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STATE HIMHIH WK.E LAWS Ml
MARCH 2, 1953 to JULY I, 1954
MOISJAIG Ai;u

Supplement to Bulletin 247

JULY I, 1954
CO

*

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-

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES P. MITCHELL. Secretary

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

WOMEN’S BUREAU

MRS. ALICE K. LEOPOLD. Director
WASHINGTON 25. D. C.

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS AND STATUTORY RATE AMENDMENTS
BECOMING EFFECTIVE MARCH 2, 1953 - JULY 1, 1954

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:

Retail Trade, May 25, 1953.
Clerical and Technical, June 8, 1954.
HAWAII:

Act 77, Laws 1953, July 1, 1953.
MASSACHUSETTS:

Laundry, Feb. 16, 1953.
Commissioner's Mandatory Order, June 25, 1953.
Needle Trade and Garment, Sept. 1, 1953.
Clerical Technical and Similar Occupations,
July 1, 1954.
Mercantile, July 1, 1954.
MIMMESOTA:

♦Public Housekeeping April 23, 1953.
♦Retail Merchandising, Sept. 4. 1953.
NEVADA:

A.B. 160, Laws 1953, March 21, 1953.

MEW YORK:

Retail Trade, Dec. 28, 1953.
Counselor Staff, in Children’s Camps, Dec. 28, 1953.
WORTH DAKOTA:

Telephone, July 7, 1953.
OREGON:

Office, Oct. 13, 1953.
PUERTO RICO:

Theaters and Movies, Sept. 16, 1953.
RHODE ISLAND:

♦Restaurant and Hotel Restaurant, Jan. 1, 1954.
UTAH:

Restaurant, amended April 2, 1953.
WISCONSIN:

■

Factories Canning or First Processing Fresh Fruits
and Vegetables, special order, season 1953.

MEW HAMPSHIRE:

Ch. 232, Laws 1953, June 11, 1953.
Laundry, June 11, 1953.
Beautician, June 11, 1953.
Retail Trade, June 11, 1953.
Dry Cleaning, June 11, 1953.




* In court, as of July 1, 1954.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:
Retail Trade Occupation,

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

"Retail Trade Occupation,"i. e., Women and minors
the selling or offering for
sale at retail of any goods,
wares, merchandise, articles,
or things, and all activities, Employees whose workweek
operations, and services con­
is 36 but not more than
nected therewith or incidental
40 hours who begin work
thereto. Exception: Oper­
after the beginning or
ating of elevators in and
resign before the end
cleaning of retail stores,
of the workweek, or are
which activities are included
voluntarily absent in
in the Public Housekeeping
any week.
Occupation Order.
Part-time

1954

Minimum—wa
rates

Hours

36- up to and
including 40
a week. 1

Prorated hourly
rate

Actual hours
worked.

85 cents an hour

Less than 36
a week. 2
Less than 36
a week.

Overtime

(Supersedes order 3,
June 16, 1947.)

$30 a week

Student under 18 for
75 cents an hour
whom certificate is in
employer's file (9
months following orig­
inal issuance of certif­
icate ).

No. 3, May 25, 1953.

Over 40 a
week. 1

85 cents an hour

If employee works a split 75 cents a day in
shift.
addition to the
applicable minimum
wage.

See footnotes at end of table.




1 -

_ 2

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

)ISTRICT OF COLUMBIA -Cont.
Retail Trade
Occupation,- Cont.

Clerical and Technical
Occupations, No. 9

June 8, 1954.
(New order issued in
place of the invali­
dated Office and
Miscellaneous Occu­
pations Order, No. 7,
Apr. 25, 1949. )

See footnotes at end of table.




1954

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

(Uniforms required
by employer as a
condition of em­
ployment must be
purchased, main­
tained, and cleaned
by the employer.)
Women and minors
"Clerical and Technical OccuWeekly wages
pations." Excludes persons
engaged in any such occupaException:- Cases of intions who are employed in an
frequent voluntary
activity covered by any other
absence. 3
wage order, e.g., persons en­
gaged in Retail Trade, ManuPart time
facturing and Wholesaling,
Public Housekeeping, Laundry
and Dry Cleaning, and Beauty
Culture.
Clerical occupations include:
Student under 18 for
General office clerks, stenog­
whom certificate is in
raphers, typists, secreta­
employer's file.
ries, file clerks, mail
clerks, bookkeepers, cashiers,
Student attending and
tellers, shipping clerks,
employed by a recog­
receiving clerks, information
nized educational
clerks,receptionists, checkers,
institution.
proofreaders, investigators,
examiners, claim adjusters,
Overtime
messengers, office boys and
girls, telephone operators,
office-machine operators,
duplicating-machine operators,

$32 a week
80 cents an hour

32 but not more
than 40 a week *
Actual time
worked. 3

88 cents an hour

Less than 32
hours per
week. 2

75 cents an hour

Less than 32
hours per
week.

75 cents an hour

Less than 32
hours per
week.

88 cents an hour

Over 40 a
week. 1

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA - Cont,
Clerical and Technical
Occupations,

No. 9,
June 8, 1954. — Cont.

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupation or industry
covered

telegraph messengers, telegraphic-typewriter operators,
telegraph operators, collection clerks, tracer clerks,
ticket agents, baggage agents,
vehicle dispatchers, and similar occupations.
Technical occupations include:
Practical nurses, nurses'
aides, and assistants to
physicians, dentists, laboratory technicians, X-ray techniclans, personnel counselors,
labor-relations counselors,
public-relations counselors,
librarians, educators, social
workers, writers, research
workers, statisticians,
editors, and assistants whose
work requires similar training, skill and supervision.
Exceptions: Employment which
is part of required course of
study toward degree or
obtaining a license or certificate to practice a profession.

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

88 cents a day in
If employee works a
split shift, or spread addition to the
of hours exceeds 11.
applicable minimum
wage.
(Uniforms required
by employer as a
condition of employment must be
t purchased, maintained, and cleaned
by the employer; ar
employer may elect
to pay $1.50 in
lieu of purchasing,
maintaining, and
cleaning, or $1.00
in lieu of laundering, or 50 cents
in lieu of furnishing.
No variation permitted without
approval of Minimum
Wage Board.)

Hours

4

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

HAWAII:

Revised. Laws (1945), oh.
75, secs. 4351 to 4300,
as amended session laws
1945, Act 15; 1949,
Act 292; 1951, Act 180;
1953, Act 77, and S.B.
No. 204.
(Minimum-wage rates as
amended in 1953,
effective July 1,
1953.)

See footnotes at end of table.




All employment. Exceptions:
Public employment; persons at
a guaranteed monthly salary
of $300 or more; agricultural
work in any workweek in which
employer has fewer than 20
employees; domestic service;
employment by relatives as
specified in the act; work in
a bona fide executive, administrative, supervisory, or
professional capacity or in
the capacity of outside sales-men or as outside collectors;
the propogating, catching,
cultivating, etc., of fish,
shellfish, Crustacea, sponges,
seaweeds or other aquatic
forms of animal or vegetable
life (including the going to
and returning from work and
the loading and unloading of
such products prior to first
processing); seamen; employees
covered by the Federal Fair
Labor Standards Act; drivers
of vehicles carrying passengers for hire, operated
solely from a fixed stand;
golf caddies.

All employees, 16 years
of age and over:
City and County of
Honolulu
Elsewhere

65 cents an hour 1

All employees, 10 years
and over.

li times regular
rate

55 cents an hour 1

(Reasonable deductions from
minimum wage permitted for board
and lodging. Employer must furnish and launder
uniforms if na~
ture of the
business requires
employees to wear
them.)

48 a week.
Do.
Over 48 a
week.

State, title and number
•of order, and effec­
tive date
MASSACHUSETTS:
Laundry Occupations,

No. 30A, Feb. 10,
1953.
{Supersedes mandatory
order 30 of Sept. 1,
1949.)

See footnotes at eno of table.




Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

"Laundry Occupations," i.e.,
Women and minors; men
any activity connected with
the washing, ironing, or pro­
cessing-incidental thereto,
for compensation, of clothing,
napery, blankets, bed cloth­
ing or fabric of any kind, or
any other employment, con­
nected with the laundry indus­
try, unless otherwise covered
by a minimum-wage order.
Exceptions: Salespersons in
this industry who are con­
nected with: (1) The solicit­
ing of sales or opportunities
for sales; (2) the collection,
distribution, sale or resale
of merchandise for laundry
service; or (3) services
rendered incidental to the
sale of laundry services.
"Laundry Occupations Estab­
lishments, " i.e., any estab­
lishment in which laundry
occupations are performed,
including wholesale and re­
tail laundries, clubs, hospi­
tals, colleges, private
schools; self-service, auto­
matic, "Help Yourself" and
"You Do It" laundries; and any
type of rental laundries.

Minimum-wage
rates

70 cents an hour

(Deductions, other
than those allowed
by law, bringing
wage below theminimum allowed
only if consent of
employee and ap­
proval of Minimum
Wage Commission
are obtained.
Deductions from
minimum wage for
meals and lodging
permitted if em­
ployee desires
these accommoda­
tions.
Maximum
charges specified
in order.
If uniforms are
reauired as a con­
dition of employ­
ment, the employer
must furnish and
maintain them.) a

Hours

Maximum for
women and
minors, 9 a
day, 48 a
week.
2

6

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

1954

Minimum-w ag
rates

MASSACHUSETTS - Cont.

Mandatory Order of
Aine 25, 1953, issued
by the Commissioner of
Labor and Industries
in accordance with ch.
558, Laws 1952 (which
restricts minimum-wage
boards from recommend­
ing rates below 85 cents
an hour, except in
certain specified in­
stances; and authorizes
the Commissioner to
adjust such rates to 65
cents an hour prior to
July 1, 1S53 ).

See footnotes at end of table.




All occupations covered by
Women and minors; men
then outstanding minimum-wage
orders which established any
All (except Public
wage rate below 65 cents an
Housekeeping, Service
hour, i.e., wage rates in the
employees).
following minimum-wage orders
were increased: Amusement and
Public Housekeeping
Recreation; Personal Services;
Industry, Service em­
Boot and Shoe Cut Stock and
ployees.
Findings; Brush; Clerical,
Technical and Similar; Corset:
Druggists' Preparations, Pro­
prietary Medicines and Chemi­
cal Compounds; Electrical
Equipment and Supplies;
Jewelry and Related Lines;
Knit Goods: Men's Clothing
and Raincoat; Men's Furnish­
ings: Mercantile; Millinery;
Paper Box; Pocketbook and
Leather Goods; Stationery
Goods; Toys, Games and
Sporting Goods; Women's and
Children's Underwear and
Neckwear and Cotton Garments;
Women's Clothing: Dry Clean­
ing; Public Housekeeping.
(The 7 orders underscored
above are now superseded
by the Needle Trade and
Garment Occupations Order,
which follows.)

65 cents an hour

50 cents an hour

Hours

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
MASSACHUSETTS - Cont.
Needle Trade and Gar­
ment Occupations, No.

32, Sept. 1, 1953.
(Supersedes the follow­
ing Mandatory Occu­
pational Orders:
Corsets, Oct. 1, 1937;
Men's Clothing and
Raincoat, Oct. 1, 1937;
Men's Furnishings, Oct.
1, 1937; Women's
Clothing, Oct. 1, 1937;
Women's and Children's
Underwear, Neckwear
and Cotton garments,
July 1, 1938; Knit
goods, June 2, 1939;
Millinery, Feb. 1, 1939. )

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

"Needle Trade and Garment
Women and minors; men
Occupations" includes all
activities, services, and
processes concerned with the
manufacture, production, pro­
cessing, or finishing of all
clothing, for human or other
use, including but not
limited to, outer wearing
apparel, millinery, under­
garments, accessories, or
trimmings incidental to the
manufacture, production, or
processing or finishing of
such items. Exceptions:
Occupations concerned with
the manufacturing, produc­
tion, processing, or finish­
ing of staple lines of
hosiery and those subject to
another Minimum Wage Com­
mission order.

See footnotes at end of table.




7

Minimum-wage
rates

4, 5

75 cents an hour

Hours

Maximum for
women and
(Deductions, other minors, 9
a day, 48 a
than those re­
quired by law,
week. 1. 2
bringing wages
below the minimum
allowed only if
consent of em­
ployee and
approval of Mini­
mum Wage Com­
mission are
obtained.)

8

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM- WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
MASSACHUSETTS - Cont.
Clerical, Technical and
Similar Occupations,

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

1954

Minimum-wa
rates

Hours

"Clerical, Technical and Simi­ Women and minors; men;
80 cents an hour7
Maximum for
lar Occupations" include all
Experienced
women and mi­
No. 24—C, July 1, 1954.
occupations in any general,
nors, 9 a day,
business, professional, or
48 a week. 1 ’ 9
(Supersedes mandatory
technical office, and in any
order 24-B of June 16,
laboratory, hospital, museum,
1, 9
Inexperienced (less than 75 cents an
Do.
1950. )
historical building, library,
hour 7* 8
school, telephone, telegraph,
000 hours in the occu­
broadcasting or televising
pations; for those cov­
(Deductions, other
ered by the On-the-Job
establishment, funeral di­
Training Program or the
than those re­
rector's establishment, or in
quired by law,
Apprentice Training
messenger service, or other
Program, the number of
bringing wage be­
establishment wherein workers
low the minimum
are employed in any capacity
hours constituting
in which the services of any
experience will be de­
allowed only if
kind and wheresoever performed
consent of em­
termined by the Minimum
Wage Commission).
are of a clerical or technical
ployee and ap­
proval of the
character.
Minimum Wage Com­
mission are
Includes persons whose duties
obtained.
are related to general office,
Deductions for
professional, or technical
meals and lodging
work in any establishment,
permitted at
whether business, medical,
prices specified
dental, funeral, technical, or
in the order.
legal, such as office boys or
If uniforms are
girls, file clerks, general
required as a
office clerks, stenographers,
condition of em­
typists, bookkeepers, cashier^
ployment the em­
various machine operators,
ployer must fur­
telephone and switchboard
nish, launder,
operators, receptionists,
clean, and main­
guides, library workers,
See footnotes at end of table.
tain them.) 3




State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
MASSACHUSETTS - Cont.
Clerical, Technical
and Similar Occupations,

No. 24-C, July 1, 1954.
Cont.

Mercantile Occupations,

No. 20-C, July 1, 1954.
(Supersedes mandatory
order 20-B of Dec. 26,
1951.)

See footnotes at end of table.




Class of employees
covered

Occupation or industry
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

draftsmen, technicians, ineluding dental and medical
technicians, and laboratory
assistants. Students workiiig
for the whole or part of their
tuition and/or maintenance at
school, college, or summer
camp which they are attending,
are excluded from the basic
wage rates of this order.

Hours

*
g

Women and minors; men:
"Mercantile Occupations" inelude any industry or business Full-time employees:
$30 a week
connected with or operated for Experienced
the purpose of selling, purchasing, or distributing mer—
75 cents an hour
chandise, wares, goods, articles, services, or commodities
to retailers, wholesalers, inInexperienced (less than $28 a week 7
dustrial, commercial, or individual users. Includes all
600 hours in the occupation).
work connected with the so70 cents an hour 7
liciting of sales or opportunitles for sales, or the
distributing of such merchandise, wares, goods, articles,
Part-time employees:
75 cents an hour
or commodities and the renderExperienced
ing of services incidental to
the sales, use, or upkeep of
70 cents an hour 7
same, whether performed on
Inexperienced (less
employer's premises or elsethan 600 hours in the
where; the selling of ice
occupation).
cream and non-alcoholic
- 9 -

36 but not
more than 44
,
a week. 1 o
Over 44 a
week.
36 but not
more than 44
a week. 10
Over 44 a
week. 1

Less than 36
a week. 9
Do. 9

10

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
MASSACHUSETTS - Cent.
Mercantile Occupations,

Cont.

See footnotes at end of table.




-

Occupation or industry
covered

beverages in mercantile
establishments where the sell­
ing of such commodities is in­
cidental to the principal
business of the establishment.
Covers all functions within
mercantile occupations not
specifically governed by any
other Massachusetts minimumwage order.
Includes sales­
persons specifically exempted
from coverage under the Dry
Cleaning and Laundry Occu­
pations orders. Exemptions;
(a) Outside salespersons who
regularly sell away from em­
ployer's place of business,
or whose hours cannot readily
be determined, and who do not
make daily reports or visits
to the office or plant of
employer.
(b) Outside salesmen employed
at other than a fixed locatioi
whose employment and sales
activities are not in any
material manner managed, reg­
ulated, supervised, directed,
controlled, or prescribed by
the employer.

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

(Deductions, other
than those allowea
by law, bringing
wage below the
minimum allowed
only if written
consent of em­
ployee and ap­
proval of Minimum
Wage Commission
are obtained.
If uniforms are re­
quired to be worn
as a condition of
employment, the
employer must
supply, maintain,
and provide for
laundering or
cleaning.) 3

Hours

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
MINNESOTA:
Public Housekeeping
Industry, No. 19, Apr.

23, 1953.

Occupation or industry
covered

Public Housekeeping Industry.

Class of employees
covered

Minimum—w age
rates

Hours

Women and minors:
Persons of ordinary
ability:

Note: Enforcement
enjoined pending court
review.

In cities of over
50,000 population.

75 cents an hour

In cities of 20,000 to
50.000.
In cities of 10,000 to

70 cents an hour

Maximum for
females over
16 years is
54 a week;
for minors
under 16, 8
a day, 48 a
week.
Do.

05 cents an hour

Do.

60 cents an hour

Do.

20.000.

In communities of less
than 10,000.

Learners and apprentices:
In cities of over 50,00C 60 cents an hour
population.
In cities of 20,000 to
55 cents an hour
50.000.
In cities of 10,000 to
50 cents an hour

Do.
Do.
Do.

20.000.

In communities of less
than 10,000.

(Deductions for
meals and lodging
allowed at prices
specified in
order.)

See footnotes at end of table.




45 cents an hour

11

Do.

12

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
MINNESOTA: - Cont.
Retail Merchandising
Business, No. 20,

Sept. 4, 1953.

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Retail Merchandising Business. Women and minors over 18:
Persons of ordinary
ability:
75 cents an hour

Maximum for
females over
10 is 54 a
week.

In cities of 20,000 to
50,000.
In cities of 10,000 to
20,000.
Communities of less
than 10,000.

70 cents an hour

Do.

05 cents an hour

Do.

00 cents an hour

Do,

00 cents an hour
05 cents an hour

Do.
Do.

In cities of 20,000 to
50,000:
First 3 months
Second 3 months

Note: Enforcement
enjoined pending
court review.

In cities of over
50,000 population.

In cities of over
50,000 population:
First 3 months
Second 3 months

(Supersedes order 18,
of June 30, 1947.)

55 cents an hour
00 cents an hour

Do.
Do.

In cities of 10,000 to
20,000:
First 3 months
Second 3 months

50 cents an hour
55 cents an hour

Do.
Do.

Learners and apprentices,
18 years of age or over:

See footnotes at end of table.




,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

MINNESOTA — Cont.
Retail Merchandising
Business - Cont.

In communities of less
than 10,000:
First 3 months
Second 3 months
Minors under 18 years of
age in each class of
cities.

See footnotes at end of table.




13

Minimum-wage
rates

45 cents an hour
50 cents an hour
Rates same as for
learners and
apprentices in
first 3 months.

Hours

Do.
Do.
Maximum for
females over
16 is 54 a
week; for
minors under
16 years, 8
a day, 48 a
week.

14

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title arid number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

NEVADA:

Compiled Laws, Vol. 1,
Private employment. Exception:
(1931-1941), secs.
Domestic service.
2825.41 to 2825.52, as
amended supplement
(1943-1949) and session
laws 1953, ch. 194.
(Minimum-wage law as
amended, effective
Mar. 21, 1953.)

Females:
Experienced

$6 a day, $36 a
week 75 cents an
hour

(Inexperienced (3 months) $5 a day, $30 a
8 a day, 48 a
week ( if stipulated week.
by employer and
employee).
All

Is times employee's Over 8 to 12 a
regular rate.
day; over 48
to 56 a week
(in emergen­
cies as speci­
fied).
(Deductions for
meals and/or lodg­
ing allowed as
specified in the
law.
If special uniforms
are required by
employer he must
furnish and launder
them without cost
to the employee.)

See Iootnotes at end of table.




8 a day, 48
week.
Less than 8
day; less
than 48 a
week. 1

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
NEW HAMPSHIRE:

Session laws 1949, ch.
310, as amended
session laws 1953, ch.
232. 1
(Minimum-wage rates
as amended in 1953,
effective June 11,
1953. )

Laundry Occupation,

No. 2, June 11, 1953.
(Supersedes order 2 of
July 28, 1949.)

Occupation or industry
covered

"Any employees." Exceptions: 1
Employees engaged in household, domestic, or farm labor;
outside salesmen; summer camps
for minors; restaurants,
hotels, inns, and cabins;
newsboys and golf caddies;
employees subject to pro­
visions of the Federal Fair
Labor Standards Act and regu­
lations issued thereunder.

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors; men:
Experienced
00 cents an hour
Ushers and pin boys
50 cents an hour
Inexperienced (6 months) 45 cents an hour
(on permit)
Handicapped
45 cents an hour
(on permit)

"Laundry Occupation", i.e., any Women and minors:
activity directly concerned
Experienced
with the washing, ironing, or
processing of laundry wares;
collection, distribution, or
Learners or Apprentices
sale of laundry services;
(3 months)
producing of laundry services
either on their own behalf or
for others by business estab­
lishments, clubs, institu­
tions, and overnight camps.
Laundry establishment, i.e.,
any place in which any phase
of laundry service is
conducted.

See footnotes at end ot table.




Minimum-wage
rates

15

60 cents an hour

45 cents an hour
(Deductions for
meals and lodging
allowed; maximum
rates specified in
the order.
If uniforms are re­
quired a fair
charge, not to ex­
ceed actual cost,
may be deducted.)

Hours

Maximum for
females and
minors: 10
a day, 48 a
week for
manual or
mechanical
labor in any
manufacturing
establishment;
10—1/4 a day,
54 a week for
such labor in
other employ­
ment except
as specified.2

10—1/4 a day,
54 a week. 9

Do. 3

16

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
NEW HAMPSHIRE - Cont.
Beautician Occupation,

No. 4-A, June 11, 1953.
(Supersedes order 4-A
of July 28, 1949.)

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

"Beautician Occupation," i.e., Women and minors:
Licensed hairdressers,
any activity directly conand manicurists who are
cerned with hairdressing,
not licensed hairdressers.
manicuring, or any other
Apprentices
(6 months)
branch of cosmetology.
Students in registered
schools who work on
paying customers.

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

60 cents an, hour

45 cents an hour
50 percent of the
charge made for the
service.

Honrs

10-1/4 a day,
54 a week. 1
Do.

(No deductions
allowed from the
minimum wage other
than taxes, unless
labor commissionei
has approved. )
Retail Trade Occupations,

No. 5-A, June 11, 1953.
(Supersedes order 5-A
of Dec. 30, 1946.)

Women and minors:
"Retail Trade Occupations",
Experienced
i.e., any retail establishment or any retail activity,
unless and until the specific
Learners a (6 months)
employment is governed by a
minimum-wage order than this
general retail order.

60 cents an hour

45 cents an hour
(on permit).
(No 'deductions from
minimum wages
allowed except as
provided by law.)

See footnotes at end




of

table.

10-1/4 a day,
54 a week. 7, 8
Do.

7, 8

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum—wage
rates

Hours

HEM HAMPSHIRE - Cont.
Dry Cleaning Occupation,

"Dry Cleaning Industry", i.e., Women and minors:
any activity directly con­
Experienced
nected with cleaning, dyeing,
(Supersedes directory
pressing, or processing of
order of July 28, 1949.") any article of wearing appare
Learners or Apprentices
household furnishings, or
(3 months).
fabrics of any kind whatso­
ever; and any process inci­
dental thereto, including
collecting and receiving such
articles for the above pur­
poses, or giving out or
collecting such articles
after they have been cleaned,
dyed, or pressed.
No. 7, June 11, 1953.

See footnotes at end of table.




17

60 cents an hour

10-1/4 a day,
54 a week.

45 cents an hour

Do.

(No deductions
allowed from the
minimum wages ex­
cept for Social
Security taxes.)

18

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
NEV YORK:
Retail Trade Industry,

No. 7—A, Dec. 28, 1953.
(Supersedes mandatory
order 7 of Hay 19,
1947. )

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

"Retail Trade Industry"includes Women and minors; men:
selling or offering for sale at Zone 1 (New York City)
retail and/or wholesale any
goods, wares, merchandise,
articles, or things, and all
occupations, operations, and
services in connection therewith or incidental thereto.
Exceptions: Establishments
engaged solely in wholesale
trade or employment exclusively!
at wholesale in an establishment engaged in both wholesale
and retail trade which realizes
less than 25 percent of its
gross annual receipts from
retail sales; employees in any
workweek when employed solely
at an occupation or in an
industry governed by another
Zone 2 (All cities,
minimum-wage order of the
villages, and uninState; outside salesmen, 3
corporated communities
and unlicensed student or
having a population of
graduate pharmacist. 3
10,000 or more, except
New York, and WestChester and Nassau
counties.)

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

$30 a week

Over 30, but
not more than
40, except in
cases of
voluntary
absence.1

75 cents an hour

Up to and ineluding 30
hours, and in
cases of
voluntary
absence 1
when employee
works less
than 40
hours. 2

$28 a week

Over 30, but
not more than
40 , except
in cases of
voluntary
absence. 1

70 cents an hour

Up to and in—
eluding 30
hours, and in
cases of
voluntary
absence. 1

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
NEV YORK - Cont.
Retail Trade Industry

Class of employees
covered

Occupation or industry
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

when employee
works less
than 40
hours. 2

-

Cont.

Zone 3 (Remainder of
State)

$26 a week

Over 30, but
not more
than 40,
except in
cases of
voluntary
absence. 1

65 cents an hour

Up to and in­
cluding 30
hours, and
in cases of
voluntary
absence 1
when employee
works less
than 40
hours. 2

Overtime:
Zone 1

$1.12i cents an
hour

Over 40 a
week. 4

Zone 2

$1.05 cents an
hour

Over 40 a
week. 4

Zone 3

$ .97i cents an
hour

Over 45 a
week. 4

See footnotes at end of table.




19 -

20

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
NEW YORK - Cont.
Retail Trade Industry -

Cont.

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

If employee works a split
shift, or spread of hours
exceeds 11, or both.
Exception: Students on
days attending school.

1954

Minimum-wag
rates

1 hour's pay a day
at minimum hourly
rate in addition
to minimum wages
otherwise required.
(The minimum wage
shall be subject
to no deductions
other than those
authorized by law.
If uniforms are re­
quired by employer
or for compliance
with law, employer
must either supply,
maintain, and
launder, or must
reimburse employee
for uniform cost
and pay applicable
specified rate for
laundry and main­
tenance. )

See footnotes at end of table.




Hours

4

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

NEV YORK - Cont.

Counselor Staff Occupations m Children's
Camps, No. 10, Dec. 28,

1953.

See footnotes at end of table.




"Counselor Staff Occupations ir Women and minors; men:
Non-resident: 5
Children's Camps," i.e., any
Experienced {at least 3 $25, 5-day week 7
camp, play group, or play
seasons at the camp). 6 $30, 6-day week
school,, engaged wholly or
partly in offering on a resi$37.50, 7-day week
dent or non-resident basis
$17.50, 5-day week 7
recreational programs of
Apprentice counselors
(at least 1 season at $21, 6-day week
supervised play or organized
the camp). 6
activity in such fields as
$26.25, 7—day week
sports, nature lore, and arts
$12.50, 5-day week 7
and crafts.
Includes all work
First-year learners
(new at the camp). 6
involving duties primarily
$15, 6-day week
relating to the guidance,
$18.75, 7-day week
instruction, supervision, and
Resident: 5
care of campers, whether such
work involves direct charge
Experienced (at least 3 $25 a week 8
seasons at the camp). 6
of or responsibility for such
activities, or merely assist$16 a week 8
ance to those in charge.
InApprentice counselors
eludes but not limited to:
(at least 1 season at
the camp). 6
Head counselors, assistant
head counselors, specialist
$10 a week 8
counselor or instructor, group
First-year learners
(new at the camp). 6
or division leader, camp
mother, teacher, supervising
counselor, senior counselor,
Employees hired after
counselor, general counselor,
beginning of week or
bank counselor, assistant
terminated before end of
counselor, co-counselor,
week, or voluntarily
absent 1 in any week:
junior counselor and counselor
aide. Exceptions: Pre-season
training"! 9 establishments
Non-resident
Prorated applicable Actual time
catering exclusively to
weekly rate.
worked.
21

22

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
NEW YORK - Cont.
Counselor Staff Occu­
pations in Children's
Camps, No. 10, Dec. 28,

1953.

See footnotes at end of table.



Occupation or industry
covered

children under 6 years, and
those operated by organi­
zations, organized and oper­
ated exclusively for re­
ligious, charitable, or edu­
cational purposes on a non­
profit basis.

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

Resident

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

Applicable weekly
rate prorated on a
6-day basis.
(The minimum wage
shall be subject
to no charge or
deduction other
than those author­
ized by law; no
charge permitted
against minimum
wage for lodging,
meals, reasonable
laundry, trans­
portation, use of
facilities, or any
other service fur­
nished in con­
nection with camp
business. If
laundry service
not furnished resi­
dent employee, em­
ployer must pay $1
per week additional.
If uniforms are
required, employer
must supply or
reimburse employee
for their purchase.

Hours

Do.

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Class of employees
covered

Occupation or industry
covered

NEV YORK - Cont.
Counselor Staff Occu­
pations m Children's
Camps - Cont.

Employer must pay
fare or make trans­
portation available
for employees who
supervise campers
in transit, or who
are required to
make special trips
to attend prebeason training
courses.)

Errata on Bulletin 247 (July 1, 1942 - March 1, 1953) p.48:
Building Service Industry, overtime rate is $1,125 an hour.
See footnotes at end of table.




Minimum—wa 6 e
rates

23

Hours

24

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
NORTH DAKOTA:
Telephone Occupation,

No. 5, July 7,

Occupation or industry
covered

Telephone occupation.

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

Women:

1953.

(Supersedes order 5 of
April 4, 1922.)

Experienced:
In exchanges of more
than 750 main stations,

75 cents an hour

8ss a day, 48
a week, maxi
mum in citie
or towns of
500 or more
popuiation,
except in
emergencies.

In exchanges of less
than 750 but more than
500 stations.

60 cents an hour

Do.

In exchanges of less
than 500 but more than
250 stations. 1

50 cents an hour

Do.

60 cents an hour

Do.

In exchanges of less
than 750 but more than
500 stations.

50 cents an hour

Do.

In exchanges of less
than 500 but more than
250 stations. 1

42s cents an hour

Do.

Learners (first 1,248
hours):
In exchanges of more
than 750 main
stations.

See footnotes at end of table.




State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
OREGON:
Office, No.

12, Oct.

Occupation or industry
covered

13, "Office" occupation includes
stenographers, bookkeepers,
typists, billing clerks,filin
(Supersedes order 11
clerks, cashiers, checkers,
of July 22, 1941. )
invoicers, comptometer oper­
ators, auditors, library
attendants, and all types of
clerical work not covered by
other orders of the Commis­
sion.
Exception: Women em­
ployed in administrative, ex­
ecutive, or professional
capacities, i.e. , work pre­
dominantly intellectual,
managerial, or creative which
requires exercise of dis­
cretion and independent judg­
ment and for which remunera­
tion is not less than $250 a
month.
195 a

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors;
Women and experienced
minors.

75 cents an hour

Inexperienced minors
(less than 90 days' ex­
perience ).

60 cents an hour

Overtime

l£ times the regu­
lar hourly rate.
(Employee may not
be required to
contribute from
the minimum wage
for the purchase
or maintenance of
uniforms, tools
or equipment or
for the laundering
and cleaning of
uni forms.)

See footnotes at end of table.




Minimum-wage
rates

5

Hours

8 a day, 44 a
week.
Do.

Over 8 a day,
over 44 a week
in emergency
on permit. 1

26

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
PUERTO RICO:
Theaters and Movies,

No.

7, Sept. 16, 1953.
(Supersedes order 7 of
Apr.4, 1945.)

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

1954

Minimum-wage
rates

All employees:
"Theaters and Movies", i.e.,
establishments or places where San Juan:
70 cents an hour
Cinematographic operplays or other artistic proators and skilled
ductions are given by actors,
musicians, or singers for proworkers.
fit, or where moving pictures
are shown for profit.
Cinematographic operator 48 cents an hour
Exceptions: Professional,
helpers, chauffeurs,
administrative, and executive
theater managers, and
theater manager helpers.
employees.

Hours

8 a day, 40 a
week, 6 days
a week.1
Do.

45 cents an hour

Do.

60 cents an hour

Do.

Cinematographic opera38 cents an hour
tor helpers,chauffeurs,
theater managers, and
theater manager helpers.

Do.

All other

Do.

All other
All'fither cities and
towns:
Cinematographic operators and skilled
workers.

See footnotes at end of table.




35 cents an hour

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Class of employees
covered

Occupation or industry
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

RHODE ISLAND:
Restaurant and Hotel
Restaurant Occupations,

"Restaurant and Hotel Restaurant Women and minors; men:
Occupations" includes any
Employees in other than
No. 5-R-2, Jan. 1, 1954. activity connected with the
resort hotel establishpreparation or offering of
ments:
Non-service: 1
(Supersedes mandatory
food and/or beverage for reorder No. 5 of Nov. 15, muneration, for human conFull time basic rate
60 cents an hour,
Actual time
1944 S. )
sumption, either on employer's
plus meals.
worked in week
premises or elsewhere, by such
of over 24, up
Note: Enforcement enservice as catering, banquet,
to and includjoined pending court
ing 45. 2’3’4
box lunch, or curb service
review. °
(whether as the principal
Part time 6
business of the employer or as
65 cents an hour,
24 hours or
less a week. 4
a unit of another business) to
plus meals.
the public, employees, members
or guests of members, or
1£ times full-time For hours over
Overtime
paying guests.
basic hourly rate. 45; in resort
hotels, over
48. 2
Service:
Full time basic rate

Part time 6

Overtime

40 cents an hour,
plus meals.

Actual time
worked in week
of over 24, up
to and including 45. 2,3,4

45 cents an hour,
plus meals.

24 hours or
less a week. 4

Is times full-time

For hours over
45; in resort
hotels, over
48. 2

basic hourly rate.
See footnotes at end of table.




27

28

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
RHODE ISLAND - Cont.
Restaurant and Hotel
Restaurant Occupations

- Cont.

Occupation or industry
covered

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

Both service and non­
service :
If meals not furnished

1954

Minimum—wa 6
rates

Hours

12 cents additional
for each hour of
working time.

Employees in resort hotel
establishments:
Non-service: 1
Full time

$19.20 a week, plus Week of 48 hours
full maintenance,
or less,
including lodging
and 3 meals a day
for 7-day week.

Overtime

la times full-time For hours over
basic hourly rate.
48 a week.

Service:
Full time

Overtime

See footnotes at end of table.




$13 a week, plus
full maintenance,
including lodging
and 3 meals a day
for- 7-day week.

Week of 48
hours or less,

la times full-time For hours over
basic hourly rate. 48 a week.
(Deductions from
minimum wage al­
lowed only when
authorized by
statute or pro­
vided for in this
orderJ

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Class of employees
covered

Occupation or industry
covered

RHODE ISLAND - Cent.
Restaurant and Hotel
Restaurant Occupations

Minimum—wage
rates

Deductions for lodg­
ing allowed at
maximums specified,
but no deductions
for lodging fur­
nished employees
in resort hotels
permitted.
Employer must fur­
nish, launder,
clean, and main­
tain uniforms re­
quired as a
condition of em­
ployment.
In lieu
of laundering
uniforms, employer
may elect to pay
additional $1 a
week. )

- Cont.

Employee (other than in 50 cents a day in
resort hotel) working
addition to the
any day in which there
hourly wage.
is more than 1 interval
off duty or spread of
hours exceeds 10; for
resort hotels, if inter­
vals exceed 2 or spread
exceeds 12.

See footnotes at end of table.




29 -

Hours

30

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS MARCH 2,
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
UTAH:
Restaurant Occupation,

No. 2, as amended
effective Apr. 2, 1953.
(Supersedes order 2 of
Nov. 20, 1947, as
amended in May 1951.)

Occupation or industry
covered

"Restaurant," i.e., anyplace
selling food or beverages in
solid or liquid form to be
consumed on the premises.
Exceptions: Retail ice-cream
or retail soft-drink (nonalcoholic) establishments
where 90 percent or more of
the business volume is from
ice-cream or soft-drink
sales.

1953 - July 1,

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors:
Experienced:
In cities of 50,000
population.
In cities over 5,000 and
under 50,000 population.
In cities over 2,500 and
under 5,000 population.
In cities and towns
having a population of
less than 2,500 (1950
U. S. Census) and other
incorporated and unin­
corporated areas.
Inexperienced (less than
3 months recognized
experience in the occupation). 2

Uuly 1, 1942 - March 1, 1953) p. 64:
:i, Minimum-wage rates for 48 hoi rs a week are
65, 62, 59 and 51 cents an hour.
See lootnotes at end of table.




1954

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

55 cents an hour

48 a week.

52 cents an hour

Do.

50 cents an hour

Do.

44 cents an hour

Do.

4 cents an hour
less than the
established
minimum wage.
(Furnishing of meals
to employees al­
lowed if a mutual
agreement has been
signed and copy
filed with Indus­
trial Commission.
If uniforms are re­
quired by the establishment,
employer must
furnish, launder,
and maintain them.)

1

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date
WISCONSIN:
Factories Canning or
First Processing
Fresh Fruits and
Vegetables, special

Occupation or industry
covered

"Canning or First Processing
Fresh Fruits or Vegetables."

Class of employees
covered

Hours

Women 18 years and over;
girls and boys 16 to 18
years of age:
Overtime

order 1953 (order issued
each season.)

See footnotes at end of table.




Minimum-wa ge
rates

31

1=5 times employee's Over 9 a day or
regular rate.1
over 54 a week,
whichever is
greater. Maxi­
mum of 11 a
day, 60 a week
permitted on
12 emergency
days during
season of
actual canning
of a product.

32

FOOTNOTES
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
*

Hour law establishes 8 hours a day,

mechanical,

48 hours a week as the maximum women 18 years of age or over may be employed in manufacturing,

or mercantile establishments,

laundries,

hotels,

restaurants,

telegraph or telephone establishments or offices,

and express

or transportation companies.

2

Employees,

other than full-time students under 18 years of age on days when schools are in session,

must be paid at least 4 hours'

wages at the applicable minimum rate on any day called to work.
An employee who is frequently or periodically absent from work shall not be deemed to be voluntarily absent.

HAWAII
*

The act authorizes the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations to make regulations providing for payment of a lower hourly rate

to learners,

apprentices,

etc.,

and to children 14 years of age and under.

MASSACHUSETTS
Hour law establishes 9 hours a day,
factory,

workshop,

tion company,

48 hours a week as the maximum for "women and children" employed in or in connection with any

manufacturing, mercantile or mechanical establishment,

private club,

office,

letter shop,

financial institution,

picture or other theater or other place of amusement,
a switchboard operator in a private exchange.
secretaries;

(2)

garage,

telegraph office or telephone exchange,

laundry,

hospital in a nonprofessional capacity,

It expressly exempts women and minors who are:

declared by the commissioner to be employed in a supervisory capacity;

Labor Commissioner is granted authority by the law,
not more than 48 hours a week)

however,

express or transporta­

hotel, manicuring or hairdressing establishment,

and

(3)

tl)

or as an elevator operator,

motion
or as

Employed exclusively as personal

professional personnel in hospitals.

to permit the employment of office workers for more than 9 hours a day (but

and of nonprofessional hospital employees for more than 9 hours a day or 48 hours a week in an emergency.

The law cites several permissible variations from its established maximum-hour standards.
In manufacturing establishments and hotels where employment is determined by the Labor Department to be seasonal,
52 hours a week,

2

Employee in laundry occupations reporting for duty on any day at the time set by employer must be paid at least 3 hours'

the applicable minimum rate,
of the employer;

2

women may be employed

but the year's weekly average may not exceed 48 hours.
wages at

unless employment on that day is impossible because of Act of God or other physical causes not the fault

those in the needle trade and garment occupations must be paid for at least 4 hours.

Employee may not be required to make a deposit for uniforms or for any other purpose,

except by permission of the Minimum Wage

Commission.
Homeworkers must be paid at the established minimum rates or the equivalent in piece rates.

Employer liable for all expenses di­

rectly incurred in connection with their employment.
Cooperative educational leave:
cooperative Educational Program,

For any person,

including a learner or apprentice,

whose employment in the occupation is part of a

Commission may grant a special license authorizing a subminimum rate fixed by the Commission and

applicable to the period.

g

Order requires homeworkers be paid no less than the minimum rate or its equivalent in piece rates.

by employer before such work may be distributed.
employment.

Payment of 2 cents an hour must be ad&ed to minimum wage where heat,

nished by the homeworker.
7
•
.
Rate applicable irrespective of basis of payment.




Special permit must be obtained

Employer liable for miscellaneous specified expenses incurred in connection with
light,

power,

office machinery and equipment are fur­

Commissions may not be averaged over more than a week.

MASSACHUSETTS

(Continued)

® The Minimum Wage Commission may grant a special educational license permitting payment of less than the established minimum (a)
any school,
versity,

college,

hospital,

university,

laboratory,

or summer camp in the case of students enrolled and employed therein;

or other training establishment in the case of each person,

technician whose employment for wages is part of an organized training program,

(b)

to any school,

including a learner,

to

college, uni­

apprentice,

or student

at such wage rates and for such a period of time as

shall be fixed by the Commission and stated in the license,

a

Employee reporting for duty on any day at the time set by employer must be paid for at least 3 hours at the applicable minimum rate.

However,

the Mercantile order excepts newsboys and bootblacks;

employees in funeral homes,

doctors'

bell on call during the nighttime,
nightly.

offices,

and the Clerical,

and who are provided sleeping quarters, must be paid the minimum rat e for not less than 4 hours

(Employer may make no deduction for sleeping quarters.)

applicable 3 or 4 hours,

Technical and Similar Occupations order provides that

and similar places of business,whose principal duties are to answer the telephone and door
If employees are unable or unwilling to accept employment for the

fhe Minimum Wage Commission may grant employer permission to pay employee for less than the required minimum

daily hours.
The Minimum Wage Commission may grant a special permit for a 48-hour week to cover peak periods of n ot more than 8 weeks in calendar
year,

at the weekly rate established in the order,

if employer can show compensatory hours of employmen t.

NEVADA
1 Employee reporting for work on any day at the time and place designated by employer,
rate agreed upon in the contract of employment.

must be paid for at least 4 day's work at the

Provision not applicable if employer has given 8 hours'

notice that her services will

not be required on that particular day.

NEW HAMPSHIRE
1 By Attorney General's

interpretation dated September 9,

wage order for occupations covered by the original law.

1949,

minimum wages for women and minors may continue to be established by

(The latter exempts domestic service in the home of the employer and labor on

a farm. )

o

Specified exceptions include:

Household labor and nursing;

operated in connection therewith and incidental thereto;

domestic,

hotel,

boarding house labor;

and cabin labor,

including dining and restaurant service

operators in telegraph and telephone offices;

farm labor;

canning of perishable fruits and vegetables.
3
■
Hour law permits commissioner to grant laundries a special license permitting operation for 60 hours a week for 3 months a year.
Daily maximum may not be exceeded.
* Employee who reports for duty on any day at the time set by employer must be paid at least 3 hours'

wages at the applicable minimum

rate.

5

Not more than one apprentice permitted for a beauty establishment at any time;

must be registered with the Board of Registration of

Hairdressers and the Minimum Wage Division.

f?

Number of learners may not exceed 10 percent of the total number of women and minors employed in any establishment except that each

establishment is allowed one learner.
Authorization of labor commissioner required.
7
Hour lawpermits suspension of the hour provisions for regular employees in mercantile establishments during the 7 days before
Christmas Day,
g

but weekly average for the year may not exceed 54 hours.

No part-time employee,

able and willing to work,

shall be employed less than 4 hours in any 1 day.

NEW YORK
^ Voluntary absence does not include absence (a)
ment;

(c)

at employer's suggestion or direction;

contemplated in employment contract;
and,

for Retail Trade only;

under doctor's care.




33 -

(d)

(b)

incurred as condition of continued employ­

recurrent or periodic absence except

for treatment

34
NEW YORK (Continued)

2

Employer required or permitted to work on any day and available for 4 hours must be paid for at least that period at applicable

minimum-wage rates,

g

Outside salesmen on commission basis and not materially controlled by employer,

and pharmacists,

to obtaining a New York license.
4
Maximum hours 8 a day, 48 a week for females and male minors between 16 and 18 years of age.
week,

10 hours allowed on one day and up to 9 hours on the 4 remaining days,

while performing work prerequisite

To make one or more short days in

but weekly hours may not exceed 48.

The 8-48 maximum does

not apply during two 1-week periods a year for inventory and for 7 consecutive days from December 4-23 as selected by employer,

who

must file with Industrial Commission a written notice of days selected.
Does not include day campers under 16 years with duties limited to a 3-hour daily maximum and resident campers under 18 with duties
limited to a 24-hour weekly maximum,
and/or camp counselors;
devolve upon them,

(b)

provided:

(a)

they are given prepared instruction and supervision in counseling by administrators

bunk responsibility or responsibility for the education or physical activities of children campers does not

except as part of their instruction program;

(c)

their parents or guardians receive a copy of Order's definition of

employee.
g

At least 1 employee must be at experienced rate;

occupations;

first-year learners shall not exceed 25 percent of total number in counselor staff

total number of first year learners and apprentice-counselors may not exceed 75 percent of total counselor staff.

A

fraction resulting from calculation to determine number in each of these 2 groups entitles employer to pay one additional at the firstyear learner rate.
7
$5 is minimum daily for non-resident employees of camps operating less than 5-day week.
A premium payment of 25 percent of employee's applicable rate for each week of employment must be paid to a resident employee at
termination of employment unless equivalent time off has been received;
duty,

12 hours of which must be sequence.

Pre-season work,

specified equivalent is an accumulated unit of 24 hours off

Time equivalent need not be accumulated in any 1 week.

other than such work incidental to and reasonably required in connection with pre-season training courses and

indoctrination of employees,

however,

must be compensated at applicable rate.

NORTH DAKOTA
1

In telephone exchanges of less than 250 main stations, arrangements of operators' schedules, maximum number of hours per day and days per

month

(no mention in order of minimum wages) must be arrived at by employer-employee agreement about which Department of Agriculture

and Labor must be notified.

If agreement cannot be reached,

matter must be referred to the Department

for adjustment.

OREGON
For work performed on Sundays and 6 specified legal holidays,
regular rate of pay or 14 times minimum-wage rate,

payment shall be made at rate of not less than 14 times employee's

unless Sunday falls within employee's regularly scheduled workweek as defined in

Order.

PUERTO RICO
Employee who works 5 hours or less during more than one performance of a show or movie is entitled to pay for 5 hours'
applicable minimum rate.
hours'

work at the

Employee who works 3 hours or less during only one performance of a show or movie is entitled to pay for 3

work at the applicable minimum rate.

RHODE ISLAND
1

Includes,

washers,

but not limited to,

and kitchen employees.

which work is diversified.




counter girls or counter waitresses,

bus boys or girls,

If service and non-service duties are interchanged,

Where,

however,

duties are definitely segregated,

cigarette girls,

hostesses,

cashiers,

dish­

non-service rate to be paid for hours on day in

the rate for each type of work may apply.

RHODE ISLAND (Continued.)
2

Maximum hours for women and minors,

0

Earnings for total hours worked in excess of 24 in any week must not be less than total possible at part-time rate for 24 hours in

9 a day,

48 a week.

If 5-day week is worked,

daily hours may be 9-3/5.

any such week.
4
Employee reporting to work as requested or permitted must be paid for at least 3 hours at applicable minimum hourly rate.
®

Rhode Island's 1942 Restaurant and Hotel Restaurant Occupations order, which became mandatory November 15,

in 1950.

The 1950 order was never put into effect because of a court injunction.

it has been enjoined pending court review.
g
Part-time hourly rates must be 5 cents an hour above full-time basic rates;

1944,

was revised first

The 1954 revision has not gone into effect because

this higher part-time rate is not applicable to regular

full-time employees who voluntarily absent themselves.

UTAH
1

Hour law establishes a maximum week of 48 hours for women and 44 hours for minors under 18.

Restaurant Occupation order requires

that a one-half hour meal period be included as working time.

2

Number may not exceed 1 learner to every 5 experienced employees in the establishment.

WISCONSIN
4

No-basic minimum-wage rate set in this order.

to size of city or town:
where in the State.

2

45 cents in cities of 3,

During the canning season,

The State's order for any occupation,

S00

population or over;

trade,

or industry sets three rates according

40 cents in cities of 1, 000 up to 3, 500;

maximum hours for women and minors over 16 are 9 a day,

54 a week,

except on 12 emergency days in the

season of actual canning of a product when women and minors 16 to 18 years of age may be employed 11 hours a day,
Hour limitation may be waived for boys of 16 and 17 years in 10 weeks during canning season,
Before and after the canning season,
for boys and girls of 17 years;

maximum hours are 9 a day,

and 8 a day,

6,0 hours a week.

under conditions specified in the order.

50 a week for women 18 years of age and over;

8 a day,

48 a week

40 a week for boys and girls of 16 except that during school vacations they may work 48

hours a week.




and 38 cents else­

35

36

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LEGISLATION
March 2, 1953 to July 1, 1954
ARKANSAS

Act No. 217,
Laws 1953.
Effective June 10, 1953

Amends the female labor law to provide that banks and trust companies,
complying with the wage and hour provisions of the Federal Fair Labor Standards
Act as amended, shall be held in compliance with the wage and hour provisions
of the State law.

CALIFORNIA

Ch. 208,
Laws 1953.
Effective September 9, 1953.

1204.

Amends the minimum-wage law to renumber Code section references in Section
No substantive change.

HAWAII

S.B. No. 204,
Laws 1953.
Effective July 1, 1953.

Amends the definition of "employee" in the wage and hour law by deleting
from the exception employment "if under 20, by father or mother" and sub­
stituting employment "by parent or parent-in-law."

Act No. 77,
Laws 1953.
Effective July 1, 1953.

Amends the wage and hour law to increase the statutory minimum-wage rate
from 40 cents to 65 cents an hour in the city and county of Honolulu and to
55 cents an hour elsewhere in the Territory.
(See chart analysis. )

MASSACHUSETTS

Ch. 515,
Laws 1953.
Effective September 22, 1953.




Amends the minimum-wage law to delete "employees of religious, non­
profit or charitable organizations or charitable hospitals, and casual help
or ushers" from the exception to the prohibition that no wage board can rec­
ommend wage rates below 65 cents an hour. As now amended the exception in­
cludes: learners and apprentices; service employees who regularly receive
tips, whose rates shall not be less than 50 cents an hour; janitors and care­
takers of residential property who, when furnished with living quarters, shall
be paid $26 a week; and golf caddies.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LEGISLATION - Cont.
MASSACHUSETTS - Cont.

Ch. 174,
Laws 1954.
Effective May 30, 1954.

Amends the definition of "occupation" in the minimum-wage law by adding
to the present exceptions, "the growing and harvesting of agricultural, floricultural and horticultural dommodities." Exceptions previously included
"domestic service in the home of the employer, labor on a farm, work by
persons being rehabilitated or trained under rehabilitation or training pro­
grams in charitable, educational or religious institutions, or work by
members of religious orders; and outside salesmen."

NEVADA

Ch. 194,
Laws 1953.
Effective March 21, 1953.

Amends the minimum—wage law to increase the statutory minimum-wage rate
for experienced females from $4 a day, $24 a week, 50 cents an hour to $6 a
day, $36 a week, 75 cents an hour.
Inexperienced rates also increased.
{See chart analysis.)

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Ch. 232,
Laws 1953.
Effective June 11, 1953.

Amends the minimum—wage law to increase the statutory minimum-wage rate
from 50 cents to 80 cents an hour.
(See chart analysis. ) The amendment also
adds "newsboys and golf caddies" to those previously excluded from coverage
of the statutory rate, i.e., "employees engaged in household, domestic, or
farm labor; outside salesmen; summer camps for minors; restaurants, hotels,
inns, or cabins; and employees subject to the provisions of the FLSA."
The amendment also sets a rate of 50 cents an hour for theater ushers and
bowling alley pin-boys.

NEW YORK

Ch. 841,
Laws 1953.
Effective April 19, 1953.




Amends the minimum-wage law to require employers to post a "digest and
summary" of the minimum-wage order covering his establishment. Formerly the
law required posting a copy of the minimum-wage order.

37 -

38 -

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LEGISLATION - Cont.
NEW YORK - Cont.

Ch. 528,
Laws 1954.
Effective July 1, 1954.

Amends the provision of the minimum-wage law relating to the compensation
of wage board members to fix a maximum of $25 per day for each meeting called
by the chairman. Formerly the law fixed a maximum of $10 for each meeting
attended or for each day actually spent in work of the Board.

OREGON

Ch. 123,
Laws 1953.
_
Effective July 21, 1953.




Amends the minimum-wage law to change the definition of "women" from
"female person of over the age of 18" Jto "female persons of 18 years of age
and over."

Labor

0.

C,


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