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Subject Index of Bulletins
Published by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1915-59

with Annotated Listing of Bulletins, 1895-1959




Bulletin No. 1281
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, C o m m issio n er




Subject Index of Bulletins
Published by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1915-59

Bulletin No. 1281
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Jam es P. M itchell,

Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
E w a n C la g u e,

Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. — Price 55 cents







Preface
From time to time, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has issued selected lists o f its
publications. The listing in this volume, however, represents the only complete
record of bulletins published by the Bureau. The first section of this volume covers
the period from the date of the Bureau’s organization (as the Bureau of Labor in
the Department of the Interior in January 1885) to December 31, 1959. It lists the
titles of the bulletins in numerical order and also shows the date of publication
(in parentheses).
The second section of this publication indexes all bulletins published since 1915
(Nos. 175 through 1263) alphabetically by subject and provides cross-references. A
subject index of Bulletins 1 through 173 was provided in Bulletin 174 (1915). Se­
lected bulletins are annotated in the numerical listing and such annotated publicacations are indicated in the subject index by asterisks. Annotations are provided for
those bulletins which report on comprehensive investigations of subject matter,
covering major industries and broad geographical areas; provide basic information
on various phases of the Bureau’s program and explain its survey techniques; present
the latest data from the Bureau’s leading historical series; or analyze major eco­
nomic and labor developments. The report series of the Bureau is not included
either in the numerical listing or in the subject index, nor are special or period­
ical publications.
Supplies of all bulletins numbered from 1 to 949 inclusive are exhausted, as are
a considerable number of later bulletins. These publications can, however, be con­
sulted at most large public libraries, as well as in most university and college li­
braries. The depository libraries, by State, which now receive the publications of
the Bureau are listed in an appendix. In foreign countries, libraries of national and
State labor and statistical offices and many universities receive the bulletins of the
Bureau.
Prices are given for bulletins which are still in print. Such publications may be
purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D.C., or from any of the regional offices of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
The numerical listing and index were prepared in the O ffice of Publications of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics by M. Frances Marshall and Gladys B. Wash.
Miss Marshall was largely responsible for the preparation of the subject classifi­
cations of the bulletins, Mrs. Wash for the numerical listing. The work was plan­
ned and to a large extent supervised by Bernard Yabroff.




ill




Subject Index of Bulletins Published by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1915-59
Annotated Numerical Listing 1895-1950
1

2

3
4
5
6
7

Strikes and Lockouts in the United States from
January 1, 1881, to June 30, 1894 [summary of
Third and Tenth Annual Reports]; Private and
Public Debt in the United States; Employer and
Employee under the Common Law (1895).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation on
work stoppages (strikes and lockouts).
The Poor Colonies of Holland; The Industrial Revo­
lution in Japan; Notes Concerning the Money of
the United States and Other Countries; The
Wealth and Receipts and Expenses of the United
States (1896).
Industrial Communities: Coal Mining Co* of
Anzin, France (1896).
Industrial Communities: Coal Mining Co. of
Blanzy, France. The Sweating System (1896).
Convict Labor; Industrial Communities; Iron and
Steel Works of Friedrich Krupp, Essen, Germany
(1896).
Industrial Communities; Familistere Society of
Guise, France. Cooperative Distribution (1896).
Industrial Communities: Other Communities;
Rates of Wages Paid Under Public and Private
Contract (1896).

8

The Padrone System and Padrone Banks; The
Dutch Society for-General Welfare (1897).

10

Work and Wages of Men, Women, and Children
[summary of Eleventh Annual R eport]; Con­
dition of the Negro in Various Cities; Building
and Loan Associations (1897).

20

The Alaskan Gold Fields and the Opportunities
They Offer for Capital and Labor; Mutual Relief
and Benefit Associations in the Printing Trade
(1898) .
Condition of Railway Labor in Europe (1899).

21

Pawnbroking in Europe and the United States
(1899) .

22

Benefit Features of American Trade Unions; The
Negro in the Black Belt; Some Social Sketches;
Wages in Lyons, France, 1870 to 1896 (1899).

23

The Attitude of Women's Clubs and Associations
Toward Social Economics; The Production of
Paper and Pulp in the United States, from January
1 to June 30, 1898 (1899).

24

Statistics of Cities (1899).

25

Foreign Labor Laws: Great Britain and France
(1899) .

26

Protection of Workmen in Their Employment;
Foreign Labor Laws: Belgium and Switzerland
(1900) .

27

Wholesale Prices: 1890 to 1899; Foreign Labor
Laws: Germany (1900).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation on
wholesale prices.

28

Voluntary Conciliation and Arbitration in Great
Britain; System of Adjusting Scale o f Wages, etc.,
in Certain Rolling Mills; Foreign Labor Laws:
Austria (1900).

29

Trusts and Industrial Combinations; The Yukon
and Nome Gold Regions; Labor Day (1900).

30

Trend of Wages from 1891 to 1900; Statistics of
Cities; Foreign Labor Laws: Russia, The Nether­
lands, Italy, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
(1900).

31

The Betterment of Industrial Conditions; Present
Status of Employers' Liability in the United
States; Condition of Railway Labor in Italy
(1900) .

32

Accidents to Labor as Regulated by Law in the
United States; Prices of Commodities and Rates
of Wages in Manila; The Negroes of Sandy Spring,
Md.: A Social Study; The British Workmen's
Compensation Act and Its Operation (1901).

33

Foreign Labor Laws: Australasia and Canada;
The British Conspiracy and Protection of Property
Act and Its Operation (1901).

Conciliation and Arbitration in the Boot and Shoe
Industry; Railway Relief Department (1897).

9

19

11

Workers at Gainful Occupations at the Federal
Censuses of 1870, 1880, and 1890; Public Baths
in Europe (1897).

12

The Inspection of Factories and Workshops in the
United States; Mutual Rights and Duties of
Parents and Children, Guardianship, etc., Under
the Law; The Municipal or Cooperative Restau­
rant of Grenoble, France (1897).

13

The Italians in Chicago [summary of Ninth Special
Report]. The Anthracite Mine Laborers (1897).

14

The Negroes of Farmville, Va.: A Social Study;
Income, Wages, and Rents in Montreal (1898).

15

Boarding Homes and Clubs for Working Women;
The Trade-Union Label (1898).

16

The Alaskan Gold Fields and the Opportunities
They Offer for Capital and Labor (1898).

34

17

Economic Aspects of the Liquor Problem [sum­
mary of Twelfth Annual R eport]; Brotherhood
Relief and Insurance of Railway Employees; The
Nations of Antwerp (1898).

Labor Conditions in Puerto Rico; Social Economics
at the Paris Exposition; The Workmen's Compen­
sation Act of Holland (1901).

35

Cooperative Communities in the United States;
The Negro Landholder of Georgia (1901).

Wages in the United States and Europe, 1870 to
1898 (1898).

36

Statistics of Cities; Statistics of Honolulu, Hawaii
(1901) .

18




1

37

Railway Employees in the United States; The
Negroes of Litwalton, Va.: A Social Study of the
“ Oyster Negro” (1901).
38 Labor Conditions in Mexico; The Negroes of Sinclare Central Factory and Calumet Plantation,
La.; Charts Exhibited at the Pan American Expo*
sition; The Quebec Trade Disputes Act (1902).
39 Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1901 (1902).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
40 Present Condition of the Handworking and
Domestic Industries of Germany; Workmen’s
Compensation Acts of Foreign Countries; Work­
ing of Compulsory Conciliation and Arbitration
Laws in New Zealand and Victoria; The Compul­
sory Arbitration Act of New South Wales (1902).
41 Labor Conditions in Cuba; Beef Prices; The True
Reformers (1902).
42 Statistics of Cities; Labor Conditions in Cuba
[Amendatory of Article in Bull. 41] (1902).

56

Influence of Trad^ Unions on Immigrants; Labor
Conditions in Australia (1905).

57

Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1904; Street
Railway Employment in the United States; The
State Cooperative Accident Insurance Fund of
Maryland (1905).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation on
wholesale prices.

58

Labor Conditions in the Philippines, Labor Con­
ditions in Java; The New Russian Workingmen’s
Compensation Act (1905).

59

Wages and Hours of Labor in Manufacturing In­
dustries, 1890 to 1904; Retail Prices of Food,
1890 to 1904; Laws Relating to Child Labor in
European Countries (1905).

60

Government Industrial Arbitration; The EightHour Law and Enforced Labor Contracts in the
Panama Canal Zone (1905).

61

Labor Conditions in Puerto Rico; A Documentary
History of the Early Organizations of Printers
(1 905) .

62

Municipal Ownership in Great Britain; Counciliation in the Stove Industry; Laws Relating to
the Employment of Children in the United States
(1906) .

43

Report to the President on Anthracite Coal Strike;
Italian Bureau of Labor Statistics (1902).

44

Factory Sanitation and Labor Protection (1903).

45

Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1902 (1903).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

46

Report of the Anthracite Coal Strike Commission
(1903).

63

Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1905 (1906).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

47

Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii
(1903) . [Reprint of Second Report of the Com­
missioner of Labor on Hawaii, S. Doc. 181, 57th
Cong. 2d Sess.]

64

Conditions of Living Among the Poor; Benefit
Features of British Trade Unions (1906).

65

Wages and Hours of Labor in Manufacturing
Industries, 1890 to 1905; Retail Prices of Food,
1890 to 1905 (1906).

66

Third Report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii [Reprint of H. Doc. 580, 59th Cong., 1st
sess.] (1906).

67

Conditions of Entrance to the Principal Trades;
Cost of Industrial Insurance in the District of
Columbia (1906).

68

Free Public Employment Offices in the United
States; Laws of Foreign Countries Relating to
Employees on Railroads (1907).

69

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1906 (1907).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

70

The Italian on the Land: A Study in Immigration;
A Short History of Labor Legislation in Great
Britain; British Workmen’s Compensation Acts
(1907) .

71

Wages and Hours of Labor in Manufacturing In­
dustries, 1890 to 1906; Retail Prices of Food, 1890
to 1906 (1907).

72

Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian Unskilled Immi­
grant Laborers in the United States; Economic
Condition of the Jews in Russia (1907).

73

Laws Relating to the Employment of Women and
Children; Laws Relating to Factory Inspection
and the Health and Safety of Employees (1907).

74

The Legal Liability of Employers for Injuries to
Their Employees, in The United States; Summary
of Foreign Workmen’s Compensation A cts; British
Workmen’s Compensation Act of 1906; Canadian
Industrial Disputes Investigation Act of 1907;
British Trade Disputes Act of 1906 (1908).

75

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1907; Industrial Hy­
giene (1908).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation on
wholesale prices.

48

Farm Colonies of the Salvation Army; The Negroes
of Zenia, Ohio; A Social Study (1903).

49

Cost of Living [A summary of the Eighteenth
Annual Report]; Labor Conditions in New Zea­
land; Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act
of New Zealand (1903).

50

Labor Unions and British Industry; Land Values
and Ownership in Philadelphia (1904).

51

Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1903; The
Union Movement Among Coal-Mine Workers
(1904) .
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation on
wholesale prices.

52

Child Labor in the United States (1904).

53

Wages and Cost of Living (1904).

54

The Working of the United States Bureau of
Labor: Bureaus of Statistics of Labor; Bureaus of
Statistics of Labor in Foreign Countries; Value
and Influence of Labor Statistics; Strikes and
Lockouts in the United States, 1881 to 1900; Wages
in the United States and in Europe, 1890 to 1903;
Cost of Living and Retail Prices in the United
States; Wholesale Prices in the United States,
1890 to 1903; Housing of the Working People in
the United States by Employers; Public Baths in
the United States; Trade and Technical Educa­
tion in the United States; Hand and Machine
Labor in the United States; Labor Legislation in
the United States; Labor Conditions in Hawaii
(1904).
For annotation on wholesale prices, see Bull.
1257, this listing; and on work stoppages (strikes
and lockouts), Bull. 1258.

55

Building and Loan Associations in the United
States; The Revival of Handicrafts in America
(1904).

2




76

77

Wages and Hours of Labor in Manufacturing In­
dustries, 1890 to 1907; Retail Prices of Food, 1890
to 1907; Compensation for Injuries of Artisans
and Laborers in the Service of the United States;
Cost of Living of the Working Classes in the
Principal Industrial Towns of Great Britain
(1 908) .

1910; Summary of Foreign Workmen’s Compen­
sation Acts; Cost of Employers’ Liability and
Workmen’s Compensation Acts; Cost of Employers’
Liability and Workmen’s Compensation Insurance
(1910) .

Canadian Industrial Disputes Investigation Act
of 1907; W hat is Done for the Unemployed in
European Countries (1908).

78

Industrial Accidents; Mexican Labor in the United
States; Cost of Living of the Working Classes in
the Principal Industrial Towns of the German Em­
pire; British Old-Age Pensions Act of 1908 (1908).
See Bull. 490 this listing for annotation on in­
dustrial accidents.

79

Women and Child W age Earners in Great Britain;
Minimum W age Act, 1908, New South Wales
(1907).

81

The Women’s Trade-Union Movement in Great
Britain; Cost of Living of the Working Classes
in the Principal Industrial Towns of France; Earn­
ings and Hours of Labor in British Textile In­
dustries (1909).

Industrial Accidents and Loss of Earning Power:
German Experience in 1897 and 1907; Workmen’s
Compensation and Insurance; Laws and Bills,
1911; Resolutions of the Sixth Delegates’ Meet­
ing of the International Association for Labor
Legislation; Report of Illinois Commission on Oc­
cupational Diseases (1911).

93

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1910; Report of British
Board of Trade on Cost of Living in the Principal
Industrial Cities of the United States; Reports of
British Board of Trade on Cost of Living in Eng­
land and Wales, Germany, France, Belgium, and
the United States; Hours of Labor of Men, Women,
and Children Employed in Factories in Austria
(1911) .
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation on
wholesale prices.

94

Fourth Report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii (1911).

95

Industrial Lead Poisoning, with Descriptions of
Lead Processes in Certain Industries in Great Brit­
ain and the Western States of Europe; White Lead
Industry in the United States, with an Appendix
on the Lead-Oxide Industry; Deaths from In­
dustrial Lead Poisoning (Actually Reported) in
New York State in 1909 and 1910; Laws Enacted
During 1911 Requiring the Report of Occupa­
tional Diseases (1911).

96

Working Hours, Earnings, and Duration o f Em­
ployment of Women Workers in Selected Industries
of Maryland and of California; Employment of
Children in Maryland Industries; Attitude of
Massachusetts Manufacturers Toward the Health
of Their Employees; The Workmen’s Insurance
Code of July 19, 1911, of Germany (1911).

97

Review of Labor Legislation of 1911; Laws of
Various States Relating to Labor Enacted Since
January 1, 1911 (1911).

98

Mediation and Arbitration of Railway Labor Dis­
putes in the United States; Canadian Industrial
Disputes Investigation Act of 1907; Conciliation
and Arbitration of Railway Labor Disputes in
Great Britain (Conciliation and Arbitration Agree­
ment of 1907); Conciliation and Arbitration in
Great Britain (Conciliation Act of 1896); Attitude
of Employing Interests Toward Conciliation and
Arbitration in Great Britain; Attitude of Labor
Toward Conciliation and Arbitration in Great
Britain; Conciliation, Arbitration, and Sanitation
in the Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Industry in New
York City; Industrial Courts in France, Germany,
and Switzerland (1912).

99

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1911; Wholesale Prices
in Canada, 1890 to 1911 (1912).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

Mortality from Consumption in Occupations Ex­
posing to Municipal and General Organic Dust
(1 909) .

83

92

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1908 (1909).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

82

Working Hours of Wage-Earning Women in Se­
lected Industries in Chicago; Labor Laws Declared
Unconstitutional; Old-Age and Invalidity Pension
Laws of Germany, France, and Australia; Review
of Labor Legislation of 1910; Laws of Various
States Relating to Labor Enacted Since January
1,1910 (1910).

The Mortality from Consumption in Dusty Trades;
Charity Relief and Wage Earnings (1908).

80

91

84

Accidents to Railroad Employees in New Jersey,
1888 to 1907; The Minnesota Iron Ranges (1909).

85

Review of Labor Legislation of 1908 and 1909;
Laws of Various States Relating to Labor, Enacted
Since January 1, 1908 (1909).

86

Canadian Industrial Disputes Investigation Act of
1907; Phosphorus Poisoning in the Match Industry
in the United States; List of Industrial Poisons;
International Association for Labor Legislation and
Its Publications; British Trade Boards Act, 1909;
Earnings and Hours of Labor in British Clothing
Industries (1910).

87

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to March 1910; Wages and
Hours of Labor of Union Carpenters in the United
States and in English-Speaking Foreign Coun­
tries ; Prices of Wheat, Bread, etc., in Milan, Italy,
1801 to 1908; Cost of Living of the Working
Classes in the Principal Industrial Towns of Bel­
gium; Earnings and Hours of Labor in British
Building and Woodworking Industries (1910).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation on
wholesale prices.

88

Cost of Living of Families of Moderate Income
in Germany in 1907-08; Trend of Wages in Ger­
many, 1898 to 1907; Wages and Hours of Labor
in German Woodworking Industries in 1906; Wages
and Hours of Labor in Austria, 1906 and 1907
(1910) .

89

Child-Labor Legislation in Europe (1910).

90

Fatal Accidents in Coal Mining; Recent Action
Relating to Employers’ Liability and Workmen's
Compensation; Essential Features of a Compen­
sation Law; Chicago Conference of November




3

100

101

102

List of Industrial Poisons and Other Substances
Injurious to Health Found in Industrial Pro­
cesses ; Act Providing for a Tax on White^ Phos­
phorus Matches and for Prohibiting Their Im­
port or Export (1912).
Care of Tuberculous Wage Earners in Germany
(1912).
British National Insurance Act, 1911 (1912).

129

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber, Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1890 to 1912
(1913) .

130

Wheat and Flour Prices From Farmer to Con­
sumer (1914).

131

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, 1907
to 1912 (1913).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building) and 1247 (printing), this
listing.

103

Sickness and Accident Insurance Law of Switzer­
land (1912).

104

Lead Poisoning in Potteries, Tile Works, and
Porcelain Enameled Sanitary Ware Factories
(1912) .

132

Retail Prices, 1890 to June 1913 (1913).

133

105

Retail Prices, 1890 to 1911.
Part I (1912).
Part II. General Tables (1912).

Report of the Industrial Council of the British
Board o f Trade on its Inquiry into Industrial
Agreements (1913).

134

106

Retail Prices, 1890 to June, 1912.
Part I (1912).
Part II (1912).

107

Law Relating to Insurance of Salaried Employees
in Germany (1913).

108

Retail Prices, 1890 to August, 1912 (1912).

109

Statistics of Unemployment and the Work of Em­
ployment Offices (1913).

110

Retail Prices, 1890 to October 1912 (1912).

140

111 Labor Legislation of 1912 (1913).
and

Opinions

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
and Hosiery and Knit Goods Industries: 1890 to
1912 (1913).
135 Wages and Hours of Labor in Cigar and Cloth­
ing Industries, 1911 and 1912 (1913).
136 Retail Prices, 1890 to August 1913 (1913).
137 Wages and Hours of Labor in the Building and
Repairing of Steam Railroad Cars: 1890 to 1912
(1914) .
138 Retail Prices, 1890 to October 1913 (1913).
139 Michigan Copper District Strike (1914).

Affecting

Retail Prices, 1890 to December 1913 (1914).

141

Lead Poisoning in the Smelting and Refining of
Lead (1914).

112

Decisions of Courts
Labor, 1912 (1913).

113

Retail Prices, 1890 to December, 1912 (1913).

142

Administration of Labor Laws and Factory In­
spection in Certain European Countries (1914).

114

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1912 (1913).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

143

115

Retail Prices, 1890 to February, 1913 (1913).

116

Hours, Earnings, and Duration of Employment of
Wage-Earning Women in Selected Industries in
the District of Columbia (1913).

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15,1913 (1914).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building) and 1247 (printing), this
listing.

117

Prohibition of Night Work of Young Persons
(1913) .

144

Industrial Court of the Cloak, Suit, and Skirt In­
dustry of New York City (1914).

118

Ten-Hour Maximum Working-Day for Women
and Young Persons (1913).

145

Conciliation, Arbitration, and Sanitation in the
Dress and Waist Industry of New York City
(1914).

119

Working Hours of Women in the Pea Canneries
of Wisconsin (1913).

146

120

Hygiene of the Painters’ Trade (1913).

Wages and Regularity of Employment and Stand­
ardization of Piece Rates in the Dress and Waist
Industry: New York City (1914).

121

Sugar Prices, From Refiner to Consumer (1913).

147

122

Employment of Women in Power Laundries in
Milwaukee. A Study of Working Conditions and
of the Physical Demands of the Various Laundry
Occupations (1913).

Wages and Regularity of Employment in the
Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Industry with Plans for
Apprenticeship for Cutters and the Education of
Workers in the Industry (1915).

148

Labor Laws of the United States, with Decisions
of Courts Relating Thereto.
Part 1 (1914).
Part II. (1914).

149

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1913 (1914).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

150

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton, Woolen,
and Silk Industries, 1907 to 1913 (1914).

151

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and Steel
Industry in the United States, 1907 to 1912
(1914).

152

Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting Labor.
1913 (1914).

123

Employers’ Welfare Work (1913).

124

Conciliation and Arbitration in the
Trades Of Greater New York (1913).

125

Retail Prices, 1890 to April 1913 (1913).

126

Workmen’s Compensation Laws of the United
States and Foreign Countries (1914).

127

Dangers to Workers From Dusts and Fumes and
Methods of Protection (1913).

128

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton, Woolen,
and Silk Industries, 1890 to 1912 (1913).

4




Building

153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber, Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1907 to 1913
(1914) .
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
and Hosiery and Underwear Industries: 1907 to
1913 (1914).
Compensation for Accidents to Employees of the
United States. Report of Operations Under the
Act of May 30,1908 (1914).
Retail Prices, 1907 to December 1914 (1915).
Industrial Accident Statistics (1915).
See Bull. 490 this listing for annotation.
Government Aid to Home Owning and Housing
of Working People in Foreign Countries (1915).
Short-Unit Courses for Wage Earners and a
Factory School Experiment (1915).
Hours, Earnings, and Conditions of Labor of
Women in Indiana Mercantile Establishments
and Garment Factories (1914).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Clothing and
Cigar Industries, 1911 to 1913 (1915).
Vocational Education Survey of Richmond, Va.
(1915) .
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Building and
Repairing of Steam Railroad Cars: 1907 to 1913
(1915).
Butter Prices, From Producer to Consumer
(1915).
Lead Poisoning in the Manufacture of Storage
Batteries (1915).
Labor Legislation of 1914 (1915).

167

Minimum Wage Legislation in the United States
and Foreign Countries (1915).
Supplemented by Bull. 285.

168

176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186

east of the Mississippi. The report covered women
and children employed in the cotton, glass, men's
ready-made garments, and silk industries, and
miscellaneous factory industries; women in stores
and factories and in metal trades; child-labor
problems; history of child-labor legislation, of
women in industry, and of trade unionism among
women; questions of health; family budgets of
cotton-mill workers; connection between occupa­
tion and criminality among women; and the en­
forcement of labor laws and laws concerning
factory inspection in the States visited.
Effect of Minimum-Wage Determinations in
Oregon (1915).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery and
Underwear Industry, 1907 to 1914 (1915).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry: 1907 to 1914 (1915).
Industrial Poisons Used in the Rubber Industry
(1915).
The Boot and Shoe Industry in Massachusetts as
a Vocation for Women (1915).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1914 (1915).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Unemployment Among Women in Department
and Other Retail Stores of Boston (1916).
Regularity of Employment in the Women's Readyto-Wear Garment Industries (1916).
Retail Prices, 1907 to June 1915 (1916).
Compensation Legislation of 1914 and 1915
(1915) .
Labor Legislation of 1915 (1916).

187

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s Cloth­
ing Industry, 1911 to 1914 (1916).

188

Report of British Departmental Committee on
the Danger in the Use of Lead in the Painting
of Buildings (1916).

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1907 to 1913 (1915).

169

Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor, 1914 (1915).

189

170

Foreign Food Prices as Affected by the War
(1915).

Decisions of
(1916) .

190

171

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
1,1914 (1915).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers
and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton, Woolen,
and Silk Industries, 1907 to 1914 (1916).

191

Collective Bargaining in the Anthracite Coal In­
dustry (1916).

192

Proceedings of the American Association of Public
Employment Offices, Annual Meetings: First—
Chicago, Dec. 19 and 20, 1913. Second— Indianap­
olis, Sept. 24 and 25, 1914. Third—Detroit, July 1
and 2, 1915 (1916).

193

Dressmaking as a Trade for Women in Massa­
chusetts (1916).

194

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
1, 1915 (1916).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers
and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.

195

Unemployment in the United States (1916).
Second, third, and fourth surveys in a series of
investigations conducted during March-September
1915 in 39 cities in East, Middle West, Rocky
Mountain, and Pacific Coast States. See Bull. 172
for the results of these unemployment surveys
conducted in early 1915 in New York City only.

196

Proceedings of Employment Managers' Confer­
ence (1916). Held Under the Auspices of the Na-

172

Unemployment in New York City, New York
(1915) .

173

Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in the United
States and Foreign Countries (1915).
Replaced by Bull. 284. See that listing for
annotation.

174

175

Subject Index of the Publications of the United
States Bureau of Labor Statistics up to May 1,
1915 (1915).
Lists, numerically and by subject, bulletins
and reports published by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor since
its organization in January 1885 as the Bureau
of Labor, to May 1, 1915.
Summary of the Report on Condition of Woman
and Child Wage Earners in the United States
(1916) .
19-volume report resulting from an investiga­
tion (1907-09) confined “ almost wholly” to States




Courts

Affecting

Labor:

1915

5

197
198
199
200

tional Safety for the Promotion of Industrial Edu­
cation and the Minneapolis Civic and Commerce
Association, January 19 and 20, 1916 (1916).
Retail Prices, 1907 to December, 1916 (1916).
Collective Agreements in the Men’s Clothing In­
dustry (1916).
Vocational Education Survey of Minneapolis,
Minn. (1917). (Made by the National Society for
the Promotion of Industrial Education.)
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1916 (1916).
See Bull. 1267 this listing for annotation.

201

Report of Committee on Statistics and Compensa­
tion Insurance Cost of the International Associa­
tion of Industrial Accident Boards and Comsions (1916).

202

Proceedings of the Conference of Employment
Managers’ Association of Boston, Mass.: Held
May 10, 1916 (1916).

203

Workmen’s Compensation Laws of the United
States and Foreign Countries (1917).
Bull. 243 contains supplemental information.

204

Street Railway Employment in the United States
(1917).

206

Anthrax as an Occupational Disease (1917).
Replaced by Bull. 267.

206

Causes of Death by Occupation. Occupational Mor­
tality Experience of the Metropolitan Life Insur­
ance Co. Industrial Department, 1911-1913 (1917).
See Bull. 607 for later data.

221

222
223

224
225
226
227

The British System of Labor Exchanges (1916).

207

220

228
229

Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting of the
American Association of Public Employment
Offices. Buffalo, N.Y., July 20 and 21, 1916
(1917).
Hours, Fatigue, and Health in British Munition
Factories. Reprints of the Memoranda of the Brit­
ish Health of Munition Workers Committee
(1917).
Welfare Work in British Munition Factories. Re­
prints of the Memoranda of the British Health of
Munition Workers Committee (1917).
Employment of Women and Juveniles in Great
Britain During the War. Reprints of the Memo­
randa of the British Health of Munition Workers
Committee (1917).
Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor, 1916 (1917).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber, Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1915 (1918).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1916 (1917).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Con­
ference, Philadelphia, Pa., April 2 and 3, 1917
(1917) .
Retail Prices, 1907 to December, 1916. (1917).
Wage-Payment Legislation in the United States
(1918) .
Includes broad discussion of the labor contract
in English and American law and of the attitude
o f the courts and public opinion toward freedom
of contract.

230

Industrial Efficiency and Fatigue in British Muni­
tion Factories. Reprints of Interim Report and
Memoranda o f the British Health of Munition
Workers Committee (1917).

208

Profit Sharing in the United States (1917).

209

Hygiene of the Printing Trades (1917).

231

210

Proceedings of the Third Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions, Held at Columbus, Ohio,
April 25-28, 1916 (1917).

Mortality from Respiratory Diseases in Dusty
Trades (Inorganic Dusts) (1918).

232

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry: 1907 to 1916 (1918).

233

Operation of the Industrial Disputes Investigation
Act of Canada (1918).

234

The Safety Movement in the Iron and Steel Indus­
try, 1907 to 1917 (1918).
Reviews briefly the course of accidents from
1907 to 1917 in the iron and steel industry, em­
phasizing effects of World War I on accident rate.
Analyzes where and why accidents occur, their
seriousness, and discusses by what means accidents
may be prevented.

235

Employment System of the Lake Carriers’ Asso­
ciation (1918).

236

Effect of the Air Hammer on the Hands of Stone­
cutters (1918).

237

Industrial Unrest in Great Britain. Reprints of
the— (1) Reports of the Commission of Inquiry
into Industrial Unrest, (2) Interim Report of the
Reconstruction Committee, on Joint Standing
Industrial Councils (1917).

211

Labor Laws and Their Administration in the Pa­
cific States (1917).

212

Proceedings of the Conference on Social Insur­
ance Called by the International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions,
Washington, D.C., December 5 to 9, 1916 (1917).

213

Labor Legislation of 1916 (1917).

214

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1916 (1917).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers
and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.

215

Industrial Experience of Trade-School Girls in
Massachusetts (1917).

216

Accidents and Accident Prevention in Machine
Building (1917).
Replaced by Bull. 256. See Bull. 1237 this listing
for annotation.

238

217

Effect of Workmen’s Compensation Laws in Di­
minishing the Necessity of Industrial Employment
of Women and Children (1918).

Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1916 (1918).

239

Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton Goods Man­
ufacturing and Finishing, 1916 (1918).

218

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and Steel
Industry: 1907 to 1915 (1917).

240

219

Industrial Poisons Used or Produced in the Manu­
facture of Explosives (1917).

Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Laws of
the United States up to December 31, 1917
(1918).
Replaced by Bull. 275.

6




Public Employment Offices in the United States
(1918).
Includes section on semipublic employment of­
fices.
Food Situation in Central Europe, 1917 (1918).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the Unit­
ed States and Foreign Countries, 1917 and 1918
(1918) .
Supplements Bull. 203.
Labor Legislation of 1917 (1918).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1917 (1919).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers
and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.
Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor, 1917 (1918).
Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Con­
ference, Rochester, N.Y., May 9, 10, and 11, 1918
(1919) .
Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions. Held at Boston, Mass.,
August 21-25, 1917 (1919).
Industrial Health and Efficiency. Final Report
of the British Health of Munition Workers Com­
mittee (1919).

cluding cotton-mill towns of New England and
the South; steel towns of Pennsylvania, Ohio,
Alabama, and Minnesota; and in the ooal mining
towns, and iron and other metal mining towns.
264 Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions Held at Madison, Wis.,
September 24-27, 1918 (1919).
265 Industrial Survey in Selected Industries in the
United States, 1919 (1920).
Summary report on wages and hours of work
in 28 selected industries.
266 Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Convention of
the Association of Governmental Labor Officials
of the United States and Canada. Held at Seattle,
Wash., July 12-15, 1920 (1921).

250

241

242
243

244
245

267

Anthrax as an Occupational Disease (1920).
Revision of Bull. 205.

268

Historical Survey of International Action Affect­
ing Labor (1920).
Briefly describes the international political
labor movement; the international trade union
movement, and the international organizations of
social reformers interested in labor problems. Re­
counts efforts of governmental conferences to
arrive at agreements for the control of labor
conditions; analyzes treaties and conventions en­
tered into by the various governments.

Welfare Work for Employees in Industrial Estab­
lishments in the United States (1919).

269

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1919 (1920).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

251

Preventable Death in Cotton Manufacturing In­
dustry (1919).

270

Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1919 (1921).

271

252

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry, 1917 (1919).

253

Women in the Lead Industries (1919).

254

International Labor Legislation and the Society
of Nations (1919).

255

Joint Industrial Councils in Great Britain. Re­
ports of Committee on Relations Between Em­
ployers and Employed, and Other Official Docu­
ments (1919).

Adult Working-Class Education in Great Britain
and the United States. A Study of Recent De­
velopments (1920).
Reports the results achieved by adult working
class educational movements, including such move­
ments as the Workers’ Educational Association of
Great Britain; the Workers’ University main­
tained by the International Ladies’ Garment
Workers’ Union (A F L ); and the Rand School of
Social Science in New York.

272

Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the Unit­
ed States and Canada (1921).
Bull. 332 contains supplementary material.

273

Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions. Held at Toronto, Can­
ada, September 23-26, 1919 (1920).

274

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1919 (1920).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers
and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.

275

Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Laws of
the United States and Canada up to January 1,
1920 (1920).
Revision of Bull. 240.

276

Standardization of Industrial Accident Statistics.
Reports of the Committee on Statistics and Com­
pensation Insurance Cost of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions, 1915-1919 (1920).
Replaced by Bull. 667.

246
247
248

249

256

Accidents and Accident Prevention in Machine
Building (1920).
Revision of Bull. 216. See Bull. 1237 this listing
for annotation.

257

Labor Legislation of 1918 (1919).

258

Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting Labor,
1918 (1920).

259

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1918 (1919).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers
and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.

260

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry, 1907 to 1918 (1919).

261

Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1918 (1919).

262

Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods Man­
ufacturing and Finishing, 1918 (1919).

263

Housing by Employers in the United States
(1920) .
Surveys action by employers to provide housing
for their employees in manufacturing towns, in­




277

Labor Legislation of 1919 (1921).

278

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry: 1907 to 1920 (1921).
7

279
280
281

282
283
284

Hours and Earnings in Anthracite and Bitumin­
ous Coal Mining. Anthracite— 1919 and 1920. Bi­
tuminous— 1919 (1921).
Industrial Poisoning in Making Coal-Tar Dyes
and Dye Intermediates (1921).
Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions. Held at San Francisco,
Calif., September 20-24, 1920 (1921).
Mutual Relief Associations Among Government
Employees in Washington, D.C. (1921).
History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment
Board, 1917 to 1919 (1921).
Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in the United
States and Foreign Countries (1921).
Revision of Bull. 173. Pt. 1 reprinted as Bull.
656.
Pt. 1 includes a critical analysis of the various
methods employed to measure price level changes.
Examines advantages and defects of these meth­
ods. Discusses uses of index numbers, reasons for
discrepancies between 2 or more series for the
same time and country, necessary safeguards in
comparing different series, and provides an ap­
praisal of index numbers as measures of price f l o ­
tations. Pt. 2 is a detailed description of the lead­
ing series of index numbers of wholesale prices
compiled by official bureaus, financial journals,
and private investigators, including the history of
each series, sources of price data, number and
kinds of commodities included, and methods used
in averaging prices. See also Bull. 1257.

285

Minimum-Wage Laws of the United States: Con­
struction and Operation (1921).
Supplements Bull. 167.
Discusses provisions of the State minimumwage laws in effect in 1920, as well as the orders
issued under them, judicial determinations up­
holding and construing the laws, and gives some
account of operations and of methods of adminis­
tration based on official reports and a general
survey made by the Bureau.

286

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1920 (1921).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers
and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.

287

National War Labor Board. A History of Its For­
mation and Activities, Together with Its Awards
and the Documents of Importance in the Record
of Its Development (1922).

288

Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1920 (1921).

297
298

299

300
301
302

303

304

305

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1920 (1922).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Petroleum In­
dustry, 1920 (1922).
Causes and Prevention of Accidents in the Iron
and Steel Industry, 1910-1919 (1922).
Includes a record of the accident experience in
the industry. Describes the preparation and use
of accident rates and statistical methods.
See also Bull. 1237 this listing.
Personnel Research Agencies. A Guide to Organ­
ized Research in Employment Management, In­
dustrial Relations Training, and Working Condi­
tions (1921).
Replaced by Bull. 518.
Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1920 (1922).
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Insur­
ance and Administration (1922).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15,1921 (1922).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.
Use of Federal Power in Settlement of Railway
Labor Disputes (1922).
Examines methods used by the Federal Govern­
ment in the settlement of railway labor disputes
as reflected in legislation. Details events leading
to passage of five laws providing for Federal in­
tervention in such disputes, the operation of these
laws, and the attitude of the interests affected
thereby. Railway labor problems engendered dur­
ing the period of World War I administration of
railroads are treated briefly. The constitutional
issues involved in Government action for preven­
tion and settlement of railway labor disputes are
examined, and the texts of Hie five laws regulat­
ing these disputes are set forth, in two appendixes.
Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions. Held at Chicago, 111.,
September 19-23, 1921 (1922).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and Steel
Industry: 1907 to 1920 (1922).

306

Occupation Hazards and Diagnostic Signs. A
Guide to Impairments to be looked for in Hazard­
ous Occupations (1922).
Replaced by Bull. 582.

307

Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Convention of
the Association of Governmental Labor Officials
of the United States and Canada. Held at New
Orleans, La., May 2-6, 1921 (1922).

Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods Man­
ufacturing, 1920 (1921).

289

296

308

Labor Legislation of 1921 (1922).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting Labor,
1921 (1922).

290

Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting Labor,
1919-1920 (1922).

309

291

Carbon-Monoxide Poisoning (1922).

310

292

Labor Legislation of 1920 (1922).

293

The Problem of Dust Phthisis in the GraniteStone Industry (1922).

Industrial Unemployment: A Statistical Study of
Its Extent and Causes (1922).
Coordinates and interprets available informa­
tion regarding trends in industrial unemploy­
ment.

294

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry, 1921 (1922).

311

295

Building Operations in Representative Cities,
1920 (1922).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.

Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Public Employment
Services. Held at Buffalo, N.Y., September 7-9,
1921 (1922).

312

National Health Insurance in Great Britain, 1911
to 1921 (1923).

8




313
314

315
316
317
318
319
320
321

322

Consumers’ Cooperative Societies in the United
States in 1920 (1923).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Cooperative Credit Societies (Credit Unions) in
America and in Foreign Countries (1922).
Reviews international development of the credit
union movement. Examines principal provisions
of credit union laws, the characteristics and ex­
perience of credit unions, and the attitudes of
labor unions toward credit unions in the United
States. Includes a comprehensive bibliography.
Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1921 (1923).
Hours and Earnings in Anthracite and Bitumin­
ous Coal Mining. Anthracite—January, 1922. Bi­
tuminous—Winter of 1921-22 (1922)
Wages and Hours of Labor in Lumber Manufac­
turing, 1921 (1923).
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the
United States in 1921 (1923).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics: United States
Department of Labor. Its History, Activities, and
Organization (1922).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1921 (1922).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional (1922).
A compilation covering about 300 separate labor
statutes whose constitutionality had been success­
fully challenged in the State Courts of last
resort or the Supreme Court of the United States.
Includes some laws of general application which
also affect employer-employee relations. The stat­
utes considered are classified under appropriate
subject headings. The decisions are reviewed and
a number of contrasting and illustrative cases are
presented.
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations (1923).
Reproduces the provisions of the 1920 Kansas
State law which created a Court of Industrial Re­
lations and of related 1921 Kansas statutes. Draws
on the first two annual reports (applying, respec­
tively, to the periods Feb. 1-Nov. 30, 1920, and the
year 1921) for a synopsis of cases, and account
of the legal proceedings, and comments on the
functions and influence of the Court.

323

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry: 1907 to 1922 (1923).

325

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1922 (1923).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.

332
333

334
335
336
337

338
339
340
341

326

Methods of Procuring and Computing Statistical
Information of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
(1923).

327

Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1922 (1923).

328

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery and
Underwear Industry, 1922 (1923).

329

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s Clothing
Industry, 1911 to 1922 (1923).




Labor Legislation of 1922 (1923).
Code of Lighting: Factories, Mills, and Other
W orkplaces (1923).
Replaced by Bull. 556.
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the Unit­
ed States and Canada, 1920 to 1922 (1923).
Supplements Bull. 272.
Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions. Held at Baltimore, Md.,
October 9-13, 1922 (1923).
Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1922 (1923).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1922 (1923).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Safety Code for the Protection of Industrial
Workers in Foundries (1923).
Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Public Employment
Services. Held at Washington, D. C., September
11-13, 1922 (1923).
Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protection of
Abrasive Wheels (1923).
Replaced by Bull. 527.
Statistics of Industrial Accidents in the United
States (1923).
See Bull. 490 this listing for annotation.
Chinese Migrations, with Special Reference to
Labor Conditions (1923).
Trade Agreement in the Silk-Ribbon Industry of
New York City (1923).

342

International Seamen’s Union of America. A
Study of Its History and Problems (1923).

343

Laws Providing for Bureaus of Labor Statistics,
etc. (1923).

344

Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting Labor,
1922 (1923).

345

Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods Man­
ufacturing: 1922 (1923).

346

Humanity in Government (1923).
Describes the early activities of the U.S. De­
partment of Labor in promoting the welfare of
wage earners, children, and other groups under
its jurisdiction. Also summarizes, briefly, work of
the U.S. Housing Corporation and the Federal
Board for Vocational Education.

347

Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the
United States in 1922 (1923).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.

348

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile In­
dustry, 1922 (1923).

349

Industrial Relations in the West Coast Lumber
Industry (1924).
A study of the extent and causes of labor unrest
in the industry. Shows how the shift of lumber
production made possible the development o f the
great lumber industry on the West Coast. Ana­
lyzes the internal financial structure of the in­
dustry to determine the ability of the employers
to grant reasonable wage demands of employees.
Technology of the industry is examined to see
what demands it makes upon employees. Discusses
hours, wage rates, working and living conditions.
Describes development of employee psychology as
conditioned by environment of the lumber indus­
try. Gives history of employee protests and em­
ployer reactions. Bibliography is provided.

Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Convention of
the Association of Governmental Labor Officials
of the United States and Canada. Held at Harris­
burg, Pa., May 22-26, 1922 (1923).

324

330
331

9

350
351
352

353
354

355

356
357
358
359

360
361
362
363
364

Rules Governing the Approval of Head Lighting
Devices for Motor Vehicles (1923),
Safety Code for the Construction, Care, and Use
of Ladders (1923).
Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention o f
the Association of Govermental Labor Officials
of the United States and Canada. Held at Rich­
mond, Va., May 1-4, 1923 (1923).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and Steel
Industry: 1907 to 1922 (1924).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1923 (1924).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.
Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Public Employ­
ment Services. Held at Toronto, Canada, Septem­
ber 4-7, 1923 (1924).
Productivity Costs in Common-Brick Industry
(1924).
Cost of Living in the United States (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile Tire
Industry, 1923 (1924).
Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions. Held at St. Paul, Minn.,
September 24-26, 1923 (1924).
Time and Labor Costs in Manufacturing 100 Pairs
of Shoes, 1923 (1924).
Labor Relations in the Fairmont, West Virginia
Bituminous Coal Field (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and Ma­
chine Shops, 1923 (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Lumber Manufac­
turing, 1923 (1924).
Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Transmission
Apparatus (1924).
Replaced by Bull. 463.

370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385

386
387
388

365

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Paper and Pulp
Industry, 1923 (1925).

366

Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1923 (1925).

367

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1923 (1925).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

390

368

Building Permits in the Principal Cities o f the
United States in 1923 (1925).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.

391

369

The Use of Cost-of-Living Figures in Wage Ad­
justments (1925).
Describes instances in which cost-of-living data
have been used by some Federal boards and com­
missions, principally in the adjustments of wages,
and the use of cost-of-living statistics by State and
municipal agencies in the adjustment of employ­
ees’ salaries. Analyzes the recognition given to
cost-of-living data in the settlement of wage dis­
putes by State and industrial arbitration boards.
Reviews methods used by individual companies
in computing their own cost-of-living data, or in
applying available data to wage adjustments.
Shows the effect of Federal cost-of-living data on
the budgets adopted by State minimum-wage
boards. Cites wage adjustment provisions tied to
cost-of-living changes in collective bargaining
agreements.

10




389

392
393
394

Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions
of Courts Relating Thereto (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods Man­
ufacturing, 1924 (1925).
Convict Labor in 1923 (1925).
Wages and Hours o f Labor in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry, 1923 (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry: 1907 to 1924 (1925).
Safety Code for Laundry Machinery and Opera­
tions (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery and
Underwear Industry, 1907 to 1924 (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1924 (1925).
Safety Code for Woodworking Plants (1925).
Replaced by Bull. 519.
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Laws of
the United States as of January 1, 1926 (1925).
Postwar Labor Conditions in Germany (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and Steel
Industry: 1907 to 1924 (1925).
Code of Lighting School Buildings (1925).
Works Council Movement in Germany (1925).
Labor Conditions in the Shoe Industry in Massa­
chusetts, 1920-1924 (1925).
Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of
the International Association o f Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions. Held at Halifax,
Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924 (1925).
The Cost of American Almshouses (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s Clothing
Industry, 1911 to 1924 (1925).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours o f Labor, May
15, 1924 (1925).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.
Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Convention
of the Association of Governmental Labor Offi­
cials o f the United States and Canada. Held at
Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924 (1925).
Wholesale Prices. 1890 to 1924 (1925).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor: 1923-1924
(1925).
Survey of Hygienic Conditions in the Printing
Trades (1925).
Trade Agreements in 1923 and 1924 (1925).
Wages and Hours o f Labor in Metalliferous
Mines, 1924 (1925).

395

Index to Proceedings of International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions,
1914-1924 (1925).

396

Retail Prices, 1890 to 1924 (1925).

397

Building Permits in the Principal Cities o f the
United States in 1924 (1925).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.

398

Growth of Legal Aid Work in the United States.
A Study o f Our Administration o f Justice Pri­
marily as It Affects the Wage Earner and of the

Agencies Designed to Improve His Position Be­
fore the Law (1926).
Replaced by Bull. 607.
399
400

401
402

Labor Relations in the Lace and Lace-Curtain In­
dustries in the United States (1925).
Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Meeting of the
International Association of Public Employment
Services. Held at Chicago. 111., May 19-23, 1924
(1925) .
Family Allowances in Foreign Countries (1926).
Collective Bargaining by Actors. A Study of
Trade Unionism Among Performers of the Eng­
lish-Speaking Legitimate Stage in America

403
404

Labor Legislation of 1925 (1926).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1925 (1926).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.
405 Phosphorus Necrosis in the Manufacture of Fire­
works and in the Preparation of Phosphorus
(1926) .
406 Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions. Held at Salt Lake
City, Utah, August 17-20, 1925 (1926).
407 Labor Cost of Production and Wages and Hours
of Labor in the Paper Box-Board Industry (1926).
408

Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925
(1926).

Workmen's Compensation Legislation of the Unit­
ed States and Canada as of July 1, 1926 (1926).
See Bull. 496 for supplementary material.
424 Building Permits in the Principal Cities o f the
United States in 1925 (1926).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
425 Record of Industrial Accidents in the United
States to 1925 (1927).
See Bull. 490 this listing for annotation.
426 Deaths from Lead Poisoning (1927).
427 Health Survey of the Printing Trades, 1922 to
1925 (1927).
428 Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention
Conference. Held at Washington, D.C., July 14-16,
1926 (1926).
429

430

410

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1926 (1927).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building),
1246 (motortruck drivers and helpers), and
1247 (printing), this listing.

432

Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions. Held at Hartford,
Conn., September 14-17, 1926 (1927).

433

Safety Codes for the Prevention of Dust Ex­
plosions (1927).
Replaced by Bulls. 562 and 617.

Safety Code for Paper and Pulp Mills (1926).

411

Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Convention of
the Association of Governmental Labor Officials
of the United States and Canada. Held at Salt
Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925 (1926).

Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Convention
of the Association of Governmental Labor Offi­
cials of the United States and Canada. Held at
Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926 (1927).
Safety Code for Power Presses and Foot and
Hand Presses (1926).

431

Laws Relating to Payment of Wages (1926).

409

423

434

Labor Legislation of 1926 (1927).

435

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s Clothing
Industry, 1911 to 1926 (1927).

436

Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protection of
Abrasive Wheels (1927).
Replaced by Bull. 527.

412

Wages, Hours, and Productivity in the Pottery
Industry, 1925 (1926).

413

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber Indus­
try in the United States: 1925 (1926).

437

414

Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Public Employ­
ment Services. Held at Rochester, N.Y., Septem­
ber 15-17, 1925 (1926).

Cooperative Movement in the United States in
1925 (Other Than Agricultural) (1927).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.

438

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Motor Vehicle
Industry: 1925 (1927).

439

Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1924-1926 (1927).
See Bull. 1016 this listing for annotation.

440

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1926 (1927).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

441

Productivity of Labor in the Glass Industry
(1927).

442

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and Steel
Industry: 1907 to 1926 (1927).

415

Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1925 (1926).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

416

Hours and Earnings in Anthracite and Bitumin­
ous Coal Mining, 1922 and 1924 (1926).

417

Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting Labor,
1925 (1926).

418

Retail Prices, 1890 to 1925 (1926).

419

Trade Agreements, 1925 (1926).

443

420

Handbook of American Trade Unions (1926).
Replaced by Bull. 618. See this listing for an­
notation.

Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1910 to 1926
(1927).

444

421

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry, 1925 (1927).

Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting Labor,
1926 (1927).

445

Retail Prices, 1890 to 1926 (1927).

Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and Ma­
chine Shops, 1925 (1927).

446

Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods Man­
ufacturing, 1910 to 1926 (1927).

422




11

447
448
449
450

Safety Code for Rubber Mills and Calenders
(1927).
Trade Agreements, 1926 (1927).
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the
United States in 1926 (1927).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry: 1907 to 1926 (1927).

451

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery and
Underwear Industries, 1907 to 1926 (1927).

453

Revised Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices, 1923
to July 1927 (1927).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

454

Hours and Earnings in Bituminous Coal Mining,
1922, 1924, and 1926 (1927).

455

Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Conven­
tion of the Association of Governmental Labor
Officials of the United States and Canada. Held
at Paterson, N.J., May 31-June 3, 1927 (1927).

467

Safety Code for Forging and Hot Metal Stamping
(1927) .

452

466

456

457

468
469
470
471
472

Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Accident Boards
and Commissions. Held at Atlanta, Ga., Septem­
ber 27-29, 1927 (1928).

473

Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15,1927 (1928).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
Supplemental information in Bull. 476. For an­
notations on selected union scales, see Bulls. 1244
(local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this
listing.

475

458

Health and Recreation Activities in Industrial
Establishments, 1926 (1928).

459

A New Test for Industrial Lead Poisoning. The
Presence of Basophilic Red Cells in Lead Poison­
ing and Lead Absorption (1928).

476

Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
1927-1928 (1929).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
Supplement to Bull. 457. For annotations of
selected union scales, see Bulls. 1244 (local-tran­
sit), 1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers
and helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.

477

Public Service Retirement Systems:
States, Canada, and Europe (1929).

478

Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Public Employ­
ment Services. Held at Detroit, Mich., October
25-28, 1927 (1928).

479

Activities and Functions of a State Department
of Labor (1928).

480

Association of Governmental Officials in Industry
of the United States and Canada. [Formerly As­
sociation of Governmental Labor Officials.] F if­
teenth Annual Convention, New Orleans, La., May
21-24,1928 (1929).

481

Joint Industrial Control in the Book and Job
Printing Industry (1928).

482

Union Scales of Wages and Hours o f Labor,
May 15, 1928 (1929).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.

483

Conditions in the Shoe Industry in Haverhill,
Mass., 1928 (1929).

484

Wages and Hours of Labor: Common Street
Laborers, 1928 (1929).

485

Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions. Held at Paterson,
N.J., September 11-14, 1928 (1929).

Apprenticeship in Building Construction (1928).

460

474

461

Labor Organization in Chile (1928).

462

Park Recreation Areas in the United States
(1928) .

463

Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Transmission
Apparatus. First revision (1928).
Revision of Bull. 364.

464

Retail Prices, 1890 to 1927 (1928).

465

Beneficial Activities of American Trade-Unions
(1928).
A study of the early extension of national and
international trade union activities beyond their
traditional interests in improving wages, hours,
and working conditions into such broader areas
as general employee welfare, housing for union
members, union business enterprises and invest­
ments, and economic and industrial problems. In­
cluded among the employee welfare activities dis­
cussed are the provisions made by labor organi­
zations for unemployment, disability, and death
benefits; care of the aged; health services; and
recreational activities. Efforts by unions to pre­
vent and to relieve the effects of unemployment,
union-management cooperation in industrial mat­
ters of mutual concern, and economic and statisti­
cal research are also examined as expressions of
unions’ expanded interests.

12




Settlement for Accidents to American Seamen
(1928).
Minimum Wage Legislation in Various Countries
(1928) .
Summarizes the development and principal fea­
tures of minimum wage legislation in the United
States and various foreign countries, including
Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain, and Italy.
Discusses the considerations underlying wage fix­
ation, the administration of such legislation, en­
forcement problems, and beneficial results. Cites
the effect of minimum wage legislation on the em­
ployees, on industry, and on the general wage
level.
Trade Agreements, 1927 (1928).
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the
United States in 1927 (1928).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Labor Legislation of 1927 (1928).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and
Machine Shops, 1927 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry, 1927 (1929).
Wholesale Prices, 1913 to 1927 (1929).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Productivity of Labor in Merchant Blast Fur­
naces (1929).
Productivity of Labor in Newspaper Printing
(1929) .

United

486
487

Labor Legislation of 1928 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and Wor­
sted Goods Manufacturing, 1910 to 1928 (1929).
Deaths from Lead Poisoning, 1925-1927 (1929).
Care of Aged Persons in the United States
(1929).
Statistics of Industrial Accidents in the United
States to the end of 1927 (1929).
Presents available work accident statistics for
various States and industries from 1907 to 1928.
Four earlier bulletins, the first of which was
published in 1908, bring together insofar as pos­
sible the important records of industrial acci­
dents throughout the country. Data for the first
three of these bulletins were based largely upon
State and other official published reports, but
the fourth, in addition, included results of the
first attempt to collect data directly from States
and industry. Earlier bulletins were: 78, 157, 339,
and 425.
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1929 edition (1929).
See Bull. 1016 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods Manu­
facturing, 1910 to 1928 (1929).
Wholesale Prices, 1913 to 1928 (1929).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Labor Legislation of Uruguay (1929).
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1928 (1929).
Data on food prices replaced by Bull. 635. See
this listing for annotation.
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the
United States and Canada as of January 1, 1929,
with Text of Legislation Enacted in 1927 and
1928 (1929).
Supplements Bull. 423.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber In­
dustry in the United States: 1928 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry, 1910 to 1928 (1929).
History of Wages in the United States from
Colonial Times to 1928 (1929).
See Bull. 604 this listing for annotation.
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the
United States in 1928 (1929).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Public Employ­
ment Services. Held at Cleveland, Ohio, Septem­
ber 18-21, 1928 (1929).

508

502

488
489
490

491
492
493
494
495
496

497
498
499
500

509
510
511

512
513
514
515

516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523

Association of Governmental Officials in In­
dustry of the United States and Canada. [Form­
erly Association of Governmental Labor Officials]
Sixteenth Annual Convention, Toronto, Canada,
June 4-7, 1929 (1930).
Textile Safety Code (1930).
Labor Legislation of Argentina (1930).
Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions. Held at Buffalo,
N.Y., October 8-11, 1929 (1930).
Code for Identification of Gas-Mask Canisters
(1930).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and Steel
Industry, 1929 (1930).
Pennsylvania Railroad Wage Data. From Report
of Joint Fact Finding Committee in Wage Negoti­
ations, 1927 (1930).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1929 (1930).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.
Hours and Earnings in Bituminous Coal Mining,
1929 (1930).
Decisions of the Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1927, 1928 (1930).
Personnel Research Agencies, 1930 edition (1930).
Revision of Bull. 299.
Safety Code for Woodworking Plants, as revised
1930 (1930).
Revision of Bull. 378.
Social and Economic Character of Unemploy­
ment in Philadelphia, April 1929 (1930).
Wholesale Prices, 1929 (1930).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and
Machine Shops, 1929 (1930).
Wages and Hours in the Manufacture of Air­
planes and Aircraft Engines, 1929 (1930).

524

Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the
United States in 1929 (1930).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.

525

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Portland
Cement Industry, 1929 (1931).

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Motor-Vehicle
Industry: 1928 (1930).

526

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Furniture In­
dustry, 1910 to 1929 (1931).

503

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s Cloth­
ing Industry, 1911 to 1928 (1929).

527

Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protection of
Abrasive Wheels (1930).
Revision of Bulls. 338 and 436.

504

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery and
Underwear Industries, 1907 to 1928 (1929).

528

Labor Legislation, 1929 (1931).

505

Directory of Homes for the Aged in the United
States (1929).
Replaced by Bull. 677.

529

Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the Latin
American Countries (1930).
Association of Governmental Officials in In­
dustry of the United States and Canada. Seven­
teenth Annual Convention, Louisville, Ky., May
20-23, 1930 (1930).

501

506

Handbook of American Trade Unions (1929).
Replaced by Bull. 618. See this listing for anno­
tation.

507

Causes of Death by Occupation. Occupational
Mortality Experience of the Metropolitan Life
Insurance Company, Industrial Department, 19221924 (1930).
Earlier data in Bull. 207.




530

531

Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Cooperative
Societies, 1929 (1931).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.

532

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cigarette Manu­
facturing Industry, 1930 (1931).
13

533
534
535
536

537
538

Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1910 to 1930
(1931).
Labor Conditions in the Territory of Hawaii,
1929-1930 (1931).
See Bull. 926 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry, 1929 (1931).
Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at Wil­
mington, Del., September 22-26, 1930 (1931).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Dyeing and
Finishing of Textiles, 1930 (1931).
International Association of Public Employment
Services. Seventeenth Annual Meeting, Philadel­
phia, Pa. September 24-27, 1929. Eighteenth An­
nual Meeting, Toronto, Canada, September 9-12,
1930 (1931).

546

Wages and Hours in Rayon and Other Synthetic
Yarn Manufacturing, 1930 (1932).
547 Wages and Hours of Labor in Cane-Sugar Re­
fining Industry, 1930 (1931).
548 Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1929-1930 (1931).
549 Labor Legislation of Venezuela (1931).
550 Cargo Handling and Longshore Labor Conditions
(1932).
551 Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry, 1910 to 1930 (1932).
552 Labor Legislation, 1930 (1931).
553 Fluctuation in Employment in Ohio, 1914 to
1929 (1932).
554 Labor Legislation of Paraguay (1931).
555

539

Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing, 1910 to 1930 (1931).

556

540

Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15,1930 (1931).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.

557
558

Social and Economic Character of Unemployment
in Philadelphia. April 1930 (1932).
Code of Lighting: Factories, Mills, and Other
Work Places. Revision of 1930 (1931).
Revision of Bull. 331.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s Clothing
Industry, 1911 to 1930 (1932).
Labor Conditions o f Women and Children in
Japan (1931).

559

Labor Legislation of Ecuador (1931).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber In­
dustry in the United States, 1930 (1932).

541

Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1931 edition (1931).
See Bull. 1016 this listing, for annotation.

560

542

Report of the Advisory Committee on Employ­
ment Statistics (1931).
Recommendations to the President of the
United States on methods for improving the
measurement of employment and unemployment,
and on meeting the problem of technological un­
employment.

561

543

Wholesale Prices, 1930 (1931).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

544

Unemployment-Benefit Plans in the United States
and Unemployment Insurance in Foreign Coun­
tries (1931).
Surveys of company and union unemployment
benefit and guaranteed employment plans for the
protection of employees against unemployment by
providing a specified money benefit for those laid
o ff or providing a guarantee of a specified period
of employment. Includes a summary of the char­
acter, significance, and operating experience of
the plans surveyed, as well as a detailed account
of each plan. See also Bulls. 906, 907, and 925
this listing.

Public Old-Age Pensions and Insurance in the
United States and in Foreign Countries (1932).
Provides a brief history and comparative an­
alysis of old-age pension legislation in the United
States; an analysis of the individual pension laws;
the text of these laws in 17 States and Alaska,
and the results of the Bureau’s studies on the
operation of these laws. Also presents descriptive
reports of public old-age pension and insurance
systems in 39 foreign countries, by U.S. consular
representatives, and a comparative analysis of
those systems.

562

Safety Codes for the Prevention of Dust Ex­
plosions (1932).
Replaces Bull. 433. Supplemented by Bull. 617.

563

Association of Governmental Officials in Industry
of the United States and Canada. [Formerly As­
sociation of Governmental Labor Officials] Eigh­
teenth Annual Convention, Boston, Mass., May
18-22, 1931 (1932).

564

Proceedings o f the Eighteenth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at Rich­
mond, Va., October 5-8, 1931 (1932).

565

Park Recreation Areas in the United States,
1930 (1932).

566

Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1931 (1932).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales, see
Bulls. 1244 (local-transit), 1245 (building), 1246
(motortruck drivers and helpers), and 1247
(printing), this listing.

567

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1931 (1933).

568

Wages and Hours o f Labor in the Manufacture
of Silk and Rayon Goods, 1931 (1932).

545

Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the
United States in 1930 (1932).
Previous bulletins in this series were: 295, 318,
347, 368, 397, 424, 449, 469, 500, and 524. Other
comprehensive information on building construc­
tion activities and trends based on building per­
mit reports are provided in Bulls. 650, 668, 689,
693, 713, and 1243.
Bulletins in the building permit series cover­
ing principal cities show data on the number of
buildings and cost (in terms of permit valu­
ations). These data cover the number of family
dwelling units provided in new residential build­
ings ; the number and estimated cost of new
nonresidential buildings, by intended use; the
volume of additions, alterations, and repairs; and
aggregate figures for all building construction.

14




569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577

578
579
580
581
582

583
584
585
586

Labor Legislation of Mexico (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and
Machine Shops, 1931 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Furniture
Industry, 1910 to 1931 (1932).
Wholesale Prices, 1931 (1933).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Metalliferous
Mines, 1924 and 1931 (1933).
Technological Changes and Employment in the
United States Postal Service (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Air Transportation,
1931 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry, 1931 (1933).
Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at Colum­
bus, Ohio, September 26-29, 1932 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Gasoline Filling
Stations and Motor-Vehicle Repair Garages, 1931
(1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry, 1910 to 1932 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Bakery In­
dustry-Bread and Cake Departments, 1931
(1933).
Laws Relating to Employment Agencies in the
United States as of January 1, 1933 (1933).
Occupation Hazards and Diagnostic Signs. A
Guide to Impairments to be Looked for in Hazard­
ous Occupations (1933).
Replaces Bull. 306.
Proceedings of the National Conference for Labor
Legislation. Held at Washington, D.C., February
14 and 15, 1934 (1934).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and Worst­
ed Goods Manufacturing, 1932 (1933).
Labor Productivity in the Automobile Tire In­
dustry (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber In­
dustry in the United States, 1932 (1933).

587

t

602

Discussions of Industrial Accidents and Diseases.
At the 1933 Meeting of the International Associ­
ation of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions, Chicago, 111., (1934).

603

Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Caro­
lina, Tennessee (1933).

604

History of Wages in the United States from
Colonial Times to 1928. [Reprint of Bull. 499 with
Supplement, 1929-1933] (1934).
A picture of American wages in representative
occupations in representative industries from
early colonial times to 1933. Pt. 1, largely text,
deals with the period prior to 1840. Methods of
wage payments as well as the wages paid during
these years are interpreted against the back­
ground of customs, system of labor (indenture
and redemption) and working conditions peculiar
to colonization. Pt. 2, which covers the period
1840 to 1933, is entirely statistical in presen­
tation.

605

Labor Through the Century, 1833-1933 (1934).
Illustrated account of the history of American
labor. Reprint of a booklet published by the
Bureau for distribution at the Century of Prog­
ress Exposition in Chicago in 1933, (Bull. 597)
with additional review of changes to May 1934.

606

Organization and Management of Cooperative
Gasoline and Oil Associations (With Model By­
laws) (1934).

607

Growth of Legal Aid Work in the United States.
A Study of Our Administration of Justice Pri­
marily as It Affects the Wage Earner and of
the Agencies Designed To Improve His Position
Before the Law (1936).
Revision of Bull. 398.

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Dyeing and
Finishing of Textiles, 1932 (1933).

589

Labor Through the Century—1833-1933. An illu­
strated account as presented by the U.S. Deartment of Labor at the Century o f Progress
Ixposition, Chicago, 1933 (1933).
See Bull. 605 this listing for annotation. [Bull.
605 is a reprint of Bull. 597 with some additional
material.]
598 Organization and Management of Consumers*
Cooperative Associations and Clubs (With Model
Bylaws) (1934).
Replaced by Bull. 1024.
599 What are Labor Statistics for? A series of pic­
torial charts prepared by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics for the U.S. Department of Labor
exhibit at the Century of Progress Exposition,
Chicago, 1933 (1933).
600 Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15,1933 (1934).
Presents data on union scales of wages and
hours in 72 trades in 67 important industrial
cities. Between 1912 and 1933, the Bureau pub­
lished results of its surveys of organized trades
each year, with data back to 1907. The first such
bulletin was published in 1913. Some data have
appeared in the Monthly Labor Review and in
Serial reprints, rather than in bulletin form. Data
on 5 selected trades only were published annually,
between 1933 and 1952; data on 4 trades only,
since 1953.
For annotations on union scales in these latter
4 selected trades, see Bulls. 1244 (local-transit),
1245 (building), 1246 (motortruck drivers and
helpers), and 1247 (printing), this listing.
601 Wages and Hours of Labor in Bituminous-Coal
Mining, 1933 (1934).

Wages and Hours of Labor in Rayon and Other
Synthetic Yarn Manufacturing: 1932 (1933).

588

597

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Leather In­
dustry, 1932 (1933).

590

Labor Legislation, 1931 and 1932 (1933).

591

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery and
Underwear Industries, 1932 (1933).

592

Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting Labor,
1931 and 1932 (1933).

593

Technological Changes and Employment in the
Electric-Lamp Industry (1933).

594

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men's Cloth­
ing Industry: 1932 (1933).

595

Prison Labor in the United States, 1932 (1933).
See also Bull. 596.

596

Laws Relating to Prison Labor in the United
States as of July 1, 1933 (1933).
Companion volume to Bull. 595.




15

608

Organization and Management of Cooperative
Housing Associations (With Model Bylaws)
(1934) .
Replaced by Bull. 858.

625

Occupational Disease Legislation in the United
States, 1936 (1937).
Reprinted as Bull. 652 with appendix contain­
ing laws enacted in 1937.

609

Discussions of Labor Laws and Their Administra- ,
tion at the 1933 Convention of the Association of
Governmental Officials in Industry of the United
States and Canada. Chicago, 111. (1934).

626

Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the Build­
ing Trades, May 15, 1936 (1937).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

610

Revised Indexes of Factory Employment and Pay
Rolls, 1919 to 1933 (1935).

627

Entrance Rates and Full-Time Hours of Com­
mon Laborers Employed by Cities, September
1935 (1937).

611

Unemployment Insurance and Reserves in the
United States. A Selected List of Recent Refer­
ences (1935).

628

Changes in Retail Prices of Gas, 1923-36 (1937).

629

Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1936.
Proceedings of the Twenty-second Convention of
the International Association of Governmental
Labor Officials, Topeka, Kans., September 1936
(1937) .

612

Consumers', Credit, and Productive Cooperation
in 1933 (1935).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.

613

Average Annual Wage and Salary Payments in
Ohio, 1916 to 1932 (1935).

630

Laws Relating to Employment Agencies in the
United States as of July 1, 1937 (1937).

614

Bulletins and Articles Published by Bureau of
Labor Statistics: A Selected List of References
(1935) .

631

Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the Print­
ing Trades, May 15, 1936 (1937).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

615

The Massachusetts System of Savings-Bank Life
Insurance (1935).
Replaced by Bull. 688.

632

616

Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1936 edition (1936).
See Bull. 1016 this listing for annotation.

Labor Offices in the United States and Canada
(1938) .
Replaced by Bureau of Labor Standards Bull.
177.

633

617

Safety Codes for the Prevention of Dust Ex­
plosions (1936).
Supplements Bull. 562.

Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in the
Set-Up Paper-Box Industry, 1933, 1934, and 1935
(1937).

634

618

Handbook of American Trade Unions (1936).
Replaces Bulls. 420 and 506.
Provides general information covering Ameri­
can national and international trade unions, their
relation to the AFL, date of each organization's
founding, its historical development, and the es­
sential facts of its structure and functions. (Ob­
jectives, territorial, and trade jurisdiction, form
of government, qualifications for membership,
apprenticeship regulations, methods of negotiat­
ing agreements, benefits, official organ, head­
quarters, extent and distribution of the organi­
zation, and membership reported to the Bureau
of Labor Statistics.)
This edition also includes a brief review of
the outstanding changes and developments that
have occurred within the American labor move­
ment since 1929, when the preceding edition of the
Handbook was published.

Characteristics of Company Unions, 1935 (1938).
A quantitative study of the various types of
employer-employee dealings and the character­
istics of “ company unions,'' as well as a detailed
analysis of the structure and functioning of
“ company unions.'' (The term “ company union''
is used in this report in its generic sense as an
organization of workers confined to a particular
plant or company and having for its purpose the
representation of employees in their dealings with
management.)

635

Retail Prices of Food, 1923-36 (1938).
Replaces report on food prices and costs in­
cluded in Bull. 495.
Presents comprehensive revision of the Bureau's
series of food-cost indexes for the period 1923-36,
inclusive, to reflect modifications in merchandis­
ing practices, increased consumer interest, and
advances in statistical methods. Contains detailed
statement describing methodological changes in­
volved, including modifications in consumption
weights, introduction of population weights, and
a shift of the base period to 1923-25.

636

Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in Eight Cities in the East
North Central Region, 1934-36 (1940).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.

637

Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in the North Atlantic Region,
1934-36.
Vol. I. New York City (1939).
Vol. II. Eleven Cities (1939).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.

638

Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and Cler­
ical Workers, 1934-36. Summary Volume (1941).
Summary of the findings of the Bureau's na­
tionwide study of money disbursements of wage

619

Labor Laws and Their Administration. Proceed­
ings of the Twenty-first Convention of the In­
ternational Association of Governmental Labor
Officials, Asheville, N.C., October 1935, (1936).

620

Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in the
Folding-Paper-Box Industry, 1933, 1934, and 1935
(1937).

621

Labor Offices in the United States and in Can­
ada (1936).
Replaced by Bureau of Labor Standards Bull.
177.

622

Wage Executions for Debt (1936).

623

Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in the
Bread-Baking Industry, 1934 (1937).

624

A Selected List of the Publications of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, 1936 edition (1936).

16




and clerical workers in 1934-36. The survey pro­
vided a general picture concerning the plane of
living available in this period to moderate-in­
come urban families in 42 cities with populations
exceeding 50,000, as reflected by sources of their
incomes, kinds of goods and services they bought
within a 12-month consecutive period, and kinds
of dwellings they occupied. Detailed data from
the 1934-36 study, by region, and by city were
presented in other bulletins. See Bulls. 636, 637,
639, 640, 641-649, and 691 this listing. Appendixes
provide a comprehensive description of the survey
methodology.

eral Trend in Construction. Pt. II. Residential
Building Construction, 1929 to 1935 (1938). Pt.
III. Building Construction, 1936 and 1937 (1938).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
651

Strikes in the United States, 1880 to 1936 (1938).
Presents the major statistical data available on
strikes and lockouts from the earliest recorded
date through 1936. However, the principal portion
of this bulletin deals with such disputes during
the period 1927-36, when a more comprehensive
program for the collection and measurement of
strike and lockout statistics was established.
Descriptive materials include definitions of the
various types of work stoppages, problems and
significance of their statistical measurement, and
an analysis of trends in strike statistics. (See
also annotation for Bull. 1258.) Includes appendix
on labor disputes in foreign countries.

639

Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and Cler­
ical Workers in Five Cities in the Pacific Region,
1934-36 (1939).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.

640

Money Disbursements of Employed Wage Earn­
ers and Clerical Workers in Twelve Cities of the
South, 1934-36 (1941).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.

652

Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in Five Cities in the West North
Central-Mountain Region, 1934-36 (1939).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.

Occupational Disease Legislation in the United
States, 1936 (With Appendix for 1937) (1938).
Reprint of Bull. 625 with appendix containing
laws enacted in 1937.

653

Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1937.
Proceedings of the Twenty-Third Convention of
the International Association of Governmental
Labor Officials, Toronto, Canada, September 1937
(1938) .

654

State Labor Legislation, 1937. Including Work­
men’s Compensation Legislation (1938).

655

Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the Print­
ing Trades, May 15, 1937 (1938).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

656

The Making and Using of Index Numbers (1938).
Reprint of Pt. 1 of Bull. 284. See this listing for
annotation.

657

Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the Build­
ing Trades in 70 Cities, May 15, 1937 (1938).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

658

P.W.A. and Industry. A Four-Year Study of
Regenerative Employment (1938).
A 4-year study intended to gage the amount of
indirect employment provided by each major type
of public works construction authorized by the
Federal Emergency Administration of Public
Works from mid-1933 to mid-1937.

659

Consumers’ Cooperation in the United States,
1936 (1939).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.

660

Mechanization and Productivity of Labor in the
Cigar Manufacturing Industry (1939).

661

A Selected List of the Publications of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, 1938 Edition (1939).

662

Productivity of Labor in the Cotton-Garment In­
dustry (1939).

663

Wages in Cotton-Goods Manufacturing (1938).
Detailed analysis of average and individual
hourly earnings data in the industry as they bear
upon the problem of wage determination. The
analysis is preceded by a comprehensive examina­
tion of the economic setting, including a descrip­
tion of the industry, the competitive character
of the cotton textile market and plant capacity,
balancing of equipment and demand, profits and
cost, mill margins, productivity and equipment,
foreign trade, and demand for cotton goods.

664

Changes in Retail Prices of Electricity, 1923-38
(1939) .

641

642

Family Income and Expenditure in Chicago, 193536.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1939).

643

Family Income and Expenditure in New York
City, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1941).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1939).

644

Family Income and Expenditure in Nine Cities
of the East Central Region, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1941).

645

Family Income and Expenditure in Five New
England Cities, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1941).

646

Family Income and Expenditure in Selected Urban
Communities of the West Central-Rocky Moun­
tain Region, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1940).

647

Family Income and Expenditure in the South­
eastern Region, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1940).

648

Family Expenditures in Selected Cities, 1935-36.
Vol. I.
Housing (1941).
Vol. II.
Food (1940).
Vol. III. Clothing and Personal Care (1941).
Vol. IV. Furnishings and Equipment (1941).
Vol. V.
Medical Care (1940).
Vol. VI. Travel and Transportation (1940).
Vol. VII. Recreation, Reading, Formal Educa­
tion, Tobacco, Contributions, and Personal
Taxes (1941).
Vol VIII. Changes in Assets and Liabilities
(1941).

649

Family Income and Expenditure in Four Urban
Communities of the Pacific Northwest, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1940).

650

Statistics of Building Construction, 1920 to 1937
as Shown by Building Permits Issued. Pt. I. Gen­




17

665

Organization and Management of Consumers’
Cooperatives and Buying Clubs (1941).
Replaced by Bull. 1024.

680

Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Building Trades, June 1, 1941 (1942).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

666

Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1938.
Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth Convention of
the International Association of Governmental
Labor Officials, Charleston, S.C., September 1938
(1939).

681

Labor Offices in the United States and in Canada,
1941 (1941).
Replaced by Bureau of Labor Standards Bull.
177.

682

667

Manual on Industrial Injury Statistics (1940).
Revision of Bull. 276.
Makes available to administrators of State
workmen’s compensation laws suggested methods
for preparing adequate statistical reports re­
quired to be submitted in cases of industrial in­
juries. The material is organized around 3 focal
points: (1) Facts concerning the efficiency of
administration, e.g., volume, type, and disposition
of cases handled, processing time, and difficul­
ties which cause operating delays; (2) practical
functioning of medical and benefit provisions of
the law, i.e., how the law affects the injured
workers; and (3) the incidence and causes of
accidents. Suggestions are given on the type of
statistical tables to be developed, the codes to
be used for this purpose and useful means of
classifying accident-cause data.

Employment and Earnings in the Engineering
Profession, 1929 to 1934 (1941).

683

A Selected List of the Publications of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, 1940 edition (1941).
Supplemented by Bull. 747.

684

Salaries and Hours of Labor in Municipal Fire
Departments, July 1, 1938.
Vol. I.
New England Cities (1940).
Vol. II.
Middle Atlantic Cities (1941).
Vol. III.
East North Central Cities (1941).
Vol. IV.
West North Central Cities (1941).
Vol. V.
South Atlantic Cities (1941).
Vol. VI.
East South Central Cities (1941).
Vol. VII. West South Central Cities (1941).
Vol. VIII. Mountain Division Cities (1940).
Vol. IX.
Pacific Cities (1940-41).

685

Salaries and Hours of Labor in Municipal Police
Departments, July 1,1938.
Vol. I.
New England Cities (1941).
Vol. II.
Middle Atlantic Cities (1941).
Vol. III.
East North Central Cities (1941).
Vol. IV.
West North Central Cities (1941).
Vol. V.
South Atlantic Cities (1941).
Vol. VI.
East South Central Cities (1941).
Vol. VII. West South Central Cities (1941).
Vol. VIII. Mountain Division Cities (1941).
Vol. IX.
Pacific Cities (1941).

686

Union Agreement Provisions (1942).
Replaced by Bull. 908 to 908-19, inclusive.

687

Labor in the Territory o f Hawaii, 1939 (1940).
See Bull. 926 this listing for annotation.

688

Operation of Savings-Bank Life Insurance in
Massachusetts and New York (1941).
Revision of Bull. 615.

689

Building Permit Survey, 1939.
Vol. I.
New England Cities (1941).
Vol. II.
Middle Atlantic Division (1942).
Vol. III.
East North Central Cities (1942).
Vol. IV.
West North Central Cities (1942).
Vol. V.
South Atlantic Cities (1942).
Vol. VI.
East South Central Cities (1941).
Vol. VII. West South Central Cities (1941).
Vol. VIII. Mountain Division Cities (1942).
Vol. IX. Pacific Cities (1941-42).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.

690

Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1940. Pro­
ceedings of the Twenty-sixth Convention of the
International Association of Governmental Labor
Officials, New York City, September 1940 (1941).

668

Building Construction 1921 to 1938 (1940).
Replaced by Bull. 713. See Bull. 545 this list­
ing for annotation.

669

The Wage and Hour Structure of the FurnitureManufacturing Industry, October 1937 (1940).

670

Earnings and Hours in Shoe and Allied In­
dustries During First Quarter of 1939. Boots
and Shoes. Cut Stock and Findings, Shoe Pat­
terns (1939).

671

Earnings and Hours in the Hat Industries, 1939
(1939).

672

Problems of Workmen’s Compensation Admini­
stration in the United States and Canada (1940).
Analysis of State experiences in administering
workmen’s compensation laws, including experi­
ence with those provisions affecting the persons
and employments covered, injuries and diseases
covered, adequacy of benefit payments, medical
aid provisions, and claims administration. The
variety of the patterns followed by individual
States is examined to show the effectiveness of
different policies and procedures.

673

Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in Union
Bakeries, June 1, 1939 (1940).

674

Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Building Trades, June 1, 1939 (1940).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

675

Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Printing Trades, June 1, 1939 (1940).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

676

Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of
Motortruck Drivers, June 1, 1939 (1940).
See Bull 1246 this listing for annotation.

691

677

Homes for Aged in the United States (1941).
Revision of Bull. 505.

Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in Thirteen Small Cities, 193335 (1942).

692

678

Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1939. Pro­
ceedings of the Twenty-fifth Convention of the
International Association of Governmental Labor
Officials, Tulsa, Okla., September 1939 (1940).

Earnings and Hours in the Paperboard Industry
(1941).
Embraces substantially the same class of estab­
lishments as that covered by Bull. 407.

693

679

Earnings and Hours in the Leather and Leather
Belting and Packing Industries, 1939 (1941).

Building Construction, 1940 (1941).
Replaced by Bull. 713. See Bull. 545 this listing
for annotation.

18




694

Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1941.
Vol. I. All Topics Except Wages (1942).
Vol. II. Wages and Wage Regulation (1942).
See Bull. 1016 this listing for annotation.

696

Subject Index to the Monthly Labor Review. Vols.
12 to 51. January 1921 to December 1940 (1942).

697

Hours and Earnings in the United States, 1932-40
with Supplement for 1941 (1942).
Primarily a statistical presentation of hours
and earnings averages in manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries by month and year,
from 1932-40. (Similar data by month for 1941
are presented in the supplement.) Also compares
the averages for 1932 and 1940, outlines the
general movements during 1932-40, and details
changes in these averages in selected industries
and industry groups. A comprehensive explana­
tion of the scope and methods utilized in pre­
paring these data is provided.

Cost of Living in 1941 (1942).
This bulletin gives cost of living indexes in large
cities from the first outbreak of war in Europe,
in the fall of 1939, through United States entry
into the war in December 1941.
See also Bulls. 699, 966, 1165, and 1256 for
analysis of price changes in other periods.

711

Strikes in 1941 and Strikes Affecting Defense
Production (1942).
In addition to an analysis o f strikes that occur­
red during 1941, contains a report on strikes that
interfered with or delayed defense production dur­
ing the 18-month period from June 1940 when
the first emergency legislation was enacted to
December 7. 1941.
See also Bull. 1258 this listing.

712

Earnings in the Grain-Mill Products Industries,
1941 (1942).

713

Building Construction, 1941 (1942).
Revision and continuation o f information in
Bulls. 668 and 693. See Bull. 545 this listing for
annotation.

714

Report on the Work of the National Defense
Mediation Board, March 19, 1941—January 12,
1942 (1942).
Report prepared by the staff of the NDMB of
the methods used and the results attained in
the handling of the most difficult labor disputes
which developed in the period of active prepara­
tion for national defense. In addition to a dis­
cussion of the powers, organization, and practice
of the NDMB, includes a brief report on each
o f the 118 cases handled, together with the full
text of all recommendations. An appendix sup­
plied by the Bureau consists of the applicable
Executive orders and other decisions reached after
the NDMB’s work in these cases was completed.
For those concerned with the collective bargain­
ing process and the relation of government there­
to, this report provides a perceptive account of
the practical problems raised by the combination
of mediatory and recommendatory power of a
vaguely compulsory nature in a tripartite body
without specific statutory authority.

Subject Index to the Monthly Labor Review. Vols.
1 to 11, July 1915 to December 1920 (1941).

696

710

698

Prison Labor in the United States, 1940 (1941).

699

Changes in Cost of Living in Large Cities in the
United States, 1913-41 (1941).
Presents new indexes of changes in the cost of
living of wage earners and clerical workers in
large cities in the United States from 1913 to
June 1941, utilizing expenditure weights derived
from a 1934-36 Bureau of Labor Statistics study
showing customary consumption patterns of these
groups. The bulletin was intended as a reference
source for persons using the indexes, and as a
guide to agencies desiring to initiate comparable
indexes for communities not covered by the
Bureau’s index series.
See also Bulls. 357, 710, 723, 724, 822, 966, 1165,
and 1256 for price changes in later periods.

700

Industrial-Injury Statistics by States (1942).

701

Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of Union
Street-Railway Employees, June 1, 1941 (1942).
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

702

Wages and Hours in the Glove Industry, 1941
(1942).

715

Labor Aspects of the Chicago Milk Industry
(1942).

703

Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1941 (1942).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.

716

Collective Bargaining in the Chemical Industry,
May 1942 (1942).

704

Wage Rates in the California Airframe Industry,
1941 (1942).

717

Incentive-Wage Plans and Collective Bargaining
(1942).

705

Wages and Hours of Union Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, June 1, 1941 (1942).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

718

Wholesale Prices, January-June 1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

706

Wage Structure of the Motor-Vehicle Industry
(1942).
Presents the results of a survey of the motorvehicle industry immediately before its complete
transition to wartime production and provides a
summary of the industry’s characteristics. In
addition to statistical data on earnings and hours,
the bulletin includes a discussion of the trend in
employment, payrolls, earnings, and hours in the
industry from 1923-41.

719

Earnings and Hours in Men’s Cotton-Garment
Industries and in Plants Manufacturing Single
Pants Other than Cotton, 1939 and 1941 (1942).

720

Earnings in the Manufacture of Industrial Ma­
chinery, 1942 (1942).

720
-A
-B

Earnings in the Manufacture
of
Machinery, 1942 (Pt. 2) (1943).
Earnings in the Manufacture
of
Machinery, 1942 (Pt. 3) (1943).

721

Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1941.
Proceedings of the Twenty-seventh Convention of
the International Association of Governmental
Labor Officials, St. Louis, September 1941 (1943).

722

Shipyard Injuries and Their Causes, 1941 (1943).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

707

Retail Prices of Food and Coal, 1941 (1942).

708

Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Printing Trades, June 1, 1941 (1942).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

709

Collective Bargaining in Paper and Allied Pro­
ducts Industry (1942).




Industrial
Industrial

19

723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730
731
732
733
734
735
736
737
738
739
740
741

Spending and Saving of the Nation’s Families
in Wartime (1942).
Income and Spending and Saving of City Families
in Wartime (1942).
Consumers’ Cooperation in the United States in
1941 (1943).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Earnings and Hours in Book and Job Printing,
January 1942 (1943).
Hourly Earnings in Private Shipyards, 1942
(1943).
Earnings in Eastern and Midwestern Airframe
Plants, 1942 (1943).
Wage Structure of the Nonferrous Metals In­
dustry, 1941-42 (1943).
Union Wages and Hours in the Building Trades,
July 1,1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.
Wage Rates of Union Street-Railway Employees,
June 1, 1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Union Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, June 1, 1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.
Hourly Entrance Rates Paid to Common Labor­
ers, 1942 (1943).
Absenteeism in Commercial Shipyards (1943).
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking Industry,
June 1, 1942 (1943).
Wholesale Prices, July-December and Year 1942
(1943).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Wages in Rubber Manufacturing Industry, August
1942 (1943).
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperation in 1942
(1943).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing Trades,
June 1, 1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.
Student Cooperatives in the United States, 1941
(1943).
Strikes in 1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

742

Effect of Incentive Payments on Hourly Earn­
ings (1943).

743

Vacation and Holiday Provisions in Union Agree­
ments, January 1943 (1943).

744

Earnings in Aircraft-Parts Plants, November
1942 (1943).
Union Membership and Collective Bargaining by
Foremen (1943).

745
746

Wage Stabilization in California Airframe In­
dustry, 1943 (1943).

747

Selected List of the Publications of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics. 1943 Supplement to 1940
Edition (1943).
Supplements Bull. 683.

748

Pay Differentials for Night Work Under Union
Agreements (1943).

749

Wartime Prices—Pt. I, August 1939 to Pearl
Harbor (1944). (Only Pt. I has been published.)
History of prices in wholesale (primary)
markets in the United States during the Defense

20




750
751
752
753
754
755
756
757
758
759
760
761
762
763
764

Period—from August 1939 (invasion of Poland)
to December 1941 (Pearl Harbor). Includes a
discussion of factors causing price advances in
this period, the operation of selective price con­
trols, and a comparison of price rises in World
Wars I and II.
Directory of Consumers’ Cooperatives in the
United States (1943). Reprinted 1947.
Replaced by Bull. 959.
Hours and Earnings in the Fertilizer Industry,
January 1943 (1943).
Earnings in Ship Construction Yards, Fall of
1942 (1943).
Maintenance-of-Membership Awards of National
War Labor Board (1943).
Family Allowances in Various Countries (1943).
See Bull. 803 for supplemental information.
Wartime Labor Conditions in India (1943).
Wages in Manufacturing Industries in Wartime
(1943).
Activities of Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1942
(1943) .
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Industrial Injuries in the United States During
1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Wholesale Prices, January-June 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Union Agreements in the Aluminum-Fabrication
Industry (1944).
Union Agreements in Agricultural-Machinery In­
dustry, 1943 (1944).
Earnings in Southwestern Petroleum Industry,
April 1943 (1944).
Hourly Earnings in Private Ship-Repair Yards,
Spring 1943 (1944).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Longshore
Industry, 1942 (1944).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

765

Wages in the Nonferrous-Metals Industry, June
1943 (1944).

766

Union Wage Rates of City Streetcar and Bus
Operators, July 1, 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

767

Union Wages and Hours in the Building Trades,
July 1,1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

768

Developments in the Cooperative Movement in
1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.

769

Spendable Earnings of Factory Workers, 1941-43
(1944) .

770

Cooperative Associations in Europe and Their
Possibilities for Post-War Reconstruction (1944).
Discusses the development and extent in Europe
of various types of cooperatives— consumers’,
workers’ productive and labor associations, credit
associations, housing associations, agricultural
associations, etc.— and their potential role in
post-World War II reconstruction.
Part I provides a comparative analysis of the
cooperative movement in European countries, in­
cluding the types of cooperatives, extent of de­
velopment, the importance of cooperatives in the
national economy and the development of inter­
national cooperative organizations. Part II deals

with the formation, growth, and activities of
the cooperative movement in individual countries.
It provides in most cases some historical back­
ground showing how the economic events of the
time, as well as changes in governments and na­
tional boundaries, affected the cooperative move­
ment and helped to speed or retard its develop­
ment or alter its direction.
Union Wages and Hours of Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.
Accident Record Manual for Industrial Plants
(1944).
Assists plants to establish and use effective
accident records by suggesting simple and useful
methods of accident recording and the uses of
such data for accident prevention.
Installment Buying by City Consumers in 1941
(1944).
Earnings of Bank Employees, Spring and Sum­
mer of 1943 (1944).
Hourly Entrance Rates of Common Laborers in
Large Cities, Spring and Summer of 1943 (1944).
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union Status,
January 1944 (1944).
Union Agreements in the Leather-Tanning In­
dustry, 1943 (1944).
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking Industry,
July 1,1943 (1944).
Post-War Capacity and Characteristics of the
Construction Industry (1944).
The productive capacity of the construction in­
dustry in the post-World War II period is pro­
jected in terms of its ability to meet accumulat­
ing wartime demands. Four types of supply
factors governing the industi^s physical capacity
for resuming postwar activities are analyzed,
viz: Organization and methods of operation of
the industry, its plant facilities, supplies of build­
ing materials and related products, and avail­
ability of construction labor.
Arbitration Provisions in Union Agreement
(1944).
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing Trades,
July 1,1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.
Strikes in 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.
Trend of Earnings Among White-Collar Workers
During the War (1944).
Demobilization of Manpower, 1918-19 (1944).

790

785

Wholesale Prices, July-December and Year 1943
(1944).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

811

Paid Vacations in American Industry, 1943 and
1944 (1945).

786

The Construction Industry in the United States
(1944).
Analysis of trends in the construction industry;
expenditures, 1915-43; employment, 1929-43; vol­
ume of Federal construction, 1935-43; and build­
ing construction (257 cities), 1921-43; nonfarm
dwelling units, 1910-43; and private building con­
struction costs, 1934-43.

812

Union Wages and Hours of Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

813

Employment Opportunities
Mechanics (1945).

814

Union Wage Rates of City Streetcar and Bus
Operators, July 1, 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

815

Union Wages and Hours in the Building Trades.
July 1, 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

816

Union Wages and Hours in the Baking Industry,
July 1, 1944 (1945).

771
772

773
774
775
776
777
778
779

780
781
782
783
784

787

Wages in Iron Mining, October 1943 (1944).

788

Cost of Clothing for Moderate-Income Families,
1935-44 (1944).

791
-A
792
793
794
795

796
797
798
799
800
801
802
803
804
805
806
807
808
809
810

Wartime Earnings and Spending in Honolulu,
1943 (1944).

789

791




Average Hourly Earnings in the Airframe In­
dustry, 1943 (1944).
Studies of the Effects of Long Working Hours,
Pt. 1 (1944).
See Bull. 917 this listing for annotation.
Studies of the Effects of Long Working Hours,
Pt. 2 (1944).
See Bull. 917 this listing for annotation.
Union Agreements in the Airframe Industry,
1944 (1944).
Intercity Variations in Wage Levels (1944).
Union Agreements in the Canned Fruit and
Vegetable Industry (1944).
Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1943. Pro­
ceedings of the Twenty-eighth Convention of the
International Association of Governmental Labor
Officials, Chicago, October 1943 (1945).
Operations of Consumers' Cooperatives in 1943
(1944).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Activities of Credit Unions in 1943 (1944).
Earnings in Cotton-Goods Manufacture During
the War Years (1944).
Retail Prices of Food, 1942 and 1943 (1945).
Wartime Development of the Aircraft Industry
(1944).
Wages in Department and Clothing Stores, Large
Cities, Spring and Summer, 1943 (1944).
Work Injuries in the United States During 1943
(1944) .
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Mid-War Developments in Civilian Family Allow­
ances (1944).
Supplements Bull. 754.
Reconversion Problems in the Buffalo Industrial
Area (1945).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Foundry
Industry, 1942 (1945).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Wages in the Rayon Industry, May 1944 (1945).
Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures
(1945) .
Dismissal Pay Provisions in Union Agreements,
December 1944 (1945).
Trends in Urban Wage Rates, April-October
1944 (1945).
Wages in Petroleum Drilling and Production in
the Southwest, April 1944 (1945).

for

Diesel-Engine

21

817

Occupational Data for Counselors. A Handbook
of Census Information Selected for Use in Guid­
ance (1945).
818 Effect of War-Contract Cut-Backs on Selected
Plants (1945).
819 Average Hourly Earnings in the Explosives In­
dustry, June 1944 (1945).
820 Union Wages and Hours in the Printing Trades,
July 1, 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.
821 Developments in Consumers* Cooperative Move­
ment in 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
822 Family Spending and Saving in Wartime (1945).

837
-1
-2
838
839
840

823

Union Agreements in the Petroleum-Refining In­
dustry in Effect in 1944 (1945).

824

Wartime Employment, Production, and Conditions
of Work in Shipyards (1945).

825

Probable Volume of Postwar Construction (1945).

826

Impact of the War on Employment in 181 Centers
of War Activity (1945).

842

827

Hourly Earnings in the Ammunition-Loading In­
dustry, 1944 (1945).

843

828

Guaranteed-Employment and Annual-Wage Pro­
visions in Union Agreements, Effective January
1945 (1945).

829

Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union Status,
January 1945 (1945).

830

Annual and Hourly Earnings, Philadelphia Knit­
ted-Outerwear Industry, 1943 (1945).
Fact Finding Activities of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics (1945).
The BLS in its capacity as a fact finding
agency for labor and government departments and
for the public generally, has compiled and made
available a substantial volume of materials on
employment, wages, working conditions, prices,
and other subjects which are directly pertinent to
many of the Nation’s economic problems. This
bulletin describes the more important types of
information compiled by the Bureau, their char­
acteristics, uses and limitations, and the forms
in which they are available.

831

832

Sick-Leave
(1945).

833

Strikes and Lockouts in 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

834

Shipyard Injuries, 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

835

Postwar Employment Prospects for Women in
the Hosiery Industry (1945).

836

Labor Unionism in American Agriculture (1945).
A graphic study of the origin, development,
problems, and accomplishments of agricultural
unionism in the United States with particular
reference to its evolution in certain States and
regions and to the relationship between the farmlabor movements and the economic and social
structure of the crop areas in which they occurred.
Analyzes the combination of circumstances that
gave rise to organized labor-employer conflicts in
agriculture; the types of farming and the changes
in farm structure and labor relations that tended
to generate such conflict; the issues in farm
labor disputes, and the tactics of group pressure

22




Provisions

in

Union

Agreements

841

844
845
846
847

and combat employed by contending groups; re­
actions of community groups to farm labor unions
and strikes and the degree to which their reac­
tions were influenced or determined by economic,
cultural, social, and politico-legal considerations.
Employment Opportunities in Aviation Occupations, Pt. 1. Postwar Employment Outlook (1945).
Employment Opportunities in Aviation Occupa­
tions, Pt. 2. Duties, Qualifications, Earnings, and
Working Conditions (1947).
Wartime Food Purchases (1945).
Fatal Work Injuries in Shipyards, 1943 and 1944
(1945).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Wages in the Basic Lumber Industry in the
Far West, 1944 (1945).
Health-Benefit Programs Established Through
Collective Bargaining, 1945 (1945).
Description of provisions in some of the more
representative types of collectively bargained
health-benefit plans in various industries. See
also Bull. 900 this listing.
Employment Outlook for Automobile Mechanics
(1945).
Operations of Consumers* Cooperatives in 1944
(1945).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Employment Opportunities for Welders (1945).
Income From Wages and Salaries in the Post­
war Period (1945).
Trends in Urban Wage Rates, October 1944 to
April 1945 (1945).
Union Agreements in the Tobacco Industry, Jan­
uary 1945 (1945).

848

Earnings and Wage Practices in Municipal Gov­
ernments of 15 Cities, 1944 (1945).

849

Work Injuries in the United States During 1944
(1945) .
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

850

Activities o f Credit Unions in 1944 (1945).

851

Wartime Prices, Price Control, and Rationing
in Foreign Countries (1946).

852

War and Postwar Wages, Prices, and Hours, 191423 and 1939-44 (1946).

853

Family Allowances in Various Countries, 1944-45
(1946) .

854

Wages in the Basic Lumber Industry, 1944 (1946).

855

Injuries and Accident Causes in the Slaughter­
ing and Meat-Packing Industry, 1943 (1946).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

856

Union Wage Rates of City Streetcar and Bus
Operators, July 1, 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

857

Impaired Workers in Industry (1946).

858

Organization and Management of Cooperative and
Mutual Housing Associations (1946).
Revision of Bull. 608.

859

Development in Consumers* Cooperative Move­
ment in 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.

860

Trends in Urban Wage Rates, April to October
1945 (1946).

861
862
863
864
865
866
867
868
869
870
871
872
873
874
875
876
877
878
879
880
881
882
883
884
885
886
887
888
-1
-2
-3

Wage Structure in the Machinery Industries,
January 1945 (1946).
Union Wages and Hours in the Building Trades,
July 1, 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.
Postwar Outlook for Physicians (1946).
Employment Situation in Certain Foreign Coun­
tries (1946).
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union Recog­
nition, 1945 (1946).
Wage Structure of the Fabricated StructuralSteel Industry, January 1945 (1946).
Wage Structure in Bituminous-Coal Mining, Fall
of 1945 (1946).
Wage Structure of the Machine-Tool Accessories
Industry, January 1945 (1946).
Workmen’s Compensation and the Protection of
Seamen (1946).
Wholesale Prices, 1944 (1947).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking Industry,
July 1, 1945 (1946).
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing Trades,
July 1, 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.
Price Trends and Price Control in Foreign Coun­
tries Since VE-Day (1946).
Union Wages and Hours of Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.
Wage Structure of Electroplating and Polishing
Industry, January 1945 (1946).
Workers’ Experiences During First Phase of
Reconversion (1946).
Wholesale Prices, 1945 (1947).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-Management
Disputes in 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.
The General Maximum Price Regulation (1946).
Employment Outlook in Foundry Occupations
(1946) .
Factors Affecting Earnings in Chemistry and
Chemical Engineering (1946).
The Changing Status of Bituminous Coal Miners,
1937-46 (1946).
Wartime Wages, Income, and Wage Regulation
in Agriculture (1946).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Brewing In­
dustry, 1944 (1946).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Union Agreements in the Cotton Textile In­
dustry (1947).
Wages of Office Workers in Metalworking In­
dustries, January 1945 (1946).
Employment and Earnings in the Philadelphia
Knitted-Outerwear Industry, 1944 and 1945
(1947) .
Labor Requirements for Construction Materials.
Pt. I— Portland Cement (1947).
Labor Requirements for Construction Materials.
Pt. II— Concrete Masonry Units (1947).
Labor Requirements for Construction Materials.
Pt. I ll— Concrete Pipe (1947).




Work Injuries in the United States During 1945
(1947).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
890 Operations of Consumers* Cooperatives in 1945
(1947).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
891 Trends in Urban Wage Rates, April 1946 (1946).

889

892

Employment Outlook for Business Machine Ser­
vicemen (1947).

893

State and Regional Variations in Prospective
Labor Supply (1947).

894

Activities of Credit Unions in 1945 (1947).

895

Employment Outlook in Machine Shop Occupa­
tions (1947).

896

Nonprofit Housing Projects in the United States
(1947).

897

Collective Bargaining With Associations and
Groups of Employers (1947).
Labor in the South (1947).
An analysis of selected basic factors affecting
labor in Southern States. Key population, migra­
tion, and labor force characteristics and the rise
of industry in the South are examined to pro­
vide a broad base for understanding the position
of labor in the region. Income trends and levels,
wage levels and wage differentials, and changes
in consumer prices are analyzed to provide in­
sight into the relative economic position of the
southern industrial worker and of other segments
of the southern population. Efforts by southern
workers to improve their economic position are
traced in the development of the trade union and
consumers’ cooperative movements in the South.
In addition, the study appraises the impact of
the Fair Labor Standards Act on southern in­
dustries and workers, describes the operation of
the old-age and survivors insurance and unem­
ployment insurance programs of the Social Secur­
ity Act, and presents principal provisions of pro­
tective labor legislation enacted in Southern
States.

898

899

Retail Prices of Food, 1944 and 1945 (1947).

900

Union Health and Welfare Plans (1947).
Describes (1) development and interest in, and
outlook for, health and welfare plans and (2)
experience of the International Ladies’ Garment
Workers’ Union (A F L ), particularly the New
York Dress Joint Board with its own health pro­
gram, emphasizing certain problems facing the
ILGWU and other unions in administering such
programs. Sample welfare clauses provided in
specific agreements and a description of trade
unions* historical interest in health and welfare
plans are also included. See also Bull. 841 this
listing.

901

Directory of Labor Unions in the United States,
1947 (1947).
Replaced by Bull. 1222. See this listing for
annotation.

902

Employment Outlook in
(1947).

903

Union Wages and Hours of Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, July 1, 1946 (1947).
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

904

Developments in Consumers’ Cooperative Move­
ment in 1946 (1947).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.

Printing

Occupations

23

905
906

Employment Outlook in Hotel Occupations (1947).
Appendix C. Guaranteed Wage or Employment
Plans (1947).
See also Bulls. 544, 907, and 925.
907 Appendix F. Economic Analysis of Guaranteed
Wages (1947).
Economic analysis of the potential effects of
guaranteed wage plans on the economy, and the
relation of guaranteed wages, if widely adopted,
to economic security, business cycles, and the use
of resources. The analysis, which was designed
to supplement the description of guaranteed wage
plans in Bull. 906, was prepared as a supplement
to the Guaranteed Wage Study Staff’s Final Re­
port to the Advisory Board of the Office of War
Mobilization and Reconversion. Comments on the
analysis by other eminent economists are included
also. See also Bulls. 544, 906, and 925 this listing.
908 Union-Security Provisions in Collective Bargain­
ing (1947).
This bulletin, and those that follow (908-2 to
908-19, incl.), reproduce a variety of sample
union-management agreement provisions, each
stressing a major area or significant problem in
collective bargaining, e.g., union security; ap­
prentices and learners; seniority; guaranteed em­
ployment and wage plans; grievance and arbitra­
tion provisions, etc. Bull. 908-17 includes texts of
selected health, welfare, and pension plans in
addition to sample clauses concerning these sub­
jects. This group of bulletins (908 to 908-19)
constitutes a revision of Bull. 686 which also
included a brief description of procedural and
structural arrangements for collective bargain­
ing and a reproduction of 15 sample agreements.
908
-2

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Incentive Wage
Provisions; Time Studies and Standards of Pro­
duction (1948).

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Guaranteed
Employment and Wage Plans (1950).

-16

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Grievance and
Arbitration Provisions (1950).

-17

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Health, Insur­
ance, and Pensions (1950).

-18

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Hours of Work;
Overtime Pay; Shift Operations (1950).

-19

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Preamble,
Scope of Bargaining Unit. Duration of Agree­
ments (1950).

909

Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union Recog­
nition, 1946 (1947).

910

Union Wages and Hours in the Building Trades,
July 1, 1946 (1947).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

911

Union Wages and Hours of Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1946 (1948).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

912

Union Wages and Hours in the Printing Trades,
July 1, 1946 (1947).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

913

Summary of Proceedings of Conference on Pro­
ductivity, October 28-29, 1946 (1947).
Summarizes and evaluates a Conference on
Productivity held in Washington, D.C., on Oc­
tober 28 and 29, 1946, under the auspices of the
Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Division of
Statistical Standards of the U.S. Bureau of the
Budget. The conference was convened as a forum
for the exchange of views on productivity con­
cepts and measurements by participants from
labor, industry, private research groups, and
government agencies.

914

Union Wages and Hours in the Baking Industry,
July 1, 1946 (1948).

915

Construction in the War Years, 1942-45. Employ­
ment, Expenditures, and Building Volume (1948).
Shows trends in construction activity particu­
larly during the 4 years of World War II. In
addition to an analysis of the effects of war on
the construction industry, this report resumes
the annual publication of a statistical bulletin
(on construction expenditures, employment, and
building volume), interrupted in 1944 by wartime
pressures.

916

Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1947 Edition
(1948).
Replaced by Bull. 1016. See this listing for
annotation.

917

Hours of Work and Output (1948).
A comprehensive report, based on 78 plant
case studies, showing the effects of working sched­
ules longer than 8 hours a day or 40 hours a
week on absenteeism, efficiency, work injuries,
and output. Includes study of the effects of
the introduction of wage incentives on output and
a comparison of worker performance before, dur­
ing, and after World War II. The description of
the case studies in this report is limited to
statements of essentials only in contrast with a
fairly comprehensive earlier report on 12 similar
case studies which was printed as Bulls. 791 and
791-A.

918

Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-Management
Disputes in 1946 (1947).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Vacations;
Holidays and Week-End Work (1948).

-3

908
-15

-4

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Apprentices and
Learners (1948).

-5

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Discharge, Dis­
cipline, and Quits; Dismissal Pay Provisions
(1948) .

-6

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Leave of Ab­
sence; Military Service Leave (1948).

-7

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Promotion,
Transfer, and Assignment; Lay-off, Work-Shar­
ing, Reemployment (1948).

-8

Collective Bargaining Provisions. General Wage
Provisions (1948).

-9

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Wage Adjust­
ment Plans (1948).

-10

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Union-Manage­
ment Cooperation, Plant Efficiency, and Tech­
nological Change (1949).

-11

Collective
(1949) .

-12

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Union and Man­
agement Functions, Rights, and Responsibilities
(1949).

-13

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Strikes and
Lock-Outs; Contract Enforcement (1949).

-14

Collective Bargaining Provisions. Safety, Health,
and Sanitation (1949).

24




Bargaining

Provisions.

Seniority

937

Directory of Labor Unions in the United States,
1948. (1948).
Replaced by Bull. 1222. See this listing for
annotation.

938

Retail Prices of Food, 1946 and 1947 (1949).

939

Supplementary Wage Practices in American In­
dustry, 1945-46 (1948).
Presents summary information on each of 6
types of supplementary wage practices (vacation
and sick leave plans, shift differentials, nonpro­
duction bonuses, incentive methods of pay, in­
surance and pension plans, and wage-rate struc­
ture) in the manufacturing and nonmanufactur­
ing industries surveyed by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics during 1945-46.

940

Occupational Outlook Handbook. (1949).
Replaced by Bull. 1255. See this listing for
annotation.

941

Construction and Housing, 1946-47 (1948) .
An account of the post-World War II revival of
the construction industry, presented through an
analysis of data showing the shifts and trends
in construction activity and employment in this
period and a brief interpretation of the factors
underlying these developments. The text deals in
some detail with the progress of postwar housing
construction, relating the developments in activity
to economic and regulatory changes.

The Economy of Hawaii in 1947 (1948).
Report on the economy of Hawaii and the
effect of World War II on the economic develop­
ment of the territory with particular reference
to wages, working conditions, and industrial re­
lations. To reflect transition from primitive selfsufficient economy to modern specialized economy,
a detailed analysis is presented of major in­
dustries in the Islands, including sugar, pine­
apple, and tourism. For similar studies covering
earlier periods, see Bulls. 47, 534, and 687.

942

Cooperatives in Postwar Europe. Survey of De­
velopments in Scandinavian Countries and East­
ern, Central, and Western Europe (1948).
Brings information in Bull. 770 up to 1945 (and
to 1946 for some countries).

943

Salaries of Office Workers in Selected Large
Cities (1949).

944

Employment Outlook in Electric Light and Power
Occupations (1949).

927

Workers’ Budgets in the United States: City
Families and Single Persons, 1946 and 1947
(1948).
See Bull. 1021 this listing for annotation.

945

Work Injuries in the United States During 1947
(1949).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

946

928

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers and
Helpers, July 1, 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

Employee Benefit Plans Under Collective Bar­
gaining (1949).

947

Wholesale Prices, 1947 (1949).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

929

Employment Outlook in the Plastics Industry
(1948).

948

930

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

Consumers’ Cooperatives: Operations in 1947
(1949).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.

949

Injuries and Accident Causes in Fertilizer Manu­
facturing (1949).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

950

Residential Heating Fuels. Retail Prices, 1941-48.
Data for 9 Locally Important Fuels in 55 Cities
(1949). 200.

951

Union Wages and Hours in the Building Trades,
July 1,1948 (1949).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

952

Wage Structure, Metalworking Industries, 1945.
Hourly Earnings and Supplementary Wage Prac­
tices in 14 Industries (1949). 400.

919

Labor Requirements to Produce Home Insula­
tion (1947).

920

Wholesale Prices, 1946 (1948).
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

921

Work Injuries in the United States During 1946
(1948).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

922

Consumers’ Cooperatives and Credit Unions: Op­
erations in 1946 (1948).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.

923

The Performance of Physically Impaired Work­
ers in Manufacturing Industries (1948).

924

Injuries and Accident Causes in the PulpwoodLogging Industry, 1943 and 1944 (1948).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

925

926

Guaranteed Wage Plans in the United States
(1948).
Exhaustive study of guaranteed wage and em­
ployment plans in the United States, including
their historical development, extent, and char­
acteristics; detailed analysis of experiences under
a selected group of 62 representative plans; and
compilation of sample guarantee provisions found
in guarantee plans or union agreements. Major
portions of this report appeared as Bull. 906. See
also Bulls. 544, 906, and 907 this listing.

931

The Economic Status of Registered Professional
Nurses, 1946-47 (1948).

932

Developments in the Consumers’ Cooperative
Movement in 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.

933

Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, October 1, 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

934

Wage Trends and Wage Policies: Various Foreign
Countries (1948).

935

Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-Management
Disputes in 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

953

Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948 (1949).
150.

936

Union Wages and Hours: The Baking Industry,
July 1, 1947 (1948).

954

Union Wages and Hours: The Baking Industry,
July 1, 1948 (1949). 200.




25

955

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1948 (1949). 150.
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
1945. Birmingham, Ala., Indianapolis, Ind., and
Portland, Oreg. (1949).
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, October 1, 1948 (1949). 100.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in Radio and Television
Broadcasting Occupations (1949).
Directory of Consumers' Cooperatives in the
United States (1949).
Revision of Bull. 750.
Contains a key to the kinds of business activi­
ties conducted by the individual consumer co­
operative association as well as a list, by States
and cities, of the names and addresses of the
various associations.
Salaries of Office Workers in Large Cities, 1949.
Pt. I. Hartford, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Phil­
adelphia, St. Louis (1949). 200.
Salaries of Office Workers in Large Cities, 1949.
Pt. II. Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, New York,
Seattle (1949). 200.
Salaries of Office Workers in Large Cities, 1949.
Pt. III. Cleveland, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Portland,
Oreg., Richmond (1949). 250.
Salaries of Office Workers in Large Cities, 1949.
Pt. IV. Cincinnati, Dallas, Washington, D.C.
(1950). 200.

968
969

977

Union Wages and Hours: The Baking Industry,
July 1, 1949 (1950). 250.

961

Employment Outlook in Railroad Occupations
(1949).

978

962

Injuries and Accident Causes in Textile Dyeing
and Finishing (1949).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1949 (1950).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

979

963

Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-Management
Disputes in 1948 (1949). 200
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
January 2, 1948, and July 1, 1949 (1950). 250.
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

980

964

Developments in Consumers' Co-ops in 1948
(1949).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.

Directory of Labor Unions in the United States,
1950 (1950).
Replaced by Bull. 1222. See this listing for
annotation.

981

Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, October 1, 1949 (1950). 150.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

982

Public Social Security Programs in the United
States, 1949-50 (1950). 150.
Summary information on the operations of the
public social security programs, published by the
Bureau as background for then current major
labor-management negotiations concerning pen­
sions and congressional consideration of amend­
ments to social insurance legislation. Describes
provisions, operating experience, financing, and
other aspects of old-age and survivors insurance,
unemployment insurance, and public-assistance
programs.

983

Glossary o f Currently Used Wage Terms (1950).
150.
Provides definitions o f wage and salary terms
currently and most frequently used in such fields
as wage and salary administration, collective
bargaining, accounting, government regulation,
and statistical reporting. The definitions, except
in a few cases where official government defini­
tions or regulations are quoted, reflect current
usage and, insofar as possible, variations in usage
of individual terms.

984

Construction, 1948 in Review (1950). 300.

956
957
958
959

960
-1
-2
-3
-4

965

Consumers' Prices in the United States, 1942-48
(1949). 500.
Detailed compilation of retail price data col­
lected for the Consumer Price Index in the
period 1942-48, as well as historical price data
back to 1935. Analyzes price movements at the
consumer level during World War II and up
to 1948, with particular reference to the effects
of price controls. Includes some discussion of the
subsidy program, especially for foods, of alloca­
tions and rationing programs, and of price de­
velopments not reflected in the Index, such as
quality deterioration, black market prices, and
upgrading. Compares price changes in large
cities with those in small cities and discusses
price movements for major commodity groups.
Contains a detailed account of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics wartime pricing polices and
of the revisions in its pricing techniques neces­
sitated by the war, as well as of certain postwar
adjustments of the Index procedures. See also
Bulls. 699, 710, 1165, and 1256 for price changes
in other periods.

970
-2
971

972
973
974
975
976

Retail Prices of Food, 1948 (1949).

966

970

967

Employment Outlook in the
(1949).

26




Building

Trades

Employment Outlook for Engineers (1950).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1948-January 1949 (1949). 100.
The Wage Chronology Series, Vol. I. American
Woolen Co., 1939-48; Northern Cotton Textile
Associations, 1943-48; United States Steel Corp.,
1937-48; Bituminous-Coal Mines, 1933-48; Chrys­
ler Corp., 1939-48; Armour and Co., 1941-48,
Swift & Co., 1942-48; Full-Fashioned Hosiery,
1941-48 (1949). 250.
The Wage Chronology Series, Vol. II. General
Motors Corp., 1939-40 (1949). 100.
Consumers' Cooperatives: Operations in 1948. A
Report on Membership, Business, and Operating
Results (1949). 150.
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook for Elementary and Second­
ary School Teachers (1949).
Wholesale Prices, 1948 (1950). 300.
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, June-Deeember 1947 (1949). 100.
Work Injuries in the United States During 1948
(1950). 150.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1949 (1950). 200.
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

985
986
987
988
989
990
991
992
993
994
995

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colorado,
November 1949 (1950). 300.
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Sup­
plementary Benefits. Atlanta, Ga., January 1950
(1950). 150.
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Supple­
mentary Benefits. Indianapolis, Ind., January
1950 (1950). 150.
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Sup­
plementary Benefits. Memphis, Tenn., February
1950 (1950). 150.
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Supple­
mentary Benefits. Oklahoma City, Okla., Febru­
ary 1950 (1950). 150.
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Supple­
mentary Benefits. Milwaukee, Wis., January 1950
(1950). 150.
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New York,
January 1950 (1950). 350
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Supple­
mentary Benefits. Boston, Mass., January 1950
(1950).
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series (1950).
Replaced by Bull. 1168.
Employment Outlook in Petroleum Production
and Refining (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Supple­
mentary Benefits. Chicago, 111., February 1950
(1950). 200.

996

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1950 (1950). 350.

997

Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Sup­
plementary Benefits, New York, N.Y., February
1950 (1950). 150.
Occupational Outlook Handbook (1951).
Replaced by Bull. 1255. See this listing for
annotation.

998

999

1000

1001

Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Sup­
plementary Benefits. Detroit, Mich., April 1950
(1950). 150.
Brief History of the American Labor Movement
1957 revision (1957). 350.
A pocket-sized history of the American labor
movement. Summarizes the development of the
early organizations of labor and the modern
organized labor movement (American Federa­
tion of Labor and the Congress of Industrial
Organizations) and traces the course of labor
events during World War I, the “ open shop”
era of the twenties, the depressed thirties, and
through World War II and postwar labor-man­
agement conflict and readjustment. A special
feature is a chronology of events of importance
to labor, 1778-1957. This publication revises a
1951 bulletin of the same number.
Tables of Working Life. Length of Working Life
for Men (1950).
A study of the length and pattern of work­
ing life of men in the United States. The re­
port describes a significant and pioneering de­
velopment in the techniques for analyzing the
dynamics of the labor force. It contains a brief
description of the pattern of working life, dif­
ferentials by color and residence, and the appli­
cation of the tables to analysis of old-age de­
pendency, labor force, and occupational outlook
data. A technical appendix provides a detailed
account of methodology.




1002
1003
1004
1005
1006
1007
1008

Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Sup­
plementary Benefits, Los Angeles, Calif., March
1950 (1950). 150.
Analysis of Work Stoppages During 1949
(1950). 200.
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.
Work Injuries in Construction, 1948-49 (1950).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, April 1949 to November 1949 (1950). 200.
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work, Sup­
plementary Benefits, Providence, R.I., June 1950
(1950). 150.
Wholesale Prices, 1949 (1951). 300.
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania, May 1950 (1950).

1009

Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and
Wage Stabilization During World War II (1950).
An appraisal of major policy decisions made
by the Government to meet the threat to pro­
duction involved in industrial disputes and sky­
rocketing wage levels, from the time the Nation
began to arm in 1940 until the end of general
price and wage controls in 1947. Analyzes the
operations of the National Defense Mediation
Board, the National War Labor Board, and the
National Wage Stabilization Board. The prob­
lems encountered and objectives sought by these
agencies are reviewed in the light of the equally
important problems of efficient manpower allo­
cation.

1010

Employment Outlook in Men's Tailored Cloth­
ing Industry (1951).

1011

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1950 (1951). 250.
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

1012

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1950 (1951). 200.
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

1013

Consumers' Cooperatives in 1949: Operations and
Developments (1951). 350.
See Bulls. 1049 and 1211 this listing for an­
notation.

1014

Union Wages and Hours: The Baking Industry,
July 1, 1950 (1951). 250.

1015

Wage Structure, Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1950.
Hourly Earnings and Supplementary Wage Prac­
tices (1951). 200.
1016 Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed. (1951)
$1.25; and 1951 supp. (1953). 500.
Earlier editions in this series were: Bulls.
439 (1924-26), 491 (1929), 541 (1931), 616
(1936), 694 (1941), and 916 (1947).
Prior to the 1947 edition, the Handbooks con­
sisted of digests of the Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics bulletins and Monthly Labor Review articles
considered to be of current and permanent in­
terest. Beginning with the 1947 edition, the form
of the Handbook was changed to serve exclusive­
ly as a basic statistical source book providing
continuing measures of economic activity and
changes in the position of labor. Coverage is
limited to major BLS statistical series and select­
ed labor and related economic series compiled
by other Federal agencies. Brief and generally
nontechnical explanations of each series are
also provided. The 1950 Handbook and the 1951
supplement contain the following statistical

27

series: Employment, Unemployment and Pay­
rolls; Labor Turn-Over; Earnings, Hours and
Wage Rates; Prices and Cost of Living; In­
dustrial Relations; Output per Man-Hour; Work
Injuries; Building and Construction; Housing
and Rents; Social Security and Related Pro­
grams; Consumers’ Cooperatives; and Produc­
tion, Income, and Expenditures.

1027

1017

Employee-Benefit Plans Under Collective Bar­
gaining, Mid-1950 (1951).

1028

1018

Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1950 (1951). 200,
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

1019

Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, October 1, 1950 (1951). 150.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

1020

Employment
(1951).

1021

Family Budget of City Workers. October 1950
(1951). 50.
Presents estimated dollar costs of a hypo­
thetical budget for urban families in 34 cities
in October 1949 and October 1950. The budget
was designed to describe a modest but adequate
standard of living for an urban worker’s family
of 4 persons. Compares estimated costs of the
budget in 1949 and 1950 with the cost in June
1947. For estimates of total budget costs and
costs of subgroups of items at March 1946 and
June 1947 price levels, see Bull. 927.

Outlook

in

Department

Stores

1022

Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1949-50.
Prevalence and Characteristics of Selected Col­
lective Bargaining Clauses (1951).

1023

Injuries and Accident Causes in the Manufacture
of Clay Construction Products (1951). 300.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

1024

Organization and Management of Consumers’
Cooperatives (1951).
Revision of Bulls. 598 and 665.
Suggests appropriate methods and procedures
and the basic information necessary for suc­
cessful organization and management of con­
sumers’ cooperative associations and buying
dubs. The report, which is concerned mainly
with consumer cooperative associations, includes
discussions of preliminary organization efforts,
content of charter and bylaws, considerations in­
volving membership and the election of directors
and officers, business methods and practices,
financial requirements, and accounting practices.
For special reports on organization and man­
agement of gasoline and oil, and housing associ­
ations, See Subject index under Cooperatives—
Consumer.
See also annotations for Bulls. 1049 and 1211.

1025

Work Injuries in the United States During 1949
(1951). 200.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

1026

Elements of Soviet Labor Law (1951). 150.
A significant contribution to critical analysis
of the Soviet economy, relating to the period
between 1920 and 1951. Through textual use
of laws, decrees, and official pronouncements,
this study (1) demonstrates the punitive charac­
ter of Soviet labor law as it applied to the Soviet
equivalent of “ free” labor, and (2) describes the
creation of conditions for industrial conflict
through pressures on management and workers,
the deterioration of the trade unions, and the
collapse of collective bargaining. It also includes

28




1029
1030
1031
1032
1033
1034
1035
1036
1037
1038
1039

1040

an account of Soviet labor policies that (1) have
caused loss of freedom on the job; (2) subjected
the determination of wages and hours of work
to severe government restriction; (3) provided
for financial responsibility of workers for dam­
ages to the employer caused by the workers, and
(4) established conscript labor of youth.
Employment, Education, and Earnings of Ameri­
can Men of Science (1951).
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1951 (1951).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colorado,
January 1951 (1951). 350.
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperatives in
1950 (1951).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
March 1951 (1951). 300.
Retail Prices of Food, 1949 (1951). 150.
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massachu­
setts, March 1951 (1951). 400.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1951 (1951). 400.
Analysis of Work Stoppages During 1950 (1951).
200.
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Manufac­
ture of Pulp and Paper (1952).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1951 (1951). 450.
Labor-Management Relations in Scandinavia
(1952). 200.
Interim Adjustment of Consumers’ Price In­
dex (1952). 300.
Detailed description of the interim improve­
ments in the Consumers’ Price Index (in advance
of the comprehensive 3-year program for modern­
ization of the Index completed in January 1953)
to reflect the effect on the Index of sharp and
diverse price rises following Korean hostilities
that started on June 25, 1950, and passage of
economic stabilization legislation which required
comparison of prices with those existing prior to
that date. Interim improvements including re­
vision of city population and commodity weights,
correction of the new unit bias in the rent index,
and addition of new items. See also Bull. 1256
this listing.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, January 1950 to January 1951 (1951).
200

.

1041

Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June
1951 (1951).

1042

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon,
June 1951 (1951). 200.

1043

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas, June
1951 (1951). 200.

1044

Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Con­
necticut, June 1951 (1951). 150.

1045

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Mary­
land, June 1951 (1952). 200.

1046

Productivity Trends in Selected Industries, In­
dexes Through 1950 (1951).
Summarizes the statistics regularly presented
in individual industry productivity reports issued

regularly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(The individual reports contain analyses of the
factors causing changes in output per man-hour
and unit man-hour requirements, as well as more
detailed statistics and information on the methods
used in computing these indexes.) In addition to
current changes in productivity, historical trends
covering the last decade are presented for most
industries. Technical notes explaining t h e
methods used in computing the indexes are in­
cluded for each of the 35 industries and in­
dustry groups covered in this report. The re­
port contains 95 series on output per worker
and per man-hour, as well as many series on
production, employment, man-hours, and labor
requirements per unit of output.
1047 Construction. Annual Review, 1950 (1951). 400.
Incorporates comprehensive listings of refer­
ence aids in the field of construction, viz: (1)
articles describing methods of preparing the
statistical series appearing in the Bureau’s
monthly publication, Construction; (2) feature
articles in Construction, 1949-50; and (3) pub­
lished sources of continuous historical data on
construction, covering leading series compiled by
the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau
of Apprenticeship.
1048

Consumers’ Cooperatives: Operations in 1950
(1952). 200.
A report on membership, business, and operat­
ing results of consumer cooperatives in 1950, by
the various types of cooperatives. Earlier bul­
letins in this series (313, 437, 531, 612, 659, 725,
757, 796, 843, 890, 922, 948, 971, and 1013) con­
tain similar information.
The information presented includes estimates
of membership and business of the consumer co­
operatives by type of association, local and
federated (e.g., local retail-distributive associ­
ations; service associations, including medicalcare, housing and cold-storage; and commercial
federations including wholesale, productive, and
service associations). The reports also show the
amount of distributive and service business,
earnings, and patronage refunds of cooperative
wholesales; operating expenses of farm and non­
farm consumers’ cooperatives; the value of goods
produced by the productive associations; and em­
ployment and earnings in local and central co­
operatives.
See also Bulls. 1024 and 1211 this listing. For
special reports on operations of Credit Unions,
see Subject index under Cooperatives— Consumer.

1059
1060
1061
1062
1063
1064
1065

1066

Employment Outlook in Accounting (1952). 200.

1049

1058

1050

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1,1951 (1952). 250.
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

1052

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1951 (1952). 250.
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: The Baking Industry,
July 1, 1951 (1952). 250.

1068
1069
1070
1071
1072
1073
1074
1075
1076
1077

Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Massa­
chusetts, January 1952 (1952). 200.

1078

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Pennsyl­
vania, December 1951 (1952). 150.

1079

Injuries and Accident Causes in Plumbing Op­
erations (1952). 250.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

1080

Subject Index of Volumes 52-71, Monthly Labor
Review, January 1941 to December 1950 (1953).

1081

Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey
City, New Jersey, November 1951 (1952). 250.

1082

Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pennsyl­
vania, November 1951 (1952).

Employment Outlook for Earth Scientists (1952).

1051

1067

1053

Occupational Wage Survey, Richmond, Virginia,
October 1951 (1952). 150.
Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Connecti­
cut, October 1951 (1952). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania, October 1951 (1952).
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, October 1, 1951 (1952). 150.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1951 (1952). 250.
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.
Collective Bargaining in the Meat-Packing In­
dustry (1952). 300.
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
Missouri, October 1951 (1952).
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
10 Cities. 1946: Savannah, Ga., Scranton, Pa.,
Milwaukee, Wis.; 1947: Manchester, N.H., Rich­
mond, Va., Washington, D.C.; 1948: Denver,
Colo., Detroit, Mich., Houston, Tex.; 1949: Mem­
phis, Tenn. (1952). See also Bull. 1097 this
listing.
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colorado,
November 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tennessee,
November 1951 (1952). 150.
Occupational Wage
Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, November 1951 (1952). 250.
Occupational Wage
Survey, Salt Lake City,
Utah, December 1951 (1952). 150.
Occupational Wage
Survey, Oklahoma City,
Okla., October 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, Rhode
Island, December 1951 (1952). 200.
Employment Outlook in Electronics Manufac­
turing (1952).
Developments in Consumers’
Cooperatives in
1951 (1952). 200.
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, Louis­
iana, December 1951 (1952). 150.
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Indi­
ana, December 1951 (1952). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1952 (1952).

1054

Employment Outlook in the Merchant Marine
(1952). 300.

1055

Retail Prices of Food, 1950 (1952).

1056

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
October 1951 (1952).

1083

Wholesale Prices, 1950 (1952). 350.
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

1057

Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Washing­
ton, September 1951 (1952).

1084

Occupational Wage Survey,
January 1952 (1952).




Houston, Texas,

29

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New York,
January 1952 (1952). 250.
1086 Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michigan,
December 1951 (1952).
1087 Occupational Wage Survey, Rochester, New
York, January 1952 (1952). 200.
1088 Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsmouth
(Hampton Roads), Virginia, February 1952
(1952).
1089 Collective Bargaining, Radio, Tevelsion, and
Electronics Industry (1952).
1090 Analysis of Work Stoppages During 1951
(1952).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.
1091 Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 195051. Prevalence and Characteristics of Selected
Collective Bargaining Clauses (1952).
1092 Employment and Economic Status of Older Men
and Women (1952). 300.
Revised by Bull. 1213. See this listing for
annotation.
1085

1093
1094
1095
1096
1097
1098
1099
1100

1101
1102
1103
1104
1105
1106

1109
1110
1111
1112
1113
1114

Cooperative Housing in the United States, 1949
and 1950 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Cali­
fornia, January 1952 (1952).
1115
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri,
January 1952 (1952). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio,
1116
February 1952 (1952). 200.
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
1116
1950, Revised June 1953 (1953). 400.
Replaces earlier bulletin of same number.
-1
Work Injuries in the United States During 1950
-2
(1952). 250.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
-3
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, March 1952 (1952). 200.
-4
Labor and the Savannah River AEC Project.
I. Manpower and Wages; II. Unionization and
-5
Industrial Relations; III. Housing and Changes
in Population; IV. Community Facilities and
Social Changes (1952). 250.
-6
An examination of the effects upon the sur­
rounding communities of the construction of the
-7
Savannah River atomic energy (“ H-Bomb” ) proj­
ect in South Carolina. The study assesses the
impact of the sudden influx of a new labor force
-8
upon the communities in several major problem
areas.
-9
Occupational Wage
Survey, New York, New
York, January 1952 (1952). 300.
-10
Occupational Wage
Survey, Atlanta,Georgia,
March 1952 (1952).
150
-11
Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Arizona,
March 1952 (1952). 150.
-12
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, New
Jersey, March 1952 (1952). 150.
-13
Occupational Wage
Survey, Chicago,Illinois,
March 1952 (1952).
250.
-14
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massachu­
setts, April 1952 (1952). 250.

Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio,
April 1952 (1952). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, Flori­
da, May 1952 (1952). 150.
Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania, May 1952 (1952).
150.
Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Ken­
tucky, May 1952 (1952). 200.
Wages and Related Benefits. 40 Labor Markets,
1951-52 (1952). 350.
Case Studies in Union Leadership Training,
1951- 52 (1952). 200.
Presents 5 case studies o f union-sponsored
educational programs as an aid to understanding
the directions toward which organized labor is
moving. In planning these studies, a few cases
were selected which pointed to significant ad­
vances in the methodology and emphasis o f work­
ers’ education. The particular labor organiza­
tions studied—AFL Ladies’ Garment Workers;
AFL papermaking unions; White-Collar Work­
shop of the American Labor Education Service;
AFL Machinists; and the CIO—were found to
be attempting to train the members of their
organizations for positions of leadership in the
labor movement of the future.
New Housing in Metropolitan Areas, 1949-51
(1952). 350.
See also Bulls. 1016 and 1231.
Wages and Related Benefits, 20 Labor Markets,
1952- 53 (1953). 550.
Occupational Wage Survey. Dallas, Texas, August 1952 (1952). 150.
Occupational Wage Survey. Portland, Oregon,
September 1952 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Cleveland, Ohio,
October 1952 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Kansas City, Mis­
souri, October 1952 (1953). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey. Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania, October 1952 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Baltimore, Mary­
land, October 1952 (1953). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey. Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, November 1952 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Denver, Colorado,
November 1952 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1953 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Providence, Rhode
Island, December 1952 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Newark-Jersey City,
New Jersey, November 1952 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. St. Louis, Missouri,
December 1952 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Memphis, Tennesse,
January 1953 (1953). 150.
Occupational Wage Survey. Los Angeles, Cali­
fornia, February 1953 (1953). 250.

1107

Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, Ala­
bama, April 1952 (1952). 150.

-15

Occupational Wage Survey. Chicago, Illinois,
March 1953 (1963). 250.

1108

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-SchenectadyTroy, New York, March 1952 (1952). 150.

-16

Occupational Wage Survey. New York, New
York, February 1953 (1953), 250.

30




-17
-18
-19
-20
1117
1118
1119

1120

1121

1122
1123
1124
1125
1126
1127

1128

Occupational Wage Survey. Boston, Massa­
chusetts, March 1953 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Atlanta, Georgia,
March 1953 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, April 1953 (1953). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Buffalo, New York
(Erie and Niagara Counties), April 1953
(1953). 200.
Federal White-Collar Workers— Their Occupa­
tions and Salaries, June 1951 (1953).
Injuries and Accident Causes in Carpentry Op­
erations (1953). 350.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Negroes in the United States: Their Employ­
ment and Economic Status (1953). 300.
A description of recent national trends in the
employment and income status of Negro men
and women in relation to that of whites. Compre­
hensive data, selected from a wide variety of
sources, present pertinent background facts con­
cerning birth and mortality rates, life expect­
ancy, education, school enrollment, and popula­
tion changes, in addition to detailed information
about labor force participation and unemploy­
ment, the industries and occupations in which
Negroes are employed, work-life expectancy,
family income and wages, and insurance pro­
tection under the social security program. An
annotated bibliography is included.
The Mobility of Tool and Die Makers, 1940-51.
A Survey of the Work Experience, Training, and
Personal Characteristics of Workers in a Critical
Occupation (1953). 350.
See Bull. 1162 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Mobility of Scientists— A Study of
Chemists, Biologists, and Physicists with Ph. D.
degrees (1953). 350.
See Bull. 1162 this listing for annotation.
Construction. Annual Review, 1951 (1953). 350.
Union Wages and Hours: The Baking Industry,
July 1, 1952 (1953).
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1952 (1953). 250.
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1952 (1953). 250.
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in Printing Occupations
(1953).
Directory o f Labor Unions in the United States,
1953 (1953).
Replaced by Bull. 1222. See this listing for
annotation.
Employment Outlook for Air Transportation
(1953).

1129

Employment Outlook for Mechanics and Re­
pairmen (1953).

1130

Employment Outlook in Metalworking Occupa­
tions (1953).

1131

Employment Outlook for Technicians. A Report
on Draftsmen, Engineering Aids, Laboratory
Technicians, and Electronic Technicians (1953).

1132

Manpower Resources in Chemistry and Chemical
Engineering (1953).
Provides information on current and prospec­
tive manpower resources in chemistry and chem­




ical engineering by field of specialization, level
o f education, age, and military status of the
scientists, engineers, and graduate students.
Other subject matters include the relative num­
bers of chemists and chemical engineers employ­
ed in different industries, functions performed,
incomes received, and employment trends. Where
possible, separate information is given for women
scientists, the first comprehensive data on em­
ployment of women in a major scientific field.
1133 Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, October 1,1952 (1953). 150.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.
1134 Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1952 (1953). 200.
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.
1135 Wage Differentials and Rate Structures Among
40 Labor Markets, 1951-52 (1953). 200.
1136 Analysis of Work Stoppages During 1952 (1953).
250.
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.
1137 Work Injuries in the United States During
1951 (1953). 250.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
1138 Employment Outlook in the Automobile Industry
(1953).
1139 Injuries and Accident Causes in the Manufacture
of Paperboard Containers (1953). 350.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
1140

The Consumer Price Index, A Layman’s Guide
(1953). 200.
A popular description o f the content, compi­
lation, uses, and limitation of the Bureau’s Con­
sumer Price Index.

1141

Retail Prices of Food, 1951 and 1952 (1953).
250.

1142

Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1952
(1953).

1143

Wholesale Prices, 1951 and 1952 (1953). 300.
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.

1144

Employment Outlook for Physicists (1953).

1145

American Labor and the American Spirit.
Unions, Labor-Management Relations, and Pro­
ductivity (1954).
Describes the development of the labor move­
ment in terms of historical and philosophical in­
fluences. Prepared originally to provide pro­
ductivity teams visiting this country with back­
ground and insight into various aspects of the
American trade union movement, the study has
substantial interest for others concerned with
industrial relations. Covers historical background
and present status of labor unions; types of
unions and their interrelations; collective bar­
gaining; new attitudes in labor-management re­
lations, collateral activities of unions; govern­
ment and labor; and labor productivity.

1146

Construction During Five Decades. Historical
Statistics, 1907-52 (1954). 450.
Handbook of construction statistics through
1952, covering the complete historical span of
each of the statistical series on construction de­
veloped in the U.S. Department of Labor. Data
are shown from the earliest years available and,
for several of the series, cover a span of 35 to
40 years. The bulletin also includes a historical
summary of construction trends and a selected
bibliography providing additional or current in­
formation concerning the statistical series.
31

1147

Pension Plans under Collective Bargaining
(1953).
See Bull. 1259 this listing for annotation.

1148

Scientific Research and Development in Ameri­
can Industry (1953). 500.
A final report on the findings in a nation­
wide survey of industrial research and develop­
ment conducted by the Department of Defense
Research and Development Board in mid-1952.
Covers about 2,000 private companies and non­
profit industrial research agencies. Included in
the information provided are the number of re­
search engineers and scientists employed; em­
ployment of supporting personnel; cost of re­
search performed; relationship of research cost
to value of sales; average cost of research per
employee; turnover rates among research en­
gineers and scientists and potential effects of
military calls of such employees. Information is
presented for different industries and for com­
panies of different sizes.

1159

Arbitration of Labor-Management Grievances—
Bethlehem Steel Company and United Steel­
workers of America, 1942-52 (1954). 350.
A study of 10 years of grievance arbitration
under the collective bargaining agreements of
the company and the union. Analyzes approxi­
mately 1,000 decisions by mutually appointed
arbitrators and illustrates standards of em­
ployer-employee relationships at the plant level.

1160

Wages and Related Benefits in the Machinery
Industries. Postwar Wage Trends. Survey of 20
Labor Markets, 1953-54 (1954). 400.

1161

Military Manpower Requirements and Supply,
1954-60 (1954). 400.
See Bull. 1262 this listing for annotation.

1162

Mobility of Molders and Coremakers, 1940-1952
(1954). 600
Third in a series of pilot studies covering the
work experience, mobility, training, and per­
sonal characteristics of workers in occupations
vital in defense mobilization. The report evalu­
ates the findings of the study in terms of their
significance for manpower planning in a mobili­
zation period. It was prepared as part of a
general program of the Department of the Air
Force to develop systematic methods of determin­
ing the manpower feasibility of military pro­
grams. The two preceding studies in this series
relate to Electronic Technicians (Bull. 1150) and
Tool and Die Makers (Bull. 1120). For studies
of the occupational mobility of scientists (chem­
ists, biologists, and physicists with Ph. D.’s), see
Bull. 1121, and of professional engineers, see
Bull. 968.

1149

Workmen’s Compensation in the United States.
A general appraisal, court proceedings, Federal
legislation, occupational diseases, medical serv­
ices, accident prevention, problems of admin­
istration, rehabilitation (1954). 300.

1150

The Mobility of Electronic Technicians, 1940-52—
The Work Experience, Training, and Personal
Characteristics of Workers in a New Skilled
Occupation (1954). 500.
See Bull. 1162 this listing for annotation.

1151

Employment Outlook in the Industrial Chemical
Industry (1954).

1163

1152

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1953 (1953).
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1953 (1954). 300.
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

1164

Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, July 1, 1953 (1954).
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

Work Injuries in the United States During
1952 (1954). 300.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

1165

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1953 (1954).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

Consumer Prices in the United States, 1949-52
(1954). 450.
See Bull. 1256 this listing for annotation.

1166

Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1953.
Prevalence and Characteristics of Selected Col­
lective-Bargaining Clauses (1954). 250.

1167

Employment Outlook in the Social Sciences
(1954).
For a related study of the social sciences, see
Bull. 1169.

1168

Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series (1955). 650.
Replaces Bull. 993.
For each major series, presents a compre­
hensive description of the historical background;
methodology and scope; concepts and definitions;
sources; sampling and estimating methods; uses
and limitations; and available measures of re­
liability. A description of the similarities and
differences in methodologies of these series and
a selected bibliography for each series are also
provided.

1169

Personnel Resources in the Social Sciences and
Humanities (1954). 700.
This report is based on information reported
by approximately 25,000 social scientists and
humanists in 14 fields of specialization, in re­
sponse to a questionnaire survey conducted in
1952 by the American Council of Learned So-

1153

1154

1155

Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1953 (1954).
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

1156

Employment Outlook in Banking Occupations
(1954).

1157
-1

Wages and Related Benefits. Major Labor Markets, 1953-1954. Pt. I. Dallas, Tex., Detroit,
Mich., Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., New Orleans,
La., Philadelphia, Pa., Portland, Oreg. (1954).

-2

Wages and Related Benefits. Major Labor Mar­
kets, 1953-1954. Pt. II. Denver, Colo., Memphis,
Tenn., Newark-Jersey City, N.J., St. Louis, Mo.,
San Francisco-Oakland, Calif. (1954). 600.

-3

Wages and Related Benefits. Major Labor Mar­
kets, 1953-1954. Pt. III. Atlanta, Ga., Boston,
Mass., Chicago, 111., Los Angeles, Calif., Milwau­
kee, Wis., New York, N.Y. (1954). 700.

1158

Consumer Cooperatives in the United States—
Recent Developments (1954).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.

32




cieties. The report presents detailed information
on specialization, age, and educational back­
grounds of the respondents in each major social
science and humanistic field as well as the spe­
cialties in which they were employed, the func­
tions they were performing, and the types of
employing organizations. Wherever possible,
separate data are given for graduate students
and women. Salaries and supplementary pro­
fessional income of the respondents employed
full time are also discussed.
1170 Structure of the Residential Building Industry
in 1949 (1954). 300.
Presents and interprets the final and complete
results from a nationwide study of the organi­
zation and scale of residential builders, opera­
tions. The survey, conducted by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics in 1951 and covering resi­
dential builders’ private housing activities in
1949, provides comprehensive and reliable data
answering for the first time such fundamental
questions as: Is there a true residential build­
ing industry, readily distinguished from other
segments of the construction industry? What
share of all new housing is produced by the
various types of builders and how large are
their respective scales of operations? Is there a
substantial difference between large and small
communities in the scale of home builders’ op­
erations and in the share of new house pro­
duction by the various types of builders? Do
residential builders serve only a local market?
In the absence of precise statistics, the report
analyzes the direction of organizational changes
in the residential building industry since 1949,
on the basis of an interpretation of historical
developments.
1171 Fact Book on Manpower. September 1954
(1954) . 500.
Description and compilation of selected data
providing basic background information needed
on the size and characteristics of the Nation’s
work force for appraising manpower supply
in relation to requirements. Presents significant
facts relating to current and prospective man­
power resources, data on population, labor force,
employment, occupations, education and training,
labor mobility, and military manpower.

-10
-11
-12
-13
-14
-15
-16
-17
1173
1174
1175
1176
1177
1178

1179

1180

Occupational Wage Survey. St. Louis, Missouri,
February 1955 (1955). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey. Atlanta, Georgia,
March, 1955 (1955). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey. Los Angeles, Cali­
fornia, March 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey. New York, New
York, March 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey. Chicago, Illinois,
April 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey. Baltimore, Mary­
land, April 1955 (1955). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey. Portland, Oregon,
April 1955 (1955). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey. Boston, Massa­
chusetts, April 1955 (1955).
Wage Differences and Establishment Practices.
17 Labor Markets, 1953-54 (1955). 350.
Injuries and Accident Causes in Warehousing
Operations (1955). 400.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1954 (1955). 300.
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1954 (1955). 300.
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, July 1, 1954 (1955). 150.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours of Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1954 (1955). 300.
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.
Factory Workers’ Earnings. Distributions by
Straight-Time Hourly Earnings, April 1954
(1955) . 250.
See Bull. 1252 this listing for annotation.
Digest of One Hundred Health and Insurance
Plans Under Collective Bargaining, 1954 (1955).
Revised by Bull. 1236.

1181

Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1954.
Prevalence and Characteristics of Selected Col­
lective Bargaining Clauses (1955). 150.

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New York
(Erie and Niagara Counties), September 1954
(1955) . 250.

1182

Average Retail Prices, 1953-54. Collection and
Calculation, Techniques and Problems (1955).
550. See Bull. 1197 this listing for annotation.

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
October 1954 (1955).

1183

Retail Prices of Food, 1953-54 (1955). 300.

1184

Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1954 (1955).
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

1185

Directory of National and International Labor
Unions in the United States, 1955 (1955).
Replaced by Bull. 1222. See this listing for
annotation.

1186

Problems in Measurement of Expenditures on
Selected Items of Supplementary Employee Re­
muneration, Manufacturing Establishments, 1953
(1956) . 500.

1172

Wages and Related Benefits— 17 Labor Markets,
1954-55 (1956). 450.

1172
-1
-2
-3

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas, Sep­
tember 1954 (1955).
-4 Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania, November 1954 (1955). 250.
-5

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, November 1954 (1954).

-6

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colorado,
December 1954 (1955). 250.

-7

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1955 (1955).

1187

Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans in Union
Contracts (1955). 150.

-8

Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City,
New Jersey, December 1954 (1955). 200.

1188

Wages and Related Benefits, 17 Labor Markets,
1955-56 (1956).

-9

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tennes­
see, February 1955 (1955). 200.

1188
-1

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas, October 1955 (1956).




33

-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-10
-11

-12
-13
-14
-15
-16
-17
-18
1189
1190

Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michigan,
October 1955 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, November 1955 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania, November 1955 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, Louis­
iana, November 1955 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colorado,
December 1955 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, San-Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, December 1955 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri,
February 1956 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City,
New Jersey, December 1955 (1956). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, Lawrence, Massa­
chusetts, February 1956 (1956). 250.
This bulletin includes information on the con­
struction industry.
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tennes­
see, February 1966 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles-Long
Beach, California, March 1956 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, Rhode
Island, March 1956 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1956 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland Oregon,
April 1956 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1956 (1956). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
April 1956 (1956). 250.
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Layoff, Recall,
and Work-Sharing Procedures (1956). 400.
Woodworking Circular-Saw Accidents (1956).
450.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

1191

Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1,1955 (1956). 300.
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

1199
-1

Older Workers Under Collective Bargaining,
Part I, Hiring, Retention, Job Termination
(1956) . 250.

-2

Older Workers Under Collective Bargaining,
Part II, Health and Insurance Plans, Pension
Plans (1956). 250.

1200

Man-Hours Per Unit of Output in the Basic
Steel Industry, 1939-55 (1956). 300.

1201

Collective Bargaining Clauses: Labor-Manage­
ment Safety, Production, and Industry Stabiliza­
tion Committees (1957). 300.
A report, based on the study o f collective
agreements covering more than 7 million work­
ers, on the structure, function, and procedures
of labor-management committees created by
formal contract provisions to deal with prob­
lems o f safety, production, and industry stabili­
zation. Plant-safety committees were most fre­
quently provided for. Only 31 of the more than
1,500 agreements studied contained provisions
establishing committees to deal with such pro­
duction problems as quality control, efficiency
and elimination of waste, or to work toward
stabilization of the industry. Production-prob­
lem committees were usually established in in­
dividual companies, while contracts setting up
stabilization of industry committees were for
the most part concluded between multiemployer
groups and unions in the apparel and construc­
tion industries. Sample provisions relating to the
committees are presented.

1202

Wages and Related Benefits, 17 Labor Markets,
1956-57 (1957). 500.

1202
-1

Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Washington,
August 1956 (1956). 250.

-2

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New York,
(Erie and Niagara Counties), September 1956
(1957) . 250.

-3

Occupational Wage Survey,Cleveland,
October 1956 (1957). 250.

-4

Occupational Wage Survey,Boston, Massa­
chusetts, September 1956 (1957). 250.

Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, July 1, 1955 (1956). 150.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

1194

Automatic Technology and Its Implications— A
Selected Annotated Bibliography (1956).

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1955 (1956). 300.
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

1193

1198

The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska,
Hawaii (1956). 550.

1192

data, covering the last quarter 1954 through
1955, include important items in all major index
groups except foods and fuels, which are publish­
ed separately, and rents and certain homeownership costs, which involve unique problems. The
first bulletin to present average retail prices
for items other than foods and fuels was pub­
lished in 1955 as Bull. 1182. That bulletin pre­
sented retail prices for 125 articles and services
and was applicable to 10 cities. Prior to that
report, regular bulletins of basic average prices
from which the CPI was computed were con­
fined to fuels and foods which, unlike other
items, were relatively easy to describe and price
and did not involve major problems of quality
variation. A few retail price bulletins published
in the early 1920’s presented average prices for
a limited list of “ dry goods” but publication of
these data was discontinued because of problems
relating to quality definition. For a listing of
BLS retail price bulletins, by item, see Sub­
ject index under Prices, retail. For current in­
dexes on items covered in these bulletins other
than food, see the Monthly Labor Review and
other BLS publications.

1195
1196
1197

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1955 (1956). 300.
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1955 (1956). 300.
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.
Average Retail Prices, 1955 (1956). 550
Presents retail prices for approximately 150
commodities and services in certain major ex­
penditure categories for the 20 largest cities sur­
veyed regularly by the Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics for the Consumer Price Index. These

34




Ohio,

-5
-6

Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mis­
souri, December 1956 (1957). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania, November 1956 (1957). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1957 (1957). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Penn­
sylvania, December 1956 (1957). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, Ala­
bama, January 1957 (1957). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles-Long
Beach, California, March 1957 (1957). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon,
April 1957 (1957). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tennes­
see, February 1957 (1957). 200.
OccupationalWage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, March 1957 (1957). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1957 (1957). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
April 1957 (1957). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1957 (1957). 250.

One of 16 studies which the Bureau under­
took in selected communities (see also Bulls.
1210-2 through 1210-16), covering earnings and
related benefits of nurses and other workers in
hospitals having at least 51 employees.

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas, Oc­
tober 1956 (1957). 250.

-7
-8
-9
-10
-11
-12
-13
-14
-15
-16
-17

1203 Job Performance and Age: A Study in Measure• ment (1956).
A pilot study, chiefly methodological, intended
to guide future programs in the investigation
and solving of employment problems of older
workers. (See also annotation for Bull. 1223 this
listing.)
1204

Tables of Working Life for Women, 1950 (1957).
300.
A study of the pattern and work life expect­
ancy of women. Provides a basis for analyzing
the factors that affect the work careers of
women—marriage, children, widowhood, and
divorce. A technical appendix describes the
methodology.

-2

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Portland, Oregon, May and July 1956
(1957). 200.
-3 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Buffalo, New York, June 1956 (1957).

200.

-4

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Baltimore, Maryland, June 1956 (1957).
250.
-5 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Chicago, Illinois, August 1956 (1957).
250.
-6 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Boston, Massachusetts, August 1956
(1957). 200.
-7 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Cleveland, Ohio, November 1956 (1957).

.

200
-8
-9

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Dallas, Texas, November 1956 (1957).
250.
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Cincinnati, Ohio, September 1956 (1957).
200.

-10

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 1956
(1957). 200.

-11

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Atlanta, Georgia, September 1956 (1957).
200

-12

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Memphis, Tennessee, December 1956
(1957). 200.

-13

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, San Franeisco-Oakland, California, No­
vember 1956 (1957). 200.

.

1205

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1956, and Trend 1907-56 (1957). 350.
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

-14

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Los Angeles-Long Beach, California,
January 1957 (1957). 200.

1206

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1956, and Trend 1936-56
(1957).
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

-15

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, March
1957 (1957). 200.

1207

Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1956, and Trend 1907-56 (1957). 300.
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

-16

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, New York, New York, February 1957
(1957). 250.

1208

Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, July 1, 1956, and Trend 1929-56
(1957). 150.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

1211

1209

Analysis of Layoff, Recall, and Work-Sharing
Procedures in Union Contracts (1957). 300.
This study, the first of its kind by the Bureau,
analyzes the ways in which all major collective
bargaining agreements deal with layoff, recall,
and work-sharing procedures. Essentially, it is
a prevalence study, and covers formal written
policy rather than actual practice.

1210
-1

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hospitals, St. Louis, Missouri, June 1956 (1957). 200.

Consumer Cooperatives (1957). 500.
Last in a series of reports on developments
affecting the various types of consumer co­
operatives in the United States, including credit
union, housing, farm supply, medical-care, stu­
dent insurance, electricity, telephone, and re­
tail- and wholesale-trade cooperatives. These
reports include summaries of developments in
Federal and State legislation, court decisions,
and the functions of the Cooperative League of
the U.S.A. in sponsoring educational and rec­
reational activities; in some bulletins in this
series, international developments and the re­
lationship between cooperatives and labor, farm,
and other groups, and government agencies are
also reviewed. Earlier bulletins in this series




35

1212

1213

1214
1215
1215
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-10
-11
-12
-13
-14
-15

(703, 738, 768, 821, 859, 904, 932, 964, 1013, 1073,
and 1158) contain similar information on de­
velopments. See also Bulls. 1024 and 1049, this
listing.
New England Labor and Labor Problems (1957).
350.
Comprises a group of articles on labor and
industrial relations and general economic area
and industry problems in New England. The
selective analyses provided by these studies are
presented to aid in understanding the changes
occurring in New England.
Employment and Economic Status of Older Men
and Women (1957). 200.
Revision of Bull. 1092.
Provides current and historical data from a
wide variety of authoritative sources on popula­
tion and labor force trends, work-life expectancy,
income, retirement, and pension programs, and
the job experience of older workers. Data are
presented separately for men and women, whereever possible, in order to reveal significant simil­
arities and differences in their economic status
and employment experience.
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1954-56
(1957). $2.
See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1957 Edition.
Replaced by Bull. 1255. See this listing for
annotation.
Employment Outlook in Teaching (1957).
Employment Outlook in Health Service Occupa­
tions (1958).
Employment Outlook in Engineering (1957).
Employment Outlook in the Physical and Earth
Sciences (1957).
Employment Outlook in the Biological Sciences
(1957) .
Employment Outlook in the Social Sciences
(1958) .
Employment Outlook in the Building Trades
(1957) .
Employment Outlook in Printing Occupations
(1958) .
Employment Outlook in Machining Occupations
(1958).
Employment Outlook in Foundry Occupations
(1958).
Employment Outlook in Forge Shop Occupa­
tions (1958).
Employment Outlook in Aircraft Manufacturing
(1958).
Employment Outlook in Air Transportation
(1958).
Employment Outlook in the Atomic Energy Field
(1958).
Employment Outlook in the Automobile Industry
(1958).

-19
-20
-21
-22
-23
-24
-25
-26
-27
-28
-29
-30
-31
-32
-33
-34
-35
-36
-37

Employment Outlook in Electronics Manufac­
turing Occupations (1958).
Employment Outlook in Hotel Occupations
(1958).
Employment Outlook in the Industrial Chemi­
cals Industry (1958).
Employment Outlook in Insurance Occupations
(1958).
Employment Outlook in the Iron and Steel In­
dustry (1958).
Employment Outlook in the Men's Tailored
Clothing Industry (1958).
Employment Outlook in Petroleum Production
and Refining Occupations (1958).
Employment Outlook in Plastic Products Manu­
facturing (1958).
Employment Outlook in Radio and Television
Broadcasting Occupations (1958).
Employment Outlook in Railroad Occupations
(1958).
Employment Outlook in Restaurant Occupations
(1958).
Employment Outlook in Telephone Occupations
(1958).
Employment Outlook in Agricultural Occupa­
tions (1958).
Employment Outlook for Accountants (1958).
Employment Outlook for Architects (1958).
Employment Outlook for Bookkeepers (1958).
Employment Outlook for Commercial Artists
(1958).
Employment Outlook for Dietitians and Home
Economists (1958).
Employment Outlook for Draftsmen (1958).

-38

Employment Outlook for Foresters (1958).

-39

Employment Outlook for Interior Designers and
Decorators (1958).

-40

Employment Outlook for Lawyers (1958).

-41

Employment Outlook for Librarians (1958).

-42

Employment Outlook for Newspaper Reporters
(1958).

-43

Employment Outlook for Personnel Workers
(1958).

-44

Employment Outlook for Psychologists (1958).

-45

Employment Outlook for Secretaries, Stenog­
raphers, and Typists (1958).

-46

Employment Outlook for Social Workers (1958).

-47

Employment Outlook for Statisticians (1958).

-48

Employment Outlook for Automobile Mechanics
(1958).

-16

Employment Outlook in Banking Occupations
(1958).

-49

Employment Outlook for Barbers (1958).

-50

-17

Employment Outlook in Department Store Oc­
cupations (1958).

Employment
(1958).

-51

Employment Outlook for Blacksmiths (1958).

-18

Employment Outlook in the Electric Light and
Power Industry (1958).

-52

Employment Outlook in Boilermaking Occupa­
tions (1958).

36




Outlook

for

Beauty

Operators

-53
-54
-55
-56
-57
-58
-59
-60

Employment Outlook for Business Machine Ser­
vicemen (1958).
Employment Outlook for Diesel Mechanics
(1958).
Employment Outlook for Dispensing Opticians
and Optical Mechanics (1958).
Employment Outlook for Electronic Technicians
(1958).
Employment Outlook for Electroplaters (1958).
Employment Outlook for Industrial Machinery
Repairmen (1958).
Employment Outlook for Instrument Makers
(1958).
Employment Outlook for Jewelers and Jewelry
Repairmen (1958).

-61

Employment Outlook for Millwrights

-63

Employment
(1958).

-65

Collective Bargaining Clauses: Dismissal Pay
(1957). 250.
A report on the prevalence of dismissal pay
provisions in collective bargaining agreements,
the amounts provided, the conditions under which
laid-off workers qualify for benefits, and re­
lated factors. Excerpts from agreements are
provided.

Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Drug Stores and Proprietary Stores
(1957). 150.

1221

Analysis of Health and Insurance Plans Under
Collective Bargaining, Late 1955 (1957). 500.
Presents detailed statistics on the provisions of
300 selected health and insurance plans under
collective bargaining. Types of benefits included
life insurance, accidental death and dismember­
ment, accident and sickness (excluding sick leave,
State workmen’s compensation, and temporary
disability payments), and hospital, surgical, and
medical care. Special benefits such as those pro­
vided for poliomyelitis and accidental injury, and
during extended periods of illness are treated
separately, as are provisions applying to matern­
ity cases.

1222

Directory of National and International Labor
Unions in the United States, 1957 (1957).
Replaces Bulls. 901, 937, 980, 1127, and 1185.
Provides current general information concern­
ing the structure and activities of the American
labor movement and lists and gives details about
all known national and international unions and
State labor bodies. Information assembled from
responses by unions relates to the number of
members and local union affiliates of the organi­
zations listed; the number of women who are
union members, and information on union con­
ventions and publications. Headquarters addres­
ses and names of principal officers of national
and international offices are also listed.

1223

Comparative Job Performance by Age: Large
Plants in the Men’s Footwear and Household
Furniture Industries (1957). 450.
This bulletin continues earlier work on the
relationship between age and work performance
(Bull. 1203), compares actual on-the-job per­
formance of older production workers with the
performance of the younger workers. The ex­
tensive data provided enable the reader to draw
more definitive conclusions than was possible
from the pilot study, which was primarily meth­
odological in nature. This later study is focused
on the measure of the relationship between age
and the three aspects of job performance: output
per man-hour, attendance, and continuity of
service.

1224
-1

Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Washington, August 1957 (1957). 200.

-2

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massachu­
setts, September 1957 (1958). 250.

-3

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Mary­
land, August 1957 (1958). 250.

-4

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas, Oc­
tober 1957 (1958).

-5

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri,
November 1957 (1958). 250.

-6

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania, October 1957 (1958). 250.

-7

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colorado,
December 1957 (1958). 250.

Employment Outlook for Welders and Oxygen
Cutters (1958).

1216

-7

Employment Outlook for Refrigeration and AirConditioning Mechanics (1958).

-64

Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Appli­
ance Store (1957). 350.

Employment Outlook for Maintenance Electri­
cians (1958).

-62

-6

Outlook for

Watch

(1958).

Repairmen

1217

Retail Prices of Food, 1955-56 (1957). 300.

1218

Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1956 (1957). 300.
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

1219

Work Injuries and Work Injury Rates in Hos­
pitals (1958). 400.
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.

1220

Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Summary Report (1958). 550.
Provides information on hourly and weekly
earnings of nonsupervisory employees in retail
trade as a group and includes summary data
for the various lines of retail trade published in
the series of separate bulletins (1220-1 through
1220-7) which are listed below.

1220 Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
-1 1956, Building Materials and Farm Equipment
Dealers (1957). 200.
-2

Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, General Merchandise Stores, Department
Stores, Variety Stores (1957). 350.

-3

Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Food Stores; Grocery Stores (1957). 300.

-4

Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service
Stations; Franchised Motor Vehicle Dealers,
Gasoline Service Stations (1957). 350.

-5

Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Apparel and Accessories Stores, Men’s and
Boys’ Clothing Stores, Women’s Ready-to-Wear
Stores, Shoe Stores (1957). 450.




-8 Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1958 (1958). 250.

37

-9

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tennes­
see, January 1958 (1958). 250.

-10

Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, Louis­
iana, February 1958 (1958). 200.

-12

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wiscon­
sin, May 1958 (1958). 250.

-19

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
June 1958 (1958). 250.

-20

Wages and Related Benefits, 19 Labor Markets,
1957-58 (1959).

1225

A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States (1958). $2.
Designed primarily for use by visiting trade
unionists and management representatives of
other countries, the study provides brief descrip­
tions and explanations of various facets of union
activity and labor-management relations. In­
cludes 31 reports divided into (1) trade union
activities; (2) collective bargaining; (3) labormanagement relations in selected industries;
and (4) general. The Guide is prepared in looseleaf form and additional reports will be issued
from time to time. See also Bulls. 1225-1 and
1225-2.

Paid Vacation Provisions in Major Union Con­
tracts, 1957 (1958). 300.
Represents the Bureau’s most comprehensive
study of paid vacation practices under collective
bargaining. Provides a detailed analysis of the
prevalence and types o f vacation plans, length
of vacation, service and work requirements, va­
cation patterns, and vacation pay. The analysis
also covers various administrative aspects of
vacation plans; for example, pay in lieu of time
off, scheduling of vacations, and vacation rights
for military service personnel or upon termina­
tion of employment.
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1957 (1958). 300.
See Bull. 1258 this listing for annotation.

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
May 1958 (1958). 250.

-18

1233

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon,
April 1958 (1958). 250.

-17

Digest of One Hundred Selected Pension Plans
Under Collective Bargaining, Winter 1957-58
(1958). 450.

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1958 (1958). 250.

-16

1232

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1958 (1958). 250.

-15

New Housing and Its Materials, 1940-56 (1958).
400.
Presents data on selected characteristics of 1family houses authorized by building permit in
1954-56, in cities of 25,000 population and over
and, in lesser detail, data on characteristics of
2- to 4-family and 5-or-more-family structures.
The introductory analysis of trends during 195456 includes comparisons with 1940 and 1950 data
from the Federal Housing Administration re­
garding new 1-family housing processed by the
FHA for mortgage insurance under the National
Housing Act. These trend data cover the general
plan and size of houses; walls, floors, roofing,
insulation, and rain-carrying equipment; win­
dows, screens, and storm windows; heating facil­
ities and fuel; electrical services; and kitchen,
laundry, and other equipment. Among other
comparisons, the data are distributed by sellingprice class, region, and metropolitan or non­
metropolitan area.

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles-Long
Beach, California, March 1958 (1958). 250.

-14

1231

Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City,
New Jersey, December 1957 (1958). 250.

-13

Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1957, and Trend 1936-57
(1958). 300.
See Bull. 1246 this listing for annotation.

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1958 (1958). 250.

-11

1230

1225
-1

-2

A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States. Supp. 1 (1959). 450.
Supplements the information in Bull. 1225
with a brief report on trade union activities,
three reports on collective bargaining, and a
bibliography.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States. Supp. 2 (1959). 450.
A second supplement to Bull. 1225, containing
three brief reports which pertain, respectively,
to trade union activities, collective bargaining,
and labor-management relations in selected in­
dustries. Provides a glossary of current indus­
trial relations terms and a bibliography.

1226

Productivity: A Bibliography (1958). $1.

1227

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1957, and Trend 1907-57 (1958). 350.
See Bull. 1245 this listing for annotation.

1228

Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1957, and Trend 1907-57 (1958). 400.
See Bull. 1247 this listing for annotation.

1229

Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operat­
ing Employees, July 1, 1957, and Trend 1929-57
(1958). 150.
See Bull. 1244 this listing for annotation.

38




1234
1235

Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1957 (1958).

$1.

See Bull. 1257 this listing for annotation.
1236

Digest o f One Hundred Selected Health and In­
surance Plans Under Collective Bargaining,
Early 1958 (1958). $1.25.
Revision of Bull. 1180

1237

Injuries and Accident Causes in the BoilershopProducts Industry (1958). 500.
Latest in a series of work injury and accident
statistics bulletins which are published as part
of the Bureau’s regular program. Annual bul­
letins present summary statistics on disabling
work injuries for each of the major industries
in the United States. Other bulletins present
detailed breakdowns of injuries and accident
causes in selected industries, occupations, or
activities during specified periods of time. Suffi­
cient information is collected to make national
estimates of the number of work injuries occurr­
ing each year and of the resultant total economic
loss expressed in man-days of work and to
indicate the varying degrees of hazards existing
in specific industries. The general purpose of
these surveys is use in accident prevention work.
For some years, statistics were published in other
than bulletin form; for example, in the Monthly
Labor Review and serial reprints.

1238

1239

1240
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-10
-11

The Earnings and Employment of Seamen on
U.S. Flag Ships (1958). 600.
A report prepared at the request of and in
cooperation with the Federal Maritime Board
and the Maritime Administration, U.S. Depart­
ment of Commerce. It analyzes the employment
experience, daily and annual earnings, and fringe
benefits of seamen on U.S. flag ships. Included
are brief summaries on the operations of the
American Merchant Marine and on the history
of collective bargaining in the maritime industry.
Union Constitution Provisions: Election and
Tenure of National and International Union
Officers, 1958 (1958). 300.
Analyzes the rules in union constitutions
which govern the qualifications, election, and
terms of union officers, and those providing for
the remuneration and the removal of union
presidents. The bulletin is basically a summary
of the union rules effective in 1958, and does
not include any analysis of union practices. Rules
governing the election of AFL-CIO officers are
summarized in the appendix.
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Washington,
August 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Mary­
land, August 1958 (1958). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New York,
(Erie and Niagara Counties) September 1958
(1959). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri,
October 1958 (1959). 150.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas, Oc­
tober 1958 (1959). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massachu­
setts, October 1958 (1959). 250.
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colorado,
December 1958 (1959). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania, November 1958 (1959). 300.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City,
New Jersey, December 1958 (1959). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tennes­
see, January 1959 (1959). 200.
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1959 (1959). 200.

-12

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles-Long
Beach, California, March 1959 (1959). 250.

-16

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wiscon­
sin, April 1959 (1959). 200.

-17

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1959 (1959). 250.

-18

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1959 (1959).

-19

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
May 1959 (1959). 200.

-20

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon,
April 1959 (1959), 200.

Wages and Related Benefits, 20 Labor Markets,
1958-59 (1959). 500.
Consolidated in this bulletin are the summaries
and analyses of the results of the individual
area surveys made in late 1958 and early 1959
(published separately in Bulls. 1240-1 through
1240-21). Shows occupational earnings of office
and plant workers for all industries combined,
by broad industry group, and by region and
selected cities. Includes data on the nature and
prevalence of selected establishment practices,
supplementary wage provisions, and fringe bene­
fits in 11 of the 20 areas surveyed. Also pro­
vides data on the trends in occupational earnings
during 1953-59. For a listing of other wage sur­
veys conducted in this and many other major
labor market areas, See Subject index—Wages
and Hours, Occupational Wage Surveys.

1241

Automation and Employment Opportunities for
Officeworkers. A report on the effect of elec­
tronic computers on employment of clerical work­
ers with a special report on programmers.
(1958) . 150.
Designed primarily for use in vocational guid­
ance, discusses the development and use of elec­
tronic computers and their effect on the em­
ployment of clerical workers. Provides a de­
scription of programming, one of the new occu­
pations which has emerged with the development
of automation, and outlines the qualifications and
employment prospects for programmers.

1242

Population and Labor Force Projections for the
United States, 1960 to 1975 (1959). 400.
Briefly reviews population growth in the
United States from 1900 to 1955 and analyzes
some effects of population change. Includes popu­
lation and labor force projections to 1975, and
a description of the methods used in preparing
the projections. Points up the increasing labor
force participation of women and the trend
toward more part-time employment.

;
1243

Trends in Building Permit Activity (1959). 650.
Includes monthly building permit statistics for
1954-56 on a national basis and annual figures
from 1949-58 for cities of 100,000 population
and over, with selected tabulations on metro­
politan-nonmetropolitan and central city-subur­
ban building during 1957-58. Describes the char­
acteristics and limitations of the data, and ex­
plains the shift from the “ old series” on “ urban
building authorized” (1920-June 1954) to the
“ new series” on “ building permit activity” (Jan­
uary 1954-1958). A selected reference list is
appended. See also Bull. 545 this listing.

1244

Union Wages and Hours: Local Transit Operat­
ing Employees, July 1, 1958, and Trend 1929-58
(1959) . 150.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting union
wages and hours of operating employees in the
local-transit industry. This bulletin presents re­
sults of the 38th annual survey by the Bureau
and is based on union scales in effect on July
1, 1958, for approximately 70,000 operating em­
ployees in 52 cities with populations of 100,000
or more. The first bulletin in this series was
printed in 1922 and presents wages as of May
15, 1920, and May 15, 1921. Surveys have been
made for all ensuing years, but from 1932 to
1940, inclusive, results were printed in the
Monthly Labor Review and in serial reprints,

Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, Louis­
iana, February 1959 (1959). 200.

-15

-22

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1959 (1959). 250.

-14

Occupational Wage Survey, Lawrence, Massa­
chusetts, May 1959 (1959). 250.

Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michigan,
January 1959 (1959). 250.

-13

-21




39

rather than in bulletin form. Hours of work
were not included in some of the earlier bulletins
because of their irregularity. The Bureau first
surveyed collectively bargained insurance and
pension plans in 1954 and the results for the
local-transit industry were first published in
Bull. 1177. See also annotation for Bull. 600 this
listing.
1245

1246

1247

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades, July
1, 1958, and Trend 1907-58 (1959). 300.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting union
wages in effect for building trades workers. In
this bulletin, rates are presented for 24 journey­
men trades and 9 helper and laborer classifi­
cations in 52 cities with populations of 100,000
or more. The first bulletin in this series was
published in 1913 and presents wage and hour
data back to 1907. Data have been published for
most of the ensuing years. The Bureau first
surveyed collectively bargained insurance and
pension plans in 1954 and the results for the
building trades were first published in Bull.
1175. See also annotation for Bull. 600, this
listing.
Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1958, and Trend 1936-58
(1959).300.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting
union wage scales for motortruck drivers and
helpers. This bulletin presents information based
on union scales in effect on July 1, 1958, and
covers approximately 265,000 drivers and 37,000
helpers in 52 cities with populations of 100,000
or more. The first bulletin in this series was
published in 1915 and presents union wage scales
in effect as of 1913 and 1914; however, the
majority of quotations for the early years are
for Teamsters rather than for Motortruck driv­
ers. Data have been published in bulletin form
for most of the ensuing years. The Bureau first
surveyed collectively bargained insurance and
pension plans in 1954 and the results for motor­
truck drivers and helpers were first published
in Bull. 1178. See also annotation for Bull. 600
this listing.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1958, and Trend 1907-58 (1959). 350.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting union
wages and hours in the printing industry. In
this bulletin, information is based on union
scales in effect on July 1, 1958, for approxi­
mately 115,000 printing trades workers in 53
cities with populations of 100,000 or more. The
first bulletin in this series was published in
1913 and presents wage and hour data back to
1907. Data have been published in bulletin form
for most of the ensuing years. The Bureau first
surveyed collectively bargained insurance and
pension plans in 1954 and the results for the
printing industry were first published in Bull.
1176. See also annotation for Bull. 600 this list­
ing.

1248

Paid Holiday Provisions in Major Union Con­
tracts, 1958 (1959). 250.

1249

Trends in Output per Man-Hour in the Private
Economy, 1909-1958 (1960). 500.
Presents indexes and average rates of change
in output per man-hour in the private economy
for the post-World War II period, 1947-58, and
for the long-term period, 1909-58. Discusses the
factors affecting the long-term increase in out­
put per man-hour, such as technological innova­

40




tion, capital investment, the role of Federal,
State, and local government investment in serv­
ices and facilities, and the skillful blending
of human resources. Summarizes the major ele­
ments in deriving the estimates of real product
and man-hours, and compares the Bureau’s man­
hour measures in the total private economy with
those of the U.S. Bureau of the Census. In­
cludes discussions of the problems of comparing
real product and man-hour estimates, and of the
limitations and qualifications of output per man­
hour measures. An appendix includes a detailed
discussion of the methods and sources used in
estimating output per man-hour.
1250

Health and Insurance Plans Under Collective
Bargaining. Accident and Sickness Benefits,
Fall 1958 (1959). 250.
Analyzes the key features of accident and
sickness benefits and the extent of the pro­
visions for such benefits in 300 selected plans
under collective bargaining in the fall of 1958.
This is the first in a planned series of bulletins
dealing separately with specific health and in­
surance benefits. A section on maternity bene­
fits is included.

1251

Premium Pay for Night, Weekend, and Over­
time Work in Major Union Contracts (1959).
300.

1252

Factory Workers’ Earnings, May 1958 (1959).
400.
This study is part of the broad program
initiated by the U.S. Department of Labor to
study the economic effects of the $1 Federal
minimum wage. Bulletin 1252 analyzes the
manufacturing wage structure, in May 1958, on
the basis of a broad survey of the straight-time
hourly earnings (exclusive of premium pay for
overtime and work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts) o f factory workers in the United
States. Levels and distributions of wages of
production and related workers are set forth
for the United States as a whole, major regions,
broad industry groups and some industries more
narrowly defined, and metropolitan and non­
metropolitan areas. Changes between April 1954
and May 1958 in the wages of production and
related workers are summarized. Also included
are data for office and clerical employees in
manufacturing in 16 of the 21 major industry
groups.
For an earlier study of factory workers’ earn­
ings in relation to minimum wage legislation, see
Bull. 1179.

1253

Earnings in Wholesale Trade, June 1958 (1959).
300.

1254

Retail Prices of Food, 1957-58. Indexes and Aver­
age Prices (1959). 300.

1255

Occupational Outlook Handbook, Employment
Information on Major Occupations for Use in
Guidance. 1959 Edition (1959). $4.25. Replaces
Bulls. 940, 998, and 1215.
The fourth edition of the Handbook provides
the latest available information on each of more
than 600 occupations of interest in vocational
guidance. These include the skilled trades; cleri­
cal, sales, and service occupations; and major
types of farming. Each occupational report de­
scribes the employment trends and outlook,
nature of the work, industries and localities in
which workers are employed, training and quali­
fications required, earnings and working con­
ditions, and sources of further information.

Trend data on population, employment, and the
broad industrial and occupational groups are
provided as background for an understanding of
the individual occupations. Important occupa­
tional groups added since the third edition in­
clude sales personnel, technicians, clergymen,
school counselors, protective service workers, pro­
grammers, office machine operators, motor ve­
hicle drivers, instrument repairmen, stationary
engineers, and workers in the missile, paper and
pulp, and baking industries.
(Reprints of material on selected occupations
and industries from the Handbook were issued
in early 1960 as Bulls. 1255-1 through 1255-89;
for listing, see inside back cover this publi­
cation.)
1256

1257

1258

1259

Consumer Prices in the United States, Price
Trends and Indexes, 1953-58 (1959).
Presents the history, scope, and meaning of
the Consumer Price Index; traces adjustments
in the series and compares movements of the
old and the adjusted series. Discusses the
comprehensive revision which resulted in the
introduction of the revised Index in January
1953, and the uses of the Index. Tables of in­
dexes and related data for earlier years are in­
cluded.
See Bulls. 699, 710, 966, 1039, and 1165 for
analyses of price changes and for Index method­
ology in earlier periods. See also Bull. 1140.
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1958 (1959).
$1.50.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting pri­
mary market prices and index numbers (re­
lative prices) dating back to 1890. The first
bulletin in this series, published in 1900, was
designed to bring up to date as nearly as
practicable the record of prices in a report of
the United States Committee on Finance for
1840 to 1891 (S. Kept. No. 1394, 52d Cong., 2d
Sess.). Bulletins have been published annually
through 1931 (except for the war years 1917
and 1918) and again beginning in 1942. Data
for intervening years were published in other
Bureau publications. Revisions in the index are
made when it is deemed necessary to expand
coverage and to change weighting patterns to
allow for shifts in the composition of the econ­
omy. Several major revisions involved changes
in the method of calculation. Despite these major
revisions, the continuity of the index has been
preserved as nearly as possible throughout the
years since its inception.
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1958 (1959).
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting in­
formation on strikes and lockouts in the United
States. Statistics are presented by State and
industry group on the number of work stoppages
beginning in the year, workers involved, and
total man-days of idleness. In addition, data are
presented concerning unions involved; major
issues, duration, and results of the strikes; and
methods used in their termination. Data have
been collected by the Bureau for many years, but
have been published in other than bulletin form
for some of the years. See also annotation for
Bull. 651, this listing.
Pension Plans Under Collective Bargaining.
Pt. I. Vesting Provisions and Require­
ments for Early Retirement;




Pt. II. Involuntary Retirement Provisions,
Late 1958 (1959). 250.
Analyzes provisions concerning vesting, bene­
fits, and eligibility contained in selected pension
plans under collective bargaining. Bull. 125®,
which deals with 300 plans in late 1958, is the
first in a new series of pension plan studies; it
does not include information on disability re­
tirement provisions. Bull. 1147 contains similar
information on 300 plans in the fall of 1952.
1260

Nonfarm Housing Starts, 1889-1958 (1959). 300.
Estimates of new permanent nonfarm dwell­
ing units started during 1889-1958. Includes
distributions from 1920 by type of structure (1family, etc.), ownership (private, public), and
location (urban, rural nonfarm ); by years from
1920; and by months from 1939 or 1940. Pre­
sents data for 20 selected States in 1954-58, by
ownership. This bulletin, which includes also an
analysis of the historical series and selected
references, represents a final report of the work
done by the Division of Construction Statistics
of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of
Labor Statistics in the development of the non­
farm housing starts series. See also Bulls. 915
and 941, this listing, for annotations.

1261

Labor Supply and Mobility in a Newly In­
dustrialized Area (1960). 350.
Provides information on the character of the
labor supply attracted to manufacturing em­
ployment in the chronically depressed rural
area of Ravenswood, W. Va., near which the
Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corp. established
a mill. Analyzes work histories of employees of
the mill and a small sample of unaccepted appli­
cants; their geographical and occupational mo­
bility; their age, sex, marital status, and educ­
ation. The study examines the standards for em­
ployment established by the company and points
out that only by employing persons who lived
considerable distances from the plant, and by
transferring professional employees from other
plants, was the company able to meet those
standards.

1262

Military Manpower Requirements and Supply,
1959-63 (1959). 150.
Analyzes military manpower requirements and
supply in the United States from the stand­
point of the current military manpower situation
and the size and characteristics (age and sources
of supply) of the military manpower pool. In­
dicates underlying assumptions and guiding
principles. Bull. 1262 provides estimates for 1958
through 1963 and an earlier bulletin, No. 1161,
provides estimates for 1954 through 1960, with
more extensive discussion.

1263

Union Constitution Provisions: Trusteeship
(1959). 300.
Analyzes the formal rules stipulated in union
constitutions governing the establishment of
trusteeships, the grounds for such action, hearing
requirements, the status of the local unions
and their officers during trusteeship, and the
provisions applying to termination and appeal.
The bulletin does not extend to union practices,
and is essentially a summary of union laws in
effect before enactment of the Labor-Manage­
ment Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959.
The section in this act covering trusteeships is
reproduced in appendix B.

41

Subject Index
[Asterisks refer to annotated bulletins.]

Absenteeism. (See also Productivity—Effects of long
hours and wage incentives.):
Absenteeism in Commercial Shipyards, Bull. 734
(1943).
Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures, Bull.
807 (1945).
Accident and sickness benefits. S ee under Collective
bargaining and agreements, general— Employee-bene­
fit plans.
Accident compensation or insurance. S ee Workmen’s
compensation.
Accident prevention. S ee Accidents— Rates, types,
causes, and prevention, by industry or occupation;
Conventions, meetings, etc.—Industrial Accident
(e tc.); and Safety— Codes.
Accidents. (S ee also Conventions, meetings, etc.— In­
dustrial Accident Boards and Commissions; Safety—
Codes; and Workmen’s compensation.):
Frequency and severity rates, by years:
1907-21. Statistics of Industrial Accidents in
the United States, Bull. 339
(1923).*
1907-25. Record of Industrial Accidents in the
United States to 1925, Bull. 425
(1927).*
1907-27. Statistics of Industrial Accidents in
the United States to the End of
1927, Bull. 490 (1929).*
1926-50. Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull.
1016, 1950 ed. (1951) and 1951
suppl. (1953).*
1940. Industrial-Injury Statistics, by States,
Bull. 700 (1942).
1942. Industrial Injuries in the United States
During 1942, Bull. 758 (1943).*
1943. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1943, Bull. 802 (1944).*
1944. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1944, Bull. 849 (1945).*
1945. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1945, Bull. 889 (1947).*
1946. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1946, Bull. 921 (1948).*
1947. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1947, Bull. 945 (1949).*
1948. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1948, Bull. 975 (1950).*
1949. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1949, Bull. 1025 (1951).*
1950. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1950, Bull. 1098 (1952).*
1951. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1951, Bull. 1137 (1953).*
1952. Work Injuries in the United States
During 1952, Bull. 1164 (1954).*
Methodology:
Accident Record Manual for Industrial Plants,
Bull. 772 (1944).*
Manual on Industrial-Injury Statistics, Bull.
667 (1940).*
Report of Committee on Statistics and Compen­
sation Insurance Cost of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions, Bull. 201 (1916).
Standardization of Industrial Accident Sta­
tistics, Bull. 276 (1920). See Bull. 667.*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statisti­
cal Series, Bull. 1168 (1955) *
Rates, types, causes, and prevention, by industry
or occupation:
Boilershop-products. Injuries and Accident
Causes in the Boilershop-Products Industry
[1951], Bull. 1237 (1958).*

42




Accidents— Con.
Breweries. Injuries and Accident Causes in
the Brewing Industry, 1944, Bull. 884
(1946).*
Carpenters. Injuries and Accident Causes
[1948-49] in Carpentry Operations, Bull.
1118 (1953).*
Clay construction products. Injuries and Acci­
dent Causes [1948] in the Manufacture of
Clay Construction Products, Bull. 1023
(1 951) .*
Construction. Work Injuries in Construction
1948-49, Bull. 1004 (1950).*
Fertilizer. Injuries and Accident Causes [1946]
in Fertilizer Manufacturing, Bull. 949
(1 949) .*
Foundries. Injuries and Accident Causes in the
Foundry Industry, 1942, Bull. 805 (1945).*
Hospitals. Work Injuries and Work-Injuries
Rates in Hospitals [1953], Bull. 1219
(1958).*
Iron and steel. Causes and Prevention of Acci­
dents in the Iron and Steel Industry, 19101919, Bull. 298 (1922).*
-------The Safety Movement in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1907 to 1917, Bull. 234
(1918).*
Logging, pulpwood. Injuries and Accident
Causes in the Pulpwood-Logging Industry,
1943 and 1944, Bull. 924 (1948).*
Longshoring. Injuries and Accident Causes in
the Longshore Industry, 1942, Bull. 764
(1 944) .*
Machine building. Accidents and Accident Pre­
vention in Machine Building, Bull. 216
(1917).*
------- Accidents and Accident Prevention in
Machine Building, Bull. 256 (1920).* (Re­
vision of Bull. 216).
Meatpacking. Injuries and Accident Causes in
the Slaughtering and Meat-Packing Indus­
try, 1943, Bull. 855 (1946).*
Paper and pulp. Injuries and Accident Causes
[1948-49] in the Manufacture of Pulp and
Paper, Bull. 1036 (1952).*
Paperboard containers. Injuries and Accident
Causes [1950-51] in the Manufacture oi
Paperboard Containers, Bull. 1139 (1 9 5 3 )/
Plumbers. Injuries and Accident Causes [1948
49] in Plumbing Operations, Bull. 107S
(1 952) .*
Pulpwood-logging.
Logging, pulpwood,

section.
Saws. See
section.

See

Woodworking Circular Saw,

this
thu

Shipbuilding. Shipyard Injuries and Theii
Causes, 1941, Bull. 722 (1943).*
------- Fatal Work Injuries in Shipyards, 194:
and 1944, Bull. 839 (1945).*
------- Shipyard Injuries, 1944, Bull. 8 8
(1 945) .*
Slaughtering.
Meatpacking,
Steel.
Iron and steel,
Textile dyeing and finishing. Injuries and Ac­
cident Causes [1945] in Textile Dyeing and
Finishing, Bull. 962 (1949).*
Warehousing. Injuries and Accident Causes
[1950] in Warehousing Operations, Bull.
1174 (1955).*
Woodworking circular saw. Woodworking Cir­
cular-Saw Accidents, Bull. 1190 (1956).*
Seamen.
Workmen’s compensation.

See

See

See under

this section.
this section.

Accounting. S ee under Employment outlook.
Actors. Collective Bargaining by Actors, Bull. 402
(1926).
Union wage scales 1929-31. S ee under Wages and
hours.
Adult education. See W ork ed education.
Aged persons, care and assistance. S ee Old-age care
and assistance.
Agricultural machinery. (S ee also Wages and hours—
Machinery manufacture.):
Union Agreements in Agricultural-Machinery In­
dustry, 1943, Bull. 761 (1944).
Agricultural occupations. Employment Outlook in Agri­
cultural Occupations, Bull. 1215-31 (1958).
Agriculture. A Guide to Labor-Management Relations
in the United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Labor Unionism in American Agriculture, Bull.
836 (1945).*
Wartime Wages, Income, and Wage Regulation in
Agriculture, Bull. 883 (1946).
Air hammer, effects on health. Effect of the Air
Hammer on the Hands of Stonecutters, Bull. 236
(1918).
Air transportation:
Employment outlook. S ee under that title .
Wages and Hours of Labor in Air Transportation,
1931, Bull. 575 (1933).
Air-conditioning mechanics. Employment Outlook for
Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanics, Bull.
1215-63 (1958).
Aircraft manufacture. (S ee also specific branch of
m anufacture under Wages and hours.):
California. Wage Stabilization in California Air­
frame Industry, 1943, Bull. 746 (1943).
Employment Outlook in Aircraft Manufacturing,
Bull. 1215-12 (1958).
New England:
Growth, employment, and earnings. New Eng­
land Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212
(1957).*
Union Agreements in the Airframe Industry, 1944,
Bull. 792 (1944).
Wartime Development of the Aircraft Industry,
Bull. 800 (1944).
Alaska. The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska,
Hawaii, Bull. 1191 (1956).

Apparel and accessories stores. Employee Earnings in
Retail Trade in October 1956, Bull. 1220-5 (1957).
F o r earlier data , see Wages and hours— Stores, re­
tail.
Apparel industry. A Guide to Labor-Management Re­
lations in the United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Appliance stores. Employee Earnings in Retail Trade
in October 1956, Bull. 1220-6 (1957). F o r earnings
April 1948, see Bull. 953 (1949).
Apprentices and learners. (S ee also Legislation—Labor
— Text, summaries, and reviews of laws, beginning
with Bull. 370 (1925).):
Apprenticeship in Building Construction, Bull. 459
(1928).
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Apprentices and
Learners, Bull. 908-4 (1948).
Labor-management training programs. A Guide to
Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225-1 (1959).*
Arbitration and conciliation. (S ee also under Collective
bargaining and agreements, general, and by industry
or occupation; also see Labor-management disputes
and Legislation— Labor-management disputes.):
Hart, Schaffner & Marx and United Garment
Workers of America. Collective Agreements in
the Men’s Clothing Industry, Bull. 198 (1916).
Arbitration and conciliation, foreign countries. See
Labor and industrial relations, foreign countries—
Great Britain.
Arbitration, process under collective bargaining. A
Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Architects. Employment Outlook for Architects, Bull.
1215-33 (1958).
Argentina. Labor Legislation of Argentina, Bull. 510
(1930).
Artists, commercial. Employment Outlook for Com­
mercial Artists, Bull. 1215-35 (1958).
Assignment. Collective Bargaining Provisions— Pro­
motion, Transfer, and Assignment; Lay-off, WorkSharing, and Reemployment, Bull. 908-7 (1948).
Assignment of wages. (S ee also Legislation—Labor—
Text, summaries, and reviews of law s.):
Wage Executions for Debt, Bull. 622 (1936).

Almshouses. The Cost of American Almshouses, Bull.
386 (1925). S ee also Bull. 489 (1929).

Atomic Energy Commission, U.S. Government. Labor
and the Savannah River AEC Project, Bull. 1100
(1952).*

Aluminum-fabrication industry. Union Agreements in
the Aluminum-Fabrication Industry, Bull. 760(1944).

Atomic energy field. Employment Outlook in the
Atomic Energy Field, Bull. 1215-14 (1958).

American Federation of Labor and Congress of In­
dustrial Organizations. S ee Labor organizations and
Labor movement.

Automation:
Bibliography. Automatic Technology and Its Im­
plications— A Selected Annotated Bibliography,
Bull. 1198 (1956).
Clerical workers, effect on employment. Automa­
tion and Employment Opportunities for Officeworkers, Bull. 1241 (1958).*

Ammunition-loading industry—General description.
Hourly Earnings in the Ammunition-Loading In­
dustry 1944, Bull. 827 (1945).
Amusements. S ee under Wages and hours.
Annual wage plans. See Guaranteed employment and
wage plans.

Automobile and other motor vehicle (and parts) manu­
facturing. See under Wages and hours and see Tire
industry.

Anthracite mining. (S ee also Wages and hours— Mining
—Anthracite and bituminous coa l.):
Collective Bargaining in the Anthracite Coal In­
dustry, Bull. 191 (1916).

Automobile industry:
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Employment outlook. S ee under that title .

Anthrax. S ee under Occupational diseases.

Automobile mechanics. See under Employment outlook.




43

Automobile repair garages and shops:
Earnings and fringe benefits. See under Wages
and hours.
Automotive dealers. Employee Earnings in Retail Trade
in October 1956, Bull. 1220-4 (1957).
Aviation occupations. See Air transportation.
Baking industry:
Collective-agreement provisions. Wages, Hours, and
Working Conditions in Union Bakeries, June 1,
1939, Bull. 673 (1940).
Wages and hours. See under that title.
Banking. Earnings of Bank Employees, Spring and
Summer of 1943, Bull. 774 (1944).
Employment outlook. See under that title.
Banking societies and banks, labor. See Cooperatives—
Consumer— Credit unions.

Boilershop products industry:
Hourly earnings, January 1945. Wage Structure—
Metalworking Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the BoilershopProduets Industry [1951], Bull. 1237 (1958).*

Barbers. Employment Outlook for Barbers, Bull. 121549 (1958).
Union wage scales 1927-31. See under Wages and
hours.

Brewing industry. Injuries and Accident Causes in the
Brewing Industry, 1944, Bull. 884 (1946).*

Bargaining unit. See under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general.
Beauty operators. Employment Outlook for Beauty
Operators, Bull. 1215-50 (1958).
Benefit associations, sickness and death benefits. Mut­
ual Relief Associations Among Government Employees
in Washington, D.C., Bull. 282 (1921).
Benefits and benefit funds:
Employee-benefit plans, collectively bargained. See
under Collective bargaining and agreements, gen­
eral.
Federal employees, Washington, D.C., Bull. 282
(1921) entitled above.
Fringe benefits. See under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general, and see Related wage benefits.
Labor organizations. Beneficial Activities of Ameri­
can Trade-Unions, Bull. 465 (1928).*
Unemployment-benefit plans— Company, union, or
collectively bargained plans. Unemployment-Bene­
fit Plans in the United States and Unemployment
Insurance in Foreign Countries, Bull. 544 (1931).*
Bethlehem Steel Company. Arbitration of Labor-Man­
agement Grievances: Bethlehem Steel Company and
United Steelworkers of America, 1942-52, Bull. 1159
(1954).*
Bibliographies. (S ee also specific s u b je c ts .):
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225-1 (1959).*
Automatic Technology and Its Implications— A
Selected Annotated Bibliography, Bull. 1198
(1956).
Productivity: A Bibliography, Bull. 1226 (1958).
Unemployment Insurance and Reserves in the
United States—A Selected List of Recent Refer­
ences, Bull. 611 (1935).
Biological sciences (animal and plant sciences, micro­
biology) .
Employment Outlook in the Biological Sciences,
Bull. 1215-5 (1957).
Biologists. See Scientists.
Bituminous coal mining. See under Mining, also under
Wages and hours— Mining.
Blacksmiths. Employment Outlook for
Bull. 1215-51 (1958).

Blacksmiths,

Boilermaking occupations. Employment Outlook
Boilermaking Occupations, Bull. 1215-52 (1958).

44




in

Bonuses. (S ee also Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, by industry or occupation and Wages and
hours— specific in d u s tr y .):
Supplementary Wage Practices in American In­
dustry, 1945-46, Bull. 939 (1948).*
Bookkeepers. S ee under Employment outlook, and see
Office workers.
Boot and shoe industry. S ee Shoe industry.
Bottling-house workmen and Brewery workers. See
under Wages and hours.

Brick industry, common-building.— General description.
Productivity Costs in Common-Brick Industry, Bull.
356 (1924).
Budgets. S ee under Cost-of-living.
Building construction. (S ee also Building trades; Con­
struction; Housing.):
Apprenticeship in Building Construction, Bull. 459
(1928).
Building permits. (S ee also Construction— Build­
ing and nonbuilding.):
Building Operations in Representative Cities,
1920, Bull. 295 (1922).*
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the
United States in:
1921, Bull. 318 (1923).*
1922, Bull. 347 (1923).*
1923, Bull. 368 (1925).*
1924, Bull. 397 (1925).*
1925, Bull. 424 (1926).*
1926, Bull. 449 (1927).*
1927, Bull. 469 (1928).*
1928, Bull. 500 (1929).*
1929, Bull. 524 (1930).*
1930, Bull. 545 (1932).*
Statistics of Building Construction, 1920 to
1937, Bull. 650 (1938).*
Building Construction, 1921 to 1938, Bull. 668
(1940).*
Building Construction, 1940, Bull. 693 (1941).*
Building Construction, 1941, Bull. 713 (1942).*
Building Permit Survey, 1939, Bull. 689 (1941 and
1942).*
Trends in Building Permit Activity, Bull. 1243
(1959).*
Materials, man-hours required to produce and
transport. See Labor requirements.
Residential. (See also Housing.):
Structure of the Residential Building Industry
in 1949, Bull. 1170 (1954).*
Statistics. S ee under Construction, general, and see
Building permits, this section.
Wage Adjustment Board—Development and ac­
tivity, digest of. Union Wages and Hours in the
Building Trades, July 1, 1946, Bull. 910 (1947).
Building materials and farm equipment dealers. Em­
ployee Earnings in Retail Trade in October 1956,
Bull. 1220-1 (1957).
Building trades. (See also Construction.):
Employment outlook. S ee under that title.
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of, by
industry or occupation. See under that title.
Wages and hours. See under that title.

Building trades— Con.
Working conditions. See under Collective bargain­
ing and agreements, by industry or occupation,
and under Employment outlook.
Bureau of Labor Statistics (U.S. Government). The
Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Depart­
ment of Labor: Its History, Activities, and Organi­
zation, Bull. 319 (1922).
Fact-Finding Activities of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Bull. 831 (1945).*
Publications, indexes to and lists of. See under that
title.

Statistics. See under that title.
Bureaus of Labor Statistics (State). S ee Labor (and
related) offices, State. F o r Directories 1936-38-41,
see Labor (and related) offices, Federal and State.
S ee also Legislation—Labor (and related) offices,
State.
Busdrivers. (See also Wages and hours— Transit in­
dustry, local.):
Collective-agreement provisions. Wages, Hours, and
Working Conditions of Union Street-Railway
Employees, June 1, 1941, Bull. 701 (1942).*

Child labor— Con.
Japan:
Early abuses and protective legislation. Labor
Conditions of Women and Children in Ja­
pan, Bull. 558 (1931).
Legislation affecting. See Legislation: Labor and
Minimum wage.
Welfare. Summary of the Report on Condition of
Woman and Child Wage Earners in the United
States, Bull. 175 (1916).*
Chile:
Labor organizations, handbook and legal aspects
of. Labor Organizations in Chile, Bull. 461
(1928).
Chinese migrants. Chinese Migrations, with Special
Reference to Labor Conditions, Bull. 340 (1923).
Cigar and cigarette manufacturing. See Tobacco in­
dustry and Wages and hours— Tobacco industry.
Civil rights of employees. See Legislation— Employee
rights, civil.

Business machine servicemen. See under Employment
outlook.

Clay construction products industry. Injuries and Acci­
dent Causes [1948] in the Manufacture of Clay
Construction Products, Bull. 1023 (1951).*

Callback pay. Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1954, Bull. 1181 (1955).

Clay workers, union wage scales 1927-31. See under
Wages and hours.
*

Canada. (S ee also under Workmen’s compensation;

Cleaners, dyers, and pressers, union wage scales 192931. See under Wages and hours.

and see other specific s u b je c ts .):

Operation of the Industrial Disputes Investigation
Act of Canada, Bull. 233 (1918).
Canning (fruit and vegetable) industry. Union Agree­
ments in the Canned Fruit and Vegetable Industry,
Bull. 794 (1944).
Carbon-monoxide poisoning, extent and seriousness of.
Carbon-Monoxide Poisoning, Bull. 291 (1922).
Cargoes, ship, loading and unloading. See Longshore
industry.
Carpentry. Injuries and Accident Causes [1948-49] in
Carpentry Operations, Bull. 1118 (1953).*
Cement industry, Portland. Labor Requirements for
Construction Materials (Part I— Portland Cement),
Bull. 888-1 (1947).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Portland Cement
Industry, 1929, Bull. 525 (1931).
Chauffeurs, and teamsters and drivers. See Wages and
hours: General trades and Truckdrivers and helpers.
Checkoff arrangements. See Collective bargaining and
agreements, general— Union security.
Chemical industry. (See also under Wages and hours.):
Collective Bargaining in the Chemical Industry,
May 1942, Bull. 716 (1942).
Employment Outlook in the Industrial Chemical
Industry, Bulls. 1151 (1954), and 1215-21 (1958).
Chemists and chemical engineers. (S ee also Scien­
tists.) :
Factors Affecting Earnings in Chemistry and
Chemical Engineering, Bull. 881 (1946).
Manpower Resources in Chemistry and Chemical
Engineering, Bull. 1132 (1953).*
Child labor. Effect of Workmen’s Compensation Laws
in Diminishing the Necessity of Industrial Employ­
ment of Women and Children, Bull. 217 (1918).
Great Britain, World War I. Employment of
Women and Juveniles in Great Britain During
the War, Bull. 223 (1917).




Cleanup time, paid. Labor-Management Contract Pro­
visions, 1953, Bull. 1166 (1954).
Clerical workers. See Office workers.
Closed shop. See Collective bargaining and agreements,
general— Union security.
Clothes-change time, paid. Labor-Management Con­
tract Provisions, 1953, Bull. 1166 (1954).
Clothing industry. (See also under Wages and hours.):
Men’s. Collective Agreements in the Men’s Cloth­
ing Industry, Bull. 198 (1916).
------ Footwear. Comparative Job Performance by
Age: Large Plants in the Men’s Footwear
and Household Furniture Industries, Bull.
1223 (1957).*
------ Suits and coats. Earnings and fringe bene­
fits. Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries,
Selected Wage Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
------ Tailored clothes. Employment outlook. See
under that title.

Women’s coats and suits and dresses. Earnings and
fringe benefits. See under Wages and hours—
Clothing industry.
Women’s ready-to-wear. Regularity of Employ­
ment in the Women’s Ready-to-Wear Garment
Industries, Bull. 183 (1916).
Coal industry. See Mining and Wages and hours—
Mining.
Coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates. Industrial Poison­
ing in Making Coal-Tar Dyes and Dye Intermediates,
Bull. 280 (1921).
Collective agreements and provisions of. See Collective
bargaining and agreements, general, and by industry
or occupation.
Collective bargaining:
Development and characteristics. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States, Bull.
1225 (1958).*

45

Collective bargaining and agreements, general. ( See
also Collective bargaining and agreements, by in­
dustry or occupation; Labor and industrial relations;
Labor-management relations.):
Accident and sickness benefits. S ee under Em­
ployee-benefit plans, this section.
Annual wage plans. See Guaranteed employment
and wage plans, this section .
Apprentices and learners:
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions—Apprentices and Learn­
ers, Bull. 908-4 (1948).
Arbitration. (S ee also Grievances, this section .) :
Analysis of agreements. Arbitration Provisions
in Union Agreements, Bull. 780 (1944).
Extent and characteristics of provisions.
Labor-Management Contract Provisions:
1949-50, and 1952, Bulls. 1022 (1951) and
1142 (1953), respectively.
Assignment. See Promotion, transfer, and assign­
ment, this section.
Bargaining structure. S ee Bargaining unit, scope
of, and Negotiation, methods of, this section.
Bargaining unit, scope o f:
Collective Bargaining with Associations and
Groups of Employers, Bull. 897 (1947).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 194950, Bull. 1022 (1951).
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions— Preamble, Scope of
Bargaining Unit, Duration of Agreements,
Bull. 908-19 (1950).
Benefit plans. S ee Employee-benefit plans, this
section.

Callback pay. Labor-Management Contract Pro­
visions, 1954, Bull. 1181 (1955).
Checkoff arrangements. See Union security, this
section.

Clauses. S ee Sample agreements and clauses, this
section.

Cleanup and clothes-change time. Labor-Manage­
ment Contract Provisions, 1953, Bull. 1166
(1954).
Company unions. Characteristics of Company
Unions, 1935, Bull. 634 (1938).*
Contract:
Duration. Collective Bargaining Provisions—
Preamble, Scope of Bargaining Unit, Dura­
tion of Agreements, Bull. 908-19 (1950).
Enforcement. Collective Bargaining Provisions
— Strikes and Lock-Outs; Contract Enforce­
ment, Bull. 908-13 (1949).
Coverage, extent of, by union status. See Union
security, this section.
Death benefits. See Employee-benefit plans, this
section.

Denmark. See Scandinavia, this section.
Disability benefits. See Employee-benefit plans,
this section.

Discharge, discipline, and quits:
Sample clauses of agreements. See under
Severance pay, this section.
Dismissal pay. S ee Severance pay, this section .
Employee-benefit plans:
Accident and sickness benefits. ( See also
Health, etc. under above heading , this sec­
tion.) :
Health and Insurance Plans Under Col­
lective Bargaining (fall 1958), Bull.
1250 (1959).*
Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1949-50, Bull. 1022 (1951).

46




Collective bargaining and agreements, general—Con.
Employee-benefit plans— Con.
Health and insurance. Analysis of Health and
Insurance Plans Under Collective Bargain­
ing, Late 1955, Bull. 1221 (1957).*
Digest of One Hundred Selected Health
and Insurance Plans Under Collective
Bargaining: 1954, Bull. 1180 (1955) and
Early 1958, Bull. 1236 (1958).
Health and welfare. Union Health and Welfare
Plans, Bull. 900 (1947).*
Health benefits, description of representative
plans. Health-Benefit Programs Established
Through Collective Bargaining 1945, Bull.
841 (1945).
Health, insurance, and pensions:
Development of plans, types, and levels of
benefits. A Guide to Labor-Management
Relations in the United States, Bull.
1225-1 (1959).*
Extent and characteristics. Health, Insur­
ance, and Pension Plans in Union Con­
tracts, Bull. 1187 (1955).
Older workers. Older Workers Under Col­
lective Bargaining, Bull. 1199-2 (1956).
Sample clauses o f agreements. Collective
Bargaining Provisions— Health, Insur­
ance, and Pensions, Bull. 908-17 (1950).
Employee Benefit Plans Under Col­
lective Bargaining, Bull. 946(1949).
Health, welfare, and pensions. Employee-Bene­
fit Plans Under Collective Bargaining, Mid1950, Bull. 1017 (1951).
Health, welfare, retirement, and medical-serv­
ice. Employee Benefit Plans Under Collec­
tive Bargaining, Bull. 946 (1949).
Medical-service. See Health, etc ., this section.
Pensions. (S ee also Health, insurance, and
pensions under Employee-benefit plans, this
se c tio n .):

Analysis of plans. Pension Plans Under
Collective Bargaining, Bulls. 1147
(1953)* and 1259 (1959).*
Digest of One Hundred Selected Pension
Plans Under Collective Bargaining,
Winter 1957-58, Bull. 1232 (1958).
Extent of coverage and financing of pro­
grams. Employee-Benefit Plans Under
Collective Bargaining, Mid-1950, Bull.
1017 (1951).
Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans in
Union Contracts, Bull. 1187 (1955).
Sick leave, paid and unpaid:
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Leave
of Absence; Military Service Leave,
Bull. 908-6 (1948).
Sick-Leave Provisions in Union Agree­
ments, Bull. 832 (1945).
Sickness and accident benefits. S ee Accident
and sickness benefits under Employee-benefit
plans, this section.
Unemployment. Unemployment-Benefit Plans
in the United States and Unemployment
Insurance in Foreign Countries, Bull. 544
(1931).*
Employer associations and groups. S ee Bargaining
unit, scope of, this section.
Employment stabilization. S ee Guaranteed employ­
ment and wage plans and Labor-management
cooperation, this section.

Collective bargaining and agreements, general— Con.
Equal job opportunity. A Guide to Labor-Manage­
ment Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225-2
(1969).*
Equal pay for equal work. Labor-Management
Contract Provisions, 1950-51, Bull. 1091 (1952).
Foremen and supervisors. Union Membership and
Collective Bargaining by Foremen, Bull. 745
(1943).
Fringe benefits. (S ee also Employee-benefit plans
and specific benefit , this section . ) :
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Grievances. (S ee also Arbitration and Labor-man­
agement cooperation, this section . ) :
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in
the United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Grievance
and Arbitration Provisions, Bull. 908-16
(1950).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 195051, Bull. 1091 (1952).
Guaranteed employment and wage plans:
Historical development, extent and character­
istics of agreement provisions:
Guaranteed-Employment and AnnualWage Provisions in Union Agreements,
Effective January 1946, Bull. 828
(1945).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1950-51, Bull. 1091 (1952).
Historical development, extent and character­
istics of agreement provisions, and exper­
ience with plans. Guaranteed Wage Plans
in the United States, Bull. 925 (1948).*
Sample clauses. Collective Bargaining Pro­
visions— Guaranteed Employment and Wage
Plans, Bull. 908-15 (1950). See also Bulls.
828 (1945) and 925 (1948).*
Health and welfare plans and programs. See Em­
ployee-benefit plans, this section.
Health standards:
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Baraining Provisions— Safety, Health, and
anitation, Bull. 908-14 (1949).
Holidays:
Extent and characteristics of agreement pro­
visions :
Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1949-50, 1953, Bulls. 1022 (1951) and
1166 (1954), respectively.
Paid Holiday Provisions in Major Union
Contracts, 1958, Bull. 1248 (1959).
Vacation and Holiday Provisions in Union
Agreements, January 1943, Bull. 743
(1943).
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions—Vacation; Holidays and
Week-End Work, Bull. 908-2 (1948). See
also Bull. 1248 (1959) entitled above.
Hours of Work. S ee Premium pay and Shift differ­
entials and operations, this section.
Incentive-wage plans. See Wage-incentive plans,

f

this section.

Industry stabilization committees. See Labor-man­
agement cooperation, this section.
Insurance plans. S ee Employee-benefit plans, this
section.

Jury leave. S ee Leave payments, this section.
Labor and management rights:
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions— Union and Management
Functions, Rights, and Responsibilities, Bull.
908-12 (1949).




Collective bargaining and agreements, general— Con.
Labor-management cooperation. (S ee also Safety,
this section . ) :
Sample clauses of agreements:
Collective Bargaining Clauses: LaborManagement Safety, Production, and
Industry Stabilization Committees, Bull.
1201 (1957).*
Collective Bargaining Provisions— UnionManagement Cooperation, Plant E ffi­
ciency, and Technological Change, Bull.
908-10 (1949).
Union adjustment to technological change.
A Guide to Labor-Management Rela­
tions in the United States, Bull. 1225
(1958).*
Layoff. (See also Severance pay, this se c tio n .):
Extent and analysis of agreements:
Analysis of Layoff, Recall, and WorkSharing Procedures in Union Contracts,
Bull. 1209 (1957).*
Sample clauses of agreements:
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Layoff,
Recall, and Work-Sharing Procedures,
Bull. 1189 (1956).
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Promo­
tion, Transfer, and Assignment; Lay­
off, Work-Sharing, and Reemployment,
Bull. 908-7 (1948).
Learners. S ee Apprentices and learners, this sec­
tion.

Leave, paid (death in family, jury duty). S ee
Leave payments, this section.
Leave payments:
Extent and characteristics of agreement pro­
visions. Labor-Management Contract Pro­
visions, 1954, Bull. 1181 (1955).
Leave, with and without pay. (S ee also Sick leave
under Employee-benefit plans and Vacations,
this s e c tio n .):

Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions— Leave of Absence; Mili­
tary Service Leave, Bull. 908-6 (1948).
Length of service. See Service, length of, this sec­
tion.

Lockouts. See Strikes, this section.
Maintenance-of-membership. See Union security,
this section.

Management. S ee Labor and management rights,
this section.

Methodology:
Collection and analysis of agreements. Tech­
niques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Military service:
Benefits and rights. Collective Bargaining
Provisions— Leave of Absence; Military
Service Leave; Bull. 908-6 (1948).
Payments. See Leave payments, this section.
Negotiation, methods of. (S ee also Bargaining unit,
scope of, this se c tio n .):
Union Agreement Provisions, Bull. 686 (1942).
Nightwork. S ee Premium pay and Shift differen­
tials and operations, this section.
Norway. See Scandinavia, this section.
Older workers. Older Workers Under Collective
Bargaining, Bulls. 1199-1 and -2 (1956)).
Overtime, and pay for. See Premium pay and Shift
differentials and operations, this section.
Pensions. S ee under Employee-benefit plans, this
section.

Plant efficiency. See Labor-management coopera­
tion, this section ; also see Safety, this section.

47

Collective bargaining and agreements, general— Con.
Premium pay. (See also Shift differentials and
operations, this section. ) :
Extent and characteristics of agreement pro­
visions :
Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1950-51, Bull. 1091 (1952).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1953, Bull. 1166 (1954).
Paid Holiday Provisions in Major Union
Contracts, 1958, Bull. 1248 (1959).
Premium Pay for Night, Weekend, and
Overtime Work in Major Union Con­
tracts, Bull. 1251 (1959).
Sample clauses of agreements:
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Hours
of Work, Overtime Pay, Shift Opera­
tions, Bull. 908-18 (1950).
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Vaca­
tions; Holidays and Week-End Work,
Bull. 908-2 (1948). (See also Bull. 1248
(1959) for clauses relating to premium
pay on holidays,)
Production standards. See Labor-management co­
operation and Wage-incentive plans, this section.
Promotion, transfer, and assignment. Collective
Bargaining Provisions— Promotion, Transfer,
and Assignment; Lay-off, Work-Sharing, and
Reemployment, Bull. 908-7 (1948).
Provisions, sample:
Collective Bargaining Provisions, Bulls. 908
[-1]-19, inc.*
Union Agreement Provisions, Bull. 686 (1942).
Quits:
Sample clauses of agreements. See under Sev­
erance pay, this section.
Recall. See Layoff, this section.
Reemployment. See Layoff and Military service,
this section.
Reporting and callback pay. See Callback pay, this
section.
Rest periods. Labor-Management Contract Pro­
visions, 1953, Bull. 1166 (1954).
Retirement. See Employee-benefit plans— Pensions,
this section.
Russia. Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026
(1951).*
Safety. (See also Labor-management cooperation,
this section.) :
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958) .*
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 194950, Bull. 1022 (1951).
Safety and sanitation standards. See Health stand­
ards, and Labor-management cooperation, this
section.
Sample agreements and clauses. (See also specific
subjects, this section. ) :
Collective Bargaining Provisions, Bulls. 908
[-1 ] -19, inc.*
Union Agreement Provisions, Bull. 686 (1942).
Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden).
Labor-Management Relations in Scandinavia,
Bull. 1038 (1952).
Seniority. See Service, length of.
Service, length of. (See also Promotion, transfer,
and assignment, this section.) :
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Seniority,
Bull. 908-11 (1949).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 195051, Bull. 1091 (1952).
Severance pay. (See also Layoff, this section.) :
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Dismissal Pay,
Bull. 1216 (1957).*
Dismissal-Pay Provisions in Union Agree­
ments, December 1944, Bull. 808 (1945).

48




Collective bargaining and agreements, general— Con.
Severance pay— Con.
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 194950, Bull. 1022 (1951).
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions—Discharge, Discipline,
and Quits; Dismissal Pay Provisions, Bull.
908-5 (1948). (For additional selected clauses
on Dismissal pay , see Bull. 1216 (1957).*)
Shift differentials and operations. (See also Pre­
mium pay, this section, and Collective bargaining
and agreements, by industry or occupation.):
Extent and characteristics of agreement pro­
visions :
Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1952, Bull. 1142 (1953).
Pay Differentials for Night Work Under
Union Agreements, Bull. 748 (1943).
Premium Pay for Night, Weekend, and
Overtime Work in Major Union Con­
tracts, Bull. 1251 (1959).
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions— Hours of Work, Over­
time Pay, Shift Operations, Bull. 908-18
(1950).
Sick leave. See under Employee-benefit plans, this
section.
Soviet Union. See Russia, this section.
Strikes:
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 195051, Bull. 1091 (1952).
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions— Strikes and Lock-Outs;
Contract Enforcement, Bull. 908-13 (1949).
Supervisors. See Foremen, this section.
Sweden. See Scandinavia, this section.
Technological change. See Labor-management co­
operation, this section.
Time studies. See Wage-incentive plans, this sec­
tion.
Transfer. See Promotion, transfer, and assignment,
this section.
Unemployment. See under Employee-benefit plans,
this section.
Union and management rights. See Labor and
management rights, this section.
Union-management cooperation. See Labor-man­
agement cooperation and Safety, this section.
Union security:
Sample clauses of agreements. Union-Security
Provisions in Collective Bargaining, Bull. 908
(1947).*
Types of and extent of worker coverage under
agreements:
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union
Status, January 1944, Bull. 776 (1944);
January 1945, Bull. 829 (1945).
Extent of Collective Bargaining and
Union Recognition, 1945, Bull. 865
(1946)
and 1946, Bull. 909 (1947).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1949-50, Bull. 1022 (1951); 1950-51,
Bull. 1091 (1952); and 1952, Bull. 1142
(1953).
Vacations:
Extent and characteristics of agreement pro­
visions :
Paid Vacation Provisions in Major Union
Contracts, 1957, Bull. 1233 (1958).*
Paid Vacations in American Industry,
1943 and 1944, Bull. 811 (1945).
Vacation and Holiday Provisions in Union
Agreements, January 1943, Bull. 743
(1943).
See also Bulls. 1022 (1951) and 1142
(1953).

Collective bargaining and agreements, general— Con.
V acations— Con.
Sample clauses of agreements. (See also Leave,
with and without pay, this section.):
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Vaca­
tions; Holidays and Week-End Work,
Bull. 908-2 (1948).
Wage adjustment:
Escalation, extent and characteristics of agree­
ment provisions, and impact of adjusted
CPI. Labor-Management Contract Provi­
sions, 1950-51, Bull, 1091 (1952).
Renegotiation provisions, extent and character­
istics of. Labor-Management Contract Pro­
visions, 1949-50, Bull. 1022 (1951).
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions—W a g e
Adjustment
Plans, Bull. 908-9 (1948).
Wage-incentive plans:
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions— Incentive Wage Pro­
visions; Time Studies and Standards of
Production, Bull. 908-3 (1948). See also
Bull. 717, entitled below.
Worker attitudes toward and procedures for
handling under collective bargaining:
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations
in the United States, Bull. 1225-2
(1959).
Incentive-Wage Plans and Collective
Bargaining, Bull. 717 (1942).
Wage provisions, general. Collective Bargaining
Provisions— General Wage Provisions, Bull. 9088 (1948).
Wage reopening. See Wage adjustment.
Washup, cleanup, and clothes-change time. LaborManagement Contract Provisions, 1953, Bull.
1166 (1954).
Weekend work. See Premium pay, this section.
Welfare plans and programs. See Employee-benefit
plans— Health, welfare, etc.f this section.
Work stoppages. See Strikes, this section.
Worksharing. See Layoff, this section.
Collective bargaining and agreements, by industry or
occupation. (See also Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general; Labor and industrial relations;
Labor-management relations.):
Actors. Collective Bargaining by Actors, Bull. 402
(1926).
Agricultural machinery. See Machinery, agricul­
tural, this section.
Airframe. Union Agreements in the Airframe In­
dustry, 1944, Bull. 792 (1944).
Aluminum-fabrication. Union Agreements in the
Aluminum-Fabrication Industry,
Bull.
760
(1944).
Anthracite mining. See Mining, this section.
Baking. Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
Union Bakeries, June 1, 1939, Bull. 673 (1940).
Bethlehem Steel Company. See Steel, this section.
Building trades. Union Wages, Hours, and Work­
ing Conditions in the Building Trades: June 1,
1939, Bull. 674 (1940) ;* and June 1, 1941, Bull.
680 (1942).*
Canning (fruit and vegetable). Union Agreements
in the Canned Fruit and Vegetable Industry,
Bull. 794 (1944).
Chemical. Collective Bargaining in the Chemical
Industry, May 1942, Bull. 716 (1942).
Clothing, men’s :
Text of agreements. Collective Agreements in
the Men’s Clothing Industry, Bull. 198
(1916).
Cotton-textile. Union Agreements in the CottonTextile Industry, Bull. 885 (1947).




Collective bargaining and agreements, by industry or
occupation— Con.
Electronics. Collective Bargaining—Radio, Tele­
vision, and Electronics Industry, Bull. 1089
(1952).
Fruit and vegetable, canned. See Canning, this
section.
Leading industries and occupations:
Trade Agreements in:
1923 and 1924, Bull. 393 (1925).
1925, Bull. 419 (1926).
1926, Bull. 448 (1927).
1927, Bull. 468 (1928).
Leather-tanning. Union Agreements in the LeatherTanning Industry, 1943^ Bull. 777 (1944).
Machinery, agricultural. Union Agreements in A g­
ricultural-Machinery Industry, 1943, Bull. 761
(1944).
Maritime industry. The Earnings and Employment
of Seamen on U.S. Flag Ships, Bull. 1238
(1958).*
Meatpacking. Collective Bargaining in the MeatPacking Industry, Bull. 1063 (1952).
Mining, anthracite. Collective Bargaining in the
Anthracite Coal Industry, Bull. 191 (1916).
Motortruck drivers. See Truckdrivers, this section.
Paper and Allied Products Industry, Bull. 709
(1942).
Petroleum-refining. Union Agreements in the
Petroleum-Refining Industry in Effect in 1944,
Bull. 823 (1945).
Printing trades:
Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the
Printing Trades, May 15, 1936, Bull. 631
(1937).
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions
in the Printing Trades: June 1, 1939, Bull.
675 (1940) ;* June 1,1941, Bull. 708 (1942).*
See also Bull. 481 (1928).
Radio. See Electronics, this section.
Seamen. See Maritime industry, this section.
Shoe industry. See Labor and industrial conditions
— Shoe industry.
Silk-ribbon. Trade Agreement in the Silk-Ribbon
Industry of New York City, Bull. 341 (1923).
Steel. Arbitration of Labor-Management Griev­
ances: Bethlehem Steel Company and United
Steelworkers of America, 1942-52, Bull. 1159
(1954).*
Television. See Electronics, this section.
Textiles, cotton. See Cotton-textile, this section.
Tobacco. Union Agreements in the Tobacco Indus­
try, January 1945, Bull. 847 (1945).
Transit, local:
Street Railway Employment in the United
States, Bull. 204 (1917).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of
Union Street-Railway Employees, June 1,
1941, Bull. 701 (1942).*
Truckdrivers. Union Wages, Hours, and Working
Conditions of Motortruck Drivers, June 1, 1939,
Bull. 676 (1940).*
Commercial artists. Employment Outlook for Com­
mercial Artists, Bull. 1215-35 (1958).
Common labor. See under Wages and hours— Municipal
employment.
Community wage surveys. See Wages and hours— Occu­
pational wage surveys, by city.
Company housing. Housing by Employers in the United
States, Bull. 263 (1920).*
Company unions. Characteristics of Companv Unions,
1935, Bull. 634 (1938).*

49

Conciliation. (S ee also Labor-management disputes.):
Hart, Schaffner & Marx and United Garment
Workers of America. Collective Agreements in
the Men’s Clothing Industry, Bull. 198 (1916).
Mining, anthracite. Collective Bargaining in the
Anthracite Coal Industry, Bull. 191 (1916).
Services, functions of. A Guide to Labor-Manage­
ment Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225
(1958).*
Concrete industry, blocks and pipes. Labor Require­
ments for Construction Materials, Bulls. 888-2 and -3
(1947).
Conferences. See Conventions, meetings, etc.
Congress of Industrial Organizations. See Labor organ­
izations and Labor movement.
Construction, general. ( See also Building construction;
Building trades.):
Estimating expenditures and labor for new con­
struction. Techniques of Preparing Major BLS
Statistical Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Injuries. Work Injuries in Construction, 1948-49,
Bull. 1004 (1950).*
Labor-management relations. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States, Bull.
1225 (1958).*
Materials, man-hours required to produce and
transport. S ee Labor requirements.
Post-World War II. Post-War Capacity and Char­
acteristics of the Construction Industry, Bull. 779
(1944).*
Public Works Administration. P.W.A. and Indus­
try. A Four-Year Study of Regenerative Em­
ployment, Bull. 658 (1938).*
Statistics. (See also Building construction— Build­
ing permits.):
Construction During Five Decades, 1907-52,
Bull. 1146 (1954).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull.
1016 (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Nonfarm Housing Starts 1889-1958, Bull. 1260
(1959).*
Construction, Building and nonbuilding. ( See also Build­
ing construction and Housing.) :
Employment, expenditures, and volume:
The Construction Industry in the United
States, Bull. 786 (1944).*
Construction in the War Years, 1942-45, Bull.
915 (1948).*
Construction and Housing, 1946-47, Bull. 941
(1948).*
Construction— 1948 in Review, Bull. 984
(1950) .
Construction, Annual Review, 1950, Bull. 1047
(1951) .*
Construction, Annual Review, 1951, Bull. 1122
(1953).
Construction During Five Decades, 1907-52,
Bull. 1146 (1954).*
Postwar projections. Probable Volume of Postwar
Construction, Bull. 825 (1945).
Consumer debt:
Garnishment and wage assignments. Wage Execu­
tions for Debt, Bull. 622 (1936).
Consumer expenditures. S ee Income and expenditures,
consumer.
Consumer Price Index (formerly “ cost-of-living” index)
and Consumer prices. See under Prices.
Consumers’ cooperative associations, clubs, and societies.
S ee Cooperatives.

50




Contract. (S ee also under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general.):
Employment. S ee Employment— Contract of.
Individual:
Freedom o f contract, court tests of law of,
English and American. Wage-Payment Leg­
islation in the United States, Bull. 229
(1918).*
War. Effect of War-Contract Cut-Backs on Se­
lected Plants, Bull. 818 (1945).
Conventions, meetings, etc.:
Accident prevention, industrial. (S ee also Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions, International
Association of, this section . ) :
Proceedings of conference July 1926, BuU. 428
(1926).
Employment Managers:
Proceedings of conferences:
January 1916, Minneapolis, Minn., Bull.
196 (1916).
May 1916, Boston, Mass., Bull 202 (1916).
April 1917, Philadelphia, Pa., Bull. 227
(1917).
May 1918, Rochester, N.Y., Bull. 247
(1919).
Employment Offices, Public, American Association
o f:
Proceedings of annual meetings:
1st, Chicago, 111., December 1913, Bull 192
(1916).
2d, Indianapolis, Ind., September 1914,
Bull. 192 (1916).
3d, Detroit, Mich., July 1915, Bull. 192
(1916) .
4th, Buffalo, N.Y., July 1916, Bull. 220
(1917) .
Employment Services, Public, International Asso­
ciation o f:
Proceedings of annual meetings:
9th, Buffalo, N.Y., September 1921, Bull.
311 (1922).
10th, Washington, D.C., September 1922,
Bull. 337 (1923).
11th, Toronto, Canada, September 1923,
Bull. 355 (1924).
12th, Chicago, 111., May 1924, Bull. 400
(1925).
13th, Rochester, N.Y., September 1925,
Bull. 414 (1926).
15th, Detroit, Mich., October 1927, Bull
478 (1928).
16th, Cleveland, Ohio, September 1928,
Bull. 501 (1929).
17th, Philadelphia, Pa., September 1929,
Bull. 538 (1931).
18th, Toronto, Canada, September 1930,
Bull. 538 (1931).
Governmental Labor Officials, International Asso­
ciation o f:
Proceedings of annual conventions:
7th, Seattle, Wash., July 1920, Bull. 266
(1921).
8th, New Orleans, La., May 1921, Bull.
307 (1922).
9th, Harrisburg, Pa., May 1922, Bull.
323 (1923).
10th, Richmond, Va., May 1923, Bull. 352
(1923).
11th, Chicago, 111., May 1924, Bull. 389
(1925).
12th, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 1925,
BuU. 411 (1926).

Conventions, meetings, etc-—Con.
Governmental Labor Officials, International Asso­
ciation of— Con.
Proceedings of annual conventions—Con.
13th, Columbus, Ohio, June 1926, Bull. 429
(1927).
14th, Paterson, N J., May-June 1927, Bull.
465 (1927).
16th, New Orleans, La., May 1928, Bull.
480 (1929).
16th, Toronto, Canada, June 1929, Bull.
508 (1930).
17th, Louisville, Ky., May 1930, Bull. 530
(1930).
18th, Boston, Mass., May 1931, Bull. 563
(1932).
19th, Chicago, 111., September 1933, Bull.
609 (1934).
21st, Asheville, N.C., October 1935, Bull.
619 (1936).
22d, Topeka, Kans., September 1936, Bull.
629 (1937).
23d, Toronto, Canada, September 1937,
Bull. 653 (1938).
24th, Charleston, S.C., September 1938,
Bull. 666 (1939).
25th, Tulsa, Okla., September 1939, Bull.
678 (1940).
26th, New York City, September 1940,
Bull. 690 (1941).
27th, St. Louis, Mo., September 1941, Bull.
721 (1943).
28th, Chicago, 111., October 1943, Bull.
796 (1945).
Government Labor Officials of the United States
and Canada, Association of. S ee Governmental
Labor Officials, International Association of,
this section.

Governmental Officials in Industry of the United
States and Canada, Association of. S ee Govern­
mental Labor Officials, International Associa­
tion of, this section.
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, In­
ternational Association of. Conference on Social
Insurance, Dec. 5-9, 1916, proceedings of, Bull.
212 (1917).
Proceedings of annual meetings:
3d, Columbus, Ohio, April 1916, Bull. 210
(1917).
4th, Boston, Mass., August 1917, Bull.
248 (1919).
5th, Madison, Wis., September 1918, Bull.
264 (1919).
6th, Toronto, Canada, September 1919,
Bull. 273 (1920).
7th, San Francisco, Calif., September
1920, Bull. 281 (1921).
8th, Chicago, 111., September 1921, Bull.
304 (1922).
9th, Baltimore, Md., October 1922, Bull.
333 (1923).
10th, St. Paul, Minn., September 1923,
Bull. 359 (1924).
11th, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 1924,
Bull. 385 (1925).
12th, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 1925,
Bull. 406 (1926).
13th, Hartford, Conn., September 1926,
Bull. 432 (1927).
14th, Atlanta, Ga., September 1927, Bull.
456 (1928).
15th, Paterson, N J ., September 1928, Bull.
485 (1929).
16th, Buffalo, N.Y., October 1929, Bull.
511 (1930).




Conventions, meetings, etc.— Con.
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, In­
ternational Association of—Con.
Proceedings of annual meetings— Con.
17th, Wilmington, Del., September 1930,
Bull. 536 (1931).
18th, Richmond, Va., October 1931, Bull.
564 (1932).
19th, Columbus, Ohio, September 1932,
Bull. 577 (1933).
20th, Chicago, 111., September 1933, Bull.
602 (1934).
Index to proceedings, 1914-24, by subject
and name, Bull. 395 (1925).
Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, July
14-16, 1926, proceedings of, Bull. 428 (1926).
Labor legislation. Proceedings of the National Con­
ference for Labor Legislation, held at Washing­
ton, D.C., February 14 and 15, 1934, Bull. 683
(1934).
Labor officials, governmental. S ee Governmental
Labor Officials, this section .
Productivity conference, 1946. Proceedings and
evaluation, summary of, Bull. 913 (1947).*
Social insurance. Proceedings of the Conference on
Social Insurance, called by the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions, Washington, D.C., December 5 to
9, 1916, Bull. 212 (1917).
Convict labor. S ee Prison labor.
Cooperative banking and credit societies. S ee Coopera­
tives— Consumer— Credit unions.
Cooperative housing. See
Housing.

Cooperatives— Consumer—

Cooperative movement. See Cooperatives.
Cooperatives. [Note: For information on the various
types and groups of cooperatives (e.g., medical-care,
housing, student, and other local-service associations
including electricity, telephone, and insurance asso­
ciations ; fangers' associations, buying clubs and
other retail-distributive associations such as store
and petroleum associations; commercial federations
including wholesale, service, and productive federa­
tions; and noncommercial federations sponsoring edu­
cational and recreational activities), see Develop­
ments and Operations under Consumer, this section .]
Consumer:
Buying clubs:
Organization, management, and bylaws of.
S ee
Organization and management
under Consumer, this section.
Bylaws of associations and buying clubs. See
Organization and management under Con­
sumer, this section.
Credit unions. (S ee also Developments and
Operations, under Consumer, this section,
and see under Legislation-Cooperatives,
consumer.):
History and experience of, in America.
Cooperative Credit Societies (Credit
Unions) in America and in Foreign
Countries, Bull. 314 (1922).*
Operations:
1925. Cooperative Movement in the
United States in 1925 (other than
Agricultural), Bull. 437 (1927).*
1929. Consumers1 Credit, and Produc­
,
tive Cooperative Societies, 1929,
Bull. 631 (1931).*
1933. Consumers', Credit, and Pro­
ductive Cooperation in 1933, Bull.
612 (1935) *

51

Cooperatives— Con.
Consumer—Con.
Credit unions— Con.
Operations— Con.
1943-44-45. Activities
of
Credit
Unions in 1943, 1944, and 1945,
Bulls. 797 (1944),* 850 (1945),*
and 894 (1947),* respectively,
1946. Consumers’ Cooperatives and
Credit Unions: Operations in 1946,
Bull. 922 (1948).
Developments:
1941. Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1941,
Bull. 703 (1942).*
1942. Developments in Consumers’ Co­
operation in 1942, Bull. 738 (1943).*
1943. Developments in the Cooperative
Movement in 1943, Bull. 768 (1944).*
1944-45-46-47. Developments in Consum­
ers’ Cooperative Movement in 1944,
1945,1946, and 1947, Bulls. 821 (1945),*
859 (1946),* 904 (1947),* and 932
(1948),* respectively .
1948. Developments in Consumers’ Co-ops
in 1948, Bull. 964 (1949).*
1949. Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1949:
Operations and Developments, Bull.
1013 (1951).*
1950-51. Developments in Consumers’ Co­
operatives in 1950, 1951, Bulls. 1030
(1951) * and 1073 (1952),* respectively.
Recent. Consumer Cooperatives in the
United States, Bull. 1158 (1954).*-----including 1956. Consumer Cooperatives,
Bull. 1211 (1957).*
Directory of Consumers’ Cooperatives in the
United States, Bulls. 750 (1943, revised
1947) and 959 (1949).*
Gasoline and oil associations. Organization
and Management of Cooperative Gasoline
and Oil Associations (with model by­
laws), Bull. 606 (1934).
Housing. (See also Developments and Opera­
tions under Consumer, this s e c tio n .):
Bylaws and other pertinent documents,
samples of. Cooperative Housing in the
United States, 1949 and 1950, Bull. 1093
(1952) .
Bylaws, samples of. S ee “ Organization
and Management,” below.
Characteristics, problems, and accomplish­
ments, 165 associations. Cooperative
Housing in the United States, 1949 and
1950, Bull. 1093 (1952).
Characteristics, problems, and accomplish­
ments, 20 selected projects. Nonprofit
Housing Projects in the United States,
Bull. 896 (1947).
Organization and Management of Coopera­
tive and Mutual Housing Associations,
Bull. 858 (1946).
Organization and Management of Coopera­
tive Housing Associations (with model
bylaws), Bull. 608 (1934).
Legal status:
Medical-care, electricity, and telephone
associations. Consumers’ Cooperation in
the United States, 1936, Bull. 659
(1939).*
Operations:
1920. Consumers’ Cooperative Societies in
the United States in 1920, Bull. 313
(1923).*
1925. Cooperative Movement in the United
States in 1925 (other than agricultural),
Bull. 437 (1927).*

52




Cooperatives— Con.
Consumer— Con.
Operations— Con.
1929. Consumers’s Credit, and Productive
Cooperative Societies, 1929, Bull. 531
(1931).*
1929. Consumers’, Credit, and Productive
Cooperation in 1933, Bull. 612 (1935).*
1936. Consumers’ Cooperation in the
United States, 1936, Bull. 659 (1939).*
1941. Consumers’ Cooperation in the
United States in 1941, Bull. 725 (1943).*
1942. Activities of Consumers’ Coopera­
tives in 1942, Bull. 757 (1943).*
1943-44-45. Operations of Consumers’ Co­
operatives in 1943, 1944, 1945, Bulls.
796 (1944),* 843 (1945),* and 890
(1947) ,* respectively.
1946. Consumers’ Cooperatives and Credit
Unions: Operations in 1946, Bull. 922
(1948) .*
1947. Consumers’ Cooperatives: Opera­
tions in 1947, Bull. 948 (1949).*
1948. Consumers’ Cooperatives: Opera­
tions in 1948, Bull. 971 (1949).*
1949. Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1949,
Operations and Developments, Bull.
1013 (1951).*
1950. Consumers’ Cooperatives: Opera­
tions in 1950, Bull. 1049 (1952).*
Organization and Management of Consumers’
Cooperative Associations and Clubs (with
model bylaws), Bull. 598 (1934).
Organization and Management of Consumers’
Cooperatives and Buying Clubs, Bull. 665
(1941).
Organization and Management of Consumers’
Cooperatives, Bull. 1024 (1951).*
Personnel policies. Consumers’ Cooperation in
the United States, 1936, Bull. 659 (1939).*
Southern States, developments in. Labor in
the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Statistics. Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950
ed., Bull. 1016 (1951).*
Student. (S ee also Developments and Opera­
tions under Consumer, this se c tio n .):
Student Cooperatives in the United States,
1941, Bull. 740 (1943).
Court decisions affecting. See Consumer: Develop­
ments and Legal status, this section.
Credit unions. See under Consumer, this section .
Directory of. See under Consumer, this section.
Housing. See under Consumer, this section.
Legislation affecting. S ee under Legislation; also
see Consumer— Developments, this section.
Personnel policies. S ee under Consumer, this
section.

Productive societies, workers’ :
1925. Cooperative Movement in the United
States in 1925 (other than agricultural),
Bull. 437 (1927).*
1929. Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Co­
operative Societies, 1929, Bull. 531 (1931).*
1933. Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Co­
operation in 1933, Bull. 612 (1935).*
Southern States. See under Consumer, this section.
Workers’ productive societies. S ee Productive soci­
eties, workers’, this section.
Cooperatives, foreign countries:
Consumer, developments in. Consumer Cooperatives
in the United States [includes data on foreign
countries], Bull. 1158 (1954).*
Consumer, status as of 1956. Consumer Cooper­
atives, Bull. 1211 (1957).*

Cooperatives, foreign countries— Con,
Credit unions. Cooperative Credit Societies (Credit
Unions) in America and in Foreign Countries,
Bull. 314 (1922).*
Europe:
Development and characteristics of cooper­
ative associations. Cooperative Associations
in Europe and Their Possibilities for PostWar Reconstruction, Bull. 770 (1944).*
Postwar developments. Cooperatives in Post­
war Europe— Survey of Developments in
Scandinavian Countries and Eastern, Cen­
tral, and Western Europe, Bull. 942 (1948).
Postwar reconstruction, possibilities for co­
operatives in. Bull. 770 (1944),* entitled
above.
Cooperatives, international. (See also Cooperatives—
Consumer— Developments, 1943 et seq.) :
Organizations and activities summarized. Bull. 770
(1944),* entitled above.
Coremakers. Mobility of Molders and Coremakers, 19401952, Bull. 1162 (1954).*
Cost of living. (See also Income and expenditures, con­
sumer; and Prices.):
Budgets, fam ily:
City workers. Family Budget of City Worker,
October 1950, Bull. 1021 (1951).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016,
1950 ed. (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Workers’ Budgets in the United States,
City Families and Single Persons, 1946
and 1947, Bull. 927 (1948).*
Historical survey. Bull. 927 (1948),* entitled
above.
Budgets, State:
Single women. Bull 927(1948),* entitled above.
Cost of Living in the United States, Bull. 357
(1924).
Cost of Living in 1941, Bull. 710 (1942).*
Southern cities:
Trends 1939-46. Labor in the South, Bull. 898
(1947).*
Wage adjustment based on. See Wage adjustment.
Cotton industries. (See also under productivity.):
Collective agreements. Union Agreements in the
Cotton-Textile Industry, Bull. 885 (1947).
Earnings and fringe benefits. See under Wages
and hours.
Economic background and distribution of earn­
ings. Wages in Cotton-Goods Manufacturing,
Bull. 663 (1938).*
Fall River, Mass. Preventable Death in Cotton
Manufacturing Industry, Bull. 251 (1919).
Fall River— New Bedford areas:
Changes in wage rates and in related prac­
tices. The Wage Chronology Series, Vol. 1,
Bull. 970 (1949).
New England textile mills, labor turnover in. New
England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212
(1957).*
Court decisions. (See also Legislation.):
Affecting labor:
1915, Bull. 189 (1916).
1916, Bull. 224 (1917).
1917, Bull. 246 (1918).
1918, Bull. 258 (1920) (and Opinions).
1919-20, Bull. 290 (1922) (and Opinions).
1921, Bull. 309 (1922) (and Opinions).
1922, Bull. 344 (1923) (and Opinions).
1923-24, Bull. 391 (1925).
1925, Bull. 417 (1926) (and Opinions).
1926, Bull. 444 (1927) (and Opinions).
1927-28, Bull. 517 (1930) (and Opinions).




Court decisions— Con.
Affecting labor— Con.
1929-30, Bull. 548 (1931) (and Opinions).
1931-32, Bull. 592 (1933) (and Opinions).
Labor Laws of the United States with De­
cisions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370
(1925). (Compilation of laws through
1924).
Cooperatives affected by. See Cooperatives—Con­
sumer— Developments.
Employment agencies, private. Laws Relating to
Employment Agencies in the United States as
of July 1, 1937, Bull. 630 (1937).
Craft wage scales. See Wages and hours.
Credit societies. See Cooperatives— Consumer— Credit
unions.
Credit unions. See under Cooperatives— Consumer.
Cutbacks. Effect of War-Contract Cut-Backs on Se­
lected Plants, Bull. 818 (1945).
Dangerous occupations. See Accidents; Occupational
diseases; Poisons, industrial; and Safety— Codes.
Death benefits:
Collectively bargained. See Collective bargaining
and agreements, general— Employee-b e n e f i t
plans.
Federal employees, Washington, D.C. Mutual Re­
lief Associations Among Government Employees
in Washington, D.C., Bull. 282 (1921).
Deaths, causes of. See Mortality statistics.
Debts, consumer:
Garnishments and wage assignments. Wage Exe­
cutions for Debt, Bull. 622 (1936).
Defense:
Labor policies, pre-World War II. Report on the
Work of the National Defense Mediation Board,
March 19, 1941-January 12, 1942, Bull. 714
(1942).*
State councils of. Labor Legislation o f :
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
Demobilization, World War I, review o f: Demobili­
zation of Manpower, 1918-19, Bull. 784 (1944).
Denmark:
Collective-bargaining structure and agreements,
and disputes settlement. Labor-Management Re­
lations in Scandinavia, Bull. 1038 (1952).
Department stores. See Stores, retail and Wages and
hours— Stores, retail.
Depressed areas. See under Unemployment.
Designers and decorators. Employment Outlook for In­
terior Designers and Decorators, Bull. 1215-39
(1958).
Diesel-engine mechanics. See under Employment out­
look.
Dietitians and home economists. Employment Outlook
for Dietitians and Home Economists, Bull. 1215-36
(1958).
Directories. See specific subject.
Disability benefits. See Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general— Employee-benefit plans.
Discharge, discipline, and quits:
Sample clauses of agreements. Collective Bargain­
ing Provisions— Discharge, Discipline, and Quits;
Dismissal Pay Provisions, Bull. 908-5 (1948).
Diseases, industrial. See Occupational diseases.

53

Dismissal compensation. S ee Collective bargaining and
agreements, general— Severance pay.
Disputes—industrial—labor. S ee Labor-management
disputes.
Draftsmen. S ee under Employment outlook.

Electronics manufacturing. (S ee also Electronic tech­
nicians, and under Employment outlook.):
Collective-agreement provisions, type and extent of,
in union contracts. Collective Bargaining—
Radio, Television, and Electronics Industry, Bull.
1089 (1952).

Dressmaking, Massachusetts. Dressmaking as a Trade
for Women in Massachusetts, Bull. 193 (1916).

Electroplaters. Employment Outlook for Electroplaters,
Bull. 1215-57 (1958).

Drivers. S ee Wages and hours: General trades and
Truckdrivers and helpers.
Drivers, bus. S ee Wages and hours—Transit industry,
local.

Electroplating and polishing industry:
Characteristics; earnings; and wage, and related
practices. Wage Structure of Electroplating and
Polishing Industry, January 1945, Bull. 875
(1946).

Drug stores and proprietary stores. Employee Earnings
in Retail Trade in October 1956, Bull. 1220-7 (1957).

Emigrant agents. S ee Legislation— Employment agen­
cies—public and private.

Dust phthisis and dusty trades. S ee Mortality statistics
— Dusty trades; also Hygiene, industrial— Printing
trades.

Employee-benefit plans. S ee under Collective bargain­
ing and agreements, general.

Dyeing and finishing textiles. (S ee also under W a g es
and hours.) :
Injuries and Accident Causes [1945] in Textile
Dyeing and Finishing, Bull. 962 (1949).*

Employee rights, civil. S ee under Legislation.

Dyers, union wage scales. S ee Wages and hours—
Cleaners, dyers, and pressers.
Dyes, coal-tar, and dye intermediates. Industrial Poison­
ing in Making Coal-Tar Dyes and Dye Intermediates,
Bull. 280 (1921).
Earnings. See Wages and hours; also specific industry
or occupation under Employment outlook.
Earth scientists. See under Employment outlook.
Economic conditions. See Labor and industrial con­
ditions; Unemployment; and specific industry .
Economic status. See Income.
Ecuador. Labor Legislation of
(1931).

Ecuador,

Bull.

559

Education. S ee Employment outlook; Vocational edu­
cation and training; and Workers’ education; also
specific occupation, profession, industry, or trade .
Efficiency, industrial. ( See also Munition workers,
Great Britain, World War I; Plant management;
Productivity.):
Union industrial engineering activities. A Guide
to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225-2 (1959).*
Electric and gas utilities. A Guide to Labor-Manage­
ment Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225
(1958).*
Electric lamp industry:
Historical review of, and description of lamp­
making processes; effect of technological changes
on productivity and employment. Technological
Changes and Employment in the Electric Lamp
Industry, Bull. 593 (1933).
Electric light and power occupations. S ee under Em­
ployment outlook.
Electricians, maintenance. Employment Outlook for
Maintenance Electricians, Bull. 1215-61 (1958).
Electricity, prices of. S ee under Prices.
Electronic technicians. (S ee also Electronics manu­
facturing and under Employment outlook.):
The Mobility of Electronic Technicians, 1940-52,
Bull. 1150 (1954).*

54




Employee representation, foreign countries. S ee Labor
and industrial relations, foreign countries.
Employee welfare. S ee Health, recreation, and wel­
fare conditions.
Employer associations and groups. Collective Bargain­
ing with Associations and Groups o f Employers,
Bull. 897 (1947).
Employer housing. Housing by Employers in the United
States, Bull. 263 (1920).*
Employers’ liability. S ee Workmen’s compensation;
also see Court decisions affecting labor and under
Legislation.
Employment. (S ee also Employment outlook; Employ­
ment statistics; Unemployment; and other specific
occupations, professions, industries, or trades .) :
Automation affecting. Automation and Employ­
ment Opportunities for Officeworkers, Bull. 1241
(1958).*
Children. S ee Child labor.
Clothing industry, women’s. Regularity of Em­
ployment in the Women’s Ready-to-Wear Gar­
ment Industries, Bull. 183 (1916).
Construction industry, 1929-43. The Construction
Industry in the United States, Bull. 786 (1944).*
See also Bull. 658 (1938).*
Contract of. See Wage payment under Legislation.
S ee also Legislation— Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws, Bulls. 186 (1916)-330 (1923),
inclusive, listed thereunder; Bull. 321 (1922),
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Uncon­
stitutional; and Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general— Contract.
Cutbacks in war contracts affecting. S ee Recon­
version.
Discriminations. State [Includes territorial] Labor
Legislation, 1937, Including Workmen’s Compen­
sation Legislation, Bull. 654 (1938).
Electric-lamp industry. Technological Changes and
Employment in the Electric Lamp Industry,
Bull. 593 (1933).
Engineers, professional. See that title .
Guaranteed. S ee Guaranteed employment and wage
plans.
Industrial, measurement o f :
Report of the Advisory Committee on Em­
ployment Statistics, Bull. 542 (1931).*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statisti­
cal Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Merchant seamen. See that title .

Employment—Con.
Minors. See Child Labor.
Negroes. Negroes in the United States: Their
Employment and Economic Status, Bull. 1119
(1963).*
New England. New England Labor and Labor
Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Older workers. See that title.
Part-time, increase in. Population and Labor Force
Projections for the United States, 1960 to 1976,
Bull. 1242 (1959).*
Postal Service. Technological Changes and Em­
ployment in the United States Postal Service,
Bull. 574 (1932).
Public Works program creating. P.W.A. and In­
dustry. A Four-Year Study of Regenerative
Employment, Bull. 658 (1938).*
Reconversion, effect of. See Reconversion.
Scientists. S ee that title.
Seamen. S ee Merchant seamen.
Seamen, Great Lakes District. Employment System
of the Lake Carriers’ Association, Bull. 235
(1918).
Shipbuilding industry. Wartime Employment, Pro­
duction, and Conditions of Work in Shipyards,
Bull. 824 (1945).
Southern States:
Manufacturing industries, trends and distri­
bution 1939-46. Labor in the South, Bull.
898 (1947).*
Statistics. S ee Employment statistics.
Women. S ee Women workers.
Employment, foreign countries:
Great Britain, World War I. Employment of
Women and Juveniles in Great Britain During
the War, Bull. 223 (1917).
Various countries. Employment Situation in Cer­
tain Foreign Countries, Bull. 864 (1946).
Employment agencies:
Private and public:
Laws relating to. S ee under Legislation.
Public:
Great Britain. The British System of Labor
Exchanges, Bull. 206 (1916).
Methods and practices of. Public Employment
Offices in the United States, Bull. 241
(1918).*
Public Employment Offices, American Association
o f:
Annual meetings, proceedings of. S ee Employ­
ment Offices, Public, etc., under Conven­
tions, meetings, etc.
Public Employment Services, International Associ­
ation o f :
Annual meetings, proceedings of. See Em­
ployment Services, Public, etc., under Con­
ventions, meetings, etc.
Employment Managers' conferences, proceedings of.
See under Conventions, meetings, etc.
Employment offices. See Employment agencies.
Employment outlook: [Note: In addition to a descrip­
tion of employment trends and outlook in various
occupations, professions, and industries, the publi­
cations listed below generally provide information
on earnings and working conditions, job character­
istics, training, and qualifications, and where ap­
propriate, a description of industry characteristics.]
Accounting, Bulls, i.048 (1952) and 1215-32 (1958).
Agricultural occupations, Bull. 1215-31 (1958).
Air transportation. Employment Opportunities in
Aviation Occupations, Bulls. 837-1 (1945) and
837-2 (1947).
Employment Outlook for Air Transportation,
Bulls. 1128 (1953) and 1215-13 (1958).




Employment outlook— Con.
Air-conditioning mechanics. Employment Outlook
for Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechan­
ics, Bull. 1215-63 (1958).
Aircraft manufacturing, Bull. 1215-12 (1958).
Architects, Bull. 1215-33 (1958).
Artists, commercial. S ee Commercial artists, this
section.

Atomic energy field, Bull. 1215-14 (1958).
Automobile industry, Bulls. 1138 (1953) and 121515 (1958).
Automobile mechanics, Bull. 842 (1945).
Employment Outlook for Mechanics and Re­
pairmen, Bull. 1129 (1953).
Employment Outlook for Automobile Me­
chanics, Bull. 1215-48 (1958).
Aviation occupations. See Air transportation, this
section.

Banking occupations, Bulls. 1156 (1954) and 121516 (1958).
Barbers, Bull. 1215-49 (1958).
Beauty operators, Bull. 1215-50 (1958).
Biological sciences (animal and plant sciences,
microbiology), Bull. 1215-5 (1957).
Blacksmiths, Bull. 1215-51 (1958).
Boilermaking occupations, Bull. 1215-52 (1958).
Bookkeepers, Bull. 1215-34 (1958). S ee also Bank­
ing occupations, this section.
Building trades, Bulls. 967 (1949) and 1215-7
(1957) .
Business machine servicemen, Bull. 892 (1947).
Employment Outlook for Mechanics and Re­
pairmen, Bull. 1129 (1953).
Employment Outlook for Business Machine
Servicemen, Bull. 1215-53 (1958).
Chemical industry, industrial, Bulls. 1151 (1954)
and 1215-21 (1958).
Clerical workers. (S ee also specific in d u s tr y .):
Automation affecting. Automation and Em­
ployment Opportunities for Officeworkers,
Bull. 1241 (1958).*
Clothing industry, men’s tailored clothes, Bulls.
1010 (1951) and 1215-24 (1958).
Commercial artists, Bull. 1215-35 (1958).
Department stores. S ee Stores, department, this
section.

Designers (interior) and decorators, Bull. 121539 (1958).
Diesel (engine) mechanics, Bull. 813 (1945).
Employment Outlook for Mechanics and Re­
pairmen, Bull. 1129 (1953).
Employment Outlook for Diesel Mechanics,
Bull. 1215-54 (1958).
Dietitians and home economists, Bull. 1215-36
(1958) .
Draftsmen, Bull. 1215-37 (1958); also Employ­
ment Outlook for Technicians, Bull. 1131 (1953);
and see specific industry, this section.

Earth scientists (geographers, geologists, geo­
physicists, meteorologists, and oceanographers),
Bull. 1050 (1952).
Employment Outlook in the Physical and
Earth Sciences, Bull. 1215-4 (1957).
Electric light and power occupations, Bulls. 944
(1949) and 1215-18 (1958).
Electricians, maintenance, Bull. 1215-61 (1958).
Electronic technicians, Bull. 1215-56 (1958); also
Employment Outlook for Technicians, Bull. 1131
(1953); and see Electronics manufacturing, this
section.

Electronics manufacturing, Bulls. 1072 (1952) and
1215-19 (1958).
Electroplaters, Bull. 1215-57 (1958).
Engineers (professional), Bulls. 968 (1950) and
1215-3 (1957).
Foresters, Bull. 1215-38 (1958).
55

Employment outlook— Con.
Forge shop occupations, Bull. 1215-11 (1958);
also Bull. 1130 (1953).
Foundry occupations, Bulls. 880 (1946) and 121510 (1958).
Employment Outlook in Metalworking Occu­
pations, Bulk 1130 (1953).
Handbooks:
Occupational data, 1940. Occupational Data
for Counselors: A Handbook of Census In­
formation Selected for Use in Guidance,
Bull. 817 (1945).
Various occupations, descriptions of and em­
ployment trends in. Occupational Outlook
Handbook, Bulls. 940 (1949),* 998 (1951),*
1215 (1957),* and 1255 (1959),*
Health service occupations, Bull. 1215-2 (1958).
Home economists. See Dietitians and home econ­
omists, this section.
Hosiery industry, women workers. See Women,
this section.
Hotel occupations, Bulls. 905 (1947) and 1215-20
(1958).
Industrial chemical industry. See Chemical in­
dustry, industrial, this section.
Industrial machinery repairmen, Bull. 1215-58
(1958). See also Mechanics and repairmen, this
section.
Instrument makers, Bull. 1215-59 (1958).
Insurance occupations, Bull. 1215-22 (1958).
Interior designers and decorators, Bull. 1215-39
(1958).
Iron and steel industry, Bull. 1215-23 (1958).
Jewelers and jewelry repairmen, Bull. 1215-60
(1958).
Lawyers, Bull. 1215-40 (1958).
Librarians, Bull. 1215-41 (1958).
Machine shop occupations, Bull. 895 (1947).
Employment Outlook in Metalworking Occu­
pations, Bull. 1130 (1953).
Employment Outlook in Machining Occupa­
tions, Bull. 1215-9 (1958).
Maintenance electricians, Bull. 1215-61 (1958).
Mechanics and repairmen. Employment Outlook
for Mechanics and Repairmen, Bull. 1129 (1953).
For later data, see specific occupational field or
specific industry, this section.
Merchant marine, Bull. 1054 (1952).
Metalworking occupations, Bull. 1130 (1953). For
later data, see specific occupational group, this
section.
Millwrights, Bull. 1215-62 (1958).
Newspaper reporters, Bull. 1215-42 (1958).
Office workers. See Clerical workers and specific
occupation or industry, this section.
Opticians and optical mechanics, Bull. 1215-55
(1958).
Oxygen cutters. See Welders, this section.
Personnel workers, Bull. 1215-43 (1958).
Petroleum production and refining occupations,
Bulls. 994 (1950) and 1215-25 (1958).
Physical and earth sciences (chemists, physicists,
geologists, geophysicists, meteorologists, and
mathematicians), Bull. 1215-4 (1957). For ad­
ditional data on earth sciences, see Earth sci­
entists, this section. See also Physicists, this
section.
Physicians, post—World War II. Postwar Outlook
for Physicians, Bull. 863 (1946). See also Bull.
1215-2 (1958).
Physicists, Bull. 1144 (1953). See also Bull.
1215-4 (1957).
Plastics products industry, Bulls. 929 (1948) and
1215-26 (1958).
Printing occupations, Bulls. 902 (1947), 1126
(1953), and 1215-8 (1958).

56




Employment outlook— Con.
Programmers. Automation and Employment Oppor«
tunities for. Office Workers, Bull. 1241 (1958).*
Psychologists, Bull. 1215-44 (1958).
Radio and television broadcasting, Bulls. 958
(1949) and 1215-27 (1958).
Radio and television manufacturing. See Elec­
tronics manufacturing, this section.
Railroad occupations, Bulls. 961 (1949) and 121528(1958).
Refrigeration and air-conditioning mechanics, Bull.
1215-63 (1958).
Repairmen. See Mechanics and repairmen, this
section. See also specific occupational field or
specific industry, this section.
Reporters, newspaper, Bull. 1215-42 (1958).
Restaurant occupations, Bull. 1215-29 (1958).
School teachers. See Teachers, this section.
Scientists. See specific group, industry, or pro­
fession, this section.
Seamen, merchant. See Merchant marine, this
section.
Secretaries, stenographers, and typists, Bull. 121545 (1958). See also Clerical workers and specific
industry, this section.
Social sciences (economics, political science, his­
tory, sociology, statistics, and anthropology),
Bulls. 1167 (1954) and 1215-6 (1958); also see
Bull. 1215-47 (1958) for later data on statistic­
ians.
Social workers, Bull. 1215-46 (1958).
Statisticians, Bull. 1215-47 (1958); For earlier
data, see Bull. 1167 (1954).
Steel industry. See Iron and steel industry, this
section.
Stores, department, Bulls. 1020 (1951) and 121517 (1958).
Teachers:
Elementary and secondary schools, Bull. 972
(1949).
Kindergarten and elementary, secondary, col­
lege and university. Employment Outlook in
Teaching, Bull. 1215-1 (1957).
Technicians, Bull. 1131 (1953). See also specialized
area of work and specific industry, this section.
Telephone occupations, Bull. 1215-30 (1958).
Television broadcasting. See Radio and television
broadcasting, this section.
Television manufacturing. See Electronics manu­
facturing, this section.
Typists, Bull. 1215-45 (1958). See also Clerical
workers and specific industry, this section.
Various occupations. See under Handbooks, this
section.
Watch repairmen, Bull. 1215-64 (1958).
Welders, Bull. 844 (1945).
Employment Outlook in Metalworking Occu­
pations, Bull. 1130 (1953).
Employment Outlook for Welders and Oxygen
Cutters, Bull. 1215-65 (1958).
Women, hosiery industry, post-World War II.
Postwar Employment Prospects for Women in
the Hosiery Industry, Bull. 835 (1945).
Employment stabilization. See Guaranteed employment
and wage plans.
Employment statistics. (See also Employment and Un­
employment.) :
Indexes. Revised Indexes of Factory Employment
and Pay Rolls, 1919 to 1933, Bull. 610 (1935).
Industrial employment, measurement of. Report of
the Advisory Committee on Employment Sta­
tistics, Bull. 542 (1931) w
*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statis­
tical Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Knitted outerwear industry, Philadelphia. See
under Wages and hours.

Employment statistics— Con.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016, 1950
ed. (1951), and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Ohio:
Columbus. Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio,
1921 to 1925, Bull. 409 (1926).
Wage earners, clerical workers, and sales­
people. Fluctuation in Employment in Ohio,
1914 to 1929, Bull. 553 (1932). See also
Bull. 613 (1935).
Selected occupations, 1910-40. Occupational Data
for Counselors: A Handbook of Census Infor­
mation Selected for Use in Guidance, Bull. 817
(1945).
Transit industry, local:
Selected cities, 1914. Street Railway Employ­
ment in the United States, Bull. 204 (1917).
World War II, specified areas:
Estimates of numbers employed. Impact of the
War on Employment in 181 Centers of War
Activity, Bull. 826 (1945).
Engineers, professional:
Employment and Earnings in the Engineering Pro­
fession, 1929 to 1934, Bull. 682 (1941). See also
Bull. 1027 (1951).
Employment Outlook for Engineers, Bull. 968
(1950), (Note: Includes Mobility) ; and Bull.
1215-3 (1957).
Manpower Resources in Chemistry and Chemical
Engineering, Bull. 1132 (1953).*
Scientific Research and Development in American
Industry, Bull. 1148 (1953).*
Equal job opportunity under collective bargaining. A
Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225-2 (1959).*
Equal pay for equal work. Labor-Management Con­
tract Provisions, 1950-51, Bull. 1091 (1952).
Escalator clauses. See Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general— Wage adjustment.
Europe. See specific country of or specific subject.
Examining and licensing of workmen. See Legislation—
Labor— Text, summaries, and reviews of laws.
Expenditures. See Income and expenditures, consumer.
Explosives industry. (See also Munition workers, Great
Britain, World War I . ) :
Characteristics, working conditions, manufacturing
processes, occupational earnings. Average Hourly
Earnings in the Explosives Industry, June 1944,
Bull. 819 (1945).
Poisons, industrial; manufacture, and physiological
effects, of. Industrial Poisons Used or Produced
in the Manufacture of Explosives, Bull. 219
(1917).
Extra pay, specific industries. See Shift differentials
and operations.
Fabricated structural-steel industry. See Wages and
hours—Iron and steel industry.
Factfinding boards:
Boards of inquiry established under national
emergency provisions of Labor-Management Re­
lations Act. Work Stoppages Caused by LaborManagement Disputes in 1948, Bull. 963 (1949).*
Factory workers. See under Wages and hours.
Fair Labor Standards Act. See under Legislation.
Family allowances. (See also Public assistance.):
Benefits extended, and legislative proposals. Family
Allowances in Various Countries, 1944-45, Bull.
853 (1946).




Family allowances— Con.
Developments in system, and recommendations.
Mid-War Developments in Civilian Family Allow­
ances, Bull. 803 (1944).
Public school teachers. Family Allowances in Var­
ious Countries, Bull. 754 (1943). See also Bull.
853 (1946), entitled above, this section.
Recommendations. Bulls. 754 (1943) and 803
(1944), entitled above, this section.
Family Allowances in Foreign Countries, Bull. 401
(1926). See also above listing.
Family budgets. See Cost of living.
Family—expenditures—income. See Income and ex­
penditures, consumer.
Farm equipment dealers. Employee Earnings in Retail
Trade in October 1956, Bull. 1220-1 (1957).
Farm labor. See Agriculture.
Fatalities, caused by accidents and injuries. See Acci­
dents.
Fatigue, industrial. See Munition workers, Great
Britain, World War I.
Federal employees. (See also specific occupation or pro­
fession.) :
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States,
Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Washington, D.C.:
Sickness and death benefits. Mutual Relief
Associations Among Government Employees
in Washington, D.C., Bull. 282 (1921).
White-collar workers. See under Wages and hours.
Fertilizer industry. Hours and Earnings in the Fertil­
izer Industry, January 1943, Bull. 751 (1943).
Injuries and Accident Causes in Fertilizer Manu­
facturing, Bull. 949 (1949).*
Fire departments. See under Wages and hours— Mu­
nicipal employment.
Firemen. Public Service Retirement Systems: United
States, Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Fireworks industry. Phosphorus Necrosis in the Manu­
facture of Fireworks and in the Preparation of
Phosphorus, Bull. 405 (1926).
Fishermen and fishing. See Wages and hours— Fisher­
men.
Food:
Expenditures, comparison of in 1944 with 1942.
Wartime Food Purchases, Bull. 838 (1945).
Indexes, retail. See under Prices— Retail.
Prices. See that title.
Stores. (See also Wages and hours—Groceries,
wholesale.) :
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Bull. 1220-3 (1957).
Supply, Central Europe. Food Situation in Central
Europe, 1917, Bull. 242 (1918).
Footwear manufacturing. See Shoe industry; also Shoe
industry under Labor and industrial conditions, and,
under Wages and hours.
Foremen. Union Membership and Collective Bargaining
by Foremen, Bull. 745 (1943).
Foresters. Employment Outlook for Foresters, Bull.
1215-38 (1958).
Forge shop occupations. See under Employment out­
look.
Foundries. (See also under Wages and hours.):
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Foundry In­
dustry, 1942, Bull. 805 (1945).*
Safety Code for the Protection of Industrial Work­
ers in Foundries, Bull. 336 (1923).
57

Foundry occupations. S ee under Employment outlook.
Freight handlers:
Union wage scales 1915-25, inc. S ee Bulletins listed
fo r those years under Wages and hours— Gen­
eral trades.
Fringe benefits. See under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general. See also Employment outlook;
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of, by
industry or occupation; Related wage benefits;
specific industry or occupation; and Wages and
hours, particularly Hospital employees, selected
cities, Occupational wage surveys, Office workers,
and bulletins entitled “ Hourly Earnings,” etc .
Fruit and vegetable industry, canned. Union Agree­
ments in the Canned Fruit and Vegetable Industry,
Bull. 794 (1944).
Fuels, prices of. See under Prices— Retail.
Furniture, homefurnishings, and appliance stores. Em­
ployee Earnings in Retail Trade in October 1956,
Bull. 1220-6 (1957). F o r earlier data , see Wages and
hours— Stores, retail.
Furniture industry:
Earnings, hours, and fringe benefits. See under
Wages and hours.
Growth and characteristics. The Wage and Hour
Structure of the Furniture-Manufacturing In­
dustry, October 1937, Bull. 669 (1940).
Job performance. Comparative Job Performance by
Age: Large Plants in the Men's Footwear and
Household Furniture Industries, Bull. 1223
(1957).*
Garages, repair:
Earnings and employment practices. Wages and
Hours of Labor in Gasoline Filling Stations and
Motor Vehicle Repair Garages, 1931, Bull. 578
(1933). S ee also Bulls. 540 (1931) and 566
(1932).
Garnishments:
Wages and salaries. Wage Executions for Debt,
Bull. 622 (1936).
Gas utilities. A Guide to Labor-Management Relations
in the United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Gasoline filling stations:
Earnings and employment practices. See Wages
and hours— Service stations.
General merchandise stores. (See also Stores, retail.):
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Bull. 1220-2 (1957).
Germany. (S ee also specific su bjects . ) :
Post-World War 1. Postwar Labor Conditions in
Germany, Bull. 380 (1925).
Workers' representation system. Works Council
Movement in Germany, Bull. 383 (1925).
Glass, clay, and stone workers. See under Wages and
hours.
Glass industry:
Development, operations, labor cost and output.
Productivity of Labor in the Glass Industry,
Bull. 441 (1927).
Glassware and glass-container industries:
Earnings and fringe benefits. See under Wages
and hours.
Glossaries:
Industrial relations terms. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States, Bull.
1225 (1958).*
Wage terms. Glossary of Currently Used Wage
Terms, Bull. 983 (1950).*

58




Glove industry, description of and wages and hours in.
S ee under Wages and hours.
Government employees. S ee Federal employees, and
Wages and hours: Municipal employees and Whitecollar workers.
Governmental Labor Officials, International Associ­
ation of. S ee under Conventions, meetings, etc.
Government Labor Officials of the United States and
Canada, Association of, and Governmental Officials
in Industry of the United States and Canada, Associ­
ation of. See Conventions, meetings, etc.— Govern­
mental Labor Officials, International Association of.
Grain-mill products industries:
Characteristics; earnings in the combined in­
dustries and earnings and hours by specific
branch of industry. Earnings in the Grain-Mill
Products Industries, 1941, Bull. 712 (1942).
Granite and stone trades. See Wages and hours— Gen­
eral trades.
Granite-stone industry, deaths caused by dust exposure
in. The Problem of Dust Phthisis in the GraniteStone Industry, Bull. 293 (1922).
Great Britain. (S ee also specific su bjects . ) :
Employment bureaus. The British System of Labor
Exchanges, Bull. 206 (1916).
Health (or sickness) insurance. National Health
Insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1921, Bull.
312 (1923).
World War I. (S ee also Munition workers, Great
Britain, World War I . ) :
Employment of Women and Juveniles in Great
Britain During the War, Bull. 223 (1917).
Industrial Unrest in Great Britain, Bull. 237
(1917).
Joint Industrial Councils in Great Britain,
Bull. 255 (1919).
Grievances. (S ee also under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general; and Collective bargaining and
agreements, by industry or occupation.):
Arbitration o f Labor-Management Grievances:
Bethlehem Steel Company and United Steel­
workers of America, 1942-52, Bull. 1159 (1954).*
Hart, Schaffner & Marx and United Garment
Workers of America. Collective Agreements in
the Men's Clothing Industry, Bull. 198 (1916).
Groceries, wholesale:
Earnings and fringe benefits. See under Wages
and hours.
Guaranteed employment and wage plans. (S ee also
under Collective bargaining and agreements, gen­
eral.) :
Company and collectively bargained plans, descrip­
tion of. Unemployment-Benefit Plans in the
United States and Unemployment Insurance in
Foreign Countries, Bull. 544 (1931).*
Economic analysis of. Appendix F.— Economic
Analysis o f Guaranteed Wages, Bull. 907
(1947).*
Historical development, extent and characteristics
of, and experience under:
Appendix C— Guaranteed Wage or Employ­
ment Plans, Bull. 906 (1947).
Guaranteed Wage Plans in the United States,
Bull. 925 (1948).*
Meatpacking industry. Collective Bargaining in the
Meat-Packing Industry, Bull. 1063 (1952).
Representative plans, experience under and evalua­
tion of, Bull. 925 (1948)* entitled above , this
section.

Handbooks:
American trade unions. Bulls. 420 (1 9 2 6 )/ 506
(1929),* and 618 (1936).*
Occupational outlook. S ee under Employment out­
look.
Labor statistics. S ee under Statistics— Labor.
Handicapped workers:
Comparison of work with able-bodied workers:
Impaired Workers in Industry, Bull. 857
(1946).
The Performance of Physically Impaired
Workers in Manufacturing Industries, Bull.
923 (1948).
Jobs and placement practices, Bull. 923 (1948) en­
titled above.

Hart, Schaffner & Marx:
Grievances—mediation, conciliation, and arbitra­
tion of. Collective Agreements in the Men’s
Clothing Industry, Bull. 198 (1916).
Hat industries. S ee under Wages and hours.
Hawaii. S ee under Labor and industrial conditions. See
also Bull. 477 (1929), Public Service Retirement
Systems.
Hazardous occupations. S ee under Occupational dis­
eases. See also Accidents; Mortality statistics; Pois­
ons, industrial; and Safety.
Health. S ee Health, recreation, and welfare conditions;
Occupational diseases; Poisons, industrial. S ee also
Legislation—Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews
of laws, Bull. 370 (1925) and subsequent bulletins
listed under that heading .
Health and welfare benefit plans, collectively bargain­
ed. See Collective bargaining and agreements, gen­
eral— Employee-benefit plans.
Health insurance. S ee Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general— Employee-benefit plans.
Health insurance, Great Britain. National Health In­
surance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1921, Bull. 312
(1923).
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of, by
industry or occupation. (S ee also Collective bargain­
ing and agreements, general— Employee-benefit
plans; Employment outlook; Wages and hours, par­
ticularly Hospital employees, selected cities, Occu­
pational wage surveys, and Office workers.):
Building trades. Union Wages and Hours: Build­
ing Trades—July 1, 1954, Bull. 1175 (1955) ;*
July 1, 1955, Bull. 1192 (1956) ;* July 1, 1956,
Bull. 1205 (1957);* July 1, 1957, Bull. 1227
(1958) ;* July 1, 1958, Bull. 1245 (1959).*
Industrial establishments. Supplementary Wage
Practices in American Industry, 1945-46, Bull.
939 (1948).*
Meatpacking. Collective Bargaining in the MeatPacking Industry, Bull. 1063 (1952).
Printing and publishing. Union Wages and Hours:
Printing Industry—
-July 1, 1964, Bull. 1176
(1955) ;* July 1, 1955, Bull. 1194 (1956) ;* July
1, 1956, Bull. 1207 (1957) ;* July 1, 1957, Bull.
1228 (1958) ;* July 1, 1958, Bull. 1247 (1959).*
Radio, television, and electronics. Collective Bar­
gaining—Radio, Television, and Electronics In­
dustry, Bull. 1089 (1952).
Transit industry, local. Union Wages and Hours:
Local Transit Operating Employees, July 1,
1954, Bull. 1177 (1955);* July 1, 1956, Bull.
1193 (1956) ;* July 1, 1956, Bull. 1208 (1957) ;♦
July 1, 1957, Bull. 1229 (1958) ;♦ July 1, 1958,
Bull. 1244 (1959).*




Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of, by
industry or occupation— Con.
Truckdrivers and helpers. Union Wages and
Hours: Motortruck Drivers and Helpers, July
1, 1954, Bull. 1178 (1955) ;* July 1, 1955, Bull.
1195 (1956) ;♦ July 1, 1956, Bull. 1206 (1957) ;*
July 1, 1957, Bull. 1230 (1958) ;* July 1, 1958,
Bull. 1246 (1959).*
Health, recreation, and welfare conditions. (S ee also
Park movement.):
Beneficial Activities o f American Trade-Unions,
Bull. 465 (1928).*
Health and Recreation Activities in Industrial
Establishments, 1926, Bull. 458 (1928).
Munition workers, Great Britain, World War I.
S ee that title .
Welfare Work for Employees in Industrial Estab­
lishments in the United States, Bull. 250 (1919).
Health service occupations. (S ee also Wages and Hours
— Hospital employees, selected cities.):
Employment Outlook in Health Service Occupa­
tions, Bull. 1215-2 (1958).
Health standards. Collective Bargaining Provisions—
Safety, Health, and Sanitation, Bull. 908-14 (1949).
Holidays. S ee under Collective bargaining and agree­
ments: general, and by industry or occupation. (A lso
see Employment outlook; Wages and hours, particu­
larly Hospital employees, selected cities, Occupational
wage surveys, Office workers, and bulletins entitled
“ H ou rly Earn in gs'* etc.) F o r legislation concerning ,
see Legislation— Labor—Text, summaries, and re­
views o f laws.
Home economists. Employment Outlook for Dietitians
and Home Economists, Bull. 1215-36 (1958).
Home industries. S ee Homeworkers.
Home insulation (heat) materials. Labor Requirements
to Produce Home Insulation, Bull. 919 (1947).
Homes for the aged. See under Old-age care and as­
sistance.
Homeworkers. State Labor Legislation, 1937, Includ­
ing Workmen’s Compensation Legislation, Bull. 654
(1938).
Homeworkers, foreign countries:
Protection through minimum wage legislation, and
nonenforcement o f the legislation in certain
countries. Minimum Wage Legislation in Various
Countries, Bull. 467 (1928).*
Hosiery and underwear manufacture. S ee under Wages
and hours.
Hosiery manufacture:
Changes in wage rates and related practices. The
Wage Chronology Series, Vol. 1, Bull. 970 (1949).
Earnings and fringe benefits. S ee under Wages
and hours— Hosiery manufacture—“ H o u r 1y
Earnings,” etc.
Union wage scales 1927-31. See under Wages and
hours.
Women. Postwar Employment Prospects for
Women in the Hosiery Industry, Bull. 835
(1945).
Hospital employees:
Earnings, supplementary benefits, and job descrip­
tions. See under Wages and hours.
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in Hospitals
[1953], Bull. 1219 (1958).*
Hospitalization benefits, collectively bargained. See
Collective bargaining and agreements, general— Em­
ployee-benefit plans.
59

Hotel and restaurant workers, union wage scales 192731. See under Wages and hours.
Hotel employees (selected occupations other than
restaurant):
Hourly earnings and fringe benefits. See under
Wages and hours.
Hotel occupations. See under Employment outlook.
Hours and earnings (nonagricultural). (See also
Wages and hours.):
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Hours of work. (See also specific industry or occupa­
tion under Employment outlook; and Wages and
hours.):
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Hours of Work,
Overtime Pay, Shift Operations, Bull. 908-18
(1950).
Great Britain:
Munition factories, World War I:
Hours, Fatigue, and Health in British
Munition Factories, Bull. 221 (1917).
Industrial Health and Efficiency, Bull.
249 (1919).
Studies of the Effects of Long Working Hours:
Bulls. 791, Part I (1944)* and 791-A, Part 2
(1944).*
Hours of Work and Output, Bull. 917 (1948).*
Housing. (See also Building construction and Construc­
tion— Building and nonbuilding.) :
Cooperatives. See under Cooperatives— Consumer.
Employer. Housing by Employers in the United
States, Bull. 263 (1920).*
Legislation. See under that title.
Materials. New Housing and Its Materials, 194056, Bull. 1231 (1958).* See also Bull. 1115
(1952).
Metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. New
Housing and Its Materials, 1940-56, Bull. 1231
(1958).* Structure of the Residential Building
Industry in 1949, Bull. 1170 (1954).*
Metropolitan areas. New Housing in Metropolitan
Areas, 1949-51, Bull. 1115 (1952).
National, volume, estimated. Techniques of Pre­
paring Major BLS Statistical Series, Bull. 1168
(1955).*
Statistics. (See also under Construction, general;
and see Building construction— Building per­
mits.) :
Nonfarm Housing Starts 1889-1958, Bull.
1260 (1959).*
Humanities. Personnel Resources in the Social Sciences
and Humanities, Bull. 1169 (1954).*
Hygiene, industrial. (See also Occupational diseases;
Poisons, industrial; Safety; Legislation—Labor—
Text, summaries, and reviews of law s.):
Munition factories, Great Britain, World War I:
Hours, Fatigue, and Health in British Muni­
tion Factories, Bull. 221 (1917). Industrial
Health and Efficiency, Bull. 249 (1919).
Printing trades:
Health Survey of the Printing Trades, 1922 to
1925, Bull. 427 (1927).
Hygiene of the Printing JTrades, Bull. 209
(1917).
Survey of Hygienic Conditions in the Print­
ing Trades, Bull. 392 (1925).
Impaired workers. See Handicapped workers.
Incentive-wage plans. See Wage-incentive plans; also
Collective bargaining and agreements, general—
Wage-incentive plans.

60




Income:
Agriculture, World War II. Wartime Wages, In­
come, and Wage Regulations in Agriculture,
Bull. 883 (1946).
Negroes in the United States: Their Employment
and Economic Status, Bull. 1119 (1953).*
Older persons:
Sources of income, June 1951. Employment
and Economic Status of Older Men and
Women, Bull. 1092 (1952).*
Sources of income, June 1956. Employment
and Economic Status of Older Men and
Women, Bull. 1213 (1957).*
Postwar, estimated. Income from Wages and Sal­
aries in the Postwar Period, Bull. 845 (1945).
Southern States, trends and levels:
Aggregate, per capita, and distribution of
1929-45. Labor in the South, Bull. 898
(1947).*
Income and expenditures. Handbook of Labor Statistics,
Bull. 1016, 1950 ed. (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Income and expenditures, consumer. (See also Cost
of living and Prices— Consumer Price Index.):
City. Installment Buying by City Consumers in
1941, Bull. 773 (1944).
Families and single persons, city:
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
10 cities, Bull. 1065 (1952).
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
1950, Bull. 1097 (Revised) (1953).
Wartime. Income and Spending and Saving of
City Families in Wartime, Bull. 724 (1942).
Wartime Food Purchases, Bull. 838
(1945).
See also Bulls. 723 (1942) and 822
(1945), entitled below.
Families and single persons, city and rural:
Wartime. Family Spending and Saving in
Wartime, Bull. 822 (1945).
Spending and Saving of the Nation's
Families in Wartime, Bull. 723 (1942).
See also Bulls. 724 (1942) and 838 (1945),
entitled above.
Families, city:
Family Expenditures in Selected Cities, 193536, Bull. 648:
Vol. I (1941), Housing.
Vol. II (1940), Food.
Vol. I ll (1941), Clothing and Personal
Care.
Vol. IV (1941), Furnishings and Equip­
ment.
Vol. V (1940) Medical Care.
Vol. VI (1940), Travel and Transporta­
tion.
Vol. VII (1941), Recreation, Reading,
Formal Education, Tobacco, Contribu­
tions, and Personal Taxes.
Vol. VIII (1941), Assets and Liabilities,
Changes in.
Family Income and Expenditure 1935-36:—
Vols. I, Family Income, Vols. II, Family
Expenditure:
Chicago, Bull. 642 (1939).
East Central Region, 9 cities, Bull. 644
(1939 and 1941).
New England, 5 cities, Bull. 645 (1939
and 1941).
New York City, Bull. 643 (1941 and 1939).
Pacific Northwest, 4 urban communities,
Bull. 649 (1939 and 1940).
Southeastern Region, Bull. 647 (1939 and
1940).
West Central-Rocky Mountain Region,
Bull. 646 (1939 and 1940).

Income and expenditures, consumer— Con.
Families, city— Con.
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
1945, Bull. 956 (1949).
Wage earners and clerical workers:
Boston area and Massachusetts 1875-1950.
New England Labor and Labor Prob­
lems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners
and Clerical Workers 1934-36:
East North Central Region, 8 cities,
Bull. 636 (1940).*
North Atlantic Region:
Eleven cities, Bull. 637, Vol. II
(1939).*
New York City, Bull. 637, Vol.
1 (1939).*
Pacific Region, 5 cities, Bull. 639
(1939).*
Southern cities, 12, Bull. 640 (1941).*
Summary volume, Bull. 638 (1941).*
West North Central-Mountain Region,
5 cities, Bull. 641 (1939).*
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners
and Clerical Workers in Thirteen Small
Cities, 1933-35, Bull. 691 (1942).
Wartime Earnings and Spending in Hono­
lulu, 1943, Bull. 788 (1944).
Methodology:
Income and Spending and Saving of City
Families in Wartime, Bull. 724 (1942).
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners
and Clerical Workers, 1934-36— Sum­
mary Volume, Bull. 638 (1941).*
Indexes. (See also Prices.):
Factory employment and payrolls. Revised Indexes
of Factory Employment and Pay Rolls, 1919 to
1933, Bull. 610 (1935).
History of, and methods used in making:
Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in the
United States and Foreign Countries, Bull.
284 (1921).*
The Making and Using of Index Numbers.
Bull. 656 (1938).*
Productivity. See Productivity—Trends.
Wholesale prices, measurement of, Bull. 284
(1921),* entitled above.
Indexes to (and lists of) publications. See Publications,
indexes to (and lists o f).
India, World War II. Wartime Labor Conditions in
India, Bull. 755 (1943).
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. See under
Conventions, meetings, etc. See also Safety—Codes;
and Workmen’s compensation.
Industrial Accident Prevention Conference. Proceedings
of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference,
Washington, D.C., July 14-16, 1926, Bull. 428 (1926).
Industrial accidents and injuries. See Accidents; Work­
men’s compensation; also Conventions, meetings, etc.
— Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions; Poi­
sons, industrial.
Industrial chemical industry. See Chemical industry.
Industrial classification. Report of Committee on Sta­
tistics and Compensation Insurance Cost of the
International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions, Bull. 201 (1916).

Industrial diseases. See Occupational diseases.
Industrial disputes. See Labor-management disputes.
Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, Canada. Opera­
tion of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act of
Canada, Bull. 233 (1918).
Industrial efficiency. (See also Munition workers, Great
Britain, World War I; Plant management; Pro­
ductivity.) :
Union industrial engineering activities. A Guide
to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225-2 (1959).*
Industrial employment. See Employment and Employ­
ment statistics.
Industrial engineering. See Industrial efficiency.
Industrial machinery. See Wages and hours— Ma­
chinery manufacture.
Industrial machinery repairmen. See under Employ­
ment outlook.
Industrial poisoning. See Poisons, industrial.
Industrial relations. See Labor and industrial rela­
tions ; Labor-management relations.
See also Labor and industrial conditions; Labormanagement disputes.
Industrial surveys. See Wages and hours: Manufactur­
ing and nonmanufacturing industries, Occupational
wage surveys, and specific industry.
Industrial unemployment. See Unemployment.
Industrial unrest. See Labor and industrial relations.
Industrial wage scales. See Wages and hours.
Industrialization, Southern States, historical review of.
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Industry stabilization committees. See Collective bar­
gaining and agreements, general—Labor-manage­
ment cooperation.
Injuries, industrial. See Accidents and Workmen’s
compensation.
See also Conventions, meetings etc.— Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions; Poisons, in­
dustrial.
Installment buying. Installment Buying by City Con­
sumers in 1941, Bull. 773 (1944).
Instrument makers. Employment Outlook for Instru­
ment Makers, Bull. 1215-59 (1958).
Insulation (heat) materials. Labor Requirements to
Produce Home Insulation, Bull. 919 (1947).
Insurance. See specific type of.
Insurance occupations. Employment Outlook in Insur­
ance Occupations, Bull. 1215-22 (1958).
Insurance plans:
Extent of, specific industry or occupation. See
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of,
by industry or occupation.
Under collective-bargaining agreements. See Col­
lective bargaining and agreements— general—
Employee-benefit plans.
Interior designers and decorators. Employment Outlook
for Interior Designers and Decorators, Bull. 1215-39
(1958).

Industrial conditions. See Labor and industrial con­
ditions.

International Association of Governmental Labor
Officials. See Conventions, meetings, etc.—Govern­
mental Labor Officials, International Association of.

Industrial councils, foreign countries. See Labor and
industrial relations, foreign countries.

International labor movement. See International labor
regulation.




61

International labor regulation:
History, to 1914. Historical Survey of International
Action Affecting Labor, Bull. 268 (1920).*
Origin and development. International Labor Legis­
lation and the Society of Nations, Bull. 254
(1919).
International Seamen’s Union. S ee Labor organizations
— Seamen’s union, international.
Intoxicants. S ee under Legislation.
Iron and steel industry. ( See also under Accidents—
Rates, types, causes and prevention—by industry
or occupation; Productivity; and under Wages and
hours.):
Employment Outlook in the Iron and Steel In­
dustry, Bull. 1215-23 (1958).
Iron-ore mining:
General description, production by district 18801943, and hourly earnings. Wages in Iron Min­
ing, October 1943, Bull. 787 (1944).
Japan. Labor Conditions of Women and Children in
Japan, Bull. 558 (1931).
Jewelers and jewelry repairmen. Employment Out­
look for Jewelers and Jewelry Repairmen, Bull.
1215-60 (1958).
Job evaluation, union attitudes toward. A Guide to
Labor-Management Relations in the! United States,
Bull. 1225-2 (1959).*
Job training. See Apprentices and learners; Voca­
tional education and training; Workers’ education.
Joint industrial councils. See Labor and industrial re­
lations, foreign countries.
Jury leave. Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1954, Bull. 1181 (1955);
Juveniles. See Child labor.
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations, Bull. 322 (1923).*
Knit-goods industry. S ee Wages and hours: Hosiery
and underwear manufacture and Knitted-outerwear
industry.
Knitted-outerwear industry, Philadelphia. S ee under
Wages and hours.
Labor agents. S ee Legislation—Employment agencies,
public and private.
Labor agreements. S ee Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general, and by industry or occupation.
Labor and industrial conditions. ( See also Labor and
industrial relations.):
Alaska. The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico,
Alaska, Hawaii, Bull. 1191 (1956).
Children wage earners. See Child labor.
Colonial Times to 1840. History of Wages in the
United States from Colonial Times to 1928, Bull.
604 (1934).* (Part I of bulletin.)
Hawaii:
Labor Conditions in the Territory of Hawaii,
1929-1930, Bull. 534 (1931).*
Labor in the Territory of Hawaii, 1939, Bull.
687 (1940).*
The Economy of Hawaii in 1947, Bull. 926
(1948).*
The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska,
Hawaii, Bull. 1191 (1956).
Longshore industry. Cargo Handling and Long­
shore Labor Conditions, Bull. 550 (1932).
New England. New England Labor and Labor
Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*

62




Labor and industrial conditions— Con.
Puerto Rico* The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico,
Alaska, Hawaii, Bull. 1191 (1956).
Shoe industry:
Massachusetts. The Boot and Shoe Industry
in Massachusetts as a Vocation for Women,
Bull. 180 (1915).
Labor Conditions in the Shoe Industry in
Massachusetts, 1920-1924, Bull. 384
(1925).
Massachusetts, Haverhill. Conditions in the
Shoe Industry in Haverhill, Mass., 1928,
Bull. 483 (1929).
New England. Collective bargaining and
competitive cost. New England Labor and
Labor Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Southern States. Labor in the South, Bull. 898
(1947).*
Women workers. See that title .
Labor and industrial conditions, foreign countries. ( See
also Labor and industrial relations, foreign coun­
tries.) :
Chinese migrants. Chinese Migrations, with Special
Reference to Labor Conditions, Bull. 340 (1923).
Germany, post-World War I. Postwar Labor Con­
ditions in Germany, Bull. 380 (1925).
India, World War II. Wartime Labor Conditions in
India, Bull. 755 (1943).
Japan. Labor Conditions of Women and Children
in Japan, Bull. 558 (1931).
Labor and industrial relations. ( S ee also Collective
bargaining and agreements, general, and by industry
or occupation; Labor and industrial conditions;
Labor-management relations; Labor movement.):
Bituminous coal mining:
Labor Relations in the Fairmont, West Vir­
ginia Bituminous Coal Field, Bull. 361
(1924).
The Changing Status o f Bituminous-Coal
Miners, 1937-46, Bull. 882 (1946).
Lace industries. Labor Relations in the Lace and
Lace-Curtain Industries in the United States,
Bull. 399 (1925).
Lumber industry, West Coast. Industrial Relations
in the West Coast Lumber Industry, Bull. 349
(1924).*
Printing industry. Joint Industrial Control in the
Book and Job Printing Industry, Bull. 481
(1928).
Seamen. S ee Labor organizations— Seamen’s union,
international.
Labor and industrial relations, foreign countries. ( See
also Labor and industrial conditions, foreign coun­
tries.) :
Germany. Works Council Movement in Germany,
Bull. 383 (1925).
Great Britain. Industrial Unrest in Great Britain,
Bull. 237 (1917).
Joint Industrial Councils in Great Britain,
Bull. 255 (1919).
Printing industry. Joint Industrial Control in
the Book and Job Printing Industry, Bull.
481 (1928). [Note: Section on Great Britain
includes newspaper branch o f industry.]
Labor chronology. See Labor Movement.
Labor contracts. S ee Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general, and by industry or occupation.
Labor costs. See Productivity.
Labor courts. Kansas Court of Industrial Relations,
Bull. 322 (1923).*

Labor, Department of (U.S. Government):
Bureau of Labor Statistics (U.S. Government).
S ee that title .
Functions and activities. Humanity in Government,
Bull. 346 (1923).*
Labor, departments and bureaus of (State). S ee Labor
[and related] offices, State. F o r Directories 1936-3841, see Labor [and related] offices, Federal and
State.
Labor disputes. S ee Labor-management disputes.
Labor exchanges. S ee Employment agencies.
Labor force. (See also Manpower and Occupational
mobility.):
Growth in. S ee Labor supply.
Negroes in. Negroes in the United States: Their
Employment and Economic Status, Bull. 1119
(1953).*
Older workers:
Trends in labor-force participation. Employ­
ment and Economic Status of Older Men
and Women, Bulls. 1092 (1952)* and 1213
(1957).*
Statistics. Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull.
1016, 1950 ed. (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Working-life, length and pattern of. S ee that title.
World War II, specified areas, estimates of num­
bers employed. Impact of the War on Employ­
ment in 181 Centers of War Activity, Bull. 826
(1945).
Labor Information Bulletin:
Selected articles, October 1940 to June 1943, sub­
ject list. “ 1943 Supplement to Selected List of
the Publications of the Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics, 1940 Edition,” Bull. 747 (1943).
Selected articles before October 1940, subject list.
S ee Bulls. 624 (1936), 661 (1939), and 683
(1941).
Labor laws and legislation. See Legislation.
Labor-management contracts. S ee Collective bargaining
and agreements, general, and by industry or occu­
pation.
Labor-management cooperation. (S ee also under Col­
lective bargaining and agreements, general.):
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Examples o f in specified industries and unions.
Beneficial Activities of American Trade-Unions,
Bull. 465 (1928).* S ee also Bull. 1225 (1958)*
entitled above.

Worker training. A Guide to Labor-Management
Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225-1
(1959).*
Labor-management cooperation, foreign countries. See
Labor and industrial relations, foreign countries.
Labor-management disputes. (S ee also Labor and in­
dustrial conditions; Labor and industrial relations;
Labor-management relations; and under Legisla­
tion.) :
Federal intervention. (S ee also Strikes, by speci­
fied yea rs , this se c tio n .):
1881-1921:
Railroads. Use of Federal Power in Settle­
ment of Railway Labor Disputes, Bull.
303 (1922).*
World War I. National War Labor Board,
Bull. 287 (1922).
History of the Shipbuilding Labor Ad­
justment Board, 1917 to 1919, Bull. 283
(1921).




Labor-management disputes— Con.
Federal intervention— Con.
World War II Defense period. Report on the
Work of the National Defense Mediation
Board, March 19, 1941-January 12, 1942,
Bull. 714 (1942).*
World War II. Problems and Policies o f Dis­
pute Settlement and Wage Stabilization
During World War II, Bull. 1009 (1950).*
Lockouts. S ee Strikes, this section.
Mining, anthracite:
Settlements of disputes under trade agree­
ments. Collective Bargaining in the Anthra­
cite Coal Industry, Bull. 191 (1916).
Railroads. S ee under Federal intervention, 18811921, this section.
Strikes. (N o t e : The term “ strike” includes all
stoppages o f work due to labor disputes w hether
initiated b y the em ployer [ lockout ] or b y the
w orkers.)

Agriculture. Labor Unionism in American Ag­
riculture, Bull. 836 (1945).*
Collective-agreement provisions:
Limitations on strikes. Labor-Management
Contract Provisions, 1950-51, Bull. 1091
(1952).
Sample clauses. Collective Bargaining
Provisions— Strikes and Lock-Outs;
Contract Enforcement, Bull. 908-13
(1949).
Defense industries. Strikes in 1941 and Strikes
Affecting Defense Production, Bull. 711
(1942).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016, 1950
ed. (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Historical review. Strikes in the United States
1880-1936, Bull. 651 (1938).*
------1927-56. Analysis of Work Stoppages,
1956, Bull. 1218 (1957).*
Methodology. Techniques of Preparing Major
BLS Statistical Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Statistics and analysis:
1880 to 1905; 1914-36. Strikes in the
United States 1880-1936, Bull. 651
(1938).*
1941. Strikes in 1941 and Strikes Affect­
ing Defense Production, Bull. 711
(1942).*
1942. Strikes in 1942, Bull. 741 (1943).*
1943. Strikes in 1943, Bull. 782 (1944).*
1944. Strikes and Lockouts in 1944, Bull.
833 (1945).*
1945. Work Stoppages Caused by LaborManagement Disputes in 1945, Bull.
878 (1946).*
1946. Work Stoppages Caused by LaborManagement Disputes in 1946, Bull 918
(1947) .*
1947. Work Stoppages Caused by LaborManagement Disputes in 1947, Bull. 935
(1948) .*
1948. Work Stoppages Caused by LaborManagement Disputes in 1948, Bull. 963
(1949) .*
1949-58, inclusive. Analysis of Work Stop­
pages During: 1949-50-51-52-53-54-5556-57 and 58, Bulls. 1003 (1950),* 1035
(1951),* 1090 (1952),* 1136 (1953),*
1163 (1954),* 1184 (1955),* 1196
(1956),* 1218 (1957),* 1234 (1958),*
and 1258 (1959).* respectively.
Work stoppages. See Strikes, this section.
World Wars I and II. See under Federal interven­
tion, this section.

63

Labor-management disputes, foreign countries.
Canada:
Industries affecting public welfare March 22,
1907-December 31, 1916; and all industries,
1901-16. Operation of the Industrial Disputes
Investigation Act of Canada, Bull. 233
(1918).
Strike statistics, various countries, 1927-36. Strikes
in the United States, 1880-1936, Bull. 651
(1938).*
Labor-management grievances. See Grievances; also
Collective bargaining and agreements: General—
Grievances— , and by industry or occupation; Labormanagement disputes.
Labor-management relations. (See also Collective bar­
gaining and agreements, general, and by industry or
occupation; Labor and industrial conditions; Labor
and industrial relations; Labor-management coopera­
tion; Labor-management disputes.):
Agriculture. See Selected industries, this section.
Apparel industries. See Selected industries, this
section.
Automobile industry. See Selected industries, this
section.
Bethlehem Steel Company and United Steelworkers
of America. Arbitration of Labor-Management
Grievances: Bethlehem Steel Company and
United Steelworkers of America, 1942-52, Bull.
1159 (1954).*
Coal mining. See Selected industries, this section.
Collective bargaining and new attitudes. American
Labor and the American Spirit, Bull. 1145
(1954).*
Company unions. Characteristics of Company
Unions, 1935, Bull. 634 (1938).*
Construction industry. See Selected industries, this
section.
Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. See Scandinavia,
this section.
Electric and gas utilities. See Selected industries,
this section.
Government's role in. A Guide to Labor-Manage­
ment Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225-1
(1959).*
Industrial engineering. A Guide to Labor-Manage­
ment Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225-2
(1959).*
Job evaluation, union attitudes toward. See Indus­
trial engineering, this section.
Maintenance-of-Membership Awards of National
War Labor Board, Bull. 753 (1943).
Maritime industry. See Selected industries, this
section, and Labor organizations— Seamen's
union, international.
Meatpacking industry. See Selected industries, this
section.
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull.
1212 (1957).*
Nonferrous metals mining. See Selected industries,
this section.
Petroleum industry. See Selected industries, this
section.
Railroad industry. See Selected industries, this
section.
Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden).
Collective-bargaining structure and agreements,
and disputes settlement. Labor-Management Re­
lations in Scandinavia, Bull. 1038 (1952).
Selected industries. A Guide to Labor-Management
Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225
(1958).*
Steel industry. See Selected industries, this section.
Textile industries. See Selected industries, this
section.

64




Labor-management relations— Con.
Transit industry, local. See Selected industries, this
section.
Wage systems. See Industrial engineering, this
section.
Labor Management Relations Act of 1947. See Labormanagement disputes— Strikes— Statistics and analy­
sis, bulletins beginning with 1947.
Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of
1959, Title III. Union Constitution Provisions: Trus­
teeship, Bull. 1263 (1959).*
Labor markets, major— Community wage surveys. See
Wages and hours— Occupational wage surveys.
Labor mobility. See Occupational mobility.
Labor movement. (See also Labor organizations.):
Agriculture. Labor Unionism in American Agri­
culture, Bull. 836 (1945).*
Development, historical and philosophical influences
in. American Labor and the American Spirit,
Bull. 1145 (1954).*
Growth and structure. See History, this section.
History:
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in
the United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Brief History of the American Labor Move­
ment, Bull. 1000 (1951) (1957).*
Labor Through the Century, 1833-1933, Bull.
597 (1933).*
Labor Through the Century [with brief review
of labor history in 1934], Bull. 605 (1934).*
Southern States, historical development of trade
unionism. Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Labor movement, international. See International labor
regulation.
Labor [and related] offices, Federal and State (and
principal Canadian o ffice s ):
Directories 1936-38-41. Labor Offices in the United
States and in Canada, Bulls. 621 (1936), 632
(1938), and 681 (1941).
Labor [and related] offices, State. (See also under
Legislation.):
New York. Activities and Functions of a State
Department of Labor, Bull. 479 (1928).
Provision for:
Text of laws, by State. Laws Providing for
Bureaus of Labor Statistics, etc., Bull. 343
(1923).
Labor organizations. (See also Labor movement and
Legislation— Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews
of law s.):
Activities. See Activities, collateral, and Adminis­
tration and activities, this section.
Activities, collateral:
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in
the United States, Bulls. 1225 (1958)* and
1225-1 (1959).*
American Labor and the American Spirit,
Bull. 1145 (1954).*
Beneficial Activities of American TradeUnions, Bull. 465 (1928).*
Actors. Collective Bargaining by Actors, Bull. 402
(1926).
Administration and activities. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States,
Bulls. 1225 (1958),* 1225-1 (1959),* and 1225-2
(1959).*
Benefits to members, collateral. See Activities,
collateral, this section.

Labor organizations— Con.
Development, types, and aims. (See also Labor
movement—H istory.):
American Labor and the American Spirit, Bull.
1145 (1954).*
Directories. (See also Handbooks, this section.) :
1947-48-50-53. Directory of Labor Unions in
the United States, Bulls. 901 (1947),* 937
(1948),* 980 (1950),* and 1127 (1953).*
1955. Directory of National and International
Labor Unions in the United States, 1955,
Bull. 1185 (1955).*
1957. Directory of National and International
Labor Unions in the United States, 1957,
Bull. 1222 (1957).*
Educational activities. See Activities, collateral,
this section.
Foremen, membership under collective agreements
and union constitutions. Union Membership and
Collective Bargaining by Foremen, Bull. 745
(1943).
Handbooks. (See also Directories, this section.) :
1926, 1929, and 1936. Handbook of American
Trade-Unions, Bulls. 420 (1926),* 506
(1929),* and 618 (1936).*
Leadership, workers’ education for:
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in
the United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Case Studies in Union Leadership Training,
1951-52, Bull. 1114 (1952).*
Membership statistics. (See also Directories and
Handbooks, this section. ) :
1897-1950. Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull.
1016, 1950 ed. (1951) and 1951 supp.
(1953).*
Officers, rules governing. Union Constitution Pro­
visions: Election and Tenure of National and
International Union Officers 1958, Bull. 1239
(1958).*
Rights and responsibilities. Collective Bargaining
Provisions—Union and Management Functions,
Rights, and Responsibilities, Bull. 908-12 (1949).
Seamen’s union, international. International Sea­
men’s Union of America. A Study of Its History
and Problems, Bull. 342 (1923).
Seamen’s union, international, Great Lakes District,
activities in. Employment System of the Lake
Carriers’ Association, Bull. 235 (1918).
State. See Directories, this section.
Trusteeships, rules governing. Union Constitution
Provisions: Trusteeship, Bull. 1263 (1959).*
Welfare activities. See Activities, collateral, this
section.
White-collar workers, unionization of. A Guide to
Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*

Labor requirements— Con.
Concrete industry, blocks and pipes. Labor Re­
quirements for Construction Materials, Bulls.
888-2 and 888-3 (1947).
Insulation (heat) materials. Labor Requirements
to Produce Home Insulation, Bull. 919 (1947).
Labor statistics. See Statistics. (See also specific sub­
ject.) :
Labor Statistics, Bureau of (U.S. Government). See
Bureau of Labor Statistics (U.S. Government).
Labor statistics, bureaus of (State). See Labor [and
related] offices, State. For Directories 1936-38-41,
see Labor [and related] offices, Federal and State.
Labor supply. (See also Manpower and Occupational
m obility.):
Depressed rural area. Labor Supply and Mobility
in a Newly Industrialized Area (Ravenswood,
W. V a.), Bull. 1261 (I960).*
Prospective size:
1950. State and Regional Variations in Pros­
pective Labor Supply, Bull. 893 (1947).
1960 to 1975. Population and Labor Force
Projections for the United States, 1960 to
1975, Bull. 1242 (1959).*
Southern States—population, migration, and labor
force characteristics. Labor in the South, Bull.
898 (1947).*
Labor unions. See Labor organizations; also Labor
movement.
Labor turnover:
New England textile mills. New England Labor
and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Statistical series, BLS. Techniques of Preparing
Major BLS Statistical Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Statistics. Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016,
1950 ed. (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Labor utilization, procedures. Improvement of LaborUtilization Procedures, Bull. 807 (1945).
Lace industries, development of and labor conditions in.
Labor Relations in the Lace and Lace-Curtain Indus­
tries in the United States, Bull. 399 (1925).
Lake Carriers’ Association:
“ Welfare plan.” Employment System of the Lake
Carriers’ Association, Bull. 235 (1918).
Latin America. See under Legislation, foreign countries.
Laundries, power. See under Wages and hours.
Laundry workers, union wage scales 1918-33. See
Wages and hours— General trades, beginning with
Bull. 259 (1919).
Lawyers. Employment Outlook for Lawyers, Bull. 121540 (1958).

Labor organizations, foreign countries:
Chile, handbook and legal aspects of organiza­
tions. Labor Organizations in Chile, Bull. 461
(1928).
Russia. Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026
(1951) *

Layoff. See under Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general.

Labor problems, New England. New England Labor
and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*

Leather and leather-products industries. (See also
under Wages and hours.):
Union Agreements in the Leather-Tanning In­
dustry, 1943, Bull. 777 (1944).

Labor productivity. See Productivity.
Labor relations. See Labor and industrial relations and
Labor-management relations. See also Labor-man­
agement disputes.
Labor requirements. (See also Productivity.):
Cement industry, Portland. Labor Requirements
for Construction Materials, Bull. 888-1 (1947).




Lead poisoning. See under Poisons, industrial.
Learners. Collective Bargaining Provisions— Appren­
tices and Learners, Bull. 908-4 (1948).

Leave. (See also Vacations.):
Paid, death in family. Labor-Management Con­
tract Provisions, 1954, Bull. 1181 (1955).
With and without pay, reasons for granting. Col­
lective Bargaining Provisions— Leave of Ab­
sence; Military Service Leave, Bull. 908-6(1948).
65

Legal aid. Growth of Legal Aid Work in the United
States, Bulls. 398 (1926) and 607 (1936).
Legislation. (The texts o f various sections o f State
labor laws appear in P a rt 11 o f the bulletins on State
labor legislation under Labor— Text, summaries, and
reviews of laws, this listin g .) :
Apprentices. See Labor— Text, summaries, and re­
views of laws, this section, beginning with Bull.
370 (1925).
Arbitration. S ee Labor-management disputes, this
section .
Bureaus of labor statistics, State. See Labor [and
related] offices, State, this section.
Child labor. S ee Labor and Minimum wage, this
section.

Civil rights of employees. S ee Employee rights,
civil, this section.
Cooperatives. (S ee also Cooperatives— Consumer
— Developments; and Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws, this se c tio n .):
Synopses of laws, by States. Consumers’, Cre­
dit, and Productive Cooperative Societies,
1929, Bull. 531 (1931).*
Cooperatives, consumer:
Citation of laws, by States. Organization and
Management of Consumers’ Cooperatives,
Bull. 1024 (1951).*
Credit unions. (S ee also Labor—Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws, this section,
beginning with Bull. 370 (1925).):
State laws as of July 1930. Consumers’,
Credit, and Productive Cooperative So­
cieties, 1929, Bull. 531 (1931).*
State legislation 1945. Activities of Credit
Unions in 1945, Bull. 894 (1947).
State and Federal laws 1946. Consumers’
Cooperatives and Credit Unions: Opera­
tions in 1946, Bull. 922 (1948).*
District of Columbia Consumers’ Cooperative
Act, text of. Organization and Management
of Consumers’ Cooperatives, Bull. 1024
(1951).*
Credit unions. See under Cooperatives, consumer.
Defense, State Councils of:
Labor Legislation o f :
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
Discrimination. S ee Employment discrimination,
this section.

Employee rights, civil:
Labor Legislation of:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
1921, Bull. 308 (1922).
1922, Bull. 330 (1923).
L a w s , compilation o f through 1924 and Labor
Legislation of 1925-32, inclusive. S ee under
Labor— Text, summaries, and reviews of
laws, this section. See also Bull. 321 (1922),*
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Un­
constitutional.
Employers’ liability. (S ee also Workmen’s compen­
sation.) :
Labor Laws of the United States with De­
cisions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull.
370 (1925). (Compilation of laws through
1924).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Un­
constitutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Labor Legislation o f :
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).

66




Legislation— Con.
Employers’ liability— Con.
Labor legislation of— Con.
1919, Bull. 277 (1921).
1920, Bull. 292 (1922).
1922, Bull. 330 (1923).
1927, Bull. 470 (1928).
Employment agencies, public and private. (See
also Labor, this se c tio n .) :
Laws Relating to Employment Agencies in the
United States: as of January 1, 1933, Bull.
581 (1933); as of July 1, 1937, Bull. 630
(1937).
Employment contract. S ee Bulls. 186 (1916)-330
(1923), inclusive, listed under Labor— Text,
summaries, and reviews o f laws— this section ;
also Bull. 321 (1922),* Labor Laws That Have
Been Declared Unconstitutional.
Employment discrimination. State [includes terri­
torial] Labor Legislation, 1937, Including Work­
men’s Compensation, Bull. 654 (1938).
Examining and licensing of workmen. See Labor
— Text, summaries, and reviews of laws, this
section ; also Bull. 321 (1922),* Labor Laws
That Have Been Declared Unconstitutional.
Fair Labor Standards A ct:
Guaranteed Wage Plans in the United States,
Bull. 925 (1948).*
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Health. S ee Labor— Text, summaries, and reviews
of laws— this section, beginning with Bull. 370
(1925). (S ee also Bull. 211 (1917), Labor Laws
and Their Administration in the Pacific States;
Bull. 603 (1933), Comparative Digest o f Labor
Legislation for the States o f Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee.) [ Includes
legislation fo r S tates other than those listed .]
Holidays. S ee Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews
o f laws, this section.
Homework. State [includes territorial] Labor Leg­
islation, 1937, Including Workmen’s Compensa­
tion, Bull. 654 (1938).
Hours o f work. S ee Labor, this section.
Housing:
Labor Legislation o f:
1920, Bull. 292 (1922).
1921, Bull. 308 (1922).
Hygiene and safety. S ee Labor, this section.
Intoxicants:
Labor Legislation of 1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
Labor Laws of the United States with De­
cisions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370
(1925). (Compilation o f laws through 1924.)
Kansas. Kansas Court of Industrial Relations, Bull.
322 (1923).*
Labor. (S ee also specific topics concerning, this
section . ) :
California. S ee Pacific States under above
heading, this section.

Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for
the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Bull. 603 (1933).
[ Includes legislation fo r States other than
those listed.']

Constitutionality. Labor Laws That Have
Been Declared Unconstitutional, Bull. 321
(1922).*
International. S ee International labor regu­
lation.
National conference for. Proceedings of the
National Conference for Labor Legislation,
held at Washington, D.C., February 14 and
15, 1934, Bull. 583 (1934).
Oregon. S ee Pacific States on following page.

Legislation—Con.
Labor—Con.
Pacific States. (See also other entries under
above heading , this section . ) :
Labor Laws and Their Administration in
the Pacific States, Bull. 211 (1917).
Southern States. Labor in the South, Bull. 898
(1947).*
Text, summaries, and reviews of laws:
Labor Legislation o f :
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
1919, Bull. 277 (1921).
1920, Bull. 292 (1922).
1921, Bull. 308 (1922).
1922, Bull. 330 (1923).
Labor Laws of the United States with
decisions of Courts Relating Thereto,
Bull. 370 (1925). (Compilation of laws
through 1924).
Labor Legislation o f :
1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
1926, Bull. 434 (1927).
1927, Bull. 470 (1928).
1928, Bull. 486 (1929).
1929, Bull. 528 (1931).
1930, Bull. 552 (1931).
1931-32, Bull. 590 (1933).
State [includes territorial] Labor Legisla­
tion, 1937, Including Workmen’s Com­
pensation Legislation, Bull. 654 (1938).
Washington, State of. See Pacific States under
above heading .
Labor laws and their administration, discussion
of. S ee Conventions, meetings, etc.
Labor-management disputes. S ee Labor— Text,
summaries, and reviews of laws— this section ,
Bulls. 186 (1916)-330 (1923), inclusive , and
Bull. 654 (1938) listed thereunder. ( See also
Bull. 211 (1917), Labor Laws and Their Admin­
istration in the Pacific States; Bull. 321 (1922),*
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Uncon­
stitutional; Bull. 603 (1933), Comparative Digest
of Labor Legislation for the States of Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee.)
Includes legislation fo r S tates other than those
isted

j .]
Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act

of 1959, Title III. Union Constitution Provisions:
Trusteeship, Bull. 1263 (1959).*
Labor [and related ] offices, State. ( See also Labor
—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws— this
section , Bulls. 186 (1916)-330 (1923), inclusive ,
listed thereunder.) :

1937 enactments. State [includes territorial]
Labor Legislation, 1937, Including Work­
men’s Compensation Legislation, Bull. 654
(1938).
Pacific States. Labor Laws and Their Admin­
istration in the Pacific States, Bull. 211
(1917).
Text of laws, by State. Laws Providing for
Bureaus of Labor Statistics, etc., Bull. 343
(1923).
Labor organizations. See Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws— this section ; also Bull. 321
(1922),* Labor Laws That Have Been Declared
U nconstitutional.
Mechanics’ liens. S ee Labor—Text, summaries, and
reviews of laws— this section , beginning with
Bull. 370 (1925).




Legislation— Con.
Minimum wage. (See also W a g e payment, this
section .) :
Development, and status of State laws. Mini­
mum Wage Legislation in Various Coun­
tries, Bull. 467 (1928).*
Principal provisions, 1933. Comparative Digest
of Labor Legislation for the States of Ala­
bama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Bull. 603 (1933). [ Includes legis­
lation fo r States other than those listed .
S tates listed in title not covered by mini­
mum wage legislation .]

Text and principal features. Minimum-Wage
Laws of the United States: Construction
and Operation, Bull. 285 (1921).*
Mining regulations:
Labor Legislation o f :
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
Occupational-disease. S ee Workmen’s compensa­
tion— Legislation.
Pensions:
Blind, indigent persons. Labor Legislation,
1931 and 1932, Bull. 590 (1933).
Mothers’. S ee Labor—Text, summaries, and
reviews of laws— this section ; also Bull.
321 (1922),* Labor Laws That Have Been
Declared Unconstitutional.
Old-age. Public Old-Age Pensions and Insur­
ance in the United States and Foreign
Countries, Bull. 561 (1932).*
See also Labor— Text, summaries, and re­
views of laws, this section , beginning
with Bull. 370 (1925).
Bull. 321 (1922),* Labor Laws That
Have Been Declared Unconstitu­
tional.
Bull. 603 (1933), Comparative Digest
of Labor Legislation for the States
of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Tennessee. [Includes leg­
islation fo r S tates other than those
listed.]
Public-service employees. S ee Labor—Text,
summaries, and reviews of laws, this section.
Police. S ee Labor—-Text, summaries, and reviews
of laws, this section.

Printing, public:
Labor Laws of the United States with De­
cisions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370
(1925). (Compilation of laws through
1924.)
Labor Legislation, 1931 and 1932, Bull. 590
(1933).
Prison labor. (S ee also Labor— Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws, this section ; also Bull. 321
(1922),* Labor Laws That Have Been Declared
Unconstitutional.):
Convict Labor in 1923, Bull. 372 (1925).
Laws Relating to Prison Labor in the United
States as of July 1, 1933, Bull. 596 (1933).
Protection of local labor. See Public works, this
section.

Public works:
Labor Legislation of 1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Uncon­
stitutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Labor Laws of the United States with De­
cisions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370
(1925). (Compilation of laws through
1924).
67

Legislation— Con.
Public works—Con.
Labor Legislation o f :
1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
1927, Bull. 470 (1928).
1928, Bull. 486 (1929).
1929, Bull. 528 (1931).
1931-32, Bull. 590 (1933).
Railroads:
Labor Legislation of:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
Labor Laws of the United States with De­
cisions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370
(1925). (Compilation of laws through 1924).
Labor Legislation, 1931 and 1932, Bull. 590
(1933).
Use of Federal Power in Settlement of Rail­
way Labor Disputes, Bull. 303 (1922).*
Sabotage. See Syndicalism and sabotage, this sec­
tion.

Safety. See Labor, this section .
Seamen:
Changes in marine law 1895-1915. Internation­
al Seamen’s Union of America. A Study of
Its History and Problems, Bull. 342 (1923).
Federal statutes. Labor Laws of the United
States with Decisions of Courts Relating
Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).
Seamen, disabled. See under Workmen’s compensa­
tion.
Social insurance:
Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for
the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina, Tennessee. To be used at the
Georgia Conference on Labor Legislation,
December 13, 1933, Atlanta, Ga., Bull 603
(1933). [ Includes legislation fo r S tates other
than those listed .]
Labor Legislation of 1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
State [includes territorial] Labor Legislation,
1937, Including Workmen’s Compensation
Legislation, Bull. 654 (1938).
State conduct of business:
Labor Laws of the United States with Deci­
sions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370
(1925). (Compilation of laws through 1924).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Un­
constitutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Labor Legislation of 1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
Sunday labor. S ee Labor—Text, summaries, and
reviews of laws— this section ; also Bull. 321
(1922),* Labor Laws That Have Been Declared
U nconstitutional.
Syndicalism and sabotage:
Labor Legislation o f:
1919, Bull. 277 (1921).
1920, Bull. 292 (1922).
'
Labor Laws of the United States with Deci­
sions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370
(1925). (Compilation of laws through
1924.)
Labor Legislation of 1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
Transit industry, local. Labor Legislation of 1915,
Bull. 186 (1916).
Unemployment compensation or insurance. See
Social insurance, this section.
Unemployment relief, Idaho. Labor Laws That
Have Been Declared Unconstitutional, Bull. 321
(1922).*

68




Legislation— Con.
Vocational education and vocational rehabilitation.
See Labor— Text, summaries, and reviews of
laws— this section ; also Bull. 603 (1933), Com­
parative Digest of Labor Legislation for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Caro­
lina, Tennessee. [Includes legislation fo r States
other than those listed .]
Voting rights. S ee Employee rights, civil, this sec­
tion.

Wage assignment. S ee Labor— Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws, this section ; also Bull. 321
(1922),* Labor Laws That Have Been Declared
Unconstitutional.
Wage payment. (S ee also Labor and Minimum
wage, this se c tio n .) :
Review of legislation and court decisions
under:
Wage-Payment Legislatiqp in the United
States, Bull. 229 (1918).*
Text of Federal and State laws and related
court decisions:
Laws Relating to Payment of Wages,
Bull. 408 (1926).
Wages and hours. See Labor, Minimum wage, and
Wage payment, this section.
Wartime (World War I), industrial control:
Labor Legislation o f:
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
Water transportation. Labor Legislation of 1915,
Bull. 186 (1916).
Women workers. S ee Labor and Minimum wage,
this section.

Working conditions:
Labor Legislation o f:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
Workmen’s compensation. See that title and see
Labor, this section.
Legislation, foreign countries. ( F o r countries not listed ,
see Various countries, this se c tio n .) :
Argentina. Labor Legislation of Argentina, Bull.
510 (1930).
Canada. (S ee also Various countries, this se c tio n .):
Industrial disputes. Operation o f the Industrial
Disputes Investigation Act of Canada, Bull.
233 (1918).
Workmen’s compensation. See under that title ,
foreign countries.
Ecuador. Labor Legislation of Ecuador, Bull. 559
(1931) .
Latin America. (S ee also specific countries com­
posing and Various countries, this se c tio n .):
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the
Latin American Countries, Bull. 529 (1930).
Mexico. Labor Legislation of Mexico, Bull. 569
(1932) .
Paraguay. Labor Legislation of Paraguay, Bull.
554 (1931).
Russia. Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026
(1951).*
Uruguay. Labor Legislation of Uruguay, Bull. 494
(1929).
Various countries:
Family allowances. See that title.
Minimum Wage Legislation in Various Coun­
tries, Bull. 467 (1928).*
Public Old-Age Pensions and Insurance in the
United States and in Foreign Countries,
Bull. 561 (1932).*

Legislation, foreign countries— Con.
Various countries— Con.
Workmen’s compensation. See that title ,
foreign countries.
Venezuela. Labor Legislation of Venezuela, Bull,
549 (1931).
Legislation, international. See International labor regu­
lation.
Librarians. Employment Outlook for Librarians, Bull.
1215-41 (1958).
Life insurance, industrial establishments. ( See also
Collective bargaining and agreements, general—Em­
ployee-benefit plans.):
Extent of plans. Supplementary Wage Practices in
American Industry 1945-46, Bull. 939 (1948).*
Life insurance, State-sponsored:
Savings-bank:
Massachusetts. The Massachusetts System of
Savings-Bank Life Insurance, Bull. 615
(1935).
Massachusetts and New York systems. Ope­
ration of Savings-Bank Life Insurance in
Massachusetts and New York, Bull. 688
(1941).
Linemen union wage scales 1921-33. See Wages and
hours— General trades, beginning with Bull. 302
(1922).
Living conditions:
Hawaii. S ee under Labor and industrial conditions.
India— Industrial workers, World War II. Wartime
Labor Conditions in India, Bull. 755 (1943).
Women workers, shoe factories, Massachusetts. The
Boot and Shoe Industry in Massachusetts as a
Vocation for Women, Bull. 180 (1915).
Living costs. See Cost of Living; Income and expendi­
tures, consumer; Prices.
Living standards, Boston worker families. New Eng­
land Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Lockouts. S ee Labor-management disputes— Strikes.
Local-transit employees. S ee Wages and hours—Transit
industry, local.
Logging. See Lumber industry.
Longshore industry:
Hiring practices (and earnings) and labor produc­
tivity. Cargo Handling and Longshore Labor
Conditions, Bull. 550 (1932).
Injuries, and accident causes, 1942; and hiring
practices. Injuries and Accident Causes in the
Longshore Industry, 1942, Bull. 764 (1944).*
Union wage scales 1926-33. See Wages and hours—
General trades, beginning with Bull. 431 (1927).
Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumbermen (Four L ),
development and plan of. Bull. 349 (1924)* entitled
below .
Lumber industry. (S ee also under Wages and hours.):
Productivity, labor. Wages and Hours of Labor in
the Lumber, Millwork, and Furniture Industries,
1915, Bull. 225 (1918).
Pulpwood-logging. Injuries and Accident Causes
in the Pulpwood-Logging Industry, 1943 and
1944, Bull. 924 (1948).*
West Coast— Development, technology, and labor
problems. Industrial Relations in the West
Coast Lumber Industry, Bull. 349 (1924).*
Machine-building. See under Accidents— Rates, types,
causes, and prevention, by industry or occupation.




Machine-shop occupations. See under Employment
outlook.
Machine shops. See Wages and hours— Foundries and
machine shops.
Machine-tool accessories industry. S ee under Wages
and hours.
Machine-tool industry. S ee Wages and hours— Machin­
ery manufacture.
Machinery manufacture:
Earnings and fringe benefits. S ee under Wages
and hours.
Machinery manufacture, agricultural. Union Agree­
ments in Agricultural-Machinery Industry, 1943,
Bull. 761 (1944).
Machinery repairmen. See Employment outlook— Me­
chanics and repairmen.
Maintenance electricians. Employment Outlook for
Maintenance Electricians, Bull. 1215-61 (1958).
Maintenance-of-union membership. (S ee also Collective
bargaining and agreements, general— Union secur­
ity.) :
Maintenance-of-Membership Awards of National
War Labor Board, Bull. 753 (1943).
Management rights and responsibilities. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions— Union and Management Func­
tions, Rights, and Responsibilities, Bull. 908-12
(1949).
Man-hour requirements. See Labor requirements; Pro­
ductivity.
Manpower. (S ee also Labor force; Labor supply; Oc­
cupational m obility.):
Chemists and chemical engineers. Manpower Re­
sources in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,
Bull. 1132 (1953).*
Demobilization of Manpower, 1918-19, Bull. 784
(1944).
Fact Book on Manpower, September 1954, Bull.
1171 (1954).*
Industrial research. Scientific Research and De­
velopment in American Industry, Bull. 1148
(1953) .*
Military Manpower Requirements and Supply:
1954-60, Bull. 1161 (1954)* and 1959-63, Bull.
1262 (1959).*
Social sciences and humanities. Personnel Resources
in the Social Sciences and Humanities, Bull. 1169
(1954) .*
Utilization. (S ee also Occupational mobility.) :
Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures,
Bull. 807 (1945).
Manufacturing industries. See under Wages and hours
— Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries;
also specific subject or industry .
Marine workers, union wage scales 1927-31. See Wages
and hours—Water transportation.
Maritime industry. See Merchant seamen.
Maritime law. See Legislation—Seamen.
Massachusetts. S ee Life insurance, State-sponsored.
See also other specific su bjects .
Meatcutters and butchers, union wage scales 1927-31.
See under Wages and hours.
Meatpacking industry. (See also under Wages and
hours.):
Collective Bargaining in the Meat-Packing Indus­
try, Bull. 1063 (1952).
69

Meatpacking industry—Con.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry, 1943, Bull. 855
(1946).*
Labor-management relations. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States, Bull.
1225 (1958).*
Mechanics and repairmen. See under Employment out­
look.
Mechanics' liens. S ee Legislation— Labor— Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws, beginning with Bull.
370 (1925).
Mechanization. S ee Productivity.
Mediation. (S ee also Labor-management disputes.):
Hart, Schaffner & Marx and United Garment
Workers of America— Labor-management griev­
ances. Collective Agreements in the Men's Cloth­
ing Industry, Bull. 198 (1916).
World War II:
Report on the Work of the National Defense
Mediation Board, March 19, 1941-January
12, 1942, Bull. 714 (1942).*
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement
and Wage Stabilization During World War
II, Bull. 1009 (1950).*
Mediation and conciliation services, functions of. A
Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Medical-service plans. See Collective bargaining and
agreements, general— Employee-benefit p l a n s—
Health, etc.
Meetings. S ee Conventions, meetings, etc.
Men's clothing industry. S ee Clothing industry—Men's;
and Wages and hours— Clothing industry—Men's.
Merchandise stores, general. (S ee also Stores, retail.) :
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in October
1956, Bull. 1220-2 (1957).
Merchant seamen. (S ee also Labor organizations—Sea­
men’s union, international; and see Workmen's com­
pensation— Seamen.):
Earnings and employment. The Earnings and
Employment of Seamen on U.S. Flag Ships, Bull.
1238 (1958).*
Employment Outlook in the Merchant Marine, Bull.
1054 (1952).
Labor-management relations. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States,
Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Union wage scales 1927-31. S ee Wages and hours
— Water transportation.
Metal trades. S ee under Wages and hours.
Metalliferous mining. S ee under W a g es and hours.
Metalworking industries. S ee specific branch o f indus­
tr y under Wages and hours.
Metalworking occupations. See under Employment out­
look.
Methodology. (S ee also Statistics and individual B L S
bulletins fo r scope and method o f su rvey and fo r
technical notes , where applicable . ) :
Accident statistics. S ee Accidents— Methodology.
A g e and work performance relationship. Job Per­

formance and A ge: A Study in Measurement,
Bull. 1203 (1956).*
Prices, retail. Average Retail Prices: Collection
and Calculation Techniques and Problems, Bull.
1182 (1955).
Related wage benefits. Problems in Measurement
of Expenditures on Selected Items of Supple­
mentary Employee Remuneration, Bull. 1186
(1956).

70




Mexico. Labor Legislation of Mexico, Bull. 569 (1932).
Migrations. Chinese Migrations, with Special Reference
to Labor Conditions, Bull. 340 (1923).
Military manpower. S ee under Manpower.
Military service:
Benefits and rights. Collective Bargaining Pro­
visions— Leave o f Absence; Military Service
Leave, Bull. 908*6 (1948).
Payments. Labor-Management Contract Provisions,
1954, Bull. 1181 (1955).
Military-tanks industry. Wage Structure— Metalwork­
ing Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Milk industry, Chicago. Labor Aspects of the Chicago
Milk Industry, Bull. 715 (1942).
Millwork. S ee under Wages and hours.
Millwrights. Employment Outlook for Millwrights, Bull.
1215-62 (1958).
Minimum wage:
Effects of 75-cent minimum:
Furniture industry, wood.
Hosiery industry, men's seamless.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected
Wage Areas, January 1950 to January
1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Legislation. S ee under that title.
Women workers, Oregon stores. Effect of Mini­
mum-Wage Determinations in Oregon, Bull. 176
(1915).
Mining. (See also under Wages and hours.):
Coal and nonferrous metals mining. A Guide to
Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Coal, anthracite. Collective Bargaining in the An­
thracite Coal Industry, Bull. 191 (1916).
Coal, bituminous. Changes in wage rates and in
related practices. The Wage Chronology Series,
Vol. I, Bull. 970 (1949).
Labor Relations in the Fairmont, West Vir­
ginia Bituminous Coal Field, Bull. 361
(1924).
The Changing Status o f Bituminous Coal Min­
ers, 1937-46, Bull. 882 (1946).
Regulations. S ee under Legislation.
Minors, employment of. S ee Child labor.
Mobility. S ee Occupational mobility.
Molders. Mobility o f Molders and Coremakers, 19401952, Bull. 1162 (1954).*
Money disbursements. S ee Income and expenditures,
consumer.
Monthly Labor Review, subject indexes to. S ee under
Publications, indexes to and lists of—Bureau of
Labor Statistics (U.S. Government).
Mortality statistics:
Cotton-mill workers, Fall River, Mass., 1908 to
1912. Preventable Death in Cotton Manufactur­
ing Industry, Bull. 251 (1919).
Dusty trades:
Health Survey of the Printing Trades, 1922
to 1925, Bull. 427 (1927).
Mortality from Respiratory Diseases in Dusty
Trades (Inorganic Dusts), Bull. 231 (1918).
The Problem of Dust Phthisis in the GraniteStone Industry, Bull. 293 (1922).
Industrial policyholders (white males), Metropoli­
tan Life Insurance Co.:
Causes o f Death by Occupation. Occupational
Mortality Experience o f the Metropolitan
Life Insurance Company, 1911-1913, Bull.
207 (1917); 1922-24, Bull. 507 (1930).

Mortality statistics— Con.
Lead poisoning:
Deaths from Lead Poisoning, Bull. 426 (1927).
Deaths from Lead Poisoning, 1925-1927, Bull.
488 (1929). [Both bulletins include selected
foreign countries.]
Motion-picture machine operators. See Wages and hours
— Amusements.
Motortruck drivers and helpers. S ee Wages and hours
— Truckdrivers and helpers.
Motor vehicle (and parts) manufacturing. See Wages
and hours—Automobile and other motor vehicle (and
parts) manufacturing.

Necrosis, phosphorus. Phosphorus Necrosis in the Man­
ufacture of Fireworks and in the Preparation of
Phosphorus, Bull. 405 (1926).
Negroes in the United States— Their Employment and
Economic Status, Bull. 1119 (1953).*
New England. ( See also specific s u b je c ts .):
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull.
1212 (1957).*
New York (State). (S ee also specific su bjects.) :
Activities and Functions of a State Department
of Labor, Bull. 479 (1928).
Operation of Savings-Bank Life Insurance in
Massachusetts and New York, Bull. 688 (1941).

Motor vehicle repair garages and shops:
Earnings and employment practices. S ee Wages
and hours—Automobile repair garages and shops.

Newspaper industry. S ee Printing and publishing.

Municipal employment:
Administration. Earnings and Wage Practices in
Municipal Governments of 15 Cities, 1944, Bull.
848 (1945).
Retirement. ( S ee also Legislation—Labor— Text,
summaries, and reviews of law s.):
Public Service Retirement Systems: United
States, Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477
(1929).
Wages and hours. S ee under that title.

Nightwork. S ee Collective bargaining and agreements,
general: Premium pay and Shift differentials and
operations.

Munition workers, Great Britain, World War I:
Conditions affecting health and welfare:
Employment of Women and Juveniles in Great
Britain During the War, Bull. 223 (1917).
Hours, Fatigue, and Health in British Muni­
tion Factories, Bull. 221 (1917).
Industrial Efficiency and Fatigue in British
Munition Factories, Bull. 230 (1917).
Industrial Health and Efficiency, Bull. 249
(1919).
Welfare Work in British Munition Factories,
Bull. 222 (1917).
Musicians. See Wages and hours—Amusements.
Mutual Relief Associations. Mutual Relief Associations
Among Government Employees in Washington, D.C.
Bull. 282 (1921).
National Defense Mediation Board (U. S. Government):
Labor disputes endangering national defense,
handling o f:
Report on the Work of the National Defense
Mediation Board, March 19, 1941-January
12, 1942, Bull. 714 (1942).*
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement
and Wage Stabilization During World War
II, Bull. 1009 (1950).*
National Wage Stabilization Board (U.S. Government):
Wage stabilization program and handling of dis­
putes in Government-operated (seized) facilities,
Bull. 1009 (1950),* entitled above .
National W ar Labor Board (U.S. Government). ( See
also Labor-management disputes— Strikes, fo r speci­
fied yea rs . ) :
World War I. National War Labor Board, Bull.
287 (1922).
World War II:
Maintenance-of-Membership Awards of Na­
tional War Labor Board, Bull. 753 (1943).
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement
and Wage Stabilization During World War
II, Bull. 1009 (1950).*
Wage Stabilization in California Airframe
Industry, 1943, Bull. 746 (1943).




Newspaper reporters. Employment Outlook for News­
paper Reporters, Bull. 1215-42 (1958).

Nonferrous metals industry. ( S ee also under Wages
and hours.):
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Norway:
Collective-bargaining structure and agreements,
and disputes settlement. Labor-Management Re­
lations in Scandinavia, Bull. 1038 (1952).
Nurses, registered professional. ( See also Health ser­
vice occupations.):
Characteristics of profession and comparison of
earnings and working conditions with other
fields. The Economic Status of Registered Pro­
fessional Nurses, 1946-47, Bull. 931 (1948).
Occupational diseases. ( See also Mortality statistics;
Poisons, industrial; Workmen’s compensation.):
Anthrax. Anthrax as an Occupational Disease,
Bulls. 205 (1917) and 267 (1920).
Hazardous occupations. Occupation Hazards and
Diagnostic Signs: A Guide to Impairments to be
Looked for in Hazardous Occupations, Bulls. 306
(1922) and 582 (1933).
Legislation. S ee under Workmen’s compensation.
Necrosis, phosphorus. Phosphorus Necrosis in the
Manufacture of Fireworks and in the Prepara­
tion of Phosphorus, Bull. 405 (1926).
Printing trades. See under Hygiene, industrial, and
Mortality statistics.
Respiratory. See Mortality statistics and Hygiene,
industrial— Printing trades.
Stonecutters. (S ee also Mortality statistics— Dusty
trades.):
Effect of the Air Hammer on the Hands of
Stonecutters, Bull. 236 (1918).
Tuberculosis. S ee Mortality statistics and Hygiene,
industrial— Printing trades.
Occupational mobility:
Coremakers. S ee Molders and Coremakers, this
section.

Depressed rural area. Labor Supply and Mobility
in a Newly Industrialized Area (Ravenswood,
W. V a.), Bull. 1261 (I960).*
Electronic technicians. The Mobility of Electronic
Technicians, 1940-52, Bull. 1150 (1954).*
Engineers, professional. Employment Outlook for
Engineers, Bull. 968 (1950).
Molders and coremakers. Mobility of Molders and
Coremakers, 1940-1952, Bull. 1162 (1954).*

71

Occupational mobility— Con.
Scientists (chemists, biologists, and physicists with
Ph.D. degrees). Occupational Mobility of Sci­
entists, Bull. 1121 (1953).*
Tool and die makers. The Mobility of Tool and
Die Makers, 1940-1951, Bull. 1120 (1953).*
Occupational outlook. S ee Employment outlook.
Occupational wage surveys. See under Wages and
hours.
Occupations. See Accidents— Rates, types, causes, and
prevention, by industry or occupation; Employment
outlook; Mortality statistics; Occupational diseases;
Poisons, industrial; Safety; Wages and hours; Work­
ing conditions; and specific occupation.
Office-building service employees:
Earnings and fringe benefits. Hourly Earnings by
Industry, Selected Wage Areas, April 1949 to
November 1949, Bull. 1005 (1950).
Office workers. (See also under Wages and hours;
and see specific occupation or industry under Em­
ployment outlook.):
Automation affecting employment of. Automation
and Employment Opportunities for Officeworkers, Bull. 1241 (1958).*
Unionization of white-collar workers. A Guide to
Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Old-age and survivors insurance. See under Old-age
care and assistance.
Old-age benefits. S ee Old-age care and assistance.
Old-age care and assistance. (S ee also Public assist­
ance and Social insurance.) :
Homes:
Directories of, by State and city. Directory of
Homes for the Aged in the United States,
Bull. 505 (1929).
Homes for Aged in the United States,
Bull. 677 (1941).
Membership in—requirements for, obligations,
and benefits provided. Care of Aged Per­
sons in the United States, Bull. 489 (1929).
Labor organizations. Beneficial Activities of Amer­
ican Trade-Unions, Bull. 465 (1928).*
Old-age and survivors insurance. Public Social
Security Programs in the United States, 194950, Bull. 982 (1950).*
Pensions:
Laws. See Legislation—Pensions.
Public Old-Age Pensions and Insurance in the
United States and Foreign Countries, Bull.
561 (1932)* and Bull. 489 (1929).
Old-age care and assistance, foreign countries. Public
Service Retirement Systems: United States, Canada,
and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929). See also Bull. 561
(1932),* entitled in above section.
Old-age pensions, extent of. S ee Health, insurance, and
pension plans, extent of, by industry or occupation.
Older workers:
Collective-bargaining provisions relating to. (See
also Collective bargaining and agreements, gen­
eral— Employee-benefit plans— Pensions.):
Older Workers Under Collective Bargaining:
Part I, Hiring, Retention, Job Termination,
Bull. 1199-1 (1956); Part II, Health and
Insurance Plans, Pension Plans, Bull. 1199-2
(1956).
Job performance:
Comparative Job Performance by Age: Large
Plants in the Men’s Footwear and Household
Furniture Industries, Bull. 1223 (1957).*

72




Older workers— Con.
Job Performance and A ge: A Study in
Measurement, Bull. 1203 (1956).*
Population, employment, and economic trends
affecting:
Employment and Economic Status of Older
Men and Women, May 1952, Bull. 1092
(1952).*
Employment and Economic Status of Older
Men and Women, Bull. 1213 (1957).*
Working life, length and pattern of. S ee that title.
Opinions, legal. See Court decisions affecting labor.
Opticians and optical mechanics. Employment Outlook
for Dispensing Opticians and Optical Mechanics, Bull.
1215-55 (1958).
Output per man-hour. See Productivity.
Overtime, and compensation for. See Collective bargain­
ing and agreements, general: Premium pay and
Shift differentials and operations.
Oxygen cutters. S ee Employment outlook—Welders.
Paint and varnish industry. See under Wages and hours.
Painters, exposure to lead poisoning. Report of British
Departmental Committee on the Danger in the Use
of^Lead in the Painting of Buildings, Bull. 188
Paper and paper products industries. (S ee also under
Wages and hours.):
Collective Bargaining in Paper and Allied Pro­
ducts Industry, Bull. 709 (1942).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Manufacture
of Paperboard Containers, Bull. 1139 (1953).*
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Manufacture
of Pulp and Paper, Bull. 1036 (1952).*
Labor Cost of Production and Wages and Hours of
Labor in the Paper Box-Board Industry, Bull.
407 (1926).
Paraguay. Labor Legislation of Paraguay, Bull. 554
Park movement:
Municipal and county parks. Park Recreation
Areas in the United States, Bulls. 462 (1928)
and 565 (1932).
Payroll statistics. (S ee also specific industry . ) :
Revised Indexes of Factory Employment and Pay
Rolls, 1919 to 1933, Bull. 610 (1935).
Pennsylvania Railroad Wage Data, Bull. 514 (1930).
Pensions. (S ee also Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general— Employee-benefit plans— Pensions;
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of, by
industry or occupation; and Older workers.):
Blind, indigent persons. Labor Legislation, 1931
and 1932, Bull. 590 (1933).
Mothers’. See Legislation— Labor— Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws.
Old-age. See under Old-age care and assistance.
Public-service employees. (S ee also Legislation—
Labor— Text, summaries, and reviews of laws.) :
Public Service Retirement Systems: United
States, Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477
(1929).
Permits, building. See Building construction— Building
permits.
Personnel research agencies:
Directory, and functions, of. Personnel Research
Agencies, Bulls. 299 (1921) and 518 (1930).
Personnel resources. See Manpower.
Personnel workers. Employment Outlook for Personnel
Workers, Bull. 1215-43 (1958).

Petroleum industry. ( See also under Employment out­
look and Wages and hours.):
Labor-management relations. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States,
Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Union Agreements in the Petroleum-Refining In­
dustry in Effect in 1944, Bull. 823 (1945).
Phosphorus Necrosis in the Manufacture of Fireworks
and in the Preparation of Phosphorus, Bull. 405
(1926).
Physical and earth sciences. See under Employment
outlook.
Physicians. See under Employment outlook.
Physicists. See Scientists and under Employment out­
look.
Pineapple industry, Hawaii. See Hawaii under Labor
and industrial conditions.
Plant management. (S ee also Collective bargaining and
agreements, general—Labor-management coopera­
tion.) :
Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures, Bull.
807 (1945).
Plastics products industry. See under Employment out­
look.
Plumbing. Injuries and Accident Causes in Plumbing
Operations, Bull. 1079 (1952).*
Poisons, industrial:
Carbon-Monoxide Poisoning, Bull. 291 (1922).
Dyes. Industrial Poisoning in Making Coal-Tar
Dyes and Dye Intermediates, Bull. 280 (1921).
Explosives manufacture. Industrial Poisons Used
or Produced in the Manufacture of Explosives,
Bull. 219 (1917). S ee also Bulls. 221 (1917) and
249 (1919).
Lead:
Danger of to women workers. Women in the
Lead Industries, Bull. 253 (1919).
Deaths from. See Mortality statistics.
Painters’ trade. Report of British Depart­
mental Committee on the Danger in the
Use of Lead in the Painting of Buildings,
Bull. 188 (1916).
Printing trades. S ee Hygiene, industrial.
Test for. A New Test for Industrial Lead
Poisoning, Bull. 460 (1928).
Phosphorus. Phosphorus Necrosis in the Manu­
facture of Fireworks and in the Preparation of
Phosphorus, Bull. 405 (1926).
Rubber industry. Industrial Poisons Used in the
Rubber Industry, Bull. 179 (1915).
Police. (See also Legislation— Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of law s.):
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States,
Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Salaries and Hours of Labor in Municipal Police
Departments, July 1, 1938, Bull. 685 (1941).
Population, changes in and forecasts. Population and
Labor Force Projections for the United States, 1960
to 1975, Bull. 1242 (1959).*
Portland cement industry. S ee Cement industry, portland.
Postal Service. Technological Changes and Employment
in the United States Postal Service, Bull. 574 (1932).
Pottery industry. Wages, Hours, and Productivity in the
Pottery Industry, 1925, Bull. 412 (1926).
Power laundries. See Wages and hours—Laundries,
power.




Premium pay. See under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general.
See also Wages and hours— specific industry .
Price control. See under Wartime policies— World War
II.
Prices: [Note: Bulletins showing retail and whole­
sale prices in particular periods frequently include
comparative data for earlier years and for foreign
countries.] (S ee also Cost of living; Income and
expenditures, consumer.):
Consumer Price Index:
Changes in Cost of Living in Large Cities m
the United States, 1913-41, Bull. 699
(1941).*
Consumer Prices in the United States, 1949-52,
Bull. 1165 (1954).*
#
ro eo
Consumer Prices in the United States, 1953-58,
Bull. 1256 (1959).*
Consumers’ Prices in the United States,
1942-48, Bull. 966 (1949).*
Cost of Clothing for Moderate-Income Fami­
lies, 1935-44, Bull. 789 (1944).
Cost of Living in 1941, Bull. 710 (1942).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016, 1950
ed. (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Interim Adjustment of Consumers’ Price In­
dex, Bull. 1039 (1952).*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Sta­
tistical Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
The Consumer Price Index. A Layman’s
Guide, Bull. 1140 (1953).*
Retail:
_
Coal. (See also bulletins fo r specified years
under
Prices— Retail— Various commodi­
ties ) *
Residential Heating Fuels, Retail Prices,
1941-48, Bull. 950 (1949).
Retail Prices of Food and Coal, 1941,
Bull. 707 (1942).
Dry goods. See bulletins fo r years from 1907
+/N

109Q

lio + o A

hatl/vtn

• m A p.'T
h

V f l/ H f t llS

f*OTYl-

modifies.
Electricity.
Changes in Retail Prices of Electricity,
1923-38, Bull. 664 (1939).
S ee also Bulls. 418 (1926), 445 (1927),
464 (1928), 495 (1929), and 950 (1949).
Food. (See also specified years listed below
under Various commodities.) :
Indexes:
Methodology:
Retail Prices of Food, 1923-36,
Bull. 635 (1938).*
Retail Prices of Food, 1951 and
1952, Bull. 1141 (1953).
Retail Prices of Food, 1953-54,
Bull. 1183 (1955).
Yearly:
1923-36, Bull. 635 (1938).*
1941, Bull. 707 (1942).
1942 and 1943, Bull. 799 (1945).
1944 and 1945, Bull. 899 (1947).
1946 and 1947, Bull. 938 (1949).
1948, Bull. 965 (1949).
1949, Bull. 1032 (1951).
1950, Bull. 1055 (1952).
1951-52; Bull. 1141 (1953).
1953-54, Bull. 1183 (1955).
1955-56, Bull. 1217 (1957).
1957-58, Bull. 1254 (1959).
Fuels. (See also specific fu el and specified
years listed below under Various commod­
ities.) :
Residential Heating Fuels, Retail Prices,
1941-48, Bull. 950 (1949).

73

Prices—Con.
Retail— Con.
Gas. ( See also Fuels, under Retail, this sec­
tion.) :
Changes in Retail Prices of Gas, 1923-36,
Bull. 628 (1937).
History of BLS studies, Bulls. 396 (1925) and
1182 (1955).
Various commodities:
1907 to June 1915, Bull. 184 (1916).
1907 to Dec. 1915, Bull. 197 (1916).
1907 to Dec. 1916, Bull. 228 (1917).
1913 to Dec. 1919, Bull. 270 (1921).
1913 to Dec. 1920, Bull. 300 (1922).
1913 to Dec. 1921, Bull. 315 (1923).
1913 to Dec. 1922, Bull. 334 (1923).
1913 to Dec. 1923, Bull. 366 (1925).
1890 to 1924, Bull. 396 (1925).
1890 to 1925, Bull. 418 (1926).
1890 to 1926, Bull. 445 (1927).
1890 to 1927, Bull. 464 (1928).
1890 to 1928, Bull. 495 (1929).
1953-54, Average Retail Prices: Col­
lection and Calculation Techniques and
Problems, Bull. 1182 (1955).
1955, Average Retail Prices 1955, Bull.
1197 (1956).*
Wartime. (S ee also bulletins fo r w ar years
under Retail and Wholesale, this section .) :
Consumers’ Prices in the United States
1942-48, Bull. 966 (1949).*
The General Maximum Price Regulation,
Bull. 879 (1946).
War and Postwar Wages, Prices, and
Hours, 1914-23 and 1939-44, Bull. 852
(1946).
Wartime Prices, Part I-August 1939 to
Pearl Harbor, Bull. 749 (1944). [Only
Part I has been published.]*
Wholesale:
Indexes:
Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016,
1950 ed. (1951), and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in
the United States and Foreign Coun­
tries, Bull. 284 (1921).* [Part I re­
printed as Bull. 656 (1938).]
Revised Index Numbers of Wholesale
Prices, 1923 to July 1927, Bull. 453
(1927).*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS
Statistical Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
S ee also Bulls. 947 (1949),* 1083
(1952),* 1214 (1957),* 1235 (1958),*
and 1257 (1959).*
Various commodities:
1890 to 1914, Bull. 181 (1915).*
1890 to 1915, Bull. 200 (1916).*
1890 to 1916, Bull. 226 (1917).*
1890 to 1919, Bull. 269 (1920).*
1890 to 1920, Bull. 296 (1922).*
1890 to 1921, Bull. 320 (1922).*
1890 to 1922, Bull. 335 (1923).*
1890 to 1923, Bull. 367 (1925).*
1890 to 1924, Bull. 390 (1925).*
1890 to 1925, Bull. 415 (1926).*
1890 to 1926, Bull. 440 (1927).*
1913 to 1927, Bull. 473 (1929).*
1913 to 1928, Bull. 493 (1929).*
1929, Bull. 521 (1930).*
1930, Bull. 543 (1931).*
1931, Bull. 572 (1933).*
1939 (August) to December 7, 1941
(Pearl Harbor), Bull. 749 (1944).*
January-June 1942, Bull. 718 (1943).*

74




Prices— Con.
Wholesale— Con.
Indexes— Con.
Various commodities— Con.
July-December and Year 1942, Bull.
736 (1943).*
January-June 1943, Bull. 759 (1944).*
July-December and Year 1943, Bull.
785 (1944).*
1944, Bull. 870 (1947).*
1945, Bull. 877 (1947).*
1946, Bull. 920 (1948).*
1947, Bull. 947 (1949).*
1948, Bull. 973 (1950).*
1949, Bull. 1007 (1951).*
1950, Bull. 1083 (1952) *
1951-52, Bull. 1143 (1953).*
1954-56, Bull. 1214 (1957).*
1957, Bull. 1235 (1958).*
1958, Bull. 1257 (1959).*
Prices, foreign countries. (S ee also Prices, above list­
ing.) :

Changes and policies. Wage Trends and Wage
Policies: Various Foreign Countries, Bull. 934
(1948).
Indexes. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in the
United States and Foreign Countries, Bull. 284
(1921).*
Wartime (World War II). S ee Price control under
Wartime policies, foreign countries—World War
Printing (trades) and publishing. (See also under Col­
lective bargaining and agreements, by industry or
occupation; Employment outlook; Hygiene, indus­
trial; Wages and hours.):
Book and job. Joint Industrial Control in the
Book and Job Printing Industry, Bull. 481
(1928).
Book and job and newspaper:
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent
of, by industry or occupation. S ee Printing
and publishing under that title.
Great Britain. S ee Book and job, this section.
Newspaper:
Development of printing and newspaper in­
dustry, and labor productivity. Productivity of
Labor in Newspaper Printing, Bull. 475 (1929).
Public printing. S ee Legislation— Printing, public.
Prison labor. (S ee also under
Convict Labor in 1923, Bull.
Prison Labor in the United
(1933).
Prison Labor in the United
(1941).

Legislation.):
372 (1925).
States, 1932, Bull. 595
States, 1940, Bull. 698

Prison-made goods. S ee Prison labor.
Production statistics. Handbook of Labor Statistics,
Bull. 1016, 1950 ed. (1951), and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Production standards. S ee Collective bargaining and
agreements, general—Labor-management coopera­
tion; Productivity; Wage-incentive plans.
Productivity. (S ee also Labor requirements and Tech­
nological changes.):
Bibliography. Productivity: A Bibliography, Bull.
1226 (1958).
Brick industry, common building. Productivity
Costs in Common-Brick Industry, Bull. 856
(1924).
Cargo handling. S ee Longshoremen, this section.
Cigar manufacturing. Mechanization and Pro­
ductivity of Labor in the Cigar-Manufacturing
Industry, Bull. 660 (1939).

Productivity— Con.
Conference, Oct. 28-29, 1946. Summary of Pro­
ceedings of Conference on Productivity, October
28-29, 1946, Bull. 913 (1947).*
Cotton-garment industry. Productivity of Labor in
the Cotton-Garment Industry, Bull. 662 (1939).
Effects of long hours and wage incentives:
Hours of Work and Output, Bull. 917 (1948).*
Studies of the Effects of Long Working
Hours, Bulls. 791 and 791-A (1944).*
Electric-lamp industry. Technological Changes and
Employment in the Electric-Lamp Industry, Bull.
593 (1933).
Gains, shared through collective bargaining. A
Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Glass industry. Productivity of Labor in the Glass
Industry, Bull. 441 (1927).
Indexes. S ee Trends, this section.
Iron and steel industry:
Productivity changes, measurement and an­
alysis o f :
Man-Hours Per Unit of Output in the
Basic Steel Industry, 1939-55, Bull. 1200
(1956).
Productivity of Labor in Merchant Blast
Furnaces, Bull. 474 (1929).
Longshoremen. Cargo Handling and Longshore
Labor Conditions, Bull. 550 (1932).
Lumber industry. Wages and Hours of Labor in
the Lumber, Millwork, and Furniture Industries,
1915, Bull. 225 (1918).
Newspaper printing. Productivity of Labor in
Newspaper Printing, Bull. 475 (1929).
Older workers. See Older workers—Job perform­
ance.
Paper box-board industry. Labor Cost of Produc­
tion and Wages and Hours of Labor in the
Paper Box-Board Industry, Bull. 407 (1926).
Pottery industry. Wages, Hours, and Productivity
in the Pottery Industry, 1925, Bull. 412 (1926).
Shipbuilding, World War II. Wartime Employ­
ment, Production, and Conditions of Work in
Shipyards, Bull. 824 (1945).
Shoe manufacturing. Time and Labor Costs in
Manufacturing 100 Pairs of Shoes, 1923, Bull.
360 (1924). [Includes comparative data for
earlier years.]
------ New England:
Competitive costs and collective bargaining.
New England Labor and Labor Problems,
Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Statistics. (S ee also specified industries and
Trends, this section . ) :
Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016, 1950
ed. (1951), and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Sta­
tistical Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Steel industry. See Iron and steel industry, this
section.

Time studies and production standards. Collective
Bargaining Provisions— Incentive Wage Pro­
visions; Time Studies and Standards of Pro­
duction, Bull. 908-3 (1948).
Tire industry. Labor Productivity in the Auto­
mobile Tire Industry, Bull. 585 (1933).
Tobacco industry (cigar). S ee Cigar manufactur­
ing, this section.
Trends, entire private economy. Trends in Output
per Man-Hour in the Private Economy, 19091958, Bull. 1249 (I960).*
------ selected industries. Productivity Trends in
Selected Industries, Indexes Through 1950, Bull.
1046 (1951).*




Productivity— Con.
------ steel industry. Man-Hours Per Unit o f Out­
put in the Basic Steel Industry, 1939-55, Bull.
1200 (1956).
Professional workers. S ee Federal employees, Sci­
entists, White-collar workers, and specific profession.
Profit sharing:
Plans in operation. Profit Sharing in the United
States, Bull. 208 (1917).
Programmers. Automation and Employment Oppor­
tunities for Officeworkers, Bull. 1241 (1958).*
Promotion, transfer, and assignment. Collective Bar­
gaining Provisions— Promotion, Transfer, and As­
signment; Lay-off, Work-Sharing, and Reemploy­
ment, Bull. 908-7 (1948).
Protection of workers. See Safety and Safety—Codes.
S ee also Accidents—* Rates, types, causes, and pre­
vention, by industry or occupation.
Psychologists. Employment Outlook for Psychologists,
Bull. 1215-44 (1958).
Public assistance. (S ee also Family allowances; Oldage care and assistance.):
Almshouses. The Cost o f American Almshouses,
Bull. 386 (1925).
Extent, trends, and financing, 1949. Public Social
Security Programs in the United States, 1949-50,
Bull. 982 (1950).*
Public employment offices. S ee Employment agencies.
Public service. (S ee also Federal workers; Legislation
— Labor— Text, summaries, and reviews of laws; and
Municipal employment.):
Retirement systems. Public Service Retirement
Systems: United States, Canada, and Europe,
Bull. 477 (1929).
Teachers. See under Employment outlook.
Public welfare. S ee Public assistance.
Public works. S ee under Legislation.
Public Works Administration. P.W.A. and Industry.
A Four-Year Study of Regenerative Employment,
Bull. 658 (1938).* S ee also Bull. 786 (1944).
Publications, indexes to and lists o f:
Bureau of Labor Statistics (U.S. Government):
A Selected List of the Publications of the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1936 ed., Bull.
624 (1936); 1938 ed., Bull. 661 (1939); 1940
ed., Bull. 683 (1941).
Bulletins and Articles Published by Bureau of
Labor Statistics: A Selected List o f Refer­
ences, Bull. 614 (1935).
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions,
International Association of. Index to Pro­
ceedings of International Association of In­
dustrial Accident Boards and Commissions
1914-1924, Bull. 395 (1925).
Monthly Labor Review. Subject Index to the
Monthly Labor Review:
Volumes 1 to 11, July 1915 to December
1920, Bull. 695 (1941).
Volumes 12 to 51, January 1921 to Decem­
ber 1940, Bull. 696 (1942).
Volumes 52-71, January 1941 to December
1950, Bull. 1080 (1953).
Selected List of the Publications of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, 1943 Supplement to
1940 Edition, Bull. 747 (1943).
Subject Index of the Publications of the United
States Bureau of Labor Statistics up to May
1, 1915, Bull. 174 (1915).*

75

Puerto Rico. The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico,
Alaska, Hawaii, Bull. 1191 (1956).
Pulp and paper industry. See Paper and paper pro­
ducts industries .
Pulp wood-logging industry. Injuries and Accident
Causes in the Pulpwood-Logging Industry, 1943 and
1944, Bull. 924 (1948).*
Quits. Collective Bargaining Provisions— Discharge,
Discipline, and Quits; Dismissal Pay Provisions, Bull.
908-5 (1948).
Radio and television broadcasting. S ee under Employ­
ment outlook.
Radio manufacture. (See also Employment outlook:
Electronic technicians and Electronics manufactur­
ing.) :
Collective bargaining, Radio, Television, and Elec­
tronics Industry, Bull. 1089 (1952).
Hourly earnings January 1945, selected plant occu­
pations. Wage Structure— Metalworking In­
dustries 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Railroads. (S ee also under Legislation.):
Employment outlook. S ee under Employment out­
look.
Labor-management relations. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States, Bull.
1225 (1958).*
Pennsylvania Railroad Wage Data, Bull. 514
(1930).
Union wage scales 1927-31. S ee under Wages and
hours.
Use of Federal Power in Settlement of Railway
Labor Disputes, Bull. 303 (1922).*
Rationing, foreign countries, World War II. Wartime
Prices, Price Control, and Rationing in Foreign
Countries, Bull. 851 (1946).
Rayon industry:
Earnings and fringe benefits. See tinder Wages
and hours.
Recall. S ee Collective bargaining and agreements, gen­
eral— Layoff.
Reconstruction, postwar, Europe. Cooperative Associ­
ations in Europe and Their Possibilities for Post-War
Reconstruction, Bull. 770 (1944).*
Reconversion:
World War I:
Review of problems. Demobilization of Man­
power, 1918-19, Bull. 784 (1944).
World War II:
Effects of War-Contract Cut-Backs on Selected
Plants, Bull. 818 (1945).
Reconversion Problems in the Buffalo Indus­
trial Area, Bull. 804 (1945).
Workers* Experiences During First Phase of
Reconversion, Bull. 876 (1946).
Recreation. See Park movement and Health, recreation,
and welfare conditions.
Reemployment. See Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general: Layoff and Military service.
Refrigeration mechanics. Employment Outlook for Re­
frigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanics, Bull.
1215-63 (1958).
Related wage benefits. (S ee also Collective bargaining
and agreements: general— specific benefit— and by
industry or occupation; Employment outlook; Health,
insurance, and pension plans, extent of, by industry
or occupation; and Wages and hours, particularly
Hospital employees, selected cities, Occupational wage
surveys, Office workers, and bulletins entitled
“ Hourly Earnings/* etc ) :
76




Related wage benefits— Con.
Changes in, specific companies or indu stries : The
Wage Chronology Series, Vol. I, Bull. 970 (1949)*
and Vol. II, Bull. 970-2 (1949).*
Collectively bargained. A Guide to Labor-Manage­
ment Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225
(1958).*
New England, compared regionally. New England
Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Problems in Measurement of Expenditures on
Selected Items of Supplementary Employee Re­
muneration, Bull. 1186 (1956).*
Supplementary Wage Practices in American In­
dustry, 1945-46, Bull. 939 (1948).*
Repairmen. See Employment outlook— Mechanics and
repairmen.
Reporters, newspaper. Employment Outlook for News­
paper Reporters, Bull. 1215-42 (1958).
Reporting pay. Labor-Management Contract Provisions
1954, Bull. 1181 (1955).
Reports. See specific su bjects .
Research and development, industrial:
Manpower engaged in and costs of. Scientific Re­
search and Development in American Industry,
Bull. 1148 (1953).*
Respiratory diseases. See Mortality statistics and Hy­
giene, industrial— Printing trades.
Rest periods with pay. Labor-Management Contract
Provisions, 1953, Bull. 1166 (1954).
Restaurant workers:
Employment Outlook in Restaurant Occupations,
Bull. 1215-29 (1958).
Union wage scales 1927-31. See Wages and hours
— Hotel and restaurant workers.
Retail prices. See Prices, retail.
Retail stores. S ee Stores, retail.
Retail trade. See under Wages and hours.
Retirement. (S ee also Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general—Employee-benefit plans— Pensions;
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of, by
industry or occupation; Legislation— Labor— Text,
summaries, and reviews of laws; and Older
workers.):
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States,
Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Rubber industry. (S ee also Tire industry.):
General description and earnings. Wages in Rub­
ber Manufacturing Industry, August 1942, Bull.
737 (1943).
Poisons, industrial. Industrial Poisons Used in the
Rubber Industry, Bull. 179 (1915).
Russia. Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026
(1951).*
Sabotage. See Legislation— Syndicalism and sabotage.
Safety. (S ee also Accidents— Rates, types, causes, and
prevention; Conventions, meetings, etc.— Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions; and Legislation
— Labor— Text, summaries, and reviews of law s.):
Codes:
Abrasive wheels. Safety Code for the Use,
Care, and Protection of Abrasive Wheels,
Bulls. 338 (1923), 436 (1927), and 527
(1930).
Dust explosions. Safety Codes for the Pre­
vention of Dust Explosions, Bulls. 433
(1927), 562 (1932), and 617 (1936).
Forging and hot metal stamping. Safety Code
for Forging and Hot Metal Stamping, Bull.
451 (1927).

Safety—Con.
Codes— Con.
Foundries. Safety Code for the Protection of
Industrial Workers in Foundries, Bull. 336
(1923).
Gas-mask canisters. Code for Identification
of Gas-Mask Canisters, Bull. 512 (1930).
Headlighting devices. Rules Governing the
Approval of Headlighting Devices for Motor
Vehicles, Bull. 350 (1923).
Ladders. Safety Code for the Construction,
Care, and Use of Ladders, Bull. 351 (1923).
Laundries. Safety Code for Laundry Machin­
ery and Operations, Bull. 375 (1924).
Lighting. (See also Headlighting devices, this
se c tio n .):

Code of Lighting: Factories, Mills, and
Other Work Places, Bulls. 331 (1923)
and 556 (1931).
Code of Lighting School Buildings, Bull.
382 (1925).
Paper and pulp mills. Safety Code for Paper
and Pulp Mills, Bull. 410 (1926).
Power presses and foot and hand presses.
Safety Code for Power Presses and Foot
and Hand Presses, Bull. 430 (1926).
Power-transmission apparatus. Safety Code
for Mechanical Power-Transmission Appa­
ratus, Bulls. 364 (1924) and 463 (1928).
Rubber mills and calenders. Safety Code for
Rubber Mills and Calenders, Bull. 447
(1927).
Stevedoring and freight-handling operations.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Long­
shore Industry, 1942, Bull. 764 (1944).*
Textile industry. Textile Safety Code, Bull.
509 (1930).
Woodworking plants. Safety Code for Wood­
working Plants, Bulls. 378 (1925) and (re­
vision) 519 (1930).
Collective-agreement provisions. See under Col­
lective bargaining and agreements, general.
Committees. S ee Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general: Labor-management cooperation
and Safety.
Iron and steel industry. The Safety Movement in
the Iron and Steel Industry, 1907 to 1917, Bull.
234 (1918).*
Salaries. S ee Wages and hours.
Sanitation. Collective Bargaining Provisions— Safety,
Health, and Sanitation, Bull. 908-14 (1949).
Printing trades. See under Hygiene, industrial.
Savannah River AEC project. Labor and the Savannah
River AEC Project, Bull. 1100 (1952).*
Savings-bank life insurance. See under Life insurance,
State-sponsored.
Savings, consumer:
Families and single persons, city:
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
1950, Bull. 1097 (Rev.) (1953).
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
10 Cities, Bull. 1065 (1952).
Wartime. Income and Spending and Saving
of City Families in Wartime, Bull. 724
(1942).
Families and single persons, rural and city:
Wartime:
Family Spending and Saving in Wartime,
Bull. 822 (1945).
Spending and Saving of the Nation's
Families in Wartime, Bull. 723 (1942).




Savings, consumer—Con.
Families (two or more persons), city. Family In­
come, Expenditures, and Savings in 1945, Bull.
956 (1949).
Families— Wage earners and clerical workers, by
specific region. S ee under Income and expendi­
tures, consumer.
Sawmill operations. S ee Lumber industry.
Saws. Woodworking Circular-Saw Accidents, Bull. 1190
(1956).*
Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden):
Collective-bargaining structure and agreements,
and disputes settlement. Labor-Management Re­
lations in Scandinavia, Bull. 1038 (1952).
Scientists. (S ee also specific professions or branch of
sc ie n c e .):

Chemists, biologists, and physicists with Ph. D.
degrees, 1948. Occupational Mobility of Sci­
entists, Bull. 1121 (1953).*
Employment outlook. See specific profession or
groups under that title.

Industrial research and development:
Employment distribution. Scientific Research
and Development in American Industry,
Bull. 1148 (1953).*
Various professions. Employment, Education, and
Earnings of American Men of Science, Bull.
1027 (1951).
Seamen. S ee Merchant seamen and under Legislation.
S ee also Labor organizations— Seamen's union, in­
ternational; and Wages and hours—Water transpor­
tation.
Seamen, disabled. See under Workmen's compensation.
Seamen's union, international. See under Labor organi­
zations.
Secretaries, stenographers, and typists. (S ee also
Office workers, and specific industry under Employ­
ment outlook.):
Employment Outlook for Secretaries, Stenograph­
ers, and Typists, Bull. 1215-45 (1958).
Seniority. S ee Service, length of.
Service, length o f :
Type of benefit accruing and prevalence of clauses
provided for in union contracts. Labor-Manage­
ment Contract Provisions, 1950-51, Bull. 1091
(1952).
Service stations. See under Wages and hours.
Severance pay. S ee under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general.
Sheet-metal establishments:
Hourly earnings, January 1945. Wage Structure—
Metalworking Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Shift differentials and operations. (See also under Col­
lective bargaining and agreements, general and see
Wages and hours.):
Manufacturing industries:
Extent of practice. Supplementary Wage Prac­
tices in American Industry, 1945-46, Bull.
939 (1948).*
Shipbuilding and repair:
Injuries. See under Accidents— Rates, types, causes,
and prevention—by industry or occupation.
Wages and hours. See under that title .
World War I. See Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment
Board.

77

Shipbuilding and repair— Con.
World War II:
Absenteeism in Commercial Shipyards, Bull.
734 (1943).
Wartime Employment, Production, and Con­
ditions of Work in Shipyards, Bull. 824
(1945).
Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board: History of the
Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919,
Bull. 283 (1921).
Shipyards. See Shipbuilding.
Shoe industry:
Fringe benefits. S ee Wages and hours— Shoe in­
dustry— Plant and office workers, selected occu­
pations.
Job performance. Comparative Job Performance
by Age: Large Plants in the Men’s Footwear
and Household Furniture Industries, Bull. 1223
(1957).*
Massachusetts. See under Labor and industrial
conditions.
New England:
Collective bargaining and competitive costs in
shoe factories. New England Labor and
Labor Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Productivity. Time and Labor Costs in Manufactur­
ing 100 Pairs of Shoes, 1923, Bull. 360 (1924).
[Includes comparative data for selected earlier
years.]
Wages and hours. See under that title .
Sick leave. (S ee also under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general— Employee-benefit plans.):
Hospital employees. See under Wages and hours.
Industrial establishments. Supplementary Wage
Practices in American Industry, 1945-46, Bull.
939 (1948).*
Sickness and accident benefits. S ee Benefits and bene­
fit funds. A lso see Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general— Employee-benefit plans.
Silk industry:
Earnings and fringe benefits. See under Wages
and hours.
Slaughtering industry. S ee Meatpacking industry and
Wages and hours— Meatpacking industry.
Small-arms industry. Wage Structure— Metalworking
Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Social conditions, shoe centers, Massachusetts. The
Boot and Shoe Industry in Massachusetts as a Vo­
cation for Women, Bull. 180 (1915).
Social insurance. (S ee also Old-age care and assistance
and Social security.):
Conference, December 1916. Proceedings o f the
Conference on Social Insurance, called by the
International Association of Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions, Washington, D.C.,
December 5 to 9, 1916, Bull. 212 (1917).
Legislation. S ee under that title .
Social sciences. (S ee also under Employment outlook.):
Personnel Resources in the Social Sciences and
Humanities, Bull. 1169 (1954).*
Social security. Public Social Security Programs in the
United States, 1949-50, Bull. 982 (1950).*
Southern States:
Coverage and adequacy of programs. Labor in
the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Statistics. Handbook o f Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016,
1950 ed. (1951), and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Social workers. Employment Outlook for Social Work­
ers, Bull. 1215-46 (1958).

78




Soft-drink establishment employees. See W a g e s and
hours— Bottling-house workmen, and Brewery work­
ers.
Soviet Union. Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull.
1026 (1951).*
Spending, family. See Income and expenditures, con­
sumer.
State conduct of business. Labor Laws of the United
States with Decisions of Courts Relating Thereto,
Bull. 370 (1925). (Compilation of laws through
1924).
Labor Legislation of 1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
State employees. Public Service Retirement Systems:
United States, Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Statisticians. S ee under Employment outlook.
Statistics. (S ee also specific subject .) :
Bureau of Labor Statistics (U.S. Government):
Fact-Finding Activities of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, Bull. 831 (1945).*
Methods o f Procuring and Computing Sta­
tistical Information of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Bull. 326 (1923).
BLS statistical series, major. Techniques of Pre­
paring Major BLS Statistical Series, Bulls. 993
(1950) and 1168 (1955).*
Handbooks of Labor Statistics:
1924-26 ed., Bull. 439 (1927).*
1929 ed., Bull. 491 (1929).*
1931 ed., Bull. 541 (1931).*
1936 ed., Bull. 616 (1936).*
1941 ed., Bull. 694, vols. 1 and 2 (1942).*
1947 ed., Bull. 916 (1948).
1950 ed., Bull. 1016 (1951).*
1951 supp., Bull. 1016 (1953).*
What are Labor Statistics for?, Bull. 599 (1933).
Steel industry. (S ee also Iron and steel industry under
Accidents— Rates, types, causes, and prevention—by
industry or occupation; under Productivity; and un­
der Wages and hours.):
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Employment Outlook in the Iron and Steel In­
dustry, Bull. 1215-23 (1958).
Steelworkers of America, United. Arbitration o f LaborManagement Grievances: Bethlehem Steel Company
and United Steelworkers of America, 1942-52, Bull.
1159 (1954).*
Stevedoring. S ee Longshore industry.
Stone—cutters, industries, trades, workers. S ee Wages
and hours— General trades.
Stonecutters, health of. Effect o f the Air Hammer on
the Hands of Stonecutters, Bull. 236 (1918).
Stores, retail. (S ee also under Wages and hours.):
Employment Outlook in Department Stores, Bulls.
1020 (1951) and 1215-17 (1958).
Unemployment Among Women in Department and
Other Retail Stores of Boston, Bull. 182 (1916).
Street laborers, unskilled. S ee Wages and hours— Mu­
nicipal employment— Common labor.
Street railways. See Transit industry, local, under Col­
lective bargaining and agreements, by industry or
occupation, and under Wages and hours.
Strikes. See under Labor-management disputes.
Sugar industry:
Hawaii. See under Labor and industrial conditions.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cane-Sugar Re­
fining Industry, 1930, Bull. 547 (1931).

Sunday labor. S ee Legislation—Labor—Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws.
Supervisors. Union Membership and Collective Bargain­
ing by Foremen, Bull. 745 (1943).
Supplementary wage practices. S ee Related wage bene­
fits. S ee also Collective bargaining and agreements:
general— specific benefit— and by industry or occu­
pation; Employment outlook; and Wages and hours,
particularly Hospital employees, selected cities, Occu­
pational wage surveys, Office workers, and bulletins
entitled “ Hourly Earnings,” etc,
Sweden:
Collective-bargaining structure and agreements,
and disputes settlement. Labor-Management Re­
lations in Scandinavia, Bull. 1038 (1952).
Syndicalism. See Legislation— Syndicalism and sabo­
tage.
T aft-H artley Act. See Labor-management disputes—
Strikes—Statistics and analysis, bulletins beginning
with 1947.
Teachers. (S ee also under Employment outlook.):
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States,
Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Teamsters. See Wages and hours: General trades and
Truckdrivers and helpers.
Technical notes. S ee Methodology.
Technicians. (S ee also under Employment outlook.) :
The Mobility o f Electronic Technicians, 1940-52,
Bull. 1160 (1954).*
Technological changes. (See also Automation; Pro­
ductivity.) :
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Union-Manage­
ment Cooperation, Plant Efficiency, and Tech­
nological Change, Bull. 908-10 (1949).
Electric-lamp industry. Technological Changes and
Employment in the Electric Lamp Industry, Bull.
593 (1933).
Postal Service. Technological Changes and Employ­
ment in the United States Postal Service, Bull.
574 (1932).
Report of the Advisory Committee on Employment
Statistics, Bull. 542 (1931).*
Union adjustment to. A Guide to Labor-Manage­
ment Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225
(1958).*
Telephone occupations. Employment Outlook in Tele­
phone Occupations, Bull, 1215-30 (1958).
Television broadcasting. S ee Employment outlook—
Radio and television broadcasting.
Television manufacture. (S ee also Employment outlook:
Electronic technicians and Electronics manufactur­
ing.) :
Collective Bargaining, Radio, Television, and Elec­
tronics Industry, Bull. 1089 (1952).
Textile industries. (S ee also Cotton industries, and see
specific branch o f industry under Wages and hours.):
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Labor turnover. New England Labor and Labor
Problems, Bull. 1212 (1957).*
Union wage scales 1927-31. S ee under Wages and
hours.
Theatrical employment, union wage scales. See under
Wages and hours.
Time study. See Productivity.




Tire industry. (S ee also Rubber industry.) :
Labor Productivity in the Automobile Tire In­
dustry, Bull. 585 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile Tire
Industry, 1923, Bull. 358 (1924).
Tobacco industry. (S ee also under Wages and hours.):
Mechanization and Productivity o f Labor in the
Cigar-Manufacturing Industry, Bull. 660 (1939).
Union Agreements in the Tobacco Industry, Jan­
uary 1945, Bull. 847 (1945).
Tool and die makers. The Mobility of Tool and Die
Makers, 1940-1951, Bull. 1120 (1953).*
Trade agreements. S ee Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general, and by industry or occupation.
Trade, retail. See Stores, retail and Wages and hours—
Retail trade.
Trade schools, girls. Industrial Experience of TradeSchool Girls in Massachusetts, Bull. 215 (1917).
Trade unions. See Labor organizations; also see Labor
movement.
Trade, wholesale. See Wages and hours—Wholesale
trade.
Training. See Apprentices and learners; Vocational
education and training; Workers’ education.
Transfer and assignment. Collective Bargaining Pro­
visions— Promotion, Transfer, and Assignment; Lay­
off, Work-Sharing, and Reemployment, Bull. 908-7
(1948).
Transit industry, local:
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of,
by industry or occupation. S ee under that title.
Labor-management relations. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States, Bull.
1225 (1958).*
Legislation 1915. Labor Legislation of 1915, Bull.
186 (1916).
Union wage scales. See under Wages and hours.
Working conditions. See under Collective bargain­
ing and agreements, by industry or occupation.
Transportation. See specific type of, and Wages and
hours— specific type o f transportation.
Treaties and conventions, international. Historical
Survey of International Action Affecting Labor,
Bull. 268 (1920).*
Truckdrivers and helpers. See under Wages and hours;
also under Health, insurance, and pension plans, ex­
tent of, by industry or occupation.
Trusteeships, labor organizations, rules governing.
Union Constitution Provisions: Trusteeship, Bull.
1263 (1959).*
Tuberculosis. S ee Mortality statistics, and Hygiene,
industrial— Printing trades.
Typists. (S ee also Office workers, and specific in­
du stry under Employment outlook.):
Employment Outlook for Secretaries, Stenograph­
ers, and Typists, Bull. 1215-45 (1958).
Underwear industry. See Wages and hours— Hosiery and
underwear manufacture.
Unemployment. (S ee also Employment and Employ­
ment statistics.):
Boston retail stores. Unemployment Among
Women in Department and Other Retail Stores
of Boston, Bull. 182 (1916).
Columbus, Ohio. Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio,
1921 to 1925, Bull. 409 (1926). See also Bull.
553 (1932).
79

Unemployment— Con.
Depressed areas:
Labor Supply and Mobility in a Newly Indus­
trialized Area (Ravenswood, W. V a.), Bull.
1261 (I960).*
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull.
1212 (1957).*
Engineers, professional— Trends and extent of un­
employment 1930-34:
Employment and Earnings in the Engineering
Profession, 1929 to 1934, Bull. 682 (1941).
Extent and causes. (See also Measurement of, this
se c tio n .):

Industrial unemployment: A Statistical Study
of Its Extent and Causes, Bull. 310 (1922).*
Extent, duration, and causes. Unemployment in the
United States, Bull. 195 (1916).*
Measurement of. ( See also Extent and causes,
this se c tio n .):

Report of the Advisory Committee on Employ­
ment Statistics, Bull. 542 (1931).*
Measures to prevent and relieve. Beneficial Activi­
ties of American Trade-Unions, Bull. 465
(1928).*
New England. S ee Boston retail stores and De­
pressed areas, this section.
Philadelphia, Pa. Social and Economic Character
of Unemployment in Philadelphia, April 1929,
Bull. 520 (1930), and April 1930, Bull. 555
(1932).
Technological. See Technological changes.
Unemployment-benefit plans. S ee Guaranteed employ­
ment and wage plans.
Unemployment insurance. (S ee also Social insurance.):
Public Social Security Programs in the United
States, 1949-50, Bull. 982 (1950).*
Unemployment insurance, foreign countries:
Systems, descriptive account of by country. Un­
employment-Benefit Plans in the United States
and Unemployment Insurance in Foreign Coun­
tries, Bull. 544 (1931).*
Unemployment insurance and reserve funds:
Bibliography. Unemployment Insurance and Re­
serves in the United States, Bull. 611 (1935).
Union agreements and contracts. S ee Collective bar­
gaining and agreements, general, and by industry or
occupation.

United Steelworkers of America. Arbitration of LaborManagement Grievances: Bethlehem Steel Company
and United Steelworkers of America, 1942-52, Bull.
1159 (1954).*
Upholsterers. See under Wages and hours.
Uruguay. Labor Legislation of Uruguay, Bull. 494
(1929).
Utilities. S ee specific utility.
Vacations. (See also under Collective bargaining and
agreements, general. A lso see Employment outlook,
and Wages and hours, particularly Hospital employ­
ees, selected cities, Occupational wage surveys, Office
workers, and bulletins entitled “ Hourly Earnings,”
e t c .) :

Supplementary Wage Practices in American Indus­
try, 1945-46, Bull. 939 (1948).*
Vegetable (and fruit) industry, canned. Union Agree­
ments in the Canned Fruit and Vegetable Industry,
Bull. 794 (1944).
Venezuela. Labor Legislation of Venezuela, Bull. 549
(1931).
Veterans’ rights. See Military service.
Vital statistics. S ee Mortality statistics.
Vocational education and training. (S ee also Workers’
education and Legislation— Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of law s.):
Apprenticeship in Building Construction, Bull. 459
(1928).
Industrial Experience of Trade-School Girls in
Massachusetts, Bull. 215 (1917).
Labor-management programs. A Guide to LaborManagement Relations in the United States, Bull.
1225-1 (1959).*
Vocational Education Survey of Minneapolis,
Minn., Bull. 199 (1917).
Vocational guidance. (S ee also Employment outlook.):
Occupational Data for Counselors: A Handbook
of Census Information Selected for Use in Gui­
dance, Bull. 817 (1945).
Vocational rehabilitation. See Legislation— Labor—
Text, summaries, and reviews of laws.
Vocational training. See Vocational education and train­
ing.

Union leadership. See Labor organizations—Leader­
ship, workers’ education for.

Voting. See Legislation— Employee rights, civil.

Union-management cooperation. See
ment cooperation.

Wage adjustment. (See also under Collective bargaining
and agreements, general.):
The Use of Cost-of-Living Figures in Wage Ad­
justments, Bull. 369 (1925).*

Labor-manage­

Union membership. See Union security.
Union security. (See also under Collective bargaining
and agreements, general.):
Effects of NWLB awards on. Maintenance-ofMembership Awards of National War Labor
Board, Bull. 753 (1943).
Supervisory personnel. Union Membership and
Collective Bargaining by Foremen, Bull. 745
(1943).

Wage Adjustment Board for the Building Construction
Industry (U.S. Government):
Development and activity, digest of. Union Wages
and Hours in the Building Trades, July 1, 1946,
Bull. 910 (1947).

Union shop. See Union security.

Wage assignments. (S ee also Legislation— Labor—Text,
summaries, and reviews of law s.):
Wage Executions for Debt, Bull. 622 (1936).
Wage chronologies. See under Wages and hours.

Union wage scales. See Wages and hours.

Wage control. (S ee also Wages and hours— bulletins

Unions, company. Characteristics of Company Unions,
1935, Bull. 634 (1938).*
Unions, labor. S ee Labor organizations; also Labor
movement.
United States Government agencies. See specific agency.

80




published in wartime y e a r s .) :

Agriculture. Wartime Wages, Income, and Wage
Regulation in Agriculture, Bull. 883 (1946).
Airframe industry, California:
National War Labor Board order March 3,
1943. Wage Stabilization in California Air­
frame Industry, 1943, Bull. 746 (1943).

Wage control— Con.
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and
Wage Stabilization During World War II, Bull.
1009 (1950).*
Wage differentials. See under Wages and hours; also
see Shift differentials and operations.
Wage escalation. See Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general—Wage adjustment.
Wage executions. (S ee also Legislation— Labor—Text,
summaries, and reviews of law s.):
Garnishments and wage assignments. Wage Execu­
tions for Debt, Bull. 622 (1936).
Wage-incentive plans. ( S ee also under Collective bar­
gaining and agreements, general.):
Effect of Incentive Payments on Hourly Earnings,
Bull. 742 (1943).
Hours of Work and Output, Bull. 917 (1948).*
Supplementary Wage Practices in American In­
dustry, 1945-46, Bull. 939 (1948).*
Wage-payment legislation. S ee under Legislation.
Wage plans, guaranteed. See Guaranteed employment
and wage plans.
Wage policies, foreign countries. Wage Trends and
Wage Policies: Various Foreign Countries, Bull. 934
(1948).
Russia. Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026
(1951).*
Wage practices, related. S ee Related wage benefits.
Wage scales. See Wages and hours.
Wage stabilization. S ee Wage control.
Wage structure, (fifee also Collective bargaining and
agreements, general: Wage-incentive plans and Wage
provisions, general; and see Wages and hours.):
Manufacturing industries:
Extent of formal rate structure v. individual
determination. Supplementary Wage Prac­
tices in American Industry, 1945-46, Bull
939 (1948).*
Wage systems, summary of. A Guide to Labor-Man­
agement Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225-2
(1959).*
Wage terminology. Glossary of Currently Used Wage
Terms, Bull. 983, (1950).*
Wages. (S ee also Legislation: Labor, Minimum wage,
and Wage payment.):
History of Wages in the United States from Co­
lonial Times to 1928, Bull. 499 (1929) ;* with
Supplement, 1929-1933, Bull. 604 (1934).*
Wages and hours. (N o te s : Bulletins showing union
scales o f wages and hours in particular years also
include comparative and other relevant data fo r
earlier years. Union wage scales— F o r occupations
and trades not specified , see Miscellaneous sections
in Bulls. 476, 515, 540, and 566.)

Actors. Union Scales of Wages and Hours of
Labor:
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Agricultural machinery industry. See Machinery
manufacture, this section.
Agriculture, World War II. See Wartime, this sec­
tion,

Air transportation. Wages and Hours of Labor in
Air Transportation, 1931, Bull. 575 (1933).




Wages and hours— Con.
Aircraft manufacture:
Aircraft engines and engine parts. Wage
Structure— Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Aircraft parts. Earnings in Aircraft-Parts
Plants, November 1942, Bull. 744 (1943).
Airframe. Average Hourly Earnings in the
Airframe Industry, 1943, Bull. 790 (1944).
Earnings in Eastern and Midwestern Air­
frame Plants, 1942, Bull. 728 (1943).
Wage Rates in the California Airframe
Industry, 1941, Bull. 704 (1942).
Wage Stabilization in California Airframe
Industry, 1943, Bull. 746 (1943).
Airplanes and aircraft engines. Wages and
Hours in the Manufacture of Airplanes and
Aircraft Engines, 1929, Bull. 523 (1930).
Glider industry. Average Hourly Earnings
in the Airframe Industry, 1943, Bull. 790
(1944).
American Woolen Co. See under Wage chronologies,
this section.

Ammunition-loading industry. Hourly Earnings in
the Ammunition-Loading Industry, 1944, Bull.
827 (1945).
Amusements. Union Scales of Wages and Hours of
Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Anthracite and bituminous coal mining. S ee under
Mining, this section.
Apparel and accessories stores. S ee under Retail
trade, this section.
Appliance stores. See Furniture, etc,, under Retail
trade, this section.
Armour and Co. S ee under Wage chronologies, this
section.

Automobile and other motor vehicle (and parts)
manufacturing:
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile
Industry, 1922, Bull. 348 (1923).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Motor Ve­
hicle Industry:
1925, Bull. 438 (1927).
1928, Bull. 502 (1930).
Wage Structure of the Motor-Vehicle Industry,
Bull. 706 (1942).*
Wage Structure— Motor Vehicles and Parts,
1950, Bull. 1015 (1951).
Automobile repair garages and shops:
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, September 1947-September
1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, June-December 1947, Bull 974
(1949).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Gasoline Filling
Stations and Motor-Vehicle Repair Garages,
1931, Bull. 578 (1933). S ee also Bulls. 540
(1931) and 566 (1932).
Automotive dealers. See under Retail trade, this
section.

Baking industry. Union Scale of Wages and
Hours of Labor, 1915-33. See General trades,
this section.

si

Wages and hours—Con.
Baking industry—Con.
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking Indus­
try:
June 1, 1942, Bull. 735 (1943).
July 1, 1943, Bull. 778 (1944).
July 1, 1944, Bull. 816 (1945).
July 1, 1945, Bull. 871 (1946).
July 1, 1946, Bull. 914 (1948).
July 1, 1947, Bull. 936 (1948).
July 1, 1948, Bull. 954 (1949).
July 1, 1949, Bull. 977 (1950).
July 1, 1950, Bull. 1014 (1951).
July 1,1951, Bull. 1053 (1952).
July 1, 1952, Bull. 1123 (1953).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Bakery In­
dustry— Bread and Cake Departments: 1931,
Bull. 580 (1933).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in the
Bread-Baking Industry, 1934, Bull. 623
(1937).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
Union Bakeries, June 1, 1939, Bull. 673
(1940).
Bank employees. Earnings of Bank Employees,
Spring and Summer of 1943, Bull. 774 (1944).
Barbers. Union Scales of Wages and Hours of
Labor:
May 15, 1927, Bull. 457 (1928).
May 15, 1928, Bull. 482 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 516 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 16, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Bituminous coal mining. S ee under M ining, this
section, and under Wage chronologies, this sec­
tion.

Boilershop products industry. Wage Structure—
Metalworking Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Boot and shoe industry. S ee Shoe industry, this
section.

Bottling-house workmen, and Brewery workers.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 1, 1915, Bull. 194 (1916).
May 15, 1916, Bull. 214 (1917).
May 15, 1917, Bull 245 (1919).
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 16, 1931, Bull. 666 (1932).
Brick industry, common building. Productivity
Costs in Common-Brick Industry, Bull. 356
(1924).
Building materials and farm equipment dealers.
S ee under Retail trade, this section.
Building trades. Union Scales of Wages and Hours
of Labor, 1915-33. S ee General trades, this sec­
tion.

Union Wages and Hours in the Building
Trades:
May *15, 1936, Bull. 626 (1937).*
May 15, 1937, Bull. 657 (1938).*
June 1, 1939, Bull. 674 (1940).*
June 1,1941, Bull. 680 (1942).*
July 1, 1942, Bull. 730 (1943).*
July 1, 1943, Bull. 767 (1944).*
July 1, 1944, Bull. 815 (1945).*
July 1, 1945, Bull. 862 (1946).*
July 1, 1946, Bull. 910 (1947).*
July 1,1947, Bull. 930 (1948).*
July 1, 1948, Bull. 951 (1949).*
July 1, 1949, Bull. 976 (I960).*
July 1, 1950, Bull. 1011 (1951).*
July 1, 1951, Bull. 1051 (1952).*
July 1, 1952, Bull. 1124 (1953).*
July 1, 1953, Bull. 1152 (1954).*

82




Wages and hours— Con.
Building trades— Con.
July 1, 1954, Bull. 1175 (1955).*
July 1,1955, Bull. 1192 (1956).*
July 1,1956, Bull. 1205 (1957).*
July 1,1957, Bull. 1227 (1958).*
July 1,1958, Bull. 1245 (1959).*
Busdrivers. S ee Transit industry—local, this sec­
tion ; also General trades, this section, beginning
with Bull. 457.
Butchers, union scales. S ee Meatcutters and butch­
ers, this section.
Cement industry, Portland. Wages and Hours of
Labor in the Portland Cement Industry, 1929,
Bull. 625 (1931).
Chauffeurs, and teamsters and drivers, union
scales 1915-33. S ee General trades, this section.
F o r later bulletins, see Truckdrivers and help­
ers, this section.
Chemical industry, industrial. Hourly Earnings in
10 Industries, Selected Wage Areas, September
1947-September 1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Chemists and chemical engineers:
Annual incomes 1951. Manpower Resources
in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,
Bull. 1132 (1953).*
Incomes 1941 and 1943. Factors Affecting
Earnings in Chemistry and Chemical Engi­
neering, Bull. 881 (1946).
Cigar manufacturing. Union Scales of Wages and
Hours o f Labor, 1927-31. S ee under Tobacco
industry, this section.
Cigarette manufacturing. S ee under Tobacco in­
dustry, this section.
Clay workers. Union Scales of Wages and Hours
of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 615 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Cleaners, dyers, and pressers. Union Scales of
Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15,1029, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Clerical workers. S ee Bank employees, Occupational
wage surveys, Office workers, and White-collar
workers, this section.
Clothing industry:
Men’s. Earnings and Hours in Men’s CottonGarment Industries and in Plants Manufac­
turing Single Pants Other Than Cotton,
1939 and 1941, Bull. 719 (1942).
Wages and Hours o f Labor in the Men’s
Clothing Industry:
1911 to 1914, Bull. 187 (1916).
1911 to 1922, Bull. 329 (1923).
1911 to 1924, Bull. 387 (1925).
1911 to 1926, Bull. 435 (1927).
1911 to 1928, Bull. 503 (1929).
1911 to 1930, Bull. 557 (1932).
1932, Bull. 594 (1933).
Men’s suits and coats. Hourly Earnings in 10
Industries, Selected Wage Areas, Septem­
ber 1947-September 1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of
Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Women’s coats and suits. Hourly Earnings by
Industry, Selected Wage Areas, April 1949
to November 1949, Bull. 1005 (1950).

Wages and hours—Con.
Clothing industry— Con.
Women’s dresses. Hourly Earnings in 10 In­
dustries, Selected Wage Areas, September
1947-September 1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Se­
lected Wage Areas, June-December
1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected
Wage Areas, January 1950 to January
1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Coal mining. S ee Mining, this section.
Common labor. Hourly Entrance Rates Paid to
Common Laborers, 1942, Bull. 733 (1943).
Hourly Entrance Rates of Common Laborers
in Large Cities, Spring and Summer of
1943, Bull. 775 (1944).
Municipal employment. S ee under that title,
this section.

Community wage surveys. S ee Occupational wage
surveys, b y city, this section.
Cotton industries. Wages and Hours of Labor in
the Cotton, Woolen, and Silk Industries, 1907
to 1914, Bull. 190 (1916).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing and Finishing, 1916, Bull.
239 (1918) and 1918, Bull. 262 (1919).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing:
1920, Bull. 288 (1921).
1922, Bull. 345 (1923).
1924, Bull. 371 (1925).
1910 to 1926, Bull. 446 (1927).
1910 to 1928, Bull. 492 (1929).
1910 to 1930, Bull. 539 (1931).
Wages in Cotton-Goods Manufacturing, Bull.
663 (1938).*
Earnings and Hours in Men’s Cotton-Garment
Industries and in Plants Manufacturing
Single Pants Other Than Cotton, 1939 and
1941, Bull. 719 (1942).
Earnings in Cotton-Goods Manufacture Dur­
ing the W ar Years, Bull. 798 (1944).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, September 1947-September
1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas:
April 1949 to November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950).
January 1950 to January 1961, Bull. 1040
(1951).
Cotton industries, New England mill. (S ee also
under Wage chronologies, this section.):
Union Scales o f Wages and Hours of Labor,
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
Department stores. See Stores, retail, and Merchan­
dise stores, general, this section.
Drug and proprietary stores. See under Retail
trade, this section.
Dyeing and finishing of textiles. Wages and Hours
of Labor in the Dyeing and Finishing of Textiles,
1930, Bull. 537 (1931), and 1932, Bull. 588
(1933).
Dyers. S ee Cleaners, dyers, and pressers, this
section.

Electric generating and distribution equipment.
Wage Structure— Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Electroplating and polishing industry. Wage Struc­
ture of Electroplating and Polishing Industry,
January 1945, Bull. 875 (1946). See also Bull.
952 (1949), entitled above.
Engineers, professional. Employment and Earnings
in the Engineering Profession, 1929 to 1934, Bull.
682 (1941).




Wages and hours— Con.
Explosives industry. Average Hourly Earnings in
the Explosives Industry, June 1944, Bull. 819
(1945).
Fabricated structural steel. See Iron and steel in­
dustry, this section.
Factory workers. (S ee also Manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries, specific industry ,
and Wartime, this se c tio n .):
Spendable Earnings of Factory Workers,
1941-43, Bull. 769 (1944).
Straight-time hourly earning. Factory Work­
ers’ Earnings: Distributions by StraightTime Hourly Earnings, April 1954, Bull.
1179 (1955).*
------ Factory Workers’ Earnings, May 1958,
Bull. 1252 (1959).*
Farm equipment dealers. Employee Earnings in
Retail Trade in October 1956, Bull. 1220-1
(1957).
Farm workers. S ee Wartime, this section.
Federal employees. See White-collar workers, this
section.

Fertilizer industry. Hours and Earnings in the
Fertilizer Industry, January 1943, Bull. 751
(1943).
Fire-department employees. See under Municipal
employment, this section.
Fishermen. Union Scales of Wages and Hours of
Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Food stores. S ee under Retail trade, this section;
also see Groceries, wholesale, this section.
Footwear manufacturing. S ee Shoe industry, this
section.

Foundries:
Ferrous. Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries,
Selected Wage Areas, June-December 1947,
Bull. 974 (1949).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected
Wage Areas, April 1949 to November
1949, Bull. 1006 (1950), and January
1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Ferrous and nonferrous. Wage StructureMetalworking Industries, 1945, Bull. 952
(1949).
Foundries and machine shops. Wages and Hours
of Labor in Foundries and Machine Shops:
1923, Bull. 362 (1924).
1925, Bull. 422 (1927).
1927, Bull. 471 (1929).
1929, Bull. 522 (1930).
1931, Bull. 570 (1932).
Freight handlers. Union Scales of Wages and
Hours of Labor, 1915-25, inc. See bulletins listed
fo r those years under General trades, this sec­
tion.

Furniture, homefumishings, and appliance stores.
S ee under Retail trade, this section.
Furniture industry. (See also Millwork, this
section . ) :
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber,
Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1915,
Bull. 225 (1918).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Furniture
Industry, 1910 to 1929, Bull. 526 (1931);
and 1910 to 1931, Bull. 571 (1932).
The Wage and Hour Structure of the Furni­
ture-Manufacturing Industry, October 1937,
Bull. 669 (1940).
Hourly earnings, selected wage areas:
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949).
83

Wages and hours— Con.
Furniture industry— Con.
Hourly earnings, selected wage areas— Con.
June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
April 1949 to November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950) .
January 1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951) .
Garages, repair. See Automobile repair garages
and shops, this section.
Gasoline filling stations. See Service stations, this
section.

General merchandise stores. S ee under Retail trade,
this section.

General Motors Corp. See under Wage chronologies,
this section.

General trades:
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 1,1915, Bull. 194 (1916).*
May 15,1916, Bull. 214 (1917).*
May 15,1917, Bull. 245 (1919).*
May 15,1918, Bull. 259 (1919).*
May 15,1919, Bull. 274 (1920).*
May 15,1920, Bull. 286 (1921).*
May 15,1921, Bull. 302 (1922).*
May 15,1922, Bull. 325 (1923).*
May 15,1923, Bull. 354 (1924).*
May 15,1924, Bull. 388 (1925).*
May 15,1925, Bull. 404 (1926).*
May 15,1926, Bull. 431 (1927).*
May 15,1927, Bull. 457 (1928).*
May 15,1928, Bull. 482 (1929).*
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).*
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).*
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).*
May 15,1933, Bull. 600 (1934).*
Glass, clay, and stone workers. Union Scales of
Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Glassware and glass-container industries. Hourly
Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage Areas:
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949).
January 1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951).
Glove industry. Union Scales of Wages and Hours
of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wages and Hours in the Glove Industry, 1941,
Bull. 702 (1942).
Grain-mill products industries. Earnings in the
Grain-Mill Products Industries, 1941, Bull. 712
(1942).
Granite and stone trades. See General trades, this
section.

Groceries, wholesale. Hourly Earnings in 10 In­
dustries, Selected Wage Areas, September 1947September 1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974
(1949).
Hat industries. Earnings and Hours in the Hat
Industries, 1939, Bull. 671 (1939).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Hawaii. See under Labor and industrial conditions.
84




Wages and hours— Con.
History of Wages in the United States from
Colonial Times to 1928, Bull. 499 (1929) ;* with
Supplement, 1929-33, Bull. 604 (1934).*
Hosiery and underwear manufacture. Wages and
Hours of Labor in the Hosiery and Underwear
Industry- (ie s ):
1907 to 1914, Bull. 177 (1915).
1922, Bull. 328 (1923).
1907 to 1924, Bull. 376 (1925).
1907 to 1926, Bull. 452 (1927).
1907 to 1928, Bull. 504 (1929).
1932, Bull. 591 (1933).
Hosiery manufacture. (S ee also under Wage
chronologies, this section . ) :
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas:
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949); April 1949 to November 1949,
Bull. 1005 (1950); and January 1950
to January 1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974
(1949).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Hospital employees, selected cities:
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals:
Atlanta, Georgia, September 1956, Bull.
1210-11 (1957).
Baltimore, Maryland, June 1956, Bull.
1210-4 (1957).
Boston, Massachusetts, August 1956, Bull.
1210-6 <1957).
Buffalo, New York, June 1956, Bull.
1210-3 (1957).
Chicago, Illinois, August 1956, Bull.
1210-5 (1957).
Cincinnati, Ohio, September 1956, Bull.
1210-9 (1957).
Cleveland, Ohio, November 1956, Bull.
1210-7 (1957).
Dallas, Texas, November 1956, Bull.
1210-8 (1957).
Los Angeles-Long Beach, California, Jan­
uary 1957, Bull. 1210-14 (1957).
Memphis, Tennessee, December 1956, Bull.
1210-12 (1957).
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, March
1957, Bull. 1210-15 (1957).
New York, New York, February 1957,
Bull. 1210-16 (1957).
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 1956,
Bull. 1210-10 (1957).
Portland, Oregon, May and July 1956,
Bull. 1210-2 (1957).
St. Louis, Missouri, June 1956, Bull. 1210-1
(1957).*
San Francisco, California, November
1956, Bull. 1210-13 (1957).
Hotel and restaurant workers. Union Scales of
Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Hotel employees (selected occupations other than
restaurant). Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries,
Selected Wage Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull. 953 (1949).

Wages and hours— Con.
Hotel employees—Con.
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974
(1949).
Industrial chemical industry. See Chemical indus­
try, industrial, this section.
Industrial machinery. See Machinery manufacture,
this section.

Iron and steel forging. Wage Structure— Metal­
working Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Iron and steel industry. Union Scales of Wages
and Hours of Labor, May 15, 1929, Bull. 515
(1930).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry:
1907 to 1915, Bull. 218 (1917).
1907 to 1920, Bull. 305 (1922).
1907 to 1922, Bull. 353 (1924).
1907 to 1924, Bull. 381 (1925).
1907 to 1926, Bull. 442 (1927).
1929, Bull. 513 (1930).
1931, Bull. 567 (1933).
Wage Structure of the Fabricated Structural
Steel Industry, January 1945, Bull. 866
(1946).
Wage Structure— Metalworking Industries,
1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Iron-ore mining. S ee under Mining, this section.
Knit-goods industry. S ee Hosiery and underwear
manufacture and Knitted-outerwear industry,
this section.

Knitted-outerwear industry. Annual and Hourly
Earnings, Philadelphia Knitted-Outerwear In­
dustry, 1943, Bull. 830 (1945).
Employment and Earnings in the Philadelphia
Knitted-Outerwear Industry, 1944 and 1945,
Bull. 887 (1947).
Labor markets, major. See under Occupational
wage surveys, this section.
Laundries, power:
Hourly earnings, selected wage areas:
September 1947-September 1948, Bull. 953
(1949) .
June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
April 1949-November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950) .
Laundry workers, union scales. See General trades,
this section, beginning with Bull. 259 (1919).
Leather and leather products industries:
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Leather
Industry, 1932, Bull. 589 (1933).
Earnings and Hours in the Leather and
Leather Belting and Packing Industries,
1939, Bull. 679 (1941).
Legislation concerning. See Labor, Minimum wage,
and Wage payment under Legislation.
Linemen, union scales. S ee General trades, this
section, beginning w ith Bull. 302 (1922).
Longshoremen:
Earnings, major ports, by foreign and inter­
coastal, and coastwide trades. Cargo Handl­
ing and Longshore Labor Conditions, Bull.
550 (1932).
Union scales. S ee General trades, this section,
beginning with Bull. 431 (1927).
Lumber industry. Union Scales of Wages and
Hours of Labor, 1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber,
Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1915,
Bull. 225 (1918).




Wages and hours— Con.
Lumber industry— Con.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Lumber Manu­
facturing, 1921, Bull. 317 (1923); 1923,
Bull. 363 (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber
Industry in the United States:
1925, Bull. 413 (1926).
1928, Bull. 497 (1929).
1930, Bull. 560 (1932).
1932, Bull. 586 (1933).
Wages in the Basic Lumber Industry in the
Far West, 1944, Bull. 840 (1945).
Wages in the Basic Lumber Industry, 1944,
Bull. 854 (1946).
Machine shops. See Foundries and machine shops,
this section.

Machine-tool accessories industry. (S ee also Ma­
chinery manufacture, this section, fo r additional
data on earnings and fringe b e n e fits .):

Wage Structure of the Machine-Tool Acces­
sories Industry, January 1945, Bull. 868
(1946).
Machine-tool industry. See Machinery manufacture,
this section.

Machinery manufacture. Earnings in the Manu­
facture of Industrial Machinery, 1942, Bulls.
720, Pt. 1 (1942); 720-A, Pt. 2 (1943); and
720-B, Pt. 3 (1943).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974
(1949).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1948-January 1949, Bull.
969 (1949); April 1949 to November 1949,
BulL 1005 (1950); January 1950 to Jan­
uary 1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
1953-54, 20 labor markets. Wages and Related
Benefits in the Machinery Industries, Bull.
1160 (1954).
Wage Structure in the Machinery Industries,
January 1945, Bull. 861 (1946).
Wage Structure— Metalworking Industries,
1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
(S ee also Factory workers, Southern States,
specific industry, and Wartime, this section . ) :
Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016, 1950
ed. (1951), 1951 supp. (1953).*
History o f Wages in the United States from
Colonial Times to 1928, Bull. 499 (1929) ;*
with Supplement, 1929-1933, Bull. 604
(1934).*
Hours and Earnings in the United States,
1932-40, with Supplement for 1941, Bull. 697
(1942).*
Industrial Survey in Selected Industries in the
United States, 1919, Bull. 265 (1920).*
Meatcutters and butchers. Union Scales of Wages
and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Meatpacking industry. Wages and Hours of Labor
in the Slaughtering and Meat-Packing Industry:
1917, Bull. 252 (1919).
1921, Bull. 294 (1922).
1923, Bull. 373 (1925).
1925, Bull. 421 (1927).
1927, Bull. 472 (1929).
1929, Bull. 535 (1931).
1931, Bull. 576 (1933).
Men’s clothing industry. See Clothing industry—
Men’s.

85

Wages and hours—Con.
Merchandise stores, general. ( See also Stores, re­
tail, this se c tio n .):
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Oc­
tober 1956, Bull. 1220-2 (1957).
Metal trades. Union Scales of Wages and Hours
of Labor:
1915-24, inc. See bulletins listed fo r those years
under General trades, this section.
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 16,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Metalliferous mining. Wages and Hours of Labor
in Metalliferous Mines 1924, Bull. 394 (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Metalliferous
Mining, 1924 and 1931, Bull. 573 (1933).
Metalworking industries. S ee specific branch, this
section.

Military-tanks industry. Wage Structure— Metal­
working Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Millinery workers. S ee Hat industries, this section.
Millwork. (See also Furniture industry, this sec­
tion.) :
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1915-24, inc. S ee bulletins listed fo r those
yea rs under General trades, this sec­
tion.

May 15,1929, Bull, 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Mining:
Anthracite and bituminous coal. Hours and
Earnings in Anthracite and Bituminous
Coal Mining:
Anthracite—1919 and 1920; Bituminous
— 1919, Bull. 279 (1921).
Anthracite—January 1922; Bituminous
— Winter of 1921-22, Bull. 316 (1922).
1922 and 1924, Bull. 416 (1926).
Bituminous coal. (See also under Wage
chronologies, this se c tio n .):
Hours and Earnings in Bituminous Coal
Mining, 1922, 1924, and 1926, Bull. 454
(1927). See also Bulls. 279, 316, and
416, entitled above.
Hours and Earnings in Bituminous Coal
Mining, 1929, Bull. 516 (1930).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of
Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 16,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in BituminousCoal Mining, 1933, Bull. 601 (1934).
Wage Structure in Bituminous-Coal Min­
ing, Fall of 1945, Bull. 867 (1946).
Iron-ore. Wages in Iron Mining, October 1943,
Bull. 787 (1944).
Nonferrous metals. See Nonferrous metals,
this section.

Motormen and conductors. See Transit—local, this
section.

Motortruck drivers and helpers. See Truckdrivers
and helpers, this section.
Motor vehicle industry. See Automobile and other
motor vehicle manufacturing, this section.
Motor vehicle repair garages and shops. See Auto­
mobile repair garages and shops, this section.
Municipal employment:
Common labor. Wages and Hours of Labor:
Common Street Laborers, 1928, Bull. 484
(1929).
Entrance Rates and Full-Time Hours of
Common Laborers Employed by Cities,
September 1935, Bull. 627 (1937).

86




Wages and hours—Con.
Municipal employment— Con.
Fire departments. Salaries and Hours of Labor
in Municipal Fire Departments [July 1,
1938], Bull. 684 (1940-41).
Police departments. Salaries and Hours of
Labor m Municipal Police Departments,
July 1, 1938, Bull. 685 (1941).
Selected occupations. Earnings and Wage
Practices in Municipal Governments of 16
Cities, 1944, Bull. 848 (1945).
Musicians, union scales. S ee Amusements, this
section.

Nonferrous metals industry. Wage Structure of
the Nonferrous Metals Industry, 1941-42, Bull.
729 (1943).
Wages in the Nonferrous-Metals Industry,
June 1943, Bull. 765 (1944).
Nurses, registered. (S ee also Hospital employees,
selected cities, this s e c tio n .):
The Economic Status o f Registered Profes­
sional Nurses, 1946-47, Bull. 931 (1948).
Occupational wage surveys:
Albany-Sehenectady-Troy, New York, March
1962, Bull. 1108 (1952).
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton,
Pennsylvania,
May 1952, Bull. 1111 (1952).
Atlanta, Georgia:
March 1961, Bull. 1031 (1951).
March 1952, Bull. 1102 (1952).
March 1953, Bull. 1116-18 (1953).
March 1954, Bull. 1157-3 (1954).
March 1956, Bull. 1172-11 (1955).
April 1956, Bull. 1188-18 (1956).
April 1957, Bull. 1202-16 (1957).
May 1958, Bull. 1224-17 (1958).
May 1959, Bull. 1240-19 (1959).
Baltimore, Maryland:
June 1951, Bull. 1045 (1951).
October 1952, Bull. 1116-6 (1953).
April 1956, Bull. 1172-15 (1955).
August 1957, Bull. 1224-3 (1958).
August 1968, Bull. 1240-2 (1958).
Birmingham, Alabama:
April 1952, Bull. 1107 (1952).
January 1957, Bull. 1202-10 (1957).
Boston, Massachusetts:
March 1951, Bull. 1033 (1951).
April 1952, Bull. 1106 (1962).
March 1953, Bull. 1116-17 (1953).
March 1954, Bull. 1157-3 (1954).
April 1955, Bull. 1172-17 (1955).
September 1956, Bull. 1202-4 (1957).
September 1957, Bull. 1224-2 (1958).
October 1958, Bull. 1240-6 (1959).
Bridgeport, Connecticut, June 1951, Bull. 1044
(1951) .
Buffalo, New York:
January 1950, Bull. 991 (1950).
January 1952, Bull. 1085 (1952).
April 1953, Bull. 1116-20 (1953).
September 1954, Bull. 1172-1 (1965).
September 1956, Bull. 1202-2 (1957).
September 1958, Bull. 1240-3 (1959).
Chicago, Illinois:
April 1951, Bull. 1034 (1951).
March 1952, Bull. 1105 (1952).
March 1953, Bull. 1116-15 (1953).
March 1954, Bull. 1157-3 (1954).
April 1955, Bull. 1172-14 (1955).
April 1956, Bull. 1188-15 (1956).
April 1957, Bull. 1202-15 (1957).
April 1958, Bull. 1224-14 (1958).
April 1959, Bull. 1240-18 (1959).
Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952, Bull. 1096
(1952) .

Wages and hours— Con.
Wages and hours— Con.
Occupational wage surveys— Con.
Occupational wage surveys— Con.
Lawrence, Massachusetts:
Cleveland, Ohio:
February 1956, Bull. 1188-11 (1956).
October 1951, Bull. 1056 (1952).
May 1959, Bull. 1240-21 (1959).
October 1952, Bull. 1116-3 (1953).
Louisville, Kentucky, May 1952, Bull. 1112
October 1954, Bull. 1172-2 (1955).
(1952).
October 1956, Bull. 1202-3 (1957).
Los Angeles, California:
June 1958, Bull. 1224-19 (1958).
January 1952, Bull. 1094 (1952).
Columbus, Ohio, April 1952, Bull. 1109 (1952).
February 1953, Bull. 1116-14 (1953).
Dallas, Texas:
March 1954, Bull. 1157-3 (1954).
June 1951, Bull. 1043 (1951).
March 1955, Bull. 1172-12 (1955).
August 1952, Bull. 1116-1 (1952).
Los Angeles-Long Beach, California:
September 1953, Bull. 1157-1 (1954).
March 1956, Bull. 1188-13 (1956).
September 1954, Bull. 1172-3 (1955).
March 1957, Bull. 1202-11 (1957).
October 1955, Bull. 1188-1 (1956).
March 1958, Bull. 1224-13 (1958).
October 1956, Bull. 1202-5 (1957).
March 1959, Bull. 1240-15 (1959).
October 1957, Bull. 1224-4 (1958).
Memphis, Tennessee:
October 1958, Bull. 1240-5 (1959).
November 1951, Bull. 1067 (1952).
Dayton, Ohio, June 1951, Bull. 1041 (1951).
January 1953, Bull. 1116-13 (1953).
Denver, Colorado:
January 1954, Bull. 1157-2 (1954).
November 1949, Bull. 985 (1950.)
February 1955, Bull. 1172-9 (1955).
January 1951, Bull. 1029 (1951).
February 1956, Bull. 1188-12 (1956).
November 1951, Bull. 1066 (1952).
February 1957, Bull. 1202-13 (1957).
November 1952, Bull. 1116-8 (1953).
January 1958, Bull. 1224-9 (1958).
December 1953, Bull. 1157-2 (1954).
January 1959, Bull. 1240-10 (1959).
December 1954, Bull. 1172-6 (1955).
Milwaukee, Wisconsin:
December 1955, Bull. 1188-6 (1956).
December 1957, Bull. 1224-7 (1958).
March 1952, Bull. 1099 (1952).
December 1958, Bull. 1240-7 (1959).
April 1953, Bull. 1116-19 (1953).
April 1954, Bull. 1157-3 (1954).
Detroit, Michigan:
November 1955, Bull. 1188-3 (1956).
December 1951, Bull. 1086 (1952).
May 1958, Bull. 1224-18 (1958).
October 1953, Bull. 1157-1 (1954).
April 1969, Bull. 1240-16 (1959).
October 1955, Bull. 1188-2 (1956).
January 1959, Bull. 1240-12 (1959).
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota:
November 1951, Bull. 1068 (1952).
Hartford, Connecticut, October 1951, Bull. 1059
November 1952, Bull. 1116-7 (1953).
(1952).
November 1953, Bull. 1157-1 (1954).
Houston, Texas, January 1952, Bull. 1084
November 1954, Bull. 1172-5 (1954).
(1952).
December 1955, Bull. 1188-8 (1956).
Indianapolis, Indiana, December 1951, Bull.
March 1957, Bull. 1202-14 (1957).
1075 (1952).
January 1958, Bull. 1224-10 (1958).
Jacksonville, Florida, May 1952, Bull. 1110
January 1959, Bull. 1240-11 (1959).
(1952).
Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey:
Kansas City, Missouri:
November 1961, Bull. 1081 (1952).
October 1951, Bull. 1064 (1952).
November 1952, Bull. 1116-11 (1953).
October 1952, Bull. 1116-4 (1953).
December 1953, Bull. 1157-2 (1954).
December 1956, Bull. 1202-6 (1957).
December 1954, Bull. 1172-8 (1955).
December 1955, Bull. 1188-10 (1956).
Labor markets, major. ( F o r m ore detailed in­
December 1957, Bull. 1224-12 (1958).
form ation, see specific city under above
December 1958, Bull. 1240-9 (1959).
heading , this section .) :
1951- 52 (summary report). Wages and Re­
New Orleans, Louisiana:
lated Benefits, 40 Labor Markets, 1951December 1951, Bull. 1074 (1952).
1952, Bull. 1113 (1952).
November 1953, Bull. 1157-1 (1954).
1952- 53 (summaries and special analyses).
November 1955, Bull. 1188-5 (1956).
Wages and Related Benefits, 20 Labor
February 1958, Bull. 1224-11 (1958).
Markets, 1952-1953, Bull. 1116 (1953).
February 1959, Bull. 1240-14 (1959).
1953- 54. Wages and Related Benefits-—
New York, New York:
Major Labor Markets, 1953-1954:
April 1951, Bull. 1037 (1951).
Pt.1, Bull. 1157-1 (1954).
January 1952, Bull. 1101 (1952).
Pt. II, Bull. 1157-2 (1954).
February 1953, Bull. 1116-16 (1953).
Pt. Ill, Bull. 1157-3 (1954).
February 1954, Bull. 1157-3 (1954).
1954- 55 (summaries and analyses). Wages
March 1955, Bull. 1172-13 (1955).
and Related Benefits, 17 Labor Mar­
April 1956, Bull. 1188-17 (1956).
kets, 1954-55, Bull. 1172 (1956).
April 1967, Bull. 1202-17 (1957).
1955- 56 (summaries and analyses). Wages
April 1958, Bull. 1224-15 (1958).
and Related Benefits, 17 Labor Mar­
April 1959, Bull. 1240-17 (1959).
kets, 1955-56, Bull. 1188 (1956).
Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Vir­
1956- 57 (summaries and analyses). Wages
ginia, February 1952, Bull. 1088 (1952).
and Related Benefits, 17 Labor Mar­
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, October 1951, Bull.
kets, 1956-57, Bull. 1202 (1957).
1070 (1952).
1957- 58 (summaries and analyses). Wages
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania:
and Related Benefits, 19 Labor Mar­
May 1950, Bull. 1008 (1950).
kets, 1957-58, Bull. 1224-20 (1959).
October 1951, Bull. 1060 (1952).
1958- 59 (summaries and analyses). Wages
October 1952, Bull. 1116-5 (1953).
and Related Benefits, 20 Labor Mar­
October 1953, Bull. 1157-1 (1954).
kets, 1958-59, Bull. 1240-22 (1959).*




8?

Wages and hours— Con.
Occupational wage surveys— Con.
Philadelphia, Pa.—Con.
November 1954, Bull. 1172-4 (1955).
November 1955, Bull. 1188-4 (1956).
November 1956, Bull. 1202-7 (1957).
October 1957, Bull. 1224-6 (1958).
November 1958, Bull. 1240-8 (1959).
Phoenix, Arizona, March 1952, Bull. 1103
(1952).
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania:
November 1951, Bull. 1082 (1952).
December 1956, Bull. 1202-9 (1957).
Portland, Oregon:
June 1951, Bull. 1042 (1951).
September 1952, Bull. 1116-2 (1953).
September 1953, Bull. 1157-1 (1954).
April 1955, Bull. 1172-16 (1955).
April 1956, Bull. 1188-16 (1956).
April 1957, Bull. 1202-12 (1957).
April 1958, Bull. 1224-16 (1958).
April 1959, Bull. 1240-20 (1959).
Providence, Rhode Island:
December 1951, Bull. 1071 (1952).
December 1952, Bull. 1116-10 (1953).
March 1956, Bull. 1188-14 (1956).
Richmond, Virginia, October 1951, Bull. 1058
(1952).
Rochester, New York, January 1952, Bull.
1087 (1952).
St. Louis, Missouri:
January 1952, Bull. 1095 (1952).
December 1952, Bull. 1116-12 (1953).
January 1954, Bull. 1157-2 (1954).
February 1955, Bull. 1172-10 (1955).
February 1956, Bull. 1188-9 (1956).
November 1957, Bull. 1224-5 (1958).
October 1958, Bull. 1240-4 (1959).
Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1951, Bull.
1069 (1952).
San Francisco-Oakland, California:
January 1950, Bull. 996 (1950).
January 1951, Bull. 1028 (1951).
January 1952, Bull. 1076 (1952).
January 1953, Bull. 1116-9 (1953).
January 1954, Bull. 1157-2 (1954).
January 1955, Bull. 1172-7 (1955).
January 1956, Bull. 1188-7 (1956).
January 1957, Bull. 1202-8 (1957).
January 1958, Bull. 1224-8 (1958).
January 1959, Bull. 1240-13 (1959).
Scranton, Pennsylvania, December 1951, Bull.
1078 (1952).
Seattle, Washington:
September 1951, Bull. 1057 (1952).
August 1956, Bull. 1202-1 (1956).
August 1957, Bull. 1224-1 (1957).
August 1958, Bull. 1240-1 (1958).
Trenton, New Jersey, March 1952, Bull. 1104
(1952).
Worcester, Massachusetts, January 1952, Bull.
1077 (1952).
Office-building-service employees. Hourly Earnings
by Industry, Selected Wage Areas, April 1949
to November 1949, Bull. 1005 (1950).
Office workers. (S ee also Bank employees and
White-collar workers, this se c tio n .):
Hospital employees, selected cities. See that
title , this section.
Metalworking industries. Wages of Office
Workers in Metalworking Industries, Jan­
uary 1945, Bull. 886 (1946).
Wage Structure— Metalworking Indus­
tries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).

88




Wages and hours— Con.
Office workers— Con.
Union scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Office workers, by city:
Salaries, Hours of work, Supplementary bene­
fits:
Atlanta, Ga., January 1950, Bull. 986
(1950).
Boston, Mass., January 1950, Bull. 992
(1950).
Chicago, 111., February 1950, Bull. 995
(1950).
Detroit, Mich., April 1950, Bull. 999
(1950).
Indianapolis, Ind., January 1950, Bull.
987 (1950).
Los Angeles, Calif., March 1950, Bull.
1002 (1950).
Memphis, Tenn., February 1950, Bull. 988
(1950).
Milwaukee, Wis., January 1950, Bull. 990
(1950).
New York, N.Y., February 1950, Bull. 997
(1950).
Oklahoma City, Okla., February 1950,
Bull. 989 (1950).
Providence, R.I., June 1950, Bull. 1006
(1950).
Office workers, selected cities. (See also Occupa­
tional wage surveys, b y cities, this se c tio n .):
Salaries of Office Workers in Selected Large
Cities, Bull. 943 (1949).
Salaries of Office Workers in Large Cities,
1949, Bulls. 960-1,-2,-3, and -4 (1949) (1950).
Ohio. Average Annual Wage and Salary Pay­
ments in Ohio, 1916 to 1932, Bull. 613 (1935).
Paint and varnish industry. Hourly Earnings in
11 Industries, Selected Wage Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1948-January 1949, Bull.
969 (1949) and January 1950 to January
1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Paper and paper products industries. Wages and
Hours of Labor in the Paper and Pulp Industry.
1923, Bull. 365 (1925).
Labor Cost of Production and Wages and
Hours of Labor in the Paper Box-Board
Industry, Bull. 407 (1926).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929). See also Bull.
540 (1931).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions 1933,
1934, and 1935, Paper-Box Industry:
Folding, Bull. 620 (1937).
Set-up, Bull. 633 (1937).
Earnings and Hours in the Paperboard In­
dustry, Bull. 692 (1941).
Pavers and curb setters. Union Scales of Wages
and Hours of Labor, 1927-28, Bull. 476 (1929).
Petroleum industry. Wages and Hours of Labor
in the Petroleum Industry, 1920, Bull. 297
(1922).
Earnings in Southwestern Petroleum Industry,
April 1943, Bull. 762 (1944).
Wages in Petroleum Drilling and Production
in the Southwest, April 1944, Bull. 810
(1945).
Police departments. S ee under Municipal employ­
ment, this section.
Portland cement. See Cement industry, this section.

Wages and hours— Con.
Pottery industry. Wages, Hours, and Productivity
in the Pottery Industry, 1925, Bull. 412 (1926).
Printing and publishing. Earnings and Hours in
Book and Job Printing, January 1942, Bull.
726 (1943).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 1, 1915-May 15, 1933. S ee General
trades, this section.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the Print­
ing Trades:
May 15, 1936, Bull. 631 (1937).*
May 15,1937, Bull. 655 (1938).*
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Con­
ditions in the Printing Trades:
June 1, 1939, Bull. 675 (1940).*
June 1,1941, Bull. 708 (1942).*
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing
Trades:
June 1,1942, Bull. 739 (1943).*
July 1,1943, Bull. 781 (1944).*
July 1,1944, Bull. 820 (1945).*
July 1,1945, Bull. 872 (1946).*
July 1,1946, Bull. 912 (1947).*
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry:
January 2, 1948 and July 1, 1949, Bull.
979 (1950).*
July 1,1950, Bull. 1018 (1951).*
July 1,1951, Bull. 1062 (1952).*
July 1,1952, Bull. 1134 (1953).*
July 1,1953, Bull. 1155 (1954).*
July 1,1954, Bull. 1176 (1955).*
July 1,1955, Bull. 1194 (1956).*
July 1,1956, Bull. 1207 (1957).*
July 1,1957, Bull. 1228 (1958).*
July 1,1958, Bull. 1247 (1959).*
Radio (including phonograph) manufacture. Wage
Structure— Metalworking Industries, 1945, Bull.
952 (1949).
Railroads. Pennsylvania Railroad Wage Data, Bull.
514 (1930).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Rayon industry. Wages and Hours in Rayon and
Other Synthetic Yarn Manufacturing, 1930,
Bull. 546 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Manufac­
ture of Silk and Rayon Goods: 1931, Bull.
568 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Rayon and
Other Synthetic Yarn Manufacturing: 1932,
Bull. 587 (1933).
Wages in the Rayon Industry, May 1944, Bull.
806 (1945).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, September 1947-September
1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas: April 1949 to November 1949, Bull.
1005 (1950); and January 1950 to January
1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Ready-to-wear, women’s stores. S ee Stores—retail,
this section.

Reconversion period. Workers’ Experiences Dur­
ing First Phase of Reconversion, Bull. 876
(1946).
Restaurant workers. See Hotel and restaurant
workers, this section.




Wages and hours— Con.
Retail trade:
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Oc­
tober 1956:
Apparel and Accessories Stores, Bull.
1220-5 (1957). F o r earlier data, see
Stores, retail, this section.
Appliance stores. S ee Furniture, etc., below.

Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service
Stations, Bull. 1220-4 (1957).
Building Materials and Farm Equipment
Dealers, Bull. 1220-1 (1957).
Drug Stores and Proprietary Stores, Bull.
1220-7 (1957).
Food Stores, Bull. 1220-3 (1957).
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Appli­
ance Stores, Bull. 1220-6 (1957). F o r
earlier data, see Stores, retail, this
section.

General Merchandise Stores, Bull. 1220-2
(1957). F o r earlier data, see Stores, re­
tail, this section.
Summary Report, Bull. 1220 (1958).*
Rubber industry. Wages in Rubber Manufacturing
Industry, August 1942, Bull. 737 (1943).
Scientists. (S ee also Chemists and chemical engi­
neers and Engineers, professional, this section .) :
Employment, Education, and Earnings of
American Men of Science, Bull. 1027 (1951).
Seamen. The Earnings and Employment of Sea­
men on U.S. Flag Ships, Bull. 1238 (1958).*
Seamen, union scales 1927-31. S ee Water trans­
portation, this section.
Service stations. Employee Earnings in Retail
Trade in October 1956. Automotive Dealers and
Gasoline Service Stations, Bull. 1220-4 (1957).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Gasoline Filling
Stations and Motor Vehicle Repair Garages,
1931, Bull. 578 (1933).
Sheet-metal establishments. Wage Structure—
Metalworking Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Shipbuilding and repair. Hourly Earnings in
Private Shipyards, 1942, Bull. 727 (1943).
Earnings in Ship Construction Yards, Fall of
1942, Bull. 752 (1943).
Hourly Earnings in Private Ship-Repair
Yards, Spring 1943, Bull. 763 (1944).
Wartime Employment, Production, and Con­
ditions of Work in Shipyards, Bull. 824
(1945).
Shoe industry:
Earnings and Hours in Shoe and Allied In­
dustries During First Quarter of 1939, Boots
and Shoes, Cut Stock and Findings, Shoe Pat­
terns, Bull. 670 (1939).
Plant and office workers, selected occupa­
tions. Hourly earnings, selected wage areas:
September 1947-September 1948, Bull. 953
(1949).
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949) .
April 1949-November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950) .
January 1950-January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951) .
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).

89

Wages and Honrs of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry.
1907 to 1914, Bull. 178 (1915).
1907 to 1916, Bull. 232 (1918).
1907 to 1918, Bull. 260 (1919).
1907 to 1920, Bull. 278 (1921).
1907 to 1922, Bull. 324 (1923).
1907 to 1924, Bull. 374 (1925).
1907 to 1926, Bull. 450 (1927).
1910 to 1928, Bull. 498 (1929).
1910 to 1930, Bull. 551 (1932).
1910 to 1932, Bull. 579 (1933).
Silk industry. Wages and Hours of Labor in the
Cotton, Woolen, and Silk Industries, 1907 to
1914, Bull. 190 (1916).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Manufac­
ture of Silk and Rayon Goods, 1931, Bull.
568 (1932).
Hourly earnings, selected wage areas:
September 1947-September 1948, Bull. 953
(1949) .
April 1949-November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950) .
Slaughtering industry. See Meatpacking industry,
this section.

Small-arms industry. Wage Structure— Metalwork­
ing Industries, 1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Soft drink establishments. See Bottling-house work­
men and Brewery workers, this section.
Southern States, selected industries. Labor in the
South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Statistics. Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016,
1950 ed. (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Steel industry. S ee Iron and steel industry, this
section.

Stone workers. See Glass, clay, and stone workers,
this section.

Stores, retail. (S ee also Retail trade, this sec­
tion.) :

Department and clothing. Wages in Depart­
ment and Clothing Stores, Large Cities,
Spring and Summer, 1943, Bull. 801 (1944).
Department and women’s ready-to-wear. Hour­
ly earnings, selected wage areas:
September 1947-September 1948, Bull. 953
(1949).
January 1950-January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951) .
Street laborers, unskilled. S ee Municipal employees
— Common labor, this section .
Street-railway employees. S ee Transit—local, this
section.

Sugar industry. Wages and Hours o f Labor in
Cane-Sugar Refining Industry, 1930, Bull. 547
(1931).
Swift and Co. S ee under Wage chronologies, this
section.

Teamsters, union scales 1915-33. S ee General
trades, this section. F o r later bulletins, see
Truckdrivers and helpers, this section.
Textiles. (S ee also specific branch o f industry ,
this section.) :

Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Theatrical employment. Union Scales of Wages
and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1918, Bull. 259 (1919).
May 15, 1919, Bull. 274 (1920).
May 15, 1920, Bull. 286 (1921).
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).




Wages and hours— Con.
Tire industry. Wages and Hours of Labor in the
Automobile Tire Industry, 1923, Bull. 358 (1924).
Tobacco industry:
Cigar manufacturing. Union Scales of Wages
and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Cigarette manufacturing. Wages and Hours
of Labor in the Cigarette Manufacturing
Industry, 1930, Bull. 532 (1931).
Transit industry—local. Street Railway Employ­
ment in the United States, Bull. 204 (1917).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours o f Labor,
1921-31, inc. See bulletins listed fo r those
yea rs under General trades, this section, and
Bull. 476 (1929).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of
Union Street-Railway Employees, June 1,
1941, Bull. 701 (1942).*
Wage Rates of Union Street-Railway Em­
ployees, June 1, 1942, Bull. 731 (1943).*
Union Wage Rates of City Streetcar and Bus
Operators:
July 1, 1943, BuH. 766 (1944).*
July 1, 1944, Bull. 814 (1945).*
July 1, 1945, Bull. 856 (1946).*
Union Wages and Hours o f Local Transit
Operating Employees:
July 1, 1946, Bull. 903 (1947).*
October 1, 1947, Bull. 933 (1948).*
October 1, 1948, Bull. 957 (1949).*
October 1, 1949, Bull. 981 (1950).*
October 1,1950, Bull. 1019 (1951).*
October 1,1951, Bull. 1061 (1952).*
October 1, 1952, Bull. 1133 (1953).*
July 1, 1953, Bull. 1153 (1954).*
July 1, 1954, Bull. 1177 (1955).*
July 1, 1955, Bull. 1193 (1956).*
July 1, 1956, Bull. 1208 (1957).*
July 1, 1957, Bull. 1229 (1958).*
July 1, 1958, Bull. 1244 (1959).*
Transportation. S ee specific typ e of, this section.
Truckdrivers and helpers, union scales 1915-33. S ee
General trades, this section.
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions
o f Motortruck Drivers, June 1, 1939, BuU.
676 (1940).*
Wages and Hours of Union Motortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers:
June 1,1941, Bull. 705 (1942).*
June 1,1942, Bull. 732 (1943).*
Union Wages and Hours of Motortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers:
July 1,1943, Bull. 771 (1944).*
July 1,1944, Bull. 812 (1945).*
July 1,1945, Bull. 874 (1946).*
July 1,1946, Bull. 9111948).*
July 1,1947, Bull. 928 (1948).*
July 1,1948, Bull. 955 (1949).*
July 1,1949, Bull. 978 (1950).*
July 1,1950, Bull. 1012 (1951).*
July 1,1951, Bull. 1052 (1952).*
July 1,1952, Bull. 1125 (1953).*
July 1,1953, Bull. 1154 (1954).*
July 1,1954, Bull. 1178 (1955).*
July 1,1955, Bull. 1195 (1956).*
July 1,1956, Bull. 1206 (1957).*
July 1,1957, Bull. 1230 (1958).*
July 1,1958, Bull. 1246 (1959).*
Underwear industry- (ies). S ee Hosiery and under­
wear manufacture, this section.
Union scales. S ee General trades and specific in­
dustry or trade, this section.

Wages and hours— Con.
United States Steel Corporation. See under Wage
chronologies, this section.
Upholsterers. (S ee also Furniture industry, this
section . ) :
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 16,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 16,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Urban rates. Trends in Urban Wage Rates:
April-October 1944, Bull. 809 (1945).
October 1944-April 1945, Bull. 846 (1945).
April to October 1945, Bull. 860 (1946).
April 1946, Bull. 891 (1946).
Wage chronologies (Changes in wage rates and
in related practices) :
American Woolen Co., 1939-48.
Armour and Co., 1941-48.
Bituminous-coal mines, 1933-48.
Chrysler Corp., 1939-48.
Cotton textile association, northern, 1943-48.
The Wage Chronology Series, Vol. I, Bull.
970 (1949).
General Motors Corp., 1939-49. The Wage
Chronology Series, Vol. II, Bull. 970-2
(1949).
Hosiery manufacturers, full-fashioned, 1941-48.
Swift and Co., 1942-48.
United States Steel Corp., 1937-48.
Bull. 970 (Vol. I ), entitled above.
Wage differentials. (S ee also Shift differentials
and operations.):
Intercity Variations in Wage Levels, Bull. 793
(1944).
Labor markets, 1951-52. Wage Differentials
and Rate Structures Among 40 Labor Mar­
kets, 1951-52, Bull. 1135 (1953).
Labor markets, 1953-54 summary report. Wage
Differences and Establishment Practices,
Bull. 1173 (1955).
New England, compared regionally. New Eng­
land Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212
(1957) *
Southern States, compared regionally. Labor in
the South, Bull. 898 (1947).♦
Wages and related benefits by major labor markets.
See Wages and hours— Occupational wage sur­
veys—Labor markets, major.
Waiters. Union Scale of Wages and Hours of
Labor *
May 15,1918, Bull. 259 (1919).
May 15,1919, Bull. 274 (1920).
May 15,1920, Bull. 286 (1921).
Wartime <World War II). {S e e other bulletins,
this section ,- fo r W artim e yea rs . ) :
Agriculture. Wartime Wages, Income, and
Wage Regulation in Agriculture, Bull. 883
(1946).
Cotton industry. Earnings in Cotton-Goods
Manufacture During the War Years, Bull.
798 (1944).
Factory wage rates, analysis of. Wages in
Manufacturing Industries in Wartime, Bull.
756 (1943).
Mining. The Changing Status of BituminousCoal Miners, 1937-46, Bull. 882 (1946).
Various industries, comparison World Wars I
and II. War and Postwar Wages, Prices,
and Hours 1914-23 and 1939-44, Bull. 852
(1946).




Wages and hours— Con.
Water transportation. Union Scales of Wages and
Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
White-collar workers. (S ee also Bank employees,
Occupational wage surveys, and Office workers,
this section. S ee also specific p r o fe s sio n .):

Federal White-Collar Workers, Bull. 1117
(1953).
Trend of Earnings Among White-Collar
Workers During the War, Bull. 783 (1944).
Wholesale trade, June 1958. (S ee also, Groceries,
wholesale, this s e c tio n .):
Earnings in Wholesale Trade, Bull. 1253
(1959).
Women’s clothing, manufacture of. S e e Clothing
industry, this section.
Woodworkers. (S ee also Furniture industry and
Millwork, this se c tio n .):
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15,1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15,1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15,1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Woolen and worsted goods manufacturing. Wages
and Hours of Labor in the Cotton, Woolen, and
Silk Industries, 1907 to 1914, Bull. 190 (1916).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing:
1916, Bull. 238 (1918).
1918, Bull. 261 (1919).
1920, Bull. 289 (1921).
1922, Bull. 327 (1923).
1924, Bull. 377 (1925).
1910 to 1926, Bull. 443 (1927).
1910 to 1928, Bull. 487 (1929).
1910 to 1930, Bull. 533 (1931).
1932, Bull. 584 (1933).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, September 1947-September
1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, April 1949 to November 1949, Bull.
1005 (I960); and January 1950 to January
1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Wages and hours, foreign countries:
India:
Hours and earnings, selected industries for
specified years 1923-1942. Wartime Labor
Conditions in India, Bull. 755 (1943).
Various countries:
Earnings by leading industry or occupation.
Wage Trends and Wage Policies: Various
Foreign Countries, Bull. 934 (1948).
Waiters. S ee under Wages and hours.
War Contracts:
Cutbacks, 1943-44, effects on employment. Effect of
War-Contract Cut-Backs on Selected Plants, Bull.
818 (1945).
War Labor Board, National. S ee National War Labor
Board.
War workers. See Munition workers, Great Britain,
World War I; also Aircraft manufacture; Recon­
version; Shipbuilding; and Bulls. 819 (1945) Explos­
ives industry, and 827 (1945) Ammunition-loading
industry.

91

Warehousing operations. Injuries and Accident Causes
in Warehousing Operations, Bull. 1174 (1955).*
Wartime policies:
World War I:
History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment
Board, 1917 to 1919, Bull. 283 (1921).
Labor Legislation o f :
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
National War Labor Board, Bull. 287 (1922).
World War II:
Price control:
Consumers' Prices in the United States,
1942-48, Bull. 966 (1949).*
The General Maximum Price Regulation,
Bull. 879 (1946).
Wholesale prices. Wartime Prices, Pt. I,
August 1939 to Pearl Harbor, Bull. 749
(1944).* [Only Pt. I has been publish­
ed.]
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement
and Wage Stabilization During World War
II, Bull. 1009 (1950).*
Wage regulation, farm workers. Wartime
Wages, Income, and Wage Regulation in
Agriculture, Bull. 883 (1946).
Wartime policies, foreign countries:
World War I. Food Situation in Central Europe,
1917, Bull. 242 (1918).
World War II. Employment Situation in Certain
Foreign Countries, Bull. 864 (1946).
------ Price control. Price Trends and Price Control in
Foreign Countries Since VE-Day, Bull. 873
(1946).
------------- Wartime Prices, Price Control, and Rationing
in Foreign Countries, Bull. 851 (1946).
Wartime spending and saving. See Income and expendi­
tures, consumer.
Washup time with pay. Labor-Management Contract
Provisions, 1953, Bull. 1166 (1954).

Women workers. (S ee also specific industries, occupa­
tions, professions, or trades . ) :
Dressmakers. Dressmaking as a Trade for Women
in Massachusetts, Bull. 193, (1916).
Employment of, necessity for. Effect of Workmen's
Compensation Laws in Diminishing the Necessity
o f Industrial Employment of Women and Chil­
dren, Bull. 217 (1918).
Hosiery industry. Postwar Employment Prospects
for Women in the Hosiery Industry, Bull. 835
(1945).
Lead industries and trades, exposure to lead poison­
ing in. Women in the Lead Industries, Bull. 253
(1919).
Legislation affecting. S ee Labor and Minimum
wage under Legislation.
Minimum wage. Effect of Minimum-Wage Deter­
minations in Oregon, Bull. 176 (1915).
Minimum wage legislation. S ee under Legislation.
Older. S ee Older workers.
Shoe industry. The Boot and Shoe Industry in
Massachusetts as a Vocation for Women, Bull.
180 (1915).
Stores, retail. Unemployment Among Women in
Department and Other Retail Stores o f Boston,
Bull. 182 (1916).
Training. Industrial Experience of Trade-School
Girls in Massachusetts, Bull. 215 (1917).
Wages and hours. S ee that title.
Welfare of. S ee Working conditions.
Working life, length and pattern of. (See also Labor
supply.):
Tables of Working Life for Women, 1950, Bull.
1204 (1957).*
Women workers, foreign countries:
Great Britain, World War I. S ee Munition workers.
Japan. Labor Conditions of Women and Children
in Japan, Bull. 558 (1931).
Woodworkers. S ee under Wages and hours.

Watch repairmen. Employment Outlook for Watch
Repairmen, Bull. 1215-64 (1958).

Woolen and worsted goods manufacturing. See under
Wages and hours. F o r fringe benefits, see Bulls. 953
(1949), 1005 (1950), and 1040 (1951), entitled under
Wages and hours.

Water transportation. (See also under Wages and
hours.):
Labor Legislation of 1915, Bull. 186 (1916).

Work injuries. See Accidents ; Workmen's compensation.
S ee also Conventions, meetings, etc.— Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions; Poisons, industrial.

Weekend work. See Collective bargaining and agree­
ments, general—Premium pay.

Work stoppages. S ee Labor-management disputes—
Strikes.

Welders. See under Employment outlook.

Worker mobility. See Occupational mobility.

Welfare, national:
Labor Department (U.S. Government) promoting.
Humanity in Government, Bull. 346 (1923).*

Workers' education. (See also Vocational education and
training.):
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Adult Working-Class Education in Great Britain
and the United States, Bull. 271 (1920).*
Case Studies in Union Leadership Training, 195152, Bull. 1114 (1952) *

Welfare plans, collectively bargained. S ee Collective
bargaining and agreements, general—Employee-bene­
fit plans.
Welfare work. S ee Health, recreation, and welfare con­
ditions.
White-collar workers. (S ee also Employment outlook:
Banking occupations, Office workers, specific occu­
p ation ; and under Wages and hours.):
Unionization of. A Guide to Labor-Management
Relations in the United States, Bull. 1225
(1958).*
Wholesale prices. See Prices, wholesale.
Wholesale trade. Earnings in Wholesale Trade (June
1958), Bull. 1253 (1959).

92




Workers' representation, foreign countries. See Labor
and industrial relations, foreign countries.
Working conditions. (See also Collective bargaining
and agreements, by industry or occupation; Employ­
ment outlook; Hygiene, industrial; and specific indus­
try or occupation . ) :
Baking industry. Bulls. 623 (1937) and 673 (1940)
entitled under Wages and hours.
Children, 1908. See Women and children, this sec­
tion.

W orkin g conditions— Con.
G reat B ritain, W orld W a r I. See M unition workers.
H aw aii. See under Labor and industrial conditions.
L egislation a ffectin g . See under Legislation.
M unicipal employm ent. See under W ages and hours.
N urses, registered professional. The Econom ic
Status o f R egistered P rofessional N urses, 194647, Bull. 931 (1 9 4 8 ).
P aper-box industry. W ages, H ours, and W orkin g
Conditions 1933, 1934, and 1935, P aper-B ox In ­
dustry :
F oldin g, Bull. 620 (1 9 3 7 ).
Set-U p, Bull. 633 (1 9 3 7 ).
Russia. Elements o f Soviet Labor Law , Bull. 1026
(1 9 5 1 ).*
Shipbuilding industry, W orld W a r II. W artim e
Em ploym ent, P roduction, and Conditions o f W ork
in Shipyards, Bull. 824 (1 9 4 5 ).
T ransit, local. Street R ailw ay E m ploym ent in the
U nited States, Bull. 204 (1 9 1 7 ). See also Bull,
701 (1 9 4 2 ).*
W om en and children, 1908. Sum m ary o f the R eport
on Condition o f W om an and Child W a g e E arners
in the United States, Bull. 175 (1 9 1 6 ).*
W om en, shoe factories, M assachusetts. The B oot
and Shoe Industry in M assachusetts as a V oca ­
tion fo r W om en, Bull. 180 (1 9 1 5 ).
W ork in g life, length and pattern of. (See also L abor
supply.) :
Men. Tables o f W ork in g L ife, Length o f W ork ­
in g L ife fo r Men, Bull. 1001 (1 9 5 0 ).*
W om en. Tables o f W ork in g L ife fo r W om en,
1950, Bull. 1204 (1 9 5 7 ).*
W orkm en ’s com pensation. (See also A ccid en ts; Con­
ventions, meetings, etc.— Industrial A cciden t Boards
and Com m issions.) :
A dm in istra tion :
Problem s o f W orkm en’s Com pensation A dm in ­
istration in the U nited States and Canada,
Bull. 672 (194 0 ).*
W orkm en’s Compensation in the U nited States,
Bull. 1149 (1 9 5 4 ). See also Bull. 301, en­
titled below, and Legislation, this section.
Court decisions. See Court decisions a ffe ctin g labor.
Insurance system s. Com parison o f W orkm en’s
Com pensation Insurance and A dm inistration,
Bull. 301 (1 9 2 2 ).
Lead poisoning. Deaths from Lead Poisoning, 19251927, Bull. 488 (1 9 2 9 ).
Legislation. (See also A dm inistration, this section;
and Legislation— Labor— Text, sum m aries, and
review s o f l a w s .):
Com pensation L egislation o f 1914 and 1915,
Bull. 185 (1 9 1 5 ).
Labor Legislation o f 1916, Bull. 213 (1 9 1 7 ).
W orkm en ’s Com pensation Law s o f the United
States and F oreign Countries, Bull. 203
(1 9 1 7 ).
Com parison o f W orkm en ’s Com pensation Laws
o f the United States up to Decem ber 31,
1917, Bull. 240 (1918) .
W orkm en’s Com pensation L egislation o f the
U nited States and F oreign Countries, 1917
and 1918, Bull. 243 (1 9 1 8 ).




W orkin g conditions— Con.
L egislation— Con.
W orkm en ’s Com pensation L egislation o f the
U nited States and Canada, Bull. 272 (1 9 2 1 ).
Com parison o f W orkm en’s Com pensation Law s
o f the U nited States and Canada up to Jan­
u ary 1, 1920, Bull. 275 (1 9 2 0 ).
W orkm en’s Com pensation L egislation o f the
United States and Canada, 1920-1922, Bull.
332 (1 9 2 3 ).
C om parison o f W orkm en’s Com pensation Law s
o f the U nited States as o f Jan uary 1, 1925,
Bull. 379 (1 9 2 5 ).
W orkm en’s Compensation L egislation o f the
United States and Canada as o f Ju ly 1,
1926, Bull. 423 (1 9 2 6 ).
W orkm en’s Com pensation Legislation o f the
United States and Canada as o f Jan uary 1,
1929, Bull. 496 (1 9 2 9 ).
O ccupational-D isease Legislation in the United
States, 1936, Bull. 625 (1937) and 652
(1 9 3 8 ).
State [includes territoria l] L abor Legislation,
1937, Including W orkm en ’s Com pensation
Legislation, Bull. 654 (1 9 3 8 ).
S eam en :
E xistin g protection v. estim ated w orkm en’s
com pensation b e n e fits :
Settlem ent fo r A ccidents to A m erican Sea­
men, Bull. 466 (1 9 2 8 ).
W orkm en’s Com pensation and the P rotec­
tion o f Seamen, Bull. 869 (1 9 4 6 ).
Statistics. See A ccidents— M ethodology.
W om en and children. E ffe c t o f W orkm en ’s Com­
pensation Law s in D im inishing the N ecessity o f
Industrial E m ploym ent o f W om en and Children,
Bull. 217 (1 9 1 8 ).
W orkm en’s com pensation, foreig n cou ntries:
Canada. (See also V ariou s countries, this section.):
A dm inistration. See Bull. 672 (1 9 4 0 ),* entitled
in above section. See also Legislation, this

section.
Claim procedure in B ritish Columbia and On­
tario. Com parison o f W orkm en ’s Com pensa­
tion Insurance and A dm inistration, Bull. 301
(1 9 2 2 ).
C onferences. See Conventions, m eetings, etc.—
Industrial A cciden t Boards and Commissions,
International A ssociation of.
Legislation. See Bulls. 272 (1 9 2 1 ), 275 (1 9 2 0 ),
332 (1 9 2 3 ), 423 (1 9 2 6 ), and 496 (1 9 2 9 ), en­

titled in above section.
L atin A m erica. W orkm en ’s Compensation L egisla­
tion o f the Latin A m erican Countries, Bull. 529
(1 9 3 0 ).
V ariou s countries. See Bulls. 203 (1 9 1 7 ), 243
(1 9 1 8 ), and 869 (1 9 4 6 ), entitled in above section.
W orksh arin g. See Collective
ments, general— L a y o ff.

bargain in g

and

agree­

W orkw eek, length o f. See specific industry or occupa­
tion under Em ploym ent outlook; and W ages and
hours.

93

Depository Libraries Receiving BLS Bulletins
Under provisions of the law, certain libraries are designated depositories for
Government publications. Through them Federal Government documents are
made available to residents of every State, the District of Columbia, and Puerto
Rico. Distribution to the libraries is made by the Office of the Superintendent
of Documents. Each library selects the classes of publications of interest to its
particular clientele.
The following list shows the locations and names of the depository librar­
ies which receive BLS bulletins.
A labama
A ubu rn
Birm ingham
M obile (S p rin g H ill)
Tuskegee Institute
U n iversity

A labam a P olytechnic Institute L ib ra ry
H ow ard College, H arw ell G. D avis L ib ra ry
Public L ib ra ry
The Thom as B ryne M em orial, S prin g H ill C ollege
H ollis B urke F rissell L ibrary
U niversity o f A labam a L ib ra ry

A rizona
Phoenix
Tem pe
Tucson

D epartm ent o f L ib ra ry and A rchives
P hoenix P ublic L ib ra ry
A rizon a State U n iversity, M atthews L ibrary
U n iversity o f A rizon a L ib ra ry

A rkansas
C ollege H eights
F ayetteville
L ittle R ock
R ussellville
State College

A rkansas A gricu ltu ral and M echanical College L ibrary
U niversity o f A rkan sas L ibrary
Little R ock P ublic L ib ra ry
A rkansas Polytechnic College L ibrary
A rkansas State College L ib ra ry

California
Berkeley
Clarem ont

Davis
E ureka
F resn o
L on g Beach
Los A ngeles

N orthridge
Oakland
Pasadena
Redlands
Richm ond
R iverside
Sacram ento
San D iego
San F ran cisco
Santa A n a
Santa B arbara
Santa R osa
S tan ford U niversity
Stockton

U n iversity o f C alifornia L ib ra ry
Pom ona College, Honnold L ibrary
U n iversity o f C aliforn ia L ibrary
E ureka F ree L ib ra ry
Fresno County F ree L ibrary
Public L ibrary
Los A ngeles Public L ibrary
Los A ngeles State College L ib ra ry
Loyola U n iversity L ib ra ry
Occidental C ollege L ibrary
U n iversity o f C aliforn ia at Los A ngeles L ibrary
U n iversity o f Southern C aliforn ia L ib ra ry
San F ernando V alley State College L ibrary
Oakland P ublic L ib ra ry
C alifornia Institute o f Techn ology L ibrary
U n iversity o f Redlands L ibrary
R ichm ond Public L ib ra ry
R iverside P ublic L ibrary
C alifornia State L ibrary
C ity F ree L ib ra ry
San D iego Public L ibrary
M echanics M ercantile L ibrary
San F rancisco Public L ib ra ry
San F ran cisco State College, Social Science and Business L ib ra ry
Santa A na Public L ib ra ry
Santa B arbara P ublic L ib ra ry
U n iversity o f C alifornia, Docum ents D epartm ent
Santa R osa Public L ibrary
S tan ford U niversity L ib ra ry
Stockton F ree Public L ibrary

S ource: Inform ation supplied by the U . S. Government Printing O ffice.

94




Colorado
Boulder
C olorado Springs
Denver
P o rt Collins
Golden
Pueblo

U n iversity o f Colorado L ib ra ry
C olorado College, Coburn L ibrary
P ublic L ib ra ry
U n iversity o f D enver, M ary Reed L ibrary
C olorado State U niversity L ibrary
C olorado School o f Mines L ibrary
M cClelland Public L ibrary

Connecticut
B ridgeport
H a rtford
M iddletown
N ew Haven
N ew London
Storrs
W aterbu ry

B ridgeport Public L ibrary
C onnecticut State L ibrary
H a rtford Public L ibrary
T rin ity C ollege L ibrary
W esleyan U niversity, Olin L ibrary
Y a le U n iversity L ibrary
C onnecticut College, Palm er L ibrary
U niversity o f Connecticut L ibrary
Silas B ronson L ibrary

Delaware
N ew ark
W ilm ington

U niversity o f D elaw are L ibrary
W ilm ington Institute F ree L ibrary

D istrict of Columbia
W ashington

D epartm ent o f A gricu ltu re L ibrary
D epartm ent o f Commerce L ibrary
D epartm ent o f H ealth, E ducation, and W e lfa re L ibrary
D epartm ent o f In terior Central L ibrary
D epartm ent o f State L ibrary
P ost O ffic e D epartm ent L ib ra ry
Public L ib ra ry
T reasu ry D epartm ent L ibrary

F lorida
Coral Gables
De Land
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Lakeland
Miam i
T allahassee
Tam pa
W in ter Park

U niversity o f Miami L ibrary
John B. Stetson U niversity, Sampson L ibrary
U n iversity o f F lorida L ibrary
Jacksonville Public L ibrary
Lakeland Public L ibrary
Miam i Public L ibrary
F lorida State L ibrary
F lorida State U niversity L ibrary
U niversity o f Tam pa L ibrary
Rollins College, Mills M emorial L ibrary

Georgia
A thens
A tlan ta
Collegeboro
Savannah
V aldosta

U n iversity o f G eorgia General L ibrary
A tlan ta Public L ibrary
E m ory U niversity, A sa G riggs Candler L ibrary
G eorgia State L ibrary
G eorgia Southern College, Rosenw ald L ibrary
Savannah Public L ibrary
V aldosta State College L ibrary

H awaii
Honolulu

L ibrary o f H aw aii
U n iversity o f H aw aii L ibrary

Idaho
Boise
Caldwell
M oscow
Pocatello
R exbu rg




Boise Public L ibrary
Idaho State L aw L ibrary
The College o f Idaho, Strahorn M em orial L ibrary
U niversity o f Idaho L ibrary
Idaho State College L ibrary
Ricks College L ibrary

95

Illinois

Carbondale
Chicago

East St. Louis
Evanston
Galesburg
Jacksonville
Monmouth
Normal
Peoria
Rock Island
Rockford
Springfield
Urbana

Southern Illinois University Library
Chicago Public Library
Newberry Library
University of Chicago Libraries
University of Illinois Library
Southern Illinois University Library
Northwestern University Library
Galesburg Public Library
MacMurray College Library
Monmouth College Library
Illinois State Normal University Library
Peoria Public Library
Rock Island Public Library
Public Library
Illinois State Library
University of Illinois Library
I ndiana

Anderson
Bloomington
Crawfordsville
Evansville
Fort Wayne
Gary
Greencastle
Hanover
Indianapolis
Lafayette
Muncie
Notre Dame
Richmond
Terre Haute

Charles E. Wilson Library, Anderson College
Indiana University Library
Wabash College Library
Evansville Public Library
Public Library
Gary Public Library
De Pauw University Library
Hanover College Library
Indiana State Library
Indianapolis Public Library
Purdue University Library
Ball State Teachers College Library
Public Library
University of Notre Dame Library
Morrison-Reeves Library
Indiana State Teachers College Library
Iowa

Ames
Cedar Falls
Council Bluffs
Des Moines
Dubuque
Fairfield
Grinnell
Iowa City
Lamoni
Mount Vernon
Sioux City

Iowa State College Library
Iowa State Teachers College Library
Free Public Library
Iowa State Traveling Library
Public Library
Carnegie Stout Free Public Library
Fairfield Free Public Library
Grinnell College Library
State University of Iowa Library
Graceland College Library
Cornell College Library
Public Library
Kansas

Emporia
Hays
Lawrence
Manhattan
Pittsburg
Topeka
Wichita

Kansas State Teachers College, William Allen White Library
Fort Hays Kansas State College, Forsyth Library
University of Kansas Library
Kansas City College Library
Kansas State University of Agriculture and Applied Sciences Library
Kansas State Library
University of Wichita Library
K entucky

Ashland
Bowling Green
Lexington
Louisville
Morehead

96




Ashland Public Library
Western Kentucky State Teachers College Library
University of Kentucky Library
Louisville Free Public Library
University of Louisville Library
Morehead State College, Johnson Camden Library

Louisiana

Baton Rouge
Lafayette
Lake Charles
Natchitoches
New Orleans
Ruston
Shreveport

Louisiana State University Law Library
Louisiana State University Library
Southwestern Louisiana Institute Library
McNeese State College Library
Northwestern State College of Louisiana
Loyola University Library
New Orleans Public Library
Tulane University, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library
Louisiana Polytechnic Institute Library
Shreve Memorial Library
Maine

Augusta
Bangor
Brunswick
Lewiston
Orono
Portland
Waterville

Maine State Library
Bangor Public Library
Bowdoin College Library
Bates College Library
University of Maine Library
Portland Public Library
Colby College Library
Maryland

Baltimore
Chestertown
College Park
Westminster

Enoch Pratt Free Library
Johns Hopkins University Library
Morgan State College Library
Washington College, George Avery Bunting Library
University of Maryland Library
Western Maryland College Library
Massachusetts

Amherst
Boston
Cambridge
Lynn
New Bedford
Tufts College
Wellesley
Williamstown
Worcester

Amherst College Library
University of Massachusetts, Goodell Library
Boston Public Library
State Library of Massachusetts
Harvard College Library, Serials Division
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Library
Lynn Public Library
Public Library
Tufts College Library
Wellesley College Library
Williams College Library
Free Public Library
Michigan

Ann Arbor
Battle Creek
Benton Harbor
Detroit
East Lansing
Flint
Grand Rapids
Houghton
Kalamazoo
Lansing
Muskegon
Saginaw

University of Michigan, General Library
Willard Library
Benton Harbor Public Library
Detroit Public Library
University of Detroit Library
Wayne State University Library
Michigan State College of Agriculture and Applied Science Library
Flint Junior College Library
Grand Rapids Public Library
Michigan College of Mining and Technology Library
Public Library
Michigan State University
Hackley Public Library
Hoyt Public Library
Minnesota

Collegeville
Duluth
Minneapolis
Northfield
St. Paul




St. Johns University Library
Duluth Public Library
Public Library
University of Minnesota Library
Carleton College Library
St. Olaf College Library
Minnesota Historical Society Library
St. Paul Public Library

97

Mississippi

Hattiesburg
Jackson
State College
University

Mississippi Southern College Library
Mississippi Library Commission
Mississippi State University, Mitchell Memorial Library
University of Mississippi Library
Missouri

Cape Girardeau
Columbia
Fulton
Jefferson City
Kansas City
St. Joseph
St. Louis
Springfield
Warrensburg

Kent Library, Southeast Missouri State College
University o f Missouri Library
Westminster College Library
Lincoln University Library
Kansas City Public Library
Rockhurst College Library
University of Kansas City Library
St. Joseph Public Library
St. Louis University Library
Washington University Library
Drury College Library
Central Missouri State College Library
Montana

Bozeman
Butte
Helena
Missoula

Montana State College Library
Montana School of Mines Library
Helena Public Library
State University of Montana Library
N ebraska

Lincoln
Omaha

Nebraska State Library
University of Nebraska Library
Municipal University of Omaha Library
Omaha Public Library
N evada

Carson City
Las Vegas
Reno

Nevada State Library
University of Nevada Library, Southern Regional Division
University of Nevada Library
N ew Hampshire

Concord
Durham
Hanover
Manchester

New Hampshire State Library
University of New Hampshire Library
Dartmouth College Library
City Library
N ew Jersey

Atlantic City
Bayonne
Camden
Convent Station
Elizabeth
Jersey City
Madison
New Brunswick
Newark
Princeton
Rutherford
South Orange
Trenton

Free Public Library
Free Public Library
Camden Free Public Library
Santa Maria Library of College of St. Elizabeth
Public Library
Free Public Library
Rose Memorial Library
Free Public Library
Rutgers University Library
Public Library
Princeton University Library
Fairleigh Dickinson College Library
Seton Hall University Library
Division of State Library, Archives and History— Department of Education
Free Public Library
N ew Mexico

Albuquerque
Santa Fe
University Park

96




University of New Mexico
New Mexico State Law Library
New Mexico State Library
New Mexico State University Library

N ew Y ork

Albany
Brooklyn
Buffalo
Canton
Elmira
Farmingdale
Flushing
Glens Falls
Hamilton
Ithaca
Jamaica
New York City

Potsdam
Poughkeepsie
Rochester
Schenectady
Syracuse
Troy
Utica

New York State Library
Brooklyn College Library
Brooklyn Public Library
Pratt Institute Library
Buffalo and Erie County Public Library
St. Lawrence University Library
Elmira College Library
Long Island Agricultural and Technical Institute Library
Queens College Library
Crandall Library
Colgate University Library
Cornell University Library
Queens Borough Public Library
St. Johns University Library
College of the City of New York Library
Columbia University Library
Cooper Union Library
Fordham University Library
New York Law Institute Library
New York Public Library (Astor Branch)
New York Public Library (Lenox Branch)
New York State Maritime College Library
Clarkson College of Technology Library
Vassar College Library
Rochester Public Library, Edgerton Branch
University of Rochester Library
Union College Library
Syracuse University Library
Troy Public Library
Utica Public Library
N orth Carolina

Chapel Hill
Davidson
Durham
Greensboro
Greenville
Raleigh
Salisbury
Winston-Salem

University o f North Carolina Library
Library of Davidson College
Duke “
University Library
Agricultural and Technical College Library
East Carolina College Library
D. H. Hill Library of North Carolina State College
North Carolina State Library
Catawba College Library
Public Library of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County
Wake Forest College Library
N orth Dakota

Bismarck
Fargo
Grand Forks
Minot

State Law Library
North Dakota Agricultural College and Experiment Station Library
University of North Dakota Library
State Teachers College Library
Ohio

Akron
Alliance
Ashland
Athens
Bowling Green
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus
Dayton
Delaware
Granville
Hiram
Marietta
Oberlin
Oxford
Toledo
Youngstown




Akron Public Library
Mt. Union College Library
Ashland College Library
Ohio University Library
Bowling Green State University Library
Public Library
University of Cincinnati Library
Adelbert College Library of Western Reserve University
Cleveland Public Library
Columbus Public Library
Ohio State Library
Ohio State University Library
Dayton Public Library
Charles Slocum Library of Ohio Wesleyan University
Denison University Library
Hiram College Library
Marietta College Library
Oberlin College Library
Miami University Library
Toledo Public Library
Youngstown Public Library

90

Oklahoma

Ada
Alva
Durant
Edmond
Langston
Norman
Oklahoma City
Shawnee
Stillwater
Tahlequah
Tulsa

East Central State Teachers College Library
Northwestern State Teachers College Library
Southeastern Teachers College Library
Central State College Library
Langston University Library
University of Oklahoma Library
Oklahoma State Library
Oklahoma Baptist University Library
Oklahoma State University Library
Northeastern State Teachers College Library
University of Tulsa Library
Oregon

Ashland
Corvallis
Eugene
Forest Grove
La Grande
Portland
Salem

Southern Oregon College of Education Library
Oregon State College Library
University of Oregon Library
Pacific University Library
Eastern Oregon College of Education Library
Library Association of Portland
Reed College Library
Oregon State Library
Pennsylvania

Allentown
Bethlehem
Bradford
Carlisle
Erie
Harrisburg
Haverford
Huntingdon
Lancaster
Meadville
Philadelphia

Pittsburgh
Reading
Scranton
State College
Swarthmore
Washington
Wilkes-Barre
Williamsport

Muhlenberg College Library
Lehigh University Library
Carnegie Public Library
Dickinson College Library
Erie Public Library
Pennsylvania State Library
Haverford College Library
Juniata College Library
Franklin and Marshall College, Fackenthal Library
Allegheny College Library
Free Library of Philadelphia
Philadelphia Commercial Museum Library
Temple University, Sullivan Memorial Library
University of Pennsylvania Library
Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
University of Pittsburgh Library
Reading Public Library
Scranton Public Library
Pennsylvania State University Library
Swarthmore College Library
Memorial Library of Washington and Jefferson College
Kings College Library
James V. Brown Library
Puerto Rico

Rio Piedras

University of Puerto Rico General Library
Rhode I sland

Kingston
Providence
Westerly

University of Rhode Island Library
Brown University Library
Providence Public Library
Rhode Island State Library
Westerly Public Library
South Carolina

Charleston
Clemson
Columbia
Rockhill

Charleston College Library
Clemson College Library
University of South Carolina Library
Carnegie Library of Winthrop College
South Dakota

Brookings
Sioux Falls
Vermillion

100




South Dakota State College Lincoln Memorial Library
Carnegie Free Public Library
University of South Dakota Library

Tennessee

Chattanooga
Johnson City
Knoxville
Martin
Memphis
Murfreesboro
Nashville

Chattanooga Public Library
East Tennessee State College Library
University of Tennessee Library
University of Tennessee Library—Martin Branch
Cossitt Library
Middle Tennessee State College Library
Joint University Libraries
Nashville Public Library
State Library Division, Tennessee State Library and Archives
Texas

Abilene
Austin
Beaumont
Canyon
College Station
Commerce
Dallas
Denton
Edinburg
El Paso
Fort Worth
Galveston
Houston
Huntsville
Kingsville
Lubbock
San Antonio
San Marcos
Waco

Hardin Simmons University Library
Texas State Library
University of Texas Library
Lamar State College of Technology Library
West Texas State Teachers College Library
Agriculture and Mechanical College of Texas Library
East Texas State Teachers College Library
Dallas Public Library
Southern Methodist University Library
North Texas State College Library
Pan American College Library
El Paso Public Library
Fort Worth Public Library
Texas Christian University Library
Rosenberg Library
Houston Public Library
University of Houston Library
Sam Houston State Teachers College, Estill Library
Texas College of Arts and Industries Library
Texas Technological College Library
Public Library, Business and Science Department
Southwest Texas State Teachers College Library
Baylor University Library
U tah

Logan
Ogden
Provo
Salt Lake City

Utah State University of Agriculture and Applied Science Library
Carnegie Free Library
Brigham Young University Library
University of Utah Library
V ermont

Burlington
Middlebury
Montpelier
Northfield

University of Vermont Library
Middlebury College, Egbert Starr Library
Vermont State Library
Norwich University Library

V irginia

Blacksburg
Emory
Norfolk
Petersburg
Richmond
University
University of Richmond,
P. 0.
Williamsburg

Virginia Polytechnic Institute Library
Emory and Henry College Library
Norfolk Public Library
Virginia State College Library
Virginia State Library
University of Virginia Library
University of Richmond Library
William and Mary College Library
W ashington

Everett
Olympia
Pullman
Seattle
Spokane
Tacoma
Walla Walla




Everett Public Library
Washington State Library
State College of Washington Library
Seattle Public Library
University of Washington Library
Spokane Public Library
College of Puget Sound Library
Tacoma Public Library
Whitman College Library

101

W est V irginia

Athens
Huntington
Institute
Morgantown

Concord College Library
Marshall College Library
West Virginia State College Library
West Virginia University Library
W isconsin

Appleton
Beloit
Eau Claire
La Crosse
Madison
Milwaukee
Racine
Stevens Point
Superior

Lawrence College Library
Beloit College Library
Wisconsin State College Library
Public Libraiy
State Historical Society Library
University of Wisconsin Library
Milwaukee Public Library
Racine Public Library
Wisconsin State College Library
Superior Public Library
W yoming

Cheyenne
Laramie

Wyoming State Library
University of Wyoming Library
☆ U. S

102




G O V E R N M E N T PRINTING O FFICE:

1 9 6 0 ---- 5 3 4 6 6 0







Occupational Outlook Report Series
Bull. N o.

P rice ,
cents

E m ploym ent Outlook fo r —

1 25 5 -1

A cco u n ta n ts

___

1 2 5 5 -2

A g r ic u ltu r a l

O ccu p ation s_____________

5

1 2 5 5 -3

A ir c r a f t , M issile, and S p a ce cr a ft F ield
A n th ro p o lo g ists, E con o m ists, H isto ria n s,

1 2 5 5 -5

P olitical S cien tists, and S ociologists
A rch ite cts _________________________________

15
5

1 2 5 5 -6

A to m ic E n e r g y F ield

10

1 2 5 5 -7

A u tom obile M a n u fa c tu rin g O ccupations

1 2 5 5 -8

A u tom obile M ech anics and D iesel M e ­

1 2 5 5 -9

B a k in g

_________

10

15

_______________________________

10

In d u stry ______________________

10

1 2 5 5 -1 0

B a n k in g

1 25 5 -1 1

B e a u ty O p erators and B a rb e rs ___

O ccu p ation s______________

1255-47

20

1 2 5 5 -4

chanics

Bull. N o.

. ...

10

1255-50
1255-51
1255-52
1255-53
1255-54

10

..

1255-48
1255-49

1 2 5 5 -1 2

B iological

1 2 5 5 -1 3

B rick la y e rs, S ton em ason s, M arb le S e t­

S cie n tists____________________

1 2 5 5 -1 4

B u sin ess

M ach in e S erv ic em e n _________

5

1 2 5 5 -1 5

C a rp en ters _________________________________

5

1 2 5 5 -1 6

C h em ists

5

1 2 5 5 -1 7

C h irop ractors

1 2 5 5 -1 8

C om m ercial A r t i s t s ______________________

1 2 5 5 -1 9

1255-55
1255-56
1255-57
1255-58
1255-59

C onstruction E le ctrician s and E le v a to r

10

te rs, T ile S ette rs, T erra zzo W o r k e r s

___________________________________

C on stru ctors

_____________________________

_____________________________

10

5
5
10

1 2 5 5 -2 0

C onstruction L ab orers and H od C a rriers

1 2 5 5 -2 1

D e n tists

1 2 5 5 -2 2

D e p artm e n t Store O ccu p ation s_________

1 2 5 5 -2 3

D isp en sin g O p tician s and O p tical L a b ­

1 2 5 5 -2 4

E le ctric L ig h t and P ow er O ccupations

1 2 5 5 -2 5

E lectro n ic Servicem en and T e c h n i c i a n s 5

1 2 5 5 -2 6

E lectro n ics M a n u fa c tu rin g O ccupations

1 2 5 5 -2 7

E le ctro p laters ____________________________

1 2 5 5 -2 8

E n g in e e rin g

_______________________________

1 2 5 5 -2 9

FBI

______________________________

F o resters

__________________________________

5

1255-63
1255-64
1255-65
1255-66
1255-67
1255-68
1255-69
1255-70
1255-71
1255-72
1255-73

5

1 2 5 5 -3 0

_______________________________

5

o ratory M ech an ics_______________________

A g e n ts

5

1255-60
1255-61
1255-62

15
5
15
10
5
15

125 5 -3 1

F o r g e Shop O ccu p ation s; B lack sm ith s

1 2 5 5 -3 2

F o u n d ry

1 25 5 -3 3

G eologists, G eop h ysicists, M eteo rolo gists

10

1 2 5 5 -3 4
1 2 5 5 -3 5

G overn m en t Occupations __________
H om e E con om ists and D ie titian s ....

15
10

1255-74

Occupations

______________

....

1 2 5 5 -3 6

H otel O ccupations ___________________

1 2 5 5 -3 7

In d u stria l Chem ical In d u stry _____

1 2 5 5 -3 8

In stru m en t R epairm en __________________

1 2 5 5 -3 9

In su ra n ce O ccu p ation s— C lerk s, A g e n ts ,

1 2 5 5 -4 0

In te rio r D esign ers and D ecorators ___

1 25 5 -4 1

Iron and Steel In d u stry ________________

10
10

10
...

and A c tu a rie s __________________________

10
5
15

1255-75
1255-76
1255-77
1255-78
1255-79
1255-80
1255-81
1255-82

5
10

1 2 5 5 -4 2

L a w y e rs ____________________________________

5

1 2 5 5 -4 3

L ib ra ria n s _________________________________

5

1 2 5 5 -4 4

1255-83
1255-84
1255-85

M ach in ists, Tool and D ie M a k ers, In ­
stru m en t M a k ers, and O th er M a ch in ­
in g O ccupations ________________________

1 2 5 5 -4 5

1255-46

M ain ten an ce E le ctrician s _________

M athem aticians, Statisticians, and P ro­
gram m ers ___________________________

5

1255-86
1255-87
1255-88

10

1255-89

15

Employment Outlook for —

Price ,
cents

Medical X-Ray Technicians, Medical
Technologists, Dental Hygienists, and
Medical Record Librarians ________
Men's Tailored Clothing Industry ___
Millwrights and Industrial Machinery
Repairmen ________________________
Newspaper Reporters _______________
Office Machine Operators; Bookkeepers
Optometrists _________
Osteopathic Physicians _______________
Painters, Paperhangers, Glaziers, and
Asbestos and Insulating Workers ....
Paper and Allied Products Industry ...
Personnel Workers __________________
Petroleum Production and Refining . ..
Pharmacists
_____________________
Physical Therapists and Occupational
Therapists _________________________
Physicians __________________________
Physicists ___________________________
Pilots, Stewardesses, and Other Air
Transport Occupations _________ ...
Plasterers, Lathers, Cement Finishers
Plastic Products Manufacturing ___
Plumbers and Pipefitters _________
_
Policemen and Firemen ...
Printing Occupations .. ... _________
Protestant Clergymen _______________
Psychologists _______________________
Rabbis
... _________________________
Radio and Television Broadcasting . ..
Railroad Occupations _______________
Refrigeration a n d Air-Conditioning
Mechanics _________________________
Registered Professional Nurses and
Practical Nurses __________________
Restaurant Occupations— Waiters and
Waitresses, Cooks and Chiefs, Managers
Roman Catholic Priests __________ _
_
Sales Occupations __________________
Secretaries, Stenographers, and Typists
Sheet Metal Workers and Roofers ____
Social Workers ______________________
Stationary Engineers ________________
Structural-, Ornamental-, and Rein­
forcing-Iron Workers; Operating En­
gineers _____________________________
Teachers and School Counselors ____
Technicians and Draftsmen ________
Telephone Occupations— Linemen, In­
stallers, Repairmen, and Operators. ..
Truckdrivers, Bus Drivers, Taxi Drivers
Veterinarians ________________________
Watch Repairmen, Jewelers, a n d
Jewelry Repairmen ________________
Welders, Oxygen Cutters, Boilermakers

15
10
5
5
10
5
5
10
10
5
15
5
10
5
5
15
10
10
5
10
20
5
5
5
10
20
5
10
10
5
15
5
5
5
5

10
15
15
15
15
5
10
10

Available from the Superintendent o f Docum ents, W ashington 25, D.C. or any o f the follow in g regional office s o f the
Bureau o f Labor Statistics, U. S. Departm ent o f L abor:
341 Ninth A ve.
105 W est Adam s St.
18 Oliver St.
1371 Peachtree St. N E . 630 Sansome St.
New Y ork 1, N. Y .
Chicago 3, 111.
Boston 10, Mass.
A tlanta 9, Ga.
San F rancisco 11, Calif.