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U . S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES }
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS) * # #
SAFETY

CODE

• No. 447

SERIES

SAFETY CODE
FOR RUBBER MILLS AND
CALENDERS
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INDUSTRIAL
ACCIDENT BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS AND THE
NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL, RUBBER SECTION




SPONSORS

RECOMMENDED AMERICAN PRACTICE
Approved March, 1927
American Engineering Standards Committee

JUNE, 1927

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON
1927




ADDITIONAL COPIES
OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM
THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON, D. C.
AT

5 CENTS PER COPY

COMMITTEE WHICH DEVELOPED THE SAFETY CODE FOR RUBBER
MACHINERY
J o h n E . C ongdon ,

Name

Chairman.

E rn est W . B ec k ,

Affiliation

Secretary.
Representing-

Ernest W. Beck, supervisor of United States Rubber Co., 1790 Broad­ American Society of Safe­
safety.
way, New York, N. Y.
ty Engineers and Na­
tional Safety Council,
rubber section.
Raymond H. Blanchard, engineer. Hood Rubber Co., Watertown, Mass... National Safety Council,
rubber section.
Daniel C. Butts.......... ................ International Association of Machinists, U. S. Department of
room 619, St. Denis Building, Eleventh
Labor.
Street and Broadway, New York,
N. Y.
Dr. Lucian W. Chaney..
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, International Association
D. C.
of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commis­
sions.
John E. Congdon, supervising en­ United States Rubber Co., New Haven, National Safety Council,
gineer, general division.
rubber section.
Conn.
H. A. Cozzens, jr., mechanical American Hard Rubber Co., 11 Mercer
Do.
engineer.
Street, New York, N. Y.
Ezra D. Davidson, sales engineer.. Farrel Foundry & Machine Co., An- American Society of Me­
chanical Engineers.
sonia, Conn.
Harry A. Dodge, electrical engi­ United States Rubber Co., New Haven, National Safety Council,
rubber section.
neer.
Conn.
C. W. Drake, general engineer___ Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Electrical Manufactur­
Co., East Pittsburgh, Pa.
ers’ Council.
American Mutual Alliance Co., 730 Fifth National Association of
John M. Eaton, secretary..
Mutual Casualty Com­
Avenue, New York, N. Y.
panies.
W. T. Edgell................................ General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. Electrical Manufactur­
ers’ Council.
Do.
E. T. Foote................................ . Cutler-Hammer Manufacturing Co., Mil­
waukee, Wis.
W. A. Gordon, engineer of design.. Birmingham Iron Foundry, Derby, Conn. B i r mi n g h a m Iron
Foundry.
Harry H. Qraef, manager employ­ Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Akron, Department of Labor,
State of Ohio.
ees’ service division.
Ohio.
Arthur Halstead, electrical engi­ Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. Bureau of Standards.
neer (alternate for P. L. Wormeley)......................................... .
A. E. Hoener, assistant superin­ Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., Akron, National Safety Council,
rubber section.
tendent of engineering.
Ohio.
Robert E. Lee.............................. ___do.................................................. International Associa­
tion of Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Com­
missions.
Do.
Rowland H. Leveridge, chief, bu­ New Jersey Department of Labor, Tren­
ton, N. J.
reau of electrical and mechanical
equipment.
Harold T. Martin, manager health The Fisk Rubber Co., Chicopee Falls, Rubber Association of
America.
and safety department.
Mass.
F. H. Oberschmidt....................... Cutler-Hammer Manufacturing Co., Electrical Manufactur­
ers’ Council.
Milwaukee, Wis.
Stewart, J. Owen, jr..................... Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. Bureau of Standards.
Walter S. Paine, research engineer.. Aetna Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn__ National Bureau of Cas
ualty and Surety Un­
derwriters.
Alfred Peabody, business repre­ International Association of Machinists, U. S. Department of
room 619, St. Denis Building, Eleventh
sentative.
Labor.
Street and Broadway, New York, N. Y.
E. W. Pilgrim.............................. General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. Electrical Manufactur­
ers’ Council.
F. W. Sehl, engineer (alternate for Aetna Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn_ National Bureau of Cas­
_
Walter S. Paine).
ualty and Surety Un­
derwriters.
Leroy Sweetser............................ State Department of Labor and Industry, Association of Govern­
Boston, Mass.
ment Labor Officials.
Joseph W. Thropp, secretary-treas- William R. Thropp &Sons Co., Trenton, William R. Thropp &
urer.
N. J.
Sons Co.
L. A. Vaughn, vice president and Vaughn Machinery Co., Cuyahoga Falls, Vaughn Machinery Co.
general manager.
Ohio.
P. L. Wormeley............................ Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. Bureau of Standards.




ni




CONTENTS
Page

Introduction________________________________________________________
Scope_______
______________________________________ ; ____________
_
Interpretations and exceptions_______________________________________
Definitions_________________________________________________________
P art 1.—New and existing installations______________________________
General____________________________________________ ___________
Safety-trip controls and qnick-stop facilities______________________ _
Determination of distance of travel-_______________ _____________
Stopping limits—
Individually driven mills_____________________________________
Mills driven in groups_______________________________________
Individually and group driven calenders______________________

1
1
1, 2
2
2-9
3
3-S

r
>

0, 7
7, 8
8.9

Operating rules_______________________________________________________

10

P art 2.—Discussion_________________________________________________

10




v




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
.

WASHINGTON

n o 447

,

j u n e 1927

SAFETY CODE FOR RUBBER MILLS AND CALENDERS
INTRODUCTION
The mechanical hazards involved in the rubber industry are of
such a character that the American Engineering Standards Com­
mittee has recognized the necessity of standardized practice in the
safeguarding and the quick stopping of all machines used in breaking
down, washing, milling, cutting, molding, and vulcanizing of rubber,
together with calenders, spreaders, coaters, and dryers, and similar
machinery used in the manufacture of rubber goods.
One purpose of this code is to serve as a guide to State or other
supervising authorities. It is also intended for use directly by the
concerns operating machines of this or a similar character and may
be adopted by any manufacturing concern as a standard to be fol­
lowed by its superintendents, foremen, designers, mechanics, and
operators. It is also intended for use by machinery concerns manu­
facturing rubber-working machinery.
SCOPE
The entire code shall cover the mechanical hazards encountered in
the manufacture of rubberized fabrics, rubber tires, fire and garden
hose, footwear, molded rubber goods, rubber belting, reclaimed
rubber, rubber solution and products made therefrom, and miscel­
laneous rubber materials; shall cover the machines used in breaking
down, washing, milling, cutting, molding, and vulcanizing of rub­
ber, together with calenders, spreaders, coaters, and dryers, and
other machinery used in the manufacture of rubber sheeting; special
machines used in the manufacture of rubber tires included, but
spinning and weaving fabrics excluded.
On account of the broad field to be covered, it was decided by the
sectional committee to consider in this preliminary issue the safe­
guarding of mills and calenders at the point of operation, and this
is the limited work that is dealt with in the following rules.
INTERPRETATIONS AND EXCEPTIONS
The purpose of this code is to provide reasonable safety for life,
limb, and health. In cases of practical difficulty or unnecessary hard­
ship, the enforcing officers or body may grant exceptions from the
literal requirements of this code, or permit the use of other devices
or methods, but only when it is clearly evident the equivalent pro­
tection is thereby secured.
1



2

SAFETY CODE FOR RUBBER MILLS AND CALENDERS

Laboratory equipment varies so much from manufacturing equip­
ment in size, speeds, and heights that exceptions may be made from
requirements indicated in this code, provided equivalent protection
is given.
This code does not apply to the internal type mixer, washer, and
masticator, except in so far as there may be exposed in-running rolls
attached or used in connection with this type of equipment.
N o t e .—To secure the uniform application of this code, enforcing officers are
urged before rendering decisions on disputed points to consult the committee
which formulated it—the Committee on Safety Code for Rubber Machinery, in
care of American Engineering Standards Committee, 29 West Thirty-ninth
Street, New York City.

DEFINITIONS
The word “ shall ” is to be understood as mandatory and the word
“ should ” as advisory.
The word “ approval ” means approved by the authority having
jurisdiction.
The word 6 bite ” means the point of meeting between any two
4
in-running rolls.
The term “ mill ” shall mean machines with rolls used in the
breaking down, cracking, washing, grating, mixing, refining, and
warming of rubber or rubber compounds.
The term u calender ” shall mean machines with rolls used for
frictioning, sheeting, coating, and spreading of rubber or rubber
compounds.
PART 1.— NEW AND EXISTING INSTALLATIONS
Rule 100. New installations.

After the date on which this code becomes effective, all new instal­
lations shall be in conformity with the intent and purpose of this
code.
Rule 101. Existing installations.

A ll existing installations within a period of three years from the
date this code becomes effective shall be made to comply with the
intent and purpose of these requirements consistent with the physical
characteristics of the drive and the general characteristics of the
plant layout.
N o t e .—It is the purpose of rule 101 to recognize the difficulty of bringing
existing installations up to the full intent and purpose of this code without
incurring an expense inconsistent with the results obtained.

Rule 102. Reference to other codes.

(a) Lighting.— Rubber mills and calendars should be so located
with respect to sources of both natural and artificial light that light
of sufficient intensity will fall on the work; direct or reflected glare
and shadows, including moving shadows, should be avoided.
N o t e .—For specific requirements see Code of Lighting for Factories, Mills,
and Other Work Places (American standard), obtainable from the American
Engineering Standards Committee and from the Illuminating Engineering
Society, both of 29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York City.

(&) Belt, pulley, gear, and shaft guards.— A ll belts, pulleys,
gears, shafts, and other moving parts shall be guarded as required




N EW AND EXISTING INSTALLATIONS

3

by the Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Transmission Apparatus
(American standard), obtainable from the American Engineering
Standards Committee, of 29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York
City, or in accordance with the State laws of the particular operating
States.
(< Switches and other electrical apparatus.— A ll switches and
?)
other electrical apparatus shall be of a type or guarded as required
by the National Electrical Safety Code (American standard), issued
by the United States Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C., or
in accordance with the State laws of the particular operating States.
GENERAL
Buie 103. Mill-roll height.

A ll mills should be installed so that the top of the front roll is not
less than forty-six (46) inches above the working floor level or
platform on which the operator stands, irrespective of the size of
the mill.
SAFETY-TRIP CONTROLS AND QUICK-STOP FACILITIES
Rule 110. Safety-trip control— Hills.

(a) A safety-trip rod or tight-wire cable for each individual mill
shall be provided front and back of all mills, extending the length
of the face of the rolls. It shall operate sensitively if it is pushed
or if it is pulled.
(&) The normal location of the safety-trip rod over the front roll
shall be two (2) inches to four (4) inches in from the edge of the
front roll and not more than sixty-nine (69) inches above the work­
ing floor level on which the operator stands, with provision made
for adiustment of three (3) inches either up or down. (See illustra­
tion No. 1.)
(c) The normal location of the safety-trip rod at the back of the
mill shall be two (2) inches to four (4) inches in from the edge of
the back roll and shall be in the same horizontal plane as the safetytrip bar over the front roll, and the length of the lever from fulcrum
shall be the same.
Rule 111.

The fixed center rod or tie running the length of the roll, some­
times used for construction purposes, shall be omitted.
Rule 112.

The locations of safety trips apply to all sizes of mills.
Rule 113. Dry grinding.

(a)
In dry grinding and in mixing processes, where the material
is shoveled into a trough over the bite of the rolls, the foregoing
rules 110 to 112, inclusive, will not apply, provided the throat of
the trough over the bite of the rolls is screened with heavy three (3)
inch by three (3) inch mesh of not less than No. 8 gauge wire and
the trough and the screen are made a permanent fixed part of the
machines and are so designed with regard to openings therein that
it is impossible for an operator’s hand, intentionally or otherwise,
to come in contact with the bite of the rolls.
46881°—27------2




4

SAFETY CODE FOR RUBBER MILLS AND CALENDERS

(6)
In dry grinding processes similar in character to the above
and where the machine is fed through a long trough— as, for in­
stance, from an upper floor level— the foregoing rules 110 to 112,
inclusive, will not apply, provided the trough is so designed and is
of such a character that it is impossible for an operator in any man­
ner to come in contact with the bite of the rolls.
Rule 120. Safety-trip control— Calenders.

(a) A safety-trip rod or a tight-wire cable shall be provided
across the front and the back of all calenders, extending the length
of face of rolls, to operate sensitively if it is pushed or if it is pulled.
This rod shall be at a height not more than sixty-nine (69) inches
above the working floor level or platform on which the operator

stands and shall be within easy reach, with provision made for ad­
justment either up or down of three (3) inches in each direction.
(See illustration No. 2.)
(&) On each side of all calenders and near both ends of the face
of the roll there shall be a vertical tight-wire cable connecting with
the bar tipping mechanism at the top and fastened to the frame
within twelve (12) inches of the floor. These cables should be posi­
tioned at a distance of not more than twelve (12) inches from the
face of the roll and at a distance of not less than one (1) inch from
calender frame. (See illustrations Isos. 2 and 2A.)
Rule 121.

A t the bite of in-running rolls where sheeting, duck, or other fab­
ric is fed, a barrier should be placed across the full length of the



N EW AND EXISTING INSTALLATIONS

5

face of the rolls so designed and applied that the operator’s fingers
can not come in contact with the bite. (See illustration No. 3.)
DETERMINATION OF DISTANCE OF TRAVEL
Rule 130.

(a)
Measurements on mill shall be taken on the front roll; meas­
urements on calender shall be taken on the drive roll. A ll measure­

ments shall be taken under normal operating conditions, with rolls
running idle.
(6)
An approved instrument consisting of a pen or pencil or
equivalent, electrically or mechanically operated, shall be used in
measuring distances traveled. This instrument shall be so designed
and attached that the pen or pencil will come in contact with a strip
of paper coincidently with the tripping of the safety control. The
strip of paper shall be wrapped around the outside of the mill or
calender roll. (See illustrations Nos. 4 and 4A.)




SAFETY CODE FOR RUBBER MILLS AND CALENDERS

6

STOPPING LIMITS— INDIVIDUALLY DRIVEN MILLS
Rule 131.

(a)
Every mill having a diameter of the front roll up to and
including sixteen and one-half ( 16^ ) inches and running empty
at any speed shall be stopped within a distance of not more than
ten (10) inches’ travel after the safety is tripped.

I l l u s t r a t io n

No. 2A

(b)
Every mill having a diameter of the front roll over sixteen
and one-half (16!/2) inches and up to and including twenty-two and
one-half (22y2) inches and running empty at any speed shall be
stopped within a distance of not more than fifteen (15) inches’
travel after the safety is tripped.



N EW AND EXISTING INSTALLATIONS

7

( c ) Every mill having a diameter o f the front roll over twentytwo and one-half (22 1
/2) inches and lip to and including twenty-six
(26) inches and running empty at any speed shall be stopped within
a distance o f not more than eighteen (18) inches’ travel after the
safety is tripped.

STOPPING LIMITS—MILLS DRIVEN IN GROUPS

Rule 132.
(a) Mills driven in groups of two or more and having a diameter
of the front roll up to and including sixteen and one-half (161/2)
inches and running empty at any speed shall be stopped within a
distance of not more than eighteen (18) /inches’ travel after the
safety is tripped.
(5) Mills driven in groups of two or more and having a diameter
o f the front roll over sixteen and one-half (16^ ) inches and up to



8

SAFETY CODE FOR RUBBER MILLS AND CALENDERS

and including twenty-two and one-half (2214) inches and running
empty at any speed shall be stopped within a distance of not more
than twenty-four (24) inches’ travel after the safety is tripped.
(< Mills driven in groups of two or more and having a diameter
?)
of the front roll over twenty-two and one-half (22^ ) inches and

up to and including twenty-six (26) inches and running empty at
any speed shall be stopped within a distance of not more than
thirty-six (36) inches’ travel after the safety is tripped.
STOPPING LIMITS—INDIVIDUALLY AND GROUP DRIVEN
CALENDERS

Rule 135.
Every calender, irrespective of the size of the rolls, shall be
stopped within a distance as shown below on the chart when meas­



N EW AND EXISTING INSTALLATIONS

9

ured at the maximum peripheral speed. Illustration: Suppose the
roll is going at one hundred and twenty-five (125) feet per minute,
then by reading the chart we note the stopping distance should not
be more than thirty (30) inches.

I l l u s t r a t io n N o. 4 A

Calenders the drive roll o f which travels at a maximum peripheral
speed of fifty (50) feet per minute or less shall be stopped within
a distance o f not more than twelve (12) inches measured on the
drive roll after the safety is tripped.
Speeds above two hundred (200) feet per minute measured on the
drive roll are special and require special consideration.




10

SAFETY CODE FOR RUBBER MILLS AND CALENDERS

OPERATING RULES
Rule 150.

Safety stops on mills and calenders should be tested daily, and
accurate measurements of distance of travel shall be taken at least
once every thirty (30) days.

ROLL SPEED - FEET PER MINUTE*
C hart

to

Show

S t o p p in g D

is t a n c e

fob

V a r io u s

Speeds

PART 2.— DISCUSSION
It is realized that the quick stopping of mills and calenders is a,
very important factor in accident prevention in that it limits the
injury to a worker if caught between the rolls. A t the present time,
due to the different type of drives and controls for stopping, there
is a wide variation in the distance that a roll will travel after the
safety trip has been operated.
Some form of braking device is absolutely necessary. With stock
in the mill or calender the stop is much quicker than when the mill
or calender is running empty, but in order to have a standard condi­
tion for testing and comparison it is necessary to make tests for quick
stopping with all the equipment running empty.
A great many tests have been made to determine the distance a roll
will travel after the safety control is operated, and the rules given
herein show what may reasonably be expected with average good con­
ditions and with as quick a stop as can be obtained without seriously
jarring the machinery or breaking some part of the equipment.



INDEX
B
Belt guards, Rule 102 (6)____________________________________________________
Braking device, some form of, necessary, discussion_____________________________
Calenders:
C
Definition_______________________________________________________________
Distance of travel, drive roll measurement, Rule 130_______________________
Individually and group driven, stopping limits, Rule 135___________________
In-running rolls, barrier and “ bite,” Rule 121______________________________
Quick stopping of, discussion--------------------------------------------------------------------Safety-control trip, Rule 120----------------------------------------------------------------------Codes:
Lighting for Factories, Mills, and Other Work. Places, reference to, Rule
102 (a)______________________________________________ _________________
Mechanical Power-Transmission Apparatus, reference to, Rule 102 (ft)_______
National Electrical Safety Code, reference to, Rule 102 (c )_________________
Uniform application of, suggestion to enforcing officers______________________
D
Definitions---------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------Dry grinding, Rule 113------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Page
2-3
10
2
5
8-9
4-5
10
4
2
2-3
3
2
2
3—
4

Gr

Guards, belt, pulley, gear, and shaft, Rule 102 (b)—-----------------------------------------

2-3

Installations:
1
Existing, Rule 101------------------------------------------------------------------------------------New, Rule 100------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2
2

M ills:
M
Definition_______________________________________________________________
Group driven, stopping limits, Rule 132-----------------------------------------------------Height of front roll from working floor, Rule 103-----------------------------------------Individually driven, stopping limits, Rule 131---------------------------------------------Quick stopping of, discussion--------------------------------------------------------------------Safety-trip control, Rule 110---------------------------------------------------------------------Travel distance, front roll measurement, Rule 130----------------------------------------

2
7-8
3
6-7
10
3
5

O
Operating rules, safety stops on mills and calenders, Rule 150----------------------------

10

P

Pulley guards, Rule 102 (6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------S
Safety-trip control:
Calenders, Rule 120-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mills, Rule 110------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Shaft guards, Rule 102 (ft)------------------------------------------------------------------------------Speed of rolls, and stopping distance, chart-------------------------------------------------------Stopping limits:
Calenders, individually and group driven, Rule 135-------------------------------------Mills, individually and group driven, Rules 131, 132-----------------------------------Switches and other electrical apparatus, Rule 102 (a)----------------------------------------

2-3
4
3
2-3
10
8-9
6-8
3

T

Travel, roll, distance of, determination:
Instrument, pen or pencil, electrically or mechanically operated, Rule 130 (b)—
Mill and calender, front and drive roll, Rule 130 (a )-------------------------------------




(id

5
5




LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
The following is a list of all bulletins of the Bureau of Labor Statistics published since
July, 1912, except that in the case of bulletins giving the results of periodic surveys of the
bureau only the latest bulletin on any one subject is here listed.
A complete list of the reports and bulletins issued prior to July, 1912, as well as the bulle­
tins published since that date, will be furnished on application. Bulletins marked thus (*)
are out of print.
Conciliation and Arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).

♦No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York.
[1913.]
♦No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade in its
inquiry into industrial agreements. [1913.]
♦No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
No. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City.
[1914.]
No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry
of New York City. [1914.]
♦No. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite coal industry. [1916.]
♦No. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry. [1916.]
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
No. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
No. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287. National War Labor Board: History of its formation, activities, etc.
[1921.]
No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement of railway labor disputes. [1922.]
No. 341. Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of New York City. [1923.]
No. 402. Collective bargaining by actors. [1926.]
No. 419. Trade agreements, 1925.
Cooperation.

No. 313. Consumers’ cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies in America and in foreign countries. [1922.]
No. 437. Cooperative movement in the United States in 1925 (other than agricul­
tural) .
Employment and Unemployment.

♦No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices in the
United States. [1913.]
No. 172. Unemployment in New York City, N. Y. [1915.]
♦No. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment indus­
tries. [1915.]
♦No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
No. 196. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneap­
olis, Minn., January, 1916.
♦No. 202. Proceedings of the conference of Employment Managers’ Association of
Boston, Mass., held May 10, 1916.
No. 206. The British system of labor exchanges. [1916.]
♦No. 227. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa.,
April 2 and 3, 1917.
No. 235. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
♦No. 241. Public employment offices in the United States. [1918.]
No. 247. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y., May
9-11, 1918.
No. 310. Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes.
[1922.]
No. 409. Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.
Foreign Labor Laws.

♦No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European
countries. [1914.]




(i)

Housing*

*No. 158. Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign
countries. [1914.]
No. 263. Housing by employers in the United States. [1920.]
No. 295. Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
No. 424. Building permits in the principal cities of the United States, 1925.

Industrial Accidents and Hygiene.

♦No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary
ware factories. [1912.]
No. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade. [1913.]
♦No. 127. Dangers to workers from dust and fumes, and methods of protection.
[1913.]
♦No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead. [1914.]
♦No. 157. Industrial accident statistics. [1915.]
♦No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914.]
♦No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
No. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of lead
in the painting of buildings. [1916.]
♦No. 201. Report of committee on statistics and compensation-insurance cost of the
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commis*
rdons. [1916.]
♦No. 207. Causes of death, by occupation. [1917.]
♦No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.]
No. 2.19. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives.
[1917.]
No. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
No. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts).
[1918.]
No. 234. Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
♦No. 236. Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
No. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of
Munition Workers Committee. [1919.]
♦No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
No. 276. Standardization of industrial accident statistics. [1920.]
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates.
[1921.]
No. 291. Carbon monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
No. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
No. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 1910 to
1919.
No. 306. Occupational hazards and diagnostic signs: A guide to impairments to be
looked for in hazardous occupations. [1922.]
No. 339. Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States. [1923.]
No. 392. Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]
No. 405. Phosphorus necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and the preparation
of phosphorus. [1926.]
No. 425. Record of industrial accidents in the United States to 1925.
No. 426. Deaths from lead poisoning. [1926.]
No. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
No. 428. Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at
Washington, D. C., July 14-16, 1926.
Industrial Relations and Labor Conditions.

No. 237.
No. 340.
No. 349.
No. 361.
No. 380.
No. 383.
No. 384.
No. 399.

Industrial unrest in Great Britain. [1917.]
Chinese migrations, with special reference to labor conditions. [1923.]
Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.]
Labor relations in the Fairmont (W. Va.) bituminous-coal field. [1924.]
Postwar labor conditions in Germany. [1925.]
Works council movement in Germany. [1925.]
Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920 to 1924.
Labor relations in the lace and lace-curtain industries in the United States.
[1925.]




(II)

Labor Laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to
labor).

No. 211. Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. [1917.]
No. 229. Wage payment legislation in the United States. [1917.]
No. 285. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States. [1921.]
No. 321. Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
No. 322. Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
No. 343. Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]
No. 370. Labor laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating thereto.
[1925.]
No. 408. Laws relating to payment of wages. [1926.]
No. 434. Labor legislation of 1926.
No. 444. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1926. (In press.)
Proceedings of Annual Conventions of the Association of Governmental Labor
Officials of the United States and Canada.

No. 266.
No. 307.
*No. 323.
No. 352.
No. 389.
No. 411.
No. 429.

Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920.
Eighth, New Orleans, La., May 2-6, 1921.
Ninth, Harrisburg, Pa., May 22-26, 1922.
Tenth, Richmond, Va., May 1-4, 1923.
Eleventh, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925.
Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926.

Proceedings o f Annual Meetings of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions.

♦No. 210.
No. 248.
No. 264.
♦No. 273.
No. 281.
No. 304.
No. 333.
No. 359.
No. 385.
No. 395.
No. 406.
No. 432.

Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916.
Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25, 1917.
Fifth, Madison, Wis., September 24-27, 1918.
Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 1919.
Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920.
Eighth, Chicago, 111., September 19-23, 1921.
Ninth, Baltimore, Md., October 9-13, 1922.
Tenth, St. Paul, Minn., September 24-26, 1923.
Eleventh, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924.
Index to proceedings, 1914-1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 17-20, 1925.
Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of International Association of Public Em­
ployment Services'*

No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20, 1913; Second, Indianapolis, September
24 and 25, 1914 ; Third, Detroit, July 1 and 2, 1915.
No. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N. Y., July 20 and 21, 1916.
No. 311. Ninth, Buffalo, N. Y., September 7-9, 1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D. C., September 11-13, 1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto, Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924.
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N. Y., September 15-17, 1925.
Productivity of Labor.

No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes. [1924.]
No. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper boxboard industry.
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.] (In press.)
Retail Prices and Cost of Living.

♦No. 121.
♦No. 130.
♦No. 164.
No. 170.
No. 357.
No. 369.
No. 445.

Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer [1913.]
Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer. [1913.]
Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
Foreign food prices as affected by the war. [1915.]
Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. [1925.]
Retail prices, 1890 to 1926. (In press.)




(HI)

Safety Codes.

No. 331.
No. 336.
No. 338.
No. 350.
No. 351.
No. 364.
No. 375.
No. 378.
No. 382.
No. 410.
No. 430.
No. 433.
No. 436.

Code of lighting factories, mills, and other work places.
Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.
Specifications of laboratory tests for approval of electric headlighting
devices for motor vehicles.
Safety code for the construction and use of ladders.
Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus.
Safety code for laundry machinery and operations.
Safety code for woodworking plants.
Code of lighting school buildings.
Safety code for paper and pulp mills.
Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.
Safety codes for the prevention of dust explosions.
Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.

Vocational and W orkers’ Education.

♦No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment.
[1915.]
♦No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va. [1915.]
No. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, Minn. [1916.]
No. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States.
[1920.]
W ages and Hours of Labor.

♦No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in
the dress and waist industry of New York City. [1914.]
♦No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry.
[1914.]
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to
1913.
No. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam railroad
cars, 1907 to 1913.
♦No. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907
to 1914.
No. 204. Street railway employment in the United States. [1917.]
No. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture indiistries, 1915.
No. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
No. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry, 1920.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes. [1924.]
No. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
No. 374. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1924.
No. 376. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industry, 1907 to
1924.
No. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines, 1924.
No. 407. Labor cost of production, and wages and hours of labor in the paper box^
board industry. [1925.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 413. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States,
1925.
No. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and
1924.
No. 421. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry,
1925.
No. 422. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1925.
No. 431. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1926.
No. 434. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, i911 to 1926.
No. 438. Wages and hours of labor in the motor vehicle industry, 1925. (Inpress.)
No. 442. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1925.
No. 443. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing,
1925. (In press.)
No. 446. Wages and hours of labor in cotton-goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1926.
(In press.)




(IV)

Welfare Work.

*No. 123. Employers’ welfare work. [1913.]
No. 222. Welfare work in British munitions factories. [1917.]
♦No. 250. Welfare wotfk for employees in industrial establishments in the United
States. [1919.]
W holesale Prices.

No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign
countries. [1921.]
No. 440. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1926. (In press.)
Women and Children in Industry.

No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in
selected industries in the District of Columbia. [1913.]
♦No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]
♦No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee. [1913.]
No. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile
establishments and garment factories. [1914.]
♦No. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries.
[1915.]
♦No. 175. Summary of the report on conditions of woman and child wage earners
in the United States. [1915.]
♦No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determinations in Oregon. [1915.]
♦No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women.
[1915J
♦No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of
Boston, Mass. [1916.]
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.]
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
♦No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of
industrial employment of women and children. [1918.]
No. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war.
[1917.]
No. 253. Women in the lead industries. [1919.]
Workmen’s Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto).

♦No. 101.
♦No. 102.
♦No. 103.
No. 107.
♦No. 155.
No. 212.
No. 243.
No. 301.
No. 312.
No. 379.
No. 423.

Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
British national insurance act, 1911.
Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzerland. [1912.]
Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]
Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by the Interna­
tional Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Wash­
ington, D. C., December 5-9, 1916.
Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and foreign
countries, 1917 and 1918.
Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration.
[1922.]
National health insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1920.
Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of
January 1, 1925.
Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada.
[1926.]

Miscellaneous Series.

♦No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor
Statistics up to May 1, 1915.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
No. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
No. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
No. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washington,
D. C. [1921.]




(V )

Miscellaneous Series— Continued.

No. 299. Fersonnel research agencies: A guide to organized research in employment
management, industrial relations, training, and working conditions.
[1921.]
No. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization.
[1922.]
No. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau
of I.abor Statistics. [1923.]
No. 342. International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and
problems. [1923.]
No. 346. Humanity in government. [1923.]
No. 372. Convict labor in 1923.
No. 386. The cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
No. 398. Growth of legal-aid work in the United States. [192G.]
No. 401. Family allowances in foreign countries. [1926.]
No. 420. Handbook of American trade-unions. [1926.]
No. 439. Handbook of labor statistics, 1924-1926. (In press.)




(V I)