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UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
WASHINGTON

SURVEY OF
l

, 1929

No. 96

ISSUEP BY

BtREAU OF THE CENSUS

IMPORTANT NOTICE
In addition: to figures given from Government sources, there .are< also incorporated for completeness of
service figures, from other sources generally accepted by the trades, the authority and responsibility for
• which are noted in the "Sources of Data"i on pages 139-142 of the present issue
/




INTRODUCTION

The SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS ik designed to designed fy> phow the trend of an Entire group of
present each month a picture of th^ business situation industries or for the -country as a whole, instead of for
by setting* fortn the principal facts regarding the vari- the single iommodif/y or industry which the relative
ous lines of tirade and industry. TJie figiires reported number cover^. Conlfarisons witji the base* year or
are very largely those already in existence. The with other periods are m^de in the ^me maniier as in
chief function of fthe department is to bring together the case of relative numbers.
these data whicn, if available at all, are scattered
RATIO CHARTS
in hundreds of different publications. A portion of
these data are collected by (^overnmen^ departments,
y
In most instances the charts us6d in the^tmvEY '
other figures are compiled by ^ecjinicjal journals, and
o$ CuKRENf BUSINESS are of the, type termed " Ratio
still others are reported by trade ^associations.
At- semiarpiual intervals detailed Cables ate pub- Charts " (logarithmic §<cale), notp-bly the Business
lished giving, for each item, monthly figures for the Indicator charts on page 2. These Charts show the
ancl aUoF, direct comparisons
past two years and yearly comparisons, w^ere aVail- pe^centagiB increase .one enr^e and that of any pther
between the slope of
abl$, back to 4913; also blank lines Sufficient for six
months hav^ been left 6t the bottom of each table, curv^ regapdle^s of its location on .the diagram^ that
enabling those who ca^re to do so to enter new figures is, a 10 per cent increase in an item is given the same
as so6n as ihey appear (^ee Tables 1 to, 117). In the vertical ino^ement whether its ctirye is n^ar the bo tintervening months the ni^re^ important comparisons ^tom or ^iear the top of the chart. The difference
only are given in the table entitled "Trend of business between this and the ordinary arithmetic forth of
xjhart can be m^d^ ^lear by an example. If a certain
movements.7/,
,
]
item haying a relative number 6f 400 in one month
increases 10 per cent in the * f oBowitig month, its
WEEKLY SUPPLEMENT
relative number will be 440, and on an ordinary
Realizing th&t current statistics are 14ghly perish- chart wotild be plotted 40 equidistant scaled points
able and that to be of use th£y must reach the business higher than the preceding months* Ano they moveman at the earliest possible moment, the department ment with a relative nun^bei" of, ;^ay, 50 also increases
has arranged to distribute supplements every week t6 10 pei^ceiit, Baking its relative htipaber 55. Oil the
siibscrib^i^ in' tke JJnited States. The supplements are ordinary (arithmetic) scale this item would rise only 5 v
usually mailed on Saturdays and give stich information equidistant joints,, whei'e^s the prefyious ^teni rose 40
as hp>s been Deceived during the week ending on the points, ^et each showed the same percentage increase.
pre9eding Tuesday The pionttily^injFot'mation con- The >atio charte avoid difficulty arid ^ive to each
. tained in these bulletins is .irepublished in th© SURVEY, o£ the two r^oyement^ exactly the saine vertical rise,
and hence, the slopes of th& two lin^s a^e directly com- <
( and the supplements also ^epntain charts, and l tables
of weekly data.
"
" parable. The ratio charts co^rip^e percentage changes,
i „',
•
i
• > ' ) ' ' ' . i
Awhile the arithmetic charts compare absolute changes.
/
B^ATIYE AND INDEX NttMbEES
\
•, , *
'< ' •
f - ' ^ - '
' .' l
l
1
MCOfep BQO?
< ' | ',
r '
'
^
To^ facilitate .coiiiparisdn between different imporAs ian aid ta headers in comparing present data
tant it^ms and to char|i series expressed in different
units, relative numbers t (often called ** index iuini- with monthly statistics in previous y^ars, the dppartbers," a ;term r^ferring^ more particularly to a special inent is coiripiling a RECOEB B^OK OP BUSINESS
Mnd of number described; below) have been calcu7 STATISTICS, in ^hidjh ijata now carried in the SURVEY
| lated. iTto inpntfyly average for 1923-192§ has OF CURRENT BUSINESS are shown by* months as far
backus 1909? if avWl^ble. , Full Ascriptions of the
usuapy been used as a base equal tb 100. ^
figures and reports of hoW the data a^e used in actual
V 'tiie relative pumbeirs are compiited by Allowing the
monthly average for the base yeto OY -period to equal practice by business firms are contained i& the EECORD
/ 100. If tfie movement for a cuKrrint month is g^eatey Boos. , The seetioris covering textiles, nietals arid fuels,
tjian thfe ba^e, the relative number will be greater than automobiles^ and rtibber have already beeijc issued and
100, aiid. vice versa. The difference ^between WO arid may be obtained lot* l6 cents per copy ^orii the ^uper^
the relative number will give at once the per cent intenident of |)ocument^, .Government printing Office,
(increase or decrease cpmp^redl with the base period. Washington, P.p. (Dp not send stamps.) Notices of
Thus a Relative number of 115 means an increase of 1|5 other sections Mil be given in the SURVEY ak they /are
' ' ' , ,V
'- I '
per eent^ver the b#se period, while a relative nurab^r issued. '
of 80 means a decrease of 20 per cent from ^he base.
> , E,elative numbeirs may &ko be^sed to c^lc^late the t Metjbodsspf using and interpreting current business
approximate percentage increase bir decrease in a moyeV statistics hate been collected by th6 department
inent from one period to the next. Thtis, if a relative fr^m many business concerns and tare descnbed in a
; number at pn^ iioonth is 120 and for a later month it bodklet en,titl^d "How to ,Use Current Business
is 144 there has been an increase 0f 20 per cent,
Statistics/' together with methods W collecting staWhen two bij mqra series of,relative numbers ai*e tistics.: This ^booklet may 4 be obtairied from tke
coihbined by a systeni 4of weightings, tfe resiilting Superintendent of lDocnmei|ts, Governnient Printing
series is denominated an index number. The index Ofjice, Washington, D. C,, at 15 cent^ per copy. (Do
/
number,! by combining many relative riumbers,\is not send stamnsj
This is»ue presents practically complete data: for the month; of June and contains text covering the,fiscal year ended
e 30* 19?9 (page J). As most data covering a particular month's business are not available until horn 15 to 30 days
after the close of the rrtqiith, a complete picture of that month's operations can, not be presented att an e#rly date* butjhe
weekly supplements give every week the latest data available.




SURVEY OF
CURRENT BUSINESS
P U B L I S H E D BY

U N I T E D STATES DEPARTMENT OF C O M M E R C E
Subscription price of the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS is 31.50 a year; single copies (monthly), 10 cents, semiannual issues, 25 cents.
Foreign subscriptions, 22.25; single copies (monthly issues), including postage, 14 cents; semiannual issues, 36 cents. Subscription
price of COMMERCE REPORTS is 34 a year; with the SURVEY, 35.50 a year. Make remittances only to Superintendent of Documents,
Washington, D. C., by postal money order, express order, or New York draft. Currency at sender's risk. Postage stamps or foreign
money not accepted

WASHINGTON

No. 96

August, 1929

CONTENTS
INDEX BY SUBJECTS

SUMMARIES
Page

Business conditions in the fiscal year, 1929
1
Monthly business indicators (table and chart)
2, 3
Mid-year statistical summary of commerce and industry- 4, 5
Measures of industrial and commercial activity (charts):
New building contracts and automobile production _
6
Mineral production and railroad ton-mileage
6
Factory employment, manufacturing and electricpower production
6
Check payments and retail trade
6
Weekly business indicators (table)
7
Indexes of market values of common stocks
8, 9
Wholesale prices (table and charts)
10,11
Business conditions in June
12
Prospective carloadings, third quarter of 1929
20
Sources of data
139
Index
143

Textiles
Metals and metal products
Fuels
Automobiles
Rubber
_
Hides and leather
Paper and printing
Building construction and housing
Lumber products
_
Stone, clay, and glass products
Chemicals and oils
Foodstuffs and tobacco.
Transportation and public utilities
Employment and wages
Distribution movement (trade, advertis., etc.)
Banking, finance, and insurance
Foreign exchange and trade

Text
page

14
15
16
16
16
16
_ _ 16
17
17
17
18
19
13
19
19
19

Table
page

27
35
34,51
49
54
57
59
64
66
73
77
86
100
108
116
123
135

BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN THE FISCAL YEAR 1929
Industry and commerce, almost without exception,
were more active during the fiscal year 1929 than in
any other comparable period on record. Pig-iron
production, long regarded as an indicator of the Nation's
business health, showed a gain of 16 per cent over the
preceding year; the output of steel ingots registered
an increase of 22 per cent; while the production of
automobiles, usually regarded as a reflection of consumer-purchasing power, showed a gain of almost 53
per cent.
New contracts awarded for building construction
during the fiscal year, measured in value, showed a
decline of slightly more than 5 per cent from the corresponding period a year ago. Factory employment during the period, however, showed an average gain of
almost 3 per cent for the year. The distribution of
commodities, through primary channels, as reflected by
61139°—29



1

data on freight-car loadings, showed a gain of 4 per cent,
while commercial transactions, measured by check payments outside of New York City, registered an increase
of more than 7 per cent.
Sales by department stores were more than 1 per
cent larger than a year ago, while the volume of business transacted by chain-store systems registered a
gain of 7 per cent over the fiscal year of 1928.
Dividend payments by corporations recorded an
advance of 11 per cent over the preceding year while
new life insurance written during the year showed a
gain of 7 per cent, reflecting the general prosperity
during this period. Business failures, showed a decline
of 4 per cent in the amount of defaulted liabilities
from the fiscal year 1928. In all, the leading indicators
of business emphasize the fullness of the prosperity which
the Nation has witnessed during the fiscal year 1929.

MONTHLY BUSINESS INDICATORS, 1923-1929
[Ratio charts—see explanations on inside front cover. The curves on check payments, wholesale trade, 10-cent chains, and department stores have been adjusted
for normal seasonal variations, and manufacturing production for the varying number of working days in the month as well]




1924 | 1925 | 1926 I 1927 I 1928 I 1929

1925 I 1926 I 1927

MANUFACTURING PRODUCTION

PIG IRON PRODUCTION

1

1

WHOLESALE TRADE (* LINES)

DEPARTMENT STORE TRADE]
AUTOMOBILE
PRODUCTION
l i i! i , I i I i , 1 .1 I i , l II I t i l , i!

SALES BY 2 MAIL-ORDER HQUSES

COTTON CONSUMPTION

NET TON-MILE OPERATION

CONSUMPTION

i,, i,. i,, I,, i,, t
INTEREST RATE, COMMERCIAL PAPER

MINERAL PRODUCTION

I . i I . 11 . i . . I . . ! . , I i , I , , I n I, . I , , I i , I , , I

PETROLEUM

PRODUCTION]

COPPER PRODUCTION
. .I. .i. . i . .i. .I. .i.

BUILDING CONTRACTS (FLOOR SPACE)
i.. i.. I., i . . i . . i . - . l . , i . . i . . i . . t , . i , . i , , i ,
UNFILLED STEEL ORDERS

M I . I . . I . . i 7 i . . t i i i n _.,n

1923 I 119214 I 1925

1928 I 1929

MONTHLY BUSINESS INDICATORS
The principal business indicators are shown below, all calculated on a comparable basis, the average for the years 1923 to 1925,
inclusive. Thus the table gives a bird's-eye view of the business situation in a concise form, so that trends of the principal indicators
may be seen at a glance.
Certain indicators, in which there is a marked seasonal movement, are shown with the average seasonal variations eliminated,
as noted below. In this manner a more understanding month-to-month comparison may be made.
MONTHLY AVERAGE
1923

ITEM

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1928 May June July Aug. Sept Oct. Nov Dec. Jan.

Feb. Mar. Apr. May June

1923 - 1925 monthly a?erage=100
Industrial production:
* Total manufacturing...
* Total minerals. .
Pig iron
_
Steel ingots
..
Automobiles
Cement
Cotton (consumption)
Wool (consumption)

..
..
. .

Raw material output:
Animal products
.
Crops
Forest products....
Crude petroleum
Bituminous coal
.
Copper
„

.

Power and construction:
Electric power
Building contracts (37 States) ...

110.0
99.0
103.1
108.3
120.2
140.8
99.5
87.1

111.0
101.0
102.8
110.3
118.7
140.6
85.7
80.4

113.0
105.0
105.0
120.9
139.7
150.9
102.6
95.2

101.0 94.0 105.0 108.0 106.0 111.0
105.0 96.0 99.0 107.0 107.0 106.0
111.7 86.7 101.5 109.0 101.0 105.5
104.8 88.7 106.4 113.1 104.6 120.2
101.7 90.8 107 5 108 4 85.7 109.8
92.1 99.8 108.1 110.0 115.3 118.0
105.9 89.7 104.4 108.5 120 2 106.8
112 8 94.6 92.6 89.7 97.0 94.7

110.0
105.0
109.9
121.6
129.0
139.3
112.5
92.7

113.0
112.0
112.8
116.3
70.9
98.1
104.1
96.8

117.0
117.0
115.2
129.9
121.5
79.5
130.2
114.0

117.0
120.0
107.3
125.1
141.2
68.6
116.5
101.3

100.0 104.0 96.0 96.0 97.0
92.0 104.0 104.0 109.0 113.0
99.0 97.0 104.0 98.0 93.0
99.4 96.9 103.7 104.6 122.3
108.0 92.5 99.5 109 7 99.0
93.4 100.2 106.4 110.2 104.9

108.0 116.0 108.0 97.0 92.0 102.0 93.0 92.0
72.0 62.0 87.0 114.0 178.0 251.0 179.0 152.0
101.0 97.0 88.0 90.0 78.0 84.0 84.0 76.0
122.5 118.1 122.9 126.8 124.5 129.5 123.8 129.4
84.1 82.6 83.3 94.4 94.8 115.6 105.7 99.6
111.8 111.0 111.3 116.7 118.8 131.1 129.5 129.8

96.0
112.0
82.0
133.5
118.1
130.9

80.0 88.0 99.7 108.9 111.8
82.0 72.0 57.2 51.0 55.7
74.0 86.0 90.2 98.7 90.9
123.3 134.4 130.5 137.5 135.9
108.5 90.3 84.7 92.2 87.0
128.5 142.1 143.9 141.6 125.6

99.0
119.0
88.2
122.2
94.3
114.9

116.0
108.0
102.5
120.0
125.8
143.9
95.9
91.8

114.0 111.0
114.0 113.0
112.9 110.5
134.5 123.2
120.3 77.9
141.1 124.5
1206 119.0
108 6 105.7

120.0
107.0
124.3
146.3
177.2
80.2
123.3
102. 7

123.0
115.0
122.6
142.8
188.2
110.6
123.1
103.8

124.0
116. 0
130.5
152.5
182.9
129.9
130.2
102.9

127.0
113.0
123.8
141.2
165.1
135.0
111. 1
93.0

92.5 98.1 109.5 122.6 133.3 146.0 142.2 139.8 142.4 149.8 145.2 158.0 154.6 157.8 164.3 148.1 159.3 157.1 161.2 154.9
89.7 92.7 117.6 111.0 106.8 121.4 143.5 142.2 123.7 118.8 114.2 129.1 111.1 98.2 88.6 81.9 117.1 128.0 122.4 109.7

Unfilled orders:
General index
U. 8. Steel Corporation

121.7
125.8

Stocks:
General index
.
Manfd. commodities (28)
Cotton
Copper (refined) .

94.5 102.0 103.5 114.6 120.8 122.7 116.5 108.4 105.4 107.5 116.0 132.9 137.0 141.5 138.4 136.4 133.0 127.0 121.2 117.9
93.8 103.2 103.0 106.3 112.5 116.7 120.2 117.3 118.3 115.4 111.3 110.7 113.7 120.4 125.2 124.8 121.0 119.0 117.3 116. 2
102.5 91.4 106.2 145.5 163.1 123.8 95.5 74.7 58.6 52.4 89.5 155.1 181.4 187.7 169.8 149.5 130.5 109.9 88.4 70. 9
106.4 113.9 73.1 64.8 85.4 58.4 68.6 52.0 48.5 48.4 45.8 40.3 46.1 57.8 55.4 48.8 46.8 50.8 62.2 73.4

Employment:
Factories
..
..

108.6

96.2

97.8
99.9
97.6
98.1

97.1
97.4
97.6
99.9

Prices:
Farm products, to producers
Wholesale, all commodities
Retail food
_
Cost of living (including food)....

!

87.0
83.6

91.3
90.6

97.2

84.6
82.1

97.9

74.0 76.2
71.1 80.7

94.4

91.2 96.7 111.9 119.6 132.5
101. 0 08.0 102.0 101.0 97.0
98.0 99.0 103.0 106.0 106 0
89.2 98.1 112.7 120.2 126.2
88.0 99.0 113.0 125.0 138.0
97.8 93.1 109.0 114.3 108.0
91.5 100.8 107.8 105.5 106.8

Transportation :
Freight, net ton-miles...

102.2

Finance:
Member bank loans and discounts
Interest rate (commercial paper) .
Federal reserve ratio
Price, corporation bonds
Price, railroad stocks
. _.
Price, industrial stocks
Failures (liabilities)

94.1
116.2
99.0
96.4
86 0
86.1
106.0




75.2
76.2

91.1 91.2

77.1 74.7
74.8 75.9

90.3

91.7

74.7
77.4

93.0

71 5 72.7
78.6 76.9

93.9 93.4

158.2
96.0
108.0
147.6
150.0
105.5
112.6

168.8
98.7
103.0
122.5
144.0
109.6
111.1

165.4
92.5
105.0
137.1
153.0
98.2
102.3

140.4
94.2
107.0
123.1
148.0
98.4
99.8

149.9
100.6
105.0
140.6
144.0
107.3
100.1

156.9
96.4
119.0
155.4
165.0
99.0
111.1

161.0 165.1
97.4 100.0
105.0 106.0
194.4 188.4
148.0 151.0
110.0 101.1
145.1 143.5

95.9 101.9 109.1 106.0 106.5 105.8 100.0 105.0 113.6 117.3 129.2 124.6
98.5
90.0
104.1
99.9
96.1
91.9
106.8

71.0
83.3

93.5

75.0
86.1

93.2

106.6 98.6 94.9 100.7 107.2 105.1 105.1 100.7 102.2 99.3 97.1 97.1 96.4
102.8 99.3 94.7 97.0 97.9 96.9 97.6 98.2 99.4 97.1 96.0 96.0 96.5
104.9 107.6 103.6 102.9 102.8 102.0 102.1 103.0 105.4 104.8 105.1 104.1 103.3
102.3 102.3 99.9 98.7 98.4 98.0 98.0 98.0 99.3 99.3 99.3 98.7 98.0

Distribution (values) :
* Bank debits, 141 cities
* Wholesale trade
* Department stores, sales
Mail-order sales, 2 bouses
* 10-cent chains, sales
Imports
Exports
_

* Seasonal adjustments.

91.9

73.9
71.6

107.4
93.5
96.9
103.6
117.9
122.0
87.2

112.9
100.9
96.0
108.0
133.4
132.4
80.4

117.3
95.4
99.1
112.5
162.7
171.4
102.2

126.8
112.8
89.1
113.0
174.5
214.8
95.6

126.9
104.4
89.2
115.0
178.9
213.6
85.2

128.4
113.2
84.7
112.3
169.6
202.1
70.3

126.6
119.0
88.9
110.9
170.3
206.1
69.8

125.6
124.8
90.0
109.8
173.8
213.4
137.3

127.3
130.6
86.5
111.0
178.5
226.9
80.1

128.3 129.8
127.6 124.8
87.0 84.5
111.3 112.0
176.4 186.0
234.5 252.6
82.5 95.8

172.3
94.9
116.0
227.4
163.6
105.0
125.3

187.2
101.1
104.0
144.9
145.8
114.2
128.5

80.0
86.8

95.4

86.0
92.4

96.6

93.0
92.7

97.1

85.2 85.9
90.1 89.2

97.2

96.8

98.6 101.4 100.0 98.6 97.8
96.0 96.8 96.1 95.1 95.7
103.2 102.2 101.3 102.4 103.4
98.0 97.4 96.8 96.8 97.4
194.3
96.3
110.0
141.8
156.9
114.4
116.4

195.1
96.3
113.0
163.3
167.4
118.8
129.0

180.6
100.0
105.0
170.0
153.0
127.1
112.2

180.5
102.0
107.0
168.2
172.0
123.9
101.4

159.0
97.0
111.0
176. 4
174.0
109.0
104.6

88.4 104.8 102.2 107.8 102.7 112.6 109.1
135.4
124.8
80.2
110.7
180.3
229.0
96.2

128.7
124.8
89.9
110.8
189.3
275.0
127.1

130.6
127.6
90.5
109.6
188.3
280.3
80.3

132.4
136.4
92.6
108.0
184.9
283.7
85.7

131.3
139.2
94.9
107.6
183.7
285.8
83.2

129.3 135. 1
139.2 • 139> 2
t
96.5 94.4
106.7 105.4
184.4 192.1
290.3 297.8
97.2 74.0

MID-YEAR STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY: 1925-1929
The following table contains a review of production
and distribution by principal industries and branches
of commerce for the first half of 1929, with comparisons

since 1925. A similar presentation for the entire year
1928, with comparisons since 1924, was given in the
February, 1929, issue of the Survey.

VOLUME OF PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION IN 1929, JANUARY-JUNE, INCLUSIVE
ITEM

1925

1326

1927

192S

1929

34, 342

38, 746

40, 974

47, 547

43, 247

2,734

2,718

2,665

2,278

2,582

108, 048

121, 153

135, 708

152, 890

169, 472

676, 395

759, 784

829, 166

742, 369

847, 078

949, 616
10, 422
113, 488

990, 015 1, 067, 542 1, 051, 888 1, 123, 743
11, 162
10, 170
10, 842
10,306
120, 839 138, 898 143, 322 157, 220

ITEM

FOODSTUFFS
Corn grindings (bu.—000 omitted)..
Sugar meltings (long tons—000
omitted)
Oleomargarine production (Ibs.—000
omitted)
Butter production (Ibs.—000 omitted)___ „ _ ,
Condensed and evaporated milk
production (Ibs.—000 omitted)
Egg receipts (cases—000 omitted)
Fish catch (Ibs. —000 omitted) .
Meat production, inspected slaughter (Ibs.—000,000 omitted):
Beef products^ _
Pork products
Lamb and mutton products
Cottonseed-oil production (Ibs. —
000,000 omitted)
Wheat-flour production (bbls —
000 000 omitted)

2,570
3,948
233

2, 754
3,845
248

2,602
4,151
241

2,327
4,808
249

2,271
4,374
258

631

734

848

529

665

56

56

58

60

263, 412
3,345
240

240, 449
3,398
237

279, 904
3,794
275

264, 254
3,353
289

292, 716
3, 770
303

2,574

2,501

2,919

1,811

2,697

160, 450

154, 307

165, 074

168, 4.78

7,308

6,677

6,386

6,770

23,219

21, 375

22, 824

21, 001

21,555

13, 124

13,355

29,812
19, 847
24, 154
1,775
40

28, 352
19, 431
23,807
1,825
37

27, 902
18, 521
24, 797
2,002
38

319, 300
433, 198

317, 425
426, 988

316, 077
422, 893

1,433

1,395

1,571

575

537

509

249

265

260

151

135

214

619
53, 468

901
46, 450

570
28, 388

314
20, 172

319
27, 051

1929

407
2,660

434
2,990

411
3,073

484
3,318

411
2,919

2,882
3,205
268
530
840
321
90
267
296
76
248
51

2,724
3,302
273
677
853
297
101
271
245
62
272
56

2,549
2,959
224
467
756
299
107
228
244
60
229
55

2,570
2,918
250
525
745
314
98
224
235
46
252
45

2,384
231
515
90
217
217
35
209
38

4,153

4,076

4,355

3,910

4,854

72, 842
70, 086

71, 824
71, 105

75, 058
74, 775

77, 071
73, 953

75, 048
70, 238

632
745
773

618
717
709

584
646
670

595
686
702

496
587
590

1,866
216

2,070
235

1,803
266

1,963
239

2,772
451

23, 401
399
30, 284

23, 161
319
29,674

26,341
338
28, 464

28, 695
258
30,292

33,365
217
32, 270

102
96
113

113
103
139

113
114
161

124
124
205

161
135
230

13
600

14
644

14
623

16
595

16
623

1G6

179

185

188

190

2,363
2,064

2,207
2,303

2,367
2,124

2,378
2,086

2,627
2,286

147
103.5
152
166

141
101.2
162
169

127
94.7
156
165

140
97.1
153
162

136
96.7
154
160

218
1, 626

279
1,982

416
1,701

538
3,335

89. 55
160. 83
79.88

108. 96
194. 37
82.78

119. 94
253. 60
85.61

130. 87
357. 32
80.32

AUTOMOBILES AND TIRES

ted):
Passenger cars
Trucks
.
Rubber ties, production (000 omitted):
Pneumatic tires
Solid tires and cushions
Inner tubes

43, 969
234, 886

36, 254
267, 506

40, 897
276, 629

37, 103
234, 289

36, 869
253, 034

25, 054

28, 632

26, 532

25, 941

29,934

370
125
30
15
175

359
143
31
16
174

438
161
28
15
193

436
175
30
205
17

488
207
28
222
17

PRICE INDEX NUMBERS
Farm prices (rel. to 1909-1914)
Wholesale price (rel. to 1926)
Retail food prices (rel. to 1913)
Cost of living (rel. to July, 1914)
BANKING AND FINANCE

31, 633
11,373
20, 260

35, 547
13, 148
22, 399

39,411
15, 205
24, 206

42, 335
17, 380
24, 955

47, 3G2
18, 126
29, 266

PAPER



Contracts awarded (36 States — .
000, 000 omitted):
Total floor space (sq. ft.)
Total value (dolls.) _.
Lumber production (board feet—
000,000 omitted):
Southern pine
.
.
.
Douglas fir __
.
California redwood
California white pine_.
Western pine
North Carolina pine
. .__
Northern hemlock
Northern hardwoods
Northern pine lumber
Northern pine lath
Oak flooring .
_.
Maple flooring
Brick production (000 omitted) :
Face brick (average per firm)__.
Cement (bbls.— 000 omitted) :
Production
Shipments
'._
Sanitary enamel ware shipments
(pieces—000 omitted) :
Baths
Lavatories
Sinks

32,553 i
DISTRIBUTION
21, 621
28,966 Sales:
2,189
2 mail-order houses (rel. to 19231925)
48 |
5 ten-cent chains
34 grocery chains
317,898 !!
535,893 Advertising, agate lines (000,000
omitted):
Magazine
Newspaper, 22 cities
1,937
Postal receipts (dollars—000,000
723
omitted)
Foreign trade of United States (dol284
lars—000,000 omitted):
E xports _ _
Imports
_318

PRODUCTION OF FUEL AND
POWER

Production (short tons—000 omitted):
Newsprint
Book paper
Wrapping paper.
__
 Wood pulp

1928

1927

7,171 | Automobile production (000 omit-

RAILWAY EQUIPMENT

Coal (short tons—000 omitted):
Anthracite
Bituminous
Coke (short tons—000 omitted):
Total
Petroleum products (000,000 omitted):
Crude petroleum (bbls.—42
gal.)
Gasoline (bbls. —42 gal.)
Kerosene (bbls. — 42gal.)-__
Lubricants (bbls.—42 gal.)
Gas and fuel oil (42 gal.) _ _
Electrical energy, central stations
(kw. .hours—000,000 omitted):
TotalBy water power
By fuels

i

172,304 !

METALS AND EQUIPMENT
Production (000 omitted):
. Iron ore consumption (tons)
28,765
Pig iron (long tons)
19,011
Steel ingots (long tons)
22, 383
Steel sheets (short tons)
1,698
Tin (consumption—long tons) . _
39
Production (short tons) :
Zine _
_293, 192
Copper
_. 429,792
New orders:
Structural steel (short tons—
000 omitted)
1,378
Steel castings (short tons—000
omitted)
500
Fabricated steel plate (short
tons—000 omitted)
178
Machine tool orders (index
number)
130

Locomotive shipments (number)
Freight-car shipments (number)

1926

BUILDING AND BUILDING
MATERIALS

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING
Consumption (000 omitted) :
Wool (pounds)
Cotton (bales)
Silk (bales)
Production (000 omitted) :
Fine cotton goods (pieces)
Boots and Shoes (pairs—000
omitted)___
__ _
Knit underwear (dozen garments —000 omitted)
Hosiery (dozen pairs—000 omitted)
Men's and boys' suits (dozen—
000 omitted)

1925

763
649
539
2,197

844
G80
531
2,315

775
680
543
2,215

719
761
571
2,157

698
553
2,277

Securities'.
Sales (000,000 omitted)—
Stocks (shares)
202
Bonds, total (dolls.)
1,868
Prices monthly average (dolls.)—
25 railroad stocks
__
79.22
25 industrials
138. 83
77.04
40 bonds
Banking and insurance (dollars—
000,000 omitted):
Life insurance, new business _ . _
5,133
Check pavments (debits) —•
Outside New York City
124, 737
New York City
154, 042
Interest rates, average (per
cent)—
New York call loans, new_ .
3.76
Prime commercial paper 4-6
mo
3.84
Business failures:
Liabilities
(dollars—000,000
omitted)
239
Firms (number).
_.
11,241,

5,668

5,819

6,241

6, 541

133, 517
172, 424

138, 530
189, 474

151, 223
247, 913

160, 518
297, 718

4.2C

4.21

5.01

8.12

4.22

4.17

4.32

5.79

210
11,476

282
12, 296

251
12, 828

232
12, 172

MID-YEAR STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY: 1925-1929—Continued
STOCKS OF COMMODITIES HELD AT * MID-YEAR INVENTORY PERIODS
1926

1929

1928

1927

Unit

COMMODITY

June

May

June

May

May

May

June

June

FOODSTUFFS AND TOBACCO
Thous. of Ibs
Thous. of Ibs.
Thous. of Ibs
Long tons
Thous. of Ibs
Short tons
Thous. of bush
Thous. of bbls
Thous. of bush_
Thous of bush
Thous. of bush.
Thous. of bush
Thous. of Ibs
Thous. of Ibs
Thous. of Ibs
Thous. of lbs._
_ _ _ Thous. of lbs._Thous. of cases
Thous. of lbs_
Thous. of Ibs
Thous. of bags
_ _ _ Thous. of pockets
Thous. of Ibs

Beef products
Pork products
Lamb and mutton
Sugar (raw at refineries)
Cottonseed oil
Cottonseed cake and meal
Wheat (visible, United States)
Wheat flour
Corn (visible, United States)
Oats (visible United States)
Barley (visible)
Rye (visible)
.
Lard
Butter
Cheese all varieties
Cheese American
Eggs, frozen
_
Eggs case
Poultry
Fish
.
Coffee (visible, United States)
Rice (domestic) _
Tobacco

52, 579
681, 296
1,697
519. 595
29, 437
285, 307
20, 125
6,400
27, 469
39, 995
2,393
9,984
106, 824
30, 561
52, 167
39, 346
34, 815
7,236
42, 808
21,540
583
1, 179, 488
i 2, 040, 067

50, 413
48, 688
722, 703
899, 826
1,871
1,210
541, 467
370, 898
15, 142
73, 029
229, 855
149, 467
30,002
13, 273
6,500
6,300
31, 528
32, 279
38, 768
22, 350
2,835
947
10, 748
2,213
120, 527
111,976
86, 897
25, 4G4
50,864
€8, 771
54,069
35, 826
45, 688
71,605
9,133
8,962
36, 730
61, 525
29, 782
31, 345
647
743
975, 043 1, 400, 980
1, 868, 296 1 2, 081, 695

43, 756
37, 212
991, 593
1, 105, 439
1,360
1,276
361, 915
701, 624
33, 985
47, 207
101, 748
59, 552
23,544=
50, 381
6,300
6,250
27, 554
36, 239
7,319
18, 110
1,435
1,143
1,696
947
186,073
147,318
15, 952
89,996
48,990
67, 216
36, 716
49, 999
67,941
81,263
8,168
10, 565
43, 872
50,065
36,696
26, 513
775
788
1, 455, 366
1, 181, 230
1, 841, 078 i 1, 998, 145

57, 315
32, 238
1, 129, 839
870, 785
2,461
1,947
682, 591
911, 055
34, 559
51,284
45, 241
191, 983
97, 962
40, 480
6,200
7,600
17, 451
15, 571
3,392
10,063
6,022
711
1,465
6,325
214, 479
183, 490
28, 369
69,750
68, 613
61,097
47,641
53, 646
77, 744
71,560
10,002
6,705
38, 230
41,643
40, 946
30, 119
861
683
1, 067, 092
1, 311, 568
1, 731, 635 i 1, 933, 940

51, 975
844, 948
3,044
875, 942
30, 079
142, 014
94, 060
13, 932
8,114
ft, 731
6,422
200, 104
91,911
79, 725
62, 739
84,763
8,499
41, 995
40, 451
700
865, 117
1

CLOTHING MATERIALS

METALS
Iron ore
Steel sheets
Steel barrels
Zinc
Tin (United States)

1331,324
4,414
31, 143
6,128
1,379
281, 354

397, 446
3,679
29,111
6,397
1,484
293, 615

l 291, 657
4,659
35,527
7,914
1,527
230, 924

385, 615
3,776
37, 024
8,141
1,623
226, 274

l 261, 749
3,590
42,088
9,030
1,709
241,264

385,407
2,808
41, 127
9,011
1,761
244, 746

1279,211
3,325
39, 898
8,394
1,679
246, 330

343,837
2,665
47, 425
8,413
1,737
250, 025

Thous. of long tons
Short tons
_.
Barrels
-. Short tons _ _
Long tons

Wool, grease equivalent (mills and dealers)
Cotton (mills and warehouses)
Silk (warehouses)
Hosiery
Knit underwear
_
Hides and skins

17, 387
178, 539
44, 021
29, 934
1,739

21, 512
176, 428
46, 751
25, 760
2,409

22, 971
173, 986
62, 435
42, 040
1,604

26, 973
168, 155
52, 094
43, 858
1,519

18, 877
166, 711
58, 585
45,225
3,708

22,981
151, 606
53, 868
44, 468
2,148

19, 146
167, 869
56, 936
33, 826
3,464

23, 701
163, 607
52, 222
36, 932
3,820

M feet b. m
M feetb. m
M feet b. m
M feet log measure
M feet b. m
M feetb. m
Tons
__.
Thous. of bbls _
Thousands
Number
Number
Number
. Barrels
Barrels .

1, 102, 498
521, 237
16, 974
2,151
60, 282
31,689
4,269
21, 255
2,082
164, 614
249, 171
307, 405
26, 719
85, 026

1, 0%, 086
605, 169
16, 992
2,961
59, 737
30,290
3,054
19,000
2,028
158, 897
248, 959
294, 587
36, 532
112, 514

1, 218, 391
482, 405
10, 915
2,882
51,430
25, 055
2,806
23, 503
2,507
158, 014
243, 959
303, 586
47, 264
153, 445

1, 208, 417
551, 687
11, 063
3,083
58, 276
25,061
3,181
20,972
2,625
139. 463
219, 007
267, 871
52, 340
165, 991

1, 101, 740
473, 560
13,264
3,009
75, 948
27, 514
2,366
25, 984
2,517
135, 793
183, 173
239, 678
46, 741
128, 789

1, 090, 126
477, 079
13, 530
2,752
71, 425
26, 271
2,153
25,029
2,495
120, 723
173, 898
227, 929
61, 336
165, 604

985, 877
442, 929
11, 970
1,897
74, 013
22. 230
2,138
29, 597
3,443
197, 472
257, 245
313, 022
53, 536
120, 665

985, 538
463, 175
12, 960
2,253
72, 147
20,964
3,077
27, 433
3,304
181, 677
246, 575
298, 739
57, 728
123, 505

9,271
214
18, 207
234, 037
39, 274

8,989
215
18, 852
241, 754
42, 132

9,370
178
24, 233
243, 762
39, 120

9,369
186
26, 549
238, 231
39, 086

9,794
156
37, 207
186, 377
42, 120

9,150
156
39, 979
184, 682
45, 870

13, 386
135
25, 778
178, 963
' 34, 112

13,468
133
24, 602
185, 209
35, 132

Thous. of lbs_
Thous. of bales
Bales
Thous. of doz. pairs
Thous. of dozens
Thous. of Ibs

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
Yellow pine
California white pine
Walnut lumber
Walnut logs
Oak flooring
Maple flooring
Roofing felt
Cement
Face brick
Baths (enamel)
Lavatories (enamel)
Sinks (enamel)
Turpentine (3 ports)
Rosin (3 ports)

__

_

RUBBER AND PAPER
T housands
Thousands
Short tons
Short tons
Short tons

Pneumatic tires
Solid tires and cushions
Newsprint (at mills)
Wood pulp, mechanical
Wood pulp, chemical
1

Quarter ending Sept. 30.

__

UNFILLED ORDERS FOR SPECIFIED COMMODITIES
JUNE 30—

Unit

COMMODITY

1926

Hosiery
Knit underwear
Cotton
finishing.
__
Pyroxylin coated textiles
Sheets, blue, black, and galvanized...
Steel (U S Steel Corporation)
Locomotives
_ . ..
Oak
flooring
_
Maple flooring
Baths (enamel)
Small ware (enamel)
Face brick
Common brick—
_
Freight cars
Ships
Furniture
Boxboard
Illuminating glassware




__

Thous. of doz. pairs
Thous. of dozens
__ Days
Thous. of linear yds
Short tons
Thous of long tons
Number
M feet b. m
_
M feet b. m
Number.. _
._ Number
Thousands
ThousandsNumber
Thous. of gross tons
No. of days' supply.
Short tons
No. of weeks' supply

6,229
2,391
4.2
2,374
422, 237
3,479
667
41, 744
9,317
80, 050
172, 026
1,130
220, 078
34, 874
199
60
109, 559
2.5

1927

1928

6,342
2,614
5.5
2,671
399, 562
3,053
400
37,983
11, 634
45, 479
115, 375
1,113
254, 191
21, 956
219
53
94, 847
1.3

4,900
2,053
3.6
4,227
526, 798
3,637
201
49,002
10,500
121, 061
315, 920
950
260, 970
12, 446
264
46
77, 782
1.3

1929

4 841
2,342
5.1
2,910
676, 568
4,257
552
50, 832
10, 600
41, 644
154, 243
1,169
163, 126
39, 173
170
58
81, 910
1.6

Percentage
change
June 30,
1929, from
June 30,
1928
— 1.2
+14.1
+41.7
—31.2
+28.4
+17.0
+174. 1
+3.7
+1.0
-65.6
—51.2
+23.1
—37.5
+214. 7
-35.6
+26.1"
+5.3
+23.1

DEC EMBER 31-

1926

1927

1928

5 100
1,562
5.0
2,523
529, 940
3,961
398
35, 995
9 706
49, 804
127, 104
673
311, 979
18, 481
314
42
86, 562
1.0

5,395
1,912
3.9
2,979
745, 393
3,973
232
27, 887
8,508
33, 160
104, 774
730
224, 825
12, 431
204
29
74, 729
1.0

4,403
1,508
5.6
3,543
592, 094
3.977
282
30, 956
7,988
39, 182
118, 100
892
182, 791
12, 671
94
m
39
94,174
1.0

6
MEASURES OF INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL

ACTIVITY

[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925 taken as 100]

NEW BUILDING CONTRACTS AND AUTOMOBILE PRODUCTION.

JOTAL AUTOMOBILE PRODUCTION
(UNITED STATES)

MINERAL PRODUCTION AND RAILROAD TON-MILEAGE

160

50

FACTORY EMPLOYMENT, MANUFACTURING. AND ELECTRIC

POWER

PRODUCTION

200

-ELECTRIC POWER PRODUCTION

401.. I . i I , . 1 i i I . . 1 i . 1 . i I i i I . . I. . I . . I . . I . . I i i I i , I i i I i . 1 i i I i i I . i I. . I . i I i , I i . I . i I i i I . i I . . I i i I . i I i . I i . Ii . ! . . I . i I . i I i . I . . I . . I .

CHECK PAYMENTS AND RETAIL TRADE

250

CHECK PAYMENTS (141 CENTERS)

50

1920




1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

WEEKLY BUSINESS INDICATORS1
[All data, except Fisher's index (1926=100), are relative to the weekly average for 1923-1925 as 100]

1
00

1928
May 5

1

I

1

f!

53 «

•8
3

•§

i

a

d

t».S
4>

in

1 £

•a

«

1
d
1
fl

"o

8
o*
F*
M*

1

d
1
A

5

il
C5tjo

1
1

1
1
1
fa
1

=

H

1

•g

•a

sin ess
lilures

S
d

BANKING AND FINANCE
e-money
rates

biive coke

[ miiious
coal

WEEK
ENDING
SAT.2—

RECEIPTS

WHOLESALE PRICES

[-money
rates

TRADE

PRODUCTION

!I r

112.0
112.0
111.0
108.0

83.9
86.1
84.0
85.9

37.6
35.5
32.7
33.5

118.4
113.1
112.3
112.9

140.3
148.8
153.2
154.7

143.3
132.9
140.6
129.9

102.2
104.5
104.7
106.5

99.8
99.6
99.6
98.8

131.0
127.1
117.1
118.6

78.7
81.3
79.8
77.6

85.9
85.9
85.8
85.8

101. 4
102.2
103.6
104.3

61.2
84.4
93.8
60.8

127.3
136.4
136.4
145.5

114.3
114.3
120.0
125.7

201.8
204.8
203.6
199.7

110.5
110.5
110.4
109.8

125.8
127.0
108.6
104.7

June 2 104.0
9 104.0
16 100.0
23 96.0
30 95.0

75.7
86.3
85.6
86.1
86.6

29.8
29.8
27.8
27.3
28.2

113.
113.
113.
114.
114.

144.0
168.7
143.3
159. 3
175.9

105.0
144.3
133.0
141.2
119.0

97.4
103.9
104.6
102.9
114.6

98.0
97.6
97.8
97.9
98.4

120. 2
117.1
115.5
115. 5
112.4

77.6
77.6
77.9
80.1
83.8

85.8
85.7
85.7
85.0
84.7

105.1
105.1
105.1
105.1
105.1

54.4 37.3 73.1 92.6 127.2 88.9 145.5
48.8 24.2 81.6 101.8 126.8 88.6 145.5
39.1 34.2 76.6 85.7 127.0 87.2 139.4
36.3 23.5 72.8 83.0 126.3 89.0 148.5
53.5 26.5 76.6 76.7 126.0 88.6 166.7

128.6
128.6
131.4
134.3
137.1

201.2
197.8
190.1
186.9
191.8

109.6
108.9
108.4
108.4
108.4

81 5
119.9
108.4
109.8
103.9

7
14
21
28

95.0
93.0
91.0
93.0

70.1
88. 3
88.7
92.0

24.5
28.6
25.3
24.1

114.
114.
115.
114.

152.1
128.8
116.2
198.0

133.6
130.3
128.4
112.1

88.7
106.9
107.8
107.8

98.8 105. 4
99.3 99.2
99.9 97.7
99.9 91.5

84.2
80.9
77.9
77.6

84.4
84.2
84.3
84.5

105.1 93.2
105.1 179.2
105.1 235. 8
105.1 290.5

24.6 61.4
30.4 87.7
9.6 113.0
10.0 73.7

66.6
77.7
69.2
59.5

128.7
126.7
126.0
125.6

84.4
87.6
89.7
90.2

157.6
160.6
136.4
133.3

137.1
137.1
137.1
137.1

195.4
192.0
191.4
194.3

108.6
108.1
107.4
108.3

87.7
114.5
104.7
87.5

Aug. 4

11
18
25

95.0
95.0
99.0
99.0

89.9
92.4
91.9
95.2

24.5
24.1
27.8
27.8

115.
114.
117.
118.

124.3
122.2
128.5
115.5

118.9
112.7
117.4
114.2

109.4
108.9
110.2
112.7

99.7
99.4
100.1
99.9

73.2
71.0
70.2
70.2

84.4
84.3
84.3
84.6

105.1
105.1
105. 1
105.1

313.0
254.0
233.6
201.0

5.0
16.9
20.8
42.3

74.4
81.0
92.4
94.9

64.3
58.4
55.8
57.5

126.9
126.4
125.9
125.6

88.5
89.7
89.9
89.8

160.6
160.6
154.5
166.7

137.1
142.9
148.6
148.6

195.0
194.3
195.5
201.4

107.0 104.2
106.9 115.5
106.9 99.3
109.2 92.6

Sept. 1
8
15
22
29

99.0
101.0
101.0
105.0
112.0

96.8
91.7
104.6
102.8
113.4

26.1
29.8
29.8
31.0
32.7

120.
119.
120.
120.
120.

109.4
96.7
123.9
199.6
162.7

105.2
111.0
125.9
142.8
126.2

116.5
103.4
118.7
119.2
124.8

100.0 82.2 70.2 84.8 105.1 195.4
99.7 82.2 71.3 84.8 105.1 189.2
100.3 81.4 65.4 84.9 106.5 222.4
99.8 82.9 68.0 85.1 108.0 231.1
99.3 85.3 71.0 85.2 108.7 249.1

71.5
122.3
137.3
202.7
256.5

97.2
95.9
120.3
140.5
121.8

55.5
53.0
58.7
61.3
72.3

125.9
126. 8
126.5
127.0
126.5

89.7
88.5
87.7
86.3
88.4

178.8
181.8
178.8
187.9
163.6

148.6
148.6
160.0
165.7
168.6

206.4
209.1
209.9
211.1
210.4

107.3 95.6
107.7 78.9
107.8 99.5
107.9 107.4
107.9 98.3

Oct.

6

113.2
115.8
115.8
113.2

113.3
115.7
111.1
115.4

33.5
37.1
40.4
40.8

121.
120.
120.
121.

180.6
130.6
134.1
144.8

150.3
129.1
137.6
135.3

123.8
124.1
121.2
121.2

99.2
99.4
98.9
98.4

85.3
86.0
84.5
82.9

70.2
72.1
73.9
71.3

85.3
85.6
85.9
86.1

108.7
108.7
108.7
110.1

279.1
231.0
286.4
188.7

303.8
293.1
360.4
308.1

121.8
102.5
124.7
127.2

56.1
68.3
76.4
86.1

127.6
127.3
127.6
127.6

89.5
87.2
86.8
87.7

178.8
157.6
166.7
160.6

165.7
165.7
155.3
160.0

209.4
210.8
216.7
217.1

107.8
107.8
107.9
107.9

105.4
86.0
119.4
122.1

Nov. 3

114.5
113.2
109.2
106.6

114.3
108.2
112.1
112.7

39.6
42.9
40.4
38.0

119.9 122.4 131.0 115.1 97.9
119.9 104.0 127.4 109.9 97.6
119.6 85.1 128.2 110.5 97.7
120.3 113.4 151.6 107.3 97.3

86.8
85.3
87.6
88.4

71.3
71.7
72.4
75.4

86.3
86.
86.
87.

113.0
114.5
114.5
114.5

154.4
116.8
109.0
139.1

295.0 108.5 71.6 128.6 86.7
217.3 88.6 73.8 128.8 89.9
245.4 113.6 96.1 128.1 87.0
264.6 104.7 101.5 129.1 88.

181.8
154.5
151.5
157.6

160.0
160.0
160.0
160.0

216.7
220.8
225. 1
230.7

108.1
108.3
108.3
108.1

103.2
89.2
108.1
117.0

181.8
218.2
190.9
178.8
251.5

160.0
168.6
177.1
188.6
191.4

233.9
225.0
219.7
222.2
231.5

108.0
107.6
107.3
107.2
107.3

102.5
110.1
123.3
120.6
88.2

79.
85.
86.
89.4

200.0
154.5
169.7
145.5

182.9
174.3
177.1
177.1

240.5
238.7
240.0
245.8

107.4
107.4
107.
107.

116.2
156.0
143.2
128.0

69.9 95.8 129.1 89.5
63.3 113.4 130. 1 89.4
63.6 114.8 129.9 90.1
59.8 93.5 129.5 91.4

160.6
163.6
169.7
169.7

177.1
171.4
177.1
177.1

252. 6
250.4
244.9
244.9

107.
106.
106.
106.

132.9
135.1
117.0
101.0

Mar. 2 118.4 114.5 50.2 129.8 124.5 124.8 101.9 98.4 91.5 76.1 87.9 139.1 105.9 80.0 63.3 94.1 130.9 90.2 187.9 177.1 253.5 106.

Apr. 6 126.3 78.4 40.0 127.6 165.0 154.5 99. / 97.9 85.3 76.1 88.

12
19
26

July

13
20
27
10
17
24

88.4
81.4
81.4
80.6

Dec. 1 109.2 101.6 35.1 120.3 171.2 133.4 93.8 97.3 88.4 76.1 87.
8 110.5 115.0 38.8 121.0 106.0 135.9 102.7 97.1 87.6 75.0 87.
15 107.9 113.2 38.0 132.3 101.6 140.9 100.6 96.8 86.0 75.4 87.

22
19

105.3 113.4 35.9 122.5 105.5 150.6
107.9 70.7 34.3 123.9 116.7 119.

1939
Jan. 5 110.5 101.1 38.8 124.4 64.4 164.
12
19
26

110.5 119.7 43.3 124.5 93.4 154.
109.2 119.9 46.9 126.9 109.6 141.
110.5 120.8 44.5 127.8 110.6 137.

Feb. 2 111.8 119.8 42.9 128.7 96.4 128.

9 113.2 124.1 41.2 129.3 79.8 145.
16 114. 5 122.5 44.9 128.4 85.1 119.
23 117.1 120.6 45.7 129.3 93.1 145.
9 122.4
16 123. 7
23 125.0
30 125.0

105. 3
98.4
86.3
81.5

51.0
51.8
51.0
47.3

93.7 96.9
69.6 97.2
83.3
95.3
97.2
96.6

97.0 83.7 73.5 87.
97.1 83.7 74.6 87.
97.2 88.4 75.0 87.
97.8 92.2 73.9 87.6

98.8
99.7
99.9
94.6

97.7
97.1
97.6
98.0

128.0 93.2 157.8 98.6
126.0 127.9 130.6 99.9
127.5 110.0 149.2 100.2
126.1 134.2 133.8 100.9

90.7
90.7
91.5
93.0

73.9
73.9
74.3
74.6

87.6
87.6
87.6
87.6

126.3
126.3
128.9

84.6 42.91 125.5 195.1 128.2 101.4 97.3
88.8 45.7 128.3 122.2 140. 7 104.7 96.7
93.6 46.1 127.3 141.2 125.6 109.7 96.7

4

132.9
127.6
128.9
126.3

90.1
93.8
91.7
94.0

94.9
79.4
78.8
76.6

77.0
79.7
81.2
94.6

127.6
127.2
127.5
126.8

90.6
90.5
89.9
90.3

114.5 140.9 274.6
114.5 103.0 266.2
114.5 112.2 225.0
114.5 98.6 197.7
117.4 68.6 200.0

67.7 73.8 130.1 84.
93.4 123.6 131.0 83.
94.0 117.9 130.3 82.
63.9 118.5 130.8 83.
40.2 80.3 131.1 79.

119.6
119.6
120.3
121.7

56.5 140.8
56.7 118.5
52.9 87.7
71.9 95.4

65.8
77.2
89.2
67.7

123.9
129.0
129.0
129.0

82.6
81.8
75.9
79.0

98.2 90.7 79.8 87.9 139.9
98.2 92.2 79.4 87.9 152.9
98.3 90.7 77.6 87.9 171.0
98.3 86.8 77.2 87.9 172.5

13

20
27

86.0 75.0 87.
85.3 75.7 87.

65.4
66.2
50.8
38.5

93.5
80.0
68.8
76.2

106.9
120.6
130. 7
111.6

135.7
130.9
129.3
128.5

82.8
79.7
76.3
67.3

68.5
84.2
81.5
71.9

64.6 83.7 131.4 89.9 218.2
69.3 63.6 131.5 91.2 178.8
78.5 92.8 132.4 92.5 206.1
76.6 79.5 132.5 92.0 309.1

177.1
180.0
182.9
194.3

250.3
250.7
252.9
246.2

106.
105.
105.
105.

131.9
120.4
113.0
107.6
125.8

88.4 76.1 88.
87.6 74.6 88.
82.9 72.8 89.

156.5
133.3
129.0
129.0

61.2
51.8
44.7
46.1

61.2
54.2
52.3
50.0

66.8
72.2
83.9
86.4

76.3
73.5
82.1
82.4

132.7
131.7
131.5
131.1

92.3
95.2
94.6
95.9

233.3
197.0
190.9
200.0

202.9
205.7
200.0
194.3

247.4
246.9
249.1
253.2

105.
105.
105.
106.

114.5
]i6.7
119.9
110.3

49.4
51.0
54.7
56.7

126.3
126.0
126.9
129.1

122.9
125.8
131.7
108.6

109.5
109.3
109.
110.

96.7
95.7
95.9
95.9

82.9
80.6
79.8
77.5

72.8
72.1
72.4
71.7

89.
89.
89.
89.

129.0
129.0
129.0
129.0

48.3
50. 81
51.3
52.4

34.6
33. 5
27.7
30.4

88.6
79.7
76.3
71.2

85.7
70.9
76.1
85. 7'

131.6
130.1
130.4
129.5

94.6
95.9
96.9
97.9

269.7
290.9
218.2
157.6

197.1
202.9
205.7
211.4

257.2
257.6
256.4
249.8

106.
105.
105.
104.

103.4
105.2
116.7
100.7

June 1
8
15
22
29

125.0 86.6 58.0
125.0 93.9 59.2
126.3 95.5 59.6
126.3 93.1 58.4
125.0 97.2 59.2

130.2
130.8
131.7
132.7
135.1

182.6 127.1 101.4
117. 4 132.3 110.0
149.1 127.9 111.
127 A 142.6 111.
149.0 125.3 114.3

95.6
95.8
96.6
97.6
97.7

72.9
76.0
79.1
79.1
84.5

68.0
69.9
69.5
68.0
68.0

89.
89.
89.
89.3
89.0

129.0
129.0
129.0
129.0
129.0

57.4
68.6
70.3
78.9
94.5

30.8
25.0
31.2
36.2
36.5

63.0
71.5
68.7
74.1
72.5

77.0
89.7
87.2
76.7
81. 7

129.6
130.7
130.9
132.4
133.4

96.1
96.0
97.0
97.8
97.2

145.5
169.7
187.9
169.7
212.1

205.7
194.3
188.6
185.7
217. 1

241.8
250.9
253.4
261.2
268.2

104.
104.
104.
104.
104.

91.9
103.9
104.7
104.9
104.4

July 6
13
20
27

123.7
122.4
125.0
126.3

137.2
138.8
138.9
139.1

175.3
145.9
158.1
156.0

166.0 94.8 98.2 87.6
121.6 111.0 98.1 90.7
143.6 112.5 98.8 100.7
138.0 114.8 99.2 100. C

67.6
67.6
70.6
68.8

88.8
88.7
88.7
88. e

129.0
129.0
129.0
129.0)
ll

143.4
207.5
229.1
374.9
1

28.8 53.2
33.1 75.3
20.3 75.0
22.7 83.2

74.6
84.3
76.4
75.7

135.4
135.3
135. 2
135.8

94.1
94.2
95.2
96.4

242.4
209.1
230.3
206.1

171.4
171. 4
180.0
182. 9

280.7
284.5
289.9
289.1

83.1
104.
104. 108.1
92.4
104.
104.1 98.3

May

11
18
25

76.1
96.8
94.4
99. 3|
1

55.9
53.9
55.1
55.5

136.0
134. 6
134.2
135.6

1 Sources of data are as follows: Bituminous coal and beehive coke production from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines,' Petroleum production (crude)
from American Petroleum Institute," Loadings of freight cars from American Railway Association; Building contracts from F. W. Dodge Corporation; Receipts of wheat from
Bradstreet's; Receipts of cattle and hogs from 17. S. Department of A griculture. Bureau of Agricultural Economics; Receipts of cotton from New Orleans Cotton Exchange;
Wholesale prices (Fisher's index), based on 1923-24 as 100, from Professor Irving Fisher; Price of cotton, middling, from New York Cotton Exchange; Price of iron and
steel, composite, from Iron Trade Review: Price of wheat, No. 2, hard winter, Kansas City, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics; Loans
and discounts of member banks and debits to individual accounts from Federal Reserve Board; Call-money and Time-money rates, and Bond prices from Wall Street
Journal; Stock prices from Annalist; Business failures from R. G. Dun & Co.
2
The actual week for all items does not always end on the same day.




INDEXES OF MARKET VALUES OF COMMON STOCKS1
(1936=100)

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

MONTH
30 Textile
January
February
March
April

May
June
July -.
August

_

September _
October
November .
December
Monthly average

334.6
284.0
293.0
314.9

174.8
172.0
166.7
173.3

174.3
178.2
183.8
191.3

208.4
222.5
226.0
212.7

171.6
163.6
157.4
142.6

131.5
120.5
105.6
102.4

112.1
108.4
102.2
94.1

103.0
105.4
1Q8.1
106.5

134.9
132.6
132.9
138.2

143.7
138.3
136.2
131.5

207.5
267.9
289.2
262.7

283.9
264.5
251.8
224.9

180.7
165.3
157.9
150.9

194.7
188.2
182.4
186.6

197.0
184.6
174.2
177.8

135.2
140.5
146.3
150.5

101.8
100.7
106.4
104.8

90.2
92.2
94.2
97.5

110.7
111.0
114.7
117.5

138.7
126.3
120.3
120.5

127.0
122.4
120.3

145.9
142.2
146.4
153.5

270.2
296.1
286.3
302.0

223.8
205.9
174.1
162.3

167.6
166.2
171.5
173.1

198.7
205.0
205.5
208.0

183.0
164.7
166.3
166.3

126.8
121.2
126.7
134.6

109.9
115.2
124.2
119.5

102.2
100.5
101.2
103.9

123.3
122.8
125.4
130.9

125.9
131.6
142.5
139.9

145.3

__.

143.2
147.7
159.4
172.7

146.6
145.0
149.6
149.5

_.

_._.

131.6
145.3
145.0
143.5

233.7

251.5

168.3

191.4

190.3

143.1

111.9

100.0

114.9

132.0

7 Motion Pictures and Amusements
85.8
74.7
80.1
83.8

September _ _ _
October
November
December

_

Monthly average _

60.7
63.3
63.0
60.9

54.1
52.1
52.5
52.9

74.6
73.8
76,0
80.6

98.9
96.2
91.3
90.0

106.2
108.0
110.3
105.9

109.4
106.1
108.0
111.3

150.6
149.3
146.2
135.8

60.2
47.8
41.9
41.8

57.3
54.6
54.3
59.5

56.6
53.2
50.8
50.8

52.7
53.6
57.1
58.3

84.3
84.3
86.1
92.1

93.7
97.1
100.9
103.9

105.1
101.5
96.1
99.4

115.6
111.5
111.0
116.6

140.1
133.4
139.0

46.1
46.0
48.8
48.7

68.9
70.3
63.7
62.4

52.7
52.3
51.8
54.9

58.2
59.3
63.9
73.4

94.2
97.7
100.9
98.4

107.0
106.3
107.0
107.0

103.7
104.1
105.4
108.4

135.1
136.7
139.1
138.7

70.8

May
June
July
August

47.7
47.9
51.7
56.7

64.9
63.4
58.3
51.5

__ _

55.1
57.4
59.2
62.1

77.3
75.7
71.6
62.7

January
February
March_ __ _
April

51.3

57.9

55.9

57.3

86.9

100.0

104.5

119.9

10 Tobacco»and Tobacco Products
January _
February
March _
April

May
June _ _
July
August

43.2
46.2
45.9
45.9

_

September
October
November
December.
Monthly average

65.3
57.8
59.2
58.7

50.3
51.1
51.2
50.2

54.6
55.1
55.6
57.3

64.3
67.2
66.1
64.2

67.6
66.3
63.5
61.7

74.8
74.5
72.7
73.2

96.2
96.7
94.6
93.3

111.9
112.3
118.1
122.6

159.2
150.0
149.5
149.1

153.1
146.1
142.5
136.4

47.5
48.2
48.8
47.7

60.0
63.2
68.5
66.6

54.3
54.0
52.7
48.2

52.5
50.8
50.8
50.9

58.1
58.9
59.2
63.0

62.0
60.6
59.9
61.4

61.7
63.6
66.6
68.5

75.4
76.8
79.0
79.7

94.2
96.6
98.7
99.1

131.7
138.9
139.9
142.0

140.0
134.9
134.3
137.6

139.1
135.1
139.1

69.2
77.1
66.2
65.4

52.4
54.5
49.6
46.9

53.1
52.0
52.1
54.7

68.3
68.5
63.3
65.4

62.4
63.8
64.2
67.3

70.0
70.5
71.7
73.6

87.2
91.0
93.0
94.2

104.7
104.8
109.0
111.1

149.4
150.4
159.1
161.0

142. 5
141.8
150.6
148.8

48.1

__

56.4
56.9
58.0
57.6

47.1
50.7
52.2
53.7

_

63.8

54.5

51.6

60.6

63.6

67.1

81.0

100.0

136.4

144.9

9 Traction, Motor Transportation, etc.
163. 4
164.0
158.7
152.0

132.3
132.7
132.1
124.2

80.3
76.0
81.6
84.0

91.1
94.2
94.3
93.1

72.3
81.7
78.4
89.2

95.7
103.1
108.3
91.8

79.8
78.4
82.5
80.7

97.2
98.6
91.1
83.0

95.3
102.6
98.8
97.6

102.1
103.3
102.7
101.6

96.7
97.1
99.4
106.7

101.7
100.6
97.4
90.4

May
June
July
August

153.2
154. 4
154.2
154.0

134.4
150.1
144.2
132.2

76.4
72.3
74.0
73.9

85.4
77.9
79.0
84.0

99.2
96.4
93.5
97.0

91.4
87.2
79.8
81.8

78.5
76.8
85.9
86.3

87.7
91.4
93.3
90.4

100.5
101.6
101.0
100.8

101.4
100.3
96.8
94.3

105.9
97.3
96.0
95.7

85.8
83.7
83.0

September
October
November
December

151.0
157.0
160.2
144.7

129.8
111.3
90.0
79.4

77.3
100.0
100.1
85.2

78.3
79.2
74.0
67.8

106.8
107.0
101.0
99.9

79.8
75.8
76.3
74.7

86.0
84.8
87.7
92.8

91.9
91.2
95.5
95.7

99.9
96.9
102. 5
104.1

93.8
94.8
95.0
95.0

99.5
96.3
95.3
96.4

155.5

124.4

81.8

83.2

93.5

87.1

83.4

92.3

100.0

98.4

98.5

January
February
March
April

Monthly average
i See footnote on p. 9.




_.

9

INDEXES OF MARKET VALUES OF COMMON STOCKS—Continued
(1936=100)
1918

1919

1990

1931

1933

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

1938

1939

MONTH

17 Chain Stores
14.5
14.9
14.3
14.2

September
October
November
December
Monthly average

19.1
19.1
18.7
19.0

20.9
21.8
21.8
22.9

29.7
31.4
32.2
32.9

40.1
41.1
44.0
43.6

63.5
62.6
62.5
66.3

118.3
114.9
99.8
88.5

100.5
101.0
101.9
103.8

130.3
128.6
131.6
135. 6

158.6
152. 9
149.6
148.7

19.7
20.8
23.4
23.5

21.0
21.0
20.3
19.3

19.7
18.7
18.1
16.9

23.8
24.0
24.3
27.0

33.6
33.2
33.1
34.0

44.2
50.2
57.5
56.8

67.7
71.6
82.8
87.4

87.4
94.3
98.3
98.7

106.6
106.4
110.0
119.7

139.0
136.8
135. 3
142.9

148.3
144. 5
148.0

23.4
24.5
22.9
22.1

19.8
19.9
19.1
18.1

17.1
18.1
19.2
20.2

28.4
29.0
29.0
29.1

35.0
35.7
38.2
39.9

57.2
56.2
58.2
61.5

90.1
103.0
108.6
110.1

98.5
95.8
100.9
103.6

128.7
127.4
132.3
132.6

150.5
150.9
161.0
155.7

15.0

_ _

22.5
20.3
20.9
21.6

14.9
15.6
16.1
16.6

May
Juno-. .
July
Auarust

17.4
17.4
18.3
19.5

14.5
14.6
14.8
14.9

January
February
March
April

21.1

20.3

18.7

25.2

34.1

44.1

81.4

100.0

114.2

141.5

9 Copper and Brass
88.9
91.2
88.2
89.2

84.0
81. 9
84.2
91.3

91.8
82.9
87.4
87.3

58.7
58.2
53.0
56.5

73.2
71.5
73.8
78.3

82.6
88.7
91.5
86.8

73.8
74.8
71.2
70.9

97.8
95.7
87.8
83.2

98.0
100.8
94.9
93.5

104.6
104.4
105.3
105.8

137.8
135.5
135. 1
143.7

262.0
286.2
329.3
294.0

Mav.
June
July. _.
August

92.8
90.2
93.6
93.0

96.7
105.6
113.7
101.7

79.8
78.2
76.8
70.4

61.3
55.4
55.1
51.7

84.1
81.5
82.2
84.4

80.8
74.2
71.6
71.9

71.5
72.0
77.7
85.8

84.9
86.9
91.6
93.8

93.9
96.1
100.1
103.8

106.1
102. 2
103.1
110.0

151.5
147.5
1.50.0
155.2

279.8
270.8
280.8

September
October
November
December .

93.7
98.2
98.8
89.8

102.3
101.8
93.6
87.0

73.6
69.0
63.0
50.3

55.8
59.5
64.3
71.4

85.3
82.1
78.0
80.0

71.7
68.1
71.3
72.2

82.5
79.5
84.8
91.6

94.1
94.6
100.3
97.7

102.2
102.7
105.3
105.7

115.9
125.8
123.4
137.2

172.0
185.1
227.0
228.6

92.3

95.3

75.9

58.4

79.5

77.6

78.0

92.4

100.0

112.0

164.1

January.
February
March .
April

__ __

__

Monthly average

•

20 Food, Other Than Meat
January
February
March
April

23.3
24.7
24.7
24.4

May
June
July
August

43.6
46.3
47.6
49.4

62.0
65.8
66.9
65.2

73.1
75.2
73.7
71.9

89.0
88.5
87.1
87.4

103.8
104.8
93.6
90.7

103.9
105.5
108.3
111.8

148.8
146.8
149.1
154.9

180.9
177.4
173.9
171. 4

36.4
37.8
40.0
37.2

39.6
38.9
38.9
37.3

36.8
34.7
35.1
35.3

50.0
50.1
51.3
53.8

63.9
63.7
62.2
64.5

73.2
74.2
77.9
82.6

87.8
88.6
92.9
93.5

91.7
97.8
100.8
104.0

118.1
117.5
120.7
124.3

158.4
152. 4
152.1
158.1

172.0
175.6
189.1

38.1
40.9
39.9
39.9

37.7
37.0
35.7
33.2

37.2
37.9
41.1
42.9

54.9
59.0
60.0
60.8

65.6
65.4
67.7
70.8

82.6
83.8
86.4
87.9

96.7
99.2
98.8
99.9

103.9
100.3
103.2
105.2

130.6
131.3
136. 1
143. 3

167.1
167.1
171.7
171.6

25.9

Monthly average-

34.8
35.3
34.7
35.6

25.9
27.6
29.0
30.0

September
October _. .
November
December

40.1
37.1
39.6
41.5

24.9
25.1
25.5
25.9

_

31.1
33.4
33.0
34.9

36.9

38.1

36.8

52.2

65.3

78.5

92.5

100.0

121.0

158. 2

103.5
102.6
97.1
95.9

102. 5
105.3
106.7
106.8

126.1
124.4
126.3
133.6

167.7
173.5
167.2
163.1

96.6
99.6
99.9
103.2

107.9
107.5
106.9
111.1

138.0
132. 3
132.7
135.4

160.8
159.4
171.8

102.6
98.0
99.8
101.5

114. 9
115. 9
119.4
125. 9

139.4
140.1
148.7
154.9

100.0

110.9

136.0

10 Machinery and Machine Equipment
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August.

_

_

September..
October
November
December
Monthly average

_
__
___

i Compiled by Standard Statistics Co. (Inc.). The indexes are weighted by the number of shares of each stock outstanding and are corrected for the value of rights,
stock dividends, changes in par value, and consolidations. Weekly indexes have been averaged to give monthly data which are presented in these tables. This table
represents details of group average^ shown iu table on p. 22 of July 1929 Survey, Further details will appear in subsequent issues.




10

WHOLESALE PRICES FOR SPECIFIED COMMODITIES
[Relative numbers, 1926 monthly average taken as 100. June, 1929, is latest month plotted. Data from which these charts are drawn are given on the opposite page]

FLOUR, WINTER

WHEAT, NO. 2, HARD, WINTER

9.ATS

CORN, NO, 2

160

•*
t.

140

X

120
m*

100

.

••

^ *** ^

60 s/w

.., ••

.
.

•••

•fi

..,

0

X •••

am

** *i

*•«

^

"•.

..^ ••
^•

~

AV

BEEF, CARCASS

HOGS, HEAVY

HAMS, SMOKED

.' .

160
»..

%

Ns

s. y

w

jr

•• ..,

BVl

A •V

^

.••

•*•'

*

*'

• •'

100

mm
A

80

S

60

^

AVw~

...

100

80

**

60

•n mm

•*•* •aa

.•'

•*

/"

*•<

0<

..,

... .
.

••

*»* mm

X mm

/W

. "•%

•*'

4.

.,
MM
4*

** ^

_j

r**

J t
L

^

120

• I 1?
•

7*

^

**

v •.,

••- •*
.
«
'

0 •ft
^

VV0(DL,

i*.-2-i.

va

^1n

**

BOM

*m

.•• ^

% aea

.80 Av\

SILK, RAW

WORSTED YARNS

HIDES, PACKERS
*• l

160

».

••

\

"W •n %M
mm. *fc

70 i/W

**

••

140

•I*'

** **' ••

b4L*_f

^

••f

6 «
*

^

BITUMINOUS COAL

COKE

vw

JLft. A*. ^2_

z IN<

TIN

COPPER INGOTS

180
140

••

mm •KZ

80

•CM

**

i ••

J

60

Smmt

/vw

• 1
0

00

_9»

PIG IRON, FOUNDRY

100

mm mm

••

•• •.^

60 v'W
120

\
\ ««,

• ^ ^. . • • •^
.

s»*

PETROLEUM

LEATHER, CHROME, CALF

180

<H

1/4 BLOOD COMBING

L.EATHER.SOLE, OAK

\

130
100

SMOKED SHEETS

w

•vw

190

•W^l

25 vw

c OTTON PRINT CLOTH

COTTON YARN

%

100

^ ••: ^

•N

-^ .•A .,•' 50

•VW

COTTON, RAW:

140

R UB BER,

IOC

-*-•-

• •'

75

•• ••

BB

mm mm —

KM
i • • ^**

•i ••i

COTTONSEED OIL

S UGAR, GRANULATED

SUGAR, RAW

120

100

Smm

:
*
* •*

• •i • •<

•vvu

CATTLE, STEERS

180

120

•(

. . «.(
.

XX

•t

»* &.*

\

80 P» mm

140

\

*.^

BB

MM

s.

IUU

X
*•*

A/W

LU MBER,PINE, FLOORING

STEEL BEAMS

A

\f\r\ ^
60

'WA

BRICK; COMMON

CEMENT

120.

100 ,•"
80

1
nn n mfiHI \

60 /vw
;




i m;lilii

2
li |

192

^vv ^W>

•vvwvw

!

I

<

19,:a

\

i*

'*• •• •• ..«

i i i 1 1 1 M I Hi

I

i •
•
L

11
WHOLESALE PRICES FOR SPECIFIED COMMODITIES
NOTE.—Prices to producer on farm products and market price of wool are from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, nonferrous metals
from the Engineering and Mining Journal-Press, except tin, which is from the American Metal Market. All other prices are from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. So far as possible all quotations represent prices to producer or at mill.
RELATIVE PRICE
ACTUAL PRICE

(dollars)
1926 average =100

Unit

COMMODITIES

May,
1929

June,
1929

June,
1928

Bushel
Bushel
Bushel ...
Pound
Ton
Pound
Pound
Pound

0.901
.862
.593
.180
37.78
.0972
.0996
.1279

0.868
.869
.633
.179
35.83
.0972
.0980
.1231

1.320
1.024
.779
.210
41.25
.0910
.0870
.1318

74
125
30
123
143
148
86
116

67
123
32
119
139
151
84
111

64
124
34
119
132
151
83
106

107
147
56
133
158
141
75
113

98
146
45
131
152
141
74
114

Bushel
Bushel
Bushel
Bushel
Bushel ..
Bushel
Cwt._.
Pound
Pound
Cwt
Cwt
Cwt
Cwt

1.107
1.193
.864
.460
.548
.902
11. 692
.195
.43
13. 438
10. 750
5.906
12. 781

1.153
1.221
.921
.467
.531
.888
8.722
.188
.42
14. 375
10.656
5.313
12. 750

1.376
1.654
1.033
.714
.962
1.257
6.492
.214
.55
13.556
10. 119
5.875
13. 031

78
83
119
116
79
105
139
115
107
146
93
139
120

72
77
114
107
79
95
138
111
94
141
87
90
93

75
79
121
109
77
93
103
107
91
151
86
81
93

97
123
141
161
150
143
137
124
120
138
78
111
111

89
107
136
166
139
132
77
122
120
142
82
89
95

Barrel
Barrel
Pound..
Pound
Pound
Pound
Pound
Pound _
Pound
Pound.

6.119
5.213
.036
.049
.097
.230
.231
.249
.44
.235

6.375
5.260
.035
.049
.096
.234
.238
.254
.44
.235

7.950
7.180
.043
.059
.102
.212
.225
.215
.44
.215

76
77
84
88
86
136
132
81
100
103

73
72
82
89
82
140
135
81
98
103

76
73
81
89
81
143
139
82
98
103

101
105
104
107
89
122
134
67
100
94

94
99
100
108
86
129
132
70
98
94

Pound..
Yard
Yard
Pound
Yard
Yard.
Yard..
Pound
Dozen pair..

.353
.073
.087
1.500
.975
2.008
1.959
4.777
9.500

.348
.072
.084
1.450
.975
2.008
1.959
4.925
9.250

.374
.077
.091
1.575
1.025
2.008
2.095
4.851
10.000

101
100
96
108
94
100
90
83
82

99
97
94
105
94
100
90
77
82

97
96
90
101
94
100
90
80
80

106
105
99
110
99
100
97
81
86

104
102
98
110
99
100
97
78
86

Pound
Pound
Square foot..
Pound
Pair
Pair..

.149
.179
.510
.490
6.750
4.850

.168
.186
.500
.485
6.750
4.850

.224
.266
.530
.680
6.750
5.000

107
108
109
112
106
100

106
103
113
112
106
100

119
107
110
111
106
100

175
170
132
153
106
101

160
154
117
155
106
103

Net ton
Net ton...
Long ton
Short ton....
Barrel

3.908
4.124
12.539
2.800
1.158

3.905
4.177
12. 628
2.800
1.300

4.001
4.343
12. 949
2.800
1.190

91
86
92
68
59

91
86
91
68
61

91
87
92
68
69

93
90
93
66
63

93
91
94
68
63

Long ton
Long ton
Long ton
Pound
Pound
Pound
Pound
Pound

20. 260
18. 375
36.000
1.778
.233
.0700
.4392
.0662

20. 260
18.500
35. 250
.1778
.233
.0700
.4463
.0669

18. 510
15. 450
32.250
.1453
.193
.0630
.4796
.0616

96
97
99
141
128
85
70
91

98
99
103
129
122
83
67
90

98
100
100
129
122
83
68
91

92
88
94
103
100
73
79
82

90
83
92
105
101
75
73
84

Mfeet...
Thousand

37.000
11.500

37.040
11.000

36.400
13.500

83
70

82
70

82
67

80
82

81
82

Barrel
Cwt
Pound
Ton
Cwt
Cwt.

1.650
1.950
.214
15. 500
2.488
3.250

1.650
1.950
.206
15.500
2.525
3.250

1.683
1.850
.194
15.500
2.525
3.250

95
97
44
107
86
94

95
100
44
107
87
94

95
100
43
107
88
94

97
96
39
107
88
94

97
95
40
107
88
94

April,
1929

May,
1929

June,
1929

May,
1928

June,
1928

FARM PRODUCTS—AVERAGE PRICE TO PRODUCER
Wheat
. . . .
Corn
Potatoes
Cotton
Cottonseed
Cattle, beef
Hogs

_

..

FARM PRODUCTS-MARKET PRICE
Wheat, No. 1, northern spring (Minneapolis)...
Wheat, No. 2, red, winter (Chicago)
Corn, contract grade No. 2, cash (Chicago)
Oats, contract grades, cash (Chicago)
Barley, feeding (Chicago) .
Rye, No. 2, cash (Chicago)
Tobacco, leaf, average sales, warehouse (Kentucky)
Cotton, middling upland (New York)
Wool, H blood combing, Ohio and Pennsylvania fleeces (Boston)
Cattle, steers, good to choice, corn fed (Chicago)
Hogs, heavy (Chicago)
..
Sheep, ewes (Chicago)
Sheep, lambs (Chicago)
FOOD
Flour, standard patents (Minneapolis)
Flour, winter straights (Kansas City)
Sugar, 96° centrifugal (New York).
Sugar, granulated, in barrels (New York)
Cottonseed oil, prime yellow (New York)
Beef, fresh, carcass, good native steers (Chicago)
Beef, fresh, carcass, steers (New York)
Pork, smoked hams (Chicago)
Butter, creamery, 92 score (New York)
Oleomargarine, standard, uncolored (Chicago)
TEXTILES
Cotton yarns, carded, white, northern, mule spun, 22-1-cones (Boston)
Cotton-print cloth, 64 x 60-38H"-5.35—yards to pound
Cotton sheeting, brown 4/4 Trion (New York)
Worsted yarns, 2/32's cross-bred stock, white, in skein (Boston)
Woman's dress goods, French, 39 inches at mills, serge
Suitings, unfinished worsted— 13-ounce, mill
Suitings, serge, 11-ounce, 56-58 inch.
Silk, Japan, 13-15 .
Hosiery, women's, pure silk, mill
LEATHER
Hides, green salted, packers' heavy native steers (Chicago)
Hides, calfskins, No. 1, country, 8 to 15 pounds (Chicago)
Leather, chrome calf, dull or bright "B" grades (Boston)
Leather, sole, oak, scoured backs, heavy (Boston)
Boots and shoes, men's black calf, blucher (Massachusetts)
Boots and shoes, men's dress welt tan calf oxford (St. Louis)
FUEL
Coal, bituminous, mine-run (composite price)
Coal, bituminous, prepared sizes (composite price)
Coal, anthracite, chestnut (composite price)
Coke, Connellsville (range of prompt and future) furnace— at ovens
Petroleum, crude, Kansas- Oklahoma— at wells
METALS
Pig iron, foundry No. 2, northern (Pittsburgh)
Pig iron, basic, valley furnace
_
Steel billets, Bessemer (Pittsburgh)
Copper ingots, electrolytic, early delivery (New York)
Brass, sheets, mill
_
Lead, pig, desilverized, for early delivery (New York)..
Tin, Straits (New York)
Zinc, slab, western (St. Louis)
BUILDING MATERIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS
Lumber, pine, southern, yellow flooring, mill
Brick, common red, domestic building (New York)
Cement, Portland, net without bags to trade, f. o. b. plant (Chicago
district)
Steel beams, mill (Pittsburgh)
Rubber, smoked sheets (New York)
Sulphuric acid, 66° (New York)
Wood pulp, sulphite, domestic, unbleached, news grade (New York)..
Newsprint, rolls, contract, mill




12

BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN JUNE
PRODUCTION

The general index of manufacturing production in
June, after adjustments for seasonal conditions, was
higher than in any other month on record, showing a
gain of more than 2 per cent over the preceding month
and almost 15 per cent over June of last year. The
index of mineral production, after seasonal adjustments, however, showed a decline from the preceding
month but was about 14 per cent greater than in June,
1928. Marketings of animal products in June were
greater than in the preceding month but showed a
decline from last year. Crop marketings likewise
were smaller than in June, 1928.

was greater than a year ago. As compared with the
preceding month, wholesale sales transacted by establishments dealing in groceries, dry goods, men's
clothing, boots and shoes, hardware, and drugs was
lower. Trade by dealers in meats and furniture
showed gains over May. As compared with last year,
wholesale trade in all lines was greater except in
groceries, which declined, and dry goods, which showed
no change.
Sales by department stores, after adjustments for
seasonal variations, were greater than in either the
preceding month or June of last year, the gain over
May amounting to about 3 per cent and the increase

MANUFACTURING PRODUCTION BY MAJOR GROUPS
[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925 taken as 100, adjusted for seasonal variations]

COMMODITY STOCKS

The general index of commodity stocks held at the
end of June showed a decline from the preceding
month but was about 9 per cent higher than at the
end of June a year ago. Stocks of manufactured
commodities at the end of June were lower than at
the end of either the preceding month or June a
year ago.
SALES

The general index of unfilled orders was lower than
at the end of May but showed a gain over last year.
Wholesale trade in June, after adjustments for
seasonal variations, showed a decline from May but




over June, 1928, averaging more than 5 per cent.
Merchandise stocks held by department stores at the
end of June showed a slight change from a year ago.
Sales by mail-order houses in June were substantially
greater than in either the preceding month or the
corresponding period of last year, the gain over a year
ago being in a large degree influenced by the extension
of retail-store outlets by the principal mail-order
houses. Sales by grocery chains in June, after adjustments for seasonal conditions, showed a considerable
gain over a year ago. Ten-cent chain-store systems
reported a gain of more than 13 per cent over June,
1928.

13
PRICES

The general index of wholesale prices showed a gain
in June over the preceding month but was more than
1 per cent lower than a year ago. Wholesale prices
for all major groups advanced over the preceding
month except textiles, metals, building materials,
chemicals, and house furnishings, which averaged
lower. As compared with a year ago, all groups
showed lower prices except fuels, metals, and building
materials, which averaged higher. Classified by the
state of manufacture, the general index showed higher
prices for raw materials and finished manufactures

meat animals and dairy and poultry products, which
averaged higher.
EMPLOYMENT

Factory employment in June showed a small decline from the previous month, but was more than 5
per cent larger than in June, 1928. Factory pay roll
payments were also lower than in the preceding
month and showed a gain of more than 10 per cent
over the corresponding period of the preceding year.
Applicants for jobs at public-employment agencies
were larger than in the preceding month, showing a
gain also over the corresponding period of 1928. The

FACTORY EMPLOYMENT, BY GROUPS
[1926 monthly average=100. June, 1929, is latest month plotted]

100

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1923

1929

than prevailed in May. As compared with the preceding year, prices for raw materials and semimanufactures were lower, while finished goods showed no change.
The index of prices received by farmers for their
produce showed a decline from, the preceding month
and June, 1928. Farm prices for grains, meat animals, and cotton and cottonseed were lower than in
the preceding month, while prices for fruits and
vegetables showed a gain and dairy and poultry
products showed no change. June prices for all
major groups were lower than a year ago, except




1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

increase over a year ago was not general, however,
being due solely to a gain in the Western States.
Other States showed declines from June, 1928.
New sales of industrial life insurance showed a decline in the number of policies from the preceding
month but were higher in values. As compared with
a year ago, new industrial business was greater in
June, both from the viewpoint of the number of
policies sold and their face values. New group
business showed a gain in number of certificates over
the preceding month and June of last year.

14
REVIEW OF PRINCIPAL BRANCHES OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
TEXTILES

The consumption of wool in June was greater than
in the corresponding month of 1928. Imports of raw
wool were smaller than a year ago.
The consumption of cotton showed a decline from
the high level of the preceding month, but was greater
than in June of last year. For the first half of the
year cotton consumption showed a gain of almost 12
per cent from the corresponding period of the preceding year. Cotton exports during June were smaller
than in either the preceding month or the same period

of 6 per cent from the same period of 1928. The
indicative consumption of silk showed a decline from
May, but was greater than a year ago. For the first
half of the year silk consumption showed a gain of 5
per cent from the corresponding period of a year
earlier. Imports of rayon were lower than in May, but
were twice as large as in June, 1928. Prices for silk
averaged higher than in either the preceding month
or June a year ago, with prices for silk goods also
showing gains from both periods. Rayon prices
showed no change from the preceding month, but were
lower than a year ago.

THE TEXTILE INDUSTRIES
[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925, taken as 100. June, 1929, is latest month plotted. Curves covering imports of wool and exports of cotton are plotted from
12 months' moving monthly averages plotted on the end month]

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1923

1924

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1923

1924

a year ago. Stocks of cotton at the end of June held
at mills and public stores were lower than a year ago.
The prices paid for cotton to producers averaged
fractionally lower than in May, showing a decline also
from June of last year. Wholesale prices for cotton
likewise averaged lower than in either period. Cottonspindle activity in June showed a decline from, the
preceding month, measured by the ratio to capacity,
but was greater than in June, 1928.
Imports of silk showed a decline from the preceding
month, but were greater than a year ago. For the first
six months of the year silk imports showed an increase



1925

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1926

1927

1928

1929

More men's and boy's suits were cut in May than
in either the preceding month or May, 1928. More
overcoats, however, were cut than in either prior
period. Hosiery production in May was greater than
in the corresponding month of the preceding year.
Hosiery stocks at the end of the month in the hands
of manufacturers were smaller than a year ago.
Sales of fur by dealers showed a decline both from
April, 1929, and May, 1928. Imports of unmanufactured fibers showed a decline from May, but were
greater than in June of last year. June imports of
burlaps, however, were lower than in either period,

15
METALS

The production of pig iron in June, although lower
than in the preceding month, was considerably larger
than in June of last year. For the first half of the
year, pig iron production was 17 per cent greater than
in the corresponding period of 1928.
The output of steel ingots likewise showed a decline
from the preceding month but was substantially larger
than a year ago. For the first half of the year ingot
production was 17 per cent greater than in the same
period of the preceding year. Unfilled steel orders
at the end of June were slightly lower than at the end
of the preceding month but were considerably larger
than a year ago.

and the corresponding month of 1928. Steel barrel
production in June was lower than in the previous
month but showed a gain over last year.
The production of steel sheets by independent steel
manufacturers showed a decline from May but was
considerably larger than a year ago. Stocks of sheets
in the hands of manufacturers at the end of June were
somewhat greater than a year ago. New orders for
steel sheets, although showing a gain over May, were
smaller than in June a year ago.
The output of malleable castings showed a decline
from the preceding month but were larger than in
June, 1928, with shipments showing similar comparisons. New orders for malleable castings was smaller

THE METAL INDUSTRIES
[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925, taken as 100. June, 1929, is latest month plotted]

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1923

1929

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1928

1929

ZING

^PRODUCTION

100

STOCKS. WORLD-»\
601, , I . , I i

! , , I , , 1 ,, Ll, ,L , 1 , , 1 , , 1 , , ! , , ! , ,

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

New orders for fabricated structural steel showed a
gain over both the preceding month and June, 1928.
Shipments of structural steel, during the first half of
the year, showed an increase of 18 per cent over the
same period of 1928. New orders for fabricated steel
plate showed a decline from the preceding month but
were larger than a year ago. For the first six months
of the year, new orders for steel plate were 9 per cent
higher than in the period of last year. New orders
for steel boilers placed in June showed a decline from
the preceding month but, measured in square feet of
heating surface, were larger than in June of last year.
New orders and shipments of steel business furniture
 declines in June from both the preceding month
showed


1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

than in May and larger than a year ago. The production and new orders of steel castings showed declines from May and gains over June, 1928. The
output of track work was smaller than in May but
greater than in June of last year.
Shipments of the principal types of enameled sanitary ware by manufacturers were lower than in either
the preceding month or June, 1928. The output of
copper by smelters was smaller than in May but
greater than a year ago. Stocks of refined copper at
the end of June held in both North and South America
were greater than at the end of either the preceding
month or June a year ago.

16
FUELS

The production of bituminous coal in June was lower
than in the past month but showed a gain over June a
year ago. The output of anthracite coal was lower
than in either prior period. Wholesale prices of bituminous averaged lower than in either the previous
month or the same period of last year, while prices for
anthracite averaged higher than the preceding month
but were lower than a year ago. The output of crude
petroleum was greater than in either the preceding
month or June of last vear.

the production of pneumatic tires showed a gain of
more than 10 per cent over the corresponding period
of 1928.
HIDES AND LEATHER

Imports of hides and skins during June exceeded
those of the previous month but were considerably
smaller than a year ago. The only class of hides for
which imports declined from the previous months
was goatskins, while all classes except calfskins were
imported in smaller quantities than in June, 1928.
Prices for cattle hides averaged higher than during

THE FUEL INDUSTRIES
[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925 taken as 100. June, 1929, is the latest month plotted where data were available]

iOl I 1 1 I ill I I Ij I I I I I I l l I III

1928

1924

1925

AUTOMOBILES AND RUBBER

The total production of automobiles, both passenger
cars and trucks, during the first half of 1929 was larger
than in any other similar period on record.
Exports of automobiles from the United States in
June were greater than in either the preceding month
or June of last year, with the total for the first half of
the year showing the largest external trade than in
any other similar period.
Imports of crude rubber in June showed a decline
from the preceding month but were about 50 per cent
higher than a year ago. Rubber prices averaged lower
than in the preceding month but were above the level
which prevailed in June of last year. The output
and shipments of pneumatic tires were considerably

greater than a year ago. For the first half of the year


1923

1924

1925

1923

1926

1927

! the previous month but were substantially lower than
a year ago. The output of sole leather exceeded that
of May but was smaller than in the corresponding
month of last year.
PAPER

Imports of wood pulp, both mechanical and chemical, showed a substantial increase over both the previous month and the corresponding month of last year.
The production of newsprint paper in the United
States was smaller than in either prior period and that
in Canada, although less than for the previous month,
was substantially greater than a year ago. The output of paperboard shipping boxes was smaller than
for either prior period, despite an increase from June,
1928, in the production of solid fiber boxes.

17
BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION

Construction costs on the whole averaged higher
than during either the previous month or the corresponding month of last year. The square footage
and value of new building contracts awarded during
June were smaller than for either the previous month
or for the corresponding month of 1928. All classes of
build ings participated in the decline from the previous month with the exception of those for educational purposes, while, as compared with a year ago,
the only increase was in the value of the industrial
buildings for which contracts were awarded. Fire
losses in the United States and in Canada were greater
than for either the preceding month or the corresponding month of last year.

Unfilled flooring orders, however, were greater than
at the end of June, 1928.
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS

New orders for architectural terra cotta were considerably less, both in the quantity and value, than for
either the previous month or the corresponding month
of last year. New orders and shipments of porcelain
plumbing fixtures, on the other hand, while less than
a year ago, exceeded those of the previous month. The
output of Portland cement increased seasonally from
May but was less than a year ago, while cement shipments exceeded those of either prior period. New orders
for concrete pavements, although less than in May, were
greater than for the corresponding month of last year.

PRODUCTION, SHIPMENTS, AND STOCKS OF PNEUMATIC TIRES
[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925, taken as 100. May, 1929, is latest month plotted]

300

1921

1922

1923

1924

LUMBER AND LUMBER PRODUCTS

The output of northern and southern pine lumber
in June showed a decline, both from the preceding
month and the corresponding month of last year,
while that of walnut increased over both prior periods.
Redwood lumber output was less than in May but
greater than a year ago. Stocks of lumber were
generally smaller than those carried at this period
of last year. New orders for redwood and walnut
were larger and those for southern and northern pine
smaller than in June, 1928, orders for each kind being
less than a year ago.
The production and shipments of maple flooring
were less than for either the previous month or the
corresponding period of last year. New orders for
maple flooring declined sharply from previous levels.

2
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ 61139°—29
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

CHEMICALS

Receipts of turpentine and rosin at the three principal ports continued to increase seasonally and were
larger than a year ago. Stocks, on the other hand,
were considerably lower than at the end of June, 1928,
and prices also declined from last year's level. Exports of fertilizer exceeded those of either the previous
month or of a year ago. Fertilizer consumption in
the Southern States was also greater than during the
same period of 1928. Sulphuric acid was exported in
much larger quantities than in May but less than for
the corresponding month of last year. Imports of
potash and nitrate of soda were also below last year's
level. Vegetable oils, on the other hand, were imported in substantially larger quantities than a year
ago.

18
FOODSTUFFS AND TOBACCO

The visible supply of wheat, both i& the United
States and Canada, showed a much smaller seasonal
decline than is customary at this season of the year,
the supply being much greater than a year ago.
Wheat prices strengthened somewhat from the previous
month but were much lower than for June, 1928.
Receipts of cattle and calves, hogs and sheep were
smaller than during either the previous month or the
corresponding month of last year. Local slaughter of
each kind of animals also declined from both prior
periods. Prices for cattle, calves, and sheep were
greater than for either period, but those for hogs, while

declines in the quantity of other meats held in coldstorage at the end of each period. Exports, both of
pork and of beef products, on the other hand, exceeded
those of either prior period.
Receipts of butter at the five principal markets exceeded those of the previous month and were practically the same as during the corresponding month of
last year, while cold-storage holdings were considerably larger than a year ago. Receipts of cheese
showed a similar trend. Wholesale prices for butter
and cheese were unchanged from the previous month,
those for butter also being the same as a year ago.

CONSUMPTION AND EXPORTS OF CIGARETTES
[Relative numbers, monthly average 1923-1925 taken as 100. June, 1929, is latest month plotted]

200

1923

1924

1925

less than in May, exceeded those of a year ago. The
production of meats slaughtered under Federal inspection was smaller than for either the previous month or
the corresponding month of last year, an increase from
May in the output of pork being more than offset by
declines in the output of beef and mutton. Lamb was
the only kind of meat produced in greater quantities
than a year ago.
Cold-storage holdings of meat were smaller than for
either prior period, an increase in the holdings of lamb
from both periods and in the holdings of beef as compared with June, 1928, being more than offset by



1926

1927

1928

1929

Imports of raw sugar declined seasonally from the
previous month but considerably exceeded those of a
year ago. Sugar meltings were larger than during
either prior period and stocks, while slightly less than
at the end of May, were much larger than at this
period of last year. Shipments and stocks of refined
sugar also exceeded those of either prior period. Sugar
prices continued to range lower than in June, 1928.
Despite the heavy exports of Cuban sugar, which were
40 per cent greater than a year ago, stocks at the end
of June exceeded last year's level,

19
TRANSPORTATION

DISTRIBUTION MOVEMENT

Freight-car loadings in June were more than 4 per
cent greater than a year ago. For the first six months
of the year, movement of freight by the railroads
showed a gain of 4 per cent over the same period of
1928. At the end of June freight-car surplusages were
lower than a year ago. Shipments of railroad locomotives during June were greater than in the same
month of last year, while for the first six months of the
year locomotive shipments by manufacturers showed
a gain of about 2 per cent over the same period of
1928.

Sales by mail-order houses and chain 10-cent store
systems showed substantial gains over last year.
Magazine advertising in June showed a decline from
both the preceding month and June of last year.
Newspaper advertising showed a decline from May but
was greater than a year ago. Mail dispatched by air
continues to reach gains over a year ago.

BANKING AND FINANCE

Check payments in June were smaller than in either
the preceding month of June, a year ago. For the

GOLD, SILVER, AND FOREIGN EXCHANGE

Imports of gold were larger than in any month of
1929 since January, showing a 50 per cent gain over
June of last year. Domestic receipts of gold at the
mint showed a gain over both the preceding month
and June, a year ago.

BUSINESS FAILURES AMONG MERCHANTS
[Actual number of failures, plotted as 12 months' moving monthly averages on the end month]

200

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS

GENERAL STORES

1923

1924

1925

first six months of the year check payments showed a
gain of about 10 per cent over last year. Loans and
discounts of Federal reserve member banks at the end
of June were greater than at the end of either the preceding month or June of last year. The Federal reserve ratio showed a decline from the preceding month
but was higher than a year ago. Interest rates on
both time and call funds averaged lower than in May
but were higher than last year. New sales of life insurance during the first half of the year were 7 per
cent greater than in the same period of 1928. Dividend and interest payments for the same period
showed a gain of about 10 per cent over last year.



1926

1927

1928

1929

Silver production showed practically no change
from the preceding month but was higher than a
year ago. Silver imports were greater than in May
but showed a decline from June, 1928.
Exchange on the principal foreign currencies showed
only slight change from the preceding month. The
Swedish krone averaged higher than in May, while
the Swiss franc averaged lower. The principal decline
from the preceding month was shown in the Japanese
yen. As compared with last year, all currencies
showed only slight change, with the exception of
Japanese yen, Indian rupee, the Argentine peso, and
the Canadian dollar.

20
PROSPECTIVE CARLOADINGS, THIRD QUARTER OF 1929
Loadings of commodities by railroads in carload
lots for the third quarter of 1929 are estimated by the
regional advisory boards set up by the American RailREGIONAL ADVISORY BOARD DISTRICTS

way Association at 7 per cent above the corresponding period of 1928. These estimates are based upon
detailed reports obtained from shippers as first described in the August, 1927, issue of the Survey of

Current Business, page 20, and are comparable to
similar data published quarterly since that time.
Estimated loadings of all commodities for the third
quarter of 1929 will be greater than a year ago except
for cottonseed and products, fresh fruits other than
citrus, potatoes, sugar, and chemicals and explosives,
for which declines are anticipated. The largest numerical increase over last year is estimated for loadings of
coal and coke, while the greatest relative increase is
anticipated for citrous fruits, where the gain is estimated at 51 per cent. In only 2 of the 13 districts
are declines estimated from the corresponding quarter
of 1928, the southeast and the Pacific northwest districts with declines of 1 per cent. The largest relative gain in loadings over 1928 is estimated for the
Alleghany district at 15 per cent. The next largest
relative gain is shown for the Ohio Valley district at
almost 12 per cent. In both these districts the principal gains over 1928 are to be found in larger anticipated loadings for coal and coke. Gains of 5 per cent
or more are indicated for the Alleghany, Ohio Valley,
midwest, northwest, trans-Missouri Kansas, and the
New England districts.

PROSPECTIVE CAR LOADINGS, THIRD QUARTER OF 1929
COMPARED WITH ACTUAL LOADINGS, SAME QUARTER OF 1928
(As reported by commodity committees, of the regional shippers' advisory boards, and compiled by The American Railway Association)
Number of cars
Actual
1928

COMMODITY GROUPS

o
£

Estimated
1939

Number of cars Per
Number of cars Per
Number of cars Per
Per
cent
cent
cent
cent
inc.
inc.
inc.
( } Actual Esti- inc.
Actual EstiActual Esti( }
(+)
(+•)
mated or dec.
1928
mated or t
1938
or dec.
dec.
mated or dec.
1928
1929
1929
1939
(-)
(-)
(-)
«->

i-

District No. 13
NEW ENGLAND

ALL DISTRICTS

O
M

Grain, all _ __
Flour, meal, and other mill products
Hay, straw, and alfalfa
Cotton
... .
Cottonseed and products, except oil

503, 875
225, 993
73, 562
60, 324
27, 797

525, 115
247, 085
76, 552
65, 525
26, 484

+4.2
+8.9
+4.1
+8.6
-4.7

254
6, 514
979
1,544
10

254
6,514
979
1,544
10

6
7
8
9
10

Citrus fruits
Other fresh fruits
Potatoes
Other fresh vegetables
Livestock

13, 557
178, 382
60, 221
63, 738
357, 997

20, 484
164, 133
58, 069
66, 681
358, 382

+51.1
-8.0
-3.6
+4.6
+0.1

79
2,901
2,382
1,136
1,916

79
2,843
2,382
1,159
1,724

11
12
13
14
15

Poultry and dairy products
Coal and coke
Ore and concentrates . _ __ .. _
Gravel, sand, and stone
Salt

37, 645
2, 488, 545
849, 732
1, 052, 417
37, 543

38, 233
2, 852, 553
914, 863
1, 075, 257
37, 651

+1.6
+14.6
+7.7
+2.2
+0.3

116
22,015
152
24, 297
43

118
24, 216
152
24, 054
43

+1.7
+10.0

16
17
18
19
20

Lumber and forest products
Petroleum and petroleum products
?ugar, sirup, and molasses
Iron and steel
Machinery and boilers

902, 232
605, 281
58, 997
470, 873
59, 095

904, 423
644, 613
58, 779
519, 419
63, 375

+0.2
+6.5
-0.4
+10.3
+7.2

36, 173
25, 928
2,339
7,471
5,752

36, 535
29, 817
2,339
8, 218
6,471

+1.0
+15.0

21
22
23
24

Cement
_ _
.
Brick and clay products
Lime and plaster
Agricultural implements and vehicles, other than
automobiles

277, 007
180, 071
68, 398

280, 675
185, 466
70, 136

+1.3
+3.0
+2.5

*6, 757
4,402
5,199

*6, 757
4, 468
6,451

30, 101

31, 808

+5.7

170

170

25
26
27
28
29

Automobiles, trucks, and parts
Fertilizers, all kinds
Paper, paper board, and prepared roofing
Chemicals and explosives. ...
Canned goods *

253, 099
71, 052
102, 052
26, 079
47, 996

27S, 596
71, 868
106, 803
27, 387
46,533

+30.1
+1.1
+4.7
+5.0
-3.0

1,660
1,854
20,342
724
1, 654

9, 184, 661

9, 816, 948

+6.9

184, 763

District No. 8
ATLANTIC STATES

1

2
3
4
5

__ _ ._ _ -. __ _ .

Total, all commodities listed
1

_ _.

__

All canned food products, including catsups, jams, jellies, olives, pickles, preserves, etc.
* Includes only loading within territory comprising New England Shippers' Advisory Board.




District No. 9
ALLEGHENY

564
1, 335
1,016

592
1,335
1,016

+5. 0

1,639
116
304
2,024

1,557
116
304
2,024

-5.0

+5.0
+5.0

637, 389

771, 241

+21.0

-0.4

63, 838

69,264

+8.5

29,744
75, 596
12, 045
81, 857
13, 546

-8.0
+12. 0

15, 130
24, 023

15, 902
25, 609

+5.7
+6. 6

+8.0
+10.0

192, 039
5, 278

202, 409
5,732

+5.4
+8.6

69, 710
12,117
15,728

66, 225
12, 238
15, 099

-5.0
+1.0
-4.0

14, 421
45, 859
2,281

16, 613
45, 721
2,486

+15. 2
—0.3
+9.0

107

110

+2.8

+5.0

11, 404
11, 875
21, 400
7,175
12, 085

13, 114
12, 302
22, 470
7,533
11, 481

+15.0
+3.6
+5.0
+5.0
-5.0

2,897
3,801
5,984
1, 745

3,100
4,135
6,104
1, 783

+7.0
+8.8
+2.0
+2.2

+5.5

911, 287

938, 337

+3.0 1, 021, 790 1, 177, 243

+15.2

6,934
12,806
6,976

6, 934
12,810
6,980

16, 885
27, 875
12, 749

16,041
27, 875
13, 386

1, 777
317, 834
25, 384
110, 508
10, 024

1,780
333, 725
25, 385
110, 146
10, 025

+10. 0
+12.5

32, 330
67, 497
12, 045
75, 794
12, 315

+1.5
+24.1

1,660
1,854
21, 562
724
1,737

+6.0

194, 834

-2.0
+2.0
-10.0

-1.0

-5.0

21
PROSPECTIVE CAR LOADINGS, THIRD QUARTER OF 1929—Continued
COMPARED WITH ACTUAL LOADINGS, SAME QUARTER OF 1928
(As reported by commodity committees, regional shippers' advisory boards, and compiled by American Railway Association)

i
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Per
Per
Per
Per
Per
cars
cars
cars
cars
cent
cent
cent
cent
cent
inc.
inc.
inc.
inc.
inc.
(+)
(+)
(+)
(+)
(+)
EstiEstiEstiEstiEstiActual mated or dec. Actual mated or dec. Actual mated or dec. Actii al mated or dec. Actual mated or dec.
1928
1928
1928
1928
(-)
1938
(-)
(-)
(-)
(-)
1929
1929
1929
1929
1929
Number of
cars

COMMODITY GROUPS
d
£

;i

-j—*
i

2
3
4
5

District No. 2
GREAT LAKES

District No, 3
NORTHWEST

i
Grain all
Flour, meal, and other mill products
Hay straw and alfalfa
Cotton
Cottonseed and products, except oil

17,817
37, 516
9,141

6
7
8
9
10

Citrus fruits
Other fresh fruits
Potatoes
_
Other fresh vegetables
Livestock . __
__

11
12
13
14
15

Poultry and dairy products
Coal and coke
Ore and concentrates
Gravel sand and stone
Salt

16
17
18
19
20

Lumber and forest products
Petroleum and petroleum products
Sugar, sirup, and molasses
Iron and steel
Machinery and boilers

21
22
23
24

Cement
__
Brick and clay products
Lime and plaster.
_ _ _ __ _
Agricultural implements arid vehicles,
other than automobiles

25
26
27
28
29

District No, 1
MID- WEST

District No. 4
OHIO VALLEY

District No. 6
SOUTHEAST

_ _

_

___

2,160
563
2,271
9,040

20, 500 +15.1
39, 000 +4.0
9,200 +0.6

2,375 +10.0
650 +15.5
2, 498 +10.0
8,450 -6.5

*60 -79.1
45, 090 -12.0
4,114 -30.0
4, 575 -8.0
16, 692 +5.0

1,062
135, 652
32, 481
121, 396
251

20, 987
13, 339
17, 702

22, 665
13, 499
18,000

+8.0
+1.2
+1.7

2,123

2,363 +11.3

+5.2
+9.0
+6.4
+9.6

21, 725 -16.0
27, 191
6,470

749

90, 000 -11.7
50, 800 +11.1
11,650 -14.9

6,158
6,742
783
62, 969

3,190

+8.8
*

24, 916

90, 500 108, 600 +20.0
27, 650 31,800 +15.0
14, 053 17, 566 +25.0

39, 550 +10.0

84, 162
33, 447
2,067

98, 000 +16. 4
37, 000 +10.6
2,067

+1.6
+9.7
+4.0
+2.0

375
2,015
1,037
40, 350

375
4,500 +123.3
1,037
40, 000 -0.9

1

28, 500 +14.4

5,465 +2.0
26, 200 -2.0
6,987 +5.0
4,306 +14.0
2,143

3,150

3,241

+2.9

28, 760

32, 239 +12.1

24, 992
14, 231

27, 741 +11.0
15, 625 +9.8

4,919
1,959
8,170
87, 163

5,000
2,150
8,500
88,900

21, 627
9,780
12, 382

26, 468 +22.4
10, 073 +3.0
13, 496 +9.0

75, 500 +3.0
49, 030 +10.0
5,040 -10.0
86, 500 +39.7
11, 880 +8.0

22, 347
4,193
1,145
3,002
1,401

42, 754
33, 000
9,202

45,000
33,000
9,432

+5.3

7,079
3,562
652

7,000
3,562
650

-1.1

+2.5

5,550

+4.9

3,657 +167. 5
520 -9.9
2,665 -20.8
73
950 -14.0

19, 844

+5.0

5,289

33, 550
7,400
16, 561
4,400
11, 800

30,000 -10.6
7,400
17,000 +2.7
4,400
10, 974 -7.0

1,367
577
3,363
73
1,105

-1.0 1,040,919 1,160,149 +11.5 1,366,670 1,515,231 +10.9 713, 772 777, 480

District No. 7
SOUTHWEST

51, 960
18, 267
4, 792
35, 710
15, 128

49, 362 -5.0
21, 920 +20.0
5, 031 +5.0
37, 435 +5.0
15, 884 +5.0

6,100 -6.9
5, 384
20 0
700 -10.6
63, 500 +0.8

41
9,568
1,275
2,910
32, 497

45 +10.0
11, 960 +25.0
1,084
lr> 0
3,201 +10.0
32, 497

6,523
6,687 +2.5
39, 643 41, 953 +5.8
7, 263
7,000 -3.6
67, 954 100, 000 +47.2
7,801
7,000
10 3

1,644
18, 521
631
68, 562
7,935

1,808 +10.0
18, 891 +2.0
662 +5.0
75, 418 +10.0
7, 935

6
7
8
9
10

Citrus fruits
Other fresh fruits
Potatoes
Other fresh vegetables
Livestock ..

11
12
13
14
15

Poultry and dairy products

Coal and coke __ _
Ore and concentrates
Gravel, sand, and stone
Salt

16
17
18
19
20

Lumber and forest products
Petroleum and petroleum productsSugar, sirup, and molasses _ ... _
Iron and steel
_.
Machinery and boilers

37, 010
78, 617
1,648
5,058
1,543

36, 800 -0.6 92, 152 92, 152
80, 975 +3.0 189, 476 197, 055 +4.0
4,942
1,038 -37.0
6,177 +25.0
5,292 +4.6
4,297
4,726 +10.0
1,389 -10.0
1 362
1,362

21
22
23
24

Cement
Brick and clay products
__
Lime and plaster _ _ _
Agricultural implements and vehicles,
other than automobiles..

26, 068
10, 218
4,442

28, 000 +7.4
12, 640 +23.7
4,500 +1.3

9,974
9,411
6,446

+4.7

379

Automobiles, trucks, and parts
Fertilizers, all kinds
Paper, paper board and prepared roofing.
Chemicals and explosives
Canned goods !

16, 920

25, 130 +48.5

784
4,319
2,382
934
896

3,920 +400. 0
4,319
2,144 -10.0
984
941 +5.0

District No. 10
CENTRAL-WESTERN

District No. 11
PACIFIC COAST

...

Total, all commodities listed
1

2,196

2,300

550, 897 588, 848

10, 472 +5.0
10, 352 +10.0
6,768 +5.0

+6. 9 597, 245 625, 019




+8.9

District No. 14
PACIFIC NORTHWEST

-8.0
-2.4
-0.4

15, 950
5,845
3,775

20, 300 +54.4
48, 000 -11.8
2,400 +7.9
23, 600 +6.0
15, 500 +1.0

20, 083
1,956
2,422
5,892

16, 492 -17.9
1,384 -29.2
2,721 +12.3
5,595 -5.0

653
6,432
32, 064
53, 653

700 +7.2
6,100 -5.2
3S, 000 +12.3
54, 100 +0.8

1,183
10, 715
5,548
6,977

1,463 +23.7
11,000 +2.7
5,983 +7.8
5,000 -28.3

7,320
38, 000 +3.1
7,000 -7.5
3,300 +20.2

75, 725
42, 152
11,510
4,527

76, 500 +1.0 197, 627 199, 108
46, 900 +11.3 14, 764 16, 212
11, 600 +0.8
1,072
1,125
5,375 +18.7
524
540

+0.7
+9.8

7,800 +11.9
1,600 +22.6

15, 809
3,893

15, 000
4,020

-5.1
+3.3

5,623
1,543
276

5,677
1,550
280

+1.0
+0.5
+2.2

188

193

+2.7

5, 394

5,825

+8.0

2,155
2,642
8,881

2,170 +0,7
2,910 +10.1
8,000 -9.9

758
285
2,989
320
3,422

995
290
3,510
353
3,935

+31.3
+1.8
+17.4
+10.3
+15.0

+3.3 311, 274 308, 976

-0.7

6,950 +0.8
7,650 +0.8
9,000 +11.1
290
500

13, 150
54, 430
2,224
26, 983
15, 346

3,500 +3.9
4 3
71, 600
15, 700 +12.5
36, 800 +62.6
1,050 -15.7

7 319
36, 859
7,564
2,746
6,970
1,305

80, 000
12, 150
3,950

-2.4
+3.9
+2.1

8,026
7,237

8,300
6,020

+3.4
16 8

59, 987

55, 000

-8.3

3,369
74, 812
13, 956
22, 636
1,245

972

1,000

+4.7 352, 527 360, 090

All canned-food products, including catsup, jams, jellies, olives, pickles, preserves, etc.
* Decrease due to Mediterranean fruit fly in Florida.

-0.3

17, 328
5,987
3,792

6,897
7, 590
8,104
291
503

81, 960
11, 694
3,870

454 +20.0

25
26
27
28
29

._

20, 250 -9.4
4,600 +9.7
1,500 +31.0
3,500 +16.6
1, 450 +3.5

73, 300
44, 576
5,600
61, 900
11,000

18,900

824 +10.0

5,358
26, 734
6,654
3, 777
2,143

+4.2 941, 583 932, 237

101, 881
45, 768
13, 692

2,932

6,269
6,770 +8.0
15, 100 14, 345 -5.0
+5.0
-0.2 753, 976 843, 699 +11.9 380, 000 500, 000 +31.6 64,963 65, 948 +1.5
122, 843 129, 000 +5.0 408, 076 450, 000 +10.3
09
-5.0 108, 212 116,327 +7.5 240, 000 204, 000 —15 0 15, 856 15, 856
370
370

-8.7 296, 338 298, 835 +0.8
+4.0 53, 992 56, 692 +5.0
+0.3 11,157 10, 990 -1.5
+2.3 33, Oil 32, 516 -1.5
2,984
+3.9
3,402 +14.0
25, 863
27, 191
6,470

35, 961

+15.0
-17.0

12, 446
24, 127
1,050
52, 362
17, 603

District No. 5
TRANS-MISSOURIKANSAS

1 Grain, all _ _
2 Flour, meal, and other mill products
3 Hay, straw, and alfalfa
_.
4 Cotton
5 Cottonseed and products, except oil

*287
51, 238
5,877
4, 973
15, 897

+10. 0
+10.0

13, 631
23, 204
1,047
51, 196
16, 936

790, 926 824, 114

COMMODITY GROUPS

8,423
20, 261
2,148
26, 196
10, 090

1,011
26, 294 28, 528 +8.5 135, 951
201, 029 212, 500 +5.7 32, 786
142, 132 142, 896 +0.5 127, 732
9,874 10, 977 +11.2
251

Automobiles, trucks, and parts
154, 277 162, 362
Fertilizers, all kinds
5,331 5,810
Paper, paper board, and prepared roofing. 10, 023 10, 664
Chemicals and explosives
Canned goods i
3,293 3,589
Total, all commodities listed. _

7, 657
18, 419
2,148
22, 779
12, 156

+2.9

+2.1 401, 008 414, 390

+4.9
+3.0

22

Table 1.—INDEX OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 1
[Adjusted for seasonal variations, except where otherwise noted]

fl

s§
2

Un- Adadjust- justed ed

82
87
85
89
96
99
105
112
118
124

77
89
70
74
105
96
99
108
107
106

118 114
114 115
122 116
134 123

113 116
113 118
112 118
96 106

Total

Bituminous
coal
..,.,
Anthracite
coal

51
s-c
«

Tobacco manufactures

s*
! fe

JL

Rubber tires

«5

MINERALS
Nonferrous
metals
Petroleum
refining

fc*+»

Leather a n d
shoes

Sj

Automobiles

•e
d
rt

•a
Lumber

YEAR AND MONTH

Un- Adadjust- just- Un- Adaded ed j ust- justed ed

1
w
Textiles

Total

Food products

MANUFACTURES

i
Sg
99
•OP*

1

Iron ore shipments

TOTAL
INDUSTRIAL

i
s i J
w

•e

|!
_

V

1

Relative to 1923-1925 average
84
87
67
87
101
94
105
108
106
111

82
99,
46
83
105
88
106
113
104
119

92 94 76
84 84 87
87 83
70
99 94 85
105 99 95
91 103 99
104 98 106
104 97 115
113 96 113
107 98 117

79 50 104 55
79 58 97 66
68 41 eo 63
89 66 102 80
99 102 110 95
96 90 94 95
105 107 96 110
100 111 98 113
94 88 103 109
89 113 102 120

105
107
110
109

103
112
115
114

108
108
114
113

96 113
94 113
100 113
100 114

97 98 99 100
96 100 102 107
92 104 98 120
86 104 99 109

1919 monthly average. __
1920 monthly average...
1921 monthly average...
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average
..
.
1927 monthly average. . . ..
1928 monthly average ..

83
87
67
85
101
95
104
108
..
106 ...
110

1927
January
February
March
April

110
113
110

109
112
109

105
110
114
112

112
107
102
105

111
109
106
107

113 112
107 109
102 •108
104 107

September
October
November.. . __
December

106
105
101
96

105
103
99
100

106 106
104 103
101 99
95 99

98
94
89
94

1938
January
February
March
April . .
.

105
111
111
110

105
109
109
109

106
113
113
113

106
110
110
110

107
113
114
122

May
June
July
August

110
107
105
110

109
109
110
112

111
108
106
110

110
111
111
113

115
117
113
__ 108

114
114
112
113

January __ _ _ _ _ _ _
February
March
__ _
April
May

May
June. _
July
August

_ _.

September
October
November .
December

. 106 107
.

116 116
108 120
105 118
102 118

103
101
96
96

113
113
114
112

96 106
94 93
95 83
95 89

115
111
109
111

135
134
135
134

89 109 52 91
109 110 61 113
79 112 64 36
78 65 75 82
108 115 100 114
92 108 97 82
100 77 103 104
110 105 104 113
99 99 121 95
94 95 122 104

81
85 87
30 39
62 68
93 96
100 97
106 107
110 116
105 111
115 112

66 84
77 87
88 102
102 100
111 98
114 95
112 93
106 88

118 102 120
123 96 123
87 122
131
94 106 120

114
111
100
106

113
112
115
120

97
95
90
90

108 113
114 113
109 116
112 112

90
93
94
94

110 132 127
108 134 140
107 136 119
109 136 117

122
115
109
118

108
108
103
111

108
105
99
106

93 115
91 102
85 74
92 106

122 120 107
122 101 105
124 99 101
123 98 101

122
120
121
114

111
112
105
97

103
105
101
102

91
90
85
87

99
106
104
91

121
123
124
123

92 89
92 88
95 80
91 107

121
119
121
120

113
109
108
106

106
107
106
111

139
142
140
137

114
117
122
113

93
101
111
108

99 114
103 117
102 112
97 111

100
108
108
109

135
139
141
147

124 119
135 120
134 120
134 120

93
91
94
87

107
117
119
133

96
108
112
112

116
123
119
126

111
115
113
117

150
153
156
160

133
143
149
151

120
125
125
129

104
104
103
110

105
101
100
105

93
91
93
91

112
76
G7
94

120
118
119
123

80
107
104
104

110
110
113
116

118
116
115
114

82
81
85
87

139 110
122 103
94 97
103 92

130
122
122
130

117
121
126
128

162
160
159
159

169
167
155
143

128
126
124
127

115
122
117
106

107
114
113
112

94
99
99
96

95
119
113
98

124
127
127
132

110
114
105

103
101
96
102

122
123
125
122

89
78
83
86

154
152
163
157

95
98
99
97

134
123
135
127

124
123
129
137

159
161
160
166

147
152
152
161

131
129
126
142

113
115
101
103

117
120
107
115

103
109
89
100

110
110
77
95

138
138
134
133

97
96

126
126

83

151
166

101
110

124
126

137
126

168

159

142

116
116

116
113

102
100

86
76

135
138

91 114
92 112
93 110
95 112

98
94
95
93

81
71
49
57

107 103
108 110
107 105
101 98

115
116
118
118

92
93
94
95

116
115
124
121

107
108
100
107

96
93
89
90

120
118
117
117

115 115
116 114
113 112
108 114

128
126
120
123

107
112
113
111

95
98
102
104

116 117
120 117
122 119
123 122

116 117
121 117
125 120
127 123

117
126
132
135

116
113
116
120

125
125

126
126

124
127

145
155

121
121

118
113
112
108

100 108
106 109
113 110
112 114

67 54
78 64
39 64 55
69 74 77
94 86 86
99 99 98
107 115 116
112 125 116
109 136 120
115 152 144

118
107
99
97

99 103
98 102
97 103
94 105

88
94
50

114
113
114
109

104 111
102 110
106 108
104 109

111
90
105 91
110 100
108 95

102 105 103
104 107 109
102 112 109
103 113 100

93
83
94
89

113
117
117
120

101
100
87
107

85
93
76
87

123
128
131
133

114
110
111
106

115
108
111
112

79
79
93
100

129
136
135
141

100
106
112
116

111
99
112
125

93
91
93
103

139
125

120
122

122
112

93
96

12
99

June _
July
August.. _.

123
125

143
126

September
October
November
December
1
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, from 60 individual series of data representing the production of about 35 industries and
estimated to represent, directly and indirectly, about 80 per cent of the total industrial production of the United States. The figures are reduced to average daily output
and in addition, the figures are corrected for seasonal variation, except the unadjusted total, which is presented to show the actual output on a daily average basis independent of seasonal conditions. Complete description of this index, which is being substituted for the indexes of manufactures and minerals previously published, was
presented in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for February, 1927, and March, 1927. Recent revisions are described in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for March, 1929. Monthly
data from 1919 appeared in the July, 1928, issue of the SURVEY (No. 83), pp. 21 and 22.




23

Table 2.—INDEXES OF MARKETINGS OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST PRODUCTS:

Miscellaneous

Lumber

Pulpwood

82
110
117
98
114
88
89
103
120

75
89
103
97
101
102
102
113
111

78
80
88
100
101
99
113
103
112

80
90
87
82
99
119
125
120
118

138
126
91
96
98
107
116
132
113

82
70
90
99
97
104
98
93
88

80
70
90
100
96
104
98
93
87

98
68
91
93
106
101
92
93
97

79
78
88
104
100
96
99
93
79

112
49
88
115
88
97
101
102
90

95
81
72
76

138
134
112
76

159
231
195
148

112
114
91
77

142
184
99
74

207
245
127
67

193
346
320
238

159
220
218
186

98
97
92
85

99
98
91
84

75
82
99
90

132
124
109
124

93
105
105
105

83
80
113
143

80
81
96
102

102
109
161
116

117
98
89
62

89
76
62
45

88
83
112
114

62
61
61
72

139
108
110
72

193
175
105
36

82
87
94
93

83
88
95
90

72
83
100
119

42
33
32
74

114
98
108
99

93
89
76
89

143
110
81
77

135
160
142
123

142
153
154
187

62
60
65
115

57
76
116
169

115
130
99
86

93
91
114
124

57
31
12
74

28
27
24
106

99
96
89
99

97
96
91
102

117
88
64
63

113
133
124
119

91
92
90
116

89
68
68
66

85
108
101
92

75
73
114
126

89
81
71
71

150
154
119
79

184
220
167
121

178
160
109
104

146
199
107
74

183
223
96
57

189
264
231
148

217
262
237
169

98
96
93
86

99
94
91
83

84
100
111
111

124
117
109
98

113
104
100
95

96
94
97
95

61
48
49
61

107
101
92
83

80
89
118
130

89
87
97
101

81
106
160
137

98
81
78
59

99
108
112
66

100
102
106
91

45
43
44
47

81
56
61
59

193
104
39
24

81
87
96
96

80
88
97
95

99
83
102
111

38
26
25
77

97
91
103
91

75
57
89
113

108
116
108
97

195
378
387
195

90
83
78
79

139
106
92
80

115
147
138
117

156
168
154
170

72
52
87
115 '

84
56
147
186

136
164
107
83

94
75
164
165

57
25
28
45

23
24
22
116

101
95
87
89

98
93
88,
88

120
96
64
82

140
172
170
161

85
84
80
78

September.
October
November.
December..

170
238
172
147

92
102
93
92

54
35
70
55

92
95
98
95

76
86
110
126

95
89
77
78

137
153
131
119

178
252
179
152

165
174
122
124

133
151
94
69

206
266
119
70

184
353
258
206

206
208
205
192

77
87
84
76

77
84
79
71

68
108
116
111

129
128
119
122

70
93
104
104

1929
January
February- _
March
April

111
82
74
61

96
80
88
100

34
14
43
49

102
78
77
87

85
67
106
141

95
88
98
103

87
138
156
164

112
82
72
57

100
95
80
59

94
96
102
104

72
69
67
86

100
55
62
46

238
134
67
32

82
74
86
91

78
75
85
87

123
93
108
127

41
26
37
115

101
97
104
104

56
61

109
112

121
306

84
76

131
111

134
147

161
179

51
56

53
75

118
147

111
89

27
18

22
25

99
91

93
87

132
99

158
177

108
100

A

£

3

e

Fruits

86
100
99
92
104
104
109
113
117

1
fc

Vegetables

91
80
84 !
92
96
112
124
136
139

•a»
•*0
•

Grains

a

YEAR AND
MONTH

Livestock

Cotton

i

Distilled wood

FOREST PRODUCTS

CROPS

Dairy products

Total,
agricultural

Poultry and
eggs

ANIMAL PRODUCTS

3
1

S

8

Relative to 1923-192 5 average
mo. av.
mo. av.
mo. av.
mo. av.
mo. av.
mo. av.
mo. av.
rno. av.
mo. av.

86
98
98
93
104
103
108
112
115

71
82
93
100
104
96
96
97
99

66
90
120
91
126
83
106
138
132

89
84
92
103
104
93
90
89
91

75
87
94
103
101
96
102
102
103

71
82
93
96
103
101
101
103
102

1926
September .
October
November .
December..

154
219
186
143

95
95
94
92

64
52
64
75

99
109
102
92

77
76
125
142

1937
January
February, _
March
April

114
97
89
65

88
79
94
95

46
48
65
72

96
78
88
79

May
June
July
August

67
65
69
114

115
123
109
105

135
348
421
225

September .
October
November .
December .

176
209
161
118

87
95
92
88

1928
January
February...
March .April

98
82
79
62

May
June
July
August

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

May
June
July
August

September .
October
November .
December. _
i Weighted averages, compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of ihe Census, representing 90 per cent of crops, 95 per cent of marketed livestock and
their products, and 80 per cent of forest products. For details pertaining to the construction of these indexes as well as earlier d ata, see the July, 1928, issue of the Surveyf
pp. 18,19, and 20. The index of total agricultural marketings is a composite of animal and crop marketings shown separately in this table.




24

Table 3.—INDEXES OF COMMODITY STOCKS AND UNFILLED ORDERS
STOCKS, END OF MONTH 1
UNFILLED ORDERS,
END OF MONTH 2

Textiles

Iron and steel

Lumber

Brick and glass

Transportation
equipment

Metals

210
101
108
122
87
91
85
74
76

74
109
125
124
82
94
84
85
72

220
104
111
124
85
91
81
71
80

484
211
118
140
86
74
88
71
62

62
33
83
109
93
98
91
78
78

115
43
78
115
95
90
76
73
71

75
72
71
68

144
154
158
165

117
125
125
123

150
146
132
118

HO
149
141
126

197
180
156
137

100
88
68
62

112
105
98
91

83
82
81
78

85
91
89
88

80
76
76
73

91
91
86
74

83
80
82
79

72
77
88
87

93
102
106
116

70
68
68
69

170
166
150
140

113
101
98
94

105
100
95
104

111
112
108
119

117
99
88
96

69
79
89
96

86
86
85
89

76
76
75
73

88
86
85
85

64
63
65
66

73
69
72
66

92
101
87
78

116
118
130
154

118
107
109
80

69
70
70
69

129
129
132
133

97
103
107
109

124
149
152
150

125
136
135
136

135
173
186
183

103
117
113
104

110
144
144
137

71
68
68
72

87
84
76
69

65
66
71
85

62
62
51
57

72
62
63
52

73
60
62
59

119
118
106
104

169
178
172
167

99
109
133
129

68
67
66
67

128
146
155
162

115
117
115
110

139
137
132
125

127
144
152
154

168
151
130
114

105
95
90
75

128
116
107
101

81
82
81
77

77
81
75
71

89
90
90
82

64
64
71
73

79
76
72
70

63
67
71
75

118
120
119
121

109
94
104
105

155
153
149
140

142
153
155
156

69
71
71
72

170
162
145
134

103
96
90
91

114
102
96
102

141
126
123
136

98
81
67
66

82
74
87
91

95
93
91
93

74
75
77
75

72
67
68
66

72
75
75
75

73
69
68
60

79
84
91
88

77
75
85
74

130
135
143
147

125
123
125
125

104
103
107
113

130
116
136
154

137
139
133
132

73
74
75
77

130
149
156
164

97
103
107
111

119
149
154
157

145
157
155
163

96
149
170
174

116
133
126
97

108
138
135
135

75
72
74
71

69
73
72
72

75
75
76
83

60
62
49
35

84
69
84
62

73
59
68
61

127
127
123
120

152
154
157
147

126
116
114
114

112
112
105
102

180
185
181
182

145
136
117
104

76
73
72
72

160
178
186
191

118
121
122
120

148
145
141
133

158
171
181
187

161
144
128
99

89
83
66
68

125
113
105
99

77
80
86
93

75
81
82
84

86
87
93
92

53
74
81
104

74
73
82
102

53
41
47
67

116
111

142
145

115
116

101
98

180
171

99
94

71
71

199
199

114
109

124
119

170
167

92
80

80
94

96
96

89
86

73
75

87
85

96
78

104
107

61
63

1
§

Foodstuffs

47
49
66
77
91
111
99
96
107
112

Rubber

90
100
101
103
106
103
91
84
91
98

Leather

Textiles

Chemicals and
oils

Paper and printing

Stone, clay, and
glass

124
143
116
99
92
109
137
146
122

Lumber

96
78
99
100
93
303
105
127
128
144

Non f err ou s
metals

94
87
105
100
95
101
104
121
127
127

Iron and steel

68
82
98
96
106
157
147
150

59
58
77
77
90
104
106
100
109
105

Textiles

1
H

Foodstuffs

Grand total

YEAR AND
MONTH

Chemicals and
oils

Raw materials

Manufactured goods

I

Relative to 1923-1925 average
1919 monthly av.
1920 monthly av.
1921 monthly av_
1922 monthly av.
1923 monthly av.
1924 monthly av_
1925 monthly av.
1 926 monthly av.
1927 monthly av_
1928 monthly av_

93
86
102
95
95
102
104
115
121
123

127
118
97
8
7
. 84
94 100
103 104
96
103
90
106
97
113
117 104

1927
January
February
March
April

132
131
124
116

109
112
112
112

May
June
July
August

108
107
105
109

September
October
November
December
1928
January
February
March
April

84
76
80
104
116
127
140
152

92
89
115
87
85
112
103
64
95
135

135
121
117
95
89
85
70
71

123
122
119
115

153
159
158
152

61
71
87
92

119
125
118
114

110
115
121
122

147
137
132
123

125
115
123
128

111
113
118
119

122
122
123
125

134
132
13*7
138

141
146
152
147

114
115
113
116

103
118
126
117

137
134
129
125

147
140
133
131

111
111
114
120

105
93
87
99

118
113
118
129

138
136
133
127

126
125
122
119

107
100
95
98

121
119

118
117

100
112

85
100
109
96
95
115
104
128

70
59
84
76
86
104
110
114
121
141

151
94
94
115
91
101
117
119

100
89
92
103
105
113
120
107

81
82
84
86

100
91
94
97

116
121
118
121

115
117
119
120

112
115
117
115

92
113
128
129

101
105
111
95

127
120
118
117

120
132
135
133

114
110
111
112

116
96
81
79

108
109
113
127

129
130
127
122

115
120
120
119

85
100
104
103

117
108
105
108

120
117
118
115

September
October
November
December

118
133
137
142

1939
January
February
March
April

May
June
July
August.

.

_

May
June
July
August
September

90
84
97

78
76
72 '
74

October
November .
December.

i
1

Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from data on 45 commodities covering stocks in the hands of manufacturers or at other visible
points at the end of each month. Details covering construction and weightings are to be found on pp. 20 to 22 of this issue. This index represents a complete revision of the
stocks index formerly published. No adjustment has been made for seasonal variations.
2
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from data on 17 commodities, weighted according to the relative value added in manufacture
in the years 1923 and 1925. In addition to the groups mentioned in this table, data are also included in the total covering paper, which, however, is not deemed representative of the paper group, since only one class of paper is included. Details as to weightings, sources, etc., are given in the January, 1928, issue (No. 77).




25
Table 4.—INDEXES OF WHOLESALE PRICES
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDEX 1

Total

Metals
Hides
Farm
and Textile Fuel and Build- Cheming
and
prod- Foods leather prod- light- metal mate- icals
and
prod- ucts
ucts
ing prod- rials drugs
ucts
ucts

Semi- FinfurMis- Raw ma nu- ished
nish- cella- mate- fac- proding neous rials tured ucts
goods
articles

House

Non-

agric.
corn-

mod.

BRADSTREET'S *
(end of month)

DUN'S 3
(end of month)

[Base year fn bold-faced type]

YEAR AND MONTH
Commodities

'• Number of quotations
550

67

131

40

75

23

73

57

78

37

25

108

62

380

483

300

96

Relative to 1928
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

69.8
68.1
69.5
85.5
117.5
131.3
138.6
154.4

71.5
71.2
71.5
84.4
129.0
148.0
157.6
150.7

64.2
64.7
65.4
75.7
104.5
119. 1
129.5
137.4

68.1
70.9
75.5
93.4
123.8
125.7
174.1
171.3

57.3
54.6
54.1
70.4
98.7
137.2
135.3
164.8

61.3
56.6
51.8
74.3
105.4
109.2
104.3
163.7

90.8
80.2
86.3
116. 5
150.6
136. 5
130.9
149. 4

56.7
52.7
53.5
67.6
88.2
98.6
115.6
150.1

80 2
81.4
112.0
160.7
165.0
182.3
157.0
164.7

56.3
56.8
56.0
61.4
74.2
93.3
105. 9
141.8

93.1
89.9
86.9
100.6
122.1
134.4
139.1
167. 5

68.8
67.6
67.2
82.6
122.6
135.8
145.9
151.8

74.9
70.0
81.2
118.3
150.4
153.8
157.9
198.2

69.4
67.8
68.9
82.3
109.2
124.7
130.6
149.8

69.0
66.8
68.5
85.3
113.1
125.1
131.6
154.8

64.3
64.8
67.6
80.3
110.5
121.9
123.2
129.3

70.9
68.9
77.4
93.3
123.8
145.2
145.6
140.6

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

97.6
96.7
100.6
98.1
103.5
100.0
95.4
97.7

88.4
93.8
98.6
100.0
109.8
100.0
99.4
105.9

90.6
87.6
92.7
91.0
100.2
100.0
96.5
101.0

109.2
104.6
104.2
101.5
105.3
100.0
107.9
121.7

94.5
100.2
111.3
106.7
108.3
100.0
95.7
96.3

96.8
107.3
97.3
92.0
96.5
100.0
86.5
82.8

117.5
102.9
109.3
106.3
103.2
100.0
98.2
99.8

97.4
97.3
108.7
102. 3
101.7
100.0
93.3
93.7

115.0
100.3
101.1
98.9
101.8
100.0
96.6
95.5

113.0
103.5
108.9
104.9
103.1
100.0
98.2
97.4

109.2
92.8
99.7
93.6
109.0
100.0
89.9
83.0

88.3
96.0
98.5
97.6
106.7
100.0
96.5
99.1

96.1
98.9
118. 6
108.7
105.3
100.0
96.9
97.4

103.3
96.5
99.2
96.3
100.6
100.0
94.5
97.0

100.1
97.3
100.9
97.1
101.4
100.0
94.4
95.5

89.1
92.3
100.8
100.9
104.6
100.0
99.4
103.1

87.2
95.3
103.5
100.0
108.0
100.0
99.4
102.4

96.3
96.4
96.0
97.4

106.1
104.5
103.5
107. 6

98.5
98.7
98.0
99.5

121.0
124.1
124.0
126.7

96.7
96.6
96.5
96.5

80.8
81.2
80.8
80.8

98.1
98.3
98.4
98.4

90.8
91.0
91.0
92.5

96.3
95.8
95.6
95.8

98.6
98.4
98.3
97.9

89.0
87.3
86.8
84.9

100.2
99.1
97.9
100.1

97.7
97.1
97.8
97.9

93.9
94.8
94.8
95.9

93.7
94.2
94.0
94.7

101.7
102.7
103.6
105.6

104.7
103.2
103.8
104.0

98.6
97.6
98.3
98.9

109.8
106.7
107.1
107.0

101.2
100.3
102.3
104.1

126.3
123.7
124.2
121.0

96.6
96.3
96.8
96.3

81.8
82.1
82.8
84.6

98.6
98.7
98.6
100.4

93.5
93.9
94.4
94.6

95.3
94.9
94.5
94.7

97.8
97.0
96.9
97.2

85.1
82.2
80.8
79.3

101.4
99.3
99.5
99.2

98.6
97.8
97.8
97.3

97.1
96.7
97.8
99.1

95.6
95 2
95.9
96.7

103.8
103.5
102.9
102.8

102.1
101.7
102.1
102.8

100.1
97.8
96.7
96.7

108.8
103.5
101.6
103.6

106.9
102.3
100.1
98.0

120.7
117.5
115.5
115.7

95.6
96.1
96.1
96.1

85.1
84.9
84,4
83.5

100. 5
101.0
101.7
102.9

94.7
95.0
96.0
96.8

95.1
95.6
96.0
96.1

97.2
96.5
96.4
96.4

79.7
80.3
80.0
80.1

100.5
97.4
96.2
97.4

96.9
96.9
96.9
97.2

100.5
98.5
97.2
96.4

97.8
96.4
95.4
94.8

103.3
102.3
102. 6
102.0

101.6
100.7
101.8
100.3

97.2
96.7
97.5
96.8

105.9
105.4
107.1
104.9

98.8
98.1
98.1
97.7

113.6
109.0
108.3
107.9

96.4
96.1
96.1
95.5

82.5
81.3
80.6
80.6

103.6
104.4
106.4
106.4

96.6
97.5
98.8
97.9

95.9
96.1
95.6
94.9

96.6
96.6
96.5
96.7

80.5
80.4
80.0
79.2

98.7
98.1
98.9
97.0

97.3
97.2
99.1
97.4

96.5
95.9
96 5
96.9

94.9
94.3
94.9
94.7

102.9
103.0
101.6
100.2

100.5
100.6
99.6
98.1

95.8
96.4

102.2
103.3

97.7
98.9

106.8
108. 0

94.2
93.3

81.1
83.3

105.2
105.1

96.8
96.4

94.2
93.4

96.7
96.6

79.6
80.4

95.3
96.6

95.1
9-J.4

96.4
96.7

94.1
94.6

98.5
100.0
101.9

96.4
66.6
97.8

1938
January
February
March
April
May

June
July
August
September.. ._
October. _
November
December.. . .
1929
January
February __
March _
ApriL

...

May-

June .
July
August
September
October
November.
December

!
j

"

II
1

,

the
1 Com lled bv the
fr S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, based on monthly averages of 550 weekly quotations, arranged in 10 groups and also reclassi
P
j ,
fied,by state of manufacture with a grouping of all nonagricultural commodities, consisting of the total index minus the 67 quotations in the farm-products group. This
,
Thi
index supersedes the index based on 1913 as 100, which was published in the August, 1927, issue (No. 72) and previous issues. In computing this new index, the price of
each commodity is weighted by multiplying it by the estimated average quantity marketed in the years 1923 to 1925, or 1923 and 1925 in the case of most manufactured
commodities, the census data being used for those years. Monthly data from 1923 appeared in the November, 1927, issue (No. 75), p. 24, except for data for state of manufacture, which appeared in the June, 1928, issue (No. 82), p. 23. Full description of the new index, with details on subgroups and on individual commodities, is contained in Bulletin 453 of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2 Data compiled, respectively, by Dun's Review and Bradstreet's and recomputed to a 1926 base for comparison with the Department of Labor index; the data are shown
as of the end of the month, instead of at the first of the month, as formerly. In Us original form, Dun's price index is an aggregate of 300 quotations, each weighted by the
amount "annually consumed by each inhabitant"; about half of the aggregate is represented by food products. Bradstreet's index is the aggregate of prices per pound of
96 commodities. Details by commodity groups are shown for each index in their respective journals.




26

Table 5.—COST OF LIVING, FARM, AND RETAIL PRICE INDJ
FARM PRICES >

Fuel and light
YBAB AND MONTH

Food

All
Sundries groups

Shel- Clothing
ter

Dairy
Fruits Meat and Cotton Unand
and ani- poul- cot- classi- All
Grains vegetatry
mals prod- tonfied groups
bles
ucts seed
Number of quotations

Com- Fuel
bined

Light

6

5

4

2

5

31

Relative to 1909-1914 average (fiscal years)

Relative to July, 1914
1909-14 monthly av_.
1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
100
1915 monthly av
100
111
1916 monthly av
1917 monthly av
146

9

RETAIL COAL PRICE*

COST OF LIVING 1

RETAIL FOOD PRICE '

[Base year In bold-faced type]

Relative to 1913

100

100

100

100

100

100

92
100
83
123
202

108
112
104
120
173

101
101
99
106
134

97
85
78
119
187

94
95
95
100
130

100
100
102
100
117
176

100
102
101
114
146

100
100
99
104
117

100

100

102
104
126

100
104
117

101
109
131

92
103
120
126
217

159
172
197
167
157
161

226
231
231
112
105
114

162
189
249
148
152
136

202
206
173
108
113
106

160
182
197
151
135
147

245
247
249
101
156
216

157
162
152
90
88
101

200
209
205
118
123
134

168
186
203
153
142
146

127
150
« 190
192
«191
194

10O

1OO

100

100
102
105

103
120
143

100

100

1918 monthly av
1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av

173
186
205
156
142
146

118
129
155
169
166
173

185
205
261
166
155
170

138
144
168
183
179
180

197

146

153
164
185
184
173
173

1924 monthly
1925 monthly
1926 monthly
1927 monthly
1928 monthly

146
157
160
155
154

184
180
176
169
162

175
174
174
171
172

169
167
163
163
161

182
181
186
184
181

142
140
120
122
122

174
175
174
173
171

163
168
168
164
162

129
156
129
128
130

124
160
189
155
146

109
139
146
139
150

137
143
141
138
143

211
177
122
128
152

100
92
88
83
87

134
147
136
131
139

146
157
161
155
154

193
U92
M94
190
188

154
153
153
154

163
162
161
161

171
171
174
173

158
158
158
159

176
176
177
178

122
122
121
121

171
171
171
171

162
161
161
161

160
152
142
120

181
168
156
137

151
150
157
162

134
132
134
136

166
162
170
153

86
87
88
87

148
145
145
139

154
153
153
154

183
185
185
187

158
157
157
156

161
161
160
160

174
173
172
171

160
161
162
163

180
182
183
184

121
121
121
121

171
171
171
171

163
163
163
162

117
116
110
112

127
114
109
108

174
160
150
143

145
150
155
159

142
147
146
148

85
83
86
90

141
137
134
134

158
157
157
156

189
189
190
190

155
154
153
152

159
159
159
160

169
170
166
168

163
162
162
160

184
184
184
180

121
120
120
120

170
170
170
170

161
161
160
159

115
123
124
120

109
111
112
110

146
150
160
164

149
148
144
138

148
149
155
152

92
91
90
88

133
136
140
138

155
154
153
152

190
190
190
186

153
155

160
159

167
167

157
157

175
175

120
120

168
168

159
160

113
111
122

119
120
136

164
163
167

137
137
137

148
146
145

86
85
85

136
135
140

153
155

182
187

av
av
av
av
av

1938
May
June __
July
August
September
October
November
December

__ ._

...
...

1939
January
February _ _
March
April.

. ._

May. _ _
JuneJuly
August
September
October
November
December

_
i

1
Index numbers of the cost of living, compiled by the National Industrial Conference Board, represent, up to March, 1922, retail prices on the first day of the month
except food, which is the retail food index of the V. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, for the 15th of the preceding month. Beginning with March, 1922,
all prices shown are as of the 15th of the month indicated. The index is weighted according to the estimated consumption of average wage earners before the war, on the
following basis: Food, 43.1 per cent; shelter, 17.7 per cent; clothing, 13.2 per cent; fuel and light, 5.6 per cent; sundries, 20.4 per cent. Figures from 1914 to 1917 are based
on July quotations: 1918 figures are for 2 months: 1919 for 3 months and thereafter monthly. Owing to different trends, the fuel and the light data have been segregated
from 1923 forward and revised, the monthly data for 1923 to 1925 being shown in the June, 192G, issue of the SURVEY (No. 58), p. 24; segregation for previous years is not

throughout the country for their respective crops and animal products, as collected by the department, and are weighted by the average annual marketings by farmers for
the period 1919-23. For the detailed explanation of this index see August, 1925, monthly supplement to " Crops and Markets," published by the Department of Agriculture.
a The retail food price index compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, the prices of 22 articles of food being weighted according to their
consumption in workingmen's families as reported by retail dealers in 51 of the largest cities as of the 15th of the month. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in Bulletin 396
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, p. 12.
4
The retail coal price index compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, is based on an unweighted average of quotations on Pennsylvania
anthracite, white ash, chestnut, as of the 15th of each month in 51 cities. The annual figures from 1913 through 1920 are based on 2 quotations a year, on Jan. 15 and
July6 15; thereaftPr monthly averages are used.
8 months' average, February, March, April, and May missing.
6
11 months' average, August missing.
7
10 months' average, no quotations being available for other months.




27
Table 6.—WOOL:

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

Domestic

IMPORTS »

Foreign

CONSUMPTION
(in
In
grease
As im- grease equivaported equiva- lent) 3
lent

STOCKS <
(in grease equivalent,
quarterly)

MACHINERY ACTIVITY «
Looms

Held by
manu- Held by
facdealers
turers

Total

Car-

Wide

Nar- pet
row and
rug

Thousands of pounds

18, 761
27, 906
35, 801
36, 683
42, 214
41, 956
39, 918
22, 839

13,483
15r894
15, 142
17, 100
17, 510
15, 275
17, 825
8,809

5,278
12, 012
20, 660
19, 583
24, 704
26, 682
22, 093
14, 030

12, 632
21, 557
34,393
37, 432
35, 083
37, 811
37, 158
21, 635

1921 monthly average... 28, 589
1922 monthly average
36, 151
1923 monthly average... 34, 759
1924 monthly average... 26,001
1925 monthly average ... 25, 501
1926 monthly average... 29, 102
1927 monthly average... 28, 629
1928 monthly average- __ 25, 074

11, 977
15, 913
12, 095
16, 687
11, 018
14, 105
18, 266
17, 543

16, 613
20, 238
22,664
9,315
14, 483
14,997
10,363
7,531

26, 722
31, 390
32, 854
22, 351
28, 271
25, 856
22, 274
20, 383

24, 921
31, 659
28, 017
25, 433
23, 174

44,487
54, 163
53, 467
44,813
43, 857
42, 503
45, 961
44, 863

1913 monthly
1914 monthly
1915 monthly
1916 monthly
1917 monthly
1918 monthly
1919 monthly
1920 monthly

average...
average
average...
average...
average. _ _
average
average...
average. ._

Sets of cards

RECEIPTS AT
BOSTON i

Spinning
spindles
H3

A

Woolen

Worsted

Per cent of active hours to total reported

73
78
73
91
88
84
72
70

68
65
72
80
74
60
57
67

79
77
84
90
94
91
84
70

77
78
78
90
90
86
83
75

77
75
85
90
93
90
83
68

74
78
74
90
85
81
79
74

492, 114
652, 258
554, 183

206, 669
227, 236
220, 339

207, 008
215, 737
255, 015

75
74
73
86
87
85
71
64

559,431
478, 761
480, 867
383, 100
352, 061
357, 266
334, 512
331, 635

279, 381
290, 023
247, 431
207, 803
179, 213
166, 100
168, 257
165, 043

233, 940
188, 738
233, 437
175, 297
172, 848
191, 166
166, 255
166, 591

69
68
83
69
69
63
62
61

64
65
76
62
64
61
63
55

51
77
82
66
72
63
64
65

71
89
98
88
86
77
79
82

89
91
98
80
77
79
80
71

72
87
92
85
84
73
78
79

82
79
92
66
67
69
67
61

385, 407

173, 556

211, 850

60
59
53
55

53
58
49
48

65
62
55
63

80
81
78
77

.64
63
59
65

79
78
75
74

55
49
50
53

369, 816

158, 346

211, 470

309, 566

152, 394

157, 171

59
67
70
69

53
66
66
55

62
67
68
62

85
93
89
83

74
82
81
74

80
88
85
80

62
68
72
66

69
69
67
70

63
59
60
64

65
67
69
70

84
85
86
87

83
84
82
81

82
82
83
84

69
69
68
70

67
65

61
61

72
69

86
85

84
78

82
82

66
65

1928
May
June
July
August

33, 331
55, 842
54,907
29, 720

25, 843
50,083
51, 346
25,802

7, 488
5,759
3,561
3,918

25, 042
19, 671
18, 289
14, 472

28, 165
21,383
19, 805
16, 078

43, 911
41, 282
38, 099
45, 103

September
October
November
December

10, 315
8,090
12, 746
14, 524

7,156
4,598
9,322
7,293

3,159
3,492
3,424
7,231

14, 510
20, 730
15, 587
20, 293

17, 015
24, 193
18, 488
24, 411

43, 492
51, 477
50, 079
45, 888

1939
January
February
March _
April

19, 673
17, 202
23, 189
15,390

4,532
1,836
5,738
6,442

15, 141
15, 366
17, 451
8,948

36, 523
33, 398
32, 743
28, 165

38, 835
37, 386
37, 682
30, 941

54, 031
47, 993
48, 656
49, 205

24, 215
47, 795
56, 981

16, 108
40, 596
53, 652

8,107
7,199
3,329

19, 786
16, 592

22, 372
17, 903

48, 765
44, 066

May
June
July
August
September
October —
November _ _
December,.

1

279, 211

161, 139

118,072

343, 837

156, 796

187, 041

_.

_ _

* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Textiles Section, pp. 10, 11, 12
14,16, and 17.
1
Receipts of wool at Boston by railroads and steamships compiled by the Boston Chamber of Commerce through January, 1925, and since that date by the Boston Grain
and Flour Exchange. They comprise usually about two-thirds of all wool imported and about half of the domestic wool clip. All classes of wool are combined in theso
figures, without reduction to grease equivalent.
2
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The left-hand column totals wool of all classes in the condition imported,
while the right-hand column shows the reduction to grease equivalent. Scoured carpet wool is converted to the grease basis, assuming a shrinkage of 40 per cent; other wools
are converted from scoured to grease on basis of a shrinkage of 45 per cent.
3
Consumption of wool by textile mills from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, until April, 1922, when the compilation was transferred
to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. These data reported by almost 600 manufacturers represent nearly 80 per cent of the industry, the figures from
the American Woolen Company and from 10 to 20 other concerns not being included. The figures are reduced to grease equivalent by multiplying scoured wool by 2 and
pulled wool by 1%. Further details as to classes of wool and districts are given in press releases.
* Stocks of wool held by about 600 manufacturers and about 400 dealers from the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, until April, 1922,
and thereafter by that bureau jointly with U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Until the third quarter of 1920, the stock reports by manufacturers are
practically complete, with about 600 firms reporting. Thereafter one large firm and a number of small firms, varying from 10 to 20, did not report, but estimates were made
for them from the third quarter of 1920 through the third quarter of 1921, in order to make the data comparable with previous figures; these figures, however, are not comparable with the later data from the reduced number of firms, which represent about 85 per cent of manufacturers' stocks. Stocks in dealers' hands include U. S. Government stocks taken over during the war and finally disposed of shortly after the end of 1921. Stocks include wool, tops, and noils and are reduced to grease equivalent in
the same manner as in the consumption report; further details as to classes of wool, etc., are given in press releases.
« Percentage of active wool machinery compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, beginning with June, 1919. From October, 1918, through
May, 1919, these data had been collected by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, while previous thereto they were compiled by the National Association of Wool Manufacturers. The 1913 figure is based on only one month (November figures as of December 1), while thereafter the averages are of quarterly data, until 1917, when monthly figures
were started in the middle of the year. The 1917 averages are therefore based on 9 months' figures. Up to 1921 the data represent the percentage of active machines to
total, and beginning with 1921 the percentage of active hours to total hours of plant operation. Figures on the old basis of active machines are still published in the press
releases but are not much different from the more accurate active hour figures. Previous to October, 1922, these figures were originally given as of the first of
the following month, representing the previous months' operations, but these have now been changed to show the activity for the month to which properly credited; where
activity of over 100 per cent is shown, overtime was reported sufficient to offset all idle hours and leaves an excess. Details as to number of spindles, etc., are given in press
releases. These data comprise practically all wool-consuming mills.




28

Table 7.—CLOTHING *
MEN'S AND BOYS'
GARMENTS CUT *

Separate
Suits trou- Overcoats
sers

YEAR AND MONTH

HOSIERY 3

KNIT UNDERWEAR'

ProUnducNet St'ks, New filled
tion ship- end of orders orders,
(all ments mo.
end of
mo.
classes)

ProNet St'ks, New
filled
duc- ship- end of orders orders,
tion ments mo.
end of

OVERALLS 2

UnNet filled
orCut ship- ders,
ments end of
mo.

Thousands of garments Thousands of dozen
garments

Thousands of dozen pairs

Un-

mo.

Thousands of dozen garments
6765
770
1,070
1,230
7
1, 038
5
1, 156 « 1, 106
1,020 1,243
1,104 1,331
1,112 1,404

53,834
3,352
3,812
3,522
3,749
159
3,436

3,331
3,758
3,620
3,780
3,513

6,259
5,771
6,703
7,781
8,364

3,410
3,888
3,639
3,909
3, 551

5,755
7,394
6,077
5,960
4,578

986
846
1, 046
1,170
7
1, 108
1,154
1,029
1,062
1,098

3,694
3,941
3,113
3,807

3,551
3,886
3,226
4,016

7,914
8,141
8,390
8,093

4,058
4,143
3,095
3,892

6,141
6,342
6,046
6,018

1,082
1,127
880
1, 082

958
1, 049
950
1,369

1,527
1,623
1,617
1,434

952
1,115
803
1,434

2,583
2,614
2,458
2,543

3,841
4,151
3,863
3,386

1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average.

4, 355
4,294
3,927
3,646

7,695
7,965
7,568
7,640

4,896
4,246
3,838
3,183

6, 407
6,481
6,167
5,395

1,055
1,181
1,181
973

1,464
1,359
1,230
959

1,216
1,322
1,073
1,100

1,241
1,147
1,046
924

2,416
2,185
1,967
1,925

-- -

2,091

2,071

466

360

316

«168
994
1,309
1,157
7
1, 119
8
1, 221
965
1,124
1,097

6837
1,840
2,992
3,807
2,456
3,002
2,175
2,364
1,969

1927
May
June
July
August

__

September
October
November
December
1928

2,396
2,564
2,478
1,707

September—
October
November
T)p,r»p,mhfir

294
353
254
308

99
106
97
125

3,578
3,603
3,808
3,304

3,033
3,279
3,808
3,217

7,983
8,466
8,494
8,618

3, 109
3,137
3,363
3,418

5, 380
5,167
4,532
4,520

1,022
1,132
1,215
1,151

917
1,042
1,194
965

1,202
1,209
1,250
1,520

1,309
1,025
1,208
934

2,313
2,275
2,281
2,245

1,933
2,098
1,898
2,222

340
496
590
734

370
367
346
394

323
322
330
360

163
159
169
159

3,462
3,292
2,786
3,474

3,312
3,386
2,963
3,735

9,030
9,011
8,916
8,656

3,682
3,573
2,836
3,207

4,794
4,900
4,711
4,079

1,148
1,113
881
1,098

1,019
998
942
1,306

1,709
1, 761
1,658
1,570

1,028
894
852
1,236

2,164
2,053
,947
,896

2, 173
2,251
1,911
1,807

728
812
528
186

385
404
343
271

358
340
297
255

161
174
230
260

3,255
3,852
3,810
3,006

3, 755
4,166
4,144
3,362

8,128
7,849
7,699
7,522

3,810
4,342
4,751
3,388

3,957
3,888
4,609
4,403

1,016
1,297
1,147
951

1,402
1,514
1,168
873

1,370
1,228
1,164
1,210

1,213
1,483
1, 163
819

1,696
,645
,605
1,508

2,440
2,434

__

354
377
372
341

1,876
1,816
1,772
2,055

May
June
July
August

298
325
329
221

1,889
2,090
2,129
2,315

__

2,074
2,308
2,257
1,920

2,411
1,885

January
February
March___
April

2,134
2,080
2,312
2,295

350
374
475
235

374
363
402
394

311
327
376
348

261
238
241
229

3,606
3,203
3,741
3,639

3,240
3,075
3,713
3,493

7,550
6,952
8,178
7,985

3,337
2,928
3,776
3,977

4,229
4,183
4,254
4, 665

1,049
1,077
1,251
1,274

948
995
1,166
1,112

1,271
1,310
1,368
1,523

1,447
1,356
1,330
1,071

2,009
2,358
2,501
2,444

1,987
2,198

2,412
2,221

346
507

384
324

352
300

194
157

3,823
3,543

3,658
3,567

8,394
8,413

4,101
3,513

5,071
4,841

1,316
1,204

1,168
1,139

1,679
1,737

1,088
1,149

2,349
2,342

1929
January
February
March
April

May
June___
July
August

_

_

_

.

_

Sp.ptfvmher

October
November

. ____!

* Monthly data from 1920 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Boole of Business Statistics, Textiles Section, pp. 37, 38, and 48,
except for men's and boys' garments, for which monthly data from 1924 appeared in the May, 1928, issue (No. 81), p. 48.
1
Compiled by the £7". S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 850 identical establishments. Details by materials are given in press releases;
2 Compiled from reports to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from approximately 290 establishments; further details by kind of overalls are given
in presssummaries. The data represent overalls, overall jackets, and one-piece overall suits, while additional data on children's play suits, work pants and breeches,
blanket-lined and similar coats, sheep-lined coats, leather jackets and hunting, riding, and camp clothing are shown in the press summaries.
3
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, as reported by 261 identical establishments, which produced 44 per cent of the total output of
hosiery in 1925, according to the census of manufacturers. Further details are given in press releases.
* Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, compiled from reports of approximately 150 establishments, which produced 61 per cent of the total output of knit underwear in 1925, according to the census of manufacturers, while stocks are from 70 to 83 establishments only. Further details as to classes given in press
releases. Data previous to May, 1924, were compiled by the Associated Knit Underwear Manufacturers of America.
6
7
611 months' average.
6 months' average.
9 months' average.




29

Table 8.—TEXTILE WHOLESALE PRICESl
COTTON

YEAR AND
MONTH

Price to Middling,
producer, upland,
New
all
grades 3 York

COTTON GOODS

COTTON YARN
Carded, Carded,
white,
north- single
warp,
ern,
40/ls,
mule southspun,
ern
22/1,
spincones,
ning
Boston

Print
cloth,
04 x 60,
Comin.,
posite 38^ yds.
index < 5.35 lb.,
to
f. o. b.
mill
Bel: to
1911-1913

Dollars per pound

Dollars per yard

Dollars per pound

SILK
GOODS

Un-

Japanese,
13-15,
New
York

Composite
index «

finished

worsted,
13 oz., at
mill

Dollars per yard

Dollars
Dollars
per pound per yard

$0.78
.64
.79
1.05
1. 56
2.11
7 1.63
1.83

$6. 273
6.960
9.639
9. 084

$1.82
1.75

.077
.086
.103
.091
.093
.076
.076
.077

.087
.104
.123
.113
.104
.093
.093
.092

.85
1.25
1.41
1.42
1.40
1.15
1.10
1.16

.26
.42
.51
.53
.55
.46
.45
.54

1.18
1.41
1.73
1.69
1.72
1.44
1.37
1.56

$1.03
.99
1.01

• $2. 168
2.195
2.348
2.005
1.912
1.997

6.574
7.648
8.653
6.248
6.574
6.195
5.443
5.072

1.40
1.44
1.57
1.38
1.39
1.36
1.24
1.18

177
175
172
168

.089
.087
.083
.080

.110
.111
.110
.105

1.12
1.12
1.12
1.14

.45
.47
.48
.49

1.38
1.40
1.40
1.40

.98
1.00
1.00
1.00

1.913
1.913
1.913
1.917

5.096
5.145
4.802
4.998

1.20
1.20
1.19
1.19

.523
.494
.483
.480

166
163
161
161

.080
.077
.076
.076

.098
.095
.092
.091

1.17
1.20
1.20
1.19

.50
.52
.52
.53

1.43
1.50
1.53
1.55

1.00
1.00
1.03
1.03

1.935
1.953
2.008
2.008

5.145
5.292
5.194
5.390

1.19
1.20
1.20
1.20

.380
.374
.384
.369

.480
.489
.515
.514

104
162
165
163

.079
.077
.079
.075

.092
.091
.092
.091

1.18
1.18
1.17
1.14

.55
.55
.55
.54

1.58
1.58
1.60
1.60

1.03
1.03
1.03
1.03

2.008
2.008
2.008
2.008

4.998
4.851
4.851
4.851

1.19
1.18
1.17
1.16

.185
.196
.199
.205

.358
.372
.375
.378

.501
.495
.511
.506

ICO
103
104
165

.074
.078
.078
.078

.089
.090
.090 ;
.091 I

1.14
1.10
1.12
1.14

.54
.54
.55
.55

1.58
1.58
1.55
1.58

.99
.98
.98
.98

2.008
2.008
2.008
2.008

5.096
5.145
5.047
4.998

1.16
1.16
1.16
1.16

.179
.180
.188
.185

.202
.202
.212
.201

.382
.372
.377
.303

.510
.512
.527
.510

165
103
164
164

.076
.075
.077
.076

. 090
.089
.089 ;
.089

1. 12
1.09
1.05
1.04

.55
.55
.52
.49

1.68
1.58
1.58
1.55

.98
.98
.98
.98

2.008
2.008
2.008
2.008

4.998
5.096
4.998
6.145

1.16
1.18
1.19
1.18

.180
.179
.178

.195
.188
.186

.353
.348
.348

.499
.499
.505

162
159
159

.073
.072
.073

.087
.084
.083

1.00
.97
.93

.43
.42
.42

1.50
1.45
1.45

.98
.98
.98

2.008
2.008
2.008

4.777
4.925
4.876

1.18
1.19
1.18

.102
.145
.235
.318
.324
.339

$0. 248
.218
.198
.297
.449
.662
.596
.703

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av

.125
.193
.270
.268
.222
.151
.159
.186

.152
.213
.294
.287
.235
.176
.176
.200

.331
.397
.486
.475
.418
.358
.351
.371

1927
September
October
November
December

.225
.210
.200
.187

.218
.211
.203
.196

1938
January
February
March
April

.186
.170
.178
.187

May
June
July
August

September
October
November
December

UOO
97
91
122
187
292
272
323

$0. 053
.046
.041
.061
.095
.159
.146
.182

$0. 448
.571
.648
.593
.558
.508
.491
.499

162
187
213
199
188
160
157
163

.406
.402
.383
.371

.547
.546
.530
.522

.190
.185
.195
.203

.369
.360
.366
.366

.201
.197
.210
.188

.217
.214
.215
.193

.176
.181
.178
.180

September.. __
October
November
December

French
serge,
39",
at mill

SILK,
RAW

.26
.36
.41
.66
8
.76
.64
.51

$0. 128

May__ _
June
July
August -.

8/3*8,
crossbred
stock,
Boston

SUITING

$0.25

$0. 120
.104
.091
.137
.220
.295
.299
.310

_ _

DRESS
GOODS

$0.57
.61
.71
.87
1.59
81.84
1.74
1.66

av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av

1939
January
February
March...
A pril

Sheet\i blood
ing, 4/4
Terri- combing
Trion,
tory, grease,
L L, 36",
Ohio
fine,
4yds.
and
staple,
tolb., scoured PennNew
sylvania
York
fleeces

WOR-

STED
YARN

$0. 062
.056
. 052
.072
.119
.195
.168
.211

1913 mo.
1914 mo
1915 mo.
1916 mo.
1917 mo
1918 mo.
1919 mo.
1920 mo
mo.
mo.
mo
mo.
mo.
mo
mo.
mo.

WOOL
(Boston) *

7.119

!
!

i Unless otherwise specified, all prices are averages of weekly quotations as compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly data from
1909 through 1926 on items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Textiles Section, pp. 13,14,15, 28, 35, and 36, except on raw
silk,3Japan, 13-15, New York, for which monthly data from 1917 were presented in the November, 1927, issue of the SURVEY (No. 75), p. 27.
Averages of weekly quotations on representative grades in the Boston market, as compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
8
Price of cotton to the producer, given at the end of each month until December, 1923, since which month it is given as of the 15th of the month, is a weighted average
of prices received by producers throughout the United States for all grades of cotton as compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
in the New York market.
„
,
,
, .^r
,,„ r
„"• T-rd at the end of each month in the New York market
r
rf
of 18 domestic numbers an! 5 Japanese numbers, including most of the standard fabrics manufactured both in the United States and in Japan. Monthly data from 1919
are given on p. 138 of the August, 1928, issue, No. 84.
fl
7
9
B
Average for years 1911 to 1913, inclusive.
Average for 10 months.
Average for 6 months.
Average for 9 months.




30

Table 9.—COTTON
PRODUCTION
(crop
estimate) 2

YEAR AND MONTH

GINNINGS
EXRE(total crop CEIPTS
PORTS CONIM- (includ- SUMPto end of
INTO PORTS ing
month
TION
indicated) * SIGHT
linters)

STOCKS
(end of month)
Domestic

World visible *

Total

Mills

Warehouses

465, 289
454,064
500, 749
551, 701
567, 984
514, 712
493,293
486,933

3,085,132

1, 359, 417
1, 209, 177
1, 552, 989
1,863,668
1, 658, 513
1, 594, 578
1,430,976
1,453,054

1, 725, 715

6, 100, 426

Total
cotton

American
cotton

3, 977, 335
4, 349, 535
4,628,711
5, 920, 777
4, 704, 844
3,978,899
4,021,720
5, 065, 485
5,662,420

2, 976, 202
3, 061, 535
3, 094, 377
4, 473, 105
3, 494, Oil

4, 410, 286
3, 152, 091
2, 152, 179

Bales «
1909-13 monthly average
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average _
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

_
-__
__

13,033,235
14, 156, 486
16, 134, 930
11,191,820
11, 449, 930
11,302,375
12,040,532
11, 420. 763
13, 439, 603

13,982,811
15,905,840
11,068,173
11,363,915

1, 203, 092
1, 035, 730
1, 256, 604
1, 186, 402
959, 945

17, 313
18, 455

7o5, 226
746, 978

26,283

547,068
727,033

33, 798

18, 781

352, 953

896, 699

29,226
49,999

561,280
513,261

9,729,306

1,014,029
1,000,802

23,158
31,030

539,509
509,484

10, 170, 694
13, 639, 399
16, 122, 516
17, 755, 070
12, 783, 112
14, 296, 549

944, 260
1, 119, 349
1, 344, 384
1, 424, 535
1, 350, 907
1, 339, 065

31, 228
26, 754
26, 113

439, 930
566, 243
711, 020

30,232

754,026

34, 268
28, 583

789, 812
727, 661

450,565
507,294
543, 444
460, 139
536, 044
556, 971
617, 085
547, 974

690,988

7,953,641
9, 762, 069
10, 139, 671
13, 627, 602
16, 103, 679
17, 977, 000
12, 955, 000
14, 478, 000

607, 546

21,347

365, 509

monthly average
monthly average.
monthly average
monthly average _ _ _ _
monthly average
_
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average .

32,064
23,103

628, 132
481, 943
bS9, 358
340, 311

11, 248, 242

11,906,480
11, 325, 532
13, 270, 970
7, 977, 778

920,106
1,031,256

412,690

3, 414, 853

4,898,345
4,777,800
4, 137, 287
4, 687, 250

4,935,973
4, 792, 190

2,205,675
3,345,356
2,914,132
2,478,774
3,092,672
3,504,998
3, 339, 136

2,752,066
2,814,722
3, 614, 068

3,909,420

4, 787, 564
3, 258, 836

5, 757, 076
4, 656, 566

1,312,862
1,447,196
1,480,319
1,087,880
1,283,913
1,432,843
1, 605, 262
1, 332, 174

4, 151, 814
3, 324, 393

6,346,620
4,950,925
3, 503, 179
3, 722, 885
4, 579, 560
5, 626, 734
6, 732, 073
5, 791, 407

629, 948
659, 841
569, 765
634, 520

4, 659, 218
3, 775, 984
3, 227, 367
3, 293, 729

1, 792, 261
1, 594, 475
1, 404, 815
1, 120, 784

2, 866, 957
2, 181, 509
1, 822, 552
2, 172, 945

6, 507, 136
5, 654, 492
4, 988, 005
4, 480, 172

4, 815, 136
4, 014, 492
3, 417, 005
3, 131, 172

631, 041
28, 347
19, 235 1, 126, 509
28, 845 1, 001, 951
41,211 767, 214

627, 784
613, 520
626, 742
538, 786

5, 080, 708

3, 964, 615
5, 419, 193
5, 655, 574

5, 356, 078
6, 478, 500
7, 314, 256
7, 501, 489

4, 108, 078
5, 296, 500
6, 074, 256

7,364,112

1, 116, 093
1, 323, 703
1, 551, 776
1, 708, 538

4,706,031
3,853,119
3, 435, 371

3,991,285
5,471,631

2,372,800
2, 347, 490

2,707,372
4,038,787

2,417,302
3, 264, 977

4,209,484
5, 240, 157
4, 006, 574

1927
May
June
July
August

162,283
13, 492, 000

834, 248

28,041

12, 692, 000
12, 678, 000
12, 842, 000
12, 955, 000

5, 944, 739
9, 920, 846
11, 738, 338
12, 072, 763

2, 045, 097
2, 897, 535
2, 606, 303
1, 691, 244

915, 233
645, 075
727, 521
727, 809

41, 445
38, 618
41, 433
18, 149

728, 935
646, 594
614, 428
485, 219

586, 142
572, 875
581, 325
524, 765

6, 722, 257
5, 982, 492
5, 104, 507
4, 426, 877

1, 708, 646
1, 668, 649
1, 592, 917
1, 507, 599

5, 013, 611
4, 313, 843
3, 511, 590
2, 919, 278

7, 162, 849
6, 701, 828
6, 273, 385
6, 022, 896

5, 469, 849
5, 019, 828
4, 543, 385
4, 101, 896

705,074

--

1, 533, 577

12,501,447

September
October
November
December

128,932

37, 078
31, 147

19, 842

14,587

591, 345
457, 781
341, 849
259, 489

577, 384
510, 399
439, 821
526, 729

3, 589, 643
2, 807, 695
2, 201, 472
1, 970, 929

1, 330, 880
1, 160, 888
1, Oil, 721
782, 068

2, 258, 763
1, 646, 807
1, 189, 751
1, 188, 861

5, 629, 762
4, 961, 966
4, 056, 219
3, 480, 388

3, 532, 762
2, 909, 966
2, 165, 219
1, 790, 388

2, 645, 977
4, 635, 981
5, 252, 843
5, 315, 411

4,114,118
6, 197, 901
7, 130, 058
7, 765, 517

2, 563, 118
4, 644, 901

6,742,896
7, 525, 734

5,973,958

6,041,489

1928
January
February
March
April

_- -- _12, 783, 112

May
June
July
August

14, 291, 000

88, 761
956, 577

301, 766
339, 439
508, 597

September
October
November
December

14, 439, 000
13, 993, 000
14, 133, 000
14, 478, 000

4, 962, 482
10, 162, 482
12, 560, 154
13, 144, 333

2, 026, 530
3, 927, 491
2, 901, 680
2, 342, 570

814, 569
18, 508
27, 840 1, 251, 966
39, 213 1, 451, 505
39, 630 1, 088, 253

492, 221
618, 788
610, 884
534, 352

3, 365, 958
5, 830, 942
6, 819, 721

7,056,303

719, 981
1, 194, 961
1, 566, 878
1, 740, 892

13, 888, 972

1, 112, 298
631, 185
735, 973
555, 444

54, 939
39, 720
37, 124
84, 621

815, 871
629, 521
569, 653
472, 304

668, 389
598, 098
632, 808
631, 710

6, 383, 079
5, 622, 752
4, 908, 091
4, 130, 406

1, 767, 742
1, 746, 537
1, 730, 944
1, 606, 832

4, 615, 337
3, 876, 215
3, 177, 147
2, 523, 574

7, 606, 856
7, 226, 096
6, 749, 152
6, 052, 806

5, 509, 856
5, 043, 096
4, 469, 152
3, 679, 806

327, 673
220, 173

42, 486
26, 113

328, 068
308, 947

668, 229
570, 281

3, 324, 996
2, 665, 022

1,477,308
1, 289, 294

1,847,688

5, 268, 387
4, 475, 721
3, 651, 078

3, 000, 387
2, 301, 721
1, 693, 078

__

18, 473
25, 258

5,438,058
5, 899, 517

1929
January
February
March
April
M^ay
June
July
August

14, 296, 549

1, 375, 728

86, 970

September
October
November
December
l|

1 Receipts into sight compiled by New Orleans Cotton Exchange; imports and exports from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce;
consumption, ginnings, and domestic stocks from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Linters are not included in the statistics in this table, except in
the exports. Yearly figures represent averages for the calendar year except for ginnings and production, in which case totals for the crop year are shown (not an average).
Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 on items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Textiles Section, p. 18 to 27.
2 The yearly figures, from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, represent the latest revised estimates of total production of the cotton
crop3 for the year (not a monthly average). The monthly figures show the current estimate of total production as reported each month.
Figures for September are to Sept. 25 only, prior to 1924. December figures cover ginnings through Dec. 13 only. January figures for all years cover ginnings through
Jan. 4 16, and March figures cover all ginnings of the crop. Yearly figures represent total ginnings for the cotton crop harvested in that year (not a monthly average).
These figures, from the Commercial and Financial Chronicle, represent world visible supply on the Saturday nearest the end of the month, covering European ports,,
United States port and interior, Egypt, India, and quantities afloat.
» All bales are running bales counting round as half bales, except for imports, which are given in equivalent 500-pound bales.




31

Table 10.—COTTON MANUFACTURING *
SPINDLE ACTIVITY 1

YEAR AND
MONTH

Active
spindles

UnPer
filled ProducTotal spin- Ratio
spin- dle to ca- Billings Orders, Ship- Stocks, Ac- ortion
gray
end of
dle
(New
yardage ments month tivity ders, Bedford)
in
end
hours place pacity
mo.

Millions
Thous. of hours Hours

1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av _
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av _
1920 mo. av
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

33,052 » 7, 532
33,026 7,725
34,681 8,292
31, 136 6,689
32,642 7,883
32, 352 8,086
32,547 8,704
29,968 7,729

Per
cent

30, 559
30, 748
31, 136
32, 293
33, 400
33,525
33,878
33,807

mo. av
mo. av
mo. av . .
mo. av
mo. av_
mo. av
mo. av _
mo. av

1928
May.__
June
July
August

FINE
COTTON
GOODS
(3)

FINISHED COTTON GOODS «

Thousands of
yards

Cases

Per
cent

Days

8 52, 787 8 39, 431 s 25, 543 8 39, 920

»206
209
222
177
208
215
237
216

838

86.7

»91.5 10 85, 386 i« 90, 054 10 44, 935 10 36, 226
93.5 U 94, 016 11 95, 509 11 49, 102 . 11 44, 937
95, 098 91,504 48, 116 46,166
98.9
77,650 76, 105 41,863 43, 139
78.5
76, 558 43, 691 39,640
78,756
92.9
81, 214 78,565 47, 352 39, 641
95.4
84,458 81, 710 49,428 38, 243
104.7
95.5
75, 100 74,299 46,563 37, 829

1065
H66
68
58
60
64
70
62

10 9. 4
H9.9
9.5
5.9
5.8
6.1
5.8
4.8

COTTON
CLOTH «

Thous. of square
yards

Thousands of
dollars

3,880
5,189
3,563
5,534
5,441
2,737
4,146
11, 732

38,890
27,207
43, 195
51,688
63,718
45, 348
56,920
68,229

$547
$519
470
311
653
284
512
746
1,054 1,471
1,512 1,603
1,208 1,681
2,521 2,238

354, 274 12 7, 148
385,770 11, 872
438, 761 18,248
366, 360 14, 782
421, 059
9,104
5,057
403,020
480, 868
5,250
261, 318
5,104

45,959
48,958
38,710
39, 818
45, 276
42, 775
46, 670
44, 337

Pieces

7 434, 188
383, 523
329, 571

7,966
7,252
6,251
7,431

222
203
176
209

95.1
88.4
79.7
87.7

73, 539
70, 029
58,685
70, 748

72, 961
61, 347
62, 310
71, 743

47, 555
42, 357
40,500
46,283

40, 449
38, 907
37,958
35, 819

62
53
51
54

4.3
3.6
3.8
4.4

128,604
134, 158
80,358
136, 237

5,722
4,615
3,490
3,753

45, 695
46,534
44, 951
43,928

September
October
November
December

28,277
30, 315
30, 597
30,622

6,961
8,694
8,524
7,711

196
246
241
219

90.6
103.9
108.1
99.1

69, 805
83,935
82,700
79, 112

74,483
87, 175
82, 657
74, 417

45, 767
50,984
49, 136
47,587

33,410
32,046
36,566
38, 678

61
66
65
62

5.0
6.0
5.5
5.6

113, 627
282,763
348, 712
363, 206

3,139
3,676
4,389
5,840

34, 694
56,087
54,248
50,661

1939
January ..
February
March
April _

30, 758
31,008
31,104
30, 924

9,225
8,221
8,910
8,861

261
233
252
251

111.6
110.7
109.3
110.3

81, 676
81, 418
98, 495
96,707

86,302
88,460
94,872
90,469

53,196
54,391
65, 112
57, 030

36, 374
37,153
35, 478
34, 920

65
74
77
74

5.6
6.4
6.3
6.4

403,300
410, 372
464,539
425, 925

6,069
4,400
5,362
5,334

55,186
51,492
58, 474
49,233

30,910
30,628

9,165
8,155

261
232

110.9
104.6

88,707
78,964

79,228
65, 462

54, 247
45, 674

35, 618
35,487

71
60

6.2
5.1

526, 971
465, 658

6,527
4,880

46,261
44,730

May
June
July
August _

September
October
November
December..

(quarterly)

ImFall New
Bedports Exports River * ford •

28,948
28,628
28,160
28,244

.

MILL
DIVIDENDS

779
762
882
705
418
290
299
232

1,365
1,500
1,258
942
981
726
567
358

241

346

217

229

225

259

235

249

225

280

226

•Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 on items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Textiles Section, pp. 29 to 34, 39,
and 40.
i Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing total cotton spindles active in textile mills during the month. The capacity percentage
takes into account working days, on a single-shift basis, exclusive of holidays. Details by States are given in press releases.
J
Compiled by the National Association of Finishers of Cotton Fabrics from reports from 31 out of 51 members, covering work done outside of regular textile mills. In the
statistics given above, white goods and dyed goods each comprise regularly about 40 per cent of billings and orders, and printed goods about 20 per cent. Prior to November, 1923, an additional firm was included. Details by Federal reserve districts and classes of goods are given in the association's reports. The goods are billed as completed,
hence billings approximate production.
8
Data on fine cotton goods, from the Fine Cotton Goods Exchange, are reported by 24 identical mills in the New Bedford district, representing about 50 per cent of the
fine cotton goods industry in New England and from 20 to 30 per cent throughout the United States. Data on sales are no longer published, as not strictly comparable
with production figures.
< Imports and exports of cotton cloth from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Exports of cotton cloth include duck and
other cloth, bleached, unbleached, and colored. Beginning with January, 1921, the figures are reported in square yards instead of linear yards, as formerly, and are probably slightly smaller than in the corresponding linear-yard measurement. Imports include bleached and unbleached, colored, dyed, printed, and woven figured cloths.
* Dividends paid by cotton mills in Fall River in quarter ending in the month given, comprising about 38 mills, are compiled by G. M. Haffards & Co. Yearly figures
are quarterly averages.
e
Dividends paid by New Bedford cotton mills in quarter ending in the month given, compiled from records comprising about 26 mills, suppliedSby Sanford &
Yearly figures are quarterly averages.
' 9 months' average, April to December, inclusive.
8
6 months' average, July to December, inclusive; previous data not available.
• 5 months' average, August to December, inclusive; previous data not available.
1011 months' average, January to November, inclusive.
"11 months' average, February to December, inclusive.
» 0 months' average, January to September, inclusive.




32

Table 11.—COTTON TEXTILES AND BUTTONS
CARDED SALES
YARN*

YEAR AND
MONTH

Production

Stocks,
end of
month

CLOTH
PRINTING s

COTTON TEXTILES «

Unfilled
orders,
Proend of duction
month

New
orders

Shipments

Stocks, Unfilled
end of orders,
end of
month month

FRESHWATER
PEARL
BUTTONS <

Production

Pro- Stocks, Pro- Ship- New Stocks,
duc- end of duc- ments orders end of
tion mouth tion
month
Ratio
to capacity

Thousands of yards

Thousands of pounds

76, 921

12, 562
13, 874
14,011
12, 489
11,969
9,799
10, 899

49, 826
64, 015
75, 725
69, 378

74, 326
75, 153
78, 151

48.8
51.1
51.9
50.7

305, 645
302, 328
272, 227
288,964

73, 520
63, 796
49, 996
54, 495

76, 149
79, 416
75, 977
74,682

417, 245
394, 742
388, 634
391, 743

398, 005
492, 556
519, 770
468, 861

66,079
77, 320
76,289
73, 753

345, 354
309, 118
325, 633
277,098

389, 195
372,950
345, 311
352, 091

440, 585
472, 176
504,876
430, 298

326, 121
252,008
252, 779

367, 340
401, 260
382, 920

382, 512
358, 748
368, 858

e 9, 887 « 27, 597
11, 609 34, 127

219, 024
277, 853
296, 925

226, 117
275, 206
299, 166

220, 815
271, 801
292, 321

257, 103
214, 840
414, 015

278, 644
454, 800
358, 851

7 56, 177
66, 183

1938
January
February
March
April

18, 934
18, 642
22, 598
16, 737

13, 444
13, 611
13, 475
13, 390

38, 287
38,457
33, 030
31, 925

297, 669
300,323
358, 025
286, 005

194, 114
256, 328
349, 855
335, 117

2C6, 947
285, 404
337, 573
270, 172

367, 223
382, 142
402, 594
418, 427

313, 893
284, 817
297, 099
362,044

May
June
Julv
August

16, 358
19, 415
12, 522
14, 046

13, 427
12, 539
12, 350
11, 574

28, 484
25, 435
24, 619
27, 044

349, 325
287, 818
221, 826
302, 470

269, 845
267, 025
187, 439
340, 810

326, 244
270, 342
217, 540
324, 073

441, 508
458, 984
463, 270
441, 667

September
October _
November
Dftcfttnhpr

18, 839
17, 621
18, 675
20, 157

10, 248
8,476
8,568
8,204

34, 836
39, 041
44,752
43, 618

253, 688
284, 899
341, 841
279, 207

387, 151
401, 953
375, 163
225, 189

278, 110
307,402
347, 949
276,098

1929
January
February
March
April

18, 311
18, 718
23,373
18, 269

8,836
8,765
8,328
8,446

43, 246
42, 722
43,476
40, 345

342, 806
292, 873
297,994
283,878

317,078
340, 709
358, 333
202, 520

17, 941
20, 272
13, 211

8,760
8,785
8,901

37, 609
32, 650
32, 472

341, 370
285, 928
234, 439

278, 335
228, 244
262, 889

_ _

Thousands of gross

46.1
46.0
33.4
44.0
46.7
49.8
47.3

1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av_
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av
1927 monthly av . « 15, 682
1928 monthly av 17, 879

May_
_
June
July
August

Stocks,
end of
month

OCEAN PEARL
BUTTONS «

185

217

248

529
»579

11,103
10, 962
10, 914
10, 949

190
233
225
220

223
258
229
217

301
336
237
216

565
578
585
584

48.8
46.8
29.7
43.6

11,098
11, 277
10, 847
10, 746

206
158
110
187

. 204
187
197
227

199
165
163
224

532
636
646
600

75, 161
73, 687
79, 437
83, 995

47.7
51.0
53.0
44.6

10, 593
10, 621
10, 815
10,865

163
195
198

241
262
258

222
288
308

482

82, 259
78, 307
92,544
88, 635

80, 212
81, 206
79, 361
82, 106

42.2
52.1
52.9
52.6

11, 306
11, 249
11,034
11, 114

85, 894
72, 808

78, 184
78, 492

51.6
50.1

11,226
11, 351

8

September
October
November
December
1 Compiled by the Cotton Textile Institute from weekly reports, the production figures being combined into the monthly totals on the basis of either 4 or 5 weeks, June
and September being 5-week months, while stocks and unfilled orders are for the Saturday nearest the end of the month. The figures for 1927 are not strictly comparable
owing to the progressive addition of reporting firms, June and July reports being from about 100 mills each week, August and September from 118 mills with about 1,400,000
spindles in place, October and most of November from 134 mills with about 1,700,OCOspindles in place, and beginning with the week ended November 26 from 141 mills
with about 1,950,000 spindles in place, these latter mills representing about 70 per cent of the spindle-capacity of the industry. These reports include only yarn made for
sale to other mills, yarn used by the same mill in further manufacture being excluded.
2 Compiled by the Association of Cotton Textile Merchants of New York from weekly, biweekly, and monthly reports of 46 commission houses and of several additional
mills through the Cotton Textile Institute, representing mills manufacturing 23 groups of textile constructions, as follows, new groups added since the beginning of 1926 being
marked with the date of inauguration of their statistics: Class A sheetings, Class B sheetings, Class C sheetings, print cloths narrower than 36 inches, print cloth 36 inches
and wider, pajama checks, drills 40 inches and narrower, 4-leaf clothing twills, pocketing twills, jeans (gray cloth only), osnaburgs, heavy-warp sateens, drills, twills,
sheetings, and sateens wider than 40 inches, denims, chambrays, cheviots and plaids, ginghams, wide brown sheetings (compiled entirely by the Cotton Textile Institute
beginning with July, 1927, with additional mills reporting), print cloth fancies (beginning March, 1926), carded broadcloth (beginning July, 1926), canton flannels for the
mitten trade (beginning July, 1926), flat ducks (beginning October, 1927), tobacco cloths (beginning October, 1927), and miscellaneous print cloths (beginning October, 1927).
orders and shipments are computed from the other figures. The mills reporting are believed to represent over 60 per cent of the industry and are located chiefly in the South.
3 Compiled by the Cotton Textile Institute from reports of from 15 to 18 mills finishing print cloths, both job printers, i. e., those printing cloths not of their own manufacture, and corporation printers, i. e., those both manufacturing and printing. These statistics, therefore, overlap somewhat the data of the National Association of Finishers
of Cotton Fabrics, as they include corporation printers, which the association statistics omit, and exclude white and dyed goods, which the association statistics cover in
addition to printed goods. The machines included in these reports represent from 68 to 74 per cent of the total printing machines. Cotton and rayon mixtures are included
in these data, and the institute's reports present details by kind of cloth and use. Stocks represent printed yardage, both in cases and open stock.
« Compiled by the National Association of Button Manufacturers from reports of 17 firms representing 95.2 per cent of the machine capacity of the association members,
except prior to July, 1922, when 16 firms reported on stocks, and there has been a further variation in the production reports; but being on a percentage basis, they are
comparable. Stocks are as of the last Saturday of the month. Monthly data from 1922 through 1926 may be found in the Pecord Book, of Business Statistics, Textile Section,
page 47.
5 Compiled by the Ocean Pearl Button Manufacturers1 Association from reports of 9 members, estimated to represent about 75 per cent of the industry. Figures represent 4-week totals, the extra week being omitted in 5-week months to insure comparability. Details by sizes are given in the association's reports, stock figures being
presented also by patterns. Production represents buttons polished.
7
8
8 7 months' average.
5 months' average.
11 months' average.
• 9 months' average.




33

Table 12.—SILK, RAYON, OTHER TEXTILES, AND FUR*
SILK

Thous.
of Ibs.

Nar- SpinAt
At
ning
ware- 2 mfg. 3 Broad row spinlooms looms
houses plants
dles
Per cent of active
hours to total

Bales

Elastic Fibers
(unwebbing^ mnfd.)

Shipments

Burlaps

Imports *

Pyroxylin-coated
textiles ?
(artificial leather)

UnPyrox- Ship- filled
ylin ments orders,
spread billed end of
mo.

Dolls, Thous.
per Ib. of dolls.

Long
tons

Thous. of Ibs.

36, 880
47, 628
39, 595
43, 436
49, 873
47, 971
52, 151
49, 915
47, 471
51, 664

96
154
306
174
326
143
583
839
1, 353
1,074

15
263
385
320
ic 818
2G8
645
1,863
1,485
2,947

$4.77
4.66
2.67
2.80
2.80
2.11
2.00
1.81
1 49
1. 50

$1, 394

27, 274
33, 817
20 418
22, 815
26, 613
24, 691
25, 854
25, 063
25, 385
26, 077

77.3
79.1
67.7
64.2

1, 366
1,146
1,080
844

2,915
3,048
3,263
3,164

1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50

1,159
1,374
1,627
1,332

39, 263
28, 493
32,102
23, 672

48, 922
66, 102
63, 901
62, 050

4, 093
4,767
5,715
4, 629

56.7
55.4
52.1
54.1

56.9
57.1
62.7
52.1

909
710
659
1,248

3,128
3,157
2,949
2,976

1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50

1, 415
1,384
1,211
1,399

21, 846
19, 672
18, 449
20, 657

58, 124
56, 913
58, 541
47, 766

92.7
102.0
94.5
92.7

54.0
50.5
51.8
52.6

66.9
69.3
60.3
58.5

924
1,238
1,004
1,759

2,814
2, 663
2,434
2,850

1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50

1,478
1, 624
1,462
1,260

21,004
25, 615
25, 651
36, 496

25, 778
25,026
25, 892
23, 108

94.7
99.8
100.2
101.1

48.0
53.6
66.3
68.8

61.0
66.5
66.3
66.9

1,707
1,267
1,901
1,683

3,036
2,889
2,863
2,736

1.50
1.30
1.30
1.30

1,412
1,572
1,869
1, 766

24, 623
23, 162
20,985

101.0
100.7

74.2
67.8

65.3
63.1

1,589
1,582

2,423

l.SO
1.30

1, 725
1,473

4,627
3,305
4,361
4,872
5,163
5,050
6,400
6,472
7,195
7,355

18, 558
27, 887
30, 635
29, 868
30, 592
41, 779
41, 796
45, 948
47,584

51, 312
21, 315
32, 350
33, 367
37, 464
44, 819
36, 814
46, 768
44, 707

15, 283
15, 176 959.3 M2.1 962.6
18, 484
73.5 55.1 72.5
20, 051
72. 5 47.8 69.5
27, 732
59.5 97.9
88.7
24, 043
84.8 62.3 88.5
22, 078
55.9
87.0
78.6
24, 524
94.5 52.6
64.3

7,401
6,657
6,715
6,561

52, 420
50, 679
52, Oil
41, 258

47, 528
41. 677
40, 186
35, 483

26, 700
27, 567
23, 096
24, 369

94.6
99.1
98.8
88.5

50.7
50.6
52.5
49.8

June
July
August

9,051
6,174
5,832
9,320

46, 367
46, 051
40, 931
50,821

42, 088
41, 127
38, 866
50, 975

23, 523
24, 746
22, 188
24, 429

90.8
97.4
93.0
89.8

September _
October __ .
November...
December

7,202
8,272
7,441
7,631

47, 797
49. 940
47, 709
45, 026

50, 464
49, 381
49, 806
48, 908

22, 786
26, 676
25, 373
22, 836

January .
February
March
April .

9,105
7,092
6,476
6,220

57, 349
46, 228
49, 878
53, 855

49,943
46, 993
45, 218
39, 125

May

8,599
7,596

49, 121
46, 504
53, 852

39, 898
47, 425
41, 143

1919 mo. average
1920 mo. average—
1921 mo. average
1922 mo. average.-.
1923 mo. average...
1924 mo. average...
1925 mo. average.. _
1926 mo. average.. _
1927 mo. average.. .
1928 mo. average.. .

Thous. of
Ibs.

FUR

OTHER TEXTILES

Price, wholesale «

Deliveries *

Stocks, imported,
end of month 1

ImYEAR AND MONTH ports *

Machinery
activity *

Imports l

Stocks, end of
month

BATON

Thous. of linear

yds.

Sales
by
dealers 8

Thous. of
dolls.

» 2, 482 9 2, 050 » 2, 469
1,577
2,201
1,630
2, 438
2,018
1,698
2, 045
2,900
2, 256
2,724
2,701
3,559
4,000
4, 015
5,095

$12, 029
13, 624
14, 227
11, 174

3,077
3,661
4,517
3,703

3, 609
4,721
4,530
3,811

7,081
13, 919
14, 572
11, 113

5,459
5, 150
5,040
5,596

4,015
4,317
3,757
4,241

4,007
4,227
4,182
3,853

12, 905
13, 840
12, 215
12, 110

43, 617
30, 874
31, 503
51, 656

4,844
5,712
5,366
4,703

3,914
4,499
4,419
3,875

4,561
3,824
3,316
3,543

10, 244
12, 576
7,960
5,553

34, 109
43, 524
26, 655
30, 389

57, 109
61, 735
52, 550
69, 787

5,389
6,073
6,629
5,554

4,303
4,603
5,638
4,822

4,286
4,099
4,302
4,061

10, 188
14, 157
21, 228
12, 994

26,300
21, 182

71,649
51, 216

5,245
4,615

4,563
4,007

3,531
2, 910

12, 522
8,546

1928
January
February
March
April

May

_ _.

1939

June
July
August
September
October
November
December

* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 on items in this table, if available, and monthly averages from 1913 through 1918 on all imports and rayon data may be found
in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Textiles Section, pp. 41 to 47.
1
Imports of silk, of unmanufactured fibers, burlaps, and of rayon, as well as stocks of rayon in bonded customs warehouses, irom U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Silk imports are a total of unmanufactured silk, including raw silk, cocoons, and waste. Unmanufactured fibers include flax, hemp,
istle, jute, kapok, manila, New Zealand flax, sisal, etc. Kayon imports are a total of yarns, threads, and filaments.
3
Deliveries of raw silk from principal warehouses in New York City, indicating approximate consumption by mills, and stocks at these warehouses are from the Silk
Association of America. A bale of silk averages about 133 pounds, but varies considerably according to origin of the bale. Details by sources are given in the association's
report. The delivery figures are computed by the association from the data on stocks and trade figures on imports through New York and Pacific ports, allowing time for
Pacific imports to reach New York.
3 Computed from data reported by the Silk Association of America, covering from 35 to 60 per cent of the silk manufactures and throwsters, averaging about 45 per cent
for most of the year 1924. Owing to the varying number of mills reporting, the original figures have been prorated up to 100 per cent, by dividing the stocks reported by
the percentage of the trade which they are estimated to represent. The maximum reporting capacity (60 per cent in April and May, 1923), coming immediately after a
month of minimum reporting capacity (35 per cent in March 1923), indicates, in the close correspondence of these prorated totals, that the prorating shows the situation
quite accurately.
4
Compiled by the Silk Association of America from manufacturers representing about 50 per cent of the industry. The figures represent the percentage of active hours
to the total hours normally worked, and are weighted averages of each section of the silk industry, for which details are given in the association's monthly reports, i. e.,
New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New England, and all other.
5
Compiled by the Silk Association of America, representing average price of bleached rayon, 150 denier, A grade, in the New York market.
e Compiled by the Webbing Manufacturers Exchange from reports of 19 manufacturers.
Prom 1920 through August, 1928, data were collected from 8 manufacturers
and shown in thousands of yards in the February, 1928, and previous issues of the SURVEY.
? Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of from 10 to 16 establishments, the number gradually increasing until 1928, when
these 16 establishments had a monthly capacity on a 24-hour basis of 11,113,074 yards, based on 26 working days. These data represent products manufactured by spreading
nitrocellulose or pyroxylin preparations upon gray goods. Further details as to values, etc., are given in press summaries.
8
Compiled by the American Fur Merchants' Association, representing sales of fur to garment manufacturers, retailers, etc., principally in New York City, but also in
other places in the United States and Canada.
810 months' average, March to December, inclusive, except for pyroxylin unfilled orders, where a different 10 months' average is used, January and October figures
not being available.
10
8 months' average.

 61139°—29


3

34

Table 13.—COAL*
BITUMINOUS
Production

YEAR AND MONTH

United
States

0)

Canada
(2)

Thous. of short
tons

ANTHRACITE

Consumption

Prices
Stocks,
end of
By coke
By
WholeExmo.,
plants
By
ports vesheld by Mine sale,
sels electric railaver- comcon(3)
err- power roads
sumers age posite,
ing plants
United Can(spot) mine
(fl)
(6)
(10)
ports (5)
run
States ada
8
7
4
()
()
()
0")
Thous. of
long tons

Thousands of short tons

1,499
1,150
1,397
1,581
1,774
1,160
1,412
1,255
1,263

1,663
1,497
2,866
1,721
924

461
604 "2,816
3,094
780
2,632
629
2,848
343

9,451
7,644
8,006

1923 monthly average— .
1924 monthly aver age. _.
1925 monthly average...
1926 monthly average- .
1927 monthly average.. .
1928 monthly average...

47,047 1,416
40,307 1,136
43, 338 1,095
47, 781 1,373
43,147 . 1,452
41,063 1,463

1,596
1,272
1,299
2,624
1,340
1,204

379
332
362
576
340
320

3,247
3,130
3,352
3,443
3,491
3,446

1939
January
February
March
April

51,456
47, 271
39, 347
36, 888

1,537
1,611
1,370
1,393

917
999
878
851

284
267
283
361

40, 172
38,073
40, 619

1,388

1,402
1,721

338
314

Dollars per short ton

642
606
620
656
574

1913 monthly
1914 monthly
1915 monthly
1916 monthly
1917 monthly

average.. average. ._
average.. .
average...
average...

39, 870
35,225
36, 886
41, 877
45,983

1918 monthly
1919 monthly
1920 monthly
1921 monthly
1922 monthly

average...
average. ..
average...
average...
average.. .

48, 282
58,822
47, 389
34,660
35, 189

May
June
July
August.
September
October
November

. -

Retail
composite,
38
cities
(n)

Production

0)

Prices
St'ks
end
of
Ex- mo., Whole- Retail,
in
sale,
ports yds.
comcomof
posite, posite,
deal- chest- chestnut
ers
nut
(12)
C11)
<")

Thous. Thous. No. of Dolls, Dolls,
of short of long days' per long per short
tons .tons sup.
ton
ton

$1.23
1.14
1.12
1.85
3.25

$5. 44
5.72
5.58
5.61
7.09

7,627
7,569
7,416
7, 298
8,301

346
319
295
347
447

3,099
4,528

57,900
40,400
29,933
44,250
38,583

2.58
2.59
5.64
2.55
3.69

7.80
8.00
" 11. 26
10.68
" 10. 21

8,236
7,341
7,467
7,539
4,557

370
370
402
348
197

36
31
20
44
12

10.05
11.89
" 15. 04
15.22
« 15. 11

9,123
8,161
8,119
8,428
7,952
7,737

7,030
5,415
6,211
6,906
6,176
6,345

187
242
240
268

49,000
49,000
44,400
42,714
62, 867
44,467

2.77 $4. 822
2.08 4.213
2.06 4.116
2.21 4.314
1.99 4.264
1.80 4.019

10.33
9.18
9.07
9.33
9.28
&94

7,778
7,327
5,151
7,036
6,675
6,388

379
299
237
300
247
248

20
54
42
39
52
48

15.35
$13. 885
13. 911 15.31
13.788 i« 15. 17
13. 767 «» 15. 35
13.298 14.99
13.004 14.87

4,146
3,713
3,576
3,415

8,631
8,241
8,180
7,393

7,028
6,586
7,486
7,156

300
279
315
306

1.85
1.87
1.79
1.69

4.035
4.029
4.000
3.912

9.09
9.07
9.06
8.76

7,337
6,670
5,044
6,441

298
274
151
160

46

3,369
3,399

7,630

7,658
7,627

318

1.68
1.67

3.908
3.905

8.52
8.50

6,308
5,069
4,987

246
189

36,000

$7.92
7.89
7.86
8.21
9.28

34

13. 107
13. 107
13. 077
12.654

15.06
15.07
15.07
14.71

12. 539
12. 628

14.40
14.48

__

* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Fuels, Automobiles, and Rubber Section,
' i Production figures, calculated from shipments from the mine and representing complete production except for small quantities used at the mines, compiled by U. S.
Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines.
2 Compiled by Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, including bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite. Previous to 1919 these data
comprised sales, colliery consumption, and coal used by operators, and thereafter the tonnage representing output of all mines.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; bunker coal on vessels engaged in the foreign trade is not included.
* Coal loaded for consumption by outgoing vessels at principal ports compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
« Compiled by the U. S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, representing fuel consumption by all plants producing electric power, mainly central stations.
Coal consumption in central stations alone shown in April, 1925, issue (No. 44), p. 29, and by street railways, manufacturing plants, and reclamation projects in March,
e Compiled by the Interstate Commerce Commission from reports of 174 Class I railroads. Consumption by switching and terminal engines is not included. It is stated
that about 3 per cent would be added to the figures by such inclusi9n. About 2 per cent of the coal consumed on railroads in 1923 was anthracite.
? Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, by applying to the coke production figures the average amount of coal used in making both byproduct and beehive coke.
s Compiled by the Department o) Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, presenting complete figures for Canada.
» Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, representing stocks in the hands of commercial consumers and retail dealers at the end of each
month, but does not include coal for steamship fuel, on lake docks, in transit, and in householders' bins. The figures for 1918 were taken on three different dates, from actual
canvasses while the later figures are based upon reports from a selected list of 5,000 consumers whose stocks in 1918 bore a known relation to the known total stocks. Data
for 1918 and 1919 are averages of 1 month, for 1920, 3 months, for 1921, 4 months, for 1922 and 1928, 6 months, for 1923 and 1926 each 8 months, for 1924, 2 months, for 1925,
5 months, and for 1927, 7 months.
10 Average mine price of spot coal in 14 representative bituminous fields weighted by the production in each field, compiled by the Coal Age; about 20 per cent of the
output of bituminous coal is sold spot, while about 55 per cent is sold on future contracts, and 25 per cent of the output is not sold commercially.
11 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Wholesale price of bituminous coal is monthly average based on run of mine as reported by
28 firms, f. o. b. city, while the retail price is average consumers' price on the 15th of the month, of lump, egg, nut, and mine run, averaged according to the month's shipments. Anthracite wholesale prices are monthly averages for chestnut coal as reported by 15 firms, f. o. b. city, while retail prices are unweighted quotations on Pennsylvania anthracite, white ash chestnut, on the 15th of the month. From 1913 through 1919 the retail averages for both bituminous and anthracite are for January 15th and
12 Compiled by the &. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, from reports of about 500 retail dealers, calculated to show the number of days' supply at the
current rate of consumption. Averages cover 1 month in 1918 and 1919, 3 months in 1920, 4 in 1921, 5 in 1922 and 1925, 8 in 1923, 1926, 1927, and 1928, and 2 in 1924.
13 ( months' average, January, May, June, August, November, and December missing.
" 8 months' average.
i« 11 months' average, August missing.
1010 months' average, January and February missing in 1926 and November and December in 1925.




35

Table 14.—IRON ORE AND PIG IRON*
PIG IRON

IRON ORE i

MANGANESE
ORE

Furnaces in blast,
end of month 3

Production

Stocks, end of month

Receipts

Wholesale prices 6

Imports 2
(manganese
content)

Con-

YEAR AND
MONTH

Imports 2

Shipsumption
ments Lake
from Erie
by
mines ports Other furTotal
and
furnaces

ports

naces

On

At fur- Lake
naces

Erie
docks

Foundry,
No. 3,
Fur- Capac- cent northof
naces
ity
ern
Mertotal (PittsTotal chant Total
4
burgh)
iron
United
States 3

Can8
ada

Long
Num- tons per Per
cent
ber
day

Thousands of long tons

1909-1913 mo. av
1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av
1920 mo. av

21
29
24
26
48
52
41
28
51

180
216
113
112
110
81
66
40
106

4,089
2,668
3,860
5,395
5,208
5,096
3,931
4,877

3,230
2,091
3,127
4,282
4,033
3,976
3,073
3,736

826
565
732
1,082
1,128
1,089 8 5, 290 8 33, 455
833 3,903 31, 325
1,104 4,531 29, 753

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

33
31
16
19
23
29
25
18

26
95
231
171
183
213
218
204

1,858
3,551
4,920
3,552
4,507
4,880
4,259
4, 498

1,296
2,643
3,639
2,631
3,225
3,524
3,046
3,063

546
873
1,230
887
1,237
1,305
1,170
1,371

2, 030
3,355
5,191
3,833
4,564
4,863
4,411
4,735

33, 330
33, 751
31, 059
31, 639
30, 422
29, 860
32, 245
29, 799

24, 512
25, 642
24, 438
25, 076
24, 319
23, 863
26, 281

9
20
13
14

251 None.
197 None.
163 None.
225
6

None.
None.
None.
None.

None.
None.
None.
6

4,303
4,395
4,808
4,781

33, 350
29,003
24, 259
19, 570

27,062
23,015

--

16
13
22
26

210
189
183
226

5,363
8,926
8,980
9,243

2,848
6,010
6,078
6,390

1,517
2,613
2,655
2,819

4,948
4,667
4,633
4,761

September.. _ _
! October
November
December

15
26
16
21

211 8,748 5,827 2,710
170 8,454 6,002 2,580
223 4,261 3,601 1,555
205 None. None. None.

15
21
18
31

180
241
244

29
51

276
244

mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av

1928
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August

1929
January
February
March
April
May
June _
July
August

_ _

284

None.
IN one.
None.
2,516

Per

Basic Com(valley posite

fur-

nace)

pig

iron 7

Dollars per long ton

60.8 $15. 60
$15. 21
63.7 16.01 $14.71 15.42
44.5 13.90 12.87 13.52
55.0 14.87 13.74 14.15
81.4 21.07 19.76 20.31
83.2 41.45 38.98 39.99
83.1 34.44 32.50 34.38
56.3 30.28 27.68 29.92
66.5 44.88 42.25 43.80

7,530
7,246
7,244
6,282
7,278
8,234
7,779
8,542

2,262
2,560
1,921
2,472
3,253
3,182
3,209
2,549
3,035

676
753
560
647
922
929
863
650
824

87
87
89
68
81

252
268
187
230
319
338
352
241
287

8,818
8,109
6,621
6,563
6,103
5,998
5,964
5,709

1,379
2,240
3,338
2,592
3,034
3,256
3,019
3,153

246
472
805
621
659
750
741
636

50
32
73
49
48
63
59
86

105 44,040
181 75, 197
277 109, 080
203 84, 772
216 99,750
221 106, 545
195 98, 415
192 103, 695

25.1
43.2
66.2
50.1
55.1
59.4
53.9
56.4

25.16
26.93
28.15
22.50
21.66
20.63
19.75
18.88

21.74
24.20
25.81
20.24
19.58
18.55
17.70
16.67

2106
25.00
27.15
21.87
21.32
21.06
19.35
18.32

18, 691
14, 388

6,288
5,988
5,240
5,182

2,870
2,900
3,200
3,185

715
625
611
630

65
65
78
75

185
187
197
195

96,640
100, 060
104, 650
104, 015

52.9
53.6
56.8
56.9

19.01
19.01
19.01
19.01

17.00
17.00
17.00
17.00

18.37
18.45
18.40
18.40

18, 877
22, 981
27, 209
31, 754

13, 942
17, 913
21, 824
26, 036

4,935
5,051
5,385
5,718

3,284
3,082
3,072
3,137

631
633
607
575

88
97
95
92

198
189
185
183

106, 145
100, 855
98, 445
98, 730

57.7
55.3
54.6
54.0

18.96
18.51
18.41
18.26

16.30
15.45
16.00
16.00

18.18
17.97
17.79
17.78

4,608
5,025
4,897
4,997

35, 808
39, 555
40, 080
35, 147

29, 708
33, 082
33, 626
29, 452

6,100
6,473
6,454
5,695

3,062
3,374
3,302
3,370

585
644
648
722

91
93
95
103

197
197
194
201

106, 755
108, 800
108, 575
110, 675

58.1
58.5
57.6
60.9

18.64
18.86
19.39
19.51

16.19
17.10
17.50
17.50

18.04
18.40
18.96
19.06

None. None.
None. None.
None. None.
1,191
387

5,195
4,819
5,465
5,417

30, 189
25, 414
20, 005
15, 930

24, 878
20, 475
15, 782
12, 283

5,311
4, 939
4,223
3,647

3,442
3,206
3,714
3,663

791
707
755
837

88
94
86
79

202
207
212
215

111, 985
115, 770
120, 740
122, 980

62.2
64.7
66.5
67.4

19.26
19.26
19.51
19.76

17.50
17.50
17. 50
17.90

19.05
19.07
19.11
19.25

2,527
2,805

5,980
5,677

19, 146
23, 701

15, 275
19, 619

3, 871
4,082
4,452

3, 898
3,717
3,785

793
717
746

81
90

219
218
216

126, 150
122, 590
121, 965

68.7
68.6

20.26
20.26
20.26

18.38
18.50
18.50

19.27
19.35

9,549
10, 174
10, 671

6, 753
6,985
7,509

8 25, 523
23, 546
21, 211

24,062

3,127

74, 487
84, 005
62, 418
83,539
106, 775
106, 498
106, 562
81, 918
97, 644

September
October
November
December
* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section,
pp. 11 to 20.
„

--„-

,

j

r

0

„„

„„„

^

UMV

V^X^W^WJLl

give by districts the consumption data. Furnaces reporting vary in number from 319 to 341 and beginning with June, 1922, feporSTromTs^Can^adia^^rnaces'are' included'
Averages are based on the full 12 months of the year.
2 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Imports of manganese ores exclude ores imported from Cuba since September, 1922, which are shown only in the raw state, but included those ores prior to that date, when they were combined with the manganese content of imported ores
8 Pig-iron production and blast-furnace data, in the United States, comprising practically the entire output, except that made with charcoal, from the Iron Age.
« Compiled from data reported by the Iron Age by subtracting the figures on pig iron produced by steel mills from the total pig-iron production figures, thus obtaining:
data on the total output of merchant pig iron.
« Data on Canadian pig-iron production compiled by Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, comprising complete production
« Wholesale prices, except composite average, are averages of weekly quotations taken from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
7 The composite pig-iron price, compiled by the American Metal Market, is the average of daily prices of 10 tons of iron distributed as follows: 1 ton each of Bessemer
Valley; No. 2 foundry valley; No. 2 X foundry at Philadelphia and at Buffalo; No. 2 foundry at Cleveland and at Chicago; 2 tons each of basic valley and No 2 Southern
foundry at Cincinnati.
8
9 months' average, April to December, inclusive.




36

Table 15.—CRUDE STEEL AND COKE*
U. S. STEEL
CORPORATION «

STEEL INGOTS

STEEL PRICES

COKE

Production

Production
Unfilled
orders, Earnings
end of
month

United States i

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

1909-13 monthly average
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average _ _

Ratio
to capacity

Thous.
of long
tons

Canada 2

Per
cent

Steel
Strucbillets,
tural
Bessesteel
beams
mer
(Pitts- (Pitts-4
burgh)* burgh)

Thous. of long
tons

Dolls,
per long
ton

106
130
140
77
92

4,795
5,907
4, 115
5,189
9, 722
10, 716
8,635
5,995
10, 022

$10, 370
11, 432
5,972
10,866
27, 798
24, 608
16, 613
11, 966
14, 724

$23. 93
25.79
20.08
22.44
43.95
70.78
47.30
40.54
56.14

56
41
74
54
63
65
76
103

2,523
1,902
2,607
3,450
3,635
3,588
2,808
3,407

Thous.
of dolls.

5,331
5,648
6,009
3, 993
4, 324
3,922
3,397
3,852

7,727
8,461
14, 971
12, 760
13, 795
16, 588
13, 691
16, 100

Iron
and
steel a

Composite
finished
steel e

United States *
ByBeehive product

Dolls,
per long
ton

Dolls,
per
pound

$0. 0151
.0118
.0128
.0253
.0374
.0300
.0252
.0284

$26. 32
22.92
24.76
40.50
70.10
56.68
50.32
65.59

$0 0171
.0172
.0152
.0163
.0280
.0446
.0379
.0332
.0363

2,799
1, 945,
2,292
2,955
2, 764
2,540
1,587
1,709

1,060
935
1,173
1,589
1,870
2,167
2,095
2,570

34.46
33.95
41.65
37.99
35.45
35.00
33.27
32. 67

.0204
.0173
.0242
.0224
.0200
.0196
.0186
. 0187

40.74
37.86
44.55
40.86
38.83
38.27
36.41
35.49

.0269
.0231
.0295
.0284
.0268
.0264
.0253
.0250

462
714
1,615
857
946
1, 041
601
365

1,646
2,379
3, 133
2,832
3,326
3,698
3,657
4,017

Dolls,
per
pound

Canada s

Thous. of short tons

i

Exports •

Wholesale
price

Connellsville 10
Thous. Dolls,
of long per short
ton
tons
73
73
49
67
87
105
126
53
68

$2. 09
2.30
1.79
1.89
3.61
8.15
6.00
4.75
10.79

123
159
165
192

23
38
92
49
71
73
60
86

3.65
7.42
5.55
3.53
4.09
4.14
3.21
2.79

I
i

1921 monthly average- _ _
1922 monthly average--.
1923 monthly average
1924 irjonthly average
1925 monthly average. _.
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average.-..

.4,155

94
76
85

1928
January _
February
March
April.

3, 991
4,043
4,507
4,305

81
86
89 |
91

84
99
118
113

4, 276
4,398
4,335
3,872

11, 900
13, 581
15, 453
13, 927

33.00
33.00
33.00
33.00

.0180
.0185
.0190
.0190

35. 27
35. 57
35.81
35.67

.0247
.0252
.0254
.0251

376
390
449
377

3,897
3,723
4,065
3,925

182
169
182
174

65
76
74
62

2.78
2.71
2.72
2.74

4,207
3,744
3,806
4,179

83
76
81
82

118
117
83
89

3,417
3,637
3,571
3,624

16, 647
16, 359
16, 134
18, 597

33.00
32.25
32.00
32.00

.0188
.0185
.0185
.0185

35.55
35.34
34.91
34.93

.0249
. 0248
.0248
.0248

376
302
280
288

4,100
3,951
3,911
3,995

193
195
200
191

89
126
79
70

2.70
2.80
2.79
2.88

September.
October
November.
December...

4,148
4,650
4,267
4,018

83
91
87
85

100
109
108
103

3,698
3,751
3,673
3,977

17, 418
19, 399
17, 365
16, 423

32.00
32.80
33.00
33.00

.0185
.0185
.0190
.0190

35.17
35.48
35.92
38.20

.0250
.0252
.0252
.0253

312
421
416
398

3,959
4,219
4,133
4, 317

194
210
205
213

77
100
121
98

2.88
2.91
2.87
2.75

1939
January
February
March
April

4,490
4,326
5,058
4,938

85
92
99
97

116
117
137
122

4,109
4,144
4,411
4,428

18, 759
19, 081
22, 285
22, 561

33.00
33.25
34.00
34.80

.0190
.0190
.0190
.0190

36.24
36.25
36.37
36.81

.0255
.0255
.0255
.0256

479
440
534
468

4,360
4,090
4,613
4,457

221
202
228
220

104
76
87
60

2.75
2.96
2.99
2.81

5,273
4,881
4,838

100
100
95

126
120

4,304
4,257

25, 605
24, 029

36.00
35. 25
35.00

.0195
.0195
.0195

37.10
37.01
38.72

.0256
.0256

597
602
601

4,664
4,510

83
92

2.80
3.80

„_ 'i.

May -. ..
June
July
August

May
June
July
August

September
October
N ovember
December

._

_

1,602
2,881
3, 624
3, 068
3, 678
3,911
3,617

I

_

!

* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section, pp. 21,
22, 25, and 26, and Fuels, Automobiles, and Rubber Section, pp. 17 and 18.
1 Yearly figures represent the monthly averages of total production of all companies as compiled annually by the American Iron.and Steel Institute. The institute
reported up to 1923 monthly production figures for 30 companies which produced 84.4 per cent of the total output of the country in 1920, 87.48 per cent in 1921, and 84.15
per cent in 1922. In order to make the monthly figures comparable they have been calculated to a 100 per cent production each year on the basis of the above percentages.
The figures since 1922 are calculated on the basis of reports from companies which produced 95.35 per cent of the total production in 1922, 94.84 per cent in 1923, 94.43 per
cent in 1924, 94.50 per cent in 1925, 95.01 per cent in 1926, and 94.68 per cent in 1927, the total computations to 100 per cent being made by the American Iron and Steel
Institute. Data for 1928 are prorated on the 1927 percentage. The capacity figures used in computing the ratio between actual production and capacity are based upon the
annual capacity as of Dec. 31,1927, of 58,627,910 long tons of Bessemer and open-hearth steel ingots, the figure for a year earlier being 57,230,350 tons. Beginning with 1927,
crucible and electric ingots are excluded, but these items represented only a fraction of 1 per cent of the total.
2
Production of steel in Canada, representing complete figures, compiled by Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
3 Unfilled orders of steel and earnings reported by United States Steel Corporation.
* Average of weekly prices from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
* Average of weekly prices compiled by the Iron Trade Review, on the following 14 products: Pig iron, billets, slabs, sheet bars, wire rods, steel bars, plates, structural
shapes, black, galvanized and blue annealed sheets, tin plates, wire nails, and black pipe. Pig iron average, in turn, is an average of 14 different quotations.
fi The figures for composite finished steel compiled by the American Metal Market represents the daily average price per pound ot steel products weighted as follows:
2H-pound bars, Impound plates, l^-pound shapes, Impound pipe, Impound wire nails, 1-pound galvanized sheets, and M-pound tin plate.
7
Production figures, representing complete production, compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines.
8 Compiled by the Canadian Department of 'Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, presenting complete figures for Canada.
6
 Exports from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
10
i
Compiled by U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing beehive furnace coke (ran;ge of prompt and future) at Connellsville ovens.



37

FABRICATED
STRUCTURAL, STEEL 1
New orders
YEAR AND MONTH

Shipments

STEEL FURNITURE <
IRON AND
STEEL fi

New orders

Business group

Per
cent

Num- Thous.
of sq.
ber
feet

Per
cent

Short
tons

54
54
35
64
65
68
72
67
68
71

222. 495
249. 840
267, 900
237, 813
260, 517

September
October
November
December

262, 500
288, 750
236, 250
262, 500

70
77
63
70

1928
January
February
March
April

207, 900
265, 650
257, 950
234, 850

May
June
July
August

Short
tons

Per
cent

Short
tons

Shelving

UnUnfilled
Imfilled
Ship- New orders, Ship- New ord- Exports, ports,
ortotal
ments orders end m'ts ders ers,
total
end
mo.
mo.

New orders

143, 640
149, 040
99, 050
194, 560
203, 580
220, 050
248, 394
241, 200
254, 375
273, 350

av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av

STEEL
BOILERS a

Total
RaRaCom- tio to Com- tio to
Ra- Storputed
ca- puted ca- Quan- tio to age
total
pactotal
pactity
ea- tanks
ity
ity
pac.
Short
tons

1919 mo.
1920 mo
1921 mo.
1922 mo.
1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.
1927 mo.
1928 mo.

FABRICATED
STEEL PLATE »

Long tons

Thousands of dollars

$1, 335
1 941
1,250
1,432
1,811
1,909 7 $1,256 7 $567
1,541
2,279
557
2,616
1,694
611
605
2,563
1,586
775
2,998
2,180

IRON, STEEL, AND
HEAVY HARDWARE SALES «

Table 16.—FABRICATED STEEL PRODUCTS*

Rel. to
Jan.
1921.

$46
285
123
205
364
466 7 $374
578 483
612 639
613 671
742
800

362, 920
405, 644
182, 661
167, 515
167, 565
150, 580
146, 881
180, 587
181, 748
238, 583

26, 854
34,546
10, 075
64, 115
59, 961
38,868
69, 836
77, 803
46, 025
49, 098

122
157
139
143
167
191
195

68
72
74
63
68

48, 489
29, 028
32, 127
42,826
41, 476
44, 401

60
36
37
52
52
56

25,285
10, 413
8,261
14, 614
17, 581
20, 230

1,592
1,639

7 $1,936
2,236
2,619
1,483
2,592
1,474
2,920

266, 250
247, 500
243, 750
236, 250

71
66
65
63

38, 662
47,090
27, 341
35, 658

48
58
34
44

15, 421
18, 648
8,920
13, 367

1, 597
1,538
1,459
1,246

1,327
1,088
1,266
1,024

2,219
2,380
2,856
2,741

2,368
2,411
2,476
2,850

1,558
1,574
1,577
1,414

531
619
591
578

608
551
575
619

738
666
651
606

166, 352
170, 255
177, 923
168, 428

46, 578
39, 510
51, 185
55, 070

203
216
186
106

54
69
67
61

204, 050
231, 000
227, 150
238, 700

53
60
59
62

35, 787
49, 820
46, 840
50, 347

45
62
59
63

11, 101
25, 532
25, 226
22, 095

1,244
1,171
1,462
1,567

993
1,285
1,470
1,460

2,713
2,909
3,169
3,066

3,248
3,296
3,283
2,915

2,000
2,389
2,512
2,360

680
682
832
716

7C9
741
841
741

680
743
775
794

205, 766
185, 915
221, 935
215, 184

49, 903
37, 022
58, 660
54, 867

157
158
187
187

308, 000
296, 450
296, 450
854, 200

80
77
77
92

261, 800
261, 800
265, 650
288, 750

68
68
69
75

42,487
35, 202
35, 959
47, 245

53
44
47
60

14, 852
12, 204
16, 881
24, 807

1,836
1,887
1,932
2,018

1.661
1,666
1,738
1,691

3,213
3,009
2,515
2,565

3,086
2,764
2,594
2,619

2, 233
1, 993
2,072
2,118

769
720
723
836

733
737
713
8G3

753
729
706
734

267, 890
262, 052
253, 336
287, 297

55, 095
56, 573
33, 465
54, 082

204
204
187
215

September
October
November
December..

319, 550
250, 250
242, 550
246, 400

83
65
C3
64

273, 350
319, 550
273, 350
281, 050

71
83
71
73

40,281
53,983
54, 418
40, 441

50
68
68
51

18, 572
23,960
32, 381
15, 152

1,749
1,803
1,660
1,343

1,453
1,500
1,460
1,308

2,754
3,159
2,854
3,117

2,689
3,193
2,676
3,611

2,062
2,095
1,917
2,410

678
954
916
791

800
959
875
829

754
7CO
721
757

228, 056
256, 870
256, 886
221, 810

47, 685
50, 176
50, 038
41, 628

207
236
210
187

1929
January
February
March
April

273, 350
289, 500
358, 050
334, 950

71
70
93
87

281, 050
238, 700
277, 2GO
304, 150

73
62
72
79

32, 705
58,684
57, 869
40, 675

41
74
72
51

11, 055
16, 093
22, 045
9,984

1,075
1,042
1,466
1,706

1,252
1,196
1,558
1,709

3,615
3,243
2,923
2,845

3, 893
3,060
2,884
2,880

2,581
902 1,100
2,408
974 920
2,344 1, 110 1,146
2,379 1,131 1,095

819
766
802
765

274, 296
259, 711
270, 925
277, 580

45, 573
45, 333
39, 888
43, 936

192
175
217
226

346, 500
354, 200

90
92

311,850

273, 350

81
71

47, 763
45, 893

60
57

10, 087
6,890

1,751
1,685

2,145
1, 823

2, 78 i
2, 585

2,814
2,531

2,401
2,321

989 1,121
911 950

897
935

201, 516
247, 811

54,445
46, 397

230
220

May...
June
July_._.

II

August

!

September
October _ _ __ _
November
December

1
1

* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section, pp.
27, 28, 32, 33, and 35.
1 Fabricated structural steel data compiled by the Bridge Builders and Structural Society up to April, 1922, and since then by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau
of the Census, including reports from the Central Fabricators' Association. Percentages of capacity calculated from reports of the Bridge Builders and Structural Society up
to April, 1922, and applied to estimated total capacity each year based on a special annual survey by the Bureau of the Census. Beginning with April, 1922, reports
received from 242 firms (and in addition 30 firms now out of business) with a total capacitv of 245,140 tons in 1922, 253,020 tons in 1923, 266,155 tons in 1924, 286,675 tons in
1925, 291,315 tons in 1926, 312,895 tons in 1927, and 322,960 tons in 1928 have been prorated to the estimated total capacity of the United States, 304,000 tons in 1922 and 312,000
tons in 1923, 326,000 tons in 1924, 347,000 in 1925, 360,000 tons in 1926, 375,000 tons in 1927, and 385,000 tons in 1928, for comparison with previous figures. Monthly data
from 1922 comparable to figures in this table and revising the figures shown in the Record Book of Business Statistics appeared in the March, 1929, issue (No. 91), p. 18.
2 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 36 identical firms, including reports from the American Erectors Association.
Reports from most of the larger fabricators are included in the figures. Data for other classifications included in the total, covering refinery, tank cars, gas holders, blast
furnaces, and miscellaneous, including stacks and ladles, but not separately shown, are given in press releases.
3 Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 72 firms, estimated to represent about 90 per cent of the capacity of the industry.
Data for classifications included in these totals, covering the principal types of stationary and marine boilers, are given in press releases. Details for the first 5 mouths of
1927 appeared in July, 1927, issue (No. 71), p. 22.

5
Iron and steel exports and imports from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The exports prior to 1922 are based on the
group of pig iron and rolled products as used in the Iron Trade Review, comparable each month back to 1913. Beginning with January, 1922, all commodities are given
in quantities in the export reports, and thus a grand total can be presented, which is not more than about 5 per cent larger, on the average, than the data for the comparable
items. Imports are identical throughout the period, with a few minor exceptions.
6
Data on the value of sales by jobbers of hardware, compiled by American Steel and Heavy Hardware Association, comprising reports from about 75 firms, estimated
to represenf about 10 per cent of the entire iron, steel, and heavy hardware jobbing trade, including iron, steel, motor accessories, and other heavy hardware. Monthly
data from 1922 appeared in March, 1927, issue (No. 67), p. 26.

7 4 months' average, September to December, inclusive; previous data not available.



38

Table 17.^3TEEL SHEETS, BARS, BARRELS, AND WASHERS *
SHEETS-BLACK, BLUE, GALVANIZED, AND FULL FINISHED 1
Production
YEAR AND
MONTH

Total

Ratio
to
capacity

Short
tons

Stocks,
end of month

Per
cent

Total

Unsold

STEEL BARBELS *
Production

Shipments

New
orders

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month

Total
Number
of barrels

Short tons

1919 mo. av.._
1920 mo. av___
1921 mo. av...
1922 mo. av_._
1923 mo. av___
1924 mo. av._.
1925 mo. av___
1926 mo. av.._
1927 mo. av.__
1928 mo. av.__

117, 520
171, 489
85. 409
190, 864
222, 660
219, 836
293, 499
287,288
273, 940
328,996

62.7
72.7
34.9
76.5
79.7
74.2
92.8
90.4
85.3
96.5

72,963
111, 906
106, 175
108, 709
129,728
122, 955
137, 863
162, 234
159, 419
163, 739

17,061
5,590
46, 989
28, 703
35, 336
42, 115
45, 702
50, 085
48, 980
54, 821

114, 869
172, 161
87, 702
182, 519
230,823
209, 329
266, 156
282, 835
262, 681
315, 008

142, 209
140, 844
75,329
203, 869
213, 583
225, 024
273, 281
266, 361
279, 558
316, 219

376, 334
689, 853
232, 551
346, 449
450, 750
368, 147
530, 869
530, 595
448, 963
577, 827

393, 800
503, 888
549, 045
552, 547
616, 482

1927
January.. ._
February
March _
April

256, 856
282, 171
359, 340
316, 100

83.5
97.4
108.8
103.1

161, 661
157, 614
160, 357
169, 977

44, 974
47, 168
46, 827
46, 901

239, 019
261, 412
338. 436
300, 858

261, 357
241, 951
345, 900
292, 965

526, 550
513, 002
510, 924
491, 290

May
June
July
August

309, 360
300, 706
237, 243
266, 645

98.7
95.9
80.2
80.3

173, 986
168, 155
154, 374
169, 315

45, 670
47, 860
44, 538
54, 553

302, 759
281, 395
252, 034
266, 713

212, 337
224, 321
230, 715
177, 647

September
October
November
December

220, 919
245, 765
232,041
260, 130

«62.6
71.7
65.9
75.9

155, 865
145, 980
145, 644
150, 104

53, 311
50, 518
52,966
52, 474

230, 443
232, 626
224, 789
221, 689

1938
January
February
March
April

316, 541
330, 565
366, 127
327, 909

89.6
98.7
103.0
97.8

170, 453
169, 918
163, 846
163, 053

59, 508
55, 594
53, 144
53, 853

May
June
July.._.
August

349, 367
311, 629
267, 685
329, 396

95.6
94.3
82.2
92.8

166, 711
151, 606
161, 933
154, 461

September
October
November
December

318, 907
369, 243
358, 402
302, 182

101.0
103.5
104.8
95.1

1929
January. _ _
February
March
April

391, 404
326, 468
364, 202
375, 256
393, 430
337, 841

May
June
July
August

. __

Ratio
to
capacity
Per
cent

Shipments

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month

Number of barrels

43.7
48.4
49.8
53.2

172, 371
384, 723
446, 344
393, 535
504, 364
548,904
552,063
616, 977

529, 137
504, 134
575, 850
599, 771

48.1
46.2
51.7
53.8

439, 067
399, 562
353, 413
312, 662

588, 077
594, 782
578, 223
615, 152

258, 427
234, 358
344, 519
530, 197

350, 117
308, 264
437, 306
745, 393

274, 126
298, 420
359, 532
327, 674

302, 921
266, 210
399, 441
284, 070

54, 047
50, 702
55, 280
51, 636

326, 324
308, 741
278, 310
324, 691

146, 832
150, 600
174, 028
191, 429

44, 519
49,800
63, 014
66, 750

109.9
109.7
115.2
115.2

198, 874
188, 441
189, 050
175, 306

115.8
110.4

167, 869
163, 607

17.4
34.0
38.8

Stocks,
end of
month

LOOK
WASHERS
(2)

COLD
FIN.
STEEL
BARS
(4)

Shipments
Thous.
of dols.

Short
tons

49, 845
52, 614
47, 865
55, 658
53,708

» 360, 859
666, 110
1, 034, 755
756, 963
1, 169, 763
1, 448, 140
1, 291, 056
1, 186, 575

$232
261

34,031
42,076

525, 518
503, 183
568, 821
609, 090

51, 409
52, 360
59, 389
50,070

1, 788, 194
1, 663, 772
1, 545, 980
1, 365, 555

208
253
302
273

34,887
39, 408
48, 032
39, 897

52.2
53.1
51.3
56.2

575, 712
605, 123
576, 602
610, 454

62, 435
52, 094
53, 715
57, 413

1, 197, 894
1. 198, 839
1, 346, 688
1, 106, 604

275
271
213
228

37,379
36,822
30,605
30,300

521, 899
578, 408
500, 909
444, 227

47.4
51.6
45.6
40.6

525, 374
572, 893
497, 345
454, 638

53, 938
59, 453
63, 017
52, 606

1, 124, 437
1, 000, 559
845, 789
1, 308, 365

203
199
174
183

27, 860
27, 656
27, 026
28, 497

694, 197
667, 054
675, 196
571, 761

475, 906
518, 944
636, 855
667, 827

43.7
46.2
55.1
57.5

474, 159
514, 362
644, 521
661, 949

54, 353
58, 935
51, 269
57, 147

1, 351, 797
1, 417, 627
1, 343, 583
1, 276, 994

219
236
293
270

45, 010
40, 354
39, 957
35, 971

250, 316
318, 902
333, 357
254, 397

527, 477
526, 798
550, 468
498, 023

696, 281
712, 779
647, 844
677, 313

59.8
61.4
55.5
57.8

694, 843
717, 496
645, 881
675, 600

58, 585
53, 868
55, 831
57, 544

1, 257, 117
1, 159, 756
1, 232, 412
1, 064, 358

282
287
257
282

39, 431
39, 542
39, 943
42, 993

322, 876
354, 925
307, 790
296, 687

370, 936
344, 614
346, 041
323, 421

539,960
525, 161
565, 739
592, 094

593, 255
656, 021
563, 647
551,113

50.2
56.4
48.0
47.1

595, 640
661, 009
568, 353
549, 913

55, 059
50, 071
45, 365
46, 465

996, 820
823, 872
957, 117
1, 357, 443

257
269
255
221

43,893
50, 867
46, 902
40,045

63, 739
61, 058
63,397
54,142

362, 229
325, 848
363,648
377, 274

438, 390
389, 496
464, 297
398, 206

652, 602
706, 955
791, 615
835, 801

558, 492
567, 398
742, 165
771, 584

48.4
47.6
61.0
64.8

548, 581
563, 532
743, 407
775, 481

56, 376
CO, 242
59,000
55, 103

1,661,710
1, 543, 846
1, 470, 258
1, 269, 044

290
317
353
370

50, 276
52, 934
62, 179
60, 486

48, 334
52, 274

392, 336
347, 989

279, 783
307, 911

713, 568
676, 568

836, 532
774, 853

72.0
61.8

834, G99
779, 567

56, 93G
52, 222

1, 215, 972
1, 548, 999

373
397

58, 768
51, 181

September
October
November
December
*Monthly data from 1919 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Bool of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section, pp. 23,
24, and 34.
1 Compiled by the National Association of Flat Rolled Steel Manufacturers, representing almost all the independent sheet manufacturers ranging in capacity from
59 per cent in 1921 to 75 per cent in 1925, the total capacity of the hot mills in the United States being given by the association as 365,000 short tons at the end of 1921 and
464,000 tons in April, 1928.
2
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from the reports of 30 identical establishments, operating 35 plants, except for figures on percentage of capacity operated prior to October, 1926, which were compiled by the Steel Barrel Manufacturers' Institute, from 14 to 23 members of the institute, no data being
collected from November, 1923, to November, 1924, inclusive.
8
Compiled by the Commercial Lock Washer Statistical Bureau from reports of 7 firms.
4
Compiled by the Cold Finished Steel Bar Institute, from reports of 8 manufacturers, estimated to represent from 60 to 70 per cent of the industry.
8
Due to change in capacity rating, increasing the rated capacities by about 11 per cent, the percentage ratios beginning with September, 1927, are not comparable with
previous ratios.
*6
 months' average.



39

Table 18.—IRON AND STEEL CASTINGS*

Per
cent

Short
tons

Miscellaneous

Per
cent

Short tons

Short tons

17, 639
12, 781
14, 283
16, 417
13, 386
11,637

93
89
85
91
91
99
136

37
58
52
66
71
73
101

44, 097
51, 744
43, 558
42, 794

16,768
14, 557
13, 217
13,387

20, 117
15, 891
10, 761
17, 559

86.5
84.1
72. S
86.8

111
99
94
82

86
83
64
71

18, 396
16, 625
27, 639
39, 112

34, 346
35, 535
35, 436
38, 324

10, 999
9,914
9,706
9,139

13,298
14, 207
15, 647
10,994

81.6
77.2
80.0
71.6

117
88
104
105

82
60
74
58

62
62
57
57

41, 276
41, 096
30, 992
32, 810

50, 172
49, 980
52, 763
51, 276

9,332
11, 371
15,058
13, 511

13, 977
15, 270
13, 355
19, 039

86.8
100.0
110. 0
108. 0

129
135
149
143

88
105
115
115

86, 796
72, 107
66, 992
81, 286

59
49
45
55

34, 995
22, 597
20, 483
25, 171

51, 801
49, 510
46, 509
56, 115

14, 141
13, 716
11, 776
11, 040

13, 887
19, 382
19, 967
12, 932

103.3
105.0
103.0
103.4

150
147
127
129

106
99
107
99

50,450
58, 481
51, 586
55, 635

82, 762
78, 860
84, 742
96, 318

56
54
58
65

35, 234
26, 736
34, 545
43, 928

47, 528
52, 124
50, 197
52,390

10, 767
9,493
8,379
11, 061

14, 586
20, 112
17, 249
14,284

90.2
103.9
91.6
78.5

131
134
130
124

90
103
95
85

35, 689
40, 282
49, 562
53, 458

57, 724
57, 286
65, 601
68, 483

124, 313
115, 639
130, 836
144, 616

85
79
90
99

64, 809
58, 903
60, 743
75, 625

59,504
56, 736
70, 093
68, 991

10, 344
12, 180
14, 927
16, 815

19, 710
23,037
20,662
23,703

104.2
103.3
108.8
113.1

126
121
133^,
122

105
107
107
102

58, 636
55, 493

68, 553
59, 918

113, 329
94, 559

78
65

44, 919
35,425

68, 410
69, 134

16, 333
14, 838
13, 844

23,588
21, 214

114.6
110.6

118
131

112
105

59,404
49, 846
54, 199

35, 236
34, 596
32, 576
32, 397

52,005
53, 469
47, 469
55, 021

73,043
91, 199
74, 569
63, 938

50
63
52
44

28, 946
39, 455
31, Oil
21, 144

49
43
41
41

25, 618
21, 947
19, 146
19, 358

44, 791
40, 866
40, 241
39, 350

52, 742
52, 160
63, 075
77, 436

36
36
44
54

74, 454
87, 727
93, 989
86, 016

51
60
64
58

28, 714
37, 719
38, 448
82, 619

45,740
50,008
55, 541
53, 397

91, 448
91, 076
83, 755
84,086

63, 847
61, 071
60, 964
66, 128

93, 333
91, 746
78, 648
87, 742

63
62
53
60

36, 599
30, 742
27, 501
27, 157

56, 734
61, 004
51, 147
60, 585

61, 736
63, 510
58, 346
56, 867

61, 163
65, 780
59, 664
61, 182

75, 761
87, 952
82, 385
82, 119

51
60
56
56

25, 311
29, 471
30, 799
26,484

77.9
77.1
87.7
87.9

77, 424
71, 093
81, 063
81, 062

77, 047
77, 976
86,744
80, 679

93, 413
97, 568
115, 163
121, 941

64
67
79
84

83.0

79, 885
71, 311

76, 673
64, 581

127, 189
115,411

87
79

94,988
80, 734
85,163

68
56
58

35, 585
30, 888
30,964

1937
May
June
July
August

62, 747
64,310
53,046
57, 096

57.2
58.5
49.3
52.4

63, 385
62, 316
54, 240
57, 193

57, 311
54, 456
53, 484
51, 368

87, 241
88,065
80,045
87, 418

60
61
55
60

September
October
November
December ..

50, 807
52,458
46, 698
53, 824

47.6
50.0
44.4
51.2

52, 722
48, 724
44, 983
49,989

46, 161
48, 062
43,202
57, 579

70, 409
62,813
59, 387
58, 708

1938
January
February
March
April

61, 072
65, 359
70, 070
63,380

62.7
66.8
73.0
66.0

55, 432
61, Oil
71, 224
65, 001

62, 328
64, 419
70, 288
62, 056

May
June
July
August

67, 903
67, 090
60, 290
68, 606

70.7
69.9
63.1
72.1

65, 823
66, 737
60, 084
66, 962

62, 665
70, 054
63, 5CO
59, 428

66.3
73.4
66.8
63.4

73,364
73,875
83, 565
83,838
80, 901
71, 055

September
October
November
December

73.8

Per cent of normal
meltings

» 7, 791 «20. 7
12, 183 51.8
20, 502 73.8
19, 022 67.6
18, 632 77.8
17, 660 81.9
15, 397 81.9
16, 170 98.6

55, 563
55, 539
62, 563
59,398
56,066
63, 241

_ _

Long
tons

Short tons

18, 310
39, 855
50, 764
40, 324
46, 475
52, 895
44,901
50, 868

67, 998
56, 125
66, 181
62,645
57, 291
62, 728

May
June
July
August..

Per
cent
14, 370
43, 480
46,540
43, 090
35,304
33, 745
32, 009
32, 489

62.3
48.4
55.3
56.6
53.8
67.9

1939
January
February
March
April

mal

26
68
75
62
60
62
53
57

71,111
57, 477
66, 100
64, 716
58,064
64,956

_

Ratio

Proto
MiscelTotal to ca- Rail- laneous duction Actual norpacroad

32,680
83, 502
07,304
83, 414
81, 779
86,640
76, 910
83, 357

1921 mo average
1922 mo average
1923 mo. average...
1924 mo. average. _.
1925 mo. average.. .
1926 mo. average...
1927 mo. average.. .
1928 mo. average...

September
October..
November
December

Ratio

ity

Ratio
Total to ca- Railpac- road
ity

Rects. of iron

New
orders

Meltings

Total stocks,
end of mo.

Ratio Shipto ca- ments
pacity

Total

TRACK
WORK3

New orders

Production

Production
YEAR AND MONTH

OHIO FOUNDRY IRON *

STEEL CASTINGS »

MALLEABLE CASTINGS »

__

_

|

!

* Monthly data from 1920 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section, pp.
28 to 31.
1 Compiled by the 17. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing reports from 130 identical establishments, covering most of the industry. New
orders, however, are furnished by only 122 firms.
2 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 130 identical firms, including reports collected through the Steel Founders'
Society. These firms have a monthly capacity of 147,400 tons, at present representing over 80 per cent of the capacity of the industry for commercial castings (as distinguished from castings used in further manufacture in the same plant), of which 67,700 tons is usually devoted to railway specialties and represents the complete capacity
of that branch, while 79,700 tons is generally devoted to miscellaneous castings. New orders for 1925 were 6 per cent larger than the production of direct steel castings manufactured for sale and interplant transfer by steel works and rolling mills and represented 93 per cent of the total of these direct steel castings and of steel castings manufactured in the foundry and machine-shop industry, according to the census of manufactures for 1925. Railway specialties include such items as bolsters, sidearms, draft arms,
couplers, and cast-steel car wheels. Owing to reports from additional firms, these figures represent revisions of those shown in the Record Book of Business Statistics,
Metals and Machinery Section. The revisions in detail appeared in the March, 1928, issue (No. 79), p. 20, including annual averages from 1913 through 1920.
3
Compiled by the American Iron and Steel Institute and covers the production of T-rail track of 60 pounds per yard and heavier, including all special or fabricated T-rail
track work (switches, switch stands, frogs, crossings, guard rails, and appurtenances) of carbon steel, manganese steel, and other metals for both domestic and export use.
Monthly figures are available only from the beginning of 1925.
* Compiled by the Ohio State Foundrymen's Association, from reports of from 40 to 70 gray iron foundries in Ohio. Owing to the varying capacity of the firms reporting
each month, from 17,000 to 32,000 tons, the data on stocks and receipts have been converted to a percentage basis for better comparison. Details as to class of receipts and
stocks are shown in the association's reports.
* 10 months' average.




40

Table 19.—CAST-IRON PRODUCTS
CAST-IRON BOILERS AND RADIATORS 1

Square Boilers

Round Boilers
YEAR AND
MONTH

ShipNew Stocks, Pro- ShipProduction ments orders end of duction ments
mo.

Radiators

New Stocks, Pro- Shiporders end of duction ments
mo.

16, 848
18,126
19, 526
19, 444
20, 445
13, 171

16, 177
17, 339
18, 935
20,412
18,900
13,547

20, 917
18, 844
13, 141

1936
May
June
July
August

20, 660
20, 982
17, 058
18, 174

18, 881
16,883
20, 882
27, 393

September—
October
November...
December __.

22, 359
17, 676
15, 914
12, 245

1937
January
February
IVIarch
April

mo. av__
mo. av__
mo. av_.
mo. av__
mo. av._
mo. av_.

New Stocks,
orders end of
mo.

Shipments

Thous. of sq. feet of heating surface Dollars

Thousands of pounds

1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

GAS-FIRED BOILERS *

93, 973
103, 668
83, 989

17, 652
18, 753
20,903
20,596
23,189
28, 315

16, 641
17,354
20, 480
21, 561
21, 455
27, 978

22, 729
20, 973
28, 156

20, 056
18, 162
23,157
29, 858

104, 917
109, 243
107,171
102, 913

20, 933
20, 655
18, 257
21, 444

19, 181
16, 502
23,991
30, 249

27, 929
30, 978
26, 175
18, 177

30, 820
24,830
23, 966
12, 768

101, 047
89, 849
81, 010
74, 967

26, 191
22, 338
19, 229
15, 543

17, 164
20, 202
27, 669
23, 719

12, 692
16, 130
15, 864
19, 352

10, 604
15, 276
19, 404
17, 627

82, 765
89, 880
101, 393
106, 225

23, 128
25, 078
19, Oil
22,311

20, 992
19, 064
18, 911
22, 588

23, 086
23, 568
20, 442
20, 781

November.. _
December ...

22, 733
19, 865
14,437
10,023

22, 311
25, 734
19, 972
13, 185

1938
January
February
March.
April

9,037
13, 341
15, 631
12, 452

May
June
July
August

Stocks,
Production end of
mo.

Thousands of B. t. u.

97, 756
103. 818
155, 875

12, 670
12, 623
13. 486
14, 519
14, 786
13, 362

11, 939
12, 304
13, 769
14, 349
13, 503
13, 457

16, 325
13, 717
14,006

43, 024
62, 775
65,811

20, 538
18, 214
27,904
33, 187

110, 533
114, 515
111,713
105, 071

14, 113
13,834
14, 424
14, 308

14, 355
10, 824
14, 983
19, 845

16, 489
13, 486
16, 243
23, 028

50, 853
53,638
52, 915
46, 519

31, 888
35, 354
27, 777
19, 932

37, 305
28, 170
28, 255
14, 156

99, 982
87, 437
77, 150
72, 951

15, 551
15, 000
12, 356
11, 829

18, 766
20,173
19, 631
14, 435

21, 080
18, 257
20, 236
12, 316

44, 534
39, 409
32, 375
29, 915

20, 658
21, 331
25, 437
20, 442

13, 105
13, 527
13, 132
16, 164

10, 896
12, 473
16, 085
15, 610

81, 849
89, 855
101, 042
105, 300

14, 226
14, 842
17, 261
15, 326

9,534
9,770
8,965
10, 594

9, 240
7,393
11, 588
10, 873

34, 464
40, 452
48, 714
53, 598

10S, 721
114, 432
114, 224
113, 776

21, 367
25, 561
21, 225
26,966

18, 539
18, 509
22, 581
29, 268

21, 439
25, 554
25, 999
26, 518

106, 933
113, 210
113, 905
111,962

14, 797
16, 242
13, 577
16, 828

12, 965
11, 756
14,30(0
17, 904

15, 810
11, 946
15, 775
18,606

60,439
60, 313
59, 692
58, 610

20, 340
25, 917
17, 740
11, 346

113, 561
104, 301
99, 284
95, 453

29, 682
24, 758
22, 575
18, 265

30, 687
31, 156
29, 156
21, 637

25, 112
30,400
24, 812
16, 781

111, 499
110, 647
101, 990
97, 619

17, 453
14, 088
11, 251
11, 539

17, 304
18, 156
17, 540
13, 193

15, 768
19, 683
16, 154
11, 772

58, 887
55, 030
49, 302
53, 793

11, 009
10, 620
10, 407
9,280

11,511
10, 566
11, 238
9,554

79, 400
81, 894
87, 666
90,529

24, 743
29, 068
36, 544
28, 994

19, 292
18, 099
16, 474
15, 787

18, 230
19, 466
17,006
15, 582

120, 522
131, 341
151, 678
164, 514

12, 581
14, 774
18, 039
13, 651

10, 661
9,357
7,994
7,541

9,990
12, 139
8,792
8,928

48, 714
54,353
64, 467
70, 845

96,589
128, 824
177, 859
161, 976

86, 892
103, 250
147, 845
119, 354

132, 733
165,901
217, 385
161, 317

846, 845
880, 423
923, 617
983,786

14, 232
12, 094
10, 581
12, 881

12, 166
13, 071
12, 302
14, 422

14, 888
14, 765
12, 950
12, 551

91, 098
89, 728
87, 993
86, 141

34,790
31, 238
19, 541
38, 693

20, 268
25, 165
28, 247
36, 212

29. 021
29,779
32, 164
31, 809

181, 972
188, 078
179, 539
182, 367

16, 513
13, 363
11, 388
15, 914

9,730
11, 665
13, 285
16, 951

13, 572
12, 394
14, 844
15, 753

77, 926
79,549
78, 279
77, 267

162, 167
230, 250
266, 627
288, 954

122, 843
182, 195
224, 098
239, 048

164, 434
135, 711
125, 000
168,547

993, 425
960,656
852, 822
778, 337

September. __ 13, 655
October
17, 953
November... 16, 846
December. ._
9,345

17, 021
22, 621
17, 362
12, 281

14, 504
19, 819
13, 252
12, 096

82, 931
78, 349
77, 785
74, 352

26, 760
30, 098
26, 770
12, 542

41,989
52, 505
36, 328
25. 368

36, 527
53, 522
28, 502
26, 2G8

167, 063
145, 051
135, 889
122, 487

13, 770
12, 853
10, 825
6,670

18, 092
23, 062
19, 219
13, 932

16, 533
23, 394
16, 931
14, 798

72, 902
63, 082
54, 776
47, 572

395, 265
351, 367
250, 315
153, 744

322, 000 169, 376 622, 687
274, 760 187, 196 596, 143
202, 868 233, 073 598, 518
128, 380 83,300 581, 451

11, 248
12, 488
12, 248
10, 184

9,605
7,676
7,208
8,603

8,224
7,071
6,151
7,920

77, 015
80,880
86. 526
87, 971

32, 938
31, 631
28, 429
20, 014

17,888
14, 269
11, 476
12, 264

15, 866
13, 111
11, 844
13. 616

136, 986
153, 759
170, 212
177, 755

14, 512
14, 354
13, 182
10, 653

9,407
7,316
6,116
6, 443

8,998
7,315
6,062
8,238

52, 599
59, 721
66,903
71, 284

115, 100
129, 966
239, 879
262, 914

88,463 202, 075
100,888 186, 770
171, 048 177, 375
202, 358 350, 409

11, 212

9,682
10, 171

9, 143
9,059

89, 104
89, 437

19, 410
16, 119

14, 946
17,458

15, 034
18, 421

181, 998
179,900

10, 641
9,364

7,900
9,226

8,178
9,603

74,067
74, 189

190,295
285, 223

149, 555 298, 794 939, 481
213, 780 271, 330 1,197,768

June
July
September

1939
January
February
March
April
May
June
July

. _ 10, 578

$91, 729
191, 112
225, 233
221, 995 179, 461 161, 998 801, 559

704,041
706, 569
825, 707
916,004

September

1
Compiled by the National Boiler and Radiator Manufacturers' Association, from reports of 30 firms, 15 reporting on cast-iron radiators and 25 reporting on cast-iron
boilers (both round and square), both estimated to represent over 90 per cent of the industry. The data for 1923 and 1924 are not available by months.
2
Compiled by the Gas Heating Boiler and Furnace Association from reports of 8 manufacturers of industrial gas-fired heating boilers, estimated to represent about 75
per cent of the industry. The annual shipments for 1925, 1926, and 1927 include furnaces as well as boilers, but furnaces form only a small proportion of the total.




41

Number of machines
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

mo. average
mo. average
mo. average
mo. average
mo. average
mo. average
mo. average
mo. average
mo. average
mo. average

Number of units

Production

90.2
86.0
123.7
143.5
163.6
244.4

104.1
87.2
108.7
125.5
117.4
146. 1

45
32
49
45

51
61
52
43

115.7
168.8
216.0
187.2

116.8
159.4
216.8
184.4

109.9
218.2
211.4
201.8

130.7
136.5
143.9
148.3

41, 701
46, 281
40, 316
50,689

2,311
2,355
2,254
2,531

1,428
1,505
1,460
1,579

1,518
1,640
1,553
1,520

3,239
3,088
2,984
3,023

4,248
4,275
3,107
3,390

56
24
44
29

63
42
59
43

186.6
219.3
211.7
219.7

186.2
222.5
206.1
187.5

188.3
202.7
241.0
387.5

146.0
142.6
142.5
146.1

10,200
11, 367
9,871
8,053

42,538
42, 315
37, 563
44, 330

2,017
2,732
2,093
2,124

1,405
1,708
1,424

1,369
1,634
1,494
1,593

3,056
3,128
3,714
3,538

3,039
4,323
3,494
3,309

40
59
39
34

42
67
63
54

179.2
153.4
108.2
123.9

145.7
129.1
79.6
93.8

354.0
280.3
257.4
280.8

145.5
148.5
154.6
168.1

1,081
1,506
1,510
1,604

7,935
6,450
9,322
11, 030

50, 723 2,265
48, 135 2,085
48, 081 1,988
44, 922 2,841

1,695
1,432
1,878
2,175

1,481
1,578
1,608
1,740

3,800
3,658
3,912
4,343

3,835
3,127
3,357
4,267

47
41
42
62

51
48
50
54

156.0
210.2
255.0
261.7

136.2
172.8
246.7
264.3

259.5
405. 0
298.3
247.9

168.3
177.3
185.1
187.2

1,444
1,228

12, 348
13,030

40, 915
39, 168

2,528
2,968

1,772
2,014

1,886
1,715

4,058
4,364

3,861
3,591
4,054

62
51
53

50
39
92

225.5
252.3

223.9
244.4

233.6
275.0

182.5
175.2

56, 728
61,944
74, 610
69,884

1,268
1,396
1,956
1,489

7,939
7,059
9,586
9,563

May
June.July
August

89, 661
75,631
57, 702
64, 164

88,164
79,962
78,564
92, 955

70, 922
63,531
62, 337
74, 253

1,480
1,235
1,218
1,402

10, 583
11, 487
10, 935
11, 248

September ._
October
November
December

89,222
96,528
90,427
114, 272

98,065
92, 971

80, 770
76, 757
64,706
53, 442

1,187
1,505
1,125
928

1929
January _
February
March
April

71, 335
86,507
123, 650
124, 882

82, 976

67, 297
78, 125

September
October
November
December

92.5
90.5
117.1
132.1
136.8
160.7

3,504
3,136
3,229
3,321

68, 820
74, 830
90,770
86, 772

116, 192
87, 951

92.1
89.8
118.2
134.0
141.1
174.1

3,112
3,260
3,309
3,383

78, 342
75, 212
97, 712
89, 587

_ _

65
73
55
49
59
58
63
51
65
53

1,138
1,177
1,352
1,376

1938
January
February
March
April ...

May
June..
July
August

68
65
57
49
49
52
61
53
51
41

1,137
1,346
1,418
1,504

7,198
8,404
9,824

90,346

3,073
3,097
3,157
3,201
3,220
3,550
3,871
3,729
3,478
3,531

50,708 1,591
54,070 1,598
56, 001 2,582
44, 736 2,302

1,446
1,510
1,349

62,533

Relative to 1923-1925 average

Number

«738
658
614
717
524
1,094
2,208

84,692
75, 297
79, 821
88,786
86,551
84, 955

47, 128
24, 117
35, 244
46, 197
51,005
61, 073
70, 307
64,638
67,490

» 51, 566
49, 804
45, 021
58,845
45, 554
43, 471
45, 937

2,084

$1, 462 $6, 076
2,543 12,653
1,468 5,974
1,254 4,631
1,753 5,430
1,260
1,252
1,394 2,676
1,552 3,273
1,400 3,261
1,447
3,236

I

$1, 882
2,674
1,072
1,406
1,679
1,212
1,452
1,582
1,432
1,500

74, 071
34, 691
48, 203
59, 036
60,741
73, 506
85,754
78, 709
82, 472

75, 252

Thousands of dollars

Shipments

Foreign

Electric

Pitcher, Power,
hand
Unhoriand
wind- zontal New Ship- filled
type orders ments orders,
mill
end of
mo.
Shipments

Domestic

Total

Steam, power, 6and
centrifugal

Agricultural
implements
Internal-combustion engines

Shipments
Shipments

Domestic 5

AGRICULTURAL
MACHINERY AND
EQUIPMENT 8

PATENTS
GRANTED 7
Total, all classes

YEAR AND MONTH

SYSTEMS*

WASHING
MACHINES 2

PUMPS

WATER

VACUUMCLEANERSi

WATER
SOFTENERS 3

Table 20.— HOUSEHOLD AND AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY AND PUMPS*

_

* Monthly data from 1913 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section, pp.
43 to 46.
1
Compiled by the Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturers' Association from companies representing about 90 per cent of the industry.
« Compiled by the American Washing Machine Manufacturers' Association from reports of 48 members representing practically the entire industry in the United States
and Canada. Data for 7 small firms have been estimated to make the compilation complete. The association's monthly reports show electric, gas and power, water-power,
and 3hand machines separately.
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 21 manufacturers, covering domestic water softeners. Values of shipments are
given-in press releases and appeared in the November, 1927, issue (No. 75), p. 27.
* Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 32 manufacturers. Details by classes are given in press releases.
8 Compiled through 1926 by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, covering 22 firms in 1922 and 1923 and 19 firms thereafter. Beginning with 1927, these data have been
compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from practically the same number of firms. Details by classes, showing units and values as between
domestic and foreign shipments, are shown in monthly press releases.
0 Compiled from data furnished by the Hydraulic Society, the original figures being prorated to compare with reports from 23 identical firms beginning with April,
1925. The number of members reporting gradually increased from 14 in 1919, representing about two-thirds of the 1925 membership, until the full 23 companies reported.
These totals are believed to represent about two-thirds of the industry, and in 1923 these shipments represented about 23 per cent of the total production of all pumps and
pumping machinery according to the census of manufactures. Details are given on the association's reports as to single steam pumps, duplex steam pumps, power pumps,
centrifugal pumps, and reciprocating deep-well pumps.
7 Patents granted compiled from the official records on file in the U. S. Department of Commerce, U. S. Patent Office, Division of Publications; inasmuch as patents are
granted on Tuesdays only, the number of patents shown for a given month represents the total of either four or five Tuesdays. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in April,
1923, issue (No. 20), p. 48, except for internal-combustion engines, which appeared in June, 1923, issue (No. 22), p. 52. Agricultural implements patents fall within the official
classification of "Agricultural implements; planters, harrows and diggers, plows, harvesters, scattering unloaders, and threshing implements."
s Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, covering 90 manufacturers, estimated to represent 80 per cent of the industry. The production figures are based on
the employment data of 88 firms and the shipment figures on the value of goods shipped by 90 firms (60 reporting foreign shipments). Details for each class, segregated
as to foreign and domestic shipments, are shown separately in the monthly summaries of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
911 months' average.




42

Table 21.—INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY *
FOUNDRY
EQUIPMENT i

MACHINE
TOOLS 3

Unfilled
New Ship- orders,
orders ments end of
month

YEAH AND
MONTH

STOKERS >

Sales (new
orders)

UnNew Ship- filled
ororders m'ts ders,
end
mo.

Relative to average
shipments, 1922-1924

1919 mo. av
1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av
1927 mo. av
1928 mo. av

ELECTRIC HOISTS <

New orders

Shipments

Qty.

Value

ELECTRIC
OVERHEAD
CRANES «

Unfilled
Ship- New orders, New
orin' ts ders end of orders
month

Dollars

Number

Total
h.p.

Relative to aver- No.
age shipments,
of
1922-1924
hoists

52, 733
65, 920
27, 262
60,409
60, 871
42, 857
46, 111
45, 519
40,300
42, 391

261
202
38
77
134
94
150 M53 7290
162 167 294
138 139 227
237 204 418

35 7
93.1
132.5
104.7
132. 6
141.1
124.2
173.3

143.9
136,2
156.9

170.0
208. 8
311.6

1927
September- .
October
November
December

80.4
98.0
95.8
106.8

116.2
113.4
97.2
110.4

130.0
106.3
105.8
103.5

104
95
67
83

27, 843
27, 222
16, 955
32, 202

106
133
134
169

128
152
149
157

266
231
214
192

300
270
223
272

147,323
114, 835
102, 238
122, 663

151, 674
121, 445
139, 066
102, 206

653
764
637
762

1938
January
February
March
April

132.7
123.6
138.6
107.7

116.4
110.6
147.9
112.5

120.6
132.9
127.1
126.1

75
85
123
88

26, 572
43, 643
43, 425
31, 043

218
201
222
222

149
175
210
219

293
330
376
371

346
399
557
394

160, 852
172, 472
260, 222
198, 004

133, 842
166, 920
214, 080
188, 967

May
June
July
August

335.6
149.1
94.8
278.0

104.7
129.4
124.8
154.1

344.5
359.3
332. 1
467.2

130
162
186
162

38, 706
42, 628
58, 670
51, 572

205
215
204
241

204
193
181
208

345
348
420
428

462
442
394
402

204, 550
181, 205
204,636
180, 365

September __
October
November
December

170.0
185.0
197.8
166.5

129.7
254.3
264.0
234.6

529.5
462.6
403.9
333.8

161
100
116
102

65, 060
27, 219
30, 938
49, 212

265
284
290
274

205
221
242
245

441
504
563
596

447
405
522
475

1929
January
February
March
April

180.5
197.0
209.4
172.6

177.3
214.8
197.5
220.3

336.1
321.2
414.4
363. 4

97
80
117
141

42, 392
31,554
42, 432
48, 749

292
336
334
320

255
303
329
311

676
702
687
718

177.7
177.3

217.0
172.7

323.8
300.8

174
203
186

60, 772
67, 322
65, 197

334
292
259

301
296
278

721
722
694

_

May
_
June
July
JAugust

S

UnCan- filled
eel- orders,
1 ca- end of
tions month

Shipments

No. of
machines

Thousands of dollars

234
183
73
130
12?
94
112
113
115
124

._

WOODWORKING MACHINERY «

$1, 233
1,777
883
1,304
1,659
1,515
1,601
1,584
1,292
1,351

81,122
1,514
1,144
1,141
1,210
1,020
1,002

$574 $226
316 175
881 764
785 742
812 898
977 974 7 $4, 036
776 665 2,626
594 633 1, 872

$772
1,415
1,709
1,460
1,661
1,555
1,253
1,413

684
566
525
586

2,273
2,117
1,975
1,792

1,182
1,144
1,075
1,305

21
23
12
19

990
975
997
1,470

1,380
1,124
1,152
1,172

1,093
872
854
881

432
595
672
659

353
519
704
410

1,735
1,763
1,699
1,520

1,145
1,245
1,317
1,329

23
9
21
42

1,4-56
1,539
1,438
1,577

1,130
1, 147
1,346
1,150

920
890
1,064
931

190, 174
195, 807
177, 404
193, 248

547
600
463
564

708
573
733
821

1,671
1,688
1,800
1,952

1,985
1,173
1,247
1,641

24
44
32
6

2, 058
1,873
1,838
2,058

1,490
1,319
1,264
1,436

1,082
871
932
1,170

228, 510
209, 594
258, 867
188, 693

172, 986
202, 829
215, 863
211, 815

464
806
701
623

713
775
725
559

2,188
2,165
2,189
2,092

1,639
1,585
1,295
1,360

26
140
21
36

2,265
2,035
1,838
1,792

1,413
1,666
1,502
1,353

1,050
1,170
985
957

533
750
595
508

253, 194
346, 810
285, 465
246, 673

213, 663
201, 404
247, 348
232,483

~852
586
773
748

1,383
1,173
1,919
1,194

2,647
3,285
4,300
4,587

,949
,893
,850
,718

60
57
29
30

2,367
2,579
2,839
2,582

1,420
1,490
1,560
2,130

998
1,003
1,179
1,420

541
600

268, 043
283, 170

262, 641 1,122 1,457
269, 978 1,091 1,189

4,786
5,047

,620
,678

40
27

2,406
2,445

1,786
1,612

1,231
1,056

311 $167, 929 $154, 073
160, 016
165, 089
300
134, 982
274
128, 358
203, 998 188,661
437

$67 $1, 899
30 2,494
52 3,705
2, 681
47
33 2,502
30
1,925
15 1,377
35 1,814

September
October
November
December
* Monthly data from 1919 through 1926 on items on this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section,
pp. 40 to 42.
i Compiled by the Foundry Equipment Manufacturers' Association from reports of from 11 to 20 members, said to represent 65 to 70 per cent of the foundry equipment
industry. The principal products are molding machines, sand-cutting machines, sand-blast machines, tumbling barrels, sand-mixing machines, cupolas, ladles, core-making
machines, etc. The reports for each month are related to the average shipments of the reporting firms for 1922 to 1924 and are thus comparable, despite the difference in number of reporting firms. The association reports give detailed index numbers by si/es of firms but no numerical data.
a Stoker sales through December, 1922, from the Stoker Manufacturers' Association, said to represent approximately 99 per cent of the industry; beginning with January,
1923, from reports to U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from 13 manufacturers, representing practically the entire industry (15 prior to August, 1924,
when 4 establishments consolidated into 2). Press releases show segregation as to installation under fire-tube or water-tube boilers.
3 Compiled by the National Machine Tool Builders' Association, including quantity reports from between 50 and 60 firms, said to represent about one-third of the industry. This index, based on average monthly shipments for the years 1922 to 1924 as 100, covers gross new orders, shipments, and unfilled orders at the end of the month.
The association reports give detailed index numbers by sizes of firms but no numerical data. Detailed shipments data, since discontinued, appeared on p. 55 of the April,
1924, issue (No. 32).
4
Compiled by the Electric Hoist Manufacturers' Association from the reports of 9 firms.
« Compiled by the Electric Overhead Crane Institute, from reports of 11 manufacturers, estimated to cover 98 per cent of the output of electric overhead cranes for factories,
etc. Monthly data from January, 1925, appeared in the March, 1927, issue (No. 67), p. 26.
' Compiled by the Association of Manufacturers of Wood Working Machinery from reports of its members, averaging about 23 each month and varying from 20 to 27.
The total shipments for 1925 represented 48 per cent of the value of woodworking machinery produced that year, according to the census of manufactures. The products
comprised in this classification include band and scroll saws, band mills, band rip and resaws, borers, circular cut-off saws, circular resaws, circular rip saws, combination
saws, dovetailers, gainers, grinders, hand planers and glue jointers, lathes, mqlders, mortisers, planers and matchers, sanders, sash and door machines, shapers, surfacers,
tenoners, wheel machines, and woodworkers, besides miscellaneous woodworking machinery.
' 3 months' average.
« 6 months' average.



43

Table 22.—ENAMELED WARE'
BATHS
YEAB AND MONTH

Ship- Stocks,
ments end mo.

New

orders

LAVATORIES
Unfilled
orders,

Ship- Stocks,
ments end mo.

end mo.

SINKS

New

orders

MISCELLANEOUS

Ship- Stocks,
New
ments end mo. orders

Ship- Stocks,
New
ments end mo. orders

TOTAL
SMALL
WARE *
Unfilled
orders,

end mo.

Number of pieces
1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av
1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av
1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av.._.

39, 831
42,450
46, 977
51, 181
33, 172
19, 432
34, 625
51, 441

60, 530
41, 684
20, 951

321,980
21, 514
69, 872
35, 107

1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av____
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av
1927 monthly av
1928 monthly av

41, 510
74, 814
90,396
95, 629
110, 460
99, 595
94, 267
93,029

75, 324
41, 768
35, 439
71, 193
106, 995
156, 620
156, 297
147, 317

83, 117
82, 810
98, 799
99, 993

123, 163
326, 490

47, 754
49, 527
55, 769
65, 230
44, 888
32, 620
45, 768
51, 438

132, 369
138, 791
43, 302

34, 322
73, 612
53, 438

40, 911
93, 033
97, 316
98, 758
115, 841
103, 581
95, 572
101, 733

49, 907
137, 628
253, 957
168, 542
104, 126
71, 230
41, 972
74, 290

58, 169
91, 512
110, 479
110, 283
127, 356
113, 773
104, 305
105, 435

109, 318
79, 507
56, 408
143, 788
217, 056
236, 642
229, 945
191, 339

56, 315
117, 222
121, 891
106, 353
131, 741

182, 363
189, 108
186, 642
175, 728

86, 802
79, 810
104,993
98, 762

47, 343
43, 104
46, 109
44,405

102, 986
88, 832
113, 983
111, 301

104, 953
115, 254
111, 291
116, 443

158, 014
139, 463
128, 516
127, 324

109, 224
113, 336
117,720
110, 916

46, 666
45, 479
46, 860
41, 183

97, 129
88, 558
74, 832
58, 025

129, 559
143, 824
163, 354

100, 413
85, 368
71, 446
68, 077

_.

71, 519
76, 809
95, 818
105, 718

155, 418
164, 842
172, 292
159, 892

May
June
July
. ._ .
August...

125, 522
119, 297
111, 067
103, 878

September
October
November
December

1929
January
February
March
April
.._

1927
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

1928
Januarv
Februarv
March
April

May__ __
June
July
August

53, 428
57, 789
70, 626
74, 293
48, 419
32, 846
54, 584
60, 231

145, 329
124, 873
66, 333

106, 019
114, 107

66, 458
95, 327
114, 146
120, 381
129, 233
113,638
109, 496
109, 764

111, 7G4
93, 336
59, 188
154, 896
266, 823
283, 031
268, 582
241, 190

256, 114
267, 550
256, 641
255, 264

106, 720
85, 880
118, 642
107, 102

99, 173
99, 613
117, 784
114, 302

296, 158

109, 206
119, 275
110,826
126, 534

243, 959
219, 007
233, 4G6
220, 361

116, 205
116, 135
121, 276
120, 027

43, 703
34, 980
29, 663
34, 173

118,257
101, 961
79, 630
68, 866

196, 259
197, 121
201, 577
212, 004

78, 190
84,575
124, 016
191, 571

36, 473
43, 321
61, 880
139, 801

86, S29
87, 897
114,558
124, 027

135, 793
120, 723
113, 430
122, 167

127, 780
113, 017
101, 603
96, 876

136, 238
121, 061
101, 560
68, 263

86, 342
93, 174
68, 783
58, 425

134, 749
147, 656
165, 738
175, 104

76, 074
90, 665
72, 677
63, 756

69, 415
66, 221
82, 897
93, 894

188, 738
207, 324
215, 000
208, 512

94, 452
89, 388

197, 472
181, 677

151,673

31, 555
34, 655
29, 367
40, 887
22, 201
23, 331
28, 383
31, 062

77, 034
79, 129
47, 410

3 15, 176
25, 427
42, 671
27, 691

283, 860
952, 334

118, 861

33, 640
45, 531
57, 913
70, 658
62, 289
50, 003
46, 978
46, 556

89, 394
68, 400
51, 260
111, 138
171, 306
151,371
133, 8G8
119, 900

31, 803
60, 931
63, 290
65, 700
58, 535
52, 364
46, 532
46, b85

180, 320
406, 291
913, 480
480, 920
250, 646
162, 217
112, 930
197, 334

325, 102
318, 391

104, 926
94, 215
123, 645
115, 254

40, 465
45, 630
50, 753
49, 018

130, 881
139, 952
133, 431
129, 823

44, 262
43, 349
51, 961
43, 020

117, 617
118, 617
115, 878
102, 664

112, 461
126, 875
115, 1C9
131, 752

303, 586
267, 871
248, 458
238, 7G3

118, 391
118, 159
120, 538
131, 053

49, 844
54, 481
45, 523
55, 030

135, 726
132, 602
134, 133
127, 827

46, 937
51, 192
49, 5CO
54, 102

117, 488
115, 375
123, 117
120, 949

119, 850
97, 263
77; 309
79, 816

118, 159
117, 303
86, 117
75, 239

222, 824
220, 875
230, 148
239, 022

126, 112
108, 774
85, 933
88, 008

50, 616
48,100
41,106
35, 165

136, 902
134, 307
132, 116
138, 713

50, 129
46, 758
38, 779
38, 332

119, 608
99, 514
97, 4S2
106, 850

202, 755
218, 529
227, 151
212, 325

93, 951
98, 140
153, 131
209, 744

93, 158
91, 302
119, 596
125, 479

234, 675
263, 273
281, 911
268, 699

96, 509
102, 611
147, 261
216, 182

39, 744
42, 819
50, 302
51, 510

131, 427
141, 134
137, 416
125, 325

39, 798
46, 968
61, 600
73, 455

100, 160
124, 743
151, 592
351, 374

141, 458
131, 623
120, 600
114, 070

183, 173
173, 898
164, 830
161, 276

139, 110
138, 113
104, 2G2
102, 140

143, 791
128, 298
122, 593
116, 497

239, 678
227, 929
213, 539
216, 338

145, 004
128, 368
116, 236
96, 830

53, 353
48, 221
48, 550
54, 003

113, 088
111, 141
110, 330
95, 958

55, 012
47, 197
41, 605
41, 692

342, 397
315, 920
274, 135
174, 072

53, 303
44, 842
45, 561
39, 182

94, 383
99, 250
79, 218
71, 607

168, 211
180, 651
195, 323
207, 940

89, 126
91, 575
81, 693
68, 293

101, 777
111, 740
89, 309
73, 623

216, 255
230, 725
242, 837
258, 426

99, 749
110, 396
92, 490
74, 700

44, 910
46, 129
44, 159
34, 971

103, 509
116, 110
125, 108
128, 259

44, 707
43, 899
37, 852
28, 838

155, 483
129, 154
130, 873
118, 100

66, 991
73, 997
99, 039
99. 070

35, 073
42, 556
54, 746
58, 015

81, 701
80, 420
94, 321
104, 199

230, 527
255, 596
278, 137
273, 284

80, 614
88, 671
107, 878
114, 819

93, 321
79, 162
97, 429
109, 748

27G, 037
304, 051
318, 069
312, 209

86, 866
88, 647
107, 127
128, 629

41, 197
33, 974
36, 152
40, 544

137, 588
141, 960
149, 013
147, 990

42, 036
37, 136
40, 050
45, 588

111, 258
171, 204
151, 113
183, 072

89, 944
82, 349

49, 870
41, 644

104, 471
101, 900

257, 245
246, 575

102, 187
92, 709

108, 081
102, 709

313,022
298, 739

111, 580
94, 446

35, 616
42, OC1

145, 277
142, 411

33, 781
41, 817

174, 981
154, 2^-3

330,063

115,065

311,786

3 29, 197
33, 422
88, 018
57, 502
64, 577
124, 179
127, 919
115, 485
133, 381
115, 666

111,251

September
October
November
December

!
* Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, beginning with January, 1922, representing complete production as reported by 22 manufacturers, including the membership of the Enameled Sanitary Ware Manufacturers Association, until its dissolution in February, 1928, after which all firms reported direct to
the Bureau of the Census. A few small firms were unable to furnish complete reports prior to January, 1924. Data prior to 1922 are totals of the association reports, estimated to represent about 98 per cent of the industry at that time. Monthly data from 1917 through 1926 may be found in the ^Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals
and 2Machinery Section, pp. 36 to 39,
Small ware includes lavatories, sinks, and miscellaneous.
8
9 months' average, April to December, inclusive; previous data not available.




44

Table 23.—COPPER AND WIRE CLOTH*
COPPER

WIRE CLOTH <
1

Stocks, end mo.

Production *
YEAR AND MONTH

Mine

Un(N. and S. America) Price,
World i Domesingots Pro- Ship- Stocks, New filled
produc- tic ship- Exports,
or2
electro- duc- ments end of orders ders,
tion,
ments, refined
Refined
lytic
mo.
Refined Blister (N. Y.)3 tion
end
Smelter (N.andS. blister refined 1
mo.
America)
Dolls,
per Ib.

Short tons

1913 monthly average.
1914 monthly average.
1915 monthly average.
1916 monthly average.
1917 monthly average.
1918 monthly average.
1919 monthly average.
1920 monthly average.

51, 487
47, 851
62,003
83, 578
78, 976
79, 584
50, 514
51,023

51,020
47, 922
57, 834
80, 327
78, 588
79, 522
53,601
50, 378

77,300
69, 615

1921 monthly average.
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average.
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average.
1926 monthly average.
1927 monthly average.
1928 monthly average.

19, 667
41, 154
61, 564
66, 115
70, 176
72, 709
69, 165
75, 754

23,938
47, 131
69, 478
74, 872
78,944
82, 014
80, 721
88, 341

44, 766
65, 736
96, 990
108, 361
112, 692
120, 038
123, 042
135, 654

1927
September
October
November.
December

65, 936
68, 959
68, 080
67, 222

74, 418
83, 551
79, 878
85, 868

1928
January.
February
March
April

68, 469
67, 423
70, 327
69, 721

May.
June
July
August

Thousands of square feet

$0. 1527
8
. 1360
.1703
.2720

52, 179

38, 593
35,003
28, 362
31,906
46, 194
30, 398
21, 413
25,888

297, 928
270, 151

79,554
112, 971
121, 624
128, 406
133, 374
141, 196
159, 706

25, 605
45, 829
61, 293
62, 782
69, 264
75, 181
68, 737
81, 955

26, 178
30, 326
33,859
45, 692
44, 212
39, 244
43, 625
45,849

337, 989
188, 211
120, 427
« 128, 918
7 82, 726
73,390
96,728
66, 119

206,377
177, 928
244, 509
« 241, 659
7 248, 213
266, 704
254, 895
234, 833

.1250
.1338
.1442
.1303
.1404
.1380
.1292
.1457

358
438
491
455
436

418
418
468
420
409

1,062
1,140
1,070
1,236
1,127

119, 100
124, 927
118, 269
128, 923

136, 291
148, 278
144, 975
151, 961

71, 578
68, 619
59, 264
60, 862

46, 143
41,296
41, 094
51, 322

86, 493
83,882
90, 874
95, 298

246, 517
246, 354
250,014
248, 420

.1294
.1296
.1332
.1377

409
432
464
492

417
446
470
404

77, 429
81, 895
79, 110
82, 087

122,723
124, 848
128, 972
122, 824

143, 546
147, 546
147, 842
146, 427

64, 824
73, 789
72, 642
72, 234

52, 095
43, 092
48, 310
45,545

96,476
86, 932
87, 292
72, 893

223, 560
231, 904
225, 721
220, 206

.1385
.1382
.1385
.1399

449
435
584
413

73, 729
73, 224
73, 426
76, 952

85, 745
88, 398
83, 875
88, 517

129, 236
131, 024
135, 092
143, 560

156, 414
159, 474
156, 190
161, 838

79, 103
81, 433
82, 245
83, 398

56, 678
50, 261
47, 855
41, 186

66, 288
58, 809
54,871
54, 793

225, 462
235, 363
241, 131
238, 923

.1420
.1453
.1453
.1453

September ._
October.
November
December

78, 341
86,480
85, 382
85, 577

85, 795
100, 720
103, 137
103, 386

137, 018
149, 199
155, 448
147, 905

157, 518
176, 623
183, 813
179, 240

88, 707
100, 371
99, 822
84, 889

36,190
45, 168
45, 171
38, 635

51, 812
45, 648
52, 153
65, 466

239, 142
241, 732
244, 854
249, 995

1929
January
February
March... _ _
April

86, 325
84,735
93, 698
94,902

101, 151
95, 234
107, 253
110, 313

154, 472
141, 385
163, 561
161, 285

178, 783
167, 090
192, 792
196, 820

100, 135
98, 771
105, 860
99, 051

52,523
49,896
43, 745
45, 842

62, 749
55, 213
52,968
57, 494

93, 392
82, 354
79, 329

108, 961
95, 339
94,690

161, 784
156, 447
153, 513

192, 589
174, 086

93, 743
95, 258
98,720

36,949
40, 852

70, 412
83, 140
97, 729

May
June
July
August

_ ..

__

Make
and
hold
orders,
end
mo.

.2718
.2481
.1869
.1746

8398
393

8401
323
356
278
290

383
438

1,242
1,187
1,161
1,213

440
476
442
381

265
332
292
316

396
412
366
413

425
453
452
405

1,189
1,150
1,141
1,147

414
399
400
399

315
297
269
283

441
412
422
438

431
400
367
430

407
364
365
387

1,134
1,157
1,124
1,120

371
310
346
408

258
185
247
285

402
414
405
457

.1472
.1520
. 1578
.1584

403
466
423
425

423
442
395
391

1,099
1,068
1,092
1,099

412
419
422
419

320
266
301
449

453
459
482
469

245, 210
241, 085
242, 341
253, 509

. 1660
.1773
.2126
.1950

461
411
473
509

412
305
439
441

1,064
1,077
1,085
1, 137

376
410
1,172
247

302
325
789
497

486
494
743
689

262, 229
251, 489
239, 470

.1778
.1778
.1778

536
4S6

518
404

1,120
1,084

262
244

495
.249

618
568

September
October
November..
December
'*

* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 on items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section
pp. 48 to 50.
i Compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics, except mine production prior to January, 1921, and smelter production prior to 1923, for which the annual data
of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, have been used for monthly averages, and refined production, shipments, and all stocks from 1919 through 1923,
compiled by the Copper Export Association. Data on mine production represent practically complete primary production of copper in the United States, the 1924 data
representing 99 per cent of the annual total reported by the Geological Survey. World production of blister copper includes the smelter output of the United States,
Mexico, Canada, Chile, Peru, Japan, Australia, Europe (in part), Belgian Congo, and Rhodesia. These countries produced about 95 per cent of the world's production
in 1922; 96 per cent in 1923; 97 per cent in 1924 and 1925, and 98 per cent in 1926. Smelter production data are based on the production of blister copper by smelters
in the United States from both domestic and imported ores, also from some scrap copper. Refined-production data represent the total output of primary refined
2
Compiled by the V. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, representing refined eopper in pigs, ingots, bars, old and scrap, pipes,
tubes, plates, sheets, and wire, except insulated wire and cable.
'4o Price of ingot copper, electrolytic, New York, based on averages of daily transaction compiled by the Engineering and Mining Journal-Press.
Compiled by the Wirecloth Manufacturers' Association, from reports of 8 manufacturers of brass and bronze wire endless belts for paper manufacturers, and estimated,
to represent from 80 to 90 per cent of the industry. Details by sizes are given in the association's report. Make and hold orders are special goods made up and held until
called for by the paper mills;6the goods included in this item are not included in any other items in the table except production.
7
8
fi 9 months' average.
10 months' average.
8 months' average, January, February, April, and May missing.
11 months' average, January missing.


45
Table 24.—ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS

Standard

New
orders

High
Special tension

Thous.
of dolls.
1921 mo.
1922 mo.
1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
192S mo.
1927 mo.
1928 mo,

1928
January _ _ _
February..
March
April.

228, 611

Indoor

Outdoor

$723, 692
661, 358
651,948
1, 023, 517

$844, 597

Number of
pieces

828,500

$871, 130
770, 695
773, 240

$105, 453
94, 612
135, 555

781, 250

Shipments

ii

Delinquent
accounts
Sales

Units

Dollars

£t<^

Ho

No. of
firms

"$226,106 i* 1, 518
,625
202, 55V
,497
201, 689
,518
188, 770
,547
190, 747
179, 179
,499
2,879 13 147, 498
187, 018
,518
127, 886
2,404
171, 152 1,335
128,301
2,740

$224, 972 121,457,461
299, 873
2, 254, 198
367, 594
2, 732, 919

$802
743
621

2,228,162
2, 577, 732
2, 728, 841
1, 947, 433

739
748
667
596

1,896
2,030
1,929
2,231

125, 802
140, 346
141, 392
140, 415

145,031
156, 606
148, 358
197, 462

1,320
1,365
1,286
1,381

322, 434

May
340, 898

311, 889
468, 903
446,991
451,894

1, 033, 466
940,563
679, 369
564,775

820, 652
740, 366
626, 093
864, 562

776, 325
834, 479
630, 628
815, 830

88, 324
85, 766
85, 766

317, 167
305, 699
295, 839
305, 699

115, 394
110, 933
131, 212
116, 516

408, 401
438,584
444,804
521, 682

677, 861
683,664
877, 401
872,336

569,883
767, 634
889, 110
730, 979

638,562
627, 799
782, 185
749, 534

137, 266
125, 736
146, 392
158, 474

567, 863
286, 374
415, 361
378, 353

2,139,038
2,715,105
3, 166, 488
2, 518, 077

663
685
662
621

2,355
2,442
2,965
2,700

137, 417
118, 363
137, 102
107, 801

184,500
184, 688
213, 043
172, 514

1,361
1,407
1,769
1,468

133, 524
128, 243
132, 762
129, 813

540, 212
514, 307
637,602
649,599

857, 478
1,020,948
1, 125, 767
1, 356, 179

805, 824

920,083

786, 991
761, 630
778,787
894,690

178, 548
144, 940
124, 345
148, 156

374, 585
385, 428
380, 416
413, 435

2, 763, 094
2,779,032
2, 769, 866
3, 049, 567

662
626
561
591

3,092
3,098
2,606
2,805

109,804
117, 104
115, 929
122, 124

193, 432
164, 693
161, 476
167, 136

1,470
1,277
1,191
1,384

129, 587
148, 999
146, 476
129, 835

493, 067
539, 810
518,956
440, 079

1,243,476
1, 365, 690
1, 139, 205
1, 062, 194

957, 093
926, 133
759, 337
915, 057

781,472
950, 707
744, 127
782,401

118, 301
108, 478
120, 494
115, 532

281, 502
313, 285
297, 449
317, 078

2,915,560
3, 123, 321
3,071,288
1, 784, 587

568
649
585
577

2,362
2,971
2,731
2,748

12G, 151
155, 243
163,491
128, 077

141, 101
163, 281
147, 737
170, 226

1,223
1,257
1,107
1,107

128, 299
144, 025
185, 908
148, 280

485, 502
652, 211
735, 865
632, 025

1, 247, 653
735, 875
1, 372, 745 1, 013, 394
1, 299, 437
942, 665
1, 409, 532 1, 258, 364

724,498
779, 650
703,848
922,220

155, 569
127, 807
162, 578
200, 564

390, 866
304, 866
521,874
400, 397

3, 273, 9C3
2, 168, 723
2, 688, 191
3, 005, 179

767
753
S28
812

3,531
2,974
3,006
3,144

149,046
137, 291
134, 751
126, 948

131, 447
162,875
209, 002
199, 949

1,056
1,137
1,363
1, 279

110, 326
101,013

282, 227

119, 744
236, 052
178, 583
111, 408

141, 065
102, 547
105, 716
109, 558

264, 466

September .
October
November
December __

Shipments

ELECTRICAL
TRADE 9

112, 210
128, 255
152, 143
92, 359

245, 521

June. _ _
July
August- _

New
orders

INDUSTRIAL
REFLECTORS s

70, 674
66,968
106,503
111, 803

May

1929
January _ _
February
March
April

New orders

VULCANIZED
FIBER 7

77, 212
65, 809
49,536
57,919

237, 508

SeptemberOctober
NovemberDecember __

1 to 200 H. P.

OUTLET
BOXES
AND
COVERS e

62, 536
74, 230
69, 195
66,391

232, 878

June
July
August.

(direct current)

POWER
SWITCHING
EQUIPMENT «

Dollars

av
av_ $162,472
av_ 215,925
av_ 211, 139 10 $71, 607 i°$217,346 "$131,171
125, 447
153, 779
av_ 228,059
35, 091
90,371 151, 503
43,497
av_ 245, 522
77, 036
av_ 231, 681
142, 807
129, 441
90, 949
av_ 257, 430
512, 259

1927
SeptemberOctober
November
•December _ _

Shipments

ELECTRIC
MOTORS *

Consumption

Shipments

YEAR AND
MONTH

LAMINATED
PHENOLIC
PRODUCTS s

Thous. Shipments
of dols.

ELECTRICAL
PORCELAIN a

ELECTRIC
GOODS
(qtly.)1

159, 785
172, 704

679, 579
667, 099

1, 477, 523
854, 349 1, 038, 218
1, 456, 335 1, 098, 864 883, 821

246, 171

460, 749

2, 931, 583

827
814

3,693
3,470

153, 716
330, 413

189, 067
168, 724

1,285
1,223

896,638
804, 226

83,000

1
1!

1 Data compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from quarterly reports by 86 manufacturers of electrical goods. The data include nonelectrical items made by electrical manufacturers and represented CO per cent of the output of the electrical industry in 1925, according to the census of manufacturers. Quar-.
terly data from 1922 through 1926 may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Metals and Machinery Section, p. 47.
2
Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association, from reports of 12 firms estimated to produce 50 to 60 per cent of all standard porcelain (8 firms) 15
to 20 per cent of special porcelain (12 firms), and 10 per cent of high-tension porcelain (3 firms), except that beginning with July, 1927, a much larger proportion of the hightension output is included.

3 Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association. This product is sold mostly in sheets, tubes, and cut panels and includes some material for noiseless
automobile gears.
4
Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association, and comprise large power direct current electric motors of from 1 to 200 horsepower, inclusive, built
in general purpose motor, frames including control equipment sold with motors. The data are estimated to represent about 85 per cent of the output of these kinds of motorst
5
Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association from reports of 11 firms estimated to represent about 90 per cent of the output of this product,
e Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association from reports of 6 firms estimated to represent 75 per cent of the output of this product.
* Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association. Shipments are exclusive of intercompany sales. Consumption represents total vulcani^d fiHopaper, both sheet and tube.
uicouneu noer
8 Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association from reports of 5 companies estimated to represent 85 per cent of the output of the product Details
by kind of reflector and wattage are given in the association's monthly reports. The reflectors shown here are only for industrial use, but most of them can be used either
indoors or outdoors.
s Compiled by the National Electrical Credit Association from reports to its constituent regional associations by electrical manufacturers and jobbers Monthlv data
from 01921 appeared in the May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 206.
'
6 months' average.
1
5 months' average.
2
7 months' average.
3
9 months' average.
4
11 months' average, February to December, inclusive.




46

Table 25.—ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS
POWER
CABLES

ELECTRICAL
PORCELAIN

FLEXIBLE
CORDS

Shipments

YEAR AND
MONTH

Shipments

2,003

1927
September..
October
November..
December

PANEL
B'DS
AND
CABINew orders NETS

Ship- Stocks,
TinSinend of
ments month Glazed glazed
gle
nail
nail Tubes opknobs knobs
erat.

Thousands of feet

1926 mo. av.,
1927 mo. av_
1928 mo. av_

WELDING
SETS

3 44, 193 3 51, 631
43, 938 45, 171

Thousands of pieces

4

Mul- Shiptiple ments Shipments
Q.Perat. (qtly.)

i
ELECTRIC
FURNACES

2, 675
3,423

n,i77

41,326
1,830 1,904

134
135
236

11
15
25

46, 632
52, 494
55, 603
37, 764

51, 091
47, 566
46, 332
46, 222

1,897
2,945
2,134
3,201

755
879
1,092
794

660
1,273
1,361
1,383

133
153
123
'129

26
37
11
11

1,710
1,611
1, 770
1,860

35, 082
37, 279
42, 390
37, 853

51, 396
47, 277
44, 958
44, 751

3,363
2,441
1,297
2,207

1,091
1, 070
1,381
953

1,127
975
1,087
1,155

128
172
285
239

7
21
31
28

May
;
June _ _
July
August

2,130
1,947
1,738
2,138

41, 357
37, 803
37, 328
51, 062

45, 145
46,882
46, 411
47, 351

2,172
2,597
4,079
4,328

1,557
1,349
2,065
2,401

873
1, 239
3,237
2, 542

238
206
294
228

11
2
10
8

September..
October
November..
December __

2,197
2,384
2, 405
2,151

43, 854
54, 973
63, 726
44, 544

44, 193
43, 214
39, 013
41, 461

4,213
5,257
5,350
3,767

2,796
3, 042
2,644
1,614

2,694
2,807
3,111
1,997

234
297
218
291

7
58
24
90

1929
January
February
March
April

1,995
1,711
2,320
1,954

49, 909
45, 973
47, 932
49, 221

41, 757
45, 238
45, 109
50, 286

4,383
3,731
3,683
3,821

2,908
2,103
2,576
2,458

1,911
1,468
1,380
1,345

281
328
443
371

11
4
7
7

1,986
2,112

48, 324
40, 588

55, 771
66, 831

4,160
3,794

3,202
1,998

2,025
1, 746

387
296

8
9

$812
1,261

9, 487
7,445

865

RADIO EQUIPMENT >
MANF»D
MICA
Stocks, dealers', end of quarter

Un-

New Ship- filled
ororders m'ts ders
end

mo.

Thous. Thous. Kiloof
of
watts
feet
dols.

Units

1938
January
February, __
March
April

June
July
August

NONMETALLIC
CONDUITS

917

1,205

1,357

1,564

1,288

8,085
6,755
8,270
7,860

Loud
speakers

Thousands
of
dollars

9, 235
9,614
9,017
6,735

821

Tubes

Receiving
sets

5,344 s $273 5 $285

Batteries

Socket
power Reunits ceiving

Rectifying

Number of pieces

680, 635
73, 082

6

72, 483 6338, 433
59,501 344, 078

6

45, 543 6580,825 638, Oil >
24, 576 595,981 38| 109

72, 908

8,939
7,645
6,373
6,960
7,376
8,804
7,543
4,733

4,226
4,719
7,171
8,109

247
302
267
259

285
326
244
254

7,475 10, 769
5,048 12, 092
6,397 7,218
6,829 14,542

285
289
335
292

305
338
308
332

8,242
6,684

305
252

298, 376

41, 332 523, 839

36, 208

88, 362

2,937
3,892
5,967
5,131
«
5,688
4,958
4,861
6,493

67, 141

77, 825

378, 489

49,753 637, 810

39, 813

80, 751

71,078

309, 682

39,912 643, 539

40, 646

52, 877

42, 158

177, 505

19, 696 401, 654

26, 461

90, 486

67, 265

293, 000

25, 206 683, 984

43, 766

68,214

57, 504

196, 123

13, 490 654, 748

41, 561

74, 817

75, 651

203, 193

7,282 756, 008

70, 956

302
294

6,562
6,237

309
246

310
335

279
270
265
283

196
305
304
290

1 Compiled by the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association, except for data on radio equipment. Data on paper-insulated, lead-covered power cables are reported
by 9 companies, representing about 90 per cent of the industry, details by voltage being given in the association reports. Data on flexible cords are reported by 16
companies, representing about 75 per cent of the industry; details by sizes are presented in the association's reports. Data on electrical porcelain are furnished by 14
companies, representing about 75 per cent of the industry; details by package sizes, with price range and averages, are presented in the association's reports. Data on
welding sets are furnished by 6 companies, representing about 90 per cent of the industry; no monthly figures are available for 1926. Details of single-operator variable
voltage sets by ampere capacities are presented in the association's reports as well as the total ampere capacity of the multiple operator constant-potential sets. Data on
panelboards and cabinets are reported by 9 companies, representing about 80 per cent of the industry from January, 1927, to March, 1928, and by 15 companies representing
90 per cent for March, 1928, and by 25 companies representing 95 per cent up to the present time. Data on nonmetallic conduits are furnished by 10 companies, representing about 90 per cent of the industry. Electric-furnace data are reported by 9 companies.representing about 90 per cent of the industry; these furnaces are for industrial use only, and are shown in number and value, classified, in the association's reports. Data on manufactured mica are reported by 6 companies, representing about
2 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, in cooperation with the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association,
from reports of about 7,500 retail dealers each quarter. Further details and segregation by States are shown in press releases. Similar data covering jobbers' stocks are also
given in press releases of the bureau.
3 6 months' average.
< 11 months' average.
6
10 months' average.
6 Average for 2 quarters.




47

Table 26.—TIN, ZINC, AND LEAD *

Stocks, end of
month
YEAR AND
MONTH

Deliveries World
visible

LEAD 3

ZINC 2

TIN*

Im-

ports,
bars,
blocks,
U.S. etc.

Price,
Straits
(New
York)*

Retorts ProOre
in oper- duction Stocks ship*
at reation, (total fineries, ments,
Joplin
end of primonth mary) end mo. district

Dolls,
per Ib. Number

Long tons

Ore shipments
Stocks, Price,
Ore Price,
U.S. pig, deRestocks, prime Proceipts and silverJoplin west- ducin U.S. Mexico, ized
district, ern (St. tion Joplin
end
(New
ore
end mo. Louis) 5
district Utah
mo. York)«
Dolls,
per Ib.

Short tons

1913 mo. av
1914 ino. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av
1920 mo. av

3, 658
3,475
4,063
4,685
4,823
4,862
2,692
4,260

12, 377
14, 907
15, 208
18, 586
18, 803
13, 894
12, 890
19, 726

1,854
1,700
2,079
3,331
2,284
286
1,630
3,322

3,880 $0. 4432
3,536 .3570
4,302 .3866
5,137 .4348
5,344 .6165
5,302 .8680
3,337 .6554
4,689 .5036

105, 684
94, 468
156, 568
204, 693
136, 639
123, 033
100, 830
89, 737

28, 890
29, 420
40, 793
55, 621
55, 798
43, 160
38, 250
39, 981

40, 659
20,095
14, 253
17, 598
53,721
41, 241
37, 485
40, 443

22, 449
20, 139
23, 530
28, 996
33, 546
29, 362
33, 622
46, 461

1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av
1927 mo. av
1928 ino. av

2,156
4,788
5,846
5,344
6,371
6,504
6,041
6,572

19, 697
24, 683
21,740
21, 254
19, 538
15, 386
14, 925
18,393

2, 351
2,482
2,667
3,251
2,890
2,164
2,101
2,763

2,016
5,016
5,745
5,422
6,386
6,424
5,929
6,495

.3000
.3258
.4271
.5020
.5790
.6530
.6437
.5046

36, 623
57, 007
84, 634
76, 748
87, 062
87,105
79, 561
66, 505

17, 968
31, 140
44, 267
44, 654
49, 244
53, 211
51, 129
51, 633

79, 394
36, 385
20, 042
39, 226
15, 720
20, 501
37, 560
44, 336

26, 192
44, 426
58, 126
60, 965
67, 767
70, 072
57, 420
49, 782

68, 063
58, 649
42, 003
25, 521
23, 544
29, 602
44, 550

1937
September
October
November
December

6,110
6,005
5,665
4,535

15, 083
14,684
14, 594
15, 733

1,973 4,938
3,158 7,179
2,003 4,813
1, 573 ' 3,958

.6149
.5850
.5768
.5849

74, 435
76, 067
76, 627
77,084

47, 735
50, 185
49, 217
52, 347

34, 277
36,223
39, 320
40, 751

55, 308
76, 430
49, 830
54, 586

1928
January
February.
March
April

5,415
5,790
7,960
7,010

15,244
17, 645
15, 586
15, 001

2,518
1,998
2,078
1,973

5,727
5,992
8,138
6,921

.5564
.5249
.5218
.5236

72, 204
72, 44V4
71, 252
72, 522

52, 414
50, 042
55, 881
53, 493

42, 163
41, 290
41, 529
44, 759

May
June
July
August .

5,335
6,950
5,545
7,200

17,064
16, 231
18, 022
18, 456

3,708
2,148
2,878
1,718

7, 045
5,050
4,772
6,584

.5154
.4796
.4710
.4808

70, 260
65, 680
62, 384
66, 428

53, 422
50, 825

September
October
November
December

6,885
6,475
7,145
7,155

19, 924
20, 907
22,067
24, 563

3,508
4,598
3,603
2,428

8,187
8,048
6,221
5,250

.4807
.4901
.5085
.5021

1929
January
February
March
April
..
..

8,795
6,750
8,175
8,435

24, 237
26, 402
26, 632
26,353

2,611
3,307
2,550
3,603

9,498
7,325
7,435
8,838

8,480
7,455

24, 765
23, 751

3,464
3,820

8,902
7,150

May
June
July_
August

$0. 0550
.0506
.1306
.1264

.0873
.0789
.0699
.0775

21, 181 3®, 692
32, 152 36, 317
43, 349 44, 231
48, 459 47, 755
67, 586 53, 902
65, 532 56, 503
68, 529 55, 010
71, 151 53, 195

102, 046
100, 706
116, 069
156, 878
160, 439

.0454
.0573
.0727
.0810
.0902
. 0842
.0676
.0631

50, 995
53, 017
57, 035
57, 027

160, 134
155, 868
155, 568
156, 280

.0630
.0625
.0626
.0650

75, 855
72, 264
77, 054
58, 401

55, 970
54, 021
52, 150
47, 939

157, 417
167, 692
173, 411
161, 207

.0650
.0633
.0600
.0610

6,352
13, 277
6,623
6,125

61, 790
77, 074
56,395
78, 811

53, 991
54, 185
49,305
53, 575

159, 375
163, 709
158, 919
156, 976

.0612
.0630
.0622
.0625

55, 167
58, 118
58, 021
57, 225

9,326
10, 514
9,102
10, 374

65, 353
71, 887
91, 538
67, 395

51, 978
55, 610
55, 660
53, 953

155, 482
152, 746
156, 879
161, 460

.0645
.0650
.0639
.0650

.0635
.0635
.0646
.0666

58, 607
48,254
59, 298
62, 476

6,097
8,929
13, 329
11, 615

71,412
71, 282
101, 763
75, 935

53,881 156, 182
50,954 160, 597
57, 197 158, 149
57, 449 156, 888

.0665
.0685
.0745
.0719

.0662
.0669
0.677

62, 119
57, 742

8,424
8,491
5,373

96,688
76,003

58,140 162, 255
53,542 173, 612

.0700
.0700
.0680

31, 381
39, 436
44, 768
51, 980
56, 503
59, 012
57, 273
54, 270

5,700
7,805
7,522
8,336
10, 774
10, 865
8,675
8,224

28, 806
29, 776
39, 296
43, 147

.0621

.0600
.0575
.0572

53, 204
56, 134
57, 703
56, 812

6,439 80, 362
7, 864 • 66, 157
8,207 70, 752
13, 079 83,003

37, 612
47, 217
47, 972
51, 579

49, 905
52, 398
59, 746
49, 097

.0564
.0555
.0562
.0576

54, 406
54, 991
58, 031
50, 115

7,463
6,665
6,424
6,438

50, 630
64, 531
43, 227
43, 466

41, 747
32, 266
31, 679
39, 303

.0603

52, 157

45,225
44,468
42, 210
44,416

.0620
.0625

51, 481
51, 501
48, 671
53, 403

61, 965
59, 832
61,544
61,544

49, 361
50, 259
50, 260
50, 591

47, 915
46, 068
46, 542
45, 441

41, 429
41, 165
49, 246
79, 308

48, 474
53, 209
51, 013
25,760

.0625
.0625
.0626
.0635

.4916
.4937
.4885
.4597

63,314
67, 631
67, 519
73, 319

49,709
48,154
55,471
54,653

45, 418
40,620
37,962
34, 588

48, 777
50,848
72, 206
54,821

27,309
24,535
20, 969
26,448

.4392
.4426
.4640

73,231
72, 087
72, 329

56, 958
52, 953

33,826
36, 932
44, 142

37,961
60, 119
48, 995

40, 957
47,458
39, 813

54,441

$0. 0437
.0386
.0467
.0686
.0879
.0750
.0576
. 0796

3 936
3,464
3,734
4,496
5,264
5 561
5,683
7,800 6 38, 938

.0466
.0572
.0669
.0634
.0762
.0734
.0624
. 0603

50,890

Dolls,
per Ib.

Short tons

.0616

September
October
November
December
* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics. Metals and Machinery Section.
pp. 52 to 59, except for price of Straits tin, which appeared in the June, 1928, issue (No. 82), p. 23.
1 Deliveries and stocks of tin from New York Metal Exchange. Stocks in the United States are at port warehouses in New York at the end of the month, while deliveries
are from these warehouses and indicate approximate consumption. The world visible supply at the end of the month includes stocks in the United States, in Europe, and
afloat. Imports of tin in bars, blocks, etc., from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
2 Production and stocks at refineries at end of month of total primary zinc and retorts in operation at end of month from American Zinc Institute. Ore shipments and
stocks at Joplin district mines at end of month from the Joplin Globe. The Joplin or Tri-State district includes parts of Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, and produces
about 65 per cent of zinc ore mined in the United States. Shipments are recorded as loaded at mines by buyers for shipment to smelters.
3 Production of crude lead (amount extracted from Mexican ore deducted), receipts of lead in United States ore, shipments of lead ore from Utah, and total subscribers'
stocks in the United States and Mexreo of ore, matte, base bullion, and refined lead, including antimonial, reported by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics. Shipments
of lead ore from mines of the Joplin district frem the Joplin Globe. Utah shipments are from the Park City, Bingham, and Tintic districts and represent totals for 4 weeks
with a fifth week added in certain months, this accounting for most of the larger fluctuations. Details by districts are given in the bureau's reports.
4
Compiled by the American Metal Market, representing average weekly price of Straits tin at New York.
6
Averages of daily prices from the Engineering and Mining Journal-Press.
« 5 months' average, August to December, inclusive.




48

BABBITT
METAL i

BAND INSTRUMENTS 2

Consumption

Shipments

Total Direct Sale
to
by
ap- pro- conpar- duc- sument
ers
ers

Cup- SaxoTotal mouth- phones Wood
wind
piece

Thousands of pounds

Dollars

GALVANIZED SHEET
METAL WARE 3

ENAMELED
SHEET

PORCELAIN ENAMELED FLATWARES

MET-

YEAR AND
MONTH

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

Pails and tubs

Other

AL
WARE < New orders Shipments

HOUSEHOLD
WARE"

Table 27.—MISCELLANEOUS METAL PRODUCTS

Ratio
Ship- Ship- Quan- to Quan- Ratio to
ments ments
tity ca- tity capacity
pacity
Thous. Per Thous.
Dozens of pieces
of sq. cent of sq. Per cent
feet
feet

Produc-

tion

Shipments

Production

24, 879
32, 018

119, 159
139, 060
149, 635

118, 806
140, 680
146, 950

44,675 43, 291
35,423 35, 097

23,120

131,006 141, 817

6,760

138, 788

28,496

202,393 182,692

372,452
440,689

6,136
7,571

21, 140

183, 812

198, 711

31, 019 32, 082
39, 018 36,123
32, 942 30, 980
30,423 33, 785

350, 748

24, 397

337, 181

159, 178

133, 387

33, Oil
48, 849
30, 712

29,900

318, 071

46, 357

292,048

31,832
44,632 48,291

37, 776

44, 852

7$588,513 ?$206,113 '$365,634 $17,100
5,752
5,495
5,009
4,973

1,177
1,282
1,092
1,028

4,575

5,440
5,452
5,626
4,812

1,220
1,066
1,208
950

4,220
4,386

587, 589
544, 377
454, 853
401, 834

219, 151 350, 817
201, 623 319,358
169, 082 260, 892
163, 659 206, 158

3,862

407, 776
474, 302
526, 181
398, 509

143, 893
160, 558
178, 680
148, 240

4,946
4,855
_. 4,605
5,497

971 3,975
830 4,025
1,442 3,162
1,008 4,489

377, 282
369, 646
346, 627
410, 474

140, 272
158, 137
130, 642

4,792
5,115
4,506
4,466

676 4,117
1,255 3,860
1,186 3,320
1,296 3,170

495, 307
550, 345
563, 667
538, 116

182, 209
216, 526
201, 341
205, 514

287, 667 25, 431
299, 785 34, 034
327, 470 34, 856
306, 847 25, 755

127, 608 , 127, 530
151, 495 141, 101
112, 690 110, 275
93, 273 90, 254

4,929
4,470
4,928
4,843

894 4,034
1,027 3,444
1,025 3,903
1,118 3,725

283, 049
445, 709
367, 687

114, 059 146, 786 22,204
156, 153 227, 193 28,632
164, 609 254, 485 26, 615
143, 424 202, 208 22, 055

125, 536 149, 304
177, 822 176, 125
173, 592 175, 472
208, 544 201, 119

June
July
August

4,607
4,731
4,693
4,756

1,028
1,106
900
939

3,817

350, 366
345, 169
266, 219
325, 688

149, 901 '
148, 148
110, 104
147, 470

174, 561 25,904
168, 420 28, 601
134, 350 21, 765
161, 034 17, 184

177, 170
141, 448
114, 343
127, 797

September
October
November
December

5,308
5,796
5,630
4,986

999 4,309
1,191 4,605
1,274 4,357
837 4,149

448, 155
579, 715
469, 884
528, 391

188, 711
244, 512
197, 028
199, 785

216, 481 42,963
270,417 64, 786
242, 561 30, 295
275, 400 53,206

January
February
March
April

6,093
5,720
6,466
6,046

1,217
1,025
1,346
1,189

4,877
4,696
4,857

322, 284
340, 522
396, 445
313, 462

135, 704
135, 619
167, 302
143, 123

145, 252
170, 625
192, 739
138, 110

May

5,479
5,928

1,230 4,249
1,107 4,821

336, 794
322, 040

156, 939
154, 327

151, 008
135, 770

4,213
3, 917

3,945

86,257 852
6,329 51
6,402 50
6,001

52

81
79
83
984

5,586

53
49
59
45

5,942
5,993
7,567
6,596

47
47
59
52

79
80
78
79

42
47
37
43

6,253
6,749
6,040
5,937

49
53
48
47

80
80

248, 599
329, 843

5,285
5,907
4,668
5,285

310, 823
322, 081
287, 115
307, 280

6,129

9,578
5,308
4,895

48
63
43
44

6,849
6,889
6,394
5,609

53
54
50
44

786

50, 904 45, 205
31, 545 36, 452

319, 871
372, 848
442, 689
351, 034

5,378
7,024
5,430

45
45
59
45

5,473
5,824
6,526
6,219

46
49
54
52

884

155, 561
144, 385
121, 415
142, 487

39, 206 35, 143
48, 038 44, 833
61, 688 47, 856
37, 846 44, 377

348, 661
299, 078
277, 684
358, 811

5,628
5,477
4,457
6,233

47
49
40
55

6,924
5,322
4,665
5,495

58
47
41
49

84

150, 845
153, 813
131, 792
112, 923

139, 183
152, 258
103, 290
102, 802

55, 850
56, 469
33, 553
36, 042

50, 606
54, 596
34, 012
23, 567

352, 484
417, 387
328, 875
322, 339

6,551

58
66
61
45

6,108

54
68
59
46

88

41, 328
34, 278
36, 424
32, 229

151, 106
151, 019
211, 252
165, 155

165, 745
170, 813
211, 516
171, 722

40,649 36, 896
50,055 49,549
55, 778 55,632

427, 871
390, 577
449, 425
463, 577

28, 847
31, 943

176, 622

150,501

43, 370

352, 885

19, 287

23,396

42, 952

40, 118

326, 411
349, 313

8 6, 789 853
5,884 47
6,092 48
5,914
51

1927

January
February
March
April

_ .

May

June
July
August _
September
October
November
December

4,418

240, 763
289, 347
319, 005
229, 129

213, 695 23,315
192, 042 19,467
196, 490 19, 495
162,971 228, 463 19,040

165, 707

110,909 119, 724
124, 264
133, 309

128, 816
148, 148

39,006 41, 368
35, 602

28, 578

22,090 17, 013

1928

January
February
March
April

__

May

3, 578

3,625
3,793

411,978

32, 678

35, 689

31,609 29, 085

5,421

7,428
6,839
5,101

7,700
6,602
5,153

78
82

1929

June
July
August
September
October
November _
December

5,120

60, 471

43, 329

38, 597

. _

i Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 31 firms, comprising a large part of the industry. Consumption is calculated
from sales by manufacturers and consumption by those firms (among them several important railroad systems) which consume their own production. These figures
include all white-base friction bearing metals.
a Compiled by the Band Instrument Manufacturers' Association, representing 64 per cent of the total output of wind instruments in 1925, according to the census of
manufactures.
s Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 12 firms , including data from the Sheet Metal Ware Association. The galvanized ware included here is the product resulting from dipping made-up shapes in molten zinc and not utensils of galvanized sheets. It is classified as follows: (a) Pails and
tubs include well buckets, cement pails, sap pails, stock pails, fire pails, water pails, and washtubs, but not pails for shipping food or candy, food-container pails, etc.
(6) Other galvanized ware includes steel baskets (but not wash boilers), ash and garbage cans, stable and street-cleaning cans, coal hods (including japanned hods), feed—
measures, dry measures (including japanned), refrigerator pans, watering pots, oil and gasoline cans, chamber pails, and ash and garbage-can covers.
4
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 18 manufacturers, comprising approximately 80 per cent of the industry.
These reports include cooking, household, and hospital utensils having a vitreous coat on a steel sheet or iron base, and exclude equipment such as stoves, heaters, signs,
etc. Details by class (white, gray, or colored), giving values, are shown in monthly press releases.
5 Compiled by the Porcelain Enamel Manujacturers Association, from reports of 11 manufacturers of porcelain flatware, such as kitchen table tops, tub covers, outdoor
advertising signs (of which 3 classes these figures are estimated to represent about 85 per cent of the industry's capacity), refrigerator linings, stove parts, etc. (for which
classes these figures are estimated to represent from 70 to 75 per cent of the industry's capacity outside of stove and refrigerator manufacturers with their own enameling
plants). The unit of measurement for these operations is the number of square feet of sheet metal passed through the furnace once.
« Compiled by the Enamelist Publishing Co. from trade reports on the wet-process vitreous enamel industry, covering stoves, kitchen ware, scales, refrigerator linings,
etc.; reports are from about 350 furnaces, representing about 90 per cent of the industry. 8
6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.
4 months' average.
months' average.



49

Table 28. -AUTOMOBILES
EXPORTS »

PRODUCTION i

Canada

United States
YEAR AND
MONTH

Canada

Complete or chassis
Total

Pas-

senger Taxi- Trucks
cabs
cars

Total

GENERAL
MOTORS
CORP.3

Complete or chassis

Sales

United States

Passenger Trucks
cars

Total

Accessories
Pasand
senger Trucks parts
cars

PasTo
Total senger Trucks dealers
cars

Thous.
of dols.

Number of cars

To
users

Number of cars
1

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av

40, 417
47, 421
80, 828
134, 809
156, 162
97, 557
161, 133
185, 612

38, 458
45, 307
74, 661
127, 132
145, 483
78, 620
138, 138
158, 797

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av

133, 069
212, 015
336, 168
300, 212
355, 486
358, 411
363, 230

121, 093
191, 910
304, 261
267, 500
313, 464
317, 759
245, 103
318, 428

618
510
447
559

1927
September
October
November
December __ __

260, 310
219, 682
134, 370
133, 571

226, 198
182, 456
108, 984
105, 309

1938
January _
February
March
April

231, 728
323, 796
413, 314
410, 104

May
June
July
August. _

283,444

7,678
10, 680
18, 938
22, 995
26, 816
11, 976

20,104
31,907
32, 711

41,403
40, 142
37, 894

8,504
12, 203
11, 271
13, 498

17,061

8,681
6,236
5,173
2,234

2,581
1,512
1,444
872

26, 273
27, 718
31, 401
23, 609

1,758
2,189

32,060

44,243

14, 921
20, 199

245
586
774
774

33, 867

11, 262

36,640

7,748

24, 612
27, 488

6,617
3,106

205, 142
290, 689
371, 150
364, 265

504
462
671
612

26, 082

32,645

8,463
12,504

41, 493
45, 227

24,211

6,705
10, 315
15, 227
20, 517

425, 783
396, 796
392, 086
461, 298

375, 356
356, 214
338, 383
400, 124

507
408
409
469

49, 920
40, 174

29,764
25, 341
20, 122
24, 274

4,178

60, 705

33, 942
28, 399
25, 226
31, 245

September
October
November
December

415, 314
397, 284
257, 140
234, 116

358, 615
276
339, 487
669
216, 754
700
204, 957 1,036

56, 423
57, 138
39, 686

21, 193
18, 536
11, 769

28,123

9,425

1939
January
February _
March
April

401, 036
466, 352
585, 094
621, 336

347, 382
405, 708
513, 266
537, 225

2,064

51,590
58,536

21,501

1,686

604, 020
545, 252

516, 055 1,318
452, 641 1,315

May
June
July
August- _.

September __
October __
November
December

2,108

2,079

17, 469

3,203
6,520
12,658
14,894
25,244

2,242
3,694

25, 452
32, 016
42, 330

33, 952
49, 974
42, 269

38,064
66,546
48,945
69, 659
102,904
130, 229
150,901

37, 195
60,940
54,797
68,921
101, 319
129,548
153,537

3,872
3,50?
3,876
2,193

2,856
2,380
2,403
1,857

1,016
1,127
1,473
336

140, 607
128, 459
57, 621
60,071

132, 596
153,833
80,539
53,760

12, 171
12, 468

3,502
4,111
3,557
3,996

1,838
2,628
2,686
2,957

1,664
1,483
871
1,039

125, 181
169, 232
197, 821
197, 597

107, 278
132, 029
183,706
209, 367

11, 497
11, 845
12, 571
13, 858

6, 157
5,589
8,021
11,011

4,511
4,431
6,545
7,985

1,646
1,158
1,476
3,026

207, 325
186, 160
169, 473
186, 653

224, 094
206,259
177, 728
187, 463

10, 079
17, 522
13, 151
11, 182

8,670
9,705
8,783
6,646

6,279
6,696
4,906
4,510

2,391
3,009
3,877
2,136

167, 460
120, 876
47, 587
35,441

148, 784
140, 883
91,410
33, 442

20,068

8,971
10, 849
15, 528
6,586

5,640
7,694
10, 194
4,164

3,331
3,155
5, 334
2,422

127, 580
175, 148
220, 391
227, 718

104,488
138, 570
205, 118
223, 303

9,561
8,219

5,727
5,346

3,834
2, 873

220, 277
200, 754

214, 870
194, 705

2,579
5,566

623
954

3,255

10, 586
12, 615

2,072
2,279
4,885
5,573
8,787

20,359
19, 878

23,229
30,756

11, 573

21,402

7,240
8,352
9,999

16, 473

7,136

20, 476
25, 114
40, 181

11, 584

19, 033
19, 366

33,644

8,838
9,793
8,625
9,061
11, 133

5,104
6,971

38, 851
36, 038
38, 880
32, 815

16, 572
13, 016
8,154
6,734

4,621

30, 559

22, 494

8,065

5,520

46,524

3,615
2,691

46, 893

29,951
29,684

16, 573
17, 209

29,954

20, 945

9,009

69, 749
82, 425

31, 287
40, 621
41, 901

17, 164
25, 584
32, 833
34, 392

4,337
5,703
7,788
7,509

37, 665
55, 058
76, 382
64, 437

24, 631
35, 253
51, .504
47, 732

13, 034
19, 805
24, 878
16, 705

86,647
81,296

31, 559
21, 492

25,129
16, 511

6,430

39, 913

28, 417

4,981

50,976

34,106

11, 496
16, 870

53,294

118
214
1,037
1,064
1,349
1,725
1,460
1,981

7,183

5,160

47, 912
47, 171
5l, 679
4
9, 007

3,058

775
2,950
4,790
3,657
4,834
4,469
3,325
4,664

2,428

3,489

2,200
3,323
2,686
3,803

596
1,434
1, 457

894
3,163
5,827
4,721
6,182
6,194
4,785
6,646

11, 876

5,330
6,737
6,686
3,937
6,894
14,304
6297

1,912
1,918

500
468
1,123
1,048
791
694
1,633
1,506

5,480
3,078
5,595

2,157
1,861

5,091
7,909
10, 769
9,814
11,298
13, 738
12,236
16, 395

$523

84
286
1,841
1,577
1,207
859
1,299

2,241
2,147

1, 460
1 510
3,245
4 638
7,885
6,257
6,661
6,970

1,958
2,115
6,167

12,790
16, 192

472
1,389
2,001

2,635
2,801

3,547

3,192
4,915
6,147

6,693
6,991

8,862
11,968

7,862
6,841

7,009
7,505
7,604
9,662

24, 416
26, 569

4

226
279
412

l|

* Monthly data from 1909 through 1926 for items in this table, if available, may be found in the Record Book of Business Statistics, Fuels, Automobiles, and Rubber Section,
pp. 35 to 43.
1
Monthly domestic automobile production data beginning July, 1921, represent practically complete production or factory sales as compiled by the U. S. Department
of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, including total membership of the National Automobile Chamber of Commerce. Foreign assemblies are included in these figures. Annual
figures through 1921 represent production as compiled by the National Automobile Chamber of Commerce from the principal producers, covering close to 90 per cent of the
industry, from quarterly reports of other member companies, and from annual figures of small nonmember companies, covering the balance of the industry. Canadian
figures have been furnished by the Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, since January, 1926. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in June, 1927,
issue (No. 70), p. 22, except for Canadian passenger cars, for which data prior to 1922 were compiled by Babson's Statistical Organization from reports of companies estimated
to represent 90 per cent of the output, and which appeared in the April, 1928, issue (No. 80), p. 18. Taxicabs included with passenger cars prior to 1925.
2
Automobile exports compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
3
Data supplied by the General Motors Corporation to show the relation between sales by the company to retail dealers and by these dealers to users. These data are
based on sales of Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Oakland, Buick, and Cfldillac cars, the Chevrolet commercial cars and trucks, and cars, trucks, and tractors not now
manufactured, including through April, 1925, the Q. M. C. trucks, which were then transferred to another manufacturing unit. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in the
July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 25.
4
9 months' average, April to December, inclusive.
« 6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.


61139°—29


4

50

Table 29.—MOTOR VEHICLES
ELECTRIC
INDUSTRIAL
TRUCKS AND
TRACTORS 2

NEW PASSENGER-CAR REGISTRATIONS
(by price groups) 1

AUTO-!
MOBILE
RIMS 3

AUTOMOBILE
ACCESSORIES <

FIRE-EXTINGUISHING
EQUIPMENT «

Shipments

Shipments

Shipments
YEAR AND
MONTH

Total

Highest
price

Second Third
highest highest

Lowest
price

Miscellaneous

Domestic
ExTrac- All ports
tors other

Number of vehicles

Number of cars

Production

Thous.
of rims

MoOrigi- ReServtor
ice
nal place- Acequip- ment cesso- equip- vehiries
cles
ment
ment parts

Relative to January, 1925

Hand
types

Number

245, 315
262, 983
218, 628
261, 113

7,113
10, 677
9,177
10, 678

47, 295
53, 031
53, 392
54, 254

39, 586
52, 232
55, 188
71, 307

147, 531
145, 364
99, 651
3,945

3,790
1, 677
1,220
929

16
16
11
9

93
94
83
101

11
8
11
12

1,358
1,929
1,822
2,167
2,017
1,668
2,020

1937
January
February
March
April

175, 273
180, 396
261, 111
331, 396

5,146
5,358
10, 241
13, 720

34, 190
34, 162
57, 728
76, 127

34, 397
37, 394
56, 990
76, 306

100, 042
102, 250
134, 587
163, 308

1,498
1,232
1,565
1,935

6
11
10
12

67
120
96
89

17
7
10
4

1,489
1,753
2,072
2,060

132
158
195
185

107
100
120
117

79
93
135
156

140
155
210
223

93
92
128
125

47,354
47, 302
50,301
47,850

May
June
July
August

318, 479
266, 291
251, 709
245, 159

11, 622
10, 367
9,769
9,881

69, 356
61, 924
65, 749
75, 046

73, 477
66,449
67, 807
72, 768

162, 458
126, 273
107, 077
86, 205

1,566
1,278
1,307
1,259

19
20
12
3

77
97
73
87

10
23
5
2

2,169
1,877
1,680
1,826

184
176
148
155

123
130
142
169

131
132
97
115

192
171
136
134

133
147
118
143

56, 548
58, 522
46, 285
48, 101

September...
October
November
December _

185, 921
186, 127
132,487
89, 189

9,274
10, 675
7,973
6,099

65, 485
48, 859
34, 860
27, 222

57, 975
53,939
37, 951
26,805

62, 239
71, 759
51,093
28,515

948
895
610
548

8
11
15
8

66
81
64
77

5
17
19
11

1,727
1,385
839
1,134

139
124
99
111

181
174
132
126

163
103
75
61

127
120
143
104

122
108
111
114

46, 255
48, 472
43, 723
47, 870

1928
January
February.
March, _
April..

136,071
165, 537
254, 214
332,056

6,827
7, 439
11, 357
14, 705

32, 193
34, 117
52, 739
70, 288

45, 705
52,682
79, 909
104, 217

50,427
70, 228
108, 863
141, 266

919
1,071
1,346
1,580

5
15
18
9

98
86
95
121

9
18
16
6

1,812
1,806
2,420
2,317

163
187
231
213

137
128
136
151

79
91
113
107

142
158
174
164

73
91
108
101

43, 175
40, 710
52,375
46, 643

351, 459
317,069
324, 021
329,827

14,643
11, 648
11, 310
11, 482

72, 243
63, 886
67, 902
76,968

107,413
94,746
84,248
76,158

155, 527
145,490
159, 916
164, 682

1,633
1,299
645
537

8
6
5
5

93
96
87
85

13
14
15
6

2,186
2,429
2,210
2,319

215
200
203
230

'183
150
148
176

113
110
112
147

157
140
120
148

107
97
105
125

55,033
48, 123
48, 897
47,490

271,782
284,656
212,065
154, 603

11,600
12,264
7,950
6,914

60,730
56,936
35,084
27,966

61, 579
59,451
52,294
37,283

137,403
155, 514
115,981
82,045

470
491
756
395

11
5
9
10

102
109
117
126

5
20
6
17

2,316
2,115
1,213
1,101

218
200
163
164

185
184
149
131

122
91
78
73

140
141
122
120

143
139
126
100

42, 1'93
49, 128
41, 954
41, 596

219, 694
235,266
378,069
481, 750

7,096
6,187
11,392
16,276

35,473
34,437
58,623
74,944

48,714
50,192
84,932
112, 183

127,800
144,006
222,646
277,854

611
444
476
493

4
10
14
12

129
121
187
169

19
3
10
13

1,835
2,265
2,613
2,730

212
243
275
287

141
136
148
174

77
69
85
91

173
192
224
227

90
76
107
108

45,608
47, 376
55, 303
58,696

453, 981
386, 441

14, 977
11, 447

67,815
57,915

103, 859
85,913

266, 891
230, 801

439
365

28
17
19

174
168
145

9
16
5

2,574
2,184
1,897

278
231

169
150

91
90

200
186

118
120

54,420
52, 018

1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

mo. av__
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av
mo. av

_ _

May
June _
July
August

September
October
November
December

.

1939
January. __ ._
February
March
April. _ _ _
May..,.
June .
July
August
September
October.
November.
December

156
139
151
199

120
124
135
155

153
131
112
103

124
156
155
144

128
127
120
110

51, 581
51, 210
49, 049
46, 443

_

1 Compiled by 12. L. Polk & Co., showing the number of new cars registered each month. Data for 1925 cover all but 3 States, estimates being made for these States,
which in the aggregate have only 2 per cent of the country's automobile population, while in 1926 all States except Mississippi are included (no estimates being made for
Mississippi) and beginning with 1927 all States are shown complete. The company's reports show data by makes of car and by States and counties.
2 Compiled by 17. S. Deportment of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing shipments of electric industrial trucks and tractors by 9 leading manufacturers,
comprising the greater part of the industry.
* Compiled by the Tire and Rim Association of America, from reports of 46 firms representing practically the entire industry. The figures include motor cycle, balloon,
high-pressure, truck, and millimeter rims approved and branded by the association after inspection and are given in detail by kinds and sizes in the association reports.
Monthly data form January, 1922, appeared in April, 1927, issue (No. 68), p. 23.
4
Sales of automobile accessories and parts shipped to customers by 75 members of the Motor and Accessory Manufacturers' Association, the relative numbers being
based on value, with January, 1925, as 100.
« Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 39 companies, representing practically the entire industry. Further details by
classes are given in press releases. Data compiled by Fire Extinguisher Exchange from January, 1922, through September, 1923, in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 81.




51

Light

Heavy

lines

Thousands of barrels

OIL WELLS
COMPLETED?

P.c.
capac.

Tank

Grand
farms Refintotal and pipe eries

YEAR AND MONTH

California3

PRICE,
KANS.-OKLA.,
A T WELLS 6

East of California

IMPORTS*

PRODUCTION i

REFINERY
OPERATIONS

STOCKS 2
(end of month)

CONSUMPTION
(run to stills)6

Table 30.—CRUDE PETROLEUM

Dolls,
per
barrel

Number of
wells

MEXICO 8

VENEZUELA 6

1,592
1,389
763
1, 565
1,383
1, 487
1,747
2,024

j

Production

Exports

Production

Exports

Thousands of barrels

1
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average

20, 704
22, 147
23, 425
25, 064
27, 943
29,661
31, 531
36, 911

104, 962
123, 709
145, 914
144, 556
133, 883
117, 412
124, 961
150, 069

104, 962
123, 709
145, 914
144, 556
128, 201
103, 886
110, 028
133, 115

11, 364
13, 540
14, 935
16, 954

1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average _
1925 monthly average _ - __
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average-1928 monthly average
_.

39, 349
46, 461
61, 034
59, 495
63, 645
64, 240
75, 094
75, 030

179, 888
278, 605
326, 682
386, 896
305, 273
282, 323
318, 634
368,026

159, 237
245, 673
294, 659
347, 320
273, 878
247, 405
281, 025
325, 871

72, 713
68,471
74, 509
72, 127

359, 260
363,807
369, 249
371, 898

317, 680
320, 979
325, 131
328, 296

75, 218
72, 526
75, 426
77, 829

371, 969
371, 212
369, 389
368, 816

76, 404
79, 662
76, 031
79, 448

1,415
1.409
1,512
1,733
2,511
3, 145
4, 402
8,848

20, 583
26, 261
27, 169
30, 127
36, 160

$0. 934
.798
.583
1.258
1.775
2.196
2.279
3.408

20, 651
32, 610
32, 190 1031,550 1048,470
39, 132
51, 708
39, 575
43, 462
71, 666
31, 395
34, 918
87, 374
35, 985
37, 609
25, 690
91, 659
42, 154
18, 412
95, 747

10, 447
10, 609
6,835
6,481
5, 152
5,032
4,865
6,632

36, 947
41, 726
48, 437
53, 643
61, 660
64, 939
69, 070
76, 061

81
80
79
79

1.704
1.806
1.439
1.446
1.675
1.883
1.284
1.203

1,218
1, 445
1,357
1, 212
1,380
1,580
1,204
1,045

16, 117
15, 190
12, 465
11, 640
9, 626
7, 535
5,343
4, 179

14, 356
15, 072
11,301
10, 808
8,043
6,727
4,035
2,802

119
183
350
754
1,641
3,102
5,370
9,008

83
150
276
681
1,524
2,852
4, 549
8,385

41, 580
42, 828
44, 118
43, 602

20, 493
20, 110
19, 633
18, 752

94, 327
94, 797
94, 484
94, 301

6,145
6,036
6,845
5,661

69, 067
66, 625
72, 428
72, 988

72
73
75
79

1,220
1.213
1.190
1.190

764
836
949
961

4,770
4,474
4,729
4,596

2,955
3,032
3,379
3,940

6,994
6,799
7,601
7,594

6,837
6,760
7,387
7,582

328, 556
328, 094
326, 314
326, 399

43, 413
43, 118
43, 075
42, 417

19, 170
19, 197
18, 215
18, 310

93, 941
94, 234
95, 663
95, 057

6,766
6,553
7,878
6,141

77, 311
75, 958
80, 602
81, 582

80
81
82
83

1.190
1.190
1.195
1.210

:-,61
1,056
1,096
1, 247

4,347
4,049
4,040
4,047

3,065
2,808
3,249
2,212

8, 781
8,339
9,398
9,031

f, 511
8,231
8,808
8,933

366, 750
367, 907
367, 619
368, 431

326, 153
328, 101
326, 852
327, 902

40, 597
39,806
40, 767
40, 529

16, 870
16, 670
16, 524
16, 995

96, 563
97, 097
98, 529
99, 975

7,140
6,703
6,908
6,807

79, 894
79, 607
77, 149
79, 520

84
82
81
78

1.210
1.210
1,210
1.210

1,192
1,224
1,195
1,059

3,716
3,904
3,724
3,748

2,244
2,731
2, 199
1,808

9,478
10, 520
11, 291
12, 270

8,615
9,283
9,660
10, 010

81, 979
75, 693
82, 515
80,110

372, 913
376, 939
379, 659
380, 706

330, 395
332, 349
333, 402
332, 976

42, 518
44,590
46, 257
47, 730

19, 196
21,810
24,067
26,500

98, 682
99, 284
100,504
100, 332

8,075
7,016
6,790
7,828

78, 825
72, 031
80, 708
80, 459

76
76
78
80

1,185
1.110
1.110
1.110

1,205
1,086
1.074
1,207

3,515
3,130
3,526
3,504

1,895
1,208
2, 169 ,
2,150

11, 521
10, 326
10, 694
11, 351

9,982
9,032
9,438
9,661

84,415
83, 403

379, 542
,379, 089

330, 984
331, 786

48, 558
47, 303

29, 934
32, 667

102, 177
103, 660

7,552
6,591

84, 420
84,400

81
83

1.158
1.300
1 300

1,191
1,316

3,635

2,923

12, 038 10, 275
12, 101 10,564

1928
January
February
March
April

_.

May.
June
July
August...

.__
_

September .
October
November
December _ _

_ __

1929
January
February
March.
April

May
.
June
July
August___
September
October
November
December

_

_ _._
_ __

1 Production data, compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, represent output transported from field of production, excluding oil consumed at
locality of production or not transported therefrom, which has comprised only 1 or 2 per cent of the total production since 1919. Details by States and fields are given in
monthly press releases. Monthly data from 1917 to 1920 given in December, 1922, issue (No. 16), p. 48, for 1921 and 1922 in August, 1923, issue (No. 24), p. 77.
2 Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, consolidating work formerly carried on by the Bureau of Mines and the Geological Survey under the
Department of the Interior. Tank-farm stocks include total stocks at pipe lines and tank farms, producers' stocks in California and imported oil held outside refineries through
December, 1924; since then California stocks are not included. Refinery stocks since January, 1925, represent only the stocks at refineries east of California. Prior to
January, 1923, the figures on tank-farm stocks included topped oil and imported oil at refineries, but the duplication between this item and the total stocks at refineries
-. .
------. _
r-r
r — -7
incompleteness of stocks'
item is no longer computed. Monthly data on stocks from 1917 to 1919 appeared in December, 1922, issue (No. 16), p. 48; from 1920 to 1922 in July, 1923, issue (No. 23),
p. 50; on days' supply from 1921 to August, 1923, issue (No. 24), p.. 77.
3
Includes producers' and refineries' stocks, light crude having a specific gravity of 20° and above and heavy crude a specific gravity below 20°; heavy crude data include
a large amount of manufactured fuel oil, for which reason California figures can not be combined with data for the country east of California.
* Imports of crude petroleum are as compiled by the U. S. Department of Commence, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Beginning with February, 1923, topped
oil has been generally excluded from the imports; on this basis imports for February, 1923, were 5,069,000 barrels instead of 6,199,000 barrels, as reported, and to which
previous month's figures are comparable.
8
Consumption by refiners, taken as amount of crude oil run to stills at refineries, compiled by the 17. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines.
« Wholesale price of Kansas-Oklahoma crude oil at wells is average for the month as compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
i Number of oil wells completed compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, from reports by American Petroleum Institute and Oil and Gas Journal.
s Compiled by the Mexican Government, Secretary of Industry, Commerce and Labor, Petroleum Department, and published in the Boletin del Petroleo. Current figures
are from O'Shautfhnessy's South American Oil Reports and are used in this table until government figures become available. Data on exports cover crude petroleum and
all derivatives therefrom. All data have been converted from cubic meters to the comparable barrel basis.
» Compiled by the Minister of the Interior of the United States of Venezuela and published annuaUy on a monthly basis in Memoria del Ministerio de Fomento. Current
figures are from O'Shaughnessy's South American Oil Reports and are used in this table until revised by government figures. All data have been converted from toneladas
to a 10
comparable barrel basis.

Average of 7 months, June to December, inclusive.



52

Table 31.—GASOLINE AND KEROSENE
GASOLINE
Production *
YEAR AND MONTH

ExNatural ports 2

Raw (at
refin- gas (at
eries) plants)

KEROSENE OIL

Stocks, end of
Prices
month l
Retail
Consump- Total at Natu- Whole- Retail, distribution, 41
tion i
tank
ral-gas sale,
refingaso- motor, wagon, States 5
eries
line N.Y.3 50 cities <

Thousands of barrels

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

mo. average..
mo. average _ _
mo. average..
mo. average. .
mo. average..
mo. average
mo. average..
mo. average..

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

mo. average..
mo. average..
mo. average ._
mo. average __
mo. average..
mo. average __
mo. average..
mo. average..

Dollars per gal.

4,085
5,656
7,084
7,853
9,688

48
85
130
205
432
561
698
763

234
323
223
706
825
1,110
738
1,272

4,693
6,209
6,815
8,434

7 8, 033
9,196
11, 248
11, 059

$0. 168
.144
.138
.230
.238
.242
.245
.293

10, 225
12, 306
14, 922
17, 777
21, 633
24, 978
27, 536
31, 432

893
1,004
1,620
1. 853
2,192
2,692
3,221
3,524

1,058
1,149
1,678
2,354
2,553
3,540
3,592
4, 302

8,960
10, 659
13, 062
15, 417
18, 655
21, 818
24, 815
27, 403

15, 018
18, 834
28, 249
35, 319
38, 142
39, 654
40, 692
33, 759

7369
515
789
620

.261
.251
.207
.180
.191
.199
.188
.174

$0. 181
.166
.176
.185
.152
.155

1928
January
February
March
April

27, 981
26, 856
29, 276
29,317

3,405
3,324
3,474
3,467

3,765
3,333
3,784
4,041

20, 778
21, 402
24, 294
25, 567

37, 368
39, 853
41, 078
41, 189

740
824
843
831

.170
.170
.170
.170

May.
June
July
August..

30, 825
30, 703
32,974
34, 101

3,471
3,355
3,431
3,445

5,647
4,614
5,108
4,452

28, 346
29,469
32, 542
33, 336

38, 224
34, 862
30, 394
27, 075

810
648
476
414

September
October
November
December

33, 669
34, 403
33, 171
33, 907

3,488
3,731
3,769
3,929

4,670
3,919
4,609
4,518

29, 722
30, 680
26, 052
26, 644

26, 378
26, 440
29, 185
33,066

1929
January
February
March
April

34, 335
31, 264
34, 467
34,636

3,983
3,736
4,324
4,264

4,506
3,797
4,594
4,443

22, 602
22, 776
27, 495
32, 019

36, 270
35, 606

4,343
4,250

5,207
5,658

34, 117
33, 693

Thous. of
gallons

May
June
July
August

__

Stocks
ConrefinEx- 2 sump- ateries,
ports
tion i end of
month

Production i

Price,
Retail
f. o. b. distriburefintion, 13
eries,
States 6
Pa.3
Dollars Thous. of
per gal. gallons

Thousands of barrels

2,888
3,426
3,622
4,646
4,603

2,221
2,005
1, 661
1,696
1, 306
974
1,943
1,728

2,067 7 12, 411
9,648
2,870
7,157
2,766
2,757
9,035

$0. 062
058
050
060
.080
.108
.115
.149

303, 435
375, 488
463, 998
566, 106
651, 127
731, 437
815, 927

3,859
4,576
4,661
5,002
4,974
5,147
4,676
5,013

1,486
1,776
1,682
1,818
1,756
1,835
1,607
1,821

2,461
2,905
2,921
3, 059
3,331
3,178
3,124
3,084

9,584
7,180
6.498
7,855
9,498
7,721
8,426
8,266

.084
.085
.084
.080
.078
.104
.076
.074

27,488
28, 718
30, 406
32, 043
32. 185
32, 093
32, 706

.143
.147
.148
.150

619,
629,
713,
759,

300
753
223
507

5,058
4,749
4,715
5,033

2,292
1,541
1,837
1,903

2,799
3,266
2,722
3,168

7,670
7,613
7,760
7,733

.070
.070
.069
.069

30, 756
30, 165
33, 532
34, 412

.170
.170
.173
.180

.152
.153
.156
.160

863,336
870, 210
954, 697
983, 898

5,243
4,849
4,994
5,389

2,035
1,632
1,826
1,653

3,383
2,323
3,141
3,296

7,537
8,432
8,470
8,887

.074
.073
.068
.072

33,046
30, 759
30, 594
38,048

436
402
404
608

.180
.180
.180
.180

.163
.163
.160
.160

919, 055
893, 735
805, 020
779, 394

5,060
5,190
4,908
4,968

2,068
1,749
2,087
1,229

3,264
3,469
2,545
3,632

8,593
8,614
8,886
9,001

.086
.082
.080
.078

39, 713
33, 083
28, 148
30, 212

40, 648
45, 704
48,205
47, 015

741
821
995
1,166

.178
.170
.170
.170

.151
.147
.149
.150

684, 445
629, 586
769, 490
817, 177

4,700
4,435
4,515
4,434

1,896
1,582
1,872
1,620

2,956
3,519
2,976
3,156

8,865
8,210
7, 855
7,497

.077
.075
.077
.084

30, 673
30, 023
30, 844
34, 281

44, 648
41, 461

1,391
1,357

.190
.190
190

.157
.160

934, 284

4,902
4,928

1, 454
1,761

3,200
2,547

7,742
8,348

.080
.074
.069

34, 322
31, 083

September
October
November
December _
j
1

Compiled by the V. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines. Data covering production and stocks of natural-gas gasoline represent total production and stocks
of this product, both blended and unblended, the amount blended being included with the production, consumption, and stock data covering the refinery product. The
figures showing output of natural-gas gasoline include amount run from California fields through pipe lines. Stocks of gasoline at refineries include marketers' stocks beginning2 with June, 1923, while consumption figures since that time take account of this change in stocks.
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Gasoline exports include gasoline and all other naphtha, less exports to
the 3
Philippine Islands to agree with data by the Bureau of Mines.
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Gasoline price represents average price of motor gasoline delivered in drums to garages in New
York City.
4
Compiled by the Oil and Gas Journal from reports of 50 representative cities as of the end of month indicated. Data were previously shown as of first of month.
Monthly data from 1923 appeared in the March, 1928, issue (No. 79), p. 21.
6
Retail distribution of gasoline compiled by the American Petroleum Institute, from reports of gasoline-tax collection by 41 States, including District of Columbia, but
excluding Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Vermont, and West Virginia. Details for certain States for 1921 through 1923 may
be found on pp. 52 and 53 of the June, 1924, issue of the SURVEY (No. 34), data from 1922 through 1924 in the May, 1925, issue (No. 45), p. 28, and data through 1925 in
the March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 27. These earlier totals are not comparable with those now published owing to the smaller number of States included. Prior to May,
1925, the earliest date for which the 41 States can be shown complete, the totals for 21 States have been prorated for comparison to the basis of 41 States, based on the proportion shown in the period from May, 1925, through December, 1926. Data for California, Montana, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee are only available quarterly and have
been6 divided by 3 to secure corresponding monthly figures.
Retail distribution of kerosene, collected from the tax statistics of Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North
Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and South Dakota by the American Petroleum Institute. No figures are available for Louisiana in 1922, but they have been assumed
as 3 per cent lower than the corresponding 1923 figures, in order to permit a total for identical States. Details by States for 1922 and 1923, except Louisiana, with partial
reports for 1921, appeared in the June, 1924, issue of the SURVEY (No. 34), p. 51, and data for 1924 and 1925 in the May, 1926, issue (No. 57), p. 28. Owing to the addition,
of Louisiana figures and the exclusion of estimates for Indiana, the totals presented here do not agree with those previously published.
7
6 months' average, July-December, inclusive.




53
Table 32.—OTHER PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

Production i

By
vessels2

Dolls,
per bbl.

Thousands of barrels
1913 monthly av_
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av...
1917 monthly av...
1918 monthly av...
1919 monthly av _
1920 monthly av.__

1,239
1,496
1,670
1,680
2,078

8833
1,152
1,133
1,229

2,831
3,107
3,928
4,165
4,112
4,093
4,057
4,193

27, 736
31, 625
32, 610
37, 675
24,480
23, 786
27, 826
34, 659

.687
.951
.929
.959
1.099
1.294
.978
.726

1,741
1,942
2,177
2,292
2,588
2,691
2,643
2,888

504
503
502
649

4,157
4,665
4,132
4,222

31,631
33,191
33, 637
34,022

.850
.865
.838
.800

3,930
3,751
4,236
4,275

595
550
614
537

4,047
3,853
4,105
4,067

30, 665
29,560
29, 104
29, 669

7865
1,094

1921 monthly av.__
1922 monthly av___
1923 monthly av.__
1924 monthly av...
1925 monthly av_._
1926 monthly av.__
1927 monthly av_._
1928 monthly av —

19, 174
21, 243
23,957
26,706
30,416
30,433
32, 756
35, 478

2,256
2,641
3,137
3,611
3,569
3,888
4,171
4,261

1,004
1,100
1,224
1,386
854
783
565
597

1937
September
October
November .
December

32, 295
33,901
32, 946
33,864

4,436
4,594
4, 110
4,264

33, 013
31, 897
34, 437
33, 870

__
__

Thousands of barrels

7 14, 806
13,071
18, 533
16,378

9,254
12,923
14, 527
15, 134
17, 582

1928
January
February
March
April

Production i

Stocks
Conat resump- fineries,
tion i end of
month i

$0. 902
.663
.513
.871
1.525
1.885
1.120
2.622

7 217
297
461
492
550
1,169
2,192

_.

Price,
Okla.,
24-26?
at refineries 5

Price,
cylinder,
600D
tank
cars,
Pa.«
Dolls,
per gal.

&

h-

»,cj

III
J&s
00

Production

YEAR AND MONTH

Stocks
at refineries,
By
By
end of
electric railmonth *
power
plants3 roads *

COKEi

ASPHALT

Imports 6

Consumption

LUBRICATING OIL

Production

GAS AND FUEL OILS

C
£
li
| |
I

91
97
74

34
45
47
50
48

Production

Stocks,
refineries,
end of
month

OQ

Thous. of short tons
18
12
12
12
16
10
9
11

WAXi

Thous. of pounds

32, 182
40,100 6108,402
42,095 172,976
38, 936 241, 895
45,100 181. 567

2, 917
3,425
3,825
3,267

60
62
51
75
108

1,004
1,294
1,438
1,510
1,715
1,881
1,806
1,928

5,552
5,492
5,659 $0.224
.289
6,230
6,879
.285
7,481
s.264
.251
7,792
7,985
.236

101
158
194
212
223
244
285
275

113
134
129
123
145
195
212
240

11
10
12
13
10
12
13
9

51
59
56
64
83
83
95
119

62
58
24
60
191
254
317
375

36,240
38,500
38,887
43,041
49,215
53,818
48, 696
52, 512

240, 072
223, 741
178, 060
109, 465
106, 409
152, 473
187, 067
105, 640

2,782
2,757
2,477
2,801

1,965
1,781
1,739
1,682

7,447
7,584
7,524
7,860

.255
.253
.245
.245

333
333
290
263

177
189
196
221

14
14
9
9

98
102
102
108

314
331
349
345

47,888
49,476
48, 146
54,039

170, 172
170, 367
171, 700
150, 638

.800
.850
.850
.840

2,6,54
2,728
2,878
3,027

1,592
1,543
1,990
2,334

7,988
8,332
8,383
8,018

.245
.245
.223
.221

202
207
265
274

219
234
270
274

7
4
8
6

103
100
107
109

331
335
352
342

55, 378
49, 158
50, 170
57, 548

149, 725
136,479
119, 522
109, 709

7

?78

711

17
37
23

May
June
July
August __

_ __

35, 620
35, 765
36, 754
37,390

5,013
4,307
4,116
4,564

487
498
554
614

4,096
3,819
4,071
4,087

32, 887
36,085
36, 410
39, 236

.763
.719
.670
.650

3,091
3,009
2,828
2,891

1,989
2,143
1,931
2,035

8,060
7,832
7,667
7,711

.228
.220
.226
.229

331
332
331
316

262
271
251
247

13
3
11
13

118
118
127
136

348
344
385
402

51, 072
50,792
45, 273
54, 429

103, 639
91, 989
84, 476
V9,622

September _
October
November
December

_ _

37, 004
36, 941
35, 771
37, 293

4,053
4,558
4,235
4,188

612
619
632
848

4,363
4,877
4,490
4,440

39,900
39, 599
37, 878
34, 926

.650
.650
.650
.625

2, 833
2,979
2,748
2,993

1,995
2,123
1,763
1,699

7,742
7,830
7,921
8,340

.236
.240
.246
.271

306
320
244
170

203
210
228
236

4
11
11
11

119
125
131
132

402
404
419
437

50,428
54,546
56, 665
54,685

85, 417
92,814
103,949
110,344

36, 838
34, 331
37,456
37, 533

3,915
4,252
4,183
4,179

939
860
743
647

4,499
4,235
4,484
4,266

32, 522
30, 118
30, 195
33,404

.625
.638
.675
.665

2,945
2,503
2,943
2,899

1,521
1,751
1,581
2,442

8,649
8,534
8,853
8,527

.299
.289
293
.363

188
208
228
283

229
236
250
249

12
8
2
6

138
127
129
131

404
388
402
445

58,885
50,027
56, 372
57, 976

123, 521
140, 053
158, 404
170,687

38, 570
37, 338

4,704
4,544

600
617

4,259
4,250

35,636
37, 332

.631
.675

3,005
2,928

2,322
2,299

8,370
8,016

.405
.400
.388

315
327

236
247

4
13

142
154

471
498

53,783
52, 714

179, 139
188,764

1929
January.. __
February
March
April .
May
June
July
August

September
October
November
December
i Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, representing practically complete data for the refineries prior to January, 1925, but since then gas and
fuel oil stocks cover only stocks of east California. The consumption data for gas and fuel oils and lubricating oil are calculated from production, exports, and changes in
stocks. For lubricating oil stocks, data include marketers' stocks beginning with June, 1923, while consumption since that time takes account of this change in stocks.
Figures on asphalt, coke, and wax relate only to the by-products of petroleum.

issue (No. 43), p. 28.
4
Compiled by the Interstate Commerce Commission from reports of 174 steam railroads of Class I, not including switching and terminal companies and excluding fuel
used in switching locomotives. Monthly data from 1921 appeared in January, 1926, issue (No. 53), p. 23.
fi
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing average of weekly prices. Lubricating oil covers quotations of cylinder oil, Pennsylvania, 600D; filtered in tank cars at refinery, and monthly data from 1923 may be found in the November, 1927, issue (No. 75), p. 27.
6
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, representing imports of foreign native asphalt. Imports have been
reduced from original data in long tons.
7
6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.
8
5 months' average, August to December, inclusive.
' 11 months' average, July omitted.




54

Table 33.—CRUDE AND SCRAP RUBBER
RECLAIMED
RUBBER
(quarterly) *

YEAR AND
MONTH

Consumption i
ImWorld ports 3 (quarterly)
ship(inments eluding
For
(2)
latex) Total tires

Domestic stocks, end of
quarter 1

Total

Manu- Dealfacers
turers

Afloat

World stocks, end of month *
Pro- EuroPlantapean
Total ducing coun- United tion,
counStates afloat
tries
tries

mo. av. . 24, 663
mo. av__ 31,800
mo. av__ 34, 398
mo. av._ 35, 101
mo. av._ 43,006
mo. av__ 51, 232
mo. av_. 50,183
mo. av__ 54,389

15, 449 38, 572
25, 090 63,546
25, 762 68, 739
27, 338 75,445
33,054 88,468
34, 445 82, 436
35, 521 85, 682
36, 351 101, 712

1937
January
February
March
April.

56,559 43, 340
44, 639 28, 337
64, 131 35, 515
44, 751 46, 202

May
June
July
August .

48, 748
49, 459
41, 938
50, 535

31,280
51, 801
55,238
62, 916
74, 247
70, 414
72, 797
87, 085

83,994
85, 935
85, 450
59, 458
45,960
61, 301
88, 627
83,119

65, 982
66, 885
46,829
37,467
50, 704
72, 701
68, 141

19, 953
18, 565
12, 629
8,493
10, 597
15, 926
14, 978

29,671
39, 523
33,589 6131,770 625,329
40, 026 188, 822 21, 238
48, 811 135, 983 17, 882
43, 565 184, 308 22, 781
42, 862 255, 701 27, 236
47,054 227, 525 23, 124

91, 279

78, 577

82, 233

68, 105

14, 128

45, 384

94,983

82,648

84, 811

71, 776

13, 035

45, 169

SeptemberOctober
November
December. ._

48, 186 33, 301 82, 073 69, 369
50, 370 30, 184
48, 565 38, 592
54,315 30, 736 74, 391 60, 592

90, 861

72, 989

17, 872

36, 006

96, 601

77, 932

18, 669

44,890

1938
January
February
March
April

48, 134
48, 579
46, 887
36, 114

39, 108
33,664
40, 61 1 95, 273
37, 935

May
June
July
August

43, 889
40, 927
52, 831
58, 345

31, 059
27, 764
31, 258
30, 874

95, 220

81,323

87, 771

77, 132

10, 639

SeptemberOctober
November
December

48, 338
43, 748
91, 860
93, 019

39, 732 108, 167
44, 058
36, 624
43, 519 108, 189

93, 173

68, 729

54,428

14, 301 43, 492

92, 972

63, 871

49, 302

14, 569

1929
January _
February
March __
April

79, 177
74, 311
72,072
72, 911

57,586
64,286
50,610 118, 280 102, 091
55, 730

May
June
July
August

36, 518
33, 045
37, 677
32, 810

51, 186
41, 828

80, 871 112, 103

95, 110

91, 700 20, 403 35, 572

65, 615

29,495

38, 478

70, 672

51, 336

Production

83,668
82,099
66, 441
53, 657 64, 273
11, 473 47, 902
29,415 61, 974
68, 371 93, 394
44, 148 88*, 127

31,038 $0. 164
42,284
.174
46, 973
.296
49,654
.261
58,726
.719
70, 139
.485
66, 699
.376
72, 1L5
.231

237,425
248, 740
256, 689
263, 362

27, 224
28, 611
29,515
26, 176

58,329
62,443
67,044
71,229

76, 172
91, 186
85, 740
92, 757

75, 700
66,500
74, 390
73,200

.391
.383
.383
.410

258,
247,
249,
255,

300
555
995
684

26, 475
23, 730
24,500
27, 427

71, 562
68, 274
68, 226
69, 109

94,563 65, 700
89, 251 66, 300
98,469 58, 800
96,148 63, 000

.409
.373
.349
.351

260, 799
263, 683
264, 590
281, 592

27, 822
27, 654
30, 376
27, 324

72, 748 97,829
73, 876 97, 453
70,880 101, 034
66, 737 100, 131

62, 400
64, 700
62, 300
67,400

.338
.343
.376
.406

276, 670
269, 572
260, 991
245, 185

27, 453
25, 649
22, 353
19,223

69, 594
66, 268
61, 478
57, 174

110, 243
108, 955
114, 060
113, 083

69, 380
68, 700
63, 100
55, 700

.400
.326
.266
.188

227,536
212, 527
208, 789
201, 078

20, 116
20, 664
21, 578
21,828

48, 243 105, 357
42, 365 90,198
39, 269 83, 242
35, 755 68, 995

53, 820
59,300
64,700
74,500

.188
.194
.192
.193

198, 481
177, 776
222, 795
228, 904

17, 687
15,489
29, 110
36,343

35, 243
27, 966
22, 328
24,095

68, 851 76, 700
66, 421 67,900
61, 957 109, 400
66, 166 102, 300

.182
.187
.182
.179

230,935
244, 340
252, 676
266, 379 '

33,038
36,254
32,955
30, 731

30, 255 76, 342
30, 778 90,058
33,584 100,537
36, 789 107, 659

91, 300
87,250
85,700
91,200

.201
.239
.244
.211

252,867

35, 242
36. 336

37. 143

97, 192
92.062

83.290

SCRAP
RUBBER

(quarterly)

ConSt'ks, Stocks sump-

end of at re- tion
quar- claim- by reter
ers claimers

Dolls,
perlb.

Long tons

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

Wholesale price,
smoked
sheets, N. Y.«

CRUDE RUBBER

Long tons
8,539
13,447
17,384
19, 018
30,906
41, 986
43, 181
51, 967

8,217
8,662
14,969
19,544
17, 116

37,496
61,963
72,096
59, 675
60, 676

11,509
17, 211
22, 002
26, 415
39, 770
54, 074
55, 547
65, 580

45, 547 21, 508

62, 807

58, 303

41, 197 19, 287

58,331

52, 059

39, 449 17, 812

55, 547

50, 495

46, 530 19, 567

62, 016

61, 331

51, 112 16, 317

61, 299

64, 069

51, 109 15, 459

51, 518

65, 387

52, 823 14,963

61, 016

66, 298

52, 825 21,724

68,869

66,567

53,552 17, 727

59, 135

71,001

.214
.206
.213

"1

September—.
October
November
December _
1 Data compiled by the Rubber Association of America (Inc.} from reports of about 285 members and nonmembers representing the principal manufacturers, importers'
and reclaimers in this field. It should be noted that these consumption and production data represent quarterly, not monthly, totals, while stock figures are shown as of
the end of the quarterly period indicated, and annual averages in these columns are of quarterly, not monthly, data.
2 Compiled by the World's Rubber Position, a British publication. Details of shipments by countries are given in the publication, as well as amounts retained by the
principal importing countries.
3 Imports of rubber, including latex, into the United States compiled by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
* Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, from basic data on producing countries (Para, Singapore, and Penang)
and on European countries (London, Liverpool, Amsterdam, and Antwerp) supplied by the Rubber Growers Association (British), on ctomestic stocks supplied by the
Rubber Association of America and prorated from 95 to 100 per cent, and on stocks of plantation rubber afloat from the World's Rubber Position.
6
Compiled by the Rubber Trade Association and representing averages of daily spot prices for rubber, standard-quality ribbed smoked sheets in the New York market.
Monthly data from 1915 may be found in the Marketing of Crude Rubber by the U. S. Department of Commerce, pp. 14 and 15.
fl 7 months' average, June to December, inclusive.




55
Table 34.—TIRES AND RUBBER-PROOFED FABRICS
RUBBER-PROOFED FABRICS '

Thousands of
pounds

Thousands

1921 mo.
1922 mo.
1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.
1927 mo.
1928 mo.

a v _ _ _ 1,821
av
' 2, 573
a v _ _ _ 2,843
a v . _ _ 3,234
av
3,811
a v _ . _ 3,857
a v . _ _ 4,045
av— 4,878

3
g

fl«2
3
*0

Net orders

d
&

.1
bc|

All other

S
1

Calendered
rubber clothing

Production

Auto fabrics

A

Shipments

Crude
rubber

a

Raw material
consumed

Fabrics

=
1

Stocks, end
of month

I

Shipments

Production

5
&

Stocks, end
of month

Shipments

Production

Stocks, end
of month

Production

YEAR AND
MONTH

Solid tires and
cushions

Inner tubes

Pneumatic tires

Production

AUTOMOBILE TIRES »

Number of coats
and sundries

Thousands of yards

4,321
4,896
5,666
5,426
5,920
8,158
8,272
8,808

1,905
2,436
2,697
3,048
3,604
3,600
3,850
4,482

43
81
89
91
116
93
168
169

2,261
3,189
3,768
4,424
5,171
4,793
4,391
5,015

4,632
6,081
7,354
7,490
8,318
13, 110
11, 805
11, 549

2,292
3,055
3,630
4,174
4,964
4,411
4,463
4,715

29
58
71
84
105
66
100
110

36
66
59
58
65
48
48
43

232
195
254
198
170
188
170
155

44
57
57
52
62
42
42
40

2
4
5
5
7
5
5
4

6,696
9,257
9,861
11, 868
14, 025
13, 830
14, 832
18, 520

17, 922
27, 301
30,601
37, 821
46, 033
43, 170
42, 916
50, 035

1,528
456
799
2,026
2,648 1,317
927
2,085
657
1,999
2,444
697
3,156
780
758
3,456

756
696
640
526 »652
765 577
1,230
517
1,833 543
1,803 896

98, 953

65, 940

1927
September
October
November
December

3,638
3,603
3,394
3,391

7,325
7,287
7,635
7,734

4, 168
3,484
3,100
2,959

136
133
145
178

4,247
3,809
3,593
3,742

10, 162
10, 187
10, 216
10, 297

4,973
3,685
3,463
3,413

103
93
88
133

36
34
32
33

173
162
161
161

42
40
32
28

13, 998
4
13, 549
4
3 12, 822
4 * 11, 949

37, 341
37, 130
33, 845
32, 654

4,545
4,634
3,791
2,518

756
819
691
621

3,123
3,179
2,489
1,303

666
636
611
594

1938
January __ _
February
March
April

4,026
4,784
5,128
4,645

7,491
8,826
9,318
9,561

3,924
3,653
4,137
4,229

132
133
174
143

4,086
5,176
5,427
4,999

9,760
11,020
11, 878
12, 500

4,469
3,997
4,205
4,196

90
81
98
86

37
37
44
44

164
159
159
157

31
36
41
40

3
3
5
3

16, 040
16, 924
18, 854
18, 310

43, 709
46, 468
48, 897
43, 701

2,177
2,575
2,853
2,416

600
757
805
835

874
1,107
1,148
874

703
711
900
707

112, 424
85, 360
111,319
137, 239

25, 952
38, 876
123, 073
117, 427

May...
June
July
August

5,082
5,030
4,881
5,607

9, 794
9, 150
8,396
7,539

4,707 146
5,1G2 184
5,811 121
6,131 179

5,382
5,222
5, 009
6,264

13, 298
12, 892
11, 248
10, 466

4,631
5, 254
6,469
6,886

100
105
83
132

47
49
46
52

156
156
152
149

44
45
45
49

4
5
4
5

19, 168
19, 646
20, 947
21, 854

51,061
53,159
47, 128
62, 224

3,034 1,015
2,953 895
3,447
763
4,613 764

1,110 909
1,351 707
1,951 733
2,598 1,251

129, 413
109, 802
59, 685
74, 509

28, 720
89, 145
37, 512
64,695

September
October
November
December

5,101
5,495
4,556
4,204

7,324
8,640
9,434
10, 218

5,191 168
4,096 191
3,539 209
3.201 242

5,327
5,197
4,198
3,888

10, 158
11, 464
11, 820
12, 087

5,245
4,138
3,618
3,466

121
108
133
178

43
47
36
32

151
153
151
152

42
43
34
28

2
3
3
3

17, 797
20, 295
17, 037
15, 373

55, 351
58, 302
48, 819
41, 604

4,966
5,914
4,173
2,348

780
609
701
567

3,179 1, 007
4,009 1,296
2,447 1,025
984
797

92, 588
106, 005
93, 080
76, 014

108, 156
75, 482
45, 876
36, 363

1929
January
February
March __ _ _
April

5,042
5,184
5,639
5,913

10, 284
11, 621
12, 264
12, 697

4,721 248
3,750 212
4,804 227
5,242 229

4,888
5,077
5,600
5,726

11, 539
12, 749
13, 313
13, 601

5,271
3,815
4,889
5,220

160
143
164
153

32
30
36
39

151
147
143
139

31
30
38
40

2
2
2
3

19, 779
20, 327
21, 238
23, 620

54,161
57, 559
61, 335
65, 673

2,828
3,028
3,084

686
811
878
917

989 1,153
1,118 1,099
1,862 1,344

58, 130
59, 825
77, 740
91, 193

31, 437
30, 286
32, 967
102, 490

6,109
5,478

13, 386
13, 468

5,185
6,288

5,745
5,234

14, 196
14, 056

5,146
5,115

133
98

40
40

135
133

40
38

3
2

23, 302
20, 359

66, 028
56, 861

2,850 1,554
1,948 1,262

100, 706
87, 530

78, 972
98, 444

May
June
July
August

- _

__ _

204
153

1,199

September
October
November
December
1
1

Compiled by the Rubber Association of America, representing reports from 75 per cent of the industry on pneumatic casings in 1923 and 78 per cent in 1925, according
to the Census of Manufactures; 79 per cent and 80 per cent, respectively, on inner tubes and 76 per cent in both years on solid tires. Prior to September, 1921, when an
important manufacturer dropped out, a larger percentage of the industry was covered, the 1921 totals representing 80 per cent of the casings output reported by the Census
of Manufacturers and 85 per cent of the output of inner tubes. Crude-rubber consumption in 1925 represented 73 per cent of that reported by the census of manufactures
in that year for manufacturers of rubber tires. Export shipments in 1925 represented 85 per cent of the total official exports for both casings and inner tubes and 72 per cent
for solid tires. In 1923 the proportions were slightly smaller in each case. The number of reporting firms increased from 36 in November, 1920, to a maximum of 66 in 1922,
while from 1923 to the early part of 1925 the number ranged between 50 and 60, in the latter part of 1925 between 45 and 50, and in 1926 and 1927 between 40 and 45. The
decrease in number of firms is stated to be due largely to cessation of business on nominal production. Data comprise all kinds of tires, including millimeter sizes. Stocks
represent domestic tires in factory and in transit to or at warehouses, branches, or in possession of dealers on consignment basis, i. e., all tires still owned by manufacturers
as a domestic stock. Shipments include only tires forwarded to purchasers and not those forwarded to warehouses, branches, or on a consignment basis. Solid and cushion
tires include plain-tread solid tires, the n9nskid-tread type termed "cushion" by some manufacturers and also hollow-center or cellular-construction tires of both the
pressed-on and demountable types. Details by kind, type, and size are given in the association's reports, as well as distribution of domestic shipments between original
equipment and other sales, of fabric consumption as between kind of material and of casings and of rubber consumption as between kind of tires. Monthly data from
January, 1922, appeared in the June, 1927, issue (No. 70), p. 21.
2
Compiled by the Rubber Association of America from reports of from 3 to 8 companies on automobile fabrics each month, representing 48 per cent of the production of
automobile fabrics in 1923 and 31 per cent in 1925, according to the Census of Manufacturers, and from 10 to 14 manufacturers of other fabrics representing 62 per cent of other
fabrics in 1925. Total fabrics reported by these manufacturers represented 62 per cent of all rubberized fabrics in 1923 and 47 per cent in 1925. Raincoat fabrics include
both single and double texture fabrics, while all other fabrics include hospital and sanitary sheetings, shoe proofings, cretonne and percale apron materials and sundries and
miscellaneous proofings, for which details are presented in the association's reports. The report on automobile fabrics also gives details by kind and by purposes of shipment.
Data on calendered rubber clothing represents black-surface rubber clothing and sundries such as black-rubber raincoat caps, ice aprons, and such heavy-duty material.
Details as to men's rubber coats, boys' rubber coats, flat rubber sundries, and made-up rubber sundries are given in the association's reports. Reports include 7 manufacturers' monthly data for 1928 appeared in the April, 1929, issue of the Survey of Current Business, No. 92, p. 22.
3
4 months' average, September to December, inclusive.




56

Table 35.—OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS

Shipments
YEAR AND MONTH

Production

To shoe To
man- repair
ufacturers trade

MECHANICAL RUBBER
GOODS 2

RUBBER SOLES i

RUBBER HEELS 1

Shipments
For
export

Stocks,
end of
month

Production

Shipments

To shoe To
man- repair For
exufacturers trade port

Stocks,
end of
month

Total

Thousands of pairs

15, 243
15,523
17, 248
15, 276
16, 692
19,596

9,889
10, 412
10, 765
8,899
8,514
9,752

4,172
4,751
5,727
5,614
6,958
7,844

1927
January
February
March
April

13, 660
12, 733
13, 640
14, 169

6,685
6,652
7,906
6,682

4,013
4,062
6,367
6,507

793
1,113

May
June
July
August

16, 133
16, 341
15, 907
18, 363

7,128
8,833
9,598
10, 624

September
October
November
"Derambpr-

18, 452
21, 151
20,556
19, 203

1928
January
February
March
April

1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly av__
monthly av._
monthly av__
monthly av__
monthly av__
monthly av__

All
other *

Shipments

Thous. Thous.
oflbs. of sq.ft.

Thousands of dollars

1929
January
February
March
April

._

_

«295
146
662
916

«15
35
85
204

« 2, 584
3,129
3,659
4,529

$4,051
5,406
6,399
5,719
5,759

$1, 084
1,526
1, 710
1,480
1,406

$1, 731
2,069
2,422
2,225
2,131

$1, 236
1,812
2,267
2,014
2,22b

772
768

46, 355
48, 010
47, 822
47, 869

1,475
880
1,661
1,726

749
621
1,221
1,122

152
132
490
532

216
18
26
53

3,247
3,309
4,802
4,113

5,327
5,678
7,161
5,823

1,263
1,370
1,714
1,459

2,351
2,447
2,970
2,370

1,713
1,861
2,477
1,995

7,016
9,303
6,936
8,676

666
838
949
908

47, 516
45, 453
41, 056
38, 849

1,779
2,247
2,128
2,333

1,275
1,918
1,356
1,768

572
583
593
849

19
42
177
119

3,853
3,757
3,564
3,170

5,726
6,018
5,477
5,863

1,350
1,609
1,622
1,778

2,437
2,348
2,011
1,934

1,939
2,061
1,845
2,151

8,882
10,546
10, 245
8,384

8,170
9,305
7,129
6,009

722
913
1,415
1,087

38,696
39, 723
41, 727
42, 802

2,634
3,697
3,347
3,255

1,390
2,169
2,520
2,498

996
1,096
976
974

27
46
142
129

3,068
3,899
3,872
3, 257

5,467
5,244
4,941
5,898

1,497
1,368
1,175
1,557

1,963
1,837
1,840
2,190

2,007
2,039
1,925
2,151

196
181
193

10, 786
10, 802
10,083
8,639

6,314
6,754
9,407
6,173

793
1,127
1,169
819

43, 796
44,289
46, 144
48, 892

3,431
3,628
3,747
2,928

2,243
2,087
1,692
1,524

916
992
1,090
884

675
529
282
141

3,148
3,381
3,822
4,084

5,630
5,828
6,675
5,406

1,388
1,351
1,524
1,211

2,257
2,289
2,589
2,078

1,984
2,198
2, 562
2,117

218
195
216
169

433
493
667
475

21, 597
18, 763
17, 620
21, 289

8,897
9,166
12, 070
11,642

7,559
9,022
7,372
9,244

884
864
457
729

52, 387
50, 569
49, 679
49, 511

3,519
3,321
3,168
3,461

1,855
1,977
1,897
2,209

894
948
808
917

120
41
55
46

4,558
4,687
5,067
5,633

6,274
6,126
5,157
6,306

1,352
1, 568
1,396
1,888

2,667
2,298
1,795
2,068

2,255
2,260
1,966
2,360

177
192
173
193

661
717
477
583

9,207
9,813
8,602
7,321

9,199
9,580
7,921
5,586

875
1,262
1,317
1,108

49, 751
50,111
48, 691
50, 903

2,725
2,297
2,649
2,771

1,703
1,655
1,906
1,730

893
958
885
805

29
328
63
143

5,501
5,212
4,723
4,534

5,393
5,837
5,201
5,271

1,412
1,387
1,203
1,198

1,731
2,026
1,811
1,964

2,250
2,424
2,186
2,109

186
216
201
188

754
559
566
623

19, 975
18, 979
17, 226
17,256

12,867
10,196
8,798
11,028

6,809
6,737
7,925
6,506

1,001
1,479
1,230
1,072

50,649
50, 010
49, 571
47, 209

3,876
2,869
2,746
2,601

2,934
2,217
1,862
1,967

861
755
705
623

156
24
34
23

4,274
4,077
4,243
4,184

6,033
6,135
7,013
7,035

1,305
1,413
1,546
1,668

2,378
2,271
2,783
2,730

2,350
2,452
2,735
2,636

219
240
288
231

418
432
603
596

19, 541
20,007

September
October. ..
November
December

8 1, 603
799
1,551
1,873

21, 451
21, 932
18, 686
15, 811

.

1,940
1,021
2,264
3,137

17, 682
19, 181
22, 583
18, 575

May
June.
July
August _ .

May
June
July_._
August

33, 962
33, 110
40, 569
48, 590
43,823
48,727

Belting Hose

RUBBER RUBBER
BANDS* FLOORING^

12, 552
12, 262

7,604
8,256

1,054
926

44,969
44, 581

2,916
2,502

2,361
2,185

635
522

32
17

3,997
3,843

7,189
6,792

1,798
1,613

2,643
2,658

2,748
2,521

205
187

733
525

«719
770
912
950

8

M90
194

584

_

September
October ___
November
December
i Compiled by the Rubber Association of America, from reports of from 13 to 16 manufacturers each month, who made 63 per cent of the total output of rubber heels
for sale as such, in 1925, according to the census of manufactures. Only salable heels are included, none so imperfect as to result in their being reclaimed. Details by kinds
of soles and heels are presented in the association's reports. Stocks include merchandise constituting domestic stock in factory, and in transit to, or at, warehouses, branches,
or in possession of dealers on consignment basis, and represent all merchandise still owned by manufacturers as domestic stocks. Shipments include only stock forwarded
to a 3purchaser and exclude goods forwarded to a warehouse, branch, or on a consignment basis.
Compiled by the Rubber Association of America from reports of 11 manufacturers whose shipments in 1925 represented 78 per cent of the total output of rubber belting
and 370 per cent of the output of rubber hose, measured in value, according to the census of manufactures. Details by classes are shown in the association's reports.
Includes tubing, packing, mats and matting (except tiling), molded goods, lathe-cut goods, and miscellaneous, but excludes jar rings, tapes, and thread.
4
Compiled by the Rubber Association of America from reports of 8 manufacturers estimated to represent 80 per cent of the industry. Details by kinds of packages are
given in the association's reports.
« Compiled by the Rubber Association of America from reports of 10 manufacturers. The data include individually cut tile and other types of rubber flooring whether
in sheet form or not, such as Pullman-car tiling, but exclude regular corrugated, knobbed, and perforated mats and matting, automobile mats, etc. Details by widths
are given in the association's reports.
6
8 months' average, April through December.
7 3 months' average, October through December.




57

Table 36.—HIDES AND SKINS

YEAR AND
MONTH

1

3

fl

ft

-^

g|
j=
cc

d
ac

DC

Total
hides
and
skins

Calf- Cattle Goat- Sheepskins hides skins skins

Thousands of animals

1909-13 monthly av
1913 monthly av...
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av. . .
1916 monthly av.
1917 monthly av...
1918 monthly av...
1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av...

582
563
596
692
863
986
841
717

160
141
152
197
262
288
331
338

1921 monthly av.__
1922monthlyav___
1923monthlyav___
1924 monthly av...
1925 monthly av...
1926 monthly av___
1927 monthly av...
1928 monthly av...

634
723
764
799
821
848
793
706

317
349
375
411
446
429
407
390

3,249
3, 593
4,445
4,406
3, 587
3,386
3,636
4,143

1,084
911
961
999
1,000
1,080
1,074
1,124

60
69
68
75
81
91
96
93

1927
September
October
November
D ecember

828
895
881
761

357
413
411
376

2,534
2,969
3,688
4,869

1,185
1,194
1,070
1,094

1928
January
February
March
April

711
666
665
623

383
374
407
438

5,479
5,780
5,140
3,446

May
June
July
Auaust

723
706
662
717

473
398
362
369

764
801
762
667

Cattle
hides

Calf
and
kip
skins

Sheep
and
lamb
skins

Dolls, per
pound

Thousands of pounds

» 6, 815 5 19, 160
6,372
18, 629
5,576
25, 671
4,076
34, 053
5,221
33,683
2,4G6
30,890
18, 421
632
33, 940
5,380
22,944
2,928

8,199
7, 473
6,321
6,607
8,686
7,409
5,197
11, 138
6,684

5,289
5,684
5,495
6,257
8,461
6,999
4,372
7,086
6,896

• 435, 477

3,995
4,627
4,058
3,426
2,401
3,767
3,673
3,783

15, 016
27, 040
24, 331
15, 463
13, 899
12, 538
19, 770
22, 957

5,260
6,745
7,154
4,353
6,807
7,300
6,775
7,564

3,821
5, 381
6,342
4,837
5,138
4,948
4,779
5,272

430, 897
355, 025
357, 392
267, 533
270, 370
284, 318
239, 262
245, 041

339, 548
275, 293
288, 589
222, 046
220, 282
229, 340
187, 562
202, 236

58, 414
52, 281
46, 485
29,878
33, 218
37, 319
32, 302
24, 129

32, 935
27, 452
22, 319
15, 601
16, 870
17, 659
19, 399
18, 676

.139
.181
.166
.147
.160
.141
.195
.238

.149
.160
.157
.184
.202
.174
.197
.274

43, 583
36,356
38, 419
38,152

4,445
3,728
3,217
3,179

25, 383
21, 532
21, 630
23,391

6,485
5,700
6,588
5,326

4,515
3,195
4,757
3,740

243, 327
248, 187
249, 673
242, 300

188, 797
200, 220
203, 146
198, 623

33, 024
27, 942
26, 973
26, 803

21, 506
20,025
19, 554
16, 874

.224
.233
.242
.250

.210
.218
.228
.250

26
18
17
16

36, 409
33, 421
48, 489
45, 443

3,410
2,861
3,018
2,836

18, 856
16, 269
28, 833
26, 101

5,448
7,453
8,362
8,182

5,117
4,276
4,841
5,428

244, 242
238, 736
229, 970
228, 037

204, 224
200, 897
194, 655
190, 492

23, 825
21, 615
20, 136
22, 687

16, 193
16, 224
15, 179
14, 858

.261
.248
.237
.256

.300
.291
.269
.295

219
205
164
140

17
25
45
62

61, 288
58, 091
50, 175
47, 056

5, 485
5,537
4,134
4,053

36, 913
34, 168
28, 193
26, 540

10, 082
8,383
7,873
7,951

6,016
7, 323
6,171
6,773

241, 264
244, 746
239, 877
243, 591

197, 775
196, 561
194, 668
197, OS6

25, 961
29, 159
25, 551
25, 758

17, 528
19, 026
19, 65S
20, 747

.246
.224
.239
.236

.295
.266
.278
.275

96
111
106
72

161
200
232
239

86
142
135
50

34, 448
35, 982
24, 720
30, 228

2,707
4,310
2, 690
4, 353

18, 504
17,883
10, 103
13, 118

6,728
7,993
5,773
6,537

4,902
3,785
4,517
4,116

249, 272
253, 921
259, 330
267, 503

203, 227
209, 902
215, 668
221, G79

24, 059
23, 118
22, 946
24, 733

21, 986
20, 901
20, 716
21, 091

.246
.219
.223
.226

.275
.246
.242
.250

1,150
953
1,006
1,119

71
57
74
105

249
208
215
208

35
21
21
19

38, 679
31, 919
34,063
39,505 1

2,608
1,951
1,462
3,379

21, 456
16, 195
16, 161
16, 155

5, 911
7,841
8,768
10, 869

5,060
3,785
4,892
6,406

262, 326
249, 563
240, 740
246, 359

219, 274
210, 760
203, 947
206, 248

23, 636
21, 595
20, 265
22, 058

19, 416
17, 208
16, 528
18, 053

.205
.153
.145
.149

.219
.171
.183
.187

1,202
1,108

110
93

187
161

17
25

38,643
41, 509

5,096
6, 559

14, 122
17, 450

9,882
8,309

6,301
6,824

246, 330
250, 025

201, 176
196, 202

26, 068
32, 525

19. 086
21, 298

.149
.168
.181

.179
.186
.199

42
38
33
35
29
32
51
55

42,854
41, 490
46, 350
53, 856
60, 526
52, 589
30, 158
62, 070
42, 520

136
161
188
243
220
208
212
212

54
50
42
43
41
46
52
53

29, 004
45, 931
44, 298
29, 713
30, 203
30, 715
37, 262
42, 146

98
117
132
79

174
208
248
254

89
138
133
43

1,151
1,048
1,016
918

66
61
81
96

271
248
247
222

3, 804
4 078
2,984
2,545

1,015
1,109
1,076
1,196

123
99
100
105

352
405
378
341

2,508
3,713
4,455
5,782

1,307
1,409
1,189
1,053

736
569
632
662

369
311
409
460

5,738
4,478
3,645
3,761

676
636

427
344

3,798
3,756

2,850
2,711
3,198
3,590
2, 826
3,435
3,484
3,168

Total
hides
and
skins

WHOLESALE
PRICES <

Calfskins, country
No. 1 (Chicago)

Canada

United States

1

STOCKS, END OF MONTH 3

IMPORTS 2

Green, salted, packers' heavy native
steers (Chicago)

INSPECTED SLAUGHTER 1

1,201
1,186
1,018
995
779
860
1,058
915

45
43
44
54
61
74
79
69

139
188
218
193
174
189
194
149

$0. 184 $0. 189
.210
.196
.215
.242
.338
.262
.327
.406
.371
.301
.685
.393
.312
.368
« 340, 339 e 63, 139 a 32, 916

•

_

_ .

September
October
November _
December

_

I

1929
January
February
March __ __
April
May
June
July
August..

September
October.
November _ _
December

__

!_____
i
1

j
1

1 Data for the United States compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, representing animals slaughtered under Federal inspection,
which according to the 1919 census amounted to 68 per cent of all hogs slaughtered in that year, 82 per cent of cattle and calves, and 91 per cent of sheep and lambs. The
data in number of animals are given here as indications to hide output. Monthly data from 1909 appeared in the August, 1927, issue (No. 72), p. 138. Data for Canada
compiled by Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and cover all slaughter under Canadian inspection. Monthly data on Canadian slaughter from 1913 appeared in the February
1927, issue (No. 66), p. 23.
2
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
3
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from returns from packers, tanners, dealers, importers, and manufacturers, and represent
practically complete returns from the leather industry. A.S given in the detailed monthly reports, which can be obtained upon request from the Bureau of the Census, the
returns for hides and skins are expressed in numbers of hides and skins. For the above summary these have been reduced to pounds on the basis of the average weights
of each class. The detailed reports also show the various kinds of skins held and where located as between tanners, dealers, etc.
< Data from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing average monthly prices.
6
4-year monthly average, 1910-1913.
« 4 months' average, September to December, inclusive.



58

Table 37.—LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS
SOLE AND BELTING LEATHER

Sole
In
only i Total > process
Thous.
of backs,
bends,
and
sides

Finished

Dols.
per
Ib.

Thousands of pounds

2,605 $0.44
.47
4,319
6,751 .50
.64
7,540
3,657
.83
.80
2,229
.91
10,222
1,869 .86

Stocks, end of
month *
Production'

In
process

Finished

Exports '

SHOES
Price, chrome
calf, "B" grade
(Boston) *

YEAR AND
MONTH

Exports 3

Price* sole, oak,
scoured backs
(Boston) <

Stocks, end of
month '

Production

UPPER LEATHER

Men's Wodress men's
welt black
tan
kid,
calf
dress
oxford welt
(St.
lace
Louis) oxford

Dollars per pair

Production

(cut) «

Dozen
pairs

$3.11
3.17
3.25
3.71
4.75
5.63
7.60
8.95

23,898
26,990
29,260
26, 102
26,963
27, 043
28, 634
28, 696

746
450
612
526
550
476
459
361

7.00
6.51
6.43
6.25
6.39
6.40
6.43
6.75

$4.92

$4.25

8 197, 593
187, 580
197,072
208, 039
217, 882
212, 658

.54
.60
.60
.60

26, 210
29,628
32, 301
26,629

388
303
471
394

6.75
6.75
6.75
6.75

4.75
4.90
4.90
4.90

4.25
4.25
4.25
4.25

177,884
194, 874
223, 271
210, 420

11,400
8,949
8,403
9,000

.60
.53
.57
.57

28, 427
27,284
28, 154
34, 974

409
318
344
331

6.75
6.75
6.75
6.75

4.90
5.00
5.00
5.00

4.25
4.25
4.25
4.25

224, 636
228,039
202, 051
237,043

247, 386
251, 350
253, 470
251, 406

9,093
11, 174
10,268
11. 030

.57
.55
.49
.50

31,000
33, 393
26,443
21,909

275
340
403
355

6.75
6.75
6.75
6.75

5.00
5.00
4.85
4.85

4.25
4.25
4.25
4.25

213, 945
236, 907
223,500
179, 330

138,500
136, 749
133, 335
130, 430

249, 468
249, 739
249, 373
246,992

10, 998
9,364
11, 991
10, 818

.53
.51
.49
.50

27, 245
27, 707
30,900
29,382

423
367
435
372

6.75
6.75
6.75
6.75

4.85
4.85
4.85
4.85

4.25
4.25
4.25
4.25

214, 826
240, 116
256, 691
258, 301

134, 079
135, 198

241, 783
235, 158

10, 208
8,491

.51
.50
.49

29,159
27,910

333
357

6.75
6.75
6.75

4.85
4.85
4.85

4.25
4.25
4.25

263, 933
252, 703

1,653
1,876
1,535 7 23, 742 7114,810 7 161, 573

1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av.
1923 mo. av.
1924 mo. av.
1925 mo. av.
1926 mo. av
1927 mo. av.
1928mo.av_

1,499
1, 478
1,561
1,220
1,240
1,135
1,319
1,346

25, 657
24, 557
27,411
21, 665
22, 431
21, 859
24, 734
24,340

111,217
100, 679
107, 144
88,429
87, 081
80,148
86, 171
86, 651

193, 528
186, 434
171,631
149, 508
126, 856
95,006
63,855
65, 911

,198
,300
,452
,872
,611
,122
818
849

.55
.52
.51
.45
.48
.44
.49
.64

57,986
72,963
78,019
64,118
63,407
69, 681
67,420
67,527

164, 216
166, 770
158,852
133,758
140, 367
152, 301
148, 432
143, 632

423,021
428,169
387,376
358,168
305,637
292, 108
258, 144
251, 747

10,416
9,228
11,264
11, 392
11, 739
12, 355
11, 297

.52
.44
.44
.45
.47
.45
.49
.56

1938
January
February..
March
April

1,223
1,240
1,363
1,358

23,095
23,409
25, 245
24,761

85, 396
86, 028
87,299
89, 181

54,828
54,085
54,302
57, 335

1,273
1,076
971
753

.59
.65
.65
.66

71, 415
70,509
73,045
63, 730

149, 952
147, 315
141, 386
140, 713

245, 931
242, 361
249, 023
253,557

15, 532
15, 567
14, 297
10, 846

May._ _ _
June
July...
August

1,407
1,399
1,436
1,463

25,140
24, 971
25, 070
25,701

90,734
91, 781
90,949
89,508

59, 614
63,921
69, 557
72,439

650
538
531
996

.67
.68
.67
.67

62, 074
66,047
66, 464
73,150

141,068
143, 099
147, 443
147, 602

255, 397
262, 667
254,563
253,854

September.
October
November .
December..

1,324
1,447
1,264
1,212

23,510
25, 711
23,184
22,277

85,990
83,388
80,931
78,632

72,243
75,188
771363
80,061

733
825
1,063
775

.65
.63
.59
.59

66, 380
72, 092
62, 619
62,804

146, 010
143, 265
138, 803
136, 922

1929
January
February __
March
April.

1,284
1,102
1,140
1,185

23,891
20, 989
22,191
22, 939

77, 989
81, 482
79, 524
79, 487

81, 518
78, 607
78, 772
76,444

1,054
729
1,336
1,060

.59
.57
.55
.49

66, 424
62, 954
66, 132
65, 152

1,144
1,210

22,691
24,911

80,606
79, 153

72, 070
70, 616

1,149
758

.49
.49
.51

63,653
68, 681

May.
June
July. .
August

Men's
ProEx- black
duc- ports a calf
tion «
blucher
(Boston)

842
827
1,412
1,623
1,237
1,100
1,780
1,403

$0.27
.28
.29
.45
.58
.60
.97
.99

1913 mo. av_
1914 mo. av.
1915 mo. av.
1916 mo. av.
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av.
1919 mo. av.
1920 mo. av.

7 42, 344

Wholesale prices 4

Dols.
per Thous. of pairs
sq. ft.

Thousands of square feet

GLOVES

7 142, 136 7400,906

24,389

27,602

September
October
November.
December..
1
Prior to July, 1922, these figures were compiled by the Tanners' Council. Since July, 1922, they have been compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau
of the Census, representing practically the entire industry. Hence the figures from July, 1922, on are not directly comparable with those for preceding months.
2
Based on figures compiled by the U, S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. The data embrace returns from packers, tanners, dealers, importers, and
manufacturers. Data on leather have been converted to pounds or square feet on the basis of the average weights of each class from original detailed reports in skins,
sides, backs, butts, pounds, etc., which may be obtained from the Bureau of the Census on request. Stocks in process represent leather in process of tanning, which takes
several months to complete, while finished stocks are those completely tanned.
3
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The exports under sole and belting cover sole leather only, while under
upper leather are included cattle, calf, goat, sheep and lamb, and patent. Exports of shoes include men's and boys', women's and children's boots and shoes but exclude
slippers, athletic shoes, sandals, and other leather footwear.
4
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing average monthly prices.
8
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from over 1,000 firms each month, comprising almost the entire industry. Figures for the years
1914, 1919, and 1921 are those reported by the census of manufactures for those years. Monthly data from November, 1921, appeared in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 97.
Further details as to classes given in press releases and details by States are given twice a year.
6
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, by 206 identical factories (including data in earlier months for 1 factory now out of business),
representing 87 per cent of the leather-glove industry, according to the census of manufactures, 1921. Details by classes are given in monthly press releases.
7
Average for last 4 months of year,
s Average for last 6 months of year.




59
Table 38.—NEWSPRINT PAPER
NEWSPRINT PAPER
Production
United States '

Total

Ratio
to capacity

Total

United
States *

Short
tons

YEAR AND MONTH

Canada 3

Consumption
by publishers

Per
cent

United
States '

Canada 3

United States '

Imports

Exports

United
States «

Canada 3

Price
roll,
f. o. b.
milli

Dolls,
per cwt.

12, 233
24, 382
20, 384
38, 601
45, 026
50,425
55, 203
59, 469

$2.25
2.25
2.05
2.70
3.35
3.41
3.88
6.00

62,083
67, 922
72,563

13, 325
12, 597
10, 682

124, 789
154, 952
155, 185
144, 712

41, 155
40,983
52,006

102, 172
121,035
123, 111
122, 505
127, 862
« 140, 399
122, 877
116, 449

66, 930
90,499
104, 793
112,063
127,096
6 156, 562
171, 896
199, 919

29,940
22,837
22, 207
29, 357
26, 867
16, 662
24, 843
35,201

17,033
10, 572
14, 745
19, 789
22, 454
13, 881
30, 052
40, 999

188,797
171, 121
175, 797
176, 855
152, 733
148, 043
216, 726
196,650

28,211
36, 657
40, 601
33, 942
32,205
36, 194
43, 820
46, 078

66,042
85, 772
109, 070
113, 103
120, 702
154, 223
165, 589
179, 570

62,969
79,960
94,830
101, 615
116, 805
144, 332
156, 822
185,382

5.00
3.69
3*89
3 '83
3.70
3.50
3.25
3.25

169, 286
184, 805
185, 202
182,027

114, 003
116, 885
116, 468
123, 883

177, 195
188, 769
187, 766
181, 439

30, 751
27, 939
28, 543
20, 877

33, 384
35, 774
38, 074
38, 117

225, 319
214, 872
214, 639
218, 177

45, 570
45, 789
46, 176
46, 708

168, 630
175. 484
188, 624
180, 670

168, 855
159, 284
179, 969
169, 202

3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25

187, 848
188, 697
196, 761
191, 594

172, 952
162, 573
186, 232
181, 112

114, 211
109, 666
115. 502
118, 583

186, 358
189, 153
190, 305
193, 860

25, 905
28, 499
34, 638
33,734

37, 731
39, 145
47, 657
46, 641

207, 449
215, 118
206, 392
188, 384

46, 522
48, 212
41, 613
43, 363

177, 808
172, 635
172, 896
163, 179

157, 466
183, 414
216, 160
1*0, Oil

3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25

84
83
82
77

202, 596
190, 757
187, 434
200,480

186, 641
170, 892
152, 763
162, 184

124, 316
116, 901
109, 849
114, 768

203, 836
185, 086
185, 069
197, 224

37, 207
39, 979
40, 386
40, 838

46, 290
47,937
48, 270
52, 108

184, 580
186, 307
199, 214
209, 044

46, 627
42, 767
44, 266
39, 744

181, 913
163, 807
174, 667
173, 872

194, 298
174, 031
167, 456
179, 334

3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25

102, 821
122, 415
123, 646
115, 049

74
81
90
84

186,396
217, 290
223, 645
208, 484

169, 625
189, 240
207, 056
185, 626

107, 834
121, 729
122, 761
115, 033

197, 532
222,430
233, 924
215, 133

35, 687
36, 380
34, 691
34, 469

43,800
37, 018
26, 254
19, 139

191, 287
188,980
187, 223
195, 822

48, 229
45, 289
53, 674
52, 624

164, 648
200, 362
201, 416
207, 727

170, 840
214,228
196, 187
213, 162

3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25

123, 822
103, 644
114, 586
118, 679

85
77
79
82

212, 191
187, 200
218, 147
221, 784

183, 502
170, 864
198, 722
189, 986

120, 263
108, 375
120, 003
121, 548

209, 020
186, 395
119, 739
220, 270

38,003
35, 642
30, 534
27, 102

21,406
25, 536
24,045
25, 741

197, 480
188, 595
174, 750
166, 089

45, 982
48, 050
45, 673
46, 724

196, 882
165, 331
182, 994
178, 076

195, 047
174, 469
244, 167
162, 381

3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25

123, 504
113, 407
111, 578

82
82

245, 644
225, 055
229, 045

200, 826
192, 424

124, 840
114, 558
112, 616

247, 449
233, 920
227, 502

25, 778
24, 602
23, 603

23, 893
24, 199
28, 993

154, 948
161, 318

51, 425
48, 716

206, 036
202, 398

214, 342
219, 895

3.25
3.25
3.25

1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average

102, 103
120, 641
123, 750
122, 548
127, 527
6 140,352
123, 791
117, 913

_

_

1939
January
FebruaryMarch
April
May_.
June
July
August

79
82

67, 339
90,028
105, 519
112, 750
126, 851
« 156, 811
173, 912
198, 425

147,957
170, 738
151, 179
136, 829
148, 897
166, 780
172, 998
177, 199

114, 659
113, 126
117, 166
119, 312

80
77
79
81

178, 815
191, 171
190, 293
181,600

84
79
80
84

128, 065
119, 673
109,861
116, 120

1928
January
February
March
April

110, 248
142, 091
148, 769

113, 858
106, 049
114, 880
125, 215

119, 525
112, 302
121, 682
117, 553

_

September
October
November.-.
December

United
States a

In
transit to
pubs.

38, 998
31,713
24,035
23,929
23, 324

61, 251
67, 284
72,931

1937
September
October
_
November
December

Canada 3

At
publishers

18, 320
26,290
30, 701
39,019
46, 593
49,689
52, 311
60,822

113, 251
105, 024
114, 543
125,997

September.
October
November
December

At mills

Short tons

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average

May
June
July
August

Stocks, end of month
Shipments

_.

1
_

1
Newsprint prices are averages of wholesale weekly prices of roll newsprint f. o. b. mill from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2
Data on production, shipments, and mill stocks of newsprint in the United States prior to May, 1923, from the Federal Trade Commission; since then from the Newsprint Service Bureau, covering almost the entire industry.
_ * Production, shipments, and mill stocks ofnewsprint, comprising practically the total production of Canada, furnished by the Newsprint Service Bureau; exports from

.piled since then by the American
mission and had on hand on May
31, 1923, a total of 133,312 tons of paper as against 176,347 tons held by those reporting to the Federal Trade Commission on that date, Monthly data on newsprint paper
from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), pp. 45-47.
6
Compiled by the U. S. Department oj Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Prior to Sept. 1, 1916, imports include only paper valued at not above
at
2.5 cents per pound; from Sept. 1,1916, to Apr. 24,1920,.not above 5 cents per pound; and from Apr. 24,1920, to date not above 8 cents per pound.
fl Annual averages are slightly larger than computations from monthly figures owing to receipt of annual instead of monthly reports from a few small firms.




60

Table 39.—BOOK PAPER AND PRINTING
BOOK PUBLICATION 2

BOOK PAPER i

Production

YEAB AND MONTH

New orders

Actual

Ratio
to
capac.

Short tons

Shipments

Per
cent

PRINTING *

Unfilled
orders, end
of month

Per cent of
normal production

Days'
production

1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

av
av_...
av
av
av
av

74, 357
70, 763
76, 232
92, 039
60,499
81, 827

72,958
71, 464
76, 665
91, 895
59, 353
82, 037

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

av
av
av
av
av
av__.

93, 466
102, 569
107, 038
112, 182
110,963
125, 578

84
88

92, 355
102,814
106, 236
112, 054
110, 335
124, 932

46, 439
48, 851
58,870
62,354
71, 212
80, 890

86
82
86
82
83

96
92
93
84
81

10
9
8
9
10

14
12
13
9
8

_

106, 205
109, 391
111, 579
110, 463

84
83
85
83

106,417
110,813
109, 347
113, 225

75, 749
74, 234
76, 461
73, 403

76
76
77
82

82
85
77
79

7
8
9
8

1938
January
February.
March
April

121, 509
123, 939
137, 572
125, 191

90
93
91
91

125, 033
123, 567
135, 370
117, 304

68, 265
69, 630
72, 415
81, 105

83
96
88
97

87
86
81
84

May
June
July
August

130, 199
122, 387
117,492
130, 416

90
84
80
89

124, 861
120, 551
118, 314
133, 024

86, 782
89, 385
88, 491
85,836

74
75
77
77

117, 374
132, 633
126, 001
122, 221

86
87
90
87

120,
133,
124,
122,

82, 403
81, 579
82, 395
82, 395

131, 999
122, 015
136, 657
138, 024

95
92
93
92

132, 791
126, 286
139, 253

79, 099"
74, 353
71, 399

Number of
editions

36, 845
29,622
31, 643
23, 719
36, 234
38, 221

1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

1937
September
October
November
December.

September
October
November
December

1939
January .
February
March
April

__

_ _

895
429
615
221

1

BLANK
FORMS «

New
orders

Shipments

Activity

Shipments

New
orders

Thousands of books

Relative to
1924

Thous.
of
checks

Thous.
of sets

728
695
648
621
581
604

110
75
67
81
113
116

10, 046
9,592
7,665
10, 779

9,850
11,118
8,264
10, 083

798

626
611
667
681
733
708

113
144
131
137
113
155

11, 344
10, 988
11, 991
11,931
12, 133
12,400

11, 488
11,260
11,916
11, 967
11, 931
12, 329

100
100
101
100
103
107

87, 489
79, 982
88, 297
86, 239
76, 038
77, 993

27, 145
31, 529
34, 524
50,952

9
9
8
8

830
981
738
720

89
143
102
102

12, 277
13, 851
12, 126
10, 671

12, 387
12, 898
13, 088
12, 934

99
105
104
105

76, 364
71, 625
82, 093
70, 413

35, 088
37, 258
36, 614
44, 257

11
11
10
12

9
9
8
9

507
654
853
697

118
153
151
123

12, 329
12, 332
13, 190
11, 796

11, 897
11, 722
11, 930
11, 807

108
109
112
111

75, 144
65, 865
78, 629
71, 715 .

43, 173
37, 172
40, 221
40, 880

77
73
80
79

11
9
10
8

7
7
8

599
745
555
551

119
113
128
169

12, 162
12,711
12, 038
12, 538

11, 645
13, 100
9,986
13, 738

111
98
96
97

80, 116
94, 668
70, 710
68, 482

48, 024
53, 774
48, 963
58, 108

81
83
84
77

80
- 86
80
82

10
10
10
7

7
8
6

835
&33
765
797

261
160
104
264

11, 837
13, 958
12, 730
11, 123

11,976
14, 605
13, 080
12, 462

105
113
112
.114

85, 489
86,889
81, 204
77,008

50, 114
67, 957
59, 429
63,614

81
94
104
89

82
87
91
84

10
9
10
10

8
9
9
10

508
681
914
718

150
113
201
108

12, 861
11, 762
12, 317
12, 718

12, 167
11, 984
12, 414
12, 176

117
126
124
123

90,616
71,043
91, 723

54,165
53, 306
63,633
62, 074

86
84

Mi ay
June
July
August
September
October
November..
December

CASH
CHECKS »

Amer-

ImStocks,
ican
end of
manu- ported
month Coat- Un- Coat- Un- fac- books
ed eoat- ed coat- ture
ed
ed

Short tons

SALES BOOKS «

80
82

10
9

9
8

601
695

135
125

12, 748
12, 332

12, 152
12, 445

70, 169
58, 687

I

•""

1""""

II

!
j

Compiled by the American Paper and Pulp Association, beginning with June, 1923, figures previous to that date having been compiled by the Federal Trade Commission,
representing practically complete production. Owing to variations in the number of reporting firms, beginning with June, 1923, the data on production and stocks have
been computed by link relatives, based on identical firms from the previous month. Shipments during this period have been computed by applying to the computed
production figures the ratio of shipments to production of the firms reporting. Data on new orders and unfilled orders are compiled from weekly reports of a smaller number
of mills, 28 on coated paper and 10 on uncoated. Unfilled orders show the average number of days which orders on hand will need for completion.
2 Compiled by the Publishers' Weekly. Imported books are those of foreign manufacture, catalogued and marketed by American publishers. Between 10 and 15 per
cent of the books manufactured in America are new editions, the remainder being new books, while about 95 per cent of the books manufactured in this country are by
American authors. Annual averages from 1913 through 1916 appeared in the August, 1927, issue (No. 72), p. 58.
3
Compiled by the Sales Book Manufacturers' Association from reports of 11 manufacturers, estimated to represent 90 per cent of the industry east of the Rocky Mountains. The sales books included are those commonly known as duplicate and triplicate books used by retail stores in recording their sales; all sizes and styles are included,
but 4not interchangeable covers and accessories. Monthly data on new orders from 1919 appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 24.
Compiled by the United Typothetx of America, representing the activity of job printing plants in 52 cities in 30 States, based on the productive hours of each department, the departments being weighted by their relative importance. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in the November, 1927, issue (No. 75), p. 25.
6
Compiled by the Cash Check Manufacturers' Association from reports of 8 manufacturers of punch and tear-off checks such as used in restaurants. The association's
report shows these classes separately, together with values and relation to normal. Monthly data from 1923 appeared in the May, 1928, issue (No. 81), p. 48.
fl
Compiled by the Continuous Fold Printers Association, from reports of 7 firms, representing from 80 to 90 per cent of the industry and presenting data on new orders
of continuously printed and folded forms, such as invoices, bills of lading, etc., used by railroads, steamship lines, banks and commercial concerns. The association's reports
show number and value of orders and number of parts, divided as between railroad and steamship forms and commercial and bank forms. Monthly data from 1925 appeared
in the May, 1928, issue (No. 81), p. 48.
' 11 months' average, February to December, inclusive.




61

Production
Short
tons

Stocks of waste
paper, end mo.
Operation

Production

ConUnfilled sumporders, tion,
New
orders end of
mouth waste
paper

Thous. Perct.
of inch- capac.
hours

Ship- Stocks,
end of
ments month

Operating
time

In
transit
At mills andunshipped 2
purchases "o
H

Production

Solid fiber

YEAR AND
MONTH

PAPER-BOARD SHIPPING BOXES '

BOX BOARD 2

Corrugated

BINDERS'
BOARD i

Table 40.—PAPER BOARD AND BOXES

Per cent of
normal

Short tons

Total

Corrugated

Solid
fiber

Thousands of square feet

i

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

mo av
mo. av_.
mo. av__
mo. av__
mo. av._
mo. av_.
mo. av. .
mo. av__

1 569

45, 383
43, 508
52, 090
49, 016
53, 093

50
70
79
74
78
80
75
77

45
66
79
72
78
81
75
75

65
81
79
79
75
77
76
80

226, 622
291, 036
306, 743
350, 418
404, 859
393, 354
417, 698

149, 323
211, 654
231, 190
274, 516
321, 505
315, 405
337, 327

77, 299
79, 382
75, 553
76, 397
83, 353
77, 949
76, 317

163, 023
158, 222
155, 513
147, 938

38, 062
40, 602
43, 789
46, 314

71
81
79
77

72
82
80
76

68
78
76
77

371, 748
421, 165
421, 110
403, 165

293,
336,
338,
322

677
910
400
002

78, 071
84, 255
82,710
81,163

48, 906
52, 452
49, 307
52, 071

149, 438
151, 671
150, 709
128, 818

59, 289
43, 807
51, 255
70, 035

75
67
68
72

75
68
69
76

76
64
66
82

406, 633
360, 888
383, 565
400, 806

326, 474
290, 546
308, 585
317, 529

80, 159
70, 342
74, 980
83, 277

228, 213
226, 647
212, 830
183, 442

42, 923
41, 630
41, 105
42, 777

126, 548
126, 040
128, 639
150, 036

51, 441
57, 936
50, 276
35, 382

80
85
77
66

79
85
76
64

84
83
81
72

386, 039
427, 263
395, 491
342, 376

308, 585
348, 835
320, 511
272, 807

77, 454
78, 428
74, 980
69, 569

189, 744
193, 966
209, 649
211,898

196, 984
289, 477
237, 621
220, 315

49, 032
50, 350
40, 439
40,319

153, 747
140, 104
139, 255
132, 621

62, 181
60, 038
47, 322
47, 551

69
77
80
74

67
75
78
72

75
84
85
80

347, 622
402, 183
425, 361
405, 319

227, 280
326, 430
348, 835
327, 815

70, 342
75, 753
76, 526
78, 845

73, 157
77, 782
79, 492
81,816

220, 750
204, 468
190, 810
213, 626

235, 794
223, 901
203, 741
233, 104

49, 107
53, 560
49, 969
47, 709

127, 217
130, 484
132, 265
117, 009

46, 375
43, 480
62, 056
48, 108

72
76
72
79

69
74
71
77

80
83
75
84

402, 956
423, 282
404, 520
441, 792

323, 493
341, 291
335, 732
364, 756

79,463
81, 991
68, 788
77, 036

234, 449
241,491
248, 447
198, 648

87, 097
81, 022
93, 203
94, 174

217, 361
240, 930
222, 693
196,164

228, 880
246, 233
236, 328
197, 529

45, 271
43, 627
47, 693
55, 624

116, 197
127, 989
136, 100
148, 096

53, 344
73, 235
49, 982
43,447

79
88
82
71

78
89
82
72

80
83
79
68

434, 371
454, 662
454, 354
415, 958

359, 553
374, 342
370, 302
348, 090

74, 818
8. , 320
84,052
67, 868

248,290
228, 034
256, 118
251, 147

241,086
227, 595
266, 895
250, 366

87, 974
87, 726
96,209
98, 162

238, 652
217, 442
242,073
231, 089

247,498
227, 206
258, 604
247, 773

56,804
57, 398
54,982
57, 881

137, 251
126, 212
137, 008
142, 666

49,104
54, 121
51, 520
68,005

78
84
86
82

78
85
86
83

77
80
85
79

451, 172
494, 105
510, 680
492, 272

352, 021 99, 151
383, 191 110, 914
398, 777 111, 903
387, 596 104, 676

264,830
240, 388

240, 395
230, 761

89, 485
81, 910

248, 813
233, 559

260, 283
235, 260

62, 311
62, 379

150,048
158, 223

54,433
56, 924

82
85

83
87

79
77

490, 117
391, 967

386, 241 103, 876
292, 045 99,922

185, 411
197, 702
210, 162
206, 761
222, 492

31, 667
28, 967
45, 031
50, 271
54, 472
56, 509
48, 570
47, 725

162, 097
172, 962
153, 773
144, 716
133, 424

1G3, 337
182, 322
209, 730
189, 942

175, 528
189, 032
217, 876
209, 944

53, 562
53, 327
54, 566
50, 211

93, 248
94, 847
109, 616
106, 076

193, 077
207, 187
182, 283
227, 907

201, 788
211, 828
194, 285
229, 722

235, 936
220, 215
184, 551
180, 409

116, 383
102, 810
76, 032
74, 664

216, 652
219, 627
203, 962
179, 447

203, 882
211, 862
227, 344
221, 074

204, 128
215, 333
244, 871
211, 304

80, 417
85, 862
93, 380
84, 513

80.2
75.3
76.3
81.6

242, 394
228, 646
201, 153
230, 750

224, 366
228, 252
209, 976
236, 682

8,344
9,430
8,843
7,632

83.0
82.8
83.9
72.4

224, 971
244,894
240,124
205, 546

3,172
2,581
2,917
2,994

9,297
8,436
9, 417
9,279

81.4
80.0
82.5
81.3

3,491
3,092
2,828

9,526
9,144

83.4
83.3

2, 256
2,675
2,314
2,712
3,067
2,474
2,972

8,442
8, 352
8,636
8,003
8, 461

81.0
80.6
84.4
75.4
78.9

101, 861
147, 745
170 490
185, 627
197, 788
210, 743
206, 444
223, 553

1927
January
February
March
April .

2,306
2,730
2,774
3,040

6, 999
7,583
8,628
7, 771

66.8
75.4
76.3
71.3

173, 629
189, 273
219, 824
205, 589

194, 285
183, 861
230, 065
197, 435

105, 669
102, 005
114, 369
101, 861

May
June
July
August

2,796
2,372
2,218
2,112

7,836
8, 277
7,443
8,878

74.8
76.0
71.1
78.5

200, 216
214, 704
190, 406
232, 587

194, 122
213, 735
213, 649
227, 978

SeptemberOctober
November...
December _._

2, 461
2,537
2,400
1,940

8,673
8,803
8,308
7,557

82.8
80.8
79.3
72.1

225, 617
224, 195
213, 056
188, 228

1938
January
February
March
April..

2, 547
4,382
3,626
3,450

7,833
8,137
8,844
8,312

75.5
78.4
78.2
79.4

May
June
July
August

3,720
2,705
2,153
3,092

8, 734
8,200
7,992
9,236

September...
October
November...
December. ._

2,431
2,644
2,196
2,718

1939
January .
February
March
AprilMay
June _
July___
August

...

September. _.
October
November...
December. ._

185, 788
197, 970
208, 857
206, 353
224, 829

98, 370
102, 502
99, 809
99, 798
84, 326

176, 854
185, 638
201, 829
197, 956
209, 338

1

1 Compiled by the Binders Board Manufacturers' Association, from repoits of 6 firms (including in previous years firms since consolidated or out of business), the association's output representing 84 per cent of the total output of the industry in 1925, according to the census of manufactures.
2
Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 89 identical manufacturers each month, including figures from the members of the
Paperboard Industries Association, formerly included in the Box Board Association, prorated from weekly reports. These box board data included all paper board of more
than 0.009 inch thickness, such as strawboard, chip board, news board, etc., used for making boxes. Similar paper board designed for making specialties, and boards of less
than 0.009 inch thickness are not classed as box board. Capacity data are determined by the number of working days in each month, Sundays and holidays excluded.
The data almost completely cover the box board industry.
3 Data from the Paperboard Industries Association, comprising the former National Contamer Association, which in turn had merged the statistical activities of the Container Club and the National Association of Corrugated and Fiber Box Manufacturers, who formerly reported separately. 30 identical companies report corrugated board
data and 11 report solid fiber data. Data for the former individual associations, extending back to 1919 for the Container Club, are given in the August, 1923, issue (No. 24)
but are not comparable with data shown here, as the former National Association of Corrugated and Fiber Box Manufacturers reported in their totals singl^face board (used
Digitized forprincipally for wrapping purposes), which is excluded from the tabulation above. Monthly data for 1921 and 1922 on the present basis, including relative;prices of finished
FRASER
board and raw materials, appeared in the November, 1923, issue (No. 27), p. 89. The production of boxes is measured by the area of board passing through the box machines.



62

Table 41.—WRAPPING, FINE, AND TOTAL PAPERJ
WRAPPING PAPER

Production

Production
YEAR AND
MONTH

RaActual tio to
capac.
Short
Per
cent
tons

WRITING (FINE) PAPER

Ship- Stocks,
end of
ments month

ShipRa- ments
Actual tio to
capae.

Stocks,
end of
month

Per
cent

Short tons

ALL OTHER GRADES

TOTAL PAPER
Production

Production

Shipments

Stocks,
end of
month

Actual

Ratio to
capac.
Per
cent

Short tons

1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922

mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.

av
av
av
av
av
av

60, 626
59, 500
57, 851
69,324
54, 300
69, 689

57, 946
60, 588
58, 993
68, 573
53, 213
68,375

53, 551
37, 664
54,702
26,013
55, 465
61,228

24, 030
30, 668
28, 647
32, 444
20, 207
30,088

23, 578
30, 495
28,902
32, 544
19, 900
29,859

32, 500
29, 308
36, 845
29,268
37, 377
36, 630

70, 658
77, 757
76, 085
98, 627
70, 426
102, 758

69, 422
78, 619
76, 394
97,095
70, 453
102, 640

41, 093
29, 308
37, 500
36, 594
49, 044
47,488

mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.

av
av
av
av
av
av

85,320
84,639
90, 615
89, 582
90,596
93, 598

81,866
83,470
93, 822
90, 416
88, 122
92, 605

67, 370
108, 635
99, 577
68, 741
75, 621
93, 141

31, 341
30, 810
37,410
38, 259
37, 226
38, 230

30,511
30, 512
37, 345
38,035
37, 321
37, 775

43, 913
50, 278
50, 650
51, 571
50,564
53, 499

90,630
92, 752
99, 737
102, 790
99, 825
102, 379

89, 570
95,767
99,127
102, 755
99,455
101, 962

53, 279
57, 811
62, 855
74, 312
70, 436
67, 211

594, 996
618, 946
660, 114
693, 346
668, 829
700,731

*85
87

«91
87

Stocks,
end of
month

Short tons

493,304
504,294
515, 861
533, 278
409, 398
552, 748

1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

Shipments

238, 113
189, 240
238, 999
181, 910
239, 697
235,371
278, 239
345, 203
353, 290
330,267
341, 254
377,667

649, 805
636,096
712, 359
674, 889

*80
83

617,479
662,096
693, 259
664,854
695, 696

323, 229
319, 564
329, 373
330, 155

646, 414
670,608
623, 450
085,805

340,985
351, 226
348, 949
361, 282

1927
January
February
March
April

91,760
86, 051
98, 325
93, 419

90, 934
85, 449
95, 179
87, 627

68, 465
66, 916
69, 116
72, 705

35, 148
34, 064
39, 195
40, 539

35, 043
35, 869
40,684
39, 931

52, 794
50, 999
49, 518
49, 446

100, 755
93, 572
108, 797
99,211

99,762
95, 095
107, 835
98,063

67, 593
65,697
66,662
67,589

656, 652
634, 482
723, 187
678, 867

May
June
July
August

84,451
88,818
85,305
94, 193

80, 735
87,219
82, 490
92,215

73, 081
74, 532
76, 796
78, 626

38, 734
37, 635
33, 360
37, 098

38,424
36, 167
35, 729
35,688

50, 436
51, 695
48, 801
50, 199

100, 357
100,515
90,382
103, 623

98,298
99,025
90,583
102, 358

72, 942
73, 897
72, 738
74, 302

654, 757
681, 729
619, 261
707, 551

September
October
November __
December

89, 696
92, 795
93,479
88, 863

94
87
82
78

86, 646
92, 424
91, 329
85, 220

81, 737
80, 907
79,653
84,916

37,329
38, 814
36, 665
38, 136

92
36, 769
38, 892
92
87 . 37,398
37, 259
91

50, 756
50, 903
50, 173
51,044

101, 157
103, 058
98, 749
97, 720

102, 311
103, 040
99,251
97, 835

73, 357
72, 594
69,106
68, 751

674, 663
681, 379
670, 694
642, 722

85
81
79
76

674, 359
688, 701
666,623
640,864

355, 273
348, 207
345, 041
341, 768

1928
January.
February
March
April..

96,223
93, 249
101, 618
91, 744

91
89
89
86

93, 144
93, 249
96, 334
89,542

87, 895
87, 593
92,551
93,975

37, 471
38, 870
42, 399
40, 288

93
97
93
92

35,550
38, 287
43,459
37, 548

52, 410
52, 973
51,850
53, 741

99, 588
96, 075
106, 528
99, 266

98,946
93, 680
105, 905
97, 858

60,838
66, 766
66,466
69, 798

678, Ij98
676, 297
737, 143
695, 116

82
82
82
85

663,868
667, 926
734, 191
681, 150

344, 345
355, 811
353, 369
372, 672

May
June
July
August

97, 793
90,577
88,477
100, 779

87
84
86
89

94, 761
89, 309
94, 228
100, 174

96, 802
98, 344
92,467
93, 340

40,904
38, 225
33, 984
39, 331

87
84
80
84

40, 863
38,875
34, 562
38, 938

53,791
53, 155
53, 156
53, 535

107, 475
104, 725
95, 469
110, 677

105. 705
104, 977
96, 056
109, 154

71, 569
71,006
70, 578
7^ 438

746, 830
704, 233
646, 436
728,073

83
82
77
78

726, 300
694, 514
656, 750
729, 162

395, 258
405, 429
395, 047
393, 696

83, 582
96, 907
91, 249
90, 979

84
85
87
81

86, 173
94,900
91, 286
88,159

91, 977
93, 416
93, 203
96, 123

34, 885
39, 680
37, 463
35, 263

80
84
88
80

34, 885
39, 839
36, 676
33, 817

53, 3G1
53, 788
54,418
55, 805

100, 138
112, 529
102, 703
93, 374

102, 437
115, 563
101, 483
91, 785

70, 140
61, 340
63, 578
62, 015

663, 771
749, 058
721, 186
662, 432

84
83
90
91

681, 104
751, 693
713, 149
648,544

378, 839
370, 212
375, 978
386, 431

101, 604
87, 082
91, 746
91,286

81
89
86
85

100,690
86, 298
96,700
91, 377

95, 288
93, 107
86, 596
86, 075

38, 228
37, 789
41, 348
41,819

92
90
86
93

40, 522
38,885
43, 788
40,564

50, 934
49, 849
47, 373
50,213

106, 157
100, 337
104, 355
104,506

104, 445
102, 634
102, 091
102, 278

62, 902
60,605
53,205
55, 486

750,100
678, 901
744, 810
745, 461

71
86
86
87

746, 209
689, 684
760, 439

383, 030
370, 954
349, 673

94, 302
87, 228

85
85

92, 227
86, 181

87, 733
88, 391

41, 660
38, 513

90
90

42, 368
37, 897

49,488
50, 103

111, 182
100, 897

107, 735
100, 098

58, 932
59, 875

773, 502
710, 176

87

September
October
November
December

1929
January __ __ _
February
March
_
April
May
June
July
August

::::::

September October
November
December
i Data to May, 1923, from the Federal Trade Commission, representing practically complete production; beginning June, 1923, production compiled from reports of the
American Paper and Pulp Association and prorated to represent complete production on the following percentages calculated on the production in the last seven months
of 1923, as compared with the total for that period derived from the Federal Trade Commission reports and the census of manufactures: Wrapping paper, 57 per cent;
fine paper, 80 per cent; "All other grades," comprising bag, tissue, hanging, felts and building and other paper, 65 per cent. Total paper figures are the aggregate of the
three previous production or stock columns plus, up to May, 1923, the figures on newsprint, book paper, and paper board as compiled by the Federal Trade Commissiont
and, after May, 1923, the figures on book paper compiled by the American Paper and Pulp Association, the figures on newsprint as compiled by the Newsprint Service
Bureau, and the figures on box board as compiled by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, except that from June through October, 1923, when these
latter .figures were not compiled, the paper-board figures of the American Paper and Pulp Association have been used, prorated up to complete production by the percentages which they bore to the box-board figures in 1924, or 60 per cent on production and 73 per cent in stocks. Stock figures represent paper at mills only. Shipment
data for wrapping and writing paper beginning June, 1923, have been compiled by applying to the prorated production figures the relation of shipments to production of
reporting mills, the shipments for "all other grades" being prorated at 65 per cent. The capacity ratio for total paper is computed by the American Paper vnd Pulp
Association on firms reporting directly to that association and is therefore based on a somewhat smaller proportion of the industry thau the other total figures.
 3
5 months' average, September to December, inclusive.



63

ABRASIVE
PAPER AND
CLOTH i

WOOD PULP
Mechanical

ConsumpProduc- tion and Stocks,
end of
tion 3
shipmonth 3
ments 3

YEAR AND MONTH

Chemical

Imports 4

ConsumpProduc- tion and Stocks,
end of
tions
shipmonth 3
ments 3

Imports *

Dolls,
per 100
Ibs.

Short tons

1909-1913 monthly average
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average

125, 678
120, 589

117,804

112, 145
145, 567

16, 463
13, 991
18, 105
14, 505
21, 876
23, 256

106, 824

Price,
sulphite,
unbleached 5

160, 572
159, 375

157, 797

25, 855
44, 799

25, 521
31, 130
38, 092
32, 860
35, 104
33, 231

129, 325

Shipments

Domestic

Foreign

Reams

ROPE PAPER
SACKS 2

Table 42.—WOOD PULP AND PAPER PRODUCTS

Shipm'ts

Eel. to
192119226

$2.23
2.16
2.12
3.81
4.81

1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923

monthly average _ _ _ _
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average _ .
monthly average
monthly average

108, 617
120, 817
131, 525
105, 668
123, 495
131, 073

109,817
120, 660
132, 308
106, 214
127, 802
131, 266

131, 170
154, 251
120,079
166, 889
136, 664
95,900

15, 457
16, 854
19, 429
15, 895
17,984
25,007

158,008
161, 247
185, 780
127, 786
165, 198
185, 253

158, 930
160, 375
185, 536
127, 467
166, 438
200, 642

33, 671
53, 725
33, 720
53, 411
52, 518
62, 472

32, 728
36, 147
56,096
42,196
86, 869
89, 745

3.84
3.52
6.58
3.50
2.56
2.97

68,150
78, 363
47, 957
72, 394
86, 916

9,171
11, 695
4,379
8,836
10, 943

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

145, 727
142, 464
154, 083
132, 473
133, 827

139, 796
143, 569
153, 495
137, 560
136, 436

195, 007
225, 804
204,065
190, 693
152, 378

20, 493
27, 591
25,313
20,467
20,907

199, 140
205, 785
222, 937
215, 666
215, 261

200, 793
206,147
223, 597
215, 181
215, 827

58, 492
41, 335
42,089
40,232
43, 361

106,400
111,044
118, 971
119, 181
124, 460

2.58
2.68
2.87
2.64
2.52

79,002
86, 891
84, 634
81, 665
90,942

10, 165
12, 435
13, 565
16, 050
18,580

160, 192
130, 158
108, 322
102, 995

137, 997
135, 689
127, 623
136,569

243, 762
238, 231
218, 795
185, 222

17,217
20, 275
13, 344
18, 597

214, 848
214, 816
198, 988
220, 138

214, 918
215, 020
198, 068
220, 162

39, 120
39, 086
40, 278
40, 254

116, 879
109, 699
117, 734
113,948

2.63
2.60
2.60
2.60

85, 928
81,917
77, 655
89, 622

17, 735
15, 877
16, 522
13, 584

92,025
121,051
137, 245
133, 783

120, 326
130, 465
143, 220
135, 632

156, 574
147, 160
158, 717
156, 872

28, 389
21, 190
28, 308
24, 976

209, 776
213, 472
214, 936
210, 388

211, 744
213, 524
213, 772
207, 064

38, 286
38, 234
41,552
45, 198

119,090
133, 170
142, 736
152, 763

2.60
2.53
2.53
2.53

85, 379
85, 155
72, 726
58, 265

14, 361
18, 389
16, 392
16, 034

January
February
March
April

142, 034
132, 743
143, 678
149, 652

139, 851
135, 952
144, 771
133, 702

159, 575
156, 366
155, 274
173, 174

21, 082
21, 151
21, 124
18, 549

209, 106
209, 820
228, 692
210, 780

210,016
207, 926
230, 484
211, 400

44, 726
47, 162
45, 854
43, 872

156, 164
130, 152
83,352
80, 592

2.53
2.53
2.53
2.53

80, 505
83, 969
96, 871
81, 782

17, 112
16, 169
20, 558
19, 635

106
97
109
92

May.__
June
July
August

156, 258
133, 854
112, 403
114, 668

143,015
135, 917
125, 465
138, 309

186, 377
184, 314
171, 098
147,611

24, 024
20, 528
14, 553
17, 233

222, 924
217, 456
200, 654
222, 116

225, 710
214, 068
204, 512
221, 008

42, 120
45, 870
42, 580
44, 682

90, 736
122, 474
129, 910
120, 643

2.53
2.53
2.53
2.53

94, 309
88, 569
81, 689
99, 789

18, 944
18, 829
17, 657
17, 875

87
83
89
111

108, 166
131, 558
145, 120
135, 785

122, 771
146, 383
141, 775
129, 322

133, 006
118, 182
118, 548
125, Oil

21, 953
23, 884
19, 627
27, 171

201, 646
228, 434
222, 934
208, 564

204, 378
231, 800
221, 262
207, 358

42, 510
40, 032
40, 242
40, 684

124, 048
149, 112
126, 790
179, 548

2.53
2.53
2.53
2.49

95, 131
98, 576
91, 405
97, 708

18, 281
20, 085
18, 601
19, 214

102
113
107
93

January
February
March
April

149, 772
126, 171
147, 640
162, 042

144,
125,
136,
142,

130,
130,
141,
160,

209
797
557
875

25,832
14, 228
16, 481
23, 314

236,
213,
231,
233,

636
582
836
742

235, 170
216, 544
231, 526
234, 638

41, 366
38, 134
37, 638
36, 150

151, 240
118, 246
85, 074
123, 757

2.45
2.45
2.45
2.45

96, 056
86, 037
101, 845
98, 394

17, 753
21, 457
22, 194
24,642

103
96
90
83

May
June
July
August-.

166, 375
142, 915

148, 251
136, 669

178, 963
185, 209

21, 044
24, 014

241, 354
225, 398

242, 254
223, 558

34, 112
35, 132

121, 989
153, 956

2.49
2.53

95, 224
90, 355

26, 040
16, 696

81
96

average
average
average
average
average

.

6100

99

1927
May
June
July
August

_

__

--

September
October
November
December

_
.

1928

.

.

.

September _
October
November
December _

1929

September
October
November
December

205
598
880
920

__

1 Data compiled by the Abrasive Paper and Cloth Manufacturers' Exchange, estimated to represent 90 per cent of the industry. The totals given include the shipments
of garnet, emery, flint, and artificial (silicon, carbide, and aluminous oxide) paper, cloth, and combinations. Figures are stated in equivalent reams 9 by 11 inches in
size. The data submitted show that in 1919 the total shipments were made up of the following approximate percentages: Garnet 39, emery 8, flint 32, and artificial 20
per cent. Details are given in the association's reports.
2 Compiled by the Rope Paper Sack Manufacturers' Association, comprising 15 manufacturers, said to represent approximately 95 per cent of the industry. Rope paper
sacks are bags or sacks made principally of old rope and used for flour, cement, lime, plaster, etc., but the figures presented here include only flour and meal sacks and are
thus on a different basis from those formerly included.
3 Data on production, consumption, and shipments by mills and stocks from the Federal Trade Commission to May, 1923, representing practically complete production;
thereafter compiled from reports of the American Paper and Pulp Association prorated to represent complete production on the following percentages calculated on the
production in the last 7 months of 1923 as compared with the total for that period derived from the Federal Trade Commission reports and the Census of Manufactures:
Mechanical pulp, 65 per cent; chemical pulp, 50 per cent.
4
Imports from the 17. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
6
Price of sulphite domestic wood pulp is
U.
of
 months' average July, 1921, to June, monthly average from notS. Department theLabor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
• 12
1922. Numerical data
furnished by
association.



64

Table 43.—BUILDING COSTS AND HOUSING
BUILDING
MATERIAL
PRICES i
(1st of mo.)
YEAR AND MONTH

Frame
house

Factory
building
costs 2

Brick
house

100

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

av
av
av
av
av
av___
av
av

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly av. _ _
monthly av
monthlv av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

Construction
costs 3

Frame4

Eel. to
1914

Relative to 1913

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

PLUMB- 1 HOUSING
ING FIX- RENTAL
TURES 6 ADVTS.

INDEXES OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS

Relative to 1913

" 100 11 100

100.0

100
100
i

i

Construction
costs 5

88.6
92.6
147.4
181.2
189.2
198.5
251. 3

Wholesale
price,
6 pieces

Minneapolis,
MinnJ

Dollars

ReinBrick, Brick, forced
wood
steel
conframe 4 frame < crete 4

Number

$C7. 58

100

11 99
11 109
11 134
11164
H212
H269

11 10O
H98
11 101
11 122
n 155
H179
n 209
n 257

n 100

11 100
11 103
11 114
11 140
11 171
11 219
H284

11 98
n 102
11 120
n 147
11 171
11 210
H264

99
100
114
152
175
198
247

11 216
11 193
219
218
210
213
214
213

H201
11 185
212
210
202
199
197
197

H207
11 188
210
206
200
201
200
200

200
184
201
202
199
197
200
199

126. 45
119. 84
112. 81
107. C4
104. 27
100. 35

11 Q7

FIRE LOSSES

United
States
and
Canada a

REAL
ESTATE
MARKET
ACTIVITY 10
Canada
only 9

Thous. of dollars

Rel. to
1926

12 1,319

$18, 727
19, C37
15, 236
19, 287
22, 273
28, 413
22 414
27, 571

$2, 196
2,027
1,139
1,707
1,674
2,651
1, 934
2,281

1,886
3,082
3,673
4,788
5, 096
5, ICO
5,020
4,857

27, 721
34, 241
32, 433
31, 4G1
31, 125
32, 751
26, 716
25, 272

2,499
3,646
2,885
2,777
2,548
2,742
1,889
2,023

96.0
104.2
100.0
92.7
87.9

182
207
201
196
195
187
178

186
209
203
197
195
188
183

179
170
202
198
195
197
193
191

201.8
174.5
214.1
215.4
206.7
208.0

206. 8

11 1*96
11 190
209
205
202
204
205
204

1928
September
October
November
December

177
179
177
175

181
184
182
181

191
191
191
190

207.3
207.7
209.5
210.2

204
204
204
204

213
213
213
212

198
197
197
197

201
201
201
201

201
202
202
203

101. 13
100.67
100.79
101. 23

7,930
6, 454
4,886
3,328

17, 183
22, 414
22,588
31,204

1,739
1,795
1,662
1,646

83.8
95.0
89.9
85.6

1929
January
February __
March
April

177
175
176
176

183
180
181
181

190
190
190
190

209.4
210.4
207.8
203.4

204
204
204
204

212
213
213
214

197
197
197
197

201
201
201
201

203
204
204
204

100. 30
98.41
98.51
97.90

2,672
2,395
3,981
5,609

36, 225
26, 872
29, 662
22, 647

2, 664
3,078
2,453
1,972

87.2
88.8
82.3
85.7

177
176
177

182
181
182

190
190

205.2
205.7
204.8
205.9

204
205

214
214

197
198

201
201

203
203
202

98.16
97.54
97.94

5,522
4,453
3,764

21, 637
26, 631
31, 528

2,551
3,079
5,027

88.6
82.3

:

|

May
_
June
July
August.__
September
O ctober
November
December

206.

_

1 Building material price indexes representing the relative cost of building materials entering into the construction of a six-room frame house and a six-room brick house,
from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Standards, Division of Building and Housing, and Bureau of the Census, are based on prices paid for material by contractors in some 60 cities of the United States. The prices are weighted by the relative importance of each commodity in the construction of a six-room house.
2
This index number, furnished through the courtesy of the Aberthaw Construction Co., is designed to show the relative changes in the cost of constructing a standard
concrete factory building. The company believes that the year 1914 gives a normal base and that July, 1920, with an index number of 265, represented the peak of costs.
Beginning with June, 1923, the Morton C. Tuttle Co. has also prepared an index on a similar basis, with practically identical results. These index numbers are given as
of the first day of the month.
3
The construction cost index, computed by the Engineering News Record, is based upon the costs of steel (structural shapes, Pittsburgh base), cement (f. o. b. Chicago
exclusive of bags), lumber (southern pine, New York base), and the rates paid common labor in the steel industry through 1920, after which common labor rates are averages reported from about 20 cities by correspondents of the Engineering News Record. The prices are weighted on the basis of the total production of steel, cement, and
lumber, and the total supply of common labor. Monthly data from 1914 appeared in June, 1923, issue (No. 22), p. 52. These index numbers are given as of the first day
of the month.
4
Compiled by the American Appraisal Company and represent construction costs for each month as based upon material and labor costs prevailing in the United States,
weighted in accordance with cost percentages determined from buildings of each type actually constructed. Details by districts and description of method of compilation
may5 be found in the American Appraisal News for January, 1925, p. 9. Quarterly data, 1920 to 1923, inclusive, appeared in October, 1925, issue of the SURVEY (No. 50), p. 26.
Compiled by the Associated General Contractors of America, combining indexes of wages and materials in the proportion of 40 per cent for wages and 60 per cent for
materials, believed to be the average of all types of construction. The wage figures are those reported for hod carriers and common labor by the National Board of Builders' Exchange fee 12 cities: Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and St. Louis. The
material prices are averages for the same 12 cities as compiled by the Engineering News Record for the following materials: Sand, gravel, crushed stone, Portland cement,
common brick, lumber (all weighted equally), hollow tile (weighted one-half), and structural and reinforcing steel (both together weighted one-half). Monthly figures from
1921 were given in the May, 1927, issue (No. 69), p. 22.
e Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, as an average of reports from 12 manufacturers and dealers of combined net selling prices to
retailers, without freight, on the following competitive fixtures: Bathtub, washstand, water-closet, sink, two-part cement laundry tub, and 30-gallon range boiler, the prices
of each item being given separately on monthly press releases.
7 Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, showing number of advertisements in a Minneapolis newspaper each month of houses and apartments to rent,
both furnished and unfurnished. No effort has been made to eliminate duplications of houses advertised from day to day, and thus the total does not represent actual
number of dwellings for rent, but it does indicate the trend.
s Compiled by the New York Journal of Commerce and include losses of $10,000 or over in the principal cities of the United States, Canada, and Alaska, each month's
figures including an item of 15 per cent to cover small and unreoorted losses. Individual losses are given in the original publication of the figures. Monthly data from
1913 and seasonal index appeared in the December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 53.
9 Compiled by the Monetary Times, from weekly reports, representing property losses only, exclusive of losses due to forest fires. Details by Provinces are shown in
the periodical since 1924. Monthly data from 1909 appeared in the December, 1927, issue of the SURVEY (No. 7f ; ), P- 48.
w Compiled by the National Association of Real Estate Boards, from the number of deeds recorded in 63 cities. The activity of each month of 1926 in taken as the form
of activity for that month.
11 Average of quarterly figures.
12 4 months' average, September to December, inclusive.




65

CONTRACTS AWARDED

CANADA*''

UNITED STATES (36 States) 1

YEAR AND MONTH

Commercial

Industrial

Thous. Thous. Thous.
dolls.
sq. ft.
dolls.

Thous.
sq. ft.

Residential

Thous.
sq. ft.

Thous.
dolls.

Educational

Public
works
and
utilities

Public and
semi public

Thous. Thous. Thous.
dolls.
sq. ft.
sq. ft.

Thous.
dolls.

Total

Total

Thous.
sq. ft.

Thous.
dolls.

Thousands of
dollars

CONSTRUCTION
VOLUME 3

Table 44.—BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

Rel. to
1913
100
97
95
108
91
63
86
47

$38, 882
30, 639

6,262
9,500
10, 669
17, 786
15, 065
12, 564

$10, 435
17, 813
24, 208
47, 085
50, 051
57, 459

20, 927
20,006
13, 864
9,552
22, 218
12, 642

$38, 121
44, 068
32, 346
27, 785
77, 465
51, 669

2,399
2,745

$11, 722
16,903

2,864
2,824

$17, 450
20, 765

$49, 977
56, 374

53, 382
38, 275

$245, 089
240, 677

$32, 013
20, 163
6,993
8,276
7,070
8,320
15, 836
21, 300

6,413
9,363
9,120
9,420
12, 589
11, 791
11, 012
12, 533

31, 803
47, 545
42, 743
49, 695
69, 639
73,342
74, 764
70, 630

3,518
6,448
6,119
4,169
5,623
6,566
5,675
7,628

16, 893
31, 674
36, 932
29, 606
38, 562
58, 426
39, 635
50,217

18, 812
28, 538
32, 562
35, 192
45, 043
41, 577
39, 523
45,694

80, 139
123, 014
144, 541
170, 841
222, 664
214, 944
207, 466
226,259

4,239
5,701
4,641
4,854
4,892
4,351
4,422
5,052

23, 918
29,754
26, 719
30, 620
34, 434
30, f 88
30, 733
32, 208

4,298
4,921
3,912
4,643
5,817
5,512
6,248
5,835

26,268
31, 653
25, 386
32, 728
46, 077
48, 347
53,293
47, 038

45, 719
55, 960
55, 456
60, 326
73, 811
89, 020
100, 938
107, 380

36, 859
54, 552
56, 352
58, 869
74, 955
70, 245
67, 699
77, 560

224, 070
318, 403
331, 776
373, 816
485, 187
508, 583
506, 996
533, 732

20,011
27,654
26, 188
23, 022
24,831
31, 079
34, 913
39, 336

89
135
157
163
177
180
188
197

9,723
11,821
7, 451
9,082

56, 938
77, 726
41, 893
85,286

5,453
5,544
6,382
4,406

48, 052
50, 370
49, 203
27, 938

38,046
45,608
41, 002
38, 747

196, 501
236, 870
207, 308
202, 447

4,114
4,103
4,477
3,582

28, 344
29, 699
30, 642
22,480

6,810
6,393
6,014
4,381

52, 742
48, 555
45, 744
35, 823

123, 254
105, 932
68, 716
90,194

64, 858
73, 765
66, 560
CO, 889

505, 830
549, 152
443, 506
464, 167

32, 788
47, 135
30, 260
36, 682

236
222
215
162

10, 803
9,084
10, 826
13, 896

65, 981
51, 564
69,490
80, 514

4,412
5,384
6,940
10,834

34, 833
31, 716
48,068
83,208

37, 516
42, 548
54, 582
55,281

186,904
232, 574
266, 069
269, 325

3,380
3,071
5,209
5,071

22, 854
18,232
33, 255
31, 829

3,955
4,855
6,385
5,941

30, 287
53,803
49, 454
45,900

69, 676
56, 134
106, 511
113, 746

60, 271
65, 137
84, 266
91, 222

410, 535
444,023
572, 847
624, 523

20,480
25, 875
22, 946
56,346

125
124
137
164

14,316
13, 982
16,835
11, 974

87, 162
90, 914
93, 144
57, 178

6,020
10,523
6,214
8,548

31, 627
57, 464
31, 193
41, 318

56, 655
52, 030
43,093
42, 859

280, 292
250, 818
221, 345
207, 521

6,960
6,978
5,586
5,418

46, 073
43, 787
35, 315
33, 559

6,063
7,192
6,605
6,392

51, 503
56,605
50,380
45, 470

144, 738
124, 636
132, 853
114, 714

91, 693
90,971
78, 778
78, 638

641,395
624, 224
564, 229
499, 760

70, 684
59, 926
38, 360
39, 449

185
244
237
239

11, 442
13, 194
13, 050
10, 992

58, 525
63, 263
65, 469
64, 352

10, 348
9,705
6, 518
6,092

112, 925
61, 170
35, 434
33, 647

38, 744
48, 298
40, 532
36, 191

196, 850
234, 654
194, 028
174, 731

5,651
4,876
4,290
4,136

37, 088
30, 746
28, 719
25, 033

6,278
6,477
5,218
4,661

51, 317
46, 820
40, 079
42,842

115, 808
146, 041
88, 503
75, 199

73, 146
82,906
70, 599
63, 094

572, 513
582, 693
452, 234
415, 803

45, 439
44, 585
29, 038
18,905

266
243
222
182

15, 250
11, 077
12,204
14, 506

98, 644
65, 926
69, 064
73, 527

7,085
7,892
9,342
6,844

60, 439
52, 395
55, 204
67, 515

27, 898
25, 659
39,849
49,908

132, 862
123, 759
190, 146
249, 896

2,631
3,400
6,241
4,627

17, 171
22, 095
36, 992
28, 730

2,863
2,845
5,191
5,070

23, 142
26, 470
44, 843
54,962

61, 811
49, 096
67, 661
148, 543

56, 331
51, 696
73, 849
81, 407

394, 069
339, 739
463, 911
623, 174

41, 963
28, 426
27, 125
43, 328

148
122
116
178

15, 789
13, 353

82, 681
78, 025

10, 325
8,341

79, 915
69, 621

38, 740
36, 227

185, 658
185, 328

6,050
6,349

36,690
41, 745

5,866
5,195

47, 387
39, 324

132, 383
117, 426

77, 586
70, 297

566, 010
532, 069

64, 860
72, 420
57, 941

211
231
218

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average _ _
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average _ . _
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average

10, 897
8,107

1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1 925 monthly average _ _
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average. _ _ _

1937
September
October _
November.
December

f
i
"

1

1928
January
Febiuary
March
April
May
June
July
August

_

September
October
November
December.

_.

1939
January
February _
March
April
May
June. - _ _
July
August

._

_ _ _.

i

September. _
October
November
December

1

1 Compiled by the F. W. Dodge Corporation from reports covering contracts awarded in small towns and rural districts as well as large cities. The data shown on this
page include figures from 36 States, all except Washington, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Wyoming, Nevada, California, Arizona, New Mexico, and parts of Kansas and
Nebraska, comprising about seven-eighths of the total building contracts in the United States. Prior to 1923, figures for Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana,
Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, and Georgia were not compiled, and the totals for those years for 27 States have been prorated to the figures shown above by applying to
the 1923 totals for 36 States the percentage changes from year to year for the 27 States. The original area figures for the years 1915 to 1918, inclusive, used in these calculations, were estimates by the F. W. Dodge Corporation. Data giving monthly figures for 27 States (except that prior to May, 1921, North and South Carolina were not
included, which, however, made little change in the total) for 1920 and 1921 appeared in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), pp. 71 and 73, and for subsequent months in the
August, 1924, issue (No. 36), p. 109. The reports of the F. W. Dodge Corporation show totals by districts and also separate the public and semipublic building group into
various classes, shown separately in the August, 1923, issue (No. 24), pp. 94 to 97, and also present military and naval and miscellaneous classifications, which are here
included only in the grand total.
2 Canadian building contracts furnished by McLean Building Reports (Ltd.)', monthly data from 1920 appeared in July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 46.
3
Compiled by the Associated General Contractors of America to show actual installations in construction as contrasted with contracts let. The index is a simple average
of structural steel bookings, common-brick bookings, Portland cement shipments, loadings of sand, gravel, and stone, shipments of face brick and shipments of enameled
sanitary ware. To allow for lag between the factory and the job, the index computed from these data for a particular month is shown as the construction installation
index for the following month. Monthly data since the beginning of 1921 were given in the May, 1927, issue (No. 69), p. 22.

61139°—29



5

66

Table 45.—DOUGLAS FIR, HEMLOCK, AND REDWOOD LUMBER
NORTHERN
HEMLOCK *

DOUGLAS FIR 1

Produc- Shiption
ments

YEAR AND MONTH

Exports 2
New Unfilled
orders,
orders end mo. Lum- Timber
ber

$9.21
7.92
7.88
10. 38
15.88
18.25

56, 203

349, 510
376, 882
373, 263
380, 351
297, 738

1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average

_ __

298, 506
409, 224
515, 951
497, 747

46,848
23,299
23,240
23,647
22,700
25,095

322, 157
364, 646
355, 358
334, 915

435,673
508, 789
488, 831
543, 966
526, 844
497, 673

558,067
529, 828
489, 839

37, 936
51, 225
43, 165

51,960
50,659

Production

Shipments

28,395

57, 874
57, 159
63, 979

46, 278
45, 402
46, 352

357,604

85,299

61, 971

386, 505
442, 517
468, 492

45, 346
58, 020

44,226
43,423
43,226

35, 327
33, 643
30, 056

29 92
14, 371
31, 479
40, 427

Production

Unfilled
ShipNew orders,
ments orders, end of
month

Thousands of feet, board measure

25.42

37, 602

416, 088
510, 318
509, 871
562, 805
536, 468
494, 763

No.l, Floorcom- ing
mon
Dolls. M ft.
b. m.

Thousands of feet, board measure
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
191 6 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average

Wholesale
price s

CALIFORNIA REDWOODS

27,290

33, 169
37, 974
37, 051
19, 431

11.83 $46.95
15.25 47.24
19.42 51.57
17.25 45.33
17.25 42.18
16.48 38.93
16.29 35.65
16.76 36.71

16, 986

18, 435

23,483
26,059
20,416

26,083
25,351

15.23
15.99
16,08
15.99

34.04
34.04

11,425

33.97

13, 360
18, 089
14, 871

16.70
16.68
16.99
17.75

34.47

22,004

20, 410

35.15
36.13
37.19

18, 426
16, 348

20,449

22,343
18,920
22,661

41.05

15, 315
16, 425
16, 359
14, 172

19, 951
21, 042
17, 139
11, 858

17. 77
18.43
19.15
18.76

44.44
40.85
42.26
42.60

18, 877
14, 802
14, 876
13, 112

9,855
13,020

18.89
18.74
18.77

42.95
42.69
42.73

14, 488
13, 527

21, 166
17, 436
16, 057
16, 437

37,460

28,547

36, 404
44, 243

32, 759
35, 337

39, 618
49, 035

28,441
44,010

53,240

18, 920
18, 082
19, 040
19, 006

48, 136
43, 294
42, 326
40, 610

49, 268
37, 583
38, 785
39, 165
42, 299

16,728

38,265

37,045

7,485
9,520

39,454

28, 745
39, 934
30, 576
29, 472
47, 805
46, 861
38, 129
38, 391

38,344
39, 458

42,371
42,993
37,664

55,030
60,165

38,763
37,299

50,415

44, 714

1928
410, 493
507, 633
508, 528
520, 615

September
October
November
De^Tnhp.r

-

620, 888
508, 976
453, 467
381, 396

516, 714
429, 688
456, 601

71, 427
85, 174

54,181

60, 797
43, 142
45, 471

257,845

59, 236

40,837

315, 144
301, 267
269, 484
272, 618

322, 754
302, 610
269, 484
299, 029

293, 657
297, 686
238, 149
293, 930

64, 265

44, 264
39, 330
47, 598

296,343

403,331
360,804

59,984

304, 401

349, 165
336, 184
371, 548

84,299

280,228
350,508

57, 167

36, 999

331, 707

77,443
65, 953

-

558, 217
583, 733
484, 803
389, 454

316, 039

May
June
July
August

444, 514
541, 206
521, 062
583, 733

296, 343
337, 527
310, 220
299, 029

__

397, 571
479, 879
479, 879
549, 264

490, 175
480, 326
415, 417
358, 566

January
February
March
April

56,238
60,207

95,104
83,966

51, 571

1939
January
February
March
April

May
June
July

_

.

354,537

58,862

65,795
60, 947
59, 193

41,939

23,309

17.32
18.06
17.92
16.38

34.13

38.85
40.61

40.88

13, 255

16,153

9,814
12, 625

30, 201
38, 700
43, 276
. 51, 210 43, 847
38, 489
38, 820

41,400
36,190
30,092

47, 772

41, 137

45, 316
36, 741

48, 000
49, 003
47, 916

43, 983

49, 351
38, 022
31, 620
39, 855

48, 910
45, 093

34,329

33,107

33, 519

47, 916

27, 851

32, 744
38, 715
28, 213

33,115

40,350

38, 848
29, 524

32, 783
32, 379

29,560

30, 944

31,000

34,801
33,431

35, 756

32, 789
43, 797
39, 292

42, 315
36, 307

47, 059
43, 363

37, 898
45, 871

49,507
38,776
35,657

45,062
40,257
47,235

45,834
29,919

38,825
29,615

14,247

48,083

48, 742

16, 262

37, 866

41,507
28,672

28,435

47, 281

46,519

37,686

October
December
i Compiled by applying the percentage figures of actual production, shipments, and orders to normal production of reporting mills as supplied by the West Coast Lumbermen s Association to the actual production of 124 mills for May, 1920. The production in that month was 447,647,540 board feet and has averaged about 75 per cent of the.
total production of Douglas fir lumber in the United States. Monthly production data for the period 1917-1921 appeared in the December, 1922, issue (No. 16), p. 49.
a Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly data from 1921 for both lumber and timber appeared in the.
December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 56. Lumber exports comprise boards, planks, and scantlings, rough and dressed, while timber exports include treated and untreated,
sawed, excluding logs and round timber.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly prices. No. 1 common is given for the State of Washington,
while flooring price is an average for Pacific coast mills, covering 1 by 4, B and better grade, vertical grain. Monthly data on flooring extending back to 1921 appeared in
the November, 1926 issue (No. 63), p. 16.
* Compiled by the Northern Hemlock and Hardwood Manufacturers' Association, representing chiefly Wisconsin and upper Michigan mills, from actual reports of from
60 to 75 mills each month. Yearly averages covering the period 1913-1916 were shown in the August, 1924, issue (No. 36).
B Compiled from data furnished by the California Redwood Association covering 7 identical mills for 1918,1919, and 1920, representing 40 per cent of the capacity of all
listed mills; for the first 4 months of 1921 covering 10 mills representing b&A per cent of listed capacity; for the remaining months of 1921 covering 11 mills representing
71 percent of the total listed capacity; for 1922 to 1924 from 14 mills representing 73 per cent; for 1925 and 1926 from 15 mills representing 79 per cent; and in 1927 from 16
mills representing 83 per cent of the total listed capacity. The actual average monthly production of the 7 reporting mills for 1918 was 14,984,000 feet. On the basis of 40
per cent capacity, the 1918 average monthly production of all mills is computed as 37,460,000 feet. Regarding this as normal production, there has been computed the
probable production of the total redwood capacity based on the proportion which capacity of the reporting mills bears to the total of all mills, and in 1925 this computed
production was about 2 per cent larger than the total reported by the census of manufactures. The other data represent a similar relationship between the actual reported
figures and the total capacity of all mills. Unfilled orders are reported by 14 mills throughout the period, representing 73 per cent of the industry and prorated to 100 per
cent monthly data on this item from 1924 through 1927 being shown in the April, 1928, issue (No. 80), p, 22.




67

Table 46.—YELLOW PINE LUMBER
NORTH CAROLINA PINE '

SOUTHERN PINE 1
3

Production

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average

Operations

Mft.
b. m.

YEAR AND MONTH

P.ct.
full
time

Shipments

New
orders

Stocks,
end of
month

Exports
Unfilled
orders, LumTimend mo. ber
ber

Price,
flooring*
Dolls.
Mft.
b. m.

Thousands of feet, board measure

Production

Shipments

New
orders

Stocks,
end of
month

Thousands of feet, board measure

34, 627 $23. 04
24, 109 21.37
13, 674
20.-29
13, 933 22.64
10, 069
31.54
2,991 33.76
12, 849
55.00
11, 245 74.53

34, 230
33, 514

32, 107
29, 791

423, 529
368, 307
380, 532
358, 031

441, 903
399, 160
379,701
330, 229

446, 405
354, 287
376, 070
306, 559

1, 371, 652
1, 116, 259
937, 748
1, 187, 587

82, 270
52, 325
38, 353
40, 263
27, 369
24, 993
36, 481
53, 096

375, 438
431, 633
450, 165
453, 376
473, 336
447, 857
431, 130
416, 171

394, 812
430, 673
458, 971
459, 483
471, 843
452, 646
427, 991
435, 707

399, 677
451, 395
451, 944
463, 763
474, 291
445, 749
436, 772
434, 292

1, 211, 174
1, 177, 627
1, 086, 042
1, 099, 374
1, 162, 665
1, 106, 661
1, 217, 034
1, 075, 415

302, 881
312, 763
341, 339

36, 061
39, 522
54, 368
55, 827
58, 420
48, 464
59, 212
59, 074

7,228
12, 616
14, 237
14, 563
12, 872
10, 249
15, 178
13, 631

35. 98
45.46
41.70
41.89
46.49
45.11
38.48
36.49

30, 164
52, 543
48, 257
49,144
54, 188
49, 474
51, 154
48, 951

29, 052
52, 496
48, 539
49, 337
51, 558
48, 901
51, 138
50, 392

40, 017
54, 335
54,096

48, 393
67, 795

477, 046
446, 696
442, 920
395, 239

483, 097
453, 811
436, 385
398, 192

1, 193, 268
1, 190, 112
1, 194, 404
1, 207, 534

320, 096
346, 715
305, 164
287, 741

48, 260
48, 561
43, 550
52, 930

16, 775
17, 542
8,925
16, 660

37.49
37.98
36.42
35.54

52,129
57, 295
53, 522
48, 139

52, 234
56,133
50, 813
47,845

46, 900
42, 560
47, 670
44, 660

73, 080
64, 050
81, 060
68, 670

62, 020
55, 790

_

1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average--.
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average.
1928 monthly average.

_

.

92

5

1937
September
October
November
December

_.

_

457, 587
438, 708
439, 773
419, 297

1938
January
February
March
April

_
_ __

418, 717
424, 525
460, 346
421, 911

97
99
100
99

426, 220
417, 652
481, 645
447, 083

473,900
430, 141
498, 006
464,896

1, 200, 031
1, 206, 904
1, 185, 605
1, 160, 433

352, 826
365, 315
381, 676
399, 489

66, 332
47, Oil
66, 527
53, 952

16, 453
17, 235
16, 515
13, 771

35.26
36.12
35.69
35.74

40, 019
51, 317
47, 523
57, 155

37, 030
46, 746
54, 866
62, 978

38, 920
54, 080
52, 010
64, 610

May
June
July
August

440, 306
404, 679
405, 937
425, 493

99
96
88
87

489, 100
416,006
435, 223
468, 672

420, 169
406, 470
434,061
479, 370

1, 101, 740
1, 090, 126
1, 063, 109
1, 019, 050

349, 362
323, 985
335, 836
339, 038

75,054
54, 313
62, 094
43, 287

21, 081
12, 933
12, 302
7,465

35.88
36.40
36.16
36.34

60, 039
57,904
44, 471
45, 437

62, 125
59, 528
48, 433
48, 643

55, 790
59, 360
43, 190
49, 560

September
October
November
December

386, 671
427, 623
396, 256
381, 589

88
90
86
79

423, 218
464, 558
413, 295
345, 816

434, 884
444, 566
392, 674
332, 069

991, 781
954, 846
952, 395
978, 954

340, 875
320, 883
300, 262
286, 515

40,837
75, 504
61, 759
62, 213

14, 897
14,104
7,562
9,249

37.73
37.73
37.58
37.19

37, 457
48,090
51, 198
46, 802

39,900
51, 590
50, 218
42, 651

50, 890
58, 870
58, 310
66, 430

425, 009
373, 118
392, 771
409, 423

87
85
83
88

398,047
357, 918
409, 229
432, 754

417, 700
382, 654
443, 936
408, 793

1,005,916
1, 021, 116
1, 004, 658
981, 327

306, 168
330, 904
365, 611
341, 650

61, 693
57, 815
57, 116
68,289

11, 507
5,580
6,255
10, 261

36.55
36.89
37.55
37.35

45,143
65,506
71, 610
64,841

38, 976
60,347
67,543
57,029

48,440
74, 200
83,300
80, 710

414, 166
369, 971

87
83

409, 616
370, 310

388, 317
343, 106

985, 877
985, 538

320, 351
293, 147

59, 384
59, 263

10, 722
9,311

37.00
37.04
37.27

61,243

65, 954

_

__

.

1939
January.February
March
April .

_

.

May
June _
July
August

September
October
November
December

_

,
i

|

1 The figures for southern yellow pine, except exports and prices, are computed data furnished by the Southern Pine Association. The method of computing is first to
find the percentage relation between the actual production, shipments, and orders of the mills reporting and the normal production of these same mills, or, in the case of
figures after December, 1927, the normal equivalent of the 3-year relative production, on which the association's statistics are now based. This percentage is then applied
to the normal production of the 192 mills. The average production in the first four months of 1916, 484,065,392 feet, is taken as normal production. There are no separate
normals for new orders and shipments since these items must be governed by production. Assuming that the mills reporting are a good sample of the industry the resulting
figures are equivalent to the actual production, shipments, and orders of the 192 identical mills, and hence a fair sample of the industry. The same procedure is followed
for stocks except that normal in this case is 1,262,450,326 feet, the average stocks during 16 months ending April, 1916 and after December, 1927, they are calculated from the
computed data on production, shipments, and previous stocks. Unfilled orders prior to 1928 are computed on the same basis as new orders and thereafter are calculated
from new orders and shipments. The figures are based on actual reports from about 180 mills on production, shipments, and stocks and from about 145 mills on orders.
Monthly data for 1921 and 1922 appeared on page 59 of the October, 1923, issue (No. 26). Monthly data 1917 to 1920 appeared in April, 1923, issue (No. 20), p. 49. Monthly
data on unfilled orders from 1926 appeared in the April, 1928, issue (No. 80), p. 22.
2 Data computed from reports furnished by the North Carolina Pine Association, Inc., for mills varying in number from 31 to 56, by first determining for a given month
the percentage which the actual data bear to the normal production of the identical mills reporting. This percentage is then applied to an arbitrary figure of 70,000,000
board feet, which represents the approximate monthly average normal production of the mills which reported in 1919. The resulting figures represent computed data
as of identical mills for each month. Stock figures are reported by a smaller number of mills, whose figures are first computed to compare with the larger number of
mills on the basis of new orders reported by both sets of mills, and then computed in the same manner as the other data.
3 Exports of southern yellow pine lumber and timber from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly data from 1921 on
lumber only are given in the December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 56. Lumber exports comprise boards, planks, and scantlings, rough and dressed, and exclude short-leaf
pine and all other not long-leaf or pitch pine. Timber exports include both treated and untreated, sawed, and exclude logs and round timber.
« From U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent average weekly prices for yellow-pine flooring, grading B and better, at Hattiesburg, Miss,

c 5 months' average, August to December, inclusive.



68
Table 47.—OTHER PINE LUMBER
WESTERN PINEi

CALIFORNIA WHITE PINE 2

NORTHERN PINE 3
Lumber

YEAR AND MONTH

Produc- Shiption
ments

Stocks,
end of
month

Unfilled
orders, Producend of
tion
month

Shipments

Stocks, New Unfilled
orders,
end of
end of
month orders month

Production

Shipments

Lath
New
orders

Thousands of feet, board measure
1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av _
1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av

109, 357
113, 424
113, 794
134, 467
74, 437
120, 689

110, 423
97,784
109, 032
110, 697
76, 840
128, 606

881, 924
1, 063, 658
857, 812

1923 monthly av
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av
1927 monthly av
1928 monthly av

145, 916
137, 661
150, 988
144, 094
130, 096

129, 140
135, 251
138. 820
148,538
136, 328

69, 113
80,234
117, 722
154, 742

31,900
37,284
36, 037
29, 114
45, 784

265, 113
287, 645
267, 276
370, 303
382, 216

40, 273
34, 204
44, 512

50, 139
27, 768
48, 357

914, 376
1, 033, 833
983, 967
1, 136, 101
1, 061, 429

101, 876
96,061
116, 576
102, 694
90,983
102, 289

61, 972
76, 765
106, 570
95, 804
92, 308
100, 282

494, 177
568, 840
567, 021
601, 215
575, 181
533, 175

91, 932
84, 414
88, 693

159, 663
178, 805
183, 244

47, 739
42, 959
46, 599
40, 687
40, 537
41, 441

114, 579
117, 193
143, 711
156, 237

1, 069, 835
1, 036, 454
1,014,062
1, 056, 021

50, 161
40,062
40, 461
52, 668

72, 082
71, 459
96,590
92, 519

591, 017
560. 748
522, 422
477, 411

70, 402
81,203
90,806
100, 179

145, 462
176, 797
181, 585
151, 418

160, 121
172, 088
156, 524
169, 338

146, 741
144, 557
132, 122
150, 979

1, 027, 541
1,050,042
1, 073, 739
1, 095. 370

106, 389
131, 713
125, 098
142, 196

99, 988
102, 571
96,305
107, 248

482, 405
551, 687
567, 809
603, 451

93, 777
91,290
81, 275
86, 322

September
October
November
December..

145, 101
134, 691
118, 704
82, 773

150, 768
153, 019
124, 083
101, 947

1, 089, 500
1, 069, 825
1, 068, 630
1, 086, 130

133, 659
109, 490
92, 289
67, 617

104, 699
111, 508
82, 168
70, 563

629,284
623, 671
624, 651
667, 618

1938
January
February
March
April

48, 843
74, 843
139, 087
155, 995

109,273
121, 504
151, 903
147, 406

889, 525
880, 228
585, 478
589,040

90,042
106, 554
119, 656
121, 881

46, 736
44, 698
69, 724
97, 096

79,796
87, 810
100, 792
98, 924

May
June
July
August

162,986
163, 399
190, 727
175, 978

162, 616
169, 719
166, 087
182,662

882,558
419, 573
833, 576
905, 298

100, 543
119, 473
118, 791
113, 660

134, 273
133, 064
123, 923
145, 491

May
June
July
August

_

_

September
October
November
December
1929
January
Februarv
March
_
April
May
June
July
August

Shipments

Thousands

52, 561
48, 263
58,368
39, 110
66, 387

1927
January
February
March
April

Production

49, 033

9,581
8,669
12, 574

6,357
9, 8S1
11, 097

44, 063
44, 621
45, 204
45, 163
37, 643
41, 234

38, 423
44,406
41, 127
41, 110
34, 262
37, 582

13,290
10, 825
12, 110
10, 527
9,908
8,782

12, 292
11, 796
9,550
10, 735
9,998
8,104

32, 493
35,127
31, 109
42, 302

30,557
33, 603
38, 777
41, 353

29,184
32 393
33,908
44, 555

7,251
7,338
6,532
9,866

6,261
7,795
7,875
9, 675

148, 161
186, 405
182, 648
181, 262

47, 379
55,502
46, 359
51,054

43, 401
45,188
40,433
42,501

44, 451
35, 045
39,203
36,884

13, 194
15, 722
13,090
14, 272

13, 634
14, 758
15,229
15, 612

90,886
97,683
70, 343
58,797

187, 878
189, 947
222, 259
191, 837

46, 852
41, 148
32, 815
24,300

39, 195
39, 175
32, 857
24,680

32, 098
33, 698
27, 569
22, 156

11, 979
9,034
6,144
4,472

11, 819
7,941
5,377
3,994

609, 181
566,957
534,740
493, 696

65.307
79, 981
92, 677
83,965

191, 837
176, 156
175, 700
167, 582

33, 550
34, 513
32, 731
36, 412

29,451
35, 413
39,645
37, 914

32, 703
36, 470
38, 856
35, 926

7,315
5,726
5,143
6,184

5,300
5,609
9,593
5,927

107, 267
107, 019
105, 482
118, 310

473, 560
477, 079
506, 119
516, 764

102, 659
89,802
96, 433
102, 805

164, 921
183, 610
190, 185
181, 014

45, 687
51, 756
52, 384
57, 335

44, 152
47, 243
48,300
47, 755

35, 974
47, 018
41, 820
41, 435

9,967
11, 706
13, 476
12, 318

9,316
11, 151
9,734
11, 099

122, 708
126, 086
107, 501
76,164

105, 246
119, 074
94, 587
79, 072

538, 136
552, 422
562, 528
566, 914

86, 716
100,760
81, 755
81, 452

188, 747
183, 493
181, 665
214, 016

51, 618
55, 031
26, 718
19, 679

44, 618
51, 378
41, 308
27,632

44, 209
41, 109
30, 282
25, 179

12, 419
11, 777
5,230
4,118

8,897
8, 937
6,560
5,121

69, 930
44, 382
67, 401
87, 238

100,633
97, 671
102, 908
106, 018

535, 998
483, 998
437, 089
427,396

95, 905
84, 890
95,848
101, 387

176, 506
168, 766
161,865
195, 268

23, 818
22, 054
22,654
42, 363

33, 167
32, 302
40, 159
44,043

35, 363
29, 398
39, 732
44, 379

4,692
2,986
2,938
7,722

6,952
5,185
7,316
8,003

127, 672
118, 422

109, 599
98, 779

442, 929
463, 175

105, 597
105, 832

143, 950
156, 475

56, 031
50, 537
50, 733

47,541
44, 197
44, 825

37, 478
37, 142
40, 012

10,001
6,818
8,822

9,632
10, 256
10, 083

September
October
November
December ..
1 Compiled by the Western Pine Manufacturers' Association, the actual data being computed to comparative bases through percentages of normal production for the
mills reporting in each period. The normal monthly production covers 54 mills with output of 148,000,000 board feet in the earlier years, gradually reduced to 42 mills with
normal output of 136,800,000 feet in 1925, and is estimated to represent 70 per cent of the output of the western pine territory through 1925 and thereafter 74 per cent, owing
to the decrease of the total number of mills in business. Beginning with 1928, several mills which withdrew from the association reported directly to the Bureau of the
Census, their figures being combined with those of the association to obtain comparable totals. Monthly data covering the period 1917-1921 appeared in the April, 1923,
issue (No. 20), p. 49, while for unfilled orders monthly data from 1920 through 1927 appeared in the April, 1928, issue (No. 80), p. 22.
2
Compiled by the California White and Sugar Pine Association from reports of from 13 to 26 mills prior to 1926; thereafter from 18 identical mills, except for stocks,
which are by a varying number of mills.
3 Compiled by the Northern Pine Manufacturers' Association, and includes reports from both member and nonmember mills located chiefly in Minnesota. The number
 has gradually declined from about 20 mills in 1920 to about 13 in 1928. Monthly data on production and shipments from 1920 appeared in the September, 1922,
of mills
issue (No.
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ 13), p. 48.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

69
Table 48.—HARDWOODS
OAKi

Total Unsold

Stocks,

end of

month

To- Untal sold

Stocks,

end of

month

To- Untal sold

WALNUT i
Unfilled orders,
end of month

Stocks, end
of month

Unfilled orders,
end of month

GUMi
Unfilled orders,
end of month

New orders

Shipments

YEAR AND
MONTH

Production

TOTAL i

Millions of feet, board measure

1922 mo.
1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.
1927 mo.
1928 mo.

av
av
av
av
av
av
av

3296 3314 3341
361 332 340
330 308 316
268 276 285

1927
January
February
March
April__

345
345
341

3 2, 639
2,765
2,566
2,609
2,801

3

2, 058 3557
2,233 513
1,985 552
2,045
564
2,234
566

3501
521
446
436
536

3

Lumber 2

Production

Logs

Made
into Stocks
UnShip- Stocks New
Puron
on
filled chases lumber
ments hand orders orders
and hand
veneer

Thousands of feet, board measure

385
413
333
324
405

3115

103
108
112
131

3933 3732 3186
900 724 169
853 658 188
941 753 188
981 816 164

1,807
2,538
3,529
3,830
2,763
2,962
2,876

1,927
2,391
3,144
3,477
3,220
2,897
3,005

10, 214
8,153 3 2, 111
11, 463
3,359
3,352
19, 282
3,125
15, 552
2,899
11, 578
3,071
12, 868

3

M feet, log measure

4, 207
5,652
7,332
7,500
7,388
5,210

1,460
2,410
2,641
2,958
2,511
2,939
2,444

1,327
2,114
2,727
3,011
2,438
2,645
2,557

2,087
3,282
3,106
4,158
2,069
2,918
2,784

255

315
353
345
319

338
375
353
334

2,738
2,690
2,648
2,524

2,129
2,068
2,032
1,940

609
621
616
582

452
444
432
382

320
315
306
280

132
129
126
113

936
957
941
930

776
762
748
732

160
194
193
200

2,417
2,606
3,319
2,547

2,809
3,303
3,115
2,745

11, 810
11, 103
11, 291
11, 093

3,621
2,564
3,736
2,978

7,591
7,574
7,279
8,243

2,441
2,117
2,858
2,285

2,088
2,361
2,738
2,176

2,260
1,927
2,047
1,918

May
June
July
August

240
285
315
386

334
300
274
296

330
255
266
319

2,428
2,381
2,465
2,557

1,876
1,858
1,949
2,014

550
524
517
543

379
387
414
427

276
290
320
329

103
97
93
98

876
856
886
939

683
673
694
737

193
183
193
202

2,717
3,127
2,967
3,314

2,884
2,987
2,661
3,127

10, 915
11, 063
11, 436
11, 498

3,042
2,654
3,060
2,461

8,114
8,061
8,249
7,522

3,440
3,184
3,083
3,308

2,476
2,883
2,583
2,937

2,882
3,083
3,316
3,687

September
October __
November
December

398
383
360
308

308
311
289
259

319
326
296
285

2,610
2,664
2,761
2,843

2,090
2,126
2,190
2,265

520
537
573
579

447
461
479
514

346
351
364
385

963
100
110
975
114 1,006
129 1,022

791
794
809
839

173
181
197
183

3,000
2,921
3,234
3,376

2,798
2,967
2,824
2,548

11, 796
11, 739
12, 149
13, 037

3,046
2,335
3,127
2,158

7,364
6,982
6,282
5,395

3,773
2,549
3,515
2,709

2,995
2,814
3,035
2,656

3,465
3,166
3,646
3,615

1938
January
February
March
April

315
270
274
252

296
266
263
251

330
285
266
263

2, 954
2,862
2,829
2,839

2,331
2,282
2,294
2,319

624
581
535
520

543
529
535
547

400
402
414
428

143
127
120
119

1,051
1,030
1,014
1,020

865
849
864
871

186
181
150
149

3,063
2,585
3,268
2,955

2,687
2,762
3,042
2,646

13, 264
13, 179
13, 327
13, 635

2,628
2,807
2,835
2,652

5,389
5,491
4,613
4,491

2,255
2,131
2,185
2,402

2,416
2,014
2,407
2,678

3,041
3,229
2,951
2,806

May
June
July
August

244
236
244
263

255
248
263
285

244
263
262
289

2,843
2,817
2,786
2,771

2,305
2,289
2,225
2,211

538
528
547
557

540
555
542
543

420
424
419
410

123 1,005
130 1,000
124
974
132
959

844
854
809
800

162
146
1C5
159

2,894
3,422
2,527
2,931

3,388
3,000
2,742
2,863

13, 264
13, 530
13,116
13, 166

4, 180
2,538
2,731
2,990

5,540
5,216
5,088
5,270

2,972
2,519
2,633
2,736

2,769
2,670
2,527
2,579

3,009
2,752
2, 99€
3, 058

September
October
November
December

270
285
289
274

293
315
308
263

293
323
323
274

2,731
2,722
2,696
2,757

2,164
2,132
2,107
2,142

566
589
589
615

529
532
518
517

396
398
376
372

133
134
142
145

954
918
907
938

775
746
741
768

161
171
166
170

2,749
2,857
2,806
2,460

3,299
3,419
3,478
2,734

12, 625
12, 249
11, 668
11, 396

2, 635
4, 174
3,033
3, 649

4,741
5,483
5,117
6,082

2,274
2,702
2,504
2,014

2,643
2,606
2,888
2,489

2,684
2, 636
2,359
1,884

1929
January
February
March
April

308
319
315
319

293
319
341
330

319
334
334
323

2,717
2,707
2,672
2,670

2,102
2,057
2,024
1,982

615
651
648
648

516
504
489
468

369
344
332
318

147
160
157
151

919
930
914
909

751
757
751
739

167
173
163
170

2,974
2,780
2,993
3,724

3,163
3,433
3,926
4,003

12, 305
11,654
10, 711
10,544

3,307
3,662
4,104
4,078

5,664
5,833
6,804
7,126

2,285
2, 021
2,213
2,899

2,538
2,126
2,539
2,799

1,557
1,261
1,048
1,152

296

293

311

2,638

2,015

617

464

328

136

918

748

169

4,508
4,532

3,823
3,699

11, 970
12,960

4,120
3,625

7,563
7,636

3,735
3,711

3,005
3,241

1,897
2,253

May
June
July.
August
September
October
November
December.

i Compiled by Hardwood Manufacturers' Institute. Data on production, shipments, and new orders are computed by taking the percentage relation of the actual production, shipments, and new orders of the mills reporting, and the normal production of these same mills and applying this per cent to the normal production of 375,000,000
feet, which represents the approximate monthly average production of the mills in the Southern and Appalachian districts. For stock and unfilled orders the average per
operating unit for the mills reporting is applied to a fixed number of 700 operating units. The 700 units were arrived at by taking the annual production of 1926, approximately 6,500,000,000 feet, and dividing by 8,736,000 feet, the figures used in determining an operating unit for the mills reporting. The resulting figures represent computed
data for the entire country. For gum the fixed number of operating units is 400. Detailed data as to size, species, grades, etc., are given in the regular reports of the
Institute.
2
Compiled by American Walnut Manufacturers' Association from reports of identical firms representing from 50 to 60 per cent of the walnut lumber industry, Monthly
data3 on new orders and unfilled orders since July, 1923, were given in the April, 1927, issue (No. 68), p. 25.
6 months' average, July through December.




70

Table 49.—TOTAL LUMBER AND FLOORING
Retail yards
10th Fed. Res.
Dist.6

Retail yards,
9th Fed. 5Res.
Dist.
YEAR AND
MONTH

Produc- Exports 4
tion 3

Pro- Ship- Stocks, New Unfilled' Proorders
duc- ments end of orders end of ducmonth
month tion
Stocks, tion
Sales end
mo.

Stocks
end
mo.

Sales

OAK FLOORING 2

MAPLE FLOORING i

LUMBER— ALL SPECIES

Ship- Stocks, New
end of
ments month orders

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month

Thousands of feet, board measure
1909-13 m. a...
1913 mo. av
1914 mo. a v _ _ _
1915 mo. av.__
1916 mo. av._.
1917 mo. a v _ _ _
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. a v _ _ .
1920 mo. av._.

2, 197, 334
2, 102, 537
2, 086, 531
2, 262, 175
2, 141, 144
1, 874, 419
2, 069, 522
2, 002, 193

178, 398
216, 037
149, 146
93, 947
91, 208
84,971
85, 314
109, 268 7 30, 995 8 215, 564
16, 786
203, 175
129, 280

10,039
10,383

11, 848
8,259

15, 448
15,963

14,163
5,106

1921 mo. a v _ _ .
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. a v _ _ _
1924 mo. av.__
1925 mo. a v _ _ _
1926 mo. a v _ _ _
1927 mo. a v _ _ _
1928 mo. av._.

1, 762, 263
2, 255, 034
2, 504, 591
2, 418, 867
2, 623, 901
2, 468, 403
2, 325, 804
2, 175, 360

100, 401
127, 743
146, 071
161, 500
161, 687
161, 714
179, 943
193, 640

13, 838
15,496
14, 651
13, 403
17, 187
13,688
11,117
12, 355

153, 155
126, 744
127, 719
111, 606 86,544 8 47, 216
111,258
7,158
47, 173
95,002
7,037
45, 611
89, 587
5,860
43, 775
85, 748
5, 667
45, 020

8,378
11, 479
11, 734
8,603
8,828
9,618
9,563
7,867

8,121
11, 934
11,805
7,865
8,428
9,983
9,163
7,760

30, 749
28,040
21, 268
23,880
26, 979
28, 180
27,633
25,535

1927
September
October _
November
December

2,487,728
2, 374, 881
2, 280, 430
2, 079, 342

188, 579
171, 074
167, 986
168, 289

14, 122
15,961
12,990
4,624

85, 970
80, 080
75, 271
76, 410

5,978
6,467
6,719
4,224

44,396
43, 114
41, 176
42, 394

9,907
9, 546
8,073
7,820

9,532
7,913
6,884
6,545

±928
January
February
March
April

2, 002, 727
2, 225, 060
2,446,356
2, 392, 894

239, 145
158,909
186, 541
179, 352

4,764
4,346
7,022
9,438

84,686
89,704
91,428
93,983

4,763
4,864
6,317
5,802

41, 842
46, 033
48,095
45, 919

7,346
7,519
7,862
7,331

May
June
July
August

2,474,885
2, 331, 672
2, 204, 457
2, 206, 862

223, 649
220, 961
185, 368
162, 221

14,323
17, 591
15, 937
17,632

92,064
88, 360
87, 345
86, 807

6,199
5,200
5,679
6,141

44,758
45,540
44, 874
45, 326

September
October
November
December

1, 927, 716
2, 114, 273
1, 991, 913
1, 785, 505

170, 457
204, 979
184, 054
208, 045

17, 860
18, 242
13, 302
7,807

84,984
81, 035
75, 810
72, 771

6,497
7,008
5,494
4,035

1929
January __
February
March
April

1, 973, 102
1, 875, 385
2,127,346
2, 170, 685

240, 384
177, 682
200,790
201, 858

5,489
3,285
6,564
11, 076

79, 400
86,453
88, 605
89, 615

2, 343, 572
2, 191, 008

220, 153
211,952

14, 111
17, 248

90,474
86, 900

May
June _
July
August
September
October
November
December

38, 289
26,723

4,572
6,675
7,464
9,205
11,563
11. 120
4,858
10, 101
10, 745

4,572
6,009
6,877
8,894
11, 470
10, 446
5,537
11, 070
7,800

12, 171
10, 544
15, 877
17, 158
22, 489
25, 652
25, 680
14, 431
25, 859

4,719
6,104
7,419
9,525
11,429
8,956
4,781
11, 782
6,343

6,290
7,285
7,578
7,547
16, 124
20, 074
7,270
15, 035
11, 324

8,991
12,194
11, 085
8,085
8,360
7,722
8,696
7,480

10, 176
20, 311
26,804
12, 347
10, 117
9,334
11, 920
9,529

12, 411
22, 877
30, 103
34, 843
45, 808
47,953
43,833
44, 286

13, 59fi
23, 945
28, 878
35,306
45, 342
45, 024
42, 756
44, 251

32, 875
23,006
33,609
43, 773
47, 104
58,293
75, 227
76, 230

14,058
23, 723
28, 313
35,900
44, 785
44, 362
42, 203
44, 464

12,003
33, 052
44, 258
46,562
52, 031
42, 206
41, 606
45, 493

25,002
25, 825
27, 149
29, 115

7,488
7,130
5,954
6,654

9,459
7,997
7,650
8,508

46, 105
45, 292
40, 195
38,548

44, 471
45, 091
37, 343
35, 074

76, 616
77, 438
79, 899
74, 773

43, 888
42, 563
37, 977
40, 496

29, 490
26, 329
27, 965
27, 887

7,252
6,889
8,184
7,545

28, 721
29, 118
28, 036
28, 326

8,161
7,712
7,211
7,036

9,154
10, 034
9,816
9,963

35, 947
38, 771
42,272
42, 924

38,080
40,232
47,599
46, 105

82, 239
82, 758
78, 855
77, 491

53, 888
36,163
48, 815
46, 071

45, 925
42, 975
47,134
48,004

7,070
7,608
7,784
8,413

8,256
8,686
8,311
9,515

27, 514
26, 271
24, 667
23, 232

9,197
7,867
7,466
8,851

11,423
10,500
10, 076
10, 187

47, 785
44, 444
46,065
51, 529

50,256
49, 475
47,832
51,860

75, 948
71, 425
68, 851
67,864

50, 295
48, 873
45, 972
49, 427

48, 681
49,002
49, 912
47, 026

45, 529
45, 362
42, 505
44, 458

7,675
8,204
8,721
8,866

7,929
8,543
6,230
5,784

22, 554
21, 352
21, 9GO
24, 674

7,110
7,230
6,537
5,382

10,106
7,940
7,157
7,988

45, 926
51, 225
45, 794
38, 747

45, 020
45, 652
37, 232
31, 665

68, 456
72, 689
80, 331
87, 856

43, 141
38, 132
43, 753
29, 033

47,099
41, 151
48, 052
30, 956

4,333
3,411
6,622
7,276

45,364
46, 217
47,564
48, 447

7,771
7,022
6,794
5,759

5,114
6,053
6,141
7,583

24, 733
25, 466
25, 494
24, 443

5,999
8,317
6,604
8,616

8,019
10,443
11, 106
13, 337

41,204
24, 865
28, 497
36, 578

31,999
28, 551
40,902
41,837

97,000
91, 987
80,603
75, 744

29,736
31, 761
52,642
40, 244

44,626
45,666
54,644
68, 925

6,682
5,421

48, 038
47, 688

5,625
5,418

6,848
6,420

22, 230
20,964

6,336
3,822

13,104
10,600

41,353

41,558

74, 013

33,909

57,496

i

i

1
i

!

'
i

* Data on maple flooring (including also birch and beech) are compiled by the Maple Flooring Manufacturers' Association, said to represent about 70 per cent of the industry. The data for the period 191971922 include reports from 20 identical mills; in 1923, 21 mills; in 1924, 18 mills; in 1925, 19 mills; in 1926 and 1927, from 20 to 22 mills.
Monthly data from 1920 appeared in July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p 43.
2
Compiled by the Oak Flooring Manufacturers' Association from reports of from 25 to 54 mills, said to represent about 90 per cent of the total oak-flooring industry.
The 3large increase in reporting mills is due to many firms starting to make oak flooring in 1927. Monthly data from 1912 appeared in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 36.
Figures in this column represent the total cut of 10 species of lumber—yellow pine, Douglas fir, hemlock, western pine, redwood, maple, birch, beech, white fir, and
sugar pine—representing over 70 per cent of the total cut of lumber in the United States. Annual figures for 1913 and 1914 are from actual reports to the U. S. Department
of Agriculture, Forest Service, and from 1915 through 1920 are computed on the basis of actual reports to the Forest Service. Monthly figures for 1920 are obtained by prorating the cut of each species as reported by the associations whose figures are carried on these columns to the Forest Service total. For subsequent months prorating is done
on an approximate average for the years 1917 to 1920.
4
Exports consisting of boards, planks, and scantlings are from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
s Data compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Stocks represent the inventories of 19 companies retailing lumber through 588 yards in the ninth Federal
reserve district; sales represent the total retail business reported by 21 companies operating 625 yards. Data for 1919 were estimated for a few companies on the basis of the
correlation of reporting companies of 1919 and 1920. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in October, 1923, issue (No. 26), p. 59.
e Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City from reports of approximately 199 retail yards in the tenth Federal reserve district.
7
8
7 months' average, June to December, inclusive.
6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

71

Table 50.—FURNITURE AND MISCELLANEOUS HARDWOODS
PIANO BENCHES AND
STOOLS 2

$32,000
35,000
20, 000
29,000
35, 625
43, 025
50, 584
55, 478
54,650
52, 232

$74,000
72,000
20,000
22,000
53, 493
53, 919
55, 414
60, 789
48, 576
44, 625

$13, 281
11,317
7,125
9,773
13, 767
11, 658
12, 288
11, 386
8, 985
7,091

$17, 225
13, 160
4,433
6,960
11, 709
5,034
4,308
4,043
2,870
2,097

1937
May. _ - _June
July
August

48, 838
45, 812
44, 570
64, 153

33, 485
32, 178
60, COS
64, 655

7,011
6,507
6,273
9,597

1,972
1, 578
1,517
2,773

6,976
6,860
6,322
8,342

September
October
November
December

69, 344
68, 541
61, 177
39, 493

70, 268
54, 717
37, 546
29, 888

10, 988
14, 395
12, 291
7,784

3,884
5,331
4,883
1,803

1928
January
February
March
April

41, 335
55, 311
57, 106
44, 347

51, 033
46, 102
31, 939
25, 439

7, 043
7,556
6,818
5,626

43, 203
39, 214
43, 462
65, 947

27, 763
30, 858
59, 214
57, 288

65, 010
70, 030
59, 855
41, 962

58, 576
50, 266
51, 136
45, 885

51, 553
56, 778
64, 527
57, 081
57, 605
47, 831

May
June
_
July
August

September..
October
November
December

_

__

1939
January.
February
March
April
May
June
July
August..

September
October
November
December

Number days'
production

Number
of pieces

Value average per firm, dollars

1919 monthly av
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av
1927 monthly av
1928 monthly av

$12, 424
11, 357 6 12, 465
6,427 10, 149
9,168
13, 689
13, 719
16, 540
11, 743
13, 969
12, 318
14, 979
11, 167
13, 829
8,848 11,417
7,048
8,577

Plant
operations

11
!»
S*
g«

end
of nio. Value Quantity

Cancellations

New
orders

Unfilled
orders,

Shipments

Shipments
Unfilled
Ship- orders,
end
ments
of mo.

YEAR AND MONTH

Outstanding
accounts,
end of mo.

FURNITURE— GRAND RAPIDS
DISTRICT 3

New orders

HOUSEHOLD
FURNITURESOUTHEASTERN DISTRICT i

LOWER MICHIGAN
NORTHERN
HARD WOODS «
HARDWOODS4

Production

No. Per ct. Per ct.
days' new
full
sales orders time

Production

Shipments

Ship- Stocks,
end of
ments month

M feet, board measure

758 715.0
57
11.3
11.2
57
13.5
53
13.5
53
55
9.2

797.3
96.8
97.5
100.0
97.2
94.9

32, 732
34,206
27, 838
26,500
37, 397
33, 352
34, 404
29, 981
28, 936
29, 780

44
43
50
55

10.0
7.5
10.5
9.0

95.0
96.5
89.0
98.0

28, 691
27 939
21, 879
27, 077

26, 919
29, 825
28, 347
29, 750

7,683
7, 337
6,006
4,893

8,091
8,789
8, 552
7,507

46, 375
44, 656
43, 046
40, 552

29
30
28
23

58
58
59
55

7.5
11.0
13.0
32.0

99.0
100.0
99.0
99.0

18, 536
15, 488
15, 469
20, 707

26, 475
27, 623
24, 556
19, 269

4,257
5,388
5,124
4,996

7,055
7,348
6,344
5,895

35, 491
33, 532
21, 350
30, 902

40
23
20
19

23
25
25
20

55
54
53
47

7.0
13.0
7.0
12.0

95.0
94.0
92.0
90.0

37, 543
41, 185
44, 948
38,404

24, 164
26, 512
29, 373
28, 491

7,934
9,188
9,193
8,625

8,147
7,541
6,078
6,548

30, 821
30, 626
30, 870
30, 925

39
46
54
53

32
27
31
30

20
17
22
31

46
44
48
56

7.0
10.0
5.0
7.0

90.0
95.0
88.0
92.0

33, 193
28,705
23, 673
20, 073

28, 827
28, 498
26,194
27, 597

9,116
7,049
5,438
5,502

7,277
6,683
7,252
7,349

29, 784
23, 610
20, 605
23, 509

49
38
50
39

31
31
50
18

30
37
35
26

65
65
65
59

9.0
10.0
6.0
17.0

101.0
103.0
100.0
99.0

16, 624
16, 727
21, 642
34, 639

25, 086
31, 473
30, 646
23, 562

4,915
4,411
5,541
6,257

6,467
6,137
7,280
5,695

20, 915
19, 434
23, 206
23, 502

58, 756
51, 676
40, 469
32, 776

40
36
37
34

24
23
27
18

24
23
24
19

56
52
49
42

10.0
9.0
6.0
14.0

97.0
95.0
93.0
94.0

37, 916
44,370
42, 865
29, 755

29,093
30, 515
32, 605
26,755

5,456
6,237
6,795
5,961

4,950
6,223
6,732
5,053

27, 126
26, 912
27, 443
28, 286

38, 713
36, 232

60
58

49
20

23
22

43
44

4.0
11.0

89.0
88.0

30,885
31, 348

23, 818
24, 444

5,825

5, 734

28, 467

763
58
62
64
46
43

724
27
28
30
28
29

725
25
27
27
24
26

8,900
8,596
8,191
10, 879

42
53
55
53

29
29
25
25

17
17
23
27

9,863
12, 935
12, 667
10, 338

12, 469
17, 401
16, 661
13, 072

50
41
45
29

30
24
35
13

2,851
2,076
1,978
1,650

5,918
7,647
6,933
5,955

7,617
9,781
9,104
7,694

44
42
34
30

6,581
5,145
4, 662
6,396

2, 094
1,372
1,183
2,323

6,136
5,812
4,914
5,251

7,958
7,414
6,223
6,020

9,508
9,929
7,812
8,014

3,012
3,178
2,385
1,066

8,343
9,760
8,594
9,315

9,826
10, 972
9,790
10, 519

33, 328
27, 509
19, 067
34, 204
38, 852
28, 533
29, 202
29, 371
27, 425
27, 535

7,765
6,695
6,931

7,504
7,504
6,871

48, 183
38, 151
25, 651

I
|

_

!

"

I
j

"

!

1

Compiled by the Southern Furniture Manufacturers' Association and represents average shipments and unfilled orders per firm from 42 to 58 firms. The firms reporting
are located in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia and represent approximately one-third of the production of these States. The reporting firms
manufacture large bedroom furniture, dining-room furniture, and chairs.
2 Compiled by the National Association of Piano Bench and Stool Manufacturers from concerns estimated to cover about 80 per cent of this industry. Reports are from
hip-

s Compiled by Seidman & ~Seidmanlrom reports o?representative manufacturers of furnttureliTthVGTfm^
reporting each month, the figures have been shown in number of days' production or sales, based on current ratios, or as percentages. The original data are based on value.
Monthly data from June, 1923, appeared in the June, 1926, issue (No. 58), p. 24.
4
Data from Northern Hemlock and Hardwood Manufacturers' Association, representing chiefly Wisconsin and upper Michigan mills. These figures represent actual
reports from 60 to 75 mills each month. The hardwoods cut are mostly maple, birch, and beech. Annual averages from 1913 through 1918 appeared in the February, 1926,
issue (No. 54), p. 65.
e Compiled by the Lower Michigan Lumber Manufacturers from reports of from 11 to 13 mills operating in lower Michigan, except for November, 1925, when only 8 mills
reported. In many instances, fewer firms report on stocks than on the other items. About half of the hardwoods reported consist of maple.
6 6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.
7
7 months' average, June to December, inclusive.




72
Table 51.—LUMBER PRODUCTS
PLYWOOD
Douglas Fir Plywood
YEAR AND MONTH

Shipments

Production

New
orders
(sales)

1

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month

Other Plywood 2

Stocks, New
end of
month orders

Shipments

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average _
monthly average

1928
January _
February __ _ _ _ _
March
April

Purchases

Production

Stocks,
end of
month

Shipments
Dozens

7 10, 043

8 7, 169

8 7, 584

__ .

-

« 4, 463
3,595
2,876
3,428

« 4, 695
3,905
2,913
3,049

c 5, 781
4,646
3,303
4,387

e 192
98
185

192
97
206

226, 278
180, 976

213, 507
186, 218

435, 709
494, 322

2,469
2,450
2,709
2,450

7 9, 615

7 9, 922

May
June __
July
August

Receipts

BUSHEL BASKETS <

Number of
carloads

Thousands of square feet surface
1925
1926
1927
1928

ROTARYCUT
VENEER 3

2,575
2,896
3,125
2,680

2,863
2,808
3,807
2,582

80
97
91
173

132
115
173
185

95, 832
231, 987
205, 887
186, 244

58,896
189, 632
193, 910
152,876

406, 694
449, 049
461, 026
537, 033

7,284
7,251
7,358

3,350
3,237
2,920
4,239

2,578
2,713
2,523
2,961

3,154
3,504
3,918
5,131

165
164
181
259

229
244
249
325

261, 355
188, 021
229, 342
243, 056

198, 592
254, 432
294, 662
262, 810

609, 882
602, 083
565, 911
570, 726

8,218
11,094

.

8,782
11, 030

9, 426
13, 079
9,291
8,426

9,257
12,003
9,135
7,921

10, 245
12, 654
8,336
9,212

7,715
6, 628
5,307
6,863

7,309
7,704
7,747
8,433

3,381
4,411
5,773
3,749

3,177
4,235
4,147
2,973

5,469
5,817
6,778
6,811

244
337
222
206

199
255
190
178

177, 982
156, 521
114, 184
81, 302

285, 813
156, 407
75, 337
111,244

409, 110
420, 671
464, 733
434, 942

12, 743
10, 244
11, 823
11, 655

September.
October
November
December

8,387
10, 988

8,156
7,494
8,024

13,530
11, 366
13, 295
11,406

16, 030
13, 357
204529
14,084

9,001
10,606
16, 904
19, 105

7,316
6,194
4,722
5,306

3,426
5,339
5,428
5,953

3,746
4,277
4,876
4,067

5,791
6,190
6,053
7,237

175
140
143
307

241
186
451
256

135,090
134, 581
187, 881
224, 835

126, 602
68, 655
140, 205
149, 055

331, 992
394, 452
480, 769
565, 598

15, 652
13, 169
15, 567

15,906
12, 778
14, 113

14, 342
10, 525
12, 149

17, 222
14, 120
12, 308

5,185
5,702
7,158

5,369
6,135

3,447
4,234

8,040
9,724

220
169
272

157
181
260

244, 782
202, 426

152, 274
200, 814

662, 636
665, 881

1929
January
February
March
April-.

.

May
June
July
August

September
October..
November
December

_
_

._ _

1

""

1 Compiled by the Douglas Fir Plywood Institute from reports of 8 members. Data represent the actual movement of plywood in square feet and are combined from
weekly reports using 4 or 5 weeks to the month. The members of the institute comprise approximately 70 per cent of the total production of Douglas fir plywood.
2
Compiled by the Plywood Manufacturers' Association from reports of 18 to 20 members in 1925,16 to 17 in 1926, and 13 to 16 in 1927. These data represent the business
of building up veneers into plywood of from 3 to 8 thicknesses. Details as to kinds of wood and nature of cores are shown in the association's report.
3 Compiled by prorating the weekly reports of the Wirebound Box Manufacturer's Association from 10 or 11 members, estimated to represent about 80 per cent of the industry, concerning their purchases and receipts of rotary-cut veneer for the manufacture of wire-bound boxes. Details by sizes and sources are given in the association reports.
< Compiled by the American Veneer Package Association from reports of about 30 firms each month, representing a large proportion of the industry. The association's
reports also contain data on other kinds of baskets.
o 9 months' average, April to December, inclusive,
7
8
fl 8 months' average, May to December, inclusive.
6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.
7 months' average, June to December, inclusive.

DOUGLAS FIR DOORS (AT MANUFACTURING PLANTS)1
(In number of doors)

Production Shipments

YEAR AND MONTH

2

1928 monthly average

320, 181

2

Unfilled
Stocks, end New orders orders, end
of month
of month

327, 857

3 272, 752

2

300, 934

3

396, 227

1929
January
February
March
April

253, 005
222, 495
298, 206
309, 192

268, 826
235, 139
275, 775
287,222

216, 207
210, 186
232, 170
260, 160

311, 347
398, 587
460, 074
349, 579

219 981
409,034
585, 652
632, 744

May
June
July
August
peptfiTnber

371, 162
322, 987
302, 452

357, 900
258, 041
340, 978

217,204
282, 150
217, 547

222, 746
261, 271
204,745

476, 215
477, 349
315, 566

_.

1
Compiled by the Western Door Manufacturers' Association from reports of 10 mills representing about 80 to 85 per cent of the capacity of the Douglas fir door industry
on the Pacific coast. Data are combined from weelily reports, using 4 or 5 weeks to the month. The association's reports also give data on garage doors.
2
8 months' average, May to December, inclusive.
* 9 months' average, April to December, inclusive.




73

Table 52.—BRICK, TILE, AND TERRA COTTA

Number

Unfilled Whole- Prosale
orders, price, ducend of red,
month N.Y.s tion
DoUs.
per
thous.

Thousands of brick

New orders
Stocks,
end of
Quan- Value month Quan- Value
tity
tity
Shipments

Thous. of
sq. ft.

129, 024
158, 524
146, 236
184, 270
185, 888

129, 573
231, 063
344, 580
281, 735
281, 751
252, 224
267, 728
231, 574

4,227
4,588
5,528
5,359
5,970

3,698
4,512
5,188
4,950
5,784

58, 331
62, 455
69, 160
100, 953

93, 806
115, 013
184, 206
197, 411

324, 837
335, 223
369, 857
348, 211

17.00
17.00
17.00
16.50

5,617
5,187
5,549
5,518

4,437
4,412
5,278
5,022

329, 572
331, 748
353, 428
427, 277

154, 151
169, 712
170, 178
178, 357

237, 107
231, 064
211, 451
194, 971

274, 959
254, 191
235, 323
231, 637

15.50
13.50
11.75
11.75

5, 253
5,241
5,214
5,544

5,172
5,174
5,299
5,461

59
71
70
77

489, 566
561, 367
538, 698
504, 836

158, 761
169, 238
91, 424
76, 601

176, 315
214, 169
187, 448
168, 282

219, 244
182, 462
211, 961
224, 825

11.75
11.75
11.75
11.25

5,612
5,928
5,080
4,551

91
73
57
23

517, 897
487, 713
405, 461
344, 572

68, 611

131, 338
121, 089
233, 702
236, 433

219, 233
231, 203
251, 105
275, 872

12. 75
13.50
13.25
13.50

May
June
July
August

5
3
11
14

297, 212
302, 249
408, 563
491, 088

125, 650
130, 990
208, 202
206, 938

225, 747
219, 522

273, 743
260, 970
299, 457
221, 625

September
October
November
December ._

21
49
67
84

498, 691
454, 931
537, 712
461, 357

257, 692
91, 226
287, 162
106, 440

167, 078
122, 078
180, 360
136, 033

213, 274
145, 427
204, 189

1929
January
February
March
April .

79
82
36
19

517, 120
366, 150
341, 843
315, 607

241, 887
184, 620
171, 545
153, 168

115, 924
74, 537

15
50

325, 208
308, 257

168, 036
154, 185

57
23
20
20
17
22
43
42

251, 949
187, 856
224, 962
275, 946
279, 500
305, 961
440, 423
433, 954

6 46, 687
64, 918
57, 340
68, 597
74, 079
121, 610
142, 827

1927
January _
February
March
April

68
78
54
2

462, 565
487, 217
427, 484
371, 320

May
June
July._
August

1
10
12
10

September
October
November___
December.

1928
January
February __
March
April

_

__

May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

64,492
69, 460
96, 998

Short Thous.
tons of dolls.
5,252
5,629
5,930

$15. 96
21.85
15. 25
17.36
19.81
17.04
14.70
16.19
13.88
12.93

1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average

Thous. Thous.
of dolls. of sq.ft.

10, 524

1,253
1,624
1,943
1,892

2,202

11,316
11,964

7,857
8,048

14, 006
13, 349
12, 261
12, 396

8, 578
11, 747
13, 454

Shipments

UiiBurned burned

Shipments

FACE BRICK <
Production

Plants closed
down

YEAR AND MONTH

Stocks, end of
month

TERRA
COTTA 3

FLOOR AND WALL TILE 2

COMMON BRICK 1

UnStocks filled
end orders,
of
end of
month month

Thousands of brick

$652
895
743
1,163
1,349
1,292
1,688
1,612
1,207
1,181

591
691
666
723
722
744
729

511
616
616
660
667
663
733

1,544
1,740
1,576
1,736
2,178
2,641
2,636

859
1,244
956
966
1,007
929
923

489
560
852
729

282
421
687
774

2,409
2, 787
2,939
2,614

727
871
1,007
1,074

10, 233
11, 251
11, 493
11, 860

12, 392
14, 633

1,138
887
1,356
1,513

2,086

11, 894
11, 972
11, 375
11, 393

10, 751
14, 637
14, 856
15, 643

1,140
1,385
1, 268
1,557

819
906
776
842

860
918
785
825

2, 507
2,625
2,513
2,564

1,069
1,113
1,026
1,069

5,696
5,326
4,409
3,708

2,162
2,010
1,672
1,581

11, 360
12, 073
12, 767
13, 289

13, 440
11, 907
11, 134

1,342
1,049
1,008
836

798
809
723
626

693
724
622
368

2,466
2,679
2,777
2,832

880
801
783
730

4,702
4,675
5,349
5,237

4,019
4,245
5,355
5,688

1,526
1,709

13, 964
14, 242
13, 982
13, 577

16, 563
12, 228

949
1,040
1,454
1,153

482
526
640
622

402
447
686
768

2,958
3,037
2,960
2,757

761
844
899
958

13.50
13.50
13.50
13.50

5,729
6,192
6,452
6,841

5,914
6,604
6,595
7,403

14, 431
13, 031
12, 837
12, 343

10, 857
16, 108
14, 191
12, 058

1,113
1,558
1,385
1,123

796
844
763
890

925
876
815
841

2,517
2,495
2,439
2,282

942
950
1,046
989

6,621
7,636
6,429
5,778

6,755
7,239
5,260
4,332

2,572
2,730
2,021
1,683

12, 253
12, 627
13, 376
14, 780

10, 570
15, 597

182,791

12.50
12.50
12.00
12.00

1,005
1,460
949
982

900
902
658
725

850
819
840
532

2,533
2,320
2,553
2, 775^

1,101
855
843
892

11.50
11.50
11.50
11.50

5,712
5,601
6,162
6,560

4,299
4,373
5,250
6,156

1,701
1,669

16,010
17,490

10,056
11,270

2,044

284, 793

136, 014
91, 615
102, 389
207, 649

18, 140
18, 630

12,949

1,090
1,196
1,172
1,472

810 559
493 362
732 766
913 1,018

3,417
3,896
3,278
3,465

910
884
987
1,117

121, 641
154, 021

144, 271
163, 126

11.50
11.00
10.13

13, 313
10, 798

1,487
1,178

907 1,060
999 1,051

3,443
3,304

1,124
1,169

238,941
218, 339

76,364

1,692
1,688

2,008
1,916
1,936
1,960
1,989

2,075
2,060
2,215

2,462
2,529
2,847

2,315

9,851

7,993

9,898

10, 850

10,284

9,998
9,453

9,961

i1|
1
li

1 Data, except prices, compiled by the Common Brick Manufacturers' Association of America from reports of about 100 concerns representing about 30 per cent of the
total output of common brick. It should be noticed that the number of plants shut down increases considerably in the winter, owing to seasonal shutdowns in the more
northern localities. Details by districts are given in the association's reports. Monthly data from 1921 appeared in May, 1925, issue (No. 45), p. 27.
2 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from data reported by 39 concerns which produced about 80 per cent of the total production
of floor and wall tile in 1923, including the entire membership of the Associated Tile Manufacturers. Details by grades and kinds are issued each month in mimeograph form.
a Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from the reports of 27 manufacturers who produced over 95 per cent of the total architectural
terra cotta made in 1922. Values exclude freight, cartage, duty, and setting charges Monthly data from 1919 are given in the October, 1924, issue (No. 38), p. 52. Details
by districts are given in the press releases.
4
Data compiled by American Face Brick Association, representing averages per plant in order to allow for the variation in number of firms reporting. Abou t 70 firms
usually report. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in January, 1926, issue (No. 53), p. 22.
fi
Wholesale prices are monthly averages from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, yearly price averages from 1913 to 1918 appeared in the November.
1924, issue (No. 39), p. 101.

0 11 months' average, February to December, inclusive.



74

Table 53.—CHINA AND PORCELAIN PLUMBING FIXTURES AND SAND-LIME BRICK
PORCELAIN PLUMBING
FIXTURES i

YEAR AND MONTH

Net new Shiporders ments

Unfilled Stocks,
orders, end of
end of
month month

VITREOUS CHINA PLUMBING
FIXTURES 2

Net new
orders

Shipments

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month

Stocks,
end of
month

SAND-LIME BRICK 3

Production

Number of pieces
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly average
monthly average. _ _
e 13, 769
monthly average
21, 369
monthly average

Shipments

&

Shipments
by
truck

Stocks, Unfilled
end of orders,
end of
month month

Thousands of brick

1936
September
October
November
December

* 343, 201
501, 241
555, 213
503, 442

20, 626
16, 886
16,988

8,456
6,192
5,473

12,319
10, 897
11, 637

e 8, 697
13, 104
14, 372

8 18, 837
17, 091
13, 233

289, 599
258,004
208, 076
205,942

523,637
417,984
616,864
578,251

471,077
497, 150
524, 937
568,931

15, 626
16, 178
16,923
12,049

6,663
4,890
6,363
3,825

9,094
12,344
10,240
7,401

9,877
8,613
8,953
11,583

18, 651
19, 325
18,150
7,701

281,896
265, 611
239,245
220,786

497,700
377, 170
351,091
347,645

558, 121
544,631
596,685
618,492

8,307
9,577
16, 748
16, 217

3,824
5,185
7,707
6,229

5,378
6,418
10,811
10,884

16,455
13,215
13,802
8,493

17,908
12,580
25,415
18,413

241, 315
344, 541
229,832
249, 169

6 29, 566
46, 169

* 439, 986
513, 133
356, 056
431, 080

200,988
145, 081
213, 166
217, 740

628,624
59, 984

4 238, 280
250, 982
244, 520
251, 014

236,289
152, 351
406,956
167, 329

• 17, 486
15, 818

* 223, 783
258, 791
224, 136
256, 640

246,223
296, 818
251,946
279,539

342, 717
390,440
368, 326
337, 956

607,968
557, 745
554,022
520,364

23,225
17,987
16,662
21,300

8,196
7,757
5,431
7,375

13,250
14,010
10, 751
13,294

8,740
10, 052
8,820
12,547

17,237
18,344
14,364
19,800

1937
January
February
March
April
]Vlay
June
»
July
August

._
...
..

20,046
14,065
14,939
6,024

21, 870
19, 582
16, 251
12,242

34, 972
29,455
28, 143
21, 925

25, 868
29,044
29,998
33, 353

223, 980
227, 896
167, 993
227, 925

235,883
245,725
180, 498
190, 076

325,069
307, 240
294,735
332,584

518, 452
500,868
527, 920
557, 293

21,680
18,928
18,086
13, 912

6,729
5,134
6,558
4,189

11, 815
13,623
11,833
8,694

18,689
14,423
13,468
18,538

16,094
15,318
14,845
14, 772

18, 545
12, 986
42, 245
60, 022

13,239
11, 969
12, 079
17, 037

22, 639
23,464
53, 515
96, 125

37, 374
40, 930
42, 442
48,831

237,727
494,042
391, 101
238, 169

240,829
246,002
335,948
291, 130

329, 482
577, 522
622, 215
569, 254

544,461
538, 965
463, 180
445, 752

12, 789
10, 921
17,063
10, 012

4,945
3,738
4,273
4,829

7,024
6,204
9,391
9, 182

15,867
16, 920
16, 777
15, 121

14, 830
12, 625
16, 942
14,123

May
June
July
August

26, 775
13, 405
12, 976
12, 960

15, 459
19, 257
20, 253
22, 970

103, 131
95, 246
81, 699
65, 029

50, 819
40, 823
48, 621
47, 690

234, 560
225, 694
184,783
217, 305

288, 238
274, 351
248, 363
267, 610

515, 576
466, 919
403, 339
353, 034

447,
444,
460,
477,

596
399
360
593

22, 244
19, 134
18, 072
21,680

7,752
5,120
6,055
8,284

18, 229
14, 437
11, 772
13, 215

12, 159
11, 656
12, 591
14, 446

14, 445
11, 718
11, 762
14, 503

September
October
November
December

9,939
22, 665
11, 715
12, 195

16, 525
17, 018
14, 657
9,350

54,583
50, 558
38,268
35,545

50,953
50, 956
47,550
47,044

180, 758
222, 190
221, 575
231, 771

215, 284
236, 781
201, 925
165, 712

318, 508
303, 917
323, 562
389, 626

510, 864
531, 119
554, 422
622, 590

17, 267
21, 590
18, 164
14, 922

6,767
5,562
4,588
3,765

11, 281
15, 802
12, 942
10, 160

15,304
14, 446
11, 579
15, 596

14, 455
13, 435
10, 447
9,509

12, 565
12, 381
14, 479
13, 417

11, 576
9,219
9,483
12, 193

34, 864
36, 798
40,047
37,184

44,688
45, 769
46, 980
47, 315

227, 050
485, 657
207, 681
205, 870

261, 102
253,235
256, 249
251, 920

405, 574
637, 996
589, 428
543, 378

570, 749
540, 639
549, 410
544, 899

10,548
7,432
11, 433
16, 155

1,674
2,955
3,945
4,359

6,206
5,942
9,498
13, 580

16, 082
16, 974
14, 256
14, 236

7,253
10,665
12, 630
11,587

8,970
9,669

10, 059
10, 807

35,045
31, 234

48, 228
45,848

199, 477
196, 911

254, 776
246, 131

488, 079
438, 715

543, 987
591, 640

12, 969
17, 578

5,658
5,412

13, 107
13, 757

10,561
10, 447

9,188
14,968

September
October _
November
December.

__

1928
January
February
March
April

_

_ _ _

1929
January
_ _ _
February. _
March
April
__
May
June
July
August

September
October
November
December
1 Compiled by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from the reports of 10 manufacturers comprising the entire industry. The figures represent
regular selection. Details by kind of fixture are given in press releases, showing also culls, the classifications including baths, lavatories, shower receptors, sinks, slope sinks,
stalls, trays (single), combination sink and trays, 2-part trays, intergral drainboard sinks, and miscellaneous. Net new orders comprise total new orders less cancellations,
while stocks show amount of finished glost fixtures on hand at the end of the month.
2
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of 32 manufacturers, covering most of the firms making vitreous chinaware which in
regular practice is connected with a drainage system. The figures represent regular selection (formerly grade A). Details by classes are given in press releases, showing
also culls, the classification including siphon jets, washdowns, reverse traps, lowdown tanks, lavatories, and miscellaneous. Net new orders comprise total new orders less
cancellations, while stocks show amount of finished glost fixtures on hand at the end of the month.
3
Compiled by Rock Products from reports of 14 firms from May through August, 1926, and from 17 to 23 firms for the remainder of that year. The 1926 averages are
based on total figures for the year by 23 firms, which represented 75 per cent of the output of the industry in 1925, according to the annual census, and whose stocks on
December 31, 1926, represented 52 per cent of total stocks on that date. Data for 1927 and 1928 were reported 6by from 23 to 30 plants each month.
4
6
6 months' average, July to December, inclusive,
8 months' average, May to December, inclusive.
4 months' average, September to December, inclusive.




75
Table 54.—CEMENT AND HIGHWAYS
CONCRETE
PAVEMENTS

PORTLAND CEMENT i

Production
Shipments

YEAB AND MONTH
Total

Ratio to
capacity

Thousands Per cent
of barrels

Stocks,
end of
month

Stocks,
clinker,
end of
month

Wholesale
price,
composite

Dolls, per
barrel

Thousands of barrels

New orders 2

Total

Roads

Thousands of square
yards

1

FEDERAL-AID
HIGHWAYS 3
Underconstruction

Completed

Cost

Distance

Thous. of
dollars

Miles

7,675
7,353
7,146
7,589
7,721
5,891
6,700
8,306

7,391
7,203
7,219
7,852
7,542
5,894
7,167
7,999

11, 220
12, 773
11,312
11, 054
11,080
9,386
9,809
7,278

4,455
3,264

4 3, 499
2,454

8,191
9,489
11, 448
12, 405
13, 434
13, 673
14, 326
14, 664

76.1
75.2

7,921
9,714
11, 324
12, 146
13,060
13, 482
14, 244
14, 621

10, 161
9,572
9,258
13, 178
16, 055
18, 886
19, 955
22, 692

4,015
6,191
7,077
9,008
9,640
10, 550

$1.881
1.843
1.789
1.744
1.686
1,672

4,686
6,595
6,580
7, 679
8,681
8,942
10, 481
12, 340

3,662
4,863
4,245
4,842
5,328
5,095
6,163
7,792

$15, 472
10, 799
17, 084
18, 410
17, 876
15, 779
16, 1£9

* 937
607
853
862
787
690
636

14, 458
14,529
14, €37
12, 187
10,890
9,660
8,879

17,505
17, 174
14, 449
11,999

92.3
87.4
75.9
60.7

19, 828
18, 105
11, 619
6,200

13,996
13, 141
16, 022
22, 082

6,490
5,960
6,374
7,660

1.683
1.683
1.683
1.683

11, 581
9,800
7, 984
6,542

6,872
5,527
5,102
4,657

- 23, 354
29,206
29,712
17, 886

927
1,151
1,101
758

9,921
9,466
8,879
8,517

9,768
8,797
10, 223
13,468

49.4
47.5
51.7
70.0

6,541
6,563
10, 135
13, 307

25, 116
27, 349
27, 445
27, 627

9,672
12,237
14,463
15,002

1.683
1.683
1.683
1.683

5,902
7,499
12, 406
17, 788

4,103
5,615
8,746
12, 722

10, 728
8,209
11,411
6,579

458
340
395
269

8,480
8,267
8,332
8,347

17, 308
17, 497
17, 474
18, 759

86.6
90.1
97.0
93.1

18,986
18, 421
19,901
21,970

25, 984
25, 029
22, 580
19, 374

14,329
12,944
11, 707
9,357

1.683
1.683
1.683
1.683

20, 695
15, 446
13,123
16,889

13, 246
8,997
6,984
9,254

16,706
18, 802
8,828
12, 145

735
661
483
599

8,967
9,494
9,497
9,547

17,884
17, 533
15,068
12, 189

91.7
87.1
77.4
60.4

20, 460
19, 836
11,951
7,384

16, 799
14, 579
17, 769
22, 650

7,566
5,944
5,953
7,422

1.650
1. 650
1.650
1.650

14, 752
7,068
8,430
8,080

9,630
3,856
5,213
5,166

26, 105
13, 413
19, 025
41, 962

1,169
598
845
1,076

9,427
9,337
8,692
8,163

January
February
March
April

9,881
8,522
9,969
13, 750

48.5
44.8
47.4
67.1

5,707
5,448
10, 113
13, 325

26, 797
29, 870
29, 724
30, 151

9,642
12, 436
14, 948
15, 472

1.050
1.650
1.650
1.650

7,461
3,241
6,000
16, 654

6, 089
1,689
2,826
12, 315

16, 057
13, 188
4,570
7,410

557
373
151
211

7,835
7,679
7,665
7,707

May
June
July
August

16, 151
16, 775

76.4
80.9

16, 706
18, 939

29, 597
27, 433

14, 910
13, 573

1.650
1.650
1,650

23, 704
16, 421

17, 518
10, 410

10, 309
15, 552
16, 445

335
520
693

7,900
8,359
8,494

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average. _ _ _
monthly average
_
monthly average
monthly average.

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly average
monthly averagemonthly average
monthly average.
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average.
monthly average

_

1937
September _
October
November
December

.

1938
January
February
March _ _
April

May
June
July
August

.

-

September.
October
NovprnbpT
December

1939

September
October. _ _
November
December

_.

_

1 Data on Portland cement, representing complete reports of manufactures, are from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, except prices, which are averages of weekly prices reported by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Clinker is unground cement. The cement industry is highly seasonal and
its figures should be compared with corresponding months of previous years rather than with other months of the current year. Detailed data by months back to 1915,
with an 8-year average for each month which can be used for seasonal comparisons, will be found in the September, 1923, issue (No. 25), p. 47, except for clinkers, for which
data appeared in the March, 1928, issue (No. 79), p. 21. Monthly price data from 1913 for quotations now discontinued appeared in the December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p.54.
2 Concrete pavements contracted for throughout the United States are from the Portland Cement Association, Highway Bureau. The total contracts include streets and
alleys besides roads.
3
Data on amount of Federal-aid highways completed during each month and under construction at the end of month specified are compiled by the U. S. Department
of Agriculture, Bureau of Public Roads, and include all kinds of improved roads built with Federal aid. Federal-aid roads represented about 45 per cent of the total mileage
of roads improved by the States in 1925, while Federal-aid grants amounted to about 20 per cent of the costs of the Federal-aid roads shown above. The data on roads
completed represent all roads reported as such to the Bureau of Public Roads, whether paid for or not. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 24.
* Of the numerical 1919 monthly average, 3,221,000 yards was actually reported. The remainder is the prorated portion of a total of 3,338,309 yards for the last years*
pavement less than 6 inches thick not allocated by class of pavement. This has been prorated to roads on the basis of the roads' share of allocated contracts.




76

Table 55.—GLASS
POLISHED
PLATE
GLASS *

ILLUMINATING GLASSWARE 1
Production

YEAR AND MONTH

Total
No. of
turns

1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
.
1926 monthly average _ _
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average

New
Ratio to orders
capacity

Shipments

Per cent of capacity

Unfiiled Stocks,
orders, end of Production
end of month
month

No. of weeks'
supply

Thous.
sq. ft.

4,021
3,112
3,385
3,147
2,910
3,254

50.1
41.6
44.5
42.3
38.5
42.0

50.7
42.1
44.7
44.3
40.0
43.2

50.5
40.0
44.2
43.0
39.4
41.4

3.2
2.6
2.3
1.4
1.2
1.4

6.7
8.4
7.0
4.8
3.7
4.2

4 465
6,390
7,422
7,630
9,769
10, 738
9,283
10, 887

2,948
2,620
3,023
3,030

35.6
37.2
39.0
39.8

35.5
48.2
39.0
39.6

40.5
40.7
41.0
38.8

0.6
1.1
1.0
1.0

3.7
3.6
3.5
3.7

8,484
9,790
11,641
10, 299

May
June
July .
August

2,797
2,689
2,169
2,410

37.0
36.0
33.6
32.0

45.0
38.0
36.3
38.3

39.3
37.3
35.3
31.4

1.2
1.3
1.2
1.3

3.6
3.6
4.0
3.5

September
October
November
December

3,609
3,814
3,454
2,353

40.7
50.6
47.8
33.2

43.4
44.0
40.2
32.9

45.7
45.2
40.7
36.7

1.5
1.4
1.3
1.0

2,685
2,936
3,137
3,243

34.8
40.6
39.4
41.8

39.7
38.1
39.6
42.4

36.5
36.9
39.5
40.1

3,368
3,365
1,748
2,985

42.1
44.2
22.3
36.5

44.5
41.6
40.2
44.5

3,190
4,193
4,245
3,949

43.0
50.5
54.2
54.6

3,950
2,974
3,256
3,285
3,884
3,239

January
February
March
April

._

1927
_•

GLASS CONTAINERS 3

Production
Total
Thous.
gross

Net
Ratio to orders

Shipments

capacity
Per

Stocks,
end of
month

Thousands of gross

cent

4

Unfilled
orders,
end of
month

4

4

76. 6
72.6
71.6
77.4

* 2, 383
2,145
2,256
2,443

* 1, 805
1,987
2,125
2,334

2,032
1,942
2,234
2,205

71.3
70.8
72.3
74.1

2, 725
2,838
2,390
2,004

1,803
1,867
2,368
2,346

10,274
11, 219
11, 137
10,658

6,541
6,646
6,488
6,341

9,618
7,999
8,868
10, 616

2,197
2, 277
2,050
2,142

73.8
76.5
71.7
69.3

1, 800
2,016
1,743
1,850

2,383
2,350
2, 227
2,120

10, 135
9,682
9,148
8,765

6,149
6,065
6,216
6,217

3.6
3.8
4.1
4.0

9,353
8,703
8,573
7,446

1,999
1,969
2,045
2,224

69.6
66.3
68.5
74.6

2,340
2,314
2,574
2.474

2,325
2,054
1,928
1,724

8,606
8,681
9,043
9,616

5,925
5,878
6,049
6,551

1.2
1.4
1.3
1.1

4.2
4.3
4.2
3.7

8,825
10, 689
11, 951
10, 560

2,207
2,085
2,570
2,421

76.9
72.7
82.9
84.3

2,680
2,577
3,424
1,965

1,958
2,113
2,646
2,491

10, 140
10, 633
11, 272
10, 705

6,327
6, 370
6,283
6,239

40.0
42.6
26.8
42>5

1.1
1.3
1.6
1.8

3.7
4.4
4.6
4.3

10, 882
11,354
9,966
12, 159

2,688
2,589
2,374
2,686

86.7
86.7
77.2
80.9

2,137
2,225
2,008
1,909

2,729
2,552
2,311
2,654

10, 076
9,642
9,166
8,467

6,192
6,220
6,267
6,297

44.2
53.2
51.1
39.0

43.0
51.9
51.9
45.0

1.7
1.7
1.6
1.5

4.3
4.1
4.2
4.7

10, 897
11, 140
11,640
10, 579

2,322
2,389
2, 146
1,970

78.7
71.6
66.8
63.8

2,122
2,721
2,950
2,599

2,433
2,261
1,990
1,874

8,084
8,415
8,872
9,510

6,173
6,302
6,455
6,542

49.0
42.6
42.9
42.9

41.2
42.8
46.8
45.3

39.9
42.5
41.8
44.9

1.3
1.0
1.1
1.1

5.3
5.8
5.5
5.3

11, 426
11,289
13, 144
12, 555

2, 367
2,261
2,574
2, 519

73.6
76.1
78.8
79.1

3,089
2,797
2,562
2,408

2,435
2,139
2,530
2,546

9,306
10, 749
10, 518
10, 214

6,460
6,552
6,595
6,588

46.8
46.3

48.1
44.6

42.2
45.1

1.4
1.6

5.8
6.0

12, 782
12, 278

2,683
2,561

79.1
81.5

2,584
2,023

2,657
2.679

9,859
9,278

6,601
6,500

< 2, 053
2,046
2,110
2,371

7, 891
8,751
9,747
9,582

4, 911
5,607
6,256
6,306

1928

January
February
March
April

-- --

May
June __
July
August

.- --

September
October
November
December
1999

January. .
February
March
April
May -_
June
July
August

_- --

September
October
November
December

_

-_
_

i Data from biweekly reports of from 9 to 11 firms to the Illuminating Glassware Guild, estimated to represent from 70 to 75 per cent of the capacity of the industry,
with capacity ranging from 4,500 to 7,000 turns per month. A turn is a 4-hour working period for one shop. Production data originally reported by firms with a
biweekly capacity of from 2,256 to 3,463 turns, have first been prorated to the equivalent production of a capacity of 3,500 turns per biweekly period; these figures have
in turn been reduced to monthly data by combining and prorating the overlapping periods. Data given in percentages of capacity are averages of either 2 or 3
biweekly periods from the association reports. Stocks and unfilled orders have been reported by capacities ranging from 1,891 to 3,098 turns biweekly, but as they are
expressed in weeks' supply, they are comparable without prorating. Data from 1923 on actual production, stocks, and unfilled orders appeared in the July, 1926, issue
(No. 59), p. 25. The association reports give details by classes of shades, reflectors, bowls, and globes in numbers of turns.
3
Compiled by Plate Glass Manufacturers of America, comprising practically the entire industry. Monthly data from 1923 appeared in January, 1926, issue (No. 53),
p. 23.
3 Data from the Glass Container Association, covering 41 manufacturers of glass containers with an annual productive capacity of 32,000,000 gross, or about 83 per cent
of the industry. Details by classes are shown in the association's report,
* 4 months' average, September to December, inclusive.




77

Table 56.—WOOD DISTILLATION

Ship- Stocks Exments end of ports 2
mo.

_.

Production

Stocks,
crude
plants,
end of
month

Dolls.
per
cwt.

Thousands of pounds
1920 monthly av.
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av
1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av
1927 monthly av
1028 monthly av

Wholesale
price 3

Production

YEAH AND MONTH

WOOD

METHANOL (CRUDE)

ACETATE OF LIME

Stocks, refineries,
end of month
United
States

Canada

Exports 2

Carbonized

Stocks,
end of
mo.

Gallons

$2.78
1.87
2.26
3.84
3.27
2.90
3.28
3.50
3.79

652, 021
324, 504
567, 409
716, 144
579, 286
647, 899
674, 663
665, 193
628, 378

2, 749, 407
8, 494, 877
2, 117, 172
1, 613, 454
924, 501
349,411
302, 927

DAILY CAPACITY

Total

Report- Shutdown
ing

Cords

41, 085
27, 795
24, 839
58, 584

58, 589
34, 343
105, 860
100, 585
53, 386
34, 015
34, 772
25, 939
47, 313

78, 580
34, 177
64, 286
80, 787
62, 048
68, 303
71, 097
71, 602
63, 395

829, 227
826, 847
942, 884
794, 744
742, 167
646, 454
502, 585
553, 604
532, 082

5,629
5,448
5,391
5,339
4,687
4,389
3,706
3,463
3,402

626
4,083
4,585 2,771
5,217 1,890
5,171 1,183
681
4,017
758
3,958
486
3,616
355
3,463
3,402
533

10, 445
13, 700
10, 815
12, 628
13, 090
13, 047
11, 008

13, 683
13, 424
10, 120
12, 686
13, 012
12, 945
12, 196

35, 833
14, 266
24, 980
22, 701
22, 180
19, 966
11, 692

1,942
], 520
2, 300
1,829
1,931
1,837
1,549
970
931

1926
September
October _
November.
December

11, 770
14, 002
14, 100
13, 4C8

11, 285
16, 013
15, 510
14, 187

23, 241
17, 746
16, 328
16, 421

1,392
1,125
1,797
675

3.25
3.25
3.38
3.50

610, 393
712, 309
720, 798
733, 678

486, 199
442, 998
463, 049
278, 219

164, 363
151, 326
144, 136
207, 682

31, 853
30, 293
18, 947
15, 369

38, 779
24, 977
29, 869
8,704

65, 807
73, 895
73, 701
70, 653

491, 307
485, 022
473, 964
502, 482

3,577
3,577
3,577
3,607

3,475
3,475
3,523
3,607

537
391
409
479

1927
January
February __
March
April

14, 181
12, 667
14, 223
13, 139

10, 067
10, 184
14, 002
13, 560

19, 910
22, 422
22, 620
22, 207

1,630
1,579
974.

3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50

805, 473
680, 583
726, 694
666,638

397, 999
340, 847
387, 684
325, 888

341, 444
613, 939
645, 852
819, 216

15, 913
19, 657
22, 574
12, 949

11, 012
16, 226
22,796
41, 254

80, 233
68, 972
75, 755
69, 895

500, 818
473, 346
481, 807
524, 259

3,553
3,555
3,526
3,535

3,553
3,555
3,526
3,535

155
155
295
319

12, 552
12, 070
11, 712
13, 125

11, 972
14, 196
12, 211
13, 587

23, 068
20, 923
20, 553
19, 889

1,582
562
1,355
283

3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50

638, 376
626, 789
592, 368
574, 710

345, 366
339, 632
295, 812
361, 657

896, 334
991, 672
1, 094, 775
1, 408, 637

33, 078
39, 025
21, 227
28, 610

22, 863
2,201
9,622
18,796

64, 309
64, 8G1
63, 714
81, 781

551, 536
584, 690
598, 209
606, 910

3,535
3,535
3,535
3,395

3,535
3,535
3,535
3,395

537
706
655
455

12, 856
13, 849
13, 468
12, 718

13, 369
17, 141
13, 575
12, 527

19, 452
16, 185
16, 057
16, 304

None.
915
676
2,078

3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50

622, 594
692, 299
690, 625
665, 166

314,
369,
359,
354,

231
965
584
2G<3

1, 467, 460
1, 181, 225
1, 407, 745
1, 165, 544

1,590
27, 995
31, 987
43, 458

20,526
57,983
48, 624
39, 369

79, 350
73, 159
70, 775
67, 101

617, 360
599, 314
593, 089
565, 456

3,395
3,339
3,323
3,329

3,395
3,339
3,323
3,329

391
145
145
226

12, 519
11, 718
13, 022
11, 693

11, 343
9,081
11, 233
13, 152

17, 596
20, 228
22, 103
20, 516

1,630
1,760
2,037
917

3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50

699, 551
642, 855
707, 460
657, 253

344, 798
363, 325
333, 496
323,183

1, 126, 152
1, 132, 377
1, 079, 047
1,120,970

56,104
55,298
47, 268
55, 934

33, 384
42, 871
41, 232
59, 244

68, 559
64,080
72, 303
63, 973

560, 568
543, 555
534, 161
515, 250

3,293
3,323
3,323
3,275

3,293
3,323
3,323
3,275

249
261
261
263

10, 987

15, 386
10, 223
13, 532
12, 840

16, 205
15, 128

1,152
215
1,792
1,141

3.50
3.50
3.50
3.88

609,604
528, 029
544, 693
535, 803

299, 062
295, 455
327, 028
287, 492

909,620
558, 483
277, 077
160, 156

57, 270
73, 955
66, 518
64,817

98, 763
66, 785
54,535
14,000

59,744
58, 959
56, 187
55, 085

489, 383
505, 329
507, 227
509, 435

3,266
3,486
3,470
3,482

3,266
3,486
3,470
3,482

299
697
807
1,053

13, 355
10, 407
13, 119
12, 684

3,134

10, 526
12, 315
12, 267

1,095

449
36
20
24

4.00
4.00
4.50
4.50

495, 555
641, 823
745, 430
732, 480

229,683
314, 171
284, 685
232, 740

164, 972
161, 723
167, 012
219, 545

67,314
57, 814
53, 426
47,287

32,540
20, 408
34, 586
69, 407

49,444
65, 182
73, 633
73, 591

514, 204
550, 412
532, 516
622, 937

3,486
3,486
3,485
3,452

3,486
3,486
3,485
3,452

1,083
668
370
388

11, 687
11, 266
12, 082
11, 796

11, 266
10, 947
10, 882
11, 986

1,543
1,765
1,930
1,495

42
16
17
None.

4.50
4.50
4.50
4.50

684, 766
676, 672
714, 266
732, 204

227,458
218, 563
272, 393
185, 123

145, 093
153, 423
147, 531
172, 765

48, 495
47, 832
59, 623
66, 218

43, 915
37, 213
28, 478
57, 134

71,490
68, 367
73, 073
73, 084

498, 301
483, 721
456,035
487, 881

3,336
3,336
3,336
3,336

3,336
3,336
3,336
3,336

372
414
404
463

12, 446
11, 714

12, 335
11, 555

1,828
1,626

13
None.

4.50
4.50
4.50

730, 585
665, 534

228, 965
229, 232

262, 082
277, 376

65, 965
66, 870

44, 602
16, 613

76, 382
70,760

524, 567
529, 684

3,336
3,326

3,336
3,326

417
441

4,885

__.

May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

__

1928
Januarv
February.
March..
April
May
June
July
August .

September
October
November
December

12, 421

9,390
9,570
9,486
8,605
_ __

1939
January
February _
March
April
May.. _
June..
July
August -.
September
October
November. _
December

11,411
7,950
2,863
2,078

"

None.

4

1, 356, 717
476, 614
1, 002, 820
589, 761

4

..._

i Except for prices and exports, data are compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, including through June, 1924, the reports of the Rational
wood Chemical Association, the total reports from all sources comprising about 95 per cent of the industry during most of this period. Beginning with July, 1924, all data
.t held at
ood for
iyzu appeared in tne September, 19^3, issue (No. 25), p. 46, the 1921 data being revised in the December, 1923, issu
1927,
issue (No. 68), p. 26. Press releases of the Bureau of the Census also give Canadian figures, beginning with 1925.
2
Exports from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
3 Wholesale prices are monthly averages compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

4
9 months' average, April to December, inclusive.



78

Table 57.—REFINED METHANOL, ETHYL ALCOHOL, EXPLOSIVES, AND DYES
ETHYL ALCOHOL 2

Production
YEAR AND MONTH
United
States

Canada

Stocks, end of
month
United
States

Canada

Shipments
United
States

Canada

monthly av
..... . ._
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av.
monthly av_ o 556, 322 6 24, 202 6 678, 528 « 47, 019
monthly av. 616, 893
24, 327 569, 982 59, 600
monthly av. 451, 180
25, 012 481, 479
55, 242
monthly av_ 498, 548
36, 038 430, 553 36, 841
.

Production

Withdrawn
for
denaturing

Warehouse
stocks,
end of
month

477, 000
503, 720

24, 442
26, 370

« 9, 485
6,119
8,137
11, 234
12,201
16, 190
16,221
14, 469
15, 415

$2 56
.80'
1.64
1.06
.76
.61
.64
.67

5 4, 398 * 4, 466
3,864
7,040
5,074
6,876
4,754
9,527
3,980
10, 965
14, 801
6,463
14, 995
7,962
8,497
13, 507
9, 521
14, 046

DYES AND
DYESTUFFS <

EXPLOSIVES 3

Exports

Production

Shipments

New Stocks,
end of
orders month Vege- Coal
table

Dolls,
per Thousands of proof gallons
gal.

Gallons

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1920
1927
1928

Wholesale
price

REFINED METHANOL 1

tar

437
354
264
302
211
314
263

698
1, 494
1,309
2,150
2,151
2,231
2,689

Thousands of pounds

30,764
36, 762
33, 740
34, 057
36, 351
34, 074
33, 118

31,080
36, 542
34, 340
34, 241
36, 361
33, 837
32, 205

28, 926
35, 174
32, 726
32, 737
34, 715
32, 545
31,243

16, 316
18, 758
17,067
17, 346
16, 674
17, 827
17, 644

i

'.

1927
January
February _ _ _ _ _
March
April

480,
305,
569,
420,

448
479
059
741

35, 290
37, 070
39, 925
39, 910

436,
426,
597,
606,

656
736
379
975

58, 596
64,719
67, 938
73,706

374, 530
337, 428
411, 114
416, 996

26, 037
30, 516
36, 109
35, 340

.83
.83
.83
.83

13, 235
10, 324
11, 491
12, 674

8,907
9,152
12, 224
11, 618

3, 563
9,842
8,313
8,459

33, 846
35, 383
32, 190
31, 962

33,726
33, 578
31, 890
33, 132

33, 616
31, 102
31, 517
31, 415

17, 303
19, 145
19, 518
18, 043

227
253
388
300

1, f 65
2,S51
3, f 95
1,227

May
June
July
August

426,
416,
347,
317,

304
042
833
521

10, 550
None.
22,800
None.

554, 313
521, 609
554, 809
428, 194

73, 726
53,350
59, 120
50,687

469, 513
575, 811
411, 229
389, 033

20, 432
10, 485
17, 827
8,440

.83
.66
.66
.58

13, 052
13, 831
15, 170
15, 587

11, 584
13, 761
14, 651
12, 212

9,335
7,496
9,700
11, 122

34, 168
34, 120
30, 954
36,304

35, 355
33, 783
31, 136
35, 736

33, 961
32, 354
30, 335
34, 680

16,784
16, 989
16, 794
17, 344

452
363
165
237

1,928
968
1,526
2,257

September
October
November
December

441,
688,
529,
470,

771
435
552
969

28, 293
6,700
38, 600
41, 000

382, 876
396, 137
452, 246
419, 812

58, 312
26, 443
32,854
34, 752

506, 914
698, 476
626, 643
506, 310

23,982
38, 569
28,629
16, 937

.55
.53
.48
.48

14,129
16, 584
18,. 051
19,502

14, 130
17, 759
17,329
18, 760

9,838
7,931
8,211
8,158

36, 858
38, 918
34, 695
29,490

36,964
38, 261
34, 645
27, 839

35, 304
36, 747
32, 111
27, 398

17, 152
17, 807
17,847
19, 196

229
359
378
422

4,469
1,838
1,920
2,226

1938
January
February
March.!
April

496, 073
390, 099
442, 023
468,446

38,700
44,850
48,400
46,000

455, 316
467,723
412, 597
430, 298

29,198
33,044
48, 413
47, 311

482, 666
407,351
469, 308
412, 597

17, 775
35, 986
11,505
39,856

.48
.46
.46
.46

13, 050
11,220
11,050
11,784

10,098
9,061
8,686
9,334

9,463
10, 120
10, 945
11,267

29,607
31, 895
30,001
32,153

31, 332
31, 035
30, 801
32, 095

29, 878
29,203
29,660
30, 701

17, 973
18,447
18,645
17,647

239
276
490
296

1,715
2,848
1,735
1,788

May
_ _ _ __
June
July
August

557, 780
603, 247
541, 113
436, 811

30,400
6,200
10,800
14,700

505,299
541, 083
444, 496
396, 730

55, 359
45, 733
39, 210
26, 715

492, 081
596, 502
667,549
497, 971

14,528
11, 462
12, 672
22,076

.46
.46
.47
.48

11,043
13, 036
16, 618
18,764

10,468
16,336
14,927
16,128

10,904
6,646
7,351
9,263

32, 850
32, 625
30, 084
35, 092

33, 511
32, 816
29, 561
23, 039

32,163
31, 305
27 993
32,268

16,990
16, 732
17, 158
18, 554

160
272
254
237

1,898
1,726
8,340
1,335

September
October
November
December

355, 353
487, 384
536, 782
667, 468

38,600
56,700
39,500
57,600

300, 478
325, 914
422, 640
464,063

33, 101
23,339
21, 751
38, 912

415, 340
493, 712
494, 047
615, 515

25, 396
48, 330
42, 989
33, 869

.48
.51
.58

18, 613
20,685
19,220
19,898

15,269
20,718
19,294
18, 236

11,295
9,907
8,132
8,953

35, 310
38, 636
35, 524
33,642

37,465
38, 854
34, 293
31, 660

33, 611
36,347
32, 723
29,068

16, 274
16, Oil
17, 147
20, 148

157
231
400
146

1,330
5,194
2,436
1,926

494, 501
449, 800
494, 435
502, 010

59,800
47,700
47,500
35,300

503,054
550, 702
681, 815
695, 180

35,534
38, 393
36, 149
48, 226

506,624
466, 621
518,906
568,118

47,629
33, 623
43,885
14, 576

.58
.58
.58
.58

15,282
13,830
14,858
14,709

13, 911
11, 813
13,090
12,003

8,701
9,662
10, 424
11,723

33,596
35,392
34, 485
36, 077

35, 576
34, 322
33, 168
36, 453

35, 733
32,606
32,543
34, 786

18, 071
19, 151
20,366
20, 119

92
188
157
160

58
29
2,305
26

. 423, 244

49,700
36,900

716, 762
759, 740

43, 474
51, 787

472, 360
449, 245

45, 274
11,650

.58
.58
.58

15, 216

13, 812

12, 341

37, 235
34,383

39, 474
35, 032

37, 199
34, 202

17, 989
17, 225

202
2C4

!

27
21

1939
January
February
March
April
May
June
July _
August

__. .

_ _
_ «

_

423, 811

September
October
November
December
1 Compiled from individual reports of all methanol-refming plants in the United States and Canada by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, the
following grades of methanol being included: 95 per cent refined, 97 per cent refined, pure, C. P. and denaturing grade methanol; except for prices, which are monthly averages2 compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Statistics of ethyl alcohol, compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, comprise all 160° proof alcohol produced in the United States.
Withdrawals for denaturing represent approximate production of denatured alcohol. The large increase in the proportion of the total production used for denaturing,
beginning with 1922, is stated to be due to the use of denatured alcohol, which pays no tax, for certain medical purposes in place of pure alcohol which was formerly used
and is taxable. Data for fiscal years previous to 1920 appeared in the February, 1928, issue (No. 78), p. 79. Beginning with April, 1928, monthly data on production and
stocks from 16 members representing about 80 per cent of the industry are also reported by the Industrial Alcohol Institute in terms of wine gallons.
3
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, from reports from 24 companies. Data comprise black powder, permissibles, and other high explosives, and do not include reports of manufacturers of ammunition and fireworks, nor production of nitroglycerin, except in so far as nitroglycerin is used in the manufacture 4of other explosives. Detailed data by classes from 1922 appeared in November, 1924, issue (No. 30), p. 107.
Data compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Export figures for " vegetable " dyes include logwood extract (about
50 per cent) and other dye extracts; coal-tar exports comprise coal-tar colors, dyes, and stains.
5
8 months' average, May to December, inclusive.
0 9 months' average, April to December, inclusive.




79
Table 58.—NAVAL STORES
STEAM DISTILLED NAVAL STORES 1

GUM TURPENTINE

GUM ROSIN

Stocks, WholeNet
end of
sale
receipts month
(3 ports)* (3 ports) 2 price8

Stocks, WholeNet
end of
sale
receipts
month
(3 ports) 2 (3 ports) 2 prices

Wood rosin
YEAR AND MONTH

Barrels of 50 gals.

Dolls,
per gal.

Barrels of 500 Ibs.

Dolls,
per bbl.

Production

Stocks
at
plants

Bbls. of 500 Ibs.

Wood
turpentine

Produetion

Stocks
at
plants

Bbls. of 50 gals.

Pine oil

Stocks
at
plants

Production

Gallons

59, 721
71, 562
96, 818
122, 792
55,481
27, 764

$0.43
4.47
.46
.49
.49
.59
1.20
1.74

58, 914
92, 260
98, 905
79, 787
53, 138
54,092
69, 912

275, 273
322, 029
323, 461
292, 126
223, 926
157, 943

$4.82
4.02
3.77
5.80
6.39
10.56
15.16
15.29

22, 110
21, 765
26, 515
25, 667
24,319
25, 279
33,876
28, 309

47, 707
26, 762
28,610
38, 567
40, 731
44, 827
56, 294
66, 443

.68
1.15
1.17
.91
1.01
.93
.62
.57

65,939
83, 439
97, 575
92, 295
90, 195
91, 426
117, 201
99,938

316, 585
308, 498
266, 932
250, 478
192, 908
145, 074
178, 557
190, 690

5.79
5.77
6.01
6.17
10.94
12.41
10.13
9.16

23,865
27, 222
34, 572
35, 043

35,449
22, 746
67, 051
107, 005

4,883
5,219
6,648
6,260

8,144
3,156
9,123
8,345

161, 550
195, 166
231, 863
224, 496

654, 069
407, 587
451, 633
777, 575

7,386
5,138
10, 132
30,989

48, 993
40, 047
24,668
31, 802

.83
.75
.74
.67

39, 136
27,214
36, 322
97, 028

160, 120
147, 635
81, 013
107, 562

12.38
11.71
11.23
9.70

35, 168
32, 043
35, 313
34, 598

33, 513
45, 124
53, 866
58, 652

7,053
6,587
7, 253
7,035

5,531
7,314
6,953
7,473

241, 563
207, 197
245,232
239, 027

305, 151
313, 457
345, 842
355, 790

48, 025
57, 730
50, 466
47,809

47, 264
52, 340
58,390
58,915

.63
.57
.56
.59

150, 397
184,971
169, 439
158, 514

153, 445
165, 991
179, 734
198, 883

9.67
9.93
9.74
10.62

36, 508
35, 197
36, 038
35, 521

64,763
72,454
72, 486
71,982

6,974
6,541
6,414
6,347

8,746
9,896
6,652
8,256

243, 880
222, 151
231, 350
242, 050

392, 864
428, 796
458,923
524, 246

45, 775
39, 115
35, 795
28, 154

73, 019
80,473
77, 676
81, 939

.55
.53
.51
.54

151, 045
132, 059
144,892
115, 397

229,426
222, 167
247,954
248, 755

10.08
9.24
8.55
8.70

34,839
35,963
35, 187
28,483

76, 327
82, 717
87, 179
85, 553

6,562
6,901
6,820
5,291

10,232
12,163
13, 385
12,869

244, 445
237, 625
235, 695
192,141

555, 818
588, 778
561, 363
588, 571

7,764
4,568
5,624
20, 765

72, 035
61,906
40, 338
45, 458

.60
.60
.60
.58

41, 160
30,549
25, 544
67, 762

200,262
159, 053
123, 074
140, 805

9.54
8.94
8.89
8.54

29,200
32, 792
35, 148
34,831

85, 413
90,429
98, 101
108, 394

5,771
5,645
6,647
6,052

10, 621
10, 477
10, 862
10,963

198, 646
237, 953
259, 079
240, 845

605, 771
641, 354
693, 522
727, 416

39,764
48, 111
46, 637
42,724

46, 741
61, 336
69, 245
73, 304

.54
.57
.55
.52

118, 460
148, 041
148, 250
145, 357

128, 789
165, 604
178, 225
227, 517

8.15
9.10
9.71
9.59

36, 036
36,054
37, 016
37, 623

114, 160
108, 200
112, 703
114,074

6,350
5,700
6,304
6,274

9,459
8,510
7,786
6,898

248,606
191, 947
238, 767
225, 668

768, 195
829, 507
824, 671
822, 813

34, 312
33,924
28,160
27,360

73, 595
79,509
83,472
90,371

.52
.53
.59
.61

116, 029
115, 235
117, 168
125, 706

230, 672
216, 917
246, 178
271, 187

9.18
9.31
9.59
9.34

35, 473
36, 942
35, 771
33,630

112,964
111, 728
112,680
115, 216

6,257
6,486
6,882
6,750

6,027
5,704
5,944
6,883

211, 828
219, 525
211,960
209, 125

845,762
845,645
827, 633
898, 610

January
February
March
April

8,175
4,758
8,440
31,610

79, 837
67, 956
48, 396
52, 687

.61
.58
.58
.54

45, 203
29,284
37, 733
100,454

227,409
177, 232
100, 722
108, 335

8.87
8.30
7.86
7.41

37, 765
33, 152
37, 361
36,150

120, 956
126, 264
128, 665
124, 192

7,347
6,436
7,059
6,917

7,869
7,648
6,773
5,356

238, 703
204,700
235, 445
212, 720

938, 737
899, 181
888, 915
895, 099

May
June
July
„
August

43, 722
48, 658

53, 536
57,728

.54
.52
.52

137, 384
154,168

120,665
123, 505

7.58
7.88
8.51

37, 708
36, 123
37,844

115, 870
113, 449
104, 492

6,855
6,505
6,718

4,503
4,778
4,628

219, 304
215, 153
235, 892

878, 784
873, 358
882, 037

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

26,494
22,807
25, 819
23,006
13, 349
15,481
21, 131

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

1

i

1927
January _
February
March
April

_ _
_.

May
June
July
August

-

September
October
November
December

_-

1938
January
February
March
April
_

_

May
June
July
August
September _
October
November.-

_

Dpr>fiTnb«r

1929

September
October..
November
December

_ .
_
__
___

1
Compiled by the Hercules Powder Company from reports of 8 firms representing almost the entire output of steam naval stores from distillation with steam from the
oleoresin within or extracted from the wood, generally softwoods.
2
Represent the receipts and stocks at Jacksonville, Savannah, and Pensacola, as reported by the Naval Stores Review, earlier data being supplied by the Savannah
Board of Trade, Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, and Pensacola Chamber of Commerce. Monthly averages for 1914 and 1915 are based on the season beginning Apr. 1 of
the year
(No. 10), p. 40.
3
 indicated and thereafter on the calendar year. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issuethe New York market. Quotations for rosin cover B grade
Oomoiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent average prices in
unit 280 pounds gross, ex dock, and turpentine quotations cover southern, in barrels, both being at New York. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in November, 1925,lssue
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/22.
/No. «m. n.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

80

Table 59.—CHEMICAL PRICES, ARSENIC, AND ROOFING
[Base year in bold-faced type]

WHOLESALE PRICE INDEXES
Drugs
Essenand
Phartial
maceu- oils*
ticals i

YEAR AND MONTH

Refined

Crude
Crude
drugs i

Relative to August, 1914

Chemicals 2

Oils
and
fats 2

Production

Relative to 1913-14 a

Stocks,
end of
month

100
213
265
158
131
135

100
185
202
134
174
220

100

201
196
129
120
142

125

142

155
157
156
158
167

140
174
170
131
154

208
198
205
202
201

114
113
113
113
113

138
154
150
131
124

1,497
697
458
1,161
1,374

156
160
169
169

203
123
126
128

202
207
206
201

113
112
112
112

134
134
133
128

January
February
March
April

169
169
169
169

130
131
132
139

208
209
212
210

112
112
113
113

May
June
July
August

169
169
168
164

159
166
162
161

208
199
197
193

164
164
164
164

158
155
175
182

164
164
164
164
163
163

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

_.
._ _.

monthly average
__
monthly average _ _ _ _
monthly average
.
monthly average
_.
monthly average _ _ __ _ _

Production

Stocks,
end of
month

Shipments
Thousands of
squares 7

Short tons

100

1914 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average

PREPARED
ROOFING ^

ARSENIC s

DRY ROOFING
FELT«

Production

Stocks,
end of
month

Short tons

100
i
1

2,079
2,360
2,182
2,541
2,542

8 9, 016
8 12, 055
16, 078

2, 427

1,072

742

2,924
3,575
3,149
1,670
2,407

1,519
923
520
860
775

3,268
7,034
3,982
1,842
2,331

2,714
2,731
2,670
2,833

17, 406
20, 297
23, 030
. 25, 276
23, 452

2,296
3,588
4,043
3,349
3,198

1,472
1,004
1,269
1,125

1,422
1,260
1,326
1,375

873
937
822
782

1,787
2,321
2,255
2,101

3,287
3,218
3,280
3,386

27,902
27, 512
25, 680
25, 853

2,907
3,748
3,810
3,118

130
122
122
125

1,158
1,600
1,076
1,098

1,407
2,005
1,834
1,863

827
668
688
669

2,496
2,403
2,479
2,760

1,587
1,320
3,248
3,016

21, 743
19, 098
25, 492
27, 534

3,088
3,558
2,775
2,844

113
113
113
113

128
123
123
121

1,225
1,703
1,385
2,086

1,876
2,099
2,105
2,999

713
732
728
803

2,370
1,916
1,568
1,618

3,008
3,236
2,398
2,447

27, 521
28,476
25, 810
25, 574

2,366
2,153
2,798
3,356

193
195
193
193

113
113
113
113

121
124
124
124

1,079
1,238
1,622
1,215

2,978
3,024
3,419
3,274

799
835
802
1,030

1,971
2,344
2,766
3,282

3, 774

24,343
23, 930
17,424
14, 475

3,427
3,367
4,045
4,600

191
195
206
205

195
195
194
187

113
113
113
113

126
128
127
123

1,136
1,262
1,307
1,382

3,019
2,782
2,418
2,451

913
900
945
836

3,571
3,643
3,458
3,316

19,833
24, 271
28,153
30, 177

4,630
3,274
3,102
2,907

193
190

187
184

113
113
113

118
116
117

1,888
2,452

2,073
2,161

779
917

3,236
3,709

31, 402
29, 981

2,138
3,077

1927

September
October
November
December

-- _

1938

-_

September
October
November
December

_

1929

January
February
M^arch
April
May
June
July
August

- -_ -- -

September
October
November
December
1 Compiled by the Oil, Paint, and Drug Reporter from weekly wholesale quotations of 40 crude botanical drugs, 20 essential oils, and 35 drugs and pharmaceutical
chemicals, respectively.
2 The chemical price indexes from Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering include quotations on 25 chemicals and 15 oils and fats selected on the basis of their importance as representing both qualitatively and quantitatively the principal branches of the chemical industry. These prices are weighted on the basis of total production
plus total imports in the year 1923. The figures are averages of weekly prices. A similar index, including 25 of the principal chemicals, oils, and fats used in the new
indexes, with yearly data from 1917 to 1923 and monthly data for 1923 and 1924, may be found in the November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 105.
a Compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics. Figures on crude arsenic cover this element in its primary state, while those on refined arsenic cover this
commodity as derived from the crude. Stocks are those in producers' hands at the end of the month. Monthly data on refined arsenic from 1923 appeared in the August,
1925, issue (No. 48), p. 48.
* Compiled by the Prepared Roofing Manufacturers' Association until 1926 and prorated to 100 per cent of the industry from reports received from 60 to 90 per cent of
the total machine activity, comprising all types of asphalt-satuiated roll roofing whether surfaced or not and all types of asphalt shingles. Monthly data back to 1919
appeared in the September, 1923, issue (No. 25), p. 55. Beginning with 1926 the name of the association was changed to the Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Association, and
data6 are prorated to 100 per ceot of the industry.
Compiled by the Felt Manufacturers' Association, including reports from 16 identical mills, until 1925, when 17 firms reported, and in January, 1929, when 20 firms
reported. The felt is made from waste rags and the data are said to represent about 50 per cent of the industry. Data as to receipts of rags and paper and stocks of all
kinds appeared in the November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 104. Average prices are also included in the reports of the association.
* Relative to 12 months' average, July, 1913, to June, 1914.
7
A roof square is equivalent to 100 square feet of covering as measured on the roof.
8 6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.




81

Table 60.—CHEMICALS
SULPHUR

SULPHURIC
ACID

Production 3
(quarterly)

Exports i

Long tons

YEAB, AND MONTH

Pounds

NITRATE OF
SODA*

Whole- ProducProduc- Sales in
tion in Imports Imports tion in
Gersale
many
price 4
Chile
France
Dollars
per 100
pounds

1919-13 mo. av __
1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av_
1917 monthly av__

614, 940
807, 417
1, 098, 015
6, 486, 619
5, 538, 625
5, 293, 578

1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

av _
av__
av
av _
av _
av__

6 251, 939

6, 691, 220
1, 774, 625
2, 415, 612
1, 067, 862
1, 039, 199
686, 981

1.60
1.00
1.12
.91
.76
.73

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly a v _ _
monthly av
monthly a v _ _
monthly av_monthly av. .

221, 294
351, 330
472, 851
527, 733
492, 387

939, 389
628, 094
768, 700
626, 030
583, 497

510, 820

Metric
tons

$1.00
1.00
1.30
2.00
1.70

1927
September.
October
November
December ___ _ _
1938
January
February _March
April
May
June
July
August

May
June
July
August—

Consumption in
Exports i Southern
States 6

Metric tons, KzO
content

__

September
October.
November
December

238, 712
139, 921
210, 386
109, 629
89, 317
158, 809

153, 756
33, 955
110, 158
30, 764
45, 205
74, 307

1,564
5,230
14, 880
8,739
20, 103
19, 205

.71
.70
.73
.75
.78

200, 266
209, 982
167, 836
134, 279
263, 625

82, 217
92, 686
76, 183
62, 399
85, 659

19, 088
21, 751
25, 304
22, 416
29, 809

22,583
25, 707
30, 555
31,003
34, 193

70, 172
102, 121
91, 656
103, 292
118,435

275, 722
285, 162
274, 458
320, 047

1, 177, 544
1, 653, 945
1, 566, 300
1, 509, 480

.75
.75
.76
.78

143, 700
189, 200
210, 000
233, 849

64, 753
55, 154
67, 091
66,546

28,822
27, 884
17, 039
16,227

31, 800
33, 000
30, 204
29,952

Ii8, 629
63, 730
68, 363
100, 470

264, 634
391, 376
355, 709
355, 590

.78
.78
.78
.78

242, 800
236, 600
253, 800
255,100

69, 867
144, 716
177, 187
131, 819

31,646
33, 774
22,230
28, 137

31,290
33, 958
34, 770
28, 600

202, 010
208, 400
161, 460
67, 414

.78
.78
.78
.78

262, 400
252, 300
264, 300
275,000

113, 722
76, 135
28,150
75, 318

12, 997
14,525
38, 461
57, 327

32, 000
34, 000
30, 260
34, 300

.78
.78
.78
.78

259, 400
282, 300
285,900
293,600

36,644
43, 385
45, 575
85,391

43, 313
28, 242
24, 639
22,412

.78
.78
.78
.78

274,500
255,500
279, 100
272, 200

83,698
146, 304
101, 297
119, 620

24, 724
28,489
22, 116
21, 299

287,306
693,027

539^832

21, 124
22, 291
17, 611
6,305
978
802

429,264
626, 792
704, 726
634,959

516, 372

Long
tons

Short
tons

103, 391
119, 938
85, 639
30, 647
32, 747
28,733

43, 177
52, 155
45, 143
64,349
101, 535
128, 601

581, 760
441, 867
632, 942
322, 787

526, 264

Shipments

Short tons

515, 617
732, 598
773, 624
291, 035

..

1929
January
February
March
April

Stocks,
end of
month

Production

559, 952
579, 759
727, 558
842, 460

440, 853

400,901

September
October
November
December

Long tons

FERTILIZER

454, 326
474, 080
417, 475
540, 948

526, 009
„

SUPERPHOSPHATE 2

POTASH 1

.78
.78
.78

276,600
262,600

127, 645
64, 733

24, 696
9,895

!

18, 713
54, 509
117, 995
74, 620
77, 912
91, 641

411,678
232, 193
292, 224
360, 412

97, 149
134, 487
160, 864

89, 027
95, 196
91,899
105, 920
100, 869

390, 477
431, 015
429, 415
381, 085
465, 717

1, 365, 635
1, 582, 559
1, 839, 569
2, 056, 493

201, 913
110, 290
80,068
87, 631

113, 322
96, 672
95, 605
78, 519

175, 070
127, 422
87, 965
156, 355

366, 003
326, 924
352, 691
322, 324

2, 262, 255
2, 134, 555
1, 396, 888
900, 499

111,
200,
463,
382,

731
458
774
561

87, 632
74, 955
114, 632
127, 111

626, 560
1, 113, 569
2, 185, 435
862, 878

63, 746
99, 948
102, 608
108, 696

285, 639
294, 115
293, 250
294, 381

823, 843
1, 025, 612
1, 258, 339
1, 414, 615

136, 387
60, 343
64, 401
82, 876

146, 480
111, 581
98, 803
103, 575

185, 025
45, 776
19, 101
62, 903

35,200
40,000
37,400
38, 538

140, 818
76, 507
82,463
107, 146

276, 811
350, 958
322, 452
349, 685

1, 424, 169
1, 566, 402
1, 832, 363
2, 058, 284

154,443
91, 165
75,680
107,008

99, 149
86, 289
94, 085
66, 134

138, 470
151, 128
84,947
112, 659

42,393
37, 513
39, 693

164, 736
144, 676
233,000
107,588

370, 231
307, 300
282, 504
286, 897

2, 253, 708
2, 316, 451
1, 558, 588
831, 841

122, 439
179, 023
414, 243
468, 200

99,751
100,508
165, 551
136, 937

450,600
817, 489
2, 118, 688
1, 242, 330

77, 326
97, 723

276, 462
302, 434

822, 659
965, 653

116,580
55, 459

114, 655
140, 090

219, 763
99,407
20,047

j

j

1
Data compiled by V. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Potash imports include potash imported as chemicals and also the
muriate and sulphate used in fertilizers. "Total fertilizer" exports are made up largely of phosphate rock. Potash data from France and Germany are secured by the
department from Potasses a' Alsace, the French government office having charge of potash mines in France, and the Kali Syndicate, controlling the German potash market,
respectively. Monthly data on these two items from 1924 appeared in the June, 1928, issue (No. 82), p. 22.
2 Data compiled by the National Fertilizer Association from reports of acidulators representing about 80 per cent of the industry; figures in greater detail divided intonorthern and southern sections are obtainable from the association's reports. Details by sections for 1925 appeared in the January, 1926, issue (No. 53), p. 16. Tons are of
16 per cent available phosphoric acid, which is equivalent to 320 pounds per ton.
3
Compiled from reports to the Texas State Comptroller from three companies, representing practically the entire industry. Figures given are for quarters ended in
month indicated. Similar figures for quarters since June 30, 1923, were given in the April, 1927, issue (No. 68), p. 23.
* Wholesale average monthly price of 60° sulphuric acid at New York from 17". S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
s Compiled by the National Fertilizer Association from tag sales reports of Commissioners of Agriculture of 12 Southern States (Virginia, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Missouri, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas). Monthly data from 1920 in May, 1926, issue (No. 57), p. 17.
6
Average for last 3 quarters of year.

61139°—29



6

82

Table 61.—COTTONSEED PRODUCTS
COTTONSEED OIL

COTTONSEED CAKE
AND MEAL

COTTONSEED 1

YEAR AND
MONTH

Con- Stocks
Receipts sump- at mills,
at mills tion
end of
(crush) month

Production

Short tons

Refined

Production^

Stocks,
end of
month

Factory
consumption
Total
In
(qtly.) 5 oleo.fl

Stocks,
end of
month 1

8

140, 040
111, 987

s 64, 419
94, 086

8

Production i

Dolls,
perlb.

Thousands of pounds

1913 mo. av_ ..
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
8 768, 756 s 463, 094 1,007,012
1917 mo. av
357,084
320, 871
538, 609

Price, summer yellow
prime *

Crude i

Stocks
at mills, Ex- 8
end of ports
month1

Production

Short tons

^0. 072
.OC6
.068
8
.106
116, 385
.155
238, 965

170, 890
99, 087

OLEOMARGARINE 2

223, 620
176, 747

8

Consumption

Thous. of Ibs.

148, 815
180, 400

41,878
42, 062
60, 785
51, 330
16, 890

7
7
7
7

12, 1C2
12, 002
12, 151
12, 709
23,937

11, 861
11, 798
11, 787
12,404
19, 044

1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av
1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av

358, 344
352, 277
304, 727
338, 488
268, 135

354, 433
392, 789
307,955
335, 846
253, 578

534, 825
360, 861
259, 179
304,661
3157 672

106, 985
119, 162
95, 223
106, 442
77,886

96, 543
107, 478
104, 563
94, 699
57,623

101, 547
97, 483
81, 645
98,826
68, 934

225, 152
169, 226
223, 758 0 1, 456
183, 517
1,239

231, 106
189, 530
271, 659
253, 101
188, 105

.201
.239
.153
.079
.102

175, 239
182, 653
137, 015
149, 183
114, 795

86,007
109, 522
198, 187
143, 476
133,357

486
26, 172
14, 169
24,400
IS, 707

29, 217
30, 733
29,957
17, 840
15, 380

26, 877
29, 081
30, 014
17, 518
14, 969

1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.
1927 mo.
1928 mo.

262,946
363, 132
439, 520
486, 842
468, 068
410, 835

266, 810
321, 566
423, 562
495, 473
491, 853
384, 411

327, 425
435, 341
592, 223
587, 386
594, 639
519, 072

81, 146
96, 286
125, 987
147, 024
150, 563
121, 683

61, 544
72,957
72, 816
75, 791
108, 154
93, 969

71,498
88, 056
112, 122
123, 079
132, 741
110, 705

168,812
194, 965
290, 279
280, 618
298, 294
294, 167

1,705
1,693
2,029
1,954
2,052
2,244

156, 684
152, 824
225, 114
209, 153
413, 970
397, 636

.113
.110
.108
.118
.097
.099

122,901
147, 394
197, 303
226, 619
220,671
173, 779

127, 702
122, 743
139, 910
226, 264
142,217
102, 404

14, 349
25, 907
33, 290
35, 088
36, 713
24, 209

18, 839
19, 294
19, 568
20, 293
23, 060
26, 374

18, 872
19, 156
19, 359
20, 226
22, 881
26, 456

1928
January. _ _ __
February
March
April _ _

318, 741
170,491
95, 722
17, 017

570, 704
448, 324
322, 955
165,097

760,990
483, 157
255, 924
107, 844

182, 334
144, 040
107, 322
57,429

170, 499
161, 127
124,029
84,474

143, 230
138, 895
124, 274
84,027

2,162
2,114
2,214
2,013

539,445
568, 667
543, 876
516,031

.101
.093
.096
.099

258, 150
201, 609
151, 549
81, 369

176,416
171, 458
110, 600
84, 515

53, 249
27, 671
12, 514
8,230

26, 205
27, 624
27, 288
24, 291

27, 729
26, 327
27,427
22, 800

May
June
July
August

7,846
18, 772
24, 936
169, 498

65,241
38, 955
33,230
73, 795

50,449
30, 266
21, 972
117, 484

24,064
13,500
11, 257
20, 863

49, 207
34, 559
20, 351
15, 346

62, 915
22, 274
25, 930
19, 677

2,135
2,106
1,867
2,062

481, 749
415,047
335, 993
236, 200

.106
.102
.101
.094

30, 526
19,847
14,065
34,760

59, 552
45, 241
32, 648
19, 794

4,906
143
71
944

23, 744
23, 738
21,444
23, 610

23, 381
23, 926
20, 490
24, 965

420, 883
566,530
903, 031 1, 182, 175
869, 599 1, 323, 367
701, 116 1, 328, 703

126, 584
280, 383
272, 893
219, 532

67, 951
123, 167
143, 080
133, 837

61, 889
204, 255
223, 886
217, 211

2,437
2,678
2,621
2,522

159, 629
220, 449
322, 857
431, 694

.099
.099
.096
.103

185, 723
405, 150
387, 160
315,442

61,350
124, 196
160, 899
182, 173

22, 013
60, 015
40, 482
60, 272

28, 446
30, 631
30, 569
28,899

29,002
30, 137
32, 755
28, 526

2,283
2,314
2,387
2,362

511, 162
567,279
584, 978
570, 889

.103
.109
.106
.102

337, 989
235, 477
167, 225
107, 296

237,067
256, 982
239,050
225, 362

34, 135
27,011
23,790
6,675

29,474
28,943
29,718
28,704

27,847
32, 713
28, 260
27,067

2,518
2,124

512, 118
431, 100
338, 320

.097
.096

50,278
28, 423
25, 971

191, 983
142, 014
80, 914

6,151
4,777

28,357
24, 276

29,008

av
av
av
av
av
av

September
October. _
November
December

869, 738
1,519,076
1, 010, 791
707, 392

303, 478

245, 123

308, 776
•

319, 290

1929
January

February
March
April
May
June
July
August

420, 026
161, 745
106, 052
40, 308

748, 093
514, 032
364, 816
236, 246

999,136
646,849
386, 986
191, 048

237, 127
165, 872
119, 825
80, 474

141, 595
125,900
106,955
80, 863

205, 804
167, 753
126, 859
101, 475

22,007
26, 041
29, 377

112, 421
63, 274
51,438

100, 634
63, 401
41, 340

39, 688
21, 552
18, 558

51, 284
30, 079
19,094

60, 581
40, 795
27,690

303, 618

303, 688

September
October...
November
December
1
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, covering the entire industry. Receipts of cottonseed at mills include seed later destroyed at mill,
but not seed reshipped. Stocks of crude oil include holdings of crude mills and of refiners and oil in transit to refiners and consumers, while stocks of refined ail include
holdings of refiners, brokers, agents, and warehousemen, and oil in transit to manufacturers of lard substitutes, oleomargarine, soap, etc. Yearly figures for all these items
are now based on the calendar year. Monthly data from 1920 on cottonseed stocks appeared in the August, 1922, issue (No. 12), p. 94, and on crude cottonseed-oil production
and 2stocks in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 87.
Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue. Production data represent total output, while consumption figures represent tax-paid withdrawals of both colored and uncolored oleomargarine, consisting of all withdrawals for domestic use except for the Government.
3
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
4
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly quotations at New York. Monthly data from 1920 appeared
in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 91.
5 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, representing practically complete consumption of refined cottonseed oil by factories in further
manufacture of such articles as lard substitutes, oleomargarine, soap, etc. Yearly figures are quarterly averages. Quarterly data for 1920 appeared in the August, 1923, issue
(No. 36), p. 119.
* Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, showing total consumption in the manufacture of oleomargarine, as ascertained from tax
reports. Data from July, 1921, together with figures for other ingredients consumed in the manufacture of oleomargarine, are given in the March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 25.
7
Average for fiscal years beginning July 1 of year stated.
8
5 months' average, August to December, inclusive.
8
6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.




83

Table 62.—FLAXSEED AND PRODUCTS

Minneapolis and
Duluth 2
ImYEAR AND MONTH ports1

Re- Ship- Stocks,
ceipts s ments end of
mo.

Mill receipts at
Duluth -Superior*

FLAXSEED

I

Oil mills s
(quarterly)

Argentina

Ship-

Factory Stocks Whole- Shipments
sale
l
at facfrom
tories s price, Minne- Exports
New
8
(qtly.) York 9 apolis
apolis 3 (qtly.)

conProduc- ments
tion 5
from
sumpStocks, (qtly.) Minne- tion*

Con- Stocks, Exsump- end of ports 6 end of
tion
qtr.
mo.7 !

Thousands of pounds

Thousands of bushels
1913 IK onthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av__.
19 16 monthly av.__
1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av___
1919 monthly av___
1920 monthly av_._

548
771
1,225
1,092
783
1,081
1,170
2, 053

2,315
1, 196
952
1,494
786
913
778
976

1, 526
702
460
871
476
439
285
338

2,999
1,907
1,017
1,463
1,033
223 1050
173
58
63
897

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

1,027
1,243
2,028
1,382
1,376
1,879
1,818
1,488

839
758
1,504
2,360
2,010
1,441
1,680
1,509

564
395
704
1,564
1,082
692
974
885

2,085
283
517
991
1,414
1,743
2, 348
1, 478

1937
September
October _
November
December

1,716
1,758
1,491
1,029

5,394
7,386
3,111
862

1,103
2,006
3,242
2,034

1938
January
February
March
April

1,181
1,264
1,671
1,718

723
616
518
398

May
June
July
August

2,156
1,664
1,484
1,068

September
October
November.
December
1939
January
February
March
April
.

i

3,336
2,761
3,219
2,099
464
1,284
2,087
3,446

132, 897
120, 550
93,863
113, 232
121, 318

15, 210
11, 868
9,862
10, 662
11, 158
9,271
10, 026
7,856

47, 286
53, 551

728
1,415
2,374
515
1,520
2,617
1, 457

126, 856

Dolls,
per Ib.

Thous. oflbs.

65, 425
78, 457

$0. 062
.067
.077
.103
.151
.212
.236
.194

30, 166
20, 684
17, 188
18,706
18, 428
15, 998
18, 473
12, 069

72, 478
42, 451
50, 532
55, 637
25, 992
7,163
29,479
19, 635

_ _

6,176
6,407

1,066
2,668

45
41
95
131
159
172
244
187

6,507
6,085
8,543
9,522
10, 263
9,757
10, 438
10, 068

2, 050
1,501
2,760
3,331
3,997
3,687
5,008
4,661

4,463
3,038
3,779
4,830
3,430
5,270
6,161

2,867
1,768
2,168
3,433
3,517
4,667
4, 975
4,799

120, 703
114, 361
163, 391
176, 397
189, 962
180, 122
194, 179
187, 861

8,157
8,156
10, 763
10, 958
13, 537
11, 057
10, 617
14, 238

59,706
85,754
95, 169
96, 127
102, 935
103, 737
115, 810
124, 550

99, 611
100, 718
85, 549
81, 482
130, 026
150, 072
167, 426
176, 457

.093
.113
.133
.131
.139
.112
.105
.100

15,068
10, 790
17, 062
17, 370
24, 283
16, 741
17, 201
22, 903

48, 856
36, 739
47, 058
54, 463
54,224
49, 149
55, 275
46, 804

1,583
5,246
4,671
3,997

117
845
978
217

9,051

4,276

12, 970
13, 202
9,253
8,878

120, 117

117, 212

9,179

3,600
3,000
2,400
2,000

169, 274

12, 701

5,629
6,731
5, 381
5,113

113, 302

193,544

.104
.099
.099
.096

19, 420
31, 492
34, 857
25, 740

52,984
48, 625
58,522
53, 999

577
457
572
572

3,312
2,668
2,087
1,627

101
45
76
25

8,397
8,308
8,312
6,154

3,937
6,299
7,057
5,906

.098
.098
.099
.098

27,056
28,540
29, 547
21, 607

44,367
53, 532
53, 686
38,582

625
632
245
1,025

687
392
272
426

856
764
411
310

24
50
76
137

3,846
6,445
4,982
6,494

7,028
6,496
5,118
4,134

.103
.103
.100
.098

16, 621
11, 421
10, 057
16, 051

45, 331
45, 135
47,258
52, 392

1,254
1,209
1,417
1,533

monthly av_—
monthly av_,_
monthly av___
monthly av___
monthly av___
monthly av___
monthly av___
monthly av__.

May
June
July
August

LINSEED CAKE
AND MEAL

LINSEED OIL

3,812
6,600
2,140
770

1,260
2,348
2,862
199

7,009

3,346
3,150
1,968
3,150

.098
.101
.102
.101

26, 257
30, 071
31,468
26, 141

38, 772
51, 894
44, 131
46, 569

1,411
2,529
2,737
3,911

369
346
369
270

283
399
351
219

.100
.102
.102
.101

24, 411
23, 479
19, 427
16, 917

22, 859
22, 117
38, 874
36,028

2,518
2,366

313
492
381

101
271
340

.102
.105
120

12, 067

32, 501
30,065

11, 871

9,608

1,063
727
603
478

3,686

11, 191

69
34
13
7

3,034

7,603

62
615
2,585 1,014
1,243 515
1,257
115

4,261

7,663

10, 723

September
October
November
December

4,544

9,816

578 None.
33
764
360
8i

3,937
6,000
7,480
6,299

3,593

5,118
4,528
4,528

238, 046

223, 751

179, 532

141, 889

206, 273

200, 123

13,023
12, 917
15, 722
15,079
17, 245
17, 196
14,229
13, 571
14, 443
15, 437
13, 622
8,375

12, 782
13, 214
14,602
14,237

112, 199

237, 517

131,833

189, 281

136, 373

121, 276

117, 794

157, 754

121, 575

181, 439

138, 210

122, 937

18,005
184, 088

1

i

i Compiled by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
Compiled by the Northwestern Miller. These figures represent a total movement of domestic and bonded grain at Minneapolis and Duluth-Superior. Receipts and
shipments are totals of weekly figures with the first and last weeks of each month prorated, while stocks are taken on the day nearest the end of the month. These data
displace any previous table on this subject previously shown in the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS.
3 Does not include mill receipts at Duluth-Superior.
4
Compiled by the Northwestern Miller and represents the receipts at mills at Duluth-Superior as distinguished from the receipts at public and bonded warehouses.
« Compiled by the £7. & Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, covering practically the entire production, factory stocks, and factory consumption, of fats and
oils and their raw materials. Quarterly data from 1920 appeared in the August, 1923, issue (No. 30), pp. 115 and 119. Data on flaxseed have been reduced to bushels from
original data in tons. Annual figures are quarterly averages. Data prior to 1919 collected by the U. S. Food Administration and published in detail in the supplement to
Bulletin 769 of the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
6
Compiled by the Argentine Ministry of Agriculture, and converted to bushels from original data in metric tons. Monthly d.ata from 1920 appeared in October, 1923,
issue (No. 26), p. 50.
7 Compiled by the Oil, Paint, and Drug Reporter, representing stocks on the Saturday nearest to the end of the month.
8
Compiled by the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce.
9
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly prices at New York. Previous to October, 1925, prices were
quoted per gallon and hav^e been reduced to pounds at 7Y& pounds to the gallon. Monthly data from 1909 appeared in the November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 26,
10
 months' average.
10

3

84

Table 63.—TOTAL VEGETABLE OILS AND COPRA
TOTAL VEGETABLE OILS

YEAR AND
MONTH

COPRA

Stocks, end of
quarter 1
Factory
conProExImImduc- sumpports 2 ports • ports 3
tion, l
tion i
Crude Refined
crude
Thousands of pounds

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av
monthly av_ 578, 749
monthly av_ 474, 776

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_

1927
September
October
November
December
1928
January
February
March
^.pril
May
June
July
August
1

September
October
November
December
1929
January
February
March
April

IVIay
June
July
September
October
November
D ecember

COCONUT OR COPRA OIL

Production * Factory consumption Stocks, end of
quarter 1
Fac- Stocks,
tory end of ImRefined
con3
sump- quar- ports
Re111
ReCrude fined Crude1
tion i ter i
oleo- Crude fined
Total i margarine *
Short tons

Thousands of pounds

24, 575
19, 547
31, 641
16, 977
11, 772
10, 437
17, 599
16, 863

21, 387
26, 441
20, 636
30, 133
36, 850
65, 295
67, 495
71, 390

1,265
2,503
4, 512
6,615
15, 279
17,944
10,788 42, 153 22, 184
8,966 25, 276 10,665

6,016
4,834
5,264
5,362
13, 591
29,674
23, 422 53, 886 69, 273 105, 564
18, 027 32, 805 46, 486 73, 525

53,055
59, 026

155, 220
93,277

34, 958

28, 499
53, 298
52, 295
67,641
55, 368
55, 815
58, 697
63, 564

7,888
11,206
13, 874
12, 128
15, 170
19,067
18, 791
23, 023

21, 525
35,881
46, 245
37,066
40, 177
50, 430
54,202
61, 728

15, 810 28,299 30, 669 58, 773
18, 943 46, 381 33, 811 76, 333
15, 157 58, 980 43, 095 90,001
18, 730 47, 839 43, 430 90, 943
19, 431 51, 901 49, 280 96,364
20, 428 65, 178 57, 809 108, 122
24, 447 70, 414 60, 773 131, 224
24, 220 77, 795 73, 978 146, 179

34, 855 «5,316 73, 550
41, 270 4,480 115, 996
52, 985 6,323 72, 692
6,938 48, 846
52, 726
51,444 7,576 51, 322
51, 823 8,137 69, 989
59, 459 10, 133 97, 587
66, 778 13, 321 83,472

19, 051
23, 522
25, 527
14, 895
13, 616
12, 943
14, 897
13, 049

21, 694
15, 637
23, 422
29,582

50,945

9,340

15, 430

55, 132

24, 853

25, 936
22, 702
30, 095
29,339

90,680

541, 107

55, 985
55, 387
6,484 68, 589
8,481 60, 010

98, 358

15, 492

578, 644

9,405
8,939
9,406
4,618

59, 870
49, 811
56,179
65, 152

26,872
7,939
15,200 62, 844
11, 334

1,996
1,652
1,145
1,444

57, 049
59, 951
53, 379
56, 364

21,383
20, 488
24, 407
19, 716

2,222 80, 914
3,681 82, 176
5,570 71, 918
3,928 70, 010

20,754
22, 897
30, 955
28,544

2,884 74, 261
3,637 80, 125
2,608 85, 328
1, 575 106, 331

23,474
22,209
31, 587
29,868

1,816 129, 285
1,428 91, 375

34, 728
23, 828

635, 803
511, 121

506, 533
378, 498

283, 592
352, 769

504, 221 502, 353
436, 828 459, 600
506, 336 511, 732
555, 423 560, 119
662, 690 673, 135
732, 036 755, 787
761, 816 786, 824
683, 881 772, 760

334, 199
331,583
306, 329
269, 540
342, 930
399, 544
464,987
452, 361

295, 979
224, 770
199, 737
201, 756

21, 705

250,978

5,729
3,733

525, 609

401, 234

259, 013

540, 274

259, 809
458, 290
424, 001

6,978
4,749
4,117

5,901

4,500

2,086
5,411

1,072,138 994, 797

790, 023

846, 483

563, 562

562, 250

392, 137

603, 088

396, 782

450, 387

427, 798

529, 345

351, 893

196,068

1,125,564 1,112,122 498, 520

470, 904

884, 022

986, 366

526, 085

615, 171

476, 613

679, 883

491, 701

470, 407

i

"

6,998
10, 705
6,615

9,885
10, 923

18,482
15, 525
14, 668

9,744

50,360

11, 721

64,582

14, 413

69, 124

22, 793

71,097

24, 671

73, 519

42,567

32, 751
22, 271
20, 889
23, 112

65, 607

57, 003 131, 390

54, 840

72, 448

73, 169 133, 912

65,590

75, 935

15, 076
12, 671 64, 857
19 629
12, 581

73, 793 148, 824

69,005

62, 572 135, 650

55, 912

10, 436
12 286
12, 373
13,549

13, 191
14,009
13, 381 99, 038
12,284
11, 613
11, 791
10 642
11,910

28,664

12,853

70, 022

11, 930

34,008 82, 269 73, 389 143, 561 66,833
31 534
29,672
36, 444 88,120 86, 156 156, 681 75, 360

14, 452 63, 216
15, 714
16, 026
14,839 101, 611

12, 942

35,164
35,264
30, 842
30, 319

15, 455
15, 221
15, 587 116, 267
14, 932

49, 260
32, 571

83, 755 162,063

75,543

92,993 73,704 154, 337

71, 436

90,175

14, 469

14,494

14, 603
12, 029 161, 103 21, 862

"

1 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, covering practically the entire production, factory stocks and factory consumption of fats and
oils and their raw materials. Quarterly data from 1920 appeared in the August, 1923, issue (No. 30), pp. 115 and 119. Annual figures are quarterly averages. Data prior
to 1919 collected by the U. S. Food Administration, and published in detail in the supplement to Bulletin 769 of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Data on production
and consumption of total vegetable oils represent those in the crude state.
2 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, including cottonseed, corn, and linseed oils.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Imports of total vegetable oils include the following oils: Chinese nut,
cocoa butter, coconut, cottonseed, olive (both edible and inedible), palm, palm kernel, peanut, rapeseed, soya bean and linseed. The figures for Chinese nut, inedible olive,
and rapeseed oils, when reported in gallons, have been converted into pounds, allowing 7M pounds per gallon.
4 Compiled by the U. S, Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, showing total consumption of coconut oil in the manufacture of oleomargarine, as ascertained from tax reports. Monthly data from July, 1921, together with figures for other ingredients consumed in the manufacture of oleomargarine are given in the March,
1926, issue (No. 55), p. 25.
6 6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.




85

Table 64.—ANIMAL FATS AND OILS
|
ANIMAL FATS

Factory
Produc- con- Stocks,
end of
sump- quarter
tion
tion

YEAR AND
MONTH

LARD COMPOUNDS AND
SUBSTITUTES

GREASES

Production

Fac- Stocks,
Stocks,
tory
con- end of Produc- end of
quarquartion
sump- ter
ter
tion

E1SH OILS

EDIBLE
GELATIN

ANIMAL GLUES

FacPro- tory Stocks,
duccon- end of
tion sump- quarter
tion

Production

Stocks,
Pro- Stocks,
end of Ship- duc- end of
quar- ments tion quarter
ter
(2)

Thousands of pounds
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

qtly. av__
qtly. av_.
qtly. av__
qtly. av__
qtly. av__
qtly. av__
qtly. av__
qtly. av__
qtly. av__
qtly.av__

67, 374
69, 741
95, 592
53, 082
57, 045
48, 098
41, 927
46, 621
50,880
45, 701

3 156, 770
196, 045
187, 631
207, 609
288, 155
285, 177
284, 916
285, 838

160, 387

180, 522

91, 545

62, 434

48, 676

153, 549

141, 931

95, 197

54,088

50, 198

612,837
497, 864
529, 623
529, 506

44, 609
45, 225
54,009
47,428
43, 228
46, 105
56, 225
67, 894
78, 795
95, 767

9, 517
15, 671
11, 756
16, 182
18, 674
18, 312
25, 879
26, 781

22,954

9,791
12, 044
19, 990
27, 513
29, 675
29, 067
38, 581
36, 141
42, 212
51, 482

242, 366

18, 127

44, 252

41, 010

338, 894

22, 926

23, 537

34, 702

51, 570

49,204

325, 939

30, 061

10, 654

39, 608

62, 199

28,040

36, 429

3

8,231
16, 507
13, 916
19, 754
21, 326
17, 271

25,291
20, 662
20, 860

23, 660
25, 015

24,924
24, 272
25, 043
26, 142
25, 902

86, 640

20, 364

36, 675

87, 440

27, 911

35, 226

4,541

8,421

5,344

9,265

5,055

9,277

2,497

7,297

4, 652

7,845

5,463

9,138

4,755

9,088

6,256 . 1,824
7,528
6,958
5,027
29, 759 6,325

7,284

160, 738

187, 222

96,504

171, 189

223, 969

102, 644

49, 527

50, 764

254, 728

23, 755

7,373

42, 901

72, 585

24, 180

36, 124

101,320

188, 796

91, 031

54, G06

51, 160

348, 208

22, 929

37, 567

41, 570

84, 432

23, 100

33, 063

163, 744

135, 514

89, 725

58, 286

52, 391

250, 120

26, 770

27, 045

44, 771

95, 964

28, 848

33, 616

6,447
7,130
6,937
6,292

6,731
6,724
6,546
6,175

5,840
5,797
5,902
6,076
6,075
7,113
6,061
6,100

6 814
6,672
36, 275 6,524
6,587

722, 968

160, 016

231, 458

106, 544

59, 122

51, 835

306, 938

26, 353

9,462

59, 240

88,662

30,777

556, 439

148, 592

267, 597

96, 556

64, 249

54, 731

236, 838

27, 300

10, 307

47, 736

93,040

26, 296

37,650

430, 660

147, 240

164, 493

84,506

66, 113

36, 930

302, 208

23,540

49, 586

44, 910

110, 302

20,454

32, 843

582, 138

143, 259

150, 120

95,073

63, 670

39, 308

297, 366

29, 929

22, 462

54, 042

91, 065

26, 095

656, 500

145, 151

242, 218

100, 606

57, 959

39,074

279, 575

27, 818

19, 921

46, 242

69, 632

27, 575

32, 520

563, 267

160, 120

249, 758

100, 871

49, 828

54, 522

297, 502

28, 941

10, 178

45, 417

90, 061

25, 930

30, 369

__..

.

May
June. .
July.
August -.
September—
October
November
December

9, 891
10, 454
9,084
8,650
8,421
8, 484

7,191

488, 250

September
October
November
December

4
4

2,401

485, 160

1928
January
February
March
April

3,305
3,541
3,134
3,868
4,387
4, 267

52, 442
50, 370
39,899 »6,674
34, 808 6,262
34, 132 6,620

583, 374

September
October
November
December

1939
January _
February
March _
April

51, 566
50, 273
44,325
61, 548
66, 911
61, 507
59,960
58, 409
53, 497
63, 289

561, 240

May
June
July
August

May
June
July
August

69, 648
86, 384
85,222
94, 430
102, 285
99,066
89, 849
88, 927
94, 976
95, 670

499, 291

1927
January
February
March
April

138, 071
185, 283
222, 630
175, 481
144, 576
162, 017
142, 383
176, 817
183, 875
203, 417

498, 741

1926
September
October.
November
December

573,051

144, 308
149, 276
141, 324
139, 043
140, 990
151, 861
141, 084
148, 649
164, 248
149, 777

367, 519
410, 676
473, 266
511, 451
612, 798

6,489
5,887
6,621
6,780

6,109
6 435
6,826
7,259

5,253

7 225
6,246

5,132

8,425

8,570

8,227

!
i

i

li
1

Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, except for shipments of animal glues, and representing practically complete production,
factory comsumption, and factory stocks. Quarterly data from 1920 appeared in the August, 1923, issue (No. 36), p. 115, except on animal glues and edible gelatin, for
which quarterly figures were not begun until 1924 and 1925, respectively. Further details are given in the quarterly press releases.
8
Compiled by the National Association of Glue Manufacturers from reports of 15 companies estimated to represent 70 per cent of the output of the industry.
Sales between members are excluded to avoid duplication. Further details are given in the association's reports.
6
3 Average of last 2 quarters of the year.
* Stocks on Dec. 31.
Monthly average.




86

Table 65.—CROP PRODUCTION

1

[Base year in bold-faced type]
WHEAT
CORN
YEAR AND MONTH

Winter

Spring

OATS

Total

BARLEY

RYE

RICE

POTA- APPLES FLAXTOES (total)
SEED

HAY,
TAME

TOTAL
VALUE
OF
CROPS*

Helative to 5-year average, 1909-1913
1909-1913 average
1914 final estimate
1915 final estimate
1916 final estimate
1917 final estimate
1918 final estimate
1919 final estimate
1920 final estimate—
1921 final estimate
1922 final estimate
1923 final estimate
1924 final estimate
1925 final estimate
1926 final estimate
1927 final estimate
1928 preliminary estimate.

100
154
151
108
93
127
171
137

100
84
144
64
91
145
85
91

100
129
149
92
92
134
140
121

100
99
110
95
113
92
104
118

100
100
135
109
139
135
104
131

100
105
124
99
115
139
80
102

100
119
150
135
174
252
209
168

100
99
122
172
146
162
177
219

100
115
101
80
124
115
90
113

100
144
130
110
95
96
81
127

100
70
72
73
47
68
37
55

100
104
128
136
124
114
130
134

100
107
121
159
236
251
270
191

135
132
128
133
90
141
124
130

88
115
92
111
112
83
101
132

118
126
116
125
98
120
116
131

113
107
113
85
108
99
102
105

94
106
114
131
130
109
103
127

84
99
107
98
116
100
144
193

171
286
175
181
129
113
161
116

158
174
142
137
140
176
188
176

101
127
116
118
90
99
113
129

56
115
115
97
98
140
70
105

41
53
87
161
115
99
132
99

123
143
133
145
128
129
158
139

122
157
175
163
154
137
149
148

Thous.
of tons

Thousands of bushels

YEAR AND MONTH

Millions
of dollars

1909-1913 average
1914 final estimate
1915 final estimate
1916 final estimate
1917 final estimate
1918 final estimate..
1919 final estimate..

445, 013
684, 990
673,947
480, 553
412, 901
565, 099
760, 377

245, 095 690, 108
206, 027 891, 017
351, 854 1, 025, 801
155, 765 636, 318
223, 754 636, 655
356, 339 921, 438
207, 602 967, 979

2, 713, 364
2, 672, 804
2,994,793
2, 566, 927
3, 065, 233
2, '502, 665
2, 811, 302

1, 143, 407
1, 141, 060
1, 549, 030
1, 251, 837
1, 592, 740
1, 538, 124
1, 184, 030

184, 813
194, 953
228, 851
182, 309
211, 759
256, 225
147, 608

36,093
42,779
54,050
48, 862
62, 933
91, 041
75, 483

23, 770
23, 649
28, 947
40, 861
34, 739
38,606
41, 985

357, 699
409, 921
359, 721
286, 953
442, 108
411, 860
322, 867

176, 340
253, 200
230, Oil
193, 905
166, 749
169, 625
142, 086

19, 543
13, 749
14, 030
14,296
9,164
13, 369
7,178

67, 097
70, 071
85, 920
91, 192
83,308
76, 660
86, 997

5,702
6,112
6,907
9,054
13, 479
14,331
15, 423

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

610, 597
600, 316
586, 878
571, 777
592, 259
401, 734
627, 433

222, 430
214, 589
280, 720
225, 617
272, 169
274, 695
203, 607

833, 027
814, 905
867, 598
797, 394
864, 428
676, 429
831, 040

3, 208, 584
3, 068, 569
2, 906, 020
3, 053, 557
2, 309, 414
2, 916, 961
2, 692, 217

1, 496, 281
1, 078, 341
1, 215, 803
1, 305, 883
1, 502, 529
1, 487, 550
1, 246, 848

189, 332
154, 946
182, 068
197, 691
181, 575
213, 863
184, 905

60,490
61, 675
103, 362
63,077
65, 466
46, 456
40, 795

52, 066
37, 612
41, 405
33, 717
32, 498
33, 309
41, 730

403, 296
361, 659
453, 396
416, 105
421, 585
323, 465
354, 328

223, 677
99, 002
202, 702
202, 842
171, 725
172, 389
246, 524

10, 752
8,029
10, 375
17, 060
31,547
22,424
19, 335

89, 785
82,458
95, 748
89, 250
97, 622
85, 717
86, 497

10, 909
6,934
8, 945
9,953
9,291
8,790
7,793

303, 110
344, 332
346, 027
350, 593
350, 593
356, 667

39, 368
36, 676
39, 274
43, 274
43, 274
43, 274
43, 274
41, 676

35, 445
36, 149
36, 545
38, 833
40, 422
41, 881

443, 640
459, 737
466, 815
463, 722
465, 651
464, 483

178, 185
178, 970
178, 949
177, 560
183, 309
185, 743

21, 461
24, 505
23,448
22, 472
20, 026
18,690

84, 383
88, 818
87, 859
80, 343
80, 343
92, 983

8,456

317, 264
304, 381

44,366
43, 634
41, 949
41, 028

32,686
34, 810

379, 270
372, 812

154, 302
149, 140

19,885
17, 979

98, 991
97, 421

final estimate
final estimate
final estimate
final estimate
final estimate
final estimate. ._
final estimate

1938
May 1 estimate
June 1 estimate
July 1 estimate
August 1 estimate
September estimate
October estimate
November estimate
December estimate. _ .
1929
May 1 estimate
June 1 estimate
July 1 estimate
August 1 estimate
September estimate
October estimate
November estimate
December estimate

486, 478
512, 252
543, 782
578, 599
578, 599
578, 599
578, 599
578, 133

595, 335
622, 148
582, 492
568, 233

256, 155
312, 693
322, 473
325, 266
325, 266
324, 058

251, 387
205, 652

799, 937
891, 292
901, 072
903, 865
903, 865
902, 191

833, 879
773,885

2, 735, 617
3, 029, 561
2, 930, 586
2, 903, 272
2, 895, 449
2, 835, 678

2, 662, 050
2, 740, 514

1, 320, 097
1, 442, 173
1, 453, 829
1, 452, 966
1, 452, 966
1, 448, 677

1, 247, 147
1, 202, 895

1 Yearly figures represent the latest revised estimates of total production for the year as reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Monthly figures are estimates of the current year's crop as made during the first week of that month. The preliminary estimates made in December of each year are subject
to revision in the final estimate made in December of the following year.
2
Estimated total value of all crops based on prices at the farm on Dec. 1. Prior to 1924, 23 crops were included, thereafter 55 crops, but the additional crops are minor
and have little effect on the grand totals.




87

Table 66.—WHEAT FLOUR
GRINDINGS OF
WHEAT

CON-

SUMPTION

PRODUCTION

STOCKS
(end of month)

Computed 4

All positions
(computed)

United States

YEAR AND
MONTH

United
States 2

Canada 3

Thous. of bushels
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

monthly av__
monthly av
monthly av_.
monthly av_.
monthly av__
monthly av_.
monthly av__
monthly av__

1937
September
October
November
December

48, 131
49, 792
44, 882
42,604

6,925
9,138
9,656
8,115

10, 470
10, 817
9,735
9,235

1928
January. _ _
February
March
April

42,823
41, 646
45,281
39, 519

7,246
6,737
7,481
6,058

May
_
June
July
August

40, 449
36, 083
39, 552
47, 657

May
June
July
August

10, 417

10,603
10, 318
10, 561

2,204
1,654

1,421
1,559
1,661
1,547
1,580
1,475
1,649

856
54
52
54
54
56

8,569
9,291
9, 223
9,719
9,492
9,626
9,300
9,460

7,148
7,228
7,701
7,344
7,046
7,197
6,966
7,200

1,400
1,252
1,359
1,333
927
994
1,068
996

606
790
928
956
860
871
772
896

8.34
7.30
6.38
7.18
a 83
8.44
7.43
7.21

7.05
6.14
5.36
5.98
7.67
7.24
6.69
6.41

8 762, 163
734, 824
702, 318
723, 384
722, 100

758,832

833, 108
866, 428

64
63
59
53

9,346
11, 617
11, 111
10, 451

8,490
7,900
6,800
6,100

1,281
1,513
1,326
1,126

677
899
1, 149
957

7.07
7.23
7.15
7.10

6.64
6.54
6.58
6.56

1,245
947
1,011
1,097

766
768
1,142
609

7.45
7.37
7.54
8.11

6.70
6.66
6.88
7.56

845
686
647
932

886
716
782
925

8.49
7.95
7.36
6.62

7.63
7.18
6.44
5.66

1,020
1,381
1,199
939

890
1,171
1,159
923

6.59
6.41
6.23
6.13

5.65
5.59
5.53
5.50

1,369
1,220
1,259
1,108

933
998
1,413
720

6.34
6.81
6.67
6.41

5.52
5.73
5.72
5.58

933
944

907
935

6.12
6.38
7.69

5.21
5.26
6.32

1,528

11, 337
10, 877

2,120
1,767

782,841

9,242
8,975
9,772
8,507

10,502

1,579
1,464
1,617
1,314

753,889
736, 387
799, 669
698, 267

55
56
54
51

8,207
9,340
10, 499
8,064

7,150
6,970
6,200
6,700

7,138
6,304
6,769
7,330

8,712
7,758
8,516
10, 370

9,960
8,854
9,409

1,541
1, 359
1,458
1,590

716, 029
645, 048
697, 371
819, 994

50
45
51
58

9,515
8,269
7,762
10, 431

6,300
6,200
7,847
7,400

48,014
52, 890
45, 289
42,246

8,554
9,473
9,690
7,600

10, 512
11, 587
9,909
9,269

11, 197
13, 316

1,892
2,130
2,175
1,672

820, 934
910, 900
780, 189
727, 305

66
66
61
57

9,077
12, 536
10, 401
9,420

8,500
7,900
7,500
7,730

45, 767
42, 004
39, 475

7,794
7,286
7,455
7,339

10, 014
9,026
9,207
8,636

10, 808
10, 020
10, 360

1,698
1,600
1,631
1,606

792, 580
716, 899
725, 848
683, 046

58
60
54
51

9,229
8,986
9,101
8,530

7,580
7,400
7,400
7,700

42, 738
40, 841

7,998
7,029

9,334
8,914

10, 680

1,749
1.548

742, 133
710, 647

55
54

9,847

» 3, 965
3,891
4,125
1,383

4,267

7,600

41,292

10, 229

9,938

$3.85
4.13
5.61
6.09
10.55
10.30
10.70
11.58

9,433
8,943

2,005

11,200

$4.58
5.10
6.66
7.26
11.39
(7)
12.00
12.68

8,156
8,237

12,540

11, 563

Dollars per barrel

Thousands of barrels

11, 816

10, 107
10, 738
9,661

StandWinter
ard
pat- straights
ents Kansas
Minne- City
apolis

408
389
464
660
731
839
839
394

9,146

10,480
11,047

United CanStates 5 ada e

1,023
1,064
1,305
1, 198
1,160
1,809

11,091

10, 102
10, 466

WHOLESALE
PRICES i

(qtly.)

9,919
9,815
9.317

« 9, 288
8,943
8,649
8,956
9,098
9,427

1939
January.. __
February
March __ _
April

Per cent

Held
by
mills2

9,338

« 43, 872
41, 277
39, 836
41, 191
41,738
43,454

September
October
_.
November
December _ _

Capacity 2

9, 702

6,386
6,886
7,418
6,940
7,110
6,732
7,532

_ __
__ _

Grain
offal 2

Thous. of
Ibs.

Thousands of barrels

monthly av
monthly av
monthly av_
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

Actual 2 Prorated <
(Census) (Russell)

Canada 3

EXPORTS

745, 242

4,540

4,189

3,634

4,180

4,597

4,356

3,826

September
October
November
December
1
Wholesale prices from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, represent averages of weekly quotations. Monthly figures from 1920 appeared in May,
1922, 9 issue (No. 9), p. 91.
Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of over 1,000 mills each month, which produced about 88 per cent of the flour manufactured in 1923, and over 91 per cent in 1925, according to the census of manufactures. This increase has been due partly to the addition from time to time of other firms
to the reporting list. Stocks include flour owned by millers whether in mills, elevators, or in transit.
3
Compiled by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Internal Trade Branch, covering merchant mills haying a capacity of about 120,000 barrels per month, and also custom
mills. The detailed reports of Canadian milling statistics also contain data on other grains as well as a division into eastern and western territory. Monthly data through
1922 4 appeared in May, 1925, issue (No. 45), p. 27.
Reported by U. S. Grain Corporation prior to July, 1920, covering practically the entire industry; beginning with July, 1920, from Russell's Commercial News, the
production and stock figures being prorated to 100 per cent from representative current data bearing a known relation to the total figures. Stocks represent flour in all
positions. Consumption is calculated from production, stocks, exports, and imports. Monthly production from January, 1914, given in October, 1922, issue (No. 14), p. 47.
8 Exports of flour from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
6
Exports of flour from Canada from Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7
No quotations.
8 Average for last 6 months of year.
» Average for 2 periods only, June and December.




88

Table 67.—WHEAT AND CORN
!

WHEAT

CORN

Includ- Including
Wheat ing
only wheat wheat
flour flour

by

•8*5
faQC
1
1

I*

No. 3 hard
winter,
Kansas City

Ship- 3 United States Canada'
Receipts 3 ments

Held

No. 1 northern spring,
Minneapolis

Visible supply -

mills
(quar- United
terly) i States Canada

YEAR AND
MONTH

Ex- Wholesale
ports * prices 6

Wholesale prices 6

Exports

Stocks (end of month)

Visible
supply, Re- 3 Ship-3 Grind- Corn, Cash,
conend of2 ceipts ments ings 7
in- tract,
month
clud- grades
ing
corn No. 2,
Chimeal cago

Dollars per bushel

Thousands of bushels
1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av_
1915 mo. av _
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av _
1920 mo. av

56, 720
54, 474
35,350
63,966
28, 234
50, 191
75, 610
39, 837

32, 665
32,604
32, 173
61, 055
47, 831
25, 871
32, 750
24, 583

18, 861
21, 619
32, 517
31, 493
27,038

1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av_
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av _
1925 mo. av__ 8 67, 712
1926 mo. av__ 85, 415
1927 mo. av__ 92, 432
1928 mo. av__ 109, 141

34, 316
34, 546
54,525
70,407
51, 241
49, 875
61, 098
88, 716

36, 516
56,510
63, 701
70, 359
63, 749
77, 741
80, 399
125, 256

36, 389
35,009
32, 363
40, 878
29, 993
32, 519
40, 105
43, 566

1927
September- __ 115, 728
October.. __
November
December
115, 637

84, 630
94, 607
96, 468
90, 506

22, 958
62, 492
121,009
147, 506

79, 740
73, 244
44, 823
26, 522

50, 374
49, 252
35, 156
19, 440

33, 775
29, 236
20, 731
6,917

1938
January
February
March
April _ _

82, 368
74, 260
69, 939
63,625

152, 560
152, 760
143, 919
129, 552

23, 542
22, 488
26,263
17, 949

14, 284
12, 771
14, 883
14, 269

50,381
40, 480
55, 362
92, 108

112, 054
99, 228
72, 891
32, 728

25, 922
15, 544
72, 618
84, 221

September. __ 151, 228
October
November .
December
153, 866

114, 523
138, 239
140, 775
142, 532

78, 069
158, 204
173, 890
197, 219

1929
January
February
March
April

130,063
126, 503
125, 351
117, 079
97, 962
94, 060
142, 855

Dolls,
per bu.

Thousands of bushels

10,233
13, 525
8,845
9,653

4,195
3,817
4,664
5,276
4,952
6,142
5,411
5,055

3,910
1,418
4,185
4,603
4,751
3,922
1,334
1,769

$0.63
.70
.73
.83
1.64
1.61
1.60
1.41

28,409
32, 814
22, 642
23,179
18,887
19, 831
20, 618
27, 587

18,949
21, 552
14, 211
14, 033
11, 261
10, 149
11, 421
17, 705

4,875
5,566
5,513
6, 279
5,855
6,341
7,130
7,244

11,015
13,844
3,724
1,676
1,180
2,094
1,248
2,242

.58
.62
.82
.97
1.04
.76
.88
.98

25, 110
21, 847
20, 439
28, 390

22, 116
18, 448
16, 971
37, 088

12, 257
9,665
10, 256
16, 064

7,501
8,612
8,064
6,301

571
538
860
1,206

.99
.88
.87
.87

1.33
1.33
1.38
1.52

30, 078
43, 582
46, 734
36,056

36,001
44,126
41, 039
19, 579

19, 551
22, 705
24, 402
18, 849

8,330
8,339
9,244
8,285

1,661
4,097
3,697
3,355

.89
.95
.99
1.03

1.96
1.79
1.47
1.38

1.60
1.47
1.20
1.06

27,554
17, 451
12, 479
9,985

23,708
18, 771
23, 742
21, 467

23,454
20, 221
16, 080
15, 778

6,921
6,428
5,833
5,193

1,186
1,045
891
1,018

1.07
1.03
1.08
.97

1.19
1.16
1.16
1.17

1.45
1.44
1.45
1.39

1.07
1.10
1.12
1.14

7,114
2,271
7,223
17,790

19, 658
13,323
26, 921
42, 712

11, 949
9,044
11, 868
18,564

6,541
7,725
7,535
6,550

668
870
2,124
6,288

.99
.94
.90
.86

25,030
19, 711
27, 566
10,554

1.21
1.28
1.25
1.20

1.42
1.40
1.35
1.25

1.14
1.18
1.16
1.10

28, 012
36, 265
37,100
30, 991

39, 876
29,229
21, 562
16, 433

19,838
13, 951
13, 461
17, 677

8,364
8,719
7,085
6,044

12, 357
8,087
5,021
2,560

.92
.97
.95
.91

31, 155
29,796

1.11
1.15
1.43

1.17
1.21
1.39

1.01
1.05
1.25

15, 571
13, 932
9,493

11,420
20,644

16, 276
15, 160

6,338
6,697
6,558

1,050
981

.86
.92
1.00

14, 198
16, 353
19, 919
23, 252

8,292
14, 488
17, 160
12,837
8,850
9,265
12, 341
18, 191

12, 897
19, 277
23, 034
18,230
14, 072
17, 405
22, 259
25,636

10, 214
12,291
8,081
16, 115
19,094
16,309
7,260
8,271

$0.88
1.01
1.31
1.44
2.31
2.19
2.57
2.60

$0.99
.99
1.31
1.42
2.29
2.19
2.39
2.54

$0.85
.93
1.29
1.34
2.30
2.15
2.39
2.44

11, 117
11, 486
16, 210
12, 824
6,111
10, 266
4,101
6,254

21, 158
17, 447
24,774
14,995
17,985

24,318
23, 107
18, 038
29, 891
21, 266
19, 388
26, 208
25, 460

23, 338
13,724
8,211
13, 858
7,210
11,514
14, 026
8,023

29,638
19, 359
14,327
19, 855
11, 380
15, 958
18, 834
12,503

13, 503
14,929
22, 099
25, 708
22, 398
24, 765
24, 728
34, 479

1.54
1.36
1.21
1.32
1.65
1.58
1.39
1.32

1.46
1.25
1.21
1.33
1.81
1.55
1.40
1.59

1.32
1.19
1.10
1.21
1.65
1.49
1.35
1.27

20, 686
25, 260
11,660
12, 868
16, 981
30, 041
33,074
21, 526

39,536
36,045
26,736
11,972

17, 118
23,475
57, 976
49, 114

1.34
1.29
1.30
1.32

1.42
1.45
1.41
1.44

1.31
1.28
1.31
1.32

5,956
2,276
2,740
2,723

11,560
6,536
7,290
7,660

18, 647
21, 828
23,794
11, 103

1.35
1.34
1.39
1.53

1.51
1.56
1.69
1.96

27, 912
14, 840
33, 543
46, 105

4,823
5,006
4,153
10, 394

8,624
8,093
7,064
14, 588

34, 268
25, 182
35, 944
29,220

1.57
1.48
1.38
1.19

73, 322
84, 423
43, 532
32,963

39, 508
30, 365
35, 627
21, 415

17, 939
22, 058
10, 561
7,641

22, 528
28, 272
15, 955
11, 866

30, 928
48, 957
80, 633
53, 243

188, 742
184, 467
181, 676
167, 837

22, 537
28, 698
27, 220
17, 472

16, 762
15, 192
16, 926
15, 697

3,399
3,214
3,487
3,942

9,559
8,704
9,153
8,930

142, 168
118, 249
103, 315

18, 637
25, 694

23, 560
18, 644

11, 741
4,564

15, 941
8,814

1

85, 385

May
June
July
August

May
June
July
August

46,083

107, 215
.
75, 355

September
October
November
December
•i

1 Compiled by the 17. $. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of over 1,000 flour mills representing 88 per cent of the industry. Stocks include
wheat owned by millers, whether at mills, in elevators, or in transit. Details by class of elevator are given in press releases.
2
Data from Bradstreet's representing stocks carried on Saturday nearest end of month at terminals, elevators, warehouses, docks, etc.
3
At principal primary markets, as compiled by the Chicago Board of Trade and reported by the Price Current Gram Reporter.
* Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly figures from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 88. Wheat
flour has been converted to wheat equivalent at 4J^ bushels to the barrel, while corn meal has been converted at 4 bushels to the barrel.
5
Exports from Canada from Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
e Compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, and represents average prices per bushel for reported cash sales, weighted by the
number of cars sold. Monthly data from 1909 appeared in the January, 1929, issue (No. 89) p. 18.
7
Grindings of corn by the wet process in the manufacture of cornstarch, glucose, etc., compiled by the Associate Corn Products Manufacturers from reports of 11 firms,
comprising practically the entire industry. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 43.
8
Average of 2 quarters, June and December.




89

Table 68.—OTHER GRAINS
BARLEY

YEAR AND
MONTH

Receipts
at
principal
interior
markets i

RYE

Wholesale
ReExExports, prices, ceipts,
Exports, Whole- Receipts
ports,
Visible includVisible includ- sale
at
at
Visible includ- bysaniing
prin- supply, ing oatsupply, ing ple, fair prin- supply,
cipal
end of
end of malt to good cipal end of
flour
in out has 3 malt- interior month «
as 3 cash, interior1 month - meal
as
Chi- 4 markets
grains
maring,
grains cago
grain 3
Chi- 4
kets^
cago

Thousands of bushels

Per
bushel

Thousands of bushels

1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo av
1918 mo. av
19 19 mo. av
1920 mo. av

9,058
7,435
8,385
9,438
6,907
6,118
7,746
3,815

5,021
5,241
4,071
5,040
4,818
4,483
8,708
3,438

1,065
1,518
2,377
2,041
1,800
1,799
4,005
1,807

$0.63 ,
.62
.70
.87
1.32
1.31
1.22
1.26

1, 294
1, 648
1,809
1,936
1,912
2,777
3,988
3,712

1921 mo.
1922 mo.
1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.
1927 mo.
1928 mo.

3,321
3,367
3,904
5,207
5,517
3,498
5,459
8,542

2,913
2,008
2,352
2,498
3,997
4,648
2,954
4,559

2,815
1,914
1,240
2,022
2,774
1,381
3,380
4,800

.64
.63
.66
.82
.85
.70
.83
.83

2,573
5,353
3,683
5,414
2,489
1,717
3,479
2,327

av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av

TOTAL
GRAINS

OATS

Per
bushel

Canada 5
Wholesale
Producprices,
tion,
cash, Grind- oatmeal
Chi- 4
ings
and
cago
rolled
oats

Per
bushel

Thousands of bushels

Thous.
of bus.

Thous.
of Ibs.

Exports,
including
flour
and
meal as
grains 3
Thous.
of bus.
18,473
25,820
39, 459
34,658
30, 113
34, 071
35, 616
35,233

13, 018
7,323

155
680
1,138
1,320
1,224
1,359
3,375
4,938

$0.64
.77
1.09
1.11
1.87
1.94
1.53
1.87

20,694
22, 200
22, 651
27, 299
24,844
28,335
19, 264
17, 801

22,907
24,390
20, 481
30, 336
23,493
22,703
22, 898
17, 610

446
2,927
8,725
8,464
8,266
9,586
4,643
1,084

$0.38
.42
.50
.46
.64
.78
.70
.80

2,785
5,516
14, 017
16,288
10,340
10, 493
5,304
3,310

2,512
3,967
2,668
3,082
2,408
1,003
3,014
1,223

1.21
.89
.75
.92
1.13
.96
1.05
1.13

17,880
19,063
19, 974
22,046
19, 512
13, 514
12, 399
12, 857

50,863
49, 317
19, 637
30, 675
58, 742
48,603
27,852
14, 014

284
2,519
295
343
2,478
987
848
882

.39
.40
.44
.51
.47
.43
.50
.56

821
821
1,053
855
893
854
950

9,610
10, 322
15, 362
11, 098
11, 716
10, 114
12,468

46,264
41,603
22,254
26,983
20,162
21, 430
27,325
21, 315

1

1927
September
October
November _ ___
Dp.cp/mbpr

15, 547
10, 908
7,654
4,199

4,900
4,398
4,338
2,707

6,830
7,240
6,752
3,649

.83
.82
.84
.88

10, 512
7,496
4,619
2,386

2,207
1,595
2,412
3,275

7,744
6,425
2,889
1,309

.97
1.00
1.06
1.09

17,223
13, 914
11,961
10, 733

26, 430
25, 182
24,429
22, 982

647
569
286
389

.49
.50
.51
.55

1,107
1,027
1,110
1,202

13, 357
11,650
13, 565
14, 734

55, 327
50,817
37,523
18,526

1928
January
February
March
April.

6,401
4,457
5,052
2,717

2,359
2,206
2,738
2,339

1,901
1,004
915
876

.93
.96
.99
1.01

1,477
1,330
1,982
1,186

3,656
4,078
4,959
5,051

519
458
313
366

1.09
1.12
1.20
1.27

10, 495
11, 667
13, 975
12, 436

21, 519
20,634
16,265
11, 453

623
336
453
387

.56
.58
.61
.65

1,040
822
944
846

12, 461
9,360
10, 982
10, 208

12,264
12, 431
12,659
12,644

May--.
June
July
August.

3,031
2,652
2,217
23, 611

1,435
711
685
6,313

1,386
1,910
2,242
8,758

1.04
.96
.83
.73

1,593
781
571

1,696
1,465
1,146
1,440

3,345
1,297
195
709

1.36
1.26
1.13
.98

14,406
7,144
6,610
27, 271

7,319
3,392
1,954
15, 687

465
78
104
2,403

.69
.71
.61
.39

887
753
723
988

11, 520
9,974
9,320
15, 968

15,006
12,423
10, 496
27, 476

September
October
November
"Dp.npTTibpr

21, 710
16, 797
7,377
6,476

8,084
8,962
9,627
9,250

14,830
11, 639
5,263
6,873

.67
.62
.55
.57

6,001
6,770
1,515
2,083

1,927
4,437
4,143
5,726

2,471
3,098
1,401
499

1.00
1.05
1.06
1.06

14, 375
13, 872
10, 834
11, 196

18,004
17, 882
16, 935
17, 118

2,308
1,653
822
951

.43
.45
.47
.49

1,100
1,292
1,112
896

16, 499
17, 760
13, 988
11,580

42, 805
45, 533
25, 564
26, 477

1929
January.
February
March
April

3,970
4,960
3,891
3,450

8,932
9,293
8,459
6,849

2,277
3,244
2,209
1,862

.60
.62
.59
.55

1,045
1,119
914
1,064

5,973
6,239
6,725
6,632

197
126
97
32

1.04
1.12
1.08
1.00

9,919
9,562
8,535
9,494

16, 212
16, 819
14, 071
12,204

703
451
513
358

.52
.53
.52
.50

824
925
925
776

9,956
11, 710
12, 133
8,987

25, 093
20, 613
16, 992
13, 741

3,264
3,338

6,022
5,731
5,518

1,268
2,783

.55
.53
.65

1,464
870

6,325
6,422

368
295

.90
.89
1 05

10, 432
8,486

10,063
8,114
8,129

513
254

.46
.47
48

900
895

10, 728
11, 360

19, 140
13, 127

May
June
July .
August

*2'636

September
October
November
December
1 Receipts of oats compiled by Chicago Board of Trade and reported by Price Current Grain Reporter, while receipts of barley and rye are compiled by the Federal Reserve
Board from receipts at 17 interior centers. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 43.
2
Data from Bradstreet's, representing stocks carried on Saturday nearest end of month at terminals, elevators, warehouses, docks, etc. Monthly data from 1913 appeared
in November, 1925, issue of the SURVEY (No. 51), p. 23.
3 Data from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 88. Malt is
converted at nine-tenths of a bushel to a bushel of barley. Barley flour converted at 5.5 bushels to the barrel, oatmeal at 5.21 bushels to 100 pounds, and rye flour at 6 bushels
to the barrel. Barley flour is included in exports of barley only in 1918 through 1920.
mills,
1922 6separating oatmeal and rolled oats appeared in May, 1925, issue (No. 45), p. 27.
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, representing stocks held in elevators and warehouses at 11 interior centers and 8 seaports.
Monthly data from 1919 appeared in the May, 1926, issue of the SURVEY (No. 57), p. 29.




90

Table 69.—RICE, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND HAY
EICEi
Paddy at
California
warehouses
YEAR AND
MONTH

Shipments

Stocks
end of
month

Southern
paddy

Shipments

Total
movement
Receipts to mills
at mills

Total
from
mills

Domes- Imports Exports Coldstor.
tic at
holdmills
Orleans
ings i
and
end
dealers
mo.
New

1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av
1920 mo. a v__

468, 036
640, «27
591, 159
633, 910
609, 477
639, 610

479, 349
652, 912
642, 918
699, 754
611, 661
554, 723

169, 718
203, 340
757, 281
196, 238
258, 484 1, 021, 642
275, 513
872,667
278, 785
682, 788
254, 825
811, 658
222, 175 1, 287, 057

1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av__
1923 mo. av__ * 337, 223 *1, 172, 184
1924 mo. av_. 188, 668
386, 862
1925 mo. av..
254, 002
66, 022
579, 429
1926 mo. av_. 211,855
1927 mo. av_. 237, 667
977, 250
1928 mo. av

796, 277
837, 657
659, 645
707, 425
494, 586
630, 670
767, 403
854, 334

957, 589
797, 973
687, 198
691, 376
536, 989
635, 703
802, 847
853, 953

318, 147
275, 358
223, 472
156, 446
133, 944
160, 417
175, 293
168, 035

1937
May
June
July
August

837, 000
452, 000
(0
(•)

396, 006
429, 614
147, 176
792, 345

700, 427
643, 295
345, 794
423, 559

September..
75, 000
00
October
200,000
(0
November. _ 125, 000
(»)
December. __ 150, 000 3, 640, 000

1, 167, 281
1, 719, 740
1, 266, 278
831, 033

325, 000
385, 000
152, 000
None.

1928
January
February _ . _
March
April

Receipts
(3)

Number of carloads

Tons

191, 510
193, 597
212, 140
179, 760
222, 059
446, 741
136, 090
109, 706

26, 633
45, 687
57, 431
109, 150
172, 990
139, 944
314, 063
327, 177

1,800
1,752
1,865
1,940
2,383

6,950
4,754
5,737
6,796
8,580

1, 291, 023
1, 253, 992
1, 343, 655
1, 142, 799
896, 837
1, 574, 641
1, 746, 110
1, 768, 120

63, 532
52, 946
40, 105
31, 728
56, 272
97, 415
43, 506
27, 999

500, 049
342, 952
290, 699
128, 758
55,583
97, 910
258, 329
316, 142

119, 681
119, 932
96, 074
109, 951

1, 400, 980
1, 181, 230
987, 310
1, 236, 674

46, 034
16, 095
26, 248
19, 503

256, 598
219, 649
74, 519
112, 232

849, 908
1, 242, 281
1, 919, 740 1, 200, 174
1, 391, 278 1, 162, 603
991, 033 1, 006, 759

195, 155
239, 453
232, 725
234, 740

1, 581, 097
2, 247, 038
2, 409, 940
2, 290, 857

27, 217
21, 888
22, 808
54, 723

1, 128, 581 1, 118, 120
961, 109
1, 129, 645
905, 678
1, 417, 266
835, 992
920, 032

158, 323
224, 932
170, 442
205, 148

2, 106, 310
2, 038, 415
2, 137, 656
1, 957, 878

909, 718
531, 073
285, 155
346, 076

203, 261
115, 399
35, 274
96, 643

1,455,366

3 994, 249
898, 093
560, 607
842, 525
1, 005, 070

721, 006
814, 614
299, 176
792, 345

HAY

Car-lot shipments 2

Thous.
ofbbls.

Pockets of 100 pounds

Barrels or sacks of 162 pounds

CITWHITE
RUS POTA- ONFRUIT TOES IONS

APPLES

Stocks,
end of
month

3,417
5,398
5,975

11,397
12, 055
14, 105
15,005
14, 627

1,304
1,596
1,835
1,740
2,163

124, 870
120, 675
119, 102

2,344 8,042
2,570 7,734
3,391 10, 268
3,484 9,009
3,320 9,202
3,867 10, 380
3,289 8,209
3,604 9,675

7,500
5,882
8,261
8,562
7,299
8,095
8,833
7,848

18, 206
19, 930
18, 956
20, 178
19,585
18, 895
20, 513
20, 886

1,932
2,163
2,132
2,502
2,453
2,685
2,697
2,813

69, 948
76, 873
76, 493
80,006
72, 343
66, 371
58,001
53, 582

2,465
1,202
1,731
3,352

10, 643
7,559
5,781
4,492

16, 407
21, 785
20, 709
17, 418

2,455
830
1,864
2,313

50, 563
53, 435
48, 005
51, 652

132, 903
203, 350
159, 871
267, 294

1,038 11, 039
5,992 31,612
7,831 16, 607
6,845 5,881

3,853
5,618
7,487
12, 123

23, 674
37, 410
20, 318
13, 206

4,473
5,754
2,924
2,234

64, 440
69, 233
55, 161
51,806

52, 744
58, 820
39, 279
34, 447

469, 435
322, 071
288, 771
392, 919

5,307
3,699
2,454
1,378

5, 305
4,913
3,569
2,322

9,057
8,735
10, 194
8,893

19, 665
22, 258
23, 582
16, 851

3,114
2,470
1,743
2,993

63,009
62, 673
57, 567
46, 628

1, 067, 092
829, 608
695, 660

27, 452
14,815
31,688
6,026

380, 725
291,287
189, 472
126, 668

602
None.
None.
None.

1,803
1,040
3,369
4,170

8,350
5,134
5,070
4,254

22, 955 ;
29, 152
20, 972
15, 538

4,133
1,200
1,652
2,561

42, 955
43, 622
43, 770
59, 774

1,631 18, 085
8,733 44,034
10, 392 19, 331
9,052 8,161

3,636
5,868
11, 671
13, 314

20, 267
28, 921
17, 593
12,872

6,009
4, 115
2,158
1,611

64, 511
60,558
54,962
42, 958

534
None.
None.
33

275, 000
325, 000
475, 000
300, 000

3, 365, 000
3, 040, 000
2, 565, 000
2, 265, 000

853, 581
804, 645
942, 266
620, 032

400, 000
220, 000

1, 865, 000
1, 645, 000

_

351, 607
129, 752
16, 892
338, 269

September.
October
November..
December

1, 197, 924
2, 113, 697
1, 935, 761
947 584

777, 583
1, 245, 714
1, 277, 631
1, 053, 585

147, 464
202, 697
251, 453
205, 384

1, 108, 564
2, 142, 144
2, 886, 600
2, 792, 141

15, 412
8,864
16, 663
29, 774

152, 906
228, 255
408, 917
542, 283

621, 096
591, 678
439, 439
429, 389

973, 256
816, 370
766,365
745, 097

146, 342
122, 455
116, 548
131, 246

2, 515, 008
2, 057, 678
1, 763, 837

76, 593
29, 251
18,647
21, 356

504, 921
368,378
428,450
378, 971

6,875
4,517
2,718
1,257

7,656
7,697
5,379
2,918

15, 226
13, 338
15,144
16, 713

19, 479
19, 868
22,334
19, 341

2,436
1,791
1,497
4,141

65,854
79, 449
75,490
57,993

231, 893
191, 944

714, 677
650, 414

125, 528
130, 369

1, 311, 568
865, 117

15, 257
2,984

343, 168
261, 377

None.
None.
None.

1,668
1,001
1,903

15, 524
Tl, 820
8,152

19,683
24, 321
19, 359

3,366
1,700
2,351

44, 197
47, 445

May
June
July
August

1929
January
February. _
March
April
May
June
July
August

751, 607
349, 752

2,354,518

September. _
October
November __
December...
i

1 Southern receipts, shipments, and stocks at mills from Rice Millers' Association, comprising movement of the whole rice crop except California rice. Data on paddy
at all California warehouses from Rice Growers' Association of California. The column " Total movement to mills " is a total of the shipments from California warehouses
and receipts at Southern mills, thus giving a view of the total movement of domestic rice to the mills. Shipments of rice through New Orleans compiled by New Orleans
Board of Trade. Imports and exports from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, data for rough rice being reduced to the equivalent
of clean rice at 162 pounds of rough to 100 pounds of clean, as barrels or sacks of 162 pounds are equivalent to clean rice pockets at 100 pounds each.
2
Data on cold-storage holdings of apples and on car-lot shipments of fruits and vegetables compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Citrus fruit shipments consists of oranges, lemons, and grapefruit.
3
Receipts of hay at 11 principal markets, compiled by prorating weekly reports to the Hay Trade Journal.
4
through December.
 Average for 10 months, March as the crop is not warehoused until the month of December,
s Stocks on hand are negligible,



91
Table 70.—LIVESTOCK MOVEMENT1
HOGS

CATTLE AND CALVES

Price,
Shipments
steers,
good to
Local choice, Total
Total
slaugh- corn receipts Stockreceipts Stockter
fed,
erand Total
erand Total
feeder
Chifeeder
cago2

SHEEP AND LAMBS

YEAE AND
MONTH

Dolls, p.
100 Ibs.

Thousands of animals

1,685
1,874
2,271
1,961

371
434
580
432

917
1,017
1,215
1,047

1,226
1,278
1,595
1,684
1,356
1,264
1,254
1,433

2,195
2,395
3,014
2,932
2,305
2,048
2,195
2,440

8.45
9.39
7.70
8.48
12.22
12.35
10.12
9.63

2,014
1,864
1,835
1,850
1,842
1,989
1,995
2,133

258
347
373
390
361
385
408
418

99
94
102
84

1,527
1,315
1,368
1,101

2,694
2,006
2,386
2,050

11.97
11.64
11.01
10.51

1,740
1,501
1,558
1,486

3,613
3,775
3,046
3,041

72
61
38
38

1,216
1,259
1,110
1,192

2,380
2,522
1,939
1,846

9.45
8.69
8.98
9.19

13.31
14.33
15.94
15.50

2,565
3,039
3,666
4,209

48
78
113
95

1,051
1,137
1,284
1,485

1,512
1,883
2,382
2,745

1,080
961
940
1,013

15.80
14.78
13.72
13.34

5,306
5,267
4,639
3,483

77
75
78
65

1,849
1,810
1,760
1, 385

682
594
608
814

1,120
963
1,013
1,007

13.18
13.56
14.99
15.11

3,723
3,548
2,924
2,523

66
56
45
43

563
799
497
253

1,067
1,327
944
598

1,069
1,195
1,038
910

16.19
14.63
14.28
14.28

2,600
3,666
4,075
4,773

1,635
1,191
1,445
1,748

178
117
162
292

561
405
497
646

1,057
787
923
1,080

13.53
12.06
12.84
13.88

1,653
1,444

292
176

680
528

979
901

13.44
14.38
14.98

321
401
418
441
342

790
859
896
819

1921 mo. av._
1922 mo. av_.
1923 mo. av__
1924 mo. a v _ _
1925 mo. a v _ _
1926 mo. a v _ _
1927
rno.av.1928 mo. a v _ _

1,649
1,935
1,934
1,975
2,006
1,989
1,897
1,790

292
405
379
332
319
309
301
331

1927
January
February
March
April

1,832
1,555
1,743
1,674

May
June _
July
August

762
855
1,053
915

$4.69
5.04
5.93
7.17
10.33
11.29
9.35
8.74

$7.79
8.12
9.23
10.02
16.09
17.33
16.13
15.90

944
973
977
983
976
1,038
1,040
1,110

1,071
889
856
867
867
949
955
1,021

3.41
5.81
6.09
6.91
7.21
6.59
6.12
6.51

9.99
13.22
13.46
14.29
15.22
13.73
13.79
14.20

207
136
140
118

819
669
719
690

921
829
843
800

6.41
7.78
8.00
7.78

12.47
13.24
15.06
15.81

2,013
1,816
1,676
2,209

259
257
216
390

1,064
849
760
1,054

951
963
920
1,137

5.90
5.16
5.31
5.58

14.85
13.25
14.22
13.58

10.85
11.06
9.47
8.58

2,848
3,587
1,896
1,609

947
1,560
497
174

1,734
2,413
988
723

1,101
1,148
950
896

5.19
5.25
5.47
5.63

13.56
13.87
13.58
13.01

3,443
3,457
2,892
2,078

8.32
8.03
7.83
9.09

1,705
1,669
1,520
1,591

116
101
95
133

705
729
705
778

994
945
814
814

6.05
8.16
8.41
8.90

12.65
15.13
15.38
15.98

1,296
1,299
1,193
1,160

2,420
2,269
1,719
1,363

9.61
10.12
10.86
11.71

1,952
1,913
1,898
2,362

205
278
234
564

994
904
828
1,250

951
1,020
1,068
1,097

7.31
5.88
5.38
5.72

15.19
13.03
15.18
14.31

55
65
62
48

1,093
1,341
1,475
1,529

1,500
2,311
2,602
3,230

12.43
10.03
9.02
8.78

3,386
3,938
2,053
1,610

1,080
1,466
544
193

2,161
2,485
1,091
693

1,213
1,403
1,016
917

5.50
5.35
5.31
6.28

14.16
13.08
12.69
13.78

5,061
3,922
3,378
3,545

47
49
72
73

1,864
1,502
1,365
1,273

3,194
2,406
2,015
2,258

9.10
10.13
11.39
11.46

1,876
1,543
1,526
2,010

188
115
122
211

837
683
699
954

1,040
839
835
1,049

8.39
7.72
8.42
9.18

15.59
15.59
16.19
16.45

3,375
3,230

57
53

1,300
1,149

2,083
2,081

10.75
10.66
11.20

2,169
1,749

217
226

1,074
740

1,101
1,020

5.91
5.31
5.55

12.78
12.75
13.80

1,106
1,240
1,136
1,016

3,170
3,738
3,706
3,510

66
82
75
61

1,048
1,198
1,197
1,275

717
889
838
808
786
784
764
751

923
1,036
1,086
1,154
1,205
1,196
1,122
1,026

8.76
9.46
9.96
9.68
10.65
9.51
12.73
14.49

3,425
3,672
4,611
4,618
3,661
3,314
3,451
3,877

42
49
68
41
44
76
77
61

205
175
200
204

657
537
607
602

1,136
1,012
1,134
1,066

10.30
11.06
11.92
12.28

4,252
3,308
3,754
3,142

1,956
1,732
1,547
2,065

235
170
138
269

732
624
562
802

1,201
1,112
971
1,231

11.44
11.83
12.30
12.58

1,988
2,635
2,346
1,691

407
675
615
319

906
1,259
1,156
729

1,085
1,291
1,240
980

1928
January
February
March
April

1,771
1,516
1,465
1,684

234
194
173
254

660
552
522
640

May
June
July
August

1,799
1,558
1,650
1,829

283
184
196
336

September. _ _
October
November...
December

2,191
2,541
1, 963
1,510

1929
January. __ _
February
March
April

September
October
November...
December

Dollars per 100
pounds

Thousands of animals

2,120
2, 537
2,501
2,230

1,922
2,108
2,052
1,950

May
June
July
August

Dolls, p.
100 Ibs.

Thousands of animals

$8.51
7.04
8.70
9.58
12.81
16. 42
17.50
14.49

, September. __
October
November. _ December

Local Price,
Local
Total
slaugh- heavy, receipts Stockslaugh- Ewes,
ter
Chi-2
erand Total ter
Chi- Lambs,
cago
feeder
cago Chicago

$8.37
8.36
7.13
9.62
15.71
17. 60
18.24
14.19

1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av__
1918 mo. av__
1919 mo. av._
1920 mo. av__

Price'

Shipments

Shipments

i
"""

"1

1 These figures, except prices, represent the movement at between 60 and 70 markets; data procured from the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural
Economics. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in November, 1922, issue (No. 15), p. 115. Data on total animals slaughtered are given in Table 36.
2
From
 U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, averages of weekly quotations. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 91.



92

Table 71.—PORK PRODUCTS
PRODUCTION i
(inspected slaughter)
YEAR AND MONTH

Total pork
products

Lard

COLD-STORAGE HOLDINGS 3

EXPORTS «

Total pork
products

Lard

(end of month)

Other Total pork
products products

Lard

APPARENT
CONSUMP. «

Lard,
Fresh and Total pork Smoked prime
hams,
cured
products Chicago contract,
NewYork

Thousand of pounds
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average...
1916 monthly average. __
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average. _.
1919 monthly average...
1920 monthly average. __

450,851
524, 294
565, 691
449, 570
583, 154
588,977
539, 452

1921 monthly average. _.
1922 monthly average...
1923 monthly average...
1924 monthly average...
1925 monthly average. _.
1926 monthly average...
1927 monthly average...
1928 monthly average...

560,212
618, 276
765, 178
734, 963
610,226
606,045
644, 230
714, 941

477, 117

WHOLESALE
PRICES s

Dollars per pound

431,847
343,486
378,420
383,581
417, 203

$0. 166
.167
.153
.185
.252
.318
.343
.334

$0. 110
.104
.094
.135
.219
.261
.290
.200

642, 209
561,021
760,042
737, 726
645, 460
551, 637
669,029
742,995

435, 295
481, 376
588,051
600,103
524, 712
512,824
558,796
610,872

.268
.265
.212
.202
.271
.307
.246
.228

.111
.115
.123
.133
.168
.150
.129
.123

111, 976
147, 318
179, 136
167, 018

787,850
844, 275
841, 271
766, 418

560,558
589,156
548, 008
595, 110

.259
.246
.243
.235

.129
.131
.132
.128

726,941
539, 240
465, 976
578, 280

118, 174
72, 121
46,154
54,855

608, 767
467, 119
419, 822
523,425

576, 349
615, 065
603,580
594, 249

.224
.233
.220
.214

.133
.130
.125
.120

18, 135
29, 409
37,008
29,605

739, 645
1, 006, 998
1, 162, 243
1, 163, 760

84,007
121,082
164,506
173, 088

655, 638
885,916
997, 737
960, 672

676, 377
641, 760
618, 922
528, 669

.212
.210
.207
.201

.124
.116
.118
.121

55, 540
53, 436
52, 940
50, 658

29,661
29,501
31, 351
31, 265

1, 105, 439
1, 129, 839
1, 024, 124
859, 903

186, 073
214, 479
204, 939
177, 888

919, 366
915, 360
819, 185
682, 015

617, 034
598, 492
560, 122
550, 185

.206
.215
.236
.249

.123
.122
.125
.128

65, 617
75, 384
88, 592
109, 671

46, 158
59, 865
67, 716
86, 358

19, 459
15, 519
20, 877
23,313

641, 977
516, 634
529, 019
755, 256

126, 890
83,474
67, 257
85, 217

515, 087
433, 160
461, 762
670,039

588, 472
675, 222
641, 378
633, 827

.254
.260
.243
.244

.132
.124
.121
.117

213, 780
164, 915
133, 923
137, 953

122, 577
93, 681
102, 276
89, 813

89, 932
65,924
70, 572
59,144

32,646
27,758
31,704
30, 669

978, 806
944, 742
921, 961
923, 558

140, 526
173, 864
179, 428
184, 748

838,280
770, 878
742, 533
738, 810

628, 505
537, 342
551, 810
559, 351

.232
.231
.238
.248

.121
.123
.125
.122

141, 989
144, 272

98, 080
100,556

64,192
67, 252

33,888
33,304

870, 785
841, 937
814, 795

183, 490
199, 699
203, 931

687, 295
642, 238
610, 864

622, 890
582, 512

.249
.254
.267

.120
.123
.125

85, 065
68,960
114.039
120,941
108, 142
187, 558
219,803
128,019

35,555
31,060
45,735
63,408
51,021

85,386
77,082
141, 823
156,394
76,998

644,543
669,284
875, 323
920,922
898,845

85, 741
74, 117
95, 959
92, 212
120,413

558, 802
595, 167
784,364
828, 710
778,432

114, 942
131, 261
164,270
160, 219
120, 979
126, 115
129, 729
145, 812

135, 887
123, 912
165,645
139,483
102,260
93,319
82, 017
90,399

72, 412
63,913
86,282
78, 675
57, 402
58,248
56, 775
63,307

63,476
59,999
79, 363
60,808
44, 857
35,073
25,241
26, 251

761,914
647, 594
837,352
827, 581
753, 480
646, 521
771, 955
883, 736

119, 705
86, 573
77,311
89,855
108,020
94,884
102,926
140, 742

681,902
778, 271
652, 896
580, 607

142,527
165, 988
140, 932
117, 871

91,878
97, 781
76, 277
72, 957

64,418
66,404
46,972
50, 816

27, 460
31, 377
29,305
22, 141

899, 826
991, 593
1, 020, 407
933, 436

458, 919
497, 128
596, 842
793, 789

89, 704
92, 860
110, 525
155, 157

89,829
72, 251
67, 764
87, 846

59, 736
50, 355
49,636
62, 855

30, 093
21, 897
18, 126
24,991

935, 467
1, 017, 548
890, 408
585, 081

194, 583
217, 354
194, 583
127, 075

98, 794
109, 280
116, 937
86, 159

70, 660
79, 872
79, 929
56,554

May
June - „ _ _ _ _
July
August

672, 640
705, 111
537, 820
466, 696

140, 414
146, 520
108, 522
92,401

85, 201
82, 936
84,290
81, 924

September
October
November
December

434,296
623, 716
741, 385
969, 121

80, 135
113, 968
141, 720
196, 500

974, 060
770,096
635, 791
655, 418
665, 985
672, 947

1937
]y:ay
June
July
August

_

September
October
November
December..

_.

1928
January «
February
March
April

__ __ _

1929
January
February
March
April
May
June
July .
August

. .

September
October
November
December
1 Production of pork products, including lard, from animals slaughtered under Federal inspection reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of AnimaT
Industry, given as total dressed weight, excluding meat from condemned animals. Slaughter of hogs under Federal inspection according to 1919 census figures amounted
to 68 per cent of total slaughter. Monthly data from 1920, slightly revised since, given in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 95, including data on exports, storage holdings, and
apparent consumption also. The figures shown here for lard revise previous figures through calculation of production from yields by the Bureau of Agricultural
Economics.
2 Exports reported by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. The total includes bacon, ham, shoulders, lard, neutral lard, and
canned, fresh, and pickled pork. In the division between lard and other products, neutral lard is included with "Other products."
3
Cold-storage holdings, reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, are distinctly seasonal.
< Apparent consumption, including only meat produced under Federal inspection, has been computed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural'
Economics from the inspected slaughter, less condemned animals, plus net imports less exports and reexports and the change in cold-storage holdings.
« Wholesale prices are averages of weekly quotations as compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly data on ham prices from 191ft
appeared in September, 1923, issue (No. 25), p. 55.



93

Table 72.—OTHER MEATS
BEEF
Wholesale
5

prices
ColdProducstorage Apparent
tion (inconExFresh
spected ports 3 holdings, sump- West- native
ern
slaughend of 3
tion ^
dressed steers,
month
ter) i
Chisteers,

YEAR AND MONTH

N.Y.

Thousands of pounds
1013 monthly average 1914 monthly average1915 monthly average.
1916 monthly average.
1917 monthly average.
1918 monthly average.
1919 monthly average.
1920 monthly average.

329, 811
314, 784
331, 971
383, 2C8
457, 910
522, 309
448, 074
395, 093

3,016
7,161
31, 297
22, 724
29, 142
58, 338
22, 592
11, 599

127, 200
192, 343
256, 523
237, 123
156, 117

1921 monthly average.
1922 monthly average.
1923 monthly average.
1924monthly average.
1925 monthly average.
1926 monthly average.
1927 monthly average.
1928 monthly average.

371, 108
414, 045
427, 407
444, 005
456, 643
479, 709
439, 760
393, 917

3,418
2,723
2,347
2,171
2,205
2,065
1,613
1,110

1937
September
October
November
December

453, 993
475, 455
459, 262
403, 660

1928
January
February
March
April

MISC,
MEATS

LAMB

cago

ColdProduc- Cold- ApparProduction (in- storage ent con- storage
holdtion
spected hold- sump(inspected
in s>
ings,
slaugh- end of tion *
f *
end of 6 slaughter) 1
ter) i mouth
month

7 48, 182
86, 774
103, 078
82, 474

852, 589
810, 258
894, 710
986, 523
935, 767
1, 137, 294
1, 075, 590
968, 944

887, 581
1, 224, 646
1, 269, 413
1, 157, 693

824, 727
793, 573
876, 854
854, 349
955, 554

43,003
35, 830
37, 615
38,047
39,140
41, 691
41, 964
43, 630

79, 137
53, 641
67, 540
72, 060
73, 021
54, 644
59, 885
62, 992

972, 417
1, 067, 141
1, 229, 773
1, 216, 998
1, 105, 812
1, 127, 495
1, 125, 809
1, 152, 404

962, 764
773, 050
984, 698
981, 848
908, 389
768, 145
893, 530
1, 005, 342

953, 358
928, 766
1, 053, 121
1, 078, 281
1, 024, 436
1, 032, 502
1, 047, 398
1, 055, 583

1,991
2,958
3,790
4,408

45,098
45, 855
41, 917
44,246

58, 163
49,235
52, 227
61, 420

958, 290
1, 018, 772
1, 098, 559
1, 242, 109

822, 973
635, 349
587, 338
721, 055

1, 079, 520
1, 138, 049
1, 091, 347
1, 035, 135

47,081
44,057
42,130
36,248

4,404
4,020
3,252
1,828

47, 055
44,428
43, 052
38, 149

64, 219
71,707
74, 949
70,438

1, 370, 298
1,431,989
1, 310, 789
982, 989

879, 919
1, 146, 474
1, 297, 700
1, 252, 220

1, 120, 828
1,067,915
1, 051, 388
947, 384

.201
.212
.229
.244

38, 455
40, 691
39, 395
44,525

1,276
1,947
1,822
1,691

40,135
39,923
39, 449
44,443

64,846
63, 941
63, 610
56,888

1, 134, 012
1, 152, 237
952, 959
909,277

1, 208, 773
1, 227, 965
1, 121, 998
949, 547

1, 099, 532
1, 057, 289
985, 784
1,002,140

.284
.282
.282
.245

.259
.255
.253
.245

49,237
54, 107
45, 546
41, 079

2,113
4,321
5,472
5,623

49,042
52, 077
44, 756
41, 051

49, 798
52, 201
60, 392
82, 915

902, 414
1, 108, 511
1, 197, 158
1, 376, 212

731, 111
631, 192
674, 516
942, 707

1, 071, 472
1, 149, 149
1, 083, 769
1, 030, 724

430, 985
339, 194
389, 622
415, 184

.245
.215
.217
.225

.240
.209
.211
.224

45, 485
38, 424
40,888
44, 575

4,009
3,252
3,109
2,533

47, 139
39,908
41, 330
46, 183

88,678
91, 363
90, 129
88, 314

1, 439, 221 1, 165, 483
1, 137, 377 1, 128, 128
1,048,621 1, 096, 806
1, 092, 777 1,085,119

1, 106, 629
916, 444
982, 762
1,020,718

417, 481
388, 427

.231
.238
.255

.230
.234
.238

46, 397
42, 012

2,461
3,061
2,633

46, 694
41, 987

82, 331
81, 132
81 149

1, 105, 198
1,079,429

1, 087, 065
1, 012, 905

354, 440
420, 946
487, 135
431, 602
400, 648

$0. ISO
.136
.129
.138
.167
.221
.233
.230

45, 661
44, 623
38, 445
37, 564
28, 287
31, 831
38, 539
34, 399

3,722
4,531
6,026
8,291
20, 174

38, 439
29, 141
31, 299
39, 166
37, 703

99,623
68, 521
75, 689
79, 712
80, 156
64, 358
59, 065
53, 801

375, 060
411, 581
427, 455
440, 905
461, 485
479, 889
446, 650
401, 113

.178
.159
.176
.171
.192
.171
.200
.245

.163
.150
.158
.171
.180
.164
.186
.228

41,096
34, 820
37, 188
38, 030
38, 943
41, 741
41, 812
43, 546

22,090
3,294
3,742
2,495
1,731
2,622
2,625
3,147

1,609
1,165
1,085
1,097

35, 878
43, 916
65, 345
76, 947

458, 073
477, 129
445, 850
396, 640

.213
.225
.234
.238

.191
.210
.215
.223

45, 378
46, 188
42, 394
44, 660

387, 750
370, 385
378, 251
361, 660

974
935
1,143
1,052

71, 651
63, 749
57, 256
46,194

397, 396
381, 727
389, 414
380, 566

.230
.230
.221
.222

.220
.212
.205
.200

May
June. .
July .
August

422,917
406, 435
375, 745
398, 056

1,165
1,392
1,510
1,419

37, 212
32,238
32,442
31,065

442,363
418, 874
386, 213
407, 512

.229
.225
.249
.260

September
October
November
December

418, 882
430, 688
410, 226
366, 012

647
1,276
934
867

37, 223
58, 036
79, 633
98.913

433, 958
421, 850
397, 635
355, 846

1929
January February
March
__
April

419, 676
328, 857
371, 942
392, 784

1,119
1,273
1,614
1,073

93, 990
88,771
81, 607
70, 714

392, 816
364, 470

1,293
1,496

57, 315
52, 055
48, 789

May
June_July
August

September
October
November
December...

ColdApparent
storage
holdings, consumption *
end of
month 3

Thousands of pounds

Dolls, per pound
$0. 132
.143
.135
.147
.188
.247
.254
.247

_ _

TOTAL MEATS
(including lard)

1, 012, 892
&78, 185
944 386

_

1 Production from animals slaughtered under Federal inspection reported by the 17. £ Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, given as total dressed
weight, excluding meat from condemned animals. The slaughter under Federal inspection, according to census figures for 1919, amounted to 82 per cent of the total number
of animals slaughtered in the United States in the case of beef and 91 per cent for lamb. Monthly data from 1920, including also exports, storage holdings, apparent consumption, and prices, appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 95. Veal is included in the beef figures and mutton in the lamb figures.
2 Exports, as reported by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domesitc Commerce, include fresh, canned, and pickled and cured beef.
3
Cold-storage holdings, reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, are distinctly seasonal. Figures represent storage holdings
on the last day of each month. Beef holdings include frozen, cured, and in process of cure, while lamb holdings embrace frozen lamb and mutton. Total meats include
lard,4 monthly data from 1917 being shown in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 19.
Apparent consumption, including only meat produced under Federal inspection, has been computed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural
Economics, from the inspected slaughter, less condemned animals, plus net imports less exports and reexports and the change in cold-storage holdings. Monthly data on total
meats from 1916 appeared in the March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 23.
6
Wholesale prices are averages for the month from U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
6
Compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture and include all stocks of beef, pork, and mutton trimmings and edibles offal that have been frozen, cured, or otherwise
prepared for food. Data do not include trimmings that have not been frozen, cured, nor processed, nor sausage or canned-meat products. Data are given for the end of
each month. Monthly data from August, 1917, appeared in the April, 1926, issue (No. 50), p. 20.
7 Average for 5 months, August to December, inclusive.




94

Table 73.—CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK

Condensed

Total

Evaporated

Case Bulk
goods •j goods
i

Evaporated

Case
goods

Total
Case Bulk
goods goods

Case
goods

Bulk
goods

Condensed

Evaporated

Case Bulk
goods goods

Case
goods

Total

1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av
1927 mo. av
1928 mo. av

Case
goods

•e
a

a

Total

ft

S
H

Dolls, per
case

Thousands of pounds

131, 501
122, 014
119, 279
147, 907
141, 712
146, 488
144, 459
154, 644
159, 869

29, 008
16, 987
19, 531
16, 567
15, 777
15, 828
13, 020
13, 582
11, 704

8,979
8,365
8,862
12, 258
12, 001
13, 246
16, 934
15,283
16, 115

82, 117
85, 798
79, 457
104, 963
100, 109
100, 704
97, 538
106, 826
112, 303

11, 398
11, 864
11, 430
14, 119
13, 825
16, 709
16, 966
18, 953
19, 747

235, 138
173, 926
137, 226
166,022
186, 925
161, 409
165,414
181, 413
176,883

50,515
31, 375
21, 166
20, 181
19, 236
29,792
27, OG5
28, 179
22,696

19, 701
17, 999
9, 875
18, 505
16, 727
7,790
14,904
13, 759
14, 434

158, 214
123, 661
105, 872
127, 089
150, 693
123, 538
123,233
139, 135
139, 469

123, 436
116, 560
87, 342
104, 558
132, 998
113, 769
120, 933
132, 773
132, 862

29, 083
23, 346
14, 833
13, 429
14, 119
21, 259
21, 438
22, 911
17, 108

11,846
13, 142
7,504
11, 142
8,870
4,092
6, 623
5,445
6,672

January __.
February .
March
April

117, 750
119, 768
153, 897
183, 352

13, 336
9,715
11, 733
17, 033

11, 819
11, 976
14, 653
17, 688

81, 621
85, 539
111, 172
128, 504

10, 974
12, 538
16, 339
20, 127

80, 228
70, 327
66,610
83,104

16, 594
12, 418
10, 935
14, 608

8,303
7,782
7,812
9,721

54,888
49, 940
47, 476
58, 455

34, 182
20, 966
18,828
20,750

11, 296
7,054
5,378
8,317

3,388
3,619
3,881
3,689

19,084
10, 150
9,346
8,531

May
June
July
August

241, 763
258, 890
200, 076
162,875

20, 031
20, 038
14, 577
12, 758

25, 569
27, 721
16, 974
14, 874

169, 338
181, 079
139, 687
111, 660

26, 825
30, 052
28, 838
23, 583

149, 260
230, 321
277, 379
300,828

26, 709
41, 028
44, 028
43, 559

15, 392
20,223
19,883
20, 796

106,636
168, 599
213, 068
236, 173

76,063
171,446
222, 774
249, 728

21,706
37, 205
38, 140
38, 325

5,220
7,573
7,719
7,600

September 117, 794
Oetober... 110, 967
November. 89, 150
December. 99, 440

9,294
12,067
10, 763
11, 633

11, 867
10, 903
8,677
10, 669

76, 206
73, 341
58, 172
65, 596

20, 427
14, 656
11, 538
11, 542

280, 734
256, 650
207, 892
173, 624

38, 357
35, 932
29,155
24, 820

19,566
14, 956
12, 362
8,310

222, 482
205, 587
166, 187
140, 133

237. 903
219, 790
179, 904
140, 944

33,004
30, 535
24,919
19, 048

EXPORTS 3

81, 890 $9.50 $8.01
79,207 7.06 5.10
64, 711 5.25 4.14
79, 751 6.24 4.71
109, 751 5.99 4.15
88, 189 5.91 4.33
92, 705 5.86 4.42
104, 253 5.87 4.57
108, 819 6.01 4.43

Evaporated

Condensed

WHOLESALE
PRICES 2

"

YEAR AND
MONTH

UNSOLD STOCKS i
(end of month)

Condensed

TOTAL STOCKS i
(end of month)

PRODUCTION i

Thous. of pounds

34, 256 23, 094
24, 144 7,825
15,625 4,734
16, 189 4,781
17, 185 5,331
12, 314 3,559
9,640 3,226
8,855 2,907
9,952 3,219

11, 162
16, 319
10,891
11, 407
11,854
8,755
6,320
5,671
6,399

1937
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.58

8,516
7,439
9,378
10, 150

2,694
2,853
2,974
2,761

5,554
4,331
6,232
7,054

48, 947
126, 534
176, 763
203, 643

5.93 4.63
5.90 4.60
5.83 4.58
5.83 4.58

11, 334
12, 368
9,283
8,009

3,642
3,190
2,716
3,532

7,305
8,926
6,326
4,240

6,500
5,970
5,521
4,656

198, 281
183, 239
149, 397
117, 115

6.00 4.58
6.00 4.58
6.02 4.59
6.00 4.57

6,434
8,196
7,941
7,213

2,439
2,760
2,981
2,345

3,756
5,130
4,662
4,532

5,216
5,230
6,034
6,453

95, 120
65, 497
56,201
72, 121

6.00 4.58
5.98 4.46
5.84 4.23
5.83 4.23

11, 414
10, 504
13, 715
9,424

3,819
2,645
4,707
2,700

7,360
7,531
8,742
6,421

95, 386
8,400
13, 368 151, 769
8,611 124, 738
8,367 101, 819

5.83 4.28
5.83 4.28
5.97 4.34
6.18 4.45

11, 357
8,742
8, 550
10, 114

3,279
3,054
3,011
3,246

7,806
5,464
5,180
6,343

5.63
5,72
5.75
5.84

1938
January...
February _
March
April

127, 801
138, 590
166, 611
181, 077

11,564
12, 366
14, 476
13, 969

13, 482
13, 242
17, 056
28, 299

88,590
97, 826
116, 306
128, 494

14, 165
15, 156
18, 773
20, 315

147, 774 20,618
119, 314 17,924
100,299 15, 845
124, 861 18, 496

8,457
7,635
8,299
11, 757

118, 444
93,528
75, 949
94, 338

115, 623
83,387
73, 238
91,928

15, 151
12, 534
10, 868
13, 169

May

223, 056
255, 369
197, 877
160, 360

13, 102
11, 727
11, 224
12, 344

25, 277
30, 775
16, 794
12, 810

157, 880
183, 509
142, 009
109, 956

26, 797
29, 358
37, 850
25, 250

158, 648 22, 396
244,473 31, 087
232, 131 30, 397
211, 841 30,542

16, 716
25,255
20, 794
19, 332

119, 210
187, 789
180, 377
161, 679

122, 875
190,611
157, 329
134,487

18, 079
25,081
23,594
24,159

September 140, 388
October _ _ _ 118, 848
November. 95,642
December - 112, 808

12, 079
9,804
6,662
11, 126

13, 940
11,316
8,723
11, 669

94, 966
82, 978
67, 586
77, 540

19, 403
14, 750
12, 671
12, 473

211,413
203, 605
192, 098
176, 198

27, 837
23,949
18,864
14, 398

17, 604
14, 429
14, 759
8,165

165, 682
164, 989
158,293
153, 351

162, 670
161, 584
153, 630
146, 980

21, 821
17, 818
13,588
9,428

6,351
4,840
3,640
3,556

134, 259
138, 808
136,271
133, 835

6.18
6.18
6.18
6.18

4.58
4.58
4.58
4.58

9,311
8,108
10, 113
8,077

3,405
2,531
3,335
2,892

5,583
5,264
6,275
4,821

June
July
August

1929
January .
February __
March. __ _
April

108, 812
124, 757
147, 671
194,810

153, 976
131, 548
127, 421
150, 959

10, 393
8,463
8,677
12, 534

6,271
5,826
6,633
11,312

137, 163
116, 823
111, 868
126, 314

120, 771
101, 911
94, 247
102, 238

5,339
3,227
3,841
7, 984

2,925
2,669
2,799
4,012

112,430
95, 925
87, 491
89, 789

6.18
6.18
6.18
6.13

4.58
4.58
4.56
4.30

9,824
10,580
12, 732
10,085

3,432
3,486
4,510
3,643

6,021
6,606
7,768
5,963

May

257, 343
290, 350

201, 382
240, 721

22, 193
31, 459

18, 262
25, 783

160, 426
222, 956

140, 196
208, 365

17, 249
25, 140

6,644
9,289

116, 144
173, 684

6.13
6.13
6.13

4.30
4.30
4.30

9,003
10, 888

2,689
3,280

5,917
7,121

June
July
August
September
October
NovemberDecember .

1 Data on production and stocks from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing practically the entire industry. Production
figures by classes are reported only every three months, while stocks are available currently. Stocks, both total and unsold, are given as of the end of each month, stocks
of evaporated bulk goods being included in each total, but omitted in detail on account of the small quantities usually held. Condensed milk is sweetened by the addition
of sugar while evaporated milk is simply milk reduced in volume. The bulk goods are generally destined for bakeries, etc., while case goods are for the retail trade.
2 Wholesale prices compiled by U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, are averages of weekly prices at New York. A case of condensed milk contains
48 14-ounce tins, while a case of evaporated milk has 48 16-ounce tins. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in December, 1925, issue (No. 52), p. 22.
3
Exports are from U. S. Department of Commercel Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.




95

Table 74.—DAIRY PRODUCTS, POULTRY AND EGGS
RAW MILK
Receipts

Production,
Greater Boston Minneapolis.
(includ.
New
York* cream ) 2 St. Paul s

YEAR AND MONTH

Thousands of quarts

Consumption in Produc- Net 6 Stocks,
Ex- Producend of
tion e orders month ? ports 8
tion «
oleomarga4
rine

Thousands
of pounds

1913 monthly average. _
1914 monthly average..
19 15 monthly average. .
1916 monthly average
1917monthly average..
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average. _

59, 765
60,526
63,593
64, 507
66, 097
70, 516
75,007
81, 376

11, 727
12, 193
13, 059
13, 865

5,715
7,145
7,786

1921 monthly average..
1922 monthly average..
1923 monthly average..
1924 monthly average..
1925 monthly average. _
1926 monthly average..
1927 monthly average..
1928 monthly average..

85, 769
89, 326
95,196
99, 655
103, 612
106, 196
110,904
113, 348

14, 116
14, 878
15, 391
15, 930
16, 511
17, 389
17, 753
17, 865

12, 141
13, 224
17, 895
21, 005
24,100
24, 769
24, 636
26, 259

1938
January
February
March _
April __

109, 709
104, 413
114, 214
109, 613

17, 490
15, 964
18, 176
17, 697

May
June .
July
August

117, 558
115, 866
122, 100
117, 162

September
October
November
December

1939
January
February
March
April .
May.
June...
July
August
September
October.. _
November
December. ._ ._

_

POULTRY

Receipts
af5
markets »

EGGS

Coldstorage
holdings
(end of
mo.) 10

Receipts
at 5
mar*
kets°

Cold-storage
holdings 10
Case

Thousands of
cases 12

Thousands
of pounds

Frozen «
Thous.
of Ibs.

j
1

1,749
1,549
2,147
2,530
3, 634
4,436

11, 645

"4,876
4,386
5,426
5,564
5,740
5,931
6,353
7,791

3,566
3,901
5,734
6,426
6,854
8,541
10, 799
13, 133

26, 140
26, 192
28, 780
27, 522

7,190
8,117
7,762
7,035

17, 914
19, 151
19, 215
19, 081

31, 949
32, 686
28, 374
24, 413

17, 329
18, 385
16, 886
17, 087

111, 129
102, 039
116, 025
110, 419

,,

Thous. of
gallons

Thousands of pounds

113, 552
116, 849
108, 685
110, 450

_

ICE
CREAM

POWDERED MILK

18, 239

44,032
64, 798
46, 146

1,224
1,079

3,069
3,504
3,367
4,156
3,261

12, 193
13, 108
15,284
15, 130
17, 865
17, 937
18, 896
19, 349

21, 355
23, 559
28, 397
30, 265
26, 733
30, 178
28,684
29, 659

50,278
54, 276
68,045
64,990
82, 050
70, 395
78,933
67, 952

1,251
1,335
1,391
1,284
1,290
1,300
1,350
1,345

4,171
5,137
5,355
4,597
5,309
4,941
5,410
5,338

24,562
22, 607
27, 716
27, 426
31, 610
37, 850
57, 447
62, 366

236
328
266
303

9,200
9,843
13,500
16, 226

29,347
20, 857
18, 135
16, 006

118, 154
103, 494
83, 169
56,832

862
' 1,320
2,034
2,360

26
66
1,087
4,515

38, 575
31, 3C2
34,411
51, 532

15, 985
21, 517
22, 632
19, 941

273
225
359
526

25, 625
29,306
38, 283
35, 026

17, 862
18, 849
22, 238
22, 361

43, 872
38, 230
40, 395
40, 749

2,503
1,763
1,335
1,076

8,168
10, 002
10, 496
9,944

67, 941
77, 744
81, 670
89, 1C 6

5,662
6,284
6,188
5,945

18, 857
16,864
13, 824
13, 366

322
313
502
365

20, 558
14, 715
10, 435
9,468

23, 859
35, 613
60, 812
69,965

43, 578
58, 093
79, 173
109, 684

939
794
546
606

8,542
6,247
3, 542
1,415

82, 255
73, 327
64, 201
56, 181

8,036
7,835
8,133
7,847

5,496
4,907
6,126
6,019

13, 450
11, 525
14, 022
16, 659

372
488
454
480

30,969
20, 672
17, 116
16,846

102, 380
89,088
68,728
52,901

918
832
1,816
2,596

248
11
559
3,952

48,055
38,250
34, 918
51, 825

7,514
6,487

7,358
8,410

22, 802
29,954

396
488

17, 593
20, 434
22, 548

41, 643
42,001
40,900

2,331
1,813
1,409

6,705
8,510
8, 958

71, 560
84, 766
91, 525

264

10, 470
11, 098
12, 357

3,948
4,347
5,170
5,448
5,963

11, 775
7,314
6,395
12, 881
7,092
10, 225
9,307
15, 148

787
516
203
461
304
222
Til
335

10, 967
11,383
13, 752
15, 496

4,880
4,781
6,062
6,037

8,334
9,185
9,113
12, 156

7,455
7,034
6,652
7,014

19, 179
20, 932
15, 338
11, 296

6,590
6,129
6,264
6,736

21, 572
20, 274
21, 678
25, 522

8,530
9,151
8,931
8,624

10, 500
9,714
8, 583
10, 461

16,631
15, 560
18,443
18,002

28, 388
27,025
31, 248
30, 960

19, 381
19,920

35, 435

4,930
10, 621
12, 071
14, 871
18,866

_ __

II
1 Receipts of milk, excluding cream, in the metropolitan area around New York City, including many large cities in New Jersey, from the Milk Reporter. Monthly
data from 1920 appeared in the July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 46. These data have been computed from original figures in 40-quart cans, previously shown in the SURVEY.
2 Receipts of milk at Boston by rail, including cream, from the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in the July, 1922, issue
(No. 11), p. 46.
3
Production of whole milk by members of the Twin City Milk Association, including most of the area within a 40-mile radius of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Monthly
data4 from 1920 appeared in the July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 46.
Data from U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Pevenue, showing consumption of milk in the manufacture of oleomargarine. Monthly data from July,.
1921, appeared in the March, 1926, issue (No. 55), p. 25.
c Data from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agriculture Economics, representing practically complete production, but reported only every three months.
Monthly data from 1920 on production of powdered milk appeared in the October, 1925, issue (No. 50), p. 26.
6 Compiled by the American Dry Milk Institute from 31 identical firms which in 1924 produced 61 per cent of the totals as compiled by the Department of Agriculture.
Monthly data from 1924 appeared in the November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 19. Data on stocks held by 21 institute members appeared in October, 1925, issue (No. 50)r
p. 26. The association reports also include production and unit prices of members.
? Compiled by U". S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Stocks comprise powdered milk derived from whole milk, skim milk, and unskimmed
milk as of the end of the month and include both case and bulk goods, the former being comparatively small. Monthly data from 1920, divided as between case and bulk
goods, are given in the November, 1925, issue (No. 51), p. 23.
8
Compiled by U". S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
8
Receipts at the markets of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and San Francisco, compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural
Economics, are totals of weekly figures with overlapping weeks prorated. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 43.
1° Cold-storage holdings at principal warehouses compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Poultry holdings are given as of the
end of the month. Monthly data from 1920 on poultry appeared in June, 1922, issue (No. 10), p. 43.
11 Cold-storage holdings at end of month reported by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing about 98 per cent of stocks held.
in public and private cold- storage warehouses. Monthly data on storage holdings of frozen eggs since 1916 were given in the May, 1927, issue (No. 69), p. 22.
121 case of eggs equals 30 dozen, or about 45 pounds net.
is e-month period, July to December, inclusive.




96
Table 75.—BUTTER AND CHEESE
CHEESE

YEAR AND
MONTH

Production
(factory) i

Apparent
consumption 2

Receipts
af5
markets 3

Coldstorage
holdings,
creamery*

Production i

Apparent
consumption 2

Receipts
at 5
markets 3

Exports

Coldstorage Im- 8
hold- ports U.S.
ings *
(6)

Canada ?

Production i

Cold- Price
storage No. 1
hold- fresh
ings 4
(•)

Dolls,
p.lb.

Thousands of pounds

1° 83, 887
41, 599

4,632
4,623
3,235
2,376
528
630

221
316
5,246
4,508
4,448
4,034

an
.30
.34
.43
.51

22, 079
20, 607

12, 942
12,076
11, 442
16, 081
16, 492
14, 573

,150. 32

1° 80, 539
51,588
54,572
49, 737

American s

Total, all varieties

Dolls,
p.lb.

Thousands of pounds
1913 monthly av___
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av_
1916 monthly av ._
1917 monthly av. . _
1918 monthly av___

Price, creamery,
92 score 5

BUTTER

10 28, 995
26, 125
47,590
34,646

$0.15
.16
.15
.19
.24
.27

63, 293
66, 107

138, 109
123, 796

1919 monthly av... 70,833
1920 monthly av_._ 71, 965
1921 monthly av.._ 87, 912
1922 monthly av___ 96,126
1923 monthly av__. 104, 268

127,094
129,466
143, 811
149, 671
155,564

38, 336
33,563
39,012
43, 893
45,448

67,229
59,754
52, 623
50,959
47, 074

.61
.61
.43
.41
.47

32, 693
31, 930
33, 531
35, 852

31,304
31,709
33, 992
35,733

16, 189
14, 055
16, 695
16, 655
18,254

53, 305
52, 917
43, 939
41, 637
52, 431

944
1,333
2,239
3,881
5,368

1,180
1,358
981
417
694

12,684
10,533
11, 135
11,104
9,546

23,486
21,224
21,811
23,567
25, 676

41,442
37, 559
30,066
30, 675
39, 579

.32
.29
.21
.20
.25

1924 monthly av___
1925 monthly av...
1926 monthly av...
1927 monthly av...
1928 monthly av___

113, 007
113,461
120,981
124, 708
122, 306

164, 742
166, 359
173,954
174, 056
173, 360

48, 956
47, 667
47, 745
48, 538
48, 231

73, 665
61, 665
67, 693
71, 018
62, 039

.43
.45
.45
.47
.47

39,024
41,917
41,290
40, 197
43,384

38, 956
40, 636
42,540
40,924
41,138

17, 921
18,488
17, 324
18, 180
16,385

66, 536
68, 489
72,684
66,933
72,501

4,931
5,200
6,535
6,650
6,784

358
766
325
284
217

9,732
10,580
11,222
9,211
9,513

27, 058
28, 937
27, 993
25,648
27,568

49,483
52,056
56,964
50, 115
57, 875

.21
.25
.23
.26
.25

1938
January
February
March _ _
April

99,866
98,276
110,568
117,474

156, 593
146, 476
160, 516
164, 379

42, 271
41, 140
45, 748
44,721

28, 273
14, 404
5,716
5,109

.49
.47
.49
.45

31, 748
32, 613
38,364
43,893

38,244
38, 214
41, 575
43,903

14,409
13,716
14,655
15, 138

55, 862
48, 784
43,303
41, 791

5,347
5,303
5,759
6,229

257
208
266
187

1,324
1,148
2,011
668

17,806
18,784
23,196
27,780

41, 793
36, 710
31,887
30, 207

.29
.24
.25
.24

May .
June
July
August

154, 245
178, 618
165, 247
143, 391

209, 772
202, 787
185, 928
189, 164

54,427
69,650
65, 145
55, 339

15, 952
69, 750
120, 437
136, 175

.45
.44
.45
.47

56, 185
64,141
56,653
49, 401

46, 452
43, 014
34,461
36,541

16,254
19, 216
21, 741
18,727

48,990
68, 613
89, 708
101, 498

6,280
6,581
5,937
5,597

303
180
172
215

4,860
5,849
20, 095
15,788

36, 794
44,482
39,543
33, 788

36, 716
53,646
73,088
83,906

.24
.26
.26
.26

September
October- _
November
"npfipmbfif

117, 790
104, 367
86, 544
91, 291

176, 879
171, 922
158, 919
156, 981

44, 969
41,884
36, 616
36, 863

128, 071
105, 811
70, 985
43, 783

.49
.48
.51
.51

45,156
40,654
32, 054
29,748

48,660
43, 522
42,506
36, 565

18, 222
18, 665
14, 180
11, 691

98, 339
97, 421
89, 970
85,730

6,744
9,410
9,379
8,836

141
204
278
190

17,123
24, 282
15, 431
5,573

29, 989
24, 771
17,727
16, 159

81,833
82, 318
74, 325
68, 075

.27
.26
.25
.26

1929
January
February
March
April

102, 827
97, 670
112, 378
126, 664

157, 457
143, 208
157, 670
170, 745

44, 925
41, 557
46, 186
48, 707

24, 747
11, 910
5,532
5,883

.48
.50
.48
.45

21, 510
20,796
23, 562
31, 105

40, 192
36,450
34, 612
39,886

13, 781
13, 878
12, 261
12,331

74, 016
63,968
58,153
54,618

7,291
5,687
5,423
5,553

244
194
278
242

1,500
714
726
804

57,764
49,546
45, 105
42,032

.25
.24
.24
.24

226, 180
181, 359

203, 760

63, 259
69, 511
68, 104

28, 369
91, 962
151, 614

.44
.44
.42

41, 083
48,854

40,639

16, 751
18,404
20,548

61, 097
79, 724
96,488

6,183
8,608

204
209

1, 692
8,403

47,641
62, 737
78, 267

.23
.23
.23

May
June
July „
August

..

September
October
November
December

I

"~

1
Data from U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing practically complete factory production. Data on American cheese are
reported only every 3 months. Total production figures covering cheese, which include cottage, pot, and bakers' cheese, are shown monthly from 1920 and American
cheese production from 1917 in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 23.
2 Compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing the disappearance of butter or cheese into trade. These data are comuted from production (comprising actual factory data plus allowance for production on farms), imports, and the difference in cold-storage holdings. Monthly data on
utter from 1917 appeared in December, 1925, issue (No. 52), p. 21, and on cheese from 1920, in the May, 1926, issue (No. 57), p. 29.
3
Compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, covering Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and San Francisco, and representing total of weekly figures with first and last weeks of rnonthT prorated.
4
Cold-storage holdings at end of month reported by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, representing about 98 per cent of stocks held
"
gs a
in public and private cold-storage warehouses. Monthly data on total cheese holdings from 1917 appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 23.
* Average of daily wholesale prices of creamery butter, 92 score at New York City, as compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Monthly data since January, 1910, were given in the April, 1927, issue (No. 68), p. 23.
6
Imports and exports for the United States from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, representing all classes of cheese.
Monthly data from 1909 appeared in the July, 1926, issue (No. 59), p. 23.
7
Exports from Canada from Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Yearly figures through 1925 represent monthly averages for the Canadian
fiscal year ended March 31 of the year indicated.
8
American cheese figures are for whole milk cheese only and do not include cheese made from part skim milk, these latter usually totaling from 1 to 2 per cent of the
American cheese output.
9
Average of daily wholesale prices of American cheeso, No. 1, fresh, at New York City, as compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural
Economics. Monthly data since January, 1910, were given in the April, 1927, issue (No. 68), p. 23.
10 Five months' average, August to December, inclusive

g




97

Table 76.—SUGAR
RAW CANE SUGAR

REFINED SUGAR

Imports i

Stocks
at reMeltings fineries,
From
From
4
Hawaii foreign
()
end of 4
and
month
Porto countries
Rico

YEAR AND
MONTH

Shipnients,
2 ports 5

Stocks,
end of
month
% ports '

Exports,*
including
maple

Long tons

63, 338
66, 890
67, 984
69, 756
75, 683
80, 581
65, 951

175, 664
201, 437
196, 569
205, 716
183, 802
192, 219

1919 monthly av.._.
1920 monthly av
1921 monthly av
1922 monthly av
1923 monthly av... .

69, 322
70, 803
74, 572
68, 436
63, 575

261, 149
298, 686
222, 005
362, 040
286, 806

326, 547
334, 981
296, 130
429, 002
345, 730

115, 706
106, 017
150, 497
191, 101
175, 770

e 41, 338
62, 202
53, 336

79, 142
100, 257
96,488
100, 101
113, 390

307, 724
332, 711
344, 125
306, 309
286, 968

378, 937
426, 075
431, 261
406, 863
393, 848

184, 473
202, 648
323, 541
287, 659
449, 738

1927
September
October
November
T)p.cp.Tnhpr

74,520
76,540
24, 340
20, 058

278, 078
319, 464
223, 855
201, 139

384, 903
375, 748
295, 922
243, 364

1928
January
February
March
April

45,026
130, 034
204, 691
164, 551

219, 926
344, 459
425, 817
448, 326

May
June
July
August

'

158, 387
180, 861
102, 353
107, 202

September October
November
December

Raw Gran96°
cen- ulated, Gran- Index, Receipts, Exports
Cuban
in
51
trifu- bbls. ulated, cities
N.Y.
ports
N.Y.

Stocks,
end of
month

irt.

Rel. to
1913

Long tons

2,927
1,926
14, 524
35, 847
58, 655
37, 604
15, 152

$0. 035
.038
.047
.058
.063
.064

$0. 043
.047
.056
.069
.077
.078

$0. 049
.053
.059
.075
.088
.094

100
108
120
146
169
176

134, 225
125, 726
210, 908
246, 245
201, 760
272, 066

129, 447
120, 972
209, 971
237,004
204, 422
265, 707

242,583
280, 333
364, 179
436, 913
308, 662
592, 065

e 18, 083
12, 745
30, 529

54, 889
34, 381
34, 739
68, 330
16, 552

.075
.130
.048
.047
.070

.089
.126
.062
.059
.084

.104
.182
.077
.066
.094

205
353
146
132
184

328, 360
288, 281
291, 342
357, 892
290, 609

323, 441
274, 811
233, 140
428, 302
290, 065

647, 341
410, 287
1, 047, 721
617, 799
395, 339

62, 532
69, 758
71, 964
67, 483
59,489

27, 319
22, 185
36, 663
39, 415
30, 309

16, 387
28, 226
7,953
9,324
9,325

.060
.043
.043
.047
.042

.075
.055
.055
.058
.056

.084
.064
.061
.065
.063

167
131
125
133
128

332, 554
420, 238
384, 321
354, 868
330, 8.50

332, 035
411, 793
388, 866
338, 677
331, 356

455, 115
713, 576
816, 549
818, 074
773, 784

258, 427
254, 963
215, 665
205, 573

68, 432
54, 010
44, 663
45, 340

37, 536
35, 128
30, 665
30, 387

4,451
3,642
4,480
3,651

.048
.047
.047
.046

.058
.057
.056
.056

.064
.064
.063
.062

131
131
131
129

167, 805
151, 747
106, 974
86, 425

292, 816
304, 118
261, 815
244, 852

671, 952
531, 142
344, 693
212, 314

307,050
310, 612
468, 496
409, 447

192, 968
333, 493
458, 231
666, 061

40, 958
47, 631
70,414
60, 571

29, 542
20,283
31, 621
42, 092

3,184
8,842
9,865
8,645

.043
.043
.045
.045

.057
.056
.057
.058

.063
.063
.063
.064

129
129
129
129

238, 129
896, 615
1, 016, 015
586, 747
•

212, 161
326, 705
584, 153
447, 097

177, 801
851, 113
1, 202, 871
1, 325, 601

271, 492
208, 241
253, 613
274, 366

378, 231
404, 120
433, 367
471, 175

701, 624
682, 591
595, 214
488,161

58, 371
64,224
67, 638
82, 773

43, 208
34, 166
24, 930
34. 049

11, 869
5,364
10, 313
11,329

.045
.043
.042
.041

.059
.059
.057
.055

.065
.067
.066
.063

131
133
133
129

237, 507
123, 340
149, 682
182, 414

287, 561
229, 869
299, 714
348, 808

1, 263, 287
1,127,054
1, 017, 638
829, 437

315, 722
257, 825
229, 477
194, 351

417, 983
436, 122
404, 450
285, 122

465, 386
357, 506
234, 429
221, 196

66, 428
61, 799
48, 231
44, 824

26, 725
32, 920
25,007
19, 168

7,413
11, 971
14, 887
8,213

.042
.039
.039
.039

.056
.052
.051
.052

.063
.062
.060
.060

127
126
124
122

168, 638
154, 547
123, 919
92,648

370, 339
323, 317
287, 075
259, 469

630, 548
446, 210
288, 393
125, 449

68,900
101, 159
124,704
143, 628

255, 768
444, 157
601, 727
605, 003

332, 872
380, 899
505, 286
502,980

221,334
381,067
559,993
779, 091

50, 026
63, 778
73, 231
87, 466

28,042
37,044
49, 451
46, 341

8,243
9,944
10, 159
9,265

.038
.037
.037
.037

.050
.049
.048
.048

.061
.060
.057
.056

122
120
118
116

638, 996
959, 318
1, 061, 472
809, 807

237, 350
468, 615
659, 501
583, 906

457, 157
947, 380
1, 296, 744
1, 509, 795

134, 891
112, 546

1929
January
February
March
ApriL
May
June
July
August

CUBAN MOVEMENT •
(RAW)

89, 047
104,841
57, 602

1924 monthly av
1925 monthly av
1926 monthly av
1927 monthly av
1928 monthly av__-

;

RETAIL
PRICE 2

Dollars per pound

1909-13 monthly av_
1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av
1917. monthly av
1918 monthly av

;

WHOLESALE
PRICE 2

458, 183
338, 905

409, 503
450,035
445, 904

911, 055
875, 942
864, 589

73, 898
81,088

47, 158
50,753

8,538
6, 341

.036
.035
.038

.049
.049
.052

.056
.056

116
116

440, 821
196, 995
153, 925

510, 217
356, 616
428,066

1, 439, 050
1, 298, 387
978, 543

__ _

September- ._
October _ _
November
December

I
1

i

1 Imports of raw cane sugar and exports of refined from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Imports from foreign countries are
mostly from Cuba and Central America, while sugar from the Philippine Islands is also included in the imports from foreign countries, not in the data from noncontiguous
territories, including Hawaii and Porto Rico. The original data in pounds have been converted into long tons for comparison with the other data.
2
Wholesale price of raw sugar, duty paid, wholesale and retail prices of granulated sugar in New York, and retail price index for 51 cities from 17. S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly prices, except retail prices which are as of the 15th of the month.
3
Statistics of receipts at Cuban ports, exports from Cuba, and stocks at Cuban ports from Statistical Sugar Trade Journal. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in the
June, 1922, issue of the SURVEY (No. 10), p. 49.
4
Meltings of raw sugar by refiners compiled by the Statistical Sugar Trade Journal represent operations at the eight ports of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Savannah, New Orleans, Galveston, and San Francisco, the Baltimore figures being added in 1921 upon completion of refinery in that city. The figures from the
four North Atlantic ports are actual monthly totals, those for San Francisco, Savannah, and Galveston are prorated from weekly totals; while the New Orleans figures are
prorated from partly estimated figures. Stocks represent the amount of raw sugar in the hands of refiners and of certain importers (the bulk of stocks being in refiners'
hands) at the end of each month for the four North Atlantic ports and on the Saturday nearest to the end of each month for the other ports, the total being considered as
of last day of month. Details of meltings and stocks, by ports, are given in the Statistical Sugar Trade Journal: also classification as between importers' and refiners' stocks,
6
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta from reports of refiners at Savannah and New Orleans. Monthly data from 1921 appeared in the February, 1928.
issue (No. 78), p. 23.
6
Average for 9 months, April to December, inclusive.

61139°—29



7

98

Table 77.—COFFEE, TEA, COCOA, AND FISH
TEA

Thousands of bags
1909-13 m. a.
1913mo.av__
1914mo.av__
1915 mo. av
1916mo.av__
1917 mo. a v__ u

Thous. of Ibs.

FISH

COCOA
Price. Formosa,
fine, N. Y.3

ReImceipts
ports
in
into
World United Brazil Total To U.S.2
total States
U.S.

Im- Stocks
in
ports United
into KingU.S.2
dom 4

Dolls,
per Ib.

Clearances
from Brazil

Visible supply,
end of month

YEAR AND
MONTH

Price,RioNo.7,
Brazil grades
New York «

COFFEE i

Shipments
from
ImGold
ports * Coast
and
Nigeria 8

Spot
price,
Accra,
New
York 5

Dolls,
per Ib.

Long tons

Dolls,
per Ib.

11,819
11, 370
9,488
9,280
10, 671

1,935
1,576
1,727
2,016
2, 611

1,138
936
1,431
1,186
1,064

1,097
928
1,395
1,078
864

441
461
589
552
526

573
538
638
776
737
812

$0. 113
.107
.080
.075
.094
.091

8,241
7,418
8,151
8,842
8,814
10,566

107, 127
96,338
107, 053
110, 784
67,040

$0. 242
.249
.248
.240
.240
.316

5, 033
5,795
6,601
8,576
9,026
14, 511

1918 mo. av
1919 mo. a v__ » 7, 318
1920 mo. av.. 7,941
1921 mo. av_. 8,913
1922 mo. av_. 8,730
1923 mo. av__
5,863

1,851
1,213
1,695
1,686
1,086
903

994
733
910
1,138
966
992

607
1,051
944
1,003
1,035
1,175

373
525
521
513
499
625

664
842
819
847
787
890

.098
.178
.120
.072
.103
.115

11,044
6,747
7,567
6,374
8,093
8,927

90,408
153, 759
213, 843
211, 666
187, 796
151, 357

.358
.353
.337
.240
.303
.310

13, 391
14,561
12, 785
11, 340
12,831
15, 411

726
736
779
759
799

1,280
1,070
1,143
1,307
1,177

1,158
1,118
1,130
1, 245
1,138

583
586
625
605
608

897
810
943
905
1,002

.168
.203
.182
.148
.165

7,701
8,437
7,994
7,464
7,499

159, 665
195, 249
180, 634
181,66ft
213, 158

.316
.350
.355
.342
.321

14,073
14, 212
15, 859
15,811
14,108

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

mo. av__
mo. av..
mo. av_.
mo. av__
mo. av_.

4,857
5,146
4,619
4,5S7
5,250

Total
catch,
principal
fishing
ports 7

Cold- Canned salmon
storage
holdings
Ship(15th of ments Exportse
mo.)6 U.S." Canada

Thous. of Ibs.

i

Cases

10 11, 164
10 11, 798
10 12, 256
16, 073 3 41, 747
15, 513 36, 912

36,604
106,083
60, 167
85, 313
83,875

$0. 0742

18, 393
17, 667
16, 195
14, 196
14, 884
16, 318

62, 533
62, 133
45, 480
44,816
35, 321
36,203

467, 086
473, 438

76,000
82,833
106, 813
53, 396
75, 729
55,896

21,286
21, 126
21, 958
20, 348
22,498

.0751
.0968
.1156
.1595
.1291

17,005
19, 951
22,055
24,056
24, 691

45,041
44,084
46,882
48,957
53,925

541, 804
527, 109
524, 805
513, 307
474, 162

93, 875
134, 938
103, 749
95, 353
111, 701

i

1938
May
June
July
August

5,143
5,321
5,734
5,515

775
861
850
793

1,158
1,303
1,168
1,181

1,308
1,100
1,105
1,057

649
549
598
548

859
906
821
925

.157
.157
.165
.173

4,755
4,863
7,209
8,086

195, 988
179, 214
170, 519
179, 106

.325
.325
.325
.325

18,604
23,336
12, 971
13,461

19, 753
7,601
6,316
4,011

.1500
.1450
.1350
.1213

27, 650
29,809
27,324
30, 130

26, 513
40,946
53, 140
66,170

154, 768
240, 311
454,600
832,632

42, 117
23,106
26, 333
121, 152

September..
October
November..
December...

5,378
5,390
5,393
5,267

702
693
752
783

1,040
1,157
1,287
1,034

997
1,330
993
1,166

570 1,655
809
657
544
882
673
993

.173
.178
.181
.181

9,754
10, 512
9,417
9,264

194, 681
209, 701
224, 717
240, 738

.325
.310
.310
:310

6,388
5,450
6,636
14, 164

3,724
15,326
33, 805
48, 268

.1163
.1125
.1055
.1050

24,284
27,129
23,236
21, 189

71, 352 1, 113, 495
73, 410 810, 723
504, 854
77, 677
78, 090 577, 378

168,963
253,265
145, 725
170, 690

1929
January
February __March..
April

5,038
5,022
4,983
5,207

732
849
822
788

1,139
1,126
1,175
1,141

1,176
1,165
1,041
1,119

678
684
501
511

1,033
1,035
1,052
988

.183
.184
.180
.176

10, 073
6,802
5,470
5,418

251, 387
253, 716
259, 651
251, 209

.322
.330
.330
.330

15,753
28,236
25,041
29,182

59, 863
39, 993
35,396
17, 670

.1038
.1083
.1088
.1044

15, 496
24,564
27, 759
29,042

62, 375
48, 347
37, 707
31, 360

523, 761
428, 399
364, 414
109, 690

205, 096
73, 556
89, 225
49, 177

5,335
5,352
5,448

683
700
760

1,079
1,069
1,056

971
1,020
1,267

503
488
634

860
817

.171
.168
163

4,769
6,029

.330
.325
310

15, 394
14,486

12, 464
9,889
7 224

.1031
.1069

28, 631
31, 728

30, 119
40,451
51, 334

186, 202
217, 781

90,775
42, 794

May. __ .
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

I
1

Data on coffee, except imports and prices, from the New York Cojjee and Sugar Exchange, Inc. Brazilian figures cover the ports of Rip, Santos, Bahia, Victoria, Pernambuco, and Paranagua, Victoria being added in 1925 and Pernambuco and Paranagua at the end of 1927, these two ports being of small importance in coffee movement
prior to those dates. The world visible supply consists of stocks in Europe, United States, Brazil, and afloat, all of which are shown separately in the Exchange's monthly
report. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in the April, 1928, issue (No. 80), p. 23, the addition of Pernambuco figures since publication of that issue making slight revision
beginning with July, 1927.
3 Imports of coffee, tea, and cocoa from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Imports of coffee have been reduced to bags from original data in pounds, taking 132 pounds to the bag.
3 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, representing averages of weekly prices in the New York wholesale markets, except that prior
to 1918 the prices are averages of quotations on the first day of the month.
* Compiled by the British Board of Trade, representing the quantity of tea remaining in bonded warehouses in the United Kingdom or entered to be warehoused on
the last day of the month. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in the November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 26.
* Shipments of cocoa compiled by the Neo York Cocoa Exchange. Shipments represent the amount of raw cocoa shipped from the Gold Coast and Nigeria, Africa.
Spot price compiled by George C. Lee Co., New York, and represents the average monthly spot price of Accra cocoa in New York.
e Cold-storage holdings of fish at principal warehouses, compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, and are given as the 15th
of each month. Monthly data from 1916 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 19.
7 Fish catch, representing landings of fresh fish from vessels at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., Portland, Me., and Seattle, Wash., compiled by U. S. Department of
Commerce, Bureau of Fisheries. Details by ports are given in monthly statements.
8 Shipments of canned salmon from Puget Sound, Astoria, Portland, Oreg. (except small rail shipments), San Francisco, and in bond through Prince Rupert, B. C.
representing practically complete pack of United States, including Alaska, reported by Pacific Canned Fish Brokers' Association, in cases of 48 one-pound cans to case.
« Canadian exports of canned salmon from Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Yearly figures represent monthly averages for the Canadian fiscal year ending Mar. 31 of the year indicated.
1° Excluding Portland and Seattle.
u 7 month's average, January to July, inclusive.
" 8 month's average, July to December, inclusive.
13 9 month's average, October to December, inclusive.




99
Table 78.—TOBACCO
MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS

UNMANUFACTURED
Wholesale
price 8

Stocks <
(quarterly)
Sales,
Production loose-leaf Exports,
Chewing,
(crop 1 waresmoking,
estimate) houses • leaf a
snuff, and
export
types

YEAR AND MONTH

Cigar
types

Leaf
ManuTotal,
average, factured
including
Kentucky tobacco
imported
and
types
waresnuff
house

1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average

1, 439, 071
1, 465, 481
1, 582, 225
, 069, 693
, 246, 837
, 515, 110

31,417
37,031
28, 941
36, 139
40, 330
20, 989

996, 176
953, 734
1, 034, 679
1, 062, 237
1, 153, 278
1, 249, 276

_

, 251, 343
, 376, 628
, 297, 889
, 211, 909
, 373, 501

1924 monthly average
1925 mnnthly average

1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average

82, 149
65, 280
74, 254
41, 601

42,028
40, 344
52, 398
65, 118

80,354
68, 164

810, 469
835, 462
915, 452
821, 564
923,240

369, 802
344, 971
361, 114
286, 007
275, 770

, 234, 014
, 224, 524
,343,396
, 165, 332
, 250, 801

33,902
64,723
39, 992
43,563
36, 821
41, 446

975, 427
, 030, 642
, 026, 109
, 227, 487
, 121, 075
, 207, 714

291, 214
303, 343
327, 185
344, 617
386, 091
404, 584
410, 435
398, 243

47, 950
39, 791
40,588
42, 656
48, 654

1, 329, 960
1, 383, 519
1, 408, 152
1, 459, 451
1, 358, 740

Large
cigars

Dolls, Thous. of
per cwt. pounds

Thousands of pounds
1909-1913 monthly average
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average

Consumption o
(tax-paid withdrawals)

400,273
357, 550
329, 499

Small
cigarettes

Exports »

Cigarettes

Thousands

$6,949
10.300
16. 793

36,990
36, 745
36, 863
38, 847
40, 248

630, 959
597, 849
549, 932
586, 844
629, 991

1, 296, 308
1, 404, 636
1, 497, 029
2, 107, 525
2, 944, 272

193, 233
200, 602
173, 015
354,889
584, 977

,337,747
, 402, 525
, 440, 507
, 650, 022
, 587, 422
, 689, 639

23.014
22. 102
14. 595
11. 784
14.450
15. 058

41, 423
35, 339
33, 324
32, 208
35, 019
34, 342

587, 796
589, 363
661, 418
563, 218
574, 383
583, 241

3, 888, 075
4, 426, 649
4, 240, 181
4, 463, 752
5, 370, 890

1, 012, 128
1,350,981
1, 319, 489
711, 973
955,848
1,021,044

, 814, 686
, 864, 016
, 879, 602
, 913, 912
, 791, 412

14.729
13. 875
8.472
11. 276
13, 503

34, 415
34, 186
34, 173
32, 840
32,009

554, 867
541, 729
549, 077
547, 615
537, 806

5, 917, 368
6, 663, 134
7, 453, 926
8, 098, 050
8, 826, 330

874, 657
678,803
794, 945
591, 087
975,509

23.227
19.294
12.467
12. 735

33,002
32, 310
33, 582
30, 602

413, 532
453, 605
497, 904
459, 022

8, 369, 087
7, 531, 914
8, 470, 466
7, 511, 408

962, 574
836,921
864, 541
1, 147, 089

11. 643
6.492
9.069
11. 580

33, 042
33, 801
30, 155
34, 981

541, 501
575, 996
558, 206
601, 877

7.871
12. 077
9.896
25, 691

31, 789
35, 333
30, 146
25, 369

586, 267
723, 318
630, 531
411,910

9, 126, 271
9, 921, 537

427, 716
437, 476
491, 305
550, 912

10, 160, 263

22,270
11,783

33, 160
29,083
31, 663
31,950

33,360

572, 413

11, 168, 407

3,720,072

1928
January
February
March
April

May _
June__
July. . __
August

587

42, 958
41, 624
46, 938
42, 007

1, 311, 824
1, 357, 712

154
144
227
70, 579

39, 681
30, 796
20, 252
26, 833

1, 371, 782
1, 353, 258
1, 346, 566
1, 373, 501

133, 718
122, 627
142, 034
142, 869

57, 509
88, 509
78, 170
68,566

174, 751
80, 574

25,726
3,245

45,804
48,703
30, 673
39,634

441
48

32, 753
28,588

135, 470

61,235
8,325

_

September..
October
November
December

_
_

1, 504, 918

383, 943

1, 998, 145

1, 280, 764

346, 500

1, 731, 635

1, 275, 639

308, 707

1, 680, 461

1, 373, 637

278, 845

1,755,408

8, 891, 803
781, 118
9,690,961 1, 032, 268
9, 723, 647 1, 078, 362
860, 791
10, 627, 344

961, 827
956, 846
8,536,426 1, 114, 381
7, 515, 101 1, 109, 392

1929
January
February
March
April

_ _

May.
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

1,446,173

384,840

1,933,940

11,692
8,722

8,062,499
8,689,510
9,608,221

1,010,368
926,297
799,935
805, 777
703,045
784, 160

1,492,508
_

_ _ _ _ _ _ _
_.. _ _

* Estimate of production of the tobacco crop from the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The annual figures represent the latest revised
estimates of the year's total crop, not monthly averages, while the monthly figures represent the current estimate of the total crop for the year made the first week of each
month. Revisions of the December estimate for each year are made in December of the following year.
2
Sales of tobacco from loose-leaf warehouses compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, from reports of State authorities of Kentucky,
North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, which States grow about 75 per cent of the total tobacco crop. Sales from Kentucky were not available for the first six months
of 1919, so that the year's figure is partly estimated by estimating the Kentucky figures for the first half year as equal to the sum of the sales in the other reporting States,
which is approximately the normal proportion of Kentucky sales to the total.
3 Exports from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
4
Stocks of leaf tobacco held by manufacturers and dealers compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. During the years 1913, 1914,1915,
and 1916 the data were collected semiannually in March and September, the quarterly collection commencing with December, 1916. Therefore the average for the years
1913 8through 1915 are semiannual, while for 1916 three quarters are averaged, and thereafter four quarters.
Compiled by the U. S. Department ol Labor, Bureau ol Labor Statistics, representing average sales of leaf tobacco from all Kentucky warehouses.
6
Figures of consumption of tobacco products from U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Internal Revenue, represent withdrawals from bonded warehouses upon payment of tax for domestic consumption. The figures for manufactured tobacco and snuff comprise plug, twist, fine-cut, and smoking tobacco and snuff. Figures for cigars
are those for large cigars, weighing over 3 pounds per thousand, while for cigarettes, small cigarettes are taken, weighing 3 pounds per thousand or less; in both cases the.
series taken represent over 90 per cent of the totals for each class.




100

Table 79.—OCEAN TRANSPORTATION
VESSEL
LOSSES.*
(quarterly)

Completed
during
month 3

Vessels in foreign
trade
YEAR AND
MONTH

Lost
Amer- Forican
eign

Abandoned

Total

Total

Thousands8 of net
tons

1913 mo. av_ 1,250
1914 mo. av. 1,000
1915 mo. av 1,340
19 16 mo. av 1,537
1917 mo. av. 1,666
1918 mo. av_ 1,563
1919 mo. av_ 2,083
1920 mo. av 2,836

3,333
3,017
2,826
2,895
2,467
2, 184
2,189
2,816

4,483
4,017
4,166
4,433
4,133
3,748
4,271
5, 653

31, 075
38,378
44, 398
32, 960
66, 781
101, 420
42,411
62, 090

10, 895
13, 495
19, 772
13, 512
11, 452
9,596
6,910
8,556

18, 836
46, 225
86, 192
226, 773
354, 845
238, 394

28,846
26, 354
9,548
27, 094
50, 895
155, 110
294, 849
208, 557

115, 569
28,246
24, 099
17, 507
17, 595
19,006
29, 946
13, 661

2,507
2,639
2,329
2,503
2,329
2,378
2,483
2,650

2,704
2,756
3,228
3,232
3,525
4,209
3,804
3,994

5,211
5,395
5,556
5,735
5,854
6,587
6,287
6,644

48, 291 15,272
28,842 34, 173
31, 216 171,683
31, 772 168, 445
21, 527 35, 845
23, 051 86,228
25, 862 80,183
27,686 47, 566

1937
September.
October
November .
December..

2,712
2,939
3,261
2,057

4,520
4,035
3,697
3,239

7,232
6,974
6,957
5,296

21, 674

16, 442

28,594

15,976

1928
January
February. _
March
April

1,865
1,877
1,895
2,090

3,298
3,158
3,686
3,447

5,163
5,035
5,581
5,537

May
June..
July
August

2,837
2,847
3,056
3,173

3,159
4,524
4,725
5,204

5,996
7, 371
7,781
8,377

September .
October
November .
December..

2,912
3,252
3,612
2,388

4,453
4,554
4,152
3,568

7,365
7,806
7,764
5,956

1,950
1,909
2,145
2,738

3,534
3,399
3,788
3,924

5,484
5,308
5,933
6,661

2,851
2,985

4,425
4,679

7,277
7,664

A rtril

May
June
July
August

Steel
seagoing

Gross tons 8

1921 mo. av
; 1922 mo. av.
1923 mo. av.
1924 mo. av.
1925 mo. av.
1926 mo. av.
1927mo.av_
1928 mo. av.

1929
January
February _ _
March

SHIP CONSTRUCTION

30,709 148, 017

30,091

22,490

19, 151

11,098

30, 791

8,657

19,809

48, 074

Under
construction 3

FREIGHT
RATES

SHIP
CLEARANCES 1

World (quarterly) *

IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION

Aliens *

United States
citizens *

Passports
Under con- Charissued 6
ter
MerEmiLaunched struction, rates Immi- grants Arrivals Deparchant
end of
tures
world grants
vessels
month
routes
7
() 1
Thous. No. of Thous. No. of Thous. Rel. to
of gross ships of gross ships of gross 1911-13
Number of people
Number
av.
tons s
tons 8
tons 8
100

1,188

438
330
186
241
278
467
621
440

833
713
300
422
735
1,362
1,786
1,466

102, 157
13,239
9,774
10, 854
11,068
13, 574
23,109
8,188

546
231
197
173
186
259
241
224

344
213
163
218
201
140
182
208

1,085
617
410
505
541
409
556
659

757
745
625
497
668
632

31, 510
9,290
26, 657
35,867

23, 303
3,364
22,554
30, 742

216
241
194
204

190

535

223

823

9,294
20, 787
12,990
9,880

2,888
15, 218
5,907
1,488

214
207
232
252

18,428
10, 719
25, 523
12, 537

12,604
4,458
21,450
2,245

259
264
256
235

27,833
7,148
4,913
3,880

24,483
4,318
1,382
1,812

242
260
169
94

7,413
3,323
11, 128
20,668

3,392
1,335
3,919
9,468

126
168
187
290

9,775
31, 616

3,804
14, 379

268
170

1,236

384
272

115, 610
57, 375
21, 557
29,647
12, 747
9,660
20,613
59, 047

22, 859
24, 470
13, 387
5,810
5,638
6,718
21,810
21, 810

24, 600
23,238
10, 161
11, 208
8,187
6,564
10, 839
17, 038

30, 069
24,580
8,954
10, 321
14, 161
27, 909
12, 247
21, 102

1,954
1,693
1,093
1,927
3,135
4,735
8,163
13, 374

2,556
2,546
2,261
1,941
2,901
2,673

160
114
108
106
99
102
107
97

46, 992
31, 764
62, 587
29, 564
24, 227
28, 025
26, 990
24, 191

20, 498
9,664
5,884
7,510
6,807
6,098
5,844
6,467

19, 272
24,296
23,020
26, 839
30, 550
31, 515
34,374
36, 883

23, 340
24,209
21, 728
25, 137
28,569
30, 645
33, 832
37,664

11, 474
11, 463
10, 521
12, 198
14,342
14, 669
15,203
15, 775

6G3

3, 074

104

693

3,119

103

31,000
31, 719
27, 758
22,350

7,625
6,402
5,871
9,085

75, 557
50, 254
24, 325
18, 922

39, 748
24, 396
22, 612
25,209

8,474
8,063
8,596
8,387

18,146
20,888
26, 270
30, 709

5,323
4,708
4,931
4,515

19,909
31,941
34, 217
32,586

27, 126
34,810
29, 422
29,506

8,896
8,971
17,334
27,098

26,158
20, 419
20,682
24,629

6,240
7,205
7,804
6,488

28,407
27, 201
32, 974
63, 191

34,993
53, 028
68, 463
50,323

37,648
29,674
15, 776
9,866

29,317
29, 917
24,805
18, 357

8,093
7,479
6,549
8,264

80, 233
49, 831
23, 198
18, 911

42, 105
34, 643
22,380
25, 173

8,056
8,494
9,441
8,051

17,806
17,254
20, 145
28, 565

4,670
4,154
2,449
3,387

23,450
33, 216
37, 375
32,288

28,808
32, 347
27, 972
25, 277

9,513
8,888
17,066
29,995

25, 711
22,490

4,985
4,881

27, 169
28, 119

31, 505
42, 846

38, 175
29.508
18, 115

188

654

667

2,893

93

229

662

650

2,660

92

228

811

587

2,521

97

185

508

622

2,618

105

182

501

2,838

711

102

2,838

730

98

1

September.
October
November..
December

!

1 Tonnage of vessels cleared in foreign trade from U". S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
2
Vessels lost and abandoned, representing all classes of American vessels, from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Navigation, given for quarter ending in month
stated, yearly figures representing quarterly averages. Scrapped vessels are included under abandoned vessels.
3 From the V. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Navigation. The total completed includes ocean-going, lake, and river vessels built and officially numbered,
including vessels of the U. S. Shipping Board and private American owners, but not vessels built for foreign owners. The column on merchant vessels under construction
includes all kinds of ships except Government vessels building or under construction at the end of the month. Monthly data from 1915 given in the January, 1924, issue
of the SURVEY (No. 29), p. 49.
* Quarterly data on world ship construction compiled by Lloyds1, covering all vessels of 100 tons and over; from 1914 to 1921 figures for Germany are not included.
5 Compiled by U. <S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Immigration. Aliens admitted and departed include legal immigration and emigration but not nonimmigrants.
« Compiled by U. S. Department of State, Division of Passport Control and excludes passports issued to Government officials.
7 Compiled by U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, covering six tramp-ship commodities over 12 world-wide trade routes.
s Net ton represents 100 cubic feet internal carrying capacity after prescribed allowance for crew and engine space, while gross ton represents in units of 100 cubic feet
entire cubical capacity of the vessel, including crew and engine space.
.the



101

Table 80.—RIVER AND CANAL CARGO TRAFFIC
CANALS

RIVERS
Ohio by districts *°

Panama l
YEAR AND
MONTH

New
In Saiilt York Cape
In
Ste.
Amer- Brit- Marie 2 State Cod *
Total ican ish
(3)

vessels

vessels

Thousands of long
tons

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

mo.
ino.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.
mo.

av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av

407
258
588
628
576
781

182
71
123
175
230
379

1921 mo.
1922 mo
1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.
1927 mo.
1928 mo.

av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av

962
1,143
2,096
2,158
1,975
2,299
2,425
2,450

1938
May
June
July
August

St.
Lawrence «

WeiSuez8 land «

Thousands of
short tons

Short
tons

Thous.
of met.
tons

(quarterly)
MissisOhio
(Pittssippi
(Govt.- Monon- Alle- burgh
owned gahela • gheny 9 to
Pitts- Hunt- Cinbarges)
Wheel- Total burgh ing- cin- Louis7
ing) a
ton nati ville
()

Thousands of short tons

Short tons

183
131
283
218
156
236

9,965
6,921
8,911
11, 486
11, 227
10, 710
8,529
9,910

372
297
265
232
185
166
177
203

134, 107
99, 411
153, 140
216, 402
158, 600

1,164
1,421

370, 105

388, 429

8, 731
13, 392

432
546
1,327
1,222
1,056
1,238
1,279
1,130

310
338
447
529
498
553
565
683

6,032
8,259
11, 203
9,140
10, 234
10, 960
10, 419
10, 874

208
264
312
254
335
339
369
392

114, 406 1, 459
103, 226 1,780
115, 788 1,898
70, 242 2,122
50, 733 2,215
65, 110 2,117
68, 762 2, 467
117, 149 2,719

422, 208
464, 809
531, 260
682, 534
805, 133
744, 931
821, 307
826, 624

518, 795
597, 653
641, 944
759, 067
851, 407
874, 814
989, 119
934, 616

36, 939
49, 841
59, 203
70, 792
75, 896
87, 054
111, 381
119, 630

1, 144, 652
1, 787, 388
1, 733, 135
1, 840, 193
2, 039, 110
2, 041, 081
2, 174, 763

2,490
2,140
2,292
2,425

1,162
1,097
1,212
1,103

726
537
535
707

9,298
12, 633
13, 247
13, 680

409
400
414
517

110, 136 2,701 997, 484
120, 261 2, 538 1, 037, 051
135, 702 2,758 1, 003, 713
148, 691 2, C02 1, 115, 601

1, 038, 485
1, 143, 735
1, 225, 338
1, 359, 561

117, 929
90, 658
112, 248
113, 903

2, 215, 732 344, 578 954, 357
2, 109, 892 225, 960 931, 641
2, 095, 608 306, 010 947, 227
2, 304, 619 346, 670 1,034,775

Soutember
October
November
December

2,313
2,582
2,502
_ 2,715

1,140
1, 195
1,145
1,111

602
679
691
750

12, 812
13, 603
10, 458
1,262

411
536
328

130, 566
160, 903
140, 4f>4
153, 838

2,634
996, 833 1, 150, 058
2,622 1, 115, 190 1, 270, 051
2,749 1, 008, 483 1, 082, 545
84,838
109, 793
3^050

148, 377
120, 444
148, 218
135, 439

2, 305, 681 288, 629 963, 766
2, 396, 557 377, 744 1,010,860
2, 302, 719 302, 344 940, 397
2, 114, 671 161, 860 764, 893

1929
January
February
March
April

2,859
2,550
2,744
2,720

1,218
1,138
1,229
1,194

806
816
755
735

2,990
2,682
3,157
3,103

299, 020

215, 402

131, 918
109, 419
104,499
134, 747

2, 287, 541
1, 960, 686
2, 382, 405
2, 438, 939

88,940
80,683
187, 400
232,204

2,537
2,424

1,206
1,186

667
591

3,093
2,590

775, 786
760, 431

878, 458
927, 933

123, 851
103, 934
94,300

2, 450, 876
2, 460, 644

328,289 1,070,125
345, 995 1,056,795

M!ay
June
July
August.

l

|

4,406

60

141, 496
137, 634
146, 483
166, 205

13, 930
14, 076
14 120

393
387

I

201,444
161, 143

247, 189
270, 053
252, 667
292, 871
209, 100
295, 570
239, 458

298, 766
538, 380
523, 497
588, 130
776, 813
801, 845
847, 918

478, 265
525, 700
840,604
976, 992

3,844
4,939
4, 962
4,989

1,912
2, 476
2,397
2,505

1,116
1,265
1,322
1,314

134
138
150
137

772
1,060
1,094
1,033

5,427

2,642

1,397

116

1,272

5,673

2,932

1,423

139

1,178

5,271

2,602

1, 394

185

1,090

3,725

1,832

1,001

42

8oO

6,420

3,070

1,348

133

1,869

_ __

September
October
November
December _

i
i Panama Canal traffic, reported by the Panama Canal, represents cargo carried by commercial vessels. Figures prior to 1922 refer to fiscal years ending June 30.
8
Traffic through the Sault Ste. Marie canals, including both the American and Canadian canals, reported by U, S. War Department, Engineer Corps. Monthly averages for each year are for eight months during which the canals are usually open—that is, the yearly totals are divided by eight in order to present a figure fairly comparable
with current monthly movements. Monthly data by classes of commodities, covering the years 1913-1922, appeared in March, 1923, issue (No. 19), pp. 48 and 49.
a Traffic through New York State canals from New York State Superintendent of Public Works. About two-thirds of this traffic goes through the Erie Canal and onethird through the Champlain Canal. Monthly averages for each year are for the seven months during which the canals are usually open.
* Compiled by the Boston, Cape Cod & New York Canal Co. through March, 1928, when the Federal Government took over the canal. Thereafter figures are from the
U. 8. War Department, Engineer Corps. The average for 1916 is an average of nine months of operation. Monthly data from 1920 on ship tonnage (not comparable with
present figures) appeared in the September, 1923, issue (No. 25), pp. 55 and 56.
8
Suez Canal traffic from Le Canal de Suez.
« Data from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce. Monthly averages for each year are for seven months during the equivalent of which period the canals are usually open—that is, totals for the years are divided by 7 in order to present a figure fairly comparable with current monthly movements.
f Cargo tonnage on Government-owned barge line on Mississippi River between St. Louis and New Orleans from U. S. War Department, Mississippi- Warrior Service.
Receipts and shipments of cargo by river at St. Louis, now discontinued, appeared in August, 1925, issue (No. 48). Monthly data from 1920, including Government bargeline 8traffic, appeared in July, 1922, issue (No. 11), p. 45.
Compiled by the U. S. War Department, Engineer Corps, represent total cargo traffic on the Ohio River between Pittsburgh and Lock and Dam 11, located between
Wellsburg and Wheeling, W. Va. The total of 3,585,188 short tons shown for the months of 1922, from which the average is computed, does not include the annual total
of 1,327,199 short tons not shown separately by months, the total movement for 1922 being 4,912,387. Data are available from 1910 to 1914 for traffic between Pittsburgh
and Lock No. 6 (near Beaver, Pa.), and from 1915 to 1921 between Pittsburgh and Lock No. 10 (near Steubenville, Ohio). Traffic between Pittsburgh and Lock 10
amounted to 4,733,620 short tons in 1920 and 2,840,978 in 1921.
9
Compiled by the U. S. War Department, Engineer Corps, representing total cargo traffic on the Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers above Pittsburgh. This traffic
consists mostly of coal. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in the November, 1926, issue (No. 63), p. 26.
10 Compiled by the U. S. War Department, Engineer Corps, representing tonnage of cargo traffic on the Ohio River. Each district includes only the traffic originating
in that district either on the Ohio River or on one of its tributaries, so that the total contains no duplications. Figures for 1925 and 1926 are quarterly averages, figures
being reported quarterly, beginning with the third quarter of 1926. Prior to that time data were made available semiannually, the distribution as between the first two
quarters of 1926 being partly estimated. The annual figures are quarterly averages.




102
Table 81.—RAILWAY, PULLMAN, AND EXPRESS OPERATIONS
PULLMAN
VISITORS TO EXPRESS
NET
TOTAL NET
OPERATING RESULTS <
C0,«
NAT. PARKS 6 EARNINGS 7
OPER- OPER- OPERATING
ATING ATING
CanINC.* REV.3 Freight carried ReEXP.i
PasUnited States *
Total OperImile
ada a
Total Pasceipts senAuto- oper- atPerYEAR AND
per
reve- sengers
mo- ating ing
MONTH
Total
gers
Total
Can- United Can- ton- carried nue carried sons
biles
reve- inoperat- Freight Passen- operat- United States
ada
States ada 3 mile Imile
ger
nue come
ing
ing
REVENUES

Millions of tons

Thousands of dollars
1913 m. a $255, 139 $176, 916 $57, 548
1914 m. a_ 241, 608 165, 943 54, 230
1915 m.a_ 256, 630 178, 804 53, 798
1916 m.a_ 302, 104 214, 784 58, 980
1917 m. a_ 337, 539 236, 177 68, 935
1918m. a_ 410, 549 288, 183 86, 056

1919m. a 1920 m. a
1921 m. a.
1922 m. a.
1923 m. a_

Cents

Millions

Thous. Thouof dolls. sands

0.719
.723
.722
.707
.715
.849

2,823
2,881
3,649
2,882
3,290
3, 006

$3, 445
3,284
3,483
3,684
4,311
4,164

Number

No. of
cars

Thousands of
dollars

$12, 613 $2,092
16, 306 3, 615
260
15, 640
116
13, 006
13, 441
105

2,072
2,182
2, 021
2,326
2,691
2,397

$181, 732
173, 916
171, 926
198, 031
238, 184
334, 767

$59, 900
53, 451
70, 002
87, 265
81, 232
57, 759

$6, 224
5,342
4,343
6,915
7,323
4,689

34, 939
36, 410

1,919
1,839
1,472
2,350
2,599
2,586

43, 034
4, 846
51, 329
64, 748
81,911

2, 651
420
3,034
3,896
4,138

33, 034
37, 445
28, 731
31, 320
38,133

2,246
2,605
2,199
2,202
2,602

.973
1.052
1.275
1.182
1.115

3,863
3,904
3,111
2,877
3,167

5,756
6,012
5,370
5,465
6,048

3,112
3,271
2,600
2,646
2,854

68, 887
74, 966
81, 812
113, 062

7,230
9,548
10, 025
12, 452

432,005
518, 785
464, 429
468, 291
529, 118

296, 410
360, 304
327, 328
334, 076
385, 465

98, 334
107, 285
96, 172
89, 686
95, 638

$37, 199

368,287
485, 861
383, 651
371, 397
412, 081

1924 in. a. 498, 963
1925 m. a. 515, 553
1926 m. a. 538, 619
1927 m. a. 517, 522
1928 m. a_ 515,089

362, 412
379, 424
401, 610
387, 491
390, 925

89, 724
87, 994
86, 993
81, 377
75, 088

39,844
35, 967
38, 315
41, 222
46, 355

379, 970
381, 946
393, 940
385, 777
372, 946

82, 229
94, 987
102, 698
90,372
99, 551

5,829
5,280
7,583
8,677
9,874

35, 803
38, 010
40, 725
39, 559
39, 761

2, 862
2,454
2,715
2,887
3,459

1.115
1.097
1.082
1.080
1.081

3,010
2,996
2,958
2,797
2,630

6,063
6,683
6,820
6, 746
6,737

2,841
2,961
3,006
2,933
2,827

132, 874
138, 910
147, 851
164, 697
171, 652

16, 002
16, 766
25, 030
31, 125
32, 334

12, 909
12,829
12, 873
12, 756
12, 347

91
101
99
93
99

1937
Sept _. . 565, 469
Oct
581, 006
Nov
504,314
467, 727
Dec

426, 937
452, 993
386, 000
334, 901

86, 319
75, 219
70, 917
81, 892

42, 779
49, 744
50,053
45, 182

386, 607
399, 841
377, 167
378, 129

133, 094
134, 040
86, 708
54,265

9,726
15, 116
14,183
7,763

42, 959
45, 537
37,250
34, 591

2,454
4,238
4,787
3,836

1.092
1.087
1.123
1.065

3,066
2,611
2,416
2,711

7,625
6,494
6,916
6,411

3, 2S8
2,851
2,606
2,831

199, 336
50, 101
34, 736
26, 939

29, 039
12, 862
4,305
3,925

13, 025
12, 958
12, 822
13, 176

115
130
120
34

1938
Jan
Feb
Mar.
Apr

458,209
456,844
506,098
475, 054

337, 960
346, 257
388,415
356, 573

78,642
69,547
70, 618
71, 071

37, 828
38,663
42,688
39,399

363, 991
348, 698
373, 922
363,888

56,562
69, 823
90,876
70, 619

4,380
6,691
9,415
6,034

36, 289
35, 723
39, 486
35,887

3,227
3,013
2,923
2,358

1.044
.076
.093
.105

2,631
2,369
2,376
2.418

6,963
6,393
6,131
6,515

2,886
2,563
2,625
2,713

50,591
57, 950
57, 732
71, 679

6,679
6,658
3,194
12, 426

11,911
11, 913
12, 389
12, 142

81
102
102
87

May
June
July
Aug.. _ _

511, 512
502, 474
512, 953
557, 856

391, 733
370, 268
381, 576
421, 007

70, 420
81, 708
82, 722
85, 102

43, 840
43, 341
45, 198
43, 203

382, 370
375, 086
375, 490
383, 90S

88,222
85, 997
95, 228
128, 414

6,964
5,174
7,146
11, 073

39, 263
37,304
39, 196
42,403

3,047
2,659
2,596
2, 435

.095
.094
.077
.090

2,464
2,928
3,076
3,132

6,313
7,432
7,279
7,593

2,614
3,095
3,073
3,312

125, 102 23, 341
271, 621 60, 324
553, 394 111, 642
499, 633 98, 523

12, 464
12, 302
12, 112
12, 164

81
77
101
90

Sept .__
Oct .
Nov
Dec

556, 044
617,782
631, 219
495, 816

423, 347
492, 275
415, 124
367, 184

80, 038
69, 564
65, 156
76, 523

£0, 879
61, 871
55, 350
49, 189

375, 646
401, 160
374, 154
357, 570

134, 513
166, 315
113, 695
94, 386

13, 2,5
22, 212
16, 218
10, 103

43, 773
48,206
41,965
37,645

3,870
5,598
5,471
4,310

.067
.094
.074
1.058

2,881
2,458
2,251
2,573

7,297
6, 650
5,751
6,529

3,081
2,738
2,466
2,758

222, 698
68, 997
39, 517
40, 910

44. 873
10,466
4,875
5,001

12, 473
12, 729
12, 458
13, 089

120
112
109
124

1939
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

487, 027
475, 112
516, 973
513, 955

366, 838
362, 957
393, 368
393, 058

74, 987
68,247
71, 879
67,509

38, 398
38,429
44.754
45, 034

369, 340
349, 684
377, 279
376, 494

77, 262
84, 769
97, 466
94,204

4,642
5,765
10,504
8,883

39,104
38,129
40,213
38, 334

3,110
2,866
3,167
2,833

1.038
1.046
1,089
1,123

2,526
2,333
2,460
2,335

7,033
6,417
6,627
6,404

2,836
2, 555
2,726
2,582

46, 242
43,505
72, 377
64,807

7,473
10,835
8,498
10, 460

11, 767
11,997
11, 986
12,278

101
98
94
70

637, 748

412, 018

68,896

45, 291

390, 977

103, 616

6,254

43,027

2,872

6,471

2,590

102, 207
273, 059

21,190
59, 412

May
June
July
Aug

Sept___
Oct
Nov
Dec.. -

...

* Data from the Interstate Commerce Commission, covering Class I railroads, those having annual operating revenues in excess of $1,000,000, which comprise 193 railroads
with8 about 98 per cent of the total operating revenues of all railroads.
Net railway operating income, from the Interstate Commerce Commission reports on Class I railroads, includes net operating revenue (equal to the difference between
total operating revenue and total operating expenses), from which there have been deducted railway tax accruals, uncollectible railway revenues, equipment, and joint
facility rents.
3
Annual figures, from Department of Trade and Comm.erce, cover all railroads in Canada, averaged for the fiscal year ending March 31 of the year indicated; monthly
reports cover all railroads with annual operating revenues of $500,000 or over, which includes 98 per cent of the total revenues of all roads. Monthly data from 1920 on net
operating revenue and on freight carried appeared in July, 1922, issue (No, 11), p. 45.
4
Data on the United States from the Bureau of Railway Economics, except tons per mile for 1915 and 1916, from Interstate Commerce Commission. Monthly data on tonmile operations from 1916 appeared in December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 52.
* Pullman passenger traffic furnished by The Pullman Company; revenues from its reports to the Interstate Commerce Commission,
6
Visitors to national parks from U. S. Department of Interior as reported by superintendents of the following 15 parks: Grand Canyon and Casa Grande, Ariz, (the latter
& monument rather than a park); Hot Springs, Ark.; General Grant, Sequoia, and Yosemite, Calif.; Rocky Mountain, Colo.; Glacier, Mont.; Platt, Okla.; Crater Lake,
Oreg.; Wind Cave, S. Dak.; Zion, Utah; Mount Rainier, Wash.; Yellowstone, Wyo.; and Mount McKinley, Alaska. Vehicles are not reported by Platt, Hot Springs,
Wind Cave, and Mount McKinley. The largest attendance of visitors is shown at Platt Park. Monthly data from 1920 appeared in December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 56.
T
Reports to the Interstate Commerce Commission of the American Railway Express Co., to which are added reports of the Southeastern Express Co. from the time of its
organization in May, 1921, thus presenting practically complete reports of the express business on railroads. Operating income includes net operating revenues (equal to
the difference between total operating revenues and operating expenses) from which have been deducted n mcollectible revenue from transportation and express taxes.



103

In bad order

Total owned

Tractive
power Number
(mills,
oflbs.)

2,573
2,592
2,602
2,608
2,587

5, 559
17,025
12,204
11, 195
10, 819
9,318
8,852
7,977

23.8
625.3
23.9
26.4
19.0
17.4
16.9
14.9
14.4
14.0

7265
187
144
200
163
116

62, 172
61,931
61, 765
61, 540

2,616
2,611
2,609
2, 603

9,030
8,759
8,535
8,502

14.7
14.3
14.0
13.9

61, 455
61, 305
61,088
60, 784

2,605
2,606
2,602
2,595

8, 345
8,778
8,961
8,257

January
February
March ___ _ .
April.

60, 679
60, 598
60, 471
60,373

2,597
2,596
2,596
2,595

May
June
July...
August

60,284
60, 095
59, 975
59, 769

September - _
October
November
December --

1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av_
monthly av.
monthly av. 7 64, 757
monthly av.
64, 962
monthly av_
64, 371
monthly av.
63, 171
monthly av_
61, 773
monthly av.
59, 923

Domestic
Total

Steam Electric

Reported by
railroads l

In

EXPORTS '

Reported by
manufacturers 3

Domestic
Total

Per
ct. of
total
in use

Number

UNFILLED ORDERS
(end of month)

SHIPMENTS BY
MANUFACTURERS 3

NEW ORDERS »

YEAR AND
MONTH

RETIRED i

ON RAILROAD LINES »
(end of month)

INSTALLED 1

Table 82.—LOCOMOTIVES

In

R R. mfg.
Steam Elec- shops plants
tric

i

SHIPMENTS,
ELECTRIC
LOCOMOTIVES »
(quarterly)

Mining

Industrial

Number of locomotives

j
1

40
59
77
34
23

846
351
236
430
164
104

80
143
84
31
22
27
30
23
19
17

34
31
57
68

40
37
36
36

251
200
173
171

10
22
16
11

167
97
74
178

49
45
42
39

32
27
18
13

102
53
51
80

8
19
5
25

222
204
178
188

161
146
123
129

38
40
37
41

22
23
20
25

151
148
117
112

13
6
26
16

220
201
198
204

138
109
98
135

39
37
59
26

30
30
17
19

83
90
56
81

5
15
32
20

178
170
152
282

118
113
104
238

27
29
31
27

15
17
26
35

98
104
97
112

33
8
21
4

6 1
1
4
2

278
339
488
495

251
301
419
419

21
20
24
24

42
38
46
38

236
253
326
308

18
13
22
10

2
1
3

444
552
539

362
489
490

22
21
18

59
55

265
334

14
14

7230
179
250
298
298
278

18
166
20
217
165
118
83
100
55
29

224
130
117
282
130
101
146
90
46

110
69
88
248
109
63
113
61
31

26
18
11
17
8
12
15
12
8

1,447
367
892
1,636
499
467
583
331
200

894
206
787
1,488
386
335
461
248
134

122
57
40
85
61
46
38
43
36

148
258
155
104

213
500
331
329

1S4
38
20
20

109
89
60
81

77
63
35
71

15
18
18
6

434
400
399
363

380
333
299
244

13.6
14.4
14.8
13,6

177
195
149
135

262
345
366
378

6
8
17
149

127
112
52
72

86
81
31
41

7
12
7
13

271
182
145
232

8,733
8,857
8,287
8,563

14.5
14.7
13.7
14.3

154
141
140
96

259
222
267
194

2
30
15
33

47
59
70
46

22
43
44
38

23
11
15
6

2,595
2,591
2,590
2,585

8,421
8,006
8,310
7,954

14.1
13.4
14.0
13.4

139
95
116
114

228
284
235
320

52
7
32
70

41
51
46
34

29
39
19
23

10
11
5
4

59,600
59, 371
59, 097
58, 758

2,582
2,578
2,571
2,562

7,815
8,177
4,671
7,931

13.2
13.9
15.1
13.6

93
102
68
132

260
331
313
420

8
4
41
59

41
36
35
44

28
2 |
26 None.
1
20
36
4

58,608
58,508
58, 322
58,144

2,559
2,557
2,553
2,550

8, 161
8,383
8,042
8,057

14.0
14.4
13.9
14.0

111
114
121
130

236
214
307
308

28
68
142
58

23
23
35
61

6
20
31
57

58, 052
57, 912

2,549
2,547

7,803
7, 453

13.4
13.0

177
158

269
297

50
181
36

99
78
69

92
58
39

813

8

»318
»142
9172
»218
»203
»128

» 15
»22
9
14
930
918

209

24

177

16

154

19

123

10

98

13

121

20

169

15

180

27

173

15

915

1927
May
June
July
August

_

September
October
November
December

1928

1999
January
February
March
April

May
June
July...
August

.

September
October
November
December

I

1

|i
jt
1

i

i Locomotives owned, retired, and building, and in bad order, both passenger and freight, on Class I railroads, from American Railway Association, Car Service Division.
Data for 1919 on bad-order locomotives from U. S, Railroad Administration.
8
Data from the Railway Age covering the principal transactions, each month's figures being totals of those given in the weekly issues of the publication appearing
during the month, and prorated up to the annual totals made from special inquiries. The percentage used in prorating the 1924 data was 91 per cent.
8
Reported direct to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, by principal locomotive manufacturing companies, exclusive of railroads making locomotives in their own shops. Both steam and electric railroad locomotives are included in these data, the totals including foreign as well as domestic business. Monthly
data from 1920 showing both shipments and unfilled orders for domestic and foreign business classified between steam and electric, appeared in the May, 1926, issue (No.
57), p. 25.
4
Data from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in April, 1925, issue (No. 44), pp. 27
and 628 and annual averages prior to 1919 in the August, 1927, issue (No. 72), p. 99.
Compiled from quarterly reports to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from nine manufacturers comprising practically the entire industry,
ess releases furnish details as to type, i. e,, trolley or storage battery. Data for 1923 not available by quarters, but annual figures are reduced to quarterly averages.
6
10 months' average, March to December, inclusive.
7
8 months' average, May to December, inclusive.
8
4 months' average, September to December, inclusive.
9 Quarterly average.




104
Table 83.—FREIGHT-CAR MOVEMENT

YEAR AND
MONTH

Box
cars

Coal
cars

LOADINGS 2

SHORTAGE 1

SURPLUS i

Total
cars3

Box
cars

Coal
cars

Total
cars3

Grain
and
grain
products

Coal
and
coke

Forest
products

Ore

747, 394
894, 180
691, 016
655, 962
851, 753
754, 650
798, 560
884, 598
816, 139
775, 157

247, 322
254,861
207, 314
243, 001
312, 074
305, 594
311, 402
304, 533
285,217
277, 859

161, 868
200, 853
75, 592
132, 524
195, 143
139, 881
167, 637
181, 595
157, 648
159, 139

Livestock

Merchandise and
1. c. 1.

Miscellaneous

Total

1, 375, 951
1, 069, 692
1, 243, 743
1, 441, 270
1, 440, 757
1, 567, 753
1, 614, 981
1, 614, 072
1, 653, 836

3, 716, 007
3, 486, 045
3,759,873
3, 276, 930
3, 600, 630
4, 151, 101
4, 044, 536
4, 268, 6/9
4, 424, 902
4, 302, 984
4, 298, 382

Number of cars

1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av___
1919 mo. av
1920 mo. a v
1921 mo. a v
1922 mo. a v
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. a v
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av
1927 mo. av
1928 mo. av

82, 135
15, 985
127, 982
47, 675
33, 635
88, 482
103, 747
104, 770
138, 184
131, 187

1937
January
February .
March
April
May
June
July.
August

75, 605
1,981
154, 499
90,897
23, 367
110, 572
96,843
61, 656
85, 194
107, 397

23,592
68, 680
189, 396
24, 194
339, 026
164,500
69, 659
229,908
241, 289
205, 915
265, 159
283,164

65, 901
28,964
18, 991
42,315
1,146
26, 653
10, 566
384
90
96
1

148, 742
141, 589
131,844
137, 432

62,588
83, 252
68,417
90,075

259, 548
275, 153
248, 477
259, 736

133, 345
147, 831
154, 437
123,901

78, 148
81, 330
76,554
53,204

74, 126
82, 411
158,304
224, 247

1938
January
February
March
April

6,437
29,251

4,200
25, 868
444
15, 852
13, 527
487
112
196
105
20

112, 934
52, 360
24,1', 4
82, 057
1,896
51, 579
27, 873
1,046
440
334
142
35

2
None.
None.
8

85
85
466
1

164
125
538
19

256, 448
274, 223
273, 275
214, 985

None.
None.
None.
None.

None.
None.
None.
147

10
None.
None.
151

34, 805
61, 455
148, 860
183, 638

135, 059
168, 829
352, 168
464,005

None.
None.
None.
None.

371
103
None.
None.

371
302
None.
25

182, 001
155, 554
125, 627
134, 069

169, 463
168, 172
171,481
140, 091

403, 792
372, 916
344, 502
320, 762

3
None.
None.
None.

None.
None.
None.
None.

4
None.
None.
None.

187, 679
187, 498
237, 497
159, 136

127, 647
130, 057
143, 350
105, 377

752, 787
726,250
869, 381
621, 002

233,119
271, 115
343, 645
257,323

32, 795
32, 394
42, 819
41,053

927, 707
974, 492
1, 299, 148
1, 041, 534

1, 187, 161
1, 268, 936
1, 816, 719
1, 514, 882

3, 448, 895
3, 590, 742
4, 752, 559
3, 740, 307

May
June
July
August.

143, 264
170, 606
137, 618
114, 355

108, 833
114, 710
90,513
47, 615

304, 153
336, 181
271,017
201, 864

None.
None.
None.
None.

None.
None.
32
8

None.
None.
82
8

163,104
172, 412
207, 348
231, 181

106,669
126,020
91,007
98,944

670, 903
773, 449
606,857
686, 417

269,569
329,127
238, 676
266,137

165, 196
327, 987
250,150
253, 085

1, 046, 248
1, 261, 515
986, 282
1, 027, 132

1, 583, 466
1, 933, 605
1, 563, 721
1,667,913

4, 005, 155
4, 924, 115
3,944,041
4, 230, 809

September
October
November
December

53,170
54,263
104, 272
199,443

21,809
21,128
75, 799
159, 147

103,906
105,017
222, 539
411, 320

None.
None.
None.
None.

159
44
None.
None.

279
44
None.
None.

295, 779
219, 298
209,556
242, 080

164, 412
154,620
133,599
138,908

952, 746
869, 199
832,480
940,402

322,538
265,872
260,103
275, 108

319, 579
240, 988
151, 639
52,069

1, 297, 461
1, 079, 167
1,048,664
1, 167, 683

2, 233, 769
1, 871, 652
1,608,987
1, 597, 528

5, 586, 284
4, 700, 796
4,245,028
4, 413, 778

1939
January
February
March
April

136, 959
98,986
95,429
89, 952

92,243
72, 613
136,452
87, 367

278, 213
217, 400
279, 107
220,821

None.
None.
40
None.

11
6
None.
None.

79
76
40
19

181,968
188,645
212, 988
143, 743

117, 998
105,684
121, 105
106,894

857,547
901,232
857, 217
643,238

218, 647
241,036
335, 479
278, 814

35, 671
36, 973
57, 113
110, 678

915, 552
969, 391
1, 305, 042
1, 060, 943

1, 243, 595
1, 324, 797
1, 919, 000
1, 639, 668

3, 570, 978
3,767,758
4, 807, 944
3,983,978

109, 924
116, 657

64,156
55, 150

222, 626
217, 657

None.
None.

18
11

18
75

152, 544
215, 606
246,696

105, 838
116, 744
91,969

690,020
842, 553
644, 715

277, 316
347, 917
245,036

283, 805
379, 813
304,962

1, 053, 688
1, 273, 002
996,357

1, 642, 498
2, 084, 936
lf 623, 485

4, 205, 709
5, 260, 571
4,153,220

September
October
November
December

.

._

May
June
July
August.

169, 393
153, 585
191, 065
204, 397
189, 642
214, 223
192, 144
280,280
198, 229
209, 352

142,939
129,452
124, 744
135, 508
147, 375
146, 087
136, 301
133,015
128, 914
126, 720

75L 043
917, 508
9b5, 495
1,013,754
1, 043, 344
1, 099, 383
1, 109, 232
1, 103, 766
], 096, 338

II

September _ _
October. ..
November
December

_ _
i

1 Data from the American Railway Association. Daily average for the last period (7 or 8 days) of the month, exclusive of Canadian roads. The association reports the
number of freight cars which are idle (surplus) and also the number of requests for cars which can not be filled (shortage). The difference between these two figures
represents the net freight-car situation for the country as a whole. The car shortages can not ordinarily be filled from the idle cars because of the uneven geographical
distribution of the latter.
2 From reports of the American Railway Association, Car Service Division. These figures are now put on a monthly basis from weekly reports, consisting of exactly four
weeks for each month prior to 1923, except in March, June, September, and December, which cover five weeks each year. From 1923 through 1925, the five-week months
are January, May, August, and October. Beginning with 1926, the five-week months are April, July, October, and December.
3
Includes other classes than groups listed.




105
Table 84.—RAILWAY CAR SUPPLY

New
orders 2

Y"EAR AND MONTH
Total

In bad order

Shipments by
mfrs.3

In railShipments Unroad
by mfrs.3 filled
orders,
hands, New
orend of ders2
end of
Do- quarquar1

Unfilled orders
end of month 1
To
mfrs.

DoTotal mestic Total

Thou- Capacity Number P. ct.
total
sands (millions
of Ibs.)
in use

In
R. R.

shops

Dolls.

I

5.9
7.0
7.3
13.9
13.3
8.0
8.2
7.9
6.7
6.1
6.4

1,838
7,017
1,945
15, 013
7,873
11, 899
6,527
4,690
4,913
3,087

7,961
11, 917
5,116
3,528
4,866
12,233
6,850
6,447
6,675
4,524
3,286

4,392
6,904
3,899
3,109
4,749
12, 069
6,718
6,124
6,471
4,460
3,165

48, 033
34, 757
30, 055
19,836
14,196

44, 548
27, 924
22, 810
13, 363
11,414

3,482
6,833
7,245
6,471
2,782

2,323
2, 355
o 345
2,329
2,298

204, 316
209, 935
211, 257
211,784
210, 250

1937
May
June
July
August

2,333
2,333
2,330
2,328

211, 875
212, 001
211,917
211, 935

147, 449
141, 433
145, 590
141, 038

6.5
6.2
6.3
6.2

4,378
7,566
1,459
1, 006

6,202
5,935
5,544
5,317

6,182
5,584
5,528
5,270

23, 666
21, 956
18, 303
18, 096

15, 122
14, 678
12, 385
13, 545

8,544
7,278
5,918
4,541

September
October
November
December

2,327
2,325
2,322
2,313

211, 970
212, 027
211, 985
210, 923

137, 571
139, 441
137, 795
130, 493

6.0
6.1
6.1
5.8

40
326
14
14, 114

4,397
4,320
3,780
2,545

4,393
4,101
3,754
2,536

14, 437
10, 901
9,721
12, 431

10,799
6,991
6,424
9,341

3, 638
3,910
3,297
3,090

1928
January
February
March
April

2,310
2,307
2,304
2,302

210, 649
210, 471
210, 312
210. 234

136, 115
138, 870
139, 698
149, 869

6.0
6.2
6.2
6.7

2,098
5,876
4,029
5,683

774
444
3,332
4,567

576
444
3,281
4,324

18,464
19, 748
22, 233
19, 325

15, 459
17, 603
20,648
17, 589

3,005
2,145
1, 585
1,736

May
June
July
August

2,300
2,301
2,300
2,299

210, 240
210, 386
210, 437
210, 483

151, 359
145, 210
151, 867
149, 252

6. 7
6.5
6.7
6.6

2,354
2,288
307
767

5,908
5,147
4,963
5,295

5,854
5,115
4,908
5,261

17,847
12, 446
13, 531
8,177

14, 168
9,316
10, 371
5,673

3, 679
3,130
3,160
2,504

53,058

September
October
November
December

2,296
2,292
2,288
2,282

210, 335
210, 092
209, 826
209, 539

148, 333
138, 238
139, 053
134, 267

6.6
6.2
6.2
6.0

1,236
1,635
6,100
4,668

3,220
2, 507
1,640
1,639

3,000
2, 345
1,549
1,327

6,619
5,437
13, 850
12, 671

3,878
1,880
10, 271
10,109

2,741
3,557
3,579
2,562

52, 949

1929
January February _
March
April.

2,275
2,271
2, 268
2,267

209, 014
208, 718
208, 507
208, 569

136, 319
144, 620
139, 538
142, 543

6.2
6.6
6.3
6.5

12, 452
14, 393
11,068
6,983

1,814
1,152
3,599
5,510

525
887
3,589
5,300

28, 121
40, 539
41, 197
43, 486

24, 109
35, 891
35,360
36, 674

4,012
4,648
5,837
6,812

2,267
2,266

208, 850
208, 869

144, 634
142, 064

a4

6.5

8,364
5,869
442

8,459
6,517

8,350
6,514

39, 843
39, 173

33, 588
34, 145

6,255
5,028

mo
mo
mo
mo.
mo
mo
mo
mo
mo
mo
mo.

av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av
av_

May
June
July..
August

ter!

Number of cars

142 790
168, 973
166, 779
318, 880
302, 456
185, 343
188, 012
183, 725
154, 983
138, 490
143, 511

1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

To- mestal tic

ter

WAREHOTELS « HOUSES
(5)
i

53, 891
54, 144
54, 324
54, 658
54, 458
54, 166
53, 856
53, 046

53,995

53, 936

53,495

53,409

52, 769

52, 872

24
148
20
198
184
213
135
110
100
148

70
19
34
75
59
138
93
76
186
118
103

63
11
23
71
46
135
88
73
178
115
94

52
61
69
36

52
147
119
152

52
147
119
146

19
18
12
150

201
119
166
174

201
119
164
174

615
82
45
142

78
74
80
51

68
72
50
34

153
57
19
589

23
95
123
147

18
95
123
144

2
56
2
11

146
68
166
181

143
68
166
150

228
21
53
250

111
90
87
86

109
90
87
78

131
176
97

48
94

44
82

6218
1,121
1,270
815
830
1,000
784
1,024

1,051

709

364

1,036

1,033

1,173

853

615

Rooms occupied

In railroad hands,
end of month l

PASSENGER CARS

Av. sale per
occupied room

FREIGHT CARS

I1
GO

Per cent
of total

74.27
4.14
4.02

69
68

4.00
4.13
4.10
4.26

70
65
62
66

4.16
4.02
4.18
3.92

68
72
73
66

4.21
4.08
3.90
4.05

72
71
68
73

67.6
68.7
69.9
69.8

3.84
4.05
3.98
4.09

69
64
60
63

68.6
67.2
67.1
67.9

3.98
4.07
4.13
3.88

68
72
70
67

66.1
66.4
68.8
68.1

4.12
4.13
3.98
4.09

73
72
69
75

67.7
68.3
69.9
71.8

3.88
3.97

71
66

70.8

68.0

September
October
November
December
|
1

Compiled by the American Railway Association, Car Service Division, covering Class I railroads and some others, including about 99 per cent of total railroad operations. Cars in railroad hands include those owned or leased by railroads but flfbt private-owned cars on their lines. Passenger coaches in railroad hands include coaches,
combination, baggage, express, and all other coaches. Monthly averages for bad-order cars for the years 1913-1917; also monthly data for 1920 and 1921, appearing in the
October, 1923, issue (No. 28), pp. 59 and 60. Annual figures for passenger cars in railroad hands and on unfilled order are quarterly averages.
2
Data from the Railway Age covering the principal transactions, each month's figures being totals of those given in the weekly issues of the publication appearing during the month, and prorated up to the annual totals made from special inquiries. The percentage used in prorating the 1924 data was 94 per cent. Data for the years 1913
to 1918 from the Iron Trade Review appeared in May, 1924, issue (No. 33), p. 77; though not comparable month by month on account of different methods of compilation,
they3 indicate the trend from year to year comparable to the above figures.
The data on shipments of manufacturers for railway equipment were obtained from the Interstate Commerce Commission. Monthly data from 1919 appeared in July,
1924, 4 issue (No. 35), p. 55.
Compiled by Horwath & Horwath from reports of over 1{X) hotels, transient and resident, throughout the country. Details by cities shown in their monthly reports.
* Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from reports of over 600 public-merchandise warehouses, excluding cold-storage and household
goods. Further details are presented by States in monthly press releases.
6 Average of 2 periods, June 30 and Sept. 30 (no report made for Dec. 31),
i Average of 3 months, October to December, inclusive.




106
Table 85.—PUBLIC UTILITIES

YEAR
AND

MONTH

Total
operating
revenues

GAS AND
ELECTRIC
COMPANIES 2

TELEGRAPH
COMPANIES i

TELEPHONE
COMPANIES^

Commercial
tele-

Net
operating
income

•53?

Telegraph
and
cable
operating
revenues

Operating
income

Gross
earnings

Net
earnings

By
Gross
water By
revenue Total power fuels

In
In mfg.
ExBy
central pl'ts Total water portsta- street
272
power ed 212 com- cities
panies
tions rys.,
etc.
Thous.of
persons

Millions of kilowatt-hours

$1, 711
1,282

$52, 493
54, 315
56, 668
63, 039
70, 416
78, 725

$21, 431
22, 325
23,512
26, 051
25, 704
24, 387

$26, 017
28,067
30, 100
35, 458
44, 925
55, 442

10,095
11, 698
10, 371
10, 608
11, 153

1,636
1,438
1, 265
1,697
1,583

90,162
108, 871
112, 690
119, 601
132, 711

26, 157
28, 949
32, 884
37,238
42, 466

60,083
73, 575
81,066
90,825
105, 796

« 3, 144
3,630
3,415
3,971
4, 639

9,085
10, 245
10, 829
10, 625
10, 887

11,210
12, 598
13, 372
13, 191
13, 697

1,548
1,796
1,765
1,792
1,784

140, 939
152, 260
166, 285
176, 089
185, 796

45, 511
52, 685
59, 596
64, 598
72, 392

112, 969
122, 365
136, 925
147, 750
159, 425

17, 448
16, 941
15, 019
15, 985

11, 333
11, 169
10, 618
11,530

14, 162
14, 036
13, 375
14, 328

2,258
1,906
1,428
1,887

180, 255
178, 697
173, 646
173, 952

67,733
67,537
62, 260
61, 810

68,432
72, 464
71, 213
73, 585

16, 496
18,565
17,649
13,968

11, 010
11, 765
10, 623
11, 386

13, 911
14, 928
13, 661
14, 514

1,918
2,247
1,770
1,811

179, 346
190,796
198, 033
202,000

74,788
71, 034
74, 899
74,830

19, 821
17, 716
17, 825
17, 776

11,180
10, 265
11,864
11, 328

14, 133
13,060
14, 911
14, 344

1,658
1,396
1,951
1,700

76,158

18, 355

11,853

15, 016

1,749

$3,710
3,709
4,139
4,785
4,700
4,649

$5, 898
6,287

$7, 674
8,477

1919 m.a.
1920 m.a.
1921 m.a.
1922 m.a.
1923 m.a.

24, 635 5,104
30, 320 5,415
36, 265 7,573
40, 204 8,882
44, 106 10, 015

7,596
9,113
8,043
8,435
9,027

1924 m.a.
1925 m.a.
1926 m.a_
1927 m.a.
1928 m.a.

48, 412
54,313
60, 483
65, 226
68, 855

10, 555
12, 988
14, 560
15, 567
16, 602

1938
May__._
June
July
Aug

69, 277
68,783
67, 676
68,784

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

1929
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
June
July
AUK

Passen- Avergers
age
carried « fares »

Canada "

United States <

Thousands of dollars

1913 m.a. $13, 132
1914 m.a. 13, 722
1915 m.a. 14, 527
1916 m.a. 16, 452
1917 m.a. 18, 700
1918 m.a. 20, 225

ELECTRIC
RAILWAYS

ELECTRIC POWER PRODUCTION

ELECTRIC
POWER
SALES 3

i

!

8209 8 1, 935
1,346 2,284
1,248 2,167
1,434 2,537
1,612 3,027

3, 334
3,129
3,650
4,297

295
286
321
342

4,918
5,489
6,149
6,684
7,321

1,664
1,863
2,182
2,489
2,892

3,254
3, 626
3,967
4,194
4,429

4,569
5,118
5,732
6,230
6,906

349
371
417
454
419

824
994
1,185
1,328

811
980
1,168
1,309

107
126
138
132

784, 893
784, 896
792, 790
782, 860
772, 337

7.420
7.569
7.706
7.915
8.086

150,300
149,500
146, 600
148, 200

7,118
6,998
7,142
7,510

3,175
3,093
3,071
3,036

3,943
3,905
4,071
4,474

6,722
6,638
6,762
7,128

408
372
381
382

1,281
1,242
1,248
1,314

1,265
1,228
1,233
1,298

135
127
130
146

797, 279
760, 509
728, 849
736, 223

8.057
8.081
8.081
8.121

68,236
73, 671
81,364
91,000

156,100
164,900
174,800
177,600

7, 276
7,922
7,753
7,912

2,788
2,873
2,788
2,762

4,488
5,049
4,965
5,150

6,927
7,548
7,378
7, 505

355
374
373
407

1,280
1,460
1,442
1,441

1,262
1,439
1,417
1,413

130
155
137
123

717, 810
795, 140
759, 254
796,280

8.121
8.129
8.137
8.178

92,000
86,000
85,000
83,000

184,200
174, 300
167, 700
167,900

8,241
7,429
7,989
7,881

2,698
2,442
3,147
3,285

5,543
4.987
4,842
4,596

7,804
7,046
7,607
7,506

437
383
382
375

1.507
1,346
1,471
1,409

1,478
1,315
1,441
1,379

114
111
127
111

799, 843
741, 023
820, 405
774, 517

8.194
8.198
8.202
8.202

189, 750
183, 000
j

|

1

203,000
194,000
195,000
190,000

|
i

Cents

82.500
79,000

8,083
7,769

3, 482
3,072

4,601
4,697

7,705
7,407

378
362

1,457
1,377

1,432
1,360

112
119

792, 894
744, 310

7.354
7.296

!

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

,

'•''

\

I

i Telephone earnings are the combined reports of 12 largest telephone companies, reduced by consolidation from 13 companies, and comprising about 83 per cent or the
total operating revenues of telephone companies with annual operating revenues over $250,000, and telegraph earnings are the combined reports of the Western Union and
the above figures are not complete they are believed to represent typical conditions within the public-utility field. Gross earnings consist, in general, of gross operating
revenues while net earnings in general represent the gross less operating expenses and taxes, or the nearest comparable figures. In some cases the figures for earlier years
do not cover exactly the same subsidiaries, owing to acquisitions, consolidations, etc., but those differences are not believed to be great in the aggregate. Monthly data
from 1920 appeared in the December, 1927, issue (No. 76), p. 48.
* Gross revenue received from the sale of electrical energy as reported by the Electrical World represents the total receipts from the sale of electricity by companies with
about 83 per cent of the installed generator rating of the country, computed to 100 per cent of the industry on the basis of the percentage which the reporting companies
bear to the installed central-station rating of the country. Companies reporting sales are not identical with those reporting production of power. These figures cover light
and power companies only, excluding electric railways which do not sell their current. M^thly data from 1913 appeared in July, 1923, issue of SURVEY (No. 23), p. 45.
* Compiled by the U. S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey. Production in central stations up to March, 1928, was segregated by the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, from the original records of reporting firms on file with the Geological Survey, from that produced in connection with street railways, manufacturing plants, and reclamation projects. Details, by months, since 1920 for central stations appeared in the June, 1928, issue of the SURVEY (No. 82), p. 22, while for the other
items details appeared in the March, 1925, issue (No. 43), p. 28. Beginning with March, 1928, this segregation has been carried on by the Geological Survey. Monthly data
from8 1919 on total production and segregation by water power and fuels appeared in the November, 1927, issue (No. 75), p. 26.
Compiled by the Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, covering all the large central electric stations in Canada, which in 1925 produced
98 per cent of all stations in Canada. These data do not include the output of pulp and paper mills and other plants generating electricity only for their own use. Monthly
data from 1925, including data on electric power generated by fuels, appeared in the April, 1928, issue (No. 80), p. 22.
« Data compiled by the American Electric Railway Association from reports of 212 companies operating 24,187 miles of revenue single track and 3,090 miles of bus routes and
carrying about 68 per cent of the total revenue passengers carried by electric railways.
7
Compiled by the American Electric Railway Association, representing the average cash fare paid in 272 cities of over 25,000 population, as of the end of each month.
8
6 months' average, January, May, June, August. November, and December missing.



107
Table 86.—CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY
I

BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS

BY LEADING INDUSTRIES

Shipbuilding

Stone, clay, and
glass

Textiles

Automobiles
and repair parts

102.9
99.8
103.8
115.5
123.0
128.4

108.9
89.2
108.6
110.0
113.8
133.8

107.2
90.9
107.2
120.8
117.5
83.8

99.7
100.1
107.4
120.0
111.0
132.7

111.5
90.5
106.5
110.0
122.4
113.4

102.3
92.5
110.9
113.7
108.9
141.1

118.6
.- - 119.0
111.9
-. . _ 101.7
..

111.5
117.8
113.3
116.0

121.2
123.4
107.2
95.2

111.0
112.8
109.3
107.3

115.2
122.5
134. 2
126.1

120.2
116.7
112.8
108.0

113.8
120.2
99.9
106.2

112.8
107.9
104.0
95.2

120.8
123.2
113.5
106.2

118.5
122.9
114.8
113.1

119.7
123.0
114.2
109.6

102.9
103.3
105.8
101.2

117.8
118.8
112.9
103.7

128.2
133. 4
118.5
118.2

114.0
113.8
112.8
101.5

111.3
117.0
115.4
141.0

129.0
130.7
118.5
122.5

113. 7
123.4
127.5
122.5

129.2
108.2
82.8
52.1

1937
January
.. . ....- 111.5
120.7
February . .
..
116.8
March
..
116.9
April

117.2
120.4
113.4
114.0

105.5
117.4
117.4
118.9

114.0
112.5
109.6
105.9

132.8
123.4
117.2
119.3

118.7
116.1
100.1
122.1

95.1
105.3
103.1
108.0

95.3
98.5
83.8
104.2

120. 5
126.8
125.6
123.5

114.0
114.3
108.3
106.3

117.7
120.5
117.0
114.9

102.5
105.6
99.7
101.3

118.8
116.0
105.7
111.4

128.7
130.2
116.0
124.2

111.2
118.4
115. 0
115,7

129.2
120.4
117.7
129.8

98.4
105.8
110.2
117.4

127.7
136.0
125.0
128.3

78.1
103.4
118.2
126.7

May
.. ..
June
July
August

120.7
112.5
110.6
110.6

115.2
112.0
109.3
105.4

124.7
110.9
115.5
112.5

108.8
101.9
96.0
97.4

123.0
120.0
112.7
121.0

126.8
117.2
125.4
115.3

111.8
101.7
104.9
97.8

115.8
113.4
121.2
111.6

122.5
116.3
113.0
106.4

109.0
105.6
104.4
103.0

116.7
110.9
108.6
104.6

96.3
97.8
96.3
97.0

136.8
113.4
112.9
128.0

124.8
119.8
115.8
117.3

120.4
114.9
109.0
117.8

134.5
130.5
116.7
112,2

130.2
107.4
111.3
114.1

128.5
118.8
113.0
113. 0

131.6
107.6
102.3

September
October
November
December

118.4
119.9
115.2
109.8

114.0
114.0
109.7
103.9

116.4
115.0
111.4
107.8

111.6
111.5
110.4
109.9

136.8
134.4
137. 8
128.0

124.6
125.7
117.0
116.9

122.6
115.8
115.5
109.0

127.4
120.8
117.9
104.6

109.6
111.8
108.9
110.6

105.2
109.7
106.3
101.2

107.4
110.8
107.7
105.9

105.9
111.0
104.5
98.2

141.3
139.2
135.8
123.3

122.7
127.7
126.5
122.0

114.4
115.6
117.0
96.7

106.6
117.2
100.8
94,6

118.2
111.0
109.7
98.8

121.2
125.4
119.2
112.3

109.5
114.2
100.7
106.4

118.4
__ 127.7
118.2
119.3

115.2
125.2
116.9
113.8

117.0
127.7
122.3
129.0

116.2
126.6
114.2
112.0

124.8
134.8
115.4
115.2

115.0
116.7
110.4
117.8

124.2 102.4
129.1 115.6
126.8 108.4
131.7 105.9

131.3
133.8
124.5
125.4

117.4
127.6
117.4
121.7

124.4
130.7
121.0
123.2

112.2
118.4
107.0
98.8

107.7
113.3
106.0
115.4

121.3
124.2
120.2
120.5

120.4
137.0
126.2
121.7

94.2
98.8
75.4
93.3

105.2 116.7
127.3 127.5
121.1 114.9
133.6 109.8

135.2
148.7
136.2
148.7

119.0
116.4
. ._ 120.2
120.8

109.1
108.4
102.4
102.2

127.2
124.6
131.8
132.4

112.9
113.4
110.8
118.3

110.6
114.6
112.0
112.8

112.9
118.5
116.5
127.5

126.3
122.6
128.5
119.2

103.9
116.8
129.2
128.3

125.0
121.2
121.2
125.4

122.7
123.7
126.3
125.8

123.6
122.7
124.2
125.5

98.1
100.2
99.0
94.7

110.8
109.2
108.8
111.6

136.4
133.7
127.3
129.1

128.5
131.7
135.3
138.4

84.0 129.3
85.3 128.0
67.2 129.8
67.3 135.3

134.5
132.0
133.3
127.3

115.3
119.3
126.0
120.2

149.7 136.0 127.5
143.5 133.4 129.7
145.7 138.9 127. 6
133.8 126.8 121.2

150.8
148.7
156.7
124.0

132.0
129.4
135.7
132.8

142.0
138.0
130.0
113.7

141.2
144.7
148.8
142.2

144.2
144.5
140.5
137.5

143.0
144.6
143.5
139.2

106.9
103.8
94.0
93.7

111.3
109.3
111.8
107.3

132.0 151.2 72.3
133.3 146.4 73.8
135.2 143.8 102.2
127.4 124.8 91.8

152.0
144.7
149.1
136.6

112.5 161.0
121.0 141.2
132.5 127.1
126.3 130.0

132.5
140.4
135.7
_ __ 136.4

127.6
132.8
130.8
125.4

138.8
149.5
141.9
146.5

126.7
130.7
130.5
128.0

120.5
137.7
125.4
126.3

131.9
140.8
138.2
137.0

129.2
138.7
133.0
131.7

128.0
127.5
122.2
121.2

153.5
163.3
160.3
153.3

135.8
153.7
151.4
148.3

142.6
157.3
154.9
149.9

94.3
102.1
93.4
82.0

107.4
107.6
104.2
108.0

126.2
125.2
129.2
136.0

148.2
154.7
155.8
155.7

108.2
95.5
99.7
116.1

137.4
148.7
138.0
145.0

129.4 149.4
133.0 161.6
126.6 154.9
128.1 170.6

136.9
135.2

123.3
123.5

148.9
142.0

130.4
129.5

128.1 144.7
128.4

129.2
133.8

122.6
121.8

172.2
154.3

144.2
143.4

154.8
147.9

95.2
98.7

111.1 129.9
113.8 137.3

157.6
158.1

135. 2
106.9

143.5
170.3

129.9
123.0

Lumber and its
products
96.6
102.5
107.0
117.1
123.6
110.2

Leather and its
products
111.1
94.7
99.0
96.4
101.3
102.2

1!

Metals
111.0
88.2
102.8
116.9
111.9
130.5

at
WS
~S

Metal-working
plants
111. 0
88.2
102.8
117.1
107.3
129.1

Food and allied
products

102.4
103.8
99.4
103.4 2 112.9
109.5 116.3
119.5 132.1

Chemicals and
allied products
91.5
100.7
112. 4
114.4
107.6
128.2

Western
100.3
98.3
103.2
116.5
118. 8
126.3

Southern
101.8
95.4
108.3
115.8
125.5
120.9

Middle Atlantic
108.5
92.2
105.7
108.4
107.5
121.6

North Central
107.2
93.8
107.6
114.4
114.5
132.1

New England
113.4
92.0
103.8
107.8
112.4
114.5

United States

Rubber and its
products

A

107.3
92.5
105.2
113. 5
115.3
123.9

YEAR AND MONTH

•5

sa

"3
ft

•§

I

1923-1925 monthly average =100
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

1926
September
October
November
December .

1928
January
February.
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November _ _
r>pc*vmhp,r

1929
January February
March
April .
May
June. _ _
July
August

September
October _ _.
November
December _ .

__ _

105.7
104.7
91.8
97.3

ioao

141.6
136.0
143.7
143.2

161.8
154.6

_

1
Data compiled by the Electrical World and represent the utilization of electrical energy by 3,600 identical concerns depending at all times upon electrical energy for
power and do not show the expansion of the market for central power with new customers. All figures are adjusted to the basis of 26 working days to the month.
2 7 months' average.




108
Table 87.—EMPLOYMENT—INDUSTRIAL, RAILWAY, MINING, AND FEDERAL
ANTHRARAILWAYS 2 CITE MINES3

INDUSTRIAL 1

YEAR AND
MONTH

Food
and
Total kin13
dred
groups products

Textiles
and
their
products

Iron Lum- Leathand ber er
steel and its and
finand its ished
their man- prodprod- ufac- ucts
ucts ture

ChemPaper icals
and
and
print- other
ing products

Stone,
clay,
and
glass
products

Vehi- Miscel- Em- Averlane- ploy- age Emous ees on hour- ployinpay
ment
ly
roll wage
dustion tries

Non- To- cles
fer- bacco for
rous man- land
met- ufac- transals6 ture porta-

Thousands

Relative to 1926

1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av__
1916 mo. av__
191 7 mo. av__
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av

!

Relative to
1923-1925

1,647 $0. 276
1,733 .313
1,842 .463
1,913 .557

~

1920 mo. av
1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av_
1923mo.av__
1924 mo. av__

108.8
98.2

111.1 116.1 108.5 110.0
106.4 102.4 93.8 104.4

110.7
100.3

96.5
96.7

101.8
93.1

1925 mo. av_.
1926mo.av__
1927 mo. av_1928mo.av__

99.2
100.0
96.4
93.8

101.2 103.7 95.0 102.5
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
99.4 101.3 93.2 91.9
98.4 96.3 91.5 87.8

101.9
100.0
97.9
92.8

97.3
100.0
100.1
99.2

95.8
100.0
96.6
93.4

83.7
91.4
95.1
84.3
101.7 . 87.3
101.5
89.4

1938
January
February
March ,
April

91.6
93.0
93.7
93.3

96.8 99.9
97.9 101.2
97.3 100.3
95.3 97.2

86.1
88.6
90.0
90.5

84.8
84.8
86.2
87.3

95.6
97.1
96.5
91.8

100.2
99.7
98.8
97.9

May.
June
July
August

93.0
93.1
92.2
93.6

95.5
96.9
97.3
96.9

94.7
94.1
90.9
91.9

91.6
91.7
91.0
92.1

87.3
88.3
87.3
89.3

89.5
89.3
93.1
94.9

98.2
98.0
98.0
98.2

89.2
87.5
87.1
88.3

September..
October
November..
December...

95.0
95.9
95.4
95.5

100.0
102.3
101.9
102.1

93.6
96.5
97.2
97.7
•

93.2
93.9
94.8
95.0

90.1
90.2
90.0
87.6

95.1
93.7
88.6
87.8

98.6
99.9
101.2
101.2

94.7
94.9
94.4
95.1

1929
January
February
March
April

95.2
97.4
98.6
99.1

98.4
98.6
97.4
95.9

96.9
98.8
99.9
98.7

94.8
97.2
99.2
100.4

85.2
85.5
86.2
88.0

91.0
93.1
91.8
89.7

99.6
100.4
100.1
99.6

99.2
98.8

96.9
98.9

97.9
97.3

101.5
101.7

89.0
89.8

89.3
88.5

99.9
100.2

May. _
June..
July
August

Dollars

Pay
roll

u. s.

GOVT.
WASHINGTON
(civilian
employees) 4

Number

OHIO
CONSTRUCTION &

[Base year in bold-faced type]

Eel.
to 1923

i 99, 970

f

100.2 102.6 116.9 109.6 103.3
97.0 95.1 109.8 97.2 90.7

2,013
1,661
1,645
1,880
1,777

.667
.665
.618
.615
.628

113.8
69.0
108. 8
115.8

102.8
60.4
106.0
117.7

92, 237
80,838
71,061
66, 214
64, 743

100.0
107.3

97.9 99.2 107.5 99.8 94.6
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
94.5 92.9 98.1 90.8 99.5
89.7 92.8 96.0 95.8 91.6

1,769
1,806
1,761
1,680

.634
.641
.654
.665

75.4
113.8
117.4
113.4

76.4
116.0
102.7
97.1

63, 703
60, 505
60, 047
61,590

111.5
106.6
101.7
113.2

85.6
89.0
90.7
92.5

91.2
95.1
96.0
93.5

86.8
90.7
93.2
94.7

92.0
90.6
89.7
90.0

1,614
1,608
1,626
1,659

.671
.679
.661
,.663

115.8
110.6
113.9
116.3

91.9
85.4
83.1
116.8

60,743
60,999
61,049
61, 311

79.6
76.2
88.8
103.2

92.7
93.4
90.6
93.7

92.5
92.0
91.7
93.1

94.5
95.3
90.2
96.8

97.6
97.7
97.0
100.2

89.8
90.0
89.8
90.4

1,710
1,736
1,729
1,731

.652
.653
.661
.655

114. 0
102.3
100.7
110.9

97.6
60.6
82.5
97.2

61, 422
61,388
61,650
62, 111

115.6
115.7
130. 6
139.4

93.4
91.6
89.2
87.3

94.2
95.8
97.8
98.6

98.9
101.3
101.2
98.0

101.5
100.3
95.5
94.6

91.7
93.2
94.0
97.9

1,723
1,724
1,680
1,622

.673
.660
.674
.683

112.7
135.9
117.7
109.4

112.5
134.7
110.1
92.9

62, 010
62, 016
62, 244
62,140

135.0
137.7
128.1
108.7

94.4
97.3
103.2
107.8

81.6 97.2
81.7 100.7
84.0 101.9
87.5 102.9

86.3
94.2
94.2
93.2

99.8
105.6
106.9
107.8

102.8
104.6
107.4
110.5

1,595
1,606
1,628
1,666

.652
.674
.652
.646

109.8
109.4
101.3
104.1

112.6
107.0
79.5
77.4

62, 257
62,388
62, 926
63,507

89.3
88.1
95.9
107.8

97.4
94.4

89.9 100.8
90,7 98.9

92.3
93.5

107.5 113.1
103.1 115.3

107.2
95.4

85.4
71.0

63,841
63,904

122.5
132.8

September . .
October
November..
December...
i Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent weighted indexes based upon the number of wage earners in the respective industries in 1925. The original data are taken from the pay roll nearest to the middle of the month as reported by more than 12,500 firms, employing 3,563,000 workers. Details
of this table, with the method of construction, may be found in the March, 1929, Monthly Labor Review, pp. 185-210, while current details are given monthly in the Trend of
Employment, as issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2
Compiled from reports of Class I carriers and 15 switching and terminal companies to the Interstate Commerce Commission. The computation of average wages excludes
the officials included in total on pay roll. Monthly data from 1920 given in January, 1923, issue (No. 17), p. 51.
3
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia from reports of operators to the Anthracite Bureau of Information relating to the first semimonthly pay-roll
period in each month. These data appeared in table form in the June, 1929, SURVEY (No. 94) p. 18.
* Compiled by the 17. S. Civil Service Commission, giving number of civilian employees carried on rolls at end of each month. Details by departments, with data on
additions and separations, are given in the monthly reports.
6
Compiled by the Ohio State University, Bureau of Business Research, based on reports from firms engaged in general contracting throughout Ohio. Employment in
the general contracting industry in Ohio follows very closely the trend in the entire construction industry in the State. Wage earners in this report include mechanics,
artisans, laborers, and foremen, and part-time workers are reduced to a full-time basis for the week including the 15th of each month, which is used as the monthly index.
Monthly data from 1923, revising previous figures, are given on p. 48 of the October, 1928, issue (No. 86). The bureau also issues an index which eliminates seasonal variations.
*Includes stamped and enameled ware and brass, bronze, and copper products.
7 9 months' average, April to December, inclusive.




109

Table 88.—FACTORY EMPLOYMENT, BY STATES AND CITIES
[Base year in bold-faced type]
EMPLOYEES ON PAY BOLL

MasNew New Penn- Dela- Mary1
sachu- York
4
Jersylsetts 2 State 3 sey 4 vania4 ware land

YEAR AND MONTH

Rel. to
1919-23
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly avaragp.

Rel. to
1924

Relative to 1923

109.2
106.4
88.6

90.3
100.0
91.2
90.5
90.7
87.0
83.5

1928
January.. _ _*
February
March
April

82.3
83.3
82.1
80.4

May
June _ _
July
August

Rel. to
1925-27

Ohio " Iowa ?

Wisconsin 6

1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

__ _

monthly average
monthly average
__ _
monthly average
monthly average
_
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average. __ __

Cleveland s

Milwaukee 9

Rel. to
Jan., 1921

Relative to 1923

" 86. 4
89 3
104.7
109.2
110.9
103.5
107.4
83.9

93.7
102.1
90.2
90.5
92.1
87.6
78.1

Illinois5

New
York
States

Oklahoma ">

Number

90.0
101.9
112.5 1OO.O
94
103.1
99.8
100
104
103.1
97.1
100
95.3
105

77.8
100.0
101.0
112.9
122.4
118.2
122.6

24,199

12 478, 334
493, 995
579, 295
604,192
613, 671
672, 959
594,099
464,200

95.1
99.3
99.5
94.8
94.2

103.6
117.3
105.6
109.2
114.7
108.7
110.6

28,151
34, 459
28,959
33,050
34, 974
35, 193
372, 258

499,542
553, 392
504,484
500,916
501, 802
481, 230
462, 284

28,234
29,035
31, 321
29,663
28,561

September
October
November _ __ _
December

1OO

100

90
90
96
96
92

89
91
92
86
81

80
81
82
75
75

10O.O
100.2
103.8
94.4
87.8

82.6
83.5
83.9
82.9

91
91
90
90

80
82
82
80

75
74
74
74

85.4
87.4
88.9
88.5

90.6
93.1
94.2
93.0

97
102
104
104

117.9
119.0
121.0
120.5

90.3
92.1
92.6
91.8

103.2
105.9
107.8
110.5

35, 492
36, 111
36,883
36, 871

457, 275
462,060
464, 162
458,640

25, 615
24,251
24,492
25,942

75.4
73.6
72.9
74.2

82.0
82.2
81.5
82.5

90
90
90
91

80
80
79
81

75
74
75
74

87.8
86.5
85.6
88.1

93.6
95.8
93.9
96.3

104
105
104
106

121.5
124.1
123.3
124.0

9L8
92.9
96.8
97.9

111.1
111.1
111.3
113.8

36, 777
36,922
37, 314
37, 385

453, 683
454,952
451, 125
456, 303

26,553
27,888
29,405
31, 137

75.6
78.8
79.3
78.9

84.3
86.0
85.8
85.3

94
95
97
98

81
82
82
80

77
74
74
75

89.0
90.4
88.0
87.7

97.7
97.8
98.3
99.2

109
110
110
109

124.0
126.0
125.3
124.8

97.1
97.0
95.7
94.8

114.5
110.6
113.2
114.4

38, 077
38, 090
38, 179
38, 995

466, 357
475, 753
475, 043
472, 054

30, 812
31,960
31, 794
32,885

78.1
79.4
79.9
79.0

_

100

84.8
87.1
88.7
88.3

97
98
99
100

81
84
84
85

75
77
76
79

85.7
88.9
90.9
91.8

98.2
100.3
102.2
103.0

108
112
113
115

121.8
124.4
125.2
127.4

94.2
97.2
98.5
99.2

117.9
123.6
123.4
123.1

40, 707
42,143
43, 226
43, 891

469, 125
482, 252
490, 879
488,390

32, 618
32,207
32, 471
34,809

78.8
77.2

87.5
87.6

101
101

85
86

79
78

91.6
93.9

103.7

115
115

127.6
130.8

99.1
98.5

124.0
123.9

44,067
43, 814
43,761

484,464
484, 637

34,686

100.0

1939
January __
February
March
April

May
June
July
August

_ _
_ _ _ _

September
_
October
November.. _
December.. __
Compiled from data furnished by the Maryland Commission of Labor and Statistics from about 250 manufacturers each month, link relatives being used for identical
concerns from month to month. Monthly reports show details by industries. Monthly figures from 1924 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 24.
2 Compiled by the Massachusetts Department of Labor and Industries, Division of Statistics, from about 1,000 firms each month. Data are connected by the chain relative
method. Monthly data from 1919 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 24.
3 Compiled by the New York State Department of Labor from reports of 1,648 firms employing more than one-third of the factory workers of New York State. Monthly
data from 1914 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 23.
* Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia from reports of about 1,000 plants each month in the States of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. Since
August, 1926, figures for New Jersey are from the New Jersey Department of Labor.
* Compiled by the Illinois Department of Labor from reports of manufacturing establishments, based on the pay roll nearest the 15th of the month.
« Compiled by the Industrial Commission of Wisconsin, based on link relatives from reports of manufacturing firms. The data have been recomputed to a 1923 base*
the monthly figures from 1923 appearing in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 23.
? Compiled from data furnished by the Iowa Bureau of Labor from reports of about 300 firms, the index being compiled by the link-relative method on reports of
identical firms from month to month. Monthly data from 1922 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (N9- 83), p. 24.
8
Compiled by the Cleveland Chamber of Commerce from reports of representative manufacturers in Cleveland.
« Compiled by the Milwaukee Public Employment Office from reports of 50 identical manufacturers, 4 of which are now out of business; Data are for the end of the
month and monthly figures from 1921 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 24.
1° Compiled by the Oklahoma Department of Labor from reports of 710 establishments. Monthly data from 1924 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 24.
11 Compiled by the Ohio State University, Bureau of Business Research, from reports of about 600 manufacturers in Ohio. Details by industries and by cities are given
in the bureau's press releases. Monthly data from 1923 are given on p. 48 of the October, 1928, issue (No. 86).
" 7 month's average, June to December, inclusive.




110

Table 89.—EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES, TRADE-UNIONS, AND INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES
TRADE-UNION
EMPLOYMENT 2

EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES 1

YEAR AND MONTH

United Eastern Central South- WestWisern Illinois consin Canada United
ern
States 1
States
average States States States States

Per cent of total
membership

Number of applicants per 100 jobs
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly av_ ._
monthly av
monthly av
_
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

Eel. to
1926

Workers
involved

Man-days
lost in
month

Number

63
45

121, 117
90,392

3, 149, 950
2, 629, 746

156
147
146
124

93.6
93.5
94.3
94.0

95.9
96.6
97.5
97.4

18
45
67
88

2,287
5,717
8,182
199, 701

58,125
115, 229
214, 283
5, 265, 420

112
116
111
110

124
127
121
109

94.8
96.8
96.7
96.3

101.8
107.2
109. 7
110.5

116
88
63
53

5, 136, 006
4, 863, 345
5, 308, 123
4, 999, 751

147
163
182
180

113
120
139
151

98
116
142
140

96.9
96.1
94.8
93.4

111.0
110.3
108.8
108.1

58
58
51
54

200,702
196, 323
199, 287
198, 444
•
196,829
82,095
82,607
81,229

4, 945, 702
2, 724, 117
2, 040, 140
2, 129, 153

87
75
65
69

239
208
173
155

182
173
161
131

161
146
137
120

82.2
81.8
82.0
84.0

93.2
93.0
93.5
94.8

100.7
102.0
102.6
102.3

63
58
47
48

81,880
103,496
76,069
129, 708

2,128,028
2, 145, 342
2, 291, 337
4, 806, 232

204
221
174
121

66
66
80
69

146
168
151
138

110
123
113
107

114
118
113
109

87.0
89.0
88.0
91.0

96.3
96.3
97.5
97.6

106.8
113.8
117.7
119.3

56
46
42
42

133,546
143, 137
132, 187
105, 760

3, 455, 499
3,670,878
3, 337, 386
3, 553, 750

126
133
125
146

91
142
153
193

63
62
71
69

130
133
144
144

104
116
140
138

98
114
143
135

90.0
91.0
90.0
87.0

97.8
96.9
95.8
93.4

119.1
118. 8
118.9
116.7

34
42
38
29

62,862
41,474
38,745
35,842

2, 571, 982
1, 304, 913
1,300,362
991,238

154
152
144
126

164
164
153
134

283
267
215
200

80
81
76
73

182
169
156
134

138
142
138
117

154
146
133
117

85.0
85.0
86.0
88.0

93.7
93.2
94.0
94.5

109.1
110.5
111.4
110.4

34
34
42
59

39, 484
40,385
41, 321
55,332

949, 692
921,583
1,094,161
1,458,992

126
127

126
140

198
185

93
71

124

118

89.0
91.0

96.0

116.2
122.4

70

59, 216

1,607,132

595
70
60
69
64
66
71
70

218
134
111
153
147
142
174
161

81
121
92
92
113
113
112
125
133

103
126
117
109
126
114
119
129
126

160
158
137
119

156
162
146
122

203
191
165
140

146
155
125
111

78
72
67
62

215
204
175
153

170
155
142
121

May
June
July
_.
August

118
137
134
129

121
149
145
137

137
163
152
156

119
125
118
122

61
65
87
70

154
180
170
165

September
October
November
December

121
120
137
145

131
129
146
155

136
145
160
165

114
122
132
145

79
61
71
80

1938
January
February
March
April .

170
175
154
137

192
208
171
146

203
189
166
147

188
222
264
219

May
June
July
August .

128
121
137
129

138
147
151
223

135
161
150
132

September
October
November
December

107
117
134
100

120
128
142
146

1929
January
February
March
April

156
153
142
128
126
128

May
June
July
August

Disputes

88.8
89.0
95.8
93.4
93.6
99.6
104.6
111.6

106
100
127
122
119
142
159

5164
125
109
130
122
108
128
183

_ _

INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES *

95.4
87.5
93.0
95.1
93.0
93.0
94.9
95.1
95.6

«235
146
131
180
175
160
159
151

1927
January _
February
March
April

Canada

EMPLOYMENT
IN
CANADA 3

«101

5173
127
105
143
140
127
135
134

«131

86.9

October
November
December
1

* Compiled from weekly reports to the U". & Department of Labor, Employment Service, showing the number of workers and jobs registered at State and municipal
employment agencies. Eastern States included in the report are Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. (Delaware, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, now reporting, are excluded to show true comparison.) Central States are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota,
of Wisconsin. These data were first shown in the April, 1929, SURVEY (No. 92), p. 22. Data for Canada compiled from weekly reports to the Dominion Department
of Labor, Employment Service of Canada. The original data covering applications and job vacancies from which the Canadian data were compiled were given in the
February, 1928, Survey, p. 110.
2
Data for the United States compiled from reports of trade-union unemployment as published by the American Federation of Labor, the figures above having been
inverted to show trade-union employment. Data for Canada from the Dominion Department of Labor, Employment Service of Canada, data covering yearly averages 1915
to 1919, inclusive, were given in the February, 1928, Survey, p. 109.
3 Compiled by the Dominion Department of Labor covering employment activity in manufacturing, construction, mining, logging, and services. These data are shown
as of the first of the month. This table appeared in the April, 1929, SURVEY (No. 92), p. 22.
4
Compiled by the 17. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, through the cooperation of the Conciliation Service and other outside agencies. The data
show the number of industrial disputes in effect at the end of the month, disputes involving fewer than six workers and those lasting less than one day being omitted.
The number of work-days lost relates only to workers directly affected and is computed by multiplying the number of workers so affected by the length of the disputes
 in working-days as normally worked by the industry or trade in question. Figures given include only those disputes which have been verified by the bureau
\neasured
6
6 months'
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ average, July to December, inclusive.
c
11 months* average, February to December, inclusive.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Ill

Oklahoma *

New York
State «

o>

£

Wisconsin i

Pennsylvania s

New Jersey 6

Per cent i Dolls,
base
per mo.
i scale

Cents per hour

WEEKLY
PAY ROLL

TOTAL PAY ROLLS

New York «

FARM WAGES
(without board) *

YOUNGSTOWN
DISTRICT (wages
of steel workers)3

Pacific

Mountain

West North
Central

East North
Central

West South
Central

East South
Central

South
Atlantic

New England
.
Middle
Atlantic

YEAR AND
MONTH

United States
average

WAGES OF COMMON LABOR IN ROAD BUILDING
(by geographic divisions) i

U. S. STEEL CORP.
WAGE BATES *

Table 90.—WAGES AND PAY ROLLS, BY STATES

Thousands of
dollars

Relative to 1923

j

160.0
191.8
174.0
192.0

$30. 21
29.72
29.97
32.58
40.19
49.13
50. 77
65. 05

939.4
42.3
55.5
65.6
82.8
89.3
110.9

38
32
43
50
50
50
50
50

151.0
123.3
138.5
145.8
131.8
132. 0
127.8
125.5

43.58
42.09
46.74
47.23
47.80
48.87
48.63
48.65

79.2
83.1
100.0
92.7
93.9
96.6
93.6
90.3

100
90
91
101
103
101

100
86
90
94
87
83

100
81
82
85
79
77

100.0
97.1
105.9
106. 8
101.4
102.4

11 943
12, 524
15, 075
13, 967 10 $750
781
14, 159
14, 559
860
814
14, 105
13, 613
778

50
54
52
53

50
50
50
50

125.5
125.5
125.5
125.5

88.6
89.4
91.3
87.6

98
100
99
95

79
85
85
80

76
76
78
75

88.9
99.1
106.7
97.6

13, 361
13, 477
13, 760
13,200

685
719
634
701

49
45
44
50

51
53
53
53

50
50
50
50

125.5
125.5
125.5
125.5

87.8
89.0
87.2
89.0

98
98
96
99

83
83
76
83

79
78
74
76

99.9
104.8
98.7
108.7

13, 241
13, 413
13, 149
13, 411

702
743
793
877

39
39
40
38

52
49
42
46

54
54
53
53

50
50
50
50

125.5
125.5
125.5
125.5

92.0
94.0
93.5
94.3

102
105
107
110

83
87
85
85

77
78
77
82

106.5
110.2
107.3
100.5

13, 862
14, 168
14,094
14, 217

865
868
864
882

45
46
42
38

38
42
37
37

44
42
43
44

52
52
52
53

50
50
50
50

125. 5
125.5
125.5
125. 5

92.5
96.0
98.8
97.4

108
111
112
113

82
90
91
92

79
83
83
86

96.1
110.0
110.7
111.5

13, 938
14, 465
14, 897
14, 687

884
881
871
908

40
38

37
37

45
47

53
52

50

125.5

96.5
96.5

114
114

94
93

88
86

110.1
107.0

14, 549
14, 549

1,039

26
28
36
45
52
60

20
20
20
24
30
38
42
46

46
37
42
41
44
43
45
46

£0
48
54
52
52
52
53
53

37
39
37
36

41
43
42
46

38
37
38
39

37
36
36
38

26
30
31
30

38
40
40
41

26
27
27
27

31
30
33
31

26
26

31
32

1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
19 15 monthly a v_.
1916 monthly av__
1917 monthly av_.
1918 monthly av
19 19 monthly av_.
1920 monthly av__

20
23
28
36
41
49

20
25
31
39
41
49

20
24
30
38
41
50

14
16
21
27
32
37

12
13
17
23
28
32

16
17
21
28
36
40

21
24
29
39
43
53

25
28
34
45
53
62

26
29
36
44
47
55

1921 monthly av__
1922 monthly av. _
1923 monthly av_ _
1924 monthly av..
1925 monthly av_.
1926 monthly av_.
1<.)27 monthly a v._
1928 monthly av__

36
32
38
38
38
39
39
40

38
39
51
50
46
50
49
50

35
37
45
45
45
46
47
44

28
21
25
28
27
30
28
26

25
20
22
24
25
25
25
26

28
24
25
27
27
27
30
28

35
31
39
40
37
38
39
39

45
31
34
36
38
36
33
38

1938
January
February
March
April

37
38
38
40

53
52
51
50

48
47
48
46

24
22
23
23

25
26
28
26

26
28
28
27

39
41
41
41

May
June
July
August

40
40
40
42

49
48
47
48

42
42
43
41

28
26
27
34

27
26
&
25

29
30
27
29

September
October
November
December

43
42
42
39

48
51
50
51

42
41
41
44

24
26
27
28

25
26
27
26

1939
January
February
March
April

36
37
37
38

52
49
51
51

45
49
44
42

23
22
23
27

40
40

50
51

42
42

30
29

MayJune
July _
August

September
October
November
December

48.44

49.32

49. 60

47.24

49.00

50.53

$5, 942
6,377
8,366
9,892
12, 481
13, 468
16,711

i

i

I

~
!

1

i
i

_ _ |
1

i

^

1 Compiled by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Public Roads. The current data beginning January, 1922, are compiled directly from Federal-aid project
reports. Earlier data included reports on farm labor or other forms of common labor closely correlated, as reported to the Department of Agriculture and the Department
of Labor.
2 Average rates in the Pittsburgh district reported by the United States Steel Corporation; rates apply to 10-hour day except for the period Oct. 1, 1918, to July 16,1921,
during which period the rates applied to a basic 8-hour day with time and a half for overtime, and beginning Aug. 16,1923, when they applied to an 8-hour day, the 10-hour
workers amounting to only 30 per cent of the total.
s Compiled from data furnished by the Western Sheet and Tin Plate Manufacturers' Association and the Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers. The
wage scales are based on the price of steel sheets in the previous 2-inonth period as ascertained by actual prices received by mills. Monthly data from 1917, together with
price of steel sheets for the same period, appeared in the May, 1926, issue (No. 57) of the SURVEY, p. 13.
* Average rates paid to farm labor as reported by crop reporters to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Data by sections of the country
are shown in the detailed reports published in Crops and Markets.
6
Compiled by the New York State Department of Labor from reports of 1,648 firms employing more than one-third of the factory workers of New York State. Monthly
data6 from 1914 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 23.
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia from reports of about 1,000 plants each month in the States of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. Since
August, 1928, figures for New Jersey are om the New Jersey Department of Labor.
1
Compiled by the Industrial Commission of Wisconsin from reports of manufacturing plants in Wisconsin.
8 Compiled by the Oklahoma Departrnent of Labor from reports of 710 establishments.
9
6 months' average.
10 7 months' average.




112

Table 91.—WEEKLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY LABOR

Rela- Rela.
tive to tive to
1914 1925-27

Relative to July, 1914

Relative to 1923

OKLAHOMA •

Dollars

1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921

monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

uoo.o

8235.4 8238.5 s 235. 2 8 253. 1 8233.0
188.0 188.3 187.5 191.2 205.0

100.0
103.0
115.6
131.2
163.1
188.3
225.6
206.1

1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av
monthly av

s 191. 8 9 193. 2 9 193. 7 9 191. 7 9204.0
211.3 212.6 212.7 211.1 222.7
209.5 212.9 212.1 213.4 215.4
214.8 220.0 218.2 220.5 220.3
216.7 222. 6 220.3 223.5 220.2
217.1 223.1 219.8 227.5 221.0
218. 7 227.5 223.9 232. 0 218.6

200.6 980.1
95.4
218.3
97.1
221.8
98.4
226.4
232.5 101.0
234.8 100.5
235.9 100.2

100
100
101
106
109
110

100
97
98
101
101
102

100
101
99
101
103
102

90.0 924.06 9 25. 69 •27.42 920.53 « 15. 99
100.0 26.50 28.27 30.12 22.61 17.46
101. 5 26.27 28.31 30.04 22.86 16.89
108.6 26.94 29.26 30.90 23.62 17.27
107.1 27.17 29.61 31.20 23.94 17.26
106. 2 27.22 29.67 31.13 24.37 17.33
109.7 27.42 30.26 31.71 24.85 17.14

7 100. 0 7100.0 7100.0 7100.0

WISCONSIN «

I

Women

§

Unskilled

Delaware 3

Wisconsin 5

Men

Pennsylvania 3

New Jersey 3

Illinois «

New York 2

Women

Unskilled

H

Skilled

YEAR AND MONTH

Grand total

Men

U. S. TOTALS, 23 INDUSTRIES *

ILLINOIS *

BY STATES

Grand total

U. S. TOTALS, 23 INDUSTRIES 1

NEW YORK STATE 2

[Base year in bold-faced type]

7$12. 54 •$13. 30 ?$14. 16 7$10. 71 7 $7. 84 $12. 48
12.85
48.6
57.3
14.43
16.37
67.0
20.35
85.3
23.50
95.9
116.5 829.51 831.72 833.31 827.11 818.27 28.15
92.8 23.57 25.05 26.55 20.48 16.07 25.72

$28.58
22.80

25.04 »$24. 70
27.24 27.07
27.68 27.55
28.26 27.93
29.02 28.67
29.30 28.52
29.44 28.56

21.66
23.97
24.40 8$26. 57
25.56 26.91
25.67 27.46
25.45 27.44
26.12 27. 16

1938
January
February
__
March
April

217.2
218.1
220.0
216.8

224.1
228.0
230.1
227.4

220. 5
223.9
228.8
224.7

230.3
235.8
233.9
228.5

219.8
221.8
221.2
212.9

234.1
233.7
237.5
230.6

96.9
102.0
100.4
97.7

109
110
110
108

98
104
104
99

100
102
104
99

98.4
107.6
115.2
106.3

27.24
27. 35
27.59
27.19

29.80
30.32
30.60
30.25

31.22
31.70
32.11
31.82

24.66
25.25
25.05
24.47

17.23
17.39
17.34
16.69

29.22
29.16
29.64
28.78

27.49
28.93
28.48
28.28

23.60
25.80
27.62
25.49

26.73
29.65
25.84
27.04

May. _ _
June
July
August

'217. 1
217.7
216.0
218.1

226.1
228.2
225.2
227.8

222.0
224.2
221.4
224.4

233.2
235.0
230.5
231.4

215.2
217.0
217.7
217.3

233.9
236.2
233.6
235.5

101.6
103. 2
96.7
99.9

110
110
108
109

103
102
96
102

104
103
98
102

108.8
112.8
102.0
111.0

27.23
27.30
27.09
27.35

30.07
30.35
29.95
30.30

31.44
31. 74
31.35
31.77

24.98
25.17
24.69
24.78

16.87
17.01
17.07
17.04

29.19
29.48
29.15
29.39

28.82
29.28
27.45
29.13

24.07
27.03
24.45
26.60

26.44
26.24
26.97
28.15

September
October
December.. _ __ __ _

221.4
221.4
218.7
221.1

232.6
230.8
223.7
226.0

229.0
227.8
220.4
222.2

235.9
230.8
227.3
231.2

221.0
221.2
218.9
219.9

238.1
238.6
237.7
241.3

99.8
100.7
99.7
101.5

110
112
111
113

101
106
104
105

101
104
103
108

109.7
113.7
112.1
106.0

27.76
27.76
27.42
27.73

30.93
30.70
29.75
30.06

32.42
32.26
31.21
31.47

25.27
24. 72
24.34
24.76

17.33
17.34
17.16
17.24

29.72
29.78
29.67
30.12

28.31
28.57
28.38
29.55

26.30
27.25
26.87
25.40

28.08
27.16
27.10
26.52

1929
January
February
March
April

223.9
229.5
227.5
227.5

229.4
237.8
238.2
237.7

225.8
233.6
234.1
233.7

273.4
243.9
243.4
242.3

218.9
227.3
226.5
227.7

238.1
240.3
243.2
240.9

98.0
102.4
101.9
102.1

112
114
114
114

102
108
109
109

104
106
108
107

102.0
113.3
112.4
112.4

28.08
28.53
28.53
28.53

30.51
31.63
31.68
31.61

31.97
33.08
33. 15
33.09

25.13
26.12
26.07
25.95

17.16
17.82
17.76
17.85

29.71
29.99
30.35
30.07

28.72
28.42
28.92

24.45
27.15
26.95
26.94

27.09
27.36
26.81
26.08

227.6

236.7

233.3

238.9

229.0

240.6
240.5

102.4
103.8

114
113

110
108

111
108

111.1
108.6

28.54

31.48

33.04

25.59

17.95

30.03
30 02

26.64
26 03

29.95

November

_

May

July

i

September _ .
October
November
December
* Compiled by the National Industrial Conference Board from reports from 1,678 manufacturing plants employing 506,315 people in January, 1921, and representing 23
industries. The nominal hours per week represent the weighted number of hours the plants are supposed normally to operate, while the actual hours represent the average man-hours worked each week. The grand total weekly earnings are compiled by weighting the average earnings in each industry by the number of wage earners employed as reported by the census of manufacturers of 1919, but as it was impossible to obtain the necessary weighting factors for the classes of labor, the latter averages are
unweighted; hence the relative number for the grand total sometimes is lower than the relative number of any class, owing to the different methods of computation.
a Figures represent reports from 1,648 firms in New York State employing more than one-third of the factory workers of the State, as reported by the New York State
Department of Labor. The 1914 average upon which the index numbers are calculated is an average of the 7 months, June to December, 1914, inclusive. As originally
published by the New York Department of Labor, the index numbers are based on June, 1914, and have been recalculated to the 7-month average.
3 Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia from reports of about 1,000 plants each month in the States of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. Since
August, 1926, figures for New Jersey are from New Jersey State Department of Labor.
Compiled by the Illinois Department of Labor from reports of manufacturing establishments, taken from the pay roll nearest the 15th of the month.
8 Compiled by the Industrial Commission of Wisconsin from reports of about 850 manufacturing establishments in Wisconsin. Monthly data on earnings from 1923
were given in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 23. Relatives prior to 1923 are recomputed from old index on 1915 base.
• Compiled by the Oklahoma Department of Labor from reports of 710 establishments. Monthly data from 1924 appeared in the July, 1928, issue (No. 83), p. 24.
7 July, 1914.
8
Average of last 7 months of the year.
9
Average of last 6 months of the year.




113

Table 92.—PAY ROLL AND HOURS IN FACTORIES
[Index numbers for base year in bold-faced type]
PAY-ROLL INDEXES »
Food
Total,

13

YEAR AND MONTH

groups

and
kin-

dred
products

Textiles
and

their
products

Lumber
and
its
their manuprodfacIron

and
and

Leather

and Paper
its fin- and
ished printing
prod-

steel

ucts

ucts

ture

HOURS OF
WORK 2
Vehicles MiscelTolanefor
bacco
and
ous
land
glass ferrous3 manu- trans- indus- Nomi- Actual
facmetals
nal
prodture porta- tries
ucts
tion

Chem- Stone,
clay,
icals

and

other
products

Non-

Hours per week

Relative to 1926

51.5
*48.7
45.5
«49.2
49.2
46.8
48.2
48.2
47.9
47.9

106.3
104.4
99.9
100.0
100.0
99.8

116.4
101.0
104.2
100.0
103.0
95.6

102.7
89.1
93.3
100.0
91.9
92.8

102.4
99.6
100.4
100.0
93.1
88.8

113.9
100.6
101.8
100.0
97.4
89.7

89.7
91.7
94.3
100.0
101.2
101.5

98.2
91.0
94.2
100.0
99.1
95.9

93.5
95.2
97.3
100.0
94.2
89.6

101.5
93.0
99.4
100.0
91.6
96.1

114.0
108.9
105.7
100.0
97.1
93.5

107.7
94.3
100.7
100.0
91.6
98.3

98.1
89.0
92.8
100.0
100.9
91.9

55.0
*50.0
49.7
850.0
49.9
49.7
49.9
49.8
49.6
49.6

94.9
100.6
102.0
100.8

98.8
98.2
97.0
95.9

103.4
109.4
109.4
103.5

93.5
99.2
100.6
99.2

89.2
91.4
92.7
91.6

99.4
105.1
102.5
95.9

101.1
101.6
102.4
101.3

100.1
104.1
108.1
107.6

86.3
92.3
96.6
99.4

93.3
96.6
99.4
92.7

88.5
91.9
93.6
90.1

79.3
95.7
98.4
100.3

105.2
107.2
109.3
111.2

49.5
49.5
49.6
50.4

48.2
48.6
48.5
48.1

99.8
97.4
93.0
95.0

98.8
102.8
101.8
99.9

101.3
100.3
97.2
100.7

96.2
94.4
87.0
89.6

94.9
94.9
91.5
94.7

93.2
94.0
98.7
106.3

101.0
99.6
97.8
99.2

98.4
98.2
93.4
94.7

101.4
99.2
91.1
94.6

96.5
92.9
88.2
89.6

96.5
100.1
98.9
92.1

101.5
92.5
87.7
92.5

107.3
102.9
97.6
94.8

49.6
49.6
49.7
49.5

48.3
47.9
47.3
47.8

September
October
November
December . . .

94.1
95.2
91.6
93.2

102.2
102.7
101.1
100.9

103.1
105.0
100.5
102.3

87.1
86.8
84.0
85.2

95.9
96.7
94.3
90.1

103.6
97.3
85.8
87.1

100.2
102.0
102.9
104.9

96.8
96.6
95.2
96.5

93.4
94.5
92.7
89.0

87.3
88.0
86.4
88.4

104.2
105.2
104.1
100.2

87.9
90.7
85.1
87.1

91.5
94.7
90.7
97.9

49.5
49.5
49.4
49.5

47.8
47.4
47.1
47.3

1928
January
February
March
._
April

89.6
93.9
95.2
93.8

98.0
99.9
98.9
94.8

99.4
102.6
101.2
93.7

82.5
90.4
92.5
91.8

81.4
84.9
87.6
88.3

92.6
98.1
96.8
84.2

102.1
101.3
101, 4
100.7

94.1
96.5
100.7
101.0

81.8
84.2
87.1
89.9

85.0
91.1
92.1
92.8

90.2
90.4
91.4
85.1

83.6
95.2
99.1
100.4

93.3
90.3
90.4
92.1

49.5
49.6
50.0
49.3

47.9
48.0
48.2
47.4

May
June
July
August

94.1
94.2
91.2
94.2

97.0
99.5
99.9
98.3

91.9
91.6
87.4
90.3

94.1
93.3
89.1
92.8

89.6
90.2
87.4
90.1

81.7
85.0
91.2
96.5

100.6
100.8
99.0
99.3

93.1
91.7
91.6
92.8

92.9
92.8
87.8
93.7

94.8
93.7
90.3
96.6

88.9
94.9
89.7
93.8

102.2
99.8
96.0
101.8

89.5
92.0
89.2
89.4

49.4
49.7
49.6
49.6

47.8
47.7
47.5
47.9

95.4
99.0
96.1
97.7

101.2
103.2
102.3
104.4

93.2
99.5
96.5
99.5

92.9
97.9
97.7
98.0

91.7
93.6
92.0
88.3

95.7
92.6
78.6
83.6

100.9
103.2
103.4
105.1

96.6
98.5
97.2
97.2

91.8
93.6
90.6
88.4

98.2
104.6
106.2
108.2

9&2
100.6
99.3
99.5

101.4
106.1
97.5
96.4

91.8
93.3
91.9
100.1

49.8
4&6
49.6
49.6

48.2
48.0
47.8
48.5

94.5
101. 8
103.9
104.6

99.6
99.8
98.6
97.7

96.3
102.2
104.3
100.6

95.5
102.5
105.2
107.4

81.9
84.9
86.8
89.4

87.1
91.2
88.2
85.0

10>.2
104.7
106.4
104.9

95.1
99.5
102.5
107.0

77.5
79.6
83.3
87.7

102.4
109.4
112.3
112.3

81.0
87.2
89.2
91.0

95.5
114.8
117.2
120.1

101.7
107.3
112.6
114,6

49.7
49.7
49.8
49.8

48.5
49.5
49.5
49.3

104.8
102.8

100.4
102,7

98.5
97.3

108.4
106.8

91.3
90.7

85.1
86.8

105.8
105.12

101.9
99.9

90.1
90.8

109.1
104.6

91.0
93.6

118.7
109.8

117.7
118.5

49.9

49.0

1914, July
1920 monthly average
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average .
1923 monthly average. _. 104.3
1924 monthly average. _. 94.6
1925 monthly average. _. 97.7
1926 monthly average. _. 100.0
1927 monthly average. _. 96.5
1928 monthly average... 94.5
1927
January
Februarv
March
April

. .

May
June
J
July
August

.

„

September.
October
November
December
1939
January
February
March
_. _
April
May
June
July
August

September.
October
November
December

.

.

I " '
i

i

_

1
Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and represent weighted indexes based upon the number of wage earners in the respective industries in 1925. The original data are taken from the pay roll nearest to the middle of the month as reported by more than 12,500 firms, employing 3,563,000 workers. Details
of this table with the method of construction may be found in the March, 1929, Monthly Labor Review, pp. 185-210, while current details are given monthly in the Trend of
Employment, as issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2
Compiled by the National Industrial Conference Board from reports from 1,678 manufacturing plants employing 506,315 people in January, 1921, and representing 23
industries. The nominal hours per week represent the weighted number of hours the plants are supposed normally to operate, while the actual hours represent the ave
m a n hours worked each week.
* * .
3 Includes enameled ware and brass, bronze, and copper products.
* Average of last 7 months of the year.
* Average of last 6 months of the year.

http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ 61139°—29—8

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

114
Table 93.—FACTORY OPERATIONS AND LABOR TURNOVER

93
95
97
97

88
93
97
97

93
94
98
96

93
96
95
95

494
95
97
97
97

490
91
93
96
97

495
95
97
98
98

490
95
97
97
98

4 92
91
94
96
97

490
96
96
96
97

491
92
95
95
95

4 93
96
97
98
98

4 92
94
96
96
97

98
98
97
97

98
99
98
98

96
98
97
97

97
97
96
97

99
99
99
98

96
96
92
92

99
99
99
99

100
99
99
98

98
97
98
97

97
98
96
97

97
97
97
97

98
98
98
98

98
98
97
97

96
97
97
97

97
96
96
95

97
99
98
98

95
96
96
96

96
97
97
97

96
97
96
95

99
99
98
98

98
97
99
99

92
98
97
96

96
98
98
97

97
93
92
90

98
98
98
99

97
96
97
97

96
97
96
97

98
97
97
98

95
94
101
94

96
97
96
97

95
96
97
100

98
98
97
98

97
95
95
96

98
97
96
96

97
97
96
96

91
94
95
95

97
97
96
96

98
98
97
97

98
98
96
97

94
94
92
93

98
98
97
97

98
97
93
95

99
99
99
99

98
98
97
98

96
95
97
95

95
95
95
95

January
February
M^arch
April

96
96
96
96

96
96
96
96

96
96
95
93

93
94
95
95

95
96
96
96

97
98
98
94

98
98
99
98

98
98
99
100

95
96
96
97

May.June
July
August

96
97
96
97

97
97
97
97

94
95
95
95

96
95
95
96

95
96
96
97

95
97
97
98

98
98
98
98

98
97
97
98

97
98
97
98

99
99
99
98

96
97
96
98

96
97
96
97

98
98
97
98

98
96
94
96

99
99
99
99

97
98
98
98

97
98
98
97

97
98
99
98

97
97
97
98

95
96
95
97

98
98
97
96

98

98

98

98

97

97

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average .
monthly average.

491

4

"o

|

Lay offs

Voluntary
quits

Accessions

Separations

Per
cent

Per cent of full time

1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

Ratio, a c t u a l
time to capacity -

Miscellaneous
industries

Vehicles for land
transportation

Tobacco manufacture

tf

LABOR TURNOVERS
Nonferrous
metals *

Chemicals and
other products

Paper and printing

Leather and its
finished products

Lumber and its
manufacture

Iron and steel
and their products

Textiles and their
products

YEAR AND MONTH

Food and kindred products

Total, 13 groups

TIME OPERATED i

Per cent of number on pay roll
(annual basis)

72
77
82
84
84

44.8

47.1
41.5
37.1

32.0
37.0
34.5
27.0
25.7

6.1
8.2
6.5

6.6
5.7
4.8

86
86
84
84

69.4
57.7
40.2
27.1

58.4
43.6
40.2
30.6

47.5
31.8
25.6
20.0

4.9
4.7
8.5
7.1

6.1
7.1
6.1
3.5

96
96
96
97

83
84
85
85

36.3
41.7
43.2
47.5

40.8
36.9
42.5
48.3

23.1
21.8
29.8
32.4

12.3
9.6
6.4
9.7

5.4
5.5
6.3
6.2

98
98
98
99

96
96
95
96

84
84
84
84

48.0
45.0
37.8
39.6

44.7
43.9
35.7
36.4

31.9
29.1
24.4
23.0

7.6
8.0
6.0
8.5

5.2
6.8
5.3
4.9

96
97
97
97

98
98
98
98

96
96
95
97

86
85
82
81

43.6
40.8
31.6
23.7

46.2
39.6
31.5
27.2

33.6
25.3
18.0
14.8

6.4
8.5
9.3
8.6

6.0
5.8
4.2
3.8

96
97
96
97

96
94
94
93

98
98
98
99

95
95
96
97

81
82
83
83

33.4
32.0
36.5
41.3

27.8
28.2
31.8
37.9

15.9
14.7
19.5
25.4

8.3
7.9
8.1
7.5

3.6
4.7
4.2
5.0

98
98
97
97

97
98
96
97

94
95
95
94

98
99
98
98

96
96
97
97

84
84
84
84

47.2
j 41.3
46.9
j 55.7

42.1
39.5
38.0
42.3

28.7
27.1
27.2
31.9

8.4
7.5
5.9
5.1

5.0
4.9
4.9
5.3

98
99
99
98

97
98
97
98

97
98
98
98

96
97
96
98

98
99
98
99

98
98
98
99

87
88
86
87

56.9
57.1
50.1
38.1

50.6
41.9
35.3
29.2

40.3
31.9
25.6
20.1

5.0
4.7
4.8
4.7

5.3
5.3
4.9
4.4

99
99
99
99

98
97
99
100

96
97
97
98

98
98
98
99

94
94
93
95

99
99
99
99

98
97
98
98

88
91
90
91

58.6
56.9
61.2
70.2

36.2
41.7
49.2
55.7

26.7
31.0
36.8
43.3

4.2
4.7
5.7
5.5

5.3
6.0
6.7
6.9

99

98

99

99

95

99

98

91

59.9
53.8

52.1
53.2

40.8
41.5

5.7
5.6

5.6
6.1

54.4
40.2

1926
September
October
November
December

_

1937
January
February
March
April

_

May
June
July
August

. -

September
October
_ -November . _
December

-

-

1938

September
October
November
December

_

1929
January..
February
March __
April

__ _
_
_

i

May
June
_
July
August. _
September
October
November
December

__
__

I

_

|

_

!

.

1

__

!
i

i

i

!

j

* Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, from reports of over 9,000 firms, employing almost 3,000,000 people showing the percentage
of full time worked by the force actually employed. Details for individual industries of each group and percentage of firms operated at full time are given in "Employment
Selected in Industries," issued each month by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2
These data, compiled by multiplying the percentage of capacity operated, as shown in the following table, by the percentage of time operated, as shown in this table,
indicate the approximate actual employment time relative to capacity.
3
Compiled by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company covering up to 135 companies employing about 600,000 wage earners for the period 1919-1925. Beginning with 1926,
data are from about 300 companies each month. Rates are based on median reports rather than arithmetic mean, to throw out exceptional cases. The annual turnover
rates were derived from the monthly rates by multiplying each month rate by 365 (366 for leap years) and dividing by the number of calendar days in the month represented. The total separation rate is the arithmetic sum of the last 3 columns. Monthly data on voluntary quits from 1919 appeared in the March, 1927, issue (No. 67), p. 25.
4

Average of last 10 months of year.
fi
Includes
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ enameled ware, bronze, and copper products.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

115

Table 94.—FACTORY FORCES RELATIVE TO CAPACITY1
Total,
13
groups

YEAR AND MONTH „

Food Textiles Iron Lumand
and
steel
and
ber
kintheir
and and its
dred prod- their manuprodprod- facture
ucts
ucts
ucts

VehiChem- Stone
Leather
MiscelTocles
clay, Non- bacco
and Paper icals
for
ats fin- and
and
and ferrous manu- land laneous
2
ished print- other glass metals
fac- trans- indusproding
prod- prodture porta- tries
ucts
ucts
ucts
tion
Per cent of full capacity

1924 monthly average 3
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average _
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average

79
83
87
87
87

78
82
88
89
87

78
85
87
91
88

70
76
82
83
85

87
89
89
85
84

73
82
87
89
87

89
92
94
95
96

76
78
80
77
78

84
85
88
85
85

69
80
84
84
89

77
83
87
90
93

82
86
89
87
92

73
78
84
84
87

January
February
March
April

85
87
87
87

85
86
84
85

87
89
88
86

79
80
82
82

89
88
88
88

82
87
88
86

94
94
95
94

83
86
89
85

85
87
86
89

86
86
87
86

85
86
89
88

88
89
88
95

82
83
83
83

May
June
July
August _.

86
85
86
87

86
86
90
89

86
84
83
85

81
81
81
82

88
88
91
90

84
82
84
88

94
92
93
93

74
72
72
80

91
91
91
90

84
82
82
82

88
84
85
87

89
87
89
88

86
80
85
84

88
88
87
87

91
92
89
87

87
89
89
88

82
82
82
86

89
89
88
88

91
91
90
88

94
95
95
95

83
82
78
75

88
87
86
81

82
82
82
84

86
90
88
86

88
88
88
88

86
87
86
85

86
87
88
88

85
85
85
85

89
91
91
91

84
86
86
86

85
84
85
85

88
89
91
87

95
94
95
94

77
80
90
91

78
79
83
87

82
84
87
87

84
87
83
87

86
88
90
90

81
86
8G
87

87
87
87
87

87
90
89
96

90
89
89
90

84
84
78
84

84
85
85
86

86
88
89
91

94
93
93
94

75
70
70
68

89
90
90
88

84
84
83
83

87
88
90
87

90
89
89
89

85
82
81
82

89
88
85
84

92
92
89
88

92
92
91
91

83
83
81
80

86
87
84
82

93
92
84
86

95
96
98
97

77
74
79
77

87
85
86
82

83
84
82
82

92
95
97
93

89
89
77
78

83
83
84
85

84
85
86
86

86
87
86
85

90
90
89
87

80
82
83
84

81
81
82
83

90
90
90
86

96
96
95
95

78
81
86
85

81
81
83
84

81
85
87
90

90
90
91
90

80
82
87
90

86
84
84
84

87
87
87
87

85
86
86
86

87
86
84
86

85
85
84
86

82
85
83
85

84
86
87
88

94
95
94
94

75
73
74
74

86
87
86
87

89
88
88
89

90
91
92
95

93
94
93
94

85
85
86
87

90
90
89
89

89
90
90
90

86
88
89
89

87
87
88
88

87
85
86
84

88
89
84
83

95
97
98
97

78
77
77
76

88
87
86
83

89
93
93
95

96
97
97
93

101
98
93
94

89
93
93
93

January
February
March
April .-

91
93
*92
93

88
89
86
85

89
91
91
91

88
91
92
93

82
83
84
85

87
89
88
87

96
97
97
97

79
80
88
90

82
84
84
86

92
96
97
95

88
90
91
91

105
107
102
101

95
96
100
102

May.
June
July
August—

93

86

90

94

86

90

97

80

88

98

92

102

101

_..

1926

_

September
October.
November
December
1937
January.
February _ .
March
_
April
May. _.
June
July
August

_

_

September.
October
November
December.
1928
January
February
March .. . .
April
May
June..
July
August

„. .

_ .

September
October . _
November
December.
1929

September
October..
November
December....

.
_.

* Compiled by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, from reports of over 9,000 firms, employing almost 3,000,000 people, showing the percentage
of their capacity force employed each month. Details for individual industries of each group and percentage of firms operated at full capacity and at full time are given
in "Employment in Selected Industries," issued each month by the Bureau of Labor Statistics,

2 Includes enameled ware, bronze, and copper products.
«Average of last 10 months of year.



116
Table 95.—POSTAL BUSINESS AND ADVERTISING
POSTAL RECEIPTS

Domestic 3 (50 principal cities)

Total *

50
50
selected industrial
cities
cities

YEAR AND MONTH

Second
class 2
(quarterly)

Thousands of dollars

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average _.
monthly average
monthly average

Paid

20,759 10 $2, 157
2,333
22,901
2,593
25,085
2,809
26,335
3,068
28,831
3,274
30, 605
3,359
31, 337
3,381
31, 445

Foreign*
Weight
dispatched
(fi)

Issued

Number

Value

Number

Value

Thousands

Thous.
of dolls.

Thousands

Thousands of
dollars

$2, 525
2,598
2,684
2,898
2,860
3,367
5,051
5,914

$13, 543
14, 611
17,066
18,380
20,688

AIR
MAIL

POSTAL MONEY ORDERS

6,313
7,248
7,149
6,784
7,773
8,098

$34, 812
40,592
44,863
50,587
65,356
72, 432

1,315
1,470
1, 610
1,711
1,895
2, 059

4,898
6,851
7,233
7,386
7,664
8,202
8,141
7,557

8,211
9,409
10, 391
10, 797
11, 161
11,008
11, 120
11,048

64,827
68,462
78,913
84, 515
81,288
87,304
86, 491
86,344

11, 014
11, 145
9,627
10,183

Pounds

ADVERTISING

Radios

Magazine

Newspaper »
Lineage
(6)
Thous.
of lines

Use of
facilities

Cost 7

Thousands of
dollars

1 224
1,137
1,144
1 373
1,490
1 351

Thous.
of lines

$11, 467
12, 702
14,657
17,837
21, 713
25, 017

$8, 526
6,781
4,464
3,667
3,230
3,151
3, 030
2,390

1,913
2,458

61,440
62, 671
61,067
83, m
95,832

2,107
2,340
2,684
2,981
3,105
3,175
3,292
3,425

23,351
24,544
28,005
29,831
31,094
33,176
34,060
34, 819

1,877
2,282
3,531
4,306
4,669
5,579
5,906
6,006

» 19, 948
88,792
295, 186

1,596
1,633
1,935
2,004
2,178
2, 443
2,482
2, 508

$12, 871
14, 787
15,901
15, 919

$852

86,661
91, 131
97,402
96,469
101, 916
105, 989
92,936
98,996

86, 110
85, 280
76,227
81, 180

3,461
3,382
3,180
3,165

35, 277
34, 263
32, 812
32,886

5,169
5,777
5,246
5,564

199,409
210, 957
214, 558
419, 047

2,986
2,630
2,193
1,755

18,414
16,500
14,210
11, 437

776
680
640
676

105, 114
97, 092
81, 244
83,354

9,748
12, 020
11, 591
12,841

79,877
99,310
94,191
100, 025

2,879
3,669
3,480
3,950

32, 382
37, 554
35, 711
39,046

6,142
5,405
5,864
12, 476

423,991
465, 635
424, 465
541, 561

2,279
2,871
2,845
2,580

14, 349
19, 595
18, 141
15, 479

814
1,362
1,158
1,084

99, 807
112, 783
110, 012
105, 516

10, 967
10, 377
12, 624
11, 825

83,154
77, 387
93, 937
90,423

3,626
3,480
3,959
3,851

36, 025
34, 621
38, 840
38, 188

5,790
5,255
5,686
5,198

488, 709
433,941
523, 414
508, 672

2,093
2,454
2,877
3,282

12,220
15,706
17,438
20,445

1,258
1,372
1,610
1,550

97,443
90, 261
112, 033
108, 401

11, 693
11, 223

90, 363
86, 958

3,702
3,545

38, Oil
36, 198

5,500

1, 159, 892

3,120
2,346

19, 310
17, 756
15, 437

1,563
1,309

113, 242
101, 200

1928
May.
June
July
August
September
October— __
November
December

1939
January
February __ _
March
April

31, 589
29,990
26,508
27, 951

__

May
June..
July
August
September
October
November
December. _

3,074
3,583
3,202
4,331

31, 615
29,993
34, 375
32, 352

3,466
3,326
3,537
3,454

32, 446
29,280
29,069

_

3,276
3,094
2,956
3,115

29,261
34,196
31, 713
39,972

_

3,339
3,061
3,189

8,198

6,301

7,059

7,332

_.
i

1 Data from U, S. Post Office Department, comprising receipts for transporting all classes of mail. The 50 selected cities cover the largest cities in the country, the
industrial cities comprising the 50 most representative industrial cities in the next largest group. The war revenue act of Oct. 3,1917, provided for an increase in the rate for
first-class letter mail from 2 cents per ounce^or fraction thereof prior to Nov. 1,1917, to 3 cents per ounce or fraction thereof, from Nov. 1, 1917, to July 1, 1919, and an increase
of the rate on postal and post cards from 1 cent to 2 cents each during the same period. Since July 1, 1919, the old rates on first-class mail have been restored. Under this
act a stamp tax of 1 cent for each 25 cents postage charge or fraction thereof is collectible on parcel-post matter. Effective Apr. 15, 1925, the new postal rates applicable almost
entirely to matter other than first class have operated to increase the magnitude of these data, thereby affecting their comparability from this point forward.
2
Note that these data from U. S. Post Office Department represent quarters ending in the months specified and the annual figures represent quarterly averages for each
year, not monthly averages. Second-class mail comprises regular mailings of periodicals. The war revenue act of Oct. 3. 1917, provided for a series of graduated annual rate
increases on second-class mail as follows, compared with a flat rate of 1 cent per pound previous to July 1,1918. From July 1, 1918, to June 30, 1919, 1^ cents, and since July
1, 1919, \y% cents per pound, these changes applying regardless of zone or distance, to portions of publications devoted to reading matter. For the advertised portions the
country was divided into eight zones, each with a graduated rate and its corresponding annual increase, beginning with July 1, 1918, and reaching the maximum on July
1,1921, making, for the first time, a differentiation between the rates on reading and advertising matter.
3
Total of 50 cities transacting two-thirds of the total money-order business of the country from the U. S. Post Office Department. Money orders paid include, in addition to those both issued and payable in the 50 cities, those presented for payment but issued at any of the other offices in the United States and the 22 foreign countries,
mostly in North America and West Indies, to which domestic postage rates apply.
4
Money orders issued to 67 principal foreign countries, representing practically the total international money orders issued by 17. S. Post Office Department.
« Compiled by the 17. S. Post Office Department, showing total weight of mails dispatched. Monthly figures since the inauguration of the air mail in February, 1928,
appeared in the June, 1928, issue (No. 82), p. 22. Details for each route showing miles of route and service, frequency of trips, and payments to contractors are given in the
department's monthly statistical report on air mail.
6
Compiled by Printer's Ink and represents magazine advertising lineage of leading magazines of the country. The data for the last four years cover the lineage in
identical magazines. For earlier years the magazines covered are not entirely identical but represent the field with equal thoroughness.
7
Compiled by the Denny Publishing Co. and published in National Advertising Records. Data on magazine advertising represent the grand total cost of all advertising
for all classes in national magazines.
8
Data on radio broadcasting include only the National Broadcasting System and Columbia Broadcasting System and cover charges for use of facilities only, talent not
being included.
8
Compiled by the New York Evening Post from 22 identical cities: New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Detroit, Cleveland, St. Louis, Boston, Baltimore, Los Angeles,
Buffalo, San Francisco, Milwaukee, Washington, Cincinnati, New Orleans, Minneapolis, Indianapolis, Columbus, Louisville, St. Paul, Birmingham, and Houston. For
the years 1916 to 1918 no reports were available for Boston, Louisville, Houston, and Columbus. The totals for those years were computed from the actual reports of the,
18 other cities, allowing 13.85 per cent of the total to the four missing cities, the average ratio of those cities to the total in the subsequent years.
 10 6 months' average, July to December, inclusive.
» 11 months' average, February to December, inclusive.



117
Table 96.—MAIL-ORDER AND CHAIN-STORE SALES
MAIL-ORDER HOUSE SALES 1

Total, 3
houses

YEAR AND MONTH

Sears, Roe- Montgombuck & Co. ery Ward
&€o.

FIVE AND TEN 2

GROCERIES 2
With
seasonal
correction

Actual

Actual

With
seasonal
correction

SHOE 2

DRUG*

Actual

With
seasonal
correction

Actual

With
seasonal
correction

Relative to 1923-1925 average

Thousands of dollars
i

76
91
86
86
93
101
106
113
115
125

$30, 332
30,409
21, 162
22,887
29, 182
32, 075
36,870
39, 330
41,275
48, 277

$21,494
21, 216
14,832
15, 181
17, 962
18, 515
21,529
22,725
24,408
28,914

$8,838
9,193
6,330
7,706
11,220
13,560
15, 341
16,605
16, 867
19,363

45
66
59
69
85
97
118
143
174
208

35,237
35,150
41, 147
40,648

22,080
20,966
23,254
24,091

13, 157
14,184
17, 893
16, 557

155
148
174
172

157
155
163
168

96
104
116
135

130
133
128
137

134
129
143
144

140
139
139
144

82
84
96
150

111
121
104
117

May
June
July
August

33, 742
36,039
32, 967
37, 795

19,994
19,341
20,961
23,970

13, 748
16, 698
12,006
13,825

171
178
166
170

171
178
176
179

123
123
121
130

132
135
139
140

134
136
141
140

137
138
144
139

109
118
109
101

99
108
124
121

September
October
November
December

40,987
50,869
51,229
59, 494

24,609
29,302
29,847
34,486

16, 378
21,567
21,382
25,008

171
190
188
204

182
187
185
188

128
153
146
279

141
144
140
147

137
151
144
182

141
152
152
148

108
121
118
178

115
112
112
130

1928
January
February _ _
March
April

37, 465
38,392
41, 787
40,100

24,240
23,842
23,986
24,159

13,225
14,550
17,801
15,941

187
193
227
202

189
194
213
203

104
115
133
135

140
142
142
147

146
148
163
155

153
153
158
161

87
86
117
130

118
120
119
109

40,074
44,848
40,253
45,994

24,203
25, 669
26,276
28,986

15, 871
19, 179
13,977
17,008

214
208
197
204

206
209
208
215

139
139
128
136

144
153
148
147

164
162
163
169

161
164
167
169

130
147
116
110

113
134
132
132

50,814
63,587
61, 628
74,386

30,004
37,002
36, 172
42, 434

20,810
26,585
25,456
31, 952

202
230
219
221

224
218
215
211

144
164
158
305

165
148
151
164

164
169
169
224

177
164
178
190

131
126
130
184

146
113
123
140

47,400
46,396
53, 413
55,619

29,271
27,741
30,796
34,046

18,129
18,655
22,617
21, 573

224
229
237
232

219
240
231
224

112
122
156
142

146
157
167
153

179
170
196
186

178
183
197
187

102
88
159
123

132
127
161
103

55,006
57, 702
53, 309

35,126
35,748
33,501

19,880
21,954
19, 808

234
222

226
232

166
153

172
174

195
197

192
208

144
161

124
153

1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926

montlily average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

W8 monthly averige

64
78
79
82
93
98
109
126
143
166

53
64
66
74
88
99
113
125
138
150

1927
January
February
March
April

-

May
June _
July
August

_ .
_ _

Sfiptembor
October
November
December

_ _ _

1929

January
February
* March
April

_

May.
June
July .
August... .

September..
October
November
December. _

_ _ _ _

i

_

1
2

j

_ __ _
_ __

Sales of two principal mail-order houses include Sears, Roebuck & Co., and Montgomery Ward & Co.
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, from reports of the following stores in-1927: 34 grocery chains with 29,433 stores and $1,359,371,361 in sales, 14 ten-cent chains with 2,944 stores and $560,773,589 in sales, 13 drug chains with 936 stores and $120,222,701 in sales, 7 shoe chains with 625 stores and $43,^83,331
in sales. In the earlier years the number of chains was generally less, but the data are all related to the sales of the same chains in the base period; figures relate to reporting
firms—with no adjustment to eliminate the influence of increase in the number of stores operated. The seasonal adjustment allows for number of working-days in the month
(excluding Sundays and 6 national holidays), and seasonal eliminations are complted by the ratio-to-moving-average method; allowance is also made for the variation in the
date of Easter, in the case of 5 and 10 cent store chains. Complete description of this index is given in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for April, 1928, pp. 232-242. Monthly
data from 1919 appeared in the May 1928, issue of the SURVEY (No. 81), p. 20,




118
Table 97.—TEN-CENT CHAIN STORES
TOTALS
(4 chains)
YEAE AND
MONTH

Sales

Stores

F. W.
WOOLWORTH
CO.

Sales

Stores

S.S.KRESGE McCRORY
STORES
CO.
CORP.

S. H. KRESS
CO.

METROPOLITAN

V.&W.
GRAND

W. T. GRANT
CO.

Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores Sales Stores

Thous. Num- Thous. Num- Thous. Num- Thous. Num- Thous. Num- Thous. NumThous.
Thous.
of dolls. Number of dolls. Number of dolls. ber of dolls. ber of dolls. ber of dolls. ber of dolls. ber of dolls. ber

1913 rno. av
1914 mo. av
1915 mo. av
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av
1920 mo. av

$7, 972
8,544
9,582
11,278
12, 806
14, 520
16, 575
19, 575

1,008
1,090
1,185
1,343
1,452
1,500
1,545
1,600

$5, 519
5,801
6,333
7, 257
8,174
8,931
9,958
11, 741

684
737
805
920
1,000
1,039
1,081
1,111

$1, 105
1,341
1,745
2,200
2,508
3,026
3,556
4,270

100
118
140
161
165
169
171
188

$450
411
468
566
655
800
957
1,198

110
116
117
132
143
147
148
156

$898
991
1,036
1, 255
1,469
1,763
2,104
2,415

114
119
123
130
144
145
145
145

$478
868

119
145

$661
735

1921 mo. av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av
1924 mo. av
1925 mo. av
1926 mo. av
1927 mo. a v
1928 mo. av

20,561
23, 344
27, 555
30, 922
35, 038
38, 111
41, 993
44, 979

1,637
1,694
1,813
1,956
2,065
2,220
2,427
2,655

12, 302
13, 934
16, 120
17,956
19, 912
21, 137
22, 729
23,942

1,137
1,176
1,261
1,364
1,420
1,484
1,588
1,727

4,655
5,433
6,820
7,508
8,831
9,935
11, 147
12, 280

199
212
233
256
298
368
435
506

1,195
1,423
1,781
2,103
2,465
2,801
3,278
3,419

159
161
167
176
181
199
221
228

2,409
2,554
2,834
3,355
3,830
4,323
4,838
5,421

142
145
152
160
166
169
183
194

538
520
615
652
732
917
1,023
1,130

84
83
68
68
72
81
91
109

1937
Mav
June
July
August

37,560
37, 451
36, 901
39, 514

2,300
2,314
2,335
2,349

20, 916
20,407
20, 175
21, 400

1,528
1,533
1,546
1,552

9,602
10, 064
9,791
10, 513

392
398
404
409

2,879
2,869
2,877
3,037

208
211
213
214

4, 163
4,111
4,058
4,564

172
172
172
174

855
903
864
965

September
October
November . ._
December

38, 744
46, 519
44,249
84,981

2,371
2,396
2,415
2,427

20, 744
26, 034
23, 730
43, 898

1,568
1,584
1,588
1,588

10, 422
12,084
12, Oil
23,044

413
419
427
435

3,022
3,332
3,236
6,857

215
217
219
221

4,556
5,069
5,272
11, 182

175
176
181
183

1928
January
February
March
April.

31, 895
35, 358
40, 447
39, 763

2,431
2,446
2,467
2,476

17, 108
18, 992
21,840
21, 936

1,591
1,603
1,619
1,624

8,658
9,320
10, 855
10, 784

436
439
443
445

2,369
2,870
3,122
3,059

221
221
222
222

3,760
4,176
4,630
4,984

May
June
July
August--

42, 233
42, 099
38,764
41,050

2,488
2,509
2,526
2,552

22,998
22,400
20,587
21,812

1,634
1,652
1,658
1,675

11, 340
11, 834
10,583
11, 272

449
450
460
468

2,972
3,099
2,951
3,116

221
223
224
224

September. _. _.
October
'.___
November
December.

42,906
48, 992
46,799
89, 445

2,586
2,615
2,637
2,655

22,637
26, 895
24,660
45, 439

1,698
1,718
1,725
1,727

11,914
12,925
13, 034
24,844

474
481
492
506

3,344
3,471
3,444
7,216

1929
January
February .
March
April

33, 511
36, 351
46, 138
41, 652

2,659
2,681
2,695
2,711

17, 658
19, 374
24,528
22,061

1,728
1,742
1,750
1,759

9,019
9,774
12,567
11,368

509
515
517
523

49, 202
44, 401
42,604

2,728
2,744
2,767

28,578
23, 609
22, 522

1,767
1,775
1,789

12, 345
12, 572
11, 687

531
537
542

May
June.
July
August -.

19
19

$253
301
370
495
644
845

22
25
30
32
33
38

305
360
452
548
711
875
1,074
1,430

19
22
23
28
37
41
55
82

1,051
1,257
1,695
2,070
2,514
2,995
3,610
4,582

45
50
58
70
77
106
151
184

83
86
86
90

935
1,018
913
947

53
53
53
54

3,160
3,299
3,018
3,114

117
119
121
126

977
1,120
1,089
2,349

90
90
91
91

1,005
1,223
1,140
2,267

55
55
55
55

3,282
4,275
4,366
8,205

130
135
145
151

183
183
183
185

692
752
912
918

91
91
93
93

800
901
1,128
1,172

62
63
64
65

2,624
2,843
3,706
3,656

158
158
161
172

4,923
4,766
4,639
4,850

184
184
184
185

971
1,027
908
985

93
94
96
97

1,153
1,259
1,205
1,236

66
70
73
74

4,096
4,366
3,731
3,996

175
181
191
191

224
224
226
228

5,011
5,701
5,661
11, 946

190
192
194
194

1,116
1,232
1,271
2,774

100
104
106
109

1,443
1,756
1,719
3,388

76
80
81
82

4,708
5,418
5,515
10,328

199
203
207
213

2,691
2,845
3,735
3,160

229
231
234
235

4,143
4,358
5,308
5,063

193
193
194
194

798
883
1,138
1,141

109
109
11
1
112

1,096
1,175
1,712
1,588

83
83
83
86

3,328
3,516
5,141
4,421

218
221
222
226

3,263
3,335
3,300

236
238
239

5,016
4,885
5,095

194
194
197

1,360
1,467
1,337

117
120
123

1,688
1,889
1,635

88
89
90

5,089
5,374
4,524

227
241
241

September
October
November
December
1
This table is submitted in response to a demand for publication of the figures of sales of the large individual ten-cent chains, as compiled from published reports in
financial papers or as reported directly by the companies. Sales data represent the retail sales in dollar values of the ten-cent chains shown, while the annual figures of stores
operated represent not an average of stores in operation for the year, but the stores operated at the end of each year. Monthly data on sales for some of these chains from
1920 appeared in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 111. Many of the companies listed above do not limit the sales prices of their individual articles to 10 cents, some selling
articles valued as high as $1, but they all come within the broad classification popularly known as "ten-cent stores."
2
Includes F. W. Woolworth, S. S. Kresge Co., McCrory Stores Corporation, and S. H. Kress Co.




119
Table 98.—RESTAURANT AND OTHER CHAIN STORES
OTHER CHAIN STORES

RESTAURANT CHAINS
Total, 3
chains

Waldorf Sys-

Childs Co.

tem, Inc.

J. R. Thompson Co.

Isaac Silver &
Bros.

J. C. Penney
Co. (clothing)

G. C. Murphy
Co.

YEAR AND MONTH
Sales

Stores

Sales

Stores

Sales

Stores

Sales

Stores

Sales Stores

Sales

Thousof dolls.

Number

Thousof dolls.

Number

Thous. Numof dolls. ber

Thous.
of dolls.

66
83
96
99
102
102
104

Thous.
of dolls.

Num- Thousber of dolls.

Number

$3, 681

2G5

$710
718
756
898
1, 141
1,228
1,384
1,828

79
83
86
88
91
86
83
86

$790

75

$375
448
571
696
746
937
1,063

3,954
4,224
4,555
4,576
4,679
4,964
4,843
4, 631

284
318
334
343
350
358
370
371

2,110
2,127
2, 308
2,298
2,367
2,493
4,400
2,198

95
101
107
113
114
115
119
113

820
1,127
1, 263
1, 237
1,229
1, 272
1,247
1,219

87
114
123
125
126
131
131
134

1,023
970
984
1,041
1,083
1,199
1,196
1,215

102
103
104
105
110
112
120
124

2 $170
202
233
266
329
397
468
555

26

May
June
July
August _

4,849
4,625
4,565
4,862

362
362
362
364

2,402
2,281
2,256
2,463

119
118
118
119

1,225
1,171
1,154
1,217

131
131
131
131

1,222
1,173
1,155
1,183

112
113
113
114

September
October
November
December

4,844
4,893
4,699
5,082

366
366
367
370

2,437
2,378
2,275
2,490

120
119
117
119

1,246
1,291
1,239
1,330

131
131
131
131

1,161
1,224
1,185
1,262

4,808
4,512
4,785
4,561

369
368
368
368

2,346
2,188
2,286
2,171

118
119
117
118

1,227
L160
1,261
1,183

131
131
131
131

4,629
4,429
4,280
4,577

367
369
369
369

2,132
2,041
2,012
2,217

116
117
116
116

1,241
1,180
1,105
1,170

4,590
4,802
4,617
4,987

366
367
369
371

2,190
2,266
2,160
2,369

113
110
112
113

January _
February
March
April

4,707
4,470
5,027
4,944

375
373
372
372

2,184
2,095
2,355
2,247

May .
June
July
August

5,025
4,762

375
375

2,261
2,177
2,259

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average __
1920 monthly average

__
_ __ _

|[l921 monthly average... _
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average..
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average.. __
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average

__

Stores Sales

Stores

Num- Thous. Number of dolls. ber

$220
297
402
701
1,240
1,778
2,398
3,569

45
67
80
117
165
192
197
312

$120
171

45
53

8
10
12
14
19
19
31

3,887
4,086
5,183
6,188
7,539
9,640
12,664
14, 725

313
371
475
569
671
747
891
1,023

186
225
329
419
540
713
853
1,010

63
62
75
85
88
92
113
133

410
430
415
394

21
21
21
21

11, 632
11, 617
10, 442
11,000

838
842
842
854

733
732
735
736

98
100
103
107

115
116
119
120

430
509
513
1,065

22
22
19
19

13, 727
17, 166
17,063
21,800

884
889
890
891

771
875
865
2,064

108
111
115
113

1,235
1,164
1,245
1,207

120
118
120
119

312
388
480
. 466

22
23
23
23

7,729
8,911
13, 160
12,994

914
915
931
946

598
673
788
930

113
113
111
111

131
131
132
132

1,256
1,209
1,163
1,190

120
121
121
121

469
517
462
460

23
25
26
26

14,831
14,129
11,734
12,886

953
953
953
981

896
881
796
873

115
116
116
118

1,215
1,267
1,250
1,363

132
134
134
134

1,185
1,269
1,207
1,255

121
123
123
124

512
610
632
1,305

29
30
31
31

16, 477
19,443
19, 301
25,104

1,006
1,020
1,021
1,023

1,046
1,056
1,132
2,450

119
120
130
133

113
112
112
112

1,299
1,228
1,388
1,338

138
136
136
136

1,224
1,147
1,284
1,359

124
125
124
124

365
441
615
566

31
32
32
36

8,621
9,028
15, 381
14,406

1,023
1,026
1,082
1,105

814
910
1,199
1,112

140
139
140
142

114
114
114

1,361
1,272
1,258

137
137

1,403
1,313

124
124

566
613
650

37
39
41

16,090
17, 121
14,554

1,109
1,215
1,215

1,192
1.229
1,148

143
145
145

1937

1938
January
February
March
April

Mav
June
July
August

_

September
October
November
December

_

1939

September
October
November... _
December ..

__ _

_ _

_
_ _

j
1

!

1 Data compiled from published reports in financial papers or reported directly by the company to the U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census These
sales data represent money values. Monthly data for Childs Co., including the operations of Boos Bros., since January, 1920 (comparable to present series), were given
in the July, 1927, issue (No. 71), p. 21. Data for the Waldorf System include sales of the Ginter Co. and its predecessors from the middle of 1922 until its absorption
into the Waldorf System in 1927, the 1922 average including undistributed estimate for the Ginter Co. for the first five months of that year. Monthly data on this
basis appeared in the September, 1927, issue (No. 73), p. 21, while data for 1920 through 1922 for Waldorf System alone appeared in the October, 1923, issue (No. 26), pp. 58
and 59. Monthly data for Penney, from 1920 were given in May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 111. Monthly data for G. C. Murphy Co. appear on p. 23 of the February, 1928,
issue (No. 78). Yearly data represent number of stores in operation at end of the year indicated.
2
7 months' average, June to December, inclusive.




120
Table 99.—DEPARTMENT-STORE SALES
INSTALLMENT
SALES 3

VALUE OF SALES, BY FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICTS 1
United States

YEAR AND MONTH

Unad- Boston
Adjusted justed

New
York

RichSt. Minne- Kansas
mond Atlanta Chicago Louis apolis City 2 Dallas

Phila- Clevedelphia land

San
Francisco

Per cent
to total

Relative to 1923-1925 average
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

78
94
87
88
98
99
103
106
107
108

monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average. _
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

New
England

78
91
89
92
98
100
102
105
106
104

76
91
87
89
96
99
105
109
111
112

79
93
89
91
101
99
100
102
98
96

77
98
86
87
100
99
101
103
105
103

84
93
89
86
97
99
104
107
105
106

94
113
96
90
100
98
102
106
107
107

81
84
99
98
103
109
110
117

90
89
99
98
103 .
105
103
104

93
105
97
93
99
99
102
99
97
87

95
100
95
95
97

98
117
97
90
96
100
104
109
106
108

68
83
79
83
96
99
105
110
113
117

5.2
6.2
6.7
7.2

1926
September.
October
November
December

109
109
106
110

101
123
121
184

97
120
119
182

104
134
129
196

88
119
124
180

97
121
113
177

91
127
132
197

89
124
123
181

111
121
120
182

105
126
122
172

103
107
101
152

98
103
107
164

109
127
121
178

109
118
116
193

5.8
5.5
7.8
3.7

1927
January
February
March__ _
April

106
107
105
105

89
83
100
111

103
78
97
111

96
85
99
112

80
78
94
103

85
83
98
116

84
78
99
110

85
88
99
109

85
89
104
115

7»
83
98
108

81
76
92
104

80
76
89
98

87
86
97
109

96
85
109
115

10.5
8.0
5.4
5.1

103
103
104
111

102
102
75
89

101
110
74
84

102
109
74
84

94
97
65
73

105
99
78
93

103
100
72
80

108
99
76
86

106
107
79
95

96
93
68
90

91
91
75
92

88
86
68
83

112
95
69
80

107
95
89
114

5.2
4.3
6.0
11.2

September
October
November
December __

108
106
107
111

100
119
122
186

99
115
120
182

106
128
134
201

83
'109
120
174

95
113
112
176

91
121
125
195

97
128
119
191

107
122
125
188

97
127
120
177

93
109
100
155

96
106
110
165

105
125
120
189

111
119
121
195

7.5
7.0
6.7
3.9

1928
January. _
February
March
April..

104
105
104
103

88
86
103
102

98
78
96
99

94
89
102
103

75
76
96
91

85
85
101
101

81
82
105
99

85
91
110
102

90
92
109
109

82
85
105
99

72
72
91
82

80
77
93
93

89
88
109
102

98
92
110
114

8.6
8.2
6.3
4.8

May
June
July
August.

103
105
107
105

108
104
78
85

101
111
76
78

109
112
77
78

95
96
65
65

106
100
78
85

106
102
75
78

114
98
77
86

118
113
86
96

104
94
73
83

90
84
68
80

94
84
71
85

116
98
71
80

116
101
94
116

5.0
4.6
5.7
12.1

September
October
November
December _

119
105
106
116

107
124
122
189

97
119
119
181

111
135
134
206

89
115
114
174

101
112
110
174

96
125
127
197

98
123
120
180

124
130
132
200

107
119
119
175

96
88
89
137

102
110
111
168

112
125
126
184

113
129
118
200

8.2
9.0
7.5
6.2

1929
January
February
March
April.

105
110
113
105

92
86
110
104

96
76
101
97

97
90
111
109

78
75
99
90

86
83
105
105

82
78
114
102

89
87
113
104

97
95
120
110

81
85
110
99

77
75
101
93

83
76
102
99

90
85
115
105

106
91
115
111

10.4
10.2
7.1
6.3

107
112

110
106

108
108

113
116

93
95

108
103

109
107

107
93

121
117

105
96

97
90

95
87

115
97

120
100

6.1
4.1

May
June.
July
August

_

Mav
June
July.
August

September
October
November
December

__

|
1
i
I
!

i Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, from reports of about 525 department stores located in 225 cities, with total annual sales of
over$2,000,000,000. The index numbers are based upon aggregate values. The index for the United States as a whole is also shown as adjusted to allow for seasonal variations, differences in number of trading days, and variations in sales attributable to the movable Easter. Monthly data from 1919 appeared in the April, 1928, issue
(No. 80), pp. 20 and 21, while a complete description of the methods of compilation may be found in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for February, 1928.
»1925 monthly average=100.
8
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston from reports of selected department stores in New England.




121

Table 100.—DEPARTMENT-STORE STOCKS
VALUE OF STOCKS AT END OF MONTH, BY FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICTS
United States

AdUn- Boston
justed adjusted

YEAK AND MONTH

New
York

San
St. Minne- Kansas
Phila- Cleve- Richdelphia land mond Atlanta Chicago Louis apolis City 2 Dallas Francisco
Relative to 1923-1925 average

99
100
114
113
115

89
120
97
91
97
102
101
95
88
82

74
96
85
88
97
102
101
104
106
106

97
99
99
80

119
126
125
100

100
103
100
79

107
113
118
97

90
95
102
103

81
87
94
95

96
109
116
115

77
85
92
93

97
102
109
110

106
97
95
101

102
97
95
97

91
84
83
87

112
104
101
116

90
83
79
88

107
103
101
103

107
112
115
90

112
118
120
97

108
112
112
93

94
97
97
78

123
129
128
102

96
97
98
74

108
113
119
100

89
96
103
104

92
101
105
108

95
102
110
112

84
93
96
98

78
84
87
89

98
111
118
116

75
83
86
87

98
105
111
111

100
94
91
95

100
95
91
92

103
96
93
95

108
100
98
105

96
91
87
93

83
79
78
81

116
108
106
118

83
76
72
83

108
103
101
104

92
101
104
83

100
108
111
91

102
116
118
96

104
109
110
91

114
124
128
102

98
104
104
86

84
87
86
72

123
129
128
104

88
92
92
70

106
113
116
95

97
99
107
110

78
85
90
90

84
91
97
100

89
94
100
102

88
98
101
103

98
106
113
114

82
86
91
93

71
75
78
78

101
122
122
124

71
79
83
84

92
98
106
107

107
101

87
83

98
92

99
94

100
94

112
105

91
88

75
70

121
112

81
72

103
77

82
82
93
103
104
105
101
94

90
111
94
93
99
100
101
96
89
82

107
116
116
95

111
118
117
96

90
100
108
110

94
101
106
107

104
98
94
93

103
92
91
96

107
112
116
93

107
118
122
97

88
93
98
97

89
96
103
103

104
99
96
100

93
87
85
86

98
107
113
95

106
117
122
101

89
95
102
103

89
91
99
102

101
95

101
94

79
105
89
89
98
101
102
103
103
101

83
97
88
94
100
100
100
100
103
100

79
108
92
92
98
99
103
106
104
104

63
77
83
89
98
101
101
100
99
9

77
106
90
86
97
102
101
101
101
98

82
107
88
90
101
100
99
102
103
100

82
113
98
96
103
101
96
98
101
101

82
82
98
99
103
103
104
108

102
104
103
102

107
114
117
96

103

IS
98

109
116
121
101

103
113
118
98

106
113
117
94

106
117
119
96

103
110
108
88

January
February
March
April

104
103
103
103

93
98
107
107

91
95
105
107

98
97
107
109

91
95
105
103

87
96
105
106

91
97
107
107

May
June
July
August

102
101
102
102

104
98
95
98

106
99
95
94

105
98
95
99

98
92
89
91

102
98
93
97

104
104
104
103

108
114
117
96

106
113
118
101

109
116
117
99

101
111
114
95

103
103
101
101

92
98
105
106

93
97
105
107

96
97
105
108

May
June „ „
July
August -

100
99
100
101

102
96
93
97

106
97
91
91

September -_
October
November.,
December

99
102
102
99

103
112
115
94

100
100
99
99
99
98

1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average _ .
1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average -1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average

_ .

1926
September
October
November _
December

__ _

1927

September
October
November
December .

..

1938
January
February
March
April

-.

1929
January
February
March _ _
April

May
June
July
August
September...
October
November
December
_ „ __

___

__

i Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, from reports of about 430 department stores, with 1925 stocks averaging $570,000,000 in the
aggregate. The index numbers are based upon aggregate values. The index for the United States as a whole is also shown as adjusted to allow for seasonal variations.
Monthly data from 1919 appeared in the April, 1928, issue (No. 80), pp. 20 and 21, while a complete description of the methods of compilation may be found in the Federal
PA««nt7« Bulletin for February, 1928.
Reserve "Rnll«tin fr>r PAhmarv 1Q9«
3
1925 monthly average=100.




122
Table 101.—WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTION1
UNADJUSTED
Total
sales,

YEAR AND MONTH

lines

ADJUSTED FOR SEASONAL VARIATION

FurFur- Total, GroGroDry Men's Boots
Dry Men's Boots
8
cer- Meats goods cloth- and Hard- Drugs nicer- Meats goods cloth- and Hard- Drugs niture
ing shoes ware
ture lines
ing shoes ware
ies
ies
Index numbers relative to 1923-1925
l[

1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly average
monthly average. _ _ __
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average _
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

111
115
87
89
100
98
102
101
97
96

118
126
93
93
100
101
99
98
94
95

145
121
80
83
94
96
110
115
108
113

100
107
91
89
103
97
100
94
89
85

78
106
72
80
99
98
103
95
92
91

140
125
99
97
104
98
98
101
104
98

96
116
80
86
102
97
101
100
95
93

91
95
86
87
97
99
104
107
108
113

73
85
102
93
105
102
100
98

118
111
101
87

109
107
102
94

125
123
112
106

122
104
98
71

148
105
61
44

126
113
104
76

109
109
100
93

116
125
112
100

117
121
112
95

103
96
101
98

100
95
96
96

117
110
116
113

97
90
99
89

97
83
82
87

103
90
99
94

January
February
March
April..

88
91
102
92

86
81
94
90

113
107
104
104

78
88
95
76

65
123
138
85

92
87
111
100

82
82
102
96

102
95
117
108 '

86
98
114
97

95
97
98
95

93
93
96
95

113
112
108
111

83
87
90
86

84
97
101
87

112
110
97
94

May
June
July
\ugust

91
91
91
112

95
101
92
97

109
106
104
111

76
78
81
125

52
46
78
165

111
85
107
122

93
96
90
98

98
99
100
110

93
90
84
111

97
96
96
102

97
98
91
97

109
104
102
109

87
88
88
102

87
90
90
101

September
October
November
December _ _

113
108
97
85

102
102
100
90

117
122
101
103

113
99
88
70

140
101
61
48

127
114
110
82

106
105
98
90

122
128
113
99

117
118
105
83

98
94
97
95

94
90
94
92

109
109
105
109

91
86
89
87

January
February
March
April

88
93
100
88

85
85
95
88

106
108
105
105

85
89
87
70

76
128
131
75

94
87
111
99

82
82
95
88

106
101
121
113

78
96
107
88

96
99
96
92

93
98
97
93

106
113
109
112

May___
June
July
August.

93
89
90
110

96
97
92
101

109
114
113
118

75
71
74
110

57
39
68
148

114
77
98
119

97
96
90
95

110
104
102
115

87
83
78
108

99
92
94
101

99
94
91
100

September
October
NovemberDecember _

111
112
99
84

100
108
100
88

130
125
117
108

105
99
90
69

137
123
66
51

110
108
105
59

100
108
98
86

119
134
114
120

126
133
106
89

96
97
99
95

1929
January.,
February ._
March.
April.

93
90
101
96

91
83
90
92

117
113
117
115

84
84
92
80

74
114
136
85

98
84
110
100

82
76
95
99

131
105
119
118

80
91
105
101

96
91

96
95

121
119

78
70

60
49

113
94

98
96

111
106

99
95

1926
September. __ _ _
October
__
November
December. _

109
108
111
107

104
101
107
101

92
93
98
94 .

104
103
106
106

98
98
101
96

110
90
134
111

91
92
92
97

104
106
105
112

98
102
102
109

92
81
86
93

104
91
105
101

99
94
100
97

114
111
112
106

103
99
100
89

89
88
83
78

99
99
94
77

115
110
96
94

92
93
91
86

108
110
110
111

89
96
95
87

109
112
111
116

86
79
80
90

96
76
79
90

113
82
123
109

94
92
91
94

117
110
107
117

92
94
95
106

92
95
94
89

122
111
122
115

84
85
91
86

89
99
95
101

90
87
100
72

92
97
100
93

112
116
113
128

112
112
101
94

101
%
97
100

99
95
91
96

117
119
122
123

88
83
88
90

96
88
98
88

119
107
95
95

92
86
92
97

133
114
108
116

91
91
93
100

102
97

99
92

121
122

89
79

101
96

112
100

95
93

118
113

104
108

101
97
102
100

1927

1928

May
June
July
___
August

i

September
October
November
December _ _

___
_

i

__ __
|

'

i

ii

1
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, Division of Research and Statistics, from reports of 298 firms on gr oeeries, 59 meat-packing companies on meats, 120 firms on
dry goods, 11 firms on men's clothing (for the New York district alone), 60 wholesale dealers and manufacturers on boots and shoes, 165 firms on hardware, 85 firms on drugs,
and 75 wholesalers and manufacturers on furniture, a total of 873 firms. Prior to 1923, fewer firms reported, bu t these differences are taken care of in the construction of
the index as percentages of the sales of identical firms between the given month and the base period (1923 to 1925). The various lines are weighted in accordance with the
manufactured value of the respective lines according to the censuses of manufacturers of 1923 and 1925. A compl ete description of the construction of this index, including
seasonal variations, is presented in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for December, 1927, p. 817; revisions made in Fe bruary, 1929, are described in the Federal Eeserve Bulletin
for March, 1929, p. 180. Monthly data from 1919 appeared in the January, 1928, issue (No. 77) of the SURVEY, p. 21.




123

Table 102.—LIFE INSURANCE—NEW BUSINESS AND PREMIUMSl
(Association of Life Insurance Presidents)
PREMIUM COLLECTIONS
(new and renewal)

NEW BUSINESS

Industrial

Ordinary

YEAR AND MONTH

Number
of
policies

Number
of
policies

Thousands of
dollars

Thousands of
dollars

Group

Ordinary

Total

Number Thouof certifi- sands of
dollars
cates 2

Number
of policies
and certificates

Thousands of
dollars

Indus- Group
trial

Total

Thousands of dollars

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

monthly average
_ __
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average
__ __
monthly average
monthly average.monthly average
monthly average

79,514
78, 779
83, 909
96, 311
110, 448
111,640
180, 261
205, 276

$141, 450
138, 225
146, 792
181, 418
210,087
219, 300
382, 644
464, 189

379, 819
410, 189
428, 559
414, 605
414, 443
433, 226
465, 248
499, 938

$51, 909
55, 217
58, 128
58, 645
61, 484
66, 099
77, 901
93,044

2,500
4,090
6,542
11, 739
25, 760
26, 266
39, 720
38, 491

$1, 736
3,790
3,927
6,560
14, 861
20, 555
35, 465
35, 478

461, 833
493, 059
519, Oil
522, 655
550, 650
571, 133
685, 229
743, 705

$195, 095
197, 231
208, 847
246, 623
286, 433
305, 953
496, 010
592, 711

$38, 953
40,506
42, 262
45, 721
50, 485
54, 579
64,348
75, 462

$10, 778
11, 580
12, 421
13, 280
14, 440
15, 807
18, 088
20, 342

$36
52
97
143
308
536
991
1,498

$49, 767
52, 138
54, 780
59, 144
65, 233
70, 922
83, 427
97, 302

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

monthly average
monthlv aver age __ _
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average _
monthly average
monthly average
monthly average

163, 313
166, 781
195, 841
196, 841
214, 168
219, 762
220, 145
248, 640

381, 688
419, 585
502, 495
532, 347
616, 551
650, 368
650, 367
683, 281

550, 065
582, 102
662, 259
703, 769
804, 380
782, 247
823, 700
866, 910

104, 813
118, 233
143, 338
163, 630
196, 598
213, 838
222, 278
224, 377

10, 299
21, 345
34, 847
29, 916
45, 533
62, 690
41, 749
46, 621

9,257
22, 885
43, 337
49, 814
83, 232
87,550
68, 698
111,361

723, 678
770,229
892, 946
930, 525
1, 064, 080
1, 064, 699
1, 085, 678
1, 162, 171

495, 758
560, 703
689, 170
745, 790
896, 381
951, 757
941, 343
1, 019, 019

81, 424
89, 242
99, 631
110, 287
125, 119
130, 882
145,026
156, 161

22, 587
25, 751
30, 057
34, 178
39, 119
44, 775
50, 189
55, 209

1,545
1,621
2,092
2,618
4,625
4,893
5,420
7,332

105, 556
116, 614
131, 779
147, 083
168, 863
180, 549
200, 635
218, 702

236, 063
239, 340
211, 711
214, 501

704, 807
702, 860
627, 787
631, 740

902, 343
816, 966
732, 665
781, 361

241, 662
221, 780
200, 835
211, 157

30, 805
41,042
29,100
30, 488

45, 683
67, 817
54, 229
43, 977

1, 169, 211
1, 097, 348
973, 476
1, 026, 350

992, 152
992, 457
882, 851
886, 874

145, 256
151, 009
140, 517
137, 510

45, 750
46, 584
47, 108
49, 220

4,954
5,164
5,123
5,327

195, 949
202, 757
192, 748
192, 057

188, 519
208, 630
206, 014
253, 007

531, 210
607, 237
586, 694
718, 793

745, 664
992, 140
940, 847
783, 539

200,622
265, 974
252, 738
211, 076

13, 496
23, 797
27, 628
124, 123

31, 475
48, 625
76, 960
165,025

947, 679
1, 224, 567
1, 174, 789
1, 160, 669

763, 307
921, 836
916, 392
1, 094, 894

131, 763
140, 041
145, 581
168, 114

45, 741
49, 272
48, 273
89, 926

4,317
5,792
4,862
6,448

181, 821
195, 105
198, 716
264,488

186, 026
214, 195
260, 349
230, 482

580, 462
655, 406
781, 122
710, 435

901, 786
846, 745
1, 049, 955
980, 796

236, 303
221, 949
273, 551
259, 962

26, 408
53,800
35, 788
36, 705

1, 114, 220
1, 114, 740
1, 346, 092
1, 247, 983

863, 606
968, 860
1, 112, 659
1, 032, 404

148, 947
154, 292
168, 961
157, 836

54,564
48, 193
51,013
50, 691

7,618
17, 623
6,465
5,928

211, 129
220, 108
226, 439
214, 455

280, 180
293, 224
249, 738
245, 081

757, 879
755, 699
660, 062
626, 594

839, 453
840, 312
753, 773
740, 371

216, 396
214, 882
194, 642
193, 365

48, 839
51, 895
38, 905
24, 605

205, 195
113,711
74, 196
56,926-

1, 168, 472
1, 185, 431
1, 042, 416
1, 010, 057

1, 179, 470
1, 084, 292
928,900
876, 885

165, 718
154, 916
152, 862
143, 386

52, 184
51, 509
53,072
50, 228

5,930
5,574
7,296
5,705

223, 832
211, 999
213, 230
199, 319

214, 010
263, 201
257, 589
289, 606

534, 112
659, 844
667, 633
810, 127

770, 416
946, 284
782, 026
951, 002

198, 949
233, 530
202, 948
246, 045

52, 943
18, 911
42, 358
128, 296

277, 943
72, 119
53, 569
224, 330

1, 037, 369
1, 228, 396
1, 081, 973
1, 368, 904

1, Oil, 004
965, 493
924, 150
1, 280, 502

135, 743
154, 489
155, 032
181, 752

49, 343
55, 961
49, 154
96,864

5,738
6,447
6,577
7,078

190, 824
216, 627
210, 763
285, 694

220,
238,
292,
284,

823
684
232
055

659, 843
683, 542
830, 244
793, 786

1, 051, 983
891, 644
1, 045, 058
964, 177

265, 998
230, 779
274, 824
256, 279

57, 921
26, 859
35, 986
47, 028

98, 637
58, 607
64,813
72, 238

1, 330, 727
1, 157, 187
1, 373, 276
1, 295, 260

1, 024, 478
972, 928
1, 169, 881
1, 122, 303

160, 867
160, 630
175, 645
172, 282

53,806
51, 956
56, 159
55,768

8,938
17,660
7,515
8,336

223, 611
230, 246
239, 319
236, 386

293, 458
277, 615

801, 698
750, 228

888,462
880, 770

240, 501
242, 166

45, 455
66, 353

109, 827
106,589

1, 227, 375
1, 224, 738

1, 152, 026
1,098,983

174, 278
158, 733

52, 218
55, 801

7,691
7,345

234, 187
221, 879

1927
May
June
July
August -

_

September
October
November _
December

_ _

_

_

__ _ _

1938
J anuary
February
March _
April

.
_

May
June
July _
August

_

September
October _
November
December. _

_
_

46, 841 |
91, 505
57, 986 1
62, 007 i

1929
January _ _
February
March
April.

May
June
_
July
August—

__ _

}

September
October
November
December
1 Compiled by the Association of Life Insurance Presidents, The data on new business represent only new business that has been paid for, exclusive of revivals,
increases, and dividend additions. Premium collections show the amount of money actually invested in life insurance each month, and include total premium collections,
new and renewal, and considerations for annuities and for supplementary contracts involving and not involving life contingencies. The 44 companies whose figures are
included in this table had in force 82 per cent of the total legal reserve life insurance outstanding in the United States as of Dec. 31,1927. Complete monthly data from
1921 were given in June, 1929, issue (No. 94), p. 19.
2
This column, by adding together the number of policies issued for ordinary and industrial insurance and the number of certificates issued under group insurance contracts, indicates the trend in number of persons covered by new insurance, but does not show the exact number of persons covered, since one person may have several
policies of ordinary insurance and in addition hold a certificate under a group contract.




124
Table 103.—LIFE INSURANCE—ASSETS AND NEW BUSINESS BY DISTRICTS
NEW BUSINESS, ORDINARY INSURANCE 2

ADMITTED ASSETS 1

Mortgage loans
YEAR AND
MONTH

Grand
total

Total

Bonds and stocks (book values)

All
Farm other Total

Policy
loans United Eastern Western Western
Far
manu- manuand
South- westGov- Rail- Pub- All pre- States, factur- factur- agricul- ern
total
lic
tural
ern
mium
ing
ing
ernment road utili- other notes
ties
Thousands of dollars

Millions of dollars

1921 mo av
1922 mo. av
1923 mo. av__
1924 mo. av._
1925 mo. av__
1926 mo. av..
1927 mo. av_.
1928 mo. av__

$7, 409
8,091
8,914
9,935
11, 043
12, 266

$2, 694
3,138
3,607
4,211
4,829
5,321

$1, 261
1,405
1,496
1,564
1,613
1,605

$1, 432
1,734
2,111
2,647
3,216
3,716

$3, 327
3,428
3, 653
3,887
4,151
4,641

$1, 219
1,119
1,053
971
922
934

$1, 750
1,849
1,975
2,117

1937
January
February
March
April

10,529
10,606
10, 713
10, 812

4,587
4,637
4,686
4,722

1,592
1,599
1,604
1,611

2,995
3,038
3,082
3,111

3,987
4,002
4,033
4,067

919
918
921
917

2,173
2,173
2,183

May .. _
June
July
August

10, 896
10, 982
11, 078
11, 172

4,764
4,806
4,847
4,898

1,615
1,617
1,620
1,622

3,149
3,189
3,227
3,276

4,085
4,117
4,152
4,192

914
915
920
923

September..
October
November _ _
December. __

11, 268
11,381
11, 484
11, 597

4,941
4,982
5, 019
5,062

1,620
1,621
1,620
1,618

3,321
3,361
3,399
3,444

4,216
4,262
4,323
4, 374

1938
January
February
March .
April

11, 704
11, 796
11, 893
12,001

5,103
5,129
5,153
5,199

1,615
1,613
1.604
1,602

3,488
3,516
3,549
3,597

May
June
Julv
August _ _ _

12, 107
12, 197
12, 312
12,406

5,241
5,292
5,338
5,382

1,601
1,600
1,601
1,602

September .. 12, 510
12, 634
October
November . _ 12, 742
December.. _ 12,889

5,429
5,484
6,517
5,580

1929
January
February
March
April

12, 982
13, 071
13, 173
13, 269
13, 373
13, 469

May
June
July
August

$425, 092

September
October
November
December

CANADIAN
SALES,
ORDINARY 3

$154, 321

$90, 152

459, 292
549, 296

174,242

98,380

208, 526

121, 194
128, 465
144, 071
152, 474
158, 233
167, 127

93, 252
107, 277
110, 174
107, 241
112, 095

$57, 145
61,645
72, 403
73,374
85,312
88, 133
87, 492
87, 933

$42,400
46,126
56, 261
61, 112
68, 197
70, 075
71, 491
73, 561

$30,847
28,421
30,487
32, 597
35,406
39,304
41, 870
48,390

86, 167
95, 686
121, 369
114, 529

66, 112
77, 258
92,094
93, 904

58, 060
61, 685
83, 035
80,064

36,986
35, 525
42, 883
41, 631

$81, 074
78, 899

90,912

$281
365
521
686
2,230 852
2,385 1,109

$77
95
105
113
147
213

$928
995
1,070
1,177
1,308
1,462

591,172

234,969

672, 286
700, 730
710, 962
744, 722

267, 430
279, 875
286, 505

764
775
792
806

131
136
137
140

1,240
1,252
1,268
1,282

601, 985
673, 855
836, 995
778, 451

356, 736
316, 582

133, 912
145, 932
183, 761
173, 372

2,225
2,234
2,242

816
831
850
876

145
146
148
151

1,291
1,305
1,316
1,327

752, 267
763, 495
680, 076
681, 654

309, 265
309, 396
267, 873
261, 413

163, 551
165, 803
151, 721
154, 708

110, 340
115, 180
105, 250
103, 638

91, 834
99, 022
86, 058
86, 549

77, 277
74,094
69, 174
75, 346

44, 553
45, 298
39, 962
38, 360

919
928
940
934

2,259
2,268
2,287
2,299

887
911
942
974

151
155
154
167

1,338
1,347
1,358
1,369

606, 760
659, 375
662, 688
833, 944

237, 184
257, 543
254, 111
316, 931

138, 441
148, 380
150, 447
188, 770

93, 224
103, 663
106, 310
131, 530

76, 998
82, 706
84, 189
113, 184

60,913
67, 083
67, 631
83, 529

35, 302
48,104
44, 935
48, 899

4,417
4,454
4,506
4,563

938
939
939
943

2,311 1,004
2,329 1,017
2,345 1,050
2,359 1,064

164
169
172
197

1,383
,396
,412
,426

609, 228
731, 145
832, 250
769, 263

261, 898
318, 664
343, 463
314, 944

130, 338
160, 185
185, 240
165, 567

90, 662
104, 811
127, 286

119,317

68,847
81, 213
96, 766
94, 128

57, 483
66, 272
79, 495
75, 307

47, 569
40, 290
44,823
47, 156

3,640
3,692
3,737
3,780

4,605
4,621
4,665
4,704

928
905
916
927

2,372 1,097
2,390 1,112
2,397 1,128
2,411 1,138

208
214
224
228

,442
,459
1,472
1,486

834, 557
805, 695
700, 939
702, 275

343, 822
333, 895
273, 188
273, 055

180, 589
176, 121
163, 694
163, 568

128, 946
121, 089
107, 659
104, 287

99, 513
96,796
85,056
86,288

81, 687
77,794
71, 342
75, 077

49, 870
51,844
49,492
43, 503

1,604
1,606
1,603
1,606

3,825
3,878
3,914
3,974

4,718
4,752
4,816
4,867

930
939
949
957

2,406
2,.410
2,437
2,448

1,151
1,163
1,180
1,203

231
240
250
259

1,497
1,510
1,523
1,539

578, 193
764, 577

218, 788
316, 574

90,916

722,495

296,968

886, 048

352, 806

136, 379
176, 739
167, 479
199, 625

71, 371
85,408
81, 768
108, 046

60, 739
72,940
71, 986
92, 614

38,872
55, 743
54,865
56, 647

5,619
5,642
5,675
5,710

1,604
1,601
1,597
1,597

4,015
4,041
4,078
4,113

4,912
4,951
5,007
5,037

979
986
1,004
1,017

2,452
2,462
2,472
2,477

1,219
1,231
1,247
1,251

262
272
284
292

1,554
1,569
1,587
1,608

709, 452
744, 513
896, 333
862, 578

305, 721
321, 051

68,238
69, 057
84,524
86,579

50,575
47,443
49,406
53,333

5,750
5,792

1,599
1,599

4,151
4,193

5,085
5,119

1,033
1,048

2,498 1,256
2,507 1,261

298
303

1,630
1,652

873, 490

92,453
82, 751

51,283
54,700

2,204
2,210

829,202

304,005

257, 734

293,294

385,309

161, 832
174, 226
207, 017

355, 180

196,585

352, 208
334, 551

200,638
189, 447

112, 916

104,294
132, 957

100, 769

100,163
122, 002
125, 988
125, 716
125, 349

72, 892^"
80, 016
97, 421
98, 246
102, 475
97,104

I

1
Compiled by the Association of Life Insurance Presidents from special reports of 40 companies having 81 per cent of the total admitted life insurance assets of United
States legal reserve companies; the data are given as of the end of each month and are designed to show the fluctuations in the character of investments of life insurance
companies. Admitted assets embrace all assets permitted by statute to be included for testing the solvency of the companies; in addition to the items separately listed,
the total also includes real estate, collateral loans, cash, bills receivable, interest due and accrued, deferred and unpaid premiums, etc. Of the bonds and stocks, approximately 983^ per cent are bonds and 1% per cent are stocks. A compilation of the mortgages owned by 57 life insurance companies, by States, as of Dec. 31, 1925, appeared
in the September, 1926, issue (No. 61), p. 26.
2
Represents data on ordinary life insurance only (thus excluding industrial and group insurance) compiled by the Life Insurance Sales Research Bureau from 81 insurance companies who held on Jan. 1, 1927, 90 per cent of the total ordinary legal life reserve in force in the United States. Monthly data for 1921 were given in the April,
1924, issue (No. 32), p. 56. The Eastern Manufacturing district includes Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New
Jersey, and Pennsylvania; Western Manufacturing district—Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin; Western Agricultural district—Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri,
North Dakota, Texas, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Southern district—Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia,
West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi; Far Western district—Montana, Idaho, Wyoming,
Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Washington, Oregon, and California. Data on lapses are presented on p. 138 of the present issue.
3
Compiled by the Life Insurance Sales Research Bureau from reports of companies which had on Jan. 1, 1927, 84 per cent of the legal reserve ordinary business in force
in Canada. Details by Provinces are given in the bureau's monthly reports.




125
Table 104.—BANKING

In New Outside
New
York
York
Cityi
City i

YEAR AND
MONTH

CONDITION OF
REPORTING MEMBER
BANKS 3
(end of month)

CONDITION OF FEDERAL, RESERVE
BANKS ' (end of month)

CHECK PAYMENTS

Bills
Cana- disda 2 counted

Notes Total
in cir- invest- Total
recula- ments serves
tion

Total
deposits

^

$9, 2CO
10, 576
11, 302

7 $696
2,157
977

$3,364
4,230
4, 617
4,968
5,464
5,579
5,984
6,525

10, 178
10, 855
11, 143
12, 065
12, 892
12, 976
13, 301
13, 538

$3, 123
3, 646
5,215

8.76
8.30
9.19

774
1,319
1,391
1,565
2,336
2,704
3,137
4,418

2,636
2,800
3,091
3,259
3,491
3,718
4,020
4,290

15, 893
16, 089
15, 861
15, 729

6,683
6,647
6,589
6.405

13, 628
13, 574
13, 186
12, 871

5,274
4,898
4,837
5,051

9.46
9.25
9.00
8.80

4, 469
4,307
4,259
4,235

4,253
4,301
4,283
4,299

66.8
67.2
65.2
61.9

15, 952
16,067
16,260
16,963

6,401
6,430
6,375
6,376

13, 226
13, 368
13, 460
14,041

5,514
5,880
6,392
6,440

9.29
9.62
9.66
9.54

4,570
4,907
5,290
5,330

4,352
4,345
4,334
4,406

2,437
2,413
2,382
2,410

69.4
69.9
71.5
73.3

16, 121
16, 366
16, 583
16, 451

6,053
5,972
5,976
5,875

13, 395
13, 308
13, 157
13, 234

6,735
6,679
6,804
6,775

9.48
9.29
9.75
9.19

5,559
5,507
5,562
5,532 j

4,410
4,423
4,466
4, 439

2,331
2,438
2,398

74.5
72.9
74.4

16, 202
16, 925
17, 058

5,799
5,560
5,549

12, 791
13,293
13, 395

6,665
7,071

9.39
9.15

5,288
5,769
5,960

4,418
4, 459

$17, 598
20, 133

$144
231
466
592
685

$384
586
1,261
1,991
2,190
2,126

$1, 154
1,738
1, 937
1 922

94.6
83. 5
75.6
57.0
50.2
43 5

17, 258
19, 988
19, 806
21, 961
26, 114
28, 255
32, 630
41, 684

15, 995
16, 626
18, 777
19, 013
21, 368
22, 426
23, 455
25, 516

1,401
1,304
1,392
1,367
1,346
1,414
1,642
1,969

1,755
550
751
362
500
581
447
880

2,664
2,215
2,239
1,866
1,689
1,707
1,714
1,654

338
618
399
583
646
627
688
613

2,672
3,149
3,192
3,196
2,869
2,955
3,111
2,807

1, 744
1,851
1, 941
2,111
2,247
2,286
2, 358
2,432

Cl. 4
77.5
76.4
80.4
74.8
74.1
76.5
68.8

$11, 927
10, 953
11, 788
12, 343
13, 450
14, 141
14, 696
15, 885

1938
May
June
July
August

45, 270
45, 455
35,085
35, 102

26, 346
27, 029
23, 897
23,401

2,279
1,986
1,896
1,813

944
1,191
1,086
1,039

1,593
1,660
1,613
1,651

525
430
378
394

2,757
2,693
2, 756
2,765

2,408
2, 459
2,402
2,325

68.9
65.4
68.6
69.5

SeptemberOctober
NovemberDecember. .

38, 726
45, 189
45, 469
52, 727

24,450
27, 705
25, 880
29, 659

1,681
2,395
2,376
2,121

1,026
932
990
1,151

1,704
1,710
1,766
1,829

545
671
716
738

2,751
2,773
2,722
2,719

2,414
2,419
2,411
2,564

1939
January
February ___
March— ___
April

54,719
46, 289
55, 425
47, 979

28, 126
24, 515
28, 131
26,803

2,124
1,723
1,942
1,873

821
952
1,030
986

1,645
1,654
1,664
1,664

646
511
351
343

2,835
2,844
2,893
2,986

50,043
43, 263
49, 215

26, 520
25, 423
28, 409

2,097
1,817

988
1,125
1,076

1,654
1,736
1,779

270
226
232

2,970
3,041
3,109

_

September..
October
November.
December _.

Mills, of dolls.
$1, 725
1,772
1,805
1, 918
1,989
2,017
2,223
2,465

$89
185
606
1,911
2,618
3,154

May
_
June
July
August

Per
cent

Millions of dollars

$29
24
224
1,158
1,936
2,557

1921 mo. av.
1922 mo. av.
1923 mo. av.
1924 mo. av.
1925 mo. av.
1926 mo. av.
1927 mo. av.
1928 mo. av.

SAV.
DEPOSITS

(end
mo.)
To N. Y. Stock
Exch. mem.4
N.Y.
Total Total
By New State
ReNet
loans
serve and dis- invest- demand
savings
Ratio York
ratio counts ments deposits Total to mkt banks 5 banks 6

$775
659
637
859
1,021
1,115
1,351
1,632

$20, 343
20, 119

(end of month)

value

Millions of dollars
1913 mo. av
1914 mo. av.
1915 mo. av.
1916 mo. av
1917 mo. av
1918 mo. av
1919 mo. av.
1920 mo. av.

BROKERS' LOANS

!

I

i

1

!

li

i
i

i Check payments for the United States are represented by debits to individual accounts as collected by the Federal Reserve Board from about 150 of the larger clearinghouse centers. These data represent check transactions more fully than clearings inasmuch as all checks debited to individual accounts are included and not merely those
passing through the clearing house. Data on clearings have been discontinued owing to the variation in number of centers reporting, the annual averages back to 1913
3 Condition reports, showing respectively the combined condition of the 12 Federal reserve banks and the condition of over 800 member banks of the Federal reserve
system, arc compiled by the Federal Reserve Board. The condition is given as of the last Wednesday of the month, but prior to April, 1921, figures are of the last Friday of
the month. The reserve ratio represents the percentage which total reserves (mostly gold) form of the combined deposit and Federal reserve note liabilities. Prior to
March, 1921, net deposits were used instead of total deposits in calculating reserve ratios. Monthly data from 1920 on condition of Federal reserve banks may be found
in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), p. 123, except for investments, which are given in the September, 1922, issue (No. 13), p. 47.
4
Compiled by the New York Stock Exchange from reports of all its members as to their net borrowings on collateral outstanding at the end of each month from banks or
agencies in New York City. These data include borrowings for out-of-town branch and correspondent offices. These security loans are used to carry securities not only
for customers but also for investment distribution. Details as between banks and other agencies and between demand and time loans are given in the exchange's monthly
reports. The ratio to market value is based on the market value of all stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange on the same date computed from actual sales. Monthly
data from 1926 are given on p. 138 of the August, 1928 issue (No. 84).
* Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board from reports, beginning with 1926, of 61 identical reporting member banks in New York City on their collateral loans to brokers
and dealers on the last Wednesday in each month (not confined to members of the New York Stock Exchange). Details as to the account for which loans were made (for
out-of-town banks, or others), differentiating in each case between call and time money, are given in the board's weekly press releases. Prior to 1926, the figures are based
on daily reports of 43 banks, a few of them nonmembers of the Federal reserve system, and did not include for some banks the loans to dealers in securities. However, the
figures are fairly comparable. Prior to April, 1921, the data represent the last Friday in each month, instead of the last Wednesday. Complete weekly data in detail from
1917 6were published in the November, 1926, issue of the Federal Reserve Bulletin, pp. 779-786.
Compiled from data furnished by the Savings Bank Association of the State of New York, comprising all savings banks in New York State at semiannual periods, totaling about 150 banks. For the intervening months, for which figures were compiled beginning in 1924, a few banks, representing about 1 per cent of the total deposits do
not report and their deposited balance at the last semiannual period is added to the figures of the reporting banks to secure complete data. Yearly figures from 1914 to
1920, inclusive, and for 1923, are averages of deposits on June 30 and December 31 of each year; 1913 figures are for December 31:1921 data are averages of four quarterly
figures, and for 1922 the first three quarters are averaged.
7
3 months' average, October to December, inclusive.




126

Table 105.—GOLD, SILVER, AND MONEY
GOLD

Imports 1

YEAE AND MONTH

Exports *

Monetary
stock
OfU.S.'

Thousands of
dollars

Millions
of dollars

SILVER
DomesRand
tic
receipts output 4
at mint 3
Fine ounces

Production
Imports *

Exports l

Stocks, end
of month 8

5

United Canada Mexico U.S.
States

Thousands of
dollars

Canada

Price
in
New
York ^
Dolls,
per fine
ounce

Thousands of fine ounces

UNITED
STATES
MONEY
IN
CIRCULATIONS

Millions
of dollars

1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average
1915 monthly average
1916 monthly average
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average
1920 monthly average

$5,309
4,782
37,663
57, 166
46,038
5,170
6,378
35, 729

$7,650
18, 551
2,619
12, 999
30,990
3,422
30, 682
26,841

148, 050
155, 083
157, 830
133, 597
112, 495
86,472
71,093
62, 377

732, 779
698, 275
757, 823
772, 128
751, 855
701, 722
694, 174
679, 801

$2, 989
2,163
2,874
2,689
4,445
5,948
7,451
7,338

$5,231
4,300
1,467
5.883
7,011
21, 071
19. 918
9,468

5,567
6,038
6,247
6.201
5,978
5,651
4,723
4,714

1921 monthly average —
1922 monthly average
1923 monthly average
1924 monthly average —
1925 monthly average —
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly average
1928 monthly average —

57,604
22,931
26, 893
26,643
10, 690
17, 792
17, 295
14, 075

1,991
3.073
2,387
5,137
21, 887
9,642
16,788
46, 730

$4,060
4,438
4,383
4,452
4.564
4,207

80,183
86, 314
84,044
90, 234
87, 693
85,390
81, 077
81, 776

676, 216
585,009
761,088
799, 803
799, 975
830,238
844,219
863, 216

5,270
5,901
6,204
6,162
5,383
5,800
4,589
5,677

4,298
5,234
6,039
9,158
8,261
7,688
6,302
7,282

4,477
4,623
5,514
5,362
5,115
5,077
4,951
4,679

1,084
1,416
,418
,412
,395
,771
,730
,694

5,372
6.756
7,568
7,620
7,743
8,191
8.715
9,045

1,091
446
459
719
453
542
384
510

655
636
409
544
442
839
701
741

.621
.675
.647
.668
.691
.621
.564
.582

$4,821
4,879
4,870
4,924
4,892
4,782

1937
September
October _
November
December

12, 979
2,056
2,082
10, 431

24, 444
10, 698
55, 266
77,849

4,584
4,566
4,490
4,416

103, 240
97,103
91, 840
75, 575

842, 118
855, 743
848,059
851, 225

4,992
5,069
5,102
3,770

6,627
5,945
5,634
7,186

4,691
4,980
5,010
5,015

2,023
1,696
1,739
1,723

7,909
8,273
10, 794
10, 437

293
178
136
353

761
494
567
608

.554
.560
.575
.580

4,917
4,934
4,936
5,048

38, 320
14, 686
2,683
5,319

52, 086
25,806
97,536
96, 469

4,377
4,373
4,335
4,287

73, 624
72, 119
67,872
65, 166

843, 857
816, 133
877, 380
825, 907

6,305
4,658
5,134
4,888

6,692
7,479
7,405
6,587

4,980
4,490
5,333
4,668

1,433
1,272
1,469
1,388

7,955
7,572
10, 861
8,904

574
170
461
128

1,141
547
803
550

.571
.570
.572
.574

4,785
4,709
4,710
4,730

1,968
20, 001
10, 331
2,445

83, 689
99, 932
74, 190
1,698

4,207
4,119
4,113
4,118

75,983
70, 205
72, 676
98, 769

886, 186
862, 363
867, 211
891, 863

4,247
6,221
6,544
6,496

6,712
7,456
6,160
9,246

4,574
4,945
3,915
4,776

1,222
1,401
2,389
2,252

9,547
2,821
8,299
8,727

133
479
262
263

456
707
430
720

.603
.600
.592
.589

4,722
4,736
4,746
4,743

September. .
October
November
December.

4,273
14, 331
29,591
24, 950

3,810
992
22, 916
1,636

4,125
4,133
4,151
4,142

83,247
121, 539
102, 893
77,220

857, 731
897, 720
872, 484
859, 761

5,739
7,319
5,448
5,120

6,229
7,252
7,674
8,489

4,087
4,352
4,756
5,273

2,177
2,051
1,459
1,815

9,138
8,514
8,643
10, 555

872
856
905
1,011

1,457
718
346
1,011

.575
.581
.580
.573

4,804
4,836
4,860
5,008

1939
January
__
February
March
April. . _ _ _ __

48, 577
26, 913
26,470
24,687

1,378
1,425
1,635
1,594

4,115
4,143
4,166
4,226

68,042
55,651
57, 765
65,547

876, 452
815,284
866,529
872, 123

8,260
4,458
6,435
3,957

8,264
6,595
7,814
5,752

1,747
5,023
1,124
4,776
1,569
5,223
5,422 4t 1>151

9,241
7,190
6,855

595
642
1,374
867

334
684
414
1,032

.570
.562
.563
.557

4,748
4,686
4,709
4,679

24, 097
30, 762

467
550

4,292
4,311

70,520
73,468
92,256

897, 598
856,029

4,597
5,022

7,485
5,441

5,080
5,003

1,105
1,382

360
543

.541
.524
525

4,684
4,687

__

1928
January
February
, March
April
May.
June..
July__
August

_

May.
June
July
August

__ __

$0. 598
548
497
.657
.814
964
1 111
1.010

1,560
1,146

September
October
November
December
1 Imports and exports of gold and silver from U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
2 Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board consisting of gold held in the Treasury and Federal reserve banks plus the amount in circulation. Gold held abroad by Federal
reserve banks is included, but gold in the United States earmarked for foreign account is excluded. The figures are based on the daily monetary gold stock. Complete
details are shown in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for December, 1927.
3 Domestic receipts of unrefined gold at U. S. mint from U. S. Treasury Department, Bureau of the Mint.
4
Silver prices, representing daily averages for the month in the New York market, and gold output from the Rand mines from the Engineering and Mining Journal.
« Production of silver by mines and producers' stocks from American Bureau of Metal Statistics, except annual figures previous to 1921, which are from U. S. Department
of Interior, Geological Survey. The United States, Canada, and Mexico combined produced about 75 per cent of the world's output of silver in 1923. Production for both the
United States and Canada includes purchases of crude silver by the mints in each country. Canadian production is incomplete, as the silver contained in blister copper,
lead bullion, and lead and zinc ores exported is omitted. Mexican production is reported to the bureau by the Mexican Government, and covers refined silver received at
the mint for coinage, refined silver exported, and silver content of base bullion, blister copper, ore concentrates, etc., exported. Detailed data are contained in the bureau's
monthly reports. Monthly data from 1921, except on production in the United States, appeared in the February, 1927, issue (No. 66), p. 25.
6
Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department and representing all money held outside the Treasury and the Federal reserve system, including gold and silver coin and
certificates, minor coin, and notes. Details by classes of money are presented in the monthly circulation statement of the Treasury. These figures are based on the daily
volume of money in circulation. A complete description of the revised computation is presented in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for December, 1927. •




127

Table 106.—PUBLIC FINANCE, INTEREST RATES, AND BOND YIELDS
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT FINANCES i

BOND YIELDS

INTEREST RATES

Stock
Exchange

YEAR AND MONTH

Gross
debt,
end of
mo.

Mills,
of dolls.
1913 monthly av
1914 monthly av
1915 monthly av
1916 monthly av
1917 monthly av
1918 monthly av
1919 monthly a v _ _ _
1920 monthly av
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

Customs
receipts

Total
ordinary
receipts

Prime
Prime bankInter- Redis.
Ordicoml. ers'
Call
ac- Fed. med. N.Y.
nary loans Time paper cept- land credit Fed.
expendi- re- loans
banks
Res.
mos. ances (4) banks Bk.
90
tures new90
(4)
days
(2)
(8)
days
al
(2)
(2)
(2)

1,188
1,191
1,225
2,976
12, 244
25, 482
24,298

24, 344
17, 439
17, 636
18, 832
15,000
15, 371
26, 909

$60, 315
$60, 474
61, 195
61, 282
57, 972
63, 353
65,003
61, 250
94, 037
165, 025
305, 382 1, 058, 153
429, 355 1, 543, 575
557, 880
540, 174

3.26
3.72

monthly av
23, 976
monthly av__. 22, 964
monthly av
22, 350
monthly av
21, 251
monthly av
20, 516
monthly av__. 19,643
monthly av
18, 510
monthly a v . _ _ 17,604

25, 714
29,704
46, 827
45, 470
45, 630
48, 286
50, 458
47, 415

468, 744
342, 425
333, 928
334, 337
315, 012
330, 813
344, 116
336, 862

18, 050
17, 951
17, 937
17,848

41, 975
42, 130
48, 277
45, 740

17, 756
17, 604
17, 526
17, 648

1928
January
February
March
April
May.
June _
July
August

.

..

September
October
November
December

_ .

1939
January. . _ __
February
March.
April ..
May
June
July
August... _

September
October
November. .December

Total,
15
15
15
60
inhigh- rail- dus- utiligrade roads trial ties
bds.
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

15
municipal
(3)

Per cent

Thousands of dollars

$1, 193 $26, 512

Treas. Libnotes erty
and and
certs. Treas.
3-6
mos. bds.
(2)
(2)

1.98
2.57
3.33
5.24
6.27
7.78

4.64
4.37
2.85
3.25
4.62
5.90
6.17
8.26

461, 517
316, 275
308, 123
292, 223
294, 137
298, 749
291, 132
303, 627

5.98
4.29
4.85
3.08
4.20
4.50
4.06
6.04

168, 840
228, 118
641, 626
169, 965

349, 142
173, 283
248, 258
326, 709

41, 438
44, 162
44, 591
52, 797

164,932
678, 927
154, 859
173, 495

17, 367
17, 544
17, 493
17, 310

50, 410
59, 741
48, 436
45, 803

17, 379
17, 345
17, 237
17,196
17, 167
16, 931
16,832

5.45

4.64
4.58
4.66
4.53
4.80
5.23
5.25
5.88

4.42
4.46
4.64
4.49
4.79
5.20
5.29
5.79

4.99
4.93
4.97
4.89
5.09
5.45
5.40
6.01

4.94
4.87
4.88
4.79
5.09
5.76
5.84
6.73

4.22
4.12
4.16
3.94
4.20
4.50
4.46
4.98

7.46

« 5 05
5.45
5.50
6.08
5.50

5.00
5.00
5 00
5.00
5.00
6.50

6.45
4.63
5.17
3.75
4.27
4.61
4.34
5.85

6.56
4.48
5.01
3. 88
4.03
4.35
4.11
4.86

5.24
3.51
4.10
2.97
3.29
3.59
3.45
4.09

5.88
5.71
5.50 75.50
5.12
5.50
4.59
5.46
4.70
5.30
4.51
5.11
4.80
5.05

5.88
4.20
4.46
3.67
3.46
3.84
3.79
4.54

4.83
3.47
3.93
2.77
3.03
3.25
3.11
3.98

5.37
4.35
4.45
4.09
3.99
3.95
8
3. 46
3.44

5.79
4.94
4.98
4.85
4.72
4.60
4.47
4.49

5.57
4.85
4.98
4.78
4.67
4.51
4.31
4.34

5.96
5.21
5.26
5.21
5.06
4.91
4.83
4.88

6.56
5.46
5.41
5.22
5.06
4.90
4.78
4.68

5.09
4.23
4.25
4.20
4.09
4.08
3.98
4.05

4.24
4.38
4.47
5. 08

4.38
4.56
4.63
4.94

4.00
4.00
4.13
4.38

3.38
3.50
3.50
3.75

5.06
5.06
5.06
5.05

4.50
4.51
4.52
4.52

3.50
4.00
4.00
4.00

3.31
3.33
3.27
3.62

3.35
3.36
3.30
3.32

4.38
4.38
4.37
4.38

4.18
4.20
4.21
4.24

4.76
4.79
4.77
4.78

4.68
4.65
4.62
4.56

3.89
3.89
3.89
3.93

217, 091
404, 607
278, 620
308, 594

5.70
6.21
6.05
6.87

5.25
5.69
6.00
6.25

4.50
4.88
5.13
5.38

4.00
4.07
4.25
4.63

5.04
5.04
5.04
5.04

4.52
4.56
4.63
4.84

4.50
4.50
5.00
5.00

3.90
3.92
4.12
4.36

3.35
3.40
3.50
3.56

4.42
4.50
4.54
4.59

4.27
4.35
4.44
4.49

4.81
4.91
4.95
4.96

4.57
4.66
4.68
4.73

4.02
4.09
4.13
4.16

557, 398
187, 627
145, 156
649, 105

482, 600
368, 653
213, 629
384, 019

7.26
6.98
6.67
8.60

7.00
7.13
6.93
7.38

5.63
5.50
5.38
5.38

4.50
4.50
4.50
4.50

5.04
5.04
5.04
5.04

5.12
5.24
5.31
5.33

5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00

4.57
4.70
4.25
4.35

3.54
3.55
3. 48
3.53

4.57
4.57
4.55
4.59

4.43
4.43
4.39
4.47

4.95
4.95
4.93
4.98

4.73
4.74
4.73
4.77

4.17
4.17
4.15
4.15

45, 549
48, 651
55,200
50,404

163, 889
158, 794
736, 816
173, 508

371, 595
185, 494
273, 865
335, 643

7.05
7.06
9.10
8.89

7.75
7.63
7.88
8.75

5.38
5.50
5.88
6.00

4.88
5.13
5.38
5.50

5.05
5.06
5.09
5.10

5.33
5.33
5.36
5.48

5.00
5:00
5.00
5.00

4.65
4.64
4.79
4.82

3.59
3.66
3.76
3.67

4.60
4.65
4.69
4.69

4.50
4.56
4.59
4.59

4.96
5.01
5.02
5.02

4. 79j
4. 79!
4.81
4.85

4.16
4.25
4.32
4.29

48, 279
52, 401
52, 144

166, 722
765, 882
169, 473

225,269
420, 473
349, 825

8.91
7.70
9.23

8.75
8.13
7.75

6.00
6.00
6.00

5.50
5.50
5.13

5.13
5.19

5.54
5.60

5.00
5.00
5.00

5.04
4.89
4.49

3.67
3.71
3.38

4.69
4.73
4.73

4.58
4.65
4.67

5.06
5.09
5.09

4.85
4.90
4.90

4.23
4.26
4.28

I

!
i
i

1 Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department. Yearly figures under this heading represent averages for the fiscal year ending June 30 of the year indicated, except the
debt figures, which represent the condition on June 30. Debt figures up to the last two months are on a warrant basis, the current months being on a cash basis, as shown
in the preliminary debt statement, where further details may be obtained. Monthly data extending back to 1921 appeared in the March, 1924, issue of the SURVEY (No.
31), p. 56. Receipts and expenditures are shown in detail currently in the daily statement of the U. S. Treasury. The large total receipts every three months are due to
payment of income-tax installments. Expenditures represent those chargeable against ordinary receipts.
2
Compiled by the Federal Reserve Board, except time loans prior to 1926 and call loans prior to 1921, which are from Ogle, Dunn & Co. Time-loan rates are those prevailing for New York Stock Exchange 90-day time loans, while call-loan rates are average renewal rates for the New York Stock Exchange. Monthly data from 1909
appeared in the June, 1928, issue (No. 82), p. 21.
» Compiled by the Standard Statistics Co., representing arithmetic averages of the yields to maturity on the individual high-grade bonds, calculated from averages of the
high and low prices of the month. For the year 1914, when the exchanges were closed for several months, the average for railroad bonds excludes the months of August
through October, the averages for industrials and public utilities exclude August through November, and the average for municipals excludes August through December.
* Compiled by the Federal Farm Loan Board, representing average interest rates charged by the Federal farm loan banks and intermediate credit banks, respectively.
These rates are based on the interest rates on farm-loan bonds issued by the respective banks, being limited by law to a rate not exceeding 1 per cent higher than the
rate of the bond issue. The law limits interest rates to a 6 per cent maximum. The rates given here for intermediate credit banks are those for direct loans only. For
descriptions of these banks and the type of their loans, see Table 108. The rates shown for each month are the averages of the loan rates of the 12 banks in the systems
of the Federal land and intermediate credit banks. No weight being given to the number of loans closed at the various rates. When a change of rate occurred during a
month, the bank's average rate for that month was obtained, each rate during the month being weighted by the number of business days it was in force.
5 From the Federal Reserve Board. Monthly averages for years prior to 1922 cover only 61-90 day commercial, agricultural, and livestock paper; since then rates shown
are applicable to all classes and maturities of eligible paper.
6
Average of 8 months, May to December, inclusive.
7
Average of 10 months, March to December, inclusive.
8
Beginning with 1927, Liberty bonds are excluded, and the average yield is calculated upon 3 issues of Treasury bonds (3%, 4, and 4^) to their last redemption dates
Digitized for (1952 to 1956). Prior to 1927 the yield is calculated on Liberty bonds only.
FRASER


128
Table 107.—SECURITY PRICES AND SALES
BOND
YIELDS

BOND PRICE INDEXES

STOCK PRICES

0)

YEAR
AND
MONTH

10
10
Com- 5 LibComSouth- Com- high- sec10
10
bined
bined
25
bined
25
ern
erty
est
ond public indus- index
index indus- rail- cotton index
and
utility trial
(40
(66
grade grade bonds bonds
(103
trials roads mills
Treas4
4
bonds) rails
rails
bonds) ury
stocks)
s
6
6
()
()
()
()
()
(6)
0
(3)
(6)
(6)
Dollars per share

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

16
foreign

Munici- Stocks
pal
bonds

i
i

Thous.
of shares

4.45
4.16
4.23
4.06
4.31
4.58
4.50
5.04

6,924
3,992
14,448
19,404
15, 378
11, 948
26, 073
18,728

$41, 499
56, 959
79, 623
94, 199
61, 866
47,544
71,322
88, 563

Liberty
and
Treasury
bonds

Total
bonds

Thousands of dollars
par value

i

$58. 19
58.08
75.35
99.14
85.44
80.98
105. 77
107. 21

ma
m.a.
m.a.
m.a.
m.a.
m.a.
m.a.
in.a.

Miscellaneous
bonds

Per
cent

Per cent of par value

Per cent of par value of 4 per cent bond

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
SALES »

$82. 97
77.57
73.16
80.05
69.12
61.34
62.06
55.94

76.76
80.49
75.58
69.84
69.07
59.70

89.79
92.45
87.43
80.02
77.89
71.33

75.55
78.00
72.42
66. 12
66.33
58.54

73.73
77.59
72.36
63.89
61.77
51.99

74.39
85.50
82.86
85.11
86.96
89.14
94.47
92.87

61.43
71.76
67.71
71.96
76.69
81.21
85.28
84.91

53.92
55.28
67.50 9 74. 00
72.27
66.26
73.21
68.93
70.81 75.45
74.40
77.86
79.53
77.47
79.48
80.33

85.38
94.93
93.46
95.68
97.52
99 23
101. 15
101. 24

93.20
99.54
98.77
101.44
102. 62
102. 73
104. 12
104. 61

92.42
101. 22
100. 22
101. 71
103.04
103. 31
105. 19
104. 98

5.02
4.21
4.27
4.21
4.13
4.13
3.99
4.05

14, 334
21, 852
19, 773
23, 503
37,684
37, 425
48, 708
76, 713

70.51
75. 89
71.35
69.36
70.76
60. 12

1

$40, 492
117, 059
236, 814
235, 406

$41, 499
56, 959
79, 623
94, 199
85, 690
164, 603
308, 136
323, 969

115, 686
206, 948
161, 521
243, 145
256, 621
238, 734
282, 539
231, 956

173, 130
136, 442
66,549
72, 178
29, 503
21, 311
24, 158
14, 860

288, 816
343, 390
227, 903
315, 323
286, 124
260, 045
306, 697
246, 816

8

1921 m.a.
1922 m.a.
1923 m.a.
1924 m.a.
1925 m.a.
3926 m.a.
1927 m.a.
1928 m.a.

$84. 57
97.08
89.59
88.74
110. 63
113. 56
130. 69
155. 79

79.38
98.58
107. 78
115.08
152. 65
165. 70
214. 54
268. 92

53.21
62.38
60.15
67.18
82.48
93.27
113. 81
122. 06

$138.45
124.68
116.99
114. 25
111.29
107. 61

60. 15
74.11
71.72
74.32
77.04
80.36
83.69
84.06

1937
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

140. 67
130. 15
142. 63
144. 26

242. 66
233. 36
237. 84
242. 50

119. 95
109. 85
117. 84 - 111.31
111.94
120. 04
112. 36
119. 68

84.35
85.05
85.43
85.98

95.19
96.11
97.23
97.20

86.11
87.24
87.87
88.57

78.29
79.00
79.14
79.55

9.81
9.93
9.86
80.82

101. 51
101. 59
102. 43
102.46

103.68
103. 92
106. 53
106.02

105. 64
104. 65
105. 46
105. 60

3.96
3.95
3.93
3.87

51,918
50, 459
51, 356
62, 367

254, 987
258, 112
261, 540
267,918

24, 326
13, 187
20, 205
23,916

279,
271,
281,
291,

1928
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

142. 13
139. 30
147. 91
159. 16

242. 25
239. 32
256. 36
263.34

118.29
115. 20
119. 00
123.09

112. 25
111. 73
111. 33
110. 97

86.15
86.13
86.04
86.26

97.04
96.50
95.90
95.33

88.75
88.61
88.81
87.89

79.66
80.03
80.32
82.17

81.28
81.33
80.95
81.09

102. 60
102. 41
102. 58
102. 44

105. 94
105. 96
106.05
105. 98

105. 90
105. 92
105. 67
105. 46

3.87
3.87
3.93
3 93

56,963
47, 165
84, 988
80,569

269, 374
222, 644
304, 610
301, 084

20, 864
16, 611
11, 910
14, 489

290,238
239, 255
316, 520
315, 573

May
June
July
Aug

162. 58
147. 69
146. 71
151.24

267. 38
252. 94
257. 98
267. 16

125.39
118. 64
119. 18
121. 57

110.58
110. 42
108. 17
104.82

85.54
83.54
82.45
81.68

94.49
92.04
90.62
89.66

86.92
84.42
83.09
80.99

81.42
79.51
79.47
79.08

80.73
79.39
77.74
77.97

101. 71
101. 14
100.05
100.36

105. 03
105. 16
103. 20
103.88

105.28
104.84
104.85
104.77

4.01
4.06
4.13
4.18

82,164
63, 741
39,001
67,704

263, 388
246,885
183, 815
173, 561

14,764
14, 517
25, 240
9,988

278, 152
261, 402
209, 055
183,549

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

154.87
154. 95
175. 63
187. 33

283.99
293. 51
316. 15
286.66

124.82
123.40
130. 07
126. 10

103. 31
103. 19
102.58
101. 97

82.53
82.79
83.31
82.34

91.05
90.72
91.30
89.83

82.51
81.98
83.11
81.87

79.51
81.12
81.30
80.34

78.18
78.34
78. 57
78.23

100.40
100.53
100.57
100.09

103. 11
103.85
103. 75
103.45

104.55
104.59
104.20
103. 77

4.16
4.16
4.14
4.17

90,907
99,077
115,435
92,837

190,582
226, 621
210, 897
190, 010

10, 467
11,949
10, 569
16,947

201,049
238, 570
221, 466
206, 957

1939
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

179. 25
189. 72
199.27
168. 17

344. 17
350.88
355. 10
357. 70

132. 40
131. 70
129.30
128.49

101.04
99.76
98.10
98.00

82.39
81.48
80.34
80.00

90.09
88.63
87.87
88.05

81.27
80.22
79.13
79.27

80.16
79.63
77.68
76.19

78.89
78.20
77.49
77.47

100.08
99.47
98.36
99.13

102. 49
101. 36
100.14
101. 75

104. 52
104.07
102. 98
103.54

4.19
4.22
4.34
4.25

110, 804
77,969
105, 662
82,600

235, 427
174, 447
201, 566
205, 649

13, 772
9,504
12, 149
9,970

249, 199
183, 951
213, 715
215, 619

155. 76

363. 37
372. 70
414. 04

128. 95
134. 37
149. 27

96.77
95.15

79.33
78.37

87.81
86.37

79.13
78.59

75. 03
74.32

76.51
75.29

97.91

100.24

103. 49

4.30
4.33
4.33

91,279
69, 548
93, 379

225, 716
227, 676
295, 577

8, 851
9,848
13, 330

234,567
237, 524
308,907

May_.__
June
July. _
Aug __
Sept
Oct _.
Nov
Dec. _
1

!
1

!

313
299
745
834

__

j|

"II

Average market yield of bonds of 20 large cities at the end of each month compiled by The Bond Buyer. Averages for 1913 to 1916, inclusive, taken from Bond Buyer's
Index of the Municipal Bond Market, based on period Jan. 1 to Dec. 1; subsequent yearly data are averages for the period Jan. 31 to Dec. 31.
2
Bond sales from Dow, Jones & Co.; stock sales from the Annalist. These data include only sales on the New York Stock Exchange and not those in the " over-thecounter" market or on other exchanges. Monthly data from 1920 are given for most items in this table in the May, 1922, issue (No. 9), pp. 125 and 129.
3 This index, compiled as of the last day of the month by the New York Trust Co., includes 25 railroad, 10 iron and steel, 5 railroad equipment, 9 motor (including accessories), 5 rubber tire, 5 shipping, 5 sugar, 5 leather and shoe, 5 tobacco, 10 copper, 10 oil, and 9 New York bank and trust companies.
4
Prices are averages of daily closing prices for these stocks on New York Stock Exchange, taken from the Annalist. Monthly data from 1913 are given in the December,
1922, issue (No. 16), p. 47.
« Compiled from weekly quotations of 25 southern cotton-mill stocks as furnished by B. S. Dickson & Co. Monthly data from 1923 may be found on p. 24 of the
March, 1926, issue (No. 55).
6
These indexes are compiled by Dow, Jones <fe Co. from the yields of the average prices of the bonds for each day of the month, the average yields for the 10 bonds of
each7 class being capitalized at 4 per cent to give the combined index.
This index, compiled as of the last day of the month by the New York Trust Co., includes 6 Liberty and Victory bonds (the 2 issues of Victory bonds being replaced
at their redemption by the Treasury bonds, thus making only 5 issues), 16 foreign government and city, 20 railroad, 10 public utility, and 5 telegraph and telephone issues.
s 7 months' average, June to December, inclusive.
9 5 substitutions in this series in January, 1922, account for the violent change in the index.




129
Table 108.—STOCK PRICE INDEXES BY GROUPS AND YIELDS
YIELDS,
industrials

PRICE INDEXES
Industrials
Total

Railroads

Utilities

YEAR AND
MONTH

Total

RubAuto- Petro- ber
mo- leum tires
and
biles
goods

Steel
and
iron

Ma- R.R. Copper Texchin- equip- and
ery
ment brass tiles

Com- High
Food, Chain Tobac- Thea- mon grade
co and
pref.
except stores prodter
meat
ucts

Number of stocks in each group
405

33

35

337

13

16

7

10

9

10

9

30

20

17

10

7

Relative to 1926 average

1923 mo.
1924 mo.
1925 mo.
1926 mo.
1927 mo.
1928 mo.

av__
av
av __
av__
av__
av__

69.0
72.8
89.7
100.0
118.3
149.9

71.9
76.7
89.5
100.0
119.1
128.5

74.7
78.9
94.9
100.0
116.0
148.9

66.6
69.8
88.4
100.0
117.6
154.3

42.0
42.5
71.9
100.0
148.5
241.5

89.7
87.1
96.8
100.0
99.4
114.1

78.4
53.6
94.2
100.0
113.3
133.5

79.5
81.3
92.1
100.0
126.1
148.0

1927
January
February
March __ _ _
April

105.6
107.9
109.1
111.1

107.1
111.6
112.2
115. 7

104.4
105.3
107.3
110.5

105.6
107.5
108.6
110.0

116.4
120.2
127.8
133.6

102.4
104.1
99.3
95.2

92.8
97.5
106.0
108.1

May
June__
July
August

114.2
115.4
117,2
122.0

118.1
119.2
120.7
123.1

114.2
115.6
114.9
118.5

113.1
114.4
116.7
112.3

139.4
141.3
144.5
157.4

95.7
96.3
95.8
99.3

September _ _ .
October
November
December

127.7
126.7
129.6
133.1

125.2
124.3
124.9
126.8

124.1
124.5
125.6
127.2

128.9
127.5
131.3
135.5

174.2
173.6
173.6
180. 2.

1928
January
February
March
April

134.4
132.3
137. 9
145.9

125.3
121.6
125.9
130.7

129.5
130.9
134.4
142.5

137.4
134.8
141.1
149.5

May.
June
July
August

152.1
145.3
144.2
148.3

133.2
126.7
124.6
126.5

155.3
148.1
145.3
147.9

September...
October
November
December

156.6
159.1
171.1
171.4

129.6
128.2
134.9
134.9

1929
Januarv
February
March.. _
April

185.2
186.5
189.1
186.6
187.8
190.7

May
June..
July
August ...

90

20

Per cent

100.0
110.9
136.0

74.7
77.5
97.1
100.0
122.6
131.9

77.6
78.0
92.4
100.0
112.0
164.1

190.3
143.1
111.9
100.0
114.9
132.0

65.3
78.5
92.5
100.0
121.0
158.2

34.1
44.1
81.4
100.0
114.2
141.5

63.6
67.1
81.0
100.0
136.4
144.9

55.9
57.3
86.9
100.0
104.5
119.9

4.76
3.97

6.12
6.08
5.90
5.78
5.51
5.35

110.0
111.9
115.3
120.3

102.5
105.3
106.7
106.8

106.1
112.4
115.8
115.2

104.6
104.4
105.3
105.8

103.0
105.4
108.1
106.5

103.9
105.5
108.3
111.8

100.5
101.0
101.9
103.8

111.9
112.3
118.1
122.6

106.2
108.0
110.3
105.9

5.02
5.01
5.07
4.97

5.65
5.60
5.57
5.54

108.4
104.0
106.3
114.5

120.7
121. 0
124.1
132. 7

107. 9
107.5
106.9
111.1

119.2
123.6
126.2
131.9

106.1
102.2
103.1
110.0

110.7
111.0
114.7
117.5

118.1
117.5
120.7
124.3

106.6
106.4
110.0
119.7

131.7
138.9
139.9
142.0

105.1
101.5
96.1
99.4

4.85
4.97
4.91
4.68

5.49
5.50
5.52
5.48

99.3
98.2
103.5
103.6

128.1
125.6
124.5
143.6

143.6
133.7
135.1
144.3

114.9
115.9
119.4
125.9

133.5
125.4
127.6
134.2

115.9
125.8
123.4
137.2

123.3
122.8
125.4
130.9

130.6
131.3
136.1
143.3

128.7
127.4
132.3
132.6

149.4
150.4
159.1
161.0

103.7
104.1
105.4
108.4

4.42
4.47
4.37
4.32

5.45
5.45
5.43
5.40

183.5
182.0
217.4
241.4

104.1
100.0
102.7
109.7

153.3
139.6
129.3
127.4

146.7
141.1
142.0
145.5

126.1
124.4
126.3
133.6

141.3
136.9
138.2
137.4

137.8
135.5
135.1
143.7

134.9
132.6
132.9
138.2

148.8
146.8
149.1
154.9

130.3
128.6
131.6
135.6

159.2
150.0
149.5
149.1

109.4
106.1
108.0
111.3

4.31
4.39
4.20
4.05

5.33
5.34
5.28
5.18

154. 9
148.2
147.8
152.6

249.4
235.3
238.4
244.7

118.7
112.0
110.9
112.6

128.8
115.8
113.3
119.3

145.6
137.7
136.6
143.6

138.0
132.3
132.7
135.4

135.2
127.1
125.1
123.6

151.5
147. 5
150.0
155.2

138.7
126.3
120.3
120.5

158.4
152.4
152.1
158.1

139.0
136.8
135.3
142.9

140.0
134.9
134.3
137.6

115.6
111.5
111.0
116.6

3.93
4.13
4.14
4.01

5.21
5.32
5.40
5.43

155.8
154.5
168.6
173.4

162.2
166.2
178.9
178.4

270.0
283.6
284.3
2G8.5

115. 7
117.0
132.6
132.7

127.6
137.6
143.2
167. 3

1^5 8
158.7
164.6
157.8

139.4
140.1
148.7
154. 9

129.5
126.8
130.6
130.7

172.0
185.1
227.0
228.6

125.9
131.6
142.5
139.9

167.1
167.1
171.7
171.6

150.5
150.9
161.0
155.7

142.5
141.8
150.6
148.8

135.1
133.7
139.1
138.7

3.78
3.72
3.50
3.60

5.41
5.44
5.42
5.43

141.8
141.6
140.4
138.3

192.7
202.4
203.7
201.4

192.5
192.3
196.0
193.4

281.4
277.1
284.2
277.6

137.4
132.6
141.4
147.6

195.4
188.9
209.8
200.3

173.8
178.9
186.6
190. 8

167.7
173.5
167.2
163. 1

139.2
140.2
144.3
142.4

262.0
286.2
329.3
294.0

143.7
138.3
136.2
131.5

180.9
177.4
173.9
171.4

158.6
152.9
149.6
148. 7

153.1
146.1
142.5
136.4

150.6
149.3
146.2
135.8

3.35
3.35
3.27
3.30

5.42
5.43
5.44
5.45

138.7
144.8

212.3
233.0

192.6
191.0

260.5
241.7

146.3
144.1

194.4
184.8

185.3
188.2

160.8
159.4

138.2
141.7

279.8
270.8

127.0
122.4

172.0
175.6

148.3
144.5

139.1
135.1

140.1
133.4

3.32
3.32

5.45
5.49

September. ..
October,
November .
December

r ___...

1
Compiled by the Standard Statistics Co., Inc., and represent long-term indexes of common-stock market values weighted according to the number of shares of each
stock outstanding, computed as of the close each Friday, and presented in relatives with the 1926 monthly average taken as equal to 100. Weekly indexes have been averaged to give monthly data. Industrial stock yields have been computed by dividing the total annual dividend rate each month by the total of monthly prices, using tho
average of high and low monthly stock prices. Only such stocks as have paid some dividend every year since 1914 have been included in the common grouping; extra
cash dividends, on an annual basis, are added to regular dividends and are considered to be part of such regular dividends, while stock dividends are disregarded, as such
adjustments are largely cared for in the market price of the stock. As preferred stocks have various dividend rates, all prices have been adjusted to an equivalent 7 per
cent basis and $100 par previous to averaging,

61139°—29




9

130

Table 109.—NEW SECURITY ISSUES AND AGRICULTURAL FINANCING
TAX-

CORPORATE SECURITIES 1

YEAR
AND

MONTH

Total

EX.
MUNICIPAL CANADIAN BOND SESECURITIES 2
SALES 3
CURITIES*

Permanent
Bonds New
ReStocks and capital fund- loans
notes
ing
(long
term)

130, 484
89, 257

97, 821 191, 944
157, 935 225, 834

1921 m. a_
1922m. a_
1923 m. a.
1924m. a.
1925 m. a_
1926 m. a.
1927 m.a_
1928 ru.a-

199, 234
256, 107
269, 403
319, 881
394, 843
441, 630
608, 690
646, 087

23, 272
51, 999
61, 330
72, 191
109, 248
109, 814
146, 573
297, 215

175, 962
204, 108
208,073
247, 690
285, 595
331, 815
462, 117
348, 872

1938
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr

577,073
621, 821
753, 344
840, 472

141, 045
134, 982
256, 490
315, 529

436,028
486, 839
496, 854
524, 943

May
June .
July
Aug .

768, 977
830, 434
323, 748
199,426

Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
1929
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
""** i
M!ay

NEW
INCOR-

PORATemCor- Total
porary Dom. Mu- pora- out- TIONS s
and
loans pro- nici- tion stdg.,
(short vincial pal bonds end of
term)
mo.

Mil. of
dolls.

Thousands of dollars
1913 m. a. $137, 145
1914 m. a. 119, 710
1915m. a. 119, 613
1916 m. a. 182, 208
1917m. a_ 127, 498
1918 m.a_ 112,068
1919m. a. 228, 305
1920m. a. 247, 192

AGRICULTURAL
LOANS OUTSTANDING FOREIGN
ISSUES s
(end of month)

Thousands of dollars

36, 360
21, 358

$34, 040 $40, 268
37, 200 24, 332
41,049 12, 894
41, 450 24, 367
37, 078 32,704
21,902 39, 428
63,528 37,508
64, 742 55, 341

$4,422
7,118
17, 901
17, 385
56, 198
58,000
64,429
9,749

$9, 647
7,032
5,542
4,158
2,365
4,917
2,583
4,466

$6, 171
3,644
1,888
3,540
2,708
628
5,121
3,846

$4,567 $172, 301
4,989
120, 306
164, 915
5,201
276, 925
5,587
373, 198
6,936
183, 275
8,047
7,893 1, 056, 519
8,512 1, 249, 920

151, 909
194, 645
225, 208
276, 858
341, 727
363, 084
448, 008
501, 230

47, 325
61, 462
44, 195
43, 023
C3, 115
78, 546
160, 682
144, 856

115, 281 63,503
106, 629 32, 965
94, 597 42, 846
120, 557 81, 590
117, 059 72, 172
113, 503 55, 101
123, 147 49, 435
115, 818 59, 733

13, 395 7,052
27, 125 7,290
25, 107 7,227
25, 748 7,270
22, 189 3,849
14, 897 5,242
13, 202 6,457
7,385 2,269

5,121
6,729
10, 880
15, 284
12, 996
22, 146
25, 255
21, 787

9,198
10, 372
11,476
12, 754
13, 727
14,838
15, 778
16, 784

412,045
420, 477
392, 101
491, 356

165, 028
201, 344
361, 243
349, 116

103, 139 73,320
132, 725 113, 389
132, 897 75, 359
129, 861 78,001

415
4,000
5,000 1,560
None. 4,379
36 2,312

9,396
3,185
7,490
41,845

16, 270
16, 434
16,549
16, 659

332, 400 436, 577
409, 611 420,823
208, 212 115, 538
73, 892 125, 534

594, 500 174, 477
613,408 217, 026
284, 803 38,945
180, 716 18, 710

141, 285 14,896
137, 213 44, 621
75,886 57, 014
78, 445 63, 543

30,000 4,347 57, 970
10, 734 2,158 77, 198
975 9,565
None.
None.
964 4,095

428, 184
655,604
760, 629
993, 328

172, 047
390, 610
447, 080
684, 681

256, 137
264, 994
313, 549
308, 647

391, 158
600, 473
702, 055
931, 673

70, 170 73, 419
98,233 82, 552
173,824 14, 496
116, 141 26,183

9,733
260
24,060 5,144
5,055 2,597
None. 2,112

970, 276
937, 253
934, 530
725, 798

632, 738
634,698
559, 139
438, 276

337, 538 827, 729 142, 547
302, 555 814, 859 122, 394
375, 391 876, 203 58,327
287, 522 891, 626 134, 172

1,313,893
630, 102

July

37, 028
55, 131
58,574
61, 655

869, 271 444, 622 920, 046 390, 847
357, 982 272, 120 613, 880 16, 222

73, 351
88,725
109, 006
87, 170

114, 675
71,749
55, 411
105, 141

189, 797 60,118
153, 138 48, 109
78, 891 51, 346

FedFedJoint eral Offered
eral
stock in terfarm
in
land 6 med,
loan
U.S.
credit
banks 6 banks banks7

$110, 498
237, 478
338, 234

$3, 144
69, 458
94, 257
59,846
2,476
67, 770
53, 016

$34, 257
76,951

373, 381 79, 124
546, 519 143, 410
732, 365 9 131, 837
879, 929 421, 394 $50, 883
974, 737 502, 183 64, 333
1, 045, 135 599, 265 81, 239
1, 128, 003 619, 764 72, 734
1, 182, 496 616, 129 73, 115

56, 259
69, 033
41,305
101, 628
110,827
109, 880
132, 717
118, 874

1, 158, 717
1, 168, 354
,175,858
, 180, 420

608,798 74, 888
609, 984 75,220
611,004 74, 119
610, 921 72, 351

158, 575
135, 129
100,027
144,100

16,724
16,847
16,890
16, 911

, 183, 672
, 184, 656
1, 185, 714
1, 187, 365

609, 363
609,580
608, 314
608, 706

70, 899
69, 978
67, 815
66,978

227, 969
271, 204
43, 591
None.

11, 980
15,396
4,425
18, 900

16, 932
17,007
17, 072
17, 109

1, 189, 345
1, 190, 278
1, 191, 724
1, 193, 846

608, 451
607,632
605, 595
605, 199

68, 619
76,547
78,685
81, 277

108, 949
65, 121
102, 527
59,298

6,417 17,022 13, 205
None. 7,037 28,725
None. 5,142 47, 326
10,000 1,002 2,485

17, 192
17,232
17, 296
17, 371

1, 195, 089
1, 199, 766
1, 202, 571
1, 203, 724

604,375
603, 827
604, 294
602, 421

79, 462
78, 532
80,706
77,609

36, 482
57, 857
179, 691
21,000

1, 204, 128
1,204,916

599, 413
597, 956

69, 326
68,101

66,000

27,616 22, 592

6,550

663, 260
700, 013
780, 896
596, 227
823, 434
912, 268
383, 642

Sept
Oct
Dec

1 Compiled by the Commercial and Financial Chronicle, except for data previous to 1920, which are from the New York Journal of Commerce. The columns "New
capital" and " Refunding" include all types of financing to be used for the purpose designated. Distribution of bond issues by classes, from 1920 through September, 1924,
appeared in June, 1923, issue (No. 22), p. 42, and in November, 1924, issue (No. 39), p. 187. Further details are given in the Commercial and Financial Chronicle.
2 gales of new securities by States and municipalities compiled by The Bond Buyer. The short-term loans are temporary, usually replaced later by permanent loans.
3 Compiled, prior to 1927, by The Financial Post, Canada; thereafter by A. E. Ames & Co., covering bonds issued in Canada; segregation between those sold in Canada
and those sold in United States are shown in weekly reports.
* Compiled by the U. S. Treasury Department from actual reports and estimates of the net amount of fully tax-exempt securities outstanding at the end of the month
(i e total outstanding less amounts in sinking fund or owned by the United States Government). The detailed estimates show separate classifications for (1) States, counties,'cities, etc., (2) Territories and insular possessions, (3) United States Government, and (4) Federal farm loan system. Monthly figures since January, 1913, are given
On P

» New incorporations represent the value of the authorized capital of new enterprises, exclusive of those under $100,000, incorporated in the principal Eastern States as
compiled by the New York Journal of Commerce.
* These data, from the Federal Farm Loan Board, represent loans made for agricultural development secured by mortgages on land and buildings, the Federal farm
loan banks being established by the Government in 12 districts, while the joint-stock land banks, of which 70 are now in existence, are private organizations. The banks
were closed during the greater part of 1920, pending litigation in the Supreme Court involving the constitutionality of the Federal farm loan act, and in 1921 many loan
requests could not be granted because the cessation of bond selling had depleted the resources. Monthly figures on loans closed from 1920 appeared in June, 1923, issue
? The Federal intermediate credit banks under the supervision of the Federal Farm Loan Board are located in the same cities as the 12 Federal land banks, as follows:
Springfield, Mass.; Baltimore, Md.; Columbia, S. O.; Louisville, Ky.; New Orleans, La.; St. Louis, Me.; St. Paul, Minn.; Omaha, Nebr.; Wichita, Kans.; Houston,
Tex.; Berkeley, Calif.; and Spokane, Wash. These banks lend money on staple agricultural products and make rediscounts for agricultural credit corporations and livestock
8 Compiled'by the V. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, representing the amount of foreign capital issues, both Government and
private publicly offered in the United States by American underwriters. Details by individual issues, classified by countries, are shown in the bureau's reports. Monthly
data from 1914 appeared in the April, 1928, issue (No. 80), p. 22.
* 6 months' average, March, June, September, October, November, and December.




131
Table 110.—NEW SECURITY ISSUES BY CLASSES
CORPORATE ISSUES

Foreign
govern- Total
ment corporate

YEAR AND
MONTH

Rail- Public Indusroads utilities trials

OOs

LONG-TERM REAL ESTATE BONDS

Purpose of issue
ShipLand, ping Grand
AcquiTo
build- and
Real sitions
ing, etc. miscel- total finance estate and
conlaneous
imstruc- mort- provetion gages ments

Kind of structure
InterOffice
and
est
other Hotels Apart- rates
comments
mercial

Thousands of dollars

Per ct.

$36, 640
24, 250
31,606
35, 942
20, 237
69,000
53, 782
42,844
64,761
54, 010

$228, 305
247, 192
199, 234
256, 107
269, 403
319, 881
394,843
441., 630
608,690
646, 087

$17, 343
31,490
54,607
54,294
43, 187
78, 358
42, 892
35, 215
80,234
60, 645

$38, 523
41, 402
55, 924
80, 007
94, 866
127, 470
143, 753
164, 538
248, 875
219, 461

$73,455
88, 595
43, 881
52, 818
68, 248
51, 512
76, 887
88, 938
97,915
129, 755

$54, 310
38, 222
27, 671
25, 192
18,822
15, 627
23, 545
41, 643
35, 445
21, 926

$5, 565
7,700
4,542
14, 875
21, 013
27, 958
62, 722
61, 347
55, 749
67, 447

$25, 908
30, 970
13, 450
28, 920
23, 268
18, 956
39, 623
46, 348
84,086
143, 152

$13, 338
19, 940
26,604
57, 963
53, 701
47, 562
56, 856

$8, 452
13, 014
19,001
33, 322
29, 480
22, 517
21,077

$1, 066
2,157
4,328
12, 613
10, 643
11, 435
17, 736

$2, 209
3,696
1,057
7,233
6,861
5,320
7,461

$6, 171
9,723
12, 214
21, 892
21,806
15, 542
16, 676

$2, 676
4,354
4,964
9,761
8,637
4,022
3,730

$2, 404
3,499
5, 567
8,155
7,261
5,125
3,517

52,383
74, 670
84, 140
121, 686

610, 035
785, 649
494, 373
520, 452

9,346
131, 872
89, 716
57, 830

309, 084
374, 775
188, 212
196, 731

106, 350
150, 115
50, 979
58,963

68, 588
2,700
31,500
79, 500

74, 381
55, 763
58, 510
56,594

40, 286
70, 424
75, 081
70, 508

67, 960
48, 798
46,840
49, 794

36, 767
17, 443
11,900
25, 912

17, 480
9,630
11,410
13, 937

6,663
14, 700
18, 790
1,470

23,295
18, 708
8,315
18, 177

4,050
925
2,860
11, 380

11, 827
3,780
2,775
2,720

6.13
6.08
6.03
6.12

23, 000
54,400
25, 596
81,000

712, 924
707, 548
371, 095
444, 278

129, 225
204, 223
14, 306
183,764

255, 614
155,006
115, 360
109, 821

83, 288
159,767
69, 127
65, 392

75,100
30,000
20, 750
25, 000

41, 510
74, 720
48, 936
38, 292

67, 124
83, 833
102, 616
22, 009

35, 520
68, 556
39, 719
32, 247

13, 740
36, 766
12, 223
19, 435

9,165
23, 960
15, 040
4,482

1,975
2,790
4,575
2,080

10, 070
26, 645
6,828
7,700

600
3,781
2,065
7,170

3,430
4,340
3,680
4,700

6.07
6.00
6.12
6.06

September
October
November
December

31,281
125, 623
35,800
67,547

451, 364
734, 081
617, 554
852,064

19, 493
32, 550
16, 796
73,686

200, 174
311, 832
252, 482
517, 412

82, 659
113, 368
180, 038
54,938

None.
42,000
8,200
42,000

45, 602
73, 729
42,730
58, 225

93, 437
160, 603
117, 309
105,803

42,763
59, 092
27, 131
52, 322

23,463
35, 819
12,460
24, 270

5,140
10, 523
5,241
11,207

3,310
525
1,850
5,115

19, 575
21, 980
9,155
16, 055

5,140 3,473
3,845 11, 519
2,660 2,226
3,790 7,025

5.98
6.03
5.88
5.87

1938
January
February
March
April

79, 808
117, 351
_ 85, 750
87, 130

577, 073
621, 821
753, 344
840, 472

78, 222
75, 216
192, 781
95, 053

210, 155
262, 825
233, 233
382, 541

118, 902
93, 570
132, 262
140, 438

2,200
20, 675
12, 952
7,300

78, 741
48, 038
73, 935
97, 152

77, 831
120, 797
106, 697
117, 988

61, 167
39,840
62, 962
87, 748

32, 759
14, 085
13, 520
29,220

12,900
2,710
35, 557
36, 865

6,533
12, 175
4,225
16, 323

29,000
22, 415
11,965
14, 605

650
700
4, 010
11, 395

4,309
1,910
4,060
3,635

6.01
5.78
5.87
5.84

May
June
July
August

79, 885
48, 550
41, 396
None.

768, 977
830, 434
323, 748
199, 426

28, 601
42, 158
18, 874
13, 726

242, 497
378, 637
57, 598
97, 776

153, 551
190, 356
98, 810
32, 989

22, 929
21,241
15, 030
None.

82, 253
74, 071
64,538
30,256

238,647
123, 971
68,374
44,678

77, 450
66, 364
48, 495
21, 947

44,515
27, 400
18, 581
9,970

20, 910
6,763
24, 079
5,590

2,600
2,610
1,510
3,252

45, 175
22, 430
9,786
4,785

10, 300
885
4,020
2,200

4,265
4,085
4,600
3,145

5.81
5.78
5.86
5.76

September
October
November
December

43, 600
36, 750
15,000
13,000

428, 184
655, 604
760, 629
993, 328

None.
45,830
57,800
79, 479

202, 239
214, 466
151, 851
199, 708

98, 234
114, 233
154, 752
228, 959

None.
7,GCO
99, 616
54, 169

57, 517
85,627
73, 745
43, 492

70, 194
163, 749
222, 866
362, 028

52, 116
64, 864
61, 360
37, 952

4,460
33, 290
12,590
12, 530

32, 955
11, 898
14, 930
7,622

530
1,509
26, 550
11, 750

2,510
15, 018
11, 095
11, 325

400
9,900
300
None.

270
8,423
1,970
1,530

5.79
6.12
6.02
6.09

1929
January
February
March..
April _

15,750
10,000
10,000
None.

970, 276
937, 253
934, 530
725, 798

61, 613
11, 695
21,500
159, 783

202, 134
295, 561
320, 222
127, 311

234, 405
168, 397
215, 350
148, 837

134, 570
16, 597
11, 594
35, 267

69, 009
118, 249
77, 314
33, 952

267, 545
300, 915
279, 185
203, 822

61,065
34,049
68, 431
21, 711

13, 610
8,945
23,250
12, 962

11, 245
7,824
31,663
4,529

26,200
2,870
9,280
2,000

12, 535
6,700
22, 340
5,390

None.
2,275
375
7,810

2,925
2,160
1,375
1,722

6.04
6.05
5.87
5.90

None. 1, 313, 893
6,000
630, 102

105, 308
91, 350

342, 919
129, 552

459, 215
105, 205

36, 102
45,641

48, 857
40, 843

319,290
217, 511

22, 868
20, 025

8,720
4,295

4,148
4,800

2,275
7,845

4,760
10, 845

2,900
700

1,885
2,200

6.11
6.07

1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

mo. av
mo. av
mo. av_
mo. av
mo av
mo. av__
mo av
mo. av
mo. av__
mo. av

1

1937
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August

May
June
July
August.

6.91
6.58
6.50
6.29
6.18
6.03
5.89

- _

September
October
November
Dp.np.m hpr
1
From the Commercial and Financial Chronicle, showing new financing in the United States. Corporate financing includes both stock and bond finances, and foreign
as well as American corporations. The industrial group comprises the following classifications given in the detailed statements: Iron, steel, coal, copper, etc.; equipment
manufacturers; motors and accessories; rubber and miscellaneous industrials. The data on long-term real estate bonds which represents only those put out by mortgage
bonding houses, have been segregated from detailed figures of individual issues in the land and building group as given in the Chronicle, eliminating data on stocks and
short-term bonds. These latter items, however, were shown in the September, 1925, issue (No. 49) of the SURVEY, p. 25, together with interest rates on the short-terin
bonds and the data shown here on long-term bonds extending back to January, 1922. In the classifications shown above by purpose of issue and by kind of structure, the
miscellaneous group, making the difference between the totals of the three classes shown and the grand total, has been omitted. The interest rates shown are the average
coupon rates on the long-term real estate bonds issued during the month.




132
Table 111.—BUSINESS PROFITS AND LOSSES
BUSINESS FAILURES »

Thous. No.
of dolls.

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

mo. av_ $22, 818
mo. av. 29, 821
mo. av. 25,106
mo. av. 16, 354
mo. av 15, 203
mo. av_ 13, 590
mo. av. 9,442
mo. av 24, 593

1921 mo. av.
1922 mo. av.
1923 mo. av.
1924 mo. av.
1925 mo. av.
1926 mo. av.
1927 mo. av_
1928 mo. av.

Thous. No. Thous. No.
of dolls.
of dolls.

353 $9, 583
385 13, 805
426 12, 436
7,616
349
308 5,843
230 4,825
155 3,139
220 7,380

929
1,071
1,336
994
786
541
334
461

$2, 869
4,704
3,335
2,655
2,732
2,644
2,002
6,547

,638
,973
,560
,718
,768
1,814
1, 929
1,995

375
473
414
434
424
450
474
494

1,166
1,410
1,089
1,197
1,263
1,272
1,340
1,373

11,641
11, 465
4,012
4,439
5,058
4,155
6,700
6,815

19, 488
17, 910
23, 379
23, 897
13, 974
13, 170
17, 626
15, 207

21, 232
22, 615
17, 495
16, 933
17, 948
16, 779
19, 016
18, 775

00

I

Canadian 2
Liabilities

Liabilities

Banks
(quarterly)

w
S

Dividend payments
Total
dividend
and
interest
pay- 3
ments

54 « $7,887
67 14, 001
84
9,306
73
1,598
61
4,614
1,284
60
4,131
48
59 12, 675
96
89
57
85
80
93
115
120

43, 254
19, 434
50,934
50, 731
41, 175
53, 019
35, 862
32, 413

630 $1, 388
54 2,562
33 2,698
12 1, 312
12 1,138
6 1,035
843
12
30 1,845
102
69
144
153
116
152
98
93

4,221
4,771
4,285
3,378
2,990
2,369
2,107
3,041

Interest
payments

E

Thousands of dollars

152 $148, 103
241 148, 948
219 155, 426
148 177, 919
93 199, 095
68 227, 061
52 265, 764
82 284, 573
199
271
243
192
176
176
168
156

Av.
payments
on
industrial
stocks
(Qtly.)*

Industrial Steam Street
and
Total
railrailmiscel- roads ways
laneous

Dolls.

Thous.
Thous.
Thous.
of
of dolls. No. of dolls. No. dolls. No.

1,336 $10, 366
1,523 11, 312
9,335
1,846
6,083
1,415
1,154
6,628
6,121
832
538
4,301
740 10, 666

52, 361
51, 989
44, 948
45, 269
36, 979
34,103
43, 342
40, 797

Firms

I

Liabilities

%

Firms

«

Trade estab- Agents and
brokers
lishments
Liabilities

YEAR AND
MONTH

Manufacturing
establishments
Liabilities

Liabilities

Total
commercial

DIVIDEND AND INTEREST PAYMENTS

e

$69,838 $38, 527 $24, 733
68, 481 36, 530 24, 549
66,020 36, 374 23,613
77, 176 44,986 26, 095
89,856 56,542 26, 038
85, 184 53,788 24, 135
78,912 48,264 23, 705
81, 841 50, 140 23,832

278, 484
76, 872 45, 200
283, 310
77,554 43, 723
298, 768
80, 271 45, 120
84, 391 47, 181
320, 049
340, 319 $251, 246 89, 073 49, 671
365, 932 268,208 97, 724 55, 365
464, 212 289, 283 174, 929 129, 623
495, 799 308, 598 187, 201 138, 432

23, 668
23, 508
24, 093
25, 100
26, 251
27, 593
29, 125
31,390

$4,906
5,368
5,149
6,020
6,493
6,318
5,977
6,074

$5.23
5.36
3.45
5.09
6.68
6.19
5.85
6.59

5,970
5,902
6,313
7,008
7,778
9,141
10, 390
10, 713

4.94
4.40
5.46
5.55
7.09
7.58
8.68
8.75
|

1937
SeptemberOctober
November..
December __

32, 786
36, 236
36, 147
51, 062

1,573
1,787
1,864
2,162

15, 349
17, 134
12, 786
29, 024

389
488
478
597

12, 052
14, 657
16, 949
16, 733

1,083
1,170
1,276
1,430

5,385
4,445
6,412
5,305

101
129
110
135

1938
January
February...
March
April .

47, 634 2,643
45, 071 2,176
54,814 2,236
37, 985 1,818

14, 871
12, 751
20, 412
16, 236

553
468
546
432

26, 446
24, 952
26,186
16,049

1,946
1,581
1,566
1,276

6,318
7,367
8,216
5,700

144
127
124
110

May
June..
July
August

36, 117
29, 827
29, 587
58, 202

2,008
1,947
1, 723
1,852

14, 230
12, 723
12, 932
16, 877

470
513
450
493

18,900
13, 781
12, 899
19, 096

1,407
1,325
1,161
1,241

2,987
3,324
3,755
22, 229

131
109
112
112

September __
October
November
December..

33, 957
34, 990
40, 601
40, 774

1,635
2,023
1,838
1,943

14, 727
13, 490
15, 446
17, 783

454
528
519
498

13, 567
17, 268
17, 224
18, 933

1,073
1,369
1.202
1,324

5,662
4,232
7,932
4,059

108
126
117
121

1929
January
FebruaryMarch
April

53, 877
34, 036
36, 356
35, 270

2, 535
1,965
1,987
2,021

16, 690
11, 891
15,001
10, 423

614
478
512
499

32, 024
17, 891
17, 190
19, 102

1,769
1,378
1,349
1,388

5,164
4,255
4,165
5,745

152
109
126
134

41, 216
31, 375

1,897
1,767

18, 954
12, 721

515
496

18, 191
13, 931

1,266
1,154

4,071
4,723

116
117

May
June
July
August
September.
October
November
December

I

20, 857

55

30,545

84

36, 802

109

28, 953

92

20,810

55

43, 085

116

37,509

81

54,458

148

1,349
2,148
2,529
3,124

145
173
162
184

392, 250
566, 175
386, 800
490, 675

250, 100
369, 850
227, 100
331, 175

142, 150
196, 325
159, 700
159, £00

115, 300 19, 750
155, 700 28, 375
113, 800 33, 500
119, 700 24, 050

7,100
12, 250
12, 400
15, 750

3,249
4,012
6,866
1,558

210
210
151
125

753, 200
344, 600
431,000
562, 210

460, 600
176,000
258,000
372, 050

292,600
168,600
173,000
190, 160

182, 800
125, 900
132,500
150, 280

33,800
34,200
34,000
29,380

21,000
8,500
6,500
10,500

3,697
1,681
1,406
2,589

127
126
124
135

344,000
470, 100
748, 704
333, 400

203, 500
316,900
466, 704
182,000

140,500
153,200
282, 000
151, 400

105,900
119,500
200,500
109, 450

27, 100
27,500
43,900
35,200

7,500
6,200
12,600
6,750

2,572
2,504
3,287
3,065

120
159
174
214

408,
586,
400,
566,

600
750
520
500

262, 500
388, 600
234, 220
382, 100

146, 100
198, 150
166, 300
184, 400

118, 450 20,400
156, 200 29, 400
118, 500 34, 900
141, 200 26, 900

7,250
12, 550
12,900
16, 300

2,241
2,443
707
2,435

185
178
183
141

853, 575
384,800
462, 870
608, 100

516, 375
199,000
264, 170
398, 100

337, 200
185, 800
198, 700
210, 000

215,000
139, 800
155, 000
167,000

39,100
36,900
36,500
32,200

22,200
9,100
7,200
10,800

4,416
3,758

164
154

398,000
558, 200
863, 356

237,000 161,000 124,500
386, 400 171, 800 136, 000
515, 156 348, 200 250,000

28,900
29,300
55,000

8.87

7,600
6,500
13,100

8.57

8.41

8.24

9.10
9.25

<

1 Compiled by Dun's Review; for annual data in greater detail, see April, 1924, issue of the SURVEY (No. 32), pp. 57-59. Monthly data on total commercial failures from
1913 2appeared in December, 1923, issue (No. 28), p. 53; monthly data on all classes from 1921 appeared in June, 1924, issue (No. 34), p. 55.
Canadian business failures from Bradstreet's.
3
Data compiled by New York Journal of Commerce. "Total dividends" include bank dividends not separately shown for those months where such payments are
reported. Monthly data for total dividend and interest payments covering the period 1913 to 1921 appeared in the September, 1922, issue (No. 13) of the SURVEY, p. 51
(figure for July, 1917, should be $333,011 instead of $633,011); and for dividends classified, covering the same period, in the October, 1922, issue (No. 14), p. 46.
4
Compiled by the Cleveland Trust Co. up to the first quarter of 1927 and thereafter by the Chase Securities Corporation, representing average dollar dividends paid on
the industrial stocks included in the Dow-Jones index of stock prices, comprising 12 stocks from 1900 through 1914 and 20 stocks from 1915 through 1924. The figures are
unweighted averages of the amount of dividends paid per share for these stocks in each quarter, reduced to an annual basis. Quarterly figures extending back to 1900 appeared in April, 1925, issue (No. 44), p. 29.
6
Yearly data are quarterly averages.




133
Table 112.—BUSINESS FAILURES BY GROUPS
TRADE ESTABLISHMENTS
Foods and tobacco

Clothing

Household
furniture

Chemicals
and paints

7
9
10
8
4
4
2
2

121
136
175
129
111
85
51
85

32
43
40
37
43
42
38
41

15
20
17
17
14
11
12
13

8
12
9
9
7
7
9
6

4
8
6
8
5
5
8
8

125
172
160
189
186
207
218
219

1,166
1,410
1,089
1,197
1,263
1,272
1,340
1,373

190
189
126
121
109
101
101
87

318
384
327
353
396
410
402
429

215
246
193
243
247
222
248
263

194
234
164
188
210
205
230
231

40
50
47
49
47
60
67
67

4
9
10
8
9
10
12
12

202
298
223
238
245
264
281
284

27
28
19
22

44
42
52
41

14
9
16
14

12
6
5
8

10
1
13
2

230
174
271
226

1,842
1, 508
1,468
1,342

176
162
106
119

500
359
435
398

402
269
276
229

362
280
266
246

63
97
77
63

19
13
18
15

320
328
290
272

23
34
38
29

8

4

19
21
26
19

9
18

4
11
4
13

10
3
9
10

227
200
200
224

1,292
1,310
1,187
1, 174

85
119
80
69

389
427
351
371

268
237
216
206

229
206
213
179

56
51
56
68

12
6
15
4

253
264
256
277

52
75
72
95

2
9
8
9

20
22
19
22

27
39
37
55

9
8
13
17

17
6
9
9

3
7
10
13

192
231
205
240

1,083
1,170
1.276
1,430

58
57
89
94

335
384
420
452

187
192
214
282

160
183
208
226

58
60
71
79

8
11
11
10

277
283
263
287

74
54
65
49

81
65
93
70

3
10
12
11

21
8
13
19

43
48
43
42

14
14
16
7

7
5
8

10
9
10
9

265
220
245
173

1,946
1,581
1,566
1,276

100
101
103
85

521
423
440
393

446
356
320
263

368
303
283
220

99
86
71
56

23
10
14
9

389
302
335
250

36
40
31
36

57
67
61
59

77
76
69
60

6
7
5
4

11
18
16
22

31
45
47
51

14
11
18
8

6
5
3
6

9
9
5
10

223
235
195
237

1, 407
1,325
1,161
1,241

93
78
77
54

408
426
387
423

265
248
202
210

263
228
179
171

60
57
55
71

14
14
11

295
281
247
307

454
528
519
4C8

35
33
46
30

74
79
85
69

73
94
105
107

8
13
6
13

6
18
9
11

24
47
29
46

15
14
18
8

4
6
12
6

3
7
6

212
217
202
202

1,073
1,369
1,202
j 1, 324

60
87
100
104

376
503
412
441

168
225
200
250

187
190
157
219

43
78
62
65

13
10
14
5

226
276
257
240

614
478
512
499

30
40
40
34

75
54
60
52

92
88
103
87

11
6
12
15

25
15
10
16

47
39
44
48

24
10
11
13

9
7
8
4

15
4
9
4

286
215
215
226

1,769
1,378
1,349
1,388

116
111
101
88

499
424
429
446

351
246
233
228

374
266
257
232

66
51
69
79

17
13
9
15

346
267
251
280

515
496
461

30
40
39

67
47
63

103
107
88

11
19
6

15
23
15

35
45
31

15
12
10

12
3
7

12
6
9

215
194
193

1,266
1,154
1,190

88
68
68

385
373
406

228
202
201

214
200
180

60
50

13
13
5

280
248
276

Total

•d
a
«h
0>
as ft
-2

oft
e
tt

All other

All other

41
43
59
45
35
26
13
11

Stone, clay,
and glass

140
168
222
137
96
64
37
53

Liquors and
tobacco

141
178
203
126
92
70
39
72

Leather, etc.

343
384
472
432
366
239
158
187

Foodstuffs

135
149
195
116
81
48
35
52

Printing and
engraving

929
1,071
1,336
994
786
541
334
461

Chemicals

132
147
169
145
123
98
65
84

Lumber

12
10
11
8
8
6
4
2

Textiles

4
8

9
10
15
11
8
7
4
5

Total

YEAR AND MONTH

Metals

General stores

MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS

Number of firms
1913 monthly average
1914 monthly average _
1915 monthly average. _
1916 monthly average _
1917 monthly average
1918 monthly average
1919 monthly average. _
1920 monthly average

353
385
426
349
308
230
155
220

32
31
32
21
22
19
17
24

73
87
88
57
54
34
19
48

42
40
40
38
43
28
20
17

6
6
6
4
5
4
4
5

15
18
23
17
12
12
5
4

22
24
30
41
25
15
14
24

11
10
11
9
7

1921 monthly average
1922 monthly average _ _
1923 monthly average- _
1924 monthly average
1925 monthly average
1926 monthly average
1927 monthly aver age. _ _
1928 monthly average

375
473
414
434
424
450
474
494

45
53
48
44
39
33
31
37

96
108
69
75
66
65
59
66

30
33
38
32
39
54
71
81

9
10
7
8
8
7
6
8

12
14
14
16
17
19
22
14

501
411
569
492

30
35
39
32

72
42
68
64

57
67
78
79

7
8
4

444
427
448
438

28
21
31
23

47
54
55
36

72
70
69
64

389
488
478
597

20
32
38
45

47
59
67
92

553
468
546
432

35
35
42
44

470
513
450
493

1927

Januarv
February
March
_
April
May
June _ _
July
August

__ _

September _ _
October
November
December.

6
6

1928

January
February
March
April
May
_
June
July
August

_

September
October
November
December...
January
February
March
April

1929
._

May
June .
July_._
August

September
October
November
December

!

*

_ _

i Compiled by Dun's Review. These tables give in greater detail the information presented in Table 111, by combining a still more detailed classification as presented
in Dun's Review into groups fairly comparable with the classification used for other data. Monthly data from 1913 appeared in the October, 1928, issue (No. 86), p. 19.




134

Table 113.—CORPORATION PROFITS AND STOCKHOLDERS
(QUARTERLY)
STOCKHOLDERS *

NET PROFITS '

$35
27
56
65
80
97

Shares
held
brokers

Per ct.
of total

Foreign

Domestic

Number

11, 258
11, 839
11, 816
6,884
2,235
1,773
1,727
1,500

41, 436
47, 777
3 42, 020
39, 365
44,531
64, 314
73, 510
88, 085

1,529
1,697
3 1, 980
939
1,191
1,484
1,475
1,300

51.48
46.73
45.87
55.08
51.88
43.22
40.65
30.35

53,205
56, 932
62,279
67,504
78, 597
96,035
115, 482
131, 643

1,041
1,175
1,270
1,187
999
1,143
1,239
1,267

138, 450
136, 181
138, 846
142, 718
144, 380
140, 954
142, 178
151, 182

1, 743
2,869
2,847
2,925
2,968
2,911
2,877
2,955

104, 621
97, 580
94, 489
96, 081
91, 043
87,467
91, 075
98,546

1,341
1,380
1,431
1,557
1,511
1,587
1,599
1, 685

22.45
24.36
22.76
22.97
26.31
28.01
26.23
23.69

163, 703
217, 599
265, 638
322, 693
353, 217
377,563
415, 734
439, 514

2,013
2,298
2,644
3,086
3,796
4,753
5,248
5, 313

1

|
$120
104
150
184
179
221

Foreign

Domestic

!

i

$34
38
47
63
67
63

Foreign

American Teleph,
& Teleg. Co.

72, 714
78, 682
81, 603
85, 343
93, 331
102, 798
111,316
126, 424

i

$246
246
283
308
271
298

U. S. Steel Corp.
(common stock)

Number

[

quarterly av .
quarterly av
quarterly av
quarterly av
quarterly av_
quarterly av
quarterly av___
quarterly av

1921 quarterly av_ _
1922 quarterly av. .
1923 quarterly a v _ _ _ $400
1924 quarterly a v _ _ _ 388
1925 quarterly av
480
1926 quarterly av... 647
1927 monthly av
606
1928 quarterly av_ _ . 582

Domestic

Millions of dollars

;•

1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920

S I

QC

Miscellaneous

1
H

Machinery

i!

•3
£

Metals and
mining

03

Ǥ>

Pennsylvania
R. R. Co.

Industrial
Motors and
accessories

1|

YEAR AND QUARTER

Telephone

| Railroad
and
p
telephone

$41
29
34
43
32
42

$12
13
14
18
19
22

$15
17
21
27
15
16

$6
5
8
11
10
17

$4
4
5
6
6

$8
10
13
16
18
20

i

1924
March
June __
September
December

374
328
412
439

203
189
286
307

35
37
37
43

136
102
89
89

37
23
22
25

45
30
18
22

24
18
16
8

12
13
15
12

5
4
6

4
4
4
4

8
9
10
12

142, 339
142, 965
143, 307
142, 261

2,987
2,901
2,903
2,913

97, 135
97, 577
94,904
. 94,708

1,542
1,549
1,558
1,577

22.39
20.45
22.82
26.21

296,738
314, 227
338,183
341, 625

2,760
2,875
3,199
3,508

1925
March
June
September
December

.

377
446
563
533

205
234
359
334

44
46
45
51

128
166
159
148

41
66
63
54

33
34
33
35

18
25
22
18

12
15
16
13

9
7
7
9

5
5
5
5

10
14
13
14

143, 224
146, 988
145,583
141, 725

2,939
2,966
2,981
2,986

92, 552
91, 910
90,651
89, 057

1,490
1,525
1,526
1,504

26.81
25.45
25.39
27.60

345, 451
354,279
355, 895
357, 242

3,740
3,994
4,102
4,347

1926
March
June
__ September
December
__

439
527
656
557

224
271
393
343

51
52
51
57

164
204
212
157

58
82
76
43

41
43
46
43

19
30
37
20

17
20
21
15

10
9
10
13

6
5
5
5

13
15
17
18

141, 097
141, 365
140, 153
141, 202

2,931
2,909
2,892
2,913

89, 102
92, 031
84, 287
84, 447

1,575
1,618
1,572
1,582

29.92
24.10
29.01
28.99

362, 093
368, 410
385, 907
393, 843

4,432
4,557
4,937
5,084

1927
March
June
September
December __

468
620
676
457

227
246
335
277

59
58
55
54

182
216
186
126

75
109
90
45

40
39
29
20

18
11
14
11

18
22
21
16

11
11
9
10

5
5
5
5

15
19
18
19

142, 593
141, 558
141, 938
142, 622

2,901
2,877
2,874
2,854

85, 529
88, 665
95, 351
94,756

1,599
1,604
1,653
1,539

27.59
26.53
25.69
25.11

412, 921
415, 024
416, 695
418, 295

5,190
6,267
6,287
5,247 '

1928
March
June
September— __ _.
December

461
553
665
648

217
248
358
370

62
65
61
64

182
240
246
214

90
123
109
G4

32
40
43
53

6
13
25
21

20
23
22
23

12
14
18
24

6
6
7
g

16
21
22
21

143, Oil
153, 294
154, 415
154, 008

2,810
3,016
3,032
2,963

95, 902
96,649
102, 457
99, 174

1,691
1,688
1, 748
1,612

23.86
22,79
23.95
24.15

430, 181
427, 195
451, 603
449, 077

5,220
6,172
6,426
5,432

576

260

70

246

94

65

11

23

27

8

18

157, 211
158, 456

2,996
2,978

101, 767

1,804

23.68

443, 570
453, 434

5,415
5,425

1929
March _ _ _ _ _ _
June
September
December
j

1930

March
June
Sp.ptfvmbfir

i

i

December
i]

l

1 Compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York from quarterly reports of net profits of 355 companies, consisting of 185 Class I railroads, 71 telephone, 18 motor
and 2accessories, 14 oil, 12 steel, 13 food, 10 metal and mining, 10 machine manufacturing, and 22 miscellaneous companies.
These data showing the growth of stockholders in three prominent c ompanies—a railroad, a public utility, and an industrial—have been furnished direct by the
respective companies and represent the number of holders of common stock at the end of each quarter, i. e., December figures are for Dec. 31 or Jan. 1.
3 Dec. 31 figures; other quarters of 191 g not available.




135

Table 114.—FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND CANADIAN TRADE
EUROPE
YEAR AND MONTH

England

CANADIAN
FOREIGN TRADE 2

THE AMERICAS

ASIA

SwitBelFrance6 Italy 7 gium 3 Nether- Sweden zerland Japan India * Canada Argen- Brazil 8 Chile"
tina
lands

Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per Rate per
gold
pound
dollar
milreis paper
rupee
yen
belga guilder krone
franc
lire
peso
sterling franc
peso
Par value
$4.87
1914 monthly av... 4.93
1915 monthly av
4.78
1916 monthly av... 4.76
1917 monthly av._ . 4.76
1918 monthly av
4.76
1919 monthly av... 4.43
1920 monthly av__. 3.66

$0. 039
.199
.182
.170
.174
.178
.137
.070

$0. 053
.195
.169
.155
.137
.134
.114
.050

$0. 139

.640
.370

.394
.344

$0. 402

$1.000

$0. 965

$0. 120

.403
.389

.956
.893

.941
.964
.997
.999
.990
.907

.234
.236
.249
.253
.267
.225

$0. 499
.491
.495
.507
.513
.533
.512
.504

$0. 365

.255
.205

$0. 193
.194
.187
.191
.211
.229
.190
.169

$0. 268

Imports

Exports

Thousands of dollars

$0.122

.226
.185

$40, 110
37, 568
63, 951
83, 838
75,848
78, 418
111, 410

$35, 693
54, 457
92,704
132, 791
103, 644
107, 903
108, 567

1921 monthly av.__
1922 monthly av~.
1923 monthly av...
1924 monthly av...
1925 monthly av...
1926 monthly av...
1927 monthly av...
1928 monthly a v...

3.85
4.43
4.57
4.42
4.83
4.86
4.86
4.87

.075
.082
.061
.052
.048
.033
.039
.039

.043
.048
.046
.044
.040
.039
.052
.053

.370
.385
.260
.230
.240
.172
.139
.139

.336
.385
.391
.382
.402
.401
.401
.402

.225
.262
.266
.265
.268
.268
.268
.268

.174
.191
.181
.182
.193
.193
.193
.193

.482
.478
.486
.412
.410
.471
.474
.464

.262
.287
.311
.318
.363
.363
.363
.365

.896
.985
.980
.987
1.000
1.000
1.000
.999

.730
.818
.786
.781
.914
.921
.963
.965

.131
.129
.102
.109
.122
.144
.118
.120

.121
.122
.122
.105
.116
.121
. 121
.121

66, 623
63, 534
75, 253
67, 345
74, 183
84, 022
90, 655
101, 850

68,058
74, 848
85, 710
89, 218
106, 925
106,983
103, 233
114,511

1937
May
June
July
August

4.86
4.86
4.86
4.86

.039
.039
.039
.039

.054
.056
.055
.054

.139
.139
.139
139

n 400

.401
.401
.401

.268
.268
.268
.268

.192
.192
.193
.193

.471
.467
.471
.473

.362
.362
.361
.361

1.001
.999
.999
.999

.962
.964
.966
.968

.118
.118
.118
.118

.120
.120
.120
.120

94, 412
101, 029
91, 369
99, 348

111,298
107, 201
80, 787
95, 955

September
October
November _
December.

4.86
4.87
4.87
4.88

.039
,039
.039
.039

.054
.055
.055
.054

.139
.139
.140
.140

.401
.402
.404
.404

.269
.269
.269
.270

.193
.193
.193
.193

.468
.466
.460
.462

.363
.364
.365
.367

1.001
1.001
1.001
.999

.971
.972
.971
.972

.119
.119
.119
.120

.121
.122
.122
.122

91, 803
93, 936
94, 312
83, 263

99, 335
105, 821
155, 521
132, 189

1938
January
February
March _ _
April

4,88
4.87
4.88
4.88

.039
.039
.039
.039

.053
.053
.053
.053

.139
.139
.139
.140

.403
.403
.403
.403

.269
.268
.268
.269

.193
.192
.193
.193

.469
.469
.472
.477

.367
.365
.365
.366

.998
.998
1.000
1.000

.971
.971
.973
.972

.120
.120
.120
.120

.122
.122
.122
.120

79, 506
85, 932
120, 418
78, 490

84,428
90, 387
109, 147
60, 455

May
June.. __
Julv
August

4.88
4.88
4.86
4.85

.039
.039
.039
.039

.053
.053
.052
.052

.140
.140
.139
.139

.404
.403
.403
.401

.268
.268
.268
.268

.193
.193
.193
.193

.466
.466
.459
.451

.366
.365
.363
.363

.999
.998
.998
1.000

.972
.969
.961
.959

.120
.120
.119
.119

.122
.122
.121
.121

113, 582
110, 694
103, 404
114, 175

120, 154
109, 139
127, 369
113, 904

September
October
November .
December

4.85
4.85
4.85
4.85

.039
.039
.039
.039

.052
.052
.052
.052

.139
.139
.139
.139

.401
.401
.401
.402

.268
.267
.267
.268

.193
.192
.193
.193

.458
.462
.464
.459

.363
.365
.365
.365

1.000
1.000
1.000
.998

.957
.956
.958
.958

.119
.120
.119
.119

.121
.121
.121
.121

106,066
112, 341
102, 967
94, 621

111, 856
143,955
170, 092
133, 245

4. 85
4.85
4.85
4.85

.039
.039
.039
.039

.052
.052
. 052
.052

.139
.139
.139
.139

.401
.401
.401
.401

.267
.267
.267
.267

.192
.192
.192
.193

.455
.452
.445
.446

.365
.364
.364
.363

.998
.996
.994
.992

.958
.958
.956
.956

.119
.119
.118
.118

.121
.121
.121
.121

96, 959
97, 042
135, 290
97, 517

97,296
83, 812
117, 520
67,154

4.85
4.85
4.85

.039
.039
.039

.052
.052
.052

.139
.139
.139

.402
.402
.401

.267
.268
.268

.193
.192
.192

.447
.439
.456

.362
.360
.360

.993
.992
.995

.955
.953
.954

.119
.119
.119

.120
.120
.120

125, 615
111, 949

109,436
112, 492

r

1939
| January
! February.
March
April
May
June _
July
August

_.

September
October
November . . _
December _ . _ _

i

1 Daily averages of noon rates for cable transfers reported to the Treasury daily by the New York Federal Reserve Bank. Average figures for the years 1914 to 1918*
inclusive, where given, are weekly averages of commercial quotations from the Annalist. Monthly figures on all items back to 1920 may be found in the May, 1922, issue
(No.2 9), p. 135.
Foreign trade statistics from Department of Trade and Commerce, Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
8
Parity established November, 1926. Prior thereto, the average values of the Belgian franc have been multiplied by 5 to obtain an equivalent quotation for the belga.
Oil this basis, the present belga was equivalent to 96.5 cents at the old pre-war par of the franc.
4
Parity established April, 1927. Prior to that, par value of the rupee was 48.66 cents.
" Parity established January, 1926. The average value of the paper peso in 1913 was 19.5 cents,
6 Parity established June, 1928. Prior to that the par value of the franc was 19.3 cents.
7 Parity established December, 1927. Prior to that the par value of the lire was 19.3 cents.
s Parity established December, 1926. Prior to that the par value of the milreis was 32.4 cents.




136
Table 115.—IMPORTS AND EXPORTS BY ECONOMIC CLASSES1
j

EXPORTS

IMPORTS

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

|

Food- ManuFinSemifacished
Crude stuffs,
crude, tured man ii- manumateriand
facfoodfacals
tures
food
tures
animals stuffs

Total

Foodstuffs, Manu- SemiCrude crude,
facmateri- and
tured manufacals
foodtures
food
animals stuffs

Finished
manufactures

AGRICULTURAL
EXPORTS 2

All
commodities

All

except
cotton

Rel. to 1910-1914

Thousands of dollars
i

1913 monthly av___ $149, 383
1914 monthly av. _ _ 149, 106
191 5 monthly av___ 148, 216
1916 monthly av.__
199, 303
1917 monthly av___
246, 039
1918 monthly av___
252, 601

$50, 462
49, 790
57, 991
84, 132
105, 682
101, 760

$18, 413
19, 561
20, 242
21, 678
32, 144
28, 795

$16, 518
21, 378
22, 770
28, 226
29,287
33, 114

$28, 355
23, 006
21, 748
34, 822
45, 124
54, 080

$34, 401
33, 936
24, 335
28,798
32, 327
33, 742

$204, 024
172, 675
291, 104
451, 887
513, 934
503, 990

$64, 017
40, 938
47, 280
60, 118
65, 061
79, 432

$14, 121
22, 939
38, 470
35, 107
42, 406
45, 620

$27, 023
25, 727
45, 880
54, 003
67, 228
117, 152

$33, 066
27, 949
39, 641
76, 022
109, 835
87, 773

$65, 120
53, 243
109, 584
218, 780
225, 066
172, 437

141
130
91
116

198
193
160
206

1919 monthly av___
1920 monthly av_ _ _
1921monthlyav__.
1922 monthly av___
1923 monthly av_._

325, 364
439, 873
209, 096
259, 396
316, 006

139, 521
146, 073
71, 090
96, 381
115, 737

45, 441
48, 136
25, 331
27,660
30, 234

46, 308
103, 179
30, 737
32, 290
44, 134

50, 860
66, 835
28, 669
45, 793
59, 976

41, 028
73, 094
51, 577
55, 642
64, 212

645, 818
673, 402
364, 911
313, 776
340, 893

134, 178
155, 902
81, 997
81, 800
100, 170

56, 530
76, 498
57, 687
38, 212
21, 457

163, 551
93, 080
55, 805
48, 965
48, 608

76, 854
79, 909
33, 270
36, 484
46, 977

213, 625
267, 032
135, 497
107, 720
123, 147

154
126
141
126
104

258
197
229
200
161

1924 monthly av___
1925 monthly av___
1926 monthly av_._
1927 monthly av___
1928 monthly av.-_

300, 830
352, 216
369, 241
348, 729
340, 954

103, 008
145, 672
149, 405
133, 471
122, 217

35, 406
41, 233
44, 980
42, 048
45, 820

43, 467
36, 076
34, 793
37, 550
33, 789

54, 657
62, 924
67, 024
62, 471
63, 554

62, 446
66, 311
73,039 i
73, 190
75,574

374, 804
401, 560
392, 643
396, 572
419, 175

110, 528
118, 505
105, 110
99, 398
107, 771

32, 724
26, 491
27, 922
35, 092
24, 556

47, 791
47, 813
41, 917
38, 608
38, 818

50,889
55, 140
54, 629
58,311
59, 696

132, 338
153, 695
163, 065
165, 163
188, 334

119
114
117
127
116

172
135
134
148
133

June_-_
July
August

346, 501
354, 892
319, 298
368, 875

135, 718
137, 511
121, 185
144, 232

37, 163
39, 619
34, 269
42, 656

39, 392
42, 172
35, 076
35, 471

63, 780
60, 384
61,523
66, 746

70, 448
75, 207
67, 244
79, 770

382, 385
348, 546
332, 994
367, 575

74, 831
63, 349
55, 023
55, 135

30, 684
25, 207
21, 909
46, 770

36, 933
36, 355
31, 278
34, 160

60, 958
62, 491
59, 369
59, 786

178, 979
161, 143
165, 414
171, 724

108
89
75
94

135
118
102
155

September
October
November
December

342, 154
355, 738
344, 269
331, 234

130, 660
119, 221
118, 394
122, 505

33. 190
44, 194
49, 146
51, 504

33, 016
41, 348
36, 123
28, 227

63, 096
67, 807
60, 092
59, 037

82, 193
83,168
80, 514
69, 961

416, 472
480, 460
452, 790
398, 361

102, 146
160, 282
145, 884
117, 572

69, 429
62, 425
46, 723
23, 303

38, 562
45, 643
42, 397
42, 052

54,790
55, 034
56, 005
59, 585

151, 545
157, 078
161, 781
155, 848

142
185
161
119

211
218
187
133

January___
February
March
_
April

337, 916
351, 035
380, 437
345, 314

133, 395
130, 882
145, 546
127, 023

48, 302
47, 544
53,452
46, 048

28, 724
36,039
41,007
43,390

61, 194
64,382
64,944
60, 672

66, 302
72, 188
75,488
68,181

401, 913
362, 614
409, 961
356, 057

112, 058
95,287
91, 619
74, 394

18, 564
13, 431
14,906
13, 259

42,804
39,354
42, 726
32, 810

63, 851
55, 755
62, 993
56, 187

164, 636
158, 786
197, 718
179, 407

113
100
100
82

127
111
117
99

May.
June
July
August

353, 981
317, 249
317, 848
346, 715

137, 799
109, 666
106, 065
122, 186

47, 968
48, 325
43, 174
45, 940

34,234
30, 005
33, 314
30, 060

59, 084
57, 655
60, 038
66, 337

74,896
71, 597
75, 258
82, 192

413, 829
380, 305
371, 471
371, 312

89, 811
74, 918
60, 177
52, 375

19, 741
17, 243
14, 217
29,310

33,120
31, 137
30, 661
34, 749

67, 150
63,046
61, 397
55, 873

204, 007
193, 961
205, 019
199, 005

92
76
64
75

103
91
84
126

September
October
November _
December

319, 618
355, 358
326, 565
339, 408

110. 289
117, 624
108, 350
117, 781

37, 207
42,007
44,573
45,296

33 771
35, 370
30, 758
28, 810

63, 455
71, 174
62,501
71, 214

74,906
89,184
80, 385
76, 308

4i4, 859
543, 171
538, 375
466, 232

120, 188
176, 354
193, 999
152, 076

42,363
52,383
31, 577
27, 682

35, 761
51,643
45,840
45, 207

51, 077
59,967
60,859
58, 195

165, 469
202, 824
206,100
183, 071

138
201
192
160

168
232
172
166

1929
January
February
March . _
April

368, 997
369, 442
383, 791
410, 666

142, 251
137, 791
138, 618
146, 932

47, 681
50,184
48, 943
52, 172

28, 773 !
35, 763 !
44, 330 !
45, 919

70, 981
69, 484
70, 525
82, 264

79, 211
75, 219
81, 375
83, 379

480, 384
434, 532
481, 716
418, 296

120, 619
92, 324
86, 458
71, 247

29,666
24, 082
21, 651
15, 814

47,535
39,629
42,996
37, 448

67, 703
60,961
66, 896
65, 441

214, 860
217, 535
263, 715
228, 345

133
107
102
86

155
134
129
112

400, 149
353, 409

141, 699
120, 717

46, 561
40, 954

42,290
36, 527

85, 918
75, 574

83, 681
79,637

376, 933
386, 864

57, 407
56, 132

21, 212
35, 922
14, 534 . 34, 090

59, 604
62, 079

202, 789
220, 029

79
69

122
102

1937
May

1938

i

May
June _
July
August
September
October
November
December

i

|

1 '

; '

"|

I

i
;

"

11

: ii

!

il

i Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, except agricultural exports. For changes in valuations, see footnote on
preceding page.
2
Compiled by the V. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, based on quantities of agricultural products exported in the perio* July, 1909, to
riod
June, 1914. "All commodities" includes 44 selected commodities, comprising usually about 75 per cent of the value of agricultural exports from the United States. The
quantities are weighted by the average export price for the base period. Monthly data from 1919 appeared in the March, 1925, issue (No. 43), p. 27. Details of compilation
and group indexes are given in the monthly supplement to Crops and Markets, issued by the Department cf Agriculture, for October, 1924, pp. 356-358.




137
Table 116.—IMPORTS BY GRAND DIVISIONS
FROM NORTH
AMERICA

FROM EUROPE

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

France

Germany

Italy

United
Kingdom

Total

FROM SOUTH
AMERICA

Canada

Total

FROM ASIA
AND OCEANIA

FROM
AFRICA
GRAND
TOTAL

Argentina

Total

Japan

Total

Thousands of dollars
1913 monthly average.
1914 monthly average.
1915 monthly average.
1916 monthly average.
1917 monthly average.
1918 monthly average.
1919 monthly average.
1920 monthly average.

$72, 056
65, 293
45, 529
52, 776
45, 929
26, 510
62, 544
102, 320

$11, 578
8, 685
6,493
9,074
8,220
4,959
10, 318
13, 805

$15, 351
12, 449
3,746
485
13
26
884
7, 403

$4,610
4,601
4,297
5,020
3,040
2,028
4, 922
6,280

$22, 663
23, 949
21, 525
25, 457
23, 340
12, 385
25, 766
42, 821

$32, 485
36, 783
42, 455
54, 870
72.. 665
81, 218
6,481
138, 555

$11, 844
13, 669
14, 800
19, 771
34, 473
37, 641
41, 225
50, 989

$16, 522
19, 127
26, 857
35,634
49, 902
50, 911
57, 294
83, 417

$2, 131
4,690
7,890
9,691
14, 855
19, 032
16, 597
17, 315

$26, 344
26, 265
30, 489
50, 865
71, 455
86, 837
99, 696
123, 058

$8, 245
8,808
9,026
15, 174
21, 139
25, 162
34,154
34, 548

$1, 978
1,638
2,887
5,158
6,089
7,126
9,349
12, 524

$149, 383
149, 106
148, 216
199, 303
246, 039
252, 601
325, 364
439, 873

1921 monthly average.
1922 monthly average.
1923 monthly average.
1924 monthly average.
1925 monthly average.
1926 monthly average.
1927 monthly average.
1928 monthly average.

63, 745
82, 600
96, 421
91, 341
103, 182
107, 155
105, 339
103, 896

11, 824
11,901
12, 468
12, 303
13, 120
12,668
13, 983
13, 229

6,690
9, 791
13, 433
11, 605
13, 679
16,541
16, 713
18, 511

5,191
5,328
7,689
6,251
8,517
8,377
9,081
8, 474

19,900
29, 739
33, 673
30, 539
34, 392
31, 933
29,828
29, 045

62,904
68, 538
83, 460
82, 930
81, 711
84, 298
82, 122
80, 059

27, 953
30, 337
34, 667
33, 262
37, 853
39, 657
39, 586
40, 775

24, 635
29,897
38, 952
38,840
43, 233
47, 332
43, 190
47, 451

4,994
7,140
9,606
6,275
6,681
7,422
8, 103
8,287

54, 447
72, 955
89, 918
81, 638
116,411
122, 421
110, 307
101,865

20,939
29, 525
28, 912
28, 338
32, Oil
33, 391
33, 509
32, 038

3,365
5,410
7,255
6,083
7,679
8,035
7,771
7, 517

209, 096
259, 396
316, 006
300, 830
352, 216
369, 241
348, 729
340, 954

1937
January
February
March
April

99, 181
90,563
112, 691
106, 548

12, 572
14, 195
14, 067
13, 454

15, 908
13, 246
16, 386
17, 817

9,011
6,713
8,735
11,061

21,428
25, 693
33, 860
27, 762

71, 993
79, 946
90, 050
86, 436

37, 563
31, 972
38, 995
36, 135

45, 007
43, 977
47, 328
46, 894

7, 542
6,700
8,380
9,388

129, 871
89, 938
116, 475
126, 103

37, 188
23, 264
33, 866
31, 864

10, 790 [
6,453
11, 787
9, 752

356, 841
310, 877
378, 331
375, 734

May
June..
July
August

98,706
99, 626
95, 761
109, 131

11, 158
12,908
11, 820
14, 729

14, 140
14,153
16, 148
17, 837

9,006
8,499
7,896
8,578

31, 469
29,591
29, 343
33, 038

85, 903
89, 836
77,830
82, 865

39, 464
40, 578
38, 158
39, 973

36, 637
40, 365
37, 631
46, 401

6,581
8,921
6,771
9, 694

119, 983
116, 592
101, 151
124, 801

33, 172
36,035
30, 025
47, 482

5,272
8,474
6,925
5,677

346, 501
354, 892
319, 298
368, 875

September.
October
November
December..

112, 625
121, 879
115, 076
102, 285

15, 923
18, 291
15, 460
13, 224

20, 162
20, 846
18,401
15, 511

8,585
11, 414
10, 697
8,777

29, 721
33, 119
33, 843
29,063

77, 784
84,752
81, 578
76, 485

41,902
44, 670
45, 113
40,504

38, 293
43, 268
44,945
47,529

10,017
8,536
8,296
6,413

106, 801
100, 768
96, 540
94,660

35, 369
33, 973
25, 639
34, 229

6,651
5,071
6,129
10,275

342, 154
355, 738
344, 269
331, 234

1938
January
February
March
April

97, 126
105, 897
104, 736
94, 284

12, 126
13, 918
12, 597
10, 429

15, 856
19, 227
18, 535
16, 726

8,846
8,099
8,238
7,899

23,089
28,799
32, 951
28, 087

76, 518
79, 430
88,524
85, 091

37,027
36, 370
39,418
35, 044

47, 192
47, 427
59, 239
49, 772

6,747
6,966
12, 525
9,746

107, 507
109, 313
120, 066
109, 777

32,001
33,593
30,748
29, 505

9,573
8,967
7,872
6,391

337, 916
351, 035
380, 437
345, 312

May
June
July
August

104, 150
95, 532
95, 596
107, 793

11, 169
11,918
11, 321
15, 075

16, 126
15, 793
20,668
21, 023

8,570
8,145
6,956
6,876

86, 092
73, 905
77, 533
78, 216

43, 183
41, 027
41, 798
43, 254

47, 394
51, 102
45, 894
51, 043

10, 723
10, 319
8,119
8,975

109, 728
87, 237
89, 788
100,880

38,536
22, 317
24,888
38, 993

6,617
9,472
7,037
8,782

353, 981
317, 249
317, 848
346, 715

September..
October
November
December

102, 315
121, 234
107, 254
110, 832

13, 783
17, 279
15, 096
14, 037

18, 661
22, 309
18, 669
18,539

6,548
10, 072
10, 479
10, 954

34, 847
27, 871
28,103
27, 535 i
I
26, 373
33, 417
28,156
29,313 |

76, 926
84,398
78,921
75, 148

42, 209
47,404
41,638
40, 932

37,560
41, 535
41,229
50,021

6,313
6,677
5, 555
6,778

97, 554
100,888
92,847
96,792

33,741
35, 261
31,943
32, 924

5,263
7,302
6,314
6, 615

319, 618
355, 358
326, 565
339, 408

1939
Januarv
February
March . _
April

107, 118
104,342
109, 812
113, 960

13, 703
13, 799
14, 522
11, 422

19, 374
21, 487
20, 766
24, 423

9,022
8,272
8,518
9,847

27, 527
25,501
31,458
29,961

82,284
79, 926
92,253
93,650

42, 053
36, 981
39, 938
40, 389

57,889
60,171
60, 716
61, 247

9,422
10, 601
12, 679
13, 061

113, 330
115, 310
110, 470
124, 518

38, 424
32,158
38,020
28,820

8,287
9,693
10,541
17, 300

368, 997
369, 442
383, 791
410, 666

113, 770

13, 949

20, 626

10, 374

29,753

92, 412

44, 330

53,579

9,172

130, 080

33, 827

10,308

400, 149
353, 409

May..
-. . _
June
July
August..

_

_
•

September.. ,_
October
November
December

1

_

!

i
1

Compiled by the U. S. Department of Commerce, ftureau of Foreign and Domestic Commercef and represent imports of merchandise only. Up to and including May,
1921, import values represented " actual market value or wholesale price at the time of exportation to the United States, in the principal markets of the country from whence
exported, including the value of all containers and coverings, whether holding liquids or solids, and all other costs, charges, and expenses incident to placing the merchandise,
in condition, packed ready for shipment to the United States." (Tariff act of 1913.) Beginning with June, 1921, the import values are either the actual foreign market
value as denned above, or " the export value, including any export tax imposed by the country of exportation," whichever is higher. (Emergency tariff act of May 27,1921.)




138
Table 117.—EXPORTS BY GRAND DIVISIONS
TO NORTH
AMERICA

TO EUROPE

YEAR AND MONTH

Total

France

Germany

Italy

United
Kingdom

Total

Canada

TO SOUTH
AMERICA
Argentina

Total

TO ASIA AND
OCEANIA

TO
AFRICA

GRAND
TOTAL
Total

Japan

Total

Thousands of dollars
1913 monthly
1914 monthly
1915 monthly
1916 monthly
1917 monthly
1918 monthly
1919 monthly
1920 monthly

average
average
average
average
average
average
average
average

$124, 964
111,608
214, 451
317, 773
338, 538
321, 558
432, 306
372, 174

$12, 827
14, 175
41, 733
71, 735
78, 399
77, 600
74, 447
56, 349

$29, 328
13, 191
981
188
2
()
2
()
7,730
25, 953

$6, 556
8,161
22,477
25, 294
34, 920
41, 015
36, 890
30, 980

$49, 228
49, 984
99, 870
157, 282
167, 450
171, 774
189, 88.0
161, 319

$50, 098
40, 132
46, 567
77, 046
105, 081
110, 457
107, 983
160, 764

$33,599
25,885
28,754
50,409
69,077
73,906
61, 187
80,988

$12, 210
7,584
12, Oil
18, 356
25,991
25, 226
36, 812
51, 993

$4, 582
2,261
4,403
6,406
8,925
8,759
12, 992
17, 811

$17, 319
14, 700
20,009
39, 211
45, 567
50, 250
74, 775
86, 932

$5, 208
3,479
3,811
9,096
15, 528
22, 815
30, 530
31, 495

$2,411
2,110
3,095
4,501
4,282
4,933
8,160
13,806

$207, 002
176, 135
296, 223
456, 887
519, 459
512, 424
660, 035
685, 668

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928

average
average
average
average
average
average
average
average

196, 992
173, 613
174, 451
203, 775
216, 979
192, 512
192, 815
197, 909

18, 745
22, 247
22,678
23,472
23,358
22, 000
19, 065
20, 058

31,027
26, 343
26, 403
36, 702
39, 195
30, 347
40, 140
38, 937

17, 955
12, 575
13, 961
15, 595
17, 096
13, 117
10, 971
13, 510

78, 510
71, 319
73, 527
81, 912
86, 155
81, 051
70, 005
70, 611

94, 132
76, 305
90,514
90,837
94,863
98,040
104, 419
110, 114

49, 473
48, 057
54, 327
52, 003
54, 064
61, 547
69, 711
76, 226

22,777
18,840
22,443
26, 188
33, 551
36, 959
36,513
40,068

9,236
7,962
9,698
9,758
12, 397
11,965
13, 624
14,908

53, 782
45, 910
54,827
55, 925
56, 340
64,771
62, 777
69, 546

19, 620
18,200
22, 019
20,859
18, 137
21, 730
21,464
24, 013

6,071
4,648
5,056
5,858
7,421
8,440
8, 924
9,726

373, 753
319, 315
347, 291
382, 582
409, 154
400, 722
405, 448
427, 363

210, 714
174, 216
187, 294
187, 285

20, 302
13, 507
17, 269
17, 069

40, 257
35, 762
36, 985
35, 999

13,238
9,881
10, 317
9,599

89, 819
70, 461
72, 791
64,671

88,054
87, 250
101, 062
110, 551

50, 718
53, 984
65, 945
74, 459

44, 584
31, 995
' 38,415
39, 623

15, 355
10, 532
12, 577
13,306

66, 370
71,448
74,204
67, 344

22,700
22, 971
28,623
20,985

9,680
7,528
7,999
10, 572

419, 402
372, 438
408, 973
415, 374

May
June
July
August

171, 773
154, 952
142, 927
168, 083

18, 086
14, 907
11, 411
14, 403

31, 367
29,941
24, 115
30,239

8,352
9,496
7,940
9,332

61,638
56, 103
52, 789
57, 670

120, 057
108, 072
98, 724
109, 058

83,978
74, 312
64,772
75, 241

33,947
31, 468
36, 034
38, 391

12,388
11, 389
15,239
15, 678

59, 493
54,710
54,579
50, 692

18, 550
13, 698
15, 190
12, 199

7,869
7,764
9,545
8,527

393, 140
356, 966
341, 809
374, 751

September
October
November _ _
December

211,570
253, 827
241, 088
207, 180

21, 084
29, 054
28, 542
23, 147

51,783
62,661
58, 716
43, 858

8,169
14,494
14, 926
15, 907

72,463
89, 959
79, 197
72, 498

118, 505
114, 543
106, 394
90, 749

85, 725
80, 682
69, 994
56, 713

33,884
32, 719
39, 725
37, 373

12, 976
13,640
15, 381
15, 025

53,061
77, 698
64,726
61,876

17, 923
33, 711
27, 853
23,166

8,247
9,888
9,007
10,462

425, 267
488, 675
461, 940
407, 641

January
February
March
April

207, 546
184, 304
194, 424
161, 578

21,300
15, 758
18, 696
13, 114

42,648
37, 424
35, 058
29, 435

14, 530
13, 648
11, 317
11, 014

74, 371
68, 924
70, 495
56, 902

87, 320
91, 090
110, 709
101, 735

54,180
60, 784
72, 939
70, 307

34, 812
31, 461
40,222
33,825

12,565
11, 184
14,884
11, 776

72,286
55, 081
65,583
59, 369

26, 108
15, 081
20, 113
16, 985

8,814
9,513
9,680
7,420

410, 778
371, 448
420, 617
363, 928

May
June
July
August___

188, 847
161, 579
152, 285
149, 216

18, 535
15, 733
15, 918
15, 167

33, 102
28, 371
22, 092
24, 579

15, 149
11, 254
11, 853
9,956

61, 834
52, 298
52, 098
52, 827

123, 466
113,810
110, 919
118, 041

88,956
81, 684
77, 940
84,963

38, 243
38, 999
43,907
43, 767

14, 082
15, 686
16, 736
17, 348

63,018
63,727
61,866
59, 971

22, 998
21,637
17,987
15, 517

8,983
10,546
10,006
8,011

422, 557
388, 661
378, 984
379,006

December

192, 840
268, 856
274, 485
238, 953

20, 049
28, 928
31, 110
26, 385

46, 298
57, 989
65, 563
44, 681

14, 275
16, 936
16,163
16, 030

59, 182
97,963
105, 461
94, 971

115,
126,
118,
103,

500
793
276
709

87, 139
89, 492
77,229
69, 101

33, 805
49, 251
49, 826
42, 695

11, 457
19,848
18, 396
14, 938

71, 917
92,484
90,225
79, 022

27, 542
39, 137
37, 198
27, 855

7,544
12,630
12,100
11, 466

421, 607
550, 014
544, 912
475, 845

1939
January
February
March ......
April. __

235, 731
200, 046
211, 907
172, 233

26, 268
24, 408
24, 621
19, 444

41, 159
34, 339
32, 993
26, 552

15, 995
12, 712
15, 057
13, 066

90,696
69,304
75, 659
59, 289

110, 186
107, 397
130, 734
128, 035

70, 927
70, 762
90,642
91, 928

51, 949
53, 075
53, 059
44, 591

19, 370
19, 394
19, 122
15, 874

80, 364
70, 221
79, 814
69, 491

26, 114
22, 472
23,086
20, 517

9,792
11, 015
14,397
11,455

488, 023
441,754
489, 911
425,806

146, 600

13, 249

24, 396

9,771

54,533

132, 681

97,641

36, 829

13, 863

61, 332

17, 385

8,550

384,993

monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly
monthly

1937
January
February
March
April

_ _
_ _

1928

__

Sfiptfimbfii*
October
November

May
June
July__
August

September
October
November
December

^
|
1

_

1
1

1 Compiled by the U, S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, and represent exports, including reexports, of merchandise only. Values
are those at time of exportation in the ports of the United States whence exported, except reexports from bonded warehouses, which are expressed in their import value.
2 Total for year 1917 is $3,275. No figures for 1918.




139

SOURCES OF DATA
[Only sources presenting current material are given here: Sources of data used to fill gaps in early figures are noted in their respective detailed tables, thus making this table
a complete record of current source material for the SURVEY!
CURRENT PUBLICATION *

DATE OF PUBLICATION

I.—REPORTS FROM GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS, FEDERAL, STATE, AND FOREIGN
ARGENTINE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE .
BRITISH BOARD OF TRADE
CANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
CANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.
FEDERAL
FEDERAL
FEDERAL
FEDERAL
FEDERAL
FEDERAL

FARM LOAN BOARD__
KESERVE BANK OF ATLANTA
_.
RESERVE BANK OF BOSTON
RESERVE BANK OF CHICAGO
RESERVE BANK OF KANSAS CITY_.
RESERVE BANK OF MINNEAPOLIS..

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF NEW YORK_._.
FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF PHILADELPHIA.
FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION-

IOWA BUREAU OF LABOR...
_
__.
MARYLAND COM. LABOR AND STATISTICS
MASSACHUSETTS DEPT. LABOR AND INDUSTRY.
MASSACHUSETTS DEPT. PUBLIC UTILITIES
MEXICAN SECRETARY OF INDUSTRY, COMMERCE, AND LABOR.
MILWAUKEE PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT OFFICE...
NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
NEW YORK STATE DEPT. LABOR
NEW YORK STATE DEPT. PUBLIC WORKS
OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.._
PANAMA CANAL
TEXAS STATE COMPTROLLER
U. S. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE:
BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS._.

BUREAU OF PUBLIC ROADS_
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE:
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

Flaxseed exports from Argentina
Tea stocks in United Kingdom
Employment in Canadian trade-unions
Operations of Canadian employment service
Foreign trade of Canada
Canadian railroad operations
.
Canadian iron, steel, coal, flour production, etc..
Canadian electric power production
Agricultural loans by land and credit banks, etc.
Refined sugar shipments
Installment sales, New England dept. stores ...
Agricultural machinery
Retail sales of lumber by yards
Retail sales of lumber by rural yards
Housing rental advert isements
Foreign exchange rates
Corporation profits
Employment in Pennsylvania and Delaware
Employment and pay rolls, anthracite mines...
Debits to individual accounts
Condition of Federal reserve banks
Condition of reporting member banks
Monetary gold stocks and interest rates
Barley and rye receipts and rye stocks
Sales of loose-leaf tobacco
Index numbers of production trade._.
Employment in Illinois.
Railway revenues and expenses
Telephone operating revenue and income
Telegraph operations and income
Express operations and income. __
Fuel consumption by railroads.
Railway employment
Factory employment in Iowa.._
Factory employment in Maryland
Massachusetts employment
Milk receipts at Boston
Mexican petroleum production and exports

Estadistica Agro-Pecuaria...
Board of Trade Bulletin
Labour Gazette (Canadian)
_
Labour Gazette (Canadian)
Foreign trade of Canada
Operating Revenues, etc., of Railways*.-.

Factory employment in Milwaukee
New Jersey factory employment
New York factory employment and earnings
New York State canal traffic
Factory employment in Oklahoma
Panama Canal traffic
Sulphur production._
Government employment in Washington, D. C.

Press release*
Business and Financial Conditions
Labor Market Bulletin and press releases*
Annual report
Oklahoma Labor Market
The Panama Canal Record
Pressrelease*
_
Not published._

Federal inspected slaughter.
Prices of farm products to producers
Wool stocks in dealers' hands and wool prices._.
Crop production...

Crops and
Crops and
Crops and
Crops and

Cold-storage holdings
Movement of cattle, hogs, and sheep
Receipts of butter, cheese, eggs, and poultry
Production of dairy products and meats
Car-lot shipments of fruits and vegetables
Farm labor, wages, supply, etc
Wheat prices
Stocks of tobacco
Consumption of butter, cheese, and meats
Index of agricultural exports
Federal-aid highways
Wages of common labor, by geographic divs

Crops and Markets.
Crops and Markets.
Crops and Markets.
Crops and Markets.
Crops and Markets.
Crops and Markets.
Press release*
Press release*
Crops and Markets .
Crops and Markets.
Public R9ads
Not published

Press release*
Not published currently.
Monthly Business Review
Monthly Review
Business Conditions.
-Not published in form used
Business Conditions
Business Conditions
Fed. Res. Bull, and daily statement*
Monthly Review
__
Business and Financial Conditions
Business and Financial Conditions
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*
Fed. Res. Bull, and weekly press releases*
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin
Federal Reserve Bulletin
The Employment Bulletin
Preliminary statement Class I roads
Operations of large telephone companies..
Not published
Not published
._
Fuel for Road Locomotives
Not published
Not published in form used
Not published in form used
Monthly statement*
Not published
_
_
Boletin del Petroleo...

Markets
Markets
Markets
Markets and press releases*...

Monthly.
Semimonthly.
Semimonthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
1st of month.
1st of month.
1st of month.
1st of month.
1st of month.
Daily and monthly.
Quarterly.
1st of month.
1st of month.
Sun. papers and monthly.
Fri. morn, papers and mo,.
Fri. aft. papers and mo.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.

Monthly.
Monthly.
Yearly.
15th of month.
Last weekly issue of month.
Quarterly.
Monthly supplement.
Monthly supplement.
Monthly supplement.
1st of mo. (cotton); and
10th (other crops).
Monthly supplement.
Monthly supplement.
Weekly.
Quarterly.
Monthly supplement.
Monthly supplement.
20th of month.
One month after end of qtr.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.

Semimo. during season.
Cotton ginned
Preliminary report on ginnings*
.
15th of month.
Cotton consumed and on hand
_ Preliminary report on cotton consume1
20th of month.
Wool machinery and cotton spindles*.
Active textile machinery.
First week of month.
Leather, hides, shoes, gloves, production, etc
Census of hides, skins, and leather*
30th of month.
Leather gloves and mittens
Pressrelease*
18th of month.
Preliminary report on cottonseed*
Cottonseed and cottonseed oil.
30th of month.
Hosiery production, stocks, etc
Press release*
30th of month.
Knit underwear production, etc
Press release*
30th of month.
Men's and boys' and work clothing
Press release*
30th of month.
Malleable castings
Press release*
30th of month.
Wheat flour production from May, 1923
Press release*
One month after end of qtr.
Wheat and wheat flour stocks
Press release*
30th of month.
Pyroxylin coated textiles..
Press release*
20th of month.
Stokers, sales from January, 1923 __
lease*
Press relea
30th of month.
Wool consumption and stocks
Press release*
30th of month.
Steel barrels
Press release*
20th of month.
Fabricated steel plate, new orders.
Press release*
30th of month.
Box board
Press release*.
One month after end of qtr.
Electrical goods, new orders
Press release*
One month after end of qtr.
Press release*
Electric locomotives, mining and industrial
15th of month.
Press release*
Electric industrial trucks and tractors
30th of month.
Press release*
Floor and wall tile
20th of month.
Fire extinguishers.
Press release*
30th of month.
Galvanized sheet metal ware
Press release*
25th of month.
Babbitt metal consumption
Press release*.30th of month.
Floor and wall tile
Press release*
Enameled sanitary ware
20th of month.
Press release*
25th of month.
Press release*
Vitreous china plumbing fixtures
One month after end of qtr.
Fats and oils, production, consumption, stocks. Statistics of fats and oils*.
Press release*
30 days after end of qtr.
Glues and gelatin, production and stocks
20th of month.
Fabricated structural steel.
Press release*
Automobile production from July, 1921
Press release*
20th of month.
* This is not necessarily the source of the figures published in the SURVEY, as many of them are obtained direct from the compilers prior to publication in the respective
journals. This column and the right-hand column have been added to assist readers in obtaining current statistics between publication dates of the SURVEY.
*Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets,




140
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued
• CURRENT PUBLICATION

DATE OF PUBLICATION

I.—REPORTS FROM GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS, FEDERAL, STATE, AND FOREIGN—Continued
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Contd.
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS (Continued)

30th of month.
20th of month.
25th of month.
20th of month.
10th of month.
30th of month.
10th of month.
30th of month.
25th of month.
15th of month.
20th of month.
30th of month,
10th of month.
30th of month.
20th of month.
Last week of month.

DIVISION OF NATIONAL PARKS..
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR:
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE

Production of electric power*..
Production of electric power*..
Not published

End of month.
End of month.

Employment agency operations

BUREAU OF NAVIGATION
BUREAU OF STANDARDS
U. S. PATENT OFFICE
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR:
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Report on Portland cement output*.
Commerce Reports
Not published
Not published

Electric power production
Consumption of fuel by public utility plants
Visitors to national parks

BUREAU OF MINES.

Press release*
Press release*
Press release*
Press release*
Press release *
Press release *
Press release*
Press release*
Pressrelease*
Pressrelease*
Press release*.
Pressrelease*
Press release*
Press release*
Monthly statement
Monthly Sum. Foreign Commerce (Pt. I)i.
Not published.
Monthly Sum. Foreign Commerce (Pt. II)
Commerce Reports.—
Pressrelease*
Commerce Reports
Press release *
Petroleum statistics*..
Explosive statistics*-..
Weekly report on production of coal*.

Portland cement, production, etc..
Vessel construction and losses
Building material price indexes
Patents granted

BUREAU OF FISHERIES..
BUREAU OF FOREIGN &.ND DOMESTIC
COMMERCE.

Wood chemical operations, crude and refined
Steel castings, new orders and production
Steel furniture, shipments
Porcelain plumbing
fixtures
..I
Locomotive shipments and unfilled orders
Earnings oi public utilities
Plumbing goods price index
Domestic pumps and water systems
Water softeners, shipments
Terra eotta, new orders
Steel boilers, new orders...
Enameled sheet-metal ware
Public-merchandise warehouses
Index numbers of stocks, and unfilled orders
Fish catch at principal fishing ports
All imports and exports
Fuel loaded for consumption by vessels
Vessels cleared
Ship charter rates index
World rubber stocks
Foreign loans issued in United States
Stocks of radio sets
Petroleum, crude and refined, production, etc...
Explosives, production, shipments, etc
Coal and coke production.

Report of Activities of State and Municipal Employment Agencies.
Not published
Wholesale Prices of Commodities
Monthly Labor Review..
Employment in Selected Industries
Monthly Labor Review
Statement of Postal Receipts*
Not published
Not published
Daily Statement of the U. S. Treasury....
Not published.
Not published
Not published

Every 4 or 5 weeks.

Immigration and emigration statistics
Wholesale prices and index
Retail price indexes
Factory employment, payroll, etc
Industrial disputes
Postal receipts
Money orders
Passports issued
Government debt, receipts, and disbursements..
Tax-exempt securities
Domestic receipts of gold at mint
Oleomargarine, production and consumption of
ingredients.
Consumption of manufactured tobacco, snuff,
cigars, cigarettes, and oleomargarine.
Ethyl alcohol, production, stocks, etc

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
U. S. POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT..
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE...
U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT..
BUREAU OF THE MINT
_.
BUREAU OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT:
ENGINEER CORPS..'__.

Sault Ste. Marie and Cape Cod Canal traffic
Ohio, Monongahela, and Allegheny Rivers,
cargo traffic.
Barge traffic on Mississippi River
Venezuelan petroleum production and exports. _
Wisconsin factory earnings and employment

MISSISSIPPI-WARRIOR SERVICE
VENEZUELAN MINISTER OF INTERIOR.
WISCONSIN INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION.

Middle of next month.
Quarterly.
30th of month.
Monthly.
Second or third weekly
issue of month.
20th of month.
First weekly issue of mo.

15th of month.
Monthly.
Monthly.
Monthly.
7th of month.
10th of month.
Last day of month.

.Statement of Tax-paid Products*.

First week of month.

Not published
Monthly during season.

Monthly statistical reportNot published
Not published
Not published currently
Bulletin on Wisconsin labor market..

15th of month.

II.—REPORTS FROM COMMERCIAL AND TRADE ASSOCIATIONS
ABRASIVE PAPER AND CLOTH MANUFACTURERS' EXCHANGE.
AMALGAMATED ASSOCIATION OF IRON, STEEL,
AND TIN WORKERS.
AMERICAN BUREAU OF METAL STATISTICS
AMERICAN DRY MILK INSTITUTE
AMERICAN ELECTRIC RAILWAY ASSOCIATION...
AMERICAN ERECTORS' ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN FACE BRICK ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR..
AMERICAN FUR MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN METAL MARKET
AMERICAN NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS' ASSOCN..
AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE

Shipments of abrasive paper and cloth

Not published _

Wages, steel workers, Youngstown district

Trade papers..

Copper, silver, lead, arsenic
Powdered milk, new orders
Passengers carried, electric railways
Fabricated steel plate, new orders
Face brick production, stocks, etc
Trade-union employment
Fur sales
Tin deliveries and metal prices
Stocks and consumption of newsprint paper
Steel ingot production
Trackwork production
Sales of iron, steel and heavy hardware

Financial and trade papers..
Monthly re port*
Aera.
Not published
Trends in the Face Brick Industry..
The Federationist..
Not published
Trade paper
Monthly report
Press release to trade papers*
Trade papers....
Not published

_

AMERICAN STEEL AND HEAVY HARDWARE
ASSOCIATION.
Paper and wood pulp production, etc
Monthly report*
AMERICAN PAPER AND PULP ASSOCIATION
Bulletin
Gasoline and kerosene consumption.._
AMERICAN PETROLEUM INSTITUTE
_
Car Surpluses and Shortages*
AMERICAN RAILWAY ASSOCIATION (Car Serv- Freight car surplus and shortage
Car loadings and bad-order cars and locomotives. Information Bulletins*
ice Division).
Not published
...
Bushel baskets
AMERICAN VENEER PACKAGE ASSOCIATION
Not published
Walnut lumber and logs
__
AMERICAN WALNUT MFRS. ASSOCIATION
Not published
_
AMERICAN WASHING MACHINE MANUFAC- Washing machine shipments
TURERS' ASSOCIATION.
Production and stocks zinc, retorts operating
Press release to trade papers*..
AMERICAN ZINC INSTITUTE
_.
Not published
ASPHALT SHINGLE AND ROOFING MFRS. ASSOCN. Prepared roofing shipments
_ Not published.
Assoc. CORN PRODUCTS MANUFACTURERS.... Corn ground into starch, glucose, etc
The Constructor
ASSOCIATED GENERAL CONTRACTORS OF AM... Indexes of construction costs and volume
Trade papers.
ASSOCIATION OF COTTON TEXTILE MERCHANTS. Cotton textiles, production, stocks, etc
Financial papers...
ASSOCIATION OF LIFE INSURANCE PRESIDENTS Life insurance, new business, premiums, etc
Not published
ASSN. OF MANF. OF WOODWORKING MACH_. Woodworking machinery
Not published
BAND INSTRUMENT MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCN. Band instrument shipments
Not published
BINDERS BOARD MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCN... Binders board production..
*Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.
i Imports and exports of gold and silver in Part IE.




Bimonthly.
Monthly,
I Monthly.
I Monthly.
First week of month.
Monthly.
7th of month.
Quarterly.

Weekly.
Weekly.

13th of month.
Monthly.

I

141
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued
CURRENT PUBLICATION

DATE OF PUBLICATION

II.-REPOB,TS FROM COMMERCIAL AND TRADE ASSOCIATIONS—Continued
BOSTON GRAIN AND FLOUR EXCHANGEBUREAU OF RAILWAY ECONOMICS
CALIFORNIA REDWOOD ASSOCIATION
CALIFORNIA WHITE AND SUGAR PINE ASSOCN..
CASH CHECK MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
CENTRAL FABRICATORS ASSOCIATION
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
CLEVELAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
COLD-FINISHED STEEL BAR INSTITUTE
COMMERCIAL LOCK WASHER STATI. Bu._
COMMON BRICK MANFRS. ASSOCN. OF AMERICA..
CONTINUOUS FOLD PRINTERS ASSOCIATION
COTTON-TEXTILE INSTITUTE
ELECTRIC HOIST MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCN...
ELECTRIC OVERHEAD CRANE INSTITUTE
FELT MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
FINE COTTON GOODS EXCHANGE
FOUNDRY EQUIPMENT MFRS. ASSOCIATION. _.
GAS HEATING BOILER AND FURNACE ASSOCN..
GLASS CONTAINER ASSOCIATION-HARDWOOD MANUFACTURERS' INSTITUTE
HYDRAULIC SOCIETY
ILLUMINATING GLASSWARE GUILD _ _
LAKE SUPERIOR IRON ORE ASSOCIATION.
LIFE INSURANCE SALES RESEARCH BUREAU..
LOWER MICHIGAN LUMBER MANUFACTURERS.
MAPLE FLOORING MANFRS. ASSOCIATION
MINNEAPOLIS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
MOTOR AND ACCESSORY MFRS. ASSOCIATION__.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BUTTON MFRS
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FINISHERS OF COTTON FABRICS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FLAT ROLLED
SHEET MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF GLUE MANFRS
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PIANO BENCH AND
STOOL MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL ASSOCN. OF REAL ESTATE BDS
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STEEL FURNITURE
MANUFACTURERS.
NATIONAL AUTO. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
NATIONAL BOILER AND RADIATOR ASSN
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CREDIT ASSOCIATION..
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MFRS. ASSOCIATION
NATIONAL FERTILIZER ASSOCIATION
NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL CONFERENCE BOARD. _.
NATIONAL MACHINE TOOL BUILDERS' ASSOCN..
NATIONAL PAPER Box MFRS. ASSOCIATION
NEW ORLEANS BOARD OF TRADE
_.
NEW ORLEANS COTTON EXCHANGE
NEWS PRINT SERVICE BUREAU
NEW YORK COCOA EXCHANGE
NEW YORK COFFEE AND SUGAR EXCHANGE...
NEW YORK METAL EXCHANGE.
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
NORTH CAROLINA PINE ASSOCIATION
NORTHERN HEMLOCK AND HARDWOOD MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
NORTHERN PINE MANFRS. ASSOCIATION.
OAK FLOORING MANFRS. ASSOCIATION
OCEAN PEARL BUTTON MFRS. ASSOCN...
OHIO STATE FOUNDRYMEN'S ASSOCIATION
PACIFIC CANNED FISH BROKERS' ASSOCIATION..
PACIFIC COAST PLYWOOD MANUFACTURERS'
ASSOCIATION.
PAPERBOARD INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION...
PLATE GLASS MFRS. OF AMERICA..
PLYWOOD MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
PORCELAIN ENAMEL MANUFACTURERS'ASSOCN.
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
RICE GROWERS' ASSOCIATION OF CALIFORNIA..
RICE MILLERS' ASSOCIATION
ROPE PAPER SACK MANFRS. ASSOCIATION
RUBBER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
RUBBER GROWERS' ASSOCIATION..RUBBER TRADE ASSOCIATION
SALES BOOK MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION-..
SAVINGS BANK ASSOCN. OF STATE OF N. Y
SHEET MET£L WARE ASSOCIATION
_.
SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
SOUTHERN FURNITURE MFRS. ASSOCIATION
SOUTHERN PINE ASSOCIATION__
STEEL FOUNDERS' SOCIETY..
TIRE AND RIM ASSOCIATION._
_
_.
TWIN CITY MILK PRODUCERS' ASSOCIATION. _.
UNITED TYPOTHETAE OF AMERICA
VACUUM CLEANER MANUFACTURERS ASSN
WEBBING MANUFACTURERS' EXCHANGE
WEST COAST LUMBERMEN'S ASSOCIATION
WESTERN DOOR MFRS. ASSOCN
WESTERN PINE MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCN
WESTERN SHEET AND TIN PLATE MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
WlREBOUND BOX MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCN..
WIRE CLOTH MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION.
" Multigraphed or mimeographed sheets.




Receipts of wool at Boston
Average railway receipts per ton-mile
Passengers and tonnage carried 1 mile
._
Redwood lumber production, etc
Sugar pine lumber production, etc
Cash checks, shipments
Fabricated structural steel, new orders, etc
Wheat, corn, and oats, receipts, etc
Factory employment in Cleveland
Cold-finished steel bars
_.
Lock washer shipments
_^
Common brick shipments, stocks, etc
_.
Commercial forms
Cotton yarns and cloth printed
Electric hoists, orders and shipments
Overhead cranes, shipments, etc
Roofing felt production, stocks, etc..
Fine cotton goods production
Foundry equipment, new orders, etc
Gas-fired boilers and furnaces
,___
Glass container production, etc
Hardwood lumber, stocks, etc
Steam, power, and centrifugal pumps
Illuminating glassware production, orders, etc
Consumption, stocks, and shipments, iron ore
Life insurance, new business and lapses, ordinaryHardwood lumber, production, etc
Maple flooring production, etc
Linseed-oil and oil-cake shipments __
Shipments of accessories and parts
Fresh-water pearl buttons, stocks, activity, etc..
Finished cotton goods, billings, orders, shipments, and stocks.
Steel sheets, production, stocks, etc..

Trade papers.Not published..
Summary of operating statistics
Not published
Not published
Not published
Not published
Trade papers...
The Clevelander
Not published
Not published.
Monthly report..
_
Not published
Weekly report
Not published _
Not published _
Not published
Trade papers
_.
Report on monthly volume of business..
Not published
Monthly report*.
Monthly report
Not published-_
Not published
Monthly report*
Monthly release
Not published _
Not published
Monthly statement _
Business Bulletin
Weekly report
Not published

Daily.

Shipments of animal glues
Production, shipments, and unfilled orders of
piano benches and stools.
Real estate conveyances
Steel furniture, shipments, orders, etc

Not published..
Not published _

Production of automobiles..
Cast-iron boilers and raqiators__
Credit conditions, electrical trade
Electrical products, shipments, orders, etc
Superphosphate and fertilizer
Cost of living, wages, and hours of labor
Machine-tool orders, shipments, etc
Paper boxes, shipments and pay roll
Rice distribution through New Orleans
Cotton receipts into sight
Newsprint production, stocks, and shipments
Cocoa shipments, etc
Coffee receipts, stocks, etc
Tin stocks and deli series. _.
_
Loans to brokers
North Carolina pine, production, etc
Hemlock and hardwood lumber production,
etc.
Northern pine lumber and lath_
Oak flooring, production, etc
Ocean pearl buttons, shipments, orders, etc
Ohio foundry iron, meltings, stocks, etc
Shipments of canned salmon
.
Douglas fir plywood production, etc

Not published
Not published
Not published
Not published
Not published
Monthly press release..
Not published
Not published
Monthly report
Monthly report.
Monthly bulletin
Monthly bulletin
Monthly statement
Trade papers
Financial papers
Not published
Not published

Paperboard shipping boxes and box board
Plate-glass production..
_
Plywood, orders, etc
New orders and shipments of flatware
Cement paving contracts
Rice, receipts, stocks, shipments (Calif, mills)-..
Rice, receipts, stocks, etc. (southern mills)
Shipments of rope-paper sacks
_
Rubber tires, heels, soles, crude stocks, etc
Rubber stocks in Europe, Asia, and Brazil
Rubber prices
Shipments and orders of sales books
_.
Savings banks deposits in New York State
Galvanized and enameled sheet metal ware
Raw silk consumption, machinery activity, etc..
Furniture shipments and unfilled orders. _1
Yellow pine production and stocks
Steel castings, bookings, and production
Production of automobile rims _ _
Milk production, Minnesota
_.
Printing activity
V acuum-cleaner shipments
_
Elastic webbing, shipments.
Douglas fir lumber production, etc
Fir doors, Pacific coast
Western pine lumber production, etc
Wages, steel workers, Youngstown district

Not published
Financial papers
Not published
Not published
Concrete Highway Magazine_
Not published
Monthly report
Not published.
Monthly reports (not published)
Bulletin of Rubber Gn•owers'' Association. _
'
Not publishedNot published.
Not published in form used.
_
Not published
Monthly press release to trade papers*
Not published in form used
Not published in form used
Not published._
Financial papers _ .
Not published-_.
Typothetae Bulletin
Trade papers
Not published.
Not published _
Not published-Not published
Trade papers..

Monthly.

Daily.

Monthly.

18th of month.
Monthly.
Weekly.

Not published.

Bulletin
Not published.

-!

Not published
Not published. _
Not published
Monthly report* (not published)..
Not published
Weekly reports

Weekly report
Rotary cut veneer, receipts and purchases
Wire cloth, production, shipments, stocks, etc.. Not published

21st of month.
First week of month.
First week oi month.
First week of month.
First week of months
5th of month.

Monthly.

Monthly.

Monthly.

5th of month,
20th of month.
Monthly.

Bimonthly.

142
SOURCES OF DATA—Continued
DATE OF PUBLICATION

III.—REPORTS FROM TECHNICAL PERIODICALS
Composite pig iron and steel prices; tin pricesStock sales and prices
State and municipal bond issues and yields
. _ Visible supply of grains (except rye)
Check payments and business failures, Canada
Wholesale price index
_
Chemical price index .
CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
Mine price of bituminous coal
COAL AGECotton, world visible supply and bond flotations
COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL CHRONICLE
New corporate securities .
Fairchild cotton goods and silk goods index
DAILY NEWS RECORD
. .
DENNY PUBLISHING Co
Magazine and radio advertising cost
New York bond sales and prices
Dow, JONES & Co (WALL STREET JOURNAL)
Mexican petroleum shipments
Business failures and wholesale price index
.
DUN'S REVIEW
ELECTRICAL WORLD
Sales and consumption of electrical energy, central stations
ENAMELIST __ _
Household enameled ware
Rand gold production; lead, zinc, copper, and silver prices
ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL- PRESS
ENGINEERING NEWS RECORD
Construction cost index
HAY TRADE JOURNAL.
Hay receipts
IRON AGE
Pig-iron production, furnaces in blast, etc
IRON TRADE REVIEW
Iron and steel prices. ._
...
Shipments, etc., zinc and lead ore, Joplin districtJOPLIN GLOBE _
MONETARY TIMES
Canadian fire losses
NAVAL STORES REVIEW.
Turpentine and rosin, receipts and stocks, 3 ports
Newspaper advertising
NEW YORK EVENING POST
Dividend and interest payments and new incorporations
NEW YORK JOURNAL OF COMMERCE
Fire losses
NEW YORK PRODUCE REVIEW AND AMERICAN CREAMERY_ Milk receipts at Greater New York
NORTHWESTERN MILLER
Flaxseed, receipts, etc
OIL, PAINT, AND DRUG REPORTERPrice indexes of drugs, oil, etc; Argentine flaxseed stocks
Magazine advertising
__
PRINTERS' INK
_
Book production
PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY
RAILWAY AGE
Railway equipment orders
Sand lime brick production, etc
ROCK PRODUCTS
RUSSELL'S COMMERCIAL NEWS
_
., Wheat flour production and stocks (computed)
STATISTICAL SUGAR TRADE JOURNAL
Sugar stocks, receipts, meltings, and Cuban statistics
WORLD'S RUBBER POSITION (BRITISH)
World shipments and stocks of rubber
AMERICAN METAL MARKET
THE ANNALIST
THE BOND BUYER
BRADSTREET'S

SOURCE

DATA

First or second week of month (daily) .
First weekly issue of month (Fridays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Weekly (Saturdays).
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays) .
Weekly (Wednesdays) .
Weekly (Thursdays) .
Weekly (Saturdays) .
Last weekly issue of month (Saturdays).
First week of month (daily).
Third week of month.
First week of month (daily).
20th of month (daily) .
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays) .
First weekly issue of month (Saturdays) .
Monthly.
Second weekly issue of month (Saturdays) .
First weekly issue of month.
Weekly (Fridays) .
First weekly issue of month (Thursdays) .
Weekly (Thursdays).
Weekly (Saturdays) .
Pt. II of this magazine (last of month).
First week of month (daily).
10th of month (daily) .
Last issue of monih.
Weekly (Wednesdays),
Weekly (Mondays).
Second week of month.
Third week of month.
Monthly.
Fourth week of month (Wednesdays).
Weekly (Fridays) .
Monthly.

CURRENT PUBLICATION

DATE OF PUBLICATION

IV.-REPORTS FROM PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS
(Excluding individual firms reporting data to be combined with other firms or trade associations)
ABERTHAW CONSTRUCTION Co
I
AMERICAN APPRAISAL Co
AMERICAN TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH Co
AMES, A. E., & Co
CHILDS Co
CHASE SECURITIES CORPORATION
OOMPAGNIE UNIVERSELLE DU CANAL MARITIME DE SUEZ.
DICKSON, R. S., & Co
DODGE. F. W., CORPORATION
_
GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION
_
GRAND, F. & W., 5-10-25 CENT STORES
GRANT, W. T., Co...
_
HAFFARDS, G. M., & Co
HERCULES POWDER Co...

Building costs
Construction costs
Stockholders in the company
Canadian bond sales.
Restaurant sales
Dividends paid on industrial stocks.
Suez Canal traffic

Southern cotton mill stocks index
Building contracts
Sales of closed cars, sales to dealers and to users..
Chain-store sales
Chain-store sales
Fall River cotton mill dividends
Steam naval stores, production and stocks
HORWATH & HORWATH...
.._ Hotel room occupancy
LAW, A. W., & Co..
Mill dividends, Spartanburg County, S. C
LEE, GEORGE C., Co
Cocoa, spot price
World ship construction...
_
LLOYD'S..
_
KRESGE, S. S., Co.
Chain-store sales
KRESS, S. H., & Co....
Chain-store sales.
MCLEAN BUILDING REPORTS, LTD..
_. Canadian building contracts
MCCRORY STORES CORPORATION
Chain-store sales
METROPOLITAN FIVE AND TEN CENT STORES. Chain-store sales
Factory labor turnover
METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE Co..
MURPHY, G. C., Co.
Chain-store sales
NEW YORK TRUST Co
Indexes of stock and bond prices
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, BUREAU OF BUSI- Employment, construction industries, Ohio
NESS RESEARCH.
O'SHAUGHNESSY'S SOUTH AMERICAN OlL Petroleum data for Mexico and Venezuela
REPORTS.
PENNEY, J. C., Co
_. Chain-store sales
Stockholders in the company
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD Co
New passenger-car registrations_.
POLK, R. L., & Co
PULLMAN Co
Pullman passenger traffic and operations._.
SANFORD & KELLEY
New Bedford cotton mill dividends
SEARS, ROEBUCK & Co
Mail-order sales
SEIDMAN & SEIDMAN
Sales of furniture in Grand Rapids district .
Chain-store sales
_
SILVER, ISAAC, & BROS
STANDARD STATISTICS Co
_
Stock and bond price indexes
Restaurant sales. _
THOMPSON, J. R., Co
Unfilled orders
UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION
Earnings
Stockholders
Wages of common labor
Restaurant sales
WALDORF SYSTEM, INC
WARD, MONTGOMERY, & Co.
Mail-order sales
WOOLWORTH, F. W., & Co_.
Chain-store sales
' Multigraphed, mimeographed, or duplicated sheets.




Construction trade papersAmerican Appraisal News.
Financial papers
Weekly bond summary *__.
Monthly report...
Not published
Le Canal de Suez
Financial papers
__
__
Statement on Building Statistics.
Financial papers.
_
Financial papers
Financial papers
Bradstreet's
Naval Stores Review
Horwath Hotel Accountant
Financial papers
Not published.
New York Journal of Commerce.
Financial papers.
Financial papers.
Canadian Building Review.
Financial papers
_
Financial papers
__
Not published
Financial papers
The Index
Bulletin

is

Monthly.
Third week of month.
Monthly.

5th, 15th, and
month.
Weekly.
Monthly.
Monthly.

25th of

Quarterly.
Monthly. .
Monthly.
Semiannually.
First week of month.
First week of month.
First week of month.
Monthly.
First week of month.
Monthly.
Monthly.

South American Oil Reports.
Financial papers..
Financial papers
National New Car Reporting Servic
Not published
Bradstreet's-.
Financial papers.
Not published.
Financial papers
Standard Securities Servia
Monthly press release*
Pressrelease*...
Press release*
Financial papers
Special reports*
Quarterly press release*._.
Financial papers _
Financial papers _

First week of month.
Quarterly. ,
Monthly.
Quarterly.
First week of month.

10th of month.
Quarterly.
Quarterly.
Occasionally.
First week of month.
First week of month.

GENERAL INDEX
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 22-138) only. Items in the il
text are arranged in groups, which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also Table of Contents, " page 1
Page
Abrasives, paper and cloth
63
Accessories, automobile
50
Acetate of lime, production, etc
77
Acid, sulphuric, price and exports
81
Active textile machinery
27, 31, 33
Advertising:
Magazine and newspaper
116
By radio
116
Rentals, Minneapolis
64
Agencies, employment
110
Agents and brokers, failures
132
Agriculture:
Foreign trade
135
Marketings, index
23
Price indexes
25, 26
Wages
111
Agricultural implements
41
Agricultural loans and mortgages
124,
130
Air, mail dispatched by
116
Alcohol, ethyl, and wood (methanol)
77, 78
Allegheny River, cargo traffic
101
American Telephone & Telegraph
Co., stockholders
134
Animal fats and glues
85
Animal products:
Marketings, index
23
Price index
26
Apartments, bond issues
131
Apparel, wearing:
Production, etc
28
Sales, chain, stores
117, 118, 119
Wholesale trade
122
Apples:
Production (crop estimate)
86
Stocks and shipments
90
Argentina:
Flaxseed, exports, and stocks
83
Foreign-exchange rates
135
Foreign trade with
137, 138
Arsenic, crude and refined
80
Asphalt, production, stocks and imports
53
Assets, life-insurance companies
124
Automobiles:
Accessories, rims, registrations,
etc
50
Earnings, manufacturers
134
Production, exports, sales, etc__ 49
Production index
22
Stock prices
129
Tires and tubes
55
Visiting national parks
102
Babbitt metal, consumption
48
Band instruments, shipments
48
Bands, rubber
56
Banks:
Condition, interest rates, etc__ 125,
126, 127
Failures
132
Farm loans. _:
130
Barley:
Exports, prices, etc
89
Production (crop estimate)
86
Barrels, steel
38
Bars, cold-finished steel
38
Baskets, bushel
72
Baths, enamel, orders, etc
43



Page Canada— Continued.
Beef, production, etc
93
Life-insurance, new business ____ 124
Methanol__________________77,78
Belgium, foreign-exchange rates
135
Newsprint paper, production, et c _ 59
Benches, piano
71
Binders' board, production
61
Oats, grindings, and oatmeal production ____________________ 89
Boilers:
Cast-iron, including gas-fired
40
Power, electric ________________ 106
Railroads, operation ___________ 102
Steel, new orders
37
Salmon, canned, exports _______ 98
Bonds:
Silver, production and stocks ___ 126
Government, outstanding
130
Held by life-insurance compaSlaughter, inspected ___________ 57
Wheat and flour, production,
nies
124
etc______________________87,88
New issues
130,131
Prices and yields
127, 128 Canals, traffic ____________________ 101
Sales
128 Canned goods:
Book paper and books
60
Milk, condensed, etc ________ 94, 95
Boots and shoes. (See Shoes.)
Salmon, shipments ____________ 98
Boston:
Cape Cod Canal, cargo traffic ______ 101
Milk receipts
95 Capital issues. (See Securities.)
Wool receipts
27 Cars, railroad, freight and passenger
Box board, production, receipts, etc_ 61
104, 105
Boxes, paper, production, etc
61
and cast-iron products ___ 39,
Bradstreet 's, price index
25 Castings receipts, shipments, prices, 40
Cattle,
Brazil:
and slaughter ___________________ 91
Coffee, receipts and clearances. _ 98 Cement, production, stocks, etc _____ 75
Foreign-exchange rates
135 Cereals. (See Grains.)
Brick:
Housing costs
64 Chain stores:
Sales ________________ 117, 118, 119
Production, stocks, etc
73, 74
Stock prices __________________
Unfilled orders, index
24 Check payments __________________ 129
British India, foreign-exchange rates. 135 Checks, cash, shipments ____________125
60
Brokers:
Failures
132 Cheese, production, receipts, etc ____ 96
Loans to
125 Chemicals:
Dyes and explosives ___________ 78
Buildings:
Employment index ____________ 108
Contracts awarded
65
Production and prices _____ 23, 80, 81
Cost indexes, losses, etc
64
Pay-roll index ________________ 113
Security issues
131
Price indexes --------------- 25, 80
Building materials, price indexes __ 25, 64
Stock index __________________ 24
Burlaps, imports
33
Time operations, factory ___ 114, 115
Butter, production, receipts, etc
98
Wood distillation and alcohol. 77, 78
Buttons, ocean pearl, production,
etc
32 Childs Co., restaurant sales _________ 119
Chile:
Cables, power
46
Foreign-exchange rates _________ 135
Cake and meal:
Nitrate production _______ ______ 81
Cottonseed, production, etc
82 China, vitreous, plumbing fixtures ___ 74
Linseed, shipments, etc
83 Cigars and cigarettes, consumption
Calendered rubber clothing
55
and exports _____________________ 99
California:
Circulation, money and notes ___ 125, 126
Petroleum, stocks
51 Citrus fruits, car-lot shipments ______ 90
Redwood lumber, production,
Clay and glass products:
etc
66
Employment index ____________ 108
White-pine lumber, production,
Pay-roll index_________________113
etc
68
Production, prices, etc_ 73, 74, 75. 76
Rice, stocks and shipments
90
Time operations ___________ 114, 115
Canada:
Unfilled orders index ___________ 24
Automobiles, production and
Cleaners, vacuum _________________ 41
exports
49 Clearances, ship ___________________ 100
Bond sales
130 Clearings, bank. (See Check payBuilding, contracts awarded
65
ments.)
Canals, cargo traffic
101
Check payments
125 Cleveland, employment, factory _____ 109
Cheese, exports
96 Cloth, cotton ___________________ 31, 32
Coal and coke, production
34, 36 Cloth, wire _______________________ 44
Employment
110 Clothing:
Cost indexes, retail ____________ 26
Failures
132
Production, stocks, etc _________ 28
Fire losses
64
Rubber-proofed _______________ 55
Foreign-exchange rates
135
Sales, chain stores _____________ 119
Foreign trade
135, 137, 138
Sales, wholesale _______________ 122
Iron and steel, production
35, 36
(143)

144
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 22-138) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups, which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also " Table of Contents," page 1
p
Page
Page
Coal:
age
42 Expenditures, United States GovernEmployment, anthracite mines. 108 Cranes, electric overhead
ment
127
Loadings, freight cars
104 Credit:
Bank
125 Exports. (See Foreign trade and
Prices, production, stocks, etc__ 34
individual commodities.)
Electrical trade
45
Production index
22
78
Farm
130 Explosives, production, etc
Retail-price index
26
Express, earnings
102
Cocoa, imports, shipments and price. 98 Crops:
Coconut oil, consumption, etc
84
Cotton, production
30
37
Coffee, imports, stocks, etc
98
Food, production and value
86 Fabricated steel
55
Coke:
Marketings, indexes
23 Fabrics, rubber-proofed
Production, exports, etc
36, 53
Price indexes
25 Factories. (See Manufactures and
Industrial corporations.)
Coal consumption
34
Tobacco, production
99
132, 133
Cold-storage holdings:
Cuba, sugar movement
97 Failures, business
31
Apples
90 Customs, receipts
127 Fall River, textile-mill dividends
Farm implements
41
Butter and cheese
96
Farm loans and mortgages
124, 130
Fish
98 Dairy products:
Meats
92, 93
Butter and cheese
96 Farm products:
Price index
25, 26
Concrete, paving contracts
75
Milk
94,95
Production indexes
23
Conduits, nonmetallic
46
Marketing indexes
23
111
Construction, building:
Price indexes
26 Farm wages
Fats, animal, greases, etc
85
Contracts awarded and volume
Debits. (See Check payments.)
index
65 Debt, United States Government
127 Federal farm-loan and intermediate
credit banks, loans
130
Cost indexes
64 Delaware:
125
Employment in Ohio
108,109
Employment and earnings. 109, 112 Federal reserve system, condition
Security issues
131
Pay rolls, factory
111 Felt, roofing, production and stocks. 80
Construction, highways
75 Delinquent accounts, electrical trade. 45 Fertilizer, exports, consumption, etc. 81
45
Construction, ships
100 Department stores, sales, etc
120, 121 Fiber, vulcanized
33
Consumption:
Deposits, bank and savings
125 Fibers, imports
Chemicals and oils. 81, 82, 83, 84, 85 Disputes, industrial
110 Finance. (See Banking and securities.)
31, 32
Coal
34 Dividends, payments
31, 132 Finishing, cotton
Fir, Douglas, lumber
66
Cotton and fabrics
30, 55 Drugs:
Fire-extinguishing equipment
50
Dairy products
95, 96
Price indexes
25, 80 Fire, losses by
64
Iron ore
35
Sales, chain stores
117 Fish:
Meats
92,93
Wholesale trade
122
Catch, cold-storage holdings, etc. 98
Petroleum products
51, 52, 53 Dry goods:
Marketings, index
23
Pulp and paper products
59, 61
Prices, wholesale
29 Fish oil, production, etc
85
Rubber
54,55
Wholesale trade
122 Flaxseed:
Tobacco
99
25
Receipts, shipments, stocks
83
Wheat and
flour
87 Dun's, price index exports
78
Production (crop estimate)
86
Wool
27 Dyes and dyestuffs,
Flooring, rubber
56
Containers:
Flooring, wooden:
Glass, production, etc
76 Earnings:
Corporations, classified
134
Production, etc., hardwoods
70
Paper, production, etc
61
Labor
112
Prices, pine and
fir
66, 67
Copper:
Public utilities
106, 134 Flour, wheat, production, etc
87
Exports, prices, etc
44
Railroads and express comFood:
Production
22, 44
panies
102, 134
Exports and imports
136
Stock prices
129
United States Steel CorporaFactory employment, index
108
Copra and copra oil, stocks, etc
84
tion
36
Failures, manufacturers
133
Cord, flexible electrical
46 Eggs, receipts, etc
95
Pay-roll index, factories
113
Corn:
33
Price index
25, 26
Production (crop estimate)
86 Elastic webbing, shipments
Electric cranes and hoists
42
Production index
22
Receipts, grindings, exports, etc. 88 Electric locomotives, shipments
103
Stock index.:
24
Corporations:
Stock price index
129
Dividend payments and failures. 132 Electric power:
Consumption
107
Time operations, factories. _ 114, 115
New security issues and incorFuel consumption
34, 53 Foreign bonds
128, 130, 131
porations
130, 131
Production and sales
106 Foreign-exchange rates
135
Profits and stockholders
134 Electric trucks and tractors
50 Foreign stockholders
134
Stock and bond prices. 127, 128, 129 Electric washing machines
41 Foreign trade:
Costs, building construction
64
45, 46
Canadian exports and imports__ 135
Costs, living, indexes
26 Electrical products
Electrical trade, delinquent accounts. 45
United States exports
136, 138
Cotton:
100
United States imports
136, 137
Consumption, exports, etc
30 Emigration
Vessels in United States ports.__ 100
Marketings, index
23 Employment:
Agencies and trade-unions
110 Forest products:
Prices
26, 29
Factory
108, 109
Car loadings
104
Cotton fabrics:
Mines, railroads, etc
108
Marketings, indexes
23
Cloth, exports
31
Time
113,114 Forms, blank
60
Consumption by tire manufac43, 48 Foundry equipment, orders, etc
42
turers
55 Enameled ware
Foundry iron, meltings, prices, etc. 35, 39
Fine goods, production
31 Engines, internal-combustion, patents granted
41 France:
Prices, wholesale
29
Foreign-exchange rates
135
Production, stocks, etc
32 England. (See United Kingdom.)
Foreign trade with
137, 138
Cotton
finishing
31 Equipment:
Agricultural, shipments
41
Potash production
81
Cotton mills:
Fire-extinguishing, shipments
50 Freight cars
104, 105
Dividends and spindle activity__ 31
100
Foundry, orders, shipments, etc. 42 Freight rates, ocean
Stock prices, southern mills
128
Railway, orders, etc___ 103, 104, 105 Fruits:
Cotton yarns:
Farm prices
26
Prices
29 Essential oils, wholesale-price index. _ 80
78
Marketings, index
23
Production, stocks, etc
32 Ethyl alcohol
135
Shipments, car-lot
90
Cottonseed and products
82 Exchange, foreign



145
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 22-138) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups, which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also "Table of Contents," page 1
Fuel:
Page Housing:
Page
Construction
65
Coal, production, etc
34
Cost of, index numbers
26, 64
Coke, production, etc
36
Rental advertisements
64
Consumption, all kinds
34
95
Cost of, index number
25, 26 Ice cream, production
Petroleum, production, etc _ 51, 52, 53 Illinois, employment earnings. 109,110,112
Fur, sales
33 Illuminating glassware
76
100
Furnishings, house, price index
25 Immigration
Imports. (See Foreign trade and inFurnaces:
dividual commodities.)
Blast, in operation
35
Electric, new orders
46 Incorporations, new
130
India. (See British India.)
Furniture:
Household
71 Industrials. (See Manufactures and
Corporations.)
Steel, office
37
120
Wholesale trade
122 Installment sales, New England
Instruments, band, shipments
48
123, 124
Galvanized sheet metal ware
48 Insurance, life
Gas and electric companies, earnings
Interest:
(see also Public utilities)
106
Rates
127
Gas and fuel oils
53
Payments
132
Gasoline
52 Investments:
Gelatin, edible, production and stocks. 85
Banks
125, 130
General Motors Corporation, sales.__ 49
Life-insurance companies
124
Germany:
Iowa, employment, factory
109
Foreign trade with
137, 138 Iron and steel:
Potash sales
81
.Barrels, washers, and bars
38
Ginnings, cotton
30
Boilers and radiators, cast-iron. 40
Glass, production, etc
76
Castings
39
Gloves, production
58
Earnings, manufacturers'
36
Glues, animal, production and stocks. 85
Employment index
108
Gold, receipts, exports, etc
126
Enameled sanitary ware
43
Government, Canadian, bond sales __ 130
Exports and imports
37
Government, United States:
Fabricated steel products
37
Bonds, prices, etc
128
Ingots, steel, production, etc
36
Employment in Washington
108
Ore, shipments, stocks, etc
35
Finances, debt, etc
127
Pay-roll index
113
Postal business
116
Pig-iron, production, prices, etc_ 35
Grains:
Production, index
22
Exports, prices, etc
88, 89
Railway equipment
103, 105
Farm-price indexes
26
Sheets, steel
38
Loadings
104
Stocks, index
24
Marketings, index
23
Time operations, factory
114, 115
Production (crop estimates).
86
Unfilled orders
24, 36
Grand, F. & W., sales
118
Vessels, construction
100
Grand Rapids, furniture
71
Grant, W. T., & Co., sales
118 Iron,Wages and heavy hardware, 111
steel,
Grease, production, etc
85
sales
37
Great Britain. (See United Kingdom.)
Issues, new capital
130, 131
Groceries:
Sales, chain stores
117 Italy:
Foreign-exchange rates
135
Wholesale trade
122
Foreign trade with
137, 138
Gum lumber, stocks
69
Gum (naval stores), marketings, index
23 Japan:
Foreign-exchange rates
135
Foreign trade with
137, 138
Ham, smoked, price
92
130
Hardware, wholesale trade
122 Joint-stock land banks, loans
Hardwood lumber
69, 70, 71 Joplin district, lead, zinc shipments. 47
Hay:
52
Production (crop estimate)
86 Kerosene
28
Receipts
90 Knit underwear, production, etc
118
Heels, rubber, production, etc
56 Kresge, S. S., Co., sales
118
Hemlock, northern, lumber
66 Kress, S. H., & Co., sales
Hides and skins:
Imports, stocks, etc
57 Labor:
Earnings
111, 112
Prices
25, 57
Employment
108
Highways, construction
75
Time worked
113,114,115
Hogs, prices, receipts, shipments, and
Turnover, factory
114
slaughter
91
93
Hoists, electric
42 Lamb, production, stocks, etc
91
Hosiery, production, stocks, etc
28 Lambs, shipments and slaughter
Lard compounds and substitutes
85
Hotels:
92
Room occupancy
105 Lard, production, exports, etc
68
Bond issues
131 Lath, northern pine
Hours, operations
31, 113, 114 Lavatories, enamel, shipments, etc___ 43
Lead, production, prices, etc
22, 47
Household:
Enameled ware, activity
48 Leather:
Employment index
108
Furnishings, price indexes
25
Furniture, shipments, etc
71
Factory time operations
114, 115
61139°—29
10



Leather—Continued.
Page
Pay-roll index
113
Products (shoes, gloves)
58
Production, stocks, etc
22, 24, 58
Leather, artificial, shipments, etc
33
Life insurance
123, 124
Light, cost of, index numbers
26
Lime, acetate
77
Linseed oil and cake
83
Livestock:
Loadings
._ 104
Marketings, indexes
23
Price to farmers, indexes
26
Receipts, shipments, prices, etc. 91
Living, cost of
26
Loadings, freight cars
104
Loans:
Agricultural
124, 130
Bank, total and to brokers
125
Life-insurance policies
124
Locomotives, exports, shipments, etc. 103
Logs, walnut
69
Losses:
Business
•
132
Fire
64
Labor disputes
110
Ships
100
Lubricating oil
53
Lumber:
Employment index
108
Factory time operations
114, 115
Marketings, index
23
Pay-roll index
113
Production index
22
Production, etc. 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71
Products (doors, furniture, etc.) _ 72
Stocks, index
24
Unfilled orders, index
24
McCrpry Stores Corporation, sales. _ 118
Machine tools, new orders
42
Machinery:
Profits and earnings
134
Shipments, etc
41, 42
Machinery activity:
Boxboard and box mills
61
Textile mills
27, 31, 33
Magazines, advertising
116
Mail, United States
116
Mail-order houses, sales
117
Malleable castings, production, etc__ 39
Manganese, ore imports
35
Manufactures:
Earnings
134
Employment index
108, 109
Exports and imports
136
Failures and dividend payments. 132
Pay-roll payments
113
Production index
22
Securities, prices, etc__ 128, 129, 131
Stocks on hand, indexes
24
Time operations
113, 114, 115
Maple flooring, production, etc
70
Maryland, employment, factory
109
Massachusetts, employment
109
Meats:
Farm prices
26
Production, etc
92, 93
Wholesale trade
122
Mechanical goods, rubber
56
Merchandise, car loadings
i 104
Metals and minerals (see also individual commodities):
Earnings, corporations
134
Employment index
108
Pay-roll index
113
Price index
25

146
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 22-138) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups, which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also "Table of Contents," page 1
Metals and minerals—Continued. Page
Production index
22
Stock and unfilled order index __ 24
Time operations, factory
114, 115
Methanol, production, etc
77, 78
Metropolitan Stores Corp., sales
118
Mexico:
Petroleum, production' exports. 51
Silver production
126
Mica, manufactured
46
Michigan, lower, hardwoods
71
Milk, receipts, production, etc
94, 95
Milwaukee, employment, factory
109
Minerals, production, index
22
Minneapolis:
Linseed oil and cake, shipments. 83
Milk, production
95
Rental advertisements
64
Mississippi River, cargo traffic
101
Money, circulation, stocks, etc_. 125, 126
Money orders, postal
116
Monongahela River, cargo traffic
101
Montgomery Ward & Co., sales
117
Mortgages:
Held by farm banks, etc
130
Held by insurance companies. _ 124
Issued for real estate, bonds
131
Motors, electric
45
Municipal bonds:
New issues
130
Yields
127, 128
Murphy, G. C. Co., sales
119
Naval stores, receipts, stocks, etc
79
Netherlands, foreign-exchange rates. 135
New Bedford, textile-mill dividends. _ 31
New Jersey:
Employment and earnings, _ 109, 112
Pay rolls, factory
111
New Orleans, rice shipments
90
Newspapers, advertising
116
New York City:
Check payments and brokers'
.loans
125
Rediscount rate
127
Milk receipts
95
New York State:
Canal traffic
101
Employment and earnings. _ 109,112
Pay rolls, factory
111
Savings banks, deposits

New York Stock Exchange:
Loans to members of
Security sales
Nitrate of soda
Nonferrous metals:
Employment index
Production index
Production, prices, etc
Pay-roll index
Stocks, index
Time operations, index

125

125
128
81
108
22
44, 47
113
24
114, 115

Oak:
Flooring, production, etc
70
Lumber, stocks, etc
69
Oats:
Exports, prices, receipts, etc
89
Production (crop estimate)
86
Ocean transportation
100
Offal, grain, production
87
Ohio:.
Foundry iron, stocks, etc
39
Employment
108, 109
Ohio River, cargo traffic
101
Oklahoma:
Employment and earnings. _ 109,112
Pay rolls, factory
.
111




Oil:

Page
Essential, wholesale price index_ 80
Fish
85
Petroleum
51, 52, 53, 131, 134
Pine
79
Vegetable
80, 82, 83, 84
Oleomargarine:
Production and consumption
82
Consumption of chief ingredients in
82,84,95
Onions, car-lot shipments
90
Orders, new. (See individual commodities.)
Orders, unfilled, index (see also individual commodities)
24
Ore:
Iron, shipments and imports. _ 22, 35
Lead and zinc, shipments, etc
47
Total, car loadings
104
Outlet boxes, electrical
45
Overalls, cut, etc
28
Panama Canal, traffic
101
Panel boards, electrical
46
Paper:
Book, fine, wrapping, etc
60, 62
Box board and boxes
. 61
Employment index
108
Newsprint, production, etc
59
Pay-roll index
113
Production index
22
Pulp and paper products
63
Stocks, index
24
Time operations
114,115
Waste for box board____
61
Parks, national, visitors
102
Passengers:
Railroad and Pullman
102
Street railways
106
Passenger cars, railroad, orders, etc
105
Passports, issued
100
Patents, granted
41
Pavements, concrete
75
Payments, check
125
Payments, dividend and interest
132
Pay roll, factories
111, 113
Pay roll, anthracite mines
108
Pennsylvania:
Employment and earnings,. 109, 112
Pay rolls, factory
111
Pennsylvania Railroad Co., stockholders
134
Penney, J. C., & Co., sales
119
Petroleum:
Capital issues
131
Crude, production, etc
22, 51
Earnings
134
Refined products
22, 52, 53
Stock prices
129
Phenolic products, laminated
45
Pianos, benches, and stools
71
Pig-iron, prices, production, etc
35
Pine lumber, production, etc
67, 68
Pine oil, production and stocks
79
Plate glass, production
76
Plumbing fixtures:
Enameled sanitary ware
43
Porcelain and vitreous ware
74
Price index
64
Plywood, shipments, etc
72
Porcelain, electrical, shipments
45, 46
Porcelain, enameled
flatware
48
Porcelain, plumbing
fixtures
74
Pork products, production, etc
92
Postal receipts and money orders
116
Potash, imports, etc
81
Potatoes:
Car-lot shipments
90
Production (crop estimate)
86

Poultry:
Page
Marketings, index
23
Price index
26
Receipts and stocks
95
Power, electric:
Fuel consumption
34
Production
106
Switching equipment
45
Prices:
Brick and cement
73, 75
Coal and coke
34,36
Coffee and tea
'.
98
Dairy products
26, 94, 96
Drugs and chemicals. _. 77, 78, 80, 83
Grains and
flour
26, 87, 88, 89
Hides and leather
25, 57, 58
Iron and steel
35,36
Lumber
66,67
Meats and livestock. _ _ 26, 91, 92, 93
Naval stores
79
Nonferrous metals
44, 47
Paper and pulp
59, 63
Petroleum and products
51, 52, 53
Plumbing
fixtures
64
Rubber
54
Silver
126
Sugar
97
Textiles
25,29,33
Tobacco
99
Vegetable oils
80, 82, 83
Price indexes (see also Prices):
Building and construction costs. 64
Farm
25,26
Retail
26
Stocks and bonds
127, 128, 129
Wholesale, classified
25
Printing:
Activity
60
Employment
108
Pay-roll index
113
Time operations
114,115
Profits. (See Earnings.)
Production, index (see also individual
commodities)
23
Public
finance
127
Public utilities:
Bonds, prices, etc_ 124, 127, 128, 131
Contracts awarded
65
Dividends, earnings, etc
106,
132, 134
Stock prices
128, 129
Publishing:
Book and job
60
Newspaper
59
Pullman, passengers and operations _ _ 102
Pulp, wood
63
Pulp wood, marketings, index
23
Pumps, shipments, etc
41
Pyroxylin-coated textiles
33
Radiators, cast-iron, production, etc_ 40
Radio, stocks
46
Railroads:
Dividend payments
132
Profits
131
Employment
108
Equipment
103,104,105
Freight-car movement
102, 104
Fuel consumption
34
Securities
124, 127, 128, 129
Railways, electric and street
106, 132
Raincoat, fabrics, rubber proofed
55
Rand, gold output
126
Raw materials:
Exports and imports
136
Price indexes
25
Stock indexes
24
Rayon, imports, stocks, and prices __ 33
Real estate, bond issues
131

147
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 22-138) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups, which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also " Table of Contents/' page 1
Page
Silk:
Page
73
Imports, stocks, etc
33 Tile, floor and wall
Receipts, U.S. Government
116, 127
47
Prices
29 Tin, imports, prices, stocks, etc
Redwood, California, lumber
66
22, 55
22, 126 Tires, production, stocks, etc
Reflectors, industrial sales
45 Silver, production, prices, etc
119 Tobacco:
Registrations, automobiles
50 Silver, Isaac, & Bros., sales
Sinks, enameled
43
Employment index
108
Rent:
Pay-roll index
113
57, 91, 92, 93
Advertisements
64 Slaughter, livestock
Production, stocks, etc
22, 99
81
Cost of
26 Soda, nitrate of
Sales, chain stores
117, 119
56
Reserves, bank
125 Soles, rubber
Stock prices
129
79
Restaurants, sales
119 Steam naval stores
Time operations, factories. _ 114, 115
Steel (see also Iron and Steel):
Retail prices:
42
Barrels, washers, and bars
38 Tools, machine, new orders
Coal
34
39
Castings
39 Track work, steel
Food and coal indexes
26
50
Earnings
36, 134 Tractors, electric, industrial
Sugar
97
Exports and imports
37 Trade:
Retail trade:
Fabricated products
37
Business failures
132
Chain stores
117, 118, 119
Ingots, prices, etc
36
Canadian
135,137,138
Department stores
120
Sheets, production, shipments.„ 38
Foreign
100, 135, 136, 137, 138
Gasoline and kerosene
52
Stock prices
129
Mail-order
117
Lumber
70
Unfilled orders
24, 36
Retail
70, 117, 118, 119, 120
Mail-order
117
Wages
111
Wholesale
122
Rice:
Stockholders, corporations
134 Trucks:
Exports, stocks, etc
90 Stocks, commodity, index numbers
Automobile, production
49
Production (crop estimate)
86
(see also individual commodities) _ _ 24
Electric industrial, shipments
50
Rims, automobile
50
Stocks, corporation:
Turnover, factory labor
114
Rivers, cargo traffic
101
New issues
130,131 Turpentine, receipts, stocks, etc
79
Roads, construction
75
Prices and sales
128, 129
Road building, wages in
111
Stokers, mechanical, sales
42 Underwear, knit, production, etc
28
Roofing, production, etc
80
Unfilled orders, index (see also indiRooms, hotel, occupancy and cost__ 105 Stone, clay, and glass products:
vidual commodities)
24
Employment index
108
Rope paper sacks, shipments
63
110
Pay-roll index
113 Unions, trade, employment
Rosin, receipts, stocks, etc
79
Production index
22 United Kingdom:
Rubber, consumption, imports, etc__ 54
Production, etc
73, 74, 75, 76
Rubber, clothing, calendered
55
Foreign-exchange rates
135
Time operations, factory
114, 115
Rubber products, production, etc
22,
Foreign trade with
137, 138
71
24, 55, 56, 129 Stools, piano
Tea stocks
98
Stores, retail
117, 118, 119, 120, 121 United States Government. (See
Rye:
36, 37
Exports, prices, etc
89 Structural steel
Government, United States.)
101 United States Steel Corporation:
Production (crop estimate)
86 Suez Canal, cargo traffic
Sugar, meltings, stocks, receipts, etc_ 97
Earnings and unfilled orders
36
81
St. Lawrence Canal, cargo traffic
101 Sulphur, production
Stockholders
134
81
Sacks, rope paper, shipments
63 Sulphuric acid, price and exports
Wage rates
111
Superphosphate, production, etc
81 Utah, lead shipments
47
Sales:
135 Utilities, public. (See Public utiliChain stores
117, 118, 119 Sweden, foreign exchange rates
ties.)
Department stores
120 Switzerland, foreign exchange rates__ 135
Factory. (See individual com41
Tax-exempt securities
130 Vacuum cleaners, shipments
modities.)
98 Vegetables:
Mail-order houses
117 Tea, imports, stocks, prices
Wholesale
122 Telegraph and telephone companies:
Car-lot shipments
90
Revenue and earnings
106, 134
Sales books, shipments and orders
60
Marketings, index
23
Stockholders, American TeleSalmon, canned, shipments, etc
98
Vegetable oils, production, stocks,
phone & Telegraph Co
134
Sand, lime brick
74
etc
82, 83, 84
117, 118, 119 Vehicles (see also Automobiles, ShipSanitary ware, shipments, etc
43 Ten-cent stores, sales
Terra cotta, new orders
73
Sault Ste. Marie Canal, cargo traffic. 101
ping, and Railroads):
Savings deposits, New York State
125 Textiles:
Employment, index
108
Sears, Roebuck & Co., sales
117
Payroll, index
113
Burlap and
fibers
33
Securities:
Production, index
22
Clothing
25, 26, 28
Held by life-insurance companies. 124
Time operations, factory
114, 115
Cotton
29, 30
New issues
130,131
Unfilled orders, index
24
Cotton manufactures
29, 31, 32
Prices and sales
127, 128, 129
72
Employment index
108 Veneer, rotary-cut
Tax-exempt, outstanding
130
Hosiery and knit underwear
28 Venezuela, petroleum production, etc_ 51
Sheep, receipts, shipments, prices and
Machine activity
27 Vessels. (See Shipping.)
slaughter
91
fixtures
74
Mill dividends
31 Vitreous china, plumbing
Sheet-metal ware
48
Pay-roll index
113 Vulcanized fiber, consumption, etc__ 45
Sheets, steel
38
Prices, wholesale
25, 29, 33
Shelter, prices of, index numbers
26
110, 111
Production index
22 Wages, factory, etc
Shelving, steel, shipments, etc
37
119
Pyroxylin-coated
33 Waldorf system, restaurant sales
Shipments. (See individual com69
Rayon
33 Walnut, lumber and logs
117
modities.)
Silk
29, 33 Ward, Montgomery, & Co
Shipping:
105
Stock index
24 Warehouses, public merchandise
38
Fuel consumption
34, 53
Stock price index
128, 129 Washers, lock
Ocean and construction
100
Time operations, factories. _ 114, 115 Washington, D. C., Government emRiver and canal cargo traffic
101
ployment in
108
Unfilled order index
24
Shoes:
41
Webbing, elastic
33 Washing machines, electric
106
Production, prices, exports, etc__ 58
Wool
27,29 Water, electric power from
Rubber heels and soles
56 Theaters, stock prices
41
129 Water softeners and systems
Wax, production and stocks
53
Sales, chain stores
117, 122 Thompson, J. R. Co., restaurant
33
sales
119 Webbing, elastic, sales
Wholesale trade
122




148
GENERAL INDEX—Continued
Page numbers refer to data in detailed tables (pp. 22-138) only. Items in the text are arranged in groups, which should make
references easy without the necessity of an index. See also " Table of Contents," page 1
Page
Page Wood distillation:
Page
29
Consumption and stocks
77 Worsted yarn, wholesale price
Welding sets, electrical
46
Marketings
23
Welland Canal, cargo traffic
101
63 Yarns:
Wells, oil, completed
51 Wood pulp
Prices, cotton and worsted
29
Woodworking machinery
42
Western pine lumber, production,
Production, etc., cotton
32
etc
68 Wool:
Marketings, index
23 Yields, bonds and stocks. _ _ 127, 128, 129
Wheat and wheat
flour
86, 87, 88
Prices, wholesale
.
29 Youngstown district, steel workers'
Wholesale trade:
wages
111
Receipts, imports, stocks, etc
27
Price indexes
25
118
Sales
122 Woolworth, F. W., & Co., sales
Zinc, prices, production, stocks, etc _ 22, 47
Wire cloth, production, etc
44 Workers:
Employed, factories, etc
108, 109
Wisconsin, employment and earnRegistered at agencies
110
ings
109, 110, 112




OF THE

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3^ the, Department of CJonn^erde^ having* 1&4 mpst direct Interest tovreadto of the" SJTBVB^ OF .
k ar^liste4 bejow* / & 'cbinpl^te J
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, iciiie," chest^ and lpe^esse?itiabl drugs, and, surgical jsu,£plies which . ,
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/V, United Staffs G^ver"nmeiit'.Master ^^ecifica^oiik-'-iTIiege
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Bibliography of Petroleum and Allied Substances, 1922 and
^
, Methods, Costs, and Safety in Stripping an
Copper Ore,^Ircftt Ore, ^au^fd, in4 /Pebble P]
a^a,cc^unipfftiie Jnethods aj^d'co^ts^f open-pit "ntfi&ing. \,T£dt
a e deiiiiptipis
t^e^lantiH ^f niaehitfery
^n^d;
a^e d^iriptions of tjie^lafxds ^r ^aehitfery used ^i^d; ,sorne
^reports }wfe given rel^ive' to accidents in open-pit omi^es ik
1
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-/ v : v ' •- ^ ' ; '- ' ' , -^
Mineral Resources of United States 1927^-—T^ reports ^oii
B^inetal r^oilrces are fiiBt issued in the forin, of ^juUetis 6f
Which the following have -*beeti \ r^aaed s i n t j i ^ Ju% aaand inxay tie ofot$med
y -Product? In 192iL ,(^t. tj, ,|ip. 695-681)

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Geodetic Surveys, Methods, Instruments, and Purposes.—
Eeyised, edition: H^rial No^ 2^ ; v ii-fl Spaces,' r ,NV,- %^
\ T$$e Cables, Ba€i|(icniC®as^ North America, Eastern Asia, <«
Commerce and Navigation
United States
The tafclesf, in and Island Grdnpa fof IT^ajWl^Oi^rSeries No, 4SB;fl7ll^|es.
^Tte; tales in tnls ^iyuib6A^^f '^LV^ the predicted times and,
; tables
^iyuib^6A^
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the ^adific Goas# df ^tW, /United States did 'Alaska;, ^,nd latV
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