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State Minimum-Wage Laws
and Orders
July 1, 1942-July 1, 1950
REVISED SUPPLEMENT TO BULLETIN 191

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
WOMEN’S BUREAU BULLETIN 227, REVISED

a


DEPOSITOR

State Minimum-Wage Laws
and Orders
July 1, 1942-July 1, 1950
REVISED SUPPLEMENT TO BULLETIN 191

lliBl

BULLETIN OF THE WOMEN’S BUREAU
No. 227, REVISED

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin, Secretary
WOMEN’S BUREAU

Frieda S. Miller, Director

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents







LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
United States Department oe Labor,
Women’s Bureau,

Washington, July 1, 1950.
I have the honor to transmit an analysis of State minimumwage orders now current which have been either newly issued or
revised since July 1942. Ninety-four orders and six statutes fixing
rates are included in the present analysis, and these represent 22 of
the 30 jurisdictions now having minimum-wage laws on their statute
books.
This bulletin adds to Women’s Bureau Bulletin 227, of which it is a
revision, analysis of statutory amendments and minimum-wage orders
that have become effective since January 1, 1949. Like Bulletin 227,
the revision supplements Bulletin 191, which analyzed statutes and
orders issued up to July 1942.
M. Loretta Sullivan and Alice Angus, of the Bureau’s Division on
Women’s Labor Law and Civil and Political Status, performed the
research and analysis for the report under the direction of Margaret
L. Plunkett, Chief of the Division.
Respectfully submitted.
Frieda S. Miller, Director.
Hon. Maurice J. Tobin,
Secretary oj Labor.
(in)
Sir:




STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS
July 1, 1942-JuIy 1, 1950

SUMMARY
This bulletin presents an analysis of the various State minimumwage orders now current which have become effective since publica­
tion of Women’s Bureau Bulletin 191, “State Minimum-Wage Laws
and Orders,” in 1942. In the present analysis only orders issued since
July 1, 1942, and now current are included. Therefore, Bulletin 191
must be consulted for analysis of currently effective orders issued prior
to that date. In the present Supplement, the orders of each State
are arranged chronologically according to the effective date. If the
order is a revision, this fact is noted and the number and effective
date of the superseded order are shown. If more than one revision
of an order was made in the 8-year period, only the one that is cur­
rently effective is shown, but appropriate references for all intermedi­
ate revisions are noted.
State action
Of the 130 minimum-wage orders and statutory rates in effect July 1,
1942, 72 have been revised or amended in the 8-year period intervening
and a total of 26 additional orders and 2 statutory rates have been
established by 11 of the 30 jurisdictions having State minimum-wage
laws. Of the 26 orders, practically all established minimum wages
for the industry for the first time. However, Kentucky and Minne­
sota issued separate orders for hotels and restaurants and retail trade,
respectively, which previously had been covered by the “general”
occupation orders of these States. Of the 100 changes that have oc­
curred since July 1, 1942, 72 took place since the end of World War II.
Of the 30 jurisdictions with minimum-wage laws, 4 (Kansas,
Louisiana, Maine, Oklahoma) have no minimum wages in effect at the
present time and 3 (Alaska, Colorado, Ohio) have not, up to July 1,
1950, revised prewar minimum wages or issued new orders for addi­
tional industries. Twenty-one States and Territories established
minimum wages in the period: Arizona, California, Connecticut,
District of Columbia, Hawaii, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota,
Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota,
Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Dakota,
Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. (This includes five with statutory




(1)

2

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS

rates: Nevada, South Dakota, and Hawaii which amended their laws
in the period to set higher basic minima; and Massachusetts and New
Hampshire, which in 1949 amended their statutes to establish statu­
tory rates, retaining, however, wage-board procedures.) In addition,
Arkansas, through a change in the overtime provision of its hour law,
indirectly improved its statutoiy rate. Illinois issued a retail trade
order during the period, but it was declared void by the Circuit Court
of Sangamon County. Ten jurisdictions issued orders for industries
not previously covered by an individual occupation wage order:
Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, and Puerto Rico for retail trade;
Connecticut, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, and Puerto Rico for restaurants or public housekeeping;
Massachusetts and Washington for amusement and recreation occu­
pations; and New Jersey for beauty parlors. Puerto Rico also adopted
orders for tobacco, sugar, hospitals, beer and carbonated drinks,
theaters and movies, bakeries and confectionery, construction, trans­
portation, laundry and dry cleaning, furniture, quarrying, and
wholesale trade.
Number of current orders issued and statutory rates established or revised during the
;period July 19^Z~July 1950, by State
State

Number

California........... ..........
Connecticut
District of Columbia.-.
Kentucky
Massachusetts

f
\

2
Law
11
5
6
Law
i2
10
Law

State

New Hampshire
New Jersey-------------North Dakota
Oregon-------------------Pennsylvania....... ........

Number

J
\

1
Law
1
Law
4
7
4
7
1

State

South Dakota........ —
Utah.____ __________
Washington..................

Number
14
3
Law
4
10
22

11 of these is the all-industries order which applies to all industries covered by the law except hotels and
restaurants and laundries, for which special orders have been issued.
2 General occupations order and annually revised canning order.

Distribution of highest basic rates
Of the 77 orders 1 for which wage rates now current were set by wage
boards during the period, 32 establish minimum rates of 60 cents an
hour or more, 3 setting rates of 70 cents or better; 25 sot rates ranging
from 50 to 59 cents. Eleven orders fall in the 40- to 49-cent hourly
range; 9 fall below 40 cents. Of the 65 current orders issued since the
end of World War II, only 10 fall below 50 cents.
Amendments to minimum-wage laws
At the time the 1942 analysis was published only one State—Con­
necticut—had amended its statute to cover adult males as well as
women and minors in a minimum-wage law. Since that time, Massa­
chusetts, New Hampshire, New York, and Rhode Island have also
i Because of the diversity of coverage of the Puerto Rican orders and the involved methods of payment
set out in thes e orders, P uerto Rico is not included in this count. Likewise excluded are the three orders that
do not set wage rates.




JULY 1, 194 2—JULY 1, 1950

3

amended their wage laws to extend coverage to adult males. In 1949,
Massachusetts and Now Hamsphire established statutory rates hut
retained wage board procedures. These and other amendments to
minimum-wage laws, July 1942 to July 1950, appear on pages 59 to 65.
These changes should bo used in connection with the folders following
page 52 in Bulletin 191.
Summary of orders by industry
The summary showing the industries covered by State minimumwage rates (pp. 3 to 8) includes all currently effective orders, irre­
spective of date of issuance, and therefore replaces a similar sum­
mary section appearing on pages 3-5 of Bulletin 191. As in the earlier
bulletin, classification is by industry or occupation, in accordance with
the usual practice of the State in issuing orders. An asterisk indicates
that a revision of the order was made or a new wage set since July 1,
1942, and that the order now current is included in the Supplement.
INDUSTRIES COVERED BY STATE MINIMUM-WAGE RATES
[Asterisk indicates that since publication of the Women’s
Bureau Bull. 191-—-“State Minimum-Wage Laws and
Orders: 1942”—a new minimum-wage order, revision
of a former order, or amendment of the statutory rate
applicable to the industry has become effective in the
State. The summary following shows the orders by
their title and not by the industries and occupations
listed in the definition of coverage of any specific
order.]
NONMANUFACTURING

Minimum-wage rates for one or more nonmanufacturing industries
have been established in the laws themselves or by minimum-wage
orders, and are now in effect in 22 States, the District of Columbia,
Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. In 7 of these 26 jurisdictions,
the minimum-wage laws are applicable to adult males as well as to
women and minors. These are Connecticut, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico.
All 26 jurisdictions have set wages that apply to workers in laundry
establishments and the great majority of these jurisdictions cover
workers in cleaning and dyeing establishments as well as laundries.
Minimum wages for employees in hotels and/or restaurants are now
established in 24 jurisdictions, and for employees in mercantile or
retail trade establishments in 23 jurisdictions.
Nineteen of the 26 jurisdictions have established minimum wages
for workers in beauty parlors. Twelve jurisdictions have wages
applicable to clerical, technical, or professional work, or work in pack­
ing plants; 11 have set minimums for amusement and recreation enter­



4

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS

prises; 9 for the telephone and/or telegraph industries and for employees
of hospitals (not nurses); 8 for workers in transportation (intrastate);
5 for agriculture; and 2 for domestic service.
These State minimum-wage rates apply as follows:
Laundries

Twenty-two States, the *District of Columbia, Alaska, *Hawaii,
and *Puerto Rico. The States are:
♦Arizona.
♦Arkansas.
♦California.
Colorado.
♦Connecticut.
Illinois.
Kentucky.
♦Massachusetts.

Minnesota.
♦Nevada.
New Hampshire.
♦New Jersey.
♦New York.
♦North Dakota.
Ohio.
♦Oregon.

Pennsylvania.
Rhode Island.
♦South Dakota.
♦Utah.
♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

Hotels and/or restaurants, or public housekeeping

Twenty States, the ^District of Columbia, Alaska, *Hawaii, and
♦Puerto Rico. The States are:
♦Arkansas.
♦California.
Colorado.
♦Connecticut.
♦Kentucky.
♦Massachusetts.
Minnesota.

♦Nevada.
New Hampshire.
♦New Jersey.
♦New York (two orders).
♦North Dakota.
Ohio.
♦Oregon.

♦Pennsylvania.
♦Rhode Island (two
orders).
♦South Dakota.
♦Utah (two orders).
♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

Connecticut, New Hampshire, New Jersey, : nd Pennsylvania cover
restaurants only.
Mercantile or retail and/or wholesale trade

Nineteen States, the *District of Columbia, Alaska, *Hawaii, and
♦Puerto Rico (two orders, wholesale and retail). The States are:
♦Arizona.
♦Arkansas.
♦California.
Colorado.
♦Connecticut.
♦Kentucky.
♦Massachusetts.

♦Minnesota.
♦Nevada.
♦New Hampshire.
♦New Jersey.
♦New York.
♦North Dakota.
♦Oregon.

♦Rhode Island.
♦South Dakota.
♦Utah.
♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

Dry cleaning and dyeing

Eighteen States, the *District of Columbia, Alaska, *Hawaii, and
♦Puerto Rico. The States are:
♦Arizona.
♦Arkansas.
♦California.
♦Connecticut.
Kentucky.
♦Massachusetts.




Minnesota.
♦Nevada.
New Hampshire.
♦New Jersey.
♦New York.
♦North Dakota.

Ohio.
♦Oregon.
Rhode Island.
♦Utah.
♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

5

JULY 1, 194 2—JULY 1, 1950
Beauty culture

Sixteen States, the *District of Columbia, Alaska, and *Hawaii.
The States are:
♦Arkansas.
*California.
Colorado.
♦Connecticut,
Illinois.
♦Kentucky.

♦Massachusetts.
Minnesota.
♦Nevada.
New Hampshire.
♦New Jersey.
♦New York.

Ohio.
Oregon.
♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

Clerical, technical, and professional occupations

Nine States, the *Di strict of Columbia, Alaska, and *Hawaii.
The States are:
♦Arkansas.
♦California.
♦Kentucky.

♦Massachusetts.
Minnesota.
♦Nevada.

Oregon.
♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

Packing

Nine States, Alaska, *Hawaii, and *Puerto Rico (leaf tobacco).
The States are:
♦Arkansas.
Minnesota.
*South Dakota.
♦California (egg, poultry, *Nevada.
*Washington (fruit and
dairy, fruit, vegetable). Oregon (fruit and vegevegetable).
♦Kentucky.
table).
♦ Wisconsin.
Amusement and recreation

Eight States, Alaska, *Hawaii, and *Puerto Rico.
♦Arkansas.
* Massachusetts.
♦California (two orders). Minnesota.
♦Kentucky.
*Nevada.

The States are:

*Washington.
*Wisconsin.

Telephone and/or telegraph

Seven States, Alaska, and *Hawaii.
♦Arkansas (with excep- *Nevada.
tions).
North Dakota.
Minnesota.
Oregon.

The States are:
Washington,
♦Wisconsin.

North Dakota covers the telephone industry only.
Transportation

Five States, Alaska, *Hawaii, and *Puerto Rico.
♦Arkansas.
♦California.
891289—51




Minnesota.
^Nevada.
-2

The States are:

*Wisconsin.

6

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS

Hospitals (not nurses)

Six States, Alaska, *Hawaii, and *Puerto Rico.
♦Arkansas.
♦Kentucky.

Minnesota.
*Nevada.

The States are:

Oregon.
*Wisconsin.

Agriculture

Two States—*Nevada and *Wisconsin—and Alaska, *Hawaii, and
*Puerto Rico.
Domestic service

One State—* Wisconsin—and Alaska.
Other

♦Miscellaneous occupations—District of Cherry stemming and pitting—Oregon.
Columbia.
♦Nut processing, cracking, bleaching,
♦Building service—Massachusetts.
grading, and packing—Oregon.
Personal service—Oregon.
♦Quarrying—Puerto Rico.
MANUFACTURING

Sixteen States, the *District of Columbia, Alaska, *IIawaii, and
*Puerto Rico have established minimum wages for all manufacturing
or certain branches of manufacturing. In Hawaii, the law of 1941
applies only to employment not covered by the Federal Fair Labor
Standards Act. The States are:
♦Arkansas.
♦California.
Illinois.
♦Kentucky.
♦Massachusetts.
Minnesota.

♦Nevada.
New Hampshire.
New Jersey.
♦New York.
♦North Dakota.
♦Oregon.

Rhode Island.
♦South Dakota.
♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

These State minimum-wage rates apply as follows:
All manufacturing

Ten States, the *District of Columbia, Alaska, and *Hawaii. The
States arc:
♦Arkansas.
♦California.
♦Kentucky,
Minnesota.

♦Nevada.
♦North Dakota.
♦Oregon.
♦South Dakota.

♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

Certain branches of manufacturing

Eleven States and *Puerto Rico. The type of manufacturing
covered appears below.
♦California.
Illinois.
♦Massachusetts.
Minnesota.



New Hampshire.
New Jersey.
*New York.
*Oregon.

Rhode Island.
♦Washington.
♦Wisconsin.

JULY 1, 194 2—JULY 1, 1950

7

Wearing apparel:

IllinoisWash dresses.
Massachusetts___ Boot and shoe cut stock and findings.
Corsets.
Knit goods.
Men’s clothing and raincoats.
Men’s furnishings.
Millinery.
Women’s clothing.
Women’s and children’s underwear, neckwear, and
cotton garments.
Minnesota Needlecraft. (In addition to order for “any
occupation.”)
New Hampshire__Clothing and accessories.
Hosiery and knit goods.
New Jersey______Wearing apparel and allied occupations.
Rhode Island____ Wearing apparel and allied industries.
Canning:

California*Canning and preserving. (In addition to order for
“manufacturing.”)
Massachusetts___ Canning and food preparations.
Oregon*Canning, dehydrating, and barreling. (In addition
to order for “manufacturing.”)
Washington*Fruit, vegetable, fish, and other canning. (In addi­
tion to order for “manufacturing.”)
Wisconsin^Canning or first processing of perishable fresh fruits
and vegetables. (In addition to order for “any
occupation.”)
Confectionery:

Illinois.
♦Massachusetts.
♦New York.
♦Puerto Rico.
Jewelry:

Massachusetts.
Rhode Island.
Miscellaneous:

Illinois Macaroni, spaghetti, and noodles.
Massachusetts*Bread and bakery products.
Brushes.
Druggists’ preparations, etc.
Electrical equipment and supplies.
Paper boxes.
Pocketbooks and leather goods.
Stationery goods and envelopes.
Toys, games, and sporting goods.




8

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS

Miscellaneous—Continued
New JerseyLight manufacturing.
Puerto Rico♦Leaf tobacco.
♦Sugar.
♦Beer and carbonated drinks.
♦Construction.
♦Furniture and wood products.

MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS, BY STATE
[Includes all current minimum-wage orders effective since publication of
Women’s Bureau Bulletin No. 191 in 1942. The 26 orders preceded by
an asterisk indicate industries not previously covered by an individual
minimum-wage order for that industry]
Arizona:

Retail trades.
Laundry and dry cleaning.
Arkansas:

Law amended to permit overtime
pay after 8 hours.
California:

Manufacturing.
Personal service.
Canning and preserving.
Professional, technical, clerical, and
similar occupations.
Public housekeeping.
Laundry, dry cleaning, and dyeing.
Mercantile.
Industries handling farm products
after harvest.
Transportation.
Amusement and recreation.
Motion picture (no basic minimumwage rate set).
Connecticut:

Mercantile.
Beauty shops.
Cleaning and dyeing.
Laundry.
♦Restaurant.
District of Columbia:

Hawaii:

Law amended to increase minimum
rates, etc.
Kentucky:

♦Hotels and restaurants.
All industries and occupations.
Massachusetts:

Candy.
Beauty culture.
Bread and bakery products.
♦Public housekeeping.
Mercantile.
♦Amusement and recreation.
Building service.
Dry cleaning.
Laundry.
Clerical, technical, and similar occu­
pations.
Law amended to establish statutory
rate, retaining, however, wageboard procedure.
Minnesota:

♦Retail merchandising.
Nevada:

Law amended to increase minimum
rates, etc,
New Hampshire:

Retail trade.
Law amended to establish statutory
rates, retaining, however, wageboard procedure.

Public housekeeping.
Laundry, dry cleaning, and dyeing.
Retail trade.
New Jersey:
Beauty culture.
♦Beauty culture.
Manufacturing and wholesaling.
♦Restaurants.
Office and miscellaneous occupa­
Laundry and cleaning and dyeing.1
tions.
♦Retail trade.
1 In this revision in 1946 the State combined these two industries. Earlier orders covered them separately-




JULY 1, 194 2—JULY 1, 1950
New York:

* Retail trade.
Laundry.
Beauty service.
Confectionery.
Cleaning and dyeing.
Restaurant.
Hotel.
North Dakota:

Public housekeeping.
Mercantile.
'
Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing.
Manufacturing.
Oregon:

9

Puerto Rico—Continued

♦Transportation.
♦Laundry and dry cleaning.
♦Furniture and wood products.
♦Quarries.
♦Wholesale trade.
Rhode Island:

Retail trade.
♦Public housekeeping.
Restaurant and hotel restaurant.
South Dakota:

Law amended to increase minimum
rate, etc.
Utah:

Minors (no wage rate set).
Retail trade.
Nut processing.
Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing.
Canning, dehydrating, and barrel­
Restaurant.
ing.
Public housekeeping.
Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing.
Washington:
Public housekeeping.
Canning.
Mercantile.
Packing.
Manufacturing.
Manufacturing.
Pennsylvania.
Minors.
♦Restaurant.
Office workers.
Puerto Rico:
Mercantile.
♦Tobacco.
♦Amusement and recreation.
♦Sugar.
Public housekeeping.
*Hospitals.
Beauty culture.
♦Beer and carbonated drinks.
Laundry, dry cleaning, and dye works.
♦Hotels, restaurants, soda fountains. Wisconsin:
♦Theaters, movies, etc.
Any occupation including domestic
♦Retail.
service and agriculture.
♦Bakery and pastry shops.
Canning (no separate wage rate
♦Construction.
set).




ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 1
State, order, and effec­
tive date2
Alaska.

Occupation or industry covered

Women and female minors:
Experienced____________

$16 a week____
35 cents an hour.

Inexperienced:8
First 6 months-------------- -........ .

(Supersedes order
1 of Feb. 1, 1939.)

Laundry and dry cleaning includes:
(1) Cleaning, dyeing, pressing, processing,
or any other work incidental thereto, of
clothing (including hats), household fur­
nishings, rugs? textiles, fur, leather, or
fabric of any kind; (2) the collection, sale,
resale, or distribution at retail or wholesale
of these services; (3) the producing of such
services on their own behalf, by establish­
ments, businesses, institutions, clubs, or
hospitals which services may be incidental
to their present business; (4) Self-Service
Laundries, Automatic Laundries, HelpYourself Laundries, U-Do-Laundries, and
any type of rental laundries. Exception:
Worker under 21 whose chief occupation
is that of a student actually attending pub­
lic or private school.

'$12.50 a week_______
21)4 cents an hour_
_
r$14 a week_________
Second 6 months
[30 cents an hour-----Full-time employee, i. e., one who Weekly rate prorated.
works 8 hours a day on 4 or more
days a week.
Women and minors:
Experienced:
In laundry industry------------------ $18.72 a week 7__
52 cents an hour.
If employee on voluntary ab­
sence.
Part time................ ....................
In dry cleaning industry.......... .

Standard workweek, i. e., 48
a week (8 a day, 6 days) or
42 a week (6 a day, 7 days).4
Less than 4 days a week, 8
hours each.5
Jsame as for experienced.
}

Do.
Less than standard week.

36 a week.
Over 36 a week 4 or during
periods when basic weekly
minimum need not be
paid.7
Actual time worked.

Less than 36 a week.®
36 a week.
Over 36 a week 4 or during
periods when basic weekly
minimum need not be
paid.7
Actual time worked.
If employee on voluntary ab­ ___ do............................................
sence.
Less than 36 a week.®
Part time............................ ....... 66 cents an hour
Inexperienced and apprentices (3 90 percent of the applicable min­
imum rate.
months).8
57 cents an hour.
$21.60 a week 7__
60 cents an hour.

(Deductions from minimum
wage for meals, lodging, or
both, allowed only on special
permit.)
Arkansas:

Mar. 20,1915 Manufacturing, mechanical, or mercantile es­
Wage fixed in law.
tablishment, laundry, express or transpor­
Digest (Pope) 1937,
tation company, hotel, restaurant, eating




Females:
Experienced.___ ______
Inexperienced (6 months)

$1.25 a day.
$1 a day....

8 a day, 6 days a week.®
Do.®

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

No. 1-A Retail, i. e., all selling of merchandise to con­
sumer and not for purpose of resale in any
Directory, Apr. 17,
form. Exception: Worker under 21 whose
1943.
chief occupation is that of a student actually
Mandatory, June 17,
attending public or private school.3
1943.

(Supersedes order
2 of June 15, 1939.)

Hours

Minimum-wage rates

No change in law.

Arizona:

No. 2-A
Directory, July 12,
1948.
Mandatory, Sept. 12,
1948.

Class of employees covered

O

secs. 9094,9096-9100;
session laws 1943,
Act 70 (amending
secs. 9084 and 9095.)

place, bank, building and loan association,
insurance company, finance or credit busi­
ness, or work in any capacity other than oc­
cupations expressly exempted by law. Ex­
ceptions: Domestic, agricultural or horticul­
tural employment; cotton factory; gathering
of fruits or farm products; switchboard op­
erators in public telephone exchanges hav­
ing less than 750 stations who are exempt
under section 13 (a) par. 11 of 1949 amend­
ment to the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act.

Women and minors:
Experienced..................................... .
Inexperienced:
Women over 18 in skilled or semi­
skilled occupations (200 hours).12
Minors under 18 12
Women 18 and over when overtime
is permitted by hour law.
If employee works a split shift........

1H times employee’s regular
rate.
Pro rata.......................................

Over 8 a day or on seventh
consecutive day.10
Less than 8 a day.

65 cents an hour.

8 a day, 48 a week (maxi­
mum).11

50 cents an hour_____ _____ _
do_____ _________ _____
1X times employee’s regular
A
rate.
65 cents a day in addition to
minimum wage.

Do.11
Do.11
Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week in an emergency as
defined in order.

(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)
No. 2 R, June 1, 1947... Personal service, i. e., any industry, business,
or establishment operated for the purpose of
(Supersedes order 2
rendering, directly or indirectly, any service,
NS of Nov. 23, 1942.)
operation, or process used or useful in the
care, cleansing, or beautification of the body,
skin, nails, or hair, or in the enhancement of
personal appearance or health; including,
but not limited to, barber and beauty shops,
bath and massage parlors, physical condi­
tioning and weight control salons, and
mortuaries.
No. 3 R, June 1, 1947... Canning and preserving, i. e., any industry,
business, or establishment operated for the
(Supersedes orders
purpose of cooking, canning, curing, freezing,
3A of Sept. 14, 1929,
pickling, salting, bottling, preserving, or
6A of May 9, 1923,
otherwise processing any fruits, vegetables,
and 3 NS of Feb. 8,
or seafood when the purpose of such process­
1943.)
ing is the preservation of the product.

See footnotes at end of table.




Women and minors....... .......................
Minors under 18 12______ _________
Women 18 and over when overtime is
permitted by hour law.
If employee works a split shift...........

65 cents an hour........................... 8 a day, 48 a week (max­
imum).11
Do.11
Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week in an emergency as
defined in order.
65 cents a day in addition to the
minimum wage.
50 cents an hour....... ...............
IH times employee’s regular
rate.

(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at the prices
specified in the order.)
Women and minors.
Minors under 18 12_.
Women 18 and over.

65 cents an hour________ _____ 8 a day, 48 a week.13
50 cents an hour..........................
Do.13
1H times employee’s regular Over 8 and up to 12 a day and
rate.
the first 8 on seventh con­
secutive day.14
Double employee’s regular rate.. Over 12 a day and all in
excess of 8 on seventh con­
(Deductions for meals and
secutive day.14
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)

JULY 1, 194 2 —
JULY 1. 1 9 5 0

California:
No. 1 R, June 1, 1947... Manufacturing, i. e., any industry, business,
or establishment operated for the purpose
(Supersedes order 1
of preparing, producing, making, altering,
NS of June 29,1942.)
repairing, finishing, processing, inspecting,
handling, assembling, wrapping, bottling,
or packaging goods, articles, or commodities,
in whole or in part. Exceptions: Any such
activities covered by orders for canning and
preserving and industries handling farm
products after harvest.

All.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 1—Continued
to
State, order, and effec­
tive date2

Occupation or industry covered

Women and minors;




65 cents a day in addition to the
minimum wage.

8 a day, 48 a week (maxi­
mum) .n
Do.11
Do.11
Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week in an emergency as
defined in order.

(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)

No. 5 R, June 1,1947___ Public housekeeping, i. e., any industry, Women and minors...............................
business, or establishment which provides
meals, housing, or maintenance services, and Minors under 1812................................
(Supersedes orders
includes restaurants; lunch counters; cafe­ Women 18 and over when overtime is
12A of Sept. 14,
permitted by hour law.
terias; catering, banquet, or box-lunch
1923, and 5 NS of
service; curb service; boarding houses; all
June 28, 1943.)
other establishments where food in either If employee works a split shift—.......
solid or liquid form is prepared for and served
to the public to be consumed on the prem­
ises; hotels and motels; apartment houses;
rooming houses; camps; clubs (private and
public); hospitals, sanitariums, or rest
homes; private schools, colleges, or nurseries;
other establishments offering rooms, offices,
or lofts for rent; building or house, cleaning or
maintenance services. Exception: Graduate
nurses or nurses in training in an accredited
school.
No. 6 R, June 1, 1947... Laundry, dry cleaning, and dyeing, i. e., any
industry, business, or establishment operated
for the purpose of washing, ironing, cleaning,
(Supersedes orders 7A
refreshing, restoring, pressing, dyeing, fumi­
of July 23,1923, and
gating, moth-proofing, water-proofing, or
6 NS of June 21,
other processes incidental thereto, on articles
1943.)

65 cents an hour..

Inexperienced;
Women over 18 in skilled or semi­ 50 cents an hour...........................
skilled occupations (200 hours) .12
Minors under 18 12................. ........ ___ do..... ........... ................... —
Women 18 and over when over­ l¥i times employee’s regular
time is permitted by hour law.
rate.
If employee works a split shift.

Hours

Minimum-wage rates

Women and minors:
Experienced___ ________________
Inexperienced:
Women over 18 in skilled or semi­
skilled occupations (200 hours).12
Minors under 1812—...................

65 cents an hour........................... 8 a day, 48 a week (maxi­
mum) -ll
Do.11
50 cents an hour
1 times employee’s regular rate- Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week in an emergency as
defined in order.
65 cents a day in addition to the
minimum wage.
(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)

65 cents an hour.
50 cents an hour.
.......do.................

8 a day, 48 a week (maxi­
mum).11
Do.11
Do.11

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

Califom ia— C ontinued
No. 4 R, June 1,1947___ Professional, technical, clerical, and similar
occupations include office workers, clerks,
typists, stenographers, office-machine oper­
(Supersedes orders 9 A
ators, bookkeepers, accountants, accounting
of Aug. 28,1933, and
clerks, computers, statisticians, tellers,
4 NS of June 28,
cashiers, collectors, telephone, telegraph,
1943.)
and teletype operators, messengers, board
markers, ticket agents, appraisers, teachers,
instructors, librarians and their assistants,
physicians’ and dentists’ assistants and
attendants, research, X-ray, medical, or
dental laboratory technicians and their
assistants, and similar occupations. Excep­
tions: Any such occupation when performed
in an industry covered by another minimumwage order; employees licensed or certified
by the State and engaged in the practice of
law, medicine, dentistry, architecture, engi­
neering, teaching, or accounting; exchange
operator of a small telephone company
whose duties as operator are incidental to
other duties.

Class of employees covered

or fabrics of any kind, including clothing,
hats, drapes, rugs, curtains, household fur­
nishings, textiles, furs, or leather goods; and
the collection, distribution, sale or resale at
retail or wholesale of these services.

V/t times employee’s regular
rate.

Women 18 and over when overtime
is permitted by hour law.

Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week in an emergency as
defined in order.

65 cents a day in addition to the
minimum wage.

891289 — 50-------3

(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)
No. 7R, June 1, 1947— Mercantile, i. e., any industry, business, or
establishment operated for the purpose of
purchasing, selling, or distributing goods or
(Supersedes orders 5A
commodities at wholesale or retail.
of Apr. 8, 1923, and
7 NS of June 21,
1943.)

Women and minors:

65 cents an hour........................... 8 a day, 48 a week (maxi­
mum).u
Do.11

Inexperienced:
Women over 18 in skilled or semi­
skilled occupations (200 hours).12

Do.11
Over 8 a day or over 48 a week
in an emergency as defined
in order.

65 cents a day in addition to the
minimum wage.
(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)
No. 8 R, June 1, 1947...
(Supersedes orders
8 A of Aug. 8, 1923,
15A of Sept. 14,1923,
and 8 NS of Aug.
27, 1943.)

No. 9 R, June 1, 1947.
(Supersedes order 9
NS of Aug. 27,
1943.)

Industries handling farm products after har­
vest, i. e., any industry, business, or estab­
lishment operated for the purpose of grading,
sorting, cleaning, drying, packing, dehy­
drating, cracking, shelling, candling, sepa­
rating, slaughtering, plucking, pasteurizing,
ripening, molding, or otherwise preparing
any agricultural, horticultural, egg, poultry,
rabbit, or dairy products for distribution.

Transportation, i. e., any industry, business,
or establishment operated for the purpose of
conveying persons or property from one
place to another, whether by rail, highway,
air, or water; and all operations or services
in connection therewith, including storing or
warehousing of goods or property, and the
repairing, parking, or maintenance of
vehicles.

Women and minors:

8 a day, 48 a week.12

Inexperienced:
Women 18 years and over in
skilled or semiskilled occupa­
tions (200 hours).12

Do.12
Do.12
times employee’s regular rate. Over 8 and up to 12 a day
and the first 8 on seventh
consecutive day.14
Double employee’s regular rate.. Over 12 a day and all in ex­
cess of 8 on seventh con­
secutive day.14
(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)
65 cents an hour........................... 8 a day, 48 a week (maxi­
mum).11
Do.11
1J4 times employee’s regular Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week in an emergency as
rate.
defined in order.
65 cents a day in addition to the
minimum wage.

Women 18 years and over when over­
time is permitted by hour law.
If employee works a split shift----------

1

See footnotes at end of table.



JU L Y 1, 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1 , 1 9 5 0

Women 18 and over when overtime is 1Yz times employee’s regular
rate.
permitted by hour law.

(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)

CO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE'SINCE 1942 '—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date2

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

No. 17 R, July 1,1949... Motion picture, i. e., any industry, business, Women 18 and over.....................
or establishment operated for the purpose of
(Supersedes order 17
motion-picture production, including but
of Aug. 11, 1931.)
not limited to, motion pictures for entertain­ Women employed at a guaranteed
ment, commercial, religious, or educational
weekly rate of pay.
purposes. Exceptions: Women who act,
sing, dance, or otherwise perform; or who
are employed in administrative, executive,
or professional capacities (as defined in order).
Colorado
Connecticut:
No. 7A for women and
minors, 7B for adult
males, Mar. 18,
1946.
(Supersedes orders 7A
and 7B of June 1,
1942.)




IK times employee’s regular
rate.
65 cents a day in addition to the
minimum wage.

Hours
8 a day, 48 a week (maxi­
mum).11
Do.11
Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week in an emergency as
defined in order.

(Deductions for meals or lodging
permitted at prices specified
in the order.)
Time and a half employee’s
regular rate.18

Over 8 a day or over 6 days a
week (in emergencies).
Over 40 a week.

No change in orders.
Mercantile trade, i. e., the wholesale or retail
selling of commodities and any operation or
service incidental thereto, such as buying,
delivery, maintenance, repair, office, stock,
and clerical work. Exceptions: Gasoline
filling stations; selling of food or drink for
consumption on the premises whether or not
the establishment is devoted exclusively to
such purpose unless the person is employed
both to sell food or drink for consumption on
the premises and to perform a service in the
mercantile trade; persons working exclusive­
ly as outside salespeople who are paid in
whole or in part on a commission basis.

Women and minors; men:
Full-time employees other than
“minor beginners."
Part-time employees other than cooperative students during training
period and “minor beginners.”
Part-time cooperative students
(women and minors) enrolled in
distributive education programs
(6 months).
Minor beginners 16 and under 18
years of age (6 months):
Full-time employees_____
Part-time employees.....................
All employees18.........................

Less than 36 a week.17
45 cents an hour............................

1K times employee's regular
hourly rate.18

Do.17

36 to 44 a week.18
Less than 36 a week.17
Over 44 a week.19

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D ER S

California—Continued
No. 10 R, June 1, 1947.. Amusement and recreation, i. e., any indus­ Women and minors___
try, business, or establishment operated for
(Supersedes order 10
the purpose of furnishing entertainment or Minors under 18 «...............
NS of Aug. 27,
recreation to the public, including but not Women 18 and over when overtime is
1943.)
limited to theaters, night clubs, dance halls,
permitted by the hour law.
bowling alleys, billiard parlors, skating
rinks, riding academies, race tracks, amuse- 11 employee works a split shift___
ment parks, athletic fields, swimming pools,
gymnasiums, golt course^, tennis courts,
carnivals, broadcasting studios, and wired
music studios. Exception: Performers whose
activities involve the exercise of artistic tal­
ent or athletic proficiency.

Minimum-wage rates

No. 1A for women and
minors, IB for
adult males, Mar.
3, 1947.

Beauty shop, i. e., any shop, store, or place, or
part thereof, in which is conducted the busi­
ness of a hairdresser or cosmetician as defined
in this State’s 1935 Statutes.

Women and minors; men:
3-year operators, i. e., registered hair­
dressers and cosmeticians:

On 4 or more days a week
irrespective of the hours
worked on any day.
8 or less a day on 3 days a
week or less.
Over 44 a week or if part­
time worker over 8 a day.20

$25 a week
$5 a day
85 cents an hour

Same as shown for 3-year
' operators.

(Supersedes orders 1A
and IB of Mar. 3,
1941.)
2-year operators, i. e., licensed assist­
ant hairdressers and cosmeti­
cians; and clerks, i. e., appoint­
ment clerks, desk clerks, tele­
phone operators, bookkeepers,
stenographers or typists, or other
clerical workers:
1-year operators, i. e., licensed oper­
ators:
Maids, porters, and cleaners:

$23 a week................... ......... —

■

Do.

32 to 44 a week.
Less than 32 a week.
Over 44 a week.20
Prorated................ -...................... Actual time worked.

70 cents an hour..... .................. .
Full-time workers voluntarily absent in any week.

No. 3, June 2, 1947
(Supersedes order 3 of
Oct. 7, 1940.)

Cleaning and dyeing, i. e., cleaning, dyeing,
redyeing, or pressing garments (including
hats), upholstery, rugs, or any other fabrics,
any process incidental thereto, including
collecting and receiving such articles for the
above purposes, of giving out or collecting
such articles after they have been cleaned,
dyed, redyed, or pressed. Exception: Any
such process when carried on in establish­
ments manufacturing textiles or garments
(including hats).

Women and minors:
Experienced and inexperienced------

(Deductions for uniforms and
maintenance of uniforms
permitted, but in no case
may the wage paid fall be­
low the minimum.)
9 a day, 45 a week.2*
D0.21
times employee’s regular rate. Over 45 a week.*8

JULY 1, 194 2—
JULY 1, 1950

$28 a week.................. ..................

See footnotes at end of table.




Cn

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 •—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive datea
Connecticut—Continued
No. 2, Sept. 29, 1947___

No. 4-A far women and
minors, 4-B for adult
males, MayJflS, 1950.




Laundry establishment includes any place in
which any service in connection with any
activity of the laundry occupation is per­
formed for compensation, except in domes­
tic service.
Laundry occupation, i. e., (1) washing, iron­
ing, or processing incidental thereto, of
laundry wares and all other operations car­
ried on in establishments engaged in this
business; (2) collecting, sale, resale, or dis­
tribution at retail or wholesale of laundry
service and keeping of accounts, billing, and
any other clerical work in connection there­
with; (3) producing of laundry service for
their own use by business establishments,
clubs, hospitals, or other public or private
institutions except those completely sup­
ported by the State or municipalities.

Class of employees covered

Minimum-wage rates

Women and minors:
Employees other than route sales­ 55 cents an hour...........................
women.
Route saleswomen............................. 60 cents an hour...........................
Any woman or minor. Exceptions: lYi times employee’s regular
Executive employees (as defined)
rate.
and route saleswomen.
(Any deduction for meals and
lodging must be in accord­
ance with rates set by the
Commissioner of Labor.
No such deduction per­
mitted if employee is receiv­
ing training or new exper­
ience at a place other than
the regular place of employ­
ment.)

Restaurant occupation, i. e., any activity Women and minors; men:
concerned with the preparation and serving,
Nonservice employees: 24
for remuneration, of food or beverage for
Full time...... ...................................
human consumption, to the public, em­
Part time____________ ____ ____
ployees, members, or guests of members, or
Overtime (adult males only)
paying guests, in any restaurant establish­
Service employees:24
ment. Covers all supplementary and inci­
Full time............................ ............
dental activities, including but not limited to
Part time
the work of hostesses, head waiters, telephone
Overtime (adult males only)
operators, check-room employees, cigarette
For any day on which spread of
girls, cleaners, maids, elevator operators, of­
hours exceeds 12 on any day.
fice workers, cashiers, and all similar activi­
For each meal not furnished to
ties whatsoever, when performed in connec­
employee.
tion with any restaurant establishment.
These employees may be excluded, however,
if the major part of their duties is devoted
to work unrelated to the restaurant estab­
lishment as defined in the order. Exceptions:
Persons employed solely as musicians and
entertainers; nurses and student nurses, in
hospitals, convalescent homes, or sanitari­
ums, and persons engaged in serving meals
to patients therein, unless also employed in
a related restaurant occupation; executives
(as defined in the order); and activities of an
educational, religious, or nonprofit organiza- I

Hours

Up to and including 44 a
week.17
9 a day, 48 a week.
Over 44 a week.28

$28 a week 25 and meals 28
40 to 48 a week.28
70 cents an hour and meals 28___ Less than 40 a week.27
90 cents an hour and meals 28___ Over 48 a week.
$18 a week 28 and meals 28............ 40 to 48 a week.20
45 cents an hour and meals 28___ Less than 40 a week.27
60 cents an hour and meals 28___ Over 48 a week.
$1 in addition to the applicable
minimum wage.
65 cents in addition to the ap­
plicable minimum wage.28
(Deductions for lodging allowed,
maximum amounts specified
in the order.)

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

(Supersedes manda­
tory order 2 of
June 3, 1940.)

05
Occupation or industry covered

(Supersedes order 4
of May 8, 1938.)

Public housekeeping, i. e., the work of host­
esses, waitresses, cooks, counter girls, salad
girls, food checkers, bus girls, vegetable girls,
dish and glass washers, kitchen help, cham­
bermaids, parlor maids, linen-room girls,
cleaners, janitresses, charwomen, telephone
operators, hat-check girls, elevator opera­
tors, cashiers, clerical workers, and all such
nonprofessional workers as may be properly
classified in this occupation in: (1) res­
taurants, either licensed or unlicensed,
whether operated as the, principal business
of the employer or as a department or unit of
another business, (2) lunch counters, (3)
cafeterias, (4) catering or banquet or boxlunch service, (5) curb service, (6) boarding
houses which offer meals for sale to 5 or more
persons, (7) all other establishments where
lunches, meals, or food in solid and/or liquid
form are prepared for and served to the
public, (8) hotels, (9) apartment houses,
(10) rooming houses offering rooms for rent
to 5 or more persons, (11) auto-camps, (12)
clubs, (13) hospitals, (14) private schools,
(15) colleges, (16) any other establishments
offering rooms for rent to the public, and (17)
women engaged in the care and servicing of
apartment houses, theaters, office buildings,
retail stores, and other similar establish­
ments as well as in those listed above.

See footnotes at end of table.




Women and minors:
Hostesses, telephone operators, hatcheck girls, elevator operators,
cashiers, clerical workers, and all
similar workers.
Counter girls, salad girls, food
checkers, cooks, bus girls, and all
similar workers.
Chambermaids, parlor maids, linenroom girls, cleaners, janitresses,
charwomen, vegetable girls, dish
and glass washers, kitchen help,
and all similar workers.
Workers in all three classifications
above.
Waitresses......................................... .

$23 a week.

40 to 48 a week.4

$22.30 a week.

Do.4

$19.60 a week.

Do.4

50 cents an hour...........................

$17.90 a week; $22.30 where tip­
ping is not allowed.
50 cents an hour
Workers not covered by hour law... 5 cents in addition to the legal
hourly rate.
If employee works a split shift, or if 60 cents a day in addition to the
applicable minimum wage.
spread of hours exceeds 11, or both.
(Deductions for meals, lodg­
ing, or uniforms permitted
at prices specified in the
order.)

Less than 40 a week.6
36 to 48 a week.4
Less than 36 a week.6
Over 48 a week.

JULY 1, 194 2—
JULY 1, 1950

District of Columbia:
No. 4, Jan. 1, 1946.........

I

tion where an employer-employee relation­
ship does not exist.
Restaurant establishment is defined as a place
or part thereof where food or beverage is
prepared or served through such services as
box lunch, catering, banquets, curb service,
table or counter service, or cafeteria, whether
operated as the principal business of the em­
ployer or as a department or unit of another
business; or in connection with institutions
such as manufacturing establishments or
other places of employment, clubs, hospitals,
convalescent homes, sanitariums, sanitoriums, schools, colleges, camps, soda foun­
tains, dairy bars, and boarding houses or
tourist homes serving 5 or more guests per
meal.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942
State, order, and effec­
tive datea

Occupation or industry covered

No. 3, June 16,1947....... Retail trade, i. e., the selling or offering for
sale at retail of any goods, wares, merchan­
(Supersedes order 3 of
dise, articles, or things, and all occupations,
Feb. 14, 1938.)
operations, and services connected there­
with or incidental thereto.

No. 6, Mar. 27, 1948___ Beauty culture includes all services, opera­
tions, or processes used or useful in the care,
(Supersedes order 6
cleansing, or beautification of skin, nails, or
of Sept. 26, 1938.)
hair, or in the enhancement of personal appearance; and all services, operations, or
processes incidental thereto.




Minimum-wage rates

Hours

Women and minors_____

Over 16 and including 44 a
week.
Over 44 a week.*
16 or less a week.

55 cents an hour_______

Women and minors...
Employees whose normal workweek
is 36 hours or more, voluntarily ab­
sent in any week.
Part time________________
Student under 18 for whom certificate
is in employer’s file (9 months fol­
lowing original issuance of certificate).
Overtime ____
If employee works a split shift, or
spread of hours exceeds 10, or both.

Women and minors:
Operators and all other employees
except maids and cleaners.
Maids and cleaners______________

Basic minimum wage may be
prorated.

36 up to and including 44 a
week.
Actual time worked.
Less than 36 a week.29
Do.

55 cents an hour..........

75 cents a day in addition to the
applicable minimum wage.

Over 44 a week.*

(For any uniform laundered
by employee 50 cents addi­
tional must be paid.)
$30.60 a week................... .
95 cents an hour......... .
do. _____________
75 cents an hour....................
1 --------- do.......... ..............

_

34 but not" more than 44 a
week.
Less than 34 a week.«
Over 44 a week.
34 but not more than 44 a
week.
Less than 34 a week.#
Over 44 a week.

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

District of Columbia—
Continued
No. 5, July 8, 1946 ......... Laundry, dry cleaning, and dyeinsr, i. e., (1)
the cleaning, pressing, finishing, refreshing,
(Supersedes order 5
dyeing, or processing of any article of wearof July 5, 1938.)
ing apparel (including hats), household furnishings, rugs, textiles, fur, leather (includ­
ing shoes), or fabric whatsoever; (2) collec­
tion, sale, resale, or distribution at retail or
wholesale of any laundry, dry cleaning, or
dyeing service; (3) the work performed by
clerical workers and telephone operators in
connection with the production and furnish­
ing of these services; (4) the production of
laundry, dry cleaning, or dyeing services on
its own behalf by any establishment, busi­
ness, institution, club, or hospital, which
services may be incidental to its principal
business.

Class of employees covered

Continued

Employee whose normal work­
week is 34 hours or more, volun­
tarily absent in any week.
If employee works a split shift, or
spread of hours exceeds 10, or both.

Basic minimum wage may be
prorated.

Actual time worked.

95 cents a day in addition to the
applicable minimum wage.
(If employee furnishes and
launders uniforms, $1.50 a
week must be added to
minimum wage.)

See footnotes at end ot table.




Women and minors:
Office, plant, and other employees
except maids and cleaners.
Part time.............. ...........................
Students under 18 for whom em­
ployer has student certificates on
file (9 months following issuance
of certificate).
Overtime...............-........ —...........
Maids and cleaners............................
Part time
Overtime..................... -........ -........
Employee whose normal working
time is 32 hours or more, volun­
tarily absent in any week.
Employee registered under the Dis­
trict of Columbia Apprenticeship
Law for whom employer has ap­
prentice wage permit on file (12
months following date of applica­
tion).

$30 a week.................................... 32 but not over 40 a week.
85 cents an hour...........................
65 cents an hour....... ..................

Less than 32 a week. 29
Do.

$1.12H an hour___ __________
$26.40 a week............................... .
75 cents an hour___ ____-........ .
99 cents an hour
Basic minimum-wage may be
prorated.

Over 40 a week.4
32 but not over 40 a week.
Less than 32 a week.29
Over 40 a week.4
Actual time worked.

80 percent of the minimum
weekly rate.
(If employee furnishes and
launders uniform $1.50 a
week must be added to tne
minimum wage; if she laun­
ders only, $1; if she furnishes
only, 50 cents.)

JU L Y 1. 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1 , 1 9 5 0

No. 8, Nov. 17, 1948___ Manufacturing and wholesaling includes the
preparing, producing, or processing, or the
selling or offering for sale at wholesale of any
(Supersedes order 8 of
goods, wares, merchandise, articles, or com­
June 5, 1939.)
modities, and all occupations, operations,
and services connected therewith or inci­
dental thereto.

CO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 ‘—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date3

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Office and miscellaneous occupations, i. e.,
all occupations in or for establishments
not covered by another minimum-wage
order. Includes, but not limited to,
work performed by general office clerks.
stenographers, typists, bookkeepers, cashiers, various office-machine operators,
office boys and girls, ushers, messengers,
maids, cleaners, elevator operators, jani­
tors, telephone and switchboard operators,
teletype operators, receptionists, library
workers, teachers, dental assistants, medical assistants and technicians, and laboratory helpers.

Women and minors:
All employees except students
under 18, elevator operators and
janitors, maids and cleaners.

Minimum-wage rates

Hours

District of Columbia—
Continued
No. 7, Apr. 25, 1949.......




All employment. Exceptions: Public employment; persons at a guaranteed monthly sal­
ary of $150 or more; agricultural work in any
workweek in which employer has fewer than
20 employees; domestic service; employment
by relatives as specified in the act; work in a
bona fide executive, administrative, super­
visory, or professional capacity or in the
capacity of outside salesmen or as outside
collectors; the propagating, catching, culti­
vating, etc., of fish, shellfish, and the various
other aquatic forms of animal or vegetable

32 but not more than 40 a
week.
Less than 32 a week.39
Over 40 a week.30
Less than 32 a week.

....... do..................... ................
Students under 18 for whom certifi- 65 cents an hour...................... .
cate is in employer’s file (9
months following original is­
suance of certificate).
Elevator operators and janitors___ $31 a week..... ........ ....................... 32 but not more than 44 a
week.
Less than 32 a week.29
Over 44 a week.30
Maids and cleaners............................
32 but not more than 44 a
week.
Employee whose normal workweek
is 32 hours or more, voluntarily
absent in any week.
If employee works a split shift, or
spread of hours exceeds 11, or both.

Hawaii:
Revised Laws 1945, ch.
75, as amended by
Act 15, session laws,
1945. Amended rates
effective July 1,1945

$31 a week

___ do____ __________ _
Basic applicable minimum wage
may be prorated.

Actual time worked.

95 cents a day in addition to
the applicable minimum
wage.
(If employee furnishes and
launders uniforms, $1.50
a week must be added to
the minimum wage; if she
launders only, $1; if she
furnishes only, 50 cents.)

All employees, 16 years of age and over.
Over 48 a week.
(Reasonable deductions from
minimum wage permitted
for board and for lodging.)

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

(Supersedes order 7
of Mar. 13, 1939.)

881289 — 51

life (including the going to and returning
from work and the loading and unloading of
such products prior to first processing); sea­
men; employments covered by the Federal
Fair Labor Standards Act; members of a
religious order or individuals donating their
services to a hospital, religious, fraternal or
charitable organization.

g
h*
to
00
| Illinois.............. ................. No change in current orders.3*

P Kansas...............................

No wage rates now in effect.

25 cents an hour...
37H cents an hour.

Up to 48 a week.
Over 48 a week.34

30 cents an hour...
45 cents an hour_

Up to 48 a week.
Over 48 a week.34

23 cents an hour...
34J-3 cents an hour.
Nonservice (see above)................... 28 cents an hour...
42 cents an hour...
Zone 3:33
Service (see above).......................... 21 cents an hour...
31H cents an hour.
Nonservice (see above)
25 cents an hour...
373^2 cents an hour.
Zone 4:33
Service (see above).......................... 20 cents an hour...
30 cents an hour...
Nonservice (see above)....... ........... 22 cents an hour...
33 cents an hour...

Up to 48 a week.
Over 48 a week.34
0 p to 48 a week.
Over 48 a week.34
Up to 50 a week.
Over 50 a week.34
Up to 50 a week.
Over 50 a week.34
Up to 52 a week.
Over 52 a week.34
Up to 52 a week.
Over 52 a week.34

JULY 1, 19 42 —
JULY 1, 1950

Kentucky:
Directory, Oct. 1, 1942.. Hotels and restaurants __________________ Women and minors:
Mandatory, Apr. 1,
Hotels, i. e., establishments having more
Zone 1:33
1943.
than 10 guest rooms which offer lodging
Service employee, i. e., one en­
accommodations for hire to the general
gaged in taking of orders and
(Included also in
public and have transient guests.
serving of food or beverages to
Bull. 191.)
Restaurants, i. e., establishments prepar­
guests or customers seated at
ing and offering for sale food for con­
tables; one delivering messages
sumption.
or articles, as a bell boy.
Nonservice employee, i. e., one
not in a service occupation.
Zone 2:33
Service (see above)..........................

(No deductions may be made
against the minimum wage
for meals but a mutual and
voluntary agreement limit­
ing the amount charged to
25 cents a meal is permitted.)

See footnotes at end of table.




fcO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942U-Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date *

(Supersedes order of
June 1,1939.)

Louisiana

All occupations. Exceptions: Labor on a farm;
domestic service in home of the employer;
firms subject to regulation by the State Pub­
lic Service Commission; employment under
any special State wage order. (Two special
minimum-wage orders are currently in effect:
(1) the laundry, dry cleaning, and dyeing
order; (2) the hotel and restaurant order.)

Class of employees covered

Women and minors:35
Experienced:
Zone l33________
Zone 2 33________
Zone 3 33________
All 3 zones.............

Minimum-wage rates

50 cents an hour_______
45 cents an hour.......... .
40 cents an hour....... ........
1H times minimum rate.

to
Hours

Up to 48 a week.
Do.
Do.
Over 48 a week.3!

(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted only
when employee is domiciled
with employer and a written
agreement made as to any
such deductions. Order
specifies maximum charge
for meals and for lodging.)

No orders issued.

Maine.*
Massachusetts:
Session laws 1946, ch.
545, Sept. 11,1946.
No. 6.........................
Directory, Sept. 15.
1942.
'
Mandatory, Mar. 1,
1943.
(Supersedes order 6
of Oct. 1, 1937.)

No. 23.............. ..............
Directory, Nov. 1,
1942.
Mandatory, Apr. 1,
1943.

Coverage of Minimum-Wage Law and existing
orders extended to men.
Candy, includes all activities, services, and
processes performed by an employee for an
employer or his agent in the manufacture of
candy and confections, including the mak­
ing, preparing, processing, handling, and in­
specting of such goods or materials, and all
activities in any manner connected there­
with, such as wrapping, packaging, or prep­
aration for sale or display thereof. Excep­
tions: Occupations within the industry cov­
ered by another minimum-wage order.

Women and minors; men:
Experienced.................... ......... ........ 40 cents an hour...................... .
Inexperienced (12 months for dip­
pers, stringers, miniature packers;
6 months for other occupations).

35 cents an hour

Maximum for women and
minors, 9 a day, 48 a week.36
Do.36

(Deductions from minimum
wage allowed only if consent
of employee and approval
of Minimum Wage Com­
mission are obtained.)

Beauty culture, i. e., all services, operations, or Women and minors; men:
processes used or useful in the care, cleans­
Experienced..................
$18 a week..........
Over 32 a week.36
ing, or beautification of skin, nails, or hair,
56 cents an hour.
32 or less a week.*
or in the enhancement of personal appear­
Inexperienced:
ance, or as in the General Laws pertaining
First 4 months...........
$12 a week_____
Over 32 a week.36
to Hail dressers.
36 cents an hour.
32 or less a week.*
‘The Maine State labor department has advised that the fish-packing order of Apr. 11,1940, is inoperative as the result of an enforcement action brought to the State Supreme
Court. (Stinson v. Taylor (1941) 137 Me. 332; 17 A. (2d) 760-761 and also Stinson v. Taylor (1942) 139 Me. 97; 27 A. (2d) 400.)




ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D ER S

Kentucky—Continued
Directory, Feb. 8, 1947.
Mandatory, May 27,
1947.

Occupation or industry covered

fcO

(Supersedes order 23
of June 1,1940.)




Women and minors; men.

$15 a week..................................... Over 32 a week.”
46 cents an hour........................... 32 or less a week.*
Prorated........................................ Actual time worked.
(Deductions from mimimum
wage or bringing higher
wage below the minimum
allowed only if consent of
employee and approval of
Minimum Wage Commis­
sion are obtained.)
40 cents an hour..........................
(Deductions bringing wage
below minimum allowed
only if consent of employee
and approval of Minimum
Wage Commission are ob­
tained.)

Maximum for women and
minors, 9 a day, 48 a week.
36 37

JU L Y 1 . 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1 . 1 9 5 0

Bread and bakery products, includes all activ­
ities, services, and processes performed by
an employee in the manufacture of bread,
(Supersedes order 15
doughnuts, biscuits, crackers, and other
of Nov. 1, 1938.)
bakery products, including the making, pre­
paring, processing, handling, and inspec­
tion of such goods or materials; wrapping,
packaging, and preparation for sale or dis­
play thereof, and all other activities inci­
dental thereto or in any manner connected
therewith. Exceptions: Occupations within
the industry covered by another minimumwage order.
See footnotes at end of table.

No. 15-A, Oct. 1, 1944.

Second 4 months.............................
Employee voluntarily absent in any
week.

to

00

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 '—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date1

Occupation or industry covered

No. 26-A........................ Mercantile, i. e., any industry or business con­
Directory, July 1,1948.
nected with or operated for the purpose of
Mandatory, Oct. 1,
selling, purchasing, or distributing mer­
1948.
chandise, wares, goods, articles, services, or
commodities to retailers, wholesalers, in­
(Supersedes orders 3
dustrial, commercial, or industrial users.
of Oct. 1, 1937 and
Includes all work connected with the solicit­
26 of June 15, 1945.).
ing of sales or opportunities for sales, or the




Minimum-wage rates

Women and minors; men:
Nonservice employees........................ 50 cents an hour___
55 cents an hour___
Service employees............................. . 35 cents an hour___
40 cents an hour___
Full-time workers voluntarily ab­ Regular hourly rate.
sent in any week or part-time
workers employed 40 hours or
(Deductions for meals and
more in week.
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.
If employee launders uniforms,
25 cents per uniform must
be added to minimum
wage.)

Women and minors; men:*®
Full-time employees:
Experienced...................
Inexperienced (1,040 hours)__

$22.50 a week_
_
55 cents an hour.
$20.50 a week__
50 cents an hour.

to
Hours

40 or over a week.*8
Less than 40 a week.**
40 or over a week.*8
Less than 40 a week.**
For each hour worked.

36 but not more than 44 a
week.*®
Over 44 a week.*8
36 but not more than 44 a
week.*8
Over 44 a week.*8

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D ER S

Massachu setts—C on.
No. 25-A....................... . Public houskeeping, i. e., any activity in
Directory, Dec. 1,
establishments directly or indirectly con­
1947.
nected with the preparation of and offering
Mandatory, Mar. 2,
of food or beverages for human consumption;
1948.
and the offering or furnishing of rooms or
lodgings for remuneration, either to the
(Supersedes and ex­
public, employees, members or guests of
tends coverage of
members, paying guests, students, or others,
order 25 of Apr. 15,
whether such service is operating as the
1942, and transfers
principal business of the employer or as a
from order 21 of
unit of another business.
Dec. 1, 1940 (office Public housekeeping occupations include the
and other building
work performed by waitresses, cooks, count­
cleaning), employ­
er and salad workers, food checkers, bus
ees affected under
and vegetable workers, dish and glass wash­
that order where it
ers, kitchen help, maids, cleaners, chamber­
applies to estab­
maids, housekeepers, housemen, stewards,
lishments covered
parlor maids, linen-room girls, check-room
by this present orattendants, matrons, hosts, hostesses, eleva­
,der.)
tor operators, and janitors. Classification
covers, but is not limited to all nonprofes­
sional workers engaged in public housekeep­
ing establishments. Exceptions: Occupa­
tions within the industry covered by another
minimum-wage order.
Establishments include restaurants, fountain
lunch counters, cafeterias, caterers, and all
other establishments whero lunches, meals,
or food in solid and/or liquid form are pre­
pared for and served to the public or to be
consumed on the premises; hotels, tourists’
camps, clubs, hospitals, private schools,
colleges, and other establishments offering
rooms for rent.

Class of employees covered

JU L Y 1 , 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1 , 1 9 5 0

No. 27.............................
Directory, Oct. 1,
1948.
Mandatory, Feb. 1,
1949.

Part-time employees:
distributing of such merchandise, wares,
Less than 36 a week.88
Experienced—............................... 65 cents an hour.
etc., and the rendering of services incidental
Do.*8
Inexperienced (1,040 hours)--------- 60 cents an hour.
to the sales, use, or upkeep of same, whether
performed on employer’s premises or
(Deductions bringing wage
elsewhere.
below the minimum al­
Order applies to all functions within mer­
lowed only if consent of
cantile occupations not specifically governed
employee and approval of
by another Massachusetts minimum-wage
Minimum Wage Commis­
order. Salespersons in both laundry and
sion are obtained.)
dry-cleaning establishments are transferred
from coverage of the orders for those indus­
tries ("see orders 29 and 30, on pp. 26-27) and
brought under this present order. Excep­
tions: Occupations determined by the Min­
imum Wage Commission to be of such a
nature that it is impossible for employer to
keep true records of the number of hours
worked by the employee. Employer must
have exemption permit.
Amusement and recreation, i. e., all activities Women and minors; men:
62H cents an hour........................ («)' («)•
Regular employees.........................
and services performed in connection with a
(").(«)Casual employees 43..................... — 55 cents an hour........................
business or enterprise engaged in or operated
Caddies:
for the purpose of furnishing entertainment
Experienced........ .................. ......... $1.25 a round.................................
or recreation to the public, including but not
Inexperienced (one who has “car­ $1 a round.....................................
limited to motion-picture and other thea­
ried” for less than fifteen 18ters, night clubs, dance halls, bowling alleys,
(Deductions bringing wage
hole rounds of golf).
billiard parlors, skating rinks, riding acade­
below the minimum al­
mies, race tracks, amusement parks and cen­
lowed only if consent of em­
ters, athletic fields, ball parks and stadiums,
ployee and approval of
swimming pools and beaches, gymnasiums,
Minimum Wage Commis­
golf courses, tennis courts, carnivals, circuses,
sion are obtained.
broadcasting studios, boathouses, arenas, and
Deductions for meals and lodg­
other similar establishments.
ing permitted; maximum
Term includes work performed by ushers, at­
prices specified in the order.)
tendants, announcers, pin boys; ticket
collectors, sellers, or punchers; billiard rack
men, game attendants, amusement machine
operators, caddies, and doormen. Excep­
tions: Performers whose activities involve
exercise of artistic talent or athletic profi­
ciency; students or members participating in
any activities conducted by summer camps
for children under 18; schools, colleges, reli­
gious or other nonprofit organizations de­
clared exempt by the Minimum Wage
Commission; occupations within the in­
dustry covered by another minimum-wage
order.

See footnotes at end of table.




to

ZJi

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1642 ^Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date2

(Supersedes manda­
tory order 21 of
Dec. 1, 1940, and
includes also oc­
cupations not pre­
viously covered by
a wage order.)

No. 29
Directory, May 2,
1949.
Mandatory, Aug. 2,
1949.
(Supersedes order
1-A of Feb. 1, 1944,
which superseded
order 1 of Oct. 1
1937. This present
order separates the
dry cleaning and
laundry indus­
tries.)




Class of employees covered

Building service occupations, i. e., work or
service performed by charwomen, window
cleaners, sweepers, janitors, caretakers,
watchmen, guards, helpers, attendants,
and all other employees engaged in or
concerned with the cleaning, servicing,
maintenance, protection, and upkeep of
buildings and establishments other than
churches. Exception: Employees covered
by another minimum-wage order.

Women and minors; men:
Employees other than those classifled as residential property em­
ployees.
Residential property employees:
If living quarters not furnished
as part of wage.
If living quarters furnished as
part of wage.44
If working for 1 employer only.

Dry-cleaning occupation, i. e., any activity
connected with the cleaning, dyeing, wetcleaning incidental to dry cleaning, spotting, finishing, pressing, repairing, altering,
or storing of any article of wearing apparel
(including hats), household furnishings,
rugs, textiles, furs, and leather; or any
other employment connected with the
cleaning and dyeing industry not covered
by another minimum-wage order. Excep­
tions: Salespersons in this industry who
are connected with: (1) The soliciting of
sales or opportunities for sales; (2) the
collection, distribution, sale or resale of
merchandise for dry-cleaning service; or (3)
services rendered incidental to the sale or
resale of dry-cleaning services.

Women and minors; men:
Experienced__________ _________ _
Inexperienced (320 hours)...................

Minimum-wage rates

Hours

(36) (38).
$28 a week.....................................
$22 a week.............. .......................
55 cents an hour.......... ............

Do.
Less than 28 a week.*8

(Deductions bringing wage be­
low minimum allowed only
if consent of employee and
approval of Minimum Wage
Commission are obtained.)
(Deductions for lodging allowed
at amounts specified in order.
Deductions for living quar­
ters limited to “a reasonable
rental for such space" and in
no case may resulting wage
be less than the applicable
minimum.)

(Deductions bringing wage
below minimum allowed
only if consent of em­
ployee and approval of
Minimum Wage Commision are obtained.)45

Maximum for women and
minors, 9 a day, 48 a
week.8?

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D ER S

Massachusetts—C on.
No. 28...................... .
Directory, May 2,
1949.
Mandatory, Aug. 2,
1949.

Occupation or industry covered

See footnotes at end of table.




DO.*7

57 cents an hour...........................
(Deductions bringing wage
below minimum allowed
only if consent of em­
ployee and approval of
Minimum Wage Commis­
sion are obtained.)
(Deductions from minimum
wage for meals and lodging
permitted if employee de­
sires these accommoda­
tions. Maximum charges
specified in order.)
65 cents an hour.

(36)

65 cents an hour.

Maximum for women and
minors, 9 a day, 48 a
week.36 38
Do.36 38

60 cents an hour
(Deductions bringing wage
below the minimum al­
lowed only if consent of em­
ployee and approval of Min­
imum Wage Commission
are obtained.)
(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at prices
specified in the order.)

JU L Y 1, 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1, 1 9 5 0

No. 30.—....................... Laundry occupations, i. e., any activity con­ Women and minors; men.
nected with the washing, ironing, or
Directory, June 1,
processing incidental thereto, for compen­
1949.
sation, of clothing, napery, blankets, bed
Mandatory, Sept. 1,
clothing, or of any article of wearing apparel,
1949.
household furnishings, rugs, or textiles, or
of any other employment connected with
(Supersedes order 1the laundry industry not covered by
A of Feb. 1, 1944,
another minimum-wage order. Exceptions:
which superseded
Salespersons in this industry who are
order 1 of Oct. 1,
connected with: (1) The soliciting of sales or
1937. This present
opportunities for sales; (2) the collection,
order separates the
distribution, sale or resale of merchandise
laundry and dry
for laundry service; or (3) services rendered
cleaning indus­
incidental to the sale or resale of laundry
tries.)
services.
_
Session laws 1949, ch. All occupations within coverage of the mini­ _ do.
mum-wage law for which no specific wage
777, Jan. 1, 1950.
has been established. (For analysis, see p.
60 of this bulletin.)
..do 3»....................... —
No. 24-B, June 16, 1950. Clerical, technical, and similar occupations,
Experienced employees.
i. e., all occupations in any general, business,
professional, or technical office, or in any
(Supersedes orders 24
laboratory, hospital, library, school, tele­
of Aug. 1,1941, and
Inexperienced employees (800 hours
phone, telegraph, or broadcasting establish­
24-A of Mar. 1,
in the occupations; but if covered
ment, funeral director’s establishment, or in
1947.)
by the On-the-Job-Training Pro­
messenger service or other establishments
gram or the Apprentice Training
wherein workers are employed in any ca­
Program, 1040 hours).
pacity in which the services of any kind and
wheresoever performed are of a clerical or
technical character. Order applies to all
functions within these occupations which
are not specifically governed by another
minimum-wage order.
Includes persons whose duties are related to
general office, professional, or technical work
in any establishment, whether business,
medical, dental, technical, or legal, such as
office boys or girls, file clerks, general office
clerks, stenographers, typists, bookkeepers,
cashiers, various machine operators, tele­
phone and switchboard operators, reception­
ists, library workers, draftsmen, technicians,
including dental and medical technicians
and laboratory assistants. Students working
for the whole or part of their tuition and/or
maintenance at a school, college, or summer
camp which they are attending, are excluded
from the basic wage rates of this order.

to

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942'—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date3

Occupation or industry covered

Wage fixed In law.
Rates effective Mar. 22,
1945. (1941 Supp. to
Compiled Laws, secs.
2825.45-46; session
laws: 1943, ch. 88; 1945,
ch. 166.)




Class of employees covered

Minimum-wage rates

Hours

Women and minors:
Experienced:
$22.50 a week.......
36 to 48 a week.
55 cents an hour..
•Over 48 a week.47
___do_____ ____
Less than 36 a week.
$21.50 a week___
Same as for class A and B
Class C cities48.............................. . 50 cents an hour..
‘ cities.
.---- do..................
$20 a week_____
Class D cities 48_________ _____ _ 45 cents an hour..
Do.
,___do_________
Inexperienced, 18 years of age or
over:
Class A and Class B cities:48
$19 a week...........
First 3 months............................ . 40 cents an hour..
Same as for experienced.
. -do..................
$20.50 a week___
Second 3 months................ ......... 45 cents an hour.,
Do.
.do____ ____
Class C cities:48
$17.50 a week___
First 3 months............................ . 37 cents an hour..
Do.
do..
$19 a week_____
Second 3 months.......................... 40 cents an hour..
Do.
.------do.................
Class D cities:48
$16 a week...........
First 3 months............................ . 34 cents an hour.,
Do.
do..
$17.50 a week_ _____________
_
Second 3 months.......................... |37 cents, an hour.......... .
"
Do.
.-—do.......... ..................... Ill'
Minors under 18 years of age in Rates same as for inexperienced
Do.
each class of cities.
in first 3 months.
Class A and Class B cities 48.......... .

(Deductions for meals allowed.
. Amounts specified in order.)
Private employment. Exception: Domestic
service.

Females:
Experienced..
Inexperienced (3 months).

$4 a day, $24 a week..
50 cents an hour........
$3 a day, $18 a week (if stipu­
lated by employer and em­
ployee).

8 a day, 48 a week.
Less than 8 a day; less than
48 a week.13
8 a day, 48 a week.

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D ER S

Minnesota:
No. 18, June 30, 1947.... Retail merchandising business, i. e., the trade
of selling any commodity, article, goods,
wares, or merchandise to the consumer and
(Separates this in­
not for the purpose of resale in any form.
dustry from the All
Occupations order
* of July 11, 1938.)

Nevada:

to

00

All.

891289

Women and minors:
Experienced.........................

-

New Hampshire:
No. 5-A, Dec. 30, 1946.. Retail trade, i. e.f any retail establishment or
any retail activity, unless and until the
(Supersedes order 5 of
specific employment is governed by a mini­
Jan. 6, 1941.)
mum-wage order other than this general
retail trade order.

50 -

Session law's 1949, cb.
310, July 28, 1949, and
Attorney General’s
interpretation of
Sept. 9, 1949.

New Jersey:
Miller-Duf
No. 6, Jan. 10, 1943
(Included also in
Bull. 191.)

“Any employees”. Exceptions: Employees
engaged in household, domestic, or farm
labor; outside salesmen; summer camps for
minors; restaurants, hotels, inns, or cabins.

Women and minors; men:
Experienced___________
Inexperienced (6 months).

Beauty culture, i. e., services, operations, or
processes used or useful in care, cleansing, or
beautification of skin, nails, or hair, or in
enhancement of personal appearance; and all
services incidental thereto, including work of
demonstrators, maids, cashiers, reception or
appointment clerks.
Beauty culture establishment includes any
shop, store, place, room or part thereof, in
which services are rendered in the beauty
culture occupation, or any branch thereof
and a charge is made to the public for such
services.
Employee, i. e., any person working under the
instruction or direction of the employer or
his agent, including part owners, stock­
holders, booth owners, booth renters, and
instructors. Exceptions: Students in public
vocational school or private trade school
operated, licensed, or approved by State
Board of Education, for whose services no
charge other than the actual cost of materials
used shall be made for the work done as part
of training.

Women and minors:
Other than maids.
Maids...................
All.......... .............

50 cents an hour__........................ 10H a day, 54 a week (maxi­
mum).8 48
Do.5 48

35 cents an hour

50 cents an hour 50.
35 cents an hour 50.

Maximum for females: 10 a
day, 48 a week for manual
or mechanical labor in any
manufacturing establish­
ment; 10M a day, 54 a
week for such labor in
other employments.

$18 a week______________ ____ 48 a week.
$15 a week
Do.
VA times minimum hourly rate.. Over 48 a week.
40 cents an hour; not under $1.40 Less than 48 a week.
on any day called to work.

.JU LY 1, 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y

I
ci

Inexperienced (6 months)49.

XYz times employee’s regular rate. Over 8 to 12 a day; over 48
to 56 a week (in emergen­
cies as specified).
(Deductions for meals and/or
lodging allowed as specified
in the law.)

See footnotes at end of table.




to

CO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 19421—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date *
New Jersey—Continued
No. 6, Aug. 13, 1943....

o
Class of employees covered

Restaurant, i. e., any eating or drinking place
which prepares and oilers food or beverage
for human consumption either on any of its
premises or by such service as catering, ban­
quets, box lunch, or curb service, to the pub­
lic, to employees, or to members or guests of
members. Exceptions: Person working in a
nonprofit institution who, while so working,
receives from such institution benefits of a
charitable or educational nature or instruc­
tion and training in a recognized profession
and whose work for such institution is an
incident of his or her receipt of such bene­
fits; persons subject to the provisions of
another minimum-wage order of the State.51

Women and minors:
Service employees, i. e., employees
whose duties relate solely to the
serving of food to patrons seated at
tables, or at tables and counters in
establishments where all food is
prepared in a kitchen separate
from the room in which food is
served, and to the performance of
duties incidental thereto, and who
customarily receive gratuities
from such patrons.
Nonservice employees, i. e., employ­
ees not in service group.

(Supersedes orders 1
(laundry) of July 11,
1938 and 4 (cleaning
and dyeing) of May
6, 1940.)




Laundry and cleaning and dyeing, i. e., any
activity in any capacity in the marking,
sorting, washing, cleansing, collecting, iron­
ing, assembling, packaging, pressing, receiv­
ing, shipping, or delivery, or any other ac­
tivity, including clerical work, directly in­
cidental or essential to the laundering,
cleansing, or renovating of any article of
clothing, napery, blankets, rugs, carpets,
draperies, bed clothing, fabric, textile, fur, or
leather, when such activity is not performed
in the original process of manufacture.
The term “clerk” includes employees coming
under the jurisdiction of this order, who are
engaged only in clerical or accounting work,
regardless of where such work is performed,
or engaged in selling of cleaning, dyeing,
laundry, and other kindred services in retail
outlets, including the handling of the same,
for the purpose of receipt or delivery over a
store counter, but not engaged in any other
processing of such articles.

Minimum-wage rates

Hours

32K cents an hour 52.
35Yl cents an hour....
48$£ cents an hour....

24 up to 48 a week.
Less than 24 a week.5
Over 48 a week.52

45 cents an hour 52_................. .
48 cents an hour____________
67^ cents an hour.
50 cents a day in addition to the
applicable minimum wage.

24 up to 48 a week.
Less than 24 a week.5
Over 48 a week.53

(Deductions for meals of both
service and nonservicc em­
ployees and for meals and
lodging of residential employ­
ees allowed as specified in the
order.)

Women and minors:
Other than clerks (18 years and
over):
Zone A54.................................... ...... 50 cents an hour 55.
Zone B 54_______
Clerks (18 and over)
Minors under 18.

10 a day, 54 a week (maxi­
mum for laundries).29
45 cents an hour 55_____ ____
Do.29
$22 a week________ _________ 30 to 48 a week.29
At hourly minimum rate appli­ Less than 30 a week.29
cable to nonclerical workers.
___ do
8 a day. 40 a week (maximum).

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S AND O R D ER S

Occupation or industry covered

If employee works a split shift or
spread of hours e sceeds 10 a day.

No. 7, Oct. 23, 1946___

CO

No. 8, June 6, 1949.

See footnotes at end of table.



40 or less a week.56
... Over 40 a week.53

82>4 cents an hour

Employee whose normal hours are
over 30 and up to 40, taking volun­
tary leave in any week.
Cooperative students and pharmacy
apprentices.

44 or less a week.56
Over 44 a week.53

523-4 cents an hour.------------------

Over 30 and up to 40 a week.
Actual time„worked.

50 cents an hour___ __________ Up to and including 48 a
week.
•
75 cents an hour..................... ...... Over 48 a week.57
30 or less a week.29

Overtime:
In communities having a popula­
tion of:
Over 5,000 and under 10,000___

52M cents an hour_____ ______
79 cents an hour____

If employee works a split shift, or
spread of hours exceeds 11, or both.
Women and minors; men:
Zone I59_________ _____ - -

_

.-

79 cents an hour-.- ________
75 cents a day in addition to the
applicable minimum wage.

Over 40 a week.57
Over 40 but not more than 44
a week.
Over 44 a week.57
Over 40 but not more than 48
a week.
Over 48 a week.57

9 4 2 —JU L Y

No. 1-a, Oct. 19, 1947... Laundry, includes (a) the washing of fabrics
or textiles of any kind whatsoever and the
ironing, pressing, repairing or processing in­
(Supersedes order 1 as
cidental to such washing; (b) the collection,
revised June 15,
distribution, or rental at wholesale or retail
1940.)
of the articles so processed; (c) the engaging
in any of the processes mentioned in (a) or
(b) above for their own use by business es­
tablishments, clubs, or institutions except
where the processing is incidental to the
manufacture or sale of a commodity; (d) all
occupations, operations, and services in con­
nection with or incidental to the processes
mentioned above. Exception: Laundry em-

90 cents an hour._ __ ___

1

Coverage of Minimum-Wage Law extended
to men.
Retail trade, i. e., selling or offering for sale at
retail and/or wholesale any goods, wares,
merchandise, articles or things, and all occu­
pations, operations, and services in connec­
tion therewith or incidental thereto. Ex­
ceptions: Establishment engaged solely in
wholesale trade; employment exclusively at
wholesale in an establishment engaged in
both wholesale and retail trade which real­
izes less than 25 percent of its gross annual
receipts from retail sales; employees in any
workweek when employed solely at an oc­
cupation or in any industry governed by an­
other minimum-wage order of the State.

Women and minors:

JU L Y 1,

New York:
Session laws 1944. ch.
792, July 1, 1944.
No. 7.—................. —Directory, Nov. 12,
1945.
Mandatory, May
19, 1947.

Retail trade, i. e., any industry or business
selling or offering for sale to the consumer
any type of merchandise, wares, goods, ar­
ticles, or commodities. Includes the solic­
iting of sales or opportunities for sale and
the distributing of such merchandise, wares,
etc., and the rendering of services inci­
dental to the sale, use, or upkeep of the
same whether performed on the employer’s
premises or elsewhere. Exception: Em­
ployee in a retail trade establishment
engaged solely in occupations covered by
another minimum-wage order.

co

o
------- Over 30 but not more than 40
a week.
From fortieth to forty-first
hour of workweek.
86 cents an hour.............. ............ Over 41 a week.57
5734 cents an hour... ------------- Actual time worked.
$23 a week _ _____

.

5734 cents an hour..... ..................
In cases of voluntary leave, new
employees, or total stoppage of
plant, as specified.
Zone II59 _ ............ —-.....................

Over 30 but not more than 40
a week.
From fortieth to forty-first
hour of workweek.
79 cents an hour............................ Over 41 a week.57
5234 cents an hour-----------------

CO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942
State, order, and effec­
tive date 2

Occupation or industry covered

No. 2-a, Oct. 19, 1947... Beauty service, includes all establishments
which perform services or operations in the
(Supersedes order 2 of
care, cleansing, or beautification of the skin,
Mar. 27, 1939.)
nails, or hair, or in the enhancement of per­
sonal appearance of women and children, and
also services or operai ions incidental thereto.
Order covers all occupations including but not
limited to maids, cleaning women, cashiers,
receptionists, appointment clerks and cleri­
cal workers. Exceptions: Barbers, manicur­
ists, or other workers in barber shops which
perform services primarily for men; beauty
service employee in a week when working
solely at a nonbeauty service occupation
covered by another minimum-wage order of
the State.




Minimum-wage rates

In cases of voluntary leave, new 52H cents an hour.
employees, or total stoppage of
plant, as specified.
Employees whose normal workweek
is 30 hours or less:
Zone 159................................. ...... 62H cents an hour.
Zone II5®
57Mi cents an hour.

Women and minors; men:
Employees other than maids and
cleaning women:
Experienced:
Full time:60
Zone 161________________
In case of voluntary leave,
new employees, or total
stoppage of business, as
specified.
Zone II91...............................

In case of voluntary leave,
new employees, or total
stoppage of business, as
specified.
Part time:
Zone 161______ _______ ___
Zone II61

CO

to
Hours

Actual time worked.

Do.5
Do.5

(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at rates
specified in order. Special
permit required before an
employer may charge em­
ployees for cost of uniforms.)

$26 a week______
81^ cents an hour.
97J^ cents an hour.
65 cents an hour...
$23.40 a week_ _
_
73 cents an hour...

40 or less a week.
Over 40 and including 44 a
week.
Over 44 a week.5?
Actual time worked.

88 cents an hour-..
58J4 cents an hour.

40 or less a week.
Over 40 and including 44 a
week.
Over 44 a week.57
Actual time worked.

$6.96 a day______
$3.48 a day 62____
97J-3 cents an hour.
$6.24 a day......... __
$3.12 a day62.........
88 cents an hour...

Over 4 but not over 8 a day.
4 or less a day.
Over 8 a day.57
Over 4 but not over 8 a day.
4 or less a day.
Over 8 a day.67

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D ER S

New York—Continued
No. 1-a—Continued___ Laundry—Continued
ployee in a week when working solely at a
nonlaundry occupation covered by another
minimum-wage order of the State.

Class of employees covered

Continued

Learners (6 months):
Full time:60
Zone I61_______

In case of voluntary leave,
new employees, or total
stoppage of business, as
specified.
Zone II61___________

Zone II m.
Maids and cleaning women:
Zone I81..............................

Zone II81,

88 cents an hour...
58cents an hour.
$21.20 a week____
66^ cents an hour.

40 or less a week.
Over 40 and including 44 a
week.
Over 44 a week.®?
Actual time worked.

7914 cents an hour53 cents an hour...

40 or less a week.
Over 40 and including 44 a
w'eek.
Over 44 a week.®?
Actual time worked.

$6.24 a day..................................
$3.12 a day 8*________ ______
88 cents an hour.......... ............
$5.65 a day___ _____________
$2.83 a day «______________
7914 cents an hour____ ______

Over 4 but not over 8 a day.
4 or less a day.
Over 8 a day.®?
Over 4 but not over 8 a day.
4 or less a day.
Over 8 a day.®?

$23.40 a week..... ........................
58H cents an hour......................

a

35 but not over 40 a week.
Less than 35 but over 18
week.
75 cents an hour____ _______ ... Up to and including 18
week.
75 cents an hour..'........................ Over 40 a week.®?
$21.20 a week
35 but not over 40 a week.
53 cents an hour_____
Less than 35 but over 18
week.
67>£ cents an hour...................... . Up .to and including 18
week.
___ do............................. .............. Over 40 a week.®?

a

a
a

JU L Y 1 , 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1, 1 9 5 0

In case of voluntary leave,
new employees, or total
stoppage of business, as
specified.
Part time:
Zone 181............... ......... ..........

$23.40 a week........
73 cents an hour...

(Deductions for meals and
lodging permitted at rates
specified in order.
Actual cost of uniforms may
be charged against em­
ployee’s wage but only to
extent that such wage ex­
ceeds minimum.)
See footnotes at end of tab!




OO
CO

CO
9^

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 1—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date 2
New York—Continued
No. 3-a, Nov.30,1947...

Confectionery, includes all activities, services,
and processes in the manufacture, prepara­
tion, and packaging of candy, confections,
sweetmeats, chewing gum, sweetened cough
drops, and sugared nuts; all occupations nec­
essary to the production of the articles speci­
fied, including but not limited to office,
clerical, maintenance, wrapping, packaging,
and shipping. Exception: Confectionery
employee in a week when working solely at
a nonconfectionery occupation covered by
another minimum-wage order of the State.

Class of employees covered

Women and minors; men.

Establishments employing 9 or more
confectionery workers in any
week:
From Sept. 1 to Apr. 1------------------

Minimum-wage rates

Hours

57)4 cents an hour; $23 a week---8634 cents an hour---------- -------

8 a day, 40 a week.29
Over 8 a day or over 40 a
week; if both, whichever
total is greater.57

$16.43 a week 63.

3 days or less in week having
3 or more workdays.
If called to work on 4th day,
regardless of whether a
work assignment is given.
On more than 4 days in any
workweek.

$18.40 a week 63.

From Apr. 1 to Sept. 1

$18.40 plus 5734 cents for each
hour worked beyond the 4th
day up to and including the
40th hour.63
$11.50 a week 63
$13.80 a week 63.

Establishments employing 8 or fewer
confectionery workers.

No. 4-a, Nov. 30, 1947.. Cleaning and dyeing includes (a) all types of
cleaning, dyeing, pressing, or processing in­
cidental thereto, of materials belonging to the
(Supersedes directory
ultimate consumer, i. e., clothing, hats,
order 4 of May 8,
household furnishings, rugs, textiles, furs,
1939, which became
leather, upholstered goods, or fabrics of any
mandatory Feb. 14,
kind whatsoever; (b) the soliciting, collect­
1944.)
ing, selling, reselling, or distributing at re­
tail or wholesale of cleaning, dyeing, and
pressing services; (c) all office, clerical, pack­
ing, or other occupations (including plant




Women and minors; men:
Full-time employees.........

Part-time employees
In cases of voluntary leave, new em­
ployees, total stoppage of plant.
If employee works a split shift-------

2 days or less in week having
2 or more workdays.
If called to work on third
day, regardless of whether
a work assignment is given.
On more than 3 days in any
workweek.

$13.80 plus 573-3 cents for each
hour worked beyond the third
day up to and including the
40th hour.83
6234 cents an hour------------------ 24 or less a week at direction
of employer.29
Over 24 up to and including
5734 cents an hour....................
40 a week.
Over 8 in any day when
9334 cents an hour
workweek is 24 or less.
$17.25 a week........
57J4 cents an hour.
86 cents an hour...

24 to 30 a week.
Over 30 to 40 a week.
Over 40 a week.57

5734 cents an hour........................ Less than 24 a week 5
5733 cents an hour----------------- Actual time worked.
86 cents an hour for each hour
worked on day a split shift
occurs.

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S AND O R D ER S

(Supersedes directory
order 3 of Nov. 14,
1938, which became
mandatory May 1,
1944.)

Occupation or industry covered

maintenance) incidental or related to the
processes described in (a) and (b) above.
Exceptions: Cleaning, dyeing, or pressing
when a process in the manufacture of new
materials or of second-hand materials being
processed for resale; establishments insofar
as they are covered by the laundry mini­
mum-wage order; employee in a cleaning
and dyeing establishment in a week
when working solely at a noncleaning and
dyeing occupation covered by another mini­
mum-wage order of the State.
Women and minors; men:
Service employees:
New York City
Communities of 19,000 or over, ex­
cept New York City.
Communities of less than 10,000-..
Nonservice (counter waitresses us­
ually nonservice, but exception
made on permit):
New York City
Communities of 10,000 or over, ex­
cept New York City.
Communities of less than 10,000. __
Service and nonservice:
Part time.............._____..................

32 cents an hour and meals
31 cents an hour and meals
30 cents an hour and meals
52 cents an hour and meals

51 cents an hour and meals
50 cents an hour and meals

4 cents additional for each hour
worked up to 24 a week.
Overtime................ ___.................... 1H times applicable minimum
rate.
If employee works a split shift, or 75 cents a day “in addition to the
spread of hours exceeds 10, or
hourly wages earned.’’
both.
If meals not furnished to employee. 10 cents an hour additional for
each hour worked.
(Deductions allowed for lodg­
ing.
In lieu of laundering uni­
forms, employer may elect
to pay employee regularly
an additional 3 cents per
hour.)

Over 24 to 45 a week.8*
Do.64
Do.84

Over 24 to 45 a week.64
Do.64
Do.64
30 or less a week, at direction
of employer.64
Over 45 a week.57

JU L Y 1, 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1, 1 9 5 0

No. 5-a, Nov. 30, 1947.. Restaurant, i. e., any eating or drinking place
which prepares and offers food or beverages
(Supersedes directory
for human consumption either on any of its
order 5 of June 3,
premises or by such service as catering, ban­
1940, which became
quet, box lunch, or curb service, to the pub­
mandatory July 17,
lic, to employees, or to members or guests of
1944.)
members; and services in connection there­
with or incidental thereto. Exceptions: Eat­
ing or drinking places operated by estab­
lishments customarily offering lodging ac­
commodations of 5 or more rooms to the
public; establishments where the service of
food or beverage is not available to the public
but is incidental to instruction, medical
care, religious observance, or to the care of
handicapped or destitute persons, or other
public charges; restaurant employee in a
week when working solely at an occupation or
in any industry governed by another mini­
mum-wage order of the State.

See footnotes at end of table.




CO
Oi

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 ‘—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date2

Occupation or industry covered




Minimum-wage rates

Hours

Women and minors; men:
All-year hotels:
Nonresidential employees:
Service employees:
In communities having pop­
ulation of:
Over 24 to 45 a week.6*
Do.04
Do.*4

25,000 to 1,000,000........ ..........
Less than 25,000
Nonservice, i. e., other than
service employees (counter
waitresses usually nonserv­
ice, but exception made on
permit):
In communities having pop­
ulation of:
1,000,000 or more...
25,000 to 1,000,000

Do.64
Do.64

Service and nonservice:

If employee works a split
shift, or spread of hours
exceeds 10, or both.
Residential employees:
In communities having popula­
tion of:
1,000,000 or more:
furnished.
If lodging and
nished.
25,000 to 1,000,000:
If lodging but
furnished.
If lodging and
nished.
Less than 25,000:
If lodging but
furnished.

3 cents in addition to the appli­
cable minimum rate for each
hour worked up to 24 a week;
applicable minimum rate for
24 to 30 hours.
50 cents a day “in addition to the
hourly wages earned” (not
applicable to residential em­
ployees).

30 or less a week (at direction
of employer).64

meals fur-

Do.

no meals

Do.

meals fur-

Do.

no meals

Do.

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E LA W S AND O R D ER S

New York—Continued
No. 6-a, Nov. 30, 1947-. Hotel, i. e., any establishment which, as a
whole or part of its business activities, offers
(Supersedes directory
lodging accommodations for hire to the pub­
order 6 of Nov. 25,
lic, to employees, or to members or guests of
1940, which became
members, and services in connection there­
mandatory July 17,
with or incidental thereto. Exceptions: Eat­
1944.)
ing or drinking places customarily offering
lodging accommodations of less than 5 rooms
to the public, to employees, or to members
or guests of members; establishments in
which lodging is incidental to instruction,
medical care, religious observance, or to the
care of handicapped or destitute persons, or
other public charges; caddies; camp coun­
selors in children's camps, and employees
who assist them and receive supervision and
training as part compensation; enrolled students in a recognized college, university, or
vocational high school who must acquire experience through employment in a hotel;
campers working 4 hours or less a day in a
children’s camp; hotel employee in a week
when working solely at an occupation or in
an industry covered by another minimumwage order of the State.

Class of employees covered

Oo

If lodging and meals fur­
nished.
Both residential and nonresidential employees.
Resort hotels:57
Service..... ........................................
C hambermaids..............................
Nonservice-............ ...... ........ .........
Employees working 3 days or less
in any week.
All employees...................................

North Dakota:
No. 1, May 6, 1946___
(Supersedes order 1
of Dec. 16, 1932, as
amended June 15,
1939.)

No. 3, May 9,1946(Supersedes order 3
of Dec. 16,1932, re­
printed Aug. 15,
1939.)

Public housekeeping, i. e., the work of wait­
resses in restaurants, hotel dining rooms,
boarding houses, bars, and taverns, and all
attendants employed at ice-cream, lightlunch, and refreshment stands, steam table
or counter work in cafeterias and delicates­
sens where freshly cooked foods are served;
the work of chambermaids in hotels, lodging
houses, and boarding houses; the work of
janitresses, car cleaners, and kitchen work­
ers in hotels and restaurants; and elevator
operators.

Women:
Full-time employees:
Waitresses or counter girls.

Mercantile, i. e., work in establishments oper­
ated for the purpose of trade in the purchase
or sale of any goods or merchandise includ­
ing the sales force, wrapping force, auditing
or checking force, the shippers in the mail­
order department, the receiving, marking,
and stockroom employees, and all other
women, except those performing office duties
solely.

Women:
Full-time employees:
Experienced.. .........

Chambermaids or kitchen help_
_
Part-time employees...................... .

Do.

1M times basic minimum rate
applicable to employee.

Over 45 a week.”

$16 a week................................... Over 3 and including 6 days
$19 a week.....................................
a week.
$22 a week...................................
Ho of the applicable weekly
Hours actually worked.*9
rate.
25 percent of applicable weekly
wage or compensatory time as On seventh consecutive day.
specified.

[

Prorated...................................... .

Actual time worked.

(Deductions from minimum
wage allowed for meals fur­
nished to nonresidential em­
ployees of all-year hotels
and for lodging and/or meals
of resort-hotel employees.
Rates specified in order.)
$17.43 a week; $75.53 a month... 9 a day, 58 a week in towns
under 500 population; 8H
a day, 48 a week elsewhere
(maximum).
$16.61 a week; $71.98 a month_
_
Do.
Hs of weekly wage.................. . For each hour worked.
(Deductions allowed for meals,
lodging, or both, as specified
in order.)

Inexperienced (1 year)*5.
Part-time employees.........

JULY 1 , 194 2 —
JULY 1, 1 9 5 0

Employees in resort hotels and
residential employees in all­
year hotels:
In cases of voluntary leave; em­
ployees hired, dismissed, or
whose employment terminates
within the week; stoppage of
service in establishment, as
specified.

$14.35 a week................................

$16.90 a week; $73.23 a month_
_

9 a day, 54 a week in towns
under 500 population; 8J4
a day, 48 a week elsewhere
(maximum).
$14.04 a week; $60.84 a month_
_
Do.
Hs of weekly wage.................... For each hour worked.

See footnotes at end of table.




CO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 ’—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date 2

Occupation or industry covered

Women:

Inexperienced:55

work performed in laundry departments of
hotels and factories.

No. 2, Sept. 1, 1949 ___ Manufacturing, i. e., all processes in the pro­
(Supersedes order 2
duction of commodities, including work in
dressmaking shops, wholesale millinery
printed Aug. 15,
houses, workrooms of retail millinery
1939.)
shops; and in the drapery and furniture­
covering workshops, the garment alteration,
art needlework, fur-garment making and
millinery workrooms in mercantile stores;
employees of creameries and produce
houses and the candy-making departments
of retail candy stores and of restaurants;
in bakery and biscuit manufacturing es­
tablishments, in candy manufacturing, and
in bookbinding and job-press-feeding estab­
lishments.
Ohio.......... ..........
Oklahoma________

Women:

$18 a week, $78 a month (with
laundry privileges at 33 per­
cent, not to exceed $5 max­
imum per week).
$14 a week, $60.65 a month (with
laundry privileges as above).
$16 a week, $69.35 a month (with
laundry privileges as above).
1/48 of weekly minimum for each
hour worked.
1/38 of weekly minimum for each
hour worked.

Hours

38 to 48 a week.

Do.
Do.
Under 32 a week.
32 and under 38 a week.
Maximum set by hours law

Inexperienced (except in job-press
feeding and book binding) (3
months).

week. Exception: Places
of less than 500 popula­
tion.^

No change in orders.
______

Oregon:
No. 10, July 22,1941..

Minors (persons under 18 years of age).

(67N

8 a day, 44 a week.

(Supersedes order 9 of
July 22, 1941.)
No. 11, Aug. 1, 1942___
(Supersedes order 10
of July 22, 1941.)




Do.
Over 8 a day, over 44 a week
in emergency.
10 a day, 60 a week.
V/2 employee’s regular rate......... Over 10 a day, over 60 a week
in emergency.
1 Yi employee’s regular rate........

Processing, bleaching, grading, and
packing.

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D ER S

North Dakota—Con.
No. 4, Mar. 10, 1947___ Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing, i. e., any place
where clothes are washed, cleaned, or dyed
(Supersedes order 4 of
by any process, by any person, firm, institu­
Dec. 16, 1932, re­
tion, corporation, or association; all proc­
printed Aug. 15,
esses connected with the receiving, mark­
1939.)
ing, washing, cleaning, ironing, and dis-

Minimum-wage rates

Class of employees covered

No. 2, June 8, 1946......... Canning, dehydrating, and barreling operations, i. e., work in the canning or processing of fresh fruit, vegetables, fish, shellfish, or
(Supersedes orders of
Crustacea, or in the barreling or preserving of
Apr. 1, 1942 and
fresh fruit and berries. Exception: Farmer
Aug. 27, 1943, and
who processes only the product of his own
order 2 of June 20,
farm.
1944.)

Women and minors
Women 18 years and over,

Double time..........
Women and minors.

No. 14, Jan. 13, 1948.... Public housekeeping, includes work of wait­
resses, cooks, counter and salad workers,
food checkers, bus and vegetable workers,
(Supersedes orders 13
dish and glass washers, kitchen help, maids,
of July 22,1941, and
chambermaids, housekeepers, barmaids,
14 of June 13, 1944.)
linen-room girls, cleaners, janitresses and
janitors, charwomen and housemen, check­
room attendants, matrons, elevator oper­
ators, and all others employed in hotels,
restaurants, boarding houses offering meals
for sale to the public, rooming houses offer­
ing rooms for rent, apartment houses, auto
camps, cafeterias, light-lunch stands, retail
candy, ice-cream and soft-drink parlors, deli­
catessens, beer parlors, and clubs (private
and public), as well as matrons, car cleaners
in transportation industries and other work
of like nature.

Women and minors:
Experienced_____

No. 9, May 5, 1948........ Mercantile, includes work in any business or
establishment operated for the purpose of
purchasing, selling, or distributing goods or
(Supersedes orders 8
commodities at wholesale or retail.
of July 22,1941, and
8 of July 15, 1944.)

Women and minors:
Experienced..........

(Supersedes orders 6
of July 22,1941, and
7 of June 13, 1944.)

Inexperienced:69
First 200 hours.
Next 200 hours.

10 a day.
Over 10 to 12 a day.
Over 12 a day.
Seventh day—First 8 hours.
Seventh day—Over 8 to 12
hours.
Seventh day—Over 12 hours.

50 cents an hour..
75 cents an hour...

8 a day, 44 a week.
Over 8 a day, over 44 a week
in emergency on permit.

65 cents an hour...
97H cents an hour.

8 a day, 44 a week.11
Over 8 a day, over 44 a week
in emergency on permit.

40 cents an hour......................... 8 a day, 44 a week.11
60 cents an hour........... .............. Over 8 a day, over 44 a week
in emergency on permit.
50 cents an hour........................... 8 a day, 44 a week.11
75 cents an hour............... .......... Over 8 a day, over 44 a week
in emergency on permit.
(Deductions for meals allowed
if mutually agreed to and
charge does not exceed 50
percent of the price charged
the public.)

65 cents an hour—.
97H cents an hour.

Inexperienced (400 hours)

50 cents an hour—.
75 cents an hour—

Regular employees.

97^ cents an hour.

Students working only after school
or on Saturdays (800 hours).

50 cents an hour.

8 a day, 44 a week.11
Over 8 a day, over 44 a week
in emergency on permit.
8 a day, 44 a week.11
Over 8 a day, over 44 a week
in emergency on permit.
Sundays or legal holidays
(unless establishment reg­
ularly open such days).
8 a day, 44 a week.

JULY 1, 194 2 —
JULY 1. 1 9 5 0

Laundry, cleaning and d3Teing, i. e., work in
places where two or more persons are em­
ployed in the process of receiving, marking,
washing, cleaning, dyeing, ironing, and dis­
tributing clothing and materials.

No. 7, Feb. 15, 1947___

66 cents an hour «.
Time and a half...
Double time_____
Time and a fourth.
Time and a half...

See footnotes at end of table.




CO
CD

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 ^Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date *
Oregon—C ontinued
No. 8, Oct. 19, 1948.

Pennsylvania:
No. 3____ _____ ____ _
Directory, Aug. 1,
1943.
Mandatory, Oct. 1,
1947.

Puerto Rico 72
No. 1, Mar. 26,1943...




Class of employees covered

Manufacturing, i. e., any industry, business,
or establishment operated for the purpose of
preparing, producing, making, altering, re­
pairing, finishing, processing, inspecting,
handling, assembling, wrapping, bottling,
or packaging goods, articles, or commodities,
in whole or in part. Exceptions: Any such
activity covered by another minimum-wage
order of the State; women employed in
administrative, executive, or professional
capacities, defined as: (1) Work predomi­
nantly intellectual, managerial or creative,
which requires exercise of discretion ana
independent judgment and for which the
remuneration is not less than $200 a month;
or (2) employees licensed or certified by the
State who are engaged in the practice of any
of the recognized professions.

Women and minors.............................
Regularly employed woman or minor.

Restaurant, i. e., any activity connected with
the preparation or offering of food and/or
beverage for remuneration, for human con­
sumption either on the employer's premises
or elsewhere by such service as catering,
banquet, box-lunch or curb service, whether
such service is operated as the principal
business of the employer or as a unit of
another business, to the public, to em­
ployees, to members or guests of members,
or to paying guests.

Women and minors: .
Full-time employees:
Service___________ _
Nonservice___ ______
Service and nonservice.

The processing of leaf tobacco, i. e.. the receiv­
ing, weighing, stowing, classification or grad­
ing, fermentation, stemming, packing or
baling, warehousing, drying, or any other
operation related to the handling of leaf to­
bacco before it is used in the manufacture of
cigars, cigarettes, or other like products.

All employees..

Any woman or minor...........................

Minimum-wage rates

Hours

65 cents an hour.......................... 8 a day, 44 a week.41
V/z employee's regular rate or 1H Sundays or legal holidays
(unless Sunday in regu­
the minimum.
larly scheduled workweek).
97H cents an hour................. ...... Over 8 a day or over 44 a
week in emergency, on per­
mit.

29 cents an hour...........................
39 cents an hour...........................
1H times the basic hourly rate
applicable to employee.

Over 24 to 44 a week.
Do.
Over 44 a week.7®

Part-time employees:
Service..........................

32 cents an hour...........................

"Nonserviee...................

42 cents an hour...........................

24 or less a week at direction
of employer.71
Do.71

(Deductions allowed for meals
and lodging as specified in
order. In lieu of laundering
uniforms employer may elect
to pay employee 35 cents for
each required laundering.)
25 cents an hour73.................... .
V/z times employee’s regular
rate.

40 a week.
Over 40 a week.7®

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

(Supersedes order 7 of
July 22, 1941.)

Occupation or industry covered

O

Sugar, i. e., the production of sugar cane in
both the agricultural and the industrial
phases.

(Deductions allowed for meals
and lodging as specified in
the order.)

See footnotes at end of table.



8 a day.
Over 8 a day.74
8 a day.
Over 8 a day.74

8 a day, 6 days a week.
Do.
Over 8 a day.74

8 a day, 48 a week.
Do.
Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week.74

8 a day, 48 a week.
Do.
8 a day, 40 a week.
Do.
8 a day, 48 a week.
Do.
8 a day, 40 a week.
Do.
Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week.74

JU L Y 1, 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1 , 1 9 5 0

Workers performing operations not
expressly enumerated in the
order:75
In agricultural phase of the industry . $1.40 a day for small and interior
farms; $1.50 a day for others.
Twice the minimum rate (to be
prorated).
In the industrial phase of the indus­ 33 cents an hour...........................
try.
Twice the minimum rate............
No. 4, July 17, 1943, Hospital, clinic, or sanitarium, i. e., any public All workers other than professional
or private establishment where medical
amended Jan. 17,
and office employees, registered
treatment is offered or where patients are
nurses, student nurses in accredited
1944.
interned.
schools, dietitians, laboratory tech­
nicians, and manual laborers, such
as plumbers, electricians, carpenters,
painters, etc.:
Regular employees (as defined)_
_ $42 a month 7fl_.............................
Temporary employees.................. . $1.75 a day 7®__.............................
Both regular and temporary Twice the applicable minimum
employees 18 years and over.
rate.
(Deductions for meals, lodg­
ing, or laundry permitted
as specified in the order. If
given all of these services,
$17 a month may be de­
ducted from wages of perma­
nent employees and 65 cents
a day from nonpermanent
employees.)
No. 5, Mar. 13, 1944, Beer and carbonated drinks, i. e., the prepara­ All employees:
tion, production, distribution, or sale of beer,
modified June 5, 1944.
Beer..................................................... 30 cents an hour............................
with or without alcohol, or of any soft drink
Carbonated drinks................ ............ 30 cents an hour............................
prepared with carbonated water.
Both industries, employees 18 years Twice employee's regular rate...
or over.
No. 6, June 15, 1944, Hotel, restaurant, canteen, or soda fountain... All employees:
modified Apr. 14,1945.
Regular workers (as defined):
Employees 18 years and over:
Zone 177................................ .
$10 a week..
Zone II77.............................. .
$8.50 a week.
Minors:
Zone 177................................ .
$8 a week...
Zone II77.............................. .
$7 a week...
Temporary workers:
Employees 18 years and over:
Zone I77................................ .
30 cents an hour............................
Zone II77.............................. .
25 cents an hour..........................
Minors:
Zone 177................................ .
22H cents an hour........................
Zone II77.............................. .
18H cents an hour........................
Employees 18 years and over__
Twice employee's regular rate...
No. 3, Apr. 28, 1943.

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 '—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date 1

Occupation or industry covered

All employees:
Employees 18 years and over:
Zone II78..........................................
Minors between 14 and 18 years:

8 a day, 40 a week.78
Do.79
Twice employee’s regular rate... Over 8 a day or over 40 a
week.7*
8 a day, 40 a week.78
Do.79

Zone II78....................................... .
No. 8,rJune 5, 1945......... Retail business, i. e., any activity, process,
operation, work, or service necessary or inci­
dental or related to retail sales, or the trans­
ferring directly to the consumer of goods,
merchandise, or articles, for compensation,
regardless of whether such sales or transfers
originate or take place within or outside such
establishment or place, or in its name, or for
its benefit.




All workers:
Employees 18 years and over:
Regular (as defined):

8 a day, 48 a week.

Zone II so..................... .............
Zone III 80_....................
Special employees, i. e., those sell­
ing merchandise priced at 25
cents or less:
Zone III so..............
Temporary:
Zone III 89 _
Minors under 18, apprentices, and
messengers.

Hours

Minimum-wage rates

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Twice employee’s regular rate... Over 8 a day or over 48 a
week.7*
75 percent of the applicable min- 8 a day, 40 a week.
mum wage.
(Deductions allowed for meals
and lodging. Amounts for
each zone specified in the
order.)
The minimum varies according
to zone and type of occupa­
tion. In Zone I, the range is
from 25 to 82H cents an hour,
in Zone II, from 20 to 60 cents
an hour.78
Twice the applicable minimum
rate.
66H percent of applicable mini­
mum rate.

8 a day, 48 a week.

Over 8 a day, or over 48 a
a week.7*
8 a day, 40 a week.

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

Puerto Rico—Continued
No. 7, Apr. 4, 1945......... Theaters and movies, i. e., establishments or
places where plays or other artistic produc­
tions are given by actors, musicians, or sing­
ers for profit, or where moving pictures are
shown for profit.

Class of employees covered

Construction, includes skilled, semiskilled,
and unskilled workers in or incidental to the
industry.

No. 12, Jan. 2, 1947,
amended Feb. 1, L94S.

Transportation includes any act, process,
operation, work, or service, necessary or in­
cidental or related to the transportation or
carrying of persons or things from one place
to another, by or in any kind of vehicle or
locomotive apparatus of a company, corpo­
ration or authority. Exceptions: Transpor­
tation performed by the Federal, Insular,
or Municipal Governments for purposes
entirely governmental; transportation work
incidental to an employer’s business, if such
business is covered by another order.

All employees..

Employees 18 years and over..

No. 13, July 1, 1947.

All employees______________

If employee works a split shift.

Laundry and dry cleaning, i. e., any act,
process, operation, service, or work per­
formed in connection with the washing,
cleaning, starching, ironing, or dyeing of
clothes or material of any kind. Includes
the preparing, wrapping, collecting, de­
livery, return, transporting, and distribut­
ing of said clothes or material.

All employees:
Employees other than piece work­
ers (rates specified in the order),
and messengers and drivers.
Messengers_____ _______________
.Drivers
Employees 18 years and over..........

Furniture and other wooden products, in­
cludes the processes of designing, building,
assembling, altering, and repairing furniture
made of wood, metal, straw, or any other
kind of material, and other classes of wooden
products.

All employees:
Experienced employees making
doors, windows, or blinds.
All other experienced employees.......
Inexperienced:
First 6 months________ ________
Last period of the apprenticeship. _.

No. 15, Nov. 22,1948___ Quarrying includes any act, process, opera­
tion, work, or service necessary or related to
the extraction, transportation, crushing, or
delivery of stone, gravel, or other quarry
products.

The minimum varies according 8 a day, 44 a week.5
to type of work. For skilled
workers range extends from 60
cents to $1.10 an hour. For
semiskilled workers minimum
is 45 cents an hour; for un­
skilled, 32 cents an hour.
Twice employee’s regular rate_. Over 8 a day or over 44
week.74
Minimum varies according to 8 a day, 48 a week.81
type of work and skill of
worker. Range extends from
55 cents an hour for chauffeurs
of trailers or semitrailers to 25
cents for unskilled railroad
workers.
Twice employee’s regular rate.. Over 8 to 9 hour shift.
1H employee’s regular rate
After 9 a day.
Twice regular rate of pay

JU L Y 1, 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1. 1 9 5 0

No. 11, July 1, 1946,
amended Nov. 1,1946.

All employees.........................................

No. 14, Sept. 15, 1948__

Employees 18 and over

25 cents an hour____ _________

8 a day, 48 a week.81

$7.50 a week....................... ..........
Do.81
40 cents an hour____ _________
Go.81
Twice employee’s regular rate-.- Over 8 a day, over 48 a
week.74
75, 60 , 40, and 30 cents an hour 8 a day, 48 a week.81
according to classification.
60, 45, 30, and 25 cents an hour..
Go.81
15 cents an hour
85 percent of the minimum fixed
for the particular occupation.
Twice employee’s regular rate.-

Go.81
Go.81

Over 8 a day or over 48
week.74
Range from $1 an hour to 35 8 a day, 44 a week.81
cents an hour, according to
occupational classification.75
Employees 18 years and over................ Twice employee’s regular rate... Over 8 a day or over 44 :
week.74

See footnotes at end of table.




co

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 i—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date *
Puerto Rico—Continued
No. 16, Oct. 1, 1949___

Occupation or industry covered

Class of employees covered

Hours

50 cents an hour...........................
Double the employee’s regular
rate.

8 a day, 44 a week.
Over 8 a day, over 44 a week,
or over 5H days a week.74

E

Rhode Island:
Session laws 1945, ch.
11624, July 1, 1945.
No. 4R_..........................
Directory, :Sept. 1,
1946.
Mandatory, Sept. 1,
| 1948.
(Supersedes manda­
tory order No. 4 of
Mar. 18, 1940.)

No. 6...............................
Directory, Mar. 1,
1947.
Mandatory, Sept. 15,
1947.




Coverage of Minimum-Wage Law and exist­
ing orders extended to men.
Retail trade occupations include all employ­
ment in or for an industry or business selling
or offering for sale any type of merchandise,
wares, goods, articles, or commodities to the
consumer. Also includes all work connected
witn the soliciting of sales or opportunities
for sales and/or the distributing of such mer­
chandise, wares, goods, articles, or commod­
ities and the rendering of services incidental
to the sale, use, or upkeep of the same
whether performed on the employer’s prem­
ises or elsewhere. Covers all types of retail
trade occupations unless and until specific
types of occupations are governed by indi­
vidual wage order. Exception: Home deliv­
ery of newspapers.

Women and minors; men:
Experienced...................................... . $22 a week *2___
55 cents an hour.
Employee taking voluntary leave Prorated............
in week when normal hours are
36 or more.
Inexperienced salespersons (3 $21 a week «*___
months).6®
50 cents an hour.
Employee taking voluntary leave Prorated.............
in week when normal hours are
36 or more.
Students under 18 69____ _________ 45 cents an hour.........................
Experienced and inexperienced........ 75 cents an hour...........................
$1 an hour............. ................... .
If employee works a split shift, or 75 cents a day in addition to the
spread of hours exceeds 12, or both.
applicable minimum wage.

Public housekeeping, i. e., all employment
connected directly or indirectly with the
offering or furnishing of rooms and/or lodging
for remuneration to the public, to employees,
to members or guests of members, to paying
guests, students, or others, whether such
service is operated as the principal business
of the employer or as a unit of another busi-

Women and minors; men:
Service, i. e., workers employed as
bellboys, page boys, or porters
who customarily receive gratuities.
Nonservice___ _________________
If employee works on more than two
shifts in any day, or spread of

36 to 44 a week.
Less than 36 a week.*®
Actual time worked.
36 to 44 a week.
Less than 36 a week.*®
Actual time worked.
Less than 36 a week.
Over 44 a week.**
On seventh consecutive day.

30 cents an hour........................... 40 or over a week.
35 cents an hour........................... Less than 40 a week.
50 cents an hour_______
55 cents an hour______ _______
75 cents a day in addition to the
hourly wage.

40 or over a week.
Less than 40 a week.

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S AND O R D ER S

Wholesale trade, i. e., all establishments, Women and minors; men..
enterprises, or agencies engaged in selling
merchandise to retailers, commercial estab­
lishments, or other wholesalers including
specifically wholesalers, agents, brokers,
commission agents, and sales branches of
manufacturing concerns. Includes the
processes of buying, selling, storing, trans­
porting, or any activity relating to these
rocesses, but excludes an establishment
aving 2 or fewer employees engaged on any
of these processes part of the time only
(such establishments come under the pro­
visions of the order for the other industry).
Exceptions: Executives and administrators;
bona fide professional employees; traveling
salesmen.

Minimum-wage rates

ness. Exceptions: Employment on a farm
or domestic service in a private home, unless
these are operated as rooming houses.
The term public housekeeping occupations
expressly includes such occupations as cham­
bermaid, parlormaid, linen-room worker, ele­
vator operator, cashier, clerical worker such
as room clerk and desk clerk, coat-room at­
tendant, matron, charwoman, telephone op­
erator, cleaner, janitor, bellboy, porter,
doorman, and all workers that may be
properly classified in this occupation in any
establishment furnishing rooms and/or lodg­
ing for remuneration.

(Deductions allowed for meals
and lodging as specified in
order.
In lieu of laundering uniforms
employer may elect to pay
employee an additional $1
per week.)

Women and minors; men:
Employees in other than resort
hotel establishments:
Nonservice:81
Full time__................................... 60 cents an hour plus meals28_
_
Overtime--..................................
Part time__________ ________
Service:84
Full time__________ ________
Overtime
Part time.............. .................... .
Both service and nonservice:
Full-time
employee, volun­
tarily absent.
If meals not furnished___
If employee works on more
than 2 shifts in any day
(more than 3 shifts in resort
hotels) or spread of hours
exceeds 10 (13 in resort
hotels).
Employees in resort hotel estab­
lishments:
Nonservice M
Service M.

Over 24 and up to 45 a
week.
1H times the basic hourly rate._. Over 45 a week.88
70 cents an hour plus meals36_
_ 24 or less a week.37
40 cents an hour plus meals28___ Over 24 and up to 45 a
week.
1 Yi times the basic hourly rate._- Over 45 a week.83
45 cents an hour plus meals28_
_ 24 or less a week.37

Applicable
full-time
basic
hourly rate.
10 cents additional for each
hour of “working time.”
50 cents a day in addition to
the hourly wages earned.

(Deduction of $3.25 a week
allowed for lodging.)
$19.20 a week plus full mainte­
nance including lodging and 3
meals a day for 7 days a week.
$12 a week plus full maintenance
including lodging and 3 meals
a day for 7 days a week.
(In lieu of furnishing and/or
laundering uniforms, em­
ployer may elect to pay
employee $1 per week
extra.)

See footnotes at end of table.



Less than 24 a week.

48 or less a week.
Do.

JU L Y 1 , 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1 , 1 9 5 0

No. 5-R, June 1, 1950— Restaurant and hotel restaurant, i. e., any
activity connected with the preparation or
(Supersedes direc­
offering of food or beverage for remuneration,
tory order 5 of
for human consumption, either on em­
June 15, 1942,
ployer’s premises or elsewhere by such
which became
service as catering, banquet, box lunch,
mandatory Nov.
or curb service (whether the principal busi­
15, 1944.)
ness of the employer or as a unit of another
business), to the public, employees, mem­
bers or guests of members, or paying
guests.

hours exceeds 10 (12 in resort
hotels.)

tf»
03

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 '—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date3

Utah:
No. 1, Sept. 1,1947
(Supersedes orders 2
and 3 of June 3,
1940, as amended
June 25, 1940, and
1 of Apr. 1, 1946.)




Class of employees covered

Factory, workshop, mechanical or mercantile
establishment, laundry, hotel, restaurant, or
packing house.

Hours

Minimum-wage rates

Females over 14 years of age:
In cities with population of 2,500 or
over.

10 a day, 54 a week (maxi­
mum).
10 a day, 54 a week (maxi­
mum).

Learners, apprentices, and women
mentally or physically deficient.
Retail trade includes any industry or business
operated for the purpose of selling, offering
for sale, or the distribution of goods, wares,
and merchandise at retail to selected individ­
uals or to the general public and rendering
services incidental to such Operations.

To be fixed by Industrial Com­
missioner.

Women and minors:
Full-time workers:
Experienced:
DoJT
Do.**
Do.st

Employee whose normal hours
are 40 or over taking vol­
untary leave in week:

Inexperienced (6 months or 1,000
hours):88

2X cents per hour less than pro­
A
vided for cities in class 1.
5 cents per hour less than pro­
vided for cities in class 1.

Do.
Do.

$2 a week less than for experi­
enced workers in respective
classes. (See above.)

Employee whose normal hours
are 40 or over taking vol­
untary leave in week:

Part-time work (at employer’s
election):
Experienced and inexperienced:

2M cents per hour less than pro­
vided for cities in class 1.
5 cents per hour less than pro­
vided for cities in class 1.

ceed weekly minimum for 40­
48-hour week).

Do.
Do.

Less than 40 a week. ®

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

South Dakota:
Wage fixed in law.
(Session laws: 1943,
ch.
76,
effective
July 1, 1943; 1945,
ch. 77.) 85
(Amends ch. 309 of
1923.)

Occupation or industry covered

Class 2 cities81...........................
Class 3 cities88.....................
Vocational students and minors:
Class 1 cities:88
Experienced..... ......................

2H cents per hour less than pro­
vided for cities in class 1.
5 cents per hour less than pro­
vided for cities in class 1.

Do.8
Do.8

No. 4, Sept. 1, 1947___
(Supersedes orders 5
(laundry) of June
16,1941, and 4 (laun­
dry, cleaning and
dyeing) of Sept. 1,
1946.)

Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing industries:
Laundry, i. e., any place where washing,
ironing, cleaning, pressing, or processing
incidental thereto of any kind of washable
fabric is conducted.
*
Cleaning, dyeing, and pressing includes only
those places or divisions of establishments
where the cleaning, dyeing, or pressing of
particular fabrics is conducted as a process
aside from usual laundry practice attend­
ing other things.

See footnotes at end of table.




Women and minors:
In laundry industry........................... $22 a week.................. ......... ......
In cleaning, dyeing, and pressing in­ $24.20 a week....... .........................
dustry.
In both industries.............................. Time and one-half......................
Individual worker's regular
hourly rate.
55 cents an hour................ ...........
Inexperienced (1 month in laundry
industry).8®

44 a week.
Do.
Over 44 a week.87
30 but less than 44 a week.
Less than 30 a week.8

$2 a week less than the minimum. 44 a week.

JULY 1, 194 2—
JULY 1, 1950

58 cents an hour.
Less than 4 a day, by reason
of school attendance.
Inexperienced............................ 53 cents an hour.......................... .
Do.
Class 2 cities:88
Experienced and inexperienced- 2^ cents per hour less, respecDo.
tively, than provided for cities
in class 1.
Class3 cities:88
Experienced and inexperienced. 5 cents per hour less, respectively,
Do.
than provided forcities in class 1.
Minors 14 to 16 doing delivery or
chore work or odd jobs in the
establishment:
Class 1 cities 88......... ....................... 40 cents an hour........................... 8 a day, 44 a week (maxi­
mum)
Class 2 cities88................................. 2H cents per hour less than pro­
Do.11
vided for cities in class 1.
Class 3 cities88.................. .............. 5 cents per hour less than pro­
‘ Do.41
vided for cities in class 1.
If employee works a split shift........ . 50 cents a day in addition to the
applicable minimum wage.
All women___ ____ _____________ lVi times employee’s regular Over 48 a week in emer­
rate.
gency.87

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 i—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date *

Occupation or industry covered

soft-drink sales.

Hours

Minimum-wage rates

Women and minors: "
Experienced full-time employees:

48 a week.87
Do.87
Do.87
Do.87
Actual working time.

All cities—Voluntary absence of
employee whose normal work­
week is 48 hours.
Experienced part-time employees:

Over 2 up to’and including 8
a day.
First 2 in day.
JSame as above.
}

Do.

}

Do.

Inexperienced (3 months):89
lished minimum wage.

No. 3, Deo. 1, 1947.......
(Supersedes orders 6
of July 14,1941, and
3 of July 1, 1946.)




Public housekeeping, i. e., all hotels, boarding
houses, rooming houses, auto camps, apart­
ment houses, resort hotels, hospitals, institu­
tions, building space to rent for business,
manufacturing, commercial enterprises, and
other public service.
Includes linen-room girls, maids, cleaners,
elevator operators, and any other female or
minor employee connected with these estab­
lishments unless or until their specific occu­
pation is governed by another minimumwage order. Exceptions: Registered nurses;
resident managers.

Women and minors:90
Women 18 and over:
Full time:
Class 1 cities:91

prescribed for experienced em­
ployees.
(Furnishing of meals to employee
allowed if mutually agreed to
in writing and copy of agree­
ment filed with Industrial
Commission.)

Inexperienced (2 months)........ $21.60 a week; 45 cents an hour..
Class 2 cities:91
$21.60 a week; 45 cents an hour..
Inexperienced (2 months)........ $20.40 a week; 42J^ cents an hour.
Class 3 cities:91
$19.20 a week; 40 cents an hour. Inexperienced (2 months)____ $18 a week; 37^ cents an hour...
Part time:
At employer’s election:
Class 1 cities:91
Inexperienced (2 months)... 47^ cents an hour....... ................

Do.87
Do.87
Do.87
Do.87
Do.87

Less than 48 a week.8
Do.8

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

Utah—Continued
No. 2, Nov. 20,1947___ Restaurant, i. e., all places selling food or
beverages in solid or liquid form to be con­
sumed on the premises. Exceptions: Retail
(Supersedes orders 4
of Aug. 5,1940 and 2
ice cream or retail soft drink (nonalcoholic)
establishments where as much as 90 percent
of June 1,1946.)

Class of employees covered

Class 2 cities:81
Inexperienced (2 months)... 45 cents an hour...........................
Class 3 cities:91
Inexperienced (2 months).._ 40 cents an hour...........................
At employee’s election:
Class 1 cities:81
Inexperienced (2 months)__
Class 2 cities:91

4233 cents an hour..L...................

Inexperienced (2 months). _ - 40 cents an hour...........................
Class 3 cities:91

Do.4
Do.4
Do.4
Do.4
Do.4
Do.4
Do.4
Do.4

Over 8 a day or work on
seventh consecutive day.
Minors 16 and under 18:
Class 1 cities:91
Experienced.................................. $20.90 a week; 47>3 cents an hour. 44 a week (maximum for
minors, includes meal pe­
riod).4
Inexperienced (2 months)........... $19.80 a week; 45 cents an hour..
Do.4
Class 2 cities:91
Experienced..... ............................ $19.80 a week; 45 cents an hour..
Do.4
Inexperienced (2 months)
$18.70 a week; 4233 cents an hour.
Do.4
Class 3 cities:91
Experienced................................. $17.60 a week; 40 cents an hour..
Do.4
Inexperienced (2 months)........... $16.50 a week; 3733 cents an hour.
Do.4
(Deductions from the mini­
mum wage for meals and
lodging permitted only if
mutually agreed to by employer and employees.
Charge may not exceed the
retail prices of such accom­
modations. Industrial Com­
mission must approve.)
Cannery or freezing plant (fruit,-^vegetable,
fish, shellfish, dog foods, or any other
products preserved for food purposes).

No. 39, Sept. 7, 1942.... Fresh-fruit packing, vegetable packing, or
dried fruit industries.
(Supersedes order 32
of Oct. 1,1934.)




of table.

1950

(Supersedes order 34
of May 6, 1937.)

1

Washington:
No. 38, July 3, 1942.

JU L Y 1, 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y

Inexperienced (2 months)... 35 cents an hour............ ..............
Overtime:

Do.4
Do.4

Time and a half.................... .
m times employee’s regular
rate.

Up to 12 a day.
Over 12 a day.
Work on seventh consecu­
tive day.

Time and a half.................... .
l}4 times employee's regular
rate.

Up to 12 a day.
Over 12 a day.
Work on seventh consecu­
tive day.
CO

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 ‘—Continued
State, order, and effec- |
tive date2

Occupation or industry covered

Washington—Continued
No. 40, Sept. 7, 1942___




Occupations not covered by a special indus­
trial welfare order. (Agricultural work,
domestic service, and specific occupations
listed in the order exempted.)
Office workers, includes but is not limited
to all types of clerical work, general office
workers, typists, stenographers, secretaries,
any and all office machine operators, book­
keepers (hand and machine), accountants,
accounting clerks, statisticians, tellers,
cashiers, collectors, telegraph and teletype
operators, PBX and office telephone opera­
tors, office messengers, ticket agents,
appraisers, librarians and their assistants,
physicians’ and dentists’ assistants and
attendants, research, X-ray medical or
dental laboratory technicians and their
assistants, office checkers, invoicers, and
similar occupations. Exceptions: Women
or minors employed by common carrier rail­
roads, sleeping car companies, and freight
or express companies subject to regulations
of Federal law; nurses and nurses’ aides
not engaged in office work; telephone opera­
tors employed directly by a telephone
company who are not engaged in office
work: occupations in an industry covered
by another minimum-wage order.

Hours

8 a day, 6 days a week (maxi­
mum).

Do.
Do.
8 a day, 6 days a week.

Minors, i. e., boys 14 and under 18
years of age; girls 16 and under 18
years of age.92
65 cents an hour.........................

(•»).

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

(Supersedes order 37
of Jan. 1, 1942.)

Minimum-wage rates

Experienced, i. e., one who has
served an apprenticeship at plant
where employed, or having served
an apprenticeship has been 3
months in the plant where em­
ployed at the particular work at
which she was an apprentice else­
where.
Inexperienced:94

(Supersedes order 29
of Jan. 22, 1922.)

(Supersedes order 31
of Oct. 27,1922, and
24 of Oct. 4, 1921.)

Class of employees covered

g

No. 44, June 6, 1949___
(Supersedes order 41
of Sept. 7, 1942,
which superseded
order 28 of Dec. 31,
1921.)

Nos. 45 and 45-A,
Nov. 28, 1949.97

Mercantile covers any industry, business, or
establishment operated for the purpose of
purchasing, selling, or distributing goods
or commodities at wholesale or retail.
Exceptions: Women or minors employed by
common carrier railroads, sleeping car com­
panies, and freight or express companies
subject to regulations of Federal law;
nurses and nurses’ aides and also telephone
operators employed directly by a telephone
company, who are not engaged in purchas­
ing, selling, or distributing goods or com­
modities at wholesale or retail; occupations
in an industry covered by another mini­
mum-wage order.

Women and minors:
Women_________
Minors............... .

.do.

65 cents"an hour.
50 cents.an hour.

8 a day (maximum set by
hour law for women and
minors in mercantile es­
tablishments).
Order specifies that the
hours of women and minors
in this industry “shall be
subject to any applicable
statutes of the State.”

(Industry not covered by
hour law for women.
The wage orders for both
branches of this industry
specify that hours of em­
ployment of women and
minors “shall be subject
to any applicable stat­
utes of the State.”)

tt*
kJ

194 2—
JULY 1. 1950

Amusement and recreation97 includes any
industry, business, or establishment oper­
ated for the purpose of furnishing enter­
tainment or recreation to the public.
Theatrical amusement and recreation97
covers both moving-picture and legitimate
theaters, and food and drink dispensaries
operated in connection therewith.
General amusement and recreation97 in­
cludes, but is not limited to, dance halls,
theaters, bowling alleys, billiard parlors,
skating rinks, riding academies, shooting
galleries, race tracks, amusement parks,
athletic fields, public swimming pools,
private and public gymnasiums, golf
courses, tennis courts, carnivals, wiredmusic studios, and concessions in any and
all amusement establishments, but exclud­
ing the Theatrical Amusement and Becreation Industry.
Exceptions: Occupations specifically covered
by another wage order; cashiers (covered
by the Office Workers’ order); employees of
common carrier railroads, sleeping car com­
panies, and freight or express companies
subject to regulations of Federal law; tele­
phone operators employed directly by a
telephone company.

.do.

See footnotes at end of table.




Oi

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942
State, order, and effec­
tive date 3

Occupation or industry covered

No. 47, Feb. 13,1950......... Beauty culture, i. e.f hairdressing; hair
coloring and bleaching; manicuring; hair
(Supersedes
order
manufacturing; massage; marcel or perma­
35-A of Dec. 1,
nent waving; cosmetology; hair cutting;
1940.)
body massage and weight reducing; selling
and demonstrating or applying beauty
preparations, cosmetics, and supplies
either to the demonstrator or to other
persons; instructing students in any of
the foregoing occupations, and all services
or operations incidental to such occupa­
tions, including the services of instructors
in beauty schools.




Women andjninors...

Hours

66 cents an hour...........................

8 a day (maximum set by
hour law for women em­
ployed in hotels, res­
taurants, and several other
industries).
Order specifies that the
hours of women and
minors in this industry
“shall be subject to any
applicable statutes of the
State.”

(If meals are furnished 40 cents
per meal may be deducted
from the wages paid.)

Women over 18 years of age licensed
by the State^to practice beauty
culture.

fcC

Minimum-wage rates

.do.

8 a day (maximum set by
hour law for women in
mercantile establishments
under which term14 beauty
parlors” are included).
Order specifies that the
hours of employment of
women in this industry
“shall be subject to any
applicable statutes of the
State.”

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

Washington—Continued
No. 46, Jan. 23, 1950_... Public housekeeping includes but is not
limited to: Restaurants; lunch counters;
(Supersedes orders
cafeterias; catering, banquet, or box-lunch
23 (public house­
service; curb service; boarding houses; all
other establishments where food in either
keeping) and 36
(apartment house) of
solid or liquid form is prepared for and
served to the public to be consumed on
Oct. 4, 1921, and
the premises; hotels and motels; apart­
Dec. 7,1937, respec­
ment houses; rooming houses; camps;
tively.)
clubs (public and private); hospitals,
sanitariums, rest homes, or maternity
homes; building or housecleaning or main­
tenance services.
Exceptions: Occupa­
tions specifically covered by another wage
order; cashiers (covered by the Office
Workers’ order); employees of common
carrier railroads, sleeping car companies,
and freight or express companies subject
to regulatiohs of Federal law; telephone
operators employed directly by a tele­
phone company; nurses, student nurses,
female internes, dietitians, and laboratorians.

Class of employees covered

Cn

Continued

No. 48, June 5, 1950------(Supersedes order 25
of Dec. 14, 1921.)

Wisconsin:
No. C-5, Feb. 10, 1947.. Any occupation, trade, or industry other than
domestic service and agriculture.
(See
entries following.)
(Supersedes order 1
(Form C-5) of June
10, 1932.)
No. 0-5, Feb. 10, 1947,
as amended Apr. 6,
1948.

Industrialized agriculture, i. e., truck gardens,
cherry and other fruit orchards, gardens
conducted or controlled by canning com­
panies, and the culture or harvesting of sugar
beets and cranberries.

Women and minors.

do.

Women and minors:
In cities having a population of:
3,500 or over..............—-...........
1,000 but less than 3,500...........
Elsewhere in the State................

45 cents an hour89 98.
40 cents an hour 39 98.
38 cents an hour 39 98.

Women and minors........................

8 a day (maximum set by
hour law for women in
laundries and mechanical
establishments).
Order specifies that the hours
of employment of women
and minors in the laundry,
dry cleaning and dye works
industry “shall be subject
to any applicable statutes
of the State.”

JU L Y 1 , 1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1 , 1 9 5 0

Laundry, dry cleaning and dye works in­
cludes but is not confined to: (1) The
marking, sorting, and washing, cleaning,
collecting, ironing, assembling, packaging,
pressing, receiving, shipping, or renovating
in any capacity directly concerned with
sale or distribution at retail or wholesale of
any laundry or dry-cleaning service; (2)
the work performed by clerical workers and
telephone operators (not employed directly
by a telephone company) in connection
with the production and furnishing of these
services; (3) the production of laundry,
dry-cleaning or dyeing services on its own
behalf by any establishment, which serv­
ices may be incidental to its principal busi­
ness; (4) the cleaning, pressing, finishing,
refreshing, dyeing, or processing of any
article of wearing apparel, including hats,
household furnishings, rugs, textiles, fur,
leather (including shoes), or any fabrics
whatsoever, when such activity is not per­
formed in the original process of manufac­
ture. Exceptions: Same as those shown for
the Amusement and Recreation orders on
p. 51 and the following additional exceptions:
Minors engaged in vocational education,
work experience or apprentice training pro­
gram, when such program is properly super­
vised by school personnel or in accordance
with written agreements or approved train­
ing schedules.

......... do. 98_.............. .

9
}Women: In general,10 a day,
50 a week, hotels a day,
55 a week; minors under 18,
8 a day, 40 a week.99

(Order C-5 permits deductions
for board and lodging in the
various occupations covered
by the order, as specified.)

See footnotes at end of table.




CJ*
03

■

ANALYSIS OF STATE MINIMUM-WAGE ORDERS EFFECTIVE SINCE 1942 ■—Continued
State, order, and effec­
tive date2

Occupation or industry covered

Women and minors:
If board only is furnished:
In cities of:
3,500 or over_____ ___
1,000 but less than 3,500____
Elsewhere in State.If both board and lodging are fur­
nished:
In cities of:
3,500 or over.......................
1,000 but less than 3,500_____
Elsewhere in State. _
Geographic areas same as those
shown above.

Minimum-wage rates

45 or more a week.
Do.
Do.

Rates same as the hourly rates
of the general order. (See
above.)

Agriculture other than industrialized agricul­
ture.

Special order, 1950 (or­
der issued each sea­
son).

Women and minors:
If board only is furnished. ___ .
If board and lodging are furnished...
If board, lodging, and washing are $6.50 a week.._______
furnished.
All____ ________________

Canning or first processing of fresh fruits or
vegetables.

Women 18 years and over; girls and
boys 16 to 18 years of age.

1 Provisions of flat-rate laws also included.
2 Where only one date is shown the order became mandatory on that date. A “direc­
tory ’ order is nonmandatory for a period during which publicity is the only penalty for
failure to pay the minimum wage.
3 Revision omits the exception as to the area around Nogales. It makes no other change.
4 Maximum hours 8 a day, 48 a week.
fi Employee must be paid at least 4 hours’ wages on any day called to work.
8 Number not to exceed 33J4 percent of women employed in establishment, except that
1 learner is permitted if less than 3 women employed.
7 The basic weekly minimum need not be paid from June 1 through Aug. 31, by estab­
lishments in the counties of Cochise, Gila, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, Pima, Pinal
Santa Cruz, and Yuma; and from Dec. 16 through Mar. 15, by establishments in Apache!
Coconino, Mohave, Navajo, and Yavapai counties.
8 Number not to exceed 10 percent of women and minors employed in establishment,
except that 1 learner is permitted if less than 4 women and minors employed.




Hours

l}4 times employee’s regular
rate.100

Do.
Do.
. Do.
Less than 45 a week.

45 or more a week.
Do.
Do.
Less than 45 a week.
Over 9 to 11 a day or over 54
to 60 a week, whichever is
greater, on 12 emergency
days during the season of
actual canning of a prod­
uct.107

9 The attorney general of Arkansas, in an opinion dated Apr. 17,1947, said that the 1943
amendment to the State’s wage-hour law made the $1.25 and $1 minimum-wage rates
applicable to a day of 8 hours.
10 Women may be employed on 7 days a week if and when an industry engaged in
handling perishable products would suffer an irreparable injury or if the labor commis­
sioner determines that exigency requires such overtime.
u Employee must be paid at least H-day’s wage on any day called to work.
12 Number not to exceed 10 percent of persons regularly employed in the establishment.
Maximum, but adult women exempted during periods when processing is necessary
to prevent perishable products from spoiling. Employee must be paid at least 2 hours’
wages on any day .called to work.
14 Upto 72 hours in any 7 consecutive days permitted by the order but 24 hours must
elapse before a woman who has worked these hours is again employed by the employer.
15 No basic minimum-wage rate set in this order.
i® A full-time employee (one regularly working 36 but not more than 44 hours a week)

ST A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D ER S

No. C-5a, Feb. 10, 1947_ Domestic service in private homes. Excep­
tion: Casual employment of minors under
18 in or around a home in work usual to the
home of the employer and not in connection
with or a part of the business, trade, or profession of the employer, such as caring for
children, mowing lawns, raking leaves, shovel­
ing snow, etc. Order defines casual employ­
ment as employment outside school hours,
for a period of not more than 5 consecutive
hours and not more than 10 hours in a week.

Class of employees covered




2® Employees, other than minor students on days when schools are in^ session, must
be paid at least 4 hours’ wages on any day called to work. New York’s retail order,
in addition to exemption of students, exempts from payment of the minimum daily
wage, stores or businesses having not more than 1 employee in any week.
so The District of Columbia hour law setting 8 hours a day, 48 hours a week as the
maximum a woman 18 years or over may be employed applies to offices of the estab­
lishments or industries covered by the law. Though general offices do not come under
this law, the offices of telegraph or telephone companies are expressly covered.
3i The 40-cent hourly rate, established in the 1945 law, supersedes the following hourly
rates set by ch. 159, session laws of 1943, which became effective July 1, 1943: 30 cents
for the city and countv of Honolulu and 25 cents for the counties of Hawaii, Maui, and
Kauai. The act authorizes the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations to make
regulations providing for payment of a lower hourly rate to learners, apprentices, etc.,
and to children 14 years of age and under.
, ,
.
. ..
a2 A retail trade order of Illinois, directory Aug. 12, 1948, was declared void by the
Circuit Court of Sangamon County, June 7, 1949.
.
33 In the hotel and restaurant order: Zone 1 includes incorporated cities having a pop­
ulation of 60,000 or over; zone 2—incorporated cities having between 15,000 and 60,000
population; zone 3—incorporated cities having between 4,000 and 15,000 population;
zone 4—rest of State. The first 3 of these zones include, in addition to the above, incor­
porated cities and territory any part of which lies within a radius of 5 miles (zone 1)
or 1 mile (zones 2 and 3) of the corporate limits thereof.
In the all-occupations order: Zone 1 includes cities of 20,000 or more population and
contiguous territory within 5 miles thereof; zone 2—cities having between 4,(K)0 and
20,000 population and contiguous territory within 2 miles thereof; zone 3—rest of state.
3* Maximum hours for women and girls in practically all industries 10 a day, 60 a week.
ss Learners may be employed only by special permit from commissioner of industrial
relations who must fix rate for each learner. Maximum learning period 720 hours.
Learners ma v not exceed H of the total number of regular full-time employees. Employer
must obtain learner certificate for worker before he can pay rates lower than those fixed
in order.
se Maximum hours for women and minors are 9 a day, 48 a week. The law covers a
variety of occupations and establishments but specifically exempts women and minors
who are: (1) Employed exclusively as personal secretaries; (2) declared by the com­
missioner to be employed in a supervisory capacity; and (3) professional personnel in
hospitals
Several variations from the maximum hour standards are included in the law. These
are as follows:
.
(1) In manufacturing establishments and hotels, 52 hours a week permitted if employ­
ment is determined by the labor department to be seasonal and the year’s weekly
average does not exceed 48 hours;
#
(2) In public service or other businesses requiring shifts, overtime allowed in extraor­
dinary emergencies, provided the conditions specified in the hours statute are met;
(3) Labor commissioner may permit the employment of: (a) Office workers for more
than 9 hours a day (but not more than 48 hours a week); (b) nonprofessional hospital
employees for more than 9 hours a day, 48 hours a week in an emergency.
37 Employee who reports for duty on any day at the time set by the employer must
be paid at least 3 hours’ wages at the applicable minimum rate, unless employment on
that day is rendered impossible by conditions beyond the employer's control and this
fact is verified by the minimum wage commission. Verification by the commission is
not provided for in the Massachusetts dry-cleaning and laundry orders, or m the Rhode
Island restaurant and hotel restaurant order.
.

Ch

d

5

1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1 , 1 9 5 0

who is required to work longer hours than his or her regularly established schedule must
be paid for any excess hours up to 44 a week at his or her regular rate of pay. If a workweek
of less than 44 hours is voluntary with any such employee the weekly wage may be pro­
rated and a proportionate amount deducted; if such hours are required by employer,
however, employee must be paid the minimum part-time hourly rate or his or her regular
rate, whichever is higher.
, ,
,
,
...
u Employee called to work on any day must be paid at least 4 hours wages at the part­
time rate or his or her regular rate, whichever is higher. In laundries having a workday
of less than 4 hours on Saturday, workers called in on that day must be paid at least 3
hours’wages.
. .
is The overtime provision is not mandatory in the case of bona fide executive, adminis­
trative, and professional employees, as defined. Employer must elect annually whether
he will pay for overtime of employees working on a commission basis, at a minimum wage
of $1 per hour plus commission or the actual overtime rate, including salary and com­
mission, at time and a quarter.
i® Maximum hours for women and minors in mercantile establishments 8 a day (10
allowed 1 day a week), 48 a week. Under certain specified conditions, hours exceeding
these are permitted in the week before Christmas and, if permit is obtained, in cases of
emergency or of seasonal or peak demand.
20 Maximum hours for women and minors in beauty shops and public restaurants, cafes,
dining rooms, 9 a day (10 allowed 1 day a week), 48 a week. Hotels are expressly exempted.
21 Unless a suspension of work due to a breakdown or an act of God occurs, an employee
called to work on any day must be paid at least 4 hours’ wages at the minimum rate or
his or her regular rate, whichever is higher.
22 Number receiving this rate limited to 1 for every 15 workers subject to this order.
22 Maximum hours for women and minors under 18 years of age, 9 a day, 48 a week.
In cases of emergency or seasonal or peak demand commissioner of labor may allow 10
hours a day, 55 hours a week, for 8 weeks in year; the Governor may extend number of
weeks beyond 8 in the interest of national defense.
. .
2* “Nonservice employee” is defined as including but not limited to counter girls and
men, counter waitresses and waiters, and employees serving food or beverage to patrons
seated at tables or booths and who do not customarily receive gratuities. (See second
paragraph following.)
, .
,
_ _ ,
.
“Service employee” is defined as an employee whose duties relate solely to the serving
of food and/or beverages to patrons seated at tables or booths, and to the performance of
duties incidental to such service and who customarily receive gratuities.
_
To be considered as customarily receiving gratuities, a full-time employee must receive
a minimum of $10 a week in gratuities and a part-time employee, $2 a day. This fact
must be evidenced by the signed statement of the employee.
_ ..
_
2s The weekly wage may not be prorated unless the employee: (1) Is hired after the
beginning of the week or his employment is terminated before the end of the week; (2) is
a full-time worker taking voluntary occasional absences; (3) is engaged in diversified
employment and his service and nonservice duties are definitely segregated and recorded,
otherwise the nonservice rate shall be paid for such employment.
26 In Connecticut employee working 5 hours or less on any day must be furnished 1 meal,
if more than 5 hours, 2 meals; in Rhode Island these work shifts are less than 5 hours,
and 5 or more hours, respectively.
27 Employee called to work on any day must be paid at least $2 for that day unless
conditions not controllable by the employer occur and this fact is established to the
satisfaction of the Department of Labor.
.
J8 Weekly wage may not be prorated unless the employee: (1) Takes time oft at her
own request, or (2) begins full-time employment and works only part of a week when
first employed, or (3) resigns after having been a full-time employee.

Oi
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44 If 40 hours work is not available to an employee in any week, a'bonus of 10 percent
must be added to the applicable minimum rate, when employee’s total wage for that
week is less than the amount she would receive for 40 hours.
58 Employees, other than minor students attending school, must be paid at least $2
on any day called to work. Not applicable on days when it is established that employer
has made available to the employee the minimum number of hours of work mutually
agreed upon prior to the commencement of work on that day.
47 Maximum hours 8 a day, 48 a week for females and male minors between 16 and 18
years of age. To make 1 or more short days in week, 10 hours allowed on 1 day and up to
9f
the 4 remaining days, but weekly hours may not exceed 48. In mercantile
establishments, the 8-48-hour maximum does not apply to week before Christmas and 2
weeks m year for inventory.
Hours law expressly exempts from its maximum hour and day-of-rest provisions females
over 16 employed m: (1) Beauty parlors in cities and towns of less than 15,000 popula­
tion; (2) resort or seasonal hotels or restaurants in rural communities and in places of
under 15,000 population.
,,53
fnanda5ory <>rder for retail trade split the population group of under 10,000 in
the directory order, so as to shorten for the small-sized communities the period to which
the overtime rate applies. Rates not changed.
49 Zone I includes the city of New York, the counties of Westchester and Nassau, and
all communities having a population of over 10,000.
Zo7ie 11 pdudes all communities having a population of 10,000 or less except com­
munities of 10,000 or less in Nassau and Westchester counties.
. A laundry located in zone II which does business with an agent who services customers
m zone I or which maintains directly or indirectly a route, office, or drop store in zone I
must be considered in zone I for weeks in which such business is done and must pav the
higher minimum-wage rates of zone I.
60 Full-time employees defined as persons other than maids and cleaning women who
work in the establishment on more than 3 days in any week.
61 Zone I includes the city of New York and all communities having a population of
momthan 50,000 or, if located in Erie, Nassau, or Westchester counties, of more than
Zone II includes the rest of the State.
89 Employee required to report for duty on any day, whether or not assigned to actual
work, must be paid this amount.
83 Employer is not obliged to pay guaranteed weekly wages: (1) To new employees or
employees who voluntarily absent themselves during the period with which the guaran­
tees are concerned; (2) to employee-students 16 to 18 years of age who are required to
attend a full-time school during the period with which the guarantees are concerned,
when work is available to them for such period; (3) to accountants and bookkeepers
employed to work occasionally for the establishment; (4) in case of an act of God, fire,
flood, public disaster, or plant-wide mechanical breakdown.
84 Employee called to work on any day, whether assigned to duty or not, must be
P.aid
the maximum length of the stint she is hired to work (3 hours, if 1 shift; 6 hours
if 2 shifts; 8 hours, if 3 shifts) at the applicable minimum rate. Employee-students
ex«^Ptedvfrom, fhls Provlsi?n on any workday when they are required to attend school.
84 Number of learners paid less than the experienced rates may not exceed 25 percent
of an establishment’s employees.
66 The order provides that “all existing State hour and wage laws applying to women
workersshallappiy to all manufacturing industries and establishments.” A law enacted
m 1943 for the duration of the present war” permits employment of females for 10 hours
a day, 54 hours a week “in emergencies,” if time and a half employee’s regular rate is
paid for hours over 48 a week. An opinion of the State attorney general declares that

Or
05

S T A T E M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S

38 Employee who reports for duty on any day at the time set by the employer must be
paid at least 3 hours’ wages at the applicable minimum rate. In the building-service
occupations order this provision applies only to employees other than those working on
residential property and to those working for more than one employer. The Massa­
chusetts public housekeeping, mercantile, clerical, and building-service orders provide
that if employee is unable or unwilling to accept 3 hours’ employment the minimum
wage commission may grant permission to employer to employ such employee for less
than 3 hours.
Order requires that home workers be employed at the established minimum rates
or the equivalent in piece rates.
40 During peak periods not to exceed 8 weeks in year the minimum wage commission
may grant employer special permit to employ worker 48 hours a week at the weekly
minimum established in this order, provided worker is given compensatory hours for
such employment.
41 Employee must be paid at least 2 hours' wages on any day called to work.
49 Motion-picture theaters and other places of amusement are covered by the State’s
hour law which sets a maximum of 9 hours a day, 48 hours a week for women and minors.
43 Casual employee, one not regularly employed who reports for work as an extra at the
direct request of employer, when such employment depends upon weather conditions,
time, or public response to specific performances. Pin boys and ushers are casual em­
ployees for the purpose of this order.
44 The term “living quarters” shall include a furnished or unfurnished apartmentadequate, decent, sanitary, well-lighted, ventilated, and heated where heat is customarilv
supplied.
45 Employer may not require employee to make a deposit for uniforms or for any other
purpose, except by permission of the minimum wage commission.
48 Class A—Cities of more than 50,000 inhabitants.
Class B—Cities of 20,000 to 50,000 inhabitants.
Class C—Cities, towns, villages, boroughs, and townships of 10,000 to 20,000 inhabitants.
Class D—Cities, towns, villages, boroughs, and townships of less than 10,000 inhabitants.
47 Maximum hours for women and girls in mercantile and several other occupations, 54
a week. In cases of emergency or when industrial commission grants special exemption,
longer hours are permitted.
48 Hour law permits suspension of the hour provisions for regular employees in mer­
cantile establishments during the 7 days before Christmas, if weekly average for year
does not exceed 54 hours.
49 Authorization of labor commissioner required for employment of learners. Number
may not exceed 10 percent of total number of women and minors employed in the estab­
lishment, except that each establishment is dllowed 1 learner. For part-time workers,
the learning period must be computed on a cumulative basis until 1,040 hours have been
worked or at the end of 1 year of part-time employment.
B0 By attorney general ruling, minimum wages for women and minors may continue to
be established by wage order for occupations exempt from the statutory rate as well as
for all (ither occupations covered by the original law. (The latter exempts domestic
service in the home of the employer and labor on a farm.)
41 The New Jersey minimum-wage law expressly exempts hotels from its coverage.
. "Guaranteed weekly wages of $8.50 (service) and $11.50 (nonservice) are established
m the order for workers whose hours total as much as 24 in any week.
43 Maximum hours for women 18 years and over, 10 a day, 54 a week.
44 Zone A includes Bergen, Camden, Essex, Hudson, Mercer, Middlesex, Morris,
Passaic, and Union counties. Zone B includes Atlantic, Burlington, Cape May, Cum­
berland, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem, Somerset, Sussex, and
Warren counties.




83 Maximum for women and minors, 9 a day, 48 a week. If 5-day week is worked, daily
hours may be 9^.
_ .. ,
_
..
..
»4 Nonservice employees are defined as all kitchen and dining-room workers other than
table waiters and waitresses receiving tips, these being classified in the order as “service”
employees.
, .
. _
,
. .
8« The provisions of the 1943 act enacted for a 2-year period were made permanent m
1945.
86 For retail trade:
Class 1—Salt Lake City and Ogden.
Class 2—Logan, Provo, Murray, and Tooele.
Class 3—Bingham, Brigham City, Eureka, Helper, Midvale, Park City, Price, Amer­
ican Fork, Bountiful, Cedar City, Lehi, Payson, Richfield, Smithfield, Spanish Fork,
Springville, St. George.
Class 4—All other towns or municipalities.
For restaurants, classification is same as for retail trade except that Price and Helper
are transferred from class 3 to class 2 cities and Nephi and Vernal are added to the class 3
group. Maximum population for the class 4 group is fixed at 5,000 rather than 2,500.
87 Hours law sets a maximum week of 48 hours for women and 44 hours for minors under
18, permitting overtime in emergencies as specified. The restaurant and public house­
keeping orders require that a H-hour meal period be included as working time.
ss Special permit required for each learner or apprentice employed. Employer must
register learners with industrial commission. Number may not exceed 25 percent of the
women and minor employees having workweek of 40 hours or over.
89 Number may not exceed 1 for every 5 experienced workers.
so Employment of girls under 18 prohibited in this industry. Boys 16 and under 18
may be employed 8 hours a day, 44 hours a week. Persons under 18 may not serve beer
to customers in restaurants.
9i Class 1—Cities of over 10,000 population.
Class 2—Cities of 3,000 and under 10,000 population.
Class 3—Cities of under 3,000 population.
®j Permits must be obtained for the employment of minors under 18 years of age.
93 At least H the women and minors employed at a piecework rate must receive an
average wage based on this rate. All pieceworkers in canneries must receive a guarantee
of 45 cents an hour.
,
9« Experienced pieceworkers must be paid at a rate that will enable at least 75 percent
of them to earn the minimum rate. The other 25 percent must be paid at the prevailing
piecework rate, but in no case shall their earnings be less than 30 cents an hour.
65 Number may not exceed 25 percent of tbe total number of women employed except
by permit in emergencies.
.
.. ,
®8 Hour laws for women and for minors set an 8-hour maximum, and this applies to
office workers in the industries and establishments covered by these laws: Mechanical
or mercantile establishments, laundries, hotels, and restaurants by the women’s law and
all industrial employment by the minors’ law. Women employed in general offices
would not, however, come under this 8-hour standard.
.
The wage order specifies that “the hours of employment of women and minors as office
workers shall be subject to any applicable statutes of the State.”
®7 For this industry, Washington issued 2 orders: 1 for theatrical amusement and rec­
reation and the other for general amusement and recreation. Except for the variance m
the definitions of coverage, the provisions of both orders are identical.
98 Piece rates on a particular kind of work are deemed adequate if they yield to 75 per­
cent of the women and minors, 3 cents per hour more than the prescribed minimum.
99 Maximum hours; however, under the 9-50-hour law women may be employed 10

5
1 9 4 2 —JU L Y 1, 1 9 5 0

this law will continue in full force and effect, until the President or the Congress officially
declares that the war is ended.
.
_
a This revision of the order applying to minors, effective the same day order No. 9 in
Bull. 191 became effective, omitted the minimum-wage provision. A letter from the
State’s enforcing agency explained that this was done because “wages for women and
minors are provided for in the several industrial orders.”
» Pieceworkers must be paid a rate which will enable at least 50 percent of such workers
to earn not less than the minimum.
.
.
w Permit must be obtained before employer may hire workers at the inexperienced
rate. The Rhode Island retail trade order also requires a certificate for any student
under 18 employed in retail trade.
io Maximum hours for women and girls, 10 a day, 48 a week.
n Employee must be paid at least 3 hours’ wages at the applicable minimum rate on any
day called to work if she reports for duty at the beginning of a work shift.
12 Order 2, promulgated in February 1943, covered the sugar industry but the Supreme
Court of Puerto Rico declared it void and unconstitutional. Order 3 was accordingly
adopted.
. t
Order 10 covering the dairy industry was also declared void by the territorial supreme
court.
.
,
.
,
’3 This minimum has been in effect since Mar. 1, 1945. An escalator clause m the order
set minimum hourly rates of 20 cents, 22H cents, and 24 cents, respectively, for periods
beginning Mar. 26, 1943, Apr. 16, 1943, and Mar. 1, 1944.
74 The 1949 amendment to the women’s employment law of Puerto Rico removed the
limitation on women’s hours of work. The amendment provides, however, that if
employee is not covered by the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act, double the regular
rate must be paid for hours over 8 and up to 12 a day and for hours over 48 and up to 72
a week. If covered by the Federal Act, 1H times the regular rate must be paid for hours
over 8 and up to 12 a day or over 40 and up to 60 a week. Three times the regular rate
must be paid to (1) all women, for hours worked in excess of 12 a day; (2) those not covered
by the Act, for hours over 72 a week; (3) those covered by the Act, hours over 60 a wee*.
7! The order establishes specific rates for numerous occupations in which women are not
customarily employed.
.
,
,
_ .
. .
Rates as amended in 1944. The 1943 order contained escalator clauses fixing minimums of from $30 a month to $40 a month for permanent employees in the periods specified
and from $1.25 a day to $1.60 a day for temporary employees during these same periods.
77 Zone I—Aguadilla, Arecibo, Bayamon, Caguas, Guayama, Mayaguez, Ponce, Rio
Piedras (including Hato Rey) and San Juan.
Zone II—All other places.
78 Zone I—San Juan and Rio Piedras.
Zone II—All other places.
,
7« Employee who works 4 hours or less a day during more than 1 performance of a show
or movie is entitled to pay for 4 hours’ work at the applicable minimum rate. Employee
who works 3 hours or less during only 1 performance of a show or movie is entitled to pay
for 3 hours’ work at the minimum rate for that particular zone.
80 Zone I—San Juan and Rio Piedras.
Zone II—Aguadilla, Arecibo, Bayamon, Caguas, Fajardo, Guayama, Humacao,
Mayagflez, and Ponce.
Zone III—All other places.
si Employee must be paid at least 4 hours’ wages on any day called to work, under con­
ditions specified in the order.
. _ .
, .
87 No reduction may be made in wage because of summer or seasonal schedules of store,
or in week in which a holiday occurs.

Ox

hours a day, 55 hours a week, during emergency periods not exceeding 4 weeks a year, if
tune and a half employee’s regular rate is paid. Industrial commission must be notified
of such overtime within 24 hours.
Attendants in sanitariums required to be on duty for more than 55 hours a week must
be paid, as a minimum, for 55 hours a week.
ioo No basic minimum-wage rate set in this order. The State's order for any occupation,
trade, or industry sets 3 rates: 45 cents in cities of 3,500 population or over: 40 cents in
cities of 1,000 up to 3,500; and 38 cents elsewhere in the State.

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© TA TE M IN IM U M -W A G E L A W S A N D O R D E R S




101 During the canning season, maximum hours for women and minors are 9 a day
54 a week, except on 12 emeregency days in the season of actual canning of a product
when women and minors 16 to 18 years of age may be employed 11 hours a day, 60 hours
a week. In addition, hour limits and overtime pay may be waived for boys 17 years of
age m 10 weeks during canning season under conditions specified in the order. Before
and after the canning season, maximum hours are 9 a day, 50 a week, for women 18 years
and over; 8 a day, 48 a week for boys and girls of 17 years; and 8 a day, 40 a week for boys
and girls of 16 except that during school vacations they may work 48 hours a week

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS
Digests of amendments becoming effective between July 1942 and July 1950*
*Cf “Analysis of State Minimum-Wage Laws,” Women’s Bureau Bull. 191, folders following p. 52.

California:

Requires the Division of Industrial Welfare to
Session laws 1943, ch. 425
determine, upon request, whether wages
(Adds subsection 1195.5 to
Deering’s Labor Code
exceeding the minimum fixed by the Com­
mission have been correctly computed and
1937.)
paid. Authorizes the Division to examine
Effective Aug. 4, 1943.
employer’s documents relative to employ­
ment of women and minors and to enforce
payment of any sums found to be due and
unpaid.
Provides that no wage order shall be effec­
Session laws 1947, ch. 1188
(Amends Statutes 1913, ch. 324 tive unless compliance is had with the pro­
as amended.)
visions governing the appointment and
operation of wage boards; specifically pro­
Effective Sept. 19, 1947.
vides that Commission may revise a wage
order upon following the procedure estab­
lished for issuance of original order; in­
creases payment of wage board members
to $15 per diem (formerly $5) and neces­
sary travel expenses while engaged in a
conference.
.
Hawaii:

Session laws 1943, Act 159
(Amends session laws 1941,
Act 66.)
Section on rates effective July
I,1943; rest of Act, May
II, 1943.




Amends the wage and hour law to raise the
minimum wage in the city and county of
Honolulu from 25 cents to 30 cents an
hour, and in the counties of Hawaii, Maui,
and Kauai from 20 cents to 25 cents an
hour.
.
Excludes from coverage of the act members
of a religious order or individuals donating
their services to any hospital, religious,
fraternal, or charitable organization.
Empowers the director or his representative
to obtain restitution whenever illegal de­
ductions from an employee’s wages are
discovered in the course of a wage and
hour inspection; provides that, if such
restitution is made, a prosecution may not
be instituted or maintained.
69

60

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS

Hawaii-—Continued

Session laws 1945, Act 15_____
(Amends session laws of 1941
and 1943.)
Effective July 1, 1945.

Session laws 1949, Act 292-----(Amends session laws 1945,
Act 15.)
Effective July 1, 1949.

Raises the minimum wage to 40 cents an
hour for workweek of 48 hours or less,
but provides that the labor department
may, by regulation, establish a lower rate
for children 14 years of age and under;
continues the provision requiring time and
one-lialf employee’s regular rate for work
in excess of 48 hours a week; removes
geographic differential; tightens enforce­
ment provisions. Amends coverage (1)
to provide that agricultural employees
shall be excluded only in weeks when the
employer has less than 20 employees; (2)
to broaden the exemption for workers en­
gaged in the processing or distribution of
the various aquatic forms of.animal or
vegetable life; and (3) to remove the ex­
emption for employees of street, suburban,
or interurban electric railways or local
trolleys or motor bus carriers.
Amends the definition of “employee” to
exempt additional categories of workers.
Deletes the exemption added in 1943 for re­
ligious orders and charitable organizations.

Massachusetts:

Session laws 1946, eh. 545-----(Amends General Laws 1932,
ch. 151, as amended.)
Effective Sept. 11, 1946.

Session laws 1948, ch. 362-------(Amends General Laws 1932,
ch. 151, sec. 2, as amended.)
Effective May 24, 1948.

Session laws 1949, ch. 777------(Amends General Laws 1932,
ch. 151, secs. 1 and 19
(2), as amended.)
Effective Jan. 1, 1950.




Extends coverage of the minimum-wage law
to all persons employed in the occupations
covered thereby, regardless of age or sex,
in the same manner and to the same ex­
tent as if such persons had been expressly
included; provides that existing orders and
regulations shall be similarly applicable.
Amends definition of “occupation” specifi­
cally to include industries or businesses
not operated for profit, but excluding, in
addition to domestic service in the home
of the employer and labor on a farm, work
by persons being rehabilitated or trained
under rehabilitation or training programs
in charitable, educational, or religious in­
stitutions, or work by members of religious
orders.
Amends the minimum-wage law to provide
that a minimum wage of less than 65
cents per hour “shall be conclusively
presumed to be oppressive and unreason­
able” unless the Minimum Wage Com­
mission has expressly approved the es­
tablishment and payment of a lesser wage
through issuance of a wage order as pro­
vided in the act. Amends the penalty
section to provide for fine or imprisonment
or both for payment of less than the rates
applicable under a wage order or less than
65 cents per hour.

JULY 1, 1942—JULY 1, 1950

61

Massachusetts—Continued

Extends from 1 to 2 years after the entry
Session laws 1950, ch. 349
date of the record, the period during
(Amends General Laws 1932,
which employer is required to keep on
ch. 151, sec. 15 as amend­
file a record of the wages paid and the
ed and adds sec. 20 A.)
time worked of each employee. Provides
Effective July 16, 1950.
that the penalty and the wage collection
provisions of the minimum-wage law shall
not be applicable to any violation of
any wage order occurring more than 2
years prior to the date of filing of a
criminal or civil action.
Nevada:

Increases the minimum wage from $3 to $4
Session laws 1945, ch. 166
per day of 8 hours and from $18 to $24 per
(Amends sec. 2825.41 of the
week of 48 hours; establishes a 50-cent
1941 Supplement to the
hourly minimum; grants employee the
Nevada Compiled Laws
right to recover unpaid wages in a civil
of 1929.)
action within a 2-year period; expressly
Effective Mar. 22, 1945.
provides that any agreement to accept a
wage less than the minimum shall be
invalid.
New Hampshire:

Session laws 1949, ch. 310____
(Adds secs. 25-29 to ch. 213,
Revised Laws 1942.)
Effective July 28, 1949.




Amends the minimum-wage law to establish
a minimum wage of 50 cents per hour
for any experienced employee and 35 cents
for inexperienced employees (on permit);
excludes from coverage of the statutory
wage, employees engaged in household,
domestic, or farm labor; outside salesmen;
summer camps for minors; restaurants,
hotels, inns, or cabins; directs the Com­
missioner of Labor to readjust the mini­
mum wage rates established in the several
orders now in effect for women and
minors, as may be necessary, in view of the
foregoing provisions; exempts employees
covered by the Federal Fair Labor
Standards Act; provides for collection of
unpaid wages and an equal additional
amount as liquidated damages.
The New Hampshire Attorney General, in
an opinion dated Sept. 9, 1949, ruled that:
(1) The statutory rate applies to men as
well as to women and minors; (2) wage
orders may be issued covering women and
minors in occupations excluded from the
statutory rate and all other occupations
covered by original law (i. e., all occupa­
tions except domestic service in the home
of the employer and labor on a farm);
and (3) the minimum wage established by
a wage order may not be less than the
statutory rate.

62

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS

New York:

Session laws 1944, ch. 792
Adds a new section (663-a) to prohibit the
(Amends ch. 32 of the 1931­
employment of a male 21 years of age or
35 Cumulative Supple­
over in an occupation at lower standards
ment to Consolidated
or rates of wages than those fixed for
Laws of 1930, ch. 584,
women and minors in such occupation
art. 19.)
under a directory or mandatory minimumEffective July 1, 1944.
wage order. Provides that sections re­
lating to publication of names, court re­
view, record keeping and the posting of
orders, wage collection, and penalties,
respectively, shall be applicable in case of
an employer’s failure to comply with the
provisions of this amendment or with any
wage order.
Session laws 1946, ch. 972
Adds subsection 9 to section 656 to require
(Amends as above.)
that the wage board hold public hearings
Effective Apr. 23, 1946.
during investigation, prior to its report and
recommendations, and that the testimony
at such hearings be submitted to the Com­
missioner together with the board’s report.
Extends the time limit for submission of
such report to the Commissioner from the
previous 60-day period to 90 days, and
provides that the Commissioner in his
discretion may extend the time to 180
days; requires wage board to submit a
record of its activities with its report.
Amends the provisions governing action
on the wage board report to require that
Commissioner hold public hearings, notice
of which shall be given to all interested
parties, and permitting him to reject the
wage board’s report or to accept it in
whole or in part.
Session laws 1947, ch. 221.
Deletes word “directory” from text and re­
(Amends as above.)
peals provisions relating to directory
Effective Mar. 20, 1947.
orders; provides that orders shall be made
by the Commissioner as mandatory orders,
to be effective within 60 days from date
of making.
Session laws 1948, ch. 353
Requires Commissioner to file report of wage
(Amends as above.)
board and recommendations with the Sec­
Effective July 1, 1948.
retary of the Department of Labor. Ex­
tends the time limit for action by the
Commissioner in accepting or rejecting
the report from previous 10-day period to
30-day period; deletes phrase “mandatory
or directory wage order” and substitutes
phrase "minimum-wage order.”




JULY 1, 1942—JULY 1, 1950

63

New York—Continued

Session laws 1950, ch. 421
(Amends as above.)
Effective July 1, 1950.
Puerto Rico:

Clarifies the wage board section of the mini­
mum-wage law and provides that a wage
board shall continue in existence for 2
years after its formation, unless sooner
dissolved by the Commissioner.

Acts of 1942, Act 9---------------- Amends the minimum-wage lav to stipulate
that the Minimum Wage Board may clas­
(Amends sec. 12, Act 8 of
sify any occupation, business, or industry
1941.)
according to the nature of the services to
Effective Mar. 20, 1942.
be rendered, and approve minimum-wage
scales suitable for different kinds of work,
for the purpose of fixing for each classifi­
cation the highest rate of minimum wage.
Provides that the board may also approve
minimum wages for different zones or dis­
tricts, where advisable, due to differing
conditions, if such action does not give
competitive advantage to other zones or
districts.
Acts of 1942, Act 44------------- Adds a section to the minimum-wage law to
provide that the Governor of Puerto Rico
(Adds sec. 10-A to Act 8 of
may, by proclamation, require the Mini­
1941.)
mum Wage Board to appoint a minimumEffective Apr. 23, 1942.
wage committee to investigate the condi­
tions in a certain occupation, business, or
industry where a strike, lock-out, emer­
gency, or controversy in regard to wages
exists, or has existed within the 6 months
preceding the proclamation, and to fix the
minimum wage that shall be paid in the
industry in question. Provides that wages
so fixed shall be retroactive to the date on
which laborers returned or may return to
work.
Provides that, in ease the committee fails to
submit its report within 15 days or within
the extension of time granted by the board,
or does not come to an agreement, the
board may dissolve the committee and
either appoint another or make the in­
vestigation itself. Once the report is
rendered, a mandatory wage order must be
issued under prescribed procedure.
Acts of 1945, Act 217................ Provides for a membership of 3 instead of 9
on the Minimum Wage Board; revises
(Amends sections of Act 8 of
procedural provisions and authorizes in­
1941.)
vestigation of several industries simultane­
Effective May 11, 1945.
ously.




64

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS

Puerto Rico—Continued

Acts of 1947, Act 451................. Transfers administration and enforcement of
(Amends Act 8 of 1941 as
wage orders issued under the Minimum
amended.)
Wage Act from the Minimum Wage
Effective May 14, 1947.
Board to the Commissioner of Labor;
modifies the procedure for issuing wage
orders by eliminating provisions for mini­
mum wage committees and providing
instead for appointment by the chairman
of the Minimum Wage Board of an equal
number of representatives of labor and
management as special members of the
Minimum Wage Board for the industry or
occupation for which issuance of a wage
order is being considered; provides for op­
portunity for hearing of interested parties
followed by issuance of mandatory order.
Acts of 1948, Act 48
Strengthens various provisions of the Act so
(Amends Act 8 of 1941 as
as to speed up the procedure for the prep­
amended.)
aration and promulgation of mandatory de­
Effective June 10, 1948.
crees. Enhances the investigating powers
of the Board and the authority of the Com­
missioner of Labor to enforce the Board’s
wage orders.
Session laws 1949, Act 169
Amends law to give the Commissioner of
(Amends Act 8 of 1941 as
Labor authority to issue summonses to
amended.)
compel the appearance of witnesses and
Effective May 4, 1949.
the production of evidence, documentary
or otherwise, which the Commissioner
may deem necessary.

Rhode Island:

Session laws 1945, ch. 1624___
(Amends ch. 289, General
Laws 1938, as amended.)
Effective July 1, 1945.

Adds a new section (16-A) to prohibit the
employment of a male 21 years of age or
over in an occupation at lower standards
or rates of wages than those fixed for
women and minors in such occupation
under a directory or a mandatory mini­
mum-wage order; provides that sections
providing for court review, record-keeping,
penalties, and wage collection, respec­
tively, shall be applicable in case of an
employer’s failure to comply with the
provisions of this amendment or with any
wage order.
Session laws 1950, ch. 2624____ Amends the minimum-wage law to author­
(Amends ch. 289, General
ize the Director of Labor or the Commis­
Law's 1938, as amended.)
sioner of Minimum Wages to bring actions
Effective Apr. 26, 1950.
in court for violations of the minimumwage law.




JULY 1, 194 2—JULY 1, 1950

65

South Dakota:

Session laws, 1943, ch. 76
(Amends sec. 17.0607, Code
1939.)
Effective July 1, 1943.
Session laws 1945, ch. 77
(Amends sec. 17.0607, Code
1939, as amended.)
Effective Eeb. 17, 1945.

Increases the minimum wage for experienced
women and girls in cities of 2,500 popula­
tion or over from $12 per week to $15
per week. Effective “until the end of the
next regular session of the legislature.”
Makes permanent the 1943 increase in
minimum-wage rates, for women and girls
in cities of 2,500 population or over.

Washington:

Session laws 1943, ch. 192
Amends the procedural requirements for
(Amends sec. 7631, Reming­
revision of minimum-wage orders to
ton’s Revised Statutes
eliminate the provision that a conference
1931.)
be called; provides instead that the In­
Effective June 9, 1943.
dustrial Welfare Committee upon holding
a public hearing may on its own motion
amend the original order on the basis of
evidence adduced at the hearing.
Session laws 1949, ch. 195
Amends the section of the minimum-wage
(Amends sec. 7633, Reming­
law pertaining to fixing of minimum
ton’s Revised Statutes
wages for minors to authorize the Indus­
1931.)
trial Welfare Committee to issue permits
Effective June 9, 1949.
for the employment of minors; exempts
from the Committee’s obligatory orders,
minors employed in agricultural labor, as
defined in the Unemployment Compensation
Law; domestic work performed in private
homes J chores in or about private resi­
dences; newspaper vendors and newspaper
carriers.




CURRENT PUBLICATIONS OF THE WOMEN’S BUREAU
FACTS ON WOMEN WORKERS—issued monthly. 4 pages. (Latest statistics
on employment of women; earnings; labor laws affecting women; news items of
interest to women workers; women in the international scene.)
1950 HANDBOOK OF FACTS ON WOMEN WORKERS.

Bull. 237.

(In

press.)
THE AMERICAN WOMAN—Her Changing Role as Worker, Homemaker,

Citizen.

(Women’s Bureau Conference, 1948.)

Bull. 224.

210 pp.

1948.

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK AND TRAINING FOR WOMEN

The Outlook for Women in Occupations in the Medical and Other Health Services.
Bull. 203:
1. Physical Therapists. 14 pp. 1945. 100.
2. Occupational Therapists. 15 pp. 1945. 100.
3. Professional Nurses. 66 pp. 1946. 150.
4. Medical Laboratory Technicians. 10 pp. 1945. 100.
5. Practical Nurses and Hospital Attendants. 20 pp. 1945. 100.
6. Medical Record Librarians. 9 pp. 1945. 100.
7. Women Physicians. 28 pp. 1945. 100.
8. X-Ray Technicians. 14 pp. 1945. 100.
9. Women Dentists. 21 pp. 1945. 100.
10. Dental Hygienists. 17 pp. 1945. 100.
11. Physicians’ and Dentists’ Assistants. 15‘pp. 1945. 100.
12. Trends and Their Effect Upon the Demand for Women Workers. 55 pp.
1946. 150.
The Outlook for Women in Science, Bull. 223:
1. Science. [General introduction to the series.] 81 pp. 1949. 200.
2. Chemistry. 65 pp. 1948. 200.
3. Biological Sciences. 87 pp. 1948. 250.
4. Mathematics and Statistics. 21 pp. 1948. 100.
5. Architecture and Engineering. 88 pp. 1948. 250.
6. Physics and Astronomy. 32 pp. 1948. 150.
7. Geology, Geography, and Meteorology. 52 pp. 1948. 150.
8. Occupations Related to Science. 33 pp. 1948. 150.
The Outlook for Women in Police Work. Bull. 231. 31 pp. 1949. 150.
Home Economics Occupations Series. Bull. 234. The Outlook for Women in:
1. Dietetics. 80 pp. 1950. 250. (Others in preparation.)
Social Work Series, Bull. 235. The Outlook for Women in:
1. Social Case Work in a Medical Setting. 59 pp. 1950. 250.
2. Social Case Work in a Psychiatric Setting. (In press. Others in prepara­
tion.)
Your Job Future After College. Leaflet. 1947. (Rev. 1948.)
Your Job Future After High School. Leaflet. 1949.
Occupations for Girls and Women—Selected References. Bull. 229. 105 pp.
1949. 300.
Training for Jobs—for Women and Girls. [Under public funds available for
vocational training purposes.] Leaflet 1. 1947.
EARNINGS

Earnings of Women in Selected Manufacturing Industries.
14 pp. 1948. 100.
66




1946.

Bull. 219.

67

JULY 1, 194 2—JULY 1, 1950

LABOR LAWS

Summary of State Labor Laws for Women. 8 pp. 1950. Mimeo.
State Legislation of Special Interest to Women. Mimeos for 1948 and 1949.
Minimum Wage

.

.

State Minimum-Wage Laws and Orders, 1942; An Analysis. Bull. 191.
52 pp. 1942. 200. Supplement, July 1, 1942—July 1, 1950. Bull. 227,
(.Revised.) (Instant publication.)
State Minimum-Wage Laws. Leaflet 1. 1948.
Model Bill for State minimum-wage law for women. Mimeo.
Map showing States having minimum-wage laws. (Desk size; wall size.)
State Minimum-Wage Orders Becoming Effective Since End of World War
II. 1950. Multilith.

Equal Pay

Equal Pay for Women. Leaflet 2. 1947. (Rev. 1949.)
Chart analyzing State equal-pay law's and Model Bill. Mimeo.
Texts of State laws (separates). Mimeo. '
Model Bill for State equal-pay law. Mimeo.
Selected References on Equal Pay for Women. 10 pp. 1949. Mimeo.
Movement for Equal-Pay Legislation in the United States. 5 pp. 1949.
Multilith.
Hours of Work and Other Labor Laws

State Labor Laws for Women, with Wartime Modifications, Dec. 15, 1944,
Bull. 202:
I. Analysis of Hour Laws. 110 pp. 1945. 150.
II. Analysis of Plant Facilities Laws. 43 pp. 1945. 100.
III. Analysis of Regulatory Laws, Prohibitory Laws, Maternity Laws.
12 pp. 1945.

50.

IY. Analysis of Industrial Ilome-Work Laws. 26 pp. 1945. 100.
V. Explanation and Appraisal. 66 pp. 1946. 150.
Working Women and Unemployment Insurance. Leaflet. 1949.
Maps of United States showing State hour law's, daily and weekly. (Desk
size; wall size.)
LEGAL STATUS OF WOMEN

International Documents on the Status of Women. Bull. 217. 116 pp. 1947.
250.
Legal Status of Women in the United States of America, January 1, 1948:
United States Summary. Bull. 157. (Revised.) (In preparation.)
Reports for States, Territories, and Possessions (separates). Bulls. 157-1
through 157-54. (Revised.) 50 and 100 each.
The Political and Civil Status of Women in the United States of America. Sum­
mary, including Principal Sex Distinctions, as of January 1, 1948. Leaflet 1948.
Women’s Eligibility for Jury Duty. Leaflet. July 1, 1950.
Reply of United States Government to Questionnaire of United Nations Economic
and Social Council on the Legal Status and Treatment of Women. Part I.
Public Law. In six Sections: A and B, Franchise and Public Office; C, Public
Services and Functions; D, Educational and Professional Opportunities; E,
Fiscal Laws; F, Civil Liberties; and G, Nationality. Mimeo.
HOUSEHOLD EMPLOYMENT

Old-Age Insurance for Household Workers. Bull. 220. 20 pp. 1947. 100.
Community Household Employment Programs. Bull. 221. 70 pp. 1948. 200.
COST OF LIVING BUDGETS

Working Women’s Budgets in Twelve States.




Bull. 226. 36 pp.

1948.

150.

68

STATE MINIMUM-WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS

RECOMMENDED STANDARDS for women’s working conditions, safety, and
health.

Standards of Employment for Women. Leaflet. 1950. 50.
When You Hire Women. Sp. Bull. 14. 16 pp. 1944. 100.
The Industrial Nurse and the Woman Worker. Bull. 228. (Partial revision of
Sp. Bull. 19. 1944.) 48 pp. 1949. 150.
Women’s Effective War Work Requires Good Posture. Sp. Bull. 10. 6 pp.
1943. 50.
Washing and Toilet Facilities for Women in Industry. Sp. Bull. 4. 11 pp.
1942. 50.
Lifting and Carrying Weights by Women in Industry. Sp. Bull. 2. (Rev. 1946.)
12 pp. 50.
Safety Clothing for Women in Industry. Sp. Bull. 3. 11 pp. 1941. 100.
Supplements: Safety Caps; Safety Shoes. 4 pp. each. 1944. 50 each.
Poster—Work Clothes for Safety and Efficiency.
WOMEN UNDER UNION CONTRACTS

Maternity-Benefits Under Union-Contract Health Insurance Plans.
19 pp. 1947. 100.

Bull. 214.

EMPLOYMENT

Women’s Occupations Through Seven Decades. Bull. 218. 260 pp. 1947. 450.
Popular version, Women’s Jobs: Advance and Growth. Bull. 232. 88 pp.
1949. 300.
Employment of Women in the Early Postwar Period, with Background of Prewar
and War Data. Bull. 211. 14 pp. 1946. 100.
Women Workers in Ten War Production Areas and Their Postwar Employment
Plans. Bull. 209. 56 pp. 1946. 150.
Women in Higher-Level Positions. Bull. 236. 86 pp. 1950. 250.
Baltimore Women War Workers in the Postwar Period. 61 pp. 1948. Mimeo.
INDUSTRY

Women Workers in Power Laundries. Bull. 215. 71 pp. 1947. 200.
The Woman Telephone Worker [1944]. Bull. 207. 28 pp. 1946. 100.
Typical Women’s Jobs in the Telephone Industry [1944], Bull. 207-A. 52 pp.
1947. 150.
Women in the Federal Service. Part I. Trends in Employment, 1923-1947.
Bull. 230-1. 81 pp. 1949. 250. Part II. Occupational Information. Bull.
230-11. 87 pp. 1950. 250.
Night Work for Women in Hotels and Restaurants. Bull. 233. 59 pp. 1949.
200.

WOMEN IN LATIN AMERICA

Women Workers in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. Bull. 195. 15 pp. 1942.
50.
Women Workers in Brazil. Bull. 206. 42 pp. 1946. 100.
Women Workers in Paraguay. Bull. 210. 16 pp. 1946. 100.
Women Workers in Peru. Bull. 213. 41 pp. 1947. 100.
Social and Labor Problems of Peru and Uruguay. 1944. Mimeo.
Women in Latin America: Legal Rights and Restrictions. (Address before the
National Association of Women Lawyers.)
THE WOMEN’S BUREAU—Its Purpose and Functions.

Leaflet.

1950.

For complete list of publications available for distribution, write—




The Women’s Bureau

U. S. Department of Labor
Washington 25, D. C.

o