View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

STATE PERSONAL INCOM E
1929-93

'

I

11 1

■ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COM M ERCE
Econom ics and Statistics Administration
Bureau of Econom ic Analysis

\

STATE P E R S O N A L I N C O M E , 1 9 2 9 - 9 3

BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
RESEARCH RESOURCES CENTER BE-16
1441 L STREET, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20230

June 1995

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Ronald H. Brown, Secretary
• • • •
F

/f /J

_______ EC O N O M IC S
AND STATISTICS
A D M IN ISTRA TIO N

ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS ADMINISTRATION
Everett M. Ehrlich, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

BUREAU OF EC O NO M IC ANALYSIS
J. Steven Landefeld, A ctin g Director

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U,S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402

Citation
U.S. Department of Commerce. Bureau of Economic Analysis. State
Personal Income, 1929-93. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing
Office, June 1995.

Acknowledgments
The Regional Economic Measurement Division of
the Bureau of Economic Analysis under the
direction of Linnea Hazen, Chief, prepared the
estimates of State personal income. Hugh W. Knox,
Associate Director for Regional Economics,
provided guidance.
Elizabeth P. Cologer,LisaC. Ninomiya, Michael
G. Pilot, John A. Rusinko, and James M. Scott of
the Regional Wage Branch, under the supervision
of Sharon C. Camevale, Chief, guided the
preparation of the estimates of nonfarm labor
earnings (wages and salaries and other labor
income). The estimates were prepared by E. Frances
Bake, Christopher T. Berry, Lisa A. Bradburn,
Susan P. Den Herder, Elizabeth A. Freeman, Lela
S. Lester, Russell C. Lusher, Richard A. Lutyk, Paul
K. Medzerian, Michael Phillips, Adrienne T. Pilot,
William E. Reid, Jr., Dolores A. Rynn, Victor A.
Sahadachny, Eugene L. Souder, and Jaime Zenzano.
James M. Zavrel of the Quarterly Income Branch,
under the supervision of Robert L. Brown, Assistant
Division Chief, guided the preparation of the
estimates of farm earnings (wages and salaries, other
labor income, and proprietors’ income). The
estimates were prepared by Elaine M. Briccetti,
Daniel R. Corrin, and Richard H. Grayson. Michael
S. Wagner and Daniel Zabronsky, under the
supervision of Robert L. Brown, prepared the
estimates of the residence adjustment.
Charles A. Jolley of the Proprietors’ Income
Branch, under the supervision of Bruce Levine,
Chief, guided the preparation of the estimates of
nonfarm proprietors’ income, dividends, interest,
rent, and personal contributions for social insurance.
The estimates were prepared by Sean P. Collier,
Catherine A. Cumberland, and Toan A. Ly. Ellen
M. Wright and Marianne A. Ziver, under the
supervision of Bruce Levine, prepared the estimates
of the transfer payments.

Robert L. Brown guided the preparation of the
estimates of disposable State personal income and
quarterly State personal income. The estimates
were prepared by Marian B. Sacks, James P. Stehle,
and Isabelle B. Whiston.
Gary V. Kennedy of the Regional Economic
Information System Branch guided the preparation
of the materials for this publication; he and Kathy
A. Albetski guided the assembly of the public use
tabulations and the data files. This work was
performed by Wallace K. Bailey, who wrote the text,
by Callan S. Swenson and Jeffrey L. Newman, who
prepared the tablesfor typesetting, and by H. Steven
Dolan, Michael J. Paris, Albert Silverman, Nancy
E. Smith, Monique B. Tyes, and Mary C. Williams.
M. Gretchen Gibson of the Publication Services
Branch coordinated the publication of this book and
edited the text, under the supervision of Leland L.
Scott, Chief of the Publication Services Branch. Eric
B. Manning typeset the tables, and Ernestine T.
Gladden typeset the text. W. Ronnie Foster designed
the cover and provided other graphics services.
In addition, other government agencies and
private organizations provided the source data for
the estimates. The contributions of the following
organizations were particularly noteworthy: The
State employment security agencies, the State
agencies that administer income maintenance
programs, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Bureau
of the Census, the National Agricultural Statistics
Service and the Economic Research Service of the
Department of Agriculture, the Internal Revenue
Service, the Social Security Administration, the
Health Care Financing Administration, the Office
of the Secretary of Defense, the Office of Personnel
Management, the Department of Veterans Affairs,
and the Association of American Railroads.

iii

Subject Assignment Directory
For information about the availability of the estimates of State
personal income and disposable personal income, call the Regional
Economic Information System staff at (202) 606-5360 (see also
appendix A).
For additional information, call the following specialists.
Subject
Disposable personal income . . . . . . .
Farm proprietors’ income
and em ploym ent........................ . . .
M ethodology...................................... . . .
Nonfarm proprietors’ income
and em ploym ent........................ . . .
Other labor income ........................ . . .
Personal contributions
for social in su ran ce................... . . .
Personal dividend income,
Personal interest income, and
Rental income of persons ................. . .
Residence adjustm ent......................... . .
Transfer p ay m e n ts........................... . . .
Wage and salary disbursements
and em ploym ent............................ . .

IV

Specialist
N um ber
Robert L. Brown . . . . . . . (202) 606-4500
James M. Zavrel . . . . . . . (202) 606-4500
Wallace K. Bailey . . . . . . (202) 606-5360
Charles A. Jolley . . . . . . (202) 606-4500
Sharon Carnevale . . . . . . (202) 606-4500
Charles A. Jolley . . . . . . (202) 606-4500
Charles A. Jolley . . . . . . (202) 606-4500
Michael Wagner . . . . . . . (202) 606-4500
Robert L. Brown . . . . . . . (202) 606-4500
Sharon Carnevale . . . . . . (202) 606-4500

Contents
Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................... M -l
A brief history .......................................................................................................................................... M -l
Uses of the State estimates ....................................................................................................................... M-2
Publication schedule .................................................................................................................................. M-2
Preparing and revising the estimates ....................................................................................................... M-2
Quarterly estimates.................................................................................................................................. M-3
Annual estimates...................................................................................................................................... M-3
Availability of the State and local area estimates .................................................................................. M-3
Sources and Methods for the Annual Estimates of State Personal Income
and Disposable Personal Income, 1987-93 ....................................................................................................... M-5
Introduction .......................................................................................................................................................... M-5
Differences in definitions and classifications ........................................................................................... M-6
Sources of the data .................................................................................................................................... M-6
Geographic characteristics of the source data ......................................................................................... M-6
Allocation procedures ................................................................................................................................ M-7
Interpolation and extrapolation procedures ............................................................................................. M-8
Personal Income ...................................................................................................................................................... M-8
Wage and Salary Disbursements ...................................................................................................................... M-8
Wages and salaries covered by the State UI programs ......................................................................... M-9
Adjustment for industry nonclassification............................................................................................. M-9
Adjustment for congressional staff wages............................................................................................. M-9
Adjustment for misreported ES-202 d ata ............................................................................................. M-9
Adjustments for wages and salaries that are excluded from the ES-202 data.................................M-10
Wages and salaries not covered by the State UI programs ................................................................... M -l 1
Farms........................................................... ...........................................................................................M-l 1
Farm labor contractors ...........................................................................................................................M -l 1
Private households..................................................................................................................................M-l 1
Private elementary and secondary schools............................................................................................ M -l 1
Religious membership organizations.......................................................................................................M -l2
Railroads.................................................................................................................................................. M-l 2
M ilitary....................................................................................................................................................M-l 2
Other..........................................................................................................................................................M-l 3
Other Labor Income .................................................................. ........................................................................ M -l 3
Contributions to private benefit plans ..................................................................................................... M -l 3
Pension and profit-sharing plans, group health and life insurance,
and supplemental unemployment insurance........................................................................................M -l 3
Workers’ compensation plans..................................................................................................................M -l 4
Directors’ fees and miscellaneous fees ................................................................................................... M -l5
Proprietors’ Income ........................................................................................................................................... M -l 5
Nonfarm Proprietors’ Income ....................................................................................................................... M -l6
Income of nonfarm sole proprietorships and partnerships..................................................................... M -l6
Income of nonfarm tax-exempt cooperatives .........................................................................................M -l7
Farm Proprietors’ Income .............................................................................................................................M -l7
USDA estimates of gross income .............................................................................................................M -l7
Cash receipts..........................................................................................................................................M -l 8
Cash receipts from other activities .......................................................................................................M -l8
Federal Government payments to farm operators.................................................................................M -l 8

Imputed gross rental value of farm housing.........................................................................................M-18
Imputed value of home consumption....................................................................................................M-18
Value of the change in farm inventories.............................................................................................. M-18
USDA estimates of production expenses ................................................................................................ M-19
Adjustments to the USDA State estimates .............................................................................................. M-19
Adjustments in definitions and classifications......................................................................................M-19
Statistical adjustments.............................................................................................................................M-20
Adjustment to exclude the income of corporate farm s.......................................................................M-20
Personal Dividend Income, Personal Interest Income, and Rental Income of Persons .............................M-21
Personal Dividend Income ...............................................................................................................................M-21
Dividend income received by individuals............................................................................................M-21
Dividend income received by nonprofit institutions...............................................................................M-21
Dividend income retained by fiduciaries............................................................................................M-21
Personal Interest Income .................................................................................................................................M-22
Monetary interest income ........................................................................................................................... M-22
Reportable interest income ......................................................................................................................M-22
Interest income received from municipal bonds..................................................................................M-22
Net accrued interest income from Federal Government savings bonds............................................M-22
Interest income received by nonprofit institutions.............................................................................M-22
Interest income retained by fiduciaries.........................................................................................
M-23
Imputed interest income ............................................................................................................................. M-23
Rental Income of Persons ...............................................................................................................................M-23
Monetary rental income ...............................................................................................................................M-23
Net rents and royalties received by individuals....................................................................................M-23
Net rents and royalties received by nonprofit institutions..................................................................M-23
Net rents and royalties retained by fiduciaries........................................................................................M-23
Imputed rental income .................................................................................................................................M-23
Imputed rent from mobile homes ........................................................................................................... M-24
Imputed rent from all other nonfarm dwellings ..................................................................................M-24
Transfer Payments .................................................................................................................................................M-24
Government Payments to Individuals ............................................................................................................. M-25
Retirement and disability insurance payments ......................................................................................... M-25
Old-age, survivors, and disability insurance payments.........................................................................M-25
Railroad retirement and disability payments ......................................................................................... M-25
Federal civilian employee retirement and disability payments............................................................ M-25
Military retirement payments .................................................................................................................. M-25
State and local government employee retirement payments................................................................M-25
Workers’ compensation....................................................................................................................
M-25
Other government retirement and disability insurance payments.........................................................M-26
Medical payments ........................................................................................................................................M-26
Medicare payments ...................................................................................................................................M-26
Medical vendor payments ........................................................................................................................M-26
Military medical insurance payments......................................................................................................M-26
Income maintenance payments ........................................................................ . ......................................M-26
Supplemental security income payments.................................................................................................M-26
Aid to families with dependent children (AFDC) ................................................................................ M-27
Food stamps............................................................................................................................................... M-27
Other income maintenance payments.....................................................................................................M-27
Unemployment insurance payments ........................................................................................................... M-27
State unemployment compensation......................................................................................................... M-27
Unemployment compensation of railroad employees ...........................................................................M-28
Unemployment compensation of Federal civilian employees..............................................................M-28

Unemployment compensation of veterans...............................................................................................M-28
Trade adjustment allowances...................................................................................................................M-28
Payments to veterans ...................................................................................................................................M-28
Veterans pension and disability payments...... ......................................................................................M-28
Educational assistance to veterans, dependents, and survivors.......................................................... M-28
Veterans life insurance payments.............................................................................................................M-28
Other payments to veterans.............. ....................................................... ...........................................M-28
Federal Government education and training payments...........................................................................M-28
Federal fellowships ..........................
M-28
Higher education student assistance........................................................................................................M-29
Job Corps payments.................................................................................................................................. M-29
Interest payments on guaranteed student loans......................................................................................M-29
Other government payments to individuals ...............................................................................................M-29
Compensation of survivors of public safety officers...........................................................................M-29
Compensation of victims of crime ......................................................................................................... M-29
Alaska Permanent Fund payments...........................................................................................................M-29
Disaster relief payments........................................................................................................................... M-29
Japanese interns redress payments...........................................................................................................M-29
Federal educational exchange payments................................................................................................ M-29
Bureau of Indian Affairs payments......................................................................................................... M-30
Payments to Nonprofit Institutions Serving Individuals ............................................................................ M-30
Federal Government payments .................................................................................................................. M-30
State and local government payments ........................................................................................................M-30
Payments for foster care........................................................................................................................... M-30
Job Training Partnership Act payments.................................................................................................. M-30
Educational assistance...............................................................................................................................M-30
Business payments........................................................................................................................................M-30
Business Payments to Individuals .................................................................................................................. M-30
Personal Contributions for Social Insurance ......................................................................................................M-30
Contributions for old-age, survivors, and disability insurance and hospital insurance ......................M-31
Contributions by employees .................................................................................................................... M-31
Contributions by the self-employed ........................................................................................................M-31
Contributions by employees for the other programs ..............................................................................M -31
Contributions for railroad employee retirement insurance..................................................................M -31
Contributions for Federal civilian employee retirement....................................................................... M -31
Contributions for State and local government employee retirement.................................................M-32
Contributions for State unemployment insurance and for temporary disability insurance.............M-32
Contributions by others for supplementary medical insurance and veterans life insurance .............M-32
Contributions for supplementary medical insurance .............................................................................M-32
Contributions for veterans life insurance................................................................................................ M-32
Residence Adjustments ........................................................................................................................................M-32
Procedure for the Income of Interstate Commuters ....................................................................................M-3 3
Procedure for the income of intercounty commuters, 1987-92 ..... ..................................................... M-33
Preliminary estimates for 1990.................................................................................................................M-33
Modifying the preliminary 1990 estimates..................................... ; .................................................. M-34
Extrapolating the 1990 estimates to 1991-92 ....................................................................................... M-35
Preparing the estimates for 1987-89 ......................................................................................................M-35
Procedure for the Income of Border workers.............................................................................................. M-36
Disposable Personal Incom e.......................................
M-36
Payments to the Federal Government ........................................................................................................... M-37
Individual income tax payments .................................................................................................................M-37
Tax payments on income retained by fiduciaries ....................................................................................M-37
vii

Estate and gift tax payments ......................................................................................................................M-38
Nontax payments ..................................................................................................................
M-38
Payments to State Governments .................................................................................................................... M-38
Individual income tax payments .................................................................................................................M-38
Estate and gift tax payments ......................................................................................................................M-38
Payments for motor vehicle, operator’s, and other licenses ....................................................................M-38
Other nontax payments ...............................................................................................................................M-38
Payments to Local Governments .................................................................................................................... M-38
Individual income tax payments .................................................................................................................M-38
Motor vehicle registration fees ...................................................................................................................M-39
Miscellaneous fees and estate and gift taxes .............................................................................................M-39
Other nontax payments ...............................................................................................................................M-39
Personal Property Tax Payments to State and Local Governments............................................................ M-39
Sources and Methods for the Quarterly Estimates of State Personal Income ..............................................M-41
State-level source data and methods ......................................................................................................... M-41
First approximations of the estimates......................................................................................................M-42
Final preparation of the estimates........................................................................................................... M-42
Control totals for the quarterly estimates .................................................................................................. M-42
Control totals for the quarterly estimates of wages and salaries.........................................................M-44
The NIPA estimates of wages and salaries.............................................................................................M-44
Sources and methods for three components and for the residence adjustment .....................................M-45
Wage and salary disbursements...............................................................................................................M-45
Farm proprietors’ income..........................................................................................................................M-45
Transfer payments .................................................................................................................................... M-45
Residence adjustment...............................................................................................................................M-45
Technical Notes ..............................................................................................................................
M-47
Disclosure-avoidance procedures ...............................................................................................................M-47
Imputation .....................................................................................................................................................M-48
Industry classification ...................................................................................................................................M-48
Interpolation and extrapolation ...................................................................................................................M-49
Per capita personal income ..........................................................................................................................M-50
Personal income, adjusted gross income, and money income ................................................................M-50
Glossary .........................................................................................................................................................................M-53
Allocation procedures...............................................................................................................................M-53
Capital consumption adjustment (CCAdj)...............................................................................................M-53
Corporate business.................................................................................................................................... M-53
County........................................................................................................................................................ M-53
Disclosure-avoidance procedures.............................................................................................................M-53
Disposable personal income.................................................................................................................... M-53
Earnings.......................................................................................................................................................M-53
Economic sectors and legal form of organization.................................................................................. M-53
Extrapolation............................................................................................................................................. M-54
Fiduciary.....................................................................................................................................................M-54
Geographic units........................................................................................................................................M-54
Government enterprise ............................................................................................................................. M-54
Imputation...................................................................................................................................................M-54
Income subject to adjustment...................................................................................................................M-54
Interpolation............................................................................................................................................... M-54
Inventory valuation adjustment (IVA) ....................................................................................................M-54
Labor earnings............................................................................................................................................M-55
viii

Local areas.................................................................................................................................................M-55
Metropolitan areas.................................................................................................................................... M-55
Other labor income .................................................................................................................................. M-55
Other private business...............................................................................................................................M-55
Partnership.................................................................................................................................................M-55
Pay-in-kind.................................................................................................................................................M-55
Per capita personal income......................................................................................................................M-55
Personal contributions for socialinsurance.............................................................................................M-55
Personal dividend income ..................................................................................................................M-55
Personal income........................................................................................................................................M-55
Personal interest income........................................................................................................................... M-56
Personal tax and nontax payments ......................................................................................................... M-56
Persons........................................................................................................................................................ M-56
Proprietors’ income with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments ......................M-56
Quasi-individuals ......................................................................................................................................M-56
Region........................................................................................................................................................ M-56
Rental income of persons with capital consumption adjustment.........................................................M-56
Residence adjustment...............................................................................................................................M-56
Residence, place o f .................................................................................................................................. M-57
Seasonal adjustment at annual rates........................................................................................................M-57
Sole proprietorship.........................................
M-57
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC).................................................................................................. M-57
State ............................................................................................................................................................ M-57
Tax-exempt cooperative........................................................................................................................... M-57
Transfer payments .................................................................................................................................... M-57
Wage and salary disbursements...............................................................................................................M-57
AppendixA: Availability of Tables From the Regional Economic Information System................................ M-55
Appendix B: Members of the BEA User Group................................................................................................. M-91
Statistical Section:
Charts:
Per Capita Personal Income by State, 1929 ................................................................................................... 3
Per Capita Personal Income by State, 1993 ................................................................................................... 4
Per Capita Personal Income by Region, 1929-93 .............................................................................................. 5
Summary Estimates .................................................................................................................................................... 6
United States................................................................................................................................................................. 34
Regions.......................................................................................................................................................................... 39
Far West ................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Great Lakes ............................................................................................................................................................. 45
Mideast ..................................................................................................................................................................... 50
New England............................................................................................................................................................ 55
Plains........................................................................................................................................................................ 50
Rocky Mountain.................................................................................................................................. -................. 55
Southeast................................................................................................................................................................... 70
Southwest................................................................................................................................................................. 75
States
Alabama ................................................................................................................................................................... 80
Alaska ....................................................................................................................................................................... 85
Arizona..................................................................................................................................................................... 90
Arkansas................................................................................................................................................................... 95
California ...................................................................................................................................................................150
Colorado.....................................................................................................................................................................155
IX

Connecticut............................................................................................................................................................. 2 2 0
Delaware..........................................................................................................................................
215
District of Columbia........................................................................................................................................
120
Florida.................................................................................................................................................
225
Georgia .......................................................................................................................................................................
Hawaii.........................................................................................................................................................................135
Idaho.......................................................................................................................................................................... ...
Illinois..........................................................................................................................................................
245
Indiana...............................................................................................................................................................
250
I o w a ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Kansas.....................................................................................................................................................
260
Kentucky........................................................................ . .............................................
265
Louisiana...............................................................................................................................................
270
Maine.................
275
Maryland...................................................................................................................................................
280
Massachusetts ......................................................................................................................................
285
Michigan ..................................................................................................................................................................... 290
Minnesota...................................................................................................................................................................295
Mississippi........................................................................................................................................................
200
Missouri........................................................................................................................................................
205
Montana.....................................................................................................................................................
210
Nebraska.................................................................................................................................................................... 215
Nevada.................................................................................................................................................................! ’. 220
New Hampshire..........................................................................................................................................................225
New Jersey...................................................................................................................................................
230
New Mexico.....................................................................................................................................................
235
New York...................................................................................................................................................................240
North Carolina........................................................................................................................................................... 245
North Dakota............................................................................................................................................................. 250
0 h io ............................................................................................................................................................................255
Oklahoma.......................................................................
0 reg°n ........................................................................................................................................................................265
Pennsylvania ............................................................................................................................................................. 270
Rhode Island............................................................................................................................................................. 275
South Carolina........................................................................................................................................................... 280
South Dakota..................................................................................................................................................... 285
Tennessee........................................................................................................................................................
290
Texas ..........................................................................................................................................................
295
U tah............................................................................................................................................................................300
Vermont...................................................................................................................................................................... 305
Virginia........................................................................................................................................................................
Washington.........................................................................................................................
3 25
West Virginia...............................................................................................................................................................
Wisconsin................................................................................................................................................................. ...
Wyoming..........................................................................................................................................................
330
Footnotes..........................................................................................................................................................................

Introduction
This introduction presents a brief history of the devel­
This publication presents the State estimates of personal
income that were prepared by the Regional Economic opment of the estimates of personal income. It describes
Measurement Division of the Bureau of Economic Anal­ the uses of the State estimates and the schedule for
ysis (BEA). It presents the following estimates for each preparing and revising the estimates, and it presents in­
State, for the eight BEA regions, and for the United formation about the availability of the estimates and
about the BEA User Group.
States:
• Annual estimates of total and per capita personal A brief history
income for 1929-93,
• Annual estimates of total and per capita disposable In the mid-1930’s, the work on the estimation of re­
gional income began, as part of the effort to explain the
personal income for 1948-93,
processes
and structure of the Nation’s economy. As a
• Annual estimates of personal income by major type result, annual
State estimates of total “income payments
of payment and by industry for 1929-93, and
to
individuals”
produced. These income payments
• Quarterly estimates of total personal income for were calculatedwere
as the sum of ( 1 ) wages and salaries, (2 )
1969-93.
other labor income and relief, (3) entrepreneurial with­
These estimates are supplemented by maps and charts. drawals, and (4) dividends, interest, and net rents and
The maps show the State distributions of per capita per­ royalties.
During the 1940’s and early 1950’s, an integrated
sonal income in 1929 and in 1993. The charts show the
set
of national economic accounts was developed, addi­
following: Per capita personal income for the regions
tional
source data were sought, and the methods used to
as a percent of the same measure for the United States
for 1929-93; per capita personal income for the United prepare the estimates were improved. One result of this
States, for each region, and for each State for selected work was the development of State personal income—a
years in 1929-93; and the composition of total personal measure that is more comprehensive than State income
income for the United States, for each region, and for payments.
State personal income differs significantly from State
each State for selected years in 1977-93.
The estimates of personal income and of per capita income payments in five ways:
personal income reflect the revised national estimates of
• State personal income consists of six major com­
personal income that resulted from the 1991 comprehen­
ponents (other labor income and transfer payments
sive revision and the 1992 and 1993 annual revisions of
replaced other labor income and relief, and the com­
the national income and product accounts. The revised
ponent personal contributions for social insurance
national estimates were incorporated into the State es­
was added as an explicit deduction);
timates of personal income as part of a comprehensive
•
Personal income includes more component detail
revision of the State estimates in August 1992. In ad­
and a broader range of income-in-kind and imputed
dition, the estimates incorporate State-level source data
income items than State income payments;
that were not available in time to be used in the com­
•
Personal income includes the income of nonprofit
prehensive revisions. However, the estimates presented
institutions that serve individuals and of private
in this publication—which were completed in August
noninsured welfare funds and private trust funds;
1994—do not reflect the most recent State-level revi­
•
Personal income includes employer contributions
sions, which were made to the estimates for 1991-93
to private pension funds—as part of other labor
when the local area estimates for 1991-93 were released
income—instead of the benefits paid by the funds;
in May 1995.
and
The estimates are first prepared for the Nation and
• Personal income includes transfer payments by
for the States. The estimates for the regions are
business.
aggregations of the State estimates.
M -l

M-2

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

In addition, in the mid-1950’s, the work on preparing personal income was one basis for the distribution of
estimates for local areas began. The estimates for a few $92 billion in Federal funds. The estimates of gross state
counties in the States in the Mideast and Plains regions product are also used in the funds allocation formula for
were prepared.
one program.
In the late 1950’s, the estimates of State disposable
In addition, the Census Bureau uses the estimates of
personal income were developed. This series was pub­ State per capita personal income as the key predictor
lished occasionally in the S
C
B
variable in the preparation of State estimates of the mean
in the 1960’s and 1970’s and has been presented annual income for four-person families.
annually since 1982.
State governments use the estimates of personal in­
During the 1960’s, quarterly estimates of State per­ come and gross state product to measure the economic
sonal income were developed. The first set of these base of State planning areas. They also use the estimates
estimates as a continuous series was published in the in econometric models that are developed for various
December 1966 issue of the S
. In addition, a
planning purposes and to project tax revenues and the
personal income series for metropolitan areas and for need for public utilities and for services. Currently, 18
nonmetropolitan counties for selected years in 1929-62 States have set constitutional or statutory limits on State
was prepared.
government revenues and spending that are tied to State
In the early 1970’s, BEA developed the estimates personal income or to one of its components. A ma­
of personal income for counties in metropolitan areas. jority of the States use the quarterly estimates of State
These estimates were published for the first time in the personal income to project tax collections.
April 1975 S
. Later in the 1970’s, BEA devel­
University schools of business and economics use
oped estimates of employment for States, counties, and the estimates for theoretical and applied economic re­
metropolitan areas.
search. Some of these schools distribute the estimates
In the 1980’s, BEA developed estimates of gross state in abstracts or similar reports to various State and local
product by industry. These estimates as an established government agencies, regional councils of governments,
series were first presented in the May 1988 S
.
private research groups, businesses, and libraries.
Now, BEA prepares annual and quarterly estimates of
Businesses use the estimates for planning activities,
State personal income and annual estimates of State dis­ such as evaluating markets for new or established prod­
posable personal income, employment, and gross state ucts and determining areas for the location, expansion,
product.1 BEA also prepares annual estimates of per­ and contraction of their activities.
sonal income and employment for all metropolitan areas
and all the counties and county equivalents for which Publication schedule
reliable source data are available.
The quarterly State estimates of total and nonfarm per­
sonal income are published in the January, April, July,
Uses of the State estimates
and October issues of the S
.
The State estimates of personal income and its com­
preliminary annual State estimates of total and
ponents, of per capita personal income, of disposable perThecapita
income and of total and per capita
personal income, and of gross state product are widely disposable personal
personal
income are published in the April
used by both the public and the private sectors to meas­ S
. The revised annual estimates of State personal
ure and to track the levels and the types of incomes that income by major type and of earnings by industry are
are received by the people who live or work in a State published in the August S
.
and the value-added that a State’s industries produce.
The
local
area
estimates
of
and per capita
These estimates provide a framework for the analysis personal income are published in total
the
April
S
.2
of each State’s economy, and they serve as a basis for
decision making.
Federal agencies use these estimates in econometric Preparing and revising the estimates
models, such as those used to project energy and water The schedule for preparing and revising the annual esti­
use; they also use the estimates as a basis for allocating mates of personal income for States is closely linked to
funds and for determining matching grants. For exam­ the schedule for preparing the quarterly estimates. The
ple, in fiscal year 1992, the estimates of State per capita revised annual estimates are a principal basis for the
u r v ey o f

u r ren t

u s in e s s

u r v e y

u r v e y

u r v e y

u r v e y

u r v e y

u r v e y

u r v e y

M.

1.
F o r inform ation about the estimates o f gross state product, see Richard
2.
However, in 1993, the local area estimates were published in the M ay
B eem iller and
Dunbar, “ G ross State Product 1977-91,” urvey
issue
the urvey the revised annual State estimates, in the September
urrent usiness 74 (August 1994): 80-97.
issue, and the revised quarterly State estimates, in the Novem ber issue.

of C

B

Ann E.

S

of

S

,

M-3

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

quarterly estimates, and the quarterly estimates are used
to prepare the preliminary annual estimates.
Quarterly estimates.—The quarterly estimates of State
personal income are prepared about 4 months after the
end of the quarter. In January and in July, the esti­
mates for specific quarters are revised to incorporate
administrative-records data for wage and salary dis­
bursements. In January, the estimates for the second
quarter of the preceding year are revised, and the es­
timates for one or more quarters preceding the second
quarter may also be revised. In July, the estimates for
the fourth quarter of the preceding year are revised, and
the estimates for one or more quarters preceding the
fourth quarter may also be revised.
In April and in October, the quarterly estimates for
the previous 3 years are revised so that they will be
consistent with the revised annual estimates.
Annual estimates.—The annual estimates of total and
per capita personal income and of total and per capita
disposable personal income for States for a given year
are prepared in two steps. First, in April, preliminary es­
timates for the preceding year that are derived from the
quarterly estimates for that year are prepared. Second,
in August, the preliminary estimates are superseded by
revised estimates that are more detailed and more reli­
able because they are derived from source data that are
more complete, more detailed, and more recent than the
data that were used to prepare the quarterly estimates
and the preliminary annual estimates.
The following April, the annual estimates for the year
are revised in order to incorporate the newly available
data that are used to prepare the county estimates of
personal income for that year.
The annual estimates for a year are routinely revised
again for 2 more years. The State estimates are re­
vised in August and in April, and the county estimates
are revised in April; each revision incorporates newly
available source data. These routine revisions are com­
pleted 3 years after the preliminary State estimates were
prepared and 2 years after the county estimates were
prepared.3
The State and county estimates are normally revised
again only after a comprehensive, or benchmark, re­
vision of the national income and product accounts
(NIPA’s) that results in revisions to the national es­
timates of personal income, which is an aggregate in
the NIPA’s; comprehensive revisions to the NIPA’s

are made approximately every 5 years.4 The revised
national estimates are incorporated into the State and
county estimates as part of the comprehensive revi­
sion of the State estimates and of the county estimates,
because the State and county estimates are designed
to be statistically and conceptually consistent with the
national estimates.
In a comprehensive NIPA revision, the national esti­
mates of personal income are affected by the statistical
changes that result from the introduction of new source
data and the use of improved estimating methods. The
national estimates may also be affected by the changes
made to the definitions and the classifications of the
NIPA components so that the NIPA’s will reflect the
evolving economy of the United States. For example, as
part of the 1985 comprehensive revision, the payments
to vendors of medical services under the medicaid pro­
gram were reclassified from government purchases to
transfer payments; as a result, these payments are now
classified as part of personal income for all the years
that the program has existed.
Availability of the State and local area estimates
Before the State and local area estimates are published
in the S
, they are available in printed and elec­
tronic news releases.5 More detailed estimates than the
estimates published in the S
are available from the
Regional Economic Information System (REIS).6
In addition, the State and local area estimates of per­
sonal income and of employment are available from the
BEA User Group. The members of this group include
State agencies, universities, and Census Bureau Primary
State Data Centers.7 The members have agreed to pro­
vide the estimates that they receive from REIS to other
users in their State; they can provide the estimates for
their State and sometimes for other States.
u r v e y

u r v ey

4. N in e comprehensive N IP A revisions have been completed— in 1947,
1951, 1954, 1958, 1965, 1976, 1980, 1985, and 1991.

The next one is

scheduled for release at the end o f 1995.
5. N ew s releases are available online and by fax from the Com m erce D e ­
partment’ s S T A T -U S A . F o r prices and other inform ation about these services,
ca ll (202) 482-1986.
6. The R egional E conom ic Inform ation System comprises the data files,
the computer programs, and the staff that maintain, manage, and distribute
the regional database. The staff operates an inform ation retrieval service that

3.
F o r a summary o f the most recent revisions, see “ L o c a l A rea Personal provides standard and specialized tabulations o f regional data. F o r further
inform ation, see the ad on page 336 and Appendix A: A v a ila b ility o f the
Income: Estimates fo r 1990-92 and R evisions to the Estimates fo r 1981—
Data and Sample Tables from the Regional E conom ic Information System.
91,” urvey 7 4 (A p ril 1994): 127-129 and “ State Personal Income, Revised
7. See A ppen dix B: M em bers o f the B E A U ser Group.
Estimates fo r 1991-93,” urvey 74 (August 1994): 64-67.

S

S

Sources and Methods for the Annual Estimates
of State Personal Income
and Disposable Personal Income, 1987-93
This text describes the sources of the data and the meth­
ods that were used to prepare the annual estimates of the
components of personal income and disposable personal
income for States for 1987-93.1
The introduction describes the relationship between
the national estimates of personal income and the State
estimates, it defines the essential terms used, and it ex­
plains a few differences between the definitions and
classifications used in the national estimates and those
used in the State estimates. This introduction also in­
cludes general information about the sources of the data
that are used to prepare the estimates and the place of
measurement of the source data. Additionally, it in­
cludes information about the allocation procedure and
a brief description of interpolation and extrapolation
procedures.
After the introduction, the text provides specific infor­
mation about the sources and methods used to prepare
the estimates of each component of personal income,
of the residence adjustment, and of disposable personal
income.

Introduction
The State estimates of personal income and disposable
personal income are designed to be conceptually and
statistically consistent with the national estimates of per­
sonal income and disposable personal income; as part
of the preparation of the State estimates, the national
estimates are disaggregated to States.2 As a result, the
1. F o r inform ation about the methodology used to prepare the estimates

definitions that are used for the components of personal
and disposable personal income for the State estimates
are essentially the same as those used for the national
estimates.3
State personal income is defined as the income re­
ceived by, or on behalf of, all the residents of the State.
It consists of the income received by persons from all
sources—that is, from participation in production, from
both government and business transfer payments, and
from government interest (which is treated like a transfer
payment).
Persons consists of individuals, nonprofit institutions
that serve individuals, private noninsured welfare funds,
and private trust funds. In this text, the last three are
referred to as “quasi-individuals.”
Personal income is defined as the sum of wage and
salary disbursements, other labor income, proprietors’
income with inventory valuation and capital consump­
tion adjustments, rental income of persons with capital
consumption adjustment, personal dividend income,
personal interest income, and transfer payments to
persons, less personal contributions for social insurance.
State per capita personal income is calculated as the
personal income of the residents of the State divided by
the population of the State on July 1.
Disposable personal income is the income that is
available to persons for spending and saving. It is cal­
culated as personal income less the sum of personal
tax payments and personal nontax payments to Federal,
State, and local governments.
State per capita disposable personal income is calcu­
lated as the disposable personal income of the residents

fo r earlier years, c a ll (202) 606-9241.
2. A t the national level, personal incom e and disposable personal incom e

F o r a com parison o f G D P , G S P , and State earnings by place o f w ork for

are parts o f the personal incom e and outlay account, w hich is one o f five

1991, see appendix B in R ich ard M . B eem iller and A n n E. Dunbar, “ Gross

accounts that compose the national incom e and product accounts.

State Product 1977-91,”

O f the aggregations in the personal income and outlay account, only
personal income, disposable personal income, and personal tax and nontax

Survey of C urrent B usiness

74 (August 1994):

85.
3.

The national estimates may tem porarily differ from the State estimates

payments are estimated fo r States. In addition, gross state product (GSP),
w h ich corresponds to gross domestic product (G D P), is estimated; G S P

because o f different estimating schedules: The State estimates o f wages and
salaries— and occasionally the estimates o f farm proprietors’ income— may

and State personal incom e share most o f the elements o f earnings by State

incorporate source data that are not available when the national estimates are

o f work; earnings consists o f wage and salary disbursements, other labor

prepared; these data are later incorporated into the national estimates when

income, and proprietors’ income.

they are revised.
M -5

M-6

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

of the State divided by the population of the State on
July 1.

source of the income. These data are a byproduct of
the administration of various Federal and State govern­
ment programs. The most important sources of these
Differences in definitions and classifications
data are as follows: The State unemployment insurance
programs
of the Employment and Training Administra­
The definitions that are used in the State estimates for
tion,
U.S.
Department of Labor; the social insurance
two components of personal income differ significantly
from the definitions that are used in the national esti­ programs of the Social Security Administration and
mates. In addition, the classifications that are used for the Health Care Financing Administration, U.S. De­
one component in the State estimates differ significantly partment of Health and Human Services; the Federal
income tax program of the Internal Revenue Service,
from those used in the national estimates.
U.S.
Department of the Treasury; the veterans benefit
The State estimates of wage and salary disbursements
programs
of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs;
and of other labor income consist mainly of the la­ and the military
bor earnings of persons who reside and who work in of Defense.5 payroll systems of the U.S. Department
the United States. However, the national estimates
Some of the estimates are based on data from other
of these components also include the earnings of U.S.
residents—including military personnel—who are tem­ sources. For example, the estimates of the components
porarily working abroad for the U.S. Government or for of farm proprietors’ income, a component of personal
income, are mainly based on the State estimates of farm
U.S. firms.
The adjustments to the estimates of the wages and income that are prepared by the U.S. Department of
salaries disbursed by domestic industries to include Agriculture, which uses sample surveys, along with cen­
the wages and salaries of U.S. residents who work in sus data and administrative-records data, to derive its
other countries and to exclude the wages and salaries estimates.
Using data that are not primarily designed to measure
of foreign residents who work in the United States
income
as it is defined in the national income and prod­
are classified in the residence adjustments in the State
estimates.4 In the national estimates, these adjustments uct accounts has both advantages and disadvantages.
are classified in the rest-of-the-world sector, which is By using these data, BEA can prepare detailed annual
estimates of personal income for States at a relatively
not recognized in the State estimates.
In addition, in the State estimates, the wages and low cost and without increasing the reporting burden
salaries of U.S. residents who are employed by inter­ on businesses and households. However, because these
national organizations and by foreign embassies and data often do not precisely “match” the series that is be­
consulates in the United States are classified in an ing estimated, they must be adjusted to compensate for
“industry” called “other.” In the national estimates, differences in definitions, in coverage, and in geographic
the wages of these residents are classified in the detail.
rest-of-the-world sector.
Geographic characteristics of the source data
Sources of the data
Personal income, by definition, is a measure of the in­
The State estimates of personal income are primarily come received by persons, and the estimates of State
based on census data and on administrative-records data. personal income should reflect the State of the resi­
The data from censuses are mainly collected from the dence of the income recipients. However, most of the
recipient of the income. The most important sources source data that are used to prepare the estimates of
of census data for the State estimates are the census of some of the components of personal income are reported
agriculture and the census of population and housing and recorded by the recipient’s place of work rather
that are conducted by the Bureau of the Census, U.S. than by the recipient’s place of residence. As a re­
Department of Commerce.
sult, the estimates of the components that are derived
The data from administrative records may originate from the place-of-work data are adjusted to a place-ofeither from the recipients of the income or from the residence basis, and the estimates of these components
are presented both by place of work and by place of
4.
The residence adjustments are m ain ly estimates o f the net inflow s o f
residence.
the labor earnings o f interstate commuters.
The State estimates o f wages b y place o f work, lik e the national estimates
o f wages fo r dom estic industries, exclude the wages o f the U.S.-resident
border workers and include the wages o f the foreign-resident border workers.

5.
The data from the State unem ploym ent insurance programs are co l­
lected b y the various State em ployment security agencies and are assembled
and supplied by the U .S. Bureau o f Lab or Statistics.

M-7

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

The estimates of the components of personal in­
come can be grouped according to the geographic
characteristics of the source data.
The estimates of wages and salaries, other labor in­
come, and personal contributions for social insurance by
employees are mainly derived from source data that are
reported and recorded by place of work. These data are
reported by industry in the State and county in which
the employing establishment is located.
The estimates of nonfarm proprietors’ income and
of personal contributions for social insurance by the
self-employed are derived from source data that are re­
ported by the tax-filing address of the recipient. This
address is usually that of the proprietor’s residence;
therefore, these data are assumed to be recorded by
place of residence. Nevertheless, the estimates of these
components—as part of the estimates of earnings—are
presented both by place of residence and by place of
work. Assuming that nonfarm proprietors who are inter­
state commuters usually file their tax returns from thenresidences, the estimates of earnings by place of work
are more likely to be misstated than the estimates of
earnings by place of residence.
The estimates of farm proprietors’ income are de­
rived from source data that are reported and recorded
by the principal place of production, which is usually
the county in which the farm has most of its land and
in which most of the work is performed. Because most
farm proprietors live on, or near, their land, the place
of residence is assumed to be the same as the place of
work.
The estimates of rental income of persons, personal
dividend income, personal interest income, transfer pay­
ments, and personal contributions for supplementary
medical insurance and for veterans life insurance are
derived from source data that are reported and recorded
by the place of residence of the income recipient.

data that are available in source data that are related to,
but that do not precisely match, the component being
estimated.
Before the allocation procedures are used, the national
estimates of some components of personal income are
adjusted for the differences in definitions and classi­
fications between the national estimates and the State
estimates. The adjusted national estimates of these
components and the national estimates of the other com­
ponents are used as the “control totals” for the State
estimates.
In the allocation procedures, the national control total
for each component is allocated to the States in propor­
tion to each State’s share of a related series of source
data. Before the allocation, the source data are often
modified or augmented by preliminary estimation—
for example, by the summation of several items (for
example, wages, tips, and pay-in-kind), by the mul­
tiplication of two items (for example, average wages
times the number of employees) or by interpolation or
extrapolation.
Because the allocation procedures use the national
control totals for the State estimates, their use yields an
additive system in which the State estimates sum to the
national estimate.
The allocation procedure used to estimate a
component of State personal income is

Allocation procedures
Using allocation procedures imparts to the State esti­
mates the characteristics of the national estimates that
are not reflected in the available State-level source data;
for most components of personal income, the State
source data are less comprehensive and less reliable than
the data that are available for the national estimates.6 In
addition, using these procedures allows the use of State
6.

How ever, the national estimates o f most components o f wages and

salaries and transfer payments, w hich together account fo r about 75 percent
o f personal income, are based m ain ly on the sum o f source data that are
available by State. Therefore, the use o f the allocation procedures to prepare
the State estimates o f these components results in estimates that do not differ
greatly from the source data.

Y‘ ={Y4 k )

where Ys is the estimator (that is, the statistical pro­
cedure used to derive an estimate) of the component of
personal income for State 5, where Yn is the national
estimate of the component (which is used as the control
total for the State estimates of the component), where
Xs is the datum for State S from the series of source
data related to the component, and where Xn is the na­
tional sum of the State data from the series of source
data related to the component {Xn = Y.XS).
In the cases in which the national estimate is cal­
culated as the sum of the State data plus an amount
An for which State data are unavailable, the allocation
procedure may be represented by two equations (which
together are mathematically identical to the preceding
equation):

- Ml

As
Ys = Xs + As

where As is the State estimator of the portion of Y
for which State data are unavailable. In effect, Ys is the

M-8

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

composite estimator consisting of Xs, the best possible
direct estimator (100 percent sample) of the portion of Y
for which State data are available, plus As, the indirect
estimator of the portion of Y for which State data are
unavailable.
For example, the national estimates of wages and
salaries for many industries consist of the sum of State
data plus a few small adjustments, which taken together
(An) are allocated to the States in proportion to the
State data. The small allocated amount for each State
(As) is added to the State datum (Xs) to yield the State
estimate ( Ys).
Interpolation and extrapolation procedures
Some of the data that are used to estimate components
of State personal income are available or adequate only
in certain years, which are called benchmark years. In
order to derive the estimates of these components for
other years, interpolation and extrapolation procedures
are used to extend the distribution of the data for the
benchmark year or years.
Interpolation procedures are used in the derivation
of the estimates for the years between 2 benchmark
years. Extrapolation procedures are used in the deriva­
tion of the estimates for the years after the most recent
benchmark year.
For the details of these procedures, see the “Technical
Notes.”

Personal Income
The sources and methods for the estimation of State
personal income are described in seven sections that
correspond to the derivation of the estimates. In
the first five sections, the estimation of the positive
components that are summed in the derivation of per­
sonal income is described; these sections are wage and
salary disbursements; other labor income; proprietors’
income; personal dividend income, personal interest
income, and rental income of persons; and transfer
payments. In the sixth section, the estimation of the
negative component—personal contributions for social
insurance—that is subtracted from the sum of the other
components is described. In the seventh section, the es­
timation of the residence adjustment is described; this
adjustment is added to the net sum of the components
that are estimated on a place-of-work basis in order to
convert them to a place-of-residence basis.

Wage and Salary Disbursements
Wage and salary disbursements are defined as the mon­
etary remuneration of employees. This remuneration
includes the compensation of corporate officers; com­
missions, tips, and bonuses; voluntary employee contri­
butions to certain deferred compensation plans, such as
401(k) plans; and receipts in kind, or pay-in-kind, that
represent income.7
Wage and salary disbursements are measured before
deductions, such as social security contributions and
union dues, and they reflect the amount of wages and
salaries disbursed, but not necessarily earned, during the
year. The estimates for most industries are prepared
at the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) two-digit
level.
Wage and salary disbursements accounted for about
57 percent of total personal income at the national level
in 1993 (see table A, which also shows the relative im­
portance of the major components of wages and salaries
to total personal income).
The State estimates of about 98 percent of wages and
salaries for approximately 80 private industries, for Fed­
eral Government civilian employees, and for State and
local government employees are based on the data that
are summarized by county and by SIC four-digit indus­
try on form ES-202 by the State employment security
agencies (ESA’s).8 The summarized data are from quar­
terly State unemployment insurance (UI) contribution
reports that are filed with an ESA by the employers
in the industries that are covered by, and subject to,
that State’s UI laws. Under most State UI laws, wages
and salaries include bonuses, tips, and the cash value of
meals and lodging provided by the employer—that is,
pay-in-kind.9
The estimates of wages and salaries for three SIC twodigit industries are based on both ES-202 data and on
other data because these three industries—agricultural
services, private education, and religious membership
organizations—are only partially covered by State UI
programs. For each of these industries, the ES-202 data
at the SIC three-digit level are segregated into the fully
7. See “ P ay-in-kind ” in the “ G lossary.”
8. Each quarter, the E S A ’s send these data to the Bureau o f Labor Statis­
tics o f the Department o f Labor, w hich provides a copy to B E A , The ES-202
tabulations fo r 1987 are based on the 1972 SIC, and those fo r 1988-93 are
based on the 1987 SIC.
9. State U I laws require em ployers to estimate ( if applicable) the cash
value o f pay-in-kind and to include the estimate w ith cash pay in their report
o f their payrolls. How ever, because em ployers are not required to distin­
guish between the two types o f pay in their reports, it is doubtful that many
employers com ply w ith this requirement. P ay-in-kind is significant only in
the fo llo w in g industries: Water transportation, eating and drinking places,
and hotels and other lodging places.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

covered portion and the incompletely covered portion.
The estimates are then prepared as the sum of (1) the
fully covered portion, which is based on the ES-202
data, and (2) the incompletely covered portion, which
is primarily based on other data.

Table A.—Wage and Salary Disbursements by Component and
Total Personal Income for the United States, 1993
M i ll i o n s o f
d o lla r s

a l in c o m e

5 ,3 5 9 ,5 8 9

1 0 0 .0 0

W a g e a n d s a la r y d is b u r s e m e n t s 2 ........................................................................

3 ,0 7 2 ,2 6 4

5 7 .3 2

F a r m .......................................................................................................................................

1 1 ,9 0 0

.2 2

A g r ic u lt u r a l s e r v ic e s , f o r e s t r y , f is h e r i e s , a n d o t h e r 3 ....................................

1 6 ,1 9 8

.3 0

M i n i n g .....................................................................................................................................

2 5 ,8 3 1

.4 8

C o n s t r u c t i o n ........................................................................................................................

1 3 2 ,7 6 7

2 .4 8

5 8 8 ,4 7 4

1 0 .9 8

2 3 5 ,0 1 9

4 .3 9

............................................................................

4 5 ,8 4 3

.8 6

T e x t il e m ill p r o d u c t s ............................................................................................

1 5 ,2 7 1

.2 8

1 7 ,0 3 4

.3 2

P a p e r a n d a l li e d p r o d u c t s

...............................................................................

2 5 ,0 7 1

.4 7

.....................................................................................

4 5 ,8 7 7

.8 6

.....................................................................

4 8 ,7 8 5

.91

........................................................................

7 ,3 1 4

.1 4

.....................................................................................

1 ,9 8 0

.0 4

2 5 ,3 9 8

.4 7

2 ,4 4 6

.0 5

3 5 3 ,4 5 5

6 .5 9

1 6 ,8 3 8

.31

1 1 ,2 9 0

.21

P r in t in g a n a p u b li s h i n g

C h e m i c a l s a n d a l li e d p r o d u c t s
P e t r o le u m

a n d c o a l p ro d u c ts

T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s

R u b b e r a n d m i s c e l la n e o u s p la s t ic p r o d u c t s

.........................................

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ............................................................................

2 4 ,8 8 8

.4 6

4 0 ,7 4 9

.7 6

7 1 ,5 1 2

1 .3 3

5 3 ,6 0 9

1.00

3 7 ,8 2 6

.71

3 5 ,3 7 9

.6 6

S t o n e , c la y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ..................................................................

1 5 ,7 7 4

.2 9

I n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e la t e d p r o d u c t s ................................................................

3 5 ,5 9 4

.6 6

9 ,9 9 6

.1 9

..........................................................................

2 0 1 ,4 4 2

3 .7 6

1 2 ,8 6 5

.2 4

T r u c k in g a n d w a r e h o u s i n g ....................................................................................

4 5 ,7 0 7

.8 5

5 ,9 7 7

.11

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t e x c l u d i n g m o t o r v e h i c l e s

T r a n s p o r t a t io n a n d p u b lic u t ilit ie s

........................

O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t io n 4 ..............................................................................................

E le c t r ic , g a s , a n d s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s .................................................................

S e r v ic e s

4 4 ,4 1 8

.8 3

5 1 ,0 1 1

.9 5

4 1 ,4 6 4

.7 7

2 0 4 ,7 6 5

3 .8 2

2 9 5 ,3 6 2

5 .5 1

.....................................................................

2 5 0 ,6 7 4

4 .6 8

...............................................................................................................................

7 7 0 ,8 4 5

1 4 .3 8

2 8 ,8 8 8

.5 4

1 8 ,8 1 0

.3 5

F i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e

P e r s o n a l s e r v ic e s

...7....” .'........................................................................................

B u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ......................................................................................................
A u t o r e p a ir , s e r v ic e s , a n d g a r a g e s

.................................................................

1 0 ,5 0 9

.2 0

1 2 8 ,7 7 7

2 .4 0

2 0 ,2 4 9

.3 8

9 ,4 5 0

.1 8

A m u s e m e n t a n d 'r e c r e a t io n s e r v i c e s ...............................................................

2 4 ,5 4 0

M o t io n p i c t u r e s ............................................................................................................

1 1 ,0 3 9

.21

2 5 7 ,3 2 2

4 .8 0

L e g a l s e r v ic e s

S o c ia l s e r v ic e s

4 6 ,4 0 4

.8 7

3 7 ,9 6 4

.71

...........................................................................................................

3 2 ,3 8 9

.6 0

1 ,3 4 8

.0 3

3 2 ,8 1 7

.61

.........................................

1 0 7 ,9 5 6

2 .0 1

..........................................................................................

2 ,3 8 3

.0 4

.........................................................

5 7 4 ,0 0 6

1 0 .7 1

............................................................................................................

1 1 5 ,0 3 7

2 .1 5

M u s e u m s , b o t a n ic a l, a n d z o o lo g ic a l g a r d e n s

E n g i n e e r i n g , a c c o u n t in g , a n d r e la t e d s e r v i c e s
M i s c e l la n e o u s s e r v ic e s

G o v e r n m e n t a n d g o v e r n m e n t e n t e r p r is e s
F e d e r a l c iv il i a n

S t a t e a n d lo c a l

.4 6

................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................

E d u c a t i o n a l s e r v ic e s

............................................

...........................................................................................................

The estimates of wages and salaries for industries that
are not covered by State UI programs or that are fully
covered in only a few States are primarily based on
data other than ES-202 data. The data on which these
estimates are based are specified in the relevant section.
The sources of data and the methods that are used to
prepare the estimates of wage and salary disbursements
are described in two sections: Wages and salaries that
are covered by the State UI programs and wages and
salaries that are not covered by the State UI programs.

P e rc e n t of
to ta l p e r s o n -

T o ta l p e r s o n a l I n c o m e 1 .................................................................................................

F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s

M-9

4 9 ,4 6 9

.9 2

4 0 9 ,5 0 0

7 .6 4

Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.
1. Includes adjustments for border workers: Income of U.S. residents working across U.S. borders less income
of foreign residents working in the United States.
2. Includes w ages received by border workers em ployed in the United States.
3. “Other" includes w ages and salaries of U.S. residents working for international organizations and for foreign
em bassies and consulates located in the United States.
4. Includes local and interurban passenger transit, transportation by air, pipelines (except natural gas), and trans­
portation services.

Wages and salaries covered by the State UI
programs
The estimates of wages and salaries that are covered by
State UI programs or by the UI program for Federal
civilian employees are based on quarterly ES-202 data
for wages and salaries, or payrolls. However, these data
do not precisely meet BEA’s statistical and conceptual
requirements. Consequently, the data must be adjusted
to provide the proper industrial and geographic patterns.

Adjustment for industry nonclassification.—The indus­

try detail of the ES-202 data regularly shows minor
amounts of payroll—only about 0.2 percent of total
payrolls nationally—that have not been assigned to
any industry. The industrial classification scheme used
by BEA does not permit this not-elsewhere-classified
category. Therefore, for each State, the amount in
this category is distributed among the industries in
proportion to the industry-classified ES-202 payrolls.

Adjustment for congressional staff wages.—In the ES-

202 payroll data for Federal civilian employees, all the
wages and salaries for congressional staff are assigned
to Washington, DC. However, some of these wages are
earned by congressional staff who work in the State
offices of the members of Congress. BEA assumes that
25 percent of the total congressional payrolls are earned
by congressional staff in State offices, so this percentage
of these payrolls are allocated to States in proportion to
their congressional representation.

Adjustment for misreported ES-202 data.—An estimate

of the wages and salaries that were not reported by em­
ployers is added to the ES-202 data for each private
industry. Because State-level data are unavailable, the
national estimate for each industry is allocated to States
in proportion to the ES-202 payroll data for the industry.
The national estimate for each industry is prepared in
two parts: One part is prepared for the payrolls that were
underreported by employers, and one part is prepared for

M -10

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

the payrolls that were not reported, because employers
failed to file a report.10
In addition, tips are assumed to be understated in the
UI contribution reports from the following industries:
Taxicabs, which is part of local and interurban passen­
ger transit; eating and drinking places; hotels and other
lodging places; amusement and recreation services; and
personal services. For each of these industries, the na­
tional estimate of the unreported tips is allocated to
States in proportion to the ES-202 payroll data for these
industries.

Adjustments for wages and salaries that are excluded
from the ES-202 data.—The ES-202 payroll data

for specific industries exclude certain, usually small,
amounts of wages and salaries that are not covered by
State UI programs.
The payrolls of electric railroads (that is, commuter
lines) are excluded from the ES-202 data for local and
interurban passenger transit; the payrolls of railroad
carrier affiliates are excluded from the data for trans­
portation services, and the payrolls of railway labor
organizations, from the data for membership organiza­
tions other than religious. These industry segments are
covered by the Railroad Unemployment Insurance sys­
tem rather than by the State UI system. The employers
in these segments file reports that include payroll data
with the Railroad Retirement Board, which gives these
data to BEA. The data for each employer are then added
to the ES-202 data for the appropriate industry and State.
The payrolls of nonprofit organizations that have
fewer than four employees are excluded from UI cover­
age in most States. A national estimate of the payrolls of
these small organizations in each of the following indus­
tries is prepared: Printing and publishing, miscellaneous
manufacturing, nondepository credit institutions, real
estate, holding and other investment companies, ho­
tels, and membership organizations other than religious.
Because State-level data are unavailable, the national
estimate for the organizations in each industry is allo­
cated to States in proportion to the ES-202 payroll data
for the industry.
The wages and salaries of students who are employed
by the institutions of higher education in which they are
enrolled are excluded from the ES-202 payroll data for
private, State government, and local government edu­
cational institutions. However, employment data that
include the student employees of private institutions are
published annually by the Census Bureau in County
Business Patterns, and unpublished employment data

10.
Robert P. Parker, “ Im proved Adjustments for M isreporting o f Tax
Return Information Used to Estimate the National Income and Product
Accounts,
urvey
(June

1977,” S

64

1984): 17-25.

that include the student employees of government in­
stitutions are available from the Census Bureau. The
national estimate of the wages of these employees of
private institutions, of State government institutions, and
of local government institutions is allocated to States by
the State distributions that are derived from the differ­
ences between the ES-202 employment data for these
institutions and the data that include these employees.
The pay-in-kind of members of religious orders who
teach at private colleges and universities is excluded
from the ES-202 payroll data for private education. The
national estimate is allocated to States in proportion to
the number of full-time teachers who are members of
religious orders from the “General Summary” of the
Official Catholic Directory.11
The pay-in-kind of workers in private hospitals who
do not receive cash wages are excluded from the ES202 data for private hospitals; these workers are mainly
interns, student nurses, and members of religious orders.
Because State-level data are unavailable, the national
estimate is allocated to States in proportion to the ES202 employment data for private hospitals.
The salaries of elected officials and members of the
judiciary are excluded from the ES-202 data for State
and local government employees. The national estimate
is allocated to States in proportion to the ES-202 payroll
data for State and local governments.
The salaries of corporate officers in Washington State,
who are exempt by State law from UI coverage, are
excluded from the ES-202 payroll data for private in­
dustries in Washington. Therefore, the estimates of
these salaries for the SIC two-digit industries are de­
rived from estimates of the number of corporate officers
at the SIC four-digit level and estimates of their aver­
age salaries at the SIC division (“one-digit”) level; these
estimates are periodically provided by the Washington
State Employment Security Department.
The estimates of these salaries are prepared in three
steps. First, an estimate of these salaries for each SIC
11.
“ General Sum m ary,” O ffic ia l C a th o lic D ir e c to r y (N ew York:
Kenedy and Sons). The D ir e c to r y is published annually.
The

General Sum m ary” is a tabulation o f the number o f members o f

religious orders who are em ployed in Catho lic institutions in each diocese
and in each State. The data are classified by clerical title and by religious
assignment.
The number o f teachers distinguishes neither between those who receive
cash wages and those who receive only pay-in-kind nor between those who
teach in elementary and secondary schools and those who teach in colleges
and universities.
The members who teach are classified by B E A in educational services,
and those who w ork in hospitals, in health services.
The data fo r the Archdiocese o f Washington, D C , w hich includes the
nearby suburban counties in M aryland, are apportioned between the D istrict
o f C olum bia and M aryland on the basis o f the detailed inform ation in the

D ir e c to r y .

P.J.

M-l 1

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

of farm labor expenses that are prepared by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture (USDA) as part of its State
estimates of farm income.13 The State estimates of the
salaries are based on unpublished data from the USDA.
Farm labor contractors.—This industry is classified in
agricultural services. Farm labor contractors and their
employees are only partially covered by UI laws in most
States. However, in California and Florida, all the em­
ployees are covered, and in Arizona, approximately 80
percent of these employees are covered.
The State estimates for most States are based on the
data for contract farm labor expenses that are reported in
the 1987 Census of Agriculture. For California, Florida,
and Arizona, the census-based estimates are compared
with the ES-202 payroll data. If the ES-202 amounts
are higher than the census-based estimates, the ES-202
amounts are substituted for the census-based estimates.
Private households.—The State estimates of cash wages
for private households are based on a place-of-work
wage series that was summed from a special tabulation
of joumey-to-work (JTW) data from the 1990 Cen­
sus of Population. The wage series was extrapolated
to 1991-93 by the annual change in the population.
The extrapolated series for each year was adjusted by
Wages and salaries not covered by the State UI
allocation to sum to the national estimate of cash wages.
programs
The State estimates of pay-in-kind for 1991-93 are
The estimates of wages and salaries for eight indus­ based on a similar extrapolation of 1990 JTW place-oftries are primarily based on data other than ES-202 data. work data on employment.
The ES-202 data are inadequate for five industries— Private elementary and secondary schools.—This in­
farms, farm labor contractors, private households, pri­ dustry is partially covered by State UI programs, but it
vate elementary and secondary schools, and religious is treated as if it were not covered, because religiously
membership organizations—because these industries are affiliated schools account for most of the wages and
extensively covered by State UI programs in only a salaries for this industry and because these schools are
few States. In addition, ES-202 data are unavailable exempt from State UI coverage. Therefore, the ES-202
for three industries—railroads, military, and “other”— data for this industry are inadequate.
because these industries are not covered by State UI
The State estimates of cash wages are based on annual
programs.12 Consequently, the wages and salaries of payroll data reported in County Business Patterns.14 Be­
all eight industries are treated as if they were not cov­ cause of the 2-year lag between the end of a year and
ered by State UI programs. In addition, because these the availability of the data for that year, the data for
estimates are primarily based on data that do not in­ 1991 were used to prepare the estimates for 1992-93.
clude wages paid in kind, an estimate of pay-in-kind
The national estimate of the pay-in-kind for these
is prepared for all these industries except farm labor schools is allocated to States in proportion to the number
contractors, railroads, and “other.”
of full-time teachers in religious orders.15
Farms.—The estimates of wages and salaries for farms
13. The U S D A State estimates o f farm labor expenses exclude the salaries
consist of estimates of the cash wages and pay-in-kind of o f the officers o f corporate farms and o f the owner-operators o f farm
these salaries are treated as part o f the return to capital.
hired farm labor and the estimates of the salaries of the partnerships;
14. The payroll data are tabulated from the administrative records o f the
officers of corporate farms and of the owner-operators old-age, survivors, and d isab ility insurance program. T his program exempts
of farm partnerships. The State estimates of the cash nonprofit religious organizations, such as these schools, from coverage, but
provisions fo r elective coverage have resulted in the participation o f most
wages and pay-in-kind are based on the State estimates itso f these
schools.

division is calculated as the product of the number of
officers and the average salaries. Second, a provisional
estimate for each SIC two-digit industry is calculated as
the product of the number of officers and the average
wages of Ul-covered workers in the industry. Third,
the estimate for each SIC division is allocated to SIC
two-digit industries in Washington in proportion to the
provisional estimates.
The commissions received by real estate agents are
excluded from the ES-202 payroll data for the real estate
industry, and the commissions received by insurance
solicitors are excluded from the data for the insurance
agents, brokers, and service industry. For each industry,
the national estimate is allocated to States in proportion
to the ES-202 payroll data for the industry.
The allowance for uniforms that is received by Federal
civilian employees in selected occupations is excluded
from the ES-202 payroll data for Federal civilian em­
ployees. Because data for the allowance are unavailable,
the national estimate is allocated to States in proportion
to the geographic distribution of the ES-202 employ­
ment data for the Postal Service, which employs most
of the Federal civilian employees who receive this
allowance.

12.

M ilita ry and “ other” are B E A , not SIC, classifications.

15.

O fficia l C a th o lic D ir e c to r y .

See also footnote 18.

M-12

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Religious membership organizations.—The estimates

of cash wages for religious membership organizations
are based on payroll data reported for these organiza­
tions in County Business Patterns. Because of the 2-year
lag between the end of a year and the availability of
the data for that year, the data for 1991 were used to
prepare the State estimates for 1992-93.
The estimate of pay-in-kind for religious membership
organizations reflects the value of the food, lodging,
laundering, and miscellaneous items received by the
clergy and members of religious orders who do not work
in hospitals or in schools.
Because of the lack of State-level data, the national
estimate is allocated to the States after it has been di­
vided into the following three categories: (1) The value
of food and laundering, which are assumed to be re­
ceived primarily by members of Catholic rectories and
convents; (2) the value of miscellaneous items and the
rental value of Catholic rectories and convents, which
are assumed to be received by members who receive no
cash wages and by resident pastors; and (3) the rental
value of parsonages other than Catholic rectories.
The State estimates are combinations of estimates for
the three categories. The allocating series for the first
category is computed as the total number of members
of religious orders in the dioceses in each State less
the number of members who work in hospitals and
who teach; the allocating series for the second cate­
gory is computed as the sum of the number of members
who receive no cash wages and the number of resident
pastors.16 The allocating series for the third category is
computed as an estimate of the total number of clergy
less the number of Catholic clergy; the estimates of the
total number of clergy for 1991-93 were extrapolated
from the number of clergy reported in the 1990 Census
of Population by the State estimates of the population
prepared by the Census Bureau.
Railroads.—The railroad industry is covered by the
Railroad Unemployment Insurance system; the sys­
tem is administered by the Railroad Retirement Board,
which does not require interstate railroads to submit
data by State. The estimates of wages and salaries
are principally based on an employment series devel­
oped from biennial reports on employment in Class I
railroads that are prepared by the Association of Amer­
ican Railroads.17 These reports include information
on employment by railroad company for each State.
16. The State estimates o f pay-in-kind fo r the first two categories are based
on data from the O ffic ia l C a th o lic D ir e c to r y . See also footnote 18.
17. R ailroad companies are classified on the basis o f a 3-year average o f
operating revenues. Since 1991, Class I railroads are those with revenues o f
$96.1 m illio n or more.

Employment for the years between the reports is ap­
proximated by straight-line interpolation, and the data
from the most recent report are used for the subsequent
year or years.
The State estimates are prepared in three steps. First,
an estimate of the wages and salaries paid by each Class
I railroad company in a State is calculated as the product
of the employment data for the company in the State and
the national average wages and salaries for the company
reported annually to the Interstate Commerce Commis­
sion. Second, the preliminary estimate for a State is
calculated as the sum of the estimates of the wages and
salaries paid by the Class I railroad companies in the
State. Third, the national estimate of the wages and
salaries paid by all railroad companies is allocated to
States in proportion to the preliminary State estimates.
Military.—The estimates of wages and salaries for the
military services consist of the estimates of cash wages
(including allowances) of full-time personnel of the
armed services (including the Coast Guard), the esti­
mates of cash wages of the members of the Reserves
including the National Guard, and the estimates of payin-kind received by the full-time and reserve enlisted
personnel of the armed services.18
The State estimates of cash wages of the full-time
personnel of the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, and
the Marine Corps are prepared in three steps. First, ap­
proximations of quarterly cash wages at annual rates are
calculated for subgroups of personnel—for officers and
for enlisted personnel in the Navy and Marine Corps
and for each pay grade of the Army and the Air Force.
The approximations are derived from quarterly averages
of monthly data on the number of military personnel at
each installation and from national annual data on av­
erage pay for each subgroup from the Department of
Defense.19 The quarterly average number of the person­
nel are summed to obtain the quarterly average number
of personnel for each subgroup in each county, and then
in order to obtain an approximation of the quarterly cash
wages for each subgroup in each county, the quarterly
average number of personnel in each county is multi­
plied by the national annual average pay (for example,
the number of Navy officers in each county is multiplied
by the national average pay of Navy officers).
Second, in order to obtain the State approximations of
the quarterly cash wages for each service, the approxi18. The estimates o f pay-in-kind reflect the value o f the food and clothing
received by enlisted personnel. The im putation fo r clothing is lim ited to
standard issue clothing; it does not include clothing and equipment fo r special
or unusual duties.
19. The A rm y and the A ir Force provide average base pay; the N av y and
M arine Corps provide average base pay and allowances.

M-13

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

mations of the quarterly cash wages for each subgroup
in each county are summed to obtain county approxima­
tions, and the county approximations for each service
are summed to obtain the State approximations. Third,
the quarterly State approximations for each service are
averaged to yield calendar year approximations, which
are then adjusted by allocation to sum to the national
estimates.
The State estimates of cash wages for the full-time
personnel of the Coast Guard for a year are based on an
annual summation of the monthly payroll data from the
Department of Transportation.
The national estimate of wages for the Reserves for
each calendar year is allocated to States in proportion to
payroll data for the calendar year from the Washington
Headquarters Service of the Department of Defense.
The national estimate of the pay-in-kind of the full­
time personnel in the Coast Guard is allocated to the
States in proportion to the number of enlisted personnel
in the Coast Guard that is reported by the Department
of Transportation, and the national estimate for each of
the other services is allocated by the number of enlisted
personnel in each service that is reported by the Depart­
ment of Defense. The national estimate for the Reserves
is allocated to States in the proportion to the estimates
of cash pay.
Other.— The estimates of wages and salaries for this
category consist of the wages and salaries of U.S. resi­
dents who are employed by international organizations
and by foreign embassies and consulates in the United
States.
At the national level, this category accounts for
approximately 0.2 percent of total wages and salaries.
Both the national and State source data are only ap­
proximations of the wages paid by these organizations.
The national estimates for all years are allocated to
States in proportion to estimates of the administrative
expenditures of the organizations in 1968.20

Other Labor Income
Other labor income consists of the contributions by em­
ployers to privately administered benefit plans for their
employees, the fees paid to corporate directors, and
miscellaneous fees. The payments to private benefit
plans accounted for more than 98 percent of other labor
income in 1993.21

Other labor income accounted for approximately 6.6
percent of total personal income at the national level in
1993 (table B).
Contributions to private benefit plans
The estimates of the contributions by employers to
privately administered benefit plans consist of the pay­
ments to pension and profit-sharing plans, to private
group health and life insurance plans, and to sup­
plemental unemployment benefit plans and the pay­
ments by employers to privately administered workers’
compensation plans.

Pension and profit-sharing plans, group health and
life insurance, and supplemental unemployment insur­
ance.—Most payments by employers to private pension

and profit-sharing plans are made on behalf of em­
ployees in private industry; some payments are made
for Federal, State, and local government employees,
but most pensions for these employees are provided
through government-operated funds, which are classi­
fied as social insurance in the national income and
product accounts.
Payments for group health and life insurance are made
for a majority of the employees in both the public
and private sectors. Payments for supplemental unem­
ployment insurance are made only for employees in
the private sector, mainly for those in manufacturing
industries.
The State estimates of the payments to these private
benefit plans are prepared for each private industry at
the SIC two-digit level of industrial detail. Because
State data are unavailable, the national estimate of these
payments for each industry is allocated to the States in
U nder the conventions o f the national incom e and product accounts, the
benefits paid from social insurance funds are counted as part o f personal
incom e in the transfer payments component, but the benefits paid by private
plans are not counted.

Table B.—Other Labor Income by Component and Total Personal
Income for the United States, 1993
M i ll i o n s o f
d o ll a r s

T o ta l p e r s o n a l i n c o m e ................................................................................................

Balance o f Payments D iv is io n o f B E A .
21. Other labor incom e excludes em ployer contributions fo r social
insurance, w h ich are paid to government-administered funds.

a l in c o m e

5 ,3 5 9 ,5 8 9

1 0 0 .0 0

3 5 4 ,9 9 4

6 .6 2

3 4 9 ,8 8 8

6 .5 3

E m p lo y e r c o n t r ib u t io n s t o p r iv a t e p e n s i o n f u n d s a n d p r iv a t e w e lf a r e
f u n d s .................................................................................................................................

20. The estimates o f the expenditures fo r 1968 were prepared by the

P e rc e n t of
to ta l p e r s o n ­

P r i v a t e p e n s i o n f u n d s , g r o u p h e a lt h in s u r a n c e , g r o u p life
3 0 9 ,8 2 4

5 .7 8

.........................................

4 0 ,0 6 4

.7 5

A l l o t h e r 1 .............................................................................................................................

5 ,1 0 6

.1 0

i n s u r a n c e , a n d s u p p le m e n t a l u n e m p l o y m e n t i n s u r a n c e ...................
P r i v a t e l y a d m in i s t e r e d w o r k e r s ' c o m p e n s a t io n

Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.
1. Consists of directors’ fees, compensation to prisoners, and judicial fees.

M-14

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

proportion to the State estimates of wages and salaries ployers to private insurance companies for workers’
for the industry.22
compensation insurance.
The State estimates of wages and salaries are used
Programs for workers’ compensation insurance are
as the allocating series for all of the payments by pri­ authorized by law in all States. Federal laws autho­
vate industries on the assumption that the relationship rize the court-awarded payments by the railroad industry
of payments to payrolls for each industry is the same at and the water transportation industry. Laws in many
the national and State levels. As a result of using this States authorize self-insurance, and laws in the District
series, the estimates of the payments reflect the various of Columbia and in all but six States authorize programs
mixes of industries among States and the wide variation for private workers’ compensation insurance.25
in contribution rates among industries, but not among
State data for the court-awarded payments by rail­
States for a given industry.
roads are unavailable; the national estimate of these
The Federal Government makes payments to a savings payments is allocated to States in proportion to the num­
plan on behalf of its civilian employees who participate ber of workers killed or injured in railroad accidents.
in the Federal Employees Retirement System (mainly The number is reported in the Annual Accident!Incident
those hired after 1983); this savings plan is classified Bulletin by the Federal Railroad Administration of the
as a private pension plan.23 The national estimate of Department of Transportation.
these payments is allocated to States in proportion to the
The national estimate of the court-awarded payments
estimates of wages and salaries for all Federal civilian by the water transportation industry is allocated to States
employees.
in proportion to the estimates of wages and salaries for
The State government payments to private pension this industry, because data on work-related injuries for
plans consist of annuity payments made by State gov­ this industry are unavailable by State.
The State estimates of the benefits paid by self-insured
ernments on behalf of selected groups of employees—
primarily teachers. The State estimates are based employers and of the net premiums paid by employers
on data from the Teachers Insurance and Annuity for each SIC two-digit industry except the railroad and
Association/College Retirement Equities Fund.
water transportation industries are prepared in four steps.
First, the national estimate of the benefits paid by selfThe national estimates of Federal, State, and local
government payments to employee group health and insured employers for all industries is allocated to States
life insurance plans are allocated to States in propor­ in proportion to tabulations that are published annually
tion to ES-202 employment data for each level of in the Social Security Bulletin 26 Second, the national
estimate of the net premiums paid by employers in
government.24
all industries to private insurance companies for work­
Workers' compensation plans.—The payments by em­ ers’ compensation insurance is allocated to States in
ployers to privately administered workers’ compen­ proportion to annual data reported in the Insurance Ex­
sation plans consist of court-awarded payments by pense Exhibit by the National Council on Compensation
the railroad industry and the water transportation in­ Insurance.27 Third, the State estimates of the premiums
dustry for work-related injuries, benefit payments by
25. North Dakota and W yom ing authorize only State-operated workers’
self-insured employers, and net premiums paid by em- compensation
insurance, and West V irg inia, Nevada, Ohio, and Washington
authorize both State-operated insurance and self-insurance.
22. The data on w hich the national estimates are based are unsuitable

In addition, various State laws establish State-operated insurance funds

fo r preparing the State estimates. M o s t o f the national estimates are based

that compete w ith private insurers and second-injury funds, and Federal

on Internal Revenue Service tabulations o f data from business incom e tax

law establishes the compensation program fo r injured Federal employees.

returns.

returns fo r the corporation rather than fo r each establishment, and the State in

How ever, these insurance programs are classified as social insurance.
26. These payments consist o f cash payments and m edical payments, w hich

w hich a corporation’ s p rin cipal office is located often differs from the State
o f some o f its other establishments; therefore, the geographic distribution o f

m ay include m edical benefits paid by em ployers who carry substandard
m edical coverage.

How ever, most m ulti-establishment corporations file incom e tax

the data does not necessarily reflect the place o f w ork o f the employees on
whose behalf the payments are made.

U nder a self-insurance program, an em ployer assumes the lia b ility fo r the

23. Although this savings plan is administered by a Federal agency, it is

payments for w orkers’ compensation; the em ployer makes the payments out
o f operating funds.

classified by B E A as a private pension plan rather than as a social insurance
fund, because the saving is controlled by the em ployee rather than by the

Each State sets the requirements that the em ployers must meet to be li­
censed for self-insurance. Self-insurance is usually lim ited to large firms

government. A cco rd in g ly, the em ployer payments to the this plan are counted
as part o f other labor income, and the em ployee payments are included in

because the financial resources necessary to assume the lia b ility are substan­

personal saving rather than in personal contributions fo r social insurance.
24. The E S-202 data are collected from employers in conjunction w ith the
administration o f the unem ploym ent insurance system. See the introduction
to the section “ Wages and Salaries.”

tial. However, about h a lf o f the States and the D istrict o f C o lu m b ia permit
group self-insurance, so that sm all companies can pool their risks and their
liabilities.
27. The available State data are gross figures fo r the premiums, w hich have
not been discounted, retrospectively rated, or otherwise modified.

M-15

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

and the estimates of the benefits for all industries are
then combined.
Fourth, a two-way allocation procedure is used to
prepare State estimates of employers’ contributions to
private workers’ compensation plans at the SIC twodigit level for all industries except the railroad and water
transportation industries.28 The national estimates of the
sum of the net premiums and the benefits for the SIC
two-digit industries are the primary control totals for the
two-way allocation, and the State estimates of the sum
of the net premiums and the benefits for all industries
are the secondary control totals.29
This procedure has multiple steps. First, the primary
control totals are allocated to States in proportion to a
modified set of State estimates of wages and salaries
at the SIC two-digit level; the modified set is used as
the allocating series, because North Dakota, Wyoming,
West Virginia, Nevada, Ohio, and Washington do not
authorize private insurance.30 The output of this alloca­
tion is then combined with a special allocating series for
West Virginia to yield the preliminary State estimates of
the benefits by industry.31
Second, the secondary control totals are allocated to
industries in proportion to the preliminary State esti­
mates. Third, the allocation of the primary control totals
is alternated with that of the secondary control totals
until the allocation of the primary control totals yields
a near-balance of the matrix.

Directors’ fees and miscellaneous fees
Directors’ fees accounted for about 0.8 percent of other
labor income in 1993. Nationally, about three-fourths
of these fees are accounted for by the finance, insur­
ance, and real estate industries. Because State data
are unavailable, the national estimate of these fees for
each SIC two-digit industry is allocated to States in
proportion to the estimates of wages and salaries.
The miscellaneous fees consist of fees paid to jurors
and witnesses, compensation of prisoners, and marriage
fees paid to justices of the peace. These fees accounted
for about 0.6 percent of other labor income in 1993. The
national estimate of each of these segments is allocated
to States in proportion to the civilian population.

Proprietors’ Income
Proprietors’ income with inventory valuation and capital
consumption adjustments is the current-production in­
come (including the income in kind) of sole proprietor­
ships and partnerships and of tax-exempt cooperatives.32
Proprietors’ income includes the imputed net rental in­
come of owner-occupants of farm dwellings, but it
excludes the dividends and the monetary interest that
are received by nonfinancial business and the nonfarm
rental income received by persons not primarily engaged
in the real estate business.33
32. A sole proprietorship is an unincorporated business owned b y a per­
son. A partnership is an unincorporated business association o f two or more
partners. A tax-exempt cooperative is a nonprofit business organization that

28. In a tw o-way allocation, two sets o f control totals are placed in a m atrix
as the row and colum n totals. The allocating series is placed in the same
m atrix as the set o f elements. These elements are adjusted alternately to sum

is co llective ly owned by its members.
33. The dividends are included in personal dividend income, the monetary
interest, in personal interest income, and the nonfarm rental income, in rental
incom e o f persons.

to the row and colum n totals u n til the sums o f the elements approach both
the row and the colum n totals.
29. In this procedure, the prim ary control totals are the colum n totals and
the secondary control totals are the row totals.

Table C.—Proprietors’ Income by Component and Total Personal
Income for the United States, 1993

The set o f national estimates used includes estimates fo r State and local
governments and excludes estimates fo r the railroad and water transportation

M i ll i o n s o f

P e rc e n t of
to ta l p e r s o n ­

industries.
30. The m odified allocating series excludes the estimates o f wages and
salaries fo r N orth Dakota, W yom ing, and West V irginia.

T o ta l p e r s o n a l I n c o m e .................................................................................................

5 ,3 5 9 ,5 8 9

1 0 0 .0 0

F o r Nevada, O hio, and Washington, the m odified series fo r each S IC

P r o p r ie t o r s ’ I n c o m e 1 ...................................................................................................

4 3 8 ,1 4 8

8 .1 8

F a r m .......................................................................................................................................

3 3 ,8 5 8

.6 3

4 0 4 ,2 9 0

7 .5 4

A g r i c u l t u r a l s e r v ic e s , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s ................................................

7 ,4 7 7

.1 4

M i n in g

..............................................................................................................................

5 ,0 4 1

.0 9

C o n s t r u c t i o n ..................................................................................................................

5 0 ,9 1 1

.9 5

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............................................................................................................

2 0 ,5 9 8

.3 8

d o lla r s

a l in c o m e

tw o-digit industry includes the estimates o f wages and salaries only for es­
tablishments w ith 500 or more employees; these estimates are based on the

N o n fa rm

...............................................................................................................................

E S-202 size-of-establishment data fo r the first quarter o f each year. These
estimates are used because data fo r self-insurance are unavailable, but B E A
assumes that only the largest firms are fin ancially capable o f providing
self-insurance.
31. A special allocating series is used fo r West V irg inia, because data for
self-insurance are available. The special series is based on lim ited data for the
“ class charges,” or costs, to self-insured em ployers from the A n n u a l R e p o r t
o f the West V irg in ia W orkers’ Com pensation Fund. These data are classified
according to the degree o f risk o f injury as determined by both industry and
occupation; they are reclassified to the S IC for the preparation o f the special
allocating series.

T r a n s p o r t a t io n a n d p u b li c u t i l i t i e s .....................................................................

2 2 ,7 8 9

.4 3

W h o l e s a le a n d r e t a il t r a d e ....................................................................................

6 0 ,3 9 8

1 .1 3

F i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ................................................................
S e r v i c e s ..........................................................................................................................

1 8 ,9 7 5

.3 5

2 1 8 ,1 0 1

4 .0 7

................................................................................................

9 5 ,4 5 7

1 .7 8

P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d s o c ia l s e r v i c e s .................................................................

1 2 2 ,6 4 4

2 .2 9

B u s in e s s s e r v ic e s

Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.
1. Shown with inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.

M-16

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Proprietors’ income accounted for approximately 8
percent of total personal income at the national level
in 1993 (table C). The estimates of proprietors’ income
are prepared in two parts—nonfarm proprietors’ income
and farm proprietors’ income. Nonfarm proprietors’
income accounted for more than 92 percent of propri­
etors’ income, and farm proprietors’ income accounted
for almost 8 percent.
Nonfarm Proprietors’ Income
Nonfarm proprietors’ income consists of the income that
is received by nonfarm sole proprietorships and part­
nerships and the income that is received by tax-exempt
cooperatives.
The national estimates of nonfarm proprietors’ in­
come are primarily derived from business income tax
data. Because these data do not always reflect cur­
rent production and because they are incomplete, the
estimates also include four major adjustments—the in­
ventory valuation adjustment, the capital consumption
adjustment, the “misreporting” adjustment, and the ad­
justment for the net margins on owner-built housing.34
The inventory valuation adjustment offsets the effects
of the gains and the losses that result from changes in
the prices of products withdrawn from inventories. The
capital consumption adjustment measures the difference
between the value of the consumption, or depreciation,
of fixed capital from the historical-cost basis used in
the source data to the consumption of fixed capital on a
replacement-cost basis.35
The “misreporting” adjustment adds an estimate of the
income of sole proprietors and partnerships that is not
reported on tax returns. This adjustment accounted for
almost half of nonfarm proprietors’ income in 1992.36
The adjustment for the net margins on owner-built
housing is an addition to the estimate for the con­
struction industry. It is the imputed net income of
individuals from the construction or renovation of their
own dwellings.
The source data necessary to prepare these adjust­
ments are available only at the national level. Therefore,
the national estimates of nonfarm proprietors’ income
34. F o r other adjustments to the tax data, see N IP A table 8.20, “ Relation o f
N onfarm Proprietors’ Income in the National Income and Product Accounts
(N IP A ’ s) to Corresponding Measures as Published b y the Internal Revenue
Service,” urvey
(July

S

74

1994): 118.

35. The capital consum ption adjustment is also used to account fo r the
differences between the depreciation schedules used fo r tax accounting and
the straight-line depreciation schedules based on econom ic service live s that
are used fo r national econom ic accounting.
See “ Capital consumption
adjustment” in the “ G lossary.”

adjustment”

and

“ Inventory

valuation

36. See footnote 17 in the section “ Wage and Salary Disbursements.”

that include the adjustments are allocated to States in
proportion to tax return data that do not reflect the
adjustments.
In addition, the national estimates include adjustments
made to reflect decreases in monetary and imputed in­
come that result from damage to fixed capital and to
inventories that is caused by disasters, such as hurri­
canes and floods. These adjustments are attributed to
States on the basis of information from the Federal
Emergency Management Agency.
Income of nonfarm sole proprietorships and
partnerships
The State estimates of the income of nonfarm sole
proprietorships and partnerships for 1987-89 are based
on data for 1987-89 that were tabulated by the Inter­
nal Revenue Service (IRS) from Schedule C of form
1040 for sole proprietorships and from form 1065 for
partnerships.37
The national estimates excluding the misreporting ad­
justment for 1987-89 for all but seven SIC two-digit
industries were allocated to States in proportion to the
IRS data for “net-profit-less-loss.”38 For oil and gas ex­
traction and for holding and other investment offices, the
national estimates were allocated to States in proportion
to “net gross receipts” (gross receipts less refunds) for
each industry. For metal mining, for banking, and for
the manufacturing of food and kindred products, motor
vehicles and equipment, and transportation equipment
excluding motor vehicles, the national estimates were
allocated to States in proportion to the number of tax
returns for each industry.
The national estimates of the misreporting adjustment
for 1987-89 for all industries were allocated to States in
proportion to net gross receipts. The data for net-profit­
less-loss are inappropriate for the allocation of the State
estimates of this adjustment because net-profit-less-loss
is reduced by the tax misreporting that this adjustment
largely reflects.
The State estimates of the income of the proprietor­
ships and partnerships for 1990-91 for all SIC two-digit
industries except for the segments for physicians and
dentists in the health services industry were extrap­
olated from the 1989 State estimates by the relative
change in the number of small establishments for each
37.

The geographic coding o f the data is b y tax-filing address. T his address

is assumed to be the same as the address o f the place o f residence.

For

additional inform ation, see the “ Geographic characteristics o f the source data”
in the introduction to “ Sources and M ethods.”
The net-profit-less-loss fo r the seven industries is not used, because
the statistics fo r these industries are h ig h ly volatile, w hich indicates that they

38.

m ay be unreliable. In addition, these statistics frequently fluctuate into the
negative range, so that they are d ifficu lt to use in an allocation procedure.

M-17

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

industry.39 The national estimates for each industry were
then allocated to States in proportion to the extrapolated
estimates.
The State estimates for 1992-93 were extrapolated
from the 1991 State estimates in three steps. First, the
1991 State estimates were summed to all-industry totals.
Second, these totals were extrapolated to 1992-93 by the
relative change in the preliminary annual State estimates
of nonfarm personal income each year; the extrapolated
estimates for each year were then adjusted by allocation
to sum to the national all-industry totals for the year.40
Third the 1991 State estimates by industry were used
as elements in a two-way allocation procedure in which
the national estimates by industry for 1992-93 were the
primary controls, and the all-industry State estimates for
1992-93 were the secondary controls.41
The 1989 State estimates of proprietors’ income re­
ceived by physicians and by dentists were extrapolated
to 1990-92 by the relative change in the number of
physicians and of dentists, respectively.42 The extrap­
olated estimates were adjusted by allocation to sum to
the national estimates. The 1992 State estimates were
then used to allocate the national estimates for 1993 to
the States.
Income of nonfarm tax-exempt cooperatives
The income of tax-exempt cooperatives consists of the
net income that is received by rural electric cooper­
atives, rural telephone cooperatives, and agricultural
cooperatives.
The State estimates of the net income of rural elec­
tric cooperatives and of rural telephone cooperatives
are based on annual data for the net margin, or profit,
of these cooperatives that have outstanding loans from
the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) of the
Department of Agriculture.43 The net margin of each
cooperative is allocated to the States in proportion to
the distribution of its customer-members that is reported
by the REA. The allocated amount for each type of co39. T h is number excludes establishments without employees and is
available in the Census Bureau’ s annual C o u n ty B u sin e ss P a tte rn s.
40. The prelim inary annual State estimates were derived from the quarterly

operative is summed to State totals, and these totals are
then used to allocate the national estimates to States.
Agricultural cooperatives are mainly farm-marketing
cooperatives and farm-supply cooperatives; they are
classified in the SIC in wholesale trade. The State
estimates of the net income of these cooperatives are
based on data provided by the Agricultural Cooperative
Service of the Department of Agriculture.
Farm Proprietors’ Income
Farm proprietors’ income is the income received by the
sole proprietorships and the partnerships that operate
farms. The national and State estimates of this income
are based on the national and State estimates of the net
income of all farms prepared by the Economic Research
Service (ERS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture
(USDA). However, the USDA estimates reflect defini­
tions that differ slightly from those used by BEA, and
they include the income received by corporate farms,
which is by definition excluded from personal income.
Therefore, to obtain the estimates of farm proprietors’
income, the USDA estimates of the net income of all
farms are adjusted to conform with BEA definitions and
to exclude the income received by corporate farms.44
In this section, the derivation of the USDA estimates
of the components of the net income of all farms is
described. Then, the adjustments made to the USDA
estimates in order to obtain farm proprietors’ income
are described.
The USDA estimates of the net income of all farms
are calculated as the estimates of gross income less the
estimates of production expenses.
USDA estimates of gross income
Gross income consists of the cash receipts from the
sales of agricultural products, the cash receipts from
other farm-related activities, the Federal Government
payments to farm operators, the imputed gross rental
value of farm housing, the imputed value of the home
consumption of farm products, and the value of the
change in farm inventories.
44.

The U S D A State estimates are based on data from the 1987 Census o f

State personal incom e estimates. Before the annual estimates are used for

Agricu ltu re and from various surveys by the N ational A g ricu ltu ra l Statistical

the extrapolation, the disaster adjustments that are made to the estimates o f

Service and the E R S .
F o r inform ation about the source data and the methods that are used to
derive the U S D A estimates, see Eco no m ic Research Service, M a jo r S ta tis­

the rental incom e o f persons and o f proprietors’ incom e are removed.
41. See footnote 35.
42. The number o f physicians excludes hospital residents and interns, and

tic a l S e r ie s o f th e U .S. D e p a rtm e n t o f A g ric u ltu re , V olum e 3 : F a rm In co m e

it is reported by the A m erican M e d ic a l Association. The number o f dentists
is reported by the A m erican Dental Association.
43. These data are published b y the R E A in its A n n u a l S ta tis tic a l R e p o rt.

(Washington, D C : National Technical Information Service (N TIS), November
1988).
See also “ Improvements and A d d ition s to Accounts” in

E c o n o m ic I n d ic a ­

The data fo r the electric cooperatives are fo r the total number o f customermembers, including businesses; the data fo r the telephone cooperatives are

to rs o f the F a rm S ec to r: S ta te F in a n c ia l S u m m ary, 1 9 9 2

(Washington, DC:

fo r the number o f residential customer-members.

N T IS , January 1994): 11-12.
The U S D A State estimates are published annually in

E c o n o m ic I n d ic a to rs.

M-18

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Cash receipts.—The cash receipts from sales accounted

for almost 90 percent of gross farm income at the na­
tional level in 1993. Cash receipts consist of the gross
revenue that is received by farmers from the sales of
crops, livestock, and livestock products (such as eggs
and milk) and of the net value of loans that are made by
the Commodity Credit Corporation and that are secured
by crops.
The USDA estimates of the cash receipts from the
sales of agricultural products are based on data for the
quantities of the products sold or produced and on data
for the market prices of these products. These data
are from surveys by the National Agricultural Statistical
Service (NASS).
The annual estimates of the cash receipts from the
crop sales are the sum of monthly estimates. The
monthly estimates are calculated as the product of the
quantity of each type of crop that is sold and the market
price for each type of crop.
The annual estimates of the cash receipts from the
sales of meat animals (cattle, swine, and sheep), of
dairy products, and of poultry and eggs are the sums of
monthly estimates that are calculated as the product of
the quantity of each type of livestock or livestock prod­
uct that is sold and the market price for each type. The
estimates of the cash receipts from the sales of other
livestock and livestock products are prepared with a va­
riety of methods; the method used depends on the data
available for each type of livestock or product.
The estimates of the net value of Commodity Credit
Corporation (CCC) loans are based on annual State esti­
mates of the net value of the loans for each type of crop.
The estimate of the net value of the loans is calculated
as the amount of the loans that are made in a given year
less the amount of the loans that are redeemed in the
year. The estimates are based on data for each type of
crop from monthly CCC reports on the amount of the
loans and of the loan redemptions.
Cash receipts from other activities.—This is the gross
income from farm-related activities other than crop and
livestock production, including the use of farms as recre­
ational facilities (for example, for hunting or fishing),
the sale of forest products, and custom work performed
for other farm operators, such as clearing land and
harvesting crops.
The estimates are based mainly on data from the Farm
Costs and Returns Survey that is conducted jointly by
ERS and NASS. These data are supplemented by data
from the census of agriculture.

Federal Government payments to farm opera­
tors.—These payments include price support payments

(such as deficiency payments and wool payments), dis­
aster payments, and payments for holding land out of
production.
The estimates of these payments are based on data
from the administrative records of the Agricultural
Stabilization and Conservation Service, USDA.
Imputed gross rental value of farm housing.—This im­
putation is an estimate of the gross rent that would be
received by the owner—usually the farm operator—of
farm housing occupied by the farm operator and by hired
farm workers if the housing were rented to others at
market value.45 The imputed rent is unrelated to the
actual rent that is paid to the landlord.
The estimate of the imputed gross rental value of the
farm housing occupied by farm operators is calculated
as the sum of the estimate of the expenses of operat­
ing the housing and the estimate of the return to the
equity and borrowed capital invested in the housing,
which is imputed as the product of the market-sale value
of the housing and the average interest rate on farm
mortgages.46
The estimate of the imputed gross rental value of all
farm housing is calculated as the product of the gross
rental value of the farm housing occupied by farm opera­
tors and the ratio of the market-sale value of all occupied
farm housing to the market-sale value of farm housing
occupied by the farm operators. The estimates are based
on data from annual NASS surveys, including the Farm
Costs and Returns Survey; the data are supplemented
by data from the census of agriculture.
Imputed value of home consumption.—This imputation
is an estimate of the value of the food and the fuel that
are produced and consumed on farms. The estimate is
based on the quantity and the value at producers’ market
prices of the food and fuel.
The estimates are mainly based mainly on data from
NASS surveys. Annual data on the consumption of
livestock are available; data on the consumption of other
products are occasionally available.

Value of the change in farm inventories.—This value

is an estimate of the value, at market prices, of the
change in the quantity of the inventories of crops and

45. The inclusion o f the imputed gross rental value o f farm housing in gross
receipts offsets the expenses— including interest, taxes, and depreciation—
that are associated w ith the operation o f the housing. The expenses are
included in farm production expenses. Including both the rental value and
the expenses in the farm incom e accounts adds the net rental value o f farm
housing to farm income.
46. The operating expenses include the expenditures on repairs, insurance
premiums, a capital consumption allowance, and residential property taxes.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

livestock that are owned by farmers.47 The estimates
of the value of the change plus the estimates of cash
receipts from the sales of agricultural products during
the year yields a measure of the gross income from
agricultural production during the year.48
The estimates of the value of the change in the in­
ventories of each type of crop are calculated as the
difference between the value of the crops that are pro­
duced and the value of the crops that are sold or used
as feed. This calculation accounts for all the invento­
ries, regardless of the location of their storage, that are
owned by farmers. The estimates are based on NASS
survey data that are adjusted for losses and for changes
due to CCC loan activities.
The estimates of the value of the change in the in­
ventories of each type of livestock are based on annual
data for the change in the number of animals and poul­
try during the year and data for the average value per
animal; these data are available annually from NASS
surveys.
USDA estimates of production expenses
The estimates of farm production expenses consist of the
estimates for the following expenses: Purchases of feed,
livestock and poultry, seed, fertilizer, agricultural chem­
icals and lime, and petroleum products; labor expenses;
machinery rental and custom work; animal health costs;
and all other expenses.49
The estimates of production expenses for purchased
goods except livestock, for labor, for machinery rental
and custom work, and for animal health costs are pri­
marily based on data for 10 “production regions” from
the Farm Costs and Returns Survey.50 The regional es­
timates are allocated to States in proportion to data from
the 1987 Census of Agriculture.
47. The U S D A ’ s definition o f the value o f the change excludes the changes
in the inventories o f crops that are held as collateral fo r C C C loans and in
the inventories o f grow ing crops, seed, fuel, and fe rtilizer owned b y farmers.
48. The role o f the estimates o f the net change in inventories in the deriva­
tion o f farm incom e is illustrated b y the fo llo w in g examples. F o r crops, the
value o f the net change is negative when farmers feed more crops to their
livestock or sell more crops than they produce during the year, so that the
amount held in inventory declines and the cash receipts overstate the value

M-19

The estimates of the expenses for livestock purchases
are based on NASS survey data on interstate shipments
of livestock that are received by farm operators.51
The estimates of all other expenses consist mainly of
the estimates of overhead, such as depreciation, mort­
gage interest, taxes, and the costs of electricity and
telephone service. The estimates of mortgage interest
are based on data from the Farm Credit System and other
financial agencies and on data from the ERS Agricul­
tural Land Values and Markets Survey. The estimates
of the other components of all other expenses are based
mainly on data from the Farm Costs and Returns Survey,
other NASS surveys, and the census of agriculture.
Adjustments to the USDA State estimates
To derive the national and State estimates of farm pro­
prietors’ income, BEA adjusts the USDA estimates of
the net income of all farms, mainly because the defini­
tions and classifications used for the estimation of farm
income by USDA differ from those used by BEA. First,
the USDA estimates are adjusted to derive the BEA es­
timates of the net income of all farms.52 Second, the
BEA estimates of the net income are adjusted to exclude
the income of corporate farms.
Adjustments in definitions and classifications.—The
USDA estimates are adjusted to account for five
differences in definitions and classifications.
The USDA estimates of depreciation expenses are on
a declining-balance basis. However, BEA measures de­
preciation expenses on a current replacement-cost basis.
The amount of the difference between the BEA national
estimates of depreciation and the USDA estimates is
allocated to States in proportion to the USDA estimates.
The USDA estimates of the net income of all farms
include estimates of the patronage dividends received
by farm operators from agricultural cooperatives, which
are mainly farm-marketing and farm-supply coopera­
tives. However, BEA classifies the income of these
cooperatives as part of nonfarm proprietors’ income in
the wholesale trade industry. Therefore, estimates of
these dividends are subtracted from the USDA national
and State estimates.53 The national estimate is allocated

o f the current production fo r market by the value o f the net withdraw als from
inventory.
F o r livestock, the value o f the net change is positive when the number
o f anim als that are b om or that farmers purchase is greater than the number
that o f anim als that die o r that are sold during the year, so that the size o f the
herds increases and the cash receipts less the cost o f purchases understates
the value o f the current production b y the value o f the net increase in the
herds.
49. Lab or expenses consist o f the payments to farm labor contractors and
the cash wages, pay-in-kind, and supplements to the wages o f hired labor.
50. Each production region consists o f States that share sim ilarities in their
agriculture.

51. Intrastate interfarm sales o f livestock are not included in the U S D A
estimates o f the expenses o f livestock purchases or in the U S D A estimates
o f cash receipts fo r livestock sales, because the receipts for these sales offset
the expenses fo r these purchases in the State estimates o f farm income.
52. F o r the differences between the U S D A and the B E A estimates o f net
farm incom e at the national level, see N IP A table 8.21, “ Relation o f Net
Farm Income in the N ational Income and Product Accounts (N IP A ’ s) to Net
Farm Income as Published b y the U .S. Department o f A g ricu ltu re (U S D A ),”

Survey 74 (July

1994): 118.
53. The incom e o f agricultural cooperatives that B E A measures as part o f

nonfarm proprietors’ incom e is the profits o f the cooperatives. The incom e

M-20

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

to States in proportion to unpublished estimates from
the ERS; these estimates reflect the State distribution
of “income from other farm-related sources” from the
1987 Census of Agriculture.
The USDA classifies the salaries received by corpo­
rate officers and by the owner-operators of partnership
farms as part of the return to capital and therefore does
not deduct these salaries in the derivation of its esti­
mates of the net income of all farms.54 However, BEA
classifies these salaries as part of wages and salaries;
therefore, the national and State estimates of the salaries
are subtracted from the USDA estimates. The BEA na­
tional and State estimates of these salaries are based on
data provided by USDA.
The USDA estimates of the cash receipts from crop
sales include the net value of CCC loans (loans less
redemptions); the loans are treated as crop sales, and
subsequent defaults on the loans do not affect the USDA
estimates of the net income of all farms. However, BEA
classifies the CCC loans as financial transactions; the
placement of crops under loan is considered to be an
increase in farm inventories, and the default of a loan
is considered to be a sale of the crops and a reduction
in farm inventories. Therefore, the USDA national and
State estimates of the cash receipts from the sale of each
type of crop and the value of inventory change for the
crop are adjusted.55 The national estimates of the adjust­
ments for each crop are allocated to States in proportion
to data on net CCC loan activity for the crop from the
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service.
The USDA estimate of the net income of all farms
excludes an estimate of the payment of fines by farm
operators to the Federal Government. However, BEA
classifies these fines as a production expense; therefore,
estimates of these fines are subtracted from the USDA
national and State estimate of net income. The national
estimate of these fines is allocated to States in proportion
to the USDA estimates of cash receipts from the sale of
crops and livestock.
Statistical adjustments.—The USDA national estimate
of the imputed gross rental value of farm housing is
statistically adjusted to improve the extrapolation of the
data from the 1987 Census of Agriculture that are used
for the estimate. The adjusted national estimate is allofrom the agricultural cooperatives that U S D A measures as part o f farm in ­
come is the patronage dividends paid to farm operators out o f the current
and accumulated profits o f the cooperatives.
54. The corporate officers include the owner-operators o f Internal Revenue
Code subchapter S “ fa m ily ” corporations.
55. The adjustments to the U S D A estimates o f the value o f inventory
change largely offset the adjustments to the estimates o f cash receipts. The
adjustments also reflect the differences in valuation that result from the
differences in the tim ing o f the sales and o f the changes in inventories.

cated to States in proportion to the USDA estimates of
the imputed rent.
In addition, the USDA national and State estimates of
a component of gross income or of production expenses
are statistically adjusted when the USDA estimates of
the component for several years have been revised, but
the BEA estimates of the component in the estimates of
farm proprietors’ income for some of those years have
not been revised. For example, in 1994, the USDA
estimates of feed purchased (a component of production
expenses) for 1988-92 had been revised, but only the
BEA estimates of the component for 1991-92 have been
revised.
In order to preclude a discontinuity between the un­
revised 1990 BEA estimate and the revised 1991 BEA
estimate, the revised USDA estimates of feed pur­
chased for 1991-92—together with the new estimates
for 1993—were adjusted so that they would be consis­
tent with the unrevised 1990 BEA estimate. For the
Nation and for each State, the difference between the un­
revised 1990 BEA estimate and the revised 1990 USDA
estimate was added to the USDA estimate for each year
in 1991-93 to yield the BEA estimate. After this ad­
justment, the difference between the BEA estimate for
each year in 1990-93 and the USDA estimate for each
year is the same, and the amount of the change in the
BEA estimates from year to year is the same as that
in the USDA estimates. The inconsistency in the esti­
mates will continue until the 1988-90 estimates of farm
proprietors’ income are revised; at that time, the BEA
estimates of feed purchased will be changed to be fully
consistent with the USDA estimates.

Adjustment to exclude the income of corporate
farms.—This adjustment is made in the last major step

in the calculation of farm proprietors’ income, because
the estimates of the total net income of all farms include
the income of corporate farms. In order to exclude the
income of these farms, national and State estimates of
the net income of corporate farms are prepared.
The national estimates of the net income for 1987-93
were prepared in five steps. First, the proportions of
each of four components of gross income and the pro­
portion of total production expenses that were accounted
for by corporate farms for 1987 were calculated from
data from the 1987 Census of Agriculture.56 Second,
corporate proportions for the same gross income com­
ponents and for production expenses were calculated for
56.

The four components are cash receipts from the sale o f agricultural

products, cash receipts from other farm-related activities, Federal government
payments, and the value o f the change in inventories.
The corporate proportions are calculated as the incom e or expense
measure fo r corporate farms divided by the measure fo r all farms.

M-21

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

1987-93 from data from the Farm Costs and Returns
Survey. Third, the 1987 census-based proportions were
extrapolated to 1988-93 by the relative change in the
corresponding survey-based proportions.
Fourth, the extrapolated proportions for each year
were multiplied by the BEA national estimate of each
component of the gross income for all farms and by
the BEA national estimate of the production expenses
for all farms in order to obtain the national estimates
of the components and of production expenses for the
corporations. Fifth, the estimate of corporate produc­
tion expenses for the year was subtracted from the sum
of the estimates of the components of corporate gross
income in order to obtain the national estimate of the
net income of corporate farms.
The State estimates of the net income of corporate
farms for 1987-93 were prepared in three steps. First,
the corporate proportions of total cash receipts from the
sale of crops and livestock for 1987 for each State were
calculated from data from the 1987 Census of Agricul­
ture. Second, the 1987 proportions were multiplied by
the BEA State estimates of the net income of all farms
for each year in 1987-93 in order to obtain preliminary
State estimates of the net income of corporate farms for
1987-93. Third, the national estimate of the net income
of corporate farms for each year was allocated to States
in proportion to the preliminary State estimates.

Personal Dividend Income,
Personal Interest Income, and
Rental Income of Persons
The State estimates of personal dividend income, per­
sonal interest income, and rental income of persons are
presented together. These three components of personal
income accounted for almost 16 percent of total personal
income at the national level in 1993 (table D).
The estimates of these three components consist of
the estimates of the income that is received by individ­
uals and the estimates of the income that is received
on behalf of individuals by quasi-individuals, which in­
clude nonprofit institutions and private trust funds that
are administered by fiduciaries.57
The national estimates of these components are based
almost entirely on data that are not available for States.
The State allocations of the national estimates are based
mainly on individual income tax data.

Table D.—Personal Dividend Income, Personal Interest Income, and
Rental Income of Persons by Component and Total Personal
Income for the United States, 1993
M i ll i o n s o f
d o lla r s

P e rc e n t of
to ta l p e r s o n ­
a l in c o m e

T o ta l p e r s o n a l I n c o m e .................................................................................................

5 ,3 5 9 ,5 8 9

1 0 0 .0 0

P e r s o n a l d iv id e n d In c o m e , p e r s o n a l I n te r e s t In c o m e , a n d r e n ta l
In c o m e o f p e r s o n s ..................................................................................................

8 4 3 ,3 6 2

1 5 .7 4

P e r s o n a l d iv i d e n d i n c o m e ..........................................................................................

1 8 1 ,3 2 4

3 .3 8

P e r s o n a l i n t e r e s t i n c o m e .............................................................................................

6 3 7 ,9 0 9

1 1 .9 0

M o n e t a r y .........................................................................................................................

2 8 8 ,1 9 3

5 .3 8

I m p u t e d ...........................................................................................................................

3 4 9 ,7 1 6

6 .5 3

R e n t a l I n c o m e o f p e r s o n s 1 ........................................................................................

2 4 ,1 2 9

.4 5

M o n e t a r y .........................................................................................................................

5 1 ,0 2 6

.9 5

I m p u t e d ...........................................................................................................................

-2 6 ,8 9 7

-.5 0

Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.
1. Shown with the capital consumption adjustment.

Personal Dividend Income
Personal dividend income consists of payments in cash
or other assets that are made by corporations in the
United States or abroad to noncorporate stockholders
who are U.S. residents; these payments exclude the pay­
ments of a corporation’s stock by the corporation to its
stockholders.
Personal dividend income accounted for more than 3
percent of total personal income at the national level
in 1993 (table D). The State estimates of personal div­
idend income consist of the estimates of the dividends
that are received by individuals, the dividends that are
received by nonprofit institutions, and the dividends that
are received, retained, and reinvested by fiduciaries.
Dividend income received by individuals.—The State
estimates are based on tabulations by State of the
dividends that are reported by individuals on Internal
Revenue Service (IRS) form 1040. These data are tab­
ulations of Federal individual income tax data from the
Individual Master File (IMF) of the IRS.58

Dividend income received by nonprofit institu­
tions.—Because State data are unavailable, the national

estimate is allocated to the States in proportion to the
annual State estimates of the civilian population that are
prepared by the Census Bureau.
Dividend income retained by fiduciaries.—The State
estimates are based on tabulations of data by State from
the entry “income from estates and trusts” in “Schedule
E: Supplemental Income” of form 1040; these tabula­
tions are published annually by the IRS in Statistics of
58.

The State I M F tabulations fo r a year are unavailable until about 18

months after the end o f the year; therefore, the State estimates that are based
on the I M F data fo r a year are first derived from the extrapolation o f the
data fo r the previous year by the relative change in the State estimates o f

57.

See “ F id u ciary” and “ Persons” in the “ G lossary.”

nonfarm personal income.

M-22

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Income. Although these data exclude the dividends that

are retained by fiduciaries, they are used because they
reflect the geographic distribution of the individuals on
whose behalf the dividends are received.

Personal Interest Income
Personal interest income is the interest income that is
received by individuals, by nonprofit institutions, and
by estates and trusts.
Personal interest income accounted for about 12 per­
cent of total personal income at the national level in
1993 (table D). The State estimates of personal inter­
est income consist of the estimates of monetary interest
income and of imputed interest income. Monetary inter­
est accounted for more than 5 percent of total personal
income, and imputed interest accounted for about 6.5
percent.

calculated.60 Second, this ratio is multiplied by the IMF
dividends for each State to yield a State approximation
of the interest that is reported as dividends. Third, the
State approximations are added to the IMF State tabu­
lations of interest to yield preliminary State estimates
of the reportable interest. Fourth, the national estimate
of the reportable interest is allocated to the States in
proportion to the preliminary estimates.
Interest income received from municipal bonds.—
Because State data are unavailable, the national estimate
of the tax-exempt interest from municipal bonds is allo­
cated to States in proportion to a series derived from the
number of high-income households from the 1980 and
the 1990 Census of Population. The allocators for the
State estimates for 1987-89 were interpolated from the
data from the censuses, and the estimates for 1990 are
based on the data from the 1990 Census. The allocators
for the State estimates for 1991-93 were extrapolated
from the 1990 data by the relative change in the civilian
population.

Monetary interest income
The State estimates of monetary interest income consist Net accrued interest income from Federal Government
of the estimates of the interest that is reportable for Fed­ savings bonds.—The State estimates of the net accrued
eral individual income tax, the estimates of the interest
on unredeemed series E, EE, H, and HH bonds
received by individuals from municipal bonds issued by interest
are
prepared
in two steps.61 First, the national estimate
State and local governments, the estimates of the net in­ of the total interest
on savings bonds during
terest accrued on unredeemed series E, EE, H, and HH a year is allocated toaccrued
States in proportion to the
bonds that are issued by the Federal Government and value of the unredeemedthebonds
at the end of the year,
that are owned by individuals, the estimates of the inter­ and the national estimate of the accrued
realized
est received by nonprofit institutions, and the estimates from bonds redeemed during the year interest
is
allocated
to
of the interest retained by fiduciaries.
the States in proportion to the value of the unredeemed
Reportable interest income.— The State estimates of the bonds at the end of the preceding year.62 Second, the
interest that is reportable for Federal individual income State estimate of the realized interest is subtracted from
tax are based on the IMF data for interest that are sup­ the State estimate of the total accrued interest to yield
plemented by a series prepared from the IMF data for the State estimate of the net accrued interest.
dividends.59 The supplementation is necessary because Interest income received by nonprofit institutions.—
the reportable interest that is received by individuals Because State data are unavailable, the national estimate
from regulated investment companies, such as money
60. The national estimate o f the reportable interest that is received by
market mutual funds, is reported as dividend income on individuals
from these companies is prepared as part o f the reconciliation o f
IRS form 1040. Therefore, the data for this portion of personal incom
e and adjusted gross income. See Thae S. Park, “ R elationship
interest income are included in the IMF dividends series Between Personal Income and Adjusted Gross Income, 1991-92,” Survey
74 (August 1994): 51-53.
rather than in the IMF interest series.
61. The net accrued interest is the excess o f the interest accrued on the
The State estimates are prepared in four steps. First, bonds
during the year over the accrued interest that was realized from the
the national ratio of the estimate of the reportable inter­ bonds redeemed during the year.
The interest accrued on unredeemed bonds is treated as i f it were received
est received by individuals from investment companies
by individuals as it accrues because it is available to the individuals.
to the sum of the estimate of this interest and the
realized accrued interest is considered part o f reportable interest in
estimate of the dividends received by individuals is the The
year that the bond is redeemed.
59.
The estimates o f the reportable interest include the interest accrued on
ind ivid u al retirement accounts and other tax-deferred savings accounts in the
year in w h ich the interest is earned, but the I M F data do not include this

A cco rd in g to Federal tax laws, the holders o f these bonds m ay report the
interest as it accrues, or they may report the accrued interest when the bonds
are redeemed. It is assumed that the interest is usually reported when the

interest, because it is reported as part o f taxable withdrawals, not as interest,

bonds are redeemed.
62. The State data series fo r the value o f the unredeemed bonds are

in the year in w h ich the funds are withdrawn

tabulated by the B on d D iv is io n o f the Department o f the Treasury.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
is allocated to the States in proportion to the annual
State estim ates o f the civ ilian population.

Interest income retained by fiduciaries.— T he State e s ­
tim ates are based on tabulations o f State data from the
entry “in co m e from estates and trusts” in “S ch ed u le E:
S u p p lem en tal In co m e” o f form 1040. T h ese tabulations
are p u b lish ed ann ually in Statistics of Income.

Imputed interest income
Im puted interest receiv ed b y person s co n sists o f the net
in vestm en t in co m e that is receiv ed by life insurance
carriers and private non in sured p en sion plans, w h ich is
attributed to person s in the year in w h ich it is earned,
and the im pu ted interest that is receiv ed by persons
from in vestm en t com p an ies and from depository in sti­
tutions, w h ich represents the valu e o f financial services
for w h ich person s are not ch arged.63 L ife insurance car­
riers and private noninsured p en sion funds accoun t for
m ore than 58 percen t o f the im puted interest in com e.
B eca u se State data are un available, the national esti­
m ates o f th ese su b com p on en ts are allocated to States in
proportion to a related series.64 T he national estim ate
o f the n et in vestm en t in co m e from life insurance carri­
ers and the n ational estim ate o f im puted interest from
in vestm en t com p an ies and depository institutions are al­
located to States in proportion to the State estim ates o f
reportable interest. T he national estim ate o f the net in ­
v estm en t in co m e from private p en sion plans is allocated
to States in proportion to the State estim ates o f em p loyer
contrib utions to th ese fu n d s.65

Rental Income of Persons
T he rental in co m e o f person s w ith capital consu m ption
adjustm ent co n sists o f the m onetary current-production
in com e o f person s from the rental o f real property;
the royalties receiv ed by persons from patents, c o p y ­
rights, and rights to natural resources; and the im puted
rental in co m e receiv ed b y ow n er-occu p an ts o f nonfarm
63. F o r additional inform ation, see “ Imputation” in the “ Technical Notes.”
64. The available State data fo r the deposits at most types o f depository
institutions do not reflect the State distribution o f the imputed interest that
is received b y persons, because personal deposits are indistinguishable from
corporate deposits in these data.
65. The State estimates o f the contributions were prepared in three steps.
First, the national estimate o f these contributions fo r 1979 fo r each S IC twod igit industry was allocated to States in proportion to wages and salaries by
State o f residence o f the em ployee fo r the industry from the 1980 Census
o f Population. Second, the 1979 State estimates fo r the industries were
summed to obtain State all-industry estimates. T hird, the 1979 State a ll­
industry estimates were extrapolated by the annual State estimates o f the
c iv ilia n population to obtain estimates fo r 1980-93.

M-23

d w e llin g s.66 T he rental in co m e o f person s ex clu d es the
m onetary rental in com e receiv ed by persons w h o are
prim arily en gaged in the real estate b u sin ess.67
T he national estim ate o f the rental in co m e o f persons
w as less than 0.5 percent o f total personal in com e in
1993 (table D ). M onetary rental in co m e accou n ted for
slig h tly less than 1 percent o f total personal in com e, and
im puted rental in co m e accou n ted for - 0 . 5 percent.
T he national and State estim ates o f m onetary rental in ­
co m e and o f im puted rental in co m e in clu d e adjustm ents
for dam age to real estate that is cau sed by disasters,
such as hurricanes and flood s. H ow ev er, the national
estim ates o f m onetary rent and o f im puted rent that are
allocated to States ex clu d e the adjustm ents for disasters;
th ese adjustm ents are a ssign ed to States on the basis o f
data from the F ederal E m ergen cy M anagem en t A g en cy .

Monetary rental income
T he State estim ates o f m onetary rental in com e con sist
o f the estim ates o f the net rents and royalties that are
receiv ed by in d ivid u als, the estim ates o f the net rents
and royalties that are receiv ed by nonprofit institutions,
and the estim ates o f the net rents and royalties retained
by fiduciaries.

Net rents and royalties received by individuals.—
B eca u se the available State data are unreliable, the
national estim ate is allocated to States in proportion to
the tabulations o f data for gross rents and royalties from
the IM F .68

Net rents and royalties received by nonprofit institu­
tions.— B eca u se State data are un available, the national
estim ate is allocated to the States in proportion to the
annual State estim ates o f the civ ilian population.

Net rents and royalties retained by fiduciaries.— T he

State estim ates are b ased on tabulations by State o f
data from the entry “in com e from estates and trusts” in
“S ch ed u le E: Su pp lem ental In co m e” o f IR S form 1040.

Imputed rental income
T he im puted rental in co m e receiv ed b y the ow neroccupants o f nonfarm d w ellin g s is an estim ate o f the
66. The imputed rental incom e received by the owner-occupants o f farm
dw ellings is included in farm proprietors’ income.
67. The rental incom e received by those in the real estate business is
included in nonfarm proprietors’ income.
68. The available IR S data fo r net rents are unreliable as a basis fo r the
estimation o f monetary rent because o f large sampling errors in the data for
the less populous States and because the depreciation expenses used fo r the
tax reporting fo r rental incom e differ sharply from the depreciation expenses
used in the national incom e and product accounts.

M-24

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

net return to h om e ow nersh ip . T he in clu sio n o f this in ­
co m e in person al in co m e is based on the prem ise that the
ow n er-occu p an ts are in the rental b u sin ess and that they
are renting the h ou ses in w h ich th ey liv e to th em selv es.69
T he State estim ates o f im pu ted rent co n sist o f the
estim ates o f the im puted rent receiv ed by the ow neroccu pants o f m o b ile h o m es and the estim ates o f the
im puted rent receiv ed b y the ow n er-occu p an ts o f all
other nonfarm d w ellin g s.

Imputed rent from mobile homes.—T he

national esti­
m ates o f im pu ted rent from m o b ile h om es for 1 9 8 7 -8 9
w ere allocated to States in proportion to a series derived
from the interpolation o f the State estim ates for 1980
and th ose for 1990.
T he State estim ates for 19 80 w ere allocated from
the national estim ate for 19 80 by the num ber o f m o ­
b ile h om es from the 19 80 C en su s o f H ou sin g, and the
State estim ates for 19 90 , by the num ber from the 1990
cen su s.70 T h e 1 9 9 1 -9 3 national estim ates w ere allocated
to States in proportion to the 1990 estim ates.

Imputed rent from all other nonfarm dwellings.— T he

n ational estim ates for 1 9 8 7 -8 9 w ere allocated to States
in proportion to a series derived from the interpolations
o f the State estim ates for 1980 and those for 19 90 .71
T he 1980 and the 1990 State estim ates w ere derived
from the allocation o f the national estim ates by State
estim ates o f the gross rental v a lu e o f o w n er-occu p ied ,
sin g le-fa m ily nonfarm d w ellin g s, w h ich w ere derived
from data from the cen su ses o f h o u sin g.72
T he State estim ates for 1 9 9 1 -9 3 w ere prepared in
tw o steps. First, prelim inary State estim ates w ere e x ­
trapolated from the 1990 State estim ates by the relative
ch an ge in the estim ates o f nonfarm personal in co m e for
1 9 9 1 -9 3 .73 S econ d , the national estim ates for 1 9 9 1 -9 3
w ere allocated to States in proportion to the prelim inary
estim ates.

Transfer Payments
Transfer paym ents are in com e paym en ts to p erson s for
w h ich n o current services are perform ed. T h ey are p a y ­
m ents by govern m en t and b u sin ess to ind ivid u als and
nonprofit institutions serving in d ivid u als.74
Transfer paym ents accoun ted for alm ost 17 percen t o f
total personal in co m e atthenational lev el in 1993 (table E).
74.

Transfer payments from the rest o f the w orld are netted against sim ilar

payments to the rest o f the world, and the net payments, termed “ personal
transfer payments to rest o f the w orld (net),” are entered in the national
incom e and products accounts as part o f personal outlays.

Table E.—Transfer Payments by Component and Total Personal
Income for the United States, 1993
M i ll i o n s o f
d o lla r s

P e rc e n t of
to ta l p e r s o n a l
in c o m e

5 ,3 5 9 ,5 8 9

1 0 0 .0 0

......................................................................................................

9 1 2 ,3 3 1

1 7 .0 2

G o v e r n m e n t p a y m e n t s t o i n d i v i d u a l s .................................................................

8 7 2 ,7 0 5

1 6 .2 8

T o ta l p e r s o n a l i n c o m e ..................................................................................................
T r a n s fe r p a y m e n ts

4 3 9 ,9 5 5

8 .2 1

................

2 9 7 ,9 2 1

5 .5 6

R a i lr o a d r e t ir e m e n t a n d d is a b i l it y p a y m e n t s .......................................

7 ,8 2 5

.1 5

F e d e r a l c iv il i a n e m p lo y e e s r e t ir e m e n t p a y m e n t s .............................

3 5 ,7 3 7

M ilit a r y r e t ir e m e n t p a y m e n t s

.......................................................................

2 6 ,3 4 4

.4 9

S t a t e a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t e m p lo y e e r e t ir e m e n t p a y m e n t s ....

5 6 ,5 9 6

1 .0 6

R e t i r e m e n t a n d d is a b i l it y i n s u r a n c e b e n e f it p a y m e n t s

.......................

O ld - a g e , s u r v iv o r s , a n d d is a b i l it y in s u r a n c e p a y m e n t s

W o r k e r s ' c o m p e n s a t io n b e n e f i t s

..............................................................

.6 7

1 1 ,2 8 2

.21

O t h e r g o v e r n m e n t d is a b i l it y i n s u r a n c e p a y m e n t s 1 ........................

3 ,8 1 6

.0 7

M e d i c a l p a y m e n t s 2 ................................................................................................

2 8 2 ,6 8 4

5 .2 7

I n c o m e m a in t e n a n c e b e n e f it p a y m e n t s .......................................................

8 6 ,6 2 1

1 .6 2

................................

2 4 ,6 7 3

A i d t o f a m i l ie s w it h d e p e n d e n t c h i l d r e n ................................................

S u p p le m e n t a l s e c u r it y i n c o m e ( S S I ) p a y m e n t s

2 3 ,9 4 8

.4 5

F o o d s ta m p s

................ 1......................................................................................

2 2 ,2 1 3

.41

O t h e r i n c o m e m a i n t e n a n c e 3 ......................................................................

1 5 ,7 8 7

U n e m p lo y m e n t i n s u r a n c e b e n e f it p a y m e n t s
S t a t e u n e m p l o y m e n t c o m p e n s a t io n

............................................

........................................................

U n e m p lo y m e n t c o m p e n s a t io n o f F e d e r a l c iv il i a n e m p lo y e e s

.6 5

3 3 ,3 0 1

.6 2

...

428
70

U n e m p lo y m e n t c o m p e n s a t io n o f v e t e r a n s ...........................................

.2 9

3 4 ,6 0 9

U n e m p lo y m e n t c o m p e n s a t io n o f r a ilr o a d e m p l o y e e s ....................

O t h e r u n e m p lo y m e n t c o m p e n s a t i o n 4

.4 6

.01
0

735

.01

....................................................

75

................................................................................

1 9 ,3 6 4

.3 6

V e t e r a n s p e n s i o n a n d d is a b i l it y b e n e f it p a y m e n t s .........................

1 6 ,6 2 8

.31

V e t e r a n s b e n e f it p a y m e n t s

0

E d u c a tio n a l a s s is t a n c e to v e t e r a n s , d e p e n d e n ts , a n d
........................................................................................................

802

V e t e r a n s lif e in s u r a n c e b e n e f it p a y m e n t s ............................................

1 ,8 9 0

O t h e r a s s i s t a n c e t o v e t e r a n s 6 ..................................................................

s u r v iv o r s 5

44

.01
.0 4
0

F e d e r a l e d u c a t i o n a n d t r a in in g a s s i s t a n c e p a y m e n t s ( o t h e r t h a n

69. See “ Imputation” in the “ Technical Notes.”
70. In the censuses, the number o f m obile homes includes trailers, which
do not y ie ld imputed rent. How ever, the number o f trailers is too sm all to
significantly affect the estimates o f imputed rent fo r the m obile homes.
71. The interpolations were partly based on data fo r the four census regions
from the Census B ureau’ s biennial A m e rican H ousing Survey.
72. F o r 1980 and fo r 1990, the State estimates o f the gross rental value
were calculated in three steps. First, the estimate o f the market value o f the
dw ellings in each value-size range for a State was calculated as the product
o f the number o f dw ellings and the median value o f the dw ellings in the
State. Second, the State estimate o f the market value fo r each range was
m u ltiplied by the national mean contract rent fo r the rented dw ellings in that
range to yie ld the estimate o f the gross rental value fo r the range in the State.
Third, the estimates fo r the ranges fo r the State were summed to y ie ld the
State estimate o f the gross rental value.
73. The annual estimates o f nonfarm personal incom e were derived from
the quarterly State estimates o f nonfarm personal income.
The extrapolation also used data fo r the four census regions from the
Census B ureau’ s 1991 A m e rican H ousing Survey.

fo r v e te r a n s ) 7

.....................................................................................................

O t h e r g o v e r n m e n t p a y m e n ts to in d iv id u a ls 8

...........................................

P a y m e n t s t o n o n p r o f it i n s t i t u t i o n s ........................................................................
fe d e r a l G o v e rn m e n t p a y m e n ts

......................................................................

S t a t e a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t p a y m e n t s 9
B u s in e s s p a y m e n ts

....................................................

8 ,2 5 6
1 ,2 1 6

22,784
5 ,7 6 1
1 1 ,1 0 3

................................................................................................

5 ,9 2 0

B u s i n e s s p a y m e n t s t o i n d i v i d u a l s 1 0 ..................................................................

1 6 ,8 4 2

.1 5
.0 2

.11
.21
.11
.4 3

.31

Detail m ay not add to totals because of rounding.
1. Includes temporary disability payments, black lung disability payments, and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corpora­
tion payments.
2. Consists of m edicare payments, medical vendor payments, and C H A M P U S payments.
3. Consists of general assistance, emergency assistance, foster care payments, earned income tax credits, and
low-income energy assistance.
4. Includes trade adjustment assistance payments.
5. Includes veterans readjustment benefit payments and educational assistance to spouses and children of dis­
abled or deceased veterans.
6. Includes payments to paraplegics, payments for autos and other conveyances for disabled veterans, veterans
aid, and veterans bonuses.
7. Includes Federal fellowship payments (National Science Foundation fellowships and traineeships, subsistence
payments to State maritime academy cadets, and other Federal fellowships), interest payments on guaranteed stu­
dent loans, higher education student assistance, and Job Corps payments.
8. Consists of Bureau of Indian Affairs payments; education exchange payments; compensation of survivors of
public safety officers; compensation of victims of crime; Japanese interns redress payments; compensation of victims
of Hurricanes Hugo, Andrew, and Iniki, and the Loma Prieta Earthquake; and Alaska Permanent bund payments.
9. Consists of foster care payments to institutions, educational assistance payments, and payments for employ­
ment and training.
10. Consists of personal injury payments to individuals other than em ployees and other business transfer
payments.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
E stim ates are prepared for app roxim ately 5 0 su b com ­
pon ents o f transfer p aym en ts.75 T he sub com ponents are
cla ssified by source— govern m en t or b u sin ess— and they
m ay also be cla ssified by recip ien t— ind ividu als or n on ­
profit institutions. In this d iscu ssio n , transfer paym ents
are grouped into three m ajor com p on en ts— governm ent
p aym en ts to in d ivid u als, govern m en t and bu sin ess p a y ­
m ents to nonprofit institutions serving in d ivid u als, and
b u sin ess p aym en ts to ind ividu als.
A t the State le v e l, app roxim ately 9 0 percent o f the
estim ates o f transfer p aym en ts are derived from data for
the paym en ts. T h e rem aining 10 percent are allocations
o f the national estim ates in proportion either to data that
are related to the com p on en ts or to the m ost relevant
p op u lation series.
M ost o f the State estim ates o f transfer paym ents are
based on data for a calendar year, but som e o f the e sti­
m ates are b ased on data for fiscal years. W hen data for
fiscal years are used , the data for the 2 fiscal years that
overlap the calendar year are averaged to y ie ld the data
for the calendar year.
T h is section is organized accord in g to the order o f the
presentation o f the com p on en ts and su b com ponents in
table E. E ach estim ated item is briefly defined, and the
preparation o f the State estim ates is described.

Government Payments to Individuals
Transfer p aym en ts by governm en t to ind ividu als a c­
cou n ted for m ore than 95 percent o f total transfer
p aym en ts at the national lev el in 1993.

Retirement and disability insurance payments
G overn m en t p aym en ts o f retirem ent and disab ility in ­
surance benefits to ind ividu als accoun ted for m ore than
48 percen t o f total transfer paym ents at the national lev el
in 1993.

Old-age, survivors, and disability insurance pay­
ments.— T h ese b enefits, popularly kn ow n as socia l se­

curity, co n sist m ain ly o f m onth ly paym ents receiv ed by
retired and disab led w orkers, dependents, and survivors
and o f lu m p -su m p aym en ts receiv ed by survivors.
T he State estim ates o f the O A S D I benefits co n sist o f
the estim ates for four categories o f th ese paym en ts. T he
estim ate for each category is based on annual tabulations
o f the p aym en ts from the S o cia l Security A dm inistration
(S S A ).

75.
The State estimates o f transfer payments in subcomponent detail for
1948-93 are available from the Regional E conom ic Inform ation System. See
the “ Introduction” and the sample table S A 3 5 in A ppen dix A .

M-25

Railroad retirement and disability payments.—T h ese

benefits are receiv ed by retired and d isab led railroad em ­
p lo y ees and their survivors under the F ederal program
o f retirem ent insurance for railroad em p lo y ees, w h o are
not co v ered by O A S D I.
T he State estim ates are based on fiscal year tab­
ulations o f the benefits disbursed by the R ailroad
R etirem ent Board.

Federal civilian employee retirement and disability
payments.— T h ese benefits are receiv ed by retired F ed ­
eral G overn m en t em p lo y ees and their survivors, and
th ey in clu d e the lum p -su m w ithdraw als o f funds co n ­
tributed by form er em p lo y ees. T h e benefits are received
from the fo llo w in g retirem ent plans: T he C ivil S erv­
ice R etirem ent S y stem (w h ich co vers m o st em p lo y ees
hired before 1984); the B a sic B enefit Plan o f the F ed ­
eral E m p loy ees R etirem ent S y stem (w h ich covers m ost
em p lo y ees hired after 1983); and sp ecial contributory
and noncontributory retirem ent plans, such as th ose o f
the F oreign S ervice, the F ederal R eserve B oard, and the
T en n essee V alley A uthority.
T he national estim ate o f th ese paym en ts is allocated
to States in proportion to data for the p aym en ts for
S eptem b er from the O ffice o f P ersonn el M anagem ent.

Military retirement payments.—T h ese

benefits are re­
ceiv ed by retired m ilitary person nel, includ in g C oast
G uard person nel, and their survivors.
T h e national estim ates for the serv ices are com b in ed ,
and the com b in ed estim ate is then allocated to States in
proportion to the paym en ts data for Septem ber that are
provided each year by the D epartm ent o f D efen se.

State and local government employee retirement pay­
ments.— T h ese benefits co n sist o f lu m p -su m paym en ts,

w ithdraw als, and m onth ly p aym en ts that are receiv ed by
retired State and local govern m en t em p lo y ees and their
survivors.
T he State estim ates o f th ese paym en ts are based on
fiscal year data from Finances of Employee-Retirement
Systems of State and Local Governments, w h ich is
pu blished annually b y the C en su s Bureau.

Workers’ compensation.— T h ese benefits co n sist o f
the paym ents that are receiv ed by ind ividu als w ith
em p loym en t-related injuries and illn e sses and by the
survivors o f ind ividu als w h o died from em p loym en trelated cau ses. T he p aym en ts are from both Federal and
State governm en t funds.
T he State estim ates o f the p aym en ts receiv ed from
the F ederal fund, w h ich co vers o n ly Federal c iv il­
ian em p lo y ees, are based on p aym en ts data from the
D epartm ent o f Labor.

M-26

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

C om p en sation p aym en ts to both pu blic and private
em p lo y ees from S tate-adm inistered w ork ers5 co m p en ­
sation fu nd s co n sist o f the paym en ts receiv ed under
e x c lu siv e ly S tate-adm inistered w ork ers’ com p en sation
insurance program s, the paym en ts receiv ed under Stateadm inistered insurance program s that co m p ete w ith
private insurance program s, and the paym en ts receiv ed
under the S tate-ad m inistered program s for second -inju ry
fu n d s.76
T he State estim ates o f th ese benefits are derived from
fiscal year data for the p aym en ts from State w ork ers’
com p en sation funds by the State o f w ork from the C en ­
sus B u reau ’s annual State Government Finances. T h ese
data are adjusted to a p la ce-o f-resid en ce b asis b y B E A .

Other government retirement and disability insurance
payments.— T h ese benefits co n sist o f the paym en ts o f

tem porary d isab ility benefits, the paym ents o f black lung
ben efits, and the p aym en ts o f b enefits from the P en sion
B en efit G uaranty C orporation.
Temporary disability benefits are the benefits re­
ceiv ed by w orkers w h o are un em p loyed b ecau se o f
n on occu p ation al illn esses or injuries. T h ese benefits are
from S tate-adm inistered program s on ly in C alifornia,
N e w Jersey, N e w York, and R hod e Island.
T he State estim ates are b ased on paym en ts data from
the E m p loym en t and Training A dm inistration o f the
D ep artm ent o f Labor.
Black lung benefits are the benefits receiv ed by
the coal m iners w h o are totally disab led by black
lung d isea se (p n eu m ocon iosis) and by the elig ib le sur­
v ivors o f m iners w h o se deaths w ere cau sed b y the
d isea se. In d ivid u als w h o se elig ib ility w as estab lish ed
b efore July 1973 receiv e their benefits from the S S A ;
th ose w h o se elig ib ility w a s estab lish ed sin ce June 1973
receiv e b en efits from the D epartm ent o f Labor.
T he State estim ates o f p aym en ts are based on State
data from both agen cies.
Pension Benefit Guaranty benefits are paid by the
rev o lvin g fund o f the P en sion B en efit G uaranty C or­
poration (P B G C ) to ind ividu als w h o se P B G C -in sured
p en sion s can n ot b e paid b y the private p en sion plans
that are liab le for the benefits.
T he national estim ate is allocated to States in propor­
tion to O A S D I paym en ts, w h ich are assu m ed to reflect
the geograp h ic distribution o f the retired population.
76.

Second-injury funds underwrite the risk o f a subsequent work-related

injury to an already disabled worker. Therefore, the lia b ility o f the employer
o f a disabled w orker is lim ited to the lia b ility fo r the im pairm ent resulting
from the injury sustained during the present employment.

The difference

between the compensation fo r the fu ll im pairm ent and the em ployer’ s lia b ility
is paid out o f the second-injury fund.

Medical payments
M ed ical p aym en ts accoun ted for alm ost 31 percen t o f
total transfer paym en ts at the national le v e l in 1993.

Medicare payments.— T h ese

benefits are F ederal G o v ­
ernm ent paym en ts m ade through interm ediaries to b en ­
eficiaries for the care provided to ind ividu als under the
m ed icare program .
T he State estim ates o f the p aym en ts under the m ed i­
care p rovision s for h osp ital insurance and su p p lem en ­
tary m ed ical insurance are b ased on the am ounts that
are paid as reim bursem ent for h osp ital and m ed ical
ex p en ses and that are reported by the H ealth Care F i­
nan cing A dm inistration (H C F A ). B eca u se the receip t o f
th ese data lag, the estim ates for 1993 are based on the
data for 1992.

Medical vendor payments.—T h ese

m ed ical benefits
are receiv ed b y lo w -in co m e ind ividu als; the benefits
are ca lled ven d or paym en ts b ecau se they are m ea s­
ured as the paym en ts to the vendors o f the m ed ical
services. T h ese paym en ts co n sist m ain ly o f the p a y ­
m ents m ade through interm ediaries to the vend ors for
care provided to ind ividu als under the fed erally as­
sisted , State-adm inistered m ed icaid program , but th ese
paym en ts also in clu d e paym en ts m ade under the g en ­
eral assistan ce m ed ical program s o f State and local
governm en ts.
T he State estim ates o f the p aym en ts m ade under the
m ed icaid program are based on paym en ts data from
H C F A . T he State estim ates o f paym en ts m ade under the
general assistan ce m ed ical program s are b ased on p a y ­
m ents data that are obtained from the State departm ents
o f socia l services b y H C FA .

Military medical insurance payments.— T h ese benefits

are ven d or paym en ts m ade under the C ivilian H ealth
and M ed ical P lan o f the U n iform ed S erv ices program
for the m ed ical care o f dependents o f active duty m ili­
tary person nel and o f retired m ilitary person nel and their
dependents at nonm ilitary m ed ical fa cilities.
T he State estim ates are based on paym ents data from
the D epartm ent o f D efen se.

Income maintenance payments
Incom e m aintenance paym ents accoun ted for about 9.5
percent o f total transfer p aym en ts at the national lev el
in 1993.

Supplemental security income payments.— T h ese

b en ­
efits co n sist o f the paym ents receiv ed by the aged,
the blind, and the d isab led from both the Federal
G overn m en t and State governm en ts.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
T h e State estim ates co n sist o f the estim ates o f the
F ederal G overn m en t paym en ts o f b asic benefits and the
estim ates o f the State govern m en t paym en ts o f su p p le­
m ental ben efits. B oth o f th ese estim ates are based on
data that are p u b lish ed in Monthly Benefit Statistics and
the Social Security Bulletin by S S A .

M-27

o f the fo o d stam ps issu ed to q u alifyin g lo w -in co m e
h ou seh old s in order to sup plem en t their ability to pur­
ch ase food . E lig ib ility is determ ined by the State
au th orities’ interpretation o f F ederal regulations; the
U .S . D epartm ent o f A griculture pays the co st o f the
stam ps.
T h e State estim ates are based on tabulations o f the
valu e o f the distributed stam ps from the D epartm ent o f
A griculture.

T he State estim ates for 1 9 8 7 -9 3 w ere extrapolated
from 1969 data for th ese p aym en ts b y the annual esti­
m ates o f A F D C paym ents. T h e 1969 data w ere from the
N ation al C enter for S o cia l Statistics o f the D epartm ent
o f H ealth and H um an S ervices.
Earned income tax credits are F ederal in com e tax
refunds to lo w -in co m e w orkers w h o have m inor ch il­
dren. E lig ib ility for the tax credits is determ ined b y the
size o f the adjusted gross in co m e, or the earned in com e,
and b y certain h ou seh o ld characteristics. T h e portion
o f the credit that is coun ted as a transfer p aym en t is
calculated as the e x c e ss o f the tax credit o v er the tax
liab ility.
T he State estim ates are d erived from tabulations o f
the am ount o f paym en ts disbursed to the residen ts o f
each State from the Internal R ev en u e S ervice.
Energy assistance payments co n sist o f the cash b en ­
efits receiv ed by n eed y h o u seh old s and the vendor
paym en ts to suppliers to help defray the co st o f h om e
heatin g, co o lin g , and w eatherization under the fed er­
ally funded and State-adm inistered en ergy assistan ce
program s.
T he State estim ates are based on paym en ts data
pu b lish ed by the S S A .

Other income maintenance payments.— T h ese

Unemployment insurance payments

Aid to families with dependent children
(AFDC).— T h ese b enefits are paym en ts to lo w -in co m e
fa m ilies under the State-adm inistered A F D C program
that receiv es F ederal m atch in g funds.
T he State estim ates are based on un published
quarterly data for th ese paym ents from the S S A .

Food stamps.— T h ese benefits are m easured as the value

benefits
co n sist o f general assistan ce paym en ts, em ergen cy as­
sistan ce p aym en ts, foster care paym en ts, earned in com e
tax credits, and en ergy assistan ce paym ents.
General assistance payments are the benefits re­
ceiv ed from State and local governm en ts by lo w -in co m e
in d ivid u als and fa m ilies w h o do not qu alify for help
under fed erally supported program s.77
T he State estim ates are based on paym en ts data from
the variou s State departm ents o f so cia l services.
Emergency assistance payments are the benefits re­
ceiv ed by fa m ilies w h o have at least one ch ild and w h o
are n ot co vered by A F D C . U nder this fed erally assisted
program , each fam ily is elig ib le o n ly o n ce every 12
m onths and is co vered for a m axim u m o f 3 0 days. T he
participation o f the States in this program is optional;
currently, about h a lf o f the States participate.
T he State estim ates are based on unpublished data for
the p aym en ts from the S S A .
Foster care payments are receiv ed from State and
local govern m en ts by fa m ilies caring for foster ch il­
dren under a fed erally aided program . T h ese p ay­
m en ts co n sist o f the paym en ts m ade under governm en t
su p ervision .78

U n em p loy m en t insurance paym en ts accoun ted for about
3.9 percent o f transfer paym en ts at the national lev el in
1993.

State unemployment compensation.— T h ese

benefits
co n sist m ain ly o f the p aym en ts receiv ed by in d ivid u ­
als under State-adm inistered u n em p loym en t insurance
(U I) program s, but th ey in clu d e the sp ecial benefits
authorized b y Federal leg isla tio n for period s o f high
u n em p loym en t.79 T h e p rovision s that govern the e lig i­
b ility, the tim in g, and the am ount o f the paym en ts vary
am ong the States, but the p rovision s that govern the
cov era g e and the financing are uniform nationally.
U nder the F ederal-State U I system , an u n em p loyed
ind ividu al w h o liv e s in on e State m ay b e e lig ib le for U I
benefits from another S tate.80 T herefore, the estim ate
for each State is calculated as the total paym en ts by a
State m inus the paym en ts b y that State to the residents
o f other States plu s the paym en ts by other States to the
residents o f that State. T h e State estim ates are based
on the data for the paym en ts from the E m p loym en t and
Training A dm inistration.
79. The program fo r Federal c iv ilia n employees and that for veterans
are administered by the States, but the benefits are classified in other

77. The Federal Governm ent neither funds nor regulates these programs.
78. The payments made under the supervision o f nonprofit institutions are
included in government payments to nonprofit institutions.

subcomponents o f unem ploym ent insurance payments.
80. The State o f the resident handles the cla im and then sends it to the
State that is responsible fo r paying the benefits.

M-28

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Unemployment compensation of railroad employ­
ees.—T h ese b en efits are receiv ed by w orkers w h o are

u n em p loyed b ecau se o f sick n ess or b ecau se w ork is
un available in the railroad industry and in related in ­
dustries, such as carrier affiliates. T h is U I program
is adm inistered by the R ailroad R etirem ent B oard un­
der a Federal program that is app licab le throughout the
N ation .
T he State estim ates are b ased on fiscal year data for
th ese p aym en ts from the retirem ent board.

Unemployment compensation of Federal civilian em­
ployees.— T h ese benefits are receiv ed by form er Federal
em p lo y ees under a F ederal program adm inistered by the
State em p lo y m en t security agen cies.
T he State estim ates are b ased on data for the paym ents
from the agen cies.

Unemployment compensation of veterans.— T h ese b en ­
efits are receiv ed by u n em p lo y ed veterans w h o have
recen tly separated from m ilitary service and w h o are not
elig ib le for m ilitary retirem ent benefits; the co m p en sa ­
tion is paid under a F ederal program that is adm inistered
by the State em p lo y m en t security agen cies.
T he State estim ates are b ased on paym en ts data from
the agen cies.
Trade adjustment allowances.—T h ese benefits are re­
ceiv ed by w orkers w h o are u n em p loyed b ecau se o f
the adverse eco n o m ic effects o f international trade
arrangem ents on em p loym en t.
T he State estim ates are based on calendar year data
for th ese p aym en ts that are tabulated b y “p etition ” (lo ­
cation o f plant) from the D epartm ent o f L abor, w h ich
adm inisters the program . T he estim ates are adjusted
for resid en ce in order to approxim ate a geograp h ic d is­
tribution that reflects the p lace o f the receip t o f the
benefits.
Payments to veterans
P aym ents to veterans accoun ted for about 2.1 percent o f
total transfer p aym en ts at the national le v e l in 1993.

Veterans pension and disability payments.—T h ese b en ­

efits co n sist m ain ly o f the paym en ts that are receiv ed
by veterans w ith serv ice-co n n ected d isab ilities and by
the survivors o f m ilitary person nel w h o died o f servicecon n ected cau ses. In addition, th ese benefits in clu d e the
p aym en ts that are receiv ed by w ar veterans w h o are 65
years o ld or old er, w h o h ave n o n serv ice-co n n ected d is­
ab ilities, w h o are perm anently and totally disabled , and
w h o m eet sp ecified in co m e requirem ents.

T he State estim ates are based on the data for these
paym ents from the D epartm ent o f V eterans A ffairs
(D V A ).

Educational assistance to veterans, dependents, and
survivors.—T h ese benefits are the p aym en ts o f the al­

low a n ces for tuition and other ed ucational costs that are
receiv ed by veterans and by the sp o u ses and the children
o f disabled and d ecea sed veterans.
T he State estim ates are based on data for these
paym en ts from the D V A .

Veterans life insurance payments.—T h ese benefits co n ­

sist o f the paym en ts receiv ed by the beneficiaries o f
veterans life insurance p o licie s and the d ivid en d s re­
ceiv ed by the p olicy h o ld ers from the five veterans life
insurance program s adm inistered by the D V A .
T he State estim ates are based on data for these
benefits from the D V A .

Other payments to veterans.— T h ese benefits con sist
o f the F ederal G overn m en t p aym en ts receiv ed by para­
p leg ics and b y certain other d isab led veterans to pur­
ch ase au tom ob iles and other co n v ey a n ces, the State and
local govern m en t p aym en ts o f a ssistan ce to in d igen t v et­
erans, and the State and local governm en t paym en ts o f
bon u ses to veterans.
T he State estim ates o f the F ederal G overn m en t p ay­
m ents are based on data for th ese paym en ts from the
D V A . T h e State estim ates o f the State and local go vern ­
m en t p aym en ts o f assistan ce and o f bon u ses are based
on fiscal year data from the C ensus B u reau ’s annual
State Government Finances.

Federal Government education and training
payments
F ederal G overn m en t paym en ts for ed ucation and train­
ing accoun ted for about 0.9 percent o f total transfer
paym ents at the national lev el in 1 9 9 3 .81

Federal fellowships.—T h ese

benefits co n sist o f the
paym ents to outstanding scien ce students w h o receiv e
N ation al S c ien ce F oundation (N S F ) grants, the su b sis­
ten ce paym ents to the cadets at the six State m aritim e
acad em ies, and the paym ents for all other Federal
fellow sh ip s.
T he State estim ates o f the paym en ts to the recip ien ts
o f N S F grants are based on annual N S F tabulations o f
81.
The large portion o f the payments under most o f these programs are
made to the school that the recipient attends. The payment is classified
as a transfer payment to a nonprofit institution i f the school is privately
administered and as a government grant-in-aid or as a government purchase
o f services i f the school is p u b lic ly administered.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
the num ber o f students receiv in g fello w sh ip s at each
institution.
T he State estim ates o f the su b sisten ce paym en ts to the
cadets are b ased on paym en ts data for each academ y.
T he am ount o f the p aym en t is assig n ed to the State in
w h ich each acad em y is located.
T he national estim ates o f the p aym en ts to the recip ­
ien ts o f all other F ederal fello w sh ip s are allocated to
States in proportion to the civ ilian pop ulation , b ecause
o f the lack o f pertinent data.

Higher education student assistance.— T h ese

benefits
co n sist o f the F ederal paym en ts, called P ell G rants,
for an undergraduate ed ucation for students w ith low
in com es.
T he State estim ates are based on tabulations o f
annual data for th ese paym ents b y the location o f
the ed ucational institution from the D epartm ent o f
E ducation.

Job Corps payments.—T h ese benefits are prim arily the

a llo w a n ces for liv in g ex p en ses receiv ed by eco n o m i­
ca lly d isad van taged ind ividu als w h o are b etw een the
ages o f 16 and 21 and w h o are en rolled in the d es­
ign ated vocation al and ed ucational training program s.
T h ese benefits also includ e the adjustm ent a llow an ces
receiv ed by trainees upon the su ccessfu l com p letion o f
their training.
T he State estim ates are based on tabulations from ETA
o f the am ount o f a llo w a n ces and allotm en ts disbursed
to the en rollees.

Interest payments on guaranteed student loans.—

T h ese p aym en ts are m ade by the D epartm ent o f E d uca­
tion to com m ercial lend in g institutions on b eh a lf o f the
in d ivid u als w h o receiv e low -in terest, deferred-paym ent
loan s from th ese institutions in order to pay the ex p en ses
o f higher ed ucation.
T he n ational estim ate is a llocated to States in propor­
tion to the num ber o f ind ividu als en rolled in institutions
o f higher ed u cation from the D epartm ent o f E ducation.

Other government payments to individuals
O ther govern m en t transfer paym en ts to ind ividu als ac­
cou n ted for about 0.1 percent o f total personal in com e
at the national lev el in 1993.

Compensation of survivors of public safety offi­
cers.— T h ese b en efits are paym en ts to the survivors o f
State and lo ca l govern m en t em p lo y ees, such as p o lice
officers and fire fighters, w h o w ere k illed in the lin e o f
duty; the p aym en ts are m ade under a F ederal program .
U n til 1988, the p aym en t w as a lum p sum o f $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 for

M-29

each claim ; in 1988, the paym en t w a s $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 . Sin ce
1988, it has b een $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 plus an allow an ce for the
increase in consu m er prices.
T he national estim ate is allocated to States by the
tabulations o f the num ber o f claim s by State from the
D epartm ent o f Justice.

Compensation of victims of crime.— T h ese

benefits
co n sist o f State and local govern m en t paym ents to crim e
victim s and to vendors on b eh a lf o f crim e victim s.
C urrently, about three-fourths o f the States h ave the
program s for th ese paym en ts.
T he national estim ate o f total p aym en ts is allocated
to States in proportion to inform ation a ssem b led by the
C rim e V ictim s B oard o f the N e w Y ork State E xecu tive
D epartm ent.

Alaska Permanent Fund payments.— T h ese

benefits
are the disbursem ents o f in vestm en t in com e to the resi­
dents o f A lask a from the A lask a Perm anent Fund. T he
fund, w h ich is derived from o il reven u es, p ays a portion
o f its net in vestm en t in co m e to every resident.
T he State estim ate is the am ount that is paid and that
is reported by the State.

Disaster relief payments.— T h ese

benefits are the F ed ­
eral paym en ts to the v ictim s o f disasters, su ch as
hurricanes and earthquakes.
T he State estim ates are based on inform ation from
the Federal E m ergency M anagem en t A g en cy . T he esti­
m ates for 1 9 8 9 -9 1 in clu d e the p aym en ts to the victim s
o f H urricane H u go and o f the L om a Prieta earthquake.
T he estim ates for 1 9 9 2 -9 3 includ e the paym en ts to the
v ictim s o f H urricanes A nd rew and Iniki; the estim ates
for 1993 also in clu d e the paym en ts to the v ictim s o f the
flood s in the M id w est.

Japanese interns redress payments.— T h ese

benefits
are the Federal p aym en ts to the A m erican citizen s o f
Japanese d escen t w h o w ere interned during W orld War
II. T he p aym en ts began in 1990.
T he State estim ates are based on the tabulations o f the
th ese paym ents by ZIP C ode area from the D epartm ent
o f Justice. T h ese tabulations are sum m ed to States by
BEA.

Federal educational exchange payments.—T h ese b en ­

efits are paym en ts to students w h o participate in the
F ulbright scholarship program and in other international
ed ucational exch an g e program s.
In the absen ce o f any pertinent data, the national esti­
m ates are allocated to States in proportion to the civ ilian
population.

M-30

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Bureau of Indian Affairs payments.— T h ese

benefits
are the p aym en ts to A m erican Indians for educational
and socia l services that are not available to them from
State or local agen cies.
T he State estim ates are based on data for these
p aym en ts from the B ureau o f Indian A ffairs.

Payments to Nonprofit Institutions Serving
Individuals
Transfer p aym en ts to nonprofit institutions serving in d i­
vid u als b y F ederal, State, and lo ca l govern m en ts and by
b u sin ess accou n ted for about 2 .2 percent o f total transfer
p aym en ts in co m e at the national le v e l in 1993.

Federal Government payments
T h ese p aym en ts co n sist m ain ly o f the paym en ts to pri­
vate nonprofit h osp itals for h osp ital construction and the
p aym en ts to private ed ucational institutions on b eh a lf
o f the recip ien ts o f F ederal fello w sh ip s, P ell grants, and
other ed u cation and training program s.82
B ecau se S tate-lev el data are un available, the national
estim ate is allocated to the States in proportion to the
civ ilian p op ulation.

State and local government payments
T h ese p aym en ts co n sist o f the paym en ts for foster care
and for jo b training b y State and local governm en ts
and the p aym en ts for ed ucational a ssistan ce by State
govern m en ts.

Payments for foster care.— T h ese

p aym en ts are m ade
to the private nonprofit a g en cies that su p ervise foster
care.
T he State estim ates for 1 9 8 7 -9 3 w ere extrapolated
from 1969 data for th ese p aym en ts b y the annual esti­
m ates o f A F D C p aym en ts. T he 1969 data are from the
N ation al C enter for S o cia l Statistics o f the D epartm ent
o f H ealth and H um an S ervices.

Job Training Partnership Act payments.—T h ese

pay­
m ents are m ade to the private nonprofit institutions that
provid e jo b training under a w ork-stu dy program funded
by the F ederal G overn m en t. B eca u se S tate-lev el data
are u n availab le, the national estim ate is a llocated to the
States in proportion to the civ ilia n population.

Educational assistance.— This

assistan ce co n sists o f
p aym en ts to private nonprofit ed ucational institutions for
82.
These payments exclude the payments to private educational institu­
tions for research and development under Federal contracts, w hich are treated
as government purchases.

ed ucational assistan ce other than under the Job Train­
ing Partnership A ct. T h e State estim ates are b ased on
data for State govern m en t expenditures for “other ed u ca­
tion assistan ce and su b sid ies” from the C en su s B u reau ’s
annual State Government Finances.

Business payments
T h ese transfer p aym en ts includ e the corporate gifts
o f m o n ey , secu rities, and real property to nonprofit
institutions serving ind ividu als.
B eca u se S tate-lev el data are un available, the national
estim ate is allocated to the States in proportion to
the estim ates o f the w age and salary disbursem ents
o f m em bership organization s, m any o f w h ich are n on ­
profit institutions that receiv e transfer paym en ts from
b u sin esses.

Business Payments to Individuals
B u sin ess transfer paym en ts to ind ividu als accou n ted
for about 2 .2 percent o f total transfer paym en ts at the
national lev el in 1993.
T h ese p aym en ts co n sist prim arily o f personal-injury
liab ility p aym en ts to ind ividu als other than em p lo y ees.
B eca u se pertinent data are un available, the national
estim ates are allocated to States in proportion to the
civ ilian population.

Personal Contributions for Social
Insurance
P ersonal contributions for so cia l insurance in clu d es the
paym en ts b y em p lo y ees, b y the self-em p lo y ed , and
b y other ind ividu als w h o participate in the fo llo w in g
program s: O ld -age, survivors, and d isab ility insurance
(O A S D I) (so cia l security); h osp ital insurance (H I) and
supplem entary m ed ical insurance (m edicare); railroad
retirem ent; govern m en t em p lo y ee retirem ent; State un­
em p lo y m en t insurance; tem porary disab ility insurance;
and veterans life insurance.
T h ese contributions accoun ted for about 4.9 percent
o f personal in com e at the national lev el in 1993 (table F).
T he self-em p lo y ed pay their contributions w ith their
quarterly p aym en ts o f estim ated F ederal ind ividu al in ­
co m e taxes. M ost o f the paym en ts o f the contributions
by em p lo y ees— lik e their paym en ts o f in com e taxes on
w a g es and salaries— are w ith h eld at the source o f the
disbursem ent o f the w a g es and salaries.
H ow ever, p aym en ts o f personal contributions, unlike
tax paym en ts, are ex clu d ed from person al incom e: T he
contributions are subtracted from the sum o f the other

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

components of personal income.83 In contrast, the tax
payments are treated as part of personal income—as
if the income from which the payments are withheld
were first received by the employee and then paid to
the government; this treatment is consistent with the
definition of personal income as a before-tax measure.
Contributions for old-age, survivors, and disability
insurance and hospital insurance
The estimates of the payments of the contributions for
OASDI and HI consist of the estimates of the payments
by the employees and the estimates of the payments by
the self employed.
Contributions by employees— These contributions are
made by the employees of private sector employers and
the employees of Federal, State, and local governments
who are covered by, and who therefore contribute to,
the OASDI and HI programs.
Most of the employees of private sector employers
except railroad companies and of State and local gov­
ernments are covered by, and contribute to, both the
OASDI and HI programs. The employees of the rail­
road industry are covered by the HI program but not by
the OASDI program.
All employees of the Federal Government except
those who are covered by the Civil Service Retirement
System are covered by the OASDI program. All Federal
Government employees are covered by, and contribute
to, the HI program.
The State estimates of the contributions of employees
consist of the estimates of the contributions by the civil83.

See “ Personal contributions fo r social insurance” and “ Wage and salary

disbursements” in the “ G lossary.”

Table F.—Personal Contributions for Social Insurance by Component
and Total Personal Income of the United States, 1993
M i ll i o n s o f
d o lla r s

P e rc e n t of
to ta l p e r s o n ­
a l in c o m e

T o ta l p e r s o n a l I n c o m e 1 .............................................................................................

5 ,3 5 9 ,5 8 9

1 0 0 .0 0

Less-. P e r s o n a l c o n t r ib u t io n s f o r s o c ia l in s u r a n c e 2 ................................

2 6 0 ,6 8 2

4 .8 6

C o n t r ib u t i o n s t o o ld - a g e , s u r v iv o r s , d is a b ilit y , a n d h o s p it a l in s u r a n c e

2 1 8 ,2 5 7

4 .0 7

1 9 4 ,5 9 2

3 .6 3

2 3 ,6 6 5

.4 4

1 ,2 6 9

.0 2

.......................................

4 ,6 1 6

.0 9

S t a t e a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t e m p lo y e e r e t ir e m e n t c o n t r i b u t i o n s ............

1 7 ,1 5 1

.3 2

E m p lo y e e c o n t r i b u t i o n s ..........................................................................................
S e lf - e m p l o y e d c o n t r i b u t io n s

.................................................................................

R a i lr o a d e m p lo y e e r e t ir e m e n t c o n t r i b u t io n s

.....................................................

F e d e r a l c i v i l i a n ’ e m p lo y e e r e t ir e m e n t c o n t r i b u t io n s

S t a t e u n e m p lo y m e n t i n s u r a n c e a n d t e m p o r a r y d is a b i l it y c o n t r ib u t io n s

3 ,3 7 0

.0 6

............................................

1 5 ,2 1 8

.2 8

V e t e r a n s lif e in s u r a n c e c o n t r i b u t i o n s ....................................................................

801

.01

S u p p le m e n t a r y m e d ic a l i n s u r a n c e c o n t r i b u t io n s

Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.
1. Total personal income is the sum of the components of personal income (tables A-E) less personal contribu­
tions for social insurance.
2. The amounts and the percentages of personal contributions and its components are shown as absolute values
in order to indicate the size of the component that is being estimated.

M-31

ian employees of all industries and governments and the
estimates of the contributions by military personnel.
The State estimates of the contributions by civilian
employees are based on a 1-percent sample of data for
these contributions from the Social Security Bulletin:
Annual Statistical Supplement, which is published by the
Social Security Administration. Because the State data
for a year are not available until 2 years after the end
of the year, the estimates for 1991 were extrapolated to
1992-93 by the change in the State estimates of wages
and salaries for these employees.
Because State data for the contributions by military
personnel are unavailable, the national estimate of these
contributions is allocated to States in proportion to the
estimates of military wage and salary disbursements
excluding pay-in-kind.
Contributions by the self-employed.—All of the selfemployed whose annual self-employment income ex­
ceeds $400 are covered by, and contribute to, the
OASDI program and the HI program.84
The State estimates of these contributions are based
on a 1-percent sample of these contributions by the selfemployed from the Social Security Bulletin. Because the
State data for a year are not available until 2 years after
the end of the year, the estimates for 1991 were extrap­
olated to 1992-93 by the change in the State estimates
of nonfarm proprietors’ income.
Contributions by employees for the other programs

Contributions for railroad employee retirement insur­
ance.—Because State data for the contributions under
this federally administered program are unavailable, the
national estimate is allocated to States in proportion to
the estimates of wages and salaries for these employees.

Contributions for Federal civilian employee re­
tirement.—These contributions are the payments that

are made by employees who are covered by, and who
contribute to, the following retirement plans: The Civil
Service Retirement System (which covers most employ­
ees hired before 1984); the Basic Benefit Plan of the
Federal Employees Retirement System (which covers
most employees hired after 1983); and special con­
tributory retirement plans, such as that of the Foreign
Service.
Because State data for these contributions are un­
available the national estimate is allocated to States in
proportion to the estimates of wages and salaries for
Federal civilian employees.
84.

B y definition, the self-em ployed exclude lim ited partners.

M-32

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Contributions for State and local government employee
retirement.—These contributions are the payments that

are made by the State and local government employees
who are covered by, and who contribute to, the State and
local government employee retirement programs that are
administered by government agencies. The State esti­
mates of these contributions are based on fiscal year
data from Finances of Employee-Retirement Systems of
State and Local Governments, which is published by the
Census Bureau.

Contributions for State unemployment insurance and
for temporary disability insurance.—The contributions
for State unemployment insurance consist of the pay­
ments by employees and those by employers in Alaska,
New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The estimate for each
State is based on unpublished data from the State.
The contributions for temporary disability insurance
are the payments by the employees who are covered by,
and contribute to, the insurance programs in California,
New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. The State
estimates of these contributions are based on State data
from the annual State Government Finances, which is
published by the Census Bureau.

Contributions by others for supplementary medical
insurance and veterans life insurance

Contributions for supplementary medical insur­
ance.—These contributions are the premiums that are

paid by the individuals who are enrolled in the voluntary
supplementary medical insurance part of medicare.
The national estimate of these contributions is allo­
cated to States in proportion to the number of indi­
viduals who are enrolled in the program and whose
premiums are not paid by State governments. The en­
rollment data are provided by the Health Care Financing
Administration.

Contributions for veterans life insurance.—These con­

tributions are the premiums that are paid by veterans
for life insurance under the five life insurance programs
administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs
(DVA).
The State estimates of these contributions are based
on summations of the data for the premiums from
Government Life Insurance Programs for Veterans and
Members of the Services, Annual Report, which is
published by the DVA.

Residence Adjustments
Personal income is a measure of income by place of
residence. The place of residence of individuals is the
State in which they live. The place of residence of
quasi-individuals is defined for the measurement of per­
sonal income as the State and county of the residence
of the individuals who benefit from the activities of
the quasi-individuals or on whose behalf the income is
received.
Consequently, the residence of military personnel is
the State in which they live while they are on mili­
tary assignment, not their permanent or legal State of
residence. Thus, the income of military personnel on
foreign assignment is excluded from the State and local
area personal income series, because their residence is
outside of the territorial limits of the United States.
The residence of seasonal migrant workers except
those working in Alaska and those who are foreignresident border workers is the State in which they live
while they are working, not their usual State of resi­
dence. However, the residence of foreign citizens who
live in the United States and who work for international
organizations and foreign embassies and consulates in
the United States is the country of which they are
citizens.
These definitions of residence differ from some of
those used by the Census Bureau, which provides source
data that are used in the preparation of the estimates of
the residence adjustment and the estimates of population
that are used to calculate per capita personal income; for
example, the residence of seasonal migrant workers is
frequently reported to the Census Bureau as their usual
State of residence rather than the State in which they
are living and working on April 1 when the decennial
census of population is taken.
The source data for most of the components of per­
sonal income are recorded, or treated as if they were
recorded, on a place-of-residence basis. These compo­
nents are transfer payments, personal dividend income,
personal interest income, rental income of persons, and
proprietors’ income.85
However, most of the source data for the remaining
three components, which compose more than 60 per­
cent of personal income, are recorded by place of work.
These components are wage and salary disbursements,
other labor income, and personal contributions for so­
cial insurance. Therefore, the initial estimates of most
of the subcomponents of these three components are on
85.

F o r specific inform ation about the source data fo r the estimates o f

the major components, see the section “ Geographic characteristics o f the
source data’’ in the introduction to “ The Sources and Methods for the Annual
Estimates.”

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

a place-of-work basis. Consequently, these initial placeof-work estimates are adjusted so that they will be on
a place-of-residence basis and so that the income of the
recipients whose place of residence differs from thenplace of work will be correctly assigned to their State
of residence.
Correctly assigning the place of residence of the re­
cipient of the income is more important for the State
estimates than for the national estimates. For the State
estimates, the income of individuals who commute to
work between States is especially important in large
metropolitan areas that extend across State boundaries—
for example, in the Washington, DC-MD-VA-WV
metropolitan area.
The State estimates of the residence adjustment are
prepared for the net labor earnings—or “income sub­
ject to adjustment”—of interstate commuters and for the
wages and salaries of border workers. Income subject
to adjustment is defined as wages and salaries plus other
labor income minus the personal contributions for social
insurance by employees.

Procedure for the Income
of Interstate Commuters
The State estimates of the residence adjustment for
the income of interstate commuters for 1987-90 were
Calculated as the sum of the corresponding county
estimates.
The State estimates for 1991-93 were calculated with
interstate adjustment factors that were derived from the
county estimates for 1991-92 and from the results of
some of the intermediate calculations in the preparation
of the county estimates for 1990-92.86 Each factor gives
the proportion of the income subject to adjustment (ISA)
that was disbursed in one State and received by the
residents of another State.87
The State estimates for 1991-93 were calculated in
three steps. First, ISA by industry and total ISA were
computed for a State from the estimates of the compo­
nents of labor earnings for the State. Second, the ISA
for the State was multiplied by the adjustment factors
for the State of work to yield interstate flows that were
both the outflows from the State of work and the in­
flows to each State of residence. Third, the outflows
from each State were subtracted from the inflows to the
State to yield the residence adjustment estimate for the
income of interstate commuters.

M-33

Procedure for the income of intercounty
commuters, 1987-92
The county estimates for 1990 were derived in two
steps. First the preliminary estimate for each county was
prepared. Second, the preliminary estimates for some
counties were modified.
The 1990 estimates for most counties and the modi­
fied preliminary 1990 estimates were then extrapolated
to obtain the county estimates for 1991-92. The extrap­
olation used two relevant series—one for the inflows
of commuters’ earnings to each county and one for
the outflows from each county. The county estimates
for 1991-92 were derived by extrapolation because in­
tercounty commuting data are available only from the
decennial censuses of population. In addition, the
estimates for 1987-89 were derived by interpolation
between the estimates for 1980 and those for 1990.
Preliminary estimates for 1990.—The procedure that is
used to prepare the estimates of the county residence
adjustment for 1990 is illustrated by the following ex­
ample of the calculation of the preliminary estimates for
a two-county area that comprises counties f and g. The
example is easily generalized to the calculation of the
estimates for more complex areas.
The preliminary 1990 estimate of the residence ad­
justment estimate for county / (R A f ) was calculated
as the total 1990 inflows of the income subject to ad­
justment to county f from county g {INf.) minus the
total 1990 outflows of the income subject to adjustment
from county f to county g {OUTf ).

RAf = IN/. - OUTf..
The estimates of IN f. and OUTf. were prepared in
industrial detail.88 The share (7f f ) of total wages or of
other labor income (OLI) in a particular industry k in
county g that were earned by residents of county / was

used in the estimation of industry-level inflows to county
/ . Analogously, the share (0/,fc) of wages or of OLI
in a particular industry k in county f that were earned
by residents of county g was used in the estimation of
industry-level outflows from county f . Both If ^ and
Of'k were calculated from joumey-to-work (JTVVj data
on the number of wage and salary workers (W) and on
their average wages (A) by county of work for each
county of residence from the 1990 Census of Population.
88.
The inflow s and the outflows o f wages and salaries and o f other labor
incom e were prepared fo r the private sector by Standard Industrial C la ssifi­
cation d ivision s and fo r the p ublic sector by Federal civilian , m ilitary, and
State and local governments.

86. For inform ation about the derivation o f the adjustment factors, call
(202) 606-9282.
87. See footnote 95.

The inflow s and the outflows o f personal contributions were also calcu­
lated, but the calculations are at a more aggregated level because the estimates
o f the contributions by private-sector employees are not made by industry.

M-34
j

f

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
_

’k

w a g e s e a r n e d in

g

b y r e s id e n ts o f /

t o t a l w a g e s e a r n e d in

g

_____________ ( ly ( / - ,g ) ,fe h A ( / - .,g ) ,fc ) _____________

„

_

g
________ (W(9-f),k^A(g-f),k)_________
w a g e s e a r n e d in /

b y re s id e n ts o f

t o t a l w a g e s e a r n e d in /

Where two subscripts are used with an arrow, the first
subscript identifies the place of residence, and the sec­
ond identifies the place of work. For example, W(/-.#),&
is the number of workers in industry k who lived in
county / but who worked in county g.
The industry-level inflows to county / from county
g (INf'k) were calculated as the inflow ratio multi­
plied by the corresponding component of the income
subject to adjustment (ISA) in industry k in county g
(ISAg ,fc). The industry-level outflows from county f
to county g (O U Tff) were calculated as the outflow
ratio multiplied by the ISA in industry k in county f
(•ISAfik).

INfik = (If ,k)(ISAgik)
OUTftk = ( Ofik)(ISA fik).
Summing the inflows for all industries yields the total
inflows to county f (IN /.), and summing the outflows
for all industries yields total outflows from county f
(OUTf .).

= k=X1I ^ f . k
O U T f. = X O U T f k
k= 1
IN f.

N

N

Modifying the preliminary 1990 estimates.—The pre­

liminary 1990 estimates of the residence adjustment for
some counties were modified in three cases. In the
first case, the estimates for each of the 1099 counties
that are in clusters that have high rates of commuting
among their constituent counties (mostly multicounty
metropolitan areas) were modified to incorporate the
1989 distribution of wages and salaries from the 1990
census.89 The estimates for these counties were modi­
fied because in numerous cases, the geographic coding
89.
The 1989 distribution reflects the place o f residence o f the incom e
recipients on A p r il 1, 1990, not their place o f residence when they received
the wages and salaries.

by place of work of the JTW data and that of the source
data for wages and salaries are inconsistent.90
First, the preliminary estimate of wages and salaries
by place of residence for each county in each cluster was
calculated as the estimate of wages and salaries by place
of work plus the net residence adjustment for wages and
salaries.91 Second, the preliminary place-of-residence
estimates of wages for the counties in each cluster were
summed to a total estimate for the cluster. Third, the to­
tal estimate for each cluster was allocated to the counties
of the cluster in proportion to the 1989 wage-and-salary
distribution from the 1990 census in order to produce the
modified preliminary estimates of wages and salaries by
county of residence. Fourth, the modified preliminary
estimate of the residence adjustment for each county
in the cluster was calculated as the modified prelim­
inary estimate of place-of-residence wages minus the
preliminary estimate of place-of-residence wages plus
the preliminary estimate of the residence adjustment.
The difference between the modified preliminary es­
timate of the residence adjustment and the preliminary
estimate of the residence adjustment was expressed as
a flow between pairs of counties in the same clus­
ter in order to facilitate the extrapolation of the 1990
residence-adjustment estimates to 1991-92. In the sim­
plest situation—a two-county cluster—the additional
flow was assumed to be from the county with the nega­
tive difference to the county with the (exactly offsetting)
positive difference.
In the second case, the preliminary estimate of the
residence adjustment for each county in 139 pairs of
adjacent counties that are not in a cluster was mod­
ified because the 1990 preliminary place-of-residence
estimate of wages for one of the counties exceeded the
place-of-residence measure of wages from the 1990 cen­
sus by a substantial amount and because the census
measure for the other county exceeded the prelimi­
nary estimate by a similar substantial amount. In order
to facilitate the extrapolation of the 1990 residenceadjustment estimates to 1991-92, these adjacent-county
modifications were also expressed as intercounty flows.
In the third case, the preliminary 1990 estimates of
the residence adjustment for eight county equivalents
(boroughs and census areas) in Alaska were modified
to account for the large amounts of the ISA received
by seasonal workers from out of State. The prelimi90. F o r example, the source data may attribute too much o f the wages o f
a multi-establishment firm to the county in w hich a firm ’ s m ain office is
located; the source data fo r the wages o f the personnel on a m ilitary base
that extends across county boundaries may attribute the wages to one county,
but the J T W data may attribute these wages to the other county.
91. O n ly the intercounty flow s fo r wages and salaries were used in the
calculation o f the net residence adjustment.

M-35

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

In the third case, the preliminary 1990 estimates of
the residence adjustment for eight county equivalents
(boroughs and census areas) in Alaska were modified
to account for the large amounts of the ISA received
by seasonal workers from out of State. The prelimi­
nary estimates yielded place-of-residence estimates of
wages and salaries that were so much higher than the
comparable census data that they could not be an ac­
curate reflection of only the wages of the permanent
residents. In order to remove the excess amounts, the
JTW-data-based outflows from these county equivalents
to selected large counties in Washington, Oregon, and
California were judgmentally increased.
Extrapolating the 1990 estimates to 1991-92.—The
1990 estimates of total inflows (IN}990) and the 1990
estimates of outflows by industry (OUT}990) were
extrapolated to 1991-92.92
The changes in the intercounty commuting patterns af­
ter the 1990 census were incorporated into the estimates
by the use of a change ratio ( CH Rf ). The numerator
of the ratio for county f is derived from the place-ofwork estimates of ISA (ISA /) for all industries, and
the denominator of the ratio is derived from tabulations
of wages and salaries by place of residence from the In­
ternal Revenue Service (IR Sf ).93 The ratio for county
/ in the year t (CHRf) is

, —ISA}/IS
A }990
___ ______ J

f

IRS}/IRS}990'

The total 1990 inflows to county f were extrapolated
to the year t on the basis of the inverse of CHR.} and
of the change in IR Sf since 1990.

( IRSff
\IR S / > CHR},

IN Ì = (IN 1990
iy9U) I ----- 1990

For each industry, the 1990 outflows from county f
to county g were extrapolated to the year t on the basis
92. The superscript 1990 was added to these expressions in order to d is­
tinguish the variables fo r 1990 from those fo r 1991-92; these variables are
denoted in the fo llo w in g text and in the equations w ith the superscript t .
93. The county tabulations o f the wages that are reported by individuals
to the IR S and that are recorded by tax-filing address are available to B E A
w ith a 1- or 2-year lag. These tabulations are used to prepare a series o f
wages and salaries that is used in the extrapolation o f the 1990 estimates o f
inflow s and o f outflows.
The tabulations through 1991 were available fo r the preparation o f the

of CHR} and of the change in IS A ff for the industry
since 1990.
(

re At

T s tff

j (CHR}).

The final estimate of the net residence adjustment for
the year t for each noncluster county and the prelim­
inary estimate of the net residence adjustment for the
year t for each cluster county were then calculated. The
estimate of the net residence adjustment equals total in­
flows minus total outflows, which are summed over all
industries.
N

RA} = IN} - X OUT}k.
k= l

The preliminary estimates of the net residence adjust­
ment for the cluster counties for year t are modified in a
four-step procedure that is similar to the modification of
the 1990 preliminary estimates for the cluster counties.
First, the place-of-residence estimate of ISA for each
cluster is calculated as the sum of the place-of-work es­
timates of ISA for all of the counties in the cluster plus
the sum of the estimates of the residence adjustment for
all of the counties in the cluster. Second, an allocating
series for the counties in each cluster is prepared: The
1990 estimate of the place-of-residence ISA for each
county is extrapolated to the year t by the wage series
derived from IRS tabulations for the county.94 Third,
the place-of-residence estimate of ISA for a cluster is
allocated to the counties of the cluster in proportion to
the allocating series to yield the final estimate of the
place-of-residence ISA. Fourth, the final estimate of the
net residence adjustment for each cluster county for the
year t is calculated as the final estimate of the place-ofresidence ISA minus the estimate of the place-of-work
ISA.
Preparing the estimates for 1987-89.—The county esti­
mates of the residence adjustment for 1981-89, the years
between the 1980 and the 1990 censuses, were interpo­
lated between the 1990 estimates and the 1980 estimates.
The 1980 estimates were mainly derived from JTW data
from the 1980 census and from the 1980 estimates of
ISA; the same methodology that was used to prepare the
1990 estimates was used to prepare the 1980 estimates.
The interpolation was prepared in four steps. First,
the 1980 total inflows to county f (IN}980) and the
1980 outflow from county f to county g for industry k
(OUT}980) were extrapolated to the year t.95 Second,

1992 estimates.
T h is series was extrapolated to 1992 b y a set o f equations that relates the
change in the IR S county tabulations to the changes in the county place-ofw o rk estimates and to the change in the c iv ilia n population.

94.
95.

See footnote 100.
The method o f extrapolation used is the same as that used to extrapolate

the 1990 flows to 1991-92.

M-36

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

the 1990 total inflows to county f (INj -990) and the
1990 outflows from county f to county g for industry
k (OUT j gk90) were extrapolated back to the year t.96
Third, net flows (inflows minus outflows) for county
/ in the year t were calculated from the 1980-based
extrapolations and from the 1990-based backward ex­
trapolations. Fourth, the estimate of the residence
adjustment for county f in the year t (RAlr ) was de­
rived from the weighted average of the 1980-based net
flows and the 1990-based net flows. Steps three and
four can be expressed as

RA*f = w J lN y - X O t / T j J
+
\
k=1
/ i98o
W jU N } . V

i

k=l

O UT} A
/ 1990

where the expressions in parentheses that have the
subscripts 1980 and 1990 define the net flows calculated
with the extrapolations from each of those years to the
year t, where Wj is the weight for the 1980-based net
flows for the year t, and where Wj is the weight for the
1990-based net flows for the year t. The weights Wj
and Wj sum to 1 in each year t, and they vary linearly
from 1981, in which tv* = 0.9 and Wj = 0.1, to 1989,
in which Wi = 0.1 and Wj - 0.9.

are subtracted from, the estimates of the net residence
adjustment for the income of interstate commuters to
obtain the final residence-adjustment estimates for the
States in which the income of border workers is relevant.
The national estimate of the inflows of the wages and
salaries earned by U.S. residents who commute to work
in Canada are assigned to Michigan, New York and the
New England region on the basis of fragmentary infor­
mation from the Immigration and Naturalization Service
of the Department of Justice. The New England portion
is allocated to Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont in
proportion to data for employment in the forest product
industries in those States’ border counties.
The small national estimate of the inflows of the
wages and salaries earned by U.S. residents who work
in the United Kingdom is evenly divided between New
York and California.
The national estimates of the outflows of the wages
and salaries earned by Mexican residents and by Cana­
dian residents who commute to work in the United
States are allocated to States in proportion to the data
from the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
The national estimate of the outflows of the wages
earned by Caribbean farm workers in the United States
is allocated to States by data on the number of autho­
rized seasonal workers by State from the Department of
Labor.

Disposable Personal Income

Procedure for the Income of Border workers
The residence adjustment for the income earned by bor­
der workers accounts for the inflows of the wages and
salaries earned by U.S. residents who commute to work
in Canada or who work in the United Kingdom, the
outflows of the wages and salaries earned by Canadian
and Mexican residents who commute to work in the
United States, and the outflows of the wages and salaries
earned by seasonal farm workers from the Caribbean
area. The adjustment does not account for the inflows
of the wages of U.S. residents who work in Mexico or
in other countries, because these workers are not nu­
merous enough for their income to be included in the
national “rest-of-the-world” account.
The State and county estimates of the inflows and
the outflows of the wages and salaries of border work­
ers are allocations of the national control totals that are
drawn from the rest-of-the-world account. The allo­
cated inflows are added to, and the allocated outflows
96.

The methodology used to extrapolate the inflow s and outflows for a

benchmark year to years after the benchmark year may also be used to
extrapolate the inflow s and outflows fo r a benchmark year to years before
the benchmark year.

Disposable personal income is the income that is avail­
able to persons for spending and saving. It is calculated
as personal income less the sum of personal tax pay­
ments and personal nontax payments to Federal, State,
and local governments.
Personal tax and nontax payments consists of the tax
payments that are net of refunds, that are made by per­
sons, and that are not chargeable to business expense
and of the payments that are made by persons to all
government agencies except government enterprises and
that are treated like taxes.
Personal taxes includes taxes on income, including re­
alized net capital gains, on gifts and transfers of estates,
and on personal property.97 Personal nontaxes includes
donations, fees, fines, and forfeitures.
97.

Personal tax payments excludes the payments o f both real estate taxes

and sales taxes. Real estate taxes are excluded because they are considered
business expenses that are deducted from both gross monetary rental incom e
and gross imputed rental incom e in the derivation o f net rental income.
Sales taxes are excluded because they are included in personal consumption
expenditures, a component o f personal outlays, and the outlays are deducted
from disposable personal incom e in the derivation o f personal saving.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

The State estimates of disposable personal income are
prepared in three steps. First the estimate of personal
income for a State is prepared. Second, the estimate
of personal tax and nontax payments for that State is
prepared.98 Third, the State estimate of personal tax and
nontax payments is subtracted from the State estimate of
personal income to yield the State estimate of disposable
personal income.
In addition, the State estimates of disposable per­
sonal income are prepared so that the sum of the State
estimates equals the national estimates of disposable
personal income.99 Disposable personal income ac­
counted for about 87 percent of personal income in the
Nation in 1993 (table G).
The State estimates of personal tax and nontax pay­
ments are described in four sections: (1) Personal tax
and nontax payments to the Federal Government, (2)
personal tax payments excluding personal property taxes
and nontax payments to State governments, (3) personal
tax payments excluding personal property taxes and
98. B oth tax payments and nontax payments are measured by place o f
residence, and they are on a payment basis rather than on a lia b ility (or
accrual) basis.
99. The national estimates o f the payments are adjusted to exclude the
payments by U .S. residents who are tem porarily liv in g abroad.

Table G.—Disposable Personal Income, Personal Tax and Nontax
Payments by Component, and Total Personal Income for the
United States, 1993
P e rc e n t of
M i ll i o n s o f
d o ll a r s

p e rso n a l
ta x a n d
n o n ta x
p a y m e n ts

T o ta l p e r s o n a l I n c o m e

Less:

Equals:

5 ,3 5 9 ,5 8 9

P e r s o n a l ta x a n d n o n ta x p a y m e n ts

6 8 5 ,3 1 9

D is p o s a b le p e r s o n a l I n c o m e

4 ,6 7 4 ,2 7 0

P e rs o n a l ta x a n d n o n ta x p a y m e n ts

6 8 5 ,3 1 9

100.00

P e r s o n a l ta x a n d n o n t a x p a y m e n t s to t h e F e d e r a l G o v e r n m e n t (n e t o f
r e f u n d s ) ..............................................................................................................................
I n d iv id u a l i n c o m e t a x p a y m e n t s ( n e t o f r e f u n d s ) ........................................

5 1 9 ,2 3 5

7 5 .7 7

4 9 8 ,4 5 1

7 2 .7 3

....................................................

5 7 3 ,8 6 8

8 3 .7 4

..........................................................................................................

7 5 ,4 1 7

I n d iv id u a l i n c o m e t a x p a y m e n t s ( g r o s s )

Less.

R e fu n d s

F i d u c i a r y I n c o m e t a x p a y m e n t s ............................................................................

6 ,3 6 3

E s t a t e a n d g if t t a x p a y m e n t s .................................................................................

1 2 ,8 5 2

N o n ta x p a y m e n ts

.........................................................................................................

P e rs o n a l ta x a n d n o n ta x p a y m e n ts to S ta te g o v e rn m e n ts
I n d iv id u a l i n c o m e t a x p a y m e n t s

11.00
.9 3

1.88

1 ,5 6 9

.2 3

1 4 0 ,9 4 4

2 0 .5 7
1 6 .6 2

...............................................

1 1 3 ,9 2 9

E s t a t e a n d g if t t a x p a y m e n t s .....................................................

4 ,7 5 0

.6 9

M o t o r v e h i c l e t a x p a y m e n t s ........................................................

8 ,5 9 0

1 .2 5

O th e r ta x p a y m e n t s '

1 ,1 2 7

.1 6

N o n ta x p a y m e n ts

......................................................................

............................................................................. .

P e r s o n a l t a x a n d n o n t a x p a y m e n t s t o lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t s
I n d iv id u a l i n c o m e t a x p a y m e n t s

.............................................

1 2 ,5 4 8

1 .8 3

2 1 ,7 3 4

3 .1 7

9 ,3 3 3

1 .3 6

M o t o r v e h i c l e t a x p a y m e n t s .......................................................

422

.0 6

....................................................................

1 ,8 4 4

............................................................................

1 0 ,1 3 5

1.48

3 ,4 0 6

.5 0

O th e r ta x p a y m e n ts i
N o n ta x p a y m e n ts

P e r s o n a l p ro p e rty ta x p a y m e n ts to S t a t e a n d lo c a l g o v e rn m e n ts *
1

.2 7

nontax payments to local governments, and (4) personal
property tax payments to State and local governments.

Payments to the Federal Government
The estimates of the payments by individuals to the Fed­
eral Government consist of the estimates of individual
income tax payments, of tax payments on income re­
tained by fiduciaries on behalf of individuals, of estate
and gift tax payments, and of nontax payments.
Individual income tax payments
These payments are net income tax payments that ex­
clude the refunds of Federal income tax payments to
individuals.
The estimates of net income tax payments are pre­
pared in three steps. First, the estimates of gross income
tax payments are prepared. These estimates are the
sum of the estimates of the income taxes that are with­
held, usually by employers, from wages and salaries, the
estimates of quarterly payments of estimated taxes on
income that is usually not subject to withholding, and
the estimates of additional tax payments that are made
when the tax returns for a year are filed and as a result
of audits. The estimates of each of these components
are based on State data on the amount of Federal in­
come tax liability that is reported by individuals to the
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on IRS form 1040.100
Second, the estimates of the refunds of income tax
payments are prepared. These estimates are the sum of
the estimates of the refunds of excess taxes that were
paid by individuals, the estimates of the refunds of ex­
cess social security and medicare contributions that were
withheld from the wages and salaries of individuals who
had more than one job, and the estimates of any interest
that was paid on the refunds. The State estimates of
these refunds are based on IRS data on the amount of
the refunds paid each year.
Third, the estimates of the net income tax payments
are calculated as the estimates of gross income tax
payments less the estimates of the refunds.
Tax payments on income retained by fiduciaries
The estimates of these payments consist of the estimates
of the taxes that are paid on the income that is received
by a fiduciary on behalf of an individual and that is
100.

Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.
1. Includes payments for noncommerical hunting and fishing licenses.
2. Includes payments of estate and gift taxes and marriage licenses fees to I x a l governments.

M-37

These IR S data are unpublished sample data prepared by the Statistics

o f Income D iv isio n . These data are reported b y tax-filing address, w hich is
usually the place o f residence o f the ind ivid u al who filed the return. However,
the tax-filing addresses o f some m ilitary personnel may be their permanent
place o f residence rather than their place o f residence w h ile they are on
assignment.

M-38

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

retained by the fiduciary rather than distributed to the
individual.101
Because State-level data for these payments are un­
available, the national estimates are allocated to the
States in proportion to the IRS data on the income that
is distributed to individuals by the fiduciaries of estates
and trusts.
Estate and gift tax payments
The national estimate of these payments is allocated to
States in proportion to IRS State data for these pay­
ments. These data, which are on a fiscal-year basis, are
published in the Annual Report of the Commissioner of
Internal Revenue.
Nontax payments
The national estimate of these payments consists of
the estimates of a variety of payments—such as pass­
port and immigration fees, civil and criminal fines, and
migratory-bird-hunting stamps—by individuals to the
Federal Government. Because State-level data are un­
available, the national estimate is allocated to States in
proportion to the civilian population.

Payments to State Governments
The estimates of the payments by individuals to State
governments consist of the estimates of individual in­
come tax payments, of estate and gift tax payments,
of payments for motor vehicle and operator’s licenses
and for other licenses, and of nontax payments. These
payments exclude personal property tax payments.

Payments for motor vehicle, operator’s, and other
licenses
The estimates of the payments for motor vehicle and
operator’s licenses consist of the estimates of the fees
that are paid for the registration and for the inspec­
tion of noncommercial motor vehicles and of the fees
that are paid for operator’s licenses by the drivers of
noncommercial motor vehicles.
The estimates of both types of fees are based on
pertinent annual State data from State Government Tax
Collections, which is published by the Census Bureau.
The estimates of the payments for other licenses con­
sist of the estimates of the fees that are paid to State
government agencies for hunting and fishing licenses for
personal, rather than commercial, use and the estimates
of the fees for other noncommercial licenses, such as
those for the registration of pleasure boats and aircraft.
The State estimates of the fees for hunting and fishing
licenses are based on unpublished quarterly data from
the Census Bureau. The State estimates of the fees for
other licenses are based on annual data from State Gov­
ernment Tax Collections. Both data series also include
fees for licenses for commercial use.
Other nontax payments
The estimates of other nontax payments consist of the
estimates of the payments of fines and forfeitures, the
estimates of donations, and the estimates of payments
of various fees. The State estimates of each of these
types of payments are based on annual data from the
Census Bureau’s State Government Finances.102

Payments to Local Governments

Individual income tax payments
These payments are net income tax payments by indi­
viduals that exclude refunds. The estimates are based on
unpublished quarterly data for the net individual income
tax collections of each State government. The data are
from the Census Bureau.

The estimates of the payments by persons to local gov­
ernments consist of the estimates of individual income
tax payments, of payments for motor vehicle registra­
tion licenses, of payments of miscellaneous fees and
estate and gift tax payments, and of other nontax pay­
ments. These payments exclude personal property tax
payments.

Estate and gift tax payments
The estimates of these payments are based on
unpublished quarterly State data from the Census
Bureau.

Individual income tax payments
The estimates of these payments for 1987 are based on
data for these payments from the 1987 Census of Gov­
ernments; the data are published by the Census Bureau
in the Compendium of Government Finances. The es­
timates for 1988-91 were extrapolated from the 1987

101.
The individual, or beneficiary, pays the taxes on the incom e that is
received from a fiduciary.
For additional inform ation about fiduciary income, see the section “ Per­
sonal D ivid end Income, Personal Interest Income, and Rental Income o f

and the payments by individuals cannot be distinguished from those by

Persons."

businesses.

102.

These data consist o f the payments by both individuals and businesses,

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

the change in the estimates of State government income
tax payments.
Motor vehicle registration fees
The estimates of the fees for the registration of motor
vehicles with local governments are based on State data
for the fees from Government Finances.103
Miscellaneous fees and estate and gift taxes
The estimates of the miscellaneous fees consist of the
estimates of the payments of the fees for marriage li­
censes, the fees for the registration of pleasure boats,
and the fees for licenses for pets. These estimates
and the estimates of estate and gift taxes are prepared
together.
The estimates for 1987 are based on the series “Other
local taxes” from the Compendium. The estimates for
1988-93 were extrapolated from the 1987 estimates by
the change in local government “Other taxes” from
Government Finances.
Other nontax payments
The estimates of other nontax payments consist of es­
timates of the payments of fines and forfeitures and of
donations.
The estimates for 1987 are based on data for “Other
charges” and “Miscellaneous general revenues” from
103.

See footnote 102.

M-39

the Compendium. The 1987 estimates were prepared in
three steps. First, because the data for the payments for
commercial charges cannot be distinguished from those
for noncommercial charges, a fixed percentage of the
data for the payments for each category of charges was
allocated to noncommercial charges. Second, the allo­
cated data for each category for each local government
in a State were summed to yield the total data for that
State. Third, the State data were used to allocate the
national estimate for 1987.
The estimates for 1988-93 were extrapolated from
the 1987 estimates by the change in the sum of the
data for “Current charges” and “Miscellaneous general
revenues” from Government Finances.

Personal Property Tax Payments to State and
Local Governments
The State estimates of the payments of personal property
taxes by individuals to State and local governments are
combined because the data for these payments to each
level of government are not available. These payments
consist of the payments of taxes on the tangible and
intangible personal property of individuals.
The estimates are based on unpublished IRS data
for these payments by individuals who itemize their
deductions on their Federal individual income tax
returns.

Sources and Methods for the Quarterly Estimates
of State Personal Income
The quarterly estimates of State personal income pro­
vide a series for the analysis and tracking of recent
economic developments in the 50 States and the District
of Columbia. The series begins with the first quarter of
1969.
The definitions of personal income and its components
that are used in the quarterly estimates are identical to
those used in the annual estimates, and the source data
used for both series are similar. However, the method­
ology used for the quarterly series differs from that
used for the annual series. For example, 49 subcompo­
nents are estimated in the preparation of the quarterly
estimates, because of the limited availability of quar­
terly data, but approximately 500 subcomponents are
estimated in the preparation of the annual estimates.
In addition, the quarterly estimates are mainly based
on quarterly data that are seasonally adjusted because
many quarterly economic time series show a seasonal
movement that regularly recurs and that can be esti­
mated on the basis of the patterns of the movement in
previous years.1 Accordingly, the data are adjusted so
that nonseasonal short-term changes and the cyclical and
long-term trends in the series can be observed.
The quarterly estimates of State personal income are
presented at annual rates so that these estimates can be
compared with the annual estimates.2
State-level source data and methods
The quarterly data for many components of State per­
sonal income are either unavailable or are less pertinent
or less comprehensive than the annual data. Accord­
ingly, the preparation of the quarterly estimates uses the
revised annual State estimates. The estimates for the
quarters of the years for which annual estimates have
been prepared are interpolated from the annual esti­
mates; the estimates for the quarters of the year or years
1. The Census M ethod II Seasonal Adjustm ent Program, with the X - l l
A R I M A variant when it is applicable, is used to adjust the quarterly data.
P rim a rily because unadjusted data fo r a number o f components are not
available, unadjusted quarterly estimates are not available.
2. See “ Seasonal adjustment at annual rates” in the “ G lossary.”

for which annual estimates have not yet been prepared
are extrapolated from the most recent annual estimates.3
The quarterly estimates and the annual estimates are
revised periodically to incorporate source data that are
more complete, more detailed, or otherwise more ap­
propriate than the data that were available when the
estimates were initially prepared.4
The “preliminary” quarterly estimates for a quarter
are prepared 4 months after the end of the quarter. The
“second” estimates for the quarter are prepared 3 months
later. The second estimates for the quarters of a year,
along with the “revised” quarterly estimates for the pre­
ceding 2 years, are revised in October of the following
year and in the following April, so that they will be
consistent with the revised annual estimates.5
The “preliminary” annual estimates for a year are
prepared in April of the following year when the pre­
liminary quarterly estimates for the fourth quarter of the
year are prepared. The annual estimates are derived
from the average of the quarterly estimates for the year.
In August, the preliminary annual estimates for the
year are superseded by new annual estimates that in3. Tw o interpolation techniques are used: One uses seasonally adjusted
quarterly data as the indicator series, and one does not use an indicator series.
F o r inform ation about those techniques, call (202) 606-4500.
Tw o extrapolation techniques are used: One uses the seasonally adjusted
quarterly data as the indicator series (see “ Interpolation and extrapolation” in
the “ Technical Notes” ), and one uses the past trends in the annual series to
construct an indicator series. The extrapolation indicators derived from the
past trends in the annual series are calculated w ith equations that are derived
from a regression analysis that relates the State estimates to the national
control totals fo r the last 6 years o f the revised annual series. F o r each State
and fo r each component, the indicator value fo r quarter

t

is given by

Y ts = a Y tN + b
where

a

and

b

are the coefficient and the constant derived from the

regression analysis, y j is the indicator value, and Y jy is the national control
total.
4. See “ A v a ila b ility o f the State estimates” in the “ Introduction.”
5. In addition, the second estimates fo r some quarters m ay be revised one
or more times before revised annual estimates are available. However, the
quarterly estimates fo r a year are not classified as “ revised” until they have
been reconciled w ith annual estimates fo r that year.
F o r additional inform ation, see Robert L . B ro w n and James P. Stehle,
“ E valuation o f the State Personal Income Estimates,” urvey of urrent

B usiness 70 (December

S

C

1990): 20-29.
M -4 1

M-42

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

corporate detailed annual data. These “revised” annual
estimates are then used in the preparation of the revised
quarterly estimates for the year. The annual estimates
are also used in the preparation of the estimates of the
second quarterly estimates for the first quarter of the
next year and subsequently for the estimates of both the
preliminary and the second quarterly estimates for the
last three quarters of that year.
The preliminary, second, and revised quarterly esti­
mates are prepared in two steps. First, first approxima­
tions of the quarterly estimates are prepared. Second,
the national control totals are allocated to States in
proportion to the first approximations.
First approximations of the estimates.—The first ap­
proximations of the quarterly estimates for the com­
ponents for which quarterly State data are available
are based on seasonally adjusted data that are used as
the indicators for the interpolation and extrapolation
of the revised annual estimates of these components
(see the table). For the other components, the first ap­
proximations are interpolated and extrapolated from the
revised annual estimates without the use of source data
as indicators.6
The first approximations of the preliminary quar­
terly estimates of most of the components of wages
and salaries, other labor income, and personal contri­
butions for social insurance are derived from monthly
survey data that are related to the components, because
quarterly data for these payments are not yet available.
The first approximations of the second quarterly
estimates of components that account for about 54
percent of personal income are based on quarterly
administrative-record data for income payments, and the
first approximations of the second estimates of com­
ponents that account for about 6 percent of personal
income are derived from monthly or quarterly data that
are related to the payments.
The first approximations of both the preliminary and
the second quarterly estimates of components that ac­
count for about 39 percent of personal income are
derived from the trends in the annual State estimates, be­
cause monthly or quarterly source data are unavailable.
These components are usually insensitive to short-term
changes in State-level economic conditions. For exam­
ple, quarterly fluctuations in personal interest income
mainly result from changes in interest rates, which do
not vary greatly among the States.
After the second quarterly estimates are prepared, lit­
tle new quarterly source data become available. There­
fore, the first approximations of the revised quarterly

estimates incorporate quarterly source data that are gen­
erally the same as the data used for the second quarterly
estimates. The revised estimates differ from the second
estimates mainly in their final preparation.
Final preparation of the estimates.—The final prepa­
ration of the preliminary, second, and revised quarterly
estimates uses the first approximations and the na­
tional control totals. The final preparation of the
revised quarterly estimates also uses the revised annual
estimates.
The preliminary and second quarterly estimates are
derived from the allocation of the quarterly national
control totals to States in proportion to the first approx­
imations. The revised quarterly estimates are prepared
with the dual, or two-way allocation procedure.7 This
procedure simultaneously allocates the annual estimates
to quarters and the quarterly national control totals to
States in proportion to the first approximations of the
revised quarterly estimates.
Control totals for the quarterly estimates
The quarterly national control totals are mainly derived
from the estimates of personal income in the national in­
come and product accounts (NIPA’s). The control totals
for most components of personal income are consistent
with the NIPA estimates of these components.8
The national control totals for the quarterly State es­
timates for the years for which revised annual estimates
have been prepared are derived from the interpolation
of the national control totals of the revised annual State
estimates, and the quarterly NIPA estimates are used as
the indicator series. For most components of personal
income, the control totals for the fourth quarter of the
last year in the revised annual series are then extrapo­
lated to the subsequent quarter or quarters in proportion
to the quarterly NIPA estimates.
However, source data that were not available when the
NIPA estimates were prepared are sometimes used in the
preparation of the control totals for the State estimates
of wages and salaries and farm proprietors’ income that
are prepared and revised in April and in July.9
7. See footnotes 28 and 29 in the section “ Other Lab or Income.”
8. However, the definitions o f some components o f State personal income
differ from the definitions o f the components in the N I P A ’ s. See “ Differences
in definitions and classifications” in the introduction to “ The Sources and
M ethods fo r the A nnual Estimates.”
9. The difference in the av ailab ility o f the data fo r the estimates o f wages
and salaries is especially important because the revision to the national control
totals o f wages and salaries that are used in the preparation o f the State
estimates o f wages and salaries in A p r il sometimes foreshadows the direction

6.

See footnote 3.

and size o f the revision to the N IP A estimates in July.

M-43

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Sources and Methods for the Quarterly and Annual Estimates of State Personal Income
C o m p o n e n t s o f p e rs o n a l in c o m e

P re lim in a r y q u a rte rly e s t im a t e s

R e v is e d a n n u a l e s tim a te s

S e c o n d q u a rte rly e s t im a t e s 1

Wage and salary disbursements by
industry:1
2
F a rm

................................................................

T r e n d e x t r a p o la t io n 3

T r e n d e x t r a p o la t io n 3 ................................

U .S . D e p a r tm e n t o f A g ric u lt u r e ( U S D A )

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a ta fo r w a g e s a n d

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta fo r w a g e s a n d

e s t im â t e s o f fa rm la b o r e x p e n s e s
A g ric u lt u r a l s e r v ic e s , fo re s try , fis h e r ie s ,

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

.

s a la r ie s a n d U S D A e s t im â t e s o f fa rm

s a la r ie s 4.

a n d o th e r.

la b o r e x p e n s e s
M in in g

..............................................................

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a t a ............................

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

s u rv e y 5.
C E S m o n th ly e m p lo y m e n t d a t a ..............

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a t a ............................

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

C E S m o n th ly d a ta fo r e m p lo y m e n t a n d

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

M o n t h ly e m p lo y m e n t d a ta fro m th e
C u r r e n t E m p lo y m e n t S t a t is t ic s ( C E S )

C o n s t r u c t io n

Manufacturing:
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s

fo r a v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d a v e r a g e
h o u rly e a r n in g s fo r p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs .
C E S m o n th ly d a ta fo r e m p lo y m e n t a n d

D u r a b le g o o d s

fo r a v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d a v e r a g e
h o u r ly e a r n in g s fo r p ro d u c tio n w o r k e rs .

Transportation and public utilities:
E x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s .......................

C E S m o n th ly e m p lo y m e n t d a t a ...................

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a t a ..................................

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

R a ilr o a d s

M o n th ly p a y r o ll d a ta fr o m th e In te rsta te

M o n th ly I C C p a y r o ll d a ta a n d A A R S t a t e

A n n u a l I C C p a y ro ll d a ta a n d A A R S ta te

.........................................

C o m m e r c e C o m m is s io n ( I C C ) a n d

e m p lo y m e n t d a ta

e m p lo y m e n t d a ta .

S t a t e e m p lo y m e n t d a ta fro m th e
A s s o c ia t io n o f A m e r ic a n R a ilr o a d s
( A A R ) fo r C la s s I ra ilro a d s .
...................................

C E S m o n th ly e m p lo y m e n t d a t a ..................

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

R e t a il t r a d e .............................................
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te

C E S m o n th ly e m p lo y m e n t d a t a ..................

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

C E S m o n th ly e m p lo y m e n t d a t a ..................

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

S e r v ic e s ...................................................

C E S m o n th ly e m p lo y m e n t d a t a ..................

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta , d a ta fro m

W h o le s a le tra d e

County

Business Patterns

(C B P ), a n d C e n s u s
B u r e a u p o p u la tio n d a t a 5

Federal civilian

ES-202

CES monthly employment data

CES monthly employment data

Annual

N u m b e r o f p e rs o n n e l a n d a v e ra g e p a y by

D O D n u m b e r o f p e rs o n n e l a n d a v e ra g e

D O D a n d C o a s t G u a r d d a ta

d a ta

F e d e r a l m ilit a r y :
A c t iv e d u t y .....

s e r v ic e fro m th e D e p a r tm e n t o f

p a y a n d C o a s t G u a r d p a y ro ll d a ta .

D e f e n s e (D O D ) a n d p a y ro ll d a ta fro m
th e C o a s t G u a rd .
R e s e r v e s .............................

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...........................................

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

..................................

D O D p a y ro ll o u tla y d a ta

S t a t e a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t

C E S m o n th ly e m p lo y m e n t d a t a ....................

Q u a r te r ly E S - 2 0 2 d a t a ............................

A n n u a l E S - 2 0 2 d a ta

O t h e r la b o r I n c o m e 2 ...........

E s t im a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s b y

B E A e s t im a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s

B E A e s t im a t e s a n d d a ta fro m o th e r
a g e n c ie s

in d u s try fr o m t h e B u r e a u o f E c o n o m ic
A n a ly s is ( B E A ) .
P r o p r ie t o r s ' in c o m e : 2
F a r m p ro p r ie to r s ’ i n c o m e .......................

U S D A e s t im a t e s o f fa rm c a s h r e c e ip ts
a n d g o v e r n m e n t s u b s id ie s .

U S D A e s t im a t e s o f fa rm c a s h r e c e ip t s
a n d g o v e r n m e n t s u b s id ie s .

U S D A a n n u a l e s t im a t e s o f fa rm g ro s s
in c o m e a n d e x p e n s e s

Nonfarm proprietors’ Income:
B E A e s t im a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s

B E A e s t im a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s

I R S a n d C B P d a ta

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...................................

T r e n d E x t r a p o la t io n ...................................

I R S a n d C B P d a ta

...........................

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...................................

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...................................

I R S d a ta

P e r s o n a l In te re s t i n c o m e .............................

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...................................

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...................................

I R S d a ta

R e n ta l in c o m e o f p e r s o n s ...........................

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...................................

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...................................

I R S a n d C e n s u s B u r e a u d a ta

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

............................. ......

T r e n d e x tr a p o la tio n

...................................

D a t a fro m th e S o c ia l S e c u r it y

C o n s t r u c t io n

...........................................

A ll o th e r in d u s tr ie s ..............................
P e r s o n a l d iv id e n d in c o m e

Transfer payments:
E x c lu d in g u n e m p lo y m e n t in s u r a n c e

A d m in is t ra t io n ( S S A ) , H e a lt h C a r e

(U l) b e n e fits .

F in a n c in g A d m in is t ra t io n ( H C F A ) ,
C e n s u s B u r e a u , D e p a r tm e n t of
V e t e r a n s A f f a ir s ( D V A ) , a n d o th e r
a g e n c ie s
U l b e n e fits

..........................................................

U l b e n e f it s d a ta fro m th e E m p lo y m e n t

E T A U l b e n e fits d a ta

.....................................

E T A U l b e n e fits d a ta

a n d T r a in in g A d m in is t ra t io n (E T A ).
P e r s o n a l c o n t rib u tio n s fo r s o c ia l In s u ra n c e ..

B E A e s tim a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s fo r
a ll in d u s trie s .

B E A e s t im a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s fo r
a ll in d u s trie s .

B E A e s t im a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s fo r
s e le c t e d in d u s tr ie s a n d S S A , H C F A ,
C e n s u s B u r e a u , a n d D V A d a ta

Addendum: Residence adjustment7

B E A e s t im a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s b y
in d u s try .

B E A e s t im a t e s o f w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s b y
in d u s try .

B E A e s t im a t e s o f la b o r e a r n in g s by
in d u s try a n d C e n s u s B u r e a u a n d IR S
d a ta

1. The data used to derive the second quarterly estim ates are also used to interpolate the revised annual esti­
mates to quarters in the preparation of the revised quarterly estimates.
2. The quarterly estimates of w ages and salaries, other labor income, and proprietors' income are prepared at
the SIC division level and the annual estim ates are prepared at the SIC two-digit level.
3. The trend extrapolation is based on the relationship between the annual State estimates and the annual nation­
al estimates
4. Tabulations of w ages and salaries from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS); the w ages are reported for unem­

ployment insurance tax returns by employers to the State employment security agencies, which report tabulations
of the data by county and industry to B L S on form ES-202.
5. The Current Employment Statistics (C ES) survey of more than 400,000 establishments is conducted monthly
by the State employment security agencies using form B L S 790; the C E S program is coordinated by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics.
6. C o u n ty B u s in e s s P a tte rn s is published annually by the Census Bureau.
7. The residence adjustment is not a component of personal income.

M-44

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Control totals for the quarterly estimates of wages
and salaries.—In April, the quarterly State estimates of

wages and salaries for the previous year are prepared.
The methodology that is used to derive the quarterly
national control totals depends on the result of a com­
parison of the NIPA estimate of wages and salaries for
the year with an alternate annual estimate that incor­
porates the ES-202 payroll data that are tabulated from
employers’ unemployment insurance tax returns.10
The alternate estimate for the previous year—for ex­
ample, for 1992—is derived in four steps. First, for
each Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) division,
the national ES-202 amount of wages and salaries for
the third quarter of 1992 was extrapolated to the fourth
quarter of 1992 by the employment data for the third and
fourth quarters from the Current Employment Statistics
(CES) survey and by the time trend of the ES-202 quar­
terly average wages and salaries.11 Second, the annual
ES-202-data-based estimate of wages and salaries for
each industry for 1992 was calculated as the sum of
the ES-202 data for the three quarters of 1992 and the
extrapolated estimate for the fourth quarter. Third, the
annual NIPA estimate for each industry for 1991 was
extrapolated to 1992 by the annual ES-202-data-based
estimate for 1992. Fourth, the extrapolated annual esti­
mate for the industries were summed to an all-industry
total in order to obtain the alternate annual estimate of
wages and salaries for 1992.
Because the alternate all-industry annual estimate for
1992 differed significantly from the published annual
NIPA estimate, an annual national control total for the
State estimates for each industry for 1992 was derived
from the extrapolation of the national sum of the annual
State estimates for 1991 to 1992 by the relative change
from the ES-202 data for 1991 for the industry to the
ES-202-data-based estimate for 1992 for the industry.
These annual national control totals were interpolated to
10. The tabulated data are from quarterly State unem ploym ent insurance
(UI) contribution reports that are filed with a State em ployment security
agency by the em ployers in the industries that are covered by, and subject to,
that State’ s U I laws. The E S-202 tabulations o f wages and salaries include
bonus payments. See also “ Wage and Salary Disbursem ents” in “ The Sources
and Methods fo r the A nnual Estimates.”
11. The C E S survey collects data for the total number o f jobs and for
the average w eekly hours and average hourly earnings o f production and
nonsupervisory workers. T his survey o f more than 400,000 nonagricultural

quarters; the NIPA quarterly estimates were used as the
indicator series.12
In April 1994 when the State estimates for the fourth
quarter of 1993 were prepared, the alternate estimate of
wages and salaries for 1993 was similar to the NIPA es­
timate. Accordingly, the national control total for each
industry for the fourth quarter of 1992 was extrapolated
to the four quarters of 1993 in proportion to the quarterly
NIPA estimates for the industry for 1993.13
The NIPA estimates of wages and salaries.—The quar­
terly NIPA estimates are interpolated and extrapolated
from the annual NIPA estimates. The indicator series is
based on monthly data on employment, average weekly
hours, and average hourly earnings from the CES survey
(see footnote 10).
The annual NIPA estimates of wages and salaries for
most industries in the private sector are based on the
ES-202 data. The ES-202 wages and salaries, unlike the
CES data, include bonus payments, but the bonuses are
not identified.
The quarterly estimates are sometimes adjusted if an
economic occurrence that affects the wages and salaries
for an industry is not reflected in the CES data. For ex­
ample, the estimate for a quarter is adjusted for strikes
during the quarter that do not occur during a pay pe­
riod for which CES data are collected. In addition,
the estimates are adjusted for bonus payments when the
payments are unusually large or when the timing of the
payments is unusual.
The advance quarterly estimates are prepared a month
after the end of the quarter from the sum of monthly
estimates.14 The quarterly estimates are subsequently
revised for the next 2 months in order to incorporate
revised and newly available monthly data. However,
the ES-202 data for a quarter are not available in time
to be used for the first or the second revision.
The quarterly estimates of wages and salaries—like
all other quarterly NIPA estimates—are revised again
the following July, when annual estimates are prepared.
In July, the quarterly estimates are interpolated from the
annual estimates by the indicator series based on the
CES data.
12.

The national control totals o f the quarterly and annual State estimates
o f wages and salaries fo r
now incorporate the N IP A estimates, because

1992

1993

the N IP A estimates were revised in August
to incorporate the ES-202
data. F o r a detailed discussion o f the revision o f the national estimates for

The data are collected on form B L S 790 for the pay period that includes
the 12th day o f the month; the data are released 1 week after the end o f

1992, see “ Note on R evisions to B E A estimates o f Wages and Salaries,”
Survey 73 (July 1993): 28-29.
13. See the box “ B E A Estimates o f Wages and Salaries for 1993,” Survey
74 (A p ril 1994): 117.

the month and are reconciled annually with the ES-202 data. The data for
average hourly earnings exclude bonus payments and several other forms o f

month.

wages and salaries. See also footnote 14.

outlays account.

establishments is conducted by the State em ployment security agencies and
coordinated by the Bureau o f Lab or Statistics.

14. The estimates fo r a month are prepared a month after the end o f the
These estimates are released as part o f the personal incom e and

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Sources and methods for three components and for
the residence adjustment
The methods used to prepare the quarterly State esti­
mates of three components of personal income—wage
and salary disbursements, proprietors’ income, and
transfer payments—and for the estimates of the resi­
dence adjustment are more complex than the methods
used to prepare the other components.
Wage and salary disbursements.—The preliminary
quarterly State estimates of wages and salaries for most
industries at the SIC division level are extrapolated from
the second estimates for the previous quarter by State
data for employment from the CES. The preliminary
estimates for durable goods manufacturing and for non­
durable goods manufacturing are extrapolated from the
second estimates for the previous quarter by the prod­
uct of the CES State data for total employment and
production workers’ hours and earnings.15
The second quarterly estimates for farms, railroads,
and the Federal Government are based on the same State
data as the preliminary estimates.
The second quarterly estimates for all other industries
incorporate the State ES-202 payroll data. These data
are a substantially better source for the State estimates
than the CES data, so the incorporation of these data
accounts for the most important differences between
the preliminary estimates and the second estimates of
personal income.
Farm proprietors’ income.—The quarterly estimates of
farm proprietors’ income are prepared in three parts:
Federal Government farm subsidies; special adjustments
for unusual occurrences, such as natural disasters; and
farm proprietors’ income excluding the subsidies and
the adjustments.
The estimates of the subsidies are interpolated and ex­
trapolated from the annual estimates by quarterly State
15.

The C E S State data at the S IC d ivisio n level are available 6 weeks

after the end o f the month. The data fo r average hourly earnings exclude
bonus payments.
F o r the nonmanufacturing industries, em ploym ent is a reliable indicator
series fo r wages and salaries when average wage rates and hours worked are
stable or when they change s im ila rly in a ll States. H ow ever, the changes in
average wage rates and hours worked can differ among States. In addition,

M-45

data on the subsidies from the U.S. Department of Agri­
culture (USDA). The estimates of the adjustments are
attributed to States on the basis of information from
the USDA. The estimates of farm proprietors’ income
excluding the subsidies and the adjustments are inter­
polated and extrapolated from the annual estimates by
USDA data on cash receipts from the sale of farm
products.
Transfer payments.—The quarterly estimates of transfer
payments are prepared as the sum of the State un­
employment insurance (UI) benefits and of all other
transfer payments. The quarterly estimates of State UI
benefits are interpolated and extrapolated from the an­
nual estimates by the sum of the extended benefits and
the seasonally adjusted data for regular benefits from
the Employment and Training Administration of the
Department of Labor.16
Residence adjustment.—The source data for a major­
ity of the components of personal income are recorded,
or treated as if they were recorded, on a place-ofresidence basis.17 However, most of the source data for
three components, which compose more than 60 per­
cent of personal income, are recorded by place of work.
These components are wage and salary disbursements,
other labor income, and personal contributions for so­
cial insurance. Therefore, the annual and quarterly State
estimates and annual county estimates of most of the
subcomponents of these three components are initially
estimated on a place-of-work basis. Subsequently, these
place-of-work estimates are adjusted so that they will
be on a place-of-residence basis and so that the income
of the recipients whose place of residence differs from
their place of work will be correctly assigned to their
State or county of residence.
The estimates of the residence adjustment are pre­
pared for the net labor earnings—or “income-subject-toadjustment”—of interstate and intercounty commuters.18
These estimates are then added to the estimates of net
labor earnings by place of work to yield the estimates
of net labor earnings by place of residence.
The annual State estimates of the residence adjust­
ment are essentially the sum of the county estimates, but

the C E S data that are available fo r the prelim inary estimates are based on a

16. The extended benefits are the special U I benefits that are received by

sample survey that may not accurately reflect the em ployment changes due
to the births o f firms.

unem ployed individuals who have exhausted their regular U I benefits during

F o r manufacturing, the data available fo r the prelim inary estimates include
wage-rate inform ation in the form o f average w eekly hours and average
hourly earnings fo r production workers. How ever, these data exclude wages
and salaries fo r nonproduction workers and wages paid under profit-sharing
plans fo r all workers.
The significance o f these exclusions has increased as the number o f pro­
duction workers relative to that o f nonproduction workers has declined and
as the profit-sharing programs have become more com m on in a ll industries.

periods o f high unemployment.
17. For specific information, see the section “ Geographic characteristics o f
the source data” in the introduction to the “ The Sources and Methods for the
Annual Estimates.”
18. Income-subject-to-adjustment is calculated as wages and salaries plus
other labor income minus the personal contributions fo r social insurance by
employees.
The estimate o f residence adjustment is the estimated net inflow o f the
earnings o f interstate or intercounty commuters.

M-46

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

the quarterly State estimates are calculated by summing
estimates of the gross flows: The outflows from each
State are subtracted from the inflows to the State.19 The
quarterly State estimates of the interstate gross flows are
derived from the interstate gross flows of commuters’
earnings that were calculated in the derivation of the
annual county and State estimates. The annual gross
flows are allocated to the quarters in proportion to the
19.
Each gross flow is an inflo w to the State o f the residence and an outflow
from the State o f work.
F o r the m ethodology fo r the annual estimates, see the section “ Residence
Adjustm ents” in “ The Sources and Methods fo r the A nn ual Estimates.”

quarterly place-of-work estimates of the components of
income-subject-to-adjustment for each State of work.
The estimates of the interstate gross flows for the
quarters in a year for which annual estimates are not yet
available are derived by the use of the adjustment fac­
tors that were calculated in the derivation of the annual
estimates for the preceding year. The adjustment factors
for each component of income-subject-to-adjustment for
each State of work are multiplied by the quarterly placeof-work estimate of the component in order to obtain
the quarterly interstate gross flows.

Technical Notes
Disclosure-avoidance procedures
Most of the data series that BEA receives from other
agencies are not confidential. The agencies summarize
these data to aggregate totals by program and by State
or county, so that each record, or data cell, contains data
for enough individuals or establishments to preclude the
identification of the data for a specific individual or es­
tablishment and, therefore, to preclude the disclosure of
confidential information.1
However, the ES-202 tabulations that BEA receives
from the Bureau of Labor Statistics include records that
would disclose confidential information. The confiden­
tial information on wages and salaries for some business
establishments is identifiable from the State and county
estimates of wages and salaries at the SIC two-digit level
that are derived from the ES-202 data.2
To prevent either the direct or the indirect disclosure
of the confidential information, BEA uses the following
procedures.
After the estimates of wage and salary disburse­
ments for each SIC. two-digit industry in a State or
county are derived from the ES-202 data, the esti­
mates are checked for two types of direct, or primary,
disclosures of wages and salaries—reporting-unit dis­
closures and dominant-establishment disclosures.3 The
reporting-unit disclosures in the estimates were deter­
mined from the ES-202 data that specify the number
of reporting units, or establishments, that provide the
data for each estimate. The dominant-establishment
disclosures were determined from an analysis of the
1. F o r a lis t o f some o f the agencies that provide data to B E A , see

ES-202 data in which the dominant-cell disclosures
are identified at the four-digit level and an analysis
of the ES-202 data that are classified by the size of
the firm.4 All of the reporting-unit disclosures and the
dominant-establishment disclosures are identified in the
primary-wage-disclosure file.
After the primary disclosures of wages and salaries in
the State or county estimates have been identified, the
estimates of wages and salaries, other labor income, and
proprietors’ income for each SIC two-digit industry are
systematically “rolled up,” or summed, to produce a file
of the estimates of the total earnings by industry. Then
the total earnings file and the primary-wage-disclosure
file are analyzed in a dominant-cell suppression test in
order to identify which estimates of earnings should be
suppressed because the estimate of total earnings does
not conceal a primary wage disclosure. In this test, if the
wages and salaries for an industry in a State or county
account for more than a specified percentage of the to­
tal earnings, then a primary earnings disclosure exists.
All of the primary earnings disclosures are identified in
the primary-eamings-disclosure file. All of these disclo­
sures are suppressed in the State and county estimates
of total earnings that are released.
The primary-eamings-disclosure file is also used to
identify “secondary” and “complementary” disclosures
that are possible because BEA releases summations of
the earnings estimates by industry and area; these sum­
mations include the estimates of earnings for regions
and States at the SIC two-digit and industry-division
levels and the estimates for counties at the SIC industrydivision level.5 In order to determine which estimates

“ Sources o f the data” in the introduction to “ The Sources and Methods fo r
the Annual Estimates.”
2. F o r specific inform ation, see “ Wage and Salary Disbursements.”
3. A reporting-unit disclosure results when the data fo r a reporting unit,
or an establishment, are identifiable because these data are in a ce ll that
contains data fo r fewer than a specified number o f establishments.
A dominant-establishment disclosure results when the data fo r an estab­

4. The State em ploym ent security agencies that report the ES-202 data
to the Bureau o f Lab or Statistics identified the dominant-establishment
disclosures at the four-digit level from the inform ation provided by the
employers.
O n ly the data for the first quarter o f a year were classified by the size o f

lishm ent are identifiable because these data account for a specified, large
percentage o f the total data in the cell.

the establishment.
5. A secondary disclosure results from the derivation o f the prim ary d is­
closure o f the county estimate o f earnings for an SIC tw o-digit industry from

E ffective w ith the county estimates released in M a y 1995 and the State
estimates to be released in August 1995, the procedures for identifying the

the estimate o f earnings fo r the S IC industry d ivisio n and from the estimates
fo r the other tw o-digit industries in the d ivision. In order to prevent the

prim ary wage disclosures have been changed. The Bureau o f Labor Statistics
now identifies the county-level prim ary disclosures in the ES-202 data fo r the

secondary disclosure, the State or county estimate o f earnings fo r another
SIC tw o-digit industry is suppressed.

SIC tw o-digit industries. B E A continues to be responsible fo r identifying the
county-level prim ary disclosures fo r the industries that it treats as partially

disclosure o f the county estimate o f earnings fo r an S IC tw o-digit industry

noncovered and the State-level prim ary disclosures fo r a ll industries.

from the State estimate o f earnings fo r the industry and from the estimates

A complementary disclosure results from the derivation o f the prim ary

M -4 7

M-48

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Imputed wage and salary disbursements, or pay-inkind, are added to the estimates of wages and salaries so
that all the earnings of employees who receive part of
their wages in pay-in-kind will be included in personal
income. This imputation is an estimate of the value of
the food, lodging, clothing, and other goods and services
that are received by employees from their employers as
full payment or as partial payment for their services.
The net imputed value of owner-occupied farm hous­
ing and that of food and fuel produced and consumed on
farms are counted as part of farm proprietors’ income
so that this measure of income reflects the income from
all of the production of noncorporate farms.
The net imputed value of owner-occupied nonfarm
housing is counted as part of the rental income of per­
Imputation
sons in order to make that measure invariant regardless
Imputations are added to personal income and to other of whether nonfarm housing is rented or owned. The
measures in the national income and product accounts imputation is based on the assumption that the owner(NIPA’s) so that a comprehensive account of total pro­ occupants are in the rental business and that they are
duction and its distribution can be presented. The renting the houses in which they live to themselves: As
imputed transactions included in the NIPA’s are a lim­ tenants, they pay rent to the landlords (that is, to them­
ited set of exceptions to the principle that the NIPA’s selves); as landlords, they collect rent from their tenants
reflect market transactions in goods and services. In (that is, from themselves), they incur expenses, and they
order to keep the NIPA measures invariant to how cer­ may have a profit or a loss from the rental business.
tain activities are carried out, imputations are made to
The net margins on owner-built housing is part of pro­
place a market value on certain transactions that do not prietors’ income, classified in the construction industry.
occur in the market economy, and that, therefore, are It is the imputed net income of individuals from the
not observable in its records. In this process, some construction or renovation of their own dwellings.
market transactions are reconstructed to provide a repre­
The imputed interest income from financial interme­
sentation of the activity that is more appropriate for the diaries, which is a part of personal interest income, is
NIPA’s. Both a measure of the production and the in­ received by persons from investment companies and
comes associated with that production are imputed. The from depository institutions, that is, from commercial
imputations described here are those that affect personal banks, mutual savings banks, savings and loan associa­
income.7
tions, and credit unions. It is an estimate of the value
Specifically, six imputations are included in the es­ of the services (such as checking) that these institutions
timates of personal income: Imputed wage and salary provide to persons reduced by the amount of the explicit
disbursements, employer-paid health and life insurance charges (if any) that are made for the services.
premiums, the net imputed value of owner-occupied
Another portion of personal interest income is of­
farm housing and of food and fuel produced and ten referred to as “imputed interest,” although it is
consumed on farms, the net imputed value of owner- not classified as such. This portion is an estimate of
occupied nonfarm housing, the net margins on owner- the investment income that is earned on the financial
built housing, and the imputed interest income from reserves of life insurance carriers and of private nonin­
financial intermediaries. These imputations account for sured pension plans. This income is attributed to the
about 7 percent of personal income at the national level. policyholders or the pension beneficiaries in order to in­
clude the investment earnings of these intermediaries in
fo r the other counties in the State. In order to prevent the complementary
personal
income and saving.
disclosure, the county estimate o f earnings fo r the industry in another county

should be suppressed, the total earnings file and the
primary-eamings-disclosure file are used to prepare a
multidimensional matrix. This matrix is tested, and the
estimates that should be suppressed are selected.6
The priority of the selection is to maximize the in­
formation that is released at the national and regional
level. For example, the estimates for the States in a
region rather than the estimate for the region will be
suppressed, and the estimates for the counties in a State
rather than the State estimate will be suppressed. Fur­
ther, the estimate for an industry at the SIC two-digit
level rather than the estimate for the industry at the SIC
industry-division level will be suppressed.

is suppressed.
In addition, the State estimates at the S IC tw o-digit level and the county
estimates at the S IC industry-division level are checked fo r these disclosures.
6. In this test, computer programs impose a set o f rules and priorities on
this m atrix so that the estimates that should be suppressed are selected until
indirect disclosure is im possible.
7. See table 8.18, “ Imputations in the N ational Income and Product
Accounts,”

Survey of Current B usiness 7 4

(July 1994): 117.

Industry classification
For the private sector, the Standard Industrial Classi­
fication (SIC) provided by the Office of Management
and Budget is used for the classification of the estimates
of wage and salary disbursements, other labor income,

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

M—49

and proprietors’ income by establishment industry. The
Standard Industrial Classification Manual 1967 is used
for the classification of the estimates for 1969-74, and
the 1972 Manual is used for the classification of the es­
timates for 1975-87. The 1987 Manual is used for the
classification of the estimates for 1988-92.8
For the public sector, the estimates of wages and
salaries and other labor income are classified by level
of government—Federal, State, and local. The esti­
mates for the Federal Government are subclassified into
civilian and military.

2 and 3 from the State data for the benchmark years 1
and 4.10 The preliminary estimate for year 2 equals the
amount for year 1 plus one-third of the increase from
year 1 to year 4; the preliminary estimate for year 3
equals the amount for year 1 plus two-thirds of the in­
crease.

28
34

34

40

State B ....................

43

53

62

Interpolation and extrapolation
Interpolation and extrapolation are used to prepare pre­
liminary State estimates of some of the components of
personal income for the years in which the data for these
components are inadequate or unavailable.9 Both proce­
dures use the data for these components for benchmark
years—the years for which the best data are available—
and both frequently use other data that are related to the
benchmark-year data for the components.
Interpolation is used to derive the preliminary esti­
mates for years that are between benchmark years. For
example, if data for wages and salaries for an indus­
try were available only from the decennial censuses of
population but employment data were available annually
from another source, the preliminary State estimates of
wages and salaries for 1981-89 might be interpolated
from the State data for wages and salaries 1980 and for
1990, the 2 census benchmark years, and from the data
for employment for 1980-90.
Extrapolation is used to derive the preliminary es­
timates for the years that are beyond the most recent
benchmark year. For example, the preliminary es­
timates of wages for 1991-93 might be extrapolated
from the census benchmark data for 1990 and from the
employment data for 1990-93.
Both interpolation and extrapolation are illustrated in
the following examples. In the first two examples, in­
terpolation is used to derive the preliminary estimates
of wages and salaries for an industry in States A, B, and
C for the years 2 and 3 that are between the benchmark
years 1 and 4. In the third example, extrapolation is
used to derive the estimates for year 5.
In the first example, “straight-line interpolation” is
used to derive the preliminary State estimates for years

State C ....................

74

81

87

94

8. O ffice o f Managem ent and Budget, Statistical P o lic y D iv isio n ,

S ta n ­

d a r d I n d u stria l C la ssific a tio n M a n u a l 1 9 6 7 (Washington, D C : U .S. G overn­
ment Printing O ffice (G PO ), 1967); M a n u a l 1 9 7 2 (G PO , 1972); M a n u a l

Wages and salaries in thousands of dollars
Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

(benchmark) (interpolation) (interpolation) (benchmark)
46

In the second example, interpolation with a related
series of data, the indicator series, is used to derive
preliminary State estimates for years 2 and 3 from the
benchmark data for years 1 and 4 and from the indi­
cator series for all 4 years. The data for wages and
salaries are the benchmark data, the employment data
are the indicator series, and the average wages (com­
puted as wages and salaries divided by employment) are
the interpolation ratios.11 This method of interpolation
is illustrated in three steps.
First, the average wages of the employees in an indus­
try for years 1 and 4 are calculated from data for wages
and salaries and data for employment for those years.
The wages for each year are divided by the number of
employees for the year to yield the average wages of
the employees.
Employment and average wages
Year 1

Year 4
Average

Employment

wages

Average
Employment

in dollars

wages
in dollars

State A ....................

4

7,000

4

11,500

State B ....................

6
11

5,667

10
10

6,200
9,400

State C ....................

6,727

10. Straight-line interpolation is the simplest, but the least satisfactory,
o f the methods o f interpolation.

Its use is based on the premise that the

magnitude o f the annual change is the same in each year in the interpolated
time series.
11. U sing an indicator series fo r interpolation between 2 benchmark years
is based on the premise that the relationship between the data fo r the incom e
component fo r the benchmark years and the data from the indicator series
fo r the benchmark years changes at a uniform rate between the benchmark
years. T his relationship is embodied in the interpolation ratios, w hich in this
example are the average wages.
T his procedure uses straight-line interpolation o f the benchmark-year
interpolation ratios to calculate the ratios fo r the intervening years. A
benchmark-year interpolation ratio is the ratio o f the datum fo r an income

7987(GPO , 1987).
9. A fte r interpolation or extrapolation is used to calculate the prelim inary

component fo r the benchmark year to the datum fo r the same year from the

State estimates o f a component o f personal income, the State estimates are

m u ltiplied by the data fo r those years from the indicator series to yie ld the

adjusted by allocation to sum to the national estimate o f the component.

interpolated series for those years.

annual indicator series. The interpolation ratios fo r the intervening years are

M-50

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Second, straight-line interpolation is used to derive
the average wages for years 2 and 3 from the average
wages for years 1 and 4.
Average wages in dollars
Year 1

Year 3

Year 2

Year 4

(benchmark) (interpolation) (interpolation) (benchmark)
State A ....................

7,000
5,667

5,845

10,000
6,022

11,500

State B ....................

8,500

State C ....................

6,727

7,618

8,509

9,400

6,200

Third, the interpolated average wages for each year
are multiplied by the employment data for each year to
yield the preliminary estimates.
Employment and wage approximations
Year 2

Year 3
Wages

Employment

in thousands

Wages
in thousands

Employment

of dollars

of dollars

State A ....................
State B ....................

5
7

43
41

4
9

40
54

State C ....................

10

76

9

77

In the third example, extrapolation with an indicator
series is used to derive the preliminary State estimates
of wages for year 5 from the average wages for year 4—
used here as the extrapolation ratios—and employment
data for year 5.12 The average wages are multiplied by
the employment data to yield the preliminary estimates
of wages for year 5.
Preliminary estimates of wages for year 5
Year 4
Average
wages

Year 5
Wages
Employment

in dollars

in thousands
of dollars

State A ................................

11,500

State B ................................

6,200

5
12

58
74

State C ................................

9,400

9

85

Per capita personal income
This measure of income is calculated as the personal
income of the residents of a given area divided by the
resident population of the area. In computing per capita
personal income for States and counties, BEA uses the
12.

U sing an indicator series fo r extrapolation is based on the premise that

the relationship between the datum fo r the incom e component for the latest
benchmark year and the datum from the indicator series fo r that year remains
unchanged in the subsequent years.

T h is relationship is em bodied in the

Census Bureau’s annual midyear population estimates.
Except for the college student and other seasonal popu­
lations, which are measured on April 1, the population
for all years is estimated on July 1.
See the following section for the differences between
per capita personal income and the Census Bureau’s per
capita money income.
Personal income, adjusted gross income, and money
income
The measure of personal income that is prepared by
BEA differs substantially from adjusted gross income
(AGI), which is the principal measure of the income
of individuals that is tabulated by the Internal Rev­
enue Service. Personal income also differs from money
income, which is prepared by the Census Bureau.
Personal income consists of the income of nonprofit
institutions serving individuals, private noninsured wel­
fare funds, and private trust funds, as well as the
income of individuals, whereas AGI consists only of
the income of individuals who file individual income
tax returns. Personal income includes employer con­
tributions to private health and pension funds, other
imputed income, transfer payments, and all of the in­
terest received by individuals, whereas AGI excludes
all employer contributions and other imputed income,
most transfer payments, and the nontaxable interest re­
ceived by individuals. Personal income, unlike AGI,
excludes personal contributions for social insurance, re­
alized capital gains and losses, and private pensions and
annuities.13
Money income consists only of the income that is
received by individuals in cash and its equivalents. Per­
sonal income for counties is prepared annually, whereas
money income for States, counties and cities is prepared
decennially from the data from the “long-form” sample
conducted as part of the census of population.14
Personal income, unlike money income, includes im­
puted income, all lump-sum payments except those
13. Private pensions and annuities are excluded from personal incom e be­
cause the funds from w h ich these payments are made consist o f accumulated
incomes— em ployer contributions and the net investment earnings o f the
funds— that were counted as part o f personal incom e in previous periods.
A cco rd ing ly, the private pensions and annuities are treated as withdrawals
from savings rather than as part o f personal income.
F o r more inform ation, see Thae S. Park, “ Relationship Between Personal
Income and Adjusted Gross Income,

51-53.

1991-92," Survey 74

(August

1994):

14. The most recent estimates o f money incom e fo r States and counties—

1989— were prepared from

data from the

1990 Census

extrapolation ratios, w hich in this example are the average wages.

the estimates fo r
Population.

of

The extrapolation ratios are m u ltiplied by the data fo r the subsequent year
or years from the indicator series to yie ld the prelim inary estimates fo r those
years.

F o r the N ation and fo r the four census regions, the Census Bureau also
prepares annual estimates o f money income from the data from the current
population survey.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

received as part of earnings, certain in-kind trans­
fer payments—such as medicaid, medicare, and food
stamps—and employer contributions to private health
and pension funds. Personal income, unlike money
income, excludes personal contributions for social in­
surance, income from private pensions and annuities,
and income from interpersonal transfers, such as child
support.
Further, both BEA and the Census Bureau prepare
estimates of per capita income, but each agency uses
different methods of computation. For example, the
estimate of per capita personal income for a State for

M-51

1989 is calculated as the 1989 State estimate of personal
income divided by the estimate of the population of the
State in July 1989; the estimate of per capita money
income for a State for 1989 is calculated as the 1989
State estimate of money income divided by the estimate
of the population for the State in April 1990.15

15.
The Census Bureau uses this method because the decennial census
requests inform ation about the incom e fo r the previous year: In A p r il 1990,
the Census Bureau asked how much incom e was received in calendar year
1989.

Glossary
Allocation procedures.—The allocation procedures are

used in the derivation of the estimates of State and
county personal income, because the data that are avail­
able for many of the components of personal income at
the State and county levels may not be as comprehen­
sive or as reliable as the data that are available at the
national level. The national estimate of a component is
allocated to the States in proportion to the States’ shares
of an economic, or allocating, series that is a measure of
the component or that is related to the component that
is being allocated; the State estimates are then allocated
to counties. For example, the national estimate of per­
sonal dividend income is allocated to the States—and
the State estimates are allocated to counties—in propor­
tion to the series for dividends reported by individuals
on their Federal income tax returns.
For additional information, see “Allocation proce­
dures” in the introduction to “The Sources and Methods
for the Annual Estimates.”
Capital consumption adjustment (CCAdj).—The CCAdj
is the difference between the depreciation that is val­
ued for determining income in business accounting—
especially for the purpose of tax reporting—and the
depreciation that is referred to as “economic depreci­
ation” and that is valued on the basis of consistent
accounting (economic service lives and straight-line de­
preciation) and at replacement cost. For example, if the
reported depreciation is $1.1 million and if the replace­
ment cost of the capital that is used up is calculated with
straight-line depreciation and the specified service life
as $1.3 million, then the CCAdj is -$0.2 million.
In personal income, the CCAdj affects the estimates
of proprietors’ income—both farm and nonfarm—and
of rental income of persons.
Corporate business.—$ee Economic sectors and legal
form of organization.
County.—Counties consist of the counties and county
equivalents, such as the parishes of Louisiana and
the boroughs and census areas of Alaska. $ee also
Geographic units.
Disclosure-avoidance procedures.—$ee “Disclosureavoidance procedures” in the “Technical Notes.”

Disposable personal income.—Disposable personal in­

come is the income that is available to persons for
spending and saving. It is calculated as personal income
less the sum of personal tax payments and personal
nontax payments to government.
$ee also Personal tax and nontax payments.
Earnings.—This aggregate is the sum of three com­
ponents of personal income—wage and salary dis­
bursements, other labor income, and proprietors’
income.
Wage and salary disbursements and proprietors’ in­
come are measured before the deduction of personal
contributions for social insurance, which is excluded
from personal income. Therefore, the measure “net
earnings” is calculated as earnings less personal contri­
butions for social insurance, so that it can then be used
in the presentation of personal income as the sum of
net earnings, transfer payments, and personal dividend
income, personal interest income, and the rental income
of persons.
Earnings is often used in the analyses of regional
economies as a proxy for the income that is generated
from participation in current production.
See also Labor earnings.

Economic sectors and legal form of organiza­
tion.—In the national income and products (NIPA’s),
four economic sectors are recognized: Domestic busi­
ness, households and institutions, general government,
and the rest of the world.
Domestic businesses are classified into four categories
according to their legal form of organization: Corporate
business, sole proprietorships and partnerships, “other”
private business, and government business enterprises.
Corporate businesses are generally entities that are
required to file Federal corporate tax returns (Inter­
nal Revenue Service (1RS) form 1120 series) . This
classification includes mutual financial institutions and
cooperatives that are subject to Federal income tax, pri­
vate noninsured pension funds, nonprofit organizations
that primarily serve businesses, Federal Reserve banks,
and federally sponsored credit agencies.
Sole proprietorships and partnerships are primarily
classified according to the type of Federal income tax
M -5 3

M-54

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

form that is filed with the IRS. Sole proprietorships
are mainly entities that are required to file IRS Sched­
ule C (Profit or Loss from Business) or Schedule F
(Farm Income and Expenses), but these proprietorships
include the similar entities that would have been re­
quired to file either of those schedules if the proprietors
had met the filing requirements for form 1040. In ad­
dition, owner-occupied farm housing is classified with
sole proprietorships. Partnerships are legal entities that
are required to file a U.S. Partnership Return of Income,
IRS form 1065.
Other private business consists of entities that are
required to report rental and royalty income on Sched­
ule E (Supplemental Income and Loss), similar entities
that would have been required to report rental and
royalty income if the individuals had met the filing
requirements for form 1040, tax-exempt cooperatives,
owner-occupied nonfarm housing, and buildings and
equipment owned and used by nonprofit institutions that
primarily serve individuals.
Government enterprises are government agencies that
cover a substantial portion of their operating costs
by selling goods and services to the public and that
maintain their own separate accounts.
E xtrapolation . —See

“Interpolation and extrapolation”
in the “Technical Notes.”

F idu ciary. —Fiduciaries

are individuals or legal entities
that serve as administrators or trustees of private trust
funds (including estates), which are counted as persons
in the NIPA’s. A fiduciary is required to report the
income that the private trust fund receives on behalf
of the beneficiaries of the estate or trust on Internal
Revenue Service form 1041. Data from form 1041 are
used in the preparation of the State estimates of personal
dividend income and personal interest income.

G eographic units. —The

estimates of personal income
are prepared for the following geographic units: Coun­
ties and county equivalents, metropolitan areas, States,
and regions. In addition, estimates can be prepared for
any area that can be defined in terms of counties.
The estimates are prepared for most counties and
for the following county equivalents: The District of
Columbia, the boroughs and census areas of Alaska,
the parishes of Louisiana, and the independent cities
of Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, and Virginia. How­
ever, the estimates for the following areas are combined
with those for adjacent counties: Kalawao County,
Hawaii; the Montana portion of Yellowstone National
Park; Menominee County, Wisconsin; and the small in­

dependent cities of Virginia, generally those with fewer
than 100,000 residents.
The estimates for metropolitan areas are aggregations
of the county estimates. The county-based definitions
of metropolitan areas are used; these definitions are is­
sued for Federal statistical purposes by the Office of
Management and Budget. Metropolitan areas consist of
metropolitan statistical areas, consolidated metropolitan
statistical areas, primary metropolitan statistical areas,
and New England county metropolitan areas.
The estimates are prepared for all States and for
the District of Columbia. In addition, the State es­
timates are aggregated to prepare the estimates for
the following eight regions: Far West, Great Lakes,
Mideast, New England, Plains, Rocky Mountain, South­
east, and Southwest. The regional classifications, which
were developed in the mid-1950’s, are based on the
homogeneity of the States in terms of economic charac­
teristics, such as the industrial composition of the labor
force, and in terms of demographic, social, and cultural
characteristics.
In addition, the State estimates are often aggregated
to prepare estimates for the nine Census divisions that
compose the four regions for which the Bureau of the
Census publishes its regional data so that the estimates
of personal income can be compared with the Census
Bureau data.
G overn m en t enterprise. —See Economic sectors and
legal form of organization.
Im putation. —Imputations are added to personal income
and to other NIPA aggregates to keep the NIPA’s in­
variant to how certain activities are carried out. The
imputations place a market value on certain transac­
tions that do not occur in the market economy, and that,
therefore, are not observable in its records. Both a meas­
ure of production and the income associated with that
production are imputed.
See “Imputation” in the “Technical Notes.”
In com e su bject to adjustm ent. —See Labor earnings.
In terpolation . —See “Interpolation and extrapolation” in
the “Technical Notes.”
In ven tory valuation adju stm en t (IVA).—This adjust­
ment is made in the estimation of nonfarm proprietors’
income in order to reflect the difference between the cost
of inventory withdrawals valued in determining prof­
its and the cost of withdrawals valued at replacement
cost. The IVA is needed because under the accounting
practices used by businesses to determine the income re­
ported in the source data, inventories are often charged

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

to cost of sales (that is, withdrawn) at their acquisition
(historical) cost rather than at their replacement cost (the
concept underlying the NIPA’s). In periods of chang­
ing prices, this practice results in profits (or losses) on
inventoried goods. The IVA is an estimate of inventory
profits, but with the sign reversed. Thus, adding the
IVA to income removes the inventory profits, which is
appropriate for a measure of current production. Farm
proprietors’ income does not need to be adjusted, be­
cause farm inventories are measured on a current-cost
basis.
L ab or earn in gs .—This aggregate is calculated as the
sum of wage and salary disbursements and other labor
income less personal contributions for social insurance
by employees. This measure is used in the residence
adjustment procedure for the quarterly estimates of State
personal income. A slightly modified version of labor
earnings—termed “income subject to adjustment”—is
used in the residence adjustment of the annual estimates
of State and county personal income.
See also Earnings.
L o ca l a rea s .—Local areas consist of metropolitan areas
and of counties and county equivalents.
See also Geographic units.
M etropolitan a rea s .—Metropolitan areas are defined for
Federal statistical purposes by the Office of Manage­
ment and Budget. Generally, they are defined in terms
of counties.
See also Geographic units.
O th er labor in co m e .—This component of personal in­
come consists of the payments by employers to privately
administered benefit plans for their employees, the fees
paid to corporate directors, and miscellaneous fees. The
payments to private benefit plans consist of the pay­
ments to pension and profit-sharing plans, to private
group health and life insurance plans, to supplemental
unemployment insurance benefit plans, and to workers’
compensation insurance. The miscellaneous fees consist
of fees paid to jurors and witnesses, the compensation
of prison inmates, and marriage fees paid to justices of
the peace.
O th er p riva te business. —See Economic sectors and
legal form of organization.
P artn ersh ip .—A partnership is an unincorporated
business association of two or more partners.
See also Economic sectors and legal form of
organization.

M-55

P ay-in -kin d. —Pay-in-kind is a component of wage

and
salary disbursements. The estimates of pay-in-kind
reflect the value of the food, lodging, clothing, and
miscellaneous goods and services that are received by
employees from their employers as full payment or as
partial payment for services performed.
See also “Imputation” in the “Technical Notes.”
P er capita p erso n a l incom e. —This measure of income
is calculated as the total personal income of the residents
of an area divided by the population of the area. See also
“Per capita personal income” in the “Technical Notes.”
Per capita personal income is often used as an in­
dicator of the quality of consumer markets and of the
economic well-being of the residents of an area.
P erson al contributions f o r social insurance. —These
contributions include the contributions, or payments,
by employees, by the self-employed, and by other in­
dividuals to the following social insurance programs:
Old-age, survivors, and disability insurance, which
is also known as social security; hospital insurance;
State and local government employee retirement in­
surance; Federal civilian employee retirement; railroad
employee retirement; State unemployment insurance;
temporary disability insurance; veterans life insurance;
and supplementary medical insurance.
These contributions are excluded from personal in­
come by definition, but the estimates of three compo­
nents of personal income—wage and salary disburse­
ments, other labor income, and proprietors’ income—
are presented before these contributions are deducted.
Therefore, the estimates of these contributions are sub­
tracted from the sum of the estimates of these three
components in order to derive the estimates of personal
income.
See also Earnings, Labor earnings, and Personal
income.
P erson al dividen d in co m e .—This component of per­
sonal income consists of the dividends that are received
by persons. Dividends are payments in cash or other
assets, excluding the corporation’s own stock, made by
corporations located in the United States or abroad to
noncorporate stockholders who are U.S. residents.
In this publications, State estimates of personal div­
idend income are combined with the estimates of
personal interest income and the estimates of rental
income of persons.
P erson al in com e .—The personal income of an area is
defined as the income that is received by, or on behalf
of, all the individuals who live in the area; therefore,

M-56

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

the estimates of personal income are presented by the of individuals. Quasi-individuals consists of nonprofit
place of residence of the income recipients.
institutions that primarily serve individuals, private
noninsured
welfare funds, and private trust funds.
Personal income consists of the income that is re­
ceived by persons from participation in production, Proprietors’ income with inventory valuation and cap­
from government and business transfer payments, and ital consumption adjustments.—This component of
from government interest (which is treated like a trans­ personal income is the current-production income (in­
fer payment). It is calculated as the sum of wage cluding the income in kind) of sole proprietorships and
and salary disbursements, other labor income, pro­
and of tax-exempt cooperatives.
prietors’ income with inventory valuation and capital partnerships
Proprietors’
income includes the imputed rental in­
consumption adjustments, rental income of persons come of the owner-occupants
of farm dwellings, but it
with capital consumption adjustment, personal dividend excludes both the imputed rental
income of the ownerincome, personal interest income, and transfer pay­ occupants of nonfarm dwellings and
the monetary rental
ments to persons, less personal contributions for social income that is received by persons who
are not primar­
insurance.
ily
engaged
in
the
real
estate
business.
It
excludes
See also Earnings; Labor earnings; Other labor the monetary interest that is received byalso
nonfinancial
income; Personal contributions for social insur­ businesses.
ance; Personal dividend income; Personal interest
See also Capital consumption adjustment and
income; Persons; Proprietors’ income; Rental in­ Inventory
valuation adjustment.
come of persons; Residence adjustment; Residence,
place of; Transfer payments; and Wage and salary Quasi-individuals.—See Persons.
disbursements.
Region.—See Geographic units.
Personal interest income.—This component of personal Rental income of persons with capital consumption ad­
income is the interest income that is received by persons
—This component of personal income consists
from all sources. The estimates of personal interest in­ justment.
of
the
income
that is received by persons who are not
come consist of the estimates of both monetary interest primarily engaged
in the real estate business and that
and imputed interest.
is
from
the
rental
of
real property, the imputed rental
In this publication, the estimates of personal inter­ income of the owner-occupants
of nonfarm dwellings,
est income are combined with the estimates of personal and the royalties received by persons
from patents,
dividend income and the estimates of rental income of copyrights, and the rights to natural resources.
The im­
persons.
puted rental income of owner-occupied farm dwellings
Personal tax and nontax payments.—Personal tax and is included in farm proprietors’ income.
See also Capital consumption adjustment and
nontax payments consists of the tax payments (net of
refunds) by persons that are not chargeable to busi­ Proprietors’ income.
ness expense and certain other payments that are made
In this publication, the estimates of the rental income
by persons to government agencies except government of persons are combined with the estimates of personal
enterprises and that are treated like taxes.
dividend income and of personal interest income.
Personal taxes includes taxes on income, including re­ Residence adjustment.—The State and county estimates
alized net capital gains, on gifts and transfers of estates, of personal income are presented by the State and county
and on personal property.1 Nontaxes includes donations, of residence of the income recipients. However, the
fees, fines, and forfeitures.
data for most of the components of wage and
The estimates of tax and nontax payments are used source
salary
disbursements,
labor income, and personal
in the derivation of disposable personal income, which contributions for socialother
insurance
by employees are on a
is calculated as personal income less personal tax and place-of-work basis.2 Consequently,
the estimates based
nontax payments.
on these source data are adjusted so that they will be on
Persons.—Persons is defined as individuals and quasi­ a place-of-residence basis.3
See also “Residence Adjustments” in the “The
individuals that serve individuals or that act on behalf
Sources
and Methods for the Annual Estimates.”
1.
Personal tax payments excludes payments o f both real estate taxes
and sales taxes. R eal estate taxes are excluded because they are considered
business expenses that are deducted from both gross monetary rental income
and gross imputed rental incom e in order to obtain net rental income. Sales

2. See “ Geographic characteristics o f the source data” in the introduction
to “ The Sources and M ethods fo r the A nnual Estimates.”
3. The estimates o f the components that are derived from the place-of-

taxes are included in personal consum ption expenditures.

w ork data are presented both by place o f w ork and by place o f residence.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Residence, place of.—The place of residence of indi­

viduals is the State and county in which they live. The
residence of military personnel is the State and county in
which they live while they are on military assignment,
not their permanent or legal State and county of resi­
dence, and the residence of seasonal migrant workers
except those working in Alaska is the State and county
in which they live while they are working, not their
usual State and county of residence.
These definitions of residence are not fully consistent
with the population statistics prepared by the Census Bu­
reau; for example, on their census forms, some seasonal
migrant workers report their usual State and county of
residence rather than the State and county in which they
are living and working when the census is taken.
See also Personal income, Persons, and Residence
adjustment.
Seasonal adjustment at annual rates.—The quarterly
estimates of State personal income are based largely on
quarterly data that are seasonally adjusted because many
quarterly economic time series show a seasonal move­
ment that regularly recurs and that can be estimated on
the basis of the patterns of the movement in previous
years. Accordingly the data are adjusted so that nonseasonal short-term changes and the cyclical and long-term
trends in the series can be observed.4
The quarterly estimates based on these data are pres­
ented at annual rates, so that these estimates can be
compared with the annual estimates. These rates show
the values for a quarter at their annual equivalent—that
is, the value that would be registered if the seasonally
adjusted rate of activity measured for a quarter were
maintained for a full year.
Sole proprietorship.—A sole proprietorship is an
unincorporated business owned by a person.
See also Economic sectors and legal form of
organization.
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC).—The SIC
that is published in the Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion Manual by the Office of Management and Budget
4.
The Census M ethod II Seasonal Adjustm ent Program— w ith the X - l l
A R I M A variant when it is applicable— is used to adjust the quarterly data.
T his method uses historical patterns to adjust the data.

M-57

is used in the presentation of the State and local area
estimates of earnings by industry. It is only used for the
estimates for the private sector, although it is designed
to cover both public and private economic activities.
In the SIC, establishments are classified by the pri­
mary activity in which they are engaged, and each
establishment is assigned an industry code.5 Indus­
tries are classified in the following four levels: The
division or one-digit level, such as manufacturing; the
major-group or two-digit level, such as food and kindred
products; the industry-group or three-digit level, such as
meat products; and the industry or four-digit level, such
as meat packing plants.
The estimates of earnings are presented at the division
and two-digit levels.
State.—See Geographic units.
Tax-exempt cooperative.—A tax-exempt cooperative is
a nonprofit business organization that is collectively
owned by its members. Although tax-exempt coopera­
tives are incorporated, their income is classified as part
of proprietors’ income.
See also Economic sectors and legal form of
organization.
Transfer payments.—This component of personal in­
come measures the payments to persons for which no
current services have been performed. It consists of
payments to individuals and to nonprofit institutions by
Federal, State, and local governments and by businesses.
Wage and salary disbursements.—This component of
personal income measures the remuneration of employ­
ees. It includes the compensation of corporate officers;
commissions, tips, and bonuses; voluntary employee
contributions to certain deferred compensation plans,
such as 401(k) plans; and receipts in kind, or payin-kind. It reflects the amount of wages and salaries
disbursed, but not necessarily earned, during the year.
This component is measured before deductions, such
as social security contributions and union dues.
See also Earnings, Labor earnings, and Pay-in­
kind.
5.

A n establishment is an econom ic unit, usually at one location, that

conducts business, provides services, or performs industrial operations.

Appendix A

AvailabilityofTables fromthe Regional Economic InformationSystem
Table

Time series

Frequency

Time laq
(months)

Media

Page

Quarterly series (available for United
States, regions, and States)
Quarterly Personal Income (SQ1) ................
Quarterly Personal Income by Major Source
and Earnings by Major Industry (SQ5).
Quarterly Wages and Salaries by Major
Source and Major Industry (SQ7).

1969-93JV
1969-93JV

Quarterly
Quarterly

4
4

1969-93JV

Quarterly

4

1929-93

Annually

8

Computer printout
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette

M-60
M-61
M-61

State annual series (available for United
States, regions, and States)
State Summary Tables (SA1-3) ...................

Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette

Personal Income........................................
Population..................................................
Per Capita Personal Income .....................
1929-93

Annually

8

1929-93

Annually

8

1969-93

Annually

8

1969-93

Annually

8

1948-93

Annually

8

Farm Income and Expenses (SA45) ............

1969-93

Annually

9

Personal Tax and Nontax Payments (SA50) .

1948-93

Annually

8

Disposable Personal Income (SA50)............

1948-93

Annually

8

1969-92

Annually

16

Personal Income by Major Source and
Earnings by Industry (SA5).
Wage and Salary Disbursements by Industry
(SA7).
Full-Time and Part-Time Employees by
Industry (SA25).
Full-Time and Part-Time Wage and Salary
Employees by Industry (SA27).
Transfer Payments (SA35) ...........................

Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette
Computer printout, microcomputer diskette

M-62
M-63
M-64
M-66
M-68
M-70
M-72
M-74
M-75
M-76
M-77

County annual series (available for United
States, regions, States, counties, and
metropolitan areas)
Summary Tables (CA1-3) ............................

Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette, CD-ROM
M-79
M-79
M-79

Personal Income........................................
Population..................................................
Per Capita Personal Income .....................
Per Capita Personal Income Rankings (CA4)
Personal Income by Major Source and
Earnings by Industry (CA5.2).
Personal Income by Major Source and
Earnings by Major Industry (CA5.11.
Full-Time and Part-Time Employees by
Major Industry (CA25).
Regional Economic Profile (CA30) ...............

1992
1969-92

Annually
Annually

16
16

Computer printout
Computer printout, magnetic tape, CD-ROM

M-80
M-82

1969-92

Annually

16

M-82

1969-92

Annually

16

1969-92

Annually

16

Wage and Salary Summary Tables (CA34) ..

1969-92

Annually

12

Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette, CD-ROM
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette, CD-ROM
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette, CD-ROM
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette, CD-ROM

Computer printout, microcomputer diskette,
CD-ROM
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette, CD-ROM
Computer printout, magnetic tape,
microcomputer diskette, CD-ROM
Computer printout, magnetic tape, CD-ROM

M-87

Computer printout, magnetic tape, CD-ROM

M-90

Total Wages and Salaries .........................
Wage and Salary Employment..................
Average Wage per Job .............................
Annually

16

Transfer Payments (CA35) ...........................

1982-92
1991-92
1969-92

Annually

16

Farm Income and Expenses (CA45) ............

1969-92

Annually

16

Census Journey-to-Work ..............................

1960, 1970,
1980, 1990
1969-92

Decennial
Census
Annually

BEARFACTS (BEA Regional Fact Sheet) ....

Total Commuters’ Income Flows ..................

16

M-85
M-85

M-86
M-86
M-86

M-88
M-88
M-89

M -5 9

M -60

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Quarterly Personal Income for States and Regions
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
1991
I

II

1992
III

IV

I

II

III

IV

United S ta te s ...............................................

4,761,845

4,812,922

4,840,899

4,911,121

5,001,184

5,077,402

5,122,205

5,312,702

New E ngland............................................

292,486
83,874
21,262
135,189
22,900
19,318
9,943

294,301
84,598
21,244
135,988
23,126
19,322
10,023

294,553
84,376
21,397
135,986
23,282
19,393
10,118

298,215
85,477
21,607
137,679
23,618
19,610
10,225

301,610
86,284
22,001
139,136
23,929
19,808
10,452

305,648
87,864
22,330
140,532
24,152
20,121
10,648

309,081
89,385
22,588
141,523
24,429
20,357
10,799

319,128
92,582
22,906
146,346
25,319
20,929
11,047

963,886
13,711
15,656
108,234
189,085
406,790
230,412

975,020
13,673
15,593
109,262
191,132
412,825
232,535

977,639
13,717
15,319
109,497
191,917
413,058
234,130

989,606
13,893
15,397
110,606
194,104
417,980
237,626

1,006,251
13,949
15,867
111,755
198,315
424,568
241,797

1,020,286
14,205
16,151
113,353
201,323
430,058
245,196

1,033,597
14,352
16,491
114,821
204,206
435,585
248,142

1,072,138
14,766
16,822
117,727
212,308
455,203
255,311

783,428
234,170
95,262
171,817
194,829
87,349

790,451
236,731
95,994
174,139
195,339
88,249

798,054
238,031
96,941
175,682
198,276
89,124

809,610
240,774
98,685
178,367
201,257
90,527

824,641
245,951
101,068
180,046
205,214
92,364

839,120
250,142
102,858
183,900
208,260
93,960

846,395
253,213
104,252
184,155
209,545
95,231

875,621
262,126
107,509
190,957
216,387
98,642

317,139
47,601
44,543
84,029
92,067
28,312
9,456
11,131

321,173
47,570
45,479
84,873
92,820
29,021
9,838
11,572

320,555
47,196
45,122
85,403
93,584
28,645
9,411
11,195

329,304
48,415
47,070
86,951
95,299
28,902
10,858
11,810

336,833
50,803
47,409
89,502
96,743
30,066
10,357
11,954

339,392
50,542
48,342
90,085
97,692
30,099
10,616
12,017

341,194
50,727
48,268
91,531
98,229
29,933
10,498
12,009

356,298
52,826
51,038
95,325
101,215
31,374
11,767
12,752

1,012,758
62,896
33,924
252,243
114,792
55,970
62,902
33,672
110,727
54,542
80,309
124,727
26,055

1,023,089
63,416
34,184
253,922
116,478
56,982
63,640
34,065
112,388
54,808
81,179
125,791
26,238

1,032,560
64,110
34,242
255,016
117,694
58,028
64,318
34,277
114,656
55,220
82,005
126,497
26,498

1,046,586
65,027
35,014
257,158
119,412
59,099
65,472
35,044
115,796
55,952
83,833
127,807
26,971

1,069,513
66,604
36,597
261,365
122,194
60,460
66,842
36,060
118,507
57,000
86,104
130,152
27,627

1,086,481
67,562
37,271
264,855
124,237
61,411
68,004
36,589
120,771
57,821
87,812
132,205
27,944

1,088,119
68,601
37,157
256,888
125,862
62,177
67,894
36,798
122,842
58,615
88,783
134,176
28,326

1,137,196
70,665
38,711
279,946
130,277
64,125
69,927
37,862
126,350
60,202
92,566
137,603
28,961

429,463
61,796
22,503
48,695
296,469

435,704
62,389
22,794
49,403
301,117

438,307
62,544
22,913
49,318
303,533

446,818
63,442
23,280
50,707
309,389

456,002
64,772
23,844
51,458
315,928

464,806
65,964
24,248
52,264
322,330

470,378
66,900
24,601
52,575
326,302

487,957
69,112
25,116
54,225
339,505

126,285
64,825
15,837
12,130
25,405
8,089

129,160
66,168
16,315
12,479
25,947
8,251

130,028
66,714
16,349
12,416
26,238
8,311

133,986
68,369
16,973
13,467
26,716
8,461

135,296
69,426
17,124
12,891
27,383
8,471

137,958
70,818
17,542
13,166
27,824
8,608

139,777
71,898
17,721
13,177
28,352
8,629

145,188
74,257
18,596
14,142
29,267
8,926

836,400
12,017
625,310
24,258
25,949
50,698
98,168

844,023
12,148
629,828
24,330
26,397
51,391
99,928

849,201
12,294
632,401
24,516
26,791
51,836
101,363

856,997
12,446
636,065
24,846
27,192
52,877
103,571

871,037
12,759
645,210
25,521
27,925
53,703
105,918

883,710
12,891
653,838
25,887
28,375
54,642
108,077

893,665
12,997
661,788
24,336
29,030
55,657
109,856

919,175
13,233
677,430
26,885
30,394
57,141
114,091

301,610
864,680
824,641
336,833
858,417
249,228
470,824
251,838
843,112

305,648
876,577
839,120
339,392
871,542
253,374
479,870
256,544
855,335

309,081
887,933
846,395
341,194
872,372
256,359
483,928
260,308
864,635

319,128
922,822
875,621
356,298
912,656
265,218
502,368
269,810
888,781

C o n n e cticu t............................................
M a in e ......................................................
M a s sa c h u se tts.......................................
New Hampshire .....................................
Rhode Island .........................................
Vermont ..................................................

M id e a st.....................................................
D e law a re .................................................
District of Colum bia ...............................
Maryland ................................................
New J e r s e y ............................................
New York ...............................................
Pennsylvania ........................................ *

Great L ake s..............................................
Illin o is......................................................
In d ia n a ....................................................
Michigan ................................................
Ohio ........................................................
W isconsin ..............................................

P la in s .........................................................
Iowa ........................................................
Kansas ....................................................
Minnesota ..............................................
Missouri ..................................................
Nebraska ................................................
North Dakota .........................................
South D a k o ta .........................................

S o u th ea st..................................................
A la b a m a ..................................................
A rk a n s a s .................................................
F lo r id a ....................................................
G e o r g ia ...................................................
K e n tu c k y .................................................
Louisiana ................................................
M ississippi .............................................
North Carolina ........................................
South C a ro lin a ........................................
Tennessee ..............................................
V irg in ia ....................................................
West Virginia ..........................................

Southwest ................................................
Arizona ...................................................
New M exico ...........................................
Oklahoma ...............................................
Texas .....................................................

Rocky Mountain ......................................
Colorado ................................................
Id a h o .......................................................
M o n ta n a .................................................
Utah ........................................................
W y o m in g .................................................

Far West ...................................................
Alaska ....................................................
C a lifo rn ia ................................................
Hawaii ....................................................
Nevada ..................................................
Oregon ...................................................
W a sh in g to n ............................................

C ensus Divisions
New E n g la n d .............................................
Middle A tla n tic ...........................................
East North Central ....................................
West North Central ...................................
South Atlantic ............................................
East South C e n t r a l....................................
W est South C e n tr a l...................................
M ou ntain....................................................
P a c ific .........................................................

292,486
826,286
783,428
317,139
820,685
232,847
441,990
236,534
810,451

Note .— Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.

294,301
836,492
790,451
321,173
828,152
235,641
448,345
240,740
817,626

294,553
839,105
798,054
320,555
834,114
238,420
451,411
242,276
822,410

298,215
849,710
809,610
329,304
842,992
243,003
460,582
247,899
829,805

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

M-61

Appendix A

Quarterly Personal Income by Major S ou rce and Earn in gs by Industry for States
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Connecticut
1992

1991
I

III

II

IV

I

II

III

IV

Income by place of residence
Total personal in c o m e ..............................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e .....................................
Farm personal in c o m e ..........................................

83,874
83,650
225

84,598
84,364
234

84,376
84,159
217

85,477
85,270
206

86,284
86,059
225

87,864
87,631
234

89,385
89,162
223

92582
92361
221

59,807
4,207
2,555
58,155
15,492
10,227
514
9,713

60,514
4,247
2,617
58,884
15,295
10,418
583
9,835

60,516
4,235
2,619
58,900
14,829
10,647
607
10,040

60,840
4,232
2,677
59,285
15,108
11,083
734
10,349

61,266
4,286
2,862
59,842
14,541
11,901
964
10,937

62,237
4,325
2,877
60,789
14,794
12,282
1,026
11,255

63,184
4,360
2,923
61,747
15,096
12,541
976
11,565

65620
4433
3220
64407
15413
12761
958
11803

48,933
5,268
5,607
144
5,463

49,448
5,384
5,682
153
5,529

49,349
5,456
5,711
139
5,572

49,570
5,549
5,721
129
5,592

49,718
5,605
5,943
148
5,795

50,464
5,717
6,056
156
5,899

51,122
5,828
6,234
145
6,088

53402
5918
6300
143
6156

225
59,583
52,180
265
56
2,885
14,149
3,674
10,475
3,109
4,032
5,436
6,827
15,421
7,403
941
461
6,000

234
60,280
52,749
281
55
2,877
14,259
3,730
10,529
2,973
3,956
5,512
6,981
15,856
7,531
937
435
6,159

217
60,299
52,946
282
56
2,942
14,290
3,828
10,463
3,061
3,958
5,469
7,013
15,874
7,353
915
394
6,044

206
60,634
53,154
286
59
2,812
14,544
3,860
10,684
3,011
3,960
5,406
6,941
16,136
7,480
978
380
6,122

225
61,041
53,418
278
56
2,785
14,266
3,707
10,559
2,959
3,997
5,395
7,374
16,306
7,623
1,024
383
6,216

234
62,003
54,376
282
62
2,832
14,376
3,888
10,488
2,997
4,060
5,519
7,291
16,956
7,628
1,030
387
6,211

223
62,962
55,294
283
63
3,132
14,398
3,893
10,505
3,080
4,101
5,525
7,354
17,360
7,668
1,051
391
6.226

221
65398
57615
284
67
2941
14745
4046
10699
3107
4237
5596
8501
18137
7783
1047
378
6358

Derivation of personal income
Total earnings by place of work ...........................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance2*
Plus: Adjustment for re s id e n c e .............................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re sid e n c e .........
Plus: Dividends, interest and rent4 .......................
Plus: Transfer p a y m e n ts .......................................
Transfers excluding State U .l..........................

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
W ages and salaries ...............................................
Other labor income ................................................
Proprietors’ incom e5 .............................................
Farm ...................................................................
N o n farm ..............................................................

Earnings by industry
F a r m ..............................................................................
Nonfarm ........................................................................
Private .......................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other
Mining ....................................................................
Construction ...........................................................
Manufacturing ........................................................
Nondurable g o o d s .............................................
Durable g o o d s ...................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s.........................
W holesale tra d e ....................................................
Retail trade ...........................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .....................
Services .................................................................
G o v e rn m e n t...............................................................
Federal, c iv ilia n ......................................................
M ilita ry ....................................................................
State and lo c a l........................................................

Quarterly Wages and Salaries by Major Source and Major Industry
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Michigan
1990

1989

Total wages and sa la rie s........................................................
F a r m ........................................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other6 .............
M in in g ......................................................................................
Manufacturing .........................................................................
Nondurable g o o d s ..............................................................
Durable g o o d s .....................................................................
Transportation and public utilities ..........................................
W holesale t r a d e .....................................................................
Retail tra d e .............................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......................................
Government ............................................................................
Military .................................................................................
State and local ....................................................................

III

IV

I

II

98,174

97,974

99,380

100,228

246
309
305
3,988
35,474
6,907
28,567
4,926
6,266
8,885
4,845
18,649
14,283
1,721
428
12,134

250
317
323
4,051
34,460
6,846
27,614
4,889
6,363
8,921
4,729
19,320
14,350
1,717
430
12,203

258
335
324
4,085
34,300
6,906
27,394
4,951
6,390
9,012
4,777
19,750
15,198
1,723
433
13,042

265
347
320
4,287
34,092
6,908
27,185
5,037
6,489
9,222
4,871
20,327
14,973
1,743
434
12,797

I

II

II

III

IV

100,906

102943

104330

103035

290
338
315
4,327
33,574
6,917
26,657
5,096
6,515
9,319
4,979
20,833
15,322
1,800
445
13,077

314
355
309
4284
34,613
7,100
27,513
5,193
6,550
9,446
5,073
21,152
15,655
1,924
445
13,286

322
360
295
4212
34,768
7,052
27,716
5,249
6,656
9,463
5,230
21,588
16,186
1,832
439
13,915

328
360
285
4125
33,815
6,981
26,834
5,225
6,634
9,453
5,195
21,445
16,169
1,816
440
13,913

I

II

III

IV

I

1992

1991

sa la rie s........................................................
F a rm ........................................................................................

T o ta l w a g e s a n d

Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other6 .............

M ining......................................................................................
Construction ............................................................................
Manufacturing .........................................................................
Nondurable goo d s..............................................................
Durable goo d s.....................................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s ..........................................
Wholesale tra d e .....................................................................
Retail trade.............................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......................................
Government ...........................................................................
Federal, civilian ...................................................................
Military .................................................................................
State and local ....................................................................

III

IV

101,990

102,674

104,179

105,967

106,332

109,401

109,389

115,440

324
371
323
3,910
32,272
6,991
25,282
5,143
6,708
9,440
5,324
21,667
16,508
1,847
471
14,190

326
374
306
3,891
32,930
7,077
25,852
5,218
6,660
9,562
5,260
21,694
16,455
1,833
465
14,157

324
365
303
3,935
33,928
7,224
26,703
5,301
6,715
9,586
5,334
21,931
16,459
1,857
446
14,156

331
376
317
3,778
34,493
7,330
27,163
5,247
6,814
9,670
5,460
22,506
16,974
1,867
435
14,673

344
383
294
3,813
33,654
7.415
26,238
5,157
6,968
9,759
5,554
23,182
17,223
1,930
429
14,865

356
395
288
3,914
35,193
7,503
27,690
5,312
7,071
9,885
5,711
23,674
17,603
1,957
431
15,216

366
387
312
3,914
34,782
7,569
27,213
5,375
7,178
10,043
5,836
24,145
17,050
1,980
433
14,637

377
399
329
3,957
37,072
7,840
29,232
5,727
7,521
10,430
6,473
25,231
17,924
1,997
414
15,513

2. Personal contributions for social insurance are included in earnings by type and industry
but excluded from personal income.
4. Includes capital consumption adjustment for rental income of persons.
5. Includes the inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.
6. "Other" consists of the wages and salaries of U.S. residents employed by international

organizations and foreign em bassies and consulates in the United States,
N o t e .— Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.

M -62

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Personal Income for States and Regions
[Millions of dollars]
1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

United States .....................

2,857,887

3,144,513

3,368,244

3,580,017

3,789,392

4,063,045

4,367,719

4,657,120

4,833,548

5,130,617

New E ng la nd .................................

170,377

C o n n e c tic u t.................................
Maine ..........................................
M assachusetts ............................
New Hampshire ..........................
Rhode Island ..............................
Vermont ......................................

189,932

49,007
11,879
79,970
12,339
11,564
5,619

204,940

222,337

241,257

263,807

291,348

296,082

310,052

54,496
13,124
89,446
13,993
12,698
6,175

58,544
14,142
96,284
15,700
13,552
6,719

281,391

63,154
15,462
104,372
17,534
14,524
7,291

68,708
16,871
112,775
19,418
15,588
7,897

75,164
18,403
123,432
21,249
16,954
8,605

80,111
19,957
131,248
22,557
18,100
9,419

83,624
20,915
135,051
23,119
18,781
9,859

84,596
21,293
137,119
23,852
19,148
10,074

89,036
22,360
142,828
25,100
19,996
10,732

Mideast ..........................................

576,966

631,876

675,812

D e la w a re .....................................
District of Colum bia ....................
Maryland .....................................
New Jersey .................................
New York ....................................
Pennsylvania ..............................

721,955

768,946

832,620

894,410

8,521
10,575
65,432
125,824
267,853
153,670

948,058

974,826

1,031,880

7,839
9,771
59,019
113,510
243,684
143,144

9,278
11,234
71,290
135,879
284,490
163,641

9,993
11,579
77,100
146,134
303,737
173,411

10,775
12,094
83,586
157,575
322,499
182,417

11,743
13,138
91,282
172,696
348,654
195,107

12,845
13,844
98,915
183,950
375,489
209,367

14,164
14,464
105,499
193,693
397,796
222,442

14,698
14,905
109,046
197,135
407,942
231,100

15,301
15,590
114,115
210,059
432,001
244,814

Great L a ke s ...................................

495,585

544,817

Illinois ..........................................
Indiana ........................................
Michigan .....................................
Ohio ............................................
W isconsin ...................................

577,709

610,498

640,129

148,875
59,118
108,056
124,644
54,892

163,377
65,574
119,446
136,240
60,180

681,960

730,196

772,192

798,109

849,274

172,330
69,062
129,247
143,732
63,338

181,432
73,079
137,924
150,915
67,147

190,876
77,210
143,595
157,837
70,611

203,976
82,140
152,965
168,221
74,659

219,458
88,205
163,200
179,035
80,298

233,019
93,493
170,554
189,268
85,858

239,916
96,985
175,961
195,544
89,702

255,651
104,204
185,713
207,769
95,936

Plains .............................................

200,073

221,375

234,306

246,054

258,156

270,350

31,526
29,454
49,936
57,078
17,764
7,574
6,742

34,747
31,759
56,548
63,130
19,618
7,977
7,596

290,650

311,028

323,471

344,904

36,073
33,685
59,977
67,770
20,722
8,221
7,858

37,573
35,309
63,536
71,624
21,399
8,339
8,275

39,072
36,898
67,589
75,114
22,241
8,498
8,744

40,384
38,960
71,082
79,360
23,726
7,917
8,920

43,947
40,841
77,370
84,546
25,262
8,876
9,809

46,998
44,121
82,324
89,551
27,442
9,758
10,834

48,598
45,527
85,266
93,928
28,744
10,024
11,385

52,103
48,807
91,512
98,963
30,438
10,934
12,147

S o u th ea st......................................

580,475

641,541

A la b a m a ......................................
Arkansas .....................................
Florida .........................................
Georgia .......................................
Kentucky .....................................
Louisiana ....................................
M ississippi ..................................
North Carolina ............................
South Carolina ............................
lenn essee ..................................
V irg in ia ........................................
W est Virginia ..............................

689,863

739,176

788,580

37,068
20,962
132,797
61,231
35,410
46,613
21,295
61,218
30,392
45,955
69,495
18,038

850,438

916,905

980,917

1,028,327

1,094,827

40,481
23,332
145,868
69,590
39,396
49,418
23,262
68,908
33,775
51,023
77,340
19,149

43,309
24,838
160,044
76,323
40,893
51,415
24,349
74,414
36,201
54,594
83,656
19,826

46,215
26,104
173,814
83,344
42,789
51,410
25,445
80,517
38,729
59,102
91,107
20,601

48,911
27,212
188,430
89,647
45,001
51,211
26,915
86,723
41,528
63,509
98,518
20,976

52,430
29,046
204,501
97,269
47,812
53,922
28,856
94,357
45,080
68,275
106,924
21,966

56,222
30,826
226,498
103,733
51,475
56,286
30,778
101,944
47,836
72,778
115,544
22,985

60,187
32,691
243,038
110,779
55,422
60,081
32,458
108,941
52,744
77,493
122,444
24,639

63,774
34,661
251,992
116,393
58,587
63,959
34,343
114,219
55,110
81,719
127,520
26,047

68,221
37,817
262,929
124,803
63,261
68,055
36,936
123,074
58,362
88,584
135,003
27,784

Southwest .....................................

274,981

300,839

324,157

333,993

A riz o n a ........................................
New Mexico ................................
Oklahoma ...................................
Texas ..........................................

342,281

360,633

384,648

33,327
13,922
36,914
190,818

413,070

435,476

467,529

37,598
15,154
39,005
209,082

41,957
16,429
40,468
225,303

46,052
17,128
40,835
229,978

49,764
17,881
40,788
233,848

52,835
18,856
42,561
246,381

56,270
20,060
45,080
263,238

59,471
21,600
47,726
284,274

62,206
23,004
49,706
300,560

66,386
24,609
52,847
323,687

Iowa ............................................
Kansas ........................................
Minnesota ...................................
Missouri ......................................
Nebraska ....................................
North Dakota ..............................
South Dakota ..............................

Rocky Mountain ...........................

82,001

88,638

Colorado .....................................
Idaho ...........................................
M o n ta n a ......................................
Utah ............................................
Wyoming .....................................

93,490

97,419

100,532

41,927
9,917
8,699
15,256
6,203

105,079

113,050

45,747
10,551
9,105
16,828
6,408

50,457
11,476
9,868
19,001
6,617

121,105

129,643

139,558

48,419
11,053
9,307
18,033
6,678

52,023
11,990
10,154
19,990
6,375

54,474
12,658
10,310
21,066
6,569

58,241
14,055
11,318
22,515
6,920

62,187
15,256
11,798
24,344
7,519

66,471
16,218
12,660
26,171
8,125

71,654
17,634
13,397
28,328
8,545

Far W e s t........................................

477,429

525,494

567,967

Alaska .........................................
C a lifo rn ia .....................................
Hawaii .........................................
Nevada .......................................
Oregon ........................................
Washington .................................

608,585

649,511

698,158

756,470

819,402

847,614

8,775
358,079
13,113
11,871
30,195
55,395

892,593

9,236
397,323
13,985
12,988
32,827
59,134

9,986
431,415
14,987
14,180
34,571
62,828

9,981
463,423
16,098
15,390
36,343
67,349

9,588
496,480
17,126
16,812
38,305
71,199

9,930
533,608
18,522
18,716
41,192
76,190

10,898
574,638
20,472
21,394
45,188
83,878

11,722
619,446
22,757
24,088
48,707
92,681

12,393
634,134
24,065
25,980
51,286
99,757

13,157
662,786
25,255
28,254
54,840
108,301

281,391
768,806
730,196
290,650
744,143
211,254
395,430
210,774
735,076

291,348
813,931
772,192
311,028
796,711
225,561
424,772
226,264
795,314

296,082
836,177
798,109
323,471
829,931
238,424
448,886
240,833
821,635

310,052
886,875
849,274
344,904
876,960
257,001
482,406
258,806
864,339

Census Divisions
New E n g la n d ..................................
Middle A tla n tic ................................
East North Central .........................
West North Central ........................
South Atlantic .................................
East South Central .........................
West South Central ........................
Mountain .........................................
P a c ific .............................................

170,377
500,338
495,585
200,073
449,800
139,728
295,307
141,121
465,558

189,932
547,348
544,817
221,375
499,158
154,162
320,836
154,379
512,505

No te .— Detail may not add to totals because of rounding.

204,940
584,010
577,709
234,306
542,267
163,144
342,023
166,056
553,787

222,337
623,283
610,498
246,054
586,784
173,550
348,326
175,989
593,195

241,257
662,491
640,129
258,156
632,277
184,335
353,059
184,990
632,699

263,807
716,457
681,960
270,350
686,260
197,372
371,910
195,487
679,442

M-63

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Total Population for States and Regions1
[Thousands]
1983

United States

233,806

1984

235,847

1985

237,950

1986

240,162

1987

242,321

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

252,160

255,082

244,534

246,820

249,466
13,222

13,195

13,200

New E ng la nd ...........
Connecticut...........
Maine ....................
Massachusetts......
New Hampshire....
Rhode Island ........
Vermont ................

12,545

12,643

12,742

12,835

12,953

13,086

13,182

3,163
1 ’145
5,800
958
956
523

3,180
1,156
5,841
977
962
527

3,201
1,163
5,881
997
969
530

3,224
1,170
5,903
1,025
977
534

3,248
1,185
5,936
1,054
990
540

3,272
1,204
5,981
1,083
997
550

3,283
1,220
6,016
1,105
1,001
558

3,290
1,231
6,020
1,111
1,005
565

3,289
1,234
5,996
1,104
1,005
567

3,281
1,235
5,998
1,111
1,005
570

M id e a st....................
Delaware...............
District of Columbia
Maryland ...............
New Jersey...........
New Y o rk ..............
Pennsylvania ........

42,546

42,690

42,799

42,996

43,196

43,442

43,585

43,703

43,899

44,104

605
632
4,314
7,468
17Ì688
11Ì838

612
633
4,366
7,516
17,747
11,816

618
635
4,414
7,566
17,794
11,772

628
638
4,488
7,623
17,836
11,784

637
637
4,566
7,672
17,871
11,812

648
631
4,659
7,713
17,944
11,847

658
624
4,727
7,726
17,983
11,866

669
601
4,802
7,735
18,002
11,893

680
595
4,859
7,753
18,055
11,958

689
589
4,908
7,789
18,119
12,009

Great L a ke s .............
Illinois....................
Indiana..................
Michigan ...............
Ohio ......................
Wisconsin .............

41,369

41,397

41,423

41,460

41,595

41,727

41,873

42,076

42,427

42,753

11,410
5,451
9,048
10,738
4,722

11,413
5,459
9,050
10,739
4,736

11,401
5,460
9,077
10,736
4,748

11,389
5,455
9,129
10,732
4,756

11,393
5,474
9,189
10,762
4,779

11,392
5,493
9,219
10,800
4,823

11,410
5,524
9,253
10,829
4,857

11,443
5,554
9,314
10,859
4,906

11,541
5,610
9,380
10,941
4,956

11,631
5,662
9,437
11,016
5,007

P la in s .......................
Iowa ......................
Kansas ..................
Minnesota ............ .
Missouri ............... .
Nebraska ..............
North Dakota .......
South D akota.......

17,326

17,384

17,404

17,395

17,430

17,536

17,595

17,690

17,812

17,960

2,871
2,416
4,142
4,944
1,584
677
693

2,859
2,424
4,158
4,976
1,589
681
697

2,830
2,428
4,185
5,001
1,585
677
698

2,792
2,433
4,206
5,024
1,575
670
696

2,767
2,446
4,236
5,057
1,567
661
696

2,769
2,462
4,297
5,082
1,572
655
698

2,771
2,473
4,338
5,096
1,575
646
697

2,780
2,480
4,390
5,127
1,580
637
696

2,795
2,495
4,432
5,157
1,593
635
704

2,812
2,523
4,480
5,193
1,606
636
711

S o u th e a st...............
Alabama...............
Arkansas..............
Florida..................
Georgia................
Kentucky ..............
Louisiana .............
Mississippi ...........
North Carolina .....
South C arolina.....
Tennessee ...........
Virginia.................
West Virginia .......

54,859

55,520

56,205

56,868

57,544

58,129

58,734

59,465

60,246

61,089

3^934
2,306
10,751
5,729
3,695
4,396
2,568
6,077
3,234
4,660
1,945

3,952
2,320
11,041
5,835
3,696
4,401
2,578
6,165
3,272
4,687
5,644
1,928

3,973
2,327
11,352
5,963
3,695
4,409
2,588
6,255
3,304
4,716
5,716
1,907

3,992
2,332
11,669
6,085
3,688
4,407
2,594
6,322
3,343
4,739
5,812
1,883

4,016
2,343
11,999
6,209
3,684
4,345
2,589
6,405
3,381
4,784
5,933
1,858

4,024
2,343
12,308
6,317
3,681
4,289
2,581
6,482
3,413
4,823
6,038
1,830

4,030
2,346
12,638
6,411
3,677
4,253
2,574
6,565
3,457
4,854
6,120
1,807

4,046
2,353
13,045
6,504
3,690
4,211
2,574
6,653
3,498
4,887
6,213
1,790

4,091
2,373
13,267
6,623
3,713
4,254
2,593
6,736
3,560
4,953
6,280
1,803

4,136
2,399
13,488
6,751
3,755
4,287
2,614
6,843
3,603
5,024
6,377
1,812

Southwest ..............
Arizona.................
New Mexico .........
Oklahoma ............
Texas ...................

23,407

23,779

24,169

24,588

24,751

24,863

25,083

25,402

25,820

26,281

2,969
1,394
3,291
15,753

3,067
1,417
3,286
16,009

3,184
1,439
3,272
16,275

3,309
1,463
3,253
16,563

3,438
1,479
3,211
16,624

3,536
1,491
3,168
16,669

3,622
1,504
3,150
16,807

3,681
1,520
3,146
17,055

3,748
1,549
3,175
17,348

3.832
1,581
3,212
17,656

Rocky Mountain ....
Colorado ..............
Idaho....................
Montana...............
Utah .....................
W yoming..............

7,035

7,110

7,168

7,201

7,207

7,204

7,234

7,295

7,456

7,640

3J34
982
814
1,595
510

3,170
991
821
1,622
505

3,209
994
822
1,643
500

3,238
990
814
1,663
496

3,261
985
805
1,678
477

3,263
986
800
1,690
465

3,276
994
800
1,706
458

3,302
1,011
799
1,729
452

3,378
1,040
809
1,770
460

3,470
1,067
824
1,813
466

Far W e s t.................
Alaska ..................
California..............
Hawaii ..................
Nevada ............... .
O regon................ .
Washington ......... .

34,719

35,324

36,041

36,820

37,646

38,548

39,534

40,614

41,303

42,054

488
25,302
1,013
902
2,653
4;301

514
25,847
1,028
925
2,667
4,344

533
26,444
1,040
951
2,673
4,401

544
27,106
1,052
981
2,684
4,453

539
27,781
1,068
1,024
2,701
4,533

542
28,468
1,080
1,075
2,742
4,641

547
29,218
1,095
1,137
2,791
4,746

551
29,956
1,113
1,224
2,861
4,909

570
30,380
1,137
1,283
2,922
5,012

587
30,867
1,160
1,327
2,977
5,136

13,182
37,575
41,873
17,595
43,008
15,136
26,556
13,498
38,397

13,222
37,630
42,076
17,690
43,775
15,197
26,765
13,719
39,391

13,195
37,766
42,427
17,812
44,403
15,350
27,151
14,036
40,020

13,200
37,918
42,753
17,960
45,061
15,529
27,554
14,381
40,726

5,565

Census Divisions

New England........
Middle Atlantic......
East North Central
West North Central
South Atlantic .......
East South Central
West South Central
Mountain...............
Pacific...................

12,545
36,995
41,369
17,326
38,853
14,857
25,745
12,301
33,817

12,643
37,080
41,397
17,384
39,496
14,913
26,015
12,519
34,399

1. Midyear population estimates from the Bureau of the Census.
Note.— Detail may not add to totals because of rounding

12,742
37,132
41,423
17,404
40,163
14,972
26,282
12,742
35,090

12,835
37,243
41,460
17,395
40,868
15,014
26,556
12,953
35,839

12,953
37,355
41,595
17,430
41,625
15,072
26,522
13,146
36,622

13,086
37,505
41,727
17,536
42,324
15,109
26,469
13,305
37,473

M -64

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Per Capita Personal Income for States and Regions
[Dollars]
1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

United States .....................

12,223

13,333

14,155

14,907

15,638

16,615

17,696

18,668

19,169

20,114

New E n g la nd .................................

13,581

C o n n e c tic u t.................................
Maine ..........................................
M a s sa c h u se tts............................
New Hampshire ..........................
Rhode Island ..............................
Vermont .......................................

15,023

16,084

15,496
10,376
13,788
12,878
12,090
10,736

17,323

18,626

17,136
11,355
15,313
14,323
13,200
11,723

18,286
12,159
16,371
15,749
13,985
12,674

20,159

21,347

19,588
13,213
17,680
17,104
14,859
13,650

22,035

21,156
14,240
18,998
18,415
15,750
14,615

22,439

23,488

22,969
15,285
20,638
19,625
17,013
15,651

24,399
16,358
21,818
20,422
18,088
16,889

25,417
16,988
22,434
20,802
18,689
17,458

25,722
17,249
22,870
21,596
19,052
17,781

27,137
18,100
23,811
22,596
19,895
18,834

Mideast ..........................................

13,561

D e la w a re .....................................
District of Columbia ....................
Maryland .....................................
New Jersey .................................
New York ....................................
Pennsylvania ..............................

14,801

12,947
15,448
13,682
15,199
13,777
12,091

15,791

16,791

13,931
16,694
14,988
16,740
15,093
13,005

17,801

19,166

15,005
17,702
16,152
17,958
15,988
13,901

15,922
18,140
17,181
19,170
17,030
14,716

16,914
18,986
18,306
20,540
18,046
15,443

20,521

21,693

18,130
20,836
19,594
22,389
19,430
16,468

19,513
22,180
20,924
23,809
20,880
17,644

22,206

23,396

21,168
24,048
21,970
25,040
22,097
18,704

21,616
25,041
22,444
25,426
22,595
19,326

22,201
26,485
23,249
26,969
23,842
20,385

Great L a ke s ...................................

11,980

Illin o is..........................................
Indiana ........................................
Michigan .....................................
Ohio ............................................
W isconsin ...................................

13,161

13,947

13,048
10,846
11,942
11,607
11,625

14,725

15,389

14,315
12,013
13,198
12,687
12,707

16,343

15,115
12,649
14,239
13,388
13,339

17,438

18,352

15,931
13,397
15,109
14,063
14,118

16,754
14,106
15,627
14,667
14,777

18,811

17,905
14,955
16,592
15,576
15,479

19,234
15,968
17,637
16,532
16,534

19,865

20,363
16,834
18,312
17,430
17,501

20,789
17,288
18,759
17,873
18,101

21,980
18,405
19,680
18,860
19,162

Plains .............................................

11,547

Iowa ............................................
Kansas ........................................
Minnesota ...................................
Missouri ......................................
Nebraska ....................................
North Dakota ..............................
South D a k o ta ..............................

12,735

13,463

10,982
12,193
12,057
11,545
11,212
11,192
9,728

14,145

12,154
13,100
13,600
12,688
12,348
11,721
10,893

14,811

15,417

12,747
13,875
14,332
13,552
13,075
12,142
11,251

16,519

13,456
14,513
15,107
14,257
13,591
12,454
11,887

17,582

14,119
15,087
15,957
14,852
14,195
12,852
12,561

18,160

19,204

14,586
15,822
16,543
15,614
15,096
12,079
12,775

15,862
16,516
17,835
16,591
16,041
13,732
14,080

16,904
17,788
18,754
17,467
17,365
15,328
15,563

17,385
18,246
19,237
18,212
18,041
15,787
16,181

18,526
19,348
20,427
19,058
18,957
17,193
17,081

Southeast ......................................
A la b a m a ......................................
Arkansas .....................................
F lo r id a .........................................
Georgia .......................................
Kentucky .....................................
Louisiana ....................................
M ississippi ..................................
North Carolina ............................
South Carolina ............................
Tennessee ..................................
V irg in ia .........................................
West Virginia ..............................

10,581

11,555

12,274

9,422
9,091
12,353
10,689
9,584
10,604
8,293
10,073
9,397
9,862
12,488
9,273

12,998

13,704

10,243
10,057
13,212
11,925
10,660
11,229
9,022
11,178
10,322
10,886
13,702
9,933

14,630

10,901
10,672
14,098
12,799
11,067
11,662
9,407
11,897
10,958
11,577
14,636
10,396

11,577
11,193
14,895
13,696
11,601
11,664
9,809
12,735
11,585
12,471
15,675
10,943

15,611

16,496

12,180
11,616
15,704
14,438
12,216
11,787
10,396
13,541
12,283
13,277
16,605
11,291

13,028
12,397
16,615
15,398
12,991
12,571
11,181
14,558
13,210
14,156
17,709
12,000

17,069

17,922

13,950
13,138
17,922
16,180
13,998
13,235
11,956
15,527
13,838
14,992
18,879
12,723

14,875
13,891
18,631
17,033
15,020
14,267
12,609
16,375
15,077
15,856
19,708
13,764

15,590
14,603
18,995
17,574
15,780
15,036
13,243
16,957
15,479
16,498
20,305
14,447

16,496
15,765
19,494
18,485
16,848
15,874
14,128
17,986
16,197
17,632
21,170
15,332

Southwest .....................................

11,748

Arizona ........................................
New Mexico ................................
Oklahoma ...................................
Texas ..........................................

12,652

13,412

13,584

11,225
9,984
11,218
12,113

12,257
10,695
11,871
13,061

13,829

13,178
11,421
12,369
13,844

14,505

15,335

16,262

13,919
11,708
12,552
13,885

14,477
12,092
12,704
14,067

16,866

17,789

14,943
12,651
13,437
14,780

15,535
13,339
14,310
15,663

16,154
14,215
15,172
16,668

16,597
14,853
15,655
17,325

17,323
15,563
16,452
18,333

Rocky Mountain ...........................

11,656

12,467

13,042

13,379
10,099
10,686
9,564
12,154

13,529

13,950

14,430
10,648
11,090
10,372
12,690

15,088
11,118
11,316
10,975
13,363

15,584
11,588
12,125
11,426
13,348

14,587

15,627

15,954
12,171
12,611
11,910
13,363

16,602

17,388

16,696
12,840
12,883
12,468
14,123

18,266

17,779
14,134
14,154
13,199
15,096

18,832
15,084
14,761
14,077
16,628

19,680
15,599
15,648
14,785
17,680

20,648
16,523
16,264
15,624
18,330

Far West ........................................

13,751

Alaska .........................................
C a lifo rn ia .....................................
Hawaii .........................................
Nevada ........................................
Oregon ........................................
Washington .................................

14,876

15,759

17,966
14,119
12,948
13,160
11,380
12,881

16,529

17,253

17,978
15,372
13,604
14,041
12,309
13,613

18,111

18,752
16,314
14,413
14,908
12,934
14,277

18,337
17,097
15,304
15,692
13,541
15,124

19,135

17,777
17,871
16,035
16,426
14,180
15,709

20,175

20,522

18,318
18,744
17,150
17,407
15,024
16,418

21,225

19,918
19,667
18,703
18,810
16,193
17,672

21,264
20,679
20,440
19,681
17,024
18,879

21,723
20,874
21,172
20,249
17,554
19,903

22,419
21,472
21,779
21,285
18,419
21,088

20,159
19,103
16,343
15,417
16,214
13,063
14,051
14,693
18,132

21,347
20,460
17,438
16,519
17,303
13,957
14,890
15,616
19,144

22,035
21,630
18,352
17,582
18,200
14,842
15,870
16,492
20,190

22,439
22,141
18,811
18,160
18,691
15,533
16,533
17,158
20,530

23,488
23,389
19,865
19,204
19,462
16,550
17,508
17,996
21,223

Colorado .....................................
Id a h o ...........................................
M o n ta n a ......................................
Utah ............................................
Wyoming .....................................

Census Divisions
New England ..................................
Middle A tla n tic ................................
East North Central .........................
West North Central ........................
South Atlantic .................................
East South Central .........................
West South C e n t r a l........................
Mountain .........................................
P a c ific .............................................

13,581
13,525
11,980
11,547
11,577
9,405
11,471
11,473
13,767

15,023
14,761
13,161
12,735
12,638
10,337
12,333
12,332
14,899

16,084
15,728
13,947
13,463
13,502
10,896
13,014
13,032
15,782

17,323
16,736
14,725
14,145
14,358
11,560
13,117
13,587
16,552

18,626
17,735
15,389
14,811
15,190
12,230
13,312
14,072
17,276

M-65

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Per Capita Personal Income for States and Regions
[Percent of national average]
1984

1983
United States .....................

100

100

1987

1986

1985
100

100

100

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

100

100

100

100

100
118
136
91
120
111
100
94

117
134
90
119

117
135

99
93

99

111
127
85
113
105
99
88

113
129
85
115
107
99
88

114
129
86
116
111
99
90

116
131
89
119
115
100
92

119
135
91
121
118
101
93

121
138
92
124
118
102
94

121
138
92
123
115
102
95

111
106
126
112
124
113
99

111
104
125
112
126
113
98

112
106
125
114
127
113
98

113
107
122
115
129
114
99

114
108
121
117
131
115
99

115
109
125
118
135
117
99

116
110
125
118
135
118
100

116
113
129
118
134
118
100

116
113
131

116
110

133
118
101

134
119
101

99
107
90
99
95
95

99
107
89
101
95
94

99
107
90
101
94
95

98
107
90
100
94
94

98
108
90
100
94
93

99
109
90
100
93
93

98
109
90
98
93
94

98
108
90
98
93
94

99

Wisconsin ...................................

98
107
89
98
95
95

South D akota...............................

94
90
100
99
94
92
92
80

96
91
98
102
95
93
88
82

95
90
98
101
96
92
86
79

95
90
97
101
96
91
84
80

95
90
96
102
95
91
82
80

93
88
95
100
94
91
73
77

93
90
93
101
94
91
78
80

94
91
95
100
94
93
82
83

95
91
95
100
95
94
82
84

95
92
96
102
95
94
85
85

Virginia.........................................
West Virginia ..............................

87
77
74
101
87
78
87
68
82
77
81
102
76

87
77
75
99
89
80
84
68
84
77
82
103
74

87
77
75
100
90
78
82
66
84
77
82
103
73

87
78
75
100
92
78
78
66
85
78
84
105
73

88
78
74
100
92
78
75
66
87
79
85
106
72

88
78
75
100
93
78
76
67
88
80
85
107
72

88
79
74
101
91
79
75
68
88
78
85
107
72

88
80
74
100
91
80
76
68
88
81
85
106
74

89
81
76
99
92
82
78
69
88
81
86
106
75

89
82
78
97
92
84
79
70
89
81
88
105
76

95
92
80
89
98

95
93
81
87
98

91
93
79
84
93

88
93
77
81
90

87
90
76
81
89

87
88
75
81
89

87
87
76
81
89

88
87
77
82
90

88

Texas ..........................................

96
92
82
92
99

Utah ............................................
Wyoming.....................................

95
109
83
87
78
99

94
108
80
83
78
95

92
107
79
80
78
94

91
105
78
81
77
90

89
102
78
81
76
85

88
100
77
78
75
85

88
100
80
80
75
85

89
101
81
79
75
89

91
103
81
82
77
92

91
103
82
81
78
91

Oregon ........................................
Washington .................................

113
147
116
106
108
93
105

112
135
115
102
105
92
102

111
132
115
102
105
91
101

111
123
115
103
105
91
101

110
114
114
103
105
91
100

109
110
113
103
105
90
99

108
113
111
106
106
92
100

108
114
111
109
105
91
101

107
113
109
110
106
92
104

106
111
107
108
106
92
105

121
115
98
93
98
79
85
88
109

121

118
116
98
94
97
80
85

117
116
98
95
98
81
86
90
107

117
116
99
95
97
82
87
89
106

New E ng la nd .................................

New Hampshire ..........................
Vermont .......................................

Maryland .....................................
New Jersey.................................
Pennsylvania ..............................

Michigan .....................................

Georgia........................................
Kentucky .....................................
Mississippi ...................................

Rocky Mountain ...........................

118

92
98
94
95

77
82
91

Census Divisions
New England........
Middle Atlantic......
East North Central
West North Central
South A tlantic.......
East South Central
West South Central
Mountain...............
Pacific...................

111
111

98
94
95
77
94
94
113

113

111

99
96
95
78
92
92

112

114
111

99
95
95
77
92
92

111

116

112

99
95
96
78
88
91

111

119
113
98
95
97
78
85
90
110

116
99
93
98
79
84
88
108

88

108

M-66

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Total Personal Income by Major S ou rce and Earn in gs by Industry for S ta te s 1
[Thousands of dollars]
New Jersey
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Income by place of residence
Total personal in c o m e ......................................................................................
Norifarm personal income ............................................................................
Farm incom e2 ...............................................................................................

157,574,866
157,312,206
262,660

172,696,206
172,430,143
266,063

183,950,259
183,661,587
288,672

193,692,795
193,427,836
264,959

197,135,102
196,857,714
277,388

210,059,382
209,767,614
291,768

Population (thousands)3 ..................................................................................
Per capita personal income (dollars)4 ............................................................

7,672
20,540

7,713
22,389

7,726
23,809

7,735
25,040

7,753
25,426

7,789
26,969

104,967,345
7,264,436
13,996,143
111,699,052
28,517,834
17,357,980

115,478,064
8,099,179
15,540,918
122,919,803
31,223,485
18,552,918

121,393,268
8,753,058
15,450,663
128,090,873
35,457,703
20,401,683

127,250,033
8,989,553
15,964,275
134,224,755
36,888,872
22,579,168

129,283,272
9,392,307
15,191.236
135,082,201
36,646,750
25,406,151

137,532,786
9,865,521
16,809,700
144,476,965
36,679,775
28,902,642

Components of earnings:
W ages and s a la rie s ......................................................................................
Other labor in c o m e .......................................................................................
Proprietors' incom e8 .....................................................................................
F a r m ..........................................................................................................
Nonfarm ................................................................................................

87,449,310
8,060,437
9,457,598
188,427
9,269,171

96,180,432
8,916,260
10,381,372
189,711
10,191,661

101,149,658
9,537,953
10,705,657
203,661
10,501,996

105,861,063
10,060,243
11,328,727
165,342
11,163,385

106,731,994
10,731,543
11,819,735
177,371
11,642,364

113,040,144
11,634,071
12,858,571
193,745
12,664,826

Earnings by industry:
Farm .............................................................................................................
Nonfarm ........................................................................................................
Private .......................................................................................................
Ag. serv., forestry, fisheries, and other9 ..............................................
Agricultural s e r v ic e s ...........................................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and other9 ..........................................................
Forestry ..........................................................................................
Fisheries .........................................................................................
O ther9 ............................................................................................

262,660
104,704,685
90,629,145
458,493
422,949
35,544
1,553
33,991
0

266,063
115,212,001
99,850,037
481,440
443,207
38,233
1,096
37,137
0

288,672
121,104,596
104,544,880
481,817
449,194
32,623
1,452
31,171
0

264,959
126,985,074
108,975,184
512,610
473,602
39,008
1,708
37,300
0

277,388
129,005,884
109,918,310
545,783
502,785
42,998
1,603
41,395
0

291,768
137,241,018
116,830,293
558,170
512,783
45,387
1,272
44,115
0

Mining ....................................................................................................
Coal mining ........................................................................................
Oil and gas extractio n.......................................................................
Metal mining ......................................................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls ...................................................

65,280
p)
-31,242

96,899

81,967

124,044
p)
22,508
p)
91,746

-13,245
p)
100,397

102,619
pi
-1,229
(D)
96,458

138,999
p)
47,930
(D)
81,557

145,119
p)
52,393
(D)
83,636

Construction ..........................................................................................
General building con tractors.............................................
Heavy construction contractors .........................................................
Special trade co n tra cto rs...................................................................

7,008,522
1,938,362
768,836
4,301,324

7,791,207
2,184,137
825,185
4,781,885

7,808,174
1,926,452
879,450
5,002,272

7,284,206
1,664,890
888,042
4,731,274

6,321,688
1,414,840
757,988
4,148,860

6,374,416
1,284,243
846,101
4,244,072

M anufacturing........................................................................................
Nondurable goods ............................................................................
Food and kindred products ...................................................
Textile mill products ......................................................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u c ts.....................................
Paper and allied products ..............................................................
Printing and p u b lish in g ............................................................
Chem icals and allied p ro d u c ts......................................................
Petroleum and coal products .........................................................
Tobacco p ro d u cts...........................................................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products ...............................
Leather and leather p ro d u c ts........................................................

22,278,640
11,993,876
1,651,788
359,360
764,522
880,649
1,918,558
4,898,603
525,639
10,854
902,402
81,501

23,771,241
13,043,384
1,757,293
372,123
786,200
922,617
2,095,856
5,548,937
531,328
10,834
935,669
82,527

24,189,672
13,494,145
1,813,982
401,174
767,503
928,262
2,191,024
5,822,929
558,684
8,723
928,602
73,262

23,865,424
13,974,152
1,777,299
404,681
732,200
929,241
2,229,030
6,238,872
602,500
5,133
971,107
84,089

23,887,531
14,362,856
1,803,934
403,673
702,314
924,233
2,218,200
6,548,448
653,809
(D)
1,003,406
p)

24,551,723
15,080,753
1,898,080
417,618
707,372
949,582
2,306,197
6,962,253
663,379
(D)
1,072,857

Durable goods ...................................................................................
Lumber and wood products ..........................................................
Furniture and fixtures ....................................................................
Prim ary metal industries ...............................................................
Fabricated metal products ............................................................
Machinery and computer equipment ............................................
Electronic equipment, excluding computer equipment .................
Transportation equip, excluding motor vehicles ...........................
Motor vehicles arid eq u ip m e n t......................................................
O rd n an ce 1 0 ....................................................................................
Stone, clay, and glass p ro d u c ts....................................................
Instruments and related products .................................................
M iscellaneous manufacturing industries .......................................

10,284,764
198,927
274,631
658,689
1,410,603
1,845,747
2,928,436
175,150
364,987
(N)
736,845
1,153,302
537,447

10,727,857
213,190
263,363
693,544
1,453,834
2,013,264
2,313,283
188,305
364,882
n
752,529
1,879,551
592,112

10,695,527
194,340
253,886
693,969
1,450,416
2,041,254
2,331,168
173,484
340,828
(N)
742,549
1,858,225
615,408

9,891,272
155,460
241,137
681,000
1,435,431
2,001,396
1,890,508
145,457
263,569
(Ni
701,596
1,831,123
544,595

9,524,675
132,867
214,250
679,123
1,359,588
1,917,921
1,773,715
125,241
257,575
(ni
662,571
1,860,777
541,047

9,470,970
127,047
208,685
705,990
1,352,996
1,868,552
1,685,895
105,731
226,250
<N)
689,810
1,945,772
554,242

Transportation and public utilities .........................................................
Railroad transportation .....................................................................
Trucking and warehousing ................................................................
Water transportation ..........................................................................
Other transportation ...........................................................................
Local and interurban passenger transit ........................................
Transportation by air .....................................................................
Pipelines, except natural g a s ..............................................
Transportation s e r v ic e s .................................................................
Communications ................................................................................
Electric, gas. and sanitary s e r v ic e s ..................................................

8,577,971
p)
2,198,831
573,741

9,129,228
2,386,364
542,529

9,251,049
106,213
2,538,472
504,775
1,684,398
632,172
531,248
5,688
515,290
2,976,240
1,440,951

9,770,105
111,562
2,562,294
514,421
1,753,222
647,494
556,163
6,134
543,431
3,310,516
1,518,090

10,223,638
124,193
2,538,708
583,007
1,866,363
671,288
581,460
6,427
607,188
3,486,089
1,625,278

10,795,511
128,721
2,570,517
627,593
1,977,211
700,166
612,056
6,745
658,244
3,767,430
1,724,039

Derivation ot total personal Income
Earnings by place of w o r k ............................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance5 .....................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence ...................................................................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent7 ............................................................
Plus: Transfer payments ..............................................................................
Earnings by place ot work

pi

pi

563,776
508,097
pi
388,096
2,930,511
1,298,809

pi

pi

572,712
521,232
pi
446,143
3,169,851
1,374,541

pi

pi

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

M-67

Total Person al Income by Major S ou rce and Earn in gs by Industry for S ta te s ’ — Continued
[Thousands of dollars]
New Jersey
1987
W holesale trade ....................................................................................
Building materials and garden eq uip m e n t........................................

Apparel and accessory stores ..........................................................
Home furniture and furnishings stores .............................................
Eating and drinking places ................................................................
M iscellaneous retail ...........................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real e s ta te .....................................................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions..............................
Other finance, insurance, and real estate ........................................
Security and commodity brokers and services ................................
Insurance c a r r ie rs ..............................................................................
Real e s ta te .........................................................................................
Combined real estate, insurance, e tc.11 ..........................................
Holding and other investment com panies ........................................
Hotels and other lodging p la c e s .......................................................

Auto repair, services, and p a rk in g ....................................................
Amusement and recreation services ................................................

Social s e rv ice s12 ...............................................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens .........................................
Membership o rg anizations.................................................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s13........................................
M iscellaneous s e r v ic e s .....................................................................
Government and government enterprises ...............................................
State and local ......................................................................................

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

9,284,845

10,394,778

11,014,583

11,606,668

11,501,094

12,501,582

10,137,043
466,698
1,063,415
1,745,730
1,699,187
808,571
743,680
1,939,715
1,670,047

11,012,697
514,668
1,126,653
1,920,146
1,800,111
878,767
798,900
2,131,672
1,841,780

11,370,882
532,765
1,170,512
2,025,601
1,730,298
905,810
833,872
2,136,616
2,035,408

11,532,391
504,709
1,170,025
2,111,543
1,685,561
975,851
818,422
2,180,587
2,085,693

11,484,060
489,352
1,164,018
2,145,974
1,632,574
980,878
745,974
2,249,578
2,075,712

11,883,245
512,318
1,173,935
2,204,533
1,676,680
1,006,487
769,688
2,303,767
2,235,837

6,957,002
2,057,041
4,899,961
916,758
2,043,112
1,131,095
436,456
-22,006
394,546

7,744,812
2,308,268
5,436,544
1,049,713
2,323,124
1,286,575
646,016
n
131,116

8,116,347
2,523,483
5,592,864
1,145,039
2,499,204
1,325,379
639,817
<")
-16,575

8,704,375
2,565,557
6,138,818
1,263,402
2,683,866
1,452,867
557,802
n
180,881

9,001,539
2,430,496
6,571,043
1,449,898
2,800,946
1,451,801
600,359
(N)
268,039

10,028,454
2,631,539
7,396,915
2,039,715
2,951,475
1,521,455
613,798
(">
270,472

25,861,349
1,848,890
855,319
185,502
8,370,587
789,572
472,474
646,582
87,655
6,832,688
1,758,533
824,332
489,853
5,581
648,273
n
2,045,508

29,400,590
1,949,704
921,131
199,118
6,730,373
893,580
495,828
818,876
157,690
7,855,608
2,043,703
886,339
565,351
7,600
730,006
4,990,741
154,942

32,215,457
2,113,544
927,763
211,812
7,301,420
935,591
517,588
855,134
183,106
8,918,023
2,184,887
960,050
650,660
9,209
794,608
5,470,906
181,156

35,596,786
2,218,674
948,881
221,935
8,388,919
938,370
487,978
1,082,842
197,280
10,021,260
2,398,107
964,134
728,117
10,320
836,805
5,955,984
197,180

36,813,978
2,182,815
939,674
213,501
8,297,670
919,623
461,634
1,281,795
191,754
10,938,632
2,478,368
1,103,995
794,726
11,812
839,154
5,947,386
211,439

39,992,073
2,281,748
980,083
234,733
9,109,184
940,488
486,864
1,375,598
212,659
12,253,179
2,634,382
1,173,265
860,852
17,316
851,497
6,366,388
213,837

14,075,540
2,405,728
580,638
11,089,174

15,361,964
2,538,291
576,402
12,247,271

16,559,716
2,695,485
574,008
13,290,223

18,009,890
2,966,847
581,018
14,462,025

19,087,574
3,142,503
575,346
15,369,725

20,410,725
3,378,896
568,185
16,463,644

D Not shown to avoid disclosure of confidential information; estimates are included in totals.
N Data not available for this year.
1. 1969-74 based on 1967 SIC. 1975-87 based on 1972 SIC. 1988-92 based on 1987
SIC.
2. Farm income consists of proprietors' net income; the cash wages, pay-in-kind, and other
labor income of hired farm workers; and the salaries of officers of corporate farms.
3. Midyear population estimates of the Bureau of the Census. The 1981-89 population esti­
mates have been adjusted to reflect both the 1980 and 1990 censuses of population; the
1990 midyear (July 1) estimates reflect the (April 1) 1990 census count and 3 months of esti­
mated population change.
4. Per capita personal income is total personal income divided by total midyear popula­
tion— see footnote 3.
5. Personal contributions for social insurance are included in earnings by type and industry
but excluded from personal income.
6. U.S. adjustment for residence consists of adjustments for border workers: income of U.S.
residents commuting outside U.S. borders to work less income of foreign residents commut­

ing inside U.S. borders to work plus certain Caribbean seasonal workers.
7. Includes the capital consumption adjustment for rental income of persons.
8. Includes the inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.
9. “Other” consists of the wages and salaries of U.S. residents employed by international
organizations and foreign em bassies and consulates in the United States.
10. Under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification, ordnance was reclassified to four
two-digit industries: fabricated metal products; electronic equipment, except computer equip­
ment; transportation equipment; and instruments and related products.
11. Under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification, combined real estate, insurance, etc.,
was reclassified to four two-digit industries: nondepository credit institutions; insurance
agents, brokers, and services; real estate; and legal services.
12. This category was new under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore esti­
mates prior to 1975 do not exist.
13. This category is new under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore esti­
mates prior to 1988 do not exist.

M -6 8

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
W age and Salary D isbursem ents by Industry for S ta te s 1
[Thousands of dollars]
Texas
1987

Wage and aalary disbursements

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

by place of work ....................................

140,878,645

148,984,372

157,089,343

169,477,189

179,157,445

191,177,718

F a r m ............................................................................................................
Nonfarm ....................................................................................
Private .........................................................................................................

496,559
140,382,086
114,139,750

505,202
148,479,170
120,753,879

562,381
156,526,962
127,050,055

647,898
168,829,291
137,433,753

640,891
178,516,554
145,529,926

585,224
190,592,494
155,077,112

Ag. serv., forestry, fisheries, and other2 ................................................
Agricultural services .............................................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and other2 ............................................................
Forestry ............................................................................................
Fisheries ....................................................................................
O ther2 ...............................................................................................

676,316
639,867
36,449
11,304
20,882
4,263

736,228
697,533
38,695
12,000
22,282
4,413

751,601
708,482
43,119
14,426
24,014
4,679

826,507
780,199
46,308
14,725
26,296
5,287

905,241
858,557
46,684
14,994
26,242
5,448

941,944
891,783
50,161
18,196
25,833
6,132

Mining ..............................................................................................
Coal mining ..........................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction .........................................................................
Metal m in in g .........................................................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels .....................................................

6,572,261

6,866,811

6,860,425

7,379,255

8,052,976

168,412

163,981

148,631

149,831

141,764

8,179,189
195,012
7,819,785
11,792
152,600

Construction .............................................................................................
General building co n tra cto rs..............................................
Heavy construction contractors ...........................................................
Special trade contractors .....................................................................

7,634,284
1,650,360
2,660,119
3,323,805

7,574,842
1,617,710
2,695,218
3,261,914

7,669,885
1,521,547
2,982,664
3,165,674

8,340,316
1,644,473
3,038,603
3,657,240

8,883,132
1,719,186
3,251,198
3,912,748

9,268,765
1,800,726
3,271,567
4,196,472

Manufacturing ..........................................................................................
Nondurable g o o d s ................................................................................
Food and kindred products ...............................................
Textile mill products ..................................................................
Apparel and other textile products ...................................................
Paper and allied products ................................................................
Printing and p u b lish in g .....................................................................
Chem icals and allied products .................................................
Petroleum and coal products ................................
Tobacco p ro d u c ts ............................................................................
Rubber and mise, plastics products ....................................
Leather and leather products ..........................................................

23,802,311
9,976,523
2,032,730

25,624,387
10,581,555
2,077,067

26,699,538
10,901,563
2,123,420

28,280,666
11,522,540
2,199,219

29,411,191
12,202,275
2,286,490

30,634,326
13,044,673
2,391,448

727,549
104,219

846,814
111,745

907,714
117,022

989,703
120,676

1,027,692
137,420

1,096,800
164,658

Durable g o o d s ......................................................................................
Lumber and wood products ............................................................
Furniture and fixtures .......................................................................
Primary metal in d u strie s..................................................................
Fabricated metal p ro d u c ts................................................................
Machinery and computer eq uip m en t...............................................
Electronic equipment, excl. computer equip.....................................
Transportation equip, excl. motor vehicles .....................................
Motor vehicles arid equipment .........................................................
O rdn an ce3 ........................................................................................
Stone, clay, and glass p ro d u c ts.......................................................
Instruments and related products ...................................................
M iscellaneous manufacturing industries .........................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s...........................................................
Railroad transportation.........................................................................
Trucking and w are ho using ..................................................................
Water transportation ............................................................................
Other transportation ............................................................................
Local and interurban passenger transit ..........................................
Transportation by air .......................................................................
Pipelines, except natural gas ...........................................................
Transportation services ...................................................................
Communications ..................................................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services ....................................................

13,825,788
607,059
277,991
689,795
1,637,321
2,717,860
3,362,527
2,435,289
353,008

15,042,832
624,201
289,394
785,483
1,740,621
3,055,880
3,203,922
2,666,958
447,909

15,797,975
588,963
290,341
804,977
1,860,176
3,256,442
3,411,890
2,852,606
422,074

16,758,126
605,762
312,259
861,612
2,054,475
3,628,448
3,580,640
2,889,727
391,421

17,208,916
586,371
313,592
895,868
2,181,271
4,015,453
3,595,488
2,708,862
403,183

17,589,653
666,316
325,776
906,736
2,277,094
3,935,550
3,601,388
2,802,772
422,921

pi

6,236,776

o

o

700,449
638,220
1,570,889
2,866,854
1,262,324

«

pi

969,032
518,222
257,684
10,601,334
787,788
2,019,105
355,984
2,447,201
172,396
1,696,373
188,464
389,968
2,523,686
2,467,570

pi

6,534,870

pi

p)

732,340
678,989
1,646,494
3,247,341
1,169,842

p)

<N)

890,514
1,050,097
287,853
11,115,969
801,093
2,142,632
370,897
2,709,755
181,952
1,893,123
201,210
433,470
2,478,879
2,612,713

pi

6,531,020

pi

pi

780,447
707,292
1,645,358
3,344,396
1,200,498

p)

<N)

886,386
1,111,859
312,261
11,788,279
800,714
2,213,930
386,475
3,000,352
190,792
2,122,045
189,754
497,761
2,567,625
2,819,183

pi

7,042,805

pi

pi

783,556
746,319
1,773,308
3,549,009
1,287,798

p)

ri

895,021
1,210,854
327,907
12,800,425
749,173
2,350,967
415,300
3,409,847
202,439
2,423,706
194,980
588,722
2,912,077
2,963,061

p)
(D)

7,712,978

p)

844,177
805,692
1,848,240
3,758,699
1,414,320

pi

pi

868,139
1,283,809
356,880
13,575,388
752,372
2,483,617
458,936
3,738,455
230,854
2,658,905
210,212
638,484
2,991,505
3,150,503

(D)

958,071
865,135
1,917,445
4,022,229
1,540,129

(D)

(N)

905,906
1,373,138
372,056
14,521,028
806,154
2,663,698
467,115
4,019,682
253,979
2,845,199
239,812
680,692
3,084,308
3,480,071

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

M-69

Appendix A

W age and Salary D isbursem ents by Industry for S ta te s 1— Continued
[Thousands of dollars]
Texas

Building materials and garden equipment ..........................................

Apparel and accessory stores ............................................................
Home furniture and furnishings stores ...............................................
Eating and drinking places .................................................................
M iscellaneous retail .............................................................................
Depository and nondepository credit inst.............................................
Other finance, insurance, and real estate ...........................................
Security and commodity brokers and services ...............................
Insurance c a rrie rs .............................................................................
Insurance agents, brokers, and services ........................................
Combined real estate, insurance, e tc.1
4 ..........................................
3
2
Holding and other investment co m p a n ie s.......................................
Hotels and other lodging places ..........................................................

Auto repair, services, and parking ......................................................
M iscellaneous repair s e r v ic e s .............................................................
Amusement and recreation services ..................................................
Motion p ic tu re s.....................................................................................

Social se rvice s5 ...................................................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological g a rd e n s ............................................
Membership o rg a n iza tio n s...................................................................
Engineering and management se rvice s6 ...........................................
M iscellaneous services ........................................................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................................................
State and local ............................................................................................

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

10,858,971
15,303,204
719,216
1,919,120
2,847,522
2,649,004
886,514
805,113
3,625,927
1,850,788

11,671,331
15,700,610
688,950
2,100,717
2,847,020
2,760,278
923,628
831,922
3,735,241
1,812,854

12,277,459
16,321,277
691,456
2,271,723
2,892,006
2,830,234
941,946
879,159
3,913,417
1,901,336

13,052,436
17,316,360
703,940
2,487,421
3,057,059
2,971,564
922,778
924,865
4,255,931
1,992,802

13,909,932
18,195,006
742,278
2,504,390
3,228,775
3,000,908
961,471
992,291
4,645,297
2,119,596

14,499,566
19,489,818
821,498
2,696,404
3,354,960
3,253,168
993,905
1,092,977
4,960,817
2,316,089

10,970,278
3,793,311
7,176,967
1,010,698
2,184,777
1,036,264
2,247,028
7,427
690,773

11,196,761
3,760,963
7,435,798
994,161
2,309,938
1,121,687
2,278,209

c)

11,886,206
3,871,818
8,014,388
989,768
2,611,064
1,252,018
2,419,766
(N)
741,772

12,466,810
3,870,906
8,595,904
1,180,228
2,762,527
1,365,177
2,532,327

13,478,176
4,092,873
9,385,303
1,568,988
2,909,142
1,465,754
2,583,740

731,803

11,372,584
3,825,693
7,546,891
975,880
2,429,940
1,137,158
2,276,845
(N)
727,068

755,645

857,679

27,720,791
1,051,816
1,072,904
674,018
6,158,516
935,142
410,752
606,673
113,219
8,358,490
2,183,543
988,661
707,865
33,407
1,432,592
(n)
2,993,193

30,266,940
1,082,944
1,041,855
722,618
5,261,741
956,311
446,419
751,312
182,717
9,273,142
2,577,547
1,101,545
762,707
38,269
1,555,649
4,461,826
50,338

33,309,007
1,125,702
1,071,170
773,931
6,152,412
1,034,082
510,784
795,406
199,609
10,121,340
2,797,388
1,197,498
845,501
41,729
1,628,110
4,957,625
56,720

37,551,582
1,216,840
1,149,504
821,995
7,273,811
1,136,377
585,720
869,518
236,314
11,462,514
3,087,742
1,261,162
970,538
45,054
1,702,996
5,669.439
62,058

40,130,250
1,233,231
1,200,676
802,890
7,548,181
1,167,674
599,382
947,226
263,810
12,714,004
3,258,020
1,304,840
1,096,802
49,494
1,732,149
6,124,410
87,461

44,064,300
1,278,344
1,306,338
894,081
8,455,688
1,264,620
644,723
1,064,480
291,172
13,949,217
3,499,501
1,333,851
1,203,497
53,626
1,815,016
6,915,616
94,530

26,242,336
5,081,186
3,194,216
17,966,934

27,725,291
5,543,118
3,232,511
18,949,662

29,476,907
5,870,016
3,344,922
20,261,969

31,395,538
6,144,984
3,362,224
21,888,330

32,986,628
6,335,087
3,391,069
23,260,472

35,515,382
6,671,124
3,764,059
25,080,199

1. 1969-74 based on 1967 SIC. 1975-87 based on 1972 SIC. 1988-92 based on 1987 SIC.
2. “Other" consists of the w ages and salaries of U.S. residents employed by international
organizations and foreign em bassies and consulates in the United States.
3. Under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification, ordnance was reclassified to four twodigit industries: fabricated metal products; electronic equipment, except computer equipment;
transportation equipment; and instruments and related products.
4. Under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification, combined real estate, insurance, etc.,
was reclassified to four two-digit industries: nondepository credit institutions; insurance

n

n

agents, brokers, and services; real estate; and legal services.
5. This categoiy was new under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore esti­
mates prior to 19/5 do not exist.
6. This category is new under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore esti­
mates prior to 1988 do not exist.
D Not shown to avoid disclosure of confidential information; estimates are included in totals.
N Data not available for this year.

M-70

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Total Full-Tim e and Part-Time Em ploym ent by Industry for S ta te s 1
Massachusetts
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Total employment ...............................................................................

3,716,518

3,816,155

3,773,335

3,668,758

3,514,769

3,494,717

By type:
Wage and salary .........................................................................
Proprietors ...................................................................................
Farm ...................................................................................................
Nonfarm 2 ..............................................................................

3,235,110
481,408
6,602
474,806

3,307,662
508,493
6,647
501,846

3,276,538
496,797
6,699
490,098

3,161,264
507,494
6,678
500,816

2,990,234
524,535
6,655
517,880

2,962,732
531,985
6,654
525,331

By Industry:
Farm .....................................................................................
Nonfarm .......................................................................................
Private ..................................................................................

13,830
3,702,688
3,259,216

13,231
3,802,924
3,349,061

12,834
3,760,501
3,310,075

12,993
3,655,765
3,204,076

12,709
3,502,060
3,064,833

12,632
3,482,085
3,054,611

Agric. serv., forestry, fisheries and other3 ...........................................
Agricultural s e rv ic e s ...........................................................................
Forestry, fisheries and other3 ............................................................
Forestry .............................................................................
F is h e rie s ...................................................................................
O ther3 ..........................................................................

32,829
24,937
7,892
355
7,537
0

33,880
25,842
8,038
421
7,617
0

31,548
23,919
7,629
376
7,253
0

31,238
23,300
7,938
273
7,665
0

30,677
23,239
7,438
275
7,163
0

30,316
23,153
7,163
273
6,890
0

Mining .............................................................................
Coal m in in g .............................................................................
Oil and gas extractio n........................................................................
Metal mining .....................................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls ...................................................

3,624
14
1,925
66
1,619

3,491
13
pi
56
p)

3,174
12
1,462
30
1,670

2,872
8
1,255
29
1,580

2,656
11
1,279
33
1,333

2,593
6
1,198
27
1,362

Construction ......................................................................................
General building con tra ctors.............................................................
Heavy construction contractors ........................................................
Special trade co n tra cto rs...................................................................

199,524
57,324
12,732
129,468

211,064
62,112
11,482
137,470

193,827
50,756
10,721
132,350

161,119
40,301
9,517
111,301

138,275
32^231
8,047
97,997

131,586
27,238
9,274
95,074

M anufacturing........................................................................................
Nondurable goods .......................................................................
Food and kindred products ............................................................
Textile mill products ................................................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u c ts.................................................
Paper and allied products ...........................................................
Printing and p u b lish in g ..................................................................
Chem icals and allied p ro d u c ts......................................................
Petroleum and coal products ........................................................
Tobacco p ro d u c ts...........................................................................
Rubber and mise, plastics p ro d u cts..............................................
Leather and leather p ro d u c ts........................................................

613,571
205,939
21,700
17,147
26,101
24,790
58,449
17,879
1,419
17
29,135
9,302

600,289
201,752
21,332
16,308
24,554
24,489
58,981
18,151
1,532
16
27,507
8,882

576,087
193,987
20,594
15,389
22,643
23,263
58,427
18,711
1,508
18
25,526
7,908

535,872
183,439
20,449
14,740
19,954
22,486
55,233
18,061
1,360
18
23,762
7,376

501,383
173,500
19,779
14,148
18,199
21,096
52,879
17,818
1,286
21
21,954
6,320

481,921
170,908
19,328
14,763
18,214
20,739
50,739
17,541
1,457
21
22,299
5,b07

Durable goods ...........................................................................
Lumber and wood products ...................................................
Furniture and fixtures ....................................................................
Pnmary metal industries ................................................................
Fabricated metal products .............................................
Machinery and computer equipment ......................................
Electronic equipment, excl. computer equip................
Transportation equip, excl. motor vehicles .....................
Motor vehicles and eq u ip m e n t......................................
O rdn an ce4 .................................................................
Stone, clay, and glass p ro d u cts.................................
Instruments and related products .........................
M iscellaneous manufacturing industries .......................................

407,632
6,725
8,807
13,699
42,255
105,392
107,588
31,446
4,051
n
12,798
53,779
21,092

398,537
6,785
7,949
13,158
41,092
102,901
88,235
29,877
2,689
n
12,449
72,310
21,092

382,100
6,154
7,016
12,310
43,910
98,196
79,739
28,310
2,252
n
12,302
71,326
20,585

352,433
5,171
5,647
11,263
41,562
87,342
73,301
27,138
849
n
11,304
69,177
19,679

327,883
4,647
5,160
10,230
38,859
78,658
69,102
25,186
643
n
10,915
65,814
18,669

311,013
4,647
5^310
9,270
36,780
74,864
64,373
23,024
jl 38
' n
11,562
61^551
18^494

145,604
pi
37,133
4,583

150,080
3,372
37,846
4,253
43,871
20,856
11,261
11
11,743
35,344
25,394

142,960
3,355
36,066
3,787
43,134
20,309
11,824
19
10,982
31,082
25,536

144,292
3,347
34,047
3,536
43,707
19,558
12,759
15
11,375
33,733
25,922

138,536
3,328
32,863
3,832
41 ;090
17,977
12,428
14
10,671
32,557
24,866

136,120
3,140
32,483
3^492
41 ,'236
17,431
12,899
14
10 892
31,113
24,656

Transportation and public utilities ...................................................
Railroad transportation ...................................................................
Trucking and warehousing ...............................................
Water transportation ...........................................................
Other transportation ..........................................................
Local and interurban passenger transit ........................................
Transportation by a i r ..........................................................
Pipelines, except natural g a s ....................................................
Transportation s e r v ic e s .............................................
Communications ...............................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ..................................................

pi

19,492
11,026
pi
10,984
35,313
23,701

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

M -71

Appendix A

Total Full-Tim e and Part-Time Em ploym ent by Industry for States 1— Continued
Massachusetts
1987
W holesale trade ....................................................................................
Building materials and garden eq u ip m e n t........................................
Automotive dealers and service s ta tio n s..........................................
Apparel and accessory stores ...........................................................
Home furniture and furnishings stores .............................................
Eating and drinking places ................................................................
M iscellaneous retail ...........................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real e s ta te .....................................................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions..............................
Other finance, insurance and real estate .........................................
Security and commodity brokers and s e r v ic e s .............................
Insurance agents, brokers, and s e r v ic e s ......................................
Combined real estate, insurance, e tc.5 ........................................
Holding and other investment com panies ....................................
Hotels and other lodging p la c e s ........................................................

Auto repair, services, and p a rk in g ...................................................
M iscellaneous repair services ..........................................................
Amusement and recreation services .................................................
Legal s e r v ic e s ....................................................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens .........................................
Membership o rg anizations.................................................................
Engineering and management se rvice s7 .........................................
M iscellaneous s e r v ic e s ......................................................................
Government and government enterprises ...............................................
State and local ......................................................................................

192,878

1989

1988
198,236

202,153

1990

1992

1991

195,101

183,993

182,299
551,781
17,960
49,765
98,360
44,236
41,636
23,528
175,481
100,815

611,535
22,884
65,260
101,841
56,621
48,552
26,336
185,333
104,708

620,888
24,399
60,646
104,559
58,092
48,981
30,316
188,039
105,856

625,134
23,797
61,550
107,545
55,733
50,011
29,385
189,212
107,901

594,149
20,886
57,082
106,682
49,987
46,731
26,271
180,614
105,896

554,592
18,665
50,240
101,299
44,415
42,516
24,121
172,285
101,051

316,994
81,274
235,720
21,171
57,287
26,701
94,848
959
34,754

332,882
82,654
250,228
22,637
57,296
29,916
99,931

309,853
77,553
232,300
24,341
55,654
31,485
89,457
(N)
31,363

296,932
70,148
226,784
25,198
54,752
32,208
83,961

291,231
69,177
222,054
27,272
53,731
30,186
82,241

40,448

324,378
81,489
242,889
22,852
56,712
30,272
93,029
(n)
40,024

30,665

28,624

1,142,657
37,150
70,973
25,309
263,337
35,205
15,489
37,773
6,152
279,076
43,233
133,081
63,863
3,939
38,661
(">
89,416

1,198,251
39,039
68,193
24,192
228,729
36,306
16,681
44,717
11,064
287,887
44,119
136,559
68,280
4,480
40,435
138,910
8,660

1,210,814
40,377
62,621
23,170
216,062
35,595
16,658
48,671
11,767
298,804
45,606
141,241
71,235
4,451
41,812
143,476
9,268

1,229,580
38,455
64,333
21,405
223,866
33,169
15,022
44,921
11,244
311,199
46,915
144,918
71,559
4,378
42,932
147,276
7,988

1,217,789
35,075
62,698
20,786
231,931
31,404
14,151
39,288
10,226
317,328
45,753
145,881
69,691
4,110
42,052
140,520
6,895

1,246,764
34,452
62,038
20,888
240,150
30,955
14,434
40,855
10,400
330,670
46,089
145,875
72,311
4,159
42,616
145,211
5,661

443,472
61,515
41,822
340,135

453,863
63,341
41,319
349,203

450,426
62,480
40,843
347,103

451,689
64,156
39,808
347,725

437,227
60,963
39,996
336,268

427,474
60,112
38,510
328,852

D Not shown to avoid disclosure of confidential information; estimates are included in totals.
N Data not available for this year.
1. 1969-74 based on 1967 SIC. 1975-87 based on 1972 SIC. 1988-92 based on 1987 SIC.
2. Excludes limited partners.
3. “Other” consists of the number of jobs held by U.S. residents employed by international
organizations and foreign em bassies and consulates in the United States.
4. Under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification, ordnance was reclassified to four twodigit industries: fabricated metal products; electronic equipment, except computer equipment;

ri

n

n

transportation equipment; and instruments and related products.
5. Under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification, combined real estate, insurance, etc.,
was reclassified to four two-digit industries: nondepository credit institutions; insurance
agents, brokers, and services; real estate; and legal services.
6. This category was new under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore, esti­
mates prior to 19 r5 do not exist.
7. This category is new under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore, esti­
mates prior to 1988 do not exist.

M-72

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Full-Tim e and Part-Time W ages and Salary Em ployees by In d u stry 1
Pennsylvania
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Wage and salary employment by place of work .......................................

5,171,750

5,293,682

5,385,389

5,420,772

5,331,395

5330076

N onfarm ..........................................................

31,391
5,140,359

30,034
5,263,648

25,998
5,359,391

25,425
5,395,347

25,655
5,305,740

25272
5304804

P riv a te ...................................................................
Ag. serv., forestry, fisheries and other2 ...............................................
Agricultural services .........................................................
Forestry, fisheries and other2 ...................................................
Forestry ..........................................................................................
Fisheries ............................................................................................
O ther2 ................................................................................................

4,389,618
25,845
25,396
449
(d)

4,511,407
27,440
26,979
461
p)
pi
60

4,600,730
27,246
26,845
401
(D)
pi
60

4,623,352
28,121
27,689
432
306
56
70

4,540,599
28,359
27,782
577
(D)
(D)
70

4535907
28030
27411
619
465
79
75

M in in g .................................................................................
Coal mining ......................................................................
Oil and gas extraction ...........................................................................
Metal m in in g .............................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels .......................................................

30,797
21,846
p>
pi
5,034

28,913
19,803

27,741
18,437

pi

pi

pi
5,288

(°)
5,559

27,755
18,348
3,532
0
5,875

25,314
16,321
3,400
0
5,593

23651
15123
2942
0
5586

Construction ...............................................................
General building contractors ...............................................................
Heavy construction con tra ctors.............................................................
Special trade contractors ......................................................................

227,567
64,099
38,119
125,349

239,336
68,300
37,424
133,612

242,807
68,018
36,321
138,468

235,507
64,531
32,106
138,870

214,286
57,529
28,889
127,868

205892
53307
29331
123254

1,052,700
455,545
91,066
31,292
87,918
41,585
82,275
58,966
10,702
1,180
39,931
10,630

1,066,570
455,313
91,726
30,936
83,425
41,784
83,999
60,104
10,481
1,171
41,033
10,654

1,057,024
451,915
92,270
29,711
78,567
42,337
84,917
60,415
10,191
1,151
42,205
10,151

1,026,528
445,159
90,526
27,932
71,026
41,484
86,770
62,546
11,271
(D)
42,627
pi

984,869
434,408
90,179
25,899
66,616
40,283
85,080
64,513
11,143
951
41,196
8,548

955331
425489
88050
24669
64062
39501
83198
65110
10225
894
42153
7627

597,155
30,017
21,658
87,411
92,228
104,592
95,848
37,261
24,752
(N)
47,692
34,112
21,584

611,257
32,649
22,056
91,006
94,145
109,982
89,832
37,146
25,023
(N)
47,628
39,806
21,984

605,109
33,225
21,573
92,969
92,951
110,549
88,435
36,715
19,185
(N)
48,170
38,947
22,390

581,369
32,070
20,193
91,919
88,605
108,244
81,906
34,696
17,356
(N)
46,092
39,049
21,239

550,461
30,183
18,139
86,352
84,863
103,328
76,458
33,803
15,761
(N)
43,289
38,067
20,218

529842
29907
17256
79379
83191
96559
73902
33305
16138
(N)
41722
38088
20395

249,179
19,433
71,277
4,679
49,469
22,918
14,761
700
11,090
49,448
54,873

256,255
18,982
75,178
4,580
52,269
23,721
16,002
704
11,842
50,112
55,134

259,581
18,770
77,365
4,378
54,622
24,398
17,051
724
12,449
49,451
54,995

266,059
17,012
79,184
4,594
61,704
25,138
23,053
709
12,804
48,265
55,300

262,237
15,199
77,531
5,199
63,008
26,800
23,664
685
11,859
47,177
54,123

264301
14633
75593
4850
65819
27857
25213
670
12079
48962
54444

Manufacturing .........................................................
Nondurable goods ..................................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u cts............................................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts .........................................................
Apparel and other textile products .................................................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts......................................................
Printing and publishing .................................................................
Chem icals and allied products ......................................................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u cts........................................................
Tobacco products .....................................................
Rubber and mise, plastics products ....................................
Leather and leather products .........................................................
Durable goods ...............................................................................
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts..........................................
Furniture and fix tu re s...................................................
Prim ary metal industries ..................................................
Fabncated metal products ....................................
Machinery and computer e q u ip m e n t.................................................
Electronic equipment, excl. computer equip.................................
Transportation equip, excl. motor v e h ic le s ........................................
Motor vehicles and equipment ..........................................
O rdn an ce3 ..................................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .....................................................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts..........................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s...........................................
Transportation and public utilities ...................................................
Railroad transportation ......................................................................
Trucking and warehousing ..................................................................
Water transportation ....................................................................
Other transportation .................................................................
Local and mterurban passenger tra n sit............................................
Transportation by a ir ........................................................
Pipelines, except natural gas ......................................
Transportation services ..................................................
C o m m unica tio ns............................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services ........................................

pi

65

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

M-73

Full-Time and Part-Time Wages and Salary Employees by Industry '— Continued
Pennsylvania
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

W holesale t r a d e ........................................................................................

267,062

275,820

284,385

280,386

270,574

269077

Retail tra d e ................................................................................................
Building materials and garden equipment ...........................................
General merchandise stores ................................................................
Food stores ...........................................................................................
Automotive dealers and service stations .............................................
Apparel and accessory s t o re s ..............................................................
Home furniture and furnishings s t o r e s .................................................
Eating and drinking p la c e s ....................................................................
M iscellaneous r e ta il...............................................................................

886,222
31,561
129,952
157,408
94,111
52,410
35,124
267,654
118,002

910,860
33,508
132,081
164,537
96,564
53,219
35,653
272,326
122,972

936,209
35,182
130,481
168,699
97,524
56,346
37,115
281,458
129,404

932,757
35,189
124,360
171,146
95,645
56,726
36,315
281,925
131,451

917,806
33,909
119,050
172,396
91,111
55,898
35,431
282,176
127,835

916640
33619
120022
169957
89120
54667
35756
284650
128849

Finance, insurance, and real estate .........................................................
Depository and nondepository credit inst...............................................
Other finance, insurance and real e s ta te .............................................
Security and commodity brokers and services ................................
Insurance c a r r ie rs ..............................................................................
Insurance agents, brokers, and services .........................................
Real e s ta te .........................................................................................
Combined real estate, insurance, e tc.4 ............................................

303,657
120,979
182,678
14,695
87,925
25,997
43229
502
10,330

306,236
120,025
186,211
15,143
88,862
27,977
44,553

309,859
121,499
188,360
14,130
89,500
28,859
45,637

314,271
118,067
196,204
13,495
94,578
30,366
47,105

313410
118216
195194
14061
93523
30571
47457

9 ,6 $

10,234

311,466
118,542
192,924
13,788
92,710
29,229
45,953
n
11,244

10,643(1

95&

Services ....................................................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ...........................................................
Personal services ..................................................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s................................................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ..................................................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking ........................................................
M iscellaneous repair s e r v ic e s ...............................................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Motion p ic tu re s ......................................................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ......................................................................................
Legal services .......................................................................................
Educational services .............................................................................
Social se rvice s5 ....................................................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological g a rd e n s .............................................
Membership organizations ...................................................................
Engineering and management se rvice s6 .............................................

1,346,589
55,872
57,351
47,784
223,264
40,302
14,901
41,978
5,657
433,781
41,563
130,737
89,969
2,094
94,749
66, 5 $

1,399,977
56,511
53,883
45,673
198,308
41,777
15,333
46,161
9,686
449,658
44,028
133,776
96,401
2,437
100,736
102,689
2,920

1,455,878
58,454
54,150
43,559
208,482
42,392
15,851
49,486
10,121
468,257
45,528
134.814
102,536
2,560
106,975
109,328
3,385

1,514,773
58,509
55,195
40,365
214,376
44,159
16,540
51,295
10,892
492,977
46,903
141,456
108,798
2,729
112,255
114,629
3,695

1,522,883
55,393
54,566
39,503
205,574
41,286
15,060
51,800
11,436
511,496
47220
145,680
114,292
3,068
113,441
109,584
3,482

1559575
55207
54471
39855
210913
39828
14293
52954
10939
533672
47232
149015
118860
3508
115625
109764
3419

Government and government e n te rp rise s...................................................
Federal, civilian .........................................................................................
M ilita ry .......................................................................................................
State and lo c a l..........................................................................................

750,741
141,312
68,284
541,145

752,241
142,393
65,650
544,198

758,661
142,239
63,241
553,181

771,995
144,436
65,062
562.497

765,141
137,909
66,438
560,794

768897
136355
65097
567445

D Not shown to avoid disclosure ot confidential Information; estimates are included in totals.
N Data not available for this year.
1. 1969-74 based on 1967 SIC. 1975-87 based on 1972 SIC. 1988-92 based on 1987 SIC.
2. "Other" consists of the number of jobs held by U.S. residents employed by International
organizations and foreign em bassies and consulates In the United States.
3. Under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification, ordnance was reclassified to four twodigit industries: fabricated metal products; electronic equipment, except computer equipment;
transportation equipment; and instruments and related products.

4. Under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification, combined real estate, insurance, etc.,
was reclassified to four two-digit industries: nondepository credit institutions; insurance
agents, brokers, and services; real estate; and legal services.
5. This category was new under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore esti­
mates prior to 1975 do not exist.
6. This category is new under the 1967 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore esti­
mates prior to 1988 do not exist.

M-74

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
T ransfer Paym ents for States
[Thousands of dollars]
Arizona
1987

Total transfer p a y m e n t s .........................................................................
Government payments to in d iv id u a ls...................................................
Retirement, disability and health insurance benefit p a ym e n ts.........
Old age, survivors, and disability insurance payments ................
Railroad retirement and disability p a ym e n ts.................................
Federal civilian employee retirement payments ...........................
Military retirement p a ym e n ts..........................................................
State and local government employee retirement payments .......
Worker’s compensation payments (Federal and State) ...............
Other govt, disability insurance & retirement p a ym ents1 .............
Medical paym ents*
2 ............................................................................
1
Income maintenance benefit payments ...........................................
Supplemental security income (SSI) p a ym e n ts............................
Aid to families with dependent children ( A F D C ) ...........................
Food stamps ..................................................................................
Other income maintenance3 ..........................................................
Unemployment insurance benefit payments ....................................
State unemployment insurance c om p e n sa tion .............................
Unemployment compensation for Federal civilian empl. (UCFE) .
Unemployment compensation for railroad employees .................
Unemployment compensation for veterans (UCX) .......................
Other unemployment compensation 4 ...........................................
Veterans benefit p a ym e n ts................................................................
Veterans pensions and compensation p a ym e n ts.........................
Educational assist, to veterans, dependents, and survivors5 ......
Veterans life insurance benefit p a ym e n ts.....................................
Other assistance to veterans6 .......................................................
Federal education and training assist, paymnts (excl. vets)7 ..........
Other payments to individuals8 .........................................................
Payments to nonprofit institu tion s.........................................................
Federal Government p a y m e n ts.........................................................
State and local government paym ents9 ............................................
Business payments ...........................................................................
Business payments to individuals10 ....................................................

7,188,224
6,818,877
4,381,763
2,861,418
95,165
485,603
472,461
271,986
187,268
7,862
1,479,507
364,970
102,944
97,827
124,249
39,950
136,352
127,842
4,473
1,888
1,137
1,012
299,910
256,206
16,243
27,078
383
112,069
44,306
172,512
53,196
75,096
44,220
196,835

1. Includes temporary disability payments and black lung payments.
2. Consists of medicare payments, medical vendor payments, and C H A M P U S payments.
3. Includes general assistance, emergency assistance, refugee assistance, foster home
care payments, earned income tax credits, and energy assistance.
4. Consists of trade readjustment allowance payments, redwood park benefit payments,
public service employment benefit payments, and transitional benefit payments.
5. Includes veterans’ readjustment benefit payments and educational assistance to spouses
and children of disabled or deceased veterans.
6. Includes payments to paraplegics, payments for autos and conveyances for disabled vet­
erans, veterans’ aid, and veterans’ bonuses.
7. Includes Federal fellowship payments (National Science Foundation, fellowships and
traineeships, subsistence payments to State maritime academy cadets, and other Federal fel-

1988
7,789,868
7,407,073
4,778,167
3,081,962
99,863
528,447
504,077
311,739
242,343
9,736
1,629,560
439,949
113,127
109,807
154,267
62,748
123,985
117,003
4,010
1,435
1,080
457
292,818
251,738
12,956
27,461
663
98,660
43,934
187,596
59,084
84,240
44,272
195,199

1989
8,615,188
8,221,131
5,147,306
3,374,375
105,232
554,437
533,732
335,152
234,842
9,536
1,888,166
527,038
122,622
125,502
190,502
88,412
131,708
123,644
4,635
1,581
1,059
789
312,449
262,934
13,563
35,451
501
132,952
81,512
196,883
59,742
89,765
47,376
197,174

1990
9,599,013
9,192,432
5,665,784
3,656,554
112,262
591,218
575,360
467,837
253,796
8,757
2,158,385
652,985
141,833
152,418
257,742
100,992
172,556
163,227
4,932
1,594
1,366
1,437
317,519
276,026
9,608
31,355
530
140,369
84,834
206,958
62,244
99,741
44,973
199,623

1991

1992

10,713,470
10,267,922
6,109,328
4,021,224
117,251
630,323
621,265
501,336
209,255
8,674
2,544,294
822,896
165,564
207,545
327,200
122,587
227,930
217,872
5,170
1,653
1,830
1,405
335,491
287,413
11,324
36,149
605
140,705
87^278
249,682
69,374
137,011
43.297
195,866

12,168,691
11,686,414
6,601,516
4,369,309
121,674
646,007
660,959
551,602
241,359
10,606
3,137,602
1,034208
207,521
265,987
380,095
180,605
336,563
316,183
8,653
1,522
9,296
909
347,304
295,775
13,407
37,551
571
153,560
75,661
275,169
80,539
151,201
43,429
207,108

lowships), interest subsidy on higher education loans, basic educational opportunity grants,
and Job Corps payments.
8. Includes Bureau of Indian Affairs payments, education exchange payments, Alaska Per­
manent Fund dividend payments, compensation of survivors of public safety officers, com pen­
sation of victims of crime, compensation of victims of Hurricane Hugo and the Loma Prieta
Earthquake, compensation for Japanese internment, compensation of victims of Hurricanes
Andrew and Iniki, and other special payments to individuals.
9. Consists of State and local government payments for foster home care supervised by
private agencies, State and local government educational assistance payments to nonprofit
institutions, and other State and local govt, payments to nonprofit institutions.
10. Includes personal injury payments to individuals other than employees and other busi­
ness transfer payments.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

M -7 5

State Farm Income and Expenditures for States
[Thousands of dollars]
Kansas
1987

1989

1988

1991

1990

1992

7,292,905

7,884,189

7,758,466

8,189,402

8,281,983

8,122,555

Total livestock and p ro d u c ts...........................................................................
Meat animals ana other livestock ..............................................................
Cattle and c a lv e s .....................................................................................
Hogs and p ig s ......................................................................................
Sheep and other livestock ...................................................................
Dairy products .........................................................................................
Poultry and poultry products ...................................................................
Total c r o p s ......................................................................................................
Total grains .................................................................................................
Corn .........................................................................................................
Oats .........................................................................................................
Sorghum ..................................................................................................
Wheat ......................................................................................................
Soybeans .................................................................................................
Other g ra in s .............................................................................................
Hay, silage, etc.............................................................................................
Vegetables ..................................................................................................
Fruits and nuts ............................................................................................
Greenhouse, nursery and mushroom products .........................................
Forest and maple products .........................................................................
Tobacco .......................................................................................................
C o tto n ..........................................................................................................
Other crops .................................................................................................

5,000,550
4,826,556
4,428,256
362,409
35,891
155,000
18,994
2,292,355
2,106,777
254,190
3,442
467,392
1,007,071
360,975
13,707
114,610
17,021
4,316
24,692
n
0
247
24,692

5,342,180
5,177,495
4,815,461
326,943
35,091
149,760
14,925
2,542,009
2,314,025
274,740
4,652
470,776
1,202,913
335,255
25,689
162,451
17,521
5,258
15,342

5,486,379
5,300,617
4,924,174
336,380
40,063
163,020
22,742
2,272,087
2,081,016
383,740
5,598
413,585
920,757
326,905
30,431
144,749
18,638
4,690
17,344

6,198,523
6,011,970
5,564,548
402,871
44,551
162,925
23,628
1,990,879
1,823,781
336,200
4,709
283,152
910,768
267,534
21,418
122,246
16,023
4,736
19,374

5,690,211
5,519,953
5,132,035
341,170
46,748
151,074
19,184
2,432,344
2,237,638
469,984
4,048
319,979
1,124,283
296,341
23,003
132,259
27,060
5,375
24,579

0
97
27,315

0
193
5,457

0
194
4,525

5,950,618
5,788,226
5,341,744
402,943
43,539
141,453
20,939
2,331,365
2,155,051
407,665
3,234
294,745
1,201,870
227,601
19,936
117,037
25,842
5,368
22,338
n
0
263
5,466

Other Income .................................................................................................
Government payments ...................................................................................
Imputed and m iscellaneous income received 1 .............................................

1,340,421
966,320
374,101

1,263,683
847,994
415,689

1,076,663
588,444
488,219

1,288,206
834,746
453,460

1,186,060
697,895
488,165

1,051,952
592,145
459,807

Production e x p e n se s....................................................................................
Feed p u rc h a se d ..............................................................................................
Livestock purchased .......................................................................................
Seed p u rc h a se d ..............................................................................................
Fertilizer and lime (includes ag. chem., 1978-fwd.) ......................................
Petroleum products p u rc h a se d .......................................................................
Hired farm labor e xp ense2 .............................................................................
All other production e xp e n se s3 .....................................................................

7,053,311
852,296
2,426,149
91,199
326,598
229,336
315,246
2,812,487

7,583,135
946,217
2,730,478
93,994
360,003
226,568
332,445
2,893,430

7,980,502
936,007
3,032,311
99,561
389,719
221,952
371,279
2,929,673

8,389,511
876,948
3,405,450
95,902
396,015
263,557
390,443
2,961,196

8,107,472
775,919
3,263,743
102,398
422,507
248,948
359,769
2,934,188

8,075,397
778,022
3,207,098
96,880
425,110
239,621
372,793
2,955,873

Value of Inventory change ...........................................................................
L iv e s to c k .........................................................................................................
Crops ..............................................................................................................

-527,642
-107,998
-419,644

-414,508
-23,482
-391,026

-263,890
54,229
-318,119

331,839
-7 3 7
332,576

-346,454
-37,069
-309,385

371,272
147,875
223,397

Total cash receipts and other Incom e.........................................................
Less: Total production e x p e n s e s ...................................................................
Realized net Incom e......................................................................................
Plus: Value of inventory c h a n g e ....................................................................
Total net income including corporate fa rm s ...............................................
Less: Corporate farms ....................................................................................
Plus: Statistical adjustm ent............................................................................
Total net farm proprietors’ Income .............................................................
Plus: Farm w ages and perquisites .................................................................
Plus: Farm other labor income .......................................................................
Total farm labor and proprietors' Income ...................................................

8,633,326
7,053,311
1,580,015
-527,642
1,052,373
135,819
-1 7
916,537
174,180
4,589
1,095,306

9,147,872
7,583,135
1,564,737
^414,508
1,150,229
175,041
12
975,200
177,212
6,102
1,158,514

8,835,129
7,980,502
854,627
-263,890
590,737
73,854
19
516,902
197,269
7,627
721,798

9,477,608
8,389,511
1,088,097
331,839
1,419,938
242,206
19
1,177,749
208,893
7,682
1,394,324

9,468,043
8,107,472
1,360,571
-346,454
1,014,117
91,908
15
922,224
190,840
8,167
1,121,231

9,174,507
8,075,397
1,099,110
371,272
1,470,382
227,675
-1 5
1,242,692
192,331
7,469
1,442,492

Cash receipts tram marketings ...................................................................

(N)

n

(n)

n

0
289
5,144

2. Includes hired workers' cash wages, social security, perquisites, and contract labor, ma­
N Data not available for this year.
1.
Includes imputed income such as gross rental value of dwellings and value of home con­ chine hire and custom work expenses.
3. Includes repair and operation of machinery; depreciation, interest, rent and taxes; and
sumption, and other farm related incomecomponents such as machine hire and custom work
other miscellaneous expensesincluding agricultural chem icals (1969-77).
income, rental income, and income from forest products (1978-92).

M-76

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Personal Tax and Nontax Payments for States
[Thousands of dollars]

Colorado
Tot»l personal Income ........................................................................
Loss: Personal lax and nontax payments ..........................................

Equals: Disposable personal Incom e...................................

1987

1988

1989

1990

52,023,010

54,474,373

58,241,362

62,187,478

6.505,275

6.405.478

«5,517,735

48,068.895

7,629,332

50,612,030

1992

.1991

8,545,721

53,641,757

66,470,947
9,124,531

57,346,416

71,653,632
9,724,530
61,929,102

Population (thousands)1 ........................................................................

3,261

3,263

3.276

3,302

3,378

3,470

Per capita personal income (dollars)1
2 ....................................................
Per capita disposable personal Income (dollars)3 .................................

15,954
13,959

16,696
14.733

17.779
15,450

18,832
16,244

19,680
16,979

20,648
17,846

Personal tax and nontax payments.................................................

6,505,275

6.405,478

7,629.332

8,545,721

9,124,531

9,724,530

Personal tax and nontax payments to:
Federal government (net of refunds) .......................................
Individual Income taxes (net of refunds)...........................
Individual income taxes (gross).....................................
Less: Refunds................................................................
Fiduciary income tax .........................................................
Estate and gift t a x .............................................................
Nontax payments ..............................................................

5,084,652
4.968,448
5,986,795
1,018,347
36,020
68,048
12,136

4,813,401
4,689,055
5,644,513
955,458
30,927
78,494
14.925

5,900,083
5.764,981
6,706,551
941,570
31,042
87,563
16,497

6,683,916
6.532,191
7,424,297
892,106
38,964
96,166
16,595

7,044,511
6,898,035
7,817,625
919,590
32,285
93,413
20.778

7,403,893
7,255,042
8,195,272
940,230
33,193
96,098
19,560

Personal tax and nontax payments to:
State governments ...................................................................
Individual income taxes.....................................................
Death and gift ta xes..........................................................
Motor vehicle taxes ...........................................................
Other taxes4 ......................................................................
Nontax payments ..............................................................

1,212,048
1,056.872
11,361
41,089
32,468
70,258

1,387,264
1,213,564
15,585
43,925
36,525
77,665

1,535,095
1,329,354
17,854
61,652
38,466
87.769

1,646,268
1.400,656
13,679
80,532
47,943
103,458

1,818,074
1,527,335
35,229
84,312
51,855
119,343

2,041,901
1,748,729
20,999
89,371
49,452
133,350

149,285

150,918

130,195

152,201

183,492

196,186

Personal tax and nontax payments to:
Local governments...................................................................
Individual income taxes.....................................................
Motor vehicle license taxes...............................................
Other taxes5 ......................................................................
Nontax payments ..............................................................

0

0

0

0

0

0

5,996
10,173
133,116

6,316
9,990
134,612

8,335
11,840

110,020

6,987
13,777
131,437

7,722
15,408
160,362

8,215
16,201
171,770

State and local personal property taxes .........................................

59,290

53,895

63,959

63,336

78,454

82,550

1. Midyear population estimates of the Bureau of the Census. The 1990 midyear (July 1)
estimates reflect the (April 1) 1990 census count and 3 months of estimated population
change.
2. Per capita personal income was computed using midyear population estimates of the
Bureau of the Census. The 1990 midyear (July 1) estimates reflect the (April 1) 1990 census
count and 3 months of estimated population change.

3. Per capita disposable personal income w as computed using midyear population esti­
mates of the Bureau of the Census, the 1990 midyear (July 1) estimates reflect the (April
1) 1990 census count and 3 months of estimated population change.
4. Includes hunting and fishing taxes and other license taxes.
5. Includes local death and gift taxes and other local taxes.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

M-77

Disposable Personal Income for States and Regions
[Millions of dollars]
1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993'

United Sta te s ....................................

2,932,404

3,121,915

3,278,016

3,535,222

3,774,071

4,033,622

4,212,193

4,484,138

4,687,969

New E ng la nd ...............................................
Connecticut ...............................................
M aine ........................................................
M assachusetts ..........................................
New Hampshire ........................................
Rhode Island .............................................
V e rm o n t.....................................................

176,061
49,562
12,563
82,045
13,856
12,183
5,853

189,828
52,892
13,555
88,717
15,357
13,013
6,295

205,514
58,096
14,678
95,361
16,846
13,690
6,843

228,223
64,491
16,254
106,361
18,643
14,952
7,521

241,080
68,494
17,678
111,294
19,659
15,751
8,204

248,890
71,062
18,546
113,899
20,144
16,645
8,594

254,494
72,320
19,088
116,471
20,835
16,932
8,848

265,943
75,393
20,098
121,365
21,919
17,729
9,439

276,066
77,920
20,944
126,168
22,819
18,384
9,830

M id e ast ........................................................
Delaware ...................................................
District of C o lu m b ia ...................................
Maryland ...................................................
New Jersey ...............................................
New York ..................................................
Pennsylvania .............................................

578,448
7,631
9,238
61,451
113,893
242,924
143,311

620,857
8,158
9,489
66,463
121,197
262,289
153,261

654,163
8,734
10,149
71,452
130,368
274,226
159,233

709,892
9,460
11,268
78,078
143,517
296,749
170,819

756,872
10,298
11,906
83,823
153,535
313,206
184,104

806,967
11,069
12,263
89,726
161,396
337,229
195,284

837,899
11,703
12,920
92,664
165,718
350,419
204,475

887,968
12,217
13,689
97,734
176,849
371,430
216,049

918,816
12,867
14,227
102,041
184,012
381,186
224,484

G reat L a k e s .................................................
Illinois .........................................................
Indiana ......................................................
Michigan ....................................................
O h io ............................................................
W isconsin ..................................................

503,807
149,740
60,504
112,025
126,033
55,505

533,632
158,299
64,158
119,661
133,026
58,489

553,538
163,521
67,549
123,755
137,553
61,161

593,024
175,009
71,966
132,438
148,972
64,639

629,888
187,719
76,887
139,905
156,510
68,866

667,483
199,341
81,308
147,448
165,624
73,762

692,397
206,125
84,616
152,737
172,106
76,814

740,115
220,325
91,256
161,837
184,038
82,659

772,637
229,825
96,113
169,518
190,551
86,630

P la in s ...........................................................
Io w a ...........................................................
Kansas ......................................................
M in n e so ta ..................................................
Missouri .....................................................
N e b ra s k a ...................................................
North D a k o ta .............................................
South Dakota ............................................

204,694
31,471
28,964
51,607
59,592
18,554
7,348
7,158

215,504
32,447
30,547
55,293
63,104
19,044
7,538
7,531

224,054
33,649
31,853
57,548
66,011
19,598
7,532
7,862

235,716
34,826
33,990
60,875
69,564
21,281
6,995
8,185

251,241
37,583
34,920
66,033
73,393
22,487
7,884
8,941

269,410
40,351
37,855
70,134
78,166
24,247
8,819
9,837

280,868
41,275
39,788
72,641
82,527
25,365
8,881
10,391

300,373
44,510
42,809
78,267
87,074
26,863
9,766
11,085

309,122
44,411
44,629
80,894
89,803
27,990
9,961
11.433

S o u th e a st ....................................................
Alabam a ....................................................
Arkansas ...................................................
Florida .......................................................
Georgia .....................................................
Kentucky ...................................................
Louisiana ...................................................
M ississippi .................................................
North C a ro lin a ...........................................
South Carolina ..........................................
Tennessee ................................................
Virginia ......................................................
W est V irg in ia .............................................

606,568
38,657
22,110
141,031
66,533
35,635
45,815
22,246
64,384
31,879
48,869
71,656
17,752

653,615
41,577
23,324
153,929
73,431
37,267
46,636
23,406
70,133
33,966
53,456
77,935
18,555

692,986
43,852
24,247
165,420
78,512
39,043
46,245
24,764
74,963
36,400
57,329
83,354
18,859

749,616
46,931
25,717
179,594
85,735
41,327
48,852
26,475
81,858
40,040
61,866
91,031
20,190

804,746
49,870
27,362
200,008
90,561
44,215
50,815
27,902
87,117
42,084
65,749
98,168
20,895

864,179
53,564
28,816
215,305
96,897
47,621
53,686
29,597
94,761
46,645
70,020
104,895
22,372

910,586
56,677
30,617
226,123
102,747
50,254
57,222
31,418
99,469
48,978
74,190
109,201
23,690

971,933
60,891
33,473
236,372
110,377
54,309
61,226
33,837
107,389
52,124
80,628
115,898
25,409

1,028,593
64,193
34,971
253,237
116,701
56,871
64,204
36,025
114,049
54,900
85,175
121,780
26,487

S o u t h w e s t ....................................................
Arizona .......................................................
New M exico ..............................................
O k la h o m a ..................................................
Texas ........................................................

283,611
37,162
14,476
35,309
196,666

291,640
40,723
15,135
35,710
200,072

300,345
43,514
15,630
35,592
205,610

319,949
46,885
16,595
37,582
218,888

341,586
49,623
18,019
39,537
234,406

365,875
52,753
19,238
41,832
252,052

388,137
54,855
20,463
43,615
269,204

418,382
58,683
21,921
46,592
291,186

443,546
62,666
23,580
48,666
308,635

R o c k y M ountain ..........................................
C o lo ra d o ....................................................
Idaho .........................................................
Montana ....................................................
Utah ...........................................................
Wyoming ...................................................

81,228
41,357
9,944
8,234
15,779
5,914

84,420
42,680
10,395
8,742
16,676
5,927

86,754
44,036
10,678
8,831
17,484
5,725

92,747
47,560
11.457
9,126
18,625
5,979

99,271
50,573
12,804
9,858
19,836
6,200

105,753
53,617
13,998
10,263
21,024
6,852

113,357
57,394
14,801
11,047
22,692
7,422

121,916
61,875
16,048
11,663
24,557
7,772

131,069
66,425
17,557
12,699
26,157
8,231

Far W e s t .......................................................
Alaska .......................................................
California ...................................................
Hawaii .......................................................
Nevada .......................................................
Oregon .......................................................
Washington ...............................................

497,986
8,674
376,306
13,013
12,585
30,041
57,368

532,418
8,537
403,063
14,062
13,623
31,586
61,547

560,662
8,230
425,047
14,820
14,947
32,912
64,706

606,054
8,780
459,231
16,239
16,701
36,064
69,039

649,387
9,467
488,570
17,600
19,111
38,932
75,707

705,064
10,149
528,976
19,691
21,434
42,044
82,770

734,456
10,836
546,875
20,847
23,132
44,448
88,318

777,507
11,545
574,751
21,934
25,254
47,556
96,467

808,120
12,166
592,902
23,476
27,474
50,726
101,376

248,890
693,909
667,483
269,410
693,933
200,802
376,386
199,179
683,630

254,494
720,612
692,397
280,868
727,494
212,540
400,658
211,807
711,324

265,943
764,328
740,115
300,373
771,209
229,665
432,477
227,774
752,253

276,066
789,681
772,637
309,122
816,289
242,264
456,476
244,789
780,646

Census Divisions

New England ................................................
Middle Atlantic ..............................................
East North Central ........................................
W est North Central .......................................
South Atlantic ...............................................
East South Central .......................................
W est South Central ......................................
Mountain ........................................................
Pacific ...........................................................
Preliminary.

176,061
500,128
503,807
204,694
471,555
145,408
299,899
145,450
485,401

189,828
536,747
533,632
215,504
512,060
155,706
305,741
153,902
518,795

205,514
563,828
553,538
224,054
547,842
164,988
311,693
160,845
545,715

228,223
611,085
593,024
235,716
597,254
176,599
331.039
172,928
589,353

241,080
650,845
629,888
251,241
644,859
187,736
352,121
186,024
630,277

M -7 8

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Per Capita Disposable Personal Income for States and Regions
[Dollars]
1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993'

United States ...................................

12,324

12,999

13,528

14,457

15,291

16,173

16,706

17,580

18,177

New England ..............................................
Connecticut ...............................................
Maine .........................................................
M assachusetts ..........................................
New Hampshire ........................................
Rhode Island .............................................
V e rm o n t.....................................................

13,817
15,481
10,802
13,950
13,900
12,572
11,041

14,790
16,405
11,583
15,028
14,980
13,313
11,785

15,866
17,888
12,389
16,065
15,976
13,832
12,665

17,440
19,707
13,500
17,784
17,219
15,004
13,678

18,289
20,860
14,490
18,501
17,799
15,741
14,711

18,828
21,604
15,064
18,926
18,120
16,570
15,225

19,278
21,979
15,442
19,427
18,810
16,870
15,584

20,153
22,992
16,256
20,252
19,656
17,706
16,521

20,867
23,776
16,898
20,985
20,278
18,384
17,076

Mideast .......................................................
Delaware ...................................................
District of C o lu m b ia ...................................
Maryland ....................................................
New Jersey ...............................................
New York ..................................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia .............................................

13,516
12,340
14,556
13,923
15,053
13,652
12,174

14,440
12,998
14,865
14,811
15,899
14,706
13,006

15,144
13,711
15,933
15,648
16,993
15,345
13,480

16,341
14,605
17,871
16,760
18,606
16,538
14,418

17,365
15,643
19,075
17,732
19,872
17,417
15,515

18,463
16,545
20,312
18,700
20,852
18,733
16,417

19,083
17,190
21,743
19,053
21,319
19,417
17,113

20,127
17,682
23,391
19,876
22,614
20,510
18,011

20,709
18,374
24,595
20,552
23,354
20,948
18,632

Great Lakes ................................................
Illinois .........................................................
Indiana ......................................................
Michigan ....................................................
O h io ...........................................................
W isconsin ..................................................

12,163
13,134
11,082
12,341
11,739
11,689

12,871
13,900
11,762
13,108
12,396
12,297

13,308
14,353
12,341
13,468
12,782
12,799

14,212
15,363
13,102
14,365
13,794
13,402

15,043
16,452
13,919
15,119
14,453
14,180

15,863
17,412
14,636
15,837
15,247
15,047

16,333
17,886
15,092
16,292
15,732
15,529

17,325
18,972
16,128
17,155
16,698
16,556

17,961
19,648
16,824
17,886
17,180
17,196

Plains ..........................................................
Io w a ...........................................................
Kansas .......................................................
M in n e s o ta ..................................................
Missouri .....................................................
N e b ra s k a ...................................................
North Dakota .............................................
South Dakota ............................................

11,762
11,120
11,931
12,332
11,916
11,707
10,853
10,248

12,389
11,620
12,556
13,147
12,561
12,095
11,257
10,819

12,854
12,159
13,024
13,586
13,052
12,508
11,391
11,294

13,442
12,578
13,804
14,168
13,687
13,540
10,672
11,721

14,279
13,565
14,121
15,222
14,403
14,278
12,198
12,834

15,231
14,516
15,258
15,990
15,246
15,340
13,837
14,120

15,790
14,794
15,976
16,413
16,004
15,950
14,023
14,809

16,762
15,880
17,019
17,516
16,775
16,784
15,403
15,648

17,122
15,782
17,635
17,907
17,158
17,416
15,688
15,981

Southeast ...................................................
Alabam a ....................................................
Arkansas ...................................................
Florida ........................................................
Georgia .....................................................
Kentucky ....................................................
L o u is ia n a ....................................................
M ississippi .................................................
North C a ro lin a ...........................................
South Carolina ..........................................
Tennessee ................................................
Virginia .......................................................
W est V irg in ia .............................................

10,792
9,730
9,500
12,423
11,157
9,644
10,392
8,594
10,294
9,650
10,363
12,536
9,309

11,494
10,415
10,000
13,191
12,067
10,104
10,581
9,023
11,093
10,160
11,279
13,408
9,856

12,043
10,920
10,350
13,786
12,644
10,599
10,644
9,566
11,705
10,766
11,985
14,049
10,151

12,896
11,662
10,976
14,591
13,572
11,229
11,389
10,259
12,629
11,733
12,827
15,077
11,030

13,702
12,374
11,662
15,826
14,126
12,024
11,948
10,839
13,269
12,174
13,544
16,040
11,566

14,532
13,227
12,236
16,535
14,891
12,901
12,728
11,491
14,243
13,327
14,315
16,886
12,479

15,110
13,857
12,914
17,036
15,502
13,528
13,483
12,120
14,739
13,756
14,981
17,366
13,167

15,906
14,717
13,981
17,532
16,296
14,468
14,309
12,939
15,709
14,467
16,045
18,125
14,047

16,608
15,332
14,424
18,513
16,871
15,010
14,947
13,631
16,421
15,071
16,705
18,762
14,552

Southwest...................................................
Arizona .......................................................
New Mexico ..............................................
O k la h o m a ...................................................
Texas .........................................................

11,735
11,672
10,063
10,792
12,084

11,861
12,308
10,346
10,977
12,079

12,135
12,658
10,570
11,086
12,368

12,868
13,261
11,133
11,865
13,131

13,618
13,700
11,982
12,550
13,947

14,408
14,338
12,658
13,291
14,785

15,037
14,645
13,224
13,768
15,514

15,907
15,312
13,858
14,536
16,467

16,541
15,921
14,587
15,060
17,116

Rocky Mountain .........................................
C o lo ra d o .....................................................
Idaho .........................................................
Montana ....................................................
Utah ...........................................................
Wyoming ....................................................

11,331
12,888
10,002
10,012
9,603
11,835

11,724
13,182
10,496
10,741
10,028
11,957

12,038
13,504
10,839
10,968
10,418
12,000

12,875
14,577
11,622
11,403
11,023
12,854

13,723
15,438
12,876
12,329
11,628
13,526

14,492
16,231
13,836
12,834
12,158
15,114

15,237
17,032
14,262
13,681
12,844
16,208

15,981
17,859
15,056
14,183
13,558
16,724

16,730
18,628
15,974
15,128
14,066
17,504

Far W e s t......................................................
Alaska ........................................................
California ....................................................
Hawaii ........................................................
Nevada .......................................................
Oregon .......................................................
Washington ................................................

13,817
16,287
14,230
12,514
13,232
11,239
13,037

14,460
15,683
14,870
13,368
13,891
11,769
13,821

14,893
15,258
15,300
13,876
14,604
12,184
14,276

15,722
16,198
16,131
15,036
15,533
13,154
14,877

16,426
17,303
16,721
16,079
16,802
13,951
15,951

17,389
18,354
17,690
17,693
17,584
14,711
16,890

17,769
19,054
17,985
18,368
17,960
15,229
17,607

18,473
19,642
18,603
18,978
18,897
16,004
18,758

18,944
20,306
18,997
20,038
19,781
16,731
19,290

18,828
18,437
15,863
15,231
15,859
13,204
14,061
14,522
17,383

19,278
19,080
16,333
15,790
16,372
13,847
14,766
15,107
17,763

20,153
20,154
17,325
16,762
17,103
14,787
15,692
15,840
18,459

20,867
20,713
17,961
17,122
17,847
15,414
16,313
16,567
18,916

Census Divisions
New England ................................................
Middle Atlantic ..............................................
East North Central ........................................
West North Central ........................................
South Atlantic ...............................................
East South Central .......................................
West South Central .......................................
Mountain .......................................................
Pacific ...........................................................
' Preliminary.

13,817
13,469
12,163
11,762
11,741
9,712
11,411
11,415
13,833

14,790
14,412
12,871
12,389
12,530
10,371
11,513
11,881
14,476

15,866
15,094
13,308
12,854
13,161
10,947
11,752
12,235
14,901

17,440
16,294
14,212
13,442
14,111
11,688
12,506
12,997
15,728

18,289
17,321
15,043
14,279
14,994
12,403
13,259
13,782
16,415

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

M-79

Total Personal Income for Counties and Metropolitan Areas
[Thousands of dollars]
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Delaware ........................................................................................

10,425,132

11,370,606

12,419,747

13,193,023

13,748,405

14,317,961

Consolidated metropolitan areas:
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City, P A -N J -D E -M D ..................

103,559,212

111,480,569

119,449,287

126,512,402

130,654,259

137,831,987

1,309,089
8,532,101

1,431,905
9,300,543

1,541,783
10,234,770

1,626,177
10,944,404

1,737,794
11,334,698

1,846,390
11,761,401

1,309,089
7,571,823
1,544,220

1,431,905
8,256,567
1,682,134

1,541,783
9,074,872
1,803,092

1,626,177
9,693,071
1,873,775

1,737,794
10,043,336
1.967,275

2,053,289

Metropolitan areas:
Wilmington-Newark, DE-M D ..........................................................
Counties:
Kent ............................................................................................
Sussex ........................................................................................

1.846,390

Total Population for Counties and Metropolitan Areas
[Thousands]
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Delaware ........................................................................................

637.0

647.7

658.3

669.0

680.8

690.9

Consolidated metropolitan areas:
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City, P A -N J -D E -M D ..................

5,800.4

5,839.5

5,870.4

5,900.0

5,923.7

5,938.5

Metropolitan areas:
Dover, D E .......................................................................................
Wilmington-Newark, DE-M D ..........................................................

106.7
489.8

108.1
499.0

109.7
507.2

111.6
515.4

114.5
523.0

116.1
530.0

Counties:
Kent ............................................................................................
New Castle .................................................................................
Sussex ........................................................................................

106.7
422.5
107.8

108.1
430.0
109.6

109.7
436.8
111.7

111.6
443.5
113.9

114.5
449.6
116.7

116.1
455.0
119.8

N o t e .— T able shows Census Bureau midyear population estimates. Estimates for 1990-92 reflect State and county population estimates as of February 1994.

Per Capita Personal Income for Counties and Metropolitan Areas
[Dollars]
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Delaware ........................................................................................

16,365

17,555

18,867

19,719

20,195

20,724

Consolidated metropolitan areas:
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City, P A -N J -D E -M D ..................

17,854

19,091

20,348

21,443

22,056

23,210

Metropolitan areas:
Dover, D E .......................................................................................
Wilmington-Newark, DE-M D ..........................................................

12,269
17,421

13,251
18,639

14,050
20,181

14,567
21,235

15,182
21,671

15,909
22,191

Counties:
Kent ............................................................................................
New Castle .................................................................................
Sussex ........................................................................................

12,269
17,921
14,320

13,251
19,201
15,343

14,050
20,774
16,142

14,567
21,854
16,456

15,182
22,336
16,859

15,909
22,897
17,137

N o t e .— P er capita personal income was computed with C ensus Bureau midyear population estimates. Estimates for 1990-92 reflect State and county population estimates as of February

Per Capita Personal Income for Counties and Metropolitan Areas
[Percent of national average]
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Delaware ........................................................................................

105

106

107

106

105

103

Consolidated metropolitan areas:
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City, P A -N J -D E -M D ..................

114

115

115

115

115

115

Metropolitan areas:
Dover, D E .......................................................................................
Wilmington-Newark, DE-M D .........................................................

78
111

80
112

79
114

78
114

79
113

79
110

Counties:
Kent ............................................................................................
New Castle .................................................................................
Sussex ........................................................................................

78
115
92

80
116
92

79
117
91

78
117
88

79
117
88

79
114
85

M-80

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Per Capita Personal Income Rankings for Counties:
50 Highest and 50 Lowest Per Capita Incomes of the 178 Counties in the Mideast Region, 1992
50 counties with the highest per capita incomes
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

County
New York, New York .............................
Westchester, New Y o r k .........................
Somerset, New Jersey ..........................
Bergen, New Jersey ..............................
Morris, New J e r s e y .................................
Montgomery, Maryland ..........................
Nassau, New Y o r k .................................
Montgomery, Pennsylvania ...................
Hunterdon, New J e r s e y .........................
Mercer. New Jersey ..............................
Chester. P e n n sy lv a n ia ...........................
Union, New Jersey ................................
District of Colum bia ...............................
Howard, Maryland .................................
Monmouth, New J e rs e y .........................
Talbot. M a ry la n d ....................................
Rockland. New Y o r k ..............................
Essex. New J e r s e y ................................
Middlesex. New Jersey .........................
Baltimore. M a ry la n d ...............................
Delaware, P e n n sy lv a n ia ........................
Putnam. New York ................................
Atlantic, New J e r s e y ..............................
Richmond. New Y o r k .............................
Allegheny, Pennsylvania .......................
Suffolk, New York ..................................
Bucks. Pennsylvania .............................
Albany. New Y o r k ..................................
Queens. New York ................................
New Castle. D e la w a re ...........................
Monroe. New Y o r k .................................
Burlington. New Jersey .........................
Montour. Pennsylvania ..........................
Cape May, New J e r s e y .........................
Sussex. New J e r s e y ..............................
Anne Arundel, Maryland ........................
Dutchess. New Y o r k ..............................
Passaic. New Jersey .............................
Ocean. New Jersey ...............................
Warren. New J e r s e y ..............................
Lehigh, Pennsylvania ............................
Schenectady. Kiew Y o r k ........................
Camden. New Jersey ............................
Queen Annes, M ary la n d ........................
Cumberland. P e n n sy lv a n ia ....................
Dauphin, P e n n sy lv a n ia ..........................
Prince Georges, M a ry la n d .....................
Hudson, New Jersey .............................
Worcester, Maryland .............................
Carroll, Maryland ...................................

Dollars
49,197
34,843
34,580
33,815
33,616
33,614
32,270
31,747
30,139
28,443
28,297
27,910
27,909
27,439
27,226
26,779
26,323
26,206
25,369
24,794
24,513
24,439
24,148
23,954
23,812
23,769
23,699
23,559
23,151
22,897
22,863
22,801
22,742
22,708
22,581
22,492
22,424
22,196
21,976
21,927
21,842
21,791
21,748
21,690
21,662
21,645
21,373
21,359
21,290
21,228

50 counties with the lowest per capita incomes
Percent of national
average
244.7
173.3
172.0
168.2
167.2
167.2
160.5
157.9
149.9
141.5
140.7
138.8
138.8
136.5
135.4
133.2
130.9
130.3
126.2
123.3
121.9
121.6
120.1
119.1
118.4
118.2
117.9
117.2
115.2
113.9
113.7
113.4
113.1
112.9
112.3
111.9
111.5
110.4
109.3
109.1
108.6
108.4
108.2
107.9
107.7
107.7
106.3
106.2
105.9
105.6

Rank
178
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
169
168
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
159
158
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
149
148
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
139
138
137
136
135
134
133
132
130
131
129

County
Forest, P e n n sy lv a n ia .............................
Somerset, Maryland ..............................
Allegany, New Y o r k ...............................
Fulton, Pennsylvania .............................
Huntingdon, P e n n sy lv a n ia .....................
Schuyler, New Y o r k ...............................
Lewis, New York ...................................
Bedford, Pennsylvania ..........................
St. Lawrence, New York .......................
Wyoming, New Y o r k ..............................
Franklin, New Y o r k ................................
Garrett, Maryland ..................................
Greene, Pennsylvania ...........................
Mifflin, P e n n sy lv a n ia ..............................
Yates, New York ...................................
Delaware, New York .............................
Tioga, Pennsylvania ..............................
Washington, New Y o r k ..........................
Caroline, Maryland ................................
Cattaraugus, New York .........................
Clinton, P e n n sy lv a n ia ............................
Fayette, Pennsylvania ...........................
Herkimer, New York ..............................
Clarion, P e n n sy lv a n ia ............................
Clinton, New York .................................
Indiana, Pennsylvania ...........................
Juniata, Pennsylvania ...........................
Schoharie, New York ............................
Cortland, New York ...............................
Jefferson, New Y o r k ..............................
Orleans, New York ................................
Bradford, Pennsylvania .........................
Clearfield, P e n n sy lv a n ia ........................
Cayuga, New York ................................
Chenango, New York ............................
Potter, Pennsylvania .............................
Crawford, Pennsylvania ........................
Kent, D e la w a re ......................................
McKean, P e n n sy lv a n ia ..........................
Perry, Pennsylvania ..............................
Armstrong, Pennsylvania ......................
Sullivan, Pennsylvania ..........................
Susquehanna, P e n n sy lv a n ia .................
Chautauqua, New York .........................
Allegany, M a ry la n d ................................
Lawrence, Pennsylvania .......................
Columbia, P e n n sy lv a n ia ........................
Somerset, P e n n sy lv a n ia ........................
Tompkins, New York .............................
Jefferson, Pennsylvania ........................

Dollars
13,021
13,279
13,328
13,564
13,615
13,931
13,967
14,042
14,065
14,143
14,147
14,183
14,204
14,616
14,763
14,801
14,833
14,859
14,942
14,950
14,998
15,092
15,130
15,137
15,263
15,275
15,385
15,396
15,531
15,535
15,568
15,584
15,691
15,712
15,728
15,742
15,792
15,909
15,949
15,953
15,998
16,018
16,065
16,083
16,102
16,165
16,202
16,232
16,232
16,296

Percent of national
average
64.8
66.0
66.3
67.5
67.7
69.3
69.5
69.8
70.0
70.3
70.4
70.5
70.6
72.7
73.4
73.6
73.8
73.9
74.3
74.4
74.6
75.1
75.3
75.3
75.9
76.0
76.5
76.6
77.2
77.3
77.4
77.5
78.0
78.1
78.2
78.3
78.5
79.1
79.3
79.3
79.6
79.7
79.9
80.0
80.1
80.4
80.6
80.7
80.7
81.1

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

M -81

Per Capita Personal Income Rankings for Counties:
50 Highest and 50 Lowest Per Capita Personal Incomes of the 183 Counties In the Far West Region, 1992
50 counties with the highest per capita incomes
Rank

County
1
2
3
4
5

6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

14

15
16
17
18
19
20
21

22
23
24
25

26

27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45

46

47
48
49
50

Marin, C a lifo rn ia .................................
San Francisco, California ..................
San Mateo, C a lifo rn ia ........................
King, W a sh in g to n ...............................
Ketchikan Gateway Borough, Alaska .
Wrangell-Petersburg, A la s k a .............
Contra Costa, C a lifo rn ia ....................
San Juan, Washington ......................
Santa Clara, California ......................
Valdez-Cordova C ensus Area, Alaska
Douglas, Nevada ...............................
W asnoe, Nevada ...............................
Juneau Borough, Alaska ...................
Anchorage Borough, A la s k a ..............
Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon, Alaska ....
Orange, C a lifo rn ia ..............................
Haines Borough, A la s k a ....................
Napa, C a lifo rn ia .................................
North Slope Borough, A la s k a ............
Honolulu, H a w a ii................................
Sitka Borough, Alaska .......................
Santa Barbara, California ..................
Alameda, California ...........................
Carson City, Nevada .........................
Sonoma, California ............................
Santa Cruz, California .......................
Placer, California ...............................
Aleutians East Borough, A la s k a ........
Ventura, C a lifo rn ia .............................
Dillingham C ensus Area, A la s k a .......
Multnomah, Oregon ........................... .
Kenai Peninsula Borough, A la s k a ..... .
Los Angeles, C a lifo rn ia ......................
Washington, Oregon ...........................
Clackam as, Oregon ........................... .
Aleutians West C ensus Area, Alaska .
Kodiak Island Borough, Alaska ..........
Storey, Nevada .................................. .
Clark, N e v a d a .................................... .
Snohomish, W a sh in g to n .................... .
Maui and Kalawao, Hawaii ................ .
San Diego, C a lifo rn ia ......................... .
Monterey, C a lifo rn ia ........................... .
Lincoln, Washington .......................... .
Sacramento, California ...................... .
Benton, Washington .......................... .
Thurston, W a shing to n........................ .
Chelan, Washington .......................... .
El Dorado, California ..........................
Yolo, California ...................................

Dollars
36,076
30,942
29,918
27,769
27,761
26,963
26,491
26,108
25,924
25,826
25,820
25,529
25,390
25,077
24,973
24,651
24,495
24,387
24,153
23,864
23,697
23,368
22,988
22,919
22,913
22,784
22,218
22,133
21,977
21,732
21,727
21,571
21,434
21,145
21,068
20,853
20,805
20,777
20,769
20,653
20,633
20,384
20,322
20,242
20,171
20,122
19,801
19,732
19,729
19,615

50 counties with the lowest per capita incomes
Percent of na­
tional average
179.4
153.9
148.8
138.1
138.1
134.1
131.8
129.9
128.9
128.5
128.4
127.0
126.3
124.7
124.2
122.6
121.8
121.3
120.1
118.7
117.9
116.2
114.3
114.0
114.0
113.3
110.5
110.1
109.3
108.1
108.1
107.3
106.6
105.2
104.8
103.7
103.5
103.3
103.3
102.7
102.6
101.4
101.1
100.7
100.3
100.1
98.5
98.1
98.1
97.6

NOTE.— Table includes only counties with total personal incomes of $50 million or more.

Rank
183
182
181
180
179
178
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
169
168
167
166
165
164
163
162
161,
160
159
158
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
149
148
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
139
138
137
136
135
134

County
W ade Hampton Census Area, Alaska .........
Del Norte, California .....................................
Kauai, H a w a ii................................................
Kings, California ...........................................
Ferry, Washington ........................................
Yuba, C a lifo rn ia ............................................
Imperial, C a lifo rn ia ........................................
Tehama, California .......................................
Lassen, C a lifo rn ia .........................................
Modoc, C a lifo rn ia ..........................................
Pend Oreille, W a sh in g to n .............................
Madera, California ........................................
Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska .........
Bethel C ensus Area, Alaska ........................
Stevens, W a sh in g to n ....................................
Malheur, O re g o n ...........................................
Glenn, C a lifo rn ia ...........................................
Merced. California ........................................
Morrow. O re g o n ............................................
Nome C ensus Area, Alaska .........................
Tulare, California ..........................................
Josephine. Oregon .......................................
Whitman, Washington ..................................
Tillamook, Oregon .........................................
Trinity, C a lifo rn ia ...........................................
Jefferson, Oregon ..........................................
Baker. Oregon ..............................................
Mason, Washington ......................................
Umatilla. O re g o n ...........................................
Matanuska-Susitna Borough. Alaska ...........
Klamath, Oregon ..........................................
Siskiyou, California .......................................
Polk, O re g o n .................................................
Kern. C a lifo rn ia .............................................
Union, Oregon ..............................................
Linn. Oregon .................................................
Coos. Oregon ...............................................
Butte. C a lifo rn ia ............................................
Harney. Oregon ............................................
Klickitat, Washington ....................................
Northwest Arctic Borough, A la s k a ................
Crook, Oregon ..............................................
Lake, Oregon ................................................
Kittitas. Washington ......................................
Grant. W a shing to n........................................
Amador. C a lifo rn ia ........................................
San Bernardino, California ...........................
Grant, O re g o n ...............................................

Dollars
9,993
11,683
11,721
13,174
13,476
13,730
13,827
14,037
14,237
14,243
14,326
14,361
14,406
14,416
14,447
14,625
14,694
14,717
14,731
14,954
15,015
15,070
15,081
15,101
15,152
15,190
15,210
15,231
15,361
15,441
15,562
15,620
15,690
15,708
15,748
15,836
15,839
15,853
15,934
15,935
15,939
15,974
16,121
16,129
16,152
16,251
16,289
16,433
16,466
16,474

Percent of na­
tional average
49.7
58.1
58.3
65.5
67.0
68.3
68.8
69.8
70.8
70.8
71.3
71.4
71.7
71.7
71.9
72.7
73.1
73.2
73.3
74.4
74.7
75.0
75.0
75.1
75.4
75.6
75.7
75.8
76.4
76.8
77.4
77.7
78.0
78.1
78.3
78.8
78.8
78.9
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.5
80.2
80.2
80.3
80.8
81.0
81.7
81.9
81.9

M-82

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Person al Income by Major S o u rce and Earn in gs by Industry for C o un ties and M etropolitan A r e a s 1
[Thousands of dollars]
Allegheny, Pennsylvania
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Total personal Incom e................................................................................
Nonfarm personal income ............................................................................
Farm Income2 ...............................................................................................

23,210,414
23,206,914
3,500

24,659,521
24,654,795
4,726

26,507,171
26,502,739
4,432

28,270,310
28,264,552
5,758

29,858,693
29,853,088
5,605

31,774,049
31,767,397
6,652

Population (thousands)3 ............................................. ....................................
Per capita personal income (dollars) ...............................................................

1,361.8
17,044

1,354.3
18,209

1,344.0
19,723

1,335.9
21,163

1,334.9
22,368

1,334.4
23,812

17,897,771
1,200,756
-1,844,236
14,852,779
4,387,338
3,970,297

19,122,397
1,328,287
-2,067,251
15,726,859
4,734,537
4,198,125

20,417,193
1,414,255
-2,225,063
16,777,875
5,300,358
4,428,938

21,951,500
1,521,343
-2,501,556
17,928,601
5,572,039
4,769,670

23,129,047
1,632,094
-2,615,035
18,881,918
5,685,843
5,290,932

24,789,657
1,720,177
-2,788,094
20,281,386
5,683,956
5,808,707

14,434,351
1,423,343
2,040,077
810
2,039,267

15,517,518
1,540,825
2,064,054
1,692
2,062,362

16,382,512
1,672,135
2,362,546
1,196
2,361,350

17,687,214
1,847,499
2,416,787
1,977
2,414,810

18,346,609
2,051,887
2,730,551
1,810
2,728,741

19,535,007
2,244,761
3.009,889
2,942
3,006,947

Nonfarm ........................................................................................................

3,500
17,894,271

4,726
19,117,671

4,432
20,412,761

5,758
21,945,742

5,605
23,123,442

6,652
24,783,005

P riv a te .......................................................................................................

15,988,556

17,095,307

18,261,444

19,629,341

20,699,488

22,231,401

F is h e rie s .........................................................................................
O ther8 ............................................................................................

37,494
36,542
952
812
140
0

37,656
37,402
254
88
166
0

39,199
38,750
449
358
91
0

42,785
42,368
417
294
123
0

50,254
49,743
511
361
150
0

73,528
73,091
437
283
154
0

Coal m in in g ........................................................................................
Oil and gas extractio n........................................................................
Metal mining ......................................................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls ...................................................

160,502
108,669
45,023
a
«

145,700
92,372
45,079
2,549
5,700

126,709
74,178
46,074
1,606
4,851

126,966
73,728
47,824
749
4,665

141,660
90,057
44,439
1,212
5,952

124,831
69,061
48,486
pi
pi

General building con tractors..............................................................
Heavy construction contractors ........................................................
Special trade co n tra cto rs...................................................................

1,475,891
400,713
155,765
919,413

1,424,789
380,407
150,064
894,318

1,433,163
343,634
145,950
943,579

1,496,940
351,370
158,286
987,284

1,510,921
343,990
162,468
1,004,463

1,722,061
362,722
207,864
1,151,475

3,564,788
1,075,060
217,847
pi
13,381
36,533
236,261
458,847
24,249
0
83,967
pi
2,489,728
23,719
33,720
763,500
356,957
354,271
411,201
50,051
45,170

3,722,463
1,082,802
216,963
pi
15,087
36,575
252,279
430,132
24,634
0
103,191
pi
2,639,661
37,026
38,145
858,289
355,166
374,734
460,522
48,172
10,633

271,129
146,336
33,674

276,470
131,604
48,900

3,616,408
1,061,174
223,261
pi
16,579
35,864
252,900
423,342
23,390
0
81,953
pi
2,555,234
46,585
35,999
950,443
340,830
367,565
289,676
41,402
7,595
0
286,351
141,821
46,967

3,844,760
1,097,985
242,222
pi
19,424
35,695
259,114
435,337
18,833
0
83,486

Machinery, except e le ctrica l...........................................................
Electric and electronic e q uip m e n t.................................................
Trans, equip, excl. motor vehicles ................................................
Motor vehicles and e q u ip m e n t......................................................
O rdnance9 ......................................................................................
Stone, clay, and glass p ro d u cts....................................................
Instruments and related products ..................................................
Misc. manufacturing industries .....................................................

3,285,893
936,845
201,949
pj
10,919
29,687
226,287
359,813
25,144
0
79,305
p>
2,349,048
23,935
35,696
694,301
335,256
348,600
397,658
69,644
45,671
(n)
244,907
116,093
37,287

2,746,775
53,619
36,980
1,094,012
351,487
376,342
298,741
47,245
7,789
0
292,326
142,572
45,662

3,937,976
1,069,208
230,139
pi
19,565
30,227
235,391
443,719
25,131
0
81,019
pi
2,868,768
57,897
37,911
1,206,500
366,970
371,743
280,252
55,652
8,477
pi
303,074
141,823
38,469

Transportation and public utilities .........................................................
Railroad transportation .....................................................................
Trucking and warehousing ................................................................
Water transportation ..........................................................................
Other transportation ...........................................................................
Local & interurban passenger tra n s it............................................
Transportation by a i r .....................................................................
Pipelines, except natural g a s .........................................................
Transportation s e r v ic e s .................................................................
Communication ..................................................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ..................................................

1,114,918
67,236
151,865
10,953
312,943
50,310
o
p)
45,263
291,129
280,792

1,203,037
68,986
168,426
12,857
358,066
51,341
p)
pi
48,607
306,344
288,358

1,299,477
68,868
188,713
14,242
411,871
53,457
pi
pi
50,940
314,275
301,508

1,659,893
59,155
205,500
12,668
734,251
58,427
0
P)
51,988
330,678
317,641

1,799,266
52,426
208,538
15,442
875,066
66,343
p>
p)
49,395
295,500
352,294

1,927,370
50,197
215,491
17,190
890,999
68,828
pi
pi
51,320
384,552
368,941

Income by place of residence

Derivation of personal Income:
Less: Personal cont. for social insur.4 ........................................................
Plus: Adjustment for residence3 .................................................................
Equals: Net earn, by place of re s id e n c e .....................................................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent6 .............................................................
Plus: Transfer payments ..............................................................................
Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:

Nonfarm ....................................................................................................
Earnings by Industry:

Agricultural s e rv ic e s ...........................................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and other8 ..........................................................

M anufacturing........................................................................................
Food and kindred products ............................................................
Textile mill products .......................................................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u c ts.................................................
Paper and allied products ..............................................................
Printing and p u b lish in g ...................................................................
Chem icals and allied p ro d u c ts.......................................................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts.........................................................
Tobacco m anufactures...................................................................
Rubber and misc. plastic products ................................................
Leather and leather p ro d u c ts........................................................
Durable goods ...................................................................................
Lumber and wood products ..........................................................
Furniture and fixtures ....................................................................
Prim ary metal industries ...............................................................

pi

0

pi

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

M -8 3

Appendix A

Person al Income by M ajor S o u rce and E a rn in gs by Industry for C o u n tie s and M etropolitan A r e a s '— Continued
[Thousands of dollars]
Allegheny, Pennsylvania
1987

1988

1989

1991

1990

1992

W holesale trade ....................................................................................

1,219,991

1,347,830

1,398,288

1,475,297

1,496,966

1,582,292

Retail t r a d e ............................................................................................
Building materials and garden eq u ip m e n t........................................
General merchandise stores ............................................................
Food s to re s ........................................................................................
Automotive dealers & service stations .............................................
Apparel and accessory stores ...........................................................
Home furniture and furnishings stores .............................................
Eating and drinking places ................................................................
M iscellaneous retail ...........................................................................

1,714,283
59,758
259,878
271,004
250,540
100,338
108,301
403,070
261,394

1,795,128
65,396
265,342
298,168
263,740
98,746
110,660
424,919
268,157

1,921,924
72,983
276,388
338,574
264,900
102,800
129,226
432,133
304,920

1,959,981
61,215
274,068
343,092
263,556
106,710
127,910
461,116
322,314

2,024,485
64,765
276,471
357,227
270,823
116,946
118,716
493,152
326,385

2,140,986
69,714
284,265
367,906
284,459
121,613
122,675
542,003
348,351

Finance, insurance, and real e s ta te .....................................................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions..............................
Other finance, insurance, and real estate ........................................
Security and commodity brokers and serv.....................................
Insurance carriers ..........................................................................
Insurance agents, brokers, and s e r v ic e s ......................................
Real estate .....................................................................................
Combined real estate, insurance, e tc .10.......................................
Holding and other investment com panies ....................................
S e r v ic e s .................................................................................................
Hotels and other lodging p la c e s ........................................................
Personal services .............................................................................
Private households ............................................................................
Business services .............................................................................
Auto repair, services, and garages ..................................................
M iscellaneous repair services ...........................................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ................................................
Motion pictures ..................................................................................
Health services ..................................................................................
Legal s e r v ic e s ....................................................................................
Educational s e r v ic e s ..........................................................................
Social se rvice s11 ...............................................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens .........................................
Membership o rg anizatio ns.................................................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s12........................................
M iscellaneous s e r v ic e s ......................................................................

1,401,401
615,964
785,437
113,174
265,200
153,798
127,649
-3,122
128,738
5,578,183
89,393
170,186
28,005
1,058,769
129,277
68,226
127,021
pi
2,021,388
405,584
537,401
122,134

1,439,321
620,353
818,968
126,185
282,991
179,052
157,163

1,538,438
643,871
894,567
143,662
313,638
187,550
178,980

1,685,870
678,099
1,007,771
138,168
355,153
215,700
186,595

1,751,116
678,395
1.072,721
151,911
362,470
229,615
212,186

1,956,259
730,228
1,226,031
224,263
377,697
246,940
229,519

73,577
6,137,058
92,289
170,969
30,029
841,178
132,299
71,665
143,172

70,737
6,781,783
102,428
168,478
32,091
912,835
129,406
69,796
165,294

112,155
7,565,201
112,367
177,450
33,806
1,011,683
135,692
71,052
192,843

116,539
8,080,060
128,007
181,751
32,633
1,044,511
141,014
64,407
229,307

147,612
8,766,098
136,314
187,819
35,875
1,112,157
138,155
77,164
261,723

2,212,426
476,967
600,974
135,953

2,463,693
552,068
626,496
154,291

2,758,228
611,892
664,378
176,282

3,334,681
692,173
757,453
244,944

626,708

183,403
977,266
35,856

200,417
1,114,251
49,933

212,771
1,311,629
49,864

3,020,410
624,771
707,375
225,319
<d)
215,246
1,365,829
48,270

Government and government e n te rp rise s...................................................
Federal, civilian .........................................................................................
M ilita ry .......................................................................................................
State and local ..........................................................................................

1,905,715
467,889
56,135
1,381,691

2,022,364
506,372
56,362
1,459,630

2,151,317
538,169
58,122
1,555,026

2,316,401
582,101
61,446
1,672,854

2,423,954
607,249
63,286
1,753,419

2,551,604
643,710
66,856
1,841,038

pi
(n)

166,063

D Not shown to avoid disclosure of confidential information; estimates are included in totals.
N Data not available for this year.
1. 1969-74 based on 1967 SIC. 1975-87 based on 1972 SIC. 1988-92 based on 1987 SIC.
2. Farm income consists of proprietors’ net farm income, the w ages of hired farm labor,
the pay-in-kind of hired farm labor, and the salaries of officers of corporate farms.
3. C ensus Bureau midyear population estimates. Estimates for 1990-92 reflect State and
county population estimates available as of February 1994.
4. Personal contributions for social insurance are included in earnings by type and industry
but excluded from personal income.
5. U.S. adjustment for residence consists of adjustments for border workers: Income of
U.S. residents commuting outside U.S. borders to work less income of foreign residents com­
muting inside U.S. borders to work plus certain Caribbean seasonal workers.
6. Includes the capital consumption adjustment for rental income of persons.

n

n

n

n

n

n

n

pi

pi

n

pi

n

n

pi

227,532
1.444,032
52,477

7. Includes the inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.
8. "Other” consists of wages and salaries of U.S. residents employed by international orga­
nizations and foreign em bassies and consulates in the U.S.
9. Under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification, ordnance was reclassified to four twodigit industries: Fabricated metal products; electronic equipment, except computer equipment;
transportation equipment; and instruments and related products.
10. Under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification, combined real estate, insurance, etc.,
was reclassified to four two-digit industries: Nondepository credit institutions; insurance
agents, brokers, and services; real estate; and legal services.
11. This category is new under the 1972 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore esti­
mates prior to 1975 do not exist.
12. t h is category is new under the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification; therefore esti­
mates prior to 1988 do not exist.

M -8 4

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Person al Income by Major S ou rce and Earn in gs by Major Industry for C o u n tie s and Metropolitan A r e a s 1
[Thousands of dollars]
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1987

1988

1990

1989

1992

1991

Income by place of residence
23,695,917
23,695,887
<l )

24,805,945
24,805,914
o

26,029,031
26,028,996
(l )

27,563,304
27,563,260

Population (thousands)3 .............................................
Per capita personal income (dollars) ..........................

1,616.1
14,663

1,599.0
15,513

1,591.2
16,358

1,581.6
17,428

1,567.3
18,228

1,552.6
19,316

Derivation of personal income:
Earnings by place of w o r k .......................................
Less: Personal cont. for social insurance4 .............
Plus: Adjustment for residence5 .............................
Equals: Net earn, by place of r e s id e n c e .................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent6 ........................
Plus: Transfer payments .........................................

22,510,349
1,491,244
-6,262,483
14,756,622
3,421,433
5,517,862

23,612,342
1,614,960
-6,583,426
15,413,956
3,506,059
5,885,930

24,444,379
1,664,467
-6,720,018
16,059,894
3,757,410
6,211,727

25,550,558
1,728,019
-6,987,922
16,834,617
4,017,573
6,711,114

26,080,945
1,793,807
-7,113,727
17,173,411
3,790,582
7,605,597

26,881,873
1,823,136
-7,144,061
17,914,676
3,763,413
8,312,102

18,968,599
1,682,901
1,858,849

20,117,603
1,810,191
1,684,548
(L)
1,684,544

20,751,927
1,959,387
1,733,065
1,733,058

21,723,242
2,083,764
1,743,552
«
1,743,541

21,978,972
2,255,948
1,846,025
<L>
1,846,015

22,523,831
2,368,057
1,989,985
«
1,989,973

(l )
23,612,311
19,259,985
22,901
2,667
730,721
3,048,055
1.972,709
1,075,346
1,776,548
1,615,012
1,707,706
2,663,766
7,692,609
4,352,326
1,733,984
244,820
2,373,522

(l )
24,444,344
19,900,943
25,953
2,082
717,807
3,181,558
2,094,779
1,086,779
1,783,058
1,586,095
1,712,938
2,635,934
8,255,518
4,543,401
1,823,545
198,470
2,521,386

(4
25,550,514
20,617,843
28,048
1,661
713,607
3,147,789
2,120,524
1,027,265
1,731,599
1,572,876
1,694,013
2,677,436
9,050,814
4,932,671
1,997,439
244,159
2,691,073

(4
26,080,899
21,023,177
29,113
3,463
595,675
3,126,546
2,156,321
970,225
1,732,545
1,446,956
1,721,594
2,780,667
9,586,618
5,057,722
2,058,969
264,051
2,734,702

<l )
26,881,826
21,648,579
24,663
5,119
563,505
3,078,964
2,167,725
911,239
1,793,210
1,467,992
1,682,048
2,824,384
10,208,694
5,233,247
2,058,043
236,924
2,938,280

<4

28,569,590
28,569,544
(l >

29,990,191
29,990,144
«

Total personal in c o m e ..................................................
Nonfarm personal income .......................................
Farm incom e2 ...........................................................

Earnings by place of work
Components of earnings:
W ages and s a la rie s .................................................
Other labor in c o m e ...................................................
Proprietors’ incom e7 .................................................
Farm ......................................................................
Nonfarm ................................................................
Earnings by industry:
Farm .........................................................................
Nonfarm ....................................................................
Private ...................................................................
Ag. serv.. for., fish., and other8 .......................
Mining ................................................................
Construction .....................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................
Nondurable goods ........................................
Durable goods ..............................................
Transportation and public utilities ....................
W holesale trade ...............................................
Retail trade ........................................................
Finance, insurance, and real e s ta te .................
S e r v ic e s .............................................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s...............
Federal, civilian ....................................................
M ilita ry ...................................................................
State and local .....................................................

<4

1,858,843

h

22,510,319
18,315,228
24,319
3,549
655,934
2,942,298
1.882,224
1,060,074
1,744,089
1,470,669
1,631,705
2,511,574
7,331,091
4,195,091
1,620,132
275,038
2,299,921

L Less than $50,000. Estimates are included in totals.
1. 1969-74 based on 1967 SIC. 1975-87 based on 1972 SIC. 1988-92 based on 1987 SIC.
2. Farm income consists of proprietors’ net farm income, the w ages of hired farm labor,
the pay-in-kind of hired farm labor, and the salaries of officers of corporate farms.
3. Census Bureau midyear population estimates. Estimates for 1990-92 reflect State and
county population estimates available as of February 1994.
4. Personal contributions for social insurance are included in earnings by type and industry
but excluded from personal income.

(4

5. U.S. adjustment for residence consists of adjustments for border workers: Income of
U.S. residents commuting outside U.S. borders to work less income of foreign residents com­
muting inside U.S. borders to work plus certain Caribbean seasonal workers.
6. Includes the capital consumption adjustment for rental income of persons.
7. Includes the inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.
8. “Other” consists of wages and salaries of U.S. residents employed by international orga­
nizations and foreign em bassies and consulates in the U.S.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

M-85

Full-Time and Part-Time Employees by Major Industry for Counties and Metropolitan Areas 1
W ayne, M ichigan
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

E m p lo ym e nt by p la ce of w ork
Total em p lo ym ent .....................................................

1,034,478

1,041,233

1,043,700

1,036,041

990,633

975,912

B y type:
Wage and salary .....................................................
Proprietors ................................................................
Farm .....................................................................
Nonfarm2 ..............................................................

959,691
74,787
354
74,433

962,442
78,791
346
78,445

967,785
75,915
342
75,573

961,551
74,490
335
74,155

911,914
78,719
335
78,384

895,131
80,781
335
80,446

B y Industry:
Farm .....................................................................
Nonfarm ................................................................
Private ..............................................................
Ag.services,forestry,fishing, and other3 .......
Mining ...........................................................
Construction ..................................................
Manufacturing ................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s.................
W holesale t r a d e ............................................
Retail trade ...................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .............
Services .........................................................
Government and government enterprises .......
Federal, civilian .............................................
M ilita ry ............................................................
State and lo c a l...............................................

674
1,033,804
896,151
3,202
753
30,907
232,715
59,494
55,474
162,214
74,132
277,260
137,653
17,904
8,337
111,412

647
1,040,586
901,292
3,595
802
32,608
227,668
61,438
54,618
165,068
76,736
278,759
139,294
18,095
8,251
112,948

600
1,043,100
900,695
3,519
837
31,582
218,488
62,913
54,978
169,206
74,923
284,249
142,405
17,846
8,262
116,297

617
1,035,424
895,394
3,561
794
30,269
207,993
65,776
53,647
170,431
72,687
290,236
140,030
17,917
7,937
114,176

610
990,023
853,449
3,837
757
27,724
189,816
61,355
52,642
160,981
72,999
283,338
136,574
17,438
7,560
111,576

578
975,334
840,896
3,664
725
26,071
186,278
58,551
51,217
154,601
68,855
290,934
134,438
17,356
7,201
109,881

1. 1969-74 based on 1967 SIC. 1975-87 based on 1972 SIC. 1988-92 based on 1987 SIC.
2. Excludes limited partners.

3.
“Other” consists of the number of jobs held by U.S. residents employed by international
organizations and foreign em bassies and consulates in the United States.

Regional Economic Profiles for Counties and Metropolitan Areas
W ashing ton , P e n n sy lv a n ia
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

P la ce of re sid en ce p rofile
Total p e rso n a l inco m e ($000) ..................................
Nonfarm personal income .......................................
Farm in c o m e ............................................................

2,866,943
2,864,615
2,328

3,038,486
3,034,512
3,974

3,255,663
3,249,784
5,879

3,496,695
3,492,045
4,650

3,656,871
3,653,547
3,324

3,883,389
3,877,721
5,668

D erivation o f p e rso n a l Income:
Net earn ing s1 ..........................................................
Transfer p a ym e n ts...................................................
income maintenance2 ..........................................
Unemployment insurance ....................................
Retirement and o t h e r ...........................................
Dividends, interest, and rent ...................................

1,784,831
614,707
43,437
25,030
546,240
467,405

1,904,478
634,450
46,090
21,977
566,383
499,558

2,032,280
669,741
47,654
19,444
602,643
553,642

2.194,009
724,487
52,029
23,721
648,737
578,199

2.274,078
807,597
55,343
32,567
719,687
575,196

2,422,127
887,603
61,967
50,017
775,619
573,659

Population (thousands)3 ..........................................

207.9

207.2

205.7

204.7

205.0

206.1

P er cap ita in c o m e s (d o lla rs)4:
Per capita personal in c o m e .....................................
Per capita net earnings ...........................................
Per capita transfer payments ..................................
Per capita income maintenance ..........................
Per capita unemployment insurance ...................
Per capita retirement and o th e r ...........................
Per capita dividends, interest, and rent ..................

13,789
8,584
2,956
209
120
2,627
2,248

14,664
9,191
3,062
222
106
2,733
2,411

15,828
9,880
3,256
232
95
2,930
2,692

17,085
10,720
3,540
254
116
3,170
2,825

17,835
11,091
3,939
270
159
3,510
2,805

18,846
11,755
4,308
301
243
3,764
2,784

Total e a rn in g s (place o f w ork, $000) ......................
W ages and s a la r ie s .................................................
Other labor income ..................................................
Proprietors’ in c o m e ..................................................
Nonfarm ................................................................
Farm .....................................................................

1,545,815
1,210,490
142,516
192,809
192,491
318

1,635,981
1,286,566
152,633
196,782
195,074
1,708

1,740,522
1,372,129
165,809
202,584
199,125
3,459

1,872,270
1,477,958
182,358
211,954
210,116
1,838

1,938,866
1,514,916
196,996
226,954
226,464
490

2,063,075
1,595,363
216,581
251,131
248,236
2,895

Total e m p lo ym ent (full- and part-time) ...................
W age and salary jo b s ..............................................
Number of proprietors .............................................
Nonfarm3 ..............................................................
Farm .....................................................................

78,886
64,425
14,461
12,630
1,831

80,921
65,932
14,989
13,205
1,784

82,531
67,899
14,632
12,868
1,764

84,495
68,784
15,711
13,984
1,727

85,637
69,108
16,529
14,809
1,720

86,046
69,141
16,905
15,217
1,688

A verag e e a rn in g s per Job (dollars) .........................
Wage and salary earnings' per job (dollars) ............
Average earnings per nonfarm proprietor (dollars) ..

19,596
18,789
15,241

20,217
19,514
14,773

21,089
20,208
15,474

22,158
21,487
15,025

22,641
21,921
15,292

23,976
23,074
16,313

P la ce o f w ork profile

1. Total earnings less personal contributions for social insurance adjusted to place of resi­
dence.
2. Includes supplemental security income payments, payments to families with dependent
children (AFDC), general assistance payments, food stamp payments, and other assistance
payments, including emergency assistance.

3. Census Bureau midyear population estimates. Estimates for 1990-92 reflect State and
county population estimates available as of February 1994.
4. Type of income divided by population yields a per capita for that type of income.
5. Excludes limited partners.

M-86

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Total Wages and Salaries for Counties and Metropolitan Areas
[Thousands of dollars]
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Connecticut ..........................................................................................

41,402,605

45,516,450

47,591,119

49,100,254

49,324,887

51,176,634

Consolidated metropolitan areas:
New York-No. New Jersey-Long Island, N Y -N J-C T-P A ......................

246,113,784

269,005,257

280,241,592

293,739,922

292,962,222

311,312,455

Metropolitan areas:
Hartford, C T .......................................................................................
New Haven-Bridgeport-Stamford-Danbury-Waterbury, C T ..............
New London-Norwich, C T .................................................................

15,906,058
20,745,758
2,809,178

17,371,973
23,019,768
2,962,737

18,276,489
23,910,984
3,122,063

18,948,148
24,619,112
3,169,878

18,952,629
24,770,789
3,255,450

19,353,361
25,991,885
3,389,483

Counties:
Connecticut (metropolitan portion) ........................................................
Connecticut (nonmetropolitan portion) ..................................................

39,460,994
1,941,611

43,354,478
2,161,972

45,309,536
2,281,583

46,737,138
2,363,116

46,978,868
2,346,019

48,734,729
2,441,905

Fairfield ..............................................................................................
Hartford ..............................................................................................
L itch fie ld .............................................................................................
M id d le se x ...........................................................................................
New Haven ........................................................................................
New London .......................................................................................
Tolland ...............................................................................................
W in d h a m ............................................................................................

12,314,379
13,715,413
1,300,249
1,503,024
8,431,379
2,809,178
687,621
641,362

13,712,205
14,948,283
1,444,961
1,634,875
9,307,563
2,962,737
788,815
717,011

14,232,064
15,719,356
1,533,280
1,708,278
9,678,920
3,122,063
848,855
748,303

14,739,540
16,299,332
1,586,256
1,771,710
9,879,572
3,169,878
877,106
776,860

14,779,677
16,240,753
1,561,645
1,833,662
9,991,112
3,255,450
878,214
784,374

15,653,776
16,604,344
1,627,862
1,834,905
10,338,109
3,389,483
914,112
814,043

1991

1992

Wage and Salary Employees for Counties and Metropolitan Areas
1987

1988

1989

1990

Connecticut ..........................................................................................

1,738,551

1,767,620

1,759,669

1,718,920

1,638,086

1,603,385

Consolidated metropolitan areas:
New York-No. New Jersey-Long Island, N Y -N J-C T-P A ......................

9,688,846

9,786,901

9,790,309

9,653,025

9,204,210

9,024,405

Metropolitan areas:
Hartford, C T .......................................................................................
New Haven-Bridgeport-Stamford-Danbury-Waterbury, C T ..............
New London-Norwich, C T .................................................................

669,305
838,411
131,573

681,714
852,854
131,047

679,403
845,454
131,798

668,183
820,347
128,467

634,480
782,413
123,651

617,089
766,441
123,254

Counties:
Connecticut (metropolitan portion) ........................................................
Connecticut (nonmetropolitan portion) .................................................

1,639,289
99,262

1,665,615
102,005

1,656,655
103,014

1,616,997
101,923

1,540,544
97,542

1,506,784
96,601

Fairfield ..............................................................................................
Hartford ..............................................................................................
Litch fie ld .............................................................................................
M id d le se x ...........................................................................................
New Haven ........................................................................................
New London .......................................................................................
Tolland ...............................................................................................
Windham ............................................................................................

449,486
563,035
63,997
70,096
388,925
131,573
36,174
35,265

455,309
572,834
65,727
71,032
397,545
131,047
37,848
36,278

450,078
570,842
66,722
70,585
395,376
131,798
37,976
36,292

435,490
561,118
66,201
68,983
384,857
128,467
38,082
35,722

416,372
530,308
63,596
67,650
366,041
123,651
36,522
33,946

407,577
515,871
62,635
64,269
358,864
123,254
36,949
33,966

Average Wage per Job for Counties and Metropolitan A reas1
[Dollars]
1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Connecticut ..........................................................................................

23,814

25,750

27,045

28,565

30,111

31,918

Consolidated metropolitan areas:
New York-No. New Jersey-Long Island, N Y -N J-C T-P A ......................

25,402

27,486

28,624

30,430

31,829

34,497

Metropolitan areas:
Hartford, C T .......................................................................................
New Haven-Bridgeport-Stamford-Danbury-Waterbury, C T ..............
New London-Norwich, C T .................................................................

23,765
24,744
21,351

25,483
26,991
22,608

26,901
28,282
23,688

28,358
30,011
24,675

29,871
31,659
26,328

31,362
33,912
27,500

Counties:
Connecticut (metropolitan portion) ........................................................
Connecticut (nonmetropolitan portion) ..................................................

24,072
19,560

26,029
21,195

27,350
22,148

28,904
23,185

30,495
24,051

32,344
25.278

Fairfield ..............................................................................................
Hartford ..............................................................................................
L itch fie ld .............................................................................................
M id d le se x ...........................................................................................
New Haven ........................................................................................
New London .......................................................................................
Tolland ...............................................................................................
W in d h a m ............................................................................................

27,397
24,360
20,317
21,442
21,679
21,351
19,009
18,187

30,116
26,095
21,984
23,016
23,413
22,608
20,842
19,764

31,621
27,537
22,980
24,202
24,480
23,688
22,352
20,619

33,846
29,048
23,961
25,683
25,671
24,675
23,032
21,747

35,496
30,625
24,556
27,105
27,295
26,328
24,046
23,107

38,407
32,187
25,990
28,550
28,808
27,500
24,740
23,966

1.
The employment estimates used to create the average wage per job are a job, not per­
son, count; people holding more than one job are counted in the estimates for each job they
hold.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

BEARFACTS
Summary of Personal Income for States,
Counties, and Metropolitan Areas:
Travis, Texas
1991-92

Travis is one of the 254 counties in Texas. It is part of the Austin-San Marcos
metropolitan area. Its 1992 population of 613,200 ranked 6th in the State.

Per capita personal income
In 1992, Travis had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $20,072. This PCPI ranked
24th in the State, and was 109 percent of the State average ($18,437) and 100 percent
of the national average ($20,105). The 1992 PCPI reflected an increase of 5.9 percent
from 1991. The 1991-92 State change was 5.7 percent and the national change was 4.9
percent.

Total personal income
In 1992, Travis had a total personal income (TPI) of $12,307,128.’ This TPI ranked 5th
in the State and accounted for 3.8 percent of the State total. The 1992 TPI reflected an
increase of 9.0 percent from 1991. The 1991-92 State change was 7.7 percent and the
national change was 6.1 percent.

Components of total personal income
Total personal income (TPI) includes the earnings (wages and salaries, other labor income,
and proprietors’ income); dividends, interest, and rent; and transfer payments received by
the residents of Travis. In 1992, earnings were 73.3 percent of TPI; dividends, interest,
and rent were 15.0 percent; and transfer payments were 11.7 percent. From 1991 to
1992, earnings increased 10.1 percent; dividends, interest, and rent increased 0.7 percent;
and transfer payments increased 14.1 percent.

Earnings by industry
Earnings of persons employed in Travis increased from $10,490,459 in 1991 to
$11,530,761 in 1992, an increase of 9.9 percent.1 The largest industries in 1992 were
services, which accounted for 29.2 percent of earnings; state and local government, 21.1
percent; and durable goods manufacturing, 15.0 percent. Of the industries that accounted
for at least 5 percent of earnings in 1992, the slowest growing from 1991 to 1992 was
state and local government, which increased 7.6 percent; The fastest was services, which
increased 13.1 percent.
1. A l l incom e estimates w ith the exception o f P C P I are in thousands o f dollars.

Regional Economic Information System
Bureau of Economic Analysis

M-87

M -8 8

Appendix A

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Transfer Paym ents for C o un ties and M etropolitan A reas
[Thousands of dollars]
Palm Beach, Florida
1987

Total transfer payments .......................................................................................

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

2,122,009

2,262,203

2,516,299

2,797,201

3,115,411

3,438,527

2,033,320
1,401,887
1,147,243
12,616
131,804
51,195
52,297
4,298
2,434
501,840
46,772
15,585
11,487
15,540
4,160
23,289
23,102
62

2,169,705
1,469,944
1,195,395
12,298
141,826
53,897
58,644
4,556
3,328
554,630
53,695
16,739
13,023
16,072
7,861
26,110
25,929
66

2,418,248
1,598,986
1,309,146
12,788
148,537
56,003
63,525
5,793
3,194
649,433
63,445
18,521
15,559
19,041
10,324
32,870
32,705
65

3,010,838
1,892,450
1,558,369
13,530
168,251
62,994
78,492
7,916
2,898
847,549
104,443
25,589
25,907
37,540
15,407
86,768
86,327
220

3,326,006
2,022,742
1,673,437
13,741
171,917
64,916
86,281
8,758
3,692
922,786
147,641
31,670
40,152
52,664
23,155
149,425
148,277
260

88
(L)
51,983
44,755
1,365
5,705
158
6,921
628

103
(l )
56,385
49,161
1,299
5,785
140
8,365
576

86
(l )
59,908
52,780
1,315
5,612
201
13,100
506

2,694,436
1,746,860
1,436,359
13,049
158,749
58,949
70,860
5,974
2,920
743,130
79,162
21,472
19,519
25,723
12,448
49,106
48,863
109
«
121
«
63,219
56,070
1,229
5,715
205
12,133
826

67,236
59,734
1,409
5,862
231
11,379
1,013

855
(L)
69,326
61,853
1,567
5,688
218
12,361
1,725

Payments to nonprofit institutions .......................................................................
federal government payments ........................................................................
State and local government paym ents9 ..........................................................
Business payments ..........................................................................................

44,568
12,118
15,894
16,556

47,086
13,603
16,674
16,809

51,042
13,914
20,041
17,087

54,074
14,807
22,558
16,709

56,929
16,680
24,075
16,174

62,142
19,250
26,669
16,223

Business payments to individuals1 0 ....................................................................

44,121

45,412

47,009

48,691

47,644

50,379

Old-age, surv. and disability insur. payments .............................................
Railroad retirement and disability payments ...............................................
Federal civil, employee retirement payments .............................................
Military retirement payments ........................................................................
State and local govt, employee ret. p a y m e n ts............................................
W orkers’ compensation payments (federal and state) ...............................
Other govt, disab. insur. and ret. p a y .1 ......................................................
Medical paym ents2 ..........................................................................................
Income maintenance benefit payments ..........................................................
Supplemental security income (SSI) payments ..........................................
Aid to families with dependent children (AFDC) .........................................
Food s ta m p s .................................................................................................
Other income m aintenance3 ........................................................................
Unemployment insurance benefit p a ym e n ts...................................................
State unemployment insurance compensation ...........................................
Unemp. compensation for fed. civilian empl. ( U C F E ) .................................
Unemp. compensation for railroad employees ...........................................
Unemp. compensation for veterans (UCX) ..................................................
Other unemployment com pensation4 ..........................................................
Veterans benefit payments .............................................................................
Veterans pensions and compensation payments .......................................
Educ. assistance to vets, dependents, and survivors5 ...............................
Veterans life insurance benefit payments ...................................................
Other assistance to veterans6 .....................................................................
Fed educ. and training asst, pay (excl. vets)7 ...............................................
Other payments to individuals8 .......................................................................

o

L Less than $50,000. Estimates are included in totals.
1. Includes temporary disability payments and black lung payments.
2. Consists of medicare payments, medical vendor payments, and C H A M P U S payments.
3. Includes general assistance, emergency assistance, refugee assistance, foster home
care payments, earned income tax credits, and energy assistance.
4. Consists of trade readjustment allowance payments, redwood park benefit payments,
public service employment benefit payments, and transitional benefit payments.
5. Includes veterans’ readjustment benefit payments and educational assistance to spouses
and children of disabled or deceased veterans.
6. Includes payments to paraplegics, payments for autos and conveyances for disabled vet­
erans, veterans’ aid and veterans’ bonuses.
7. Includes federal fellowship payments (National Science Foundation fellowships and train­
eeships, subsistence payments to State maritime academy cadets, and other federal fellow-

fi

n

O')

208

h

O')

ships), interest subsidy on higher education loans, basic educational opportunity grants, and
Job Corps payments.
8. Includes Bureau of Indian Affairs payments, education exchange payments, Alaska Per­
manent Fund dividend payments, compensation of survivors of public safety officers, compen­
sation of victims of crime, compensation of victims of Hurricane Hugo and the Loma Prieta
earthquake, compensation for Japanese internment, and other special payments to individ­
uals.
9. Consists of State and local government payments for foster home care supervised by
private agencies, State and local government educational assistance payments to nonprofit
institutions, and other State and local government payments to nonprofit institutions.
10. Includes personal injury payments to individuals other than employees and other busi­
ness transfer payments.

Farm Income and Expenses for Counties
[Thousands of dollars]

Fresno, California
1987

Cash receipts from marketings ...................................................................
Total livestock and p ro d u cts.........................................................................
Total c r o p s ....................................................................................................

Other In co m e ..................................................................................................
Government payments .................................................................................
Imputed income" and rent received 1 ............................................................

Production e xpenses.....................................................................................
Feed p u rch a se d ............................................................................................
Livestock purchased .....................................................................................
Seed purchased ...........................................................................................
Fertilizers and lime (includes agricultural chemicals, 1978 forward) ..........
Petroleum products purchased ...................................................................
Hired farm labor e xp e n se s2 .........................................................................
All other production e xp e nse s3 ...................................................................

Value of inventory change ............................................................................
L iv e sto c k .......................................................................................................
Crops ............................................................................................................

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1,957,538
445,295
1,512,243

2,010,804
517,415
1,493,389

2,204,383
630,835
1,573,548

2,527,011
746,507
1,780,504

2,123,536
734,763
1,388,773

2,155,938
675,852
1,480,086

126,746
57,778
68,968

119,270
41,123
78,147

136,656
52,100
84,556

114,895
23,828
91,067

115,097
21,788
93,309

147,567
56,885
90,682

1,373,151
160,753
95,029
13,225
125,086
35,556
333,006
610,496

1,489,493
184,311
111,683
18,212
134,964
36,673
374,410
629,240

1,672,665
195,926
127,857
21,626
151,547
38,644
429,588
707,477

1,812,932
192,797
142,682
23,839
154,666
48,828
505,828
744,292

1,897,017
177,525
143,954
28,869
174,627
49,093
535,655
787,294

1,846,579
181,868
123,689
26,478
177,380
46,525
557,692
732,947

14,570
-4,290
18,860

38,692
2,152
36,540

20,862
6,132
14,730

-76,609
-11,766
-64,843

64,424
-6,300
70,724

51,453
-310
51,763

2,084,284
1,373,151
711,133
14,570
725,703
93,608
(l )
632,089
183,910
15,757
831,756

2,130,074
1,489,493
640,581
38,692
679,273
86,939

2,341,039
1,672,665
668,374
20,862
689,236
77,314

2,641,906
1,812,932
828,974
-76,609
752,365
112,513
(l )
639,861
265,800
25,412
931,073

2,238,633
1,897,017
341,616
64,424
406,040
29,286

2,303,505
1,846,579
456,926
51,453
508,379
73,268
(L)
435,101
231,297
26,534
692,932

Derivation of farm labor and proprietors’ Income:
Total cash receipts and other in c o m e .........................................................
Less: Total production e x p e n s e s ..............................................................
Realized net in c o m e .....................................................................................
Plus: Value of inventory c h a n g e ...............................................................
Total net income including corporate fa rm s ..........................................
Less: Corporate farms ..............................................................................
Plus: Statistical ad justm ent......................................................................
Total net farm proprietors' income ...............................................................
Plus: Farm w ages and perquisites ...........................................................
Plus: Farm other labor income .................................................................
Total farm labor and proprietors' income ....................................................

O’) Less than $50,000. Estimates are included in totals.
1. Includes imputed income such as gross rental value of dwellings and value of home consumption and other farm related income components such as machine hire and custom work
income, rental income, and income from forest products (1978 to present).

e-)

f)

592,325
222,084
17,763
832,172

611,929
242,740
20,239
874,908

(l )

376,760
259,053
29,853
665,666

2. Consists of hired workers’ cash wages, social security, perquisites, and contract labor;
and machine hire and custom work expenses,
3. Includes repair and operation of machinery; depreciation, interest, rent and taxes; and
other miscellaneous expenses (including agricultural chemicals, 1969-77).

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Census Bureau Journey-to-Work Employment for States and
Counties:
Total Employment in Each Intercounty Commuting Flow
County of residence

County of work

Jefferson, A L ............
Lee, A L .....................
Montgomery, A L .......
Banks, G A ................
Barrow, G A ...............

Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,

GA
GA
GA
GA
GA

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

Carroll, G A ................
Cherokee, G A ...........
Clarke. G A ................
Clayton, G A ..............
Cobb, G A ..................
Coweta, G A ..............
Dawson. G A .............
De Kalb. G A .............
Douglas, G A .............
Fannin, G A ...............
Fayette. G A ..............
Floyd, G A ..................
Forsyth, G A ..............
Franklin, G A ..............
Fulton, G A ................
Gwinnett, G A ............
Hall. G A ....................

Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,

GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

Jackson. G A .............
Lumpkin, G A .............
Madison, G A .............
Muscogee, G A ..........
Newton, G A ..............
Oconee, G A ..............
Paulding, G A ............
Pickens, G A ..............
Polk, G A ...................
Rockdale, G A ...........
Spalding, G A ............
Stephens, G A ...........
Towns, G A ................
Troup, G A .................

Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,

GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA

Walker, G A ...............
Walton, G A ...............
White, G A .................
Cherokee, N C ...........
Clay, NC ...................
Anaerson, S C ...........
Hamilton, T N .............

Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,
Gwinnett,

GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA
GA

1960

1970

1980

1990

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

0
0
0
0
163
0
4
0
5
7
11
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
145
0
0
7,094
233
0
16
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
4
258
6
9
28
18
115
297
32
9
1,489
22
0
20
50
372
0
1,098
9,400
415
18
49
8
0
0
16
8
6
53
63
50
7
0
0
7

11
0
4
24
842
43
49
408
39
459
1,879
14
77
7,794
193
2
90
34
1,207
6
2,860
30,595
1,279
145
249
33
32
40
99
26
124
4
33
301
14
7
19
0

22
36
26
104
3,210
196
170
1,831
363
1,387
6,115
124
404
20,904
481
48
231
21
2,758
56
12,437
95,027
3,632
517
812
134
120
22
436
135
235
124
19
1,353
99
48
35
25

.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

0
41
0
0
0
0
0

1
181
0
0
0
0
0

0
972
19
2
9
0
7

26
3,158
89
28
36
38
34

N o t e .— C ommuting employment tabulations are from the Bureau of the Census 1960,
1970, 1980, and 1990 Census of Population and reflect editing by the Bureau of Economic
Analysis.

M -8 9

M-90

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix A

Census Bureau Journey-to-Work for States and Counties
1980 and 1990 Intercounty Commuting Flow by Industry
1990

1980
County of residence

County of work

Industry

Allegany. M D ....................
Allegany. M D ....................
Allegany. M D ....................

Allegany. MD ...................
Allegany. MD ....................
Allegany. MD ...................

Farm .............................................................................
Agricultural services ....................................................
Construction .................................................................

Allegany. M D ....................
Allegany. M D ....................
Allegany. M D ....................

Allegany. MD ...................
Allegany. MD ...................
Allegany. MD ...................

Transportation, communications, and public utilities ...
W holesale and retail trade ..........................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ...........................

Allegany. M D ....................

Allegany. MD ...................

Federal, civilian go vernm en t.......................................

Allegany, M D ....................

Baltimore. MD ..................

State and local g o ve rnm en t........................................

Allegany. M D ....................

Frederick. M D ..................

Not specified ................................................................

Allegany, M D ....................

Fredenck, MD ..................

Manufacturing .............................................................

Allegany. M D ....................

Garrett. MD ......................

Finance, insurance, and real estate ...........................

Allegany. M D ....................

Montgomery. MD .............

Not specified ................................................................

Allegany. M D ....................
Allegany. M D ....................

Montgomery. MD .............
Montgomery. MD .............

Manufacturing .............................................................
W holesale and retail t r a d e ..........................................

Number of
workers

Average

7
1,559
64
199
624
5,954
2,482
5,527
750
4,218
710
23
5,346
12
22
0
16
0
33
19
15
0
35
47
85
15
86
0
38
100
9
0
0
0
10
50
28
21
13
0
26
13
17
0
79
51
20
60
27
36
15
33
29
22

25,005
13,141
16,751
12,049
13,989
16,077
15,471
7,214
12,078
9,171
11,662
11,337
10,884
7,005
15,764
0
5,705
0
10,433
9,775
3,005
0
15,191
16,126
9,545
4,505
6,620
0
4,720
8,332
1,105
0
0
0
27,005
1,899
8,762
6,525
18,005
0
1,802
1,105
29,555
0
10,411
17,162
16,669
11,954
2,415
6,257
24,005
1,139
926
16,505

Number of
workers
23
1,717
64
263
1,226
3,078
1,334
5,903
939
5,573
401
27
4,530
57
30
33
35
38
43
70
2
14
20
103
25
101
26
43
182
17
26
21
119
23
26
0
15
8
30
6
24
67
22
147
34
84
93
6
42
34
7
6
14

N o t e .— C ommuting employment tabulations are from the Bureau of the C ensus 1980 and 1990 Census of Population and reflect editing by the Bureau of Econom ic Analysis.

Total Commuters’ Income Flows for States and Counties
[Thousands of dollars]
1987
Bullock, AL:
Inflow ..........................................
O u tflo w ........................................
Net residence adjustm ent...........
Butler, AL:
Inflow ..........................................
O u tflo w ........................................
Net residence adjustm ent...........
Calhoun, AL:
Inflow ..........................................
O u tflo w ........................................
Net residence adjustm ent...........
Cham bers, AL:
Inflow ..........................................
O u tflo w ........................................
Net residence adjustm ent...........
Cherokee, AL:
Inflow ..........................................
O u tflo w ........................................
Net residence adjustm ent...........

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

11,330
9,139
2,191

12,896
10,701
2,195

14,440
11,153
3,287

15,978
11,565
4,413

16,728
12,318
4,410

17,896
13,102
4,794

26,772
17,316
9,456

29,094
18,494
10,600

30,867
18,433
12,434

33,023
19,577
13,446

34,695
20,011
14,684

37,023
21,171
15,852

77,518
154,089
-76,571

82,119
162,032
-79,913

83,952
170,192
-86,240

87,317
176,530
-89,213

89,309
187,111
-97,802

96,139
192,493
-96,354

88,657
55,862
32,795

93,926
57,740
36,186

103,350
59,295
44,055

103,151
56,849
46,302

101,726
54,866
46,860

108,251
59,039
49,212

65,694
9,660
56,034

69,275
11,028
58,247

72,914
11,637
61,277

77,482
12,242
65,240

80,338
13,097
67,241

86,513
13,638
72,875

Average
35,576
19,837
11,342
20,276
20,918
23,327
24,303
12,478
26,688
17,906
22,351
21,630
20,938
18,295
18,616
20,173
13,041
21,455
20,827
15,008
16,860
1,500
32,412
16,650
20,136
19,208
10,910
20,327
11,586
22,447
11,204
4,252
28,670
13,914
22,565
4,843
0
36,000
9,540
14,829
50,000
31,027
19,113
12,273
17,507
36,823
11,305
24,093
12,000
30,852
15,443
4,452
6,323
38,571

Appendix B
Members of the BEA User Group
Alabama

P ia M ontoya

E conom ic Developm ent and Planning

D iv is io n o f Eco no m ic and Business Research

C a lifo rn ia State U n ive rsity-C hico

Director, Center fo r Business and E conom ic

The U n ive rsity o f A rizo n a

C h ico , C a lifo rn ia 95929-0765

Research

M c C le lla n d H a ll, R oom 2 0 4 K

T E L : 916 898-4598

U n ive rsity o f South Alabam a

Tucson, A rizo n a 85721

M o b ile , A labam a 36688

T E L : 602 621-2155

T E L : 205 460-6156

M o b in Qaheri

Semoon Chang

Senior Eco no m ic Specialist, Planning and P o lic y
Parker C o llin s

Developm ent

Alabam a Department o f Eco no m ic and C om m u­

A rizo n a Department o f Com m erce

nity A ffa irs

3800 N orth Central, Suite 1400

P.O. B o x 5690

Phoenix, A rizo n a 85012

Montgom ery, A labam a 36103-5690

T E L : 602 280-1321

T E L : 205 242-5493

Deborah H am ilton
Center fo r Business and E co n o m ic Research
The U n ive rsity o f Alabam a
B o x 870221
Tuscaloosa, A labam a 35487-0221
T E L : 205 348-6191

2538 Channing Way
Berkeley, C a lifo rn ia 94720

Phoenix, A rizo n a 85007

T E L : 510 642-6571

T E L : 602 542-5491
T om R . Rex

T E L : 602 965-3961

Troy, Alabam a 36082

Arkansas
D onald M arket

3211 Providence D rive

and Technical Assistance

1716 W est Adam s Street

T roy State University

U n iversity o f A laska

U n ive rsity o f C a lifo rn ia Data A rch iv e

U n ive rsity o f C alifo m ia-B erk eley

Tempe, A rizo n a 85287-4406

search

Sacramento, C a lifo rn ia 95814-3701
T E L : 916 322-2263

Com m ittee

Center fo r Business and E co no m ic Services

Director, Institute o f So cial and Eco no m ic R e ­

915 L Street, 8th F lo o r

A T T N : Fred G ey

ness Research A rizo n a State U n iversity

Lee G orsuch

Department o f Finance

C h ie f Econom ist, Joint Legislative Budget

M a c R . H olm es

Alaska

Finan cia l and Eco no m ic Research

H enry C. Reardon

M anager o f Research Support, Center fo r B u si­

T E L : 205 670-3144

Pauline P. Sweezey

Director, Bureau o f Business and E conom ic
Research
C o lle ge o f Business Adm inistration; R oom 443
U n ive rsity o f Arkansas
Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701
T E L : 501 575-4151

Colorado
John W . Green
Department o f Econom ics
U n ive rsity o f Northern Colorado
Greeley, Colorado 80639
T E L : 303 351-2639
G in Hayden
System Analyst, Graduate School o f Business
Adm inistration
U n ive rsity o f Colorado
Campus B o x 420
Boulder, Colorado 80309
T E L : 303 492-8227

Anchorage, A la sk a 99508

N eva Wayman

R eid T. R eynolds

T E L : 907 786-7710

U n ive rsity o f Arkansas-Little R o ck L ib rary 512

Colorado D iv isio n o f L o c a l Government

A rea Research G roup

A T T N : Jim Westkott

Jack Kreinheder

2801 South University

1313 Sherman Street, R oo m 520

O ffice o f Managem ent and Budget

L ittle R ock, Arkansas 72204

Denver, Colorado 80203

Pouch A M

T E L : 501 569-8551

T E L : 303 866-2156

California

C u rt Wiedeman

Steven J. K ro hn

O ffice o f State Planning and Budget

Juneau, A la sk a 99811-0164
T E L : 907 465-3568

Arizona

Real Estate and Land Use Institute

111 State C ap itol B u ild in g

M a x Jerrell

C a lifo rn ia State U n iversity

Denver, Colorado 80203

C o llege o f Business Adm inistration

7750 College Tow n D rive , Suite 102

T E L : 303 866-3319

Northern A rizo n a U n iversity

Sacramento, C a lifo rn ia 95826-2344

P.O. B o x 15066

T E L : 916 278-6633

T E L : 602 523-7405

Connecticut
Jeffrey Blodgett

Flagstaff, A rizo n a 86011-5066
D an R ip ke

Research Director, Connecticut Department o f

Assistant Director, U n iversity Center for

E co no m ic Developm ent
M -9 1

M-92

Appendix B

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

865 B ro o k Street

221 M atherly H a ll

R o c k y H ill, Connecticut 06067-3405

G ainesville, F lo rid a 32611

Athens, G eo ig ia 30602-6269

T E L : 203 258-4219

T E L : 904 392-0171

T E L : 706 542-4085

M in g J. W u

D a v id G ray

Budget Specialist, O ffice o f P o lic y and M anage­

Research Associate, Center fo r Econom ic

ment

D onald Ratajczak

and Managem ent Research

80 Washington Street

E co no m ic Forecast

U n ive rsity o f South Florida

Georgia State U n iversity

Hartford, Connecticut 06106

C O B A B S N 3403

35 B road Street, 2nd F loo r

T E L : 203 566-8342 and 3960

4202 East F o w le r Avenue

Atlanta, Georgia 30303

Delaware

Tampa, F lo rid a 33620-5500

T E L : 404 651-3282

Doug Clendartiel

Brooks H a ll

T E L : 813 974-4266

Delaware Developm ent O ffice

M a rty M o rriso n

Hawaii

99 K in g s H ighw ay

Librarian, Research Lib rary

R ich ard Y .P . Joun

P.O. B o x 1401

Bureau o f Eco no m ic A n a lysis

Department o f Business, Eco no m ic Developm ent

Dover, Delaware 19903

Florida Department o f Com m erce

and Tourism

T E L : 302 739-4271

C o llin s B u ild in g

P.O. B o x 2359

James Craig
Bureau o f E conom ics and Statistics

Tallahassee, F lo rid a 32399-2000

H onolulu, H aw aii 96804

T E L : 904 487-2971

T E L : 808 586-2470

Department o f Finance

Sarah Voyles

C arvel State O ffice B u ild in g , 10th F loo r

E xecutive O ffice o f the G overnor

Robert K o ik e

820 North French Street

The C apitol

Tax Research and Planning Officer,

W ilm ington, Delaw are 19801

Tallahassee, F lo rid a 32399

H a w a ii Department o f Taxation

T E L : 302 577-3324

T E L : 904 487-2814

P.O. B o x 259

P auly Iheanacho

Georgia

H onolulu, H aw aii 96809

Reference Department

Susan Boatright

U n ive rsity o f Delaware Lib rary

Cooperative Extension Service

New ark, Delaware 19717-5267

The U n ive rsity o f Georgia

T E L : 302 831-2432

H oke Sm ith Annex

District of Columbia
G an A huja

Athens, Georgia 30602-4356
T E L : 706 542-8938

T E L : 808 587-1440

Idaho
Law rence H. M e rk
Director, Center fo r Business Developm ent
and Research
C o lle ge o f Business and Econom ics

D istrict o f C o lu m b ia Planning O ffice

W illia m Hahn

Presidential B u ild in g , Suite 570

Bureau o f Business Research

M oscow , Idaho 83844-3227

415 12th Street, N W .

School o f Business

T E L : 208 885-6611

Washington, D .C . 20004

Savannah State College

T E L : 202 727-6533
Paul des Jardin

Savannah, G eorgia 31404
T E L : 912 356-2830

M etropolitan W ashington C o u n cil o f G ove rn­

G lo ria Hardnett

ments

M e d ia Center

777 N orth C ap ito l Street, N E ., Suite 300

M arketing and Research D iv isio n

Washington, D .C . 20002-4201

Georgia Department o f Industry and Trade

T E L : 202 962-3293, ext. 399

285 Peachtree Center Avenue

L o r i Hunter
Department o f Finance and Revenue

U n ive rsity o f Idaho

A la n Porter
Idaho Department o f Com m erce
700 West State Street
Boise, Idaho 83720
T E L : 208 334-2470

Atlanta, G eorgia 30303

Derek Santos

T E L : 404 656-7655

D iv isio n o f F inan cia l Management

One Judiciary Square

R o b in K irk p a trick

441 4th Street, N W ., Suite 400

Georgia O ffice o f Planning and Budget

State o f Idaho
Statehouse, R oom 122
Boise, Idaho 83720-1000

Washington, D .C . 20001

254 W ashington Street, SW ., R oo m 640

T E L : 202 727-6083

Atlanta, Georgia 30334-8501

Florida

T E L : 404 656-0911

D aniel B lazek

Richard Leacy

Econom ics Department

Governm ent Publications

Head, Governm ent Documents Department

B oise State U n iversity

T E L : 208 334-2906
Charles L. Skoro

U n iversity o f M ia m i Lib rary

Georgia Institute o f Technology Lib rary

1910 U n iversity D rive

P.O. B o x 248214

Atlanta, Georgia 30332

Boise, Idaho 83725

C oral Gables, F lo rid a 33124

T E L : 404 894-4519

T E L : 208 385-1117

T E L : 305 284-3155
A lb ert W . N iem i, Jr.

Paul Zelus

Selig Center fo r E conom ic Grow th

Center fo r Business Research and Services

Bureau o f Eco no m ic and Business Research

A T T N : Suzanne A . Lin dsay

Idaho State U n iversity

U n iversity o f F lorida

The U n ive rsity o f Georgia

Campus B o x 8450

Janet G alvez

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix B

Pocatello, Idaho 83209

Iowa

Kentucky

T E L : 208 236-3050

R on Am osson

R on Crouch

O ffice o f the State Com ptroller

Director, Kentucky State Data Center

Iowa State Capitol, R oom 12

Urban Research Institute

R oger B eck

Des M oines, Iowa 50319

U n ive rsity o f L o u is v ille

Department o f Agribusiness Econom ics

T E L : 515 281-3078

L o u isv ille , Kentucky 40292

Illinois

T E L : 502 588-6626

Southern Illin o is U n iversity
Carbondale, Illin o is 62901-4410
T E L : 618 453-1706

D aniel Otto
Extension Econom ist

Sue Ebetsch

Iowa State U n iversity

Coordinator, Illin o is State Data Center Coopera­

560 Heady H a ll

tive

Am es, Iowa 50011

Illin o is Bureau o f the Budget

T E L : 515 294-6147

R o y Sigafus
Center fo r Business and Eco no m ic Research
U n ive rsity o f Kentucky
301 M athew s B u ild in g
Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0047
T E L : 606 257-7677
James A . Street

605 Stratton B u ild in g
Springfield, Illin o is 62706

Deputy Director, O ffice o f Finan cial Management
H arvey Siegelman

and Eco no m ic A n a lysis

State Econom ist

Finance and Adm inistration Cabinet

M artha Greene

Department o f Econom ic Developm ent

261 C apitol Annex

Bureau o f E co no m ic and Business Research

200 East Grand Avenue

Frankfort, Kentucky 40601

U n iversity o f Illin o is

Des M oines, Iowa 50309

T E L : 502 564-2924

428 Com m erce B u ild in g West

T E L : 515 242-4868

T E L : 217 782-1381

1206 South Sixth Street

Louisiana

Champaign, Illin o is 61820

D iv is io n o f Adm inistration

T E L : 217 244-3099
John H am ilton

Charles H. W hitem an
Department o f Econom ics
The U n ive rsity o f Iowa

D iv isio n o f Research and A n a lysis

108 Pappajohn B u ild in g

Department o f Com m erce and Com m unity A f ­

Iow a C ity, Iowa 52242

fairs

T E L : 319 335-0834

620 East Adam s
Springfield, Illin o is 62701
T E L : 217 785-6117

Indiana
D a v id Broom hall
Department o f Ag ricu ltu ra l Econom ics
Purdue U n iversity

Kansas

Baton Rouge, Lou isian a 70804
T E L : 504 342-7410
V incent M aruggi
D iv is io n o f Business and E conom ic Research
U n ive rsity o f N ew Orleans
N ew Orleans, L ou isian a 70148
T E L : 504 286-6980

State Capitol B u ildin g, R oom 343-N

James Robert M ich a el

Topeka, Kansas 66612

Director, Research D iv isio n

T E L : 913 296-3296

L ou isian a Tech U n iversity
P.O. B o x 10318
Ruston, Louisiana 71272

James T. Janousek

T E L : 317 494-0593

D irector o f Research and A na lysis

A T T N : M orton J. M arcus

A T T N : Karen Paterson
P.O . B o x 94095

Kansas State Lib rary

West Lafayette, Indiana 47907

Indiana Business Research Center

Louisiana O ffice o f Planning and Budget

M a rc G albraith

1145 Krannert B u ild in g

Terry Creeth

M -9 3

Kansas Department o f Com m erce and H ousing
700 Southwest Harrison, Suite 1300
Topeka, Kansas 66603-3712

801 West M ich ig a n Street B S 4 0 0 0 A
Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5151
TEL: 317 274-2204
Laurence E. Hathaway
Head, Reference and Government Services Divi­
sion
Indiana State Library
140 North Senate Avenue
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204
TEL: 317 232-3676
Bob Lain
Research Office
Indiana Department of Commerce
One North Capitol, Suite 700
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204-2288

T E L : 913 296-3760

T E L : 317 232-8959

T E L : 318 257-3701
Loren Scott
Department o f Econom ics
C o lle ge o f Business Adm inistration
L ou isian a State U n iversity
Baton Rouge, L ou isian a 70803-6306
T E L : 504 388-3779

Thelm a H elyar

Jerry L . W all

Institute fo r P u b lic P o lic y and Business Research

Director, Center fo r Business and Econom ic

The U n ive rsity o f Kansas

Research

607 B la ke H a ll

Northeast Louisiana University

Lawrence, Kansas 66045-2960

M onroe, L ou isian a 71209-0101

T E L : 913 864-3701

T E L : 318 342-1215

Carlene H ill

Maine

Director, Center fo r Eco no m ic Developm ent

James H. Breece

and Business Research

N ew England E lectronic Data Center

The W ich ita State U n iversity

Department o f Econom ics

D e v lin H a ll

U n ive rsity o f M ain e at Orono

1845 Fairm ount Street, 2nd F loo r

Stevens H a ll

W ichita, Kansas 67260-0121

Orono, M ain e 04469

T E L : 316 689-3225

T E L : 207 581-1863

M —9 4

Appendix B

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

B ill Gardner

Michigan

Research D iv is io n

M itc h e ll Bean

M achine-Readable Data Center

Staff Econom ist, H ouse F isca l Ag en cy

U n ive rsity o f M innesota

M ic h ig a n House o f Representatives

W ilso n Lib rary, R oo m B 2

P.O . B o x 30014

301 19th Avenue South

Bureau o f Taxation
Station 24
Augusta, M a in e 04333
T E L : 207 289-4702
Laurie LaChance

W endy Treadw ell

Lansing, M ic h ig a n 48909-7514

M inneapolis, M innesota 55455-0414

T E L : 517 373-8080

T E L : 612 624-4389

Mississippi

State Econom ist, M ain e State Planning O ffice
184 State Street

D an K itch e l

State H ouse Station 38

O ffice o f Revenue and Tax A n a lysis

M is s y Lee

Augusta, M a in e 04333

Department o f Treasury

Inform ation Services L ib rary

T E L : 207 287-3261

Treasury B u ild in g

M ississip p i Institutions o f H igh er Learning

Lansing, M ic h ig a n 48922

A T T N : M arianne H ill

Robert C. M cM a h o n
Center fo r Business and Eco no m ic Research

T E L : 517 373-2958

3825 R idgew ood Road
Jackson, M ississip p i 39211

U n ive rsity o f Southern M ain e
96 Falm outh Street

Thom as N ich olas

T E L : 601 982-6314

Portland, M ain e 04103

Jobs Com m ission

T E L : 207 780-4308

V ic to r O ffice Center, 4th F loo r

Maryland

201 N . W ashington Square

Center fo r Business Developm ent and Research

Lansing, M ic h ig a n 48913

U n ive rsity o f Southern M ississip p i

Peggy Dalton

T E L : 517 373-4600

Southern Station, B o x 5094

R. E ric Reidenbach

G u ild Center

Hattiesburg, M ississip p i 39406-5094

Econom ics Department

T E L : 601 266-7011

Frostburg State U n iversity
Frostburg, M arylan d 21532-1099
T E L : 301 689-4386

Candice Santell
M ich ig a n Databases
M ic h ig a n State U n ive rsity
321 Berkey H a ll

M ic h e l Lettre

East Lansing, M ich ig an 48824-1111

Assistant Director, M aryland O ffice o f Planning

T E L : 517 353-3255

301 West Preston Street, R oom 1101
Baltim ore, M aryland 21201

Minnesota

T E L : 410 225-4450

George How se

J. W illia m Rush
Associate Dean, O ffice o f External A ffa irs
M ississip p i State U n iversity
A T T N : Janis Bryant
P.O. D raw er 5288
M ississip p i State, M ississip p i 39762
T E L : 601 325-3817

Lester Salamon

State A g ricu ltu ra l Statistician,

Institute fo r P o lic y Studies

A g ricu ltu ra l Statistics D iv isio n

Center fo r Population Studies

The Johns H opkins U n iversity

M innesota Department o f Ag ricu ltu re

The U n ive rsity o f M ississip p i

M a x W . W illia m s

Shriver H a ll

P.O. B o x 7068

Bondurant B u ild in g , R oo m 3W

Baltim ore, M aryland 21218

90 West Plato Boulevard, R oom 149

U niversity, M ississip p i 38677

T E L : 410 516-7174

St. Paul, M innesota 55107

T E L : 601 232-7288

Massachusetts

T E L : 612 296-2230

Stephen P. Coelen
Director, Massachusetts Institute fo r Social
and E conom ic Research
U n ive rsity o f Massachusetts
128 Thom pson H a ll
Amherst, Massachusetts 01003
T E L : 413 545-3460
W illia m M urray
Massachusetts State Data Center
State House
c/o M I S E R
P.O. B o x 219
Boston, Massachusetts 02133-0219

Missouri
A d am G. M arsn ik

Kate G ra f

L eg isla tive Reference L ib rary

Census Data Center

645 State O ffice B u ild in g

M isso u ri State L ib rary

100 Constitution Avenue

P.O. B o x 387

St. Paul, M innesota 55155-1050

Jefferson C ity, M isso u ri 65102

T E L : 612 296-0586

T E L : 314 751-1823

Jerrold M . Peterson
Bureau o f Business and Eco no m ic Research
U n ive rsity o f M innesota-Duluth
R oom 115 S B E
Duluth, M innesota 55812
T E L : 218 726-7256

T E L : 617 727-4537

Tom Kruckem eyer
Planner, D iv is io n o f Budget and Planning
O ffice o f Adm inistration
Capitol B u ildin g, R oom 124
Jefferson C ity, M isso u ri 65102
T E L : 314 751-9324
Edw ard H. Robb

Gregory Perkins

D a v id Rademacher

Deputy Director, Research Department

O ffice o f the State Demographer

Research Center

Boston Redevelopm ent A uthority

M innesota State Planning Ag en cy

U n ive rsity o f M isso u ri-C o lu m b ia

Director, Business and P u b lic Adm inistration

1 C ity H a ll Square

300 Centennial O ffice B u ild in g

10 Professional B u ild in g

Boston, Massachusetts 02201-1007

St. Paul, M innesota 55155

Colum bia, M isso u ri 65211

T E L : 617 242-7400, ext. 4411

T E L : 612 297-3255

T E L : 314 882-4805

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix B

M —95

Montana

W illia m E . P illsb ury, Jr.

Law rence L ittlefield

Paul E. P o lz in

Director, N ew H am pshire O ffice o f Industrial

H ousing and E conom ic Planning Department

Director, Bureau o f Business and E conom ic

Developm ent

N ew Y o rk C ity Department o f Planning

Research

P.O. B o x 856

22 Reade Street, 4 West

U n ive rsity o f Montana

Concord, N ew H am pshire 03302-0856

N ew York, N ew Y o rk 10007

M issoula, M ontana 59812

T E L : 603 271-2591

T E L : 212 720-3442

T E L : 406 243-5113
Patricia Roberts
Census and E co no m ic Inform ation Center
M ontana Department o f Com m erce
1424 N in th Avenue
Helena, M ontana 59620-0535
T E L : 406 444-4393

Nebraska
R ich ard Gettemy
Adm inistrator, Finance and Research
Nebraska Department o f Revenue
P.O. B o x 94818

New Jersey
Lib rarian
Bureau o f E co n o m ic Research
Rutgers, The State U n ive rsity o f N ew Jersey
N ew Jersey H a ll
N ew B runsw ick, N e w Jersey 08903
T E L : 201 932-8019

North Carolina
John E . Connaughton
Director, N orth C aro lin a E co no m ic Forecast
Department o f Econom ics
U n ive rsity o f N orth Carolina-Charlotte
Charlotte, N orth C aro lin a 28223
T E L : 704 547-2185

V incent J. M artucci

D irector

A ctin g Manager, Center for Health Statistics

Tax Research D iv isio n

N ew Jersey Department o f Health

N orth C aro lin a Department o f Revenue

C N 360, R oo m 405

P.O. B o x 25000

Trenton, N ew Jersey 08625

Raleigh, N orth C aro lin a 27640-0001

T E L : 609 984-6703

T E L : 919 733-4548

New Mexico

R ic k K irk p a tric k

T im K . Him berger
Center fo r P u b lic A ffa irs Research

B rian M cD o n a ld

The U n ive rsity o f Nebraska-Om aha

Director, Bureau o f Business and E conom ic

Ann ex 26

Research

Omaha, Nebraska 68182-0059

The U n ive rsity o f N ew M e xico

T E L : 402 554-4883

Boone, N orth C aro lin a 28608

1920 Lom as, N .E .

T E L : 704 262-6127

L in coln , Nebraska 68509
T E L : 402 471-2971, ext. 284

F. Charles Lam phear

Director, Bureau o f E co no m ic and Business
Research
John A . W alker C o lle ge o f Business
Appalachian State U n iversity

Albuquerque, N ew M e x ic o 87131-6021
D elos M onteith

Bureau o f Business Research

T E L : 505 277-2216

The U n ive rsity o f N ebraska-Lincoln

Laurie M o ye

200 C o llege o f Business A dm inistration

Western C aro lin a U n iversity

Eco no m ic Developm ent and Tourism Department

L in co ln , Nebraska 68588-0406

Cullow hee, N orth C arolina 28723

Joseph M ontoya B u ild in g

T E L : 402 4 7 2 -2334 o r 2335

T E L : 704 227-7492

1100 St. Francis D rive

Nevada

Sante Fe, N ew M e x ic o 87503

Center fo r Im proving M ountain L iv in g

T E L : 505 827-0300

Nevada State Data Center

James F. Sm ith
K enan-Flagler Business School
The U n ive rsity o f North C arolina

N evada State L ib ra ry and A rchives

James T. Peach

Chapel H ill, North C aro lin a 27599-3490

A T T N : P atricia Deadder

Department o f Econom ics

T E L : 919 962-3176

C ap itol Com plex

N ew M e xico State U n iversity

Carson C ity , N evada 89710

B o x 30001, Department 3 C Q

Francine J. Stephenson

T E L : 702 687-5160

Las Cruces, N ew M e x ic o 88003-0001

Manager, State Data Center

Carole P op o ff
Assistant Director, Bureau o f Business
and E conom ic Research
U n ive rsity o f Nevada-Reno
Reno, Nevada 89557-0016
T E L : 702 784-6877

T E L : 505 646-3113

O ffice o f State Planning
116 West Jones Street

New York
W illia m T . Grainger
Bureau o f E co no m ic and Dem ographic Informa­
tion
N ew Y o rk State Department o f E conom ic

K e ith Schwer

Developm ent

Center fo r Business and Eco no m ic Research

O ne Com m erce Plaza, R oo m 910

U n ive rsity o f Nevada

A lb any, N ew Y o rk 12245

L a s Vegas, N evada 89154-6002

T E L : 518 474-1141

Raleigh, N orth C aro lin a 27603-8003
T E L : 919 733-4131

North Dakota
R ich ard Rathge
Department o f A g ricu ltu ra l Econom ics
N orth D akota State U n iversity
Fargo, N orth Dakota 58105-5636
T E L : 701 237-8621

T E L : 702 895-3191
B arclay G. Jones

Scot A . Stradley

Director, C IS E R Program in Urban and Regional

Director, Bureau o f Business and Econom ic

Thom as J. D u ffy

Studies

Research

Senior Planner, O ffice o f State Planning

C o rnell University

U n ive rsity o f North Dakota

2 1^2 Beacon Street

106 West Sib ley H a ll

P.O. B o x 8369

Concord, N ew H am pshire 03301

Ithaca, N ew Y o rk 14853

G rand Forks, North Dakota 58202-8369

T E L : 603 271-2155

T E L : 607 255-6846

T E L : 701 777-2637

New Hampshire

M—96

Appendix B

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Kathryn L . Strom beck

Je ff W allace

7

O ffice o f State Tax Com m issioner

O klahom a State Data Center

Providence, Rhode Island 02903-3189

State Capitol

O klahom a Department o f Com m erce

T E L : 401 277-2601

600 East Boulevard Avenue

P.O. B o x 26980

Jackson W alkw ay

Bism arck, N orth Dakota 58505

O klahom a C ity , O klahom a 73126-0980

T E L : 701 224-3402

South Carolina

T E L : 405 841-5184

Betsy Jane Clary

Ohio
M a rk Carrozza
Southwest O hio Regional Data Center
U n iversity o f C incinn ati
M a il Location 132
Cincinnati, O hio 45221

Oregon
A rth ur A yre
O regon Eco no m ic Developm ent Department
775 Sum m er Street, N E .
Salem, Oregon 97310
T E L : 503 986-0100

T E L : 513 556-5028

Lero y Hushak
Department o f A g ricu ltu ra l E conom ics and R ural
Sociology
The O hio State U n iversity
2120 Fyffe Road
Colum bus, O hio 43210-1066

O ffice o f Strategic Research
P.O. B o x 1001, 27th F loo r
Colum bus, O hio 43266-0101
T E L : 614 466-2115

search
School o f Business and Econom ics
C o llege o f Charleston
9 Lib e rty Street
Charleston, South C aro lin a 29424
T E L : 803 792-8107
D a v id Frontz

Stanley D. M ile s

D iv isio n o f Research and Statistics

A g ricu ltu ra l and Resource Econom ics

Rembert Dennis B u ild in g , R oom 440

O regon State U n iversity

1000 A ssem bly Street

219 B alla rd Extension H a ll

Colum bia, South Carolina 29201

C o rva llis, Oregon 97331-3601

T E L : 803 734-3785

T E L : 503 737-1442

R andy M artin

Paul Warner

C o lle ge o f Business Adm inistration

Director, D iv isio n o f Research

T E L : 614 292-3548

Jim K e ll

Director, Bureau o f E co no m ic and Business R e­

State Econom ist, Department o f Adm inistrative

U n ive rsity o f South Carolina

Services

Colum bia, South C arolina 29208

155 Cottage Street, N E .

T E L : 803 777-2510

Salem, Oregon 97310
T E L : 503 378-3405

South Dakota
DeVee Dykstra

Paul J, K o z lo w s k i

Pennsylvania

C o lle ge o f Business

R alph L . Bangs

The U n ive rsity o f Toledo

Research Associate, The U n ive rsity o f Pittsburgh

Stranahan H all, R oom 3011

121 U n ive rsity Place

Toledo, O hio 43606

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260

T E L : 419 537-2430

T E L : 412 624-3856

Oklahoma

Susan Forbes

Ahm ed Abo-Basha
O ffice o f Business and Eco no m ic Research
O klahom a State U n iversity
345 C o llege o f Business Adm inistration

Department o f Geography
Indiana U n ive rsity o f Pennsylvania
10 Leonard H a ll
Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705-1087
T E L : 412 357-2251

Stillw ater, O klahom a 74078
T E L : 405 744-5125

M a rv in Hankins

Business Research Bureau
School o f Business
The U n ive rsity o f South Dakota
414 East C lark
V erm illion , South Dakota 57069
T E L : 605 677-5287
Wayne EUingson
E conom ic Data Center
Department o f Econom ics
South Dakota State U n iversity
P.O. B o x 504A
B rookings, South Dakota 57007
T E L : 605 688-4869

Paul H . R ig b y
The Pennsylvania State U n iversity

Tennessee

A T T N : D o ris J. B ic k le

L e w A lvarado

Department o f Econom ics and Business A d m in ­

110 Business Adm inistration B u ild in g II

Business and E conom ic Research

istration

U n iversity Park, Pennsylvania 16802

M em phis State U n iversity

School o f Business

T E L : 814 865-7669

F E C , R oo m 220
M em phis, Tennessee 38152

Southwestern O klahom a State U n iversity
100 Campus D rive

D iane Shoop

Weatherford, O klahom a 73096-3098

Pennsylvania State Data Center

T E L : 405 774-3750

The Pennsylvania State University-Harrisburg

111

West Harrisburg Pike

T E L : 901 678-2281
Charles B ro w n
Planning A n a ly st IV , State Planning Office

M iddletow n, Pennsylvania 17057-4898

309 John Sevier B u ild in g

T E L : 717 948-6173

500 Charlotte Avenue

307 West Brooks Street, R oom 4

Rhode Island

T E L : 615 741-1676

Norman, O klahom a 73019-0450

V incent K . Harrington

Tony E ff

T E L : 405 325-2931

Rhode Island Department o f Econom ic

M id d le Tennessee State U n iversity

John M cC raw
Center fo r Eco no m ic and Management Research
The U n iversity o f O klahom a

N ash ville, Tennessee 37243-0001

Developm ent

P.O. B o x X 0 5 0

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Appendix B

M —97

Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37132

Austin, Texas 78713

O ld D o m inion U n iversity

T E L : 615 898-2387

T E L : 512 471-5180

N o rfo lk , V irg in ia 23508-8507

D a v id Hake

Utah

Director, Center fo r Business and E conom ic

R . Thayne Robson

Roger R . Stough

Research

Bureau o f Eco no m ic and Business Research

Deputy Director, The Institute for P u b lic P o lic y

A T T N : P atricia A . Price

The U n ive rsity o f Utah

George M ason U n iversity

The U n ive rsity o f Tennessee

K D G B 401

P o h ick M odule, 4400 U n ive rsity D rive

K n o x v ille , Tennessee 37996

Salt L ake C ity , Utah 84112

Fairfax, V irg in ia 22030-4444

T E L : 615 974-5441

T E L : 801 581-7274

T E L : 703 993-2280

Texas

Lance R o v ig

Washington

Jesse Acosta

State Data Center

Supervisor, Department o f Planning

G overn or’ s O ffice o f Planning and Budget

Tw o C iv ic Center Plaza

116 State C ap itol B u ild in g

E l Paso, Texas 79901-1196

Salt L ake C ity, Utah 84114

O lym pia, W ashington 98504-0912

T E L : 915 541-4721

T E L : 801 538-1543

T E L : 206 586-6736

F.G . Bloodw orth

Thomas M . W illia m s

Section C h ie f, Water Use Section

Senior Econom ist, Utah State Tax Com m ission

Texas Water Developm ent Board

519 Heber M . W ells B uild in g

P.O. B o x 13231, C ap itol Station

160 East 300 South

Austin, Texas 78711-3231

Salt Lake C ity , Utah 84134

T E L : 512 445-1451

T E L : 801 530-6093

Jam ie Ford
Institute fo r Studies in Business
C ollege o f Business
The U n ive rsity o f Texas at San A ntonio
San Antonio, Texas 78249
T E L : 210 691-4317

T E L : 804 683-4713

Vermont
Je ff Carr
O ffice o f P o lic y Research Coordination
P a v ilio n O ffice B u ild in g
109 State Street
M ontpelier, Vermont 05602

Robert F. Hodgin

T E L : 802 658-2598

U n ive rsity o f H ouston-Clear L ake C ity
2700 B a y A rea Boulevard, B o x 200
Houston, Texas 77058
T E L : 713 283-3126

Virginia
Thomas Johnson
Department o f A g ricu ltu ra l and A p p lie d E c o ­

Fran Sawyer

nom ics

Research D iv isio n

A T T N : M a rk Craw ford

Texas C ontroller o f Pu b lic Accounts

V irg in ia Polytechnic Institute and State U n iv e r­

P.O. B o x 13528, C apitol Station

sity

Austin, Texas 78711-3528

Blacksburg, V irg in ia 24061-0401

T E L : 800 531-5441, ext. 51054

T E L : 703 231-6461

B re t B erto lin
O ffice o f the Forecast C o u n cil
P.O. B o x 40912

P h ilip J. Bourque
Professor o f Business Econom ics
The Graduate School o f Business Adm inistration
U n ive rsity o f Washington
DJ-10
Seattle, W ashington 98195
T E L : 206 543-8738

D a v id Schumacher
Forecasting D iv isio n
O ffice o f Finan cial Management
P.O . B o x 43113
O lym pia, Washington 98504-3113
T E L : 206 586-2478

G ary W . Sm ith
Extension Econom ist, W ashington State U n iv e r­
sity
203C H ulbert H a ll
Pullm an, W ashington 99164-6210
T E L : 509 335-2852

West Virginia
Randy C h ild s

Susan T u lly
Texas State Data Center
Texas Department o f Com m erce
P.O . B o x 12728, C ap itol Station
Austin, Texas 78711
T E L : 512 320-9683
Bernard W einstein
Director, Center fo r Eco no m ic Developm ent
and Research
U n ive rsity o f North Texas
P.O. B o x 12988
Denton, Texas 76203
T E L : 817 565-4049

John L . Knapp

Bureau o f Business Research

Center fo r P u b lic Service

West V irg in ia U n iversity

U n iversity o f V irg in ia

323 Business and E conom ic B u ild in g

918 Em m et Street North, Suite 300

P.O. B o x 6025

Charlottesville, V irg in ia 22903-4832

M organtow n, West V irg in ia 26506-6025

T E L : 804 982-5638

T E L : 304 293-7832

R o y L . Pearson

Fred C u tlip

Director, Bureau o f Business Research

Director, Com m unity Developm ent D iv isio n

School o f Business Adm inistration

A T T N : M a ry C. Harless

C o llege o f W illia m and M ary

B u ild in g 6, R oom B-553

P.O. B o x 8795

C ap itol Com plex

W illiam sburg, V irg in ia 23187-8795

Charleston, West V irg in ia 25305

T E L : 804 221-2935

T E L : 304 558-4010

R ita W right
Bureau o f Business Research

Richard A . P h illip s

The U n ive rsity o f Texas at A ustin

Editor,

P.O. B o x 7459, U n ive rsity Station

School o f Business Adm inistration

H a m p to n R o a d s E c o m o m ic R e p o r t

K e rri Petty
Tax Analyst, Department o f Tax and Revenue
P.O. B o x 2389

M-98

Appendix B

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Charleston, West V irg in ia 25328

M adison, W isconsin 53707-7868

P.O. B o x 3925

T E L : 304 558-8730

T E L : 608 266-1927

Laram ie, W yom ing 82071
T E L : 307 766-2939

Wisconsin

Gene Schubert
W isconsin Department o f Revenue

Steve Furtney

125 South Webster Street

E conom ic A n a ly sis D iv isio n

Director, Bureau o f Business and Eco no m ic

M adison, W isconsin 53702

W yom ing Department o f Adm inistration

Research

T E L : 608 266-8132

Jan G allagher

and Information
Em erson B u ild in g , R oo m 327E

U n ive rsity o f W isco n sin -L a Crosse
204 North H a ll

W illia m A . Strang

Cheyenne, W yom ing 82002

1725 State Street

Associate Dean fo r External Relations

T E L : 307 777-7504

L a Crosse, W isconsin 54601

The U n ive rsity o f W isconsin-M adison

T E L : 608 785-8500

975 U n ive rsity Avenue, R oo m 5151

C ly n n P h illip s

M adison, W isconsin 53706-1323

Associate Director, Department o f A g ricu ltu ra l

T E L : 608 262-1550

Econom ics

Robert N aylo r

The U n ive rsity o f W yom ing

Dem ographics Services Center

Wyoming

Department o f Adm inistration

G. Fred D o ll

Laram ie, W yom ing 82071

101 South Webster Street, 6th F loo r

Director, Survey Research Center

T E L : 307 766-2178

P.O. B o x 7868

U n ive rsity o f W yom ing

P.O. B o x 3354, U n iversity Station

STATISTICAL SECTION

Per Capita Personal Income by State, 1929

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Summary

Summary

Per Capita Personal Income by State, 1993

-b.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Per Capita Personal Income by Region
Percent of United States Average

140%

120%

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

100%

80%

60%

1929

1939

1949

1959

1969

1979

1989

1993

Summary

40%

6

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 1.— Total Personal Income for States and R egions, 1929-93
[Millions of dollars]

Line

State and region

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1

84,069

75,227

64,349

49,028

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

7,008

6,473

5,767

1,614
473
3,790
316
591
225

4,588

1,469
455
3,514
297
533
204

1,287
390
3,187
258
477
167

998
302
2,578
199
382
129

940
300
2,358
195
371
119

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

26,940

25,033

21,677

241
601
1,223
3,615
13,842
7,418

16,850

203
602
1,140
3,398
12,912
6,777

185
590
1,034
2,987
11,144
5,737

143
527
838
2,376
8,646
4,321

16
17
18
19
20
21

19,793

16,929

14,135

7,120
1,938
3,737
5,047
1,952

6,092
1,647
3,127
4,353
1,709

10,281

5,081
1,407
2,551
3,713
1,382

7,488

6,702

1,410
977
1,523
2,228
806
254
290

1,244
862
1,405
2,025
707
209
249

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

9,842
844
566
737
992
1,012
849
562
1,026
464
972
1,036
781

43
44
45
46
47

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

45,939

1934

1i935

1937

1938

1939

1940

52,755

59,426

67,696

73,081

67,332

71,760

77,217

4,744

5,085

5,728

5,939

5,437

1,330
420
3,076
255

6,307

166

1,424
424
3,153
268
500
171

5,859

1,275
392
2,895
255
459
160

1,397
413
3,108
271
496
173

1,546
441
3,325
281
530
184

21,356

22,407

20,820

22,027

218

23,592

239
705
1,143
3,011
11,158
6,152

201
688
1,094
2,809
10,505
5,523

233
722
1,164
3,044
10,988
5,877

272
793
1,281
3,371
11,522
6,354

2,586
225
398

2,758

15,549

17,346

18,704

138
461
770

511

8^049
4,026

1936

2,305
8,849

2,517
4,998

1,057
2,858
10,743
5,802

11,347

13,189

15,182

16,890

14,771

16,146

958

1,174

1,386

5,031
1,594

17,470

i! o o i

5,670
1,827

2 1646

2Ì548

3,023

3,459

3,987

4,352

5,020
1,578
2,851
3,772
1,549

5,473
1,742
3,179
4,172
1,580

5,847
1,866
3,567
4,496
1,694

5,551

4,179

3,697

978
738
1,180
1,803
562
126
164

4,104

727

5,451

621

5,563

664

6,409

5,847

1,059

974

6,102

1,289

6,401

418
118
129

1,179
684
1,416
1,880
518
204
221

1,251
745
1,442
1,938
571
224
229

8,418

7,406

5,574

695
416
677
877
841
735
397
910
416
840
915
699

582
388
582
735
762
663
342
775
353
726
886
611

422
283
472
573
556
505
248
592
272
527
679
443

435
286
436
590

10,221

4,195

3,582

254
170
1,060
2,711

3,023

2,274

222
141
865
2,355

181
124
705
2,012

2,243

134
90
507

128
93
520
1,725

1,589

1,463

1,159

594
222
267
251
130

871

492
168
204
188
107

1,027

372
124
180
156
84

372
104

188

190

U ta h ....................................................
Wyoming ............................................

632
224
307
277
149

916

153
84

160
94

Far West ...............................................

7,214

6,626

5,631

4,366

4,140

5,373

4,960

4,257

3,326

77
625
1,138

75
573
1,018

60
482
832

52
363
625

586

Indiana ................................................

Plains ....................................................
Io w a ....................................................

Idaho ..................................................

Alaska ................................................
Hawaii ................................................
Nevada ...............................................

See footnote at the end of the table.

120

180
200

154

212
211

1,127
692
1,341
1,772
528
181
206

6,878

7,527

8,716

9,457

8,761

682
463

9,436

oao

886
804
728
469
984
454
840
980
698

729
481
815
937
938
780
462
1,084
484
923
1,075
750

669
439
797
880
820
777
421
999
451
835
1,007
668

698
477
890
948
849
821
438
1,093
509
881
1,114
716

2,955

3,362

3,815

3,655

4,041

2,249

219
171
790
2,475

3,800

1,944

225
180
861
2,550

233
184
799
2,585

248
197
854
2,742

1,239

1,449

1,451

1,423

1,476

581
213
280
232
145

1,569

202
116

584
233
261
242
130

556
216
281
235

571
225
292
245
143

608
238
313
262
148

4,731

5,275

6,339

6,713

6,618

6,915

7,616

3,163

3,552

3,974

4.773

5,069

5,007

5,179

5,737

46

52

64

84
555
927

77
575
992

80
560
972

90
609
1,037

99

1,466
98
89

482
261
668
301
550
684
448

350
365

2,578

roo

135

789
500
979
1,032
902
844
460
1,141
577
983
1,245
767

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

7

Table 1.— Total Person al Income fo r States and R egions, 1929-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

94,625

121,184

147,574

158,905

163,477

175,512

188,679

207,545

204,636

227,314

255,280

272,203

288,934

291,749

313,152

1

7,676
1,978
531
3,918
344
684
221

9,442
2,520
711
4,659
405
882
264

10,833
2,834
880
5,345
445
1,029
300

11,200
2,855
880
5,620
480
1,067
298

11,294
2,768
858
5,767
511
1,066
323

12,224
2,993
939
6,288
564
1,069
370

12,986
3,322
990
6,533
614
1,133
395

13,662
3,409
1,078
6,972
664
1,115
424

13,506
3,332
1,061
6,939
671
1,091
411

14,884
3,762
1,091
7,669
713
1,209
441

16,537
4,329
1,204
8,378
791
1,334
502

17,521
4,729
1,310
8,726
837
1,404
514

18,681
5,142
1,319
9,283
898
1,500
540

18,973
5,246
1,338
9,409
938
1,496
545

20,362
5,663
1,472
10,044
1,014
1,600
568

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

27,520
317
907
1,642
4,014
13,034
7,605

32,851
358
1,144
2,217
4,975
15,026
9,131

38,624
407
1,328
2,664
5,944
17,599
10,682

41,762
426
1,332
2,823
6,423
19,301
11,456

43,128
433
1,399
2,783
6,465
20,406
11,642

46,855
466
1,498
2,888
6,805
22,573
12,626

49,916
504
1,511
3,014
7,195
23,902
13,790

53,181
515
1,603
3,339
7,781
25,305
14,639

53,322
558
1,662
3,411
7,859
25,370
14,463

58,281
653
1,742
3,790
8,694
27,222
16,181

64,005
704
1,843
4,348
9,922
29,419
17,770

67,664
757
1,933
4,775
10,728
30,837
18,634

72,313
815
1,882
5,103
11,566
32,887
20,059

73,268
843
1,852
5,130
11,806
33,995
19,643

77,991
969
1,848
5,533
12,580
36,237
20,824

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

21,713
7,026
2,493
4,476
5,637
2,082

26,846
8,243
3,181
5,769
7,029
2,624

32,426
9,663
3,883
7,236
8,511
3,133

34,485
10,603
4,085
7,528
9,004
3,266

35,145
11,052
4,252
7,193
9,179
3,469

38,120
12,398
4,423
7,747
9,750
3,802

42,152
13,536
4,921
8,836
10,686
4,173

47,290
15,388
5,619
9,569
12,007
4,707

45,522
14,487
5,366
9,524
11,493
4,652

50,619
15,879
6,028
10,849
12,726
5,137

57,420
17,692
6,989
12,148
14,672
5,920

60,891
18,611
7,351
13,013
15,733
6,183

66,490
19,918
8,104
14,804
17,272
6,393

65,818
20,045
7,683
14,432
17,307
6,351

71,176
21,321
8,298
16,036
18,681
6,840

16
17
18
19
20
21

7,824
1,497
960
1,654
2,412
691
322
288

10,504
2,017
1,488
2,102
3,052
1,012
385
448

12,427
2,365
1,861
2,414
3,524
1,246
524
493

13,018
2,279
2,041
2,518
3,771
1,314
548
547

13,808
2,489
1,984
2,790
3,940
1,423
565
618

15,498
3,044
2,027
3,231
4,441
1,477
616
661

16,830
3,024
2,401
3,523
4,667
1,598
860
758

19,844
4,164
2,543
4,136
5,247
1,961
860
933

18,139
3,488
2,489
3,874
5,117
1,744
723
704

20,481
4,020
2,797
4,285
5,628
2,065
844
843

22,356
4,281
3,117
4,740
6,210
2,155
873
982

23,559
4,520
3,601
4,917
6,556
2,302
799
863

23,892
4,347
3,459
5,186
6,953
2,205
811
930

24,791
4,690
3,649
5,333
6,992
2,345
830
952

25,292
4,456
3,658
5,635
7,487
2,259
911
886

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

13,320
1,074
664
1,214
1,316
1,111
1,103
663
1,499
762
1,281
1,705
928

18,328
1,511
945
1,697
1,803
1,497
1,484
958
2,033
1,085
1,639
2,564
1,112

22,823
1,879
1,018
2,482
2,326
1,867
1,987
1,189
2,498
1,263
2,120
2,918
1,276

25,412
2,051
1,210
2,797
2,604
1,992
2,150
1,325
2,761
1,414
2,472
3,243
1,392

26,352
2,159
1,296
2,919
2,693
2,078
2,127
1,302
2,879
1,434
2,606
3,351
1,507

27,120
2,179
1,358
2,854
2,725
2,265
2,093
1,261
3,203
1,504
2,664
3,330
1,681

28,518
2,354
1,353
2,928
2,877
2,403
2,255
1,407
3,369
1,571
2,803
3,272
1,927

32,098
2,619
1,623
3,056
3,213
2,795
2,626
1,673
3,837
1,818
3,102
3,636
2,101

31,628
2,500
1,506
3,190
3,212
2,668
2,812
1,475
3,777
1,768
3,074
3,677
1,968

35,262
2,783
1,627
3,632
3,677
2,901
2,995
1,684
4,375
1,957
3,400
4,115
2,114

40,176
3,193
1,827
4,102
4,242
3,381
3,332
1,847
4,900
2,414
3,777
4,819
2,342

42,869
3,384
1,892
4,611
4,568
3,600
3,611
1,955
5,038
2,597
3,939
5,239
2,435

44,918
3,539
1,903
5,137
4,709
3,777
3,836
1,990
5,238
2,686
4,231
5,412
2,460

44,844
3,425
1,866
5,435
4,677
3,726
3,846
1,919
5,327
2,531
4,273
5,488
2,331

48,742
3,871
2,032
6,230
5,159
3,899
4,100
2,154
5,784
2,696
4,517
5,828
2,474

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

4,929
309
236
965
3,419

6,968
480
319
1,379
4,791

9,220
656
407
1,703
6,454

10,128
644
459
1,932
7,093

10,245
661
495
1,949
7,140

10,655
684
517
2,012
7,441

11,885
765
583
2,173
8,363

13,144
908
675
2,377
9,183

13,936
926
734
2,443
9,833

14,921
1,027
826
2,540
10,528

17,054
1,266
961
2,839
11,987

18,487
1,438
1,040
3,093
12,916

19,082
1,531
1,087
3,205
13,260

19,488
1,577
1,111
3,208
13,592

20,936
1,721
1,204
3,396
14,614

43
44
45
46
47

1,915
720
296
383
324
191

2,644
1,003
436
465
507
232

3,221
1,183
507
551
700
280

3,235
1,190
559
553
642
291

3,402
1,316
552
571
663
300

3,744
1,436
608
667
692
342

4,231
1,663
663
780
744
381

4,681
1,818
739
884
811
429

4,648
1,838
726
797
836
451

5,180
2,001
783
977
926
493

5,957
2,365
880
1,072
1,076
565

6,299
2,551
961
1,091
1,141
556

6,345
2,583
921
1,110
1,174
556

6,380
2,635
931
1,099
1,172
542

6,934
2,878
981
1,197
1,294
584

48
49
50
51
52
53

Line

9,728

13,601

17,999

19,665

20,103

21,295

22,161

23,646

23,935

27,686

31,774

34,913

37,214

38,186

41,720

54

7,219

9,889

13,157

14,485

15,032

16,022

16,552

17,446

17,749

19,762

22,843

25,341

27,230

28,064

30,929

56

118
864
1,527

214
1,247
2,251

227
1,680
2,936

227
1,721
3,232

234
1,696
3,142

251
1,835
3,187

261
2,035
3,312

272
2,295
3,634

279
2,276
3,631

318
2,525
4,080

367
2,832
4,511

429
3,009
4,799

473
3,056
5,067

510
3,026
5,202

593
3,270
5,485

58
59
60

8

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 1.— Total Person al Income for States and Regions, 1929-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]

Line
1

State and region
United States1

1956

1957

1958

1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

336,407

355,342

365,559

389,815

406,318

423,568

450,268

473,128

507,079

549,017

596,917

640,971

New England .....
Connecticut .....
M aine ..............
M assachusetts .
New Hampshire
Rhode Island ....
V e rm o n t...........

21,769
6,184
1,560
10,666
1,072
1,667
621

22,944
6,591
1,615
11,241
1,144
1,710
643

23,453
6,643
1,686
11,549
1,162
1,760
654

25,074
7,115
1,760
12,370
1,264
1,859
706

26,121
7,405
1,858
12,879
1,335
1,898
745

27,405
7,838
1,879
13,521
1,408
1,984
775

29,064
8,368
1,954
14,298
1,509
2,124
811

30,362
8,836
2,017
14,875
1,572
2,220
841

32,537
9,500
2,179
15,903
1,690
2,364
900

35,033
10,248
2,366
17,046
1,834
2,550
990

38,189
11,271
2,530
18,452
2,026
2,785
1,126

41,658
12*385
2,666
20Ì137
2,217
3,026
1,226

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Mideast ...................
D e la w a re ...............
District of Columbia
Maryland ...............
New J e r s e y ...........
New York ..............
P e n n sy lv a n ia .........

83,737
1,115
1,926
6,040
13,661
38,489
22,506

88,488
1,118
1,973
6,395
14,535
40,792
23,674

90,269
1,142
2,039
6,633
14,774
41,888
23,792

95,755
1,197
2,110
7,028
15,910
44,488
25,022

99,849
1,255
2,194
7,386
16,769
46,401
25,845

103,843
1,297
2,285
7,847
17,628
48,440
26,346

109,642
1,371
2,393
8,476
18,951
51,014
27,437

114,508
1,471
2,508
9,072
19,902
53,086
28,470

122,605
1,594
2,628
9,904
21,373
56,686
30,420

131,434
1,764
2,780
10,861
23,058
60,311
32,660

141,931
1,868
2,922
11,986
24,977
64,922
35,256

153,141
<997
3Ì138
13Ì074
26Ì968
70Ì176
37Ì786

16
17
18
19
20
21

Great Lakes
Illinois .....
Indiana ....
Michigan ..
O h io ........
Wisconsin

76,229
23,265
8,928
16,709
19,940
7,387

79,360
24,269
9,230
17,168
20,949
7,744

79,455
24,712
9,211
16,884
20,744
7,905

84,841
26,299
9,812
17,921
22,218
8,592

87,940
27,093
10,289
18,628
23,070
8.860

89,912
28,110
10,579
18,640
23,444
9,139

95,266
29,656
11,302
19,974
24,685
9,650

99,720
30,843
11,873
21,315
25,703
9,987

107,175
32,958
12,640
23,377
27,449
10,752

117,328
35,818
14,000
26,035
29,798
11,676

127,804
38Ì889
15,141
28Ì412
32,579
12,782

134,694
4 <409
15,876
29Ì672
34^210
13Ì527

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

P la in s .............
Io w a .............
Kansas ........
M in n esota ....
M is s o u ri.......
N e b ra s k a .....
North Dakota
South Dakota

26,620
4,732
3,849
5,912
7,899
2,335
948
946

28,487
5,247
4,064
6,271
8,129
2,696
974
1,107

30,076
5,375
4,503
6,638
8,506
2,800
1,117
1,138

30,909
5,523
4,560
6,907
9,010
2,831
1,036
1,042

32,426
5,666
4,730
7,329
9,264
3,012
1,152
1,274

33,610
5,989
4,933
7,698
9,564
3,084
1,057
1,286

35,866
6,258
5,133
8,122
10,064
3,349
1,471
1,469

37,355
6,658
5,268
8,619
10,569
3,448
1,371
1,423

38,915
6,970
5,534
8,968
11,149
3,538
1,362
1,394

42,802
7,748
5,917
9,933
12,138
3,905
1,590
1,570

46,090
8,446
6,351
10,773
12,997
4^208
1,613
1,701

48,435
<632
6 ’667
11,583
13^836
4,375
1,616
<726

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Southeast ........
A la b a m a ........
Arkansas .......

52,714
4,146
2,097
7,206
5,529
4,145
4,534
2,194
6,173
2,803
4,840
6 ,3l0
2,737

55,549
4,394
2,161
7,983
5,716
4,344
5,014
2,223
6,208
2,917
5,053
6,606
2,931

58,283
4,608
2,270
8,699
5,989
4,547
5,156
2,414
6,565
3,019
5,231
6,921
2,864

62,503
4,860
2,485
9,630
6,401
4,792
5,408
2,666
7,036
3,257
5,616
7,388
2,963

64,748
5,058
2,517
10,079
6,689
4,935
5,506
2,696
7,421
3,421
5,763
7,657
3,007

68,112
5,210
2,727
10,650
6,968
5,242
5,713
2,906
7,834
3,585
6,094
8,137
3,044

72,624
5,478
2,910
11,480
7,479
5,553
6,019
3,041
8,401
3,850
6,462
8,777
3,171

77,426
5,838
3,097
12,326
8,116
5,834
6,422
3,348
8,830
4,071
6,852
9,384
3,308

83,620
6,338
3,359
13,517
8,796
6,097
6,877
3,470
9,554
4,381
7,359
10,350
3,524

91,078
6,912
3,566
14,859
9,719
6,622
7,454
3,768
10,328
4,836
8,031
11,208
3,773

100,014
7,431
3,968
16,407
10,717
7,234
8,241
4,101
11,475
5,424
8,862
12,145
4,007

108,485
7,656
4,224
18,237
11,646
7,825
<017
4 436
12Ì388
5,855
9,489
13^260
4,252

43
44
45
46
47

Southwest....
A r iz o n a ......
New Mexico
Oklahoma ...
Texas ........

22,505
1,938
1,302
3,603
15,662

24,128
2,120
1,458
3,770
16,780

25,212
2,236
1,606
4,063
17,307

26,773
2,479
1,731
4,250
18,313

27,732
2,706
1,779
4,468
18,779

29,223
2,945
1,861
4,620
19,797

30,747
3,169
1,941
4,822
20,815

32,080
3,332
2,005
4,990
21,752

34,368
3,573
2,116
5,341
23,337

36,930
3,808
2,248
5,737
25,138

40,141
<165
2,376
6,150
27,450

43,803
4Ì524
2,477
6 ’711
30Ì092

48
49
50
51
52
53

Rocky Mountain
C o lo ra d o ........
Idaho .............
Montana ........
U t a h ...............
Wyoming .......

7,536
3,171
1,079
1,257
1,408
623

8,124
3,485
1,138
1,315
1,521
665

8,376
3,577
1,170
1,371
1,576
681

8,865
3,855
1,240
1,348
1,695
727

9,363
4,122
1,270
1,399
1,811
762

9,919
4,439
1,346
1,399
1,935
801

10,673
4,667
1,441
1,635
2,102
828

11,016
4,891
1,473
1,623
2,184
846

11,507
5,173
1,520
1,653
2,292
869

12,410
5,549
1,742
1,784
2,430
905

13,188
5,983
1,774
1,916
2,583
933

14,038
6<67
<889
<959
2,723
1,000

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far West .....
Alaska ......
California ...
Hawaii ......
Nevada .....
Oregon .....
Washington

45,296
530
33,869
1,013
616
3,502
5,766

48,261
518
36,374
1,080
659
3,503
6,128

50,434
509
38,194
1,150
689
3,601
6,290

55,095
546
41,916
1,289
759
3,900
6,685

58,139
645
44,247
1,468
830
4,023
6,925

61,544
645
46,944
1,586
919
4,173
7,275

66,387
677
50,632
1,696
1,107
4,435
7,841

70,660
737
54,153
1,806
1,244
4,679
8,042

76,352
832
58,750
1,962
1,343
5,042
8,423

82,001
903
62,891
2,156
1,441
5,505
9,106

89,560
979
68,411
2,361
1,523
5,957
10,328

96,717
1,081
73^811
2,573
1,620
6,328
11Î304

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Florida ...........
Georgia .........
Kentucky .......
L o u isia n a .......
M ississip p i.....
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee ....
Virginia ..........
West Virginia ..

See footnote at the end of the table.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

9

Table 1.— Total P e rson al Incom e fo r States and Regions, 1929-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1978

1979

1980

1981

Line

703,575

767,608

824,823

888,002

974,938

1,092,217

1,200,575

1,302,532

1,442,221

1,596,944

1,802,663

2,024,812

2,259,006

2,526,009

1

45,234
13,235
2,854
22,025
2,457
3,311
1,353

49,285
14,448
3,104
23,996
2,709
3,555
1,474

52,803
15,318
3,390
25,753
2,886
3,849
1,607

55,960
16,029
3,628
27,379
3,110
4,078
1,736

60,602
17,276
3,965
29,559
3,442
4,445
1,915

66,405
18,939
4,479
32,182
3,897
4,798
2,111

72,053
20,561
4,980
34,850
4,288
5,092
2,282

76,882
21,887
5,310
37,138
4,621
5,461
2,465

84,256
23,912
6,118
40,174
5,280
6,021
2,752

92,379
26,395
6,657
43,772
5,964
6,597
2,994

103,099
29,472
7,376
48,620
6,892
7,280
3,460

115,726
33,266
8,241
54,292
7,920
8,098
3,909

130,875
37,875
9,266
61,210
9,061
9,084
4,380

145,851
42,267
10,258
68,099
10,234
10,093
4,901

2
3
4
5

168,175
2,195
3,331
14,462
29,693
77,446
41,047

181,593
2,387
3,472
16,084
31,948
83,166
44,537

195,084
2,529
3,783
17,700
34,535
88,808
47,729

208,526
2,742
4,169
19,197
37,152
94,744
50,521

225,193
3,004
4,545
21,032
40,264
101,293
55,055

244,334
3,344
4,830
23,404
43,980
108,190
60,586

265,521
3,622
5,294
25,658
47,809
116,438
66,700

285,004
3,873
5,766
27,675
51,151
124,243
72,297

309,097
4,256
6,166
30,382
55,944
132,921
79,427

336,092
4,608
6,634
32,972
61,244
143,483
87,152

370,152
5,035
7,039
36,780
68,268
156,583
96,447

409,009
5,506
7,478
40,817
76,181
171,876
107,150

455,185
6,162
7,975
45.747
85,920
191,573
117,806

504,595
6,737
8,681
51,109
95,647
212,978
129,443

147,021
44,417
17,242
32,842
37,737
14,784

159,583
47,930
18,918
35,620
41,024
16,091

167,222
50,728
19,592
36,713
42,994
17,195

179,602
54,356
21,276
39,937
45,600
18,433

196,009
58,883
23,262
44,312
49,454
20,098

220,178
65,973
26,814
49,709
55,164
22,519

239,127
72,213
28,628
53,197
60,348
24,741

255,626
78,062
30,660
56,122
64,021
26,759

284,085
85,571
34,410
63,523
70,972
29,608

316,394
94,404
38,197
71,750
78,847
33,197

352,020
104,561
42,774
80,100
87,351
37,235

388,946
115,116
47,244
88,160
96,531
41,895

420,270
124,423
50,615
93,977
105,194
46,061

457,660
137,842
55,311
100,388
114,167
49,953

21

52,692
9,252
7,226
12,745
15,293
4,657
1,675
1,845

57,379
10,072
7,850
14,023
16,403
5,215
1,851
1,964

61,885
10,734
8,456
15,221
17,838
5,579
1,930
2,127

66,517
11,244
9,175
16,190
19,236
6,115
2,227
2,330

73,376
12,528
10,263
17,554
20,910
6,762
2,674
2,685

86,062
15,147
11,745
20,643
23,406
7,907
3,796
3,417

91,051
15,702
12,712
22,247
24,995
8,243
3,751
3,401

99,050
17,421
13,797
23,814
27,121
9,305
3,889
3,704

107,093
18,622
15,168
25,989
30,006
9,797
3,834
3,677

118,644
20,637
16,582
29,305
33,380
10,614
3,978
4,149

135,123
23,963
18,457
32,947
37,456
12,405
5,062
4,834

149,926
25,795
21,275
36,848
42,019
13,400
5,235
5,354

161,365
27,253
23,297
40,778
45,571
14,140
5,002
5,323

182,046
30,872
26,314
44,953
50,898
16,359
6,489
6,162

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

120,139
8,579
4,573
21,015
12,867
8,548
9,853
4,838
13,630
6,494
10,555
14,680
4,507

132,527
9,366
4,974
24,064
14,337
9,360
10,396
5,252
15,126
7,146
11,431
16,245
4,829

144,695
10,140
5,447
27,000
15,534
10,136
11,191
5,757
16,484
7,797
12,381
17,460
5,368

158,903
11,067
6,024
30,251
17,042
10,997
12,170
6,358
17,878
8,519
13,596
19,107
5,894

178,673
12,295
6,780
34,823
19.225
12,172
13,319
7,245
20,198
9,549
15,277
21,261
6,531

204,240
13,911
8,055
40,855
21,831
13,743
14,927
8,320
23,028
10,941
17,471
24,002
7,156

227,888
15,447
8,994
45,976
24,073
15,500
16,978
9,157
25,344
12,381
19,294
26,790
7,953

247,827
17,148
9,810
49,688
25,816
16,813
18,950
9,854
27,198
13,363
20,838
29,365
8,983

277,314
19,393
10,893
54,539
28,857
18,937
21,618
11,259
30,465
15,025
23,494
32,732
10,101

308,739
21,444
12,203
61,107
31,947
21,426
24,218
12,609
33,556
16,509
26,077
36,365
11,276

352,321
24,261
14,246
70,958
36,416
24,019
27,840
14,058
38,087
18,755
29,756
41,331
12,593

397,870
27,121
15,684
82,140
41,050
26,949
31,719
15,974
42,186
21,122
33,341
46,480
14,105

449,114
29,879
16,880
96,780
45,832
29,507
36,655
17,352
47,183
23,693
36,868
52,914
15,571

506,643
33,087
19,041
111.566
51,712
32,769
42,242
19,452
52,988
26,598
40,897
59,467
16,825

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

48,745
5,193
2,675
7,352
33,525

53,993
5,970
2,920
8,018
37,086

59,443
6,779
3,213
8,796
40,655

64,748
7,701
3,550
9,535
43,962

72,064
8,854
3,978
10,484
48,749

82,374
10,275
4,485
11,958
55,657

92,961
11,614
5,052
13,371
62,925

104,150
12,340
5,723
14,917
71,170

117,772
13,841
6,430
16,556
80,946

132,281
15,617
7,270
18,411
90,983

153,286
18,522
8,350
20,999
105,415

178,402
21,988
9,485
24,504
122,425

205,459
25,365
10,676
28,329
141,090

240,110
28,803
12,085
33,076
166,147

43
44
45
46
47

15,229
7,173
2,009
2,056
2,924
1,066

16,772
7,963
2,257
2,227
3,167
1,160

18,651
8,941
2,483
2,457
3,507
1,264

20,682
10,049
2,718
2,610
3,898
1,407

23,433
11,358
3,090
3,039
4,369
1,576

26,967
13,070
3,605
3,540
4,908
1,845

30,398
14,657
4,242
3,840
5,509
2,151

33,339
16,084
4,515
4,193
6,123
2,423

37,187
17,848
5,114
4,516
6,982
2,726

41,646
20,055
5,586
4,902
7,920
3,183

48,485
23,172
6,470
5,813
9,142
3,888

55,244
26,792
7,148
6,284
10,419
4,600

62,859
30,889
8,000
6,885
11,695
5,390

71,456
35,596
8,757
7,780
13,186
6,136

48
49
50
51
52
53

106,340
1,176
80,934
2,882
1,886
6,896
12,566

116,476
1,373
88,540
3,295
2,149
7,528
13,592

125,040
1,542
94,942
3,770
2,403
8,163
14,220

133,064
1,678
100,799
4,058
2,658
8,918
14,953

145,587
1,825
110,192
4,468
2,968
9,997
16,137

161,656
2,146
121,577
4,970
3,401
11,314
18,248

181,576
2,652
135,999
5,721
3,761
12,774
20,669

200,655
3,779
149,338
6,149
4,207
14,011
23,172

225,416
4,560
167,374
6,655
4,831
15,998
25,997

250,770
4,638
186,394
7,203
5,642
17,948
28,945

288,176
4,710
213,858
8,016
6,899
20,703
33,991

329,689
4,947
244,743
9,087
8,062
23,584
39,266

373,879
5,541
277,967
10,431
9,362
26,054
44,524

417,647
6,431
311,761
11,243
10,642
27,943
49,627

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

6
7
8
9
10

11

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

10

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

Table 1.— Total Person al Income for States and Regions, 1929-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
Line

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1

U nited S t a t e s ' ..............................

State and región

2,683,456

2,857,710

3,144,363

3,368,069

3,579,783

3,789,297

4,061,806

4,366,135

4,655,420

4,840,768

5,135,062

5,359,589

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

New E ng la nd .........................................
Connecticut .........................................
Maine .................................................
M assachusetts ...................................
New Hampshire .................................
Rhode Is la n d ......................................
V e rm o n t..............................................

157,154
45,493
10,973
73,583
11,093
10,798
5,213

170,081
48,735
11,876
79,898
12,338
11,617
5,618

190,073
54,372
13,159
89,523
14,026
12,807
6,185

205,307
58,484
14,169
96,592
15,654
13,683
6,726

223,553
63,435
15,516
105,055
17,490
14,733
7,324

241,830
68,965
16,906
113,178
19,021
15,866
7,894

265,334
75.790
18,486
124,327
20,888
17,261
8,581

281,095
80,601
20,089
130,466
22,065
18,454
9,421

289,961
83,633
20,981
133,890
22,491
19,121
9,846

295,985
85,038
21,421
136,673
23,218
19,523
10,112

308,308
89,043
22,460
141,578
24,229
20,256
10,742

319,387
91,625
23,271
147,148
24,947
21,204
11,193

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

M id e ast .................................................
Delaware ............................................
District of C o lu m b ia ............................
Maryland ............................................
New Jersey ........................................
New York ...........................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia ......................................

540,034
7,209
9,303
54,776
102,941
229,054
136,752

576,760
7,746
9,760
59,253
111,524
245,407
143,070

633,601
8,403
10,558
66,085
123,702
270,682
154,170

678,703
9,092
11,134
72,043
132,761
289,199
164,473

727,808
9,754
11,523
78,213
142,751
310,608
174,959

774,467
10,425
12,276
84,511
153,396
329,553
184,305

834,323
11,371
13,420
91,790
167,602
353,658
196,483

894,080
12,420
14,227
99,769
178,582
377,342
211,739

947,684
13,193
14,878
105,985
187,167
401,833
224,628

979,399
13,831
15,506
109,347
192,341
413,726
234,648

1,033,548
14,579
16,569
114,075
204,091
437,119
247,115

1,068,536
15,220
17,259
118,759
210,622
450,754
255,921

16
17
18
19
20
21

G re a t L a k e s ..........................................
Illinois ..................................................
Indiana ...............................................
Michigan .............................................
O h io ....................................................
Wisconsin ...........................................

472,727
143,180
56,835
101,882
118,451
52,379

496,105
149,056
59,489
108,026
124,636
54,898

544,534
163,235
65,623
119,335
136,355
59,987

577,143
171,881
68,988
129,110
144,078
63,085

610,422
181,012
72,920
137,887
151,706
66,898

639,123
190,036
76,977
143,404
158,465
70,242

680,125
201,919
81,901
152,142
169,902
74,260

728,259
217,594
88,227
162,359
180,248
79,831

769,910
230,790
93,415
169,808
190,608
85,288

795,567
237,658
96,851
175,244
196,927
88,888

846,619
252,938
104,022
185,665
208,560
95,434

885,296
263,591
109,465
194,687
217,693
99,860

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

P la in s ....................................................
lo w a ....................................................
Kansas ...............................................
M in n e so ta ...........................................
Missouri ..............................................
N e b ra s k a ............................................
North D a k o ta ......................................
South Dakota .....................................

191,297
31,167
28,238
47,713
53,588
17,144
7,004
6,443

199,972
31,606
29,453
49,932
56,974
17,780
7,516
6,712

220,695
34,447
31,794
56,449
63,012
19,570
7,904
7,520

233,380
35,587
33,615
59,896
67,701
20,666
8,132
7,783

245,143
36,884
35,210
63,598
71,636
21,355
8,277
8,183

257,304
38,565
36,727
67,612
75,240
22,105
8,353
8,704

269,192
39,681
38,778
70,914
79,134
23,908
7,816
8,962

289,663
43,352
40,553
77,405
84,348
25,276
8,877
9,851

309,893
46,375
43,763
82,388
89,245
27,470
9,765
10,888

322,012
47,714
45,476
85,368
93,358
28,700
9,877
11,520

343,309
50,953
48,341
91,654
98,441
30,775
10,859
12,286

354,656
51,564
50,295
94,942
102,369
31,754
10,872
12,860

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

S o u th e a st .............................................
A la b a m a ..............................................
Arkansas .............................................
Florida .................................................
Georgia ...............................................
Kentucky ............................................
L o u isia n a .............................................
M is s is s ip p i...........................................
North C a ro lin a ....................................
South Carolina ...................................
Tennessee ..........................................
Virginia ................................................
West V irg in ia .......................................

539,815
34,759
19,836
120,438
55,840
34,518
45,037
20,503
56,128
28,020
43,043
63,913
17,780

580,433
37,023
20,982
132,908
61,326
35,325
46,639
21,386
61,161
30,412
45,900
69,318
18,053

641,440
40,578
23,322
146,339
69,878
39,014
49,386
23,343
68,706
33,711
50,979
76,991
19,195

690,361
43,601
24,841
160,983
76,713
40,568
51,288
24,459
74,243
36,049
54,605
83,132
19,878

739,797
46,573
26,140
175,287
83,967
42,342
51,140
25,546
80,253
38,374
59,201
90,253
20,721

788,739
49,341
27,200
189,558
90,312
44,260
51,015
27,043
86,328
41,239
63,691
97,653
21,099

849,116
52,521
28,793
205,127
97,819
46,930
53,911
28,854
93,560
45,018
68,379
106,011
22,193

916,226
56,291
30,702
228,024
104,184
50,586
56,369
30,672
100,010
47,995
73,177
114,864
23,352

981,283
60,332
32,450
244,604
111,406
54,454
60,228
32,398
108,339
52,855
77,786
121,397
25,034

1,028,204
63,808
34,276
254,880
116,891
57,365
63,944
34,243
113,445
55,077
81,659
126,229
26,385

1,092,607
68,254
37,312
265,418
125,116
61,698
67,831
36,744
121,880
58,262
88,553
133,452
28,086

1,155,025
71,620
38,776
283,297
132,832
64,237
71,252
38,869
129,790
61,236
93,894
139,831
29,392

43
44
45
46
47

S o u t h w e s t .............................................
Arizona ................................................
New México ........................................
O k la h o m a ...........................................
Texas ..................................................

261,411
30,276
13,099
36,659
181,377

275,265
33,337
13,926
36,997
191,004

300,157
37,680
15,086
38,876
208,515

322,181
42,092
16,287
40,189
223,613

328,372
46,290
16,915
40,137
225,031

339,607
49,926
17,587
40,154
231,941

360,245
53,251
18,713
42,158
246,122

385,260
56,646
20,134
44,694
263,785

414,512
59,833
21,602
47,580
285,497

437,913
62,779
22,930
49,593
302,612

470,588
67,001
24,550
52,807
326,230

497,775
71,317
26,402
55,047
345,009

48
49
50
51
52
53

R o c k y M ountain ...................................
C o lo ra d o .............................................
Idaho ..................................................
Montana .............................................
U t a h ....................................................
Wyoming ............................................

76,853
39,063
9,047
8,174
14,225
6,345

81,916
41,907
9,890
8,649
15,261
6,209

88,102
45,293
10,545
9,074
16,776
6,414

92,410
47,423
11,041
9,261
17,933
6,752

95,379
48,766
11.438
9,775
18,821
6,579

98,548
50,541
11,849
10,053
19,769
6,336

104,451
53,966
12,668
10,269
20,915
6,633

113,279
58,202
14,241
11,317
22,520
6,999

121,418
62,163
15,482
11,790
24,320
7,664

130,157
66,536
16,452
12,753
26,038
8,378

139,385
71,292
17,775
13,469
28,078
8,770

149,761
76,581
19,279
14,617
30,010
9,275

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

F a r W e st ...............................................
Alaska ................................................
California ............................................
Hawai i .................................................
Nevada ................................................
Oregon ................................................
Washington .........................................

444,165
7,704
332,844
11,933
11,188
28,366
52,131

477,179
8,750
357,818
13,117
11,890
30,148
55,456

525,762
9,060
397,350
13,969
13,113
32,741
59,529

568,584
9,805
431,380
14,910
14,408
34,493
63,586

609,308
9,695
462,970
16,055
15,726
36,356
68,506

649,678
9,299
495,290
17,182
17,230
38,265
72,412

699,019
9,720
532,444
18,924
19,253
41,327
77,352

758,274
10,741
573,255
20,957
22,031
45,452
85,838

820,759
11,550
617,679
23,266
24,682
49,161
94,420

851,530
12,280
634,896
24,539
26,755
51,919
101,140

900,699
13,074
667,318
25,912
29,210
55,615
109,570

929,154
13,785
683,002
27,389
31,593
58,962
114,422

1. Alaska and Hawaii are not included in United States totals prior to 1950.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

11

Table 2 — Per Capita P e rson al Income for States and Regions, 1929-93 1
[Dollars]
Line

2
3
4

State and region

1937

1938

1939

1940

467

529

567

519

548

585

New England ........................................

862
1,012
594
896
677
864
625

792
911
568
827
638
777
568

704
790
484
750
550
700
466

558
609
371
605
420
565
359

519
572
366
551
409
549
333

572
643
410
601
469
590
376

608
696
424
635
491
636
409

683
795
501
706
530
701
466

706
848
503
723
558
720
480

645
757
465
663
526
661
450

488
715
554
708
484

747
905
519
770
571
738
508

955
1,022
1,244
754
906
1,137
763

871
849
1,234
697
835
1,021
702

745
766
1,171
624
725
867
591

575
584
1,027
499
577
665
443

527
558
872
455
512
613
412

585
637
899
510
564
668
475

627
694
958
536
616
711
511

713
860
1,079
606
700
797
594

747
939
1,144
652
737
826
628

689
783
1,079
619
685
777
555

1 097
649
737
813
594

786
936
601
779
762
665

668
797
508
647
653
579

556
661
432
532
555
462

403
479
305
388
394
356

370
430
290
342
378
328

442
497
354
446
448
374

511
566
416
523
510
456

585
642
476
612
586
512

647
722
541
676
639
545

563
638
466
564
552
500

565
573
523
592
615
586
377
420

503
503
458
545
556
512
306
360

413
394
392
451
486
406
185
237

309
292
261
358
361
302
174
186

273
249
246
304
329
270
146
129

302
265
281
353
362
255
179
182

400
419
355
445
416
403
269
306

409
388
380
467
461
391
232
243

473
516
420
534
502
409
323
321

433
452
376
487
469
398
280
317

362
319
305
510
342
388
407
281
327
267
373
427
455

308
263
224
460
301
321
349
198
287
239
321
377
403

270
220
210
390
251
287
312
171
244
202
273
362
351

201
159
154
311
195
208
235
124
183
156
194
277
253

204
164
154
281
200
202
221
129
205
172
200
278
256

244
208
183
340
240
230
259
171
249
207
241
313
309

265
214
204
368
264
261
283
175
267
226
260
343
333

304
249
244
442
298
291
324
226
294
255
301
384
386

327
264
253
477
308
337
346
222
320
269
330
415
414

299
240
227
450
285
293
340
198
290
246
296
382
365

467
591
405
447
470

393
512
329
360
403

329
422
285
293
341

247
315
205
212
259

242
301
207
218
250

276
355
243
246
285

314
409
288
292
317

354
455
338
316
363

400
496
357
369
408

381
469
333
340
393

342
406

413
497
372
367
427

530
571
497
495
493
576

415
466
370
378
366
468

326
349
270
334
301
367

308
347
225
294
293
363

360
363
397
359
306
402

432
438
395
471
385
488

499
535
471
470
458
543

494
526
420
506
439
598

481
500
421
509
439
551

510
432
525
452
577

521
538
457
561
475
592

Great Lakes ..........................................

22
23
24

Plains ....................................................

25
26

1936

417

16
17
18
19
20
21

27
28
29

1935

366

Delaware ............................................
District of C o lu m b ia ............................
Maryland ............................................
New Jersey ........................................
New York ...........................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia ......................................

13

1934

393

Mideast .................................................

14
15

1933

519

10
11

12

1932

611

8

7

1931

690

9

6

1930

United States2 ..............................
Connecticut ........................................
Maine .................................................
M assachusetts ...................................
New Hampshire .................................
Rhode Is la n d ......................................
V e rm o n t..............................................

5

1929

Illinois .................................................
Indiana ...............................................
Michigan .............................................
O h io ....................................................
W isconsin ...........................................
Io w a ....................................................
K an sas ...............................................
M in n e s o ta ...........................................
M issouri ..............................................
N e b ra s k a ............................................
North D a k o ta ......................................
South Dakota .....................................

728

694
512
506
452
375
511
393
316
342

778
1,013
1,149
697
807
856
642
654
740
544
671
649
539
474
493
417
517
512
434
350
357

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Southeast .............................................

43
44
45
46
47

S ou th w e st.............................................

48
49
50
51
52
53

Rocky Mountain ...................................
C o lo ra d o .............................................
Idaho ..................................................
Montana .............................................
U t a h ....................................................
Wyoming ............................................

586
627
502
586
546
666

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far West ...............................................

888

796

665

511

480

540

592

695

717

695

714

770

971

869

731

564

530

586

643

753

776

752

763

826

854
660
732

819
600
649

643
499
527

541
374
395

484
352
368

533
433
435

643
451
482

827
542
561

748
549
590

766
525
572

844
564
604

878
601
648

Alabam a .............................................
Arkansas ............................................
Florida ................................................
Georgia ..............................................
Kentucky ............................................
L o u is ia n a ............................................
M is s is s ip p i..........................................
North C a ro lin a ....................................
South Carolina ...................................
Tennessee .........................................
Virginia ...............................................
W est V irg in ia ......................................
Arizona ...............................................
New M exico .......................................
O k la h o m a ...........................................
Texas .................................................

A laska ................................................
California ............................................
Hawaii ................................................
N e v a d a ...............................................
Oregon ...............................................
Washington ........................................

See footnotes at the end of the table.

248
245
485
304
301

307
383
392
480

338
277
256
511
331
315
356
212
319
303
335
458
402

12

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 2.— Per Capita Personal Incom e for States and R egions, 1 9 2 9 -9 3 1— Continued
[Dollars]

Line

State and region

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1

United States 2 ..............................

709

900

1,096

1,185

1,226

1,248

1,313

1,421

1,376

1,497

1,658

1,741

2

New England .......................................
Connecticut .........................................
Maine ..................................................
M assachusetts ...................................
New Hampshire .................................
Rhode Island ......................................
V e rm o n t...............................................

894
1,130
623
890
700
920
635

1,094
1,402
848
1,062
841
1,134
766

1,269
1,577
1,092
1,250
966
1,186
923

1,304
1,585
1,093
1,289
1,043
1,262
945

1,326
1,553
1,070
1,338
1,102
1,266
1,026

1,372
1,566
1,125
1,386
1,140
1,354
1,081

1,434
1,687
1,159
1,424
1,206
1,445
1,117

1,480
1,692
1,228
1,492
1,276
1,416
1,182

1,440
1,640
1,175
1,464
1,260
1,362
1,115

1,598
1,866
1,189
1,637
1,340
1,538
1,163

1,780
2,135
1,315
1,800
1,496
1,701
1,327

1,872
2,273
1,432
1,877
1,565
1,750
1,372

905
1,149
1,188
857
943
982
767

1,089
1,275
1,353
1,102
1,153
1,155
940

1,298
1,448
1,496
1,270
1,413
1,367
1,133

1,420
1,491
1,546
1,309
1,540
1,522
1,239

1,480
1,515
1,617
1,297
1,568
1,628
1,268

1,500
1,553
1,678
1,297
1,510
1,680
1,278

1,547
1,648
1,731
1,336
1,555
1,708
1,352

1,612
1,649
1,908
1,470
1,630
1,746
1,423

1,586
1,767
2,059
1,464
1,608
1,704
1,392

1,728
2,033
2,161
1,609
1,784
1,831
1,540

1,886

1,963

2,127
2^281
1,781
1,982
1,976
1,699

2,221

13
14
15

Mideast ................................................
Delaware ............................................
District of C o lu m b ia ............................
Maryland .............................................
New Jersey .........................................
New York ............................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia .......................................

16
17
18
19
20
21

Great Lakes .........................................
Illinois ..................................................
Indiana ................................................
Michigan ..............................................
O h io .....................................................
W isconsin ............................................

803
879
716
819
810
663

989
1,024
905
1,039
1,008
856

1,225
1,244
1,127
1,341
1.240
1,042

1,301
1,374
1,189
1,379
1,300
1,099

1,332
1,452
1,242
1,315
1,327
1,171

1,341
1,519
1,194
1,319
1,297
1,200

1,446
1,622
1,302
1,455
1,387
1,284

1,585
1,799
1,449
1,540
1,525
1,420

1,501
1,671
1,356
1,504
1,441
1,372

1,658
1,817
1,520
1,693
1,595
1,494

1,859
2,013
1,706
1,870
1,820
1,721

1,933
2,078
1,772
1,957
1,901
1,782

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Plains ...................................................
Io w a .....................................................
Kansas ................................................
M in n e so ta ...........................................
Missouri ...............................................
N e b ra s k a ............................................
North D a k o ta ......................................
South Dakota .....................................

589
601
543
608
632
543
524
470

800
826
841
789
797
813
660
751

973
1,014
1,033
939
954
1,009
960
840

1,046
994
1,158
998
1,060
1,082
1,025
973

1,114
1,082
1,154
1,101
1,121
1,176
1,038
1,078

1,176
1,234
1,124
1,180
1,181
1,176
1,081
1,125

1,252
1,205
1,297
1,260
1,213
1,262
1,487
1,263

1,459
1,638
1,344
1,442
1,365
1,550
1,483
1,525

1,310
1,353
1,293
1,320
1,318
1,340
1,210
1,116

1,452
1,531
1,460
1,430
1,420
1,556
1,363
1,286

1,578
1,636
1,599
1,575
1,547
1,637
1,445
1,499

1,662
1,721
1,822
1,623
1,651
1,756
1,314
1,326

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Southeast ............................................
Alabam a .............................................
Arkansas ............................................
Florida .................................................
Georgia ..............................................
Kentucky ............................................
L o u isia n a .............................................
M ississippi ...........................................
North C a ro lin a ....................................
South Carolina ...................................
Tennessee ..........................................
Virginia ................................................
West V irg in ia ......................................

429
370
338
599
413
390
441
303
417
388
430
573
492

580
512
476
775
561
533
584
435
566
538
555
774
607

718
651
553
994
717
694
776
527
686
640
721
831
733

812
733
683
1,100
824
762
867
625
760
725
859
890
815

855
780
737
1,161
872
798
881
626
817
747
907
940
883

854
750
753
1,154
838
821
824
609
859
774
866
988
920

887
800
738
1,153
879
858
874
667
893
787
885
1,000
1,024

995
882
889
1,185
986
992
1,012
806
1,000
911
965
1,134
1,107

964
833
817
1,196
966
936
1,067
707
966
872
950
1,117
1,020

1,041
910
853
1,293
1,063
988
1,111
774
1,075
926
1,026
1,241
1,054

1,167
1,044
961
1,376
1,201
1,150
1,203
854
1,189
1,114
1,120
1,403
1,180

1,237
1,103
1,029
1,461
1,275
1,233
1,270
909
1,226
1,193
1,175
1,495
1,244

43
44
45
46
47

Arizona ................................................
New Mexico .......................................
O k la h o m a ...........................................
Texas ..................................................

500
628
467
427
518

694
905
628
619
708

892
992
763
773
930

1,042
873
940
1,034

1,119
934
962
1,047

1,107
920
944
1,034

1,174
1,002
1,019
1,133

1,316
1,118
1,138
1,204

1,296
1,140
1,161
1,290

1,303
1,358
1,198
1,140
1,354

1,442
1,613
1,340
1,285
1,478

1,527
1,708
1,416
1,394
1,553

48
49
50
51
52
53

Rocky M ountain..................................
C o lo ra d o ..............................................
Idaho ...................................................
Montana .............................................
U t a h .....................................................
Wyoming ............................................

645
641
590
705
588
768

891
886
906
892
872
933

1,071
1,028
1,016
1,140
1,117
1,138

1,091
1,058
1,088
1,175
1,042
1,214

1,167
1,182
1,127
1,196
1,113
1,249

1,204
1,201
1,195
1£97
1,085
1,350

1,330
1,345
1,270
1,471
1,169
1,490

1,428
1,440
1,341
1,630
1,241
1,596

1,374
1,419
1,273
1,400
1,246
1,630

1,482
1,510
1,328
1,647
1,331
1,700

1,698
1,783
1,494
1,799
1,524
1,941

1,764
1,869
1,638
1,812
1,575
1,896

54

Far West ..............................................
Alaska .................................................
C a lifo rn ia .............................................

949

1,238

1,497

1,536

1,516

1,576

1,624

1,704

1,683

1,799

1,993

2 ,112

56

993

1,266

1,526

1,564

1,563

1,647

1,670

1,734

1,717

1,851

2,052

2,178

58
59
60

Nevada ................................................
Oregon ................................................
Washington .........................................

963
808
852

1,539
1,106
1,182

1,494
1,368
1,452

1,465
1,378
1,512

1,592
1,346
1,404

1,733
1,368
1,385

1,750
1,492
1,489

1,741
1,633
1,611

1,776
1,591
1,583

1,966
1,648
1,709

2,183
1,820
1,861

2,371
1,902
1,960

3
4
5
6

7
8

9
10
11
12

See footnotes at the end of the table.

2,402
1,910
2,093
2,030
1,774

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

13

Table 2.— Per Capita Personal Income for States and R egions, 1929-93 '— Continued
[Dollars]
1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

1958

1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

Line

1,818

1,802

1,897

2,001

2,076

2,099

2,201

2,258

2,315

2,425

2,511

2,654

2,838

3,054

3,248

1

1,940
2,372
1,444
1,931
1,642
1,841
1,425

1,930
2,333
1,444
1,916
1,694
1,834
1,446

2,063
2,462
1,576
2,057
1,821
1,944
1,516

2,193
2,670
1,663
2,181
1,894
1,984
1,646

2,288
2,794
1,713
2,281
1,999
2,010
1,710

2,295
2,716
1,786
2,305
2,000
2,051
1,721

2,402
2,820
1,839
2,417
2,121
2,169
1,823

2,480
2,911
1,906
2,496
2,193
2,220
1,915

2,569
3,031
1,889
2,591
2,278
2,313
1,987

2,691
3,161
1,966
2,717
2,387
2,438
2,065

2,764
3,240
2,032
2,784
2,423
2,534
2,119

2,909
3,395
2,194
2,919
2,550
2,671
2,256

3,092
3,587
2,373
3,098
2,713
2,856
2,450

3,341
3,882
2,532
3,334
2,975
3,098
2,727

3,603
4,220
2,656
3,600
3,181
3,329
2,899

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

2,057
2,322
2,324
1,988
2,212
2,118
1,881

2,045
2,290
2,341
1,911
2,203
2,150
1,816

2,147
2,492
2,354
2,018
2,286
2,270
1,904

2,283
2,732
2,538
2.149
2,433
2,389
2,051

2,383
2.625
2,586
2,226
2,534
2,491
2,161

2,393
2,638
2,694
2,224
2,508
2,523
2,152

2,507
2,715
2,773
2,292
2,645
2,666
2Z21

2,587
2,794
2,867
2,373
2,748
2,756
2,281

2,654
2,812
2,937
2,471
2,814
2,839
2,313

2,772
2,923
3,037
2,598
2,972
2,949
2,416

2,857
3,045
3,142
2,679
3,047
3,040
2,492

3,023
3,208
3,293
2,836
3,209
3,223
2,641

3,204
3,480
3,487
3,017
3,407
3,401
2,811

3,432
3,621
3,694
3,244
3,646
3,639
3,023

3,680
3,804
3,967
3,480
3,893
3,913
3,235

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

2,067
2,197
1,938
2,170
2,010
1,823

1,991
2,167
1,802
2,042
1,951
1,760

2,107
2,260
1,902
2,201
2,072
1,859

2,216
2,441
2,003
2,238
2,166
1,974

2,270
2,510
2,038
2,268
2,226
2,043

2,233
2,500
2,010
2,202
2,161
2,057

2,361
2,634
2,127
2,307
2,297
2,208

2,423
2,686
2,201
2,378
2,370
2,236

2,456
2,775
2,237
2,362
2,379
2,280

2,580
2,885
2,386
2,518
2,486
2,383

2,669
2,965
2,474
2,645
2,574
2,429

2,830
3,115
2,603
2,855
2,723
2,582

3,055
3,350
2,844
3,115
2,921
2,759

3,281
3,589
3,029
3,338
3,154
2,991

3,423
3,783
3,142
3,438
3,285
3,144

16
17
18
19
20
21

1,675
1,654
1,735
1,700
1,729
1,673
1,332
1,435

1,715
1,786
1,787
1,713
1,720
1,750
1,358
1,454

1,717
1,663
1,748
1,776
1,811
1,644
1,481
1,336

1,786
1,751
1,816
1,825
1,897
1,671
1,546
1,412

1,902
1,932
1,910
1,915
1,941
1,934
1,591
1,662

2,006
1,985
2,102
2,004
2,032
2,025
1,843
1,735

2,034
2,024
2,111
2,052
2,116
2,027
1,677
1,562

2,10 2

2,056
2,167
2,140
2,141
2,126
1,817
1,865

2,159
2,173
2,227
2,219
2,199
2,133
1,649
1,856

2,291
2,275
2,301
2,312
2,310
2,288
2,309
2,083

2,377
2,424
2,376
2,441
2,406
2,336
2,130
2,009

2,465
2.538
2,505
2,520
2,510
2,387
2,099
1,989

2,706
2,826
2.682
2,765
2,717
2,655
2,450
2,269

2,901
3,058
2,887
2,979
2,874
2,890
2,494
2,490

3,038
3,091
3,034
3,166
3,048
3,003
2,582
2,572

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

1,295
1,159
1,069
1,552
1,323
1,301
1,338
946
1,271
1,232
1,275
1,521
1,275

1,288
1,136
1,076
1,551
1,298
1,284
1,334
930
1,290
1,163
1,272
1,544
1,224

1,377
1,269
1,178
1,663
1,419
1,340
1,392
1,046
1,363
1,226
1,323
1,624
1,316

1,461
1,350
1,231
1,781
1,494
1,430
1,495
1,052
1,433
1,257
1,417
1,695
1,474

1,506
1,413
1,247
1,826
1,518
1,484
1,610
1,065
1,421
1,283
1,471
1,719
1,590

1,557
1,457
1,315
1,879
1,574
1,536
1,634
1,157
1,500
1,311
1,507
1,768
1,552

1,640
1,517
1,415
2,003
1,655
1,598
1,686
1,247
1,578
1,387
1,595
1,870
1,597

1,665
1,545
1,407
2,014
1,691
1,623
1,689
1,236
1,623
1,430
1,612
1,921
1,623

1,722
1,571
1,510
2,031
1,736
1,716
1,738
1,317
1,680
1,488
1,682
1,987
1,665

1,807
1,649
1,571
2,103
1,830
1,803
1,799
1,356
1,785
1,589
1,759
2,100
1,753

1,900
1,739
1,651
2,190
1,945
1,884
1,902
1,492
1,862
1,655
1,843
2,195
1,842

2,022

1,867
1,771
2,338
2,066
1,948
1,996
1,548
1,990
1,770
1,952
2,376
1,961

2,176
2,007
1,883
2,496
2,244
2,109
2,132
1,678
2,124
1,939
2,115
2.541
2,112

2,367
2,145
2,090
2,688
2,447
2,299
2,321
1,827
2,344
2,153
2,319
2,726
2,257

2,546
2,272
2,222
2,922
2,642
2,467
2,518
1,991
2,502
2,312
2,459
2,941
2,403

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

1,568
1,712
1,437
1,469
1,591

1,586
1,690
1,456
1,452
1,622

1,651
1,744
1,534
1,510
1,687

1,736
1,840
1,615
1,585
1,774

1,811
1,884
1,722
1,652
1,850

1,854
1,874
1,812
1,792
1,871

1,930
1,966
1,884
1,857
1,947

1,948
2,048
1,865
1,913
1,951

2,005
2,093
1,929
1,941
2,016

2,059
2,154
1,983
1,987
2,071

2,123
2,191
2,028
2,046
2,141

2,249
2,296
2,104
2,184
2,272

2,396
2,404
2,221
2,351
2,422

2,579
2,581
2,359
2,506
2,616

2,784
2,749
2,477
2,696
2,839

43
44
45
46
47

1,728
1,805
1,546
1,802
1,589
1,919

1,697
1,765
1,552
1,762
1,563
1,851

1,783
1,862
1,588
1,882
1,652
1,902

1,870
1,951
1,717
1,916
1,740
1,995

1,975
2,095
1,773
1,972
1,841
2,118

2,024
2,146
1,812
2,059
1,866
2,161

2,098
2,254
1,888
2,015
1,948
2,270

2,152
2,330
1,892
2,060
2,012
2,302

2,206
2,407
1,968
2,009
2,067
2,376

2,330
2,458
2,082
2,343
2,194
2,487

2,378
2,526
2,157
2,308
2,242
2,518

2,462
2,626
2,236
2,341
2,343
2,565

2,640
2,796
2,540
2,527
2,452
2,725

2,785
2,981
2,574
2,710
2,560
2,887

2,935
3,150
2,746
2,794
2,672
3,106

48
49
50
51
52
53

2,161
2,410
2,223
1,790
2,425
1,909
2,055

2,143
2,211
2,202
1,802
2,392
1,861
2,068

2,269
2,183
2,355
1,810
2,504
1,971
2,106

2,371
2,365
2,470
1,849
2,462
2,063
2,161

2,442
2,241
2,550
1,885
2,534
2,046
2,249

2,465
2,271
2,567
1,933
2,562
2,096
2,268

2,605
2,439
2,710
2,113
2,719
2,234
2,370

2,687
2,816
2,788
2,352
2,854
2,271
2,426

2,752
2,711
2,846
2,467
2,919
2,335
2,524

2,876
2,753
2,966
2,597
3,144
2,439
2,665

2,969
2,877
3,065
2,691
3,133
2,525
2,721

3,133
3,162
3,237
2,894
3,153
2,671
2,845

3,293
3,332
3,384
3,088
3,245
2,842
3,069

3,540
3,614
3,628
3,388
3,414
3,025
3,379

3,754
3,888
3,849
3,634
3,608
3,198
3,561

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Summary

14

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 2 — Per Capita Personal Income for States and Regions, 1929-93 '— Continued
(Dollars]

Line

State and region

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1

United S ta te s 1
2 ..............................

3,530

3,813

4,047

4,294

4,659

5,168

5,628

6,045

6,629

7,267

8,117

9,017

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

New E ng la nd .........................................
Connecticut .........................................
Maine ..................................................
M assachusetts ...................................
New Hampshire .................................
Rhode Island .......................................
V e rm on t...............................................

3,887
4,465
2,871
3,921
3,465
3,591
3.146

4,200
4,816
3,129
4,247
3,741
3,814
3,373

4,445
5,041
3,401
4,515
3,890
4,049
3,600

4,665
5,236
3,572
4,771
4,081
4,230
3,821

5,013
5,628
3,831
5,130
4,403
4,552
4,135

5,466
6,171
4,281
5,564
4,860
4,905
4,505

5,927
6,685
4,698
6,033
5,248
5,340
4,823

6,314
7,095
4,948
6,445
5,567
5,771
5,138

6,902
7,749
5,613
6,988
6,233
6,336
5,673

7,537
8,546
6,022
7,620
6,841
6,907
6,084

8,380
9Ì523
6,612
8,466
7,709
7,606
6,944

9,374
10>31
7,326
9,448
8,686
8,465
7,730

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

M id e ast ..................................................
Delaware .............................................
District of C o lu m b ia ............................
Maryland .............................................
New Jersey .........................................
New York ............................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia .......................................

4,011
4,111
4,282
3,791
4,239
4,290
3,496

4,312
4,420
4,556
4,158
4.503
4,594
3,793

4,588
4,595
5,010
4,495
4,803
4,860
4,041

4,864
4,852
5,554
4,772
5,102
5,159
4,251

5,238
5,235
6,111
5,153
5,488
5,520
4,625

5,704
5,775
6,583
5,696
5,996
5,946
5,098

6,217
6,212
7,346
6,208
6,518
6,443
5,622

6,670
6,578
8,117
6,657
6,967
6,890
6,077

7,244
7,180
8,855
7,282
7,618
7,395
6,682

7,899
7,747
9,730
7,860
8,342
8,038
7,335

8,726
8,416
10,506
8,733
9,280
8,836
8,129

9,656
9J94
11,407
9,665
10,332
9,747
9,024

16
17
18
19
20
21

G re a t L a k e s ...........................................
Illinois ..................................................
Indiana ................................................
Michigan ..............................................
O h io .....................................................
Wisconsin ............................................

3,708
4,040
3,385
3,777
3,588
3,402

3,999
4,342
3,678
4,057
3,884
3,675

4,147
4,560
3,765
4,127
4,030
3,885

4,421
4,851
4,053
4,451
4,248
4,133

4,801
5,230
4,392
4,910
4,602
4,468

5,377
5,859
5,032
5,480
5,123
4,984

5,827
6,405
5,351
5,840
5,606
5,452

6,219
6,904
5,730
6,162
5,944
5,856

6,897
7,532
6,406
6,967
6,600
6,458

7,651
8,276
7,067
7,835
7,320
7,196

8,480
9,144
7,854
8,705
8,091
8,039

9,347
10Ì078
8,629
9,532
8,939
8,979

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

P la in s .....................................................
Io w a .....................................................
Kansas ................................................
M in n esota ............................................
Missouri ...............................................
N e b ra s k a .............................................
North D a k o ta .......................................
South Dakota ......................................

3,284
3,301
3,261
3,442
3,348
3,174
2,697
2,759

3,541
3,591
3,511
3,731
3,535
3,538
2,980
2,941

3,785
3,795
3,762
3,990
3,808
3,749
3,119
3,190

4,038
3,943
4,085
4,203
4,073
4,065
3,554
3,470

4,430
4,380
4,550
4,540
4,399
4,454
4,238
3,963

5,176
5,289
5,187
5,313
4,902
5,173
6,003
5,033

5,461
5,475
5,605
5,707
5,223
5,360
5,915
5,002

5,916
6,046
6,055
6,066
5,656
6,036
6,091
5,436

6,351
6,413
6,599
6,569
6,221
6,325
5,941
5,353

7,000
7,081
7,154
7,363
6,889
6,828
6,127
6,021

7,935
8,209
7,912
8,227
7,689
7,948
7,780
7,012

8,769
8,844
9,064
9,125
8,594
8,566
8,028
7,770

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
42

S o u th e a st ..............................................
Alabam a ..............................................
Arkansas .............................................
Florida .................................................
Georgia ...............................................
Kentucky .............................................
L o u isia n a .............................................
M ississippi ...........................................
North C a ro lin a ....................................
South Carolina ...................................
Tennessee ..........................................
Virginia ................................................
West V irg in ia .......................................

2,791
2,490
2,404
3,267
2,871
2,675
2,735
2,180
2,724
2,538
2,722
3,221
2,556

3,051
2,723
2,600
3,623
3,150
2,927
2,873
2,366
3,006
2,781
2,933
3,521
2,766

3,290
2,939
2,822
3,944
3,373
3,138
3,066
2,592
3,233
3,001
3,145
3,747
3,073

3,530
3,164
3,055
4,223
3,618
3,334
3,280
2,806
3,438
3,201
3,390
4,020
3,329

3,883
3,473
3,360
4,631
3,999
3.648
3,540
3,140
3,814
3,513
3,737
4,403
3,634

4,346
3,885
3,913
5,154
4,449
4,076
3,940
3,541
4,278
3,942
4,222
4,892
3,964

4,752
4,258
4,282
5,528
4,820
4,536
4,444
3,850
4,641
4,355
4,592
5,381
4,384

5,080
4,659
4,545
5,817
5,103
4,847
4,875
4,106
4,914
4,608
4,891
5,807
4,881

5,601
5,189
5,023
6,272
5,629
5,364
5,471
4,633
5,447
5,108
5,427
6,377
5,380

6,136
5,669
5,529
6,875
6,130
5,993
6,031
5,126
5,920
5,523
5,924
6,986
5,917

6,893
6,328
6,357
7,771
6,889
6,651
6,835
5,650
6,635
6,167
6,669
7,822
6,558

7,655
7^009
6,912
8,673
7,614
7,396
7,663
6,369
7,271
6,842
7,355
8,729
7,274

43
44
45
46
47

S o u th w e s t..............................................
A r iz o n a ................................................
New M exico ........................................
Oklahoma ............................................
Texas ..................................................

3,047
3,087
2,692
2,937
3,099

3,307
3,437
2,888
3,163
3,358

3,576
3,777
3,140
3,427
3,618

3,792
4,061
3,371
3,642
3,820

4,117
4,408
3,690
3,945
4,146

4,591
4,835
4,061
4,438
4,631

5,065
5,221
4,472
4,894
5,129

5,543
5,397
4,922
5,382
5,663

6,112
5,895
5,380
5,864
6,273

6,711
6,434
5,934
6,424
6,897

7,596
7,356
6,670
7,209
7,810

8,587
8,333
7,407
8,250
8,816

48
49
50
51
52
53

R o c k y M ou ntain ...................................
C o lo ra d o ..............................................
Idaho ...................................................
Montana ..............................................
U t a h .....................................................
Wyoming .............................................

3,128
3,384
2,891
2,938
2,841
3,291

3,393
3,676
3,192
3,208
3,024
3,525

3,702
4,020
3,462
3,524
3,291
3,788

3,982
4,363
3,679
3,671
3,541
4,138

4,365
4,724
4,049
4,226
3,851
4,545

4,879
5,237
4,610
4,867
4,199
5,220

5,380
5,767
5,250
5,208
4,595
5,901

5,766
6,219
5,427
5,597
4,963
6,368

6,286
6,781
5,968
5,954
5,488
6,894

6,851
7,439
6,323
6,355
6,016
7,735

7,749
8,375
7,102
7,415
6,702
9,023

8,580
9'403
7,665
7,963
7,358
10,180

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far W e st ................................................
Alaska .................................................
C a lifo rn ia .............................................
Hawaii .................................................
Nevada ................................................
Oregon ................................................
Washington .........................................

4,069
4,125
4,173
4,008
4,064
3,441
3,843

4,373
4,638
4,492
4,435
4,478
3,651
4,066

4,614
5,066
4,742
4,942
4,872
3,887
4,161

4,826
5,302
4,954
5,126
5,111
4,148
4,338

5,215
5,590
5,353
5,462
5,428
4,554
4,682

5,707
6,441
5,826
5,904
5,977
5,053
5,248

6,305
7,692
6,423
6,666
6,303
5,600
5,826

6,838
10,188
6,934
7,026
6,786
6,027
6,403

7,532
11,600
7,631
7,458
7,469
6,744
7,044

8,208
11,672
8,340
7,866
8,320
7,358
7,673

9,211
11,710
9,364
8,630
9,591
8,249
8,747

10,316
12,397
10,524
9,564
10,536
9,147
9,785

1. Per capita personal income w as computed using midyear population estimates of the Bureau
of the Census. Estimates for 1990-93 reflect State population estimates available as of February
1994.
3
2. Alaska and Hawaii are not included in United States totals prior to 1950.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

15

Table 2.— Per Capita P erson al Income for States and R egions, 1929-93 '— Continued
[Dollars]
1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

Line

9,940

11,009

11,583

12,223

13,332

14,155

14,906

15,638

16,610

17,690

18,667

19,199

20,131

20,781

1

10,582
12,170
8,218
10,659
9,803
9,576
8,546

11,729
13,509
9,054
11,805
10,927
10,591
9,506

12,604
14,493
9,653
12,750
11,705
11,317
10,041

13,558
15,410
10,374
13,776
12,876
12,146
10,735

15,034
17,097
11,386
15,326
14,357
13,314
11,742

16,113
18,268
12,182
16,423
15,703
14,119
12,689

17,418
19,675
13,259
17,796
17,060
15,073
13,713

18,670
21,235
14,270
19,066
18,039
16,030
14,610

20,276
23,160
15,354
20,787
19,292
17,321
15,607

21,325
24,548
16,467
21,688
19,977
18,441
16,891

21,935
25,426
17,041
22,248
20731
19,035
17,444

22,421
25,844
17,330
22,796
20’961
19,451
17,811

23,364
27ÌÌ54
18 167

27 957

3

19^442

8

10,768
10,356
12,508
10,824
11,648
10,906
9,923

11,921
11,304
13,631
11,993
12,913
12,124
10,916

12,742
12,032
14,669
12,789
13,853
13,022
11,545

13,556
12,793
15,431
13,736
14,933
13,874
12,085

14,842
13,740
16,668
15,137
16,458
15,252
13,047

15,858
14,704
17,545
16,323
17,546
16,253
13,971

16,927
15,541
18,051
17,429
18,726
17,415
14,847

17,929
16,365
19,272
18,508
19,995
18,440
15,603

19,206
17,555
21,284
19,703
21,729
19,709
16,584

20,513
18,867
22,794
21,105
23,114
20,983
17,844

21,682
19,719
24,643
22,088
24,182
22.322
18,884

22,306
20,317
26Ì094
22,483
24,744
22,925
19,638

10,077
10,875
9,215
10,154

10,989
12,046
10,093
10,901
10,583
10,569

11,393
12,534
10,394
11,177
11,011
11,076

11,992
13,064
10,914
11,939
11,607
11,627

13,154
14,302
12,021
13,186
12,698
12,666

13,933
15,076
12,636
14,223
13,420
13,286

14,723
15,894
13,368
15,104
14,136
14,065

15,365
16,681
14,063
15,607
14,725
14,699

16,299
17,725
14,911
16,502
15,732
15,397

17,392
19,071
15,972
17,546
16,644
16,438

18,297
20,159
16,815
18,239
17,547
17,399

10,545
10,617
11,034
10,933
10,320
10,364
9,839
8,936

11,063
10,791
11,760
11,548
10,871
10,838
10,469
9,329

11,542
11,010
12,192
12,056
11,524
11,222
11,106
9,684

12,696
12,049
13,114
13,576
12,664
12,318
11,614
10,784

13,410
12,575
13,847
14,313
13,538
13,040
12,011
11,142

14,093
13,209
14,472
15,122
14,260
13,563
12,361
11,756

14,762
13,936
15,017
15,962
14,877
14,108
12,632
12,503

15,351
14,332
15,748
16,504
15,570
15,211
11,925
12,835

16,462
15,647
16,399
17,843
16,552
16,050
13,735
14,139

9,448
8,444
8,304
10,946
9,287
8,928
9,862
7,661

10,580
9,410
9,099
12,363
10,705
9,561
10,610
8,328
10,064
9,403
9,850
12,456
9,281

11,553
10,267
10,053
13,254
11,975
10,556
11,222
9,054
11,145
10,302
10,876
13,640
9,956

12,283
10,975
10,674
14,181
12,864
10,979
11,634
9,449
11,870
10,912
11,579
14,544
10,424

13,009
11,667
11,208
15,022
13,798
11,480
11,603
9,848
12,694
11,478
12,492
15,528
11,006

13,707
12,287
11,611
15,798
14,545
12,015
11,742
10,446
13,479
12,197
13,315
16,459
11,357

14,607
13,051
12,289
16,666
15,485
12,751
12,568
11,181
14,435
13,192
14,177
17,558
12,124

9,772
9,374
9,829
9,256
7,641
8,491

'

21 729
20 229
18701
23,427
23 199
26 098
24Ì138
20,601

21741

15

18,767
20,622
17*275
18,693
18,001
17,970

19,818

20,580

16

17,519
16,683
17,639
18,784
17,407
17,379
15,320
15,628

18,103
17^102
18759
19789
18,105
18,047
15,594
16,419

19,158

15,600
13,967
13,085
18,043
16,250
13,756
13,254
11,915
15,233
13,884
15,074
18,768
12,926

16,501
14,899
13,779
18,785
17,121
14,751
14,279
12,578
16,284
15,101
15,903
19,543
13,964

17,062
15*601
14,458
19703
17,636
15,442
15,067
13,210
16,810
15,469
16,489
20,074
14,665

15 584
19 686
18,472
16*436
15752
14,050
17,828
16,171
17 622
20,870
15,527

18 384
19,681
18 923
19,115

20 542
19722

21

17777

29

16788

36

19 219
18 965
17*127
17*344

7,558
8,010
9,857

8,366
8,838
10,924
8,610

9,951
8,855
8,646
11,501
9,883
9,371
10,347
8,019
9,325
8,735
9,264
11,636
9,120

9,588
9,272
8,147
9,308
9,840

10,922
10,250
9,068
10,683
11,267

11,470
10,476
9,604
11,434
11,830

11,760
11,228
9,987
11,243
12,125

12,623
12,284
10,648
11,831
13,025

13,331
13,220
11,322
12,284
13,740

13,355
13,990
11,562
12,338
13,586

13,721
14,524
11,893
12,507
13,952

14,489
15,061
12,554
13,310
14,765

15,359
15,639
13,388
14,187
15,695

16,323
16,262
14,213
15,117
16,747

16,965
16760
14,818
15,656
17,440

17,892
171483
15,520
16 475
18Ì449

1 9 J3 4

47

9,532
10,616
8,433

10,598
11,954
9,101
9,783
8,702
12,479

11,132
12,759
9291
10,167
9,128
12,528

11,644
13,373
10,072
10,625
9,568
12,165

12,392
14,287
10,642
11,052
10,340
12,703

12,891
14,778
11,106
11,260
10,914
13,511

13,246
15,061
11,550
12,011
11,317
13,272

13,675
15,499
12,028
12,485
11,779
13,282

14,500
16,540
12,850
12,832
12,379
14,260

15,659
17,767
14,321
14,152
13,201
15,270

16,639
18,818
15,304
14,743
14,063
16,905

17,495
19,745
15,854
15,793
14,737
18795

18,271
20,577
16776
16,379
15 503
18,871

19,116

48

17 540
17 413

50

191724

53

12,492
15,368
12,838
11,494
12,555
10,474
11,717

13,030
17,134
13,410
12,007
12,691
10,644
12,190

13,744
17,914
14,109
12,951
13,181
11,363
12,895

14,884
17,634
15,373
13,588
14,177
12,277
13,703

15,776
18,411
16,313
14,339
15,149
12,905
14,450

16,548
17,810
17,080
15,263
16,035
13,546
15,383

17,258
17,240
17,828
16,087
16,834
14,165
15,976

18,134
17,931
18,703
17,522
17,907
15,074
16,669

19,180
19,631
19,620
19,146
19,370
16,287
18,085

20,242
20,887
20,656
20,905
20,248
17,201
191268

20,601
21,592
20,880
21,621
20,774
17,789
20,163

21,400
22,244
21*599
22^420
21,857
18*716
21,306

21,782

7,371
8,353
8,05l
8,672
6,868

11,356
11,407
13,692
11,681
10,774
11,559
9,863

17,881

18 688
21 544
161Î48

42

18 Î Î 9
16 333

23 378
191447
21773

60

16

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

Table 3.— D isposable Person al Income for States and R egions, 1948-93
[Millions of dollars]
Line

State and region

1948

1949

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

1

U nited S t a t e s 1 ........................................................................

187,010

186,677

206,271

225,832

237,614

252,907

258,715

277,300

296,309

312,628

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

New E n g la n d ..................................................................................
Connecticut ..................................................................................
M aine ...........................................................................................
M assachusetts .............................................................................
New Hampshire ...........................................................................
Rhode Is la n d ................................................................................
V e rm o n t........................................................................................

12,185
2,997
996
6,219
607
977
390

12,262
3,006
988
6.273
622
993
381

13,449
3,352
1,017
6,929
657
1,087
407

14,562
3,759
712
1,168
455

15,145
4,034
1,175
7,508
749
1,217
462

16,244
4,420
1,185
8,047
793
1,312
487

16,802
4,565
1,222
8,337
849
1,332
497

17,925
4,947
1,351
8,793
917
1,405
513

19,104
5,360
1,410
9,353
963
1,466
552

20,138
5,740
1,457
9,838

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

M id e ast ...........................................................................................
D e la w a re ......................................................................................
District of C o lu m b ia ......................................................................
Maryland ......................................................................................
New Jersey ..................................................................................
New York .....................................................................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia ................................................................................

47,134
415
1,440
2,964
6,979
22,198
13,137

47,941
455
1,489
3,051
7,155
22,611
13,179

52,371
521
1,562
3,389
7,908
24,250
14,741

55,869
566
1,613
3,756
8,789
25,431
15.714

58,210
608
1,645
4,068
9,374
26,292
16,224

62,490
644
1,633
4,405
10,116
28,159
17,532

64,267
664
1,621
4,523
10,484
29,503
17,472

68,274
753
1.609
4,863
11,180
31,421
18,448

72,864
896
1,681
5,257
12,079
33,211
19,739

76,966
911
1,707
5,579
12,846
35,179
20,744

16
17
18
19
20
21

G re a t L a k e s ....................................................................................
Illinois ...........................................................................................
Indiana .........................................................................................
Michigan .......................................................................................
O h io ..............................................................................................
W is c o n s in .....................................................................................

42,499
13,689
5,150
8.595
10,800
4,265

41,455
13,095
4,936
8,706
10,470
4,248

46,062
14,346
5,567
9,854
11,605
4,691

50,730
15,490
6,290
10,726
12,954
5,271

53,129
16,114
6,544
11,350
13,694
5,426

57,943
17,308
7,212
12,817
14,992
5,614

58,446
17,655
6,923
12,748
15,439
5,680

63,156
18,922
7,456
14,216
16,495
6,068

67,118
20,353
7,992
14,708
17,545
6,520

69,859
21,244
8,231
15,131
18,434
6,820

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

P la in s ..............................................................................................
Io w a ..............................................................................................
Kansas .........................................................................................
M in n e so ta .....................................................................................
M is s o u r i........................................................................................
N e b ra s k a ......................................................................................
North D a k o ta ............ ...................................................................
South Dakota ...............................................................................

18,205
3,873
2,308
3,764
4,788
1,805
792
875

16,701
3,224
2,291
3,560
4,684
1,613
670
659

18,914
3,741
2,581
3,928
5,155
1,922
792
796

20,198
3.911
2,817
4,259
5,541
1,955
800
916

21,033
4,108
3,225
4,333
5,756
2,089
728
793

21,259
3,909
3,083
4.593
6,098
1,980
739
857

22,402
4,287
3.296
4,782
6,248
2,140
767
882

22,789
4,059
3,303
5,034
6,675
2,056
842
820

23,895
4,296
3,478
5,244
7,028
2,113
866
869

25,589
4,760
3,663
5,561
7,221
2,470
887
1,026

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

S o u th e a st .......................................................................................
A la b a m a .......................................................................................
Arkansas ......................................................................................
Florida ........ .................................................................................
Georgia ........................................................................................
Kentucky ......................................................................................
L o u is ia n a ......................................................................................
M is s is s ip p i....................................................................................
North C a ro lin a ..............................................................................
South Carolina .............................................................................
Tennessee ...................................................................................
Virginia .........................................................................................
W est V irg in ia ................................................................................

29,796
2,455
1,535
2,787
2,984
2.595
2,400
1,593
3,572
1,703
2,898
3,338
1,936

29,547
2,351
1,431
2,943
2,998
2,496
2,610
1,403
3,544
1,657
2,883
3,393
1,839

32,923
2,616
1,542
3,340
3,455
2,695
2,783
1,604
4,106
1,830
3,178
3,801
1,973

36,878
2,942
1,712
3,683
3.911
3,096
3,042
1,739
4,527
2,234
3,470
4,374
2.148

38,868
3,107
1,767
4,106
4,150
3,242
3,247
1,832
4.604
2,364
3,592
4,678
2,179

40,839
3,244
1,768
4.593
4,320
3,400
3,466
1,868
4,801
2,477
3,852
4,833
2,219

40,997
3,164
1.727
4,898
4.296
3,372
3,496
1,799
4,915
2,343
3,934
4,936
2,114

44,526
3,563
1,895
5.610
4,735
3,524
3,720
2,028
5,327
2,488
4,155
5.240
2.240

47,825
3,799
1,936
6,430
5,059
3,730
4,087
2,044
5,677
2,572
4,415
5,617
2,459

50,192
4,007
1,993
7,120
5,195
3,864
4,516
2,073
5,658
2,680
4,608
5,869
2,610

43
44
45
46
47

S o u t h w e s t .......................................................................................
Arizona .........................................................................................
New M exico .................................................................................
O k la h o m a .....................................................................................
Texas ...........................................................................................

11,906
833
621
2,173
8,278

12,835
864
678
2,276
9,017

13,629
945
762
2,338
9,583

15,299
1,151
870
2,563
10.715

16,431
1,282
925
2,765
11,459

17,061
1,383
977
2,872
11,829

17,495
1,430
1,008
2,896
12,161

18,848
1,557
1,086
3,075
13,129

20,174
1,740
1,174
3,237
14,023

21,521
1,900
1,305
3,364
14,952

48
49
50
51
52
53

R o c k y M o u n t a in .............................................................................
C o lo ra d o .......................................................................................
Idaho ............................................................................................
Montana .......................................................................................
U t a h ..............................................................................................
Wyoming ......................................................................................

4,280
1,646
686
806
751
391

4.274
1,671
675
730
780
417

4,775
1,819
733
902
865
456

5,372
2,111
801

5.604
2,241
865
977
1,027
494

5,652
2,270
839
991
1,056
495

5.728
2,335
849
986
1,070
488

6,239
2,561
898
1,080
1,174
525

6,707
2,787
968
1,133
1,267
553

7,269
3,100
1,033
1,174
1,369
593

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far W e st .........................................................................................
Alaska ..........................................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ......................................................................................
Hawaii ..........................................................................................
Nevada .........................................................................................
Oregon ......................................................................................
Washington ..................................................................................

21,005

21,662

24,149

26,923

29,195

31,418

32,579

35,543

38,621

41,092

15,446

16,024

17,835

20,102

21,990

23,840

24,800

27,193

29,882

31,965

238
2,038
3,284

252
2,058
3,329

283
2,281
3,750

320
2,489
4,011

362
2,621
4,222

408
2,686
4,485

440
2,676
4,662

522
2,900
4,928

536
3,051
5,152

570
3,086
5,471

See footnote at the end of the table.

1950

1,101
7,366

967
984
508

1,021
1,508
575

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

17

Table 3.— D isp o sa b le Person al Income for States and R egio ns, 1948-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

323,228

343,676

357,730

373,414

395,661

415,271

451,219

487,321

526,108

563,337

612,112

658,419

716,490

1

20,663

22,024

22,710

23,944

25,332

26,414

28,757

30,879

33,391

36,344

41,769

5,816
1,531
10,138
1,041
1,552
585

6,213
1,600
10,806
1,131
1,644
630

6,400
1,669
11,132
1,183
1,663
664

6,789
1,687
11,789
1,250
1,737
691

7,239
1,748
12,414
1,338
1,870
724

7,620
1,814
12,902
1,389
1,947
742

8,341
1,975
14,023
1,525
2,094
800

38,901

8,924
2,150
15,015
1,647
2,256
886

45,458

2

9,739
2,296
16,113
1,797
2,454
992

10,646
2,408
17,562
1,966
2,682
1,080

11,180
2,551
18,927
2,163
2,899
1,180

12,039
2,734
20,255
2,380
3,099
1,262

13,110
3,021
22,038
2,519
3,385
1,385

3
4
5

78,856

83,304

86,488

89,870

94,659

98,764

107,224

114,530

122,959

132,161

947
1,753
5,806
13,037
36,268
21,045

987
1,785
6,104
14,077
38,258
22,094

1,034
1,853
6,396
14,757
39,717
22,730

1,070
1,956
6,835
15,499
41,224
23,286

1,106
2,029
7,289
16,646
43,498
24,091

1,182
2,141
7,769
17,455
45,262
24,956

143,869

153,350

1,256
2,274
8,614
19,088
48,997
26,995

1,398
2,411
9,421
20,457
51,940
28,903

166,991

9

1,513
2,498
10,227
22,134
55,608
30,978

1,642
2,709
11,146
23,743
59,639
33,281

1,798
2,882
12,025
25,924
65,377
35,862

1,939
2,941
13,241
27,487
69,370
38,373

2,073
3,217
14.846
30,028
75,406
41,422

10
11

70,683

75,297

77,385

79,522

83,812

87,608

95,426

112,555

118,242

23,213
8,791
15,982
19,717
7,593

23,696
9,141
16,484
20,318
7,746

24,651
9,457
16,611
20,746
8,057

25,917
10,040
17,640
21,747
8,468

104,093

21,802
8,300
15,127
18,449
7,005

27,030
10,483
18,759
22,610
8,726

127,633

136,097

144,131

29,293
11,273
20,845
24,514
9,502

31,753
12,477
23,123
26,451
10,288

34,184
13,363
25,083
28,768
11,157

36,267
13,938
26,151
30,182
11,705

38,493
15,020
28,440
32,896
12,784

40,680
16,273
30,274
35,226
13,644

43,217
17,045
31,685
37.407
14,777

16
17
18
19
20

26,965

27,708

28,855

29,877

31,853

33,126

34,964

38,378

40,987

46,359

49,688

54,168

4,829
4,053
5,913
7,575
2,535
1,021
1,039

4,981
4,109
6,141
8,014
2,558
947
959

5,062
4,222
6,477
8,171
2,697
1,053
1,174

5,374
4,404
6,802
8,427
2,735
959
1,176

42,929

5,616
4,564
7,143
8,828
3,003
1,351
1,348

5,981
4,664
7,609
9,246
3,079
1,248
1,298

6,311
4,996
8,012
9,914
3,201
1,241
1,289

7,001
5,341
8,850
10,714
3,554
1,460
1,457

7,548
5,647
9,531
11.427
3,795
1,472
1,567

7,690
5,909
10,206
12,153
3,920
1,464
1,586

8,174
6,345
11,165
13,346
4.133
1,515
1,681

8,779
6,819
12,061
14,074
4,546
1,640
1,770

9,426
7,394
13,272
15,512
4,904
1,725
1,936

52,994

56,574

58,353

61,477

65,120

69,345

75,637

82,121

89,486

4,205
2,092
7,836
5,451
4,095
4,684
2,252
6,032
2,784
4,771
6,195
2,596

4,594
2,312
9,039
6,030
4,434
4,979
2,484
6,705
3,117
5,211
6,765
2,682

106,313

115,521

4,748
2,505
9,548
6,288
4,732
5,167
2,697
7,080
3,260
5,524
7,212
2,717

4,955
2,646
10,280
6,700
4,972
5,431
2.797
7,538
3,477
5,758
7,737
2,829

5,284
2,816
11,019
7,264
5,235
5,771
3,075
7,897
3,679
6,174
8,192
2,938

97,008

4,435
2,289
8,651
5,817
4,317
4,854
2,473
6,392
2,971
5,119
6,591
2,665

5,767
3,094
12,161
7,931
5,499
6,249
3,209
8,655
3,994
6,701
9,211
3,167

127,375

6,278
3,273
13,361
8,743
5,960
6,782
3,476
9,259
4,389
7,280
9,925
3,396

6,687
3,602
14,736
9,573
6,442
7,381
3,752
10,230
4,877
7,960
10,665
3,580

7,064
3,833
16,225
10,436
6,987
8,101
4,058
11,067
5,261
8,548
11,624
3,804

7,661
4.103
18,494
11,387
7,574
8,777
4,403
11,995
5,788
9,383
12,761
3,987

8,225
4,405
20,947
12,428
8,126
9,180
4,748
13,105
6,302
10,036
13,820
4,200

9,045
4,850
23,768
13,664
8,886
10,017
5,177
14,413
6,947
10,957
14,926
4,724

22,618

23,984

24,735

26,025

27,325

28,497

30,950

2,007
1,451
3,665
15,495

33,189

35,792

38,972

2,213
1,558
3,821
16,393

2,400
1,605
4,008
16,721

2,623
1,679
4,124
17,599

2,809
1,747
4,304
18,465

2,954
1,805
4,454
19,284

42,925

46,942

52,264

3,207
1,929
4,808
21,006

3,420
2,029
5,168
22,572

3,738
2,145
5,499
24,411

4,040
2,238
5,993
26,701

4,602
2,405
6,525
29,393

5,189
2,575
6,991
32,186

5,915
2,847
7,767
35,735

44

7,488

7,899

8,287

8,777

9,480

9,754

10,369

11,173

3,422
1,113
1,196
1,518
650

11,791

12,500

13,446

14,563

3,165
1,051
1,240
1,420
611

3,606
1,132
1,252
1,620
678

3,885
1,209
1,241
1,725
716

4,090
1,297
1,477
1,880
736

4,285
1,321
1,455
1,950
743

16,391

4,631
1,378
1,499
2,075
786

4,965
1,581
1,608
2,202
816

5,309
1,601
1,719
2,326
836

5,713
1,698
1,753
2,445
892

6,269
1,798
1,836
2,596
946

6,846
2,000
1,927
2,776
1,015

7.790
2,218
2,164
3,108
1,110

48
49
50
51
52
53

1958

42,961

46,886

33,657

36,849

599
3,134
5,572

668
3,401
5,967

50,918

53,922

58,081

61,763

67,892

72,959

79,146

561
38,720
1,251
724
3,502
6,160

565
41,097
1,349
792
3,659
6,460

589
44,244
1,468
961
3,871
6,948

85,181

92,666

100,489

109,712

639
47,320
1,567
1,074
4,050
7,113

740
52,239
1,728
1,187
4,393
7,605

790
55,955
1,906
1,274
4,838
8,196

861
60,496
2,056
1,342
5,208
9,182

951
65,023
2,237
1,427
5,538
10,006

1,030
70,508
2,479
1,624
5,976
11,049

1,162
76,523
2,789
1,806
6,392
11,818

1,327
83,412
3,214
2,097
7,057
12,604

Line

6
7

8

12
13
14
15

21

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

34
35
36
37
38
39
40

41

42
43

45
46
47

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

18

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

Table 3.— D isp o sa b le Person al Income for States and Regions, 1948-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
Line

State and region

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1

United S ta te s ' ........................................................................

779,862

843,492

952,156

1,042,000

1,146,601

1,260,385

1,387,481

1,563,159

1,745,358

1,947,373

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

New E ng la nd ..................................................................................
Connecticut ..................................................................................
Maine ...........................................................................................
M assachusetts .............................................................................
New Hampshire ...........................................................................
Rhode Is la n d ................................................................................
V e rm on t........................................................................................

48,815
13,918
3,273
23,732
2,762
3,591
1,539

51,968
14,714
3,558
25,165
3,005
3,869
1,656

57,405
16,299
3,990
27,628
3,449
4,187
1,851

62,320
17,746
4,441
29,905
3,779
4,437
2,011

67,513
19,178
4,782
32,385
4,127
4,858
2,183

73,422
20,703
5,489
34,793
4,678
5,308
2,451

80,197
22,830
5,975
37,673
5,255
5,821
2,643

89,173
25,318
6,591
41,830
6,033
6,343
3,058

99,383
28,392
7,327
46,318
6,933
6,978
3,435

111,987
32,118
8,212
51,983
7,959
7,879
3,837

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

M id e ast ...........................................................................................
Delaware ......................................................................................
District of C o lu m b ia ......................................................................
Maryland ......................................................................................
New Jersey ..................................................................................
New York .....................................................................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia ................................................................................

180,696
2,272
3,592
16,315
32,722
81,472
44,322

192,155
2,476
3,892
17,552
34,932
86,082
47,222

210,066
2,754
4,128
19,677
38,524
92,601
52,382

227,466
2,996
4,544
21,395
41,732
99,373
57,426

247,799
3,242
4,970
23,474
45,303
107,568
63,242

267,427
3,516
5,236
25,786
49,070
114,578
69,241

288,807
3,815
5,680
27,683
53,037
123,142
75,449

317,751
4,185
5,988
30,902
59,127
134,204
83,346

348,816
4,534
6,281
34,094
65,357
146,380
92,168

387,761
5,059
6,722
38,447
73,571
162,465
101,496

16
17
18
19
20
21

G reat L a k e s ....................................................................................
Illinois ...........................................................................................
Indiana .........................................................................................
Michigan .......................................................................................
O h io ..............................................................................................
W is c o n s in .....................................................................................

156,892
47,059
18,698
34,791
40,281
16,064

168,586
50^273
20,195
37,889
42,931
17^97

190,675
56,825
23,514
42,886
48,011
19,439

206,421
61.943
24,694
46,135
52,401
21,248

223,475
67,831
26,963
49,370
56,062
23,248

246,185
73,680
29,955
55,075
61,843
25,632

272,423
80,967
33,107
61,590
68,229
28,530

302,128
89,570
36,987
68,254
75,509
31,808

332,654
98,018
40,684
75,151
82,851
35,950

361,659
106,131
43,875
81,257
90,794
39,601

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

P la in s ..............................................................................................
Io w a ..............................................................................................
Kansas .........................................................................................
M in n eso ta .....................................................................................
M is s o u ri........................................................................................
N e b ra s k a ......................................................................................
North D a k o ta ................................................................................
South Dakota ...............................................................................

58,859
9,976
8,141
14,246
16,863
5,470
2,023
2,141

64,012
10,917
9,019
15,176
18,075
5,930
2,425
2,471

75,819
13,345
10,311
18,088
20,514
6,962
3,463
3,136

78,848
13,453
11,022
19,086
21,743
7,162
3,309
3,071

86,826
15,151
12,097
20,595
23,915
8,240
3,435
3,392

93,258
16,028
13,276
22,378
26,248
8,637
3,378
3,314

103,046
17,768
14,394
25,159
29,194
9,221
3,523
3,787

117,363
20,780
16,004
28,192
32,619
10,882
4,486
4,400

129,177
22,137
18,279
31,243
36,439
11,591
4,625
4,865

138,826
23,291
19,955
34,742
39,535
12,221
4,321
4,762

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

S o u th e a st .......................................................................................
Alabam a .......................................................................................
Arkansas ......................................................................................
Florida ..........................................................................................
Georgia ........................................................................................
Kentucky ......................................................................................
L o u isia n a ......................................................................................
M is s is s ip p i....................................................................................
North C a ro lin a ..............................................................................
South Carolina .............................................................................
Tennessee ...................................................................................
Virginia .........................................................................................
West V irg in ia ................................................................................

140,817
9,898
5,428
26,763
15,130
9,736
10,900
5,797
15,750
7,598
12,121
16,484
5,211

156,232
10,908
6,071
30,245
16,825
10,613
11,825
6,501
17,527
8,345
13,576
18,052
5,744

179,809
12,355
7,200
35,738
19,273
12,139
13,321
7,531
20,174
9,629
15,536
20,573
6,339

199,885
13,691
7,982
40,419
21,252
13,430
15,025
8,204
22,063
10,876
17,175
22,798
6,970

221,297
15,360
8,861
44,546
23,240
14,889
16,937
8,961
24,247
12,031
18,732
25,596
7,897

245,684
17,274
9,705
48,550
25,717
16,707
19,144
10,153
26,860
13,341
21,036
28,362
8,836

272,425
19,063
10,906
54,173
28,290
18,736
21,355
11,408
29,443
14,608
23,291
31,277
9,875

309,902
21,522
12,749
62,669
32,106
20,966
24.405
12,586
33,344
16,582
26,486
35,413
11,073

348,003
23,941
13,924
72,125
35,769
23,512
27,605
14,249
36,610
18,464
29,675
39,803
12,328

392,388
26,308
14,891
84,575
40,101
25,898
31,797
15,469
40,930
20,776
32,757
45,322
13,562

43
44
45
46
47

S o u t h w e s t .......................................................................................
Arizona .........................................................................................
New M exico .................................................................................
O k la h o m a .....................................................................................
Texas ...........................................................................................

57,537
6,789
3,201
8,520
39,028

63,254
7,734
3,555
9,222
42,743

72,753
9,104
4,012
10,631
49,007

81,412
10,230
4,499
11,694
54,989

92,454
11,113
5,185
13,218
62,938

103,845
12,375
5,759
14,627
71,084

115,636
13,849
6,512
16,130
79,144

134,140
16,317
7,420
18,252
92,152

154,698
19,246
8,418
21,255
105,779

177,476
22,286
9,495
24,400
121,295

48
49
50
51
52
53

R o c k y M ountain .............................................................................
C o lo ra d o .......................................................................................
Idaho ............................................................................................
Montana .......................................................................................
U ta h ..............................................................................................
Wyoming ......................................................................................

18,293
8,811
2,426
2,329
3,482
1,244

20,541
9,802
2,771
2,678
3,881
1,410

23,645
11,339
3,211
3,110
4,358
1,626

26,505
12,659
3,748
3,361
4,879
1,859

29,415
14,081
4,019
3,704
5,487
2,125

32,588
15,558
4,549
3,951
6,174
2,357

36,281
17,342
4,953
4,258
6,972
2,756

42,272
20,015
5,731
5,099
8,059
3,369

47,824
23,007
6,321
5,429
9,144
3,923

54,500
26,567
7,069
5,968
10,289
4,606

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far W est .........................................................................................
Alaska ..........................................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ......................................................................................
Hawaii ..........................................................................................
N e v a d a .........................................................................................
Oregon .........................................................................................
Washington ..................................................................................

117,953
1,452
89,489
3,515
2,345
7,777
13,376

126,744
1,554
95,895
3,816
2,598
8,623
14,257

141,984
1,859
106,976
4,259
2,987
9,800
16,102

159,145
2,236
119,436
4,933
3,294
10,984
18,263

177,822
3,164
132,673
5,425
3,781
12,235
20,544

197,976
3,819
147,227
5,822
4,267
13,843
22,999

218,666
3,882
162,740
6,258
4,956
15,307
25,523

250,430
4,005
186,094
6,922
6,017
17,642
29,751

284,803
4,131
211,750
7,821
6,979
20,037
34,085

322,776
4,710
239,964
8,991
8,146
22,254
38,711

1. Alaska and Hawaii are not included in United States totals prior to 1960.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

19

Table 3 — D isp o sa b le Person al Income for States and R egions, 1948-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

Line

2,166,707

2,313,067

2,489,875

2,750,258

2,932,404

3,121,915

3,278,016

3,535,222

3,774,071

4,033,622

4,217,960

4,487,681

4,674,270

123,983

134,166

146,118

164,387

35,650
9,005
57,316
8,965
8,775
4,273

38,294
9,551
62,488
9,817
9,435
4,581

176,061

41,774
10,400
67,743
10,891
10,365
4,945

189,828

205,514

46,810
11,675
76,407
12,583
11,463
5,448

49,562
12,563
82,045
13,856
12,183
5,853

228,223

52,892
13,555
88,717
15,357
13,013
6,295

241,080

58,096
14,678
95,361
16,846
13,690
6,843

248,890

64,491
16,254
106,361
18,643
14,952
7,521

68,494
17,678
111,294
19,659
15,751
8,204

255,133

264,566

273,474

71,062
18,546
113,899
20,144
16,645
8,594

72,712
19,152
116,516
20,816
17,053
8,883

74Ì925
20,138
120,543
21,638
17,854
9,469

76,974
20 792
125’020
22,192
18 659
9Ì837

426,128

456,033

493,287

5,477
7,211
42,474
81,602
178,685
110,677

543,329

5,947
7,567
45,742
87,824
191,265
117,687

578,448

6,522
8,065
50,311
96,205
208,063
124,122

620,857

7,059
8,808
56,486
106,858
229,721
134,396

654,163

7,631
9,238
61,451
113,893
242,924
143,311

709,892

8,158
9,489
66,463
121,197
262,289
153,261

8,734
10,149
71,452
130,368
274,226
159,233

756,872

9,460
11,268
78,078
143,517
296,749
170,819

806,967

10,298
11,906
83,823
153,535
313,206
184,104

838,999

11,069
12,263
89,726
161,396
337,229
195,284

887,324

916,914

11,808
12,901
92,583
165,919
350.646
205,142

12,432
13,839
97,797
175,464
372,358
215,433

13,000
14 376
180 645
383 885
22 3 J1 5

392,051

409,497

432,461

117,423
47,675
86,400
97,897
42,654

476,823

503,807

123,666
49,398
88,648
102,683
45,102

533,632

129,913
52,055
94,014
108,516
47,963

142,237
58,051
104,393
119,787
52,355

149,740
60,504
112,025
126,033
55,505

553,538

593,024

158,299
64,158
119,661
133,026
58,489

163,521
67,549
123,755
137,553
61,161

629,888

175,009
71,966
132,438
148,972
64,639

667,483

692,204

187,719
76,887
139,905
156,510
68,866

199.341
81,308
147,448
165,624
73,762

740,747

206.302
84,673
152,646
171,665
76,918

772,422

220Ì298
91,550
163 214
182712
82,974

189Ì870
86,545

156,253

164,039

173,737

26,408
22,290
38,138
43,978
14,286
5,618
5,534

193,810

204,694

26,838
23,999
40,639
45,917
14,690
6,207
5,749

27,535
25,400
42,618
49,725
15,695
6,682
6,083

215,504

30,508
27,680
48,782
55,226
17,543
7,200
6,871

224,054

31,471
28,964
51,607
59,592
18,554
7,348
7,158

32,447
30,547
55,293
63,104
19,044
7,538
7,531

235,716

251,241

33,649
31,853
57,548
66,011
19,598
7,532
7,862

34,826
33,990
60,875
69,564
21,281
6,995
8,185

269,410

37,583
34,920
66,033
73,393
22,487
7,884
8,941

280,733

40,351
37,855
70,134
78,166
24,247
8,819
9,837

300,259

41,362
39,757
72,737
82,165
25,372
8,873
10,467

44Ì254
42,334
78,008
87,204
27,436
9,828
11,196

308,656

440,777

471,475

511,872

567,322

606,568

29,042
16,813
97,256
44,999
28,592
36,328
17,205
45,842
23,182
36,304
50,555
14,658

30,798
17,377
104,089
48,863
30,166
39,274
18,478
49,208
24,654
38,346
54,643
15,580

32,960
18,631
117,288
53,602
31,106
41,336
19,384
53,871
26.861
41,076
59,816
15,939

653,615

692,986

36,436
20,564
129,162
60,892
34,546
44,225
21,177
60,660
30,043
45,940
66,730
16,947

38,657
22,110
141,031
66,533
35,635
45,815
22,246
64,384
31,879
48,869
71,656
17,752

41,577
23,324
153,929
73,431
37,267
46,636
23,406
70,133
33,966
53,456
77,935
18,555

749,616

43,852
24,247
165,420
78,512
39,043
46,245
24,764
74,963
36,400
57,329
83,354
18,859

804,746

46,931
25,717
179,594
85,735
41,327
48,852
26,475
81,858
40,040
61,866
91,031
20,190

864,179

909,461

49,870
27,362
200,008
90,561
44,215
50,815
27,902
87,117
42,084
65,749
98,168
20,895

53,564
28,816
215,305
96,897
47,621
53,686
29.597
94,761
46,645
70,020
104,895
22,372

966,958

56,632
30,533
226,288
102,494
50,143
57,030
31,366
99,382
48,885
73,613
109,451
23,645

61,047
33,293
234,786
110,088
53,974
60,793
33 611
106^588
51,963
79,462
115,977
25,377

121 333
20,472

42

204,996

224,513

241,029

263,941

25,050
10,611
28,030
141,305

283,611

26,386
11,458
30,788
155,880

29,392
12,491
32,136
167,010

291,640

33,470
13,403
33,908
183,161

300,345

37,162
14,476
35,309
196,666

319,949

40,723
15,135
35,710
200,072

43,514
15,630
35,592
205,610

341,586

46,885
16,595
37,582
218,888

365,875

388,234

49,623
18,019
39,537
234,406

419,410

52,753
19,238
41,832
252,052

43

55,035
20,520
43,738
268,940

442,918

59,412
22,038
46,482
291,478

48 389
307,795

61,594

66,318

72,056

77,892

30,444
7,659
6,762
11,526
5,204

81,228

33,325
7,990
7,176
12,385
5,442

84,420

36,670
8,960
7,496
13,566
5,365

39,893
9,552
7,967
14,835
5,645

41,357
9,944
8,234
15,779
5,914

86,754

92,747

42,680
10,395
8,742
16,676
5,927

99,271

44,036
10,678
8,831
17,484
5,725

105,753

113,724

47,560
11,457
9,126
18,625
5,979

50,573
12,804
9,858
19,836
6,200

53,617
13,998
10,263
21,024
6,852

121,597

57,400
14,856
11,198
22,730
7,541

61 '141
16,011
11,804
24,757
7,883

360,926

387,027

419,314

462,755

5,33b
269,672
9,676
9,267
23,933
43,043

6,496
289,879
10,486
9,803
24,315
46,047

497,986

7,443
313,962
11,422
10,684
26,199
49,603

7,844
348,455
12,314
11,507
28,812
53,822

532,418

8,674
376,306
13,013
12,585
30,041
57,368

560,662

8,537
403,063
14,062
13,623
31,586
61,547

606,054

649,387

8,230
425,047
14,820
14,947
32,912
64,706

705,064

8,780
459,231
16,239
16,701
36,064
69,039

9,467
488,570
17,600
19,111
38,932
75,707

739,471

10,149
528,976
19,691
21,434
42,044
82,770

786,819

10,903
550,841
20,884
23,375
44,710
88,759

11,655
582,965
22,198
25,501
47,862
96,640

1
3
5
6
7
8
9
10
13
15

96 048
20
21

43 870
28 190
11^662

29

1,019,331

116 311

63 066
47

6 5645
17^334
12 784

50

8*315

53

595,212

56

27Ì480
100Ì917

60

20

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 4.— Per Capita D isp o sa b le Personal Incom e for States and R egions, 1 9 4 8 -9 3 1
[Dollars]

Line
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

State and region

1948

1949

1950

United States2 ..................................
New England ......................
Connecticut .........................................................................
Maine .............................................
M assachusetts .................................................
New Hampshire .............................................. ....ZZZZZZZZ
Rhode Is la n d ......................................................... .ZZZZZZZ
V e rm on t........................................

1,473
1,488
1,134
1,330
1,167
1,241
1,087

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Mideast ..................................
Delaware ...............................
District of C o lu m b ia .........................
Maryland ...........................................
New Jersey ...........................
New York ...........................
P e n n sy lv a n ia ...............................

16
17
18
19
20
21

Great L a k e s ................................
Illinois ............................

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Plains ..........................................
Io w a ............................................
Kansas ........................................
M in n e so ta ............................................
Missouri ........................................
N e b ra s k a ..........................................
North D a k o ta ............................
South Dakota ..................................

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Southeast ....................................
A la b a m a .......................................................................................
Arkansas ................................................... ......ZZZZZZZZZ!
Florida .............................................................. Z.ZZZZZZZ!
Georgia ........................................................ ..Z.iZ.ZZZZZZ.
Kentucky .......................................................... .....ZZZZZZZ!
L o u isia n a ................................................................ .ZZZ.ZZZ.
M is s is s ip p i........................................................
North C a ro lin a ......................................... .!I1 Z Z !Z Z Z !!Z
South Carolina ........................................... .....Z...ZZZZZZZ!
Tennessee ........................................................ ....... "ZZZZZ
Virginia ..................................................... Z..ZZZZZZZZZZ
W est V irg in ia ...................................

43
44
45
46
47

Southw est....................................
A r iz o n a .............................................................................
New M exico .......................................... ZZZZZZZZZZZZ!
O k la h o m a ......................................................... ......ZZZZZZZ
Texas .........................................

1,081

48
49
50
51
52
53

R o c k y M ountain ...................................
C o lo ra d o ...................................................
Idaho ....................................
Montana .....................................
U t a h .......................................
Wyoming ....................................

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far West ....................................
Alaska ......................................
California ......................................................... ............
Hawaii .........................................................Z..Z.Z..Z...Z.ZZZ

1,479
1,094
1,323
1,166
1,240
1,032

See footnotes at the end of the table.

1*663
1,109
1,479
1,236
1,383
1,074

1 j1 5 A
1*111

1,854
1,202
1,583
1,346
1,490
1,203

1,510

1,642
1,403
1,o38

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

1,526

1,598

1,605

1,688

1,771

1,835

1,618

1,687

1,939
1,284
1,615
1,400
1,517
1,231

1,709

2,039
1,298
1,674
1,450
1,610
1,285

1,816

2,030
1,319
1,698
1,532
1,632
1,320

1,924

2,151
1,447
1,801
1,647
1,707
1,367

2,314
1,503
1,912
1,701
1,746
1,464

2,008

1,689

1,711
1,996
1,539
1,756

1,778

1,782
2,043
1,627
1,829
1,731
1,545

1,793

1,836
2,017
1,716
1,935
1,814
1,644

1,804
2,049
1,685
1,956
1,866
1,615

2.433
1,545
1,996
1,784
1,772
1,528

1,880

1,987

1,936
2,049
1,774
2,032
1,968
1,686

2,073

2,196
2,215
1,870
2,151
2,061
1,799

2,137
2,237
1,942
2,239
2,148
1,894

1,643

1,687

1,762
1,536
1,651
1,607
1,533

1,799
1,578
1,707
1,655
1,564

1,768

1,870

1,909
1,725
1,879
1,745
1,601

1,908
1,624
1,804
1,740
1,574

1,951

2,005
1,709
1,951
1,829
1,649

1,998

2,136
1,793
1,970
1,906
1.742

2,197
1,817
1,999
1,959
1,799

1,426

1,484

1,490

1,550

1,547

1,633
1,614
1,536
1,537
1,597
1,255
1,347

1,603

1,515
1,578
1,587
1,615
1,496
1,369
1,236

1,708

1,594
1,197
1,218

1,487
1,546
1,506
1,517
1,502
1,214
1,322

1,589
1,641
1,619
1,688
1,512
1,413
1,298

1,752
1,721
1,699
1,724
1,772
1,450
1,540

1,121

1,178

1,013
961
1,301
1,158
1,110
1,143
851
1,121
1,086
1,072
1,335

1,177

1,062
993
1,388
1,214
1,171
1,209
887
1,165
1,136
1,161
1,359
1,150

1,258

1,050
996
1,397
1,193
1,162
1,213
872
1,190
1,077
1,171
1,389
1,110

1,326

1,168
1,098
1,497
1,302
1,211
1,263
984
1,256
1,131
1,217
1,460
1,191

1,361

1,237
1,136
1,589
1,367
1,287
1,348
980
1,317
1,154
1,293
1,509
1,324

1,289
1,150
1,628
1,379
1,320
1,450
993
1,178
1,342
1,527
1,416

1,294

1,357

1,466
1,213
1,160

1,402

1,522
1,259
1,246

1,547
1,292
1,316

1,424

1,486

1,556

1,615

1,569

1,539

1,642
1,473
1,622
1,419
1,685

1,587
1,408
1,609
1,429
1,706

1,564
1,415
1,580
1,427
1,665

1.445
1,415
1,380
1,486
1,324
1,399
827
841
1,081
916
921
924
767
931
853
901
1,041
1,020

1952

1,646

1,502

Michigan ................................
O h io ............................................
W is c o n s in ..............................

Oregon ................................
Washington .....................................

1951

1,565
1,631
1,430

784
776
1,103
902
876
991
673
906
817
891
1,031

856
808
1,189
999
918
1,032
737
1,009
866
959
1,146

1,207
1,028
1,040

1,210
1,053
1,081

1,250
1,107
1,049

1,306

1,264

1,304
1,246
1,487
1,149
1,452

1,367

1,290
1,185
1,282
1,163
1,506

1,531

1,373
1.242
1,521
1.243
1,572

1,592
1,360
1,623
1,394
1,747

1,513

1,523

1,636

1,762

1,842

1,903

1,905

2,016

2,107

2,167

1,535

1,550

1,670

1,805

1,890

1,946

1,946

2,071

2,179

2,241

1,526
1,450
1,456

1,603
1,438
1,451

1,749
1,489
1,571

1,907
1,600
1,655

2,001
1,657
1,725

2,091
1,678
1,819

2,068
1,646
1,853

2,201
1,748
1,893

2,144
1,797
1,931

2,192
1,803
2,008

962
900
1,236
1,108
1,053
1.099
804
1.099
1,031
1,029
1,274

1,533
1,321
1,311
1,451

1,578
1,384
1,367
1,516

1,523

1,295

1,653
1,457
1,424
1,588

1,689
1,541
1,474
1,649

1,604

1,664

1,657
1,454
1,699
1,499
1,712

1,767

1,715
1,542
1,727
1,566
1,771

1,863
1,609
1,760
1,658
1,889

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 4.— Per Capita D isposa ble Personal Income for States and R egions, 1948-93 '— Continued
[Dollars]

Summary

21

22

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

Table 4 — Per Capita D isp o sa b le Person al Income for States and R egions, 1 9 4 8 -9 3 1— Continued
[Dollars]
Line

State and region

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1

United S ta te s 2 ........................................................................

3,771

4,031

4,505

4,884

5,322

5,793

6,314

7,038

7,772

8,569

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

New E ng la nd ..................................................................................
Connecticut ..................................................................................
Maine ...........................................................................................
M assachusetts .............................................................................
New Hampshire ...........................................................................
Rhode Island ................................................................................
V e rm on t........................................................................................

4,069
4,546
3,223
4,136
3,624
3,725
3,386

4,299
4,794
3,438
4,367
3,844
3,963
3,575

4,726
5,311
3,813
4,777
4,301
4,281
3,952

5,126
5.770
4,189
5,177
4,625
4,654
4,250

5,545
6,217
4,455
5,620
4,973
5,134
4,548

6,015
6,709
5,036
6,052
5,523
5,585
5,053

6,543
7,392
5,406
6,559
6,027
6,094
5,370

7,248
8,181
5,909
7,284
6,749
6,626
6,137

8,050
9,159
6,513
8,061
7,603
7,294
6,792

9,055
10,321
7,283
9,052
8,611
8,306
7,485

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

M id e ast ...........................................................................................
Delaware ......................................................................................
District of C o lu m b ia ......................................................................
Maryland ......................................................................................
New Jersey ..................................................................................
New York .....................................................................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia ................................................................................

4,215
4,020
4,786
4,056
4,494
4,436
3,729

4,470
4,315
5,232
4,301
4,761
4,691
3,967

4,904
4,756
5,626
4,789
5,252
5,089
4,407

5,326
5,137
6,304
5,176
5,689
5,498
4,840

5,799
5,506
6,997
5,647
6,171
5,965
5,315

6,268
5,932
7,519
6,181
6,682
6,374
5,825

6,788
6,414
8,331
6,600
7,224
6,898
6,350

7,490
6,995
8,936
7,337
8,037
7,573
7,025

8,235
7,572
9,581
8,073
8,864
8,301
7,762

9,173
8,502
10,542
9,097
9,974
9,249
8,549

16
17
18
19
20
21

G reat L a k e s ....................................................................................
Illinois .........................................................................................
Indiana .........................................................................................
Michigan ....................................................................................
O h io ..............................................................................................
W isconsin .....................................................................................

3,862
4,199
3,561
3,878
3,752
3,602

4,130
4,466
3,813
4,198
3,995
3,845

4,657
5,047
4,412
4,727
4,459
4,302

5,030
5,494
4,616
5,065
4,867
4,682

5,437
5,999
5,039
5,421
5,205
5,088

5,977
6,486
5,577
6,041
5,751
5,591

6,588
7,098
6,125
6,726
6,334
6,184

7,278
7,833
6,791
7,417
6,995
6,867

7,994
8,581
7,431
8,125
7,672
7,705

8,672
9,276
7,988
8,779
8,405
8,401

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

P la in s ..............................................................................................
Io w a ..............................................................................................
Kansas .........................................................................................
M inn esota .....................................................................................
Missouri ........................................................................................
N e b ra s k a ......................................................................................
North D a k o ta ................................................................................
South Dakota ..............................................................................

3,573
3,498
3,624
3,698
3,571
3,636
3,228
3,189

3,865
3,816
3,999
3,925
3,803
3,906
3,843
3,648

4,560
4,659
4,554
4,656
4,296
4,555
5,476
4,619

4,729
4,691
4,860
4,896
4,544
4,658
5,217
4,517

5,186
5,258
5,309
5,246
4,987
5,346
5,380
4,978

5,530
5,520
5,775
5,656
5,442
5,576
5,235
4,825

6,080
6,097
6,210
6,322
6,026
5,932
5,427
5,497

6,892
7,119
6,860
7,040
6,696
6,972
6,894
6,383

7,555
7,589
7,787
7,737
7.453
7,409
7,091
7,061

8,065
7,987
8,419
8,505
8,030
7,769
6,600
6,890

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

S o u th e a st .......................................................................................
Alabam a .......................................................................................
Arkansas ......................................................................................
Florida ..........................................................................................
Georgia ........................................................................................
Kentucky ......................................................................................
L o u isia n a ......................................................................................
M is s is s ip p i..................................................................................
North C a ro lin a ..............................................................................
South Carolina .............................................................................
Tennessee ...................................................................................
Virginia .......................................................................................
West V irg in ia ................................................................................

3,128
2,830
2,752
3,736
3,212
2,952
2,938
2,559
3,028
2,854
3,023
3,468
2,944

3,395
3,081
3,008
4,022
3,500
3,181
3,143
2,818
3,309
3,070
3,320
3,739
3,197

3,826
3,450
3,498
4,508
3,928
3,601
3,516
3,205
3,748
3,469
3,754
4,193
3,511

4,168
3,774
3,800
4,860
4,255
3,930
3,933
3,449
4,040
3,825
4,088
4,580
3,843

4,536
4,173
4,105
5,215
4,594
4,292
4,357
3,734
4,381
4,149
4,396
5,062
4,291

4,962
4,622
4,475
5,583
5,017
4,732
4,845
4,177
4,802
4,536
4,859
5,526
4,706

5,415
5,040
4,941
6,094
5,428
5,241
5,318
4,638
5,194
4,887
5,291
6,008
5,182

6,063
5,613
5,689
6,863
6,074
5,806
5,991
5,059
5,809
5,453
5,936
6,702
5,766

6,695
6,187
6,136
7,616
6,635
6,453
6,669
5,681
6,310
5,981
6,546
7,475
6,357

7,418
6,741
6,502
8,595
7,309
7,066
7,523
6,122
6,939
6,627
7,117
8,443
6,944

43
44
45
46
47

S o u th w e s t.......................................................................................
Arizona .........................................................................................
New Mexico .................................................................................
O k la h o m a .....................................................................................
Texas ...........................................................................................

3,369
3,581
3,039
3,254
3,391

3,614
3,850
3,299
3,470
3,635

4,055
4,284
3,633
3,946
4,077

4,436
4,599
3,983
4,280
4,482

4,921
4,861
4,460
4,769
5,008

5,389
5,271
4,819
5,181
5,509

5,867
5,706
5,315
5,628
5,999

6,647
6,481
5,927
6,266
6,827

7,446
7,294
6,574
7,156
7,617

8,282
8,147
7,246
8,017
8,459

48
49
50
51
52
53

R o c k y M ountain .............................................................................
C o lo ra d o .......................................................................................
Idaho ............................................................................................
Montana .......................................................................................
U t a h ..............................................................................................
Wyoming ......................................................................................

3,522
3,825
3,284
3,275
3,163
3,660

3,826
4,077
3,630
3,723
3,421
4,064

4,278
4,543
4,105
4,276
3,729
4,602

4,691
4,981
4,639
4,559
4,070
5,099

5,088
5,445
4,831
4,944
4,447
5,585

5,509
5,910
5,308
5,208
4,852
5,960

5,969
6.433
5,606
5,520
5,296
6,697

6,756
7,234
6,291
6,504
5,907
7,819

7,427
8,075
6,777
6,879
6,457
8,682

8,265
9,130
7,452
7,565
6,987
9,705

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far W est .........................................................................................
Alaska ..........................................................................................
California ......................................................................................
Hawaii ..........................................................................................
Nevada .........................................................................................
Oregon .........................................................................................
Washington ..................................................................................

4,278
4,587
4,398
4,440
4,509
3,617
3,880

4,540
4,761
4,659
4,665
4,752
3,928
4,136

5,012
5,579
5,126
5,059
5,251
4,377
4,631

5,526
6,486
5,641
5,749
5,519
4,815
5,148

6,059
8,530
6,160
6,200
6,099
5,263
5,677

6,615
9,714
6,712
6,524
6,597
5,836
6,232

7,157
9,769
7,281
6,833
7,309
6,275
6,766

8,005
9,957
8,148
7,452
8,365
7,030
7,656

8,911
10,351
9,106
8,232
9,121
7,771
8,494

9,848
11,639
10,084
9,286
10,058
8,425
9,317

1. Per capita disposable personal income was computed using midyear population estimates
of the Bureau of the Census. Estimates for 1990-93 reflect State population estimates available
as of February 1994.
2. Alaska and Hawaii are not included in United States totals prior to 1960.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

23

Table 4 — Per Capita D isposable Personal Income for States and R egions, 1948-93 '— Continued
[Dollars]
1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

Line

9,443

9,984

10,649

11,661

12,324

12,999

13,528

14,457

15,291

16,173

16,729

17,593

18,124

1

9,970
11,394
7,948
9,936
9,572
9,208
8,287

10,761
12,199
8,402
10,827
10,359
9,888
8,824

11,647
13,209
9,084
11,680
11,366
10,837
9,449

13,002
14,719
10,102
13,081
12,880
11,916
10,344

13,817
15,481
10,802
13,950
13,900
12,572
11,041

14,790
16,405
11,583
15,028
14,980
13,313
11,785

15,866
17,888
12,389
16,065
15,976
13,832
12,665

17,440
19,707
13,500
17,784
17,219
15,004
13,678

18,289
20,860
14,490
18,501
17,799
15,741
14,711

18,828
21,604
15,064
18,926
18,120
16,570
15,225

19,327
22,098
15,494
19,434
18,793
16,990
15,646

20,049
22,849
16,289
20,115
19,404
17,830
16,573

20,671
23.487
16,775
20,794
19,721
18,658
17,088

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

10,068
9,191
11,323
9,966
11,017
10,172
9,333

10,760
9,926
11.933
10,680
11,818
10,873
9,935

11,594
10,771
12,751
11,663
12,882
11,763
10,485

12,727
11,541
13,906
12,939
14,217
12,944
11,374

13,516
12,340
14,556
13,923
15,053
13,652
12,174

14,440
12,998
14,865
14,811
15,899
14,706
13,006

15,144
13,711
15,933
15,648
16,993
15,345
13,480

16,341
14,605
17,871
16,760
18,606
16,538
14,418

17,365
15,643
19,075
17,732
19,872
17,417
15,515

18,463
16,545
20,312
18,700
20,852
18,733
16,417

19,108
17,344
21,710
19,036
21,345
19,430
17,169

20,112
17,995
23,648
19,888
22,437
20,562
17,960

20,666
18,564
24,852
20,523
22,927
21,096
18,518

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

9,414
10,262
8,699
9,382
9,075
9,025

9,869
10,825
9,034
9,725
9,545
9,537

10,454
11,386
9,550
10,390
10,106
10,158

11,518
12,463
10,634
11,535
11,155
11,055

12,163
13,134
11,082
12,341
11,739
11,689

12,871
13,900
11,762
13,108
12,396
12,297

13,308
14,353
12,341
13,468
12,782
12,799

14,212
15,363
13,102
14,365
13,794
13,402

15,043
16,452
13,919
15,119
14,453
14,180

15,863
17,412
14,636
15,837
15,247
15,047

16,329
17,901
15,103
16,282
15,692
15,550

17,340
18,970
16,180
17,301
16,578
16,619

17,956
19,589
16,813
18,023
17,119
17,179

16
17
18
19
20
21

9,051
9,081
9,347
9,276
8,917
9,051
8,519
8,025

9,486
9,292
9,995
9,836
9,315
9,287
9,279
8,324

10,027
9,592
10,514
10,290
10,058
9,906
9,874
8,777

11,149
10,671
11,418
11,732
11,099
11,042
10,580
9,853

11,762
11,120
11,931
12,332
11,916
11,707
10,853
10,248

12,389
11,620
12,556
13,147
12,561
12,095
11,257
10,819

12,854
12,159
13,024
13,586
13,052
12,508
11,391
11,294

13,442
12,578
13,804
14,168
13,687
13,540
10,672
11,721

14,279
13,565
14,121
15,222
14,403
14,278
12,198
12,834

15,231
14,516
15,258
15,990
15,246
15,340
13,837
14,120

15,782
14,826
15,963
16,435
15,934
15,954
14,010
14,918

16,755
15,789
16,830
17,459
16,800
17,142
15,500
15,804

17,097
15,786
17,335
17,779
17,283
17,540
15,340
16,301

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

8,220
7,412
7,332
9,542
8,082
7,790
8,482
6,776
7,696
7,292
7,845
9,286
7,501

8,691
7,846
7,574
9,940
8,649
8,190
9,023
7,227
8,175
7,686
8,253
9,948
7,991

9,331
8,378
8,080
10,910
9,357
8,419
9,404
7,549
8,864
8,305
8,814
10,749
8,194

10,218
9,219
8,864
11,698
10,435
9,347
10,049
8,214
9,840
9,181
9,801
11,822
8,790

10,792
9,730
9,500
12,423
11,157
9,644
10,392
8,594
10,294
9,650
10,363
12,536
9,309

11,494
10,415
10,000
13,191
12,067
10,104
10,581
9,023
11,093
10,160
11.279
13,408
9,856

12,043
10,920
10,350
13,786
12,644
10,599
10,644
9,566
11,705
10,766
11,985
14,049
10,151

12,896
11,662
10,976
14,591
13,572
11,229
11,389
10,259
12,629
11,733
12,827
15,077
11,030

13,702
12,374
11,662
15,826
14,126
12,024
11,948
10,839
13,269
12,174
13,544
16,040
11,566

14,532
13,227
12,236
16,535
14,891
12,901
12,728
11,491
14,243
13,327
14,315
16,886
12,479

15,092
13,846
12,879
17,049
15,464
13,498
13,438
12,100
14,726
13,730
14,864
17,406
13,142

15,825
14,754
13,905
17,414
16,253
14,378
14,208
12,852
15,591
14,423
15,812
18,137
14,029

16,459
15,264
14,239
18,272
16,815
14,777
14,843
13,380
16,307
14,943
16,486
18,694
14,544

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

9,325
8,915
7,962
9,053
9,583

9,851
9,130
8,401
9,603
10,167

10,297
9,899
8,957
9,766
10,602

11,100
10,911
9,460
10,320
11,441

11,735
11,672
10,063
10,792
12,084

11,861
12,308
10,346
10,977
12,079

12,135
12,658
10,570
11,086
12,368

12,868
13,261
11,133
11,865
13,131

13,618
13,700
11,982
12,550
13,947

14,408
14,338
12,658
13,291
14,785

15,040
14,693
13,261
13,807
15,499

15,946
15,503
13,932
14,502
16,484

16,517
16,022
14,642
14,974
17,070

43
44
45
46
47

9,135
10,224
7,960
8,503
7,606
10,584

9,606
10,885
8,205
8,926
7,947
10,745

10,242
11,701
9,125
9,208
8,505
10,511

10,956
12,584
9,640
9,704
9,143
11,180

11,331
12,888
10,002
10,012
9,603
11,835

11,724
13,182
10,496
10,741
10,028
11,957

12,038
13,504
10,839
10,968
10,418
12,000

12,875
14,577
11,622
11,403
11,023
12,854

13,723
15,438
12,876
12,329
11,628
13,526

14,492
16,231
13,836
12,834
12,158
15,114

15,286
17,034
14,316
13,867
12,865
16,466

15,939
17,647
15,022
14,354
13,669
16,962

16,656
18,409
15,771
15,229
14.203
17,682

48
49
50
51
52
53

10,796
12,748
11,104
9,892
10,933
8,971
10,162

11,354
14,448
11,679
10,551
11,120
9,124
10,767

12,078
15,239
12,379
11,278
11,845
9,874
11,534

13,100
15,269
13,482
11,979
12,440
10,804
12,390

13,817
16,287
14,230
12,514
13,232
11,239
13,037

14,460
15,683
14,870
13,368
13,891
11,769
13,821

14,893
15,258
15,300
13,876
14,604
12,184
14,276

15,722
16,198
16,131
15,036
15,533
13,154
14,877

16,426
17,303
16,721
16,079
16,802
13,951
15,951

17,389
18,354
17,690
17,693
17,584
14,711
16,890

17,890
19,171
18,115
18,401
18,149
15,319
17,695

18,694
19,829
18,869
19,207
19,081
16,107
18,792

18,990
20,491
19,071
20,057
19,786
16,716
19,203

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

24

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 5.— Quarterly Total Personal Income, States and Regions
(Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Line

1969

State and region
I

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

United States ...........................

II

741,544

759,038

New England ........................

Connecticut .......................
Maine ..............................
Massachusetts .........................
New Hampshire ........................
Rhode Island............................
Vermont...............................

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Mideast ............................

16
17
18
19
20
21

Great Lakes ..........................

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Plains ...........................

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Southeast .....................

43
44
45
46
47

Southw est.....................

48
49
50
51
52
53

Rocky Mountain ..................

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far West ....................

Delaware ...............................
District of Columbia..................
Maryland .............................
New Jersey ................
New York ..........................

23Ì287
2,621

3Ì336
30,789
81,090
43,215

Nebraska.......................
North D akota..................
South Dakota .....................

Colorado............................
Idaho .............................
Montana .....................
U ta h .........................
Wyoming ......................
Alaska ...............................
C alifornia.......................
Hawaii ..........................
Nevada ............................
Oregon ..............................
Washington ........................

bee footnotes at the end of the table.

8Ì978

9,259

22,933
13,685
9,066
10.058
5,110
14,470
6,831
11.059
15,561
4,652

23,515
14,119
9,278
10,267
5,190
14,970
7,060
11,315
16,003
4,781

1 371

IV

II

792,476

801,984

821,250

832,873

843,185

860,384

882,236

49,825

50,674

14,595
3,139
24,276
2,741
3,582
1,493

14,848
3,195
24,662
2,792
3,647
1,530

51,472

52,560

15,005
3,282
25,060
2,814
3,743
1,568

53,30e

15,265
3,375
25,646
2,878
3,804
1,593

15,441
3,422
26,004
2,905
3,91 S
1,618

53,872
15,562
3,483
26,303
2,947
3,929
1,649

54,498

55,579

15,663
3,508
26,696
2,983
3,969
1,678

15,970
3,592
27,227
3,075
4,004
1,711

183,425

187,010

189,511

194,467

2,473
3,606
17,085
33,308
86,591
46,448

197,224

2,535
3,854
17,776
34,355
88,371
47,576

2,531
3,824
17,877
35,007
89,762
48,223

199,133

203,201

207,848

168,879

169,414

51,155
19,769
37,229
43,391
17,335

51,914
19,854
36,536
43,518
17,592

63,397

2,466
3,651
16,759
33,111
85,254
45,768

161,536

Io w a .........................
Kansas .............................
Minnesota..............

Arizona ...........................................
New Mexico .......................
Oklahoma............................
Texas .................................

777,373

2,415
3,508
16,338
32,289
83,865
45,009

Illinois .......................
Indiana ...............................
Michigan ........................
O h io ............................
Wisconsin ....................

Alabama ......................................... ” ”
Arkansas ........................
Florida ............................................. "
Georgia ...........................
Kentucky ..............................
Louisiana.................................
Mississippi............................
North C arolina..........................
South Carolina .............................
Tennessee ................................
Virginia ....................................
West Virginia......................... .!!!!!!!!!!!!

1970

III

2,576
3,848
18,063
35,471
90,506
48,667

48,526
19,186
36,038
41,499
16,287

164,257
49,123
19,412
36,655
42,183
16,526

166,339

49,800
19,279
36,037
42,315
16,826

50,041
19,466
37,051
42,752
17,028

58,166

59,734

10,245
7,936
14,184
16,622
5,298
1,899
1,983

10,507
8,195
14,620
16,923
5,475

60,609

62,351

2,073

10,622
8,236
14,905
17,390
5,477
1,913
2,066

61,182
10,605
8,370
15,091
17,649
5,496
1,859
2,112

10,733
8,549
15,370
18,031
5,604
1,926
2,137

10,975
8,667
15,520
18,283
5,738
2,022
2,192

134,718

137,474

139,234

143,937

146,117

149,491

10,245
5,534
27,382
15,565
10,291
11,300
5,841
16,607
7,818
12,514
17,619
5,401

10,387
5,682
27,974
16,044
10,489
11,525
5,982
16,888
8,039
12,834
18,016
5,631

9,515
5,026
24,489
14,610
9,478
10,562
5,295
15,427
7.277
11,576
16,586
4,877

54,889

9,714
5,117
25,317
14,934
9,618
10,699
5,413
15,635
7,416
11,774
16,831
5,005

9,821
5,174
25,738
15,028
9,741
10,797
5,477
16,035
7,552
11,918
16,800
5,152

10,106
5,397
26,907
15,497
10,024
11,140
5,729
16,407
7,780
12,258
17,403
5,288

2,667
4,064
18,742
36,136
92,378
49,214

173,363
52.358
20,413
38,715
44,210
17,667

2,722
4,142
19,085
36,935
94,633
50,331

III
896,057

IV
913,330
57,145

1,754

1,801

50,948

51,591

18,673

19,097

178,675
54,024
21,162
39,691
45,502
18,295

64,374

65,811

10,903
8,847
15,741
18,688
5,885
2,091
2,220

11,101
9,109
16,036
19,110
6,026
2,170
2,260

2Ì367

2,472

152,642

157,288

160,975

164,706

5,905
29,833
16,881
10,888
12,074
6,250
17,623
8,465
13,488
19,023
5,889

6,082
30,733
17,277
11,075
12,261
6,432
18,225
8,648
13,714
19,295
6,028

6,318
31,725
17,687
11,369
12,501
6,607
18,542
8,788
14,110
19,701
5,936

66,909

10,676
5,792
28,714
16,323
10,658
11,842
6,142
17,121
8,176
13,071
18,408
5,720

5,849
2,878
7,905
36,528

6,070
2,956
8,156
37,707

56,088

57,083

6,306
3,014
8,328
38,440

6,494
3,084
8,420
39,085

59,285

60,066

6,745
3,210
8,743
40,587

6.830
3,247
8,908
41,081

61,337

62,735

7,049
3,311
9,111
41,866

64,254

7,278
3,415
9,240
42,802

65,094

7,595
3,538
9,487
43,635

7,794
3,579
9,558
44,163

16,099

16,571

8,137
3,669
9,856
45,246

7,652
2,149
2,136
3,050
1,112

17,014

7,860
2,243
2,185
3,133
1,151

17,404

8,059
2,286
2.278
3,216
1,176

17,953

8,279
2,350
2,308
3,267
1,199

8,586
2,410
2,367
3,370
1,220

18,456

18,914

8,825
2,454
2,445
3,478
1,254

9,079
2,509
2,504
3,544
1,278

19,283

19,897

20,505

20,829

21,497

112,426

115,486

117,800

120,194

121,866
1,496
92,590
3,588
2,337
7,936
13,918

125,024

126,015

5,653
2,831
7,682
35,668

1,283
85,658
3,140
2,013
7,231
13,101

•

1,352
87,822
3,172
2,116
7,485
13,539

1,398
89,454
3,347
2,199
7,656
13,746

1,459
91,227
3,521
2,269
7,738
13,980

1,570
94,930
3,781
2,404
8,114
14,225

1,535
95,660
3.831
2,399
8,253
14,337

~

^

9,271
2,559
2,511
3,635
1,305

9,626
2,631
2,537
3,750
1,353

10,012
2,681
2,565
3,861
1,385

10,142
2,724
2,608
3,928
1,426

10,417
2,834
2,731
4,051
1,465

127,257

129,674

1,566
96,590
3,882
2,472
8,349
14,398

132,275

1,616
98,270
3,970
2,557
8,596
14,665

133,911

1,659
100,209
4,048
2,651
8,835
14,874

136,397

1,689
101,433
4,082
2,695
9,004
15,009

1,748
103,286
4,131
2,728
9,239
15,264

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Summary

25

Table 5.— Quarterly Total Person al Income, States and R egio ns— Continued
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates)
19 75

1974

1973

1972

Line

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

939,366

954,312

981,826

1,024,249

1,047,683

1,072,189

1,101,993

1,147,004

1,159,732

1,180,594

1,218,991

1,242,983

1,250,363

1,279,901

1,320,055

1,359,809

1

73,982
21,080
5,114
35,814
4,405
5,205
2,364

74,297
21,298
5,052
35,917
4,409
5,263
2,359

76,008
21,643
5,204
36,779
4,537
5,429
2,415

77,588
22,021
5,374
37,504
4,688
5,508
2,493

79,635
22,585
5,611
38,352
4,848
5,645
2,595

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

58,760
16,773
3,822
28,704
3,308
4,328
1,825

59,994
17,128
3,906
29,289
3,382
4,406
1,883

60,706
17,295
3,981
29,613
3,470
4,410
1,937

62,948
17,909
4,150
30,630
3,607
4,635
2,016

64,368
18,359
4,254
31,272
3,746
4,698
2,039

65,675
18,725
4,391
31,854
3,836
4,788
2,081

66,948
19,100
4,525
32,424
3,931
4,842
2,126

68,629
19,570
4,746
33,177
4,076
4,863
2,197

69,902
19,953
4,854
33,793
4,162
4,950
2,191

71,337
20,394
4,919
34,468
4,252
5,050
2,255

72,990
20,816
5,033
35,326
4,334
5,162
2,318

220,017
2,891
4,444
20,382
38,978
99J3 5
54,187

215,883
2,971
4,470
20,702
39,911
99,181
48,648

228,717
3,029
4,553
21,184
40,390
101,882
57,679

236,156
3,125
4,713
21,859
41,778
104,975
59,706

237,761
3,204
4,708
22,538
42,869
105,786
58,655

241,334
3,288
4,754
23,010
43,448
107,125
59,708

245,825
3,390
4,885
23,688
44,166
108,665
61,032

252,416
3,494
4,973
24,381
45,435
111,184
62,949

256,529
3,489
5,055
24,793
46,386
112,767
64,038

262,897
3,550
5,213
25,277
47,526
115,517
65,814

269,094
3,716
5,373
25,951
48,278
117,939
67,837

273,563
3,734
5,537
26,611
49,044
119,527
69,109

276,369
3,780
5,551
26,847
49,489
120,706
69,996

281,577
3,769
5,701
27,146
50,473
123,398
71,091

287,693
3,898
5,839
27,894
51,667
125,426
72,968

294,377
4,044
5,972
28,813
52,974
127,442
75,133

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

188,510
56,814
22,320
42,527
47,557
19,292

193,490
58,269
22,844
43,733
48,779
19,866

196,733
58,982
23,371
44,526
49,691
20,163

205,302
61,468
24,512
46,460
51,791
21,071

211,754
63,286
25,577
48,012
53,312
21,566

216,360
64,827
26,270
49,102
54,140
22,020

221,947
66,595
27,040
49,988
55,676
22,647

230,653
69,184
28,368
51,734
57,527
23,840

231,269
70,046
27,840
51,208
58,265
23,910

234,616
70,647
27,953
52,264
59,379
24,373

243,152
73,174
29,017
54,573
61,311
25,076

247,472
74,986
29,704
54,742
62,434
25,606

246,284
75,411
29,508
53,550
62,134
25,681

250,385
76,727
29,750
54,847
62,843
26,218

258,859
78,970
31,188
57,034
64,517
27,149

266,975
81,142
32,196
59,057
66,591
27,989

16
17
18
19
20
21

69,355
11,756
9,678
16,735
19,991
6,386
2,372
2,438

71,614
12,218
10,103
17,138
20,682
6,617
2,302
2,555

73,799
12,484
10,395
17,549
21,008
6,813
2,826
2,724

78,737
13,653
10,877
18,795
21,960
7,233
3,197
3,022

80,395
13,903
10,960
19,292
22,614
7,402
3,180
3,044

83,259
14,587
11,209
20,021
22,979
7,597
3,594
3,271

86,865
15,489
11,882
20,927
23,557
7,935
3,702
3,372

93,731
16,608
12,928
22,332
24,475
8,694
4,710
3,982

91,010
15,665
12,576
22,090
24,531
8,195
4,266
3,687

88,570
14,989
12,314
21,900
24,518
7,951
3,627
3,269

90,988
15,733
12,748
22,373
25,183
8,268
3,377
3,305

93,637
16,420
13,209
22,626
25,747
8,558
3,733
3,343

94,472
16,634
13,144
22,781
25,956
8,857
3,575
3,525

96,785
16,934
13,506
23,267
26,568
9,138
3,773
3,598

101,226
17,748
14,131
24,242
27,596
9,593
4,114
3,801

103,717
18,366
14,408
24,964
28,364
9,630
4,092
3,893

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

170,291
11,846
6,414
32,866
18,318
11,582
12,689
6,830
19,258
9,126
14,545
20,487
6,330

175,200
12,091
6,603
34,128
18,803
11,912
13,181
7,072
19,825
9,323
14,991
20,870
6,401

179,994
12,325
6,855
35,006
19,428
12,247
13,456
7,343
20,359
9,649
15,400
21,354
6,574

189,206
12,917
7,248
37,292
20,353
12,945
13,949
7,734
21,351
10,097
16,171
22,331
6,818

194,449
13,252
7,481
38,609
20,775
13,250
14,210
7,974
21,829
10,377
16,697
23,038
6,958

199,692
13,634
7,868
39,965
21,358
13,380
14,462
8,135
22,549
10,689
17,094
23,548
7,009

206,786
14,039
8,157
41,668
22,091
13,833
15,213
8,360
23,185
11,062
17,696
24,269
7,213

216,031
14,718
8,713
43,176
23,100
14,508
15,821
8,811
24,550
11,637
18,398
25,154
7,445

219,195
14,788
8,678
44,272
23,270
14,719
16,118
8,837
24,734
11,926
18,571
25,670
7,613

224,212
15,149
8,738
45,533
23,716
15,188
16,582
8,982
24,961
12,143
18,982
26,358
7,880

232,054
15,739
9,146
46,872
24,453
15,836
17,328
9,386
25,721
12,613
19,663
27,192
8,105

236,092
16,114
9,413
47,228
24,853
16,259
17,887
9,424
25,960
12,843
19,959
27,937
8,215

236,944
16,301
9,315
47,950
24,631
16,091
18,055
9,387
25,645
12,623
19,899
28,323
8,725

243,411
16,717
9,519
49,263
25,359
16,467
18,610
9,625
26,658
13,102
20,401
28,883
8,807

251,089
17,465
10,109
50,279
26,096
17,006
19,199
9,985
27,627
13,548
21,109
29,676
8,989

259,863
18,111
10,298
51,259
27,178
17,686
19,937
10.419
28,863
14,178
21,944
30.577
9,413

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

68,944
8*436
3,828
10,047
46,634

70,889
8,661
3,912
10,329
47,987

72,509
8,945
3,983
10,569
49,012

75,914
9,375
4,188
10,990
51,361

77,955
9,699
4,273
11,268
52,716

80,510
10,078
4,380
11,613
54,439

83,631
10,437
4,543
12,157
56,495

87,401
10,887
4,742
12,794
58,979

88,969
11,175
4,834
12,830
60,130

91,013
11,458
4,959
13,036
61,560

94,923
11,857
5,159
13,655
64,252

96,940
11,964
5,255
13,964
65,756

99,107
11.827
5,420
14,227
67,633

101,994
12,074
5,594
14,604
69,721

105,923
12,545
5,829
15,241
72,309

109,575
12,913
6,049
15,596
75,017

43
44
45
46
47

22,204
10,767
2,897
2,824
4,217
1,498

22,973
11*123
3,024
2,978
4,306
1,542

23,644
11,461
3,133
3,089
4,368
1,592

24,912
12,081
3,306
3,266
4,586
1,673

25,482
12,472
3,353
3,246
4,681
1,731

26,402
12,826
3,472
3,506
4,799
1,799

27,160
13,184
3,645
3,519
4,972
1,841

28,825
13,797
3,951
3,890
5,180
2,007

29,379
14,103
4,120
3,814
5,268
2,074

29,610
14,362
4,072
3,668
5,418
2,089

30,889
14,916
4,326
3,883
5,612
2,153

31,713
15,245
4,448
3,993
5,738
2,289

31,601
15,210
4,298
3,968
5,827
2,298

32,576
15,763
4,388
4,073
5,983
2,369

34,034
16,432
4,584
4,304
6,245
2,468

35,144
16,929
4,791
4,428
6,440
2,557

48
49
50
51
52
53

141,283
1*773
107Ì322
4,307
2,854
9,543
15,483

144,268
1,771
109,268
4,430
2,937
9,864
15,998

145,724
1,829
110,231
4,474
2,967
10,056
16,168

151,073
1,928
113,946
4,662
3,113
10,524
16,901

155,519
2,037
117,144
4,833
3,244
10,840
17,421

158,958
2,114
119,747
4,879
3,335
11,088
17,796

162,830
2,181
122,433
4,984
3,434
11,356
18,443

169,317
2,254
126,985
5,183
3,590
11,971
19,334

173,478
2,335
130,167
5,423
3,655
12,207
19,691

178,338
2,512
133,870
5,592
3,733
12,527
20,104

184,902
2,707
138,457
5,852
3,781
13,053
21,051

189,585
3,052
141,502
6,016
3,874
13,310
21,830

191,289
3,357
142,807
5,939
3,990
13,210
21,985

197,165
3,610
146,815
6,067
4,141
13,710
22,822

203,643
3,910
151,425
6,181
4,263
14,342
23,522

210,523
4,241
156,304
6,407
4,432
14,783
24,357

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

26

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 5 — Q uarterly Total Personal Income, States and R e g io n s— Continued
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Line

1976

1977

State and region

1978

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

1

United States ................................

1,396,360

1,422,372

1,456,560

1,493,592

1,530,525

1,570,778

1,622,538

1,663,935

1,707,577

1,778,672

1,833,520

1,890,884

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

New England ........................................

81,443
23,081
5,836
38,998
5,048
5,817
2,662

83,175
23,593
6,016
39,733
5,189
5,934
2,709

85,471
24,259
6,231
40,674
5,384
6,122
2,800

86,938
24,715
6,390
41,289
5,497
6,210
2,837

89,008
25,500
6,411
42,167
5,681
6,388
2,860

90,975
26,026
6,567
43,107
5,847
6,493
2,934

93,572
26,620
6,760
44,428
6,049
6,667
3,047

95,962
27,435
6,888
45,384
6,279
6,840
3,136

98,212
28,034
7,054
46,414
6,530
6,915
3,265

101,743
29,081
7,301
47,952
6,776
7,213
3,419

104,808
29,929
7,473
49,482
7,011
7,388
3,525

107,634
30,843
7,674
50,632
7,249
7,606
3,630

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Mideast .................................................

300,913
4,123
6,037
29,443
54,339
129,905
77,066

305,541
4,228
6,077
30,029
55,273
131,560
78,374

312,599
4,261
6,197
30,743
56,631
134,456
80,311

317,334
4,412
6,353
31,315
57,535
135,762
81,958

325,255
4,427
6,436
31,817
59,203
139,409
83,964

331,557
4,554
6,570
32,520
60,411
141,529
85,973

340,073
4,671
6,678
33,289
61,951
145,045
88,439

347,483
4,779
6,852
34,262
63,410
147,950
90,231

354,381
4,844
6,805
34,981
65,215
150,581
91,956

366,157
4,987
6,964
36,321
67,464
155,076
95,346

374,969
5,106
7,098
37,327
69,247
158,239
97,952

385,101
5,202
7,291
38,490
71,147
162,436
100,536

16
17
18
19
20
21

Great Lakes ..........................................

274,512
83,166
33,130
60,918
68,727
28,570

280,497
84,479
33,989
62,753
70,111
29,166

286,437
86,265
34,762
63,963
71,538
29,909

294,894
88,374
35,761
66,460
73,513
30,786

302,336
91,166
36,310
68,231
74,918
31,712

312,117
93,162
37,739
70,679
77,777
32,760

322,986
95,794
39,059
73,476
80,641
34,016

328,138
97,493
39,681
74,613
82,051
34,299

335,888
100,230
40,423
76,577
83,074
35,584

347,853
103,633
42,291
78.755
86,388
36,786

357,222
106,070
43,543
81,256
88,599
37,754

367,115
108',309
44,837
83,811
91,343
38,814

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Plains ....................................................

104,670
18,203
14,812
25,120
29,112
9,726
3,905
3,793

105,641
18,382
14,989
25,479
29,527
9,736
3,840
3,688

107,402
18,674
15,226
26,269
30,235
9,749
3,760
3,488

110,660
19,227
15,647
27,089
31,152
9,978
3,829
3,739

114,317
20,048
15,828
28,398
31,985
10,281
3,707
4,071

116,187
20,351
16,110
28,924
32,744
10,361
3,744
3,953

120,555
20,986
16,742
29,867
34,023
10,760
3,935
4,243

123,515
21,163
17,649
30,032
34,767
11,052
4,525
4,327

127,558
22,656
17,309
31,358
35,496
11,543
4,667
4,529

133,534
23,864
18,081
32,514
37,087
12,373
4,879
4,735

136,591
24,364
18,840
33,214
38,061
12,409
4,894
4,807

142,811
24',966
19,598
34,701
39,179
13,295
5,810
5,263

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Southeast .............................................

268,653
18,809
10,657
52,848
27,928
18,341
20,737
10,883
29,499
14,546
22,781
31,774
9,852

273,269
19,081
10,740
53,882
28,511
18,537
21,392
11,062
29,944
14,796
23,168
32,211
9,945

279,549
19,511
10,889
54,779
29,137
19,147
21,786
11,334
30,931
15,260
23,683
33,014
10,078

287,785
20,171
11,286
56,647
29,855
19,723
22,559
11,755
31,485
15,499
24,345
33,931
10,530

294,288
20,448
11,726
57,851
30,326
20,399
23,194
12,054
32,042
15,750
24,879
34,776
10,845

303,334
21,102
11,939
59,755
31,363
21,197
23,844
12,353
33,009
16,234
25,600
35,720
11,216

314,412
21,819
12,511
62,380
32,532
21,840
24,604
12,943
34,205
16,768
26,489
36,940
11,383

322,920
22,408
12,637
64,444
33,568
22,268
25,232
13,084
34,970
17,283
27,339
38,026
11,660

331,057
22,794
13,425
66,577
34,528
22,281
26.041
13,292
36,040
17,821
27,977
39,110
11,173

347,556
24,004
14,048
69,476
35,844
23,962
27,384
13,947
37,588
18,431
29,386
40,817
12,670

359,912
24,839
14,669
72,686
37,060
24,607
28,558
14,355
38,672
19,056
30,370
41,950
13,090

370,760
25',407
14,842
75,092
38,232
25,228
29,379
14,641
40,049
19,712
31,292
43,446
13,439

43
44
45
46
47

S ou th w e st.............................................

113,729
13,299
6,175
16,123
78,132

115,894
13,653
6,329
16,253
79,658

118,849
13,996
6,497
16,667
81,690

122,619
14,416
6,720
17,179
84,303

125,641
14,807
6,912
17,456
86,466

129,602
15,334
7,124
17,926
89,218

134,568
15,862
7,399
18,653
92,654

139,312
16,466
7,644
19,607
95,594

142,948
17,150
7,831
19,517
98,451

150,598
18,065
8,221
20,689
103,623

156,938
19,043
8,556
21,477
107,862

162,662
19,832
8,790
22,315
111,725

48
49
50
51
52
53

Rocky Mountain ...................................

36,174
17,324
5,139
4,435
6,653
2,623

35,904
17,615
4,266
4,479
6,872
2,671

37,772
17,942
5,494
4,508
7,077
2,751

38,897
18,512
5,558
4,643
7,326
2,859

39,465
18,932
5,357
4,704
7,526
2,946

40,690
19,616
5,432
4,785
7,759
3,099

42,342
20,380
5,667
5,006
8,018
3,271

44,087
21,291
5,889
5,114
8,376
3,416

45,432
21,725
6,077
5,451
8,600
3,579

47,735
22,759
6,390
5,738
9,018
3,830

49,343
23,639
6,574
5,834
9,313
3,983

51,431
24Ì563
6,838
6,231
9,638
4,161

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far West ...............................................

216,266
4,272
160,660
6,476
4,579
15,301
24,978

222,451
4,597
165,120
6,591
4,760
15,743
25,641

228,482
4,715
169,652
6,703
4,900
16,226
26,286

234,464
4,658
174,066
6,851
5,085
16,723
27,081

240,215
4,895
178,226
6,998
5,318
17,131
27,646

246,316
4,758
183,191
7,075
5,508
17,532
28,252

254,030
4,416
189,022
7,224
5,737
18,202
29,429

262,519
4,483
195,136
7,516
6,004
18,926
30,453

272,101
4,665
201,988
7,647
6,350
19,597
31,853

283,495
4,700
210,442
7,856
6,730
20,388
33,380

293,737
4,681
218,130
8,153
7,100
21,019
34,655

303,369
4,793
224,873
8,406
7,416
21,807
36,075

Connecticut .........................................
M aine ..................................................
M assachusetts ...................................
New Hampshire .................................
Rhode Is la n d ......................................
V e rm o n t...............................................
Delaware ............................................
District of C o lu m b ia ............................
Maryland ............................................
New Jersey ........................................
New York ...........................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia ......................................
Illinois ..................................................
Indiana ................................................
Michigan .............................................
O h io .....................................................
W isconsin ...........................................
Io w a ....................................................
Kansas ...............................................
M in n e so ta ...........................................
Missouri ..............................................
N e b ra s k a ............................................
North D a k o ta ......................................
South Dakota .....................................
Alabam a .............................................
Arkansas ............................................
Florida ................................................
Georgia ..............................................
Kentucky ............................................
L o u is ia n a ............................................
M ississippi ..........................................
North C a ro lin a ....................................
South Carolina ...................................
Tennessee .........................................
Virginia ...............................................
West V irg in ia ......................................
Arizona ...............................................
New Mexico .......................................
O k la h o m a ...........................................
Texas .................................................
C o lo ra d o .............................................
Idaho ..................................................
Montana .............................................
U t a h ....................................................
Wyoming ............................................
Alaska ................................................
California ............................................
Hawaii ................................................
N e v a d a ...............................................
Oregon ...............................................
Washington ........................................

See footnotes at the end of the table.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

27

Summary

Table 5.— Quarterly Total Personal Income, States and R egions— Continued
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
1980

1979

1981

1982
Line

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

1,939,738

1,986,579

2,055,292

2,117,639

2,183,920

2,199,279

2,275,955

2,376,870

2,446,743

2,488,601

2,570,837

2,597,855

2,617,905

2,672,954

2,702,714

2,740,251

1

110,931
31,753
7,892
52,150
7,564
7,816
3,756

113,532
32,624
8,082
53,277
7,783
7,930
3,836

117,316
33,739
8,375
54,984
8,048
8,211
3,959

121,125
34,949
8,614
56,756
8,286
8,434
4,086

126,108
36,424
8,963
58,981
8,726
8,777
4,238

127,924
37,023
9,046
59,848
8,856
8,913
4,238

131,981
38,159
9,343
61,818
9,104
9,140
4,417

137,487
39,892
9,712
64,193
9,557
9,504
4,629

140,720
40,904
9,999
65,501
9,753
9,795
4,768

143,652
41,696
10,125
67,038
10,005
9,954
4,834

148,636
43,095
10,395
69,414
10,481
10,272
4,979

150,397
43,372
10,512
70,443
10,695
10,352
5,023

152,139
44,228
10,545
71,132
10,697
10,472
5,064

155,876
45,195
10,854
72,977
10,968
10,689
5,193

159,514
45,993
11,160
74,755
11,318
10,995
5,292

161,086
46,557
11,333
75,470
11,390
11,036
5,301

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

392,181
5,306
7,210
39,193
72,970
164,362
103,140

402,137
5,408
7,360
40,064
74,814
169,265
105,226

415,217
5,576
7,563
41,411
77,244
174,795
108,628

426,502
5,734
7,781
42,601
79,697
179,082
111,606

439,583
6,001
7,710
44,163
82,765
184,234
114,711

446,617
6,024
7,809
44,741
84,274
188,316
115,454

458,302
6,197
8,063
46,105
86,524
193,148
118,264

476,237
6,426
8,320
47,980
90,118
200,596
122,797

487,559
6,545
8,483
49,307
91,886
205,678
125,660

496,833
6,657
8,545
50,228
94,208
209,529
127,665

513,908
6,861
8,784
52,150
97,691
216,804
131,619

520,081
6,885
8.911
52,751
98,804
219,900
132,829

524,536
6,982
9,059
53,080
100,065
221,535
133,817

536,365
7,181
9,243
54,410
102,178
227,083
136,270

544,804
7,279
9,377
55,227
104,058
230,944
137,919

554,431
7,395
9,531
56,384
105,464
236,656
139,000

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

377,062
110,582
45,977
86,509
93,845
40,150

383,130
113,139
46,532
87,322
94,919
41,219

393,613
117,221
47,699
88,762
97,437
42,495

401,980
119,523
48,771
90,046
99,925
43,717

411,631
121,993
49,695
92,345
102,497
45,101

409,847
121,827
49,213
91,128
103,081
44,597

421,053
125,135
50,537
93,840
105,333
46,209

438,549
128,737
53,013
98,596
109,866
48,336

446,753
134,972
54,118
97,963
110,877
48,823

453,321
136,164
54,749
100,158
112,823
49,427

464,241
139,290
56,250
101,655
116,345
50,700

466,326
140,940
56,125
101,775
116,623
50,862

462,894
139,682
55,715
100,260
115,833
51,404

472,412
143,383
56,760
101,953
118,111
52,206

476,192
144,167
57,168
102,355
119,556
52,946

479,409
145,488
57,698
102,961
120,302
52,960

16
17
18
19
20
21

143,592
25,158
20,098
35,131
40,392
12,725
4,974
5,114

147,295
25,367
20,844
36,247
41,353
13,250
5,000
5,232

152,219
26,138
21,669
37,350
42,726
13,640
5,263
5,432

156,600
26,517
22,491
38,663
43,605
13,984
5,703
5,637

158,092
26,981
22,622
39,709
44,298
13,913
5,194
5,374

155,606
26,199
22,595
39,354
44,227
13,599
4,657
4,975

162,443
27,331
23,477
41,223
46,029
14,197
4,888
5,298

169,317
28,500
24,494
42,825
47,731
14,850
5,270
5,647

178,358
30,704
25,629
43,888
49,614
16,171
6,273
6,080

179,712
30,535
25,985
44,313
50,233
16,169
6,348
6,130

184,410
31,182
26,623
45,579
51,714
16,508
6,587
6,217

185,705
31,068
27,018
46,032
52,031
16,588
6,747
6,221

185,733
30,265
27,442
46,571
52,108
16,530
6,626
6,189

190,781
30,889
28,378
47,422
53,495
17,367
6,787
6,444

191,623
31,260
28,189
47,909
53,943
17,022
6,867
6,434

197,051
32,255
28,945
48,949
54,804
17,658
7,735
6,704

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

381,160
26,227
15£55
77,680
39,288
26,118
30,115
15,341
40,647
20,116
32,261
44,501
13,610

389,642
26,628
15,372
80,251
40,246
26,367
30,857
15,663
41,477
20,729
32,656
45,534
13,863

403,364
27,189
15,838
83,756
41,668
27,288
32,317
16,232
42,581
21,417
33,733
47,057
14,287

417,315
28,441
16,273
86,870
43,000
28,025
33,585
16,661
44,038
22,224
34,714
48,827
14,659

432,004
29,095
16,463
92,414
44,013
28,511
34,764
16,824
45,488
22,808
35,788
50,697
15,139

436,220
29,071
16,198
93,674
44,667
28,584
35,449
16,783
45,922
23,127
35,822
51,584
15,339

453,774
30,000
17,060
97,965
46,293
29,825
37,295
17,584
47,551
23,902
37,224
53,437
15,638

474,460
31,351
17,799
103,068
48,355
31,108
39,111
18,219
49,770
24,937
38,637
55,938
16,167

489,811
32,409
18,600
106,788
49,872
32,068
40,367
18,904
51,391
25,691
39,834
57,358
16,531

498,164
32,627
18,974
109,759
50,978
31,980
41,479
19,270
52,279
26,264
40,475
58,266
15,813

517,025
33,627
19,357
114,084
52,783
33,482
43,124
19,742
54,037
27,049
41,646
60,646
17,448

521,573
33,685
19,234
115,632
53,215
33,546
44,001
19,891
54,245
27,388
41,632
61,596
17,508

527,112
33,970
19,398
117,108
54,196
33,989
44,580
20,169
54,578
27,394
41,977
62,110
17,643

538,014
34,701
19,837
119,592
55,579
34,653
45,043
20,493
56,130
27,810
42,818
63,467
17,889

544,115
35,030
19,868
121,840
56,299
34,780
45,295
20,506
56,707
28,175
43,379
64,397
17,839

550,019
35,335
20,240
123,212
57,286
34,651
45,230
20,844
57,098
28,702
43,996
65,678
17,748

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

168,568
20,743
9,043
23,076
115,707

174,036
21,406
9,310
23,864
119,456

181,707
22,510
9,637
24,976
124,584

189,297
23,293
9,949
26,100
129,955

196,282
24,326
10,330
26,990
134,636

199,162
24,725
10,338
27,175
136,923

208,161
25,430
10,822
28,916
142,994

218,232
26,978
11,212
30,236
149,807

228,987
27,505
11,600
31,502
158,379

234,981
28,343
11,867
32,342
162,430

245,071
29,496
12,309
33,752
169,515

251,403
29,867
12,564
34,709
174,263

256,904
29,832
12,810
36,146
178,116

260,961
30,212
13,049
36,722
180,978

261,887
30,232
13,120
36,795
181,740

265,893
30,828
13,416
36,974
184,676

43
44
45
46
47

52,324
25,229
6,836
6,059
9,892
4,308

53,850
26,076
6,976
6,129
10,180
4,489

56,383
27,450
7,253
6,341
10,641
4,699

58,417
28,412
7,529
6,607
10,965
4,903

60,735
29,668
7,846
6,796
11,303
5,121

60,797
29,906
7,609
6,611
11,452
5,219

63,131
31,135
8,004
6,828
11,715
5,450

66,773
32,848
8,539
7,307
12,311
5,768

68,966
34,044
8,691
7,587
12,734
5,910

70,008
34,732
8,727
7,676
12,858
6,017

72,864
36,339
8,855
7,938
13,482
6,249

73,986
37,270
8,756
7,921
13,671
6,368

74,916
38,017
8,815
7,874
13,821
6,390

76,596
38,977
9,028
8,046
14,117
6,428

77,179
39,241
9,074
8,140
14,379
6,345

78,722
40,018
9,270
8,637
14,581
6,215

48
49
50
51
52
53

313,920
4,782
233,213
8,693
7,633
22,387
37,212

322,958
4,854
239,631
8,947
7,871
23,155
38,499

335,474
5,022
248,854
9,236
8,216
24,022
40,124

346,402
5,130
257,274
9,470
8,527
24,771
41,231

359,484
5,289
266,554
10,148
9,022
25,539
42,933

363,106
5,379
270,287
10,126
9,062
25,287
42,965

377,111
5,543
280,470
10,501
9,455
26,157
44,984

395,814
5,955
294,555
10,950
9,908
27,233
47,214

405,591
6,004
302,226
10,951
10,258
27,746
48,406

411,930
6,263
307,059
11,103
10,525
27,815
49,164

424,682
6,564
317,213
11,390
10,864
28,177
50,474

428,385
6,894
320,546
11,527
10,921
28,034
50,463

433,671
6,991
324,997
11,563
11,031
28,021
51,067

441,948
7,385
331,439
11,889
11,132
28,190
51,913

447,401
8,093
335,112
12,108
11,249
28,447
52,390

453,641
8,345
339,827
12,171
11,337
28,806
53,155

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

28

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 5.— Quarterly Total Person al Income, States and R e g io n s— Continued
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

Line

1983

1984

State and region

1985

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

1

United States ................................

2,768,302

2,826,089

2,875,416

2,961,033

3,052,434

3,111,553

3,181,649

3,231,816

3,301,969

3,346,970

3,379,456

3,443,882

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

New England .........................................

164,050
47,375
11,441
76,924
11,673
11,232
5,405

167,759
47,944
11,770
78,908
12,099
11,482
5,556

171,288
48,947
11,981
80,426
12,536
11,714
5,684

177,227
50,672
12,313
83,333
13,044
12,040
5,825

182,626
52,144
12,759
85,857
13,552
12,344
5,971

188,008
53,812
13,084
88,485
13,796
12,703
6,128

193,035
55,382
13,289
90,952
14,176
12,978
6,258

196,622
56,152
13,504
92,798
14,582
13,204
6,382

200,539
57,224
13,924
94,355
15,061
13,431
6,545

203,212
57,832
14,013
95,735
15,414
13,566
6,651

206,096
58,769
14,156
96,935
15,786
13,675
6,775

211,381
60,111
14,582
99,345
16,353
14,058
6,933

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Mideast ..................................................

558,923
7,556
9,571
57,292
107,750
236,497
140,258

570,126
7,614
9,709
58,508
109,649
243,266
141,379

582,067
7,783
9,809
59,946
112,431
247,951
144,147

595,922
8,030
9,949
61,266
116,266
253,915
146,497

613,168
8,138
10,262
63,609
118,557
263,039
149,564

629,817
8,359
10,485
65,304
122,461
270,346
152,861

641,454
8,484
10,699
67,134
125,573
273,537
156,026

649,963
8,632
10,787
68,291
128,216
275,808
158,228

664,456
8,867
11,027
70,110
129,248
284,249
160,955

673,227
9,032
11,061
71,356
131,745
286,625
163,408

681,623
9,096
11,131
72,520
133,457
289,970
165,449

695,506
9,375
11,318
74,188
136,593
295,952
168,082

16
17
18
19
20
21

Great Lakes ..........................................

482,332
146,531
58,427
103,843
120,472
53,058

491,851
148,318
58,971
106,539
123,581
54,443

498,457
148,758
59,405
109,015
125,803
55,476

511,782
152,615
61,152
112,709
128,689
56,616

531,182
159,679
64,427
115,652
132,574
58,850

539,775
162,113
64,978
118,161
135,140
59,383

550,377
164,635
66,200
120,670
138,345
60,527

556,801
166,512
66,886
122,857
139,361
61,186

567,074
169,063
67,784
126,392
141,722
62,113

574,646
171,610
68,917
127,492
143,615
63,012

578,116
172,077
69,110
129^271
144,411
63,247

588,736
174,775
70,143
133,285
146,565
63,967

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Plains .....................................................

194,104
31,269
28,399
48,224
55,765
17,094
6,899
6,454

199,584
32,076
29,129
49,704
56,645
17,938
7,298
6,794

198,559
30,912
29,448
49,829
56,860
17,451
7,522
6,537

207,639
32,166
30,836
51,969
58,625
18,635
8,346
7,062

218,363
35,436
31,291
55,136
61,364
19,846
7,777
7,513

216,501
33,691
31,170
55,442
62,345
18,971
7,566
7,317

221,200
34,145
31,771
56,911
63,670
19,509
7,707
7,486

226,715
34,517
32,943
58,307
64,666
19,954
8,566
7,762

230,321
35,364
33,085
58,910
66,264
20,606
8,331
7.761

235,285
36,926
33,519
60,149
67,406
21,463
7,887
7,934

232,081
34,930
33,604
59,825
68,071
20,127
7,882
7,642

235,833
35,129
34,253
60,700
69,062
20,468
8,428
7,793

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Southeast .............................................

561,185
35,893
20,573
126,937
58,560
34,854
46,058
21,126
58,813
29,190
44,735
66,750
17,696

573,067
36,606
20,978
130,221
60,406
34,889
46,138
21,378
60,169
30,146
45,567
68,643
17,928

585,272
37,274
20,847
135,613
61,952
35,245
46,688
21,100
61,826
30,676
45,909
69,982
18,162

602,208
38,319
21,531
138,861
64,388
36,313
47,673
21,939
63,836
31,634
47,391
71,895
18,428

621,442
39,410
23,158
140,964
67,033
38,008
48,371
23,225
66,199
32,817
49,311
74,209
18,737

634,530
40,186
22,955
144,525
68,897
38,707
49,074
23,080
67,944
33,385
50,599
76,034
19,144

650,200
41,136
23,395
148,670
71,039
39,547
49,875
23,392
69,643
34,071
51,627
78,227
19,578

659,587
41,579
23,779
151,196
72,541
39,792
50,224
23,675
71,037
34,572
52,378
79,493
19,319

675,028
42,732
25,077
155,678
74,383
39,907
51,324
24,509
72,234
35,202
53,271
81,098
19,613

685,815
43,366
24,580
159,906
75,848
40,517
51,261
24,327
73,613
35,712
54,270
82,472
19,943

694,035
43,752
24,709
162,608
77,400
40,693
51,392
24,023
74,703
36,269
54,820
83,619
20,046

706,567
44,555
24,996
165,741
79,221
41,156
51,174
24,977
76,423
37,014
56,059
85,342
19,910

43
44
45
46
47

S outhw est..............................................

267,569
31,611
13,455
36,507
185,996

272,385
32,849
13,804
36,737
188,994

275,752
33,918
14,054
36,777
191,003

285,352
34,972
14,392
37,968
198,021

290,781
36,512
14,630
38,255
201,384

296,584
37,126
14,944
38,683
205,831

303,879
38,214
15,284
38,934
211,446

309,384
38,869
15,487
39,632
215,397

317,129
40,882
16,010
40,041
220,195

319,896
41,588
16,234
40,028
222,045

323,225
42,443
16,345
40,160
224,277

328,475
43,456
16,560
40,527
227,933

48
49
50
51
52
53

Rocky Mountain ...................................

79,139
40,550
9,516
8,320
14,581
6,173

80,673
41,388
9,615
8,429
15,098
6,142

82,636
42,337
9,981
8,677
15,445
6,196

85,215
43,353
10,448
9,171
15,920
6,324

85,481
43,950
10,233
8,803
16,229
6,266

87,260
44,921
10,395
8,889
16,651
6,405

89,030
45,833
10,625
9,070
17,026
6,476

90,637
46,468
10,927
9,533
17,197
6,511

91,233
46,765
10,975
9,334
17,570
6,589

92,013
47,290
10,974
9,170
17,843
6,736

92,378
47,451
10,983
9,122
18,032
6,790

94,016
48,186
11,232
9,416
18,288
6,895

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Far West ................................................

461,000
8,372
345,199
12,805
11,497
29,257
53,871

470,643
8,583
352,673
12,905
11,783
29,886
54,813

481,385
8,902
361,588
13,182
11,942
30,261
55,509

495,687
9,143
371,810
13,575
12,338
31,187
57,632

509,390
9,142
384,241
13,531
12,617
31,820
58,039

519,077
9,053
391,924
13,928
12,945
32,385
58,843

532,473
8,982
402,773
14,132
13,296
33,080
60,210

542,107
9,062
410,463
14,284
13,596
33,680
61,022

556,189
9,501
422,033
14,547
13,987
34,007
62,114

562,877
9,763
426,756
14,767
14,240
34,308
63,044

571,901
9,960
433,814
15,010
14,546
34,583
63,987

583,368
9,996
442,919
15,317
14,861
35,075
65,199

Connecticut .........................................
M aine ..................................................
M assachusetts ...................................
New Hampshire .................................
Rhode Is la n d .......................................
V e rm o n t...............................................
Delaware .............................................
District of C o lu m b ia ............................
Maryland .............................................
New Jersey .........................................
New York ............................................
P e n n sy lv a n ia .......................................
Illinois ..................................................
Indiana ................................................
Michigan .............................................
O h io .....................................................
W is c o n s in ............................................
Io w a .....................................................
Kansas ................................................
M in n e so ta ............................................
Missouri ...............................................
N e b ra s k a .............................................
North Dakota .......................................
South Dakota .....................................
Alabam a .............................................
Arkansas ............................................
Florida .................................................
Georgia ..............................................
Kentucky ............................................
L o u isia n a .............................................
M ississippi ...........................................
North Carolina ....................................
South Carolina ...................................
Tennessee .........................................
Virginia ................................................
West V irg in ia ......................................
Arizona ................................................
New Mexico ........................................
O k la h o m a ............................................
Texas ..................................................
C o lo ra d o ..............................................
Idaho ...................................................
Montana .............................................
Utah ..................................................
Wyoming ............................................
Alaska .................................................
California .............................................
Hawaii .................................................
Nevada ................................................
Oregon ................................................
Washington .........................................

See footnotes at the end of the table.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 5.— Q uarterly Total Person al Income, States and R egio ns— Continued
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
1988

1987

3,569,126

3,601,469

3,637,410

3,701,356

3,746,059

3,799,039

3,910,734

3,955,409

4,024,531

1

221,408
62,846
15,345
103,972
17,386
14,607
7,252

225,808
63,967
15,729
106,194
17,669
14,858
7,391

230,529
65,465
16,040
108,367
18,007
15,135
7,514

233,461
66,591
16,289
109,361
18,240
15,367
7,613

238,085
67,942
16,674
111,376
18,689
15,605
7,800

244,195
69,661
17,075
114,300
19,215
15,994
7,950

251,578
71,665
17,587
117,676
19,938
16,497
8,214

256,943
73,542
17,872
120,374
20,203
16,700
8,253

262,341
74,607
18,258
123,163
20,707
17,139
8,468

2
3
4
5

722,225
9,676
11,443
77,541
141,767
307,838
173,961

734,983
9,851
11,564
79,025
144,403
313,460
176,680

743,067
9,977
11,687
80,433
145,870
317,271
177,829

751,432
10,044
11,937
81,770
148,687
319,721
179,273

765,490
10,285
12,127
83,391
151,146
325,911
182,630

780,415
10,506
12,352
85,083
154,515
332,615
185,343

800,533
10,866
12,690
87,799
159,237
339,966
189,975

810,462
10,902
13,011
89,121
162,398
343,520
191,510

823,243
11,185
13,245
90,206
165,140
349,389
194,078

9

611,815
182,495
73,327
137,998
151,222
66,774

613,513
181,704
73,166
138,467
152,776
67,401

618,873
183,206
73,972
139,870
153,881
67,945

627,708
186,230
75,376
141,551
155,798
68,753

631,318
187,373
75,940
142,479
156,408
69,118

639,072
189,845
76,847
143,178
158,882
70,319

658,397
196,695
79,744
146,407
162,771
72,779

667,664
199,295
81,004
149,246
165,439
72,680

674,255
199,733
81,421
150,719
168,806
73,576

16
17
18
19
20
21

250,743
38,758
35,395
64,381
71,535
23,119
8,836
8,720

244,460
36,853
35,264
63,811
71,995
20,779
7,752
8,006

247,893
36,413
36,148
64,464
72,527
21,076
8,925
8,340

255,319
38,708
36,289
66,917
74,207
21,877
8,622
8,699

252,664
37,236
36,514
66,231
74,586
21,299
8,278
8,520

252,645
36,846
36,334
67,041
75,106
21,174
7,820
8,324

268,589
41,470
37,769
70,260
77,063
24,069
8,689
9,271

268,353
40,821
37,950
70,699
77,529
23,685
8,452
9,216

269,366
39,644
39,069
70,315
78,901
24,380
8,083
8,974

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

734,400
46,193
25,861
173,941
83,068
42,261
51,231
25,446
79,516
38,136
58,682
89,434
20,630

745,641
46,944
26,158
177,143
84,798
42,611
51,000
25,603
81,175
38,584
59,901
90,939
20,785

752,859
47,176
26,358
179,025
86,168
42,691
50,437
25,635
82,164
39,097
60,577
92,712
20,818

768,616
48,234
27,200
183,484
87,718
42,957
50,765
26,946
83,710
40,016
62,236
94,617
20,733

778,810
48,684
26,950
187,020
89,056
43,702
50,342
26,706
85,263
40,795
62,868
96,441
20,983

792,229
49,543
26,967
190,740
90,823
44,506
50,937
26,936
86,853
41,495
63,833
98,463
21,135

815,300
50,905
27,683
196,987
93,650
45,876
52,017
27,584
89,485
42,650
65,827
101,092
21,544

822,966
50,946
27,772
197,604
94,794
45,825
52,813
28,061
90,541
43,654
66,496
102,591
21,867

841,347
52,164
29,109
201,819
96,990
46,675
53,780
28,771
92,440
44,740
67,838
104,923
22,099

30
31
32
33
34
35

329,025
45,931
16,900
40,465
225,729

327,178
46,506
16,944
39,577
224,150

325,992
47,346
16,948
39,887
221,810

336,116
48,761
17,216
40,121
230,019

336,489
49,476
17,422
39,848
229,743

339,645
49,920
17,634
40,057
232,034

346,180
51,549
18,077
40,588
235,967

351,101
51,883
18,234
41,481
239,503

359,293
52,896
18,687
41,904
245,807

43
44
45
46
47

95,712
48,908
11,359
9,924
18,809
6,712

95,235
48,792
11,563
9,576
18,868
6,437

95,835
48,754
11,676
10,193
18,919
6,293

96,856
49,541
11,648
10,140
19,355
6,172

98,126
50,213
11,784
10,028
19,744
6,357

98,617
50,627
11,865
9,960
19,802
6,363

100,593
51,784
12,100
10,082
20,176
6,452

101,543
52,417
12,224
10,030
20,339
6,535

103,889
53,775
12,491
10,165
20,738
6,720

48
49
50
51
52
53

603,798
9,766
458,712
15,841
15,596
36,166
67,717

614,651
9,602
467,422
16,283
15,867
36,614
68,862

622,361
9,472
472,458
16,505
16,134
36,889
70,903

631,848
9,166
481,687
16,619
16,480
37,297
70,599

645,079
9,264
492,314
16,968
16,936
37,854
71,743

652,222
9,341
496,916
17,338
17,446
38,513
72,667

669,564
9,425
510,243
17,804
18,058
39,394
74,640

676,376
9,534
514,868
18,298
18,414
40,074
75,188

690,798
9,708
525,981
18,661
19,034
40,790
76,623

54
55

6
7

8
10

11

12

13
14
15

36

37
38
39
40
41
42

56

57
58
59
60

30

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 5.— Quarterly Total Person al Income, States and R egio ns—

Continued

[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]
Line

1ÏÌ89

State and region

1990

1991

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

United S ta te s ................................

4,288,022

4,342,582

4,376,254

4,457,682

4,571,269

4,630,734

4,680,939

4,738,738

4,775,991

4,819,787

4,849,931

New E n g la n d ........................................

278,446
79,545
19,811
129,524
21,979
18,299
9,287

280,467
80,316
20,042
130,220
22,060
18,423
9,406

281,206
80,761
20,062
130,522
22,028
18,421
9,411

284,263
81,783
20,441
131,600
22,191
18,671
9,577

287,057
82,250
20,820
132,825
22,319
19,019
9,825

289,375
83,306
21,025
133,603
22,472
19,117
9,853

291,659
84,242
21,112
134.653
22,616
19,180
9,856

291,752
84,734
20,966
134,480
22,555
19,166
9,851

294,447
84,223
21,348
136,226
23,124
19,530
9,995

295,634
85Ì046
21,306
136,603
23! 162
19,442
10,074

877,035
12,156
14,161
97,884
175,963
368,721
208,150

890,530
12,332
14,253
99,130
177,960
376,710
210,145

898,477
12,462
14,145
100,131
179,182
379,828
212,729

910,277
12,729
14,349
101,930
181,223
384,110
215,935

929,692
12,838
14,029
104,095
183,775
394,875
220,080

944,206
13,090
14,573
105,468
186,556
400,956
223,563

955,881
13,382
15,279
106,939
188,648
405,101
226,532

960,957
13,462
15,631
107,439
189,687
406,402
228,336

968,745
13,727
15,299
108,595
190,079
408,813
232,233

976,707
13 717
15 ¿ 6 7
109,044
191,613
413,239
233Ì627

G reat L a k e s ..........................................

719,098
213,963
87,643
160,246
178,369
78,876

724,150
216,243
88,000
161,200
179,337
79,369

729,613
218,219
88,015
163,064
180,595
79,720

740,175
221,949
89,251
164,925
182,689
81,360

756,918
227,240
92,213
167,022
186,751
83,692

766,622
229,465
92,636
169,239
190,500
84,782

774,135
231,358
93,986
171,375
191,670
85,746

781,966
235,096
94,826
171,597
193,511
86,934

784,850
234,426
95,484
172,568
194,777
87,594

790,211
2 36703
96,070
174774
194,774
88,291

797,855
238!293
96 951
175729

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

P la in s ....................................................

286,358
43,529
39,880
75,801
82,960
25,273
9,070
9,845

287,599
42,995
40,428
76,657
83,785
25,209
8,723
9,803

287,326
42,470
40,094
77,370
84,476
24,885
8,417
9,615

297,367
44,416
41,810
79,793
86,170
25,737
9,299
10,141

307,021
47,027
42,922
81,331
87,658
27,799
9,459
10,827

307,732
45,823
43,337
82,180
88,714
27,368
9,516
10,794

306,956
45,537
43,312
82,271
89,546
26,837
8,942
10,512

317,863
47,112
45,480
83,771
91,064
27,875
11,143
11,418

317,439
47,664
44,411
83,969
92,445
28,296
9,406
11,247

320,977
47767
45,354
84,912
92742
28 987
9,746
11 ¿ 6 8

320,304

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

S o u th e a st .............................................

899,634
55,183
30,757
220,350
102,655
49,674
55,754
30,624
98,748
48,101
71,812
112,652
23,324

911,596
56,085
30,516
226,518
103,567
50,171
56,132
30,513
99,498
48,459
72,672
114,329
23,137

915,755
56,391
30,493
230,145
104,310
50,698
56,380
30,491
99,403
45,560
73,471
115,161
23,250

937,919
57,503
31,041
235,084
106,204
51,801
57,211
31,058
102,392
49,860
74,754
117,316
23,696

963,653
58,999
32,300
240,335
109,132
53,349
59,113
31,881
106,209
51,644
76,498
119,565
24,626

975,579
60,131
32,325
243,366
110,585
53,940
59,748
32,204
108,085
52,665
77,123
120,580
24,826

988,281
60,595
32,334
246,508
112,529
54,720
60,541
32,473
109,587
53,315
78,366
122,160
25,153

997,618
61,603
32,842
248,209
113,379
55,806
61,510
33,033
109,475
53,794
79,156
123,280
25,531

1,013,669
62,971
33,953
252,259
114,890
56,012
62,968
33,742
110,797
54,567
80,243
125,203
26,062

1,022,878
63769
34! 155
254!215
116,363
56 892
63,519
34 054

43
44
45
46
47

S o u t h w e s t .............................................

377,607
55,659
19,656
43,929
258,363

382,671
56,213
20,039
44,411
262,008

386,164
56,888
20,180
44,693
264,404

394,599
57,825
20,662
45,744
270,367

404,847
58,800
21,089
46,507
278,451

411,506
59,454
21,305
47,064
283,683

417,688
60,277
21,734
47,654
288,023

424,008
60,802
22,280
49,093
291,832

429,784
62,006
22,565
48,719
296,494

435,804
62!609
22,840
49,423
3 0 0 ¿3 2

48
49
50
51
52
53

R o c k y M ountain ...................................

110,359
56,720
13,801
11,120
21,874
6,844

112,645
57,867
14,169
11,245
22,404
6,961

113,414
58,487
14,227
11,072
22,623
7,005

116,698
59,733
14,768
11,828
23,180
7,189

118,230
60,569
15,140
11,502
23,585
7,434

120,338
61,658
15,415
11,578
24,080
7,607

121,447
62,407
15,370
11,440
24,546
7,685

125,658
64,016
16,004
12,639
25,068
7,930

126,867
65,019
15,943
12,266
25,421
8,218

129,373
6 6 J58
16,389
12,568
25,908
8,348

54
55

Far W e st ...............................................

739,486
10,193
561.755
20,223
21,112
43,858
82,345

752,926
10,782
569,564
20,723
21,762
45,139
84,955

764,298
11,092
577,238
21,180
22,236
45,753
86,799

776,384
10,897
584,462
21,701
23,014
47,057
89,253

803,852
11,244
606,796
22,346
23,844
47,931
91,691

815,376
11,532
614,023
22,995
24,364
48,920
93,542

824,892
11,616
620,174
23,576
25,049
49,421
95,056

838,916
11,807
629,722
24,149
25,472
50,374
97,392

840,191
12,071
628,045
24,117
26,232
50,916
98,811

848,204
12174
633!473
24,282
26,561
51,531
100 J8 2

2
3
4
5

6
7

8
9

M id e ast .................................................

10

11
12
13
14

District of C o lu m b ia ............................

15

16
17
18
19
20
21

56

57
58
59
60 1
3
2

L o u is ia n a ............................................

1. The third-quarter 1992 estimates of personal income reflect the losses resulting from damage
caused by Hurricane Andrew in Florida and Louisiana and by Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii.
2. The third-quarter 1993 estimates of personal income reflect the losses resulting from damage
caused by floods in Illinois. Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South
Dakota, and W isconsin and by drought in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
3. The first-quarter 1994 estimates of personal income reflect the losses resulting from damaqe
caused by the Northridge Earthquake in California.

54,723
81 !009
125,741
26!204

84 ¿ 2 3
2 3 ’150
10,133

109 265
192 843
234!854

89! 133

11,243

255 447

26!453
438,896
22 955
303722
130,151
66!663
12!519
26 185
8¿8 2
855,312
637 658
26,931
101 ¿ 1 0

4,917,364
298,544
85,960
21,626
137,634
23,437
19,641
10,245
991,713
14,055
15,737
110,484
194,831
418,729
237,877
809,353
241,210
98,899
178,304
200,407
90,534
329,328
48,334
47,054
87,131
94,954
28,973
10,958
11,923
1,044,606
64,829
34,858
257,600
118,956
58,702
65,192
34,939
115.636
55,864
83,512
127,695
26,822
447,169
63,686
23,358
50,827
309,298
134,239
68,305
17,076
13,659
26.636
8,563
862,412
12,524
640,410
25,084
27,298
53,138
103,958

N o t e .— The personal income level shown for the United States is derived as the sum of the
State estimates; it differs from the national income and product accounts (NIPA) estimate of per­
sonal income because, by definition, it omits the earnings of Federal civilian and military person­
nel stationed abroad and of U.S. residents employed abroad temporarily by private U.S. firms.
It can also differ from the NIPA estimate because of different data sources and revision sched­
ules.

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

31

Table 5.— Quarterly Total P e rso n al Income, States and R egions— Continued
[Millions of dollars, seasonally adjusted at annual rates]

II

I

19$)4

1993

1992
III1

IV

II

I

III2

IV

I3

II

5,012,145

5,082,874

5,127,992

5,317,236

5,239,451

5,348,392

5,381,287

5,469,226

5,540,239

5,644,488

1

302,122
86,712
22^002
139,432
23,722
19,805
10,449

305,149
87,941
22,288
140,268
23,966
20,027
10,659

307,545
89,098
22,553
140,683
24,150
20,264
10,798

318,414
92,420
22,998
145,930
25,079
20,927
11,061

310,790
89,395
22,801
142,731
24,321
20,614
10,927

318,469
91,619
23,176
146,626
24,815
21,094
11,138

323,148
92,485
23,452
149,144
25,261
21,481
11,325

325,141
93,000
23,653
150,090
25,392
21,625
11,381

331,266
95,422
24,009
152,425
26,011
21,865
11,534

336,624
96,856
24,373
155,117
26,294
22,309
11,675

2
3
4
5
6
7
8

1,009,427
14,178
16,251
111,600
198,759
426,693
241,946

1,020,466
14,427
16,406
112,752
201,461
430,612
244,809

1,032,607
14,644
16,655
114,439
204,223
435,453
247,193

1,071,692
15,067
16,965
117,509
211,922
455,717
254,512

1,038,870
14,935
16,982
116,421
205,437
435,220
249,875

1,069,695
15,254
17,142
118,499
211,087
452,253
255,459

1,078,163
15,295
17,361
119,362
212,387
455,758
258,000

1,087,416
15,398
17,550
120,755
213,577
459,785
260,352

1,100,857
15,927
17,752
122,808
215,765
465,694
262,910

1,119,390
16,285
18,015
124,893
219,876
472,825
267,496

9
10
11
12
13
14
T5

824,059
246'259
100,975
180,270
203^895
92,660

838,889
250,231
102,954
184,675
206,740
94,288

847,231
253,212
104,441
185,512
208,403
95,663

876,296
262,051
107,718
192,204
215,199
99,123

867,308
259,254
107,287
189,904
213,056
97,807

882,369
262,946
108,955
194,399
216,662
99,407

888,056
264,005
109,682
195,725
218,599
100,045

903,451
268,157
111,937
198.719
222,455
102,183

922,549
272,550
113,911
205,777
226,457
103,853

935,783
276,988
115,732
208,919
228,732
105,411

16
17
18
19
20
21

336,244
50^464
47,181
89,367
96,459
30,348
10,391
12,034

338,668
50,188
47,769
90,048
97,525
30,460
10,612
12,066

341,915
50,689
47,870
91,684
98,355
30,551
10,589
12,178

356,409
52,471
50,543
95,517
101,426
31,739
11,845
12,868

352,779
52,881
49,460
94,048
100,802
32,019
10,651
12,919

354,716
51,433
50,324
94,929
102,512
31,834
10,921
12,763

346,145
49,026
49,354
93,600
100,950
30,887
10,056
12,272

364,984
52,916
52,043
97,189
105,212
32,276
11,861
13.487

369,182
54,159
51,749
99,343
106,362
32,634
11,231
13,704

373,136
54,234
52,607
99,553
108,344
33,357
11,408
13,632

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

1,067,403
66^505
36,496
261,522
121,499
60,152
66,591
36,040
118^469
56,830
85,844
130,032
27,423

1,083,626
67,382
37,135
265,125
123,713
61,073
67,548
36,447
120,264
57,648
87,561
131,965
27,764

1,084,902
68,619
37,083
255,442
125,420
61,871
67,438
36,723
122,653
58,529
88,766
134,110
28,249

1,134,495
70,509
38,536
279,582
129,833
63,695
69,747
37,765
126,136
60,039
92,042
137,703
28,908

1,127,421
70,191
38,314
275,709
128,691
62,659
70,050
38,129
126,167
59,987
91,368
137,318
28,838

1,150,821
71,206
38,708
282,490
132,731
64,011
71,170
38,509
129,079
61,033
93,072
139,428
29,383

1,162,732
71,962
38,435
286,296
133,730
64,600
71,572
38,942
130,727
61,737
94,525
140,701
29,506

1,179,124
73,121
39,646
288,691
136,176
65,680
72,215
39,895
133,185
62,185
96,610
141,879
29,841

1,203,041
74,327
40,462
292,767
139,048
66,394
75,595
41,363
136,816
63,524
98,086
144,094
30,565

1,224,528
75,269
40,728
299,154
141,408
67,756
77,078
41,946
139,474
64,309
99,568
146,904
30,933

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

457,280
65,172
23,902
51,473
316,733

465,200
66,220
24,295
52,288
322,397

471,381
67,159
24,728
52,936
326,558

488,490
69,456
25,273
54,529
339,231

485,647
69,060
25,679
53,998
336,910

495,959
70,950
26,172
54,830
344,008

499,501
72,028
26,601
55,025
345,848

509,990
73,230
27,154
56,337
353,269

518,961
75,277
27,815
56,654
359,216

526,993
76,650
28,376
57,522
364,445

43
44
45
46
47

134,908
68Ì995
17,137
12,960
27,262
8,554

137,537
70,436
17,501
13,242
27,663
8,695

139,796
71,639
17,830
13,299
28,264
8,763

145,300
74,098
18,633
14,376
29,124
9,068

145,621
74,396
18,663
14,219
29,205
9,137

148,718
76,026
19,130
14,521
29,805
9,235

149,978
76,981
19,225
14,274
30,225
9,273

154,727
78,919
20,096
15,453
30,804
9,455

157,012
80,018
20,347
15,230
31,711
9,705

159,485
81,182
20,658
15,402
32,372
9,871

48
49
50
51
52
53

880,702
12,782
653,864
25,873
28J0 9
53^934
106,141

893,339
12,925
662,941
26,164
28,646
54,793
107,872

902,615
13,136
669,522
24,586
29,374
56,125
109,872

926,141
13,455
682,946
27,024
30,711
57,609
114,395

911,015
13,570
670,483
27,152
30,636
57,738
111,436

927,644
13,752
682,488
27,446
31,328
58,575
114,055

933,564
13,800
686,299
27,453
31,851
59,205
114,956

944,393
14,019
692,739
27,505
32,557
60,330
117,242

937,371
14,345
681,803
28,124
33,685
61,652
117,760

968,549
14,477
708,555
28,462
34,495
62,827
119,733

54
55
56
57
58
59
60

32

Summary

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
Table 6.— C o n trib u tion s to U.S. Earn in gs and TPI by Industry, Type of Payment, and Region
United States

Line

Percent of U.S. total

Millions of dollars
1948

1993

Percent
1948

Far West
1993

1948

Great Lakes

1993

1948

1993

Earnings by place of work
1
2
3
4
5
6

Total earnings by place of work ................................................................
W ages and salaries ............................................................................
Other labor income .......................................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 1 ...........................................................
Farm .....................................................................................
N o n fa rm ...........................................................................

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Earnings by industry:
F a r m ........................................................................................
Ag. services, forestry, fisheries, and other1
2 .............................................
M in in g ...............................................................
Construction ........................................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s...............................................
W holesale and retail t r a d e ........................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..................................................
Services ......................................................................
Government and government enterprises ......................................
Federal, civilian ...............................................................
Federal, m ilita ry ...............................................................
State and local ...........................................................

20
21
22

Less: Personal contributions for social in su ra n ce .............................
Plus: Adjustment for residence .............................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence ..................................................

177,189

16.65

134,067
2,715
40,407
17,435
22,972

3,072,264
354,994
438,148
33,858
404,290

’656

24Ì568

75.66
1.53
22.80
9.84
12.96

14,604
34,208
6,372

296,538

17*658

631,398

9.97

2,161
-2 4
175,004

260,682
-8 2 8
3,603,896

98.77

3,603,896

84.32

912,331
872,705
439,955
297,921

5.33

79.48
9.18
11.34
10.46

11.28
9.94
11.43
6.98
14.80

.91

5.05

17.16
16.81
21.65
18.05
21.95

23.99
25.78
20.06
20.67
19.59

16.99
18.18
12.98
8.22
13.38

21.60

19.46
13.24
11.73
20.79
31.62
21.27
21.57
19.27
19.93
16.78
13.26
9.79
21.54

9.46
11.99
6.55
16.47
24.59
15.33
16.54

21.20

17.71

23.13

16.63

11.94

8.24
17.71

...... .

14.70
13.96
10.41
5.34
15.91

Income by place of residence
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59

Total personal income .......................................................

207,545

Net earnings by place of re sid e n c e ..................................................
Dividends, interest, and rent3 .........................................................
Transfer payments ......................................................................
Government payments to ind ivid ua ls..............................
Retirement, disability and health insurance benefit p a ym e n ts.....................................
Old age. survivors, and disability insurance payments ...........................
Railroad retirement and disability payments ......................................

175,004
21,473

Military retirement p a y m e n ts............... .".....................................
State and local government employee retirement payments ...................................
W orkers’ compensation payments (Federal and State) ...........................................
Other government disability insurance and retirement paym ents4 ..........................
Medical p aym ents5 .................................................
Income maintenance benefit p a ym e n ts........................................
Supplemental security income payments ................................
Aid to families with dépendent children .....................................................................

226
300
119
28

10,247
1,696
552
251

Other income maintenance6 ............................................
State unemployment insurance com p e nsa tion.............................................. *"**” " ”
Unemployment compensation for federal civilian employees ...................
Unemployment compensation for railroad em ployees .............................................
Unemployment compensation for veterans ...............................................................
Other unemployment com pensation7 .......................................................................[
Veterans pensions and compensation p a y m e n ts ........................
Educational assistance to veterans, dependents, and survivors8 ...........................
Veterans life insurance benefit p a ym e n ts.....................................
Other assistance to veterans9 ..........................................
Federal educ. and training assistance payments (excl. veterans)1 0 ...........................
Other payments to individuals11..................................
Payments to nonprofit institutions .........................................
Federal government p a ym e n ts............................................
State and local government paym ents12 ......................................................................
Business p a ym e n ts..........................................................
Business payments to individuals11.......................................

1. Includes the inventory valuation and capital consumption adjustments.
2. "Other” consists of the w ages and salaries of U.S. residents employed by international orga­
nizations and foreign em bassies and consulates in the United States.
3. Includes the capital consumption adjustment for rental income of persons.
4. Includes temporary disability payments, Panam a Canal construction annuity payments, and
black lung payments.
5. Consists of M edicare payments, medical vendor payments, and C H A M P U S payments.
6. Includes general assistance, emergency assistance, refugee assistance, foster home care
ments, earned income tax credits, and energy assistance.
. Consists of trade readjustment allowance benefits, redwood park benefit payments, public
service employment benefit payments, and transitional benefit payments.
8. Includes veterans' readjustment benefit payments and educational assistance to spouses and
children of disabled or deceased veterans.
9. Includes payments to paraplegics, payments for autos and other conveyances for disabled

1,271
790
60
421
2,541
1,739
358
881
1
619
329
51
239
202

.82

26,344
56,596
11,282
4,250
282,684

.14
.06
.01

24,673
23,948
22,213
15,787
34,609
33,301
428
70
735
75
19,364

.61
.38

*802

.04

* 44
8,256

.03
.20

22.79

16.52

67.24
15.74
17.02
16.28
8.21

11.26
12.21
11.89
12.04
15.85

17.68
16.86
16.42
16.42
15.84

23.13
21.20
20.34
20.32
19.91

16.63
16.13
16.43
16.38
16.75

.49
1.06
.21
.08
5.27

25.35
12.48
29.35
79.16

15.93
20.21
20.56
31.65
47.72
14.70

13.58
9.65
22.82
25.66
.88
........

.46
.45
.41
.29
.65
.62
.01

0
.30

1 1 J03

.02

6.01
18.63
20.75
6.64

.01

10.74
12.41

.36

8.47

23.66
31.28
13.69
18.33
23.41
23.63
21.72
6.80
18.01
4.17
13.45

.01

7.45

20.52

16.41

7.04

.15
.02
.43
.11
.21

3.55
9.40
5.00
9.67
10.22
4.81
9.95

21.92
14.78
69.69
15.72
16.48
15.49
15.41

45.52
20.60
1.00
19.36
19.24
10.36
21.44
24.56

9.82
16.52
4.55
17.56
16.76
18.45
16.69
17.15

0

18.33
22.06

0

22 >84

19.35

14.72
14.87
14.94
14.40
22.11

16.54
16.37
12.66
15.79
15.84
10.05
27.27
15.13
21.48
12.09

veterans, veterans’ aid and veterans’ bonuses.
10. Includes federal fellowship payments (National Science Foundation fellowships and traineeships, subsistence payments to State maritime academy cadets, and other federal fellowships),
interest subsidy on higher education loans, basic educational opportunity grants, and Job Corps
payments.
11. Includes Bureau of Indian Affairs payments, education exchange payments, Alaska Perm a­
nent Fund dividend payments, compensation of survivors of public safety officers, compensation
of victims of crime, and other special payments to individuals.
12. Consists of State and local government payments for foster home care supervised by pri­
vate agencies, State and local government educational assistance payments to nonprofit institu­
tions, and other State and local government payments to nonprofit institutions.
13. Includes personal injury payments to individuals other than employees and other business
transfer payments.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

33

Summary

Table 6.— Contributions to U.S. Earnings and TPI by Industry, Type of Payment, and Region— Continued
Percent of U.S. total
New England

Mideast
1948

1993

1993

1948

Rocky Mountain

Plains
1948

1993

1948

Southeast

1993

1948

Southwest
1993

1948

Line
1993

25.63

19.86

6.40

5.88

9.59

6.65

2.23

2.88

15.47

20.90

6.27

9.55

1

28.62
29.44
15.43
5.36
23.08

20.12
18.91
18.78
4.26
20.00

7.12
7.32
3.93
1.65
5.65

5.95
6.00
5.34
1.76
5.64

7.16
6.70
17.86
28.55
9.75

6.60
6.75
6.93
14.29
6.31

1.92
1.73
3.27
4.28
2.50

2.82
2.71
3.49
8.18
3.10

14.21
13.73
19.76
24.30
16.32

21.12
21.02
19.25
28.96
18.44

5.69
5.36
8.27
8.21
8.31

9.25
9.62
11.57
16.27
11.18

2
3
4
5
6

6.06
17.37
20.57
22.52
30.72
28.25
26.12
33.98
29.61
26.48
31.17
19.50
25.79

5.12
13.22
4.50
16.86
16.44
19.06
17.96
30.06
22.17
20.35
26.09
9.16
19.95

2.05
10.39
.28
5.87
9.30
4.92
6.20
7.16
6.58
5.82
4.73
5.46
6.66

1.94
4.99
.51
5.10
6.48
4.48
5.85
7.14
6.69
4.74
4.02
2.87
5.14

26.38
6.84
4.96
8.43
5.26
9.76
9.46
7.64
7.47
7.41
6.95
4.37
8.77

13.41
7.35
4.29
6.61
7.09
7.68
7.25
6.03
5.83
6.42
5.64
5.18
6.78

4.49
.84
5.16
2.46
.86
2.80
2.27
1.70
2.01
2.65
3.23
2.11
2.45

7.26
3.17
9.15
3.47
2.10
3.53
2.88
2.33
2.70
3.21
3.91
3.84
2.94

23.63
23.24
29.97
15.58
11.61
14.82
14.35
11.80
14.07
18.99
19.23
29.92
15.05

26.86
21.60
22.07
22.38
20.88
22.17
21.89
16.43
19.26
23.28
24.26
38.26
21.37

9.26
5.16
22.28
8.61
2.72
6.74
6.67
5.35
6.25
7.31
7.32
9.56
6.52

14.34
9.65
40.98
9.90
7.66
11.59
9.93
7.70
9.03
9.97
9.75
11.84
9.83

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

27.72

21.49

6.64

5.97

7.31

6.91

2.20

2.82

15.70

19.61

5.52

8.68

25.52

19.48

6.42

5.98

9.61

6.56

2.23

2.89

15.56

21.15

6.28

9.62

20
21
22

25.62

19.94

6.58

5.96

9.56

6.62

2.26

2.79

15.47

21.55

6.33

9.29

23

25.52
26.87
24.89
24.63
29.73
29.71
24.76
31.87
17.71
45.84
25.10
2.16

19.48
20.86
20.89
20.85
19.15
18.97
17.46
20.42
8.03
24.74
18.16
21.36
23.82
19.75
17.70
21.26
16.89
24.70
25.67
25.87
26.49
19.28
16.02
33.34
14.36
13.98
7.13
20.74
12.15
18.72
4.10
22.97
17.26
28.91
17.39
20.09

6.42
7.81
6.84
6.90
7.50
10.21
4.09
6.76
8.40
7.05
1.05
15.46

5.98
6.18
5.67
5.69
5.25
5.58
2.60
4.24
3.18
6.13
2.76
3.13
6.46
4.78
4.46
6.71
3.35
4.36
7.70
7.84
4.84
2.29
3.67
6.09
5.66
5.67
3.18
6.68
2.57
4.64
1.02
4.57
5.15
4.85
3.47
6.18

9.61
9.97
8.04
8.07
6.30
6.59
12.48
7.97
4.08
3.48
1.52
.22

6.56
7.08
6.43
6.41
6.73
7.53
12.72
5.91
4.62
4.28
3.31
1.25
6.54
4.81
4.23
4.77
5.22
5.20
4.63
4.61
4.01
11.58
4.80
5.74
6.86
6.83
5.81
7.56
4.88
8.27
4.76
6.91
7.02
6.54
7.52
6.55

2.23
2.32
2.55
2.57
2.35
1.76
3.14
2.55
3.48
1.13
4.56
.05

2.89
2.74
2.44
2.42
2.86
2.50
4.67
4.16
4.29
2.45
6.52
.92
1.88
1.84
1.74
1.52
2.08
2.13
1.89
1.83
4.59
3.80
2.84
2.39
3.07
3.02
4.34
3.06
1.71
4.01
2.04
3.18
3.03
2.26
5.05
2.76

15.56
13.32
18.19
18.18
13.98
13.02
17.73
18.45
23.18
5.55
8.91
1.75

21.15
21.84
22.86
22.97
24.26
24.72
24.52
28.67
38.13
15.61
11.36
17.65
21.74
22.41
26.23
13.04
28.13
22.60
13.94
13.61
17.97
20.49
25.59
14.79
31.65
32.25
37.89
23.73
32.73
22.68
5.09
20.32
23.92
16.48
24.02
20.31

6.28
6.29
7.27
7.29
4.38
3.77
5.30
5.46
8.16
1.66
3.85
.30

9.62
8.32
8.87
8.86
9.16
8.96
8.66
10.79
15.52
7.61
5.48
1.33
8.27
8.99
7.58
4.87
14.26
10.02
6.97
6.76
10.32
8.49
13.96
12.00
12.86
13.24
14.09
9.04
14.23
10.39
8.74
8.77
10.39
7.03
10.46
9.39

24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59

18.56

32.93
36.55
22.36
27.65
23.09
21.86
18.85
22.42
35.26
22.60
2.30
27.65
23.45
62.63
25.97
29.40

7.36

9.94
11.23
3.59
8.44
5.87
7.05
5.57
6.76
2.68
6.30
0
5.77
6.78
5.51
4.43
7.27

11.19

5.02
3.42
13.37
6.84
8.31
9.08
9.57
9.96
2.94
9.40
23.40
7.83
8.84
4.15
7.22
7.46

4.33

1.44
.92
5.14
1.88
2.34
2.54
2.80
2.66
.74
2.30
2.00
2.38
2.87
1.05
1.99
1.84

14.48

14.21
9.34
21.62
22.30
21.57
21.73
28.92
19.91
7.29
21.90
.70
19.86
19.66
9.23
22.41
13.23

9.87

3.41
1.61
8.23
6.10
8.24
8.92
10.42
8.14
2.03
7.50
65.60
7.47
8.93
2.25
6.59
5.51

£

United States

United States
Percent of Earnings by Industry
Selected Years, 1972-93
30%

------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Farm

Ag.Serv. Mining

Constr.

Manu.

TPU*

Trade

FIRE** Services

■ 1972 B 1 9 7 7 B 1982 111987 0 1 9 9 3
* Transportation and public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate

Gov't

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

United States

35

P erson al Incom e by M ajor S o u rce and Earn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the United S ta te s 2 3, 1929-57
[Millions of dollars]
1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

84,069
76,670
7,399

75,227
69,743
5,484

64,349
60,038
4,311

49,028
46,298
2,730

45,939
42,826
3,113

52,755
49,203
3,552

59,426
53,421
6,005

67,696
62,538
5,158

73,081

66,101

67,332
61,985
5,347

71,760
66,408
5,352

77,217
71,796
5,421

94,625
87,006
7,619

121,184
109,454
11,730

147,574
133,569
14,005

121,769 123,075 124,038 124,839 125,580 126,372 127,251 128,054 128,822 129,824 130,884 131,955 133,417
690
611
519
417
467
529
567
519
548
585
709
393
366

134,670
900

134,697
1,096

1943

Income by Place of Residence
Total personal Income ..................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e .............................
Farm incom e4 ................................................
Population (thousands)5 ........................
Per capita personal Income (dollars)6

6,980

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 ......................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ...........................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re s id e n c e .........
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ......................
Plus: Transfer payments .......................................

65,424
138
n.a.
65,286
17,466
1,317

57,984
143
n.a.
57,841
16,025
1,361

48,256
147
n.a.
48,109
13,742
2,498

36,155
148
n.a.
36,007
11,104
1,917

34,825
148
n.a.
34,677
9,378
1,884

41,314
153
n.a.
41,161
9,619
1,975

47,475
158
n.a.
47,317
9,894
2,215

53,067
176
n.a.
52,891
11,455
3,350

59,430
562
n.a.
58,868
11,949
2,264

54,392
550
n.a.
53,842
10,786
2,704

57,909
592
n.a.
57,317
11,614
2,829

62,966
655
n.a.
62,311
11,912
2,994

79,558
796
n.a.
78,762
12,898
2,965

105,781
1,136
n.a.
104,645
13,530
3,009

132,380
1,782
n.a.
130,598
14,132
2,844

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ..
Other labor income ...
Proprietors’ inco m e10
Farm .....................
Nonfarm 10 ............

50,356
527
14,541
6,095
8,446

46,110
515
11,359
4,303
7,056

39,053
473
8,730
3,393
5,337

30,413
414
5,328
2,058
3,270

28,935
378
5,512
2,493
3,019

33,639
412
7,263
2,870
4,393

36,614
441
10,420
5,227
5,193

41,832
530
10,705
4,286
6,419

46,017
548
12,865
5,988
6,877

42,886
547
10,959
4,364
6,595

45,848
569
11,492
4,360
7,132

49,694
626
12,646
4,388
8,258

61,757
706
17,095
6,366
10,729

80,991
857
23,933
10,093
13,840

102,477
1,080
28,823
11,972
16,851

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Nonfarm .............................................................................
Private ............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o the r11 .
Mining .........................................................................
C o n stru ction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s...............................
W holesale and retail t ra d e ..........................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Services ......................................................................
Government and government en te rp rise s.....................
Federal, c iv ilia n ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and local ............................................................

7,399
58,025
53,147
178
1,601
3,606
16,798
6,577
12,216
3,785
8,386
4,878
1,068
249
3,561

5,484
52,500
47,404
177
1,387
3,018
14,312
6,128
10,885
3,339
8,158
5,096
1,104
253
3,739

4,311
43,945
38,744
166
999
2,134
11,088
5,250
9,087
2,889
7,131
5,201
1,114
248
3,839

2,730
33,425
28,513
131
711
1,083
7,834
4,109
6,644
2,412
5,589
4,912
1,045

3,113
31,712
26,620
109
705
786
8.092
3,744
6,300
2,215
4,669
5.092
1,306
216
3,570

3,552
37,762
31,739
113
955
1,067
9,981
4,093
7,800
2,301
5,429
6,023
1,887
217
3,919

6,005
41,470
35,029
135

5,158
47,909
40,113
132
1,210
1,915
12,961
4,872
9,856
2,682
6,485
7,796
3,779
272
3,745

6,980
52,450
45,020
175
1,407
1,979
15,108
5,323
11,065
2,866
7,097
7,430
3,196
291
3,943

5,347
49,045
40,887
160
1,178
1,897
12,300
4,941
10,752
2,763
6,896
8,158
3,684
300
4,174

5,352
52,557
44,423
162

5,421
57,545
49,216
170
1,374
2,419
16,313
5,564
12,834
2,947
7,595
8,329
3,472
485
4,372

7,619
71,939
62,046
191
1,653
3,834
22,887
6,403
15,725
3,123
8,230
9,893
3,785
1,608
4.500

11,730
94,051
79,135
253
1,914
5,924
32,649
7,600
17,920
3,303
9,572
14,916
5,159
5,172
4,585

14,005
118,375
94,838
283
2,173
5,088
43,209
8,894
20,643
3,568
10,980
23,537
7,562
11,177
4,798

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

Total personal Income ........................................................
Nonfarm personal incom e..................................................
Farm income4 ....................................................................

158,905
144,772
14,133

163,477
148,814
14,663

175,512
158,165
17,347

188,679
170,800
17,879

207,545
187,111
20,434

204,636
189,176
15,460

227,314
210,884
16,429

255,280
236,280
19,001

272,203
254,260
17,943

288,934
273,301
15,633

291,749
276,779
14,970

313,152
299,289
13,862

336,407
322,741
13,666

355,342
341,625
13,716

Population (thousands)3 ........................................................
Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .............................

134,075
1,185

133,387
1,226

140,638
1,248

143,665
1,313

146,091
1,421

148,666
1,376

151,871
1,497

153,970
1,658

156,369
1,741

158,946
1,818

161,881
1,802

165,058
1,897

168,078
2,001

171,178
2,076

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 ..................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.....................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
Plus: Transfer payments ....................................................

142,674
1,885
n.a.
140,789
14,610
3,506

143,837
1,917
n.a.
141,920
15,464
6,093

148,111
1,894
n.a.
146,217
18,083
11,212

159,466
2,068
n.a.
157,398
19,715
11,566

177,189
2,161
-2 4
175,004
21,473
11,068

172,094
2,214
-5 5
169,825
22,663
12,148

189,024 218,886
3,448
2,898
-4 0
-1 0 9
186,086 215,329
26,264
27,612
14,964
12,339

233,757
3,801
-1 2 8
229,828
29,336
13,039

246,723
3,994
-135
242,595
32,314
14,025

245,517 263,196
4,633
5,251
-190
-2 0 5
240,693 257,740
34,982
38,017
16,073
17,395

282,845
5,837
-220
276,788
41,040
18,579

296,684
6,714
-219
289,751
44,119
21,472

Earnings by type:7
Wages ana salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ income10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm10.......................................................................

111,102
1,525
30,047
11,924
18,123

110,539
1,794
31,504
12,356
19,148

109,778
1,957
36,376
14,805
21,571

121,530
2,378
35,558
15,084
20,474

134,067
2,715
40,407
17,435
22,972

133,332
2,938
35,824
12,644
23,180

146,497
3,671
38,856
13,546
25,310

170,094
4,644
44,148
16,013
28,135

183,996
5,208
44,553
15,018
29,535

197,421
5,901
43,402
12,831
30,571

195,821
6,142
43,553
12,311
31,242

227,719
8,081
47,044
11,020
36,024

238,569
9,075
49,039
10,977
38,062

Earnings by industry:7
F a rm ...................................................................................
Nonfarm..............................................................................
Private.............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other11 .
M ining..........................................................................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Transportation and public utilities ..............................
Wholesale and retail tra d e ..........................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ...........................
Services ......................................................................
Government and government enterprises.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilitary.........................................................................
State and local ............................................................

14,133
128,541
101,382
334
2,388
3,947
45,847
10,435
22,265
3,816
12,350
27,159
7,753
14,339
5,067

14,663
129,174
101,147
364
2,331
4,113
41,443
10,844
24,456
4,284
13,312
28,027
7,503
15,019
5,505

17,347
130,764
112,290
411
2,571
6,108
39,507
12,235
30,985
5,197
15,276
18,474
6,351
5,773
6,350

17,879
141,587
125,534
442
3,251
7,949
45,156
13,313
33,006
5,571
16,846
16,053
5,581
2,925
7,547

20,434
156,755
139,097
656
3,923
9,983
50,249
14,604
34,208
6,372
19,102
17,658
5,822
3,043
8,793

15,460
156,634
137,196
700
3,420
9,950
47,724
14,551
34,078
6,866
19,907
19,438
6,365
3,354
9,719

16,429
172,595
151,047
754
3,724
11,411
54,396
15,356
36,426
7,877
21,103
21,548
6,862
4,236
10,449

13,862
13,666
13,716
19,001
17,943
15,633
14,970
199,886 215,814 231,091 230,547 249,334 269,179 282,968
172,674 184,701 198,897 197,674 214,820 232,351 244,014
1,054
944
973
1,056
1,103
1,119
858
4,407
5,135
4,217
4,261
4,409
4,057
4,973
15,429
15,416
16,590
18,276
18,975
13,690
14,870
77,014
80,271
69,497
73,240
86,622
90,111
64,336
22,454
23,654
17,470
18,707
19,835
19,625
20,778
53,654
51,234
40,304
41,999
44,052
44,972
47,790
14,467
10,239
11,255
12,556
13,518
8,601
9,388
28,054
34,171
31,370
36,900
23,199
25,035
26,946
34,514
32,194
27,211
31,113
32,873
36,828
38,953
9,597
10,807
11,200
9,930
9,895
10,230
8,786
8,308
8,181
8,283
8,228
6,990
8,555
8,578
13,721
14,968
16,103
17,738
19,526
11,435
12,628

1,022

1,271
11,250
4,373
8,693
2,439
5,846
6,441
1,978
248
4,215

1,222

2,190
14,171
5,229
11,517
2,839
7,093
8,134
3,569
327
4,238

Income by Place of Residence

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

210,663
7,052
45,480
11,225
34,255

United States

36

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

P erson al Income by M ajor S o u rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the United S ta te s 3, 1958-93
[Millions of dollars]
Line

1958

1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Income by Place of Residence
1
2
3

Total personal Income ....
Nonfarm personal income
Farm incom e4 ................ .

365,559
349,832
15,726

389,815
376,178
13,636

406,318
392,061
14,257

423,568
408,522
15,046

450,268
435,124
15,144

473,128
458,006
15,120

507,079
493,071
14,008

549,017
532,614
16,403

596,917
579,402
17,515

640,971
624,80C
16,171

703,575
687,267
16,308

767,608
749,444
18,164

4
5

Population (thousands)5 ............................................
Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .................

174,143
2,099

177,124
2,201

179,954
2,258

182,960
2,315

185,708
2,425

188,423
2,511

191,063
2,654

193,451
2,838

195,486
3,054

197,360
3,248

199,297
3,530

201,298
3,813

6

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .............................
Less: Personal contributions for social insuran ce8
P lu s: Adjustment for r e s id e n c e ..............................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re s id e n c e .........
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 .......................
P lu s: Transfer payments ........................................

300,423
6,851
-2 1 8
293,354
46,331
25,874

320,697
7,903
-2 3 3
312,562
50,214
27,039

333,217
9,204
-299
323,714
53,798
28,806

343,928
9,593
-2 9 5
334,04C
56.68C
32,848

365,818
10.23S
-251
355,328
60,883
34,057

383,348
11,696
-2 2 A
371,428
65,545
36,155

410,493
12,472
-2 2 A
397,796
71,414
37,869

442,796
13,221
-171
429,404
78,552
41,061

484,727
17,648
-150
466,92£
84,258
45,730

515,928
20,41 £
-153
495,356
91.03C
54,585

565,911
22,664
-1 7 8
543,069
97,337
63,169

619,377
26,013
-176
593,188
103,946
70,474

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...............................................
Other labor income ................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.............................................
Farm ...................................................................
Nonfarm 10...........................................................

239,446
9,432
51,545
12,850
38,694

258,196
10,610
51,892
10,680
41,212

270,149
11,217
51,851
11,232
40,619

277,770
11,819
54,339
11,893
42,446

296,360
13,033
56,425
11,903
44,522

311,736
13,955
57,657
11,798
45,859

334,285
15,719
60,489
10,646
49,843

359,913
17,834
65,049
12,945
52,104

395,495
19,871
69,361
14,012
55,349

423,421
21,606
70,901
12,672
58,229

465,654
25,177
75,080
12,676
62,404

512,168
28,417
78,792
14,296
64,496

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Nonfarm..............................................................................
Private.............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and other11 ...............................
Mining..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil
and gas extraction ........................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels ........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable a o o d s...................................................
Food and kindred products..................................
Textile mill p rod u ca .............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied products....................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chemicals and allied products ............................
Petroleum and coal products..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products.....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood products.................................
Furniture and fixtures...........................................
Primary metal industries......................................
Fabricated metal products ...................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
Ordnance12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related products........................
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.............
Transportation and public utilities ...............................
Railroad transportation ............................................
Trucking and warehousing ......................................
Water transportation................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Communications......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services .......................
Wholesale tra d e ..........................................................
Retail tra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ...........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real estate..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal services....................................................
Private households..................................................
Business services....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
Miscellaneous repair services .................................
Amusement and recreation services......................
Motion pictures........................................................
Health services........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social services13 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations ......................................
Engineering and management services14.............
Miscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government enterprises.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and lo c a l............................................................

15,726
284,697
243,172
1,179
872
307
4,690
1,209
2,236
552
693
18,695
86,322
34,892
8,895
3,246
4,017
3,072
5,013
5,158
1,904
377
1,921
1,288
51,430
2,551
1,622
7,414
6,194
8,254
6,911
6,346
4,404
973
3,026
1,960
1,775
23,211
5,724
4,891
1,316
3,074
4,421
3,785
19,113
35,454
15,256
4,187
11,069
39,252
1,893
4,405
3,494
4,015
1,608
1,111
1,341
848
9,473
2,365
2,019
n .a
32
3,308
n.a.
3,340
41,525
12,181
7,836
21,507

13,636
307,061
263,474
1,172
893
279
4,589
1,179
2,136
541
734
20,416
95,056
37,429
9,355
3,614
4,314
3,380
5,289
5,535
1,936
394
2,201
1,410
57,627
2,960
1,814
8,243
6,815
9,409
8,231
6,517
4,937
1,204
3,408
2,179
1,909
24,519
5,761
5,438
1,396
3,316
4,685
3,923
20,412
37,923
16,531
4,486
12,045
42,855
2,020
4,621
3,543
4,665
1,729
1,097
1,433
875
10,531
2,761
2,189
n.a.
32
3,721
n.a.
3,638
43,587
12,535
7,956
23,096

14,257
318,960
272,499
1,236
977
259
4,653
1,122
2,131
636
764
20,823
97,933
38,501
9,664
3,590
4,391
3,510
5,595
5,820
1,899
426
2,221
1,385
59,432
2,833
1,841
8,612
6,980
9,751
8,860
6,173
5,304
1,366
3,475
2,280
1,957
25,347
5,657
5,727
1,476
3,446
4,908
4,133
21,288
38,848
17,123
4,909
12,214
45,248
2,038
4,750
3,766
5,025
1,921
1,172
1,565
864
10,969
2,828
2,397
n.a.
34
4,112
n.a.
3,807
46,461
13,291
7,993
25,177

15,046
328,882
279,029
1,317
1,039
278
4,556
1,004
2,167
620
765
21,584
97,971
39,286
9,816
3,543
4,430
3,698
5,781
6,040
1,919
422
2,243
1,394
58,685
2,704
1,793
8,265
6,794
9,679
9,233
6,064
4,770
1,703
3,413
2,315
1,952
25,754
5,367
5,880
1,455
3,615
5,079
4,358
21,960
39,263
18,324
5,199
13,125
48,300
2,079
4,989
3,702
5,501
2,043
1,255
1,690
929
11,634
3,213
2,676
n.a.
37
4,466
n.a.
4,086
49,853
14,225
8,133
27,495

15,144
350,674
297,052
1,529
1,220
309
4,484
998
2,102
604
780
22,924
105,551
41,268
10,083
3,757
4,756
3,930
6,036
6,372
1,888
444
2,552
1,450
64,283
2,869
1,933
8,840
7,335
10,753
10,186
6,391
5,641
2,188
3,612
2,469
2,066
26,917
5,414
6,362
1,519
3,773
5,306
4,543
23,001
41,502
19,302
5,564
13,738
51,842
2,194
5,219
3,773
6,096
2,236
1,292
1,718
944
12,622
3,409
2,988
n.a.
38
4,851
n.a.
4,462
53,622
15,093
8,644
29,885

15,120
368,228
310,958
1,528
1,227
301
4,548
1,024
2,153
591
780
24,427
109,686
42,420
10,254
3,804
4,896
4,094
6,232
6,671
1,914
456
2,653
1,446
67,266
3,090
2,009
9,091
7,643
11,238
10,327
6,817
6,254
2,310
3,782
2,590
2,115
28,052
5,403
6,790
1,567
3,939
5,540
4,813
24,038
43,098
20,589
5,979
14,610
54,992
2,330
5,433
3,791
6,593
2,419
1,406
1,842
969
13,404
3,688
3,285
n.a.
47
5,075
n.a.
4,710
57,270
16,111
8,850
32,309

14,008
396,485
334,627
1,776
1,445
331
4,757
1,073
2,212
634
838
26,647
117,241
44,951
10,832
4,070
5,194
4,316
6,631
7,095
1,898
483
2,889
1,543
72,290
3,345
2,177
10,076
8,361
12,489
10,737
7,059
6,766
2,252
4,082
2,698
2,248
29,951
5,511
7,294
1,672
4,203
6,089
5,182
25,458
46,681
22,223
6,443
15,780
59,893
2,467
5,822
3,875
7,461
2,616
1,466
1,963
1,021
14,878
4,037
3,632
n.a.
58
5,343
n.a.
5,254
61,858
17,151
9,409
35,298

16,403
426,393
359,745
1,925
1,544
381
4,945
1,127
2,270
665
883
29,114
126,741
47,572
11,156
4,477
5,559
4,571
7,015
7,555
1,948
491
3,212
1,588
79,169
3,584
2,379
10,928
9,174
13,916
11,799
7,590
7,960
2,152
4,319
2,938
2,430
32,022
5,680
8,044
1,697
4,531
6,649
5,421
26,961
49,813
23,751
6,895
16,856
64,473
2,719
6,081
3,927
8,223
2,687
1,574
2,058
1,133
16,058
4,392
4,106
n.a.
62
5,701
n.a.
5,752
66,648
18,200
9,689
38,759

17,515
467,212
392,904
2,044
1,644
400
5,074
1,178
2,270
711
915
31,674
140,497
51,273
11,720
4,904
5,985
4,958
7,559
8,323
1,993
501
3,600
1,730
89,224
3,772
2,650
11,842
10,188
16,129
13,682
9,391
8,468
2,508
4,599
3,382
2,613
34,406
5,771
8,695
1,923
5,009
7,242
5,766
29,319
53,341
25,321
7,363
17,958
71,228
2,990
6,656
3,970
9,292
2,884
1,777
2,204
1,235
17,805
4,885
4,589
n.a.
71
6,274
n.a.
6,596
74,308
20,018
11,312
42,978

16,171
499,757
417,960
2,217
1,820
397
5,477
1,251
2,619
673
934
32,941
146,973
53,960
12,312
5,020
6,308
5,226
8,043
8,918
2,069
527
3,801
1,736
93,013
3,753
2,668
11,771
10,551
16,938
14,782
10,431
8,139
2,965
4,665
3,654
2,696
36,469
5,814
9,013
2,003
5,714
7,769
6,156
31,197
56,836
27,552
8,023
19,529
78,298
3,255
7,077
4,129
10,430
3,228
1,826
2,327
1,290
20,256
5,194
5,053
n.a.
81
6,852
n.a.
7,300
81,797
21,877
12,053
47,867

16,308
549,603
458,162
2,464
2,062
402
5,999
1,261
3,023
755
960
36,349
160,423
58,831
13,047
5,614
6,968
5,678
8,657
9,769
2,246
563
4,362
1,927
101,592
4,116
2,964
12,662
11,570
17,962
15,959
11,261
9,874
3,259
5,077
3,967
2,921
39,745
5,966
10,119
2,176
6,373
8,405
6,706
33,798
62,045
31,382
8,862
22,520
85,957
3,528
7,417
4,325
11,446
3,470
1,987
2,523
1,469
22,874
5,449
5,783
n.a.
88
7,486
n.a.
8,112
91,441
24,124
13,152
54,165

18,164
601,213
500,578
2,790
2,373
417
6,342
1,444
3,057
849
992
40,554
173,790
63,405
13,868
5,974
7,333
6,247
9,468
10,686
2,442
583
4,884
1,920
110,385
4,400
3,235
13,868
12,657
19,965
17,457
12,045
10,443
3,222
5,595
4,378
3,120
43,350
6,213
10,990
2,166
7,108
9,587
7,286
36,843
67,278
33,910
9,914
23,996
95,721
3,863
7,673
4,382
13,040
3,844
2,215
2,575
1,514
26,096
6,013
6,749

7

8
9

10

11

12
13
14
15
16

17
18
19

20
21

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

66
67

68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

86

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

101
8,469
9,187
100,635
25,885
14,423
60,327

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

United States

37

Person al Income by M ajor S o u rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the United S ta te s 3, 1958-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
1970

Line

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Incom e by P la ce o f R e sid e n ce
1
2
3

Total p e rso n a l in co m e ........................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

824,823
806,393
18,430

888,002
868,921
19,081

974,938 1,092,217 1,200,575 1,302,532 1,442,221 1,596,944 1,802,663 2,024,812 2,259,006 2,526,009
952,150 1,056,654 1,169,761 1,272,886 1,416,587 1,572,160 1,774,022 1,994,399 2,238,300 2,498,732
27,277
20,706
24,784
28,641
30,413
30,814
25,634
35,563
29,646
22,788

4
5

Population (thousands)5 ........................................................
P e r cap ita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

203,799
4,047

206,818
4,294

209,275
4,659

211,349
5,168

213,334
5,628

215,457
6,045

6
7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Le ss: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence ..........................................
E quals: Net earnings by place of re s id e n c e .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

657,609
27,624
-1 8 6
629,799
110,409
84,615

701,147
30,457
-2 1 0
670,480
117,411
100,111

773,568
34,247
-2 4 4
739,077
124,044
111,817

867,908
42,376
-263
825,269
138,995
127,953

939,279
47,695
-282
891,302
157,781
151,492

996,872 1,107,817 1,230,336 1,392,777 1,552,617 1,681,256 1,839,129
88,254
104,053
50,184
60,966
69,478
80,661
55,250
-487
-441
-427
-402
-488
-3 3 6
-3 5 8
946,352 1,052,209 1,168,968 1,322,858 1,471,529 1,592,514 1,734,589
237,554
281,934
423,796
204,154
344,256
165,764
181,389
367,624
271,349
322,236
208,623
223,822
242,251
190,416

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages ana salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
N onfarm 10.......................................................................

545,416
32,480
79,713
14,376
65,337

578,509
36,666
85,972
15,053
70,919

633,600
43,000
96,968
18,636
78,332

703,787
49,136
114,985
30,691
84,294

767,839
56,490
114,950
25,126
89,824

809,941
65,894
121,037
23,509
97,528

18,430
639,179
526,768
2,973
2,457
516
6,950
1,820
3,100
945
1,085
42,742
175,215
66,040
14,804
6,031
7,307
6,527
9,942
11,367
2,576
653
4,944
1,889
109,175
4,436
3,206
13,807
12,854
20,369
17,693
11,115
9,512
2,725
5,829
4,434
3,195
47,554
6,589
11,618
2,272
7,825
11,127
8,123
39,654
71,750
35,729
11,176
24,553
104,201
4,223
7,85S
4,446
14,067
4,078
2.27C
2,857
1,512
29.27C
6,915
7,684
n.a.
115
8,884
n.a
10,021
112,411
28,777
15,106
68,528

19,081
682,066
559,287
3,362
2,820
542
7,023
1,918
2,997
962
1,146
46,797
178,672
68,462
15,453
6,278
7,533
6,765
10,252
11,667
2,738
674
5,240
1,862
110,210
4,844
3,356
13,775
13,197
19,548
17,468
10,213
11,528
2,361
6,172
4,446
3,302
51,491
6,901
13,054
2,156
8,249
12,244
8,887
42,248
77,178
40,192
12,227
27,965
112,324
4,51 C
7,850
4,499
14,715
4,690
2,492
3,038
1,575
32,089
7,716
8,567
n.a.
16C
9,688
n.a
10,733
122,779
30,869
15,671
76,239

22,788
750,780
616,389
3,756
3,149
607
7,982
2,275
3,450
1,024
1,233
52,266
196,430
73,696
16,151
7,039
8,088
7,393
11,025
12,438
2,864
718
6,012
1,968
122,734
5,587
3,870
15,490
14,715
22,004
18,959
11,075
13,107
2,482
6,898
4,924
3,623
57,571
7,329
15,034
2,260
8,899
14,118
9,931
46,538
83,732
43,899
13,286
30,612
124,215
4,906
8,071
4,579
16,412
5,282
2,727
3,401
1,677
36,06^
8,706
9.77C
n.a
144
10,326
n.a
12.15C
134,391
33,117
16,906
84,368

35,563
832,345
685,885
4,294
3,566
728
9,208
2,519
4,200
1,114
1,375
58,405
220,363
79,846
17,107
7,739
8,769
8,045
11,926
13,538
3,056
805
6,842
2,019
140,517
6,349
4,333
18,009
16,898
25,634
21,834
12,081
15,483
2,604
7,713
5,658
3,921
63,995
8,207
17,154
2,487
9,709
15,608
10,830
51,590
93,009
46,941
14,769
32,172
138,080
5,426
8,442
4,754
18,786
6,047
3,106
3,982
1,745
40,049
9,896
10,502
n.a
156
10,941
n.a
14,241
146.46C
35,295
17,629
93,536

30,814
908,465
748,930
4,791
3,931
860
12,713
3,472
6,271
1,419
1,551
62,255
239,052
86,416
18,701
7,868
8,943
8,761
12,739
15,438
3,676
894
7,354
2,042
152,636
6,628
4,456
20,530
18,409
29,412
23,670
13,178
14,998
2,565
8,244
6,313
4,233
69,957
8,646
18,512
2,712
11,072
17,266
11,749
59,197
99,868
48,932
16,794
32,138
152,165
5,784
8,897
4,521
21,119
6,580
3,554
4,386
1,878
45,319
10,934
11,166
n.a.
174
11,857
n.a.
15,996
159,535
38,652
18,451
102,432

27,277
24,784
28,641
20,706
25,634
30,413
29,646
967,226 1,082,183 1,205,552 1,364,136 1,522,204 1,660,550 1,811.852
791,574
892,753 1,001,703 1,141,756 1,281,582 1.395,502 1,520,802
7,747
6,572
7,631
7,915
4,990
5,915
5,563
5,234
6,256
6,785
4,114
4,531
6,075
4,705
1,338
1,556
1,491
1,130
876
1,210
1,032
21,134
27,562
35,920
42,740
15,917
23,179
16,981
9,432
9,722
7,367
8,422
4,713
5,015
6,833
11,274
20,644
26,489
10,341
13,905
8,057
8,591
2,291
2,743
3,160
3,751
1,583
1,993
1,475
2,247
2,492
2,684
2,778
1,792
1,967
1,672
106,371
92,342
103,771
107,723
62,752
71,766
78,438
351,684
418,374
452,417
312,147
393,710
241,140
273,297
127,094
161,326
141,103
149,905
89,346
100,897
114,579
28,904
31,239
33.461
20,017
22,058
24,232
26,389
8,694
10,134
10,746
11,192
11,746
7,460
9,385
13,850
13,725
14,200
10,266
11,565
12,945
8,899
12,864
14,194
15,444
16,830
11,648
8,909
10,365
25,365
14,594
17,254
19,972
23,545
24,279
13,327
31,808
21,584
23,599
26,288
28,975
16,486
18,556
6,672
7,386
8,240
5,388
5,991
4,216
4,780
1,334
1,915
1,438
1,615
956
1,065
1,145
12,727
14,611
10,007
13,135
7,149
8,268
11,311
2,915
3,150
1,927
2,371
2,555
2,739
2,251
291,091
224,590
252,607
268,469
151,794
172,400
197,568
13,104
9,884
11,683
12,685
12,333
6,894
8,298
5,692
6,470
7,127
5,065
5,599
3,906
4,510
31,364
31,681
34,350
24,899
27,900
19,430
21,809
25,184
31,548
32,962
35,302
28,278
19,882
22,432
55,887
61,347
50,748
37,886
43,573
30,120
33,218
45,727
37,641
41,710
28,760
33,083
22,491
25,379
31,292
20,689
24,360
28,317
16,150
18,036
15,113
24,872
26,350
24,112
25,583
14,267
18,417
22,432
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
14,109
9,214
10,417
11,898
13,069
13,445
8,188
14,312
16,398
8,242
9,626
10,866
12,381
7,277
6,443
6,888
7,523
5,379
6,056
4,226
4,731
104,334
117,517
128,053
140,006
92,266
73,695
83,270
11,564
14,108
10,554
13,188
13,906
9,689
8,611
32,497
23,479
26,889
29,980
30,868
18,472
21,229
4,484
4,972
5,409
3,483
4,068
2,866
3,183
23,866
17,421
19,618
21,789
11,896
13,192
15,455
33,964
30,122
38,690
23,172
26,378
18,720
20,840
22,554
18,014
20,125
25,436
15,137
16,123
13,130
113,797
123,534
103,145
65,722
72,102
78,498
90,660
128,914
158,958
168,828
181,912
145,670
105,612
118,276
110,222
69,382
80,117
90,051
99,700
53,224
61,981
29,664
37,761
21,064
23,219
26,152
33,760
18,771
60,387
72,461
40,917
53,965
65,940
34,453
46,163
247,198
279,237
316,712
354,333
168,522
189,165
215,361
12,837
14,392
8,324
10,044
11,373
6,066
7,131
14,379
13,399
14,991
10,462
11,045
12,453
9,282
6,007
6,044
6,442
6,279
4,563
5,334
5,853
39,641
55,060
63,330
47,466
23,809
27,906
33,470
9,627
11,502
8,107
10,579
10,720
7,225
8,391
7,242
5,532
6,200
7,275
3,754
4,133
4,665
9,097
9,975
10,838
7,062
8,165
4.84C
5,481
4,299
4,331
2,114
3,067
3,858
4,066
2,638
86,146
99,750
113,989
59,482
67,972
76,881
52,205
26,100
16,071
17,900
20,156
23,575
11,892
13,053
12,117
13,337
15,021
16,497
10,714
11,322
10,966
9,014
9,897
6,877
7,87c
4,567
5,202
5,714
342
387
272
307
184
205
230
16,364
15,402
13,136
14,056
10,471
10,868
11,910
n.a.
n.a.
n.a
n.a
n.a
n.a
n.a
20,54$
28,903
33,056
38,429
17,913
24,25c
16,835
240,622
265,048
291,050
175,652
203,849
222,380
189,430
62,074
67,504
48,776
53,26$
56,62c
42,156
45,505
28,317
21,615
23,887
19,563
20,638
18,776
19,136
162,384
179,087
195,229
148,473
114,716
124,787
135,510

Earnings by industry:7
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

N o n farm ..............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o the r11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction ............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels ........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable g o o d s ...................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts.................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals and allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts.....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts.................................
Furniture and fix tu re s..........................................
Primary metal industries .....................................
Fabricated metal products ..................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related products .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ...............................
Railroad transportation ............................................
Trucking and warehousing .....................................
Water transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Co m m unica tio ns......................................................
Electric, gas. and sanitary services .......................
W holesale t r a d e ..........................................................
Retail t ra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, Insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places .............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services ................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social se rv ice s13 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations .....................................
Engineering and management se rvice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ..........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and lo c a l............................................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

217,554
6,629

894,806
79,663
133,348
18,728
114,620

219,761
7,267

222,098
8,117

224,564
9,017

227,255
9,940

229,457
11,009

988,840 1,115,654 1.249,394 1,369,317 1,508,012
139,675
152,791
94,657
110,009
124,131
167,114
172,264
178,326
179,092
146,839
22,047
11,994
18,710
20,953
17,463
160,270
159,616
129,376
146,161
157,045

38

United. States

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

P e rson al Income by M ajor S o u rce and Earn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the United S ta te s 3, 1958-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
Line

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

Income by Place of Residence
Total personal In co m e ...............................................
2
3

4

Population (thousands)5 ................................................

5

Per capita personal income (dollars)6 .......................

6

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of work .................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ....
P lu s: Adjustment for residence ...................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence ...............
P lu s: Dividends, int'eres't, and rent9 ............................
P lu s: Transfer payments .............................................

7

8
9

10

11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

20
21

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37

43
41

42
43

44

45
46
47
48
49
50
51

52

53
54
55
56

57

58
59
60
61
62
63

Earnings by type:7
W ages and s a la rie s ......................................................
Other labor in c o m e .......................................................

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...........................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and
o ther11 ................................................
Agricultural services ..........................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o th e r11 ........................
Oil and gas extraction ......................................
Metal mining ......................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls ...................
Construction ...................................................
Nondurable goods ............................................
Textile mill products .......................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u c ts................
Paper and allied products .............................
Printing and publishing .................................
Chem icals and allied p ro d u c ts......................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts........................
Tobacco products ..........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics products
Leather and leather p ro d u c ts........................
Durable goods ..................................................
Lumber and wood products ..........................
Furniture and fixtures ....................................
Primary metal industries ...............................
Fabricated metal products ............................
Machinery and computer equipment ............
Electric equipment, except computer
eq uip m e n t...................................................
Transportation equipment excl. motor
v e h ic le s .......................................................
Motor vehicles and eq uip m e n t......................
O rd n an ce 12 ....................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products ...................
Instruments and Telateci products .................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.......
Transportation and public utilities ........................
Railroad transportation .....................................
Trucking and warehousing ...............................
Water transportation ..........................................
Other transportation...........................................
Comm unications ...........................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ..................

64
65

Finance, insurance, and real estate ....................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ........

67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75

Private households ............................................
Business services ..............................................
Auto repair, services, and parking ...................
M iscellaneous repair services ..........................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ................

77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

Museums, botanical, zoological gardens .........
Membership organizations ...............................
Engineering and management se rvice s14 .......
M iscellaneous s e r v ic e s .....................................
Government and government enterprises ...............

66

Hotels and other lodging p la c e s .......................

76

Educational s e r v ic e s ..........................................

86
See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

2,683,456 2,857,710 3,144,363 3,368,069 3,579,783 3,789,297 4,061,806 4,366,135 4,655,420 4,840,768 5,135,062 5,359,589
2,659,905 2,842,255 3,114,577 3,338,329 3,548,998 3,750,87c 4,024,51* 4,318,56* 4,607,203 4,796,091 5,085,15C 5,312,834
23,551
15,455
29,786
29,740
30,785
38,424
37,292
47,571
48,211
44,677
49,912
46,755
231,669
11,583

233,806
12,223

235,847
13,332

237,950
14,155

240,162
14,906

242,321
15,638

244,534
16,610

246,820
17,690

249,399
18,667

252,137
19,199

255,078
20,131

257,908
20^781

1,920,633 2,040,159 2,259,505 2,426,033 2,578,526 2,768,680 2,983,387 3,171,180 3,364,033 3,472,632 3,705,208 3,865,406
111,826
119,212
132,247
148.48Ì
161,52*
172,95£
193,813
210,678
224,112
235,312
248,032
260,682
-5 5 9
-552
-6 1 7
-647
-622
-656
-696
-7 4 0
-790
-7 8 5
-778
-828
1,808,248 1,920,393 2,126,641 2,276,897 2,416,38C 2,595,066 2,788,878 2,959,762 3,139,131 3,236,535 3,456,398 3,603,896
465,762
497,397
564,05c
604,72*
644,967
651,616
695,935
781,152
828,491
835,062
820,601
843,362
409,446
439,920
453,669
486,448
518,436
542,613
576,995
625,221
687,798
769,171
858,063
912,331
1,584,314 1,675,343 1,839,881 1,975,780 2,094,603 2,249,899 2,432,365 2,575,603 2,732,912 2,801,916 2,964,451 3,072,264
165,064
174,328
184,411
191,547
200,505
210.24C
230,312
251,683
274,023
298,784
328,433
354,994
171,255
190,488
235,213
258,706
283,418
308,541
320,70S
343,894
357,098
371,932
412,324
438,148
13,990
6,238
20.54S
20,347
21,965
29,572
27,269
36,856
35,716
32,400
37,968
33,858
157,265
184,250
214,664
238,359
261,453
278,969
293,440
307,038
321,382
339,532
374,356
404,290
23,551
15,455
29,786
29,740
30,785
38,424
37,292
47,571
48,211
44,677
49,912
46,755
1,897,082 2,024,704 2,229,719 2,396,293 2,547,741 2,730,256 2,946,095 3,123,609 3,315,822 3,427,955 3,655,296 3,818,651
1,583,153 1,689,595 1,871,078 2,009,882 2,138,497 2,292,412 2,476,862 2,619,667 2,771,238 2,850,331 3,046,712 3,187,253
8,335
7,368
967
43,294
10,601
27,136
2,863
2,694
107,388
450,866
166,911
35,096
11,156
14,064
17,363
27,198
33,718
8,636
2,050
14,635
2,995
283,955
11,124
7,026
29,747
33,788
59,435

9,875
8,340
1,535
35,631
8,448
21,727
2,630
2,826
115,409
466,380
176,098
35,895
12,310
14,957
18,548
29,355
35,020
8,862
2,176
16,011
2,964
290,282
13,148
7,827
27,244
34,083
56,515

11,162
9,727
1,435
38,181
9,401
23,207
2,434
3,139
135,318
513,232
187,628
37,267
12,664
16,077
20,194
32,252
37,024
8,775
2,167
18,361
2,847
325,604
15,004
8,951
28,897
37,970
63,650

47,801

51,868

59,822

32,182
24,081
n.a.
13,572
17,642
7,557
148,541
13,285
32,393
5,285
25,429
43,464
28,685
128,492
190,281
115,033
42,449
72,584
390,923
15,304
15,929
6,143
72,150
11,818
7,589
11,526
4,813
129,356
30,590
18,216
10,379
434
17,819
n.a.
38,857
313,929
70,719
32,150
211,060

32,316
26,908
n.a.
14,157
18,411
7,805
153,753
13,101
33,415
5,238
27,240
44,431
30,328
131,784
210,982
132,995
47,099
85,896
432,786
17,678
17,825
6,174
83,458
14,115
8,501
12,925
5,340
139,536
34,341
19,804
11,351
483
18,901
n.a.
42,354
335,109
75,148
34,226
225,735

35,265
32,283
n.a.
15,431
19,681
8,650
165,074
13,650
37,413
5,548
29,801
44,866
33,796
146,803
233,137
140,572
51,574
88,998
487,599
20,338
19,591
7,155
97,818
17,135
10,166
14,428
7,125
149,306
40,633
21,795
12,494
530
19,968
n.a.
49,117
358,641
79,795
36,163
242,683

13,002
10,572
2,430
38,684
9,149
23,997
2,325
3,213
149,105
535,657
193,614
38,424
12,348
15,933
20,948
35,021
38,579
8,590
2,291
18,862
2,618
342,043
15,502
9,587
27,518
39,820
67,006

13,956
10,799
3,157
29,899
8,994
15,304
2,140
3,461
167,418
550,498
201,674
40,047
13,178
16,489
21,796
37,411
40,495
7,923
2,216
19,610
2,509
348,824
17,206
9,967
26,317
40,050
65,622

16,913
14,021
2,892
28,180
7,633
14,784
2,263
3,500
176,182
569,620
212,612
41,748
14,392
16,985
22,789
40,669
41,592
8,232
2,347
21,266
2,592
357,008
18,634
10,998
26,310
40,440
67,206

63,285

64,912

38,970
35,391
n.a.
15,804
20,738
8,422
174,756
13,171
38,871
5,735
32,107
46,646
38,226
157,742
252,550
149,390
55,460
93,930
538,996
23,706
23,229
7,200
113,876
20,293
9,662
16,194
7,640
160,460
44,502
23,504
13,991
594
20,881
n.a.
53,264
386,411
84,438
38,400
263,573

42,093
35,715
n.a.
16,318
21,968
8,656
181,115
12,482
42,030
5,578
34,650
47,303
39,072
165,917
270,152
168,996
61,890
107,106
590,546
26,063
25,593
7,581
126,493
21,777
10,736
17,792
8,287
173,538
51,209
24,893
15,682
699
22,119
n.a.
58,084
409,244
84,601
40,086
284,557

17,522
14,626
2,896
30,309
7,402
16,668
2,465
3,774
187,897
610,104
228,656
43,900
14,783
17,836
23,936
44,643
46,658
8,332
2,526
23,384
2,658
381,448
20,067
11,593
28,833
43,248
73,893

17,866
15,101
2,765
29,677
7,354
15,591
2,787
3,945
194,254
636,963
239,012
45,265
15,421
18,412
25,046
47,184
49,329
8,429
2,592
24,680
2,654
397,951
20,762
12,041
30,251
45,490
77,600

20,736
17,506
3,230
31,885
7,945
17,097
2,774
4,069
198,186
651,775
248,824
47,768
15,304
18,331
26,077
49,227
52,288
8,863
2,552
25,739
2,675
402,951
20,377
12,053
30,869
46,555
79,666

22,370
19,165
3,205
34,364
7,776
19,657
2,978
3,953
185,297
661,640
258,057
50,324
15,423
18,903
26,755
50,200
55,509
9,575
2,582
26,168
2,618
403,583
20,100
11,911
31,343
46,032
79,772

65,601

56,414

58,790

58,755

59,268

44,039
35,289
n.a.
16,928
22,316
9,247
190,562
12,120
44,628
5,500
38,678
50,490
39,146
177,666
282,409
199,788
66,509
133,279
651,092
28,750
26,939
7,557
141,339
22,609
10,718
19,325
8,898
197,972
56,446
27,410
17,577
773
24,222
n.a.
60,557
437,844
90,006
42,094
305,744

45,192
37,368
n.a.
17,303
37,413
10,124
198,867
12,268
47,530
5,787
40,777
52,316
40,189
194,721
300,942
213,815
71,339
142,476
722,685
29,464
28,424
8,145
123,750
23,833
11,741
23,389
11,090
218,485
64,654
30,165
19,741
957
26,999
96,787
5,061
469,233
96,992
42,903
329,338

47,797
38,040
n.a.
17,769
38,819
10,592
209,036
12,014
50,321
6,010
44,899
52,598
43,194
207,679
317,287
214,108
74,463
139,645
792,797
32,358
28,500
8,743
135,709
24,645
12,560
25,543
12,147
241,916
68,635
32,785
22,258
1,055
28,923
110,793
6,227
503,942
102,612
44,403
356,927

49,586
37,077
n.a.
18,089
39,406
10,518
223,849
11,692
53,896
6,297
48,734
57,624
45,606
218,168
328,658
228,784
77,550
151,234
869,197
32,768
29,340
9,252
152,673
25,345
13,170
31,580
14,172
269,748
74,556
34,430
25,126
1,168
30,601
118,906
6,362
544,584
110,645
45,729
388,210

48,733
37,450
n.a.
17,521
40,727
10,726
232,514
12,232
54,233
6,888
51,421
59,331
48,409
223,032
335,476
241,230
78,589
162,641
914,408
34,031
29,540
8,984
153,237
26,742
12,244
36,350
14,569
295,361
77,112
39,081
27,901
1,251
31,294
120,342
6,369
577,624
116,322
48,392
412,910

23,133
20,201
2,932
34,942
7,721
20,127
2,971
4,123
186,229
692,766
273,513
53,047
16,473
19,745
28,382
52,489
59,631
10,132
2,686
28,347
2,581
419,253
21,154
12,841
31,489
47,634
81,527

24,568
21,502
3,066
35,151
7,107
20,833
2,965
4,246
197,592
709,492
281,611
54,653
17,057
19,978
29,166
54,144
61,176
10,111
2,545
30,191
2,590
427,881
22,966
13,720
32’ 175
49,171
84,118

61,061

63,627

48,693
44,875
43,838
45,456
n.a.
n.a.
18,093
18,807
41,549
41,099
11,374
11Ì867
245,388
257,360
12,940
13,699
56,894
60^076
6,797
6,812
54,670
57,235
62,136
65,513
51,951
54,025
236,590
240,724
352,433
368,207
281,230
296,538
85,794
90,571
195,436
205,967
994,001 1,057,621
35,254
36,675
31,436
33,094
9,948
10,515
168,829
186,069
27,358
29Î649
12,733
13,670
41,593
44,814
14,778
16,390
324,012
342,999
83,317
85,996
42,997
41,246
30,886
33 471
1'364
1,444
32,846
34,357
131,399
138,201
7,002
608,584
631,398
123,209
128,185
51,288
49,469
434,087
453,744

Per Capita Personal Income, 1993
Regions

40

Far West

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

United States
and
Far
West
Region
Per Capita Personal Income
Selected Years, 1929-93
^

Dollars (Thousands)

20
15

10
5
0

1929

1939

1949

1959

1969

1979

1989

1993

□ United States « F a r West

Far West Region
Percent of Earnings
Selected Years, 1972-93
35%
30%
25%

20 %
15%

10%
5%

0%
Farm Ag.Serv. Mining Constr. Manu.

TPU*

Trade FIRE**Services Gov't

■ 1972 = 1977 ■■1982 CD1987 01993
* Transportation and public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate

Far West

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

41

P e rson al Income by M ajor S ou rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the Far W est Region, 1929-57
[Millions of dollars]
1929

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1938

1936

1939

1943

1940

Income by Place of Residence
Total personal Income ....
Nonfarm personal Income
Farm Income4 .................

6,583
631

6,626
6,043
583

5,631
5,223
408

4,366
4,101
265

4,140
3,806
334

4,731
4,284
447

5,275
4,764
511

6,339
5,749
590

6,713
6,146
567

6,618
6,124
495

6,915
6,443
472

7,616
7,092
525

9,728
8,936
792

13,601
12,366
1,235

17,999
16,281
1,719

Population (thousands)5 ........................
Per capita personal Income (dollars) 6

8,123
888

8,327
796

8,465
665

8,546
511

8,629
480

8,753
540

8,905
592

9,120
695

9,360
717

9,526
695

9,688
714

9,889
770

10,254
949

10,985
1,238

12,025
1,497

Derivation of personal Income:
Total earnings7 ......................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ............................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re sid e n c e .........
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 .......................
Plus: Transfer p a ym e n ts........................................

5,483
11
n.a.
5,472
1,631
111

5,094
12
n.a.
5,082
1,428
116

4,205
12
n.a.
4,193
1,223
215

3,241
12
n.a.
3,229
974
164

3,152
13
n.a.
3,139
843
157

3,739
14
n.a.
3,726
839
166

4,222
14
n.a.
4,207
866
201

4,958
23
n.a.
4,935
1,092
313

5,423
60
n.a.
5,363
1,118
232

5,298
67
n.a.
5,231
1,108
280

5,541
72
n.a.
5,469
1,122
323

6,120
77
n.a.
6,042
1,197
377

8,050
98
n.a.
7,952
1,402
374

11,953
164
n.a.
11,789
1,454
358

16,342
278
n.a.
16,064
1,583
352

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ..
Other labor income ...
Proprietors’ inco m e10
Farm .....................
N onfarm 10 ............

4,181
51
1,251
410
841

3,962
51
1,081
368
714

3,378
47
780
242
537

2,703
42
496
151
345

2,556
39
557
233
324

2,918
43
778
331
447

3,235
46
940
384
556

3,742
55
1,161
449
713

4,201
57
1,165
393
771

4,149
57
1,092
327
765

4,356
59
1,125
298
827

4,721
1,332
354
978

6,091
75
1,884
584
1.300

9,164
93
2,696
946
1,750

12,640
113
3,589
1,329
2,261

Earnings by industry:7
F a r m ...................................................................................
Nonfarm .............................................................................
Private ............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o the r11 .
Mining ........ ................................................................
C o n stru ction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s...............................
W holesale and retail t ra d e ..........................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Services ......................................................................
Government and government enterprises ....................
Federal, c iv ilia n ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and lo c a l............................................................

631
4,853
4,362
30
92
297
999
587
1,142
367
848
491
94
42
354

583
4,511
3,991
31
83
222
875
544
1,086
309
840
519
98
45
377

408
3,797
3,263
29
60
148
654
462
899
263
747
534
98
45
391

265
2,977
2,472
23
43
91
461
364
675
224
592
504
92
44
368

334
2,818
2,304
20
42
90
482
327
627
221
494
514
115
41
359

447
3,292
2,699
22
61
102
606
366
750
217
575
593
161
43
389

511
3,711
3,057
27
70
127
680
398
878
230
648
653
166
48
439

590
4,368
3,625
26
85
198
816
453
1,053
257
739
742
303
51
388

567
4,856
4,123
34
102
196
965
519
1,210
274
823
733
263
54
416

495
4,803
4,016
31
95
237
863
488
1,200
282
820
787
287
59
442

472
5,069
4,258
30
98
250
965
521
1,263
286
846
810
290
68
453

525
5,595
4,721
32
109
287
1,086
554
1,454
301
898
874
300
103
471

792
7,258
6,125
37
116
467
1,704
639
1,830
328
1,003
1,133
369
257
507

1,235
10,718
8,700
50
115
783
3,202
791
2,197
355
1,208
2,018
637
846
535

1,719
14,624
11,368
55
124
809
4,790
1,004
2,692
397
1,496
3,256
1,054
1,636
566

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

Total p e rso n a l Incom e ....................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e .............................................
Farm incom e4 ................................................................

19,665
17,877
1,787

20,103
18,244
1,859

21,295
19,105
2,190

22,161
20,170
1,991

23,646
21,873
1,773

23,935
22,413
1,522

27,686
25,916
1,770

31,774
29,637
2,137

34,913
32,691
2,222

37,214
35,176
2,038

38,186
36,251
1,934

41,720
39,734
1,986

45,296
43,219
2,077

48,261
46,279
1,982

Population (thousands)5 ....................................................
P er capita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .........................

12,803
1,536

13,264
1,516

13,514
1,576

13,650
1,624

13,880
1,704

14,219
1,683

15,392
1,799

15,942
1,993

16,530
2,112

17,217
2,161

17,820
2,143

18,384
2,269

19,101
2,371

19,764
2,442

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 .............................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 .....
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ...................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re sid e n c e ................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..............................
Plus: Transfer p a y m e n ts...............................................

17,862
308
n.a.
17,555
1,663
447

17,864
324
n.a.
17,541
1,844
719

18,178
300
n.a.
17,878
2,172
1,245

18,706
291
n.a.
18,415
2,386
1,360

20,011
296
-7
19,708
2,623
1,316

19,839
293
-2 0
19,526
2,816
1,593

22,703
385
-1 4
22,304
3,354
2,028

26,902
458
-41
26,403
3,686
1,685

29,688
518
-4 7
29,122
3,955
1,835

31,411
560
-4 9
30,802
4,455
1,957

31,727
647
-7 5
31,005
5,017
2,163

34,639
740
-8 4
33,814
5,553
2,352

37,854
834
-8 9
36,930
5,829
2,537

39,889
972
-89
38,828
6,500
2,934

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ......................................................
Other labor income .......................................................
Proprietors’ inco m e10....................................................
Farm ..........................................................................
Nonfarm 10 .................................................................

13,830
151
3,881
1,345
2,536

13,627
176
4,062
1,387
2,675

13,213
197
4,768
1,680
3,088

14,106
239
4,361
1,449
2,913

15,124
270
4,617
1,217
3,400

15,129
291
4,418
997
3,422

17,329
367
5,007
1,168
3,838

20,644
472
5,786
1,496
4,291

23,029
550
6,109
1,566
4,543

24,675
627
6,109
1,384
4,725

24,959
681
6,088
1,300
4,788

27,185
798
6,656
1,355
5,301

29,918
934
7,002
1,424
5,578

31,652
1,070
7,167
1,319
5,848

Earnings by industry:7
F a r m ..............................................................................
Nonfarm ........................................................................
Private .......................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other
Mining ....................................................................
C o n stru ction ...........................................................
Manufacturing ........................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s.........................
W holesale and retail t ra d e .....................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .....................
Services .................................................................
Government and government enterprises ...............
Federal, c iv ilia n ......................................................
M ilita ry ....................................................................
State and lo c a l.......................................................

1,787
16,075
12,392
72
131
771
5,012
1,230
2,975
447
1,753
3,683
1,189
1,891
604

1,859
16,005
11,970
80
129
731
3,978
1,328
3,305
523
1,895
4,035
1,253
2,107
675

2,190
15,988
13,086
86
144
965
3,187
1,461
4,237
703
2,304
2,902
1,033
1,058
811

1,991
16,716
14,251
104
172
1,245
3,509
1,577
4,425
752
2,467
2,465
863
600
1,002

1,773
18,238
15,666
150
198
1,572
3,981
1,671
4,569
834
2,690
2,571
821
587
1,163

1,522
18,317
15,496
162
192
1,435
3,891
1,680
4,454
901
2,781
2,822
895
611
1,316

1,770
20,933
17,393
185
202
1,730
4,579
1,813
4,814
1,101
2,970
3,540
1,125
946
1,469

2,137
24,765
20,236
204
233
2,043
5,764
2,088
5,401
1,180
3,323
4,529
1,479
1,414
1,636

2,222
27,466
22,152
219
256
2,134
6,602
2,275
5,750
1,257
3,659
5,314
1,671
1,802
1,841

2,038
29,373
23,878
223
283
2,323
7,216
2,440
6,072
1,365
3,956
5,495
1,612
1,823
2,060

1,934
29,793
24,277
245
276
2,285
7,311
2,443
6,103
1,498
4,115
5,516
1,553
1,685
2,278

1,986
32,653
26,839
234
296
2,438
8,205
2,628
6,576
1,763
4,699
5,814
1,662
1,671
2,482

2,077
35,776
29,522
246
311
2,690
9,229
2,870
7,108
1,921
5,148
6,254
1,772
1,709
2,774

1,982
37,907
31,333
244
310
2,751
9,888
3,034
7,478
2,007
5,621
6,574
1,793
1,704
3,077

66

Income by P la ce of R e sid e n ce

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

42

Far West

STATE PERSONAL INCOME
P erson al Income by Major S o u rce and Earn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the Far W est Region, 1958-93
[Millions of dollars]

Line

1958

1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm inco m e4 ................................................................... ,

50,434
48,565
1,869

55,095
53,131
1,965

58,139
56,119
2,020

61,544
59,599
1.945

66,387
64,341
2,046

70,660
68,667
1,993

76,352
74,261
2,091

82,001
79,904
2,097

Population (thousands)5 ........................................................
P e r capita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

20,459
2,465

21,147
2,605

21,641
2,687

22,362
2,752

23,083
2,876

23,800
2,969

24,367
3,133

7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence ..........................................
E quals: Net earnings by place of residence .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ...................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

41,139
1,056
-8 9
39,994
6,890
3,549

45,203
1,213
-9 3
43,896
7,511
3,688

47,428
1,405
-110
45,913
8,119
4,108

49,853
1,513
-100
48,240
8,583
4,721

53,893
1,644
-102
52,147
9,257
4,984

57,272
1,898
-9 6
55,278
9,956
5,426

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Other labor in c o m e .............................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10.......................................................................

32,902
1,078
7,160
1,181
5,979

36,271
1,260
7,672
1,225
6.447

38,418
1,359
7,651
1,256
6,394

40,434
1,489
7,931
1,160
6,771

43,770
1,673
8,449
1,272
7,177

1,869
39,271
32,117
271
180
91
284

1,965
43,238
35,637
270
187
83
287

2,020
45,408
37,133
279
203
76
290

1,945
47,908
39,084
303
217
87
306

2,046
51,847
42,262
355
257
97
308

1964

1967

1968

1969

89,560
87,219
2,341

96,717
94,519
2,197

106,340
103,897
2,443

116,476
113,919
2,557

24,902
3,293

25,298
3,540

25,764
3,754

26,136
4,069

26,635
4,373

61,647
2,038
-100
59,510
10,975
5,867

65,642
2,182
-5 0
63,410
12,144
6,447

72,201
2,864
-51
69,287
13,095
7,178

77,095
3,266
-51
73,778
14,279
8,659

85,021
3,627
-5 7
81,337
15,090
9,913

92,918
4,124
-105
88,689
16,395
11,392

46,744
1,892
8,637
1,216
7,421

50,088
2,169
9,390
1,293
8,097

53,542
2,422
9,677
1,265
8,413

59,182
2,712
10,307
1,465
8,842

63,548
2,935
10,612
1,350
9,262

70,020
3,454
11,547
1,511
10,037

76,941
3,953
12,024
1,544
10,480

1,993
55,279
44,877
352
262
91
316

2,091
59,556
48,314
411
310
101
342
pi
196
42

2,097
63,544
51,356
449
331
119
363

2,341
69,860
56,185
484
354
129
383

2,197
74,898
59,784
503
383
120
428
pi
263
53

2,443
82,578
65,750
557
433
123
489
pi
319
58

2,557
90,361
71,849
628
502
126
520

1965

1966

Incom e by P la ce of R e sid e n ce

1 Total p e rso n a l Incom e ........................................................
2
3

4

5

6

17

18
19
20
21
22

23

24
25

26

27
28
29
30
31
32
33

34
36

35
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53

54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

66
67

68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
N o n farm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o the r11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 ...............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil
and gas extraction ........................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fu e ls .........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and Kindred p ro d u c ts..................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts .............................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u cts.......................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts....................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals and allied p ro d u cts............................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather p ro d u cts..............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood products .................................
Furniture and fix tu re s...........................................
Primary metal industries ......................................
Fabricated metal products ...................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and eq uip m en t............................
O rd n an ce 1 2 ..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts ............ ...........
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ...............................
Trucking and warehousing ......................................
Water transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
C om m u n ica tio n s......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary s e rv ic e s ........................
W holesale t r a d e ..........................................................
Retail t ra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging p la c e s .............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking ..........................
M iscellaneous repair services .................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s .......................
Motion p ic tu re s ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social se rv ice s1 3 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations ......................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and local ............................................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

p>

169
36

p)

2,837
9,920
3,149
1,222
40
263
286
512
348
309

p)

138
31
6,771
899
194
430
620
582
769
2,223
190
288
297
154
126
2,984
536
590
292
466
691
409
2,553
5,162
2,127
539
1,588
5,978
338
590
401
633
274
189
293
358
1,534
269
227
n.a.
6
359
n.a.
509
7,154
1,974
1,730
3,450

pi

166
35

pi

3,238
11,158
3,399
1,310
45
280
322
553
373
324

p)

159
32
7,759
1,067
226
471
688
671
1,021
2,357
218
412
328
158
142
3,174
540
681
303
498
733
418
2,807
5,668
2,328
605
1,723
6,707
371
642
407
779
310
192
324
396
1,722
324
242
n.a.
6
417
n.a.
576
7,601
2,052
1,763
3,786

pi

164
40

p)

3,330
11,481
3,551
1,382
46
289
341
598
394
308
«
161
32
7,930
1,011
229
494
713
696
1,257
2,148
237
489
344
167
144
3,332
531
723
326
522
789
440
2,988
5,844
2,444
693
1,751
7,145
393
674
432
876
342
201
358
390
1,797
336
244
n.a.
7
477
n.a.
618
8,274
2,160
1,842
4,272

P)

177
40
pi
3,536
11,866
3,660
1,415
45
295
354
624
417
312

p)

165
32
8,205
970
226
506
727
725
1,397
2,170
216
584
355
180
149
3,427
503
757
322
543
826
476
3,123
6,010
2,623
744
1,879
7,890
412
727
427
1,021
375
216
396
446
1,930
404
280
n.a.
7
535
n.a.
715
8,823
2,307
1,845
4,672

p)

176
38
pi
3,799
12,938
3,827
1,463
49
305
380
662
444
308
pi
182
34
9,110
1,024
239
525
768
809
1,678
2,191
257
883
390
183
163
3,663
515
830
324
599
881
514
3,312
6,466
2,809
822
1,987
8,613
447
780
437
1,171
423
226
423
431
2,108
440
307
n.a.
7
600
n.a.
814
9,585
2,451
1,965
5,169

p)

183
38

p)

4,212
13,556
3,971
1,493
54
317
403
685
463
340
pi
185
32
9,585
1,099
251
546
784
857
1,746
2,257
278
962
426
203
176
3,876
512
891
346
627
939
561
3,493
6,804
3,050
911
2,139
9,217
480
824
441
1,243
465
250
454
440
2,259
488
352
n.a.
8
650
n.a.
863
10,402
2,581
2,067
5,754

pi

4,571
14,172
4,210
1,599
56
336
424
727
492
349

p)

190
36
9,961
1,227
267
596
843
939
1,700
2,261
291
975
463
219
180
4,204
544
959
357
685
1,044
615
3,679
7,456
3,330
1,003
2,327
10,149
514
889
454
1,428
509
267
486
474
2,518
536
390
n.a.
10
719
n.a.
955
11,242
2,721
2,189
6,332

p)

204
50
pi
4,758
14,891
4,400
1,649
64
352
456
777
498
362
1
208
34
10,490
1,280
273
626
902
1,039
1,793
2,374
346
932
479
246
202
4,563
561
1,046
381
758
1,163
654
3,865
7,923
3,590
1,078
2,512
10,955
572
930
462
1,546
520
286
517
558
2,689
584
454
n.a.
10
781
n.a.
1,047
12,188
2,938
2,274
6,977

p)

214
57

pi

4,997
16,873
4,718
1,757
71
378
501
831
518
377
1
240
45
12,155
1,312
291
727
1,022
1,255
2,106
3,050
368
1,022
493
283
226
5,026
579
1,123
454
874
1,292
704
4,191
8,453
3,748
1,127
2,621
12,031
640
1,011
472
1,752
554
319
551
610
2,960
638
500
n.a.
11
867
n.a.
1,146
13,675
3,279
2,665
7,731

p)

4,846
18,090
4,927
1,812
75
402
524
867
554
388
1
264
41
13,163
1,283
285
752
1,081
1,381
2,440
3,464
361
1,105
484
293
235
5,406
583
1,160
472
1,054
1,379
758
4,442
8,901
4,004
1,220
2,784
13,164
701
1,069
492
1,944
615
328
582
630
3,390
677
543
n.a.
12
941
n.a.
1,241
15,115
3,660
2,853
8,602

P)

5,356
19,740
5,368
1,929
84
445
578
941
600
415
1
328
47
14,373
1,454
332
820
1,181
1,504
2,633
3,738
431
1,149
538
322
269
5,975
602
1,310
507
1,208
1,531
818
4,844
9,746
4,647
1,337
3,310
14,395
776
1,126
519
2,086
669
351
633
707
3,807
712
605
n.a.
12
1,019
n.a.
1,373
16,829
4,026
3,222
9,581

p)

343
60

p)

5,943
21,225
5,831
2,040
97
484
639
1,036
651
448
1
386
49
15,393
1,530
364
909
1,300
1,731
2,879
3,868
471
1,071
603
366
301
6,598
631
1,449
501
1,391
1,726
901
5,273
10,533
5,061
1,492
3,569
16,068
868
1,155
531
2,378
742
391
657
736
4,277
781
724
n.a.
13
1,180
n.a.
1,634
18,511
4,272
3,537
10,702

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Far West

43

P erson al Incom e by M ajor S o u rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the Far W est Region, 1958-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
Line

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Income by Place of Residence
1
2
3

Total personal Income ......................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

125,040
122,535
2,505

133,064
130,519
2,545

145,587
142,388
3,200

161,656
157,336
4,320

181,576
176,088
5,487

200,655
195,766
4,889

225,416
220,549
4,867

250,770
246,036
4,733

288,176
283,367
4,809

329,689
323,684
6,005

373,879
366,306
7.573

417,647
411,712
5,934

4
5

Population (thousands)5 ........................................................
Per capita personal Income (dollars) 6 ............................

27,101
4,614

27,570
4,826

27,918
5,215

28,328
5,707

28,801
6,305

29,346
6,838

29,929
7,532

30,553
8,208

31,285
9,211

31,960
10,316

32,776
11,407

33,433
12,492

7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence ..........................................
E quals: Net earnings by place of r e s id e n c e .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

97,984
4,365
-112
93,507
17,579
13,955

102,986
4,701
-111
98,174
18,731
16,159

113,846
5,474
-1 1 6
108,256
19,715
17,615

126,572
6,747
-133
119,693
22,195
19,768

140,702
7,346
-214
133,142
25,027
23,406

153,633
7,932
-376
145,325
26,251
29,079

173,451
8,932
-493
164,026
28,947
32,442

193,385
9,983
-316
183,086
32,611
35,073

221,926
10,936
-267
210,723
39,264
38,189

252,595
12,971
-275
239,349
48,096
42,244

280,367
13,555
-352
266,459
57,898
49.522

304,560
16,185
-308
288,067
71,666
57,914

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages ana salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
N onfarm 10.......................................................................

81,389
4,433
12,163
1,427
10,735

85,131
4,872
12,984
1,478
11,506

93,047
5,752
15,048
2,091
12,957

102,910
6,578
17,085
3,038
14,046

113,665
7,669
19,369
3,920
15,450

124,015
9,289
20,330
3,064
17,266

138,259
11,379
23,814
2,814
21,000

153,990
13,874
25,520
2,632
22,888

176,255
16,515
29,156
2,787
26,369

201,125
18,828
32,642
3,779
28,863

224,085
21,579
34,702
5,225
29,477

248,184
23,754
32,622
3,620
29,002

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
N o n fa rm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o th e r11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and other11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and pas extraction .............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fu e ls .........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts.................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts ............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing .......................................
Chem icals and allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts.....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood products .................................
Furniture and fix tu re s..........................................
Primary metal industries .....................................
Fabricated metal products ..................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ..............................
Railroad transportation ...........................................
Trucking and warehousing .....................................
Water transportation................................................
Other transportation ................................................
C om m u n ica tio n s......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services .......................
W holesale trade ..........................................................
Retail t r a d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services ................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ..............................................
Social se rv ice s1 3 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations .....................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and local ............................................................

2,505
95,479
74,847
699
530
169
533
P)
335
67
n
6,238
20,777
6,078
2,134
99
501
683
1,081
677
460
1
392
51
14,699
1,550
366
902
1,302
1,791
2,801
3,307
429
917
651
365
319
7,153
659
1,496
498
1,561
1,940
999
5,602
11,149
5,322
1,661
3,661
17,374
961
1,160
561
2,572
769
388
721
710
4,817
927
816
n.a.
15
1,226
n.a.
1,733
20,632
4,745
3,741
12,145

2,545
100,441
78,347
766
604
163
506
n
300
66
pi
6,560
20,530
6,320
2,230
108
538
702
1,110
696
471
1
411
54
14,210
1,731
381
879
1,285
1,718
2,664
2,890
478
787
698
371
327
7,695
688
1,646
434
1,655
2,157
1,115
5,934
11,888
5,968
1,826
4,141
18,500
1,020
1,135
588
2,704
875
416
769
710
5,113
1,033
929
n.a.
20
1,343
n.a.
1,846
22,095
5,042
3,791
13,263

3,200
110,647
86,693
892
711
181.
572
p)
351
57

4,320
122,252
96,518
1,077
843
234
659
pi
406
64
pi
8,080
25,454
7,455
2,539
151
683
823
1,335
802
489
1
559
74
17,999
2,244
511
1,118
1,627
2,289
3,415
3,539
668
870
836
502
380
9,403
843
2,142
515
1,995
2,581
1,326
7,428
14,315
7,053
2,243
4,810
23,050
1,226
1,242
658
3,513
1,127
524
993
831
6,359
1,398
1,224
n.a.
17
1,518
n.a.
2,419
25,734
5,635
4,309
15,790

5,487
135,215
106,974
1,256
973
283
920
p)
608
100
pi
8,920
28,290
8,339
2,842
163
744
928
1,449
922
583
1
622
86
19,951
2,306
525
1,340
1,858
2,710
3,846
3,930
659
904
887
577
408
10,383
871
2,348
545
2,301
2,839
1,479
8,577
15,500
7,432
2,551
4,881
25,696
1,335
1,347
642
3,965
1,240
618
1,114
939
7,168
1,595
1,319
n.a.
19
1,667
n.a.
2,727
28,241
6,262
4,575
17,404

4,889
148,745
117,334
1,300
1,028
272
1,138
p)
825
86
pi
10,295
29,627
8,916
3,089
162
800
966
1,531
992
689
1
605
81
20,711
2,390
491
1,355
2,032
2,924
3,676
4,941
546
n.a.
916
1,012
428
11,247
852
2,506
579
2,548
3,092
1,671
9,630
16,954
8,098
2,867
5,231
29,044
1,462
1,462
663
4,744
1,410
676
1,233
1,078
8,181
1,776
1,315
529
21
1,572
n.a.
2,922
31,411
6,859
4,658
19,893

4,867
168,585
134,575
1,607
1,179
428
1,307
p)
985
69
pi
12,638
33,208
10,005
3,373
186
921
1,141
1,709
1,128
752
1
693
101
23,203
2,964
573
1,434
2,257
3,238
4,142
5,130
765
n.a.
1,009
1,187
503
12,614
934
2,859
643
2,874
3,428
1,876
10,743
19,198
9,839
3,361
6,478
33,420
1,729
1,706
794
5,709
1,641
763
1,425
1,405
9,395
1,934
1,354
640
24
1,676
n.a.
3,224
34,010
7,337
4,697
21,976

4,733
188,651
152,109
1,548
1,189
359
1,578
pi
1,145
151
p)
13,573
38,277
11,791
3,818
207
1,112
1,301
2,200
1,325
839
1
865
123
26,486
3,523
665
1,678
2,466
3,688
4,676
5,614
996
n.a.
1,159
1,407
613
13,947
989
3,111
698
3,327
3,871
1,950
11,909
21,384
10,835
3,861
6,974
39,057
2,076
1,795
889
6,930
1,595
878
1,913
1,664
10,974
2,403
1,445
740
27
1,884
n.a.
3,844
36,542
7,831
4,824
23,887

4,809
217,117
177,509
1,900
1,384
517
1,638
pi
1,151
159
pi
15,905
44,409
13,369
4,190
238
1,315
1,319
2,724
1,478
952
2
1,008
142
31,040
4,071
769
1,918
2,848
4,354
5,596
6,582
1,151
n.a.
1,336
1,673
743
16,042
1,103
3,560
760
3,865
4,566
2,188
13,927
24,685
13,082
4,482
8,599
45,921
2,557
2,051
997
8,285
1,935
1,054
2,257
2,089
12,737
2,708
1,597
934
35
2,131
n.a.
4,552
39,608
8,504
5,123
25,982

6,005
246,590
203,852
2,237
1,640
597
1,919
p)
1,381
183
pi
18,474
51,882
15,450
4,665
266
1,485
1,531
3,409
1,681
1,061
3
1,173
175
36,432
4,481
691
2,207
3,479
5,384
6,587
8,002
1,236
n.a.
1,518
2,044
802
18,132
1,279
4,009
800
4,313
5,278
2,452
15,850
27,452
15,334
5,245
10,089
52,573
2,907
2,256
989
9,990
2,158
1,287
2,527
2,295
14,365
3,173
1,734
1,120
40
2,308
n.a.
5,425
42,738
9,091
5,342
28,305

7,573
272,794
225,761
2,334
1,774
560
2,750
pi
2,076
282
pi
19,131
57,309
16,396
5,081
257
1,422
1,726
3,402
1,860
1,226
4
1,244
174
40,913
4,205
910
2,403
3,843
6,035
7,938
9,580
990
n.a.
1,615
2,515
880
20,158
1,375
4,218
914
4,835
6,032
2,784
17,716
29,666
17,118
6,043
11,075
59,579
3,292
2,460
948
11,555
2,233
1,540
2,803
2,391
16,586
3,830
1,953
1,290
44
2,553
n.a.
6,100
47,032
9,964
5,846
31,222

5,934
298,625
246,684
2,299
1,947
352
3,396
pi
2,546
449
P)
19,779
62,192
17,586
5,489
262
1,428
1,868
3,466
2,103
1,446
4
1,346
175
44,607
3,977
1,034
2,536
4,092
6,713
8,920
10,597
1,089
n.a.
1,679
2,911
1,059
22,314
1,423
4,410
1,000
5,287
7,032
3,162
19,200
32,108
18,879
6,879
12,000
66,517
3,666
2,565
1,010
13,179
2,400
1,519
3,044
2,501
18,988
4,375
2,129
1,416
52
2,728
n.a.
6,945
51,941
10,867
6,846
34,228

6

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

P)

7,296
22,672
6,830
2,346
129
607
774
1,207
740
481
1
483
63
15,842
1,987
453
955
1,425
1,914
2,935
3,227
571
818
778
427
351
8,502
743
1,891
483
1,787
2,367
1,232
6,576
12,940
6,606
2,024
4,582
20,638
1,106
1,177
617
3,097
978
444
839
794
5,772
1,202
1,111
n.a.
16
1,427
n.a.
2,057
23,953
5,335
4,092
14,526

Far West

44

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

P erson al Income by Major S ou rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the Far W est Region, 1958-93—

Continued

[Millions of dollars]
Line

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

Income by Place of Residence
1
2
3

Total personal Income ....
Nonfarm personal income
Farm incom e4 ................ .

4
5

6

444,165
438,153
6,012

477,179
471,288
5,891

525,762
518,837
6,925

568,584
562,172
6,411

609,308
601,904
7,404

649,678
640,942
8,736

699,019
689,952
9,067

758,274
748,314
9,960

820,759
810,776
9,981

851,530
842,716
8,814

900,699
891.054
9,646

929,154
919,054
10,100

Population (thousands)3 ............................................
Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .................

34,087
13,030

34,719
13,744

35,324
14,884

36,041
15,776

36,820
16,548

37,646
17,258

38,548
18,134

39,534
19,180

40,547
20,242

41,334
20,601

42,090
21,400

42,658
21,782

10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k ............................
Less: Personal contributions for social insuran ce8
Plus: Adjustment for residence .............................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence .........
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 .......................
Plus: Transfer payments ........................................

320,671
17,461
-338
302,871
77,150
64,144

346,091
19,446
-336
326,309
82,558
68,311

384,035
21,711
-381
361,943
93,542
70,277

416,331
24,303
-419
391,609
99,568
77,407

448,855
26,896
-444
421,515
105,519
82,274

486,397
29.37C
-508
456,51 S
106,900
86,259

526,258
33,221
-582
492,455
114,337
92,227

567,997
35,572
-674
531,751
126,261
100,262

611,363
38,653
-758
571,952
137.23C
111,577

630,316
40,564
-762
588,989
138,548
123,992

664,997
42,286
-750
621,961
137,909
140,829

681,753
43,839
-753
637,162
142,181
149,810

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...............................................
Other labor income ................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.............................................
Farm ...................................................................
Nonfarm 10...........................................................

261,802
26,004
32,865
3,331
29,535

279,110
28,214
38,768
3,274
35,494

306,842
30,209
46,984
4,263
42,721

332,057
31,941
52,333
3,666
48,666

355,701
33,572
59,581
4,796
54,786

386,511
35,666
64,220
6,076
58,144

419,670
39,433
67,155
6,015
61,140

452,277
43,610
72,109
6,651
65,458

488,023
48,078
75,262
6,044
69,218

499,611
52,220
78,485
4,908
73,577

520,011
56,018
88,968
5,908
83,061

527,239
59,674
94,840
6,111
88,729

6,012
314,659
258,990
2,351
2,068
284
3,331
p>
2,559
399
a
18,760
64,730
18,396
5,758
255
1,454
1,869
3,664
2,249
1,649
3
1,336
159
46,334
3,513
975
2,398
3,962
7,249
10,024
11,268
993
n.a.
1,588
3,197
1,168
23,648
1,380
4,478
1,037
5,587
7,631
3,535
19,750
33,591
19,429
7,609
11,820
73,401
3,862
2,733
1,080
14,979
2,460
1,605
3,253
2,766
21,559
5,250
2,390
1,505
61
2,932
n.a.
6,966
55,669
11,469
7,774
36,426

5,891
340,200
281,051
2,760
2,294
466
3,079
p>
2,180
496
o
20,099
68,140
19,400
5,835
295
1,552
1,970
4,012
2,396
1,737
3
1,453
148
48,740
4,128
1,095
2,190
4,112
7,445
11,340
11,140
944
n.a.
1,638
3,479
1,229
24,802
1,412
4,728
1,121
5,839
7,915
3,787
20,774
37,390
22,397
8,454
13,943
81,609
4,446
3,012
1,133
17,353
2,962
1,827
3,641
3,116
22,786
5,922
2,601
1,634
71
3,058
n.a.
8,047
59,150
12,379
8,327
38,444

6,925
377,110
313,848
3,011
2,612
400
3,436
117
2,471
463
384
23,839
74,779
20,709
6,043
310
1,756
2,160
4,359
2,565
1,703
3
1,676
134
54,070
4,544
1,279
2,309
4,571
8,184
13,179
12,029
1,081
n.a.
1,806
3,841
1,247
26,464
1,511
5,275
1,283
6,192
7,884
4,319
23,524
41,624
23,357
9,257
14,100
93,814
5,302
3,413
1,367
20,603
3,594
2,316
4,173
4,035
24,422
7,023
2,860
1,831
81
3,156
n.a.
9,637
63,262
13,061
8,795
41,405

6,411
409,920
341,073
3,767
2,796
971
3,566
pi
2,480
p>
390
26,179
79,295
21,419
6,136
323
1,794
2,250
4,667
2,688
1,774
2
1,659
127
57,875
4,511
1,377
2,127
4,713
8,719
14,584
13,556
1,152
n.a.
1,836
4,132
1,170
28,150
1,445
5,552
1,357
6,408
8,164
5,224
25,673
45,525
24,354
9,928
14,425
104,565
6,298
4.145
1,423
23,460
4,259
2,241
4,618
4,422
26,579
7,816
3,041
2,053
94
3,314
n.a.
10,803
68,847
13,771
9,323
45,753

7,404
441,451
368,507
4,235
2,861
1,374
3,148
188
1,999
578
383
29,840
82,808
22,388
6,314
356
2,035
2,344
5,036
2,760
1,637
1
1,776
129
60,420
4,885
1,360
2,089
4,687
8,684
15,008
14,985
1,155
n.a.
1,948
4,447
1,171
29,397
1,347
6,040
1,420
6,892
8,280
5,417
27,630
48,973
27,531
11,197
16,334
114,944
6,907
4,628
1,546
25,779
4,547
2,367
5,319
4,814
28,900
9,055
3,115
2,326
108
3,464
n.a.
12,068
72,944
13,819
9,694
49,430

8,736
477,661
399,398
4,834
3,600
1,235
3,120
189
1,864
695
372
31,880
87,377
24,155
6,621
423
2,273
2,478
5,560
2,936
1,688
1
2,042
133
63,222
5,282
1,562
2,143
4,664
9,040
15,555
15,706
1,260
n.a.
2,078
4,650
1,283
30,243
1,288
6,379
1,469
7,484
8,451
5,172
29,167
51,200
33,266
12,114
21,152
128,310
7,743
4,931
1,585
29,021
4,688
2,291
5,879
5,376
33,542
10,307
3,401
2,662
122
3,656
n.a.
13,107
78,263
14,676
10,152
53,436

9,067
517,191
433,578
5,303
3,833
1,470
3,323
p)
2,124
755
p)
35,541
94,114
26,274
6,935
447
2,484
2,530
6,232
3,468
1,832
1
2,217
128
67,840
5,533
1,601
2,382
5,013
9,935
10,739
16,386
1,381
n.a.
2,271
11,191
1,407
31,499
1,300
6,792
1,573
7,862
8,701
5,269
32,419
55,336
34,472
12,731
21,741
141,572
8,452
5,252
1,753
25,339
5,004
2,454
6,556
6,102
36,390
11,923
3,830
2,983
152
4,131
20,131
1,118
83,613
15,745
10,400
57,468

9,960
558,037
467,672
5,417
4,116
1,301
3,474
p)
2,057
916
p)
39,184
100,061
27,995
7,333
502
2,727
2,703
6,758
3,595
1,879
1
2,364
133
72,065
5,863
1,683
2,525
5,348
10,742
11,226
17,879
1,443
n.a.
2,449
11,456
1,450
34,198
1,340
7,417
1,731
9,008
8,819
5,883
35,160
59,704
33,307
13,216
20,091
157,167
9,465
5,374
1,926
27,957
5,258
2,716
7,111
6,467
39,986
13,102
4,227
3,333
171
4,438
24,223
1,414
90,365
16,592
10,781
62,992

9,981
601,382
502,560
6,399
4,892
1,506
3,723
pi
2,280
921
pi
41,307
103,587
29,844
8,020
509
2,966
2,782
7,161
3,786
1,952
«
2,528
141
73,743
5,662
1,587
2,543
5,353
11,488
11,656
18,740
1,379
n.a.
2,583
11,250
1,500
36,550
1,299
8,117
1,786
9,738
9,546
6,064
38,002
62,978
35,687
13,786
21,901
174,327
9,971
5,568
2,083
31,879
5,451
2,752
9,295
7,861
44,383
14,231
4,269
3,813
191
4,780
26,266
1,534
98,822
17,754
11,191
69,878

8,814
621,502
515,113
6,583
5,069
1,514
4,063
59
2,543
1,007
454
38,222
104,619
30,896
8,521
480
3,200
2,874
7,400
3,547
2,172
«
2,555
146
73,723
5,337
1,568
2,577
5,130
11,832
11,900
18,061
1,554
n.a.
2,471
11,745
1,550
38,001
1,354
8,092
1,858
10,409
9,843
6,446
38,398
64,095
37,420
13,778
23,642
183,712
10,542
5,614
2,037
32,045
5,864
2,611
10,754
7,943
48,432
14,640
5,184
4,365
205
4,840
27,051
1,585
106,389
18,439
11,940
76,011

9,646
655,352
543,243
6,627
5,307
1,320
4,122
70
2,540
1,016
496
37,080
105,888
31,999
8,899
496
3,266
2,993
7,629
3,834
2,207

10,100
671,654
557,591
6,887
5,561
1,327
4,195
68
2,611
1,031
485
37,962
104,687
32,624
8,986
515
3,276
3,043
7,869
4,041
2,119

116
73,889
5,326
1,659
2,386
5,079
12,052
11,894
17,842
1,772
n.a.
2,441
11,748
1,692
39,937
1,444
8,342
1,875
10,993
10,272
7,011
40,427
66,120
45,560
15,067
30,493
197,482
10,960
5,866
2,268
35,214
5,867
2,693
12,424
7,896
52,260
15,577
5,468
4,829
220
5,101
29,037
1,802
112,109
19,535
12,243
80,331

2,663
113
72,062
5,430
1,723
2,345
5,111
11,983
12,428
15,714
1,779
n.a.
2,492
11,322
1,735
41,586
1,592
8,604
1,878
11,193
10,845
7,474
39,977
67,870
46,923
15,818
31,105
207,504
11,459
6,106
2,401
38,222
6,214
2,806
12,930
8,973
54,198
15,694
5,787
5,221
231
5,302
30,136
1,825
114,063
20,405
11,639
82,019

7
8
9

17

18
19
20
21

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

66
67

68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

86

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Non fa rm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 ...............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction .............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels ........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts..................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts .............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts....................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals and allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts...............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable g o o d s .........................................................
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts.................................
Furniture and fix tu re s...........................................
Primary metal in d u s trie s ......................................
Fabricated metal products ...................................
Machinery and computer e q u ip m e n t..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 1 2 ..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ...............................
Trucking and warehousing ......................................
Water transportation................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Co m m u n ica tio n s......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services .......................
W holesale t r a d e ..........................................................
Retail tra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s t a te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking ..........................
M iscellaneous repair services .................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s .......................
Motion pictures ................ .......................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social se rvice s13 .....................................................
Museum s, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations ......................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, c iv ilia n ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and lo c a l............................................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Great Lakes

United States and Great Lakes Region
Per Capita Personal Income
Selected Years, 1929-93
Dollars (Thousands)
25 ---------------------------

1929

1939

1949

1959

1969

1979

1989

1993

□ United States «G reat Lakes

Great Lakes Region
Percent of Earnings
Selected Years, 1972-93
40%

30%

20 %

10%
0%

Farm Ag.Serv. Mining Constr. Manu. TPU*

Trade FIRE**Services Gov’t

■ 1972 S1977 «1982 @1987 01993
Transportation and public utilities
* Finance, insurance, and real estate

46

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Great Lakes

Person al Income by Major S o u rce and Earn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the Great Lakes Region, 1929-57
[Millions of dollars]
1934

1935

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

9,471
3,973
498

11,347
10,750
597

13,189
11,946
1,243

15,182
14,214
968

16,890
15,403
1,486

14,771
13,765
1,006

16,146
15,150
996

17,470
16,550
920

21,713
20,266
1,448

26,846
24,720
2,127

32,426
30,011
2,415

25,535
403

25,632
370

25,694
442

25,824
511

25,960
585

26,096
647

26,243
563

26,456
610

26,725
654

27,042
803

27,158
989

26,478
1,225

10,994
26
n.a.
10,968
2,616
551

7,990
26
n.a.
7,964
1,893
425

7,611
27
n.a.
7,584
1,460
427

9,389
28
n.a.
9,361
1,558
429

11,019
29
n.a.
10,990
1,707
492

12,412
31
n.a.
12,382
2,091
709

14,311
124
n.a.
14,187
2,229
474

12,392
112
n.a.
12,280
1,936
554

13,467
124
n.a.
13,343
2,207
596

14,657
139
n.a.
14,518
2,318
634

18,572
173
n.a.
18,399
2,690
624

23,523
218
n.a.
23,304
2,861
682

29,143
294
n.a.
28,848
2,962
615

11,013
128
2,250
762
1,488

9,009
116
1,870
760
1,110

6,812
100
1,078
400
678

6,502
90
1,018
411
607

7,886
97
1,406
504
902

8,715
105
2,199
1,131
1,068

10,135
126
2,152
336
1,316

11,401
130
2,779
1,339
1,440

10,058
130
2,204
861
1,343

11,016
135
2,316
851
1,465

12,045
147
2,465
768
1,697

14,942
169
3,46'
1,268
2,194

18,644
208
4,671
1,910
2,761

23,398
269
5,475
2,151
3,325

1,267
14,519
13,483
19
210
931
5,352
1,511
2,888
790
1,781
1,036
157
16
863

929
12,462
11,374
18
172
678
4,240
1,384
2,480
687
1,716
1,088
162
17
909

891
10,104
9,035
19
120
436
3,197
1,168
2,032
582
1,480
1,069
162
17
890

493
7,497
6,538
15
80
209
2,221
898
1,486
487
1,141
959
153
17
789

498
7,112
3,107
12
86
146
2,313
820
1,373
415
941
1,005
227
16
763

597
8,792
7,589
12
113
241
3,055
905
1,703
461
1,101
1,203
341
12
850

1,243
9,776
8,547
15
119
295
3,566
974
1,900
495
1,183
1,229
323
14
892

968
11,444
9,886
14
148
443
4,193
1,092
2,146
542
1,309
1,558
715
16
827

1,486
12,824
11,379
19
165
478
5,053
1,183
2,446
595
1,441
1,446
557
17
872

1,006
11,386
9,636
18
139
390
3,753
1,087
2,299
555
1,395
1,750
801
18
931

996
12,471
10,800
19
148
465
4,460
1,162
2,532
567
1,448
1,671
715
20
936

920
13,737
12,142
20
167
489
5,236
1,242
2,853
585
1,549
1,595
608
28
959

1,448
17,125
15,536
23
208
769
7,301
1,447
3,489
622
1,677
1,589
55'
75
964

2,127
21,396
19,445
29
247
1,010
9,941
1,670
3,981
655
1,911
1,951
629
336
986

2,415
26,728
23,695
32
289
890
13,255
1,869
4,516
701
2,144
3,033
900
1,094
1.039

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

34,485
32,241
2,245

35,145
32,502
2,643

38,120
35,072
3,049

42,152
39,212
2,940

47,290
43,314
3,976

45,522
42,897
2,626

50,619
47,947
2,672

57,420
54,151
3,270

60,891
57,797
3,094

66,490
63,759
2,731

65,818
63,089
2,729

71,176
69,025
2,151

76,229
73,887
2,342

79,360
77,119
2,240

Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .............................

26,511
1,301

26,379
1,332

28,425
1,341

29,153
1,446

29,832
1,585

30,324
1,501

30,530
1,658

30,883
1,859

31,498
1,933

32,166
2,067

33,063
1,991

33,779
2,107

34,404
2,216

34,967
2,270

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 ..................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence7 ........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re s id e n c e .....................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
Plus: Transfer p a y m e n ts....................................................

31,013
313
n.a.
30,700
3,052
734

30,974
317
n.a.
30,657
3,198
1,290

32,570
364
n.a.
32,206
3,770
2,145

36,200
430
n.a.
35,769
4,078
2,304

40,970
458
26
40,485
4,553
2,252

38,989
468
-29
38,493
4,833
2,196

43,074
619
-2 7
42,429
5,616
2,574

50,102
742
-31
49,328
5,871
2,221

53,215
816
-2 1
52,372
6,089
2,430

57,803
850
-2 8
56,925
6,873
2,691

56,471
1,018
-2 2
55,431
7,212
3,175

61,140
1,155
-1 6
59,969
7,828
3,379

65,285
1,279
-4
64,002
8,586
3,641

67,444
1,448
13
66,009
9,120
4,230

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ inco m e10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10 ......................................................................

25,138
387
5,487
1,963
3,524

24,473
451
6,050
2,354
3,696

25,166
496
6,908
2,725
4,183

28,976
615
6,609
2,603
4,006

32,166
700
8,104
3,603
4,501

31,435
757
6,797
2,277
4,521

34,826
975
7,272
2,338
4,935

40,384
1,257
8,461
2,919
5,541

43,235
1,403
8,577
2,759
5,818

47,606
1,626
8,571
2,422
6,150

46,074
1,643
8,754
2,445
6,309

50,406
1,926
8,808
1,872
6,935

53,740
2,171
9,374
2,061
7,313

55,416
2,395
9,633
1,950
7,683

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Nonfarm .............................................................................
Private ............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o the r11 .
Mining .........................................................................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s ..............................
W holesale and retail t ra d e .........................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Services ......................................................................
Government and government enterprises ....................
Federal, c iv ilia n ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and lo c a l............................................................

2,245
28,768
25,177
38
306
712
14,091
2,136
4,780
742
2,372
3,591
898
1,589
1,104

2,643
28,331
24,409
40
306
80
12,483
2,212
5,187
827
2,547
3,922
885
1,822
1,215

3,049
29,521
26,663
48
331
1,285
11,982
2,593
6,534
982
2,908
2,858
818
644
1,396

2,940
33,259
30,640
52
410
1,631
14,333
2,890
7,029
1,053
3,242
2,620
739
281
1,599

3,976
36,994
34,030
87
460
2,076
15,886
3,107
7,380
1,228
3,807
2,964
772
298
1,894

2,626
36,364
33,152
95
401
2,063
14,975
3,104
7,281
1,321
3,912
3,212
842
301
2,069

2,672
40,402
36,974
103
462
2,281
17,380
3,317
7,799
1,498
4,145
3,427
896
356
2,176

3,270
46,832
42,682
120
486
2,854
20,551
3,746
8,681
1,658
4,586
4,150
1,121
667
2,361

3,094
50,121
45,510
136
459
3,165
22,011
3,964
3,967
1,826
4,982
4,611
1,252
751
2,608

2,731
55,073
50,301
141
477
3,407
25,059
4,222
9,547
2,008
5,439
4,772
1,262
674
2,837

2,729
53,742
48,782
153
436
3,524
22,911
4,117
9,732
2,219
5,690
4,960
1,223
613
3,123

2,151
58,989
53,744
159
467
3,830
25,783
4,399
10,364
2,452
6,290
5,245
1,285
623
3,337

2,342
62,943
57,295
164
515
4,236
27,096
4,713
11,068
2,636
6,866
5,648
1,317
660
3,671

2,240
65,204
59,200
169
526
4,276
27,647
4,918
11,525
2,813
7,326
6,004
1,371
628
4,005

1929

1930

1931

1932

19,793
18,526
1,267

16,929
16,000
929

14,135
13,245
891

10,281
9,789
493

Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .............................

25,187
786

25,332
668

25,426
556

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 ..................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re s id e n c e .....................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ...................................
Plus: Transfer payments ....................................................

15,786
25
n.a.
15,761
3,724
307

13,391
26
n.a.
13,365
3,253
311

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Non fa rm 10 ......................................................................

12,753
132
2,901
1,074
1,827

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Nonfarm .............................................................................
Pnvate ............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and t h e r " .
Mining .........................................................................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s..............................
W holesale and retail tra d e ..........................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Services ......................................................................
Government and government enterprises ....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and local ............................................................

1933

Income by Place of Residence
Total personal Income .......................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................
Population (thousands)5 ........................................................

Income by Place of Residence
Total personal income .......................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................
Population (thousands)5 ........................................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Great Lakes

47

Person al Income by Major S o u rce and Earn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the Great Lakes Region, 1958-93
[Millions of dollars]
1958

Line

1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Incom e by P la ce of R e sid e n ce
1
2
3

Total p e rso n a l in co m e ........................................................
Nonfarm personal income ..................................................
Farm inco m e4 ....................................................................

79,455
76,880
2,575

84,841
82,712
2,128

87,940
85,739
2,200

89,912
87,302
2,609

95,266
92,759
2,507

99,720
97,205
2,515

107,175
104,954
2,221

117,328
114,522
2,806

127,804
124,618
3,186

134,694
131,903
2,791

147,021
144,311
2,710

159,583
156,496
3,087

4
5

Population (thousands)3 ........................................................
P er cap ita p e rso n a l in co m e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

35,578
2,233

35,928
2,361

36,290
2,423

36,616
2,456

36,927
2,580

37,357
2,669

37,868
2,830

38,405
3,055

38,951
3,281

39,347
3,423

39,645
3,708

39,904
3,999

6
7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k ........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence ..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

65,983
1,395
43
64,630
9,410
5,415

70,934
1,625
48
69,357
10,117
5,367

73,188
1,908
47
71,327
10,879
5,734

73,690
1,936
65
71,819
11,439
6,653

78,301
2,078
79
76,302
12,260
6,704

81,927
2,360
97
79,664
13,141
6,915

88,171
2,493
113
85,791
14,294
7,091

96,494
2,653
122
93,962
15,741
7,625

105,967
3,658
145
102,454
16,940
8.410

110,669
4,189
176
106,656
18,113
9,925

120,821
4,662
192
116,351
19,304
11,365

131,912
5,345
250
126,816
20,300
12,467

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages ana salaries ...........................................................
Other labor in c o m e .............................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 1 0 .........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10.......................................................................

53,412
2,503
10,069
2,270
7,799

58,075
2,757
10,102
1,818
8,284

60,301
2,902
9,985
1,873
8,112

60,175
2,921
10,594
2,256
8,339

64,183
3,290
10,829
2,132
8,697

67,473
3,442
11,012
2,108
8,903

72,723
3,917
11,531
1,826
9,705

79,282
4,590
12,622
2,418
10,204

87,123
5,177
13,668
2,802
10,865

91,555
5,376
13,738
2,405
11,334

100,355
6,269
14,196
2,317
11,880

110,153
7,114
14,645
2,673
11,972

2,575
63,408
56,947
169
160
9
501
165
114
60
161
4,036
25,432
7,327
2,186
133
353
819
1,359
1,082
335
12
837
211
18,104
279
484
2,833
2,443
3,648
2,395
901
3,325
158
858
359
421
4,831
1,366
1,244
100
419
838
865
3,959
7,516
2,958
828
2,130
7,546
310
957
492
845
305
202
264
91
1,947
487
320
n.a.
6
682
n.a.
637
6,461
1,477
556
4,428

2,128
68,805
62,041
168
161
7
515
177
109
58
172
4,232
28,426
7,823
2,256
158
372
905
1,425
1,160
344
12
959
231
20,603
317
514
3,324
2,795
4,257
2,789
910
3,715
173
959
402
448
5,135
1,374
1,415
114
450
888
894
4,232
8,016
3,153
876
2,277
8,163
326
992
499
954
329
196
269
91
2,147
567
347
n.a.
6
766
n.a.
67 4
6,765
1,521
566
4,677

2,200
70,988
63,717
185
178
7
538
171
116
72
179
4,296
29,068
8,010
2,289
149
383
937
1,494
1,217
343
13
960
227
21,058
304
518
3,412
2,861
4,298
2,854
822
3,979
162
964
421
463
5,281
1,349
1,484
122
472
918
935
4,391
8,159
3,254
944
2,309
8,546
321
1,014
530
992
364
210
281
90
2,241
576
375
n.a.
6
845
n.a.
70C
7,271
1,607
581
5,083

2,609
71,081
63,222
183
176
8
519
157
121
64
177
4,309
28,020
8,085
2,287
139
388
969
1,535
1,245
346
12
940
225
19,935
290
497
3,246
2,672
4,112
2,894
753
3,533
134
934
414
456
5,245
1,277
1,469
106
489
932
972
4,469
8,136
3,430
996
2,434
8,912
323
1,047
517
1,032
368
216
294
90
2,346
635
409
n.a.
7
913
n.a.
715
7,856
1,705
609
5,544

2,507
75,795
67,410
215
207
8
516
163
115
63
175
4,400
30,596
8,459
2,331
141
415
1,029
1,593
1,302
338
12
1,062
237
22,136
307
527
3,562
2,932
4,638
3,142
802
4,172
172
969
433
480
5,485
1,311
1,588
106
517
961
1,003
4,639
8,561
3,585
1,048
2,537
9,414
334
1,072
523
1,115
394
209
286
94
2,534
661
45C
n.a.
7
992
n.a.
742
8,384
1,797
627
5,960

2,515
79,412
70,538
212
203
8
519
166
122
59
173
4,679
32,000
8,707
2,362
146
430
1,070
1,649
1,347
337
12
1,119
237
23,292
332
539
3,720
3,111
4,903
3,118
846
4,600
180
1,002
448
493
5,682
1,309
1,686
108
542
987
1,050
4,852
8,849
3,781
1,111
2,669
9,965
348
1,113
521
1,201
434
230
308
96
2,676
708
511
n.a.
9
1,023
n.a.
785
8,873
1,935
577
6,361

2,221
85,950
76,348
242
232
10
545
169
126
67
183
5,194
34,671
9,214
2,479
144
454
1,127
1,754
1,443
332
12
1,221
249
25,456
353
567
4,154
3,443
5,561
3,313
884
4,963
173
1,073
446
527
6,055
1,349
1,812
115
577
1,080
1,121
5,201
9,534
4,054
1,179
2,875
10,852
363
1,201
528
1,327
470
251
333
98
2,948
777
582
n.a.
11
1,061
n.a.
901
9,602
2,056
621
6,925

2,806
93,688
83,318
258
247
11
565
177
126
68
194
5,882
38,153
9,779
2,570
153
493
1,192
1,854
1,551
339
12
1,359
257
28,373
386
624
4,555
3,854
6,196
3,688
969
5,764
175
1,140
468
555
6,504
1,392
2,019
124
614
1,190
1,165
5,592
10,284
4,314
1,264
3,050
11,768
400
1,275
530
1,441
493
274
353
104
3,244
859
642
n.a.
12
1,135
n.a.
1,006
10,370
2,173
643
7,553

3,186
102,782
91,263
269
258
12
577
192
109
73
202
6,542
42,087
10,522
2,685
165
527
1,280
2,004
1,732
342
11
1,507
269
31,564
420
718
4,911
4,195
7,184
4,191
1,168
6,184
225
1,219
553
597
6,922
1,399
2,187
131
678
1,285
1,242
6,103
11,082
4,604
1,360
3,244
13,077
444
1,406
529
1,627
533
320
377
116
3,586
965
723
n.a.
14
1,278
n.a.
1,157
11,519
2,353
773
8,393

2,791
107,878
95,461
299
286
14
638
207
146
75
210
6,965
42,776
11,018
2,790
159
535
1,343
2,118
1,896
350
10
1,553
264
31,758
417
705
4,807
4,246
7,323
4,337
1,279
5,919
308
1,224
592
601
7,255
1,425
2,234
128
751
1,400
1,317
6,501
11,818
4,979
1,488
3,490
14,230
477
1,482
543
1,786
594
331
397
123
4,030
1,017
790
n.a.
15
1,378
n.a.
1,266
12,417
2,587
798
9,033

2,710
118,111
104,243
332
318
14
695
214
192
77
212
7,757
46,800
11,991
2,950
174
611
1,443
2,268
2,069
401
10
1,781
286
34,809
447
751
5,210
4,740
7,563
4,594
1,371
7,149
358
1,322
671
633
7,836
1,463
2,496
139
833
1,467
1,437
6,999
12,812
5,538
1,630
3,908
15,473
501
1,524
560
1,946
633
355
435
147
4,512
1,047
902
n.a.
17
1,495
n.a.
1,398
13,869
2,839
832
10,197

3,087
128,825
113,614
369
356
13
731
250
182
78
222
8,737
50,851
12,967
3,142
185
632
1,568
2,486
2,269
440
9
1,934
301
37,884
479
818
5,775
5,102
8,333
5,013
1,435
7,644
412
1,459
755
659
8,510
1,536
2,688
143
908
1,700
1,536
7,571
13,816
5,905
1,800
4,104
17,123
531
1,568
557
2,171
702
401
444
140
5,135
1,130
1,069
n.a.
19
1,696
n.a.
1,560
15,211
3,034
892
11,285

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
N o n fa rm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o th e r’ 1 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o the r11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction .............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls .........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and Kindred p ro d u c ts.................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts.............................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u c ts......................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals and allied p ro d u cts............................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather p ro d u cts..............................
Durable g o o d s .........................................................
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts................................
Furniture and fix tu re s..........................................
Primary metal industries .....................................
Fabricated metal products ..................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and eq uip m en t............................
O rd n an ce 12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ..............................
Trucking and warehousing ......................................
W ater transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
C om m u n ica tio n s......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ........................
W holesale trade ..........................................................
Retail t r a d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging p la c e s .............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ...................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services ................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social se rv ice s, J .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations .....................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and local ............................................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

48

Great Lakes

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Person al Incom e by Major S o u rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the Great Lakes Region, 1958-93—

Continued

[Millions of dollars]
Line

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Incom e by P la ce o f R e sid e n ce
1
2
3

Total p e rso n a l Incom e ........................................................
Nonfarm personal income ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

167,222
164,479
2,743

179,602
176,429
3,173

196,009
192,637
3,372

220,178
214,811
5,368

239,127
234,304
4,823

255,626
249,70^
5,922

284,085
279,157
4,928

316,394
311,42$
4,965

352,020
347,391
4,628

388,946
383,748
5,198

420,270
417,090
3,180

457,660
454,001
3,659

4
5

Population (thousands)3 ........................................................
P er cap ita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

40,320
4,147

40,622
4,421

40,824
4,801

40,947
5,377

41,037
5,827

41,105
6,219

41,187
6,897

41,353
7,651

41,510
8,480

41,611
9,347

41,706
10,077

41,646
10,989

6
7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence .........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

136,382
5,525
234
131,091
21,233
14,898

145,273
6,081
295
139,487
22,391
17,724

159,123
6,802
336
152,655
23,515
19,838

179,093
8,447
382
171,026
26,266
22,882

191,403
9,601
468
182,271
29.74C
27,116

199,422
9,85£
52S
190,091
31,187
34,347

223,152
10,853
658
212,956
33,991
37,137

249,911
11,918
826
238,818
38,214
39,362

278,808
13,880
1,063
265,991
43,699
42,330

305,228
16,114
1,291
290,404
50,942
47,600

315,351
17,237
1,546
299,660
61,267
59,343

335,217
19,846
1,589
316,961
74,410
66,290

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ inco m e 10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10.......................................................................

114,403
7,835
14,144
2,299
11,845

120,869
8,957
15,447
2,726
12,721

132,093
10,372
16,658
2,900
13,757

147,542
11,916
19,635
4,817
14,818

158,528
13,356
19,519
4,162
15,356

162,836
14,994
21,593
5,176
16,417

181,554
18,350
23,247
4,065
19,182

202,184
21,846
25,881
4,042
21,838

226,772
24,733
27,303
3,745
23,557

248,995
27,386
28,847
4,217
24,629

259,128
29,544
26,678
2,137
24,542

277,261
31,069
26,886
2,615
24,272

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
N o n fa rm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o th e r11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction ............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls .........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts.................................
Textile mill products ............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing .......................................
Chem icals and allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood products ................................
Furniture and fix tu re s ..........................................
Prim ary metal industries .....................................
Fabricated metal products ..................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ..............................
Railroad tran sportation............................................
Trucking and warehousing .....................................
Water transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Co m m u n ica tio n s......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services .......................
W holesale trade ..........................................................
Retail t r a d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, Insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services .................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health services ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ..............................................
Social se rv ice s1J .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological g a rd e n s ...............
Membership organizations .....................................
Engineering and management services “ .............
M iscellaneous services ..........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .......................................................................
State and local ............................................................

2,743
133,639
116,491
385
366
18
793
301
176
79
235
8,571
50,230
13,397
3,364
176
589
1,610
2,595
2,373
464
9
1,923
294
36,833
479
786
5,625
5,025
8,330
5,054
1,351
6,927
340
1,497
749
667
9,159
1,629
2,722
153
993
1,940
1,721
8,126
14,507
6,246
2,025
4,221
18,475
570
1,602
553
2,289
737
410
488
141
5,775
1,274
1,213
n.a.
22
1,774
n.a.
1,628
17,148
3,414
929
12,805

3,173
142,100
123,282
440
420
20
775
314
135
78
248
9,116
51,981
13,871
3,533
182
626
1,644
2,654
2,447
488
10
2,001
286
38,110
523
800
5,720
5,184
7,741
5,134
1,355
8,380
243
1,591
753
685
9,988
1,711
3,100
159
1,017
2,133
1,867
8,667
15,451
7,003
2,202
4,801
19,860
601
1,592
549
2,387
833
442
510
149
6,360
1,392
1,363
n.a.
32
1,935
n.a.
1,716
18,817
3,569
925
14,323

3,372
155,751
135,195
482
460
22
930
388
193
88
262
9,811
57,613
14,870
3,690
201
688
1,789
2,803
2,593
518
11
2,268
311
42,743
597
902
6,533
5,827
8,865
5,379
1,486
9,579
243
1,774
798
759
11,050
1,802
3,541
145
1,091
2,399
2,072
9,430
16,520
7,527
2,358
5,169
21,833
661
1,635
549
2,562
918
477
565
161
7,205
1,557
1,542
n.a.
26
2,022
n.a.
1,952
20,556
3,788
965
15,803

5,368
173,725
151,317
529
503
27
1,055
431
241
97
287
10,728
65,858
16,182
3,892
210
764
1,958
3,010
2,827
604
10
2,589
320
49,676
674
1,036
7,733
6,704
10,376
6,169
1,638
11,372
266
1,953
926
829
12,237
1,992
4,083
151
1,169
2,621
2,221
10,279
18,330
8,005
2,598
5,407
24,296
719
1,699
561
3,045
1,059
546
653
167
8,006
1,762
1,612
n.a.
30
2,135
n.a.
2,304
22,408
4,060
984
17,364

4,823
186,580
162,499
576
543
32
1,394
541
413
127
314
11,210
69,608
17,395
4,237
194
767
2,099
3,170
3,154
709
10
2,725
329
52,213
699
1,068
8,588
6,924
11,660
6,381
1,720
10,949
259
2,045
1,013
907
13,236
2,090
4,353
153
1,325
2,931
2,384
11,759
19,566
8,306
2,928
5,378
26,844
779
1,781
525
3,407
1,161
620
713
170
9,092
1,932
1,747
n.a.
34
2,315
n.a.
2,569
24,081
4,377
1,052
18,652

5,922
193,500
166,939
596
565
32
1,733
723
549
138
323
11,175
68,248
17,800
4,551
195
729
2,082
3,253
3,340
764
11
2,590
285
50,448
776
946
7,842
7,222
11,491
5,863
1,813
10,466
n.a.
2,070
1,092
866
13,550
2,075
4,185
160
1,388
3,116
2,627
12,786
20,369
9,072
3,251
5,821
29,409
762
1,806
522
3,761
1,245
631
788
195
10,515
2,069
1,588
775
37
2,069
n.a.
2,658
26,561
4,745
1,088
20,728

4,928
218,224
189,685
695
652
43
1,958
800
686
127
345
12,745
78,957
20,065
5,019
220
883
2,443
3,533
3,776
882
11
2,977
322
58,892
910
1,087
9,135
8,411
12,613
6,692
2,009
13,449
n.a.
2,369
1,256
962
15,320
2,330
4,892
183
1,540
3,407
2,968
13,942
22,682
10,507
3,634
6,873
32,879
886
1,996
600
4,428
1,459
687
891
236
11,932
2,236
1,620
903
41
2,152
n.a.
2,811
28,539
5,021
1,106
22,412

4,965
244,945
214,366
637
609
28
2,387
1,054
788
162
382
14,294
90,622
22,711
5,501
247
1,023
2,708
4,032
4,280
984
12
3,590
333
67,911
1,078
1,209
10,400
9,756
14,340
7,650
2,331
15,978
n.a.
2,632
1,459
1,078
16,950
2,529
5,472
201
1,865
3,720
3,163
15,255
24,710
11,979
3,990
7,990
37,532
1,048
2,113
650
5,263
1,429
770
1,122
269
13,619
2,820
1,672
1,031
53
2,337
n.a.
3,334
30,579
5,311
1,117
24,151

4,628
274,180
240,625
732
701
31
2,381
1,097
652
199
433
16,585
101,054
25,000
5,973
251
1,113
3,003
4,553
4,668
1,062
15
4,012
349
76,054
1,267
1,330
11,693
10,841
16,241
8,473
2,717
17,797
n.a.
2,908
1,596
1,191
18,984
2,695
6,213
240
2,149
4,147
3,539
17,313
27,415
13,607
4,478
9,129
42,554
1,230
2,358
706
6,080
1,666
887
1,231
344
15,360
2,989
1,826
1,206
64
2,589
n.a.
4,018
33,555
5,881
1,125
26,549

5,198
300,029
263,666
846
811
34
2,857
1,373
791
223
470
18,173
109,663
27,188
6,423
256
1,131
3,244
5,157
5,098
1,152
16
4,357
354
82,475
1,385
1,426
12,760
11,714
18,258
9,055
3,144
18,679

3,180
312,171
272,443
851
818
33
3,544
1,490
1,359
234
461
17,399
109,333
28,241
6,804
247
1,040
3,417
5,292
5,548
1,238
15
4,248
393
81,092
1,283
1,514
12,116
11,320
19,121
9,221
3,422
16,876

3,659
331,558
289,005
886
857
29
3,640
1,438
1,504
245
453
16,391
116,007
29,811
7,169
244
1,108
3,659
5,432
5,988
1,117
17
4,666
409
86,196
1,278
1,627
13,120
12,095
20,152
9,860
3,634
17,823

3,152
1,669
1,234
20,934
2,980
6,790
262
2,379
4,635
3,889
19,453
29,329
14,961
5,040
9,921
47,450
1,340
2,506
680
7,157
1,799
989
1,337
319
17,088
3,336
1,956
1,359
71
2,729

3,132
1,771
1,316
21,758
2,968
6,559
249
2,537
5,138
4,306
20,430
30,203
16,099
5,621
10,478
52,825
1,406
2,655
651
7,996
1,723
1,091
1,427
304
19,616
3,885
2,174
1,553
80
2,964

3,260
1,949
1,399
23,169
2,852
6,790
270
2,778
5,682
4,797
21,902
31,570
17,195
6,060
11,135
58,245
1,479
2,712
649
9,048
1,819
1,048
1,490
280
22,316
4,143
2,387
1,689
86
3,101

4,785
36,363
6,152
1,175
29,036

5,301
39,728
6,746
1,335
31,647

5,997
42,553
7,265
1,588
33,699

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Great Lakes

49

P erson al Income by M ajor S ou rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the Great Lakes Region, 1958-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
Line

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

Income by Place of Residence
1

Total personal Income ....

2
3

Nonfarm personal income
Farm incom e4 .................

4
5

6
7
8
9

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

66
67

68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

86

472,727
470,166
2,561

496,105
496,799
-694

544,534
540,920
3,614

577,143
573,067
4,076

610,422
606,870
3,552

639,123
634,791
4,332

680,125
677,511
2,614

728,259
721,605
6,654

769,910
764,409
5,501

795,567
792,298
3,269

846,619
841,54C
5,079

885,296
880,872
4,424

Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .................

41,493
11,393

41,369
11,992

41,397
13,154

41,423
13,933

41,460
14,723

41,595
15,365

41,727
16,299

41,873
17,392

42,079
18,297

42,392
18,767

42,719
19,818

43,017
20,580

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k ............................
Le ss: Personal contributions for social insurance8
Plus: Adjustment for residence .............................
E quals: Net earnings by place of r e s id e n c e .........
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ......................
P lu s: Transfer p a y m e n ts........................................

337,001
20,799
1,494
317,696
80,584
74,447

350,840
21,526
1,486
330,800
86,042
79,263

389,552
23,863
1,600
367,289
96,387
80,858

415,313
26,748
1,632
390,197
101,516
85,431

438,951
28,588
1,689
412,052
107,873
90,497

464,933
30,593
1,755
436,095
108,425
94,603

498,763
33,946
1,891
466,708
114,044
99,373

530,216
37,008
1,924
495,132
127,092
106,035

556,922
39,348
1,918
519,493
135,257
115,160

572,248
41,481
1,955
532,722
135,413
127,433

614,304
43,706
2,085
572,683
133,044
140,892

643,436
46,165
2,178
599,450
135,993
149,853

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...............................................
Other labor income ................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.............................................
Farm ...................................................................
N onfarm 10...........................................................

280,096
32,135
24,769
1,383
23,385

292,132
33,134
25,574
-1,813
27,387

321,009
34,939
33,605
2,508
31,096

342,661
36,029
36,622
2,966
33,657

361,854
37,432
39,665
2,523
37,142

384,170
38,668
42,095
3,318
38,777

414,844
41,997
41,922
1,441
40,481

437,051
45,371
47,793
5,374
42,420

460,442
48,900
47,580
3,974
43,606

471,302
53,095
47,851
1,715
46,136

500,612
60,120
53,572
3,503
50,069

522,010
64,547
56,879
2,783
54,097

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Non fa rm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o the r11..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction .............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels ........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and Kindred p ro d u c ts..................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts.............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals and allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts .................................
Furniture and fix tu re s...........................................
Primary metal in d u s trie s ..................................
Fabricated metal products ..................................
Machinery and computer e q u ip m e n t..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts.......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public u tilitie s...............................
Railroad transportation ............................................
Trucking and warehousing .....................................
Water transportation................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Co m m u n ica tio n s........... ;.........................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services .......................
W holesale t r a d e ..........................................................
Retail t ra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair s e r v ic e s .................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion p ic tu re s ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social se rvice s1 3 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations ......................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government en te rp rise s.....................
Federal, c iv ilia n ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and lo c a l............................................................

2,561
334,439
288,695
936
925
11
3,537
1,674
1,294
149
419
15,586
110,183
30,816
7,473
250
1,102
3,775
5,740
6,322
1,106
17
4,620
412
79,367
1,176
1,610
11,177
11,138
17,910
9,503
3,560
16,830
n.a.
3,105
1,952
1,407
23,821
2,613
6,531
247
2,977
6,088
5,365
22,245
31,972
17,648
6,598
11,050
62,768
1,516
2,813
653
10,085
1,847
1,054
1,536
324
24,688
4,697
2,634
1,784
95
3,317
n.a.
5,727
45,744
7,582
1,821
36,342

-694
351,534
303,315
1,118
1,065
53
2,879
1,459
845
146
428
16,123
112,771
32,351
7,529
279
1,205
4,007
6,126
6,556
1,123
18
5,090
418
80,420
1,371
1,734
10,604
11,660
16,138
9,835
3,690
18,702
n.a.
3,161
2,155
1,369
24,424
2,499
6,726
253
3,180
6,210
5,555
22,538
34,758
19,699
7,042
12,658
69,005
1,729
3,077
650
11,982
2,167
1,208
1,698
358
26,331
5,178
2,834
1,935
103
3,485
n.a.
6,270
48,219
8,049
1,946
38,225

3,614
385,938
334,707
1,293
1,235
58
3,206
1,616
979,
136
475
18,704
126,219
34,960
7,744
289
1,371
4,355
6,609
7,096
1,156
20
5,912
408
91,259
1,565
1,979
11,341
13,297
18,507
11,071
4,190
21,937
n.a.
3,414
2,411
1,547
26,241
2,605
7,558
281
3,541
6,266
5,989
25,266
37,573
20,589
7,576
13,013
75,616
1,893
3,273
746
13,690
2,633
1,422
1,839
532
27,552
5,925
3,096
2,093
108
3,597
n.a.
7,220
51,231
8,481
2,105
40,645

4,076
411,237
356,908
1,392
1,329
63
3,089
1,539
921
132
497
20,777
132,342
36,540
7,874
296
1,486
4,565
7,089
7,476
1,181
18
6,163
390
95,803
1,708
2,118
.11,004
14,319
19,307
11,172
4,495
24,119
n.a.
3,488
2,570
1,503
27,599
2,499
7,850
285
3,849
6,575
6,541
26,986
40,154
21,764
7,976
13,787
82,805
2,153
3,819
744
16,357
3,141
1,378
2,030
572
28,898
6,332
3,326
2,327
117
3,752
n.a.
7,858
54,329
8,929
2,272
43,128

3,552
435,399
377,545
1,426
1,350
76
2,602
1,423
503
134
542
23,546
135,181
38,293
8,113
308
1,568
4,812
7,400
8,105
1,164
15
6,391
417
96,888
1,960
2,219
10,584
14,501
19,125
11,416
4,759
24,555
n.a.
3,539
2,664
1,567
28,886
2,416
8,427
282
4,289
6,800
6,672
28,473
42,789
24,588
8,725
15,863
90,054
2,354
4,169
777
18,331
3,376
1,555
2,169
650
30,928
7,130
3,479
2,558
129
3,941
n.a.
8,507
57,854
8,954
2,422
46,478

4,332
460,601
399,362
1,870
1,799
72
2,404
1,258
451
137
559
25,511
137,408
40,313
8,376
315
1,561
5,023
7,946
8,519
1,264
16
6,839
455
97,095
2,214
2,481
10,594
14,527
19,323
11,278
4,712
23,903
n.a.
3,661
2,714
1,687
30,646
2,380
8,937
307
4,827
7,164
7,032
30,631
44,799
28,293
9,379
18,915
97,800
2,568
4,359
769
20,282
3,481
1,535
2,278
626
34,399
7,687
3,777
2,862
145
4,320
n.a.
8,713
61,239
9,544
2,512
49,183

2,614
496,150
430,630
1,907
1,853
54
2,394
1,177
480
140
597
27,968
147,495
43,715
8,918
354
1,675
5,298
8,694
9,460
1,287
16
7,536
477
103,780
2,534
2,715
11,686
15,534
21,595
11,037
4,285
25,260
n.a.
3,607
3,702
1,823
31,821
2,362
9,469
339
5,196
7,401
7,054
33,510
47,463
30,904
10,118
20,785
107,169
2,623
4,559
822
17,870
3,691
1,759
2,891
763
37,150
8,748
4,151
3,219
169
4,798
13,184
773
65,520
10,237
2,541
52,741

6,654
523,562
453,832
1,991
1,937
54
2,371
1,194
411
155
611
29,689
152,874
45,669
9,032
355
1,682
5,430
9,286
10,163
1,301
15
7,971
436
107,204
2,613
2,886
12,177
15,877
22,829
11,311
4,373
25,593
n.a.
3,689
4,088
1,770
32,747
2,242
9,867
361
5,601
7,369
7,306
35,980
49,911
31.560
10,625
20,935
116,709
2,914
4,569
877
19,540
3,842
1,895
3,246
1,037
40,292
9,142
4,428
3,604
184
5,104
15,092
942
69,730
10,800
2,624
56,306

5,501
551,422
476,364
2,336
2,269
67
2,443
1,253
433
130
627
30,992
155,439
47,777
9,575
379
1,561
5,769
9,660
10,763
1,329
16
8,253
472
107,663
2,624
2,977
12,291
15,948
23,210
11,430
4,409
24,836
n.a.
3,810
4,256
1,871
34,671
2,123
10,513
365
6,049
7,832
7,788
37,550
51,745
33,816
11,164
22,652
127,372
2,873
4,715
922
21,818
4,045
2,004
3,979
1,189
44,716
9,749
4,637
4,032
205
5,393
16,141
953
75,058
11,684
2,728
60,646

3,269
568,978
489,182
2,588
2,526
62
2,426
1,187
481
165
593
29,857
156,652
49,737
10,008
372
1,534
5,891
9,979
11,792
1,380
16
8,315
450
106,915
2,655
2,973
12,484
15,710
22,703
11,458
4,356
24,546
n.a.
3,733
4,389
1,908
35,599
2,147
10,549
392
6,555
7,810
8,146
38,817
53,188
35,897
11,660
24,237
134,158
3,014
4,775
892
22,045
4,246
1,874
4,601
1,295
48,796
10,086
5,196
4,446
228
5,522
16,206
935
79,796
12,117
2,801
64,878

5,079
609,225
524,567
2,775
2,709
66
2,419
1,129
472,
166
651
30,499
167,381
53,120
10,734
384
1,493
6,281
10,605
12,716
1,493
18
8,939
457
114,261
2,872
3,209
12,655
16,539
23,385
11,999
4,158
28,676
n.a.
4,001
4,730
2,037
37,564
2,255
11,156
400
7,002
8,048
8,702
40,978
56,181
40,690
12,943
27,747
146,080
3,073
5,128
983
24,327
4,398
1,990
5,268
1,347
53,517
10,940
5,533
4,952
242
5,827
17,539
1,016
84,658
12,932
2,798
68,928

4,424
639,012
550,852
2,947
2,875
72
2,303
960
506
164
672
32,552
174,445
55,270
10,898
402
1,581
6,541
10,940
13,400
1,444
17
9,591
457
119,174
3,151
3,455
13,170
17,427
24,831
12,694
3,870
29,554
n.a.
4,151
4,764
2,107
39,448
2,406
11,916
433
7,507
8,285
8,901
42,026
58,673
42,941
13,740
29,201
155,518
3,105
5,411
1,034
26,971
4,766
2,162
5,768
1,431
56,356
11,342
5,855
5,426
257
6,106
18,443
1,086
88,160
13,349
2,641
72,170

Population (thousands)5 ............................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

Mideast

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

United States
and Mideast Region
Per Capita Personal Income
Selected Years, 1929-93
Dollars (Thousands)
25 ---------- -----------------

1929

1939

1949

1959

1969

1979

1989

1993

□ United States ■ Mideast

Mideast Region

Percent of Earnings
Selected Years, 1972-93

Farm Ag.Serv. Mining Constr. Manu.

TPU*

Trade FIRE**Services Gov't

■ 1972 SU1977 *1 9 8 2 LJ1987 01993
‘ Transportation and public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

M ideast

51

Personal Income by Major Source and Earnings by Industry1 for the Mideast Region, 1929-57
[Millions of dollars]
1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

Income by Place of Residence
Total personal Income ........................................................

26,940

25,033

21,677

Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

16,850

15,549

17,346

18,704

21,356

22,407

24,531
503

21,231
446

20,820

22,027

26,372
569

23,592

27,520

32,851

38,624

16,558
292

15,226
323

17,003
343

18,236
468

20,906
450

21,877
530

20,377
443

21,614
413

23,165
427

26,982
538

32,070
780

37,695
930

Population (thousands)3 ........................................................

28,223

28,727

Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .............................

29,078

29,321

29,488

955

871

29,665

29,823

29,959

527

585

627

30,225

30,325

30,400

30,177

29,767

575

30,013

30,267

745

713

747

689

728

778

905

1,089

1,298

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 ..................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 .......................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re sid e n c e .....................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
Plus: Transfer p a y m e n ts....................................................

19,525
55
n.a.
19,470
7,089
382

18,040
58
n.a.
17,982
6,655
396

15,260
61
n.a.
15,199
5,794
685

11.530
62
n.a.
11,468
4,819
562

10,857
62
n.a.
10,795
4,165
590

12,576
63
n.a.
12,513
4,167
666

13,794
66
n.a.
13,728
4,191
784

15,787
70
n.a.
15,717
4,654
985

17,088
184
n.a.
16,903
4,806
697

15,927
186
n.a.
15,741
4,194
886

16,894
203
n.a.
16,691
4,439
897

18,487
224
n.a.
18,263
4,440
889

22,337
259
n.a.
22,078
4,578
864

27,859
335
n.a.
27,524
4,485
841

33,741
446
n.a.
33,295
4,569
760

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ inco m e10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10 ......................................................................

16,331
178
3,016
412
2,604

15,353
174
2,513
348
2,166

13,141
159
1,960
319
1,640

10,227
139
1,164
191
973

9,580
127
1,150
235
915

10,894
138
1,543
251
1,292

11,749
149
1,896
370
1,525

13,391
180
2,215
341
1,875

14,527
188
2,373
405
1,968

13,542
188
2,197
314
1,883

14,403
196
2,295
288
2,007

15,639
216
2,632
296
2,336

18,806
230
3,302
382
2,920

23,276
272
4,311
586
3,725

28,157
332
5,252
695
4,557

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Nonfarm .............................................................................
Private ............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other11 .
Mining .........................................................................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s..............................
W holesale and retail tra d e .........................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Services ......................................................................
Government and government enterprises ....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and lo c a l............................................................

569
18,956
17,475
26
483
1,265
5,706
2,001
3,706
1,493
2,795
1,482
373
67
1,041

503
17,537
15,979
27
437
1,111
5,055
1,901
3,389
1,314
2,744
1,558
388
72
1,098

446
14,814
13,181
26
340
795
3,922
1,662
2,873
1,136
2,426
1,633
393
68
1,171

292
11,239
9,649
21
238
389
2,735
1,323
2,067
951
1,927
1,589
365
64
1,160

323
10,534
8,936
16
222
257
2,746
1,204
1,965
911
1,615
1,597
385
55
1,157

343
12,233
10,423
17
297
287
3,319
1,302
2,432
908
1,861
1,810
549
56
1,206

468
13,326
11,376
20
288
368
3,678
1,362
2,695
966
1,999
1,951
632
63
1,256

450
15,337
12,887
20
314
577
4,189
1,508
3,002
1,077
2,200
2,450
1,244
67
1,139

530
16,558
14,231
26
339
601
4,775
1,629
3,336
1,145
2,380
2,327
1,067
69
1,192

443
15,483
13,047
25
271
556
4,042
1,487
3,267
1,091
2,308
2,436
1,102
70
1,264

413
16,480
14,078
25
291
652
4,575
1,592
3,461
1,119
2,363
2,403
1,044
75
1,284

427
18,060
15,628
27
336
708
5,345
1,701
3,831
1,141
2,538
2,432
1,013
84
1,335

538
21,800
19,082
31
404
863
7,429
1,923
4,579
1,180
2,672
2,718
1,158
202
1,358

780
27,079
23,427
42
472
1,191
10,170
2,219
5,088
1,252
2,994
3,651
1,640
652
1,358

930
32,811
27,581
49
518
1,033
13,017
2,603
5,694
1,338
3,329
5,230
2,283
1,556
1,391

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1956

1957

Totai personal Income ......

41,762

43,128

46,855

Nonfarm personal income .
Farm incom e4 ..................

49,916

53,181

53,322

58,281

40,786
976

42,106
1,023

45,638
1,218

48,804
1,113

51,943
1,238

52,221
1,102

57,195
1,086

29,405

29,131

31,239

32,257

32,981

33,623

1,420

1,480

1,500

1,547

1,612

1,586

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 .....................................................
Le ss: Personal contributions for social insurance8
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ...........................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re s id e n c e ........ .
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ......................
Plus: Transfer p a y m e n ts .......................................

36,606
472
n.a.
36,134
4,722
906

37,081
480
n.a.
36,601
4,971
1,557

38,840
510
n.a.
38,330
5,637
2,889

41,557
572
n.a.
40,986
6,166
2,765

45,406
599
-151
44,656
5,770
2,754

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ..............................................
Other labor income ...............................................
Proprietors’ inco m e10............................................
Farm ...................................................................
Nonfarm 10 ..........................................................

30,519
453
5,634
731
4,903

30,593
518
5,970
766
5,204

31,698
572
6,569
926
5,643

34,881
704
5,973
802
5,171

Earnings by industry:7
F a r m ............................................................................... .
Nonfarm ......................................................................... .
Private ........................................................................ .
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o ther1
Mining ......................................................................
Construction .............................................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................
Transportation and public u tilitie s ..........................
W holesale and retail tra d e .......................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ...................... .
Services .................................................................. .
Government and government enterprises ................ .
Federal, c iv ilia n ........................................................
M ilita ry ......................................................................
State and lo c a l.........................................................

976
35,630
29,454
55
571
833
13,814
3,041
6,031
1,393
3,716
6,176
2,289
2,449
1,438

1,023
36,058
29,670
56
548
895
12,962
3,102
6,567
1,551
3,990
6,388
2,179
2,704
1,505

1,218
37,622
32,965
75
622
1,451
12,719
3,432
8,324
1,826
4,516
4,657
1,902
1,067
1,688

1,113
40,445
36,198
81
738
1,857
13,972
3,696
8,930
1,933
4,990
4,247
1,694
548
2,006

1954

1955

72,313

73,268

77,991

83,737

88,488

71,160
1,153

72,246
1,022

77,063
928

82,732
1,005

87,577
911

34,466

35,146

35,835

36,323

36,677

37,127

1,963

2,057

2,045

2,147

2,283

2,383

55,003
967
-2 8 8
53,748
7,301
2,956

58,259
1,054
-358
56,847
7,722
3,095

62,019
1,097
-412
60,510
8,470
3,333

61.795
1,264
-440
60,091
9,207
3,971

65,657
1,422
-504
63,731
9,968
4,291

70,523
1,550
-575
68,398
10,776
4,563

74,246
1,779
-645
71,822
11.432
5,235

40,852
1,052
6,552
796
5,756

46,459
1,313
7,230
967
6,263

49,445
1,452
7,363
939
6,424

52,836
1,631
7,552
870
6,682

52,484
1,700
7,610
756
6,854

55,598
1,909
8,150
677
7,473

59,842
2,181
8,500
754
7,746

62,862
2,455
8,929
654
8,274

1,086
47,370
42,087
136
710
2,699
16,174
4,238
9,388
2,524
6,217
5,283
2,028
657
2,598

1,269
53,734
47,291
153
778
3,072
18,835
4,816
10,181
2,729
6,726
6,443
2,569
1,048
2,826

1,234
57,025
49,679
171
707
3,122
20,150
5,094
10,400
2,921
7,113
7,346
2,882
1,344
3,120

1,153
60,866
53,304
176
698
3,296
22,091
5,403
10,943
3,130
7,566
7,563
2,887
1,327
3,348

1,022
60,773
53,134
189
549
3,410
21,040
5,323
11,258
3,430
7,934
7,639
2,741
1,276
3,622

928
64,729
56,695
187
545
3,657
22,379
5,655
11,760
3,771
8,740
8,035
2,934
1,219
3,882

1,005
69,518
60,957
197
604
4,035
24,221
6,075
12,543
3,960
9,322
8,561
3,058
1,188
4,315

911
73,335
64,262
197
615
4,216
25,250
6,421
13,260
4,245
10,058
9,073
3.188
1,132
4,753

1952

1953

64,005

67,664

62,736
1,269

66,429
1,234

33,726

33,937

1,728

1,886

45,021
618
-189
44,214
6,167
2,942

48,456
811
-235
47,410
7,060
3,811

38,371
799
6,236
934
5,302

37,991
863
6,167
817
5,350

1,238
44,168
39,493
114
807
2,249
15,438
4,126
8,936
2,165
5,657
4,676
1,815
593
2,268

1,102
43,919
38,879
125
648
2,308
14,635
4,039
8,927
2,282
5,914
5,040
1,986
596
2,458

Income by Place of Residence

Population (thousands)3 ...........................................

Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

52

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Mideast

Person al Income by M ajor S ou rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the M ideast Region, 1958-93
[Millions of dollars]
Line

1958

1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

Incom e by P la ce o f R e sid e n ce
1
2
3

Total p e rso n a l Incom e ........................................................
Nonfarm personal income ..................................................
Farm inco m e4 ....................................................................

90,269
89,116
1,153

95,755
94,771
984

99,849
98,782
1,067

103,843
102,780
1,063

109,642
108,761
881

114,508
113,574
934

122,605
121,674
931

131,434
130,412
1,022

141,931
140,888
1,043

153,141
152,045
1,095

168,175
167,132
1,043

181,593
180,379
1,214

4
5

Population (thousands)5 ........................................................
P er cap ita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

37,721
2,393

38,202
2,507

38,597
2,587

39,133
2,654

39,552
2,772

40,083
2,857

40,555
3,023

41,025
3,204

41,360
3,432

41,617
3,680

41,924
4,011

42,111
4,312

6
7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence ..........................................
E quals: Net earnings by place of residence .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

74,668
1,784
-690
72,194
11,704
6,371

79,250
2,053
-7 4 6
76,451
12,626
6,678

82,592
2,377
-830
79,385
13,511
6,953

85,069
2,439
-894
81,736
14,205
7,902

89,706
2,564
-984
86,158
15,373
8,112

93,163
2,915
-1,064
89,183
16,697
8,627

99,517
3,094
-1,171
95,252
18,368
8,986

106,155
3,242
-1,311
101,601
20,203
9,630

115,188
4,319
-1,431
109,438
21,535
10,958

123,130
4,902
-1,634
116,594
23,276
13,270

134,538
5,393
-1,788
127,357
25,211
15,607

145,541
6,145
-1,771
137,625
26,639
17,329

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Other labor in c o m e .............................................................
Proprietors’ inco m e1 0 .........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10 .......................................................................

62,833
2,565
9,270
867
8,402

66,688
2,858
9,704
704
9,000

69,930
3,019
9,643
783
8,859

71,768
3,164
10,137
777
9,361

75,890
3,436
10,380
588
9,791

78,801
3,640
10,722
638
10,084

83,914
4,038
11,565
632
10,933

89,506
4,536
12,113
715
11,398

97,222
4,977
12,988
757
12,231

103,925
5,345
13,860
806
13,054

113,435
6,172
14,931
753
14,178

123,589
6,821
15,131
906
14,225

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Nonfarm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o th e r11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction .............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls .........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts..................................
Textile mill products ............................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u c ts......................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals and allied p ro d u cts............................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics products .....
Leather and leather p ro d u cts..............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood products ................................
Furniture and fix tu re s..........................................
Primary metal industries ......................................
Fabricated metal products ...................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and eq uip m en t............................
O rd n an ce 1 2 ..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ...............................
Railroad transportation ............................................
Trucking and warehousing .................................
Water transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Communications ......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ........................
W holesale trade ..........................................................
Retai, t ra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s t a te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging p la c e s .............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private households ..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services ................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social services 13 .....................................................
Museum s, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations ......................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
Military .........................................................................
State and local ............................................................

1,153
73,515
63,963
199
153
45
538
350
39
37
111
4,133
24,068
10,661
2,015
785
2,210
775
1,738
1,787
483
74
399
394
13,407
207
347
2,610
1,576
2,045
2,248
1,094
479
235
861
1,010
695
6,188
1,251
1,087
636
992
1,266
956
5,263
8,208
4,540
1,214
3,326
10,826
490
1,109
848
1,477
328
247
402
203
2,373
768
650
n.a.
11
873
n.a.
1,049
9,552
3,475
986
5,091

984
78,266
68,277
196
151
45
516
324
40
37
115
4,523
25,793
11,318
2,125
843
2,328
837
1,835
1,903
493
77
448
428
14,475
232
379
2,765
1,660
2,202
2,599
1,059
555
211
952
1,117
744
6,447
1,257
1,179
665
1,062
1,302
982
5,483
8,613
4,943
1,273
3,670
11,762
517
1,159
856
1,668
343
256
429
205
2,620
888
708
n.a.
11
969
n.a.
1,130
9,989
3,531
992
5,466

1,067
81,525
70,905
202
160
42
498
293
46
39
119
4,635
26,760
11,590
2,191
823
2,345
858
1,934
1,995
490
82
450
421
15,169
224
386
2,984
1,700
2,359
2,730
1,027
590
260
975
1,177
757
6,694
1,233
1,246
702
1,116
1,359
1,038
5,739
8,935
5,068
1,362
3,705
12,376
523
1,184
907
1,781
389
286
464
207
2,695
913
807
n.a.
12
1,061
n.a.
1,147
10,620
3,748
989
5,883

1,063
84,006
72,638
217
169
47
460
259
48
38
115
4,770
26,700
11,751
2,238
790
2,332
883
1,997
2,074
482
75
458
422
14,949
209
373
2,794
1,650
2,368
2,842
928
552
324
963
1,195
751
6,871
1,170
1,299
693
1,190
1,425
1,094
5,871
8,992
5,532
1,439
4,093
13,225
530
1,238
885
1,927
426
310
485
217
2,868
1,055
920
n.a.
13
1,136
n.a.
1,217
11,368
4,003
965
6,401

881
88,825
76,638
242
191
50
455
252
44
36
123
5,182
28,164
12,234
2,289
816
2,423
943
2,068
2,154
477
76
549
437
15,930
221
392
2,949
1,754
2,567
3,008
1,007
629
325
1,022
1,267
791
7,081
1,130
1,392
733
1,210
1,478
1,138
6,111
9,409
5,739
1,529
4,210
14,255
555
1,291
895
2,107
461
328
490
229
3,134
1,143
1,049
n.a.
14
1,226
n.a.
1,334
12,188
4,243
1,007
6,937

934
92,229
79,304
242
191
52
470
256
55
37
122
5,396
28,715
12,466
2,320
824
2,446
973
2,108
2,259
469
77
558
433
16,249
236
398
2,988
1,779
2,611
2,985
1,091
726
268
1,052
1,311
805
7,342
1,129
1,484
736
1,258
1,538
1,196
6,320
9,722
6,098
1,620
4,478
14,999
589
1,337
891
2,249
497
337
523
247
3,309
1,231
1,132
n.a.
18
1,274
n.a.
1,364
12,925
4,565
970
7,390

931
98,586
84,637
279
222
56
499
271
60
40
128
5,773
30,274
13,070
2,424
851
2,546
1,027
2,239
2,384
457
89
595
458
17,204
243
428
3,307
1,897
2,798
3,075
1,087
787
223
1,128
1,370
861
7,834
1,139
1,599
791
1,330
1,700
1,275
6,664
10,448
6,555
1,731
4,824
16,310
624
1,408
903
2,541
545
340
556
257
3,720
1,334
1,235
n.a.
22
1,337
n.a.
1,489
13,949
4,884
1,024
8,041

1,022
105,133
90,014
303
239
64
516
277
67
39
133
6,127
32,320
13,727
2,476
910
2,679
1,069
2,357
2,549
470
86
669
462
18,593
265
454
3,563
2,034
3,074
3,301
1,141
940
228
1,183
1,485
925
8,264
1,175
1,741
764
1,428
1,845
1,311
7,004
11,069
7,020
1,836
5,184
17,391
661
1,457
906
2,741
565
373
567
274
3,924
1,436
1,381
n.a.
24
1,420
n.a.
1,661
15,119
5,239
1,056
8,824

1,043
114,144
97,363
321
255
67
512
279
56
41
136
6,581
35,098
14,641
2,558
973
2,828
1,146
2,528
2,800
479
84
747
497
20,457
280
493
3,806
2,240
3,403
3,719
1,374
946
262
1,273
1,695
966
8,832
1,156
1,864
855
1,566
2,014
1,378
7,533
11,712
7,599
1,960
5,639
19,175
695
1,574
906
3,077
602
418
606
302
4,345
1,589
1,517
n.a.
28
1,625
n.a.
1,891
16,782
5,739
1,210
9,832

1,095
122,035
103,550
346
278
69
563
281
111
40
131
6,913
36,413
15,272
2,648
979
2,942
1,185
2,689
2,947
504
87
795
494
21,141
275
507
3,747
2,285
3,622
3,934
1,449
917
312
1,290
1,818
987
9,306
1,154
1,936
894
1,756
2,102
1,464
7,981
12,405
8,447
2,156
6,291
21,176
739
1,667
930
3,470
673
434
634
316
4,948
1,702
1,687
n.a.
32
1,852
n.a.
2,092
18,485
6,194
1,245
11,046

1,043
133,495
112,729
386
315
71
620
277
171
40
132
7,612
38,955
16,388
2,782
1,073
3,173
1,261
2,874
3,192
533
91
871
540
22,567
290
538
3,990
2,433
3,888
4,159
1,505
1,109
318
1,367
1,916
1,054
10,035
1,151
2,158
937
1,938
2,269
1,582
8,561
13,475
9,834
2,418
7,417
23,251
774
1,730
961
3,816
714
472
673
356
5,587
1,797
1,944
n.a.
35
2,020
n.a.
2,371
20,767
6,762
1,378
12,627

1,214
144,327
121,564
434
356
77
657
314
160
42
141
8,313
41,662
17,495
2,930
1,117
3,305
1,376
3,095
3,484
590
91
981
527
24,167
306
583
4,272
2,630
4,273
4,444
1,580
1,120
300
1,491
2,062
1,106
10,902
1,192
2,328
924
2,135
2,594
1,729
9,226
14,438
10,374
2,748
7,626
25,559
839
1,750
959
4,331
770
491
677
380
6,293
1,939
2,202

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

41
2,257
n.a.
2,629
22,764
7,157
1,459
14,147

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Mideast

53

Person al Income by Major S o u rce and Earn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the M ideast Region, 1958-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
1970

Line

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Incom e by P la ce o f R e sid e n ce
1
2
3

Total p erso nal Incom e ........................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

195,084
193,914
1,170

208,526
207,438
1,088

225,193
224,116
1,077

244,334
242,855
1,479

265,521
264,125
1,396

285,004
283,712
1,292

309,097
307,738
1,359

336,092
334,936
1,156

370,152
368,779
1,373

409,009
407,442
1,567

455,185
454,028
1,157

504,595
503,089
1,506

4
5

Population (thousands)5 ........................................................
P e r capita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

42,517
4,588

42,870
4,864

42,992
5,238

42,837
5,704

42,709
6,217

42,728
6,670

42,667
7,244

42,547
7,899

42,421
8,726

42,358
9,656

42,273
10,768

42,327
11,921

6
7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence ..........................................
E quals: Net earnings by place of residence .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

155,256
6,497
-1,683
147,075
27,454
20,555

163,938
7,037
-1,750
155,151
28,585
24,790

177,186
7,825
-1,875
167,487
29,777
27,930

192,327
9,622
-1,970
180,734
32,541
31,058

205,955
10,622
-2,152
193,181
36,237
36,103

216,031
11,030
-2,429
202,572
37,314
45,118

234,044
11,752
-2,715
219,578
40,385
49,134

254,621
12,755
-3,006
238,860
44,934
52,299

281,692
14,709
-3,481
263,501
51,036
55,615

309,553
17,009
-4,036
288,508
59,464
61,037

336,736
18,747
-4,774
313,216
71,553
70.416

365,425
22,082
-5,276
338,066
86,864
79.665

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10.......................................................................

132,281
7,908
15,066
855
14,212

139,280
8,838
15,819
778
15,042

150,359
10,182
16,645
764
15,880

163,543
11,301
17,483
1,090
16,394

175,520
12,739
17,696
942
16,753

182,553
14,737
18,740
796
17,944

195,216
17,115
21,713
815
20,898

209,767
19,802
25,052
574
24,478

230,621
22,486
28,585
812
27,773

253,521
25,029
31,003
953
30,050

276,960
28,163
31,613
513
31,100

302,499
30,621
32,304
875
31.430

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
N o n fa rm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction .............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fu e ls .........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ..................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts.................................
Textile mill products ............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts ...................................
Printing and publishing .......................................
Chem icals and allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable g o o d s .........................................................
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts................................
Furniture and fix tu re s ..........................................
Primary metal industries .....................................
Fabricated metal products ..................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related products .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ...............................
Railroad transportation ...........................................
Trucking and warehousing .....................................
Water transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Communications ......................................................
Electric, gas. and sanitary services ........................
W holesale trade ..........................................................
Retail t ra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services ................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ..............................................
Social s e rv ice s13 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations .....................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ..........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and local ............................................................

1,170
154,086
128,433
453
361
91
717
376
143
43
156
9,079
42,248
17,994
3,096
1,119
3,185
1,431
3,226
3,729
604
96
989
519
24,254
312
576
4,281
2,691
4,404
4,493
1,476
987
282
1,544
2,097
1,111
12,021
1,270
2,515
931
2,313
3,095
1,897
9,899
15,422
10,661
3,118
7,543
27,934
894
1,775
966
4,670
827
508
743
396
7,031
2,194
2,551
n.a.
47
2,394
n.a.
2,938
25,653
7,870
1,576
16,207

1,088
162,850
134,686
520
418
102
636
376
59
43
158
10,009
42,378
18,360
3,192
1,157
3,180
1,475
3,295
3,797
659
91
1,012
502
24,018
328
564
4,119
2,692
4,275
4,358
1,346
1,281
249
1,590
2,094
1,122
12,715
1,343
2,797
862
2,405
3,264
2,045
10,361
16,400
11,905
3,384
8,522
29,762
939
1,723
971
4,746
942
556
772
404
7,712
2,434
2,769
n.a.
59
2,630
n.a.
3,104
28,164
8,450
1,635
18,079

1,077
176,109
145,354
565
453
111
821
439
170
47
166
10,714
44,992
19,257
3,246
1,270
3,283
1,567
3,492
3,994
688
93
1,107
517
25,735
354
628
4,556
2,884
4,529
4,591
1,357
1,347
269
1,733
2,293
1,194
14,037
1,368
3,121
879
2,532
3,855
2,281
11,281
17,446
12,755
3,623
9,132
32,745
997
1,717
981
5,247
1,054
603
829
415
8,667
2,711
3,176
n.a.
59
2,860
n.a.
3,430
30,755
9,097
1,725
19,933

1,479
190,848
157,138
627
502
125
931
495
207
47
183
11,714
48,934
20,311
3,341
1,373
3,408
1,659
3,694
4,306
702
97
1,212
519
28,623
397
664
5,251
3,196
4,981
5,073
1,505
1,519
295
1,937
2,545
1,259
15,123
1,520
3,439
949
2,660
4,081
2,473
12,121
18,796
13,031
3,951
9,080
35,862
1,071
1,776
1,010
5,807
1,178
661
936
417
9,704
2,981
3,383
n.a.
63
2,978
n.a.
3,897
33,710
9,754
1,715
22,240

1,396
204,559
168,066
669
522
147
1,326
685
386
65
190
11,966
52,721
21,445
3,508
1,350
3,308
1,812
3,896
4,880
835
98
1,249
508
31,276
404
686
6,025
3,541
5,596
5,415
1,709
1,463
279
2,072
2,775
1,310
16,160
1,599
3,623
1,012
2,902
4,390
2,633
13,496
19,656
13,368
4,509
8,860
38,704
1,104
1,801
953
6,341
1,252
734
1,003
429
10,804
3,208
3,565
n.a.
69
3,177
n.a.
4,264
36,493
10.664
1,693
24,136

1,292
214,739
175,317
686
527
159
1,676
900
532
59
185
11,097
52,942
21,823
3,668
1,246
3,239
1,787
4,037
5,090
957
96
1,225
477
31,119
442
561
5,733
3,703
5,814
5,417
1,761
1,420
n.a.
2,018
2,931
1,319
16,879
1,619
3,520
1,054
3,078
4,709
2,899
14,504
20,705
14,658
5,066
9,591
42,171
1,076
1,805
957
6,885
1,338
714
1,097
464
12,336
3,451
3,555
1,501
72
2,710
n.a.
4,208
39,422
11,510
1,680
26,232

1,359
232,685
191,086
777
588
188
1,885
924
721
56
185
11,429
57,556
23,829
3,952
1,310
3,555
2,015
4,335
5,592
1,028
95
1,406
541
33,727
510
589
6,124
4,051
6,201
5,855
1,799
1,772
n.a.
2,197
3,181
1,447
18,731
1,849
3,895
1,139
3,328
5,241
3,279
15,603
22,420
16,637
5,588
11,049
46,049
1,199
1,956
1,115
7,727
1,510
761
1,209
551
13,805
3,930
3,561
1,592
78
2,724
n.a.
4,330
41,599
12,534
1,690
27,375

1,156
253,464
209.569
767
577
190
2,353
1,265
798
94
197
11,944
64,054
26,686
4,241
1,377
4,028
2,270
4,913
6,412
1,149
103
1,620
572
37,369
592
642
6,760
4,333
6,861
6,295
2,102
2,229
n.a.
2,415
3,529
1,611
20,594
2,061
4,238
1,224
3,817
5,756
3,499
16,586
23,613
18,829
5,969
12,860
50,829
1,325
2,030
1,218
9,042
1,449
839
1,526
637
15,296
4,551
3,632
1,645
81
2,823
n.a.
4,735
43,895
13,330
1,669
28,896

1,373
280,319
232,991
862
652
210
2,180
1,337
548
76
219
13,690
70,479
29,178
4,558
1,461
4,531
2,496
5,485
6,863
1,247
128
1,812
598
41,301
674
725
7,372
4,722
7,829
7,004
2,345
2,363
n.a.
2,699
3,842
1,727
22,783
2,224
4,735
1,382
4,208
6,409
3,824
18,808
26,052
21,190
6,522
14,668
56,947
1,542
2,197
1,335
10,447
1,664
953
1,759
817
16,877
5,161
3,815
1,889
92
3,069
n.a.
5,329
47,328
14,532
1,711
31,085

1,567
307,986
257,534
959
729
231
2,481
1,514
655
74
237
15,151
77,920
31,833
4,914
1,453
4,816
2,696
6,284
7,549
1,327
132
2,020
641
46,087
778
710
8,410
5,217
8,775
7,834
2,588
2,637
n.a.
2,925
4,377
1,836
25,091
2,489
5,208
1,477
4,517
7,235
4,164
21,038
27,810
23,405
7,217
16,188
63,680
1,832
2,337
1,295
12,304
1,795
1,047
1,961
815
18,546
5,706
4,220
2,156
105
3,280
n.a.
6,279
50,452
15,306
1,807
33,339

1,157
335,580
280,601
997
746
251
3,275
1,602
1,328
98
247
15,751
82,656
33,390
5,244
1,492
4,552
2,870
6,636
8,279
1,461
137
2,075
645
49,266
763
812
8,587
5,506
9,592
8,609
2,929
2,533
n.a.
3,016
5,015
1,905
26,843
2,491
5,392
1,625
4,862
7,976
4,498
23,266
29,392
26,196
8,173
18,023
72,225
2,231
2,518
1,239
14,166
1,831
1,217
2,156
930
21,041
6,683
4,790
2,448
118
3,568
n.a.
7,289
54,979
16,710
2,000
36,269

1,506
363,919
304,146
1,063
807
256
3,337
1,602
1,370
115
251
16,186
88,159
35,458
5,607
1,538
4,618
3,100
6,999
8,958
1,596
154
2,215
674
52,700
757
874
9,260
5,722
10,261
9,289
3,111
2,612
n.a.
3,134
5,678
2,003
28,824
2,404
5,582
1,691
5,189
8,982
4,976
25,164
31,356
29,275
9,091
20,184
80,784
2,674
2,639
1,259
16,080
1,974
1,251
2,371
911
23,642
7,477
5,293
2,804
134
3,673
n.a.
8,601
59,772
18,117
2,451
39,205

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

54

Mideast

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Person al Income by M ajor S ou rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the M ideast Region, 1958-93—

Continued

[Millions of dollars]
Line

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

Income by Place of Residence
1
2
3

Total personal Income ........................................................

540,034

576,760

633,601

Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

538,634
1,400

575,793
966

631,846
1,755

4
5

Population (thousands) 5 ........................................................

42,383

12,742

42,546

42,690

Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 .............................

13,556

385,888
23,708
-5,460
356,719
94,940
88,375

6
7

8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence ..........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence .....................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................

678,703
676,836
1,867

727,808
725,726
2,081

774,467
772,287
2,181

834,323
832,194
2,129

894,080
891,523
2,556

947,684
945,260
2,424

979,399 1,033,548 1,068,536
977,300 1,031,070 1,066,140
2,396
2,099
2,478

14,842

42,799
15,858

42,996
16,927

43,196
17,929

43,442
19,206

43,585
20,513

43,708
21,682

43,907
22,306

44,119
23,427

44,368
24,083

412,021
25,674
-5,541
380,806
101,234
94,719

452,799
28,461
-5,857
418,480
117,154
97,966

487,804
32,015
-6,102
449,687
125,574
103,442

526,552
35,669
-6,360
484,523
133,932
109,354

570,966
38,711
-6,818
525,437
135,351
113,679

617,429
43,302
-7,467
566,660
147,149
120,514

649,375
46,338
-7,749
595,288
168,017
130,775

685,934
48,808
-8,516
628,610
175,914
143,160

699,372
51,415
-8,761
639,196
178,598
161,605

742,633
54,082
-9,352
679,200
173,663
180,685

767,644
56,016
-9,597
702,032
175,934
190,570

320,344
33,287
32,257
706
31,551

340,754
34,899
36,368
299
36,069

372,784
36,494
43,521
1,085
42,436

401,045
37,667
49,092
1,184
47,908

430,998
39,577
55,977
1,438
54,539

468,677
41,610
60,679
1,534
59,145

510,529
45,459
61,441
1,399
60,042

537,857
49,252
62,265
1,778
60,487

566,816
53,044
66,074
1,516
64,558

572,124
57,539
69,708
1,201
68,508

603,212
62,562
76,859
1,605
75,254

618,213
67,127
82,305
1,442
80,863

1,400
384,487
320,442
1,179
905
275
3,187
1,688
1,144
99
256
17,092
87,777
36,692
5,822
1,447
4,552
3,190
7,502
9,481
1,661
173
2,221
643
51,085
690
918
7,707
5,523
10,244
9,699
2,910
2,293
n.a.
3,003
6,121
1,978
30,938
2,012
5,530
1,655
5,435
10,765
5,542
26,656
32,857
31.209
10,460
20,749
89,546
2,922
2,810
1,292
18,286
2,055
1,323
2,456
1,033
26,758
8,779
5,826
2,976
150
3,998
n.a.

966
411,055
342,733
1,370
1,031
339
2,233
1,329
524
112
267
19,053
89,198
38,523
6,090
1,504
4,744
3,383
8,027
9,830
1,735
184
2,389
636
50,675
809
992
6,727
5,410
10,013
10,304
2,775
2,503
n.a.
3,037
6,081
2,025
31,093
1,744
5,687
1,626
5,779
10,501
5,756
27,793
36,690
36,231
11,547
24,684
99,071
3,414
3,157
1,309
21,013
2,426
1,485
2,733
1,126
29,206
9,736
6,347
3,245
167
4,183
n.a.
9,524
68,322
19,691
3,051
45,580

1,755
451,044
377,413
1,550
1,191
359
2,580
1,451
722
85
323
22,955
95,427
40,947
6,444
1,515
4,940
3,661
8,759
10,461
1,667
194
2,683
622
54,480
960
1,148
6,692
5,840
10,811
11,511
2,984
2,980
n.a.
3,180
6,142
2,231
33,384
1,644
6,313
1,646
6,443
11,002
6,336
30,812
40,429
38,672
12,477
26,195
111,605
4,112
3,474
1,532
24,195
2,905
1,762
2,963
1,512
31,539
11,596
6,930
3,537
180
4,393
n.a.
10,973
73,631
20,979
3,251
49,401

1,867
485,937
407,405
1,747
1,319
427
2,575
1,336
804
78
357
26,424
98,180
42,330
6,753
1,494
4,803
3,704
9,514
10,944
1,609
193
2,738
577
55,850
1,065
1,235
6,149
6,061
11,249
11,759
3,196
3,267
n.a.
3,205
6,536
2,127
34,957
1,662
6,527
1,680
6,857
11,156
7,074
32,879
44,050
42,591
13,520
29,071
124,002
5,054
4,114
1,553
28,042
3,427
1,765
3,372
1,528
34,057
12,690
7,470
3,978
198
4,600
n.a.
12,155
78,533
22,043
3,411
53,079

2,081
524,470
441,158
1,886
1,413
473
2,021
1,294
225
64
437
31,219
99,457
43,477
6,990
1,515
4,776
3,731
10,143
11,342
1,422
164
2,842
553
55,980
1,259
1,292
5,555
6,205
10,955
12,140
3,277
3,051
n.a.
3,325
6,752
2,168
36,405
1,616
7,093
1,659
7,385
11,310
7,340
34,922
48,194
50,265
15,359
34,906
136,791
5,759
4,540
1,648
31,272
3,694
1,941
3,580
1,565
36,852
14,752
7,945
4,571
221
4,862
n.a.
13,589
83,312
21,974
3,571
57,767

2,181
568,786
478,877
2,288
1,795
493
1,797
1,039
240
59
458
34,579
101,966
45,435
7,223
1,604
4,790
3,860
11,091
11,696
1,447
116
3,049
561
56,530
1,431
1,385
5,443
6,306
10,742
12,296
3,373
3,138
n.a.
3,471
6,648
2,297
37,908
1,593
7,627
1,507
8,081
11,960
7,141
37,753
51,218
60,399
16,838
43,561
150,970
6,451
4,808
1,651
34,914
3,957
1,990
3,898
1,624
41,819
16,162
8,704
5,081
240
5,343
n.a.
14,327
89,908
23,204
3,853
62,851

2,129
615,300
518,178
2,376
1,920
456
1,687
892
281
50
465
37,407
108,913
49,216
7,595
1,624
4,988
4,022
12,184
13,259
1,482
134
3,350
577
59,697
1,636
1,432
5,769
6,656
11,796
9,627
3,336
3,069
n.a.
3,656
10,240
2,481
39,605
1,602
8,141
1,460
8,327
12,616
7,460
41,405
54,803
62,491
18,704
43,786
169,492
6,303
5,063
1,792
29,516
4,141
2,143
5,096
2,141
46,744
19,050
9,530
5,644
286
5,907
25,000
1,135
97,122
24,901
3,909
68,312

2,556
646,819
541,910
2,501
2,011
490
1,701
880
259
44
518
38,057
112,334
50,811
7,821
1,688
4,993
4,153
12,540
13,839
1,531
148
3,515
583
61,523
1,682
1,444
6,207
6,872
11,849
10,003
3,361
3,218
n.a.
3,785
10,433
2,668
40,984
1,557
8,692
1,416
8,984
12,283
8,052
43,244
57,401
61,179
19,741
41,438
184,508
6,679
4,990
1,933
31,921
4,297
2,158
5,554
2,352
52,064
20,333
10,281
6,432
312
6,385
27,336
1,482
104,909
26,395
4,019
74,494

2,424
683,511
569,952
2,846
2,244
602
1,743
917
261
36
529
37,438
113,105
52,584
7,947
1,620
4,882
4,225
12,986
14,920
1,641
154
3,638
572
60,521
1,601
1,388
6,371
6,818
11,871
9,373
3,242
3,085
n.a.
3,832
10,403
2,538
43,936
1,482
9,163
1,446
9,826
13,557
8,461
44,943
58,473
66,565
20,817
45,748
200,903
6,548
5,109
2,058
34,949
4,404
2,235
6,712
2,558
58,144
22,181
10,981
7,244
345
6,786
29,149
1,501
113,559
28,544
4,254
80,761

2,099
697,273
578,544
2,975
2,373
602
1,651
875
247
41
488
33,533
113,749
53,669
8,188
1,576
4,869
4,143
12,905
15,804
1,718
179
3,738
548
60,080
1,589
1,289
6,542
6,636
11,903
9,131
3,213
3,148
n.a.
3,682
10,449
2,498
45,217
1,463
9,045
1,629
10,253
13,830
8,996
44,520
58,526
70,798
20,880
49,919
207,573
6,651
5,091
1,980
33,912
4,447
1,918
7,553
2,595
63,544
22,629
12,073
7,941
353
7,001
28,405
1,479
118,729
30,407
4,540
83,782

2,478
740,155
616,327
3,039
2,421
618
1,652
883
253
38
478
32,324
116,373
55,908
8,526
1,565
4,911
4,333
13,460
16,668
1,739
179
4,010
517
60,465
1,602
1,306
6,312
6,833
11,827
9,191
3,294
3,463
n.a.
3,699
10,349
2,589
47,325
1,561
9,197
1,605
10,549
14,831
9,582
47,173
60,528
84,851
22,813
62,038
223,061
6,829
5,353
2,176
36,406
4,444
1,895
8,344
2,653
69,595
24,245
12,763
8,739
389
7,315
30,352
1,564
123,829
32,163
4,653
87,013

2,396
765,249
636,763
3,248
2,557
690
1,582
778
262
38
503
33,306
116,633
56,522
8,709
1,642
4,954
4,359
13,647
16,615
1,751
188
4,152
504
60,112
1,700
1,350
6,185
6,875
11,580
9,270
3,121
3,563
n.a.
3,721
10,055
2,692
49,042
1,701
9,462
1,588
10,893
15,409
9,987
47,494
61,852
89,137
23,278
65,860
234,470
7,096
5,534
2,289
38,810
4,686
1,968
8,846
2,747
73,507
24,956
13,340
9,284
411
7,629
31,768
1,598
128,485
33,445
4,529
90,511

Earnings by type:7
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

66
67

68
69
70
71
72
/3
74
75

76
77
78

79
80

81
82

83
84

Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10.......................................................................
Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
N o n farm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o the r11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o th e r11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Nonm etallic'minerals, except fuels ........................
Construction ................................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts.................................
Textile mill products .............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts ...................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals and allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather products .............................
Lumbef and wood p ro d u c ts ................................
Furniture and fix tu re s...........................................
Primary metal industries ......................................
Fabricated metal products ..................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Railroad transportation ............................................
Trucking and warehousing .....................................
Other transportation ................................................
Co m m u n ica tio n s......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services .......................
Retail tra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s t a te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services .................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Social se rv ice s13 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations .....................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................

85
86

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

8,881
64,045
18,843
2,835
42,368

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

New England

United States and New England Region
Per Capita Personal Income
Selected Years, 1929-93

Dollars (Thousands)
25 --------------------------1

1929

1939

1949
1959
1969
1979
□ United States ■ New England

1989

1993

New England Region
Percent of Earnings
Selected Years, 1972-93
35%
30%
25%
20 %

15%

10 %
5%
0%

Farm Ag.Serv. Mining Constr. Manu.
■ 1972
* Transportation and public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate

IS 1977

TPU*

Trade FI RE** Services Gov't

■ 1 9 8 2 CM 987 01 99 3

56

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

New England

Person al Incom e by M ajor S ou rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the New England Region, 1929-57
[Millions of dollars]
1929

1930

1931

1932

1934

1935

1936

Total personal Income ........................................................
Nonfarm personal income..................................................
Farm Income4 ....................................................................

7,008
6,810
199

6,473
6,272
201

5,767
5,626
141

4,588
4,484
104

4,282
4,169
114

4,744
4,623
120

5,085
4,942
143

5,728
5,563
165

5,939
5,776
163

5,437
5,296
141

5,859
5,715
144

6,307
6,175
133

7,676
7,506
170

9,442
9,191
251

10,833
10,504
329

Population (thousands)3 ........................................................
Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 ..............................

8,130
862

8,175
792

8,193
704

8,220
558

8,254
519

8,296
572

8,361
608

8,391
683

8,409
706

8,427
645

8,438
694

8,449
747

8,586
894

8,627
1,094

8,534
1,269

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 ..................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance* ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.....................
Plus: Dividends, Interest, and rent9 ...................................
Plus: Transfer payments....................................................

5,213
11
n.a.
5,202
1,703
103

4,723
11
n.a.
4,712
1,653
107

4,059
11
n.a.
4,048
1,525
194

3,114
11
n.a.
3,103
1,325
160

2,983
11
n.a.
2,972
1,146
165

3,436
12
n.a.
3,424
1,168
151

3,778
12
n.a.
3,766
1,161
158

4,189
13
n.a.
4,177
1,294
257

4,510
53
n.a.
4,458
1,303
178

4,124
48
n.a.
4,076
1,122
238

4,445
46
n.a.
4,399
1,234
226

4,835
50
n.a.
4,784
1,276
247

6,184
64
n.a.
6,121
1,326
229

7,947
87
n.a.
7,860
1,355
227

9,375
120
n.a.
9,256
1,356
221

Earnings by type:7
Wages ana salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ income10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm10 ......................................................................

4,408
37
767
136
631

4,014
36
674
141
533

3,521
32
506
90
416

2,762
28
325
63
262

2,643
25
316
80
236

2,994
27
416
84
332

3,262
30
486
103
384

3,576
36
577
121
456

3,884
38
589
115
474

3,545
38
541
93
448

3,829
40
577
95
482

4,149
44
642
81
562

5,313
50
821
108
714

6,816
62
1,069
175
894

8,011
79
1,286
241
1,044

199
5,014
4,638
17
13
337
1,925
384
938
320
703
376
70
24
282

201
4,523
4,135
18
11
297
1,618
365
857
287
682
387
72
21
295

141
3,918
3,523
16
8
231
1,347
328
730
260
604
395
72
19
304

104
3,010
2,628
11
5
124
946
269
570
218
484
382
68
18
296

114
2,869
2,491
9
4
78
1,008
243
535
204
410
379
83
17
278

120
3,316
2,846
10
5
113
1,142
261
641
211
463
469
120
14
335

143
3,635
3,106
12
5
115
1,289
275
704
215
490
529
126
17
387

165
4,025
3,429
13
6
165
1,418
298
771
232
526
596
264
18
313

163
4,347
3,792
16
7
166
1,627
320
845
240
570
555
220
20
315

141
3,983
3,374
15
5
144
1,294
309
829
228
549
609
257
21
331

144
4,301
3,698
16
6
168
1,518
316
876
240
559
603
247
22
334

133
4,702
4,101
17
6
207
1,731
330
960
257
594
601
233
33
335

170
6,015
5,293
19
7
290
2,530
372
1,168
275
632
722
273
113
337

251
7,696
6,673
27
9
376
3,546
425
1,295
273
723
1,023
394
294
335

329
9,047
7,576
29
8
270
4,322
480
1,401
292
774
1,470
554
576
341

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

1933

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

Income by Piece of Residence

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Nonfarm .............................................................................
Private ............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other11 .
Mining .........................................................................
Construction................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Transportation and public utilities..............................
Finance, insurance, and real e sta te ..........................
Services ......................................................................
Government and government enterprises ....................
Federal, civilian...........................................................
Military.........................................................................
State and lo ca l............................................................

Income by Place of Residence

11,200

Total personal Income ......................................................
Nonfarm personal income................................................
Farm income4 ..................................................................

10,903
297

11,294
10,955
339

12,224
11,839
385

12,986
12,613
373

13,662
13,244
418

13,506
13,111
395

14,884
14,544
340

16,537
16,152
385

17,521
17,117
405

18,681
18,315
366

18,973
18,687
287

20,362
20,017
344

21,769
21,458
311

22,944
22,635
308

Population (thousands) 5 ......................................................
Per capita personal Income (dollars) 6 ............................

8,588
1,304

8,515
1,326

8,909
1,372

9,059
1,434

9,232
1,480

9,379
1,440

9,316
1,598

9,289
1,780

9,358
1,872

9,628
1,940

9,833
1,930

9,871
2,063

9,928
2,193

10,030
2,288

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 ................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance* ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ........... .......... ................
Equals: Net earnings by place of residence.....................
Plus: Dividends, Interest, and rent9 ..................................
Plus: Transfer payments..................................................

9,697
129
n.a.
9,569
1,356
275

9,571
126
n.a.
9,445
1,374
476

9,900
128
n.a.
9,772
1,555
897

10,568
136
n.a.
10,433
1,658
896

11,332
144
39
11,228
1,676
757

11,032
143
46
10,936
1,673
897

12,003
187
66
11,881
1,999
1,004

13,762
222
89
13,630
2,027
880

14,469
239
112
14,342
2,239
940

15,390
249
141
15,281
2,376
1,024

15,331
292
165
15,204
2,596
1,173

16,358
328
197
16,227
2,867
1,268

17,604
354
235
17,485
2,960
1,324

18,411
410
271
18,272
3,130
1,541

Earnings by type:7
Wages ana salaries .........................................................
Other labor income ..........................................................
Proprietors’ income1 0 .......................................................
Farm .............................................................................
Nonfarm10 ....................................................................

8,275
113
1,309
203
1,106

8,052
131
1,387
237
1,150

8,204
143
1,553
279
1,274

8,942
176
1,451
258
1,193

9,547
199
1,586
288
1,299

9,237
210
1,585
273
1,312

10,108
265
1,631
216
1,415

11,630
340
1,792
255
1,537

12,240
373
1,856
290
1,566

13,086
417
1,887
261
1,626

12,999
434
1,898
192
1,706

13,745
489
2,124
245
1,878

14,861
564
2,179
204
1,974

15,474
628
2,308
190
2,118

Earnings by industry: 7
F a rm .................................................................................
Nonfarm ...........................................................................
Private ..........................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other11 .
Mining .......................................................................
Construction..............................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Transportation and public utilities..............................
Wholesale and retail trade........................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Services ....................................................................
Government and government enterprises ....................
Federal, civilian.........................................................
Military.......................................................................
State and local..........................................................

297
9,401
7,724
34
8
224
4,315
540
1,451
304
847
1,677
552
774
351

339
9,231
7,563
43
8
243
3,922
568
1,560
330
889
1,669
455
836
377

385
9,515
8,446
52
12
404
3,983
655
1,935
393
1,012
1,069
326
320
424

373
10,195
9,264
54
14
493
4,406
693
2,053
422
1,130
931
275
151
506

418
10,915
9,887
68
11
586
4,673
718
2,119
456
1,256
1,028
276
166
586

395
10,637
9,487
69
11
598
4,202
701
2,104
490
1,313
1,150
301
189
660

340
11,663
10,438
73
12
686
4,795
726
2,229
547
1,371
1,225
308
211
706

385
13,377
11,854
80
14
781
5,679
790
2,429
602
1,479
1,523
419
346
758

405
14,065
12,348
83
13
809
5,931
848
2,448
646
1,571
1,716
482
418
816

366
15,024
13,220
80
15
827
6,422
901
2,579
699
1,696
1,804
494
431
880

287
15,044
13,182
83
17
887
5,981
942
2,694
782
1,795
1,862
471
447
945

344
16,013
14,091
82
19
1,025
6,349
986
2,809
848
1,972
1,923
494
430
998

311
17,293
15,256
88
22
1,133
6,914
1,058
2,995
909
2,139
2,037
522
457
1,057

308
18,102
15,929
89
23
1,196
7,067
1,103
3,128
991
2,332
2,173
546
478
1,150

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

57

New England

Person al Incom e by M ajor S o u rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry1 for the New England Region, 1958-93
[Millions of dollars]
1958

Line

1959

1960

1962

1961

1964

1963

1966

1965

1967

1968

1969

Incom e by P la ce of R e sid e n ce

Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

23,453
23,108
345

25,074
24,793
281

26,121
25,776
344

27,405
27,109
296

29,064
28,781
283

30,362
30,088
274

32,537
32,228
308

35,033
34,674
359

38,189
37,824
365

41,658
41,393
265

45,234
44,943
291

49,285
48,966
319

Population (thousands)3 ........................................................
P e r cap ita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

10,219
2,295

10,437
2,402

10,532
2,480

10,666
2,569

10,800
2,691

10,986
2,764

11,186
2,909

11,329
3,092

11,430
3,341

11,562
3,603

11,637
3,887

11,735
4,200

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social Insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence .........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re s id e n c e .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ...................................
P lu s: Transfer p a y m e n ts....................................................

18,542
409
291
18,424
3,187
1,842

19,929
473
319
19,775
3,438
1,860

20,744
553
342
20,533
3,632
1,956

21,561
588
364
21,337
3,877
2,191

22,816
622
394
22,588
4,240
2,236

23,654
705
417
23,366
4,627
2,369

25,199
747
458
24,910
5,151
2,475

26,945
783
500
26,662
5,741
2,630

29,546
1,051
551
29,046
6,262
2,881

31,764
1,210
604
31,158
7,031
3,469

34,505
1,338
681
33,848
7,289
4,097

37,577
1,548
822
36,851
7,846
4,588

15,558
613
2,372
216
2,156

16,750
698
2,482
172
2,310

17,504
738
2,502
234
2,268

18,211
787
2,564
188
2,376

19,285
858
2,673
172
2,500

20,017
910
2,726
161
2,565

21,208
1,001
2,989
195
2,794

22,681
1,126
3,138
243
2,895

24,967
1,252
3,326
249
3,077

26,965
1,391
3,407
150
3,258

29,214
1,608
3,682
178
3,505

31,935
1,820
3,822
200
3,622

345
18,197
15,837
96
52
44
24

281
19,648
17,172
89
49
40
25
(°)
1
1
Q
1,221
7,453
2,993
404
523
305
403
350
216
17
4
336
434
4,460
141
99
404
552
919
811
638
51
120
146
270
309
1,137
184
269
30
129
288
236
1,121
2,262
1,127
268
859
2,738
106
272
193
268
87
5C
66
24
77C
178
329
n.a

344
20,400
17,797
86
52
34
28

296
21,265
18,467
91
56
36
30
(D)
4

283
22,532
19,574
102
63
39
28

274
23,380
20,254
100
61
39
30

308
24,890
21,529
112
70
42
33

359
26,586
23,033
122
73
48
35

365
29,181
25,310
128
79
49
32
(°)
4

265
31,499
27,237
134
87
46
46

291
34,213
29,437
142
97
45
67

319
37,258
32,055
161
115
46
67

1
2
3

Total p e rso n a l Incom e ........................................................

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by type:7
W ages ana salaries ...........................................................
Other labor in c o m e .............................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 1 0 .........................................................
N onfarm 10.......................................................................
Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o th e r" .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o th e r" ...............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction .............................................
Metal m in in g ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls .........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable g o o d s ...................................................
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts..................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts.............................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u cts......................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals and allied p ro d u cts............................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather p ro d u cts..............................
Durable g o o d s .........................................................
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts.................................
Furniture and fix tu re s...........................................
Primary metal industries .....................................
Fabricated metal products ...................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and eq uip m en t............................
O rd n an ce 1 2 ..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts .......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ..............................
Railroad transportation ............................................
Trucking and warehousing .....................................
Water transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Co m m u n ica tio n s......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary s e rv ic e s ........................
Retail t ra d e ..................................................................
Finance, Insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging p la c e s .............................
Personal s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services ................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ................. ......................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social se rvice s1 3 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations .....................................
Engineering and management services '■ * .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
M ilita ry .........................................................................
State and lo c a l............................................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

6,742
2,759
392
481
284
370
329
190
16
4
300
392
3,983
127
88
356
505
811
679
616
43
102
126
236
293
1,091
184
249
26
124
279
230
1,061
2,139
1,056
263
793
2,492
102
26C
191
219
82
51
64
26
69*1
154
297
n.a.
4
143
n.a
205
2,36C
602
49^
1,264

4

166
n.a
225
2,476
62*
499
1,354

n
J
7,664
3,028
419
502
307
413
370
231
18
5
341
423
4,636
147
101
389
555
978
861
651
53
166
145
268
315
1,177
180
282
30
135
302
249
1,168
2,346
1,172
287
886
2,919
107
282
204
31C
99
55
72
24
798
177
368
n.a

J
7,827
3,053
416
485
303
421
387
237
17
4
359
423
4,773
137
100
386
567
1,001
892
723
51
191
146
271
309
1,210
168
292
29
145
314
262
1,194
2,417
1,254
304
95C
3,157
110
29S
199
357
113
58
81
23
851
206
405
n.a.

189
n.a
235
2,602
662
487
1,453

212
n.a
237
2,796
72C
49*
1,583

4

4

n

1, 3^1
8,296
3,170
429
503
318
436
407
244
17
4
385
428
5,126
143
105
412
611
1,083
966
740
56
223
158
308
320
1,262
162
317
29
152
330
272
1,241
2,548
1,323
322
1,001
3,398
114
314
202
405
121
61
82
24
912
221
456
n.a.
*
233
n.a
25C
2,956
736
515
1,705

n

8,391
3,168
423
485
315
446
430
247
15
4
380
422
5,223
147
106
398
614
1,100
969
820
62
208
165
315
318
1,311
162
333
29
158
342
287
1,277
2,658
1,408
342
1,066
3,617
120
324
201
453
12S
67
88
24
972
237
493
n.a.
5
236
n.a
267
3,126
77S
505
1,843

1
1,622
8,768
3,315
449
487
328
465
453
262
16
4
407
445
5,443
160
114
423
662
1,183
966
829
73
188
182
325
338
1,396
158
364
31
162
372
309
1,345
2,841
1,512
364
1,148
3,902
124
342
204
49!
138
67
96
2*
1,064
26r
539
n.a
6
248
n.a
29’
3,361
822
527
2,013

a

9

Q

1
9,400
3,469
457
514
341
492
471
276
16
5
434
464
5,931
163
125
451
716
1,287
1,054
943
87
177
200
358
369
1,488
160
396
30
174
398
330
1,402
2,993
1,599
387
1,212
4,241
139
359
205
534
145
71
101
25
1,168
285
602
n.a
7
271
n.a
329
3,553
834
542
2,177

1,895
10,501
3,701
478
543
357
534
509
302
16
4
461
497
6,800
176
134
513
807
1,466
1,226
1,143
92
215
217
409
403
1,583
163
427
32
189
425
346
1,534
3,207
1,701
416
1,286
4,728
154
391
206
609
155
79
106
26
1,295
318
681
n.a
8
311
n.a
387
3,871
924
57C
2,374

8

2,015
11,099
3,823
501
534
366
561
551
306
18
4
479
504
7,276
179
132
528
861
1,520
1,366
1,220
90
276
224
458
421
1,686
164
448
32
214
461
367
1,662
3,449
1,865
459
1,406
5,292
166
422
211
706
176
82
115
28
1,50'
342
739
n.a
9
353
n.a
443
4,262
964
594
2,704

2 , lS
11,745
4,093
522
568
389
596
589
338
18
4
523
546
7,651
188
137
529
912
1,543
1,460
1,263
92
333
247
493
453
1,808
162
493
36
242
474
401
1,799
3,752
2,072
508
1,564
5,859
179
439
219
779
189
90
125
31
1,710
360
841
n.a
9
393
n.a
495
4,776
1,063
631
3,082

2À
12,476
4,267
544
577
398
639
644
377
17
4
553
515
8,209
198
146
570
998
1,630
1,571
1,314
95
376
271
557
483
2,024
167
538
34
277
574
435
1,994
4,054
2,256
573
1,683
6,546
196
449
219
885
206
100
122
33
1,957
382
969
n.a.
11
447
n.a.
573
5,203
1,112
666
3,425

58

New England

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Person al Income by M ajor S o u rce and Earn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the New England Region, 1958-93—

Continued

[Millions of dollars]
Line

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Incom e by P la ce o f R e sid e n ce
1
2
3

Total p e rso n a l Incom e ........................................................
Nonfarm personal income ..................................................
Farm inco m e4 ....................................................................

52,803
52,473
330

55,960
55,649
311

60,602
60,289
313

66,405
65,986
419

72,053
71,601
451

76,882
76,553
329

84,256
83,811
446

92,379
91,981
399

103,099
102,688
411

115,726
115,344
382

130,875
130,511
364

145,851
145,381
470

4
5

Population (thousands)5 ........................................................
P er cap ita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

11,878
4,445

11,996
4,665

12,088
5,013

12,148
5,466

12,157
5,927

12,176
6,314

12,207
6,902

12,257
7,537

12,303
8,380

12,345
9,374

12,368
10,582

12,435
11,729

6
7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
P lu s: Adjustment for residence .........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of r e s id e n c e .....................
P iu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

40,020
1,645
828
39,203
8,120
5,481

41.87C
1,796
856
40.93C
8,445
6,585

45,589
1,967
904
44,526
8,855
7,221

50.12C
2,346
943
48,716
9,624
8,065

53,540
2,739
1,019
51,82C
10,681
9,551

55,509
2,836
1,091
53,764
10,855
12,262

61,302
2,988
1,195
59,509
11,766
12,982

67,537
3,294
1,319
65,562
13,149
13,668

75,868
3,662
1,485
73,691
14,890
14,519

84,833
4,329
1,689
82,193
17,370
16,163

93,886
4,914
1,972
90,943
21,275
18,657

102,229
5,855
2,102
98,476
26,009
21,366

12
13
14
15
16

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Other labor income ............................................................
Proprietors’ inco m e1 0 .........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
Nonfarm 10.......................................................................

34,058
2,090
3,871
212
3,659

35,507
2,301
4,062
197
3,865

38,568
2,689
4,333
199
4,134

42,336
3,032
4,752
287
4,466

45,252
3,417
4,872
311
4,561

46,627
3,892
4,991
178
4,813

50,722
4,601
5,980
289
5,691

55,554
5,342
6,641
215
6,426

62,232
6,145
7,491
229
7,263

69,776
6,964
8,093
186
7,907

77,560
8,021
8,305
162
8,142

84,989
8,918
8,322
276
8,046

330
39,690
33,874
175
119
57
66

311
41,559
35,195
194
135
59
41

313
45,276
38,210
207
140
67
71

41S
49,701
41,979
243
164
79
76

451
53,088
45,040
263
166
97
132

329
55,180
46,513
266
162
104
174

446
60,857
51,619
317
179
138
246

p>

pi

pi

399
67,138
57,095
305
180
125
306

411
75,457
64,546
370
206
164
225

364
93,522
80,708
437
240
197
500

pi

pi

382
84,451
72,677
436
234
202
266

470
101,759
88,077
392
253
139
527
(D)
389
20
' (°)
4,844
31,735
9,056
1,021
871
728
1,587
1,654
1,205
96
16
1,137
740
22,679
547
285
1,206
3,029
4,976
4,558
3,616
274

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
N o n fa rm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and o th e r11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction .............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except f u e ls .........................
Construction ................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and Kindred p ro d u c ts .................................
Textile mill products ............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing ........................................
Chem icals arid allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coal p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics products .....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood products ................................
Furniture and fixtures ..........................................
Primary metal industries .....................................
Fabricated metal products ..................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles and equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 12 ..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts..........
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ...............................
Trucking and warehousing ..............................
Water transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
Co m m unica tio ns......................................................
Electric, gas. and sanitary services ........................
W holesale trade ..........................................................
Retail t ra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private households ..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services ................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ............................................
Social se rv ice s13 .................... ................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations ......................................
Engineering and management se rv ice s14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
Federal, civilian ...........................................................
Military ................................................................
State and local ............................................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

31
1

p>

2,750
12,539
4,298
577
546
390
648
676
410
18
5
536
491
8,241
204
149
552
1,043
1,648
1,609
1,281
88
330
280
569
488
2,243
169
576
40
307
665
486
2,159
4,371
2,401
657
1,745
7,169
208
453
220
942
223
102
137
34
2,198
435
1,087
n.a.
12
484
n.a.
633
5,816
1,257
724
3,835

5
1

pi

2,965
12,240
4,344
595
531
392
654
703
429
20
6
555
459
7,896
209
152
527
1,053
1,515
1,536
1,154
99
306
288
562
495
2,450
177
635
43
329
745
521
2,252
4,663
2,664
706
1,958
7,727
223
441
220
962
254
113
145
36
2,457
480
1,209
n.a.
18
524
n.a.
645
6,364
1,314
741
4,309

34
2

pi

3,230
13,245
4,671
617
586
420
714
757
463
34
6
628
446
8,574
230
167
577
1,182
1,655
1,682
1,170
112
322
308
615
552
2,761
180
712
44
351
884
588
2,470
4,950
2,832
753
2,079
8,444
243
438
222
1,036
281
120
166
42
2,722
528
1,325
n.a.
15
566
n.a.
740
7,066
1,439
798
4,830

37
1

p)

3,408
14,769
5,010
631
638
451
788
797
513
39
6
705
443
9,758
273
190
634
1,346
1,934
1,945
1,297
136
338
353
726
585
3,032
198
798
60
375
974
626
2,785
5,363
3,032
831
2,202
9,272
256
456
228
1,173
323
147
197
46
3,036
607
1,303
n.a.
16
593
n.a.
810
7,722
1,501
768
5,453

85
3

pi

3,305
16,213
5,226
649
614
455
849
853
562
50
7
758
430
10,987
291
202
709
1,509
2,248
2,170
1,481
108
384
383
860
641
3,226
202
823
56
423
1,060
661
3,110
5,685
3,125
929
2,197
9,982
259
472
215
1,293
348
158
209
45
3,396
655
1,447
n.a.
18
611
n.a.
856
8,048
1,563
642
5,843

pi

124
1

pi

3,068
16,199
5,213
666
574
462
826
905
612
52
8
681
426
10,987
265
192
623
1,676
2,245
2,100
1,776
108
n.a.
355
993
654
3,360
211
796
57
446
1,134
716
3,345
5,954
3,377
1,026
2,351
10,768
268
488
216
1,335
385
186
226
45
3,823
681
1,345
305
20
490
n.a.
954
8,667
1,706
628
6,334

pi

pi

199
Ç-)

219
4

3,234
18,129
5,873
732
667
526
965
991
647
55
9
771
511
12,256
313
205
700
1,870
2,449
2,360
1,953
130
n.a.
388
1,135
751
3,715
240
886
63
495
1,220
810
3,664
6,468
3,852
1,125
2,726
11,994
321
529
251
1,548
438
199
254
50
4,280
732
1,465
355
23
523
n.a.
1,025
9,238
1,832
619
6,787

3,366
20,477
6,517
776
715
620
1,080
1,139
710
63
9
871
535
13,960
368
218
779
2,021
2,929
2,660
2,207
173
n.a.
435
1,337
831
4,096
268
970
63
599
1,341
855
3,953
6,966
4,237
1,212
3,026
13,389
367
562
273
1,857
418
211
319
54
4,799
929
1,476
406
26
557
n.a.
1,136
10,043
1,977
644
7,422

pi

p)

pi

135
3

pi

pi

3,828
23,199
7,192
828
772
696
1,197
1,301
802
72
11
926
588
16,006
471
245
874
2,265
3,353
3,094
2,459
193
n.a.
525
1,575
952
4,537
293
1,089
78
682
1,465
930
4,524
7,771
4,810
1,340
3,470
15,281
438
631
299
2,263
490
251
365
59
5,294
1,011
1,586
497
29
616

4,331
26,204
7,852
900
799
712
1,323
1,463
898
84
13
1,022
639
18,351
541
232
1,019
2,525
3,985
3,593
2,873
212

375
18
(D)
4,568
29,259
8,408
976
822
692
1,465
1,551
1,046
79
14
1,083
679
20,851
574
271
1,131
2,834
4,688
4,105
3,322
243

571
1,784
1,017
5,083
336
1,207
85
793
1,643
1,019
5,198
8,521
5,342
1,502
3,840
17,296
489
686
290
2,754
541
282
410
67
5,875
1,135
1,753
564
32
663

591
2,007
1,084
5,540
345
1,241
88
862
1,857
1,147
5,854
9,131
5,868
1,726
4,141
19,552
537
737
278
3,287
542
325
439
79
6,758
1,303
1,880
671
36
724

615
2,414
1,159
6,044
343
1,305
94
939
2,109
1,253
6,268
9,903
6,539
1,952
4,588
21,825
592
767
279
3,847
582
320
479
76
7,610
1,411
2,132
722
40
740

1,451
10,911
2,174
705
8,032

1,755
11,774
2,258
750
8,766

1,956
12,813
2,427
825
9,561

2,227
13,682
2,672
961
10,049

pi

165
6

pi

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

New England

59

Person al Income by M ajor S o u rce and E a rn in gs by In d u stry 1 for the New England Region, 1958-93— Continued
[Millions of dollars]
Line

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1990

1989

1991

1992

1993

Incom e by P la ce of R e sid e n ce
1
2
3

Total p e rso n a l Incom e ........................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

157,154
156,648
506

170,081
169,610
471

190,073
189,510
563

205,307
204,747
560

223,553
222,973
580

241,830
241,171
658

265,334
264,665
669

281,095
280,417
679

289,961
289,222
739

295,985
295,215
771

308,308
307,420
888

319,387
318,478
908

4
5

Population (thousands)3 ........................................................
P e r cap ita p e rso n a l Incom e (d o lla rs)6 .............................

12,468
12,604

12,545
13,558

12,643
15,034

12,742
16,113

12,835
17,418

12,953
18,670

13,086
20,276

13,182
21,325

13,219
21,935

13,201
22,421

13,196
23,364

13,230
24,141

6
7
8
9
10
11

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings by place of w o r k .........................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insuran ce8 ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence .........................................
E quals: Net earnings by place of residence .....................
P lu s: Dividends, interest, and rent9 ..................................
P lu s: Transfer payments ....................................................

108,970
6,334
2,248
104,884
28,795
23,474

119,167
6,861
2,365
114,670
30,419
24,992

134,081
7,724
2,503
128,859
35,303
25,910

146,897
8,831
2,645
140,712
37,417
27,178

160,914
9,852
2,793
153,855
40,727
28,970

177,175
10,680
2,979
169,473
42,268
30,089

195,571
12,080
3,214
186,705
46,305
32,324

203,139
13,009
3,168
193,298
51,997
35,800

208,025
13,648
3,314
197,691
52,245
40,025

207,976
14,062
3,287
197,201
52,771
46,013

218,824
14,783
3,653
207,694
50,834
49,780

227,387
15,557
3,713
215,543
52,100
51,744

91,132
9,894
7,944
297
7,646

98,704
10,764
9,699
266
9,433

110,453
11,570
12,058
355
11,703

120,505
12,254
14,138
345
13,793

131,447
12,980
16,488
375
16,113

145,125
13,889
18,160
449
17,711

159,631
15,411
20,529
433
20,096

166,735
16,671
19,733
426
19,307

170,567
17,450
20,008
443
19,565

169,535
18,400
20,041
479
19,562

177,176
19,762
21,886
604
21,282

182,691
21,284
23,411
597
22,814

506
108,464
93,934
416
299
117
434
(D)
303
16
p>
5,326
33,013
9,596
1,129
813
743
1,667
1,811
1,376
96
21
1,214
726
23,417
483
283
1,221
3,021
5,065
4,964
3,897
238
n.a.
591
2,505
1,148
6,505
311
1,325
102
1,001
2,370
1,396
6,588
10,438
6,786
2,209
4,577
24,427
653
830
28A
4,521
623
354
507
88
8,625
1,617
2,370
769
45
766
n.a
2,375
14,530
2,817
1,099
10,615

471
118,696
103,049
545
355
191
212
p>
86
13
p>
6,263
34,602
10,140
1,139
888
770
1,768
1,966
1,440
92
25
1,313
738
24,463
570
293
1,152
3,007
5,100
5,512
4,187
240
n.a.
612
2,604
1,186
6,914
292
1,411
117
1,118
2,493
1,483
7,064
11,984
8,031
2,452
5,580
27,433
800
1,001
285
5,349
762
422
567
95
9,37$
1,864
2,612
862
48
797
n.a
2,590
15,648
2,96£
1,176
11,503

563
133,517
116,600
578
427
151
287
33
155
10
89
7,953
38,617
10,942
1,188
962
835
1,915
2,198
1,581
88
29
1,457
689
27,675
694
334
1,291
3,112
5,824
6,747
4,499
360
n.a.
667
2,858
1,289
7,448
306
1,601
140
1,279
2,434
1,688
8,045
13,614
8,758
2,740
6,017
31,301
940
1,119
330
6,528
941
494
654
143
10,148
2,245
2,920
962
55
840
n.a.
2,981
16,917
3,182
1,243
12,493

560
146,337
127,785
766
503
263
337
p>
186
p)
100
9,563
40,163
11,188
1,243
913
797
1,949
2,434
1,663
90
32
1,479
588
28,975
727
368
1,158
3,161
6,200
7,209
4,887
352
n.a.
705
2,909
1,299
8,069
303
1,682
164
1,421
2,537
1,962
8,960
15,231
9,610
3,064
6,546
35,085
1,111
1,366
332
7,751
1,153
497
772
174
10,959
2,497
3,174
1,106
65
847
n.a.
3,280
18,552
3,363
1,321
13,867

580
160,334
140,527
922
562
360
170
37
-1 0
10
133
11,893
41,134
11,601
1,287
912
781
2,016
2,655
1,778
92
32
1,528
521
29,533
831
402
1,153
3,106
6,253
7,289
5,048
337
n.a.
729
3,056
1,331
8,358
247
1,856
179
1,534
2,505
2,037
9,830
17,232
11,436
3,614
7,822
39,553
1.26C
1,540
35C
9,123
1,301
615
884
204
11,842
2,96$
3,448
1,271
72
907
n.a
3,767
19,807
3,39$
1,388
15,026

658
176,516
154,886
1,114
777
338
200
p)
18
11
pi
13,730
42,144
12,154
1,322
954
724
2,120
2,974
1,820
106
33
1,585
515
29,991
918
433
1,158
3,186
6,726
6,810
5,122
317
n.a.
813
3,114
1,393
8,985
234
2,033
199
1,711
2,774
2,034
11,265
18,866
14,283
4,171
10,112
44,297
1,438
1,656
34 E
10,362
1,385
642
98C
217
13,43$
3,288
3,84^
1,48$
82
1.01C
n.a
4,112
21,631
3,651
1,430
16,550

669
194,901
171,128
1,147
846
301
225
pi
19
8
pi
14,702
44,368
12,920
1,394
970
730
2,265
3,284
1,908
109
36
1,695
528
31,449
926
447
1,216
3,430
7,213
5,691
5,121
273
n.a.
828
4,800
1,502
9,487
229
2,168
197
1,819
2,899
2,175
12,704
20,535
16,777
4,67$
12,098
51,182
1,522
1,797
375
9,481
1,48$
732
1,235
381
15.24C
3,877
4,088
1,74$
96
1,160
7,682
277
23,772
3,972
1,465
18,335

679
202,461
176,776
1,124
832
292
190

739
207,286
180,030
1,206
866
340
162
pi
5
14
p)
11,685
45,282
13,337
1,483
936
631
2,337
3,410
2,157
107
39
1,709
527
31,945
764
378
1,152
3,629
7,221
5,679
5,664
198
n.a.
759
4,959
1,541
10,451
218
2,246
196
2,217
2,949
2,626
13,402
20,772
17,480
5,023
12,457
59,589
1,601
1,814
426
10,091
1,442
75$
1.57C
41C
19,330
4,387
4,806
2,17C
114
1,346
8,936
383
27,256
4.57C
1,545
21,141

771
207,205
179,298
1,202
872
330
151
7
9
13
122
9,638
45,017
13,562
1,555
961
627
2,323
3,398
2,336
100
41
1,715
505
31,455
740
363
1,113
3,467
6,925
5,649
5,685
198
n.a.
701
5,085
1,530
10,599
239
2,195
224
2,201
3,029
2,712
13,246
20,203
17,848
4,789
13,059
61,395
1,573
1,750
409
9,914
1,409
707
1,755
417
20,942
4,524
5,331
2,233
116
1,391
8.57C
352
27,907
4,68^
1,550
21,674

888
217,936
189,196
1,175
895
280
166
7
9
11
139
9,369
46,026
14,148
1,606
1,027
673
2,395
3,447
2,485
123
60
1,830
501
31,878
761
388
1,132
3,563
7,055
5,762
5,515
246
n.a.
717
5,137
1,603
11,017
247
2,186
213
2,370
3,130
2,871
13,946
20,888
20,148
5,114
15,034
66,461
1,623
1,829
447
10,721
1,409
734
2,055
436
22,897
4,822
5,560
2,416
124
1,423
9,582
383
28,740
4,883
1,514
22,343

908
226,478
196,570
1,225
958
267
181
12
11
13
146
10,077
45,988
14,634
1,645
1,076
680
2,414
3,557
2,494
137
51
2,035
547
31,354
836
412
1,147
3,625
6,834
5,557
5,186
258
n.a.
723
5,154
1,622
11,523
273
2,280
203
2,514
3,225
3,027
14,039
21,598
21,169
5,262
15,907
70,770
1,656
1,928
469
11,886
1,553
787
2,237
483
24,272
5,029
5,811
2,625
130
1,477
10,033
394
29,909
5,151
1,420
23,338

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

Earnings by type:7
W ages and salaries ...........................................................
Proprietors’ in co m e 10.........................................................
Farm ...............................................................................
N onfarm 10.......................................................................
Earnings by industry:7
Farm ...................................................................................
N o n fa rm ..............................................................................
P riv a te .............................................................................
Agricultural services, forestry, fisheries, and other11 .
Agricultural services ................................................
Forestry, fisheries, and o ther11 ..............................
M in in g ..........................................................................
Coal mining .............................................................
Oil and gas extraction ............................................
Metal mining ............................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels ........................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Food and Kindred p ro d u c ts.................................
Textile mill p ro d u c ts.............................................
Apparel and other textile products .....................
Paper and allied p ro d u c ts...................................
Printing and publishing .......................................
Chem icals and allied products ...........................
Petroleum and coai p ro d u c ts..............................
Tobacco products ................................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics p ro d u c ts .....
Leather and leather products .............................
Durable goods .........................................................
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts ................................
Furniture and fix tu re s...........................................
Prim ary metal industries .....................................
Fabricated metal products ...................................
Machinery and computer equipment ..................
Electric equipment, except computer equipment
Transportation equipment excl. motor vehicles ...
Motor vehicles arid equipment ...........................
O rd n an ce 12..........................................................
Stone, clay, and glass products .........................
Instruments and related p ro d u c ts.......................
M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s.............
Transportation and public utilities ...............................
Railroad transportation ...........................................
Trucking and warehousing .....................................
Water transportation ................................................
Other transportation ................................................
C om m u n ica tio n s......................................................
Electric, gas, and sanitary services .......................
Retail tra d e ..................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..........................
Depository and nondepository credit institutions ....
Other finance, insurance, and real e s ta te ..............
Services ......................................................................
Hotels and other lodging places ............................
Personal services ....................................................
Private h o u se h o ld s..................................................
Business s e r v ic e s ....................................................
Auto repair, services, and parking .........................
M iscellaneous repair services ................................
Amusement and recreation s e r v ic e s ......................
Motion pictures ........................................................
Health s e r v ic e s ........................................................
Legal services .........................................................
Educational services ...............................................
Social se rvice s13 .....................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens ...............
Membership organizations .....................................
Engineering and management services 14 .............
M iscellaneous services ...........................................
Government and government e n te rp rise s.....................
M ilita ry .........................................................................

See footnotes at the end of the statistical section.

pi

11
25
pi
13,571
45,473
13,229
1,392
961
675
2,342
3,386
2,084
114
19
1,716
539
32,245
858
430
1,188
3,702
7,439
5,736
5,374
297
n.a.
819
4,837
1,565
9,866
213
2,218
191
1,982
2.79C
2,472
13,387
21,179
16,555
4,956
11,597
55.43C
1,683
1,807
403
9,297
1,487
782
1,311
373
17,465
4,02^
4,485
1,98:
106
1,262
8,581
382
25,685
4,20$
1,495
19,982

Plains

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

United States and Plains Region
Per Capita Personal Income
Selected Years, 1929-93

1929

1939

1949

1959

1969

1979

1989

1993

□ United States »Plains

Plains Region
Percent of Earnings
Selected Years, 1972-93
25%
20 %

15%

10 %
5%
0%

Farm Ag.Serv. Mining Constr. Manu.

TPU*

Trade FIRE**Services Gov't

■ 1972 S1977 »1982 □1987 01993
* Transportation and public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate

STATE PERSONAL INCOME

Plains

61

Person al Incom e by M ajor S ou rce and Earn in gs by In d u stry1 for the P la in s Region, 1929-57
[Millions of dollars]
1929

1930

1932

1931

1934

1933

1935

1937

1936

1939

1938

Income by Place of Residence

6,102
5,049

1940

1941

1942

1943

1,052

6,401
5,270
1,131

7,824
6,164
1,660

10,504
7,615
2,889

12,427
9,158
3,269

13,505
452

13,498
474

13,292
589

13,126
800

12,768
973

4,940
37
n.a.
4,903
702
242

5,123
40
n.a.
5,083
759
260

5,374
44
n.a.
5,330
800
271

6,742
49
n.a.
6,693
859
272

9,312
66
n.a.
9,245
989
269

11,214
102
n.a.
11,112
1,049
266

3,477
38
1,955
1,269
687

3,372
37
1,531
864
667

3,474
38
1,610
893
717

3,582
41
1,751
956
795

4,225
48
2,470
1,440
1,030

5,365
57
3,890
2,599
1,292

6,696
72
4,445
2,920
1,525

1,428
4,043
3,365
13
84
151
749
533
1,079
208
548
678
304
15
359

1,023
3,917
3,184
12
63
164
654
501
1,052
205
533
733
343
I4
376

1,052
4,071
3,352
13
64
183
724
511
1,105
212
539
719
326
15
378

1,131
4,243
3,531
14
68
168
784
527
1,187
219
563
713
313
13
387

1,660
5,082
4,325
16
83
351
1,025
604
1,424
231
592
757
295
66
396

2,889
6,423
5,481
20
99
490
1,594
726
1,599
248
704
942
294
249
399

3,269
7,945
6.440
21
116
357
2,201
829
1,852
270
794
1,505
376
713
415

Total personal Income ......................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

7,488
5,864
1,624

6,702
5,471
1,230

5,551
4,857
694

4,179
3,742
437

3,697
3,342
355

4,104
3,870
234

5,451
4,146
1,306

5,563
4,848
715

6,409
4,981
1,428

5,847
4,824
1,023

Per capita personal Income (dollars)6 ............................

13,260
565

13,335
503

13,446
413

13,518
309

13,567
273

13,593
302

13,630
400

13,601
409

13,544
473

13,491
433

Derivation of personal income:
Total earnings7 ..................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re s id e n c e .....................
Plus: Dividends, interest, and rent5 ..................................
Plus: Transfer p a y m e n ts....................................................

6,256
11
n.a.
6,246
1,094
149

5,553
11
n.a.
5,543
1,011
148

4,419
11
n.a.
4,408
873
269

3,301
11
n.a.
3,290
/0Ü
189

2,972
10
n.a.
2,961
567
168

3,335
11
n.a.
3,324
605
1/5

4,646
11
n.a.
4,636
625
191

4,503
11
n.a.
4,491
722
350

5,471
39
n.a.
5,432
743
234

4,002
40
2,214
1,349
865

3,770
39
1,744
993
750

3,281
36
1,102
513
589

2,611
31
658
306
353

2,384
29
559
242
318

2,722
32
581
118
463

2,906
33
1,708
1,162
546

3,244
39
1,220
568
651

1,624
4,632
4,176
14
90
261
863
683
1,282
288
694
456
98
13
345

1,230
4,323
3,853
14
81
263
794
631
1,117
271
682
470
100
12
357

694
3,725
3,249
15
56
202
642
531
967
244
593
476
102
12
362

437
2,864
2,412
12
45
108
487
413
687
207
453
451
96
11
345

355
2,617
2,157
9
43
73
460
3/4
654
170
374
460
129
11
320

234
3,100
2,524
8
50
90
553
409
802
178
432
577
191
11
375

1,306
3,341
2,741
10
57
114
587
446
880
190
456
599
187
13
400

715
3,787
3,082
9
66
161
667
492
987
199
502
705
351
14
340

1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

Total personal Income ......................................................
Nonfarm personal in c o m e ..................................................
Farm incom e4 ....................................................................

13,018
9,961
3,057

13,808
10,663
3,144

15,498
11,565
3,933

16,830
12,610
4,220

19,844
14,453
5,391

18,139
14,961
3,178

20,481
16,429
4,053

22,356
18,226
4,131

23,559
19,643
3,916

23,892
20,847
3,045

24,791
21,383
3,408

25,292
22,802
2,490

26,620
24,065
2,555

28,487
25,356
3,132

Population (thousands)5 ........................................................
Par capita personal Income (dollars)5 ............................

12,446
1,046

12,394
1,114

13,180
1,176

13,446
1,252

13,604
1,459

13,850
1,310

14,103
1,452

14,167
1,578

14,175
1,662

14,268
1,675

14,453
1,715

14,730
1,717

14,905
1,786

14,979
1,902

Derivation of personal Income:
Total earnings7 ..................................................................
Less: Personal contributions for social insurance8 ..........
Plus: Adjustment for residence7 ........................................
Equals: Net earnings by place of re sid