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Retail Prices of Food
1951 and 1952




Bulletin No. 1141

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MARTIN P. DURKIN, Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
EW AN C L A G U E ,

Commissioner




Retail Prices of Food
1951 and 1952




Bulletin NOo

1141

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MARTIN P. DURKIN, Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
EW AN C L A G U E ,

Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 25 cents

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

United States Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C., June 1, 1953.
S ir:
I have the honor to tran sm it herew ith a rep o rt on re ta il
p ric e s and indexes of re ta il p ric e s of food fo r the y e a rs
1951 and 1952.
The original plan of publication involved separate bulletins
covering re ta il p rice data fo r 1951 and 1952. In o rd er to
make m ore data availab le to the public as soon as p ossib le,
a ll the 1952 sta tistica l m a te ria l was added to the tables and
charts of this bulletin. The discussion, how ever, co vers
a c tivitie s in the food p rice field fo r 1951 only, except fo r a
b rie f sum m ary of 1952.
The y e a r 1952 m arks the end of the adjusted se rie s of the
R etail Food P ric e Index, based on 1935-39 as 100. The y e a r
1953 m arks the beginning of the re vise d se rie s based on the
y e a rs 19 47-49 as 1 0 0 .
A monthly mimeographed re p o rt on re ta il p ric es of food,
giving index numbers fo r groups and subgroups of commodi­
ties, and average p ric es fo r individual foods in each of the
56 cities in the adjusted index, is available fo r a ll periods
through Decem ber 1952.
This re p o rt was p repared by F rances H. M artin of the
B ureau’ s D ivision of P ric e s and Cost of Living.
Ewan Clague, C om m issioner.
Hon. M artin P. Durkin,
S e c re ta ry of Labor.




ii

CONTENTS

S u m m a ry.............................................................................................................................................
Food p rices during 1 9 5 1 .........................................................•................... ..................................
Trend of p rices fo r m ajo r food groups, 1951 . . ......................................................................

Page
1
2
3

CHARTS
1 . R etail p ric es of food in larg e cities combined.................................... .........................
2. Retail, p rices fo r groups of food in larg e cities combined..........................................

7
8

TABLES
1. Indexes of re ta il p ric es of food in larg e cities combined, by y e a r, 19 13 -5 2 , and
by month, Jan u ary 1951 to D ecem ber 1952 .................................................................
2. Indexes of re ta il p ric e s of food, in larg e cities combined, by commodity group,
by y e a r, 19 23-52, and by month, 1 9 5 1 - 5 2 ....................................................................
3. Control classificatio n of item s in the R etail Food P ric e Index under p rice regu ­
lations adopted during 1951 and 19 5 2 ....................................... .....................................
4. Indexes of re ta il p ric es of food, by city and by month, 1951 and 1952 ......................
5. R etail Food P ric e Index percent changes, by citie s, 1951 and 1952 ...........................
6 . C lassification of re ta il food item s by percentage change in p rice from Decem­
ber 1950 to Decem ber 1951, and from D ecem ber 1951 to Decem ber 19 5 2.......
7. Indexes of re ta il p rices of p rincipal foods in larg e cities combined, by month,
1 9 5 1 ........................................................................................................................................
7a. Indexes of re ta il p rices of prin cip al foods in larg e cities combined, by month,
19 5 2 ................................................. ....................................................................................
8 . A verage re ta il p ric es of p rincipal foods in larg e cities combined, by month,
1 9 5 1 ...................................................................................................................................... :
8 a. A verage re ta il p ric es of p rincipal foods in larg e cities combined, by month,
19 5 2 .......................................................................................................................................
9- Annual average re ta il p rices of p rincipal foods, by city, 1 9 5 1 ...................................
10. Annual averag e re ta il p rices of principal foods, by city, 19 5 2 ...................................

9
10
11
12
14
16
17
18
19
20
22
26

APPENDIX
B rie f description of R etail Food P ric e Index...........................................................................
Store sample s e le c tio n ...........................................................................................................
C ollection of p r i c e s .................................................................................................................
P ro ce ssin g ..................................................................................................................................
R elative Im portance.................................................................................................................
R evisio n s.....................................................................................................................................
P u b lica tio n s...............................................................................................................................

32
32
32
33
33
34
35

APPENDIX TABLES
A. Population weights used in computing re ta il food p rices and indexes fo r 56 cities
com bined..................................................................................................................................
B. L ist of foods and re la tive im portance of individual foods and groups of foods in ­
cluded in the R etail Food P ric e Index, in the base period (1935-39= 100), De­
cem ber 1951, and Decem ber 1952




iii

36

37




RETAIL PRICES OF FOOD, 1951 and I9S21*
Sum m ary
Business was g en erally good during 1951
and 1952. The National Defense p rogram
continued to expand during both y e a rs , a l­
though the rate of expansion was not as
g reat in 1952. Production continued to ris e
as expenditures w ere in creased fo r plants
and equipment. Employment and incomes
w ere high and person al savings increased.
Inventory buildup was heavy during the fir s t
half of 1951 and the la s t h alf of 1952. Total
expenditures fo r consum er purchases in ­
creased during both y e a rs . In 1951 the
in crease was due en tire ly to higher p ric e s.
In 1952 the higher expenditures rep resen ted
in creased quantities of goods purchased.
Quantities of foods purchased by consum ers,
how ever, w ere maintained during 1951 and
increased during 1952. The in crease in
dom estic demand in 1952 was accompanied
by a d ecrease in foreign demand.
In 1951, re ta il food p ric e s continued the
upward trend started in M arch 1950. P ric e wage controls w ere im posed in January
1951. The Office of P ric e Stabilization
issued its ‘ ‘P ric e F reeze Order** (the
GCPR) on January 26, 1951, which was
designed to hold p ric e s at le v e ls no higher
than the highest p ric e s charged between
Decem ber 19, 1950 and January 25, 1951,
and which affected approxim ately 85 percent
of the foods included in the R etail Food
P ric e Index. This em ergency action was
followed during 1951 and 1952 by p ric e
regulations adapted to the specific re q u ire ­
m ents of individual commodities and indus­
trie s .
A fte r sharp r is e s in Jan u ary and F ebruary
1951, p ric e s fluctuated upward gradually,
establishing new highs in a ll the 56 cities
surveyed. In 1952, re ta il food p ric e s dropped
sharply in F ebruary, then ro se to another

alltim e peak in August, a fter which they
declined during the rem ainder of the y e a r.
By December 1952, re ta il food p ric es w ere
1.0 p ercen t below December 1951, but 6.3
p ercent above Decem ber 1950. Table 1 and
chart 1 p resent the trend in re ta il p ric e s of
foods in larg e cities combined, from 1913
fo rw ard .
A ll 56 cities included in the re ta il food
p rice index rep orted higher food p ric es
over the period between December 1950 and
December 1951. P ric e in creases ranged
from 3.8 percen t in Richmond to 10.4 p e r­
cent in Los A ngeles. A ll 56 cities rep orted
also higher a verag es fo r the y e a r 1951 as a
whole than fo r 1950. Between December
1951 and Decem ber 1952, re ta il food p ric e s
declined in 46 of the 56 cities priced, with
d ecrea ses ranging from 0.1 percent in New
Haven and W inston-Salem to 4.2 percent in
Portland, Oregon.
The p rice decline in the R etail Food
P ric e Index during 1952 was associated with
high a g ricu ltu ral production, esp ecially of
livestock products. Livestock m arketings
w ere larg e in 1952, exceeding the w artim e
peak. R etail p ric e s of beef and ve al de­
creased alm ost continuously throughout the
y e a r, and w ere the la rg e st factor in the
decline in the index. Following heavy m a r­
ketings and low p ric e s e a rly in the y e a r,
hog production, which had been expanding,
dropped 1 0 p ercen t below the previous y e a r,
and was the sm allest since 1948.
In contrast to 1952, 1951 beef and veal
p ric es ro se sharply as OPS tried to regulate
p ric e s by imposing controls. In 1951, the
ris e in beef and ve a l p ric es was the main
reason fo r thf ris e in the m eats, poultry,
and fish index, and was one of the m ost
im portant fa c to rs in the ris e of the 4‘a ll
foods” index.
Other im portant group ris e s during 1951

1 The changes in prices that occurred during 1951 are discussed in detail in the following pages. The year 1952, how­
ever, has been treated only in brief summary form in order to expedite the printing of the available data. The tables and
charts are complete for both 1951 and 1952.



- 1 -

w ere fo r fre sh fru its and vegetables, d airy
products, and ce re a ls and bakery products.
Fats and o ils, how ever, w ere in larg e
supply, and the p rice d ecrease begun in May
1951 continued through May 1952. A re v e rs e
trend then o ccu rred through August with
in creased dom estic demand, s m a lle r hog
slaughter and la rd production, and the
realization that supports fo r cottonseed and
soybeans would provide a flo o r fo r p ric es.
Beginning in Septem ber 1952, fats and oils
p rices again declined, finishing the y e a r at
approxim ately the May 1952 le v e l, as la rd
p rices d ecreased in sympathy with pork,
and la rd exports fe ll below the previous
y e a r.
Indexes of averag e re ta il food p rices by
city a re presented in table 4 and re ta il food
price index percent changes by cities in
table 5.
C lassificatio n of re ta il fooditem s by p e r ­
centage change in p rice a re to be found in
table 6 .
A verage re ta il indexes and p rices of
individual foods fo r larg e cities combined
are presented in tables 7, 7a, 8 , and 8 a,
re sp e ctively. A verage re ta il p ric es of p rin ­
cipal foods in each of 56 cities a re shown in
tables 9 and 1 0 .
Food P ric e s During 1951
At the beginning of 19 5 1, re ta il food
p rices ro se to a new high, 2.4 percent above
the fo rm e r peak of m id -Ju ly 1948.
The m ovem ent in the re ta il food p rice
index during 1951 was as follow s:
1951
Decem ber (1950)-Jan u a ry J a n u a ry -F e b ru a ry -----------F e b ru a ry -M a rc h -------------M a rc h -A p ril--------------------A p r i l- M a y ----------------------M a y -Ju n e ------------------------J u n e -J u ly ------------------------J u ly -A u g u s t--------------------A u g u st-S ep tem b e r-----------S e p te m b e r-O c to b e r--------Octobe r - Novembe r -----------N o vem b er-D ecem b er-------

P ercen t Change
+ 2 .6
+ 1.8
+ .1
-

+
+
+
+
+
+

.2
.8

.2

.4
.3
.1
.8

1.0

between Decem ber 19, 1950, and Jan u ary
25, 1951.
This was an em ergency action taken to
check p rice ris e s until specific p rice reg u ­
lations could be worked out. It affected
approxim ately 85 percent of the foods in ­
cluded in the Bureau of Labor S tatistics
re ta il food p rice index. In effect, it divided
foods into three groups: those subject to
flexible co n trols, those subject to firm con­
tro ls , and those fre e from con trols. (F o r a
distribution of commodities by type of con­
tro l during 1951 and 1952, see table 3 on
page 1 1 .)
A pproxim ately 49 percent of the re ta il
food p rice index was made subject to flexib le
co n trols. These foods w ere those processed
in substantial p art from ag ricu ltu ra l p ro d ­
ucts having p ric es below p a rity or the legal
minimum as established by the Defense
Production Act of 19 5 0 . 2 P ro c e ss o rs w ere
allowed to add to th eir ceiling p ric es the
d o llars-a n d -cen ts in crea se s in th eir costs
fo r any a g ricu ltu ra l products, which w ere
selling below th eir legal minimum p ric e s.
The foods in the index subject to firm
controls made up approxim ately 36 p ercent
of the re ta il food p rice index. These w ere
the foods not subject to p a rity and also
those p ro cessed in substantial p art from
a g ricu ltu ra l products fo r which p rices had
alread y reached or su rp assed the legal
m inim um .
In the orig in al GCPR, p ric es of fresh
fru its and vegetables and fre s h fish and
seafood w ere not placed under control.
Because of th eir highly seasonal nature and
p e rish a b ility , it was thought best to issu e
sep arate regulations esp ecially adapted to
these foods. H owever, potatoes was the only
one of these item s subsequently controlled
and then only fo r slig h tly m ore than 4
months during 1952.
On F e b ru a ry 12, the OPS free d sugar
from p rice control, because it was thought
that the S e c re ta ry of A g ricu ltu re would be
able to stab ilize sugar p ric es by controlling
im p orts as req u ired in the Sugar A ct of
1948.
Most of the ris e of 1.8 p ercent in the food
index between Jan u ary 15, and F eb ru ary 15,

2 The general ceiling-price regulation provided that no ceil­
ing should be established for any agricultural commodity be­
low the highest of the following prices: (1) The parity price for
such commodity as determined by the Secretary of Agricul­
ture in accordance with the Agricultural Adjustment Act of
1938, as amended, or (2) the highest price received by pro­
ducers during the period from May 24,1950, to June 24,1950.

.3

On Jan u ary 26, 1951, the Office of P ric e
Stabilization issued its “ P ric e F re ez e O r­
d e r” (the g eneral ceiling p rice regulation,
o r GCPR) g en erally holding p ric e s at leve ls
no higher than the highest p ric es charged




2

-

A p ril 15 p ric es. The other 2 item s had
in creased fra c tio n a lly . Although many re ta il
food p rices declined during the month ending
May 15, the index in creased 0.8 percent,
la rg e ly because of the higher p rices of fre sh
fru its and vegetables and eggs.
R etail food p ric es fe ll 0.2 percent from
m id-M ay to m id-June as chicken p rices
dropped 4.1 percent, fre s h produce dropped
1.3 percent, and some other subgroups
declined frac tio n ally, w hereas reported in ­
c re a se s w ere sm all.
In the third q u arter of 1951, p rices w ere
fa irly steady, risin g slightly in July and
Septem ber, and falling slightly in August.
During this tim e, the m ost im portant de­
clines w ere fo r fru its and vegetables,
w hereas in crea ses w ere reported fo r eggs,
d airy products, and m eats.
In this q u arter, 2 p rice ord ers affected
the food index. E ffective Ju ly 28, supple­
m entary regulation 43 to the GCPR allowed
in crea se s in p ric es of cola drinks, following
perm ission to w h olesalers and distrib u tors
to in crease th eir p ric e s to re ta ile rs . E ffec­
tive August 6 , re ta il p rices of pork loin
cuts w ere computed under new “ seven-day
d iffe re n tia l” p rice ceilin gs, thus allowing
fo r change in p ric es in accordance with
changes in pork loins during the previous
week as com pared with the base week of
Jan u ary 19 -2 5 , 1951 (supplem entary reg u la­
tion 47).
During the la st q u arter of 1951, re ta il
food p ric es ro se , with fre sh fru its and ve g ­
etables the controlling fa c to r. R ises in
d a iry products also contributed. P ric e s of
fats and oils continued the decline started
in May, and m eat p ric es declined during
November and D ecem ber.
During this q u a rte r, additional m eat item s
w ere placed under “ seven -d ay d iffe re n tia l”
ceilin gs. On October 1 , 1951, bacon, ham,
and sa lt pork w ere added to the lis t in
supplem entary regulation 65 which su p e r­
seded supplem entary regulation 47. On
November 13, 19 51, v e a l cutlets and leg of
lamb w ere placed under “ se v e n -d a y d iffe r­
en tial’ ’ ceilings in supplem entary regulation
79.

1 9 5 1 , occurred in the 2 weeks a fter the
GCPR was issued. In addition to a 4 . 6 -p e rcent in crease fo r uncontrolled foods, higher
p rices w ere reported fo r many controlled
foods. These in crea ses w ere probably due
to the fact that some of the controlled foods
had not reached the highest le v e ls charged
during the December 19, 19 5 0 -Jan u ary 25,
1951, base period.
To elim inate the p ossib ility of s e lle rs
basing th eir “ highest” p ric es on a few
isolated sales during the base period, the
OPS on F eb ru ary 23 issued an amendment
to the GCPR. This amendment required that
m anufacturers and w h olesalers m ust have
at lea st 1 0 percent of d e liv e rie s during the
base period (December 19, 1 9 5 0 - -Jan u ary
25, 1951) to one class of p u rch aser at a
specific price before using that p rice as a
basis fo r the new ceilings.
Ceiling p rice regulations 14, 15, and 16,
issued by the OPS on M arch 28, provided
specific maximum m arkups o ver cost of
many foods fo r 4 cla sses of w h olesalers
and 4 groups of re ta ile rs defined in the
regulations. These regulations w ere sim ila r
to those followed by the Office of P ric e
Adm inistration from 1943 to 1946 to sta b i­
lize dry g ro cery p ric es during W orld W ar
.3
The application of percentage m argins
was allowed any tim e a fte r A p ril 5, but
was not com pulsory until May 14.
It is not known how g en eral the use of
these markups was by A p ril 15, when the
B ureau’s A p ril su rvey was taken. However,
m ost foods in the index subject to these
regulations advanced during the period
from m id-M arch to m id -A p ril, although the
food index as a whole declined 0 . 2 percent
during this tim e as uncontrolled foods
declined fu rth e r, along with eggs, pork, and
d airy products.
C eilin g -p rice regulation 25 also was made
effective May 14. This o rd er established
d ollar-an d -cen t ceiling p ric es fo r re ta il
sales of standardized re ta il beef cuts by
grade, by d ealer classificatio n , and by
geographic location. This regulation also
called fo r the posting on August 1 of d o lla rand-cent ceiling p rices fo r the beef item s
affected by CPR 25.
By May 15, im m ediately a fte r the e ffe c ­
tive date of these controls, re ta il p rices fo r
2 of the 4 beef item s in the re ta il food p rice
index declined m ore than 1 percent below

u

Trend of P ric e s fo r M ajor Food Groups,
1951
~
F ro m Decem ber 1950 to December 19 51,
p rices moved higher fo r a ll m ajo r food
groups except eggs and fats and oils. P ric e
in c re a se s, in o rd e r of magnitude, w ere:
fru its and vegetables, 16.0 percent; d airy

3 Maximum price regulations 421, 422, and 423.




-

3

-

Cattle p ric es in creased sh arp ly between
Jan u ary and A p ril 1951, catching packers in
a p rice squeeze. In A p ril and May 1951, the
OPS issued four regulations establishing
d o llar-an d -cen t ceilings on cattle and
w holesale and re ta il sa les of beef. CPR 25,
effective May 14, 1951, established d o lla rand-cent ceiling p ric es fo r re ta il sales of
standardized re ta il beef cuts, and applied to
four beef item s in the re ta il food p rice
index--round steak, rib ro ast, chuck ro ast,
and ham burger. The w holesale regulation
incorporated a system of zone d ifferen tials
to encourage m ovem ent of m eat to deficit
a rea s by allowing packers to re c o v e r costs
of transporting livestock and m eat.
These wholesale and re ta il ceiling p ric es
fo r beef w ere to be effective until August 1,
19 51, at which tim e reduction in ceiling
p rices of 4 j percent was contemplated.
Another reduction was planned fo r October
1, 1951. In extending the Defense Production
Act of 1950, how ever, Congress prohibited
these p rice ro llb ack s, and banned slaughter
quotas (see distribution regulation 1 ,
amendment 7, effective August 7, 1951).
O ver the month from m id-Septem ber to
m id-O ctober, beef and ve a l averaged 2. 0
percent higher, a fte r new d o llar-an d -cen t
ceilings went into effect on October 1 fo r the
4 beef item s. Rib ro ast, which was allowed
the la rg e st ceiling in c re a se , averaged 5.4
percent higher.
Under supplem entary regulation 79, e f­
fective November 13, ceiling p ric e s of ve a l
and lamb cuts w ere established by each
re ta ile r ev ery Monday in accordance with
changes in the cost of these item s during the
previous week as com pared with the base
week Jan u ary 19 -2 5 , 1951.
At the end of 1950, beef and v e a l p rices
had reached a le v e l slightly above the
fo rm e r high of August 1948. By November
1951, the beef and ve a l subgroup index was
10.9 percent above August 1948. The lamb
index in 1951 was above a ll previous le ve ls
except for Jan u ary. By D ecem ber 19 51,
lamb averaged 7.8 percent above June 1949,
the high of previous y e a rs .
E ffective August 6 , re ta il p ric e s of pork
loin cuts w ere computed under new 44sevenday- d ifferen tial’ ’ p ric e ceilings (sup. reg.
47). P ric e s w ere adjusted each Monday in
accordance with changes in the cost of pork
loins during the previous week as com pared
with the base week Jan u ary 19 -2 5 , 1951.
R eflecting the new ceilin gs, the p rice of
pork chops ro se 7.2 percent over the month

products, 9.9 percent; c e re als and bakery
products, 7 . 1 percent; m eats, poultry, and
fish, 6. 6 percent; beverag es, 5.9 percent;
and sugar and sw eets, 0.8 percent. P ric e
d ecreases w ere reported fo r eggs (13.1
percent), and fats and oils (0.4 percent).
By Decem ber 1951, the foods which had
ris e n the m ost above th eir 1935-39 price
leve ls w ere: b everag es, 246.8 percent;
m eats, p oultry, and fish, 170.1 percent;
fru its and vegetab les, 136.5 percent; eggs,
116.7 percent; and d a iry products, 113 .2
percent.
A ll food groups averaged higher fo r 1951
than fo r 1950. Eggs w ere 21.7 percent
higher; fats and o ils, 17.0 percent; m eats,
poultry, and fish, 11.7 percent; d airy p ro d ­
ucts, 11.5 percent; b everag es, 1 0 . 2 percent;
fru its and vegetab les, 9«4 percent; c e re a ls
and bakery products, 9»1 percent; and sugar
and sw eets w ere 3.7 percent higher.
Table 2 presents indexes of re ta il food
p ric es by commodity group from 1923 fo r ­
w ard. C hart 2 , page 8 , shows the trend of
re ta il food p ric e s by group.
C erea ls and bakery p rod u cts. - -P ric e s of
c e re a ls and bakery products ro se 4.3 p e r ­
cent in Jan u ary 1951 from an alread y reco rd
high in D ecem ber 1950, and then in creased
gradually until in Decem ber 1951 they w ere
7.1 percent above D ecem ber 1950. P ric e s
fo r a ll item s in the group averaged higher
o ver 1951 than over the previous y e a r. By
D ecem ber 1951, bread p rices w ere higher
than in Decem ber 1950 in 55 of the 56 cities
in the R etail Food P ric e Index, and in one
city they w ere unchanged.
Food grain production was somewhat
low er in 1951 than in 1950, because a com ­
bination of drought and rainy w eather during
harvesting fo rced acreage abandonment and
cut down y ie ld s.
M eats, poultry, and fis h .- - A ll item s ex ­
cept bacon, sa lt pork, and salm on w ere
higher at the end of 1951 th an atth e close of
1950.
On F eb ru ary 9, 19 51, 2 weeks a fte r the
general p ric e fre e z e , the OPS is sued d is tr i­
bution regulation 1 in an effo rt to keep
livestock moving in norm al channels. This
regulation established licensing and quota
controls fo r livestock slau g h terers of cattle,
ca lves, sheep, lam bs, and hogs. D istribution
regulation 2, effective May 7 ,1 9 5 1 , req u ired
the grading of beef, veal, and lamb by the
standard Department of A g ricu ltu re grades,
and established a system of reco rd s of p ro ­
duction and d e liv e ry by grades.




-

4

-

P ric e s of fre s h fru its and vegetables w ere
not controlled by OPS during 19 51, although
at the end of the y e a r, plans w ere being
made to control p ric es of potatoes. (Potatoes
w ere subsequently controlled by percentage
m arkups under CPR ’s 15 and 16 from Jan u ­
a ry 28, 1952, to June 6 , 1952.)
Supplies of fru its w ere fa irly larg e in
1951, with larg e stocks at the beginning of
the y e a r and good sized crops during the
y e a r. O ranges, in plentiful supply, showed a
p rice d ecrease fo r the y e a r. Although apples
averaged low er in 1951 than in 1950, they
sold fo r higher p ric es at the end of 1951
than at the end of 1950. Banana p rices
averaged slightly higher fo r 1951, but
showed a decline by December of that y e a r.
Although bad w eather at the beginning of
the y e a r reduced supplies of fresh veg e­
tab les, m arketings fo r 1951 a sa w h o le w e re
n ea rly as larg e as fo r 1950. H owever,
consumer demand was strong, and re ta il
p rices of fre s h vegetables averaged from 15
percent to 69 percent higher in December
1951 than in D ecem ber 1950, although they
fluctuated during the y e a r.
There was no p rice support program on
the 1951 crop of potatoes. P ric e s had
dropped quite low in late 1950, and larg e
stocks w ere c a rrie d over. F a rm e rs reduced
th eir acreage in 1951, and the resulting
short crop, 25 percent low er than in 1950
and the sm allest in m ore than a decade,
caused p ric es to ris e rapidly during the
la tte r p art of the y e a r to a le v e l above p arity
in D ecem ber. P ric e controls w ere applied
in 1952 (see page l l ) .
B e v e ra g e s. - -A fte r a 4.0 percent ris e in
Jan u ary, beverage p ric e s continued upward
during the rem ain d er of the y e a r at a com ­
p a rative ly slow ra te, and in December 1951
w ere 5.9 percent above December 1950.
A fter a substantial ris e in the fir s t 2
months of 1951, coffee p ric e s leveled off
during the re s t of the y e a r.
P ric e s of cola drinks moved upward from
August through D ecem ber. Supplem entary
regulation 43 to the GCPR allowed in creases
in re ta il p ric es of cola drinks a fter Ju ly 28,
following p erm ission to w h o lesalers and
d istrib u tors to in crea se th e ir p rices to
re ta ile rs .
Fats and o ils .--P ro d u c tio n o f fats and oils
in 1951 was at a high le v e l, because of larg e
crops of oilseeds and the larg e numbers of
hogs slaughtered.
Except fo r November and D ecem ber 1950,
p rices moved upward from M arch 1950

from Ju ly 15 to August 15. E ffective October
1 , 1 9 5 1 , bacon, ham, and salt pork w ere
added to the lis t under the se ve n -d ayd ifferen tial in supplem entary regulation 65
superseding supplem entary regulation 47 to
the GCPR.
Unlike beef, p rices of m ost pork item s
during 1951 rem ained below th e ir 1950
peaks.
P oultry p ric e s in 1951 averaged somewhat
above 1950, but w ere w ell below the higher
levels reached in 1946 and 1948.
Supplies of canned salm on w ere sm all
during e a rly 19 5 1 , keeping p ric es w ell above
1950 leve ls until late in th e y e a r. P ric e s fo r
1951 w ere 30 percent higher on the average
than in 1950. In 1951, fre s h and frozen fish
averaged m ore than 6 percent higher than in
1950.
D airy products .--T he ris e of d airy p rod­
ucts p rices which started in Ju ly 1950,
continued throughout 1951 except fo r m inor
d ecreases in A p ril and May 1951, and
reached a re co rd high by Decem ber 1951.
Fluid m ilk p ric e s , at new high le v e ls ,
ro se during the y e a r in n ea rly a ll cities
included in the R etail Food P ric e Index.
P ric es averaged approxim ately 11 percent
higher fo r 1951 than fo r 1 9 5 0 .
E ffective Septem ber 24, 1951, supple­
m entary regulation 63 to the GCPR p e r ­
m itted such groups as p ro c e sso rs and
d istributors in individual m ilk m arketing
areas to apply to OPS fo r adjustm ents of
ceiling p rices in th eir a re a s.
Butter p rices declined g en erally through
Septem ber (except fo r May and June) after
a sharp 8.7-p ercen t ris e in Jan u ary 1951.
E ggs.--A t the end of 1950, egg p rices
had reached a 30-y e a r high and storage
holdings w ere the low est on re co rd . By
December 1951, egg p ric es had dropped
13.1 percent below Decem ber 1950, although
they averaged 21.7 percent higher o ver the
y e a r.
There was no p rice-su p p ort program fo r
eggs in 19 51. Egg p ric es w ere kept up by
high m eat p ric es, reduction in the number
of la y e rs on fa rm s , hatchery req u irem en ts,
and in creased m ilita ry demand.
F ruits and veg etab les. - - By D ecem ber
1951, re ta il p rices of fru its and vegetables
w ere 16 percent higher than in Decem ber
1950. Increases of 23.2 percent fo r the
fre sh group and 5.2 percent fo r the canned
group m ore than offset d ecreases of 5.0
percent fo r frozen item s and4.0 percent fo r
dried ite m s.




-

5

-

uncolored
c itie s .

through A p ril 1951. P ric e s ro se 8.2 percent
in Jan u ary 1951 and an additional 2 .9 percent
in F eb ru ary.
In e a rly A p ril, re ta il p rices of fats and
oils in the index w ere placed under the p e r­
centage m arkup regulations, CPR ’ s 15 and
16. (P rice s at the p ro c e s s o r’ s le v e l w ere
ro lled back somewhat by CPR 6 , effective
F eb ru ary 12, 1951.)
A fte r A p ril, re ta il p rices of fats and oils
turned downward and by Decem ber 1951
w ere 0.4 percent below the le v e l of D ecem ­
b er 1950, although p ric es fo r the y e a r 1951
averaged 17.0 percent higher than fo r the
y e a r 1950.
At the end of 1950, the sale of colored
m arg arine.w as prohibited by State la w in l9
of the 56 cities included in the B u reau ’s
R etail Food P ric e Index. As these laws w ere
repealed in some States during 1951, p ric es
of colored m arg arin e w ere substituted fo r




-

m arg arin e

Date
J anua r y - Ju ly
19 5 0 ......................
August-D ecem ber
19 5 0 ......................
J anuary-M arch
1 9 5 1 ......................
A p ril-Ju ly 1 9 5 1 ....
August 1 9 5 1 ............
Septem ber 1 9 5 1 ....
O ctober-D ecem ber
1 9 5 1 ......................

in

10

additional

Number of cities priced
Uncolored
Colored
m arg arin e
m arg arine
56

- -

19

37

18
12

38
40
43
44

9

47

16

13

Sugar and sweets .--T h e sugar and sw eets
index stayed above 1950 leve ls during m ost
of 1951.

6

-

1935-39 = 100

240

INOEX

INDEX

240

220

220

200

-

200

180

180

160

160
140

120

120

100

100

1913 1915
U N IT E D STATES D EPA R TM EN T OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




1920

1925

1930

1935

1940

1945

ESTIMATES OF WORLD WAR I AND POSTWAR UNDERSTATEMENT BY THE INDEX
WERE NOT INCLUDED. SEE MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW FOR MARCH 1947.

Chart 1. - -R etail P ric e s of Food in L arge C ities Combined, 19 13 -19 5 2

1950 1952

1 9 3 5 -3 9

=

100

UNITEO STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Chart 2. —R etail P ric e s



fo r Groups of Food in L arge C ities Combined, 1935 to 1952
-

8

-

TABLE 1 .—INDEXES OF RETAIL PRICES OF FOOD IN LARGE CITIES COMBINED, BY YEAR, 1913-52, AND BY MONTH,
JANUARY 1951 TO DECEMBER 1952
[ 1935-39 = 100]
Allfoods
index

All­
foods
index

Year

Allfoods
index

Year

Year and month

All­
foods
index

BY YEAR
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917

----------------

138.0
136.1
139.1
159.6
193.8

193019311932-

130.8
132.5
126.0
103.9
86.5

1943
1944
1945
1946
1947

19181919192019211922-

134.4
149.8
168.8
128.3
119.9

19331934193519361937-

84.1
93.7
100.4
101.3
105.3

1948
1949

1950 Adjusted—

204.5
204.1

1923—
1924—
1925—
1926—
1927—

124.0

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942

97.8
95.2
96.6
105.5
123.9

1951 Adjusted—

1951 Old se rie s

227.4
227.2

1952 Adjusted—
1952

231.5

122.8
132.9
137.4
132.3




Year and month

All­
foods
index

All­
foods
index

BY MONTH

81.8
80.9
90.8
116.9

-----------

All­
foods
index

-----

1950 Old se rie s

Old se rie s

2 1 0 .2
201.9

233.9

1951
JanuaryFebruary
March--April—

Adj u ste d s eOld
r ie s
221.6
221.9
226.0
226.0
226.2
225.7

1952

225.4
224.

January------------February-----------March--------------April---------------

6
226.7
227.0

Adjus ted seOld
rie s
232.4
23k. 6
227.5
229.1
227.6
229.2
230.0
232.3

May--June—
July—
August-

227.4
226.9
227.7
227.0

227.5
226.4

May----------------June---------------July---------------August--------------

230.8
231.5
234.9
235.5

SeptemberOctober—
NovemberDecember-

227.3
229.2
231.4
232.2

226.3
229.2
232.1
233.9

September---------October------------November-----------December------------

233.2
232.4
232.3
229.9

9

23k. 6
236.0
239.1
238. 4
234. 7
234.1
233. 7

230.9

TABLE 2.--INDEXES OF RETAIL PRICES OF FOOD, IN LARGE CITIES COMBINED, BY COMMODITY GROUP, BY YEAR, 1923-52
AND BY MONTH, 1951-521

[ 1935-39 - 100-]
Fruits and vegetables
M
eat
s
M
eats,
Cereals
Sugar
Fats
Yearmontand
All bakery
and poultry,
Bever­
Dairy
and
and
Beef
Fish
Eggs
Chickens
h foods
and
ages
products
Total
Frozen2Fresh
sweets
Total
Dried
oils
Canned
L
am
b
Pork
and
products fish
veal
BYYEAR,1923TO19523
173.76 128.
175.14
124.28 175.
129.
10 169.
55
131.
126.21 159.
12-4.80 107.2
159.406 170.
124.
14 136.
139.
159.
147.356 134.
162.
122.
185.
1
159.
132.
3
124.
128.
2
151.
2
193.
5
149.
1
111.
3
116.
0
120.260
127.
122.98 152.
226.
137.
194.24 120.
145.94 170.
130.74 141.
183.88
163.34 145.
132.08 127.
133.27 210.
116.08
vy^n
132.-34 115.7 117.
63 153.
161.04
166.
55 120.
90 165.
128.23 114.
123.31
131.04 137.
110.16 123.
130.58 107.
124.
173.
171.
164.284 127.
131.
143.348 177.
169.
127.111
132.
noon
121.
143.
118.
6
107.
4
121.
0
5
185.
7
158.
7
119.
2
119.
126.
0
104.
3
96.10 99.
128.
102.
103.
105.97 103.
112.66 71.
89.16
84.98 95.
103.57
91.13 118.
82.63 125.
91.27 124.
82.64 79.3
86.59 91.
193^
118.39 103.
88.14 ■107.102.64 66.
87.99 101.
94.
82.98 77.
113.18
68.9
84.37 78.
76.344 100.
97.937
122.
90.
88.296 119.
98.
193^
__
104.
0
110.
98.
8
100.
8
97.
5
99.
7
106.
2
96.
3
95.
5
104.
98.
9
104.
7
98.
2
99.999 100.
100.-4 101.
7
8 98.
1935------100.92 116.
96.60 103.
99.46 102.
99.62
106.
101.19 101.
98.50 101.
103.23 104.
98.64 106.
94.75 103.
108.26 103.
105.88 101.
107.98
106.46 101.
105.64 101.
105.21 104.
105.3 103.3 105.8 106.
57 100.
97.96
4 93.
93.33 97.
7 93.
99.96 100.
3 93.
1 97.
95 104.
6 101.
25 — 92.
101.30 95.
39 97.
96 97.
98.71 96.
86 101.
99.58 98.
1938------- 97.
8 94.
94.
95.
1
92.
3
95.
5
87.
88.
99.
93.
8
91.
0
96.
96.
1939------95.
2
—
100.
6
96.
84
97.
3
92.
4
92.
5
82.
2
94.
8
110.
6
101.
4
93.
8
96.
5
81.
1
94.45 102.
88 100.1 106.
99.76 102.1 124.5 112.0 112.2 103.2
96.65 96.
8 107.
95.58 106.
194-0------94.
0
97.
9
106.
7
106.
101.
5
104.
2
110.
97.
9
105.
19*41------121.
6
119.
6
136.
3
122.
1
126.
5
122.
6
130.
8
132.
8
163.0 125.4 136.5
19-42------- 123.9 105.1 126.0 122.5 123.6 120.4 124.1
10,0
130.
6
158.
9
124.
8
126.
1
127.
178.
0 129.5 164.5 124.3 123.3 126.51
10 207.
66 153.
161.99 168.
168.28
206.56 134.
64 129.
133.98 117.9 118.7 112.2 134.5 146.
13010 107.
133.
151.
177.
2
108.
136.
tVwc
0 126.59
2 168.24 124.
154.4 217.12 133.
9 164.
1
188.
118.
136.
112.
118.
i109.
o*50n 217.13 214.
182.
140.
139.867 124.
168.488 177.
190.527 130.
152.
163.910 174.
150.546 215.
148.296 220.
150.708 213.
19^6
159.
180.0
197.15 143.
199.44
166.28 190.
263.5 186.
271.4 165.
201.
183.20 236.
186.21 200.
19-47------193.68 155.4 161.
174.
205.
0
212.
4
158.
0
246.
8
195.
5
204.
8
205.
2
222.
5
246.
8
203.
2
312.
8
208.
7
243.
9
258.
5
170.
9
246.
5
l^'
S
210.
2
227.54 220.
4 179.
152.90 228.
176.904
218.18 146.
7 148.
208.21 —
1 184.
186.77 201.
26 199.
205.92 251.
7 183.
191.53 314.
4 229.
30 265.
241.37 203.
201.
95 172.
169.77 233.
19-49------—
144.
3
173.
206.
312.
5
257.
8
308.
5
242.
243.
6
20-4.
1950------98.68 223.
206.08 193.
211.31 217.
227.-54 188.
1951------- 231.
188.61
259.39 165.
163.98 249.
240.98 344.
346.57 168.
143.28 186.
239.93 90.
343.00 214.
307.94 215.
213.74 288.
283.88 192.
192.18 352.
269.29 274.
271.15 310.
193.51 272.
1952------.
BYPRICE-REPORTINGPERIOD, 1951AND1952
1951
Jan. 15----15----- 226.
221.09 187.
6 193.
185.14 270.
263.16 265.
90 215.
184.23 345.
38 202.
6 191.
5 300.
220.04 160.
210.22 273.
253.74 340.
171.55 185.
28 233.
Feb.
307.
279.
7
271.
2
204.
4
347.
179.258 214.
224.
311 100.
100.
165.
160 257.
342.
766 176.
256.
186.
060
M
ar.
15----271.
9
215.
4
308.
0
280.
5
198.
9
226.
2
187.
5
272.
2
204.
6
217.
220.
7
342.
351.
2
195.
101.
2
167.
4
177.
3
186.
Apr.
15----272.6 272.54 309.
7 188.23 *272.
2 198.45 351.
7 204.51 191.
168.96 256.
214.8 100.26 215.
257.8 *343.35 178.
9
227.
M
ay 15----15----- 225.
213.744 284.
289.
308.578 213.
198.224 221.
226.955 170.
169.
176.237 185.
185.
June
226.-94 188.
188.4 271.86 272.
214.
273.1 308.
292.15 *199.
219.96 99.
191.3 353.
203.9 201.
98.8 223.
4 254.74 345.
356.13 203.
345.2 175.
186.14
July
15----- 227.
227.07 188.
189.70 275.
310.13 222.
215.36 292.
195.43 353.
211.58 208.
98.08 209.
170.08 250.
274.26 310.
292.20 194.
205.91 225.
218.95 98.
221.18 165.
344.
273.20 276.
188.03
168.
ASept
ug. 15----15----356.234 205.
248.
567 345.
345.208 161.
162.587 188.
227.
3
189.
4
275.
6
277.
6
310.
7
224.
3
195.
1
204.
3
292.
2
353.
206.
4
239.
3
205.
1
97.
5
245.
164.
2
188.
Oct.
189.24 273.
276.56 278.
281.60 317.
0 215.
207.94 243.
8 95.
97.95 214.
40 162.
240.18 346.
345.68 158.
160.56 186.
229.
24 190.
223.88 295.
188.07 351.
4 210.
162.78 238.
187.270
293.76 184.
353.21 210.
NDec.
ov. 15----15----231.
317.
3
223.
5
241.
8
235.
15----- 232.2 190.4 270.1 274.6 316.9 203.8 300.0 181.9 351.2 213.2 216.7 236.5 95.0 255.4 163.3 238.9 346.8 157.8 186.4
1952
Jan.
15----- 227.
232.54 190.
273.88 316.
203.08 297.
272.
16 192.
215.08 166.
241.54 95.
351.55 217.
184.53 223.
238.A6 346.
263.
163.63 238
91
Feb.ar. 15----190.
926 267.
285.
271.117 270.
314.
206 201.
197.
576 *351.
234.246 163.
94.
250 248.
347.
17 155.
150.
936 185.
185.
312.
M
15----227.
6
268.
8
200.
3
190.
191.
276.
5
348.
0
215.
7
161.
3
232.
1
92.
163.
9
236.
3
347.
1
145.
184.
Apr.
15----191.81 '266.
230.
0 193.
266.07 268.
28 208.
198.76 283.
11 188.
84 345.
6 165.
90 247.
17 311.
346.33 212.
28 91.
57 272.
84 163.
57 236.
98 346.
347.36 143.
1 186.
233
M
ay
15----175.
230.
8
271.
310.
210.
6
287.
164.
283.
253.
163.
88.
236.
139.
9
187.
June 15----- 231.5 193.3 270.6 275.9 310.9 219.4 291.5 181.9 343.9 209.8 169.1 250.0 90.0 278.1 162.3 237.1 346.5 140.1 187.7
274.31 308.
194.24 277.
270.34 280.
219.30 290.
290.38 197.
July
15----- 235.
234.59 194.
08 237.
187.84 339.
212.38 217.
162.
238.94 346.
342.18 213.
208.27 242.
90.18 283.
253.32 90.
140.64 189.
188.99
307.
ASept
ug. 15----15----162.264 241.
265.
300 164.
346.646 141.
308.
7
221.
4
227.
6
194.
1
277.
0
278.
5
288.
5
202.
1
339.
3
233.
2
231.
2
216.
7
90.
3
241.
243.
5
346.
141.
1
190.
303.19 210.
6 200.
274.18 298.
193.10 338.
230.06 ;236.
232.34 194.
194.33 265.
271.55 263.
228.31 281.
1 218.
218.21 226.
227.73 89.
89.00 254.
164.08 248.
Oct.
15----240.33 166.
244.17 346.
346.13 140.
140.37 190.
746
335.
9
NDec.
ov. 15----15----- 229.
272.
2
232.
190.
9 194.5 262.4 257.6 292.8 203.4 261.6 206.7 333.9 217.1 201.8 236.4 88.3 254.0 165.9 248.8 347.0 139.8 190.5
—
—

—

1 Aggregate costs in each city weighted to represent total purchases of families of wage earners
and lower-salaried workers, have been combined with the use of population weights.
2 December 1950=100.




3 Comparable indexes for the years 1923-34 have been computed by converting indexes fromthe 1923-25
base to the 1935-39 base.
4 Revised.

10

TABLE 3.—CONTROL CLASSIFICATIONOF ITEMS IN THE RETAIL FOOD PRICE INDEX UNDER PRICE REGULATIONS ADOPTED DURING
1951AND 1952

men­ General overriding
men­ Supplementary CPR25, Suppl
General ceiling price regulation CPR's 15 and CPR25 Supple­
tary eregu­
tary eregu­
mentary Suppl
regulation
65
revised
lation
79 Regulation7, revision 1
lation
47
regulation
to
G
C
P
R
dollar16
m
axi
m
um
Subject
to
to
G
C
P
R
dollar43
to
G
C
P
R
to
G
C
P
R
7Subject
to
Free
from
and-cent
7-day
dif­
percentage
7-day Free fromcontrol
dollar- day dif­ ferential and-cent
control firm control flexible
control markups1 ceilings and-cent
ceilings Ammentend­22 mAentmend­127
ceilings ceilings ceilings differential
ceilings ferential
ay14, July195128, A1951
ug. 6, Oct.
Jan.195126, Jan.195126, Jan.195126, Apr.
19521, Nov.195220,
19511, Nov.195113, July
19511, Oct.
19515, M1951
CEREALSANDBAKERYPRODUCTS
Flour,
wheat
Flour,
wheat3
Corn
flakes Corn
Cornmeal3
flakes3
Cornmeal
Rice
Rolled
oats Rolled oats3
Bread,
white
Vanilla
ies cakecook­ Vanilla
ies3 cook­
Layer
Jellyroll
MEATS, POULTRY,ANDFISH
Roundroast
steak
Round
steak
Round
steak
Rib
Rib
roast
Rib
roast
Chuck
roast
Chuck
roast
Chuck
roast
Frankfurters
Ham
burger
Hamburger
Hamburger Veal cutlets
Veal
cutlets
Pork
chops
Pork
chopsPork
chops
Bacon,
Bacon,
HSalt
am, pork
wholsliced
e
HSalt
am, pork
wholsliced
e
Lamb, leg Frying chick­
Lamb, leg
ens
Fresh
Frozenfish
fish4 Salmon, pink,
Sal
mon, pink,
canned
canned
DAIRYPRODUCTS
Butter
Butter3
Cheesefresh, Cheese3
Milk,
delivered
Milk,
fresh,
grocery
Ice
cream
Milk,
rated evapo­ Milk,
rated3evapo­
_______ _______________ EGGS
|Eggs, fresh [
|
1
1
FRUITSANDVEGETABLES
Frozen
Fresh
Apples
Strawberries
Strawberries
Strawberries
Bananas
Orange
juice
Orange
juice concentrate3
Orange juice
Oranges
concentrate
concentrate
Beans,
green
Peas
Peas
Peas3___
Cabbage
Canned
Carrots
i
Peaches
Peaches3
Lettuce
Peaches
Pineapple Corn
Pineapple
Onions
Pineapple
Corn3
Potatoes5
Cornatoes
Tom
at
o
es
Tom
at
o
es3
Sweetpotatoes
Tom
Peas
Peas3
Tomatoes
Peas
Baby
foods, Baby
foods,
Baby
foods,
strained
strained3
strained
DRIED
Prunes Navybeans Prunes
Prunes
Navybeans3
Navybeans
B
EV
ER
A
G
ES
Coffee Cola drink Coffee
Cola drink
Cola
FATSdrink
ANDOILS
Lard
Lard
Hydrogenated
Hydrogenated
shortening
shortening
Salad
dress­
Salad
ing dress­
ing
Margarine,
Margarine,
uncolored
uncolored
Margarine,
Margarine,
colored
colored
SUGARANDSWIEETS
Sugar6
Grape jelly Grape jelly3
1 Application of markups allowed any time from April 5, 1951, but not compulsory until May 14, 1951,
2 Following the Defense Production Act amendments of 1952, effective July 1, 1952, which eliminated controls on frank and proc sed fruits and vegetables.
3 Subject to parity requirements.
4 Frozen fish was under firm price control fromJanuary 26, 1951, to May 21, 1951; freed from price control May 22, 1951.
3 Potatoes were controlled by percentagemarkups under CPR’s 15 and 16 fromJanuary 28, 1952, to June 6, 1952.
6 Sugar was under flexible price control fromJanuary 26, 1951* to February 11, 1951; freed from price control February 12,1951.
7 Controls suspended.




- 11 -

TABLE 4.—INDEXES OF RETAIL PRICES OF FOOD, BY CITY AND BY MONTH, 1951AND 19521

[1935-39 a 1001
Average
Region and city foryearthe Jan. 15 Feb. 15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 May15 June 151951July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15
UNITEDSTATES---------- 227.4 221.9 226.0 226.2 225.7 227.4 226.9 227.7 227.0 227.3 229.2 231.4 232.2
WENGLAND
215.
209.91 213.
60 215.
213.
Boston-NE------------—
80 214.
218.94 219.
39 212.
226.
226.
225.500 219.
224.397 217.
224.188 213.
226.
225.
324 214.
225.399 216.
227.
428 227.
228.389
Bridgeport-----------225.907 220.
221.
220.
216.
0
219.
8
219.
222.
2
223.
224.
2
223.
220.
219.
2
221.
Fall
River-----------92
219.
90 214.
215.10 218.
218.34 221.
90 219.
217.36 217.
Manchester-----------221.660 221.
219.298 222.
220.509 221.
219.299 219.
222.514 220.
222.
220.
220.
218.186 220.
222.848 222.
NPortland,
ewHaven------------207.
9
210.
0
216.
M
ai
n
e-------211.
0
209.
213.
217.
215.
213.
215.
216.
213.
1
210.
5
Providence------------ 230.2 225.1 230.8 228.6 229.5 229.1 229.6 231.8 228.9 228.3 232.8 233.3 234.11
MIDDLEATLANTIC 221.5 215.5 217.9 219.6 218.0 221.9 224.3 222.1 219.2 221.5 224.2 227.2 226.7
Buffalo--------------26
20 225.
50 223.
27 224.
14 225.
54 225.
225.31 226.
39 227.
—-----— 225.
NNew
ewark—---—
230.
221.
227.
224.329 227.
226.
57 225.
225.
520 226.
227.418 228.
230.
226.
338 220.
226.
224.
York-------------224.
221.
4
222.
223.
8
223.
228.
6
228.
Philadelphia----------223.
217.
7
222.
2
222.
2
223.
6
224.
1
227.
8 230.
59 230.
39 221.
232.59 232.
09 231.
0 233.
2 227.
4 227.
4 227.
22 227.
5 235.
234.864
230.44 222.
Pittsburgh-----------222.
218.
217.
8
220.
212.
2
216.
2
218.
220.
2
222.
3
226.
3
220.
Rochester----------Scranton-------------- 225.0 217.7 223.7 222.7 221.4 225.2 225.7 225.5 225.9 225.6 227.2 229.8 229.9
EASTNORTHCENTRAL 233.4 225.1 232.9 231.6 231.1 233.0 233.4 235.3 233.4 232.3 236.2 237.8 238.1
Chicago--------------229.30 229.
00 238.
27 235.
228.37 235.
230.54
225.38 226.
97 233.
227.16 226.
74 226.
Cincinnati-----------239.
237.
276 232.
Cleveland---—
—------ 227.
231.108 235.
236.
359 229.
236.
235.960 223.
227.
232.
207.
6
207.
3
207.
8
209.
206.
207.
3
208.
211.
4
35
207.
206.
7
207.
1
--------200.
7
Col
u
m
bus,
Ohi
o
229.31 229.
13 228.
9 228.
44 230.
5 233.
59 211.
234.
36 228.
8 3 227.
36 223.
4 229.
229.
36 218.
223.76 228.
Detroit--------------227.
224.
3
225.
227.
223.
226.
3
220.
221.
222.
4
223.
222.
1
Indianapolis----------29 227.
96 235.
228.96 239.
60
98 '229.
231.57 232.
91 237.
9 231.
64 227.
4 226.
224.98 227.
56 229.
20 219.
M
ilwaukee------------- 228.
235.
239.
2
36.
242.
5
238.
240.
241.
2
233.
236.
5
238.
Peoria---------------Springfield, 111------- 238.4 233.7 238.2 237.8 237.6 237.6 238.5 238.6 237.9 238.1 238.6 241.4 242.6
STNORTHCENTRAL 235.9 229.2 230.6 234.9 234.8 236.5 237.2 238.5 236.0 235.1 237.8 240.5 239.8
CedarWERapids2---------213.99 216.
00
8 215.
84 219.
212.26 218.
4 218.
04 208.
58 217.
67 212.
213.26 212.
213.70 211.
210.59 211.
4 3 218.
Kansas
City----------- 213.
217.
5
224.
221.
2
217.
6
219.
213.
217.
218.
Minneapolis----------220.
0
225.
1
227.
219.
6
219.
1
219.
6
223.
3
217.
0
216.
8
219.
3
213.70 216.
4 239.4 237.6 238.4 238.2 237.9 237.2 238.8 239.3 242.2 243.90
Omaha----------------219.
79 234.
238.
240.
0
St.
Louis------------216.92 216.
215.10 234.
214.51 214.
St. Paul-------------- 216.
242.79 221.
238.52 216.
237.28 215.
241.14 220.
244.16 223.
248.78
234.14 234.
231.51 212.
235.99 237.
238.44 210.
Wichita2-------------SOUTHATLANTIC
232.31 230.
14 242.
19 237.
229.40 238.
231.04 238.
230.57
228.07 228.
228.35 223.
48 224.
224.18 228.
Atlanta--------------238.
241.
109 232.
242.
236.
252 239.
231.
237.
10 236.
Baltimore-—
---—
—---- 238.
218.
0
218.
9
221.
0
220.
6
217.
221.
50
211.
5
211.
6
213.
2
212.
208.
9
214.
3
215.
8
Charleston,
S.
C
------61 234.
50 231.
234.98 235.
9 233.
71 232.
230.54 231.
8 233.
0 231.
51 233.
234.88 227.
234.39 229.
0 229.
Jacksonville----------- 233.
229.
229.
1
229.
233.
6
229.
2
230.
231.
230.
0
225.
2
Norfolk--------------74 218.
215.09 217.
46 216.
35 217.
29 215.
Richmond-------------241.
237.
64 216.
237.376 216.
239.
241.529 240.
241.117 218.
241.379
231.
240.074 219.
229.268 218.
232.344 215.
237.
------ 217.
Savannah------—
222.
6
224.
0
228.
228.
222.
2
224.
224.
2
221.
228.
222.
221.
223.
3
224.
3
------W
ashington,
D
.
C
Winston-Salem2--------- 220.7 217.6 221.3 223.7 220.4 220.6 220.6 220.3 220.7 219.3 220.1 220.5 222.8
220.21 229.
224.04 227.
TJackson2-------------H-rnn-EAt-nSTghumSOUTHCENT-RAL--- 219.
218.
38 227.
224.34 229.
220.84 220.
49 214.
56 217.
222.27
222.
224.
221.
226.534 250.
222.319 218.
223.
213 216.
223.
186 226.
225.377 219.
250.
253.
1
254.
9
256.
249.
8
253.
7
256.
2
253.
251.
7
248.
253.
1
252.
--—
Knoxville2-----87 215.
64 216.
219.619
0 214.
218.67 238.
59 213.
50 216.
70 237.
214.68 212.
76 215.
06 214.
58 233.
215.31 210.
Louisville-----------237.
238.
227.
230.
233.
234.
232.
234.
232.
3
234.
M
em
phi
s
——
—
——--Mobile-------------- — 226.8 220.4 222.5 223.8 225.7 224.2 225.7 229.5 227.0 229.1 231.7 230.0 231.4
WESTSOUTHCENTRAL— 230.6 225.9 228.7 229.9 228.7 228.9 227.9 227.0 230.9 233.5 233.8 236.0 235.4
Dallas-------------6 237.84 241.
2
237.2 239.
2 235.26 222.
235.6 238.
3 3 237.11 235.
Houston—
■ - -—--------- 237.
4 236.07 225.
223.460 237.
224.
224.
226.581 238.
224.
Little
Rock----------238.8 240.98 240.
239.49 225.
241.3 229.
244.39
239.5 225.
240.92 225.
238.22 223.
237.8 239.28 242.
240.39 222.
NewOrleans-----------MOUNTAIN
228.5 229.29 230.
6 225.65 227.
4 229.60 232.
2 233.72
223.9 222.99 226.
7 222.50 230.
226.37 220.
Butte----------------Denver---------------228.5 236.
232.95 239.
233.4
230.0 230.
228.36 231.
227.4 228.40 234.
226.9 232.
228.33 232.
222.28 229.
225.6 227.59 229.
Salt Lake City-——-—— 232.
228.2 227.
PACIFIC
34 247.
233.39 234.
95 232.
237.18 253.
240.37
96 230.
94 229.
34 226.
Los Angeles-----------246.596 251.
251.
251.
278 232.
247.
248.
252.129 230.
250.
387 228.
247.
243.
249.
306 226.
Portland,
Oreg--------- 232.
235.
234.
8
240.
7
234.
4
241.
237.
237.
4
238.
4
238.
0
235.
3
241.
238.
San
Francisco---------239.49
Seattle--------------- 234.5 230.2 231.7 234.3 234.4 236.6 233.0 233.8 232.7 234.4 234.8 238.1 248.
See footnotes at end of table.




12

TABLE 4.--INDEXES OF RETAIL PRICES OF FOOD, BY CITY AND BY MONTH, 1951AND 1952X--Continued

Region and city
UNITEDSTATES---------NEWENGLAND
Boston---------------Bridgeport-----------Fall River-----------Manchester-----------NPortland,
ewHaven—
-----M---—
aine-------Providence-----------MIDDLEATLANTIC
Buffalo--------------NNew
ewark---------------York-------------Philadelphia----------Pittsburgh-----------Rochester-----------Scranton-------------EASTNORTHCENTRAL
Chicago--------------Cincinnati-----------Cleveland------------Columbus, Ohio--------Detroit--------------Indianapolis----------M
ilwaukee---- --------Peoria---------------Springfield, 111------WERapids2---------STNORTHCENTRAL
Cedar
Kansas
City-----------Minneapolis-----------O
m
aha----------------St.
Louis------------St. Paul-------------Wichita2-------------SOUTHATLANTIC
Atlanta--------------Baltimore------------Charleston,
S. C-------JNorfolk--------------acksonville----------RiSavannah--------—
chmond------ ---------W
ashington, D. C—----Winston-Salem2--------EASTSOUTHCENTRAL
JKnoxville2----—
ackson2-------------—----Louisville-----------M
em
phi
s
--------------Mobile---------------WESTSOUTHCENTRAL
Dallas---------------Houston——
————————
Rock—--------NLittle
ewOrleans————
-M
O
U
N
T
A
I
N
DButte----------------enver—
Salt
Lake City--—----—
PACIFIC
Los
Angeles—--------Portland,
Oreg--------San Francisco----—
--—
Seattle—
——----------

Average
foryearthe
231.5
219.21
231.
223.
222.678
224.
216.
235.29
225.69
228.
229.
229.78
234.7
226.
231.51
237.50
234.
240.
44
214.
232.
68
227.
233.
8
240.
243.30
237.
46
216.
223.
44
224.
243.
5
222.
245.59
229.
243.
76
223.
5
236.71
236.
217.
89
242.
228.
1
221.6
220.
74
227.
254.
5
217.
236.640
229.
233.
239.140
228.
242.4
230.
6
234.
234.52

235.35
249.
244.34
239.

[ 1935-39 = 1001

Jan. 15
232.4
218.
229.204
224.
221.
26
222.
217.
234.04
225.
227.227
230.
229.
235.
744
227.
232.0

237.
233.
259
240.
214.
30
235.
227.
232.886
243.
244.1
238.38
217.
223.18
226.
244.
0
224.
248.30
230.
243.378
222.
237.22
237.
219.
242.376
228.
223.2
220.32
230.
256.
94
218.
237.
231.86
236.
34
241.
229.
244.87
230.22
236.
232.
9
239.
254.398
248.
243.4

Feb. 15
227.5
214.
50
227.
220.
216.787
219.
214.
229.15
221.
225.200
226.
224.
229.
84
223.
5
225.6
231.14
228.
237.
28
209.
229.
18
223.
227.
3
238.
240.52
235.
10
213.
220.
222.
661
238.
221.
242.27
227.64
238.
219.
231.754
3 232.
214.
39
238.
223.
218.16
217.
225.328
253.
213.
234.609
228.
228.
80
236.
224.
6
240.5
227.50
230.
231.2
234.
246.529
240.
238.2

Mar. 15
227.6
214.
227.364
221.
216.
62
220.
213.
231.48
221.
224.318
225.
224.
229.
336
221.
224.3
233.
228.386
235.
209.28
228.
224.
228.610
235.
238.6
235.11
213.
220.
24
222.
238.
3
220.
240.80
223.59
239.
219.32
3231.
231.90
212.
238.
7
224.
217.60
215.39
223.
250.25
213.
231.
228.00

229.
236.318
224.
239.8
228.1
230.
231.54
234.
248.
364
245.
239.7

Apr. 15
230.0
215.
228.234
220.
217.50
221.
213.64
233.
224.
228.327
229.
226.94
231.
222.
227.28
234.
89
231.
238.
2
211.24
231.
222.
25
231.
239.
240.18
236.
214.
44
222.
3
223.52
240.
221.
240.64
225.
242.
60
220.
2
232.
67
234.
216.
8
239.3
227.
218.80
215.
87
223.
250.
214.
594
231.
229.1
231.39
237.
226.
240.11
228.90
232.
233.7

237.
16
250.
249.
241.55

May15
230.8
218.
230.548
224.
221.21
226.
215.
237.84
227.
228.604
227.
228.10
233.
226.14
231.
239.
234.
333
240.
213.
86
231.
225.
237.100
240.
242.2
238.
215.250
224.
224.
243.286
223.
241.5
223.
22
243.
221.
231.
340
235.
215.
241.
368
226.
217.1
216.
47
222.
249.
6
216.
4
231.
224.74
231.
236.518
226.
239.2
229.64
232.
234.
2

235.
251.
370
247.
239.7

1952
June 15 July 15
231.5 234.9
225.
219.
238.690
230.229 228.
225.
223.
228.60
232.
225.390 222.
219.
238.5 241.38
227.
228.
230.232
226.904 233.
226.
235.31
228.98 237.
232.
232.70
226.97 237.
230.
239.
29 239.
239.
195
236.
242.
5
245.
217.22
214.
234.329 237.
228.
232.
237.
9 237.
607
243.
3
243.
245.9 246.9
240.
216.668
226.
226.
66
247.
225.
1
245.9

226.
54
242.
222.
236.208
236.
214.96
242.
227.
219.20
217.24
225.
251.15
218.
235.
230.64
232.
237.270
228.
241.4
231.
235.178
234.

235.
250.440
247.
237.8

240.29
220.
226.54
225.
248.
6
224.
246.10
236.
248.164
231.
240.10
242.
220.37
247.
232.
224.29
225.
57
229.
256.
221.286
236.
235.2
233.77
239.
230.64
246.
231.
8
237.
236.78
235.57
250.
243.
239.20

Aug. 15 Sept. 15
235.5 233.2
225.
235.265 221.
232.365
225.
227.
230.46 227.
225.97
229.
222.
9
219.
241.3 235.06
229.
227.
230.507 231.
229.789
232.
235.94 232.
31
240.
237.
231.
0
234.78
237.7 227.
241.
64
239.587 238.
237.
245.
243.
220.33 233.
218.390
235.
235.
240.169 231.
234.
360
245.
244.
246.9 244.7
238.
76 237.
220.
217.370
225.
0
223.
227.
30 224.
249.
244.
364
223.
3
222.
250.9 249.9
238.90 234.
249.
246.359
232.
2
226.
244.60 240.
244.
238.197
224.
1
222.
252.
0 245.
232.270
233.
228.61 224.
26
230.88 224.
232.
231.
258.
263.
4
158
224.74 221.
240.
243.
236.0 233.1
237.84 237.
240.196
242.
231.
233.
6
248.7 245.4
232.8 233.66
237.
237.37 235.
237.5
235.
36
251.
241.
239.70

234.
249.
695
240.
240.7

Oct. 15
232.4
221.49
233.
224.
20
226.
226.
218.16
235.2

227.54
230.
231.
34
231.
237.
226.040
232.
238.56
237.
241.
216.254
233.
230.
39
235.
237.
242.96

236.
39
218.
224.
223.
584
244.
222.
248.86
230.17
243.
222.
235.158
235.
218.
242.212
229.
222.7
223.
84
228.
253.
6
218.
1
239.
226.34
233.
240.398
228.
241.4
232.4
236.
235.36

233.
247.067
240.
238.5

Nov. 15
232.3
219.
231.527
222.
222.
224.867
214.
233.3
226.97
232.
234.
231.
204
237.
227.
230.79
238.
11
234.
238.
214.299
231.
227.
232.777
238.
243.2
236.
217.116
223.
223.
243.
257
221.
248.2
231.51
243.
221.
237.316
239.
218.56
241.
227.
222.84
221.
26*
227.
254.
215.
604
235.
226.3
232.
239.370
229.
240.4
231.
0
234.
235.26
234.
247.197
242.
238.3

Dec. 15
229.9
215.
230.570
219.
220.
222.330
213.
229.9
224.20
230.
228.
230.607
235.
225.
228.69
232.
232.316
234.
214.71
230.
225.
230.610
232.
240.6
235.
37
214.
221.
221.
564
240.
220.
247.54
228.34
241.
222.
236.116
234.
216.
19
242.
225.
2
222.5
221.
227.
640
255.
214.
233.611
227.
231.
22
241.
228.
240.20
229.6
232.
233.65
235.
242.046
245.
236.5

1 Agregate costs of foods in each city weighted to represent total purchases by families of wage earners and lower-salaried workers, have been combined for the United States with the use of population weights.
3 June 1940 = 100.
3 Revised.




13

TABLE 5.—RETAIL FOOD PRICE INDEX PERCENT CHANGES, BY CITIES, 1951AND 1952

Dec. 15, Jan.195115, Feb.195115, Mar.195115, Apr.195115, May195115, June195115, July195115, Aug.195115, Sept.15,
Oct.195115, Nov.195115, Dec.195015, Annual
averageto
1951
City and regional area Jan.1950
to Oct.to15, Nov.to15, Dec.to15, Dec.to15, 1950
to15, Feb.to15, Mar.to15, Apr.to15, Mayto15, Juneto15, Julyto15, Aug.to15, Sept.15,
annual
1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 1951 average
1951
UNITEDSTATES------------- +2.6 +1.8 +0.1 -0.2 +0.8 -0.2 +0.4 -0.3 +0.1 +0.8 +1.0 +0.3 +7.4 +11.2
NEW
ENGLAND:
84 +0.
+0.44 +7.
-0.7
+0.32 +0.08 -0.5
Boston-----------------+2.
+2.24 +1.
-0.22 -0.2
+0.
-0.4 -0.6
-0.3 +1.
+1.
+0.324 +0.
+6.
794 +9.
+10.907
+1.
Bridgeport-------------+2.294 +2.
-0.43 +0.
-0.38 +1.
+1.
6
0
+0.
+5.
+10.
+0.
4
-0.5
-0.2
Fall
River--------------0.3
+0.
+2.
2
-0.7
-0.93 +1.
M
+0.53 +0.
1 +0.
-0.7
+9.55
+0.30 +1.
-0.6
1 +1.
+2.
-0.1
0 +5.
+6.
551 +10.
NPortland,
ewanchester-------------Haven--------------+2.554 .+1.
+2.588 -0.2
-0.3 +0.
+0.921 +0.
-1.1
+1.
124 -0.1
-0.5
-0.5
-1.3
+0.
3
-0.1
+1.
+1.
4
+1.
+6.
+9.88
+1.
-0.4
M
ai
n
e---------+2.
+0.
2
Providence-------------- +2.6 +2.5 -1.0 +0.4 -0.2 +0.2 +1.0 -1.3 -0.3 +2.0 +0.2 +0.3 +6.7 +10.
MIDBuffalo----------------DLEATLANTIC:
38 -0.2
+9.
3 +11.
-1.01 -1.3
+1.10 +1.
2 +1.
+11.54
83 +1.
1 +0.
+3.
9 +2.
8 +0.
-0.74 +1.
+1.14 +0.
-0.5
+5.
5
-0.3
+0.
+0.
5
+0.
+1.
-0.7
-1.0
NNew
ewark-----------------+2.
3
+1.
4
+0.
9
+0.
3
+0.
8
-0.1
+10.16
-0.4
+6.
7
-1.0
-0.9
+0.
1
+0.
7
33 +2.
York---------------- +2.
71 -0.4 +0.4 +0.7 -0.7 +0.6 -0.2 +0.4 +1.3 +0.7 +0.1 +7.5 +11.
Philadelphia-----------+2.
+2.
-0.4
-0.3
+7.
6
+1.10 +1.
+0.7
+1.2 -0.19 +1.
1 -0.4
+10.57
+2.29 +0.
-0.1 +0.3 +1.
Pittsburgh-------------- +2.
-1.22 +0.
Rochester--------------+3.060 +1.
-0.16 +1.
+0.7 +1.18 +0.05 +10.
+0.2 -0.6
-0.1 +0.
+8.34 +11.
-0.6 +1.74 +0.
+11.1
Scranton---------------- +2.
+2.8 -0.49 -0.2
EAChicago----------------STNORTHCENTRAL:
-0.53 +0.
+1.37 +1.
+0.09 +0.
55
+1.66 +3.
54 -0.6
-0.21 +0.
+0.
+10.
+1.280 -0.8
-0.4
-0.71 +7.
+6.704 +11.
+0.586 +0.
-0.123 +0.
+3.
Cincinnati-------------+1.
-0.53 +0.
+0.
8
+0.
8
-0.2
+8.
+1.
+0.
+0.
-0.4
-0.2
-0.6
+11.
2
+2.
3
+0.
Cleveland--------------+2.
9
-0.1 +0.
99 +0.
04 +7.
+11.
+0.86 +0.
+0.61 -0.4
-0.5 +0.
+3.
Columbus, Ohio----------- +1.
-0.1
+0.
+1.937 +0.
-0.14 +0.
-0.252 +0.
+8.600 +11.
+12.307
Detroit----------------+3.770 +0.
-0.227 -0.7
+2.190 +0.
4
-0.4
+0.
+0.
+0.
4
-0.4
+5.
+0.
Indianapolis-------------0.2
+0.
8
+1.
+0.
-0.6 +0.4 +1.27 +1.
M
ilwaukee--------------9 -1.2 -0.5
+0.4 +7.
+1.2 +1.12 +0.
-0.27 -0.9
______
__ +1.
Peoria__
+6.597 +10.
+9.838
+2.599 +3.
+1.396 +0.
+0.4 -0.6
0 -1.2
-0.3 +0.1 +0.02 +1.
+1.2 -0.33 +4.
-0.1 +1.01 +0.
+11.
-0.2 -0.1
Springfield,
111.-------+0.
+1.
WECedar
STNORRapids-----THCENTRAL: ------- +1.5 +0.6 +1.9 0 +0.7 +0.3 +0.5 -1.0 -0.4 +1.1 +1.1 -0.3 +6.2 +11.7
-0.45 +0.
2 +0.
+7.33 +11.
+11.94
4 -0.9
+1.12 +0.
+1.90 +0.
+0.04 +0.
Kansas
City------------+2.64 +1.
-0.9
-0.74 +0.
+1.578 +1.
+1.378 +8.
+1.
261 +0.
+0.
-0.2
Minneapolis------------ +3.
-0.152 +0.
OSt.maha-___
__
_____
+0.
+0.
8
1
-0.2
-0.2
+1.
+0.
+8.
2
+1.
9
+1.
3
1
+1.
+11.
18
+0.
33 +0.
-0.11 -0.3
-0.15 +0.
+0.
7 +0.
26 +1.
24 +0.
79 +10.
+1.
98 +2.
-0.81 +0.
+6.23 +11.
Louis--------------61 +0.
-0.26 +0.
-0.1
-0.5
+2.
+0.
+0.
+0.
+12.
St.
Paul---------------+3.
+1.
Wichita----------------- +0.5 +2.1 +0.7 -1.4 0 +0.4 +1.4 -0.2 +1.5 +0.6 +0.5 +1.9 +8.2 +11.38
SOAtlanta----------------UTHATLANTIC:
+0.94 +0.
+0.31 +1.
+0.
6 +0.
-0.92 +0.
9 -0.6
+6.31 +13.
0 +0.
1 -0.3
4
0 +2.
+2.
94 +2.
+0.33 -0.1
0
-0.8
+0.
5
-0.3
0
+1.
2
+7.
+10.
7
Baltimore--------------+2.
+3.
4
+1.
0
0
06 +0.8 -0.1 +0.
-0.25 -1.2
+1.
-0.3
+2.68 +1.
+0.54 -1.0
51
Charleston,
S. C.-------- +2.
+2.11 +1.
-0.94 +0.
+1.08 -+0.
-1.67 +0.
+0.617 +9.
+5.
380 +12.
Jacksonville-------------0.2
+11.
0
-0.1
0
0
+0.
-2.5
+0.
+8.
+2.
6
Norfolk----------------+11.
+4.
8
+1.
2
-0.18 +0.07 -0.3
+0.
86 +0.
3 +0.
34 -0.4
RiSavannah---------------chmond---------------- +2.
+3.
84 +10.
37 +0.
-0.43 +2.
-0.73 +0.04 +0.
44
50 +1.
-0.5
+0.
-0.3
0
+0.
+8.
+3.
+13.
9
+0.
-0.1 +0.
+0.19 00 -1.0
+0.79 +1.
-0.41 -1.5
W
D. C.-------- +1.
+2.61 +1.
+10.74
-0.66 +1.
-0.1 +0.
+0.32 +0.
+0.84 +0.02 +0.
+1.04 +5.
+4.61 +10.
Washington,
inston-Salem-----------EABiSTrmSOinUgham
THC-------------ENTRAL:
+3.35 +0.
-0.1
-1.0 +0.
-0.15 -0.8
80 +0.
-0.93 +1.
+1.30 +1.
-0.78 +6.
+4.19 +11.
+0.
+1.371 +1.
-0.910 +0.
+3.
-0.6
+1.
+0.
Jackson----------------+1.558 +0.
01 -1.9
+9.489
+0.
6
-0.5
+1.
-1.0
+0.
8
+0.
2
+5.
3
-0.2
Knoxville--------------+10.
+2.
1
-0.2
+1.
-0.60 +1.
+0.4 +0.53 +0.
6 +0.
9 +0.52 +6.
Louisville-------------3 +2.
0 -,-0.4
+7.8 +11.59
1.0 +0.
M
s----------—---- +3.
-0.327 +1.
-0.778 +0.
+1.
+1.014 +1.
Mem
obilphie-----------------+0.6 +8.75 +10.
8 +0.
+1.
+1.1 -0.1
-0.7 +0.
+3.64 +1.
+0.36 +0.
-0.77 +0.
-1.1 +0.29 +0.
+11.2
WEDallas-----------------STSOUTHCENTRAL:
+0.
-0.4
+0.19 +1.
-0.34 +6.
+6.50 +11.
52 -0.5
77
+2.
27 +1.
+0.019 +0.
-0.816 +0.
-0.8
0 +1.
+0.
97 ' +1.
-0.1
-1.311 -0.4
+10.
+3.
-0.221 +0.
+1.
Houston----------------0
+0.
+2.
0
+0.
-0.7
-0.3
+0.
4
+5.
9
Little
Rock------------+2.
6
-0.8
+10.
+0.
7
+1.
NewOrleans------------- +4.2 +0.8 +1.0 -0.8 -0.3 -0.5 +0.3 +0.8 -0.1 -0.3 +0.6 +1.2 +7.1 +10.48
MOBut
UNTt©AI——
N: ———————————— +2.3 +0.8 +0.6 -0.4 +1.7 -0.5 +0.8 +0.7 -0.2 +0.3 +0.4 +1.5 +8.3 +11.3
+0.07 -0.3
Denver____-_______
+0.7 +0.
+0.60 +0.
-0.44 +0.
+0.33 +1.
+0.21 +0.
+1.98 +1.
+0.04 +7.
+7.50 +11.
+11.59
-0.4 +1.
+0.17 -0.9
+2.39 +0.
+1.55 +1.
Salt Late City----------- +1.
PALos
CIFIC:Angeles------------- +3.8 +0.3 +1.3 -0.4 +0.9 0 +0.8 -0.2 +0.4 +0.5 +1.1 +1.5 +10.4 +12.9
+2.20 +3.
-0.12 -1.5
-0.43 +2.
+0.26 +8.
+12.69
+1.
4 -0.2
+0.
22 +0.
+7.58 +10.
6 +1.
27 -0.7
+3.69 +1.
Portland,
Qreg.---------- +3.
+0.
-1.6
+0.
-1.4
+1.
2
-1.4
+2.
San
Francisco------------1.1
+1.
4
+0.8 +6.3 +10.7
Seattle----------------- +2.0 +0.7 +1.1 0 +0.9 -1.5 +0.3 -0.5 +0.7 +0.2




- 14 -

TABLE 5 .— RETAIL

City and regional area

FOOD

PRICE INDEX PERCENT CHANGES, BY CITIES, 19S1 and 1952--Continued

15, Oct.195215, Nov.195215, Dec.195115,
Dec.195115, Jan.195215, Feb.195215, Mar.195215, Apr.195215, May195215, June195215, July195215, Aug.195215, Sept.
1952
to
to
to
to
to
to15, Julyto15, Aug.to15, Sept.to 15, Oct.to15, Nov.to15, Dec.to15, Dec.to15,
ay15, June1952
Jan.195215, Feb.195215, Mar.195215, Apr.195215, M1952
1952 1952 1952 1952 1952 1952 1952
+0.1 -2.1 0 +1.1 +0.3 +0.3 +1.5 +0.3 -1.0 -0.3 0 -1.0 -1.0
34 -1.2
+0.34 +1.
74 -0.2
-1.6 +0.
-1.65
70 +0.
-0.52 -1.7
+3.
+0.
+1.
-0.154 +2.
-1.2 -1.9
+0.031 +0.
-1.1 +0.
-0.7
-0.7
+0.
-1.0
-0.6
+1.
5
-0.4
-0.9
-0.8
+0.
-0.5
+1.
8
+0.
-1.3
-1.5
-1.9
+0.
1
0 -1.5
10 +0.
-0.12 +0.
+0.44 +2.
-0.3
+0.
+1.37 +1.
-1.1
+3.
-0.427 +2.
-0.9 -0.7
-1.139 -2.0
-0.7 -0.5
-1.2 -0.1
-1.3
+0.
+0.421 -2.0
+1.
5
+0.
-1.7
-0.4
-0.1
-0.1
+0.
8
-1.5
-1.3
+1.
+0.
-1.8
+0.1 -2.1 +0.8 +0.9 +1.9 +0.3 +1.4 -0.2 -2.4 -0.2 -0.8 -1.5 -1.3
67 +0.
0 -1.0
6 -0.8
38 +1.
0 +0.
-0.23 +1.
-0.20 -1.3
-0.72 -1.9
+0.
4 +1.
-1.23
-0.1
0
+0.
+1.
+0.
2
+1.
+1.
-0.4
-1.1
+0.
-1.2
-0.3
-0.8
+2.
8
-0.3
-0.2
-2.3
-0.4
+1.
8
-0.2
+1.
2
-0.98
-1.7
-0.2
+2.98 +0.
15 -1.6
-1.3 -0.4
0 +1.
-0.12 -0.2
+0.
29 +0.
57 +0.03 +1.
+0.
+1.
+0.
+0.
0
-1.0
-0.2
+0.
+0.
2
+0.035 -2.2
-2.5
+0.63 +1.
-1.7 -0.9
0 -1.4
+1.94 +0.
-0.11 +2.
+2.39 -0.4
-0.6 +1.
-1.2 -0.6
-1.2 +0.
-0.56 -0.9
-0.9 -0.8
+0.9 -2.8
-0.4
+1.09 +1.01 +0.
39 +0.
-1.3
01 -0.2
-0.32 -2.2
-2.5 -2.5
-2.6 +0.
+0.
+0.038 -0.7
-1.0 +0.
-1.5 -1.9
-0.6
+1.604 +0.
+1.
+1.
+0.
28 +0.
+1.
+1.
9
+0.
9
-1.0
-0.6
+1.
2
-1.1
-1.830
+1.
0
-1.5
+1.
4
+1.
4
-0.9
-0.9
-1.0
0
-0.3
+1.
1
+0.
2
+1.
4
+1.
1
+1.
-2.1
34 +1.
-0.86 -1.0
+0.
-0.5
-0.11 +1.
23 +1.
-2.5 +0.
+0.23 -1.7
17 +1.
+1.
+1.
-0.617 -0.6
-0.850 +0.
-1.7
-1.2 -1.6
-0.9
+0.
+1.
-1.1
-0.1
-1.4
+1.
+2.
4
+0.
3
+0.
1
+0.
3
+1.
1
-2.4
+0.
-1.1
-2.4
-1.1
+0.
9
-0.8
-2.6
+0.
1
+1.
4
+0.
2
+0.
5
-2.6
-1.2
+1.
8
+0.
5
-2.2
-0.8
+0.6 -1.6 -0.7 +0.6 +0.9 +1.5 +0.4 0 -0.9 -0.7 +0.1 -1.1 -4.1

UNITEDSTATES-----------NEW
ENGLAND:
Boston___________
Bridgeport------------Fall River-------*-----Manchester------------NewHaven-------------Portland,
Maine-------Providence------------MIDBuffalo---------------DLEATLANTIC:
NNew
ewark________—
__
York--------------Philadelphia-----------Pittsburgh------ -----Rochester-------------Scranton--------------EAChicago-—
STNORTHC_________
ENTRAL:
Cincinnati------------Cleveland-------------Col
umbus, Ohio--------Detroit---------------Indianapolis-----------Milwaukee-------- -----Peoria----------------Springfield, 111-------WECedar
STNORRapids-----------THCENTRAL:
Kansas
City-----------Minneapolis-----------OSt.maha-----------------Louis-------------St. Paul--------------Wichita---------------SOUAtlanta---------------THATLANTIC:
Baltimore-------------Charleston, S. C.------Jacksonville-----------Norfolk---------------Richmond--------------Savannah--------------W
D. C.------Washington,
inston-Salem----------EABiSTrmSOinUgham
THCE------------NTRAL:
Jackson—
—
—
—
————————
Knoxville-------------Louisville------------M
s—————————————---———
Mem
obilphie-----------WEDallas------------STSOUTHCENTRAL: -—
Houst
on---------------Little
Rock-----------NewOrleans-----------MOButte------------UNTAIN:
----Denver—
Salt Lake——City---------PALos
CIFIC:Angeles-----------Portland,
Greg.--------San
Francisco----------Seattle----------------




-0.6
-0.1
-0.4
-0.1
0
+0.
-0.21
05
+0.
+0.
+0.594
+1.
+0.
54
+0.
-0.1
+0.2
-1.15
+0.
+0.
1
-0.3
-0.51
+0.
41
+0.
+0.
-0.1
+0.2
-1.5
-1.3
-0.2
-0.66
+0.
+0.
+1.52

-1.3
-2.2
-1.3
-1.9
-2.2
-1.2
-2.3
-1.4
-2.1
-1.3
-2.4
-1.9
-2.3
-1.5
-2.4
-2.1
-1.3
-2.0
-1.4
-2.2
-1.2
-1.6
-3.2
-2.2
-2.2
-1.8
-1.2
-2.6
-0.7
-2.1
-3.1
-3.4
-2.1

000
-0.1
-0.1
-0.5
-0.8
-1.54
+0.
0
-0.1
-0.7
-0.7
-0.1
+0.
-0.54
-0.9
-0.8
-1.1
-0.2
-1.7
0
+0.04
-0.1
-0.3
+0.32
+0.
+0.
1
+0.
+0.260
+2.
+0.6

+0.66
+0.
+1.
+0.094
+0.
+0.
-0.27
+0.35
+1.
+0.
+0.
646
+1.
+1.38
+0.
+1.
+0.27
+0.
-0.122
+0.
+0.
+0.562
+0.
+0.87
+0.
+0.
+0.18
+0.
4
+0.
+1.70
+1.91
+0.
+1.
+0.78

+0.
+0.579
+0.
+0.
+1.737
+0.
+0.5
-0.82
+0.
+0.
-0.651
+0.
-0.68
+0.
-0.4
-0.4
+0.
-0.43
-0.5
+0.
9
+0.
-2.11
+0.
-0.822
+0.
-0.4
+0.
+0.322
+0.
-0.63
+0.
-1.0
-0.7

+1.
16
+0.
+1.
+0.816
+1.
+0.
+1.98
+1.
-0.356
+0.
+2.
14
+0.
-0.5
+0.
+0.972
+0.
+0.
+1.185
+0.
+0.
8
+1.
+2.77
+0.51
+0.
+1.
+0.90
+1.
+1.310
+0.
-0.1
-0.52
+0.
-0.8

15

+0.
16
+1.
-0.1
-0.54
+0.
-0.4
0
+4.
26
+2.
+3.
+1.579
+2.
+2.
+1.288
+2.
+2.7
+3.
+2.700
+2.
+1.
+0.514
+2.
+0.
+1.
177
+0.
+2.2
0
+1.
+0.19
+0.
+0.
21
-1.8
+0.6

-0.92
+0.
-0.68
+0.
+0.
-0.420
+2.
+0.
+0.
583
+0.
+1.89
+0.
+1.
+1.495
+0.
+1.6
+2.34
+1.
+2.
+1.974
+2.
+0.3
+1.
+1.
364
+1.
+0.9
+0.04
+0.2
-0.24
+0.
-0.5
-0.1

-0.7
-1.5
-0.6
-1.2
-1.9
-0.4
-0.4
-1.6
-1.2
-2.5
-1.8
-2.1
-0.6
-2.8
-0.4
-1.7
-2.9
-0.5
-1.9
-1.5
-1.2
-1.2
-0.1
-0.8
-0.9
-1.3
+0.
-0.913
+0.

-0.3
-0.8
-0.3
+0.7

-0.37
+0.
+0.
5
-0.5
0
+0.
-0.52
-1.8
-1.3
-1.6
-1.9
-1.6
-2.0
-1.2
-1.3
-0.9
-0.2
-1.4
-1.9
-1.4
-0.6
-2.9
-1.3
-0.2
-1.2
-1.6
-0.5
■M
-0.9D.4
-0.3
-0.8
-0.4
-0.9

+0.
-0.81
-0.8
+0.
1
-0.5
-0.6
-0.2
+0.
4
-0.1
-0.5
+0.78
+1.
+0.
-0.21
-0.6
-0.1
-1.2
-0.4
+0.
2
-1.1
-1.7
0
-0.7
-0.2
+0.
-0.41
-0.6
-1.01
+0.

-0.5
-1.1
-0.7
-1.0
-1.2
-0.5
-0.3
-1.2
-0.9
+0.
-0.52
-1.9
-1.15
+0.
-1.1
0.
-0.1
06
+0.
-0.5
-1.04
+0.
-0.56
+0.
-0.4
-0.1
-0.6
-0.7
-0.8
+0.05 +0.
-2.122
+0.
9
+1.
-0.1 -0.8

-1.9
-1.5
-1.1
-2.4
-1.4
-1.5
-0.5

-1.0
-0.53
+0.
+0.
54
+0.
-1.0
+0.
5
-1.6
-0.1
-0.8
-0.7
-0.5
-2.1
-2.4
-1.9
-1.8
0
-0.8
-1.7
-1*8
-2.8
+0.
1
-2.2
-4.2
-1.4
-1.4

Annual
average
1951
to
annual
average
1952
+1.8
+2.40
+2.
+1.
+1.223
+2.
+1.
+2.28
+2.50
+1.
+1.
+2.597
+1.
+2.
+2.87
+1.
+2.359
+2.
+3.
+1.394
+1.
+2.
5
+0.
+1.99
+0.67
+1.
+2.
+2.
193
+1.
+2.
+3.18
+0.
+2.
356
+3.
+1.39
+2.
+0.
+2.317
+1.
+0.4
+0.59
+0.
+0.
71
+1.
+0.
+1.27
+1.70
+0.
+1.
+0.69
+1.7
+0.
+2.88
+1.05
+2.14
+2.

TABLE 6.—CLASSIFICATION OF RETAIL FOODITEMS BY PERCENTAGE CHANGE INPRICE FROM DECEMBER 1950TODECEMBER 1951
AND FROM DECEMBER 1951TODECEMBER 1952

PERCENTCHANGEFROMDECEMBER1950TODECEMBER1951
+5.0$ to +9.9$
+0.1$ to +4.9$
-5.0$ to -9.9$
+10.0$ and over
-0.1$ to -4.9$
■ 10.0$and over
Grape jelly-----+9.11 Apples-----------+4.
---- -13.1
Cabbage, fresh----+69.
__5-5638 Eggs,
dried---- ■-1.1.14 Salt pork----------5.
—+4.+4.634 Prunes,
Beans,fresh—
green,fresh—
Ice cream-----Corn, cake------canned------+9.
Lettuce--------—
+62.518 Layer
Oranges---------Milk,
fresh,
Pork
chops------Potatoes--—-----+62.
-33.0
an
grocery—+9.1 Ham, whole------- +2.1 Salmon, pink,
Strawberries,
Milk,
fresh,
Sweetpotatoes-----+49.
4
canned—- ■ 3.0 Orange juicefrozen---6.8
delivered-+8.+8.49 Baby foods,strained—+1.9 Peas, canned---—
Carrots----------+38.
burger-------Coffee——-----—+26.030 Ham
Frying
chickens---+1.
Peas,
5
frozen-----flakes-—---+8.
3
coneentrate—7.5
Corn
Butter-----------+15.
+8.11 Shortening,
Sugar------------+1.2 Bacon, sliced-—-- *3.
Tomat
oroast—--—
es, fresh---+14.
95 Frankfurters----*3.19
Bread,
white------+7.
Chuck
+13.
hydrogenated—
Cheese-----------+13.
36 Fish, fresh,frozen—+6.2 Pineapple,
Veal
cutlets------+12.
canned—+++ .7..93
Rolled
oats-----+6.
2
Salad
dressing——
Rib
roast-------+12.
4
canned---+6.+5.07
Round
steak—-—--+12.
15 Peaches,
Com
meal------—
Lam
b,
leg--------•
+11.
Cola drink------+11.
Vanilla
cookies--+10.289 Flour, wheat------+5.5
o
es,
canned--+10.
Tomat
Milk, evaporated— +10.4
PERCENTCHANGEFROMDECEMBER1951TODECEMBER1952
Applea_______ +37.6 Beans, green, fresh +9.9 Com, canned—---- +4.4 Coffee_______ - .3 Veal cutlets---—- -6.0 Shortening,
roast------- - -6.1
Commeal--evaporated-- +4.
Layer cake------Onions—————————
---- +7.
Frankfurters-----Salt pork------+3.28 Vanilla
cookies--- --- .4..46 Rib
+5.+5.177 Milk,
-6.4
Lam
b,hydrogenated—-10.7
leg-------dried----Sweetpotatoes—
---—+26.
+16.87 Prunes,
Flour,
wheat-----Eggs,
fresh----Frying
chickens,
N
avy
beans,
dried—
Milk,
fresh,
-6.9
Carrots,
fresh---- -12.
-13.
178
delivered—+3.
8
Grape
jelly-----.
8
Butter----------~
-7.1
Ham
burger-------3
-13.
N
.
Y
.
dressed—+15.
Peas,
canned—-1.0
Salad
dressing----7.8
Orange concentratejuice -15.7
Potatoes—
----- +12.8
Peaches,
canned--Cheese,canned—
Amprocess—+3.
erican—-- +3,87 Pineapple,
-1.5
Chuck
roast—
——-7.92 Tomat
Frying
chickens,
Pork
chops------o
es,
fresh--- -16.9
-3.1
Sal
m
on,
pink—
—
dressed
and
drawn
+10.
1
--9.
coloredCabbage, fresh---Milk, fresh,grocery—+3.6 Margarine,
-4.1
+10.0
-23.20
Rice-Lettuce-------—-29.
Peas,
frozen—
-—
—-4.1
Round
steak-----Lard________
Sugar-----------+3.
6
-4.1
-30.
3
Bread,
white------ +3.
25
+2.
Bacon-----------Tomat
oes,ecanned—+2.
39
HIceam,cream-------whol
------- +1.
+1.
Rolled
oats------ +1.310
Baby
foods,strained+1.
Oranges--—
------ ++ .7.9 .
Cola drinks------




16

TABLE 7.—INDEXES OF RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODSIN LARGE CITIES COMBINED, BY MONTH, 1951

Article

[1935-1939= 1001
Aver1951
age
for
the Jan. 15 Feb. 15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 May15 June 15 July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15
year

Cereals
and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour,
wheat---~-----5pounds—
201.32
Corn
flakes----------13
ounces—
200.
Corn
meal—
------------pound—
203.
Rice1---oats2---------20
--- -----------do--99.512
160.
Rolled
ounces—
Bakery
products:
Bread,
white-----------pound—
Vanilla
cookies
------------do—— 183.
216.33
Layer
cake
(and
jelly107.2
roll,
each)3
Meats,
poultry,
and-4-----------do--fish:
Meats:
Beef:
Round
steak-----------—pound—
50
295.
Rib
roast-----------do--- 323.
-----------do--328.
2
Chuck
roast—
Frankfurters3-----------do--Hamburger2------------- do--- 107.
216.28
Veal:
Cutlets--------------- -do--- 315.2
Pork:
Chops----------------do—— 240.24
Bacon,
226.54
HSalt
am,pork--------------do--wholsliced-----------do--e------—-----do--- 176.
184.
LamLeg------------------b:
do--- 293.
192.14
Poultry:
Frying
chickens-----do--Fish;
Fish
frozen)*----Salproducts:
mon,(fresh,
pink*----16-ouncedo--can— 289.
499.28
Dairy
Butter----------———----pound—
Cheese-------------------do--- 224.
261.19
M
iFresh
lk: (delivered)------—quart—
187.
96
189.
Fresh
(grocery)-----------do--Ice
cream
3-----------------pint—
104.
Milk,Fresh--------;
evaporated—14---------dozen—
l/2-ounce can— 211.
202.318
Eggs:
Fruits
andfruits:3
vegetables:
Frozen
Strawberries3-------16 ounces— 97.6
Orange
juice
concentrate3--------6
ounces— 101.4
Frozen
vegetables:
Peas3---------------12
ounces— 98.1
Fresh
fruits:
Apples—
----------------pound—
208.
270.
333
Bananas------------------do--Oranges,
size
200----—dozen—
171.
Fresh
Beans,vegetables:
green-----------pound— 207.
Cabbage-----------------do--228.
66
232.
5
Carrots-----------------bunch—
195.
Lettuce------------------head—
191.
210
Onions------------------pound—
209.
15
pounds—
Potatoes-----------Sweetpotatoes—
------- pound— 228.
Tomatfruits:
oes5-6---------------do--179.44
Canned
175.30
Peaches----------N
o. 2 l/2 can— 178.
Pineapple----------------do--Canned
vegetables:
Corn7---------------N
o. 2 can— 164.
209.894
Tomatoes-----------------do--117.
N
o.
303
can—
Peas-------------Baby foods, strained3
101.
57
4 1/2-4 3/4 ounces—
270.
Dried
fruits:
Prunes------pound—
225.
3
Dried
vegetables:
N
avy
beans—
do--Beverages:
Coffee—
---------------—
—
do*--344.
Colaanddrink3-----103.98
FatsLard---------------------pound—
oils: 6-bottle carton— 165.
189.257
Hydrogenatea
shortening--—do—
■— 160.
Salad
dressing------------pint—
Margarine---------------—pound— 185.6
Sugar
and•—
sweets:
188.27
Sugar—
--------—
---5
Grape jelly3---------- 12pounds—
ounces— 100.

196.
192.535
200.
100.57
154.
182.
209.28
103.1

199.90
193.
202.58
101.
155.
2
183.
211.60
105.8

200.
194.397
203.
101.69
156.
182.
213.87
106.0

202.44
197.
201.
101.236
160.
182.28
213.
107.3

202.
38
197.
200.
101.334
161.
183.54
213.
106.9

201.57
199.
200.58
101.
161.
5
183.
214.94
108.6

312.
30
288.
315.
0
104.
212.14
300.2
228.19
175.
224.
186.97
277.
184.39
283.
493.07
228.90
254.
183.
57
185.
104.
194.512
191.
100.8
102.0
99.1
204.
266.345
153.
303.
239.506
206.
164.
144.330
172.
182.57
254.
172.
177.15
159.5
191.
119.25
100.
268.280
231.
340.87
107.
166.
191.324
161.
193.9
187.
100.33

317.
294.226
323.
105.
217.57
308.0
235.06
178.
229.57
187.
284.
193.21
283.
501.17
226.31
264.
184.78
186.
105.
201.480
179.
101.3
102.4
99.9
206.
274.440
173.
244.28
425.
258.
189.
327
173.
177.6
189.
218.77
172.58
178.
161.8
209.
119.17
100.
8
271.
234.94
343.95
107.
173.34
197.
164.
199.25
187.56
100.

318.
90
292.
80 320.
294.326 320.
289.
327.
1
324.
1
326.
106.27 106.
106.84 219.
218.
216.59
308.6 311.9 315.4
26
235.27 177.
233.64 234.
177.
178.
230.
1
228.
0
226.
188.0 187.9 184.39
285.90 198.
293.84
288.57 6199.
198.
287.
502.64 286.
508.14 287.
511.17
224.
265.07 219.
265.77 223.
260.33
185.34 186.
185.96 184.
185.997
187.
104.
9
105.
2
104.
202.24 191.
203.22 198.
202.84
195.
101.3 100.5 98.7
104.2 105.1 105.0
100.1 98.3 98.3
206.
205.1 213.
276.120 273.
274.267
166.
158.90 163.
193.
205.67 212.
386.354 225.
191.570
192.
9
196.
220.
229.18
17 235.
149.
186.
176.218 212.
202.55
179.
185.
0
190.
192.14 201.
216.31 193.
196.6
173.
8
174.
3
174.
178.3 179.7 178.86
162.8 163.66 7 226.
164.4
215.
119.69 223.
119.3 118.84
101.5 101.
101.
273.189
272.144 273.
235.35 233.
235.
342.
108.39 6344.
108.52
108.14 346.
174.44 173.
167.18
198.
201.187 201.
165.
5
165.
164.88
199.1 199.9 197.
187.
101.40
100.48 186.
101.57 186.

322.
25
289.
327.
106.258
215.
317.2
235.
38
177.
228.
184.19
297.
191.32
291.
511.40
223.
261.38
185.14
186.
104.9
203.
201.32
97.0
104.8
98.0
232.
271.597
167.
187.
39
172.
202.
162.
86
246.
1
230.
231.244
179.
174.19
178.
164.2
230.
118.84
102.18
272.
230.7
346.
108.70
166.
198.214
166.
194.3
187.
101.40

323.
10
290.
327.
0
108.
215.49
319.1
236.89
177.
229.
183.60
296.
195.39
288.
509.12
221.08
260.
187.
188.215
105.
203.35
211.
97.4
103.2
98.2
240.
268.529
161.
149.
10
151.
229.
2
192.76
205.
236.
251.218
170.
174.
177.68
164.90
228.
119.
2
101.
7
274.
224.54
346.20
108.
159.
94
190.
163.
5
184.2
190.80
100.

201.68
196.
203.
102.127
159.
182.97
214.
107.9

1July 1947 =100.
2February 1943 =100.
3 December 1950 * 100.
4 1938 - 39 =100.
5October 1949 *100.
6 Revised,
7S p e c ifjc a tic a c-tauged from No. 2 can to No. 303 can, May 15, 1951.




17

201.91
203.
201.
101.308
162.
183.
215.58
107.1
323.
289.125
327.
108.16
215.
319.8
254.
177.448
229.
184.9
296.
194.74
292.
508.25
220.
259.53
188.
35
190.
105.
2
203.
225.87
95.8
101.5
98.3
214.
264.350
188.
166.
86
151.
235.
180.060
176.
203.27
308.
112.
6
175.
177.53
165.
209.480
117.
101.
275.179
220.
346.
108.34
161.47
181.
158.
174.36
191.
99.74

201.38
205.
203.
99.276
162.
183.07
220.
107.9

201.
206.384
204.
94.29
162.
183.59
221.
107.5

202.39
207.
206.
93.174
162.
183.19
223.
109.8

203.17
207.
209.
94.990
162.
184.28
223.
109.1

323.
290.376
327.
108.
216.16
320.1
258.10
178.
229.24
186.
296.
195.19
290.
503.11
219.
259.74
189.
191.
287
104.
203.30
239.
95.6
100.2
97.8
203.
265.640
194.
185.
153.
74
241.
1
168.
16
168.
193.
3
265.
101.58
177.40
177.
165.7
200.
116.97
101.97
274.
216.8
345.
109.31
163.14
179.
156.
172.98
191.
99.36

332.
306.
474
337.
108.
218.97
319.6
258.
178.574
226.
185.6
298.
188.74
294.17
489.
224.32
258.
191.
27
192.
104.
9
203.
243.14
95.1
99.2
98.5
178.
4
269.
189.39
188.
160.
549
235.
186.
40
177.
215.
2
227.58
142.
177.
177.89
165.3
194.
115.85
101.
7
268.
213.17
345.21
110.
167.47
178.
153.
171.20
189.
99.48

334.
308.
256
338.
108.
217.66
319.5
248.
172.787
218.
179.2
300.
184.30
295.48
477.
226.
261.29
194.
195.580
104.
202.88
241.
94.9
96.6
96.3
191.
2
270.
175.58
246.
22
217.
289.
232.164
196.
247.54
234.
144.
3
177.
177.66
166.7
194.
114.26
101.17
263.
211.9
345.58
110.
158.23
177.
152.
170.58
189.10
100.

333.26
307.
338.
3
108.
217.19
322.9
226.20
165.
217.
174.28
304.
181.89
296.
475.17
241.32
263.
195.
0
197.
1
104.84
202.
216.
7
93.2
92.5
96.9
204.
3
267.
164.77
208.
00
268.
281.
8
272.08
209.
266.
2
265.
222.24
178.33
177.
168.3
195.
114.34
101.
9
261.
213.69
345.
111.24
155.56
176.
153.
169.44
188.
99.68

TABLE 7a.—INDEXES OF RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS IN LARGE CITIES COMBINED, BY MONTH, 1952

11935-1939 = 1001

Article

Aver1952
age
for
the
year Jan. 15 Feb. 15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 May15 June 15 July 15 Aug. 15Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15

Cereals
and bakery products:
Cereals:
80
Flour,
wheat----------5pounds—
210.
Corn
flakes1---------13
ounces— 202.
220.
Corn
meal---------------pound—
100.337
Rice2-------------------do-- 164.
Rolled
oats3--------20
ounces—
Bakery
Bread,products:
white-----------pound— 188.
223.37
Vanilla
cookies------7 ounces—
Layer
cake
(and
jellyroll)*
-------------------pound— 108.8
Meats,
poultry,
and
fish:
Meats:
Beef:
329.
34
ound
steak------------pound-297.
----------- —do-RiRChuck
b roast—
325.
46
roast------------do-105.
Frankfurters*------------do-207.
0
do-Ham
burger3------------Veal:
Cutlets—————————————do——320.1
Pork:
11
Chops—
do-— 243.
170.
- ---------------—
sliced------------do-222.
2
HBacon,
am
,
whol
e
—
-----------do-Salt
——do— 172.4
LamLeg——
b: pork--—
—
—
—
—
—
—
——
—
———do—
—288.3
Poultry:
192.8
Frying
chickens------------do-Fish:
293.
7
Fish
(fresh,
frozen)3------do-Sal
m
on,
pink3-----16-ounce
can—
451.
8
Dairy
products:
Butter------------------pound— 234.
268.92
Cheese-------------------do-Milk:
59
Fresh (grocery)------------do-(delivered)-------- quart— 197.
198.
Fresh
105.
Ice
cream
*-----------------pint—
351
Milk,Fresh-----------------dozen—
evaporated—14 l/2-ounce can— 209.
193.
Eggs:
Fruits
andfruits:*
vegetables:
Frozen
Strawberries*
7------ 12 ounces— 89.3
Orange
juice concentrate*
-----—_——
ounces— 79.6
Frozen
vegetables: —6 ounces—
95.6
Peas*---------------12
Fresh
fruits:
Apples—---------------pound—
282.
07
270.
------do-Bananas----------177.
8
Oranges,
size
200-------dozen—
Fresh
vegetables:
Beans,
green----------pound—
220.
252.927
Cabbage-----------------do-- 224.
Carrots-----------------bunch—
185.10
head— 274.
Lettuce----------------Onions—__________ pounds—
pound*—
313.
08
Potatoes—----------15
!
346.
Sweetpotatoes----------pound—
178.
2
Tomat
o
es8---------------—
do-Canned
fruits:
176.
Peaches----------N
o.
2
l/2
can—
Pineapple---------------—
do-- 176.21
Canned
vegetables:
58
Comat.............-—N
o.No.3032 can—
can— 173.
195.
Tom
o
es---—
-----—
0
Peas-------------N9o.4303
Baby
foods, strained*
3/4-5can— 114.
-------—
--------—
-ounces—
101.
96
258.
Dried
fruits: Prunes10----pound—
218.
2
Dried
vegetables:
N
avy
beans—
-do-Beverages:
345.
05
Coffee---—
—
-------------do-Colaanddrink*
FatsLard---------------------pound—
oils: 11----6-bottle carton— 111.
123.
85
Hydrogenated
shortening----- pint—
-do— 161.
144.
Salad
dressing------------157.87
Margarine-----------------pound—
Sugar
and
sweets:
Sugar
98.33
Grape------------------5
jelly*-----------12pounds—
ounces— 192.

204.
32
208.
212.
96.173
163.
184.25
224.
108.3

204.
44
209.
216.
1
96.78
163.
184.85
224.
107.9

333.33 331.
92
305.
303.
334.
0
336.
7
107.06 106.
215.39
217.
325.0 326.8
227.
163.685 223.
161.994
214.
216.
171.4 168.1
301.8 290.2
192.6 197.5
298.
471.32 6 299.
467.61
252.
266.48 258.
265.54
196.55
196.
01 198.
198.
105.
3
105.67
205.
166.5
184.13 206.
792.7 92.0
88.8 85.3
98.5 98.7
218.
8 229.24
269.
156.2
161.97 273.
191.
3
238.
419.
87 220.
260.100
291.
256.
56 250.
145.94
242.
289.
5
270.
5
299.
189.07 309.
160.97
179.
176.08
176.17 180.
169.
51 171.
32
195.
194.
113.0 113.0
101.9 102.00
260.
214.60 259.
214.5
345.
2
111.3 345.
111.29
149.
8
174.
06 143.
170.177
153.
151.
165.4 157.2
188.
98.87 187.
98.39

1Specification changed from 13 ounces to 12 ounces, effective May IS, 1952.
2 July 1947 = 100.
3 February 1943 = 100.
4 December 1950 = 100.
s 1938 - 1939 = 100.
6 Revised.
7 Specification changed from 16 ounces to 12 ounces, effective January 15, 1952.




203.
203.94
210.
164 1209.
217.
98.27 217.
99.018
163.
163.
185.52 189.
222.
223.37
108.2 108.9

203.
58
209.
217.
99.927
164.
188.96
224.
107.9

202.38
210.
218.95
100.
164.6
190.
225.14
109.7

202.50
210.
220.
6
102.
164.29
190.29
224.
108.7

201.
23
210.
231.
0
102.
164.89
190.34
222.
108.8

201.
44
210.
229.
0
103.
165.30
190.35
223.
109.1

201.
34
210.
226.
0
103.
165.80
190.
222.28
109.6

201.96
210.
223.
9
104.
164.39
190.94
221.
110.0

330.04 330.
00 330.
30
299.
298.
299.
332.
3
332.
333.
7
105.87 210.
106.
105.667
214.23 211.
326.4 325.5 325.3
225.
160.916 223.
158.884
159.228 245.
210.
211.
213.
164.0 160.9 159.4
280.9 287.7 291.7
190.7 188.8 175.4
296.
460.97 295.
459.35 295.
456.17
245.
265.86 231.
266.11 225.
266.32
196.77 195.
193.27
196.006 105.
198.
194.
106.
0
106.
5
208.32 209.
161.
165.96 209.
164.80
91.9 88.5 89.8
84.2 83.0 73.3
95.8 96.3 93.3
239.
4 279.17 310.
0
281.
160.58 282.
159.9 278.
164.73
250.
85 236.
198.314 258.
235.
327.867
196.
193.
4
234.
166.
199.13
313.
300 184.
382.
250 370.
282.
307.
333.74
331.
387.78 433.
201.4
192.29 •231.
179.
7
178.
8
176.4 176.5 180.
176.06
171.
29 172.
08 172.
22
195.
194.
195.
113.0 112.3 111.8
102.0 102.
256.173 9 102.
256.
256.026
212.92 10213.
213.
345.
111.92 345.
111.84 345.
111.22
130.
3
124.
8
31
165.
6 162.
87 118.
159.
142.
147.
9
146.
153.8 151.6 151.98
187.
98.20 189.
98.91 191.
98.22

330.10
297.
327.
106.915
211.
326.7
257.
167.531
226.
166.8
296.1
181.9
293.
456.39
223.
265.35
193.33
193.
105.01
210.
169.1
89.2
73.9
95.9
395.
277.990
170.
161.
229.297
220.
166.
276.997
351.
470.
217.07
173.
176.66
172.
61
193.
111.7
102.
256.200
214.
345.30
111.
122.
158.
114
141.
153.9
192.
97.25

330.
27
297.
318.
106.546
207.
318.2
254.
170.147
227.
167f0
294.9
187.4
291.
454.28
229.
266.04
195.07
196.
105.1
209.
208.77
88.6
74.6
96.4
366.
9
265.
188.65
235.36
287.
216.
171.
387
250.
360.18
444.
204.9
172.
L76.24
173.
08
193.
112.4
101.
256.807
216.
344.
111.83
120.
157.
870
142.
156.7
193.
98.34

28
331.
16 331.
296.
296.
318.07 323.
106.324
106.
207.1 207.
316.5 321.5
278.
185.
227 266.
185.017
236.
239.
178.6 181.2
295.4 293.1
197.8 202.1
290.
448.78 291.
444.25
230.
267.64 235.
269.96
199.86
197.30 201.
198.
105.
4
5
210.21 105.
210.
217.
221.34
88.8 88.6
78.5 78.3
96.3 95.4
288.
7 258.17
269.
193.24 267.
203.0
167.44
214.
8
286.
22 218.
199.
216.
77
177.
83 186.
219.
234.
354.24 263.
312.617
407.
151.8 114.0
172.
176.81 173.
175.19
174.
47 176.
53
196.
192.
112.8 115.3
102.00 101.
256.
257.976
220.
4 222.
344.
344.58
111.67 11„ 111.
122.
2
20
158.
157.
7 118.
142.
6
143.
158.5 159.21
195.
98.16
98.01 195.

328.21
295.
321.00
105.
200.
0
316.2
263.
183.676
229.
184.6
286.1
193.1
292.
437.24
233.
272.86
201.68
203.
105.6
210.
230.46
87.8
78.5
93.3
250.54
255.
216.
6
192.
3
185.18
214.
179.04
232.
289.
3
243.
130.04
172.
175.86
176.81
198.
116.2
101.84
259.
223.
6
344.
111.64
114.
157.
980
142.
161.4
195.
98.49

324.27
292.
316.
0
103.
192.35
309.2
232.
175.254
219.
185.3
276.5
200.0
290.81
433.
229.
274.15
202.08
204.
105.6
210.
226.80
87.0
78.9
93.9
266.
7
261.
193.47
275.
92
192.
228.
194.116
251.
304.30
260.
160.2
175.
175.16
177.17
200.
117.7
101.9
263.
226.27
344.
111.07
111.
03
158.
141.
161.99
195.
98.38

320.
07
288.
311.
8
101.
187.29
303.6
219.
04
169.
221.
181.25
265.7
206.7
288.
431.67
224.
273.30
202.
203.
346
105.
210.
201.58
86.7
78.1
92.9
279.
9
265.
165.99
228.36
204.
245.
192.918
263.
300.
3
309.
184.76
175.
175.57
176.
56
199.
118.3
101.97
265.
226.2
344.
112.17
108.18
158.
141.
161.67
195.
98.65

203.
76
209.
218.
0
96.75
163.
185.16
224.
108.5

* October 1949 = 100.
9 Size range changed from 4%- 4%ounces, beginning May 15, 1952.
10 Specification changed from medium to large prunes, effective April 15, 1952.
11 Specification changed from 6-bottle carton in 56 cities, to carton of 6, 6 ounce bottles in 54 cities;
carton of 6, 10 ounce bottles in 1 city; and carton of 6,12 ounce bottles in 1 city, effective September 15,
1952.

18

TABLE 8 .—AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS IN LARGE CITIES COMBINED, BY MONTH, 1951

Article
Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat------------- —5 pounds—
Corn flakes----------------13 ounces—
Corn meal----------------- -----pound--Rice----------------------- --------do----Rolled oats----------------20 ounces—
Bakery products:
Bread, white------------- -----pound---Vanilla cookies1----------------do----Layer cake---------------- ------ -do----Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak------------ -------do----Rib roast----------------------do----Chuck roast------------ -------do----Frankfurters---------- --------do----Hamburger-------------- --------do----Veal:
Cutlets.----------------- --------do----Pork:
Chops----------------- —— ——do— —
Bacon, sliced—:------ -------do----Ham, whole------------- --------do----Salt pork-------------- -------do----Lamb:
Leg------ ------ ----------——-do-—Poultry:
Frying chickens:
New York dressed3----------- do----Dressed and drawn3—-------do----Fish:*
Salmon, pink---------16 ounce can—
Dairy products:
Butter------------------------ -----pound---Cheese------------------------ -------do----Milk:
Fresh, (delivered)----- -----quart---Fresh (grocery)--------- -------do----Ice cream-------------------- ------pint--Milk, evaporated—14 1/2 ounce can—
Eggs: fresh------------------------- -dozen—
Fruits and vegetables:
Frozen fruits:
Strawberries---------- —-16 ounces—
Orange juice concentrate-6 ouncesFrozen vegetables:
Peas--------------------------12 ounces—
Fresh fruits:
Apples----------- —------------pound--Bananas-------------------- -------do----Oranges, size 200------------dozen--Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green------------------ pound--Cabbage---------------------------- do----Carrots------------------------ bunch--Lettuce----—------------- ------head--Onions-------------------------- pound---Potatoes--------------------15 pounds—
Sweetpotatoes-----------------pound---Tomatoes------------------- — --—do----Canned fruits:
Peaches----------------No. 2 l/2 can—
Pineapple------ -------------------do----Canned vegetables:
Corn5-------------------No. 2 1/2 can—
Tomatoes--------—-------- — .—-do----Peas--------------------- No. 303 can---Baby foods, strained-4 1/2-4 3/4
ounces—-----—------—--------—-—
Dried fruits: Prunes---------- pound---Dried vegetables: Navy beans—do----Beverages:
Coffee-------------------------------- do----Cola drink------------6-bottle carton—
Fats and oils:
Lard-------------------------------- pound---Hydrogenated shortening—---- ——do———
Salad dressing--------------------pint--Margarine:
Uncolored6--------------------- pound---Colored6------------------- -------do----Sugar and sweets:
Sugar-------------------------- — 5 poundsGrape jelly-------------------12 ounces—

Aver1951
age
for
the Jan. 15 Feb..15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 May 15 June 15 July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15
year
51.9
21.4
9.6
17.8
17.7
15.7
(2)
49.4

50.7
20.6
9.5
18.0
17.0
15.6
49.1
47.3

51.4
20.7
9.6
18.2
17.1
15.7
49.5
48.7

51.9
20.8
9.6
18.3
17.3
15.6
50.0
48.9

52.1
21.0
9.6
18.3
17.5
15.6
50.3
49.8

52.2
21.1
9.5
18.2
17.7
15.6
49.9
49.4

52.2
21.1
9.4
18.1
17.8
15.7
50.0
49.2

52.1
21.3
9.5
18.2
17.8
15.7
50.3
50.1

109.3
85.2
74.1
65.1
66.4
126.3
79.4
67.2
66.5
38.9
83.1

105.6
83.2
71.2
63.4
64.9
120.4
75.4
67.1
66.1
39.4
78.7

107.4
85.0
73.0
64.2
66.6
123.5
77.9
67.9
67.5
39.6
80.5

107.5 108.2
84.6 85.1
73.2 73.7
64.6 64.5
67.0 67.2
123.7 125.0
77.9 77.1
68.0 67.8
67.6 67.0
39.7 39.6
80.7 81.8

108.4
83.5
73.9
64.7
66.4
126.4
77.3
67.8
66.5
38.9
83.2

108.9
83.6
73.9
64.6
66.0
127.1
77.7
67.8
67.0
39.0
84.2

48.5
61.8
61.8
81.9
59.1
23.1
21.7
31.2
14.4
73.7

46.3
60.2
61.1
83.1
57.7
22.5
21.3
31.0
13.8
66.8

48.8
62.0
62.0
82.4
59.8
22.7
21.4
31.4
14.3
62.8

50.2
64.1
62.2
81.6
60.2
22.8
21.4
31.3
14.4
68.1

50.1
63.9
62.9
80.0
60.1
22.8
21.4
31.3
14.5
66.7

50.7
62.5
63.3
81.3
58.9
22.7
21.3
31.2
14.4
69.2

57.2
23.7
24.6
11.1
16.3
48.7
22.3
8.6
12.6
16.1
7.9
76.2
11.8
27.3
33.7
38.6
(2)
18.8
21.6
9.9
27.4
16.7
86.8
28.5
24.6
39.1
38.7
37.3
34.7
50.6
23.9

59.2
23.9
24.8
10.9
16.1
43.7
32.6
9.0
11.2
13.6
5.9
62.8
9.5
38.7
33.1
38.5
19.8
17.1
21.9
9.8
27.2
17.2
85.7
28.2
24.7
39.5
39.0
37.5
36.6
50.2
23.9

59.4
24.0
25.0
11.0
16.5
49.4
26.3
15.9
14.1
15.7
7.2
64.8
9.8
33.3
33.2
38.8
20.1
18.7
21.9
9.9
27.5
17.4
86.4
28.3
25.8
40.8
39.6
39.0
37.5
50.3
24.0

59.4
24.4
25.1
11.0
16.6
47.3
20.8
14.5
12.0
12.3
7.3
65.3
9.9
32.9
33.4
38.7
20.2
19.4
21.9
9.9
27.6
17.4
86.3
28.4
25.9
41.0
39.9
39.1
37.4
50.3
24.0

58.9
57.9
24.6 24.6
24.6 24.6
11.0
11.4
16.5
16.5
45.0 46.6
22.1
22.8
8.4
7.1
10.5
10.7
17.6 19.0
7.7
9.7
67.4
73.8
10.0
10.4
29.4
29.9
33.6
33.5
39.0
38.8
20.3 5 17.8
20.0 20.3
21.8
21.7
10.0
9.9
27.7 27.7
17.4 17.3
86.6
87.2
28.3
28.4
25.8
24.9
41.5 41.5
40.0
39.7
39.6 39.5
37.4 36.9
50.0
50.1
24.2 24.1

52.0
51.9
21.8
22.0
9.5
9.6
18.1
17.8
17.9
17.9
15.7
15.7
50.5 1 22.9
49.2
49.7

52.1
22.0
9.6
16.9
18.0
15.7
23.0
49.6

52.2
22.2
9.7
16.7
17.9
15.7
23.2
50.7

52.4
22.2
9.8
17.0
18.0
15.7
23.2
50.4

109.2
83.8
73.9
65.8
66.1
127.9
78.2
67.8
67.3
38’. 7
84.1

109.2
83.6
73.9
65.9
65.8
128.1
84.0
67.8
67.4
38.9
84.0

109.2
83.9
74.0
65.9
66.1
128.3
85.2
67.9
67.4
39.2
84.1

112.4
88.5
76.2
66.1
66.9
128.0
85.4
68.0
66.5
39,0
84.5

113.0
89.0
76.4
65.9
66.6
128.0
82.1
65.9
64.2
37.7
85.1

112.7
88.8
76.4
65.6
66.7
129.4
74.6
63.0
63.8
36.8
86.3

48.2
61.9
63.2
81.5
59.2
22.7
21.3
31.3
14.5
70.2

49.3
62.7
63.0
80.8
58.8
23.0
21.6
31.3
14.5
73.8

48.8
63.2
62.9
80.3
58.7
23.1
21.8
31.3
14.5
78.8

49.2
62.9
62.2
80.0
58.7
23.3
21.9
31.2
14.4
83.5

47.8
60.0
60.5
81.6
58.5
23.5
22.0
31.2
14.4
84.9

46.4
59.1
59.1
82.6
59.1
23.8
22.4
31.1
14.4
84.3

45.8
58.7
58.8
87.9
59.6
23.9
22.5
31.1
14.4
75.6

56.9
24.5
24.5
12.5
16.4
47.7
20.1
6.5
11.0
13.5
10.2
83.9
12.0
27.3
33.6
38.7
17.8
20.6
21.8
10.0
27.6
17.1
87.2
28.3
24.7
41.0
40.1
38.6
36.3
50.2
24.1

57.1
24.2
24.6
12.8
16.2
46.0
16.0
5.7
12.5
15.9
8.5
86.1
13.1
25.9
33.6
38.6
17.9
20.4
21.8
9.9
27.8
16.6
87.1
28.3
23.8
39.3
39.4
36.8
34.4
51.2
23.8

56.2
23.8
24.6
11.5
15.9
53.5
17.9
5.7
12.8
14.9
7.3
74.3
16.0
17.1
33.7
38.5
17.9
18.7
21.6
9.9
27.9
16.4
87.1
28.4
24.0
37.5
38.2
35.5
32.6
51.4
23.7

56.0
23.5
24.5
10.9
16.0
55.3
19.9
5.8
13.1
13.9
7.0
70.4
13.8
15.4
34.0
38.5
18.0
18.0
21.4
9.9
27.8
16.0
86.9
28.6
24.2
37.0
37.8
35.5
32.2
51.4
23.7

55.8
23.2
24.7
9.5
16.2
53.9
20.2
6.0
12.8
15.4
7.3
78.4
11.8
21.7
34.2
38.6
17.9
17.4
21.1
10.0
27.2
15.8
86.8
28.8
24.9
36.8
36.9
35.5
32.0
50.9
23.7

55.6
22.6
24.1
10.2
16.3
50.0
26.4
8.1
15.7
19.-2
8.1
90.2
12.1
21.9
34.1
38.5
18.1
17.4
21.0
9.9
26.6
15.7
86.9
29.0
23.5
36.6
36.8
35.4
31.8
50.7
23.8

54.7
21.7
24.3
10.9
16.1
46.8
22.3
10.0
15.3
22.6
8.6
97.0
13.7
33.8
34.3
38.5
18.3
17.5
20.9
9.9
26.5
15.8
86.9
29.1
23.1
36.5
37.0
35.3
31.6
50.6
23.7

1 Specification changed from 16 ounces to 7 ounces effective September 15, 1951.

1Not available.

3 28 cities.
4 Costs of fish, fresh and/or frozen, are included in the index but average prices are not computed.
5 Specification changed from No. 2 can to No. 303 can corn, effective May 15, 1951.
6 United States average computed from varying numbers of city averages during 1951, as reports for colored margarine became available; January-March: colored, 38 cities, uncolored, 18 cities; April-July: colored,
40 cities; uncolored, 16 cities; August: colored, 43 cities; uncolored, 13 cities; September colored, 44 cities, uncolored, 12 cities; October-December: colored, 47 cities, uncolored, 9 cities.




“ 19.-

TABLE 8 a .—AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS IN LARGE CITIES COMBINED, BY MONTH, 1952

Article

1952
Average
for
the Jan. 15 Feb. 15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 May 15 June 15 July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15
year

Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat---------------------5 pounds— 52.3
52.0
52.7
52.7 52.6
52.5
52.3 52.1
51.9
52.5
52.5
51.9
Corn flakes1-------------------13 ounces— (2)
22.3 22.4
22.3 22.3
22.3
22.3
22.2
22.4 2 22.2
22.2
22.3
Corn meal---------------- ----- -------pound— 10.4
10.0
10.3 10.4
10.9
10.2 10.2
10.2
10.2
10.2
10.8
10.6
Rice--------------------------------------do----- 18.0
17.3 17.3
17.9
18.4
17.2
17.6
18.1 18.3
18.4
17.7
18.6
Rolled oats---------------------20 ounces— 18.1
18.0
18.1 18.0
18.0
18.0
18.1 18.2
18.1
18.2
18.2
18.2
Bakery products:
Bread, white-------------------------pound— 3 16.0 3 15.7 3 15.8 3 15.8 3 15.8 3 16.2 3 16.1 3 16.2 3 16.2 3 16.2 3 16.2 3 16.2
Vanilla cookies4---------------7 ounces— 23.2
23.3
23.3 23.3
23.4 23.4
23.1
23.3
23.1
23.1
23.2
23.2
Layer cake----------------------------pound— 5 49.8
49.9
50.1 49.6
49.6
49.8
50.1
49.7 49.8
49.5
49.8
49.2
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak-----—-------------- pound— 111.2 112.6 112.1 111.6 111.5 111.6 111.5 111.6 111.8 111.9 110.9 109.7
Rib roast-------------------------- -do----- 85.9
86.0 85.7
88.2
87.6 86.1
86.4
85.8
85.7
85.3
86.4
84.4
Chuck roast-------------------------do----- 73.5
76.0
73.0
75.0
71.9 71.8
75.4 75.3
73.9
72.5
75.1
71.4
Frankfurters----------------------- do----- 64.1
65.3
64.5 64.5
64.6
64.6
64.7
64.4
64.2
64.1
63.7
62.8
Hamburger----------------------------do----- 63.3
66.4
66.0 65.6
64.8
63.4
64.8
64.4
63.5 63.4
61.2
58.8
Veal:
128.2 130.2 130.9 130.8 130.4 130.4 130.9 127.5 126.8 128.8 126.7 123.9
Pork:
80.3
75.2
73.9 74.3
84.0 92.0
87.8
85.0
73.7
81.2
87.1
76.8
Bacon, sliced----------------------do----- 64.9
62.3
70.0
61.8 61.3
60.6
63.8
70.8
65.1 70.7
66.8
60.7
Ham, whole-------------------------- do----- 65.2
63.0 62.2
63.7
61.9
66.4
69.3
67.4
62.7
66.7 70.3
64.4
Salt pork----------------------------do----- 36.3
36.1
38.8
35.4 34.5
33.9
33.5
35.1 37.6
38.1
39.0
35.1
Lamb:
Leg------------------------------------ do----- 81.7
85.5
83.0
81.0
82.6
81.5
83.9
83.5 83.7
78.3
82.2 79.6
Poultry:
Frying chickens:
New York dressed6---------------- do----- 7 49.0
48.6
49.0
48.3
44.9
46.3
47.4 50.3
51.2
51.0
50.2 48.3
Dressed and drawn8---------------do----- 9 60.7
61.6
61.9 60.7
58.1
53.9
64.5
61.3
56.7
59.7 62.1
62.8
Fish:
Ocean perch fille t, frozen------ do----- 5 1045.9 ( “ )
46.5 45.9
45.6
46.4
46.1
46.1
45.9 45.7
45.7
45.6
Haddock fille t, frozen------------ do----- 10“ 50. 7 ( 1Z)
52.0 51.8
50.1 50.3
50.6
50.5
50.4
50.7
50.7
50.5
Salmon, pink---------------16-ounce can— 55.9
58.3
54.9
57.8 57.0
56.8
56.5
56.2 55.5
54.1
56.5
53.6
Dairy products:
Butter------------ —---------------------pound— 85.5
91.9
94.1 89.5
84.1
82.0
81.4
83.4 84.0
85.9
85.1
83.4
Cheese---------------- ----------------- —do----- 60.7
60.4
60.1 60.1
61.0
60.0
60.2
60.3 60.5
60.2
61.7
62.1
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)------------------quart— 24.2
24.1
24.0 24.2
24.1 24.1
23.9
24.5
24.8
23.8
24.9
23.7
Fresh (grocery)---------------------- do----- 22.8
22.7
22.4 22.7
23.1
23.3
22.5
22.1
23.3
22.7 22.7
22.2
Ice cream—------------------------------ pint— 31.4
31.4
31.5 31.6
31.6
31.3
31.3 31.4
31.4
31.5
31.4
31.5
Milk, evaporated--------- 14 l/2-ounce can 14.9
14.6
14.9 14.9
14.9
15.0
14.9
14.9
14.9
15.0
14.7 14.8
Eggs: Fresh--------- -----------—----—dozen— 67.3
64.3
59.0
58.1 56.2
72.8 75.7
57.8
57.2
77.2
80.4
78.8
Fruits and vegetables:
Frozen fruits:
Strawberries13---------------- 12 ounces— 39.7
41.2
39.4 39.5
39.4
39.0
40.9 40.9
39.3
39.9
39.7
38.7
Orange juice concentrate-—6 ounces— 18.6
20.8
20.0 19.7
17.3
18.3
19.4
17.5 18.4
18.5
17.2
18.4
Frozen vegetables:
Peas------------------------------ 12 ounces— 23.9
24.1
24.0
23.9
24.7
24.1 24.1
23.4
23.4
24.7 24.0
23.5
Fresh fruits:
11.7
Apples------------------------------ —pound— 10 14.7
15.0
15.4
13.8
16.6
21.4
13.4
14.3
12.2 12.8
( 1Z) 16.3
Bananas--------------------------------- do----- 16.4
16.3
16.1
16.5 17.0
17.1
16.9
16.8
16.2
15.5
15.8
Oranges, size 200------------------dozen— 50.6
46.0
57.8
61.6
44.4 45.7
45.5
46.8
48.4
53.7 55.0
55.1
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green-------------------------pound— 23.7
18.0
20.5
25.6 26.9
27.8
25.4
17.3
25.3 23.1
20.7
29.6
Cabbage---------------------------------do----9.4
15.7
12.3
8.6
10.8 10.7
7.5
6.9
8.8
9.7
7.4
7.2
Carrots--------------------------------bunch— 12.2
15.8
12.0
11.8 11.7
11.9
12.4
11.9 10.7
10.5
12.8
11.7
Lettuce--------------------------------- head— 15.3
12.0 13.7
13.8
15.4
16.1
21.2
15.3
16.5
14.2 14.7
14.8
Onions--------------------------------- pound— 11.3
10.0
9.0
10.3
11.4
9.6
10.4 12.9
15.8
15.3
9.7
10.4
Potatoes-------------------------15 pounds— 114.0 105.5
98.6 102.8 111.9 121.6 128.2 131.2 129.2 114.0 105.4 110.8
Sweetpotatoes—-------------------- pound— 10 17.5
15.5
16.1 17.2
20.1
24.4
13.7
12.6
22.4
21.1
13.5
(
zz)
Tomatoes--------------------------------do----- 27.1
30.6
33.0
17.3
28.7
24.4 29.3
31.2 23.1
19.8
35.2
24.4
Canned fruits:
34.4
34.6 34.5
34.6
33.4
33.3
33.6
34.4
33.1 33.2
Peaches----------------------- No. 2 1/2 can 33.8
33.2
Pineapple------------------------------do----- 38.2
38.3
38.3
38.2
38.1
38.1
38.4 38.3
38.3
38.3
38.2 38.2
Canned vegetables:
Corn----------------------------No. 303 can— 18.8
18.4
19.1
18.6 18.6
18.6
19.1
18.7
18.8 18.9
18.7
19.2
Tomatoes-------------------------No. 2 can— 17.6
17.5
17.6
17.4
17.4 17.3
18.0
17.4 17.5
17.5
17.3
17.8
Peas----------------------------No. 303 can— 20.9
20.6 20.6
20.7
21.3
20.7 20.7
20.5
20.5
20.4
21.1
21.5
Baby foods,strained14-4 3/4-5 ounces- 10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0 10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
9.9 10.0
9.9
10.0
Dried fruits: Prunes---------------- pound- (15)
27.3
26.9 26.9
26.4
26.9
27.1
26.9
27.7
26.2 25.9 15 26.9
16.0 16.3
15.8
15.8
16.5
Dried vegetables: Navy beans------do— 16.1
15.9 15.8
15.9
16.5
15.8
16.7
Beverages:
86.8
87.0 87.0
87.0
86.8
Coffee---------------------------------------do— 86.8
86.8
86.7
86.6
86.5
86.7 86.7
29.1
29.1
Cola drink16-----—-------6-bottle carton- 17 29.1
29.1
29.1 29.1
29.1
29.1
29.1
29.1 29.2 17 29.1
See footnotes at end of table.




20

52.1
22.3
10.5
18.7
18.2
3 16.2
23.1
50.2
108.1
83.4
70.4
61.4
57.5
121.7
72.3
64.6
65.0
38.2
75.3
52.8
64.6
45.1
50.4
53.4
81.7
61.8
24.8
23.3
31.5
15.0
70.4
38.5
18.3
23.3
15.0
16.1
47.2
24.5
7.7
13.3
16.0
10.9
109.4
16.0
28.1
33.8
38.1
19.1
17.9
21.7
10.0
28.0
16.7
86.6
29.3

TABLE 8 a .—AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS IN LARGE CITIES COMBINED, BY MONTH, 1952—Continued

Article

Aver1952
age
for
the Jan. 15 Feb. 15 Mar. 15 Apr. 15 May 15 June 15 July 15 Aug. 15 Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Nov. 15 Dec. 15
year

Fats and oils:
Lard------------------------------------- pound— 18.4
33.3
Hydrogenated shortening------------do----Salad dressing-------------------------pint— 34.9
Margarine:
Uncolored--------------------------- pound— ( l8)
Colored---------------- -------------- do----- 19 29.4
Sugar and sweets:
Sugar--------------------------------5 pounds— 51.5
Grape jelly----------------------12 ounces— 23.4

22.2
35.9
37.0
34.7
30.S
50.6
23.5

21.3
35.3
36.4
33.3
29.3
50.4
23.4

19.3
34.2
35.6
32.4
28.6
50.1
23.4

18.5
33.6
35.3
32.1
28.2
50.7
23.6

17.6
32.8
34.4
32.3
28.2
51.2
23.4

18.2
32.6
34.0
32.4
28.7
51.5
23.2

17.9 18.1
32.6 32.6
34.2 34.4
( 18) (18)
29.1 29.7
51.8 52.3
23.4 23.4

17.5
32.6
34.5
(!8)
29.8
52.4
23.4

17.0
32.6
34.2
(18)
30.2
52.5
23.4

16.5
32.7
34.2
(18)
30.3
52.5
23.4

16.1
32.6
34.1
(18)
30.3
52.4
23.5

1 13 ounces priced in 39 cities, 8 ounces priced in 17 cities, January through April; 12 ounces priced in 39 cities, 8 ounces priced in 17 cities, May through December.
2 Specification changed from 13 ounces to 12 ounces, effective May 15, 1952.
3 Priced in 52 cities.
4 7 ounces in 47 cities, 12 ounces in 9 cities.
3 Priced in 46 cities.
* Published as dressed, beginning September 15, 1952.
7 Priced in 28 cities January through August; priced in 23 cities September through December.
• Published as ready-to-cook, beginning September 15, 1952.
9 Priced in 28 cities January through August; priced in 33 cities September through December.
10 Average for 11 months.
11 Not available.
13 Priced in 47 cities.
13 Specification changed from 16 ounces to 12 ounces, effective January 15, 1952.
14 Size range changed from 4^-4% ounces to 4%-5 ounces, beginning May 15, 1952.
13 Specification changed from medium to large prunes, effective April 15, 1952.
13 Specification changed from 6-bottle carton in 56 cities, to carton of 6, 6 ounce bottles in 54 cities; carton of 6, 10 ounce bottles in 1 city; and carton of 6, 12 ounce bottles in 1 city, effective September 15,
1952.
17 Average price for 56 cities January through August and for 54 cities September through December.
13 Priced in 9 cities January through July; and in 6 cities August through December. United States average price not computed after July.
19 Priced in 47 cities January through July; and in 50 cities August through December.




21

TABLE 9 .—ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1951

Article

MIDDLE ATLANTIC
NEWENGLAND
United
Port­
Scran­
Phila­ Pitts­
Fall Man­ New land, Provi­ Buffalo Newark New
States Boston Bridge­
York delphia burgh Rochester ton
dence
port River chester Haven Maine

Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat--------------- —5 pounds— 51.9 51.0
Corn flakes1---------------- -13 ounces— 21.4 1 15.8
Corn meal—---------------- ------pound— 9.6 10.8
Rice--------------------------- ---------do— 17.8 17.5
Rolled oats----------------- -20 ounces— 17.7 17.5
Bakery products:
Bread, white---------------- —— pound—— 15.7 15.6
Vanilla cookies----------(*) (*)
Layer cake3—-------------- -------do----- 3 49.4 51.4
Jelly roll7----------------- -------each— (7)
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
-pound109.3 119.0
Round steak-------------85.2 82.1
Rib roast----------------74.1 2 73.9
Chuck roast-------------65.1 66.8
Frankfurters------------66.4 70.9
Hamburger------ —------Veal:
119.3
126.3
Cutlets-------------------Pork:
79.2
79.4
Chops----------------------67.2 67.0
Bacon, sliced----------Ham, whole--------------66.5 67.5
38.9 29.3
Salt pork----------------Lamb:
83.1 82.8
LegPoultry:
Frying chickens:
® 48.5 46.7
New York dressed®—
® 61.8
Dressed and drawn®Fish:
Salmon, pink------------ -16-ounce can— 61.8 59.0
Dairy products:
—pound— 81.9 82.2
Butter—do59.1 55.2
Cheese—
Milk:
—quart— 23.1 25.6
Fresh (delivered)21.7 22.8
Fresh (grocery)---—pint— 31.2 33.4
Ice cream—
14.4 14.4
Milk, evaporated----- -14-l/2-ounce can73.7 77.2
Eggs: Fresh--------------- ----------------dozenFruits and vegetables:
Frozen fruits:
Strawberries— -----------------16 ounces— 57.2 53.2
Orange juice concentrate------ 6 ounces— 23.7 22.2
Frozen vegetables:
Peas--------------------------------- 12 ounces— 24.6 23.3
Fresh fruits:
11.1 3 9.3
16.3 16.3
Oranges, size 200--------------------dozen— 48.7 47.8
Fresh vegetables:
—pound— 22.3 22.8
Beans, green—
8.6 8.9
Cabbage12.6 14.4
Carrots16.1 18.5
Lettuce-------pound— 7.9 8.1
Onions—
—15 pounds— 76.2 64.0
-------pound11.8 (6)
Sweetpotatoes—
-------- do—27.3 24.6
Tomatoes-------Canned fruits:
Peaches----------No. 2-1/2 can— 33.7 32.7
--------------do38.6 37.7
Pineapple----------Canned vegetables:
-No. 2 can— (9) (9)
Corn-------------------------do18.8 19.0
Tomatoes-----------------21.6 21.9
Peas------------------------ -No. 303 canBaby foods, strained— ~4 1/2--4 3/4-ounces9.9 10.2
27.4 27.7
Dried fruits: Prunes- -------— poundDried vegetables: Navybeans-------- -do------ 16.7 19.0
Beverages:
-do—
86.8 87.3
Coffee------------------------------Cola drink------------------- 6 bottle carton— 28.5 25.0
Fats and oils:
24.6 25.5
Lard-----------------------------------------pound39.1 39.1
Hydrogenated shortening---------------do—
Salad dressing----------------— -------pint— 38.7 40.3
Margarine:
Uncolored11---------------------------- pound— 11 37.3
Colored11--------------------------------do----- 11 34.7 34.1
Sugar
and sweets:
Sugar------------------------------------5 pounds- 50.6 49.9
Grape jelly-------------------------- 12 ounces— 23.9 24.9

53.9
19.9
11.2
17.9
17.5
15.5
(*)
48.9

52.4 52.8 53.3
22.1 21.4 21.4
11.2 10.9 11.0
17.4 17.3 17.6
18.0 17.7 17.6
16.1 15.0 15.5
(*)
(*) (*)
46.3 45.0 3 43.6

52.1 52.3 51.3
21.2 21.6 21.8
11.0 10.9 11.0
17.4 17.2 18.5
17.2 17.3 17.3
15.8 15.9 16.6
(*) (*)
(*)
3 54.6
7 38.0 7 32.1

117.0 118.6 116.7 119.4 113.0 117.0 105.1
84.1 82.2 82.4 84.2 81.6 83.0 84.3
75.8 3 73.8
79.2 74.9 75.1 79.5 (6)
68.0 66.9 64.4 69.0 64.5 67.2 64.6
72.5 (b)
70.8 2 71.3 69.1 69.8 66.2
131.6 (6) 133.0 138.5 (6) 129.3 118.3
80.1 79.5 79.3 79.9 77.0 81.3 82.2
65.6 67.3 67.6 68.0 63.8 68.2 66.8
68.2 66.4 65.4 67.0 66.4 67.0 (*)
28.9 29.7 28.9 31.0 3 29.1 29.5 (6)
84.9 84.8 85.3 84.4 2 84.3 86.1 84.8

115.1
82.9
73.9
70.0
69.7
138.3
80.5
68.3
66.6
(6)
81.0

51.4 52.6 51.5 53.5 48.6
1 15.6 21.4 21.9 1 16.0 21.7
11.1 10.5 11.0 10.9 10.9
18.6 17.3 17.4 17.1 18.0
17.4 16.9 17.7 17.7 17.5
16.8 16.6 16.0 15.6 15.6
(*)
(*)
(*)
(*)
(*)
(6)
(6)
(6)
(6)
(6)
115.5 117.0 106.9 2 109.7 112.3
87.0 86.2 85.7 83.3 84.5
75.7 74.2 75.7 74.5 75.4
68.3 65.2 68.7 67.2 64.6
65.7 68.0 69.0 67.0 67.7
139.3 148.1 120.1 125.8 3 134.8
79.2 83.1 82.5 85.0 78.9
72.1 70.5 66.5 63.9 65.7
67.9 68.2 64.3 3 66.3 65.6
44.8 42.6 38.7 47.8 3 29.6
81.4 84.5 83.7 3 83.6 3 84.5

48.2 47.0

48.7

48.5 3 46.8 48.2

(6)

46.5 46.5

45.6

59.6
82.1
57.2
23.5
23.3
(6)
14.6
75.1

60.0
79.2
59.1
23.3
22.9
31.7
14.6
74.1

61.0
82.8
60.7
23.9
24.8
32.1
14.5
77.0

62.3
79.8
63.4
23.8
21.8
30.4
14.2
73.4

60.2
82.7
64.4
25.5
23.8
31.7
14.7
79.2

60.9
82.0
57.9
23.0
22.8
28.7
14.4
78.5

61.8
83.3
59.2
24.0
24.2
31.1
14.9
76.8

51.9 57.4
23.8 26.2
24.6 23.9
3 9.7 10.1
16.4 16.3
51.6 52.4
23.6 (6)
8.4 9.2
14.6 14.5
18.6 18.2
8.2 8.0
69.9 59.4
(6) 310.4
25.2 24.8
34.8 33.3
39.2 38.7
(9) (9)
20.4 19.5
21.1 22.0
10.4 10.4
27.4 25.8
17.2 18.8
89.0 87.3
2 30.5 25.1
25.2 25.2
39.5 40.2
40.5 39.3
(X1)(6)
(1X)(6) 34.9
51.3 50.9
23.7 23.8

60.2 59.3
80.1 83.6
55.1 58.1
23'.4 24.7
23.0 23.1
30.9 3 31.9
14.7 14.2
75.0 74.8

62.6
82.6
61.3
25.0
21.9
36.4
14.5
79.4

64.4
63.2
84.0
59.5
23.0
21.7
32.5
14.4
76.6

56.0 53.2 57.6 58.0 56.4 57.9 59.4 55.2 59.4
23.4 23.5 22.6 23.5 23.9 23.7 23.2 22.6 24.9
23.8 24.4 ' 23.8 23.9 24.0 24.2 24.2 24.3 26.1
8.4 3 8.3 3 9.2 2 9.5 3 9.7 3 10.0 2 10.9 3 11.5
9.8
16.3 15.8 16.0 15.9 16.9 15.2 15.3 15.0 16.2
51.5 49.2 49.9 46.4 52.0 51.8 51.6 45.5 49.8
24.7 ( 6) 3 22.9 3 22.7 21.1 21.7 22.2 23.0
(6)
8.6 7.3 8.9
8.9
9.0
7.5 8.0 8.3
8.7
13.5 14.2 12.5 14.6 12.5 14.4 14.2 14.0 13.5
3 18.0 18.0 2 17.9 18.3 15.4 18.5 18.1 17.9 17.1
7.9
8.0 7.6 7.8
8.0 7.9 7.9
8.1
8.2
58.5 66.8 56.2 63.1 60.8 73.5 71.2 73.6 78.1
11.2 3 10.5 2 11.8 2 10.2 2 10.9 10.5 12.1
(6)
(6)
24.4 23.2 23.6 23.7 28.8 26.4 28.0 27.2 29.4
34.7 33.8 35.0 34.6 34.7 34.6 33.1 32.4 35.7
37.6 38.6 40.1 ,37.5 37.9 38.6 39.3 36.9 39.9
(9) (9) (9)
(9)
(9) (9) (9)
(9)
(9)
19.1 18.9 19.6 19.4 19.6 19.2 19.4 18.1 20.0
21.6 21.7 19.9 21.9 20.2 20.8 21.7 22.6 21.3
10.3 10.3 10.2 10.0 10.4 10.5 10.2 10.0
9.8
27.3 27.6 27.7 26.0 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.6 28.9
18.1 17.3 17.8 17.9 15.9 17.1 17.0 16.2 15.7
85.8 88.3 85.7 85.4 86.0 87.8 86.7 83.9 87.5
25.4 25.2 27.7 25.2 29.8 29.5 29.6 30.5 33.7
24.3 25.5 25.1 25.1 25.6 25.3 25.0 24.6 24.4
39.2 39.8 38.7 39.6 38.2 39.5 39.5 38.4 39.1
40.8 40.3 39.1 39.0 34.5 40.8 38.5 37.7 39.3
35.8
36.4 (n )(6) (l l )(#)
(1X)(6)
34.3 (xl)(#) 35.2 35.0
36.1
(X1)(6) (l l )(6)
52.0
49.8 51.6 48.9 48.7 48.7 24.1
50.2
50.1
50.8
23.5 24.1 24.9 24.8 24.3 22.2 22.5 22.2

See footnotes at end of table.




51.9
22.1
11.0
17.5
17.4
15.8
(4)
(6)

22

49.6

45.7

61.1 57.8
80.7 79.7
54.4 56.5
23.3 22.8
22.8 23.1
33.6 2 30.4
14.6 14.0
74.6 73.6
57.8
23.3
24.3
8.8
15.0
47.7
21.3
7.7
13.5
3 16.9
7.4
57.0
2 9.3
26.5
34.4
3 39.3
(9)
17.7
22.7
10.3
27.9
19.1
83.1
29.4
24.2
38.2
37.4
(X1)(6)
(xl)(6)
52.0
50.3
22.6 23.1

52.8
23.8
24.2
(6)
16.5
48.5
2 23.4
7.3
11.4
(6)
7.2
56.0
(6)
3 31.5
35.1
39.8
(9)
19.6
21.2
10.4
(6)
15.9
83.7
29.8
25.2
39.0
37.0
35.9

TABLE 9 .—ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1951—Continued

EAST NORTH CENTRAL
Indian­ Mil­
CineinColumCleveChicago nati
land bus Detroit apolis waukee
Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
----5 pounds—
Flour, wheat—
—13 ounces—
Corn flakes1—
—pound—
Corn meal—
Rice---—do----Bakery products:
Bread, whiteVanilla cookiesLayer cake5Jelly roll7Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
—pound—
Round steak-do—
Rib roast—
-do----Chuck roast—
FrankfurtersHamburger----Veal:
Cutlets----------Pork:
ChopsBacon, sliced—
Ham, wholeSalt pork—
Lamb:
Leg------------------------Poultry:
Frying chickens:
New York dressed8—
Dressed and drawn8Fish:
Salmon, pink— -16-ounce can—
Dairy products:
—poundButterCheese—
Milk:
-quartFresh (delivered)Fresh (grocery)---------—pint—
Ice cream—
Milk, evaporated—14 l/2-ounce can—
Eggs: Fresh------------------- --------dozen—
Fruits and vegetables:
Frozen fruits:
Strawberries-------------- 16 ounces—
Orange juice concentrate
6 ounces—
Frozen vegetables:
Peas--------------------------12 ounces—
Fresh fruits:
—pound—
Apples—do---Bananas—
Oranges, size 20
Fresh vegetables:
-pound—
Beans, green----:—do----Cabbage-----------Carrots—head—
Lettuce----—pound—
Onions—
-15 pounds—
-------pound—
Sweetpotatoes—------do----Tomatoes-------Canned fruits:
-No.
2 1/2 can—
Peaches---------PineappleCanned vegetables:
Corn-----------------Peas----------------------- No. 303 can—
Baby foods, strained
4 1 / 2 - 4 3/4 ounces—
Dried fruits: Prunes----------- pound—
Dried vegetables: Navy beans—do----Beverages:
Coffee——— — —
-do—
-6-bottle carton—
Fats and oils:
—pound—
Lard-----------Hydrogenated shortening— —-do----Salad dressing-------------------- pint—
Margarine:
Uncolored11--------------------- pound—
Colored11Sugar and sweets:
-5-pounds—
Sugar-12-ounces—
Grape jelly—

50.2
21.5
11.1
16.7
17.3
14.5
(*)
45.9

53.7 51.3 51.4 50.7
22.2 22.0 21.8 22.4
11.3 11.2 11.6 11.3
17.7 17.6 17.9 17.4
17.7 17.5 17.4 17.4
14.4 14.8 13.9 15.5
(*)
(*)
(*)
47.6 2,(*)47.7
7 42.6 7 40.7

104.2 106.7 105.4 106.7 106.9
82.9
81.6 86.3 85.0 86.1
73.5
74.4 75.0 75.5 75.4
62.8 66.1 62.2 63.9
63.0
66.5 63.0 66.6 66.8
65.2
114.1 122.7 115.4 116.6 120.1
80.1
77.7 83.6 79.8 83.3
69.0 63.2 65.4 66.6
65.5
64.0
66.2 66.2 65.1 68.4
43.5
36.8 43.5 36.5 40.1
80.9 3 93.2 83.4 2 92.7 83.2

80.2
59.1
23.6
21.7
30.5
14.3
70.8

12.0
18.0
52.8
24.7
9.0
12.0
16.1
7.8
92.0
} 12.4
31.1
34.1
39.1
(9)
20.4
20.9

23.8
39.0
35.5
11)(6)
51.1
22.4

62.2
63.7
80.2
55.3
22.2
20.7
30.5
14.6
67.5

64.6 62.0
62.3 64.0
81.2 79.5
56.1 57.8
21.8 20.4
20.8 20.4
29.8 3 29.4
14.6 14.7
75.6 67.8

2 52.4
60.7
80.1
57.5
22.6
21.0
33.6
14.2
71.5

34.3
52.0
25.1

33.9
52.8
25.6

32.7
51.9
23.6

33.6
52.6
25.6

- 23 -

50.7
21.0
11.1
18.4
17.8
15.2
<J>
(6)

48.6 51.8
49.2 53.1 50.0 50.9
21.3 1 15.9 1 15.8 22.6 22.5 21.3
11.3 11.8
11.0 11.0 10.8 11.0
17.9
16.4 17.4 16.3 16.8
(6)
17.5 17.1 17.8 17.0
17.7 18.0
15.6 14.8
15.3 14.9 14.7 15.6
(4)
(J)
(*)
43.4 (4) 3 (*)
36.0 2,<*>
52.4
(6)
(6)
7 36.7

106.3 105.9 3 106.4 106.5 104.1 102.2 102.5 99.9 106.9
85.3
83.4 3 83.0
78.5 2 78.0
82.8 83.1 80.2 82.9
72.9
75.2 3 73.4
72.0 72.1
70.8 72.1 69.1 72.9
61.7
62.7
63.4 3 62.4 61.5
62.9 69.4 59.3 65.0
66.6
68.4
62.1 64.6 62.3 67.3
65.7
65.7 64.3
124.4 3 1*0.5 (6)
105.7 (6) 3 114.6 113.8 (6)
121.2
78.5
77.5
75.4 76.0
76.3
76.9 75.7 68.3 78.5
67.9
68.0
63.5 64.7
65.1
64.8 67.4 60.3 68.5
66.8
64.5
64.0
64.7 67.6
64.1 63.5 62.0 65.1
41.9 (6)
38.9 40.1 37.0 40.7
39.5
41.2
(6)
90.4
87.1 (6)
(6)
(6)
(6) 2 83.1 79.5 83.5
63.7
62.0
81.3
66.0
21.4
21.0
28.1
14.4
66.9

54.8 57.9 55.3 60.4
58.4
24.3 25.4 24.0 25.4
24.9
24.9 25.5 25.3 25.9
25.1
9.9 3 10.6
3 10.2 10.2 3 9.6
16.2
16.7 16.4 16.5 17.2
43.1 48.7 46.9 53.3
47.8
19.7 23.4 20.1 25.5
19.7
9.1
9.5 90.2
9.3
9.7
13.0
13.1 12.7 13.7 12.6
17.6 16.9 16.8 16.4
17.1
9.3
8.4
8.3 83.3
8.4
79.8 74.5 68.4 77.9
85.2
12.5 3 12.5 12.3 3 13.6
13.1
28.1 33.2 28.9 30.4
29.0
34.9 35.0 35.7 35.0
35.2
40.9 40.2 40.0 41.2 3 41.3
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
18.0 19.1 18.5 19.7
19.5
23.6
19.2 21.2 21.1 21.6
10.6 10.2 10.5 10.6
10.4
29.0
28.3 28.8 29.2 28.4
14.8 16.4 13.6 14.4
14.6
86.6 85.9 86.8 85.7
86.7
25.6
30.0 30.1 25.4 29.7
24.6
25.4 26.3 23.8 24.3
39.5
39.2 39.0 39.0 39.6
40.6
40.5 36.2 39.5 37.1

See footnotes at end of table.




53.0
50.4
22.3
21.9
11.3
11.2
18.6
18.2
17.7
17.4
14.5
13.5
(*)
2 (*)
45.4
(6)

WEST NORTH CENTRAL
St.
SpringCedar
Kansas
Peoria field Rapids City Minne­
apolis Ctaaha Louis

36,8
53.7
25.3

52.5
64.8
80.0
60.7
19.2
18.9
(6)
14.5
65.3

50.5
70.0
64.2
65.0 62.4
62.1
76.7
78.7 77.0
59.3
60.5 62.2
22.2 19.8
22.7
19.9
21.2 18.9
32.3 3 30.4 (6)
14.6
14.8 14.9
56.6
57.8 56.8

58.6
52.3
55. 2
22.9
23.0
25.0
25.3
25.6
24.4
12.2
11.9 2 10.6
18.2
17.6
17.4
51.6
50.8
54.2
21.6 2 21.4
25.3
8.9
10.7 3 9.9
11.8
13.6
13.4
16.0
16.0
16.5
8.8
7.3
8.6
86.0
77.3
81.7
13.2 (6)
3 12.6
29.8
27.8
27.3
35.5
35.2
35.5
41.5
40.3
(6)
(9)
(9)
(9)
17.9
18.3
19.7
24.0
20.1
20.3
10.1
9.8
9.8
27.8
29.4
28.7
16.3
14.9
14.5
86.2
87.0
87.9
25.5 3 26.0
43.3
23.8
24.8
24.2
38.6
39.2
39.8
39.9
38.8
37.7
49.1 (1X)(6) (X1)(6)
(X1)(6) (1X)(6)
52.5
52.8
52.1
25.3
26.3
26.0

53.1 3 52.2
64.5
64.8
62.1 2 61.4 63.0 64.6
80.0 80.0 78.8 83.5
55.0 54.1 50.5 58.3
21.2 18.2 20.5 22.8
20.5 17.6 19.7 21.7
28.5 26.0 28.7 3 30.0
14.2 15.0 14.6 14.1
64.1 62.7 57.7 67.0

61.2
55.3 57.5 52.7
25.0
23.8 24.9 23.2
25.0
24.5 24.4 23.8
2 11.3 2 11.0 3 13.2 12.0
17.2
16.4 18.4 17.7
51.5 54.6 54.1
51.7
22.0 3 25.3 2 23.5
(6)
9.1
8.7
9.4
9.1
12.5
12.8 11.9 12.7
15.3
16.7 15.9 17.1
8.1
7.9
7.6
8.2
71.6
82.3 72.3 73.3
2 12.6 3 13.0 (6)
(6)
30.9
27.9 27.1 26.9
36.8 3 30.9 34.3 33.8
41.6
39.9 41.5 40.2
(9)
(9)
20.2
19.2 (9)
20.1 (9)
18.7
21.9
20.4 23.7 19.4
9.3
9.7
9.4
9.1
28.2
28.1 28.6 26.6
15.5
14.6 16.3 13.5
87.6
88.6 88.6 86.9
25.0 3 25.6 3 25.3
(6)
24.0
23.1 24.3 22.9
39.3
38.7 40.2 38.3
36.8
39.4 38.8 37.7
42.0
48.5
33.4
33.2
53.3
52.4 53.1 50.3
25.1 25.5 26.3
(6)

57.4
23.1
23.7
3 11.0
17.7
55.1
23.2
9.8
13.8
17.5
8.5
83.8
3 12.0
24.6
33.9
40.1
(9)
19.8
20.7
9.2
28.6
15.0
86.9
3 29.8
23.2
38.9
38.7
34.8
50.5
3 24.3

TABLE 9 .--ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1951—Continued

Article
Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat------ 5 pounds—
Corn flakes1-----13 ounces—
Corn meal---------------pound—
Ri ce-------------- --------do----Rolled oats------ 20 ounces—
Bakery products:
Bread, white-----------pound—
Vanilla cookies-----—do----Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak--------- pound—
Rib roast-----------—do----Chuck roast-----------do----Frankfurters--------- do----Hamburger------------ -do----Veal:
Pork:
Chops------------------- do----Bacon, sliced-----—do----Ham, whole------------do----Salt pork------------- do----Lamb:
Leg---------------------- do----Poultry:
Frying chickens:
New York dressed®—do----Dressed and drawn8-do----Fish:
Salmon, pink-16 ounce can—
Dairy products:
Butter----------------------pound—
Cheese—-------------- -----do----Milk:
Fresh (delivered)-—quart—
Fresh (grocery)--------do----Ice cream------------------- pint—
Milk, evaporated
14- 1/2 ounce can—
Fruits and vegetables:
Frozen fruits:
Strawberries— -16 ounces—
Orange juice concentrate
6 ounces—
Frozen vegetables:
Peas---------------- 12 ounces—
Fresh fruits:
Apples------------------pound—
Bananas--------- ---------do----Oranges, size 200— dozen—
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green-----------pound—
Carrots--------- -----—bunch—
Lettuce------------:-------head—
Potatoes-----------15 pounds—
Sweetpotatoes---------pound—
Tomatoes---------------- -do----Canned fruits:
Peaches------ No. 2 1/2 can—
Pineapple---------------- do----Canned vegetables:
Corn---------------- No. 2 can—
Tomatoes——---------—do----Peas--------------No. 303 can—
Baby foods, strained
4 1/2 - 4 3/4 ounces—
Dried fruits: Prunes—pound—
Dried vegetables:
Navy beans-----—------ .do----Beverages:
Coffee------------------------do----Cola drink—6 bottle carton—
Fats and oils:
Lard-------------------------pound—
Hydrogenated shortening
do----Margarine:

WEST NORTH
SOUTH ATLANTIC
CENTRAL—Cont.
Balti­ Charles­ Jackson­
Rich­
St.
Paul Wichita Atlanta more ton, S.C. ville Norfolk mond
51.4
56.5
52.7
21.6 1 16.6 1 16.1
11.3
11.3
11.2
18.0 2 15.7
17.8
17.5
17.2 3 18.2
16.6
15.2
15.7
(4)
(4)
41.2 (4)
44.0
(6)

53.0
20.7
8.2
16.0
17.4
15.3
(4)
(6)

51.9
20.7
8.5
16.1
17.0
15.0
(4)
53.1

53.7 54.2
21.8 1 15.9
9.5
6.8
18.2
(6)
17.7 17.6
15.9 14.9
(4)
(4)
40.1 49.9

55.6
52.2
56.2
22.6 1 15.4 1 16.3
9.0
7.0
7.7
19.0
18.2
17.9
18.5
17.4
17.7
15.4
16.2
15.7
(4)
(4)
(4)
45.3
44.9 (6)

98.5 100.9 2 111.3 113.5 2 108.8 (6)
2 84.1 84.1
88.5 (6)
80.1 (6)
70.9
69.3 3 73.3 74.4 3 73.7 (6)
58.9
59.1
69.3 3 $1.9
62.9 63.6
64.3 2*64.4'
64.6
60.9
65.3 70.9
118.6 138.4 (6)
107.0 (6)
(6)
75.2
73.6
70.9 79.0
71.0
73.6
66.6 67.2
66.5
67.4
67.4
66.0
62.3
65.8
62.2
64.5 67.2
65.7
41.9
39.3
38.5 38.2
37.5
39.4
2 86.8 82.4 (6)
3 83.7 (6)
(6)

109.9
83.9
72.3
59.7
66.2
124.4
73.6
67.3
67.5
38.0
78.7

110.2
84.2
72.5
60.9
63.6
129.6
76.7
68.9
67.3
36.4
83.8

107.9 112.5
86.3 84.5
73.1 74.0
58.6 62.5
65.5 66.4
112.2 130.9
70.2 78.0
63.7 70.8
61.7 68.4
37.6 37.6
82.7
(6)

110.2
85.9
75.4
60.6
66.5
120.9
72.7
68.6
67.2
35.2
(6)

57.5
58.8
59.5
59.9
61.7 3 61.4
82.9
83.1
84.5
59.1
63.1 3 61.0
24.8
24.4
26.8
24.6
24.7
26.4
31.7
33.7 (6)
14.6
14.0
14.2
71.8
67.8
71.2

61.0
61.7
84.1
59.5
23.0
23.3
(6)
14.4
72.3

56.6
(6)
83.7
58.4
27.0
27.6
(6)
14.1
70.7

54.4
55.3
50.6
22.6
22.5 1 15.5
10.9
11.5
7.1
17.3
16.9
16.8
17.4
18.0
17.7
15.9
14.9 2 15.0
(4)
(4)
(4)
(6\
(6)
7 36.7

54.2
60.5
79.8
55.5
18.8
16.2
26.8
15.1
62.1

62.1
65.5
79.6
55.2
22.5
21.4
30.8
14.7
61.8

56.9
61.5
86u4
61.2
25.0
25.8
29.4
14.2
71.1

48.8
63.2
83.3
62.1
22.7
22.8
34.3
14.3
74.7

54.4 60.9
51.5
57.7
23.9
25.2 24.3
24.7
24.5
26.1
26.8 25.5
3 13.5 3 12.8 3 12.5 (6)
19.1
17.5
14.5 16.0
55.3
38.0 45.1
57.7
3 25.3 (6)
20.0 20.1
9.1
8.6
8.9
10.2
12.0 (6)
13.2 14.5
17.2
19.6
16.0 17.7
7.7
7.9
8.6
9.1
76.4 75.2
84.5
92.8
3 13.4 3 11.6 10.6
(6)
25.6
26.4 24.3
28.7
34.6 33.8
36.0
34.7
37.5 37.6
41.3
41.4
(9)
(9)
(9)
18.2 19.2
3(9)
21.4
20.4
25.1
24.2 20.9
24.5
10.3 10.5
9.2
9.5
27.9
27.1
28.3 (6)
15.3 16.5
16.1
14.9
90.0
85.9
83.5 87.1
25.0 25.1
25.4
25.0
24.3 24.2
24.1
23.4
40.9
38.3 39.4
40.8
39.3 39.4
39.1
41.9
49.4
38.0
31.4 36.1
Sugar and sweets:
54.9
53.8
49.2 49.7
Grape jelly--------- 12 ounces— 26.1
25.0 22.6
25.5

57.3
61.7
53.4
24.9
23.4
25.2
25.1
26.5
27.1
2 12.2
11.4 3 10.4
12.4
13.9
14.6
39.6 2 33.9
42.0
20.3
20.9 3 18.8
8.1
7.8
7.6
14.4
13.3
13.5
15.4
16.9
16.3
8.4
7.5
8.4
71.6
66.4
71.7
2 10.2 3 11.3
11.0
23.1
23.6
26.3
34.1
35.5
34.7
39.2
38.9 (6)
(9)
(9)
(9)
18.8
18.7
18.0
26.9
27.3
22.4
10.6
10.3
10.3
3 27.0
28.3 3 28.9
17.8 (6)
14.4
83.4
85.9
89.0
3 30.6
24.8 2 25.0
25.4
24.8
24.8
39.4
38.4
38.7
40.2
38.9
36.6
34.0
50.3
23.7

33.8
48.7
24.4

See footnotes at end of table.




EAST‘ SOUTH CENTRAL
Savan­ Washing­ Winston- Birming­ Jackson Knox­
nah ton,D.C. Salem ham
ville

24

35.4
51.0
24.2

45.4

57.8
1 16.2
7.2
19.3
17.8
16.2
(4)
38.0

107.7 106.2 2 109.3
82.4 2 85.5 2 85.3
71.6 3 73.7 2 73.4
59.0
64.8
60.6
65.1
63.4 3 64.6
108.6 3 110.9 (6)
67.8
72.7
70.7
67.6
63.0
66.4
68.0
62.2
64.5
39.9
34.7
38.7
(6)
(6)
(6)
59.6
64.9
84.4
65.4
23.0
23.1
28.5
14.8
68.1

56.7
65.4
82.6
62.8
22.7
23.1
27.3
14.9
67.7

61.6
58.0
24.5
25.0
25.8
27.7
12.2
(6)
15.5
14.0
42.1
37.1
19.5
20.7
8.1
7.8
13.5
13.9
18.1
14.3
8.2
7.8
68.2
71.2
12.2 2 11.1
26.1
23.4
35.3
34.7
40.5
37.1
(9)
(9)
17.2
18.5
25.3
25.8
10.4
10.2
26.9 (6)
15.1
16.8
85.5
85.6
25.4
25.0
23.9
25.3
38.5
38.8
38.5
38.4

59.6
58.6
54.6
59.9
22.3
25.9
23.1
24.1
24.8
27.0
26.8
27.4
11.2
10.2 2 12.0 (6)
16.8
14.8
14.6
14.2
45.5
41.8
39.4
44.1
21.5
18.0
22.5 3 25.7
8.4
7.9
7.8
9.0
14.1
12.3
14.4
12.7
18.9
14.6
14.3
17.1
7.8
8.3
9.7
8.7
71.3
78.1
80.1
95.8
12.8 3 10.5 3 10.6 3 10.0
26.6
25.6
23.6
26.5
34.8
35.2
34.0
35.6
38.2 (6)
40.1
37.9
C9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
17.9
19.4
19.0 2 17.8
20.2
26.3
21.9
22.5
10.6 3 11.0
10.0
9.2
27.2
29.2
28.2
26.7
16.6
15.2
16.0
16.8
88.2
89.8
83.6
92.2
25.1
29.5 3 25.0
24.7
24.7
26.5
24.0
25.1
39.5
40.2
38.3 3 37.9
41.0
39.6
39.7
41.4

3 55.9
26.2
27.4
2 11.0
14.6
40.9
2 21.8
8.0
3 13.9
16.1
8.8
78.4
3 11.0
21.4
33.3
41.3
(9)
2 20.6
22.5
10.6
29.0
15.5
83.6
25.0
25.7
39.9
38.8

35.3
51.2
21.1

37.1
51.2
23.0

34.4
48.4
26.3

63.5
85.0
59.4
22.7
20.8
38.9
14.8
76.3

59.2
57.7
62.5
60.7
86.3
84.4
62.1
58.3
24.0
25.6
24.9
25.0
33.5 3 31.2
14.1
15.2
70.3
68.5

36.9
52.2
25.3

34.7
36.6
49.2
49.9
22.2 3 24.3

37.3
52.2
26.6

TABLE 9 .--ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL POODS, BY CITY, 1951—Continued

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL—
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL
MOUNTAIN
PACIFIC
Continued
Salt
Louis­ Memphis Mobile Dallas Houston Little New Butte Denver Lake Los Portland, San Seattle
Rock Orleans
ville
City Angeles Oregon Francisco

ii ii
ii ii
ii
p,0: oo,:
11 11
11 11

ii
ii
i
cci
1
111

Cereals and Bakery Products:
Cereals:
Flour, wheat50.7 57.1
Corn flakes1--------------13 ounces—
1 16.1
Corn meal---------------------- pound— (6)
8.7 7.4
Rice------------------------------ do----- 19.2 15.7
Rolled oats---------------20 ounces— 17.3 17.3
Bakery products:
Bread, white------------------ pound— 14.4 15.8
Vanilla cookies----------------do----- (*)
(*)
Layer cake5---------------------do----- (6)
Jelly roll7---------------------each—
7 31.8
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak----------------- pound— 106.4 105.0
Rib roast--------------------- do----- 81.2 84.1
Chuck roast--------------- -—do---- 73.1 72.1
Frankfurters------------------do---- 65.4 62.1
Hamburger--------------------- do----- 65.5 64.4
Veal:
Cutlets------------------------do----- .132.3 3 109.9
Pork:
Chops---------------------------do----- 75.6 72.3
66.2 64.8
d°
Ham°n\:hclcCed
64.5 63.3
do
33.3 41.0
Lamb:
Leg-------------------3 90.3 83.9
Poultry:
Frying chickens:
New York dressed8—
Dressed and drawn859.1 61.5
Fish:
Salmon, pink----------16-ounce can— 63.3 (6)
Dairy products:
Butter------------------------------pound— 80.3 83.0
Cheese-------------------------------- do--- 57.5 62.2
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)-------------quart— 23.3 20.7
Fresh (grocery)------------------do--- 23.0 20.7
Ice cream--------------------------- pint— 3 32.5 27.9
Milk, evaporated—14 l/2-ounce can— 14.5 14.6
Eggs: Fresh----------------------- dozen— 67.8 71.0
Fruits and vegetables:
Frozen fruits:
Strawberries-------------- 16 ounces— 57.2 57.8
Orange juice concentrate
------------------------------- 6 ounces— 23.9 23.9
Frozen vegetables:
Peas----------12 ounces— 25.1 26.3
Fresh fruits:
Apples--------------------------- pound— 11.3 (6)
Bananas---------------------------- do--- 16.3 16.3
42.7 41.1
Oranges, size 200—
Fresh vegetables:
—pound— 20.8 25.7
Beans, green--------9.8 8.4
Cabbage—
-----do—
Carrots--------------------------bunch— 14.2 12.0
Lettuce--------------------------- head— 16.8 16.3
Onions--------------------------- pound— 9.2 9.1
Potatoes-------------------15 pounds— 71.3 93.3
Sweetpotatoes------------------pound— 12.9 3 11.8
25.5 27.8
Canned fruits:
Peaches--------------- No. 2 l/2 can— 35.0 32.1
Pineapple-------------------------do----- 38.8 37.5
Canned vegetables:
Corn------------------------No. 2 can— (9) (9)
18.3 17.5
Peas----------------------No. 303 can— 22.2 24.7
Baby foods, strained
-------------4 1/2 - 4 3/4 ounces— 10.7 8.8
Dried fruits:Primes------------- pound— 28.6 27.7
Dried vegetables: Navy beans—do----- 14.2 (6)
Beverages:
88.8 88.2
Cola drink----------- 6-bottle carton— 25.4 25.0
Fats and oils:
23.5 24.4
Hydrogenated shortening---------do----- 38.9 38.1
Salad dressing--- ----- --------pint— 37.7 41.0
Margarine:
—pound—
Uncolored1x—
—do---- 35.7 36.1
Colored11---Sugar and sweets:
Sugar—5 pounds— 53.5 50.6
Grape jelly—
—12 ounces— 22.2 3 25.2

53.1
20.8
10.7
17.1
17.2
2 18.8
(*)
47.8

49.7 52.9 54.0 54.2
22.0 1 15.8 1 16.2 1 16.1
10.4 10.9 7.7 10.7
19.1 16.6 16.2 15.7
17.6 17.5 18.0 17.5
15.5 13.3 16.0 15.7
(4)
(*)
(*)
(*)
(6) 44.8
41.8
(7)(6)

48.0 51.9
22.8 1 15.5
12.8 11.2
18.1 18.0
18.3 18.4
15.3 15.9
(*)
(4)
38.7
(7H6)

52.6
22.4
11.5
21.6
19.1
15.6
(4)
45.9

55.2 51.9
22.9 22.1
11.5 11.6
21.0 21.3
19.5 18.9
2 17.5 (*)
15.8
(4)
3 42.2
3 7 26.0

106.5 2 108.1
88.3
73.8 3(6)
76.7
63.9
65.4
65.3
66.0
127.0 118.9
86.9
77.1
71.2
67.9
66.6
67.1
44.0
39.6
84.1
92.3

112.7 110.4
87.8 87.7
74.5 74.3
69.8 66.5
63.1 67.0
2 133.5 2 121.6
88.4 76.5
70.4 66.2
68.4 66.7
44.0 43.2
85.5 2 81.3

56.8

58.9

55.2

3 58.4 3 59.6

62.6
81.1
54.7
20.2
19.2
(6)
14.3
68.3

62.3
81.3
57.4
20.7
19.7
26.7
14.0
74.4

3 63.1
80.2
55.5
21.9
21.9
26.9
14.1
71.4

63.7 3 59.8
84.3 82.6
61.4 56.2
20.7 20.3
19.7 19.3
29.5 34.5
14.9 14.4
75.0 73.0

109.8 105.1 110.8 104.5 101.0 103.4
(6) 108.7
86.0 89.3 84.9 86.1 82.9 82.0 86.1
3 81.7
3 70.9 72.6 76.2 72.9 73.4 3 71.4 69.9 71.7
61.4 59.2 61.0 58.6 64.0 61.8 61.3 66.0
63.5 64.9 67.3 64.6 67.7 64.3 63.7 65.2
108.2 117.8 108.4 (6) 118.0 (6) 112.5 114.5
68.9 71.3 74.5 69.5 71.0 77.6 72.6 79.3
63.8 64.2 65.6 66.5 65.8 68.4 66.2 69.5
65.4 66.5 66.6 62.5 68.3 67.6 61.6 64.5
37.5 36.3 41.2 39.1 39.5 38.4 37.5 39.6
(6) 87.5 (6) (6) 89.1 3 80.2 79.8 83.6
57.9
60.7
82.0
58.9
24.9
24.9
29.7
14.1
67.2

61.8
60.9
86.3
59.9
22.9
24.1
26.7
14.1
73.5

58.8 60.8
61.1 3 66.6
84.3 82.3
66.8 60.3
25.0 21.5
23.1 22.1
25.9 28.7
14.3 14.3
71.4 68.4

59.0
64.4
81.8
59.3
24.1
23.1
(6)
14.1
69.4

57.8
60.4
83.2
58.0
20.1
21.0
28.2
14.9
78.8

67.7
63.5
81.3
55.5
22.6
20.9
32.5
14.6
74.1

52.8 56.3 61.1 57.6 57.6 67.8 56.7 61.0 57.1
60.8
24.0
(*) 23.9 24.5 25.2 23.7 29.3 23.4 24.1 23.2
25.1 25.4 25.8 27.3 25.4 27.3 24.9 25.2 23.6
26.0
2 12.9 15.9 (6) (6) 2 13.5 2 12.1 3 11.4 2 11.8 3 10.2
(6)
12.4 13.9 14.9 16.4 12.1 19.8 17.7 17.0 17.5
18.7
40.0 52.4 51.7 56.5 40.6 52.3 53.8 47.1 36.8
50.1
22.4 23.7 26.0 24.3 21.6 (6) (6) (6) 3 25.8 (6)
7.5
8.3 8.9 9.3 9.4 7.8 9.6 8.6 8.3
8.3
9.3
10.0
11.2 11.2 11.6 2 12.4 11.6 3 12.1 10.3 9.7
14.8
15.5 15.8 15.6 17.7 14.3 17.1 15.4 14.4 11.4
6.6
6.9
7.5 7.2 9.5 8.4 7.1 8.5 6.4 6.9
77.4
88.8 95.9 111.0 87.4 87.1 68.5 73.9 75.0 83.9
9.9 (6) 2 12.7 3 13.7 15.3 (6)
3 11.3 2 11.7 12.1 (6)
30.3
24.8 26.4 27.2 29.1 26.2 31.2 30.4 27.0 26.2
31.8
32.0 34.1 33.5 35.4 33.9 34.3 34.5 32.0 30.5
35.3
(6) 39.1 2 37.7 (6) 2 37.6 40.5 39.8 38.5 36.6
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
18.0 19.1 17.4 (6) 18.2 20.6 3 19.4 1021.8 10 23.1 (10) (6)
19.1
23.9 20.5 20.5 17.8 20.2
22.9 25.2 25.0 26.0
9.1
9.0 9.1 9.0 9.2 9.0 9.6 9.1 9.1
8.7
24.6
26.5
26.2 27.6 28.1 29.2 27.0 27.7 28.3 (‘)
17.9
19.1
15.7 20.3 20.2 16.1 15.4 15.9 19.1 (6)
90.6 87.6 88.9 86.1 85.7 91.7 92.5 91.5 90.3
88.7
24.9 25.2 25.0 25.0 24.9 39.0 25.0 3 25.0 37.0 3 25.0
27.3
23.9 3 26.5 26.1 25.7 24.7 27.5 24.2 26.0 25.5
39.7
37.5 38.1 38.0 40.2 38.8 41.1 39.4 40.1 38.2
40.7
38.6 38.8 38.5 41.1 38.0 43.1 40.4 39.8 39.8
(1X) (6)
36.3
36.3 46.7 34.5 M w
35.3 32.9 35.7 34.2 34.1
54.7
48.2 48.3 48.6 51.1 46.5 58.4 53.5 54.4 50.3
24.3 25.5 24.4 27.8 24.2 26.1 26.2 28.3 23.4 2 26.0

1 8 ounces in 17 cities.
2Average for 10 months.
Average for 11 months.
43 Specification
changed from pound to 7-ounce and 12-ounce packages, September 15, 1951. (12ounce packages in Atlanta, Birmingham, Charleston, Cincinnati, Norfolk, Omaha, Richmond, Washington,
D. C., and Winston-Salem.)
5 46 cities.
6 Not available; insufficient number of reports during the year.
7 Priced in 10 cities; U. S. average not computed. (8 ounces: New Orleans 0 une- December), Salt
Lake City, San Francisco; 10 ounces: Buffalo, Memphis, Minneapolis, New Orleans (January-May); 12
ounces: Atlanta, Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Providence.




51.4 49.3
23.1 22.8
11.6 10.8
18.6 17.4
18.9 17.6
16.0 2 15.3
(*)
(*)
37.2 (6)
{ J

59.6
24.9
25.6
3 11.4
18.6
43.8
(6)7.5
9.7
11.0
7.1
81.0
(6)
27.1
31.8
37.9
(9)
10 24.2
20.2
9.1
25.1
19.7
90.6
3 26.7
28.0
40.6
40.6
37.1
50.2
25.6

61.4
25.2
23.7
12.0
19.4
53.4
(6)9.6
10.8
15.7
6.9
79.9
(6)
31.8
)6)
35.9
(9)
( l d ) ( 6)
19.5
9.1
25.3
20.6
90.8
(6)
27.0
38.9
39.7
36.3
53.0
25.5

• 28 cities.
9 Not available; specification changed from No. 2 can to No. 303 can, May 15, 1951.
10 No. 2%can.
11 U. S. average computed from varying numbers of city averages during 1951, as reports for
colored margarine became available, January • March: colored, 38 cities; uncolored, 18 cities.
April - July: colored, 40 cities; uncolored, 16 cities. August: colored 43 cities; uncolored, 13
cities. September: colored, 44 cities; uncolored, 12 cities. October - December colored, 47
cities; uncolored, 9 cities.

25

TABLE 10.—ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1952

Article

United
States

MIDDLE ATLANTIC

NEWENGLAND
Fall Man­
New
Boston Bridge­
port River chester Haven

Cereals and bakery products:
Cereals:
51.4
Flour, wheat———5 pounds—
52.3
3 16.0
Corn flakes1------ 13 ounces— (2)
11.8
Corn meal-------------- —pound—
10.4
17.6
18.0
Rice______________—do----18.0
18.1
Rolled oats--------20 ounces—
Bakery products:
16.0
Bread, white---------- -pound— 6 16.0
23.2
Vanilla cookies9—7 ounces—
22.7
49.8
52.4
Layer cake-------------—pound— 11(13\
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Meats:
Beef:
118.8
Round steak---------—pound— 111.2
85.9
80.0
Rib roast------------— do----73.5 (*)
Chuck roast--------64.1
Frankfurters------- _ d 0----67.1
63.3
65.2
Hamburger—--------Veal:
124.9
Cutlets-------------128.2
Pork:
x
80.3
80.0
Chops----------------- — do----64.6
Bacon, sliced-----64.9
66.2
65.2
—do----28.4
Salt pork----—---- — do----36.3
Lamb:
81.8
81.7
Leg--------------------— do----Poultry:
Frying chickens:
48.0
New York dressed13—do----- 16 49.0
Dressed and drawn1®—
19 60.7
Fish:
Ocean perch fille t, frozen
— do----- 11 3 45.9 3 2 48.8
Haddock fille t, frozen—
— do----- 3 23 50.7 3 20 44.3
Salmon, pink-16-ounce can---55.9
54.6
Dairy products:
85.5
86.0
Butter----------------------- pound—
57.0
Cheese--------------------- — do----60.7
Milk:
26.4
Fresh (delivered)— quart—
24.2
23.8
22.8
Fresh (grocery)-------—do—
31.4
35.1
Ice cream-----------------—pint—
Milk, evaporated------14.9
14.8
------------- 14 1/2-ounce can—
67.3
70.9
Eggs: Fresh-------------- —dozen—
Fruits and vegetables:
Frozen fruits:
38.1
Strawberries26----12 ounces—
39.7
Orange juice concentrate—
-------------- -------6 ounces—
18.6
17.3
Frozen vegetables:
Peas------------------12 ounces—
23.9
22.6
Fresh fruits:
Apples------------------ —pound— 3 14.7 3 13.9
Bananas-----------------— do----16.4
16.3
Oranges, size 200----- dozen—
50.6
46.7
Fresh vegetables:
24.0
Beans, green--------- —pound—
23.7
Cabbage-—--------- —— do----9.4
9.8
Carrots-----------------—bunch—
12.2
13.4
Lettuce------------------- head—
15.3
17.3
Oniona------------------—pound—
11.3
11.3
108.1
Potatoes------------ 15 pounds— 114.0
Sweetpotatoes-------- —pound— 3 17.5 (*)
Tomatoes--------------- — do—
27.1
25.4
Canned fruits:
33.6
Peaches--------No. 2j 1/2—can—— 33.8
Pineapple------------ -— do---38.2
37.7
Canned vegetables:
18.8
18.6
Corn----— ------No. :303 can—
17.6
18.4
Tomatoes------------ No. 2 can20.9
Peas-----------'— No. .303 can—
21.4
Baby foods, strained2*—
-------4 3/4-5 ounces—
10.2
10.0
Dried fruits: Prunes— pound— (29)
(29)
Dried vegetables:
Navy Beans--------- —— do-—
16.1
18.1
Beverages:
86.8
87.9
Coffee—— ------------- — do----Cola drink30
25.0
---------------6-bottle carton— 3129.1

54.1
(2)
11.9
17.9
18.3
16.1
21.4
51.5

52.4 52.7
(2)
(2)
12.3 11.7
17.7 18.1
18.4 18.0
16.7 15.5
23.7
(*)
49.1 50.6

53.1 51.3
51.7 52.6
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
12.0 11.9
12.4 11.7
17.5 18.0
17.4 17.8
18.0 17.6
17.5 17.6
16.2 16.0
16.4 16.3
23.4 25.7
22.4 22.4
—
51.0 3 52.6 —
39.8 14 32.7

51.5
(2)
12.0
(*)
18.2
17.3
22.0
(4)

118.0
83.3
78.4
69.6
69.2
137.8
81.1
64.5
67.2
27.3
83.9

119.7 116.9
83.4 78.6
3 72.4 72.1
67.9 64.6
66.4
(*)
139.7
(*)
79.5 80.0
63.7 64.7
65.5 65.6
28.2 28.2
82.8 83.5

119.1 116.8
116.5 107.5
82.9 86.3
82.2 79.3
74.3 (*)
74.4
(*)
70.1 64.4
67.7 63.7
65.6 64.6
65.1 63.6
140.2 (*)
3 136.8 120.6
80.2 78.3
79.8 82.7
65.6 58.0
64.9 64.7
66.1 64.3
64.8
28.2 28.7
27.7 (?)
(4)
82.0 82.8
84.1 83.1

118.4
84.7
74.0
70.1
64.0
139.7
79.6
65.8
65.2
42.1
79.5

48.1 46.8

48.4

48.0

47.5

50.1 (*)

51.3 53.1
3 15.9 (2)
11.9 11.8
3 18.7 17.8
17.8 17.6
17.3 17.1
21.7 22.3
5 57.2 (*)

52.2 53.8 48.8
3 16.3 (2)
(2)
11.9 11.9 12.1
17.5 17.7 18.3
18.1 18.1 18.0
7 16.8 16.1 16.1
23.3
(4)
<*)
46.6
(*)
(4)

117.9 120.3 108.6 111.9 113.1
87.0 88.2 86.6 86.2 87.4
74.1 74.4 73.1 73.7 74.8
68.2 63.7 66.8 65.6 61.7
63.3 64.9 65.9 65.8 63.5
141.8 151.0 124.4 127.6 143.0
79.1 84.8 84.8 86.1 78.5
68.4 67.5 64.2 61.8 63.4
65.8 66.5 61.9 64.4 64.6
43.6 40.4 35.4 45.2 3 25.3
80.0 82.2 83.7 82.5 83.4

47.6 47.1

3 51.1 47.8

47.3
61.6

3 44.6
3 49.3
57.3
88.4
60.7
24.9
25.0
31.8
15.3
70.8
3 39.5
19.2
24.3
7 13.2
16.4
57.3
26.0
10.1
14.5
19.3
11.6
3 111.6
(*)
26.1
35.2
38.7
18.7
18.4
20.4
10.5
(29)

(*) 20 44.1 3 20 44.4 (4)(21) (4)(21)
(*) 3 48.5 3 46.8 3 44.2 3 43.7 3 42.2 3 -45.0
3 48.2 (*)
3 50.0 (*) 3 20 43.6 (4) 3 53.9 3 51.2 3 51.3 3 46.8 3 45.0 3 50.4
54.1 55.2
54.3 55.7
53.4 54.4 56.5 57.0 55.0 57.0 55.6 56.0
86.5 83.9
87.2 83.7 86.2 85.3 85.4 86.4 84.4 82.9
85.7 83.0
57.5 57.4
60.8 64.4 65.2 62.2 60.4 62.2 57.8 59.3
62.3 57.2
24.4 24.3
25.3 23.8
25.7 2*. 6 26.0 25.4 24.5 24.3 24.0 23.6
24.2 23.9
25.3 23.4
24.2 22.6 24.2 22.2 23.7 23.1 23.2 24.0
32.6 31.0
31.3 31.6
31.0 31.1 31.6 34.6 29.9 33.4 33.9 30.8
14.9 14.7
14.7 14.9
14.6 14.6 15.3 15.0 14.8 14.7 15.2 14.6
66.8 67.2
70.6 69.1
68.8 68.1 73.0 71.8 70.2 70.2 69.3 67.6
41.2
19.9
23.2
(*)
16.2
51.3
(*)
9.5
13.5
17.2
11.4
100.4
(*)
25.4
33.9
38.6
18.7
17.7
21.1
10.4
(29)

38.3
18.8
23.1
3 12.9
16.1
50.9
(*)
9.5
11.9
16.8
11.4
102.1
(*)
24.9
35.2
37.0
18.6
17.8
20.3
10.0
(29)

39.1
18.1
23.5
7 12.3
15.8
47.4
25.8
9.6
14.0
3 17.0
11.2
110.4
(*)
24.1
34.7
38.2
18.7
17.7
21.2
10.2
(29)

41.1
19.0
23.4
3 12.9
16.1
46.9
(*)
8.8
12.6
16.3
11.3
101.4
(4)
24.3
35.5
39.7
18.0
18.4
20.4
10.2
(29)

16.4 17.5
88.8 87.6
30.5 27.2

17.3
82.8
25.5

16.3
87.6
25.1

17.3
85.1
29.0

See footnotes at end of table.




Port­ Provi­
New Phila­ Pitts­ Rochester Scran­
land,
Buffalo Newark York
delphia burgh
ton
Maine dence

26

39.6 39.0 42.2 40.6 39.3 40.8 37.8 40.6
18.5 19.1 19.1 18.1 18.0 19.2 18.7 18.1
23.2 23.7 23.9 23.7 23.8 25.2 23.6 24.0
7 13.9 7 12.3 7 13.4 (4) 3 14.7 3 13.0 7 10.9 3 11.8
15.7 16.7 15.0 15.2 15.2 15.9 16.5 14.6
47.6 58.9 52.8 51.4 43.9 52.1 49.2 47.4
25.3 25.3 22.2 22.7 24.2 25.0 3 25.5 22.7
9.6
8.5 9.4 9.7 10.4 10.5
8.7 9.2
14.1 12.0 13.4 13.2 13.5 12.9 11.3 12.1
7 17.3 14.4 7 17.2 7 17.3 16.8 15.8 15.0 15.9
11.4 11.6 11.2 11.1 11.4 11.5 10.9 10.7
105.5 108.9 104.7 105.6 119.4 114.7 106.0 104.1
7 15.8
(4)
(*)
(4) 7 17.0 7 15.4 7 17.0
24.1 26.4 26.4 28.1 27.0 28.8 (4)
31.9 26.6
34.5 34.7 34.2 34.7 33.3 35.4 35.0 35.1
36.0 37.7 38.6 39.0 36.8 38.6 39.6 38.8
18.4 18.7 18.6 19.3 18.7 18.8 18.4 19.0
18.1 18.3 17.4 17.8 17.6 17.8 3 19.2 16.8
21.0 19.6 20.4 20.4 20.6 20.6 21.5 21.9
10.1 (29)
10.5 (29)
10.4 (29)
10.2 (29)9.9 (29)
10.3 (29)
10.4 (29)
10.2
(29)
17.1 16.2 17.1 16.9 15.6 15.5 16.0 19.5
85.4 86.4 88.2 86.9 83.5 87.0 82.7 82.6
27.0 30.1 29.9 30.2 30.9 32 32.0 29.8 31.0

TABLE 1 0.—ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1952—Continued

Article

NEW ENGLAND
United
States Boston Bridge­ Fall Man­
New
port River chester Haven

Fats and oils:
Lard-------------------- —pound—
18.4
Hydrogenated short— do----ening33.3
34.9
Salad dressing------- —pint—
Margarine:
\)
_/3\ 429.4
Colored---------- --do----- 3®
Sugar and sweets:
51.5
Sugar-------------------—5 pounds—
23.4
Grape jelly---------- ■ 12 ounces—

Port­ Provi­
New Phila­ Pitts­ Rochester Scran­
land,
Buffalo Newark York
delphia burgh
ton
Maine dence

19.8
33.2
35.9

20.0 18.8
34.3 33.9
36.6 36.2

18.3
33.0
36.0

19.6
33.7
36.6

18.7
32.5
35.5

28.3
50.8
24.8

29.9 29.9
52.0 51.8
23.2 23.7

28.5
51.1
21.9

30.9
50.4
22.9

30.5
51.4
24.6

See footnotes at end of table.




MIDDLE ATLANTIC

27

18.9
33.3
35.1

20.0 20.4 19.2
33.2 33.4 33.8
31.2 35.0 36.1
(V3 5\J
( 3 5\
30.0
31.1
50.1 52.5 49.5 49.0
24.2 23.9 22.2 21.7
—

17.6
32.4
34.5
29.8
49.8
21.1

17.6
33.6
35.4

19.2 18.0
33.3 32.3
33.9 33.6
(35)
30.2
29.6
52.6 53.4 51.3
23.8 22.6 21.8

TABLE 10.—ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1952—Continued
A rtic le

WEST NORTH CENTRAL
EAST NORTH CENTRAL
Indian­
SpringCedar
Minne­
Colum­
Kansas
C
incin­
Cleve­
Milwau­
Chicago n a ti
bus D etro it a p o lis kee Peoria fie ld Rapids City
apolis Omaha
land

C erals and bakery products:
C ereals:
50.0
Flour, wheat-------------------5 pounds—
Corn fla k e s 1----------------- 13 ounces— ( 2)
Com meal-----------------------------pound— 12.1
Rice---------------------------------------do-----17.1
Rolled o a ts-------------------20 ounces— 17.7
Bakery products:
Bread, w hite------------------------pound— 15.2
V anilla cookies 9------------ 7 ounces— 25.7
Layer cake--------------------------- pound— ( 4)
J e lly r o l l 12--------- --------12 ounces— —
Meats, p o u ltry , and fish :
M eats:
Beef:
Round steak ---------------------- pound— 104.9
83.1
Rib ro a s t--------------------------- do-----Chuck ro a s t------------------------do-----71.1
F ran k fu rters---------------------- do-----61.0
61.2
Hamburger--------------------------- do-----Veal:
C u tle ts-------------------------------do------ 115.8
Pork:
81.1
Chops----------------------------------do-----Bacon, s lic e d —'----------------- do-----63.5
Ham, whole--------------------------do-----62.6
S a lt pork--------------------------- do-----40.3
Lamb:
Leg------------------------------------- do-----79.2
Poultry:
Frying chickens:
Dressed and drawn 18-----------do-----Fish:
Ocean perch f i l l e t , frozen—do------ 5 44.1
Haddock f i l l e t , frozen--------- do------ 5 50.6
Salmon, pink------------ 16-ounce can— 54.8
Dairy products:
B utter-------------------------------------pound— 83.0
Cheese---------------------------------------do-----60.5
Milk:
Fresh (d e liv e re d )----------------q u a rt—
25.3
Fresh (grocery)---------------------do-----23.3
Ice cream----------------------------------p in t— 31.3
M ilk, evaporated—14 l/2-ounce can— 15.0
64.1
Eggs: fre sh --------------------------------dozen—
F ru its and vegetables:
Frozen fr u its :
S traw berries 26--------------12 ounces—
38.7
Orange ju ic e concentrate —6
ounces— 17.9
Frozen vegetables:
22.9
Peas------------------------------ 12 ounces—
Fresh f r u its :
Apples----------------------------------pound— 16.4
Bananas----------------------------------do-----18.4
Oranges, size 200---------------dozen—
52.7
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green------------------------pound— 25.4
Cabbage----------------------------------do-----9.6
C arrots--------------------------------bunch— 11.3
L ettuce--------------------------------- head— 14.5
Onions--------------------------------- pound— 11.4
Potatoes------------------------15 pounds— 123.3
Sweetpotatoes---------------------- pound— 19.1
Tomatoes--------------------------------do-----31.9
Canned fr u its :
Peaches-------------------No. 2 1/2 can— 34.0
Pineapple------------------------------ do-----38.8
Canned vegetables:
Corn--------------------------- No. 303 can— 18.2
Tomatoes------------------------No. 2 can— 18.2
Peas--------------------------- No. 303 can— 20.0
Baby foods, stra in e d 28—
4 3/4-5 ounces— 10.3
Dried f r u its : Prunes--------------pound— ( 2 9 )
Dried vegetables: Navy beans—do-----15.7
Beverages:
Coffee---------------------------------------do-----83.7
Cola drin k 30----------- 6-b o ttle carton— 28.9
Fats and o ils :
Lard---------------------------------------- pound— 17.6
Hydrogenated shortening-----------do-----33.3
Salad dressing--------------------------p in t— 32.3
M argarine:
Uncolored-----------------------------pound—
Colored----------------------------------do-----29.2
Sugar and sweets:
Sugar----------------------------------5 pounds— 51.9
Grape je lly ---------------------- 12 ounces—
21.2

51.8
50.8
53.2
50.1
50.2
49.2
49.1
53.6
54.3
52.2
50.3
52.1
52.1
3 16.6 3 16.2 ( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
2)
( 2)
( 2)
2)
11.5
12.0 ( 12.3
12.4
12.3
12.0 ( 11.8
12.2 12.3 12.4 12.4
12.5
11.9
18.0
18.0 17.2
17.6
18.1
17.3
17.6
17.9
17.7
18.7
17.7
16.5
17.0
17.8
18.2 18.0 18.3 17.5
17.9
17.9
17.7
18.1 18.3
18.0
17.4
18.0
15.6
15.6
15.3
14.6
15.1
15.0
15.5
14.2
15.0
15.0
15.5
15.1
15.5
25.6
25.1
24.6
23.3
24.7
22.5 10 25.2
24.7
23.3
10 27.7 24.6 26.9 24.7
—
—
51.9 ( 4)
42.2
36.5
44.6
49.8
(
4)
(4)
—(*)
—(*)
—
—
—
—
—
—
41.8 —
14 38.8 —
43.8
108.3
85.3
75.3
62.8
63.9
124.2
80.8
66.9
65.6
34.1
92.6

109.3 107.8
87.8
86.7
74.9 75.2
66.2 62.3
60.9
64.2
119.2 120.4
82.8
81.3
60.6
63.0
65.4
63.6
40.6
34.5
84.3 5 92.3

109.4
85.8
76.1
61.4
63.7
122.4
84.9
64.0
67.4
37.7
82.2

107.0
87.7
72.8
61.1
64.5

106.0
84.4
73.0
61.8
66.0 64.0
128.0 114.1 ( 4)
80.8 76.0 74.0
63.8
64.8
61.5
62.1
63.2
65.6
7 37.9 37.5 5 39.6
91.0
84.5 <*)
107.3
84.0
73.5
60.3

51.8
52.6
62.4
63.2
62.5
67.9
62.4
5 45.0 5 45.2 5 41.0 5 45.2 5 44.9 5 39.2 5 48.9
5 50.6 ’5 50.5 5 46.1 5 50.3 5 50.8 5 50.5 5 52.1
56.0
59.1
58.4
55.6
56.6
56.8
54.4
84.0
84.2
85.5
83.0
79.3
85.6
84.1
58.9
58.4
62.1
67.6
61.0
59.0
59.7
22.0 23.6
23.6
23.9
23.0
21.2 24.4
22.5
22.0 22.2 22.2 22.5 20.4 20.9
34.0
29.1 <*)
32.2
30.7
30.4
30.7
15.3
15.0
15.3
14.8
14.9
14.9
15.0
63.3
65.1
59.0
70.2
64.6
60.8
55.7

109.0
83.3
70.8
60.1
64.4
103.8
77.7
63.0
61.8
( 4)
( 4)

103.8
<*)
74.1
61.2
62.2
( 4)
77.2
63.3
66.9
(4)
(4)

104.3
84.3
71.0
63.1
59.1
117.7
79.0
64.3
63.0
36.1
92.7

V)
63.3
61.5
5 48.3 5 43.7 5 44.2
5 50.8 5 51.1 5 52.7
54.9
57.7
55.9
82.2 80.6 84.4
63.9
60.6
56.8
20.3
23.7
22.7
22.8 19.4 21.7
31.0
29.1
27.2
15.2
15.7
14.7
5 56.5 49.7 58.0

102.5
102.5
82.8
83.0
72.6
69.5
68.9
58.3
60.3
5 61.3
116.7 7 113.1
77.5
68.3
58.1
64.7
61.1
62.1
37.3
35.0
82.9
83.5
fl7 \

50.4

107.3
84.6
72.0
62.6
63.0
123.3
78.9
65.0
64.0
39.3
85.4
63.3

5 42.7 5 42.7
5 55.4 5 50.9

5 45.8
5 51.4

21.8
20.8

60.0
25.3
24.0
30.4
14.5
60.9

57.0
84.0
55.9
191.8
19.0
26.0
15.4
56.6

56.6
82.0
46.4

30.4
15.1
49.8

57.0

88.2

40.9
38.6
43.3
40.5
36.1
39.4
38.6 5 38.9
38.7
37.7
39.8
38.4
39.9
18.9
19.2
19.8
19.3
19.5
17.8
17.7
20.0 18.4 18.2
19.9
17.8
19.1
23.1
24.8
24.2
25.6
24.6
22.5
24.1
24.3
23.7
23.5
24.1
24.2
24.4
5 13.1 14.8 5 14.1 13.8 7 14.0 16.5 15.0 5 13.8 (4) 5 17.0 5 17.4 5 16.9
16.4
16.8
17.2
18.2
17.4
16.1
17.6
16.2
18.7
17.5
17.3
19.2
18.3
18.4
45.3
60.0
46.1
41.5
50.4
57.4
52.4
53.1
50.7
61.3
58.7
64.4
56.8
21.5
26.1
21.4
20.8 5 26.9 22.8 ( 4)
27.3
24.2 5 27.7 7 24.9
25.9
4)
10.6 9.8 10.3 10.7
9.6
10.0 ( 10.0
10.7
10.5
8.8
9.7
9.2
10.2
12.4
12.6 13.5 12.3
12.7
11.5
15.2
13.4 7 11.9 5 12.5
11.7 5 14.5
13.2
16.4
16.1
16.3
16.2
16.6
15.9
15.4
14.8
15.1
15.8
15.6
16.8
16.6
11.6 11.8 12.1 12.5 11.5 12.1 12.8 12.1 12.0 11.6 11.6 12.0
11.4
120.7 116.3 116.2 113.1
119.7 111.7 115.6
116.2 107.6 117.3
103.8
108.9
116.0
5 17.3 7 17.6 5 17.9 7 18.5 5 18.0 ( 4 ) 7 17.3 7 17.1 ( 4 ) 7 18.5 ( 4 )
5 17.9
4)
28.3
30.6
32.4
30.0
29.3
29.3
29.1
28.4
26.8
28.2 26.7 ( 25.2
27.3
34.5
35.0
35.0
35.3
35.0
35.4
34,4
34.7
36.0
33.3
34.1
33.9
34.4
39.8
39.4 40.3
40.1
40.5
40.6
39.5
38.9 40.1
40.0
40.5
39.4
39.1
18.-8 19.0
18.7
18.9
17.9
19.1
18.6
18.3
18.9
18.7
18.4
18.6 18.4
18.3
18.5
18.4
18.2 18.7 18.7 18.3
18.2 20.8 17.8 7 19.3
19.0 5 19.0
20.9
21.2 21.2 20.8 22.1 20.1 23.0
20.6 21.0 19.7
22.0 18.7
20.1
10.6 ( 210.3
10.4 ( 210.6
10.4 ( 210.0
9.6
9.8 ( 2 9.7
9.2
9.3
9.2
9.3
(29)
9)
(2 9 )
(29)
( 29)
9)
9)
(2 9 )
9)
(29)
(2 9 )
( 29)
( 29)
16.0
14.8
14.7
14.2
15.2
16.2
15.2
15.0
15.4
15.2
16.2
14.1
14.8
87.0
85.8
86.8 85.2
86.5
86.3
86.6 87.7 87.7 88.6 88.9
87.0
86.7
30.2
30.1
25.0
25.1
31.2
29.1
26.3
43.2
25.1
25.0
29.8
25.0
29.5
19.4
20.8 17.2 17.5
18.3
17.5
18.3
18.6
19.2
16.4
17.6
16.4
16.7
33.2
32.9
33.3
33.9
32.8
33.4
33.8
34.5
34.3
33.2
33.9
33.1
33.0
36.8
34.9
35.5
37.0
35.1
35.0
32.7
36.8
33.6
36.0
34.6
34.2
35.0
—
43.2 —
36.7 —
42.9 __________ ____________
28.8
28.9
27.6
28.5
31.6
28.5
30.5 —
28.1 ____________
27.1
28.3
52.1
54.9
53.1
53.6
53.3
53.9
54.5
53.0
53.8
53.4
55.0
52.4
52.3
26.8
24.8
25.0
24.8
25.8
24.1
25.8
25.8
26.3
24.5
24.8
25.1
26.3

See footnotes a t end of tab le.




S t.
Louis

- 28 -

TABLE 10.—ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1952—Continued
A rtic le
C ereals and bakery products:
C ereals:
Flour, wheat--------------------------5 pounds—
Corn flak e s 1------------------------13 ounces—
Corn meal----------------------------------- pound—
Rice--------------------------------------------- do-----Rolled o a ts--------------------------20 ounces—
Bakery products:
Bread, w hite------------------------------ pound—
V anilla cookies 9-------------------7 ounces—
Layer cake----------------------------------pound—
M eats, p o u ltry , and fis h :
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak -----------------------------pound—
Rib ro a s t----------------------------------do-----Chuck ro a s t------------------------------ do-----F ran k fu rters-----------------------------do-----Hamburger----------------------------------do-----Veal:
C u tle ts------------------------------------- do-----Pork:
Chops------------------------------ ---------do-----Bacon, s lic e d --------------------------- do-----Ham, whole-------------------------------- do-----S a lt pork----------------------------------do-----Lamb:
Leg------------------------------------------- do-----P o ultry:
Frying chickens:
New York dressed 15------------------- do-----Dressed and drawn 18----------------- do-----Fish:
Ocean perch f i l l e t , frozen------- —do-----Haddock f i l l e t , frozen----------------do-----Salmon, pink-------------------16-ounce can—
Dairy products:
B utter--------------------------------------------pound—
Cheese----------------------------------------------do-----Milk:
Fresh (d e liv e re d )---------------------- q u a rt—
Fresh (grocery)--------------------------- do-----Ice cream---------------------------------------- p in t—
Milk evaporated-----------14- l/2-ounce can—
Eggs: Fresh---------------------------------------dozen—
F ru its and V egetables:
Frozen f r u its :
S traw berries 26---------------------12 ounces—
Orange ju ic e concentrate------ 6 ounces—
Frozen vegetables:
Peas-------------------------------------12 ounces—
Fresh f r u its :
Apples---------------------------------------- pound—
Bananas---------------------------------------- do-----Oranges, siz e 200---------------------- dozen—
Fresh vegetables:
Beans, green------------------------------ pound—
Cabbage---------------------------------------- do____
C arrots---------------------------------------bunch—
L ettuce---------------------------------------- head—
Onions---------------------------------------- pound—
P o tatoes------------------------------ 15 pounds—
Sw eetpotatoes-----------------------------pound—
Tomatoes---------------------------------------do-----Canned f r u its :
Peaches------------------------- No. 2 1/2 can—
Pineapple------------------------------------- do-----Canned vegetables:
Corn----------------------------------No. 303 can—
Tomatoes------------------------------ No. 2 can—
Peas----------------------------------No. 303 can—
Baby foods, stra in e d 28
4- 3/4—5 ounces—
Dried f r u its : Prunes---------------------pound—
Dried vegetables: Navy beans--------- do-----Beverages:
Coffee--------------------------------------------- do-----Cola drink 30----------------- 6-b o ttle carton—
Fats and o ils :
Lard-----------------------------------------------pound—
Hydrogenated shortening----------------- do-----Salad dressing -------------------------------- p in t—
M argarine:
C olored^
Sugar and sweets:
Sugar---------------------------------------- 5 pounds—
Grape je lly -----------------------------12 ounces—

WEST NORTH
CENTRAL—Cont.

SOUTH ATLANTIC

At­ B a lti­ C harles- Jackson­
S tPaul W ichita lan ta more ton,S .C . v ille
54.6
(a )
11.8
17.6

18.2

15.4
24.3
54.3

55.0
52.2
(2 ) 3 16.0
7.8
12.9
17.4
17.2

51.5
56.8
(2) 3 17.1
11.8 12.7
18.4 (4)
18.2 18.0 18.0 18.8
8 15.9 15.9 15.7 16.7
24.6 10 36.7 23.3 10 35.4
42.7
7 41.8 — (4)
( 4)

105.4 7 112.4 117.4 ( 4)
86.7 (*)
( 4)
(4 )
70.8 7 74.8 75.1 (4)
60.6 63.4
62.3
58.7
59.5
62.0 69.0
62.2
117.5 140.6 7 121.0
111.2 (4)
71.8 79.5
70.2
76.8
76.2
64.3 65.6
65.1
65.0
65.3
61.3
64.4 66.9
61.9
65.7
35.0
39.1
34.5 34.8
40.7
83.3
98.8
84.8 83.5 7 91.4
(4)
(4 )
68.5
62.3

5 81.2

(17)

______

5 44.2
5 54.6

57.3
83.6
56.8

20.2
17.7
26.7
15.8
55.7

49.8
•62.4
56.4
56.2
5 47.7 5 38.2 5 44.9 5 40.8
5 57.2 (*) 5 48.8 ( 4)
53.1 56.5
60.8
54.9
90.3 87.1
87.5
85.2
64.3
59.9
59.0 (4 )
24.4
24.5
25.2 23.5
26.0 23.6
24.9
23.4
31.0
30.6 (*) 5 34.9
14.9 14.8
15.2
15.3
55.9
63.4 68.2 63.2

37.6 44.2
37.5 5 39.5
20.4
19.4
19.8 19.2
23.4
26.0
24.9 24.8
5 17.0 18.2 (4) 5 13.1
18.2
14.4 15.6
19.7
57.2
68.1 35.6 41.7
7 24.9 5 25.0 21.3 22.3
9.6
10.2 9.3 9.8
13.4
13.5 13.3
11.7
19.1
17.0
15.0 16.1
11.4
13.1
10.7 5 11.4
116.0 5 128.2 120.0 117.6
20.3 7 17.4 7 15.0
(4 )
24.8
27.5
25.3 24.3
35.1
34.0
33.6
34.9
40.1
40.0
38.0 37.4
18.0
19.5
19.5 18.7
21.1 20.3 16.2 18.1
23.6
24.1
22.1 20.6
10.4
10.5
9.3
9.3
(29)
(29)
(29)
(29)
15.6 16.2
15.6
15.5
91.2
86.1 83.1 86.8
25.0 25.0
29.8
25.0
16.3
18.2 17.5
17.2
33.0 33.6
34.4
34.3
32.5 35.4
37.3
35.8
43.4
31.6
25.6 31.1
56.6
55.2
49.7 50.4
23.4 21.7
25.5
26.1

17.4
17.8
15.0
24.1
43.9

(4)
(*)
(*)
60.5
(4)
(4)
76.3
(4)
67.9
39.8
(*)
58.4
5 44.1
<*)
55.9
87.2
63.5
27.0
26.4
33.0
14.7
65.1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL

Rich­ Savan­ Washing­ W inston- Birming­ Jackmond nah ton,D.C. Salem
ham
son

53.0
52.3
(2)
(2)
8.2 8.8
17.7
17.1
17.7
17.3
15.4 5 14.8
10 30.7 10 32.6
(4)
(4)

53.4
54.5
55.4
(2 ) 3 16.4
(2)
7.0
9.6
9.1
18.6
19.3
(4)
18.3
18.2
19.0
16.0
14.8
15.7
24.0 10 35.9 10 36.5
40.5
50.6
46.2

111.4 112.4 110.3
86.9
86.1 87.7
71.4
71.0 75.6
59.4
60.8 58.5
60.6 63.8
62.2
130.1 134.5 113.9
76.0
78.2 72.2
65.8
66.6 62.6
68.0 67.5 62.3
34.2 35.8
35.2
80.7
84.0 87.5

115.7
85.5
73.9
61.4
63.5
135.8
78.5
68.3
67.4
35.1
81.8

113.4
88.6
75.7
59.9
63.2
120.5
72.6
66.8
65.2
32.8
7 89.5

39.9 36.5
41.8
42.0
42.1
( 4)
19.5
21.0
17.8
19.0 20.0 17.9
24.3 26.5
24.9
26.3
24.2
24.8
14.4 7 11.6
14.9 5 13.4 (4)
(4)
13.0
16.5
14.8
15.2 13.9
14.8
43.8
41.0
40.3 34.2
5 33.0
40.7
19.4
22.8 23.0 7 19.9 20.8 21.3 23.8
8.5
9.8
8.5
9.0
9.4
9.2
9.2
12.3
13.5
5 14.0
12.8 7 13.0 13.3 5 14.4
15.5
16.4
16.0
18.4
17.7 14.8
17.1
11.1 11.0 1 1 . 3 11.7 10.6 11.6 12.4
114.4
111.4 114.1 110.0 120.5
114.7
118,1
17.3
18.7 7 14.2
(4)
( 4) 7 15.9 7 16.4
25.1
22.9
22.7
25.2
25.1 22.8 26.5
34.0 5 34.3
34.9
34.1 35.1
34.1
35.4
38.2
39.3
37.5 39.2
(4)
(4)
<*)
18.9
20.0
20.4
19.0 18.7 20.4
19.2
16.8
16.8
15.6 16.5
17.6
16.5
16.2
26.0
20.1 24.6
25.4
20.3
24.5 25.0
10.2 ( 2 10.3
10.4
10.4 10.3
11.2
10.7
(29)
(2 9 )
( 29)
9)
( 29 )
(29 )
(29)
17.3
14.6
15.2 16.1
16.4
15.4
(4)
89.7
88.8 89.6
87.4
89.0
85.6 85.9
24.7
25.0
25.0
24.7
30.4
25.2 25.0
18.1
19.9
20.2 18.5
18.4 17.3 19.0
33.3
34.2
33.4
32.7
33.0 32.8 34.1
35.9
35.2
36.6
35.0
34.1 32.5
34.8
28.2
51.5
24.1

29

29.0
48.7
23.7

52.5

55.3

Knox­
v ille
58.5

3 15.8 3 16.8 3 16.8
8.2 7.9 8.1
5 18.4 18.0 20.3

17.7
15.4
10 36.1
(4)

18.0 18.5
17.0 16.2
18.8 • 24.4
44.0
(4)

108.8 5 108.8 (4)
82.4 5 88.0 (4)
71.6 5 73.6 (4)
57.8
63.0 58.2
63.0
60.1 63.9
109.2 113.1 ( 4)
67.3
74.3 72.1
60.9
64.2 64.3
61.4 68.2 64.4
31.7 - 38.1 36.4
84.5 ( 4)
(4)

------:---- —
—
( 17) —
60.3
60.7 55.5
57.0
56.8
57.3 55.7
5 46.7 5 43.3 5 47.0 5 43.5 5 42.5 5 37.1 5 47.7 5 46.8
5 50.8 5 49.0 5 53.3 5 47.2 5 49.0 (4)
(4) 5 52.5
56.5
55.0 53.5
58.3
52.6
60.5 59.0
55.7
87.9
88.6 91.1
87.9
87.1 87.9
89.1 87.4
5 62.4 60.5 59.1 60.8
60.6
58.6
65.3 63.8
23.5 27.2
25.2
23.7
24.3
25.9
24.0 24.7
21.8 25.2
24.8
23.4 27.8
25.7
24.2 25.1
38.3
33.4 (4)
32.9
32.5
28.7 27.2
( 4)
14.8
15.5
15.2 14.4
15.5
14.4
15.4 15.3
65.8 63.7 72.1
61.9
66.4
64.2
66.2 62.9

38.9
20.5
26.4
7 14.0
13.8
36.0

See footnotes at end ot tab le.




53.1

3 16.5
12.2

Nor­
fo lk

30.5
51.7
5 25.1

29.7
51.5
20.5

29.5
48.6
24.4

31.3
51.0
21.7

31.4
52.7
23.8

38.5
19.6
25.0

41.2 40.6
16.8 21.1
26.8 27.2
7 18.0 (4)
(4)
14.6
14.2 14.6
35.2
41.6 5 38.1
25.0 7 27.5 5 23.5
8.6 8.7
7.9
(4)
(4)
( 4)
13.7
14.1 15.1
10.4
11.2 11.4
123.0 128.6 121.2
(4)
(4) 7 15.0
23.1
25.7 21.8
33.9
35.3 33.1
38.1
40.1 41.8
20.6 19.4
19.2
17.8 ( 4)
16.7
21.4
21.8 22.2
9.2 10.6
10.2
( 2 9)
(2 9 )
(29)
15.7
16.7 15.7
83.4
92.3 83.8
25.0 25.0
29.5
17.8
18.2 18.9
33.4 33.4 34.1
35.2
36.5 35.2
29.8
49.3

21.0

30.4
50.0
23.5

31.8
53.1
26.0

TABLE 10.—ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1952—Continued
EAST SOUTH
CENTRAL—Continued

A rticle

Louis­
v ille

Cereals and bakery products:
C ereals:
Flour, wheat-----------------5 pounds—
Corn flakes 1--------------- 13 ounces—
Corn meal------------------------- pound—
Rolled oats-----------------20 ounces—
Bakery products:
Bread, w hite-—— ------------pound—
Vanilla cookies9—------- 7 ounces—
Layer cake------------------------pound—
Jelly r o l l 12--------------- 12 ounces—
Meats, poultry, and fish :
Meats:
Beef:
Round steak------------------- pound—
Rib ro a st----------------------- -do----Chuck ro a st--------------------- do----Frankfurters---------------do-Hamburger------------------------ do----Veal:
C utlets----------------------------do----Pork:
Chops----------------------------- do----Bacon, sliced-----------------do----Ham, whole--------------------- do----S alt pork-----------------------do----Lamb:
Poultry:
Frying chickens:
New York dressed 15--------- do----Dressed and drawn18-------do-----Fish:
Ocean perch f i l l e t , frozen-do----Haddock f i l l e t , frozen------do----Salmon, pink----------16-ounce can—
Dairy products:
B utter-------------------------------- pound—
Milk:
Fresh (delivered)------------ quart—
Fresh (grocery)----- ------------do---Ice cream----------------------------- p in t—
Milk, evaporated 14 l/2-ounce can—
Eggs: Fresh-----------------------------dozen—
Fruits and vegetables:
Frozen fru its :
Strawberries 26------------12 ounces—
Orange juice concentrate
6 ounces—
Frozen vegetables:
Peas-------------------------- 12 ounces—
Fresh fru its :
Apples------------------------------pound—
Bananas-------------------------------do----Oranges, size 200-------------dozen—
Fresh vegetables:
B eans, gree n-------------------------------- pound—
Cabbage-------------------------------do----Carrots---------------------------- bunch—
Lettuce------------------------------head—
Onions------------------------------pound—
Potatoes--------------------15 pounds—
Sweetpotatoes------------------- pound—
Tomatoes----------------------------do----Canned fru its :
Peaches---------------- No. 2 l/2 can—
Pineapple--------------------------- do----Canned vegetables:
Corn------------------------No. 303 can—
Tomatoes---------------------No. 2 can—
Peas— ------------------ No. 303 can—
Baby foods, strained2*
4 3/4-5 ounces—
Dried fru its : Prunes—— -----pound—
Dried vegetables: Navy beans
Beverages:

Coffee ----------------------

Cola drink30—-------- 6 -b o ttle

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL

Mem­ Mobile Dallas Houston
phis

50.4 57.9 51.7 50.1
(2) 3 16.3 (2) (2)
9.1
8.1 11.9 10.7
19.2 15.8 16.9 19.5
17.6 17.8 18.0 18.1
14.9 5 15.9 8 17.3 15.6
21.8 19.2 20.3 23.3
37.6 _______ 42.2 5 43.1
103.0
80.6
68.7
64.7
61.5
133.0
76.5
62.3
63.3
7 29.6
90.2

102.8 (4)
82.6

(4)
69.6 (4)
61.0 59.0
62.1 59.8
115.0 110.6
71.7 70.0
62.4 60.4
61.0 63.6
37.7 36.0
83.3 94 .'4

106.6
84.2
67.6
57.6
61.3
113.4
71.2
62.8
65.6
34.3
90.7

52.6

53.4

53.4

PACIFIC
Salt
Lake
City

50.3 ( 249.5
)
(2)
12.2
13.6
17.5 5 18.0
18.2
18.9
15.9 15.7 16.4 8 15.3 5 16.8
19.5 22.6 24.1 25.0 (4)
5 37.6 (4) (3) (A)
43.2
3 26.5
51.3

3 16.4 3 16.3 3 16.5 (2)
12.4
8.5 12.2 12.5
16.8 16.5 16.4 5 18.6
18.0 18.3 18.2 19.0
14.0
24.5
(4)

111.1 105.2 108.3 (4)
90.4 88.1 84.8 (4)
76.1 73.4 71.6
59.8

66.1
105.4
77.5
63.9
66.0
38.9
5 94.3

57.9 62.1
63.9 63.1
(4) 116.0
70.2 72.3
64.3 64.3
63.3 68.6
36.8 36.3
7 91.0 88.2

100.1

81.1
67.4
(4)
63.0 62.2
65.5 62.1
117.2 106.9
77.1 74.8
67.6 65.2
66.1 61.0
36.2 36.4
81.6 81.0

105.4
87.4
71.0
63.8
61.4
115.0
81.9
69.5
64.1
38.7
81.4

Los An­
geles
53.7

3 15.9
12.6
18.2
19.1
16.4
23.6
39.5

Port­
land,
Oreg.
53.4
(2)
12.3
21.0
19.5
7 16.0
24.5
7 43.7

111.4 7 108.5
89.6 (4)
73.5 (4)
61.8
63.3
64.5
62.9
128.1 17 117.9
88.6
78.0
67.4
65.5
65.5
65.0
41.1
37.2
81.8
86.9

San
Fran­
cisco
57.3
(2)

12.6
21.0

19.6

8 18.3

25.3

3 28.2
116.1
90.0
(4)
69.9
63.3
133.8
90.5
68.5
67.5
42.6
83.4

S eattle

53.8
12.4
21.4
19.4
5 16.2
24.9
(4)

l2)

112.8

87.5
73.8
67.0
65.7
(4)
77.0
64.3
64.6
41.8
78.5

58.9
60.2 7 54.2
56.0 (0.7)
( 17)
68.3
57.8 60.0 58.0
57.4 59.4 57.0 59.5
5 41.1 7 48.6 7 44.5 5 45.4 5 49.1 5 49.4 5 49.8 (4)(22) 5 45.0 5 22 73#3 5 22 77.8 7 22 75.1 5 55.4 5 22 72.4
5 47.1 7 51.0 (4) 7 51.6 5 24 63.7 5 57.8 5 54.8 (4)(25) 4 52.7 5 25 65.6 5 25 63.0 5 25 61.1 5 22 75.1 7 25 60.9
56.1 58.8 55.9 58.2 56.6
55.3 52.8
55.8
55.2 (4)
55.0
58.3
54.7
53.7
83.8 86.3 86.4 90.3
89.5 86.5 86.7 88.7 86.9
86.3
85.7
84.0
89.1
86. 260.1 62.4 60.3 59.9
66.3 61.1 60.7 57.8 58.9
56.1
61.1
61.1
58.5
58.5
24.6 22.5 25.2 25.4
26.2 24.1 25.1 20.2 23.6
22.6
22.6
21.7
22.0
22.1
24.4 22.4 25.8 25.3
24.2 23.9 24.2 21.0 21.9
21.4
22.0
21.6
20.7
21.1
26.6 29.2 29.2 5 28.3 32.5
26.6
31.7 28.0 29.3 26.6
27.8
29.8
34.4
(4)
14.8 14.8 14.5 15.2 15.2
15.0 15.1 14.6 14.7
15.0
14.7
14.7
15.4
14.8
61.4 65.3 60.2 68.0
65.0 62.1 62.4 76.1 68.5
67.0
63.2
66.7
69.8
70.0
41.0
21.3
24.7
14.9
16.3
41.4

39.0 5 37.4 37.0
21.7 18.3 18.7
25.0 23.8 22.8
(4) (4) 7 17.9
16.3 12.2 14.4
41.2 5 36.8 62.4
22.6 27.2 22.3 25.0
8.8 8.8 8.0
10.5
14.1 10.9 11.0 (4)
16.3 15.5 14.1 15.4
13.2 12.5 10.6 10.2
109.2 130.6 120.3 126.1
5 18.4 18.3 (4) (4)
28.1 29.8 23.7 25.8
35.0 31.9 32.1 33.3
39.2 37.6 35.5 (4)
18.6 18.1 18.6 19.7
18.3 17.0 16.1 17.4
21.6 24.2 22.5 23.5
10.6 (29)
9.0 9.4 (29)
9.0
(29)
(29>
14.7 15.4 15.3 17.3
—do— 09.4 09.1 90.7 06.5
oarton—
25.2 25.0 24.9 24.8

37.1 7 39.6 39.1 37.1 37.4
38.6
39.0 7 39.7
40.2
39.3
18.3 20.3 18.8 19.3 18.8
18.6
18.3
19.4
19.2
19.9
23.6 23.6 24.2 23.9 24.3
23.3
24.0
25.2
24.2
23.8
20.1 5 17.7 16.0 (4) 16.6
15.8
15.8
14.1
13.4
15.9
14.5 17.0 11.8 20.4 17.6
18.3
17.7
19.6
19.6
19.5
39.9
51.7 64.8 36.9 5 56.4 64.1
55.0
57.7 5 54.0
61.6
5 25.0 (*)
7 26.4 (4)
25.8 7 26.8 23.3 (4) (4)
(4)
8.5
9.1 7.5 10.1
9.0
9.0
6.4
8.6
7.6
9.7
11.3 (4)
10.0
9.2
10.7 (4)
9.7
10.7
9.7
11.4
15.0 17.8 13.5 16.8 •15.2
15.1
11.7
14.7
14.6
10.9
11.8 11.8 9.9 11.3 9.8
10.9
11.2
11.1
10.6
11.0
139.1 120.4 123.9 107.3 5 104.6
115.3
111.5
110.8 112.7 113.5
7 17.8 (4) 7 13.6 (4) 7 17.0 (4)
7 20.9 (4)
(4)
(4)
24.5
27.6
26.2 29.9 25.2 29.6 31.4
27.3
27.0
32.3
31.4
33.7 34.9 33.9 34.5 33.9
30.7
31.0
31.5
33.8
35.9
38.2
36.7 5 39.8 36.4 40.3 39.4
35.7
37.2
35.9
19.0
19.8 20.4 19.4 19.0 18.7
17.7
18.6
18.3
20.2
17.5 19.0 17.7 20.2 7 20.1 27 22.9 27 21.1 27 23.3 27 22.0 27 23.9
20.4
19.1
22.8 26.5 23.6 20.8 20.6
17.9
21.2
19.8
9.0
9.0
9.3
9.1
9.5
9.2
9.0
8.9
9.2
5
(29)
(29) (29) (29) (29)
(29)
(29)9.2
(29)
(29)
(29)
16.7 16.5
08.6 85.1
25.0 33 25.0

See feetaotee at eed of table.




MOUNTAIN

L ittle New
Butte Den­
Rock Or­
ver
leans

30

15.5
86.4
24.9

16.6
91.7
38.2

16.7
92.2
25.0

15.7
92.0
25.0

16.6
90.3
37.2

16.9
87.1
26.9

17.6
92.0
29.4

17.4
91.6
(4)

TABLE 10.—ANNUAL AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF PRINCIPAL FOODS, BY CITY, 1952—Continued
EAST SOUTH
CENTRAL—Continued

A rtic le

Louis­ Mem­
v ille phis

Fats and o ils :
Lard------------------------------- -------pound—
Hydrogenated shorteningSalad dressin g ----------------------- p in t—
M argarine:
do
Sugar and sweets:
Sugar------------------------------—5 pounds—
Grape je lly -------------------- -12 ounces—

1 13
39
17
2
38
4
5
11
6
52
7
10
8
97
47
10 12
11
46
12 12
4
13
14 10
15
18
28
17
18
19
28
20

8

17

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL

Mobile D allas Houston

12

9

10

3




L ittle New
Or­ Butte
Rock leans

Den­
ver

PACIFIC
S a lt
Lake
C ity

Los An­
geles

P o rt­
land,
Oreg.

San
Fran­
cisco

17.8
33.5
36.7

17.6
32.4
33.7

32.6
34.3

32.8
34.8

34.3
36.6

20.6 18.3 23.5
34.0
34.8

18.1
33.3
36.6

18.8
33.4
35.1

20.7
33.1
34.8

33.1
35.7

20.0

23.7
33.7
36.1

28.3
51.8
22.0 5 25.4

29.2
48.7
23.6

28.1
49.7
24.8

29.7
49.3
25.3

27.9
52.4
27.1

29.8
47.9
25.3

31.0
54.7
26.7

40.7
55.5
28.5

29.0
52.3

30.8
55.7
26.0

30.8
51.6
25.8

12
15 1952

39

16.6
33.0
33.6
30.9
53.3

20.1

ounces in
cities, ounces in
■cities, January through April;
ounces in
cities,
ounces in
cities, May through December.
Specification changed from
ounces to
ounces, effective May
,
.
ounces.
Not available; insufficient number of reports during year.
Average for
months.
Priced in
cities.
Average for
months.
Per loaf.
ounces in
cities,
ounces in cities.
ounces.
Priced in
cities.
ounces in cities,
ounces in cities, ounces in cities.
Average price not computed for United States.
ounces.
Published as dressed, beginning September
,
.
Priced in
cities January through August, priced in
cities September through December.
Specification changed from dressed to ready-to-cook, effective September
,
.
Published as ready-to-cook, beginning September
,
.
Priced in
cities January through August, priced in
cities September through December.
Cod, fillet, frozen.

13

MOUNTAIN

12

8

20.2

8

23
15 1952
33

59.0
26.2

22.8

22.1

33.4
35.5
5 30.6
54.6

5 25.2

21 Haddock, fillet, fresh.
22 Salmon, fresh or frozen.
23 Priced in 47 cities.
24 Sea trout, fresh, dressed.
25 Halibut, fresh or frozen.
26 Specification changed from 16 ounces to 12 ounces, effective January 15, 1952.
27 No. 2Va can.
28 Size range changed from 4^ - 4% ounces to 4% - 5 ounces, beginning May 15, 1952.
29 Specification changed from medium to large prunes, effective April 15, 1952.
30 Specification changed from 6- bottle carton in 56 cities, to carton of 6, 6-ounce bottles in 54 cities,
carton of 6, 10-ounce bottles in 1 city, and carton of 6, 12-ounce bottles in 1 city, effective September 15,
1952.
31 Average price for 56 cities January through August, and for 54 cities September through December.
32 12 ounces.
33 10 ounces.
34 Priced in 9cities January through July, aid in 6 cities August through December. United States aver­
age price not computed after July.
35Uncolored margarine priced from January through July, colored margarine priced from August through
December.
36 Priced in 47cities January through Ju ly, and in 50cities August through December.

3

15 1952

34.4
37.0
30.0

S e a ttle

15 1952

31

APPENDIX
B r ie f D e s c r ip tio n o f R e ta il F o o d P r ic e In d ex
T h e R e ta il F o o d P r ic e In d ex , a co m p o n en t
of th e C o n s u m e r s ’ P r ic e In d ex , m e a s u r e s
a v e r a g e c h a n g e s in r e ta il p r ic e s o f a fix e d
l i s t o f fo o d s o f co n sta n t q u a n tity and q u a lity ,
b ou gh t by m o d e r a te -in c o m e f a m ilie s in
la r g e c i t i e s . T h is is in lin e w ith th e g e n e r a l
p u r p o se o f th e C o n s u m e r s ’ P r ic e In d ex of
m e a s u r in g h ow m u c h m o r e o r l e s s it c o s ts
at on e tim e th an at a n o th er to p u r c h a se a
fix e d l is t o f g o o d s -1 T h e in d e x is n ot d e sig n e d
to m e a s u r e h ow m u ch m o r e it c o s ts to liv e
in one c ity th a n in a n o th er.2
R e ta il fo o d p r ic e s w e r e f ir s t c o lle c te d in
1903, w h en th e B u r e a u ’s r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s
o b ta in ed p r ic e s fo r th e y e a r s 1890 th rou gh
1903 fr o m g r o c e r s ’ r e c o r d s . A t th at tim e ,
30 fo o d s w e r e p r ic e d in 171 r e p r e s e n ta tiv e
c it ie s in 33 S ta te s . S in c e th en ch a n g e s in th e
l is t s o f fo o d s and in th e n u m b er o f c it ie s
h a v e b e e n m a d e , w ith th e n u m b er o f fo o d s
v a r y in g b e tw e e n 16 and 87 and th e n u m b er of
c it ie s b e tw e e n 39 and 171. T h e b a s e p e r io d ,
c o lle c tio n and co m p u ta tio n m e th o d s , and
te c h n iq u e s h a v e a ls o ch a n g ed fr o m tim e to
tim e .
In 1951 and 1 9 52 , th e B u rea u p u b lish e d
r e ta il p r ic e s of 59 fo o d s in 56 c it ie s . E a ch
m o n th abou t 8 0 ,0 0 0 q u o ta tio n s w e r e c o l ­
le c te d fr o m 1 ,6 5 0 in d ep en d en t s t o r e s and 150
ch a in o r g a n iz a tio n s r e p r e s e n tin g 6 ,5 0 0 ch a in
s t o r e s , o r a to ta l o f abou t 8 ,1 5 0 s t o r e s .
S to r e S a m p le S e le c tio n
In s e le c tin g th e s a m p le o f s t o r e s fo r fo o d
p r ic e r e p o r ts , th e B u rea u h a s ta k e n in to
1 A detailed discussion of the Consumers’ Price Index is
presented in the bulletin, Consumers’ Prices in the United
States, 1942^48 (Bull. 966). The index as it was computed
through 1941 is described in Changes in Cost of Living in
Large Cities in the United States 1913-41 (Bull. 699).
2 A special study of differences in costs between cities
is presented in The City Worker’s Family Budget in the
Monthly Labor Review, February 1948 (also reprinted as
Serial No. R. 1909).




- 32

a cco u n t ty p e o f s to r e in te r m s o f fo o d s
h a n d led , s iz e o f s to r e a s m e a s u r e d by s a le s
v o lu m e , and g e o g r a p h ic lo c a tio n w ith in th e
c ity .
R e v is io n s in s to r e s a m p le s a r e m a d e fr o m
tim e to tim e , to m a in ta in th e a c c u r a c y o f th e
B u r e a u ’s fo o d p r ic e in d e x . T h e la t e s t c o m ­
p le te sa m p le r e v is io n to o k p la c e b e tw e e n
S e p te m b e r 1945 and Jun e 1 9 4 6 .3 A t th a t
tim e th e s iz e o f th e s a m p le o f in d ep en d en t
s to r e s in e a c h c ity w a s ch a n g ed so a s to b e
eq u a l to th e sq u a r e r o o t o f th e to ta l n u m b e r
of in d ep en d en t fo o d s to r e s o p e r a tin g in th e
c ity . T h is r e la tio n s h ip w a s em p lo y e d s in c e
th e r a tio n e c e s s a r y to o b ta in s ta b le a v e r a g e
p r ic e s in a s m a ll c ity is h ig h e r th an is
n e c e s s a r y fo r a la r g e m e tr o p o lita n a r e a .
A c o m p le te lis tin g of a ll in d ep en d en t
s to r e s in e a c h of th e 56 c it ie s w a s c la s s if ie d
a c c o r d in g to ty p e o f c o m m o d itie s h a n d le d -c o m b in a tio n s to r e s (g r o c e r ie s and m e a ts ),
g r o c e r ie s o n ly , m e a ts o n ly , p r o d u c e m a r ­
k e ts , e tc . T h e lis tin g fo r e a c h s to r e ty p e w a s
fu r th e r c la s s if ie d by s a le s v o lu m e c l a s s - u n d er $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 , $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 and u n d er $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ,
and $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 and o v e r an n u a l s a le s v o lu m e .
S to r e s w e r e fu r th e r d is tr ib u te d w ith in c ity
a r e a s and a ra n d o m s e le c t io n th en m a d e
w ith in e a c h a r e a to fu lfill th e s a m p le r e ­
q u ir e m e n ts . T h e r e s u lt w a s a s e lf-w e ig h tin g
sa m p le o f in d ep en d en t s t o r e s b a s e d on
c u r r e n t d is tr ib u tio n o f to ta l in d ep en d en t
s to r e s a le s in e a c h c ity . T h e B u rea u c o n ­
tin u ed to in c lu d e a ll im p o rta n t ch a in s to r e s
in e a c h c ity .
C o lle c tio n o f P r ic e s
T h e B u rea u c o lle c t s r e t a il p r ic e s o f 59
fo o d s in e a c h o f th e 56 la r g e c it ie s in c lu d e d
in its R e ta il F o o d P r ic e In d ex , d u rin g th e
f ir s t 3 d a y s o f th e w e e k c o n ta in in g th e
fifte e n th o f th e m o n th . L o c a l B u rea u r e p r e 3 See Store Samples for Retail Food Prices in Monthly
Labor Review for January 1947; also reprinted as Serial No.
R. 1878.

s e n ta tiv e s c o lle c t r e ta il fo o d p r ic e s fr o m
g r o c e r s w ho r e p o r t v o lu n ta r ily . T h e r e p r e ­
s e n ta tiv e s a r e p r o v id e d w ith a d e s c r ip tio n
(s p e c ific a tio n ) o f th e q u a lity fo r w h ich p r ic e
q u o ta tio n s a r e d e s ir e d . W ith in th e ra n g e o f
e a c h s p e c ific a tio n , th e y a r e in s tr u c te d to
s e c u r e a p r ic e fo r th e ty p e , b ra n d , e t c ., s o ld
in g r e a te s t v o lu m e in e a c h s t o r e . S p e c ific a ­
tio n s a r e d e fin e d p r e c is e ly en ou gh to in s u r e
a m e a n in g fu l a v e r a g e p r ic e and a v o id m o v e ­
m e n t in th e in d e x b e c a u s e o f s h ifts in th e
q u a lity p r ic e d fr o m one p e r io d to th e next*
T h ey a r e a ls o b ro a d en ou g h , w ith in lim it a ­
tio n s , to p r o v id e an a d eq u a te n u m b er of
q u o ta tio n s and to a llo w fo r c ity and r e g io n a l
d iffe r e n c e s in g r a d e s , ty p e s , p a ck a g e s i z e s ,
e tc .
P r ic e s w e r e o b ta in ed fo r ite m s found to be
m o s t im p o r ta n t in w a g e e a r n e r s ’ fa m ily
b u d g ets a s sh o w n by a c o m p r e h e n s iv e stu d y
in 1 9 3 4 -3 6 , u n til th e in te r im a d ju stm en t of
1 9 5 0 , w h en m o r e r e c e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9 d a ta w e r e
a v a ila b le . T h e s e le c t io n o f th e in d e x ite m s
a ls o ta k e s in to a cco u n t s im ila r it y o f p r ic e
c h a n g e s , s in c e it is im p o s s ib le fo r th e
B u rea u to c o lle c t p r ic e s fo r a ll o f th e m a n y
fo o d s p u r c h a se d by f a m ilie s . P r ic e m o v e ­
m e n ts o f fo o d s n ot in c lu d e d in th e m o n th ly
s u r v e y s a r e im p u te d to th o s e o f o th e r fo o d s
o r fo o d g ro u p s sh o w in g s im ila r p r ic e tr e n d s ,
by m e a n s o f a llo c a tio n o f w e ig h ts .
P r o c e s s in g
E a ch m o n th , th e B u r e a u ’s fie ld r e p r e s e n ­
ta tiv e s r e tu r n th e ir p r ic in g s c h e d u le s to th e
W ash in g to n o ffic e , w h e r e th ey a r e ed ited
c a r e fu lly fo r c o n fo r m a n c e to th e r e q u ir e d
s p e c ific a tio n s ; c o n v e r s io n s to u n ifo rm
q u an tity u n it a r e m a d e a s n e c e s s a r y , and
w e ig h tin g fa c to r s a r e e n te r e d in p r e p a r a tio n
fo r m a c h in e ta b u la tio n . T h e d ata a r e th en
p r o c e s s e d by m a c h in e ta b u la tio n .
T h e R e ta il F o o d P r ic e In d ex is a fix e d b a s e -w e ig h te d -a g g r e g a te in d e x . W eig h tin g
fa c to r s a r e u s e d to m a in ta in a p p r o p r ia te
r e la tio n s h ip s , ( l ) a m o n g ch a in s t o r e s (o u tle t
w e ig h ts ), (2) b e tw e e n ch a in and in d ep en d en t
s t o r e s (c h a in -in d e p e n d e n t r a tio ), (3) a m o n g
fo o d s in e a c h c ity (c o n su m p tio n w e ig h ts ), and
(4) a m o n g c it ie s (p o p u la tio n w e ig h ts ).
A v e r a g e p r ic e s fo r e a c h fo o d in e a c h c ity
a r e co m p u ted s e p a r a te ly fo r ch a in and
in d ep en d en t s t o r e s . W eig h tin g fa c to r s
(c a lle d o u tle t w e ig h ts) b a s e d on ann ual
v o lu m e s a le s o f r e ta il r e p o r te r s a r e u s e d in
c a lc u la tin g a v e r a g e p r ic e s fo r c h a in s t o r e s
w ith in e a c h c ity . A s im p le a v e r a g e o f in d e ­




p en d en t s to r e p r ic e s is o b ta in ed , s in c e th e
s a m p le w a s s e le c t e d to b e a s e lf-w e ig h tin g
s a m p le . C h ain and in d ep en d en t a v e r a g e
p r ic e s fo r a c ity a r e co m b in e d b y u s e o f
ch a in -in d e p e n d e n t r a tio s to o b ta in a v e r a g e
p r ic e s fo r th e c ity . T h is c h a in -in d e p e n d e n t
r a tio is b a s e d on th e p e r c e n ta g e o f to ta l fo o d
s a le s in a c ity m a d e by c h a in s and by in d e ­
p en d en t s t o r e s .
C o n su m p tio n w e ig h ts (c a lle d q u a n tity
w eig h tin g fa c to r s ) fo r e a c h c ity a r e a p p lied
to th e in d iv id u a l fo o d p r ic e s to g iv e th em
th e ir c o r r e c t p r o p o r tio n s in th e c it y ’s grou p
and a ll-fo o d s in d e x e s . T h e s e w e ig h ts w e r e
b a s e d on c o n s u m e r e x p e n d itu r e d ata o b ­
ta in e d in 1 9 3 4 -3 6 u n til th e in te r im a d ju s t­
m e n t o f th e in d e x in 19 50 , w h en m o r e r e c e n t
1 9 4 7 -4 9 d ata w e r e a v a ila b le . T h e r e s u ltin g
w e ig h te d a g g r e g a te s a r e co m b in e d to o b ta in
in d e x e s fo r th e m a jo r fo o d g ro u p s and fo r a ll
fo o d s c o m b in ed .
C ity p o p u la tio n w e ig h ts a r e e m p lo y e d in
o b ta in in g a v e r a g e p r ic e s and in d e x e s fo r 56
c it ie s co m b in e d . T h e s e w e ig h ts a r e b a s e d on
th e p o p u la tio n o f th e m e tr o p o lita n a r e a
co n ta in in g th e c ity in w h ich p r ic e s a r e c o l ­
le c te d and th at o f c it ie s in th e s a m e r e g io n
and s iz e c l a s s . A d ju stm e n ts in th e s e p o p u la ­
tio n w e ig h ts w e r e m a d e in F e b r u a r y 1943
in a c c o r d a n c e w ith C e n su s B u rea u e s tim a te s
of ch a n g e s in p o p u la tio n fr o m A p r il 1940 to
M ay 1 9 42 , b a s e d on th e r e g is tr a tio n s fo r th e
s u g a r -r a tio n book; and a g a in in 1 9 5 0 , u sin g
th e 1950 D e c e n n ia l C e n su s d a ta . T a b le A
sh o w s th e p o p u la tio n w e ig h ts now in u s e .
R e la tiv e Im p o r ta n c e
T h e r e la tiv e im p o r ta n c e o f th e in d iv id u a l
fo o d s in th e o v e r a ll in d e x is co m p u ted and
r e le a s e d by th e B u r e a u o n ce e a c h y e a r .*
T h e s e r e la tiv e im p o r ta n c e fig u r e s a r e
p e r c e n ta g e d is tr ib u tio n s o f th e v a lu e s o f th e
in d iv id u a l fo o d s in th e in d e x a s o f a c e r ta in
d a te . T h e v a lu e s a r e o b ta in e d by m u ltip ly in g
th e q u a n tity c o n su m p tio n w e ig h ts by th e
a v e r a g e p r ic e s fo r th e s p e c ifie d d a te . T h u s,
th e r e la tiv e im p o r ta n c e fig u r e s a r e not
w e ig h ts in t h e m s e lv e s . T h ey ch a n g e fr o m
tim e to tim e a s p r ic e s fo r th e v a r io u s fo o d s
ch a n g e at d iffe r e n t r a t e s , s in c e th e c o n ­
su m p tio n w e ig h ts u s e d in th e ir co m p u ta tio n
r e m a in c o n s ta n t. T a b le B p r e s e n ts a l is t o f
th e fo o d s in c lu d e d in th e in d e x , and r e la tiv e
* See Consumers’ Price Index: Relative Importance of Com­
ponents, in the Monthly Labor Review for August 1948; also
reprinted as Serial No. R. 1933.

- 33 -

im p o r ta n c e (p e r c e n ta g e ) o f e a c h in th e a l l ­
fo o d s in d e x fo r 56 la r g e c it ie s co m b in e d ,
fo r th e b a s e p e r io d (1 9 3 5 -3 9 ), D e c e m b e r
1951, and D e c e m b e r 1952.
R e v is io n s
T o m a in ta in th e a c c u r a c y o f th e in d ex ,
s p e c ia l te s ts 'a n d s u r v e y s fr o m w h ich r e v i ­
s io n s m a y d e v e lo p , a r e m a d e fr o m tim e to
tim e . A s p r o c e d u r e s ch an g e and r e v is io n s
a r e m a d e , in d e x e s a r e lin k e d (m a d e eq u a l in
a g iv e n m on th ) s o th a t c h a n g e s a r is in g fr o m
th e m e c h a n ic s o f r e v is io n s do n ot a lte r th e
le v e l o f th e in d e x and it c o n tin u e s to r e fle c t
p r ic e m o v e m e n ts o n ly . S o m e o f th e m o r e
im p o r ta n t r e c e n t r e v is io n s a r e d e s c r ib e d
b e lo w .
A d ju stm e n ts to w a r tim e and th en to p o s t ­
w a r co n d itio n s w e r e m a d e in M a rch 1943
and F e b r u a r y 1 9 46 . In M a rch 1 9 4 3 , q u a n tity
w e ig h ts o f 27 fo o d s w e r e r e d u c e d in lin e
w ith a n tic ip a te d 1943 su p p lie s a v a ila b le to
c o n s u m e r s u n d er ra tio n in g r e g u la tio n s , and
w e ig h ts o f 26 l e s s s c a r c e c o m m o d itie s w e r e
in c r e a s e d /* A t th e s a m e tim e 7 fo o d s w e r e
add ed to th e in d e x . T h e c h a in -in d e p e n d e n t
s to r e r a tio w a s r e v is e d on th e b a s is o f
la t e s t a v a ila b le e s tim a te s o f c h a n g e s in
v o lu m e o f fo o d s o ld th ro u g h c h a in s and
in d ep en d en t s t o r e s . F iv e c it ie s w e r e ad d ed
to th e in d e x , in c r e a s in g th e to ta l n u m b er
fr o m 51 to 5 6 . T h e p o p u la tio n w e ig h ts w e r e
ch a n g ed t o ‘ ta k e in to a cco u n t th e m a r k e d
s h ifts in p o p u la tio n d u rin g w a r tim e .
In F e b r u a r y 1 9 46 , th e R e ta il F o o d P r ic e
In d ex w a s a g a in r e v is e d to e lim in a te th e
s p e c ia l w a r tim e a d ju stm e n ts.6 P r e w a r c o n ­
su m p tio n w e ig h ts w e r e r e s to r e d , w ith m in o r
a d ju stm e n ts to r e ta in th e 7 ite m s ad d ed to
th e in d e x in 1 9 4 3 , and o u tle t w e ig h ts w ith in
c it ie s w e r e ch a n g ed , u s in g th e la t e s t s a le s
v o lu m e d ata a v a ila b le .
T h e c o m p u ta tio n o f a v e r a g e p r ic e s fo r
ch a in and in d ep en d en t s t o r e s , s e p a r a te ly ,
w a s in itia te d a t th is tim e . F o r m e r ly th e
r a tio b e tw e e n th e tw o ty p e s o f s t o r e s w a s
u s e d in co m p u tin g c ity a v e r a g e s but th e
c o m p u ta tio n p r o c e d u r e did n ot m a in ta in th e
fix e d r a tio w h en th e n u m b er o f q u o ta tio n s
v a r ie d fr o m p e r io d to p e r io d . T h e r e v is e d
p r o c e d u r e w a s an im p r o v e m e n t in th a t th e
^ See Bureau of Labor Statistics Cost-of-Living Index in
Wartime, in the Monthly Labor Review for July 1943; also
reprinted as Serial No. R. 1545.
See Store Samples for Retail Food Prices, in the Month­
ly Labor Review for January 1947; also reprinted as Serial
No. R. 1878.




s ta b ility o f th e a v e r a g e s w o u ld b e a ffe c te d
l e s s b y s h o r t s u p p lie s , s in c e th e c h a in -in d e ­
p en d en t r a tio w ou ld r e m a in fix e d , e v e n
th ou gh s o m e r e p o r te r s w e r e u n ab le to fu r ­
n is h p r ic e q u o ta tio n s e v e r y c o lle c tio n d a te
b e c a u s e o f fo o d s h o r ta g e s .
D u rin g th is r e v is io n s o m e c h a n g e s in
ed itin g w e r e a ls o in tr o d u c e d . T h e sa m p le o f
s t o r e s w a s c o n s id e r e d la r g e en ou gh th a t
m in o r ch a n g e s in th e s a m p le o f s t o r e s o r
s h ifts fr o m on e b ra n d to a n o th er w ith in
s p e c ific a tio n d id n ot r e q u ir e a d ju stm en t fo r
c o m p a r a b ility in co m p u tin g in d e x e s . In d ex
n u m b e rs fo r in d iv id u a l ite m s w h ich w e r e
b egu n at th is tim e a r e u s e d in o b ta in in g
p e r c e n ta g e c h a n g e s , r a th e r th an p r ic e s ,
s in c e m a jo r d iffe r e n c e s in th e s a m p le and
in s p e c ific a tio n s a r e s t i ll ta k e n c a r e o f in
th e in d e x by lin k in g .
A fte r F e b r u a r y 1 9 46 , s a le s ta x e s w e r e
no lo n g e r in c lu d e d in th e p u b lish e d a v e r a g e
p r ic e s , but w e r e in c o r p o r a te d in th e in d e x
fo r e a ch c ity . A v e r a g e p r ic e s in c it ie s
h a v in g s a le s ta x e s w e r e r e d u c e d by th e
am ou n t o f ta x fo r m e r ly in c lu d e d .
In A u g u st 1 9 47 , th e l i s t o f fo o d s in c lu d e d
in th e in d e x w a s r e d u c e d fr o m 62 to 5 0 ,
a new su b g ro u p fo r m e a ts (e x c lu d in g p o u l­
tr y and fis h ) w a s a d d ed , and th e n u m b er o f
q u o ta tio n s fr o m in d ep en d en t s t o r e s fo r d r y
g r o c e r ie s and s ta p le s w a s r e d u c e d .7 T h is
r e d u c tio n d id n ot m a te r ia lly a ffe c t th e
a c c u r a c y o f th e a v e r a g e p r ic e s b e c a u s e o f
th e s m a ll a m o u n t o f p r ic e v a r ia tio n fro m
s to r e to s to r e fo r th e s e fo o d s .
In 1 9 49 , th e B u rea u o f L a b o r S t a t is tic s
b eg a n a 3 -y e a r r e v is io n o f it s C o n su m ers*
P r ic e In d ex , c a llin g fo r a r e v ie w o f th e
e n tir e s tr u c tu r e o f th e C o n su m ers* P r ic e
In d ex . It is e x p e c te d th a t th is c o m p r e h e n s iv e
r e v is io n w ill b e r e le a s e d by th e B u rea u
b eg in n in g in 19 53 .
In te r im A d ju stm en t o f th e R e ta il F o o d
P r ic e In d ex . - -D u rin g th e su m m e r o f 19 50 ,
w o r ld co n d itio n s m a d e n e c e s s a r y c e r ta in
im m e d ia te r e v is io n s in th e C o n s u m e r s ’
P r ic e In d ex , in c lu d in g th e R e ta il F o o d P r ic e
In d ex.
W ith th e p u b lic a tio n of th e S e p te m b e r 15,
1 950, in d e x , th e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is tic s
a n n ou n ced it s in te n tio n to p u b lish an in te r im
a d ju stm en t o f th e in d e x . In th is te m p o r a r y
a d ju stm e n t, th e fo llo w in g r e v is io n s w e r e
in tr o d u c e d in th e R e ta il F o o d P r ic e In d ex a s
n

See Revision of Retail Food Price Index in August 1947,
in the Monthly Labor Review, October 1948; also reprinted
as Serial No. R. 1941.

- 34 -

o f J a n u a ry 1 9 5 0 , and p u b lish e d w ith th e
J a n u a ry 1951 in d ex:
1. C ity p o p u la tio n w e ig h ts w e r e r e v is e d ,
u sin g th e 1950 D e c e n n ia l C e n su s D a ta .
2. T e n n ew fo o d ite m s w e r e ad d ed to th e
l i s t p r ic e d in th e in d e x . F o o d ite m s add ed
b e c a u s e o f th e ir in c r e a s e d im p o r ta n c e in
fa m ily sp en d in g w e r e fr o z e n s tr a w b e r r ie s ,
fr o z e n o r a n g e ju ic e c o n c e n tr a te , fr o z e n
p e a s , and ca n n ed bab y fo o d . F o o d ite m s
ad d ed b e c a u s e th ey w e r e n e c e s s a r y to im ­
p r o v e m e a s u r e m e n t o f p r ic e m o v e m e n ts
w e r e fr a n k fu r te r s , ic e c r e a m , c o la d r in k s ,
and g ra p e j e lly , and la y e r c a k e in 4 6 c it ie s
and je lly r o ll in 10 c i t i e s .
3. C o m m o d ity w e ig h ts w e r e r e v is e d to
r e f le c t c u r r e p t fa m ily sp en d in g h a b its,
b a s e d on r e c e n t e x p e n d itu re s u r v e y s . In
a r r iv in g a t th e s e w e ig h ts th e B u rea u m a d e
u se o f its m o s t r e c e n t e x p e n d itu re s u r v e y s
in 7 c it ie s s in c e 1947, s im ila r s u r v e y s by
th e U n ited S ta te s D e p a r tm e n t o f A g r ic u ltu r e
in 4 c i t i e s , and tr a d e and o ffic ia l s o u r c e s on
p r o d u c tio n , m a r k e tin g , s a le s , and o th e r
fa c ts p e r tin e n t to co n su m p tio n and e x p e n d i­
tu r e s .
T h e n ew A d ju sted In d ex es w e r e co m p u ted
b a ck to J a n u a ry 1 9 50 . T h e s e w ill now
r e p la c e th e “ o ld in d e x s e r i e s ” and u n til th e
fin a l in d e x r e v is io n in J a n u a ry 1 9 5 3 , a ll
fig u r e s p u b lish e d w ill r e fe r to th e a d ju sted
s e r i e s , u n le s s o th e r w is e in d ic a te d . S e e
ta b le 1 fo r “ o ld in d ex s e r i e s ” fo r la r g e
c it ie s c o m b in e d .
T h e n ew A d ju sted R e ta il F o o d P r ic e In d ex
w a s lin k ed to th e “ o ld in d e x s e r i e s ” in
J a n u a ry 1950 to fo r m a co n tin u o u s s e r ie s




s in c e 1 9 13 . T h e r e t a il fo o d p r ic e in d e x e s
o r ig in a lly p u b lish e d fo r J a n u a r y 1950 and
e a r lie r d a te s h a v e n ot b e e n ch a n g ed .
In th is a d ju stm e n t o f th e in d e x , no c h a n g es
w e r e m a d e in th e b a s ic in d e x fo r m u la ,
c a lc u la tio n p r o c e d u r e s , o r p r ic e c o lle c tio n
m e th o d s .
B e g in n in g w ith p r ic e s fo r J a n u a ry 1 9 53 ,
th e B u rea u w ill p u b lish a r e v is e d R e ta il
F o o d P r ic e In d ex . S o m e c it ie s p r ic e d c u r ­
r e n tly w ill b e d ro p p e d , and s o m e m e d iu m s iz e d and s m a ll c i t i e s , ra n g in g dow n to
2 ,5 0 0 p o p u la tio n , w ill b e in c lu d e d . T h u s,
th e in d e x fo r th e .fir s t tim e w ill m e a s u r e th e
e ffe c t o f p r ic e ch a n g e on th e liv in g c o s ts o f
a ll u rb a n w a g e e a r n e r s and c le r ic a l
w ork ers.
T h e new in d e x w ill in c lu d e d ir e c t p r ic in g
fo r m o r e fo o d s and w ill in c o r p o r a te m a n y
o th e r im p r o v e m e n ts m a d e p o s s ib le b y th e
d e v e lo p m e n t o f s t a t is t ic a l te c h n iq u e s o v e r
th e la s t d e c a d e .
P u b lic a tio n s
R e ta il fo o d p r ic e d a ta w e r e is s u e d r e g u ­
la r ly th ro u g h 1952 a s fo llo w s :
1. C o n s u m e r s ’ P r ic e In d ex and R e ta il
F o o d P r ic e s (m o n th ly - -m im e o ­
g ra p h ed ) .
2. R e ta il F o o d P r ic e s by C itie s
(m o n th ly - -m im e o g r a p h e d ).
3. R e ta il F o o d P r ic e s by C it ie s - - A n ­
n u a l A v e r a g e s (a n n u a lly -- m im e o ­
g ra p h ed ) th ro u g h 1951 o n ly .
4 . M on th ly L a b o r R e v ie w (m o n th ly ).
5 . R e ta il P r ic e s o f F o o d (a n n u a lly ).

- 35 -

TABLE A.—POPULATION WEIGHTS USED IN COMPUTING RETAIL FOOD PRICES AND INDEXES FOR 56 CITIES COMBINED
C ity
56 c itie s combined-------A tla n ta , Ga-------------------B altim ore, Md----------------Birmingham, Ala------------Boston, Mass-----------------B ridgeport, Conn—-------B uffalo, N. Y----------------B utte, Mont-------------------Cedar R apids, Iowa-------C harleston, S. C-----------Chicago, 111-----------------C in cin n ati, Ohio-----------C leveland, Ohio------------Columbus, Ohio--------------D a llas, Tex-------------------Denver, Colo-----------------D e tro it, Mich----------------F a ll R iver, Mass-----------Houston, Tex------------------




Weight

C ity

Weight

Percent

Percent

1.0.2
1.5
1.2.4
6.0.2.9
.1.6
1.5
1.1.3

100.0 Ind ianap olis, Ind
Jackson, Miss-----1.6 Jac k so n v ille , Fla
1.6 Kansas C ity, Mo—
1.6 K noxville, Tenn—
3.8 L ittle Rock, Ark—
Angeles, C alif1.6.5.1 MLos
L o u isv ille , Ky------anchester, N. H—
Tenn-------.1.4 Memphis,
Milwaukee, Wis------7.2 M inneapolis, M inn1.6 M obile, Ala----------3.3 Newark, N. J ---------1.3 New Haven, Conn----O rleans, La----2.1
New York, N. Y------.8 New
5.6 N orfolk, Va-----------.2 Omaha, Nebr----------2.3

4.2
1.4

1.1
12.0
1.0.7

36

C ity
P eoria, 111-------------P h iladelphia, Pa-----P ittsb u rg h , Pa--------P o rtland, Maine-------P o rtland, Oreg--------Providence, R .I------Richmond, Va-----------R ochester, N. Y-------S t. L ouis, Mo----------S t. P aul, Minn--------S a lt Lake C ity , Utah
San Francisco, C alif
Savannah, Ga-----------Scranton, Pa-----------S e a ttle , Wash----------S p rin g fie ld , 111-----Washington, D. C----W ichita, Kans----------Winston-Salem, N. C-

Weight

Percent

.6

7.1
4.1
.2
.9
.9
.9

2.2
2.2.6
.3
3.8
.2.8
1.5

1.8.3.3
.2

TABLE B . —LIST OF FOODS AND RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF INDIVIDUAL FOODS AND GROUPS OF FOODS INCLUDED IN THE RETAIL FOOD PRICE
INDEX, IN THE BASE PERIOD (1935-39=100), DECEMBER 1951, AND DECEMBER 1952

Cereals and bakery products—
Cereals:
Flour, wheat------------------Corn flakesCorn meal---Rice-----------Bakery products:
Bread, white—
Bread, whole wheat—
Bread, rye-------------Vanilla cookies-----Soda crackers--------Layer cake and jelly ro ll—
Meats, poultry, and fish -------MeatsBeef:
Round steakRib roast----Frankfurters—
Hamburger-------Veal: Cutlets----Pork:
Chops— --------Bacon, sliced —
Ham, whole——
Salt pork-------Lamb:
LegRib chops—
Poultry:
Roasting chickensFrying chickens—
Fish:
Fish (fresh, frozen)Salmon, pink------------Dairy productsButter—
CheeseMilk, fresh (delivered)Milk, fresh (grocery)—
Ice cream— .....-....—-----Milk, evaporated—
Eggs, fresh------------

December December
1952
1951
1935-39 adjusted
average series adjusted
series

December December
1952
1951
>35-39
rerage adjusted adjusted
series series

Percent Percent Percent

ercent Percent Percent

100.0
15.6
1.8
1.0
1.4
.3
(?)

i1)

6.7
.8
1.2
1.8
.6
i1)
28.2
22.4
3.8
4.6
1.7
(?)
i1)
1.9
3.5
1.9
2.2
.3
1.2
1.3
3.3

i1)

1.7
.8
19.1
5.4
1.6
3 11.1
(3)
(X)
1.0
5.5

100.0
11.10
1.65
(X)
.43
.11
.20
.23
6.08
(X)
(X)
.79
(X)
1.61
32.84
24.58
4.60
1.45
1.99
2.87
3.78
1.07
2.89
1.40
1.81
.24
2.48

i1)

(X)
5.36
1.90
1.00
17.85
2.59
1.66
6.36
4.80
1.55
.89
5.17

100.0 Fruits and vegetables--------------Frozen fruits and vegetables—
Frozen fruits:
11.45
Strawberries------------- --1.66
Orange juice concentrate—
Frozen vegetables: Peas—
(X)
Fresh fruits and vegetables—
.44
.12
Fresh fruits:
Apples.22
.23
Bananas—
Oranges—
Fresh vegetables:
6.36
Beans, green-----(X)
Cabbage------------(")
.79
(X)
1.63
32.21
Potatoes--------23.28
Spinach---------Sweetpotatoes—
4.44
Tomatoes———
Canned fru its and vegetables—
1.37
1.85
Canned fruits:
Peaches----------------------—
2.72
3.30
PineappleCanned vegetables:
1.02
Com-------------------Tomatoes2.83
Peas-------1.45
Baby foods—
1.86
Dried fru its and vegetables-— .26
Dried fruits: Prunes-------------Dried vegetables: Navy beans2.18
i1) Beverages--------------------------- ------- Coffee--------------------------------------Test------------------------------------------i1)
6.14
Fats and o ils Lard— ——
1.87
Other shortening—
.92
18.36
Hydrogenated shortening—
2.43
Mayonnaise1.74
Salad dressing—
Margarine--------6.67
Peanut butter—
5.00
1.58 Sugar and sweets—
.94
Sugar--------------Grape jelly ——
4.87

1Not priced.
2 Not included in index.
3 Not given separately for delivered and grocery milk.




- 37 U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1953 O - 258601

21.6
t1)
(X)
(x)
b
16.5
2.1
1.4
3.4
.8
.7
.9
1.7
1.1
3.2
.8
.4
(")
4.1
.6
.4
.7
1.5
.9
C1)
1.0
.6
.4
3.4
2.6
.8
(x)
3.2
1.1
.7
(1)
.9
(l >
.3
.2
3.4
3.4
(X)

20.64
.66
.21
.11
.34
14.03
.80
1.33
1.90
.66
.64
.95
1.67
.81
2.88
C1)
.43
1.96
5.34
.94
.64
1.02
1.35
.75
.64
.61
.24
.37
6.93
5.17
0)
1.76
2.72
.41
(X)
1.01
(X)
.69
.61
(X)
2.75
1.96
.79

20.84
.62
.20
.09
.33
14.10
1.10
1.34
1.93
.73
.50
.83
1.19
1.04
3.29
C1)
.51
1.64
5.48
.94
.64
1.08
1.38
.79
.65
.64
.24
.40
7.00
5.20
i1)
1.80
2.43
.29
(X)
.91
(X) '
.65
.58
i1)
2.84
2.05
.79