
7,086,997
7,106,571
7,094,000

7,112,492
7,294,017
7,231,365
7,250,125
7,238,144

7,100,516
7,290,807
7,232,449
7,250,352
7,238,603

2.6
1.4
1.7
1.5

2.5
1.4
1.8
1.6

2.5
1.5
1.8
1.6

2.6
1.7
1.9
1.8

2.7
1.9
2.1
1.9

Percent change in GDP
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A ...........................................
B...........................................
C ..........................................
D ..........................................

2.7
1.1
1.8
1.3

2.6
1.0
1.6
1.1

1992

1994

1993

2.8
1.3
1.8
1.4

2.8
1.2
1.8
1.4

1995

2.8
1.3
1.8
1.4

2.7
1.3
1.7
1.4

1997

1996

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Millions of chained (2000) dollars
G D P ................................................................
GDP in scenario A .................................
GDP in scenario B.................................
G DP in scenario C ................................
G DP in scenario D ................................

7,336,614
7,526,957
7,470,918
7,487,939
7,476,063

7,532,658
7,719,384
7,666,435
7,682,131
7,670,520

7,835,512
8,023,550
7,975,238
7,989,464
7,978,141

8,031,655
8,234,469
8,189,862
8,201,751
8,191,480

2.6
1.8
2.1
1.9

2.5
1.8
2.0
1.8

2.4
1.8
2.0
1.8

2.5
2.0
2.1
2.0

8,328,913
8,542,059
8,504,107
8,513,219
8,505,043

8,703,528
8,928,417
8,896,708
8,901,578
8,896,713

9,066,854
9,303,370
9,282,527
9,285,008
9,284,297

9,470,332
9,721,418
9,716,479
9,716,956
9,717,955

9,816,973
10,082,823
10,098,968
10,097,907
10,098,145

9,890,694
10,151,897
10,181,259
10,182,661
10,183,341

10,048,846
10,295,813
10,339,339
10,342,505
10,341,526

2.6
2.4
2.4
2.4

2.7
2.6
2.6
2.6

2.7
2.9
2.9
2.9

2.6
2.9
3.0
3.0

2.5
2.9
2.9
2.9

Percent change in GDP
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A ...........................................
B...........................................
C .........................................
D ..........................................

Notes. Percentage change is calculated tram GDP for each year.
Adjusted GDP incorporates the impact of treating R&D as investment.
Scenario A uses an input price index.
Scenario B uses a multifactor productivity-adjusted price index.
Scenario C uses a high-productivity service industries price index.
Scenario D uses a top four R&D performers price index.




2.6
2.1
2.2
2.1

2.6
2.2
2.3
2.2

December

2006

S urvey

of

29

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

Table 1.2 Current-Dollar Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and GDP with R&D Adjustments, 1959-2002
1959

1960

1961

1962

1964

1963

1965

1967

1966

1968

1969

Millions of dollars
G D P ...............................................................
G DP in scenario A ................................
G D P in scenario B ................................
G D P in scenario C ................................
G D P in scenario D ................................

506,585
515,740
516,850
517,230
517,380

526,398
536,110
537,449
537,756
537,950

544,716
554,792
556,355
556,726
556,757

585,627
596,139
598,014
598,258
598,506

617,740
629,137
631,700
631,904
632,002

663,615
676,479
679,588
679,700
679,755

719,119
733,416
737,175
737,228
737,346

787,788
804,140
808,828
808,430
808,735

832,596
851,070
855,833
855,405
855,877

909,989
931,319
936,150
935,697
936,495

984,602
1,008,944
1,013,644
1,012,453
1,013,865

2.0
2.5
2.5
2.5

2.1
2.7
2.6
2.7

2.2
2.8
2.7
2.8

2.3
2.9
2.8
2.9

2.5
2.9
2.8
3.0

Percent change in GDP
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A
B
C
D

..............................................
..............................................
..............................................
..............................................

1.8
2.0
2.1
2.1

1.8
2.1
2.2
2.2

1971

1970

1.8
2.1
2.2
2.2

1972

1.8
2.1
2.2
2.2

1973

1.8
2.3
2.3
2.3

1.9
2.4
2.4
2.4

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Millions of dollars
G D P ...............................................................
G D P in scenario A ................................
G D P in scenario B ................................
G D P in scenario C ................................
G D P in scenario D ................................

1,038,545
1,064,390
1,068,569
1,067,149
1,069,084

1,127,118
1,154,342
1,158,291
1,158,009
1,159,122

1,238,292
1,267,947
1,271,507
1,271,790
1,272,341

1,382,704
1,414,822
1,418,686
1,418,623
1,419,305

2.5
2.9
2.8
2.9

2.4
2.8
2.7
2.8

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.3
2.6
2.6
2.6

1,499,978
1,534,975
1,539,570
1,538,163
1,538,923

1,638,339
1,676,081
1,680,325
1,679,626
1,680,552

1,825,267
1,866,147
1,870,680
1,871,028
1,871,990

2,030,945
2,075,218
2,080,265
2,080,758
2,081,814

2,294,706
2,343,566
2,349,551
2,349,029
2,350,053

2,563,326
2,618,688
2,625,568
2,622,846
2,624,773

2,789,504
2,852,494
2,859,291
2,855,987
2,857,476

2.2
2.5
2.5
2.6

2.2
2.4
2.5
2.5

2.1
2.4
2.4
2.4

2.2
2.4
2.3
2.4

2.3
2.5
2.4
2.4

Percent change in GDP
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A
B
C
D

..............................................
..............................................
..............................................
..............................................

1981

1982

1984

1983

2.3
2.6
2.5
2.6

2.3
2.6
2.5
2.6

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

Millions of dollars
G D P ...............................................................
G D P in scenario A ................................
G D P in scenario B ................................
G D P in scenario C ................................
G D P in scenario D ................................

3,128,435
3,200,388
3,208,403
3,205,224
3,206,014

3,255,011
3,335,419
3,342,222
3,341,779
3,342,096

3,536,665
3,625,340
3,632,466
3,633,847
3,632,755

3,933,173
4,031,912
4,040,445
4,043,769
4,040,694

4,220,262
4,327,600
4,337,161
4,343,431
4,336,794

4,462,825
4,573,170
4,583,164
4,590,982
4,582,991

4,739,471
4,854,806
4,866,150
4,871,027
4,866,039

5,103,791
5,226,089
5,240,357
5,244,029
5,239,936

5,484,350
5,613,704
5,631,357
5,631,720
5,629,729

5,803,067
5,943,750
5,963,292
5,961,603
5,961,864

5,995,926
6,148,830
6,169,819
6,167,636
6,169,705

2.4
2.7
2.8
2.7

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.4
2.8
2.7
2.7

2.6
2.9
2.9
2.9

Percent change in GDP
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A
B
C
D

..............................................
..............................................
..............................................
..............................................

2.3
2.6
2.5
2.5

1992

2.5
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.5
2.7
2.7
2.7

1994

1993

2.5
2.7
2.8
2.7

1995

2.5
2.8
2.9
2.8

2.5
2.7
2.9
2.7

1997

1996

1998

1999

2000

2002

2001

Millions of dollars
G D P ...............................................................
G DP in scenario A ................................
G DP in scenario B ................................
G DP in scenario C ................................
GDP in scenario D ................................

6,337,744
6,495,124
6,515,711
6,515,410
6,517,268

6,657,408
6,815,813
6,837,580
6,838,426
6,838,562

7,072,228
7,235,079
7,256,189
7,257,585
7,258,581

7,397,651
7,577,084
7,597,208
7,600,648
7,597,809

2.5
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.3
2.6
2.6
2.6

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.7

7,816,860
8,010,315
8,031,684
8,034,824
8,030,540

8,304,344
8,512,490
8,533,352
8,539,094
8,532,485

8,746,997
8,969,464
8,990,650
8,993,329
8,985,561

9,268,412
9,509,980
9,529,791
9,530,358
9,526,281

9,816,973
10,082,824
10,098,969
10,097,908
10,098,146

10,127,976
10,396,528
10,414,785
10,409,475
10,410,270

10,469,603
10,733,588
10,751,493
10,743,502
10,747,342

2.5
2.8
2.8
2.7

2.6
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.7
2.9
2.9
2.9

2.7
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.5
2.7
2.6
2.7

Percent change in GDP
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A
B
C
D

..............................................
..............................................
..............................................
..............................................

Notes. Percent change is calculated from GDP for each year.
Adjusted GDP incorporates the impact of treating R&D as investment.
Scenario A uses an input price index.
Scenario B uses a multifactor productivity-adjusted price index.
Scenario C uses a high-produdivity service industries price index.
Scenario D uses a top four R&D performers price index.




2.5
2.7
2.8
2.7

2.5
2.8
2.8
2.7

30

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 1.3 Gross Domestic Income (GDI) and GDI with R&D Adjustments, 1959-2002
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Millions of dollars
G D I.................................................................
GDI in scenario A ...................................
GDI in scenario B ...................................
GDI in scenario C ...................................
GDI in scenario D ..................................

506,124
515,279
516,389
516,769
516,919

527,327
537,039
538,378
538,685
538,879

545,266
555,342
556,905
557,276
557,307

585,269
595,781
597,656
597,900
598,148

618,511
629,908
632,471
632,675
632,773

662,767
675,631
678,740
678,852
678,907

717,529
731,826
735,585
735,638
735,756

781,511
797,863
802,551
802,153
802,458

827,959
846,433
851,196
850,768
851,240

905,435
926,765
931,596
931,143
931,941

981,437
1,005,779
1,010,479
1,009,288
1,010,700

2.0
2.5
2.5
2.5

2.1
2.7
2.6
2.7

2.2
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.4
2.9
2.8
2.9

2.5
3.0
2.8
3.0

Percent change in GDI
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A ...............................................
B ...............................................
C ..............................................
D ..............................................

1.8
2.0
2.1
2.1

1970

1.8
2.1
2.2
2.2

1.8
2.1
2.2
2.2

1972

1971

1.8
2.1
2.2
2.2

1973

1.8
2.3
2.3
2.3

1974

1.9
2.4
2.4
2.4

1976

1975

1977

1978

1979

1980

Millions of dollars
G D I.................................................................
GDI in scenario A ...................................
GDI in scenario B ...................................
GDI in scenario C ..................................
GDI in scenario D ...................................

1,031,241
1,057,086
1,061,265
1,059,845
1,061,780

1,115,515
1,142,739
1,146,688
1,146,406
1,147,519

1,229,172
1,258,827
1,262,387
1,262,670
1,263,221

1,374,059
1,406,177
1,410,041
1,409,978
1,410,660

1,489,124
1,524,121
1,528,716
1,527,309
1,528,069

2.5
2.9
2.8
3.0

2.4
2.8
2.8
2.9

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.8

2.3
2.6
2.6
2.7

2.4
2.7
2.6
2.6

1,620,627
1,658,369
1,662,613
1,661,914
1,662,840

1,800,138
1,841,018
1,845,551
1,845,899
1,846,861

2,008,651
2,052,924
2,057,971
2,058,464
2,059,520

2,268,128
2,316,988
2,322,973
2,322,451
2,323,475

2,517,280
2,572,642
2,579,522
2,576,800
2,578,727

2,748,069
2,811,059
2,817,856
2,814,552
2,816,041

2.3
2.5
2.5
2.6

2.2
2.5
2.5
2.5

2.2
2.4
2.4
2.4

2.2
2.5
2.4
2.4

2.3
2.5
2.4
2.5

Percent change in GDI
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A ...............................................
B ...............................................
C ..............................................
D ..............................................

1981

1982

1984

1983

1985

2.3
2.6
2.5
2.6

1987

1986

1988

1989

1990

1991

Millions of dollars
G D I.................................................................
GDI in scenario A ..................................
GDI in scenario B ...................................
GDI in scenario C ...................................
GDI in scenario D ...................................

3,097,508
3,169,461
3,177,476
3,174,297
3,175,087

3,254,706
3,335,114
3,341,917
3,341,474
3,341,791

3,490,932
3,579,607
3,586,733
3,588,114
3,587,022

3,918,582
4,017,321
4,025,854
4,029,178
4,026,103

4,203,578
4,310,916
4,320,477
4,326,747
4,320,110

4,415,834
4,526,179
4,536,173
4,543,991
4,536,000

4,717,795
4,833,130
4,844,474
4,849,351
4,844,363

5,123,316
5,245,614
5,259,882
5,263,554
5,259,461

5,444,689
5,574,043
5,591,696
5,592,059
5,590,068

5,736,843
5,877,526
5,897,068
5,895,379
5,895,640

5,923,410
6,076,314
6,097,303
6,095,120
6,097,189

2.4
2.7
2.8
2.7

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.5
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.6
2.9
2.9
2.9

Percent change in GDI
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A ...............................................
B ...............................................
C ..............................................
D ..............................................

2.3
2.6
2.5
2.5

1992

2.5
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.5
2.7
2.8
2.8

1994

1993

2.5
2.7
2.8
2.7

1995

2.6
2.8
2.9
2.8

2.5
2.7
2.9
2.7

1997

1996

1998

1999

2000

2002

2001

Millions of dollars
G D I.................................................................
GDI in scenario A ...................................
GDI in scenario B ...................................
GDI in scenario C ...................................
G DI in scenario D ..................................

6,234,996
6,392,376
6,412,963
6,412,662
6,414,520

6,517,867
6,676,272
6,698,039
6,698,885
6,699,021

6,929,731
7,092,582
7,113,692
7,115,088
7,116,084

7,296,466
7,475,899
7,496,023
7,499,463
7,496,624

7,723,173
7,916,628
7,937,997
7,941,137
7,936,853

2.5
2.9
2.8
2.9

2.4
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.4
2.7
2.7
2.7

2.5
2.7
2.8
2.7

2.5
2.8
2.8
2.8

8,233,690
8,441,836
8,462,698
8,468,440
8,461,831

8,761,644
8,984,111
9,005,297
9,007,976
9,000,208

9,304,137
9,545,705
9,565,516
9,566,083
9,562,006

9,944,136
10,209,987
10,226,132
10,225,071
10,225,309

10,217,619
10,486,171
10,504,428
10,499,118
10,499,913

10,490,593
10,754,578
10,772,483
10,764,492
10,768,332

2.5
2.8
2.8
2.7

2.6
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.7
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.6
2.8
2.8
2.8

2.5
2.7
2.6
2.6

Percent change in GDI
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A ...............................................
B................................................
C ..............................................
D ..............................................

Notes. Percent change is calculated from GDI for each year.
Adjusted GDI incorporates the impact of treating R&D as investment.




2.5
2.8
2.9
2.8

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

31

Table 1.4 National Saving and National Saving with R&D Adjustment as a Percent of Adjusted Gross National Income, 1959-2002
1959
National saving...................................
National saving in scenario A ...........
National saving in scenario B ...........
National saving in scenario C ...........
National saving in scenario D ...........

20.9
22.9
22.9
22.9
22.9

1970
National saving...................................
National saving in scenario A ...........
National saving in scenario B ...........
National saving in scenario C ...........
National saving in scenario D ...........

18.6
20.6
20.5
20.6
20.5

1981
National saving...................................
National saving in scenario A ...........
National saving in scenario B ...........
National saving in scenario C ...........
National saving in scenario D ...........

21.0
23.2
23.1
23.1
23.1

1971

15.1
17.4
17.3
17.3
17.3

1962

20.8
23.1
23.0
23.0
23.0

1972

18.6
20.5
20.5
20.5
20.5

1982

20.9
22.8
22.7
22.7
22.7

1992
National saving...................................
National saving in scenario A ...........
National saving in scenario B ...........
National saving in scenario C ...........
National saving in scenario D ...........

1961

1960

19.1
21.1
21.1
21.1
21.1

1993
14.7
16.9
16.8
16.8
16.8

19.2
21.1
21.0
21.0
21.0

1983
17.3
19.4
19.3
19.3
19.3

1994
15.4
17.5
17.4
17.4
17.4

N ote . Adjusted national saving incorporates the impact of treating R&D as investment.




21.2
23.4
23.4
23.4
23.3

1973
21.1
22.8
22.8
22.8
22.7

1984
19.6
21.6
21.6
21.6
21.6

1995
16.2
18.2
18.2
18.2
18.2

1963
21.4
23.8
23.7
23.6
23.6

1974
20.0
21.8
21.7
21.8
21.8

1985
18.1
20.4
20.3
20.3
20.3

1996
16.6
18.7
18.7
18.7
18.7

1964
21.5
23.9
23.8
23.8
23.8

1975
18.2
20.0
19.9
19.9
19.9

1986
16.5
18.8
18.8
18.8
18.8

1997
17.7
19.8
19.7
19.7
19.7

1965
21.9
24.3
24.1
24.1
24.1

1976
18.8
20.6
20.5
20.5
20.5

1987
16.8
19.1
19.0
19.0
19.0

1998
18.2
20.3
20.2
20.2
20.2

1966
21.4
23.8
23.7
23.7
23.7

1977
19.6
21.3
21.3
21.3
21.3

1988
17.8
19.9
19.9
19.9
19.9

1999
17.9
20.0
20.0
20.0
20.0

1967
20.5
22.8
22.7
22.7
22.7

1978
20.9
22.6
22.5
22.5
22.5

1989

20.0
22.2
22.1
22.1
22.1

1979

17.7
19.9
19.9
19.9
19.9

20.1
22.2
22.1
22.1
22.1

1980

21.1
22.8
22.7
22.8
22.7

1990

17.3
19.4
19.4
19.4
19.4

2000

1969

1968

16.3
18.5
18.5
18.5
18.5

2001
16.2
18.4
18.3
18.3
18.3

19.7
21.6
21.6
21.6
21.6

1991
16.2
18.5
18.4
18.4
18.4

2002
14.2
16.4
16.3
16.4
16.3

32

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 1.5 Aggregate Current-Cost Returns to R&D Assets, 1959-2002
[Millions of chained (2000) dollars]
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1 966

1967

1968

1969

B u s in e s s
Net returns......................................................................
Depreciation....................................................................

3,68 9
4,001

3 ,7 8 8
4 ,2 9 7

3,981
4 ,4 8 3

4,36 2
4,61 0

4 ,4 7 5
4 ,6 0 5

4 ,7 6 2
4 ,6 5 5

5 ,1 5 6
4,771

5 ,4 0 3
5,0 0 2

5 ,4 4 4
5 ,3 6 3

5 ,9 4 3
5 ,8 5 5

6,25 6
6,54 9

N onprofit institutions serving households
Net returns......................................................................
Depreciation...................................................................

36
94

37
101

40
109

48
122

54
135

63
149

74
165

84
187

89
2 12

100
237

104
262

G o v e rn m e n t
Net returns......................................................................
Depreciation....................................................................

1,33 6
3,49 6

1,50 0
4 ,1 0 7

1,76 8
4 ,8 0 6

2,22 5
5,67 4

2,651
6,58 2

3 ,2 4 6
7 ,6 5 7

3,961
8 ,8 4 6

4 ,5 3 7
1 0,1 35

4,821
11,4 62

5 ,3 1 3
12,6 33

5,36 8
13,561

1 970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

B u s in e s s
6,361
7 ,4 9 3

N onprofit institutions serving households
Net returns......................................................................
Depreciation

7 ,2 0 0
8 ,2 7 2

7 ,8 6 9
8 ,9 7 6

8,66 4
9,79 3

8,741
1 0,9 84

9 ,9 0 4
12,6 19

1 1,3 80
14,2 05

1 3 ,0 1 7
1 5,7 48

14,2 13
17,0 58

1 4,9 20
1 9 ,0 5 4

15,6 26
2 1 ,4 9 7

104
2 95

117
3 25

128
3 53

140
381

138
419

156
4 80

180
542

20 6
602

226
654

2 36
7 28

244
8 09

5,1 4 7
14,631

Net returns..
Depreciation

5,55 9
1 5,4 13

5 ,8 3 2
16,0 55

6,12 7
16,713

5,87 5
1 7,8 16

6,3 8 0
19,6 16

7 ,0 6 7
21 ,2 8 8

7 ,8 0 0
22,771

8,20 2
23 ,7 5 5

8 ,2 1 2
2 5 ,3 0 9

8 ,1 5 9
2 7 ,0 8 7

G o v e rn m e n t
Net returns..
Depreciation

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

B u s in e s s
1 8,9 63
2 4 ,6 4 5

N onprofit institutions serving households
Net returns......................................................................
Depreciation....................................................................

2 0 ,8 9 8
2 9 ,0 9 0

24,731
32 ,5 2 7

30,911
36,241

3 3 ,9 9 8
4 0 ,5 4 8

36 ,0 3 9
4 4 ,8 6 2

39 ,0 7 9
48 ,5 5 5

4 3 ,6 3 5
5 2 ,6 8 3

46,511
57,631

48 ,6 6 3
63 ,4 5 8

51 ,2 3 6
70 ,7 7 4

290
909

3 12
1,04 8

3 59
1,14 0

434
1,229

464
1,335

4 89
1,47 0

5 43
1,628

631
1,83 8

707
2 ,1 1 4

7 73
2 ,4 3 2

840
2,7 9 9

9,36 2
2 9 ,3 6 3

Net returns
Depreciation

9 ,7 0 4
3 2 ,5 9 8

10,7 59
34 ,1 4 7

12,5 75
35 ,5 7 7

13,061
37,591

13,471
40 ,4 6 5

1 4,5 26
43 ,5 5 2

1 6,1 73
4 7 ,1 2 0

17,251
51,581

17,9 97
56 ,6 3 3

18,591
61,971

G o v e rn m e n t
Net returns,,
Depreciation

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1 997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2 002

B u s in e s s
5 4,6 46
76,371

Net returns
Depreciation
N onprofit institutions serving households
Net returns......................................................................
Depreciation....................................................................

5 7 ,1 4 3
7 9 ,9 7 2

6 0 ,3 9 0
8 2 ,6 1 7

6 2,3 83
83,201

6 7 ,6 9 9
87 ,2 9 9

7 3 ,9 3 5
9 3 ,7 7 0

7 4 ,1 8 7
9 8 ,7 9 8

7 8 ,7 2 9
10 9 ,4 4 5

84 ,2 4 4
1 2 2 ,1 7 7

83 ,3 3 5
1 3 4,688

8 8 ,3 2 4
1 41,814

924
3,1 1 5

1,00 3
3 ,3 8 7

1,101
3 ,6 3 5

1,158
3,72 7

1,249
3 ,8 8 7

1,34 3
4 ,1 1 0

1,32 2
4 ,2 4 9

1,36 7
4 ,5 8 7

1,41 3
4 ,9 4 5

1,36 6
5 ,3 2 8

1,46 5
5 ,6 7 4

1 9,4 00
6 5 ,4 2 6

2 0 ,1 1 8
6 7 ,9 4 4

2 1 ,2 5 8
7 0 ,1 8 0

2 1 ,5 7 9
69,4 52

2 2 ,4 2 5
69,781

2 3 ,1 9 9
7 1 ,0 0 3

2 1 ,8 8 6
7 0 ,3 3 5

2 1 ,6 0 8
7 2 ,4 8 9

2 1 ,2 4 2
74 ,3 4 2

1 9.6 54
76 .6 5 4

2 0 ,4 7 8
7 9 ,3 4 3

G o v e rn m e n t
Net returns
Depreciation

N o t e . I m p l e m e n t e d u s in g a s s u m p t i o n s d e f i n e d in s c e n a r i o D .




33

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 2.1. Historical-Cost Investment Flows in R&D A ssets by Funder, 1959-2002

[M n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

12,575

13,819

14,625

15,662

17,483

19,094

20,374

22,321

23,728

25,109

26,286

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

5,967
5,834
16
117

5,948
5,807
18
123

5,484
5,318
19
147

5,009
4,811
21
177

5,057
4,840
22
195

5,248
5,025
28
195

5,440
5,180
38
222

6,295
6,004
46
244

7,014
6,697
52
266

8,562
8,223
56
284

10,325
9,968
59
298

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governm ents1............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

6,607
4,785
1,668
111
44

7,871
5,876
1,823
123
48

9,141
6,962
1,988
136
54

10,653
8,264
2,177
150
62

12,426
9,713
2,476
165
72

13,847
10,729
2,853
181
84

14,934
11,492
3,153
194
95

16,026
12,312
3,382
215
116

16,714
12,786
3,556
226
146

16,547
12,520
3,610
253
164

15,961
11,751
3,736
298
176

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

26,627

27,460

29,404

31,738

34,330

36,757

40,523

44,432

49,694

56,878

65,461

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

10,761
10,363
64
334

11,017
10,590
70
358

12,133
11,680
70
384

13,711
13,241
68
402

15,226
14,696
74
457

18,321
17,646
90
585

20,248
19,491
108
649

23,381
22,509
134
738

27,955
26,963
156
836

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governments1............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

15,866
11,288
4,053
329
196

16,442
11,427
4,430
363
221

17,270
11,802
4,831
394
243

18,027
12,227
5,084
438
278

19,104
12,895
5,405
480
324

16,187
15,582
81
523
20,571
13,911
5,777
529
354

22,202
15,209
6,037
566
390

24,184
16,839
6,271
613
461

26,313
18,367
6,706
693
547

28,924
20,229
7,292
772
631

32,788
31,673
174
940
32,674
22,980
8,106
844
743

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

Total R&D in ve stm en t..................................................................

74,798

82,924

91,680

103,948

116,262

122,744

127,619

135,602

143,924

154,233

163,575

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

38,940
37,656
202
1,082

44,855
43,423
230
1,201

51,255
49,685
242
1,328

59,436
57,706
269
1,462

66,029
64,082
304
1,643

68,792
66,320
383
2,089

73,273
70,383
428
2,463

76,970
73,726
478
2,765

84,482
80,962
546
2,974

93,488
89,578
618
3,293

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural.........................................
State and local governments 1............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

35,858
25,257
8,795
952
854

38,069
26,733
9,333
1,026
978

40,425
27,976
10,256
1,083
1,110

44,512
30,718
11,390
1,169
1,235

50,234
34,877
12,604
1,326
1,427

66,478
64,270
342
1,866
56,267
39,397
13,688
1,511
1,671

58,827
41,811
13,510
1,634
1,872

62,328
44,273
14,190
1,779
2,086

66,954
47,568
15,109
1,914
2,362

69,752
49,401
15,675
2,039
2,636

70,087
49,557
15,566
2,128
2,836

1981

1982

1983

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

167,786

168,051

171,635

185,086

198,769

213,827

227,725

245,878

268,559

275,294

276,533

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
B usiness...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural.........................................
State and local governm ents' ............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

94,842
90,659
631
3,551
72,945
51,986
15,867
2,162
2,930

93,106
88,702
629
3,775
74,945
53,297
16,405
2,178
3,066

94,715
90,179
651
3,885
76,920
54,849
16,599
2,215
3,257

108,937
104,242
708
3,987

121,293
116,338
782
4,173
77,476
55,210
16,159
2,473
3,633

133,804
128,485
797
4,522
80,023
56,832
16,570
2,590
4,032

146,481
140,772
811
4,898
81,244
57,638
16,566
2,683
4,357

163,863
157,817
883
5,163
82,015
57,953
16,481
2,851
4,730

185,749
179,231
972
5,546

186,207
179,292
1,061
5,854

82,810
58,032
16,450
3,080
5,249

89,087
61,831
18,249
3,269
5,739

178,269
170,779
1,190
6,300
98,264
68,713
19,922
3,482
6,147

1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .




76,149
54,108
16,318
2,344
3,379

34

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 2.2. Real Investment Flows in R&D Assets by Funder, 1959-2002
[Millions of chained (2000) dollars]
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

19,409

21,224

22,509

23,972

27,174

29,844

31,749

34,247

35,446

36,558

37,446

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

9,211
9,005
25
181
10,199
7,385
2,574
171
68

9,135
8,919
27
190
12,089
9,024
2,801
189
74

8,440
8,185
29
226
14,069
10,715
3,060
210
84

7,666
7,364
31
271
16,306
12,649
3,332
229
95

7,860
7,522
34
303

8,202
7,854
44
305
21,642
16,769
4,459
282
131

8,477
8,072
60
345
23,271
17,907
4,913
302
149

9,659
9,212
71
375

10,478
10,004
77
397

12,466
11,972
81
413

14,709
14,201
84
424

24,589
18,891
5,190
330
178

24,968
19,100
5,312
338
218

24,092
18,228
5,256
369
239

22,738
16,740
5,322
425
250

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

1970

1971

1972

1973

19,314
15,097
3,848
257
112

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

36,008

35,844

37,862

40,088

41,528

40,811

42,011

43,974

48,227

53,519

59,495

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

14,552
14,014
86
452

14,382
13,823
91
467

15,624
15,040
90
494

17,318
16,724
86
508

18,419
17,777
89
552

17,972
17,301
90
581

18,994
18,294
93
607

20,039
19,290
107
642

22,690
21,845
130
716

26,304
25,370
146
787

29,799
28,786
159
855

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

21,455
15,265
5,480
444
266

21,463
14,917
5,783
474
289

22,238
15,197
6,221
508
313

22,769
15,444
6,421
553
351

23,109
15,598
6,538
580
392

22,839
15,445
6,414
587
393

23,017
15,767
6,258
587
405

23,935
16,665
6,206
607
456

25,536
17,825
6,508
673
531

27,216
19,034
6,861
726
594

29,695
20,885
7,367
767
675

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

1981
64,962

1982
67,722

74,035

84,296

95,657

101,469

106,655

113,115

118,375

123,975

126,619

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

33,819
32,704
176
939

36,632
35,463
188
981

41,390
40,123
195
1,072

48,199
46,796
218
1,185

32,644
22,591
8,282
875
896

36,097
24,910
9,237
948
1,001

51,992
36,931
11,836
1,484
1,740

55,069
39,124
12,427
1,574
1,943

67,908
65,079
439
2,390
56,067
39,710
12,600
1,639
2,119

72,366
69,339
478
2,549

31,090
21,832
7,622
838
798

57,492
55,426
320
1,746
49,164
34,943
11,290
1,366
1,564

63,307
60,639
394
2,274

31,143
21,935
7,639
827
742

54,955
53,130
282
1,543
46,514
32,568
11,315
1,249
1,381

61,123
58,711
357
2,054

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

54,326
52,725
250
1,351
41,331
28,695
10,370
1,091
1,174

1983

1984

1985

54,252
38,361
12,049
1,647
2,195

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t...................................................................

128,330

129,120

268,559

285,661

87,938
84,148
572
3,218

184,926
115,719
111,119
689
3,911

239,359

71,537
68,153
483
2,900

165,738
101,137
97,005
652
3,480

213,125

72,539
69,340
483
2,716

132,713
73,237
69,729
504
3,004

149,408

P riv a te .....................
Business..............
Universities and colleges
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

137,090
131,747
759
4,584

159,519
153,633
860
5,026

185,749
179,231
972
5,546

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural
Federal Government intramural.
State and local governments1....
Universities and colleges.......................................................

55,791
39,761
12,136
1,653
2,241

57,583
40,950
12,604
1,673
2,356

59,477
42,411
12,835
1,713
2,518

61,470
43,678
13,172
1,892
2,728

64,601
46,036
13,474
2,062
3,029

69,207
49,150
14,330
2,240
3,487

76,035
53,943
15,504
2,511
4,078

79,841
56,417
16,044
2,775
4,604

82,810
58,032
16,450
3,080
5,249

193,219
186,044
1,101
6,074
92,442
64,159
18,936
3,392
5,955

288,335
185,877
178,067
1,241
6,569
102,458
71,645
20,773
3,631
6,409

1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .
N o t e . Im p le m e n t e d u s in g a s s u m p t io n s d e fin e d in s c e n a r io D .




December 2006

Survey of Current Business

35

Table 2.3. Historical-Cost Net Stock of R&D Assets by Funder, 1959-2002
[Millions of dollars]
1968

1969

Total R&D net s to c k ......................................................................

1959
43,541

49,792

55,851

61,961

68,838

76,175

83,595

91,702

99,895

108,137

116,231

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

23,140
22,622
86
432

25,171
24,600
90
481

26,468
25,829
94
545

27,131
26,405
99
627

27,739
26,921
104
714

28,432
27,531
115
787

29,199
28,193
133
874

30,642
29,518
156
969

32,534
31,284
180
1,069

35,574
34,198
205
1,171

39,789
38,289
229
1,271

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural.........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

20,401
13,278
6,508
431
184

24,621
16,721
7,218
480
201

29,383
20,653
7,975
534
221

34,830
25,199
8,792
593
246

41,100
30,404
9,763
657
275

47,743
35,768
10,938
725
312

54,395
41,032
12,214
796
353

61,060
46,267
13,510
875
407

67,361
51,153
14,773
953
482

72,563
55,061
15,896
1,044
561

76,442
57,672
16,967
1,164
640

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Total R&D net s to c k ......................................................................

123,426

130,313

137,964

146,627

156,388

166,930

179,375

193,568

210,499

231,537

257,358

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
B usiness...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

43,775
42,131
253
1,390

47,399
45,607
280
1,512

51,513
49,570
303
1,640

56,469
54,382
321
1,766

62,083
59,819
341
1,924

67,743
65,259
365
2,119

74,529
71,793
393
2,342

82,079
79,053
434
2,591

91,394
88,016
493
2,885

103,543
99,754
563
3,226

118,340
114,089
640
3,612

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

79,652
59,463
18,171
1,293
725

82,913
61,113
19,543
1,435
821

86,451
62,864
21,080
1,585
923

90,158
64,744
22,620
1,752
1,042

94,305
66,960
24,227
1,933
1,185

99,187
69,784
25,936
2,133
1,335

104,846
73,384
27,630
2,337
1,496

111,489
77,952
29,286
2,553
1,698

119,106
83,249
31,096
2,812
1,949

127,994
89,473
33,176
3,104
2,241

139,018
97,308
35,698
3,419
2,592

1990

1991

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

Total R& D net s to c k ......................................................................

287,942

321,455

358,041

400,487

447,957

494,302

538,204

582,905

628,598

676,974

726,735

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

136,608
131,807
731
4,070

157,608
152,203
834
4,571

181,378
175,331
933
5,114

209,149
202,409
1,042
5,698

238,853
231,323
1,167
6,363

264,517
256,074
1,308
7,135

288,472
279,009
1,466
7,997

312,979
302,262
1,642
9,075

337,229
325,119
1,838
10,272

364,791
351,241
2,068
11,482

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

151,334
106,075
38,479
3,787
2,994

163,848
114,891
41,340
4,168
3,449

176,664
123,535
44,626
4,544
3,958

191,338
133,419
48,468
4,944
4,507

209,103
145,667
52,857
5,429
5,150

229,785
160,259
57,589
6,013
5,923

249,732
174,895
61,447
6,623
6,766

269,926
189,614
65,356
7,275
7,681

291,369
205,172
69,528
7,955
8,714

312,184
220,093
73,598
8,648
9,845

396,549
381,415
2,329
12,805
330,187
232,919
76,957
9,319
10,992

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Total R&D net s to c k ......................................................................

772,928

812,435

849,332

893,137

943,028

999,364

1,060,105

1,128,526

1,207,664

1,281,162

1,344,780

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intram ural.........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

424,795
408,062
2,563
14,169
348,133
246,068
80,090
9,921
12,054

447,198
428,902
2,760
15,536
365,237
258,457
83,251
10,447
13,082

467,730
447,982
2,949
16,799
381,602
270,424
86,117
10,929
14,132

498,337
477,208
3,162
17,967
394,800
279,910
88,294
11,458
15,138

535,783
513,240
3,410
19,132

579,184
555,103
3,636
20,445
420,180
298,214
91,825
12,618
17,523

627,802
602,051
3,841
21,909
432,303
306,797
93,375
13,207
18,925

685,205
657,725
4,082
23,398
443,322
314,384
94,614
13,863
20,461

754,242
724,855
4,369
25,019
453,422
320,906
95,638
14,632
22,247

813,347
781,972
4,694
26,681
467,815
329,963
98,172
15,461
24,218

856,244
822,646
5,091
28,506
488,537
344,028
101,875
16,363
26,271

1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .
N o t e . Im p le m e n t e d u s in g a s s u m p t io n s d e fin e d in s c e n a r io D.




407,245
288,993
89,997
12,027
16,227

36

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 2.4. Current-Cost Net Stock of R&D Assets by Funder, 1959-2002
[Millions of chained (2000) dollars]
1959

1960

1968

1969

44,928

50,300

55,629

60,574

66,086

72,644

79,964

88,767

97,903

106,707

116,824

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

23,829
23,284
97
448

25,412
24,826
97
488

26,496
25,780
101
615

26,536
25,745
104
687

26,947
26,082
113
752

27,705
26,738
130
837

29,419
28,326
154
940

31,658
30,429
180
1,050

34,915
33,553
205
1,158

39,847
38,335
232
1,279

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

21,099
13,633
6,824
449
193

24,889
16,806
7,387
489
206

26,350
25,706
99
545
29,279
20,498
8,023
536
223

34,078
24,592
8,661
582
242

39,550
29,223
9,427
633
266

45,698
34,223
10,482
694
299

52,259
39,421
11,735
763
340

59,348
44,977
13,126
849
397

66,245
50,314
14,521
936
475

71,792
54,482
15,720
1,032
557

76,977
58,078
17,083
1,171
646

1961

1962

1963

1964

Total R&D net stock.......................................................................

1965

1966

1967

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Total R&D net stock.......................................................................

126,304

132,890

139,157

148,558

163,900

181,171

196,426

208,336

241,444

267,780

P riv a te ............................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

44,646
42,961
261
1,423

48,183
46,354
287
1,542

51,814
49,854
306
1,654

57,084
54,969
326
1,789

64,921
62,549
358
2,015

73,302
70,611
397
2,294

81,274
78,288
431
2,555

87,919
84,677
467
2,775

222,036
95,932
92,386
518
3,028

107,451
103,518
585
3,349

122,580
118,173
663
3,744

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

81,658
60,973
18,617
1,324
744

84,708
62,467
19,940
1,463
838

87,342
63,548
21,267
1,597
930

91,474
65,724
22,922
1,774
1,055

98,979
70,322
25,392
2,024
1,241

107,870
75,973
28,145
2,308
1,443

115,152
80,702
30,273
2,549
1,628

120,417
84,290
31,577
2,737
1,812

126,104
88,223
32,889
2,955
2,037

133,992
93,736
34,713
3,227
2,317

145,200
101,690
37,282
3,550
2,677

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

Total R&D net s to ck .......................................................................

303,062

334,452

359,444

386,788

419,786

452,274

484,144

522,241

565,008

614,795

658,363

P riv a te ............................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

143,152
138,114
767
4,271

163,190
157,582
865
4,743

181,315
175,258
934
5,123

201,441
194,943
1,004
5,495

223,601
216,554
1,092
5,955

241,898
234,173
1,197
6,529

259,431
250,895
1,322
7,213

280,404
270,739
1,479
8,185

303,086
292,097
1,665
9,323

331,405
318,968
1,896
10,540

359,723
345,858
2,133
11,732

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

159,910
112,127
40,672
3,981
3,130

171,262
120,123
43,238
4,335
3,565

178,129
124,595
45,018
4,563
3,952

185,347
129,267
46,970
4,774
4,336

196,185
136,682
49,602
5,083
4,818

210,375
146,746
52,703
5,499
5,428

224,713
157,454
55,178
5,961
6,120

241,837
170,002
58,363
6,531
6,942

261,923
184,582
62,248
7,171
7,922

283,390
199,938
66,517
7,878
9,058

298,639
210,795
69,291
8,465
10,087

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Total R&D net stock.......................................................................
P riv a te ............................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

683,625
376,377
361,396
2,294
12,687

696,604
384,047
368,134
2,396
13,518

694,650
383,050
366,639
2,443
13,968

697,116
390,490
373,736
2,502
14,252

710,649
406,843
389,606
2,611
14,625

714,429

761,111
471,997
453,279
2,768
15,950

803,138

844,879

418,813
401,371
2,635
14,808

726,280
437,115
419,252
2,654
15,209

514,770
495,094
2,916
16,760

550,119
529,271
3,122
17,727

887,686
576,419
553,928
3,428
19,063

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

307,248
217,320
70,335
8,794
10,798

312,557
221,333
70,875
8,975
11,373

311,600
220,990
69,916
8,953
11,741

306,626
217,553
68,120
8,948
12,005

303,806
215,764
66,566
9,053
12,423

295,615
209,946
63,942
8,986
12,742

289,166
205,312
61,666
8,976
13,212

289,114
205,031
60,771
9,242
14,071

288,368
203,897
59,782
9,594
15,094

294,760
207,395
60,913
10,076
16,376

311,267
218,634
63,986
10,748
17,898

1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .
N o t e . Im p le m e n t e d u s in g a s s u m p t io n s d e fin e d in s c e n a r io D.




December 2006

Survey of Current Business

37

Table 2.5. Real Net Stock of R&D Assets by Funder, 1959-2002
[Millions of chained (200 0) dollars]
1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Total R&D net sto ck.......................................................................

69,176

77,338

85,382

93,427

103,004

113,371

123,643

134,377

144,372

153,667

162,093

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

36,690
35,850
150
690

39,071
38,170
150
751

40,443
39,454
152
836

40,867
39,762
156
948

41,360
40,128
162
1,071

42,054
40,705
176
1,173

42,839
41,343
201
1,295

44,535
42,880
233
1,422

46,684
44,872
265
1,548

50,281
48,319
295
1,667

55,287
53,190
322
1,775

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments’ .............................................
Universities and colleges......................................................

32,486
20,990
10,506
692
298

38,267
25,840
11,358
752
317

44,939
31,461
12,314
822
342

52,560
37,929
13,359
898
373

61,644
45,548
14,694
986
415

71,317
53,410
16,358
1,083
466

80,804
60,954
18,145
1,180
525

89,842
68,086
19,870
1,285
601

97,688
74,195
21,413
1,380
700

103,386
78,459
22,639
1,486
802

106,806
80,582
23,702
1,625
896

1959

1960

1961

1962

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Total R&D net s to c k ......................................................................

167,784

172,286

177,461

183,588

189,770

194,259

198,913

204,169

212,152

223,244

237,847

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

59,308
57,071
347
1,890

62,466
60,095
372
1,999

66,077
63,577
391
2,109

70,544
67,931
402
2,211

109,820
80,985
25,852
1,896
1,086

111,385
81,040
27,122
2,036
1,187

113,044
81,221
28,327
2,192
1,304

116,610
81,724
30,657
2,581
1,649

86,160
82,983
458
2,720
118,008
82,604
30,946
2,683
1,776

91,662
88,273
495
2,893
120,491
84,296
31,425
2,823
1,947

99,352
95,715
541
3,096

108,476
80,998
24,731
1,759
989

78,597
75,711
425
2,460
115,662
81,461
30,179
2,475
1,547

82,303
79,279
436
2,587

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

75,169
72,421
414
2,333
114,602
81,422
29,400
2,343
1,437

108,878
104,963
589
3,326
128,969
90,323
33,115
3,154
2,378

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

Total R&D net stock.......................................................................

255,115

271,602

290,874

315,934

346,203

375,919

404,237

432,565

459,376

484,866

506,564

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

120,504
116,263
646
3,595

132,524
127,969
703
3,852

146,726
141,825
756
4,146

184,407
178,595
901
4,911

201,060
194,639
995
5,427

216,612
209,485
1,104
6,023

232,255
224,250
1,225
6,780

246,422
237,488
1,354
7,580

261,366
251,558
1,495
8,313

276,782
266,114
1,641
9,027

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges......................................................

134,610
94,388
34,237
3,351
2,635

139,078
97,550
35,113
3,520
2,895

144,148
100,827
36,430
3,693
3,198

164,540
159,232
820
4,488
151,394
105,587
38,365
3,900
3,542

161,796
112,724
40,907
4,192
3,973

174,859
121,972
43,805
4,571
4,512

187,625
131,466
46,071
4,978
5,110

200,311
140,810
48,341
5,409
5,750

212,954
150,073
50,610
5,830
6,441

223,499
157,683
52,460
6,213
7,143

229,782
162,192
53,315
6,513
7,761

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Total R& D net s to ck.......................................................................

524,059

536,926

548,681

571,854

603,373

642,243

693,102

750,886

817,981

878,812

930,634

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................

288,526
277,042
1,759
9,726
235,532
166,595
53,918
6,742
8,278

296,015
283,749
1,847
10,419
240,912
170,598
54,629
6,918
8,766

302,558
289,596
1,930
11,033
246,123
174,553
55,224
7,072
9,274

320,324
306,580
2,053
11,691
251,529
178,461
55,880
7,340
9,848

345,428
330,794
2,217
12,418
257,945
183,194
56,518
7,687
10,547

376,497
360,817
2,369
13,311
265,746
188,733
57,481
8,078
11,454

417,146
400,100
2,532
14,514
275,956
195,933
58,849
8,566
12,608

465,656
447,190
2,731
15,736
285,230
202,276
59,954
9,118
13,882

524,284
504,244
2,970
17,070
293,697
207,666
60,887
9,772
15,373

572,214
550,528
3,247
18,439
306,599
215,724
63,360
10,480
17,034

604,308
580,728
3,594
19,985
326,327
229,212
67,082
11,269
18,764

Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................

1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .
N o t e . Im p le m e n t e d u s in g a s s u m p t io n s d e fin e d in s c e n a r io D.




123,892
86,670
32,096
2,984
2,142

1990

1991

38

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 2.6. Historical-Cost Depreciation of R&D Assets by Funder, 1959-2002
[Millions of dollars]
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Total R&D d e p re c ia tio n ...............................................................

6,574

7,568

8,566

9,552

12,954

14,213

15,535

16,867

18,192

3,557
3,477
14
66

3,917
3,829
14
74

4,187
4,089
15
83

4,346
4,235
16
95

10,605
4,449
4,324
16
109

11,758

P riva te...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

4,554
4,415
18
122

4,673
4,518
20
135

4,852
4,679
23
149

5,122
4,930
27
165

5,522
5,309
31
182

6,111
5,877
35
198

G overnm ent.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges......................................................

3,017
1,921
1,001
66
29

3,650
2,432
1,113
74
31

4,379
3,030
1,232
82
34

5,206
3,718
1,359
91
38

6,156
4,508
1,504
101
42

7,203
5,365
1,678
112
48

8,281
6,227
1,877
123
54

9,361
7,078
2,086
136
62

10,412
7,899
2,293
148
72

11,345
8,612
2,487
162
85

12,082
9,140
2,665
179
97

1970
Total R&D d ep re ciatio n ................................................................

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

19,432
6,775
6,521
39
216

20,573

21,752

23,075

24,569

26,215

28,079

30,239

32,762

35,841

39,640

P riv a te ............................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

7,392
7,114
43
235

8,020
7,717
47
256

8,755
8,429
51
276

9,612
9,260
54
299

10,526
10,141
57
328

11,536
11,112
61
362

12,698
12,231
67
400

14,065
13,546
75
444

15,806
15,225
86
495

17,990
17,339
98
554

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

12,656
9,497
2,849
199
111

13,181
9,776
3,058
221
125

13,732
10,052
3,294
245
141

14,320
10,347
3,543
271
159

14,956
10,679
3,798
299
181

15,689
11,087
4,067
330
204

16,543
11,608
4,343
362
230

17,541
12,271
4,615
396
259

18,697
13,070
4,896
435
296

20,035
14,005
5,211
480
340

21,650
15,144
5,584
529
392

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

Total R&D d e p re c ia tio n ...............................................................

44,214

49,411

55,094

61,502

68,793

76,399

83,717

90,901

98,230

105,857

113,814

P riva te............................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

20,671
19,937
111
623

23,855
23,028
127
701

27,485
26,557
143
785

31,664
30,628
160
877

36,325
35,168
179
978

40,814
39,519
201
1,094

44,837
43,385
225
1,227

48,766
47,130
252
1,384

52,720
50,869
282
1,569

56,921
54,840
317
1,764

61,730
59,405
356
1,969

G overnm ent.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges......................................................

23,542
16,491
6,014
584
453

25,555
17,916
6,472
645
522

27,609
19,332
6,970
706
601

29,838
20,834
7,548
769
686

32,468
22,629
8,216
841
783

35,586
24,805
8,955
928
898

38,880
27,175
9,652
1,025
1,029

42,134
29,555
10,281
1,127
1,171

45,510
32,010
10,937
1,235
1,329

48,937
34,481
11,605
1,346
1,505

52,084
36,731
12,207
1,457
1,690

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Total R&D d e p re c ia tio n ...............................................................

121,594

128,543

134,738

141,281

148,878

157,491

166,984

177,457

189,421

201,797

212,914

P riva te............................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

66,595
64,012
397
2,187

70,702
67,862
432
2,409

74,183
71,099
463
2,622

78,330
75,015
495
2,819

83,848
80,307
533
3,008

90,403
86,622
571
3,209

97,864
93,823
606
3,434

106,460
102,144
642
3,674

127,102
122,175
735
4,192

G overnm ent.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges......................................................

54,999
38,837
12,734
1,560
1,869

57,841
40,907
13,244
1,651
2,038

60,555
42,882
13,733
1,733
2,207

62,952
44,622
14,141
1,815
2,373

65,031
46,127
14,456
1,904
2,543

67,088
47,611
14,742
1,998
2,736

69,120
49,055
15,016
2,094
2,955

70,997
50,366
15,242
2,195
3,193

116,712
112,101
685
3,926
72,709
51,510
15,426
2,310
3,463

135,372
130,104
793
4,475
77,542
54,648
16,220
2,580
4,094

1. E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .
N o t e . Im p le m e n t e d u s in g a s s u m p t io n s d e fin e d in s c e n a r io D .




74,695
52,773
15,714
2,440
3,767

39

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 2.7. Current-Cost Depreciation of R&D A ssets by Funder, 1959-2002

[M n o c rre t (2 0)d lla ]
illio s f u n 00 o rs
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Total R & D d epreciation................................................................

7,591

8,505

9,399

10,406

11,322

12,461

13,782

15,325

17,037

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

4,095
4,001
18
76

4,398
4,297
17
84

4,593
4,483
17
92

4,732
4,610
18
104

4,739
4,605
18
116

4,936
4,771
22
144

5,189
5,002
26
161

5,575
5,363
30
182

6,092
5,855
35
202

6,811
6,549
40
222

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural
Federal Government intramural
State and local governments1..
Universities and colleges.....................................................

3,496
2,208
1,177
77
34

4,107
2,718
1,269
84
36

4,806
3,310
1,367
91
38

5,674
4,038
1,494
100
42

6,582
4,811
1,617
109
45

4,804
4,655
19
129
7,657
5,699
1,788
119
51

8,846
6,650
2,006
132
58

10,135
7,664
2,258
146
67

11,462
8,696
2,523
163
80

12,633
9,591
2,768
180
94

13,561
10,261
2,990
201
110

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

18,725

20,371

1979

1980

Total R&D d ep re ciation................................................................

22,419

24,011

25,384

26,888

29,219

32,714

36,034

39,121

41,467

45,091

49,393

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

7,788
7,493
45
249

8,598
8,272
51
275

9,330
8,976
55
298

10,174
9,793
59
322

11,404
10,984
64
356

13,099
12,619
72
408

14,746
14,205
79
463

16,350
15,748
87
515

17,712
17,058
95
559

19,782
19,054
107
620

22,306
21,497
121
688

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intram ural..........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

14,631
10,981
3,292
230
128

15,413
11,437
3,571
258
147

16,055
11,760
3,845
285
165

16,713
12,084
4,129
315
185

17,816
12,729
4,518
355
214

19,616
13,876
5,075
410
254

21,288
14,956
5,576
463
293

22,771
15,949
5,979
511
332

23,755
16,624
6,212
548
371

25,309
17,706
6,578
601
423

27,087
18,960
6,986
657
484

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

Total R&D d ep re ciation................................................................

54,916

62,736

67,814

73,047

79,473

86,798

93,735

101,641

111,326

122,523

135,544

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

25,553
24,645
138
771

30,137
29,090
161
887

33,667
32,527
176
964

37,470
36,241
190
1,039

41,882
40,548
207
1,128

46,332
44,862
228
1,243

50,183
48,555
252
1,376

54,521
52,683
283
1,555

59,745
57,631
322
1,792

65,889
63,458
370
2,062

73,573
70,774
429
2,371

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural..........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................

29,363
20,577
7,503
725
558

32,598
22,861
8,260
818
659

34,147
23,917
8,625
870
735

35,577
24,848
9,004
914
811

37,591
26,203
9,515
971
902

40,465
28,210
10,182
1,053
1,020

43,552
30,450
10,798
1,147
1,156

47,120
33,072
11,468
1,262
1,319

51,581
36,306
12,350
1,403
1,522

56,633
39,934
13,374
1,563
1,763

61,971
43,732
14,461
1,740
2,038

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Total R&D dep re ciatio n ................................................................

144,913

151,303

156,432

156,380

160,967

168,883

173,382

186,521

201,464

216,670

226,832

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................

79,486
76,371
478
2,637
65,426
46,230
15,078
1,864
2,255

83,359
79,972
514
2,873
67,944
48,086
15,480
1,948
2,431

86,252
82,617
544
3,091
70,180
49,735
15,829
2,016
2,600

86,928
83,201
556
3,171
69,452
49,266
15,506
2,011
2,669

91,186
87,299
585
3,302
69,781
49,535
15,395
2,058
2,793

97,880
93,770
622
3,488
71,003
50,426
15,456
2,137
2,983

103,047
98,798
636
3,613
70,335
49,945
15,104
2,161
3,124

114,032
109,445
680
3,907
72,489
51,437
15,346
2,284
3,422

127,122
122,177
732
4,213
74,342
52,642
15,518
2,426
3,757

140,016
134,688
794
4,534
76,654
54,064
15,865
2,586
4,138

147,489
141,814
858
4,817
79,343
55,777
16,352
2,726
4,488

Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intram ural.........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .
N o t e . Im p le m e n t e d u s in g a s s u m p t io n s d e fin e d in s c e n a r io D.




40

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 2.8. Real Depreciation of R&D Assets by Funder, 1959-2002
[Millions of current (200 0) dollars]
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Total R&D d ep re ciatio n ................................................................

11,716

13,063

14,466

15,926

17,597

19,477

21,477

23,513

25,450

27,263

29,020

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

6,321
6,176
27
118

6,754
6,599
27
128

7,069
6,901
27
141

7,242
7,056
27
159

7,366
7,157
29
181

7,508
7,276
30
202

7,693
7,435
34
224

7,962
7,675
40
248

8,329
8,012
45
271

8,870
8,525
51
294

9,702
9,329
57
316

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

5,395
3,408
1,816
119
52

6,308
4,175
1,949
129
55

7,397
5,094
2,104
140
59

8,684
6,181
2,287
153
64

10,231
7,478
2,513
169
71

11,968
8,908
2,795
186
79

13,784
10,363
3,126
205
90

15,551
11,760
3,464
225
103

17,122
12,991
3,769
243
119

18,393
13,964
4,030
262
137

19,318
14,617
4,259
286
156

1970

1971

1972

1973

Total R&D d ep re ciatio n ................................................................

30,317

31,342

32,687

33,961

P riv a te ..................
Business...........
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

10,532
10,134
62
337

11,223
10,798
66
358

12,013
11,558
71
384

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governm ents'.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

19,786
14,850
4,451
311
173

20,119
14,929
4,662
337
191

20,673
15,143
4,951
368
212

1981

1982

1983

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

36,322

37,357

38,718

40,243

42,428

44,891

12,851
12,370
75
406

35,345
13,794
13,287
77
430

14,543
14,011
79
453

15,288
14,726
82
480

16,182
15,586
86
510

17,189
16,554
92
543

18,614
17,929
101
584

20,273
19,538
110
625

21,110
15,263
5,216
398
234

21,551
15,397
5,465
429
259

21,779
15,406
5,635
456
282

22,069
15,505
5,780
480
304

22,536
15,785
5,917
506
329

23,054
16,133
6,029
532
360

23,814
16,660
6,190
566
398

24,618
17,232
6,349
597
440

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

Total R&D d ep re ciatio n ................................................................

47,694

51,235

54,762

59,237

65,388

71,753

78,337

84,786

91,564

98,486

104,921

P riv a te ............................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

22,193
21,404
119
670

24,613
23,757
131
724

27,188
26,267
142
779

30,386
29,389
154
843

34,459
33,361
170
928

38,301
37,086
188
1,027

41,940
40,579
211
1,150

45,480
43,947
236
1,297

49,140
47,401
265
1,474

52,963
51,008
297
1,658

56,951
54,784
332
1,835

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural..........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments’ .............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

25,501
17,871
6,516
629
485

26,622
18,670
6,746
668
538

27,575
19,314
6,965
702
593

28,851
20,150
7,302
741
658

30,928
21,559
7,828
799
742

33,451
23,320
8,417
871
843

36,398
25,448
9,025
959
966

39,306
27,588
9,566
1,052
1,100

42,425
29,861
10,158
1,154
1,251

45,523
32,099
10,750
1,256
1,417

47,970
33,852
11,194
1,347
1,577

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Total R&D d ep re ciatio n ................................................................

110,836

116,252

120,958

126,236

134,218

162,266

64,048
61,446
395
2,207

66,693
63,882
421
2,390

145,289
139,760
824
4,705

153,783
147,867
894
5,022

50,041
35,359
11,532
1,425
1,725

52,204
36,946
11,894
1,497
1,867

54,265
38,457
12,240
1,559
2,010

76,033
72,792
488
2,753
58,185
41,303
12,837
1,716
2,329

96,441
92,464
596
3,381

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Government extramural.........................................
Federal Government intramural...........................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................

70,172
67,163
449
2,560
56,064
39,769
12,517
1,624
2,154

201,464
127,122
122,177
732
4,213

236,513

60,795
58,412
366
2,017

181,575
111,009
106,543
662
3,804

224,830

P riv a te ............................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............

146,056
84,650
81,095
538
3,017
61,406
43,611
13,367
1,848
2,580

65,826
46,743
14,136
2,022
2,924

70,567
50,073
14,939
2,224
3,331

74,342
52,642
15,518
2,426
3,757

79,541
56,100
16,463
2,683
4,294

82,730
58,158
17,050
2,843
4,679

1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .
N o t e . Im p le m e n t e d u s in g a s s u m p t io n s d e fin e d in s c e n a r io D.




41

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 3.1. Historical-Cost Investment in R&D A ssets by Performer, 1959-2002

[M n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs
1959

1960

1962

1961

1964

1963

1965

1967

1966

1968

1969

13,819

14,625

15,662

17,483

19,094

20,374

22,321

23,728

25,109

26,286

11,437
10,108
346
208

11,985
10,404
406
256

12,711
11,076
467
311

14,090
12,270
529
376

15,179
13,117
605
431

16,021
13,873
692
496

17,588
15,309
784
520

18,662
16,095
873
606

19,846
17,178
931
610

20,789
18,047
954
592

438
192
45

498
209
68

576
237
106

442
272
142

428
326
162

479
369
178

383
375
202

364
387
225

428
413
246

424
436
267

475
445
276

2,152
1,668
48
291

2,382
1,823
52
345

2,639
1,988
57
411

2,951
2,177
62
506

3,392
2,476
67
626

3,916
2,853
67
747

4,353
3,153
75
875

4,732
3,382
85
1,010

5,066
3,556
104
1,138

5,263
3,610
128
1,244

5,497
3,736
145
1,331

146

161

183

207

224

248

250

255

269

282

286

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

12,575

P riv a te .....................
B usiness.............
Universities and colleges
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business........
Universities and colleges
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

10,423
9,283
286
178

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Government.............................................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Total R&D in ve stm en t..................................................................

26,627

27,460

29,404

31,738

34,330

36,757

40,523

44,432

49,694

56,878

65,461

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business..............................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

20,682
17,844
979
662

20,984
18,082
1,001
702

22,345
19,268
1,046
755

24,228
21,043
1,099
786

26,255
22,732
1,188
860

27,997
24,090
1,313
948

31,201
26,801
1,416
1,063

34,439
29,534
1,563
1,180

38,739
32,993
1,826
1,395

44,750
38,208
2,122
1,588

51,852
44,451
2,376
1,822

487
449
261

507
452
240

572
478
227

567
515
218

677
557
241

761
632
253

930
725
267

1,005
859
298

1,128
1,046
352

1,214
1,200
418

1,333
1,355
515

G o ve rn m en t................................................................................
Federal Governm ent..............................................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

5,945
4,053
162
1,445

6,476
4,430
189
1,573

7,058
4,831
223
1,708

7,510
5,084
251
1,859

8,075
5,405
266
2,053

8,760
5,777
284
2,289

9,322
6,037
301
2,491

9,993
6,271
312
2,792

10,954
6,706
340
3,180

12,128
7,292
387
3,613

13,609
8,106
428
4,108

286

284

296

317

352

411

493

618

729

836

967

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t...................................................................

74,798

82,924

91,680

103,948

116,262

122,744

127,619

135,602

143,924

154,233

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business..............................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

59,929
51,843
2,599
2,046

67,048
58,534
2,770
2,186

74,310
65,097
2,956
2,415

84,687
74,529
3,244
2,730

94,849
83,607
3,608
3,090

99,225
87,060
4,024
3,433

103,325
90,215
4,462
3,658

109,567
94,955
4,953
4,297

115,849
99,929
5,398
4,916

124,540
107,470
5,753
5,380

163,575
133,034
114,739
6,132
6,072

1,450
1,415
576

1,555
1,434
570

1,650
1,565
627

1,800
1,732
651

1,919
1,927
698

1,940
2,151
616

2,046
2,366
578

2,176
2,576
610

2,251
2,681
674

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Governm ent..............................................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges......................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

14,869
8,795
461
4,528

15,875
9,333
482
4,876

17,370
10,256
491
5,291

19,261
11,390
483
5,842

21,414
12,604
497
6,586

23,520
13,688
538
7,416

24,293
13,510
559
8,251

26,035
14,190
604
9,188

28,075
15,109
641
10,191

2,385
2,751
801
29,694
15,675
629
11,167

30,542
15,566
597
12,060

1,085

1,185

1,331

1,547

1,726

1,878

1,973

2,054

2,133

2,223

2,319

1981

1982

1983

2,341
2,850
900

1992
Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................
P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business..............................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........
G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Governm ent..............................................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges......................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .




1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

167,786
136,135
116,795
6,503
6,514

168,051
135,078
115,483
6,815
6,779

171,635
137,755
117,444
7,113
6,806

185,086
150,753
129,878
7,380
6,869

198,769

213,827

206,646
182,011
9,246
8,774

268,559
227,394
199,886
10,012
10,389

275,294

177,485
155,418
8,192
7,349

227,725
190,012
167,065
8,658
8,011

245,878

163,847
142,389
7,744
7,065

229,839
199,815
10,969
11,557

276,533
226,294
193,677
12,099
12,474

2,415
2,942
965
31,652
15,867
566
12,864

2,017
2,967
1,017

2,261
3,041
1,090

2,338
3,087
1,201

2,362
3,064
1,223

2,186
3,099
1,241

2,131
3,004
1,143

2,001
2,986
1,628

2,010
3,044
2,053

2,072
3,235
2,192

2,316
3,409
2,319

32,972
16,405
588
13,632

33,880
16,599
596
14,375

34,333
16,318
547
15,142

34,922
16,159
506
15,868

36,342
16,570
519
16,799

37,713
16,566
583
17,916

39,232
16,481
611
19,407

41,165
16,450
609
21,298

45,455
18,249
680
23,413

50,239
19,922
769
25,838

2,354

2,348

2,310

2,326

2,389

2,455

2,649

2,733

2,808

3,113

3,710

42

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 3.2. Real Investment in R&D Assets by Performer, 1959-2002
[Millions of chained (2000) dollars]
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

19,409

21,224

22,509

23,972

27,174

29,844

31,749

34,247

35,446

36,558

37,446

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business...............................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

16,087
14,329
441
275

17,566
15,526
532
319

18,447
16,013
625
394

19,455
16,953
715
476

21,901
19,071
822
584

23,724
20,502
945
674

24,965
21,619
1,079
773

26,987
23,490
1,203
798

27,877
24,043
1,304
905

28,895
25,010
1,355
888

29,615
25,708
1,359
843

675
297
70

887
365
163

676
417
218

666
506
251

748
577
279

596
584
315

558
593
345

640
617
368

617
635
389

677
635
393

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Governm ent..............................................................
State and local governm ents'.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

3,322
2,574
74
449

764
320
105
3,658
2,801
80
530

4,062
3,060
88
632

4,517
3,332
94
774

5,273
3,848
104
973

6,120
4,459
105
1,168

6,783
4,913
116
1,364

7,261
5,190
131
1,549

7,568
5,312
155
1,700

7,663
5,256
186
1,811

7,831
5,322
206
1,895

225

248

282

317

348

387

390

390

402

410

407

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t..................................................................

36,008

35,844

37,862

40,088

41,528

40,811

42,011

43,974

48,227

53,519

59,495

P riv a te ...................
Business............
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business................................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

27,969
24,131
1,324
895

27,391
23,604
1,307
916

28,773
24,810
1,347
972

30,602
26,579
1,388
993

31,759
27,498
1,437
1,040

31,084
26,747
1,458
1,053

32,347
27,785
1,467
1,102

34,084
29,230
1,547
1,168

37,596
32,019
1,772
1,354

42,107
35,952
1,997
1,494

47,126
40,399
2,160
1,656

659
608
353

661
590
313

737
615
292

717
650
275

819
674
291

845
702
281

964
751
277

995
850
295

1,095
1,015
341

1,142
1,129
394

1,212
1,231
468

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Governm ent..............................................................
State and local governm ents'.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

8,039
5,480
219
1,954

8,453
5,783
246
2,053

9,089
6,221
287
2,200

9,486
6,421
317
2,348

9,769
6,538
322
2,483

9,727
6,414
315
2,541

9,664
6,258
313
2,583

9,890
6,206
308
2,764

10,631
6,508
330
3,086

11,412
6,861
364
3,400

12,369
7,367
389
3,733

386

371

382

400

425

456

511

612

707

786

879

1981

1984

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t...................................................................

64,962

67,722

74,035

84,296

95,657

101,469

106,655

113,115

118,375

P riv a te ............................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business................................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........
G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal Governm ent..............................................................
State and local governm ents'.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

52,048
45,025
2,257
1,777

54,757
47,803
2,262
1,785

60,008
52,568
2,387
1,950

68,676
60,438
2,631
2,214

78,039
68,790
2,969
2,542

82,026
71,970
3,327
2,838

86,352
75,396
3,729
3,057

91,397
79,208
4,132
3,584

95,284
82,190
4,440
4,043

123,975
100,107
86,386
4,624
4,325

126,619
102,977
88,816
4,747
4,700

1,260
1,229
500

1,333
1,264
506
14,027
8,282
396
4,273

1,460
1,405
528
15,620
9,237
391
4,737

1,579
1,585
574

1,603
1,778
510

1,851
2,205
554

1,917
2,211
644

1,812
2,206
697

17,618
10,370
409
5,419

19,443
11,315
445
6,131

1,710
1,977
483
20,303
11,290
467
6,896

1,815
2,149
509

12,914
7,639
400
3,932

1,270
1,171
465
12,965
7,622
393
3,982

21,717
11,836
504
7,664

23,091
12,427
527
8,382

23,868
12,600
505
8,976

23,641
12,049
462
9,335

943

967

1,075

1,254

1,420

1,552

1,649

1,713

1,754

1,787

1,795

1982

1983

1985

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

Total R&D in v e s tm e n t...................................................................

128,330

129,120

132,713

149,408

165,738

184,926

213,125

239,359

268,559

285,661

288,335

P riv a te ............................................................................................
Business....................................................................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business................................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

104,122
89,330
4,974
4,982

103,786
88,730
5,236
5,209

106,516
90,811
5,500
5,263

121,693
104,842
5,958
5,545

136,619
118,727
6,457
5,891

153,495
134,411
7,085
6,356

177,830
156,354
8,103
7,497

201,167
177,185
9,001
8,541

227,394
199,886
10,012
10,389

238,494
207,340
11,382
11,992

235,952
201,943
12,615
13,006

1,847
2,250
738

1,550
2,280
782

1,748
2,351
843

1,887
2,492
969

1,969
2,555
1,020

1,890
2,680
1,073

1,994
2,812
1,070

1,948
2,907
1,584

2,010
3,044
2,053

2,150
3,357
2,274

2,415
3,555
2,418

G o ve rn m en t.................................................................................
Federal G overnm ent..............................................................
State and local governm ents'.............................................
Universities and colleges.......................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

24,209
12,136
433
9,839

25,334
12,604
452
10,474

26,197
12,835
461
11,115

27,715
13,172
442
12,223

29,118
13,474
422
13,231

31,430
14,330
448
14,528

35,295
15,504
545
16,767

38,192
16,044
594
18,893

41,165
16,450
609
21,298

47,167
18,936
706
24,295

52,383
20,773
802
26,941

1,800

1,804

1,786

1,877

1,992

2,123

2,479

2,661

2,808

3,231

3,868

1. Excludes universities and colleges.
Note. Implemented using assumptions defined in scenario D.




2002

43

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 4.1 Aggregate Input Price Indexes for R&D Investment, 1959-2002
[Index numbers, 20 0 0 = 1 0 0 ]
1959
Total funder R&D inve stm en t....................................................
Federal extramural.................................................................
Federal intramural..................................................................
Non-federal domestic............................................................

18.4
24.2
12.0
17.2

1960
18.4
24.6
11.2
17.3

1961

1962

1963

18.8
25.0
12.2
17.4

19.1
26.2
12.2
16.9

19.5
24.8
13.4
19.1

1964

1965

1967

1966

20.0
25.5
14.4
19.0

20.6
26.1
15.5
19.3

1968

1969

21.3
26.4
16.4
20.6

22.1
27.7
17.3
20.7

23.1
28.9
18.5
21.7

24.4
30.6
19.8
22.7

Total perform er R&D in v e s tm e n t.............................................

18.4

18.4

18.8

19.1

19.5

20.0

20.6

21.3

22.1

23.1

24.4

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business..............................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

20.4
20.9
13.1
16.6

20.6
21.2
13.3
16.7

20.9
21.5
13.7
16.7

21.2
21.8
14.2
16.9

21.4
22.1
14.7
17.2

21.8
22.4
15.2
17.6

22.2
22.8
15.8
18.0

22.8
23.4
16.7
18.7

23.6
24.1
17.6
19.3

24.6
25.2
18.7
20.1

25.8
26.4
19.8
20.8

19.2
24.6
24.5

19.0
24.2
25.1

18.9
24.0
25.7

19.6
24.8
27.0

18.5
23.5
25.6

19.1
24.2
26.3

19.7
24.8
26.7

20.6
25.6
26.8

12.4
12.0
16.6
13.0

11.8
11.2
16.7
13.2

12.6
12.2
16.7
13.5

12.7
12.2
16.9
13.9

13.6
13.4
17.2
14.3

14.5
14.4
17.6
14.8

15.4
15.5
18.0
15.3

16.3
16.4
18.7
16.1

22.6
27.9
29.3
18.2
18.5
20.1
17.9

24.2
29.5
31.0

P u b lic ............................................................................................
Federal Governm ent.............................................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

21.6
26.7
28.1
17.1
17.3
19.3
16.9

19.5

19.0

18.8

19.2

18.5

19.0

19.6

20.4

21.4

22.5

24.1

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1977

1976

1979

1978

1980

25.8

27.3

28.8

30.4

33.2

36.4

38.6

41.2

44.0

47.6

52.2
62.0
47.9
48.1
52.2

P riv a te ..................................
Business..........................
Universities and colleges
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
B usiness..............................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

27.2
27.8
21.0
21.5

28.5
29.2
22.0
22.3

29.8
30.4
22.9
23.0

31.5
32.1
24.3
24.3

34.4
35.0
26.6
27.9

37.6
38.2
28.8
30.6

39.8
40.5
30.5
32.7

42.3
43.0
32.5
34.9

45.3
46.0
34.8
37.5

49.0
49.9
38.0
41.3

53.6
54.4
42.0
46.6

25.7
31.2
32.6

27.2
32.9
34.5

29.2
35.1
37.3

31.2
37.0
39.2

34.4
40.4
42.6

38.8
44.7
46.6

41.1
46.8
48.8

44.2
49.4
51.3

47.2
52.1
54.0

51.0
56.0
57.9

56.2
60.8
62.8

P u b lic ............................................................................................
Federal Governm ent.............................................................
State and local governments’ .............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges.................................................

21.1
21.6
21.5
20.2

22.9
23.8
22.3
21.5

24.8
26.1
23.0
22.5

26.4
27.8
24.3
24.0

28.6
29.8
27.9
26.4

31.5
33.0
30.6
28.7

33.6
35.3
32.7
30.4

36.4
38.5
34.9
32.4

38.8
40.7
37.5
34.9

41.9
43.6
41.3
38.3

46.2
47.9
46.6
42.4

25.6

27.1

28.9

31.0

34.2

38.6

40.7

43.9

47.2

51.1

56.5

Total funder R&D inve stm en t....................................................
Federal extramural.................................................................
Federal intramural..........
Non-federal domestic....

25.8
32.1
21.6
23.9

27.3
34.0
23.8
25.0

Total perform er R&D investm ent

1981

1982

30.4
38.5
27.8
26.9

1983

67.4

69.1

71.9

74.5

77.6

80.2

82.6

69.1
70.1
55.9
59.2

70.7
71.6
58.1
61.0

73.6
74.7
61.2
63.5

76.3
77.4
64.0
66.8

79.4
80.6
67.4
69.3

81.9
83.0
70.6
71.9

84.2
85.2
72.8
75.1

73.5
76.8
78.4

75.2
78.5
80.2

75.9
79.3
81.0

77.5
80.6
81.0

80.1
83.1
82.8

82.5
85.4
84.9

84.6
87.1
86.4

55.7
57.8
55.8
51.1

71.0
74.7
76.6
57.9
59.8
57.9
53.7

60.0
61.7
59.2
56.2

62.1
63.8
61.0
58.5

64.5
65.9
63.5
61.6

67.1
68.7
66.8
64.1

69.6
70.7
69.3
67.3

72.8
74.1
71.9
70.4

75.6
77.4
75.1
72.6

69.0

71.4

74.0

75.8

77.0

78.9

81.6

84.0

86.0

61.4
65.3
67.2

68.7
72.0
73.7

50.3
52.2
51.6
46.1

66.0
69.4
71.0
53.5
55.5
54.1
49.0

62.0

66.3

87.0
88.6
89.8
77.1
78.9

87.0
89.6
88.9

88.3
90.6
90.0

P u b lic .............................................................................................
Federal Governm ent.............................................................
State and local governments1.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges................................................

77.5
79.3
77.4
74.7
88.2

1 . E x c lu d e s u n iv e r s itie s a n d c o lle g e s .




1991

65.3

62.9
64.6
65.6
50.8
55.8

86.6
87.8
75.0
77.4

1990

67.0
68.0
53.4
57.9

60.5

84.9

1989

82.6
86.7
77.4
81.6

62.1
63.1
48.7
54.1

P riv a te ....................
Business............
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business..............................................................................
Universities and colleges.................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........

1988

80.2
85.0
74.1
79.0

58.6
59.5
45.7
51.6

Total perform er R&D in v e s tm e n t.............................................

1987

47.6
57.0
43.6
43.8

77.6
82.9
70.7
76.3

57.0

87.0
90.1
82.1
86.5

1986

44.0
53.4
40.7
39.9

74.5
81.0
68.7
72.4

P riv a te ...........................................................................................
Business...................................................................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households.............
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Business..............................................................................
Universities and colleges................................................
Other nonprofit institutions serving households........
P u b lic ............................................................................................
Federal Governm ent.............................................................
State and local governm ents'.............................................
Universities and colleges.....................................................
Federally funded R&D centers............................................
Universities and colleges................................................

1993

38.6
47.7
35.3
34.6

71.9
80.9
65.9
68.5

Total perform er R&D in v e s tm e n t.............................................

84.9
88.9
79.3
84.1

1985

36.4
45.6
33.0
32.4

69.1
80.1
63.8
64.6

57.0
66.6
52.2
53.2

Total fu n d e r R&D in ve stm en t....................................................
Federal extramural.................................................................
Federal intramural..................................................................
Non-federal domestic............................................................

1984

33.2
41.6
29.8
29.7

67.4
78.4
61.7
63.0

Total funde r R&D in ve stm en t....................................................
Federal extramural.................................................................
Federal intramural..................................................................
Non-federal domestic............................................................

1992

60.5
71.1
55.5
56.3

28.8
36.7
26.1
25.2

41.2
50.4
38.5
37.0

19.5
19.8
20.8
19.0

62.9
74.2
57.8
58.4

1994

65.3
76.7
59.8
60.8

1995

1996

1997

1998

90.1
92.7
88.2
89.4

91.9
93.4
90.6
91.6

93.8
95.3
92.7
93.4

95.1
96.6
94.4
94.7

88.8

90.1
91.1
91.8
82.1
84.1

91.9
92.7
93.3
85.0
86.7

93.8
94.4
95.0
87.6
89.3

95.1

90.1
91.2
79.5
80.5

95.6
96.1
90.2
92.0

90.0
92.3
91.7

92.7
93.8
92.9

93.7
94.4
93.5

95.4
96.0
95.5

96.4
97.0
96.7

80.0
82.1
78.9
77.0

82.6
85.0
80.5
79.5

85.5
88.2
84.1
82.1

88.1
90.6
86.7
85.1

90.4
92.7
89.3
87.6

89.5

91.2

94.2

95.3

96.6

88.8
91.5
85.0
88.2

1999
96.8
97.7
96.9
96.5

2000

2001

2002

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

102.6
101.9
102.6
102.8

106.3
103.9
106.5
107.2

96.8

100.0

102.6

106.3

96.9
97.1
95.0
94.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

102.4
102.4
104.2
101.6

106.2
106.4
108.1
102.9

97.3
97.7
97.6

100.0
100.0
100.0

102.4
101.7
101.9

104.9
103.6
104.0

92.5
94.4
92.0
90.3

96.0
96.9
94.5
95.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

103.3
102.6
101.6
104.2

107.0
106.5
102.9
107.9

97.2

97.6

100.0

101.9

104.0

44

2006 R&D Satellite Account

December 2006

Table 4.2 Alternative Scenario Price Indexes for R&D Investment, 1959-2002
[Index numbers, 20 0 0 = 1 0 0 ]
1959
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A .....................................................................................
B.....................................................................................
C ....................................................................................
D ....................................................................................

Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A .....................................................................................
B .....................................................................................
C ....................................................................................
D ....................................................................................

Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A .....................................................................................
B.....................................................................................
C ....................................................................................
D ....................................................................................

Scenario
Scenario
Scenario
Scenario

A .....................................................................................
B.....................................................................................
C ....................................................................................
D ....................................................................................

18.4
94.5
43.6
64.8

1970
25.8
90.3
48.3
73.9

1981
57.0
138.1
80.8
115.1

1992
84.9
134.2
112.8
130.7

1960
18.4
92.3
43.6
65.1

1971
27.3
90.8
52.2
76.6

1982
60.5
139.0
87.2
122.4

1993
87.0
132.9
115.1
130.2

1961
18.8
91.0
45.2
65.0

1972
28.8
90.7
54.4
77.7

1983
62.9
137.9
92.0
123.8

1994
88.8
128.4
114.2
129.3

Notes. Scenario A uses an input price index.
Scenario B uses a multifactor productivity-adjusted price index.
Scenario C uses a high-productivity service industries price index.
Scenario D uses a top four R&D performers price index.
The price index for scenario A corresponds to the total price indexes for funders and performers in table 4.1.




1962
19.1
87.9
44.6
65.3

1973
30.4
92.1
55.4
79.2

1984
65.3
135.7
97.2
123.3

1995
90.1
123.8
115.2
123.9

1963
19.5
86.5
45.3
64.3

1974
33.2
101.1
57.6
82.7

1985
67.4
134.2
104.9
121.5

1996
91.9
121.0
115.2
119.9

1964
20.0
85.4
45.8
64.0

1975
36.4
105.8
62.5
90.1

1986
69.1
132.1
110.4
121.0

1997
93.8
115.4
116.1
115.6

1965
20.6
84.1
46.4
64.2

1976
38.6
107.6
67.1
96.5

1987
71.9
129.3
107.2
119.7

1998
95.1
111.4
111.6
106.9

1966
21.3
85.9
47.0
65.2

1977
41.2
110.1
70.3
101.0

1988
74.5
128.9
108.4
119.9

1999
96.8
105.8
105.8
102.7

1967
22.1
86.6
48.0
66.9

1978
44.0
114.6
72.0
103.0

1989
77.6
132.2
108.4
121.6

2000
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1968
23.1
86.1
48.5
68.7

1979
47.6
122.2
72.0
106.3

1990
80.2
134.4
108.7
124.4

2001
102.6
100.0
96.3
96.4

1969
24.4
87.7
47.7
70.2

1980
52.2
130.3
75.3
110.0

1991
82.6
136.5
110.8
129.2

2002
106.3
99.4
93.2
95.9

45

D ece m ber 2006

A n n u a l In d u s tr y A c c o u n ts
R e v is e d E s tim a te s f o r 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 5

By Thomas F. Howells III, Kevin B. Barefoot, and Brian M. Lindberg

I N 2005, the services sector led real growth in the

U.S. economy, reflecting continued strong growth in
the following industry groups: Professional, scientific,
and technical services; real estate and rental and leas­
ing; and information. Thirty-one of the thirty-six de­
tailed services-producing industries expanded in 2005.
Growth in the goods sector was driven by the contin­
ued strength of durable-goods manufacturing and by
accelerating growth in construction.
These conclusions are drawn from the 2006 annual
update of the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) an­
nual industry accounts, released on December 11,
2006. This update includes revised and more detailed
estimates of the gross-domestic-product-(GDP)-byindustry accounts for 2005, which are integrated with
newly available input-output (I-O) accounts for 2005.
This update also includes revised estimates of the inte­
grated GDP-by-industry accounts and the annual 1-0
accounts for 2003 and 2004.
The revised estimates for 2005 provide information
on value added for 65 industries and information on
gross output and intermediate inputs for 65 industries
and commodities. The previously published advance
estimates for 2005 were prepared using a methodology
developed for summary source data and were limited
to value added for 21 industry groups.1
Highlights of the revised annual industry accounts
include the following:
• The 2005 expansion was widespread among both
goods-producing and services-producing indus­
tries; however, 8 of 25 goods-producing industries
and 16 of 36 services-producing industries expand­
ed at a slower rate in 2005 than in 2004.
• Real growth in the goods sector accelerated sharply
to 4.8 percent in 2004 from 0.6 percent in 2003. In
2004, real growth in the goods sector exceeded real
growth in the services sector (4.1 percent) for the
first time since 2000 (chart 1).
• Durable-goods manufacturing increased 4.9 percent
in 2005 after increasing 7.7 percent in 2004. In both
years, durable-goods manufacturing contributed
1. See Thomas F. Howells III and Kevin B . Barefoot, “Annual Industry
Accounts: Advance Estimates for 2005,” S u r v e y o f C u r r e n t B u sin e ss 86 (May
2006): 11-24.




Chart 1. Annual Growth in Real Value Added
Percent
GDP
Services-producing sector
G oods-producing sector

2002

2003

2004

2005

U .S . B u reau of Eco n o m ic Analysis

strongly to real GDP growth. Within durable-goods
manufacturing, the largest contributor to real
growth in 2003, 2004, and 2005 was computer and
electronic products manufacturing, which experi­
enced double-digit growth in 2005 for the third
consecutive year.
• Accelerating growth in the retail trade and “admin­
istrative and waste management services” industries
contributed significantly to real GDP growth in
2005.
• The largest contributors to real GDP growth in the
services sector in 2005 were the following industry
groups: Professional, scientific, and technical ser­
vices; real estate and rental and leasing; and infor­
mation. All three expanded at a slower rate in 2005
than in 2004.
• Information-communications-technology (ICT)producing industries experienced their second con­
secutive year of double-digit real growth in 2005,
increasing 13.3 percent after increasing 13.7 percent

Annual Industry Accounts

46

in 2004.2 These industries accounted for less than 4
percent of current-dollar GDP, but they accounted
for more than 15 percent of real GDP growth.
• The value-added price index for the goods sector
increased 6.1 percent in 2005, the largest increase
since 1990. Within goods, the value-added price
index increased 43.8 percent for oil and gas extrac­
tion and 49.8 percent for petroleum and coal prod­
ucts manufacturing, reflecting the third straight
year of strong increases in petroleum prices (chart
2 ).

• Continuing declines in the value-added price index
for ICT-producing industries partly offset increases
in the value-added price indexes for the oil and gas
extraction and the petroleum and coal products
manufacturing industries.
The revised annual industry accounts incorporate
the most timely, most detailed, and most accurate
source data available, including Census Bureau annual
survey data on industry and commodity output, Bu­
reau of Labor Statistics data on producer prices, and
BEA estimates of final demand and industry returns to
labor and capital from the 2006 annual revision of the
national income and product accounts (NIPAs). These
2. The ICT-producing industry aggregate consists of computer and elec­
tronic products, publishing industries (includes software), information and
data processing services, and computer systems design and related services.

Chart 2. Annual Growth in Chain-Type Price Indexes
or Value Added________________________________

data were combined within an 1-0 framework that bal­
ances and reconciles industry production and com­
modity usage (see the appendix).
The remainder of this article is organized into four
parts: First, a discussion of industry trends and devel­
opments; second, an analysis of the domestic output
and domestic supply of commodities; third, a look at
revisions to the previously published estimates; and
fourth, an appendix that discusses the methodology
used to revise the annual industry accounts. The de­
tailed industry and commodity estimates are presented
in tables 1-26 following the article (see the box “Data
Availability”).

In d u s try T ren d s an d D e v e lo p m e n ts
R eal g ro w th
Private goods-producing sector. Real growth in the
goods sector slowed sharply to 2.1 percent in 2005
from 4.8 percent in 2004 and 0.6 percent in 2003 (table
A). The goods sector, which accounts for about a fifth
of current-dollar GDP, accounted for 12.8 percent of
real GDP growth in 2005 and 24.1 percent in 2004 (ta­
ble B). In 2004, growth in the goods sector exceeded
growth in the services sector for the first time since
2 0 0 0 .

The 2005 deceleration in the goods sector was wide­
spread; real growth in the manufacturing and “agricul­
ture, forestry, fishing, and hunting” industry groups
slowed, and growth in the mining industry group
turned down. In contrast, growth in the construction
Table A. Percent Changes in
Real Value Added by Industry Group

Percent
7

2002

Line

6

2003

2004

2005

Gross dom estic p ro d u c t....................................................

1.6

2.5

3.9

3.2

2 Private industries............................................................................
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting...............................
3
4
Mining.............................................................................................
Utilities............................................................................................
5
Construction..................................................................................
6

1.4
5.5
-6 .3
4.3
-2 .0

2.7
7.5
-0 .9
6.9
-2 .0

4.2
6.1
0.9
2.4
1.5

3.3
0.1
-2 .6
1.2
3.9

1

5
4

7
8
9
10
11

1

2.8
1.7
4.2
1.0
2.2

1.1
2.6
-0 .8
2.1
3.9

6.5
7.7
4.9
1.1
2.5

2.2
4.9
-1 .3
1.5
5.0

Transportation and warehousing..............................................
Information.....................................................................................
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing...........
Professional and business services........................................
Educational services, health care, and social assistance

2.2
2.1
0.9
-0 .2
4.2

2.0
3.0
2.4
4.4
4.4

5.2
11.4
4.3
5.2
3.3

4.0
9.0
3.0
5.6
3.5

17

2

Durable goods.........................................................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Wholesale trade............................................................................

12
13
14
15
16

3

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services............................................................................
Other services, except government........................................

1.7
0.3

3.1
2.0

3.0
-0 .5

1.4
-0 .7

1.7

1.3

0.5

0.7

1.3
1.5

0.6
3.3

4.8
4.1

2.1
3.7

2.0

7.2

13.7

13.3

18

19 G overnm ent......................................................................................
Addenda:
20
Private goods-producing industries ' ......................................
21
Private services-producing industries2.................................
22
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3................................................................................

0

-1

-2

D ece m ber 2006

2002

2003

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis




2004

2005

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis­
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

47

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

growth for the third consecutive year. The 19.9-percent
growth in computer and electronic products ac­
counted for more than 6 percent of real GDP growth in
2005, nearly six times this industry’s share of currentdollar GDP. In 2004, durable-goods manufacturing
growth accelerated sharply to 7.7 percent from 2.6 per­
cent in 2003. The 2004 acceleration was due to strong
upturns in primary metals, machinery, and other
transportation equipment and an acceleration in fabri­
cated metals.
Nondurable-goods manufacturing declined 1.3 per­
cent in 2005 after increasing 4.9 percent in 2004 and
decreasing 0.8 percent in 2003. The largest contribu­
tors to both the 2005 acceleration and the 2004 decel­
eration in nondurable goods were petroleum and coal
products and chemical products manufacturing. In
2005, strong downturns of 21.3 percent in petroleum
and coal products and 1.7 percent in chemical prod­
ucts offset a strong upturn of 4.8 percent in the food,
beverage, and tobacco industry. In 2004, petroleum
and coal products turned up, growing 24.1 percent af­
ter declining 5.6 percent in 2003. Chemical products
increased 8.3 percent after declining 0.5 percent in
2003.
Private services-producing sector. The services

industry group was strong, accelerating from 1.5 per­
cent in 2004 to 3.9 percent in 2005, its strongest
growth since 1998. The 2004 acceleration in real
growth in the goods sector was broad-based. The agri­
culture, forestry, fishing, and hunting industry group
was the only industry group to decelerate, increasing
6.1 percent in 2004, compared with 7.5 percent in
2003.
The manufacturing industry group was the primary
driver of both the deceleration in 2005 and the acceler­
ation in 2004 in the goods sector, increasing 2.2 per­
cent in 2005 after increasing 6.5 percent in 2004 and
1.1 percent in 2003. Manufacturing accounted for 8.4
percent of real GDP growth in 2005 and 20.3 percent
in 2004. Despite slower growth, 12 of the 19 detailed
manufacturing industries expanded in 2005, compared
with 14 industries in 2004.
Within manufacturing, growth in durable goods de­
celerated in 2005, mainly because of slower growth in
machinery, which increased 4.1 percent after increas­
ing 14.3 percent in 2004, and a downturn in primary
metals, which declined 1.0 percent after increasing 15.2
percent in 2004. Slower growth in these industries was
partly offset by computer and electronic products
manufacturing, which experienced double-digit

Table B. Contributions to Growth in Real Gross Domestic Product Relative to Industry Group Size
2003
Line

Share of real
G DP growth1

1
G ross dom estic product........................................................................
2 Private in d u s tries..............................................................................................
3
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting..................................................
4
M inin g................................................................................................................
5
Utilities................................................
6
Construction.......................................

2004

Share
of G D P 2

R atio3

Share of real
GDP growth'

2005

Share
of G D P 2

R atio3

Share of real
G DP growth1

Share
of G D P 2

R atio 3

100.0

100.0

1.0

100.0

100.0

1.0

100.0

100.0

1.0

92.4
2.8
-0 .4
5.2
- 4 .0

87.1
1.0
1.3
2.0
4.5

1.1
2.8
-0 .3
2.6
-0 .9

94.6
1.8
0.3
1.3
1.8

87.3
1.2
1.5
2.0
4.6

1.1
1.5
0.2
0.6
0.4

90.9
0.0
-1 .3
0.6
5.9

87.4
1.0
1.9
2.0
4.9

1.0
0.0
-0 .7
0.3
1.2

0.5
1.1
- 0 .3
0.9
1.6

20.3
13.6
6.7
1.8
4.4
3.8
12.6
22.3
4.4
18.2
15.1
13.3
1.3
0.5
6.7
0.5
5.9

12.3
7.0
5.3
5.9
6.7

8.4
10.6
- 2 .2
2.8
10.3
3.4
12.2
18.8
5.3
13.4

12.1
6.9
5.3
6.0
6.6

2.8
4.5
20.6
7.8
12.7

1.6
1.9
1.3
0.3
0.7
1.4
2.8
1.1
0.6
1.4

2.8
4.5
20.4
7.7
12.7

0.7
1.5
-0 .4
0.5
1.6
1.2
2.7
0.9
0.7
1.1

11.5
6.8
1.8
2.9

1.3
2.0
0.7
0.2

20.0
14.4
0.9
4.7

11.7
6.9
1.8
3.0

7.8
0.9
6.9

0.9
0.6
0.9

8.4
0.6
7.8

7.8
0.9
6.9

3.6
0.9
2.7

0.8
0.0
1.0

1.6
0.0
1.6

3.6
0.9
2.7

1.7
2.1
0.5
1.6
1.1
0.7
1.1
0.4
0.0
0.6

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
2U
21
22
23
24
25
26

Manufacturing..................................................................................................
Durable goods...
Nondurable goods......................................................................................
Wholesale trade....
Retail trade.............
Transportation and warehousing.................................................................
Information........................................................................................................
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing...............................
Finance and insurance..............................................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing.......................................................

6.0
7.6
-1 .6
5.2
10.8
2.4
5.2
19.6
11.2
8.4

Professional and business services...........................................................
Professional, scientific, and technical services..................................
Management of companies and enterprises.......................................
Administrative and waste management services...............................

20.0
10.4
2.0
7.2

12.4
7.0
5.4
5.8
6.9
2.9
4.5
20.5
7.9
12.6
11.4
6.7
1.8
2.9

Educational services, health care, and social assistance....................
Educational services.................................................................................
Health care and social assistance.........................................................

13.6
1.2
12.4

7.8
0.9
6.9

1.8
1.6
1.1
2.5
1.7
1.3
1.8

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services
Arts, entertainment, and recreation......................................................
Accommodation and food services........................................................

4.4
0.8
3.6

3.6
1.0
2.7

1.2
0.8
1.3

2.8
0.0
2.8

27

0.8
1.2
1.0
1.4
0.7

Other services, except government...........................................................

2.0

2.4

0.8

-0 .3

2.3

-0.1

-0 .6

2.3

-0 .3

28 G o ve rn m en t.........................................................................................................
29
Federal...............................................................................................................
30
State and local.................................................................................................

6.8
4.0
2.8

12.9
4.1
8.8

0.5
1.0
0.3

1.8
1.0
0.8

12.7
4.1
8.6

0.1
0.3
0.1

2.5
-0 .3
2.8

12.6
4.0
8.5

0.2
-0.1
0.3

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries4.........................................................
Private services-producing industries5.....................................................
Information-communications-technology-producing industries6

4.4
88.0
11.2

19.3
67.8
3.8

0.2
1.3
2.9

24.1
70.5
12.8

19.6
67.7
3.8

1.2
1.0
3.4

12.8
77.8
15.3

19.9
67.5
3.9

0.6
1.2
3.9

31
32
33

1. Equals the industry’s contribution to growth in real GDP divided by the growth in real GDP times 100.
Shares of real GDP growth do not sum to 100 percent because the contribution of “not allocated by industry” is
excluded.
2. Equals the industry’s value added divided by GDP times 100.
3. Equals the industry’s share of real GDP growth divided by its share of GDR A ratio greater than 1 indi­
cates the industry’s contribution is large relative to its size in the economy.
4. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.




5. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance,
insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health
care, and social assistance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other
services, except government.
6. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (indudes software); information and
data processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

Annual Industry Accounts

48

sector grew 3.7 percent in 2005 after growing 4.1 per­
cent in 2004 and 3.3 percent in 2003. This sector ac­
counted for nearly 80 percent of real GDP growth in
2005 and more than 70 percent of real GDP growth in
2004. However, this sector accounted for less than 70

D ece m ber 2006

percent of current-dollar GDP in both years. Despite
slower growth in the services sector in 2005, 31 of the
36 services-producing industries expanded.
In 2005, the retail trade and “administrative and
waste management services” industries contributed to

Dom estic Supply and Use of Oil and Gas Extraction and Petroleum and Coal Products
The annual industry accounts provide useful information
for analyzing structural changes in the U.S. economy. In
addition to showing industry interactions, they provide
information on both the domestic supply and use of com­
modities. This box reviews the information the accounts
provide about two commodities: (1) Oil and gas extraction
products, primarily crude oil and natural gas, which have
little practical use in their raw state, and (2) petroleum and
coal products, the refined products derived from these raw
materials.
Summary-level use tables (available on BEA’s Web site)
show that the domestic supply of oil and gas extraction
products in current-dollar producer prices increased at
an average annual rate of 22.5 percent between 1998 and
2005. Over the same period, real domestic supply was
unchanged, indicating that the increase in current-dollar
output was primarily due to an increase in producer
prices (chart A).

Chart A. Domestic Supply of Oil and Gas Extraction
Commodities

Table A. Real Supply and Use of Oil and Gas Extraction Products
[Billions of chained (2 0 0 0 ) dollars] '

1 998

2005

Average
annual growth in
1 9 9 8 -2 0 0 5

D o m e s tic s u p p ly 2 .......................................
Dom estic output..........................................
Plus: Im p o rts ...............................................
Less: Expo rts...............................................

2 3 1 .9
129.6
105.3
3.0

2 3 1 .7
116.6
120.7
2.2

0 .0
- 1 .5
2 .0
- 4 .2

D o m e s tic u s e .................................................
Oil and gas extraction in d u s try .............
Petroleum and coal products
manufacturing in d u s try .......................
O ther industries 3........................................

2 3 1 .9
14.9

2 3 1 .7
21 .3

0.0
5.2

1 44.7
7 2 .6

139.7
70.5

- 0 .5
- 0 .4

1.
from
2.
3.

Chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive because they are calculated using weights
more than one period.
Equals domestic output plus imports, less exports, less change in private inventory.
Includes net deposits into the strategic petroleum reserve.

The composition of real domestic use of oil and gas
extraction products also changed over this period.
Demand by the oil and gas extraction industry for its
own primary output increased at an average annual rate
of 5.2 percent. Although this industry’s demand is a rela­
tively small share of total demand for these products, this
increase offset declining real demand in all other indus­
tries.
Real domestic use of petroleum and coal products
increased at an average annual rate of 1.0 percent from
1998 to 2005, almost entirely because of an increase in
personal consumption expenditures (table B). This
increase in real final demand was primarily met by
imports, which increased at an average annual rate of
nearly 10 percent. Domestic output increased at an aver­
age annual rate of just 0.3 percent.
Table B. Real Supply and Use of Petroleum and Coal Products
[Billions of chained (200 0) d o lla rs ]1

1998

2005

Average
annual growth in
1 9 9 8 -2 0 0 5

D o m e s tic s u p p ly 1 .......................................
Dom estic output..........................................
Plus: Im p o rts ...............................................
Less: Expo rts...............................................

The level of real domestic supply did not change over
this period, but the sources of domestic supply did
change. Real domestic output declined at an average
annual rate of 1.5 percent, and real imports increased at
an average annual rate of 2.0 percent (table A).




2 3 0 .7
2 2 2 .8
18.1
12.9

2 4 8 .0
227 .9
34 .4
11.3

1.0
0.3
9.6
-1 .9

D o m e s tic u s e ..................................................
Oil and gas extraction in d u s try.............
Petroleum and coal products
m anufacturing in d u s try .......................
O ther industries..........................................
Personal consumption expenditures...

2 3 0 .7
0 .5

2 4 8 .0
0.7

1.0
4.6

16.7

17.8
139.1
90 .6

1.0
0.5
2 .0

134.5
79.1

1. Chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive because they are calculated using weights
from more than one period.
2. Equals domestic output plus imports, less exports, less change in private inventory.

D ece m ber 2006

Survey

of

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

strong growth in the services sector; retail trade growth
accelerated to 5.0 percent from 2.5 percent in 2004,
and “administrative and waste management services”
growth accelerated to 5.3 percent from 0.8 percent in
2004. Despite slower growth, the “professional, scien­
tific, and technical services,” “real estate and rental and
leasing,” and information industry groups were the
largest services-producing contributors to real GDP
growth in 2005, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the
growth. In 2004, growth in the information and “pro­
fessional, scientific, and technical services” industry
groups led the acceleration in the services sector, in­
creasing 11.4 percent and 7.8 percent, respectively.
In both 2004 and 2005, the information industry
group accounted for more than 12 percent of real GDP
growth. Its contribution to growth was nearly three
times its share of current-dollar GDP. Within the in­
formation industry group, growth was strong in the
publishing industry (includes software) (12.9 percent
in 2005 and 12.5 percent in 2004) and the broadcasting
and telecommunications industry (7.4 percent in 2005
and 11.8 percent in 2004).
All three industries within the professional, scien­
tific, and technical services industry group experienced
decelerating growth in 2005 and accelerating growth in
2004. Despite decelerating in 2005, the “computer sys­
tems design and related services” and “miscellaneous
professional, scientific, and technical services” indus­
tries remained strong, with growth of 7.5 percent and
8.8 percent, respectively. Growth in the legal services

49

industry slowed to 0.8 percent in 2005, from 3.5 per­
cent in 2004.
Within the transportation and warehousing indus­
try group, truck transportation was the largest contrib­
utor to real GDP growth, increasing 4.6 percent in
2005 and 7.8 percent in 2004. Real growth in pipeline
transportation turned up strongly in 2005, increasing
19.6 percent after decreasing 0.3 percent in 2004 and
3.3 percent in 2003.
In contrast to services-sector growth patterns, the
wholesale trade, retail trade, “finance and insurance,”
and “administrative and waste management services”
industries experienced stronger growth in 2005 and
weaker growth in 2004.
ICT-producing industries. In 2005, ICT-producing
industries, which include detailed industries from both
the goods and services sectors, continued to show
strong growth, increasing 13.3 percent in 2005 after in­
creasing 13.7 percent in 2004 and 7.2 percent in 2003.
In 2005, ICT-producing industries accounted for 15.3
percent of real GDP growth, almost four times their
share of current-dollar GDP. Computers and elec­
tronic products, the only goods-producing industry
within the ICT-producing industries, accounted for 41
percent of the ICT-producing industries’ contribution
to real GDP growth.
V a lu e -a d d e d p ric e g ro w th
Changes in the value-added price index reflect changes
in the prices of labor and capital (primary) inputs for

Acknowledgm ents
Sherlene K.S. Lum, Chief of the Services Branch of the
Current Industry Analysis Division (CIAD), supervised
the preparation and release of this year’s annual industry
accounts. Sumiye Okubo, Associate Director for Industry
Accounts, Ann M. Lawson, Chief of the CIAD, and
George M. Smith, Chief of the Goods and Value Added
Branch, provided overall guidance. Pat A. Wilkinson pro­
vided administrative and program assistance.
Ann M. Lawson, Amanda S. Lyndaker, George M.
Smith, Erich H. Strassner, Anna M. Jacobson, and Will­
iam H. Nicolls IV helped prepare this article.
Felicia V. Candela and William H. Nicolls IV developed
and operated the computer systems that were used to
compile, check, analyze, and report the final estimates.
Other CIAD staff who made significant contributions
to the annual revision are listed below by area of exper­
tise. Agriculture, business services, and personal services:
Sherlene K.S. Lum, Robert I. Corea, Vincent A. Davis,




Edward A. Kocis, and Brian M. Lindberg. Transportation,
utilities, and government: Paul V. Kern, Greg R. Linder,
and Sarah R. Mattingly. M ining, construction, manufac­
turing, and trade: Robert J McCahill, Kevin B. Barefoot,
.
Anna M. Jacobson, Amanda C. Roberts, and Shawn L.
Snyder. Value added, real measures, and prices: Thomas F
.
Howells III, Kathleen M. Karlon, Amanda S. Lyndaker,
Justin M. Monaldo, and Conrad E. Roesch. Robert S.
Robinowitz of the Industry Benchmark Division pre­
pared the industry accounts estimates of foreign trade.
Gabriel W Medeiros and Robert E. Yuskavage of the
.
Industry Accounts Directorate provided valuable assis­
tance in the review of the estimates. Staff members from
the Office of the Chief Information Officer—particularly
Stephen P Holliday, Brian D. Kajutti, Paul A. Kilday,
.
Douglas J Klear, Janice E. Townsend, and Rajeshwari R.
.
Bhosale—helped reengineer the data-processing applica­
tions that were used to prepare the estimates.

50

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

cent in 2005 after increasing 19.0 percent in 2004 and
35.8 percent in 2003 (table D). Strong growth in the
value-added price index for mining was primarily due

an industry, including changes in the industry’s unit
profit margins.3 In general, an industry’s value-added
price index will increase if the industry’s output prices
increase more (or decrease less) than its intermediate
(secondary) input prices. Alternatively, an industry’s
value-added price index will decline if its intermediateinput prices increase more (or decrease less) than its
output prices.
Private goods-producing sector. The value-added
price index for the goods sector increased 6.1 percent
in 2005 after increasing 3.3 percent in 2004 and 3.2
percent in 2003. Strong value-added price growth in
2005 marked the third consecutive year that growth in
the goods sector exceeded growth in the services sector.
The 2005 increase in the goods sector accounted for
39.7 percent of GDP price growth, the largest share
since 1966 (table C).
The large 2005 acceleration in the value-added price
index for the goods sector was driven by increases in
mining and nondurable-goods manufacturing. The
value-added price index for mining increased 39.2 per­

Table D. Percent Changes in Chain-Type Price Indexes
for Value Added by Industry Group
Line

2002

2003

Gross dom estic p ro d u c t..............................................................

1.7

2.1

2 Private industries.....................................................................................
3
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting........................................
4
Mining.......................................................................................................
5
Utilities......................................................................................................
6
Construction...........................................................................................
7
Manufacturing.........................................................................................
8
Durable goods...................................................................................
9
Nondurable goods............................................................................
10
Wholesale trade.....................................................................................
11
Retail trad e..............................................................................................
12
Transportation and warehousing........................................................
13
Information...............................................................................................
14
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing....................
15
Professional and business services..................................................
16
Educational services, health care, and social assistance...........
17
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food
services...............................................................................................
18
Other services, except government..................................................

1.5
-7 .5
-4 .2
- 1 .7
4.8

1.8
11.5
35.8
-0 .8
5.0

2.8
3.0
2.8
3.1
17.0 -1 3 .4
19.0 39.2
4.4
4.2
7.4
8.7

- 1 .9
- 2 .2
- 1 .4
0.4
1.8

-0 .6
-2 .9
2.5
1.3
0.5

-0 .9
-1 .4
-0 .2
6.8
1.4

3.2
-0 .6
8.4
6.4
0.4

0.3
-0 .9
3.1
2.1
3.8

1.9
-1 .7
2.4
0.6
2.7

-0 .9
-2 .9
2.9
2.5
3.3

0.4
-3 .7
2.3
2.6
3.0

1

2004

2005

3.7
4.2

1.4
3.0

3.1
3.8

3.4
3.9

19 G overnm ent................................................................................................

4.6

4.6

4.6

4.2

Addenda:
20
Private goods-producing industries1...............................................
21
Private services-producing industries2............................................
22
Information-communications-technology-producing industries3

- 0 .8
2.2
-3 .7

3.2
1.4
-5 .7

3.3
2.6
-6 .3

6.1
2.3
-4 .3

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance,
insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health
care, and social assistance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other
sen/ices, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and
data processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

3. For more information on value-added price indexes, see the box “Inter­
preting the Value-Added Price Index” in Robert E. Yuskavage and Mahnaz
Fahim-Nader, “Gross Domestic Product by Industry for 1947-86,” S u r v e y
85 (December 2005): 77.

Table C. Contributions to Percent Change in the Chain-Type Price Index for Gross Domestic Product Relative to Industry Group Size
2003
Line

1

Share of GDP
price growth1

2004

Share
of G D P 2

R atio 3

Share of GDP
price growth1

2005

Share
of G D P 2

R atio3

Share of GDP
price growth1

Share
of G D P 2

R atio3

Gross dom estic produ ct.......................................................................

100.0

100.0

1.0

100.0

100.0

74.8
5.2
17.1
-1 .0
11.0

87.1
1.0
1.3
2.0
4.5

0.9
5.2
13.2
-0 .5
2.4

86.1
6.4
8.9
3.2
11.8

87.3
1.2
1.5
2.0
4.6

1.0
1.0
5.4
6.0
1.6
2.6

100.0

2 Private in d u s tries.................................
3
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.................................................
4
Mining................................................................................................................
5
Utilities...............................................................................................................
6
Construction.....................................................................................................

91.0
- 5 .3
18.7
2.7
13.3

100.0
87.4
1.0
1.9
2.0
4.9

1.0
-5 .3
9.8
1.3
2.7

-3 .8
-1 0 .5
6.7
3.8
1.9
2.4
-3 .8
22.9
5.7
17.1

12.4
7.0
5.4
5.8
6.9

-0 .3
-1 .5
1.2
0.7
0.3

-3 .9
-3 .6
- 0 .4
13.9
3.2

12.3
7.0
5.3
5.9
6.7

-0 .3
-0 .5
-0.1
2.4
0.5

13.0
-1 .3
14.3
12.7
1.0

12.1
6.9
5.3
6.0
6.6

1.1
-0 .2
2.7
2.1
0.2

12
13
14
15
16

Manufacturing.................................................................................................
Durable goods............................................................................................
Nondurable goods.....................................................................................
Wholesale trade
Retail trade..
Transportation and warehousing................................................................
Information.......................................................................................................
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing.............................
Finance and insurance.............................................................................
Real estate and rental and leasing.......................................................

2.9
4.5
20.5
7.9
12.6

0.8
-0 .8
1.1
0.7
1.4

-1.1
- 4 .6
21.4
11.1
10.4

2.8
4.5
20.6
7.8
12.7

-0 .4
-1 .0
1.0
1.4
0.8

0.3
-5 .7
15.7
5.7
10.0

2.8
4.5
20.4
7.7
12.7

0.1
-1 .3
0.8
0.7
0.8

17
18
19
20

Professional and business services..........................................................
Professional, scientific, and technical services.................................
Management of companies and enterprises......................................
Administrative and waste management services..............................

3.3
0.0
2.9
0.5

11.4
6.7
1.8
2.9

0.3
0.0
1.6
0.2

10.4
1.4
3.2
5.7

11.5
6.8
1.8
2.9

0.9
0.2
1.8
2.0

10.0
4.0
3.3
2.7

11.7
6.9
1.8
3.0

0.9
0.6
1.9
0.9

21
22
23

Educational services, health care, and social assistance...................
Educational services................................................................................
Health care and social assistance........................................................

10.0
1.4
8.6

7.8
0.9
6.9

1.3
1.6
1.2

9.3
1.8
7.5

7.8
0.9
6.9

1.2
2.0
1.1

8.0
1.7
6.3

7.8
0.9
6.9

1.0
1.9
0.9

24
25
26

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services
Arts, entertainment, and recreation.....................................................
Accommodation and food services......................................................
Other services, except government..........................................................

2.4
1.4
1.4

3.6
1.0
2.7

0.7
1.4
0.5

3.9
1.1
3.2

3.6
0.9
2.7

1.1
1.2
1.2

4.0
1.0
3.0

3.6
0.9
2.7

1.1
1.1
1.1

3.3

2.4

1.4

3.2

2.3

1.4

3.0

2.3

1.3

28 G o ve rn m en t........................................................................................................
29
Federal..............................................................................................................
30
State and local................................................................................................

28.1
9.5
18.6

12.9
4.1
8.8

2.2
2.3
2.1

20.7
8.2
12.9

12.7
4.1
8.6

1.6
2.0
1.5

17.7
6.0
11.7

12.6
4.0
8.5

1.4
1.5
1.4

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries4 ........................................................
Private services-producing industries5....................................................
Information-communications-technology-producing industries6.......

29.0
45.7
-1 1 .0

19.3
67.8
3.8

1.5
0.7
-2 .9

23.2
62.9
-9 .3

19.6
67.7
3.8

1.2
0.9
-2 .4

39.7
51.3
-5 .7

19.9
67.5
3.9

2.0
0.8
-1 .5

7
8
9
10
11

27

31
32
33

1. Equals the industry’s contribution to the percent change in the chain-type price index for GDP divided by
the percent change in the chain-type price index for GDP times 100. Shares of GDP price growth do not sum to
100 percent because the contribution of “not allocated by industry” is excluded.
2. Equals the industry’s value added divided by GDP times 100.
3. Equals the industry’s share of real GDP growth divided by its share of GDP A ratio greater than 1 indi­
cates the industry’s contribution is large relative to its size in the economy.
4. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.




1.0

5. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance,
insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health
care, and social assistance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other
services, except government.
6. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and
data processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

to accelerating growth in the oil and gas extraction in­
dustry. In 2005, gross-output prices for the oil and gas
extraction industry surged for the third consecutive
year, contributing to strong growth in this industry’s
value-added price index.
Growth in the value-added price index for nondurable-goods manufacturing industries turned up in
2005, increasing 8.4 percent after decreasing 0.2 per­
cent in 2004 and increasing 2.5 percent in 2003.
Private services-producing sector. In 2005, growth
in the value-added price index for the services sector
decelerated to 2.3 percent and accounted for just over
half of GDP price growth. This slowdown was wide­
spread; growth in the value-added price index deceler­
ated (or declined more) in 6 of the 10 major servicesproducing industry groups. In 2004, the value-added
price index for this sector increased 2.6 percent; this
increase accounted for 62.9 percent of GDP price
growth.
Despite decelerating growth in the value-added
price index, the wholesale trade and “real estate and
rental and leasing” industries were the largest contrib­
utors to value-added price growth in 2005, accounting
for 22.7 percent of GDP price growth.
The value-added price index in the information in­
dustry declined at steadily increasing rates in each of
the last 3 years, falling 1.7 percent in 2003, 2.9 percent
in 2004, and 3.7 percent in 2005. The value-added
price index for three of the four industries within the
information industry group declined in all 3 years.
Petroleum prices. Rising petroleum prices boosted
the price of energy inputs within both the services and
goods sectors, putting downward pressure on the
value-added price index of petroleum-dependent in­
dustries. For example, the price for energy inputs in
the air transportation industry increased 42.6 percent
in 2005 and 26.2 percent in 2004, contributing to a de­

51

crease in the industry’s value-added price index of 14.1
percent in 2005 and 18.0 percent in 2004.
ICT-producing industries. The value-added price
index for ICT-producing industries continued to de­
cline in 2005, decreasing 4.3 percent after decreasing
6.3 percent in 2004 and 5.7 percent in 2003. Declining
value-added prices in ICT-producing industries par­
tially offset the higher value-added prices in the “oil
and gas extraction” and “petroleum and coal prod­
ucts” industries in 2005 and fully offset increases in
these industries in 2004.
C o m p o s itio n o f v a lu e a d d e d
Value added for an industry equals the difference be­
tween the value of its gross output and the cost of its
intermediate inputs (energy, materials, and purchased
services). Value added consists of the industry’s returns
to labor and capital—its primary inputs to produc­
tion—and the industry’s net return to government.
The return to labor is approximated by the industry’s
compensation of employees, and the return to capital
is approximated by its gross operating surplus. The in­
dustry’s net return to government is approximated by
its taxes on production and imports less subsidies.
Economy-wide, labor (compensation) accounted
for 56.5 percent of value added in 2005, down from
58.7 percent in 2001 (table E). Capital (gross operating
surplus) accounted for 36.6 percent of value added in
2005, up from to 34.6 percent in 2001. This trend of
changing value-added composition was evident in
both the goods and services sectors, but it was more
pronounced in the goods sector.
In the goods sector, labor accounted for 57.1 percent
of value added in 2005, compared with 63.1 percent in
2001. Capital accounted for 40.3 percent in 2005, up
5.8 percentage points from 34.5 percent in 2001. In
comparison, the capital share decreased 2.6 percentage

Table E. Components of Value Added by Industry Sector as a Percentage of Value Added
[Percent]
Line

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

1
2
3
4

Gross dom estic product................................................................................................
Compensation of employees......................................................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...................................................
Gross operating surplus..............................................................................................

100.0
57.4
6.9
35.7

100.0
57.9
6.8
35.3

100.0
59.0
6.8
34.3

100.0
58.7
6.6
34.6

100.0
58.2
6.9
34.8

100.0
57.8
6.9
35.3

100.0
56.8
7.0
36.2

100.0
56.5
6.9
36.6

5 Private goods-producing industries ’ ..........................................................................
6
Compensation of employees......................
7
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......................................................
8
Gross operating surplus..............................

100.0
60.4
2.5
37.1

100.0
61.4
2.1
36.5

100.0
62.4
2.1
35.5

100.0
63.1
2.4
34.5

100.0
62.9
2.9
34.2

100.0
61.8
2.8
35.5

100.0
58.6
2.9
38.5

100.0
57.1
2.6
40.3

9 Private services-producing in d u s trie s 2.......................................................................
Compensation of employees......................
10
11
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......................................................
12
Gross operating surplus..............................

100.0
51.5
9.9
38.7

100.0
51.9
9.7
38.3

100.0
53.2
9.6
37.1

100.0
52.7
9.3
38.0

100.0
51.8
9.6
38.6

100.0
51.3
9.6
39.0

100.0
50.9
9.7
39.5

100.0
50.9
9.7
39.4

13 Inform ation-com m unications-technology-producing in d u s trie s 3 ....................
14
Compensation of employees...........................................................................................
15
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies........................................................
16
Gross operating surplus...................................................................................................

100.0
71.5
1.7
26.8

100.0
75.2
1.6
23.2

100.0
83.5
1.6
14.9

100.0
85.8
1.9
12.3

100.0
79.3
2.0
18.8

100.0
76.8
2.0
21.2

100.0
76.0
2.0
22.0

100.0
73.7
2.0
24.3

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance,
insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health
care, and social assistance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other




2005

services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and
data processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

Annual Industry Accounts

52

points between 1998 and 2001. In the durable-goods
manufacturing industry, the share of value added ac­
counted for by labor declined 3.3 percentage points,
from 75.0 percent in 2001 to 71.7 percent in 2005. This
decline follows a 7.3-percentage-point increase from
1998 to 2001.
In the services sector, labor accounted for 50.9 per­
cent of value added in 2005, down 1.8 percentage
points from 52.7 percent in 2001. Capital accounted
for 39.4 percent in 2005, up 1.4 percentage points from
38.0 percent in 2001. Within the services sector, the
largest changes in recent years to the composition of
value added were in the information industry group:
An 8.0-percentage-point decrease in the labor share of
value added and an 8.1-percentage-point increase in
the capital share of value added.
In ICT-producing industries, labor accounted for
73.7 percent of value added in 2005, down 12.1 per­
centage points from 85.8 percent in 2001. The capital
share of value added increased 12.0 percentage points,
from 12.3 percent in 2001 to 24.3 percent in 2005. This
followed a decline of 14.5 percentage points between
1998 and 2001.

D o m e s tic S u p p ly a n d U se o f C o m m o d itie s
Domestic supply is the value of goods and services
available for domestic final and intermediate con­
sumption and is estimated as the value of domestic
Data Availability
The integrated annual GDP-by-industry and 1-0 esti­
mates for 1998-2005 and historical estimates of GDPby-industry for 1947-97 are available on BEA’s Web
site; go to <www.bea.gov> and click on “
Annual
Industry Accounts.” For the GDP-by-industry tables,
click on “Interactive Tables” under “Gross Domestic
Product (GDP) by Industry.” Online tools are avail­
able for users to customize tables so that they show
data only for the industries and years of interest. Tools
are also available for creating graphs of data and
downloading tables to update spreadsheets. A guide to
the interactive GDP-by-industry accounts tables is
also available.
For 1-0 tables, from “
Annual Industry Accounts,”
click on “Interactive Tables” under “Input-Output
(I-O) Accounts.” Online tools are available for users to
create and store unique levels of aggregation of data
for specific commodities and industries. Tools are also
available for viewing and downloading entire 1-0
tables, including the “make” and “use” tables.
For a guide to the annual industry accounts tables,
see Tameka R.L. Harris and Greg R. Linder, “Guide to
the Annual Industry Accounts Tables,” S u r v e y o f C u r ­
r e n t B u s i n e s s 85 (December 2005): 34-38.




D ece m ber 2006

output plus imports less exports less the change in pri­
vate inventories. Domestic output is the value of com­
modities produced by labor and property located
within the United States. The domestic supply of com­
modities is consumed by persons as final consump­
tion, by private businesses as intermediate inputs or
fixed investment, or by government as intermediate in­
puts, gross investment, or final consumption.
Domestic goods output as a percentage of domestic
goods supply fell to 87.7 percent in 2005 from 89.0
percent in 2004 and 89.2 percent in 2003; however,
current-dollar domestic goods output increased 8.2
percent in 2005 and 8.6 percent in 2004. Imports as a
percentage of domestic supply increased 0.8 percent­
age point to 22.1 percent in 2005 from 21.3 percent in
2004 (table F).
Table F. Components of Domestic Supply by Commodity Group
as a Percentage of Domestic Supply
[Percent]
Line
1
?
3
4
5

2003

2004

2005

Total dom estic supply of all c o m m o d itie s 1 ....................

100.0

100.0

100.0

Domestic output.......................................................................
Plus: Im ports............................................................................
Less: Exports............................................................................
Less: Change in private inventories....................................

97.6
7.1
4.6
0.1

97 5
7.6
48
0.3

97 0
8.0
49
0.1

6 G o o d s 2 ...............................................................................................
7
Domestic output............................................................................
8
Plus: Im ports.................................................................................
q
Less: Exports................................................................................
10
Less: Change in private inventories........................................

100.0
89.2
19.9
8.7
0.4

100.0
89.0
21.3
9.0
1.4

100.0
87.7
22.1
9.0
0.8

11 S e rv ic e s 3...........................................................................................
1?
Domestic output............................................................................
13
Plus: Im ports................................................................................
14
Less: Exports................................................................................
15
Less: Change in private inventories........................................

100.0
102.2
0.3
2.5
0.0

100.0
102.5
0.3
2.6
0.1

100.0
102.5
0.3
2.7
0.1

1. Includes nonco m p arab le im ports, scrap, used goods, in ventory valuation ad justm ent, an d rest-of-thew o rld adjustm ents.
2. Consists of co m m od ities from agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and m anu­
facturing.
3. C onsists of s ervices from utilities; w h o le s a le trade; retail trade; tran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing; inform a­
tion; finance, insuran ce, real estate, rental, and leasing; professional an d business services; education al
services, health care, an d social assistance; arts, en te rta in m e n t, recreation, acco m m o d atio n , and food
s ervices; an d o th er s ervices, e x cep t govern m en t.

Within goods, the import share of manufactured
commodities increased 0.6 percentage point to 26.5
percent in 2005 from 25.9 percent in 2004, and the im­
port share of mining commodities increased 1.4 per­
centage points to 38.8 percent in 2005 from 37.4
percent in 2004. Net exports in 2005 were negative for
nearly all 25 detailed goods commodities. Farms,
“mining, except oil and gas,” and “other” transporta­
tion equipment were the only significant exceptions.
Imports accounted for less than 1 percent of the do­
mestic supply of services in both 2004 and 2005. Net
exports in 2005 were negative for just 5 of the 36 de­
tailed services commodities: Utilities; truck transpor­
tation; insurance carriers and related activities;
performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and re­
lated activities; and other services, except government.
In 2005, 21.3 percent of the domestic supply of
goods was consumed by households and nonprofit in­
stitutions serving households (personal consumption
expenditures) while 69.5 percent was consumed by

53

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

published manufacturing estimates for 2003 reflected
the use of the 2003 ASM.
GDP-by-industry accounts. The overall pattern of
growth in the revised estimates is consistent with pre­
viously published estimates for all years, confirming
the pattern of decelerating growth in 2005 and acceler­
ating growth in 2004.
Real growth in value added for private industries
was revised down in 2005 because of downward revi­
sions to the goods and services sectors (table G).
Growth in the goods sector was revised down 0.6 per­
centage point to 2.1 percent, and growth in the services
sector was revised down 0.4 percentage point to 3.7
percent in 2005. Real growth for private industries in
2004 was also revised down because of a downward re­
vision of 0.8 percentage point in the services sector
that more than offset an upward revision of 1.0 per­
centage point in the goods sector.
The largest source of revisions within the goods sec­
tor was the manufacturing industry group; it was re­
vised down 1.8 percentage points for 2005 and up 1.7
percentage points for 2004. Within manufacturing,
nondurable goods was revised down 2.9 percentage
points for 2005 and revised up 2.2 percentage points
for 2004.
Revisions to the nondurable-goods manufacturing
industries were primarily due to revisions in the petro­
leum and coal products industry. In 2005, real value
added for the petroleum and coal products industry
was revised down significantly, reflecting both a large
downward revision to current-dollar value added and
an upward revision to the value-added price index for

private business as fixed investment or intermediate
consumption. Government consumption expendi­
tures, gross investment, and intermediate consump­
tion accounted for 9.2 percent of the domestic supply
of goods. For services, 50.8 percent of domestic supply
was consumed by households and nonprofit institu­
tions serving households, 44.1 percent by private busi­
ness, and the remaining 5.1 percent by government.

R e v is io n s
The revised estimates of industry value added were
prepared using the integrated annual GDP-by-industry
and 1-0 accounts methodology and incorporated
more complete, more detailed, and more reliable
source data. The integrated accounts methodology
combines the source data within an 1-0 framework
that balances and reconciles industry production with
commodity usage. The newly available source data in­
clude Census Bureau annual survey data on gross out­
put, Bureau of Labor Statistics data on producer prices,
and BEA estimates of final demand and industry re­
turns to labor and capital from the 2006 annual revi­
sion of the NIPAs. The previously published estimates
for 2005 were prepared using an abbreviated method­
ology.
For 2003 and 2004, the revised estimates incorpo­
rate revised NIPA estimates and, for manufacturing,
newly available source data from the 2004 Annual Sur­
vey of Manufacturers (ASM). The previously pub­
lished manufacturing estimates for 2004 reflected the
use of Census Bureau manufacturers’ shipments, in­
ventories, and orders (M3) survey data. The previously

Table G. Revisions to Change in Real Value Added by Industry Group
2003
Line

1

Previously
published
(percent)

2005

2004

Revised
(percent)

Revision
(percentage
points)

Previously
published
(percent)

Revised
(percent)

Revision
(percentage
points)

Previously
published
(percent)

Revised
(percent)

Revision
(percentage
points)

G ross dom estic product........................................................................

2.7

2.5

-0 .2

4.2

3.9

-0 .3

3.5

3.2

-0 .3

2 Private in d u s tries..............................................................................................
3
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting..................................................
4
M ining................................................................................................................
5
Utilities..................................................
6
Construction.........................................

2.8
7.6
- 1 .5
7.8
-1 .3

2.7
7.5
-0 .9
6.9
- 2 .0

-0 .1
-0.1
0.6
-0 .9
-0 .7

4.6
1.8
2.3
1.1
2.5

4.2
6.1
0.9
2.4
1.5

3.8
-4 .4
- 2 .6
0.4
2.7

1.1
2.6
- 0 .8
2.1
3.9

-0 .7
-1 .7
0.4
-0.1
0.3

4.8
6.3
2.7
4.6
6.4

6.5
7.7
4.9
1.1
2.5

4.0
5.7
1.6
1.2
2.9

3.3
0.1
- 2 .6
1.2
3.9
2.2
4.9
- 1 .3
1.5
5.0

-0 .4
4.6
0.0
0.7
1.2

1.9
4.3
-1 .2
2.2
3.6

-0 .4
4.4
-1 .4
1.3
-1 .0
1.7
1.3
2.2
-3 .5
-3 .8

7
8
9
10
11

Manufacturing.....................................
Durable goods.................................
Nondurable goods..........................
Wholesale trad e.................................
Retail trade...........................................

12
13
14
15
16

Transportation and warehousing....
Information........................................................................................................
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing...............................
Professional and business services...........................................................
Educational services, health care, and social assistance....................

3.7
2.7
3.4
3.2
2.8

2.0
3.0
2.4
4.4
4.4

-1 .6
0.3
-1.1
1.2
1.6

4.0
12.8
3.8
6.4
3.2

5.2
11.4
4.3
5.2
3.3

1.2
-1 .4
0.5
-1 .3
0.1

3.7
7.4
4.1
5.9
4.3

4.0
9.0
3.0
5.6
3.5

0.3
1.6
-1 .2
-0 .3
-0 .8

17
18

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services
Other services, except government...........................................................

2.9
1.1

3.1
2.0

0.1
0.8

3.0
1.2

3.0
-0 .5

0.0
-1 .7

4.1
2.4

1.4
-0 .7

-2 .7
-3 .1

19 G ove rnm ent.........................................................................................................

1.3

1.3

0.0

1.0

0.5

-0 .5

1.1

0.7

-0 .5

Addenda:
20
Private goods-producing industries ’ .........................................................
21
Private services-producing industries2 ....................................................
22
Information-communications-technology-producing industries 3

1.2
3.2
6.7

0.6
3.3
7.2

-0 .6
0.0
0.5

3.9
4.9
12.9

4.8
4.1
13.7

1.0
-0 .8
0.8

2.6
4.1
11.9

2.1
3.7
13.3

-0 .6
-0 .4
1.4

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance,
insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health
care, and social assistance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other




-1 .8
-0 .8
-2 .9
0.3
2.1

services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and
data processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

54

Annual Industry Accounts

the industry. The revision to current-dollar value
added reflects the incorporation of greater industry
detail of NIPA business-income measures. The revi­
sions to the value-added price index reflect the incor­
poration of revised producer price indexes from the
Bureau of Labor Statistics. In addition, revisions to the
price index reflect the use of the integrated accounts
double-deflation methodology rather than the single­
deflation methodology used to prepare the advance es­
timates.4
For 2004, real growth for the petroleum and coal
products industry was revised up 29.4 percentage
points. This revision reflects a large upward revision to
current-dollar value added for the industry that re­
sulted from incorporating revised NIPA business-in­
come measures that incorporate new IRS tabulations
for 2004.
In the services sector, the main sources of revision
for 2004 were downward revisions to the wholesale
trade industry (3.5 percentage points) and the retail
trade industry (3.8 percentage points). The finance
and insurance industry group was revised downward
2.4 percentage points for 2003 and 4.5 percentage
points for 2005, resulting in a more stable growth pat­
tern for this industry.
Real growth in ICT-producing industries, which
comprises three industries from the services sector and
one from the goods sector, was revised up for all 3

December 2006

years.
Input-output (I-O) accounts. The revised 1-0 ta­
bles for 2003-2004 incorporated revised source data
on gross output and value added by industry and on
gross output and final uses of commodities. The effect
of these revisions on intermediate and value-added in­
puts can be summarized by reviewing the revisions (in
absolute value) to each industry’s direct requirements
coefficients.5
Nearly 80 percent of the 3,886 input coefficients cal­
culated for each year were less than 0.01 (table I).
Eighty-three coefficients in 2004 and 36 in 2003 were
revised in absolute value by more than 0.01. Of the re­
visions greater than 0.01, about 60 percent (50 in 2004
and 21 in 2003) were less than 0.02. Only eight coeffi­
cients in 2004 and two in 2003 were revised by more
than 0.04.
5. Direct requirements coefficients are calculated for an industry’s inter­
mediate inputs and value added by dividing the intermediate input or value
added amounts by the industry’s gross output.

Table I. Revisions to 1-0 Direct Requirements Coefficients1
2004

2003
3,886

3,886

Coefficients greater than 0.0 1 ....................................................................................

833

824

0.01 to 0.019 (absolute v alu e)..............................................................................

21

50

0.02 to 0.029 (absolute v alu e)..............................................................................

10

21

0.03 to 0.039 (absolute valu e)..............................................................................

3

4

0.04 or greater (absolute value)............................................................................

4. Single deflation best approximates the results obtained through double
deflation when an industry’s inputs prices and output prices are growing at
about the same rate.

Total count of direct requirements coefficients.......................................................

2

8

Revisions of

1. F or the p u rp o ses of this table, direct req u irem en ts co efficien ts w e re derived from th e use tab le before
redefinitions.
I-O Input-output

Table H. Revisions to Value Added by Industry Group
[Billions of dollars]
2004

2003
Line

1

Previously
published

Revised

Revision

Previously
published

Revised

2005
Revision

Previously
published

Revised

Revision

Gross dom estic p rodu ct.......................................................................

10,971.2

10,960.8

-1 0 .5

11,734.3

11,712.5

-2 1 .8

12,487.1

12,455.8

-3 1 .3

2 Private in d u s tries.............................................................................................
3
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting................................................
4
Mining................................................................................................................
Utilities...............................................................................................................
5
Construction....................................................................................................
6

9,556.8
114.2
142.3
222.6
501.0

9,542.3
114.4
143.3
220.0
496.2

-1 4 .4
0.2
1.0
-2 .7
-4 .7

10,251.0
141.6
171.9
235.3
549.5

10,221.5
142.0
172.1
235.2
541.0

-2 9 .5
0.4
0.2
-0.1
-8 .5

10,934.8
119.1
213.6
238.9
593.5

10,892.2
123.1
233.3
248.0
611.1

-4 2 .6
4.0
19.8
9.1
17.6

7
8
9
10
11

1,369.2
785.5
583.7
633.0
751.0

1,359.3
771.8
587.5
637.0
751.5

-9 .9
-1 3 .7
3.8
4.1
0.5

1,420.1
824.1
596.1
694.7
790.4

1,434.8
819.6
615.2
688.2
781.2

14.7
-4 .4
19.1
-6 .6
-9 .2

1,496.5
868.4
628.1
733.1
828.6

1,512.5
854.3
658.2
743.2
823.5

16.0
-14.1
30.1
10.1
-5.1

12
13
14
15
16

Manufacturing.................................................................................................
Durable goods............................................................................................
Nondurable goods.....................................................................................
Wholesale trad e.............................................................................................
Retail tra d e .
Transportation and warehousing................................................................
Information.......................................................................................................
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing..............................
Professional and business services..........................................................
Educational services, health care, and social assistance...................

321.6
491.8
2,260.4
1,235.9
850.6

316.6
489.1
2,244.6
1,248.9
857.3

-5 .0
-2 .7
-1 5 .8
13.0
6.7

332.9
538.7
2,412.9
1,351.9
909.0

330.1
529.2
2,408.7
1,346.4
914.7

-2 .8
-9 .5
-4 .2
-5 .5
5.7

362.2
578.3
2,574.4
1,468.5
977.4

344.6
555.2
2,536.1
1,458.8
975.3

-1 7 .6
-23.1
-3 8 .3
-9 .8
-2.1

17
18

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services
Other services, except government..........................................................

398.8
264.3

398.9
265.3

0.1
0.9

424.3
277.7

424.0
274.1

-0 .4
-3 .6

455.9
294.6

444.6
282.8

-1 1 .2
-1 1 .8

19 G o ve rn m en t........................................................................................................

1,414.5

1,418.4

3.9

1,483.3

1,490.9

7.6

1,552.3

1,563.6

11.3

Addenda:
20
Private goods-producing industries1 ........................................................
21
Private services-producing industries2....................................................
22
Information-communications-technology-producing industries3......

2,126.7
7,430.0
420.9

2,113.3
7,429.1
421.2

-1 3 .5
-1 .0
0.3

2,283.1
7,967.9
445.2

2,289.9
7,931.6
448.5

6.8
-3 6 .2
3.3

2,422.7
8,512.1
481.0

2,480.1
8,412.2
486.7

57.3
-9 9 .9
5.7

1. C onsists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; m ining; construction; an d m anufacturing .
2 . C onsists of utilities; w h o le s a le trade; retail trade; transp ortation and w arehousing; inform ation; finance,
insuran ce, real e s ta te, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; ed u catio n al services, health
c are , an d social as s is ta n ce ; arts, en te rta in m e n t, recreation, accom m o dation, and food services; and other




services, excep t governm ent.
3. C onsists of com pute r an d electronic products; publishing industries (includes softw are); inform ation and
d a ta processing services; an d co m p u te r system s design an d related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

A p p e n d ix : A n n u a l In d u s try
A c c o u n ts In te g ra te d M e th o d o lo g y
The annual 1-0 accounts and the GDP-by-industry ac­
counts are created using an integrated methodology
that makes the annual estimates of gross output, inter­
mediate inputs, and value added by industry more
timely and consistent than previously possible.6 Indus­
try estimates are published for 65 detailed industries,
as defined by the 1997 North American Industry Clas­
sification System (NAICS). Commodity estimates are
published at the same level of detail plus four addi­
tional commodities.7 Estimates of final uses and value
added are also included in the annual estimates. Com­
pared with previous methodologies, the integrated
methodology is applied at a finer level of industry and
commodity detail to enhance the accuracy of aggregate-level estimates.
The integrated annual 1-0 accounts and GDP-byindustry accounts are prepared in five steps:
Step one. Industry estimates of current-dollar value
added for 2003-2005 are extrapolated forward from
the annual industry accounts estimates for 2002, which
were not revised, using the percentage changes in the
annual estimates of gross domestic income (GDI) from
the NIPAs. The GDI-by-industry estimates consist of
compensation of employees, taxes on production and
imports less subsidies, and gross operating surplus.
Additionally, corporate data on profits before tax, net
interest, and capital consumption allowances are con­
verted from an enterprise basis to an establishment ba­
sis using data on employment. Finally, the statistical
discrepancy (the difference between GDI and GDP
from the NIPAs) is distributed among the industries.
In general, annual revisions to the industry estimates
of value added largely reflect revisions to the compo­
nents of GDI and to the statistical discrepancy from
the annual NIPA revision.
Step two. Industry estimates of gross domestic out­
put for 2003-2005 are extrapolated from the 2002 esti­
mates. The extrapolators for these estimates are
prepared using a wide array of source data, including
surveys from the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, and other public and private sources.8 An­
6. For more information about the integrated annual industry accounts,
see Brian C. Moyer, Mark A. Planting, Mahnaz Fahim-Nader, and Sherlene
K.S. Lum, “Preview of the Comprehensive Revision of the Annual Industry
Accounts,” S u r v e y 84 (March 2004): 38-51.
7. These special commodities consist of noncomparable imports, scrap,
used and secondhand goods, rest of the world adjustment to final uses, and
inventory valuation adjustment.
8. The estimates of the commodity composition of extrapolated industry
gross output are largely consistent with the 1997 benchmark 1-0 relation­
ships for nonmanufacturing industries and with current survey data for
manufacturing industries.




55

nual revisions to industry estimates of gross output are
due to revisions in these source data.
Step three. The initial commodity composition of
intermediate inputs is calculated for each industry by a
process that uses the previous year’s direct require­
ments coefficients. First, gross output for each indus­
try is revalued at previous year commodity prices.
Next, the revalued gross output is multiplied by the in­
dustry’s direct requirements coefficients from the pre­
vious year.9 Finally, the resulting commodity estimates
of intermediate inputs for the industry are revalued in
the commodity prices of the current year.
Step four. The initial commodity composition of
each GDP expenditure component is estimated by ap­
plying commodity-flow relationships from the revised
1997 benchmark 1-0 accounts to the domestic supply
of each commodity in the current year. The annual 1-0
use tables are then balanced using a biproportional ad­
justment procedure to ensure that intermediate and fi­
nal use of commodities is consistent with domestic
supply, that intermediate use is consistent with gross
output and value added, and that final use is consistent
with the final expenditure components from the
NIPAs. The current-dollar measures of gross output,
intermediate inputs, and value added are then incor­
porated into the GDP-by-industry accounts.
Step five. Price and quantity indexes for the GDPby-industry accounts are prepared in three steps. First,
indexes are derived for gross output by separately de­
flating each commodity produced by an industry that
is included as part of its gross output. Second, indexes
for intermediate inputs are derived by deflating all
commodities that are consumed by an industry as in­
termediate inputs in the annual 1-0 use tables.1 Third,
0
indexes for valued added by industry are calculated us­
ing the double-deflation method in which real value
added is computed as the difference between real gross
output and real intermediate inputs.1
1
9. Direct requirements coefficients specify the amount of each commod­
ity required by the industry to produce a dollar of output.
10. Source data used to prepare the commodity price indexes for deflation
can be found in Moyer et al., 48-49.
11. Separate estimates of gross output and intermediate inputs are com­
bined in a Fisher index-number formula in order to generate the indexes
for value added by industry. This method is preferred because it requires
the fewest assumptions about the relationships between gross output by
industry and intermediate inputs by industry.

Tables 1 through 2 6 follow.

56

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 1. Value Added by Industry, 2002-2005
[Billions of dollars]
Line

2002

2003

2004

2005

Gross dom estic p ro d u ct....................................................

10,469.6

10,960.8

11,712.5

12,455.8

? Private in d u s trie s ..........................................................................

1

9,131.2

9,542.3

10,221.5

10,892.2

3
4
5

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and h u n tin g .......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

95.4
70.8
24.6

114.4
88.3
26.1

142.0
114.6
27.4

123.1
95.9
27.2

6
7
8
y

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and g as....................................................
Support activities for mining................................................

106.5
62.8
26.8
16.9

143.3
93.8
27.2
22.3

172.1
116.4
29.3
26.5

233.3
159.6
31.5
42.2

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

207.3

220.0

235.2

C on stru ctio n ...............................................................................

482.3

496.2

541.0

611.1

12
13
14
1b
1b
17
18
19
20
?1
22
23
24
?5
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................
Wood products...................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary m etals...................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M achinery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

1,352.6
774.8
30.4
45.9
41.9
107.4
96.5
124.2
48.8
118.9
69.6
31.1
60.0
577.9
172.9
21.9
20.9
50.3
45.7
26.2
174.4
65.5

1,359.3
771.8
32.1
45.1
38.4
106.3
94.3
124.0
48.8
124.1
62.4
33.4
62.9
587.5
167.9
23.1
18.3
50.3
45.2
39.1
179.5
64.0

1,434.8
819.6
38.3
49.5
54.3
118.4
104.4
129.5
45.7
109.8
65.7
36.7
67.4
615.2
156.2
23.4
17.1
52.8
46.4
53.8
198.4
67.1

1,512.5
854.3
39.0
53.3
61.1
130.5
111.1
135.3
47.8
95.4
71.1
37.1
72.6
658.2
175.7
23.8
16.8
54.6
46.9
63.5
209.2
67.7

34

W holesale tra d e .........................................................................

615.4

637.0

688.2

743.2

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

719.6

751.5

781.2

823.5

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation.....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

304.6
48.3
26.2
7.0
95.7
15.7
11.5
73.4
26.8

316.6
51.7
28.1
8.7
98.4
16.1
9.9
75.4
28.3

330.1
44.9
30.2
9.0
108.0
16.6
9.6
81.7
30.1

344.6
41.0
32.3
9.0
114.1
17.1
9.3
89.1
32.7

45
46
4/
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes softw are).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications..............................
Information and data processing services........................

483.0
119.0
38.9
278.9
46.2

489.1
123.5
38.3
277.9
49.3

529.2
133.6
39.9
301.4
54.2

555.2
150.2
40.5
304.1
60.4

50
51
W
53
54
55
56
57
58

248.0

11

Line

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74

2002

2003

2004

2005

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing. ..
Finance and insurance.......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities.............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................

2,141.9
822.7

2,244.6
864.6

2,408.7
917.3

2,536.1
957.7

417.4
148.4
237.4
19.5

445.0
145.9
255.0
18.7

444.5
156.8
295.6
20.4

474.7
167.4
296.1
19.5

Real estate and rental and leas in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets..............................................................................
Professional and business s e rv ic e s .................................

1,319.2
1,215.9

1,380.0
1,274.2

1,491.4
1,386.3

1,578.4
1,472.6

103.3
1,189.0

105.8
1,248.9

105.1
1,346.4

105.8
1,458.8

705.2
145.8
127.3

733.1
154.2
124.3

794.9
169.1
131.1

864.1
180.9
140.8

432.2
183.8
300.0
273.3
26.7

454.6
195.5
320.3
290.9
29.4

494.6
210.6
341.0
310.1
30.8

542.5
225.8
368.8
336.6
32.3

799.6
93.3
706.3
361.8
281.1
63.4

857.3
100.1
757.2
385.7
303.9
67.6

914.7
108.2
806.4
409.3
326.1
71.0

975.3
115.8
859.6
441 9
342.2
75.4

Professional, scientific, and technical s e rv ic e s ......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services...........................................................................
M anagem ent of com panies and en terp rises.............
Adm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent services. ..
Administrative and support services.............................
Waste management and remediation services
Educational services, health care, and social
a s s is ta n c e ..............................................................................
Educational s e rv ic e s..........................................................
Health care and social a s s is ta n c e ................................
Ambulatory health care services..................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................
Arts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food serv ices..........................................................................

381.5

398.9

424.0

444.6

102.4

107.2

110.8

114.1

77

Arts, entertainm ent, and recre atio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities.............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...

46.7
55.7

54.0
60.1

A ccom m odation and food s e rv ic e s ..............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking p laces...............................

279.1
89.1
190.0

49.6
57.6
291.7
90.7
201.0

52.1
58.6

78
79
80

313.2
99.1
214.0

330.5
104.6
225.9

81
O ther services, except g o ve rn m en t..................................
82 G overnm ent.....................................................................................
Fe d e ra l.............................
83
84
General government..
85
Government enterprises
86
State and lo c a l..............
87
General government..
88
Government enterprises.......................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries’ ......................................
89
Private services-producing industries2 .................................
90
91
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3.................................................................................

252.5
1,338.4
417.3
352.9
64.5
921.1
848.9
72.2

265.3
1,418.4
448.6
383.9
64.7
969.8
896.2
73.7

274.1
1,490.9
478.4
411.6
66.8
1,012.6
936.8
75.7

1,563.6
498.8
436.7
62.1
1,064.8
986.2
78.6

2,036.9
7,094.3

2,113.3
7,429.1

2,289.9
7,931.6

2,480.1
8,412.2

416.6

421.2

448.5

486.7

75
76

282.8

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food sen/ices; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

57

Table 2. Value Added by Industry as a Percentage of Gross Domestic Product, 2002-2005
[Percent]
2002

Line
1

2003

2004

2005

G ross dom estic p rodu ct....................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

? Private in d u s trie s ..........................................................................

87.2

87.1

87.3

87.4

3
4
5

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and huntin g......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

0.9
0.7
0.2

1.0
0.8
0.2

1.2
1.0
0.2

1.0
0.8
0.2

6
7
A
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and g as....................................................
Support activities for mining................................................

1.0
0.6
0.3
0.2

1.3
0.9
0.2
0.2

1.5
1.0
0.2
0.2

1.9
1.3
0.3
0.3

10

2.0

2.0

50
51
52

2.0

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

2.0

11

C on stru ctio n ...............................................................................

4.6

4.5

4.6

4.9

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................
Wood products...................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary m etals...................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M achinery...........................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills.............................
Apparel and leather and allied products......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products..........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products..........................................

12.9
7.4
0.3
0.4
0.4
1.0
0.9
1.2
0.5
1.1
0.7
0.3
0.6
5.5
1.7
0.2
0.2
0.5
0.4
0.3
1.7
0.6

12.4
7.0
0.3
0.4
0.3
1.0
0.9
1.1
0.4
1.1
0.6
0.3
0.6
5.4
1.5
0.2
0.2
0.5
0.4
0.4
1.6
0.6

12.3
7.0
0.3
0.4
0.5
1.0
0.9
1.1
0.4
0.9
0.6
0.3
0.6
5.3
1.3
0.2
0.1
0.5
0.4
0.5
1.7
0.6

12.1
6.9
0.3
0.4
0.5
1.0
0.9
1.1
0.4
0.8
0.6
0.3
0.6
5.3
1.4
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.4
0.5
1.7
0.5

34

W holesale tra d e .........................................................................

5.9

5.8

5.9

6.0

35

Retail tra d e ..................................................................................

6.9

6.9

6.7

6.6

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation..............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................

2.9
0.5
0.3
0.1
0.9
0.1
0.1
0.7
0.3

2.9
0.5
0.3
0.1
0.9
0.1
0.1
0.7
0.3

2.8
0.4
0.3
0.1
0.9
0.1
0.1
0.7
0.3

2.8
0.3
0.3
0.1
0.9
0.1
0.1
0.7
0.3

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation..................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes software).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications............................
Information and data processing services........................

4.6
1.1
0.4
2.7
0.4

4.5
1.1
0.3
2.5
0.4

4.5
1.1
0.3
2.6
0.5

4.5
1.2
0.3
2.4
0.5

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




2002

Line

53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
fifi
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80

2004

2005

20.5
7.9

20.6
7.8

20.4
7.7

4.0
1.4
2.3
0.2
12.6
11.6

4.1
1.3
2.3
0.2
12.6
11.6

3.8
1.3
2.5
0.2
12.7
11.8

3.8
1.3
2.4
0.2
12.7
11.8

1.0
11.4
6.7
1.4
1.2

1.0
11.4
6.7
1.4
1.1

0.9
11.5
6.8
1.4
1.1

0.8
11.7
6.9
1.5
1.1

4.1
1.8
2.9
2.6
0.3

4.1
1.8
2.9
2.7
0.3

4.2
1.8
2.9
2.6
0.3

4.4
1.8
3.0
2.7
0.3

Educational services, health care, and social
assistance...............................................................................
Educational s e rv ic e s ................
Health care and social assistance
Ambulatory health care services
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................

7.6
0.9
6.7
3.5
2.7
0.6

7.8
0.9
6.9
3.5
2.8
0.6

7.8
0.9
6.9
3.5
2.8
0.6

7.8
0.9
6.9
3.5
2.7
0.6

A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food se rv ic e s .........................................................................

3.6

3.6

3.6

3.6

1.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.4
0.5
2.7
0.9
1.8
2.4

0.5
0.5
2.7
0.8
1.8
2.4

0.4
0.5
2.7
0.8
1.8
2.3

12.8
4.0
3.4
0.6
8.8
8.1
0.7

12.9
4.1
3.5
0.6
8.8
8.2
0.7

0.4
0.5
2.7
0.8
1.8
2.3
12.7
4.1
3.5
0.6
8.6
8.0
0.6

12.6

19.5
67.8

19.3
67.8

19.6
67.7

19.9
67.5

4.0

3.8

3.8

3.9

Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets...............................................................................
Professional and business s e rv ic e s .................................
Professional, scientific, and technical serv ices.......
Legal services....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................
M anagem ent of com panies and en te rp ris e s .............
A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Administrative and support services............................

A rts, entertainm ent, and rec re a tio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...
Accom m odation and food s e rv ic e s ..............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................
O ther services, except g o ve rn m en t..................................

81
82 G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................
83
84
85
86
87

2003

20.5
7.9

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....
Finance and in su ran ce ......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................

F e d e ra l..........................................................................................
General government.............................................................
Government enterprises......................................................

General governm ent.............................................................
Government enterprises......................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1......................................
89
90
Private services-producing industries2..................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
91
industries3................................................................................

4.0
3.5
0.5
8.5
7.9
0.6

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

58

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 3. Components of Value Added by Industry Group, 2002-2005
[Billions of dollars]
Line

2002

2003

2004

2005

Gross dom estic p ro d u ct....................................................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

10,469.6
6,096.6
724.4
3,648.6

10,960.8
6,331.1
759.3
3,870.4

11,712.5
6,656.3
819.4
4,236.8

12,455.8
7,036.6
865.1
4,554.1

65
66
67
68

5 Private in d u s trie s ..........................................................................
6
Compensation of em ployees....................................................
7
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.................
8
Gross operating surplus............................................................

9,131.2
4,957.6
737.5
3,436.1

9,542.3
5,118.7
773.2
3,650.4

10,221.5
5,376.5
834.0
4,011.0

10,892.2
5,695.0
879.9
4,317.2

1
2
3
4

Line

2002

2003

2004

2005

Professional and business serv ices..................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

1,189.0
851.5
23.0
314.5

1,248.9
878.5
24.0
346.4

1,346.4
933.9
25.7
386.8

1,458.8
1,019.7
27.3
411.7

69
70
n
t'i

Professional, scientific, and technical s erv ices .......
Compensation of em ployees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

705.2
489.1
11.9
204.2

733.1
497.4
12.6
223.2

794.9
531.3
13.5
250.1

864.1
575.7
14.3
274.1

9
10
11
12

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and h u n tin g ......................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

95.4
36.4
-3 .8
62.8

114.4
36.1
-9.1
87.4

142.0
39.2
-5 .4
108.2

123.1
41.8
-1 3 .9
95.2

73
74
75
/6

M anagem ent of com panies and e n te rp ris e s .............
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

183.8
139.5
3.1
41.2

195.5
148.2
3.2
44.1

210.6
158.9
3.4
48.3

225.8
176.7
3.7
45.5

13
14
15
16

M in in g ............................................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

106.5
37.7
12.7
56.1

143.3
39.4
14.7
89.2

172.1
43.2
16.6
112.3

233.3
50.4
19.2
163.7

77
/8
/y
81)

A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

300.0
222.9
8.0
69.1

320.3
232.9
8.3
79.1

341.0
243.8
8.8
88.4

368.8
267.4
9.3
92.2

17
18
19
?0

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

207.3
51.2
34.7
121.4

220.0
51.8
37.2
131.0

235.2
54.1
39.0
142.0

248.0
55.1
41.1
151.8

81

?1
??
?3
?4

C on stru ctio n ...............................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

482.3
332.7
5.7
143.8

496.2
341.0
6.3
148.9

541.0
356.7
7.0
177.3

611.1
391.1
7.7
212.2

82
83
84

Educational services, health care, and social
a s sistan ce...............................................................................
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

799.6
639.3
9.6
150.6

857.3
681.8
10.4
165.0

914.7
723.2
11.0
180.4

975.3
766.0
11.4
198.0

?5
?6
?7
?8
29
30
31
32
33
34
3b
3b

M anu facturing.......................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Durable goods....................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

1,352.6
874.3
44.4
434.0
774.8
570.8
14.7
189.2
577.9
303.5
29.7
244.7

1,359.3
888.6
46.4
424.4
771.8
583.6
15.6
172.6
587.5
305.0
30.8
251.8

1,434.8
901.9
48.8
484.1
819.6
590.9
16.8
212.0
615.2
311.0
32.0
272.1

1,512.5
932.7
51.1
528.7
854.3
612.5
17.8
224.0
658.2
320.2
33.3
304.7

85
8b
8/
88

Educational services...........................................................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

93.3
85.5
1.2
6.5

100.1
90.9
1.3
7.9

108.2
96.7
1.4
10.1

115.8
102.7
1.4
11.7

89
yu
yi
y2

Health care and social ass is ta n c e.................................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

706.3
553.8
8.4
144.0

757.2
590.9
9.1
157.1

806.4
626.5
9.6
170.3

859.6
663.4
9.9
186.3

93
94
95
96

A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s e rv ic e s .........................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

398.9
249.9
45.6
103.3

424.0
264.6
48.8
110.6

444.6
276.8
51.7
116.1

37
38
39
4U

W holesale tra d e.........................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

615.4
333.4
137.9
144.1

637.0
344.8
144.4
147.9

688.2
366.8
153.5
167.9

743.2
389.0
163.7
190.4

97
98
99
100

Arts, entertainm ent, and re c re a tio n ..............................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

381.5
237.7
42.9
100.9
102.4
59.9
10.0
32.6

110.8
66.0
11.4
33.4

114.1
67.6
12.0
34.5

41
42
43
44

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

719.6
422.3
147.0
150.3

751.5
432.6
155.0
163.9

781.2
450.2
165.7
165.3

823.5
467.9
176.7
178.9

101
102
103
104

Accom m odation and food serv ices...............................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

279.1
177.8
32.9
68.4

107.2
63.1
10.6
33.5
291.7
186.8
35.0
69.8

313.2
198.6
37.3
77.2

330.5
209.2
39.8
81.6

45
46
4/
48

Transportation and w arehousing ........................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

304.6
204.1
15.8
84.6

316.6
204.1
14.2
98.3

330.1
215.7
17.4
97.0

344.6
224.8
18.7
101.1

105
106
10/
108

O ther services, except governm ent....................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

252.5
176.7
16.8
59.0

265.3
184.6
17.7
63.0

274.1
193.4
18.9
61.9

282.8
199.3
20.2
63.3

49
50
51
52

Inform ation.............................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

483.0
227.9
37.9
217.1

489.1
225.6
38.7
224.8

529.2
235.1
40.5
253.6

555.2
240.1
42.3
272.9

109 G o v e rn m e n t.....................................................................................
110
Compensation of employees....................................................
111
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.................
112
Gross operating surplus.............................................................

1,338.4
1,139.0
-13.1
212.5

1,418.4
1,212.4
-1 3 .9
219.9

1,490.9
1,279.8
-1 4 .6
225.8

1,563.6
1,341.6
-1 4 .8
236.9

53
54
bb
bb

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

2,141.9
532.1
213.0
1,396.8

2,244.6
559.9
227.8
1,456.9

2,408.7
598.4
246.6
1,563.7

2,536.1
640.2
262.7
1,633.1

57
58
59
60

Finance and in s u ra n c e ......................................................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

822.7
448.0
33.6
341.2

61
62
63
64

Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

1,319.2
84.1
179.4
1,055.7

864.6
472.3
36.8
355.6
1,380.0
87.7
191.0
1,101.3

917.3
503.5
40.3
373.4
1,491.4
94.8
206.3
1,190.3

957.7
538.0
42.7
377.0
1,578.4
102.2
220.0
1,256.1

1. C onsists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, an d hunting; m ining; construction; and m anufacturing .
2. C onsists of utilities; w h o le s a le tra d e; retail trade; transp ortation an d w arehousing; inform ation; finance, insurance,
real e state , rental, a n d leasing; professional and business services; ed u catio n al services, health care, an d social assis-




Addenda:
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120

Private goods-producing in d u s tries1................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

2,036.9
1,281.2
58.9
696.8

2,113.3
1,305.1
58.3
749.9

2,289.9
1,341.1
67.0
881.8

2,480.1
1,416.1
64.1
999.9

Private services-producing in dustries2............................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

7,094.3
3,676.4
678.6
2,739.4

7,429.1
3,813.6
714.9
2,900.6

7,931.6
4,035.4
767.0
3,129.2

8,412.2
4,279.0
815.8
3,317.4

121

Inform ation-com m unications-technology-producing
industries3...............................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

416.6
330.2
8.2
78.3

421.2
323.5
8.5
89.2

448.5
340.9
9.1
98.5

486.7
358.9
9.7
118.1

122
123
124

tance; arts, en tertain m en t, recreation, acco m m o d atio n , an d food services; and o th er services, e xcept governm ent.
3. C onsists of c o m p u te r and electronic products; publishing industries (includes softw are); inform ation an d d ata
processing services; an d c o m p u te r system s design an d related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

59

Table 4. Components of Value Added by Industry Group as a Percentage of Value Added, 2002-2005
[Percent]
2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

Gross dom estic produ ct....................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

100.0
58.2
6.9
34.8

100.0
57.8
6.9
35.3

100.0
56.8
7.0
36.2

100.0
56.5
6.9
36.6

65
66
6/
68

Professional and business services..................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

100.0
71.6
1.9
26.5

100.0
70.3
1.9
27.7

100.0
69.4
1.9
28.7

100.0
69.9
1.9
28.2

5 Private in d u s trie s ..........................................................................
Compensation of employees....................................................
6
7
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies................
Gross operating surplus............................................................
8

100.0
54.3
8.1
37.6

100.0
53.6
8.1
38.3

100.0
52.6
8.2
39.2

100.0
52.3
8.1
39.6

69
70
n
12

Professional, scientific, and technical s e rv ic e s.......
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

100.0
69.4
1.7
29.0

100.0
67.8
1.7
30.4

100.0
66.8
1.7
31.5

100.0
66.6
1.7
31.7

1
2
3
4

9
10
11
12

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and huntin g ......................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................

100.0
38.2
-4 .0
65.8

100.0
31.5
-8 .0
76.4

100.0
27.6
-3 .8
76.2

100.0
34.0
-1 1 .3
77.3

73
74
lb
/b

M anagem ent of com panies and e n te rp ris e s .............
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

100.0
75.9
1.7
22.4

100.0
75.8
1.6
22.6

100.0
75.5
1.6
22.9

100.0
78.2
1.6
20.1

13
14
15
16

Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................

100.0
35.4
11.9
52.7

100.0
27.5
10.3
62.2

100.0
25.1
9.6
65.2

100.0
21.6
8.2
70.2

77
/8
/9
8U

A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

100.0
74.3
2.7
23.0

100.0
72.7
2.6
24.7

100.0
71.5
2.6
25.9

100.0
72.5
2.5
25.0

17
18
19
20

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................

100.0
24.7
16.7
58.6

100.0
23.5
16.9
59.6

100.0
23.0
16.6
60.4

100.0
22.2
16.6
61.2

81

?1
22
?3
24

C o n struction...............................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

100.0
69.0
1.2
29.8

100.0
68.7
1.3
30.0

100.0
65.9
1.3
32.8

100.0
64.0
1.3
34.7

82
83
84

Educational services, health care, and social
assistan ce...............................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

100.0
80.0
1.2
18.8

100.0
79.5
1.2
19.2

100.0
79.1
1.2
19.7

100.0
78.5
1.2
20.3

25
26
?7
?fl
29
30
31
32
33
34
3b
3b

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

100.0
64.6
3.3
32.1
100.0
73.7
1.9
24.4
100.0
52.5
5.1
42.3

100.0
65.4
3.4
31.2
100.0
75.6
2.0
22.4
100.0
51.9
5.2
42.9

100.0
62.9
3.4
33.7
100.0
72.1
2.0
25.9
100.0
50.6
5.2
44.2

100.0
61.7
3.4
35.0
100.0
71.7
2.1
26.2
100.0
48.6
5.1
46.3

8b
86
8/
88

Educational services...........................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

100.0
91.7
1.3
7.0

100.0
90.8
1.3
7.9

100.0
89.4
1.3
9.3

100.0
88.7
1.2
10.1

89
90
91
92

100.0
78.4
1.2
20.4

100.0
78.0
1.2
20.8

100.0
77.7
1.2
21.1

100.0
77.2
1.2
21.7

94
95
96

Health care and social assistance
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s e rv ic e s .........................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

100.0
62.3
11.2
26.5

100.0
62.4
11.5
26.1

100.0
62.3
11.6
26.1

37
38
39
40

W holesale tra d e .........................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................

100.0
54.2
22.4
23.4

100.0
54.1
22.7
23.2

100.0
53.3
22.3
24.4

100.0
52.3
22.0
25.6

97
98
99
100

A rts, entertainm ent, and re c re a tio n .............................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

100.0
58.5
9.7
31.8

100.0
62.7
11.4
25.9
100.0
58.8
9.9
31.2

100.0
59.6
10.3
30.1

100.0
59.3
10.5
30.3

41
42
43
44

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................

100.0
58.7
20.4
20.9

100.0
57.6
20.6
21.8

100.0
57.6
21.2
21.2

100.0
56.8
21.5
21.7

101
102
103
104

Accom m odation and food services...............................
Compensation of employees...........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
Gross operating surplus...................................................

100.0
63.7
11.8
24.5

100.0
64.1
12.0
23.9

100.0
63.4
11.9
24.7

100.0
63.3
12.0
24.7

45
46
47
4H

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................

100.0
67.0
5.2
27.8

100.0
64.5
4.5
31.0

100.0
65.3
5.3
29.4

100.0
65.2
5.4
29.3

105
106
107
108

Other services, except governm ent....................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

100.0
70.0
6.6
23.4

100.0
69.6
6.7
23.7

100.0
70.6
6.9
22.6

100.0
70.5
7.2
22.4

49
50
51
52

Inform ation..................................................................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................

100.0
47.2
7.9
45.0

100.0
46.1
7.9
46.0

100.0
44.4
7.7
47.9

100.0
43.2
7.6
49.1

109 G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................
110
111
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.................
Gross operating surplus............................................................
112

100.0
85 1
-1 .0
15.9

100.0
85.5
-1 .0
15.5

100.0
85.8
-1 .0
15.1

100.0
85.8
-0 .9
15.1

53
54
hh
56

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............
Gross operating surplus.......................................................

100.0
24.8
9.9
65.2

100.0
24.9
10.1
64.9

100.0
24.8
10.2
64.9

100.0
25.2
10.4
64.4

100.0
62.9
2.9
34.2

100.0
61.8
2.8
35.5

100.0
57.1
2.6
40.3

Compensation of employees..........................................

100.0
54.5
4.1
41.5

100.0
54.6
4.3
41.1

100.0
54.9
4.4
40.7

100.0
56.2
4.5
39.4

100.0
51.8
9.6
38.6

100.0
51.3
9.6
39.0

100.0
58.6
2.9
38.5
100.0
50.9
9.7
39.5

100.0
6.4
13.6
80.0

100.0
6.4
13.8
79.8

100.0
6.4
13.8
79.8

100.0
6.5
13.9
79.6

100.0
79.3
2.0
18.8

100.0
76.8
2.0
21.2

100.0
76.0
2.0
22.0

100.0
73.7
2.0
24.3

57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64

Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......

1. C o n sis ts of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; m ining; construction; and m anufacturing .
2 . C o n s is ts of utilities; w h o le s ale trade; retail trade; transp ortation and w arehous ing; inform ation; finance, insuran ce,
real es ta te, rental, an d leasing; professional an d business services; education al services, health care, an d social assis-




93

Addenda:
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124

Private goods-producing in d u s tries1................................
Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............

Compensation of employees...............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............

100.0
50.9
9.7
39.4

Inform ation-com m unications-technology-producing

Taxes on production and imports less subsidies............

tance; arts, e n tertain m en t, recreation, acco m m o d atio n , and food services; an d o th er services, exc ep t g o vernm ent.
3. Consists of c o m p u te r an d electronic products; publishing industries (includes softw are); inform ation a nd d a ta
processing services; and c o m p u te r system s design and related services.

Annual Industry Accounts

60

December 2006

Table 5. Chain-Type Quantity Indexes for Value Added by Industry, 2002-2005
[2 0 0 0 = 1 0 0 ]

2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

Gross dom estic pro d u ct....................................................

102.362

104.931

109.031

112.546

50

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....

104.800

107.288

111.875

115.182

? Private in d u s trie s..........................................................................

102.354

105.068

109.521

113.170

Finance and in s u ra n c e .......................................................

106.681

110.451

112.761

115.264

3
4
5

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and h u ntin g ......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities.............................

98.767
98.001
100.779

106.173
106.220
105.604

112.686
114.112
107.104

112.854
115.266
103.799

51
52

6
7
8
y

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and g as....................................................
Support activities for mining................................................

88.719
101.200
89.524
51.999

87.922
96.444
88.856
59.752

88.683
95.284
87.146
68.037

86.395
90.894
84.209
72.801

related activities............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................

119.480
101.216
94.323
77.322

124.986
106.235
94.204
90.815

124.524
122.313
99.299
111.960

5fi
57
58

Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets...............................................................................

103.647
104.363

105.363
106.455

120.707
112.922
102.036
104.570
111.320
113.264

96.292

93.965

90.892

87.706

59

Professional and business s e rv ic e s .................................

99.192

103.554

108.925

115.018

60
61
fi?
63

Professional, scientific, and technical serv ices.......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................
M anagem ent of com panies and en te rp ris e s .............
A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent services . ..
Administrative and support services............................
Waste management and remediation services.........
Educational services, health care, and social
assistance...............................................................................
Educational s e rv ic e s ..........................................................
Health care and social assistan ce.................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................

99.059
97.383
101.473

102.990
99.233
101.202

111.032
102.717
109.517

118.637
103.559
117.751

98.929
101.080
98.359
98.455
97.378

104.786
103.913
104.653
104.627
104.886

114.428
106.716
105.529
105.869
102.196

124.483
108.256
111.100
111.193
110.233

107.527
102.438
108.213
111.543
102.961
113.301

112.257
106.056
113.098
116.708
107.040
120.473

115.926
108.546
116.934
121.199
109.629
126.786

119.964
110.614
121.257
128.313
110.247
134.069

101.022

108.798

1

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

99.144

105.990

108.540

109.837

11

C on stru ctio n ...............................................................................

98.201

96.189

97.632

101.466

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
?1
22
23
24
2b
26
2/
28
29
3(1
31
3?
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods...................
Wood products.............
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary m etals.............
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M achinery.....................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

97.066
95.663
96.460
99.537
91.555
85.780
85.370
100.104
96.557
107.964
99.673
89.240
98.033
99.056
99.273
80.804
84.306
91.440
88.804
123.795
108.549
94.224

98.168
98.169
96.772
98.862
87.803
85.920
83.825
115.626
99.088
115.974
86.057
96.036
102.764
98.265
97.825
89.144
73.793
93.728
88.675
116.921
107.961
94.352

104.520
105.680
99.900
106.227
101.146
93.329
95.831
139.281
92.303
109.035
88.447
108.940
112.465
103.108
94.220
88.754
70.641
101.253
92.357
145.045
116.870
102.090

106.794
110.832
103.211
105.791
100.146
97.852
99.733
167.012
94.002
105.905
91.844
106.339
121.842
101.801
98.737
90.869
70.719
103.421
93.595
114.209
114.904
100.519

34

W holesale tra d e .........................................................................

108.059

110.380

111.634

113.262

3b

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

109.294

113.559

116.429

122.274

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation.....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

99.531
108.822
95.762
77.875
94.279
101.126
110.255
100.515
102.642

101.534
116.462
100.567
74.154
95.731
99.030
106.567
100.086
107.894

106.860
123.300
105.446
81.652
103.161
98.937
106.219
102.626
115.088

111.117
130.998
101.721
91.479
107.877
99.930
127.013
103.923
125.958

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes softw are).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications..............................
Information and data processing services........................

106.263
98.873
110.050
107.565
115.749

109.430
106.069
111.123
108.505
123.142

121.914
119.376
112.806
121.266
141.024

132.868
134.758
114.080
130.231
160.509

53
54
55

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




64
bb
66
6/
68
69
70
71
72
73

115.115
117.726

74

A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s erv ices.........................................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, and recre atio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...

106.783

104.138
108.824

107.313

lb
/6

109.352

108.914

107.344
106.309

109.798
108.003

111.171
107.809

109.830
108.160

A ccom m odation and food s e rv ic e s ..............................
78
79
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................
80
81
O ther services, except g o v e rn m e n t..................................
82 G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................
F e d e ra l..........................................................................................
83
84
General government..............................................................
85
Government enterprises.......................................................
86
State and lo ca l............................................................................
87
General government..............................................................
88
Government enterprises.......................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries’ ......................................
89
Private services-producing industries2..................................
90
91
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3................................................................................

99.059
95.600
100.886
98.667
102.467
100.322
102.518
89.779
103.451
104.360
93.792

102.544
96.082
105.865
100.615
103.776
102.763
105.250
90.788
104.230
104.997
96.116

106.635
99.720
110.187
100.126
104.302
103.722
106.265
91.462
104.552
105.491
94.522

108.783
100.417
113.085
99.437
104.994
103.558
106.947
86.647
105.652
106.536
96.243

96.853
104.107

97.402
107.496

102.125
111.866

104.243
116.007

101.626

108.915

123.840

140.347

U

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

December 2006

61

Survey of Current Business

Table 5.A Percent Changes in Chain-Type Quantity Indexes for Value Added by Industry, 2002-2005
2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

Gross dom estic pro d u ct....................................................

1.6

2.5

3.9

3.2

50

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....

0.9

2.4

4.3

3.0

2 Private in d u s trie s ...........................................................................

1.4

2.7

4.2

3.3

3.5

2.1

2.2

A griculture, forestry, fishin g, and huntin g.......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

5.5
6.8
1.5

7.5
8.4
4.8

6.1
7.4
1.4

0.1
1.0
-3.1

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and gas....................................................
Support activities for mining................................................

-6 .3
5.5
-6 .2
-40.1

-0 .9
-4 .7
-0 .7
14.9

0.9
-1 .2
-1 .9
13.9

-2 .6
-4 .6
-3 .4
7.0

Finance and in s u ra n c e ......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments....
Insurance carriers and related activities.......................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets...............................................................................

2.2

3
4
5

51
52

10.2
-8 .9
-1 .8
-4 .7
0.1
0.3

4.6
5.0
-0 .1
17.5
1.7
2.0

-3 .4
6.3
8.3
15.1
5.7
6.4

3.2
8.3
- 2 .7
7.1
3.4
3.9

-2 .3

-2 .4

Professional and business services..................................

-0 .2

4.4

-3 .3
5.2

-3 .5

59
60
61
62
63

Professional, scientific, and technical s erv ices.......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................
M anagem ent o f com panies and e n te rp ris e s.............
Adm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Administrative and support services............................
Waste management and remediation services..........

-1 .5
-3 .7
1.9

4.0
1.9
- 0 .3

7.8
3.5
8.2

6.8
0.8
7.5

- 1 .7
3.0
1.2
1.2
1.2

5.9
2.8
6.4
6.3
7.7

9.2
2.7
0.8
1.2
-2 .6

8.8
1.4
5.3
5.0
7.9

4.2
2.6
4.4
5.4
2.4
7.5

4.4
3.5
4.5
4.6
4.0
6.3

3.3
2.3
3.4
3.8
2.4
5.2

3.5
1.9
3.7
5.9
0.6
5.7

1

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

4.3

6.9

2.4

1.2

11

C on stru ctio n ...............................................................................

-2 .0

-2 .0

1.5

3.9

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods
Wood products
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary metals
Fabricated metal products...............................................
Machinery
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products..........................................

2.8
1.7
-1 .8
0.8
2.2
-4 .6
-7.1
2.1
0.7
21.9
-1 .5
0.4
2.0
4.2
-1 .5
-0 .8
-7 .0
4.2
-3 .9
35.7
11.4
2.4

1.1
2.6
0.3
-0 .7
-4 .1
0.2
-1 .8
15.5
2.6
7.4
-1 3 .7
7.6
4.8
-0 .8
-1 .5
10.3
-1 2 .5
2.5
-0 .1
- 5 .6
-0 .5
0.1

6.5
7.7
3.2
7.4
15.2
8.6
14.3
20.5
-6 .8
-6 .0
2.8
13.4
9.4
4.9
-3 .7
-0 .4
-4 .3
8.0
4.2
24.1
8.3
8.2

2.2
4.9
3.3
- 0 .4
- 1 .0
4.8
4.1
19.9
1.8
-2 .9
3.8
-2 .4
8.3
-1 .3
4.8
2.4
0.1
2.1
1.3
-2 1 .3
-1 .7
- 1 .5

34

W holesale tra d e .........................................................................

1.0

2.1

1.1

1.5

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

2.2

3.9

2.5

5.0

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation.....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

2.2
10.1
-1 .3
-1 7 .8
-0 .5
1.0
15.3
1.7
5.1

2.0
7.0
5.0
-4 .8
1.5
-2 .1
-3 .3
- 0 .4
5.1

5.2
5.9
4.9
10.1
7.8
-0 .1
-0 .3
2.5
6.7

4.0
6.2
-3 .5
12.0
4.6
1.0
19.6
1.3
9.4

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes software).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications............................
Information and data processing services........................

2.1
-0 .2
12.3
0.9
8.7

3.0
7.3
1.0
0.9
6.4

11.4
12.5
1.5
11.8
14.5

9.0
12.9
1.1
7.4
13.8

53
54
55
56
57
58

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73

Educational services, health care, and social
assistan ce...............................................................................
Educational s e rv ic e s ..........................................................
Health care and social a s sistan ce.................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................

74

A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s e rv ic e s ..........................................................................

75
76

A rts, entertainm ent, and re c re a tio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities.............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...

77

78
Accom m odation and food services...............................
79
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................
80
O ther services, except g o v e rn m e n t..................................
81
82 G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................
83
Federal...........................................................................................
84
General government...............................................................
Government enterprises........................................................
85
86
State and lo c a l............................................................................
87
General government...............................................................
88
Government enterprises........................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1 ......................................
89
90
Private services-producing industries2..................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
91
industries3................................................................................

5.6

1.7

3.1

3.0

1.4

3.5

1.9

0.5

-0 .4

5.7
1.8

2.3
1.6

1.3
-0 .2

-1 .2
0.3

1.1
1.5
0.9
0.3
1.7
2.0
2.0
2.2

3.5
0.5
4.9
2.0
1.3
2.4
2.7
1.1

1.5
1.9
-3 .1

0.8
0.6
2.5

4.0
3.8
4.1
-0 .5
0.5
0.9
1.0
0.7
0.3
0.5
-1 .7

2.0
0.7
2.6
-0 .7
0.7
-0 .2
0.6
-5 .3
1.1
1.0
1.8

1.3
1.5

0.6
3.3

4.8
4.1

2.1
3.7

2.0

7.2

13.7

13.3

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

62

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 6. Real Value Added by Industry, 2002-2005
[Billions ot chained (2 0 0 0 ) dollars]
2002

2003

2004

2005

Gross dom estic pro d u ct....................................................

10,048.8

10,301.0

10,703.5

11,048.6

Line
1

? Private in d u s trie s ...........................................................................

8,817.1

9,050.9

9,434.5

9,748.8

3
4
b

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and h untin g.......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

96.8
70.1
26.7

104.1
76.0
28.0

110.5
81.6
28.4

110.6
82.4
27.5

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction....
Mining, except oil and g a s....................................................
Support activities for mining.................................................

107.6
82.0
24.2
6.9

106.7
78.1
24.0
8.0

107.6
77.2
23.5
9.1

104.8
73.6
22.7
9.7

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

187.7

200.6

205.5

207.9

11

C o n stru ctio n ...............................................................................

428.1

419.3

425.6

442.3

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
21
22
?3
?4
?fi
71
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods..........................................................................
Wood products....................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary m etals....................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M achinery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing
Nondurable goods........................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products....................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products.............................................................
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

1,384.4
827.7
30.3
45.5
44.1
104.4
93.3
185.8
48.8
127.5
64.2
29.2
56.4
555.7
153.7
21.4
21.1
50.8
43.5
32.5
170.5
62.9

1,400.1
849.4
30.4
45.2
42.3
104.6
91.6
214.6
50.1
137.0
55.5
31.4
59.1
551.2
151.4
23.6
18.5
52.1
43.5
30.7
169.6
63.0

1,490.7
914.4
31.4
48.6
48.7
113.6
104.7
258.5
46.7
128.8
57.0
35.6
64.7
578.4
145.9
23.5
17.7
56.3
45.3
38.1
183.6
68.1

1,523.1
959.0
32.4
48.4
48.3
119.1
109.0
309.9
47.5
125.1
59.2
34.8
70.1
571.1
152.9
24.0
17.7
57.5
45.9
30.0
180.5
67.1

34

W holesale tra d e ..........................................................................

639.4

653.1

660.5

670.2

3b

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

724.0

752.2

771.3

810.0

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation.....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

300.2
62.8
24.4
5.6
87.5
14.6
9.6
70.6
25.6

306.2
67.2
25.7
5.4
88.9
14.3
9.3
70.3
26.9

322.3
71.1
26.9
5.9
95.8
14.3
9.3
72.1
28.7

335.2
75.6
26.0
6.6
100.1
14.4
11.1
73.0
31.5

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes softw are).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications..............................
Information and data processing services........................

487.0
115.4
35.8
291.8
43.7

501.5
123.8
36.1
294.4
46.5

558.7
139.4
36.7
329.0
53.2

608.9
157.3
37.1
353.3
60.6

1. C h a in e d (2 0 0 0 ) d o lla r s e rie s a r e c alcu lated as th e product of th e ch ain -typ e quantity index an d the 2 0 0 0 currentd ollar va lu e of the co rrespondin g se rie s, divided by 1 0 0 . B e c a u s e th e form ula for th e ch ain -typ e q u antity indexes uses
w eig h ts of m o re th a n o n e period , th e correspondin g c h ain ed -d o llar estim a te s a re usually not additive. T h e va lu e of not
a llo c ated by industry reflects th e differe n ce b e tw e e n th e first line and th e sum of th e m ost detailed lines, as w ell as the
d ifferences in s o u rc e d a ta us ed to es tim a te G D P by industry an d the e x p en d itu res m e a s u re of real GDP.
2 . C onsists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; m ining; construction; an d m anufacturing .




2002

Line
50
51
W
53
54
55
56
57
58
SM
60
61
62
63
64
65
fifi
67
68
69
/U
/1
n
/3
/4
75
76
77
78
/9
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leas in g .....
Finance and insurance........................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities..............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments....
Insurance carriers and related activities.......................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles...................
Real estate and rental and leasing.................................
Real e s ta te ...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets................................................................................
Professional and business se rv ic e s ...................................
Professional, scientific, and technical s e rv ic e s .......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services........
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................
M anagem ent of com panies and en terp rises..............
A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent serv ices.....
Administrative and support services..............................
Waste management and remediation services.........

Educational serv ices...........................................................
Health care and social a s s is ta n c e .................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance................................................................
Arts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food services...........................................................................
Arts, entertainm ent, and recre ation...............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities..............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries....
Accom m odation and food s erv ices...............................
Accommodation...................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................
O ther services, except g o ve rnm ent....................................
G overnm ent.......................................................................................
F ed e ral............................................................................................
General government...............................................................
Government enterprises........................................................
State and lo c a l........
General government...............................................................
Government enterprises........................................................
Not allocated by in d u s try1 ..........................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries2.......................................
Private services-producing industries3...................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries4..................................................................................

2003

2004

2005

2,023.6
790.0

2,071.7
817.9

2,160.3
835.0

2,224.1
853.5

381.2
169.8
224.7
12.0
1,233.9
1,129.3

398.7
178.2
224.5
14.1
1,254.3
1,152.0

385.1
189.4
243.1
16.2
1,325.2
1,225.7

397.3
205.1
236.6
17.3
1,370.4
1,273.9

104.3
1,131.6
668.8
132.6
127.6

101.8
1,181.4
695.3
135.1
127.3

98.5
1,242.7
749.6
139.8
137.7

95.0
1,312.2
800.9
141.0
148.1

408.8
185.3
277.7
253.2
24.5

433.0
190.5
295.5
269.1
26.4

472.9
195.7
298.0
272.3
25.7

514.4
198.5
313.7
286.0
27.7

729 5
81.2
648.4
343.1
245.6
60.1

761.6
84.0
677.7
359.0
255.3
63.9

786 5
86.0
700.7
372.8
261.5
67.2

813 9
87.6
726.6
394.7
263.0
71.1

353.7
94.7

364.6
96.5

375.7
97.0

380.9
96.6

43.0
51.7
259.0
86.7
172.3
226.1
1,232.4
380.0
323.3
56.9
852.4
787.1
65.4
-9 .4

43.9
52.6
268.1
87.1
180.8
230.5
1,248.1
389.2
331.9
57.5
858.8
791.9
67.0
-1 7 .2

44.5
52.5
278.8
90.4
188.2
229.4
1,254.4
392.8
335.1
58.0
861.4
795.6
65.9
-2 7 .2

43.9
52.6
284.4
91.1
193.1
227.8
1,262.7
392.2
337.3
54.9
870.5
803.5
67.1
-5 2 .3

2,016.0
6,801.1

2,027.4
7,022.5

2,125.7
7,308.0

2,169.8
7,578.5

473.4

507.3

576.8

653.7

3. C onsists of utilities; w h o le s a le trade; retail trade; transp ortation a n d w arehousing; inform ation; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, an d leasing; professional and b u siness services; ed u catio n al services, he a lth ca re, a nd social a s sis ­
tance; arts, e n tertain m en t, recre atio n , a c co m m o d atio n , an d food services; an d o th e r s erv ice s, e x c ep t g o vernm ent.
4. C onsists of c o m p u te r an d electronic products; publishing industries (includes s oftw are); inform ation and d ata
processing services; an d c o m p u te r system s design an d related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

63

Table 7. Chain-Type Price Indexes for Value Added by Industry, 2002-2005
[200 0=1 00]
Line
1

2002

2003

2004

G ross dom estic pro d u ct....................................................

104.187

106.404

109.426

2005
112.737

? Private in d u s trie s ..........................................................................

103.563

105.431

108.342

111.729

3
4
fa

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and h u ntin g......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

98.587
101.031
92.226

109.909
116.180
93.342

128.552
140.433
96.455

111.283
116.270
99.062

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and gas....................................................
Support activities for mining.................................................

98.966
76.565
111.048
244.070

134.369
120.109
113.569
279.377

159.923
150.771
124.365
291.444

222.586
216.774
138.669
434.466

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

110.474

109.643

114.464

119.278

11

C o n stru ctio n ...............................................................................

112.663

118.343

127.126

138.166

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
21
22
n
?4
P
?fi
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................
Wood products...................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary m etals...................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M achinery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products............
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

97.707
93.602
100.319
100.900
95.060
102.894
103.450
66.836
99.890
93.232
108.429
106.400
106.466
103.995
112.490
102.680
99.019
98.969
104.918
80.770
102.275
104.230

97.088
90.861
105.524
99.805
90.635
101.675
102.903
57.793
97.376
90.598
112.439
106.466
106.469
106.588
110.894
97.987
98.771
96.551
104.121
127.561
105.853
101.708

96.250
89.634
121.812
101.887
111.353
104.265
99.630
50.117
97.911
85.287
115.220
102.886
104.227
106.358
107.059
99.797
96.516
93.715
102.578
141.311
108.111
98.449

99.304
89.082
120.074
110.171
126.513
109.598
101.906
43.660
100.582
76.285
120.136
106.603
103.658
115.265
114.929
99.204
95.027
94.893
102.327
211.694
115.944
100.887

34

W holesale trad e.........................................................................

96.246

97.535

104.183

110.898

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

99.390

99.899

101.285

101.673

36
3/
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation .................................................................
Rail transportation...,
Water transportation.
Truck transportation..
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

101.449
77.009
107.129
123.722
109.303
107.278
119.834
103.955
104.718

103.372
77.010
109.364
163.183
110.694
112.214
106.109
107.313
105.112

102.410
63.172
112.232
153.155
112.759
116.111
103.691
113.312
104.619

102.829
54.257
124.260
136.734
113.978
118.478
84.205
122.048
103.957

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes software).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications............................
Information and data processing services........................

99.173
103.097
108.634
95.588
105.642

97.520
99.781
105.919
94.416
106.103

94.720
95.902
108.879
91.617
101.878

91.177
95.510
109.189
86.066
99.638

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




2002

Line
50
51
fa2
53
54
55
56
57
58
f>9
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
/U
/1
/2
n
/4

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing. ..
Finance and in su ran ce.......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
asse ts..............................................................................
Professional and business s e rv ic e s .................................
Professional, scientific, and technical s e rv ic e s ......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services...........................................................................
Managem ent of com panies and en terp rises.............
A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent services ...
Administrative and support services............................
Waste management and remediation services.........
Educational services, health care, and social

2003

2004

2005

105.843
104.148

108.348
105.716

111.500
109.855

114.026
112.206

109.516
87.415
105.652
162.482
106.911
107.664

111.606
81.881
113.608
133.123
110.021
110.613

115.427
82.773
121.606
125.846
112.540
113.106

119.496
81.599
125.168
112.177
115.176
115.591

98.985
105.068
105.451
109.949
99.786

103.889
105.716
105.439
114.162
97.703

106.736
108.347
106.037
120.956
95.205

111.360
111.171
107.886
128.296
95.064

105.705
99.172
108.000
107.906
108.979

104.976
102.611
108.389
108.097
111.397

104.599
107.606
114.430
113.898
119.907

105.456
113.771
117.568
117.678
116.338

109.605
114.903
108.928
105.441
114.453
105.510

112.562
119.108
111.730
107.424
118.997
105.893

116.297
125.826
115.095
109.771
124.700
105.682

119.839
132.093
118.305
111.963
130.116
106.104

107.862
108.130

109.395
111.075

112.837
114.250

116.725
118.132

108.802
107.586

112.848
109.614

117.211
111.791

122.832
114.209

77

Educational s e rv ic e s ..........................................................
Health care and social assistance.................................
Ambulatory health care services...................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s erv ices.........................................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, and recre atio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...

78
79
80

Accom m odation and food s e rv ic e s ..............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking p laces...............................

107.774
102.789
110.291

108.796
104.100
111.171

112.331
109.631
113.749

116.221
114.928
116.975

81

75
76

O ther services, except g o ve rn m en t...................................

111.706

115.076

119.506

124.127

82 G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................

108.608

113.648

118.854

123.827

83
84
8b

F e d e ra l..........................................................................................
General government..............................................................
Government enterprises......................................................

109.831
109.147
113.255

115.255
115.672
112.350

121.771
122.817
115.212

127.172
129.479
113.088

86
87
88

State and loca l............................................................................
General government..............................................................
Government enterprises......................................................

108.065
107.855
110.385

112.932
113.166
109.954

117.542
117.747
114.903

122.323
122.735
117.176

89
90
91

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1......................................
Private services-producing industries2 .................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3................................................................................

101.037
104.311

104.235
105.790

107.724
108.534

114.298
111.000

88.014

83.025

77.754

74.447

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

64

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 7.A Percent Changes in Chain-Type Price Indexes for Value Added by Industry, 2002-2005
Line
1

2002

2003

2004

2005

Gross dom estic p ro d u ct....................................................

1.7

2.1

2.8

3.0

? Private in d u s trie s ...........................................................................

1.5

1.8

2.8

3.1

3
4
b

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and h u n tin g .......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

-7 .5
-9 .4
-2 .0

11.5
15.0
1.2

17.0
20.9
3.3

-1 3 .4
-1 7 .2
2.7

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and gas....................................................
Support activities for mining.................................................

-4 .2
-1 8 .0
5.6
47.7

35.8
56.9
2.3
14.5

19.0
25.5
9.5
4.3

39.2
43.8
11.5
49.1

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

-1 .7

-0 .8

4.4

4.2

11

C o n stru ctio n ................................................................................

4.8

5.0

7.4

8.7

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
26
2/
28
29
mi
31
3?
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods..........................................................................
Wood products....................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products..........................................
Primary m etals....................................................................
Fabricated metal products................................................
M achinery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing..........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products....................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

-1 .9
-2 .2
- 1 .0
1.6
-0.1
0.5
0.7
-1 1 .2
-1 .5
-6 .0
2.2
2.4
2.8
-1 .4
5.0
-2 .6
-1 .3
-1 .4
1.3
-42.1
-0 .4
1.0

- 0 .6
- 2 .9
5.2
-1 .1
- 4 .7
- 1 .2
- 0 .5
-1 3 .5
- 2 .5
- 2 .8
3.7
0.1
0.0
2.5
-1 .4
-4 .6
-0 .3
- 2 .4
- 0 .8
57.9
3.5
-2 .4

-0 .9
-1 .4
15.4
2.1
22.9
2.5
-3 .2
-1 3 .3
0.5
-5 .9
2.5
-3 .4
-2.1
-0 .2
-3 .5
1.8
-2 .3
-2 .9
-1 .5
10.8
2.1
-3 .2

3.2
-0 .6
-1 .4
8.1
13.6
5.1
2.3
-1 2 .9
2.7
-1 0 .6
4.3
3.6
-0 .5
8.4
7.4
-0 .6
-1 .5
1.3
- 0 .2
49.8
7.2
2.5

34

W holesale tra d e ..........................................................................

0.4

1.3

6.8

6.4

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

1.8

0.5

1.4

0.4

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing ........................................
Air transportation.....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities......................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

0.3
-12.1
3.8
14.1
3.0
3.0
9.0
1.1
1.8

1.9
0.0
2.1
31.9
1.3
4.6
-1 1 .5
3.2
0.4

-0 .9
-1 8 .0
2.6
-6.1
1.9
3.5
-2 .3
5.6
-0 .5

0.4
-14.1
10.7
-1 0 .7
1.1
2.0
-1 8 .8
7.7
-0 .6

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes softw are).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications..............................
Information and data processing services........................

-0 .9
0.5
3.2
-2 .4
2.3

- 1 .7
-3 .2
-2 .5
-1 .2
0.4

-2 .9
-3 .9
2.8
-3 .0
-4 .0

-3 .7
-0 .4
0.3
-6.1
-2 .2

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




Line
50
51

53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63

2002
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing. ..
Finance and in su ran ce.......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities.............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
a ssets..............................................................................
Professional and business s e rv ic e s .................................
Professional, scientific, and technical serv ices.......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................

2003

2004

2005

3.1
2.8

2.4
1.5

2.9
3.9

2.3
2.1

5.2
-4 .3
3.2
13.7
3.2
3.6

1.9
-6 .3
7.5
-18.1
2.9
2.7

3.4
1.1
7.0
-5 .5
2.3
2.3

3.5
-1 .4
2.9
-1 0 .9
2.3
2.2

-1 .1
2.1
2.5
4.0
-1 .6

5.0
0.6
0.0
3.8
-2 .1

2.7
2.5
0.6
6.0
-2 .6

4.3
2.6
1.7
6.1
-0 .1
0.8

3.2

-0 .7

-0 .4

64

M anagem ent of com panies and e n te rp ris e s .............

0.4

3.5

4.9

5.7

65
66
67
68

A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent services....
Administrative and support services.............................
Waste management and remediation services
Educational services, health care, and social
assistance...............................................................................
Educational s e rv ic e s ..........................................................

2.4
2.2
4.1

0.4
0.2
2.2

5.6
5.4
7.6

2.7
3.3
-3 .0

3.8
6.8

2.7
3.7

3.3
5.6

3.0
5.0

3.4
1.5
6.4
1.5

2.6
1.9
4.0
0.4

3.0
2.2
4.8
-0 .2

2.8
2.0
4.3
0.4

69
70
71
72
73

Health care and social assistance.................................

74

A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s erv ices..........................................................................

75
/b

A rts, entertainm ent, and recre atio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities.............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries ...
Accom m odation and food s e rv ic e s ..............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking p lac es ...............................
O ther services, except g o ve rn m en t...................................
G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................

U
78
79
80
81
82

Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................

F e d e ra l..........................................................................................
General government..............................................................
Government enterprises.......................................................
State and loca l............................................................................
General government..............................................................
Government enterprises.......................................................
Addenda:
89
Private goods-producing industries1......................................
Private services-producing industries2 .................................
90
91
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3.................................................................................
83
84
85
8fi
87
88

3.7

1.4

3.1

3.4

3.4

2.7

2.9

3.4

3.5
3.3
3.9
0.3
5.6
4.2
4.6

3.7
1.9
0.9
1.3
0.8
3.0
4.6

3.9
2.0
3.2
5.3
2.3
3.8
4.6

4.8
2.2
3.5
4.8
2.8
3.9
4.2

6.1
6.3
5.1
4.0
4.0
3.7

4.9
6.0
-0 .8
4.5
4.9
-0 .4

5.7
6.2
2.5
4.1
4.0
4.5

4.4
5.4
-1 .8
4.1
4.2
2.0

—
0.8
2.2

3.2
1.4

3.3
2.6

6.1
2.3

-3 .7

-5 .7

-6 .3

-4 .3

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

December

2006

Survey

of

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

65

Table 8. Gross Output by Industry, 2002-2005
[Billions of dollars]
Line

2002

2003

2004

2005

2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

All in d u s trie s .........................................................................

18,788.4

19,757.5

21,306.9

22,857.1

50

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing. ..

3,198.6

3,382.4

3,713.2

3,990.9

? Private in d u s trie s ..........................................................................

16,632.9

17,457.3

18,859.3

20,256.0

51
52

Finance and in su ran ce.......................................................

1,349.2

1,432.5

1,574.0

1,690.3

related activities............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................

580.8
236.9
458.9
72.6
1,849.5
1,651.3

615.0
245.6
498.7
73.3
1,949.9
1,732.0

644.7
273.8
569.6
86.0
2,139.2
1,910.0

682.9
320.7
593.0
93.7
2,300.6
2,053.1

198.2
1,916.4
1,130.4
202.6
164.7

217.9
2,004.5
1,184.2
223.7
164.4

229.2
2,164.3
1,273.3
234.4
167.7

247.5
2,318.5
1,359.3
245.3
180.4

763.0
290.7

796.1
303.8

871.2
337.8

933.6
368.0

495.4
443.3
52.1

516.5
461.0
55.4

553.2
493.3
59.9

591.2
525.2
66.0

1,296.9
160.6
1,136.3
524.7
507.0
104.6

1,387.6
172.7
1,214.9
563.7
540.5
110.7

1,474.5
181.4
1,293.1
606.3
571.7
115.1

1,578.0
192.1
1,385.9
649.4
615.7
120.8

683.8
163.2

721.3
171.4

770.9
178.9

815.4
182.8

75.4
87.8
520.6
134.0
386.6
460.2

79.1
92.3
549.9
142.7
407.2
480.7

80.3
98.6
591.9
158.2
433.8
505.5

81.7
101.1
632.6
170.8
461.9
522.3

2,155.5
683.7
600.9
82.9

2,300.2

2,447.6

2,601.1

758.9
672.6
86.2

824.8
734.9
89.9

872.3
781.9
90.4

1,471.8
1,301.8
169.9

1,541.3
1,363.1
178.2

1,622.8
1,437.1
185.7

1,728.9
1,531.9
196.9

5,206.5
11,426.4

5,453.9
12,003.4

5,896.7
12,962.6

6,385.5
13,870.5

856.0

860.2

898.0

948.0

1
3
4
5

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and h u ntin g.......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

249.8
202.0
47.7

279.6
227.7
51.9

319.5
260.8
58.7

312.4
253.2
59.2

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and gas....................................................
Support activities for mining................................................

200.2
111.5
49.4
39.2

259.9
159.4
50.2
50.3

307.1
190.5
56.3
60.3

396.3
248.5
64.4
83.4

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

328.0

355.7

372.9

410.0

11

C o n stru ctio n ...............................................................................

906.9

956.8

1,063.0

1,175.0

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
?1
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Wood products...................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary m etals...................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M achinery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products..........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

3,849.7
2,084.5
88.0
94.0
138.6
242.7
239.9
351.9
100.7
463.5
163.6
74.4
127.3
1,765.2
572.2
74.6
46.2
151.4
95.2
212.5
443.7
169.5

3,957.6
2,114.9
90.4
95.9
135.1
240.2
246.7
351.0
97.2
487.0
165.5
73.6
132.3
1,842.7
599.5
72.4
39.3
148.1
91.8
242.8
474.3
174.5

4,207.1
2,221.6
102.5
101.2
176.0
252.9
259.6
361.4
100.8
489.2
166.8
78.2
133.1
1,985.5
631.9
71.4
35.0
150.8
92.7
308.2
516.6
178.8

4,501.8
2,364.1
105.0
111.8
193.5
270.9
287.4
381.3
109.3
482.9
191.9
85.4
144.7
2,137.7
658.8
68.6
35.8
155.2
89.6
397.6
539.3
192.9

34

W holesale tra d e .........................................................................

874.0

902.3

995.1

1,073.6

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

1,080.4

1,138.9

1,223.3

1,288.7

36
3/
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

576.1
104.6
44.2
28.1
205.6
25.7
31.9
99.1
36.8

598.5
115.5
46.7
31.3
204.3
27.0
31.5
103.1
39.0

648.4
126.3
51.2
34.2
225.6
27.8
32.1
111.3
39.9

712.1
135.1
57.6
35.8
250.6
28.7
39.1
121.4
44.0

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes software).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications............................
Information and data processing services........................

1,011.9
241.1
83.8
588.7
98.3

1,031.5
242.8
84.1
602.6
102.0

1,094.7
255.4
86.0
639.8
113.5

1,161.1
268.2
87.0
687.8
118.2

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




53
54
55
56
57
58
HH
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81

Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
asse ts..............................................................................
Professional and business s e rv ic e s .................................
Professional, scientific, and technical s e rv ic e s ......
Legal services.....................................................................
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services...........................................................................
M anagem ent o f com panies and en terp rises.............
A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent serv ic e s ....
Administrative and support services............................
W aste management and remediation services.........
Educational services, health care, and social
assistance...............................................................................
Educational s e rv ic e s ..........................................................
Health care and social assistance.................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s erv ices.........................................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, and rec re a tio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...
Accom m odation and food s e rv ic e s ..............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking p laces...............................
O ther services, except g o ve rn m en t..................................

82 G ove rnm ent.....................................................................................
F e d e ra l..........................................................................................
General government..............................................................
Government enterprises.......................................................
State and local............................................................................
General government.............................................................
Government enterprises......................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1......................................
89
90
Private services-producing industries2 .................................
91
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3................................................................................

83
84
8b
86
87
88

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

Annual Industry Accounts

66

December 2006

Table 9. Intermediate Inputs by Industry, 2002-2005
[Billions of dollars]
Line
1

2002

2003

2004

2005

All in d u s trie s .........................................................................

8,318.8

8,796.7

9,594.4

10,401.3

? Private in d u s trie s ...........................................................................

7,501.8

7,915.0

8,637.8

9,363.8

3
4
5

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and h u n tin g .......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

154.3
131.2
23.1

165.2
139.5
25.8

177.6
146.2
31.4

189.3
157.3
32.0

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Mining, except oil and gas....................................................
Support activities for mining.................................................

93.6
48.8
22.6
22.2

116.6
65 6
23.0
28.1

135.0
74 2
27.0
33.8

162.9
88 9
32.8
41.2

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

120.7

135.7

137.7

162.0

11

C o n stru ctio n ...............................................................................

424.6

460.5

521.9

563.9

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
?1
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods..........................................................................
Wood products....................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products..........................................
Primary m etals....................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M ach inery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing..........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products....................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

2,497.1
1,309.8
57.5
48.1
96.6
135.3
143.4
227.7
51.9
344.7
93.9
43.4
67.2
1,187.3
399.3
52.7
25.3
101.0
49.5
186.2
269.3
104.0

2,598.3
1,343.1
58.3
50.7
96.8
133.9
152.5
227.0
48.4
362.9
103.2
40.1
69.4
1,255.1
431.5
49.2
21.1
97.8
46.6
203.7
294.8
110.4

2,772.3
1,402.0
64.2
51.6
121.7
134.5
155.3
231.8
55.1
379.4
101.2
41.5
65.7
1,370.3
475.7
48.0
17.9
98.1
46.2
254.4
318.2
111.7

2,989.3
1,509.8
66.1
58.5
132.5
140.4
176.3
246.0
61.4
387.5
120.8
48.3
72.1
1,479.5
483.1
44.7
19.0
100.6
42.7
334.1
330.0
125.2

34

W holesale tra d e ..........................................................................

258.6

265.3

306.9

330.4

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

360.8

387.4

442.1

465.2

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation.....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities......................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

271.5
56.2
18.0
21.1
109.9
10.1
20.4
25.8
10.0

281.9
63.8
18.7
22.6
105.9
11.0
21.7
27.7
10.6

318.3
81.3
21.0
25.2
117.6
11.2
22.5
29.7
9.8

367.5
94.1
25.3
26.7
136.5
11.6
29.7
32.3
11.3

45
46
4/
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes softw are).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications..............................
Information and data processing services........................

528.9
122.2
44.9
309.7
52.1

542.4
119.2
45.8
324.7
52.7

565.4
121.8
46.0
338.4
59.3

605.9
117.9
46.5
383.7
57.8

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




2002

2003

2004

2005

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....
Finance and in s u ra n c e .......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities.............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets................................................................................
Professional and business s e rv ic e s ..................................
Professional, scientific, and technical serv ices.......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................

1,056.8
526.5

1,137.8
567.9

1,304.6
656.7

1,454.8
732.6

163.4
88.5
221.4
53.2
530.3
435.4

169.9
99.7
243.7
54.6
569.9
457.8

200.2
117.0
273.9
65.6
647.8
523.8

208.2
153.3
296.8
74.2
7 ???
580.5

94.9
727.5
425.1
56.9
37.4

112.1
755.5
451.0
69.5
40.1

124.1
817.9
478.4
65.3
36.6

141.7
859.7
495.2
64.5
39.7

330.9

341.5

376.6

391.1

64

M anagem ent of com panies and e n te rp ris e s .............

106.9

108.3

127.2

142.1

65
66
67

A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Administrative and support services............................
Waste management and remediation services .....
Educational services, health care, and social
assistan ce...............................................................................
Educational s e rv ic e s ..........................................................
Health care and social assistan ce.................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s e rv ic e s ..........................................................................

195.4
170.1
25.4

196.2
170.1
26.0

212.2
183.1
29.1

222.4
188.6
33.8

497.3
67.3
430.0
162.9
225.8
41.2

530.3
72.6
457.7
178.0
236.6
43.1

559.9
73.2
486.7
197.0
245.6
44.1

602.7
76.3
526.4
207.5
273.5
45.4

302.3

Line
50
51
W
53
54
55
Sfi
57
58
h9
60
61
62
63

68
69
70
71
72
73
74

322.4

346.9

370.8

60.8

64.2

68.2

68.7

77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
8b

A rts, entertainm ent, and re c re a tio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities.............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...
Accom m odation and food s e rv ic e s ..............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................
O ther services, except g o v e rn m e n t...................................
G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................
F e d e ra l..........................................................................................
General governm ent..............................................................
Government enterprises.......................................................

28.7
32.2
241.5
44.9
196.6
207.7
817.0
266.4
248.0
18.4

29.5
34.7
258.3
52.0
206.3
215.5
881.7
310.3
288.7
21.6

27.7
41.0
302.1
66.1
236.0
239.5
1,037.5
373.5
345.2
28.3

86
87
88

State and lo ca l............................................................................
General government..............................................................
Government enterprises.......................................................

550.7
452.9
97.8

571.5
466.9
104.5

28.2
40.0
278.8
59.0
219.7
231.4
956.6
346.4
323.4
23.1
610.2
500.3
110.0

89
90
91

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1......................................
Private services-producing industries2...................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3.................................................................................

3,169.7
4,332.1

3,340.6
4,574.3

3,606.8
5,031.0

3,905.4
5,458.4

439.4

439.0

449.5

461.3

75
76

664.1
545.7
118.3

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

67

Table 10. Chain-Type Quantity Indexes for Gross Output by industry, 2002-2005
[200 0=1 00]
2002

Line
1

2003

2004

2005

All in d u s trie s .........................................................................

100.966

103.278

? Private in d u s trie s ..........................................................................

100.268

3
4
5

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and h u ntin g.......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

99.173
98.905
100.325

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction..
Mining, except oil and gas
Support activities for mining

95.266
98.106
97.235
86.949

10

U tilitie s ..............................

99.331

98.965

97.989

96.613

11

C o n stru ctio n ...............................................................................

98.461

100.174

104.736

108.616

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
21
22
?3
?4
?5
?fi
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................
Wood products...................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary m etals...................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M achinery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing
Nondurable goods....................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products......................
Paper products.....................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products
Chemical products..............
Plastics and rubber products

94.757
92.670
95.361
96.641
92.589
91.224
84.093
83.846
83.494
101.019
100.775
98.214
105.523
97.373
98.670
89.651
70.001
95.319
90.444
104.069
100.757
96.433

95.160
94.204
94.768
97.527
88.288
89.586
85.900
88.552
80.876
106.264
99.407
96.090
108.488
96.413
99.531
86.693
59.216
92.257
87.009
97.562
102.601
97.313

96.533
95.932
96.452
99.499
95.520
88.219
88.347
95.241
80.803
105.579
96.744
100.324
107.472
97.376
99.948
84.181
52.579
91.624
87.132
101.452
105.439
97.103

97.522
99.682
98.182
102.693
95.242
89.370
94.093
104.850
83.487
103.902
107.182
105.778
114.308
95.341
101.094
78.294
53.597
90.168
82.711
97.554
100.243
97.711

107.203

110.297

102.588

106.770

110.132

103.032
102.116
107.066

106.093
104.092
115.284

106.960
105.629
112.972

97.938
97.991
95.421
102.694

100.246
97.062
98.850
115.258

99.654
92.453
102.167
126.408

103.373

105.153

109.565

112.136

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

106.723

111.342

116.866

121.240

36
37
38
39
40
41
4?
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation.......................
Rail transportation....................
Water transportation.................
Truck transportation..................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation............
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage......

96.787
99.052
99.442
92.009
92.521
97.922
116.029
94.760
108.366

97.097
105.255
103.132
92.533
89.470
98.518
108.762
95.259
113.065

102.501
118.153
108.611
99.443
95.133
97.306
105.290
97.471
114.881

106.880
121.395
111.985
101.675
100.606
96.713
119.868
98.473
125.033

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation.....................................
Publishing industries (includes softw are).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............

105.591
97.840
102.724
108.362
112.308

107.717
99.791
102.455
110.685
115.929

114.994
106.272
101.916
118.287
130.810

123.469
110.827
101.447
130.338
136.849

34

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




Line
50
51
52

2002

2003

2004

2005

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....
Finance and in s u ra n c e ......................................................

100.138
95.218

103.486
99.331

110.307
105.442

115.628
110.861

related activities............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments....
Insurance carriers and related activities.......................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets...............................................................................
Professional and business services..................................
Professional, scientific, and technical s erv ices.......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................
M anagem ent of com panies and e n te rp ris e s .............
A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Administrative and support services............................
W aste management and remediation services..........
Educational services, health care, and social
assistan ce...............................................................................
Educational serv ices...........................................................
Health care and social assistan ce.................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s e rv ic e s .........................................................................

102.478
77.770
101.409
81.745
104.102
105.122

106.552
82.900
105.080
85.263
106.845
107.426

108.260
91.199
113.778
99.785
114.233
115.471

111.180
106.750
115.452
110.211
119.479
120.816

96.500
101.750
104.726
103.255
95.726

102.591
105.305
109.132
110.440
97.006

105.010
111.015
116.086
110.377
100.594

109.511
115.856
121.679
110.003
108.132

107.360
95.962
98.891
99.152
96.712

111.741
97.547
101.819
102.198
98.678

121.531
104.477
104.158
104.634
100.246

128.479
108.840
107.729
107.859
106.535

109.701
104.639
110.445
111.314
108.820
113.995

113.980
108.114
114.844
117.265
111.588
118.771

117.267
108.624
118.552
122.994
113.424
121.827

121.491
110.009
123.213
128.476
117.434
125.656

101.398

104.661

108.195

110.597

Arts, entertainm ent, and re c re a tio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...
Accom m odation and food services...............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................
O ther services, except governm ent....................................

104.260

106.548

107.973

106.568

106.774
102.207
100.538
94.904
102.712
100.327

108.348
105.085
104.098
99.290
105.964
102.154

106.186
109.508
108.274
105.134
109.513
104.023

103.511
109.178
111.830
108.701
113.066
103.836

82 G o v e rn m e n t.....................................................................................

106.840

109.094

110.956

111.926

83
84
8b

Federal...........................................................................................
General government...............................................................

107.761
110.520
91.188

114.670
118.021
94.495

118.810
122.671
95.460

119.987
124.079
95.150

86
87
88

S tate and lo c a l............................................................................
General government...............................................................

106.418
106.556
105.380

106.540
106.495
106.891

107.357
107.542
105.960

108.232
108.625
105.254

95.573
102.617

96.457
105.646

98.497
110.907

99.879
115.298

92.244

95.453

102.271

109.674

53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
/U
n
ri
/3
74
75
76
77
7fi
79
80
81

89
90
91

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1......................................
Private services-producing industries2..................................
Information-communications-technology-producing

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

Annual Industry Accounts

68

December 2006

Table 10.A Percent Changes in Chain-Type Quantity Indexes for Gross Output by Industry, 2002-2005
2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

All in d u s trie s .........................................................................

1.0

2.3

3.8

2.9

? Private in d u s trie s ...........................................................................

0.7

2.3

4.1

3.1

3
4
5

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and h u n tin g .......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

0.6
0.3
1.4

3.9
3.2
6.7

3.0
1.9
7.7

0.8
1.5
-2 .0

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and gas....................................................
Support activities for mining.................................................

-6 .8
- 2 .0
-2 .2
-2 3 .7

2.8
-0.1
-1 .9
18.1

2.4
-0 .9
3.6
12.2

-0 .6
-4 .7
3.4
9.7

1

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

0.9

-0 .4

-1 .0

C o n stru ctio n ...............................................................................

-1 .9

1.7

4.6

3.7

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
?5
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anufacturing
Durable goods
Wood products
Nonmetallic mineral products..........................................
Primary m etals....................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
Machinery
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipment.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

-0 .3
-1 .2
1.9
-0.1
2.0
-2 .7
-5 .7
-1 1 .6
-7 .6
11.6
- 7 .0
4.4
7.2
0.7
0.3
-0 .8
-1 7 .7
0.4
-4 .9
2.0
4.4
1.4

0.4
1.7
-0 .6
0.9
-4 .6
-1 .8
2.1
5.6
-3.1
5.2
-1 .4
-2 .2
2.8
-1 .0
0.9
- 3 .3
-1 5 .4
-3 .2
-3 .8
- 6 .3
1.8
0.9

1.4
1.8
1.8
2.0
8.2
-1 .5
2.8
7.6
-0.1
- 0 .6
-2 .7
4.4
-0 .9
1.0
0.4
-2 .9
-1 1 .2
-0 .7
0.1
4.0
2.8
-0 .2

1.0
3.9
1.8
3.2
-0 .3
1.3
6.5
10.1
3.3
-1 .6
10.8
5.4
6.4
-2 .1
1.1
-7 .0
1.9
-1 .6
-5 .1
-3 .8
-4 .9
0.6

34

W holesale tra d e .........................................................................

2.3

1.7

4.2

2.3

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

4.2

4.3

5.0

3.7

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation..................
Rail transportation...............
Water transportation............
Truck transportation.............
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

1.0
5.5
- 1 .4
-5 .8
- 1 .4
0.2
15.7
-1 .8
7.2

0.3
6.3
3.7
0.6
- 3 .3
0.6
-6 .3
0.5
4.3

5.6
12.3
5.3
7.5
6.3
-1 .2
-3 .2
2.3
1.6

4.3
2.7
3.1
2.2
5.8
-0 .6
13.8
1.0
8.8

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes software).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications..............................
Information and data processing services........................

1.3
- 0 .9
4.4
1.1
6.1

2.0
2.0
-0 .3
2.1
3.2

6.8
6.5
-0 .5
6.9
12.8

7.4
4.3
-0 .5
10.2
4.6

50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58

-1 .4

11

Line

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
/I)
/1
n
/3
74
75
76

2002
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....
Finance and in s u ra n c e .......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities.............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments....
Insurance carriers and related activities.......................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets................................................................................
Professional and business s erv ices...................................
Professional, scientific, and technical s e rv ic e s .......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................
M anagem ent of com panies and e n te rp ris e s .............
A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Administrative and support services............................
Waste management and remediation services.........
Educational services, health care, and social
as sistan ce...............................................................................
Educational serv ices............................................................
Health care and social a s sistan ce.................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance................................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s e rv ic e s ..........................................................................

2003

2004

2005

-0 .4
-3 .0

3.3
4.3

6.6
6.2

4.8
5.1

0.7
-1 4 .2
0.6
-1 0 .9
1.6
2.2

4.0
6.6
3.6
4.3
2.6
2.2

1.6
10.0
8.3
17.0
6.9
7.5

2.7
17.1
1.5
10.4
4.6
4.6

-3 .2
0.5
0.3
1.4
- 3 .8

6.3
3.5
4.2
7.0
1.3

2.4
5.4
6.4
-0.1
3.7

4.3
4.4
4.8
-0 .3
7.5

1.0
- 0 .6
1.4
1.7
-1 .1

4.1
1.7
3.0
3.1
2.0

8.8
7.1
2.3
2.4
1.6

5.7
4.2
3.4
3.1
6.3

5.2
2.4
5.6
6.0
5.3
4.6

3.9
3.3
4.0
5.3
2.5
4.2

2.9
0.5
3.2
4.9
1.6
2.6

3.6
1.3
3.9
4.5
3.5
3.1

2.2

3.2

3.4

2.2

3.1

2.2

1.3

-1 .3

77
78
79
80
81
82

Arts, entertainm ent, and re c re a tio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities.............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries....
Accom m odation and food serv ices...............................
Accommodation...................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................
O ther services, except governm ent....................................
G o v e rn m e n t.....................................................................................

3.9
2.5
1.8
2.2
1.7

1.5
2.8
3.5
4.6
3.2

-2 .0
4.2
4.0
5.9
3.3

-2 .5
-0 .3
3.3
3.4
3.2

0.4
3.5

1.8
2.1

1.8
1.7

-0 .2
0.9

83
84
8b

Federal...........................................................................................
General government...............................................................
Government enterprises........................................................

5.1
6.4
- 3 .5

6.4
6.8
3.6

3.6
3.9
1.0

B6
87
88

S tate and lo c a l............................................................................
General government...............................................................
Government enterprises........................................................

2.8
3.0
1.2

0.1
-0 .1
1.4

0.8
1.0
-0 .9

1.0
1.1
-0 .3
0.8
1.0
-0 .7

89
90
91

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries'......................................
Private services-producing industries2..................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3 .................................................................................

-0 .8
1.4

0.9
3.0

2.1
5.0

1.4
4.0

- 5 .5

3.5

7.1

7.2

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

69

Table 11. Chain-Type Price Indexes for Gross Output by Industry, 2002-2005
[200 0=1 00]
2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

All in d u s trie s .........................................................................

102.321

105.189

109.286

113.949

? Private in d u s trie s ...........................................................................

101.846

104.477

108.447

112.923

3
4
b

A griculture, forestry, fishin g, and h u ntin g.......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

99.042
100.341
93.820

106.725
109.542
95.577

118.444
123.067
100.498

114.848
117.725
103.370

6
7
8
9

M in in g ............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction............................................................
Mining, except oil and g as....................................................
Support activities for mining................................................

97.329
82.639
106.809
146.834

122.944
118.217
110.555
159.694

141.906
142.657
119.707
170.329

184.214
195.343
132.418
214.985

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

103.369

112.515

119.128

132.837

11

C o n stru ctio n ........ ......................................................................

106.919

110.869

117.809

125.575

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
?1
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................
Wood products...................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products.........................................
Primary m etals...................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M ach inery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills.............................
Apparel and leather and allied products......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products..........................................
Chemical products............................................................
Plastics and rubber products..........................................

98.028
96.617
98.062
101.424
96.573
100.823
101.305
83.803
99.081
98.300
103.482
102.368
102.594
99.807
104.095
98.505
99.503
97.783
101.753
88.631
100.627
100.651

100.347
96.430
101.385
102.469
98.762
101.614
102.005
79.152
98.715
98.181
106.184
103.403
103.718
105.225
108.115
98.778
100.102
98.841
102.075
108.054
105.638
102.666

105.157
99.469
112.934
105.982
118.877
108.624
104.352
75.766
102.523
99.267
109.951
105.227
105.364
112.260
113.489
100.387
100.366
101.382
102.836
131.900
111.974
105.428

111.382
101.868
113.704
113.475
131.128
114.856
108.470
72.616
107.532
99.568
114.176
109.010
107.708
123.446
116.970
103.658
100.680
105.990
104.749
176.922
122.939
113.064

34

W holesale trad e.........................................................................

97.500

98.958

104.732

110.406

1

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

100.117

101.167

103.522

105.127

36
3/
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation.....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................

100.384
86.615
104.116
105.792
104.238
104.071
102.841
102.903
104.124

103.955
90.046
106.209
117.315
107.105
108.620
108.267
106.487
105.486

106.678
87.670
110.402
119.187
111.232
113.136
113.925
112.341
106.381

112.372
91.288
120.490
121.823
116.860
117.612
121.734
121.219
107.701

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes software).........................

99.911
101.760
106.041
97.904
102.755

99.836
100.449
106.661
98.126
103.299

99.243
99.224
109.600
97.478
101.903

98.044
99.904
111.409
95.110
101.386

Broadcasting and telecommunications............................
Information and data processing services........................

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




2002

Line

2003

2004

2005

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing....
Finance and in s u ra n c e .......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities.......................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets...............................................................................
Professional and business s e rv ic e s .................................
Professional, scientific, and technical serv ices .......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................

104.044
102.005

106.461
103.820

109.647
107.464

112.423
109.761

106.173
89.281
105.721
103.156
105.687
106.440

108.113
86.839
110.878
99.822
108.564
109.249

111.554
88.003
116.958
100.033
111.404
112.085

115.066
88.063
119.998
98.699
114.547
115.148

100.076
103.861
104.138
108.180
99.690

103.482
104.963
104.689
111.655
98.187

106.355
107.502

110.148
110.350

117.064
96.571

122.947
96.645

104.140

104.391

105.044

106.478

64

M anagem ent of com panies and en te rp ris e s.............

100.762

103.615

107.557

112.462

65
66
67
68

105.159
105.063
105.969

106.473
106.009
110.467

111.480
110.778
117.534

115.195
114.415
121.922

106.518
109.263
106.131
104.479
108.350
103.984

109.688
113.681
109.130
106.553
112.648
105.626

113.293
118.890
112.519
109.255
117.230
107.063

117.029
124.282
116.036
112.046
121.936
108.926

105.370
106.431

107.673
109.333

111.319
112.669

115.189
116.591

77
78
79
80

A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Administrative and support services............................
Waste management and remediation services
Educational services, health care, and social
assistan ce...............................................................................
Educational s e rv ic e s ..........................................................
Health care and social assistan ce.................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................
A rts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s e rv ic e s .........................................................................
Arts, entertainm ent, and re c re a tio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...
Accom m odation and food s e rv ic e s ..............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................

107.124
105.855
105.047
102.585
105.937

110.725
108.168
107.166
104.437
108.152

114.718
110.969
110.905
109.335
111.464

119.690
114.070
114.759
114.166
114.954

81

50
51
W
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
61
62
63

69
70
71
72
/3
74
75
76

O ther services, except g o ve rn m en t...................................

107.109

109.884

113.473

117.439

82 G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................
83
F e d e ra l..........................................................................................
84
General governm ent..............................................................
8b
Government enterprises.......................................................

106.249
107.168
106.774
109.654

111.039
111.781
111.930
110.148

116.171
117.260
117.666
113.594

122.390
122.790
123.761
114.622

86
B7

105.831
105.942
104.993

110.705
110.993
108.537

115.668
115.879
114.072

122.235
122.293
121.819

99.482
102.991

103.253
105.090

109.324
108.105

116.748
111.271

92.730

90.048

87.737

86.373

State and lo c a l............................................................................
General governm ent..............................................................
Government enterprises.......................................................
Addenda:
89
Private goods-producing industries1......................................
90
91
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3 ................................................................................

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

70

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 11.A Percent Changes in Chain-Type Price Indexes for Gross Output by Industry, 2002-2005
2002

Line
1

2003

2004

2005

All in d u s trie s ..........................................................................

1.1

2.8

3.9

4.3

? Private in d u s trie s ...........................................................................

0.8

2.6

3.8

4.1

3
4
b

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and h u n tin g .......................
Farm s.........................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities..............................

- 4 .0
-4 .5
- 1 .8

7.8
9.2
1.9

11.0
12.3
5.1

- 3 .0
-4 .3
2.9

6
7
8
9

M in in g .............................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction.............................................................
Mining, except oil and g as....................................................
Support activities for mining................................................

-4 .4
-1 3 .9
3.2
18.8

26.3
43.1
3.5
8.8

15.4
20.7
8.3
6.7

29.8
36.9
10.6
26.2

10

U tilitie s ..........................................................................................

-6 .3

8.8

5.9

11.5

11

C o n stru ctio n ................................................................................

2.7

3.7

6.3

6.6

12
13
14
15
16
1/
18
19
20
?1
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

M anu facturing.............................................................................
Durable goods..........................................................................
Wood products....................................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products..........................................
Primary m etals....................................................................
Fabricated metal products...............................................
M achinery............................................................................
Computer and electronic products................................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts............
Other transportation equipm ent.....................................
Furniture and related products.......................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing..........................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products..................
Textile mills and textile product mills..............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.......................
Paper products...................................................................
Printing and related support activities..........................
Petroleum and coal products...........................................
Chemical products.............................................................
Plastics and rubber products...........................................

- 0 .9
- 0 .9
-0 .6
0.9
-0.1
0.3
0.4
- 4 .9
- 0 .9
-1 .2
1.1
1.0
1.1
-0 .8
-0 .2
-1 .2
-0 .6
-1 .9
0.0
- 4 .2
0.0
- 0 .2

2.4
-0 .2
3.4
1.0
2.3
0.8
0.7
-5 .5
-0 .4
-0 .1
2.6
1.0
1.1
5.4
3.9
0.3
0.6
1.1
0.3
21.9
5.0
2.0

4.8
3.2
11.4
3.4
20.4
6.9
2.3
- 4 .3
3.9
1.1
3.5
1.8
1.6
6.7
5.0
1.6
0.3
2.6
0.7
22.1
6.0
2.7

5.9
2.4
0.7
7.1
10.3
5.7
3.9
-4 .2
4.9
0.3
3.8
3.6
2.2
10.0
3.1
3.3
0.3
4.5
1.9
34.1
9.8
7.2

34

W holesale tra d e ..........................................................................

0.4

1.5

5.8

5.4

35

Retail tra d e ...................................................................................

1.5

1.0

2.3

1.6

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and w arehousing........................................
Air transportation.....................................................................
Rail transportation..................................................................
Water transportation...............................................................
Truck transportation................................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation..................
Pipeline transportation..........................................................
Other transportation and support activities.....................
Warehousing and storage....................................................

-0 .1
- 6 .5
2.1
3.6
1.4
1.6
-0 .5
0.8
1.4

3.6
4.0
2.0
10.9
2.8
4.4
5.3
3.5
1.3

2.6
-2 .6
3.9
1.6
3.9
4.2
5.2
5.5
0.8

5.3
4.1
9.1
2.2
5.1
4,0
6.9
7.9
1.2

45
46
47
48
49

Inform ation...................................................................................
Publishing industries (includes softw are).........................
Motion picture and sound recording industries..............
Broadcasting and telecommunications..............................
Information and data processing services........................

-0 .2
0.3
2.4
- 0 .9
1.1

-0.1
-1 .3
0.6
0.2
0.5

-0 .6
- 1 .2
2.8
-0 .7
-1 .4

-1 .2
0.7
1.7
-2 .4
-0 .5

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




Line
50
51
W
53
54
55
56
b/
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
fifi
67
68

2002
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and le a s in g ....
Finance and in s u ra n c e .......................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities.............................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments....
Insurance carriers and related activities.......................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles..................
Real estate and rental and le a s in g ................................
Real estate...........................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets................................................................................
Professional and business s e rv ic e s .................................
Professional, scientific, and technical s erv ices.......
Legal services.....................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services............................................................................

2003

2004

2005

2.4
2.2

2.3
1.8

3.0
3.5

2.5
2.1

3.8
-3 .0
3.3
2.0
2.5
2.9

1.8
-2 .7
4.9
-3 .2
2.7
2.6

3.2
1.3
5.5
0.2
2.6
2.6

3.1
0.1
2.6
-1 .3
2.8
2.7

-0 .1
1.6
1.9
3.3
- 1 .2

3.4
1.1
0.5
3.2
- 1 .5

2.8
2.4
1.1
4.8
-1 .6

3.6
2.6
1.9
5.0
0.1

2.2

0.2

0.6

1.4

M anagem ent of com panies and e n te rp ris e s .............
A dm inistrative and w aste m anagem ent s e rv ic e s ....
Administrative and support services.............................
Waste management and remediation services.........

0.7
1.6
1.5
2.6

2.8
1.2
0.9
4.2

3.8
4.7
4.5
6.4

4.6
3.3
3.3
3.7

Educational services, health care, and social
assistan ce................................................................................

2.6

3.0

3.3

3.3

69
70
71
72
73
74

Educational s e rv ic e s ..........................................................
Health care and social assistan ce.................................
Ambulatory health care services....................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...............................................................
Arts, entertainm ent, recreation, accom m odation, and
food s e rv ic e s ..........................................................................

4.2
2.4
1.4
3.7
1.1

4.0
2.8
2.0
4.0
1.6

4.6
3.1
2.5
4.1
1.4

4.5
3.1
2.6
4.0
1.7

2.2

2.2

3.4

3.5

75
76

A rts, entertainm ent, and re c re a tio n ..............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities.............................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...
Accom m odation and food services...............................
Accommodation.................................................................
Food services and drinking places................................

2.7

2.7

3.1

3.5

2.9
2.5
2.0
0.3
2.7

3.4
2.2
2.0
1.8
2.1

3.6
2.6
3.5
4.7
3.1

4.3
2.8
3.5
4.4
3.1

O ther services, except g o v e rn m e n t...................................
81
82 G o ve rn m en t.....................................................................................
83
F e d e ra l..........................................................................................
84
General government...............................................................
85
Government enterprises........................................................
86
State and lo c a l............................................................................
87
General government...............................................................
88
Government enterprises........................................................
Addenda:
89
Private goods-producing industries’ ......................................
90
Private services-producing industries2...................................
91
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3 .................................................................................

2.8
3.1
4.3
4.4
3.7
2.6
2.8
1.0

2.6
4.5
4.3
4.8
0.5
4.6
4.8
3.4

3.3
4.6
4.9
5.1
3.1
4.5
4.4
5.1

3.5
5.4
4.7
5.2
0.9
5.7
5.5
6.8

- 0 .6
1.5

3.8
2.0

5.9
2.9

6.8
2.9

- 2 .2

-2 .9

-2 .6

-1 .6

77
78
79
8(1

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

71

Table 12. Chain-Type Quantity Indexes for Intermediate Inputs by Industry, 2002-2005
[2 0 0 0 = 1 0 0 ]
Line
1

2002

2003

2004

2005

101.339

105.248

108.154

97.764

99.748

103.621

106.663

99.438

101.026

101.714

99.382
99.837

99.736
108.587

97.976
123.691

99.743
122.375

6

Mining..................................................................

103.875

111.471

116.216

118.669

7

Oil and gas extraction....................................
Mining, except oil and gas............................
Support activities for m ining.........................

94.795
107.828
128.277

100.724
104.396
154.773

100.153
115.065
171.738

95.146
127.321
192.482

Line
50
51
52

103.039

Farm s..............................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities........

All industries................................................

99.219

2 Private industries.................................................

3
4
5

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting..

8

9
10

Utilities...............................................................

99.198

87.853

82.244

77.767

11

C o n s t r u c t i o n ........................................................................................................

98.743

104.759

113.010

116.930

12

M a n u f a c t u r i n g .....................................................................................................

93.554

93.601

92.595

93.002

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

D u r a b l e g o o d s ................................................................................................

90.951
94.830
94.015
93.052
96.020
83.278
76.197
74.018
98.831
101.414
105.572
113.044
96.593
98.471
93.847
61.340
97.336
91.928
101.524
96.306
97.832

91.948
93.760
96.282
88.523
92.831
87.265
76.637
67.779
103.219
109.359
95.967
114.207
95.553
100.289
85.608
50.411
91.520
85.373
95.116
99.530
99.186

90.675
94.653
93.638
93.307
84.214
83.848
77.452
72.205
104.351
102.854
93.325
102.792
94.837
102.223
82.135
41.811
86.967
82.241
95.488
99.056
94.358

93.718
95.505
99.927
93.335
82.702
90.654
81.337
75.474
103.056
118.597
104.846
107.304
92.508
102.136
72.738
43.334
83.887
72.888
95.490
92.208
96.133

20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

W o o d p r o d u c t s ........................................................................................
N o n m e t a l l i c m i n e r a l p r o d u c t s ......................................................
P r i m a r y m e t a l s ........................................................................................
F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ..............................................................
M a c h i n e r y ...................................................................................................
C o m p u t e r a n d e l e c t r o n i c p r o d u c t s ..........................................
E le c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t , a p p l i a n c e s , a n d c o m p o n e n t s
M o to r v e h i c l e s , b o d i e s a n d t r a i l e r s , a n d p a r t s ...............
O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ................................................
F u r n i t u r e a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ...................................................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................................................
N o n d u r a b l e g o o d s .......................................................................................
F o o d a n d b e v e r a g e a n d t o b a c c o p r o d u c t s .......................
T e x tile m ills a n d te x tile p r o d u c t m il ls .......................................
A p p a r e l a n d l e a t h e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s .............................
P a p e r p r o d u c t s ........................................................................................
P r in t in g a n d r e l a t e d s u p p o r t a c t i v i t i e s ..................................
P e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c t s ........................................................
C h e m i c a l p r o d u c t s ...............................................................................
P l a s t i c s a n d r u b b e r p r o d u c t s ......................................................

34

W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ................................................................................................

93.127

93.788

104.736

109.320

35

R e t a i l t r a d e ............................................................................................................

101.853

107.120

117.422

119.209

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and warehousing........................

93.857

92.408

97.871

102.339

Air transportation..................................................
Rail transportation................................................
Water transportation..........................
Truck transportation...........................
Transit and ground passenger transportation....
Pipeline transportation......................
Other transportation and support activities.......
Warehousing and storage................

89.122
105.049
98.750
91.113
93.505
118.972
81.579
127.161

94.155
106.949
101.227
84.330
97.992
109.763
84.214
130.064

109.917
113.357
107.809
88.565
95.171
104.907
85.673
115.061

111.175
127.892
106.810
94.589
92.366
117.360

45
46
47
48
49

Information.............................................

104.982

106.184

109.002

115.434

96.868
97.167
109.105
109.489

93.912
95.905
112.675
109.955

94.292
93.763
115.801
122.381

89.548
92.054
130.384
117.929

Publishing industries (includes software)..........
Motion picture and sound recording industries.
Broadcasting and telecommunications.............
Information and data processing services.........

86.002

123.184

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

67
68

2004

2002

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing....
Finance and insurance....................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities.........................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments....
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles................
Real estate and rental and leasing...............................
Real estate.....................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets.........................................................................
Professional and business services................................
Professional, scientific, and technical services.......
Legal services................................................................
Computer systems design and related services........
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services......................................................................
Management of companies and enterprises.............
Administrative and waste management services....
Administrative and support services...........................
Waste management and remediation services.........
Educational services, health care, and social
assistance.........................................................................
Educational services.......................................................
Health care and social assistance...............................
Ambulatory health care services.................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance...........................................................
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services....................................................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities.........................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries....
Accommodation and food services............................
Accommodation.............................................................
Food services and drinking places.............................
Other services, except government.................................
Government................................................................................
Federal....................................................................................
General government..........................................................
Government enterprises...................................................
State and local......................................................................
General government..........................................................
Government enterprises...................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries'....................................
Private services-producing industries2................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3 ..........................................................................

2003

92.019
81.680

96.905
86.207

107.713
96.862

116.608
105.791

2005

75.849
54.913
110.357
82.656

77.634
59.973
118.893
82.708

89.135
69.228
128.689
97.311

90.614
136.366
108.436

105.280

110.627

121.638

130.510

107.343

110.260

121.850

129.694

96.796

120.824

134.028

106.173
115.570

112.221
108.324
120.890

114.622
125.789

117.294
127.609

121.758
80.173

146.178
85.567

134.305
76.994

129.743
82.697

120.554

122.610

132.640

134.909

88.214
99.700

87.909
97.454

101.239
102.041

110.103
102.529

100.278
95.993

98.259
92.325

102.633
98.195

102.412
102.803

113.254
107.560
114.200

116.769
110.818
117.758

119.410
108.439
121.243

123.944
108.803
126.478

110.836
116.594
114.962

118.520
117.503
116.058

126.960
118.262
114.287

128.928
127.122
113.172

101.868

105.317

109.300

112.842

100.372

103.052

105.894

102.969

105.824
96.017

105.980
100.742

98.066
112.278

93.199
110.915

102.246

105.892

110.165

115.354

93.553
104.448

105.471
105.993

115.567
108.792

124.739
112.971

101.735

103.982

108.866

109.329

114.578
121.331

118.559
136.726

122.870
147.002

124.343
150.782

123.808
95.856

139.566
107.507

150.650
109.491

153.353
124.050

111.599

110.533

112.239

112.723

110.802
115.379

109.348
116.170

111.493
115.799

112.652
113.130

94.777
100.212

95.870
102.777

96.274
109.418

97.217
114.188

84.548

84.608

85.538

86.684

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

72

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 12.A Percent Changes in Chain-Type Quantity Indexes for Intermediate Inputs by Industry, 2002-2005
Line
1

2002

2003

2004

2005

All industries....................................................................

0.4

2.1

3.9

2.8

? Private industries.....................................................................

-0.3

2.0

3.9

2.9

3
4
b

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.....................

-2.3

1.6

0.7

Farms..................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities...........................

-3.0
1.4

0.4

- 1.8
13.9

6

Mining.....................................................................................

-7.3
- 10.6

7.3

Mining, except oil and gas................................................
Support activities for mining.............................................

2.9
- 8.6

7
8

g

8.8

1.3
1.8

- 1.1

6.3
-3.2
20.7

4.3
- 0.6
10.2
11.0

2.1

-5.0
10.7
12.1

10

Utilities...................................................................................

-4.3

-11.4

-6.4

-5.4

11

Construction..........................................................................

-1.8

6.1

7.9

3.5

12

Manufacturing.......................................................................

0.4

Durable goods....................................................................
Wood products...............................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products......................................
Primary metals..............................................................
Fabricated metal products............................................
M achinery......................................................................
Computer and electronic products..............................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts...........
Other transportation equipment..................................
Furniture and related products....................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing......................................
Nondurable goods..............................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products................
Textile mills and textile product mills............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.....................
Paper products...............................................................
Printing and related support activities........................
Petroleum and coal products........................................
Chemical products........................................................
Plastics and rubber products........................................

0.1
1.1
- 1.1

-1.1

13
14
15
16
1/
18
ia

-1.9
- 2.8

-1.4

2.4
-4.9
-3.3
4.8

-2.7
5.4
-9.3
-3.9

3.4
0.9
6.7

20
21
22

?3
?4
P'S
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

4.0
-0.9
1.9
- 1.1
-4.7
-17.9
-14.2
8.4
- 10.6
7.5

0.6

1.1

-8.4
4.4
7.8
-9.1

6.5

12.1

1.0

-0.9

- 1.1

1.1
- 0.8

1.8
- 8.8

-24.8
-1.3
-5.8
- 2.2
0.4

-17.8
- 6.0
-7.1
-6.3
3.3
1.4

0.8

1.0

1.1

-5.9
- 2.8
- 10.0
-0.7
1.9
-4.1
-17.1
-5.0
-3.7
0.4
-0.5
-4.9

0.0

- 1.8
8.1

5.0
4.5
- 1.2
15.3
12.3
4.4
-2.5
- 0.1
-11.4
3.6
-3.5
-11.4
0.0

-6.9
1.9

34

Wholesale trade....................................................................

5.5

0.7

11.7

4.4

35

Retail trade.............................................................................

8.5

5.2

9.6

1.5

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and warehousing.....................................

-0.4

-1.5

5.9

Air transportation................................................................
Rail transportation...............
Water transportation.............
Truck transportation.............
Transit and ground passenger transportation................
Pipeline transportation........
Other transportation and support activities....................
Warehousing and storage...

1.7
-1.5
-1.3
- 2.2
- 0.8
15.9

5.6

16.7

1.8

6.0

4.6
1.1
12.8

2.5
-7.4
4.8
-7.7
3.2
2.3

6.5
5.0
-2.9
-4.4
1.7
-11.5

45
46
47
48
49

Information...............................

- 10.8
13.3

-0.9
6.8

-2.9
11.9
0.4
7.1

0.6

1.1

2.7

- 1.6
-1.5

0.4
- 2.2

-5.0
- 1.8

1.2

-3.1
-1.3
3.3

2.8

12.6

Information and data processing services......................

4.0

0.4

11.3

-3.6

50
51
62
53
54
55
56
57
58

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




2002

2003

2004

2005

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing. ..
Finance and insurance...................................................

-3.0
-10.2

5.3
5.5

11.2
12.4

8.3
9.2

Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities........................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles.................

-17.2
-21.9
3.4
- 12.8

2.4
9.2
7.7

14.8
15.4

1.7
28.6

8.2

6.0

17.7

11.4

10.0

7.3

10.5

6.4

Real estate and rental and leasing..............................

5.4

0.1
5.1

Real estate.....................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets.........................................................................

7.8

2.7

-4.2

15.9

7.7

10.9

Professional and business se rv ic e s...............................
Professional, scientific, and technical s e rv ic e s......

1.5
3.6

Legal services................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services.....................................................................

17.2
-19.2

2.0
4.6
20.1

5.8
4.1
- 8.1
- 10.0

-3.4
7.4

4.8

1.7

8.2

1.7

64
65
fifi
67

Management of companies and enterprises............
Administrative and waste management services. ..

-6.3
1.6

15.2
4.7

Administrative and support services..........................
Waste management and remediation services.........

2.4
-3.4

-0.3
-2.3
- 2.0

8.8
0.5
- 0.2

68

Educational services, health care, and social
a ssista n c e ........................................................................
Educational serv ices......................................................
Health care and social a s s is ta n c e ..............................

59
60
61
62
63

69
/U
/1

72
/3
74
75
76

6.7

2.3
1.4

-3.8

4.5
6.4

6.8
2.1
7.5

3.1
3.0
3.1

2.3
-2.1
3.0

Ambulatory health care services................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance..........................................................

7.3
9.1
0.4

6.9

7.1

0.8
1.0

-1.5

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services....................................................................

2.7

3.4

3.8

3.2

Arts, entertainment, and recreation............................

2.5

2.7

2.8

-2.8

Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities........................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...

1.0

0.1

3.9

4.9

-7.5
11.5

-5.0
- 1.2

77
78
Accommodation and food serv ices............................
Accommodation............................................................
79
Food services and drinking places.............................
80
81
Other services, except government................................
82 Government...............................................................................
83
Federal....................................................................................
General government.........................................................
84
8b
Government enterprises...................................................

0.6

4.7
3.8
0.3
4.3
1.6

7.5
- 1.0

2.7

3.6

4.0

4.7

3.4
2.5

12.7
1.5

9.6
2.6

7.9
3.8

0.5

1.7

4.7

0.4

6.6

3.5

3.6

1.2

10.3

12.7

7.5

13.3
-18.8

7.9

2.6
1.8

12.2

1.8

13.3

86

State and lo c a l.....................................................................

5.0

-1.0

87

General government.........................................................
Government enterprises...................................................

5.1
4.6

-1.3
0.7

1.5
2.0

0.4
1.0

-0.3

-2.3

- 2.1
1.2

1.2
2.6

0.4
6.5

4.4

- 11.8

0.1

1.1

1.3

88

5.9

Publishing industries (includes software).......................
Motion picture and sound recording industries.............
Broadcasting and telecommunications...........................

Line

12.7

Addenda:

89
90
91

Private goods-producing industries 1...................................
Private services-producing industries 2 ...............................
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries 3...........................................................................

1.0

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

73

Table 13. Chain-Type Price Indexes for Intermediate Inputs by Industry, 2002-2005
[2 0 0 0 = 1 0 0 ]
Line
1

2002

2003

2004

2005

All industries....................................................................

100.102

103.715

108.918

114.906

? Private industries.....................................................................

99.878

103.408

108.634

114.406

3
4
b

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.....................

99.314

104.663

111.704

99.986
95.574

105.886
98.028

112.978
104.774

119.423
107.910

6

Mining.....................................................................................

95.341

110.629

122.881

145.256

Mining, except oil and gas................................................
Support activities for mining.............................................

90.945
101.715
99.980

115015
106.802
104.498

130 833
114.176
113.428

165100
125.322
123.373

50
51

117.548

Farm s..................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities...........................

Line

7
8

9
10

Utilities...................................................................................

93.464

118.699

128.659

160.030

11

Construction.........................................................................

101.051

103.306

108.526

113.319

12

Manufacturing.......................................................................

98.192

102.121

110.145

118.246

13
14
15
16
1/
18
19

98.439
96.889
101.916
97.250
99.095
99.916
94.812
98.579

27
28
29
30
31
32
33

Durable goods....................................................................
Wood products..............................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products......................................
Primary metals..............................................................
Fabricated metal products............................................
M achinery......................................................................
Computer and electronic products.............................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts...........
Other transportation equipment..................................
Furniture and related products....................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing......................................
Nondurable goods.............................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products................
Textile mills and textile product mills...........................
Apparel and leather and allied products.....................
Paper products..............................................................
Printing and related support activities........................
Petroleum and coal products.......................................
Chemical products........................................................
Plastics and rubber products.......................................

99.422
99.063
97.917
100.803
96.694
99.886
97.204
98.991
89.871
99.680
98.486

99.853
99.244
104.995
102.383
101.448
101.400
93.969
100.318
100.835
102.128
101.156101.132
104.635
106.962
99.116
101.214
100.031
100.323
104.920
105.582
103.187

105.692
108.312
109.908
122.143
112.283
107.466
94.958
107.312
104.270
106.445
107.594
106.451
115.101
115.691
100.631
103.869
105.615
103.327
130.556
114.508
109.718

110.126
110.430
116.597
132.931
119.361
112.884
95.938
114.451
107.835
110.265
111.449
111.899
127.396
117.573
105.945
105.997
112.332
107.577
171.430
127.588
120.753

34

Wholesale trade....................................................................

100.815

102.699

106.373

109.713

20
21
22
?3

24
?5
?6

100.012
100.222

35

Retail trade............................................................................

101.585

103.732

107.975

111.914

36
3/
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and warehousing.....................................

99.310

104.725

111.629

123.270

Air transportation...............................................................
Rail transportation.............................................................
Water transportation..........................................................
Truck transportation...........................................................
Transit and ground passenger transportation................
Pipeline transportation.....................................................
Other transportation and support activities....................
Warehousing and storage................................................

98.272
99.900
98.905
100.255
99.569
95.100
100.418
102.402

105.520
101.796
103.135
104.360
103.578
109.338
104.628
106.332

115.238
107.832
107.917
110.334
108.937
118.860
110.113
111.320

131.795
115.437
115.585
119.900
116.407
140.378
119.400
119.129

45
46
47
48
49

Information............................................................................

100.589

101.988

103.562

100.501
104.105
100.107
100.401

101.193
107.518
101.628
101.016

102.915
110.446
103.043
102.173

104.954
113.598
103.793
103.356

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




2005

103.069
101.562

100.284
92.901
105.749
91.061

101.904
95.853
108.015
93.419

104.566
97.476
112.180
95.416

106.978
99.328
114.715
96.914

Real estate and rental and lea sin g ..............................

102.686

105.016

108.574

112.814

Real estate.....................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets.........................................................................

103.034

105.467

109.188

113.701

101.225

103.119

106.015

109.157

59
60
61
K2
63

Professional and business services................................
Professional, scientific, and technical services.......

101.865
101.803

103.694
103.252

106.083
105.259

108.970
107.396

Legal services................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
services......................................................................

103.175
99.543

104.983
99.936

107.333
101.369

109.763
102.259

101.951

103.460

105.470

107.692

64
65

Management of companies and enterprises............
Administrative and waste management se rv ic e s....

103.323
101.041

105.098
103.741

107.197
107.172

110.091
111.784

66

67
68

69
/U
/1
/2

/3
74

Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities........................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments....
Insurance carriers and related activities.....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles................

2004

109.522
106.764

53
54
55
56
57
58

100.815
99.373

2003

106.322
104.534

Administrative and support services..........................
Waste management and remediation services.........

100.735
103.048

102.857
109.749

105.984
115.278

109.397
127.918

Educational services, health care, and social
a ssistan ce.........................................................................
Educational se rv ic e s......................................................
Health care and social a ssistan ce...............................

101.782
102.240
101.707

105.268
106.920
105.007

108.675
110.222
108.430

112.705
114.489
112.424

Ambulatory health care services.................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance..........................................................

102.391
101.194
101.789

104.661
105.202
105.346

108.098
108.494
109.443

112.134
112.395
113.787

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food serv ices....................................................................

102.369

105.592

109.479

113.326

75
76

Arts, entertainment, and recreation...........................

103.749

106.584

110.174

114.161

77
78
79

Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities........................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...

104.564
103.041

107.465
105.818

110.851
109.563

114.689
113.647

Accommodation and food services............................

102.027

105.346

109.305

113.118

Accommodation............................................................

102.188
101.998

105.047
105.427

108.866
109.423

112.951
113.162

81
Other services, except governm ent................................
82 Government...............................................................................
83
Federal....................................................................................
84
General government..........................................................
8b
Government enterprises....................................................

101.948

104.044

106.714

109.976

102.433
102.939

106.832
106.399

111.839
110.491

119.858
116.127

103.347
98.580

106.725
103.122

110.752
108.137

116.145
116.977

104.797

Publishing industries (includes software).......................
Motion picture and sound recording industries.............
Broadcasting and telecommunications..........................
Information and data processing services......................

2002
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and lea sin g ....
Finance and insurance..................................................

an

86

State and local......................................................................

102.187

107.070

112.591

122.001

87

General government..........................................................
Government enterprises....................................................

102.446
101.013

107.027
107.258

112.460
113.179

121.419
124.682

98.518
100.934

102.648
104.019

110.362
107.460

118.341
111.718

97.147

96.986

98.221

99.481

88

Addenda:

89
90
91

Private goods-producing industries 1 ...................................
Private services-producing industries 2................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries 3 ..........................................................................

tanee; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

74

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 13.A Percent Changes in Chain-Type Price Indexes for Intermediate Inputs by Industry, 2002-2005
Line

2002

1

All industries....................................................................
2 Private industries.....................................................................

2003

2004

2005

0.1
0.0

3.6
3.5

5.0
5.1

5.5
5.3

5.4
5.9
2.6

6.7
6.7
6.9

5.2
5.7
3.0

11.1
13.8
6.9
8.5

18.2
26.2
9.8

3
4
5

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.....................
Farm s..................................................................................
Forestry, fishing, and related activities...........................

-1.7
-1.7
- 1.6

6

-4.5
- 8.6
0.4

9

Mining.....................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction........................................................
Mining, except oil and gas................................................
Support activities for m ining.............................................

0.8

16.0
26.5
5.0
4.5

10

Utilities...................................................................................

-10.7

27.0

8.4

24.4

11

Construction.........................................................................

0.5

2.2

5.1

4.4

12

-0.4
- 0 .2
-0.4

4.0
1.4
2.4
3.0
5.3
2.4
1.5
-0.9

7.9
5.8
9.1
4.7
19.3
10.7

7.4
4.2

1.8
0.8

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

Manufacturing.......................................................................
Durable goods....................................................................
Wood products...............................................................
Nonmetallic mineral products......................................
Primary m etals...............................................................
Fabricated metal products............................................
M achinery......................................................................
Computer and electronic products..............................
Electrical equipment, appliances, and components
Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts...........
Other transportation equipm ent..................................
Furniture and related products....................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing.......................................
Nondurable goods..............................................................
Food and beverage and tobacco products................
Textile mills and textile product mills............................
Apparel and leather and allied products.....................
Paper products...............................................................
Printing and related support activities........................
Petroleum and coal products........................................
Chemical products........................................................
Plastics and rubber products........................................

7.0
3.4
4.2
6.4
5.3

7
8

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

0.2
0.0
0.2
0.2

-1.5
-0.3
0.4
0.3
0.0

-0.4
- 0.6
-2.3
- 0.6
- 0.1
- 2.2
-1.3
3.4
0.2

- 1.0

1.9
1.7
2.1

6.9
6.1

2.5
1.3
2.9
1.3
16.7
5.9
4.8

6.0
1.1

10.0
8.2

8.8

2.0
6.1
8.8

6.3
5.0
1.0

6.7
3.4
3.6
3.6
5.1
10.7
1.6

1.5

5.3

2.6

2.0

5.6
3.0
24.4
8.5
6.3

6.4
4.1
31.3
11.4
10.1

34

Wholesale trade....................................................................

0.4

1.9

3.6

3.1

35

Retail trade.............................................................................

0.9

2.1

4.1

3.6

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Transportation and warehousing.....................................
Air transportation................................................................
Rail transportation.............
Water transportation..........
Truck transportation...........
Transit and ground passenger transportation................
Pipeline transportation......
Other transportation and support activities....................
Warehousing and storage.

-0.6
- 1.2
-0.4
0.3

5.5
7.4
1.9
4.3
4.1
4.0
15.0
4.2
3.8

6.6
9.2
5.9
4.6
5.7
5.2
8.7
5.2
4.7

10.4
14.4
7.1
7.1
8.7
6.9
18.1
8.4
7.0

45
46
4/
48
49

Information.............................
Publishing industries (includes software).......................
Motion picture and sound recording industries.............
Broadcasting and telecommunications............................
Information and data processing services......................

0.4

1.4
0.7
3.3
1.5

1.5
1.7
2.7
1.4

2.9
0.7

0.0

0.6

1.1

1.2

0.0

-0.4
-5.1
0.1
0.2

0.4
0.0
1.8

50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
f)9
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

67
68

69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76

2002

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing....
Finance and insurance...................................................
Federal Reserve banks, credit intermediation, and
related activities........................................................
Securities, commodity contracts, and investments...
Insurance carriers and related activities....................
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles.................
Real estate.....................................................................
Rental and leasing services and lessors of intangible
assets.........................................................................
Professional and business services...............................
Professional, scientific, and technical services.....
Legal services................................................................
Computer systems design and related services.......
Miscellaneous professional, scientific, and technical
Management of companies and enterprises............
Administrative and waste management services ...
Administrative and support services..........................
Waste management and remediation services
Educational services, health care, and social
assistance.........................................................................
Educational services......................................................
Health care and social assistance..............................
Ambulatory health care services................................
Hospitals and nursing and residential care facilities
Social assistance..........................................................
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services....................................................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation............................
Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and
related activities........................................................
Amusements, gambling, and recreation industries...
Accommodation and food services............................
Accommodation............................................................
Food services and drinking places.............................
Other services, except government................................
Government...............................................................................
Federal....................................................................................
General government.........................................................
Government enterprises...................................................
State and lo c a l.....................................................................
General government.........................................................
Government enterprises...................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries 1...................................
Private services-producing industries 2 ...............................
Information-communications-technology-producing

1.0
1.2
0.9
- 1.0
3.4
-1.5
0.8
0.8
1.0

0.8
0.9
1.4

2003

2004

2005

2.2
2.2

3.2
2.9

3.0
2.1

1.6

2.6

3.2

1.7
3.9

2.3
1.9
2.3

2.1
2.6

2.1

1.6

2.3
2.4

3.4
3.5

3.9
4.1

1.9
1.8
1.4

2.8

3.0
2.7
2.0
2.3
0.9

2.3
1.9

1.8

2.2

0.1

0.4

1.4

0.9
1.1
0.4
0.3

1.5
1.7
2.7

1.2

6.5

1.9
2.0
3.3
3.0
5.0

11.0

0.7
0.8
0.7

3.4
4.6
3.2

3.7
3.9
3.7
3.7
3.6
4.0

2.1

2.1

2.7
4.3
3.2

1.0

2.2

0.5
0.6

4.0
3.5

3.2
3.1
3.3
3.3
3.1
3.9

0.3
1.5

3.1
2.7

3.7
3.4

3.5
3.6

1.9

2.8

1.1

2.7
3.3

3.5
3.7
3.5
3.8
3.4
3.1
7.2
5.1
4.9

86

87
88

8.0
10.2

89
90
91

0.6

3.4
2.1
4.3
3.4
3.3
4.6
4.8
4.5

- 1.0

6.2

3.2
3.5
3.8
3.6
3.8
2.6
4.7
3.8
3.8
4.9
5.2
5.1
5.5

-0.4
0.3

4.2
3.1

7.5
3.3

7.2
4.0

- 0.8

77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
8b

1.2
2.0

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




Line

- 0.2

1.3

1.3

0.0
0.4
- 0.1
1.0
0.7
1.5
1.6

- 0.2
0.3

2.8

8.2

8.4

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

75

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 14. Cost per Unit of Real Value Added by Private Industry Group, 2002-2005

[Dlla ]
o rs
2002

Line
Private industries.......................................................
Compensation of employees..................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies..
Gross operating surplus.........................................
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting....................
Compensation of employees
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies..........
Gross operating surplus
Mining...................................
Compensation of employees
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies..........
Gross operating surplus.... .............................................
Utilities..................................................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies..........
Gross operating surplus..................................................
Construction........................................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies..........
Gross operating surplus..................................................
Manufacturing......................................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.........
Gross operating surplus.................................................
Durable goods..................................................................
Compensation of employees.....................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies....
Gross operating surplus.............................................
Nondurable goods.......
Compensation of employees.....................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies....
Gross operating surplus.... ........................................
Wholesale trade..................................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.........
Gross operating surplus.................................................
Retail trade..........................................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.........
Gross operating surplus.................................................
Transportation and warehousing...................................
Compensation of employees.........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.........
Gross operating surplus.................................................
Information..........................................................................
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.........
Gross operating surplus.................................................
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing..
Compensation of employees..........................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.........
Gross operating surplus.................................................
Finance and insurance................................................
Compensation of employees.....................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.....
Gross operating surplus.............................................
Real estate and rental and leasing...........................
Compensation of employees.....................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies....
Gross operating surplus.............................................

1.036
0.562
0.084
0.390
0.986
0.376
-0.040
0.649
0.990
0.351
0.118
0.521
1.105
0.273
0.185
0.647
1.127
0.777
0.013
0.336
0.977
0.632
0.032
0.313
0.936
0.690
0.018
0.229
1.040
0.546
0.053
0.440
0.962
0.521
0.216
0.225
0.994
0.583
0.203
0.208
1.014
0.680
0.053
0.282
0.992
0.468
0.078
0.446
1.058
0.263
0.105
0.690
1.041
0.567
0.043
0.432
1.069
0.068
0.145
0.856

2003
1.054
0.566
0.085
0.403
1.099
0.347
-0.088
0.840
1.344
0.370
0.138
0.836
1.096
0.258
0.185
0.653
1.183
0.813
0.015
0.355
0.971
0.635
0.033
0.303
0.909
0.687
0.018
0.203
1.066
0.553
0.056
0.457
0.975
0.528
0.221

0.226
0.999
0.575
0.206
0.218
1.034
0.666

0.046
0.321
0.975
0.450
0.077
0.448
1.083
0.270
0.110

0.703
1.057
0.577
0.045
0.435
1.100

0.070
0.152
0.878

2004

2005

1.083
0.570
0.088
0.425
1.286
0.355
-0.049
0.980
1.599
0.402
0.154
1.043
1.145
0.264
0.190
0.691
1.271
0.838
0.017
0.417
0.963
0.605
0.033
0.325
0.896
0.646
0.018
0.232
1.064
0.538
0.055
0.470
1.042
0.555
0.232
0.254
1.013
0.584
0.215
0.214
1.024
0.669
0.054
0.301
0.947
0.421
0.072
0.454
1.115
0.277
0.114
0.724
1.099
0.603
0.048
0.447
1.125
0.072
0.156
0.898

1.117
0.584
0.090
0.443
1.113
0.378
-0.126
0.861
2.226
0.481
0.183
1.562
1.193
0.265
0.198
0.730
1.382
0.884
0.017
0.480
0.993
0.612
0.034
0.347
0.891
0.639
0.019
0.234
1.153
0.561
0.058
0.534
1.109
0.581
0.244
0.284
1.017
0.578
0.218
0.221

1.028
0.671
0.056
0.302
0.912
0.394
0.069
0.448
1.140
0.288
0.118
0.734
1.122

0.630
0.050
0.442
1.152
0.075
0.161
0.917

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis­
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food sen/ices; and other services, except government
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data




2002

Line
Professional and business services....................................
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Professional, scientific, and technical services...........
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Management of companies and enterprises..................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Administrative and waste management services.........
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Educational services, health care, and social assistance
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Educational services...........................................................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus...................................................
Health care and social assistance...................................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services........................................................................
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies................
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation.................................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus...................................................
Accommodation and food services.................................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Other services, except government.....................................
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1..............................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Private services-producing industries2..........................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Informatlon-communications-technology-producing
industries3.........................................................................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................

2003

2004

2005

1.057
0.744

1.083
0.752

1.112

0.020

0.020

0.021

0.021

0.278
1.055
0.731
0.018
0.305
0.992
0.752
0.017

0.293
1.054
0.715
0.018
0.321
1.026
0.778
0.017
0.232
1.084
0.788
0.028
0.268
1.126
0.895
0.014
0.217
1.191
1.082
0.016
0.094
1.117
0.872
0.013
0.232

0.311
1.060
0.709
0.018
0.334
1.076
0.812
0.017
0.247
1.144
0.818
0.030
0.297
1.163
0.920
0.014
0.229
1.258
1.124
0.016
0.118
1.151
0.894
0.014
0.243

0.314
1.079
0.719
0.018
0.342
1.138
0.890
0.019
0.229
1.176
0.852
0.030
0.294
1.198
0.941
0.014
0.243
1.321
1.172
0.016
0.133
1.183
0.913
0.014
0.256

1.094
0.685
0.125
0.283

1.128
0.704
0.130
0.294
1.143
0.680
0.118
0.344
1.123
0.712
0.134
0.277
1.195
0.843
0.082
0.270

1.167
0.727
0.136
0.305
1.181
0.700
0.124
0.357
1.162
0.735
0.140
0.287
1.241
0.875
0.089
0.278
1.143
0.653
0.030
0.461

0.744
0.549
0.015
0.181

1.051
0.752

0.222

1.080
0.803
0.029
0.249
1.096
0.876
0.013
0.206
1.149
1.053
0.015
0.080
1.089
0.854
0.013
0.222

1.079
0.672
0.121

0.285
1.081
0.632
0.105
0.344
1.078
0.687
0.127
0.264
1.117
0.782
0.074
0.261

1.111

0.654
0.110

0.347
1.088
0.697
0.131
0.260
1.151
0.801
0.077
0.273

0.636
0.029
0.346
1.043
0.541

1.042
0.644
0.029
0.370
1.058
0.543

0.403

0.413

1.077
0.631
0.032
0.415
1.085
0.552
0.105
0.428

0.100

0.102

0.880
0.698
0.017
0.165

0.830
0.638
0.017
0.176

0.778
0.591
0.016
0.171

1.010

0.777

1.110

0.565
0.108
0.438

processing services; and computer systems design and related sen/ices.
N o t e . These unit-cost measures differ from the unit-labor-cost and unit-nonlabor-cost series published by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics (BLS). See BLS Handbook of Methods, Bulletin 2490 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing
Office, April 1997), <www.bls.gov/opub/hom/home.htm>.

76

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 14.A Percent Changes in Cost per Unit of Real Value Added by Private Industry Group, 2002-2005
Line
1
2

2002
Private industries............................................................

Compensation of employees........................................
3
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......
4
Gross operating surplus...............................................
5 Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.........................
Compensation of employees................................................
6
/
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
8
Gross operating surplus........................................................
9 Mining..........................................................................................
10
Compensation of employees................................................
11
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies................
12
Gross operating surplus........................................................
13 Utilities........................................................................................
14
Compensation of employees................................................
1b
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies................
16
Gross operating surplus........................................................
17 Construction..............................................................................
18
Compensation of employees................................................
19
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
20
Gross operating surplus........................................................

1.5
0.1
6.2
2.6

2003
1.8
0.6
2.1

2004

2005

2.8
0.8

3.1
2.1

4.2

2.5

3.5

3.5
5.4

-7.5

11.5

17.0

-13.4

-4.2
-71.4
- 20.0

-7.9
121.8

29.4

2.5
^43.8
16.6

6.5
155.6
- 12.2

-4 .2

35.8

19.0

39.2

3.7
-4.6
- 8.8

5.4
17.4
60.3

8.7
11.7
24.8

19.6
18.9
49.7

-1.7

-0.8

1.5
29.1
-9.1

-5.5

4.4
2.1

4.2
0.6

0.2
1.0

2.5
5.8

4.0
5.6

4.8

5.0

7.4

8.7

3.6
10.5
7.3

4.6
12.4
5.7

3.1
10.0

5.5
5.8
15.2

21 Manufacturing............................................................................

-1.9

-0.6

-0.9

22
23
24
26
26
2/
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
61
52
53
54
bb
56
57
58
59
60

-3.0
3.5
- 0.1
- 2.2
-4.0
3.5
3.0
-1.4
-0.5
2.5
-3.0

0.5
3.4
-3.3
-2.9
-0.4
3.6
- 11.1
2.5
1.3
4.5
3.7

-4.7
- 1.2
7.1
-1.4
-5.9
-0.4
14.1
- 0.2
- 2.8
- 0.8
3.0

- 0.6
- 1.2
1.3
0.7
8.4
4.3
5.3
13.4

0.4
- 1.2

1.3
1.2

6.8

6.4

0.9
3.6

2.5
0.5

5.2
5.1

4.5
5.1

12.2

11.8

Compensation of employees
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus
Durable goods...........
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus
Nondurable goods....
Compensation of employees
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus
Wholesale trade...........

Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies................
Gross operating surplus........................................................

17.3

3.2
1.2

2.5
6.9

Retail trade.................................................................................

1.8

0.5

1.4

0.4

Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

0.7
0.9

-1.4
1.5
5.0

1.5
4.2

- 1.0

- 1.6

3.1

6.2

1.6

Transportation and warehousing..........................................

0.3

1.9

-0.9

0.4

Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

-1.9
56.0
-0.9

- 2.0
-11.7
13.9

0.4
16.1
- 6.2

0.3
3.7

Information.................................................................................

-0 .9

-1.7

-2.9

-3 .7

Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

-8.7

-3.9
-0.9
0.5

-6.5
- 6.1
1.3

-6.3
-4.2
-1.3

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and lea sin g ........

3.1

Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................

1.7
7.4
3.0

0.2

8.7

Finance and insurance.......................................................

2.8

Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................

0.3
4.7

Real estate and rental and lea sin g ..................................

6.2
3.2

Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................

3.4
8.5
2.4

2.4
2.8

4.5
1.9

0.2

2.9

2.3

2.5
3.8
2.9

3.9
3.5
1.4

3.9

2.1

5.8
0.7

4.4
7.4
2.9

4.5
3.6

1.5
1.8

- 1.2

2.9

2.3

2.3

2.5
4.7

2.4
2.2

4.2
3.2

2.6

2.3

2.1

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis­
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data




Line

2002

Professional and business services....................................
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Professional, scientific, and technical services...........
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Management of companies and enterprises..................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Administrative and waste management services.........
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Educational services, health care, and social assistance
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Educational services.............
Compensation of employees
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus......
Health care and social assistance
Compensation of employees
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus......
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services..........................................................................
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies................
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Arts, entertainment, and recreation.................................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Accommodation and food services.................................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Other services, except government.....................................
Compensation of employees................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...............
Gross operating surplus........................................................
Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1 ..............................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Private services-producing industries2..........................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................
Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3..........................................................................
Compensation of employees............................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies...........
Gross operating surplus....................................................

2003

2.1

0.6

-0.4
3.4
9.7

- 1.2
0.0

5.5

2004
2.5
1.1
2.0
6.1

2005
2.6

3.4
0.6
0.8

2.5

0.0

0.6

1.7

- 0.6

-0.9

1.4
-0.9

10.4

- 2.2
1.7
5.1

3.9

2.6

0.4

3.5

4.9

5.7

-3.2
-4.1
15.7

3.4
-1.5
4.2

4.4
4.0

9.6

6.6

-7.2

2.4

0.4

5.6

2.7

1.5

- 1.8
- 2.6
7.7

3.8
5.7

4.2

10.8

-0.9

6.2

2.0

5.5
3.8

0.0

8.0

0.0

2.7
2.2

3.3

3.0

2.7
2.6

2.4
- 0.6

6.2

3.4
5.0

5.9

6.0

6.8

3.7

5.6

5.0

6.7
3.9
9.0

2.7
3.0
16.5

3.9
5.2
25.4

13.1

3.4

2.6
2.1

3.2
3.5

2.7
3.5
5.9
3.7

3.5
4.4
1.4
2.0

3.0

4.2
0.2
2.8
2.1

2.5
2.3
4.8

-0.7
5.5

3.1

3.4

2.7
3.7
3.9

3.2
4.6
3.5

2.7
1.4
7.4

3.2
-0.7

3.4

2.7

2.9

3.4

1.5
7.5

3.4
4.7
0.9

4.1
7.2
-0.9

2.9
4.9
3.9

3.9

0.9

3.1
1.4
7.2

1.5
2.7
-1 .4

3.2
2.2
2.6

4.2

3.0

3.8

3.9

6.4
4.7

2.5
3.3
4.6

5.3
7.2
-1.3

3.7

2.0

- 1.8
-0.8
- 1.1
20.0

6.4

3.5

3.3
4.4
3.5

8.0

3.0

3.2

3.3

6.1

- 2.0
9.6

3.4
- 6.2

-1.7

1.3
- 1.6
7.0

12.2

11.1

2.2

1.4

2.6

2.3

0.5
5.1
3.7

0.5

1.7
3.1
3.7

2.3

2.0

-6.3

-4.3

-7.3
-5.9
-2.9

-7.1
S .7
5.8

-3 .7

- 11.1
1.8

46.8

2.5
-5.7
- 8.6

-2.3
6.3

2.6
2.2

processing services; and computer systems design and related services.
N o t e . These unit-cost measures differ from the unit-labor-cost and unit-nonlabor-cost series published by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics (BLS). See BLS Handbook of Methods, Bulletin 2490 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing
Office, April 1997), <www.bls.gov/opub/hom/home.htm>.

77

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 15. Components of Domestic Supply by Commodity Group, 2002-2005

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs
Line
1
2

2003

2002

2004

2005

Line

2002

23,552.6

916.8

974.9

22,857.1
1,882.5
1,165.8
21.3

Domestic output..................................
Plus: Im ports.......................................
Less: Exports.....................................
Less: Change in private inventories.

865.7
3.7
23.8

939.5
4.6
26.5

998.0
5.4
28.3

0.8

885.9
4.2
24.9
- 0.2

0.8

0.2

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and

3.130.4

3,303.9

3.615.1

3,873.5

Domestic output.............................................
Plus: Im ports..................................................
Less: Exports.................................................
Less: Change in private inventories............

3.185.5
24.7
79.7

3,364.0
26.2
86.3

3.686.1
29.5
100.5

3.954.8
29.0
110.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

20,242.6

Domestic o utput............................................................
Plus: Im ports..................................................................
Less: Exports.................................................................
Less: Change in private inventories...........................

18,788.4
1,334.1
909.7
11.9

19,757.5
1,436.7
937.3
14.3

21,306.9
1,669.7
1,056.4
57.3

6 Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.........................

257.7

281.3

316.2

317.5

7

Domestic output.....................................................................
Plus: Im ports..........................................................................
Less: E xports.........................................................................
Less: Change in private inventories....................................

251.9
24.8

281.8
26.8
24.8
2.5

322.1
28.0
28.3
5.6

315.5
31.2
26.1
3.2

11 Mining..........................................................................................
12
Domestic output.....................................................................

278.8

362.0

445.6

583.2

189.7
92.8
3.7
0.1

246.5
124.5
4.1
4.8

289.9
166.5
5.9
4.9

376.6
226.1
9.7
9.7

16 Utilities........................................................................................
17
Domestic output.....................................................................
Plus: Im ports..........................................................................
18
Less: E xports.........................................................................
19
Less: Change in private inventories....................................
20

392.1

416.5

442.9

492.4

391.4

416.0
1.5

442.5
1.4

0.0

1.0
0.0

1.0
0.0

490.2
3.5
1.3

21 Construction..............................................................................
22
Domestic output.....................................................................

1,005.5

1,063.1

1,180.6

1,302.3

1,005.5

1,063.1

1,180.7

1,302.4

Plus: Im ports..........................................................................
Less: E xports.........................................................................
Less: Change in private inventories....................................

0.0
0.1
0.0

0.0
0.1
0.0

0.0
0.1
0.0

0.0
0.1
0.0

26 Manufacturing...........................................................................
27
Domestic output.....................................................................
Plus: Im ports..........................................................................
28
Less: E xports.........................................................................
29
Less: Change in private inventories....................................
30

4,308.6

4,474.7

4,782.7

5,179.6

3,801.4
1,014.5
495.6

3,923.1
1,077.7
508.9
17.3

4,194.9
1,239.1
568.3
83.0

4,481.9
1,372.4
627.9
46.8

31 W holesale trade........................................................................
Domestic output.....................................................................
32
Plus: Im ports..........................................................................
33
34
Less: E xports.........................................................................
Less: Change in private inventories....................................
35

771.9

797.6

871.7

938.7

858.8
-19.9
65.4
1.5

889.9
-21.4
68.0
2.8

984.1
-23.3
76.8
12.3

1,055.9
-25.3
84.9
6.9

Addenda:
G oods2...................................................

9
10

21.0

- 2.0

2005

865.4

21,862.8

8

2004

844.8

19,200.9

3
4
5

2003

information..............................................

Total dom estic supply of all com m odities1 ..............

Professional and business se r v ic e s .

13
14
15

23
24
25

Plus: Im ports..........................................................................
Less: Exports.........................................................................
Less: Change in private inventories....................................

36 Retail trade.................................................................................
37
Domestic output.....................................................................
Plus: Im ports..........................................................................
38
Less: E xports.........................................................................
39
Less: Change in private inventories....................................
40
41 Transportation and warehousing.........................................
42
Domestic output.....................................................................
Plus: Im ports..........................................................................
43
44
Less: Exports.........................................................................
Less: Change in private inventories....................................
45

1.2

0.5

11.8

988.6

1,046.4

1,132.7

1,132.7

0.0
0.0
0.0

0.0
0.0
0.0

564.5

604.1

615.2

12.1

12.2

60.2
- 0.2

60.4

666.4
13.2
71.0
4.5

731.4
15.1
79.2
3.7

2.6

1. Includes noncomparable imports, scrap, used goods, inventory valuation adjustment, and rest-of-the-world adjust­
ments.
2. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
3. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,




0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

1,463.1

1.563.6

1.660.5

1.770.3

1,462.9
0.9
0.7

1.563.7
0.5

1.660.6

1.770.4
0.7

0.0

0.6
0.0

0.7
0.0

0.8
0.0

747.1

786.7

842.1

896.6

747.6

787.2

842.7

897.3

0.2
0.6
0.0

0.1
0.6
0.0

0.2
0.0

0.2
0.8
0.0

Other services, except governm ent.

585.0

608.0

640.1

664.4

Domestic output.................................
Plus: Imports......................................
Less: Exports.....................................
Less: Change in private inventories.

583.3
1.9

606.2

638.2
2.1
0.2
0.0

662.4
2.3

0.1
0.0

2.0
0.2
0.0

Government...........................................

1,738.9

1,863.4

1,984.7

Domestic output.................................
Plus: Im ports......................................
Less: Exports.....................................
Less: Change in private inventories.

663.5

592.1

60.4

2.557.9
13.1
73.3

1,739.1

1,863.6

1,984.9

0.0
0.2
0.0

0.0
0.2
0.0

0.0

2,110.3
2 , 110.6
0.0

0.3

0.3

0.0

0.0

Domestic output...................................................................
Plus: Im ports........................................................................
Less: Exports.......................................................................
Less: Change in private inventories..................................

0.0
0.0
0.0

544.3

2,497.7

2.389.2
11.9
65.9

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food s e rv ic e s......................................................................

1,192.2

0.0
0.0
0.0

2.335.2

2,213.8

Domestic output..................................................
Plus: Imports
Less: Exports
Less: Change in private inventories..................

1,192.2

1,046.4

2,163.5

2,120.9
9.1
60.6

Educational services, health care, and social
assistance..

0.0

988.6

2,069.4

Domestic output..................................
Plus: Im ports.......................................
Less: Exports......................................
Less: Change in private inventories..

10.1

0.6

0.7

0.2
0.0

6,181.0

6.725.1

7.382.7

5.248.6
1,132.2
520.4
9.9

5,514.5
1,229.0
537.9
24.6

5.987.6
1.433.7
602.6
93.6

6,476.4
1.629.7
663.8
59.6

Services3................................................

87

5.850.5

Domestic output.................................
Plus: Im ports......................................
Less: Exports.....................................
Less: Change in private inventories.

11.536.7

12,116.2

13,061.2

13.964.3

Domestic output.................................
Plus: Imports
Less: Exports.....................................
Less: Change in private inventories.

11.796.7
33.8
291.7

12,388.3
35.3
302.3
5.2

13.382.1
40.2
343.4
17.7

14.310.3
43.8
379.0
10.9

2.1

real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis­
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government
N o te . In the l-O use table, imports are reported with the sign reversed in order to reconcile the value of domestic uses,
which includes imports, with domestic output.

78

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 16. Components of Domestic Supply by Commodity Group as a Percentage of Domestic Supply, 2002-2005
[Percent]

Line
1
2
3
4
5

2002

2003

2004

2005

Line

2002

2003

2004

2005

Domestic output..............................................
Plus: Imports...................................................
Less: Exports..................................................
Less: Change in private inventories.....................

100.0
97.9
6.9
4.7
0.1

100.0
97.6
7.1
4.6
0.1

100.0
97.5
7.6
4.8
0.3

100.0
97.0
8.0
4.9
0.1

46 Information................................................................................
47
Domestic output....................................................
Plus: Imports.........................................................
48
49
Less: Exports........................................................
50
Less: Change in private inventories...........................

100.0
102.5
0.4
2.8
0.1

100.0
102.4
0.5
2.9
0.0

100.0
102.5
0.5
2.9
0.1

100.0
102.4
0.6
2.9
0.0

6 Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.........................
7
Domestic output.....................................................
8
Plus: Imports.........................................................
9
Less: Exports........................................................
10
Less: Change in private inventories............................

100.0
97.7
9.6
8.1
-0.8

100.0
100.2
9.5
8.8
0.9

100.0
101.9
8.9
9.0
1.8

100.0
99.4
9.8
8.2
1.0

51 Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing
52
Domestic output....................................................
Plus: Imports.........................................................
53
54
Less: Exports........................................................
Less: Change in private inventories...........................
55

100.0
101.8
0.8
2.5
0.0

100.0
101.8
0.8
2.6
0.0

100.0
102.0
0.8
2.8
0.0

100.0
102.1
0.7
2.8
0.0

11 Mining..........................................................................................
12
Domestic output.....................................................
13
Plus: Imports.........................................................
14
Less: Exports.........................................................
15
Less: Change in private inventories............................

100.0
68.0
33.3
1.3
0.0

100.0
68.1
34.4
1.1
1.3

100.0
65.1
37.4
1.3
1.1

100.0
64.6
38.8
1.7
1.7

56 Professional and business services..................................
57
Domestic output.....................................................
Plus: Imports.........................................................
58
Less: Exports........................................................
59
60
Less: Change in private inventories...........................

100.0
102.5
0.4
2.9
0.0

100.0
102.3
0.5
2.8
0.0

100.0
102.3
0.5
2.8
0.0

100.0
102.4
0.5
2.9
0.0

16 Utilities........................................................................................
17
Domestic output
18
Plus: Imports.
19
Less: Exports
20
Less: Change in private inventories............................

100.0
99.8
0.3
0.1
0.0

100.0
99.9
0.4
0.2
0.0

100.0
99.9
0.3
0.2
0.0

100.0
99.6
0.7
0.3
0.0

61 Educational services, health care, and social
assistance.............................................................................
Domestic output....................................................
62
Plus: Imports.........................................................
63
64
Less: Exports........................................................
Less: Change in private inventories...........................
65

100.0
100.0
0.1
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

21 Construction..............................................................................
22
Domestic output.....................................................
Plus: Imports.........................................................
23
24
Less: Exports.........................................................
Less: Change in private inventories............................
25

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

66 Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services..
67
Domestic output
68
Plus: Imports....
Less: Exports...
69
70
Less: Change in private inventories......................

100.0
100.1
0.0
0.1
0.0

100.0
100.1
0.0
0.1
0.0

100.0
100.1
0.0
0.1
0.0

100.0
100.1
0.0
0.1
0.0

26 Manufacturing............................................................................
27
Domestic output.....................................................
28
Plus: Imports.........................................................
29
Less: Exports.........................................................
Less: Change in private inventories............................
30

100.0
88.2
23.5
11.5
0.3

100.0
87.7
24.1
11.4
0.4

100.0
87.7
25.9
11.9
1.7

100.0
86.5
26.5
12.1
0.9

71 Other services, except government...................................
72
Domestic output....................................................
73
Plus: Imports.........................................................
74
Less: Exports........................................................
75
Less: Change in private inventories...........................

100.0
99.7
0.3
0.0
0.0

100.0
99.7
0.3
0.0
0.0

100.0
99.7
0.3
0.0
0.0

100.0
99.7
0.3
0.0
0.0

31 Wholesale trade........................................................................
Domestic output.....................................................
32
Plus: Imports.........................................................
33
Less: Exports.........................................................
34
35
Less: Change in private inventories............................

100.0
111.3
-2.6
8.5
0.2

100.0
111.6
-2.7
8.5
0.4

100.0
112.9
-2.7
8.8
1.4

100.0
112.5
-2.7
9.0
0.7

76 Government..............................................................................
77
Domestic output....................................................
78
Plus: Imports.........................................................
Less: Exports........................................................
79
80
Less: Change in private inventories...........................

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

36 Retail trade.................................................................................
37
Domestic output.....................................................
38
Plus: Imports..........................................................
39
Less: Exports.........................................................
40
Less: Change in private inventories............................

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

81
82
83
84
85

100.0
89.7
19.4
8.9
0.2

100.0
89.2
19.9
8,7
0.4

100.0
89.0
21.3
9.0
1.4

100.0
87.7
22.1
9.0
0.8

41 Transportation and warehousing..........................................
Domestic output.....................................................
42
43
Plus: Imports..........................................................
44
Less: Exports.........................................................
45
Less: Change in private inventories............................

100.0
108.8
2.2
11.1
0.0

100.0
109.0
2.2
10.7
0.5

100.0
110.3
2.2
11.8
0.7

100.0
110.2
2.3
11.9
0.6

86
87
88
89
90

100.0
102.3
0.3
2.5
0.0

100.0
102.2
0.3
2.5
0.0

100.0
102.5
0.3
2.6
0.1

100.0
102.5
0.3
2.7
0.1

Total domestic supply of all commodities1...............

Addenda:
Goods2..................................................................................

Domestic output.................................................
Plus: Imports.....................................................
Less: Exports....................................................
Less: Change in private inventories........................
Services3 ...........................................................................

Domestic output
Plus: Im
ports
Less: Exports
Less: Change in private inventories........................

1. Includes noncomparable imports, scrap, used goods, inventory valuation adjustment, and rest-of-the-world adjust3. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
ments.
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis2. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government




December 2006

79

Survey of Current Business

Table 17. Use of Domestic Supply by Commodity Group, 2002-2005
[B illio n s o f do lla rs]

Line

Line

2003

2004

2005

2002

2003

2004

2005

Total dom estic supply of all com m odities1 ..............

19,200.9

20,242.6

21,862.8

23,552.6

Information......................................................................

844.8

865.4

916.8

974.9

Personal consumption expenditures..........................
Private fixed investment...............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..................................................................
Total intermediate use..................................................

7,350.7
1,570.2

7,703.6
1,649.8

8,211.5
1,830.6

8,742.3
2,036.2

274.9
56.5

282.5
56.4

297.7
60.6

312.8
62.2

1,961.1
8,318.8

2,092.5
8,796.7

2,226.2
9,594.4

2,372.8
10,401.3

Personal consumption expenditures.........................
Private fixed investment..............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment................................................................
Total intermediate use.................................................

6.8

506.6

7.3
519.2

7.6
551.0

9.1
590.8

6 Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.........................

257.7

281.3

316.2

317.5

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing.

3.130.4

3,303.9

3.615.1

3,873.5

44.0

44.4

48.6

51.7

Personal consumption expenditures...........................
Private fixed investment................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...................................................................
Total intermediate use...................................................

1,705.1
70.9

1,759.1
82.3

1,896.5
98.3

2,004.3
112.3

1
2

3
4
5

7

Personal consumption expenditures...................................
Private fixed investment........................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
Total intermediate u se...........................................................

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- 1.2
214.8

-1.4
238.2

- 1.6
269.2

- 2.8
268.6

11 Mining..........................................................................................
12
Personal consumption expenditures...................................

278.8
0.2

362.0
0.1

445.6
0.1

583.2
0.2

35.8

45.9

55.2

50

76.8

8

9
10

13
14

Private fixed investment........................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
Total intermediate u se...........................................................

2002

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

1.354.5

1.462.4

1,620.4

1,756.9

Professional and business se rv ic e s.........................

2,069.4

2.163.5

2.335.1

2.497.7

Personal consumption expenditures.........................
Private fixed investment..............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment................................................................
Total intermediate use.................................................

160.2
154.1

171.5
154.2

181.1
163.6

191.0
175.0

23.6
1.731.6

24.1
1,813.8

24.5
1,966.0

27.1
2.104.7

Educational services, health care, and social
assistan ce....................................................................

1.463.1

1.563.6

1,660.5

1,770.3

1.406.1

1.503.7

1,596.1

1,701.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

57.0

59.9

64.4

69.2

747.1

786.7

842.1

896.6

578.6

609.7

654.3

698.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

168.5

177.0

187.8

198.5

1.2

1.8

241.6

314.1

3.3
387.0

504.2

16 Utilities.......................................................................................
17
Personal consumption expenditures...................................
18
Private fixed investment........................................................
19
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
20
Total intermediate use...........................................................

392.1

416.5

442.9

492.4

179.7

195.7

206.3

231.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

212.4

0.0
220.8

236.6

261.2

21 Construction..............................................................................
Personal consumption expenditures...................................
22

1,005.5
0.0

1,063.1
0.0

1,180.6
0.0

1,302.3
0.0

Private fixed investment........................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
Total intermediate use...........................................................

665.1

711.6

810.9

906.4

215.2
125.2

221.9
129.5

228.4
141.3

243.6
152.3

26 Manufacturing...........................................................................
27
Personal consumption expenditures...................................
Private fixed investment........................................................
28
29
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
Total intermediate use...........................................................
30

4,308.6

4,474.7

4,782.7

5,179.6

Other services, except government..........................

585.0

608.0

640.1

664.4

1,277.2
547.0

1,343.4
552.5

1,413.2
585.7

1,518.1
640.8

386.7

400.4

423.4

437.6

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

88.0

97.4
2,686.4

104.6
2,916.2

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

2,396.4

90.4
2,488.4

Personal consumption expenditures.........................
Private fixed investment..............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment................................................................
Total intermediate use.................................................

198.3

207.6

216.7

226.8

31 Wholesale trade........................................................................
32
Personal consumption expenditures...................................
33
Private fixed investment........................................................
34
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
Total intermediate use...........................................................
35

771.9

797.6

871.7

938.7

Government.....................................................................

1,738.9

1,863.4

1.984.7

2,110.3

284.7
71.8

292.3
72.4

311.7
79.5

340.3
87.2

49.1

50.9

53.3

55.6

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

9.0
406.5

8.7
424.2

9.7
470.8

9.6
501.7

Personal consumption expenditures.........................
Private fixed investment..............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment.................................................................
Total intermediate use.................................................

1,618.2
71.6

1,738.0
74.5

1.856.7
74.7

1,979.5
75.2

36 Retail trade.................................................................................
37
Personal consumption expenditures...................................
38
Private fixed investment........................................................
39
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
40
Total intermediate use...........................................................

988.6

1,046.4

1,132.7

1,192.2

841.2
41.1

885.8
38.7

960.2
41.2

1,009.8
52.0

G oods2..............................................................................

5.850.5

6,181.0

6,725.1

7,382.7

1,321.4
1,247.8

1.388.0
1.310.1

1.461.9
1.451.9

1.569.9
1.624.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

106.2

121.9

131.3

130.4

Personal consumption expenditures.........................
Private fixed investment..............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment................................................................
Total intermediate use.................................................

303.2
2,978.1

312.8
3.170.2

327.4
3,484.0

347.5
3.841.2

41 Transportation and warehousing..........................................
42
Personal consumption expenditures...................................
Private fixed investment........................................................
43
44
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
45
Total intermediate use...........................................................

544.3

564.5

604.0

663.5

Services3..........................................................................

11,536.7

12,116.2

13,061.2

13,964.3

135.4
11.4

141.1
11.4

153.5

167.3
14.6

Personal consumption expenditures.........................
Private fixed investment..............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment.................................................................
Total intermediate use.................................................

5.952.6
405.7

6.241.8
415.5

6,680.8
455.0

7,093.4
503.2

40.4
5,138.0

41.1
5.417.8

42.9
5,882.4

46.7
6.320.9

15

23
24
25

11.8

1.0

1.0

1.2

396.5

410.9

437.5

2.1

0.9
480.7

Personal consumption expenditures.........................
Private fixed investment..............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment................................................................
Total intermediate use.................................................
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services......................................................................

Personal consumption expenditures.................................
Private fixed investment......................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment........................................................................
Total intermediate use.........................................................

Addenda:

87

90

1. Includes noncomparable imports, scrap, used goods, inventory valuation adjustment, and rest-of-the-world adjust3. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
ments.
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational sen/ices, health care, and social assis2. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.




80

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 18. Use of Domestic Supply by Commodity Group as a Percentage of Total Supply, 2002-2005

[Prc n
e e t]
Line
1
2

2002

2003

2004

2005

Total dom estic supply of all com m odities1...............

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Personal consumption expenditures..........................
Private fixed investment...............................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..................................................................
Total intermediate use..................................................

38.3

38.1
8.2

37.6
8.4

37.1

8.2
10.2

10.3
43.5

10.2

10.1

43.3

43.9

44.2

6 Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

17.1

15.8

15.4

16.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

-0.5
83.4

-0.5
84.7

-0.5
85.1

-0.9
84.6

100.0
0.1
12.8

100.0
0.0

100.0
0.0

100.0
0.0

12.7

12.4

13.2

3
4
5

1
8

9
10

Personal consumption expenditures....................................
Private fixed investment.........................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
Total intermediate use...........................................................

11 Mining..........................................................................................
12
Personal consumption expenditures....................................

13
14

Private fixed investment.........................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
Total intermediate use...........................................................

8.6

Line

2002

2003

2004

2005

46 Information.................................................................................
47
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
48
Private fixed investment.........................................................
49
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
50
Total intermediate u s e ...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

32.5
6.7

32.6
6.5

32.5

32.1
6.4

0.8

0.8

0.8

60.0

60.0

60.1

0.9
60.6

51 Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing.........
52
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
53
Private fixed investment.........................................................
54
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
55
Total intermediate u s e ...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

54.5
2.3

53.2
2.5

52.5
2.7

51.7
2.9

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

43.3

44.3

44.8

45.4

56 Professional and business services....................................
57
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
58
Private fixed investment.........................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
59
investment..........................................................................
60
Total intermediate u s e ...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

7.7
7.4

7.9
7.1

7.8
7.0

7.6
7.0

1.1

1.1

1.0

1.1

83.7

83.8

84.2

84.3

61 Educational services, health care, and social assistance
62
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
63
Private fixed investment.........................................................
64
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
65
Total intermediate u s e ...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.1

96.2

96.1

96.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

3.9

3.8

3.9

3.9

0.4
86.7

0.5

0.7

86.8

86.8

0.4
86.5

16 Utilities........................................................................................
17
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
18
Private fixed investment.........................................................
19
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
20
Total intermediate u se...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

45.8

47.0

46.6

46.9

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

54.2

53.0

53.4

53.0

21 Construction..............................................................................
22
Personal consumption expenditures....................................

100.0
0.0
66.1

100.0
0.0

100.0
0.0

100.0
0.0

66.9

68.7

69.6

21.4
12.5

20.9

19.3

12.2

12.0

18.7
11.7

26 Manufacturing............................................................................
27
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
28
Private fixed investment.........................................................
29
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
30
Total intermediate use...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

29.6
12.7

30.0
12.3

29.5

29.3
12.4

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

55.6

55.6

56.2

56.3

31 Wholesale trade........................................................................
32
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
33
Private fixed investment.........................................................
34
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
35
Total intermediate use...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

36.9
9.3

36.6
9.1

35.8
9.1

36.3
9.3

1.2

1.1

1.1

1.0

52.7

53.2

54.0

53.4

36 Retail trade.................................................................................
37
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
38
Private fixed investment.........................................................
39
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
40
Total intermediate use...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

85.1
4.2

84.7
3.7

84.8
3.6

84.7
4.4

0.0

10.7

0.0
11.6

0.0
11.6

10.9

85

Personal consumption expenditures................................
Private fixed investment.....................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment......................................................................
Total intermediate u s e .......................................................

41 Transportation and warehousing..........................................
42
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
43
Private fixed investment.........................................................
44
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
45
Total intermediate use...........................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

86

24.9

25.0

25.4

25.2

87

2.1

2.0

2.0

2.2

88

6.6

15

23
24
25

Private fixed investment.........................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment..........................................................................
Total intermediate use...........................................................

12.2

66 Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food s e rv ic e s........................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Personal consumption expenditures....................................
Private fixed investment.........................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
Total intermediate u s e ...........................................................

77.4

77.5

77.7

77.9

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0
22.6

0.0

0.0

22.5

22.3

0.0
22.1

71 Other services, except government.....................................
12
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
73
Private fixed investment.........................................................
74
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
75
Total intermediate u s e ...........................................................

100.0
66.1
0.0

100.0

100.0
66.1
0.0

100.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

33.9

34.1

33.9

34.1

76 Government................................................................................
77
Personal consumption expenditures....................................
78
Private fixed investment.........................................................
79
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment...........................................................................
Total intermediate u s e ...........................................................
80

100.0
2.8
0.0

100.0

100.0

2.7

2.7

0.0

0.0

100.0
2.6
0.0

93.1
4.1

93.3
4.0

93.6
3.8

93.8
3.6

100.0
22.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

22.5

21.7

21.3

21.3

21.2

21.6

22.0

5.2
50.9

5.1
51.3

4.9
51.8

4.7
52.0

Services3................................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Personal consumption expenditures................................
Private fixed investment.....................................................
Government consumption expenditures and gross
investment......................................................................
Total intermediate u se .......................................................

51.6
3.5

51.5
3.4

51.1
3.5

50.8
3.6

0.4
44.5

0.3
44.7

0.3
45.0

0.3
45.3

67
68

69
70

65.9

65.9
0.0

Addenda:

0.0

81
82
83
84

89
0.2

0.2

0.2

0.1

72.8

72.8

72.4

72.4

90

G oods2....................................................................................

1. Includes noncomparable imports, scrap, used goods, inventory valuation adjustment, and rest-of-the-world adjust3. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
ments.
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis2. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.




December 2006

Survey of Current Business

81

Table 19. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Gross Domestic Product by Industry Group, 2002-2005
Line

2004

2003

2002

2005

1 Percent change:
2

Gross dom estic product........................................................................................

1.6

3 Percentage points:
4
Private industries....................................................................................................
5
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting...........................................................
6
M ining.....................................................................................................................
7
U
t i l i t i e
s
..................................................
Construction
..................................................
8
Manufacturing
..................................................
9
Durable goods...................................................................................................
10
11
Nondurable goods.............................................................................................
12
Wholesale trade...........
13
Retail trade....................
14
Transportation and warehousing
Information....................
1b
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing..........................................
16
17
Finance and insurance
Real estate and rental and leasing................................................................
18
Professional and business services....................................................................
19
Professional, scientific, and technical services.............................................
20
21
Management of companies and enterprises................................................
22
Administrative and waste management services.........................................
Educational services, health care, and social assistance................................
23
24
Educational services........................................................................................
25
Health care and social assistance..................................................................
26
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services.............
Arts, entertainment, and recreation...............................................................
27
28
Accommodation and food services................................................................
Other services, except government....................................................................
29
Government..............................................................................................................
30
Federal....................................................................................................................
31
32
State and local.......................................................................................................

3.9

2.5

1.25

2.31

0.05
-0.07
0.08
-0.09
0.36
0.13
0.23
0.06
0.15
0.07
0.19
0.17

0.07
- 0.01
0.13
- 0.10
0.15
0.19
-0.04
0.13
0.27
0.06
0.13
0.49
0.28

0.01

0.21

- 0.02
- 0.10
0.05
0.03
0.31

0.50
0.26
0.05
0.18
0.34
0.03
0.31

0.10

0.02

0.29
0.06
0.03
0.03

0.07

3.69

0.02

0.19
0.27
0.34
-0.07
0.09
0.33
0.11

0.26

0.39
0.60
0.17
0.43
0.64
0.46
0.03
0.15
0.27

0.02

0.02

0.23

0.25
0.05

0.02

0.11
0.00
0.11
- 0.01

0.00

0.05
- 0.02

0.07

- 0.01
0.09

0.94
2.75
0.50

0.07

0.08

0.04
0.03

0.17
0.10

0.08
0.13

-0.04

0.05
0.07
0.79
0.53
0.26
0.07
0.17
0.15
0.49
0.87
0.17
0.71
0.59
0.52
0.05

0.09
0.05

0.21

2.91
0.00

0.01

0.11
0.02

0.01

3.2

0.41
2.49
0.49

Addenda:

33
34
35

Private goods-producing industries'.......................................................................
Private services-producing industries 2 ...................................................................
Information-communications-technology-producing industries 3 .........................

0.25
1.00

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance,
insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health
care, and social assistance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other
services, except government.

0.11
2.20

0.08

0.28

3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and
data processing services; and computer systems design and related services.
N o t e . Percentage-point contributions do not sum to the percent change in gross domestic product because
the contribution of “not allocated by industry” is excluded.

Table 20. Contributions to Percent Change in the Chain-Type Price Index for Gross Domestic Product by Industry Group, 2002-2005
Line

2004

2003

2002

2005

1 Percent change:
2

1.7

2.1

2.8

1.31

Gross dom estic product........................................................................................

3 Percentage points:
4
Private industries....................................................................................................
5
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting...........................................................
6
M ining.....................................................................................................................
7
Utilities.
Construction...........................................................................................................
8
Manufacturing
9
10
Durable goods
11
Nondurable goods
12
Wholesale trade.....................................................................................................
13
Retail trade.............................................................................................................
14
Transportation and warehousing.........................................................................
15
Information................................
16
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing..........................................
17
Finance and insurance
18
Real estate and rental and leasing
19
Professional and business services
20
Professional, scientific, and technical services.............................................
21
Management of companies and enterprises................................................
22
Administrative and waste management services..........................................
23
Educational services, health care, and social assistance................................
24
Educational services.........................................................................................
25
Health care and social assistance..................................................................
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services.............
26
27
Arts, entertainment, and recreation...............................................................
28
Accommodation and food services.................................................................
Other services, except government....................................................................
29
Government
30
31
Federal.
32
State and local.......................................................................................................

1.57
0.11

2.41

2.73

0.18
0.25
0.09
0.33

-0.16
0.56
0.08
0.40
0.39
-0.04
0.43
0.38
0.03

-0.07
-0.05
-0.03

0.36
-

0.02

-0.04
0.62

0.23
-0.08
- 0.22
0.14
0.08
0.04
0.05
-0.08
0.48

0.22

0.12

0.40
0.24
0.17

0.36
0.07

0.22

-0.25
-0.17
-0.08
0.02

0.13
0.01

0.00

0.01

0.06

0.07
0.28
0.06

0.01
0.21

0.22

0.13
0.03
0.10
0.10

0.03
0.18
0.05
0.03
0.03
0.07

- 0.11
- 0.10
- 0.01
0.39
0.09
-0.03
-0.13
0.60
0.31
0.29
0.29
0.04
0.09
0.16
0.26
0.05
0.21
0.11

0.03
0.09
0.09

3.0

0.01

-0.17
0.47
0.17
0.30
0.30
0.12
0.10

0.08
0.24
0.05
0.19
0.12

0.03
0.09
0.09

0.58

0.59
0.20

0.58

0.53

0.34

0.39

0.23
0.36

0.18
0.35

-0.16
1.46
-0.16

0.61
0.96
-0.23

0.65
1.76
-0.26

1.19
1.54
-0.17

0.23

Addenda:

33
34
35

Private goods-producing industries 1 .......................................................................
Private services-producing industries 2 ...................................................................
Information-communications-technology-producing industries 3 .........................

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance,
insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health
care, and social assistance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other
services, except government.




3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and
data processing services; and computer systems design and related services.
N o t e . Percentage-point contributions do not sum to the percent change in the chain-type price index for
gross domestic product because the contribution of “not allocated by industry" is excluded.

82

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 21. Composition of Gross Output by Industry Group, 2002-2005
[B illio n s o f D ollars]
2002

2003

2004

2005

All Industries....................................................................

18,788.4

19,757.5

21,306.9

22,857.1

67

Transportation and warehousing.....................................

576,1

598.5

648.4

712.1

Value Added...................................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................................
Energy inputs............................................................
Materials inputs.........................................................
Purchased-services inputs......................................

10,469.6
8,318.8
352.5
3,288.4
4,677.8

10,960.8
8,796.7
378.6
3,483.5
4,934.7

11,712.5
9,594.4
440.2
3,798.1
5,356.1

12,455.8
10,401.3
526.1
4,121.8
5,753.5

68

Value A dded.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

304.6
271.5
43.8
38.3
189.4

316.6
281.9
47.1
39.4
195.4

330.1
318.3
60.1
44.2
213.9

344.6
367.5
81.6
51.3
234.6

7 Private industries.....................................................................
Value Added...........................................................................
8
Intermediate inputs.................................................................
9
Energy inputs.....................................................................
10
Materials inputs..................................................................
11
Purchased-services inputs...............................................
12

16,632.9

17,457.3

18,859.3

20,256.0

9.131.2
7,501.8
288.9
3,069.6
4.143.3

9,542.3
7,915.0
312.4
3.245.8
4.356.8

10,221.5
8,637.8
359.5
3,553.2
4,725.1

10,892.2
9.363.8
434.4
3,861.5
5.067.9

1
2

3
4
5
6

13
14
15
16
17
18

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.....................

249.8

279.6

319.5

312.4

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

95.4
154.3
10.7
96.5
47.2

114.4
165.2
10.5
105.1
49.7

142.0
177.6
10.7
114.5
52.3

123.1
189.3
13.6

19

Mining.....................................................................................

200.2

259.9

307.1

396.3

20
21
22

Value Added............
Intermediate inputs.
Energy inputs.....
Materials inputs..
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

106.5
93.6
7.5
42.8
43.4

143.3
116.6

172.1
135.0
14.2
66.7
54.0

233.3
162.9

328.0

355.7
220.0

372.9

410.0

135.7
39.5
78.1
18.1

235.2
137.7
40.5
82.4
14.8

248.0
162.0
45.0
104.3
12.7

23
24

11.1

54.1
51.4

122.1

53.5

20.0

81.8
61.1

25
26
27
28
29
30

Utilities........................

31
32
33
34
35
36

Construction.........................................................................

906.9

956.8

1,063.0

1,175.0

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

482.3
424.6
8.7
292.1
123.8

496.2
460.5
9.7
316.7
134.2

541.0
521.9
360.7
149.3

611.1
563.9
15.8
386.4
161.7

37
38
39
40
41
42

Manufacturing.......................................................................

3,849.7

3.957.6

4,207.1

4,501.8

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

1,352.6
2.497.1
58.2
1.785.2
653.7

1.359.3
2.598.3
62.2
1.861.7
674.4

1.434.8
2,772.3
64.5
2.034.9
672.9

1.512.5
2,989.3
71.4
2 .221.6
696.4

43
44
45
46
47
48

Durable g o o d s ..................................................................

2,084.5

2,114.9

2,221.6

2,364.1

Value Added...................................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................................
Energy inputs............................................................
Materials inputs.........................................................
Purchased-services inputs......................................

774.8
1,309.8
944.3
343.8

771.8
1,343.1
23.8
955.5
363.8

819.6
1,402.0
23.8
1,024.6
353.7

854.3
1,509.8
27.1
1,105.8
377.0

49
50
51
52

Nondurable g o o d s...........................................................

1,765.2

1,842.7

1,985.5

2,137.7

Value Added...................................................................
Energy inputs............................................................
Materials inputs.........................................................
Purchased-services inputs......................................

577.9
1,187.3
36.5
840.9
309.9

587.5
1,255.1
38.4
906.2
310.6

615.2
1,370.3
40.7
1,010.4
319.2

658.2
1,479.5
44.3
1,115.8
319.4

55
56
57
58
59
60

Wholesale trade....................................................................

874.0

902.3

615.4
258.6
8.3
50.2
200.1

637.0
265.3
8.9
52.3
204.1

995.1
688.2

1,073.6

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

306.9
10.9
61.7
234.3

743.2
330.4
13.0
66.4
251.1

61
62
63
64
65

Retail trade.............................................................................

1,080.4

1,138.9

1,223.3

719.6
360.8
17.7
70.1
272.9

751.5
387.4

781.2
442.1
24.3
82.2
335.5

823.5
465.2
27.6
81.9
355,6

69
70
/1
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
/y
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
8/
8b

89
yu
91

1,288.7

Value Added
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

Line

53

54

66

1.C
2. C

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

207.3
120.7
37.6
60.7
22.3

21.6

20.2

73.8
293.5

12.0

sts of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
sts of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-




9?
93
94
95
96
97

2002

Information

2003

2004

2005

.....................................................................

1,011.9

1,031.5

1,094.7

1,161.1

Value A dded..
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

483.0
528.9
3.4
87.3
438.2

489.1
542.4
3.6
84.9
454.0

529.2
565.4
3.8
87.9
473.7

555.2
605.9
4.2
93.6
508.1

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing....

3,198.6

3,382.4

3,713.2

3,990.9

Value A dded.......................................................................

2,141.9
1,056.8
37 0

2,408.7
1,304.6
48 8
127.4
1,128.4

2,536.1
1,454.8
60.3
144.7
1,249.8

Materials inputs..............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

917.6

2,244.6
1,137.8
39 2
109.2
989.3

Professional and business serv ices................................

1,916.4

2,004.5

2,164.3

2,318.5

Value A dded.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

1,189.0
727.5
22.4
105.8
599.3

1,248.9
755.5
24.0
107.7
623.8

1,346.4
817.9
28.0
115.0
674.9

1,458.8
859.7
34.0
120.4
705.3

Educational services, health care, and social
a ssista n ce.........................................................................

1,296.9

1,387.6

1,474.5

1,578.0

799.6
497.3

914.7
559.9
15.4
145.1
399.4

975.3
602.7
17.9
150.7
434.1

130.4
354.1

857.3
530.3
13.8
141.0
375.5

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food services.....................................................................

683.8

721.3

770.9

815.4

Value A dded..
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

381.5
302.3
14.3
126.2
161.8

398.9
322.4
15.5
138.7
168.2

424.0
346.9
18.3
140.8
187.8

444.6
370.8

Other services, except government.................................
103
104
Value A dded.......................................................................
105
Intermediate inputs....
106
Energy inputs ....
107
Materials inputs....
108
Purchased-services inputs...........................................
109 Government.......................

460.2

480.7

505.5

522.3

252.5
207.7

274.1
231.4

81.7
119.4

265.3
215.5
7.1
83.2
125.1

89.5
133.8

282.8
239.5
9.0
91.6
138.8

98
99
100
101
102

Value A dded..
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

102.2

12.8

6.6

8.0

21.1

144.8
204.9

2,155.5

2,300.2

2,447.6

2,601.1

Intermediate inputs........
Energy inputs.........
Materials inputs....
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

1,338.4
817.0
63.7
218.8
534.6

1,418.4
881.7

1,490.9
956.6
80.7
245.0
630.9

1,563.6
1,037.5
91.6
260.3
685.6

Addenda:
115
Private goods-producing industries1...............................

5,206.5

5,453.9

5,896.7

6,385.5

116
11/
118
119

2,036.9
3,169.7
85.1
2,216.5

2,289.9
3,606.8
101.4
2,576.9
928.5

2,480.1
3,905.4
2,811.8
972.7

Private services-producing industries2..........................

868.0
11,426.4

2,113.3
3,340.6
93.5
2,337.5
909.6
12,003.4

12,962.6

13,870.5

Value A dded.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

7.094.3
4,332.1
203.8
853.0
3.275.3

7.429.1
4,574.3
218.9
908.3
3.447.1

7.931.6
5,031.0
258.1
976.3
3.796.6

8,412.2
5,458.4
313.6
1,049.6
4,095.1

110
111
112

113
114

120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132

Value A dded.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

66.1

237.7
577.9

120.8

Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3..........................................................................

856.0

860.2

898.0

948.0

Value A dded,.
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

416.6
439.4
4.2
175.1
260.1

421.2
439.0
4.3
169.0
265.6

448.5
449.5
4.4
175.0
270.1

486.7
461.3
4.5
184.5
272.3

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government,
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

83

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 22. Shares of Gross Output by Industry Group, 2002-2005

[Prc n
e e t]
A ll In d u s trie s ................................................
Value Added...............................................
Intermediate inputs...................................
Energy inputs........................................
Materials inputs.....................................
Purchased-services inputs..................

2004

2003

2002

Line

2005

Line

2004

2005

100.0

100.0

67

Transportation and w arehousing....................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

55.7
44.3
1.9
17.5
24.9

55.5
44.5
1.9
17.6
25.0

55.0
45.0

54.5
45.5
2.3
18.0
25.2

68

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs...........................................................
Energy inputs................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

52.9
47.1
7.6
6.7
32.9

52.9
47.1
7.9

50.9
49.1
9.3

32.6

33.0

48.4
51.6
11.5
7.2
32.9

Information............................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Value Added......
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

47.7
52.3
0.3

47.4
52.6
0.3

48.3
51.7
0.3

47.8
52.2
0.4

43.3

44.0

43.3

43.8

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing....

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs...........................................................
Energy inputs................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

67.0
33.0

66.4
33.6

1.2

1.2

3.2
28.7

3.2
29.3

64.9
35.1
1.3
3.4
30.4

63.5
36.5
1.5
3.6
31.3

Professional and business se rv ic e s...............................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

62.0
38.0

62.3
37.7

1.2

1.2

5.5
31.3

5.4
31.1

62.2
37.8
1.3
5.3
31.2

62.9
37.1
1.5
5.2
30.4

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

61.7
38.3

61.8
38.2

62.0
38.0

61.8
38.2

1.0
10.1

1.0
10.2

Private in d u s trie s .................................................
Value Added.......
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs...........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

54.9
45.1
1.7
18.5
24.9

54.7
45.3

53.8
46.2

18.6
25.0

54.2
45.8
1.9
18.8
25.1

A gricu ltu re, forestry, fish in g, and hunting..
Value Added...................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................
Energy inputs.............................................
Materials inputs..........................................
Purchased-services inputs.......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

38.2
61.8
4.3
38.6
18.9

40.9
59.1
3.7
37.6
17.8

44.4
55.6
3.4
35.8
16.4

39.4
60.6
4.4
39.1
17.1

M ining..................................................................
Value Added...................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................
Energy inputs.............................................
Materials inputs.........................................
Purchased-services inputs.......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

86

53.2
46.8
3.7
21.4
21.7

55.1
44.9
4.3

58.9
41.1
5.1

88

19.8

56.0
44.0
4.6
21.7
17.6

U tilitie s ...............................................................
Value Added...................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................
Energy inputs.............................................
Materials inputs.........................................
Purchased-services inputs.......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

63.2
36.8
11.5
18.5

61.8
38.2

63.1
36.9
10.9

60.5
39.5

22.1

6.8

5.1

25.4
3.1

1.8

20.8

11.1
22.0

2.1

17.8
25.1

4.0

2.1

19.1
25.0

20.6

15.4

11.0

C o nstru ctio n .....................................................
Value Added
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs.......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

53.2
46.8

51.9
48.1

50.9
49.1

1.0

1.0

1.1

32.2
13.6

33.1
14.0

33.9
14.0

52.0
48.0
1.3
32.9
13.8

M anufacturing...................................................
Value Added
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs.......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

35.1
64.9
1.5
46.4
17.0

34.3
65.7

33.6
66.4

47.0
17.0

34.1
65.9
1.5
48.4
16.0

49.3
15.5

Durable g o o d s ..............................................
Value Added...............................................
Intermediate inputs...................................
Energy inputs........................................
Materials inputs.....................................
Purchased-services inputs..................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

37.2
62.8

36.5
63.5

36.9
63.1

36.1
63.9

1.0

1.1

1.1

1.1

45.3
16.5

45.2
17.2

46.1
15.9

46.8
15.9

N ondurable g o o d s .....................................
Value Added..............................................
Intermediate inputs..................................
Energy inputs.......................................
Materials inputs....................................
Purchased-services inputs.................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

32.7
67.3

31.9

31.0
69.0

30.8
69.2

2.1

2.1

50.9
16.1

52.2
14.9

1.6

2.1

68.1
2.1

47.6
17.6

49.2
16.9

1.6

W holesale trade
Value Added
Intermediate inputs.......................................
Energy inputs
Materials inputs........................................
Purchased-services inputs......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

70.4
29.6
0.9
5.7
22.9

70.6
29.4

69.2
30.8

69.2
30.8

5.8

1.1
6.2

1.2
6.2

22.6

23.5

23.4

Retail trade...................................

100.0
66.6

100.0
66.0

100.0

34.0

63.9
36.1

63.9
36.1

87
89
90
91
92
93
94
9b
96
97

1.0

1.6

1.8

2.0

2.1

6.5
25.3

6.5
25.8

6.7
27.4

6.4
27.6

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis-

Educational services, health care, and social
a ssistan ce.........................................................................

Value Added......
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

8.6

6.6

8.2

6.8

8.0

8.1

1.0

1.1

9.5
27.5

27.3

27.1

9.8
27.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs...........................................................
Energy inputs................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

55.8
44.2

55.3
44.7

54.5
45.5

2.1

2.1

18.5
23.7

19.2
23.3

55.0
45.0
2.4
18.3
24.4

103
Other services, except government................................
104
Value Added..................
105
Intermediate inputs......
106
Energy inputs...........
107
Materials inputs........
Purchased-services inputs
108
109 Government..........................
110
Value Added............................................................................
111
Intermediate in pu ts...............................................................
112
Energy inputs................................................................
113
Materials inputs.............................................................
114
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

54.9
45.1
1.4
17.8
26.0

55.2
44.8
1.5
17.3
26.0

54.2
45.8
17.7
26.5

54.1
45.9
1.7
17.5
26.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

62.1
37.9
3.0

60.9
39.1
3.3

60.1
39.9
3.5

10.0

10.0

24.8

61.7
38.3
2.9
10.3
25.1

25.8

26.4

98
99
100
101
102

115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122

100.0

33.4




2003

100.0

69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
7/
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

Value Added.............................
Intermediate inputs..................
Energy inputs.......................
Materials inputs...................
Purchased-services inputs..

2002

100.0

123
124
126
126
127
128
129
130
131
132

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food serv ices....................................................................

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1.............................

10.2

1.6

2.6

17.8
25.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

39.1
60.9
42.6
16.7

38.7
61.3
1.7
42.9
16.7

38.8
61.2
1.7
43.7
15.7

38.8
61.2
1.9
44.0
15.2

Private services-producing industries2.........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Value Added.....
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

62.1
37.9

61.9
38.1

61.2
38.8

1.8

1.8

2.0

1.6

7.5
28.7

7.6
28.7

7.5
29.3

60.6
39.4
2.3
7.6
29.5

Information-communications-technology-produclng
industries3........................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs...........................................................
Energy inputs................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

48.7
51.3
0.5
20.5
30.4

49.0
51.0
0.5
19.7
30.9

49.9
50.1
0.5
19.5
30.1

51.3
48.7
0.5
19.5
28.7

tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other sen/ices, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data
processing services; and computer systems design and related services.

84

Annual Industry Accounts

December 2006

Table 23. Contributions to Percent Changes in Chain-Type Quantity Indexes for Gross Output by Industry Group, 2002-2005

[P rc n a dp rc n g p in ]
e e t n e e ta e o ts
Line
1
2

3
4
5
6

2002

2003

2004

2005

2003

2004

2005

2.3

3.8

2.9

67

Transportation and warehousing.....................................

1.0

0.3

5.6

4.3

Value Added...................................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................................
Energy inputs............................................................
Materials inputs.........................................................
Purchased-services inputs......................................

0.81

1.64
1.25
-0.05
0.19

68

Value A dded.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

1.16

1.06
-0.74
-0.58
- 0.11
-0.05

2.73
2.84
0.54
0.52
1.78

1.98
2.29
0.24
0.53
1.52

0.22

1.38
0.91

0.07
- 0.11
0.26

- 0.12
0.28
0.76

2.07
1.73
0.09
0.33
1.31

0.7

2.3

4.1

3.1

0.78
-0.07
0.08
-0.19
0.04

1.45

1.80
1.35

-0.09
0.24
0.70

2.31
1.77
0.07
0.39
1.30

3.9

3.0

0.8

2.91
0.98
-0.55
0.52

2.58
0.39
-0.37
0.58
0.19

0.06
0.75
0.09
1.04
-0.38

69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

0.86

1.11

0.01
0.21

1.13

13
14
15
16
17
18

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.....................

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

-1.54
0.17
- 0.88
-0.84

19

Mining.....................................................................................

-6.8

2.8

2.4

-0.6

20
21
22

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

-3.36
-3.41
-0.27
- 1.68
-1.46

-0.49
3.29
0.68

0.48
1.87
0.56

1.63
0.99

-0.79

-1.49
0.90
0.39
0.47
0.04

25
26
27
28
29
30

Utilities...................................................................................

0.9

-0.4

-1.0

-1.4

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

2.56
-1.71
0.89
-1.30
-1.30

4.15
-4.52
-1.45
-1.70
-1.37

1.48
-2.46
-0.52
-0.90
-1.05

0.72
-2.13
-0.94
-0.53
- 0.66

31
32
33
34
3b
36

Construction.........................................................................

-1.9

1.7

4.6

Value Added
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

-1.03
- 0.86
- 0.01
-0.77
-0.07

- 1.10
2.83
-0.06
2.04
0.85

0.78
3.77
0.05
2.51

3.7
2.02

37
38
39
40
41
42

Manufacturing.......................................................................

-0.3

0.4

1.4

1.0

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

0.95
-1.26
-0.03
-0.82
-0.41

0.39
0.03
-0.09
-0.05
0.17

2.16
-0.72
-0.07
0.09
-0.74

0.73
0.29
-0.07
0.28
0.09

43
44
45
46
47
48

Durable g o o d s ..................................................................

-1.2

1.7

1.8

3.9

Value Added...................................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................................
Energy inputs............................................................
Materials inputs.........................................................
Purchased-services inputs......................................

0.63
-1.78
- 0.01
-1.28
-0.49

0.96
0.69

2.73
-0.89
-0.08
0.26
-1.07

1.77
2.14

49
bO
51
52
53
54

Nondurable g o o d s...........................................................

0.7

-1.0

1.0

-2.1

Value Added.......
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs.
Materials inputs.........................................................
Purchased-services inputs......................................

1.34
-0.63
-0.04
-0.26
-0.32

-0.26
-0.73
-0.17
-0.16
-0.39

1.52
-0.52
-0.06
- 0.10
-0.36

-0.39
-1.70
-0.15
-1.04
-0.51
2.3
1.01

55
56
57
58
59
60

Wholesale trade........

61
62
63
64
65

Retail trade....

66

2002

1.0

7 Private industries.....................................................................
8
Value Added...
9
Intermediate inputs................................................................
Energy inputs
10
11
Materials inputs..................................................................
12
Purchased-services inputs...............................................

23
24

Line

All Industries....................................................................

Value Added...........
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................
Value Added
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

0.5
2.02

1.01

- 0.01
0.05
0.65

2.11

1.21

2.3

1.7

4.2

0.70
1.57

1.51

0.80
3.39

- 0.01
0.22

1.35

0.21

-0.03
0.17
0.08

4.2

4.3

1.47
2.74

2.59
1.74
0.07
0.27
1.40

0.11

0.72
1.91

1.69
0.06
0.80
0.83

- 0.01
1.50
0.64

1.33

0.11

0.00

0.82
2.46

0.25
1.08

5.0
1.66

3.30
0.19
0.55
2.56

88

89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102

Value A dded.
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs
Materials inputs..............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing

Value A dded.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................
Professional and business services................................

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132

1.3
1.02

0.31
0.00

-0.55
0.86
-0.4

0.60
- 1.01
0.08
0.09
-1.18
0.5
- 0.10

0.55
0.07
0.09
0.39

2.0

6.8

7.4

1.41
0.60

5.34
1.41

4.29
3.09

- 0.01
- 0.21
0.82

0.00

0.16
1.25

- 0.01
0.29
2.80

3.3

6.6

4.8

1.59
1.75
-0.03
0.14
1.64

2.84
3.76

1.92
2.91

0.20

0.12

0.36
3.19

0.31
2.48

3.5

5.4

4.4

2.72
0.77
-0.06
0.07
0.77

3.23
2.19
0.09
0.25
1.85

3.48

2.9
2.02
0.86
0.02

2.16
1.45

-0.04
0.89

-0.09
1.51

Educational services, health care, and social
a ssista n ce..........................................................................

5.2

3.9

Value A dded.
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

2.60
2.58
0.14
0.50
1.94

2.71
1.19

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food s e r v ic e s....................................................................

Value Added.
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

103
Other services, except government
104
Value Added..........................
105
Intermediate inputs...............
106
Energy inputs.....................
107
Materials inputs................
108
Purchased-services inputs...........................................
109 Government...................................
110
Value Added
......................................................................
111
Intermediate inputs
112
Energy inputs..................................................................
113
Materials inputs
114
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

3.7

3.19
0.56
-0.03
-0.25
0.84

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis­
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data




87

Information.............................................................................

- 0.21
0.80
-0.24
-0.76

- 0.01
0.54
0.66

2.1

3.2

0.97
1.18

1.71
1.50

0.10

- 0.02
1.13
0.40

0.39
0.69

3.4
1.68

1.69
0.23
-0.50
1.97

0.88
0.01

0.08
0.79
3.6

0.02

2.2

0.76
1.46
0.06
-0.04
1.44

0.4

1.8

1.8

-0.2

0.18
0.25
0.08
0.48
-0.31

1.13
0.70
-0.03
0.25
0.48

-0.27

-0.37
0.19
-0.05
-0.03
0.27

2.10

0.04
1.01

1.04

3.6

2.1

1.7

0.9

1.04
2.51
-0.09
0.57
2.03

0.79
1.32
-0.37
0.52
1.16

0.31
1.39
0.18

0.40
0.47
-0.55
0.04
0.98

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1 ..............................

-0.8

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

0.48
-1.29
- 0.02
-0.85
-0.42

Private services-producing industries2..........................

1.4

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

0.92
0.51
0.14
0.12

0.25

0.9
0.22

0.70
-0.07
0.44
0.34
3.0
2.02

0.94
-0.09
0.15
0.87

- 0.12
1.33
2.1

1.4

1.85
0.26
-0.03
0.64
-0.35

0.80
0.60
- 0.02
0.42
0.19

5.0

4.0

2.51
2.47

2.26
1.70

0.12

0.02
0.12

0.28
2.06

Information-commumcations-tecnnoiogy-proaucing
industries3..........................................................................

-5.5

3.5

7.1

Value A dded.
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

0.92
-6.44
-0.04
-3.73
-2.67

3.44
0.04
-0.03
-0.31
0.37

6.57
0.57
-0.03
0.74
-0.14

1.56
7.2

6.56
0.68

-0.04
0.93
- 0.21

processing services; and computer systems design and related services.
N o te . The percent changes for each industry group are shown in bold. Below each industry group, the percentagepoint contributions of value added and of intermediate inputs to the percent change are shown; the percentage-point
contributions of the components of intermediate inputs are also shown.

December 2006

85

Survey of Current Business

Table 24. Contributions to Percent Changes in Chain-Type Price Indexes for Gross Output by Industry Group, 2002-2005

[P rc n a dp rc n g p in ]
e e t n e e ta e o ts
2002

2003

2004

-0.1

68

1.23
0.79

1.79
2.47
0.45
1.30
0.72

Value A dded.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

0.17
-0.30
-0.41
- 0.10

2.6

3.8

4.1

- 0.01
- 0.11
- 0.22
0.32

0.99
1.59
0.23
0.80
0.56

1.51
2.29
0.19
1.33
0.77

1.70
2.43
0.38
1.39

-3.9

7.8

11.0

-3.0

-2.93
-0.98
- 0.21
-0.59
-0.19

4.46
3.29
0.47
2.36
0.47

7.05
3.93
0.47
2.73
0.73

-5.95
2.91
0.82
1.35
0.74

69
70
n
72
73
74
75
76
//
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

-4.4

26.3

15.4

29.8

86

-2.24
- 2.12
-0.29
-1.15
- 0.68

18.65
7.67

10.41
5.01
0.59
2.57
1.86

21.69
8.13
1.45
4.39
2.29

89
90
91

5.9

11.5

2.77
3.11
0.82
2.13
0.16

2.69
8.82

Value Added.............................
Intermediate in pu ts.................
Energy inputs.......................
Materials inputs...................
Purchased-services inputs..

0.02
- 0.11
- 0.20

3.9
1.66

2.23

0.33

1.60
0.26
0.75
0.59

Private industries................................

0.8

Value Added......................................
Intermediate inputs...........................
Energy in pu ts...............................
Materials inputs............................
Purchased-services inputs..........

0.81

C o nstru ctio n .....................................................
Value Added...................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................
Energy inputs.............................................
Materials inputs.........................................
Purchased-services inputs.......................
M anufacturing...................................................
Value Added...................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................
Energy inputs............................................
Materials inputs.........................................
Purchased-services inputs.......................

1.04

-5.3

-1.03
-4.27
-0.75
-3.72
0.20

1.02

3.76
2.89
O
O
O
O

U tilitie s ...............................................................
Value Added..
Intermediate inputs........................................
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs.......................

-0.48
9.33
2.10

7.09
0.14

0.22

0.66

2.20

6.49
0.13

2.7

3.7

6.3

6.6

2.49
0.25
-0.07

2.63
1.07
0.17
0.62
0.28

3.79
2.47
0.18
1.97
0.32

4.42
2.17
0.30
1.56
0.31

0.01

0.31
-0.9
- 0.66

2.4
- 0.22

-0.24
-0.13
-0.34
0.23

Durable g o o d s ............................

Value Added.............................
Intermediate inputs..................
Energy inputs.......................
Materials inputs....................
Purchased-services inputs..

4.8

5.9

2.59
0.19
2.03
0.37

-0.30
5.09
0.13
4.25
0.71

1.09
4.83
0.24
4.13
0.47

-0.9

-0.2

3.2

2.4

-0.82
- 0.11
-0.07
-0.23

-1.09
0.90

-0.50
3.66
0.08
2.97
0.60

-0.23
2.64
0.15
2.09
0.40

0.20

0.11

0.49
0.30

Nondurable g o o d s .....................

-0.9

5.4

6.7

10.0

Value Added.............................
Intermediate in pu ts.................
Energy inputs.......................
Materials inputs....................
Purchased-services inputs..

-0.46
-0.39
-0.19
-0.46
0.27

0.82
4.61
0.29
3.88
0.45

-0.07
6.75
0.19
5.73
0.84

2.61
7.36
0.34
6.47
0.55

Wholesale trade..........................

0.4

1.5

5.8

5.4

Value Added.............................
Intermediate inputs..................
Energy inputs.......................
Materials inputs....................
Purchased-services inputs..

0.27

0.95
0.55

4.75
1.09

4.44
0.98

0.11

0.11

0.07
0.38

0.19
0.79

0.20
0.20

0.12

-0.06
- 0.11
0.29

0.57

Retail trade...................................

1.5

1.0

2.3

1.23
0.30
-0.06
-0.03
0.39

0.34
0.71
0.15
0.07
0.49

0.91
1.42
0.17
0.18
1.07

0.25
1.30
0.30

87
88

92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102

0.22

0.78

1. Consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; mining; construction; and manufacturing.
2. Consists of utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance, insurance,
real estate, rental, and leasing; professional and business services; educational services, health care, and social assis­
tance; arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services; and other services, except government.
3. Consists of computer and electronic products; publishing industries (includes software); information and data

Information..........

115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132

0.21
-0.2

2003
3.6
1.01

2.55
1.17
0.30
1.08

2004
2.6

-0.49
3.11
1.57
0.27
1.27

2005
5.3
0.21

5.13
3.01
0.53
1.59

-0.1

-0.6

-1.2

-0.80
0.72

-1.39
0.80

-1.82
0.61
0.05

Value A dded....
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

-0.41

0.02

0.02

-0.17
0.40

-0.03
0.73

0.13
0.65

Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and lea sin g ....

2.4

2.3

3.0

2.5

Value A dded.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

2.04
0.35
-0.07

1.58
0.75

1.91
1.08
0.08
0.16
0.84

1.46
1.07
0.18
0.15
0.74

0.21
- 0.01

0.00

0.42

Professional and business serv ices................................

1.6

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

1.33
0.31
-0.06
-0.06
0.43

Educational services, health care, and social
a ssista n ce.........................................................................

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and
food se rv ic e s....................................................................

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

103
Other services, except government.................................
104
Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
105
Energy inputs..................................................................
106
107
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................
108
109 Government................................................................................
Value Added...........................................................................
110
111
Intermediate inputs................................................................
112
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
113
114
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

1.6

Value Added.............................
Intermediate inputs..................
Energy inputs.......................
Materials inputs....................
Purchased-services inputs..




2002
Transportation and warehousing.....................................

2.8
1.21

M in in g ..................................................................
Value Added..
Intermediate inputs
Energy inputs
Materials inputs
Purchased-services inputs.......................

Line
67

1.1

A griculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting..
Value Added...................................................
Intermediate inputs........................................
Energy inputs.............................................
Materials inputs.........................................
Purchased-services inputs.......................

2005
4.3

All Industries...............................

0.10

0.07
0.57

0.22

0.34

1.1

2.4

2.6

0.38

1.55
0.87

1.63

0.68

0.14
0.03
0.50

0.11
0.11

0.65

0.26
0.17
0.59

1.02

2.6

3.0

3.3

3.3

2.32
0.28
-0.05

1.67
1.31
0.09
0.26
0.96

2.05
1.23
0.09
0.34
0.81

1.89
1.41
0.14
0.46
0.81

0.01

0.32
2.2

2.2

3.4

3.5

2.06
0.14

0.79
1.39
0.19

1.74
1.65
0.16
0.78
0.71

1.89
1.59
0.30
0.54
0.74

- 0.12
-0.18
0.44

0.68

0.52

2.8

2.6

2.29
0.47
-0.09

1.62
0.98
0.16
0.07
0.75

0.02

0.54

3.3
2.10

1.17
0.13
0.29
0.74

3.5

2.09
1.40
0.25
0.44
0.71

4.5

4.6

5.4

0.23
- 0.12
-0.05
0.40

2.87
1.64
0.49
0.34
0.82

2.81
1.81
0.45
0.44
0.93

2.55
2.81

Addenda:
Private goods-producing industries1..............................

-0.6

3.8

5.9

6.8

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs..................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

-0.30
-0.27
-0.13
-0.32
0.18

1.24
2.55
0.23
1.87
0.45

1.31
4.57
0.18
3.69
0.70

2.38
4.41
0.34
3.52
0.55

Private services-producing industries2..........................

1.5

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

1.34

2.0
0.88

3.1
2.86

1.16

0.12
- 0.10

0.22

-0.17
0.38

0.32
0.61

1.01

0.58
1.22

2.9

2.9

1.60
1.27
0.19
0.28
0.80

1.39
1.54
0.40
0.44
0.71

Information-communications-technology-producing
industries3.........................................................................

-2.2

-2.9

-2.6

-1.6

Value Added.......................................................................
Intermediate inputs............................................................
Energy inputs.................................................................
Materials inputs.............................................................
Purchased-services inputs...........................................

-1.77
-0.43
- 0.02
-0.57
0.16

-2.81
-0.08
0.04
-0.39
0.27

-3.20
0.63
0.03
-0.04
0.64

-2.18
0.63
0.06
0.13
0.44

processing services; and computer systems design and related services.
N o te . The percent changes for each industry group are shown in bold. Below each industry group, the percentagepoint contributions of value added and of intermediate inputs to the percent change are shown; the percentage-point
contributions of the components of intermediate inputs are also shown.

00

o>

Table 25. The Make of Commodities by Industries, 2005
[Millions of dollars]

02

03

04

Wholesale
trade

Finance,
Professional
Transportation
insurance,
and
Information real estate,
and
business
warehousing
rental, and
services
leasing

Retail
trade

06

Utilities Construction Manufacturing

07

05

08

09

10

11

Educational
services,
health care,
and social
assistance
12

Arts,
entertainment,
Other
recreation,
services,
Government
except
accommodation,
government
and food
services
14

13

15

O ther'

Scrap,
used and
secondhand
goods

16

S 002

Total
industry
output

01 Agriculture, forestry,
310,240
373,811
808 393,396

628

4,159

6
680
1,235

1,821

41,192
6,450
5,480

9
431

19,645

46,278
94,247

985,439

248
4,370

2,244
151,516

48
1,941

2
38

377
2,467

-7 4 0
118

481

3,895,563

17,053

8,812

202

2,284,775

1,325

10,253

6,321
7,502 6,130

12,057
11,515

-6 5 5
-1 ,9 0 7
-9 ,7 1 0
-1 ,0 6 6
-1 9 ,7 8 9
-1 0 ,1 3 2
-6 ,4 4 8

891

7,389

1,542,432

15,714

540
717
99

6,134

1,144,827

1,068
7,291

42

698,780

40,723
1,006,450

660
1,613

73,422

3,136

30

1,046

467

863

-3 0 5

166

712,141
1,161,134
3,990,862

-1 5 3

5,945

4,467

312,373
396,278
409,979
1,174,995
4,501,822
1,073,587
1,288,717

-5 4

11 Professional and business
207

556

666

12,664

3,629

2,318,477

12 Educational services,
health care, and social
1,216

1,578,006

A c c o u n ts

09
10 Finance, insurance, real
estate, rental, and

411
10
225
22,752
16,971
1,176,061
1,433 4,433,798
124
10,654
1,568
10,160

In d u s try

02
03
04
05
06
07
08 Transportation and

A n n u a l

Mining

01

Industries/commodities

Line

Agriculture,
forestry,
fishing, and
hunting

13 Arts, entertainment,
recreation,
accommodation, and
7,654

2,729

3,159

739

799,256

4 68

-3 4 2

18,053

3,241

438
26,766

1,122
35,556

27
223,484

3,769
56,587

509,597
1,965

-1 5 0

4,111

7,157
4,719

2,109,518

4,481,885

1,055,892 1,192,164

731,356

997,972

3,954,780

2,557,856

1,770,435

897,299

662,374

2,110,564

1,587

142

815,391

14 Other services, except
92,656

287
15,455

315,525 376,586 490,211

1,302,388

4,657

15

Total commodity output

1,410

6

522,252
2,601,131
11,189 22,857,143
2,951

-51,333

1. Includes noncomparable imports, inventory valuation adjustment, and rest-of-the-world adjustments.

D e ce m be r
2 0 0 6




00

Table 26. The Use of Commodities by Industries, 2005

[M n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs

B u s in e s s
C u rre n t

Commodities/industries

01 Agriculture, forestry,
fishing, and hunting.....
02 M ining....................................
03
04 Construction........................
05 Manufacturing.....................
06 Wholesale trade.................
07
Transportation and
08
warehousing...................
09 Information...........................
10 Finance, insurance, real
estate, rental, and

Mining

Utilities

Con­
struction

01

Line

Agri­
culture,
forestry,
fishing,
and
hunting

02

03

04

71,803
524
5,742
1,596
61,400
12,360
90

1
57,042
2,657
75
34,865
5,186
393

1C
112,875
163
3,236
7,092
1,315
65

8,302
1,124

8,971
765

28,112
265

1,442 172,185
6,747 297,554
3,865
47,747
1,264
7,851
275,046 1,445,987
32,796 263,042
67,797
12,762
18,237
11,113

Retail
trade

Infor­
mation

06

07

08

09

2,846
62
6,656
2,552
57,551
34,420
2,765

318
45
16,064
5,739
75,221
10,478
5,535

11
10,238
3,429
1,774
98,543
19,702
2,308

17
2
5,596
3,097
76,653
14,336
711

1,970
1,999
61,538
38,035
111,934
13,556
13,754

6,081
358
17,950
10,927
98,979
16,051
9,513

540
10
13,071
10,272
131,264
18,912
2,539

9,299
66
18,733
7,778
111,717
18,070
3,691

381
11
6,910
3,785
70,097
11,258
8,412

1,699
16,633
51,128
54,314
259,799
30,213
35

17,246
16,398

24,248
20,446

83,655
10,415

10,431
227,830

36,701
39,349

27,245
84,048

17,876
38,278

10,618
18,372

6,318
14,846

46,940
72.444

M anu­
W hole­
facturing sale trade

05

135,770
35,139

Arts,
Finance,
enter­
Educa­
tainment,
Other
insurance,
Pro­
tional
fessional services,
recrea­ sen/ices,
real
estate,
and
health
tion,
except
business care, and accom­ govern­
rental,
and
ment
services
social
modation,
leasing
assistance and food
services

Transpor­
tation
and
ware­
housing

10

11

12

14

13

Govern­
ment

Total
inter­
mediate
use

15

Change
Personal
in
con­
Private
Exports of Imports of
sumption
fixed
private goodsand goods and
services
services
expendi­ investment inven­
tures
tories

F010

268,602
51,660
504,166
158
261,250 231,136
152,295
2,916,149 1,518,088
501,692 340,314
130,370 1,009,798

of

76,831

F030

3,176
9,655

F040

F050

26,124
-3 1 ,2 4 8
9,743
-2 2 6 ,0 5 9
1 277
-3 ,45 1
66
627,880 -1 ,3 7 2 ,4 2 4
84,912
25,316
1

906,440
640,799
87,153
51,994

46,813
6,923

167,344
312,760

14,641
62,168

3,725
171

1,756,889 2,004,305

112,303

110,273

174,951

73,270

- 1 3 131

817

17,109

24,959

3,449

38,152

109,916

53,278

110,418

37,626

76,462

742,776

160,561

158,027

81,707

51,280

91,169

25,500

4,059

91,128

333,782

105,969

171,291

60,901

138,704

304,407

342,337

146,332

55,959

48,357

270,755

23

118

280

158

3,473

967

771

708

3,135

1,763

3,070

14,124

689

901

38,976

598

653

476

2,528

18,795

6,109

8,121

6,405

17,003

26,503

33,956

24,638

21,112

5,205

26,447

198,548

698,093

3,172
107
133

439
52
1,272

346
140
103

11,634
1,336
628

43,972
2,812
36,037

8,311
3,808
11,455

9,983
5,589
561

8,495
1,080
22,209

17,349
4,603
9,992

31,048
9,423
20,720

27,195
14,058
7,375

11,687
14,890
197

8,997
3,536
413

6 952
3,779
252

37,248
9,988
24,342

226,828
75,199
135,688

437 612
55,568
-4 2 ,4 6 9

10

355

7

0

3

721

5,381

28,301

65,900

79,162
28,307

-1 5 ,0 7 5
-5 ,3 8 4

Total
Total
final uses commodity
output
(GDP)

F100

46,924
-127,580
228,962
243,588 1,150,094
104,582 1,565,737
554,200
9,583
1,061,793

315,525
376,586
490,211
1,302,388
4,481,885
1,055,892
1,192,164

250,686
407,140

731,356
997,972

-2 ,7 8 8
2,091

-2 8 ,9 8 9

2,104,673

480,669
590,833

5,192

S u rv e y

F020

Govern­
ment con­
sumption
expendi­
tures and
gross
invest­
ment

889
9,118

2,197,892

3,954,780

453,183

2,557,856

-6 5 3

1,701,279

1,770,435

-1 7 5

698,751

897,299

435,547
1,979 503 2,035,365
-2 0 2 ,5 2 6
-1 ,3 1 7 -187,021

662,374
2,110,564
-51,333

-17,113

11,189

11 Professional and business
190 966

27,127

12 Educational services,
health care, and social
13 Arts, entertainment,
recreation,
accommodation, and
food services.................
14 Other services, except
15
16 Other inputs1.......................
S002 Scrap, used and
secondhand goods......

Total intermediate
Inputs........................
V001 Compensation of
em ployees......................
V002 Taxes on production and
imports, less subsidies
V003 Gross operating surplus

Total value added..........
Total industry output.

0

0

189,274 162,949 161,986

22,492

4

-6 8 4

10

563,881 2,989,313

330,394

465,184 367,505

605,922 1,454,794

859,712

602,659

640,229 1,019,714

766,037

276,792

11,353
197,957

51,723
116,118

2006
D e ce m be r

833
32
2,088 -5 1 ,3 3 3

158
293
108,536

-2 ,2 5 6

370,759 239,463 1,037,511 10,401,305

41,835

50,370

55,120

391,145

932,719

389,041

467,899

224,815

240,060

-1 3 ,9 2 8
95,192

19,222
163,738

41,073
151,800

7,726
212,244

51,085
528,704

163,712
190,440

176,706
178,928

18,742
101,079

262,714
42,272
2 72,880 1,633,125

27,311
411,740

2

mmmmm

123,099 233,330 247,992 611,114 1,512,509 743,193 823,532 344,636 555,212 2,536,068 1,458,765 975,347
312,373 396,278 409,979 1,174,995 4,501,822 1,073,587 1,288,717 712,141 1,161,134 3,990,862 2,318,477 1,578,006

1. Includes noncomparable imports, inventory valuation adjustment, and rest-of-the-world adjustments.




69,156 1,701,115

199,269 1,341,584
20,221
63,299

-1 4 ,8 4 5
236,881

444,633 282,789 1,563,620
815,391 522,252 2,601,131

-9 3 ,2 1 5

2,113

14,148

-6 ,4 4 5

386

7,036,626
865,088
4,554,124
12,455,837
8,742,349 2,036,154

21,275 1,165,798 -1,882,501 2,372,762

22,857,143

88

D ecem ber

2006

Subject Guide
V o l u m e 8 6 ( 2 0 0 6 ) Ja n u a r y - D

e c e m b er

This guide lists the major items that were published in the S u r v e y o f C u r r e n t
B u s in e s s in the January-December 2006 issues. It gives the m onth o f the issue
and the beginning page number, and it includes selected boxes that are cited
by title and page number.

General
R esearch sp o tlig h t
Taxation and Multinational Activity
New Evidence, New Interpretations {February,
16}
Schedule o f BEA exhibits
For Fiscal Year 2006 {March, 25}
Schedule o f BEA News Releases in 2007
{October, 159; December 90}

National
F ederal b u d g et estim ates
For Fiscal Year 2007 {March, 12}
NIPA Estimates o f the Federal Sector and the Fed­
eral Budget Estimates [box, 13]
Federal p erso n al incom e tax liabilities a n d p ay m en ts
For 1959 to 2004 {November, 28}
Fixed assets a n d co n su m er d u ra b le goods
For 1995-2005 {September, 22}
G ross do m estic p ro d u c t
Revisions and Source Data {February, 11}
In ventories, sales, a n d inventory-sales ra tio s for
m an u fa c tu rin g a n d tra d e
Third Quarter 2005 {January, 6}
Fourth Quarter 2005 {April, 9}
First Quarter 2006 {July, 6{
Fourth Quarter 2002 to Second Quarter 2006 {Octo­
ber, 14}
N atio n al incom e a n d p ro d u c t accounts (NIPAs)
Annual Revision
Annual Estimates for 2003-2005 and Quarterly
Estimates for First Quarter 2003 to First Quarter
2006 {August, 7}
Newly Available NIPA Tables
Tables 3.15.1-3.16.6, 3.16-3.17, 5.9, and
7.15-7.19 {September, 15}
Tables 3.18B-3.21 and 8.1-8.6 {October, 6}
Tables 2.9 and 7.20 {November, 7}
NIPA Tables {August, 32}
BEA Personal Income and IRS Adjusted Gross
Income




New Estimates for 2004 and Revised Estimates for
2003 {November, 29}
Business Situation
Advance Estimates
Fourth Quarter 2005 and for 2005 {Febru­
ary, 1}
The M onthly Treasury Statem ent and BEAs
Estimates o f Federal Government Spending
[box, 6]
Final Estimates
Third Quarter 2005 {January, 1}
GDP and the Economy (formerly the Business Situa­
tion)

Advance Estimates
First Quarter 2006 {May, 1}
Second Quarter 2006 {August, 1}
Third Quarter 2006 {November, 1}
Motor Vehicle Output in GDP [box, 6]
Preliminary Estimates
Fourth Quarter 2005 {March, 1}
First Quarter 2006 {June, 1}
Second Quarter 2006 {September, 1}
Third Quarter 2006 {December, 1}
Final Estimates
Fourth Quarter 2005 {April, 1}
First Quarter 2006 {July, 1}
Second Quarter 2006 {October, 1}
Government Receipts and Expenditures
Fourth Quarter 2005 {April, 6}
First Quarter 2006 {June, 11}
Second Quarter 2006 {September, 11}
TIPS and Federal Government Interest Payments
[box, 14]
Third Quarter 2006 {December, 11}
GDP and Other Major NIPA Series
For 1929 to Second Quarter 2006 {August,
169}
Note on the Returns for Domestic Nonfinancial Cor­
porations in 1960-2005 {May, 6}
Updated Summary NIPA Methodologies {Novem­
ber, 10}

89

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Industry
In d u s try accounts
A nnual In d ustry Accounts
Advance Estimates for 2005 {May, 11}
Revised Estimates for 2003-2005 {December, 45}
R esearch an d developm ent satellite account
Prelim inary Estimates for 1959-2002 and the Effect
on GDP and O ther M easures {December, 14}
Travel a n d to u ris m satellite accounts
For 2002-2005 {June, 14}

For 2005 {April, 22}
H ow BEA Aligns and A ugm ents Source D ata From
the U.S. Treasury D epartm ent for Inclusion in the
International Transactions Accounts {July, 49}
Q uarterly Estimates
T hird Q uarter 2005 {January, 9}
F ourth Q uarter 2005 {April, 12}
First Q uarter 2006 {July, 52}
Second Q uarter 2006 {October, 75}
R econciliation o f U .S.-Canadian C urrent Account,
2004 and 2005 {November, 70}

International
D irect in v estm en t positions: C o u n try a n d in d u s try
d etail
For 2005 {July, 20}
F oreign d irect in v estm en t in th e U nited States
D etail for H istorical-C ost Position and Related C api­
tal and Incom e Flows for 2002-2005 {September,
34}
New Investm ent in 2005 {June, 32}
O perations o f U.S. affiliates o f foreign com panies
In 2004 {August, 195}
U.S. d irect in v estm ent a b ro ad
D etail for H istorical-Cost Position and Related C api­
tal an d Incom e Flows for 2003-2005 {September,
87}
O perations o f U.S. M ultinational C om panies
Prelim inary Results From the 2002 B enchm ark
Survey {November, 37}
A P rim er on Accessing the D ata Interactively {May,
61}
U.S. in te rn a tio n a l accounts
A nnual Revision for 1995-2005 {July, 36}
U.S. in te rn a tio n a l in v estm en t p o sitio n
Yearend 2005 {July, 9}
U.S. in te rn a tio n a l services
Cross-Border Trade in 2005 and Sales T hrough Affili­
ates in 2004 {October, 18}
U.S. in te rn a tio n a l tra n sa c tio n s
An Ow nership-Based Fram ew ork o f the U.S. C urrent
A ccount for 1993-2004 {January, 43}




Regional
G ross state p ro d u c t
Advance Estimates for 2005 and Revised Estimates
for 1998-2006 {July, 108}
Local area p erso n al incom e
For 2002-2004 {May, 28}
M etro p o litan area p e rso n a l incom e
For 2005 {September, 130}
R egional p ro g ra m o u treach
For C alendar Year 2006 {April, 70}
State p erso n al incom e
A nnual Estimates
For 2003-2005 {April, 71}
Errata {May, 26}
Q uarterly Estimates
T hird Q uarter 2005 {January, 46}
Largest State Personal Incom e Declines [box, 48]
F ourth Q uarter 2005 {April, 71}
First Q uarter 2006 {July, 133}
Second Q uarter 2006 {October, 110}
A nnual Revision
Revised Estimates for 2003-2005 and First Q uarter
2006 {October, 110}
Im proved Prelim inary State Estimates o f Q u a r­
terly Wage and Salary D isbursem ents [box,
117]
Personal Incom e in the NIPAs and State Personal
Incom e [box, 118]
Per C apita Personal Incom e for 2005 {April, 71}

90

December 2006

Schedule of BEA News Releases in 2007
January

Feb. 13
Feb. 28

Personal Incom e and Outlays, January 2007

M arch 1
M arch 9

U.S. International Transactions, 4th quarter 2006

M arch 14

Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts, 4th quarter and annual 2006

M arch 20

State Q uarterly Personal Incom e, 1st quarter 2003-4th quarter 2006 and
State Annual Personal Incom e, 2006 (prelim inary)

M arch 27

Gross D om estic P roduct, 4th quarter 2006 (final) and
C orporate Profits, 4th quarter 2006

M arch 29

Personal Incom e and Outlays, February 2007

M arch 30

U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services, February 2007*

April 13

Advance Sum m ary Estimates for M ultinational C om panies, 2005

April 19

Advance Gross D om estic P roduct by Industry, 2006

April 24

Local Area Personal Incom e, 2003-2005

April 26

Gross D om estic Product, 1st quarter 2007 (advance)

April 27

Personal Incom e and Outlays, M arch 2007

April 30

U.S. International Trade in Goods and Services, M arch 2007*

May 10

Gross D om estic Product, 1st quarter 2007 (prelim inary) and
C orporate Profits, 1st quarter 2007 (prelim inary)

May 31

Personal Incom e and Outlays, April 2007

June 1

Foreign Investors Spending, 2006

June 5

Gross D om estic P roduct by State, 2006 (advance) and
Revised Gross D om estic P roduct by State, 2003-2005

June 7

U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services, April 2007 and
U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services A nnual Revision, 2006*

June 8

U.S. International Transactions, 1st quarter 2007

June 15

Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts, 1st quarter 2007

June 20

State Q uarterly Personal Incom e, 1st quarter 2 0 0 6 -lst quarter 2007

June 21

Gross D om estic P roduct, 1st quarter 2007 (final) and
C orporate Profits, l stquarter 2007 (revised)

June 28

U.S. International Investm ent Position, 2006

June 28

Personal Incom e and Outlays, May 2007

June

Feb. 1

U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services, January 2007*

May

Personal Incom e and Outlays, D ecem ber 2006

Gross D om estic Product, 4th quarter 2006 (prelim inary)

April

Jan. 31

U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services, D ecem ber 2006*

March

Jan. 10

Gross D om estic P roduct, 4th quarter 2006 (advance)

February

U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services, N ovem ber 2006*

June 29

*Joint release by B ureau o f the Census and the Bureau o f Econom ic Analysis



December 2006
m_
July

91

Survey of Current Business

Aug. 14
Aug. 30
Aug. 31

U.S. International Trade in Goods and Services, July 2007*

Sept. 11

U.S. International Transactions, 2nd quarter 2007

Sept. 14

State Q uarterly Personal Incom e, 1st quarter 2004-2nd quarter 2007 and
Revised State Personal Income, 2004-2006

Sept. 20

Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts, 2nd quarter 2007

Sept. 24

Gross Dom estic Product, 2nd quarter 2007 (final) and
C orporate Profits, 2nd quarter 2007 (revised)

Sept. 27

Personal Incom e and Outlays, August 2007

Sept. 28

U.S. International Trade in Goods and Services, August 2007*

Oct. 11

Gross Dom estic Product, 3rd quarter 2007 (advance)

Oct. 31

Personal Incom e and Outlays, Septem ber 2007

Nov. 1

U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services, Septem ber 2007*

Nov. 9

Gross Dom estic Product, 3rd quarter 2007 (prelim inary) and
C orporate Profits, 3rd quarter 2007 (prelim inary)

Nov. 29

Personal Incom e and Outlays, O ctober 2007

Nov. 30

U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services, O ctober 2007*

Dec. 12

U.S. International Transactions, 3rd quarter 2007

Dec. 17

Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts, 3rd quarter 2007

Dec. 18

State Q uarterly Personal Incom e, 1st quarter 2006-3rd quarter 2007

Dec. 19

Gross Dom estic Product, 3rd quarter 2007 (final) and
C orporate Profits, 3rd quarter 2007 (revised)

Dec. 20

Personal Incom e and Outlays, N ovem ber 2007

December

U.S. International Trade in Goods and Services, June 2007*

Personal Incom e and Outlays, July 2007

November

July 31

Gross Dom estic Product, 2nd quarter 2007 (prelim inary) and
C orporate Profits, 2nd quarter 2007 (prelim inary)

October

July 27

Personal Incom e and Outlays, June 2007

September

July 12

Gross Dom estic Product, 2nd quarter 2007 (advance)

August

U.S. International Trade in G oods and Services, May 2007*

Dec. 21

All releases are scheduled for 8:30 a.m.
*Joint release by Bureau o f the Census and the Bureau o f Econom ic Analysis



U ite S P stal S ice
n d tates o erv
S t a t e m e n t o f O w n e r s h ip , M a n a g e m e n t, a n d C ir c u la t io n

1. P b nT e
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D-

December 2006

B E A C u r re n t and H is t o r ic a l Data
National, International, and Regional Data
A selection of estimates from the national, industry, in­
ternational, and regional accounts of the Bureau of Eco­
nom ic Analysis (BEA) are presented in this section. BEA’s
estimates are not copyrighted and may be reprinted w ith­
out BEA’s permission, and citing the S u r v e y o f C u r r e n t
B u s in e s s and BEA as the source is appreciated.

More detailed estimates from BEA’s accounts are avail­
able on BEA’s Web site at <www.bea.gov>. These esti­
mates are available in a variety of formats, including
interactive access. In addition, news releases, articles, and
other inform ation, including methodologies and work­
ing papers, are available.

The tables present annual [A], quarterly [Q], and monthly [M] data.

N a tio n a l D a ta
A. Selected NIPA tables [A, Q]
1. Domestic product and income................................D-2
2. Personal income and outlays.................................D-18
3. Government current receipts and expenditures ...D-21
4. Foreign transactions...............................................D-33
5. Saving and investment...........................................D-3 7
6. Income and employment by industry.................. D-42
7. Supplemental tables................................................ D-43
B. Other NIPA and NIPA-related tables
B.l Personal income and its disposition [A, M ]...... D-46
B.2 Value added by industry [A]................................D-47
C. Historical measures [A, Q]
C.1 GDP and other major NIPA aggregates............. D-48
D. Charts
Selected NIPA series................................................... D-52

G .

F.2 USDIA: Selected items.......................................... D-65
F.3 Selected financial and operating data of foreign
affiliates of U.S. companies............................D-66
F.4 FDIUS: Selected item s..........................................D-67
F.5 Selected financial and operating data of U.S.
affiliates of foreign companies...................... D-68
Charts
The United States in the international economy.....D-69

R e g io n a l D a ta
H. State and regional tables
H .l Personal income [Q ]........................................... D-70
H.2 Personal income and per capita
personal income [A]..........................................D-71
H.3 Disposable personal income and per capita
disposable personal income [A].......................D-72
H.4 Gross state product [A].......................................D-73
I. Local area table
I.1 Personal income and per capita personal income
by metropolitan area [A ]..................................D-74

I n te r n a tio n a l D a ta
E. Transactions tables
E.l U.S. international transactions in goods
and services [A, M ] ...........................................D-58
E.2 U.S. international transactions [A, Q ] ............... D-59
E.3 U.S. international transactions by area [Q ]....... D-60
E.4 Private services transactions [A].........................D-63

A : A d d it io n a l i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t th e N IP A e s tim a te s

F. Investment tables [A]
F.l U.S. international investment position............... D-64

Statistical conventions................................................ D-81
Reconciliation table [A, Q ]........................................D-82
B: Suggested reading....................................................... D-83




J. Charts
Selected regional estimates.........................................D-79
A p p e n d ix e s

D-2

December 2006

National Data
A. Selected NIPA Tables
T h e selected set o f N IP A tables presents the
m o st recent estim ates o f gro ss d o m e stic p ro d u c t
( G D P ) a n d its co m p o n e n ts that w ere released
o n N o v e m b e r 29, 2006. T h e se estim ates in clu d e
the “p r e lim in a ry ” estim ates fo r the th ird q u a r­
ter o f 2006. A ls o in c lu d e d are re vise d estim ates
o f w ages a n d salaries a n d o f affected in c o m e side series fo r the seco n d q u arte r o f 2006.

1.

D o m e s tic

P ro d u c t a n d

T h e selected set presents q u a rte rly estim ates
that are u p d a te d m o n th ly . A n n u a l estim ates are
presented in m o st o f the tables.
T h e G D P new s release is a vailable o n B E A ’s
W eb site w ith in m in u te s after the release. To re ­
ceive an e -m a il n o tific a tio n o f the release, go to
< w w w .b ea.go v> a n d su b scrib e . T h e “ Selected
N IP A T a b le s” are available later that day.

In c o m e

Table 1.1.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real
Gross Domestic Product

Table 1.1.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real
Gross Domestic Product

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

IV

Ill
Gross dom estic product ...
Personal consumption
expenditures

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

2005 .
I
1.8

II
5.6

Line

2.2
2.9
6.0
1.1

Gross domestic product....
3.5

3.9

0.8

4.8

2.6

5.5
4.5

-12.3
3.9

19.8
5.9

2.6

9.0
3.4
3.2

2.0

1.6

- 0.1
1.4
3.7

Gross private domestic
investment.................................

6

9.8

5.4

5.2

7

7.5

1.0
- 1.6

6.8
1.1

6.3
5.9
-7.0

7.8
8.2

8

7.3
5.9

16.2
2.8

5.2

8.9

11.0

12.0
2.8

4.4
20.3
-1.4

8.6

7.1

-0.9

13.7
8.7
15.6
-0.3

7.3
9.9

Net exports of goods and
services.....................................

14
15
16
17
18
19

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

Federal........................................
National defense....................
Nondefense...........................
State and local...........................




9.2
9.0
9.7

7.5
5.1

10.8

6.1

6.8

3.2
3.7
2.1

10.9

6.7

2.5
2.7

10.0

2.8

1.2

9.6
11.5
5.5
13.2
14.1
8.3

20
21
22

1.9

0.9

3.4

-1.1

4.3
5.9

1.5
1.7

9.6

23
24

1.2

1.1

11.2
6.2

-4.6
-9.9
7.1

0.5

0.5

- 0.1

1.0

14.0
17.3
6.7
9.1
9.4
7.4

4.9
8.8

8.9
8.5
2.7

II

III

- 11.1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2.2

Personal consumption
expenditures.............................

2

2.71

2.44

2.76

0.53

3.38

1.81

1.99

0.0

Durable goods...........................
Nondurable g oods.....................
Services......................................

3
4
5

0.54
0.73
1.45

0.45
0.90
1.09

0.74
0.70
1.32

-1.08
0.79
0.83

1.50
1.20

0.67

- 0.01
0.30
1.52

0.47
0.23
1.29

G ross private domestic
investment.................................

6

1.49
1.11

0.87

0.84
1.02

2.51

1.31

0.17

0.01

0.46
0.52
0.31

1.34
1.36
0.25

-0.27
0.45
0.56
- 0.10
-0.72
0.44

-0.15

-0.9
10.0

16.7
7.2
-18.0

6.2
6.0

6.3
9.4

6.7
1.4

- 1.0
5.3
6.9
-2.7

- 0.1
9.9

1

3.1

1H

Exports.......................................
Goods.....................................
S ervices.................................
Im ports........................................
Goods.....................................
Services.................................

IV

Percentage points at annual
rates:

3.9

6.4
3.6
3.5

10
11
12

2006
I

Percent change at annual rate:

2

2.2

2005
III

2.6

3
4
5

9

2005

III

Durable goods...........................
Nondurable goods.....................
Services...

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software
Residential.............................
Change in private inventories...

2004

0.8

2.2

-4.5
- 2.0
-9.3
4.0

1.5
- 1.1
6.8
2.6

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Net exports of goods and
se r v ic e s .....................................

Exports.......................................
Goods.....................................
Services..................................
Imports.........................................
Goods.....................................
Services..................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

Federal.........................................
National defense....................
Nondefense............................
State and local...........................

7
8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

20
21
22

23
24

0.58
0.06
0.52
0.53
0.38

1.17
0.67
0.03
0.64
0.50
-0.30

-0.65
0.88

-0.26
0.68

0.60
0.28
-1.53
-1.29
-0.24

0.52
0.16
-0.94
-0.87
-0.07

0.36

0.30
0.27
0.03
0.06

0.59

1.01

- 0.20
0.78
0.43
-0.18

0.21

1.11

-0.06
2.05

- 0.02
-0.03

-0.06

-1.07

-0.04

0.33
0.27
0.06
-0.39
-0.36
-0.03

0.97
0.80
0.17
-2.04
-1.84
- 0.20

0.42
0.66

-0.21
0.68

1.20
0.21

0.45

-1.46
-1.27
-0.19

-0.24

0.71
-0.03
-0.89
-0.96
0.07

0.17
0.11

0.64
0.66

-0.21

0.94

0.16

0.08
0.03
0.06

0.52
0.14
- 0.01

-0.33
-0.49
0.16
0.13

0.61
0.41

-0.32
-0.09
-0.23
0.48

1.41

0.20

0.33

0.21
0.01

-0.25

0.49
0.52
-1.16
0.16

0.42
0.10

-0.05
0.15
0.32

December 2006

D-3

Survey of Current Business

Table 1.1.3. Real Gross Domestic Product, Quantity Indexes

Table 1.1.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross domestic product . ..
Personal consumption
expenditures.............................
Durable goods...........................
Nondurable goods.....................
S ervices.....................................
Gross private domestic
investment.................................
Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Net exports of goods and
services.....................................
Exports.......................................
Goods.....................................
S ervices.................................
Im ports.......................................
Goods.....................................
S ervices.................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................
Federal.......................................
National defense....................
Nondefense...........................
State and local...........................

Line

2006
IV

I

II

2005

112.546 113.223 113.719 115.274 116.004 116.640

2 112.430
3 125.753
4 111.913
5 110.055

116.349 117.152 117.373 118.761 119.521 120.367
132.666 136.207 131.799 137.893 137.868 139.879
116.924 117.481 118.608 120.313 120.742 121.078
112.925 113.379 113.945 114.398 115.440 116.336

102.026 107.537 106.938 111.034 113.143 113.429 113.438
7 102.080 109.708 111.032 111.811 114.033 113.570 113.312
8
92.995 99.326 100.025 101.308 104.606 105.738 108.284
9 79.418 80.302 78.903 81.174 82.893 86.819 90.245
10
98.400 107.180 108.889 109.653 113.704 113.313 115.312
11 125.281 136.050 138.821 138.495 138.391 134.368 127.852
1?
6

2006

2005
III

III

1 109.031

VA
14
15
16
17
18
19

2004

Gross domestic product....
Personal consumption
expenditures............................
Durable goods...........................
Nondurable g oods.....................
Services......................................
Gross private domestic
investment.................................
Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Net exports of goods and

1

IV

109.429 112.744 113.139 114.048

2 108.373 111.493 112.067
3 90.845 90.198 89.908
4 107.617 111.530 113.016
5 112.863 116.529 116.858

I

II

III

114.967 115.905 116.414

112.873 113.445 114.573 115.259
89.606
89.385 89.206 88.968
113.177 113.484 115.769 116.442
118.281 119.194 120.059 120.992

6 106.645 110.284 110.675 111.853 112.860 113.717 113.866
7 106.811 110.542 110.946 112.194 113.238 114.074 114.195
8 100.834 103.428 103.607 104.510 105.471 106.266 106.487
9 120.951 134.647 136.089 141.476 145.684 149.432 151.338
94.503 94.134 93.983 93.754 93.887 93.920 93.695
10
11 120.618 126.714 127.573 129.536 130.765 131.696 131.592
12
1M

102.201
100.002

107.667
115.962
116.786
112.051

109.105 109.503
107.507 108.050
113.118 113.158
123.007 122.520
124.640 124.159
115.170 114.652

112.720 113.731
123.813 125.701
128.374 130.593
23 115.606 116.896
24 107.094 107.660

20
21
22

112.054
111.027
114.693
126.377
128.331
116.954

115.783
115.535
116.564
129.146
131.236
119.055

117.536
117.228
118.463
129.608
131.218
121.896

119.337
119.902
118.162
131.300
133.417
121.056

114.358 114.048 115.423 115.657 116.291
127.545 126.053 128.728 127.262 127.726
133.423 130.002 132.808 132.141 131.780
116.939 118.971 121.411 118.488 120.460
107.674 107.954 108.682 109.762 110,480

Exports.......................................
G oods.....................................
Services..................................
Imports........................................
G oods.....................................
Services..................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................
Federal........................................
National defense....................
Nondefense...........................
State and local...........................

105.151 108.949 109.341
104.392 107.628 107.846
106.985 112.115 112.918
104.678 111.268 112.919
102.962 109.622 111.383
113.786 119.933 120.945

110.108
108.450
114.080
114.117
112.790
120.913

110.737
109.192
114.430
113.918
112.331
122.242

112.400
110.852
116.098
116.608
115.197
123.890

114.718 121.183 122.029
115.249 120.726 121.353
115.954 121.855 122.467
23 113.963 118.606 119.261
24 114.417 121.463 122.438

123.444
121.479
122.760
119.059
124.620

124.791
123.721
124.752
121.787
125.434

126.262 126.918
124.871 125.365
126.006 126.656
122.736 122.922
127.095 127.847

14
15
16
17
18
19

20
21
22

Table 1.1.5. Gross Domestic Product

Table 1.1.6. Real Gross Domestic Product, Chained Dollars

[B illio n s o f d o lla r s ]

113.655
112.297
116.870
118.156
116.866
124.719

[B illio n s o f c h a i n e d ( 2 0 0 0 ) d o lla r s ]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross domestic product ...
Personal consumption
expenditures............................
Durable goods...........................
Nondurable goods.....................
Services.....................................
Gross private domestic
investment.................................
Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Net exports of goods and
services.....................................
Exports.......................................
Goods.....................................
S ervices.................................
Im ports.......................................
Goods.....................................
S ervices.................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................
Federal.......................................
National defense....................
Nondefense...........................
State and local............................

Line

2006
IV

I

II

8,211.5
986.3
2,345.2
4,880.1

8,742.4
1,033.1
2,539.3
5,170.0

8,847.3
1,057.3
2,584.9
5,205.1

8,927.8
1,019.6
2,613.5
5,294.7

9,079.2
1,064.1
2,658.2
5,356.8

9,228.1
1,061.8
2,721.4
5,444.9

9,349.1
1,074.4
2,744.9
5,529.8

12

1,888.0
1,830.6
1,155.3
300.8
854.5
675.3
57.3

2,057.4
2,036.2
1,265.7
338.6
927.1
770.4
21.3

2,052.6
2,067.9
1,276.7
336.3
940.4
791.2
-15.3

2,154.5
2,105.8
1,304.3
359.7
944.7
801.5
48.6

2,214.8
2,167.7
1,359.2
378.2
981.0
808.5
47.2

2,237.1
2,174.8
1,384.3
406.3
977.9
790.6
62.3

2,239.4
2,172.2
1,420.5
427.7
992.8
751.6
67.2

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

-613.2
1,178.1
818.8
359.3
1,791.4
1,495.2
296.2

-716.7
1,303.1
907.5
395.6
2,019.9
1,699.0
320.9

-728.8
1,312.4
913.9
398.5
2,041.2
1,719.1
322.1

-775.4
1,352.4
944.3
408.1
2,127.8
1,799.3
328.5

-765.2
1,405.4
989.3
416.0
2,170.6
1,832.6
338.1

-781.8
1,448.1
1,019.1
429.0
2,229.8
1,879.0
350.8

-802.2
1,486.7
1,055.9
430.7
2,288.9
1,938.2
350.7

2U

2,226.2
825.9
551.2
274.7
1,400.3

2,372.8
878.3
589.3
289.0
1,494.4

2,402.4
895.8
605.0
290.7
1,506.6

2,423.6

2,479.6
921.7
613.5
308.2
1,557.9

2,513.9
919.7
616.5
303.2
1,594.2

2,540.8
926.7
618.0
308.7
1,614.1

3
4
5
6

7
8

9
10
11

21
22

23
24




886.2

590.9
295.3
1,537.4

2005

Gross domestic product....
Personal consumption
expenditures............................
Durable g oods...........................
Nondurable goods.....................
Services......................................
Gross private domestic
investment.................................
Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Residential.............................
Change in private inventories...
Net exports of goods and
services.....................................
Exports
G oods.....................................
Services..................................
Imports
Goods
Services..................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................
Federal........................................
National defense...................
Nondefense...........................
State and local...........................
Residual...........................................

2006

2005
III

III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,327.1
2

2004

IV

I

II

III

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,450.5
7,577.1
1,085.7
2,179.2
4,323.9

7,841.2
1,145.3
2,276.8
4,436.6

7,895.3
1,175.9
2,287.6
4,454.5

7,910.2
1,137.9
2,309.6
4,476.7

8,003.8
1,190.5
2,342.8
4,494.5

8,055.0
1,190.3
2,351.1
4,535.4

8,112.0
1,207.6
2,357.7
4,570.7

10
11
12

1,770.6
1,713.9
1,145.8
248.7
904.2
559.9
53.4

1,866.3
1,842.0
1,223.8
251.5
984.9
608.0
19.6

1,855.9
1,864.2
1,232.4
247.1
1 ,000.6
620.4
-12.7

1,927.0
1,877.3
1,248.2
254.2
1,007.6
618.9
43.5

1,963.6
1,914.6
1,288.8
259.6
1,044.8
618.5
41.2

1,968.5
1,906.8
1,302.8
271.9
1,041.2
600.5
53.7

1,968.7
1,902.5
1,334.1
282.6
1,059.6
571.4
58.0

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

-590.9
1,120.4
784.4
335.9
1,711.3
1,452.2
260.3

-619.2
1,196.1
843.2
352.9
1,815.3
1,549.9
267.5

-607.6
1,200.5
847.5
353.0
1,808.1
1,543.9
266.3

-636.6
1,228.4
870.8
357.8
1,865.0
1,595.8
271.7

-636.6
1,269.3
906.2
363.6
1,905.9
1,631.9
276.6

-624.2
1,288.5
919.5
369.5
1,912.7
1,631.7
283.2

-629.4
1,308.3
940.4
368.6
1,937.7
1,659.0
281.2

20
21
22

1,940.6
716.6
475.4
241.0
1,223.9
0.4

1,958.0
727.5
483.6
243.7
1,230.4
-10.5

1,968.8
738.2
494.1
243.8
1,230.5
-17.0

1,963.5
729.6
481.4
248.0
1,233.7
- 8.8

1,987.1
745.1
491.8
253.1
1,242.0
-23.7

1,991.2
736.6
489.3
247.0
1,254.4
- 20.8

2,002.1
739.3
488.0
251.1
1,262.6
-27.6

2

3
4
5
6

7
8

9

23
24
25

N o t e . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the differ­
ence between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

D-4

December 2006

National Data

Table 1.1.7. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Prices for
Gross Domestic Product

Table 1.1.8. Contributions to Percent Change in the Gross Domestic Product
Price Index

[Prc n
e e t]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross dom estic product....

1

2.8

3.0

Line

IV
3.3

I
3.3

II
3.3

3.3

1.8

2

2.6

2.9

4.1

2.9

2.0

4.0

2.4

- 1.6
3.3
3.2

-0.7
3.6
3.2

-2.9
9.0
3.2

-1.3

- 1.0

0.6

1.1

5.0

3.1

- 0.8
8.3
2.9

- 1.1
2.3
3.1

6

3.3

3.4

3.7

4.3

3.7

3.1

0.5

7

3.4

3.5

4.0

4.6
3.5
16.8
- 1.0
6.3

3.8
3.7
12.4

3.0
3.0
10.7

0.4

0.6

0.1

3.8

2.9

Net exports of goods and
se rv ic e s.....................................

1H

Exports........................................
Goods.....................................
S ervices.................................
Im ports.......................................
Goods.....................................
Services.................................

14
15
16
17
18
19

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

Federal.......................................
National defense....................
Nondefense...........................
State and local...........................

8

9

20
21
22

1.2
6.2

-0.4
7.3

3.7
3.7
3.5
5.0
5.0
5.1

2.6

2.2

11.3
-0.4
5.1

-1.5

3.6
3.1
4.8
6.3
6.5
5.4

13.2
6.9

2.6

2.8

2.3

1.3
5.6

2.3
4.2
4.3
5.1

2.8
1.2

10.2

11.3
4.3

- 0.1

0.8

5.2
- 1.0
-0.3

4.5
5.3
2.7
5.4
5.9
2.7

6.1
6.2
6.0

-0.7
- 1.6
4.5

9.8
10.6

5.5

4.4

5.6

5.9

4.7

4.4

4.8

4.8
5.1
4.1

-0.7
7.3

7.6
6.7
9.5

6.2

3.3
3.4
3.2
7.4

0.4

23
24

4.7
4.7
4.7
4.3

2.6

3.8
4.1
3.2
5.4

25

2.8

3.0

3.3

3.2

3.3

3.3

1.0

2.1
1.6
2.1
0.6

2.4

Addendum:

Gross national product.............

2006
IV

I

II

III

Percent change at annual rate:

3
4
5

10
11
1?

2005
III

III

Durable goods...........................
Nondurable goods.....................
S ervices.....................................

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...

2005

2006

Personal consumption
expenditures.............................

Gross private domestic
investment.................................

2004

1.8

Gross dom estic product....

1

2.8

3.0

3.3

3.3

3.3

3.3

1.8

Percentage points at annual
rates:
Personal consumption
expenditures............................

Durable goods...........................
Nondurable g oods.....................
Services......................................
Gross private domestic
investment.................................

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Net exports of goods and
se r v ic e s.....................................

E xports.......................................
Goods.....................................
Services..................................
Imports........................................
G oods.....................................
Services..................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

Federal.........................................
National defense....................
Nondefense...........................
State and local...........................

2
3

4
5
6

1.85

2.02

2.87

2.04

1.44

2.80

1.68

-0.14
0.67
1.33

-0.06
0.73
1.35

-0.25
1.78
1.33

- 0.11

-0.08
0.23
1.29

-0.06

-0.09
0.48
1.29

0.52

0.56

7

0.52

8

0.12

9

0.16
-0.03
0.39

0.56
0.26
0.29
-0.03
0.30

0.00

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

20
21
22

23
24

0.12

2.03

1.66
1.21

0.61

0.72

0.62

0.52

0.09

0.64

0.62
0.38
0.34
0.04
0.24

0.49
0.32
0.31

- 0.01

0.18
0.03

0.07
0.09
0.16
-0.07
- 0.02

0.00

0.33
- 0.11
0.42
-0.03

0.75
0.36
0.43
-0.07
0.39
-0.03

-0.37

-0.61

-1.29

-0.40

0.37

-0.92

-0.41

0.36
0.25

0.37

0.27
0.10

0.15
-0.98
-0.84
-0.14

0.17
-1.57
-1.46
- 0.11

0.30
0.17
0.13
-0.70
-0.70

0.25

0.22

0.23
- 0.11

0.65
0.47
0.19
-1.57
-1.43
-0.14

0.49
0.41
0.09
-0.90
-0.83
-0.07

0.40
0.11
0.10
0.01

0.10

-0.73
-0.60
- 0.12

0.22

0.00

0.21

0.04
0.12

0.01

0.84

1.06

1.10

0.89

0.84

0.90

0.32

0.33
0.24
0.09
0.73

0.24
0.16
0.07

0.03
0.05

0.52
0.31

- 0.02

0.22

0.86

0.86

0.32

0.26
0.19
0.07
0.64

0.22
0.11

0.51

Table 1.1.9. Implicit Price Deflators for Gross Domestic Product

0.29

Table 1.1.10. Percentage Shares of Gross Domestic Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

0.02

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted

2005
Line

Line

2004

2005

2005

III

IV

I

II

III

Gross dom estic product . ..

1

109.426

112.737

113.121

114.034

114.951

115.887

116.388

Personal consumption
expenditures.............................

2

108.373

111.493

112.058

112.865

113.436

114.564

115.250

3 90.844
4 107.617
5 112.863

90.198
111.531
116.529

89.912
112.998
116.850

89.610
113.158
118.273

89.389
89.210
113.466 115.750
119.185 120.051

88.972
116.424
120.984

6

110.243

110.601

111.807

112.797

113.644

113.752

113.219 114.056
105.459 106.255
145.685 149.434
93.889 93.922
130.724 131.654

114.176
106.476
151.340
93.696
131.551

Gross private dom estic
investment.................................

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...

106.628

7 106.811
8 100.834
9 120.951
10
94.503
11 120.618
1?

110.542 110.927 112.175
103.428 103.596 104.499
134.647 136.087 141.478
94.134 93.987 93.756
126.714 127.533 129.496

Net exports of goods and
services.....................................

1H

Exports.......................................
Goods.....................................
S ervices.................................
Im ports.......................................
Goods.....................................
Services.................................

14
15
16
17
18
19

105.152
104.393
106.985
104.678
102.962
113.786

108.950
107.628
112.114
111.269
109.622
119.933

109.324 110.091
107.832 108.435
112.906 114.069
112.890 114.090
111.347 112.756
120.944 120.914

110.720
109.176
114.420
113.890
112.297
122.243

112.383 113.637
110.836 112.282
116.087 116.859
116.581 118.127
115.162 116.830
123.892 124.720

20
21
22

114.719

121.183

122.022

124.784

126.254

23
24

115.249
115.954
113.962
114.417

120.726
121.855
118.606
121.463

121.346 121.472 123.715 124.865
122.461 122.753 124.746 125.999
119.257 119.056 121.783 122.733
122.434 124.615 125.428 127.090

125.359
126.650
122.919
127.841

25

109.416

112.726

113.113

116.380

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

Federal........................................
National defense....................
Nondefense...........................
State and local............................

123.437

126.910

Addendum:

Gross national product.............




114.025

114.942

115.879

2006

2005

2006

III

Durable goods...........................
Nondurable goods.....................
S ervices.....................................

2004

Gross domestic product....
Personal consumption
expenditures............................

Durable goods...........................
Nondurable goods.....................
Services......................................
Gross private domestic
investment.................................

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Residential.............................
Change in private inventories...
Net exports of goods and
s e r v ic e s .....................................

Exports.......................................
G oods.....................................
Services..................................
Imports.........................................
G oods.....................................
Services..................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

Federal........................................
National defense....................
Nondefense...........................
State and local...........................

IV

II

III

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

2

70.1

70.2

70.4

3
4
5

8.4

69.8
8.2

20.6

20.4
41.2

70.2
8.1
20.6

41.4

20.5
41.6

69.9
8.0
20.6

41.7

8.3
20.4
41.5

70.1
8.0

20.0

41.3

41.5

6

16.1

16.5

16.3

16.9

17.0

17.0

16.8

7

15.6
9.9

16.3

16.4

16.5

8

10.2

10.2

9

2.6

10
11
12

7.3
5.8
0.5

2.7
7.4

2.7
7.5
6.3

10.2
2.8

16.7
10.4
2.9
7.5

16.5
10.5
3.1
7.4

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

-5.2
10.1

20
21
22

1

23
24

8.4

6.2

6.0

0.4

0.5

16.3
10.7
3.2
7.4
5.6
0,5

-6.1
10.6

-5.9
10.8

-5.9
11.0

-6.0
11.2

7.4
3.2
16.7
14.1

7.6
3.2
16.7
14.1

7.9
3.2
17.2
14.5

2.6

2.6

2.6

7.7
3.3
16.9
14.2
2.7

19.0

19.1

19.0

19.1

19.0

19.1

7.1
4.7
2.3

7.1
4.8
2.3

7.0
4.6
2.3

7.1
4.7
2.4

7.0
4.7
2.3

7.0
4.6
2.3

12.0

12.0

12.1

12.0

12.1

12.1

6.2
0.2

- 0.1

-5.8

-5.8

12.8

10.5
7.3
3.2
16.2
13.6

10.4
7.3
3.2
16.2
13.7

2.5

2.6

19.0

7.1
4.7
2.3
12.0

7.0
3.1
15.3

I

7.4
6.3
0.4

2.6

D-5

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 1.2.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Gross Domestic Product
by Major Type of Product

Table 1.2.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real
Gross Domestic Product by Major Type of Product

[Prc n
e e t]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

Line

2006

2004

III
Gross domestic product.......
Final sales of domestic
product..............................
Change in private
inventories........................
G oods................................................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods..............................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods........................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Services 2..........................................
Structures.........................................
Addenda:
Motor vehicle output.....................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3...........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers..................................
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers.................................

2.2
2.1

3.7
3.2

12.8

13.1
13.4
11.5

4.1
-5.4

9.0
16.0

2.3
- 1.8

16.1

6.3
- 0.1
0.9

10.8

3.0
-5.9
5.9

22.6

-19.1

3.1
24.5

3.5

3.6
11.6

-9.4

3.8

33.8

1.5
15.8

3.9

19

27.2

2.6

3.1

4.1

1.6

5.6

2.5

4.2

3.1

3.9

2.5

5.1

1.9

2.1

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Indus­
trial Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

Percent change at annual rate:
Gross domestic product.......
Percentage points at annual
rates:
Final sales of domestic
product...............................
Change in private
inventories........................
G oods................................................
Final sa le s.................................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods...............................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods........................
Final sa le s.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Services 2..........................................
Structures..........................................
Addenda:
Motor vehicle output.....................
Gross domestic product excluding
motor vehicle output................
Final sales of computers 3 ...........
Gross domestic product excluding
final sales of computers...........

1

3.9

2

3.53

3
4
5
7

0.38
1.56
1.18
0.38
0.85

8

0.66

9

0.18
0.71
0.52

3.52

4.36
-0.18
2.07
2.26
-0.18
1.79
1.56
0.23
0.28
0.70
-0.42
2.02
0.09

1.84
0.51

0.20

III

II

1.8

13
14

10
11
12

I

IV

4.2

3.2

-0.30
1.43
1.73
-0.30
0.84
0.96
- 0.12
0.58
0.76
-0.18
1.31
0.49

6

2006

2005

2005

5.6

2.6

2.2

-0.28

5.61

2.11

2.06

2.05
0.97
-1.08
2.05
0.58
-0.77
1.35
0.39
-0.31
0.70
0.46
0.33

-0.03
3.86
3.89
-0.03
1.26

0.44
1.12
0.67
0.44
0.31
-0.03
0.34
0.80
0.70

0.16
1.15
0.99
0.16
1.17
0.83
0.34

2.11

-0.85
2.60
1.78
0.82
1.39
0.33

1.40
0.04

- 0.02
0.16
-0.18
1.73
-0.66

0.10

15

0.12

0.20

0.70

-0.71

0.12

-0.31

0.76

16
17

3.79
0.06

3.03
0.16

3.48
0.08

2.47
0.20

5.46
0.07

2.87
0.04

1.45
0.09

18

3.85

3.07

4.10

1.56

5.52

2.51

2.12

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

Table 1.2.3. Real Gross Domestic Product by Major Type of Product,
Quantity Indexes

Table 1.2.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product
by Major Type of Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005
III

Gross domestic product......
Final sales of domestic
product..............................
Change in private
G oods................................................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods...............................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods........................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Services 2..........................................
Structures........................................
Addenda:
Motor vehicle output.....................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3...........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers..................................
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers.................................

2006

2005
IV

I

II

Line

1

109.031

112.546 113.223 113.719

115.274

116.004 116.640

109.096

112.958

115.455

116.060

113.883

116.654

4 107.604
5 107.656
fi
7 105.478
8 105.719
q
10 109.703
11 109.497
1?
13 110.477
14 106.297

112.515 113.448 114.326 117.831 118.877 119.964
113.689 115.696 114.689 118.277 118.917 119.871

112.963 113.513 113.738
111.235 111.852 112.698

114.408 115.094 115.949
113.518 113.612 111.910

15 111.420

118.006

117.341

111.888

113.219
113.386
114.342

16 108.947 112.359
17 153.070 190.534
18 108.699

19 110.114

112.053

113.571

113.586
116.131
113.690
115.616

122.582

114.743
114.523
114.342
115.095

116.260

117.231
118.845
118.691
118.096

117.887
118.780
120.058
119.302

114.487

120.387
120.594
120.613
119.575

121.591

112.907 113.626 115.197 116.043 116.472
192.596 207.153 211.907 215.393 223.453
112.722

114.095

113.162

114.796

114.703

116.235

115.421

116.787

116.030

117.393

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.




2005

Gross domestic product
Final sales of domestic
product...............................
Change in private
G oods................................................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods...............................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods........................
Final sa le s.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Services 2..........................................
Structures..........................................
Addenda:
Motor vehicle output.....................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3 ...........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers..................................

2006

2005
III

III

2

113.965

2004

IV

I

II

1

109.429 112.744 113.139 114.048 114.967 115.905

2

109.455

113.181

114.101

3
4 100.063 100.162 100.248
5 100.102 100.206 100.299

99.734
99.811

112.783

115.025

115.961

III
116.414
116.466

100.237 100.768 100.707
100.325 100.841 100.764

6

7
8

92.651
92.650

92.214
92.186

92.090
92.063

91.803
91.789

91.830
91.824

91.650
91.652

91.250
91.228

106.851
106.940

107.452
107.574

107.738
107.872

107.008
107.181

107.963
108.149

109.165
109.319

109.429
109.573

9
10
11
12

13 113.413 117.810 118.273 119.744 120.745 121.811 122.671
14 119.911 128.721 129.859 132.758 134.749 136.479 137.109
97.041

97.656

96.976

96.857

97.636

97.564

96.461

16 109.910
17 49.625

113.332
41.430

113.772
40.421

114.721
38.476

115.646
37.234

116.624
35.362

117.195
33.829

18 110.215

113.724

114.144

115.107

116.067

117.060

117.610

15

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

D-6

December 2006

National Data

Table 1.2.5. Gross Domestic Product
by Major Type of Product

Table 1.2.6. Real Gross Domestic Product
by Major Type of Product, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Final sales of domestic
product..............................
Change in private
inventories........................

Structures.........................................

I

II

3
4
5
6

7
8

9
10
11
12

13
14

57.3

21.3

-15.3

48.6

47.2

62.3

67.2

3,713.7

3,886.5

3,921.9

3,932.6

4,073.2

4,131.0

4,165.4

3,656.3
57.3
1,651.0
1,619.4
31.6
2,062.7
2,036.9
25.8

3,865.3
21.3
1,742.9
1,725.6
17.3
2,143.6
2,139.7
4.0

3,937.2
-15.3
1,767.0
1,767.7
- 0.8
2,155.0
2,169.5
-14.5

3,883.9
48.6
1,779.6
1,738.1
41.6
2,152.9
2,145.9
7.0

4,026.1
47.2
1,818.6
1,804.3
14.3
2,254.6
2,221.7
32.9

4,068.7
62.3
1,825.1
1,800.0
25.1
2,305.9
2,268.7
37.2

4,098.2
67.2
1,855.7
1,819.0
36.7
2,309.8
2,279.2
30.6

6,798.0

7,220.4

7,283.6

7,388.9

7,494.5

7,606.0

7,716.6

1,200.8

1,348.9

1,368.0

1,409.1

1,440.6

1,460.3

1,445.1

15

394.6

420.5

433.3

411.8

418.0

408.2

2005

427.9

2005
III

Final sales of domestic
product..............................
Change in private
inventories.......................
Residual................................

Services 2.........................................

Residual.............................................

II

III

2 10,648.3 11,025.2 11,123.5 11,115.5 11,269.0 11,328.0 11,386.0

3
4
5

G o o d s...............................................

Final sa le s................................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods..............................
Final sales................................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods.......................
Final sa le s................................
Change in private inventories 1

2006
I

IV

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,450.5

Gross dom estic product

Structures.........................................

Addenda:

Motor vehicle output.....................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3...........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers..................................

2004

III

2 11,655.1 12,434.6 12,588.8 12,681.9 12,961.2 13,135.1 13,259.8

G ood s................................................

Services 2..........................................

IV

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,327.1

Gross dom estic product

Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories
Durable goods...............................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories 1
Nondurable goods........................
Final sales.................................
Change in private inventories 1

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2006

6

7
8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16

53.4
1.8

19.6
3.8

-12.7
4.3

43.5
4.8

41.2
6.2

53.7
6.4

58.0
6.5

3,711.6

3,881.0

3,652.6
53.4
1,781.9
1,747.9
30.7
1,930.7
1,904.7
23.1

3,857.3
19.6
1,890.2
1,871.9
16.4
1,995.6
1,989.0
3.9

3,913.2

3,943.5

4,064.4

4,100.5

4,138.0

3,925.4
-12.7
1,918.9
1,920.0
-0.5
2,000.9
2 ,011.2
- 11.6

3,891.2
43.5
1,938.4
1,893.4
39.2
2,012.4
2 ,002.1
6.4

4,013.0
41.2
1,980.5
1,964.9
13.4
2,088.9
2,054.3
27.1

4,034.7
53.7
1,991.5
1,963.8
23.1
2,113.0
2,075.3
30.3

4,067.0
58.0
2,033.8
1,993.8
33.2
2 , 112.2
2,080.0
25.4

5,994.0
1,001.4

6,128.9

6,158.7

6,244.5

6,290.9

1,053.7

6,170.9
1,061.7

6,207.3

1,047.9

1,070.3

1,054.3

1.7

-9.4

-16.4

-9.9

1,069.4
- 20.0

-19.2

-27.1

406.6

430.7

447.4

424.3

428.3

417.8

443.8

Addenda:

16 11,317.9 12,035.3 12,140.2 12,318.8 12,590.4 12,789.1 12,899.2
17
83.5
87.9
84.0
83.4
86.8
85.9
87.0
18 11,629.0 12,369.1 12,487.6 12,642.6 12,921.3 13,113.3 13,243.7

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

Motor vehicle output....................
Gross domestic product
excluding motor vehicle output
Final sales of computers 3 .........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers.................................

17

18 10,297.7 10,620.2 10,672.0 10,739.9 10,888.4 10,968.4 11,008.9
19
211.7
227.7
245.7
168.3
209.5
233.0
236.8
20 10,551.4 10,877.0 10,942.0 10,984.7 11,134.3 11,204.0 11,263.1

1. Estimates for durable goods and nondurable goods for 1996 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Indus­
trial Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS).
2. Includes government consumption expenditures, which are for services (such as education and national defense)
produced by government. In current dollars, these services are valued at their cost of production.
3. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.
N o te . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar
value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of
more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line following change in
private inventories is the difference between gross domestic product and the sum of final sales of domestic product and of
change in private inventories; the residual line following structures is the difference between gross domestic product and the
sum of the detailed lines of goods, of services, and of structures.

Table 1.3.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Gross
Value Added by Sector

Table 1.3.3. Real Gross Value Added by Sector,
Quantity Indexes

[Percent]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

IV

III

Seasonally adjusted

2006

2005
I

II

Line

2004

2005

III

2005

2006

III

IV

I

II

III

113.223
114.542

113.719
115.057

115.274
116.942

116.004

116.640
118.381

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

2.2

Gross domestic product....

1

3.8

4.9

2.7

2.2

3.8
1.0

4.9
11.3

6.7
14.1

2.7
3.9

2.3
-8.3

Business 1.....................................
Nonfarm 2 ...................................

2

4.3
7.4

1.8
1.8
8.1

5.6
6.7

2.6

4.4

Households and institutions....

3
4
5

4.2

2.1

2.6

2.3

4.4

3.0

Households................................
Nonprofit institutions serving
households 3 .........................

6

6.9

3.1

2.3

4.1

7.4

4.0

2.1
2.8

7

0.9

0.8

3.0

0.0

1.8

1.2

Households.................................
Nonprofit institutions serving
households 3 .........................

7

108.391

109.294

109.815

109.805

109.982

110.484

110.820

General governm ent4................

8

0.9

General governm ent4................

8

105.732

106.666

106.731

106.982

106.795

107.014

107.625

9

0.5

-0.4
1.4

1.5
0.7

0.8
- 0.1
1.2

2.3

10

0.9
0.6
1.0

0.8

Federal........................................
State and local............................

0.6
1.0

0.6
-0 .7

Federal.........................................
State and local............................

10

106.947 106.726 107.121 106.167 106.148
106.536 106.726 106.915 107.065 107.389

106.989
107.899

107.857

112.416

Gross dom estic product . ..
B usiness 1.....................................
Nonfarm 2 ...................................

Farm ............................................

1
2

-3.5
0.6

3.2
1.9

11

5.6

2.7

1.9

2.8

7.1

4.0

2.8

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and
used by nonprofit institutions serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing owned by
nonprofit institutions.
4. Equals compensation of general government employees plus general government consumption of fixed capital.




112.546
113.706

117.735

9 106.265
105.491

Addendum:

Addendum:

Gross housing value added

Farm ............................................
Households and institutions....

109.031
109.596

3 109.547 113.690 114.545 115.044 116.911 117.700 118.375
4 114.112 115.266 114.172 116.415 120.316 121.458 118.849
5 108.826 111.086 111.349 111.972 113.180 114.028 114.619
6 109.250 112.605 112.658 113.798 115.853 116.985 117.783

Gross housing value added.

11

104.980

107.927

108.674

110.563

111.642

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and
used by nonprofit institutions serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing owned by
nonprofit institutions.
4. Equals compensation of general government employees plus general government consumption of fixed capital.

December 2006

D-7

Survey of Current Business

Table 1.3.4. Price Indexes for Gross Value Added by Sector

Table 1.3.5. Gross Value Added by Sector

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted

2004

Line

2005

2005
III

Gross dom estic product . ..
Bu siness 1.....................................
Nonfarm 2 ...................................

Farm ............................................
Households and institutions....

H ouseholds................................
Nonprofit institutions serving
households 3 .........................

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006
IV

I

II

2005

III

1 109.429

112.744

113.139

114.048

114.967

115.905

116.414

G ross dom estic product....

110.324

110.720

111.581

112.325

113.179

113.483

B usiness 1.....................................
Nonfarm 2 ...................................

3 106.924 110.268 110.690 111.582 112.379 113.320 113.527
4 140.433 116.270 113.998 111.773 106.945 98.811 109.317
5 115.057 117.960 118.146 119.389 120.628 122.104 123.568
6 112.530 114.495 114.683 115.448 116.397 118.148 119.920

IV

Households and institutions....

I

II

III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,327.1
2

Farm ............................................

2006

2005
III

2

107.243

2004

Line

9,007.6

9,613.4

9,717.7

3
4
5

8,893.0
114.6

9,517.5
95.9

9,624.7
93.0

1,356.5

1,419.6

1,425.1

9,837.9 10,065.4 10,210.4 10,293.3
9,745.0 9,973.6 10,124.8 10 ,201.2

92.9

91.8

85.6

92.2

1,448.2

1,479.0

1,508.3

1,534.3

869.6

756.9

793.7

795.4

808.8

830.2

850.9

122.437

122.618 124.508

126.142

127.233

128.262

Households.................................
Nonprofit institutions serving
households 3 .........................

6

7 118.278

7

599.6

625.8

629.7

639.4

648.8

657.4

664.7

General governm ent4................

8

119.235

124.718

125.330

128.170

129.182

130.257

General governm ent4................

8

1,348.4

1,422.9

1,430.7

1,444.5

1,464.0

1,478.6

1,499.4

Federal........................................
State and local...........................

9

122.817
117.747

129.479 130.093
122.735 123.347

129.782 133.763 134.390
124.764 125.844 127.015

134.545
128.471

Federal.........................................
State and local...........................

9

10

10

411.6
936.8

436.7
986.2

437.9
992.9

438.4
1,006.0

447.9
1,016.2

449.9
1,028.7

454.0
1,045.5

11

112.580

114.694

115.764 116.716

120.098

11

938.7

982.6

984.9

999.2

1,025.0

1,049.6

1,072.3

126.237

Addendum:

Gross housing value added ,,.,

Addendum:

114.898

118.361

Gross housing value added

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and
used by nonprofit institutions serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing owned by
nonprofit institutions.
4. Equals compensation of general government employees plus general government consumption of fixed capital.




1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and
used by nonprofit institutions serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing owned by
nonprofit institutions.
4. Equals compensation of general government employees plus general government consumption of fixed capital.

Table 1.3.6. Real Gross Value Added by Sector, Chained Dollars
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2006

2005
IV

III

II

I

III

Gross dom estic product................................................

1

10,703.5

11,048.6

11,115.1

11,163.8

11,316.4

11,388.1

11,450.5

B usiness 1..................................................................................
Nonfarm 2 ................................................................................

2

8,402.4

8,717.5

8,781.6

8,821.0

8,965.6

9,026.4

9,075.9

3
4
5

8,320.3
81.6

8,634.9
82.4

8,699.9
81.7

8,737.8
83.3

8,879.6
86.1

8,939.5
86.9

8,990.8
85.0

Farm .........................................................................................
Households and institutions.................................................

1,176.1

1,200.5

1,203.4

1,210.1

1,223.1

1,232.3

1,238.7

7

672.6
504.1

693.2
508.3

693.6
510.7

700.6
510.7

713.2
511.5

720.2
513.8

725.1
515.4

General governm ent4.............................................................

8

1,130.9

1,140.9

1,141.6

1,144.3

1,142.3

1,144.6

1,151.1

Federal....................................................................................
State and local........................................................................
Residual........................................................................................

9
10
11

335.1
795.6
-5.8

337.3
803.5
- 11.0

336.6
805.0
-12.4

337.8
806.4
- 12.8

334.8
807.5
-16.3

334.8
810.0
-17.1

337.4
813.8
-17.0

12

833.8

856.7

857.2

863.2

878.2

886.8

892.9

Households.............................................................................
Nonprofit institutions serving households 3 ........................

6

Addendum:

Gross housing value added..................................................

1. Equals gross domestic product excluding gross value added of households
and institutions and of general government.
2. Equals gross domestic business value added excluding gross farm value
added.
3. Equals compensation of employees of nonprofit institutions, the rental
value of nonresidential fixed assets owned and used by nonprofit institutions
serving households, and rental income of persons for tenant-occupied housing
owned by nonprofit institutions.

4.
Equals compensation of general government employees plus general
government consumption of fixed capital.
N o te . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chaintype quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar value of the corresponding
series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes
uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar esti­
mates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between the
first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

Table 1.4.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross
Domestic Purchases, and Real Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers
[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005
III

1
2

3.9

Equals: Gross dom estic purchases.....................................

3
4
<i

10.8
4.4

Equals: Final sa les to dom estic purchasers......................

6
7

Gross domestic product.........................................................

Less: Exports of goods and services.......................................
Plus: Imports of goods and services........................................

2006

2005
IV

I

II

3.2
6.8
6.1

4.2

1.8

5.6

3.2
2.5

9.6
13.2

14.0
9.1

3.3

4.0

2.7

4.0

3.6

4.2

3.5

3.5

4.4

9.2

III
2.6
6.2

2.2

1.4

6.3
5.3

5.3

2.0

2.3

0.7

5.4

1.6

2.1

-0.3

5.6

2.1

2.1

Addendum:

Final sales of domestic product............................................

D-8

National Data

December 2006

Table 1.4.3. Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross Domestic Purchases,
and Real Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers, Quantity Indexes

Table 1.4.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product, Gross Domestic
Purchases, and Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

2005

Seasonally adjusted

2006

Line

III
Gross domestic product............
Less: Exports of goods and
services......................................
Plus: Imports of goods and
services......................................
Equals: Gross domestic
purchases..................................
Less: Change in private
inventories..................................
Equals: Final sales to domestic
purchasers................................
Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product

1 109.031

112.546

IV

I

II

113.719

115.274

116.004

116.640

102.201

109.105

109.503

112.054

115.783

117.536

119.337

3 115.962

123.007

122.520

126.377

129.146

129.608

131.300

4 110.691

114.351

114.889 115.657

117.161

117.746

118.414

2

5
6

110.761

7 109.096

2005

2005

III

113.223

2004

114.755 115.610 115.825 117.345

117.810 118.437

112.958

116.060

113.965

113.883

115.455

116.654

2006
IV

Gross domestic product............
Less: Exports of goods and
sen/ices......................................
Plus: Imports of goods and
services......................................
Equals: Gross domestic
purchases..................................
Less: Change in private
inventories..................................
Equals: Final sales to domestic
purchasers.................................
Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product

1

109.429

2

I

II

III

112.744 113.139 114.048

114.967 115.905 116.414

105.151

108.949

109.341

110.108

110.737

112.400

113.655

3 104.678

111.268

112.919

114.117

113.918

116.608

118.156

4 109.210 112.981

113.572 114.541

115.313 116.455 117.049

5
6

109.235 113.021

7 109.455

112.783

113.614 114.594 115.371

116.510 117.102

113.181

115.961

114.101

115.025

116.466

Table 1.4.5. Relation of Gross Domestic Product, Gross Domestic Purchases,
and Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers

Table 1.4.6. Relation of Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross Domestic
Purchases, and Real Final Sales to Domestic Purchasers, Chained Dollars

[Billions of dollars]

[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross domestic product............
Less: Exports of goods and
services......................................
Plus: Imports of goods and
services......................................
Equals: Gross domestic
purchases..................................
Less: Change in private
inventories..................................
Equals: Final sales to domestic
purchasers................................
Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product




Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2006
IV

I

II

2

1,178.1

1,303.1

1,312.4

1,352.4

1,405.4

1,448.1

1,486.7

3

1,791.4

2,019.9

2,041.2

2,127.8

2,170.6

2,229.8

2,288.9

4 12,325.7 13,172.5 13,302.3 13,505.9 13,773.6 13,979.1 14,129.3
57.3

21.3

-15.3

48.6

47.2

62.3

2005

67.2

6 12,268.4 13,151.3 13,317.6 13,457.3 13,726.4 13,916.8 14,062.1

7 11,655.1 12,434.6 12,588.8 12,681.9 12,961.2 13,135.1 13,259.8

2005
III

III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,327.1

5

2004

Gross domestic product............
Less: Exports of goods and
services......................................
Plus: Imports of goods and
services......................................
Equals: Gross domestic
purchases..................................
Less: Change in private
inventories..................................
Equals: Final sales to domestic
purchasers.................................
Addendum:
Final sales of domestic product

2006
IV

I

II

III

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,450.5
2

1,120.4

1,196.1

1,200.5

1,228.4

1,269.3

1,288.5

1,308.3

3

1,711.3

1,815.3

1,808.1

1,865.0

1,905.9

1,912.7

1,937.7

4 11,286.5 11,659.7 11,714.6 11,792.9 11,946.3 12,005.9 12,074.0
5

53.4

19.6

-12.7

43.5

41.2

53.7

58.0

6 11,231.1 11,636.1 11,722.8 11,744.6 11,898.7 11,945.9 12,009.5

7 10,648.3 11,025.2 11,123.5 11,115.5 11,269.0 11,328.0 11,386.0

Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive.
N o te .

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

D-9

Table 1.5.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Gross Domestic Product,
Expanded Detail

Table 1.5.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real
Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail
[Percent]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

2006

Line

2004

2005

G ross dom estic p ro d u ct....
Personal consum ption
e xp e n d itu re s.............................
Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and parts.....
Furniture and household
equipment..........................
O th er......................................
Nondurable goods.....................
F ood........................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.....................
O th er......................................
S ervices.....................................
H ousing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and g as............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical care..........................
Recreation..............................
O th e r......................................
G ross private dom estic
investm ent.................................
Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software.....................
Computers and
peripheral
equipm ent............
Software 1 ................
O ther.........................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment.................
Other equipm ent..........
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Farm ........................................
Nonfarm..................................
Net exports o f goods and
se rv ic e s .....................................
Exports.......................................
Goods.....................................
Services.................................
Im ports.......................................
Goods.....................................
Services.................................
G overnment consum ption
expenditures and gross
investm ent.................................
Federal.......................................
National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment...................

3.9

3.2

4.2

3.9
6.4
1.9

3.5
5.5

3.9
9.0
10.5

12.1
6.8

10.0

3.6
3.4
5.0
1.0

4.3
3.5
3.8
2.6
1.6

3.3
1.2

3.1
4.8
4.2
9.8
7.3
5.9

0.6

8.7
4.5
5.4
6.2

-0.5
4.1
2.6
2.8
2.1
2.6
1.8
0.1

3.6
2.7
2.0

-12.3
-34.9

13.7
- 2.0
3.4
6.4
3.0

11.6
6.1

-5.8
2.9
3.2
2.3
2.4

-2.3
3.6

2.1

2.0
- 0.8
- 0.2

3.9
4.1
10.3

5.2
6.3
5.9
-7.0

8.9

22.8

3.3
-3.7
1.4

5.6

16.3
5.9
6.7

11.0

2.0

6.0

1.0
1.1
- 1.2

8.6

-3.8

5.3

-1.3
6.4

0.7
3.4
3.7
2.4
8.4
15.8
3.4
1.7

4.9
1.5
3.1

1.6

2.6
0.8
6.1

2.6

10.7
22.7
2.7
1.1

2.9
3.0
1.8

16.2

7.8

1.0

0.0

2.8

8.2

13.7
8.7
15.6

- 1.6
4.4
20.3
-1.4

-0.9

5.2
12.0
2.8

10.1

8.5

7.3

7.0

14.2

17.9
5.8
7.2

8.6

27.1

10.0
8.1

4.6
9.9

2.8

12.2

-4.1

8.1

20.1

3.0
16.2

13.2
5.6
9.9

12.9
7.0

23.0

- 21.8

2.0

6.6

8.6

7.1

-0.9

9.2
9.
9

10.0

16.7
7.2

21.8

- 1.1

9.5

24.9
31.6
-3.6

4.7
4.2
-9.0
13.6

26.5
3.2
9.5
0.3

27.7
8.5
-0.3

- 22.8
7.4
- 11.1

11.8

4.1
-18.0

6.3
9.4

9.6
11.5
5.5
13.2
14.1
8.3

10.9

0.9
1.5
1.7

3.4

9.6

1.2

11.2
11.1

5.5

11.7

1.1
0.1
8.1

6.2

0.5
0.9
-0.9

4.0
22.8
- 0.1

14.0
17.3
6.7
9.1
9.4
7.4

- 1.1
-4.6
-9.9

10

4.9

0.8

2.2

8.8

-4.5
- 2.0
-4.1
14.1
-9.3
-5.0
-32.9
4.0

1.5

- 10.8
-3.1
7.1
2.4
43.8

1.4
-6.4

1. Excludes software “embedded," or bundled, in computers and other equipment.




2.9

2.3
-14.0
-29.7
- 0.1
4.0
4.3
3.1
3.2

3.7
1.5
1.7

4.6

7.3

2.2

2.6
- 0.1
- 1.2

1.7
0.3

1.8

6.8
1.1

2.6

4.8
19.8
18.9

2.0

2.7
-1.7
4.4

2.2

26

5.4
7.5

5.6
0.8

1.0
1.0

1.4

8.9
9.1
7.9
8.5
8.1
10.8

2.7
1.7
7.0

- 1.0
5.3
6.9
-2.7

- 1.1
- 1.0
- 1.8
6.8

7.4
3.2
2.6

2.1

3.0

12.5

1.2

Percent change at annual rate:
Gross dom estic p ro d u c t....
Percentage points at annual
rates:
Personal consum ption
e xp e n d itu re s............................
Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and p a rts.....
Furniture and household
equipment..........................
Other.......................................
Nondurable g oods.....................
Food.........................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.....................
Other.......................................
Services......................................
H ousing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and g a s ............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical c a re ..........................
Recreation..............................
Other.......................................
G ross private dom estic
investm ent.................................
Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software.....................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment.............
Software 1..................
O th e r.........................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment..................
Other equipment...........
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Farm .......................................
Nonfarm..................................
Net exports of goods and
services
Exports
Goods.....................................
Services..................................
Imports
G oods.....................................
Services..................................
G overnment consum ption
expenditures and gross
investm ent.................................
Federal.........................................
National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local...........................
Consumption expenditures...
Gross investment...................

1

3.9

2
3

4
5

4.2

2.71

2.44

0.54
0.07

0.45
0.02

0.35
0.11

7

0.73
0.33
0.14

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

IV

3.2

6
8

2006

2005
III

0.02

0.24
1.45
0.40
0.10
0.02

20

0.08
0.03
0.37
0.14
0.41

21
22

1.49
1.11

II

I

III

5.6

2.76

0.53

3.38

1.81

1.99

0.74
0.38

-1.08
-1.51

1.50
0.60

- 0.01
-0.04

0.47
0.29

0.29
0.14
0.90
0.51
0.17

0.40
-0.03
0.70
0.61
0.08

0.33

0.65
0.26

- 0.01
0.23
1.09
0.30
0.08
0.04
0.04

-0.15
0.16
1.32
0.24
0.09
0.03
0.06
-0.04
0.53
0.05
0.44

-0.06
0.19
0.83
0.18

0.00

0.00
0.10

0.44
0.04
0.16

0.52
0.09
0.31

0.84
1.02

2.51

1.31

0.17

0.01

0.46
0.52
0.31

1.34
1.36
0.25

-0.15

0.21

1.11

-0.27
0.45
0.56
- 0.10

0.00

0.43
0.08
0.20
0.87

0.10

0.79
0.39
0.27

0.01

0.03
- 0.02

1.20

0.64
0.23
-0.03
0.36
0.67
0.24
-0.58
-0.58

2.6

2.2

1.8

0.10

-0.06
0.30
0.19
- 0.10
0.02

0.19
1.52
0.25
0.31
0.23
0.08
0.04
0.31
0.02

0.58

0.17
0.02

0.23
- 0.12
0.14
0.13
0.08
1.29
0.27
0.39
0.33
0.06
0.03
0.35
0.09
0.17

23
24
25

0.58
0.06
0.52

1.17
0.67
0.03
0.64

26

0.36

0.30

0.26

0.25

0.74

-0.04

0.33

0.16
0.04
0.04
0.19

0.15
0.18
0.40
-0.05

0.03
0.07
-0.14
0.16

0.15
0.05
0.13

0.31

-0.32
0.09
-0.72
0.44
-0.09
0.54

0.13
0.05
-1.16
0.16

0.42
0.66

-0.21
0.68

0.45

0.71
-0.03
-0.89
-0.96
0.07

27
28
29
30

0.59
- 0.20
0.78

0.10

0.12

0.15

0.09

0.11

0.10
0.10

0.06
0.07
0.13
0.23

-0.31
0.08
-0.06
2.05
0.14
1.90

-0.05

31
32
33
34
35
36

0.14
0.07
0.53
0.38
0.07
0.31

0.15
0.09
0.50
-0.30
-0.06
-0.24

0.27
0.03
0.43
-0.18
0.28
-0.46

37
38
39
40
41
42
43

-0.65
0.88

-0.26
0.68

-0.06

-1.07

-0.04

0.52
0.16
-0.94
-0.87
-0.07

0.97
0.80
0.17
-2.04
-1.84
- 0.20

1.41

0.60
0.28
-1.53
-1.29
-0.24

0.33
0.27
0.06
-0.39
-0.36
-0.03

-1.46
-1.27
-0.19

0.36

0.17
0.11

0.64
0.66

-0.21

0.94

0.16

0.08
0.05
0.03
0.03

0.52
0.45
0.07
0.14
0.08
0.06

-0.33
-0.49
-0.47
- 0.02
0.16
0.05

0.61
0.41
0.37
0.05

-0.32
-0.09
-0.17
0.08
-0.23
- 0.10
- 0.12
0.48

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

0.30
0.27
0.22

0.05
0.03
0.03
0.00

0.06

0.00
0.02

0.10

0.06
0.08

-0.04

- 0.02

- 0.01
0.14
-0.15

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.

0.11

0.13
0.09
0.03

0.11
- 0.02

-0.03
- 0.01
- 0.02

1.20
0.21

0.20

0.16
0.03
0.33
0.17
0.16

0.21

-0.24
0.01

-0.25

0.20

0.28

1.01

0.49
0.52

0.00

0.01

0.14

0.42
0.10

-0.05
-0.04
- 0.01
0.15
0.14
0.01

0.32
0.29
0.03

D-10

National Data

December 2006

Table 1.5.3. Real Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail, Quantity Indexes

Table 1.5.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

2005

Seasonally adjusted

2006

Line

III

IV

I

II

109.031

112.546

113.223

113.719

115.274

116.004

116.640

Gross domestic product....

Personal consumption
expenditures.............................

2

112.430

116.349

117.152

117.373

118.761

119.521

120.367

Personal consumption
expenditures.............................

3 125.753
4 116.518

132.666
117.173

136.207
122.801

131.799
110.286

137.893
115.158

137.868
114.799

139.879
117.251

Gross private domestic
investment.................................

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software
Information processing
equipment and
software.....................
Computers and
peripheral
equipm ent............
Software 1 ................
O ther.........................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipm ent................
Other equipm ent..........
Residential..............................
Nonfarm..................................
Net exports of goods and
se rv ic e s.....................................

Exports........................................
Goods.....................................
Services.................................
Im ports........................................
Goods.....................................
Services.................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

Federal........................................
National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense............................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment...................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

104.727
116.072
110.055
108.459
104.922
104.569
105.147
97.510
118.550
113.618
107.403
102.026

104.204
120.838
112.925
111.540
107.145
107.317
107.016
97.652
122.799
116.727
109.540
107.537

103.288
121.368
113.379
111.918
107.506
107.443
107.543
97.376
123.437
117.009
110.176
106.938

102.679
122.432
113.945
112.394
107.598
107.963
107.320
97.330
124.563
117.445
110.634
111.034

102.348
124.356
114.398
113.035
103.628
98.875
107.289
98.298
125.887
118.336
111.521
113.143

102.532
125.409
115.440
113.713
105.735
102.566
108.190
98.722
126.690
118.581
113.175

113.438

Gross private domestic
investment.................................

113.429

23
24
25

102.080 109.708 111.032 111.811 114.033 113.570 113.312
92.995
99.326 100.025 101.308 104.606 105.738 108.284
79.418
80.302 78.903 81.174 82.893 86.819 90.245
98.400 107.180 108.889 109.653 113.704 113.313 115.312

26

108.905

118.169

27
28
29
30

138.489
110.703
95.076
83.354

163.269 163.804 173.913
117.072 118.092 118.920
101.880 103.171 103.947
90.147 90.994 94.468

31
32
33
M
35
36

80.063
104.902
125.281

90.382 94.682
112.290 113.399
136.050 138.821

102.201
100.002

109.105
107.507
113.118
123.007
124.640
115.170

37
38
39
40
41
42
43

119.268 121.307

127.437

127.088 130.012

183.839 185.956
122.383 123.658
111.339 108.753
93.602 96.640

197.205
124.624
111.246
96.702

89.030 94.635
115.224 117.597
138.495 138.391

88.698
119.702
134.368

91.202
120.915
127.852

112.054
111.027
114.693
126.377
128.331
116.954

117.536 119.337
117.228 119.902
118.463 118.162
129.608 131.300
131.218 133.417
121.896 121.056

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software.....................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment.............
Software 1..................
O th er.........................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment..................
Other equipment...........
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Farm ........................................
Nonfarm..................................
Net exports of goods and
se rv ic e s .....................................

107.667
115.962
116.786
112.051

44 112.720
45 123.813
46 128.374
47 127.006
48 138.370
49 115.606
50 116.431
51 110.674
52 107.094
53 106.736
54 108.488

109.503
108.050
113.158
122.520
124.159
114.652

115.783
115.535
116.564
129.146
131.236
119.055

E xports.......................................
Goods.....................................
Services..................................
Imports.........................................
Goods.....................................
Services..................................

113.731

114.358

114.048

115.423

115.657

116.291

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

125.701
130.593
128.551
145.920
116.896
116.593
119.670
107.660
107.655
107.563

127.545
133.423
131.236
149.882
116.939
116.675
119.443
107.674
107.817
106.963

126.053
130.002
127.544
148.703
118.971
117.362
130.801
107.954
108.074
107.335

128.728
132.808
130.343
151.544
121.411
119.666
134.201
108.682
108.536
109.177

127.262
132.141
128.981
156.631
118.488
118.137
121.448
109.762
109.095
112.448

127.726
131.780
128.663
155.922
120.460
120.255
122.394
110.480
109.903
112.784

Federal.........................................
National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local...........................
Consumption expenditures...
Gross investment...................

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.




103.761
125.871
116.336
114.436
108.447
107.953
108.918
98.986
127.604
119.459
113.675

Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and p a rts......
Furniture and household
equipment..........................
Other.......................................
Nondurable goods.....................
Food.........................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.....................
Other.......................................
Services......................................
H ousing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and g a s............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical ca re ..........................
Recreation..............................
Other........................................

5 142.541 156.790 159.059 163.472 172.097 173.496 175.886
6 119.370 129.696 130.021 131.958 137.039 135.754 136.081
7 111.913 116.924 117.481 118.608 120.313 120.742 121.078
8 109.273 115.191 116.189 117.349 119.265 119.853 119.477
9 117.869 125.195 125.581 128.686 131.367 130.113 131.794

2005

2006

III

1

10
11
12

2005

III

Gross dom estic product....

Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and p arts.....
Furniture and household
equipment..........................
O th er......................................
Nondurable goods.....................
Food........................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.....................
O ther......................................
S ervices.....................................
Housing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and gas............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical care..........................
Recreation..............................
O th er......................................

2004

IV

I

II

III

1

109.429

112.744

113.139

114.048

114.967

115.905

116.414

2

108.373

111.493

112.067

112.873

113.445

114.573

115.259

3
4

90.845
97.242

90.198
98.967

89.908
98.607

89.606
98.906

89.385
99.460

89.206
99.532

88.968
99.631

79.929
98.044
107.617
8 110.270
9 92.655

76.884
97.688
111.530
112.732
91.706

76.315
98.189
113.016
113.012
91.265

75.435
98.005
113.177
113.642
91.101

74.671
73.894 73.047
97.567 98.351
98.950
113.484 115.769 116.442
114.414 114.905 115.727
91.341
90.870 91.651

124.064
106.139
112.863
113.234
109.943
117.821
105.374
108.373
114.660
112.059
113.086

151.423
107.775
116.529
116.165
115.554
129.900
107.233
112.663
118.438
115.168
116.625

167.157
107.930
116.858
116.453
115.498
129.526
107.364
113.621
118.752
115.535
116.985

163.612
108.619
118.281
117.279
120.579
142.169
108.047
114.970
119.949
116.702
117.959

161.126 182.632
109.301 109.737
119.194 120.059
118.269 119.717
122.403 121.019
145.582 140.799
108.977 109.447
115.411 116.826
120.482 121.332
117.311 118.582
119.116 119.970

185.632
110.040
120.992
121.055
121.382
140.316
110.284
117.675
122.180
119.422
120.848

21
22

106.645

110.284

110.675

111.853

112.860

113.866

106.811
23 100.834
24 120.951
25 94.503

110.542
103.428
134.647
94.134

110.946 112.194 113.238 114.074 114.195
103.607 104.510 105.471 106.266 106.487
136.089 141.476 145.684 149.432 151.338
93.983 93.754 93.887 93.920 93.695

26

84.741

82.218

81.863

2/

58.599
94.503
91.294
104.249

51.407
94.067
90.492
108.064

50.407
94.012
90.369
108.373

5
6

7

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

28
29
30

31 109.923
32 103.914
33 120.618
34
35
3R

108.882 108.351
108.174 108.742
126.714 127.573

37
38 105.151 108.949
39 104.392 107.628
40 106.985 112.115
41 104.678 111.268
42 102.962 109.622
43 113.786 119.933

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

81.313

80.940

48.634 47.125
94.009 94.430
90.343 90.186
108.973 109.659
107.933
109.100
129.536

113.717

80.737

80.429

45.443 43.872
95.005 95.356
90.523 90.734
110.544 111.711

108.867 109.257
109.841 109.608
130.765 131.696

106.889
110.311
131.592

109.341 110.108
107.846 108.450
112.918 114.080
112.919 114.117
111.383 112.790
120.945 120.913

110.737
109.192
114.430
113.918
112.331
122.242

112.400
110.852
116.098
116.608
115.197
123.890

113.655
112.297
116.870
118.156
116.866
124.719

126.918

114.718

121.183

122.029

123.444

124.791

126.262

115.249
115.954
118.472
99.911
113.963
116.274
100.007
114.417
115.388
110.587

120.726 121.353
121.855 122.467
125.071 125.833
101.628 101.370
118.606 119.261
121.381 122.127
101.913 102.051
121.463 122.438
122.177 123.079
118.679 119.954

121.479
122.760
126.061
102.026
119.059
121.810
102.470
124.620
125.365
121.716

123.721
124.752
128.327
102.438
121.787
124.944
103.035
125.434
126.112
122.799

124.871 125.365
126.006 126.656
129.681 130.314
103.109 103.835
122.736 122.922
125.958 126.154
103.623 103.750
127.095 127.847
127.916 128.692
123.893 124.548

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.

December 2006

D-11

Survey of Current Business

Table 1.5.5. Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail

Table 1.5.6. Real Gross Domestic Product, Expanded Detail, Chained Dollars

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs

[B n o c a e (2 0 ) d lla ]
illio s f h in d 0 0 o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

G ross dom estic product....
Personal consumption
expenditures.............................

Durable goods............................
Motor vehicles and parts......
Furniture and household
equipment...........................
O th er.......................................

Gross private dom estic
investment.................................

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software.....................
Computers and
peripheral
Software 1 ................
O th er.........................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipm ent................
Other equipm ent..........
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...
Farm .......................................
Nonfarm..................................
Net exports of goods and
serv ices.....................................

Goods
Services
Im ports.
Goods
Services
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense............................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local...........................
Consumption expenditures...
Gross investment...................

IV

I

II

Line

2

8,211.5

8,742.4

8,847.3

8,927.8

9,079.2

9,228.1

9,349.1

3
4

986.3
437.9

1,033.1
448.2

1,057.3
468.1

1,019.6
421.6

1,064.1
442.7

1,061.8
441.7

1,074.4
451.5

5

356.5
191.8
2,345.2
1,114.8
325.1

377.2
207.7
2,539.3
1,201.4
341.8

380.0
209.2
2,584.9
1,214.7
341.3

386.0
2,613.5
1,233.7
349.1

402.3
219.1
2,658.2
1,262.3
355.4

401.3
218.8
2,721.4
1,274.0
355.1

402.2
220.7
2,744.9
1,279.1
358.4

248.8
656.5
4,880.1
1,236.1
450.0
176.6
273.5
307.8
1,395.7
341.6
1,148.9

302.1
694.0
5,170.0
1,304.1
483.0
199.8
283.2
320.4
1,493.4
360.6
1,208.4

331.0
698.0
5,205.1
1,311.7
484.3
199.4
285.0
322.3
1,505.0
362.6
1,219.1

322.1
708.6
5,294.7
1,326.6
506.1
219.9
286.2
325.9
1,534.0
367.7
1,234.4

316.2
724.2
5,356.8
1,345.4
494.8
206.2
288.6
330.4
1,557.2
372.4
1,256.5

359.1
733.3
5,444.9
1,370.1
499.1
206.9
292.2
335.9
1,578.2
377.2
1,284.3

369.3
738.0
5,529.8
1,394.2
513.5
217.0
296.5
339.3
1,600.7
382.7
1,299.4

6
8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

212.0

Personal consumption
expenditures............................

Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and p a rts.....
Furniture and household
equipment..........................
Other.......................................
Food.........................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other

2,057.4

2,052.6

2,154.5

2,214.8

1,830.6
1,155.3
300.8
854.5

2,036.2
1,265.7
338.6
927.1

2,067.9
1,276.7
336.3
940.4

2,105.8
1,304.3
359.7
944.7

2,167.7
1,359.2
378.2
981.0

2,174.8
1,384.3
406.3
977.9

26

431.6

454.3

456.6

461.3

482.4

479.9

?/
28
29
30

82.3
184.3
164.9
138.4

85.1
194.0
175.2
155.1

83.9
195.6
177.2
157.0

85.9
196.9
178.4
163.9

88.0

203.6
190.8
163.4

85.9
207.0
187.1
170.1

31
32
33
34
35
36

141.6
143.0
675.3
57.3
8.4
49.0

158.3
159.4
770.4
21.3
0.3

165.0
161.8
791.2
-15.3
1.3
-16.6

154.6
164.9
801.5
48.6
5.8
42.8

165.7
169.4
808.5
47.2
5.4
41.8

155.9
172.1
790.6
62.3
2.3
59.9

3/
38
39
40
41
42
43

-613.2

-716.7

-728.8

-775.4

-765.2

-781.8

-802.2

1,178.1
818.8
359.3
1,791.4
1,495.2
296.2

1,303.1
907.5
395.6
2,019.9
1,699.0
320.9

1,312.4
913.9
398.5
2,041.2
1,719.1
322.1

1,352.4
944.3
408.1
2,127.8
1,799.3
328.5

1,405.4
989.3
416.0
2,170.6
1,832.6
338.1

1,448.1
1,019.1
429.0
2,229.8
1,879.0
350.8

1,486.7
1,055.9
430.7
2,288.9
1,938.2
350.7

Gocd‘
Services
Imports
Gocds
Services..................................
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

2,226.2

2,372.8

2,402.4

825.9
551.2
483.7
67.5
274.7
240.7
33.9
1,400.3
1,130.3
270.0

878.3
589.3
516.9
72.4
289.0
251.7
37.4
1,494.4
1,207.2
287.3

895.8
605.0
530.9
74.2
290.7
253.4
37.4
1,506.6
1,217.8
288.7

2,423.6
886.2

590.9
516.9
74.1
295.3
254.2
41.1
1,537.4
1,243.4
294.0

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software.....................
489.0
Computers and
peripheral
87.9
Software 2..................
209.3
191.8
O th er.........................
172.0
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment..................
156.8
Other equipment...........
175.0
751.6
Residential..............................
67.2
Change in private inventories...
2.4
Farm .......................................
Nonfarm..................................
64.8

2,172.2
1,420.5
427.7
992.8

2,479.6

2,513.9

2,540.8

921.7
613.5
537.7
75.8
308.2
265.9
42.4
1,557.9
1,256.2
301.7

919.7
616.5
537.7
78.8
303.2
264.6
38.6
1,594.2
1,280.7
313.5

926.7
618.0
539.0
79.0
308.7
269.8
38.9
1,614.1
1,298.0
316.1

Net exports of goods and
se r v ic e s .....................................

National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local............................
Consumption expenditures...
Gross investment...................
Residual...........................................

2006
IV

I

II

III

2

7,577.1

7,841.2

7,895.3

7,910.2

8,003.8

8,055.0

8,112.0

3
4

1,085.7
450.4

1,145.3
452.9

1,175.9
474.6

1,137.9
426.3

1,190.5
445.1

1,190.3
443.7

1,207.6
453.2

5

446.0
195.6
2,179.2
1 ,011.0
350.9

490.6
2,276.8
1,065.7
372.7

497.7
213.1
2,287.6
1,074.9
373.9

511.5
216.3
2,309.6
1,085.7
383.1

538.5
224.6
2,342.8
1,103.4
391.1

542.9
222.5
2,351.1
1,108.8
387.4

550.4
223.0
2,357.7
1,105.4
392.4

200.5
618.5
4,323.9
1,091.6
409.3
149.8
259.5
284.0
1,217.3
304.8
1,016.0

199.5
643.9
4,436.6
1 , 122.6
418.0
153.8
264.1
284.4
1,260.9
313.1
1,036.2

197.8
646.7
4,454.5
1,126.4
419.4
154.0
265.4
283.6
1,267.5
313.9
1,042.2

196.6
652.4
4,476.7
1,131.2
419.8
154.7
264.9
283.5
1,279.0
315.1
1,046.5

196.0
662.6
4,494.5
1,137.6
404.3
141.7
264.8
286.3
1,292.6
317.5
1,054.9

196.3
668.3
4,535.4
1,144.5
412.5
147.0
267.0
287.5
1,300.9
318.1
1,070.6

198.7
670.7
4,570.7
1,151.7
423.1
154.7
268.8
288.3
1,310.3
320.5
1,075.3

6
8

9
m

Other.......................................
Services......................................
H ousing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and g a s ............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical ca re ..........................
Recreation..............................
Other.......................................

1,888.0

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54

2005

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,450.5

7

23
24
25

21.0

2005

III
Gross dom estic product....

Gross private domestic
2,237.1 2,239.4
investment.................................

21
22

2004

III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,327.1

7
Food.......................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.....................
O th er......................................
S ervices.....................................
Housing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and gas............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical care..........................
Recreation..............................
O th er......................................

2006

11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

212.6

1,770.6

1,866.3

1,855.9

1,927.0

1,963.6

1,968.5

1,968.7

23
24
25

1,713.9
1,145.8
248.7
904.2

1,842.0
1,223.8
251.5
984.9

1,864.2
1,232.4
247.1
1 ,000.6

1,877.3
1,248.2
254.2
1,007.6

1,914.6
1,288.8
259.6
1,044.8

1,906.8
1,302.8
271.9
1,041.2

1,902.5
1,334.1
282.6
1,059.6

26

509.3

552.6

557.7

567.3

595.9

594.3

608.0

71
28
29
30

195.0
180.7
132.7

206.2
193.6
143.5

208.0
196.0
144.9

209.5
197.5
150.4

215.6
149.0

217.8
206.7
153.9

219.5
211.4
154.0

128.8
137.6
559.9
53.4

145.4
147.3
608.0
19.6

152.3
148.8
620.4
-12.7

143.2
151.2
618.9
43.5
4.8
38.6

152.2
154.3
618.5
41.2
4.3
36.8

142.7
157.1
600.5
53.7
1.9
52.2

146.7
158.7
571.4
58.0
2.4
56.0

31
32
33
34
35
36
V
18
39
40
41
42
43

44
4>S
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55

6.1

0.2

1.1

47.0

19.6

-14.0

211.6

-590.9

-619.2

-607.6

-636.6

-636.6

-624.2

-629.4

1,120.4
784.4
335.9
1,711.3
1,452.2
260.3

1,196.1
843.2
352.9
1,815.3
1,549.9
267.5

1,200.5
847.5
353.0
1,808.1
1,543.9
266.3

1,228.4
870.8
357.8
1,865.0
1,595.8
271.7

1,269.3
906.2
363.6
1,905.9
1,631.9
276.6

1,288.5
919.5
369.5
1,912.7
1,631.7
283.2

1,308.3
940.4
368.6
1,937.7
1,659.0
281.2

1,940.6

1,958.0

1,968.8

1,963.5

1,987.1

1,991.2

2,002.1

716.6
475.4
408.3
67.5
241.0
207.0
33.9
1,223.9
979.6
244.1
-17.6

727.5
483.6
413.3
71.2
243.7
207.3
36.7
1,230.4
988.0
242.1
-42.6

738.2
494.1
421.9
73.2
243.8
207.5
36.6
1,230.5
989.5
240.7
-47.1

729.6
481.4
410.0
72.6
248.0
208.7
40.1
1,233.7
991.9
241.6
-53.7

745 1
491.8
419.0
74.0
253.1

736.6
489.3
414.7
76.5
247.0

739.3
488.0
413.6
76.1
251.1
213.8
37.5
1,262.6
1,008.7
253.8
-87.9

212.8

210.1

41.1
1,242.0
996.1
245.7
-78.7

37.2
1,254.4
1 ,001.2
253.1
-77.6

1. Excludes software “embedded,” orbund ed, in comr uters and ither equiprnent.




1. The quantity index for computers can be used to accurately measure the real growth of this component. However,
because computers exhibit rapid changes in prices relative to other prices in the economy, the chained-dollar estimates
should not be used to measure the component’s relative importance or its contribution to the growth rate of more aggregate
series; accurate estimates of these contributions are shown in table 1.5.2 and real growth rates are shown in table 1.5.1.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
N ote. The residual line is the difference between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

D-12

National Data

December 2006

Table 1.6.4. Price Indexes for
Gross Domestic Purchases

Table 1.6.7. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Prices for
Gross Domestic Purchases

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0

[Prc n
e e t]
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

2005

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

Line

III
Gross dom estic p u rch ases...
Personal consumption
expenditures.............................

Durable goods...........................
Motor vehicles and parts......
Furniture and household
equipment..........................
O th er......................................
Nondurable goods.....................
Food........................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.....................
O th e r......................................
S ervices.....................................
Housing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and g as............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical care..........................
Recreation..............................
O th e r......................................
Gross private dom estic
investment.................................

Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software.....................
Computers and
peripheral
equipm ent............
Software 1 ................
O th er.........................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipm ent................
Other equipm ent..........
Residential..............................
Change in private inventories...

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

Federal........................................
National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............

1 109.210

112.981

IV

I

II

114.541

115.313

116.455

117.049

Gross domestic purchases. ..
Personal consumption
expenditures.............................

2

108.373

111.493

112.067

112.873

113.445

114.573

115.259

3
4

90.845
97.242

90.198
98.967

89.908
98.607

89.606
98.906

89.385
99.460

89.206
99.532

88.968
99.631

76.884 76.315
97.688 98.189
111.530 113.016
112.732 113.012
91.706 91.265

75.435
98.005
113.177
113.642
91.101

74.671
97.567
113.484
114.414
90.870

73.894 73.047
98.351
98.950
115.769 116.442
114.905 115.727
91.341
91.651

124.064 151.423
106.139 107.775
112.863 116.529
113.234 116.165
109.943 115.554
117.821 129.900
105.374 107.233
108.373 112.663
114.660 118.438
112.059 115.168
113.086 116.625

167.157
107.930
116.858
116.453
115.498
129.526
107.364
113.621
118.752
115.535
116.985

163.612
108.619
118.281
117.279
120.579
142.169
108.047
114.970
119.949
116.702
117.959

161.126
109.301
119.194
118.269
122.403
145.582
108.977
115.411
120.482
117.311
119.116

182.632
109.737
120.059
119.717
121.019
140.799
109.447
116.826
121.332
118.582
119.970

185.632
110.040
120.992
121.055
121.382
140.316
110.284
117.675
122.180
119.422
120.848

106.645

110.284

110.675

111.853

112.860

113.717

113.866

G ross private domestic
investment.................................

23
24
25

106.811
100.834
120.951
94.503

110.542 110.946 112.194
103.428 103.607 104.510
134.647 136.089 141.476
94.134 93.983 93.754

113.238
105.471
145.684
93.887

114.074
106.266
149.432
93.920

114.195
106.487
151.338
93.695

26

84.741

82.218

81.863

81.313

80.940

80.737

80.429

27
28
29
30

58.599
94.503
91.294
104.249

51.407
94.067
90.492
108.064

50.407
94.012
90.369
108.373

48.634
94.009
90.343
108.973

47.125
94.430
90.186
109.659

45.443
95.005
90.523
110.544

43.872
95.356
90.734
111.711

31 109.923
32 103.914
33 120.618
34
SS
36

108.882
108.174
126.714

108.351 107.933
108.742 109.100
127.573 129.536

108.867
109.841
130.765

109.257 106.889
109.608 110.311
131.696 131.592

3/
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

114.718

121.183

122.029

123.444

124.791

126.262

115.249
115.954
118.472
99.911
113.963
116.274
100.007
114.417
115.388
110.587

120.726
121.855
125.071
101.628
118.606
121.381
101.913
121.463
122.177
118.679

121.353
122.467
125.833
101.370
119.261
122.127
102.051
122.438
123.079
119.954

121.479 123.721
122.760 124.752
126.061 128.327
102.026 102.438
119.059 121.787
121.810 124.944
102.470 103.035
124.620 125.434
125.365 126.112
121.716 122.799

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

Final sales of computers to
domestic purchasers 2 .........
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers..............................
Food............................................
Energy goods and services......
Gross domestic purchases
excluding food and energy....
Gross domestic product...........
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
com puters.....................
Food...................................
Energy goods and
services.........................
Gross domestic product
excluding food and
energy ...........................
Final sales of domestic product
Final sales to domestic
purchasers..............................

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment.................................

124.871 125.365
126.006 126.656
129.681 130.314
103.109 103.835
122.736 122.922
125.958 126.154
103.623 103.750
127.095 127.847
127.916 128.692
123.893 124.548

Federal.........................................
National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............

IV

I

II

III

1

3.1

3.5

2

2.6
-1 .6

2.9

4.1

2.9

2.0

4.0

2.4

-0.7
1.8

-2.9
-2.7

-1.3

-0.4

1.2

- 1.0
2.3

- 0.8
0.3

- 1.1
0.4

5

-4.1

6

0.1

0.6
2.2

1.1

- 1.0

-6.7
3.9
9.0
1.4
-3.2

-4.0
- 1.8

3.3
3.1
-0 .4

-3.8
-0.4
3.6

-4.5
-0.7

7

-0.7

-4.1
3.3
8.3
1.7
3.5

-4.5
2.5
2.3
2.9
-1.3

17.5
0.9
3.2
2.5

22.1

91.6

- 8.2

1.5
3.2

2.0

2.6

3.2

2.1

5.1
10.3

5.0
2.9
18.8
45.1

3
4

8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

3.9

2.2

2.6

1.0

1.8

2.3
4.1

4.0
3.3

4.4

3.5

2.2
6.2

13.6
1.3

2.6

4.8
4.1
4.1
3.4

6.2

2.6

2.8

20

3.7

3.1

2.9
3.5
2.9

3.4

2.7

2.7
- 1.0
-5.9
2.5
3.1
3.4
6.2
10.0

3.5
1.5
1.8
2.1

4.0

4.0

65.1

2.1

6.7

1.6

1.1

2.9
5.0
-4.4
-12.5
1.7
5.0
2.9
4.4
2.9

3.1
4.5
1.2

-1.4
3.1
2.9
2.8

2.9
3.0

21
22

3.3

3.7

4.3

3.7

3.1

0.5

3.4

3.5

4.0

23
24
25

1.2
6.2

2.6

2.2

13.2
-1.5

3.0
3.0
10.7

0.8

11.3
-0.4

3.8
3.7
12.4

-0.4

4.6
3.5
16.8
- 1.0

0.6

0.1

5.2
- 1.0

26

-3.6

-3.0

-3.2

-2.7

- 1.8

- 1.0

-1.5

2/
28
29
30

-7.3
-2.3
-3.1

-13.7
- 0.8
- 0.6

-13.3

- 11.8

0.0
- 0.1
2.2

1.8

2.6

-12.3
-0.5
-0.9
3.7

-0.7
2.5

-13.5
2.5
1.5
3.3

-13.1
1.5
0.9
4.3

31
32
33
34
35
36

5.7
0.7
7.3

-0.9
4.1
5.1

-3.2

3.5
2.7
3.8

1.4
- 0.8
2.9

-8.4

6.9

-1.5
1.3
6.3

2.1
1.6
2.1
2.0
2.8
0.6
0.6

3/
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

1.2

2.6

0.4

2.6

-0.3

4.4

5.6

5.9

4.7

4.4

4.8

4.7
4.7
5.1
1.9
4.7
5.2

7.6
6.7
7.4

3.8
4.1
4.3

2.6

1.6

2.6

5.9
7.3

-0.7
- 1.0
1.7
7,3
7.6

9.5
10.7

4.3
4.2
4.6

3.3
3.4
3.9
-0.4
3.2
3.5
1.3
7.4
7.1
8.4

0.4

0.8

4.8
5.1
5.6
1.7
4.1
4.4
1.9

6,0

2.4
3.6

3.2
3.3
2.3
5.4
5.8
3.6

48

-9.1

-13.6

-15.6

-14.5

-12.9

-15.7

- 12.8

49
50
51

3.2
3.1
11.9

4.6
1.2

-2.4

4.2
1.7
30.6

3.0

54.1

3.7
2.3
14.8

2.9

2.2

19.1

52
53

2.7

2.8

2.8

3.0

2.5
3.3

3.0
3.3

3.0
3.3

2.9
3.3

2.0
1.8

54
55

2.9
3.3

3.2
1.8

3.4
1.5

3.4
1.7

3.4
2.5

3.5
1.9

1.9
3.3

66

5.9

8.8

25.7

6.9

11.2

17.3

-10.9

b/
58

2.7

3.0
3.0

2.8

2.8

3.3

3.3
3.3

3.1
3.3

3.0
3.3

2.1
1.8

59

3.1

3.5

4.4

3.5

2.7

4.0

2.0

6.2

1.0

0.7

2.2
2.6

0.5
2.4
2.4
2.1

Addenda:

44.424

37.397

49
50
51

121.649

114.210 114.838 115.873 116.704 117.922 118.570
112.598 112.842 113.482 114.220 114.697 115.554
144.830 153.098 158.485 157.543 168.404 168.674

52
53

108.555
109.429

111.638 111.939
112.744 113.139

54
55

110.215
110.929

113.724 114.144 115.107
112.925 113.269 113.749

116.067
114.442

117.060 117.610
114.970 115.911

56

116.292

126.526

129.409

131.589

135.113

140.609

136.598

5/
58

109.047
109.455

112.298
112.783

112.624
113.181

113.545
114.101

114.417
115.025

115.272
115.961

115.863
116.466

59

109.235

113.021

113.614

114.594

115.371

116.510

117.102

110.188

41.803

38.697

51.421

110.211

43.470

40.388

48

112.758 113.605 114.420
114.048 114.967 115.905

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
2. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.




Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential........................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Information processing
equipment and
software.....................
Computers and
peripheral
equipment.............
Software 1..................
O th e r.........................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipment..................
Other equipment...........
Residential..............................
Chanae in private inventories...

126.918

Addenda:

2006

III

Durable goods............................
Motor vehicles and p a rts.....
Furniture and household
equipment..........................
Other.......................................
Nondurable g oo d s.....................
Food.........................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.....................
Other.......................................
Services......................................
Housing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and g a s ............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical ca re ..........................
Recreation..............................
Other.......................................

5 79.929
98.044
6
7 107.617
8 110.270
9 92.655

2005

2005

III

113.572

2004

114.998
116.414

Final sales of computers to
domestic purchasers 2 ..........
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers..............................
Food.............................................
Energy goods and services......
Gross domestic purchases
excluding food and energy....
Gross domestic product............
Gross domestic product
excluding final sales of
computers......................
Food....................................
Energy goods and
services.........................
Gross domestic product
excluding food and
energy............................
Final sales of domestic product
Final sales to domestic
purchasers.............................

3.7

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
2. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.

2.6

2.2
0.6

December 2006

D-13

Survey of Current Business

Table 1.7.1. Percent Change from Preceding Period in Real Gross Domestic
Product, Real Gross National Product, and Real Net National Product

Table 1.6.8. Contributions to Percent Change in the Gross Domestic
Purchases Price Index

[Prc n
e e t]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
ine

2004

2005

2005
IV

III
Percent change at annual rate:
G ross dom estic p u rch a se s...
Percentage poin ts at annual
rates:
Personal consum ption
e xp en d itu res.............................
Durable goods............................
Motor vehicles and p arts......
Furniture and household
equipment..........................
O th er......................................
Nondurable goods.....................
Food........................................
Clothing and shoes...............
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.....................
O ther.......................................
Services.....................................
Housing..................................
Household operation............
Electricity and g as............
Other household operation
Transportation........................
Medical care..........................
Recreation..............................
O th er......................................
G ross private dom estic
investm ent.................................
Fixed investment........................
Nonresidential.......................
Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
information processing
equipment and
software.....................
Computers and
peripheral
equipm ent............
Software 1 ................
O ther.........................
Industrial equipment....
Transportation
equipm ent................
Other equipm ent..........
Residential.............................
Change in private inventories...
Farm ........................................
Nonfarm..................................
G overnm ent consum ption
expenditures and gross
investm ent.................................
Federal........................................
National defense....................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Nondefense...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
State and local...........................
Consumption expenditures
Gross investment..............
Addenda:
Final sales of computers to
domestic purchasers 2 .........
Gross domestic purchases
excluding final sales of
computers to domestic
purchasers..............................
Food............................................
Energy goods and services.....
Gross domestic purchases
excluding food and energy....

I

II

Line

III

2004

2005

2005
III

1

3.1

3.5

4.4

3.5

2.7

4.0

2.1

2

1.76

1.92

2.74

1.93

1.35

2.66

1.60

3
4

-0.14
- 0.02

-0.06
0.06

-0.23
- 0.10

- 0.10
0.04

-0.07
0.07

-0.06

-0.08

0.01

0.01

- 0.11
- 0.01
0.70

- 0.20
0.06
1.70
0.13
-0.08

-0.13
- 0.01

- 0.12
-0.03

- 0.12
0.05
1.58
0.16
0.09

-0.13
0.04
0.46
0.26
-0.03

1.55

- 0.21
0.13
1.92
0.28
0.65
0.59
0.05

1.24
0.09
1.15
0.48
-0.16
- 0.20
0.04

0.17
0.06

5

- 0.12

6

0.00

7

0.64
0.28
- 0.01

8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

0.32
0.05
1.27
0.25
0.08
0.06

0.20

-0.03
0.44
0.08
1.28
0.26
0.19
0.15
0.04

0.10

1.27

0.11
0.20

- 0.02

-0.14
0.13
1.22

1.22

0.12

0.46

0.20

0.32

0.11

0.12

0.31

0.06
0.36

0.27

0.44
0.04
- 0.02
0.06
0.07
0.32
0.08
0.27

0.59

0.68

0.58

0.50

0.08

0.62
0.32
- 0.11

0.71
0.34
0.41
-0.07

0.59
0.36
0.32
0.04

0.47
0.30
0.29
0.01

0.07
0.08
0.15
-0.07

- 0.11

- 0.11

-0.09

-0.06

-0.03

-0.05
-0.04
-0.04
0.03

-0.09
- 0.01
- 0.01
0.04

-0.09
- 0.01
- 0.01

-0.09

-0.09
0.04

0.03

0.06

0.04
0.03
0.23

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.04
0.03
0.40
-0.03
- 0.01
-0.03

- 0.02

0.38

- 0.01
0.05
0.28

Plus: Income receipts from the
rest of the w orld.........................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the w orld.................................
Equals: Gross national product

Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private...........................
Government...................
General government
Government
enterprises...........
Equals: Net national product....

0.10

21
22

0.50

0.49

23
24
25

0.12

0.37
0.08
0.29

0.10

0.26

0.53

0.15
-0.03

0.53
0.25
0.27
-0.03

26

-0.13

27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36

0.21

0.33
0.22

0.12

2006
IV

II

1

III

1

3.9

3.2

4.2

1.8

5.6

2.6

2

18.4

21.3

29.6

27.1

26.8

38.8

7.4

3
4
5

26.3

28.2

8.6

76.3

13.8

47.1

13.5

3.8

3.1
8.1
8.8

8

4.9
5.4
2.5
2.3

6

7

2.2

4.9

0.5

6.1

2.3

-55.8
-60.4
-18.5
2.3

-4.9
-6.4
3.0
3.4

2.3

2.3

2.2

2.1

3.0

2.6

152.7
185.2
28.7
2.3

2.8

3.2
3.1

4.2

1.9

9

3.9

12.7

243.8

-69.1

1.4

3.5

3.6

10

3.6

2.4

-8.5

14.4

7.7

2.3

1.9

11
12

3.8
3.7
3.8
3.6

3.2
3.1
2.5
2.5

4.4
5.1
-9.3
-9.2

2.1
0.8

10.2

-0.5
-0.7

3.5
3.2

16.1
16.7

2.6
- 0.8

2.2

Addenda:

Gross domestic income 1 .........
Gross national income 2 ...........
Net domestic product................
Net domestic income 3 .............

13
14

-0.09

0.01

-0.08
0.03
- 0.01
0.03

Gross dom estic product............

-0.05

0.02

0.06
0.46
0.07
0.34

20

0.21

0.25
-0.03

0.15
0.07
0.04

0.22
0.22

0.19
0.03
0.15
0.33

10.7
7.1
12.4

3.6

1. Gross domestic income deflated by the implicit price deflator for gross domestic product.
2. Gross national income deflated by the implicit price deflator for gross national product.
3. Net domestic income deflated by the implicit price deflator for net domestic product.

Table 1.7.3. Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross National Product, and
Real Net National Product, Quantity Indexes
[Index num bers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

48

0.01

0.00
0.00

0.02

0.37
-0.03
0.00

- 0.01

-0.03

0.00
- 0.01

0.02

0.02
0.01

0.04

0.05

0.02
- 0.01

- 0.10
0.03
- 0.02

0.17
0.03
0.00

0.03

0.80

1.01

1.05

0.84

0.79

0.86

0.31

0.32
0.23
0.22
0.01

0.23
0.15
0.16

0.03
0.04
0.03

0.49
0.29
0.28

0.25
0.18
0.17

0.00

0.01

0.09
0.08

0.07
0.07

0.01
0.20
0.20
0.01

0.30

0.21
0.20
0.01
0.10
0.10
0.00

0.01

0.00

0.01
- 0.01
- 0.02
0.00

0.82
0,64
0.18

0.81
0.69
0.13

0.22

0.10

0.69
0.53
0.16

- 0.10

-0.16

-0.17

-0.16

0.49
0.39

0.07
0.06
0.01

0.02
0.01
0.01

Line

2004

2005

2005

Plus: Income receipts from the
rest of the w orld.........................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the w orld.................................
Equals: Gross national product

Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private............................
Government...................
General government
Government
enterprises...........

0.38
0.10

Equals: Net national product....

0.09
0.08

IV

I

II

III

1 109.031

112.546

113.223

113.719

115.274

116.004

116.640

98.438

119.374

122.075

129.623

137.541

149.298

151.994

160.106

165.255

115.753

116.311

2

3 96.969 124.286 122.148 140.747 145.380
4 109.039 112.399 113.252 113.390 115.085
5 116.601 125.998 148.411 121.012 119.495
6 117.814 128.179 154.123 122.285 120.271
7 110.561 115.240 120.608 114.612 115.475
8 110.062 112.885 113.225 113.863 114.812
9 113.234

127.575

159.062

118.606

119.022

120.063

121.131

10

108.018

110.597

108.658

112.366

114.475

115.140

115.683

Net domestic product................

11

108.004 110.755

108.604

112.733

114.687

115.421

116.051

0.22

Table 1.7.4. Price Indexes for Gross Domestic Product, Gross National
Product, and Net National Product

0.05

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

0.27

0.08

-0.14

-0.17

-0.14

3.16
0.29
0.47

3.61

4.55

3.61

2.86

0.20

0.12

0.22

0.24

0.79

2.08

0.70

52

2.30

2.46

2.18

2.54

120.187 120.867
120.931 121.561
116.321 117.237
115.621 116.508

Addendum:

0.02
0.01
0.01
0.00

0.61
0.53
0.08

49
50
51

2006

III
Gross domestic product............

Seasonally adjusted
Line

1. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
2. Some components of final sales of computers include computer parts.




Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

- 0.11

4.19
0.16
1.37

2.19
0.28
0.04

2.59

2.49

1.74

2004

2005

2005

2006

III
Gross dom estic product............

Plus: Income receipts from the
rest of the w orld.........................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the w orld.................................
Equals: Gross national product

Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private...........................
Government...................
General government
Government
enterprises...........
Equals: Net national product....

IV

I

II

III

1

109.429

112.744

113.139

114.048

114.967

115.905

116.414

2

108.894

112.377

112.934

113.959

114.707

115.839

116.401

3 109.180 112.704 113,221
4 109.419 112.733 113.131
5 103.694 107.229 107.709
6 103.261 106.498 106.933
7 105.956 111.117 111.852
8 105.231 110.292 111.007

114.269

115.000

116.124

116.694

114.038

114.958

115.897

116.405

108.746 109.110 110.216
107.959 108.207 109.363
112.953 113.936 114.778
112.121 113.134 113.965

110.167
109.194
115.357
114.561

115.495

116.338

117.373

118.200

119.101

119.589

10

110.250

113.529

113.915

114.800

115.800

116.716

117.303

11

110.266

113.546

113.929

114.814

115.814

116.729

117.317

9 109.825

Addendum:

Net domestic product................

D -14

National Data

December 2006

Table 1.7.5. Relation of Gross Domestic Product, Gross National Product, Net
National Product, National Income, and Personal Income

Table 1.7.6. Relation of Real Gross Domestic Product, Real Gross National
Product, and Real Net National Product, Chained Dollars

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs

[B n o c a e (2 0 ) d lla ]
illio s f h in d 0 0 o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross dom estic product...............

Plus: Income receipts from the rest
of the w orld....................................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the w orld....................................
Equals: Gross national product...

Less: Consumption of fixed capital
P rivate...............................
Domestic business......
Capital consumption
allowances..........
Less: Capital
consumption
adjustm ent..........
Households and
institutions...............
Government......................
General government....
Government
enterprises..............
Equals: Net national product........
Less: Statistical discrepancy.......
Equals: National income...............

Less: Corporate profits with
inventory valuation and capital
consumption adjustments............
Taxes on production and
imports less subsidies....
Contributions for
government social
insurance..........................
Net interest and
miscellaneous payments
on assets..........................
Business current transfer
payments (n e t)................
Current surplus of
government enterprises
Wage accruals less
disbursements..................
Plus: Personal income receipts on
assets.............................................
Personal current transfer
receipts..............................
Equals: Personal incom e..............

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2006
IV

I

II

410.2

513.3

527.2

564.9

603.3

661.4

676.6

662.4
363.9
481.5
552.4
638.6
3
475.0
574.3
4 11,758.7 12,487.7 12,625.7 12,743.0 13,037.4 13,220.1 13,341.2
5 1,436.2 1,604.8 1,898.0 1,562.5 1,548.0 1,572.8 1,581.0
6 1,205.4 1,352.6 1,632.3 1,307.5 1,288.9 1,309.8 1,314.6
7
969.5 1,059.1 1,197.6 1,044.4 1,035.1 1,050.4 1,053.1
8

1,155.9

953.1

1,019.7

941.5

960.7

964.3

968.3

9

186.4

-106.1

-177.9

-102.9

-74.4

- 86.1

-84.9

10
11
12

235.9
230.8
192.7

293.5
252.2
207.2

434.7
265.7
209.1

263.1
255.0
212.4

253.8
259.1
216.1

259.5
262.9
219.2

261.5
266.4
222.1

42.6
43.0
43.7
44.3
13
38.0
45.1
56.6
14 10,322.6 10,882.9 10,727.7 11,180.5 11,489.4 11,647.3 11,760.2
66.7
74.3
15
71.0
84.5
-61.9
35.8
-4.5
16 10,255.9 10,811.8 10,643.2 11,106.2 11,551.3 11,611.5 11,764.8
17

1,182.6

1,330.7

1,266.3

1,393.5

1,569.1

1,591.8

1,658.0

18

819.4

865.1

872.1

874.2

897.4

914.0

2006

19

826.4

880.6

888.5

898.9

936.7

938.8

485.1

483.4

482.9

490.0

514.8

513.2

Plus: Income receipts from the
rest of the w orld.........................
Less: Income payments to the rest
of the w orld .................................
Equals: Gross national product

Less: Consumption of fixed capital
Private...........................
Government...................
General government
Government
enterprises...........
Equals: Net national product....

I

II

III

1 10,703.5 11,048.6 11,115.1 11,163.8 11,316.4 11,388.1 11,450.5
2

376.7

456.9

467.2

496.1

526.4

581.7

571.4

427.2
419.9
499.7
3
333.3
483.8
568.0
550.3
4 10,746.8 11,077.9 11,162.0 11,175.6 11,342.7 11,408.5 11,463.5
5 1,385.0 1,496.6 1,762.9 1,437.4 1,419.4 1,427.6 1,435.7
6 1,167.4 1,270.1
1,527.1 1,211.7 1,191.7 1,198.2 1,204.5
7
217.8
227.0
237.6
225.8
227.5
229.1
230.9
183.1
187.8
191.0
192.4
8
188.4
189.5
193.9
9

34.6

39.0

48.7

36.3

36.4

10

9,363.1

9,586.6

9,418.5

9,740.0

9,922.8

36.7

37.1

9,980.4 10,027.5

Addenda:

Gross domestic income 1 .........
Gross national income 2 ...........
Net domestic product................
Net domestic income 3 .............

11 10,642.6 10,985.6 11,040.4 11,098.7 11,370.3 11,357.2 11,454.4
12 10,685.9 11,014.9 11,087.3 11,110.5 11,396.5 11,377.7 11,467.4

13
14

9,319.8
9,259.3

9,557.2
9,494.7

9,371.6
9,297.4

9,727.9
9,663.2

9,896.5
9,949.9

9,959.8 10,014.2
9,929.2 10,018.1

1. Gross domestic income deflated by the implicit price deflator for gross domestic product.
2. Gross national income deflated by the implicit price deflator for gross national product.
3. Net domestic income deflated by the implicit price deflator for net domestic product.
N ote. Except as noted in footnotes 1,2 and 3, chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type
quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the
chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not
additive.

948.0

20

Gross dom estic product............

IV

921.3

503.8

Table 1.8.3. Command-Basis Real Gross National Product, Quantity Indexes

21

85.5

74.2

0.2

99.1

93.8

93.1

-5.0

-15.4

-27.7

-13.3

-9.2

-9.4

-15.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

24

1,427.9

1,519.4

1,532.7

1,580.2

1,602.3

1,647.7

1,685.0

25
26

1,426.5

1,526.6

1,569.0

1,539.8

1,570.4

1,589.7

1,618.8

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

9,731.4 10,239.2 10,262.7 10,483.7 10,721.4 10,807.3 10,954.0

27
28
29
30
31
32

11,645.8
11,692.0
10,792.2
10,276.3
10,209.6
9,356.1

12,384.8
12,416.6
11,492.7
10,851.0
10,780.0
9,887.9

12,489.0
12,541.2
11,696.6
10,675.5
10,591.0
9,798.7

12,656.2
12,668.7
11,708.6
11,168.0
11,093.8
10,146.2

13,070.3
13,099.3
12,117.4
11,460.3
11,522.2
10,569.3

13,161.6
13,184.3
12,186.5
11,624.6
11,588.8
10,613.7

13,331.6
13,345.8
12,341.0
11,746.1
11,750.6
10,760.0

2005

2005

- 10.0

23

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

93.4

22

1. Consists of compensation of employees, proprietors’ income with inventory valuation adjustment (IVA) and capital
consumption adjustment (CCAdj), rental income of persons with CCAdj, corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj, net interest and
miscellaneous payments, and consumption of fixed capital.
2. Consists of gross national factor income less consumption of fixed capital.




2005
III

Addenda:

Gross domestic income...............
Gross national income..................
Gross national factor income 1....
Net domestic product...................
Net domestic income....................
Net national factor income 2 ....

2005

III

1 11,712.5 12,455.8 12,573.5 12,730.5 13,008.4 13,197.3 13,327.1
2

2004

2006

III
Gross national product..............

IV

I

II

III

1

109.039

112.399

113.252

113.390

115.085

115.753

116.311

112.914 116.793

121.636

126.043

128.082

Less: Exports of goods and
services and income receipts
from the rest of the w orld..........
Plus: Command-basis exports of
goods and services and income
receipts from the rest of the
world 1 ........................................

2

101.276

111.906

3

101.813

110.121

110.147

113.619

119.044

122.488

124.198

Equals: Command-basis gross
national product.......................

4 109.120 112.131

112.837

112.914

114.696

115.219

115.728

4.1

0.3

6.5

1.8

1.8

Addendum:

Percent change from preceding
period in command-basis
real gross national product...

5

3.6

2.8

1. Exports of goods and services and income receipts deflated by the implicit price deflator for imports of goods and
services and income payments.

Table 1.8.6. Command-Basis Real Gross National Product, Chained Dollars
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Gross national product..............

2006
IV

I

II

III

1 10,746.8 11,077.9 11,162.0 11,175.6 11,342.7 11,408.5 11,463.5

Less: Exports of goods and
services and income receipts
from the rest of the w orld..........
Plus: Command-basis exports of
goods and services and income
receipts from the rest of the
world 1 .........................................

2

1,497.8

1,655.0

1,669.9

1,727.3

1,798.9

1,864.1

1,894.3

3

1,505.8

1,628.6

1,629.1

1,680.4

1,760.6

1,811.6

1,836.9

Equals: Command-basis gross
national product.......................

4 10,754.7 11,051.5 11,121.1 11,128.7 11,304.4 11,356.0 11,406.1

Addendum:

Terms of trade 2 .........................

5 100.531

98.406

97.552

97.286

97.872

97.183

96.971

1. Exports of goods and services and income receipts deflated by the implicit price deflator for imports of goods and
services and income payments.
2. Ratio of the implicit price deflator for exports of goods and services and income receipts to the corresponding implicit
price deflator for imports divided by 100 .
N ote. Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive.

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

D-15

Table 1.10. Gross Domestic Income by Type of Income
[Billions of dollars]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2006

2005
III

I

IV

III

II

G ross dom estic in com e........................................................................................................................

1

11,645.8

12,384.8

12,489.0

12,656.2

13,070.3

13,161.6

Compensation of em ployees, paid..............................................................................................................

2

6,656.3

7,036.6

7,100.1

7,190.7

7,406.6

7,431.8

7,517.3

Wage and salary accruals............................................................................................................................
Disbursements..........
To p ersons............
To the rest of the world
Wage accruals less disbursements
Supplements to wages and salaries

3
4
5

5,671.1
5,671.1
5,661.9
9.2

5,721.7
5,721.7
5,712.2
9.4

5,793.3
5,793.3
5,784.0
9.3

5,976.4
5,976.4
5,967.2
9.2

5,987.2
5,987.2
5,978.0
9.2

6,054.2
6,054.2
6,044.9
9.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

8

5,383.2
5,398.2
5,389.2
8.9
-15.0
1,273.2

1,365.5

1,378.4

1,397.4

1,430.3

1,444.5

1,463.1

Taxes on production and imports................................................................................................................

9

864.0

922.4

930.2

937.3

952.5

966.4

973.3

Less: Sub sidies...............................................................................................................................................

10

44.7

58.1

63.1

55.1

52.3

52.0

Net operating surplus.....................................................................................................................................

11
12

2,733.9

57.3
2,878.2

2,618.9

3,028.8

3,218.2

3,243.0

3,312.0

2,738.9
609.0
85.5
911.1
127.0

2,893.6
642.3
74.2
970.7
72.8

2,646.6
647.7
967.3
-11.5

3,042.1
667.5
99.1
996.8
81.5

3,227.4
705.5
93.8
1,008.3
76.8

3,252.3
724.0
93.1
1,011.9
71.4

3,321.9
720.3
93.4
1,013.9
73.4

1,133.7
399.3
734.4
338.7

1,042.9
378.9
664.0
237.9

1,197.2
424.6
772.6
234.9

1,343.0
456.9

20

1,006.3
300.1
706.2
492.7

1,351.9
476.1
875.9
549.4

1,420.9
491.1
929.7
557.2

21
22

213.6
-5.0

395.7
-15.4

426.1
-27.7

537.7
-13.3

357.9
-9.2

326.5
-9.4

372.5
- 10.0

1,572.8

1,581.0

Private enterprises........................................................................................................................................
Net interest and miscellaneous payments, domestic industries.........................................................
Business current transfer payments (net).............................................................................................
Proprietors’ income with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.......................
Rental income of persons with capital consumption adjustment.......................................................
Corporate profits with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments, domestic
industries..............................................................................................................................................
Taxes on corporate incom e.................................................................................................................
Profits after tax with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustm ents.........................
Net dividends....................................................................................................................................
Undistributed corporate profits with inventory valuation and capital consumption
adjustments.................................................................................................................................
Current surplus of government enterprises..............................................................................................
Consumption of fixed capital........................................................................................................................

Private.............................................................................................................................................................
Government...................................................................................................................................................

6

7

13
14
1b
16
17
18
19

0.2

886.1

528.1

13,331.6

23
24
25

1,436.2

1,604.8

1,898.0

1,562.5

1,548.0

1,205.4
230.8

1,352.6
252.2

1,632.3
265.7

1,307.5
255.0

1,288.9
259.1

1,309.8
262.9

1,314.6
266.4

26

66.7

71.0

84.5

74.3

-€1.9

35.8

-4.5

Addendum:

Statistical discrepancy.................................................................................................................................




D -16

National Data

December 2006

Table 1.12. National Income by Type of Income

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

National in com e......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of employees

1

2006
IV

I

III

II

10,255.9

10,811.8

10,643.2

11,106.2

11,551.3

11,611.5

2

6,650.3

7,030.3

7,093.6

7,184.4

7,400.3

7,425.5

7,510.9

3
4
5

5,377.1
941.8
4,435.3
1,273.2

5,715.2
980.6
4,734.6
1,378.4
942.1
436.3

5,787.0
988.1
4,798.9
1,397.4
956.1
441.3

5,970.1
998.1
4,972.0
1,430.3
971.6
458.7

5,980.9
1,005.9
4,975.0
1,444.5
985.7
458.9

6,047.8
1 ,020.2
5,027.7
1,463.1
1 ,000.1
463.0
1,013.9
20.8

11,764.8

7

866.1

8

407.1

5,664.8
977.7
4,687.1
1,365.5
933.2
432.3

Proprietors’ income with IVA and CCAdj...................................................................................................

9

911.1

970.7

967.3

996.8

1,008.3

1,011.9

Farm................................................................................................................................................................
Nonfarm .........................................................................................................................................................

10
11

36.2
874.9

30.2
940.4

29.7
937.7

28.7
968.1

23.9
984.4

17.5
994.3

Rental income of persons with CCAdj.

12

127.0

72.8

-11.5

81.5

76.8

71.4

73.4

Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj..

1,182.6

1,330.7

1,266.3

1,393.5

1,569.1

1,591.8

1,658.0

300.1
882.5
539.5
343.0

399.3
931.4
576.9
354.5

378.9
887.5
584.0
303.5

424.6
968.9
601.0
367.9

456.9
615.7
496.4

476.1
1,115.7
631.1
484.6

491.1
1,166.8
650.4
516.5

485.1

483.4

482.9

490.0

514.8

513.2

503.8

Taxes on production and imports................................................................................................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

922.4

930.2

937.3

952.5

966.4

973.3

Less: Sub sidies...............................................................................................................................................

20

864.0
44.7

57.3

58.1

63.1

55.1

52.3

52.0

B u siness current transfer payments (net)

21

85.5

74.2

0.2

99.1

93.8

93.1

93.4

22
23
24
25

28.1
49.8
7.5

45.7
30.1
- 1.6

79.8
-34.3
-45.4

39.0
49.4
10.7

34.5
55.6
3.7

35.0
56.7
1.4

35.5
57.9

-5.0

-15.4

-27.7

-13.3

-9 .2

-9.4

-10.0

26
27
28
29
30

1,139.2
343.0
796.2
-39.8
1,178.9

1,211.3
354.5
856.8
-32.6
1,243.9

1,230.7
303.5
927.2
-30.9
1,261.5

1,223.9
367.9
856.0
-39.2
1,263.2

1,349.2
496.4
852.8
-22.9
1,372.1

1,350.3
484.6
865.6
-58.9
1,409.2

1,384.8
516.5
868.3
-37.2
1,422.0

31
32
33
34
3b
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
bO

911.1
36.2
42.0
-5.8
874.9
750.3
-5.2
129.8
127.0
142.7
-15.7
1,182.6
1,104.5
1,144.3
300.1
844.2
539.5
304.7
-39.8
78.1

970.7
30.2
36.8
-6.5
940.4

967.3
29.7
36.3
- 6.6
937.7
887.8
-5.5
55.3
-11.5
36.5
-48.0
1,266.3
1,444.9
1,475.8
378.9
1,096.9
584.0
513.0
-30.9
-178.6

996.8
28.7
35.4
-6.7
968.1
887.7
- 6.2
86.5
81.5
98.6
-17.1
1,393.5
1,559.1
1,598.3
424.6
1,173.7
601.0
572.7
-39.2
-165.6

1,008.3
23.9
30.5
- 6.6
984.4
891.1
-2.4
95.7
76.8
91.6
-14.8
1,569.1
1,717.7
1,740.6
456.9
1,283.7
615.7

1,011.9
17.5
24.3
-6.7
994.3
904.7
-6.9
96.5
71.4
86.5
-15.1
1,591.8
1,752.6
1,811.5
476.1
1,335.4
631.1
704.3
-58.9
-160.8

1,013.9

Wage and salary accruals
Government..............
O ther..........................
Supplements to wages and salaries..........................................................................................................
Employer contributions for employee pension and insurance fu n d s.................................................
Employer contributions for government social insurance....................................................................

Taxes on corporate incom e...................
Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj....
Net dividends............................................................................................................................................
Undistributed profits with IVA and CCAdj..............................................................................................
Net interest and m iscellaneous payments.................................................................................................

To persons (net)............................................................................................................................................
To government (net)...............................
To the rest of the world (net).................
Current surplus of government enterprises.............................................................................................

6

1 , 112.1

993.1

0.0

Cash flow:

Net cash flow with IVA and C C A dj..............................................................................................................
Undistributed profits with IVA and CCAdj
Consumption of fixed capital............
Less: Inventory valuation adjustment...
Equals: Net cash flow ............................
Addenda:

Proprietors' income with IVA and CCAdj....................................................................................................
Farm............................................................................................................................................................
Proprietors’ income with IVA...............................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment..
Nonfarm ..............................................
Proprietors’ income (without IVA and CC A dj)..................................................................................
Inventory valuation adjustment..........................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment..
Rental income of persons with CCAdj..
Rental income of persons (without CCAdj)...........................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment.............................................................................................................
Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj..
Corporate profits with IV A................
Profits before tax (without IVA and CC A dj).......................................................................................
Taxes on corporate incom e......
Profits after tax (without IVA and CCAdj)......................................................................................
Net dividends........................
Undistributed profits (without IVA and C C A dj)........................................................................
Inventory valuation adjustment..........................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment.............................................................................................................
IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment




866.2

•

-5.1
79.3
72.8
96.2
-23.4
1,330.7
1,486.1
1,518.7
399.3
1,119.4
576.9
542.5
-32.6
-155.5

668.0

-22.9
-148.6

20.8

27.3
- 6.6
993.1
897.6
-3.6
99.1
73.4
88.3
-14.9
1,658.0
1,820.5
1,857.8
491.1
1,366.6
650.4
716.3
-37.2
-162.6

December 2006

D-17

Survey of Current Business

Table 1.14. Gross Value Added of Domestic Corporate Business in Current Dollars and Gross Value Added of Nonfinancial
Domestic Corporate Business in Current and Chained Dollars
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

1
2

Gross value added of corporate business 1....................................................................................

Consumption of fixed capital............................................................................................................................
Net value added...............
Compensation of employees
Wage and salary accruals
Supplements to wages and salaries
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies
Net operating surplus...........................
Net interest and miscellaneous payments
Business current transfer payments
Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj
Taxes on corporate income
Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj
Net dividends....................................................................................................................................
Undistributed profits with IVA and CCAdj......................................................................................

3
4
5
6

7
8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Gross value added of financial corporate business 1...................................................................

2006
I

IV

II

III

6,873.2

7,357.0

7,424.5

7,539.4

7,823.0

7,865.8

7,995.7

796.2
6,077.1
4,354.6
3,558.9
795.7
567.0
1,155.4
78.3
70.8
1,006.3
300.1
706.2
492.7
213.6

856.8
6,500.2
4,612.5
3,761.0
851.5
604.9
1,282.7
56.3
92.7
1,133.7
399.3
734.4
338.7
395.7

927.2
6,497.3
4,658.7
3,799.2
859.4
610.1
1,228.6
54.3
131.4
1,042.9
378.9
664.0
237.9
426.1

856.0
6,683.4
4,723.2
3,850.6
872.6
614.8
1,345.4
57.1
91.2
1,197.2
424.6
772.6
234.9
537.7

852.8
6,970.2
4,884.1
3,989.3
894.8
625.0
1,461.1
60.9
57.1
1,343.0
456.9

865.6
7,000.2
4,894.9
3,991.7
903.1
634.4
1,470.9
62.8
56.1
1,351.9
476.1
875.9
549.4
326.5

868.3
7,127.3
4,948.5
4,034.0
914.5
638.7
1,540.1
63.2
56.0
1,420.9
491.1
929.7
557.2
372.5

886.1

528.1
357.9

940.3

987.3

998.8

1,004.5

1,034.9

1,075.8

1,080.4

5,932.9
686.2

6,369.7

6,425.7

6,534.8

6,788.2

6,790.0

6,915.3

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

5,246.7
3,873.4
3,158.4
714.9
522.9
850.4
137.8
60.0
652.6
185.3
467.4
366.9
100.5

739.7
5,630.1
4,099.7
3,335.1
764.6
558.1
972.2
156.6
51.4
764.2
251.4
512.9
228.5
284.4

804.9
5,620.8
4,140.7
3,369.0
771.7
562.9
917.3
159.3

737.2
5,797.6
4,198.0
3,414.5
783.5
567.2
1,032.4
165.1
60.9
806.4
266.4
540.0

744.4
6,045.7
4,350.6
3,539.7
811.0
585.3
1,109.7
180.0
61.7

419.9

733.7
6,054.5
4,341.0
3,537.5
803.5
576.7
1,136.8
175.1
60.9
900.9
280.9
620.0
377.7
242.3

283.3
584.8
392.8
192.0

746.4
6,168.9
4,398.3
3,577.1
821.2
589.3
1,181.3
179.6
62.5
939.2
297.8
641.4
398.5
242.9

32
33
34
35

968.0
667.9
-39.8
78.1

1,321.7
922.4
-32.6
-155.5

1,252.4
873.5
-30.9
-178.6

1,402.0
977.4
-39.2
-165.6

1,514.6
1,057.6
-22.9
-148.6

1,571.6
1,095.6
-58.9
-160.8

1,620.7
1,129.5
-37.2
-162.6

36
37
38
39

Gross value added of nonfinancial corporate business 1............................................................

Consumption of fixed capital............................................................................................................................
Net value added.................................................................................................................................................
Compensation of employees...
Wage and salary accruals...
Supplements to wages and salaries......................................................................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies.......................................................................................
Net operating surplus....................................................................................................................................
Net interest and miscellaneous payments
Business current transfer payments
Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj
Taxes on corporate income
Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj
Net dividends...........................
Undistributed profits with IVA and CCAdj.....................................................................................

623.8
438.6
-39.8

932.6
681.3
-32.6
-135.8

935.0
679.2
-30.9
-157.3

988.7
722.3
-39.2
-143.0

1,050.6
769.7
-22.9
-126.8

1,063.5
780.2
-58.9
-136.5

1,113.6
815.8
-37.2
-137.2

6,224.7

6,335.8

669.2
5,555.6

672.0
5,663.8

20
21
22

11.1

746.8
255.8
491.0
126.3
364.7

120.1

868.1

Addenda:
Corporate business:

Profits before tax (without IVA and CC Adj)...........................................................................................
Profits after tax (without IVA and CCAdj)..............................................................................................
Inventory valuation adjustment...............................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment.............................................................................................................
Nonfinancial corporate business:

Profits before tax (without IVA and CCAdj)...........................................................................................
Profits after tax (without IVA and CCAdj)..............................................................................................
Inventory valuation adjustment...............................................................................................................
Capital consumption adjustment............................................................................................................

68.6

Value added, in billions of chained (2000) dollars
40
41
42

Gross value added of nonfinancial corporate business 2............................................................
Consumption of fixed c a p ita l 3 ...........................................................................................................
Net value added 4 ................................................................................................................................

5,654.5

5,959.9

5,994.7

6,079.8

650.9
5,003.6

681.6
5,278.3

738.9
5,255.8

670.5
5,409.3

6,268.0
666.1

5,601.8

1. Estimates for financial corporate business and nonfinancial corporate business for 2000 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are
based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
2. The current-dollar gross value added is deflated using the gross value added chain-type price index for nonfinancial industries from the GDP-by-industry accounts. For periods when this price index is not available,
the chain-type price index for GDP goods and structures is used.
3. Chained-dollar consumption of fixed capital of nonfinancial corporate business is calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar value of the corresponding series, divided by
100.
4. Chained-dollar net value added of nonfinancial corporate business is the difference between the gross product and the consumption of fixed capital.
IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment

Table 1.15. Price, Costs, and Profit Per Unit of Real Gross Value Added of Nonfinancial Domestic Corporate Business
[Dollars]
Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Price per unit of real gross value added of nonfinancial corporate business 1...............................

1

1.049

1.069

1.072

1.075

1.083

1.091

1.091

Compensation of employees (unit labor c o s t).........................................................................................

2

0.685

0.688

0.691

0.690

0.693

0.699

0.694

Unit nonlabor c o s t ..........................................................................................................................................

3

0.257

0.124

0.253
0.120

0.102

0.026

0.103
0.027

0.102

6

0.103
0.024

0.134
0.096
0.027

0.251
0.121

0.247

4
5

0.248
0.121

0.252

Consumption of fixed capital........................................................................................................................
Taxes on production and imports less subsidies plus business current transfer paym ents...............
Net interest and miscellaneous paym ents.................................................................................................
Corporate profits with IVA and CCAdj (unit profits from current production)..................................

7

0.115

0.128

0.125

0.133

Taxes on corporate incom e..........................................................................................................................
Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj............................................................................................................

8

0.033
0.083

0.042
0.086

0.043
0.082

0.044
0.089

9

0.249

0.028

0.104
0.029

0.118
0.103
0.028

0.144

0.139

0.148

0.045
0.099

0.046
0.094

0.047

0.117

0.101

1. The implicit price deflator for gross value added of nonfinancial corporate business divided by 100. Estimates for nonfinancial corporate business for 2000 and earlier periods are based on the 1987 Standard
Industrial Classification (SIC); later estimates for these industries are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
N ote. The current-dollar gross value added is deflated using the gross value added chain-type price index for nonfinancial industries from the GDP-by-industry accounts. For periods when this price index is not avail­
able, the chain-type price index for GDP goods and structures is used.
IVA Inventory valuation adjustment
CCAdj Capital consumption adjustment




18

National Data

December 2006

Personal Income and Outlays.
Table 2.1. Personal Income and Its Disposition
[Billions of dollars]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Personal income...............................................................................................................................................

Compensation of employees, received
Wage and salary disbursements
Private industries...............
Government.........................
Supplements to wages and salaries
Employer contributions for employee pension and insurance funds.............................................
Employer contributions for government social insurance................................................................
Proprietors’ income with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments...........................
Farm..........................................
Nonfarm...................................
Rental income of persons with capital consumption adjustment............................................................
Personal income receipts on assets
Personal interest income........
Personal dividend incom e.....
Personal current transfer receipts
Government social benefits to persons..................................................................................................
Old-age, survivors, disability, and health insurance benefits..........................................................
Government unemployment insurance benefits...............................................................................
Veterans benefits....
Family assistance 1.
O ther........................
Other current transfer receipts, from business (net).............................................................................
Less: Contributions for government social insurance...............................................................................
Less: Personal current ta x e s .......................................................................................................................
Equals: Disposable personal in co m e........................................................................................................
Less: Personal ou tlays..................................................................................................................................

Personal consumption expenditures
Personal interest payments 2
Personal current transfer payments
To government........................
To the rest of the world (ne t)..
Equals: Personal saving................................................................................................................................
Personal saving a s a percentage of disposable personal incom e.................................................

1
2

3
4
5
6

10,239.2

10,262.7

10,483.7

10,721.4

10,807.3

10,954.0

7,030.3
5,664.8
4,687.1
977.7
1,365.5
933.2
432.3
970.7
30.2
940.4
72.8
1,519.4
945.0
574.4
1,526.6
1,480.9
844.9
31.3
36.8
18.3
549.4
45.7
880.6

7,093.6
5,715.2
4,734.6
980.6
1,378.4
942.1
436.3
967.3
29.7
937.7
-11.5
1,532.7
951.2
581.5
1,569.0
1,489.2
848.5
30.2
37.0
18.4
555.1
79.8
888.5

7,184.4
5,787.0
4,798.9
988.1
1,397.4
956.1
441.3
996.8
28.7
968.1
81.5
1,580.2
981.7
598.5
1,539.8
1,500.8
854.6
31.6
37.2
18.5
558.8
39.0
898.9

7,400.3
5,970.1
4,972.0
998.1
1,430.3
971.6
458.7
1,008.3
23.9
984.4
76.8
1,602.3
989.1
613.2
1,570.4
1,536.0
909.9
27.8
39.1
18.6
540.6
34.5
936.7

7,425.5
5,980.9
4,975.0
1,005.9
1,444.5
985.7
458.9
1,011.9
17.5
994.3
71.4
1,647.7
1,019.2
628.5
1,589.7
1,554.7
928.1
27.0
39.8
18.8
541.0
35.0
938.8

7,510.9
6,047.8
5,027.7
1 ,020.2
1,463.1
1 ,000.1
463.0
1,013.9

866.1

407.1
911.1
36.2
874.9
127.0
1,427.9
890.8
537.1
1,426.5
1,398.4
791.4
36.0
34.3
18.4
518.4
28.1
826.4

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34

III

6,665.3
5,392.1
4,450.3
941.8
1,273.2

7
10
11
12

II

1

9,731.4

8

9

2006
IV

20.8

993.1
73.4
1,685.0
1,037.2
647.8
1,618.8
1,583.3
936.7
27.3
40.2
18.9
560.1
35.5
948.0

1,049.8

1,203.1

1,215.0

1,247.6

1,332.6

1,361.0

1,365.6

8,681.6

9,036.1

9,047.7

9,236.1

9,388.8

9,446.2

9,588.4

8,507.2

9,070.9

9,180.3

9,264.5

9,418.5

9,577.0

9,709.7

8,211.5
186.0
109.7

8,847.3
214.6
118.5
72.7
45.8

8,927.8
214.9

42.9

8,742.4
209.4
119.2
72.0
47.1

74.2
47.6

9,079.2
218.5
120.9
75.7
45.2

9,228.1
222.9
126.0
77.3
48.7

9,349.1
231.5
129.2
79.0
50.2

174.3

-34.8

-132.6

-28.5

-29.7

-130.8

-121.3

2.0

-0 .4

-1.5

-0 .3

-0 .3

-1 .4

-1.3

35

8 ,010.8

8,104.6

8,074.1

8,183.3

8,276.8

8,245.4

8,319.7

36
37
38

29,536
27,254
293,933

30,458
27,318
296,677

30,461
27,183
297,027

31,020
27,484
297,748

31,470
27,743
298,340

31,595
27,578
298,982

31,992
27,759
299,716

39
40

6.4
3.6

4.1
1.2

3.5
-0 .6

8.6
5.5

6.8
4.6

2.5
-1.5

6.2
3.7

66.8

121.8

Addenda:

Disposable personal income:
Total, billions of chained (2000) dollars 3 ..............................................................................................
Per capita:
Current dollars......................................................................................................................................
Chained (2000) dollars.........................................................................................................................
Population (midperiod, thousands).............................................................................................................
Percent change from preceding period:
Disposable personal income, current dollars.................................................................................
Disposable personal income, chained (2000) dollars....................................................................

1. Consists of aid to families with dependent children and, beginning with 1996, assistance programs operating under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.
2. Consists of nonmortgage interest paid by households.
3. Equals disposable personal income deflated by the implicit price deflator for personal consumption expenditures.

Table 2.2B. Wage and Salary Disbursements by Industry
[Billions of dollars]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Wage and salary disbursem ents.........................................................................................................

1

5,392.1

5,664.8

5,715.2

5,787.0

5,970.1

5,980.9

6,047.8

Private industries..............................................................................................................................................

2

4,450.3

4,687.1

4,734.6

4,798.9

4,972.0

4,975.0

5,027.7

Goods-producing industries..........................................................................................................................
Manufacturing..........................
Services-producing industries....
Trade, transportation, and utilities
Other services-producing industries 1

3
4
5

1,050.8

7

3,399.5
899.2
2,500.3

1,101.3
704.7
3,585.8
937.2
2,648.5

1,113.9
709.7
3,620.7
945.5
2,675.2

1,124.9
715.0
3,673.9
954.9
2,719.0

1,177.3
742.8
3,794.7
983.6
2,811.0

1,173.0
732.8
3,802.0
990.8
2,811.2

1,180.1
733.7
3,847.5
1,003.1
2,844.4

Government.......................................................................................................................................................

8

941.8

977.7

980.6

988.1

998.1

1,005.9

1,020.2

6

688.0

1. Other services-producing industries consists of information; finance and insurance; real estate and rental and leasing; professional, scientific, and technical services; management of companies and enterprises,
administrative and support and waste management and remediation services; educational services; health care and social assistance; arts, entertainment, and recreation; accommodation and food services; and other
services.
N o t e . Estimates in this table are based on the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).




D -19

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 2.3.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Personal
Consumption Expenditures by Major Type of Product

Table 2.3.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Personal
Consumption Expenditures by Major Type of Product

[Prc n
e e t]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

Line

2004

2005
III

III

Personal consumption
expenditures....................

1

3.9

3.5

3.9

0.8

4.8

2.6

2.9

Durable g o o d s ..............................

2

6.4

9.0

-12.3

19.8

Motor vehicles and p arts..........
Furniture and household
equipment...............................
O th e r...........................................

3

1.9

5.5
0.6

10.5

-34.9

18.9

-0.1
- 1.2

6.0
8.8

4
5

12.1
6.8

10.0

13.7
- 2.0

11.6
6.1

22.8

3.3
-3.7

5.6

8.7

Nondurable g o o d s.......................

6

3.6

4.5

3.4

3.9

5.9

F ood............................................
Clothing and shoes....................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.........................
Gasoline and oil.....................
Fuel oil and coal....................
O ther...........................................

7

3.4
5.0

5.4

6.4
3.0

4.1
10.3

6.7

1.4
2.0

1.1
- 1.2

8.6

-3.8

5.3

2006

2005
IV

I

II

III

Percent change at annual rate:

8

6.2

9

1.5
-5.1
4.3

0.0
- 6.2

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Housing......................................
Household operation................
Electricity and g as................
Other household operation...
Transportation............................
Medical care...............................
Recreation..................................
O th er...........................................

-0.5

10
11
12

Services..........................................

1.0

3.5

2.6
2.8
2.1
2.6
1.8
0.1

20
21

3.8
2.6
1.6

3.3
1.2

3.1
4.8
4.2

4.1

3.6
2.7

-5.8
-5.2
- 12.2
2.9

-2.3
- 0.8
-20.9
3.6

16.3

-1.3

0.7

0.0

-17.6
6.4

- 0.8
25.1
3.4

3.2

2.0

1.6

1.7
0.3

2.1

2.0
- 0.8
- 0.2

2.3
-14.0
-29.7
- 0.1
4.0
4.3
3.1
3.2

2.4
8.4
15.8
3.4
1.7

4.9
6.9
- 20.2
1.5

3.7

2.3
2.4
2.7
-1.7
4.4

3.7
1.5
1.7

1.8

4.6

2.0

1.0

3.1
2.6

10.7
22.7
2.7
1.1

2.9
3.0

2.6
0.8
6.1

1.8

Addenda:

Energy goods and services 1...
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy.............................

22

23

1.3
4.1

0.8

- 2.8

3.3

-0.7

4.0

-13.8

0.3

6.2

11.1

2.4

6.0

3.0

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.

Personal consumption
expenditures....................
Percentage points at annual
rates:
Durable g o o d s...............................

Motor vehicles and p a rts ..........
Furniture and household
equipment...............................
Other............................................

1

3.9

3.5

2

0.76
0.10

0.65

3

0.03

4
5

0.51
0.16

0.42
0.20

Nondurable g o o d s .......................

6

1.03

1.28

Food.............................................
Clothing and shoes....................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.........................
Gasoline and o il.....................
Fuel oil and c o a l....................
Other............................................

7

0.46

0.73
0.24

S ervices..........................................

Housing.......................................
Household operation..................
Electricity and g a s ................
Other household operation...
Transportation............................
Medical ca re ...............................
R ecreation..................................
Other............................................

3.9

0.8

4.8

2.6

2.9

1.05

-1.54

2.14

-0.01

0.68

0.54

-2.15

0.85

-0.06

0.41

0.56
-0.05

0.47
0.14

0.92
0.37

0.14
-0.09

0.24

1.00
0.86
0.12

1.12

1.71

0.42

0.33

0.55
0.38

0.92
0.33

0.27
-0.15

-0.17

-0.09
-0.03
-0.06
0.28

-0.05
-0.05
0.51

0.03
-0.03
0.05
0.27

0.19
0.25
-0.06

0.02

0.20

8

0.20

9

0.03
0.04

- 0.02

- 0.01
0.34

- 0.02
0.33

- 0.21
-0.18
-0.03
0.23

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

2.06

1.55

1.87

1.18

0.96

2.17

1.85

0.57
0.15
0.03

0.43

0.25

0.36
0.44
0.34

0.00

0.11

0.11

0.58

0.28

0.15
0.74
0.13
0.45

0.06
0.44
0.03
0.83

0.38
0.56
0.47
0.09
0.04
0.50

0.20

0.05
-0.03
- 0.01
0.62
0.06
0.23

0.34
-0.84
-0.83

20
21

0.34
0.13
0.05
0.09
-0.06
0.75
0.07
0.63

22

0.06

0.04

-0.16

-0.04

- 0.88

0.36

0.66

23

3.33

2.71

3.22

0.25

4.77

1.95

2.37

10
11
12

0.11

0.05
0.53

0.00

0.12

0.06
0.06
0.01

0.61

0.02

0.00

0.12

0.12

0.25

Addenda:

Energy goods and services 1....
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy..............................

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.

Table 2.3.3. Real Personal Consumption Expenditures by Major
Type of Product, Quantity Indexes

Table 2.3.4. Price Indexes for Personal Consumption Expenditures by Major
Type of Product

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Personal consumption
expenditures....................
Durable g o o d s ..............................

Motor vehicles and parts..........
Furniture and household
equipment...............................
O th er...........................................
Nondurable g o o d s .......................

Food............................................
Clothing and shoes....................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.........................
Gasoline and oil.....................
Fuel oil and co a l....................
O ther...........................................
Services..........................................

Housing......................................
Household operation................
Electricity and g as................
Other household operation...
Transportation............................
Medical care...............................
Recreation..................................
O ther...........................................

1

116.349

Seasonally adjusted

2006
IV

I

II

Line

111.493
90.198

112.067
89.908

112.873
89.606

113.445
89.385

114.573
89.206

115.259
88.968

98.967

98.607

98.906

99.460

99.532

99.631

79.929
98.044

76.884
97.688

76.315
98.189

75.435
98.005

74.671
97.567

73.894
98.351

73.047
98.950

107.617

111.530

113.016

113.177

113.484

115.769

116.442

7 110.270
92.655

112.732
91.706

113.012
91.265

113.642
91.101

114.414 114.905
90.870 91.651

115.727
91.341

167.157 163.612 161.126 182.632
167.116 162.470 160.254 182.620
166.678 178.440 172.031 180.783
107.930 108.619 109.301 109.737

185.632
185.363
187.518
110.040

108.373
90.845

97.242

4
5
6

120.367
139.879

115.158

114.799

117.251

4 142.541
5 119.370

156.790
129.696

159.059 163.472 172.097 173.496
130.021 131.958 137.039 135.754

175.886
136.081

Motor vehicles and p a rts..........
Furniture and household
equipment...............................
Other............................................

6

111.913

116.924

117.481

120.742

121.078

Nondurable g o o d s .......................

7 109.273
8 117.869

115.191
125.195

116.189 117.349 119.265 119.853
125.581 128.686 131.367 130.113

119.477
131.794

102.679 102.348
104.683 104.696
81.167 77.338
122.432 124.356

102.532
104.481
81.795
125.409

103.761
106.229
77.298
125.871

Food.............................................
Clothing and shoes....................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.........................
Gasoline and o il.....................
Fuel oil and c o a l....................
Other............................................

113.945

114.398

115.440

116.336

S ervices..........................................

112.394 113.035
107.598 103.628
107.963 98.875
107.320 107.289
97.330 98.298
124.563 125.887
117.445 118.336
110.634 111.521

113.713
105.735
102.566
108.190
98.722
126.690
118.581
113.175

114.436
108.447
107.953
108.918
98.986
127.604
119.459
113.675

Housing.......................................
Household operation..................
Electricity and g a s ................
Other household operation...
Transportation............................
Medical ca re ...............................
Recreation..................................
Other............................................

102.498

105.236

8

9 124.064 151.423
123.925 150.760
125.377 159.465
106.139 107.775
13 112.863 116.529
14 113.234 116.165
15 109.943 115.554
16 117.821 129.900
17 105.374 107.233
18 108.373 112.663
19 114.660 118.438
20 112.059 115.168
21 113.086 116.625
10
11
12

116.858

118.281

119.194

116.453 117.279 118.269
115.498 120.579 122.403
129.526 142.169 145.582
107.364 108.047 108.977
113.621 114.970 115.411
118.752 119.949 120.482
115.535 116.702 117.311
116.985 117.959 119.116

120.059

120.992

119.717 121.055
121.019 121.382
140.799 140.316
109.447 110.284
116.826 117.675
121.332 122.180
118.582 119.422
119.970 120.848

Addenda:
22

104.676

105.473

104.963

104.786

23

113.455

117.255

118.125

118.216 119.953

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.




III

1

137.868

110.286

Addenda:

Energy goods and services 1...
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy.............................

II

3

118.761
137.893

122.801

9 104.727 104.204 103.288
105.861 105.824 104.887
92.479
86.762 86.060
116.072 120.838 121.368
13 110.055 112.925 113.379
14 108.459 111.540 111.918
15 104.922 107.145 107.506
16 104.569 107.317 107.443
17 105.147 107.016 107.543
18 97.510 97.652 97.376
19 118.550 122.799 123.437
20 113.618 116.727 117.009
21 107.403 109.540 110.176

I

2

117.373
131.799

117.173

10
11
12

IV

Durable g o o d s...............................

117.152
136.207

119.521

132.666

120.313

2006

2005
III

Personal consumption
expenditures....................

112.430
125.753

118.608

2005

III

3 116.518

2

2004

100.967

120.674 121.559

Energy goods and services'....
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy..............................

22

121.376

142.141

150.861

154.420

23

107.314

109.559

109.732

110.418 110.983

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.

154.467 164.836
111.738

166.332
112.359

D-20

National Data

December 2006

Table 2.3.5. Personal Consumption Expenditures by Major
Type of Product

Table 2.3.6. Real Personal Consumption Expenditures by Major
Type of Product, Chained Dollars

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs

[B n o c a e (2 0 ) d lla ]
illio s f h in d 0 0 o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

I

II

II

III

1

7,577.1

7,841.2

7,895.3

7,910.2

8,003.8

8,055.0

8,112.0

1,085.7

1,145.3

1,175.9

1,137.9

1,190.5

1,190.3

1,207.6

441.7

451.5

3

450.4

452.9

474.6

426.3

445.1

443.7

453.2

401.3
218.8

402.2
220.7

4
5

446.0
195.6

490.6

212.0

402.3
219.1

Motor vehicles and p a rts ..........
Furniture and household
equipment...............................
Other............................................

212.6

497.7
213.1

511.5
216.3

538.5
224.6

542.9
222.5

550.4
223.0

2,584.9

2,613.5

2,658.2

2,721.4

2,744.9

Nondurable g o o d s .......................

6

2,287.6

2,309.6

2,342.8

2,351.1

2,357.7

1,233.7
349.1

1,262.3
355.4

1,274.0
355.1

1,279.1
358.4

7
8

350.9

1,065.7
372.7

1,074.9
373.9

1,085.7
383.1

1,103.4
391.1

1,108.8
387.4

1,105.4
392.4

331.0
308.2

316.2
295.1

369.3
346.3
23.0
738.0

200.5
186.0
14.6
618.5

199.5
185.9
13.7
643.9

197.8
184.2
13.6
646.7

196.6
183.9

196.0
183.9

652.4

662.6

196.3
183.5
12.9
668.3

198.7
186.6

724.2

359.1
335.6
23.5
733.3

9

698.0

322.1
299.1
23.0
708.6

Food.............................................
Clothing and shoes....................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.........................
Gasoline and o il.....................
Fuel oil and co a l....................
Other............................................

2,179.2
1 ,011.0

2,276.8

1,214.7
341.3

670.7

5,205.1

5,294.7

5,356.8

5,444.9

5,529.8

S ervices..........................................

4,323.9

4,454.5

4,476.7

4,494.5

4,535.4

4,570.7

1,304.1
483.0
199.8
283.2
320.4
1,493.4
360.6
1,208.4

1,311.7
484.3
199.4
285.0
322.3
1,505.0
362.6
1,219.1

1,326.6
506.1
219.9
286.2
325.9
1,534.0
367.7
1,234.4

1,345.4
494.8
206.2
288.6
330.4
1,557.2
372.4
1,256.5

1,370.1
499.1
206.9
292.2
335.9
1,578.2
377.2
1,284.3

1,394.2
513.5
217.0
296.5
339.3
1,600.7
382.7
1,299.4

Housing.......................................
Household operation..................
Electricity and g a s ................
Other household operation...
Transportation............................
Medical ca re ...............................
Recreation..................................
Other............................................
Residual...........................................

4,436.6
1 , 122.6

418.0
153.8
264.1
284.4
1,260.9
313.1
1,036.2
-31.9

1,126.4
419.4
154.0
265.4
283.6
1,267.5
313.9
1,042.2
-36.4

1,131.2
419.8
154.7
264.9
283.5
1,279.0
315.1
1,046.5
-36.7

1,137.6
404.3
141.7
264.8
286.3
1,292.6
317.5
1,054.9
-53.0

1,144.5
412.5
147.0
267.0
287.5
1,300.9
318.1
1,070.6
-50.6

1,151.7
423.1
154.7
268.8
288.3
1,310.3
320.5
1,075.3
-51.5

425.3

501.9

530.4

542.0

522.4

566.0

586.4

6,671.4

7,039.1

7,102.2

7,152.1

7,294.4

7,388.1

7,483.6

8,927.8

9,079.2

9,228.1

1,057.3

1,019.6

1,064.1

1,061.8

Motor vehicles and parts..........
Furniture and household
equipment...............................
O th er.........

3

437.9

448.2

468.1

421.6

442.7

4
5

356.5
191.8

377.2
207.7

380.0
209.2

386.0

Nondurable g o o d s.......................

6

2,345.2

2,539.3

Food..........
Clothing and shoes....................
Gasoline, fuel oil, and other
energy goods.........................
Gasoline and oil.....................
Fuel oil and co a l....................
O ther...........................................

7

1,114.8
325.1

1,201.4
341.8

248.8
230.4
18.4
656.5

302.1
280.2
21.9
694.0

4,880.1

5,170.0

20
21

1,236.1
450.0
176.6
273.5
307.8
1,395.7
341.6
1,148.9

22

23

22.8

21.1

Addenda:

Energy goods and services 1 ...
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy............................

I

2

8,847.3

1,033.1

Housing......................................
Household operation................
Electricity and g as................
Other household operation...
Transportation.............................
Medical care...............................
Recreation..................................
O ther...........................................

2006
IV

Durable g o o d s...............................

8,742.4

986.3

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

2005
III

1,074.4

8,211.5

Services..........................................

2005

9,349.1

1
2

9

2004

III
Personal consumption
expenditures....................

Durable g o o d s ..............................

10
11
12

Line

2006
IV

Personal consumption
expenditures....................

8

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

12.8

12.2

12.2

20
21
22

1,091.6
409.3
149.8
259.5
284.0
1,217.3
304.8
1,016.0
-18.9

23

350.4

353.1

351.4

350.8

338.0

343.1

352.3

24

6,216.7

6,424.9

6,472.6

6,477.6

6,572.7

6,612.3

6,660.7

Addenda:

Energy goods and services '....
Personal consumption
expenditures excluding food
and energy..............................

1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.




1. Consists of gasoline, fuel oil, and other energy goods and of electricity and gas.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2 000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the differ­
ence between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

December 2006

D-21

Survey of Current Business

3. Government Current Receipts and Expenditures




Table 3.1. Government Current Receipts and Expenditures
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

Current receipts.......................................................................
Current tax receipts............................................................................
Personal current taxes...................................................................
Taxes on production and im ports................................................
Taxes on corporate incom e..........................................................
Taxes from the rest of the w o rld ..................................................
Contributions for government social insurance...............................
Income receipts on assets........
Interest and miscellaneous receipts............................................
Dividends.........................................................................................
Current transfer receipts...........
From business (net)..............
From persons.................................................................................
Current surplus of government enterprises....................................
C urrent e xpen d itu res.............................................................
Consumption expenditures...............................................................
Current transfer payments.................................................................
Government social benefits..........................................................
To persons..................................................................................
To the rest of the world.............................................................
Other current transfer payments to the rest of the world (net)..
Interest payments...............................................................................
To persons and business..............................................................
To the rest of the w orld..................................................................
Subsidies.............................................................................................
Less: Wage accruals less disbursements......................................
Net governm ent saving..........................................................
Social insurance funds......................................................................
O th er...................................................................................................
Addenda:
Total re c e ip ts ................................................................................
Current receipts.........................................................................
Capital transfer receipts...........................................................
Total expenditures......................................................................
Current expenditures...............................................................
Gross government investment................................................
Capital transfer payments........................................................
Net purchases of nonproduced assets..................................
Less: Consumption of fixed capital........................................
Net lending or net borrow ing ( - ) .............................................

1
2

3,244.5
2 ,211.1

3
4
5

1,049.8
864.0
287.6
9.7
826.4
95.4
93.0
2.4
116.6
49.8

6

7
8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39

I

IV

II

III

3,586.3

3,518.4

3,712.5

3,895.1

3,961.6

4,001.6

2,520.7
1,203.1
922.4
384.4

2,520.8
1,215.0
930.2
364.2
11.4
888.5
98.4
95.9
2.4
38.4
-34.3
72.7
-27.7

2,604.8
1,247.6
937.3
408.4
11.4
898.9
98.5
96.1
2.5
123.6
49.4
74.2
-13.3

2,736.2
1,332.6
952.5
440.7
10.4
936.7

2,796.5
1,361.0
966.4
458.2
10.9
938.8

100.0

101.6

97.5
2.5
131.4
55.6
75.7
-9.2

99.0

2,823.6
1,365.6
973.3
473.1
11.7
948.0
103.1
100.5

3,933.8
2 ,002.1

3,993.3

2,014.5
1,542.8
1,504.0
1,500.8
3.2
38.9
372.9
247.6
125.3
63.1

10.8

880.6
98.3
95.8
2.4
102.1

-5.0

30.1
72.0
-15.4

3,639.4

3,898.8

1,854.8
1,427.2
1,401.4
1,398.4
3.0
25.9
312.7
224.2
88.5
44.7

1,975.7
1,517.8
1,484.0
1,480.9
3.1
33.9
348.0
234.4
113.6
57.3

66.8

2006

2005
III

1,523.9
1,492.3
1,489.2
3.1
31.6
349.6
232.4
117.2
58.1

2.6

2.6

134.1
56.7
77.3
-9.4

136.9
57.9
79.0
- 10.0

4,029.3

4,098.6

4,173.3

2,059.7
1,561.2
1,539.2
1,536.0
3.2

2,083.0
1,581.2
1,558.0
1,554.7
3.3
23.2
382.0
236.9
145.1
52.3

2,106.8
1,612.1
1,586.6
1,583.3
3.4
25.5
402.5
253.1
149.4
52.0

22.0

353.3
218.5
134.8
55.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

-394.9

-312.5

-415.4

-280.8

-134.3

-136.9

-171.7

57.8
-452.7

65.4
-377.9

71.2
-486.6

75.3
-356.0

62.3
-196.6

48.4
-185.3

50.2
- 221.8

3,274.8

3,616.5

3,548.5

3,744.0

3,928.8

3,994.1

4,032.8

3,244.5
30.3

3,586.3
30.2

3,518.4
30.1

3,712.5
31.4

3,895.1
33.7

3,961.6
32.5

4,001.6
31.2

3,807.9

4,072.8

4,093.8

4,175.5

4,223.6

4,294.4

4,370.9

3,639.4
371.4
16.8

3,933.8
400.3
16.1
9.3
265.7

3,993.3
409.1
16.1

4,029.3
419.9
21.3

230.8

3,898.8
397.1
18.3
10.9
252.2

255.0

259.1

4,098.6
430.9
18.1
9.8
262.9

4,173.3
434.1
16.8
13.1
266.4

-533.1

-456.3

-545.3

-431.5

-294.8

-300.3

-338.1

11.1

11.8

12.2

D-22

December 2006

National Data

Table 3.2. Federal Government Current Receipts and Expenditures

Table 3.3. State and Local Government Current Receipts and Expenditures

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2004

2005
III

IV

I

II

III

2,001.0

2,246.8

2,182.4

2,349.8

2,490.9

2,523.2

2,562.2

Current receipts.........................

1,150.2
801.4
94.6
71.4
23.3
244.5
18.1
226.4
9.7

1,366.2
927.9

1,364.2
941.0
102.4
77.0
25.4
309.5
21.7
287.8
11.4

1,428.4
968.4

1,524.9
1,039.2

101.6

101.1

75.9
25.7
347.1
24.6
322.5
11.4

75.4
25.7
374.3
25.0
349.3
10.4

1,553.2
1,049.9
103.0
75.9
27.1
389.4
27.3
362.1
10.9

1,581.7
1,067.0
100.9
73.5
27.4
402.1
29.0
373.2
11.7

11
12

802.2

863.2

13
14
15
16
17

15.5
27.7
15.2
12.5

855.3
22.9
15.9
7.1
7.1
- 6.6
13.8

873.8
22.3
15.3
6.9
30.6
16.3
14.3

911.9
23.3
15.0
8.3
32.2
17.5
14.7

914.1
24.2
15.3
8.9
32.8
17.7
15.2

923.3
25.1
15.8
9.3
33.6
18.0
15.6

18
19

- 1.2

-4.9

- 6.0

-5.4

-1.4

- 1.1

-1.5

2,383.0

2,555.9

2,578.5

2,613.3

2,637.9

2,686.2

2,731.9

23
24
25

724.5
1,393.3
1,018.4
1,015.4
3.0
374.9

768.6
1,476.7
1,081.7
1,078.6
3.1
395.0

784.3
1,481.3
1,087.8
1,084.7
3.1
393.5

771.1
1,502.4
1,096.7
1,093.5
3.2
405.7

803.6
1,522.0
1,148.8
1,145.5
3.2
373.3

802.3
1,546.6
1,166.4
1,163.1
3.3
380.3

808.8
1,566.7
1,175.6
1,172.2
3.4
391.1

Current tax receipts..............................
Personal current taxes.....................
Income ta xe s................................
Other..............................................
Taxes on production and imports....
Sales taxes...................................
Property taxes..............................
Other..............................................
Taxes on corporate income.............
Contributions for government social
insurance ...........................................
Income receipts on assets...................
Interest receipts................................
Dividends...........................................
Rents and royalties..........................
Current transfer receipts......................
Federal grants-in-aid........................
From business (net).........................
From persons....................................
Current surplus of government
enterprises.........................................

26
27
28
29
30
31

349.0
25.9
220.9
132.4
88.5
44.3

361.1
33.9
253.8
140.3
113.6
56.9

361.9
31.6
255.2
137.9
117.2
57.7

366.8
38.9
277.1
151.8
125.3
62.7

351.3
257.5
122.7
134.8
54.7

357.0
23.2
285.4
140.3
145.1
51.9

365.6
25.5
304.9
155.5
149.4
51.6

3?

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

S3
34
35

-382.0

-309.2

-396.0

-263.6

-147.0

-163.1

-169.7

50.3
-432.3

58.1
-367.3

64.0
-460.0

68.5
-332.0

56.2
-203.2

42.6
-205.7

44.7
-214.4

2,025.6
2 ,001.0

2,271.7

2,207.3

2,376.1

2,519.7

2,550.9

2,588.7

24.6

2,246.8
25.0

2,182.4
24.9

2,349.8
26.3

2,490.9
28.8

2,523.2
27.7

2,562.2
26.5

2,453.4

2,633.0

2,653.2

2,692.7

2,725.8

2,815.7

2,383.0
101.4
63.1

2,555.9
109.8
67.0

2,578.5
111.5
65.3

2,613.3
115.1
64.8

2,637.9
118.2
72.0

2,766.9
2 ,686.2

43

0.0

- 0.6

-2.3

0.0

0.2

-2.3

0.8

44
45

94.1

99.0

99.8

100.7

102.4

103.7

105.0

-427.8

-361.3

-445.9

-316.6

-206.1

-216.0

-227.1

Line

Current receip ts.......................
Current tax receipts...........................
Personal current taxes...................
Taxes on production and imports..
Excise taxes...............................
Customs duties..........................
Taxes on corporate incom e...........
Federal Reserve banks.............
O th er...........................................
Taxes from the rest of the w o rld ...
Contributions for government social
insurance.........................................
Income receipts on assets.................
Interest receipts..............................
Rents and royalties.........................
Current transfer receipts....................
From business.................................
From persons.................................
Current surplus of government
enterprises.....................................
C urrent e xp en d itu res..............
Consumption expenditures...............
Current transfer payments................
Government social benefits..........
To persons...................................
To the rest of the world.............
Other current transfer payments...
Grants-in-aid to state and local
governments..........................
To the rest of the world (net)....
Interest payments...............................
To persons and business..............
To the rest of the w orld ..................
Subsidies.............................................
Less: Wage accruals less
disbursements................................
Net Federal G overnment
sa vin g ....................................
Social insurance funds......................
O ther....................................................
Addenda:
Total re c e ip ts ................................
Current receipts..........................
Capital transfer receipts.............
Total e xpenditures.......................
Current expenditures.................
Gross government investment..
Capital transfer payments..........
Net purchases of nonproduced
assets......................................
Less: Consumption of fixed
capital......................................
Net lending or net borrow ing (-)




1
2

3
4
5
6

7
8

9
10

20
21
22

22.1
6.6

101.1

75.8
25.3
326.4
21.5
304.9
10.8

2005

22.8

15.7
7.1
-61.7
-75.7
14.0

22.0

Line

Current expenditures...............

Consumption expenditures..................
Government social benefit payments
to persons..........................................
Interest paym ents.................................
Subsidies...............................................
Less: Wage accruals less
disbursements..................................

117.4
69.2

2,731.9
117.9
70.1

3
4
5
6

7
8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

2005

IV

I

II

III

1,592.6

1,700.6

1,697.8

1,729.6

1,755.4

1,795.5

1,805.0

1,060.9
248.4
225.1
23.4
769.4
370.3
329.8
69.3
43.1

1,154.4
275.2
250.9
24.4
821.2
394.1
350.4
76.7
58.0

1,156.6
274.0
249.5
24.4
827.9
397.9
353.0
76.9
54.7

1,176.3
279.3
254.3
25.0
835.7
397.2
358.1
80.5
61.3

1,211.3
293.4
268.3
25.1
851.4
407.9
363.2
80.3
66.4

1,243.3
311.1
285.6
25.5
863.3
413.2
368.6
81.5
68.8

1,241.9
298.6
272.8
25.9
872.3
415.1
374.1
83.0
70.9

24.2
73.3
62.1
2.4
8.7
438.0
349.0
34.7
54.3

25.3
75.3
63.4
2.4
9.5
456.1
361.1
36.7
58.3

25.3
75.6
63.6
2.4
9.6
462.0
361.9
41.4
58.8

25.2
76.3
64.0
2.5
9.8
459.8
366.8
33.1
59.9

24.8
76.7
64.1
2.5

24.7
77.4
64.5

24.7
78.1
64.9

10.1

10.3
458.3
357.0
39.1
62.2

2005

2006

450.5
351.3
38.2
61.0

2.6

2.6
10.6

468.8
365.6
39.9
63.3

20

-3.8

-10.5

-21.7

-7.9

-7.8

- 8.2

-8.5

21
22

1,605.5

1,703.9

1,717.2

1,746.8

1,742.7

1,769.4

1,807.0

1,130.3

1,207.2

1,217.8

1,243.4

1,256.2

1,280.7

1,298.0

23
24
25

382.9
91.8
0.4

402.3
94.2
0.4

404.5
94.5
0.4

407.3
95.8
0.4

390.4
95.8
0.4

391.7
96.6
0.4

411.0
97.6
0.4

26

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Net state and local
government saving...............

?7

-12.9

-3.3

-19.3

-2.0

29

7.5
-20.4

7.3
- 10.6

7.2
-26.6

-17.2
6.8

26.1

Social insurance funds.........................
Other.......................................................

12.7
6.2

-24.0

6.5

5.8
20.4

5.5
-7.5

1,644.5

1,754.6

1,752.3

1,783.4

1,811.1

1,851.5

1,863.0

1,592.6
51.9

1,700.6
53.9

1,697.8
54.4

1,729.6
53.8

1,755.4
55.6

1,795.5
56.0

1,805.0
58.0

1,749.8

1,849.6

1,851.7

1,898.3

1,899.7

1,935.8

1,974.0

1,605.5
270.0

1,703.9
287.3

1,717.2
288.7

1,746.8
294.0

1,742.7
301.7

1,769.4
313.5

1,807.0
316.1

Addenda:
Total receipts...................................

36
37
38
39
40
41
42

1
2

2004

III

2006

Current receipts............................
Capital transfer receipts..............
Total expenditures.........................

Current expenditures...................
Gross government investment....
Net purchases of nonproduced
assets.......................................
Less: Consumption of fixed
capital........................................
Net lending or net borrowing (-)

30
31
32
33
34
35
37

11.0

11.6

11.6

11.8

12.0

12.2

12.3

38
39

136.7

153.2

165.9

154.3

156.7

159.2

161.4

-105.3

-95.0

-99.4

-114.9

-88.7

-84.3

-111.0

December 2006

Survey of Current Business

D-23

Table 3.9.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Government Consumption
Expenditures and Gross Investment

Table 3.9.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Government
Consumption Expenditures and Gross Investment
[Percent]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investm ent..........................

1
2

1.9
2.1

3
4
5

0.5
-3.1
7.2

Federal...............................................

6

4.3

1.5

Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software......

7

4.0

8

6.6

0.9
6.4

9

-9.1
9.7

- 1.6
7.7

Consumption expenditures '
Gross investm ent 2..............
Structures.........................
Equipment and software

National d efen se.........................

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software......
N ondefense..................................

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.....
State and local.................................

Consumption expenditures..........
Gross investment..........................
Structures..................................
Equipment and software..........

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

3.4

0.9

4.2
-0.9
-7.2

1.1

- 2.0
6.4

1.5

-4.4
-4.9
-40.9
2.5

1.7
- 0.2
-4.7
0.5

11.7

0.5
1.0

1.8

-4.5

6.0

- 1.6
-2.7
3.1

2.5

8.7
8.9
-17.0
14.2

-9.5

23
24
25

-0.5
7.4
10.3

8.8

1.1
0.1
8.1
- 0.6

21
22

4.4
7.6
5.5

-4 .6

6.2

1.3

2.2

-6.7

11.7
0.4

1.2

0.8

9.6
8.8

11.2
11.1

1.2

4.9

2.6

69.9
3.5

0.8

0.3

-9 .9

8.9

-2.0

-1.1

9.1
7.9
-19.0

12.6

- 10.8
-3.1
11.3
-4.1

-4.1
14.1
-10.7
16.1

- 1.0
- 1.8
15.3
-2.9

6.2

7.1

-9.3

6.8

4.0

2.4
43.8
108.3
24.6

8.5
8.1
10.8

-5.0
-32.9
-51.4
-24.5

7.4
3.2
-13.8
9.7

4.0
2.1

2.6

12.5
14.8
2.9

1.2
0.6

22.8

22.9
22.8

0.5

-0.1

0.9
-0.9
- 2.0
4.2

1.4
-6.4
-8.4
3.0

10.2

-16.1
23.9
2.7

1.0
1.0

1.7
7.0
7.4
5.6

1.4
0.9
3.7

2006
IV

III

II

I

Percent change at annual rate:

11.1

1.7
1.2

5.4
9.5
-8.5
11.3

III

4.0
4.3
3.5

11.1

2005

2005
III

10.8

5.5
-3.5

5.9

II

I

-1.1
- 2.1

15.3
14.6
15.4

2004

2006
IV

0.9

Line

3.0
4.3

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
(construction and software).
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment...........................

1

1.9

0.9

3.4

-1.1

4.9

0.8

2.2

2

1.78

- 0.21
0.39

3.50
-0.14
-0.78
0.65

1.06
0.16

2.07
0.14
0.03

0.22

3.65
1.26
0.59
0.67

-0.41

0.09
-0.34
0.43

0.72
0.18

-1.74

3
4
5

0.11

Federal...............................................

6

1.56

0.56

3.44

-1.73

3.17

-1.69

0.54

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software......

7

1.26
0.29
-0.07
0.36

0.28
0.28

2.78

- 0.01
0.30

0.08
0.58

-2.23
0.49
0.36
0.13

2.76
0.42
-0.13
0.55

-1.45
-0.24
-0.34

0.55
- 0.01
-0.03

0.10

0.02

1.40

0.43

2.70

-2.57

2.15

-0.50

1.13
0.27
- 0.02
0.29

0.26
0.16
- 0.01
0.17

2.36
0.34

-2.47
- 0.10

0.00

-0.91
0.41
- 0.02
0.43

-0.06
0.03
-0.09

0.15

0.74

1.02

-1.19

0.80

-0.05
0.06

0.14
0.02
0.12
0.00
0.12

0.02
- 0.12
0.84

1.91
0.24
-0.05
0.28

-0.27
- 0.21

0.42
0.32
0.08
0.24

0.25
0.59
0.33
0.26

0.85
0.18
-0.09
0.26

-0.55
-0.65
-0.31
-0.33

0.76
0.05
-0.06

0.32

0.33

-0.08

0.66

1.74

2.50

1.67

0.52
- 0.20
-0.27
0.07

0.44
- 0.10
- 0.2 0

0.72
-0.80
-0.87
0.07

0.49
0.17
0.09
0.08

0.89
0.85
0.72
0.13

1.05
1.46
1.39
0.06

1.52
0.15
0.06
0.09

Percentage points at annual
rates:

Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investm ent 2 ..............
Structures.........................
Equipment and software

National d efen se.........................

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.....
N ondefense..................................

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.....
State and lo ca l.................................

Consumption expenditures..........
Gross investment..........................
Structures..................................
Equipment and software..........

8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25

0.14
0.02

0.10

0.66

0.44

0.66

0.34

1.22

0.11

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
(construction and software).
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

Table 3.9.3. Real Government Consumption Expenditures and
Gross Investment, Quantity Indexes

Table 3.9.4. Price Indexes for Government Consumption Expenditures and
Gross Investment

[Index numbers, 2000=100]

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005
III

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investm ent..........................

Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investm ent 2..............
Structures.........................
Equipment and software
Federal...............................................

Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.....
National d efen se.........................

Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software......
Nondefense..................................

Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.....
State and local.................................

Consumption expenditures..........
Gross investment..........................
Structures..................................
Equipment and software..........

1 112.720

2006

2005
IV

I

II

114.358

114.048

115.423

113.700
115.649
104.881
136.707

114.925 114.784 115.495
117.777 119.898 120.144
106.305 108.939 109.011
140.345 141.261 141.891

116.291

6

Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investm ent 2 ..............
Structures.........................
Equipment and software

127.545

126.053

128.728

127.262

127.726

Federal...............................................

124.339 126.115
135.726 138.068
95.106 91.922
144.848 148.557

123.952
141.739
104.947
149.824

126.577 125.156
144.796 142.979
100.160 87.820
154.873 155.821

125.689
142.909
86.776
156.008

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.....

11
12

130.593

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25

128.374

125.701

133.423

130.002

132.808

131.780

National d efen se.........................

127.006 128.551 131.236
138.370 145.920 149.882
88.381
85.263 83.766
144.478 153.436 158.129

127.544
148.703
86.045
156.470

130.343 128.981 128.663
151.544 156.631 155.922
81.631
79.347 82.218
160.333 166.443 165.222

132.141

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software.....

116.896

116.939

118.971

121.411

118.488

120.460

Nondefense..................................

116.431 116.593
110.674 119.670
101.631 100.972
114.658 128.100

116.675
119.443
96.771
129.796

117.362
130.801
116.262
137.125

119.666
134.201
111.254
144.679

118.137
121.448
92.885
134.864

120.255
122.394
89.512
138.011

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures..............................
Equipment and software......

107.094

107.660

107.674

107.954

108.682

109.762

110.480

State and lo c a l.................................

106.736
108.488
107.653
112.239

107.655 107.817 108.074
107.563 106.963 107.335
105.501 104.672 104.901
116.965 117.464 118.538

108.536
109.177
106.780
120.176

109.095 109.903
112.448 112.784
110.517 110.670
121.051 122.323

Consumption expenditures..........
Gross investment..........................
Structures..................................
Equipment and software.....

115.606

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account invest­
ment (construction and software).
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.




III
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment...........................

7 123.279
8 127.622
9 96.691
10 134.445

123.813

2006

2005

2005

III

2 112.595 113.564 114.298
3 113.210 114.431 114.517
4 106.884 104.770 103.781
5 125.107 133.146 135.523

113.731

115.657

Line

2004

IV

I

II

III

122.029

123.444

124.791

126.262

126.918

2 116.248 122.768 123.614
3 107.736 113.947 114.798
4 115.179 125.497 127.072
5 95.994 96.580 96.467

125.034
116.192
129.603
96.399

126.480
117.085
131.056
96.566

128.065
118.041
132.477
96.915

128.729
118.660
133.484
97.027

6

1

114.718

121.183

115.249

120.726

121.353

121.479

123.721

124.871

125.365

7 117.695
99.994
9 114.151
10
97.495

123.792
101.776
121.970
98.436

124.548
101.650
123.055
98.160

124.594
102.226
125.790
98.446

127.152
102.693
127.651
98.721

128.391
103.336
129.602
99.199

128.876
103.865
130.674
99.662

11
12

8

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25

121.855

122.467

122.760

124.752

126.006

126.656

118.472 125.071
99.911 101.628
115.424 122.288
98.529 99.901

125.833
101.370
123.410
99.558

126.061 128.327
102.026 102.438
126.785 128.116
100.044 100.399

129.681
103.109
129.674
101.016

130.314
103.835
129.747
101.774

113.963

118.606

119.261

119.059

121.787

122.736

122.922

116.274
100.007
113.512
95.009

121.381
101.913
121.819
94.902

122.127
102.051
122.873
94.783

121.810
102.470
125.301
94.603

124.944
103.035
127.394
94.703

125.958
103.623
129.531
94.861

126.154
103.750
131.133
94.619

114.417

121.463

122.438

124.620

125.434

127.095

127.847

115.388
110.587
115.249
93.789

122.177 123.079 125.365
118.679 119.954 121.716
125.737 127.344 129.860
93.793 93.956 93.282

126.112
122.799
131.283
93.263

127.916
123.893
132.670
93.389

128.692
124.548
133.674
92.897

115.954

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
(construction and software).
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

D-24

National Data

December 2006

Table 3.9.5. Government Consumption Expenditures and
Gross Investment

Table 3.9.6. Real Government Consumption Expenditures and Gross
Investment, Chained Dollars

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs

[B n o c a e (2 0 ) d lla ]
illio s f h in d 0 0 o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investm ent...........................
Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investm ent2...............

1
2

2,226.2

2,372.8

1,975.7
397.1
248.9
148.1

2,402.4
2 ,002.1

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006
IV

I

II

Line

2,423.6

2,479.6

2,513.9

2,540.8

2,014.5
409.1
257.3
151.8

2,059.7
419.9
263.7
156.1

2,083.0
430.9
273.2
157.7

2,106.8
434.1
275.5
158.6

3
4
5

Federal................................................

6

825.9

878.3

895.8

886.2

921.7

919.7

926.7

Federal...............................................

7

724.5
101.4
14.7
86.7

768.6
109.8
15.4
94.4

784.3
111.5
15.0
96.5

771.1
115.1
17.5
97.6

803.6
118.2
17.0
101.2

802.3
117.4
15.1
102.3

808.8
117.9
15.1
102.9

Consumption expenditures.....
Gross investment......................
Structures.............................
Equipment and software.....

551.2

589.3

605.0

590.9

613.5

616.5

618.0

National d e fen se .........................

483.7
67.5
5.1
62.4

516.9
72.4
5.2
67.2

530.9
74.2
5.1
69.0

516.9
74.1
5.4

537.7
78.8
5.1
73.7

539.0
79.0
5.3
73.7

Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment......................
Structures.............................
Equipment and software.....

274.7

289.0

290.7

68.6
295.3

537.7
75.8
5.2
70.6
308.2

303.2

308.7

N ondefense..................................

240.7
33.9
9.6
24.3

251.7
37.4

254.2
41.1

265.9
42.4

264.6
38.6

12.1

11.8

10.0

27.1

253.4
37.4
9.9
27.5

29.0

30.6

28.6

269.8
38.9
9.8
29.2

Consumption expenditures......
Gross investment......................
Structures.............................
Equipment and software.....

1,400.3

1,494.4

1,506.6

1,537.4

1,557.9

1,594.2

1,614.1

State and lo c a l.................................

1,130.3
270.0
218.4
51.6

1,207.2
287.3
233.5
53.8

1,217.8
288.7
234.6
54.1

1,243.4
294.0
239.8
54.2

1,256.2
301.7
246.8
54.9

1,280.7
313.5
258.1
55.4

1,298.0
316.1
260.4
55.7

Consumption expenditures..........
Gross investment..........................
Structures..................................
Equipment and software..........
Residual..............................................

National d efen se..........................

Consumption expenditures.......
Gross investment.......................
Structures...............................
Equipment and software.......
N ondefense...................................

Consumption expenditures.......
Gross investment.......................
Structures...............................
Equipment and software.......
State and local..................................

Consumption expenditures...........
Gross investment............................
Structures...................................
Equipment and software...........

8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25

10.2

2005

2006

III
Government consumption
expenditures and gross
investment...........................

Structures..........................
Equipment and software...
Consumption expenditures.......
Gross investment.......................
Structures...............................
Equipment and software.......

2005

III

1,854.8
371.4
233.1
138.3

400.3
249.7
150.6

2004

Consumption expenditures 1
Gross investm ent 2 ..............
Structures.........................
Equipment and software

1
2

IV

I

II

III

1,940.6

1,958.0

1,968.8

1,963.5

1,987.1

1,991.2

2,002.1

3
4
5

1,595.6
344.7
202.4
144.1

1,609.3
348.5
198.4
153.4

1,619.7
348.7
196.5
156.1

1,611.2
352.2
198.6
157.5

1,628.6
358.6
201.3
161.7

1,626.6
365.1
206.2
162.7

1,636.7
365.9
206.4
163.4

6

716.6

727.5

738.2

729.6

745.1

736.6

739.3

7

615.6
101.4
12.9
89.0

620.8
107.9

629.7
109.7

618.9

12.6

12.2

95.8

98.3

14.0
99.1

632.0
115.1
13.3
102.5

624.9
113.6
11.7
103.1

627.6
113.6
11.5
103.2

475.4

483.6

494.1

481.4

491.8

489.3

488.0

408.3
67.5
4.4
63.3

413.3
71.2
4.2
67.3

421.9
73.2
4.2
69.3

410.0
72.6
4.3

419.0
74.0
4.1
70.3

414.7
76.5
3.9
73.0

413.6
76.1
4.1
72.4

241.0

243.7

243.8

248.0

207.0
33.9
8.5
25.6

207.3
36.7
8.4
28.6

207.5
36.6

253.1
212.8

247.0
210.1

29.0

208.7
40.1
9.7
30.6

41.1
9.3
32.3

37.2
7.7
30.1

1,223.9

1,230.4

1,230.5

1,233.7

1,242.0

979.6
244.1
189.5
55.0
- 0.6

988.0
242.1
185.7
57.3
- 2.1

989.5
240.7
184.3
57.6
- 2.6

991.9
241.6
184.7
58.1
-3.1

996.1
245.7
188.0
58.9
-3.7

1,254.4
1 ,001.2

8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26

8.1

112.6

68.6

253.1
194.5
59.3
-3.3

251.1

213.8
37.5
7.5
30.8
1,262.6

1,008.7
253.8
194.8
60.0
-3.6

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government
(construction and software).
that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets; (construction and software).
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.
2. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar
value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more
than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between
the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.




D-25

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 3.10.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Government Consumption Expenditures and
General Government Gross Output
[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

IV

III
Government consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................

Grass output of general government............................................................................................
Value added...................
Compensation of general government employees............................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 .......................................................................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods....
Services...................................................................................................................................
Less; Own-account investment4
Sales to other sectors
Federal consumption expenditures 1

Gross output of general government................................................................................................
Value added.....................................................................................................................................
Compensation ot general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods....
Nondurable goods
Services.............
Less: Own-account investm ent4
Sales to other sectors............................................................................................................
Defense consumption expenditures 1

Gross output of general government
Value added....................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods
Services.........................
Less: Own-account investment 4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors
Nondefense consumption expenditures 1

Gross output of general government
Value added.......................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods...............
Nondurable goods.........
Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change..............................................................
Other nondurable goods
Services.........................
Less: Own-account investment 4
Sales to other sectors............................................................................................................
State and local consumption expenditures 1

Gross output of general government................................................................................................
Value added.......................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods...............
Nondurable goods
Services.........................
Less: Own-account investment 4
Sales to other sectors
Tuition and related educational charges..........................................................................
Health and hospital charges.............................................................................................
Other sales..........................................................................................................................

1
2

3
4
5

2.1
2.0
0.6

6

0.3
2.3
4.2

7

6.8

8

3.6
4.2
-0.7

9
10
11

1.0

12

4.0

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

3.9

20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

1.0

0.7
1.8

7.9
10.2

9.6
7.5
-3.7
5.5

2006

2005
I

4.2

-2.1

4.4

4.1

0.9

0.8
0.6

-1.5
0.9
0.7
2.3
-5.3

0.6
2.6

1.3
2.5
1.2

1.3
1.4
2.3
0.9
1.1
0.6
0.1
2.6
1.8

11.8
- 0.8

-8.4
5.0

3.9
-0.7
-1.4
3.4
11.5
-5.2
3.8
16.3
3.7

3.8

1.6

1.0

8.8

-6.7

9.7
-0.4
- 1.2

-6.7
1.5

2.3
9.5
9.8
3.5

6.1
0.8

2.6

1.2
2.6

- 0.2
37.2

23.8
16.4
16.4
25.7
7.3
158.6

-16.0
9.3
-1.4
-20.4
4.0
-17.0

3.1
0.7
1.8

III

II

0.9
1.1

8.7
8.1

-3.5
-5.1
2.6

24.4
- 10.2
2.2

32.6
- 8.8
-33.1

-0.5
0.2
0.8

2.5

2.4
2.3

0.5

2.2

2.8

3.1
2.5
16.0
4.3
0.7

-0.9
0.0

-0.4
- 1.1
8.9
3.6

2.0
1.8

-4.4

1.7

-3.9
- 0.1
-0.7
2.3
-8.3
- 2.0
-22.3
-7.1
2.5
60.9

1.5
3.2
3.5

8.3
-19.2

2.1

- 0.6
26.9
5.9
^ .1

1.2

11.1

-10.8

9.1

-4.1

-1.0

5.3

1.3

1.8
1.8
1.8

0.8

0.3
2.5

-3.3
-0.7
- 1.6

9.7

1.8

10.0

2.4
-3.0

9.8
-4.7
-6.9
2.4
29.6
-12.3
- 0.6
42.1
-3.9
316.1

5.4

2.2

11.4
0.5
- 0.2
2.5
25.5
16.3
4.8
29.6

-5.5
21.7

60.1

-11.5
0.9
0.4
2.4
-24.0
9.8
-22.7
-28.6
5.5
-81.3

195.8

-1.4
3.7
4.3
1.9
-7.0
29.3
7.1
-13.0
5.4
-46.2

1.3

0.1

4.0

2.4

8.1

-5.0

7.4

1.4
-0.5
- 1.0

0.9
0.3

6.5

3.6
2.7

4.7

-4.9

- 1.2
- 2.1
3.3
13.6
17.8

1.1
0.8

7.6
2.4
2.3
2.7
15.3

12.7
9.3
-7.6
- 1.6

1.8

2.1

- 6.2
- 1.1
-29.8
-4.1
2.1

11.8

- 1.8
-2.7
2.9
19.9
17.9

2.2
0.8

-21.5
17.6

10.9

3.7

4.3
48.1

11.8

272.6

2.9
71.8

15.5
14.9
- 12.6
-74.5

-18.9
-13.1

0.0
11.1
1.0
1.0

0.9
1.0
1.0
0.8
2.6
1.0

1.4

1.0

1.7

2.1

1.3
1.4
1.3

1.3
0.7
0.5

1.9

2.3

0.6
0.1

1.2

2.1

2.0
2.2
1.8

4.0
4.2

0.9
3.3
4.1

2.2

2.8

1.3

4.1
4.4
7.0

4.1
4.1
10.4
2.4
2.4
2.4
2.5

1.8

4.3
13.1
12.6

0.5
0.2

2.7
2.0

2.4
2.6
1.6
0.0

0.9
- 2.1
0.7
3.5

- 0.2
2.7
1.7

1.7
1.3
0.9
1.8

1.5
- 0.1

1.3
1.1
1.2

2.6

2.9
5.0
3.1

0.2

1.4
-2.7
1.3

2.8

5.3

1.2

4.6

0.8

0.4

0.1

2.1
2.0
2.0

4.0

2.8

3.8

2.4

2.2

3.0
-12.9
-11.7

2.8

-4.9

1.1

6.3
17.8
10.7
16.9
3.0
2.8

1.9
1.7
3.9
4.5
2.3
4.1
4.9
0.5
2.4
2.4
2.4
2.4

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in soft­
ware in table 3.9.5.




D-26

National Data

December 2006

Table 3.10.3. Real Government Consumption Expenditures and
General Government Gross Output, Quantity Indexes

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0
Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Government consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................

1
2

2006
IV

I

II

III

112.595

113.564

114.298

113.700

114.925

114.784

115.495

10
11

112.198
105.732
105.000
110.062
124.301
118.990
117.204
127.301
107.331
110.131

113.382
106.666
105.633
112.885
125.958
121.957
118.582
128.934
108.787
112.623

114.052
106.731
105.654
113.225
127.769
123.603
118.717
131.429
108.900
112.945

113.618
106.982
105.844
113.863
126.054
125.453
118.964
128.568
110.242
113.391

114.712
106.795
105.475
114.812
129.540
123.777
120.087
133.507
111.243
113.676

114.756
107.014
105.601
115.621
129.256
123.767
119.971
133.128
113.632
114.697

115.437
107.625
106.167
116.508
130.067
128.453
121.249
133.368
114.186
115.201

Federal consumption expenditures1.........................................................................................................

12

123.279

124.339

126.115

123.952

126.577

125.156

125.689

Gross output of general government................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

122.671
106.265
106.798
104.590
150.650
128.212
148.512
154.361
115.710
80.240

124.079
106.947
106.928
107.277
153.353
132.188
149.585
157.103
115.435
110.081

125.916
106.726
106.551
107.636
158.882
135.100
149.459
163.780
116.551
117.265

123.736
107.121
106.867
108.320
152.088
138.132
148.933
154.720
117.699
111.937

126.160
106.167
105.465
109.028
160.611
134.476
149.736
166.028
115.007
101.235

124.925
106.148
105.274
109.659
157.173
133.782
140.591
163.015
115.717
114.020

125.391
106.989
106.184
110.239
156.954
141.978
142.615
161.312
118.058
108.103

127.006

128.551

131.236

127.544

130.343

128.981

128.663

126.979
107.144
109.051
102.268
160.172
126.772
145.555
169.398
151.975
108.080

128.619
108.048
109.389
104.858
163.094
129.812
141.149
173.189
143.678
131.580

131.402
107.976
109.180
105.202
170.916
132.649
147.394
182.313
143.760
152.501

127.446
108.206
109.277
105.838
159.574
135.799
138.197
167.614
145.681
100.221

130.460
106.903
107.336
106.467
170.275
131.412
137.986
182.994
144.245
143.135

129.366
106.707
106.895
107.024
167.587
131.040
126.313
181.077
145.007
187.707

128.905
107.674
108.014
107.537
164.587
139.743
128.497
174.881
146.943
160.775

116.431

116.593

116.675

117.362

119.666

118.137

120.255

114.982
104.712
103.363
111.132
133.055
146.541

115.974
104.998
103.165
114.097
135.352
163.760

116.099
104.511
102.520
114.500
136.611
167.703

117.140
105.200
103.184
115.322
138.297
168.987

118.495
104.874
102.635
116.260
142.770
176.035

117.004
105.173
102.838
117.111
137.929
170.628

119.153
105.786
103.421
117.888
142.933
171.084

178.567
129.965
96.177
68.422

182.531
131.001
100.285
101.312

175.346
133.715
101.973
102.681

179.923
133.788
102.699
117.558

186.530
138.511
99.301
83.558

177.024
133.728
99.986
82.507

179.729
139.314
102.562
85.783

Gross output of general government............................................................................................
Value added.................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees............................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 .......................................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................................................................
Services....................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment 4 ...................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors........................................................................................................

Defense consumption expenditures 1..............................................................................................

Gross output of general government.................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ...............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................
Nondefense consumption expenditures 1........................................................................................

Gross output of general government.................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ...............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................................
Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change..............................................................
Other nondurable goods........................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investm ent4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................
State and local consumption expenditures 1...........................................................................................

Gross output of general government.................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 ...............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................
Tuition and related educational charges..........................................................................
Health and hospital charges.............................................................................................
Other sales..........................................................................................................................

3
4
5
6

7
8

9

20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
4?
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

106.736

107.655

107.817

108.074

108.536

109.095

109.903

107.542
105.491
104.326
115.264
111.493
108.138
112.658
111.166
105.541
111.028
105.618
113.121
111.762

108.625
106.536
105.152
118.215
112.652
109.924
114.080
112.139
107.398
112.737
105.537
113.985
116.208

108.777
106.726
105.327
118.538
112.730
110.095
114.247
112.160
107.281
112.864
105.352
114.112
116.581

109.116
106.915
105.468
119.137
113.354
110.576
114.608
112.945
108.670
113.474
106.533
114.140
117.672

109.622
107.065
105.499
120.303
114.528
111.177
115.776
114.163
110.519
114.077
107.065
114.711
118.381

110.234
107.389
105.748
121.272
115.678
111.953
116.955
115.323
113.298
114.768
107.709
115.399
119.112

111.009
107.899
106.182
122.435
116.952
112.598
118.124
116.707
113.443
115.452
108.354
116.092
119.810

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in soft­
ware in table 3.9.5.




D-27

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 3.10.4. Price Indexes for Government Consumption Expenditures and
General Government Gross Output

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0
Seasonally adjusted
Line

2005

116.248

122.768

123.614

125.034

126.480

128.065

128.729

116.454
119.235
121.865
105.231
111.778
102.208
113.758
112.219
114.279
117.920

122.760
124.718
127.425
110.292
119.320
104.161
130.408
117.323
119.227
122.970

123.534
125.330
128.016
111.007
120.341
104.345
133.343
117.798
119.819
123.303

125.031
126.237
128.881
122.728
104.587
138.589
119.469
120.962
125.310

126.402
128.170
130.995
113.134
123.245
105.113
136.627
120.800
122.470
126.196

127.905
129.182
132.042
113.965
125.475
106.044
144.244
121.416
123.723
127.211

128.688
130.257
133.212
114.561
125.818
106.643
143.337
122.140
124.657
128.719

12

117.695

123.792

124.548

124.594

127.152

128.391

128.876

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

117.666
122.817
129.376
103.803
110.752
101.277
109.625
112.235
119.837
112.767

123.761
129.479
137.416
106.480
116.145

124.640
129.782
137.540
107.295
117.673
102.780
133.584
117.848
125.626
126.346

127.083
133.763
142.519
108.456
118.384
103.098
131.526
118.935
128.460
118.459

128.312
134.390
143.102
109.199
120.254
104.131
139.058
120.289
129.596
118.899

128.798
134.545
143.040
109.950

127.253
116.691
124.946
118.928

124.486
130.093
138.198
106.616
116.999
102.783
132.557
117.122
125.697
117.072

118.472

125.071

125.833

126.061

128.327

129.681

130.314

118.475
124.019
132.100
104.718
111.334
102.127
111.656
113.246

125.822
132.233
142.466
107.730
117.692
103.845
145.561
117.881
127.102
122.866

126.044
132.009
141.844
108.456
118.382
103.896
148.658
118.490
127.119
121.976

128.300
135.894
146.796
109.818
118.923
104.288
144.162
119.505
130.097
122.008

129.649
136.388
147.173
110.581

117.603

125.063
131.671
141.713
107.623
116.727
103.728
137.758
117.386
126.127
122.661

131.602
122.699

130.282
136.642
147.120
111.542
122.126
106.017
158.739
122.046
131.548
123.573

116.274

121.381

122.127

121.810

124.944

125.958

126.154

116.213
120.762
125.333
101.430
109.583
91.890

121.351
125.685
130.947
103.518
114.981
91.303

122.013
126.391
131.776
103.726
115.586
91.174

122.035
125.929
131.059
104.285
116.232
90.620

124.838
130.080
136.088
104.924
117.305
90.214

125.836
130.937
136.985
105.616
118.476
90.280

126.038
130.920
136.910
105.825
118.955
90.040

108.213
110.499
119.529
109.934

115.953
115.631
123.897
116.681

118.310
115.928
124.473
113.980

117.371
116.899
124.336
127.844

117.844
118.138
127.055
116.921

120.175
119.148
127.901
117.159

120.132
119.738
128.405
117.501

115.388

122.177

123.079

125.365

126.112

127.916

128.692

115.879
117.747
119.234
106.538
112.459
103.349
114.432
112.174
112.918
118.031
133.203
117.214
109.789

122.293
122.735
123.913
113.684
121.419
106.072
130.870
117.817
117.826
123.047
143.186
121.443
113.066

123.091
123.347
124.437
114.904
122.549
106.383
133.343
118.328
118.379
123.446
144.423
121.631
113.284

125.267
124.764
125.841
116.399
126.080
106.986
139.407
120.797
119.808
125.236
146.403
123.593
114.703

126.097
125.844
126.948
117.285
126.468
107.816
137.466
122.333
121.008
126.372
148.838
124.394
115.580

127.740
127.015
128.157
118.192
128.939
108.600
145.093
122.317
122.287
127.402
151.492
125.142
116.090

128.671
128.471
129.756
118.655
128.951
109.313
143.860
122.908
123.371
128.937
154.238
126.441
117.266

III
Government consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................

Gross output of general government............................................................................................
Value added.................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees............................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 ..........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 .......................................................................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Services
Less: Own-account investment4
Sales to other sectors
Federal consumption expenditures 1

Gross output of general government
Value added...........
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 ...............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ...........................................................................
Durable goods....
Nondurable goods
Services.............
Less: Own-account investment4
Sales to other sectors
Defense consumption expenditures 1

Gross output of general government
Value added.............. .'.....................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ,,.
Durable goods......................................................
Nondurable goods...................................................................................................
Services.........................
Less: Own-account investm ent 4
Sales to other sectors
Nondefense consumption expenditures 1

Gross output of general government
Value added.......................
Compensation of general government employees
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3....
Durable goods......................................................
Nondurable goods
. .
Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change
Other nondurable goods.................................... 7..................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investm ent4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors...........
State and local consumption expenditures 1

Gross output of general government
Value added....................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods...............
Nondurable goods.
Services.........................
Less: Own-account investment 4
Sales to other sectors
Tuition and related educational charges..........................................................................
Health and hospital charges
Other sales.....................7...................................................................................................

2006

2005

2004

1
2

3
4
5
6

7
8

9
10
11

20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

120.112

102.688

IV

112.121

I

II

121.112

105.421
156.904
121.022

III

121.100

104.651
139.961
121.171
129.856
119.483

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in soft­
ware in table 3.9.5.




D-28

December 2006

National Data

Table 3.10.5. Government Consumption Expenditures and General
Government Gross Output

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

Government consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................

Gross output of general government............................................................................................
Value added.................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees............................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 .......................................................................
Durable goods.........................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................................................................
Services....................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 ...................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors........................................................................................................

1
2

2006
IV

III

I

III

II

1,854.8

1,975.7

2,002.1

2,014.5

2,059.7

2,083.0

2,106.8

2,313.8
1,422.9
1,215.7
207.2
890.9
56.0
224.7
610.2
23.5
314.6

2,342.1
1,430.7
1 ,221.6
209.1
911.4
56.9
230.0
624.5
23.6
316.4

2,361.4
1,444.5
1,232.1
212.4
917.0
57.8
239.5
619.6
24.1
322.8

2,410.3
1,464.0
1,247.9
216.1
946.3
57.4
238.4
650.5
24.7
325.9

2,439.9
1,478.6
1,259.4
219.2
961.3
57.9
251.4
652.0
25.4
331.5

2,469.4
1,499.4
1,277.4

9

2,172.0
1,348.4
1,155.7
192.7
823.6
53.6
193.7
576.3

10
11

295.0

Federal consumption expenditures 1.........................................................................................................

12

724.5

768.6

784.3

771.1

803.6

802.3

808.8

Gross output of general government.................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ...............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................

13
14
15
16
1/
18
19

734.9
411.6
323.0

798.1
437.9
344.2
93.6
360.2
33.4
37.5
289.4
4.7
9.1

785.2
438.4
343.6
94.8
346.8
34.1
37.6
275.1
4.8
9.4

816.3
447.9
351.4
96.5
368.5
33.3
37.3
297.9
4.8
7.9

816.1
449.9
352.2
97.7
366.3
33.5
37.0
295.8
4.8
9.0

822.3
454.0
355.1
98.9
368.3
35.7
37.8
294.9
5.0

6.0

781.9
436.7
343.5
93.2
345.2
32.6
36.0
276.6
4.7
8.7

483.7

516.9

530.9

516.9

537.7

537.7

539.0

488.3
264.7

522.1
283.4
215.4

64.5
223.6
28.8
16.9
177.9

238.7
30.0
20.3
188.5

536.6
284.4
216.1
68.3
252.2
30.7
22.3
199.3

521.4
284.5
215.4
69.1
236.9
31.4
21.3
184.1

543.2
289.3
218.9
70.4
253.9
30.5

544.4
289.9
218.6
71.3
254.5
30.8

545.1
293.0

200.2

20.6

21.2

197.9

2.1

2.1

2.1

20.6
202.8
2.1

203.2

2.1

2.2

2.2

2.5

3.1

3.6

2.4

3.4

4.5

3.9

240.7

251.7

253.4

254.2

265.9

264.6

269.8

246.7
146.9

259.8
153.3
128.1
25.2
106.5

263.9
153.9
128.2
25.7
109.9
2.7
16.3

273.1
158.5
132.4
26.1
114.6

271.8
160.0
133.6
26.4

2.8

2.7
16.4

277.2
160.9
134.3
26.7
116.3
2.7
16.6

Defense consumption expenditures 1 ..............................................................................................

Gross output of general government.................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ...............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................
Nondefense consumption expenditures 1........................................................................................

Gross output of general government.................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ...............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................................
Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change..............................................................
Other nondurable goods........................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................
State and local consumption expenditures 1...........................................................................................

Gross output of general government.................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ...............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods........................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment 4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................
Tuition and related educational charges..........................................................................
Health and hospital charges.............................................................................................
Other sales..........................................................................................................................

3
4
b
6

7
8

20
21
22

23
24
25
26
2/
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

22.2

88.6

323.4
31.2
30.8
261.4
4.5

68.0

222.1

970.0
60.4
252.5
657.1
25.8
336.9

8.6

220.8

72.2
252.0
33.0

5.5

261.5
153.5
128.1
25.4
108.0
2.7
15.2
- 0.8
15.9
90.1
2.7
5.4

4.5

16.4
92.6
2.7
4.5

1,130.3

1,207.2

1,217.8

1,243.4

1,256.2

1,280.7

1,298.0

1,437.1
936.8
832.7
104.1
500.3
22.4
162.9
314.9
17.7
289.0
62.3
139.9

1,531.9
986.2
872.3
113.9
545.7
23.4
188.7
333.6
18.8
306.0
67.0
146.1
92.9

1.544.0
992.9
877.4
115.5
551.1
23.5
192.5
335.1
18.9
307.3
67.4
146.4
93.4

1,576.2
1,006.0
888.5
117.6
570.1
23.7
201.9
344.5
19.4
313.4
69.1
148.8
95.5

1,594.0
1,016.2
896.5
119.6
577.8
24.0

1,623.8
1,028.7
907.2
121.5
595.0
24.4
214.4
356.2

1,647.1
1,045.5
922.3
123.2
601.6
24.7
214.8
362.2

122.8

24.1
99.7
2.4
13.9
- 1.0
14.8
83.5
2.4
3.5

86.8

2.6

15.7
-0.5
16.3
88.1
2.6

0.1

16.2
90.9
2.7
7.0

16.6
-0.3
16.9
95.1
2.6

201.1

352.6
19.9
318.0
70.6
150.6
96.8

111.8

0.1

0.0

16.6
97.0
2.8

4.7

20.6

20.8

322.5
72.3
152.4
97.8

328.3
74.1
154.9
99.4

1. Government consumption expenditures are sen/ices (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in soft­
ware in table 3.9.5.




December 2006

D-29

Survey of Current Business

Table 3.10.6. Real Government Consumption Expenditures and General Government
Gross Output, Chained Dollars

[B n o c a e (2 0 ) d lla ]
illio s f h in d 0 0 o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

1,595.6

1,609.3

1,619.7

1,884.8
1,140.9
954.1
187.8
746.7
53.8
172.3
520.1
19.7
255.9

1,896.0
1,141.6
954.3
188.4
757.4
54.5
172.5
530.2
19.7
256.6

2005
III

Government consumption expenditures 1..................................................................................

1
2

2006
IV

II

I

1,611.2
1 ,888.8

III

1,628.6

1,626.6

1,636.7

1,906.9
1,142.3
952.7
191.0
767.9
54.6
174.5
538.6

1,907.7
1,144.6
953.8
192.4
766.2
54.6
174.3
537.0

Gross output of general government............................................................................................
Value added.................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees............................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..........................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 .......................................................................
Durable goods........................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods..................................................................................................................
Services...................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 ...................................................................................................
Sales toother sectors........................................................................................................

10
11

1,865.1
1,130.9
948.4
183.1
736.8
52.5
170.3
513.5
19.4
250.2

20.0

20.1

257.6

258.3

260.6

1,919.0
1,151.1
958.9
193.9
771.0
56.6
176.2
538.0
20.7
261.7

Federal consumption expenditures 1.........................................................................................................

12

615.6

620.8

629.7

618.9

632.0

624.9

627.6

Gross output of general government................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods.......................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

624.6
335.1
249.7
85.3
292.0
30.8
28.1
232.9
3.7
5.3

631.8
337.3
250.0
87.5
297.2
31.8
28.3
237.0
3.7
7.3

641.1
336.6
249.1
87.8
307.9
32.5
28.3
247.1
3.8
7.8

630.0
337.8
249.8
88.4
294.8
33.2
28.2
233.4
3.8
7.4

642.4
334.8
246.5
89.0
311.3
32.3
28.3
250.5
3.7
6.7

636.1
334.8
246.1
89.5
304.6
32.1
26.6
245.9
3.7
7.5

638.5
337.4
248.2
90.0
304.2
34.1
27.0
243.4
3.8
7.2

Defense consumption expenditures 1 ..............................................................................................

Gross output of general government.................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods.......................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors............................................................................................................
Nondefense consumption expenditures 1........................................................................................

Gross output of general government................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods.......................................................................................................................
Commodity Credit Corporation inventory change..............................................................
Other nondurable goods........................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investment4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors.............................................................................................................
State and local consumption expenditures 1...........................................................................................

Grass output of general government................................................................................................
Value added......................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed c a p ita l 2 ..............................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ............................................................................
Durable goods..............................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods.......................................................................................................................
Services........................................................................................................................................
Less: Own-account investm ent4 .......................................................................................................
Sales to other sectors............................................................................................................
Tuition and related educational charges..........................................................................
Health and hospital charges.............................................................................................
Other sales.........................................................................................................................
Residual..............................................................................................................................................................

3
4
5
6

7
8

9

20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61

1,144.3
956.0
189.5
747.2
55.3
172.9
518.6

20.6

408.3

413.3

421.9

410.0

419.0

414.7

413.6

412.1
213.4
151.5
61.6
200.9
28.2
15.2
157.1
1.7

417.5
215.2
152.0
63.2
204.5
28.9
14.7
160.6

426.5
215.1
151.7
63.4
214.3
29.5
15.4
169.0

413.7
215.5
151.8
63.7

419.9
212.5
148.5
64.5

1.6

2.1

1.6
2.6

30.2
14.4
155.4
1.7

423.4
212.9
149.1
64.1
213.5
29.3
14.4
169.7

3.0

2.0

1.6
2.8

3.7

418.4
214.5
150.1
64.8
206.4
31.1
13.4
162.1
1.7
3.1

207.0

207.3

207.5

208.7

212.8

210.1

213.8

212.3
121.7
98.0
23.8
91.0

214.1

216.2

12.7
- 1.0
13.7
75.6

219.9
122.9
98.1
25.2
97.8
3.0
13.8

13.8
77.8

218.7
121.9
97.3
24.8
97.7
3.1
14.1
- 0.2
14.3
80.5

216.0

97.8
24.4
92.6
2.9
13.4
- 0.6
14.0
76.2

214.3
121.4
97.2
24.5
93.4
3.0
12.7
- 0.8
13.5
77.8

2.0

2.1

2.1

2.2

2.1

2.1

2.2

3.2

4.7

4.8

5.5

3.9

3.9

4.0

2.6

122.0

200.1

122.2

97.8
24.6
94.6
3.0
13.9
0.1

210.2

29.2
13.2
167.9
1.6

122.2

97.5
25.0
94.3
3.0
13.7
0.1

0.0

13.6
77.8

13.8
81.0

979.6

988.0

989.5

991.9

996.1

1,001.2

1,008.7

1,240.2
795.6
698.4
97.7
444.8
21.7
142.4
280.7
15.7
244.9
46.8
119.4
79.1
- 1.6

1,252.7
803.5
703.9

1,258.3
806.4
706.0

1,264.2
807.5
706.3

1,271.2
810.0
707.9

449.5

1,254.4
805.0
705.1
100.5
449.8

1,280.2
813.8
710.8
103.8
466.6

22.1

22.1

22.2

144.2
283.2
16.0
248.7
46.8
120.3
82.2
- 2.1

144.4
283.2
15.9
248.9
46.7
120.4
82.5
- 2.8

144.9
285.2
16.2
250.3
47.2
120.4
83.2
-2.3

100.2

101.0

102.0

102.8

452.3

456.9
22.3
146.3
288.3
16.4
251.6
47.4

461.5
22.5
147.8
291.2
16.8
253.1
47.7

121.0

121.8

83.7
-4.1

84.3
-4.0

22.6

149.3
294.7
16.9
254.6
48.0
122.5
84.7
-4.0

1. Government consumption expenditures are services (such as education and national defense) produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and
government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in
software in tabie 3.9.5.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type
quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between the first line and the sum of the most detailed
lines.




D-30

National Data

December 2006

Table 3.11.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real National Defense Consumption
Expenditures and Gross Investment by Type

[Prc n
e e t]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

National defense consumption expenditures and gross investm ent........................................

1

5.9

1.7

11.2

-9 .9

8.9

Consumption expenditures 1.......................................................................................................................

2

5.4

1.2

11.1

-10.8

9.1

Gross output of general government..........................................................................................................
Value added...............................................................................................................................................
Compensation of general government employees..........................................................................
M ilitary...............................................................................................................................................
Civilian...............................................................................................................................................
Consumption of general government fixed ca p ita l 2 .......................................................................
Intermediate goods and services purchased 3 ....................................................................................
Durable goods
Aircraft...
Missiles..
Ships.....
Vehicles..............................................................................................................................................
Electronics........
Other durable goods
Nondurable goods.
Petroleum products
Ammunition.......
Other nondurable goods
Services................
Research and development...........................................................................................................
Installation support..........................................................................................................................
Weapons support..........
Personnel support.........
Transportation of material
Travel of persons...........
Less: Own-account investm ent4
Sales to other sectors...

3
4
5

5.3

1.3
0.8

11.4
0.5
- 0.2
-1.7
3.2
2.5
25.5
16.3
- 2.6
-15.5
51.8
143.8
85.7
1.4
4.8
-2.7
30.1
5.7
29.6
13.5

-11.5
0.9
0.4
1.3
- 1.6
2.4
-24.0
9.8
14.4
100.3
-67.6

9.8
-4.7
-6.9
-8.5
-3.5
2.4
29.6
-12.3
-22.9
-37.8
89.5
21.5
-17.0
5.6
- 0.6

Gross investm ent5.........................................................................................................................................

Structures.......................
Equipment and software
Aircraft........................
M issiles.......................
Ships...........................................................................................................................................................
Vehicles.......................
Electronics and software
Other equipment..,

6

1.8
1.8
1.1

7

3.3

8

1.8

- 0.6
2.3
2.5

9

9.7

1.8

10
11
12

10.0

2.4
- 10.2
24.0
-5.9
37.7
26.1
-1.7
-3.0
-4.7
5.6
-5.8

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

4.3
7.3
8.4
-4.2
17.8
18.9
12.7
5.5
31.2
11.4
9.3
10.9
-0.3
14.3
17.4

0.3

12.8

III
-2.0
-4.1

-1.1
-1.0

-3.3
-0.7
- 1.6
-2.3
- 0.1

-1.4
3.7
4.3
5.0

2.1

1.9
-7.0
29.3
22.5
-16.4
85.0
62.6
70.6

- 6.2
- 1.1
-15.8
25.2
4.7
-0.9
5.4
3.1
-29.8
- 20.0
-42.3
-37.1
-4.1
0.4
-16.2
-22.7
7.4
-1.3
-5.4

2.6

- 11.8
20.3
-7.6
- 1.6

11.1

105.7
54.5
-16.5
-29.5

-5.5
21.7

60.1

7.7
-0.9
-22.7
-37.1
-2.9
-0.5
-28.6
-40.5
-17.2
-49.5
-23.1
9.4
7.2
5.5
-81.3

195.8

41.9
-11.3
-13.0
-21.3
-7.3
-33.0
-4.7
3.8
5.2
5.4
-46.2

9.5

5.5

11.7

-3.1

7.9

14.1

-1.8

-8.5
11.3
24.1
16.1
-3.2
-9.6

-3.5

0.4

11.3
-4.1
-4.9
314.3
-50.0
-44.9
7.8

-19.0

-10.7
16.1
0.9
83.7
64.8
38.5
9.8
-1.4

15.3
-2.9
-14.7
-76.2
-24.5
81.4
31.1
12.3

10.0

15.7

2.2

-0.9
- 0.8
- 0.1
8.4
- 2.2

6.2
21.6

6.4
-8.5
44.9
13.5
-2.9

22.2

1.8

12.6

23.5
-54.3
57.6
28.9
33.2
-4.4

0.1

1.0

-14.8
7.5
42.1
94.8
6.8

71.3
28.6
10.2

5.0
-3.9
316.1

10.2

18.0
-38.2
15.5
33.2
-6.9
24.8

2.1

20.0

7.1
6.2

1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account
investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on
these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account investment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in
software.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets; inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.




D-31

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 3.11.3. Real National Defense Consumption Expenditures
and Gross Investment by Type, Quantity Indexes

Table 3.11.4. Price Indexes for National Defense Consumption
Expenditures and Gross Investment by Type

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0

[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

Line

1

128.374

130.593

133.423

130.002

132.808

132.141

131.780

Consumption expenditures 1.......

2

127.006

128.551

131.236

127.544

130.343

128.981

128.663

Consumption expenditures 1 .......

Gross investm en t5.........................

Structures......................................
Equipment and software..............
Aircraft
Missiles
S hips.
Vehicles
Electronics ana software.........
Other equipment.......................

3 126.979
4 107.144

128.619
108.048

131.402
107.976

127.446
108.206

130.460
106.903

129.366
106.707

128.905
107.674

fa 109.051
6 112.829
7 102.068

109.389 109.180
112.152 111.478
104.400 105.118

109.277
111.842
104.682

107.336
109.385
103.765

106.895
108.738
103.732

108.014
110.082
104.407

104.858

105.838

106.467

107.024

107.537

170.916 159.574 170.275 167.587
132.649 135.799 131.412 131.040
102.940 106.450 99.736 95.525
125.010 148.713 132.061 139.700
111.454 84.079 98.650 99.789
162.361 167.311 175.653 175.243
221.019 225.152 214.920 217.765
148.117 147.784 149.794 150.949
147.394 138.197 137.986 126.313
148.565 132.296 132.636 125.420
208.667 207.138 198.988 173.415
119.782 119.627 121.802 108.465
182.313 167.614 182.994 181.077

164.587
139.743
100.497
133.594
116.386
197.899
248.882
157.981
128.497
127.331
189.258
105.273
174.881

102.268

9

160.172 163.094
126.772 129.812
116.020 104.160
103.597 128.465
97.810
103.945
104.373 143.721
159.330 200.845
151.612 149.019
145.555 141.149
142.708 135.949
188.553 199.202
131.042 123.436
169.398 173.189

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

105.202

186.412 184.690 194.216 170.603 201.544 201.760 190.004
131.545 130.523 135.776 129.517 131.661 125.960 123.608
183.997 183.742 205.583 173.265 198.225 185.876 168.179
190.028 205.921 220.458 206.460 219.853 223.795 221.115
172.084 168.245 163.098 166.799 170.900 170.331 171.928
143.334 159.254 149.686 152.315 154.189 152.072 154.025
151.975 143.678 143.760 145.681 144.245 145.007 146.943
108.080 131.580 152.501 100.221 143.135 187.707 160.775
138.370

145.920

149.882

88.381
85.263 83.766
144.478 153.436 158.129
165.043 200.755 211.065
142.652 151.840 132.654
137.456 125.840 137.614
149.871 217.174 255.464
124.579 141.432 148.380
150.486 146.192 143.964

148.703

151.544

155.922

Gross investm ent5.........................

Structures......................................
Equipment and software..............
Aircraft.......................................
Missiles......................................
Ships...........................................
Vehicles.....................................
Electronics and software..........
Other equipment.......................

1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of
production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services
of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account invest­
ment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related
expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in software.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.




Gross output of general
government................................
Value added...............................
Compensation of general
government employees...
M ilitary...............................
Civilian...............................
Consumption of general
government fixed c a p ita l 2
Intermediate goods and
services purchased 3...........
Durable goods......................
A ircraft...............................
Missiles..............................
Ships..................................
Vehicles.............................
Electronics........................
Other durable goods........
Nondurable g oods...............
Petroleum products..........
Ammunition.......................
Other nondurable goods
Services.................................
Research and
development................
Installation support..........
Weapons support............
Personnel support...........
Transportation of material
Travel of persons..............
Less: Own-account investm ent 4
Sales to other sectors......

79.347 82.218
86.045 81.631
156.470 160.333 166.443 165.222
208.420 217.205 217.708 209.210
189.261 167.819 195.380 136.509
115.745 120.001 135.964 126.726
220.092 236.426 256.475 297.657
151.179 148.485 151.980 162.625
144.000 152.199 151.670 156.150

156.631

2005

2006

III
National defense
consumption
expenditures and gross
investment............................

8

2005

III

National defense
consumption
expenditures and gross
investm ent..........................

Gross output of general
government...............................
Value added..............................
Compensation of general
government employees...
Military...............................
Civilian...............................
Consumption of general
government fixed capital 2
Intermediate goods and
services purchased 3 ..........
Durable goods......................
Aircraft...............................
M issiles............................
S hips.................................
Vehicles............................
Electronics........................
Other durable goods........
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum products.........
Amm unition......................
Other nondurable goods
S ervices................................
Research and
development................
Installation support..........
Weapons support............
Personnel support...........
Transportation of material
Travel of persons.............
Less: Own-account investment4
Sales to other sectors....

2004

IV

I

II

III

1 115.954

121.855

122.467

122.760

124.752

126.006

126.656

2

118.472

125.071

125.833

126.061

128.327

129.681

130.314

3 118.475
4 124.019

125.063
131.671

125.822
132.233

126.044
132.009

128.300
135.894

129.649
136.388

130.282
136.642

5 132.100
6 135.002
7 126.513

141.713
146.516
132.396

142.466
147.164
133.353

141.844
146.573
132.675

146.796
151.951
136.805

147.173
152.024
137.760

147.120
152.005
137.643

104.718

107.623

107.730

108.456

109.818

110.581

111.542

8

9 111.334 116.727 117.692 118.382
102.127 103.728 103.845 103.896
103.859 104.937 105.151 104.933
103.611 105.609 105.523 105.262
13 104.453 106.894 106.693 107.871
14 114.848 117.881 116.940 118.410
15 93.768 93.937 93.849 93.767
16 101.205 104.060 104.495 104.730
17 111.656 137.758 145.561 148.658
18 121.590 184.637 205.241 214.186
19 106.422 111.615 111.450 112.270
20 104.981 107.787 108.107 108.830
21 113.246 117.386 117.881 118.490
10
11
12

22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

110.808 115.975 116.403 117.453
114.787 119.578 119.778 120.566
110.892 114.430 114.951 115.459
113.986 116.705 116.979 117.355
119.954 124.019 125.720 125.491
116.423 121.155 123.459 122.998
120.112 126.127 127.102 127.119
117.603 122.661 122.866 121.976

118.923 121.112 122.126
104.288 105.421 106.017
105.222 106.750 107.423
106.187 107.151 108.021
108.235 109.735 110.506
118.073 118.643 116.532
93.899
94.873 95.719
105.365 106.211 106.830
144.162 156.904 158.739
199.547 229.490 232.587
114.872 119.216 121.128
109.264 110.729 111.252
119.505 121.022 122.046
118.530 120.063
121.821 123.346
116.397 117.528
118.523 119.528
124.984 128.077
123.160 127.507
130.097 131.602
122.008 122.699

121.138
124.369
118.033
120.527
129.539
129.096
131.548
123.573

99.911

101.628

101.370

102.026

102.438

103.109

103.835

115.424
98.529
89.015
100.981
111.408
98.482
90.678
102.485

122.288
99.901
86.839
102.142
118.372
99.263
89.167
105.822

123.410 126.785
99.558 100.044
85.693 85.933
102.520 101.402
117.161 120.674
98.719 99.866
88.934 88.413
106.207 106.590

128.116
100.399
85.092
102.223
123.783
99.343
88.472
107.120

129.674
101.016
85.464
100.889
127.160
99.159
88.727
107.688

129.747
101.774
86.102

101.928
131.255
96.964
88.707
108.387

1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of
production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services
of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on these assets.
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account invest­
ment.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related
expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in software.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.

D-32

National Data

December 2006

Table 3.11.5. National Defense Consumption Expenditures and
Gross Investment by Type

Table 3.11.6. Real National Defense Consumption Expenditures
and Gross Investment by Type, Chained Dollars

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs

[B n o c a e (2 0 ) d lla ]
illio s f h in d 0 0 o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005
III

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

2005
IV

I

II

Line

1

551.2

589.3

605.0

590.9

613.5

616.5

618.0

2

483.7

516.9

530.9

516.9

537.7

537.7

539.0

Gross investm ent5..........................

Structures........................................
Equipment and software...............
Aircraft.........................................
Missiles........................................
S hips...........................................
Vehicles......................................
Electronics and software..........
Other equipment........................

National defense
consumption
expenditures and gross
investment...........................
Consumption expenditures 1

3
4

488.3
264.7

522.1
283.4

536.6
284.4

521.4
284.5

543.2
289.3

544.4
289.9

545.1
293.0

5

200.2

136.2
63.9

216.1
146.7
69.4

215.4
146.6

I

215.4
146.9
68.4

68.8

218.9
148.6
70.3

218.6
147.8
70.8

220.8

6

8

64.5

68.0

68.3

69.1

70.4

71.3

72.2

9

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

223.6
28.8
11.8
2.6

1.4
0.9
4.4
7.6
16.9
7.0
3.6
6.3
177.9

238.7
30.0
10.7
3.3
1.4
1.3
5.5
7.7
20.3

252.2
30.7

236.9
31.4

10.6

11.0

3.2

3.8

1.6

1.2

149.6
71.2

253.9
30.5
10.3
3.4
1.4

254.5
30.8

252.0
33.0

10.0

10.6

3.7
1.4

3.5
1.7

1.6
6.0
8.0
20.6

7.0
8.4
21.2

11.3
3.7
5.5
203.2

11.7
4.2
5.3
197.9

63.7
38.7
20.9
61.4
9.4
9.1

60.5
38.3
19.0
61.2
9.6
9.3
2.2

1.5

1.6

6.1

6.2

7.7
22.3

7.7
21.3

5.9
7.8

10.2

12.2

11.2

4.0
188.5

4.2
5.9
199.3

4.2
5.9
184.1

54.3
37.6
19.6
49.7
8.9
7.8

56.3
38.9

59.4
40.5

20.2

22.6

55.2
9.0
9.1

59.2

52.7
38.9
19.2
55.6
9.0

2.1

2.1

2.1

8.8
2.1

2.1

2.2

2.5

3.1

3.6

2.4

3.4

4.5

3.9

67.5

72.4

74.2

74.1

75.8

78.8

79.0

5.1
62.4
11.4
3.9

5.2
67.2
13.5
4.2
9.8
3.9

5.1
69.0
14.0
3.7

5.4

5.2
70.6
14.3
4.6
9.8
4.3
13.3
24.3

5.1
73.7
14.4
5.3
11.4
4.7
13.6
24.3

5.3
73.7
14.0
3.7

10.1

2.7
11.4
22.9

6.1

12.8

23.0

1.5

8.8

8.7

10.6

4.6
13.3
22.7

68.6

13.9
5.2
9.2
4.0
13.5
22.8

20.6

10.4
4.1
6.1
202.8

62.8
40.0
22.1

59.8
9.2
8.9

2005

2006

III

Consumption expenditures 1........

10
11
12

2005

III

National defense
consumption expenditures
and gross investm ent........

Gross output of general
governm ent................................
Value added...............................
Compensation of general
government employees....
Military................................
Civilian................................
Consumption of general
government fixed c a p ita l 2
Intermediate goods and
services purchased 3 ...........
Durable goods.......................
Aircraft................................
M issiles..............................
S hips..................................
Vehicles..............................
Electronics.........................
Other durable goods.........
Nondurable goods................
Petroleum products..........
Ammunition.......................
Other nondurable goods...
S ervices.................................
Research and
development.................
Installation support...........
Weapons support.............
Personnel support............
Transportation of material
Travel of persons..............
Less: Own-account investment 4
Sales to other sectors......

2004

1.8

11.0

5.3
14.6
25.2

Gross output of general
government................................
Value added...............................
Compensation of general
government employees...
M ilitary...............................
Civilian...............................
Consumption of general
government fixed c a p ita l 2
Intermediate goods and
services purchased 3...........
Durable goods......................
Aircraft...............................
Missiles..............................
Ships..................................
Vehicles.............................
Electronics........................
Other durable goods........
Nondurable goods...............
Petroleum products..........
Ammunition.......................
Other nondurable goods
Services.................................
Research and
development................
Installation support..........
Weapons support............
Personnel support...........
Transportation of material
Travel of persons..............
Less: Own-account investm ent4
Sales to other sectors......
Gross investm ent5.........................

Structures.......................................
Equipment and software..............
Aircraft........................................
Missiles......................................
Ships...........................................
Vehicles.....................................
Electronics and software..........

IV

I

II

III

1

475.4

483.6

494.1

481.4

491.8

489.3

2

408.3

413.3

421.9

410.0

419.0

414.7

413.6

3
4

412.1
213.4

417.5
215.2

426.5
215.1

413.7
215.5

423.4
212.9

419.9
212.5

418.4
214.5

5

152.0
100.3
51.7

151.7
99.7
52.1

151.8

7

151.5
100.9
50.5

149.1
97.8
51.4

148.5
97.2
51.4

150.1
98.4
51.7

8

61.6

63.2

63.4

63.7

64.1

64.5

64.8

9

200.9
28.2
11.4
2.5
1.4

204.5
28.9

214.3
29.5

200.1

210.2

10.2

10.1

3.2
1.3

3.1
1.5
1.3
6.5
7.4
15.4

213.5
29.3
9.8
3.2
1.3
1.4
6.3
7.4
14.4
5.4
3.6
5.6
169.7

206.4
31.1
9.9
3.3
1.5
1.5
7.3
7.9
13.4
5.2
3.4
4.8
162.1

53.0
32.8
19.0
50.5
7.3
7.2

53.0
31.4
17.8
51.4
7.3
7.1

6

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39

100.0

51.8

30.2
10.5
3.6
1.1

1.3

29.2
9.4
3.4
1.3
1.4
6.4
7.5
13.2
5.1
3.1
4.9
167.9

488.0

0.8

1.1

4.7
7.5
15.2
5.8
3.4

5.9
7.4
14.7
5.5
3.6
5.6
160.6

3.8
5.5
169.0

48.5
32.5
17.6
47.3
7.2
7.5

51.0
33.8
19.7
50.6
7.0
7.0
1.6

2.1

1.6
2.6

44.8
32.3
16.6
47.4
7.2
7.1
1.7

3.0

2.0

1.6
2.8

3.7

49.9
30.8
16.1
50.7
7.4
7.2
1.7
3.1

67.5

71.2

73.2

72.6

74.0

76.5

76.1

4.4
63.3

4.2
67.3
15.6
4.1
8.3
4.0
14.3
21.7
-4.0

4.2
69.3
16.4
3.6
9.1
4.7
15.0
21.4
-5.2

4.3

4.1
70.3
16.8
4.5
7.9
4.3
15.0

3.9
73.0
16.9
5.3
9.0
4.7
15.4

22.6

22.6

4.1
72.4
16.2
3.7
8.3
5.4
16.4
23.2
-6.3

6.0

157.1
49.0
32.8
17.6
43.6
7.4
6.7
1.7

12.8

3.8
9.0
2.7
12.6

22.4
- 2.1

6.0

6.6

7.3
14.4
5.4
3.8
5.5
155.4

68.6

16.2
5.1
7.6
4.0
15.3
21.4
-4.8

1.6

- 6.1
- 6.8
production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment (construction and software).
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services
1. National defense consumption expenditures are defense services produced by government that are valued at their cost of
of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on these assets.
production. Excludes government sales to other sectors and government own-account investment (construction and software).
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account invest­
2. Consumption of fixed capital, or depreciation, is included in government gross output as a partial measure of the services
ment.
of general government fixed assets; the use of depreciation assumes a zero net return on these assets.
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related
3. Includes general government intermediate inputs for goods and services sold to other sectors and for own-account invest­
expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in software.
ment.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
4. Own-account investment is measured in current dollars by compensation of general government employees and related
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.
expenditures for goods and services and is classified as investment in structures and in software.
5. Gross government investment consists of general government and government enterprise expenditures for fixed assets;
inventory investment is included in government consumption expenditures.
N o t e . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 current-dollar
value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more
than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between
the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.




December 2006

4.

F o r e ig n

Survey of Current Business

D-33

T r a n s a c tio n s

Table 4.1. Foreign Transactions in the National Income and Product Accounts
[Billions of dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

2006
IV

I

II

III

Current receipts from the rest of the world......................................................................................

1

1,588.3

1,816.5

1,839.6

1,917.3

2,008.7

2,109.5

2,163.3

Exports of goods and serv ices....................................................................................................................

2

1,178.1

1,303.1

1,312.4

1,352.4

1,405.4

1,448.1

1,486.7

3
4
5
6

818.8
561.8
257.1
359.3

907.5
625.6
281.9
395.6

913.9
631.0
282.8
398.5

944.3
662.5
281.8
408.1

989.3
689.1
300.3
416.0

1,019.1
705.0
314.1
429.0

1,055.9
726.9
329.1
430.7

7

410.2

513.3

527.2

564.9

603.3

661.4

676.6

8

2.9
407.3
105.3
116.7
185.4

2.9
510.4
172.4
320.0
18.0

2.9
524.3
180.3
437.7
-93.7

3.0
561.9
201.3
453.3
-92.8

2.9
600.4
224.1
150.7
225.6

2.9
658.5
256.5
150.8
251.2

2.9
673.7
266.1
168.8
238.7

Durable......................................................................................................................................................
Nondurable................................................................................................................................................
Services 1 ................
Income receipts.........

Wage and salary receipts
Income receipts on assets
Interest.......................................................................................................................................................
Dividends...................................................................................................................................................
Reinvested earnings on U.S. direct investment abroad......................................................................
Current payments to the rest of the world........................................................................................
Imports of goods and serv ices....................................................................................................................
Goods 1...........................................................................................................................................................

Durable....
Nondurable................................................................................................................................................
Services 1...
Income payments

Wage and salary payments..........................................................................................................................
Income payments on assets
Interest..............................
Dividends.........................
Reinvested earnings on foreign direct investment in the United States............................................
Current taxes and transfer payments to the rest of the world (net)....................................................

From persons (net)........................................................................................................................................
From government (n e t)................................................................................................................................
From business (net)
Balance on current account, NIPAs...................................................................................................

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

2,237.4

2,587.9

2,554.5

2,785.4

2,824.8

2,952.0

3,036.8

1,791.4

2,019.9

2,041.2

2,127.8

2,170.6

2,229.8

2,288.9

1,495.2
929.9
565.3
296.2

1,699.0
1,017.5
681.5
320.9

1,719.1
1 ,020.8
698.3
322.1

1,799.3
1,049.9
749.4
328.5

1,832.6
1,095.8
736.8
338.1

1,879.0
766.8
350.8

1,938.2
1,143.4
794.8
350.7

363.9

481.5

475.0

552.4

574.3

638.6

662.4

20
21
22

8.9
355.0
229.2
69.8
56.0

9.2
472.2
331.2
81.8
59.2

9.4
465.6
345.1
91.6
28.9

9.3
543.1
378.9
87.3
77.0

9.2
565.1
414.8
63.1
87.1

9.2
629.4
467.3
69.0
93.1

9.3
653.1
482.6
75.7
94.8

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32

1 , 112.2

82.1

86.6

38.4

105.2

79.9

83.5

85.5

42.9
19.2
20.0

47.1
26.1
13.3

45.8
23.3
-30.7

47.6
30.6
26.9

45.2
14.9
19.9

48.7
15.6
19.3

50.2
17.2
18.1

-649.1

-771.4

-714.9

-868.2

-816.1

-842.6

-873.5

-651.3
-649.1
2.3

-775.8
-771.4
4.4

-717.2
-714.9

-870.2
- 868.2
2.1

-823.1
-816.1
7.0

-846.1
-842.6
3.5

-873.5

2.2

Addenda:

Balance on current account, NIPAs........................................................................................................

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclas­
sified from goods to services.
2. Consists of capital transfers and the acquisition and disposal of nonproduced nonfinancial assets.




D-34

National Data

Table 4.2.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Exports and in
Real imports of Goods and Services by Type of Product

December 2006

Table 4.2.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Exports and in Real
Imports of Goods and Services by Type of Product

[Prc n
e e t]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

E xports o f goods and
se rvice s............................
E xports o f goods 1 ......................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials.................................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...................................
O ther......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and parts................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
O th er...........................................
E xports o f services 1 .................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts.........
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees........
Other private services..............
O th er...........................................
Im ports o f goods and
se rvice s.............................
Im ports o f goods 1 ......................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products..........................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
Petroleum and products...........
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
p arts...................................
O th er......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
O th er...........................................
Im ports o f services 1...................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees........
Other private services..............
O th e r...........................................
Addenda:
Exports of durable goods.........
Exports of nondurable goods...
Exports of agricultural goods 2
Exports of nonagricultural
goods......................................
Imports of durable goods..........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

Line

IV

I

II

III

1

9.2

6.8

3.2

9.6

14.0

6.2

6.3

9.0

7.5

3.7

17.3

6.0

9.4

3

-6.3

5.6

-13.1

11.5
11.8

15.8

20.7

12.3

4
5

2.6
8.0
- 0.2

-5.2
20.9
-16.7

-10.3

26.5

11.1
- 20.6

8.0

6

6.4
4.5
7.3

38.9

14.4
4.8
20.3

2.9
3.3
2.7

7

13.0

9.2

3.0

28.3

16.3

6.6

5.6

8

2.9

16.7

-36.0

69.9

55.2

-20.9

0.4

9

8.8

15.3

17.8

-0.4

16.1

6.6

12.6

9.8
9.0

12.0

10

3.9
24.8

14.1

8.0

11

9.8

9.3

27.6

13.6

2.7

-4.6

26.7

12

13.6
16.3
10.7
0.9

11.0

10.8

8.9

18.6
2.3
18.9

11.7
9.1
14.8
0.2

15.7
16.8
14.5
20.5

1.1

15.1

- 11.2
-19.7

15.6
9.9
23.2
25.5

9.7

5.1

2.1

5.5

6.7

6.7

-1.0

18.8

48.8
-16.6

-53.3
-3.6
10.5

-14.7
8.7
-24.4

1.2

2.5
4.4
11.9
28.8

-30.8
-7.3
-6.3
- 0.1

11.3

1.1

8.6

7.5
7.5

19.4
5.3
3.0
- 0.8
5.9
5.9
-2.7

20.8

10.8

6.1

10.9

5.7

17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26

12.0

8.9
13.7
8.6

6.6

22.8
- 10.2

12.5

12.8

9.0
6.7
3.9

-5.8

4.1
7.2

11.3
9.7
4.1

2.5

13.2

9.1

1.4

5.3

6.7

2.7

14.1

9.4

-0.1

6.9

3.7

14.5

1.9

16.5

-4.8

9.9

15.6
29.1
4.3
40.6

1.9
25.2
-17.4
-4.8

- 1.2
- 6.8
-18.3

13.4
24.2
0.9
7.0

1.9
4.4

27
28
29
30

15.6

6.8

20.6
10.8
6.6

7.5
2.3

4.8
-5 .4
16.7
-12.5

31

17.4

11.2

5.9

9.7

16.1

11.6

13.6

32

-2.7

2.4

-46.9

19.7

50.1

-14.1

-3.9

33
34

23.8
17.4

14.3

19.6

11.0

8.6

9.3
9.0

34.3
7.6

17.0
12.7

18.7
13.6

35

6.8

3.9

11.2

15.6

14.3

-1.3

- 8.6

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

10.9
15.5

6.1

6.0

-0.7

10.9
5.1
3.0

- 2.6
12.3
-17.5
27.8

9.0
15.9
-22.4

8.4
10.9
5.5
44.1

5.7
-4.2
18.6
1.9

14.9
16.5
13.0
-28.8

10.0

2.8

1.2

8.3

7.4

-2.7

3.8
6.7
15.1

-5.9
-1.4
5.5
5.2
2.3
6.9
0.7

-4.2
-11.7
3.1
- 10.1
20.4
15.4
6.7

1.5
11.9
-6 .3
17.8
-9.2
11.9

-2.7
-5.4

9.9
- 11.0

1.6

0.7

6.2

10.8

18.5
11.1

5.6

8.2

12.1

1.1

12.4
37.7
12.0

15.4
25.0
8.7
- 2.8
14.4
- 0.6

-4.4
- 20.6
-23.1
12.6

-8.9
9.1
1.0

48
49
50

11.3
4.1
-5.5

9.6
3.0
5.2

-10.3
-5.1

20.5
- 6.8
6.4

13.2
27.4
23.8

4.1
10.4
19.1

9.3
9.8
1.4

51
52
53
54

10.3
13.7
6.5
11.5

7.7
8.5
4.0
7.4

4.5
7.8
-4 .4
5.7

11.9
11.7
17.8
9.7

16.8
16.8
-0 .5
12.3

5.1

10.1
8.0

10.8

2.0

-3 .0
3.9

5.2
6.8

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.




2005

2005
III

2

13
14
15
16

2004

2006
Percent change at annual rate:
Exports o f g oods and
s e rvice s............................
Percentage poin ts at annual
rates:
E xports o f goods 1 ......................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials.................................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable g oods................
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
p a rts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
p a rts...................................
Other.......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts ................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable g oods................
Other............................................
E xports o f services 1...................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts.........
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation...................
Royalties and license fe e s........
Other private services...............
Other............................................
Percent change at annual rate:
Im ports o f goods and
se rvice s.............................
Percentage points at annual
rates:
Im ports o f goods 1.......................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products..........................
Durable g oods.......................
Nondurable g oods................
Petroleum and products............
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
p a rts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
p a rts...................................
Other.......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts ................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable g oods.......................
Nondurable g oods................
Other............................................
Im ports o f services 1 ...................
Direct defense expenditures.....
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation...................
Royalties and license fees........
Other private services...............
Other............................................

1

9.2

6.8

2

6.25

3

-0.34

4
5

1.06
0.26
0.81

6

2006
IV

I

II

III

3.2

9.6

14.0

6.2

6.3

5.20

2.60

7.94

11.92

0.26

-0.62

0.52

0.69

4.22
0.86

0.55

0.45
0.47
- 0.02

-0.97
1.18
-2.14

- 1.86
-2.54

4.36
0.52
3.83

2.48
0.32
2.16

0.55
0.23
0.32

0.68

6.56

7

3.59

2.55

0.82

7.24

4.59

1.85

1.59

8

0.13

0.71

-2.08

2.54

2.40

- 1.21

0.02

9
10

0.33
3.14

0.53
1.31

0.58
2.31

0.14
4.56

0.34
1.85

0.38
2.67

- 0.01
1.58

11

0.75

0.69

1.86

1.02

0.22

-0.35

1.79

12

1.16
0.71
0.45
0.03

0.95

1.02

0.44
0.58

1.39
0.80
0.59

0.10

0.27
0.30

0.92
0.83
0.09
0.60

0.01

0.68

0.57
-0.47
-0.72

1.31
0.47
0.84
0.77

2.94

1.55

0.62

1.71

2.07

1.97

-0.29

0.22

0.58
-1.15
0.34
-0.35
0.38
0.78
0.05

-1.04
-0.23
0.17
0.04
0.48
2.36
-0.08

0.03
0.27
0.19
0.90
0.05
0.53
0.09

-0.18
0.50
-0.42
0.41
0.47
1.14
0.05

-0.39
-0.45
- 0.10

2.5

13.2

9.1

1.4

5.3

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

0.68

20
21
22

0.74
0.14
0.42
0.39
0.93

23

0.11

0.24
0.34
0.05
-0.03
0.26
0.73
-0.04

24

10.8

6.1

25
26

9.10
0.21

5.62

2.28

11.88

7.90

-0.05

5.75

0.13

0.46

0.07

0.54

-0.16

0.32

27
28
29
30

1.82
1.19
0.64
0.63

0.87
0.49
0.38
0.26

0.58
-0.38
0.96
-1.67

2.03
1.74
0.28
4.85

0.27
1.55
-1.29
-0.67

-0.15
-0.50
0.35
-2.78

1.67
1.62
0.05

0.00

0.36
0.23
0.05

1.00

31

3.24

2.08

1.10

1.82

2.88

2.05

2.42

32

-0.04

0.03

-0.82

0.23

0.53

-0.19

-0.05

33
34

1.12

0.66

1.39

0.84
1.08

0.43
1.17

1.38
0.96

0.72
1.53

0.79

2.16

35

0.91

0.48

1.27

1.81

1.65

-0.15

- 1.02

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

2.32
1.69
0.64
-0.04

1.66

1.17
0.49
0.14

-0.53
1.26
-1.80
1.08

2.38
0.98
1.40
-1.06

1.64
1.15
0.49
1.61

1.07
-0.45
1.52
0.08

2.74
1.62

1.67

0.46

0.19

0.06
0.25

- 0.10
-0.05
0.07
0.16
0.03
0.34

-0.06
-0.43
0.04
-0.32
0.23
0.70
0.03

0.20

0.32
0.23
0.57
0.03

0.00

1.32
0.02

0.39
-0.08
0.52
- 0.11
0.58
0.01

1.68

1.12

-1.39

1.15

1.49

-0.42

-0.04
-0.18
0.37
0.40
0.58

-0.16
0.46
0.29
0.25
-0.0 4
0.69

-0.06
-0.73
-0.33
0.35
- 0.11
0.45

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.01

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.

D-35

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 4.2.3. Real Exports and Imports of Goods and Services by
Type of Product, Quantity Indexes

Table 4.2.4. Price Indexes for Exports and Imports of Goods and Services
by Type of Product

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005

2006

Line

III

IV

I

II

109.105

109.503

112.054

115.783

117.536

119.337

Exports of goods and
s e rv ic e s............................

Exports of goods 1......................

2

100.002

107.507

108.050

111.027

115.535

117.228

119.902

Exports of goods 1......................

Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials.................................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods.................
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...................................
O ther......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p arts................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
O th er...........................................

3

96.066

101.447

99.827

102.645

106.488 111.621

114.909

4 105.125
5 91.591
6 113.692

107.833
98.919
113.494

108.578 105.673 112.078
101.543 104.254 106.269
113.052 106.719 115.851

115.906 116.750
107.520 108.404
121.333 122.151

7

95.131

103.891

103.797

110.480

114.725

116.563

118.172

8

88.738

103.567

97.640

111.470

124.414

117.316

117.442

9
10

88.326
98.334

101.824 104.890
104.790 105.529

105.896
111.535

108.409 111.517
113.977 117.807

111.394
120.089

11

108.457

118.503

121.209

125.128

125.976

124.494

132.085

114.592 127.235
13 114.430 131.759
14 114.793 122.322
15 84.415 91.957
16 107.667 113.118

128.214
134.398
121.489
94.202

131.801 136.707 137.093 142.160
137.358 142.791 147.050 150.557
125.763 130.094 126.284 133.042
94.244 98.749 93.488 98.945

Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials.................................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
p a rts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
p a rts...................................
Other.......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable g oods................
Other............................................

113.158

114.693

116.564

118.162

Exports of services 1...................

17 114.039 136.148 149.600
18 86.251
90.829 89.715
19 71.415 73.532 75.745
20 114.782 113.820 111.450
21 111.585 118.215 118.015
22 126.922 134.469 134.081
23 105.777 102.887 103.664

123.654
88.889
77.656
111.794
121.215
140.579
102.124

124.407 119.562 109.036
89.850 91.735 90.004
79.862 74.462 73.259
119.089 122.718 122.682
121.551 124.840 127.452
142.014 145.332 146.029
103.914 104.960 106.090

Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts.........
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation...................
Royalties and license fe e s........
Other private services...............
Other............................................

Exports of services 1 .................

Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts.........
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees........
Other private services..............
O th er...........................................
Imports of goods and
s e rv ic e s............................
Imports of good s 1 ......................

Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products..........................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
Petroleum and products...........
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
p a rts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...................................
O th er......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
O th er...........................................
Imports of services 1...................

Direct defense expenditures....
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees........
Other private services..............
O th e r...........................................

118.463

24 115.962 123.007 122.520 126.377 129.146 129.608 131.300
25 116.786 124.640 124.159 128.331 131.236 131.218 133.417
26 125.491 130.080 132.425 133.045 138.226 136.554 139.816
27
28
29
30

116.566
120.472
112.677
114.691

124.516
129.471
119.572
117.307

31

108.414

120.594 122.186

32

124.135
126.209
121.965
111.191

128.729 129.337 128.956
134.534 142.299 139.807
123.254 117.500 119.216
121.068 119.584 113.702

133.078
147.592
119.475
115.653

133.442

137.762

125.060

129.823

89.382

84.088

86.106

80.208

83.894

92.853

33 135.875
34 102.473

155.319
113.789

158.741
115.859

162.326
118.385

174.749
120.560

181.738 189.690
124.213 128.247

35

113.679

118.057

118.838

123.221

127.403

126.991

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

134.128 145.091 143.921
137.067 152.070 153.181
131.024 137.669 134.085
99.822 102.828 106.287

48
49
50

97.700
106.614
96.382

112.051

115.170

114.652

155.867 146.715 146.838
86.964 85.774 83.367
84.818 89.466 91.317
111.040 116.843 112.610
129.503 132.485 136.824
135.966 145.354 147.409
108.373 109.179 109.043

88.488

124.169

148.093 151.104 153.195 158.593
156.529 160.621 158.898 165.077
139.130 140.995 147.147 151.712
99.746 109.283 109.807 100.874
116.954

119.055

121.896

Imports of go o d s 1.......................

Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products..........................
Durable g oods.......................
Nondurable goods................
Petroleum and products............
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
p a rts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
p a rts...................................
Other.......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts ................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable g oods.......................
Nondurable g oods................
Other............................................

121.056

Imports of services 1...................

Direct defense expenditures....
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation...................
Royalties and license fe e s........
Other private services...............
Other............................................

IV

I

II

III

1

105.151

108.949

109.341

110.108

104.392

107.628

107.846

108.450

110.737
109.192

112.400
110.852

113.655

2

3 123.011

121.396

122.908

121.758

122.087

123.100

127.305

4 113.905 126.641
5 116.348 126.819
6 112.480 126.371

127.123
125.841
127.612

130.596
129.080
131.214

132.748 138.162
134.752 142.545
131.308 135.386

141.866
146.440
138.975

112.297

97.800

98.357

98.835

123.363 125.280

126.753

127.236

77.761
96.393

77.934
96.507

77.094
97.172

76.493
97.871

103.523

103.603 103.941

104.215

104.636

105.062

100.640 101.755
100.587 101.606
100.676 101.901
106.826 111.135

101.708 101.892
101.710 101.771
101.674 102.007
111.421 112.368

102.184
101.689
102.747
113.279

102.867
102.405
103.388
115.170

103.556
103.107
104.060
116.797

106.985

112.115

112.918

114.080

114.430

116.098

116.870

17 100.918
18 104.891
19 127.600
20 109.435
21 108.855
22 104.257
23 114.447

103.662
109.135
137.593
124.536
112.332
107.635
120.959

103.935
110.323
140.606
126.829
112.873
107.910
120.575

105.137
111.265
133.733
134.803
113.908
108.404
123.267

105.674
111.833
132.775
131.495
114.658
109.532
122.703

106.575
114.587
138.013
133.436
115.796
110.600
123.341

107.151
115.205
140.918
134.401
116.362
111.275
124.199

7

97.626

97.788

97.792

8

117.106

122.042

122.317

9
10

87.257
95.838

80.519
96.557

79.663
96.692

11

102.365

12

13
14
15
16

97.423

24 104.678 111.268 112.919 114.117 113.918 116.608 118.156
25 102.962 109.622 111.383 112.790 112.331 115.197 116.866
26 107.701 113.852 113.336 115.427 116.617 116.628 118.851
27
28
29
30

111.786
111.904
111.450
130.918

31

91.300

123.104 122.042
117.748 116.368
128.925 128.244
178.639 201.397
90.618

90.350

128.709 129.290 132.142
121.580 128.973 133.027
135.882 127.928 129.221
201.102 200.744 232.096 242.329
132.065
117.929
147.671

89.830

89.758

89.726

89.899

32

109.560

113.386

113.960

114.529

116.052

117.306

118.000

33
34

72.672
97.447

66.928
99.027

66.024
99.020

64.567
98.925

63.393
99.326

62.125
99.885

61.277
100.594

35

102.481

103.575

103.640

103.762

103.519

103.810

104.204

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

98.625
96.423
101.065
104.085

99.547
96.665
102.810
107.658

99.495
96.433
102.982
107.667

99.432
96.437
102.830
109.418

99.636 99.696
96.739 97.117
102.909 102.571
109.308 110.088

100.353
97.958
103.002
111.048

113.786

119.933

120.945

120.913

122.242

123.890

124.719

139.523
116.848
115.223
117.737
108.832
103.845
112.166

152.087
124.639
120.026
128.305
112.299
106.084
118.239

152.454
127.402
120.082
130.292
112.834
105.981
119.887

151.195
123.525
121.874
132.827
113.869
106.530
119.141

152.061
125.440
123.509
130.301
114.618
109.626
120.155

160.023
128.249
125.759
128.846
115.755
110.908
121.986

163.170
130.455
126.988
126.378
116.322
112.187
122.711

Addenda:

107.101
109.802
101.382

108.099 113.262 116.815 117.999
109.286 107.389 114.084 116.936
100.906 102.485 108.099 112.931

120.653
119.688
113.326

51 100.439 108.165 108.798 111.899 116.323 117.765 120.629
52 115.688 125.519 126.302 129.834 134.971 135.633 138.283
53 119.478 124.267 121.908 126.999 126.830 125.883 127.488
54 117.067 125.768 126.357 129.327 133.131 134.425 136.667

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.




Imports of g ood s and
se rv ic e s.............................

147.388 146.392 142.187 140.585
85.753 84.568 87.650 82.732
89.837 90.088 95.250 89.194
117.312 120.798 123.349 127.054
133.554 144.675 143.654 140.363
151.602 155.946 161.263 164.822
109.471 109.667 109.496 109.760

Addenda:

Exports of durable goods.........
Exports of nondurable goods...
Exports of agricultural goods 2
Exports of nonagricultural
goods......................................
Imports of durable goods..........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

2006

2005
III

102.201

12

2005

III

1

Exports of goods and
se rv ic e s.............................

2004

Exports of durable goods..........
Exports of nondurable goods....
Exports of agricultural g o o d s 2
Exports of nonagricultural
goods......................................
Imports of durable goods..........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

48 101.010 102.620 102.552 102.754 103.628 104.959 105.834
49 112.086 119.357 120.280 121.961 122.325 124.843 127.788
50 123.675 121.201 122.347 121.817 121.904 122.663 126.523
51 102.874 106.494 106.647 107.323 108.107 109.825 111.102
98.474 98.531
98.920 99.915 100.749
52 97.943 98.771
53 111.910 129.722 135.490 139.572 137.406 144.084 147.458
54 99.981 102.436 102.167 103.731 103.264 103.452 104.328

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.

D-36

National Data

Table 4.2.5. Exports and Imports of Goods and Services by
Type of Product

December 2006

Table 4.2.6. Real Exports and Imports of Goods and Services by
Type of Product, Chained Dollars

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs

[B n o c a e (2 0 ) d lla ]
illio s f h in d 0 0 o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Line

2004

2005

2005
III

E xports o f goods and
se rvice s.............................
E xports o f goods 1 ......................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
m aterials.................................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods.................
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
parts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts...................................
O ther......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
O th er...........................................
E xports o f services 1 ..................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts.........
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation.................
Royalties and license fees........
Other private services..............
O th er...........................................
Im ports o f goods and
se rvice s.............................
Im ports of goods 1 ......................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products..........................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods.................
Petroleum and products...........
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
p arts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
p arts...................................
O th er......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
O th er...........................................
Im ports o f services 1...................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation..................
Royalties and license fees........
Other private services..............
O th er...........................................
Addenda:
Exports of durable goods.........
Exports of nondurable goods...
Exports of agricultural goods 2
Exports of nonagricultural
goods......................................
Imports of durable goods..........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006
IV

I

II

Line

1

1,178.1

1,303.1

1,312.4

1,352.4

1,405.4

1,448.1

1,486.7

2

818.8

907.5

913.9

944.3

989.3

1,019.1

1,055.9

3

56.6

59.0

58.7

59.8

62.2

65.7

70.0

4
5

227.5
79.8
147.7

230.0
81.3
148.8

230.0
85.6
144.5

248.0
91.1
156.9

266.9
97.5
169.5

276.1

6

199.5
67.8
131.7

7

331.6

362.7

362.4

384.3

400.6

409.3

417.0

8

50.0

60.8

57.4

66.1

74.9

71.5

71.8

9
10

42.8
238.8

45.5
256.4

46.5
258.5

45.8
272.4

47.0
278.7

47.8
290.0

47.4
297.8

11

89.2

98.6

100.9

104.5

105.5

104.7

111.5

12

103.1
53.8
49.3
38.9

115.7
62.5
53.2
44.1

116.6
63.8
52.7
45.2

120.0

65.3
54.7
45.6

124.9
67.8
57.0
48.2

126.0
70.3
55.7
46.4

131.6
72.5
59.1
49.8

359.3

395.6

398.5

408.1

416.0

429.0

430.7

14.8
74.5
18.9
37.4
52.5
144.7
16.6

18.1
81.7
20.9
42.2
57.4
158.2
17.0

19.9
81.6

16.9
82.8
21.9
46.7
60.3
170.0
17.4

16.3

42.2
57.6
158.1
17.1

16.7
81.5
21.5
45.0
59.7
166.6
17.2

21.3
48.9
62.5
175.7
17.7

15.0
85.4
21.4
49.2
64.1
177.6
18.0

24
25
26

1,791.4

2,019.9

2,041.2

2,127.8

2,170.6

2,229.8

2,288.9

1,495.2

1,699.0
68.1

1,719.1

1,799.3

1,832.6

1,879.0

1,938.2

62.1

69.0

70.6

74.1

73.2

76.4

27
28
29
30

225.2
119.2
105.9
180.5

264.9
134.8
130.0
251.9

261.6
129.9
131.7
269.1

293.6
140.4
153.2
292.6

287.5
153.1
134.4
288.5

287.9
159.6
128.4
317.2

303.7
173.7
129.9
336.8

31

343.5

379.2

383.2

389.9

404.4

415.6

429.8

32

24.3

25.8

24.1

25.4

28.4

27.7

27.6

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23

33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

22.0

86.6

101.0

175.1

230.6

93.3
260.2

94.2
264.9

94.2
270.4

99.5
276.5

101.4
286.4

104.4
297.8

228.2

239.5

241.2

250.4

258.3

258.2

253.4

88.6

373.1
197.6
175.4
82.7

407.3
219.8
187.5
88.1

403.8
220.9
182.9
91.1

415.3
225.7
189.5
86.9

424.6
232.4
192.2
95.1

430.7
230.8
199.9
96.2

448.8
241.8
207.0
89.2

296.2

320.9

322.1

328.5

338.1

350.8

350.7

29.3
65.8
23.7
54.2
23.2
90.4
9.6

30.1
69.2
26.1
62.1
24.5
98.7

30.2
68.7
26.6
60.8
25.4

30.0

30.9
69.8
27.5

100.0

30.6
72.7
29.1
65.9
27.4
114.5

10.2

10.4

30.0
68.5
26.6
64.6
25.0
103.4
10.3

68.6

27.0
65.3
27.3
109.4
10.4

10.6

66.6

26.9
118.4
10.7

48
49
50

561.8
257.1
62.9

625.6
281.9
64.9

631.0
282.8
65.2

662.5
281.8
65.9

689.1
300.3
69.5

705.0
314.1
73.1

726.9
329.1
75.7

51
52
53
54

755.9
929.9
565.3
1,314.8

842.7
1,017.5
681.5
1,447.1

848.7
1 ,020.8
698.3
1,449.9

878.4
1,049.9
749.4
1,506.7

919.8
1,095.8
736.8
1,544.0

946.0
1 , 112.2
766.8
1,561.9

980.3
1,143.4
794.8
1,601.4

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer qoods.




2004

2005

III

2005

2006

III
Exports o f goods and
se rv ic e s ............................
E xports o f g oods 1 ......................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials.................................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
p a rts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
parts 2.................................
Other........................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
Other............................................
Exports o f services 1...................
Transfers under U.S. military
agency sales contracts.........
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation...................
Royalties and license fees........
Other private services...............
Other............................................
Residual...........................................
Im ports o f goods and
se rvice s............................
Im ports o f goods 1.......................
Foods, feeds, and beverages....
Industrial supplies and
materials, except petroleum
and products..........................
Durable g oods.......................
Nondurable g oods................
Petroleum and products............
Capital goods, except
automotive..............................
Civilian aircraft, engines, and
p a rts...................................
Computers, peripherals, and
p a rts 2.................................
Other.......................................
Automotive vehicles, engines,
and p a rts ................................
Consumer goods, except
automotive..............................
Durable goods.......................
Nondurable goods................
Other............................................
Im ports o f services 1 ...................
Direct defense expenditures....
Travel...........................................
Passenger fares.........................
Other transportation...................
Royalties and license fe e s........
Other private services...............
Other............................................
Residual...........................................
Addenda:
Exports of durable goods..........
Exports of nondurable goods....
Exports of agricultural goods 3
Exports of nonagricultural
goods......................................
Imports of durable goods..........
Imports of nondurable goods....
Imports of nonpetroleum goods

IV

I

II

III

1

1,120.4

1,196.1

1,200.5

1,228.4

1,269.3

1,288.5

1,308.3

2

784.4

843.2

847.5

870.8

906.2

919.5

940.4

3

46.0

48.6

47.8

49.1

51.0

53.4

55.0

4
5
6

175.2
58.3
117.1

179.7
62.9
116.9

180.9
64.6
116.5

176.1
66.3
109.9

186.7
67.6
119.3

193.1
68.4
125.0

194.5
69.0
125.8

7

339.6

370.9

370.6

394.4

409.6

416.1

421.9

8

42.7

49.8

47.0

53.6

59.8

56.4

56.5

10

249.1

265.5

267.4

282.6

288.8

298.5

304.3

11

87.2

95.2

97.4

100.5

101.2

100.0

106.1

12

102.4
53.4
49.0
36.4

113.7
61.5
52.2
39.6

114.6
62.8
51.8
40.6

117.8
64.2
53.7
40.6

122.2

66.7
55.5
42.6

122.5
68.7
53.9
40.3

127.1
70.3
56.8
42.7

335.9

352.9

353.0

357.8

363.6

369.5

368.6

14.6
71.1
14.8
34.2
48.2
138.7
14.5
-4.0

17.5
74.8
15.2
33.9
51.1
147.0
14.1
-6.3

19.2
73.9
15.7
33.2
51.0
146.6
14.2
-7.5

15.9
73.2
16.1
33.3
52.4
153.7
14.0
-9.5

16.0
74.0
16.5
35.5
52.5
155.2
14.2
-7.3

15.3
75.6
15.4
36.6
54.0
158.9
14.4
- 8.2

14.0
74.2
15.2
36.6
55.1
159.6
14.5
-9.3

9

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27

1,711.3

1,815.3

1,808.1

1,865.0

1,905.9

1,912.7

1,937.7

1,452.2

1,549.9

1,543.9

1,595.8

1,631.9

1,631.7

1,659.0

57.7

59.8

60.9

61.2

63.6

62.8

64.3

28
29
30
31

201.4
106.5
95.1
137.8

215.2
114.5
100.9
141.0

214.5

222.4
119.0
104.0
145.5

223.5
125.8
99.1
143.7

222.8

230.0
130.5

102.9
133.6

32

376.2

418.5

424.0

434.0

33

22.2

22.7

21.2

22.1

111.6

123.6
100.6

100.8

136.7

139.0

450.5

463.1

478.1

24.5

23.6

23.3

34
35

236.6

262.7

267.5

273.3

278.4

286.8

296.1

36

222.7

231.2

232.8

241.4

249.6

248.7

243.2

37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49

378.3
205.0
173.6
79.5

409.2
227.4
182.4
81.9

405.9
229.1
177.6
84.6

417.6
234.1
184.3
79.4

426.1
240.2
186.8
87.0

432.0
237.6
194.9
87.4

260.3
21.0

267.5

266.3

271.7

276.6

283.2

281.2

8.6

8.6

8.6

- 8.2

-17.5

-24.3

97.1
8.7
-18.6

19.7
54.7
21.9
50.0
23.8
99.8
8.7
-28.3

19.2
56.7
23.1
51.1
23.7
103.2
8.7
-38.8

18.9
53.5
21.7
52.6
23.1
105.5
8.7
-42.0

50
51
52

556.1
229.3
50.9

609.7
236.2
53.5

615.3
235.1
53.3

644.7
231.0
54.1

665.0
245.4
57.1

671.7
251.5
59.6

257.5
59.8

53
54
55
56

734.8
949.4
505.1
1,315.0

791.3
1,030.1
525.4
1,412.7

795.9
1,036.5
515.4
1,419.4

818.6
1,065.5
536.9
1,452.7

850.9
1,107.7
536.2
1,495.4

861.5
1,113.1
532.2
1,510.0

882.4
1,134.9
539.0
1,535.2

56.3
20.6

46.0
21.3
87.0

19.8
55.5
21.7
48.4
21.8

93.1

19.8
53.9

19.9
55.5

22.2

21.8

46.7
22.5
94.4

48.6
22.0

447.2
246.9
201.0

80.3

686.8

1. Exports and imports of certain goods, primarily military equipment purchased and sold by the Federal Government, are
included in services. Beginning with 1986, repairs and alterations of equipment are reclassified from goods to services.
2. The quantity index for computers can be used to accurately measure the real growth of this component. However,
because computers exhibit rapid changes in prices relative to other prices in the economy, the chained-dollar estimates
should not be used to measure the component’s relative importance or its contribution to the growth rate of more aggregate
series; accurate estimates of these contributions are shown in table 4.2.2. and real growth rates are shown in table 4.2.1.
3. Includes parts of foods, feeds, and beverages, of nondurable industrial supplies and materials, and of nondurable nonau­
tomotive consumer goods.
Note. Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. For exports and for imports, the
residual line is the difference between the aggregate line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

5 .

S a v in g

a n d

D-37

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

In v e s tm e n t

Table 5.3.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Private Fixed
Investment by Type

Table 5.1. Saving and Investment
[Billions of dollars]

[Percent]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006

III

IV

I

II

Line

III

Gross saving............................

1

1,543.7

1,612.0

1,653.5

1,621.2

1,880.5

1,789.7

2

107.5

7.2

-244.5

58.7

332.4

216.9

223.5

Net private saving.........................
Personal saving........................
Undistributed corporate profits
with inventory valuation and
capital consumption
adjustments..........................
Undistributed profits............
Inventory valuation
adjustment........................
Capital consumption
adjustment........................
Wage accruals less
disbursements......................
Net government saving................
Federal......................................
State and local..........................

3
4

502.4
174.3

319.7
-34.8

170.9
-132.6

339.5
-28.5

466.7
-29.7

353.9
-130.8

395.2
-121.3

2005

Consumption of fixed capital.......

Private............................................
Domestic business...................
Households and institutions....
Government...................................
Federal......................................
State and local..........................
Gross dom estic investment,
capital account
transactions, and net
lending, NIPAs....................

Gross domestic investment.............
Gross private domestic
investment.................................
Gross government investment....
Capital account transactions (net) 1
Net lending or net borrowing (-),
NIPAs..............................................
Statistical discrepancy.........

Gross saving a s a percentage
of gross national incom e......
Net saving a s a percentage of
gross national in com e..........

354.5
542.5

303.5
513.0

367.9
572.7

496.4

6

343.0
304.7

7

-39.8

-32.6

-30.9

-39.2

8

78.1

-155.5

-178.6

9

-15.0
-394.9
-382.0
-12.9

0.0

5

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

20
21

668.0

484.6
704.3

516.5
716.3

-22.9

-58.9

-37.2

-165.6

-148.6

-160.8

-162.6

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

-312.5
-309.2
-3.3

-415.4
-396.0
-19.3

-280.8
-263.6
-17.2

-134.3
-147.0
12.7

-136.9
-163.1
26.1

-171.7
-169.7
- 2.0

1,436.2

1,604.8

1,898.0

1,562.5

1,548.0

1,572.8

1,581.0

1,205.4
969.5
235.9
230.8
94.1
136.7

1,352.6
1,059.1
293.5
252.2
99.0
153.2

1,632.3
1,197.6
434.7
265.7
99.8
165.9

1,307.5
1,044.4
263.1
255.0
100.7
154.3

1,288.9
1,035.1
253.8
259.1
102.4
156.7

1,309.8
1,050.4
259.5
262.9
103.7
159.2

1,314.6
1,053.1
261.5
266.4
105.0
161.4

1,610.3

1,683.1

1,737.9

1,695.4

1,818.6

2,259.4

2,454.5

2,452.9

2,563.6

2,634.7

22

1 ,888.0

23
24

371.4
2.3

2,057.4
397.1
4.4

2,052.6
400.3

2,154.5
409.1

2.2

2.1

2,214.8
419.9
7.0

1,825.5
2 ,668.0

2,237.1
430.9
3.5

1,800.0

2,673.5
2,239.4
434.1

25
26

-651.3

-775.8

-717.2

-870.2

-823.1

-846.1

66.7

71.0

84.5

74.3

-61.9

35.8

-4.5

27
28
29
30
31

1,707.8
-164.1
-287.9
123.8
823.2

1,672.3
-60.2
- 210.1
149.9
849.7

1,803.2
-149.7
-296.2
146.6
554.9

1,647.0
-25.8
-162.9
137.1
1 ,001.1

1,755.7
124.8
-44.6
169.4
1,086.7

1,663.7
126.0
-59.4
185.4
1,095.2

1,709.8
94.7
-64.7
159.4
1,092.5

32

13.2

13.0

13.2

12.8

14.4

13.6

13.5

33

0.9

0.1

-1.9

0.5

2.5

1.6

1.7

1. Consists of capital transfers and the acquisition and disposal of nonproduced nonfinancial assets.




II

III
-0.9

13.7

-1.6
4.4

12.0

8.7

20.3

10.0
16.7

-3.7
17.8
-25.2

3.2
32.0
12.4

7.1
-1.7
14.3

11.7
28.0
4.9

29.1
7.7
13.8

IV

I

Private fixed investment....

1

7.3

7.5

6.3

2.8

8.2

Nonresidential...............................

2

5.9

5.2

3
4
5

2.2
2.6

6.8
1.1
- 0.8
21.1

5.9

Structures..................................

Addenda:

Gross private saving.....................
Gross government saving............
Federal......................................
State and local..........................
Net domestic investment.............

2006

2005
III

1,804.5

Net s a v in g .........................................

2004

-7 .0

Commercial and health care
Manufacturing........................
Power and communication....
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells............................
Other structures 1 ..................
Equipment and softw are........

Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment......................
Software 2..........................
O th e r 3 ................................
Industrial equipm ent.............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipm ent 4 ................
Residential.....................................

6

5.1
- 12.6

-6.7

13.2
3.1

2.0

11.1

23.6

28.0
35.1

10.0

-5.2

-9.0
- 6.8

22.4

8

9

7.3

8.9

11.0

2.8

15.6

-1.4

7.2

10

10.1

8.5

7.3

7.0

21.8

- 1.1

9.5

14.2

17.9
5.8
7.2

8.6

27.1

24.9

10.0
8.1

4.6
9.9

2.8

12.2

-4.1
13.2
5.6

8.1

20.1

3.0
16.2

4.7
4.2
-9.0
13.6

26.5
3.2
9.5
0.3

12.9
7.0

23.0

- 21.8
6.6

- 22.8
7.4

11.8

2.0

31.6
-3.6
27.7
8.5

9.9

8.6

7.1

-0 .9

-0.3

-11.1

-18.0

-1.1

-0.5
0.8
- 1.8

7

11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

11.0

Permanent site.......................
Single fam ily......................
Multifamily..........................
Other structures 5 ..................

11.5
11.9
7.8
7.4

8.6
10.6

7.1
10.6

20
21
22

10.3
14.1
5.3

9.8
17.9
1.5

- 11.6

25.7
-2.7

Equipment.................................

23

10.8

5.0

2.1

9.9

Structures..................................

9.9

5.6
4.8
12.5

9.0

4.1

-11.2

-18.2

-17.6
-19.2
- 2.6

-24.0
-27.7

1.1

-7.6

13.6

-2.9

-3.1

-7.2

10.0

Addenda:

Private fixed investment in
structures................................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software.......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6 ............................
Nonresidential structures......
Residential structures...........

24

7.4

6.3

2.6

2.8

2.4

- 1.8

25

7.3

8.9

10.9

2.9

15.6

-1.4

7.1

26
27
28

6.4

6.1
1.0

3.2
-7.1

3.9

-1.7

8.9

8.8

7.9
11.9
5.9

-5.3
16.6
-16.9

2.0
8.8

8.6

20.2

1.5

-12.3

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6 . Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.

D-38

National Data

Table 5.3.2. Contributions to Percent Change in Real Private Fixed
Investment by Type

December 2006

Table 5.3.3. Real Private Fixed Investment by Type, Quantity Indexes

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0
Seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

2006
IV

III

Line

I

II

7.3

7.5

6.3

2.8

8.2

-1.6

-0.9

114.033

113.570

113.312
108.284

92.995

99.326

100.025

101.308

104.606

105.738

80.302

78.903

81.174

82.893

86.819

90.245

4
5

76.507
50.993
76.571

75.875
61.759
71.479

75.296
61.647
67.615

75.888
66.082
69.626

77.193
65.797
71.989

79.366
69.992
72.859

84.605
71.303
75.259

7 120.793
78.836
9 98.400

134.078
74.770

132.582
72.821

139.450
74.755

140.128 149.062 152.641
78.828 84.988 86.836

107.180

108.889

109.653

113.704

113.313

10

108.905

118.169

119.268

121.307

127.437

127.088 130.012

11
12

138.489
110.703
95.076
83.354
80.063
104.902

163.269 163.804
117.072 118.092
101.880 103.171
90.147 90.994
90.382
94.682
112.290 113.399

173.913
118.920
13
103.947
14
94.468
89.030
15
16
115.224
17 125.281 136.050 138.821 138.495
18 125.330 136.160 138.967 138.599
19 128.052 141.681 144.340 146.307
20 128.786 142.013 144.686 146.396
21 121.575 138.770 141.299 145.525
22 121.081 127.527 130.562 126.591
23 122.148 128.239 128.186 131.261

183.839
122.383
111.339
93.602
94.635
117.597

185.956 197.205
123.658 124.624
108.753 111.246
96.640 96.702
88.698 91.202
119.702 120.915

3.82

4.28

3.65

3.19

8.30

2.72

6.14

0.37

0.19

-1.19

1.50

3.34

2.97

-0.06

1.81

0.34
0.23

- 0.02
0.27

0.74
0.32

0.10

-0.15

-0.25
0.19
-0.57

0.46

6

0.18
0.05
-0.35

1.92
0.21

0.10

0.27

Equipment and software........

/

0.37

-0.34
- 0.22

0.81
0.33

0.09
0.71

1.16
1.03

0.48
0.31

0.22

8

0.11

0.36
-0.18

9

3.45

4.09

4.84

1.27

6.80

-0.62

3.17

10

2.40

1.95

1.60

1.50

4.52

-0.24

2.03

11
12

0.63
0.75
-0.35
0.96
0.45

0.75
0.57
0.63
0.62
0.98
0.55

0.35
0.44
0.82
1.41
1.67
0.16

0.98
0.26
0.25
1.16
-1.89
0.50

0.94

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

0.94
0.30
0.79

0.66

0.18
0.39
-0.82
0.98
-1.91
0.56

3.19
3.17

2.68
2.67

-0.36

-0.11

-4.33

-7.04

-0.40

-0.17

-4.32

-7.03

2.44

2.46
2.06
0.40

1.30

0.21

0.29
-1.70

0.19
-0.39
0.58
-0.36

-4.46
-4.39
-0.07
0.14

-5.99
-6.24
0.25
-1.03

0.01

0.04

0.06

-0.01

-0.01

Permanent s ite ......................
Single fam ily......................
M ultifam ily.........................
Other structures 5..................

20
21
22

Equipment.................................

23

1.01

3.51
3.46

2.46
2.29
0.17

2.12

1.00

0.31
0.74

0.05

0.02

1.02

1.12

2.46
-0.28
1.90

0.02

0.80
0.32

Addenda:

24

3.82

3.36

1.49

1.52

1.33

-0.98

25

3.50

4.11

4.85

1.31

6.86

-0.63

3.15

26
27
28

3.00
0.33
2.67

2.98
0.18
2.81

1.61
-1.19
2.79

3.76
1.90
1.87

1.98
1.48
0.50

-0.85
3.31
-4.16

-2.70
2.94
-5.64

-4.06

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6 . Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.




111.811

79.418

3
4
5

Private fixed investment in
structures................................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software.......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6.............................
Nonresidential structures......
Residential structures...........

III

111.032

3

2

Structures.................................

II

109.708

2

Structures.................................

Residential....................................

1 102.080

I

Nonresidential...............................

Nonresidential..............................

Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipm ent.....................
S oftw are 2 .........................
O th e r 3................................
Industrial equipment.............
Transportation equipment.....
Other equipm ent 4 ................

2006
IV

Structures..................................

1

Commercial and health care
Manufacturing........................
Power and communication....
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells............................
Other structures ' ..................

Equipment and software........

2005
III

Private fixed investment....

Percentage points at annual
rates:

Commercial and health care
Manufacturing........................
Power and communication...
Mining exploration, shafts,
and w e lls...........................
Other structures 1..................

2005

III

Percent change at annual rate:
Private fixed investm ent....

2004

Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment......................
Software 2..........................
O th e r 3 ................................
Industrial equipment.............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipm ent 4 ................
Residential.....................................
Structures..................................

Permanent site.......................
Single fam ily......................
Multifamily..........................
Other structures 5 ..................
Equipment.................................

6

8

115.312

138.391

134.368

127.852

138.440

134.378

127.793

146.598
145.741
154.078
125.738

139.692 130.427
138.160 127.411
153.066 156.772
126.070 123.611

135.523

134.514

133.453

Addenda:

Private fixed investment in
structures................................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software.......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6 .............................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures...........

24

106.071

112.707

113.715

114.497

115.170

114.647

112.516

25

98.593

107.352

109.046

109.829

113.882

113.485

115.458

109.439 109.841
80.287 78.891
133.472 135.406

111.947
81.141
137.357

113.031
82.832
137.880

112.543 111.023
86.729 90.124
133.419 127.404

26 103.100
27 79.472
28 122.551

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded," or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6 . Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.

D-39

Survey of Current Business

December 2006

Table 5.3.4. Price Indexes for Private Fixed Investment by Type

Table 5.3.5. Private Fixed investment by Type

[In e n me , 2 0 = 0 ]
d x u b rs 0 0 1 0

[B n o d lla ]
illio s f o rs
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Seasonally adjusted
Line

2004

2005

2005

Line

2006

2004

2005

2005

2006

III

IV

I

II

III

III

IV

I

II

III

Private fixed investm ent....

1

106.811

110.542

110.946

112.194

113.238

114.074

114.195

Private fixed investment....

1

1,830.6

2,036.2

2,067.9

2,105.8

2,167.7

2,174.8

2,172.2

Nonresidential..............................

2

100.834

103.428

103.607

104.510

105.471

106.266

106.487

Nonresidential...............................

2

1,155.3

1,265.7

1,276.7

1,304.3

1,359.2

1,384.3

1,420.5

3 120.951 134.647 136.089
4 116.235 127.001 128.421
5 113.985 122.924 123.944
6 116.231 123.233 123.340

141.476

145.684

149.432

151.338

Structures..................................

300.8

338.6

336.3

359.7

378.2

406.3

427.7

131.210 133.482 135.627 137.278
126.615 129.037 131.133 132.494
124.987 126.637 128.151 129.733

Commercial and health care
Manufacturing........................
Power and communication....
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells.............................
Other structures 1 ..................

3
4
5

122.3
18.5
41.7

132.5
24.1
41.2

133.0
24.3
39.0

137.0
26.6
40.7

141.7
27.0
42.7

148.1
29.2
43.7

159.8
30.0
45.7

54.9
63.5

76.4
64.3

76.8
63.1

89.3

8

66.1

96.0
70.8

107.9
77.4

112.3
79.9

Structures.................................

Commercial and health care
Manufacturing........................
Power and communication...
Mining exploration, shafts,
and w e lls ...........................
Other structures 1..................
Equipment and software........

Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipm ent.....................
Software 2 .........................
O th e r 3................................
Industrial equipment.............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipm ent4 ................
Residential....................................
Structures.................................

7 167.286 209.732 213.626 236.244 252.697 267.060 271.457
8 115.251 123.118 124.092 126.442 128.550 130.395 131.677
9 94.503 94.134 93.983 93.754 93.887 93.920 93.695

47.125 45.443 43.872
94.430 95.005 95.356
90.186 90.523 90.734
109.659 110.544 111.711
108.867 109.257 106.889
109.841 109.608 110.311
131.696

131.592

Residential.....................................

132.236

132.118

Structures..................................

123.013 128.285 128.944 130.869 132.247 133.034 132.697
123.810 128.918 129.493 131.398 132.782 133.572 133.233
116.268 122.984 123.881 125.973 127.300 128.058 127.733
118.016 125.627 126.832 128.948 129.920 131.133 131.376

Permanent site.......................
Single fam ily......................
Multifamily..........................
Other structures 5 ..................
Equipment.................................

84.741

11
12

58.599
94.503
91.294
104.249
109.923
103.914

51.407 50.407 48.634
94.067 94.012 94.009
90.492 90.369 90.343
108.064 108.373 108.973
108.882 108.351 107.933
108.174 108.742 109.100

120.618

126.714

127.573

129.536

130.765

121.052

127.205

128.069

130.063

131.293

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Permanent s ite ......................
Single fam ily......................
M ultifam ily.........................
Other structures 5 .................

20
21
22

Equipment.................................

23

94.223

82.218

96.852

81.863

97.378

81.313

97.347

80.940

98.518

80.737

98.710

80.429

99.453

Addenda:

Private fixed investment in
structures................................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software.......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6 ............................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures...........

7
9

854.5

927.1

940.4

944.7

981.0

977.9

992.8

10

431.6

454.3

456.6

461.3

482.4

479.9

489.0

11
12

82.3
184.3
164.9
138.4
141.6
143.0

85.1
194.0
175.2
155.1
158.3
159.4

83.9
195.6
177.2
157.0
165.0
161.8

85.9
196.9
178.4
163.9
154.6
164.9

88.0

203.6
190.8
163.4
165.7
169.4

85.9
207.0
187.1
170.1
155.9
172.1

87.9
209.3
191.8
172.0
156.8
175.0

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

675.3

770.4

791.2

801.5

808.5

790.6

751.6

666.8

761.3

782.0

792.1

798.7

780.8

741.9

20
21
22

417.5
377.6
39.9
249.3

481.7
433.5
48.2
279.6

493.1
443.6
49.5
288.9

507.3
455.5
51.8
284.8

513.7
458.2
55.4
285.0

492.4
437.0
55.4
288.4

458.5
402.0
56.6
283.3

23

8.5

9.1

9.2

9.4

9.8

9.8

9.8

24

967.7

1,099.9

1,118.3

1,151.8

1,176.9

1,187.1

1,169.6

25

863.0

936.2

949.6

954.1

990.8

987.7

1 ,002.6

873.9
300.3
573.6

992.4
337.9
654.5

1,003.2
335.6
667.6

1,046.5
358.9
687.6

1,074.8
377.4
697.4

1,085.7
405.3
680.4

1,075.8
426.6
649.2

Addenda:

24

121.199

129.651

130.690

133.679

135.796

137.602

138.141

25

94.496

94.156

94.012

93.785

93.928

93.962

93.745

26
27
28

121.579
121.057
121.561

130.078
134.842
127.366

131.059 134.145 136.448 138.434 139.048
136.290 141.714 145.953 149.726 151.648
128.109 130.072 131.433 132.510 132.405

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6 . Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers' commissions on the sale of structures.




Equipment and software........

Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment......................
Software 2..........................
O th e r 3 ................................
Industrial equipment.............
Transportation equipment....
Other equipm ent 4 ................

10

6

Private fixed investment in
structures................................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software.......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 6 ............................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures...........

26
27
28

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
3. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
4. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
5. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
6 . Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers' commissions on the sale of structures.

D -4 0

N a tio n a l D a ta

D ecem ber 2006

Table 5.3.6. Real Private Fixed Investment by Type, Chained Dollars

Table 5.6.5B. Change in Private Inventories by Industry

[B illions o f c h a in e d (2 0 0 0 ) d o llars ]

[B illio n s o f d o llars ]

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005
III

Private fixed investment....
Nonresidential..........................
Structures.............................
Commercial and health care
Manufacturing.....................
Power and communication...
Mining exploration, shafts,
and wells........................
Other structures 1...............
Equipment and software.......
Information processing
equipment and software...
Computers and peripheral
equipment2................
Software 3......................
Other4............................
Industrial equipment...........
Transportation equipment....
Other equipment5..............
Residential...............................
Structures.............................
Permanent site...................
Single family...................
Multifamily......................
Other structures 6...............
Equipment.............................
Residual....................................
Addenda:
Private fixed investment in
structures............................
Private fixed investment in
equipment and software......
Private fixed investment in new
structures 7.........................
Nonresidential structures.....
Residential structures.........

Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

2006
IV

I

II

Line

2005

III

1 1,713.9 1,842.0 1,864.2 1,877.3 1,914.6 1,906.8 1,902.5
2 1,145.8 1,223.8 1,232.4 1,248.2 1,288.8 1,302.8 1,334.1
247.1
254.2
259.6
271.9
3
248.7
251.5
282.6
104.4
104.4
4
105.2
103.6
106.2
109.2
116.4
19.6
5
16.2
19.6
21.0
20.9
22.3
22.7
6
35.8
33.5
31.6
32.6
33.7
34.1
35.2
7
8
9

32.8
55.1
904.2

36.4
36.0
37.9
38.1
40.5
52.2
52.2
50.9
55.1
59.4
984.9 1,000.6 1,007.6 1,044.8 1,041.2

10

509.3

552.6

557.7

567.3

595.9

594.3

608.0

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

195.0
180.7
132.7
128.8
137.6
559.9
550.9
339.4
305.0
34.4
211.3
9.0
-6.2

206.2
193.6
143.5
145.4
147.3
608.0
598.5
375.5
336.3
39.2
222.5
9.4
-13.1

208.0
196.0
144.9
152.3
148.8
620.4
610.8
382.6
342.6
39.9
227.8
9.4
-13.4

209.5
197.5
150.4
143.2
151.2
618.9
609.2
387.8
346.6
41.1
220.9
9.7
-17.3

215.6
211.6
149.0
152.2
154.3
618.5
608.5
388.6
345.1
43.5
219.4
10.0
-26.6

217.8
206.7
153.9
142.7
157.1
600.5
590.6
370.2
327.1
43.3
220.0
9.9
-25.8

219.5
211.4
154.0
146.7
158.7
571.4
561.7
345.7
301.7
44.3
215.7
9.8
-35.8

25

798.4

848.4

856.0

861.9

866.9

863.0

846.9

41.5
60.7
1,059.6

26

913.2

994.3

1,010.0

1,017.3

1,054.8

1,051.2

1,069.4

27
28
29

718.8
248.1
471.8

762.9
250.6
513.9

765.7
246.2
521.3

780.4
253.3
528.8

788.0
258.6
530.8

784.6
270.7
513.7

774.0
281.3
490.5

1. Consists primarily of religious, educational, vocational, lodging, railroads, farm, and amusement and recreational struc­
tures, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
2. The quantity index for computers can be used to accurately measure the real growth rate of this component. However,
because computers exhibit rapid changes in prices relative to other prices in the economy, the chained-dollar estimates
should not be used to measure the component’s relative importance or its contribution to the growth rate of more aggregate
series; accurate estimates of these contributions are shown in table 5.3.2 and real growth rates are shown in table 5.3.1.
3. Excludes software “embedded,” or bundled, in computers and other equipment.
4. Includes communication equipment, nonmedical instruments, medical equipment and instruments, photocopy and
related equipment, and office and accounting equipment.
5. Consists primarily of furniture and fixtures, agricultural machinery, construction machinery, mining and oilfield machinery,
service industry machinery, and electrical equipment not elsewhere classified.
6. Consists primarily of manufactured homes, improvements, dormitories, net purchases of used structures, and brokers’
commissions on the sale of residential structures.
7. Excludes net purchases of used structures and brokers’ commissions on the sale of structures.
N ote . Chained (2000) dollar series are calculated as the product of the chain-type quantity index and the 2000 currentdollar value of the corresponding series, divided by 100. Because the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights
of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar estimates are usually not additive. The residual line is the differ­
ence between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.




2004

2005

2006

III
Change in private
inventories.....................
Farm..........................................
Mining, utilities, and construction
Manufacturing.............................
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries....
Wholesale trade..........................
Durable goods industries........
Nondurable goods industries....
Retail trade................................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers
Food and beverage stores
General merchandise stores
Other retail stores...................
Other industries..........................
Addenda:
Change in private inventories...
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries
Nonfarm industries.................
Nonfarm change in book
value 1............................
Nonfarm inventory valuation
adjustment2...................
Wholesale trade......................
Merchant wholesale trade ,
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods
industries....................
Nonmerchant wholesale
trade..............................

IV

I

II

III

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

57.3
8.4
1.0
-0.7
-0.1
-0.6
19.1
16.9
2.2
22.2
7.2
0.5
4.3
10.2
7.4

21.3
0.3
1.8
-3.2
1.2
-4.3
17.1
14.3
2.8
5.4
-2.7
0.0
2.9
5.2
-0.1

-15.3
1.3
-1.5
-14.5
0.5
-15.0
11.0
7.9
3.1
-9.8
-13.1
-1.7
3.2
1.8
-1.8

48.6
5.8
-0.4
0.1
-1.5
1.6
14.7
18.8
-4.1
27.6
19.5
1.5
1.2
5.4
0.9

47.2
5.4
-3.1
9.2
-0.2
9.4
16.8
6.8
10.0
13.5
5.5
1.1
-4.9
11.8
5.5

62.3
2.3
7.7
13.9
6.5
7.4
22.0
16.5
5.5
8.3
1.0
1.2
-0.5
6.7
8.0

67.2
2.4
2.3
14.6
11.3
3.3
41.2
30.9
10.3
1.1
-7.2
0.3
4.9
3.1
5.5

16
17
18
19

57.3
31.6
25.8
49.0

21.3
17.3
4.0
21.0

-15.3
-0.8
-14.5
-16.6

48.6
41.6
7.0
42.8

47.2
14.3
32.9
41.8

62.3
25.1
37.2
59.9

67.2
36.7
30.6
64.8

20

107.7

72.3

35.8

115.7

47.1

117.6

105.1

21
22
23
24

-58.7
19.1
18.4
16.5

-51.3
17.1
16.7
13.7

-52.4
11.0
12.9
7.7

-72.9
14.7
16.4
19.7

-5.3
16.8
14.0
7.4

-57.7
22.0
22.5
18.0

-40.3
41.2
35.0
25.8

25

1.9

3.0

5.1

-3.2

6.6

4.5

9.2

26

0.7

0.4

-1.9

-1.7

2.8

-0.5

6.2

1. This series is derived from the Census Bureau series “current cost inventories.”
2. The inventory valuation adjustment (IVA) shown in this table differs from the IVA that adjusts business incomes. The IVA
in this table reflects the mix of methods (such as first-in, first-out and last-in, first-out) underlying inventories derived primarily
from Census Bureau statistics (see footnote 1). This mix differs from that underlying business income derived primarily from
Internal Revenue Service statistics.
N ote . Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

T a b le 5 .6 .6 B . R e a l C h a n g e in P riv a te In v e n to rie s b y In d u s try , C h a in e d D o lla rs
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]
Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
Line

2004

2005

2005

2006

III
Change in private
inventories.....................
Farm..........................................
Mining, utilities, and construction
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods industries.........
Nondurable goods industries....
Wholesale trade..........................
Durable goods industries.........
Nondurable goods industries....
Retail trade................................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers
Food and beverage stores.......
General merchandise stores....
Other retail stores...................
Other industries..........................
Residual.....................................
Addenda:
Change in private inventories...
Durable goods industries.....
Nondurable goods industries
Nonfarm industries.................
Wholesale trade......................
Merchant wholesale trade....
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods
industries....................
Nonmerchant wholesale
trade...............................

IV

I

II

III

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

53.4
6.1
0.7
-0.4
-0.2
-0.2
18.2
16.4
2.3
21.9
7.5
0.4
4.2
9.9
7.4
-1.1

19.6
0.2
1.2
-2.4
1.1
-3.3
15.7
13.5
2.6
5.2
-2.7
0.0
2.7
4.9
-0.1
-0.5

-12.7
1.1
-1.1
-12.2
0.6
-11.8
10.2
7.5
2.8
-9.2
-13.3
-1.5
3.1
1.8
-1.6
-0.3

43.5
4.8
-0.5
0.5
-1.3
1.5
13.3
17.8
-3.3
26.4
19.8
1.3
1.1
5.1
0.8
-3.6

41.2
4.3
-2.0
7.6
-0.1
7.1
15.0
6.4
8.2
12.8
5.5
1.0
-4.7
10.8
5.2
-0.5

53.7
1.9
5.4
11.1
5.7
5.2
19.3
15.3
4.5
7.8
1.0
1.0
-0.5
6.1
7.4
0.7

58.0
2.4
1.6
11.5
9.6
2.2
35.9
28.3
8.5
1.1
-7.4
0.3
4.6
2.9
5.1
-0.1

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

53.4
30.7
23.1
47.0
18.2
17.6
16.0

19.6
16.4
3.9
19.6
15.7
15.4
12.9

-12.7
-0.5
-11.6
-14.0
10.2
11.9
7.3

43.5
39.2
6.4
38.6
13.3
15.0
18.6

41.2
13.4
27.1
36.8
15.0
12.6
6.9

53.7
23.1
30.3
52.2
19.3
20.0
16.7

58.0
33.2
25.4
56.0
35.9
31.0
23.5

24

1.9

2.7

4.6

-2.7

5.6

3.8

8.0

25

0.7

0.5

-1.5

-1.4

2.3

-0.4

4.8

N ote . Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
Chained (2000) dollar series for real change in private inventories are calculated as the period-to-period change in
chained-dollar end-of-period inventories. Quarterly changes in end-of-period inventories are stated at annual rates. Because
the formula for the chain-type quantity indexes uses weights of more than one period, the corresponding chained-dollar esti­
mates are usually not additive. The residual line is the difference between the first line and the sum of the most detailed lines.

S urvey

D ecem ber 2 0 0 6

D -4 1

C u r r e n t B u s in e s s

of

Table 5.7.5B. Private Inventories and Domestic Final Sales by Industry

Table 5.7.6B. Real Private Inventories and Real Domestic Final Sales

[B illions o f d o lla rs ]

b y In d u s try , C h a in e d D o lla rs
[Billions of chained (2000) dollars]

Seasonally adjusted quarterly totals
Line
III
Private inventories 1.........................................
Farm.........................................................................
Mining, utilities, and construction................................
Manufacturing.................
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries
Wholesale trade..............
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries
Retail trade.....................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers.............................
Food and beverage stores
General merchandise stores..................................
Other retail stores........
Other industries.........................................................
Addenda:
Private inventories.................................................
Durable goods industries....................................
Nondurable goods industries..............................
Nonfarm industries................................................
Wholesale trade....................................................
Merchant wholesale trade..................................
Durable goods industries................................
Nondurable goods industries...........................
Nonmerchant wholesale trade............................
Final sales of domestic business2..................
Final sales of goods and structures of
domestic business 2....................................
Ratios of private inventories to final sales of
domestic business:
Private inventories to final sales.............................
Nonfarm inventories to final sales...........................
Nonfarm inventories to final sales of goods and
structures...........................................................

Seasonally adjusted quarterly totals

2006

2005
IV

I

II

1 1,780.3 1,817.0 1,839.2 1,896.9 1,921.2
2
160.4
165.6
173.1
175.7
188.1
3
80.1
89.8
82.1
80.6
81.0
4
509.2
515.6
523.9
550.0
552.3
293.4
5
296.3
301.4
316.1
321.8
6
215.8
219.3
233.9
222.5
230.5
7
423.7
456.7
430.6
437.8
464.3
244.4
8
250.9
265.1
273.4
255.0
179.2
9
190.8
179.8
182.8
191.6
10
478.7
499.2
498.7
486.4
492.0
11
154.4
159.7
157.1
157.6
160.5
12
36.0
36.7
37.4
36.8
38.0
76.7
13
76.0
75.9
76.4
78.0
14
212.3
215.3
219.7
224.9
225.6
15
128.3
128.9
134.7
130.2
136.8
16 1,780.3
17
795.1
18
985.2
19 1,619.9
423.7
20
21
363.5
22
215.2
23
148.2
24
60.2
25
720.0

1,817.0 1,839.2 1,896.9 1,921.2
850.7
862.7
810.5
823.8
1,006.5 1,015.4 1,046.2 1,058.5
1,651.4 1,666.2 1,721.2 1,733.1
456.7
430.6
437.8
464.3
370.8
377.0
392.5
400.9
221.7
235.7
225.8
242.6
156.9
151.2
149.0
158.3
59.9
64.2
63.4
60.8
741.4
751.1
756.8
724.3

26

442.1

441.1

455.6

460.8

461.9

27
28

2.47
2.25

2.51
2.28

2.48
2.25

2.53
2.29

2.54
2.29

29

3.66

3.74

3.66

3.74

3.75

1. Inventories are as of the end of the quarter. The quarter-to-quarter change in inventories calculated from current-dollar
inventories in this table is not the current-dollar change in private inventories component of GDR The former is the difference
between two inventory stocks, each valued at its respective end-of-quarter prices. The latter is the change in the physical
volume of inventories valued at average prices of the quarter. In addition, changes calculated from this table are at quarterly
rates, whereas, the change in private inventories is stated at annual rates.
2. Quarterly totals at monthly rates. Final sales of domestic business equals final sales of domestic product less gross
output of general government, gross value added of nonprofit institutions, compensation paid to domestic workers, and space
rent for owner-occupied housing. It includes a small amount of final sales by farm and by government enterprises.
N o te . Estimates in this table are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

T a b le 5 .7 .9 B . I m p lic it P ric e D e fla to rs f o r P riv a te In v e n to rie s b y In d u s tr y
[Index numbers, 2000=100]
Seasonally adjusted
Line

2005

2006

III
Private inventories 1.........................................
Farm.........................................................................
Mining, utilities, and construction................................
Manufacturing................
Durable goods industries
Nondurable goods industries..................................
Wholesale trade.............
Durable goods industries........................................
Nondurable goods industries..................................
Retail trade................................................................
Motor vehicle and parts dealers..............................
Food and beverage stores......................................
General merchandise stores..................................
Other retail stores...................................................
Other industries.........................................................
Addenda:
Private inventories.................................................
Durable goods industries....................................
N