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STATE WIMWIIM-WACR LAWS IP ORDERS
JULY 2, 1954 to MAY I, 1955
Tvsr
fjt

Supplement 2 to Bulletin 247

MAY I, 1955

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES P. MITCHELL. Secretary
BOARD*




WOMEN’S BUREAU
MRS. ALICE K. LEOPOLD. Director
WASHINGTON 25. D. C.

STATE MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS AND STATUTORT RATES BECOMING EFFECTIVE
JULY 2, 195k to MAY 1, 1955

ALASKA
S. 81*, Laws 1955, June 27, 1955
ARIZONA
Retail Trades, August 10, 1951*
IDAHO
Ch. 151*, Laws 1955, May 1*, 1955
KENTUCKY
Hotel and Restaurant, July 15, 1951*
MASSACHUSETTS
Diy Cleaning, May 1, 1955
NEVADA
A.B. 72, Laws 1955, March 28, 1955
NEW MEXICO
Ch. 200, Laws 1955, June 10, 1955
NEW YORK
Hotel, October 11, 1955




OREGON
Beauty Operators and Manicurists, August 10, 1951*
UTAH
Retail Trade, January 11, 1955
Public Housekeeping, February 11, 1955
Restaurant, March 12, 1955
WASHINGTON
Counselors and Leaders in Organized Seasonal
Recreational Camps, June 12, 1951*
WYOMING
Ch. 121, Laws 1955, May 20, 1955
PUERTO RICO
Beer, August 1951*
Coffee, December 1951*
Restaurant, Canteen or Soda Fountain
January 1955
*

1

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

ALASKA*
Wage fixed in lav.
Rate effective
June 27, 1955.
(Session laws 1955,
S.B. 81*.)

S«e footnotes at end of table.




I
Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Employers of U or more em­
Any employee, male or
$1.25 an hour
ployees, including bona fide
female
executive, administrative,
or professional employees,
and outside salesmen (as
defined by FLSA Regulations). Employees, not acting
l| times regular
Exceptions: Persons per­
in a supervisory carate
forming only occasional
pacity, engaged in
•
chores; baby sitters; boys
commerce or other busi­
delivering papers part-time;
ness or in the produc­
errand boys; part-time em­
tion of goods or
_
ployees and aged or partial­ materials. Exceptions*
ly disabled persons as
Employees employed in
authorized under work per­
small, mineral or
mits of the Labor Commis­
metal, mining operations
sioner.
where 12 or less are
employed; employees of
employers subject to
the Federal Railway
Labor Act; and em­
ployees "of similar
class or classes or
employed in similar
industry or industries,
which employers or
industries are ex­
empted from the pro­
visions of FISA as
abended, and the same
exemptions, both in
interstate and intra-

Hours

Over 8 a
day, liO a
week.

2

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

ALASKA — Con.
Wage fixed in law —
Con.

See footnotes at end of table.



Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

state commerce, are
hereby allowed under
FISA, in Sec. 13 (a),
(b), and (c)".

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

- 3 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

ARIZONA.:
Retail Trades Industry,
No. 1-B.
Directory, June 10,
195U.
Mandatory, August 10,
195U.
(Supersedes mandatory
order 1-A of June 17,
19U3.)

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

"Retail Trades Industry," i.e*. Women and female minors:
all selling of merchandise
Experienced
to consumer and not for
purpose of resale in any
form. Exception: Worker
under 2l whose chief occupation is that of a student
actually attending public
or private school.
Part-time

Inexperienced: 3/
First 6 months

Minimum-wage
rates

$26.ho a week

55 cents an hour

$2U a week

50 cents an hour
$25.20 a week
52| cents an hour

Full-time employee,
i.e., one who works
8 hours a day on U or
more days a week

See footnotes at end of table.

Standard
workweek,
i.e., Ii8 a
week (8a
day, 6 days)

Part-time
Second 6 months
Part-time




Hours

Weekly rate prorated

or k2 a
week (6a
day, 7
days). 1/
Less than U
days a week,
8 hours
each. 2/
Same as for
experienced.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Less than
standard
week.

- h

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

IDAHO:
Wage fixed in law.
Rate effective
May U, 1955.
(Session laws 19$$,
ch. 15U.)

See footnotes at end of table.



Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Any employee
Any employer:
Exception: The United
Statesj any State, or polit­
ical subdivision, and any
labor organization or its
representative (other than
when acting as an employer);
persons employed in a bona
fide executive, administra­
tive, or professional ca­
pacity; in domestic service;
in agricultural labor (as
defined); as State and
public employees; and as
outside salesmen.

Minimum-wage
rates

75 cents an hour
(Ey definition,
"wages0 include:
1. All tips,
gratuities and
commissions of
every kind;
2. Reasonable 1/
cost of fumisfil
ing board, lodg­
ing, or other
facilities
customarily fur­
nished and used
by employe.)

Hours

Maximum for
females 16
and over,
9 a day,
in occupa­
tions as
specified
in Hours
law.

5
State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

KENTUCKY:
Hotel and Restaurant
Industry,
Mandatory, July 15,
195k (as modified by
Franklin Circuit
Court in compliance
with the Mandate of
the Kentucky Court of
Appeals in Middlekamp
v. Willis, 267 S.W.
2d 92U).

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Hotels, i.e., all establish­ Women and minors:
ments offering lodging
Zone 1 - Cities of
accommodations for hire to
20,000 or more popu­
the general public. Ex­
lation and contigu­
ception: Those having no
ous territory within
5 miles thereof:
more than 10 guest rooms,
none of which are for
Nonservice
transient guests.
Restaurants, i. e., establish*
ments preparing and offering
for sale food for consump­
tion.
Service

(Supersedes directory
order of Feb. 26,
1951.)

Minimum-w age
rates

h5 cents an hour
67J cents an hour
30 cents an hour
cents an hour

Zone 2 - Cities of not
less than li,000 nor
more than 20,000 popu­
lation and contiguous
territory within 2
miles thereof:
Nonservice
U3 cents an hour

6U^ cents an hour
Service

28 cents an hour
k2 cents an hour

See footnotes at end of table.



Hours

Up to and
including
1*8 a week.
Over U8 a
week, 1/
Up to and
including
U8 a week.
Over 1*8 a
week. 1/

Up to and
including
U8 a week.
Over U8 a
week. 1/
Up to and
including
I|8 a week.
Over U8 a
week. 1/

- 6 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

KINTUCK! — Con.
Hotel and Restaurant
Industry — Con.

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Zone 3 - All territory
not included in Zones
1 and 2:
Nonservice

Minimum-wage
rates

ill cents an hour

61^ cents an hour
Service

26 cents an hour
39 cents an hour

Learners 2/ (90 days,
on permit)

If spread of hours ex­
ceeds 12, or employee
has more than one
interval off duty
(excluding any meal
period of 1 hour or
less), or if both
situations occur.

See footnotes at end of table.




5 cents less than
applicable mini­
mum wage rate
60 cents a day in
addition to the
hourly wage
earned

Hours

Up to and
including
U8 a week.
Over U8 a
week. 1/
Up to and
including
U8 a week.
Over U8 a
week. 1/
(Same as for
Experienced)

- 7 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

MASSACHUSETTS:
Women and minors; men:
Dry Cleaning Occupation, "Dry Cleaning Occupation,"
No. 29-A, May 1, 1955.
Experienced
i.e., any activity con­
nected with the cleaning,
(Supersedes order No. 29, dyeing, wet-cleaning inci­
dental to dry-cleaning,
spotting, finishing, press­
ing, repairing, altering, or
Inexperienced (320
storing of any article of
wearing apparel (including
hours)
hats), household furnishing,
rugs, textiles, furs, and
leather; or any other employment connected with the
cleaning and dyeing industry
not covered by another
minimum-wage order. Excep­
tions* Salespersons in tnis
industry who are connected
with: (1) The soliciting of
sales or opportunities for
sales; (2) the collection,
distribution, sale or resale
of merchandise for dry
cleaning service; or (3)
services rendered incidental
to the sale or resale of diy
cleaning services.

See footaotes at end of table.




Minimum-wage
rates

80 cents an hour

75 cents an hour
(Deductions
bringing wage
below minimum
allowed only if
consent of employee and approval of Minimum Wage Coramission are
obtained.
If uniforms are
required as a
condition of
employment, the
employer must
furnish and
maintain them;
deposit prohibited except on
permit.)

Hours

Maximum for
women and
minors, 9
a day, U8
a week. 1/
2/
Do. 1/ 2/

- 8 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

NEVADA.:
Wage fixed in lav.
Rates effective
Mar. 28, 1955.
^Compiled laws (1931 19 la) and Supplement
(19l*3-U9), secs.
2825.1a to 2825.U7
as amended session
laws 1953* ch. 19lij
1955, A.B. 72.7

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Females, 18 years of age
Private employment.
Exception: Domestic service. and over
Experienced

Minimum-wage
rates

♦7 a day, $1*2 a
week
87.5 cents an hour

Inexperienced (3 months) ♦5.50 a day, $32 a
week
Females under 18
Experienced

$6 a day, $36 a
week
75 cents an hour

Inexperienced

$5 a day, $30 a
week

Hours

8 a day, U8
week, 6 days
a week.
Less than 8
a day, 1*8 a
week. 1/
8 a day7 U8
a week, 6
days a week.

8 a day, U8
a week, 6
days a week.
Less than 8
a day, U8
a week. 1/
8 a day, H8
a week, 6
days a week.

A

All

See footnotes at end of table.



lj times employee's Over 8 to 12
regular rate
a day; over
U8 to 56 a
(Deductions for
week (in
meals and/or
emergencies
lodging allowed
as specified).
as specified in
the law.

9

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

NEVADA. — Con.
Wage fixed in law
Con.

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wa ge
rates

If special uni­
forms are re­
quired by em­
ployer he must
furnish and
launder them
without cost to
the employee.)

Hours

-

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

NEW MEXICO j
Wage fixed by law.
Rates effective
June 10, 1955.
(Session laws 1955,
ch. 200.)

See footnotes at end of table.



Occupation or industry
covered

10

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

75 cents an hour
Any individual employed
Employers of h or more.
by an employer (except
Exceptions: Persons em­
ployed in agriculture} in
Service employees, see
Below).
domestic service in or
about a private home; in a
bona fide executive, ad­
ministrative, or profes­
sional capacity; by the U.S.,
or by the State, or any
political subdivision; in
Service employees, i.e., 50 cents an hour
hospitals, mortuaries, and
persons employed in:
ambulance services; in
activities of an educational, restaurants, cafes,
drug stores, and other
charitable, religious or
establishments furnish­
non-profit organization
ing food or drink for
where no employer-employee
consumption on the
relationship exists, or
premises; laundries;
where services are volun­
cleaning establishments
tary; foremen, superintend­
engaged in cleaning or
ents; supervisors; sales­
repairing garments at
men or individuals paid on
retail; hotels, motels,
piece-work, flat-rate
tourist courts and
schedules, or comnission
other establishments
basis; primary or secondary
furnishing lodging for
school students working
hire to the public;
after school hours or on
vacation; apprentices and
gasoline and automotive
service stations;
learners otherwise provided
bakeries
by law; G.I. bill trainees
while under training; in­
experienced workers (less
than 3 months for any one
employer).

Hours

Maximums for
females 16
and over,
8 a day
and 1*8 a
week, in
occupations
as speci­
fied in
Hours law.
Do.

11 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

NEW YORK:
Hotel Industry, No. 6-C,
"Oct.
(Supersedes order
No. 6-b of Feb. l5»
1953.)

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors; men:
"Hotel Industry" includes
All-year hotels?
any establishment which, as
Nonresidential em­
a whole or part of its
business activities, offers
ployees :
Nonservice:
lodging accommodations for
In New York City
hire to the public, to
employees, or to members or
guests of members, and serv­
ices in connection therewith
In remainder of
or incidental thereto. The
industry includes but is not
the State
limited to conmercial hotels,
apartment hotels, resort
hotels, lodging houses,
boarding houses, furnishedroom houses, children’s
Service (except bell
camps, adult camps, tourist
boys and baggage
camps, tourist homes, auto
porters):
camps, residence clubs,
In New York City
membership clubs, dude
ranches, Turkish baths, and
Russian baths. Exceptions:
Eating or drinking places
In remainder of the
customarily offering lodg­
State
ing accommodations of less
than 5 rooms to the public,
to employees, or to members
or to guests of members;
establishments in which
lodging accoirmodation is
not available to the public

Minimum-wage
rates

75 cents an hour
1/
72 cents an hour

1/

50 cents an hour
1/
Do. 1/

Hours

Over 30 up
to and in­
cluding Uo
a week.
Over 30 up
to and in­
cluding 1*1*
a week (1*3
a week after
Feb. 15,
1956).

Over 30 up
to and in­
cluding 1*0
a week.
Over 30 up
to and in­
cluding 1*1*
a week (1*3
a week after
Feb. 15,
1956).

- 12 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

NEW YORK — Con.
Hotel Industry — Con.

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

or to members or guests of
members, but is incidental
to instruction, medical care,
religious observance, or to
the care of handicapped or
destitute persons, or other
public charges; caddies;
Turkish bath employees employed by concessionaires,
or by independently operated
Turkish baths, unless employed in connection with
lodging facilities of the
establishment} camp counselors in children's camps,
and employees who assist
them and receive supervision
and training as part compensation; enrolled students
in a recognized college,
university, junior college,
institute, or vocational
high school who must acquire
experience through employment
in a hotel; campers working
1+ hours or less a day in a
children's camp; hotel employee in a week when working solely at an occupation
or in an industry covered by
another minimum-wage order of
the State.

Bellboys and Baggage
Porters
In New York City

In remainder of the
State

Service and nonservices
Part time

Overtime:
In New York City

Minimum-wage
rates

i|8 cents an hour
1/

16 cents an hour
1/

U cents an hour
in addition to
the applicable
minimum hourly
rate

Hours

Over 30 up
to and ineluding UO
a week.
Over 30 up
to and ineluding UU
a week (U3
a week after
Feb. 1$,
1956).

30 or less
a week at
the discretion of the
employer.2/

Over U0 a
l\ times the apweek, h/
plicable minimum
hourly rate
In remainder of the
Co.
. Over Ui a
week (over
State
U3 after
Feb. 15,
1956). V
Residential employees:
UU or less
In New York City
$28 a week 1/
a week

13 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

NEW YORK — Con.
Hotel Industry — Con.

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

In the remainder of
the State
Overtime

On any day the
spread of hours
exceeds 10 or
there is more
than one interval
off duty (exclud­
ing any meal peri­
od of one hour or
less), or where
both situations
occur
Resort hotels:
Nonservice
Chambermaids
Service

Part time

Overtime

See footnotes at end of table.




Minimum-wa ge
rates

$26 a week

V

I2 the applicable
prorated minimum
rate
75 cents in ad­
dition to the
hourly wages
earned

$28 a week 1/
$22* a week T/
$20 a week T/

Hours

Do.
Over hh a
week.

)U8 or less
) but more
) than 2h
hours or
3 days a
week.
l/UO of the appli­ 2h hours or
cable minimum
less or 3
weekly wage
days or
less a week.2/
1-2 the applicable
Over ii8 hoursprorated minimum
a week or
rate
on 7th con­
secutive
day. 3/

-11* -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

NEW YORK — Con.
Hotel Industry — Con.

See footnotes at end of table.



Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

(The minimum wage
shall be subject
to no deductions
except as au­
thorized by
statute.
Any employer in
the establish­
ments covered
must furnish,
launder, clean,
and maintain
uniforms. If
employee fur­
nishes uniforms
at the request
or direction of
employer or as a
condition of em­
ployment, em­
ployer must re­
imburse him or
her for the cost
thereof within
the period
specified.
In lieu of laun­
dering and main­
taining uniforms,
employer may
elect to pay
regularly to em­
ployees an

Hours

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

NEW YORK — Con.
Hotel Industry — Con.

See footiotes at end of table.




Occupation or industrycovered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

additional 3
cents an hour.)

Hours

-

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

OREGON:
Beauty Operators and
Manicurists, No. 1,
August 10,195U.
(Supersedes order 1
of July 22, 19Ul,
Supplemented
Aug. 6, 19i»l.)

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupation or industry
covered

16

-

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors
"Beauty operators and manicurists," i.e., those
providing services or operations used or useful in the
care, cleansing or beautification of the skin,
scalp, nails or hair, or in
the enhancement of personal
Overtime
appearance, and all services
or operations incidental
thereto, including services
of maids, cashiers, receptionists or appointment
clerks. Exceptions: Women
employed In administrative,
executive, or professional
capacities, i.e., work
predominantly intellectual,
managerial, or creative
which requires exercise of
discretion and independent
judgment and for which
remuneration is not less than
$250 a month.

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

75 cents an hour

For female
beauticians,
10 a day,
Ui; a week;
for others,
8 a day,
Ui a week.

lj times the
regular hourly
rate.

All overtime,
in emergencies,
permit.

(Employee may not
be required to
contribute from
the minimum wage
for the purchase
or maintenance
of uniforms,
tools or equipment or for the
laundering and
cleaning of
uniforms.

17 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

UTAH:
Retail Trade Occupa­
tions, Wo. 1, as
amended Jan. 11, 1955.

"Retail Trade Occupations,"
Women and minors:
i.e., any industry or busiExperienced:
In Salt Lake City and
ness, operated for the
70 cents an hour
purpose of selling, offer­
Ogden
ing for sale, or distrib­
(Supersedes order 1 of
Sept. 1, 19U7 as
uting goods, wares, and
amended, June 1, 1952. ) merchandise at retail to
selected individuals or to
the general public, and
rendering services incidental
to such operations.
In Logan, Provo, Murray 67 cents an hour
and Tooele
6I4. cents an hour
In other cities and
towns over 2,500
population
56 cents an hour
In towns or munici­
palities of 2,500 or
less (1950 U. S.
Census) and all unin­
corporated areas
Inexperienced (6 months
5 cents less an
or 1000 hours) 3/
hour than appli­
cable minimum
wage for experi­
enced employees
Minors lU to 16, doing
delivery work, chore
work, or odd jobs in
the establishment, not
otherwise provided for
in the order

See footnotes at end of table.




55 cents an hour

Hours

8 a day, U8
a week, 6
days a week
for women;
8-liU^ for
minors under
3.8. 1/2/
Do. 1/ 2/
Do. 1/ 2/

do.

y 2/

8 a day, UU
a week, 6
days a week.

y

18 -

State, title and number
of order, and effective date

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

•
If employee works a
split shift

UTAH — Con.
Retail Trade Occupations — Con,

Handicapped employees
unable to produce same
as able bodied em­
ployee

Hours

55 cents a day in
addition to the
applicable mini­
mum wage
66 2/3% of applicable minimum
wage
(Permits furnish­
ing of meals and
lodging to em­
ployees at a
charge not in
excess of retail
price, if a
mutual agreement
has been signed
and copy filed
with Industrial
Commission.
If uniforms are
required, eraployer must supply free and
provide for care
and upkeep.)

:

r

See footnotes at end of table.




Minimum-wage
rates

* c?c ;? br£&
stj if#i«r

|

Jnf J it» ill

ii

'

•••*»£

19 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

UTAH — Con.
Public Housekeeping
Industry, No. 3 as
amended Feb. 11, 1955.

Occupation or industry
covered

"Public Housekeeping Indus­
try," i.e., hotels, board­
ing houses, rooming-houses,
motels, apartment houses,
resort hotels, hospitals,
(Supersedes order 3 of
Dec. 1, 19U7, as
institutions, building
amended Nov. 16, 1952.) space to rent for business,
manufacturing, commercial
enterprises, and other
public service. Includes
linen-room girls, maids,
cleaners, elevator oper­
ators, and any other female
or minor employee connected
with the establishment
unless or until their spe­
cific occupation is gov­
erned by another minimumwage order. Exceptions;
Registered nurses, licensed
practical nurses, and
resident managers.

See footnotes at end of table.




Class of employees
covered

Women and minors; h/
In cities over 107000
populatiQn;
Experienced
Learners (2 months)
In cities over 3,000
and under 10,000
population;
Experienced
Learners (2 months)
In cities under 3>000
population and all
other unincorporated
areas;
Experienced
Learners (2 months)

Minimum-wage
rates

70 cents an hour
65 cents an hour

Hours

8 a day, U8

a week, 6
days a week.

V 5/
D°. h/|(
5/

65 cents an hour
60 cents an hour

Do.

60 cents an hour
55 cents an hour

Do. h/ 5/
Do. U/ 5/

(Permits furnish­
ing of meals and
lodging to em­
ployees at a
charge not in
excess of retail
price, if a
mutual agreement
has been signed
and copy filed
with Industrial
Commission.

20 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

UTAH — Con.
Public Housekeeping
Industry — Con.

See footnotes at end of table.



Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Exceptiont Re­
sort hotels under
the conditions
specified.
If uniforms are
required, em­
ployer must sup­
ply and bear
entire cost of
same, including
purchase price,
maintenance and
laundry.)

Hours

21

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

UTAH — Con.
Restaurant Occupation,
No. 2 as amended
Mar. 12, 1955.
(Supersedes order 2 of
Nov. 20, 19U7, as
amended May 1951 and
April 2, 1953.)

Occupation or industry
covered

"Restaurant," i.e., any
place selling food or bever
ages in solid or liquid
form to be consumed on the
premises. Exceptions: Re­
tail ice-cream or retail
soft-drink (nonalcoholic)
establishments where as
much as 90 percent of the
business volume is from
ice-cream or soft-drink
sales.

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors:
Experienced
In cities over 50,000
population:
Salt Lake City,
Ogden

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

60 cents an hour

a day, U8
a week, 6
days a week,
for women;
8-UU-6 for
minors under

In cities over 5,000
57 cents an hour
and under 50,000
population
55 cents an hour
In cities over 2,500
and under 5,000
population
k9 cents an hour
In cities and towns
having a population of
less than 2,500 (1950
Census) and all other
incorporated and unin­
corporated areas
Inexperienced (less than
3 months recognized
experience in the
occupation) 7/

h cents an hour
less than the
established
minimum wage.
(Furnishing of
meals to employ­
ees allowed if a
mutual agreement
has been signed

See footnotes at end of table.




18.

6/

Do. 6/
Do. 6/
Do. 6/

22

' State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

UTAH — Con.
Restaurant Occupation- Con.

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

and copy filed
with Industrial
Commission.
If uniforms are
required by the
establishment,
employer must
furnish, launder
j
and maintain
them.)

nr ..:ro3*s
: •*I ; .
:>
"c i t iioH : : J
H i0l£88i&/C.b »!? ! ! .K,t
10 lofee.-aroo
is.f:c3q«
adus
f *j:o
eai
HS £>r;a
•ro qacog
•

:.r« -Miesb-trao v£'!.
V;: (6qs/s»
j
See footnotes at end of table.




t.S S3 XL

- 23 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

WASHINGTON:
Counselors and
Leaders in Organized
Seasonal Recreational
Camps, No. 5U,
June 12, 195U.

Occupation or industry
covered

Class of employees
covered

Women and minors
"Counselor or Leader Occu­
pations in Organized Season­ Non-resident:
Experienced (3 seasons $31*20,
al Recreational Camps," i.e.,
1/ of employment in
only an established resident
"title counselor staff)
group camp, established and
maintained for recreation,
$22.20,
Apprentice counselors
education, vacation, or
(at least 1 but less
religious purposes for use
than 3 seasons 1/ of
by organized groups wherein
employment in ary
these activities are con­
counselor staff occu­
ducted on a closely super­
pation) 2/
vised basis and wherein
$16.20,
First-year learners
day-to-day living facili­
(never employed in
ties, including food and
any counselor staff
lodging, are provided
occupation) 2/
either free of charge, or
by payment of fee. In­
Resident:
cludes all work involving
Experienced (3 seasons $25.00,
duties primarily relating
1/ of employment in
3/
to guidance, instruction,
The counselor staff)
supervision, and care of
$16.00,
Apprentice counselor
campers, whether such work
(at least 1 but less
involves direct charge of,
3/
than 3 seasons 1/ of
or responsibility for, such
employment in ary
activities, or merely as­
counselor staff occu­
sistance to persons in
pation) 2/
charge. Includes but not
$10.00,
First-year learners
limited to: Head counselor,
(never employed in
3/
assistant head counselor,
any counselor staff
specialist counselor or
instructor (swimming, arts
occupation) 2/
and crafts, etc.), group or

y

See footnotes at end of table.




Minimum-wage
rates

6-day week

6-day week

6-day week

6-day week
6-day week

6-day week

Hours

- 2li -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

WASHINGTON — Con.
Counselors and
Leaders in Organized
Seasonal Recreational
Camps — Con.

Occupation or industry
covered

division leader, camp mother,
teacher, supervising counse­
lor, senior counselor,
counselor, general counselor,
bunk counselor, assistant
counselor, co-counselor,
junior counselor and counse­
lor aide. Exceptions! Camp
cooks or kifohen help as de­
fined in Public Housekeeping
Order No. U6 and Order No. U9
(Minors), or any other type
of work other than counse­
lors or leaders; pre-season
training; women or minor (16
and over) members or associ­
ate members of the group or
association, who may serve
as volunteer counselors or
leaders provided written
agreement requirement (ap­
plicable to all persons in
the camp except paying
campers) has been complied
with; resident campers under
16 whose duties are limited
to a maximum of 21+ hours
weekly provided (1) prepared
instructions and supervision
related to their responsi­
bility are given them by

See footnotes at end of table.




Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wa ge
rates

Hours

25 State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

— Con.
Counselors and
Leaders In brganited
Seasonal Recreational
damps — Con.

Occupation or industry
covered

WASHINGTON

See footnotes at end of table.



administrators and/or
counselors; (2) neither bunk
responsibility nor responsi­
bility for educational or
physical activities of
cancers devolves on them,
except as part of their
instruction program; (3) a
copy of this regulation is
furnished to their parents
or guardians.

Class of employees
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

-

State, title and number
of order, and effective date

WICMING:
Wage fixed by law.
Rate effective
May 20, 1955.
(Session laws 1955*
ch. 121.)

See footnotes at end of table.



Occupation or industry
covered

26

-

Class of employees
covered

Any individual employed
Any occupation in which
by an employer (except
individuals are gainfully
minors under 18, see
employed. Exceptions*
Exceptions).
Any individual employed in
agriculture} domestic service in or about a private
home; in a bona fide executive, administrative, or
professional capacity; by
the U. S., or hy the State
or any political subdivision;
in activities of an educational, charitable, re­
ligious or non-profit
organization where no
employer-employee relation­
ship exists, or where serv­
ices are voluntary; part
time and piece workers;
outside salesmen solely on
commission basis; any person
who drives ambulance or
other vehicles on call;
minors under 18.

Minimum-wage
rates

75 cents an hour

Hours

Maximum for
females 16
and over,
8 a day and
U8 a week,
for occupations as
specified
in Hours
law.

27 -

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

PUERTO KtCO: 1/
Beer, No, 2h
August 195U.

Occupation or industry
covered

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

8 a day,
U8 a week.
Do,

See footnotes at end of table.

70 cents an hour

Other employees^

60 cents an hour

All employees

Twice employee1 s
regular rate

Over 8 a
day or over
1*8 a week.

20 or less
a week.

Wage guaranty 32
hours at regular
hourly rate




Permanent employees

Wage guaranty 1-g
times employee's
regular hourly
rate

(Supersedes in part 2/
No, 5, Mar, 13, 19UI,
modified June 5,
19llU

"Beer Industry," i.e., the
preparation, production,
distribution, or sale of
beer, with or without
alcohol.

Class of employees
covered

More than
20 but less
than 32.

-

State, title and number
of order, and effec­
tive date

Occupation or industry
covered

PUERTO RE CO 1/ — Con.
Coffee Industiy, No. 19, "Coffee Industry" includes
December 195U.
all agricultural operations
necessary for the production
of coffee; drying, hulling,
(Supersedes No. 19,
Oct. 26, 1950.)
and packing or the trans­
portation thereof by the
farmer.

DigitizedSee FRASER
for footnotes at end of table.


28

Class of employees
covered

Coffee pickers

Minimum-wage
rates

1*5 cents an
almud, which is
U/5 of a liter

1/
Other occupations

$1.50 per day 3/

Hours

I

29

State, title and number
of order, and effec­

tive date

PUERTO HTCO 1/ — Con
Restaurants! Canteen
or Soda Fountain!
No. 6, January 1955

Occupation or industry
covered

Restaurant, Canteen, or Soda
Fountain

-

Class of employees
covered

All occupations
Zone 1
Zone 2

(Supersedes No. 6,
June 15, 19khy
modified Apr. ll*,
19l*5.)

Se« footnotes st end of table.



Zone 3
All occupations

Minimum-wage
rates

Hours

33 1/3 cents an
hour
29 1/6 cents an
hour
25 cents an hour

8 a day,
1*8 a week.
Do.

Twice employee's
regular rate

Over 8 a day
t
or U8 a
week.

Wage guaranty 1£
times employee's
regular hourly
rate
Wage guaranty 1*0
hours at regular
hourly rate

20 or less
a week.

(Deductions for
meals and lodging
allowed as fol­
lows;
Breakfast 10
cents; lunch, 25
cents; dinner, 25
cents; dormitory,
15 cents daily.)

Do.

More than
20 but
less than
1*0.

- 30 -

FOOTN OTES

ARIZONA

1/
2/
~
3/
“

Maximum hours for women and minors, 8 a day, i*8 a week.
Employee called to work on any day must be paid at least U hours’ wages at the rate at which he
or she is classified.
Number not to exceed 33 1/3 percent of women employed in establishment, except that 1 learner is
permitted if less than 3 women are employed. Rule not applicable during the month of December or
the 2 weeks immediately preceding Easter.

IDAHO
1/ As determined by Employment Security Agency.
KENTTJCKT
1/
—
2/
”

Maximum hours for women and girls in practically all industries and occupations, 10 a day, 60
a week.
Humber of learners may not exceed one-third of regular full time employees. Authorization of
labor commissioner required.

MASSACHUSETTS

1/ Hour law establishes 9 hours a day, U8 hours a week as the maximum for "women and children"
employed in or in connection with any factory, workshop, manufacturing, mercantile or mechanical
establishment, telegraph office or telephone exchange, express' or transportation company, private
club, office, letter shop, financial institution, laundry, hotel, manicuring or hairdressing
establishment, motion picture or other theater or other place of amusement, garage, hospital in
a nonprofessional capacity, or as an elevator operator, or as a switchboard operator in a private
exchange. It expressly exempts women and minors who ares (1) Employed exclusively as personal
secretaries; (2) declared by the commissioner to be employed in a supervisory capacity; and
(3) professional personnel in hospitals. Labor Commissioner is granted authority by the law,
however, to permit the employment of office workers for more than 9 hours a day (but not more than
U8 hours a week) and of nonprofessional hospital employees for more than 9 hours a day or U8
hours a week in an emergency. The law cites several permissible variations from its established
maximum-hour standards.




- 31 MASSACHUSETTS

(Continued)

In manufacturing establishments and hotels where employment is determined by the Labor Department
to be seasonal, women may be employed 52 hours a week, but the year's weekly average may not
exceed U8 hours.
£/

Employee reporting for duty on any day at the time set by employer must be paid at least 3 hours'
wages at the applicable minimum rate, unless employment on that day is rendered impossible by
conditions beyond the employer's control.

NEVADA
1/

Emplcyee reporting for work on any day at the time and place designated by employer, must be paid
for at least \ day's work at the rate agreed upon in the contract of employment, unless employer
has given 8 hours notice that her services will not be required on that particular day.

NEW YORK
1/

In all-year-hotels nonresidential employees receiving one meal per day may be paid 5 cents less
than the applicable basic hourly rates and 10 cents less if two or more meals are received; for
residential employees in such establishments who receive meals, a weekly differential of $7 is
permitted. In resort hotels employees who receive lodging but no meals may be paid $5 less than
the weekly minimum rate established for employees receiving neither meals nor lodging if 3
meals but no lodging, $7 less; and if both lodging and 3 meals a day are received, $12 less.
2/ Employee called to work on any day, whether assigned to duty or not, must be paid for the maximum
length of the stint she is hired to work (3 hours, if 1 shift; 6 hours if 2 shifts; 8 hours if
3 shifts) at the applicable minimum rate. The hotel order provides that actual hourly earnings
must be paid, if such earnings exceed the minimum daily wage. Employee-students exempted from
this provision on any workday when they are required to attend school, must be paid for each hour
of actual work or permitted attendance in the establishment at the applicable minimum hourly rate.
3/ Hour law expressly exempts from the 8-1$ hour maximum females over 16 employed in resort or
seasonal hotels or restaurants in rural coranunities and small cities and villages as specified.




- 32
NEW YORK
V

(Continued)
Maximum hours 8 a day, U8 a week for females and male minors between 16 and 18 years of age.
To make one or more short days in week, 10 hours allowed on one day and up to 9 hours on the
U remaining days, but weekly hours
may not exceed 1*8. In mercantile establishments, the 8-U8
hour maximum does not apply during
2 weeks in year for inventory and for 7 consecutivedays from
Dec. li though 23, selected by the employer who must notify the Industrial Commission.
Hours law expressly exempts from its provisions females over 16 employed in: (1) Beauty parlors
in cities and towns of less than 15,000 population; (2) resort or seasonal hotels or restaurants
in rural communities and in places of under 15,000 population, as specified.

UTAH
1/
"

Hour law permits overtime if life or property is in imminent danger. In emergencies or peak
periods in the business of an employer, Industrial Commission may permit longer hours. Regulations
issued by the Commission prescribe certain conditions for obtaining permits for such overtime.
2/ Employee called to work on any day
must be paid for at least k hours at the rate of 70cents an
hour. Exception: Minors must be paid for at least 2 hours.
3/ Number may not "exceed 25% of total number of workers covered by the order.
V Employment of girls under 18 and of boys under 16 prohibited in this industry. Boys 16 and under
“
18 may be employed 8 hours a day, 6 days, UU hours a week if certificate has been obtained from
school superintendent or the local issuing officer.
5/ Order requires that a \ hour meal period, paid for at minimum rate, be included in the 8 hours.
"
xn emergencies, females over 21 may be employed over 8 hours a day or on the 7th day, if employer
obtains a permit from the Industrial Commission.
6/ Restaurant Occupations Order requires that a \ hour meal period be included as paid time.
7/ Number may not exceed 1 learner to every 5 experienced employees in the establishment.

WASHINGTON
Season defined as a minimum period of 6 weeks in any 1 year.
No more than 30 percent of total number of counselor staff employees may be paid the first-year
learner rate in any week and the total number of employees paid the first-year learner and appren­
tice counselor rate may not exceed 80 percent of the total staff provided that in camps of UO
campers or less, where these percentages may be unworkable, the Supervisor of Women and Minors
Division shall have authority to make reasonable adjustments upon showing that limitations will
work a hardship.
3/ At the termination of employment a resident counselor shall be entitled to a premium payment of
“
25 percent of applicable weekly rate for each week of employment, unless the equivalent thereof has

been received in time off duty. Premium payment for 1 week is equivalent to 2k hours off duty, 12
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
________
___________ ________________ ________________________
Federal Reserve Bank of St. of which must be in sequence.
Louis
1/
?/

- 33 PUERTO RICO
I””" * digest of "outstanding provisions of decrees issued by the Puerto
the p- r- DepartBent °f
*«*■ s
2/

Beer Industry was previously covered by Mandatory Decree No. 5, Beer and Carbonated Drinks
the^Sort * Drink*!ndus try! ***
13' 19UU'
*** —ins in e^ect^r

3/

Order provides that the minimum wage increase or decrease according to the price of coffee
set by a Production Board.