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SUPPLEMENTARY COMPENSATION FOR
NONPRODUCTION WORKERS, 1963

Employer Expenditures
Employer Practices

Bulletin No. 1470

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T I S T I C S
A r t h u r M. Ross, C o m m i s s i o n e r







SU PPLEM EN TA R Y COMPENSATION FOR
NONPRODUCTION WORKERS, 1963

Employer Expenditures
Employer Practices

Bulletin No. 1470
December 1965

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S
A r th u r M. Ross, C o m m is s io n e r

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Prefa ce
A s the N a tio n ’ s la r g e s t e m p lo y e r , the F e d e r a l G ov ern m en t has an o b l i ­
gation to d e v e lo p and m ain tain a sound p r o g r a m fo r com p en sa tin g its e m p lo y e e s— a
p r o g r a m w hich is equ itable both to the e m p lo y e e s and to the c o u n tr y ’s ta x p a y e rs.
M o r e o v e r , p o lic ie s adopted by the F e d e r a l G ov ern m en t m a y have a substan tial
im p a c t on em p loy m en t and co m p e n sa tion p r a c t ic e s in p riv a te in du stry.
The F e d e r a l S a la ry R e fo r m A c t o f 1962 is a lan dm ark in the evolu tion
o f F e d e r a l pa y p r a c t ic e s .
It d e c la r e s that, as a m a tter o f p o lic y , " F e d e r a l
s a la r y ra tes sh a ll be co m p a r a b le with p riv a te e n te r p r is e s a la r y rates fo r the
sa m e le v e ls o f w o rk . ”
T o im p le m e n t this d e cla ra tio n , the statute c a lls upon the
P r e s id e n t to have p r e p a r e d ’ ’annually a r e p o r t w hich c o m p a r e s the ra tes o f s a l­
a r y fix e d b y statute fo r F e d e r a l e m p lo y e e s with the ra tes o f s a la r y paid fo r the
sa m e le v e ls o f w o rk in p r iv a te e n te r p r is e as d eterm in ed on the b a s is o f a p p r o ­
p ria te annual su rv e y s con du cted by the B ureau o f L a b or S t a t is t ic s , . . . ” F u r ­
th e r m o r e , the P r e s id e n t is to r e p o r t this c o m p a r is o n and his recom m en d a tion s
fo r r e v is io n o f F e d e r a l p r a c t ic e s annually to the C o n g r e s s . 1
In k eepin g w ith this le g is la tiv e m andate, the B ureau o f L a b or S ta tistics
con du cts annually a n ation al su r v e y o f s a la r y ra tes fo r a w ide v a rie ty o f p r o ­
fe s s io n a l, a d m in istra tiv e , te c h n ica l, and c l e r i c a l jo b s .
In form ation is c o lle c te d
fr o m a sa m p le o f esta b lish m e n ts to p r o v id e re p re se n ta tiv e data fo r m uch o f the
p riv a te in d u stry s e c t o r o f the e co n o m y . 2
It is r e c o g n iz e d that b a s ic s a la r y n o r m a lly is on ly p a rt, although the
m a jo r p a rt, o f total e m p lo y e e com p en sa tion .
P a r tic u la r ly sin ce W orld W ar II,
a h ost o f su p p lem en ta ry p a y p r a c t ic e s (c o m m o n ly ca lle d frin g e b e n e fit s 3 ) have
b e c o m e e sta b lish ed as in te g ra l p a rts o f the com p en sa tion p a ck a g e.
C on sequ en tly,
the B u reau o f the B udget and the C iv il S e r v ic e C o m m is s io n , w hich sh are r e ­
sp o n sib ility fo r a n a lyzin g re su lts o f the BLS s a la r y su rv e y and fo r p re p a rin g the
P r e s id e n t 's r e co m m e n d a tio n s to the C o n g re ss on F e d e r a l pay, e x p r e s s e d a need
fo r data on su p p lem en ta ry pay in p riv a te in d u stry.
The B u reau o f the B udget and the C iv il S e r v ic e C o m m is s io n , th e r e fo r e ,
re q u e ste d BLS to con d u ct a study o f su p p lem en ta ry com p en sa tion in p riv a te in ­
d u s try w h ich cou ld be a n a lyzed in con ju n ction with the BLS s a la r y su rv ey .
Plans
fo r the su r v e y w e r e d e v e lo p e d by sta ff o f the th ree a g e n cie s .
1 For the most recent Presidential report, see Pay Increases for Certain Civilian Employees and Members of the
Uniformed Services, Message from the President of the United States, 89th C on g., 1st s e s s., House of Representatives,
Document 170 (May 12, 1965). See also Federal Statutory Salary System s, Communication from the President of the United
States Transmitting Joint Annual Report on Federal Statutory Pay Systems, Pursuant to the Federal Salary Reform Act
of 1962, 89th C ong., 1st se ss., House o f Representatives, Document 174 (May 17, 1965). The Salary Reform Act
does not apply to Federal manual workers, whose wages are tied to private industry wages in the localities where
they work. The act also does not apply to employees in some agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority,
coming under separate pay systems.
2 See, for exam ple, National Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, FebruaryMarch 1965 (BLS Bulletin 1469, 1965).
3 The term supplementary compensation is not more precise than fringe benefits, but it avoids some of the
am biguities of the latter, which im plies that the practices are a sm all insignificant appendage to the wage and salary
structure, voluntary on the part o f the employer, and of exclusive benefit to the employee. None of these im pli­
cations fit current conditions.




iii

P r e f a c e --- C ontinued
The re su ltin g su rv e y , the findings o f w hich a re re p o rte d in this b u lletin ,
app lied to the ca le n d a r y e a r 1963 and c o v e r e d n on p rod u ction (w h it e -c o lla r ) e m ­
p lo y e e s in m e t r o p o lit a n -a r e a esta b lish m en ts having a total em p loy m en t o f 250
w o r k e rs o r m o r e .
M o st p riv a te in d u strie s w e re in clu d ed in the su rv e y . 4 To
the extent that r e c o r d k e e p in g p r a c t ic e s in p riv a te in d u stry p e rm itte d , data w e re
c o lle c t e d se p a r a te ly fo r grou ps o f w h it e -c o lla r e m p lo y e e s ra th er than s im p ly fo r
a ll su ch e m p lo y e e s co m b in e d . 5 A lthough the study em p h a sized c o lle c tio n o f data
on ex p en d itu res fo r v a r io u s types o f su p p lem en ta ry co m p e n sa tio n , c o n s id e r a b le
m a te r ia l was c o lle c t e d on the p r a c t ic e s giving r is e to the ex p en d itu res.
H ow ev er,
no attem pt w as m a d e to m e a s u r e expen ditu res fo r a ll su p p lem en ta ry com p en sa tion
p r a c t ic e s o r to study la b o r c o s ts — a s till b r o a d e r undertaking.
The p r a c t ic e s
studied a r e b e lie v e d to con stitu te the m a jo r elem en ts o f su p p lem en ta ry c o m p e n ­
sa tion in p riv a te in d u stry . 6
The sa m p le o f e sta b lish m e n ts o r ig in a lly s e le c te d fo r study in clu d ed about
1 ,2 0 0 u n its.
A p p r o x im a te ly 750 r e p o r ts w e re obtain ed, so m e fo r sin g le -u n it
c o m p a n ie s , o th e rs fo r in dividu a l e sta b lish m en ts o f la r g e r fir m s , and s till o th ers
fo r the total o p e ra tio n s o r d iv is io n s o f m u lti esta b lish m en t co m p a n ie s.
M any
r e p o r ts did not con tain a ll the in fo rm a tio n re q u e ste d .
C on sequ en tly , it was not
p o s s ib le to w eigh t the r e p o r ts r e c e iv e d to r e p r e s e n t s ta tis tic a lly the u n iv e rse
fr o m w h ich the sa m p le was draw n.
The ad eq u a cy o f the data as an in d ica to r
o f p riv a te in d u stry p r a c t ic e s is c o n s id e r e d in the b od y o f the r e p o r t.
The BLS su r v e y w as d e sig n ed p r in c ip a lly to m e e t n eed s o f the F e d e r a l
G ov ern m en t, but the fin din gs have c o n s id e r a b ly b r o a d e r a p p lica tion .
T hey w ill
be o f aid in evaluating pa y p r a c t ic e s in in d ivid u al fir m s and a ls o w ill be u se fu l
in v a rio u s e c o n o m ic a n a ly s e s .
It is not u n rea son a b le to a ss u m e that as the u s e ­
fu ln ess o f data on ex p en d itu res fo r su p p lem en ta ry co m p en sa tion b e c o m e s m o r e
w id e ly r e c o g n iz e d , m o r e e m p lo y e r s w ill m aintain a p p ro p ria te r e c o r d s , th ereb y
sim p lify in g data c o lle c t io n in fu tu re s u rv e y s .
A p p en d ix B contains a co m p a r is o n
o f ex p en d itu res in the F e d e r a l G ov ern m en t and in p riv a te in d u stry .
The B u reau o f L a b o r S ta tis tics , on its own
oth er F e d e r a l a g e n c ie s that p a r ticip a te d in planning
p r e s s its a p p re cia tio n to the co m p a n ies co o p e ra tin g
con su m in g e n d ea v or and to the in dividu als who gave
m en ta l stages o f the su rv e y .

b eh a lf and on b eh a lf o f the
the s u rv e y , w ish es to e x ­
in this d ifficu lt and tim e a d v ice during the d e v e lo p ­

This study was con du cted in the B u re a u 's D iv isio n o f N ational W age and
S a la ry In com e b y N orm a n J. S a m u els, C h ief o f the D iv is io n , under the g e n e ra l
d ir e c tio n o f L. R. L in se n m a y e r , A s s is ta n t C o m m is s io n e r fo r W ages and In d u strial
R e la tio n s.
Sam uel E. C ohen and T h e o d o re J. G olonka d e v ise d the sa m p lin g p r o ­
ce d u re s and s u p e r v is e d the s e le c tio n o f the sa m p le .
The a n a ly sis was p re p a re d
by V ic t o r J. S h e ife r, a s s is te d b y G era ld D. W eintraub.
F ie ld w ork fo r the sur~
v e y w as d ir e c te d b y the B u re a u 's A s s is ta n t R eg ion a l D ir e c t o r s fo r W ages and
In d u stria l R e la tio n s .
Data p erta in in g to the F e d e r a l G ov ern m en t w e re co m p ile d
and tra n sm itted to the B u reau by the B u reau o f the Budget and the C iv il S e r v ic e
C o m m is s io n .
4 The universe and the sam pling procedures are described in detail in appendix A.
5 The reasons for collecting data separately by groups, and the criteria for selecting the groups, are considered
in appendix A.
6 A more detailed discussion of the items studied is in appendix A.
The framework for this study is sim ilar
to that used in other BLS studies of employer expenditures for supplementary compensation practices. A list of Bureau
publications in the field is found at the end of this bulletin.




iv

Contents
P age

1
1

C h apter I. In trod u ction and s u m m a r y --------------E m p lo y e r ex p en d itu res -----------------------------------S u p plem en ta ry co m p e n s a tio n p r a c t ic e s -------D e riv a tio n o f a v e r a g e s ------------------------------------E valu a tion o f su rv e y r e s u lts ---------------------------

4

C h apter II. E xpen ditu res f o r s u p p le m e n t s ------A ll n on p rod u ction e m p l o y e e s --------------------------E xpen ditu res fo r in dividu a l e m p lo y e e grou ps

10
10
15

C h apter III. Su pplem en tary pay p r a c t i c e s --------P a id le a v e p r a c t i c e s ----------------------------------------L ength o f the w o r k w e e k -----------------------------------P en alty pay p r a c t ic e s --------------------------------------P r iv a te w e lfa r e plans --------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s p r a c t i c e s ----------------------------------V a ria tio n s am ong e m p lo y e e g r o u p s ---------------

37
37
41
41
43
44
44

6
7

C h a rts:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

A v e ra g e e m p lo y e r ex p en d itu res f o r su p p lem en ta ry com p en sa tion ,
a ll n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s , 1963 ----------------------------------------------------------S e le cte d su p p lem en ta ry pay p r a c t ic e s , 1963--------------------------------------------P a ttern s in e m p lo y e r ex p en d itu res fo r su p p lem en ta ry co m p en sa tion ,
a ll n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s , 1 9 6 3 ----------------------------------------------------------P a ttern s in e m p lo y e r ex p en d itu res fo r su p p lem en ta ry com p en sa tion ,
n on exem pt n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s , 1963 -------------------------------------------P a ttern s in e m p lo y e r ex p en d itu res fo r su p p lem en ta ry co m p en sa tion ,
exem pt n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s , 1 9 6 3 —--------------------------------------------- —
F o r m a l paid v a ca tio n p r a c t ic e s , 1 9 6 3 -------------------------------------------------------W eeks o f v a ca tio n pay r e c e iv e d by e m p lo y e e s , 1 9 6 3 ------------------------------P en alty p r a c t ic e s , 1963 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------S e le c te d p riv a te w e lfa r e plan s, 1963 --------------------------------------------------------V a ria tio n s in p r a c t ic e s am ong e m p lo y e e g ro u p s, 1 9 6 3 ---------------------------

2
5
11
16
18
38
40
42
45
46

T a b le s :
E m p lo y e r ex p e n d itu re s— a ll n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s :
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

S u m m a ry— a ll re p o r tin g units ---------------------------------------------------------------S u m m a ry— units re p o r tin g e x p e n d itu r e s ----------------------------------------------P aid le a v e , e x clu d in g s ic k l e a v e -----------------------------------------------------------R e tire m e n t p r o g r a m s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------U n em ploym en t p r o g r a m s ------------------------------------------------------------------------H ealth b en efit p r o g r a m s -------------------------------------------------------------------------Savings and th rift plans and y e a r end and oth er s p e c ia l b o n u s e s -------P en a lty p a y ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S e le c te d c o n tr ib u to ry and n o n con trib u tory p riv a te
w e lfa r e plans ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




v

8
9
20
21
22
23
25
26
27

Contents— Continued
P age

T a b le s— C ontinued
E m p lo y e e co n trib u tio n s— a ll n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s :
10.

P r iv a te w e lfa r e plans ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

28

E m p lo y e r e x p en d itu res— n on exem pt n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s :
11.
12.

P a id l e a v e -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P a y r o ll ite m s in addition to b a s ic s a la r ie s -----------------------------------------

29
30

E m p lo y e r e x p en d itu res— all exem p t e m p lo y e e s :
13.
14.

P a id l e a v e -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P a y r o ll ite m s in addition to b a s ic s a la r ie s ___________________________

32
33

E m p lo y e r e x p en d itu res— u pp er m an agem en t e m p lo y e e s :
15.
16.

P a id l e a v e -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Y e a re n d and oth er s p e c ia l b o n u s e s --------------------------------------------------------

35
36

Practices—
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.

F o r m a l paid v a ca tio n s— non ex em p t n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s ________
F o r m a l pa id v a ca tio n s— exem p t e m p lo y e e s exclu d in g u pp er
m a n a gem en t ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------F o r m a l pa id v a ca tio n s— u pper m an agem en t e m p l o y e e s _____________
V a ca tion pay r e c e iv e d — n on exem pt n on p rod u ction e m p l o y e e s ----------V a ca tion pay r e c e iv e d — e x em p t e m p lo y e e s exclu d in g u pp er
m a n a gem en t ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------V a ca tio n pay r e c e iv e d — u pp er m an agem en t e m p lo y e e s ______________
P a id h o l i d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------F o r m a l s ic k lea ve p la n s -------------------------------------------------------------------------L ea v e f o r c iv ic r e s p o n s ib ilitie s ----------------------------------------------P e r s o n a l l e a v e -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S tr a ig h t-tim e w o r k w e e k -------------------------------------------------------------------------P ay fo r o v e r tim e w o rk ---------------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p e n s a to ry tim e o ff f o r o v e r tim e w o r k ------------------------------------------E x tra pay fo r w o rk on pa id h o l i d a y s ----------------------------------------------------C o m p e n s a to ry tim e o ff f o r w ork on paid h o lid a y s _____________
P r e m iu m pay f o r nigh two r k -------------------------------------------------------------------T y p es o f sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a ls --------------------------------------------------------------------Shift d iffe r e n tia l— cen ts p e r hour— se co n d sh ift _____________________
Shift d iffe r e n tia l— cen ts p e r hour— th ird s h i f t -----------------------------------Shift d iffe r e n tia l— p e r c e n t addition— se co n d s h ift ------------------------------Shift d iffe r e n tia l— p e r c e n t addition— third s h i f t ______________________
E m p lo y e e c o v e r a g e — p r e m iu m pay and co m p e n s a to ry tim e o f f _____
S e le c te d p riv a te w e lfa r e p la n s ----------------------------------------------------------------




vi

47
49
51
53
54
56
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74

Contents— Continued
P age

T ab 1e s— C o ntinue d
P r a c t ic e s — C ontinued
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.

E m p lo y e e c o v e r a g e — life in su ra n ce , a ccid e n ta l death and
d ism e m b e rm e n t in su ra n ce , o r death b e n e f i t s ____________________
E m p lo y e e c o v e r a g e — h o sp ita liza tio n , m e d ic a l, o r s u r g ica l
b e n e fit s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e e c o v e r a g e — m a jo r m e d ic a l b e n e f i t s ------------------------------------E m p lo y e e c o v e r a g e — sic k n e s s and a ccid e n t i n s u r a n c e ______________
E m p lo y e e c o v e r a g e — p e n sio n o r re tire m e n t b e n e f i t s ------------------------M isc e lla n e o u s p r a c t i c e s -------------------------------------------------------------------------V a ria tio n s am ong e m p lo y e e g r o u p s -----------------------------------------------------V a ria tio n s in va ca tion and h olid a y p r a c t ic e s am ong em p loy ee
g rou p s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

76
77
78
79
80
81
82
85

A p p e n d ix e s:
A.
B.
C.

S cop e and m eth od o f s u r v e y _______________________________________________
C o m p a riso n o f e m p lo y e r expen ditu res fo r su p plem en tary co m p e n ­
sation in p r iv a te in d u strie s and the F e d e r a l G o v e r n m e n t---------------Q u e s tio n n a ir e ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




vii

86
90
93




Supplementary Compensation for Nonproduction Workers, 1963

Chapter I. Introduction and Summary
U nder t o d a y 's m any fa c e te d sy s te m s fo r com p en sa tin g e m p lo y e e s , re g u la r
pa y f o r h ou rs a ctu a lly w o rk e d is an inadequate m e a s u r e o f a w o r k e r 's total e a r n ­
in gs.
N o r m a lly , p a rt o f an e m p lo y e e 's pay re p re se n ts a continuation o f sa la ry
during le a v e p e r io d s , such as tim e away fr o m the jo b b e ca u s e of v a ca tio n s , h o l i ­
d a y s, o r illn e s s e s . O ther e m p lo y e r paym ents to w o r k e rs a re in addition to re g u la r
o r b a s ic s a la r y , e x a m p les o f w hich a r e o v e r tim e p ay, n on p rod u ction b o n u se s , and
s e v e r a n c e pay.
F u rth e r, s o m e e m p lo y e r outlays f o r v a rio u s re tire m e n t, health,
u n em p loy m en t, and re la te d e m p lo y e e b en efits a re paym en ts to funds, in su ra n ce
c o m p a n ie s , and g ov e rn m e n ta l units.
This b u lletin a n a ly zes m a jo r su p p lem en ts,
c o n s id e r in g both e m p lo y e r expen ditu res fo r the su p plem en ts and the p r a c t ic e s f o r
w h ich the paym en ts a r e m ad e.
E m p lo y e r E x p en d itu res
In 1963, e m p lo y e r expen ditu res f o r su p p lem en tary pay con stitu ted a
siz a b le p o r tio n o f tota l Outlays fo r e m p loy ee co m p en sa tion .
The a v era g e r e ­
p ortin g unit stu died spent an am ount equal to m o r e than o n e -fo u rth of the b a s ic
s a la r ie s
in p ro v id in g to n on prod uction em p lo y e e s the v a rio u s supplem ents
a n a ly zed .
(See ch a rt 1 and table 1 .) When c o n s id e rin g this fig u r e , it is i m ­
p ortan t to r e m e m b e r that pa ym en ts fo r lea v e a re p a rt o f b a s ic s a la ry .
T h ere­
fo r e , ex p en d itu res fo r b a s ic s a la r y and outlays fo r a ll supplem ents a re not a d ­
d itiv e ; com b in a tion o f the two w ould in v olv e double counting o f le a v e pay m en ts.
It is u se fu l to c o n s id e r a v era g e e m p lo y e r expen ditu res f o r individu al
g ro u p s of su p plem en ts as w e ll as outlays f o r all item s com b in ed .
T ota l paid
le a v e , exclu d in g s ic k le a v e , 1 en tailed the la r g e s t expen ditu re f o r n on p rod u ction
w o r k e r s in the re p o rtin g units studied— 8 p e r c e n t o f b a s ic s a la r ie s .
Substantial
ex p en d itu res w e re a ls o re p o r te d f o r re tire m e n t p r o g r a m s and health b en efits
p r o g r a m s — 7 .4 and 4 .2 p e r c e n t, r e s p e c t iv e ly .
O utlays fo r the rem ain in g item s
studied w e re s m a lle r :
P en a lty p a y, 3. 2 p e rce n t; y e a re n d and oth er s p e c ia l b o ­
n u s e s , 2 .3 p e r c e n t; u n em p loy m en t p r o g r a m s , 1 .6 p e rce n t; and savin gs and th rift
p la n s, 0 .3 p e r c e n t.
T he fig u r e s in the p r e c e d in g p a ra g ra p h s w e r e d e r iv e d fr o m a ll re p o rts
obtain ed in the study, in clu d in g th ose stating th e re w e re no expen ditu res f o r a
g iv e n ite m .
In com pu tin g the a v e r a g e s , units with no ex p en d itu res w e r e tre a te d
as having z e r o e x p en d itu res.
T h u s, the resu ltin g a v e ra g e s a re in flu en ced by
both the le v e l o f ex p en d itu res in units m aking paym ents and the re la tiv e n um ber
o f units having e x p e n d itu re s.
A v e r a g e s w ere a ls o com pu ted b a se d upon only th ose
units w h ich r e p o r te d paym en ts f o r g iv en su p plem en ts. *

* Conceptually, sick leave can be classified either as a form of paid leave or as a health benefit program. In
tabulating data for all nonproduction employees combined, sick leave was included as a health benefit program. How­
ever, in computing expenditure rates for individual employee groups, sick leave was included as a type of paid leave,
since aggregrate expenditures for all health benefit programs were not determined by employee group.




1

2

Chart 1. Average Employer Expenditures for Supplementary Compensation,
All Nonproduction Employees, 1963




(Percent of basic salaries)
Percent

1

| All units

Units with expenditures

3

B e ca u se o f w id e sp r e a d p r e v a le n c e , a v e r a g e s com p u ted f o r a ll re p o rtin g
units and fo r units w ith ex p en d itu res w e re the sa m e f o r total paid le a v e , e x ­
clu din g s ic k le a v e ; r e tir e m e n t p r o g r a m s ; u n em p loy m en t p r o g r a m s ; and health
b e n e fit p r o g r a m s .
P en a lty pay at 3. 3 p e r c e n t f o r units with ex p en d itu res w as
on ly slig h tly h ig h e r than f o r a ll re p o rtin g units.
On the oth er hand, a v e ra g e
ex p en d itu res fo r b on u ses in units with such ex p e n d itu re s, 4 .6 p e rce n t, w e r e tw ice
the a v e r a g e fo r a ll re p o rtin g u n its. R e fle ctin g the r e la tiv e in fre q u e n cy with w hich
the ite m a p p e a re d , the a v e r a g e fo r savin gs and th rift plans in units with th ese
ex p en d itu res was 2. 5 p e r c e n t, m o r e than eight tim e s that f o r a ll rep o rtin g units
(table 2).
A s a g e n e r a l r u le , units with 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e tended to have
la r g e r ex p en d itu res than did units w ith 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s . 2 H o w e v e r, y e a re n d
and oth er s p e c ia l b on u ses p ro v id e d a strik in g e x cep tion ; the a v e ra g e fo r a ll o f
the s m a lle r units w as 3. 1 p e r c e n t, c o m p a r e d to 1 .7 p e r c e n t f o r the la r g e r u n its.
Bonus ex p en d itu res o c c u r r e d r e la tiv e ly m o r e fre q u e n tly in units with 250—999 e m ­
p lo y e e s and, when fou n d, on the a v e ra g e w e re g r e a te r in th ese units.

N o c o n s is te n t p attern o f d iffe r e n tia ls betw een m anu factu rin g and n on ­
m an u factu rin g in d u strie s is d is c e r n ib le in the fin din gs o f this study.
F or som e
g rou p s o f su p p le m e n ts, su ch as total paid le a v e , exclu d in g s ic k le a v e , and un­
em p loy m en t p r o g r a m s , the a v e r a g e s fo r m a n u factu rin g and nonm anufacturing in ­
d u s trie s w e r e a lm o s t id e n tic a l. H o w e v e r, ex p en d itu res f o r re tire m e n t p r o g r a m s
w e r e m a rk e d ly h ig h e r in n onm anufacturing in d u strie s— 8 .4 p e r c e n t co m p a re d with
6. 8 p e r c e n t in m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s trie s .
On the oth er hand, ex p en d itu res f o r
b on u ses w e r e h ig h e r in m an u factu ring in d u strie s than in the n on m an u factu r­
ing s e c t o r — r e s p e c t iv e ly 2. 6 p e r c e n t fo r a ll re p o rtin g units as c o m p a r e d with
1. 8 p e r c e n t.
S im ila r ly , no c o n siste n t d iffe re n tia ls w e re found betw een ex p en d itu res
fo r n on ex em p t and e x e m p t 3 n o n p rod u ction w o r k e r s .
In te r m s o f ex p en d itu res
f o r a ll r e p o rtin g u n its, paym en ts fo r total paid le a v e , in clu d in g s ic k le a v e , a v ­
e r a g e d 9. 6 p e r c e n t fo r n on exem pt w o r k e rs and 9. 9 p e r c e n t f o r ex em p t e m p lo y e e s .
The c lo s e n e s s o f the two fig u r e s g iv e s no in d ica tion o f the d iffe r e n c e s in in d iv id ­
ual co m p o n e n ts.
T h u s, w h ile v a ca tion ex p en d itu res w e re g r e a te r f o r exem p t
e m p lo y e e s — 5. 3 as a g a in st 4. 5 p e r c e n t— the op p o site w as tru e fo r s ic k lea v e—
1 .7 p e r c e n t fo r n on ex em p t and 1 .4 p e r c e n t f o r e x e m p t e m p lo y e e s .
L ittle , if
an y, d iffe r e n c e w as found betw een the e m p lo y e e g rou p s with r e s p e c t to oth e r
ty p es o f le a v e . H o w e v e r , o v e r tim e paym en ts f o r n on ex em p t e m p lo y e e s a v e r a g e d
5 .6 p e r c e n t fo r a ll re p o r tin g units co m p a re d to on ly 1 p e r c e n t f o r ex em p t e m p lo y ­
ees.
C o n v e r s e ly , bonus ex p en d itu res w e r e su b sta n tia lly h ig h er fo r ex em p t e m ­
p lo y e e s — 3 .4 p e r c e n t a s a g a in st 1 .1 p e r c e n t fo r n on ex em p t e m p lo y e e s in a ll r e ­
p ortin g units (ta b le s 11—14). A c tu a lly , the h ig h est a v e ra g e paym ents r e p o r te d
f o r tota l paid le a v e , in clu din g s ic k le a v e , 10. 2 p e r c e n t, w e re m ade to u p p er
m a n a gem en t e m p l o y e e s .4 L ik e w is e , bonus ex p en d itu res w e re c o n s id e r a b ly h ig h er
f o r u p p e r m a n a g em en t e m p lo y e e s , a v era g in g 6. 6 p e r c e n t f o r a ll re p o rtin g units
and 14. 9 p e r c e n t in u n its with ex p en d itu res (tables 15 and 16).

2

Employment figures pertain to total employees in the unit, not to the number o f nonproduction employees.
3 The terms "nonexempt" and "exempt" pertain to application o f regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act.
The former group is subject to the act's overtime provisions, while the latter is not.
In general, the nonexempt
group consists o f nonsupervisory workers, whereas the exempt group is made up of professional, administrative, and
executive employees.
More detail on this point is in appendix A.
4 In addition to being presented separately, payments to upper management employees are included in the all­
exempt-employee figures.




4

S u p plem en ta ry C om p en sa tion P r a c t ic e s
One o r m o r e fo r m s o f p a id le a v e a p p ea red in each o f the rep ortin g u n its.
E a ch unit had so m e type o f v a ca tio n plan.
(See ch a rt 2. ) T y p ic a lly , the am ount
o f v a ca tio n p a y v a r ie d w ith an in d iv id u a l1s length o f s e r v i c e , the m a x im u m c o m ­
m o n ly b ein g 3 o r 4 w eek s (ta b les 1 7 -1 9 ).
T hus, e m p lo y e r paym en ts f o r v a ca tio n s
w e r e dependent upon two f a c t o r s , the v a ca tio n plan and the le n g t h -o f-s e r v ic e d i s ­
trib u tion o f the w o rk f o r c e .
In on ly a m in o r ity o f the rep ortin g units did at le a s t
h a lf o f th o se e m p lo y e e s b e lo w the u p p er m an agem en t g rou p r e c e iv e 3 w eek s o r
m o r e o f v a c a tio n p a y (ta b les 2 0 -2 2 ).
P a id h o lid a y s w e r e r e p o r te d in a ll but one
o f the u n its, the m o s t co m m o n n u m b er p e r y e a r bein g 7 o r 8 (table 23).
F orm al
s ic k le a v e plan s o c c u r r e d le s s fre q u e n tly , but n e v e r th e le s s e x is te d in a m a jo r it y
o f the r e p o rtin g u n its.
T o so m e extent, s ic k n e s s and a ccid e n t in su ra n ce w as a
su b stitu te f o r fo r m a l s ic k le a v e p la n s; h o w e v e r, both b e n e fits w e r e p r o v id e d in
m an y u n its, w h ile o th e rs had n e ith er (table 24).
P a id lea v e f o r v a rio u s c iv ic
r e s p o n s ib ilit ie s and p a id p e r s o n a l le a v e a ls o w e re co m m o n , and o c c u r r e d r e la ­
tiv e ly m o r e fre q u e n tly f o r e x em p t e m p lo y e e s (ta b les 25 and 26).
C lo s e to fo u r -fift h s o f the r e p o rtin g units w e r e on a 4 0 -h o u r b a s ic w o r k ­
w eek .
N on exem p t e m p lo y e e s a lm o s t u n iv e r s a lly r e c e iv e d ex tra p a y , u su a lly tim e
and o n e -h a lf, f o r e x tra w o rk .
O v e rtim e pay w as m u ch le s s co m m o n f o r ex em p t
e m p lo y e e s , e x clu d in g u pp er m a n a g em en t, o c c u r r in g in about a th ird o f the r e ­
p o rtin g units and m o s t fre q u e n tly at s tr a ig h t-tim e ra te s .
O v e rtim e w as r a r e ly
p a id to u p p er m a n a g em en t e m p lo y e e s .
O c c a s io n a lly , co m p e n s a to ry tim e o ff w as
a v a ila b le to ex em p t e m p lo y e e s as a substitute f o r o v e r tim e pay.
E x tra pay f o r
w o rk on h o lid a y s w as p r o v id e d f o r n on exem pt w o r k e r s in o v e r fo u r -fift h s o f the
re p o rtin g u n its.
Such pay w as found f o r ex em p t e m p lo y e e s , exclu d in g u p p er
m a n a g em en t, in on ly about o n e -fift h o f the u n its, and w as r a r e fo r upp er m a n a g e ­
m e n t e m p lo y e e s .
S om e units w ithout ex tra -p a y p r a c t ic e s did not w ork on h olid a y s
and h en ce had no n eed f o r a pay p r a c t ic e .
Shift d iffe r e n tia l p r a c t ic e s fo llo w e d
the p a ttern found f o r o th e r p r e m iu m pay ite m s .
That i s , e x tra p a y f o r nightw ork
w as c o m m o n f o r n on exem pt e m p lo y e e s ; le s s fre q u e n t fo r exem pt e m p lo y e e s , e x ­
clu din g u p p er m a n a gem en t; and r e la tiv e ly r a r e f o r u p p er m an agem en t.
W here
sh ift d iffe r e n tia ls w e r e pa id to exem pt e m p lo y e e s , ex clu d in g u p p er m an agem en t,
the p r a c t ic e often d id not c o v e r a ll w o r k e rs in the g ro u p ; e .g . , in s o m e in s ta n ce s ,
it a p p lied on ly to f i r s t - l in e s u p e r v is o r s .
(T h is c o v e r a g e p a ttern a ls o a p p lied to
o v e r t im e pay and e x tra pay f o r h o lid a y w o rk f o r ex em p t e m p lo y e e s , exclu d in g
u p p e r m a n a g e m e n t.) (See ta b les 2 7 - 3 8 .)
T h e v a st m a jo r it y o f the re p o rtin g units p r o v id e d the fo llo w in g , e ith e r
on a c o n trib u to ry o r n o n co n trib u to ry b a s is :
L ife in s u ra n ce , a ccid e n ta l death and
d is m e m b e rm e n t in s u r a n c e , o r death b e n e fits ; h o s p ita liz a tio n , m e d ic a l, o r s u r ­
g ic a l b e n e fits (ex clu d in g m a jo r m e d ic a l b e n e fits ); and p riv a te p e n s io n o r r e t i r e ­
m en t b e n e fits .
M a jo r m e d ic a l b e n e fits w e r e le s s co m m o n , but w e r e found in
o v e r th r e e -fift h s o f the u n its.
S ick n ess and a ccid e n t in su ra n ce w as p r o v id e d f o r
n on ex em p t e m p lo y e e s in ju s t o v e r h a lf the u n its, but w as exten ded to exem pt
e m p lo y e e s in slig h tly le s s than h a lf the units.
M o st p lan s c o v e r e d 90 p e r c e n t
o r m o r e o f the e m p lo y e e s in a g rou p .
P r o p o r tio n a te ly , the lo w e s t c o v e r a g e ap­
p lie d to p e n s io n o r r e tir e m e n t plan s f o r non exem p t e m p lo y e e s , about a q u a rter
o f th ese plan s c o v e r in g le s s than 90 p e r c e n t o f the e m p lo y e e s .
(See tables 3 9 -4 4 .)
P r o v is io n f o r p a y f o r tr a v e l tim e on com p an y b u s in e s s ou tsid e o f re g u la r
w ork in g h ou rs w as found, f o r n on exem pt e m p lo y e e s , in o v e r tw o -fifth s o f the r e ­
p o rtin g u n its.
On the o th e r hand, such p aym en ts w e r e r a r e ly m a d e to exem p t
e m p lo y e e s .
R e im b u rse m e n ts f o r m ov in g e x p en ses ca u se d by jo b ch an ges w ithin
the com p a n y w e r e m a d e to e x em p t e m p lo y e e s in o v e r se v e n -te n th s o f the u n its,
but slig h tly u n d er h a lf the units r e im b u r s e d n on exem pt e m p lo y e e s .
P ay f o r tr a v e l




5

Chart 2. Selected Supplementary Pay Practices, 1963
(Percent of reporting units with the indicated practices]

Percent

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

Paid vacations

Paid holidays

Paid formal sick leave

Extra pay for overtime work

Shift premium for nightwork

Life insurance 1 / for current
employees
Hospitalization
employees

for current

Pension or retirement
benefits
Major medical benefits for
current employees
Sickness and accident
insurance
j

| Nonexempt employees (subject to FLSA overtime provisions).
Exempt employees, excluding upper management (not subject to FLSA overtime provisions).
w i i i i j i l Upper management employees (all exempt).
\j
Includes accidental death and dism em berm ent insurance and death benefits.
2/
Includes medical and surgical benefits (excluding major medical benefits).




90

100

6

and tra n sp o rta tio n to the f i r s t jo b was g ran ted le s s fre q u e n tly than m ov in g e x ­
p e n se r e im b u r s e m e n t, and on ly f o r u p p er m an agem en t e m p lo y e e s w as it found in
a m a jo r it y o f the re p o rtin g units (table 4 5).
It m u st be kept in m ind that m any
co m p a n ie s did not have th ese p r o v is io n s b e ca u s e th ere w e re no o c c a s io n s f o r
th e ir u s e .
F re q u e n tly , units with a given b en efit p ro v id e d it to e m p lo y e e s in each
o f the th re e n o n p rod u ction w o r k e r g ro u p s, although not n e c e s s a r ily in p r e c i s e l y
the sa m e fa sh io n .
T h is was p a r tic u la r ly tru e fo r m any le a v e item s and p riv a te
w e lfa r e p la n s.
H o w e v e r, p re m iu m pay often was lim ite d to a sin g le g rou p —
n on ex em p t e m p lo y e e s (ta b les 46 and 47).
D e riv a tio n o f A v e r a g e s
In s e v e r a l m a jo r r e s p e c t s , m eth ods o f tabulating data obtained in the
s u r v e y w e r e a ffe c te d by the lim ite d re s p o n s e to re q u e s ts fo r in fo rm a tio n .
The
in a b ility o r u n w illin gn ess o f m any com p a n ies to fu rn ish data m a d e it im p o s s ib le
to p r o je c t su rv e y findings to r e p r e s e n t the u n iv e rs e o f e sta b lish m en ts fr o m w hich
the in itia l sa m p le w as draw n.
Thus, fig u r e s p re s e n te d in this bu lletin r e f e r
on ly to the s p e c ific re p o rtin g units w hich su p plied in fo rm a tio n .
B e ca u se a p r o p e r w eighting sch e m e cou ld not be d e v is e d , equal w eight
w as g iv en to ea ch r e p o r t , r e g a r d le s s o f s iz e . H o w e v e r, it should be o b s e r v e d
that m o r e la r g e than s m a ll u n its, i. e. , th ose with 1 ,000 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e ,
c o m p a r e d to th ose with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s , w e re stu d ied .
A ls o , re s u lts a r e
show n se p a r a te ly f o r units in the two s iz e g r o u p s .
E x p en d itu res f o r ea ch su p ­
p le m e n ta ry co m p e n sa tio n ite m o r g rou p of item s in a rep ortin g unit w e re e x ­
p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t o f that u n it’ s ex p en d itu res fo r b a s ic s a la r ie s — d efin ed in
a c c o r d a n c e with the co n c e p t o f sa la r y in F e d e r a l S e r v ic e .
A v e r a g e co m p e n s a tio n
f o r an ite m (v a ca tio n s o r a ll r e tir e m e n t p r o g r a m s , f o r exam p le) w as d e te rm in e d
by com pu tin g a sim p le a v e r a g e o f the p e rce n ts in each o f the rep ortin g u n its.
In m any in s ta n c e s , co m p a n ie s w e re unable to fu rn ish the s p e c ific am ount
p a id f o r a g iv en ite m , but did state w hether o r not th ere was an ex p en d itu re.
Only units re p o rtin g d o lla r am ounts w e r e in clu d ed when a v e ra g e s w e re com p u ted
f o r units with e x p en d itu res fo r an ite m .
H o w e v e r, to a v oid b ia sin g the r e s u lt,
units re p o rtin g th e re w e r e e x p e n d itu re s, but not show ing the am ou n ts, w e re in ­
clu d e d in com pu tin g a v e r a g e s fo r a ll rep ortin g units on the a ssu m p tion that the
p e r c e n ts o f b a s ic s a la r ie s r e p r e s e n te d by th eir ex p en d itu res w e re n ot d iffe re n t
fr o m the a v e r a g e in units re p o rtin g the am ount o f ex p e n d itu re s. 5
In this c o n n e c tio n , it sh ou ld be o b s e r v e d that e stim a te s o f a v e ra g e s fo r
g ro u p s o f ite m s w e r e b a s e d on ly upon r e p o r ts giving a ctu a l d o lla r am ounts (o r
re p o r tin g th e re w e re no ex p en d itu res) fo r a ll com p on en t ite m s .
R e p o rts g ivin g
ex p en d itu res fo r s o m e o f the com p on en ts w e re u sed in com pu tin g a v e ra g e s f o r
th ose ite m s but not f o r the g ro u p tota l.
T h e r e fo r e , the sum o f the a v e r a g e s
show n f o r the co m p o n e n ts m a y not n e c e s s a r ily equal the g rou p total p re s e n te d .
A s a r u le , the d is c r e p a n c y is m in o r .
A s id e fr o m th is , a v e r a g e s com pu ted fo r
r e p o rtin g units w ith ex p en d itu res a r e not ad d itive b e ca u s e the a v e r a g e s m a y be
b a s e d upon d iffe r e n t g ro u p s o f r e p o r t s .

5
The number of units reporting there were expenditures, but not showing the amount, is included in the detail
tables. Since there were some reports which were not complete for all items, the number o f reports used in com­
puting the averages varies by item.




7

A s d e s c r ib e d in the p r e fa c e , som e o f the re p o r ts r e c e iv e d in this study
w e r e f o r s in g le -e s ta b lis h m e n t c o m p a n ie s , o th e rs w e re fo r in dividu al e s ta b lis h ­
m en ts o f m ultiunit c o m p a n ie s , and s till o th e rs w e re fo r the total o p e ra tio n s o r
d iv is io n s o f m u ltie sta b lish m e n t fir m s .
E ach re p o rt obtained was a n a ly zed without
r e g a r d to its c o v e r a g e , and no a llo w a n ce w as m ade fo r v a ria tio n in the s c o p e o f
o p e ra tio n s in clu d ed .
E valu ation o f S u rvey R esu lts
W h ile it is not p o s s ib le to m ake any quantitative statem en ts as to the
r e lia b ility o r d e fic ie n c ie s o f the su rv e y r e s u lts , it can be p re s u m e d fr o m e x tern a l
e v id e n ce that th ese r e s u lts g iv e an adequate p ictu re o f su p p lem en tary co m p en sa tion
p r a c t ic e s and ex p e n d itu re s. R e a so n a b ly co n siste n t and lo g ic a l rela tio n s h ip s ap p ear
in the data, such as re la tio n s h ip s betw een la r g e and sm a ll f ir m s , m an u factu rin g
and n onm anufacturing in d u str ie s, and non exem pt and exem p t e m p lo y e e s , in lin e
with re la tio n s h ip s app aren t fr o m p r io r a n a ly s e s . D istrib u tion s o f re p o rtin g units
a c c o r d in g to m agnitude o f expen ditu res ap p ear c o n siste n t with known p r a c t ic e s .
C on tra sts betw een the fin din gs o f this su rv e y and o f oth er BLS studies a re in ­
clu d ed in su bsequ en t ch a p te rs.
The p r o b le m o f a c c u r a c y o f su rv e y findings is not lim ite d to s iz e o f
r e s p o n s e . In m any c a s e s , resp on d en ts e stim a ted the in form a tion su p plied .
F or
e x a m p le , a n u m ber o f co m p a n ie s e stim a ted h olid a y pay by m u ltip lyin g a v e ra g e
h o u rly earn in gs by the n u m ber o f h olid a y h o u rs.
E x p e r ie n ce in past su rv e y s
in d ica tes that fig u r e s d e r iv e d through such tech n iq u es, although not taken fr o m
a ccou n tin g sta tem en ts, do a deq u ately r e fle c t the tru e p ictu re . 6

6 In some instances, BLS personnel estimated expenditure data for individual items in a report.
These estimates
were made only when there was sufficient information in the report to permit application of estimating techniques.




Table 1. Supplementary Compensation in All Reporting Units1— A ll Nonproduction Employees
(Average em ployer expenditures as a percent of b asic sa la r ie s,

All
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

1963)
Nonmanufacturing industries

Manufacturing industries

A ll industries surveyed
Item

00

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

V acation s---------------------------- --------- ...............
H o lid a y s ...... ..........— ----- -— - .............■ .
........... -

8 .0
4 .8
2.9
.3

7.6
4.5
2.9
.2

8.5
5.1
3 .0
.4

8.1
4 .9
2.9
.3

7.6
4 .6
2.8
.2

8.3
5.1
2.9
.3

8 .2
4 .7
3.1
.4

7.7
4 .4
3.0
.3

8.6
5.0
3.2
.4

R etirem ent p r o g r a m s -.-----------------------------------------L e g a lly required p rogram s 3—--------- -— -— ----P rivate pension and r etirem en t p lan s— — —

7 .4
2.6
4.9

7.0
2.6
4.6

7.7
2.6
5.1

6.8
2 .4
4.5

6.5
2 .4
4.3

7 .0
2.3
4 .7

8 .4
3 .0
5.5

7.9
2.8
5.2

8.8
3.1
5.7

Unem ploym ent p ro g ra m s ------- ----- ------------------—— L e gally required p rogram s 4 —--------- ----- --------Severance or d is m is s a l pay
-----—
Supplemented unem ployment b en efits-------------

1.6
1.5
.1
(5)

1.6
1.6
(*)

1.6
1.5
.2
(5)

1.6
1.5
.2
(5)

1.6
1.5
.1
(5)

1.6
1.4
.2
(5)

1.7
1.6
.1
(5)

1.7
1.6
.1
"

1.7
1.6
.1
(5)

Health benefit p rogram s . . . ---------------------- . ----- ----- —
L e g a lly requ ired w ork -conn ected
disab ility p rogram s 6 —----------------------------------Other le g a lly req u ired p rogram s 7-----------------Sick leave —------ — ........... — .................... . —- ---------Health, accident, and life insurance . . . . . . —
Life insurance, accidental death and
dism em b erm en t insurance, and
death benefits —........— ........... — --------- --------Hospitalization, su rg ica l, and m e d ic a l
plans and sick n ess and accident
insurance —— — --------- -----------— ...... ..........—

4.2

4 .0

4 .4

4 .4

4.1

4 .6

4 .0

3.8

4.1

.3
(5)
1.5
2.5

.4
(5)
1.3
2.5

.3
(5)
1.6
2.6

.3
(5)
1.4
2.8

.4
(5)
1.3
2.7

.3
(5)
1.5
2.8

.3
(5)
1.6
2 .2

.3
(5)
1.3
2.1

.2
(5)
1.7
2.2

.9

.9

.9

.9

1.0

.9

.9

.9

.9

1.6

1.5

1.6

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.3

1.2

1.3

Savings and thrift plans . . . -----.....................................—

.3

.1

.4

.3

.1

.4

.3

•1

.4

2.3

3.1

1.7

2.6

3.3

2.1

1.8

2.7

1.2

3.2
3.0
2.1
.9
.2

2.7
2.7
1.8
.8

3.5
3.3
2.3
1.0
.2

3.3
3.1
2.2
1.0
.2

2.8
2.8
1.9
.8
.1

3.8
3 .4
2 .4
1.1
.3

2.9
2.8
1.9
.9
.2

2.4
2 .4
1.6
.7
.1

3.2
3.0
2.1
1.0
.2

Yearen d and other sp ec ial bonuses —

Total overtim e p a y --------

....... — — -

... — —.........................

At p rem iu m r a te s —l —..—.------- ------------ ------ —
Shift d iffe r e n tia ls ------— ----- ---------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

A v era g e s include units reporting no expenditures for the item.
Includes m ilita ry , ju ry , w itn ess, voting, and person al leave.
O ld -a g e , su rv iv o rs, and d isab ility insurance plus railroad retirem ent.
Unem ploym ent com pensation plus ra ilroad unemployment insurance.
L e s s than 0 .0 5 percen t.
W ork m en 's com pensation plus paym ents under F ede ral E m ployers' Liability Act.
Includes tem p orary disability insurance and payments into Ohio Disabled W orkm en 's R e lie f Fund.

NOTE:

See appendixes for su rve y coverage and definitions.




Table 2. Supplementary Compensation in Units Reporting Expenditures1— A ll Nonproduction Employees
(Average em ployer expenditures as a percent of basic sa la r ie s,
A ll industries surveyed

1963)

Manufacturing industries

Nonmanufacturing industries

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
emDlovees

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em nlovees

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

Total paid le a v e , excluding sick le a v e—— — —
V a c a tio n s-.......___ — ---------------—— .
H o lid a y s------ ---------------- ------ ------------- --------- -------—
M iscellan e ou s paid leave 2 —----------....

8 .0
4.8
3.0
.4

7.6
4 .5
2.9
.3

8 .5
5.1
3 .0
.4

8.1
4 .9
2.9
.3

7.6
4 .6
2.8
.3

8.3
5.1
2.9
.3

8 .2
4 .7
3.1
.4

7.7
4 .4
3.0
.3

8.6
5.0
3.2
.4

R etirem ent p r o g r a m s ..............................................

7 .4
2.6
5.5

7 .0
2.6
5.6

7 .7
2.6
5.5

6.8
2 .4
5.1

6.5
2 .4
5 .4

7 .0
2.3
4 .9

8 .4
3.0
6 .2

7.9
2.8
5.9

8.8
3.1
6.4

Unem ploym ent p rogram s — —------- ------------- ----- —
L e g a lly req u ired p rogram s 4 --------- ----- -— —
Severance or d is m is s a l p ay............... .. ....... —

1.6
1.5
.3
.3

1.6
1.6
.3
.2

1.6
1.5
.3
.3

1.6
1.5
.4
.3

1.6
1.5
.4
.2

1.6
1.4
.3
.3

1.7
1.6
.2
.2

1.7
1.6
.2
-

1.7
1.6
.2
.2

Health benefit p r o g r a m s --------------------------- --------- —
L e g a lly req u ired w ork -conn ected

4 .2

4 .0

4 .4

4 .4

4.1

4.6

4 .0

3.8

4.1

.3
.2
1.6
2.6

.4
.3
1.4
2.5

.3
.2
1.7
2.6

.4
.2
1.5
2.8

.4
.3
1.4
2.8

.3
.2
1.6
2.8

.3
.2
1.6
2 .2

.3
.2
1.4
2.1

.3
.2
1.7
2.2

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

.9

1.0

1.0

1.0

Item

P rivate pension and r etirem en t p la n s ........ —

Other le g a lly required p rogram s 6 — .........—
Sick le a v e -------------------— ------------------ -----------------Health, accident, and life in su ra n ce--------—
Life in suran ce, accidental death and
dism em b erm en t in suran ce, and
death b e n e fits ------------------------------- --------- —
H ospitalization, su rg ica l, and m edical
plans and sickn ess and accident
in suran ce______________ ____ - ........— ........... —

P enalty p a y ------ --- --------... — ---------------------- ------ -----T otal overtim e p a y ........- ......................................
At p rem iu m r a t e s .. . . . . . ----------------------- ------

1
2
3
4
5
6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.8

1.8

1.9

1.3

1.3

1.4

2.5

2.3

2.6

2.2

2.1

2.2

3.4

3.1

3.4

4.6

Savings and thrift p la n s ..... --------------------------------—

5.6

3 .7

5.0

6 .0

4 .0

3.9

4 .8

3.2

3.3
3.1
2.1
1.0
.4

2 .9
2.8
2 .0
.8
.4

3.6
3.3
2.3
1.0
.4

3.4
3.2
2.2
1.0
.3

3 .0
3 .0
2.1
.9
.3

3.8
3 .4
2.4
1.1
.4

3 .0
2 .9
2 .0
.9
.4

2.5
2.5
1.7
.8
.5

3.2
3.1
2.1
1.0
.4

A v era g e s exclude units reporting no expenditures for the item .
Includes m ilita r y , ju ry , w itness, voting, and personal leave.
O ld -a g e , su rv iv o rs, and disability insurance plus railroad retirem ent.
Unem ploym ent com pensation plus railroad unemployment insurance.
W ork m en 's com pensation plus payments under Federal E m p loyers' Liability Act.
Includes tem p orary d isab ility insurance and payments into Ohio Disabled W ork m en 's R e lie f Fund.

NOTE:

See appendixes for su rvey coverage and definitions.




(0

Chapter II. Expenditures for Supplements
Pay supplements may be grouped in several ways.
For example, they
may be classified according to the type of benefit provided, thereby taking into
account the fact that individual items may complement each other or serve as
substitute means of providing a general type of benefit. A second method of
classification relates supplements to the manner in which expenditures are made,
i. e. , payments which are part of basic salaries are in one category, payroll
expenditures in addition to basic salaries in a second group, and outlays in ad­
dition to payroll in a third.
These two approaches are followed in this study,
the former being used for data applying to all nonproduction employees combined
and the latter applying to individual groups of white-collar employees.
A ll Nonproduction Employees
Paid Leave, Excluding Sick Leave.
The widespread adoption of paid
leave plans for white-collar employees is revealed clearly in table 3. All re­
porting units had expenditures for vacations, and all but one made holiday pay­
ments. Payments for military, jury, witness, voting, or personal leave (here­
after referred to as miscellaneous leave) were less frequent, but still occurred
in over 9 out of 10 reporting units. Such payments were least common in manu­
facturing industry units with 250—
999 employees, but even here were found in
8 out of 10 units.
The average reporting unit paid 8 percent of basic salaries for total
paid leave, excluding sick leave. Vacations were the major item, 4 .8 percent.
Holiday pay added another 2. 9 percent, and miscellaneous paid leave only 0. 3 per­
cent.
On the average, units in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries
spent approximately the same percentages of pay for the three leave items com­
bined.
However, expenditures were greater in reporting units with 1,000 em ­
ployees or more as compared to those with 250—
999 employees— 8. 5 as against
7. 6 percent.
Concentration on average expenditures disregards the considerable varia­
tion in level of payments in individual reporting units. Three units showed outlays
between 3 and 4 percent while, at the other extreme, two units reported expendi­
tures between 13 and 14 percent. Nevertheless, there was a strong tendency for
averages to cluster toward the center of the distribution. Three out of four units
reporting expenditure figures fell in the range of 6—10 percent.
Particularly
interesting is a comparison of the distributions of holiday pay expenditures in
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries, the former showing much less
variation.
This reflects the diverse practices in nonmanufacturing industries,
which include, among others, retail trade companies, commonly having relatively
few paid holidays, and financial institutions, often having many paid holidays.7
Additional information on variation in amount of expenditure is shown
in chart 3, depicting the range within which the middle 50 percent of the units
actually reporting expenditures were found.
The general position of a bar in
relation to the base line is a measure of the magnitude of expenditures, while
the length of a bar indicates dispersion among units with respect to expenditure
7
See Wages and Related Benefits. Part II: Metropolitan Areas. United States and Regional Summaries. 1962-63
(BLS Bulletin 1345-83, 1964), p. 71.




10

11

Chart 3. Patterns in Employer Expenditures for Supplementary
Compensation, All Nonproduction Employees, 1963
(Median expenditure and range containing middle 50 percent of reporting units)
Percent of basic salaries

0

1

2

3

4

5

Total paid leave,
excluding sick leave
Vacations
Holidays
All retirement
programs
Legally required
programs
Private pension
and retirement
plans
All unemployment
programs
Legally required
programs
All health benefit
programs
Sick leave
Total health,
accident, and
life insurance
Savings and thrift
plans
Yearend and other
special bonuses
Total penalty pay
Total overtime pay

NOTE:

Group totals may include items




not shown separately.

6

7

8

9

10

12

level. (The median value, also shown, is the central value in data ranked ac­
cording to level of expenditures.
It is the dividing line above and below which
the number of units reporting expenditures are the sa m e.)
Retirement Programs.
Each of the reporting units in the survey was
covered by a legally required retirement program— either old-age, survivors,
and disability insurance (social security—
OASDI) or railroad retirement. In ad­
dition, close to 90 percent of the units had expenditures for a private plan. There
was no substantial difference between manufacturing and nonmanufacturing indus­
tries in the relative frequency of expenditures for private plans; however, such
payments were more common in the larger units (table 4).
Average expenditures for all retirement programs, public and private,
added 7 .4 percent to basic salaries.
Nonmanufacturing industries had higher
expenditures than manufacturing units (8 .4 versus 6 .8 percent) and larger units
spent more than smaller units (7. 7 as against 7 percent). Interestingly, whereas
at one time public plans were the primary ones, in 1963^ private plans entailed
the greater average employer outlay for all reporting units— 4 .9 compared to
2. 6 percent. The average employer payment for private plans in units with such
expenditures was 5. 5 percent.
There is a striking contrast between the degree of variation in em ­
ployer expenditures for legally required and private plans. This contrast is not
surprising. In 1963, the employer's tax rate for OASDI was 35 percent of the
/g
first $4 ,8 0 0 of each employee's pay. The railroad retirement tax was 71 per­
/*
cent, and was based on the first $400 of monthly railroad compensation for the
period to November 1 and on the first $450 thereafter.
Thus, the degree to
which expenditures as a percent of basic salaries differ among units for a legally
required plan is relatively small, being dependent on the extent of variation in
the amount and frequency with which individual employee earnings exceed the
statutory ceiling.
On the other hand, much variation is to be expected among
private plans, since expenditures for them are influenced by many forces, such
as liberality of benefits, age composition of the work force, method of financing,
and extent of funding past-service liabilities.
Unemployment Programs. As with retirement programs, each of the
reporting units in the survey was covered by a legally required unemployment
program, either the Federal-State unemployment compensation program or rail­
road unemployment insurance. However, employer expenditures for private plans
providing benefits to laid-off employees were considerably less frequent than pay­
ments to private retirement programs.
Just under half of the reporting units
paid severance or dismissal pay and less than 1 out of 20 had expenditures for
supplemental unemployment benefits (SUB).
Four-fifths of the units reporting
SUB payments were in manufacturing industries and had 1,000 employees or
more (table 5). 8
On an all-reporting-unit basis, expenditures for all unemployment pro­
grams averaged 1. 6 percent and consisted almost exclusively of outlays for legally
required programs— 1. 5 percent.
Even in units which had severance and dis­
m issal pay or SUB expenditures, payments averaged only 0 .3 percent for each
and rarely went as high as 1 percent.

— ____________ ________

,i

p

A BLS stud/ o f provisions in major collective bargaining agreements, mainly covering b lu e-colla r workers, also
found a concentration o f SUB plans in manufacturing industries. See Major C ollective Bargaining Agreements: Supple­
mental Unemployment Benefit Plans and Wage Employment Guarantees (BLS Bulletin 1425-3, 1965).




13

Health Benefit Programs, All but one of the units reported expenditures
for one or more health benefit programs (table 6).
These programs take on a
variety of forms. Some, such as sick leave and sickness and accident (wage and
salary continuance) insurance, are designed to continue all or part of the salary
of an employee absent from work because of illness. Others, such as hospitaliza­
tion, medical, and surgical insurance, reimburse employees for expenses growing
out of illness.
Also included are payments occasioned by the death of an em­
ployee.
Included are legally required programs— workmen's compensation, for
example— and private plans. Since to a considerable extent these programs are
complementary rather than alternative means of meeting a particular need, a
reporting unit's compensation package usually included a number of programs.
The vast majority of reporting units had expenditures for each of the following
programs: Legally required work-connected disability programs; sick leave; life
insurance, accidental death and dismemberment insurance, and death benefits;
and hospitalization, surgical, and medical plans, and sickness and accident insur­
ance. Outlays for "other" legally required programs, consisting of payments under
temporary disability insurance laws (which exist in four States) and payments into
the Ohio Disabled Workmen's Relief Fund, were found in 1 out of 6 units.
Expenditures for all health benefit programs combined averaged 4. 2 per­
cent, and consisted mainly of outlays for private plans. Reflecting the low in­
cidence of accidents among white-collar employees, legally required workconnected disability programs entailed expenditures of only 0 . 3 percent. "Other"
legally required programs resulted in average payments of less than 0. 05 percent
for all units and 0. 2 percent in units with expenditures. Outlays for private plans
encompassed both direct payments to employees, i. e. , sick leave, and nonpayroll
expenditures, primarily payments to insurance companies or funds for health,
accident, and life insurance; the former amounted to 1. 5 percent for all reporting
units and the latter to 2. 5 percent. Generally, only minor variations in average
expenditures existed among industry and size groups, and were more important
for private plans. Particularly notable is the higher expenditure for hospitaliza­
tion, surgical, and medical plans, and sickness and accident insurance in manu­
facturing industries.
Other Programs. In addition to the items already discussed, several
other programs were included in the study— savings and thrift plans, yearend
and other special bonuses, and penalty pay (overtime pay and shift differentials).
These three programs varied in frequency of occurrence. Only 1 of 10 reporting
units had payments for savings and thrift plans, and half had expenditures for
yearend and other special bonuses (table 7).
On the other hand, some penalty
pay was nearly universal, with almost all units paying overtime and close to
half paying shift differentials (table 8).
Because of their limited occurrence, savings and thrift plans involved
only a minor average expenditure for all reporting units— 0. 3 percent. The av­
erage outlay in all units with expenditures was 2. 5 percent, ranging from 2. 1 per­
cent in manufacturing industry units with 250—
999 employees to 3 .4 percent in
nonmanufacturing industry units with 1,000 employees or more.
Expenditures
for yearend and other special bonuses averaged 2. 3 percent for all units and
4. 6 percent in units actually having such payments. Interestingly, expenditures
for supplements were greater in units with 1,000 employees or more as a general
rule, but bonus payments showed a reverse pattern, being greater in the smaller
units.9 Total penalty pay, 3.2 percent for all units, consisted predominantly of
overtime pay.
Shift differentials added only 0 .2 percent to the expenditures.
9 A BLS stud/ o f production workers
with under 100 employees than in units
Expenditures for Selected Supplementary
Payroll Hours: Manufacturing Industries,




in manufacturing industries found higher bonus expenditures in establishments
with either 100-499 employees or 500 employees or more.
See Employer
Compensation Practices for Production and Related Workers; Composition o f
1962 (BLS Bulletin 1428, 1965), p. 76.

14

Even in units with shift payments, these premiums amounted to only 0 .4 percent.
Total overtime pay of 3 percent for all units consisted of overtime paid at straighttime rates, 2. 1 percent, and overtime paid at premium rates, 0. 9 percent. The
relationship between overtime at straight-time and premium rates clearly reflects
the influence of the practice of paying nonexempt employees time and one-half for
overtime work. 10
Expenditures for savings and thrift plans, bonuses, and penalty pay varied
considerably among the units making these outlays. Particularly striking is the
diversity of bonus payments.
Seventy-seven units reported expenditures under
1 percent, while 17 reported expenditures of 15 percent and over.
Variations
in expenditures for savings and thrift plans and bonuses are the result of con­
siderable differences among company plans.
On the other hand, differences in
the level of company expenditures for premium pay are mainly a function of varia­
tions in the volume of overtime work.
Contributory and Noncontributory Private Welfare Plans. Important in­
sights into the operation of private welfare plans can be gained by examining the
relative frequency of noncontributory and contributory plans and by contrasting
expenditure patterns under these two types of plans.
One-fourth of the units
reporting health, accident, and life insurance plans paid the full cost of the plans;
employees in three-fourths of the units paid part of the cost of one or more of
these plans (table 9).
Frequently, employers paid the total cost of some plans
and shared the cost of others with the employees. Therefore, the relative fre­
quency of noncontributory arrangements was greater for life insurance, accidental
death and dismemberment insurance, and death benefits; and for hospitalization,
surgical, and medical plans, and sickness and accident insurance individually
than for total health, accident, and life insurance. Nevertheless, even for the
two components separately, less than half of the reporting units paid the full cost.
In contrast to the findings for health, accident, and life insurance, private pen­
sion plans did not involve employee contributions in 3 out of 5 units with plans. 1
1
The employer's share of the total cost was over half in 4 of 5 units with
both employer and employee contributions for pension and retirement benefits.
Similarly, about two-thirds of the employers with contributory arrangements paid
over half the cost of hospitalization, surgical, and medical plans, and sickness
and accident insurance. On the other hand, quite frequently employers contrib­
uted a smaller share of the cost of life insurance, accidental death and dis­
memberment insurance, and death benefits— 2 out of 5 employers with contribu­
tory plans paid over 25 through 50 percent of the cost.
The relation between employer expenditures under noncontributory and
contributory plans is interesting.
In the case of health, accident, and life in­
surance, employer expenditures were higher under noncontributory than contribu­
tory plans— 3. 1 as compared to 2 .4 percent. This relationship was also found in
separate tabulations for life insurance, accidental death and dismemberment insur­
ance, and death benefits; and for hospitalization, surgical, and medical plans, and
sickness and accident insurance.
On the other hand, no clear difference was
10 For purposes o f this stud/, overtime at premium rates was defined as that part o f total overtime pay which
was above regular straight-time pay, e. g . , the half tim e o f tim e and o n e -h a ll The straight-time portion o f total
overtime pay was tabulated as overtime at straight-time rates.
11 A 1965 study by the Bureau o f Labor Statistics o f about 15,000 single-em ployer private pension plans found
that 7 out o f 10 plans covering salaried employees were noncontributory. See The Older Am erican Worker; Age Dis­
crimination in Employment. Report o f the Secretary o f Labor to the Congress Under Section 715 o f the Civil Rights
A ct o f 1964, Research Materials (June 1965), p. 28. Additional information on the relative importance o f contribu­
tory and noncontributory health, insurance, and pension plans is found in Health and Insurance Benefits and Pension
Plans for Salaried Employees. Spring 1963 (BLS Bulletin 1405, 1964); and Part II o f BLS Bulletin 1345-83, cited
in footnote 7.




15

found for pension and retirement plans for which employer expenditures were
higher under contributory plans in reporting units with 250—
999 employees (5. 8 as
compared to 5. 1 percent) and higher under noncontributory plans in the larger
units (5. 6 versus 4. 9 percent). Although not conclusive evidence, these findings
suggest that employee contributions for health, accident, and life insurance tend
to defray part of the cost of a fixed benefit package, whereas worker contribu­
tions for retirement programs frequently purchase additional benefits.
With but
a single exception (hospitalization, surgical, and medical plans, and sickness
and accident insurance in nonmanufacturing industry units with 250—
999 employ­
ees), in each of the industry-size groups average employer expenditures con­
sistently rose for each of the benefits studied as the employer's share of the
total expenditure under contributory plans increased.
Employee Contributions.
While the emphasis in the study was on em­
ployer expenditures, data were collected also on employee payments under con­
tributory private welfare plans. The average employee contribution in units with
contributory health, accident, and life insurance was 1. 3 percent of basic salaries.
The figure for pension and retirement plans was 2 percent (table 10). In both
of these cases, there was relatively little variation among industry-size groups,
and relatively few units reported employee contributions of 3 percent and over.
Moreover, in both cases, the average employee contribution was less than the
corresponding average employer expenditure under contributory plans.
Expenditures for Individual Employee Groups
In order to compare expenditures for individual employee groups, em­
ployers' payroll expenditures were collected separately for nonexempt nonproduc­
tion employees; exempt employees, excluding upper management; and upper man­
agement employees. 12 Since employers often do not keep records on expenditures
for legally required insurance and private welfare plans separately for individual
groups of white-collar employees, it was not possible to collect data on these
expenditure items by employee group.
For some types of private plans, the
Internal Revenue Code provisions encourage employers to establish single plans
for all nonproduction employees. Nevertheless, some information was obtained on
expenditures for special private welfare plans for upper management employees.
Nonexempt Nonproduction Employees. Nonexempt employees in each of
the reporting units received pay for one or more types of leave time.
All of
the units paid for vacations and all but one paid for holidays.
Pay for sick leave
and miscellaneous leave, although not quite as common, occurred in the vast
majority of the units, the fQrmer being found in 94 percent of the units and the
latter in 86 percent (table 11).
On the average, total paid leave accounted for 9# 6 percent of the non­
exempt employees' basic salaries.
Thus, only nine-tenths of the employees'
regular pay was for work performed and time not worked but spent at the work­
place, e . g . , coffee breaks. None of the units reporting expenditures spent less
than 3 percent for paid leave, and four of them spent 15 percent or more (chart 4).
Vacations accounted for nearly half of all leave expenditures— 4. 5 percent. A v­
erage expenditures for holiday pay were 3 percent. Sick leave and miscellaneous
leave entailed lower outlays— 1.7 and 0 .4 percent, respectively, for all report­
ing units.
For each of the types of paid leave, units with 250—
999 employees
spent, on the average, less than the larger units; however, except for vaca­
tions (4. 1 against 4. 7 percent) the differences between the two groups were minor.
Percentage differences between manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries,
likewise, were minimal.
12
Some units could not provide information in this detail.
Therefore, the number o f units shown in the all­
em ployee tables differs from that included in the tables for individual em ployee groups.




16

Chart 4. Patterns in Employer Expenditures for Supplementary
Compensation, Nonexempt Nonproduction Employees, 1963
(Median expenditure and range containing middle 50 percent of reporting units]
Percent of basic

0 1

NOTE:

2

3

4

5

6

Group totals include items not shown separately.




salaries

7

8

9

10

11

12

17

In nearly a ll o f the reporting units, the nonexempt grou p 's pay included
additions to regular salary. The m ost frequent addition was overtim e pay, found
in ov er 95 p ercen t of the units.
Two out of five units made payments fo r shift
d ifferen tials, and the sam e prop ortion gave severa n ce o r d ism issa l pay.
O ver
a third o f the units paid bonuses, and clo s e to a fourth made still other payments—
incentive aw ards, retroa ctive pay, etc. (table 12).
Expenditures for these additions to the b a sic sa la ries o f nonexempt w ork ­
e rs averaged 7. 1 percen t for all units and 7. 2 percent in units with expenditures.
O vertim e pay was cle a rly the dominant com ponent, averaging 5. 6 and 5. 8 p e r ­
cent, re sp e ctiv ely . T hese averages hide the con sid erab le variation in overtim e
expenditures; 31 units reporting expenditures spent under 1 percent and 25 spent
15 p ercen t o r m o re . On an a ll-rep ortin g -u n it b a sis, total overtim e pay was d i­
vided into overtim e at straight-tim e rates— 3. 8 p ercen t— and overtim e at prem ium
rates— 1.9 percen t.
A verage total overtim e in manufacturing— 6 .4 percent—
was con sid erab ly higher than the corresponding figure in nonmanufacturing—
4. 1 percen t. A verage bonus expenditures— 1. 1 percen t fo r all units and 3. 1 p e r ­
cent in units with expenditures— w ere im portant.
On the other hand, shift d if­
fe ren tia ls, severa n ce or d ism issa l pay, and other pay contributed only m inor
percen t additions to a verage em ployer p a y rolls.
A ll Exem pt E m p loyees.
The findings on leave payments to exempt
em ployees c lo s e ly p a ra llel those concerning nonexem pt em p loyees, both as to
frequency o f o ccu rre n ce and rate o f expenditure (table 13 and chart 5).
The
m ost n oticeable d ifferen ce was in vacation pay, for which em ployers paid on
the average grea ter amounts to exem pt em ployees— 5. 3 percent com pared with
4. 5 percen t fo r nonexem pt w ork ers.
P ay roll expenditures in addition to b asic sa la ries o cc u rre d le ss often
fo r exem pt em ployees, m ainly because of the frequent absence o f overtim e pay­
ments to em ployees exempt from the overtim e p rovision s of the F air L abor
Standards A ct. N everth eless, over fou r-fifth s of the reporting units did add to
the b a sic sa la ries o f exem pt em ployees (table 14).
N early tw o-fifths paid o v e r ­
tim e, a fifth paid shift prem ium s, a third severa n ce o r d ism issa l pay, nearly
half bonuses, and a lm ost a fourth other pay.
Mainly because of low er overtim e
payments— 1 percent for all units and 2. 8 percen t in units with expenditures—
total expenditures fo r additions to exem pt e m p lo y e e s' b asic sa la ries w ere low er
than in the ca se of nonexem pt em ployees— 4. 9 percent fo r all units and 5. 8 p e r ­
cent in units with expenditures. O vertim e pay fo r exem pt em p loyees, it may be
ob serv ed , con sisted p rim a rily of payments at straigh t-tim e rates; prem ium pay
was rela tively m in or.
H ow ever, bonus pay— at 3 .4 percen t fo r all units and
7 p ercen t in units with expenditures— was higher than fo r nonexem pt em ployees.
Upper Management E m p loyees. A ll units with upper management em ­
ployees paid fo r vacations and holidays.
H ow ever, only 85 percent actually paid
sick leave and 75 percen t, m iscellan eou s leave.
F o r the latter two types o f
lea ve, the rela tive frequency of payments was le ss for upper management em ­
p loyees than fo r either nonexempt or all exem pt em ployees.
Leave payments to
upper m anagement em ployees averaged 10. 2 percen t, higher than for either non­
exem pt o r all exem pt em p loyees.
The m a jor item , vacation s, entailed expendi­
tures o f 5 .8 percent (table 15).
P a y roll additions to the b asic sa la ries o f upper management em ployees
w ere made too infrequently to warrant tabular presentation fo r m ost o f the item s.
O vertim e pay was reported in only 10 of 436 units and shift differentials even
le s s frequently. Severance or d ism issa l pay was found in c lo s e to a fifth of the




18

Chart 5.

Pa tte rn s in Em ployer Expenditures for Supplem entary Com pensatio
Exem pt Nonproduction Em ployees, 1963

iMedian expenditure and range containing middle 50 percent of reporting units)
Percent of basic salaries

0

1

2

3

4

5

Total paid leave,
including sick leave

Vacations

Holidays

Sick leave

Payroll items in
addition to basic
salaries— items
all
studied
Total overtime pay

Yearend and other
special bonuses

NOTE:

G r o u p to ta ls inc lude items not shown s e p a ra te ly .




6

7

8 9

10

11

12

19

units and
over 2 of
units and
reporting

other pay in a tenth. However, bonuses were paid more frequently, in
5 units, and occasioned high average expenditures— 6. 6 percent for all
14. 9 percent in units with expenditures.
In fact, 52 of the 15 7 units
bonus expenditures showed payments of 15 percent or more (table 16).

It is known that some companies have separate private welfare plans for
upper management employees. Some of these plans supplement plans having wider
coverage, which also include upper management employees.
In other instances,
the upper management group is covered solely by special plans and not by plans
applying to lower level employees.
Some information on this point was obtained
in the survey.
Of the units with upper management em ployees, 76 reported ex­
penditures for separate health, accident, and life insurance plans for upper man­
agement, averaging 2 percent.
Fifty-eight reported expenditures for separate
pension and retirement plans, averaging 6. 2 percent.
However, it was not de­
termined to what extent these plans supplemented plans having broader employee
coverage or were substitutes for the broader plans. 1 *
3

* Payroll data for upper management employees are included in the figures for all exempt employees.
the data on separate private welfare plans are included in the all-em ployee figures.




Similarly,

Table 3. Paid Leave, Excluding Sick Leave— A ll Nonproduction Employees

8

(E m ployer expenditures as a percen t o f b a s ic s a la r ie s , 1963)
Number of units

Average expenditures
Item, industry, and size of reporting unit

A ll
Reporting
reporting units with
units
expenditures

Total

Reporting
there were
1
Repoiting no expenditures
but not
expenditures
Under and
1
under
showing the
2
amount

Reporting expfenditures of15
and
over

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

24

2
1
1

-

-

-

-

Total paid leave, excluding sick leave
A ll industries surveyed_________ ______________
Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or m ore_______
Manufacturing industries
____ ________ ___
Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______
Nonmanufacturing industries------------------------- _
Units with 250—
999 employees ____ _____
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______

2

690
289
401
423
189
234
267

7

1 00

6

167

4. 8
4. 5
5. 1
4 .9
4. 6
5. 1
4. 7
4. 4
5. 0

4. 8
4. 5
5. 1
4 .9
4. 6
5. 1
4. 7
4. 4
5. 0

695
293
402
426

2.9
2.9
3. 0
2.9
2. 8
2.9
3. 1
3. 0
3. 2

3. 0
2.9
3. 0
2.9
2. 8
2.9
3. 1
3. 0
3. 2

695
293
402
426

.4

690
289
401
423
189
234
267

8.
7.
8.
8.
7.
8.
8.
7.
8.

0
6

5
1
6

3
2

7
6

8.
7.
8.
8.
7.
8.
8.
7.
8.

0
6

5
1
6

3

_
-

384
151
233
239
99
140
145
52
93

_

73

_
-

_
-

_
-

22

9

3

8

2

16
13
5

7
4

2
1
2
2

3
5

-

22

8
11

5
17

3

1

-

8

4

1

.
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

73
29
44
48

28
16

47
24
23
32
17
15
15
7

12

8

17

62
23
39
46
16
30
16
7
9

23
3

3

12

17

2
1
2
1
1
1
1

7
5
7
5

12

55
33

5

22

10
8
2

27
17

-

3

7
4
3

123
78
45
76
54

215
93

169
57

122

1 12

131
56
75
84
37
47

109
43

4

21

50
23
27
14
7
7
36
16

55

20

61
18
43
39
13
26

2

5
2

10

21

27
25
8

1

1

2
1
1

-

Vacations
A ll industries surveyed ----------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees _____________
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______
Manufacturing industries_______________________
Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______
Nonmanufacturing industries___ _____ ______
Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______

192

234
269

-

101

-

168

-

21

52
26
8

18
47
13
34

1
1

4
3

-

1

1
1

3

-

-

-

2
1
1
1

-

13
9
14
8
6
8

5
3

22

47
24
23

66

60
14
46

20

19
3
16
4
4

3
1
2
1
1

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

Holidays
A ll industries surveyed ----------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______
Manufacturing industries---------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or more----------Nonmanufacturing industries ------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees________________
Units with 1,000 employees or more ________

1 92

234
269
101
1 68

1
1

1
1

-

46
13
33
11
6

5
35
7
28

3
1
2
2
1
1
1

1

35
19
16

14
8
6
21
11
10

325
141
184
229
97
132
96
44
52

231
94
137
155
73
82
76

1

3
1
1

3
1
2

Miscellaneous paid leave 1
A ll industries surveyed ___________________________
Units with 250—
999 employees________________
Units with 1,000 employees or m ore ________
Manufacturing industries ------------------------ ---------Units with 250—
999 employees________________
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______
Nonmanufacturing industries----------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or m ore--------

. 3
. 2

.4
. 3
. 2
. 3

.4
. 3
.4

. 3
.4
. 3
. 3
. 3
.4
. 3
.4

1 Includes m ilita ry , ju ry , w itn e ss, voting, and person al leave.
NOTE:

See appendixes fo r su rve y co v e ra g e and definitions.




62
50
12

44
38
6

18

100

12

167

6

380
150
230
237
98
139
143
52
91

230
85
145
131
51
80
99
34
65

16
4

2

12
10
2
8

2
1

6

1
1

-

2

4

-

1

Tabic 4.

Retirement Program s-—A ll N onproduction Employees

(Employer expenditures as a percent of basic salaries, 1963)
Average expenditures
Item, industry, and size of reporting unit

All
Reporting
reporting units with
units
expenditures

Number of units

Total

Reporting
there were
Reporting no expenditures
1
but not
expenditures
Under and
showing the
1
under
amount
2

Reporting expenditures of—
2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

60
42
18
45
33

50
28

49
29
37
15

40
14
26
19
7

31

-

1

_

1

15
9

75
19
56
51
13
38
24

85
31
54
56

22

81
33
48
52
24
28
29
9

50

22

_
_
_

4
4
3
3
_

-

-

6

20

18

74
31
43

486
195
291
328
141
187
158
54
104

95
57
38
30

22

2

.

21

1

22
1

2
1

21

1

55

77
33
44
59
24
35
18
9
9

72
27
45
53
18
35
19
9

51
13
38
34

10

12

12

10
12

13

14

13

14

15

15
7

15
and
over

All retirement programs
A ll industries surveyed-------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more
Manufacturing industries
- _
Units with 250—
999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more-

686

_

287
399
419
187
232
267

-

100

-

7 .4
7 .0
7.7

7 .4
7 .0
7.7

6 .8
6. 5

6 .8
6. 5

7 .0
8 .4
7 .9

7. 0
8 .4
7 .9

8.8

8.8

167

2. 6
2. 6
2.6

2. 6
2. 6
2 .6

2. 4
2 .4
2. 3
3. 0

2. 4
2. 4
2. 3
3. 0
2. 8
3. 1

693
289
404
426
189
237
267

67
24
43
36
14
10
21

_
-

12

34
19
15
16
9
7

20

22
12

5
7

6

16

40
29
15
14

21

29
34
15
19
16
6
10

12
21

7
14

40
14
26
16
5

19

14

8
11
11

6
8

14
5
9

4
4

2
2

10
2
8

12

6

_ _

11

5

24
9
15

8
2
6

13

8

6

4
4
5
3

3
4
3

3
9

8
8

5
3
7

23
11
12
11
6

5
12

5

5
7

8

5

10

4
4
4

2

3
3

5
5
4
3

2

Legally required programs 1
Units with 2>tA-QQQ B-mp1ny»o« _
... ...
Units with 1, 000 employees or more—--------Units with 25G-QQQ employ***
Units with 1,000 *mplny*AS nr mnrp

2 .8

Units with 1, 000 employees or more

3. 1

14
4
.

10

7

61

2

25
36
13

5
7

100

2

6

167

5

7

_

21
9

65
36
29

Private pension and retirement plans
All industries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more
Manufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 employees_______________
Units with 1, 000 employees or more-----------Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250-999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more

1

4 .9
4 .6
5. 1
4. 5
4. 3
4. 7
5. 5
5.2
5.7

5. 5
5.6
5. 5
5. 1
5.4
4 .9
6 .2

5.9
6 .4

690
289
401
423
189
234
267

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




61
23
38
36
14

30
14

50
20

21

17
9

30
33
13

34
36
15

16

22

8

20

21

13
5

17
7

19

8

10

13

100

12

25
9

167

18

16

Old-age, survivors, and disability insurance plus railroad retirement.

NOTE:

78
51
27
48
39
9
30

6

74
27
47
44
14
30
30
13
17

8

26
17
5

38
14
24
14
7
7
24
7
17

25
9

19

16

10

16

9

6
10

13
4
9

12
8

4
4

12

5
7

4
7
2

5

7
4
3
1

12
2
10

2

9
3

3

6

2

2
2

6
2

2

4

Table 5. Unemployment Programs— A ll Nonproduction Employees
(Employer expenditures as a percent of basic salaries, 1963)
Number of units

Average expenditures

Item, industry, and size of reporting unit

Reporting
All
reporting units with
expenditures
units

Total

Reporting
there were
1
Reporting no expenditures
Under and
expenditures
but not
1
under
showing the
2
amount

Reporting expenditures of2

3

4

3

4

5

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

All unemployment proerams

Nonmanufacturing industries------- —
......... .......
Units with 250—
999 employees------------------------

1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6

1 .6
1.6
1.6
1 .6
1.6
1 .6

1.7
1.7
1.7

1.7
1.7
1.7

666

-

276
390
404
181
223
262
95
167

-

693
289
404
426
189
237
267
167

-

687
288
399
422
191
231
265
97
168

354
1
1 7*
163
228
141
87
126
50
76

689
288
401
422
188
234
267

658
284
374
393
184
209
265

100

All industries surveyed----------------- --------------------Units with 250—
999 employees------------ — —
—
Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore------------

100

167

165

128
41
87

-

66

19
47
62
22

40

127
52
75
76
39
37
51
13
38

268
116
152
184
80
104
84
36
48

105
53
52
62
35
27
43
18
25

176

346
142
204
235
93
142

111

32
11
21
11
6

5
21

5
3
2

4
2
2
1

5
16

1

24
8

2
2

16
5
4

2
2

Legally required proerams 1
2
All industries surveyed——. —. ................................
Units with 250-999 employees------— ----------—
Units with 250-999 employees----------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore-----------Nonmanufacturing industries —. . . — .... ..........—
Units with 250-999 employees..........—............—
Units with 1, 000 employees or more------------

1.5

1.5

1.6

1 .6

1.5
1.5
1.5
1.4

1.5
1.5
1.5
1.4

1.6
1.6
1.6

1 .6
1 .6
1.6

.1

.3
3

.2
.2
.1
.2
.1
.1
.1

\s

100

34
13
21
20
8
12

14
5
9

66
110

104
45
59
72
21

51

58
53
60
37
23
51

1

49
62

21

30

19
4
15

8
2

4

1

6
6
2

3
3

1
1

4

3

1

2

1
1

111

Severance or dismissal pay
All industries surveyed -------------------------------------Manufacturing industries —--------------------------------Units with 250-999 employees- .. — ...........
Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore...........
Nonmanufacturing industries------------------- ------—

.4
.4
.3
.2
.2
.2

112

34
78
57
15
42
55
19
36

208
60
148
127
33
94
81
27
54

-

1

2

Supplemental unemployment benefits
All industries surveyed—--------------------------------- —
Units with 250—
999 employees----------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or more— — —
Manufacturing industries
... —
Units with 1, 000 employees or more—— — —

(?)
(*)
?
(?>
(?)
?)

iz \
\ /

1
2

.3
.2

.3
.3
.2

.3
.2
2

Unemployment compensation plus railroad unemployment insurance.
Less than 0.05 percent.

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions,




1

1

-

29
4
25
28
4
24

1
1

j

1
1
1
1

-

1

15
and
over

Tabic 6. Health Benefit Programs— A ll Nonproduction Employees
(Employer expenditures as a percent of basic salaries, 1963)
Average expenditures
Item, industry, and size of reporting unit

All
Reporting
reporting
units with
units
expenditures

Number of units

Total

Reporting
there were
Reporting no expenditures
1
Under and
but not
expenditures
under
showing the
1
2
amount

Reporting expenditures of—
2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

_

15
and
over

All health benefit programs
All industries surveyed---- -------------------------- -----Units with 250—
999 employeesUnits with 1,000 employees or more
Manufacturing industries
—
Units with 250—
999 employeesUnits with 1, 000 employees or more----------Nonmanufacturing industries----------—----------— —
Units with 1,000 employees or m ore-----------

4 .2
4 .0
4 .4
4 .4
4. 1
4. 6
4 .0
^ ft
4. 1

4 .2
4. 0
4. 4
4 .4
4. 1
4 .6
4. 0

.3
.4
.3
.3
.4

.3
.4
.3
.4
.4
. 3

!

r

664
273
391
405
180
225
259
93

4. 1

166

•

688

48

286
402
424
189
235
264
97
167

20

1
-

1
1

324
132
192
204
86

4
3
1
2
2

22

61

13
9
14

35
26
34

11

22
12

-

118

-

3

-

1 20

2

8
2

46
74

27
13
14

80
28
52
46
17
29
34

72
26
46
35

11

10

36
29
5
24
17
5

23

27

12

5
5

.

.

16

19
37

46
10

1

6

536
225
311
329
145
184
207
80
127

24
15
9

1
1

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

16
11

1
1

1
1

1
1

-

35
18
17
25
13
12
10

10

3
7
7
3
4
3
3

3

3

-

3

2
1

2

3

-

2
1

2
1

.
-

-

-

_
_

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

-

2
2

"

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

~

■

-

-

!

_

.

.

.

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

3

1

Legally required work-connected
disability programs 1
All industries surveyed
_
- Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or m ore----------Manufacturing industries —
Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or more --------------TTpi + e

^O Q a m p l n y A o e

. 3
. 3
. 3

#2

. 3

t3
#3

28
32
15
17
16
5

76
23
53
43
15
28
33
g

11

25

691
288
403
425
189
236
266
99
167

579
247
332
364

19

1 69

1

195
215
78
137

12

5

90
38
52
47
19
28
43
1Q
24

689
288
401
422
188
234
267

28
18

100

g

167

1

289
124
165
183
80
103
106
44
62

91
50
41
62
36
26
29
14
15

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

5
g

4
4

Other legally required programs 2
A l l i n d u e t r i o e Q ii r t r o y A d
TTr^if c uri+l-t ? ^(W O Q Q n m p i r t y o o c

Units with 1, 000 employees or more --------------X X a r ^ ii f a r t n i» i « g i r»d n e t r i a o
TT*|ite uritVi 7 ^ 0 —QQQ o m p l n y n o c

Units with 1, 000 employees or more----------? ^ fL -Q Q Q orv> pl n y o o c
Units with 1,000 employees or more----------T T p ife

(?)
( )
( )
(?)

. 2

3
!2

.

. 2

t

3

!2

<;>
()

_2
#2

H

!2

2

17
13
g
1

2
1
1
2
1

Sick leave
All industries surveyed------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or more _________
Manufacturing industries -----------------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees ------------------------------Units with 1,000 employees or m ore --------------Nonmanufacturing industries --------------------------------------TTrvite \xrt t

7 ^ H—Q O Q A - m p l n y o o e

Units with 1,000 employees or more __________

See footnotes at end of table.




1. 5
1.3
1.6

1.4
1. 3
1. 5
1.6
1 .3

1.7

1.6

1. 4
1.7
1. 5
1.4
1. 6
1. 6
1 .4
1.7

10
21
12

9
7

181
68

113
103
41
62
78
27
51

87
25
62
44

16
28
43

10
2

2

_

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
7

2
1

2

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

1
1

3

9

34

3

1

Tabic 6. Health Benefit Programs— All Nonproduction Employees— Continued
(E m ployer expenditures as a percent of basic sa la r ie s,

1963)
Number of units

A verage expenditures

Item , industry, and siz e of reporting unit

A ll
reporting
units

units with
expenditures

Total

Reporting no
expenditures

Reporting
there were
expenditures
1
Uncier
but not
and
showing the
1
under
amount
___ i ___

Reporting expenditures of—
2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

15
and
over

20
10
10
18
9
9
2
1
1

7
4
3
6
3
3
1
1

2
1
1
2
1
1

3
3
3
3
-

-

-

-

-

-

4
2
2
4
2
2

3
2
1
3
2
1

Total health, accident, and life in su r a n c e 4
A ll in du stries su rv e y e d ----------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e -----------Manufacturing in d u str ie s _________________________
Units with 250—999 em p loyee sUnits with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ------------------------------Units with 250—999 em p loyee s-----------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ------------

2. 5
2. 5
2. 6
2 .8
2. 7
2 .8
2. 2
2. 1
2. 2

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

6
5
6
8
8
8
2
1
2

690
289
401
423
189
234
267
100
167

6
5
1
3
3
3
2
1

49
17
32
25
9
16
24
8
16

73
45
28
29
22
7
44
23
21

184
66
118
108
44
64
76
22
54

172
70
102
110
47
63
62
23
39

107
43
64
77
29
48
30
14
16

64
23
41
39
17
22
25
6
19

.9
.9
.9
.9
1 .0
.9
.9
.9
.9

1 .0
1 .0
1. 0
1 .0
1 .0
.9
1. 0
1 .0
1 .0

690
289
401
423
189
234
267
100
167

26
20
6
15
14
1
11
6
5

150
57
93
97
39
58
53
18
35

323
130
193
198
85
113
125
45
80

140
60
80
82
36
46
58
24
34

38
16
22
20
10
10
18
6
12

11
5
6
9
4
5
2
1

1 .6
1 .6
1 .6
1 .8
1 .8
1 .9
1 .3
1 .3
1 .4

690
289
401
423
189
234
267
100
167

23
17
6
8
6
2
15
11
4

143
57
86
93
40
53
50
17
33

156
69
87
82
41
41
74
28
46

202
77
125
115
48
67
87
29
58

118
49
69
86
37
49
32
12
20

32
11
21
25
8
17
7
3
4

9
5
4
7
5
2
2

su rgical,

and

-

2
1
1
2
1
1

1 .6
1 .5
1 .6
1 .8
1 .8
1 .8
1 .3
1 .2
1 .3

3
2
1
3
2
1

L ife in suran ce, accidental death and
d ism em b erm en t in suran ce, and
death benefits
A ll in du stries su rv e y e d ----------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------Manufacturing in du stries „
_____ _ __ __
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s- — _
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s -------- -----— —
Units with 25 0—
999 em p loyee s-----------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
H ospitalization, su rg ica l, and m e d ical plans
and sickn ess and accident insurance
A ll in du stries su rv e y e d ----------------------------------------Units with 2 50—
999 em p loyee s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------Manufacturing in d u str ie s-------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s- _ - --------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s-----------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ------------

1 W ork m en 's com pensation plus payments under Federal E m ployers' Liability A ct.
2 Includes tem p orary d isab ility insurance and payments into Ohio D isabled W orkm en's R elief Fund.
3 L e s s than 0. 05 percent.
4 L ife in suran ce, accidental death and dism em berm ent insurance, and death benefits plus hospitalization,
N O TE :

See appendixes for su rvey coverage and definitions.




-

2

m edical

plans

and

sickn ess

and

accident

insurance.

Table 7. Savings and Thrift Plans and Yearend and Other Special Bonuses— All Nonproduction Employees
(Em ployer expenditures as a percent of basic sa la r ie s,

1963)

Average expenditures
Item , industry, and siz e of reporting unit

All
Reporting
reporting
units with
units
expenditures

Number of units

Total

expenditures

Reporting
there w ere
expenditures
but not
showing the
amount

Reporting expenditures of1
Under
and
1
under
2

-

j

3

4

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

11
12

12
_
13

13
_
14

14
_
15

15
and
over

Savings and thrift plans
---A ll industries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 em ployees ....
Units with 1. 000 f.mplnypps nr m nro
Manufacturing in du stries ...............
Units with 250—
999 em ployees .....
Units with 1. 000 pmployppfi nr m nro
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees ....
Units with 1. 000 em ployees or more..

0.3
.1
#3
.i
.3
.i
.4

2.3
2.6
2.2
2 .1
2 .2
3 .4
3.1
3.4

689
288
401
too
234
100
167

613
272
341
368
176
192
245
96
149

346
131
215
199
86
113
147
45
102

2
1
1
2
1
1

23
5
18
18
5
13
5
5

9
3
6
6
2
4
3
1
2

6
2
4
3
1
2
3
1
2

4
1
3
4
1
3
-

-

22
3
19
17
2
15
5
1
4

37
10
27
25
6
19
12
4
8

77
29
48
50
20
30
27
9
18

44
22
22
32
16
16
12
6
6

36
17
19
23
11
12
13
6
7

38
15
23
20
9
11
18
6
12

20
12
8
9
6

“

-

1
_
1
1

3
1
2
-

_

_

2

_

3
1

2
2

_

_

_

2
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_

9
7
2
4
3
1
5
4

3

1
_

3
1
2

1
2
_
2

18
10
8
12
6
6
6
4
2

15
5
10
13
4
9
2
1
1

10
7
3
6
5
1
4
2
2

1
1

1
1

Yearend and other sp ecial bonuses
A ll industries surveyed
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or
Manufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1. 000 em ployees or
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 em ployees
Units with 1. 000 em ployees or

NOTE:

....
m o r e ----_ .
m ore

m ore

2.3
3.1
1.7
2.6
3.3

2.1
1.8
2.7
1.2

3.7
5.0
6 .0
4 .0
4.8
3.2

692
? Q1
401
191
233
9 ZQ
coo
100

3

11
6
5

1

7

3
4
2
1
1
5
2
3

6
4
2
4
2
2
2
2

4
2
2
3
1
2
1
1

3
2
1
3

2
1

2
1
1
1
1
1
1

3

1
2
2
1
1

17
13
4

16
12
4
1
1

1

See appendixes for su rvey coverage and definitions.




1
0

01

Table 8. Penalty Pay— All Nonproduction Employees
(E m p lo y e r ex p e n d itu r e s a s a p e r c e n t o f b a s ic s a la r i e s ,

1963)

A v e r a g e e x p e n d itu r e s

Ite m , in d u s t r y , and s i z e o f r e p o r t in g unit

A ll
Reporting
reporting
units with
units
expenditures

N u m b e r o f units

Total

Reporting no
expenditures

Reporting
there w ere
1
expenditures
and
but not
Under
under
showing the
1
2
amount

Reporting expenditures of—
2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1.0

11

12

13

14

J5

8
3
5
7
2
5
1
1

5
2
3
5
2
3
-

_
-

6
3
3
5
2
3
1
1

6
3
3
5
2
3
1
1

15
and
over

Total penalty pay 1
A ll in du stries su rv e y e d _________________________ _
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 em p lo y ee s________________
9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing in d u s tr ie s _________________________
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 em p lo y ee s________________
9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s____________________
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p lo y ee s________________
9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________

3.2
2.7
3.5
3.3
2.8
3.8
2.9
2 .4
3.2

3.3
2.9
3.6
3.4
3.0
3.8
3.0
2.5
3.2

691
292
399
424
192
232
267
100
167

20
17
3
12
12
8
5
3

130
36
94
69
21
48
61
15
46

102
67
35
65
43
22
37
24
13

136
57
79
82
33
49
54
24
30

92
43
49
55
30
25
37
13
24

66
27
39
43
21
22
23
6
17

46
11
35
28
7
21
18
4
14

26
6
20
18
5
13
8
1
7

14
4
10
7
2
5
7
2
5

14
6
8
9
4
5
5
2
3

14
4
10
10
3
7
4
1
3

7
3
4
6
3
3
1

3.0
2.7
3.3
3.1
2.8
3.4
2.8
2 .4
3.0

3.1
2.8
3.3
3.2
3.0
3.4
2.9
2.5
3.1

693
293
400
425
192
233
268
101
167

20
17
3
12
12

76
22
54
40
16
24
36
6
30

114
68
46
76
44
32
38
24
14

156
62
94
94
35
59
62
27
35

103
46
57
58
31
27
45
15
30

80
29
51
50
21
29
30
8
22

46
12
34
25
6
19
21
6
15

24
8
16
16
6
10
8
2
6

18
7
11
10
4
6
8
3
5

15
5
10
10
3
7
5
2
3

13
3
10
10
3
7
3

7
3
4
7
3
4

2.1
1.8
2.3
2.2
1.9
2 .4
1.9
1.6
2.1

2.1
2.0
2.3
2.2
2.1
2 .4
2.0
1.7
2.1

693
293
400
425
192
233
268
101
167

21
17
4
12
12

113
33
80
54
19
35
59
14
45

192
99
93
128
64
64
64
35
29

155
65
90
92
41
51
63
24
39

96
38
58
59
27
32
37
11
26

41
11
30
23
6
17
18
5
13

30
12
18
20
8
12
10
4
6

14
3
11
10
2
8
4
1
3

11
4
7
10
4
6
1

8
4
4
7
3
4
1
1

3
2
1
3
2
1

1
1

.9
.8
1.0
1.0
.8
1.1
.9
.7
1.0

1.0
.8
1.0
1.0
.9
1.1
.9
.8
1.0

693
293
400
425
192
233
268
101
167

22
19
3
12
12

374
179
195
238
117
121
136
62
74

127
40
87
81
27
54
46
13
33

41
11
30
27
7
20
14
4
10

12
7
5
10
6
4
2
1
1

4
1
3
3

3
3

-

-

10
7
3

109
33
76
50
20
30
59
13
46

.2
.1
.2
.2
.1
.3
.2
.1
.2

.4
.4
.4
.3
.3
.4
.4
.5
.4

692
292
400
424
192
232
268
100
168

371
224
147
220
151
69
151
73
78

89
19
70
47
9
38
42
10
32

218
45
173
149
31
118
69
14
55

10
2
8
6

2
1
1
2
1
1

_
1

1

1

1
1

1
1

1
_ ■

_
_
_
~

_
_
_

j
1
- 2
2
- _
_ 1
- 1
-

- 3
1
- 2
_ 2
_ 1
_ 1
_ 1
- - 1

-

-

“

-

-

_ _
- 1
1
_ _ ■ _

9
6
3
6
4
2
3
2
1

T otal overtim e pay
A ll in du stries su rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 2 5 0 - 9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s________________
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing in d u s tr ie s _________________________
Units with 2 5 0 - 9 9 9 em p loyees________________
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ____________________
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p lo y ee s________________
9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________

_

8
5
3

_ _

3

"

O vertim e at stra ig h t-tim e rates
A ll in du stries s u rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 em p loyee s________________
9
Units with 1, 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing in d u s tr ie s _________________________
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p lo y ee s________________
9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing in d u s tr ie s ____________________
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p lo y e e s._______________
9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________

_

9
5
4

_
1

1
_

1
1
_

1
_ 1
_
1
_ _ _
_ _ _
"

1

1
1

2
2

8
5
3
6
4
2
2
1

1
1
_
1
1

1
-

O ve rtim e at p rem iu m rates
A ll in du stries s u rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 2 5 0 - 9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s________________
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ___ ____
Manufacturing in d u s tr ie s _________________________
Units with 2 5 0 - 9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s________________
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ____________________
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 em p lo y ee s_- ___________ _
9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________

_

_

3
1
1

Shift d ifferen tials
A ll in du stries s u rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 2 5 0 - 9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s________________
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing in d u str ie s _________________________
Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p lo y ee s-----------------------9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ------------------------------Units with 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p lo y ee s-----------------------9
Units with 1 , 0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ------------

1 O v e rtim e pay plus shift d ifferen tials.

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions,




6
4
2
2

_
_

2
1
1

2
1

_

3
3
_

1
1
1
1

_

_

-

-

_

Table 9. Selected Contributory and Noncontributory Private Welfare Plans--- All Nonproduction Employees
(E m ployer expenditures as a percent of b asic sa la r ie s,
Average expenditures in units reporting data for—

Item , industry, and siz e of reporting unit

Noncontrib­
utory
plans

C ontributory
plans

1963)

I

Contributory plans with em ployer expenditures
as a percent of combined em p lo y erem ployee expenditures of—
Over
Over 50
25 percent
Over 25
75
through
through
and
percent
50 percent
75 percent
under

Number of units reporting data for—

None ont r ib utory
plans

C on trib utory
plans

Contributo r y plans with em ployer expenditures
as a percent of combined em p loyere*mployee expenditures of—
25 percent
Over 25
Over 50
Over
and
through
through
75
50 percent 75 percent
under
percent

Total health, accident, and life insurance 1

Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s-----------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
Manufacturing industries — ----------------------- ------- —
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s—-------------------. . .
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e —---------■
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ------------- ..... , ■ Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s— --------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e —----------

3.1
3 .0
3.2
3.2
3.1
3.3
2.7
2.4
3.1

2.4
2.4
2.4
2 .6
2 .6
2 .6
2.1
2 .1
2 .1

0.5
.5
.5
.4
.5
.4
.5
.5
.5

1.5
1.3
1 .6
1.5
1.3
1 .6
1.5
1.3
1 .6

2 .4
2 .4
2.4
2 .4
2.3
2.5
2.3
2.5
2.3

3.3
3.3
3.3
3.6
3.7
3.5
2 .8
2.7
2 .8

154
82
72
125
69
56
29
13
16

445
177
268
243
101
142
202
76
126

20
10
10
6
2
4
14
8
6

104
35
69
47
18
29
57
17
40

193
77
116
104
44
60
89
33
56

128
55
73
86
37
49
42
18
24

1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1 .2

•9
.9
.9
.9
.9
.8
.9
.9
.9

.2
.1
.2
.2
.1
.2
.1
.1
.2

.6
.5
.6
.6
.5
.6
.6
.6
.7

1 .1
1 .2
1.1
1.1
1 .2
1 .0
1.1
1 .2
1.1

1.5
1.4
1.5
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.5
1.3
1.7

179
92
87
135
72
63
44
20
24

323
119
204
167
62
105
156
57
99

34
11
23
18
4
14
16
7
9

125
42
83
66
23
43
59
19
40

113
44
69
52
22
30
61
22
39

51
22
29
31
13
18
20
9
11

1.9
1.9
2 .0
2 .1
2 .0
2 .2
1.4
1.4
1.4

1.4
1.4
1.4
1 .6
1.5
1 .6
1.3
1 .2
1.3

.3
.3
.3
.2
.3
.1
.3
.3
.4

.9
.8
.9
.9
.8
.9
.9
.8
.9

1.5
1 .6
1.4
1.4
1.5
1.4
1.5
1.7
1.4

2 .2
2 .0
2 .2
2.4
2.3
2 .4
1 .8
1 .6
2 .0

208
95
113
155
80
75
53
15
38

305
118
187
158
61
97
147
57
90

27
14
13
7
3
4
20
11
9

66
26
40
38
16
22
28
10
18

130
43
87
61
20
41
69
23
46

82
35
47
52
22
30
30
13
17

5.4
5.1
5.6
4 .9
4.8
4 .9
6.3
5.7
6 .6

5 .3
5.8
4 .9
5 .0
5.6
4.6
5.8
6 .1
5.5

.1

1.9
1.9
1.9
2 .1
2 .2
2 .1
1.5
1 .2
1.7

4 .6
4 .8
4.6
4.7
4 .8
4.6
4.5
4 .6
4.5

7.8
8 .1
7.4
7.4
8 .0
6 .8
8 .\
8.3
8.3

334
133
201
198
86
112
136
47
89

224
89
135
146
57
89
78
32
46

7
2
5
7
2
5

30
11
19
21
8
13
9
3
6

105
37
68
69
24
45
36
13
23

82
39
43
49
23
26
33
16
17

L ife insurance, accidental death and
dism em b erm ent insurance, and
death benefits

Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s------------- ----- -----Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e —. ....... —
Manufacturing in d u str ie s ------------- ------ ------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ------------Nonmanufacturing industries — — — — — —
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s---------------- —-----Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e — ------H ospitalization, su rg ica l, and m ed ical plans
and sic k n ess and accident insurance

Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e —---------Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing industries —
Units with 250—999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
P en sion and retirem en t plans
A ll industries su rveyed —................................... ........
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e .---------—
M anufacturing industries
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 em ployees
—
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 em p loyee s—----------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore

1

-

.1
.1
-

.1
-

-

L ife insurance, accidental death and dism em berm ent insurance, and death benefits plus hospitalization, su rgical, and m edical plans and sickn ess and accident insurance.

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




1
0

Table 10. Employee Contributions for Selected Contributory Private Welfare Plans— All Nonproduction Employees
(E m p lo y e e c o n tr ib u tio n s as a p e r c e n t o f b a s ic s a la r i e s ,

1963)

Number of units reporting data

Item , industry, and size of reporting unit

Average
contributions
in units
reporting data

With contributions of—
Total

Under
1

1
and
under
2

2

3

4

3

4

5

6
4
2
1
1

5
and
over

Total health, accident, and life insurance 1
A ll industries surveyed ____ -______
Units with 250—999 em ployees
_ _
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ________
M anufacturing industries — _
_
--------Units with 250—
999 em ployees
__
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s-------------------------------Units with 250—999 em p loyees_
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e -------------

1.3
1.3
1.4
1.3
1 .2
1.3
1.4
1.4
1.4

458
183
275
250
103
147
208
80
128

186
79
107
106
50
56
80
29
51

183
76
107
107
42
65
76
34
42

71
19
52
32
9
23
39
10
29

12
5
7
4
1
3
8
4
4

.7
.6
.8
.7

254
103
151
133
55
78
121
48
73

76
25
51
40
13
27
36
12
24

6
1
5
4
4
2
1
1

2
2
-

.8
.7
.7
.8

338
129
209
177
68
109
161
61
100

.9
.9
.8
.8
.8
.8
.9
1 .0
.9

317
124
193
164
64
10 0
153
60
93

206
81
125
111
44
67
95
37
58

100
36
64
51
19
32
49
17
32

10
6
4
2
1
1
8
5
3

2 .0
2 .0
2 .0
2 .1
2 .2
2 .1
1 .8
1.7
1.9

232
94
138
149
59
90
83
35
48

46
19
27
23
9
14
23
10
13

78
29
49
49
16
33
29
13
16

70
33
37
49
23
26
21
10
11

-

5
3
2

_
-

-

Life insurance, accidental death and
dism em b erm ent insurance, and
death benefits
A ll industries surveyed
___ __ __ __
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
_____
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o re------------____
Manufacturing industries __
Units with 250—999 em ployees „
__ —
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o re------------Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s-------------------------------Units with 250—999 em ployees
__
__ __
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore

.6

-

2
2

_
-

-

_
-

-

H ospitalization, su rgical, and m edical plans
and sickn ess and accident insurance
A ll industries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 em ployees _
__ -----Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o re------------Manufacturing in du stries ______ — - ---------Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s------------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o re------------Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s-------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s------------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o re-------------

_

_

_

_
_

-

_

_
_
_

1
1
_
-

1
1

-

_
_

-

-

-

28
10
18
21
9
12
7
1
6

8
2
6
6
2
4
2

2
1
1
1

P ension and retirem ent plans
A ll industries su rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
- Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o re------------Manufacturing in d u str ie s--------------------------------------Units with 250— 9 em ployees
99
— —
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing industries __ ~ _
Units with 250—
999 em ployees __ _ __
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e —_______

_

_

1
1
1

2
'

1 L ife in s u r a n c e , a c c id e n t a l death and d is m e m b e r m e n t in s u r a n c e , and death b e n e fit s plu s h o s p it a liz a tio n ,
s i c k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e .
NOTE:




S ee

a p p e n d ix e s f o r s u r v e y c o v e r a g e and d e fin it io n s .

s u r g i c a l, and m e d i c a l p la n s and

Table 11. Paid Leave--- Nonexempt Nonproduction Employees
(E m p lo y e r e x p e n d itu r e s as a p e r c e n t o f b a s ic s a la r i e s ,

1963)

A v e r a g e e x p en d itu res

Item , in d u s t r y , and s iz e o f r e p o r t in g unit

A ll
r e p o r tin g
units

R ep ortin g
units with
ex p e n d itu r e s

N u m b e r o f units

T o ta l

R e p o rtin g no
e x p e n d itu r e s

R e p o rtin g
th e r e w e r e
e x p e n d itu r e s
but not
sh ow in g the
am ount

R e p o rtin g < x p e n d itu r e s o fe
1
U n der and
1
un d er
2

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

66
23
43
49
20
29
17
3
14

46
14
32
30
11
19
16
3
13

35
8
27
17
3
14
18
5
13

9
2
7
7
1
6
2
1
1

5
1
4
2
1
1
3
_
3

_
_
,
_

_

1'5
and
over

T o t a l pa id le a v e , in clu d in g s i c k le a v e
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d __________________________
Units w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s _______________
Units w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ----------M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U nits w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ____________________
U nits w ith 2 5 0 — 99 e m p l o y e e s ________________
9
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______

9.6
8.9
10.1
9.6
8.9
10.1
9.7
8.9
10.2

9.6
8.9
10.1
9.6
8.9
10.1
9.7
8.9
10.2

629
282
347
399
190
209
230
92
138

_
-

260
119
141
167
80
87
93
39
54

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
..
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
.
_
_
_
_
_

4
3
1
4
3
1
_
_

-

-

-

4.5
4.1
4.7
4.5
4.2
4 .8
4 .3
3.9
4.6

4.5
4.1
4.7
4.5
4.2
4.8
4.3
3.9
4.6

633
285
348
402
193
209
231
92
139

_
-

51
16
35
16
6
10
35
10
25

3
3
_
3
3
_
_
_

9
8
1
7
6
1
2
2
-

3.0
2.9
3.0
2.9
2.9
2.9
3.1
2.9
3.2

3.0
2.9
3.0
2.9
2.9
2.9
3.1
3.0
3.2

633
285
348
402
193
209
231
92
139

1
1
_
_
1
1

43
13
30
16
7
9
27
6
21

3
1
2
3
1
2

1.7
1.5
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.8
1.7
1.6
1.8

1.8
1.6
1.9
1.7
1.6
1.9
1.8
1.7
1.8

629
282
347
399
190
209
230
92
138

38
26
12
28
20
8
10
6
4

159
71
88
96
46
50
63
25
38

.4

.4
.4
.4
.4

630
283
347
400
191
209
230
92
138

89
70
19
63
53
10
26
17
9

265
109
156
159
71
88
106
38
68

"

-

8
7
1
3
3
_
5
4
1

5
3
2
3
3
_
2
_
2

25
18
7
18
14
4
7
4
3

43
27
16
23
12
11
20
15
5

61
26
35
39
19
20
22
7
15

58
28
30
35
18
17
23
10
13

36
25
11
20
15
5
16
10
6

170
102
68
101
66
35
69
36
33

196
73
123
129
49
80
67
24
43

115
43
72
84
35
49
31
8
23

40
13
27
33
11
22
7
2
5

9
1
8
8
1
7
1
_
1

3
_

1
1

3
_
_

1
1

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

3
_
3

_
_

_
_

.
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

31
19
12
17
11
6
14
8
6

282
135
147
195
94
101
87
41
46

217
90
127
152
70
82
65
20
45

51
25
26
17
9
8
34
16
18

4
_
4
1
.
1
3

1
1

_

1
1

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

.
_

_
_

87
47
40
60
35
25
27
12
15

186
82
104
119
56
63
67
26
41

127
46
81
72
24
48
55
22
33

23
7
16
17
7
10
6

1

1

1
1

1
1

1
_

1
_

_

_

6

7
3
4
5
2
3
2
1
1

247
93
154
161
58
103
86
35
51

24
8
16
15
7
8
9
1
8

1
1
_
_

1
1
_
1
1

3
2
1
1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

1

_

2
1
1

_

_

_ _

_

_

_ _

4
3
1
2
2
2
1
1

V a c a tion s
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d __________________________
U nits w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U nits w ith 1 .0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U nits w ith 2 5 0 — 99 e m p l o y e e s _______________
9
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
N on m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ____________________
U nits w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______

-

_
_
_
_
-

-

H o lid a y s
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
.......... .
U n its w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U nits w ith 1 .0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e ____ _
M a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s _
_
U n its w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s
_ ..... . .
U nits w ith 2 5 0 — 99 e m p l o y e e s _
0
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______

3

S ic k le a v e
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d __________________________
U nits w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U nits w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
Units w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
N on m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s __________ _______
U nits w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s ___ ____________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
M i s c e ll a n e o u s pa id le a v e 1
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
Units w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________ ________________
U n its w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ____________________
U n its w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s .
____ __ __
U nits w ith l f 000 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e
__

1 I n c lu d e s m il it a r y ,
NOTE:

ju r y ,

S e e a p p e n d ix e s f o r




w it n e s s ,

v o tin g ,

.3
.4

.3
.3
.3
.4
.3
.5

.5
.4
.5
.4
.6

1

_

and p e r s o n a l le a v e .

s u r v e y c o v e r a g e and d e fin itio n s .

10

(0

Table 12. Payroll Items in Addition to Basic Salaries— Nonexempt Nonproduction Employees
(E m ployer expenditures as a percent of b asic sa la r ie s ,

Number of units

A verage expenditures

Item , in du stry, and siz e o f reporting unit

Reporting
A ll
units with
reporting
expenditures
units

8

1963)

Total

Reporting
th ere'w ere
Reporting no expenditures
expenditures
but not
showing the
amdunt

Reporting expenditures of1
Under and
under
2

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

44
20
24
27
15
12
17
5
12

57
29
28
32
17
15
25
12
13

57
23
34
36
13
23
21
10
11

37
13
24
21
8
13
16
5
11

44
23
21
29
18
11
15
5
10

31
12
19
21
10
11
10
2
8

26
10
16
18
6
12
8
4
4

17
9
8
12
6
6
5
3
2

22
12
10
18
10
8
4
2
2

12
6
6
11
6
5
1
1

13
8
5
12
8
4
1

11
6
5
10
5
5
1
1

8
3
5
8
3
5
-

1

-

"

14
7
7
12
6
6
2
1

11
4
7
10
4
6
1
1

10
4
6
8
2
6
2
2

8
3
5
8
3
5

5
2
3
4
2
2
1

15
and
over

A ll item s studied

A ll in du stries su rv e y e d _____ __ ___________________
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s— ------------ „
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------Manufacturing in d u str ie s _________________________
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing in d u s tr ie s ------------------------------Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s-------- ------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________

7.1
7 .2
7.1
7 .8
7.7
7.9
5.7
5 .8
5.6

7.2
7 .3
7.1
7.9
7.9
7.9
5.8
6 .0
5.6

624
278
346
397
190
207
227
88
139

8
7
1
4
4
4
3
1

154
52
102
79
28
51
75
24
51

13
11
2
11
9
2
2
2
-

30
15
15
16
9
7
14
6
8

5.6
5 .4
5.7
6 .4
6 .1
6 .6
4.1
3.9
4 .3

5.8
5.7
5.8
6.5
6.5
6 .6
4 .3
4 .2
4 .3

632
285
347
401
193
208
231
92
139

19
17
2
11
11
8
6
2

57
18
39
25
11
14
32
7
25

31
20
11
17
11
6
14
9
5

57
29
28
33
17
16
24
12
12

74
30
44
41
18
23
33
12
21

89
42
47
48
24
24
41
18
23

61
24
37
37
15
22
24
9
15

52
16
36
29
11
18
23
5
18

31
14
17
23
11
12
8
3
5

38
15
23
30
12
18
8
3
5

22
13
9
19
11
8
3
2
1

18
9
9
16
9
7
2
2

15
8
7
13
7
6
2
1
1

1

3.8
3.7
3.8
4 .2
4 .0
4 .4
2.9
2 .8
2.9

3.9
3.9
3.9
4 .3
4 .3
4 .4
3.0
3.0
3.0

632
285
347
401
193
208
231
92
139

20
17
3
11
11
9
6
3

75
26
49
33
15
18
42
11
31

56
35
21
35
22
13
21
13
8

102
40
62
58
24
34
44
16
28

112
52
60
62
30
32
50
22
28

78
25
53
51
18
33
27
7
20

52
24
28
35
17
18
17
7
10

37
20
17
30
17
13
7
3
4

28
15
13
27
15
12
1

23
11
12
17
8
9
6
3
3

13
3
10
10
1
9
3
2
1

12
5
7
12
5
7

7
2
5
5
1
4
2
1

2
1
1
2
1
1

2
1
1
2
1
1

-

-

1

-

1.9
1 .8
2 .0
2 .1
2 .0
2 .3
1.4
1.3
1.4

2 .0
1.9
2 .0
2 .2
2 .2
2.3
1.4
1.4
1.5

632
285
347
401
193
208
231
92
139

21
19
2
11
11
10
8
2

76
25
51
33
15
18
43
10
33

156
77
79
86
45
41
70
32
38

192
81
111
113
51
62
79
30
49

85
36
49
69
30
39
16
6
10

52
27
25
46
25
21
6
2
4

23
6
17
20
4
16
3
2
1

11
4
7
9
3
6
2
1
1

7
3
4
6
3
3
1
-

4
4
4
4

2
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

_
-

_
_
-

-

40
19
21
32
15
17
8
4
4

Total overtim e pay

A ll in du stries surveyed -------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing industries ----------------------------------Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s— ----------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ____________________
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s--------------- -----Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ------------

-

-

•

25
12
13
21
10
11
4
2
2

O vertim e at stra ig h t-tim e rates

A ll in du stries su rv e y e d ------------------- ------------------Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing in d u str ie s _____ __________________
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p lo y e e s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ------------------------------Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________

-

1

-

-

2
2
2
2
-

-

-

6
4
2
5
3
2
1
1

1

•

-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

-

O vertim e at p rem iu m rates

A ll in du stries su rv e y ed _____ ____________________
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing in d u str ie s -------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s______ ________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ------------------------------Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ------------




-

-

!
1
1
1
-

Table 12. Payroll Items in Addition to Basic Salaries--- Nonexempt Nonproduction Employees— Continued
(E m p lo y e r e x p e n d itu r e s as a p e r c e n t o f b a s ic s a l a r i e s ,

1963)

Average expenditures

Item , in du stry, and siz e of reporting unit

A ll
Reporting
reporting
units with
expenditures
units

Number- of units

Total

Reporting
there w ere
Reporting no expenditures
1
but not
Under
and
expenditures
showing the
under
1
amount
2

Reporting expenditures of2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

15
and
over

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

7
3
4
4
2
2
3
1
2

4
4
_
3
3
_
1
1

1
1
_
1
1
_
-

1
_
1
1
_
1
_

1
1
_
1
1
_

-

-

-

2
2
_
1
1
_
1
1

-

-

1
.
1
_
_
.
1
_
1

1
1
_
_
_
_
1
1

-

6
2
4
2
1
1
4
1
3

1

_

_

.

.

.

Shift differen tials

Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ----------Manufacturing in d u s tr ie s _________________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______

630
284
346
400
193
207
230
91
139

359
224
135
223
157
66
136
67
69

65
15
50
28
5
23
37
10
27

184
40
144
132
28
104
52
12
40

16
3
13
12
2
10
4
1
3

3

.4
2
.1
.2

0 5
.6
.5
.5
.6
.5
.4
.6
.3

.2
.1
.2
.2
.1
.2
.1
.1
.l

.4
.3
,4
.5
.4
.5
.2
.2
.2

624
279
345
397
191
206
227
88
139

372
201
171
250
150
100
122
51
71

86
27
59
42
13
29
44
14
30

149
48
101
91
26
65
58
22
36

1.1
1.4
.9
1.0
1.2
.7
1.4
1.7
1.2

3.1
3.3
2.9
2 .8
3.1
2.4
3.6
3.6
3.5

631
283
348
401
192
209
230
91
139

402
164
238
261
115
146
141
49
92

16
4
12
7
2
5
9
2
7

.1
.1

.3
.4
.3
.4
.6
.3
.2
.2
.2

630
282
348
400
191
209
230
91
139

482
241
241
307
169
138
175
72
103

38
10
28
24
8
16
14
2
12

0.2
.1
.3
.2

1
_

3
3

1
1

3

1

-

-

10
2
8
8
2
6
2
2

6
1
5
5

1
1

5
1
1

1

60
30
30
42
19
23
18
11
7

42
24
18
28
18
10
14
6
8

33
17
16
21
12
9
12
5
7

104
28
76
64
12
52
40
16
24

3
1
2
2

1
1

2
2

-

1
1

-

1
1

19
10
9
9
5
4
10
5
5

16
9
7
7
4
3
9
5
4

11
6
5
7
5
2
4
1
3

8
5
3
6
3
3
2
2

1
1

_

_

_

Severance or d is m is s a l pay
A ll in du stries su rv e y e d ---------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s________________
TTn-fto
tV 1 Hon AmplnyAPC nr mnrp
i
Manufacturing in d u s tr ie s -------------------------------------TTnita u/itb 7.^0— QQ pmplnyppa
Q
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ______
Nonmanufacturing in d u s tr ie s ____________________
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s________________
TTniffl iiri tb 1 j nnn pm pi nyp p c nr mnrp

1

Yearend and other sp ecial bonuses
A ll industries su rv e y e d ___ —_____________________
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Manufacturing in d u s tr ie s -------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------Nonmanufacturing in d u s tr ie s ------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e — ------

“

-

Other pay
A ll in du stries s u rv e y e d __________________________
Tn
T -ifre un tb 7^fl—
QQQ PmpInyppQ
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Manufacturing in du stries _
_____
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s________________
Units wi tb 1 r O
HO pmpl nyPPQ nr mnrp
Nonmanufacturing in d u s tr ie s ____________________
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______

.1
.1
1

0
)
(M

1 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions,




-

2
1
1

1
1

1
1

_

_

-

1
1
1

_

-

Table 13. Paid Leave— All Exempt Employees
(Employer expenditures as a percent of basic salaries, 1963)
A v era g e expenditures

Item , in du stry, and siz e of reporting unit

A ll
reporting
units

Reporting
units with
expenditures

Number of units

Total

Reporting no
expenditures

Reporting
there w ere
expenditures
1
but not
Under and
showing the
1
under
2
amount

Reporting expenditures of2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14.

15

13
9
4
11
7
4
2
2
-

21
14
7
13
9
4
8
5
3

29
13
16
20
9
11
9
4
5

39
26
13
25
14
11
14
12
2

45
15
30
28
12
16
17
3
14

31
9
22
19
6
13
12
3
9

30
12
18
15
9
6
15
3
12

7
2
5
5

6
1
5

95
33
62
53
21
32
42
12
30

37
7
30
24
5
19
13
2
11

16
8
8
5
4
1
11
4
7

_
_
_
_
_
_
.
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

1
1
_
_
_
_
1
1
-

_

_

_

_ _

15
and
over

T otal paid le ave, including sick leave
A l l industries surveyed
_
......
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 .0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ..
Manufacturing industries
..................._
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s___ _____ __ ____
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing industries ,
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______

_

_
_
_
_

1
_
1
1
_
1
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

5
3
2
3
2
1
2
1

-

-

-

-

1

7
5
2
4
3
1
3
2
1

80
21
59
30
9
21
50
12
38

1
1
_
1
1
_
_
_

3
2
1
3
2
1
_
_

-

-

17
11
6
11
7
4
6
4
2

86
59
27
65
44
21
21
15
6

131
61
70
90
41
49
41
20
21

146
72
74
103
52
51
43
20
23

4
2
2
3
1
2
1
1
-

39
20
19
24
12
12
15
8
7

252
123
129
184
88
96
68
35
33

207
90
117
137
69
68
70
21
49

45
22
23
15
8
7
30
14
16

3
_
3
1

-

60
16
44
21
8
13
39
8
31

610
274
336
383
184
199
227
90
137

39
24
15
28
15
13
11
9
2

281
123
158
174
81
93
107
42
65

83
44
39
59
33
26
24
11
13

148
58
90
85
36
49
63
22
41

46
17
29
27
12
15
19
5
14

8
6
2
7
5
2
1
1
-

3
_
3
1
_

609
27 3
336
383
184
199
226
89
137

87
63
24
58
46
12
29
17
12

347
141
206
221
97
124
126
44
82

160
64
96
95
39
56
65
25
40

14
5
9
8
2
6
6
3
3

9 .9
9 .4
10. 5
9 .6
9. 2
10. 0
10. 5
9. 6
11. 1

609
273
336
383
184
199
226
89
137

5. 3
5 .0
5. 5
5. 1
4 .9
5. 4
5. 6
5. 2
5 .9

5. 3
5. 0
5. 5
5. 1
4 .9
5 .4
5 .6
5. 2
5 .9

613
276
337
385
186
199
228
90
138

_
.
_
_
_
_
_
_

3. 0
2 .9
3. 0
2 .9
2. 8
2 .9
3. 1
3. 0
3. 2

3. 0
2 .9
3. 0
2 .9
2. 8
2 .9
3. 2
3. 1
3. 2

613
276
337
385
186
199
228
90
138

1
1

1 .4
1. 3
1. 5
1 .4
1. 3
1. 4
1. 5
1. 2
1.6

1. 5
1 .4
1.6
1. 5
1 .4
1. 5
1. 6
1. 4
1. 6

. 3
. 3
.4
. 3
. 2
. 3
.4
. 3
. 4

.4
. 3
.4
. 3
. 3
. 3
.4
.4
.5

-

_
_
-

_
_
"

372
163
209
238
112
126
134
51
83

_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

9 .9
9 .4
10. 5
9 .6
9. 2
10. 0
10. 5
9 .6
11. 1

4
2
1
1

_

3
1
2
1

6
1
5

1
2
1
1

_
_

V acations
A ll industries su rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s_________ _____
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees________________
Units with 1 .0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ..

-

Holidays
A ll industries su rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyees________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re
Manufacturing in d u str ie s_________________________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing industries _ ____
__
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ..______

_
1
1

_
_

2
2

_

_
_

1
1

1
1

_
_

_

_

-

_
_
_
_

_
_ _
_ _ _
_ _ _
_
_
_

-

-

_

_ _ _

_

_

_

_
_
_
_
-

1
1

_

-

_
_

_

_

1

_
_
_
_
_

2
2

_
_

_
_
_
_

1
2
_
2

Sick leave
A l l industries su rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 250—999 em p loyee s_______________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing in d u str ie s_________________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s________________
Units with l f 000 em ployees or m o r e _______
Nonmanufacturing industries _ _
Units with 250—
999 em ployees ______________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________

l

2
2

M iscellan eou s paid le a v e 1
A ll industries su rv e y e d ___________________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Manufacturing industries _______ ______________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s________________
U n i t s with 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m nr#» . _
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ____________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re .

1 Includes military, jury, witness, voting, and personal leave.

NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions,




1
1
1
1

_

_

_

_

Table 14. Payroll Items in Addition to Basic Salaries— -All Exempt Employees
(Employer expenditures as a percent of basic salaries, 1963)
A verage expenditures

Item , industry, and siz e of reporting unit

Reporting
A ll
reporting
units with
units
expenditures

Number of units

Total

Reporting
there w ere
Reporting no expenditures
1
expenditures
but not
Under
and
under
showing the
1
2
amount

Reporting expenditures of2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

15
and
over

3
1
2
3
1
2

-

7
4
3
5
2
3
2
2

5
3
2
4
2
2
1
1
-

4
3
1
3
2
1
1
1
-

34
23
11
28
19
9
6
4
2

j
_
l

A ll item s studied

A ll in du stries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
M a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s——-------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore - -

5. 8
7. 2
4. 5
6.8
7. 7
5. 7
4. 1
6. 0
2. 8

602
269
333
379
183
196
223
86
137

1.0
.7
1. 3
1. 2
.9
1. 5
.7
.3
.9

2. 8
2.8
2. 7
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2. 3
2. 4
2. 3

611
276
335
384
186
198
227
90
137

.9
.6
1. 0
1.0
.8
1 .3
.5
.3
.7

2. 5
2. 7
2 .4
2. 6
2. 7
2. 6
2. 1
2. 7
1 .9

611
276
335
384
186
198
227
90
137

401
213
188
233
133
100
168
80
88

.
.
.
1.

611
276
335
384
186
198
227
90
137

456
237
219
284
156
128
172
81
91

4 .9
5 .7
4. 0
5 .8
6 .2
5. 2
3. 3
4 .6
2 .3

97
57
40
54
36
18
43
21
22

146
41
105
94
26
68
52
15
37

386
207
179
223
129
94
163
78
85

48
12
36
30
9
21
18
3
15

109
48
61
53
29
24
56
19
37

39
14
25
25
11
14
14
3
11

n

28
10
18
20
8
12
8
2
6

34
15
19
26
11
15
8
4
4

14
7
7
10
5
5
4
2
2

21
13
8
17
12
5
4
1
3

18
8
10
n
6
5
7
2
5

15
6
9
7
2
5
8
4
4

10
3
-7
8
2
6
2
1

5
1
4
4
4
1

3
2
1
2
2
1

_

1

-

1

-

3
1
2
3
1
2
-

4
1
3
3
_
3
1
1

2
2
.
2
2
_
_

_
.
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_

5
6
5
2
3
6
3
3

9
7
2
6
5
1
3
2
1

8
4
4
8
4
4

-

-

_

-

_
_
_
_

2
2
2
_
2
-

2
1
1
2
1
1
_

j
1
_
1
1
_
_

.
_
1

-

-

-

-

1

1
_
1
1
_
1
_

_
_
_
_
.
_

1
_
1
1
_
1
_

1
1
_

1
_

-

_

Total overtim e pay

A ll in du stries surveyed — - _____________ __________
Units with 25 0 —
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
Manufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee sNonmanufacturing in du stries
TTnita urith 7 ^fV QQQ omplnyoee
—

63
22
41
42
17
25
21
5
16

38
12
26
27
11
16
11
1
10

19
3
16
12
3
9
7

18
4
14
18
4
14
-

9
4
5
9
4
5
-

7

-

-

6
4
2
4
3
1
2
1
1

50
12
38
33
8
25
17
4
13

64
19
45
39
16
23
25
3
22

29
10
19
23
10
13
6

22
5
17
17
4
13
5
1
4

15
4
11
14
4
10
1

11
5
6
9
4
5
2

6
3
3
5
3
2
1

1

1

j

43
12
31
26
9
17
17
3
14

78
21
57
44
16
28
34
5
29

21
2
19
21
2
19

9
2
7
6
2
4
3

1
1

2
1
1
2
1

1

-

-

_

-

-

_
_
-

_
_

O vertim e at stra ig h t-tim e rates

A ll in du stries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
Manufacturing in du stries
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s- Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e — -----—
....................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s . ..
TTnita u/itVi 1 000 em plnyoac nr m nro

6

-

.

1
1
_
_

1
_
_
1

O vertim e at p rem iu m rates
All indnatri*»a onrvayafl . .
TTnita until 7^0— QQ amplnysaa
Q
Units wit/h 1( 000 pmplnyppa nr mnrp ......
Manufacturing inrliifitrina

..

...........

TTnita with 2*i0— Q pmplnyppa .... . .
Q Q
TTnita with
000 pmplnyppa nr mnrp ......... .....

Units with 250—
999 em ployees
TTnita with 1 000 pmplnyaac nr mnrp




.2
. l
.3
.3
.

4

.
.

1
2

8
8
8
0
.8
1. 0
.6
.8
.5

3

1
1
1

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

Tabic 14. Payroll Items in Addition to Basic Salaries— All Exempt Employees— Continued
(E m p lo y e r e x p e n d itu r e s as a p e r c e n t o f b a s ic s a la r i e s ,

1963)
Number of units

A verage expenditures

Item , industry, and size of reporting unit

A ll
Reporting
reporting
units with
units
expenditures

Total

Reporting
there w ere
Reporting no expenditures
1
expenditures
but not
Under and
showing the
under
amount
2

Reporting expenditures of2

3

4

5

3

4

5

6

5
2
3
4
3

9

10

11

12

13

14

10

11

12

13

14

15

_

5
3
2
3
1
2
2
2

2
2

2
2
2

6
7

7
8

8
9

15
and
over

Shift differen tials
85
19
66
75
18
57
10
1
q
7

7
2
5
6
1
5

204
86
118

35
7
28
23
6
17
12
1
11

603
270
333
379
184
195
224
86
138

402
205
197
250
144
106
152
61
91

79
25
54
45
14
31
34
11
23

106
34
72
71
22
49
35
12
23

9
4
5
7
3
4
2
1

7. 0
8 .4
5. 4
7. 4
8. 5
6. 0
6. 2
8. 0
4. 4

611
274
337
384
185
199
227
89
138

317
132
185
187
87
100
130
45
85

40
9
31
26
6
20
14
3
11

57
27
30
38
18
20
19
9
10

23
9
14
16
7
9
7
2
5

18
10
8
12
8
4
6
2
4

1. 3
1. 7
.9
1 .4
2. 0
1. 1
1. 1
1. 5
. 7

61 0
273
337
383
184
199
227
89
138

469
224
245
290
154
136
179
70
109

44
10
34
32
8
24
12
2
10

74
29
45
44
15
29
30
14
16

7
1
6
5

5
3
2
5
3
2
-

-

2
1

All
275
334
382
186

247
235
278
161

.2

227
89
138

2
1
1
1

.4
.5
4
5
#5
. 5
. 3
.5
’
. 2

3 .4
4. 3
2. 5
3 .8
4. 5
3. 0
2 .6
4. 0
1. 4

3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
1

Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ______ —

(*)
. 1

.3

Units with 250—999 em p loyee s--------------------------

(M

.3

<:>
( )
n

#i
i
2
#2

Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s _____________________

Severance or d is m is s a l pay

Units with 250—999 em p loyee s-------------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e --------------- -

.
.

TTnitc « n tb ? <;n_QQO o m p l A y A a e
.
N n n m a n n fa r tn r i n g in r in s tr ip s

Units with 250—999 em p loyee s --------------------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e --------------—

.
.
.

.
.

2

1

1

Yearend and other sp ecial bonuses
A ll in du stries su rv e y e d -----------------------------------------------------Units with 250—999 em p loyee s --------------------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ------------Manufacturing in d u str ie s ----------------------------------- ---Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s_
----Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing in du stries
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s ------ — Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e -----------------

27
11
16
16
7
9
11
4
7

19
13
6
14
8
6
5
5

1
1
1
1

3
2
1
1
1

-

-

-

10
5
5
8
5
3
2
-

2

19
11
8
13
9
4
6
2
4

10
3
7
5
2
3
5
1
4

12
5
7
7
3
4
5
2
3

8
4
4
5
1
4
3
3
-

7
4
3
5
3
2
2
1
1

3
3
-

-

1
1

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

1
1
-

1
1

-

-

34
23
11
27
18
9
7
5
2

Other pay
A ll in du stries su rv e y ed -----------------------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s- —
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ----------------Manufacturing in d u str ie s -------------------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s ------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re
-------Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s -----------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s --------------------------------TTrjite

1

fK 1

n n n a m p l n y o a e r»r* rv-»a t o

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions,




-

5
2
1
1

-

-

_

_

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

2
1
1
2
1
1

_

_

-

1
1

-

1
1

-

-

-

_

-

1
1
-

-

_

1
1

Table 15. Paid Leave— Upper Management Employees
(E m ployer expenditures as a percent of basic sa la r ie s,

1963)

A verage expenditures

Item , industry, and size of reporting unit

Reporting
A ll
units with
reporting
units
expenditures

Num ber of units

Total

Reporting no
expenditures

Reporting
there w ere
1
expenditures
but not
Under and
under
showing the
amount
2

Reporting expenditures of—
2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

15
and
over

Total paid leave, including sick leave
A ll in du stries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
Manufacturing in d u str ie s__________________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s------------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ----- ------ -------------------Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o re -

10. 2
9 .4
10.8
10. 0
8 .9
10. 9
10. 5
10. 2
10. 7

10. 2
9 .4
10. 8
10. 0
8 .9
10 .9
10. 5
10. 2
10.7

432
166
266
262
107
155
170
59
111

5. 8
5 .4
6. 1
5. 5
5. 1
5. 8
6. 5
6. 1
6. 7

5. 8
5 .4
6. 1
5. 5
5. 1
5. 8
6. 5
6. 1
6 .7

436
169
267
264
109
155
172
60
112

3. 0
2. 9
3. 1
2 .9
2. 8
3 .0
3. 1
3. 0
3. 2

3. 0
2. 9
3. 1
2 .9
2. 8
3 .0
3. 1
3. 0
3. 2

436
169
267
264
109
155
172
60
112

1.6
1. 8
1. 5
1 .7
2 .0
1.6
1. 3
1 .4
1 .3

1 .9
2. 3
1 .7
2. 1
2. 7
1. 8
1. 5
1 .7
1. 5

432
166
266
262
107
155
170
59
111

.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
4
.3
.4

.4
.5
.4
.4
.5
.3
. 5
.4
.5

432
166
266
262
107
155
170
59
111

-

277
101
176
170
67
103
107
34
73

_
-

.
_
-

_
_
-

1
1
1
1
_
-

-

-

-

78
19
59
34
10
24
44
9
35

.
-

2
2
1
1
1
1

-

58
13
45
24
7
17
34
6
28

2
1
1
2
1

66
37
29
45
27
18
21
10
11

214
79
135
127
50
77
87
29
58

107
55
52
68
38
30
39
17
22

262
89
173
157
58
99
105
31
74

-

-

2
2
1
1
1
1
-

6
3
3
2
2
4
1
3

10
7
3
9
6
3
1
1
-

10
7
3
6
6
_
4
1
3

22
11
11
14
7
7
8
4
4

21
9
12
13
4
9
8
5
3

29
7
22
20
4
16
9
3
6

18
6
12
9
3
6
9
3
6

18
8
10
7
4
3
11
4
7

7
1
6
3
1
2
4
_
4

6
2
4
4
1
3
2
1
1

5
1
4
3
_
3
2
1
1

57
38
19
46
32
14
11
6
5

58
24
34
42
16
26
16
8
8

103
43
60
72
30
42
31
13
18

42
13
29
27
8
19
15
5
10

57
18
39
27
8
19
30
10
20

19
9
10
6
2
4
13
7
6

6
_
6
1
_
1
5
_
5

3
1
2
1
1
2
_
2

2
_
2
_
_
_

«
_
.
_
_

2
_
2

2
1
1
1
_
1
1
1
-

_
_
.
_

-

6
1
5
5
1
4
1
1

25
15
10
14
9
5
11
6
5

155
67
88
105
44
61
50
23
27

155
58
97
106
43
63
49
15
34

38
14
24
12
5
7
26
9
17

3
1
2
1

-

_

.

.

_

_

_

57
24
33
34
16
18
23
8
15

54
12
42
29
6
23
25
6

26
7
19
18
4
14
8
3
5

8
2

1
1
_
-

1
_
1
1

_

_

_
_

_
_

1
_
1
1

57
20
37
33

6
2
4
4
2
2
2

Vacations
A ll industries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ------------Manufacturing in du stries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 , 000 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing in du stries _
-----Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee sUnits with 1, 000 em ployees or m ore

-

_

_

1
_
1
1
_
1
_
.

-

-

-

_
_

Holidays
All industries surveyed
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e __ ___ __
Manufacturing in du stries
Units until 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ——___ —
Nonmanufacturing in d u s tr ie s ....... ........
. ___
Units until 250— Q employees
Q Q
Units with 1,000 employees or m ore. . ....

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

1
2
1
1

Sick leave
A ll in du stries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
Manufacturing in du stries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Nonmanufartiiring industries

Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 employees or m ore

...............

1
9

M iscellaneous paid leave 1
All industries surveyed

...

_ . ..

Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s—---------------------Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s ... .......
. ...
Units with 250— Q employees .
Q Q

..

.. .

Units with 1, 000 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nnnmanufactnring industries

................ ...
.

.

Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s— _____________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e —
—

1

Includes

NOTE:

m ilita r y , ju r y ,

w itness,

voting,

and personal leave.

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions,




Q

24
24
11
13

2

6

4
1
3
4
1
3

_
_

1
1

2
2
_

1
1

_

_
_

1
1

_
_

1

_

_

_

_

_
_

1

_

1
1

.

_

.

_

_
_
_
_

_

_

_
_

1
1

_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_
.

_

_
_

1
1
1
1

Table 16. Yearend and Other Special Bonuses----Upper Management Employees
(E m p lo y e r e x p e n d itu r e s as a p e r c e n t o f b a s ic s a l a r i e s ,

1963)

A v e r a g e e x p e n d itu r e s

In d u s try and s i z e o f r e p o r t in g unit

A il
r e p o r t in g
units

A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ___________________________
U n its w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U nits w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ____________________
U nits w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________

1 U n its w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s fo l lo w s :
NOTE:

6.6
8.1
5.5
9.1
9 .7
8.5
2.8
5.1
1.3

R e p o rtin g
units w ith
e x p e n d itu r e s

14.9
17.2
13.0
18.0
19.7
16.7
7.9
12.0
4 .3

T o ta l

435
168
267
264
109
155
171
59
112

R e p o rtin g no
e x p e n d itu r e s

242
89
153
131
55
76
111
34
77

36
8
28
25
6
19
11
2
9

23
6
17
13
4
9
10
2
8

8
4
4
4
2
2
4
2
2

R e p o r tin g e x p e n d itu r e s of2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

5
2
3
4
2
2
1

6
1
5
1

13
10
3
6
3
3
7
7

4
1
3
3
1
2
1
1

14
3
11
10
3
7
4
4

4
1
3
2
1
1
2
2

11
5
6
10
5
5
1

-

1

-

1
5
1
4

-

1

5
3
2
1
1
4
2
2

2
1
1
2
1
1

5
3
2
5
3
2

-

-

-

1
1
_
-

_
1
1

3
2
1
3
2
1
-

16 at 15 to 20 p e r c e n t ; 7 at 20 to 25 p e r c e n t ; 9 at 25 to 30 p e r c e n t ; 4 at 30 to 40 p e r c e n t ; 6 at 40 t o 50 p e r c e n t ; and 10 at 50 p e r c e n t and o v e r .

S ee a p p e n d ix e s f o r s u r v e y c o v e r a g e and d e fin it io n s .




N u m b e r o f u n its
R e p o r tin g
th ere w e re
e x p e n d itu r e s
1
U n der
and
but not
u n d er
sh ow in g the
1
a m ount
2

1
_
1
_
-

_
1
-

1

15
and
over

1 52
28
24
44
20
24
8
8

Chapter III. Supplementary Pay Practices
T h is study fo c u s e d p r im a r ily on e m p lo y e r ex p en d itu res fo r pay su p p le ­
m en ts d e s c r ib e d in the p r e c e d in g c h a p te rs .
Since the re q u e st fo r m a te r ia l on
d o lla r ou tlays p la c e d a h eavy re p o rtin g bu rden on resp on d en ts, it w as im p r a c tic a l
to a sk d eta iled q u estion s on the su p p lem en tary pay p r a c t ic e s as su ch .
N ever­
th e le s s , a lim ite d am ount o f pay p r a c tic e in fo rm a tio n w as c o lle c t e d , in p a rt fo r
u se in ch e ck in g and in te rp re tin g expen ditu re r e p o r ts and in p a rt to in d ica te the
p r e v a le n c e o f s o m e p r a c t ic e s fo r w hich th ere is on ly scan t k n ow led ge.
T his
ch a p ter p r e s e n ts fin din gs re g a rd in g su p p lem en tary pay p r a c t ic e s .
In form a tion is
p r e s e n te d se p a r a te ly fo r n on exem pt n on p rod u ction e m p lo y e e s ; exem p t e m p lo y e e s ,
ex clu d in g u pper m a n a gem en t; and u pp er m anagem ent e m p lo y e e s . **
l
It m u st be
s t r e s s e d that the p r a c t ic e s w e r e not exam ined in depth, and the re s u lts should
be a n a lyzed w ith c a r e . S om e o f the lim ita tion s a re poin ted out in the d is c u s s io n .
F o r ex a m p le , w h e re a p r a c t ic e is shown fo r a r e p o rtin g unit, it d oes not fo llo w
that a ll w h it e -c o lla r e m p lo y e e s n e c e s s a r ily w e re c o v e r e d .
R esp on den ts w e r e in ­
stru cte d to r e p o r t they had a p r a c t ic e fo r a given e m p lo y e e grou p if th ere w as a
p r a c t ic e c o v e r in g any w o r k e r s in that g rou p ; it w as not n e c e s s a r y that the p r a c tic e
apply to a ll o r even a m a jo r ity o f the e m p lo y e e s .
In addition, the p r a c t ic e need
not have b een in vok ed.
P a id L e a v e P r a c t ic e s
V a c a tio n s .
A ll r e p o rtin g units in the su rv ey granted paid v a ca tio n s .
M o r e o v e r , this b e n e fit w as p ro v id e d u n iv e rs a lly to each o f the th ree e m p lo y e e
g rou p s— n on exem pt e m p lo y e e s ; exem pt e m p lo y e e s , exclu d in g upp er m an agem en t;
and u pper m a n a g em en t e m p lo y e e s . In su bstan tially a ll in sta n ce s, v a ca tion plans
w e r e fo r m a l, u su a lly p ro v id in g paid v a ca tion s (o r the equ ivalen t in v a ca tion pay)
w h ich v a r ie d in du ration a c c o r d in g to the in dividu al e m p lo y e e 1s length o f s e r v ic e .
(See ch a rt 6 and ta b le s 17—1 9 .)
T w o -w e e k v a ca tio n s w e r e standard fo r non exem pt e m p lo y e e s with 1 y e a r
o f s e r v ic e , b ein g found in th r e e -fo u r th s o f the units re p o rtin g fo r m a l plans fo r
th ese w o r k e r s . 15 The pattern a fter 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e w as dom in ated even m o r e
by 2 -w e e k v a ca tio n s , 6 out o f 7 units fo llo w in g this p o lic y .
L o n g e r v a ca tion s
w e r e co m m o n a fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e ; o v e r h a lf the units gran ted 3-w e e k v a c a ­
tion s to n on exem pt e m p lo y e e s , although 2 -w e e k v a ca tion s w e r e found in o n e -th ir d .
T h r e e -w e e k v a ca tio n s c le a r ly dom in ated a fter 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e , ex istin g in
fo u r -fift h s o f the u n its. T h r e e -w e e k v a ca tion s w e re a lso the m a jo r p r a c t ic e a fter
20 y e a r s , but lo n g e r v a ca tio n s— u su ally 4 w eek s— w e r e given in n e a rly a th ird o f
the u n its. H o w e v e r, o v e r h a lf the units gave 4 -w e e k v a ca tion s to n on exem pt e m ­
p lo y e e s w ith 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e . 16 T h e se fig u r e s p erta in to b a s ic v a ca tion plans
o n ly . A r e la tiv e ly sm a ll n u m ber o f the re p o rtin g units with fo r m a l plans (23 out
o f 743) gave a dd ition a l v a ca tio n s , f o r ex a m p le, an ex tra w eek at 5 -y e a r in te rv a ls
begin n in g w ith a s p e c ifie d length o f s e r v ic e , co m m o n ly 20 y e a r s .
P r a c t ic e s fo r
the two g rou p s o f exem p t e m p lo y e e s w e r e s im ila r to th ose fo r non exem pt e m p lo y ­
e e s , although tending to be som ew h at m o r e lib e r a l.

14 Information is not shown on an all-em ployee level.
Figures for all employees com bined are difficult to
interpret and evaluate where practices differ among the individual em ployee groups.
15 Where practices varied, companies were instructed to report the practice applying to the largest number o f
workers in an em ployee group.
The periods o f service for which data are presented were selected as representative o f the most com mon
practices, but they do not necessarily reflect individual company provisions for progression.
For exam ple, the changes
in proportions indicated at 5 years o f service may include changes which occurred after 4 years.




37

t

38

Chart 6.

Formal Paid Vacation Practices, 1963

(Percent of reporting units granting specified amounts of vacation
pay after indicated lengths of service)
Percent

4 weeks or more after 25
years’ service

3 weeks or more after 15
years’ service

3 weeks or more after 10
years’ service

2 weeks or more after 5
years’ service

2 weeks or more after 1
year's service

f

| Nonexempt employees (subject to FLSA overtime provisions).
| Exempt employees, excluding upper management (not subject to FLSA overtime provisions).
Upper management employees (all exempt).

NOTE:

Data include basic vacation plans only.




39

The combined effect of employers* vacation plans and individual employ­
ees* lengths of service is seen in figures on the actual amount of vacation time
(or pay) received by workers. (See chart 7 and tables 20—22.) In over half the
reporting units, a majority of the nonexempt employees received between 2 and
3 weeks of vacation. Three-week or longer vacations were received by a majority
of these employees in only a tenth of the units.
Vacations tended to be longer
for exempt employees, excluding upper management; over tyvo-fifths of the units
gave 3-week or longer vacations to a majority of these employees. As one would
expect, largely because of their generally greater length of service, upper man­
agement employees received the most liberal vacations, nearly 3 out of 4 units
granting half the employees 3-week or longer vacations and one-third granting
4 weeks and over.
Holidays. Paid holidays were reported in all but one of the units. 1
7 The
most common number of holidays was 7 or 8, although some units had under 5,
and others 13 and over (table 23). With few exceptions, companies maintained
a single holiday schedule for all white-collar employees. Thus, the distributions
of reporting units by number of holidays were quite similar for each employee
group.
On the other hand, differences appeared between manufacturing and non­
manufacturing industries; both above- and below-average number of holidays were
relatively more frequent in the latter.
Formal Sick Leave. Close to three-fourths of the reporting units had
formal sick leave plans for nonexempt employees (table 24). Such plans were less
prevalent for each of the exempt employee categories, being found in two-thirds
of the units. However, it does not follow that nonexempt employees were treated
more generously. A number of companies without formal plans continued to pay
the salary of employees out of work because of illness. It is quite likely that such
informal salary continuation plans were more common for exempt employees. 1
8
Sickness and accident insurance is a second method for continuing em­
ployee income during periods of illness. For this reason, tabulations were pre­
pared relating the presence of formal sick leave plans and sickness and accident
insurance. It is noteworthy that less than half of the units without formal sick
leave had sickness and accident insurance, the percents being 47 for nonexempt
workers and 43 for each of the exempt employee categories.
One out of 6 or
1 out of 7 reporting units (depending upon employee group) had neither benefit.
Furthermore, sickness and accident insurance was relatively more common in
units which also had formal sick leave plans.
This does not mean employees
often received duplicate benefits. Companies with both sick leave and sickness
and accident insurance commonly either utilize the former to compensate workers
during short absences and the latter to provide earnings during long-term ill­
nesses, or integrate cash payments under the two programs so that employees
do not receive more than their regular salaries. 1
9
Miscellaneous Leave. Employers commonly paid workers for leave due
to civic responsibilities, such as military, jury, witness, 20 and voting leave.
A
majority of the reporting units paid for each of these types of leave, relatively
more often for exempt employees (table 25). Well over half the units paid exempt
employees for leave taken for one or more other types of civic responsibility,
e. g . , meetings of civic organizations, but such leave was provided nonexempt
17 This unit did not have upper management employees.
A ll units reporting for these employees had paid
holidays.
18 Although information collected on sick leave practices was lim ited to formal plans, data collected on sick
leave expenditures included employer outlays under both formal and informal plans.
19 See BLS Bulletin 1405, cited in footnote 11, pp. 3 and 4.
20 Company payments to an em ployee appearing in court as a witness for the company were not considered
leave payments.




40

Chart 7.

Weeks of Vacation Pay Received by Employees, 1963

(Percent of reporting units in which 50 percent or more of the employees
received the indicated weeks of vacation pay)

Percent

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

----------- 1
---------- 1
----------- 1
----------- 1
---------- 1
----------- 1
--------1
----------- 1
------------ 1-------- —

4 weeks and over

3 but less than 4 weeks

2 but less than 3 weeks

Less than 2 weeks

y
J_______ L
Nonexem pt employees (subject to FISA overtime provisions).

Exempt employees, excluding upper management (not subject to FLSA overtime provisions).
Upper m anagem ent employees (all exempt).

1/

Less than 0.5 percent for upper management employees.




41

employees in only 45 percent of the units. Of the four leave types analyzed sep­
arately (military, jury, witness, and voting leave), paid leave for jury duty oc­
curred most frequently and voting leave least often.
However, it must be re­
membered that some companies gave Election Day as a paid holiday and thus had
no need to give voting leave on this day. 21
A great majority of the reporting units granted paid leave for family
emergencies and death in the family. Over half also gave leave for one or more
other personal reasons. As with leave for civic responsibilities, personal leave
was relatively more common for exempt employees (table 26).
Length of the Workweek
Close to four-fifths of the reporting units were on a 40-hour straight-time
workweek.
Longer workweeks were infrequently reported.
Workweeks under
40 hours were found in one-fifth of the units, the most common such workweek
being 37 V2 hours (table 27).
For each employee group, the 40-hour week was
relatively more common in manufacturing industries, while shorter workweeks
were reported relatively more often in nonmanufacturing industries.
Penalty Pay Practices
Overtime Work.
With only two exceptions, all units reported paying
nonexempt employees extra money—usually time and one-half— for overtime work.
(See chart 8 and table 28.) Overtime payments were considerably less common
for exempt employees, excluding upper management, occurring in about a third
of the units.
The most frequently reported overtime rate for these employees
was straight-time. Upper management employees rarely received overtime pay. 22
Compensatory time off for overtime work was more common for exempt
employees than for nonexempt employees. However, even in the former case,
it was reported in only a small minority of the units.
With respect to exempt
employees, a majority of both the units granting compensatory time off and those
not granting such time off did not pay overtime.
Nevertheless, overtime pay was
relatively more frequent in units granting compensatory time off (table 29)• It
should be borne in mind that, in establishments with the two practices, employees
working overtime did not necessarily receive both overtime pay and compensatory
time off, although this might have occurred. In some instances, employees re­
ceived either of the benefits, and in other cases, each benefit applied to a different
group of workers, e . g . , first-line supervisors received overtime pay while other
exempt employees, excluding upper management, received compensatory time off.
Holiday Work. Over four-fifths of the reporting units paid nonexempt
employees extra money for work on paid holidays.
Such payments were consid­
erably less frequent for exempt employees, excluding upper management, occurring
in a fifth of the units, and were rare for upper management employees (table 30).
Actually, these figures tend to understate the prevalence of extra pay for holiday
work, since a number of the units without extra-pay practices probably did not
work on holidays and thus had no need for a pay practice. The survey did not
determine the number of units without extra-pay practices which had employees
working on paid holidays. The most common pay rates (although neither existed
in a majority of the units) were time and one-half (plus holiday pay as such) for
nonexempt employees and straight-time for exempt employees.

21 A number o f States have laws providing paid time o ff for voting.
Such tim e o ff com m only is permitted
only if there is insufficient tim e outside working hours during which an em ployee may vote.
See Tim e O ff For
Voting Under State Laws (Bureau o f Labor Standards, Bulletin 138, 1964 Revision). Some units in States with these
laws reported no policy o f granting paid voting leave. Apparently, employees in these units had sufficient tim e to
vote outside working hours.
2 2 Tabulations on overtime pay do not include supper money and related payments.




42

Chart 8.

Penalty Practices, 1963

(Percent of reporting units with the indicated practices)
Percent

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Nonexempt employees (subject to FLSA overtime provisions).

Exempt employees, excluding upper management (not subject to FLSA overtime provisions).

Upper management employees (all exempt).

'J

Number of units with the practice is related to the number of units reporting paid holidays.




100

43

A minority of the units reported they granted compensatory time off for
holiday work.
The practice was most common for exemptemployees, excluding
upper management, but even
here was found in less than 1 out of 5 units.
With
respect to exempt employees, the bulk of the units granting compensatory time
off did not give extra pay for holiday work.
Conversely, a majority of the units
with compensatory time off for nonexempt workers also granted holiday pay to
this employee group.
Shift Differentials.
Close to half the reporting units had premium pay
practices for nightwork performed by nonexempt employees.
Of course, almost
4 out of 5 without shift differentials did not have nonexempt nonproduction em­
ployees working night shifts, and hence had no need for the practice.
Premiums
for nightwork were considerably less common for exempt employees, particularly
upper management (table 32).
Employers most frequently paid shift differentials
as cents-per-hour (or other
amounts per time unit, e. g . , dollars per week or
month) additions to day rates, although percent additions also were common
(table 33).
Cents-per-hour (or the equivalent) additions to day rates tended to
cluster between 7 .5 cents and 15 cents for second-shift work (table 34) and be­
tween 10 and 17.5 cents for third-shift work (table 35).
Percent additions most
often were between 10 and 12.5 percent for the second and third shifts (tables
36 and 37). 23
Coverage of Practices. In a great majority of the cases, each of the
premium pay and compensatory time off practices applied to all nonexempt em­
ployees, although for each practice there were some units which limited coverage
to only a part of the employee group (table 38).
Limited coverage for nonexempt
employees was most common with respect to shift differentials; 1 out of 6 units
with this practice did not extend it to all employees.
For example, some units
paid shift differentials only to employees in data processing operations. (It is
possible that some units developed practices only for the types of employees ac­
tually working at night.)
Regarding exempt employees, excluding upper management, a majority
of the reporting units with compensatory time off practices applied them to all
such employees.
Conversely, most units limited the coverage of premium pay
practices.
A number of the units restricted premium pay either to first-line
supervisors or to employees below a specified salary level.
Units providing
compensatory time off to upper management employees generally extended the
benefit to all such employees. Too few units had premium pay practices for upper
management employees to permit generalization about coverage of the plans.
Private Welfare Plans
Reporting units generally had a variety of private welfare benefits.
The
great majority provided the following, either on a contributory or noncontributory
basis: Life insurance, accidental death and dismemberment insurance, or death
benefits; hospitalization, medical, or surgical benefits (excluding major medical
benefits); and private pension or retirement benefits (table 39).
Major medical
benefits were less common, but were found in over three-fifths of the units. Just
over half the reporting units provided sickness and accident insurance for non­
exempt employees; however, slightly less than half extended this benefit to ex­
empt employees, who probably were more frequently covered by more liberal
sick-leave practices.
23
A BLS study o l shift differentials for production and related workers in manufacturing industries in 1962 found
that cents-per-hour premiums com m only ranged between 5 and 11 cents for the second shift and between 5 and 13 cents
for the third shift. Percent differentials most frequently were 5 or 10 percent for the second shift and 10 percent for
the third shift. See article by Arnold Strasser, "Provisions for Late Shifts in Manufacturing Industries," Monthly Labor
R eview . May 1965, pp. 511-516.




In many instances, employers granted these benefits to retired employees
and workers* dependents. Thus, most of the reporting units continued employees*
life insurance (although not necessarily in the same amount) after retirement, al­
though only a small minority provided this benefit for dependents of current em­
ployees. Current employees* dependents generally were covered by health benefits,
but retired employees and their dependents were covered in only a minority of
the units.
At times, employers limited the coverage of private welfare plans, for
example, to employees with a minimum length of service or age. Nevertheless,
most plans covered 90 percent of the employees in a group or more. On a propor­
tionate basis, the lowest coverage applied to pension or retirement plans for non­
exempt employees, where about one-fourth of the plans covered less than 90 per­
cent of the employees. (See chart 9 and tables 39—
44.)
Miscellaneous Practices
Over two-fifths of the units reported a practice of paying nonexempt
employees for travel time on company business outside of regular working hours.
However, exempt employees rarely received such payments (table 45). As with
several practices already discussed, it must be remembered that many companies
did not have a pay practice since employees did not travel on company business.
Conversely, some firms reported a pay practice for nonexempt employees because
of requirements under the Fair Labor Standards Act, although actual payments
were not made since the circumstance did not arise.
Over seven-tenths of the reporting units had plans covering reimburse­
ment of exempt employees for moving expenses caused by job changes within the
company but slightly under half the units had such plans for nonexempt employees.
Here too, many companies did not have plans because there were no occasions for
their use. In addition to paying direct moving expenses, a number of companies
financed the costs of househunting trips, temporary quarters, and subsistence.
Other company payments, although found less frequently, were for incidental ex­
penses, storage of furniture, reimbursement for losses in the sale of real estate,
brokers* commissions, and other payments relating to the purchase or sale of
real estate.
Pay for travel and transportation to the first job occurred less frequently
than moving expense reimbursement, and only for upper management employees
was it a practice in a majority of the reporting units. It may well be that many
units did not have the practice because local people were hired, particularly at
lower levels.
Variations Among Employee Groups
Frequently, companies having a given type of benefit extended it to em­
ployees in each of the three nonproduction worker groups, although not necessarily
in precisely the same manner. (See chart 10 and table 46.) This was particularly
evident with respect to paid leave items and private welfare plans. In sharp con­
trast, premium pay often was granted to only a single employee group— nonexempt
employees.
Vacations and holidays, both of which were provided to employees in all
three groups by each reporting unit with employees in all three groups, were ex­
amined in greater detail. Nearly 3 out of 4 units had a uniform vacation schedule
for the three groups and practically all units granted the same holidays to the
three groups (table 47).
There was a greater tendency for uniform vacation
schedules in manufacturing than in nonmanufacturing industries.




45

Chart 9.

Selected Private Welfare Plans, 1963

(Percent of reporting units with plans covering 90 percent or more of employees) v
P e rce n t

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Life insurance,
accidental death and
dismemberment
insurance, or death
benefits
Hospitalization, medical,
or surgical benefits
(excluding major
medical benefits)

Major medical benefits

Sickness and accident
insurance

Pension or retirement
benefits

|_____ 1

Nonexempt employees (subject to FLSA overtime provisions ).
Exempt employees, excluding upper management (not subject to FLSA overtime provisions ).
Upper management employees (all e xe m p t).

1/

Includes only plans providing for company contributions for benefits.




100

46

Chart 10.

Variations in P ractices Am ong Employee Groups, 1963

(Knits with benefits for ail 3 employee groups jy as a percent of all reporting units with benefits
for one or more employee group)
Percent

0

10

20

i—

30

r

40

50

60

i ----- r

70

80

90

100

Paid vacations
Paid holidays
Paid formal sick leave
Life insurance 2/3/
Hospitalization 3/S/
Major medical
benefits y
Sickness and accident
insurance
Pension or retirement
benefits
Moving expense
reimbursement
Pay for travel and trans
portation to first job
Extra pay for
overtime work
Shift premium for
nightwork

J____ L

J____ L

1 / Nonexempt employees; exempt employees, excluding upper management; and upper management employees.
2 / For current employees.
3/ Includes accidental death and dismemberment insurance and death benefits.
4 / Includes medical and surgical benefits (excluding major medical benefits).
NOTE: Includes only units with employees in each of the groups.




Table 17. Formal Paid Vacation Practices*--- Nonexempt Nouproduction Employees
(N u m b er o f un its g ra n tin g s p e c i fie d a m ou n ts o f v a c a t io n p a y a ft e r in d ic a t e d len gth s o f s e r v i c e ,
A l l in d u s tr ie s s u r v e y e d
A m o u n t o f v a c a t io n p a y

N u m b e r o f r e p o r t in g u n it s __________________

A ll
units

U nits w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

1963)

M a n u fa ctu r in g in d u s t r ie s

U nits w ith 1, 000
e m p lo y e e s
o r m ore

A ll
un its

U n its w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

N on m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s

U n its w ith 1, 000
e m p lo y e e s
o r m ore

A ll
u n its

U n its w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

U nits w ith 1, 000
e m p lo y e e s
or m ore

743

313

430

460

202

258

283

111

172

167
6
556
14

77
2
231
3

90
4
325
11

86
3
361
10

53
1
145
3

33
2
216
7

81
3
195
4

24
1
86
-

57
2
109
4

49
20
651
23

26
5
276
6

23
15
375
17

33
4
407
16

21
2
175
4

12
2
232
12

16
16
244
7

5
3
101
2

11
13
143
5

22
4
683
18
15
1

15
1
285
6
6

7
3
398
12
9
1

19
4
4 13
12
12

14
1
178
4
5
-

5
3
235
8
7

8
_
639
35
59
2

6
_
263
12
32

2

376
23
27
2

8
_
401
17
33
1

8
_
584
52
95
4

6
_
244
17
45
1

2
_
340
35
50
3

8

6

2
_

352
33
65
2

155
10
31
-

197
23
34
2

5
_
240
59
428
11

4
_
131
16
157
5

1
_
109
43
271
6

5
_
125
49
276
5

4
_
74
12
110
2

51
37
166
3

A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k _______________________________________________
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 2 w e e k s _______________________________________

A fte r 2 y ea rs o f s e r v ice
1 w e e k ___________________________
_
______
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O ver 2 w eeks _
_

A fte r 3 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
____
_ _
_
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s _ __
___
2 w e e k s _ ____
__
O v e r 2 an d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _ _
_
_ _
3 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 3 w e e k s _______________________________________

-

-

-

3
_
270
6
3
1

1

2

107
2
1

163
4
2
1

93
6
12

145
12
14
1

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e ek
_
_ ._
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 2 an d u n d e r 3 w e e k s
3 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 3 w e e k s _______________________________________

-

_

6
_
170
6
20
-

2

_

231
11
13
1

_
238
18
26
1

A fte r 8 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek.
_
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s
. _
2 w e e k s __________
__ _
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks
3 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 3.w e e k s _ _
_
_
.
_

_

_

_
232
19
30
2

_

_

89
7
14
1

143
12
16
1

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ______
_____
O v e r 1 an d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _ _
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 2 an d u n d e r 3 w e e k s
_
. . .
3 w eeks
_
___
_ _ _ _ _
O ver 3 w eeks
_
_
___

See footnote at end of table.




1
_

_
115
10
152
6

_
57
4
47
3

_
58
6
105
3

Table 17. Formal Paid Vacation Practices1----Nonexempt Nonproduction Employees----Continued
(Num ber of units granting specified amounts of vacation pay after indicated lengths of s e r v ic e ,
A ll industries surveyed
A m ount of vacation pay

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

1963)
Nonmanufacturing industries

Manufacturing industries

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or m ore

A fte r 12 ye ars o f se r v ic e
Under 2 w e e k s __ ____ ______________________________
________ ___________
2 w e e k s ___ __ __ __
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks _ ___ _
3 w eeks _ _________ _
___ .
_ _
___
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks __
_ __ _ __
4 w flp k?................. .
...
.....
O ver 4 w eeks

-

_
101
11
162
2
6
1

3
37
1
149
2
9
1

1
13
2
224
8
10
-

25
3
230
13
11
1

_
21
_
80
5
5
"

_
4
3
150
8
6

4
48
1
251
9
144
3

3
35
_
115
2
45
2

1
13
1
136
7
99
1

_
22
2
181
3
72
3

_
18
_
69
1
22
1

_
4
2
112
2
50
2

4
48
1
151
10
241
2
2
1

3
35
_
83
2
77
_
1
1

1
13
1
68
8
164
2
1
"

_

124
2
127
3
1
1

1
17
2
127
8
262
9
4
~

21
1
100
_
148
10
3

_
17
41
_
50
3
_

3
52
_
122
2
128
2
3
1

1
17
2
124
7
264
4
10
1

4
48
1
150
9
241
2
3
2

3
35
_
82
2
78
_
1
1

1
13
1
68
7
163
2
2
1

21
1
96
_
151
4
10

4
20 2
60
459
5
12
1

3
117
20
165
1
7
-

1
85
40
294
4
5

4
101
49
297
3
6

1

-

4
75
6
603
23
30
2

3
58
1
229
7
14
1

1
17
5
374
16
16
1

4
50
3
373
10
19
1

4
70
3
432
12
216
6

3
53
184
3
67
3

1
17
3
248
9
149
3

4
69
2
251
10
389
12
5
1

3
52

4
69
2
246
9
392
6
13
2

3
66
15
114
_
4

1
35
34
183
3
2

_
51
5
51
1
3
-

_
50
6
111
1
3
1

A fte r 15 years of s e r v ic e
Under 2 weeks
____
. _
_
__ _ __
2 w e e k s __ ________ __
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks
_____ __ ______ __
______ __ ___ __ __
3 w e e k s ___ _ __ ___
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______ ___ _____ _____
_
_
4 w e e k s ______ _ ______ __ __________ _ __ __ ___ _
O ver 4 w eek s------------------------------------------------------------

_

1

A fte r 20 ye ars of s e r v ic e
Under 2 w e e k s ______________________________________
2 wpeks ..
_
_
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks _
__
_ _
_ __
3 w eeks _ __
________ _
_
____ __
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks _ __ _______
_______
4 w e e k s _______ __ _____ . . ______ __ _______
O ver 4 w eeks ____
__ __ _____ __ _
_ __
A fte r 25 y e a rs of se r v ic e
Under 2 w e e k s __
__ _
------ ---- __ .
___
2 w eeks
______ ____________ _________ _ _ ~
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w eeks _
_ _____
_ ___
__
_ _____
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks _ __ ___________ ___
4 w e e k s ___________________ _______ — __ ~ ____
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s ------------------------------------5 we.eks _ ___________ _____ ___
. ____ __ ___
Over 5 w ee k s- ___ __ _____ ____ _ _______

-

-

_
4
1
59
_
98
7
3
-

A fte r 30 ye ars o f se r v ic e
Under 2 w e e k s _____
____
—
— — -------2 w e e k s ------------- ----- -------- ---------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------3 w eeks _____________________ ____________________ ____
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s --------------------------- -----4 w e e k s --------------- ------ ------------------------------------------Over 4 and under 5 w eeks
— ------------------- „
5 w e e k s ________ — -------------------------- ----------- -----Over 5 w eek s_____________________
________ ____

1

_

Includes basic plans only. Excludes plans such as vacation-savings and those plans which offer "extended" or "sabbatical" benefits beyond basic plans,
the employer made payment directly to the employee. Funded arrangements are excluded.
NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions,




_
17
_
40
_
50
2
2

_
4
1
56
_
101
2
8

Includes only plans for which

Table 18. Formal Paid Vacation Practices1— Exempt Employees Excluding Upper Management
(Number of units granting specified amounts of vacation pay after indicated lengths of s e r v ic e , 1963)
A ll industries surveyed
Am ount of vacation pay

Number of reporting units__________________

Manufacturing industries

A ll
units

Units with
25 0-999
employees

Units with 1 ,0 0 0
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

728

304

424

458

20 0

142
3
524
59

62
1
228
13

80
2
29 6
46

74
3
353
28

43
11
607
67

22
2
265
15

21
9
342
52

16
2
633
16
50
11

11
273
5
14

5
584
24
102
13

Nonmanufacturing industries

Units with 1, 0 0 0
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

Units with 1, 000
em ployees
or more

258

270

104

166

43
1
151
5

31
2
202
23

68
_
171
31

19

49

77
8

94
23

28
3
394
33

18
1
175
6

10
2
219
27

15
8
213
34

4
1
90
9

11
7
123
25

5
2
360
11
36
10

15
2
401
11
21
8

11
_
179
4
6

4
2
2 22
7
15
8

1
_
232
5
29
3

.
94
1
8
1

1
_
138
4
21
2

3
248
9
43
1

2
_
336
15
59
12

5
_
381
14
49
9

3
_
170
5
22

2
_
211
9
27
9

_
.
203
10
53
4

_
78
4
21
1

_
125
6
32
3

5
_
544
39
127
13

3
.
230
14
56
1

2
_
314
25
71
12

5
_
346
27
71
9

3
_
156
8
33
"

2
_
190
19
38
9

_
_
198
12
56
4

_
74
6
23
1

_
_
124
6
33
3

2
213
50
437
2
23

1
115
16
165

1
.
98
34
272
2
16
1

2
.
121
41
280
1
13

1
_
73
12
112
_
2

1
_
48
29
168
1
11

_
_
92
9
157
1
10

_
42
4
53
_
5

A fte r 1 year of se r v ic e
1 w eek____________ ____ ____________ __ ___ _______ _
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s __ __ ____ __________
2 w eeks _ _ ___ ____ __ ___________ ___________
Over 2 w eeks ___ _ ___ ____ __ _____ _____

A fte r 2 y e a rs of service
1 week
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O ver 2 w eeks __
_
_ ______

A fte r 3 y e a rs of se r v ic e
1 week____
__ _ _ ____
______ _ _ __
_
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _________ __________
2 weeks
_____
_ __ _
_____ ____ __ ___
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______ ___ __
__ ___ ___ __________ _ _____
3 weeks
O ver 3 w ee k s. _____
_
__

1

A fte r 5 y e a rs of serv ic e
1 week_
_
____
___ __ _ ____ ______
O ver 1 and under 2 w eeks _ _ _ ___
2 w e e k s ____________ ___ ___ __ __ ___________. . . . . ____
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s __ _______
________
3 w e e k s __ __________ _ __ ___ _______ ___ ___ ____ ____
_
O ver 3 w eeks
__ ______ _____ ____ _ _____ . .

-

A fte r 8 ye ars of se r v ic e
1 w e e k .. __________
_
. . . . .
—
___
O ver 1 and under 2 w eeks ________________________
2 w eeks __
__ ___ __ .
______ ____
O ver 2 and under 3 weeks
___ . . .
__ . .
3 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O ver 3 w eeks_______________________________________
A fte r 10 y e a rs of serv ic e
1 w eek. ___ ___
.
___
._ ________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ___ ____________________
2 weeks ___ ^___ ___________ ..
__ _______ _________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w eeks
___
_ . . ____ ____ __ _____ .
._
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w eeks — _____ ___________ ____ ____ _______ ____ ___
O ver 4 w eeks__
_
_ _ _ _ _

See footnote at end of table.




-

7

1

_
50
5
104
1
5
1

Table 18. Formal Paid Vacation Practices1— Exempt Employees Excluding Upper Management----Continued

8
(N u m b e r of units g ra n tin g s p e c ifie d a m ou n ts o f v a c a t io n p a y a fte r in d ic a te d le n g th s o f s e r v i c e ,
A ll in d u s t r ie s su r v e y e d
A m ou n t o f v a c a t io n p a y

A ll
un its

U nits w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

1963)

M a n u fa ctu r in g in d u s t r ie s

Units w ith 1 ,000
e m p lo y e e s
or m ore

U n its w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

A ll
units

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s

U n its w ith 1 ,000
e m p lo y e e s
or m ore

U n its w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

A ll
units

U n its w ith 1,0 0 0
e m p lo y e e s
or m ore

A f t e r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n der 2 w e e k s _________ _____ _________
2 w e e k s __________________ _ __ _ ___ _____
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ________________________
_ __ _ ______ _ ______ _
3 w e e k s _________ _
O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s __ _ __
__ ______
4 w e e k s ______ _
_ __
______ ______
__
_____ _ _
__
___
O v e r 4 w e e k s ___ __

2
176
51
466
6
26
1

1
101
18
174
1
9
-

1
75
33
292
5
17
1

2
96
43
299
3
15

2
67
4
583
22
48
2

1
51
1
226
7
17
1

1
16
3
357
15
31
1

2
49
2
366
8
30
1

1
37
1
149
2
9
1

2
62
1
416
12
229
6

1
12
1
217
6
21

1
46
179
3
72
3

1
16
1
237
9
157
3

2
46
_
249
8
150
3

2
62
1
243
5
398
12
4
1

1
46

1
16
1
121
4
269
9
3

_

-

_

_

80
8
167
3
11
1

1
32
29
182
3
11

-

1
64
14
117
_
4
-

37
4
57
1
5

43
4
110
2
6
1

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n der 2 w e e k s _
___ __ _____ _
2 w e e k s ___ ___ ________ ___
________ _____ _
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s __
___
_ ______
3 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s __________________
__ _____ _
_ _
O v e r 4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

.

.

.

-

18
2
217
14
18
1

14
_
77
5
8
-

4
2
140
9
10
1

1
34
_
114
2
47
2

1
12
_
135
6
103
1

16
1
167
4
79
3

12
_
65
1
25
1

4
1
102
3
54
2

2
46
153
5
247
2
2
1

1
34
83
1
79
_
1
1

1
12
_
70
4
168
2
1
-

16
1
90
_
151
10
2
-

12
_
39
_
50
3
_

4
1
51
_
101
7
2
-

2
46

1
34

1
12

_

_

_

153
4
246
2
3
2

83
1
79

70
3
167
2
2
1

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n der 2 w e e k s _ ------------- ---------- _ --------------- 2 w e e k s ______-____________ ___ _______ __ ____ _____ _
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s — ------------------- ----- _
3 w e e k s _ _________ _ _
------------------- ---------------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s __ __ _______ _ __
____
_______
O v e r 4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

_

A fte r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n der 2 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ______________ ____________________ __ _____
_
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------3 w e e k s _ ---------------- -------- - —
----- —
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s
— ---------- — - _
4 w e e k s ____________________________________ __ _
O v e r 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s —
_ — -------- - _
5 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 5 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

-

122
1
129
3
1
1

-

-

A fte r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n der 2 w e e k s _ _________
_ _
_ __ ___
2 w eeks _
- - ---------- ------------------- --------- ----- ---O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s _____ ________________
3 w e e k s _____ _________ — -------------------- ----------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s _ ___ _____________ _
4 w e e k s ---------------------------- ----------------------------------------O v e r 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s --------- -----------------------5 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 5 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

1 In c lu d e s
w h ic h

th e

b a s i c p la n s o n l y .
e m p lo y e r m a d e p a y m e n t

NOTE:

S ee

a p p e n d ix e s




fo r

2
62
1
238
4
401
6
12
2

E x c l u d e s p la n s s u c h a s
d i r e c t l y t o th e e m p l o y e e .

su rvey

coverage

1
46
-

120
1
130
2
3
1

1
16
1
118
3
271
4
9
1

v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s a n d t h o s e p la n s w h i c h
F u n d ed a rra n g e m e n ts a re e x clu d e d .

an d d e fin itio n s .

-

1
1

o ffe r

"ex te n d e d "

or

"s a b b a t ic a l"

12

16
1
85
155
4
9

51
2
2

_

_

b e n e fit s

4
1
48

37

beyond

_

_

b a s ic

p la n s .

104
2
7

In c lu d e s

o n ly p la n s

fo r

Table 19. Formal Paid Vacation Practices1----Upper Management Employees
(Number of units granting specified amounts of vacation pay after indicated lengths of se r v ic e ,
A ll industries surveyed
Amount of vacation pay

Num ber of reporting u n its.

__ -----

1963)

Manufacturing industries

Nonmanufacturing industries

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0-999
em ployees

608

219

389

368

136

109
3
377
7
45
54
13

40
1
145
1
17
12
3

69
2
232
6
28
_
42
10

51
3
276
5
17
_
16
-

24
1
104
1
4
_
2

29
11
442
9
49
1
54
13

14
2
169
2
17
12
3

15
9
273
7
32
1
42
10

16
3
306
8
19
_
16

9
1
118
2
4
_
2

10
464
12
54
1
54
13

5
176
3
20
12
3

5
288
9
34
1
42
10

9
310
10
23
_
16
-

5
120
3
6
_
2
-

4
190
7
17
_
14

2
427
18
91
_
56
14

1
154
6
43
12
3

1
27 3
12
48
_
44
11

2
293
12
43
_
18

1
110
5
18
_
2

1
183
7
25

-

-

16
-

2
399
32
105

1
143
10
50
12
3

l
256
22
55
_
44
11

2
269
24
55
_
18

1
102
7
24
_
2

1
167
17
31
_
16

Units with 1 ,0 0 0
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

Units with 1 , 0 0 0
em ployees
or m ore

A ll
units

Units with
2 5 0 -9 9 9
em ployees

Units with 1 ,0 0 0
em ployees
or more

232

240

83

157

27
2
172
4
13
_
14

58
.
101
2
28
_
38
13

16
_
41
_
13
_
10
3

42
_
60
2
15
_

7
2
188
6
15
_
14

13
8
136
1
30
1
38
13

5
l
51
_
13
_
10
3

8
7
85
1
17
1
28
10

56
_
14
_
10
3

1
98
2
17
1
28
10

A fter 1 year of se r v ic e
1 Week_______________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s --------- ------------2 w eeks _ ________ _
_ __
__________ _____
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ------------ -------------------_
_________ _
___
3 w e e k s ____ — __
O ver 3 and under 4 weeks __ _______ _ ________
4 w e e k s ______ ______ _____ ____ _______ _____________ _
O ver 4 w ee k s-----------------------------------------------------------

“

28
10

A fter 2 ye ars of service
1 week
_
- -O ver 1 and under 2 w eeks _ __
----. —
2 w eeks __
____ ____
_
—
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s _______ _
__ —
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks _ __
__ _ __
4 w eeks —
—
—
—
— - ____
__
_ ____
O ver 4 w eeks

-

-

A fter 3 y e a rs of serv ic e
Under 2 w e e k s _____________________________________
2 w e e k s _____
_____ ____ _ — -------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ____________ __________
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks _ _ 4 w eeks _ ____
_ ________ ____
_
__
O ver 4 w e e k .----------------------------------------------------------

-

!
154
2
31
1
38
13

A fter 5 years of serv ic e
Under 2 w eeks _ _______ _
__
__
.
2 w eeks .
.
_____
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _
3 w eeks _ _ ___
__
____
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks
4 w eeks __________
____ _ . , . .
___
O ver 4 w eek s-----------------------------------------------------------

.
134
6
48
_
38
14

10
3

90
5
23
_
28
11

41
3
26
_

89
5
24
_

10
3

28

44
\
25

_

A fter 8 y e a rs of serv ic e
Under 2 w eeks
.
_ ________
2 w e e k s ______________________ ______ _
_
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks __
_____ _____ ____
3 w eeks _ _
_ _ _ _ _
__________
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks ______ _— _____ ______ _
4 w e e k s __
_
_ _________ ____ __
O ver 4 weeks
— _
~
_—

See footnote at end of table.




-

56
14

_
130
8
50
_
38
14

Table 19. Formal Paid Vacation Practices1--- Upper Management Employees— Continued
(N u m b e r o f units g ra n tin g s p e c ifie d a m ou n ts o f v a c a t io n pay a ft e r in d ic a t e d len g th s o f s e r v i c e ,
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
A m ou n t o f v a c a t io n pay

A ll
units

U nits w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

1963)
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s

Units w ith 1 ,0 0 0
e m p lo y e e s
or m ore

A ll
u nits

U nits w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0
e m p lo y e e s
or m ore

U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0
e m p lo y e e s
o r m ore

U n its w ith
2 5 0 -9 9 9
e m p lo y e e s

A ll
u n its

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s ___ _________________ _________________ _____ _
O v e r 4 w e e k s _______________________________________

134
42
351
1
66
14

67
12
119
18
3

67
30
232
1
48
11

84
37
225
1
21

47
11
74
4

37
26
151
1
17

-

-

-

107
44
371
3
69
14

55
16
125
20
3

52
28
246
3
49
11

63
40
240
2
23

38
15
77
6

25
25
163
2
17

-

-

44
4
131
1
46
14

37
2
457
11
85
16

26
1
159
2
26
5

11
1
298
9
59
11

26
1
297
8
35
1

17
1
105
2
10
1

9
192
6
25
-

11
1
160
3
50
15

54
16
4

2
1
106
3
34
11

33
323
9
222
21

22
131
2
57
7

11
192
7
165
14

23
201
7
133
4

14
82
2
36
2

9
119
5
97
2

10
122
2
89
17

8
49
21
5

2
73
2
68
12

33
199
4
338
21
8
5

22
94
1
93
6
1
2

11
105
3
245
15
7
3

23
125
4
210
2
2
2

14
62
1
57

9
63
3
153
2
1
1

10
74

8
32

2
42

33

22
92
1
95
4
3
2

11
103
3
245
10
13
4

23
124
4
209
2
3
3

14
61
1
58

50
5
126

20
1
45
14
3

17
1
48

-

45
14

30
4
81
31
11

27
3
83
1
32
11

A f t e r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------

-

14
3

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s __________________________ _________________
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s _________________ ____
3 w e e k s ------------------------------ ----------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O v e r 4 w e e k s ------------------------------- ------------------------

-

9
-

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------

-

A f t e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s ----------------------------------5 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 5 w e e k s _______________________________________

-

1
1

-

-

-

128
19
6
3

36
6

92
13
6
2

-

1

A f t e r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 4 a n d u n d er 5 w e e k s ----------------------------------5 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 5 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------

-

195
4
340
14
16
6

1

the

In c lu d e s b a s ic p la n s o n ly .
E x c l u d e s p la n s s u c h a s v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s an d t h o s e p la n s w h i c h
n p l o y e r m a d e p a y m e n t d i r e c t l y to t h e e m p l o y e e .
F und ed a rra n g e m e n ts are e x clu d e d .
NOTE:

See

a p p e n d ix e s




fo r

su rvey

coverage

an d d e f i n i t i o n s .

o ffe r

-

1
1

"e x te n d e d "

or

10
71

9
63
3
151
2
2
2

"s a b b a tic a l"

b e n e fit s

-

-

131
12
13
3

beyond

b a s ic

2
40
94
8
11
2

8
31
37
4
2
1

p la n s .

In c lu d e s

o n ly

p la n s

fo r

w h ic h

Table 20. Vacation Pay Received by Employees1----Nonexempt Nonproduction Employees
(N u m b er o f units in w hich s p e c i fie d p e r c e n t s o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e d the in d ic a te d w e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y ,

1963)

U nits in w h ic h the p e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s w a s—
W e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y , in d u s t r y ,
and s i z e o f r e p o r t in g unit

A ll
units

r e p o rtin g
in fo r m a t io n

0

U n der
10

10
but le s s
than
20

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

_
-

_

100

N o v a c a t io n s
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ___________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ______________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ______ _
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s __________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s _____________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

285
86
199
143
46
97
142
40
102

193
108
85
143
80
63
50
28
22

147
50
97
103
37
66
44
13
31

70
37
33
40
19
21
30
18
12

33
21
12
19
12
7
14
9
5

13
8
5
9
6
3
4
2
2

4
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1

3
3
2
2
1
1

1
1
1
1
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

_
- -

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

285
86
199
143
46
97
142
40
102

353
182
171
243
127
116
110
55
55

82
32
50
55
20
35
27
12
15

20
10
10
14
6
8
6
4
2

6
5
1
4
4
2
1
1

1
1
1
1
-

1
1
1
1
-

_
-

_
-

1
1

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

285
86
199
143
46
97
142
40
102

97
65
32
77
51
26
20
14
6

211
78
133
144
53
91
67
25
42

96
47
49
59
27
32
37
20
17

35
22
13
22
13
9
13
9
4

9
7
2
6
5
1
3
2
1

5
4
1
3
3
2
1
1

3
2
1
3
2
1
-

-

4
3
1
3
2
1
1
1

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

285
86
199
143
46
97
142
40
102

11
7
4
8
6
2
3
1
2

9
5
4
7
3
4
2
2

26
11
15
21
10
11
5
1
4

32
12
20
26
11
15
6
1
5

59
25
34
43
18
25
16
7
9

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

285
86
199
143
46
97
142
40
102

81
64
17
58
45
13
23
19
4

61
37
24
35
19
16
26
18
8

94
43
51
54
24
30
40
19
21

98
32
66
67
25
42
31
7
24

53
20
33
42
19
23
11
1
10

-

L e s s than 1 w e e k
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ___________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s — _ ________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------- ----- ----U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r i e s ___________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ______ „
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ____ __

-

-

-

-

1 but l e s s than 2 w e e k s
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d _ _
________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________
M a n u fa ctu r in g in d u s t r i e s __________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s _________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e ________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r i e s __________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________ __ _
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________

2

_

_

-

-

2
2
2

2
2
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

74
35
39
50
25
25
24
10
14

91
36
55
55
22
33
36
14
22

55
24
31
33
11
22
22
13
9

55
36
19
35
22
13
20
14
6

22
12
10
16
8
8
6
4
2

11
8
3
10
7
3
1
1

19
19
_
15
15
4
4

-

-

33
14
19
28
10
18
5
4
1

18
8
10
13
5
8
5
3
2

14
5
9
13
5
8
1
1

6
3
3
5
3
2
1
1

5
4
1
4
3
1
1
1

-

-

-

2 bu t l e s s than 3 w e e k s
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ------------------------------------ __
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e ______ _
M a n u fa ctu r in g in d u s t r i e s --------------------------------------U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s -------- --------U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e ________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r i e s _____________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e ________
3 but l e s s than 4 w e e k s
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ____ ____________ _____
U n its w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s _________
U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ________________ __ ____
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s _______ ______
U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r i e s _____________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________

_
-

1
1
_
_
_
1
1

See footnote at end of table.




8

Table 20. Vacation Pay Received by Employees1--- Nonexempt Nonproduction Employees----Continued
(N u m b e r o f u n its in w h ic h s p e c i fie d p e r c e n t s o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d the in d ic a te d w e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y ,

2

1963)

U n its in w h ic h the p e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s w a s—
A ll
u n its

W e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y , in d u s t r y ,
and s i z e o f r e p o r t in g u n it

-------H5------r e p o r t in g
in fo r m a t io n

0

U n d er
10

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

26
6
20
17
4
13
9
2
7

but le s s
than
20

20

10
2
8
8
8
2
2

9
4
5
7
3
4
2
1
1

5
2
3
4
2
2
1
1

1
1
1
1
-

“

■
■

*
■
■
-

100

4 w e e k s an d o v e r
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ______________ __________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e . _____
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e -----------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ---------- -------------------U n its w ith 250—999 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ________

749
316
4 33
462
204
258
287
112
175

285
86
199
143
46
97
142
40
102

241
161
80
176
115
61
65
46
19

107
39
68
64
22
42
43
17
26

65
16
49
42
12
30
23
4
19

1 I n clu d e s o n ly v a c a t io n s f o r w h ic h the e m p lo y e r m a d e p a y m e n t d i r e c t ly to the e m p lo y e e .
NOTE:

S e e a p p e n d ix e s f o r

“

•
“
■
“
"

E m p lo y e r co n t r ib u t io n s to funds that d is t r ib u t e v a c a t io n p a y m e n ts to e m p lo y e e s a r e e x c lu d e d .

s u r v e y c o v e r a g e and d e fin it io n s .

Table 21. Vacation Pay Received by Employees1----Exempt Employees Excluding Upper Management
(N u m b e r o f u n its in w h ic h s p e c i fie d p e r c e n t s o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d the in d ic a te d w e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y ,

1963)

U n its in w h ich the p e r c e n t o f e m p l o y e e s wasW e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y , in d u s t r y ,
and s i z e o f r e p o r t in g u nit

A ll
u n its

U n its n ot
re p o r t in g
in fo r m a t io n

0

U n d er
10

10
but le s s
than
20

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

■
■
“

*
■
”

'

■

“
“
"
"

100

N o v a c a t io n s
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ----------------------------------------U n its w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e ----- -----M a n u fa ctu r in g in d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------U n its w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e -----------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------- U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ----------------------- U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ------------

See footnote at end of table.




749
316
4 33
462
204
258
287
112
175

334
98
236
175
53
122
159
45
114

291
162
129
203
114
89
88
48
40

99
37
62
66
23
43
33
14
19

17
13
4
12
9
3
5
4

6
5
1
5
4
1
1
1

2
1
1
1
1
1
1

*

"
■

■
~
“
■

*

■
■
■
■
■
■
-

Table 21. Vacation Pay Received by Employees1--- Exempt Employees Excluding Upper Management----Continued
(N u m b er o f units in w h ich s p e c i f ie d p e r c e n t s o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d the in d ic a te d w e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y ,

1963)

U n its in w h ic h the p e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s w asW e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y , in d u s t r y ,
and s i z e o f r e p o r t in g unit

A ll
units

U nits not
r e p o r tin g
in fo r m a t io n

0

U n der
10

10
but l e s s
than
20

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
-

.
_
-

-

-

100

L e s s than 1 w e e k
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ----------------------------------------U nits w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ----------M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------U nits w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ----------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------U n its w ith 250—999 e m p l o y e e s —
_ _
U n its w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

334
98
236
175
53
122
159
45
114

363
198
165
248
135
113
115
63
52

46
17
29
34
13
21
12
4
8

6
3
3
5
3
2
1
1

_
_
-

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

334
98
236
175
53
122
159
45
114

236
143
93
156
96
60
80
47
33

139
47
92
99
32
67
40
15
25

21
12
9
16
9
7
5
3
2

7
6
1
6
6
1
1

5
4
1
3
2
1
2
2

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

334
98
236
175
53
122
159
45
114

37
17
20
18
9
9
19
8
11

29
13
16
18
10
8
11
3
8

46
21
25
32
14
18
14
7
7

59
30
29
46
23
23
13
7
6

45
22
23
30
13
17
15
9
6

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

334
98
236
175
53
122
159
45
114

72
52
20
52
38
14
20
14
6

25
17
8
15
10
5
10
7
3

45
21
24
33
18
15
12
3
9

73
30
43
50
20
30
23
10
13

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

334
98
236
175
53
122
159
45
114

207
138
69
154
102
52
53
36
17

30
13
17
23
8
15
7
5
2

43
17
26
21
8
13
22
9
13

33
11
22
27
10
17
6
1
5

_
_
-

-

-

_
_
_
-

-

-

-

1 bu t l e s s than 2 w e e k s
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ---------------------------------------U n its w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s - . _
U n its w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------U n its w ith 2 50—
999 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e -----------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ____________________
U nits w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ------------

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

46
17
29
36
12
24
10
5
5

34
16
18
23
13
10
11
3
8

31
20
11
21
13
8
10
7
3

22
13
9
18
12
6
4
1
3

10
6
4
7
4
3
3
2
1

13
8
5
9
4
5
4
4
-

43
35
8
29
24
5
14
11
3

54
21
33
33
11
22
21
10
11

26
15
11
18
10
8
8
5
3

41
17
24
29
10
19
12
7
5

29
15
14
22
11
11
7
4
3

21
11
10
17
10
7
4
1
3

13
8
5
8
5
3
5
3
2

6
5
1
4
4
2
1
1

10
6
4
6
4
2
4
2
2

22
6
16
15
4
11
7
2
5

23
13
10
14
8
6
9
5
4

25
7
18
18
5
13
7
2
5

14
7
7
8
3
5
6
4
2

9
3
6
4
2
2
5
1
4

4
1
3
2
1
1
2
2

4
4
4
4
-

-

2
2
2
2
-

1
1
1
1
-

2 but l e s s than 3 w e e k s
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ___________________________
U nits w ith 250—999 e m p l o y e e s .
----U nits w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e -----------M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------U n its w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U nits w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e -----------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s — _
— _
U nits w ith 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p l o y e e s ________
9
U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e -----------3 but l e s s than 4 w e e k s
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
_
- ___ __
__
U nits w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s - ___ _________ _
U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U nits w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s — ___ - — _
U nits w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------U nits w ith 2 5 0 — 99 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------9
U nits w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
4 w e e k s and o v e r
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ----------------------------------------U nits w ith 2 5 0 —
999 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ----------M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U nits w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s — ----------U nits w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e -----------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------U n its w ith 250—999 e m p l o y e e s _ ___ U nits w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______

In c lu d e s o n ly v a c a t io n s f o r w h ic h the e m p lo y e r m a de p a y m en t d i r e c t ly to the e m p lo y e e .
NOTE:

S ee

a p p e n d ix e s




fo r

su rvey

coverage

an d d e fin itio n s .

E m p lo y e r

_
-

_
-

*

5
2
3
1
1
4
2
2

co n t r ib u t io n s to fund s that d is t r ib u t e v a c a t io n p a y m e n ts to e m p lo y e e s a re ex clu d e d .

Table 22. Vacation Pay Received by Employees1 Upper Management Employees
—
(N u m b er o f u n its in w h ich s p e c i fie d p e r c e n t s o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e d the in d ic a te d w e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y ,

1963)

U n its in w h ic h the p e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s w a s —
W e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y , in d u s t r y ,
and s i z e o f r e p o r t in g u nit

A ll
units

U n its not
re p o rtin g
in fo rm a tio n

0

U n der
10

10
but le s s
than
20

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

_
.
.
_

_
_
_
.
_

2
1
1
2
1
1
.

_
_
.
_
_
.
_

.
_
_
_
_
.
_

_
_
.
_
_
.
_

_
_
_
.
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
_
-

.
_
_
_
_
.
_

.
_
.
.
_
_
.

_
_
.
_
_
.
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
.
.
_

100

N o v a c a t io n s

A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d .. _______________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U n its w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s _
. . .
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s . . ____________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

321
87
234
175
51
124
146
36
110

290
128
162
189
83
106
101
45
56

10
1
9
8
8
2
1
1

5
4
1
4
3
1
1
1
~

-

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

321
87
2 34
175
51
124
146
36
110

299
129
170
199
85
114
100
44
56

4
1
3
2

2
2
_
1
1
1
1

2
2
_
1
1
1
1

'

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

321
87
234
175
51
124
146
36
110

279
122
157
181
79
102
98
43
55

14
2
12
11
1
10
3
1
2

7
3
4
6
2
4
1
1

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

321
87
234
175
51
124
146
36
110

163
75
88
87
42
45
76
33
43

16
1
15
11
1
10
5
_
5

28
7
21
23
5
18
5
2
3

-

-

-

_

L e s s than 1 w e e k

A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d ___________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s
U n its w ith 1 .0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ____________________
U n its w ith 250—999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e

-

2
2
1
1

.
_
-

-

.
.
.

.
.
.

.
_
.
_
_
.

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

5
5
_
3
3
_
2
2

_
.
_
_
_

1
1
_
1
1
.
.
_

_
_
.
_
_
.
_

_
_
_
.
_
_
_

_
_
_
.
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
.
.

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

1
1
.
1
1
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

11
5
6
10
4
6
1
1

5
2
3
5
2
3
_
_

4
3
1
4
3
1
_

2
_
2
2
_
2
_

32
22
10
26
18
8
6
4
2

1 but le s s than 2 w e e k s

A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
U n its w ith 250—999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s
_ _
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e

-

2 but le s s than 3 w e e k s

A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s
____
U n its w ith 1 .0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
N on m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s ________________
U n its w ith 1 .0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e

S e e fo o tn o te

at end




o f t a b le .

16
4
12
14
3
11
2
1
1

15
5
10
11
3
8
4
2
2

6
2
4
5
1
4
1
1

9
8
1
5
5
_
4
3
1

_

_

Table 22. Vacation Pay Received by Employees1— Upper Management Employees— Continued
(N u m b er o f u n its in w h ich s p e c i f ie d p e r c e n t s o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e d the in d ic a te d w e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y ,

1963)

U n its in w h ic h the p e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s w a s
W e e k s o f v a c a t io n p a y , in d u s t r y ,
an d s i z e o f r e p o r t in g u nit

A ll
un its

U n its not
re p o rtin g
in fo rm a tio n

0

U n d er
10

16
but le s s
than
20

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

100

3 but l e s s than 4 w e e k s
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d . . . . . . _____ __________
U n its w ith 250— 99 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------9
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e . . . . .
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s _________________. _______
U n its w ith 250— 99 e m p l o y e e s . . ________ ___ _
9
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s __ _________________
U n its w ith 2 5 CM?99 e m p lo y e e s
__________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e __ _____

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

321
87
234
175
51
124
146
36
110

100
45
55
55
28
27
45
17
28

5
1
4
3
3
2
1
1

22
7
15
16
5
11
6
2
4

26
12
14
20
9
11
6
3
3

16
3
13
12
2
10
4
1
3

18
11
7
12
7
5
6
4
2

14
7
7
11
6
5
3
1
2

20
5
15
15
2
13
5
3
2

12
4
8
9
3
6
3
1
2

10
2
8
9
1
8
1
1
-

4
2
2
3
2
1
1
1

60
35
25
38
22
16
22
13
9

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

321
87
234
175
51
124
146
36
110

145
85
60
108
61
47
37
24
13

2
2
2

16
7
9
13
5
8
3
2

18
4
14
13
2
11
5
2
3

14
4
10
10
3
7
4
1
3

10
3
7
6
1
5
4
2
2

9
2
7
8
2
6
1

12
1
11
10
1
9
2

-

-

1

2

8
3
5
5
2
3
3
1
2

8
3
5
4
2
2
4
1
3

3
1
2
1
.
1
2
1
1

62
21
41
23
8
15
39
13
26

-

4 w e e k s and o v e r
A l l in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d . ____ _____ __ __ __________
U n its w ith 250— 99 e m p lo y e e s . . ------------9
U n its w it h 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _ . .
M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s __ ______________________
U n its w ith 250— 9 9 e m p l o y e e s __ __ __________
9
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s . . . __________________
U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s
.
. . ____
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e __ __ __

-

2
-

‘
1 I n clu d e s o n ly v a c a t io n s f o r w h ic h the e m p lo y e r m a d e p a y m en t d i r e c t ly to the e m p lo y e e .
NOTE:

S e e a p p e n d ix e s f o r




s u r v e y c o v e r a g e and d e fin itio n s .

E m p lo y e r c o n t r ib u t io n s to fund s that d is t r ib u t e v a c a t io n p a y m e n ts to e m p lo y e e s

a r e e x clu d e d .

Table 23. Paid Holidays1

8

(Number of units granting the indicated number of paid holidays per year, 1963)
U n its p r o v id in g —
E m p lo y e e g r o u p , in d u s t r y , and
s i z e o f r e p o r t i n g unit

A ll
units

U n its not
r e p o r t in g
in fo r m a t io n

No
pa id
h o lid a y s

P a id h o lid a y s o f—
U nder
5
days

5

9
5
4
8
4
4
1
1
-

15
11
4
5
4
1
10
7
3

4
4

6
3
3
5
2
3
1
1
-

17
11
6
7
4
3
10
7
3

4
4

.
.
.
.
.

4
2
2
4
2
2

3
3

_

-

13
7
6
5
2
3
8
5
3

5*/z

6

6V2

7

7*/z

8

8V,

9

9Vz

10

10Vz

11

HV2

12

12Vz

13
and
over

N on exem pt e m p lo y e e s
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
U n its w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s -----------------------M a n u fa ctu r in g i n d u s t r i e s ______________________ - —
U n its w ith 2 5 0 — 99 e m p l o y e e s ___________ _— 9
U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s
U n its w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s
U n its w ith 1, 000 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ------------

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

2
_
2
1

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

4
1
3
3
1
2
1

628
221
4 07
378
138
240
250
83
167

18
5
13
10
2
8
8
3
5

-

1
1
1

1
1
_
-

1
1
-

-

2
2
-

2
2
-

76
48
28
35
26
9
41
22
19

23
13
10
14
9
5
9
4
5

225
77
148
150
54
96
75
23
52

19
10
9
13
6
7
6
4
2

180
69
111
143
56
87
37
13
24

25
8
17
17
6
11
8
2
6

60
25
35
35
17
18
25
8
17

8
5
3
5
4
1
3
1
2

42
16
26
18
10
8
24
6
18

10
3
7
5
4
5
2
3

23
12
11
9
5
4
14
7
7

80
51
29
37
28
9
43
23
20

22
13
9
13
9
4
9
4
5

221
75
146
148
53
95
73
22
51

19
10
9
13
6
7
6
4
2

181
69
112
143
56
87
38
13
25

26
9
17
18
7
11
8
2
6

58
24
34
34
16
18
24
8
16

7
4
3
4
3
1
3
1
2

43
17
26
19
11
8
24
6
18

10
3
7
5
1
4
5
2
3

23
12
11
9
5
4
14
7
7

4
1
3
4

66
39
27
26
18
8
40
21
19

16
8
8
10
6
4
6
2
4

182
51
131
121
36
85
61
15
46

13
5
8
9
3
6
4
2
2

150
46
104
118
37
81
32
9
23

19
2
17
13
2
11
6

51
17
34
29
11
18
22
6
16

6
3
3
3
2
1
3
1
2

38
15
23
15
10
5
23
5
18

9
3
6
4
1
3
5
2
3

16
8
8
7
4
3
9
4
5

4
1
3

1

4
1
3
-

9
3
6
1

-

-

4
1
3

8
3
5

1

10
5
5
"

10
5
5

4
-

4
1
-

1
3
-

3

E x e m p t e m p l o y e e s , e x c lu d in g
upper m anasem en t
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
U n its w ith 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s
U n its w ith 1, 0 00 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e
U n its w ith 2 5 0 — 99 e m p l o y e e s - .............. .............
9
U n its w ith 1, 0 00 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e - _______
U n its w ith 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p l o y e e s . _________ —----9
U n its w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e . . . . . . . . .

-

1

1
1
.
-

1
1
-

-

2
2
-

2
2
-

3

9
3
6
1
8
3
5

10
5
5
10
5
5

4
4
1
1
3
“
3

9

4

U pper m an asem en t
A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d
U n its w ith 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p l o y e e s ________________
9
U n its w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e
M a n u fa c t u r in g in d u s t r ie s
U n its w ith 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p l o y e e s
9
U n its w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e ^ . ----N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
-----.
U n its w ith 2 5 0 ^ 9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s ..............................
U n its w ith 1, 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e . . . . —. . .

_

I n c lu d e s o n ly h o lid a y s f o r w h ic h the e m p lo y e r m a d e p a y m en t d i r e c t ly to the e m p lo y e e .

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




-

2
2
-

1
1

E m p lo y e r co n t r ib u t io n s to fu n d s that

-

6

d i s t r ib u t e h o lid a y p a y m e n ts

-

4
1
3

7
2
5
1
-

1
6
2
4

4

5
-

9
4
5

-

4
1
-

1
3
-

3

to e m p lo y e e s a r e e x c lu d e d .

Table 24. Formal Sick Leave Plans
(Number of units classified by presence or absence of sickness and accident insurance, 1963)
Unit8 with fo rm a l sick leave plans
E m ployee group, industry, and
s iz e of reportin g unit

A ll
unit 8

Units not reporting
inform ation on
sick leave

With s ick n e ss and
accid ent insurance

Units without form a l sick leave plans

Without sick n ess and
accident insurance

With sick n ess and
accident insurance

Without sick ness and
accident insurance

N onexem pt em p lo ye e s
A ll indu stries surveyed
Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s
Units with 1 ,000 em p lo ye e s o r m o r e .
M anufacturing in du stries
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,0 0 0 em p lo ye e s o r m ore
N onm anufacturing industries
________ .
Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s_____ . . . ............
Units with 1,0 0 0 em p loyees o r m o re________

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

4
2
2
3
1
2
1
1
-

278
105
173
202
77
125
76
28
48

256
94
162
121
51
70
135
43
92

100
52
48
76
39
37
24
13
11

111
63
48
60
36
24
51
27
24

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

8
4
4
6
3
3
2
1

243
89
154
173
64
109
70
25
45

246
87
159
120
44
76
126
43
83

108
57
51
85
45
40
23
12
11

144
79
65
78
48
30
66
31
35

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

21
7
14
13
4
9
8
3
5

207
71
136
143
48
95
64
23
41

197
53
144
95
28
67
102
25
77

88
38
50
70
31
39
18
7

115
52
63
57
27
30
58
25
33

Exem pt em p loy e e s, excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll in du stries surveyed
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m ore____
M anufacturing in du stries
__
Units with 250-999 em p loyees
Units with 1 ,000 em p loyees o r m o r e .__. . . . . .
N onm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s __ _________________
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s ........--- --------Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o re

1

Upper m anagem ent
A ll in d u strie s su rveyed

_

Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s .. .
.....
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e --------------M anufacturing in d u strie s
Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s

_

_ _
__
--------

Units with 1, 000 em ployees o r m o r e --------------N onm anufacturing industries
. ..
Units with 25(>-999 e m p lo y e e s ---------------------------Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o re ________

NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




1
1

Table 25. Leave for Civic Responsibilities
(Number of units granting the indicated types of paid leave, 1963)

M ilitary leave
E m ployee group, industry, and
s iz e o f reportin g unit

A ll
units

No
Not
infor - Granting
Granting
granting
m ation

Not
granting

Leave for other civ ic
r espons ib ilities

Voting leave

W itness leave

Jury leave

No
Not
Granting granting in fo r ­
mation

No
Not
in fo r ­ Granting
granting
m ation

No
Not
in fo r ­ Granting
granting
m ation

No
in fo r ­
m ation

N onexem pt em ployees
A ll industries surveyed _ ___
Units w ith 250—
999 em p loyees
__
___
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o re __
M anufacturing in d u s tr ie s __ ___ '________________
Units w ith 250—
999 em p loyees ___________
Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ----------N onm anufacturing industries
____
Units w ith 250—
999 em p lo y e e s ______________
Units w ith 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e
._ _

1
1
1

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

433
155
278
257
92
165
176
63
113

315
161
154
204
112
92
111
49
62

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

449
162
287
269
98
171
180
64
116

296
153
143
189
105
84
107
48
59

4
1
3
4
1
3

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

380
117
263
227
71
156
153
46
107

230
100
130
140
65
75
90
35

18
4
14
11

55

5

-

1
-

-

655
254
401
400
156
244
255
98
157

93
62
31
61
48
13
32
14
18

1
1
1
1

688
274
414
420
172
248
268
102
166

58
41
17
39
31
8
19
10
9

3
1
2
3
1
2
-

577
196
381
348
122
226
229
74
155

35
21
14
20
14
6
15
7

16
4
12
10

8

4

-

-

4

468
181
287
268
110
158
200
71
129

277
135
142
192
94
98
85
41
44

516
205
311
303
128
175
213
77
136

227
110
117
155
75
80
72
35
37

6
1
5
4
1
3
2

438
154
284
251
94
157
187
60
127

171
63
108
116
42
74

19
4
15
11

55

8
2

-

4
2
-

2
2
-

2

378
152
226
220
89
131
158
63
95

367
163
204
239
114
125
128
49
79

4
1
3
3
1
2
1

403
161
242
237
95
142
166
66
100

340
153
187
220
107
113
120
46
74

6
2
4
5
2
3
1

334
109
225
195
61
134
139
48
91

275
107
168
171
74
97
104

19
5
14
12

-

1

330
123
207
191
74
117
139
49
90

398
186
212
255
124
131
143
62
81

21
7
14
16
6
10
5
1
4

461
180
281
281
115
166
180
65
115

266
129
137
164
83
81
102
46
56

22
7
15
17
6
11
5
1
4

399
137
262
244
87
157
155
50
105

198
77
121
114
47
67
84
30
54

31
7
24
20
4
16
11

Exem pt em p lo y e e s , excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll industries s u r v e y e d ----------------------Units w ith 250—
999 em p lo y e e s-------- ------------Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e _______
M anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ..
__ . . ____
Units w ith 250—
999 em p lo y e e s -------- ------------Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ----------Nonm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s .
_.
— ----Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s______________
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e -----------

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

Upper m anagem ent
A ll industries surveyed
.
. . ------- — ._
Units w ith 250—
999 em p lo y e e s
— . ----Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ----------M anufacturing in d u s tr ie s ----------------------------------Units w ith 250—
999 em ployees
---------Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e _______
N onm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s ___________________
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s---------------------Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e -----------

NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




2

9
7
2

2
8

6
2

21
34

2

9
6

3

9
7

33

2

71

5

3
8

Table 26. Personal Leave
(Number of units granting the indicated types of paid leave, 1963)
Leave fo r fam ily e m e rg e n cie s
E m ployee group, industry, and
s iz e o f rep ortin g unit

Leave fo r death in fam ily

Granting

Not
granting

Not
granting

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

527
219
308
327
143
184
200
76
124

215
96
119
129
60
69
86
36
50

7
1
6
6
1
5
1

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

616
257
359
386
170
216
230
87
143

123
57
66
68
32
36
55
25
30

10
2
8
8
2
6
2

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

515
182
333
316
117
199
199
65
134

90
34
56
47
18
29
43
16
27

All
units

No
inform ation

Granting

Other p erson al leave 1

No
inform ation

Granting

Not
granting

414
179
235
262
117
145
152
62
90

318
129
189
189
81
108
129
48
81

17
8
9
11
6
5
6
2
4

237
101
136
144
65
79
93
36
57

19
9
10
13
7
6
6
2
4

187
64
123
107
40
67
80
24
56

31
10
21
19
6
13
12
4
8

No
inform ation

N onexem pt em p loyees
A ll in d u stries su rveyed
Units w ith 250 -99 9 em p lo y e e s .......... ........ .......
Units with 1, 000 em p loyees o r m o r e — ---- —
M anufacturing indu stries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees o r m o re
—
N onm anufacturing industries
Units w ith 25CH999 em p loyees

669
275
394
411
177
234
258
98
160

78
40
38
49
26
23
29
14
15

43
23
20
23
13
10
20
10
10

4
2
2
4
2
2
.

2

702
291
411
435
189
246
267
102
165

-

493
206
287
305
132
173
188
74
114

23
5
18
15
3
12
8
2
6

583
203
380
354
130
224
229
73
156

28
13
15
13
5
8
15
8
7

17
5
12
11
3
8
6
2
4

410
147
263
252
92
160
158
55
103

-

1

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

-

Exem pt em p loy e e s, excluding
upper m anasem ent
A ll industries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s .— . —. . . - . ——
.
.M anufacturing industries
N onm anufacturing in du stries
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s ----------— . — —
Units with 1, 000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e — . —

-

-

Upper m anasem ent
A ll in du stries su rveyed
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
M anufacturing indu stries
Units with 250 -99 9 e m p lo y e e s .........................
Units with 1, 000 em p lo ye e s o r m o re
---N onm anufacturing indu stries — ----------------- --- ---

1 E xclu des leave fo r c iv ic r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .
NOTE:

See table 25.

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




Tabic 27. Straight-Time Workweek
(Num ber o f units w ith indicated straigh t-tim e w ork w eek s, 1963)
E m ployee gro u p , industry, and
s iz e o f re p ortin g unit

A ll
units

Units not
reporting
inform ation

Under 40 hours

40
hours

O ver
40
hours

T otal1

35

36%

37%

38%

22
12
10
10
7
3
12
5
7

580
233
347
394
161
233
186
72
114

-

N onexem pt em ployees
A l l in du stries su rveyed
Units w ith 250-999 em p lo y e e s______ ________
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o re _______
M anufacturing industries
Units w ith 250-999 em p lo y e e s— ___________
Units w ith 1 ,000 em p loyees o r m o r e ______ _
N onm anufacturing in d u s t r ie s _______ ___. . . . ____
TTmitit w ith 250—
QQ4 e m p lo y e e *
----- Units w ith 1,000 em p lo ye e s o r m o re

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

10
2
8
5
1
4
5
1
4

158
80
78
62
41
21
96
39
57

29
17
12

15
7

8

4
4
21
13
8

3
2
1
12
5
7

79
38
41
38
26
12
41
12
29

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

12
2
10
7
2
5
5
5

139
70
69
51
35
16
88
35
53

27
14
13
7
3
4
20
11
9

16
7
9
4
2
2
12
5
7

67
32
35
28
21
7
39
11
28

18
11
7
9
7
2
9
4
5

570
228
342
388
159
229
182
69
113

28
16
12
16
8
8
12
8
4

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

26
6
20
14
3
11
12
3
9

110
49
61
40
26
14
70
23
47

25
12
13
7
3
4
18
9
9

14
6
8
4
2
2
10
4
6

51
22
29
21
15
6
30
7
23

13
7
6
6
5
1
7
2
5

470
155
315
312
105
207
158
50
108

22
11
11
12
4
8
10
7
3

8

1
1
1
1
-

Exem pt e m p lo y e e s , excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll in du stries s u rveyed — . . . ______ ___________ _
Units w ith 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o re —
M anufacturing induatriea
_ _
Unit* w ith 250-000 e m p loy ee*

_

-----. -------

Units w ith 1,000 e m ployees o r m o r e —
N onm anufacturing In du strie*

----- __

Units w ith 250—
999 em ployees
Units w ith 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e -------------

-

U pper m anagem ent
A l l indu stries s u r v e y e d _____ . . . . ______ . . _______
Units w ith 250-999 em p lo y e e s—
U nits w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m ore
M anufacturing industries
Units With 250-999 e m p lo y e e * ----------Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ------------Nonm anufacturing indu stries
Units w ith 250-999 em ployees
Units w ith 1,000 em p loyees o r m o re _______

1 Includes w eek ly schedules other than those presented separately.
NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




Table 28. Pay for Overtime Work1
(Number o£ units with indicated overtim e pay p r a c tic e s , 1963)
O vertim e paid at—
E m p loyee group, industry, and
s iz e o f reportin g unit

All
units

Units not
reporting
inform ation

No
overtim e
com pensation

Specified
amount
per hour

F ra ctio n or m ultiple o f regular hourly rate
Less* than
straight tim e

Straight tim e

T im e and
on e-h alf

Other
m ultiple

Other

Rate not
specified

N onexem ot em ployees
A ll industries su rveyed
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em ployees o r m o re
M anufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees..—
- ............
Nonm anufacturing industries — — ____________ Units with 250—
999 em ployees

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

2
2

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
-

-

-

-

12
5
7
8
4
4
4
1
3

1
1
_
1
1
_
-

-

_

-

671
290
381
435
195
240
236
95
141

70
21
49
24
7
17
46
14
32

4
2
2
1
1
3
2
1

2
1
1
1
1
.
1
1

88
26
62
66
21
45
22
5
17

71
20
51
50
16
34
21
4
17

46
6
40
33
5
28
13
1
12

23
2
21
19
2
17
4
_
4

11
5
6
7
3
4
4
2
2

Exem pt em p loy e e s, excluding
upper m anagem ent
Units with 250—
999 em p loyees
Units w ith 1, 000 em p loyees o r m o r e — . .. ..
M anufacturing industries
Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s ----------------- . .. .
Units with 1, 000 em p loyees o r m o r e ---- ——
N onm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s ---------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p lo ye e s
Units with 1, 000 em p loyees o r m o re

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

3
1
2
2
1
1
1
-

494
250
244
276
151
125
218
99
119

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

15
4
11
9
2
7
6
2
4

598
217
381
355
136
219
243
81
162

1

Upper m anagem ent
A ll industries surveyed
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units w ith 1, 000 em p loyees o r m o re
M anufacturing industries ------------------------------- Units with 250—
999 em p loyees
Units with 250—
999 em p loyees

1

_

.

.
_

1
_
_
-

1
-

_
_
_

5

1

_

_

_

_

.

5
5

1
1

3
3

3
3

2
2

_

_

3

3

_

_

_

5

1

3

3

2

_
_

_
_

.
-

_

.
_

_

1

“
'

Tabulations do not include supper m oney and related payments.
NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




2

Table 29. Compensatory Time O ff for Overtime Work

2
(Num ber o f units cla s sifie d by p resen ce o r absence o f o vertim e pay, 1963)

E m ployee group, industry, and
s iz e o f reporting unit

A ll
units

Units not
reporting
inform ation on
com pensatory
tim e off

Units granting com pensatory
tim e o ff

Units not granting com pen satory
tim e o ff

O vertim e
pay pra ctice
not reported

With
overtim e
pay

_
-

.
-

-

-

.
-

.
-

703
301
402
445
200
245
258
101
157

2
2

-

With
ove rtim e
pay1

Without
o v ertim e
pay

Without
o v ertim e
pay

O vertim e
pay p ra ctice
not reported

N onexem pt em ployees
A ll in du stries su rveyed
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e -----------M anufacturing in du stries
. — __
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 e m p loyees o r m o r e ________
N onm anufacturing in du stries
-------Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 e m p loyees o r m o r e ------------

1
1
1

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

-

1
-

43
13
30
15
3
12
28
10
18

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

8
3
5
6
2
4
2
1
1

44
5
39
31
3
28
13
2
11

63
27
36
30
15
15
33
12
21

_
.
.
_
-

206
59
147
152
49
103
54
10
44

427
222
205
243
135
108
184
87
97

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

23
7
16
15
5
10
8
2
6

3
3
3
3
-

56
13
43
31
7
24
25
6
19

.
.
-

11
.
11
10
10
1
-

535
201
334
319
126
193
216
75
141

_
-

1
1
1
1
-

-

-

Exem pt e m p lo y e e s , excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll in du stries s u r v e y e d -------------------------------------Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s----------------------Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e ___ ___ _
M anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ____________ ___ ______
Units with 250-999 e m ployees
___
Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e -----------N onm anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ___________________
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1, 000 em p loyees o r m o r e .

1
.
1
.
.
1
1

Upper m anagem ent
A ll in du stries su rveyed
__________
Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s----------------------Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m ore
M anufacturing in du stries
_
Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s .
.
—
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ________
Nonm anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ________ __________
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m ore

1 E m ployees who w orked overtim e did not n e ce ssa rily r e c e iv e both pay and com pen satory tim e off.
NOTE:




See appendixes fo r survey co ve ra ge and defin itions.

1

.
.
.
-

Table 30. Extra Pay for Work on Paid Holidays
(Number of units with indicated pay p r a ctic e s, 1 1963)

E m p loyee group, industry, and
siz e of reporting unit

Units
reporting
paid
holidays

Units not
information

Extra pay 1 of—
2
No
extra
pay

pay

Specified
stinount
p er hour

Fraction or m ultiple of regu lar hourly rate
L e s s than
straight time

Straight tim e

T im e and
o n e-h a lf

310
128
182
178
84
94
132
44

145
32
113
114
24
90
31

Rate not
specified

Other
m ultiple

Nonexem pt em ployees
A ll in du stries su rv e y e d ----------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
M anufacturing in d u str ie s _________________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s____________ ___
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ____________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re ____

748
315
433
462
204
258
286

11
1

i
i
_
i
i
-

-

175

10
2
85
35
71
52
19
49
33
16

17

6

151
57
94
87
36
51
64

3
3

43

i
i
.

1
0
7
1
1

-

7
4

.
i
i

2
1

8
8

8

2
1
1

1
1

_

.
.

-

-

-

-

2
1

23

1

33

9

1
1

E xem pt e m p lo y ee s, excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll in du stries su rveyed ___ __________________
___
_
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p lo y e e s. __
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore__ __
M anufacturing in d u str ie s_________________________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees __ __
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e ________
Nonmanufacturing industries
_________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
-------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______

746
314
432
460
203
257
286

11
1
175

4

1

3
3

1
2
1
1

587
276
311
355
175
180
232

11
0

131

5

2
3
1
1
4

1
1
1
1

-

1

-

3

-

2
2

.
.

69
19
50
45
13
32
24

6

18

32

1
0
2
2
18
7

1
1

14
3

1
1

2

31
26

2

24
7
7

1
8
7
1
6
2
2

6
3
3
4
3

1
2
2

-

Upper m anagem ent
A l l in du stries surveyed —
Units with 250—999 em p loyee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Manufacturing in d u str ie s __________________ ___
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s.. _____ ___
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Nonmanufacturing in d u str ie s ___ __ __________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees — —
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______

1
2

612
216
396
369
136
233
243
80
163

Tabulations include only units reporting paid holidays.
E xcludes holiday pay as such.

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




7

2

5
3

1
2
4
1
3

597
213
384
361
135
226
236
78
158

_

-

-

-

-

2
2

4

1

3
3
3

1
1

1
1
1
1
.

-

1
1
1
1
.

-

_

_
_

_
_
_
-

_
-

-

-

Table 31. Compensatory Tim e O f f fo r W ork on Paid Holidays

$

(Num ber o f units c la s sifie d by p re se n ce o r absen ce o f extra pay fo r w ork on paid h o lid a y s ,1 1963)

E m ployee gro u p , industry, and
s is e o f reportin g unit

Units
reporting
paid
holidays

Units granting com pen satory
Units not
tim e o ff
reporting
inform ation on
Extra pay
Without p r a c tic e not
com pen satory With extra
extra pay
pay2
tim e o ff
reported

Units not granting com p en satory
tim e o ff
With extra
pay

Extra pay
Without p r a c tic e not
extra pay
rep orted

N onexem pt em ployees
______
A ll industries s u r v e y e d _______
Units w ith 250-999 em p loyees..........................
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e .--------M anufacturing in d u s tr ie s ______________ ____
Units with 250-999 em p loyees______________
Units with 1,000 e m ployees o r m o re _______
Nonm anufacturing industries — ________________
Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s ^ .________
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e _______

1

38
10
28
17
4
13
21
6
15

24
19
5
16
12
4
8
7
1

-

587
218
369
373
147
226
214
71
143

96
66
30
55
40
15
41
26
15

1
l
1
1
■

746
314
432
460
203
257
286
111
175

9
5
4
5
3
2
4
2
2

26
7
19
16
3
13
10
4
6

107
45
62
67
27
40
40
18
22

1
1
1
1
-

129
30
99
86
24
62
43
6
37

472
226
246
284
145
139
188
81
107

2
1
l
1
1
1
1

612
216
396
369
136
233
243
80
163

12
5
7
7
3
4
5
2
3

_
-

80
28
52
52
16
36
28
12
16

1
1
1
1
-

8
1
7
5
5
3
1
2

508
181
327
303
116
187
205
65
140

3
1
2
1
1
2
2

748
315
433
462
204
258
286
111
175

2
1
1
2
1

Exem pt e m p lo y e e s , excludine
upper m anagem ent
A ll industries s u r v e y e d ________________________
Units with 250—
999 e m p loyees___________ ___
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o re ___ ___
M anufacturing in d u s tr ie s __. . . . . __ . . . . . ___ ______
Units with 250-999 em p loyees______________
Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ..
N onm anufacturing industries
—
— —
Units with 250-999 e m p l o y e e s ^ . __________
Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o re _______
U pper m anagem ent
All industries s u r v e y e d __
~
Units with 250—
999 e m p loyees___. . . . . ______
Units w ith 1,000 em p loyees o r m o re _______
M anufacturing indu stries
—
. . --------Units with 250—
999 em ployees _ ____________
Units with 1,000 e m ployees o r m o re _______
N onm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s __________________
Units with 250—
999 em p loyees_____ _ . .
Units with 1,000 e m ployees o r m o re _______

1 Tabulations include only units reporting paid holidays.
* E m ployees who w orked on paid holidays did not n e c e s s a r ily r e c e iv e both extra pay and com pen satory tim e o ff.

NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




Tabic 32. Premium Pay for N ightwork
(N um ber o f units with and without a shift d ifferen tia l, 1963)

E m ployee group, industry, and
s ize o f reporting unit

A ll
units

Units not
reporting
inform ation
on shift
d ifferen tial

Units with
shift
differen tial

Units without shift d ifferen tial
No night shift
in operation

Night shift
in op eration

No inform ation
on operation
o f shifts

300
202
98
202
144
58
98
58
40

83
34
49
26
14
12
57
20
37

9
2
7
2
.
2
7
2
5

Nonexem pt em ployees
A ll in d u stries surveyed
— __
Units with 250-999 em ployees
...
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ---------M anufacturing in d u s tr ie s__________ _________ __
U n i t s w ith 2 5 0 - 9 9 9 u m p l n y e e n ._____ _
___
U n i t s w ith 1,000 em ployee* «T rp«i"e
___
N o n m a n u fa rtn rin g in d u s t r ie s

---

Units with 250-999 em ployees -------------------Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ----------

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

1
1
1
i
_
-

356
77
279
231
45
186
125
32
93

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

5
3
2
4
2
2
1
1
"

194
38
156
146
29
117
48
9
39

363
213
150
207
131
76
156
82
74

158
55
103
91
39
52
67
16
51

29
7
22
14
3
11
15
4
11

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

15
4
11
9
2
7
6
2
4

21
3
18
16
16
5
3
2

533
204
329
322
131
191
211
73
138

26
3
23
14
1
13
12
2
10

33
7
26
17
4
13
16
3
13

Exem pt e m p loyees, excluding
upper management
A ll in d u s t r ie s su rv e y e d

................

Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ..
M anufacturing industries
__
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m ore
N onm anufacturing industries
Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s.
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e .....—
...
Upper m anagement
A ll in d u stries surveyed
Units with 250-999 em p lo ye e s______________
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o re — ------.
M anufacturing industries
. .
___
Units with 250-999 e m p loyees______________
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ______
N onm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s____ _____ _______
Units with 250-999 em ployees
- .
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m ore

NOTE:




See appendixes fo r survey co ve ra ge and defin itions.

0>

s

Tabic 33. Types o f Shift D ifferentials
(Num ber o f units with the indicated types o f diffe re n tia ls, 1 1963)
T h ird shift

Second shift
E m ployee group, industry, and
s iz e o f rep ortin g unit

A ll units
reporting
shift
differential

Other

A ll units
reporting
shift
d ifferential

Cents per
hour*

P ercen t
addition to
day rates

F u ll pay
fo r reduced
hours

8
l
7
6
6
2
1
1

311
58
253
210
38
172
101
20
81

161
37
124
116
29
87
45
8
37

121
18
103
71
8
63
50
10
40

4
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1

25
1
24
21
21
4
1
3

4
4
2
2
2
2

171
27
144
129
22
107
42
5
37

80
17
63
64
15
49
16
2
14

74
9
65
51
6
45
23
3
20

2
1
1
2
1
1
"

15
15
12
12
3
3

18
1
17
15
15
3
1
2

8
8
8
8
-

7
1
6
4
4
3
1
2

-

3
3
3
3
-

Cents per
hour*

P ercen t
addition to
day rates

Full pay
fo r reduced
hours

345
73
272
225
42
183
120
31
89

189
45
144
136
33
103
53
12
41

146
26
120
82
8
74
64
18
46

2
1
1
1
1
1
-

183
32
151
137
24
113
46
8
38

96
21
75
77
18
59
19
3
16

82
10
72
57
5
52
25
5
20

1
1
1
1
-

20
3
17
15
15
5
3
2

12
1
11
11
11
1
1

8
2
6
4
4
4
2
2

-

-

-

-

Other

Nonexem pt em p lo ye e s
A ll in du stries su rveyed — ------- ----------- ---------------Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s ...............— ------M anufacturing in d u s t r ie s -----------------------------------Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s ................... —----Units with 1, 000 em p lo y e e s o r m o re
Nonm anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ....................................
Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s
Units with 1, 000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e ---- -------

1

E xem pt em p loy e e s, excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll in du stries s u r v e y e d ...........................—— -----—
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s ----------------------M anufacturing in d u s t r ie s .............. . . . ................... —
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s -------- -----------—
Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e ----------—
N onm anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ....................................
Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s ----------------- — —
Units with 1, 000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e -----------U pper m anagem ent
A ll in du stries s u r v e y e d --------- -------------------- . . . ----Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s .......... ..................
Units with 1,000 em p loy ees o r m o r e -----------M anufacturing in du stries . . . ---------------------------- —
Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s
Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e _ — ----N onm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s -----—
------- --------------Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s -----------------------Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e — — ----

1 E xcludes units w hich rep o rte d e x is te n ce o f a shift d ifferential p ra ctice but did not sp e cify the type.
2 Includes other d iffe re n tia ls e x p r e s s e d as an amount per unit o f tim e, such as d o lla rs per week o r m onth.

NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




Table 34. Shift D ifferential Paid in Cents Per H our for W ork on a Second Shift
(Num ber o f units in which the rate o f pay in cents per hour

E m ployee grou p, 2 industry, and
s iz e o f reportin g unit

A ll units
paying
Units not
reporting
amount
per unit inform ation
o f tim e

Under
2.5
cents

2.5
but le s s
than
5.0

_

1

-

-

1was

equal to the indicated am ounts, 1963)

5.0

7.5

10.0

12.5

15.0

17.5

20.0

22.5

7.5

10.0

12.5

15.0

17.5

20.0

22.5

25.0

17
5
12
11
2
9
6
3
3

47
9
38
38
7
31
9
2
7

66
16
50
47
13
34
19
3
16

28
6
22
24
5
19
4
1
3

15
3
12
10
3
7
5
_
5

4
1
3
2
1
1
2
_
2

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

7
2
5
7
2

12
4
8
11

11
2
9
10
2
8
1

_
_
_

1

5

1
1

8
1
1

16
4
12
15
4
11
1

2
_
2
2

5

32
7
25
24
6
18
8
1

2

_
_
_
_

_
_

4
3
1
2
2

7

1

“

“

25.0
and
over

N onexem pt em p loyees
A ll in d u s t r ie s su r v e y e d

Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s ____ ____ _____
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e _______
M anufacturing in d u s tr ie s ---- ----------------------------U n it s w ith 250-999 e m p l o y e e s _
_
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e ---------N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g i n d u s t r i e s
_
---Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s ______________
Units with 1,000 em p lo ye e s o r m o r e _______

189
45
144
136
33
103
53
12
41

8
3

2
3

-

-

-

1

96
21
75
77
18
59
19

9
1
8
4

_
-

-

-

3

1
4

-

5

3
1
2
5

1
-

-

1

3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1

Exem pt em p loy e e s, excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll indu stries s u r v e y e d _____________ __ -______
Units with 250-999 em p loyees
Units with 1,000 em p lo ye e s o r m ore
M anufacturing in du stries
Units with 250-999 em p loyees
U n it s w ith 1 , 0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g in d u s t r i e s
U n its w ith 2 5 0 - 9 9 9 e m p l o y e e s _

Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m ore

16

4
5

-

_

1
1
_
_
_

1

_

-

.

3

1

1 Includes other d iffe re n tia ls expressed as an amount per unit o f tim e, such as d o lla rs per week o r month.
2 T oo few units rep orted differen tials fo r upper management em p loyees to w arrant presentation o f a distribution.
was the sam e as fo r exem pt em p lo y e e s, excluding upper management.

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




_

>
1

_
"

1

2

In 10 o f the 12 units reporting a d ifferen tial fo r this group, the amount

Table 35. Shift Differential Paid in Cents Per Hour for Work on a Third Shift
(N um ber o f units in which the rate o f pay in cents 1 per hour was equal to the indicated amounts, 1963)

E m ployee group, 1 industry, and
2
s iz e o f rep ortin g unit

A ll units
paying
Units not
amount
reporting
per unit inform ation
o f tim e

2.5
but le s s
than
5.0

5.0

7.5

10.0

12.5

15.0

17.5

7.5

10.0

12.5

15.0

17.5

20.0

7
3
4
6
2
4
1
1

3
3
1

-

_
-

-

-

-

1
2
2

60
15
45
46
10
36
14
5
9

25
5
20
19
4
15
6
1
5

33
9
24
23
9
14
10
10

1
10
7
1
6
4
.
4

7
_
7
4
4
3
_
3

.
_
.
-

4
2
2
4
2
2
-

1
1
1
1
-

23
4
19
20
4
16
3
3

13
5
8
12
4
8
1
1

15
3
12
12
3
9
3
_
3

5
_
5
4
_
4
1
-

l

!

1
1
_
1
_
-

_
1
1
_

Under
2.5
cents

20.0

22.5

22.5

25.0

25.0
and
ov er

N onexem pt em p loyees
A ll in d u stries surveyed
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e __ _____
M anufacturing indu stries
Units with 250—
999 em p loyees
Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o re
N onm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s -----------------------------Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e ------------

_
.

161
37
124
116
29
87
45
8
37

9
3
6
5
2
3
4
1
3

80
17
63
64
15
49
16
2
14

8
1
7
3
3

_
.
-

5

-

-

-

-

u

.
_
_
_
_
_
-

6
1
5
5
1
4
1
1

Exem pt em p loye e s, excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll in d u stries surveyed
____
Units with 250-999 em p lo y e e s Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o re
M anufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y e e s
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o re
N onm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s -------— —____ ___ __
Units with 250-999 em p loyees
Units with 1,000 em p loyees o r m o r e ____— —

1
4

1 Includes other d iffe re n tia ls e x p r e s s e d as an amount per unit o f tim e, such as d o lla rs per week o r month.
2 T oo few units r ep o rte d d iffe re n tia ls fo r upper m anagement em ployees to w arrant presentation o f a distribution.
was the sam e as fo r exem pt e m p lo y e e s, excluding upper m anagement.

NOTE:

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




1

l

_
”

9
2
7
6
2
4
3
_
3

'

In 6 o f the 8 units reporting a differen tial fo r this group, the amount

Table 36. Shift Differential Paid as a Percent Addition to Day Rates for W ork on a Second Shift
(Num ber o f units in w hich the addition to day rates was equal to the indicated p e r c e n ts , 1963)
A ll units
paying
Units not
p ercen t
reporting
addition to inform ation
day rates

E m ployee g r o u p ,1 industry, and
s ize o f reporting unit

Under
2 .5
percen t

2 .5
but le s s
than
5 .0

5 .0

7. 5

10.0

12.5

7. 5

10.0

12.5

15.0

15.0
and
over

Nonexem pt em ployees
A ll i n d u s t r i e s s u r v e y e d ................
_ ----- Units w ith 250-999 em ployees______ _______
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e _______
M anufacturing in d u strie s________________ ____
Units with 250-999 em ployees______________
Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o re _______
Nonm anufacturing in d u strie s_____ ____________
Units With 250—
999 e m p l n y e e s -------Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e ____ __

146
26
120
82
8
74
64
18
46

_
.
.
_
_
_
_
-

37
4
33
30
4
26
7
.
7

9

2

1

_

_

2

1
1

5
1
4
5
i
4
_

3
1
2
_
_
.
3
1
2

8
8
1
7
l
_
1

90
19
71
41
3
38
49
16
33

!
.
1
1
.
_
-

6
1
5
2
2
4
1
3

Exem pt em ployees, excluding
upper management
A ll indu stries s u r v e y e d __
_
___
Units with 250-999 em ployees_______ ______
Units with 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e _____ _
M anufacturing industries
.___ „ „ ___
U n i t s w ith 2 5 0 — 9 9 e m p l o y e e s
0

_

Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o r e _______
Nonm anufacturing in d u strie s____ T
___
Units w ith 250-999 e m p l o y e e s .
—
_ _
Units w ith 1,000 em ployees o r m o re _______

82
10
72
57
5
52
25
5
20

.

1

2

_

26
3
23
23
3
20
3

_

-

_

.
_

2

_

3

.

43
5
38
26
1
25
17
4
13

1
_

1
I

_
1
_
_

4
1
3

_

1
3
1
2

'

1 T oo few units reported differentials fo r upper m anagem ent e m ployees to w arrant presentation o f a distribution. In a ll o f the 8 units
rep ortin g a differen tial fo r this group, the amount was the sam e as fo r exem pt e m p loyees, excluding upper m anagem ent.

NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




T able 37. Shift D ifferential Paid as a Percent Addition to Day R ates for W ork on a Third Shift
(Num ber o f units in which the addition to day rates was equal to the indicated p e rce n ts, 1963)

E m ployee grou p , 1 industry, and
s ic e o f reporting unit

A ll units
paying
Units not
reporting
percent
addition to inform ation
day rates

Under
2.5
perqent

2.5
but le s s
than
5.0

5.0

7.5

10.0

12.5

7.5

10.0

12.5

15.0

15.0
and
ov er

Nonexem pt em ployees
A ll indu stries su rveyed
—
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 em p lo ye e s o r m o re _______
M anufacturing indu stries
Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s---------------------Units with 1, 000 em p lo ye e s o r m ore
N onm anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ---------------------------Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s---------------------Units with 1,000 e m p loyees o r m ore

121
18
103
71
8
63
50
10
40

2
2
2

74
9
65
51
6
45
23

2

-

_
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

14
3
11
13
3
10
1

-

-

-

1

2

12
4
8
12
4
8
-

8
1

-

-

2

9
1
8
7
1
6
2

72
6
66
42
2
40
30
4
26

2
2
2
2
-

22
8
14
7
2
5
15
6
9

43
2
41
29
1
28
14
1
13

2
2
2
2
-

6
2
4
1
1
5
2
3

Exem pt e m p lo y e e s , excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll in du stries surveyed
Units with 250-999 em ployees
Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e ----------M anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ---------------------------------Units with 250-999 e m p lo y e e s---------------------Units with 1,000 em p lo y e e s o r m o r e ----------N onm anufacturing indu stries
Units with 250—
999 e m ployees
Units with 1,000 em p lo ye e s o r m ore

3
20

_

-

-

2
2
2

-

1
1
1
1
-

7

6
1
5
2
2

1 T oo few units reported d ifferen tials fo r upper m anagem ent em ployees to w arrant presentation o f a distribution. In all o f the 7 units
reportin g a d iffe re n tia l fo r this group, the amount was the sam e as fo r exem pt em p lo y e e s, excluding upper managem ent.

NOTE:




See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.

Table 38. Employee Coverage o f Plans for Premium Pay and Compensatory Time O ff
(N um be r of units in which plans covered all or fewer than all employees, 1963)
Extra pay for w o r k on
paid holidays

Overtime pay
Em p l o y e e group, industry, and
size of reporting unit

Wo rk er s covered

Total
with
plan

All

747
314
433
461
203
258
286
111
175

730
310
420
459
202
257
271
108
163

252
65
187
184
52
132
68
13
55

Wo r k e r s covered

Total
with
plan

All

13
2
11

4
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1

627
229
398
390
151
239
237
78
159

601
219
382
384
147
237
217
72
145

18
4
14
2
1
1
16
3
13

62
12
50
42
8
34
20
4
16

180
47
133
135
39
96
45
8
37

10
6
4
7
5
2
3
1
2

155
37
118
102
27
75
53
10
43

64
12
52
39
6
33
25
6
19

15
15
14

3
3
3

11
11
10

1

8
1
7
5

5
1
4
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
1
1

3
-

10
1
1

1
-

5

2
3
1
2

Fewe r
than
all

No
information

P r e m i u m pay for
nightwork
Wo r k e r s covered

Total
with
plan

All

8
6
2
4
3
1
4
3
1

356
77
279
231
45
186
125
32
93

286
57
229
197
37
160
89
20
69

61
19
42
30
7
23
31
12
19

83
21
62
60
18
42
23
3
20

8
4
4
3
3
5
1
4

194
38
156
146
29
117
48
9
39

90
14
76
68
9
59
22
5
17

3
3
3
3
-

_
-

21
3
18
16
16

19
3
16
14
14

No
Fewer
infor­
than
all
mation

Compensatory time off for
overtime w o r k
Wo r k e r s covered

Total
with
plan

All

9
1
8
4
1
3
5
_
5

43
13
30
15
3
12
28
10
18

35
10
25
12
2
10
23
8
15

6
3
3
1
1
_
5
2
3

2
_
2
2
_
2
_
_

100
24
76
75
20
55
25
4
21

4
_
4
3
_
3
1

107
32
75
61
18
43
46
14
32

79
28
51
48
17
31
31
11
20

_
_

2
_
2
2
_
2
-

59
13
46
34
7
27
25
6
19

52
12
40
28
6
22
24
6
18

Fewer
No
than
infor­
all
mation

Compen sa to ry time off for
w o r k on paid holidays
W o rk er s covered

Total
with
plan

All

-

62
29
33
33
16
17
29
13
16

54
25
29
27
13
14
27
12
15

3
2
1
2
2
_
1
_
1

5
2
3
4
1
3
1
1
-

20
3
17
8
_
8
12
3
9

8
1
7
5
1
4
3
3

134
52
82
84
30
54
50
22
28

113
46
67
72
27
45
41
19
22

13
3
10
6
1
5
7
2
5

8
3
5
6
2
4
2
1
1

3
.
3
3
_
3
-

4
1
3
3
1
2
1
1

81
28
53
53
16
37
28
12
16

77
25
52
50
14
36
27
11
16

_
_
_
_
_
_

No
Fewer
than infor­
all
mation

Fewer
No
infor­
than
mation
all

N o n e x e m p t employees
All industries s u rveyed______________________
Units with 250— 999 employees_____________
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e ______
Manufacturing industries_____________________
Units with 250— 999 employees_____________
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e ______
Nonmanufacturing industries_________________
Units with 250— 999 employees_____________
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e ______

13
2
11
-

E x e m p t employees, excluding
upper m a n a g e m e n t
All industries surveyed______________________
Units with 250— 999 employees_____
.
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e ______
Manufacturing industries___ _______
___
Units with 250— 999 e m ployees_____________
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e ______
Nonmanufacturing industries__ __ _________
Units with 250— 999 employees_____________
_
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e . _ _

-

1

Upper m a n a g e m e n t
All industries surveyed __ _________________
Units with 250— 999 employees_____________
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e ______
Manufacturing industries____________________
Units with 250— 999 employees
___
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e _
_
Nonmanufacturing industries_________________
Units with 250— 999 employees_____________
Units with 1,000 employees or m o r e

NOTE:

-

1
1

3
1
2

-

-

5

5

3
2

3
2

-

-

_

4
3
1
3
2
1
1
1

See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




C
O

Table 39. Selected Private W elfare Plans1
(Number of units with the indicated types of plans, 1963)
Hospitalisation, medical, or surgical benefits (eaccluding
major medical benefits) for—

Life insurance, accidental death and dismember­
ment insurance, or death benefits for—
Employee group, industry, and
size of reporting unit

Current employees'
All
Current employees
dependents
units
With

No
No
With­ infor­
With­
infor­ With out
out
mation
mation

Retired employees Current employees
With

With­
out

Current employees'
dependents

Retired employees

Retired employees'
dependents

No
No
No
No
With­
With­
With­
With­
infor­ With out
infor­ With out
infor­ With out infor­ With out
mation
mation
mation
mation

No
infor­
mation

Nonexempt employees
All industries surveyed------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or more----------Manufacturing industries----------------------------------Units with 250-999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore---- -----Nonmanufacturing industries----------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or more-----------

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

727
301
426
448
192
256
279
109
170

22
15
7
14
12
2
8
3
5

_
.
.
-

749
316
433
462
204
258
287
112
175

722
300
422
446
191
255
276
109
167

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

593
207
386
360
129
231
233
78
155

1

-

85
26
59
57
18
39
28
8
20

663
290
373
405
186
219
258
104
154

25
15
10
14
12
2
11
3
8

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

86
28
58
61
20
41
25
8
17

660
287
373
399
183
216
261
104
157

3
1
2
2
1
1
1

20
10
10
9
7
2
11
3
8

15
4
11
9
2
7
6
2
4

68
17
51
50
13
37
18
4
14

544
200
344
319
123
196
225
77
148

16
4
12
9
2

-

-

1
-

1
1

464
158
306
277
92
185
187
66
121

283
156
127
183
110
73
100
46
54

2
2
2
2
"

691
282
409
437
190
247
254
92
162

58
34
24
25
14
11
33
20
13

568
215
353
365
146
219
203
69
134

181
101
80
97
58
39
84
43
41

"

333
103
230
194
58
136
139
45
94

416
213
203
268
146
122
148
67
81

-

“

471
162
309
281
96
185
190
66
124

274
152
122
178
106
72
96
46
50

4
2
2
3
2
1
1
1

683
278
405
435
187
248
248
91
157

64
37
27
25
16
9
39
21
18

2
1
1
2
1
1
“

562
216
346
367
148
219
195
68
127

185
99
86
93
55
38
92
44
48

2
1
1
2
1
1
“

332
103
229
194
58
136
138
45
93

415
212
203
266
145
121
149
67
82

409
117
29 2
244
71
173
165
46
119

202
99
103
124
64
60
78
35
43

17
5
12
10
3

557
188
369
354
128
226
203
60
143

56
29
27
15
8

15
4
11
9
2

7

7

41
21
20

6
2
4

470
154
316
309
108
201
161
46
115

143
63
80
60
28
32
83
35
48

15
4
11
9
2
7
6
2
4

283
69
214
163
38
125
120
31
89

330
148
182
206
98
108
124
50
74

-

-

-

-

-

279
83
196
167
48
119
112
35
77

470
233
237
295
156
139
175
77
98

2
1
1
2
1
1
”

278
82
196
166
47
119
112
35
77

469
233
236
294
156
138
175
77
98

2
1
1
2
1
1
~

15
4
11
9
2

236
57
179
139
32
107
_97
25
72

377
160
217
230
104
126
147
56
91

15
4
11
9
2

-

■
-

"
■
■
■
"
"

Exempt employees, excluding
upper management
All industries surveyed------------------------------------Units with 250-999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or more----------Manufacturing industries----------------------------------Units with 250-999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or more----------Nonmanufacturing industries----------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees--------- ----------—
Units with 1, 000 employees or more

-

1

"

Upper management
All industries surveyed------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore----------Manufacturing industries----------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or m ore----------Nonmanufacturing industries---------------------------- Units with 250-999 employeesUnits with 1,000 employees or more-----------

See footnote at end of table.




7
7

2
5

7
7
2
5

7
6
2
4

7
6
2
4

Table 39. Selected Private W elfare Plans1— Continued
(Number of units with the indicated types of plans, 1963)
Major medical benefits for—
Employee group, industry, and
size of reporting unit

Current employees
With

With­
out

473
172
301
266
101
165
207
71
136

276
144
132
196
103
93
80
41
39

516
191
325
302
116
186
214
75
139

231
124
107
158
87
71
73
37
36

436
135
301
253

No
infor­
mation

177
82
95
116
56
60
61
26
35

Current employees'
dependents
With

With­
out

No
infor­
mation

Retired employees'
dependents

Retired employees
With

With­
out

No
infor­
mation

With

With­
out

606
272
334
400
186
214
206
86
120

No
infor­
mation

auu
accident insurance

With

With­
out

380
158
222
280
117
163
100
41
59

368
157
211
182
87
95
186
70
116

reusiun ur
retirement benefits

No
infor­
mation

With

With­
out

No
infor­
mation

Nonexempt employees
All industries surveyed------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or more_______
Manufacturing industries - — — ---------Units with 250—
999 employees------------- -----Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore---------Nonmanufacturing industries__________________
Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore----------

_

401
135
266
229
80
149
172
55
117

348
181
167
233
124
109
115
57
58

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

436
150
286
260
92
168
176
58
118

311
165
146
200
111
89
111
54
57

15
4
11
9
2
7
6
2
4

373
108
265
222
66
156
151
42
109

240
109
131
147
70
77
93
39
54

-

_
-

_

_

.

167
53
114
73
22
51
94
31
63

582
263
319
389
182
207
193
81
112

-

143
44
99
62
18
44
81
26
55

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

173
53
120
78
22
56
95
31
64

574
262
312
382
181
201
192
81
111

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

149
44
105
67
18
49
82
26
56

598
271
327
393
185
208
205
86
119

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

353
148
205
260
111
149
93
37
56

393
166
227
200
92
108
193
74
119

15
4
11
9
2

151
36
115
66
13
53
85
23
62

462
181
281
303
123
180
159
58
101

15
4
11
9
2

130
30
100
56
10
46
74
20
54

483
187
296
313
126
187
170
61
109

15
4
11
9
2

298
111
187
216
81
135
82
30
52

314
105
209
153
55
98
161
50
111

-

_
-

-

-

-

_

662
260
402
415
166
249
247
94
153

87
56
31
47
38
9
40
18
22

3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1

674
266
408
418
169
249
256
97
159

73
49
24
42
34
8
31
15
16

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

16
5
11
9
2

569
192
377
346
121
225
223
71
152

44
25
19
23
15
8
21
10
11

15
4
11
9
2

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

-

Exempt employees, excluding
upper management
A ll industries surveyed------- - — ------------ Units with 250—
999 employees— — ------- Unit8 with 1, 000 employees or more----------Manufacturing industries----------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore----------Nonmanufacturing industries---------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore----------Upper management
A ll industries surveyed------------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore----------Manufacturing industries---------------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore----------Nonmanufacturing industries--------------------— — .
Units with 250-999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore-------

80
173
183
55
128

7
6
2
4

7
6
2
4

7
6
2
4

7
7
3
4

7
6
2
4

1 Includes only plans providing for company contributions for benefits.
NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




•>1
01

>1

Tabic 40. Employee Coverage o f Plans for Life Insurance, Accidental Death and
Dismemberment Insurance, or Death Benefits1

0)

(Number of units in which plans covered the indicated percent of employees, 1963)

Employee group, industry, and
size of reporting unit

A ll units
reporting
plans

Plans
Employee
covering
coverage
90 percent
not
or more of
reported
employees

Plans covering less than 90 percent of employees
Total

Percent
not
known

75
and under
90
percent

50

25

75

50

Under
25

Nonexempt employees
A ll industries surveyed— --- ---------------------- ------Units with 250-999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employee* or m ore..___
Manufacturing industries _________ _________
Units with 250—
999 employees_________ _____
Units with 1,000 employees or more. ____
Nonmanufacturing industries_____________ _— —
Units with 250—
999 employees
----------------Units with 1,000 employees or more______

1

727
301
426
448
192
256
279
109
170

3
1
2
2
1
1
1
1

677
274
403
428
179
249
249
95
154

47
26
21
18
12
6
29
14
15

722
300
422
446
191
255
276
109
167

4
1
3
2
1
1
2
2

701
292
409
437
186
251
264
106
158

17
7
10
7
4
3
10
3
7

593
207
386
360
129
231
233
78
155

4

584
207
377
357
129
228
227
78
149

5

.

-

4
1
1
3
3

-

-

1
-

1
1

20
8
12
4
2
2
16
6
10

20
14
6
12
10
2
8
4
4

3
2
1
1
1
2
2
“

3
2
1
1
1
2
2
-

8
2
6
2
1
1
6
1
5

4
3
1
3
3
1
1

3
1
2
2
2
1
1

1
1
1
1

Exempt employees, excluding
upper management
A ll industries surveyed________________________
Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or more______
Manufacturing industries_______ . . . ------------— ~
Units with 250—
999 employees .
---- —
Units with 1,000 employees or more.
Nonmanufacturing industries
________
Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or m ore.____ _

1
-

1
1
1

Upper management
A ll industries surveyed -------------- ------------------Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or m ore. __ __
Manufacturing industries _ _ _________ __ __
Units with 250—
999 employees . ____ __
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______
Nonmanufacturing industries---------------------------Units with 250—
999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or more___ __

-

1 Includes only plans providing for company contributions for benefits.
NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




5
2
2
3
3

-

4

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

4
1
1
3
3

-

1
1
1
-

Table 41. Employee Coverage o f Plans for Hospitalization, Medical, or Surgical Benefits
(Excluding Major Medical Benefits)1
(Number of units in which plans covered the indicated percent of employees, 1963)

Employee group, industry, and
size of reporting unit

All units
reporting
plans

Plans
Employee
covering
coverage
90 percent
not
or more of
reported
employees

Plans covering less than 90 percent of employees
75
Percent
25
50
and under
Under
not
Total
90
25
known
75
50
percent

Nonexempt employees
All industries surveyed _
.
------ _ ----Units with 250-999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or more_______
_______
—
Manufacturing industries
.
Units with 250-999 employees______________
Units with 1,000 employees or more_______
Nonmanufacturing industries---------------------------Units with 250-999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or more

691
282
409
437
190
247
254
92
162

4
1
3
2
1
1
2
2

647
262
385
426
183
243
221
79
142

40
19
21
9
6
3
31
13
18

683
278
405
435
187
248
248
91
157

5
1
4
2
1
1
3

661
269
392
429
183
246
232
86
146

17
8
9
4
3
1
13
5
8

557
188
369
354
128
226
203
60
143

4

549
186
363
352
127
225
197
59
138

4
2
2
1
1

2
1
1
1
-

1
1
1
"

25
11
14
5
4
1
20
7
13

9
4
5
2
2

3
2
1
1

1
1

-

-

1
2
2
-

-

10
4
6
2
1
1
8
3
5

3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1

3
1
2
1
1

1
1

7
2
5

-

1
1
-

Exempt employees, excluding
upper management
All industries surveyed
Units with 250-999 employees
Units with 1,000 employees or m ore.
Manufacturing industries
_ . -----Units with 250-999 employees
Units with 1,000 employees or more----------Nonmanufacturing industries-------- -— —---- ------Units with 250-999 employees
_ —
Units with 1,000 employees or more

-

3

1
-

1
-

1
-

1

2
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
-

1

1
1
-

-

Upper management
A ll industries surveyed
Units with 250-999 employees
_
-----Units with 1,000 employees or more
Manufacturing industries___ _____ ____ _____ —
Units with 250-999 employees
Units with 1,000 employees or more----------Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250-999 employees---------------------Units with 1,000 employees or more----------

-

4
1
-

1
3
-

3

1 Includes only plans providing for company contributions for benefits.
NOTE:




See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.

-

3
1
2

_
-

-

2
-

2

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

Table 42. Employee Coverage o f Plans for M ajor Medical B en efits1
(Number of units in which plans covered the indicated percent of employees, 1963)

Employee group, industry, and
size of reporting unit

All units
reporting
plans

Plans
Employee
covering
coverage
90 percent
not
or more of
reported
employees

Plans covering less than 90 percent of employees
Total

Percent
not
known

75
and under
90
percent

50

25

75

50

Under
25

Nonexempt employees
All industries surveyed ......................—
................. Units with 250-999 employees--------- — . . . . . .
Units with 1, 000 employees or more---------Manufacturing industries------------- ------------ -------Units with 250-999 employees-------------------—
Units with 1, 000 employees or more---- — —
Nonmanufacturing industries.............—........ — —
Units with 25O -999 employees-................... —
h

473
172
301
266
101
165
207
71
136

3
-

3
3
3
-

-

429
155
274
248
96
152
181
59
122

41
17
24
15
5
10
26
12
14

-

494
183
311
292
112
180
202
71
131

20
8
12
8
4
4
12
4
8

2
1
1
1

428
134
294
250
79
171
178
55
123

6
1
5
1
1
5
5

-

25
13
12
6
3
3
19
10
9

11
3
8
5
1
4
6
2
4

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

3
3
2
2
1
1

12
4
8
3
2
1
9
2
7

2
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1

3
1
2
2
2
1
1
"

Exempt employees, excludins
upper manaeement
Units with 250-999 employees—
Units with 250-999 employees---------------------Units with 1, 000 employees or m ore-—
___ Nonmanufacturing industries —— — — — — —
Units with 250-999 employees— —........... —

516
191
325
302
116
186
214
75
139

2
-

2
2
2
*

1
1
1
-

1
1

Upper manaeement
Units with 250-999 employees— ......
Units with 1, 000 employees or more— —
Units with 1, 000 employees or more—
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250-999 employees—

436
135
301
253
80
173
183
55
128

2
2
2
2
-

Includes only plans providing for company contributions for benefits.
NOTE:




See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.

-

6
1
5
1
1
5
5

-

-

-

-

Table 43. Employee Coverage o f Plans for Sickness and Accident Insurance1
(Number of units in which plans covered the indicated percent of employees, 1963)

Employee group, industry, and
size of reporting unit

reporting
plans

Plans
Employee
covering
coverage
90 percent
not
or more of
reported employees

Plans covering less than 90 percent of employees
Total

Percent
not
known

75
and under
90
percent

50

25

75

50

Under
25

Nonexempt employees
-----------A ll industries surveyed----- — ------------—
Units with 250-999 employees
—
Units with 1, 000 employees or more.............
Manufacturing industries----- ---------------------------Units with 250-999 employees--------- -------- —
Units with 1, 000 employees or more-— ---Nonmanufacturing industries — ........................ .
Units with 250-999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more----------

380
158
222
280
117
163
100
41
59

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

361
149
212
268
113
155
93
36
57

17
8
9
10
3
7
7
5
2

3
2
1
3
2
1

3
3
3
3
-

4
2
2
4
2
2
“

4
3
1
2
1
1
2
2
“

3
1
2
1
1
2
1
1

353
148
205
260
111
149
93
37
56

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

341
143
198
250
107
143
91
36
55

10
4
6
8
3
5
2
1
1

2
2
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2

2
2

-

2
2
-

3
1
2
3
1
2
-

1
1
1
1

298
111
187
216
81
135
82
30
52

2

292
110
182
212
81
131
80
29
51

4
1
3
3
3
1
1

1
1
1
1

2

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
-

-

1
1
1
-

-

Exempt employees, excluding
upper management
All industries surveyed------------------------- -------—
Units with 250-999 employees— ..............
.....
Units with 1, 000 employees or more_______
Manufacturing industries
Units with 250-999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more----------

-

-

Upper management
All industries surveyed
Units with 250-999 employees—......... .............
Units with 1, 000 employees or more---------Manufacturing industries---- ---------------------------Units with 250-999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more-........—
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 250—
999 employees
Units with 1, 000 employees or more

-

2
1
1
1
1

1 Includes only plans providing for company contributions for benefits.
NOTE:




See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.

Table 44. Employee Coverage of Plans for Pension or Retirement Benefits1
(Number of units in which plans covered the indicated percent of em p loyees, 1963)

Em ployee group, industry, and
s iz e of reporting unit

A ll units
reporting
plans

P lans
Em ployee
covering
coverage
90 percent
not
or m ore of
reported
em ployees

P lans covering le ss than 90 percent of em ployees

Total

P ercen t
not
known

75
and under
90
percent

50

25

75

50

Under
25

Nonexempt em ployees
____
A ll industries surveyed __ __ ______
Units with 250—
999 em ployees—
__
Units with 1 .0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
Manufacturing in d u strie s_______________ ________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees_______________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore_______
Nonmanufacturing industries
.
.
Units with 250—
999 em ployees_______________
Units with 1 .0 0 0 em ployees or m ore _

662
260
402
415
166
249
247
94
153

8

478
175
303
334
129
205
144
46
98

176
80
96
75
33
42

13
9
4

101

11

47
54

7
4

1
2

77
27
50
48
19
29
29

9
3

3
3
3

588
235
353
364
147
217
224

88
136

8
21

5
3

6
4

2
2
1
1

2
2

_

33
17
16
16
9
7
17

45

11
20

8

21

9

9

24

11

32
9
23
24
9
15

25

79
33
46
34

12
22

36
14

15
7

22
16

8

5

7
5

2
8
2
6

Exem pt em ployees, excluding
upper management
A ll in du stries surveyed
...
Units with 250—
999 em ployees_______________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re_______
Manufacturing in d u strie s________________________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees-______________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re——____
Nonmanufacturing in d u strie s____________________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re_______

674
266
408
418
169
249
256
97
159

9
4
5

6

6

5

8

14
16
7
9
9
4
5

9
4
5

5

2

6

3
4

3
3

3
3
3

2
2
1

1
2
1

1
2

1

1

3

2
1
6
1

8

4

11
4

2
2
2

7
4
3
3

1
2
4
3

2

1

4

3

1

2
1
1
1

2
2

Upper management
A l l industries surveyed
___________
_ _
Units with 250—
999 em ployees.
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re_______
Manufacturing industries _______
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
__ _
Units with 1 .0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing in d u strie s____________________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees_______________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o re_______

569
192
377
346

6
2
4
5

121

1

225
223
71
152

4

1
1

540
179
361
327
113
214
213

66
147

1 Includes only plans providing for company contributions for benefits.

NOTE: See appendixes for survey coverage and definitions.




23

11
12
14
7
7
9
4
5

2
1
1

2
2

Table 45. Miscellaneous Practices
(Number of units with the indicated p ra ctic es,

Em ployee group, in du stry, and
siz e of reporting unit

A ll
units

Pay for travel tim e on company busin ess
outside of regular working hours
With

Without

No
inform ation

1963)

Moving expense reim bu rsem ent
With

Without

No
inform ation

Pay for travel and transportation
to fir st job
With

Without

No
information

584

7

Nonexempt em ployees
A ll industries su r v e y e d ____ ______________________
Units with 250—
999 e m p lo y ee s______
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Manufacturing in du stries
_ __
_____
Units with 250—
999 em p lo y ee s-----------------------Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing in d u s tr ie s ____________________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 .0 0 0 em ployees o r m o r e _ _

749
316
433
462
204
258
287

112
175

316

101
215
213
73
140
103
28
75

429
214
215
247
131
116
182
83
99

4

1
3

2
_

2
2
1
1

354
107
247
229
71
158
125
36
89

394
209
185
232
133
99
162
76

86

-

533
185
348
353

212

4

129
83
107
77
30
105
52
53

2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1

1
1
1

_

1
_

158
53
105
127
45
82
31

261

2
5
4

23

323
331
158
173
253
103
150

358
125
233
268
95
173
90
30
60

382
188
194
188
107
81
194
81
113

9
3

313
89
224
228

292
127
165
135
69

23
5
18
15
3

66

12
8
2
6

8

1
3
3

1
2

E xem pt em p loyee s, excluding
upper m anagem ent
A ll industries s u r v e y e d .
. ________ ____
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Manufacturing in du stries
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e .
Nonmanufacturing in d u s tr ie s ____________________
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p lo y ee s________________
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e . _____

749
316
433
462
204
258
287

112
175

30

6
24
19
5
14

11
1
10

711
307
404
439
197
242
272

110
162

8
3
5
4

2
2

126

1

227
180
59

3

121

19
5
14

456
133
323
294
87
207

4

6
6
2
4
3

1
2

Upper m anagem ent
A ll industries s u rv e y e d __________________________
Units with 250—
999 em ployees
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m o r e _______
Manufacturing in du stries
Units with 250— 9 em ployees
99
Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore
Nonmanufacturing industries
Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 e m p lo y e e s_________ ____
Units with 1 .0 0 0 em ployees o r m o r e .
_ .

NOTE:

628
221
407
378
138
240
250
83
167

See appendixes for su rvey coverage and definitions.




12
2
10
8
1
7
4

1
3

597
214
383
359
134
225
238
80
158

11
3

8
8
2
6

162
46
116

157
84
73
75
49
26
82
35
47

15
4

11
9

2

66

7

6
2

162
85
23

4

62

157
58
99

Table 46. Variations in Practices Among Employee Groups1
(N u m b er o f un its w ith b e n e fits f o r the in d ic a te d n u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e g r o u p s , 2 1963)
A ll reporting units
Benefit

A ll units
tabulated

None
of the
groups

Only 1
group

Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore

Units with 250—
999 em ployees

Only 2
groups

With benefits for—

With benefits for—

With benefits for—
A ll 3
groups

A ll units
tabulated

None
of the
groups

Only 1
group

Only 2
groups

A ll 3
groups

A ll units
tabulated

None
of the
groups

Only 1
group

Only 2
groups

A ll 3
groups

A ll industries surveyed
Paid v a c a tio n s______________________________________
P aid holidays________________________________________
F o r m a l sick leave plan_____________________ ____
Leave for civic resp o n sib ilitie s:
M ilita ry ______________ __________________________ _
Jury__
W itness
_ ....
... .. ___
.
V o tin g _
_
________
Other civic re sp o n sib ilitie s ___ __
P erson al leave;
F am ily e m e r g e n c ie s ___
________
__
Death in f a m ily _________________________________
Other p erso n a l le ave___________________________
L ife in suran ce, acciden tal death and
d ism em b erm e n t in suran ce, or
death benefits for—
Current e m p lo y e e s _____________________________
C urrent em p lo y ee s' dependents______________
Retired em ployees
H osp italization , m e d ic a l, or su rg ica l benefits
(excluding m a jo r m e d ic a l benefits) for—
Current e m p lo y e e s _____
_ __ _
C urrent em p lo y e e s' dependents_____
_ _
R etired em p loyee s.
R etired em p lo y e e s' d ep en dents.
M ajor m e d ic a l b en efits for—
Current e m p lo y e e s ____ ________________________
C urrent em p lo y e e s' dependents
R etired em ployees . . . __ ____ _____ ______________
R etired em p lo y ee s' dependents _ __
S ick n ess and accid en t in suran ce_________________
P en sion or retirem en t b e n e fits __________________
E xtra pay for o v e rtim e w o r k _____________________
C om p en sato ry tim e off for ov e rtim e w ork_____
P r e m iu m for n ightw ork ___________________________
E xtra pay fo r w ork on paid holidays _________
C om p en sato ry tim e o ff fo r w ork on
paid holidays —
.................. __
P a y for tra v e l tim e on com pany bu sin ess
outside o f regu lar working h ours_____
____
M oving expense r e im b u r se m e n t_______________
P a y for tra v e l and transportation
.
____
...
to f ir s t j o b ___

See footnotes at end of table.




599
608
606

153

_
37

_
18

599
608
398

213
214
213

609
612
609
611
596

227
34
171
277
198

3
4

16
29
42
19
107

363
548
392
313
279

217
217
217
216
213

605
611
597

90
29
186

81
31
70

428
548
334

216
216

613
612
610

4
3

200

592
65
398

613
613
613
613

43
132
328
376

7
9
4

613
613
613
613

6

613
596
581
589
582

171
234
462
483
285
43
.
472
282
84

161

54
130

372

572

450

40

607
611

326
152

254
11

603

284

20

612

15
540

1
2
12
6
3
7

2
4
4

1

8

3
3
26
3
389
51

71

14

-

213
214

6

122

4

67

191

57
16
123

5
3
4

49
18
49

278
358

2

2

4
3

6

385
48
284

7
40

102
88

32
13

150

190

21

124

389
395
386

207
17
114

396
395
395

7
340

188
154

396
396
396
396

18
71
181
217

6
8

6

3
-

1
1

211

90
126
281
296
188
18
284
128
29

6

28
24
5
5

272
238
107
92
183
370

1

2

554
468
279
235

217
217
217
217

25
61
147
159

1
1
1
1

3

395
335
143
293
557
11

217
217
217
217
216
217
215

9
171

122

4
16
4

213
213

81
108
181
187
97
25
188
154

64

18

208

15
150

12
298

167

132

10

121

252
367
260

-

8

2

196

2

21
12

181
132

1

122

10

3

111

21

-

5
5
8

2
1

6
15

1

98

41
36

128
13
108
170

386
394
276

1

8
200

2
1

392
395
392
395
383

_
-

12

-

217
217
215

9
4

_
23

21
63
107
77

3

8

_
82

99

33
13
63

211

386
394
393

-

1
1

68

-

57

13

123
97
36
30

102

14

3

3

211

210

366
314
178

55

40
133

44
13
16
24

187
1
3
1

396
396
396
396
396
396
381
369
376
369

239

5
152
41
114
98

171

6

19

12

364

279

34

45

6

216
217

131
82

80
3

3
57

2

195
70

174

12

10

75

391
394

8

93

223

215

123

5

52

35

388

161

15

115

97

212

10

12
5

110

8

3
3
17
3
218
41

121

8

11
3
13
3

Table 46. Variations in Practices Among Employee Groups1--- Continued
(Number of units with benefits for the indicated number of em ployee grou ps, 2 1963)
A ll reporting units
Benefit

Units with 2 5 0 -9 9 9 em ployees

With benefits fo r —
A ll units
tabulated

None
of the
groups

Only 1
group

Only 2
groups

Units with 1 ,0 0 0 em ployees or m ore

With benefits fo r —
A ll 3
groups

A ll units
tabulated

None
of the
groups

Only 1
group

Only 2
groups

With benefits for—
A ll 3
groups

A lj units
tabulated

None
of the
groups

Only 1
group

Only 2
groups

A ll 3
groups

Manufacturing industries
Paid vacations _.
—
___ ____ _____ __ ______
Paid h olid ays____________ ___________________________
F o rm a l sick leave plan___________ — _________ ___
Leave for civic resp o n sib ilitie s:
------ ------ _ . - _ — ______ _ _____
M ilita ry
J u r y --------------------------------------------------------------------W itn ess _
_
______________
____ _______
VOting ______ . . . . . . . . . -■ ................... rT......-,r.-..l ___
Other civic resp on sib ilitie s
__ . . . . . . . .
P erson al leave:
F a m ily em erge n c ies _
___ ____
__
Death in fa m ily
------- ------ ------ ----Other p erson al le a v e____________ ________ __ __
Life in su ran ce, accidental death and
d ism em b erm en t in suran ce, or
death ben efits fo r —
C urrent em ployees _
.
. . . __ _
C urrent e m p lo y ee s1 d ep en den ts..____________
R etired em p loyee s— — ---------- ------------------------H osp italization , m e d ic a l, or su rgical benefits
(excluding m a jo r m e d ical benefits) fo r —
Current e m p lo y e e s __ __
. . . __ ______
Current em p lo y ee s' dependents--------------------Retired em p lo y ee s____ . . . ------ -- -------------------------------Retired em p lo y ee s' dependents _
M ajor m ed ical benefits fo r —
C urrent e m p lo y e e s _______________ _________ ___
C urrent em p lo y ee s' dependents__ _
..
_
R etired em p lo y ee s____ ________ _ ___ _____ __ ___
R etired e m p loyee s' dependents
_
S ickn ess and accident in su ran ce .
_____ _____
Pension or retirem en t b e n e fits ____ _________ ___
E xtra pay fo r ove rtim e w o r k ___ ____ _______ ____
C om p en satory tim e off for overtim e w ork_____
P rem iu m fo r nightwork ____ . . .
. . .
E xtra pay for w ork on paid h o lid a y s.
________
C om pensatory tim e off for work on
paid h o lid a y s. —
. . . .
. . . . .
Pay for tra vel tim e on company business
outside of regular working h o u r s .
________
Moving expense reim bu rsem ent
Pay for tra v el and transportation
to f ir s t j o b ___
_.
____
_ ...

365
368
364

.

_

99

22

367
368
366
367
357

138
19
117
172
114

363
367
359

47
14
106

7

369
369
367

8
318
123

369
369
369
369
369
369
369
369
369
369
359
345
351
348

_
9

365
368
234

134
136
133

.
46

13
19
33
14
76

214
329
179
160

136
136
136
135
133

64
14
43
74
47

_
4

54
24
38

259
329
208

135
135
132

18

1

6
40

3

-

1

1
1

3
3

360
47
240

136
136
134

123
63

14
59
205
229

1
1
2
1

2
2
1

351
307
160
138

136
136
136
136

28
97
103

116
147
303
313
133

1
1
1
1

222

11
2
11
1

136
136
136
136
136
136
136
133
135
135

-

2
1
4

2
7
3
-

3

212

22

-

-

210

291
154
50

24
94
218

30
27
4
4
4
4
138
28
92
79

342

265

25

41

11

133

367
368

179
74

171

8

2

9
104

188

135
136

362

129

11

119

103

135

19

194
61
51
213
343

6

8

56
70
123

.

.

11

2

134
136
74

231
232
231

.
53

1

5
13
17
5
31

66
109
75
56
51

231
232
230
232
224

74
5
74
98
67

94
118
80

228
232
227

29

2

8
* 66

.
4

.

1

22
11
9

1
1

8
6

220

3

16
9
45

137
123
109

32
13
29

211

2
3

1

129
13

_

.
3

68

195
60

1

2

233
233
233

2

-

1

-

1

-

-

1

128
108
37
32

233
233
233
233

31
108
126

1
1
1

3

1
1

71
58
13

233
233
233
233
233
233
223

212

_
.
-

9

8

6

60

-

1
1
1
1

2
1
1
21

148

165
128

231
34
172

223
199
123
106
151
136
48
41
133
224

216
213

77
180
187
83
7
.
168
53
16

7

209

153

21

31

4

1

104
26

115

49

232
232

1

6
66

7
139

29

227

63

7

83

74

6
.

2

100

36

80
119
.

3

6

1

101

21

34

84

13
17

_
-

112

4

10

75
48

56

1

3
38

66

4

36

50
15
123

231
232
160

-

.
-

126

.
7

.

11

10

13
.

19
4
4
4

21

2
102
22

73
134

79
62

no

11
1
11
l

See footnotes at end of table.




8

Table 46. Variations in Practices Among Employee Groups1— Continued
(N u m b er o f units w ith b e n e fits f o r the in d ic a te d n u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e g r o u p s , 2 1963)

A l l units
ta bu lated

N on e
o f the
g ro u p s

O nly 1
g rou p

Only 2
g ro u p s

W ith b e n e fit s f o r —

W ith b e n e fit s f o r —

W ith b e n e fits f o r —

B e n e fit

U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e

U n its w ith 250—
999 e m p lo y e e s

A l l r e p o r tin g units

A ll 3
g ro u p s

A l l u n its
ta b u la ted

N on e
o f the
g ro u p s

O n ly 1
g ro u p

O n ly 2
g ro u p s

A ll 3
grou p s

A l l u nits
ta b u la ted

N on e
o f the
grou p s

O n ly 1
g ro u p

O n ly 2
g ro u p s

A ll 3
grou p s

N on m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s
P a id v a c a t i o n s ______________________________________
P a i d h o lid a y s _______________________________________
F o r m a l s i c k le a v e p la n ___________________ _______
L e a v e f o r c i v i c r e s p o n s i b il it ie s :
M i li t a r y ______________________ __________________

V o t i n g _____________________________________ _____
O th er c i v i c r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s __________________
P e r s o n a l le a v e :
F a m ily e m e r g e n c i e s ___________________________
D ea th in fa m il y „ _____________________________
O th e r p e r s o n a l le a v e ___________________________
L if e in s u r a n c e , a c c i d e n t a l d ea th and
d is m e m b e r m e n t in s u r a n c e , o r
dea th b e n e fit s f o r —
C u r r e n t e m p l o y e e s ------------------------------------------C u r r e n t e m p l o y e e s ' d e p e n d e n t s --------------------R e t i r e d e m p l o y e e s -------------- --------------------------H o s p ita liz a t io n , m e d i c a l, o r s u r g i c a l b e n e fit s
(e x c lu d in g m a jo r m e d i c a l b e n e fit s ) f o r —
C u r r e n t e m p l o y e e s ------------------------------------------C u r r e n t e m p l o y e e s ' d e p e n d e n t s --------------------R e t i r e d e m p l o y e e s --------------------------------------------R e t ir e d e m p l o y e e s ' d e p e n d e n t s --------------------M a jo r m e d i c a l b e n e fit s f o r —
C u r r e n t e m p l o y e e s ------------------------------------------C u r r e n t e m p l o y e e s ' d e p e n d e n t s ______________
R e t i r e d e m p l o y e e s .. --------------------------------------R e t i r e d e m p l o y e e s ' d e p e n d e n t s --------------------S ic k n e s s a n d a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e _________________
P e n s io n o r r e t i r e m e n t b e n e f i t s __________________
E x tra p a y fo r o v e r t i m e w o r k ____________________
C o m p e n s a t o r y t im e o f f f o r o v e r t i m e w o r k -------P r e m iu m f o r n ig h t w o r k ----------------------------------------E x tra p a y f o r w o r k on p a id h o l id a y s ------------------C o m p e n s a t o r y tim e o f f f o r w o r k on
p a id h o l i d a y s ______________________________________
P a y f o r t r a v e l t im e on c o m p a n y b u s in e s s
o u t s id e o f r e g u la r w o r k in g h o u r s --------------------M o v in g e x p e n s e r e i m b u r s e m e n t -------------------------P a y f o r t r a v e l and t r a n s p o r t a t io n
to f i r s t j o b ________________________________________

79
78
80

_

_

9

234
240
164

25

3

4

79
78
48

155
162
162

29

_
12

_
5

155
162
116

1
_
_
_
5

3
10
9
5
31

149
219
180
134
119

81
81
81
81
80

35
7
20
33
30

4

1
2
4
2
9

45
72
57
46
37

161
163
162
163
159

54
8
34
72
54

1
1

2
8
5
3
22

104
147
123
88
82

43
15
80

3
3
-

27
7
32

169
219
126

81
81
79

15
7
23

-

10
2
12

56
72
44

161
163
159

28
8
57

3
3
-

17
5
20

113
147
82

244
243
243

7
222
77

2
3
3

3
5

232
18
158

81
81
81

2
77
35

-

1
-

78
4
46

163
162
162

5
145
42

2
3
3

2
5

154
14
11 z

244
244
244
244

29
73
123
147

6
8
2
-

6
2
-

203
161
119
97

81
81
81
81

17
33
50
56

1
1
-

3
1
-

60
46
31
25

163
163
163
163

12
40
73
91

5
7
2
-

3
1
-

143
115
88
72

244
244
244
244
243
244
237
236
238
234

55
87
159
170
152
21
181
128
34

5
7
2
2
7
3
179
27
67
154

11
9
1
1
4
6
58
26
38
43

173
141
82
71
80
214
2
5
3

81
81
81
81
80
81
79
79
78
78

25
38
58
61
47
10
65
53
21

3
71
7
19
49

4
4
3
8
7
3
7

52
39
23
20
30
68
3
1

163
163
163
163
163
163
158
157
160
156

30
49
101
109
105
11
116
75
13

5
7
2
2
4
3
108
20
48
105

7
5
1
1
4
3
50
19
35
36

121
102
59
51
50
146
2
2
2

230

185

15

23

7

75

59

2

9

5

155

126

13

14

2

159
162

91
44

59
7

6
27

3
84

161

98

8

32

23

234
240
242

54

15

242
244
243
244
239

89
15
54
105
84

242
244
238

.

240
243

147
78

83
9

6
46

4
110

81
81

56
34

24
2

19

1
26

241

155

9

48

29

80

57

1

16

6

1 N o n e x e m p t e m p l o y e e s ; e x e m p t e m p l o y e e s , e x clu d in g u p p e r m a n ag em en t; and u p p e r m a n a g e m e n t e m p lo y e e s .
2 T a b u la tio n s c o v e r o n ly u n its w ith e m p lo y e e s in e a ch o f the g ro u p s and w h ich r e p o r t e d in fo r m a t io n fo r e a c h g r o u p .
w a s n ot r e p o r t e d f o r e a c h b e n e fit .
NOTE:

S e e a p p e n d ix e s f o r




s u r v e y c o v e r a g e and d e fin it io n s .

_

T h e n u m b e r o f units ta b u la te d v a r ie s b y b e n e fit b e c a u s e fu ll in fo r m a t io n

Table 47. Variations in Vacation and Holiday Practices Among Employee Groups1
(N u m b er o f units w ith u n ifo r m p r a c t ic e s f o r a ll t h re e e m p lo y e e g r o u p s , 2 1963)
V a c a t io n s c h e d u le s
In d u s try and s iz e o f re p o rtin g unit

A ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d --------------------------------------U nits w ith 250—
999 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
M a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r i e s ________________________
Units w ith 250 —
999 e m p l o y e e s .______________
U n its w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ____________________
U nits w ith 2 50 —
999 e m p l o y e e s _______________
U nits w ith 1 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e _______

A ll units
ta bu lated

599
213
386
365
134
231
234
79
155

U n ifo r m

443
165
278
302
116
186
141
49
92

N u m b er o f h o lid a y s
N ot u n ifo r m

156
48
108
63
18
45
93
30
63

A ll units
ta bu lated

U n ifo r m

N ot u n ifo r m

608
214
394
368
136
232
240
78
162

600
210
390
363
133
230
237
77
160

8
4
4
5
3
2
3
1
2

1 N o n e x e m p t e m p lo y e e s ; e x e m p t e m p lo y e e s , e x clu d in g u p p er m a n a g e m e n t; and u p p e r m a n a g em en t e m p lo y e e s .
2 T a b u la tio n s c o v e r on ly units with p la n s , w h ich had e m p lo y e e s in e a ch o f the th re e g ro u p s, and r e p o r t e d in fo r m a t io n f o r e a ch g ro u p .
NOTE:




S ee a p p en d ix es fo r s u r v e y c o v e r a g e

and d e fin it io n s .

00
01

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope

of S u rvey

p lo y e r s

T h is s tu d y o f s u p p l e m e n t a r y c o m p e n s a t io n e x p e n d it u r e s and p r a c t i c e s c o v e r e d e m ­
in a b r o a d s e g m e n t o f A m e r i c a n in d u s t r y .
T h e f o llo w in g i n d u s t r i e s w e r e in c lu d e d :
Industry

SIC C o d e 24*

Manufacturing
-----------------------------------------------------------Transportation,
com m unication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services--------------------------------------------Wholesale t r a d e -------- ---------------------------------------------------Retail trade ------------------------------------------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e -----------------------------Research, developm ent, and testing laboratories----------Engineering and architectural s e r v ic e s ---------------------------

19-39 inclusive
40, 411, 441, 442, 45, 48, and 49
50
52-59 inclusive
60-67 inclusive
7391
891

W it h in t h e s e i n d u s t r i e s , c o v e r a g e e x te n d e d to e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g 2 5 0 e m p l o y e e s o r m o r e
a t th e t i m e o f r e f e r e n c e o f the u n i v e r s e d a ta , and lo c a t e d in S ta n d a r d M e t r o p o li t a n S t a t i s t i c a l
A r e a s 26 in th e 5 0 S ta t e s an d th e D i s t r i c t o f C o lu m b ia .
S a m p lin g

P roced u re

I n i t i a l l y , i t w a s p la n n e d to c o n d u c t th is s u r v e y o n the b a s i s o f a h ig h ly s t r a t i f i e d
p r o b a b ilit y s a m p le .
P r i m a r i l y th r o u g h th e u s e o f l i s t s m a in t a in e d b y S ta te a g e n c i e s a d m in ­
i s t e r i n g u n e m p lo y m e n t c o m p e n s a t io n l a w s , a s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w a s s e l e c t e d in a c ­
c o r d a n c e w ith i n d u s t r y , l o c a t i o n , and s i z e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s .
T h is s a m p l e c o n ta in e d a p p r o x i ­
m a te ly 1 ,2 0 0 e s ta b lis h m e n ts .
C o l l e c t i o n o f D a ta
B u r e a u e c o n o m i s t s v i s i t e d e a c h e m p l o y e r in c lu d e d in the s a m p l e .
In s o m e i n s t a n c e s ,
th e d e s i r e d i n f o r m a t io n w a s o b ta in e d a t t h e s e v i s i t s .
H o w e v e r , in m o s t c a s e s , a l l o r p a r t
o f th e r e q u e s t e d d a ta w e r e n o t r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e .
C o n s e q u e n t ly , the B u r e a u r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s
o f t e n e x p la in e d w h a t w a s s o u g h t, a t t i m e s s u g g e s t in g e s t i m a t i o n te c h n iq u e s w h e r e a c c o u n tin g
r e c o r d s w e r e n o t m a in t a in e d , an d c o m p a n y o f f i c i a l s s u b s e q u e n t ly c o m p i le d the i n f o r m a t io n .
U p o n r e c e i p t b y th e B u r e a u , q u e s t io n n a ir e s w e r e r e v i e w e d f o r c o m p l e t e n e s s and r e a s o n a b l e ­
n ess.
O n o c c a s i o n , c o m p a n ie s w e r e r e c o n t a c t e d to c l a r i f y q u e s t io n a b le e n t r i e s .
R e p o r t in g

P r o b le m s

S o m e c o m p a n ie s w e r e u n w illin g to s u p p ly the in f o r m a t io n r e q u e s t e d , and o t h e r s w e r e
p r e c l u d e d f r o m p a r t ic ip a t in g in th e s u r v e y b y a l a c k o f a p p r o p r ia t e r e c o r d s .
M oreover, b e ­
c a u s e o f th e n a t u r e o f t h e ir a c c o u n tin g r e c o r d s , m a n y o f the m u l t i e s t a b l i s h m e n t c o m p a n ie s
w e r e u n a b le to f u r n i s h d a ta f o r in d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , a s r e q u e s t e d , and i n s t e a d , f u r ­
n is h e d c o m p a n y - o r d i v i s i o n -w i d e d a ta .
S u c h r e p o r t s w e r e a c c e p t e d e v e n th o u g h th e y m a y
h a v e in c lu d e d d a ta f o r u n its w ith l e s s th a n 2 5 0 e m p l o y e e s o r f o r o n e s l o c a t e d o u t s id e m e t ­
r o p o lit a n a r e a s .
(S in c e th e e x p e n d it u r e d a ta w e r e p r e s e n t e d a s r a t i o s , th e l i m i t e d in c l u s io n
o f u n its o u t s id e th e s u r v e y 's s c o p e h a d no a p p r e c ia b l e e f f e c t o n th e t a b u la t io n s . ) In a fe w
i n s t a n c e s , c o m p a n ie s c o u ld p r o v id e in f o r m a t io n o n ly f o r f i s c a l y e a r s e n d in g o n o t h e r th a n
D e ce m b e r 31, 1963.
H e r e t o o , the c o m p a n y r e p o r t s w e r e a c c e p t e d an d the d i s c r e p a n c y
w a s ig n o r e d .
In t o t a l, 7 5 2 u s a b le r e p o r t s w e r e r e c e i v e d , s o m e f o r s i n g l e - u n i t c o m p a n i e s , o t h e r s
f o r in d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o f l a r g e r f i r m s , an d s t i l l o t h e r s f o r the t o t a l o p e r a t io n s o r
d iv is io n s o f m u ltie s ta b lis h m e n t c o m p a n ie s .
O f th is n u m b e r , 7 2 1 p r o v i d e d e x p e n d it u r e d a ta
( P a r t I o f th e q u e s t io n n a ir e ) an d 7 4 8 c o n ta in e d i n f o r m a t io n o n p r a c t i c e s ( P a r t II o f the
q u e s t i o n n a i r e ) . 27

24
26
26
27

Based upon the 1957 edition o f the Standard Industrial Classification Manual, prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Limited to railroad, loca l and suburban passenger, deep-sea water (foreign and dom estic), and air transportation industries.
A great m ajority o f the Federal Government's w hite-collar em ployees are in metropolitan areas.
The questionnaire is reproduced in appendix C .




86

87

However, a number of the reports did not provide information for each item or em ­
ployee group. In some instances, it was possible for Bureau personnel to make reasonable
estimates of missing item s. For example, estimates were made of holiday pay expenditures
if information was available on number of paid holidays, employment, and average hourly
earnings. Estimates of this type were based upon the same techniques which many respond­
ents themselves used in arriving at expenditure figures.
Tabulating Procedures
Considering the size and nature of the response, it was not possible to weight r e ­
ports obtained to statistically represent the universe from which a sample was selected.
Consequently, tabulations pertain only to the specific units which furnished data.
In p re­
paring these tabulations, equal weight was given to each report, regardless of industry,
size, or location. Nevertheless, size had some influence because more large units (those
with 1, 000 employees or more) were included than small ones (those with 250—
999 employees).
A lso, a greater number of reports were obtained from manufacturing industries than from
nonmanufacturing industries.
The first step in summarizing expenditures for each supplementary compensation
item or group of items was to express the expenditure in a given reporting unit as a p er­
cent of that unit’ s expenditures for basic salaries.
The average expenditure for an item
(in percentage term s) was then obtained by computing a simple average of the percents in
each of the reporting units.
Two sets of averages were derived. One was limited to units with expenditures for
an item, and was obtained by averaging the percents in units reporting a dollar expenditure
figure for the item under study.
The second set of averages included units which had no
expenditures for the item, and in computing these averages such units were treated as having
zero expenditures.
Some units reported they had expenditures for an item, but did not
show the dollar amount. These reports were excluded from the first set of averages. How­
ever, they were included in the second to avoid biasing the result, and they were included
on the assumption they had outlays as percents of basic salaries equal to the average in
units reporting the amount of expenditures. The number of units for which such an assump­
tion was made is shown in the detail tables.
In computing average outlays for groups of item s, the only reports used were those
containing dollar amounts (or stating there were no expenditures) for all components. Re­
ports giving data for only some of the components were used in computing averages for those
item s, but not the group total.
Therefore, expenditures included in deriving averages for
individual items may not have been used in computing averages for groups of items. As a
result, the sum of the averages presented for the components need not equal the group total,
although normally the difference is slight.
Apart from this factor, averages derived for
reporting units with expenditures are not additive since the averages may be based upon dif­
ferent groups of reports.
As previously described, many— but not all— of the reports received from multi­
unit companies were for either divisions or the entire firm instead of for those individual
establishments which were included in the sample. Such discrepancies were ignored in the
tabulations. Each completed questionnaire was utilized without regard to its coverage.
For
this reason, the analysis is in terms of reporting units, rather than establishments or
companies.
A number of the reports received were not complete for all items or employee
groups.
As a result, the number of reporting units varies by item and employee group.
Moreover, although all reporting units had nonexempt employees and exempt employees, ex­
cluding upper management, not all units had upper management employees.
Expenditures for supplementary compensation items were tabulated as percents of
basic salaries in order to permit meaningful comparisons among reporting units. Obviously,
simple comparisons of reporting units' absolute expenditures for supplementary compensation
could be misleading in view of the units’ differing sizes and payrolls.
However, expend­
itures expressed as a percent of basic salaries also may be misinterpreted. Some types of
supplementary compensation— such as pay for vacations, holidays, sick leave, and m isce l­
laneous leave— are parts of white-collar employees' basic salaries, while other supple­
ments— such as expenditures for hospitalization insurance and pensions— are in addition to




88

payments for basic salaries.
Therefore, not all of the figures shown represent, in p er­
cent term s, components of basic salaries, and not all represent percent additions to such
salaries.
This point is particularly relevant to a percent figure on expenditures for all
supplements combined.
Employee Coverage
This survey was designed to develop information for nonproduction employees
Part-tim e and casual employees were excluded unless they were covered by the same
plementary compensation practices as regular full-tim e employees in the reporting
This exclusion was made because the Federal G o v e r n m e n t 's practices for white-collar
ployees differentiate between the two groups.

only.
sup­
unit.
em ­

During the early stages of survey planning, there was thought of obtaining data sep­
arately by job classification, as is commonly done in salary surveys, in order to compare
expenditures and practices for individual jobs. However, it soon became evident that em ­
ployers do not keep records in this detail.
Data were therefore collected separately for
three groups: Nonexempt employees; exempt employees, excluding upper management; and
upper management employees.
Because accounting records generally are not maintained
even in this detail for legally required insurance and private welfare plan item s, only a llwhite-collar-em ployee expenditures were collected for these item s, except for figures on
separate private welfare plans for upper management employees.
The terms "nonexempt" and "exem pt" employees pertain to coverage under the over­
time provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, the former employees being subject to
the overtime provisions and the latter excluded. This basis for classification was adopted
since employers frequently maintain separate payrolls for these two groups. Upper manage­
ment employees were defined as those high-level workers (but under the senior officer level)
who were treated separately for compensation purposes or, if there was no such differen­
tiation, were earning $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 or more per year, including cash bon u ses.28 As thus defined,
the groups essentially covered, respectively, nonsupervisory workers, lower and middle
management, and upper level employees. They blanketed the broad spectrum of grade levels
in the Federal civil service.
Because a number of companies were unable to report expenditure data separately
for the two groups of exempt employees, the tabulations of employer outlays were for all
exempt employees combined, with a separate presentation of reported data for upper man­
agement employees alone. However, practice data are shown separately for the two exempt
employee groups.
Practices Studied
The expenditure data presented in this bulletin relate to selected practices involving
payments either directly to employees or their dependents or to funds, insurance companies,
or governmental units. Collection of data was limited to practices that were both m easur­
able and common in private industry generally.
For example, although paid rest periods
are common, the practice is largely informal and detailed records often are not maintained.
Consequently, measurement difficulties made it impractical to include this item in the sur­
vey.
Despite this limitation, the practices studied are believed to constitute the major
elements of supplementary compensation in private industry. Nevertheless, it must be rec­
ognized that items not surveyed may be important in some individual companies.
The outlays reported in this study do not constitute measures of employer costs
occasioned by granting supplementary compensation benefits.
For example, expenditures
shown for vacations are limited to direct payments to employees for vacation periods. P os­
sible costs of hiring replacements are not included, nor is any consideration given to the
possible effects of vacations on employee productivity. , Similarly, sick leave entails pay­
ments to employees, but not costs to the extent that employees make up their work upon
return to the job.
28
The intent o f this definition was to obtain data for private-industry em ployees com parable to Federal em ployees at grades
GS-16, 17, and 18. A more precise definition of upper management em ployees would have been preferred, but one still having
general applicability could not be developed.




For the most part, practice questions were limited to the types of items for which
expenditure data were requested. However, information was obtained on practices concern­
ing moving expense reimbursement and pay for travel and transportation to the first job
since, while such payments are not part of compensation, they bear upon it.
Definition of Terms
Term s used in this survey were defined in the explanation booklet given to respond­
ents and reproduced in appendix C. Several definitional matters warrant special consider­
ation at this point.
"B asic salaries" consist of the normal payments for hours during the regular
straight-time workweek, including continuation of salary during paid leave periods.
This
definition is in accordance with the concept of salary in Federal Service and thus provides
a common denominator for comparisons between expenditures in private industry and the
Federal Government.
Plans for health, accident, and life insurance and private pensions were classified
as being either "contributory" or "noncontributory" depending upon whether employees paid
part of the cost of the plans.2
9 Although no specific question was asked as to whether plans
in effect were contributory or noncontributory, this information could be ascertained since
employer and employee payments were requested separately.3
0
In part to simplify reporting by respondents, expenditure items were classified as
either "payroll expenditures" or "expenditures in addition to payroll. " The former consists
of direct payments to employees and the latter mainly of payments to funds, insurance com­
panies, and governmental units. Classification was based upon the usual manner of paying
for the items studied. However, this scheme was not always accurate. For example, since,
for the employees studied, severance pay is usually given directly to employees, this item
was classified as a payroll expense. Nevertheless, there are some funded severance pay
arrangements. Respondents were instructed to report their expenditures on the appropriate
lines of the questionnaire, even if there resulted an incorrect classification of items as pay­
roll outlays or expenditures in addition to payroll. For the most part, the errors are minor.

29

Plans paid for entirely by em ployees, except possibly for em ployer payments o f administrative costs, were excluded from
the study.
30 Units showing plans but no expenditures in 1963 are included in table 9, S elected Contributory and Noncontributory Private
Welfare Plans, as having expenditures o f zero percent. There was 1 such unit for total health, accident, and life insurance; 7 for life
insurance, accidental death and dismemberment insurance, and death benefits; 6 for hospitalization, surgical, and m edical plans and
sickness and accident insurance; and 16 for pension and retirement plans.




Appendix B. Comparison o f Employer Expenditures for Supplementary
Compensation in Private Industries and the Federal Government
The table on the next page compares the findings of this study with expenditures
by the Federal Government in the year ending June 30, 1963.
It is limited to a comparison
of employer expenditures, and does not take into account employees* contributions to their
benefits.
Furthermore, the table does not portray the specific kinds of practices financed
nor, for nonpayroll item s, the level of benefits supported by the expenditures.
Comments
on specific items follow.
Penalty Pay
This table does not compare expenditures for penalty pay, since variations in ex­
penditures are mainly the result of differences in the volume of overtime or nightwork,
rather than differences in pay practices.
Vacations
The Federal Government does not have a vacation practice as such.
Instead, it
provides to employees set amounts of annual leave, covering both vacations and time off for
personal reasons.
The figure shown for the Federal Government is its total payment for
annual leave and thus includes expenditures for personal leave, which are reported, for
private industries, as a part of miscellaneous paid leave.
Miscellaneous Paid Leave
The figure for private industries includes paid personal
leave in lieu of overtime pay (to the extent such leave exceeded
hours worked).
Neither of these items is included in the figure for
Coffee breaks and washup time or get-ready time are excluded from
and Federal Government data.

leave and compensatory
the number of overtime
the Federal Government.
both the private industry

Retirement Programs
Expenditures for retirement programs are greatly influenced by methods of financing
used as well as by the benefit formulas.
The figures shown do not contrast accruing costs.
Sick Leave
In private enterprise, continuation of income during illness is sometimes provided
by plans other than for sick leave, e. g., sickness and accident insurance.
The data given on the next page on Federal expenditures were provided by the Bureau
of the Budget and the Civil Service Commission.
The items shown are defined here in the
same way as in this report.




90

91

Expenditures as a percent
_____ of basic salaries______
Private
industries

Federal
Government

23. 8

23. 5

Total paid leave, excluding sick le a v e _________________________________
V acations--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Holidays-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Miscellaneous paid leave -------------------------------------------------------------------

8. 0
4. 8
2.9
. 3

11.5
8. 2
3. 0
.4

Retirement p ro g ra m s___________________________________________________
Legally required p rogram s__________________________________________
Private pension and retirement p la n s _______________________________

7.4
2. 6
4. 9

6.6
. 2
6.4

Unemployment program s------------------------------------------------------------------------Legally required program s---------------------------------------------------------------Severance or dism issal p a y --------------------------------------------------------------Supplemental unemployment b en efits_______________________________

1. 6
1.5
. 1

.4
.4
(>)

(2 )

(M

Health benefit program s-------------------------------------------------------------------------Legally required work-connected disability p ro g ra m s____________
Other legally required programs ____________________________________
Sick leave--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Health, accident, and life insurance________________________________
Life insurance, accidental death and dismemberment
insurance, and death benefits___________________________________
Hospitalization, surgical, and medical plans and sickness and
accident insurance______________________________________________

4. 2
. 3

5. 1
. 3

(2 )
1. 5
2. 5

(*)
3.4
1. 3

.9

. 3

1. 6

1.0

Savings and thrift plans__________________________________________________

. 3

Yea rend and other special bonuses -------------------------------------------------------

2. 3

Item
T o ta l_______________________________________________________________

n
(l )

1 No such program in the Federal Government in 1963.
2 Less than 0. 05 percent.
NOTE: For the Federal Government, because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal totals. Because o f the method
used in deriving the percents for private industries, the figures are not additive. Nevertheless, to permit a comparison o f expendi­
tures for all supplements com bined, a grand total for private industries was obtained by adding the percents for individual items or groups
o f items.







Appendix C. Questionnaire

Budget Bureau No. 44-6332
Approval expires D ec. 31, 1964

BLS 2833

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B U R E A U O F LA B O R S T A TIS TIC S

Your reply will be
held in confidence.

W A S H IN G T O N

25, D.C.

S u p p le m e n ta ry C o m p e n s a tio n :
E m p lo y e r E x p e n d itu re s and
P r a c t ic e s fo r N o n p ro d u c tio n W o r k e r s , 1963
I.

C o m p a n y I d e n t if i c a t io n :

II.

Location:

County, State, e t c ., for which data are re­
quested if different from company address.

III.

M a jor P rod u ct o r A ctivity:
What w a s the p r i n c i p a l p r o d u c t p r o d u c e d at this e s t a b lis h m e n t d u rin g 1963, o r
its p r i n c i p a l a c t i v it y , in t e r m s o f valu e of r e c e i p t s , if the e s t a b lis h m e n t w as
not e n g a g e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g ? _______________________________________________________

IV.

E m ploym ent:
F o r e a c h o f the e m p l o y e e g r o u p s li s t e d b e l o w , e n te r the total n u m b e r of
p e r s o n s on the p a y r o l l of this e s t a b l i s h m e n t w ho w o r k e d o r r e c e i v e d pay
f o r any p a rt o f the pay p e r i o d endin g n e a r e s t S e p t e m b e r 15, 1963.
(If, b e ­
c a u s e o f e m p l o y m e n t f lu c t u a t io n s , data f o r S e p t e m b e r 15 a r e not r e p r e s e n t a ­
tiv e of e m p l o y m e n t th roug hou t 1963, p l e a s e supply e m p lo y m e n t data f o r a
m o r e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e pay p e r i o d and s p e c i f y the su bstitu te pay p e r i o d on
page 2.
Data f o r c l e r i c a l , t e c h n i c a l ,
p rofession a l,
a d m in is t r a t iv e , and
e x e c u t i v e e m p l o y e e s should sh ow the n u m b e r o f r e g u l a r f u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s
plu s the n u m b e r o f p a r t - t i m e and c a s u a l e m p l o y e e s f o r w h o m s u p p l e m e n t a r y
c o m p e n s a t i o n p r a c t i c e s a r e the s a m e as f o r r e g u l a r f u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s . )
T o t a l e m p l o y m e n t in e s t a b l i s h m e n t -----------------------------------

---------------------------------------

N um ber of c le r i c a l, technical, p r o fe s s io n a l,
a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , and e x e c u t iv e e m p l o y e e s :
N o n e x e m p t---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------

E x e m p t , e x c lu d in g u pper m a n a g e m e n t ------------------------

----------------------------------------

U pp er m a n a g e m e n t -----------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------

F O R B L S USE O N L Y
Schedule
number




Refc.

State

SIC
code

City
size

93

Est.
size

Weight

Special
charac.

94

Part I. Annual Expenditures and Hours
PLEASE

READ

E X P L A N A T IO N S

BEFORE

C O M P L E T IN G

T H IS

FORM

D a ta s h o u ld b e r e p o r t e d in the i t e m s w h ic h f o llo w o n ly f o r the r e q u e s t e d e m ­
p lo y e e g r o u p s in the e s t a b li s h m e n t id e n t if ie d on p a g e 1 o f th is q u e s t io n n a ir e
( s e e I t e m s I an d II).
IF NO MAN-HOURS OR EXPENDITURES WERE INVOLVED DURING 1963 FOR A GIVEN ITEM, ENTER "N one" IN
THE APPROPRIATE SPACE. IF EXACT DATA ARE NOT AVAILABLE FOR ANY ITEM, PLEASE PROVIDE A CARE­
FULLY CONSIDERED ESTIMATE. PLEASE DO NOT LEAVE ANY LINES BLANK. IF ANY FIGURES ARE ESTIMATED,
PLEASE INDICATE THE METHOD USED IN ESTIMATING.

V.

A n n u a l P a y r o l l E x p e n d it u r e s :
A.

B.

T o t a l p a y r o l l ( t o t a l s h o u ld e q u a l
s u m o f " t o t a l w a g e s p a i d " a s sh o w n
o n W - 2 f o r m s an d n o r m a l l y s h o u ld
e q u a l o r a p p r o x im a t e s u m o f e x ­
p e n d it u r e s r e p o r t e d in I t e m s B
an d C ) ----------------------------------------------------------

C lerical, techn ical, professional,
administrative, and executive
Exempt
Excluding
Upper
Nonexempt
upper
management
management

L
1
N
b

]E x p e n d itu re s 5
$

$

$

1

T o t a l e x p e n d it u r e s f o r b a s i c s a l a ­
r i e s in c lu d in g e x p e n d it u r e s f o r
2

C.

E x p e n d it u r e s in a d d itio n to
b a s ic s a la r ie s :
1 . P a y f o r o v e r t i m e h o u r s and f o r
e x t r a w o r k on p a id h o lid a y s and <
th e 6 th and 7 th d a y s an d S a t u r ­
d a y an d S u n d ay a s s u c h :
a.

P a y m e n t s at s t r a i g h t t i m e r a t e s -------------------------------

3

P a y m e n t s at p r e m i u m
r a t e s ------------------------------------------

4

E x t r a p a y f o r s h ift w o r k
( s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l ) -----------------------

5

3. S ev eran ce or d is m is s a l p ay—

6

b.

2.

4.

Y e a r e n d , C h r i s t m a s , an d
o th er ir r e g u la r b o n u ses
( s p e c i f y t y p e ) ____________________

7

5 . O th er ir r e g u la r pay (s p e c ify
t y p e , e . g . , in c e n t iv e a w a r d s ,
r e tr o a c tiv e pay fo r 1 962 o r
e a r lie r y e a r s , e t c .)
8

D.




P a y fo r le a v e t im e :
1 . V a c a t i o n s ------------------------------

9

2 . H o l i d a y s -------------------------------

10

3 . S ic k l e a v e ----------------------------

11

4 . M ilita r y , ju r y , w itn e s s ,
v o tin g , an d p e r s o n a l
l e a v e ---------------------------------------

12

Annual H o u rs:

A.

T o t a l h o u r s p a id f o r ( to t a l sh o u ld
e q u a l s u m o f h o u r s r e p o r t e d in
I t e m s B an d C ) ----------------------------------------

B.

N u m b e r of o v e r tim e h o u rs
p a id f o r — —— — —- — - —----- --------- -------

D.

N u m b >er o f M a n -1 lo u r s

T o t a l h o u r s p a id f o r e x c lu d in g
o v e r t i m e h o u r s but in c lu d in g
l e a v e h o u r s p a id f o r -----------------------------

C.

C lerical, technical, professional,
administrative, and executive
Exempt
Excluding
Upper
Nonexempt
upper
management
management

p jz -r

95

N u m b e r o f p a id le a v e h o u r s :
1.
V a c a t i o n s ------------------------------------------

2.

H o l i d a y s ---------------------------------------------

3.

S ic k l e a v e -----------------------------------------

4.

M ilita r y , ju r y , w itn e s s ,
v o t in g , an d p e r s o n a l
l e a v e ----------------------------------------------------

A ll clerical, technical, pro­
fessional, administrative, and
executive employees

V I I . E x p e n d it u r e s in A d d it io n to P a y r o l l :
A.




E m p l o y e r e x p e n d it u r e s f o r
l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d in s u r a n c e :
1.
O l d - A g e , S u r v i v o r s , and
D is a b ility In su ra n ce
( S o c ia l S e c u r it y ) ___________________
2.

$

8

U n e m p lo y m e n t C o m p e n s a t io n
( e x c lu d e R a i l r o a d U n e m p l o y ­
m e n t I n s u r a n c e ):
a.

P a y m e n t s to S ta te
g o v e r n m e n t _____________________

9

b.

P a y m e n t s to F e d e r a l
G o v e r n m e n t ____________________

10

3.

R a i l r o a d R e t i r e m e n t T a x _______

11

4.

R a i l r o a d U n e m p lo y m e n t
I n s u r a n c e _____________________________

12

5.

W o r k m e n 's C o m p e n s a t i o n ______

13

6.

P a y m e n t s f o r w o r k -c o n n e c t e d
d i s a b i li t y in e s t a b li s h m e n t s
s u b j e c t to th e F e d e r a l E m p l o y ­
e r s ' L i a b i l i t y A c t _________________

14

7.

O t h e r , in c lu d in g S ta te T e m p o ­
r a r y D is a b ility In su ra n ce
( s p e c i f y ) _______________________________

15

Private Welfare Plans
E m p lo y e r e x p e n d it u r e s f o r P r i v a t e W e l f a r e P la n s an d e m p lo y e e c o n t r ib u t io n s f o r
s u c h p la n s n e e d b e r e p o r t e d f o r u p p e r m a n a g e m e n t e m p l o y e e s s e p a r a t e l y o n ly if
a s e p a r a t e p la n i s in e f f e c t f o r th i s g r o u p .
P R O F IT S H A R IN G
P r o f i t s h a r in g a s s u c h s h o u ld n o t b e r e p o r t e d . I n c lu d e c a s h a c t u a ll y p a id ou t to
e m p l o y e e s in 1 9 6 3 in th e f o r m o f b o n u s e s in I t e m V - C - 4 . (D o n o t r e p o r t p r o f i t s h a r in g fu n d s s e t a s i d e in 1 9 6 3 f o r d is t r ib u t i o n in s u b s e q u e n t y e a r s a s b o n u s e s . )
O t h e r u t i li z a t i o n s o f p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p r o c e e d s s h o u ld b e r e p o r t e d in th e a p p r o ­
p r i a t e s u b d iv is io n s o f I t e m V I I - B . ( F o r e x a m p l e , p a y m e n t s d e f e r r e d u n til r e t i r e ­
m e n t s h o u ld b e r e p o r t e d a s p e n s i o n and r e t i r e m e n t p l a n s .)

V II.

E x p e n d it u r e s in A d d it io n
to P a y r o l l — C o n tin u e d
B.

E m p lo y e r e x p e n d it u r e s f o r
p r iv a t e w e l f a r e p l a n s :
1.

L i f e in s u r a n c e , a c c id e n t a l
d e a th an d d i s m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e , an d d e a th
b e n e f it s -------------------------------------------

2.

S u p p le m e n t a l u n e m p lo y ­
m e n t b e n e f i t s --------------------------------

5.
V IH .

$

P e n s io n an d r e t i r e m e n t
p la n s (in c lu d e p a y - a s - y o u g o p l a n s ) ------------------------------------------

4.

$

Upper
management

H o s p ita liz a tio n , s u r g ic a l
an d m e d i c a l p la n s (in c lu d e
m a j o r m e d i c a l p la n s ) ,
an d s i c k n e s s an d
a c c id e n t i n s u r a n c e ---------------------

3.

AH clerica l, techn ical, profes­
sional, administrative, and
executive em ployees

S a v in g s and t h r if t p l a n s ------------

E m p lo y e e C o n tr ib u tio n s f o r P r i v a t e
W e lfa r e P la n s :
R e p o r t e m p lo y e e c o n tr ib u tio n s
o n ly i f t h e r e w a s a p la n in v o lv in g
c o m p a n y e x p e n d it u r e s f o r p r e m i u m s . If c o m p a n y p a id th e t o t a l
p r e m i u m s e n t e r " N o n e . " If c o m ­
p a n y p a id o n ly p a r t o f th e p r e m i u m
e n t e r th e e m p lo y e e c o n t r ib u t io n .
D o n ot in c lu d e e m p lo y e e p a y m e n t s
f o r d e p e n d e n t s if c o m p a n y d id
n ot a l s o c o n tr ib u te to d e p e n d e n t
coverage.
A.

L i f e i n s u r a n c e , a c c id e n t a l
d e a th an d d i s m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e , an d d e a th

B.

H o s p i t a l i z a t i o n , s u r g i c a l and
m e d i c a l p la n s (in c lu d e m a j o r
m e d i c a l p l a n s ) , an d s i c k n e s s
an d a c c id e n t i n s u r a n c e --------------------

C.

P e n s io n and r e t i r e m e n t p l a n s ------




8

97

BLiS 2 8 3 3

Budget Bureau No. 44-6332
Approval expires D ec. 31, 1964

U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F LA B O R

Your reply w ill be
held in confidence.

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W a s h i n g t o n 25, D .C .

Sepplenentary Conpeisation: Employer Expenditures and
Practices for Nonprodnction Workers, 1963
I.

C o m p a n y I d e n t i fic a t io n :

I I.

L o c a t io n :

County, State, e t c ., for which data are re­
quested if different from com pany address.

Part II. Practices and Policies
IX .

P a id L e a v e an d S c h e d u le d W o r k w e e k :
A.

V a c a tio n s c h e d u le s :
D e s c r i b e b e lo w th e e l i g i b i l i t y r e q u i r e m e n t s ( s u c h a s le n g th o f s e r v i c e )
f o r th e v a r i o u s le n g t h s o f p a id v a c a t io n s ( o r e q u iv a le n t s in v a c a t io n
pay) g ra n ted :
1.

N o n e x e m p t n o n p r o d u c t io n e m p l o y e e s

2.

E x e m p t n o n p r o d u c t io n e m p l o y e e s , e x c lu d in g u p p e r m a n a g e m e n t

3.

U pper m an agem en t

FOR
Schedule
number




R eg.

State

BLS

C ity
size

USE O N L Y
SIC
code

Est.
size

Weight

Special
charac.

IX,

C lerical, technical, professional,
administrative, and executive
Exempt
Excluding
Upper
Nonexempt
upper
management
management

P a id L e a v e an d S c h e d u le d
W o r k w e e k — C o n tin u e d
B.

V a c a t io n s p a id f o r :
N u m b e r o f w e e k s p a id f o r in 1 9 6 3
( o r e q u iv a le n t )

L

I
N
E

Niumber o f Employees

N o n e ______________________________________________

1

L e s s th a n 1 w e e k _________________________

-

2

1 b u t l e s s th a n 2 w e e k s -------------------------------

3

2 b u t l e s s th a n 3 w e e k s -------------------------------

5

4 w e e k s an d o v e r ------------------------------------------C.

4

3 b u t l e s s th a n 4 w e e k s ---------------- —_______

6

N u m b e r o f p a id h o l id a y s o b s e r v e d in
1 96 3 (e n te r n u m b e r o f d a y s p e r
e m p lo y e e ):
1 , F u l l - d a y h o l i d a y s -------------------------------------

D.

7

2 , H a l f - d a y h o l id a y s

8

—

—

------

-

S tr a ig h t-t im e w o rk w e e k (e n te r n u m ­
b e r o f h o u r s p e r w e e k p e r e m p lo y e e ) —

9
Enter "Y es" or "N o" in Each Column

E.

W a s t h e r e a f o r m a l s i c k l e a v e p la n
in e f f e c t ( o th e r th a n i n s u r a n c e ) ? _
_ ___

F.

W e r e th e f o llo w in g ty p e s o f p a id
le a v e p e r m itt e d ?




10

11
2 . J u r y ---------------------------------------------------------------

12

13
14
5 . O th er c iv ic r e s p o n s ib ilit ie s —

___

-

15

S p e c if y ty p e

6.

16

F a m i l y e m e r g e n c i e s --------------- —___

7 . D e a th in f a m i l y __________ ___________ _____

17

8 . O t h e r p e r s o n a l l e a v e -------

18

Specify type

------------

—

99

X

Insurance and Pensions:
A.




Did the company have a plan p ro ­
viding for company contributions
(other than ad m in istrative co sts)
fo r—

C lerica l, technical, professional,
administrative, and executive
Exempt
Excluding
Upper
Nonexempt
upper
management
management

L
1

N
E

Enter "Yes" or "N o" in Each Column

1. L ife in su ran ce, acciden tal death
and d ism em berm en t in suran ce,
or death benefits—
a. F o r cu rren t e m p lo y e e s?---------

1

b. F o r cu rren t em ployees*
2

c. F o r re tire d e m p lo y e e s?----------

3

2. H ospitalization , m ed ical, or
su rg ic a l benefits (excluding m ajo r
m ed ical benefits)—
a. F o r cu rren t em ployees ? ---------

4

b. F o r cu rren t em ployees'
dependents ? --------------------------

5

c. F o r re tire d e m p lo y e e s?-------- —

6

d. F o r re tire d em ployees'
dependents ? -------------------------

7

3. M ajor m ed ical benefits—
a. F o r cu rren t e m p lo y e e s?---------

8

b . F o r c u rr e n t e m p lo y e e s '

dependents ? -------------------------c. F o r re tire d e m p lo y e e s?----------

5.

10

d. F o r re tire d em ployees'
dependents?-------------------------4.

9

11

S ick n ess and accident
in su r a n c e ?--------------

12

Pension or retirem en t
b e n e fits?_____________

13

100

X

Insurance and P en sion s— Continued
B.

At the end of 1963, w ere m ore than
10 percen t of the em ployees not
covered by p lan s, wholly or partly
paid fo r by the company, for the
following ben efits?

C lerica l, technical, professional,
administrative, and executive
Exempt
Excluding
Upper
Nonexempt
upper
management management
Enter "Y es" or "N o" in Each Column

1. L ife in suran ce, acciden tal
death and dism em berm en t
in suran ce, or death ben efits_
2. H ospitalization , m ed ical, or
su rg ic a l benefits (excluding
m ajo r m ed ical b e n e fits)_____
3. M ajor m ed ical b e n e fits-------4. Sick n ess and accident
in su ra n c e ------------------------5. Pension or retirem en t
b en efits_____________________
C.




If the an sw ers to any p a rts of the
preceding question w ere "Y e s, "
for those p a rts of the question,
approxim ately what percen t of the
em ployees w ere not covered?
1. L ife in suran ce, accidental
death and dism em berm ent
in suran ce, or death b e n e fits__

%

%

%

2. H ospitalization, m ed ical, or
su rg ic a l benefits (excluding
m ajo r m ed ical b e n e fits)_________

%

%

%

3. M ajor m ed ical b e n e fits-------------

%

%

%

4. Sick n ess and accident
in su ra n c e --------------------------------

%

%

%

%

%

%

m

5. Pension or retirem en t

101

X I.

E x tr a




(P r e m iu m )

P ay:
C le r ic a l, te c h n ic a l, professional,
ad m in istrative, and ex ec u tiv e

W a s t h e r e a c o m p a n y p r a c t i c e in e f ­
f e c t to pay ad d itio n a l m o n e y a n d / o r
o th e r p r e m i u m s f o r o v e r t i m e w o r k ?
( E n te r " Y e s " o r " N o . ") ______________________
If "Y e s , " sp ecify rate o f pay a n d /o r other p r e m iu m -----

N on exem p t

Exiem pt
Excluding
upper
m an a g em en t

L
I
IN

Upper
m an agem en t

1
2

If "Y e s , " what em p lo y ee s were covered? (If a ll e m ­
p loyee s in a category were covered, enter " A l l "

in

the appropriate co lu m n ; otherw ise, list b elow the
sp e c ific groups o f em p loyees covered. )

3

W a s c o m p e n s a t o r y tim e o f f a l l o w e d
f o r o v e r t i m e w o r k ? (E n ter " Y e s "
o r " N o . " ) _________________________________________________

4

If "Y e s , " what em p loyee s were covered? (If all e m ­
p lo y ee s in a category were covered,

enter " A l l " in

the appropriate colu m n ; otherw ise,

list b elo w the

sp e c ific groups o f em p loyee s covered. ) ---------------------------

5

Was t h e r e a c o m p a n y p r a c t i c e in e f ­
f e c t to pay a p r e m i u m f o r n ig h t w o r k ?
(E n te r " Y e s " o r " N o . " ) ______________________

6

If "Y e s , " sp ecify rate o f d ifferen tial a n d /o r other
p rem iu m for—
1.

2d s h i f t --------------------- --------------------------------------------------------

7

2.

3d s h i f t _______________

_______

8

3.

Other shift

----------------------------------------------------------------------

9

____

____

_

If "Y e s , " what em p loyee s were covered?
p loyee s in a category were covered,

(If all e m ­

enter " A l l "

the appropriate co lu m n ; otherw ise, list b elow
sp e c ific groups o f em p loyee s covered. ) ._

If "N o , " were any night shifts in operation?
"Y e s "

or " N o . " )

in

the

10

(Enter

--------------------------------------------------------------

11

X I.

E x tr a

(P r e m iu m )

P a y — C o n tin u e d

Clerical, technical, professional,
administrative, and executive
Exempt
Excluding
Upper
Nonexempt
upper
management management
C.

I f t h e r e w e r e p a id h o l i d a y s , w a s
t h e r e a c o m p a n y p r a c t i c e in e f ­
f e c t to p a y m o n e y in a d d itio n
to r e g u la r h o lid a y p a y f o r w o r k
on a p a id h o l i d a y ?
(E n ter
" Y e s " o r " N o . " ) ____________________

If "Y e s," specify rate of pay (exclude pay
for holiday as such) -----------------------------------If "Yes, " what employees were covered? (If all
employees in a category were covered, enter
"All" in the appropriate column; otherwise, list
below the specific groups of employees covered.)—

W a s c o m p e n s a t o r y t im e o f f g iv e n
f o r w o r k o n p a id h o l i d a y s ?
(E n t e r " Y e s " o r " N o . " ) ____________

If "Yes, " what employees were covered? (If all
employees in a category were covered, enter
"A ll" in the appropriate column; otherwise, list
below the specific groups of employees covered.) —

D.




W a s th e r e a co m p a n y p r a c tic e
in e f f e c t to p a y (in a d d itio n to
e x p e n s e a ll o w a n c e s ) f o r r e q u i r e d
t r a v e l t im e on c o m p a n y b u s i n e s s
o u t s id e o f e m p l o y e e s ’ r e g u l a r l y
s c h e d u le d w o r k in g h o u r s ?
( E n t e r " Y e s " o r " N o . " ) _____________

103

XII. O th er C o m p a n y P r a c t i c e s :
D id the c o m p a n y h ave a pla n in e f ­
f e c t p r o v i d in g f o r —
A.

C le r i c a l , te c h n ic a l, p ro fe s sio n a l,
a d m in is tra tiv e , and e x e c u tiv e
E xem pt
E x c lu d in g
N onexem pt
Upper
up p e r
m anagem ent
m anagem ent

M o v in g e x p e n s e r e i m b u r s e m e n t ?
(E n te r " Y e s " o r " N o . " ) ___________

L

I
N
E

1

If "Y e s , " de s crib e p ra c tic e s and e m p lo y ee s
c o v e re d , in c lu d in g a d e s c rip tio n o f such ite m s
as re im b u rs e m e n t fo r expenses and losses in
s ale o f r e a l e s ta te , cost o f h o usehunting trip s ,
and te m p o ra ry quarters and subsistence, and
any g e n e ra l c a t c h - a ll ty p e o f a llo w a n c e .

B.

P a y f o r t r a v e l and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n to
f i r s t j o b ? ( E n te r " Y e s " o r " N o . " ) _
_

2

If o n ly in c e r ta in o c c u p a tio n s o r jo b le v e ls , s p e c ify —

Remarks

N a m e o f a u th o r iz in g o f f i c i a l
( P l e a s e p r in t o r ty pe)

T it le

Do y o u w ant a c o p y o f the B u r e a u ’ s r e p o r t f o r th is s u r v e y ? ---------- Y e s □

Date

No □

F i e l d e c o n o m i s t and date o f v i s i t ______ ___________________________________________________




104

E x p la n a t io n s
BUS 2833

Supplementary Compensation: Employer Expenditures and
Practices for Nonproduction Workers, 1963
G eneral E xp lanations

C overage

o f R eport

E a c h r e p o r t i s in te n d e d to c o v e r o n ly th a t e s t a b l i s h m e n t , u n it , o r l o c a t io n d e s ig n a t e d in
I t e m s I an d II o f th e q u e s t io n n a ir e .
H o w e v e r , r e p o r t in g on th e b a s i s o f o t h e r o r g a n iz a t i o n a l
g r o u p in g s m a y b e s a t i s f a c t o r y .
If in r e p o r t in g t h e r e is a n y d e v ia t io n f r o m th e u n it d e s ig n a t e d ,
p l e a s e e x p la in f u ll y on th e q u e s t io n n a ir e .
In a n y e v e n t , a l l e n t r i e s sh o u ld r e f e r to th e s a m e
grou p o r grou p s o f e m p lo y e e s .
E m p lo y m e n t
In o r d e r th a t th e s i z e o f th e e s t a b li s h m e n t o r u n it m a y b e d e t e r m i n e d , p l e a s e r e p o r t on the
f i r s t lin e o f I t e m IV th e t o t a l n u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s in th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
I n c lu d e p r o d u c t io n
and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s a s w e l l a s n o n p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s , b u t do n o t in c lu d e p r o p r i e t o r s ,
m e m b e r s o f u n in c o r p o r a t e d f i r m s , o r u n p aid f a m i l y w o r k e r s .
H o w e v e r , s in c e th is s u r v e y is d e s ig n e d to d e v e lo p in f o r m a t io n o n s u p p l e m e n t a r y c o m p e n s a t io n
p r a c t i c e s f o r n o n p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s , p l e a s e l i m i t a n s w e r s in th e r e m a i n d e r o f the q u e s t io n ­
n a i r e to th e f o llo w in g c a t e g o r i e s o f e m p l o y e e s :
C le r ic a l, te c h n ic a l, p r o fe s s io n a l, a d m in is ­
t r a t i v e , an d e x e c u t i v e .
T h e s e c a t e g o r i e s e x c lu d e s e n i o r o f f i c e r s o f c o r p o r a t i o n s , p r o p r i e t o r s , m e m b e r s o f u n in ­
co rp o ra ted f ir m s ,
an d u n p a id f a m i l y w o r k e r s .
A l s o e x c lu d e o u t s id e s a l e s m e n .
A ir lin e
p i l o t s and o t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t io n in d u s t r y e m p lo y e e s w h o s e w o r k i s p e r f o r m e d in m o v in g v e ­
h i c l e s s h o u ld b e e x c lu d e d , e v e n i f s u c h e m p lo y e e s a r e in e m p lo y e e g r o u p s f o r w h ic h d a ta
a r e re q u e ste d .
In g e n e r a l , th e d a ta to b e r e p o r t e d s h o u ld c o v e r o n ly r e g u la r f u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s .
H ow ­
e v e r , d a ta f o r p a r t - t i m e and c a s u a l e m p lo y e e s sh o u ld b e r e p o r t e d i f s u p p l e m e n t a r y c o m p e n ­
s a t io n p r a c t i c e s a r e th e s a m e f o r t h e s e e m p lo y e e s a s f o r r e g u la r f u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s .
N o n e x e m p t an d

E x e m p t E m p lo y e e s

E m p l o y e e s c o v e r e d b y th is s u r v e y ( s e e a b o v e e x p la n a t io n o f c o v e r a g e ) a r e d iv id e d in to tw o
g r o u p s , " n o n e x e m p t " and " e x e m p t " e m p l o y e e s ,
and d a ta a r e to b e r e p o r t e d s e p a r a t e l y f o r
e a c h o f t h e s e g r o u p s w h e r e a p p l i c a b le .
" N o n e x e m p t " e m p lo y e e s a r e th o s e s u b j e c t to th e
o v e r t i m e p r o v i s i o n s o f th e F a i r L a b o r S ta n d a r d s A c t ,
w h e r e a s , " e x e m p t " e m p lo y e e s a r e
n o t s u b j e c t to t h e s e p r o v i s i o n s .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s n o t s u b j e c t to th e F a i r L a b o r S ta n d a r d s
A c t s h o u ld c o n s i d e r n o n s u p e r v i s o r y n o n p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p lo y e e s a s "n o n e x e m p t " and a l l o t h e r
e m p l o y e e s c o v e r e d b y th is s u r v e y a s " e x e m p t . M G e n e r a l l y , th e f o r m e r w i l l in c lu d e c l e r i c a l
an d t e c h n i c a l e m p lo y e e s and th e l a t t e r w i l l in c lu d e p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m in i s t r a t iv e , and e x e c u ­
t iv e e m p l o y e e s .
U pper M an agem en t
M a n y c o m p a n ie s h a v e s e p a r a t e c o m p e n s a t io n p r a c t i c e s f o r e m p lo y e e s a b o v e th e m id d le m a n ­
a g e m e n t le v e l.
E m p lo y e e s
to b e c o n s i d e r e d a s u p p e r m a n a g e m e n t a r e th o s e w ho a r e
t r e a t e d s e p a r a t e l y f o r c o m p e n s a t io n p u r p o s e s .
A p o s s i b l e e x a m p l e i s th e g r o u p o f e m p lo y e e s
w h o a r e o n th e e x e c u t i v e p a y r o l l .
If n o s u c h d if f e r e n t ia t io n e x i s t s in a f i r m , c o n s i d e r a s
u p p e r m a n a g e m e n t a l l e m p lo y e e s e a r n in g $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 p e r y e a r o r m o r e , in c lu d in g c a s h b o n u s e s .
In a n y e v e n t , e x c lu d e s e n i o r o f f i c e r s o f c o r p o r a t i o n s .
U p p e r m a n a g e m e n t e m p lo y e e s c o m ­
m o n l y a r e t h o s e w h o in it ia t e p o l i c y r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s .




105
Com pany

R ecords

If s e p a r a t e c o m p a n y r e c o r d s a r e n ot m a in t a in e d f o r th e p r e c i s e e m p lo y e e g r o u p s f o r w h ic h
d a ta a r e r e q u e s t e d , but a r e m a in t a in e d f o r e m p lo y e e g r o u p in g s w h ic h a r e s i m i l a r in c o v e r a g e ,
th e g r o u p in g s f o r w h ic h d a ta a r e a v a il a b l e m a y b e s u b s t itu t e d f o r t h o s e r e q u e s t e d .
If su c h
s u b s t itu t io n i s m a d e , p l e a s e n o te t h i s f a c t on th e q u e s t io n n a ir e an d d e fin e th e g r o u p s f o r
w h ic h d a ta a r e s h o w n .
In a n y e v e n t , d a ta r e p o r t e d in a l l i t e m s o f th e q u e s t io n n a ir e s h o u ld
b e f o r th e s a m e e m p lo y e e g r o u p s .
Annual

P a y r o ll

E x p e n d it u r e s

an d E x p e n d it u r e s

in A d d it io n to

P a y r o ll

T o s i m p l i f y r e p o r t i n g , th e q u e s t io n n a ir e f o r m c l a s s i f i e s a l l r e q u e s t e d e x p e n d it u r e s in to e it h e r
" p a y r o l l e x p e n d i t u r e s " o r " e x p e n d i t u r e s in a d d itio n to p a y r o l l . "
It i s r e c o g n i z e d th a t th e
c l a s s i f i c a t i o n a d o p te d f o r in d iv id u a l e x p e n d it u r e i t e m s m a y n ot c o n f o r m to p r a c t i c e s in a l l
e s ta b lis h m e n t s .
N e v e r t h e l e s s , e x p e n d it u r e s f o r a l l l i s t e d i t e m s s h o u ld b e r e p o r t e d on th e
l i n e s on w h ic h th e d a ta a r e r e q u e s t e d .

I n d iv id u a l I t e m s

( E x p la n a t io n s f o r i t e m s a r e in th e s a m e o r d e r
i t e m s a p p e a r on th e q u e s t io n n a ir e )

as

th e

P art I

T otal

P a y r o ll

F o r e a c h e m p lo y e e c a t e g o r y , r e p o r t th e t o t a l a m o u n t o f w a g e s an d s a l a r i e s p a id to e m p lo y e e s
d u r in g th e y e a r .
In c lu d e p a y f o r o v e r t i m e , h o l i d a y s , v a c a t i o n s , an d s ic k l e a v e , p a id b y th e
e s t a b li s h m e n t d i r e c t l y to th e e m p l o y e e . A l s o in c lu d e c o m m i s s i o n s , b o n u s e s ( e . g . , C h r i s t m a s
b o n u s e s ) n ot p a id r e g u l a r l y e a c h p a y p e r i o d , and p a y n ot e a r n e d d u r in g th e y e a r ( e . g . , r e t r o ­
a c t iv e p a y , d i s m i s s a l p ay)*
A l l p a y m e n t s sh o u ld b e sh o w n p r i o r to su c h d e d u c t io n s a s w it h ­
h o ld in g t a x e s an d e m p lo y e e c o n t r ib u t io n s f o r S o c i a l S e c u r i t y , g r o u p i n s u r a n c e , an d s a v in g s
bon ds.
E x c lu d e a l l o w a n c e s f o r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , liv in g c o s t s , an d o t h e r e x p e n s e s in c u r r e d in
th e p e r f o r m a n c e o f w o r k .
T h e c o n c e p t o f t o t a l p a y r o l l f o l l o w s th e d e fin it io n o f " t o t a l w a g e s
p a i d " th a t i s u s e d f o r i n c o m e t a x p u r p o s e s on th e W ith h o ld in g T a x F o r m ( W - 2 F o r m ) .
T o t a l E x p e n d it u r e s

fo r

B a s ic

S a la r ie s

R e p o r t th a t p a r t o f t o t a l p a y r o l l w h ic h c o n s i s t s o f c a s h p a y m e n t s to e m p lo y e e s f o r h o u r s
d u r in g th e r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t i m e w o r k w e e k .
I n c lu d e p a y m e n t s f o r r e s t p e r io d s and o th e r
n o n w o r k t i m e a t th e p la n t o r o f f i c e , p a y f o r h o u r s o f the n o r m a l w o r k in g d a y s p e n t a w a y f r o m
th e p r e m i s e s on c o m p a n y b u s i n e s s , an d p a y f o r l e a v e h o u r s .
In a d d itio n to b a s e s a l a r y ,
in c lu d e c o m m i s s i o n s an d b o n u s e s p a id r e g u l a r l y ( e . g . , w e e k ly o r m o n t h ly ) , c o s t - o f - l i v i n g
a l l o w a n c e s , and r e t r o a c t i v e p a y a p p ly in g to 1 9 6 3 .
W h e r e p a id , in c lu d e s a l a r i e s p a id to e m ­
p lo y e e s w h ile a tte n d in g c o n v e n tio n s o r m e e t i n g s o r on e d u c a t io n a l l e a v e .
T o t a l e x p e n d it u r e s
f o r b a s i c s a l a r i e s c o n s i s t o f t o t a l p a y r o l l l e s s e x p e n d it u r e s f o r s u c h i t e m s a s o v e r t i m e ; sh ift
p r e m i u m s ; s e v e r a n c e p a y p la n s ; an d y e a r e n d ,
C h r is tm a s ,
an d o t h e r i r r e g u l a r b o n u s e s .
P ay fo r

O v e r tim e

H ou rs

R e p o r t t o t a l p a y m e n t s d u r in g th e y e a r f o r o v e r t i m e w o r k .
If e m p l o y e e s w o r k e d o v e r t i m e but
r e c e i v e d n o c o m p e n s a t io n in a d d itio n to t h e ir r e g u la r b a s i c s a l a r i e s , n o e x p e n d it u r e sh o u ld
be re p o rte d h e r e .
F o r d a ily an d w e e k ly o v e r t i m e and f o r e x t r a w o r k on th e 6th an d 7th d a y s and S a tu r d a y and
S u n d a y a s s u c h it i s n e c e s s a r y to d is t in g u is h b e tw e e n th a t p a r t o f t o t a l e x p e n d it u r e s w h ic h
c o n s t it u t e s p a y m e n t at r e g u la r r a t e s an d th a t p a r t w h ic h r e p r e s e n t s p r e m i u m p a y .
If c o m ­
p e n s a t io n f o r o v e r t i m e i s at th e r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t i m e r a t e o r l e s s , r e p o r t th e t o t a l p a y m e n t
in I t e m a .
If c o m p e n s a t io n i s at m o r e th a n th e s t r a i g h t - t i m e r a t e ( e . g . , t i m e and o n e -h a l f )
r e p o r t th e s t r a i g h t - t i m e in I te m a an d th e p r e m i u m in I te m b .
If e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e c a s h
m e a l a l l o w a n c e s f o r o v e r t i m e w o r k ( e it h e r in lie u o f o r in a d d itio n to o v e r t i m e p a y ), the s u m
o f s u c h m e a l a l l o w a n c e s s h o u ld b e r e p o r t e d in I te m b .
(D o n ot in c lu d e th e v a lu e o f f r e e
m e a l s p r o v id e d in a c o m p a n y c a f e t e r i a f o r o v e r t i m e w o r k . )




106

F o r p a y f o r h o lid a y w o r k , i t i s n e c e s s a r y to d is t in g u is h b e tw e e n th e e x t r a p a y f o r w o r k on
a h o lid a y , th e p a y m e n t at th e r e g u la r r a te f o r w o r k p e r f o r m e d , an d the h o lid a y p a y w o r k e r s
w o u ld h a v e r e c e i v e d i f th e y h ad n o t w o r k e d .
T h e h o lid a y p a y e m p lo y e e s w o u ld h a v e r e ­
c e iv e d i f th e y had n o t w o r k e d s h o u ld b e r e p o r t e d a s p a r t o f e x p e n d it u r e s f o r b a s i c s a l a r i e s .
T h e r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t i m e p a y f o r w o r k a c t u a ll y p e r f o r m e d sh o u ld b e r e p o r t e d in I t e m a .
The
b a la n c e o f p a y f o r h o lid a y w o r k , i f a n y , i s th e p r e m i u m f o r w o r k on h o lid a y s and s h o u ld b e
r e p o r t e d in I t e m b .
( I f t h e r e a r e h o lid a y s f o r w h ic h p r e m i u m r a t e s a r e p a id i f th e d a y s
a r e w o r k e d b u t n o p a y is g iv e n i f th e d a y s a r e n o t w o r k e d , r e p o r t th e s t r a i g h t - t i m e p a y f o r
w o r k on s u c h d a y s a s p a r t o f e x p e n d it u r e s f o r b a s i c s a l a r i e s and th e p r e m i u m a s o v e r t i m e
p a y m en ts at p r e m iu m r a t e s .)
If e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d b o th p a y in li e u o f v a c a t io n and p a y f o r th e t i m e w o r k e d , r e p o r t a s
e x p e n d it u r e s f o r b a s i c s a l a r i e s th e v a c a t io n p a y and r e p o r t a s o v e r t i m e th e p a y f o r th e
t im e w o r k e d .

E x tr a

Pay

fo r

S h ift W o r k

I n c lu d e o n ly s h if t p r e m i u m p a y a b o v e th e r e g u la r r a t e s f o r th e d a y s h if t .
T h is c o v e r s n o t
o n ly d i f f e r e n t i a l s p a id in th e f o r m o f a h i g h e r r a t e , b u t a l s o s p e c i a l p a y m e n t s to l a t e - s h i f t
w o r k e r s f o r m e a l p e r i o d s and f o r an y o t h e r h o u r s n o t w o r k e d b y t h e m b u t p a id f o r ( e . g . ,
i f l a t e - s h i f t w o r k e r s r e c e i v e 8 h o u r s ' p a y f o r 7 V2 h o u r s ' w o r k , c o m p a r e d w ith 8 h o u r s '
w o r k f o r th e d a y s h i f t , t o t a l e x p e n d it u r e s f o r th e V 2 h o u r 's p a y s h o u ld b e r e p o r t e d a s s h ift
d iffe r e n tia l).
In c lu d e c a s h p a y m e n t s f o r m e a l s g r a n t e d to l a t e - s h i f t e m p lo y e e s if su c h p a y ­
m e n t s a r e n o t m a d e to e m p lo y e e s on th e d ay s h if t .
S ev eran ce o r D is m is s a l Pay

T h is i t e m c o v e r s p la n s w h ic h a r e d e s ig n e d to p r o v id e p a y m e n t s in c a s e o f l o s s o f e m p l o y ­
m e n t.
P a y m e n t s m a y b e m a d e on a l u m p - s u m o r w e e k ly b a s i s .
T h e s e p la n s a r e a l s o r e ­
f e r r e d to a s t e r m i n a t i o n o r l a y o f f p a y p l a n s .
In c lu d e p a y m e n t s to b o th p e r m a n e n t ly and t e m ­
p o r a r i l y la id o f f e m p l o y e e s .
R e p o r t p a y m e n t s m a d e b y th e c o m p a n y d u r in g th e y e a r , d i r e c t l y
to s e p a r a t e d e m p lo y e e s o r to fu n d s w h ic h a r e r e s p o n s i b l e f o r m a k in g s u c h p a y m e n t s to s e p a ­
r a te d e m p l o y e e s . P a y m e n t s to p la n s w h ic h a r e p r i m a r i l y s u p p le m e n t a l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e fit
p la n s s h o u ld b e r e p o r t e d u n d e r p r i v a t e w e l f a r e p la n s ( i t e m V I I - B - 4 ) .
S e e th e e x p la n a t io n s
b e lo w f o r p r i v a t e w e l f a r e p la n s f o r a d e f in it io n o f s u p p le m e n t a l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e f it p la n s .
Y e a r end.

C h r is tm a s ,

an d O t h e r

Ir r e g u la r

B on u ses

R e p o r t s p e c i a l b o n u s p a y m e n t s m a d e at th e end o f th e c a le n d a r o r f i s c a l y e a r o r d u r in g th e
C h r is tm a s s e a s o n .
R e p o r t a l s o c a s h p a y m e n t s f o r p e r f e c t a t te n d a n c e and lo n g s e r v i c e , and
r e la te d b o n u s e s .
I n c lu d e c a s h f r o m p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s a c t u a l l y p a id ou t to e m p lo y e e s in
1 9 6 3 in the f o r m o f b o n u s e s .
(D o n o t r e p o r t p r o f i t - s h a r i n g fu n d s s e t a s i d e in 1 9 6 3 f o r d i s ­
t r ib u t io n in s u b s e q u e n t y e a r s . )
E x c lu d e r e g u l a r l y p a id b o n u s e s ( s u c h a s w e e k ly and m o n t h ly
p r o d u c tio n b o n u s e s ) , b o n u s e s in th e f o r m o f m e r c h a n d i s e , and s u c h in c e n t iv e p a y m e n t s a s
s a f e t y a w a r d s and s u g g e s t i o n a w a r d s .

O th er Ir r e g u la r

P ay

R e p o r t c a s h p a y m e n ts n ot e ls e w h e r e r e p o r te d .
In c lu d e r e t r o a c t i v e p a y f o r p r e v i o u s y e a r s ,
in c e n t iv e a w a r d s , s a f e t y a w a r d s , and s u g g e s t io n a w a r d s .
H o w e v e r , e x c lu d e a l l o w a n c e s f o r
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , l iv in g c o s t s , and o t h e r e x p e n s e s in c u r r e d in th e p e r f o r m a n c e o f w o r k , and
p a y m e n t s f o r e d u c a tio n a l e x p e n s e s .
Pay

fo r

Leave

T im e

T h is s e c t i o n i s in te n d e d to m e a s u r e p a y r o l l e x p e n d it u r e s a c c o u n te d f o r b y p a id l e a v e d u r in g
th e y e a r .
E x c lu d e p a y m e n t s u n d e r s e v e r a n c e p a y and s u p p le m e n t a l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e fit




107
p la n s .
F o r e a c h ty p e o f e x c u s e d a b s e n c e l i s t e d , r e p o r t t o ta l p a y m e n t s m a d e d i r e c t l y to
th e e m p l o y e e s b y th e c o m p a n y .
( T h e s e e x p e n d it u r e s w e r e a l s o in c lu d e d in e x p e n d it u r e s
fo r b a s ic s a l a r i e s .)
1.

V a c a t i o n s . R e p o r t t o t a l v a c a t io n p a y m e n t s m a d e b y th e c o m p a n y d i r e c t l y to th e e m p lo y e e s d u r in g 1 9 6 3 , w h e t h e r v a c a t i o n s w e r e ta k e n o r n o t. If e m p l o y e e s w o r k e d d u r in g th e
v a c a t io n p e r i o d , an d w e r e g iv e n b o th p a y f o r w o r k an d p a y in lie u o f v a c a t io n , r e p o r t
h e r e o n ly th e p a y m e n t s in l ie u o f v a c a t io n .
If e m p l o y e e s w ho le f t th e c o m p a n y w e r e p a id
f o r u n u s e d v a c a t i o n , r e p o r t th e p a y m e n t s m a d e .

2.

H o l i d a y s . R e p o r t t o t a l h o lid a y p a y m e n t s m a d e b y th e c o m p a n y d i r e c t l y to th e e m p l o y e e s
d u r in g th e y e a r , w h e th e r th e h o lid a y s w e r e ta k e n o r n o t.
F o r e m p l o y e e s w ho w o r k e d on
a p a id h o lid a y , a n d r e c e i v e d b o th p a y f o r w o r k and p a y in lie u o f t im e o f f , r e p o r t h e r e
o n ly th e h o lid a y p ay th e e m p lo y e e w o u ld h a v e r e c e i v e d i f h e h a d n o t w o r k e d .

3.

S ic k l e a v e .
R e p o r t t o t a l s ic k l e a v e p a y m e n t s m a d e b y th e c o m p a n y d i r e c t l y to th e e m ­
p lo y e e s d u rin g th e y e a r .
In c lu d e p a y m e n t s u n d e r b o th f o r m a l s ic k le a v e p la n s a n d i n ­
f o r m a l s a l a r y c o n tin u a tio n p la n s .
I n c lu d e p a y m e n t s f o r b o th s h o r t - t e r m and l o n g - t e r m
illn e s s .
If a s ic k le a v e p la n w a s in e f f e c t p r o v id in g p a id t im e o f f o r c a s h b o n u s e s f o r
u n u s e d s ic k l e a v e , r e p o r t a s s ic k le a v e o n ly p a y f o r t i m e o f f b e c a u s e o f a c tu a l i l l n e s s .
P a id t im e o f f f o r u n u s e d s ic k le a v e sh o u ld be r e p o r t e d a s p e r s o n a l l e a v e ( I t e m V - D - 4 ) ,
and c a sh b o n u se s
a s y e a r e n d , C h r i s t m a s , an d o t h e r i r r e g u l a r b o n u s e s (I t e m V - C - 4 ) .
( P a y m e n t s r e p o r t e d a s p a y f o r le a v e t i m e s h o u ld a l s o b e r e p o r t e d a s e x p e n d it u r e s f o r
b a s i c s a l a r i e s , I t e m V - B ; but c a s h b o n u s p a y m e n t s sh o u ld b e in c lu d e d in e x p e n d it u r e s in
a d d itio n to b a s i c s a l a r i e s , I t e m V - C . )
P a y m e n t s w h ic h s u p p le m e n t l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d p a y m e n t s , m a d e b y the c o m p a n y d i r e c t l y to
e m p lo y e e s f o r t i m e l o s t b e c a u s e o f o n - t h e - j o b i n j u r i e s , sh o u ld b e r e p o r t e d a s s i c k l e a v e .
P a y m e n t s p u r s u a n t to S ta te T e m p o r a r y D i s a b i l i t y I n s u r a n c e la w s sh o u ld b e r e p o r t e d a s
s i c k le a v e if th e y a r e m a d e by th e c o m p a n y d i r e c t l y to th e e m p l o y e e s .
H ow ever, p ay­
m e n t s f o r in s u r a n c e p r e m i u m s p u r s u a n t to S ta te T e m p o r a r y D i s a b i l i t y I n s u r a n c e la w s
s h o u ld o n ly b e r e p o r t e d a s o t h e r l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d in s u r a n c e ( i t e m V I I - A - 7 ) .
O th er e x ­
p e n d it u r e s f o r s i c k n e s s an d a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e p r e m i u m s sh o u ld be r e p o r t e d u n d e r
Ite m V I I - B - 2 .
(S e e b e l o w .)

4.

M i l i t a r y , j u r y , w i t n e s s , v o t in g , an d p e r s o n a l l e a v e .
R e p o r t to t a l p a y m e n t s m a d e b y th e
c o m p a n y d u r in g th e y e a r , d i r e c t l y to th e e m p l o y e e s , f o r m i l i t a r y , j u r y , w i t n e s s , o r
v o tin g l e a v e o r le a v e g r a n t e d f o r p e r s o n a l r e a s o n s s u c h a s d e a th in th e f a m i l y , t i m e
o ff fo r p e r fe c t a tte n d a n ce , e tc .

T o ta l H ou rs

P a id

For

R e p o r t th e to t a l n u m b e r o f m a n - h o u r s p a id f o r .
T h i s sh o u ld in c lu d e m a n - h o u r s s p e n t a t th e
p la n t o r o f f i c e , m a n - h o u r s a w a y f r o m th e e s t a b li s h m e n t on c o m p a n y b u s i n e s s , and th e m a n ­
h o u r s e q u iv a le n t to p a y f o r t i m e s p e n t a w a y f r o m th e e s t a b li s h m e n t d u r in g p a id le a v e p e r i o d s .
To

d e t e r m in e th e m a n - h o u r s

e q u iv a le n t to th e

p a y r e c e i v e d d iv id e th e p a y m e n t f o r th e it e m
F o r e x a m p l e , u n d e r j u r y l e a v e , i f an e m p lo y e e
w h o is r e g u l a r l y p a id $ 2 an h o u r w a s g iv e n $ 5 f o r a d a y *s a b s e n c e f o r j u r y d u ty , th e m a n ­
h o u r s e q u iv a le n t to th e p a y r e c e i v e d w o u ld b e 2 V2 h o u r s ( i . e . , $ 5 4 $ 2 ) .
S im ila r ly , u nder
s ic k l e a v e , i f a n e m p lo y e e r e c e i v e d a d a y 's s i c k l e a v e at h a lf h is r e g u la r r a t e o f p a y , th e
m a n - h o u r s e q u iv a le n t w o u ld b e 4 , e v e n th o u g h th e e m p lo y e e w a s a b s e n t f o r 8 h o u r s .

b y the e m p l o y e e ' s s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly r a t e .

Do

not c o n v e rt

H ou rs

P a id

O v e r tim e
P a id

o v e r tim e

For

( E x c lu d i n g

H ou rs,

Leave

or

H o u rs

o th e r

p r e m iu m

O v e r tim e

p a id h o u r s

to

s tr a ig h t-t im e

e q u iv a le n t h o u r s .

H o u rs),

an d
(Ite m s

V I-B ,

C,

a n d D)

In e a c h o f t h e s e t h r e e i t e m s , r e p o r t th e n u m b e r o f m a n - h o u r s o r th e m a n - h o u r s e q u iv a le n t
( a s d e fin e d a b o v e ) .
T h e h o u r s r e p o r t e d s h o u ld b e t h o s e f o r w h ic h e x p e n d it u r e s f o r b a s i c s a l a ­
r i e s , o v e r t i m e , an d p a id l e a v e , r e s p e c t i v e l y , w e r e r e p o r t e d in th e a n n u a l p a y r o l l e x p e n d it u r e s
s e c t io n o f th e q u e s t io n n a ir e .
I n c lu d e a s o v e r t i m e h o u r s o n ly t h o s e
a d d itio n a l c o m p e n s a t io n w a s p a id .




hou rs

w ork ed

o u t s id e th e

r e g u la r

w ork w eek fo r

w h ic h

108

L eg a lly R equired Insurance
R eport the net lia b ility in cu rre d by the com pany fo r the y e a r 1963 fo r em p loyee b en efit p r o ­
g ra m s that a re re q u ire d by law. E xclu de em p loyee con tribu tion s to the paym en ts. R eport the
net lia b ility in c u r r e d fo r 1963 rather than the amount paid during 1963.
F o r exam p le, re p o rt
S o cia l S ecu rity tax paym ents fo r the fourth qu arter of 1963, even though they w e re paid in
the fir s t qu arter o f 1964.
E xclude paym ents fo r the fourth qu arter of 1962, even though
they w ere paid in_ the fir s t qu arter of 1963.
1.

S ocia l S ecu rity T axes (F IC A ) fo r O ld -A g e , S u rv iv o rs, and D isa b ility In su ra n ce.
R eport
the lia b ility in cu rre d fo r 1963 rather than the amount paid during 1963.
N O TE: If you
obtain you r fig u re s fr o m you r " E m p lo y e r 's Q u arterly F e d e r a l Tax R etu rn" (F o r m 941),
p le a se exclu d e amounts deducted fr o m e m p lo y e e s ' pay.
E xclu d e R a ilroa d R etirem en t
T ax p aym en ts.

2.

U nem ploym ent C om p en sa tion . R eport sep a ra tely paym ents to State govern m en ts and to the
F e d e ra l G overn m en t.
E xclu de R a ilroa d U nem ploym ent Insurance paym en ts.

3.

R ailroad R etirem en t T a x , and

4.

R a ilroa d U nem ploym ent Insurance
R eport paym ents fo r re tire m e n t and unem ploym ent com p en sa tion pursuant to sp e c ia l
le g isla tio n fo r the r a ilr o a d industry.

5.

W o rk m e n 's C om p en sa tion .
R eport net expenditures during the y e a r fo r in su ra n ce p r e ­
m ium s (i. e. , p rem iu m s le s s refunds) and paym ents to State funds.
If you r com pany q u a lifies as a s e lf-in s u r e r , re p o rt the total net expenditures m ade during
the y ea r fo r w o r k m e n 's com p en sa tion ben efits that a re req u ired by law.
Do not include
c o s ts o f m e d ic a l and fir s t -a id s e r v ic e s n o rm a lly supplied by the com pany.
E xclu de p a y ­
m ents fo r w o r k -c o n n e c te d d isa b ility under the F e d e r a l E m p lo y e r s ' L ia b ility A ct.
P rem iu m s fo r p riv a te p la n s, ov e r and above le g a lly re q u ire d w o r k m e n 's com p en sa tion ,
p rovid in g ben efits fo r w o r k -co n n e cte d illn e ss o r in ju ry , should be rep orted in co m b in a ­
tion with w o r k m e n 's com p en sation .

6.

P aym ents fo r W ork -C on n ected D isa b ility Under the F e d e r a l E m p lo y e r s ' L ia b ility A c t .
R eport expen ditu res m ade in tra n sp orta tion industry establish m en ts su b je ct to the F e d e ra l
E m p lo y e r s ' L ia b ility A ct and not c o v e r e d by State w o r k m e n 's com p en sa tion a cts.

7.

O ther, Including State T e m p o ra ry D isa b ility In su ra n ce. S p ecify each oth er le g a lly req u ired
p ro g ra m fo r w hich e m p lo y e r expenditures w e re m ade.
Include total paym ents m ade to
in su ran ce c a r r ie r s , to State o r oth er funds, o r d ir e c tly to the em p loyee fo r those b en efits
req u ired by law w hich have not been a ccou nted fo r else w h e re in the qu estion n aire.
An
exam ple of item s to be included h ere is State T e m p o ra ry D isa b ility In su rance.
R eport
total em p lo y e r expenditures fo r p rem iu m s fo r such in su ra n ce even w h ere a plan is m o r e
lib e r a l than the State req u irem en ts.
W here e m p lo y e r expenditures fo r p rem iu m s fo r
leg a lly req u ire d T e m p o ra ry D isa b ility Insurance cannot be iso la te d fr o m e m p lo y e r p a y ­
m ents fo r oth er b en efits re p orted on the qu estion n a ire, p le a se indicate this fa ct and a lso
the item which in clu d es the paym ents fo r T e m p o ra ry D isa b ility In su rance.

E m p lo y e r E xpenditures fo r P riv a te W elfa re Plans
F o r each of the p riv a te w e lfa re plan item s rep ort a sin gle fig u re rep re se n tin g the com bined
expen ditu res fo r a ll c le r ic a l, te ch n ica l, p r o fe s s io n a l, a d m in istra tiv e, and execu tive e m p lo y e e s.
In addition, if sep a ra te plans ex isted fo r u pper m anagem ent e m p lo y e e s , re p o rt expenditures
fo r such plans se p a ra te ly .
(Do not re p o rt any expenditures in the upper m anagem ent colum n
u n less separate plans w e re in e ffe ct fo r these e m p lo y e e s .
E xpenditures rep orted in the
upper m anagem ent colum n sh ou ld b e in cluded in the r e p o rte d expen ditu res fo r a ll n o n p ro ­
duction em p loy e e s . )
E xclude paym ents a lre a d y re p o rte d as pay fo r leave tim e o r le g a lly re q u ire d in su ra n ce.
E x­
clude em p loyee con tribu tion s to the paym ents.
Include com pany paym ents to funds and to
plans finan ced through p r o fit sharing.
F o r paym ents to in su ra n ce c a r r ie r s re p o rt only net
expen ditu res (i. e. , p rem iu m s le s s re b a te s, refunds, and dividends r e c e iv e d during the y e a r ,
u n less they go to p u rch a se additional in su ra n ce).
Include paym ents fo r dependents and r e ­
tire d em p lo y e e s .




109

1.

L ife In su ra n ce, A ccid e n ta l Death and D ism em b erm en t In su rance, and Death B e n e fits , and

2.

H osp italiza tion , S u rgica l and M e d ica l P la n s , and S ickn ess and A ccid e n t In su ran ce.
Re p o rt net expenditures fo r in su ra n ce p re m iu m s, paym ents to w e lfa re funds, paym ents
under s e lf-in s u r e d a rra n g e m e n ts, etc. E xclude a d m in istra tiv e expen ses in cu rre d by the
com pany and e m p loyee con tribu tion s to the paym ents fo r the plan.
Include paym ents fo r
tra v e l a ccid en t in su ra n ce in the fig u re fo r life in su ra n ce, a ccid e n ta l death and d is m e m ­
b erm en t in su ra n ce , and death b en efits (Item V II-B -1 ). Sickness and a ccid e n t in su ra n ce,
w hich u su ally is financed through a group in su ra n ce p o lic y , p ro v id e s paym ents to e m p lo y ­
ees during a b se n ce s fr o m w ork caused by illn e ss o r a ccid e n t. Do not include com pany
paym ents d ir e c t ly to e m p loyees under extended sick lea v e p lan s; these should be re p o rte d
as paym ents fo r s ick lea v e.

3.

P en sion and R etirem en t P la n s . R ep ort p rem iu m s paid by the com pan y to an in su ran ce
c a r r ie r , le s s dividends o r oth er c r e d its ; com pany paym ents into an ir r e v o c a b le tru st
fund; com pany paym ents to p e n sio n e rs under p a y -a s -y o u -g o plans (i. e. , unfunded p la n s),
etc.
P aym ents fo r p ast s e r v ic e lia b ility as w ell as cu rre n t s e r v ic e cre d its should be
rep orted . P aym ents under p r o fit-s h a r in g plans d e fe r r e d until re tire m e n t should be r e ­
p orted h e re . Include p rem iu m s fo r d isa b ility re tire m e n t in su ra n ce.
E xclude a d m in is­
trative co s ts (inclu din g a ctu a ria l and leg a l exp en ses) in cu rre d by the com pany and e m ­
p loy ee con tribu tion s to the paym ents fo r the plans.

4.

Supplem ental U nem ploym ent B e n e fits . This item c o v e r s plans which a re design ed p r i ­
m a r ily to p ro v id e ben efits w hich supplem ent le g a lly re q u ire d unem ploym ent com pen sation
b en efits. R ep ort expenditures during 1963. E xpenditures fo r s e v e ra n ce pay should be
rep orted in the se ctio n o f the qu estion n aire co v e rin g annual p a y r o ll expen ditu res.

5.

Savings and T h rift P la n s.
Under these p lan s, n o rm a lly em p loyee savings a re su p p lem ented by com pan y con trib u tion s. R eport ca sh p a ym en ts, m ade by the com pany during
the y e a r, to a sep a ra te fund o r to em p loyee a ccou n ts.
E xclude in te re st cred ited to the
e m p lo y e e 's accou nt.
A ls o exclu de paym ents m ade under arran gem en ts which a re p r i ­
m a rily pen sion p lan s. Paym ents to funds which a re p r im a r ily design ed to p ro v id e p en sion
o r retirem e n t ben efits a re to be re p o rte d as pen sion and re tire m e n t plans (Item V II-B -3 ).

E m p loyee C ontributions fo r P riv a te W elfa re Plans
R eport the con tribu tion s in 1963 by em p loyees fo r p rem iu m s fo r the sp e c ifie d b en efits. R e ­
p ort con tribu tion s on ly i f th ere was a plan involving com pan y expenditures fo r p re m iu m s.
Include con tribu tion s fo r both e m p lo y e e s ' and their dependen ts' b e n e fits, p rov id ed the c o m ­
pany a lso con tribu ted tow ards dependen ts' b en efits. H ow ever, i f the com pany p rov id ed b e n e ­
fits fo r em p loyees only and the fu ll c o s t o f dependents' b en efits w e re born e by e m p lo y e e s,
re p o rt on ly the con tribu tion s o f the e m p loyees fo r their own b e n e fits, but not those fo r th eir
d ependen ts' b e n e fits.
R ep ort data fo r upper m anagem ent e m p loyees sep a ra tely only if a
sep arate plan ex isted fo r these e m p lo y e e s . In any event, include data fo r upper m anagem ent
em p loyees in the fig u re fo r a ll nonprodu ction em p lo y e e s.
P a rt II
V acation Schedules
R ep ort the le n g t h -o f-s e r v ic e req u irem en ts fo r the va riou s lengths o f paid vacation s (o r eq u i­
valents in vaca tion pay) granted. D e s c r ib e the p r a c tic e applying to the la r g e s t group o f e m ­
p loy ees in each o f the em p loyee grou p s.
If lengths o f v a ca tion a re not dependent upon e m ­
p lo y e e s ' lengths o f s e r v ic e , d e s c r ib e the m ethod o f determ in in g lengths o f vacation .
(if
additional sp ace is needed to answ er this question, use the re m a rk s a rea at the end o f the
q u estion n aire fo r m .)
V acation s P aid F o r
R eport the num ber o f e m p loyees on the p a y r o ll at any tim e during 1963 who r e c e iv e d , d ir e c tly
fro m the com pany, paid vacation s o f the lengths sp e c ifie d .
(If fu ll pay was not given fo r
all tim e o ff, b a se rep ortin g on the fu ll-tim e equivalent o f the pay r e c e iv e d .)
R ep ort on the
"N on e" line the num ber o f em p loyees who did not r e c e iv e paid v a ca tio n s.
If an em p loyee
r e ce iv e d as va ca tion pay a p ercen ta g e o f his annual ea rn in gs, c o n sid e r 2 p e rce n t o r sligh tly
m o r e as equivalent to 1 w e e k 's v a ca tion , 4 p e rce n t o r slig h tly m o r e to 2 w e e k s' v a ca tion , etc.




110

H olidays
R ep ort the num ber o f h olidays p er p e r s o n o b se rv e d in 1963.
h oliday tim e o ff le s s than a fu ll h alf day.

Do not c o n s id e r as a h a lf-d a y

S tra ig h t-T im e W orkw eek
R eport fo r the la r g e s t group o f e m p loyees in each c a te g o r y the num ber o f h ours p e r w eek
p e r em p loyee in the stra ig h t-tim e w ork w eek . This need not be the h ou rs a ctu a lly w ork ed.
S ick Leave
C on sid er as a s ic k lea ve plan one w h ereb y the com pan y pays d ir e c t ly , in w hole o r in p a rt,
s a la rie s to em p loyees who a re away fr o m w ork b e ca u se o f illn e s s o r in ju ry , oth er than
le g a lly req u ired w o rk m e n 's com p en sa tion . In form a l a rran gem en ts fo r such paym ents should
be an sw ered "N o. " An in su ra n ce p o lic y p rov id in g cash paym ents to il l e m p lo y e e s should
not be co n sid e re d as s ick le a v e , but should be re p o rte d under "In su ra n ce and P e n s io n s "
(Item X - A - 4 ) . A n sw er " Y e s " fo r a p a rticu la r em p loyee group if th ere was a plan applying
to any em p loyees in that group (the plan need not apply to a ll o r a m a jo r ity o f the e m p lo y e e s ).
M iscella n eou s L eave
In these qu estion s, a n sw er " Y e s " if th ere was a com pan y p o lic y o f granting paid lea v e o f the
types lis te d , even if no actu al paid lea v e was granted in 1963 b e ca u se the cir c u m s ta n c e s
causing such lea v e did not a r is e .
A n sw er " Y e s " fo r a p a rticu la r em p loyee group i f th ere
was a p o lic y applying to any e m p loyees in the group (the p o lic y need not apply to a ll o r a
m a jo r ity o f the e m p lo y e e s ).
C om pany P lan s fo r In su rance and P en sion s
In this se ctio n , a question should be an sw ered " Y e s " on ly if th ere was a plan in volvin g c o m ­
pany expenditures fo r b e n e fits.
If the com p a n y 's r o le was lim ited to c o lle c tin g p rem iu m s
fr o m em p loyees and turning the funds c o lle c te d o v e r to an in su ra n ce c a r r ie r , the a p p rop ria te
question should be an sw ered "N o. " If a com pan y p ro v id e d b en efits fo r em p lo y e e s but the
em p loy ees paid the fu ll c o s t o f d ep enden ts' b e n e fits, the a p p rop ria te question should be an­
sw ered " Y e s " fo r e m p loyees and "N o " fo r dependents.
If a com pan y had no expenditures
in 1963 fo r a ben efit b e ca u se dividends o r oth er c r e d its e x ce e d e d p rem iu m s o r b e ca u se
th ere was no o c c a s io n to m ake paym ents under a s e lf-in s u r e d plan, an sw er " Y e s " fo r that
ben efit. A n sw er " Y e s " fo r a p a rticu la r e m p loyee group if th ere was a plan applying to any
em p loyees in the group (the plan need not apply to a ll o r a m a jo r ity o f the e m p lo y e e s ).
C ov era g e o f Insurance and P en sion P lans
F o r p u rp oses o f th ese q u estion s, fo r in su red plans and fo r th ose financed b y oth er funding
a rra n g em en ts, c o n s id e r as " c o v e r e d " e m p loyees those fo r whom the com pan y was m aking
paym ents.
Thus, an e m p loyee would be " c o v e r e d " by a p en sion plan if the com pany was
m aking paym ents fo r his p en sion b e n e fits, even i f he was not cu rre n tly e lig ib le to r e c e iv e
the ben efits b e ca u se he had not reach ed re tire m e n t age o r had not su fficie n t length o f s e r v ­
ic e .
E m p loyees not c o v e r e d would be th ose fo r whom the com pan y was not m aking paym ents
b ecau se o f such fa c to r s as age o r le n g t h -o f-s e r v ic e req u irem en ts fo r c o v e r a g e and fa ilu re to
m ake em p loyee con tribu tion s under co n trib u to ry p lan s. F o r plans financed on a p a y -a s -y o u go b a s is , em p loyees not co v e r e d would be th ose who would not cu rre n tly o r in the future
be elig ib le fo r b e n e fits.
E xtra (P rem iu m ) P a v and M isce lla n e o u s P r a c tic e s
In each o f these it e m s , an sw er " Y e s " o r "N o " fo r each o f the e m p lo y e e groups and, as r e ­
quested, p rov id e in form a tion on the nature o f the com pany p r a c tic e and the s p e c ific e m p loyees
co v e re d by the p r a c tic e .
W here a p p lica b le , an sw er " Y e s " i f a com pan y p o lic y e x iste d , even i f the p o lic y was not in ­
voked b eca u se the con tin gen cy did not a r is e .
A n sw er " Y e s " fo r a p a r tic u la r e m p loyee group
i f th ere was a p o lic y applying to any em p lo y e e s in the group (the p o lic y need not apply to
a ll o r a m a jo r ity o f the e m p lo y e e s ).




Other BLS Publications on Employer Expenditures for Supplementary Compensation
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