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SIGTARP: Quarterly Report to Congress | April 21, 2009
SIGTARP: Quarterly Report to Congress | April 21, 2009

SIGTARP

Q2
2009

AL
CI

ASS

E T R ELIEF

PR

SIGTARP

Office of the Special Inspector General
for the Troubled Asset Relief Program

Advancing Economic Stability Through Transparency, Coordinated Oversight and Robust Enforcement

SIG-QR-09-02
202.622.1419
Hotline: 877.SIG.2009
SIGTARP@do.treas.gov
www.SIGTARP.gov
cover_tan_shadow3April10.indd 1

Quarterly Report to Congress
April 21, 2009

4/14/2009 11:38:39 AM

CONTENTS
Executive Summary
Tremendous Expansion in the Scope, Scale, and Complexity of the TARP
Oversight Activities of SIGTARP
SIGTARP’s Recommendations on the Operations of TARP
Report Organization

1
3
4
6
8

Section 1
THE OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR
THE TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM
SIGTARP’s Creation and Statutory Authority
SIGTARP’s Mission and Core Values
SIGTARP’s Oversight Activities Since the Initial Report
SIGTARP’s Organizational Structure
Progress in Building SIGTARP’s Organization

9
11
12
13
24
27

Section 2
TARP OVERVIEW
Financial Overview of TARP
Capital Investment Programs
TARP Tutorial: Capital Structure
Institution-Specific Assistance
The Automotive Industry Financing Program
TARP Tutorial: Securitization
Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility
Public-Private Investment Program
Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses
Making Home Affordable Program
Executive Compensation

31
33
43
58
65
78
92
95
105
111
113
120

Section 3
TARP OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

127

Section 4
LOOKING FORWARD: SIGTARP’S RECOMMENDATIONS
TO TREASURY
Recommendations for Existing Programs
Recommendations for Newly Announced Programs
Endnotes
APPENDICES
A. Glossary
B. Acronyms
C. Reporting Requirements
D. Principal/Income Transactions Report
E. Cross-Reference of Report to the Inspector General Act of 1978
F. Public Announcement of Audits
G. Key Oversight Reports and Testimonies
H. Warrants
I. Correspondence with Treasury Regarding TALF
J. Response to SIGTARP Recommendations
K. Organizational Chart
L. Use of Funds Request Letter
Please visit www.sigtarp.gov for further reference material.

135
137
145
161

169
176
177
195
202
203
205
212
223
228
244
245

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
INVESTIGATIONS

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

The Troubled Asset Relief Program (“TARP”) now includes 12 separate, but often interrelated, programs involving Government and private funds of up to almost $3 trillion
— roughly the equivalent of last year’s entire Federal budget. From programs involving large capital infusions into hundreds of banks and other financial institutions, to
a mortgage modification program designed to modify millions of mortgages, to publicprivate partnerships purchasing “toxic” assets from banks using tremendous leverage
provided by Government loans or guarantees, TARP has evolved into a program of
unprecedented scope, scale, and complexity. Before the American people and their
representatives in Congress can meaningfully evaluate the effectiveness of this historic
program, that scope and scale must be placed into proper context, and the complexity
must be made understandable. That is what this report attempts to do.

In this report, the Office of the Special Inspector General for the Troubled
Asset Relief Program (“SIGTARP”) endeavors to (i) explain the various TARP
programs and how the Department of the Treasury (“Treasury”) has used those
programs through March 31, 2009, (ii) describe what SIGTARP has done since its
Initial Report to Congress, dated February 6, 2009 (the “Initial Report”), to oversee
this historic program with respect to both audits and investigations, and (iii) set
forth a series of recommendations for the operation of TARP.

TREMENDOUS EXPANSION IN THE SCOPE,
SCALE, AND COMPLEXITY OF TARP
TARP, as originally envisioned in the fall of 2008, would have involved the purchase,
management, and sale of up to $700 billion of “toxic” assets, primarily troubled mortgages and mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”). That framework was soon abandoned,
however, and the program’s scope, size, and complexity have dramatically increased. As
of the writing of this report, TARP funds are being used, or have been announced to be
used, in connection with 12 separate programs that, as set forth in Table 1.1, involve
a total (including TARP funds, Federal Reserve loans, Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation (“FDIC”) guarantees, and private money) that could reach nearly $3
trillion.

Treasury has announced, as of March 31, 2009, the parameters of how
$590.4 billion of the $700 billion in TARP funding authorized by the Emergency
Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (“EESA”) would be spent through the 12
programs. Of the $590.4 billion that Treasury has committed, $328.6 billion has
actually been spent as of March 31, 2009. This report provides an update on those
TARP programs that had been announced as of SIGTARP’s Initial Report, as well
as descriptions of programs that have subsequently been announced.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

TABLE 1.1

TOTAL FUNDS SUBJECT TO SIGTARP OVERSIGHT, AS OF MARCH 31, 2009 ($ BILLIONS)
Program

Brief Description or Participant

Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”)

Total Projected
Funding

Projected TARP
Funding

$218.0

$218.0

$25.0

$25.0

$5.0

$5.0

Investments in 532 banks to date; 8 institutions total
$125 billion

Automotive Industry Financing Program (“AIFP”)

GM, Chrysler, GMAC, Chrysler Financial

Auto Supplier Support Program (“ASSP”)

Government-backed protection for auto parts suppliers

Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses (“UCSB”)

Purchase of securities backed by SBA loans

$15.0

$15.0

Systemically Significant Failing Institutions (“SSFI”)

AIG Investment

$70.0

$70.0

Targeted Investment Program (“TIP”)

Citigroup, Bank of America Investments

$40.0

$40.0

Asset Guarantee Program (“AGP”)

Citigroup, Bank of America, Ring-Fence Asset Guarantee

$419.0

$12.5

FRBNY non-recourse loans for purchase of asset-backed
Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”)
securities

$1,000.0

$80.0

$75.0

$50.0

$500.0 – $1,000.0

$75.0

TBD

TBD

$109.5

$109.5

$2,476.5 – $2,976.5

$700.0

Making Home Affordable (“MHA”) Program

Modification of mortgage loans

Public-Private Investment Program (“PPIP”)

Disposition of legacy assets; Legacy Loans Program,
Legacy Securities Program (expansion of TALF)

Capital Assistance Program (“CAP”)

Capital to qualified financial institutions; includes stress
test

New Programs, or Funds Remaining for Existing
Programs

Potential additional funding related to CAP; AIFP; Auto
Warranty Commitment Program; other

Total
Note: See Table 2.1 in Section 2 for notes and sources related to the information contained in this table.

OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES OF SIGTARP
Since the Initial Report, SIGTARP has been actively engaged in fulfilling its vital investigative and audit functions as well as in building its staff and organization.

On the investigations side, SIGTARP’s Hotline (877-SIG-2009 or accessible
at www.SIGTARP.gov) is staffed, operational, and providing an interface with the
American public to facilitate the reporting of concerns, allegations, information,
and evidence of violations of criminal and civil laws in connection with TARP. As of
the drafting of this report, the SIGTARP Hotline has received and analyzed nearly
200 tips, running the gamut from expressions of concern over the economy to
serious allegations of fraud. Both from the Hotline and from other leads, SIGTARP
has initiated, to date, almost 20 preliminary and full criminal investigations.
Although the details of those investigations generally will not be discussed unless
and until public action is taken, the cases vary widely in subject matter and include
large corporate and securities fraud matters affecting TARP investments, tax matters, insider trading, public corruption, and mortgage-modification fraud.
SIGTARP has been proactive in dealing with potential fraud in TARP. For
example, to get out in front of any efforts to profit criminally from the Term
Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”), which, as announced, involves
up to $1 trillion of lending by the Federal Reserve backed by up to $80 billion in

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TARP funds, SIGTARP has organized and leads a multi-agency task force to deter,
detect, and investigate any instances of fraud or abuse in the program. In addition to SIGTARP, the TALF Task Force consists of the Office of the Inspector
General of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal
Bureau of Investigation, Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, U.S.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Internal Revenue Service Criminal
Investigation division, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the U.S.
Postal Inspection Service. Representatives from each member organization participate in regular briefings about TALF, collectively identify areas of fraud vulnerability, engage in the training of agents and analysts with respect to the complex issues
surrounding the program, and will serve as points of contact for leads relating to
TALF and any resulting cases that are generated. The TALF Task Force represents
a historic law enforcement effort with an ambitious goal: to redefine the policing of
complex Federal Government programs by proactively arranging a coordinated law
enforcement response before fraud occurs.
On the audit side, SIGTARP has initiated and is in the process of conducting
six audits:
• Use of Funds: SIGTARP’s first audit examines the use of TARP funds by TARP
recipients, and is based upon a survey that SIGTARP sent to 364 TARP recipients that had received funds as of January 31, 2009.
• Executive Compensation Compliance: SIGTARP’s second audit, also based
on SIGTARP’s survey, examines how TARP recipients are implementing controls
with respect to applicable executive compensation restrictions.
• Bank of America: The third audit examines the review and approval processes
associated with TARP assistance to Bank of America under three different
TARP programs and examines Treasury’s decision making related to additional
TARP assistance provided in connection with Bank of America’s acquisition
of Merrill Lynch. Since its commencement, the audit’s scope has expanded to
examine broadly Treasury’s decision making regarding the first nine institutions
to be considered for funding under TARP.
• External Influences: The fourth audit examines whether, or to what extent, external parties may have sought to influence decision making by Treasury or bank
regulators in considering and deciding on applications for funding from individual banks seeking TARP funds. This audit seeks to determine what procedures
are in place to avoid undue outside influence on the process, whether there are
any indications of any undue influence, and what actions might be needed to
strengthen existing processes to avoid such undue influences in the future.
• AIG Bonuses: The next audit examines Federal oversight of executive compensation requirements, with a particular focus on recent payouts of large bonus
payments to American International Group, Inc. (“AIG”) employees. SIGTARP

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

has undertaken an audit to determine: (i) the extent to which the recent bonus
payments were made in accordance with conditions imposed in return for TARP
assistance, and (ii) Treasury’s monitoring of AIG’s executive compensation
agreements and whether it was aware of the full range of executive compensation, bonus, and retention payments throughout AIG’s corporate structure.
• AIG Counterparty Payments: AIG, which has received the largest amount of
financial assistance from the Government during the current financial crisis,
reportedly made counterparty payments to other financial institutions, including
foreign institutions and other TARP recipients, at 100% of face value. SIGTARP
will examine the basis for the counterparty payments and seek to determine
whether any efforts were made to negotiate a reduction in those payments.

SIGTARP’S RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE
OPERATION OF TARP
One of SIGTARP’s oversight responsibilities is to provide recommendations to Treasury
so that TARP programs can be designed or modified to facilitate effective oversight
and transparency and to prevent fraud, waste, and abuse. In Section 4 of this report,
SIGTARP details instances in which Treasury has addressed recommendations made in
and since the Initial Report, and makes a series of new recommendations, including:

• Use of Funds: SIGTARP continues to recommend that Treasury require all
TARP recipients to report on their actual use of TARP funds. This recommendation is particularly important with respect to the potential application of
the Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”) to large insurance companies that may
have purchased banks eligible for CPP in order to access TARP funds, and to
Treasury’s recent announcement of an additional $30 billion investment in AIG.
Simply put, the American people have a right to know how their tax dollars are
being used. This recommendation applies not only to capital investment and
lending programs involving banks and other financial institutions, but also to
programs in which TARP funds are used to purchase troubled assets, including
transactions in the Public-Private Investment Program (“PPIP”) and surrenders
of collateral in TALF.
• Expansion of TALF: The announced expansion of TALF to permit the posting
of MBS as collateral poses significant fraud risks, particularly with respect to
legacy residential MBS (“RMBS”). SIGTARP has made a series of recommendations to mitigate these risks, including, among others, that Treasury should require a security-by-security screening for legacy RMBS; that any RMBS should
be rejected as collateral if the loans backing particular RMBS do not meet
certain baseline underwriting criteria or are in categories that have been proven

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

to be riddled with fraud, including certain undocumented subprime residential mortgages (i.e., “liar loans”); and that Treasury should require significantly
higher haircuts for all MBS, with particularly high haircuts for legacy RMBS.
• PPIP Fraud Vulnerabilities: Aspects of PPIP make it inherently vulnerable to
fraud, waste, and abuse, including significant issues relating to conflicts of interest facing fund managers, collusion between participants, and vulnerabilities to
money laundering. SIGTARP has made a series of recommendations to address
these concerns, including, among others, that Treasury should (i) impose strict
conflict-of-interest rules upon Public-Private Investment Fund (“PPIF”) fund
managers, (ii) mandate transparency with respect to the participation and management of PPIFs, including disclosure of the beneficial owners of the private
equity stakes in the PPIFs and of all transactions undertaken in them, and (iii)
that all PPIF fund managers have stringent investor-screening procedures, including comprehensive “Know Your Customer” requirements at least as rigorous
as that of a commercial bank or retail brokerage operation.
• Interaction Between PPIP and TALF: In announcing the details of PPIP,
Treasury has indicated that PPIFs under the Legacy Securities Program could,
in turn, use the leveraged PPIF funds (two-thirds of which will likely be taxpayer
money) to purchase legacy MBS through TALF, greatly increasing taxpayer
exposure to losses with no corresponding increase of potential profits. Such an
expansion could cause great harm to one of the fundamental taxpayer protections in the original design of TALF by significantly diluting the private party’s
personal stake, the “skin in the game,” and therefore reduce their incentive to
conduct appropriate due diligence. Treasury should not allow Legacy Securities
PPIFs to invest in TALF unless significant mitigating measures are included
to address the dilution of this incentive, which could include prohibiting the
use of leverage for PPIFs investing through TALF or proportionately increasing
haircuts for PPIFs that do so.
• Mortgage Modification Program: To prevent fraud in the mortgage modification program, SIGTARP has recommended that Treasury build certain fraud
protections into the mechanics of the program, including requiring third-party
verification of residence and income, conducting a closing-like procedure in
which identities of participants are confirmed, and delaying modification incentive payments to servicers. SIGTARP has also recommended that Treasury
proactively educate homeowners about the nature of the program, publicize that
no fee is necessary to participate in the program, and collect and maintain a
database of the names and identifying information for each participant in each
mortgage modification transaction.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

REPORT ORGANIZATION
The report is organized as follows:

• Section 1 describes the activities of SIGTARP.
• Section 2 describes how Treasury has spent TARP money thus far and contains an explanation or update of each program, both implemented and recently
announced.
• Section 3 describes the operations and administration of the Office of Financial
Stability (“OFS”), the office within Treasury that manages TARP.
• Section 4 lays out SIGTARP’s recommendations to Treasury with respect to the
operation of TARP.
• The report also includes numerous appendices containing, among other things,
figures and tables detailing all TARP investments through March 31, 2009.
The goal is to make this report a ready reference on what TARP is and how it
has been used to date. In the interest of making this report as understandable as
possible, and thereby furthering general transparency of the program itself, certain
technical terms are highlighted in the text and defined in the adjacent margin.
In addition, portions of Section 2 are devoted to tutorials explaining the financial
terms and concepts necessary to obtain a basic understanding of TARP operations.

SECTION 1

THE OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL
INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR THE
TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

INVESTIGATIONS

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

SIGTARP’S CREATION AND STATUTORY AUTHORITY
The Office of the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program
(“SIGTARP”) was created by Section 121 of the Emergency Economic Stabilization
Act of 2008 (“EESA”). Under EESA, SIGTARP has the responsibility, among
other things, to conduct, supervise, and coordinate audits and investigations of
the purchase, management, and sale of assets under the Troubled Asset Relief
Program (“TARP”). SIGTARP is required to report quarterly to Congress describing SIGTARP’s activities and providing certain information about TARP over that
preceding quarter. EESA gives SIGTARP the authorities listed in Section 6 of the
Inspector General Act of 1978, including the power to obtain documents and other
information from Federal agencies and to subpoena reports, documents, and other
information from persons or entities outside of Government.
The Special Inspector General, Neil M. Barofsky, was confirmed by the Senate
on December 8, 2008, and sworn into office on December 15, 2008.
On March 25, 2009, Congress unanimously passed the Special Inspector
General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program Act of 2009 (the “SIGTARP Act” or
the “Act”), which amends EESA as follows:
• provides SIGTARP the authority, with limited exceptions, to conduct, supervise,
and coordinate audits and investigations into any actions taken under EESA
• makes clear that SIGTARP can undertake law enforcement functions without
first obtaining Attorney General approval
• gives SIGTARP the responsibility to coordinate and cooperate with other inspectors general on oversight of TARP-related activities
• clarifies that SIGTARP’s quarterly reports are due 30 days after the end of a fiscal quarter
• provides SIGTARP with the ability to hire up to 25 Federal retirees, without offset of their pension, and, for six months, the authority to hire Federal employees
under 5 U.S.C. § 3161, which gives employees a right to return to their original
agencies once SIGTARP no longer exists
• requires the Treasury Secretary to take steps to address deficiencies identified by
SIGTARP or certify to Congress that no action is necessary or appropriate
• mandates that SIGTARP shall provide a report to Congress, by September 1,
2009, on how TARP recipients have used TARP funds
• releases SIGTARP’s $50 million allocation for immediate use
SIGTARP believes that the Act makes clear that it has the authorities it needs to
fulfill its mission and will significantly improve its ability to attract and hire experienced Government auditors and investigators. As of April 17, 2009, the Act had not
yet been signed into law.

Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of
2008 (“EESA”): A law enacted in response
to the global financial crisis. This act
created TARP and authorized Treasury
to spend up to $700 billion to purchase
troubled assets.
Special Inspector General for the Troubled
Asset Relief Program Act of 2009: The
measure amends EESA and expands the
authority of the TARP Special Inspector
General to conduct, supervise, and
coordinate audits and investigations
regarding any action taken pursuant to
EESA.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

SIGTARP’S MISSION AND CORE VALUES
SIGTARP’s mission is to advance economic stability through transparency, coordinated oversight, and robust enforcement, thereby being a voice for, and protecting
the interests of, those who fund TARP — i.e., the American taxpayers. SIGTARP
does so by promoting transparency in TARP, through effective oversight of TARP in
coordination with other relevant oversight bodies, and by robust criminal and civil
enforcement against those, whether inside or outside of Government, who waste,
steal, or abuse TARP funds.

Transparency
Promoting transparency in the management and operation of TARP is one of
SIGTARP’s primary roles. Through EESA, the American taxpayer has been asked
to fund — through programs now involving up to approximately $3 trillion — an
unprecedented effort to stabilize the financial system and promote economic recovery. In this context, the public has a right to know how the U.S. Department of
the Treasury (“Treasury”) decides to invest that money, how it manages the assets it
obtains, and how TARP recipients use these funds. Transparency is a powerful tool
to ensure accountability and that all those managing and receiving TARP funds will
act appropriately, consistent with the law, and in the best interests of the country.

Coordinated Oversight
SIGTARP plays a vital role in promoting economy and efficiency in the management of TARP and views its oversight role both prospectively (by advising TARP
managers on issues relating to internal controls and fraud prevention, for example)
and retrospectively (by assessing the effectiveness of TARP activities over time and
suggesting improvements). SIGTARP’s oversight role also reaches the recipients
of TARP funds; in that context, SIGTARP complements Treasury’s compliance
function to ensure that recipients are satisfying their obligations under the various
TARP initiatives. SIGTARP plays a significant coordinating role — formalized in
the SIGTARP Act — among the TARP oversight bodies both to ensure maximum
oversight coverage and to avoid redundant and unduly burdensome requests on
Treasury personnel who run the program.

Robust Enforcement
SIGTARP’s third primary role is to prevent, detect, and investigate cases of fraud,
waste, and abuse of TARP funds and programs. Through its own audit and investigative resources and through partnership with other relevant law enforcement
agencies, SIGTARP is committed to robust criminal and civil enforcement against
those, whether inside or outside of Government, who waste, steal, or abuse TARP
funds.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

SIGTARP’S OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES SINCE THE
INITIAL REPORT
In light of the size and complexity of TARP and the speed with which TARP has
been implemented, it has been imperative that SIGTARP conduct a full range of
oversight activities even while it builds its staff and capabilities. Since SIGTARP’s
Initial Report to Congress, dated February 6, 2009 (the “Initial Report”), SIGTARP
has continued to conduct its oversight tasks in multiple parallel tracks, from
making recommendations relating to preventing fraud and abuse prospectively, to
coordinating closely with other oversight bodies in both the audit and investigative
arenas, to auditing aspects of TARP both inside and outside of Government, all the
while trying to promote transparency in TARP programs to the American
people and Congress.

Maintaining Lines of Communication with TARP Managers
SIGTARP has attempted to establish and maintain regular lines of communications
with the personnel primarily responsible for running TARP, including those working within Treasury’s Office of Financial Stability (“OFS”) and Office of General
Counsel (“OGC”) and within other agencies who manage TARP-related programs
or activities, such as the bank regulators, the Federal Reserve Board, and the
Federal Reserve Bank of New York (“FRBNY”):
• SIGTARP personnel generally receive briefings concerning each new TARP
initiative and new developments in implemented programs when necessary.
• The Special Inspector General and Chief of Staff meet weekly with the head of
OFS and OFS’s Chief Compliance Officer to discuss ongoing issues and new
developments.
• Staff members communicate regularly with OFS’s Chief Compliance Officer,
who serves as OFS’s day-to-day liaison with SIGTARP.
• SIGTARP also meets regularly with Treasury’s lawyers within OGC to discuss
any legal issues relating to TARP.
• Upon request, personnel from OFS’s outside vendors have made themselves
available to SIGTARP personnel.
• SIGTARP has established regular communication with officials from the
Federal Reserve System (staff from the Federal Reserve Board of Governors and
FRBNY) in connection with the Federal Reserve TARP-related programs.
Generally, Treasury and the other agencies have been cooperative in making
their personnel available to SIGTARP and have responded to SIGTARP’s requests
for documents and information.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

In connection with this open communication between SIGTARP and TARP
managers, SIGTARP has endeavored, to the extent it has had an opportunity, to examine the planned framework for TARP initiatives before their terms are finalized
and to make recommendations designed to advance oversight and internal controls
and prevent waste, fraud, and abuse within the programs. Since the Initial Report,
SIGTARP has made such recommendations with regard to TALF and the Mortgage
Modification Program, among others.

Asset-Backed Securities (“ABS”): A tradable security backed by a pool of loans,
leases, or any other cash-flow-producing
assets. For a more detailed discussion of
the securitization process, see the “TARP
Tutorial: Securitization” discussion in
Section 2 of this report.
Financial Stability Plan (“FSP”): A Department of Treasury plan to stabilize and
repair the financial system, and support
the flow of credit necessary for economic
recovery.
Mortgage-Backed Securities (“MBS”):
A set of similar mortgages bundled
together by a financial institution and sold
as one security — a type of ABS.

TALF
The Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”) is a Federal Reserve-led
program in which FRBNY makes loans that are designed to be fully secured by
collateral — asset-backed securities (“ABS”). The loans have terms of up to three
years and are non-recourse; that is, if the borrower defaults on the loan, the Federal
Reserve will have no recourse against the borrower beyond the collateral for the
loan. Surrendered collateral will be purchased by a special purpose vehicle that
will be funded in part by TARP funds. As TALF is currently structured, FRBNY
will loan up to $200 billion (supported by credit protection of up to $20 billion
in TARP funds in the event of default), secured by ABS that are backed by credit
card loans, auto financing, student loans, auto floorplan loans, business equipment
loans, mortgage servicing advances, and Small Business Administration (“SBA”)
loans. A potential expansion of TALF has been announced as part of Treasury’s
Financial Stability Plan (“FSP”), with respect to both the inclusion of additional
asset classes, such as newly issued and legacy commercial mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) and non-agency residential MBS, and to increase lending to up to $1
trillion, supported by up to $80 billion of TARP funds in the event of default. For a
more detailed description of the changes to TALF, see the TALF portion of Section
2: “TARP Implementation.”
The Initial Report contained a series of SIGTARP recommendations with
regard to the design of TALF. Since the Initial Report, SIGTARP has remained in
regular contact with Treasury and FRBNY with regard to oversight and fraud prevention in TALF and has sought greater transparency, explicit oversight access, and
assurances regarding underwriting standards on the loans underlying the securities,
among other things. SIGTARP’s past and new recommendations regarding TALF
are discussed in greater detail in Section 4 of this report. Although not all of these
recommendations have been adopted, the design of the program, in SIGTARP’s
view, has significantly improved from an oversight perspective due to SIGTARP’s
suggestions and FRBNY’s willingness to engage on these issues.
Mortgage Modification Program
As discussed in Section 2 in detail, Treasury’s FSP includes a program entitled the
Home Affordable Modification Program (“HAMP”) through which TARP funds
will be made available to mortgage loan servicers to encourage them to modify

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

certain existing mortgages in an effort to reduce the rate of foreclosures. SIGTARP
had a series of briefings with OFS with respect to this program, and, after consultation with mortgage fraud experts at the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”),
SIGTARP made a series of fraud prevention-oriented suggestions for the design of
the program. As discussed in Section 4 of this report, some of those suggestions
were adopted, including a fraud warning sheet and requiring a signed certification
with respect to certain representations under criminal penalty.

Coordination with Other EESA Oversight Bodies
EESA, as amended, is explicit in mandating that SIGTARP coordinate audits and
investigations into TARP with the other primary oversight bodies: the Financial
Stability Oversight Board (“FSOB”), the Congressional Oversight Panel (“COP”),
and the Government Accountability Office (“GAO”). Numerous other agencies,
both in the Inspector General (“IG”) community and among criminal and civil law
enforcement agencies, potentially have responsibilities that touch on TARP as well.
SIGTARP takes seriously its mandate to coordinate these overlapping oversight responsibilities, both to ensure maximum coverage and to avoid duplicative requests
of TARP managers. SIGTARP and its partners have continued to have significant
success on this front since the Initial Report. These coordination efforts include:
• bi-weekly conference calls with staff from FSOB
• regular meetings with staff from COP
• frequent interactions with GAO to coordinate ongoing and planned work to
avoid any unnecessary duplication of efforts and to better facilitate their individual responsibilities

TARP-IG Council
Due to the scope of the various programs under TARP, numerous Federal agencies have some role in administering or overseeing TARP programs. To further
facilitate SIGTARP’s coordination role, the Special Inspector General founded and
chairs the TARP Inspector General Council (“TARP-IG Council”), made up of
the Comptroller General and those IGs whose oversight functions are most likely
to touch on TARP issues. The Council meets monthly to discuss developments in
TARP and to coordinate overlapping audit and investigative issues. Since the Initial
Report, the Council was expanded to include the Inspector General for the SBA in
light of SBA involvement in a new TARP initiative. The TARP-IG Council currently
consists of:
• The Special Inspector General
• Inspector General of the Department of the Treasury
• Inspector General of the Federal Reserve Board

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•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Inspector General of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Inspector General of the Securities and Exchange Commission
Inspector General of the Federal Housing Finance Agency
Inspector General of the Department of Housing and Urban Development
Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration
Inspector General for the Small Business Administration
Comptroller General of the United States (head of the GAO) or his designee

Coordination with Law Enforcement Agencies
SIGTARP’s coordination role extends not only to audits and oversight but also to
investigations; it is the only one of the four primary oversight bodies with criminal law enforcement authority. As a result, SIGTARP has been active in forging
partnerships with criminal and civil law enforcement agencies. These relationships
are designed to benefit both investigations originated by other agencies, when
SIGTARP expertise can be brought to bear, and SIGTARP’s own investigations,
which can be improved by tapping into additional resources. In this regard:
• SIGTARP has continued to develop close working relationships with the FBI,
with the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation division (“IRS-CI”),
and with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), both with each
agency’s headquarters and various field offices.
• The Special Inspector General and Chief of Staff recently met with the new
Chairman of the SEC, and SIGTARP looks forward to a close partnership with
a reinvigorated SEC.
• SIGTARP has continued to develop relationships with the Department of
Justice (“DOJ”), both at Main Justice and with United States Attorney’s Offices
across the country, to discuss criminal and civil enforcement.
• The Special Inspector General and Chief of Staff recently met with the Attorney
General and Deputy Attorney General, and SIGTARP is confident that DOJ
stands ready to prosecute aggressively TARP-related crimes.
• SIGTARP continues to coordinate with State Attorneys General.
• SIGTARP personnel have given training presentations to DOJ prosecutors and
to SEC enforcement attorneys.
• SIGTARP representatives have joined the Mortgage, Banking and Securities,
and Commodities Working Groups sponsored by DOJ — bodies in which key
information regarding these law enforcement disciplines is shared.

Assistant Inspector General for Investigations TARP Working
Group
The Assistant Inspector General for Investigations (“AIGI”) TARP Working Group
was established by SIGTARP’s Deputy Special Inspector General for Investigations.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Its objective is to provide an active forum for heads of investigative divisions within
the IG community and other law enforcement agencies, whose agency mission is
in some way affiliated with TARP, to coordinate and share relevant programmatic
and investigative information at the national level. AIGIs from various entities
work cooperatively within the Working Group to establish the most efficient law
enforcement information sharing protocols; share lessons learned on investigative
techniques and operations; and determine training requirements for special agents,
attorney investigators, and analysts regarding structures and processes affiliated
with existing and new TARP-related initiatives.

TALF Task Force
In a proactive initiative to get out in front of any efforts to profit criminally from the
up to $1 trillion TALF program, SIGTARP has organized and leads a multi-agency
task force to deter, detect, and investigate any instances of fraud or abuse in TALF.
In addition to SIGTARP, the TALF Task Force comprises the Federal Reserve
Board IG, FBI, Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”),
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”), IRS-CI, SEC, and the U.S.
Postal Inspection Service (“USPIS”). Representatives from each agency participate
in regular briefings about TALF, collectively identify areas of fraud vulnerability,
engage in the training of agents and analysts with respect to the complex issues
surrounding the program, and will serve as points of contact within each agency for
leads relating to TALF and any resulting cases that are generated.
TALF is an important program that, both because of its complexity and its
eventual size (up to $1 trillion), is an enormous challenge to law enforcement. This
Task Force, consisting of both civil and criminal law enforcement agencies, with
both investigative and analytical resources, demonstrates that the agencies involved
are meeting that challenge proactively and before the bulk of the money has gone
out the door. The members of the TALF Task Force will combine their shared
expertise in securities fraud investigations and maximize their resources to deter potential criminals, to identify and stop fraud schemes before they can fully develop,
and to bring to justice those who seek to commit fraud through TALF. Although
TALF participants who play by the rules have nothing to fear from this Task Force,
Federal law enforcement is ready now to detect, investigate, and bring to justice
any who would try to steal from this important program.
The TALF Task Force represents a historic law enforcement effort with an
ambitious goal: to redefine the policing of complex Federal Government programs
by proactively arranging a coordinated law enforcement response before the fraud
occurs.
The TALF Task Force has already received its first substantive briefing on the
mechanics of TALF from FRBNY representatives and has further training sessions
scheduled.

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Coordination with FinCEN and NY HIFCA
On March 13, 2009, SIGTARP entered into an agreement with FinCEN to augment SIGTARP’s data and personnel resources. On March 18, 2009, SIGTARP
entered into a similar agreement with the New York High Intensity Financial Crime
Area (“NY HIFCA”). The FinCEN agreement provides SIGTARP with direct
electronic access to Bank Secrecy Act (31 U.S.C. § 5311 et seq.) information,
including currency transaction reports filed by financial institutions and casinos,
currency and monetary instrument reports, foreign bank reports, and suspicious
activity reports filed by depository institutions and participants in the securities and
futures industries. This electronic access will assist SIGTARP to develop leads for
cases, follow up on leads, and identify investigative targets. The agreement with
NY HIFCA complements the FinCEN agreement by providing SIGTARP with two
experienced financial analysts who will use FinCEN and other available data resources to identify indicators of fraud associated with TARP recipients and provide
analytical support with respect to SIGTARP’s ongoing investigations.

SIGTARP Hotline and Investigations
SIGTARP’s Hotline is staffed, operational, and providing an interface with the
American public to facilitate the reporting of concerns, allegations, information,
and evidence of violations of criminal and civil laws in connection with TARP.
Reporting may include allegations of fraud, waste, abuse, and reprisals for bringing
to light TARP-related concerns.
As of the drafting of this report, the SIGTARP Hotline has received and analyzed nearly 200 tips. These contacts run the gamut from expressions of concern
over the economy to serious allegations of fraud involving TARP. The SIGTARP
Hotline is capable of receiving information anonymously, and identity confidentiality can and will be provided to the fullest extent possible. The American public can
provide information by telephone, mail, fax, or online. SIGTARP has established
a Hotline connection on its website at www.SIGTARP.gov. SIGTARP honors all
whistleblower protections.
Both from the Hotline and from other sources of leads, SIGTARP has initiated
nearly 20 preliminary and full criminal investigations to date. Although the details
of those investigations will generally not be discussed unless public action is taken,
the cases vary widely in subject matter and include large corporate and securities
fraud matters affecting TARP investments, tax matters, insider trading, public corruption, and mortgage-modification fraud.

SIGTARP Audits
Since SIGTARP’s Initial Report, the Audit Division has continued to focus on
recruiting staff while launching an initial set of audits and planning future work. At
the same time, the Audit Division has been able to launch a survey of 364 TARP

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

recipients to obtain answers to recurring questions regarding use of TARP funding
and actions taken to comply with executive compensation requirements associated
with the funding. Efforts are now underway to analyze the results of those surveys
which will help facilitate two ongoing audits in areas covered by the surveys and
provide a potential base of knowledge from which to examine progress of TARP
in the future. Meanwhile, SIGTARP is continuing its efforts to coordinate work
with other audit agencies engaged in oversight of TARP and its numerous program
areas.

Survey of TARP Recipients
Beginning on February 5, 2009, SIGTARP sent letters to 364 TARP recipients —
institutions that had received TARP funds as of the end of January 2009 —
requesting that they provide information concerning their use of TARP funding
and their compliance with executive compensation requirements. Most of the
recipients were financial institutions receiving assistance under the TARP Capital
Purchase Program (“CPP”). A copy of the letter is in Appendix M and is posted
on the SIGTARP website at www.SIGTARP.gov. Recipients were asked to provide
their responses within 30 days of the date of the request and to include copies of
pertinent documentation to support their responses.
As indicated in Table 1.2, the firms surveyed varied in the amount of funding
received, with the majority of funding going to a small number of large institutions.
Twenty-six firms had received approximately 93% of the funding through January
30, 2009.1
As of March 23, 2009, SIGTARP had received responses from all 364 TARP
recipients — a remarkable 100% response rate. SIGTARP’s initial look at some
of the responses indicates that those responding to the request provided a broad
range of answers to the two sets of questions. For example, some identified detailed
TABLE 1.2

NUMBER OF TARP RECIPIENTS SURVEYED BY FUNDING RECEIVED
Funding Category

Number of
Firms

Funding Received
($ Billions)

Percentage of
Funding

$10 billion or more

8

$219.3

73.4%

$1 billion to $9.9 billion

18

58.3

19.5%

$100 million to $999.9 million

54

14.6

4.9%

Less than $100 million

284

6.6

2.2%

TOTAL

364

$298.8

100%

Note: The total funding includes $190.5 billion under the Capital Purchase Program, $40 billion under the Targeted Investment Program, $40 billion under the Systemically Significant Failing Institutions Program, $23.3 billion under the Automotive Industry Financing
Program, and $5 billion under the Asset Guarantee Program.
Source: SIGTARP analysis of Treasury data.

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and specific use of the funds, whereas others provided more general responses.
Respondents also provided varying degrees of documentation to augment and support their narrative responses, with some noting that additional documentation had
been segregated at their office and was available for review as needed.
Although time will be required to assess fully the responses received, SIGTARP
can report that, based on a preliminary review of responses received:
• Use of Funds: Respondents provided diverse answers on how TARP funds have
been used; some common responses described use of TARP funds to: strengthen the bank’s capital base to provide a foundation for lending activities; retire
debt; purchase MBS; increase credit lines; and make loans.
• TARP Impact on Lending: Some respondents spoke to new lending activities
in relationship to actual TARP funds received, whereas others spoke of leveraging the funds to achieve greater lending than that related to the face value of
TARP funds received. Some, however, noted that, although they were committed to making prudent commercial and consumer loans, growth of new loans
had slowed as a result of the economy. Others noted that TARP funds permitted
them to preserve an adequate level of capital so that they were able to maintain,
or at least not severely reduce, their lending levels.
• Segregation of Funds: Some respondents indicated that the TARP equity
investment was separately recorded as a discrete component of the bank’s
capital, but the actual funds associated with the investment were not physically
segregated from other cash funds; others cited efforts to segregate physically the
funds or to manage them separately.
• Executive Compensation Compliance: Responses regarding compliance with
executive compensation restrictions varied from simple statements of obvious
compliance based on the size of their banks and compensation, to detailed
answers regarding extensive efforts to assess compensation practices relative to
restrictions associated with their funding agreements, including having retained
expert consultants to help with the assessments — the latter not necessarily
related to the amount of funding received or the size of the bank.
• Executive Compensation Regulation Uncertainty: Some responses related
to executive compensation expressed frustration with changing guidance and
legislation related to executive compensation requirements, as well as the lack
of regulations concerning these changes, which has limited their ability to give
a complete answer at this time; nonetheless, others noted actions they were taking at this time based on known requirements, recognizing that final guidelines
have not yet been issued.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Given the diversity of the responses and the fact they were asked for and provided in narrative form, it will require some time to (i) analyze the data fully, (ii)
identify areas where follow-up contact with respondents is needed, and (iii) identify
the degree of commonality of responses in selected areas that may be aggregated
for reporting purposes.
To further assess and complete its analysis of the responses during a period
when it is still in the process of staffing its Audit Division, SIGTARP has awarded
a contract to Concentrance Consulting Group, a Section 8(a) women-owned small
business, to help analyze the survey data. The contract with Concentrance calls
for it to complete analysis of the survey responses within two months, including
identification of potential areas for follow-up work by SIGTARP with respondents.
From this analysis and any needed follow-up work, SIGTARP expects to issue a
preliminary report in June 2009 summarizing the audit responses. Two additional
reports — one on use of funds and the other on executive compensation issues —
are targeted for completion by summer 2009.

Audits Underway and Planned
As noted in the Initial Report, SIGTARP’s Audit Division will conduct primarily
performance audits related to TARP, using generally accepted Government auditing
standards. SIGTARP audits emphasize:
• ensuring transparency in TARP to the fullest reasonable extent so as to foster
accountability in use of funds and program results
• testing compliance with the policies, procedures, regulations, terms, and conditions that are imposed on TARP recipients
• coordinating actively with other relevant audit and oversight entities to maximize
audit coverage while minimizing overlap and duplication of efforts
With these objectives in mind, SIGTARP has initiated the following six audits:
1. Use of Funds: SIGTARP’s first audit examines the use of TARP funds by TARP
recipients, as set forth in the previous discussion about SIGTARP’s survey of
TARP recipients.
2. Executive Compensation Compliance: SIGTARP’s second audit, also based
on SIGTARP’s survey of TARP recipients, and initiated at the request of Senator
E. Benjamin Nelson, examines how TARP recipients are implementing controls
with respect to applicable executive compensation restrictions.
3. Bank of America: The third audit examines the review and approval processes
associated with TARP assistance to Bank of America under three different programs, including the Capital Purchase Program, Targeted Investment Program,
and the announced Asset Guarantee Program’s loss protection on a pool of

Targeted Investment Program (“TIP”): A
direct-investment program through which
Treasury can invest in institutions whose
failure would threaten similar institutions
and the economy in general.
Asset Guarantee Program (“AGP”): An
insurance-like program which allows Treasury to assume a loss position on certain
troubled assets held by the qualifying
financial institution.

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troubled assets. The audit also examines Treasury’s decision making related to
additional TARP assistance in connection with Bank of America’s acquisition of
Merrill Lynch. Since its commencement, the scope of this audit has expanded
to examine broadly Treasury’s decision making regarding the first nine institutions to be considered for TARP funding in October 2008.
4. External Influences: Concerns have arisen whether, or to what extent, external
parties may have sought to influence decision making by Treasury or bank regulators in considering and deciding on applications for funding from individual
banks. Importantly, the Treasury Secretary announced that Treasury would be
implementing new guidelines to prevent such external influences. Accordingly,
this audit seeks to determine what processes and procedures are in place to
guide consideration of such applications so as to avoid undue outside influence
on the process, whether there are any indications of any undue influence, and
what actions might be needed to strengthen existing processes.
5. Executive Compensation Oversight (AIG Bonuses): The next audit, initiated in connection with a request by Senator Charles E. Grassley, examines
Federal oversight of executive compensation requirements, focusing specifically
on recent payouts of large bonus payments to American International Group,
Inc. (“AIG”) employees. These payments have raised questions regarding AIG’s
compliance with executive compensation requirements imposed as a condition
of financial assistance under TARP and the extent of coordination between
Treasury and the Federal Reserve. Accordingly, SIGTARP has undertaken an
audit to determine: (i) the extent to which the recent bonus payments were
made in accordance with conditions imposed in return for TARP assistance, and
(ii) the extent of Treasury’s monitoring of AIG’s executive compensation agreements and to what extent it was aware of the full range of executive compensation, bonus, and retention payments throughout AIG’s corporate structure. For
a detailed description of Government assistance to AIG, see the “InstitutionSpecific” discussion in Section 2: “TARP Overview” of this report.
6. AIG Counterparty Payments: At the request of Congressman Elijah E.
Cummings and 26 other Members of Congress, SIGTARP has initiated a review
of AIG’s payments to counterparties to its various transactions. AIG, which has
received the largest amount of financial assistance from the Government during
the current financial crisis, reportedly made these counterparty payments to
other financial institutions, including some foreign institutions and others that
received financial assistance under TARP. Further, according to the request
made to SIGTARP, the counterparty claims were paid at 100% of face value. As
a result, SIGTARP will examine the basis for the counterparty payments and
seek to determine whether any efforts were made to negotiate any reduction in
those payments.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

As SIGTARP’s Audit Division staffing capacity increases, it expects to undertake additional reviews in the area of Treasury oversight of TARP, executive
compensation, and use of TARP funds. In addition, as Treasury implements new
programs, such as TALF and home mortgage assistance, SIGTARP’s Audit Division
anticipates undertaking audits in these areas in coordination with other audit
organizations.

Communications with Congress
One of SIGTARP’s primary functions is to make sure that Members of Congress,
as the creators of SIGTARP, are kept informed of developments in TARP and
SIGTARP’s oversight activities. To fulfill that role, the Special Inspector General
and SIGTARP personnel meet regularly with and brief Members of Congress and
Congressional staff. More formally, since the Initial Report, the Special Inspector
General has testified six times before various Congressional Committees.
• Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs: On February 5,
2009, Special Inspector General Barofsky testified before the Senate Committee
on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, during a hearing entitled, “Pulling
Back the TARP: Oversight of the Financial Rescue Program.” The purpose of
this oversight hearing was to explore how TARP can be made more effective
in the areas of: protecting home values, college funds, retirement accounts,
and life savings; preserving homeownership and promoting jobs and economic
growth; maximizing the returns to the taxpayers for their investment; and enhancing some measure of public accountability.
• Senate Judiciary Committee: On February 11, 2009, Special Inspector
General Barofsky testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee, during a
hearing entitled, “The Need for Increased Fraud Enforcement in the Wake of
the Economic Downturn.” The purpose of the hearing was, among other things,
to examine the issue of fraud in TARP.
• House Committee on Financial Services: On February 24, 2009, Special
Inspector General Barofsky testified before the House Committee on Financial
Services, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, during a hearing entitled, “A Review of TARP Oversight, Accountability and Transparency for U.S.
Taxpayers.” The purpose of this hearing was to ensure that the TARP oversight
organizations created/assigned by EESA (i.e., GAO, SIGTARP, and COP) understand their respective roles, cooperate with each other, and avoid repetitive
efforts and inefficiencies. The hearing also examined how S.383 (the SIGTARP
Act), which primarily deals with SIGTARP and had already been approved by
the Senate, will improve TARP oversight.
• House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform: On March 11,
2009, Special Inspector General Barofsky testified before the House Committee

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on Oversight and Government Reform, Subcommittee on Domestic Policy, during a hearing entitled, “TARP Oversight: Assessing Treasury’s Efforts to Prevent
Waste and Abuse of Taxpayer Funds.” The purpose of this hearing was to assess
Treasury’s oversight of the use of funds by financial institutions that received
funds under TARP. Specifically, the hearing evaluated Treasury’s data collection
procedures for monitoring the use of TARP funds and examined Treasury’s ability to detect and prevent waste and misuse of TARP monies.
• House Committee on Ways and Means: On March 19, 2009, Special
Inspector General Barofsky testified before the House Committee on Ways and
Means, Subcommittee on Oversight, during a hearing entitled, “Hearing on the
Troubled Asset Relief Program: Oversight of Federal Borrowing and the Use of
Federal Monies.” The purpose of the hearing was to review the role of Federal
borrowing in TARP, its impact on the national debt, and Treasury’s efforts to
protect public funds. In the latter regard, the hearing explored Federal tax compliance issues.
• Senate Committee on Finance: On March 31, 2009, Special Inspector
General Barofsky testified before the Senate Committee on Finance during a
hearing entitled, “TARP Oversight: A Six Month Update.” The purpose of the
hearing was to survey the various TARP and TARP-related programs, and to
examine SIGTARP’s oversight of these programs.
Copies of the Special Inspector General’s written testimony, the hearing transcripts, and a variety of other materials associated with the previously listed hearings are posted at www.SIGTARP.gov/reports.

SIGTARP’S ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
In addition to the executive staff, SIGTARP pursues its mission through four divisions: audit, investigations, operations, and the Division of the Chief Counsel.

Chief of Staff
SIGTARP’s mission is supported by the Chief of Staff, Kevin R. Puvalowski, who is
the Special Inspector General’s senior advisor. The Chief of Staff and the Deputy
Chief of Staff, Cathy Alix, oversee and coordinate the activities of the other divisions and manage cross-divisional projects as necessary.

Audit Division
The Audit Division, led by Barry Holman, the Deputy Special Inspector General for
Audit, is tasked with designing and conducting programmatic audits with respect to
Treasury’s operation of TARP and the recipients’ compliance with their obligations

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

under relevant law and contract. The division is designed to provide SIGTARP with
maximum flexibility in the size, timing, and scope of audits so that, without sacrificing the rigor of the methodology, audit results, whenever possible, can be generated
rapidly both for general transparency’s sake and so that the resulting data can be
used to improve the operations of the fast-evolving TARP.
A particular focus of the Audit Division is to ensure that appropriate compliance and control mechanisms are in place and are complied with, both by Treasury
in its management of TARP and by the recipients of TARP funds. Where controls
or compliance are found to be lacking, or where particular aspects or policies are
found ineffective at reaching TARP’s goals, the Audit Division will assist the Special
Inspector General in fashioning recommendations to resolve such issues.

Investigations Division
SIGTARP’s Investigations Division is led by Christopher R. Sharpley, the Deputy
Special Inspector General for Investigations. Made up of special agents, investigators, analysts, and attorney advisors, the Investigations Division supervises and
conducts criminal and civil investigations into those, whether inside or outside of
Government, who waste, steal, or abuse TARP funds. The model for the division
is to build teams of experienced financial and corporate fraud investigators that
include not only special agents but also forensic analysts and, critically, attorney
advisors, within the division itself, so that SIGTARP can have a broad array of
expertise and perspectives in developing even the most sophisticated investigations.
Scott Rebein, the Special Agent-in-Charge, will supervise the Federal agents, and
Richard Rosenfeld, the Chief Investigative Counsel, will supervise the attorney
advisors.
The Investigations Division will, of course, pursue any wrongdoers within
Government, but it will also focus on the recipients of TARP funds — i.e., the institutions that receive TARP investments and the vendors hired to administer TARP
activities. Those who make intentional misrepresentations in the TARP application
process or in their financial reporting to Treasury may be in violation of several
criminal statutes, including securities fraud, wire fraud, mail fraud, and false statements. SIGTARP intends to investigate these potential crimes vigorously.
In the interests of maximizing criminal and civil enforcement, the Investigations
Division coordinates closely with other law enforcement agencies to form law
enforcement partnerships, including task force relationships across the Federal
Government, to leverage SIGTARP’s expertise and unique position with respect to
TARP.
The Investigations Division will take the lead in responding to referrals made
to SIGTARP’s Hotline through telephone, email, website, and in-person complaints, abiding by all applicable whistleblower protections. When a full audit

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or investigation is not possible or advisable due to time or other constraints, the
Investigations Division will work closely with the Audit Division to conduct inspection and evaluation projects and may issue public Special Reports.

Operations Division
The Deputy Special Inspector General for Operations, Dr. Eileen Ennis, leads
SIGTARP’s Operations Division. The Operations staff is built around a core
group of experienced professionals with cross-functional backgrounds in human
resources, information technology, budget and finance, acquisitions, and facilities
and logistics, as well as experience in program and project management. These
seasoned veterans include employees detailed or transferred from other
departments and agencies as well as former Treasury Department employees.
The Operations Division’s strategy is to build SIGTARP’s support infrastructure and staff rapidly while maintaining flexibility in an environment in which
SIGTARP’s oversight responsibilities can change substantially with each new
program. Operations takes the lead on building and managing SIGTARP’s physical facilities, technical infrastructure, budget and finance functions, procurement
activity, and human resources activities. Operations strives to provide SIGTARP
with the ability to expand or shift emphasis swiftly — in size, location, and scope of
expertise — while ensuring that internal controls are in place and supported with
sound policies.

Division of the Chief Counsel
The Chief Counsel, Bryan Saddler, serves as SIGTARP’s chief legal advisor and supervises legal work conducted within SIGTARP. The Chief Counsel plays a crucial
role in ensuring that SIGTARP is in compliance with the complex framework of
laws and regulations applicable to audit and law enforcement entities. He also provides the Special Inspector General advice on contractual and legislative language
central to TARP, which directly impacts SIGTARP’s oversight of, and recommendations for, those programs.
In addition to fulfilling these legal roles, the Chief Counsel also manages
several other important SIGTARP functions, including communications and press
issues, legislative affairs, and Freedom of Information Act inquiries. Supporting
him, the Communications Director, Kristine Belisle, assists the Special Inspector
General with media relations and inquiries, and the Director of Legislative Affairs,
Lori Hayman, assists the Special Inspector General with Congressional relations
and inquiries.
Since the Initial Report, SIGTARP’s organizational structure has been modified to create the Division of Chief Counsel, and to move the communications and
legislative affairs functions into that division. The SIGTARP organizational chart,
as of March 31, 2009, is included in Appendix K.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

PROGRESS IN BUILDING SIGTARP’S ORGANIZATION
From the day that the Special Inspector General was confirmed by the Senate,
SIGTARP has worked to build its organization through various complementary
strategies, including hiring experienced senior executives who can play multiple
roles during the early stages of the organization, leveraging the resources of other
agencies, and, where appropriate and cost-effective, obtaining services through
SIGTARP’s authority to contract. Since the Initial Report, SIGTARP has made
substantial progress in building its operation.

Hiring
Since the Initial Report, SIGTARP has succeeded in substantially completing its
hiring of senior staff.
As noted previously, Dr. Eileen Ennis has taken over as Deputy Special
Inspector General for Operations. Dr. Ennis comes to SIGTARP with more
than 21 years of Federal service, most recently with the U.S. Department of
Transportation (“USDOT”) where she was the Associate Administrator for
Administration and Chief Information Officer at USDOT’s Research and
Innovative Technology Administration. Dr. Ennis was asked to serve temporarily as
the acting Director of USDOT’s Volpe National Transportation Research Center in
Cambridge, Massachusetts. After Volpe, Dr. Ennis was invited to provide leadership in USDOT’s departmental Office of the Chief Information Officer (“CIO”)
and led two organizations acting as Associate CIO for IT Enterprise Projects and as
Associate CIO for IT Policy Oversight. Prior to joining USDOT, Dr. Ennis was at
the Commodity Futures Trading Commission from 2000 to 2007. There, she was a
Deputy Director for the Office of Information and Technology Services. Dr. Ennis
holds a Doctorate in Information Systems from Nova Southeastern University
in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and a Master’s Degree in Information and Resources
Management from Webster University.
Each of the divisions has begun the process of filling out their ranks. As
of March 31, 2009, SIGTARP had approximately 35 personnel, including detailees from other agencies, with several new hires to begin over the coming
weeks. SIGTARP’s employees hail from many Federal agencies, including DOJ,
the FBI, the Department of Defense Air Force Office of Special Investigations,
GAO, USDOT, the Department of Energy Office of the Inspector General, the
Internal Revenue Service, the Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq
Reconstruction, the Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of the
Inspector General, SEC, and the U.S. Secret Service. Hiring is actively ongoing,
building to SIGTARP’s current goal of approximately 150 full-time employees.

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Contracting
EESA gives SIGTARP the express authority to contract for goods and services.
Whenever it can do so cost effectively, and without damaging its mission or independence, SIGTARP will use the services of other Governmental agencies and outside vendors to develop rapidly its operational capacity. As discussed in the Initial
Report, SIGTARP entered into contracts with the following agencies and outside
service providers:
• Treasury’s Bureau of Public Debt for certain back-office human resources and
personnel services and for financial reporting services
• The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration for the detailing of personnel and for certain technical assistance
• Deloitte Financial Advisory Services LLP for program management services in
connection with the production of SIGTARP’s Quarterly Reports to Congress
Since the Initial Report, SIGTARP has entered into several additional contracts:
• Concentrance Consulting Group for assistance with SIGTARP’s analysis of a
survey sent to 364 TARP recipients seeking information about the recipients’
use of TARP funds and executive compensation policies
• NY HIFCA initiative (under the auspices of the New York High Intensity Drug
Trafficking Area program of the Office of National Drug Control Policy) for
forensic analysts
• FinCEN for multi-source financial intelligence expertise and data access
A full listing of all of SIGTARP’s current contracts, and copies of its contracts
with non-governmental entities, is available at www.SIGTARP.gov.

SIGTARP’s Physical and Technical Infrastructure
SIGTARP is moving forward in its development of a physical and technical infrastructure, now occupying several different office spaces within the main Treasury
building. SIGTARP is in the process of leasing office space at 1801 L Street, NW,
in Washington, D.C., the same office building in which the Treasury officials
managing TARP are located. It is anticipated that SIGTARP will be able to move
into that space by the end of 2009. In the meantime, SIGTARP is working with
Treasury and the General Services Administration to locate and let temporary
quarters.
SIGTARP operates a website, www.SIGTARP.gov, on which it posts all of its reports, testimony, audits, investigations (once such investigations are made public),
contracts, and more. The website also prominently features SIGTARP’s Hotline,
which also can be accessed by phone (877-SIG-2009 or 877-744-2009). The

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

SIGTARP Hotline is operating to handle referrals from the general public or from
whistleblowers concerning allegations of fraud, waste, or abuse with respect to
TARP. SIGTARP is, of course, committed to abiding by all applicable whistleblower
protections.

Developing SIGTARP’s Internal Systems, Policies, and
Procedures
Since the Initial Report, SIGTARP has moved rapidly to begin developing and
implementing management and information systems, as well as the policies and
procedures necessary to run a complex Federal agency. Among other things,
SIGTARP has begun to put into place the following:
• policies and procedures concerning the roles and authorities of SIGTARP executives and divisions, standards of conduct and discipline, travel by SIGTARP
employees, and subpoena authorities
• systems relating to human resources, time and attendance reporting, expenditure tracking, and recordkeeping
• a budget framework to plan and manage SIGTARP’s initial funding authorization and short-term and long-term budget strategies to address the initial startup as well as the potential expansion of TARP and related financial recovery
programs

29

30

SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

TARP OVERVIEW

SECTH A P2 E R 3
C ION T

32

SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

This section provides details of activities that the U.S. Department of Treasury
(“Treasury”) has conducted under the Troubled Asset Relief Program (“TARP”),
including the following:
•
•
•
•

a financial overview of TARP initiatives, implemented and announced
a detailed update on previously described programs
a program-by-program description of newly announced programs
the status of executive compensation restrictions for TARP recipients

For more information on the previously implemented programs, refer
to SIGTARP’s Initial Report to
Congress dated February 6, 2009,
Section 3: “TARP Implementation
and Administration.”

FINANCIAL OVERVIEW OF TARP
As of March 31, 2009, Treasury had announced the parameters of how $590.4
billion2 of the $700 billion authorized by the Emergency Economic Stabilization
Act of 2008 (“EESA”) would be spent.3 Of the $590.4 billion4 that Treasury has
committed, $328.6 billion5 has been spent. The $328.6 billion already expended
has provided support for U.S. financial institutions and companies through the
six previously implemented programs that purchase or guarantee troubled assets.6
TARP expenditures as of March 31, 2009, account for about 47% of the $700
billion available for TARP implementation.
Subsequent to SIGTARP’s Initial Report to Congress (“Initial Report”) dated
February 6, 2009, and in reaction to the continued deterioration of the credit
markets, Treasury announced the creation of the Financial Stability Plan (“FSP”).
Treasury explained that the FSP was designed “to protect taxpayers and ensure
that every dollar is directed toward lending and economic revitalization” and that
it would “institute a new era of accountability, transparency, and conditions on the
financial institutions receiving funds.”7 According to Treasury, the FSP will address
a number of concerns:
•
•
•
•

high home foreclosure rates
a shortage of consumer credit
a shortage of small-business credit
ongoing efforts to stabilize financial institutions

Treasury plans to support U.S. financial institutions, companies, and
individual borrowers through a combination of 12 separate TARP programs
implemented or announced thus far. A number of the newly announced initiatives
are interrelated with existing programs. Complete details on these new programs
are not yet available, but summaries of their announced descriptions, along with
updates on the previously implemented programs, are provided in the following
section.

Troubled Assets: Includes mortgages,
mortgage-related instruments, and any
other financial instrument whose
purchase Treasury determines is
needed to stabilize the financial
markets.

33

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Tangible Common Equity (“TCE”): A
measure of a bank’s capital adequacy; the
amount of money that would be left over
if a bank were dissolved and all creditors
and higher levels of stock were paid off.
Systemically Significant: A financial
institution whose failure would impose
significant losses on creditors and counterparties, call into question the financial
strength of other similarly situated financial institutions, disrupt financial markets,
raise borrowing costs for households and
businesses, and reduce household wealth.
Non-Cumulative Preferred Shares: Shares
where unpaid dividends do not accrue
when a company does not make a
dividend payment.

• Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”). Treasury intends for CPP to provide
funds to “encourage U.S. financial institutions to build capital to increase the
flow of financing to U.S. businesses and consumers and to support the U.S.
economy.”8 As of March 31, 2009, Treasury investments in institutions through
CPP accounted for approximately $198.8 billion in TARP purchases,9 out of
a projected funding total of $218 billion under the program.10 Of the $198.8
billion expended, $0.4 billion has been repaid to the Government by CPP
participants. See the “Capital Purchase Program” discussion in this section for
more detailed information. Subsequent to SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Citigroup
announced an offering to exchange up to $25 billion of Treasury’s preferred
shares, obtained through CPP, for common stock.11 See the “Institution-Specific
Assistance” portion of this section for a detailed discussion of Citibank’s exchange offering.
• Capital Assistance Program (“CAP”). The mechanics of CAP are similar to
those of CPP, and both programs involve injecting capital into the financial
system. Under CAP, financial institutions with more than $100 billion in assets
will have to participate in a “stress test” to determine if they have enough of
a capital buffer to continue lending in worse-than-expected economic conditions.12 Institutions that are found to need additional capital will have up to
six months to raise private capital, after which they will be required to accept
Treasury assistance under CAP. In addition to the 19 financial institutions participating in the stress test, all qualifying financial institutions may apply to CAP
for additional capital without the stress-test requirement. CAP includes a provision whereby preferred shares issued under CPP and the Targeted Investment
Program may be exchanged for convertible preferred shares that provide the
issuing institution the option to convert preferred shares to common stock,
and thus increase the institution’s tangible common equity (“TCE”). Treasury
expects that most applicants will convert existing TARP preferred shares for
CAP convertible preferred shares without seeking additional capital.13 However,
those receiving additional capital will do so in exchange for convertible preferred
shares under CAP.
• Systemically Significant Failing Institutions (“SSFI”) Program. Under the
stated terms of the SSFI program, Treasury invests in systemically significant
institutions to prevent their failure and the market disruption that would follow.14 As of March 31, 2009, Treasury’s projected investment through this program accounts for $70 billion in investments in and credit provided to American
International Group, Inc. (“AIG”). As reported in SIGTARP’s Initial Report, $40
billion was used to purchase preferred stock from AIG.15 Subsequently, Treasury
announced the allocation of an additional $30 billion to the SSFI program for a
new equity capital facility that AIG can draw on as needed. In return, Treasury
will receive non-cumulative preferred shares.16 See the “Institution-Specific
Assistance” part of this section for a detailed discussion of the AIG transactions.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

• Targeted Investment Program (“TIP”). The stated objective of TIP is to make
targeted investments in financial institutions where a loss of confidence would
“result in significant market disruptions that threaten the financial strength
of similarly situated financial institutions and thus impair broader financial
markets and pose a threat to the overall economy.”17 As reported in SIGTARP’s
Initial Report, Treasury purchased $20 billion of senior preferred stock and
received warrants of common stock from each of Citigroup and Bank of
America, for a total expenditure of $40 billion in TARP funds.18 As of
March 31, 2009, Treasury had made no further funding under this program.
• Asset Guarantee Program (“AGP”). Through AGP, Treasury’s stated goal is
to use insurance-like protections to help stabilize at-risk financial institutions.
AGP provides certain loss protections on a select pool of mortgage-related or
similar assets held by participants whose portfolios of distressed or illiquid assets
pose a risk to market confidence.19 As discussed in SIGTARP’s Initial Report,
Treasury, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”), and the Federal
Reserve agreed to provide certain loss protections with respect to $301 billion in
troubled assets held by Citigroup.20 A similar arrangement with Bank of
America was announced on January 16, 2009, but had not yet closed as of
March 31, 2009. Treasury’s projected TARP investment through this program
accounted for $12.5 billion as of March 31, 2009 — $5 billion in protection for Citigroup21 and $7.5 billion for Bank of America.22 See the discussion
of “Institution-Specific Assistance” in this section for more information on
Citigroup’s transactions.
• Automotive Industry Financing Program (“AIFP”). The stated objective of
AIFP is to “prevent a significant disruption of the American automotive
industry, which would pose a systemic risk to financial market stability and have
a negative effect on the economy of the United States.”23 Under this program,
Treasury made emergency loans to General Motors Corporation (“GM”),
Chrysler Holding LLC (“Chrysler”), and Chrysler Financial Services Americas
LLC (“Chrysler Financial”). In addition to these investments, Treasury purchased senior preferred stock from GMAC LLC (“GMAC”). As of March 31,
2009, Treasury has expended $24.8 billion in AIFP investments,24 out of an
initial projected funding total of $25 billion.25 Subsequent to the Initial Report,
the manufacturers (GM and Chrysler) submitted restructuring plans to Treasury
on February 17, 2009, as required.26 Upon submission, the President’s Designee
on the Auto Industry determined that these restructuring plans did not meet the
threshold for long-term viability. However, on March 30, 2009, both GM and
Chrysler were granted extensions to complete the restructuring plans in order
to comply with the requirements set forth under AIFP. As a modification to the
existing loans, GM will receive up to $5 billion and Chrysler up to $500 million
in additional working capital during the extension period.27 See the discussion

Senior Preferred Stock: Shares that give
the stockholder priority dividend and
liquidation claims over junior preferred
and common stockholders.
Illiquid: Assets that cannot be quickly
converted to cash.

35

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Credit Protection: Security against losses
on an investment. For TALF purposes,
TARP funding is used as credit protection
on the Federal Reserve loans (i.e., losses
on the loans are absorbed by TARP funds
up to the commitment amount).
Legacy Loans: Underperforming real
estate-related loans held by a bank that
it wishes to sell, but recent market
disruptions have made difficult to price.
Legacy Securities: Troubled real estaterelated securities (residential mortgagebacked securities (“RMBS”), commercial
mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”),
and asset-backed securities (“ABS”))
lingering on institutions’ balance sheets
due to an inability to determine value.

of “Automotive Industry Financing Program” later in this section for a detailed
discussion of the GM and Chrysler restructuring plans. In addition to the initial
$25 billion committed in AIFP, Treasury has recently announced two new subprograms to assist the automobile industry.
• Auto Supplier Support Program (“ASSP”). As an expansion of AIFP, the
stated purpose of ASSP is to provide up to $5 billion of Government-backed
financing to break the adverse credit cycle affecting the auto suppliers and
the manufacturers by “providing suppliers with the confidence they need to
continue shipping their parts and the support they need to help access loans
to pay their employees and continue their operations.”28 See the discussion
of “Auto Supplier Support Program” for more information.
• Auto Warranty Commitment Program. As another complementary program to AIFP, the Auto Warranty Commitment Program was devised by the
Administration with the stated intent to bolster consumer confidence in automobile warranties on GM- and Chrysler-built vehicles. In order to reassure
consumers that their auto warranties will be honored during this period of
restructuring, the Administration will provide Government-backed financing. Treasury preliminarily discussed potential funding for the Auto Warranty
Commitment Program for up to an estimated $1.1 billion.29 See the discussion of “Auto Warranty Commitment Program” for more information.
• Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”). TALF was originally
intended to increase the credit available for consumer and small-business loans
through a Federal Reserve loan program backed by TARP funds. TALF provides non-recourse loans to investors secured by certain types of asset-backed
securities. TALF was originally announced as a $200 billion Federal Reserve
loan program under which Treasury provides $20 billion in credit protection to
the Federal Reserve.30 Treasury and the Federal Reserve have announced plans
to expand TALF to cover additional asset classes, including legacy mortgagebacked securities, which could bring the total facility funding up to $1 trillion,31
for which Treasury will provide up to $80 billion in TARP funds to absorb
losses.32 An overview of TALF, later in this section, provides more information
on these activities.
• Public-Private Investment Program (“PPIP”). On March 23, 2009, Treasury
announced a coordinated effort with FDIC in an attempt to improve the health
of financial institutions holding real estate-related assets in order to increase
the flow of credit throughout the economy. Within two subprograms, PPIP will
involve investments in multiple Public-Private Investment Funds (“PPIFs”) to
purchase real estate-related loans (“legacy loans”) and real estate-related securities (“legacy securities”) from financial institutions. The program, involving up
to $1 trillion in total, will utilize up to $75 billion of TARP funds.33

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

• Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses (“UCSB”). On March 16, 2009,
Treasury announced that it will begin purchasing up to $15 billion in securities
backed by Small Business Administration (“SBA”) loans. As demand has diminished in the secondary market for these securities due to adverse credit conditions, there has been a reduction in the volume of new small-business loans
written by banks. In connection with this program, the Treasury Secretary also
called for the largest 21 banks that have received TARP funds to begin reporting
monthly the amount of their small-business lending.34
• Making Home Affordable (“MHA”) Program. On March 4, 2009, Treasury
announced its MHA program, which might expend up to $50 billion of TARP
funds.35 MHA is a foreclosure mitigation plan intended to “help bring relief to
responsible homeowners struggling to make their mortgage payments, while
preventing neighborhoods and communities from suffering the negative spillover effects of foreclosure, such as lower housing prices, increased crime, and
higher taxes.”36 Treasury, along with other Federal agencies, “will undertake a
comprehensive multiple-part strategy,” which will provide for (i) a $75 billion
loan modification program for homeowners in default on their payments or
facing imminent default; (ii) a streamlined refinancing process for homeowners
whose loans are serviced by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac; and (iii) approximately
$200 billion to support Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.37 The funds for this effort
will be provided from both TARP- and non-TARP-related sources.
The following figures and tables provide a status summary of the implemented
and announced TARP and TARP-related initiatives:
• total funds subject to SIGTARP oversight (Table 2.1)
• projected TARP funding for all implemented and announced programs under
TARP (Figure 2.1)
• expenditure levels by program as of March 31, 2009 (Table 2.2)
• cumulative expenditures over time for implemented programs (Figure 2.2)
• expenditures by program snapshot as of March 31, 2009 (Figure 2.3)
• summary of terms of TARP agreements (Table 2.3 and Table 2.4)
• summary of dividend and interest payments received by program (Table 2.5)
For a reporting of all purchases, obligations, expenditures, and revenues of
TARP, see Appendix C: “Reporting Requirements.”

37

Secondary Market: Created when banks
sell a portion of their loans to a dealer
who then pools the loans together and
sells portions of the loan pools as securities to investors. The secondary market
serves as a source of cash for banks,
providing them money to make new
loans.

FIGURE 2.1

TARP PROJECTED FUNDING,
BY PROGRAM
$ Billions, % of $700 Billion

New Programs, or
Remaining Funds
for Existing
Programs $109.5

2% AGP $12.5
AIFP $25.0

4%

16%

UCSB
$15.0 2%
ASSP $5.0 1%

31% CPP $218.0

PPIP $75.0 11%

MHA $50.0

7%
6%

TIP $40.0

11%

10%

SSFI $70.0
TALF $80.0

Implemented Programs
Announced Programs
Remaining Funds

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. As of 3/31/2009, funding for
Capital Assistance Program (“CAP”) to be determined. Treasury
preliminarily discussed potential funding for the Auto Warranty
Commitment Program for up to $1.25 billion.
Sources: See final endnote.

38

SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

TABLE 2.1

TOTAL FUNDS SUBJECT TO SIGTARP OVERSIGHT,
AS OF MARCH 31, 2009 ($ BILLIONS)
Program

Brief Description or Participant

Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”)

Investments in 532 banks to date; 8
institutions total $125 billion

Automotive Industry Financing Program
(“AIFP”)

GM, Chrysler, GMAC, Chrysler Financial

Auto Supplier Support Program (“ASSP”)

Total Projected
Funding ($)

Projected TARP
Funding ($)

$218.0

$218.0

$25.0

$25.0

Government-backed protection for auto parts
suppliers

$5.0

$5.0

Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses
(“UCSB”)

Purchase of securities backed by SBA loans

$15.0a

$15.0

Systemically Significant Failing Institutions
(“SSFI”)

AIG Investment

$70.0

$70.0b

$40.0

$40.0

$419.0c

$12.5d

Targeted Investment Program (“TIP”)

Citigroup, Bank of America Investments

Asset Guarantee Program (“AGP”)

Citigroup, Bank of America, Ring Fence Asset
Guarantee

Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility
(“TALF”)

FRBNY non-recourse loans for purchase of
asset-backed securities

Making Home Affordable (“MHA”) Program

Modification of mortgage loans

Public-Private Investment Program (“PPIP”)

Disposition of legacy assets; Legacy Loans
Program, Legacy Securities Program
(expansion of TALF)

Capital Assistance Program (“CAP”)

Capital to qualified financial institutions;
includes stress test

New Programs, or Funds Remaining for
Existing Programs

Potential additional funding related to CAP; AIFP;
Auto Warranty Commitment Program; other

Total

$1,000.0
$75.0e

$80.0
$50.0

$500.0 – $1,000.0

$75.0

TBD

TBD

$109.5
$2,476.5 – $2,976.5

$109.5f
$700.0

Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
a Treasury announced that it would purchase up to $15 billion in securities under the Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses program.
b A new equity capital facility will be created by Treasury allowing AIG to draw down up to $30 billion as needed.
c Bank of America’s pool of assets has not been finalized.
d Bank of America’s $7.5 billion of projected TARP funds is preliminary based on the 1/15/2009 Treasury announcement and pending the finalized agreement.
e
$75 billion is for mortgage modification.
f Treasury preliminarily discussed potential funding for the Auto Warranty Commitment Program for up to $1.25 billion.
Sources: CPP, TALF, and PPIP: Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, Chief of Compliance and CFO, SIGTARP interview, 3/30/2009; AIFP: Treasury, Fifth Tranche Report to Congress, 3/6/2009, p. 2 states
that Treasury will fund an additional $4 billion on 3/17/2009; ASSP: Treasury, “Auto Supplier Support Program: Stabilizing the Auto Industry in a Time of Crisis,” 3/19/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/19/2009; UCSB: Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009; SSFI: Treasury, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve
Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009; TIP: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009; AGP: Treasury, “Treasury, Federal Reserve, and
FDIC Provide Assistance to Bank of America,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/16/2009; Treasury, “U.S. Government Finalizes Terms of Citi Guarantee Announced in November,” 1/16/2009,
www.treas.gov, accessed 3/30/2009; TALF: Treasury, “Financial Stability Plan Fact Sheet,” 2/10/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009; MHA: Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed
Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009; GAO, “Report to Congressional Committees: Troubled Asset Relief Program — March 2009 Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues,” 3/26/2009; PPIP: Treasury, “Public-Private Investment Program: Fact Sheet,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009; Treasury, SIGTARP briefing, 4/14/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TABLE 2.2

EXPENDITURE LEVELS BY PROGRAM, AS OF MARCH 31, 2009

($ BILLIONS)

Amount
Authorized Under EESA

Percent (%)

Section Reference

$700.0

Released Immediately

$250.0

35.7%

Released Under Presidential Certificate of Need

$100.0

14.3%

Released Under Presidential Certificate of Need &
Resolution to Disapprove Failed

$350.0

50.0%

TOTAL RELEASED
Less: Expenditures by Treasury Under TARPa
Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”):
Bank of America Corporationb
Citigroup, Inc.
JP Morgan Chase & Co.
Wells Fargo and Company
The Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
Morgan Stanley
Other Qualifying Financial Institutionsc

$700.0

$25.0
$25.0
$25.0
$25.0
$10.0
$10.0
$78.8

CPP TOTAL
Systemically Significant Failing Institutions
Program (“SSFI”):
American International Group, Inc. (“AIG”)

28.4%
5.7%

$40.0

2.9%
2.9%
$40.0

$5.0

AIFP TOTAL

0.7%
$5.0

BALANCE REMAINING OF TOTAL FUNDS
MADE AVAILABLE AS OF MARCH 31, 2009

“Institution-Specific Assistance”

0.7%
2.0%
0.7%
0.6%
0.2%

$24.8

“Automotive Industry Financing
Program”

3.5%

Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”):
TALF LLC
$20.0

TARP REPAYMENTSf

“Institution-Specific Assistance”

5.7%

Automotive Industry Financing Program (“AIFP”):
General Motors Corporation (“GM”)
$14.3
General Motors Acceptance Corporation LLC
(“GMAC”)
$5.0
Chrysler Holding LLC
$4.0
Chrysler Financial Services Americas LLCe
$1.5

TALF TOTAL

“Institution-Specific Assistance”

5.7%

$20.0
$20.0

AGP TOTAL

SUBTOTAL – TARP EXPENDITURES

“Capital Investment Programs”

$40.0

TIP TOTAL
Asset Guarantee Program (“AGP”):
Citigroup, Inc.d

3.6%
3.6%
3.6%
3.6%
1.4%
1.4%
11.3%
$198.8

SSFI TOTAL
Targeted Investment Program (“TIP”):
Bank of America Corporation
Citigroup, Inc.

100.0%

2.9%
$20.0

“Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan
Facility”

2.9%
$328.6
$(0.4)
$371.8

47.0%
(0.1)%
53.1%

Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
a From a budgetary perspective, what Treasury has committed to spend (e.g., signed agreements with TARP fund recipients).
b Bank of America’s share is equal to two CPP investments totaling $25 billion, which is the sum $15 billion received on 10/28/2008 and $10 billion received on 1/9/2009.
c Other Qualifying Financial Institutions (“QFIs”) include all QFIs that have received less than $10 billion through CPP.
d Treasury committed $5 billion to Citigroup under AGP; however, this funding is conditional based on losses realized and may potentially never be expended.
e Treasury’s $1.5 billion loan to Chrysler Financial represents the maximum loan amount. This $1.5 billion has not been fully expended because the loan will be funded incrementally at $100 million per
week. As of 3/31/2009, $1,175 million out of the $1.5 billion has been funded.
f As of 3/31/2009, CPP repayments total $353.0 million and AIFP loan principal payments (Chrysler Financial) total $3.5 million.
Sources: EESA, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008; Library of Congress, “A joint resolution relating to the disapproval of obligations under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008,” 1/15/2009, www.
thomas.loc.gov, accessed 1/25/2009; Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009; Treasury, responses to SIGTARP data call, 4/6/2009 and 4/8/2009.

39

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

FIGURE 2.2

EXPENDITURES, BY PROGRAM, CUMULATIVE
$ Billions

350

$5.0 AGP
b

300

$24.8 AIFP
$20.0 TALF

250

$40.0 TIP
$40.0 SSFI

200
150
100

a

$198.8 CPP

50
0
10/28

11/25

12/31

1/30

2008

2/27
2009

AGP
AIFP
TALF
TIP
SSFI
CPP

Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
a As of 3/31/2009, $353.0 million of CPP funding has been repaid.
b As of 3/31/2009, $3.5 million of principal payments related to AIFP loans (Chrysler Financial) has been repaid.
Sources: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009; Treasury response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

FIGURE 2.3

EXPENDITURES BY PROGRAM,
SNAPSHOT
$ Billions, % of $328.6 Billion

2% AGP $5.0
b

AIFP $24.8
TALF $20.0

8%
6%

TIP $40.0 12%

SSFI $40.0

a
60% CPP $198.8

12%

Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
a As of 3/31/2009, $353.0 million of CPP funding has been repaid.
b As of 3/31/2009, $3.5 million of principal payments related to AIFP
loans (Chrysler Financial) has been repaid.
Source: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009.

3/31

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TABLE 2.3

EQUITY AGREEMENTS
TARP
Program

Company

CPP – Public

280 QFIs

“Date of
Agreement”

Cost
Assigned

Description of
Investment

10/14/2008a
and later

$195.6 billionb Senior Preferred Equity

Common Stock
Purchase Warrants
CPP – Private 252 QFIs

11/17/2008c
and later

$3.2 billionb Preferred Equity

Investment
Information

Dividends

1-3% of Risk Weighted
Assets, not to exceed
$25 billion for each QFI

5% for first 5
years,
9% thereafter

Perpetual

15% of Senior Preferred
amount

—

Up to 10 years

1-3% of Risk Weighted
Assets, not to exceed
$25 billion for each QFI

5% for first 5
years,
9% thereafter

Perpetual

9%

Up to 10 years

10%

Perpetual

2% of issued and
outstanding Common
Stock on investment date;
$2.50 strike price

—

Up to 10 years

$20 billion

8%

Perpetual

10% of total Preferred
Stock issued; $10.61
strike price

—

Up to 10 years

$20 billion

8%

Perpetual

10% of total Preferred
Stock issued; $13.30
strike price

—

Up to 10 years

$5 billion

8%

Perpetual

5% of Preferred amount

9%

Up to 10 years

Preferred Stock Purchase 5% of Preferred amount
Warrants that are exercised
immediately
SSFI

 AIG

11/25/2008

$40 billion Perpetual Senior Preferred $40 billion aggregate
Equity
liquidation preference
Common Stock
Purchase Warrants

TIP

Citigroup

12/31/2008

$20 billion Senior Preferred Equity
Warrants

TIP

Bank of
America

1/16/2009d

$20 billion Senior Preferred Equity
Warrants

AIFP

GMAC LLC

12/29/2008

$5 billion Senior Preferred
Membership Interests
Preferred Stock Purchase
Warrants that are
exercised immediately

Term of
Agreement

Notes:
a Announcement date of CPP Public Term Sheet.
b As of 3/31/2009, $353.0 million of CPP funding has been repaid ($338.0 million Public, $15.0 million Private).
c Announcement date of CPP Private Term Sheet.
d Date from Treasury’s Transactions Report, dated 1/27/2009. The Security Purchase Agreement has a date of 1/15/2009.
Sources: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009; Treasury, “TARP Capital Purchase Program Agreement, Senior Preferred Stock and Warrants, Summary of Senior Preferred Terms,” 10/14/2008; Treasury,
“TARP Capital Purchase Program Agreement, (Non-Public QFIs, excluding S Corps and Mutual Organizations) Preferred Securities, Summary of Warrant Terms,” 11/17/2008; Treasury, “Securities Purchase
Agreement dated as of November 25, 2008 between American International Group, Inc. and United States Department of Treasury,” 11/25/2008; Treasury, “TARP AIG SSFI Investment, Senior Preferred Stock
and Warrant, Summary of Senior Preferred Terms,” 11/25/2008; Treasury, “Securities Purchase Agreement dated as of January 15, 2009 between Citigroup, Inc. and United States Department of Treasury,”
1/15/2009; Treasury, “Citigroup, Inc. Summary of Terms, Eligible Asset Guarantee,” 11/23/2008; “Securities Purchase Agreement dated as of January 15, 2009 between Bank of America Corporation
and United States Department of Treasury,” 1/15/2009; Treasury, “Bank of America Summary of Terms, Preferred Securities,” 1/16/2009; Treasury, “GMAC LLC Automotive Industry Financing Program,
Preferred Membership Interests, Summary of Preferred Terms,” 12/29/2008.

41

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

TABLE 2.4

DEBT AGREEMENTS
TARP
Program

Company

Date of
Agreement

Cost
Assigned

AIFP

General
12/31/2008
Motors
Corporation

AIFP

General
Motors

1/16/2009

$884 million

AIFP

Chrysler
1/2/2009a
Holding LLC

AIFP

Chrysler
Financial

1/16/2009

$13.4
billion

Description of
Investment

Investment
Information

Interest/
Dividends

Debt Obligation with
Loan is funded incrementally;
LIBOR + 3%
Warrants and Additional $4 billion funded on
Note
12/29/2008, $5.4 billion
funded on 1/21/2009,
$4 billion funded on 2/17/2009

Term of
Agreement
12/29/2011

Debt Obligation

To purchase Class B
membership interest of
GMAC LLC

LIBOR + 3%

1/16/2012

$4 billion

Debt Obligation with
Additional Note

Loan up to $4 billion, available
on the closing date; Additional
note of $267 million (6.67% of
the maximum loan amount)

3% or 8% (if the
1/2/2012
company is in
default of its
terms under the
agreement) plus
the greater of a)
three-month LIBOR
or b) LIBOR floor
(2.00%)

$1.5 billionb

Debt Obligation with
Additional Note

Loan is funded incrementally
at $100 million per week;
Additional note is $75 million
(5% of total loan size), which
vests 20% on closing and 20%
on each anniversary of closing

LIBOR + 1% for
first year
LIBOR + 1.5% for
remaining

1/16/2014

Notes:
a Date from Treasury’s Transactions Report, dated 1/27/2009. The Security Purchase Agreement has a date of 12/31/2008.
b As of 3/31/2009, $3.5 million of principal payments related to AIFP loans has been repaid.
Sources: Treasury, “Loan and Security Agreement By and Between General Motors Corporation as Borrower and The United States Department of Treasury as Lender Dated as of December 31, 2008,”
12/31/2008; Treasury, “General Motors Corporation, Indicative Summary of Terms for Secured Term Loan Facility,” 12/19/08; Treasury, “General Motors Promissory Note,” 1/16/2009; Treasury, “Loan
and Security Agreement By and Between Chrysler Holding LLC as Borrower and The United States Department of Treasury as Lender Dated as of December 31, 2008,” 12/31/2008; Treasury, “Chrysler,
Indicative Summary of Terms for Secured Term Loan Facility,” 12/19/2008; Treasury, “Chrysler LB Receivables Trust Automotive Industry Financing Program, Secured Term Loan, Summary of Terms,”
1/16/2009; Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 1/30/2009.

TABLE 2.5
DIVIDEND AND INTEREST PAYMENTS,
BY PROGRAM ($ MILLIONS)
Program

Amount

CPP

$2,517.9

SSFI

–

TIP

$328.9

AGP

$26.9

AIFP

$250.6

TOTAL

$3,124.3

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. Data as of 3/31/2009.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROGRAMS
Treasury has created two TARP initiatives aimed at facilitating the investment
of capital in financial institutions. According to Treasury, the Capital Purchase
Program (“CPP”), announced in October 2008, was created to stabilize the financial system by providing capital to institutions of all sizes. Treasury announced the
establishment of the Capital Assistance Program (“CAP”) in February 2009, with
the intent to ensure that banks have a sufficient capital cushion to withstand largerthan-expected losses in the future. A comparison of the terms of each program can
be found in Table 2.15 in the “CAP Terms” discussion in this section.

Capital Purchase Program
Under CPP, as of March 31, 2009, Treasury anticipated that $218 billion38 of
TARP funds will eventually be invested in Qualifying Financial Institutions
(“QFIs”), which include private and public U.S.-controlled banks, savings associations, bank holding companies, and certain savings and loan holding companies.39 Treasury originally announced that CPP would be a $250 billion program,
but, on March 30, 2009, stated that it now forecasts only expending $218 billion.
According to Treasury, the intention of CPP is to invest in healthy, viable banks in
order to promote financial stability, maintain confidence in the financial system,
and permit institutions to continue meeting the credit needs of American consumers and businesses.40 For a summary of the distribution of CPP funding by participant, see Figure 2.4.
Treasury issued initial guidelines for public applicants for CPP on October 20,
2008.41 Guidelines were released for private applicants on November 17, 2008,42

For more information regarding the
CPP application process, refer to
SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section
3: “TARP Implementation and
Administration.”
FIGURE 2.4

CPP EXPENDITURES, BY PARTICIPANT,
CUMULATIVE
$ Billions, % of $198.8 Billion

Other
Institutions
$78.8

Bank of America
$25.0

40%

12.5%

JPMorgan
Chase
12.5% $25.0

12.5% Wells Fargo
$25.0

5%
Morgan Stanley
$10.0

5% 12.5%
Citigroup
$25.0
Goldman Sachs
$10.0

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. As of 3/31/2009, $353 million
has been redeemed. Bank of America = Bank of America
Corporation; JPMorgan Chase = JPMorgan Chase & Co.;
Wells Fargo = Wells Fargo and Company; Citigroup = Citigroup Inc.;
Goldman Sachs = The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Source: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009.

Qualifying Financial Institutions (“QFIs”):
Private and public U.S.-controlled banks,
savings associations, bank holding companies, and certain savings and loan holding
companies.
Bank Holding Company (“BHC”): A company
that controls a bank. Typically, a company
controls a bank through the ownership of
25% or more of its voting securities.

Savings and Loan Holding Company
(“SLHC”): A company (other than a BHC)
that controls a savings association.
Public Applicant: A QFI whose securities are
traded on a national securities exchange
and is required to file, under national securities laws, periodic reports with either the
Securities and Exchange Commission or its
primary Federal banking regulator.

43

Private Applicant: Any QFI whose shares
are not traded on a national securities
exchange, excluding S corporations and
mutual organizations.
S Corporation: Any U.S. bank, U.S. savings
association, bank holding company (“BHC”),
or savings and loan holding company
(“SLHC”) organized such that it is exempt
from most Federal income taxes as they
are passed through to the shareholders.

44

SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

TABLE 2.6

KEY DATES AND DEADLINES FOR CPP APPLICATION PROCESS,
BY APPLICANT CATEGORY
Type

Announced Date

Application Deadline

Publicly Held

10/20/2008

11/14/2008

Privately Held

11/17/2008

12/8/2008

“S” Corporation

1/14/2009

2/13/2009

Mutual Organization

4/7/2009

5/7/2009

Note: Private QFIs are those that are non-public QFIs, excluding S corporations and mutual organizations. Data as of 4/7/2009.
Sources: Publicly Held: Treasury, “Application Guidelines for TARP Capital Purchase Program,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed
1/22/2009; Privately Held: Treasury, “Process Related FAQs for Private Bank Capital Purchase Program,” no date, www.treas.gov,
accessed 1/22/2009; “S” Corporation: Treasury, “S Corporation FAQs,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/22/2009; Mutual
Organization: Treasury, “Process Related FAQs for the Capital Purchase Program, Mutual Holding Company FAQs,” 4/7/2009, www.
financialstability.gov, accessed 4/7/2009.

Mutual Organization: A corporation that
is owned by depositors which distributes
income in proportion to the amount
of business that members do with the
company.

for “S” corporations on January 14, 2009,43 and on April 7, 2009, guidelines were
released for mutual organizations.44 Key dates for each type of institution that may
apply for CPP funding are outlined in Table 2.6.

Program Updates
The CPP process remains largely the same since SIGTARP’s Initial Report, with
the exception being the modifications contained in the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009 (“ARRA”), which imposed more stringent executive
compensation requirements and changed the terms under which a TARP recipient
could pay back Treasury investments. The new repayment terms provide greater
flexibility by removing time restrictions and no longer requiring the bank to demonstrate that it has received private equity investment in proportion to the funds that
it seeks to repay. Under ARRA, EESA’s executive compensation provisions were
amended to detail the number of employees subject to more stringent guidelines
based on level of funding. The amendments also require TARP recipients to create
a Board Compensation Committee, submit a certification of compliance, and require the Treasury Secretary to review prior compensation payments.45 For more information on the amended executive compensation restrictions, see the “Executive
Compensation” discussion in this section.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

FIGURE 2.5

TRACKING CAPITAL PURCHASE PROGRAM INVESTMENTS ACROSS THE COUNTRY

$10 Billion or More
$1 Billion to $10 Billion
$100 Million to $1 Billion
$10 Million to $100 Million
Less than $10 Million
$0
Note: Banks in Montana and Vermont had not received any funds as of 3/31/2009.
Source: Treasury, “Local Impact of the Capital Purchase Program,” 3/31/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed
3/31/2009.

Status of CPP Funds
As of March 31, 2009, Treasury had purchased $198.8 billion in preferred stock
from 532 different QFIs in 48 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.46
Closings for CPP purchases generally occur each week on Friday, and information
about the transaction is made publicly available by the following Tuesday. For the
geographical distribution of all the QFIs that have received funding see Figure 2.5.
For a full listing of CPP recipients, see Appendix C: “Reporting Requirements.”

Preferred Stock: A form of ownership in a
company that generally entitles the owner
of the shares (an investor) to collect
dividend payments. Preferred shares are
senior to common stock, but junior to
debt.

45

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Market Capitalization: The value of a
corporation determined by multiplying
the current market price of one share of
the corporation by the number of total
outstanding shares. This is an important
metric because it is often used to determine the aggregate value of a company.

Although the eight largest investments accounted for $134.2 billion of the program, CPP has also had many more modest investments: 206 of the 532 recipients
received less than $10 million each. Table 2.7 shows the distribution of recipients
based on their market capitalization, and Table 2.9 shows the 10 largest firms that
received funds. Table 2.8 and Table 2.10 show the distribution of the investments
by size. A full listing of all public recipients’ market capitalization can be found in
Appendix C: “Reporting Requirements.”
On February 6, 2009, the Congressional Oversight Panel (“COP”) released a report in which it discussed a valuation analysis conducted with respect to Treasury’s
investments. The report concluded that “Treasury paid substantially more for
the assets it purchased under TARP than their then-current market value.” The

TABLE 2.7

TABLE 2.9

PUBLIC CPP RECIPIENTS BY
MARKET CAPITALIZATION

TOP 10 PUBLIC CPP RECIPIENTS BY MARKET CAPITALIZATION ($ BILLIONS)
Market Capitalization

CPP Funding Received

7

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

$99.9

$25.0

$1 Billion to $20 Billion

29

Wells Fargo & Company

$60.4

$25.0

$100 Million to $1 Billion

82

The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

$49.0

$10.0

Bank of America Corporation

$43.7

$25.0

Bank of New York Mellon Corporation

$32.5

$3.0

U.S. Bancorp

$25.7

$6.6

Morgan Stanley

$24.6

$10.0

American Express Company

$15.8

$3.4

Citigroup, Inc.

$13.9

$25.0

Northern Trust Corporation

$13.4

$1.6

$20 Billion or More

Less than $100 Million

Company

154

Note: Data accessed 4/1/2009 10:20am.
Sources: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009; Capital
IQ, Inc., a Division of Standard & Poor’s. 

Note: Data accessed 4/1/2009 10:20am. Numbers affected by rounding.
Sources: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/30/2009; Capital IQ, Inc., a Division of Standard & Poor’s. 

TABLE 2.8

TABLE 2.10

CPP INVESTMENT SIZE

CPP INVESTMENT SUMMARY

$10 Billion or More

6

Largest Capital Investment

$1 Billion to $10 Billion

18

Smallest Capital Investment

$301,000

$100 Million to $1 Billion

56

Average Capital Investment

$372.2 Million

Less than $100 Million

452

Median Capital Investment

TOTAL

532

Note: Data as of 3/31/2009. Bank of America Corporation
and SunTrust Banks, Inc., each received funds in two separate
transactions.
Source: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009.

$25 Billion

$15 Million

Note: Data as of 3/31/2009. Bank of America Corporation
and SunTrust Banks, Inc., each received funds in two separate
transactions.
Source: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009.

47

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

report estimated that for every $100 spent on the eight largest CPP transactions of
2008, Treasury received assets worth approximately $78.47 In addition to the COP
analysis, on April 4, 2009, the Congressional Budget Office (“CBO”) issued a new
estimate of $356 billion as the “ultimate cost to taxpayers” for assistance to financial institutions under TARP. In other words, CBO projects that Treasury will only
recover $344 billion, or approximately 49%, of the $700 billion of TARP funds.48

Warrant: The right, but not the obligation,
to purchase shares of common stock at a
fixed price.

Warrants Received by Treasury
As discussed in the Initial Report, Treasury receives warrants of common stock
from publicly traded CPP participants.49 Appendix H: “Warrants” includes a full
listing and status of all warrants from publicly traded CPP participants. As of
March 31, 2009, no warrants of common stock in public companies had been
exercised. Table 2.11 outlines Treasury’s warrant positions from its 10 largest CPP
investments.

Common Stock: A security that provides
voting rights in a corporation and pays
a dividend after preferred stockholders
have been paid.

For more information regarding
the mechanics of warrants, refer to
SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section 2:
“TARP Overview.”

TABLE 2.11

LARGEST POSITIONS IN WARRANTS HELD BY TREASURY AS OF MARCH 31, 2009

Transaction
Date

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Bank of America Corporation 10/28/2008

$23.02

Participant

Amount “In
Percent
the Money” or Change in
“Out of the Stock Price
In or
Out of
Money” as of Since Initial
Money?
3/31/2009
Report

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike Price
as Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock Price
as of
3/31/2009

48,717,116

$30.79

$6.82

OUT

(23.97)

9.3%

Bank of America Corporation 1/9/2009

$12.99

73,075,674

$30.79

$6.82

OUT

(23.97)

9.3%

Citigroup Inc.

10/28/2008

$13.41

210,084,034

$17.85

$2.53

OUT

(15.32)

-27.1%

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

10/28/2008

$37.60

88,401,697

$42.42

$26.58

OUT

(15.84)

9.5%

Wells Fargo & Company

10/28/2008

$34.46

110,261,688

$34.01

$14.24

OUT

(19.77)

-10.3%

Morgan Stanley

10/28/2008

$15.20

65,245,759

$22.99

$22.77

OUT

(0.22)

21.7%

The Goldman Sachs Group,
Inc.

10/28/2008

$93.57

12,205,045

$122.90

$106.02

OUT

(16.88)

41.5%

The PNC Financial Services
Group Inc.

12/31/2008

$49.00

16,885,192

$67.33

$29.29

OUT

(38.04)

-3.2%

U.S. Bancorp

11/14/2008

$26.30

32,679,102

$30.29

$14.61

OUT

(15.68)

-0.2%

SunTrust Banks, Inc.

11/14/2008

$33.52

11,891,280

$44.15

$11.74

OUT

(32.41)

-21.6%

SunTrust Banks, Inc.

12/31/2008

$29.54

6,008,902

$33.70

$11.74

OUT

(21.96)

-21.6%

Capital One Financial
Corporation

11/14/2008

$31.19

12,657,960

$42.13

$12.24

OUT

(29.89)

-36.7%

Note: Bank of America Corporation and SunTrust Banks, Inc., each received funds in two separate transactions.
Sources: Participants and Transaction Date: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 3/31/2009; Market price data: Capital IQ, Inc. (a division of Standard & Poor’s),
www.capitaliq.com, accessed 3/12/2009 at 11:00am EST and 4/2/2009 at 2:00pm EST; Number of warrants and strike price: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/1/2009.

48

SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

TABLE 2.12

TOP 10 CUMULATIVE DIVIDENDS PAID BY CPP RECIPIENTS SINCE
PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION ($ MILLIONS)
Company

Size of Cumulative Dividends

JPMorgan Chase and Co.

$427.1

Citigroup Inc.

371.5

Wells Fargo and Company

371.5

Bank of America Corporation

272.9

Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

148.6

Morgan Stanley

106.9

US Bancorp

83.4

Suntrust Banks, Inc.

72.9

Bank of New York Mellon Corporation

59.2

The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.

47.4

TOP 10 TOTAL

$1,961.4

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. Data as of 3/31/2009. Bank of America Corporation paid an additional $128.9 million
under TIP. Citigroup, Inc. paid an additional $26.9 million under AGP and $200 million under TIP.
Sources: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2008; Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.

Dividends Received by Treasury
As of March 31, 2009, Treasury had received approximately $2.5 billion in dividends from preferred stock investment through CPP. Most CPP recipients made
a dividend payment on February 15, 2009; however, eight recipients did not
declare dividends due to a lack of necessary regulatory and/or shareholder approvals. According to the CPP terms, six missed payments give Treasury the right to
elect two members to the board of directors.50 For a detailed table of the dividends
received by Treasury from all programs under TARP, see Appendix C: “Reporting
Requirements.”
The top 10 largest dividends paid by CPP recipients since TARP funding began
are captured in Table 2.12.
Federal Banking Agency (“FBA”): One of
four agencies:
1) Comptroller of the Currency
2) Board of Governors of the Federal
Reserve System
3) Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
4) Director of the Office of Thrift
Supervision

Repayment of Funds
Pursuant to ARRA, repayment of the capital provided by Treasury is “subject to
consultation with the appropriate Federal banking agency.”51 Any bank wishing
to buy back its shares can contact both Treasury and its Federal Banking Agency
(“FBA”), at which point Treasury will discuss the request with the FBA. If the
FBA confirms that the bank will have sufficient capital after repayment, banks
can choose to pay back the entire CPP investment in a lump sum, or they can
pay it back over time as long as every payment is at least 25% of the original total
investment (unless the last payment is less by default). Banks that repay the CPP

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TABLE 2.13

CPP SHARE REPURCHASES ($ MILLIONS)
Repurchase
Date

Institution

Original
Investment Amount

Principal Amount
Repurchased as of
3/31/2009

$120

$120

100

100

3/31/2009

Signature Bank

3/31/2009

Old National Bancorp

3/31/2009

IberiaBank Corporation

90

90

3/31/2009

Bank of Marin Bancorp

28

28

3/31/2009

Centra Financial Holdings, Inc.

15

15

$353

$353

TOTAL

Note: Data as of 3/31/2009. Treasury has also received $2.3 million in accrued and unpaid dividends.
Source: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009.

investment also have the opportunity to repurchase the warrants received by
Treasury at their fair market value. Under ARRA, if the bank does not repurchase
its warrants, Treasury is required to liquidate the warrants at the current market
price. Additionally, banks are responsible for any unpaid dividends that are owed to
Treasury at the time of their redemption. All principal funds that are repaid can be
used for other TARP initiatives. However, dividends, interest, and profits from the
sale of equity interests must be used to pay down the debt and cannot be reused.52
As of March 31, 2009, five banks have repurchased their shares from Treasury.
Treasury has received $353 million in principal and an additional $2.3 million in
accrued and unpaid dividends.53 As of March 31, 2009, one of the five institutions
had notified Treasury that it intends to buy back its warrants as well. Treasury has
indicated that it will give the banks 15 days to exercise this right before Treasury
seeks to sell the warrants to a third party.54 For details of the share repurchases
conducted as of March 31, 2009, see Table 2.13.

Treasury’s Snapshots
On January 8, 2009, Treasury launched an effort to begin measuring the lending
activities of CPP recipients to “help taxpayers easily assess the lending and other
activities of banks receiving Government investments.”55 Treasury is performing
both quarterly and monthly data analysis. The quarterly data will illustrate balance
sheet changes for all CPP recipients.56 The first quarterly report will be publicly
available on June 30, 2009.57

49

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot

Call Report: Quarterly report of financial
condition commercial banks file with their
Federal and state regulatory agencies.

The stated purpose of the monthly snapshot is to provide both Treasury and the
public with data regarding the lending activities of the banks that received CPP
funding. Treasury originally stated that analyzing the largest banks, which represent
over 80% of the total CPP funds disbursed, would “quickly but effectively provide
an objective analysis to the public.”58 This survey is intended to report on the potential impact, but not use, of TARP funds.
On January 16, 2009, the Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability
sent letters to the 20 largest CPP recipients in which he explained the snapshot
process:
This Monthly Intermediation Snapshot will complement a more thorough analysis Treasury will conduct quarterly of all CPP recipient
banks using call report data. The snapshot is designed to be simple
enough to allow Treasury and TARP senior management to draw
inferences about intermediation activity generally, but also granular
enough to provide insight into patterns by broad category and by
institution.59
In addition to the snapshots, pursuant to a recommendation made by the
Government Accountability Office (“GAO”), Treasury recently requested certain
monthly lending data from all CPP recipients. The first CPP Monthly Lending
Report is due by April 30, 2009, and is expected to be published in mid-May
2009.60
December 2008 Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot
The initial set of responses to Treasury’s letters was published on February 17,
2009, and contained data for the time period from October through December
2008. These responses included data looking back for a three-month period; subsequent reports only include data from the prior month. Treasury made the following
conclusions from the initial monthly snapshot:
• Banks continued to originate, refinance, and renew loans despite significant
headwinds posed by unprecedented financial market crisis and economic turn.61
• Banks reported a general trend of modestly declining total loan balances due
to decreasing loan demand and tighter underwriting standards, as well as other
factors such as charge-offs, or losses written off on loans.62

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

• Month-to-month changes were driven by outside factors, including falling
interest rates, loan demand, and the credit crisis.63 Treasury made the following
observations about these changes:
• Lending activity decreased from October to November 2008.
• Lending activity increased from November to December 2008.
• Drivers of this phenomenon varied by loan type.
January 2009 Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot
The next set of responses was published on March 16, 2009, and contained data
for the time period between January 1, 2009, and January 31, 2009. Treasury
surveyed the top 21 recipients of Government investments through CPP rather
than the top 20, due to a large investment on January 9, 2009.64 Treasury reviewed
and analyzed data from December 31, 2008, to January 31, 2009, and came to the
following conclusions:
• Consumer lending levels increased as a result of increases in originations of residential mortgages and student loans due to attractive interest rates and seasonal
demand.65
• Commercial lending, industrial lending, and commercial real estate lending
declined from the prior month due to weak demand for debt.66
• Renewals of existing accounts and new loan commitments in commercial real
estate lending decreased significantly from the prior month as a result of the
frozen securitization markets and lack of commercial mortgage-backed securities activity.67

Capital Assistance Program
On February 10, 2009, Treasury announced the Capital Assistance Program
(“CAP”) as part of FSP. CAP follows CPP as the vehicle for Treasury to provide
TARP capital to QFIs.68 CAP has three main components:
• a stress test to evaluate major financial institutions’ capital buffers
• access to capital for QFIs
• a Financial Stability Trust to manage the Government’s investments in the
program
CAP’s stated goal is to “ensure the continued ability of U.S. financial institutions to lend to creditworthy borrowers in the face of a weaker-than-expected
economic environment and larger-than-expected potential losses.”69

51

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Risk-Weighted Assets: The amount of
a bank’s total assets after applying an
appropriate risk factor to each individual
asset.
Professional Forecasters: The three
forecasters used for the purpose of the
stress test were the Consensus Forecasts, the Blue Chip Survey, and the
Survey of Professional Forecasters.

Stress Test
According to Treasury, the stress test assesses whether a QFI has enough capital
to continue lending under economic conditions that are worse than expected. The
test is required for the 19 financial institutions with more than $100 billion in riskweighted assets. These 19 institutions represent roughly two-thirds of aggregate
U.S. BHC assets.70 The tests are designed to determine how much additional capital each institution may need to remain well capitalized in an economic downturn.
Regulators have created two forward-looking economic scenarios. The first scenario
is a baseline forecast for 2009 and 2010, based on the most recent projections
available from three professional forecasters prior to the start of the stress tests on
February 25, 2009.71 Although the baseline is intended to forecast likely economic
metrics, the unemployment rate in the baseline scenario, 8.4%, has already been
eclipsed with the April 3, 2009, announcement of 8.5% unemployment.72 The
second scenario evaluates the institutions under worse economic conditions than
those provided in the baseline forecast — an “adverse case” scenario. The assumptions for the baseline and adverse case are found in Table 2.14.
QFIs will be asked to report their estimates of losses and resources to absorb
them using a standardized template. The FBAs will then evaluate the estimates by
examining the data and assumptions and request additional material, as necessary.
The FBAs supervise the process and may revise the estimates that will be used to
determine the amount of capital needed to establish the appropriate buffer.73
When the stress tests are completed, by the end of April 2009,74 the institutions
that are found to need additional capital will have up to six months to raise private
capital. If an institution raises enough private capital, it is not required to take CAP
assistance.75 If it is unable to raise a sufficient amount of private capital, then it
must accept CAP assistance.76

TABLE 2.14

ECONOMIC METRICS UNDER BASELINE AND MORE ADVERSE SCENARIOS
2009 Scenarios

2010 Scenarios

Baseline

More
Adverse

Real GDP (% Change in Annual Average)

-2.0%

-3.3%

2.1%

0.5%

Civilian Unemployment Rate

8.4%

8.9%

8.8%

10.3%

-14.0%

-22.0%

-4.0%

-7.0%

House Prices (% Change Relative to Q4 of Prior Year)

Baseline

More
Adverse

Note: As reported by the source document, baseline forecasts for real GDP and the unemployment rate equal the average of projections
released by Consensus Forecasts, the Blue Chip Survey, and the Survey of Professional Forecasters in February 2009.
Source: FDIC, “FAQs – Supervisory Capital Assessment Program,” 2/25/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Access to Capital
The second core component of CAP is “access for qualifying financial institutions to contingent common equity provided by the U.S. Government as a bridge
to private capital in the future.”77 In addition to the 19 targeted institutions, CAP
will make capital widely available to other QFIs by offering to invest in the QFI
in return for shares of mandatory convertible preferred stock. Such securities are
considered a higher quality of capital for banks because they have more characteristics similar to common equity than the investments made under CPP and TIP,
which can be viewed more like debt. They are riskier investments for the taxpayer,
however, because once the shares are converted to common stock, the Government
will no longer be entitled to receive a set quarterly dividend and will have a junior
right to repayment if the bank were to fail. Existing TARP recipients that decide to
apply for participation in CAP will be able to take advantage of this higher-quality
capital offered under CAP by exchanging their existing CPP and TIP equity for
CAP equity. For more details on the terms of these agreements, see the “CAP
Terms” discussion in this section. For a more detailed description of the financial
terms used in this discussion, refer to “TARP Tutorial: Capital Structure” later in
this section.
On February 25, 2009, Treasury released the terms for public QFIs to apply
for CAP funding. QFIs must apply to their appropriate FBA by May 25, 2009.
According to Treasury, the process and eligibility determination will be substantially
similar to those under CPP.78 For more information on the CPP process, refer to
SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section 3: “TARP Implementation and Administration.”
As of March 31, 2009, the process details for CAP applications by private QFIs, S
corporations, and mutual organizations have not yet been released.
Financial Stability Trust
As of March 31, 2009, under CPP and TIP, Treasury invested $238.8 billion for
preferred shares and warrants of common stock.79 Similar investments under CAP
will be managed in a separate entity called the Financial Stability Trust.80 As of
March 31, 2009, there were no additional details available about this entity.
CAP Terms
Under CAP, Treasury will provide the QFI with additional capital by purchasing new convertible preferred stock (“convertible preferred”). If the QFI already
received funds from either the CPP or TIP, the QFI may choose to use CAP to
redeem the previously issued preferred stock. CAP allows the QFI effectively to
exchange one type of equity for another by permitting the bank to convert preferred
shares purchased under CPP to CAP convertible preferred shares.

Convertible Preferred: A preferred stock
that is convertible into common stock.
In the context of CAP, the conversion is
at the option of the QFI until year seven
when it becomes mandatory.
Redeem: To buy back a prior obligation.
In the case of CAP, the QFI can buy back
(redeem) its CPP shares with the funds
received from the CAP investment.

53

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

As its name suggests, the convertible preferred shares that will be acquired by
Treasury can be converted into common stock. The QFI can choose to convert the
stock from preferred to common with the approval of its FBA. If the QFI does not
choose to convert, the CAP terms require that the conversion automatically take
place seven years after the transaction date. Once converted, Treasury will hold
common stock in the QFI as if it had been purchased in the public market. Note
that, as such, it will carry voting rights in the institution just like other common
stock; Treasury’s stake, however, will no longer have the benefit of receiving defined
dividends as would preferred stock. Since Treasury could potentially own a significant percentage of a QFI’s common stock, it has stated that it will publish how it
will use these rights prior to closing any transactions.81 Prior to conversion, convertible preferred shares subject the QFI to terms similar to those under CPP.
Table 2.15 compares the key characteristics of the convertible preferred terms for
public QFIs under CAP to the preferred terms for public QFIs under CPP.
Upon receipt of the CAP investment, the QFIs agree to comply with Treasury’s
rules, regulations, and guidance with regard to executive compensation, transparency, accountability, and monitoring that are published and effective at the time
of the closing.82 As of March 31, 2009, Treasury has not published any additional
executive compensation guidance for this program. For more information on executive compensation, refer to “Executive Compensation” later in this section.

TABLE 2.15

COMPARISON OF EXPECTED TERMS: CAP CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED AND CPP PREFERRED SHARES
CAP

CPP

Eligibility

All QFIs

All QFIs

Size

Between 1% and 2% of Risk-Weighted Assets plus amount necessary
to redeem CPP and/or TIP shares, or more as per “exceptional
assistance” clause

Between 1% and 3% of Risk-Weighted Assets not
to exceed $25 billion

Security

Convertible Preferred

Senior Preferred

Term of Conversion to
Common Stock

Mandatory at 7 years
At option of QFI before 7 years

N/A

Conversion Price

90% of the average closing price for the common stock for the 20
trading days period ending on 2/9/2009

N/A

Dividends Prior to Conversion

9%

5% for the first 5 years
9% thereafter

Voting Rights

Voting Rights upon conversion to common (if dividends are not paid
prior to conversion)

Non-Voting (unless dividends are not paid)

Notes: Data as of 3/31/2009. The contents of this table have been summarized for readability and highlight differences between the programs rather than provide a comprehensive representation of the
programs’ terms. As of 3/31/2009, no agreements have been issued under CAP and thus the terms may change.
Source: Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock (“Convertible Preferred”) Terms Capital Purchase Program Description,” 3/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

55

TABLE 2.16

COMPARISON OF EXPECTED TERMS: CAP WARRANTS AND CPP WARRANTS
CAP

CPP

Warrant

20% of Convertible Preferred
amount on the date of investment

15% of the Senior Preferred amount on the
date of the investment

Term

10 years

10 years

Exercisable

Immediately, in whole or in part

Immediately, in whole or in part

Voting

Treasury will not exercise voting

Treasury will not exercise voting

Note: The contents of this table have been summarized for readability and highlight differences between the programs rather than
provide a comprehensive representation of the programs’ terms. As of 3/31/2009, no agreements have been issued under CAP and
thus the terms may change.
Source: Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock Terms,” 3/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.

In addition, the QFI will be required to provide Treasury with warrants of common stock. The terms of the warrants under CAP are similar to the warrant terms
under CPP and are summarized in Table 2.16.

The CAP Application Process
In addition to the 19 institutions required to participate in stress testing, CAP,
like CPP, is open to applications from all public QFIs. According to Treasury, the
application process, eligibility requirements, and determination criteria are similar
to those under CPP.83 Note that the 19 institutions do not need to wait for the
completion of the stress tests in order to apply for CAP funding.84 The deadline for
public QFIs to submit a CAP application is May 25, 2009. As of March 31, 2009,
application deadlines and term sheets had not been released for private QFIs, S
corporations, or mutual organizations. A timeline of CAP milestones can be found
in Figure 2.6.

For more information regarding the
CPP application process, refer to
SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section
3: “TARP Implementation and
Administration.”

FIGURE 2.6

CAPITAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM TIMELINE

FEBRUARY 2009

FEBRUARY 10
Treasury announces
Capital Assistance
Program (“CAP”).

MARCH 2009

FEBRUARY 25
Treasury releases
the terms for
public QFIs to apply
for CAP funding.

APRIL 2009

APRIL END OF MONTH
Mandatory stress tests
for 19 largest QFIs are
expected to be complete.

MAY 2009

MAY 25
Deadline for all
public applicants
to CAP are due.

+ 6 MONTHS

6 MONTHS AFTER
COMPLETION
OF STRESS TESTS
Deadline for
19 largest QFIs that are
determined to need
additional capital to
raise it privately or
accept CAP funding.

+ 7 YEARS

7 YEARS AFTER
CAP SETTLEMENT DATE
Convertible preferred
shares held by
Government
mandatorily convert
to common shares.

Sources: Treasury, “Secretary Geithner Introduces Financial Stability Plan,” 2/10/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009; Treasury Press Release, “U.S. Treasury Releases Terms of Capital Assistance
Program,” 2/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009; FDIC Press Release, “Agencies to Begin Forward-Looking Economic Assessments,” 2/25/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed 3/25/2009; Treasury,
“Application Guidelines for Capital Assistance Program,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009; FDIC, “FAQs—Supervisory Capital Assessment Program,” 2/25/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed
3/25/2009; Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock Terms,” 3/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Program Considerations
CAP introduces several new considerations relating to Government assistance for
the financial industry. Although final details of the program have not been published, the program announcement provided insight into several elements of the
program.
Equity Quality: As discussed in “TARP Tutorial: Capital Structure” later in this
section, both shares issued under CPP and CAP are considered tier one capital
(“T1”). As such, they are part of a bank’s cushion against future losses and depositors’ demands. However, the market views CAP’s convertible preferred shares as
also fitting the higher-quality classification of tangible common equity (“TCE”).
TCE is the cushion left over if all creditors and higher levels of stock, like preferred
stock, were paid off. The convertible preferred under CAP was designed to create
a higher quality of capital for the banks than the preferred shares under CPP and
TIP. This provides a better cushion for the banks in the event of further deterioration of the economy and the banks’ balance sheets.
Converting Preferred to Common: According to the Treasury-issued term
sheet, CAP participants can convert the convertible preferred to common stock at
any point with the permission of the appropriate FBA. This conversion takes place
not at the market price, but at a 10% discount to the average price for the 20-day
trading period prior to February 9, 2009. Should market prices drop further prior
to the conversion, this price is more advantageous to the QFI.85 On the other hand,
if the institution’s share price increases, the Government will realize a gain. This
concept is demonstrated in Table 2.17 with a select sampling of QFIs chosen for
illustrative purposes.
TABLE 2.17

HYPOTHETICAL CONVERSION PRICE EXAMPLE

Institution
Bank of America Corp
Citigroup, Inc.

2/9/2009 Value
(Average Price
for the Preceding
Month)

Conversion
Price (90%
of 2/9/2009
Average)

$6.93

Unrealized
Treasury Gain
3/31/2009
(Loss)
Market Price
Per Share

$6.24

$6.82

$0.58
($0.93)

$3.85

$3.46

$2.53

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

$24.67

$22.20

$26.58

$4.38

Wells Fargo & Company

$18.64

$16.78

$14.24

($2.54)

Morgan Stanley

$19.49

$17.54

$22.77

$5.23

The Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

$79.92

$71.93

$106.02

$34.09

The PNC Financial Services
Group, Inc.

$34.01

$30.61

$29.29

($1.32)

U.S. Bancorp

$16.26

$14.64

$14.61

($0.03)

SunTrust Banks, Inc.

$15.23

$13.71

$11.74

($1.97)

Capital One Financial
Corporation

$19.84

$17.86

$12.24

($5.62)

Sources: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009; Capital IQ, Inc., A Division of Standard & Poor’s. 

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

When a QFI is faced with the decision to convert, it must weigh the benefit of
not having to pay dividends against the disadvantage of further dilution to its common shareholders’ stake. This “dilution” occurs when ownership of the company is
spread over more common shares.
Mandatory Seven-Year Conversion: CAP convertible preferred must be converted to common stock after seven years. Unlike CPP, this gives the institutions
and the markets a clear date by which the terms attached to the preferred shares
expire and when additional common stock will enter the market.
Investment Size: The CAP terms allow a QFI to issue convertible preferred
shares totaling between 1% and 2% of the QFI’s risk-weighted assets in addition to
Treasury’s investment under the CPP or TIP. Additionally, Treasury will determine,
on a case-by-case basis, if an institution qualifies for “exceptional assistance.” In
these exceptional cases, Treasury may fund the QFI in excess of the stated limits.86
Once the stress tests are completed, Treasury will have a better indication of the
size of the total investment.
Common Stock Voting Rights: The convertible preferred will generally have
no voting rights prior to its conversion. If the QFI chooses to convert the shares
to common stock, then Treasury will have the standard voting rights associated
with common stock. Prior to closing any transaction, Treasury will publish further
guidance as to how these voting rights will be used, although it has stated that the
shares will be held in the Financial Stability Trust.87 The inclusion of voting rights
is necessary to maintain the market value of the common shares if, and when,
Treasury sells them in the open market.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

58

TARP TUTORIAL: CAPITAL STRUCTURE
The Bank Balance Sheet and TARP
Since the onset of the current credit contraction, the financial industry has expressed
concern with the weakening of American banks’ balance sheets.88 In December 2008,
Interim Assistant Secretary Neel Kashkari testified before Congress that, “As the markets
rapidly deteriorated in October, it was clear to Secretary Paulson and Chairman Bernanke
that the most timely, effective way to improve credit market conditions was to strengthen
bank balance sheets quickly through direct purchases of equity.”89 This section provides an
illustration of the generally accepted accounting principles regarding the balance sheet.

The Balance Sheet Overview
Put simply, the balance sheet is a statement of a bank’s financial condition at a single point
in time.90 It provides three fundamental pieces of information: how much the company
owns (assets), how much it owes (liabilities), and the amount of the shareholders’ position
(owners’ equity). A financial analyst or regulator will look at the relative levels of certain
sub-components of the balance sheet to make judgments as to the financial health of the
institution. A summary balance sheet for our hypothetical example bank, Sample Bank, is
shown in Table 2.18.
In this example, note that “Assets = Liabilities + Equity” (shareholders’ equity is often
referred to simply as “equity”). By definition, this equation is always true. It is one of the
most important accounting principles and is useful to remember when assessing the effects of bank activity. For example, if a bank experiences losses, those losses will reduce
TABLE 2.18

SAMPLE BANK – HYPOTHETICAL BALANCE SHEET
Assets

$ Million

% of Assets

Cash

$100

2%

Securities

1,000

20%

Loans

3,500

70%

Other Assets
TOTAL ASSETS

Liabilities & Equity
Deposits
Debt
Shareholder’s Equity
TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY

400

8%

$5,000

100%

$ Million

% of Liabilities
& Equity

$3,200

64%

1,300

26%

500

10%

$5,000

100%

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

its assets, and equity will have to shrink to keep the equation in balance. At a certain level
of losses, the bank’s equity will be zero or less, and the firm will then be considered insolvent and potentially shut down by regulators.91

Assets
The asset side of Sample Bank’s balance sheet shows how it categorizes its incomeproducing resources — or how it makes money from the resources it holds. Assets are
listed by order of liquidity (the easier to convert to cash, the higher on the balance sheet).
The asset line item labeled “Loans” represents the bank’s loan portfolio. Although not
particularly liquid, loan portfolios typically represent the majority of a bank’s assets. Loans
are typically the highest interest-bearing (and also highest risk) investments banks make.
Depending on several characteristics of the loans, such as what they are used for (e.g.,
mortgages, corporate, home equity) and where the assets underlying the loan are located
(e.g., economic sector, geographical location), a financial analyst can gain a picture of the
relative strength or riskiness of a bank’s loan portfolio.
Securities (e.g., stocks, bonds, ABS, MBS) make up the second largest component
of assets for Sample Bank. Securities are more liquid than loans, and tend to pay a lower
interest rate, especially the safest ones such as Government debt.
Cash is often the smallest component of assets, since holding cash does not make a
bank any money. The bank needs to keep a certain amount on hand, however, to satisfy
customers’ withdrawals.
Other assets, such as the bank’s real estate and buildings or intangible assets (such as
goodwill, which attempts to capture such factors as the bank’s brand value or competitive
position), also tend to be a relatively small component of a bank’s total assets.

Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
The liabilities and shareholders’ equity portion of Sample Bank’s balance sheet summarizes the claims on the company, by both creditors and shareholders. Like most banks,
the majority of its liabilities are deposits — customers’ savings and checking account
balances. This is often the least expensive form of capital. For example, the interest that
a bank pays to its customer on a checking or savings account is lower than what a bank
charges its loan customers. Deposits are considered liabilities because they represent the
amount of money the bank owes to its depositors. In many ways, a deposit is a loan from
a customer to a bank.

Loan Portfolio: The total amount of
dollars the bank has lent to customers
and expects to be repaid.
Securities: A financial instrument that
represents debt, such as a bond, or
which represents ownership, such as a
stock certificate. A security can be
assigned value and traded in the
financial markets.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Debt also reflects a major source of funds. It includes bonds that the bank sells, loans
it gets from other financial institutions, or loans from the Federal Reserve. Debt tends to
require a higher interest rate than deposits, and is thus used more as a secondary fund
source by the bank.
Shareholders’ equity represents the difference between assets and liabilities, and will
include such items as initial payments into the bank by the shareholders, and any profits
retained by the bank, but equity is reduced by the reserves it has set aside against losses.

Determining If a Bank Is Healthy
Banking sector regulators (such as FDIC, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency
Regulatory Capital: The net capital
position of a financial institution as determined by the rules of the applicable
Federal or state banking regulator.
Insolvent: A condition where a financial
institution has liabilities that exceed its
assets. By definition, shareholders’ equity in such a situation will be negative.

(“OCC”), and the Federal Reserve) use a variety of measures to enforce compliance with
banking regulatory standards. Central to these measures is the notion of capital. The term
“regulatory capital” is generally used to describe the cushion a bank has against future
losses. As a starting point, it is helpful to think of the bank’s capital as being roughly equal
to the shareholders’ equity. If capital is adequate, then theoretically the firm could cover
all liabilities by selling all assets, and still have something left over for its shareholders. If,
however, losses become greater than the bank’s capital, the firm would be insolvent —
assets could not cover outstanding liabilities.
The solvency of the bank, therefore, depends on how it accounts for losses (which

Tier One Capital (“T1”) = Common
Equity + Preferred Equity + Retained
Earnings – Goodwill.
Tangible Common Equity (TCE)
= Common Equity – Intangible Assets.
Tier One Capital Ratio (“T1 Ratio”)
= T1 / Risk-Adjusted Assets.

reduce its assets) and how capital is defined. In practice, there are many different ways of
defining capital, each describing a different level of cushion against losses.

“Tier One Capital” versus “Tangible Common Equity”
Two of the most relevant measures of capital adequacy are tier one capital (“T1”) and
tangible common equity (“TCE”). For many TARP recipients, these two measures are
significantly divergent in the current market, capturing different aspects of their health or
lack thereof.
T1, often called “core capital,” is the measure of bank capital traditionally used by
regulators in the United States. It can be described as a measure of the bank’s ability to
sustain future losses and still meet depositor’s demands. T1 is a concept coordinated
internationally through an agreement known as the “Basel II Accord.”92 Federal regulators look at T1 to calculate the tier one capital ratio (“T1 Ratio”), which determines what
percentage of a bank’s total assets is categorized as T1 — the higher the percentage, the
better it is for the bank. Under traditional Federal regulations, a bank with a T1 Ratio of 4%
or greater is considered adequately capitalized.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TCE is a more conservative measure of capital adequacy. Only capital that is “real” and
possesses the last claim on the assets of a company can be counted as TCE. It can be
thought of as the amount that would be left over if the bank were dissolved and all creditors and higher levels of stock, such as preferred stock, were paid off. TCE is the highest
“quality” of capital in the sense of providing a buffer against loss by claimants on the bank.
TCE is used in calculating the tangible common equity ratio (“TCE Ratio”) which determines
what percentage of a bank’s total assets is categorized as TCE — the higher the percentage, the better it is for the bank. Preferred stock is an example of capital that is counted in
T1, but not in TCE.

Why the Selection of Capital Measure Matters
Through TARP, Treasury makes capital investments in banks. The type of security it receives in return for these capital investments depends on the type of bank capital it wishes
to support. The difference between alternative definitions of capital is important.
Under CPP, TARP purchased preferred stock, which is included in tier one capital.
Going forward, however, under CAP, investments would involve convertible preferred
stock. TARP will purchase “convertible” preferred stock, which is effectively common
stock, a measure more targeted to TCE.
The stress tests for bank holding companies appear to be targeting more than simply
the traditional tier one capital. According to FDIC, regulators will be examining “the composition, level and quality of capital; the ability of the institution to raise additional common
stock and other forms of capital in the market; and other risks that are not fully captured in
regulatory capital calculations.”93
In this context, it is clear that the Citigroup exchange offer, which can convert up to $25
billion in Treasury’s preferred stock to common stock, had the primary effect of increasing
Citigroup’s TCE ratio. See the “Institution-Specific Assistance” portion of Section 2 for a detailed description of the Citigroup exchange offer. A comparison of Citigroup’s T1 Ratio and
TCE Ratio, before and after the exchange, demonstrates this difference. See Table 2.19.
TABLE 2.19

CAPITAL ADEQUACY COMPARISON — EFFECT OF
CITIGROUP EXCHANGE OFFER
(as of 12/31/08)
Tier One Capital (T1) Ratio
Tangible Common Equity (TCE) Ratio

No Exchange

If Exchange

11.9 %

11.9%

3.0 %

8.1 %

Source: Citigroup Inc., Form 8K, 3/10/2009, www.sec.gov, accessed 4/10/2009.

Tangible Common Equity Ratio (“TCE
Ratio”) = TCE / Risk-Adjusted Assets.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

As Treasury officials have recognized, the massive infusion of preferred shares as a
result of its CPP investments have altered analysts’ views of tier one capital. Analysts have
begun to view Treasury’s preferred shares investment more as debt than traditional tier
one capital, causing investors and analysts to discount tier one capital as a measure and
look more closely at TCE as a measure of a bank’s health.

When a Bank Gets Into Trouble
The balance sheet problems affecting many banks during the current credit crisis
stemmed from losses from two of their primary types of assets. First, many banks saw
Derivative Instruments: Investments
that are valued by reference to the
values of other investments. Examples
include options and credit default
swaps.

the value of their loan portfolios (mortgages, home equity, or other loans) decline as some
of their loan customers defaulted on their debts. Second, many banks owned MBS or
derivative instruments that ultimately took their value from mortgages, which also dropped
in value as homeowners began defaulting on their mortgage payments.
When a bank forecloses on a property, it must be able to re-sell the property to
recover as much as possible of the loan value. Given the nationwide decline in real estate
values, many banks faced losing not only the stream of income they had enjoyed from the
loans as the homeowner made payments on the mortgage, but also faced being forced to
accept losses officially on the difference in the value of the loan and the value they would
get in re-selling the property in a depressed market. Similarly, the market for the mortgage-related securities had also declined and many of the securities the banks held could
no longer be sold in the open market for more than a fraction of what they had paid.
These developments affected the banks’ balance sheets in various ways. First, the
decline of the value of the banks’ loan portfolios meant a decline in the value of their assets. As losses occurred, they were subtracted from equity, which resulted in a decline in
the banks’ tier one capital.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Assuming that the example bank, Sample Bank, suffered similar losses, Table 2.20
demonstrates the deterioration of its balance sheet in three places: the Securities line on
the Assets side, the Loans line on the Assets side, and the Shareholders’ Equity line on the
Liabilities & Equity side. The shareholders’ equity goes down by the amount of the total
losses because of the fundamental equation (shareholders’ equity = assets – liabilities). In
other words, the balance sheet must “balance” by matching any reduction in assets with a
reduction in shareholders’ equity. The loss in Sample Bank’s Securities category represents the decline of the MBS market and the decrease in the value of the bank’s securities
holdings. Further, if Sample Bank had a large number of subprime mortgages in its loan
portfolio, and a portion of those borrowers had defaulted, it would have to write down the
value of its Loan line. Supposing that the value of securities (the MBS) held by Sample
Bank declined by 20%, and the value of its loan portfolio (mortgages) declined by 15%, we
can observe that Sample Bank now has negative shareholders’ equity, or is insolvent.
This sudden swing in shareholders’ equity from +10% to –5% affects the key regulatory ratios — both T1 and TCE are now negative. Sample Bank must take some action to
avoid being shut down by the regulators or forced into bankruptcy by its creditors.
TABLE 2.20

SAMPLE BANK — DETERIORATING BALANCE SHEET
Before
Assets

After

$ Million

% of Assets

$ Million

% of Assets

Cash

$100

2%

$100

2%

Securities

1,000

20%

800

19%

Loans

3,500

70%

3,000

70%

Other Assets
TOTAL ASSETS

Liabilities & Equity
Deposits
Debt
Shareholder’s Equity
TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY

400

8%

400

9%

$5,000

100%

$4,300

100%

$ Million

% of
Liabilities &
Equity

$ Million

% of
Liabilities &
Equity

$3,200

64%

$3,200

74%

1,300

26%

1,300

30%

500

10%

-200

-5%

$5,000

100%

$4,300

100%

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. Values in red reflect changes in balance sheet.

Write Down: The act of recognizing the
loss on an asset as permanent on a
bank’s balance sheet.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Fixing the Problems
For more information on CPP
eligibility criteria and process, refer
to SIGTARP’s Initial Report,
Section 3: “TARP Implementation
and Administration.”

For the bank, taking action to improve its weakening balance sheet boils down to raising
more capital. For example, it has to sell enough preferred or common stock (thereby
increasing the asset of cash with what it receives from investors for the sale of stock, and
therefore enjoy a corresponding increase in its shareholders’ equity) to bring its capital
ratios above the minimum requirements. By mid-2008, it became very hard for banks to
sell bank stock, as prospective investors were concerned that not all of a bank’s losses
had yet been recognized.
There are other, less effective things a troubled bank can do. For example, the bank
can reduce its assets (especially its risky ones) to improve the capital ratio. This is called
“shrinking the balance sheet” which has some side effects for the bank, such as reducing the potential for profits. The problem with shrinking the balance sheet is an obvious
one for policy makers; it reduces new lending because new loans require capital. As new
loans decline, jobs and consumer activity may be adversely affected. A third option is for
the bank to seek a merger with a stronger bank. This is an option only if the losses on the
losing bank can be quantified and accounted for in the purchase price.
During this crisis, Treasury, through CPP, became the critical outside investor for some
banks. It provided the funds needed to increase their capital.94 This action increased tier
one capital for the participating banks by increasing cash and shareholders’ equity, thereby
helping them to meet or improve their cushion over the risk-adjusted capital ratio.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

INSTITUTION-SPECIFIC ASSISTANCE
As of March 31, 2009, the institution-specific programs accounted for $122.5 billion of total TARP funding, having increased $30 billion since SIGTARP’s Initial
Report.95 This section provides updates to institution-specific assistance previously
reported in SIGTARP’s Initial Report, including modifications to existing agreements and any additional funding guidance. The institution-specific programs in
SIGTARP’s Initial Report included the Systemically Significant Failing Institutions
(“SSFI”), Targeted Investment Program (“TIP”), Asset Guarantee Program
(“AGP”), and the automotive programs; the automotive programs have since been
expanded and are given their own discussion, “Automotive Industry Financing
Program” later in this section. TARP institution-specific assistance is focused on
three institutions: American International Group, Inc. (“AIG”), Citigroup Inc., and
Bank of America Corp.
Figure 2.7 provides the status of TARP institution-specific assistance by institution and program as of March 31, 2009.

For more information on the terms and
conditions of the programs associated
with institution-specific assistance,
refer to SIGTARP’s Initial Report,
Section 3: “TARP Implementation and
Administration.”

FIGURE 2.7

INSTITUTION-SPECIFIC COMMITMENTS
AND PROJECTIONS, BY PARTICIPANT,
CUMULATIVE
$ Billions, % of $122.5 Billion
Citigroup
$5.0

American International Group, Inc.
As of March 31, 2009, $70 billion in TARP funding has been allocated to AIG
through the SSFI program. The initial $40 billion of TARP funds was used to
purchase preferred stock in AIG,96 and the remaining $30 billion has been committed to create an equity capital facility for AIG in exchange for additional
preferred shares.97 Treasury and the Federal Reserve announced a restructuring
of the Government’s assistance to AIG on March 2, 2009. According to Treasury,
the stated intention of the restructuring is to stabilize AIG and to enhance the
company’s capital and liquidity to facilitate the orderly divestiture of certain of the
company’s assets.98
According to Treasury, the restructuring plan offers a multi-part approach,
which identifies and separates AIG’s non-core businesses and provides protection
for taxpayers in connection with this commitment of resources. The stated goal of
Treasury and the Federal Reserve under the plan is to create an economically viable
company for the repayment of taxpayer money as soon as possible,99 largely from
the sale of AIG’s non-core businesses.100

Equity Capital Facility: An agreement
between two parties under which one
may require the other to make an
equity investment.
Capital: Money invested in a company.

Liquidity: The ability to convert an
asset to cash quickly — characterized
by a high level of trading activity.
Divestiture: Disposition or sale of an
asset by a company.

4%

Citigroup

16.5% $20.0
AIG
$70.0

57%

Bank of

16.5% America
$20.0

6%
SSFI
AGP
TIP

Bank of
America
$7.5

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. For purposes of this report,
amounts in the Transactions Report are considered committed, and
as of 3/31/2009, total $85.0 billion. AIG—SSFI includes an
additional projection of $30.0 billion announced by Treasury and
Federal Reserve on 3/2/2009. Bank of America—AGP is Treasury’s
projected guarantee of $7.5 billion announced by Treasury, FDIC, and
Federal Reserve on 1/16/2009.
Sources: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009. Treasury,
“U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation
in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/4/2009. FDIC, “FDIC Press Release,” 1/16/2009,
www.fdic.gov, accessed 1/23/2009.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

The restructuring plan involves the following three key steps:101
• Preferred Equity Exchange: Treasury will exchange the $40 billion of preferred shares that it originally received under the SSFI program for new preferred shares. These new preferred shares will have revised terms that will more
closely resemble those of common equity; these new shares will not receive
dividend payments unless declared by AIG’s board of directors. However, as
mentioned in the following “AIG Preferred Equity Exchange” discussion, repeated failure to pay dividends could result in a change in AIG’s governance.102
The written agreement for the preferred equity exchange had not been finalized
as of March 31, 2009.
• Equity Capital Commitment: Treasury will create a new equity capital facility
in which AIG will be allowed to receive up to $30 billion in return for preferred
shares.103 The written agreement had not been finalized as of March 31, 2009.
• Federal Reserve Revolving Credit Facility: The Federal Reserve will make
several modifications to the Revolving Credit Facility established in September
2008. The Revolving Credit Facility will be reduced by up to approximately
$26 billion in exchange for preferred interests in two special purpose vehicles
(“SPVs”) created to hold all of the outstanding common stock of two life
insurance holding company subsidiaries of AIG. In addition, the total amount
available under the Revolving Credit Facility will be reduced from $60 billion
to $25 billion. The interest rate payable under the Revolving Credit Facility will
be modified by removing the existing floor (3.5%) on the three-month London
Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”).104 As agreed to on September 22, 2008, an
additional issuance of preferred stock representing a 77.9% equity interest in
AIG was finalized on March 4, 2009. “As a result of the Transaction, a change
in control of AIG has occurred”105 as the 77.9% equity interest in preferred
shares has been placed in an independent trust account for the sole benefit of
the U.S. Government.106

AIG Preferred Equity Exchange
Under the proposed terms of the AIG Preferred Equity Exchange, the original preferred shares issued to Treasury on November 25, 2008, will be exchanged for new
preferred shares. The conversion amount will be equal to the amount paid for the
original preferred shares, plus any dividends unpaid to Treasury that have accrued
since the November 25, 2008, agreement. The original preferred shares paid a 10%
annual dividend (paid quarterly) to Treasury.107 As of March 31, 2009, approximately $733 million in dividends have accrued and gone unpaid to Treasury.108 The
new preferred shares will have features more like common stock; Treasury will only
receive dividends from AIG if and when the AIG board of directors, or a duly authorized committee, declares them.109 In other words, under the original agreement,
AIG was required to pay $4 billion a year to Treasury in dividends; under the new

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

agreement, AIG will have no obligation to pay any dividends — but if it declares
any dividends, it must pay the Government first. Corporate control provisions were
preserved in the new agreement. Should dividends (under the new agreement) not
be paid for four dividend periods (need not be consecutive), Treasury will have the
right to elect the greater of:110
• two directors
• number of directors (rounded up) equal to 20% of the total number of directors
(currently there are 11 directors)
Once four consecutive dividend payments have been made, the Treasuryselected directors shall resign.111 As of March 31, 2009, the terms of this proposed
transaction have not been finalized. For more information on the original terms
of AIG’s SSFI agreement, refer to SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section 3: “TARP
Implementation and Administration.”

AIG Equity Capital Commitment
In addition to the preferred equity exchange, Treasury has announced that it will
invest more equity into AIG. Treasury’s stated intent is to provide AIG with ready
access to capital in order to stabilize its business and/or lower its leverage. It will do
this through a new equity facility with a five-year duration. Under the terms of the
equity facility, AIG will be able to sell to Treasury additional preferred shares for up
to $30 billion, as needed, upon the date of each drawdown. According to the term
sheet, at the start date of the facility, Treasury will receive a warrant to purchase
shares equal to 1% of AIG’s issued and outstanding common stock. The warrant
will have an initial strike price of $2.50, adjusted for future common share issuances.112 The price of AIG’s common stock was $1.00 as of March 31, 2009.113
Under the announced terms of the agreement, if AIG files for Chapter 11
Bankruptcy, it may not receive additional funds through the equity facility.114 As of
March 31, 2009, the terms of this announced agreement had not been finalized.
AIG Executive Compensation
On March 15, 2009, AIG paid out $165 million in retention bonuses to employees under one plan in its Financial Products Division. According to the Treasury
Secretary, “this is the very division most culpable for the rapid deterioration of
AIG.”115 Treasury stated its recognition that AIG believed the employee bonus
contracts, negotiated in April 2008, to be binding. Treasury stated that its lawyers
concluded that it would be “legally difficult to prevent these contractually-mandated payments.”116
Under the new capital restructuring plan, AIG must comply with stricter guidelines on executive compensation, including those yet to be finalized, and continue
to comply with restrictions on expenses and lobbying included in the original SSFI

For more information on the
mechanics of warrants, refer to
SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section 2:
“TARP Overview.”

Leverage: The ratio of a company’s debt
to its equity.
Strike Price: The stated price per share
for which underlying stock may be
purchased by the option holder upon
exercise of the option contract.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

agreement dated November 25, 2008.117 The modified executive compensation
guidelines include the most recent amendment to Section 111 of EESA that is
contained in Section 7001 of ARRA.118 Under ARRA, executive compensation provisions were amended to detail the number of employees that the more stringent
guidelines apply to based on the institution’s level of TARP funding, but do not apply to any employment contracts entered into prior to February 11, 2009; therefore,
they do not apply to the AIG bonuses for its Financial Products Division.119 As of
March 31, 2009, the Treasury Secretary is reportedly working with the Department
of Justice to determine “what avenues are available by which the U.S. Government
can recoup the $165 million in bonuses paid to AIG Financial Products Division
employees.”120
ARRA legislation requires the Treasury Secretary to publish regulations that
implement the executive compensation requirements within Section 7001 of
ARRA.121 As of March 31, 2009, Treasury had not yet released regulations implementing Section 7001. For more information on the amended executive compensation restrictions and SIGTARP’s announced audit on executive compensation
oversight, refer to “Executive Compensation” later in this section.

Citigroup Inc.
For more information on the terms and
conditions of the programs associated
with Citigroup Inc., refer to SIGTARP’s
Initial Report, Section 3: “TARP
Implementation and Administration.”

Treasury funding to Citigroup has been pursuant to the following three programs: the Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”), the Targeted Investment Program
(“TIP”), and the Asset Guarantee Program (“AGP”). Since SIGTARP’s Initial
Report, Treasury has made no further funding to Citigroup. According to Treasury,
Citigroup is still considered a systemically significant institution, and the AGP
agreements — which protect Citigroup against future losses on an asset pool of
$301 billion — are “part of a broader effort to support Citigroup as the company
executes its restructuring plans.”122 The funding received by Citigroup, as of
March 31, 2009, includes:123
• Capital Purchase Program: $25 billion on October 28, 2008
• Targeted Investment Program: $20 billion on December 31, 2008
• Asset Guarantee Program: $5 billion loss protection on January 15, 2009

Citigroup Use of Funds Report
Under its TIP agreement, based on SIGTARP’s recommendation, Citigroup has a
number of requirements including the submission of a quarterly report to Treasury
outlining the following information:124
• how it has used TARP funds
• the implementation of internal controls for its use of TARP funds
• Citigroup’s compliance or non-compliance with restrictions on use of its TARP
funds

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Citigroup must submit this quarterly report, entitled “TARP Progress Report”
until it has accounted for all of its TARP funds.
On February 3, 2009, Citigroup released its “TARP Progress Report for Fourth
Quarter 2008.” This report describes the actions and results of Citigroup’s Special
TARP Committee (the “Committee”), made up of senior Citigroup executives for
the purpose of reviewing and approving the use of TARP capital. According to the
report, the Committee has authorized initiatives to deploy $36.5 billion of TARP
funds across various areas in order to expand credit.125 This represents approximately 81% of the $45 billion in cash that Citigroup received under TARP as of
March 31, 2009.
According to the report, Citigroup plans to increase lines of credit in areas such
as residential mortgages, business and personal loans, student loans, credit card
lending, and corporate loan activity.126 Details provided by Citigroup on the distributions of the $36.5 billion authorized by the Committee are shown in Figure 2.8.

Status of Citigroup Funds
As of March 31, 2009, Citigroup has been allocated $45 billion in TARP funding
including $25 billion in connection with CPP and $20 billion in connection with
TIP.127 Treasury also allocated $5 billion of TARP funds to the AGP “ring-fencing”
of approximately $301 billion of Citigroup assets, but this amount has not yet been
disbursed.128 A more detailed discussion on ring-fencing occurs later in this section.
Although Treasury has not allocated additional funds to Citigroup since SIGTARP’s
Initial Report, Treasury’s investments are expected to be modified. Potential
modifications include an exchange of a portion of Citigroup’s preferred shares held
by Treasury as part of CPP funding, and an increased seniority of TIP and AGP
preferred shares.129

FIGURE 2.8

CITIGROUP USE AND INTENDED USE
OF FUNDS
$ Billions, % of $36.5 Billion

Fannie/Freddie
MBS
$10.0

27%

21%

Corporate
Loan Activity
$1.5 4%

22%
Credit Card
Lending
$5.8

16%

Student Loans
$1.0 3%

U.S. Prime
Residential
Mortgages
$7.5

Family/
Individual
Mortgage
Loans
$8.2

Business Loans

3% $1.0

Personal Loans
$1.5 4%

Purchases
Loans

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. MBS = mortgage-backed
securities.
Source: Citigroup Inc., “What Citi is Doing to Expand the Flow of
Credit, Support Homeowners and Help the U.S. Economy, TARP
Progress Report for Fourth Quarter 2008,” 2/3/2009,
www.citigroup.com, accessed 2/24/2009.

Citigroup’s Exchange Offering

On February 27, 2009, Citigroup requested that Treasury participate in an offer to
exchange preferred shares for common equity in an effort to strengthen its capital
structure and, in particular, its tangible common equity.130 For more details about
a bank’s capital structure, see the “TARP Tutorial: Capital Structure” earlier in this
section. Citigroup offered the exchange to both its private and public preferred
shareholders. Citigroup would exchange up to $27.5 billion of its non-Treasury
held preferred securities to common equity. Treasury announced it would match up
to $25 billion of non-Treasury preferred securities by exchanging its own preferred
stock acquired under CPP, equaling a maximum total conversion, subject to shareholder approval, of $52.5 billion.131
On March 19, 2009, Citigroup announced that it had entered into agreements
with a portion of its non-Treasury holders of preferred stock. The agreements,
so far, provide for the exchange of a total of $12.5 billion in preferred stock that
was originally issued in January 2008. As of March 31, 2009, Citigroup is in the

Ring-fencing: Segregating assets from the
rest of a financial institution, often so that
the assets’ problems can be addressed in
isolation.
Exchange: In reference to Citigroup
agreement, taking one type of stock
(i.e., preferred) and converting it at a
specific rate to another type of stock
(i.e., common).

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

TABLE 2.21

PROPOSED CITIGROUP EXCHANGE OF TREASURY’S CPP INVESTMENT
Trust Preferred Security: A security that
has both equity and debt characteristics.
Trust Preferred Security is created by
establishing a trust and issuing debt to
the new trust. A company would create
a trust preferred security to realize tax
benefits, since the trust is tax deductible.

Details
# of shares
$ per share
Total Value
Dividends

Preferred Sharesa

Common Shares at
Announced Exchange Rateb

25 million

7,692,307,692
($25 billion / $3.25)

$1,000

$3.25

$25 billion

$25 billion

$1.25 billion/year
(5% annually)

Only if declared by Citigroup’s
Board of Directors

Note: Numbers are affected by rounding. Agreements and terms have not been finalized.
Sources:
a
Citigroup Inc., “Securities Purchase Agreement,” 10/28/2008.
bCitigroup Inc., 8-K, 3/2/2009.

process of finalizing definitive documentation of this transaction.132 The effect of
the announced transaction would not increase the total dollar amount of Treasury’s
investment in Citigroup;133 however, it would convert up to $25 billion of Treasury’s
preferred shares to common equity. If all $25 billion of Treasury shares were exchanged, it would increase the percentage of Treasury ownership to “approximately
36% of Citigroup’s outstanding common stock.”134 The exchange would also eliminate the 5% dividend on those shares converted by Treasury, which would equal up
to $1.25 billion per year.
The $20 billion and $4 billion in preferred shares received under the TIP and
AGP agreements, respectively, would be converted into a trust preferred security
that has greater seniority than Treasury’s original preferred shares. Treasury will still
be entitled to receive dividends on these shares under the original agreements at
8% annually.135
Table 2.21 details an example of Treasury’s exchange of Citigroup shares.
Asset Guarantee Program for Citigroup

Under the Asset Guarantee Program, Treasury, FDIC, and the Federal Reserve
provided certain loss protections with respect to $301 billion of troubled assets
held by Citigroup.136 In return for the guarantees provided by Treasury and FDIC,
the U.S. Government collected $7 billion in premiums in the form of preferred
stock plus warrants of common stock; $4 billion of the preferred shares and all the
warrants were received by Treasury.137 For more information on the contractual
terms of the preferred shares, refer to SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section 3: “TARP
Implementation and Administration.” The AGP agreement calls for segregating or
“ring-fencing” of the asset pool and lays out which assets will be covered, the loss
considerations, and management of the asset pool.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Citigroup Ring-Fencing

In banking, “ring-fencing” refers to the separation of certain assets within a financial institution. This separation does not physically remove the assets from the
institution’s balance sheet. Instead, the specific assets are identified and tracked for
special controls on management, accounting, and measures to contain any losses
on those assets.
Ring-fences are often confused with the concept of a “bad bank,” whereby a
bank accumulates its problem loans (or other troubled assets) into a separate entity
(the bad bank). In the bad-bank process, the problem assets are taken off the books
of the original bank, which is what distinguishes a bad bank from a ring-fence.
Having placed its problems into a separate company, management of the original
bank will now find it much easier to raise new capital from potential investors. This
is because investors will have comfort that they are protected from unexpected
future losses on the hard-to-value assets now held by the bad bank.
The AGP agreement with Citigroup creates a ring-fence around $301 billion
of Citigroup’s assets (“covered assets”). These assets are not physically removed
from Citigroup’s balance sheet, and therefore do not constitute a “bad bank.” The
Federal Reserve notes that Citigroup assets “will remain on the books of the institution but will be appropriately ‘ring-fenced.’”138 The covered assets are retained
throughout the bank’s operating units and are identified for tracking purposes.139
Although the covered assets are not removed from Citigroup’s balance sheet, investor exposure to future losses on the troubled assets is limited because Treasury,
FDIC, and the Federal Reserve have agreed to provide certain loss protections after
the first $39.5 billion in losses. Citigroup will then absorb 10% of all additional
losses on the pool of assets, and Treasury and FDIC will absorb 90% of further losses up to $5 billion and $10 billion, respectively. At that point, should any further
losses be incurred, the Federal Reserve will provide non-recourse loans collateralized by these assets with the same 90%/10% loss-sharing provision.140
Covered Assets Criteria
Only certain assets on Citigroup’s books are eligible for inclusion in the ring-fence.
The criteria to determine covered assets are as follows:141
• The asset must have been issued or originated prior to March 14, 2008, as
mandated by EESA.
• Equity securities, and securities whose value is derived by reference to equity
securities, are excluded.
• Foreign assets, subject to limited allowances per the Master Agreement, are
excluded (i.e., only U.S. entities and securities are eligible).
• Assets guaranteed by any Governmental authority (outside of the Master
Agreement) are excluded.

Bad Bank: An entity (the “bad bank”)
that is legally separated from the bank
that created it (the “good bank”) and
into which are placed problem loans (or
other troubled assets). Usually created by
banks to clean up their balance sheets.
Covered Asset: An asset owned by
Citigroup or any of its subsidiaries that is
included in the ring-fence.
Non-Recourse Loan: A secured loan
whereby the borrower is relieved of the
obligation to repay the loan upon the surrender of the collateral.
Equity Security: Any stock or similar
security that represents ownership (or
the right to purchase ownership) in an
organization or asset.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Schedule A: Listing of the covered
assets.
Baseline Value: The value of each covered
asset on November 21, 2008. For markto-market assets, it is the fair market
value, and for accrual assets, it is the
unpaid principal balance.
Market Value: The price at which an asset
can be sold to a willing buyer by a willing
seller, in a reasonable amount of time.
Mark-to-Market Assets: An asset being
assigned a value based upon the market
value as of a specific date.
Accrual Assets: In the context of the AGP
agreements, accrual assets are those
that are held on the bank’s books at accrued value (i.e., earned but not necessarily received), as opposed to “mark-tomarket” value.

The first announcement regarding the loss protections, dated November 23,
2008, sized the asset pool at a total of $306 billion.142 After excluding assets not
permitted under EESA, the final agreed-upon portfolio was reduced to $301
billion.143
From the Master Agreement date of January 15, 2009, Citigroup has 90 days to
prepare and deliver a finalized listing of covered assets (“Schedule A”) to all relevant
U.S. Government parties. The Master Agreement includes a preliminary Schedule
A, which is a summary of the $301 billion ring-fenced assets. The finalized
Schedule A will detail the value for asset categories, reclassifications or corrections
to original baseline values, and adjustments for market values. The Schedule A
may be updated from time to time as Citigroup and the U.S. Government mutually
agree.144 The U.S. Government parties (Treasury, FDIC, and the Federal Reserve)
have 120 days after the receipt of the finalized Schedule A to object to covered assets that do not meet the covered asset criteria, are improperly categorized, or are
improperly baseline valued.145
The pool of covered assets is divided into two groups for valuation purposes:
mark-to-market assets and accrual assets. The mark-to-market assets are valued
at their current market value; those assets totaled $24.63 billion as of November
21, 2008.146 Accrual assets are valued based on the unpaid principal of each asset,
and, together, accounted for $264.96 billion of the covered assets as of November
21, 2008.147 Blackrock Inc., a financial management company, has been retained
by the Federal Reserve to conduct the valuation and pricing of assets.148 Figure 2.9
shows the breakdown of the types of covered assets included in mark-to-market
asset and accrual asset categories.
FIGURE 2.9

CITIGROUP’S RING-FENCED ASSETS
$ Billions
$43.07
$26.44
Mark-to-Market
Assets
$24.63
Other Held to
Maturity Assets
$11.21

$18.96

8%
4%

88%

Accrual Assets
$264.96

Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
Source: Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Schedule A,” 1/15/2009.

$264.96
$176.49

Commercial Real Estate
Other Consumer Loans
Auto Loans
Mortgages

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Management/Administration of the Covered Assets
Citigroup is responsible for establishing a senior oversight committee (“SOC”),
consisting of senior members of Citigroup’s management who are acceptable to
U.S. Government parties. SOC responsibilities include, but are not limited to:149
• reviewing and approving the overall business and governance strategy for the
covered assets
• reviewing a plan for communication with key stakeholders (i.e., board of directors, shareholders, and the U.S. Government) prepared by the Executive Team
• reviewing strategic responses developed by the Executive Team or the business
units
• monitoring compliance
Additionally, Citigroup has appointed a “Covered Asset CEO,” a Citigroup
employee. The appointment was subject to approval by the SOC and U.S.
Government parties. The Covered Asset CEO is responsible for management and
oversight of the covered assets. The Covered Asset CEO reports to the SOC and
will be the primary point of contact for the U.S. Government parties.150 The SOC
is responsible for establishing any bonus or incentive components for the Covered
Asset CEO. In turn, the Covered Asset CEO is responsible for setting bonus and
incentives for the other members of the Executive Team and appropriate portfolio
managers. All compensation packages are subject to review and approval by the
SOC and the U.S. Government parties.151 The governance structure for the covered assets is detailed in Figure 2.10.
FIGURE 2.10

COVERED ASSET GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

CITIGROUP
SENIOR OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE (”SOC”)
Covered Asset CEO
Rick Stuckey

Executive
Team

COO/CFO/
Project
Management

Risk
Management

Oversight and
Control

Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/4/2009.

Finance

Project
Management

Senior Oversight Committee (“SOC”):
Consists of Citigroup’s Chief Financial Officer, Chief Risk Officer, General Counsel,
Controller, Chief Accounting Officer, and
the Treasurer.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

The Covered Asset CEO is supported by the Executive Team, comprising representatives of Citigroup business units, finance, risk, and legal functions. These
representatives are to commit substantial time to the management oversight of the
covered assets. Each Executive Team representative will manage the covered assets
(including monitoring of the performance of the covered assets, modifying processes and procedures as needed, and ensuring compliance by the portfolio
managers) from their relevant business unit. Incentives and compensation guidelines, based on the performance of the covered assets, are to be established and
overseen by the SOC and Covered Asset CEO, with U.S. Government parties’
review and approval.152
According to the Master Agreement, the management, administration, and
oversight of the covered assets will remain in control of Citigroup. However, the
U.S. Government can assume certain management responsibilities over the assets
once certain levels of losses are suffered. Specifically, at any time when losses in
excess of $19 billion are reached, the U.S. Government parties reserve the right to
take actions which include, but are not limited to:153
• imposing increased reporting, communication, or audit requirements
• appointing one or more representatives of the U.S. Government parties as voting members of the SOC
• reviewing/revising compensation guidelines

Net Loss: Net loss occurs when total
expenses exceed total revenues.
Realized Losses: Loss realized by an
investor on a security after it has been
finally sold and the costs associated with
the security exceed the benefits of the
holding.
Impaired: Decrease of value in an asset
due to long-term credit deterioration or
temporary market disruption.

At any time that net losses incurred are in excess of $27 billion, the U.S.
Government parties have the right to change the asset manager for all or part of the
covered assets. It may also change the fundamental business objective of Citigroup
and require Citigroup to provide a business plan reflecting changes in management
and business strategy with respect to the covered assets acceptable to the U.S.
Government parties.154
Determining Covered Losses
At the end of each calendar quarter, Citigroup will calculate its actual losses on the
covered assets. The schedule in Figure 2.11 is used to determine if a loss claim is
to be paid, and by which agency.155
Only realized losses are covered under AGP, not “mark-to-market” fluctuations
in value. That is, there has to have been some event that caused an actual loss to
be incurred. For example, if Citigroup sells an asset at a loss, the loss portion is
eligible for coverage. In addition, if an actuary, appraiser, or other valuation expert
determines that an asset’s value has been impaired in such a way that it results in a
write-down of the value on Citigroup’s books, the drop in value will be eligible for
a claim.156 Variations in asset value that are not realized in these fashions will not
create losses.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

The definition of “loss” is a net loss concept. Net loss is calculated by accounting for the effects of both gains and losses from across a ring-fence entity, adding provisions for fees and costs of workouts, and any other permanent valuation
changes. The net loss is calculated on a quarterly basis. For example, if asset A is
sold for a loss of $6, but asset B is sold for a $4 profit, the net loss on these two
assets is $2.
Over time, the potential liability of Treasury, FDIC, and the Federal Reserve
may decline as Citigroup experiences excess gains and recoveries on covered assets,
and as covered assets progress to maturity. A reduction in coverage could also occur
if losses are deemed to be due to the failure of Citigroup to manage and service
the covered assets in compliance with the terms of the “Governance and Asset
Management Guidelines” set forth in the Master Agreement.157
Citigroup is generally prohibited from exchanging assets from its own portfolio
in and out of the covered assets pool, but may do so under strict rules regarding
equivalent valuation and trading.158 As an example, two assets that have similar
collateral and similar market values may be swapped with the approval of U.S
Government parties.
According to Treasury, estimated losses on the ring-fence portfolio through
December 31, 2008, were approximately $900 million. Information on losses incurred after December 31, 2008, has not yet been received.159

For more information on the
guarantees and loss protections
to Citigroup, refer to SIGTARP’s
Initial Report, Section 3: “TARP
Implementation and Administration.”

FIGURE 2.11

U.S. GOVERNMENT GUARANTEES AND LOSS PROTECTIONS TO CITIGROUP
$ BILLIONS

Loss 1
0

Loss 2
$39.5

Non-recourse
Loan

Loss 3
$45.1

$56.2

Total
$301

Citigroup

$39.5

$0.6

$1.1

$24.5

Treasury

—

$5.0

—

—

$5.0

FDIC

—

—

$10.0

—

$10.0

Federal Reserve

$65.7

—

—

—

$220.4

$220.4

$39.5

$5.6

$11.1

$244.8

$301.0

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. According to the Federal Reserve, Citigroup’s loss position is “exclusive of reserves.”
Sources: Citigroup Master Agreement, 1/15/2009; Federal Reserve, response to SIGTARP draft, 1/29/2009.

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Bank of America Corporation
Since SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Treasury has made no further funding to Bank
of America beyond that of its CPP, TIP, and proposed AGP agreements. Bank of
America has received $25 billion in CPP funding (which includes the $10 billion
received with the acquisition of Merrill Lynch).160 It has also received $20 billion
in TIP funding and is projected to receive another $7.5 billion in loss protection
from Treasury through AGP.161 According to Treasury, the previously approved Asset
Guarantee Program agreement with Bank of America is currently in the process of
being finalized and will contain ring-fencing parameters similar to those detailed in
the Citigroup Agreement.
The funding received by Bank of America as of March 31, 2009, includes:162
• Capital Purchase Program: $15 billion on October 28, 2008
• Capital Purchase Program: $10 billion on January 9, 2009
• Targeted Investment Program: $20 billion on January 16, 2009
Additionally, Treasury announced Bank of America’s participation in the Asset
Guarantee Program:163
• Asset Guarantee Program: $7.5 billion loss protection announced on
January 16, 2009

Asset Guarantee Program for Bank of America
On January 16, 2009, Treasury, in partnership with FDIC and the Federal Reserve,
indicated the U.S. Government’s intention to provide certain loss protection for
approximately $118 billion in troubled assets held by Bank of America.164 In return
for the guarantees provided by Treasury and FDIC, the U.S. Government will
collect $4 billion in premiums in the form of preferred shares of stock and warrants. Bank of America will also be required to implement a mortgage modification program acceptable to the U.S. Government.165 As of March 31, 2009, the
AGP transaction had not closed, and the description herein is based solely on the
intended terms announced by the parties. For more information on the contractual
terms of the preferred shares, refer to SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section 3: “TARP
Implementation and Administration.”
Figure 2.12 shows the announced loss protections provided by the U.S.
Government in return for the premiums paid. The preliminary terms of the AGP
agreement call for ring-fencing of the asset pool. It also describes which assets will
be covered and the loss considerations for those assets.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Description of Covered Assets
According to Bank of America’s Annual Report released on February 27, 2009,
the asset pool of $118 billion is projected to include approximately $81 billion of
derivative assets and $37 billion of other financial assets. Assets expected to be
covered may generally include pre-market disruption assets (i.e., originated prior to
September 30, 2007) and the majority are assets added to Bank of America’s books
as a result of the acquisition of Merrill Lynch. Types of assets expected in the asset
pool may include:166
•
•
•
•
•

Derivative Asset: An asset whose stated
value or cash flow is determined by reference to the value or cash flow of another
asset (the “underlying asset”).

leveraged and commercial real estate loans
collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”)
financial guarantor counterparty exposure
trading counterparty exposure
investment securities

Although an agreement with Bank of America has not been reached, it is
expected that assets excluded will be generally similar to those excluded in the
Citigroup agreement, other than certain foreign assets that would have not been
allowable under the Citigroup agreement, but may be permitted for Bank of
America.167 As of March 31, 2009, the AGP agreement with Bank of America had
not been finalized.

FIGURE 2.12

ANNOUNCED U.S. GOVERNMENT GUARANTEES AND LOSS PROTECTIONS
TO BANK OF AMERICA
$ BILLIONS

Loss 1
0
Bank of America

Non-recourse
Loan

Loss 2
$10.0

$21.1

Total
$118.0

$10.0

$1.1

$9.7

$20.8

Treasury

—

$7.5

—

$7.5

FDIC

—

$2.5

—

$2.5

Federal Reserve

—

—

$87.2

$87.2

$10.0

$11.1

$96.9

$118.0

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. The details in this graphic are based on preliminary terms announced by Treasury, the
Federal Reserve, and FDIC on 1/16/2009.
Sources: FDIC, “FDIC Press Release,” 1/16/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed 1/23/2009; Bank of America AGP Agreement,
“Summary of Terms, Eligible Asset Guarantee,” 1/15/2009.

For more information on the
guarantees and loss protections to
Bank of America, refer to SIGTARP’s
Initial Report, Section 3: “TARP
Implementation and Administration.”

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THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY FINANCING
PROGRAM

Restructuring Plan: As defined in Treasury’s agreement with GM and Chrysler, a
plan to achieve and sustain the long-term
viability, international competitiveness,
and energy efficiency of the company and
its subsidiaries.

FIGURE 2.13

AIFP EXPENDITURES BY PARTICIPANT,
CUMULATIVE

The assistance provided by Treasury to the U.S. automotive industry comes under
the Automotive Industry Financing Program (“AIFP”); the stated objective of AIFP
is to prevent a significant disruption of the American automotive industry that
could pose a systemic risk to financial market stability and have a negative effect on
the economy of the United States.168 The program requires participating institutions (General Motors Corporation (“GM”); Chrysler Holding LLC (“Chrysler”);
GMAC LLC (“GMAC”); and Chrysler Financial Services Americas LLC (“Chrysler
Financial”)) to implement restructuring plans that will achieve long-term viability,
and to adhere to executive compensation standards and other measures designed
to protect the taxpayers’ interests, including limits on the institution’s expenditures
and other corporate governance requirements.
On December 19, 2008, Treasury created AIFP, and, on December 29, 2008,
signed an agreement to provide assistance to GMAC, followed shortly by an agreement with GM signed on December 31, 2008. The agreement for assistance to
Chrysler was signed on January 2, 2009, and to Chrysler Financial on January 16,
2009. TARP funding provided to each institution is illustrated in Figure 2.13. In
order to receive assistance, the manufacturers were required to submit restructuring plans by February 17, 2009.

$ Billions,% of $24.8 Billion

Recent Developments

Chrysler Financial $1.5

Since the publication of SIGTARP’s Initial Report, there have been several important developments relevant to TARP assistance to the automotive sector. As of
March 31, 2009, key developments include:

6%
Chrysler $4.0

GMAC $5.0

16%

20%

58% GM $14.3

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. As of 3/31/2009. On
3/17/2009, Chrysler Financial made its first principal repayment in
the amount of $3.5 million.
Sources: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009; Treasury,
response to SIGTARP data call, 4/9/2009.

• Release of Restructuring Plans and Viability Determination. On
February 17, 2009, both GM and Chrysler released their restructuring plans as
required in their respective assistance agreements with Treasury. Treasury determined that the manufacturers had not met the threshold to assure their longterm viability. Treasury granted Chrysler a 30-day extension, until May 1, 2009,
and GM a 60-day extension, until June 1, 2009, to resubmit their restructuring
plans.
• Creation of Presidential Task Force on the Auto Industry. On
February 20, 2009, President Obama formed a committee, headed by the
Treasury Secretary and the National Economic Council Director, to review issues related to the auto industry and provide recommendations.169

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

• Initiation of Auto Supplier Support Program. On March 19, 2009, Treasury
announced a program to support auto industry suppliers with up to $5 billion
worth of receivables financing. As stated by Treasury, the objective of the program is to address concerns about the auto manufacturers’ ability to make payment on parts they buy from their suppliers by providing Government-backed
financing to suppliers.
• Launch of Auto Warranty Commitment Program. On March 30, 2009, the
Administration announced the creation of a warranty commitment program
that guarantees consumer warranty obligations on GM and Chrysler vehicles
purchased during the restructuring period. Treasury preliminarily discussed
potential funding for the Auto Warranty Commitment Program of up to an
estimated $1.25 billion.170

Presidential Task Force on the Auto Industry
Since SIGTARP’s Initial Report, the Administration created a Presidential Task
Force on the Auto Industry (“Task Force”), which comprises the heads of several Federal departments and agencies. The Task Force, officially introduced
on February 20, 2009, is headed by the Treasury Secretary and the National
Economic Council Director and is responsible for, among other things, coordinating the Administration’s response to the restructuring plans submitted by GM and
Chrysler.171 The President named Ron Bloom as Senior Advisor on Auto Issues
at Treasury and Steven Rattner as Counselor to the Treasury Secretary to lead
Treasury’s efforts with regard to the automotive sector bailout.172 The two will
act as day-to-day co-leaders of the Task Force. In addition, on March 30, 2009,
Edward Montgomery was appointed the Director of Recovery for Auto Workers and
Communities and will work to facilitate economic recovery efforts in areas affected
by changes in the auto industry.173 As of March 31, 2009, the Treasury Secretary
was serving as the official President’s Designee until a permanent appointment
could be made. The Task Force structure is outlined in Figure 2.14.
The Task Force held its initial meeting on February 20, 2009, to review the
restructuring plans of GM and Chrysler. The participants also reportedly discussed
financial and operational restructuring, improving competitiveness of wage and
benefit structures, and progress toward creating clean, competitive cars. The members were tasked with performing additional analysis and forming initial recommendations in their areas of expertise for presentation at the next meeting. The Task
Force members also have reviewed the auto manufacturers’ progress reports and
issued a report on the viability of both GM and Chrysler on March 30, 2009.

President’s Designee: One or more officers
from the Executive Branch designated by
the President. For the purposes of AIFP, the
President’s Designee is the Treasury
Secretary.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

80

FIGURE 2.14

PRESIDENTIAL TASK FORCE ON THE AUTO INDUSTRY

LEADERS

Timothy Geithner
Treasury Secretary

Larry Summers
Director, National
Economic Council

DAY-TO-DAY LEADERS

Steven Rattner
Counselor to the
Treasury Secretary

Ron Bloom
Senior Advisor on
Auto Issues

Diana Farrell

Gene Sperling
Jared Bernstein
Edward Montgomery*
Lisa Heinzerling

OFFICIAL DESIGNEES

Austan Goolsbee

Dan Utech
Heather Zichal

Joan DeBoer

Rick Wade

Deputy Director,
National Economic
Council
Counselor to the
Treasury Secretary
Chief Economist to
Vice President Biden
Senior Advisor,
Department of Labor
Senior Climate Policy
Counsel to the EPA
Administrator
Staff Director and Chief
Economist of the
Economic Recovery
Advisory Board
Senior Advisor to the
Secretary of Energy
Deputy Director, White
House Office of Energy
and Climate Change
Chief of Staff,
Department of
Transportation
Senior Advisor,
Department of
Commerce

MEMBERS
Secretary of Treasury
National Economic Council
Director
Secretary of Transportation
Secretary of Commerce
Secretary of Labor
Secretary of Energy
Chair of the President’s
Council of Economic
Advisers
Director of the Office of
Management and Budget
Environmental Protection
Agency Administrator
Director of the White House
Office of Energy and
Climate Change

Note: *Edward Montgomery is also serving as the Director of Recovery for Auto Workers and Communities.
Sources: White House Press Release, “Geithner, Summers Convene Official Designees to Presidental Task Force on the Auto Industry,”
2/20/2009, www.whitehouse.gov, accessed 4/13/2009; White House Press Release, “Obama Administration New Path to Viability for
GM & Chrysler,” 3/30/2009, www.whitehouse.gov, accessed 3/30/2009.

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TABLE 2.22

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS FOR AUTO MAKERS: STATUS
Report Type

Due or Start Date

Frequency*

Restructuring Plan

2/17/2009

Once

Restructuring Plan Progress Report

3/31/2009**

Once

Cash Forecast Status Report

1/12/2009

Weekly

Liquidity Status Report

1/12/2009

Bi-weekly

Expense Policy Certificate

After closing date

Monthly

Executive Compensation Compliance Certificate

After closing date

Quarterly

Financial Statements

As Reported

As Reported

Note:
* Both GM and Chrysler submitted each report, statement, and certificate at the required frequency.
** Initial due date. On March 30, 2009, the date was extended 60 days for GM and 30 days for Chrysler.
Sources: GM Agreement, “Loan And Security Agreement By and Between The Borrower Listed on Appendix A As Borrower and The
United States Department of Treasury as Lender Dated as of December 31, 2008.” Chrysler Agreement, “Loan And Security Agreement
By and Between The Borrower Listed on Appendix A As Borrower and The United States Department of Treasury as Lender Dated as of
December 31, 2008;” White House Press Release, “Obama Administration New Path to Viability for GM & Chrysler,” 3/30/2009,
www.whitehouse.gov, accessed 3/30/09; Treasury, response to SIGTARP data calls, 4/1/2009 and 4/8/2009.

Reporting Requirements
The manufacturers’ assistance agreements (virtually identical for both GM and
Chrysler) contain a number of strict reporting requirements, ranging from developing viable restructuring plans to the ongoing reporting of key indicators such as liquidity and compliance with executive compensation limitations. Table 2.22 shows
a summary of the reporting requirements, as well as the status of the auto makers’
compliance. Both GM and Chrysler were given extensions from the original
March 31, 2009, restructuring plan progress report due date.

General Motors Corporation
The key developments relating to Treasury assistance to GM since the issuance of
SIGTARP’s Initial Report include the following:
• release of restructuring plan and viability determination
• issuance of the 2008 10-K report

Restructuring Plan and Viability Determination
The GM restructuring plan, issued on February 17, 2009, attempts to address
the key requirements set forth in the Loan and Security Agreement (“LSA”) of
December 31, 2008. On March 30, 2009, the Treasury Secretary, as the President’s
Designee, determined that GM had not met the requirements of its LSA, because
its restructuring plan failed to demonstrate that GM was on the path to long-term
viability. The Treasury Secretary characterized GM’s timeframe and industry
growth rate assumptions as overly optimistic. He also noted that GM had failed to
meet the following conditions of its LSA: reach an agreement on its labor modifications, receive the necessary approvals of the Voluntary Employees Beneficiary

For more information on the terms
and conditions of both the GM
and Chrysler agreements, refer to
SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section
3: “TARP Implementation and
Administration.”

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Association’s (“VEBA’s”) modifications, and execute a required bond exchange
offer.174
The Treasury Secretary acknowledged that, although GM has made significant
progress on meeting its goals, more progress needs to be made in order for GM to
become a viable long-term enterprise. GM was given 60 days to submit a revised
plan to demonstrate progress for its long-term viability. If it fails to do so, GM’s loan
from the Government will become due 30 days thereafter, which will likely force
GM into bankruptcy.175 GM will submit a report on the progress of its restructuring
on June 1, 2009. Table 2.23 provides an overview of the program details contained
in the February 17, 2009, “General Motors Corporation 2009-2014 Restructuring
Plan.”

Additional Funding
As part of the February 17, 2009 restructuring plan, GM requested additional
funds through a combination of secured term debt, a revolving line of credit, and
preferred equity. For the baseline scenario, GM asked for up to $22.5 billion —
consisting of an $18 billion investment, plus $4.5 billion in required incremental
funding.176 GM also ran a downside scenario in which GM would require an additional $7.5 billion of funding in the form of a secured revolver facility. This additional funding would bring GM’s total Government assistance up to $30 billion.177
Based on the revised submission date granted to GM, additional funding, estimated
to be up to $5 billion, will be provided to GM during the 60-day extension.178

Going Concern: Term used by auditors
to refer to a company that is able to
continue its operations into the foreseeable future.

Auditors’ Opinion
Exhibit 23.a of GM’s annual report on Securities and Exchange Commission
(“SEC”) Form 10-K filed on March 5, 2009, contains a declaration from the
company’s independent auditors that expresses “the existence of substantial doubt
about the Corporation’s ability to continue as a going concern.”179 The auditor
provided a detailed statement regarding GM’s recurring losses from operations, its
stockholders’ deficit, and its inability to generate sufficient cash to meet its obligations and sustain its operations. The statement reflects the auditors’ concern that
GM may not be able to overcome its losses and generate enough cash to stay in
business.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TABLE 2.23

KEY ASPECTS OF GM RESTRUCTURING PLAN
Loan Agreement
Requirement

February 17, 2009 Plan Details

Competitive Product Mix and
Cost Structure

• Reducing the number of brands, nameplates, and retail outlets to focus on “fewer, better” entries with more competitive
dealer economics
• Focused on core brands of Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick, and GMC, with Pontiac playing niche role
• A 25% reduction in number of nameplates by 2012
• Increased focus on cars and crossovers (81% of nameplates by 2014, up from low of 52% in 2004)
• Consolidating dealerships into fewer locations (25% reduction over 4 years)
• Increase use of global architectures (centralized planning, design, engineering, etc.) to develop 50% of GM’s U.S.
passenger cars by 2012, and approximately 90% by 2014
• Improvements in manufacturing productivity since 2000 show GM competitive with Toyota for North American vehicle
assembly
• Lowered cost per vehicle by 26% from 2004 to 2008
• Suspended JOBS program, which provided full income and benefit protection in lieu of layoff for indefinite period
• Implemented voluntary incentivized attrition program for hourly workforce
• Reached tentative agreement on modifying labor agreement with United Auto Workers (UAW), awaiting ratification by union
• Plans in place to report competitiveness progress to U.S. Secretary of Labor to certify competitiveness relative to foreign
manufacturers operation in United States

Compliance with Federal
Fuel Economy and Emission
Requirements

• In 2008, offered 20 models with greater than 30 MPG (highway), up from 8 in 2004; plans for 23 by 2012 and 33 by
2014
• Increased number of alternative fuel models from 6% of sales in 2004 to 17% in 2008; plan calls for increase to 61% in
2012 and 65% in 2014
• Increased number of hybrid and plug-in models from 2 in 2004 to 6 in 2008; plan calls for 14 in 2012 and 26 in 2014
• Stated intention to comply with 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which sets mileage targets for 2020
• Plan targets an average fuel efficiency of 33.7 MPG for cars and 23.8 MPG for trucks by 2012, and 38.6 MPG for cars
and 26.8 MPG for trucks by 2014

Domestic Manufacturer of
“Advanced Technology”
Vehicles

• Increased investment in electric vehicles and lithium-ion battery development (1,000 engineers and technicians), including
planned construction of new manufacturing facility for battery packs
• Submitted two proposals for advanced technology vehicle development to U.S. Department of Energy totaling $8.4
billion, with a third submitted on March 31, 2009

Rationalization of Costs,
Capitalization, and Capacity

• Accelerated efforts at labor cost reductions
• Specifics relating to salaried cost competitiveness, restructuring VEBA obligations (VEBA is a tax-free health
reimbursement arrangement where GM makes contributions into a trust account for employees and their families to use
for eligible out-of-pocket healthcare costs and premiums)
• Negotiating plan with UAW to convert VEBA and retiree “pay as you go” healthcare obligations (present value of $20
billion) into plan whereby GM funds 50% of the obligations, and meets the other half of obligations by paying common
stock into the VEBA trust
• Plan anticipates, if negotiations with UAW and regulatory review are successful, to complete conversion in May 2009
• Negotiating bond exchange where 2/3 or more of the unsecured bondholders would receive equity instead
• Plan contains letter of understanding, with anticipated bond exchange scheduled for late March

Financial Viability and Federal
Loan Repayment

• Significant short-term negative cash flow for North American and global manufacturing (anticipated negative operating
cash flow of $14 billion in 2009)
• Despite reduced sales expectations, plan anticipates positive operating cash flow by 2010 for North American
operations, reaching approximately $7 billion by 2013-2014
• Globally, anticipate positive operating cash flow by 2012
• Baseline NPV analysis (assuming reduction of VEBA and conversion of 2/3 debt to equity), shows positive $5 billion – $14
billion; downside analysis is negative NPV; upside analysis is positive $30 billion – $41 billion
• Plan calls for total TARP funding to reach $22.5 billion by 2011, and repayment to begin in 2012
• Estimates for repayment of TARP funds average approximately $3 billion per year beginning 2012 with final repayment in
2017

Source: General Motors, “General Motors Corporation Restructuring Plan 2009–2014,” 2/17/2009.

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GMAC LLC
The Federal Reserve approved an application for GMAC to reorganize as a bank
holding company in December 2008. As part of this reorganization, the Federal
Reserve required GMAC to increase capital by raising $7 billion of new equity.
TARP funded $5 billion of this requirement through a purchase of senior preferred
equity (“the stock purchase agreement”),180 and GMAC conducted a rights offering for the remaining capital requirement. As part of this rights offering, GM
and Cerberus Capital Management (GMAC’s majority shareholder) entered into
agreements to purchase new common equity.181 Treasury loaned GM $884 million through TARP to participate in the GMAC rights offering, which closed on
January 16, 2009. Under the terms of its loan agreement, Treasury has the right
to exchange its loan for the shares purchased by GM in the rights offering.182 As of
GMAC’s 8-K report issued on March 25, 2009, Treasury has not yet exercised that
right.
As a condition of the Federal Reserve’s approval of the bank holding company
status, neither GM nor Cerberus was allowed to maintain a controlling interest in
GMAC. GM was to reduce its holding to less than 10% and transfer that interest to
an independent trust, to be approved by the Federal Reserve and Treasury.
GMAC was also required to make changes to its board of directors no later than
March 24, 2009. The new board should include seven members: the GMAC CEO,
one representative from FIM Holdings, LLC (a subsidiary of Cerberus), two directors appointed by a trust to be formed by Treasury, and three independent directors
selected by the other directors. In addition, GM and FIM Holdings, LLC are each
entitled to one non-voting observer on the board. In GMAC’s 8-K filed on March
25, 2009, it states that several board members resigned or were removed on March
24, 2009, and lists the names of the new appointments: Stephen Feinberg (FIM
Manager), Alvaro G. de Molina (the CEO), and Robert Hull and Samuel Ramsey
(the CEO Appointments).

Key Reporting Requirements Performance
Under the stock purchase agreement, GMAC must comply with restrictions on
stock repurchase, dividends, executive compensation, and expense policy requirements similar to those required for GM.183

Chrysler Holding LLC
Since SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Chrysler released its restructuring plan on
February 17, 2009, which was also found to be deficient.

Restructuring Plan and Viability Determination
Chrysler issued the “Restructuring Plan for Long-Term Viability” on
February 17, 2009. On March 30, 2009, the Treasury Secretary, acting as the

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

President’s Designee, determined that Chrysler was not on target to meet the
conditions laid out in the LSA dated December 31, 2008, based on its February
17, 2009, restructuring plan. He also determined that Chrysler would not be able
to operate as a stand-alone entity in the long term and therefore must formalize a
partnership with Fiat SpA (“Fiat”) or another external entity to ensure its long-term
viability. In addition to producing a non-viable restructuring plan, Chrysler was not
able to obtain approval of the required labor modifications, did not receive the necessary approvals of its VEBA modifications, and had not commenced the required
TABLE 2.24

KEY ASPECTS OF CHRYSLER RESTRUCTURING PLAN
Loan Agreement
Requirement

February 17, 2009 Plan Details

Competitive Product Mix and
Cost Structure

• Signed term sheet agreeing to work toward a 50% reduction in Chrysler’s VEBA Cash Payment Liability (conditioned on
satisfactory debt restructuring)
• Shareholders (Cerberus and Daimler) will (i) relinquish their equity, and (ii) convert 100% of their 2nd lien debt for equity
(conditioned on a viable plan and overall restructuring)
• Signed tentative agreement with the UAW with respect to competitive level compensation, work-rules and severance
provisions with U.S. transplants
• Continue to work with UAW on funding the 2009 healthcare payments out of the existing VEBA, and to modify the terms
of the settlement agreement to include the pension pass-through revision and future payment streams

Compliance with Federal
Fuel Economy and Emission
Requirements

• For the 2009 model year, 73% of Chrysler’s products offer improved fuel economy compared with 2008 models
• An all-new family of fuel-efficient V-6 engines will join Chrysler’s lineup in 2010
• Over the past decade, built more than 1.5 million Flexible Fuel Vehicles capable of running on renewable, American-made
ethanol fuel — (E85) — are committed to making 50% of Chrysler’s new light-duty vehicles capable of using alternative
fuels in 2012
• In the proposed alliance with Fiat, would gain access to Fiat Group vehicle platforms that would complement current
product portfolio and would accelerate the company’s plans for the introduction of more environmentally friendly vehicles
• Plans to launch additional small, fuel-efficient vehicles as well as a breakthrough family of all-electric and range-extended
electric vehicles
• Will have more than 66 ENVI advanced propulsion electric-drive vehicles in fleet service this year
• First Chrysler electric-drive vehicle will be available for retail customers in 2010, with additional models in production by
2013

Rationalization of Cost,
Capitalization and Capacity

•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Reduced fixed cost by $3.8 billion (27%)
Reduced unit capacity by 1.3 million (35%)
Reduced headcount by 35,000 (41%)
Completed asset sales of $1.0 billion
Nameplate reduction by 7
Eliminated retiree life insurance
Suspended salary merits and bonuses
Suspended 401(k) match
Suspended tuition assistance program
Fully compliant with all Government executive compensation requirements

Financial Viability and Federal • A commitment from the UAW to restructure the VEBA
Loan Repayment
• Wage and benefit reductions and work-rule modifications that are competitive with the U.S. transplant levels
• Severance benefit reductions, incl. elimination of “Jobs Bank”
• Cerberus and Daimler have agreed to convert their 2nd lien debt
• Has no public bonds, and has requested its three creditor groups to participate in reducing its debt and debt service by
$5 billion
Source: Chrysler Restructuring Plan for Long-Term Viability, 2/17/2009.

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debt exchange offer.184 Table 2.24 summarizes Chrysler’s restructuring plan submission that was determined to be non-viable by Treasury.
On May 1, 2009, Chrysler is required to produce an update on its efforts to
implement the restructuring plan, which, as a condition to receiving continued
Government support, must include a formal partnership with Fiat or another company.185 Chrysler will be provided with approximately $500 million in TARP funds
while it attempts to complete its restructuring plan.186

Chrysler Financial Services LLC
As discussed in SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Treasury announced on January
16, 2009, a loan under AIFP of up to $1.5 billion to Chrysler LB Receivables
Trust (“Chrysler Trust”), a special purpose entity created by Chrysler Financial,
to finance the extension of new consumer auto loans. Under the agreement,
Chrysler Financial must comply with the executive compensation and corporate
governance requirements of Section 111(b) of EESA, as well as enhanced restrictions on executive compensation including the need to reduce its bonus pool for
Senior Executive Officers and Senior Employees by 40%.187 Per the agreement
with Treasury, Chrysler Financial has specific requirements related to the loan.
In particular, interest, principal, and other proceeds from the repayment of the
loan financed with TARP funds must be deposited into a collection account.
Disbursements from Treasury to Chrysler Financial under this loan are shown in
TABLE 2.25

FUNDS DISBURSED TO CHRYSLER FINANCIAL
Date of Funding

($ MILLIONS)

Amount of Funding

1/16/2009

$100

1/22/2009

100

1/29/2009

100

2/5/2009

100

2/19/2009

–

2/26/2009

–

3/5/2009

250

3/12/2009

250

3/19/2009

150

3/26/2009

125

TOTAL

$1,175

Notes: Amount of funding is based on Bank of New York Mellon’s Cash Activity Report.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/6/2009.

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Table 2.25. Chrysler Financial made its first loan payment to the Government on
March 17, 2009, repaying $3.5 million of its principal balance along with interest
payments of approximately $932,000.188
According to Treasury officials, Chrysler Financial sought additional funding
from TARP beyond the initial $1.5 billion. In response, on April 7, 2009, Treasury
asked Chrysler Financial to obtain waivers from the top 25 Chrysler Financial executives that would have waived legal claims against Treasury and Chrysler Financial
resulting from the recent changes in executive compensation requirements for
TARP recipients. Chrysler Financial’s management, however, informed Treasury
that it was unable to obtain waivers from all 25 executives, therefore the request for
additional funding was denied.189

Auto Supplier Support Program
On March 19, 2009, Treasury announced a new program aimed at supporting
the suppliers to the U.S. auto manufacturing industry. The Auto Supplier Support
Program (“ASSP”) is a renewable one-year program that will provide up to $5 billion in financing that is intended to benefit both suppliers and auto manufacturers.
The program provides Government-backed protection to the suppliers against any
failure by the manufacturers to make payments on goods that they receive from
their suppliers, even if the manufacturers file for bankruptcy.190

Program Objectives
As of March 31, 2009, TARP has provided $24.8 billion of support to GM,
Chrysler, GMAC, and Chrysler Financial. The auto suppliers, however, are confronted by their own challenges in the face of potentially bankrupt clients. First,
the auto suppliers are concerned with whether they will continue to have customers (the auto manufacturers) to purchase their parts. These auto suppliers have developed symbiotic, long-term relationships with the auto manufacturers, frequently
developing specialized parts for their use. Secondly, the auto suppliers are uncertain about whether they will receive payments for auto parts that are delivered to
the auto manufacturers. On March 19, 2009, the Treasury Secretary stated:
The Supplier Support Program will help stabilize a critical component of the American auto industry during the difficult period
of restructuring that lies ahead. The program will provide supply
companies with much needed access to liquidity to assist them
in meeting payrolls and covering their expenses, while giving the
domestic auto companies reliable access to the parts they need.191
Treasury stated that it intends to provide Government-backed financing to break
the adverse credit cycle affecting the suppliers and the manufacturers by “giving

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

suppliers the confidence they need to continue shipping parts, pay their employees
and continue their operations.” The program goals are as follows:192

Receivables: Receivables are amounts of
money owed to a company. They include
claims to cash or other assets that arise
from the sale of goods or services, or
other provisions.

• enable access to the program for auto companies and suppliers (upon approval)
for a fee based on qualifying terms
• provide suppliers with Government-backed protection that money owed to
them for products they ship will be paid no matter what happens to the auto
manufacturer
• permit suppliers to sell their receivables into the program at a modest discount,
which provides access to funding to pay their workers and support ongoing
operations

Background
The ASSP aims to address three areas of concern:193
• Tightening Receivables: Because of uncertainties about the manufacturers’ abilities to honor their obligations, suppliers are tightening receivables
conditions, or the timing of when the manufacturers must pay for their parts.
Normally, suppliers allow manufacturers 45 to 60 days to pay for the parts that
they deliver. However, currently suppliers are shortening the time that they are
giving the manufacturers to pay for the parts, at times requiring cash on delivery,
or even advance payment. The suppliers are shortening these time periods
because they are concerned that they will not be paid should the manufacturer
declare bankruptcy.
• Manufacturer Disruptions: More stringent payment terms complicate the
manufacturers’ attempts to implement their restructuring programs, because
they would need significantly more cash on hand to make these payments
so quickly. It also complicates their ability to produce automobiles on a normal schedule, which, through a self-reinforcing cycle, further endangers the
suppliers.
• Tightening Credit for Suppliers: Banks are less willing to extend credit based
on the suppliers’ receivables, because the banks are not certain that suppliers
will be able to collect the funds in the event that the auto manufacturers are
unable to pay.

Implementation
All domestic auto manufacturers have been invited to participate in the program,
and, as of March 31, 2009, GM and Chrysler have accepted.194 The auto manufacturer, not Treasury, selects which receivables from which suppliers it wishes to
include in ASSP. According to Treasury officials, once approved into the program,
the supplier will pay a fee that is deducted from the purchase price to participate.195

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Only receivables that are made with normal commercial terms are eligible for
participation. Further, only receivables relating to products or services shipped after
March 19, 2009, are eligible.196 The program will not cover the entire industry;
only certain receivables from certain suppliers, as selected by the manufacturer,
will be included in the program.197 The ASSP gives SIGTARP, GAO, and Treasury
the same inspection rights and access to personnel and information for the suppliers as they currently have for the auto manufacturers. Treasury will also receive
periodic certifications from the suppliers to ensure compliance with the program’s
requirements.198

Special Purpose Vehicle
The key operating component of the ASSP will be a special purpose vehicle (“SPV”)
that will be administered by Citigroup.199 The participating auto manufacturer will
provide an up-front cash commitment to the SPV (to be 5% of the total value of its
program). TARP will then provide a loan to the SPV for the agreed-upon amount.200
The SPVs will be structured in a way that, in the event of a bankruptcy filing by
the participating auto manufacturer, the SPV will be able to continue financing receivables while the company continues to operate under bankruptcy protection.201
Operations
Once included in the program, the suppliers will have the option either to allow a
receivable covered by the program to run its normal payment term (45 to 60 days)
or sell it to the SPV immediately at an additional discount. According to Treasury
officials, the supplier’s choice has the following ramifications:
• If they choose the former option, and the auto manufacturer pays the receivable
on its due date, the supplier receives that payment less a 2% discount and has
essentially paid a fee to insure against default. If the manufacturer fails to pay
the receivable, the TARP-funded SPV will fund the payment to the supplier.
• If the supplier chooses to sell the receivable before the payment is due, the
TARP-funded SPV will buy the receivable at a 3% discount from the supplier,
and then will seek payment from the auto manufacturer for the full amount
originally due to the supplier.202
In either case, if the auto manufacturer fails to make the payment, the SPV
(and, as direct result, the American taxpayer) will suffer a loss to the extent that accumulated fees from earlier transactions and the auto manufacturer’s 5% contribution are not sufficient to make up the shortfall.203
For example, an auto manufacturer anticipates that it will purchase $1,000
worth of auto parts from a supplier this year, so it pays the SPV $50 (e.g., 5% of
$1,000) to participate in the program with the supplier. Thereafter, every time the

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

auto company buys $100 worth of auto parts, it owes the supplier $100, giving
the supplier a $100 receivable. The supplier can then place the receivable into the
program. The supplier then has two possible ways to proceed based on its business
needs:
• Sell at a Discount: Sell the receivable to the SPV, immediately, at a 3% discount, $97 in this case. Although the supplier receives less than $100 for the
goods sold, it has cash in hand for its operations. The SPV will then attempt to
collect payment from the auto manufacturer.204
• Collect on Due Date: Collect the receivable when it is due at a 2% discount,
$98 in this case. The SPV will then attempt to collect the full amount from the
auto manufacturer.205
Traditionally, the private sector has offered similar receivables financing services
to suppliers in a variety of industries. However, due to the perceived riskiness of the
U.S. auto industry, and the general tightness of credit, the interest rates for these
loans have become too high for suppliers to afford. Treasury’s stated objective of
ASSP is to provide a temporary option to the affected industry and to transition
back to the private sector as soon as practical.206

Executive Compensation
Although the auto manufacturers that participate in ASSP are bound by the EESA
executive compensation limits, Treasury is not requiring the suppliers, even though
they are obvious beneficiaries of the program, to be bound by the same restrictions.

Auto Warranty Commitment Program
On March 30, 2009, Treasury announced a new program designed to give consumers purchasing new GM and Chrysler automobiles the confidence that their warranties will be honored.207 Treasury preliminarily discussed potential funding for the
Auto Warranty Commitment Program of up to an estimated $1.1 billion.208
Restructuring Period: As it relates to the
Auto Warranty Commitment Program,
the restructuring period began on
March 30, 2009, the announcement
date of the Program, and ends the date
that restructuring is complete.

Program Objectives
As noted previously, the Administration is working with both GM and Chrysler to
develop new restructuring plans that comply with the requirements set out under
AIFP. On March 30, 2009, both GM and Chrysler were granted 60- and 30-day
extensions, respectively, for submitting revised restructuring plans to Treasury.209
The Auto Warranty Commitment Program will help provide certainty to GM and
Chrysler consumers that if they purchase a new car during the restructuring
period,210 their warranties will be valid, even if the manufacturer goes bankrupt.211

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Background
The warranty program will cover all warranties on new vehicles purchased from
GM and Chrysler from the date of the announcement, March 30, 2009. Their
participation in the program is subject to the same executive compensation and
corporate governance provisions that were established for AIFP. Specifically, the
program will involve the following activities:212
• creation of a separate legal entity that is jointly funded by cash from the manufacturer and a loan from Treasury to pay for warranty expenses on new vehicles
sold during the restructuring period
• appointment of a program administrator who will either arrange for the warranty liabilities to be assumed by a third party or use the cash to pay for covered
warranty services in the event that an auto manufacturer fails

Implementation
Consumers who buy a new GM or Chrysler car during the covered periods are
eligible for the Auto Warranty Commitment Program. Participation in the program
is automatic; the consumer does not need to do anything to receive the program’s
benefits.
Auto manufacturers normally establish an accounting reserve, or funding allowance, for each new vehicle sold to cover expected warranty costs for each vehicle.
According to Treasury, future warranty payments will be estimated from historical
costs by vehicle type. The warranty program will be funded for 125% of projected
future costs — 15% by auto manufacturers and 110% by Treasury; this cash will
be placed into a “special purpose company” for paying warranty claims. The special
purpose company will be able to continue paying warranty claims even if the auto
manufacturer discontinues operations. In the event that the auto manufacturer
discontinues operations, the program administrator and Treasury will attempt to
transfer the warranty obligations to another entity, such as an insurance company,
another auto manufacturer, or parts supplier that could fulfill the consumers’ warranty claims. If the obligation cannot be transferred, the administrator will use the
cash to pay covered warranty claims.213

Warranty: A service contract or agreement for a specific duration that is a
guarantee of the integrity of a product
and details the manufacturer’s responsibility for the repair or replacement of
defective parts.
Special Purpose Company: Term used
interchangeably with special purpose
vehicle (“SPV”).

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92

TARP TUTORIAL: SECURITIZATION
Basics of Securitization
Securitization: A process whereby a
financial institution assembles pools of
cash-flow-producing assets (such as
loans) and then sells an interest in the
cash flows as securities to investors.

Securitization is a process whereby a financial institution buys pools of cash-flow-producing
assets (such as loans) and then sells interests in the monthly payments by the borrowers
as securities to investors.
Securitized assets, which include consumer and business loans, have played a prominent role in the current credit crisis. The weakness in the securitized asset market can

Subprime Borrowers: Refers to borrowers who do not qualify for prime
interest rates because they exhibit one
or more of the following characteristics: weakened credit histories typically
characterized by payment delinquencies, previous charge-offs, judgments,
or bankruptcies; low credit scores; high
debt-burden ratios; or high loan-to-value
ratios.

substantially be traced back to the individual subprime borrowers whose loans had been
securitized. As the subprime borrowers began to miss their monthly loan payments, the
value of the securities backed by the borrowers’ loans began to lose value. Throughout
2008, investors were losing confidence in these securities and therefore stopped buying
them. Banks, unable to sell their loans to securities issuers, did not have the money to
continue making new loans.
In response to these circumstances, Treasury and the Federal Reserve introduced
TALF and other programs designed to alleviate the impact of problems in the securities
market. A short overview of the subject will help place some of these programs in context.

Securities Issuer: A separate legal
entity that buys cash-flow-producing
assets such as loans, pools them
together, and sells portions of the
pools of loans as securities.

Conceptually, all securitizations share the same simple timeline:
1.

Borrowers take out loans with a lender or bank.

2.

The bank sells a collection of the loans to a specialized entity (the “issuer” or
“securities issuer”).

3.

The issuer sells “securities” to investors.

The actual transactions can become extremely complex, but the essential steps in
Figure 2.15 will always be present.
The process has the potential to be beneficial to all parties. First, the borrowers may
receive lower interest rates as a result of the greater supply of funds available for lending.

FIGURE 2.15

SIMPLIFIED SECURITIZATION PROCESS
STEP
1
INDIVIDUAL
BORROWERS

STEP
2
BANK

SECURITIES
ISSUER

STEP
3
INVESTORS

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Second, the bank can sell a large number of loans for cash, which allows it to make more

FIGURE 2.17

loans. Third, the investors can put their money in a small number of relatively diversified

PRIVATE-LABEL MORTGAGE-BACKED
SECURITIES NET ISSUANCE IN THE
UNITED STATES

and potentially liquid (i.e., easy to sell) investments (securities), rather than investing in
individual loans.

$ Billions

Securitization has become important because it has been replacing the traditional
way that banks held loans, i.e., on their books and for the long term. This change has
been especially significant for residential and commercial mortgages, which have been

$600
$400

packaged into mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”), and for consumer and small-business
loans which have been packaged into asset-backed securities (“ABS”). This method of

$200

funding had been growing until 2008, when troubles in the securitization market led to a

0

precipitous decline. Treasury has estimated that, prior to 2008, securitization represented

0

40% of all lending in the United States, with traditional financial institutions such as banks

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

-$200

making up the remaining 60%. Figure 2.17 illustrates how significantly securitization has
declined as a result of the current crisis. This decline in lending contributed to the crisis

-$400

that prompted Treasury’s creation of TARP.
MBS
CMBS

Major Securitization Participants
An example of a mortgage securitization (see Figure 2.16) will help illustrate the process.
The Borrower. The borrower is the homeowner. The process of creating a mortgage
starts with a prospective homebuyer who selects a house to purchase and then applies for
a loan.
The Bank. The bank is the lender. The homeowner works with a lender who prepares
and approves the mortgage application. Lenders are typically banks, savings and loan
institutions, or mortgage bankers.
If the application is approved, funds are loaned to the homeowner for the purchase of
the home; at this point, a mortgage is created. The lender or “loan originator” may then

FIGURE 2.16

SECURITIZATION PARTICIPANTS AND ROLES

BORROWER

BANK

ISSUER

INVESTORS

Note: Data as of 3/12/2009.
Source: Federal Reserve, “Flow of Funds Account of the United
States,” 3/12/2009, www.federalreserve.gov, accessed
3/31/2009.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

sell the newly created mortgage to the issuer. Banks do this in part to “free up” capital, to
get more cash and make more loans.
The Issuer. The issuer is the party that buys loans made by banks and creates a security backed by the pool of loans. The issuers buy the loans from sellers and place them
into a company they have created to own a specific collection of loans — such an entity is
known as a special purpose vehicle (“SPV”) or mortgage trust.
The SPV is a company in its own right. It has its own special collection of assets and
its own corporate structure.
Because the securities that the issuer creates are collateralized, or “backed” by the
mortgages that make them up, they are called mortgage-backed securities, or MBS.
These MBS are like bonds; they pay an interest rate to the investors who buy them. The
money to pay the interest comes from the monthly payments made by each one of the
homeowners who make their monthly mortgage payments on their loans.
The issuer might sell more than one class of MBS from the same pool of loans. It may,
for example, sell the first dollars received from the underlying mortgages to a “class A”
security, and the remaining payments to a “class B” security. These various “classes” of
securities are sometimes called “tranches.”
The Investor. The investors in MBS are almost exclusively institutions: pension funds,
insurance companies, mutual funds, and corporations. They buy the MBS from the issuer
and can hold the MBS and receive the regular interest payments, or can sell it to others on
the open market.

Supporting Securitization Participants
The Loan Servicer. The SPV typically hires a specialty firm to service the loans it
buys. These firms collect the monthly payments from the borrowers, follow up on delinquencies, and, when payments are significantly late, arrange foreclosures or negotiate
loan modifications.214
The Rating Agency. The SPV hires a rating agency to perform an analysis of the
pool of loans that have been collected together and assign a rating. Rating agencies
consider factors such as the credit scores of the borrowers, the underwriting standards
used, and the anticipated cash flow.215 The rating reflects the rating agency’s opinion as
to the likelihood that the borrowers will continue to make the necessary payments on
their mortgages. During the current economic crisis, rating agencies often proved to be
overly optimistic with respect to the repayment rates of MBS, in particular MBS backed by
residential mortgages.

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TERM ASSET-BACKED SECURITIES LOAN FACILITY
In November 2008, the Federal Reserve and Treasury announced the Term AssetBacked Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”), a new facility under which, as initially
announced, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (“FRBNY”) would issue up to
$200 billion in loans designed to make credit available to consumers and small
businesses. As part of the original TALF, Treasury committed to provide up to $20
billion to absorb losses on those loans using TARP funds.216 Subsequent to the
initial TALF announcement, Treasury and the Federal Reserve have announced the
intended expansion of TALF, bringing the total facility funding up to $1 trillion, of
which Treasury anticipates it will fund up to $80 billion.217
In recent years, funds for consumer and small-business loans have frequently
come from the sale of ABS. In the ABS market, pools of loans are gathered together and then securitized. Rating agencies rate the riskiness of the pooled loans.
Investors, in turn, base their interest rate requirements, or the amount of interest
the security will pay to the investor, to a large degree, on the ratings of the security.
The ABS market made up almost 25% of the overall funding for consumer and
small-business loans prior to the credit market disruptions of 2008.218
In 2008, with investors increasingly reluctant to buy AAA-rated ABS, the
Federal Reserve proposed TALF as a means of reopening channels of funding
for assets that have traditionally been securitized, and, thus, indirectly supplying
funds to the end user — the consumer and business borrowers. According to the
Federal Reserve, TALF’s effect on the market began even before its first transaction: “Recently, consumer loan growth has also reportedly been buoyed by banks’
decisions to build inventory in anticipation of issuance into the Term Asset-Backed
Securities Loan Facility (TALF).”219

The ABS Market Faces Breakdown
In 2008, as borrowers began defaulting on their loans and the ABS supported by
those loans depreciated in value, investors stopped buying ABS. Traditional investors exited the market, non-traditional investors were unable to obtain funding,
and investors in general were concerned about a deep recession.220 According to
Treasury, “the [market] shock was compounded by the fact that loan underwriting
standards used by some originators had become far too lax and by the proliferation
of structured credit products, some of which were ill-understood by some market
participants.”221
Lenders that relied on the ABS securitization of their consumer and small-business loans were then unable to make as many loans, because their funding source
for such loans — the cash they received from the sale of existing loans — was no
longer available. With traditional ABS investors absent from the market, FRBNY
and Treasury developed TALF to provide low-cost, non-recourse financing for the
purchase of certain types of ABS in an attempt to induce investors to purchase
AAA-rated ABS.

For more details on the securitization process and the typical lending process prior to the market
breakdown, refer to “TARP Tutorial:
Securitization” earlier in this section.

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Floorplan: Revolving lines of credit used
to finance inventories of items including,
but not limited to, vehicles; agricultural,
construction, or manufacturing equipment; manufactured housing; large appliances; and electronic equipment.
Servicing Advance Receivables: Receivables related to residential mortgage loan
securitizations that grant the servicer
first priority in any insurance or liquidation
proceeds from a loan, and, if those proceeds are insufficient, grants the servicer
a first priority to general collections of the
related securitization.
Haircut: Difference in the value of the collateral and the value of the loan (the loan
value is less than the collateral value).
Primary Dealers: Banks and securities
broker-dealers that trade in U.S. Government securities with the Federal Reserve
Bank of New York for the purpose of carrying out open market operations. The 16
current primary dealers are listed below.
Primary Dealer List:
BNP Paribas Securities Corp.
Banc of America Securities LLC
Barclays Capital Inc.
Cantor Fitzgerald & Co.
Citigroup Global Markets Inc.
Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC
Daiwa Securities America Inc.
Deutsche Bank Securities Inc.
Dresdner Kleinwort Securities LLC
Goldman, Sachs & Co.
Greenwich Capital Markets, Inc.
HSBC Securities (USA) Inc.
J. P. Morgan Securities Inc.
Mizuho Securities USA Inc.
Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated
UBS Securities LLC

TALF Mechanics
As of March 31, 2009, TALF could fund up to $200 billion in FRBNY loans, and it
has been announced that TALF’s funding capacity could increase up to $1 trillion.
TALF is divided organizationally into two parts:
• lending program: originates loans to eligible borrowers
• asset disposition facility: an SPV used by FRBNY if borrowers choose to stop
paying interest on their loans and surrender their collateral
FRBNY will manage both the lending program and the asset disposition facility.
The funding for the lending program will come from FRBNY. The funding for the
asset disposition SPV will first come from interest payments made by borrowers
from the lending program, and then from Treasury’s use of TARP funds to purchase
subordinated debt from the SPV.222 As of March 31, 2009, TARP participation in
TALF had committed $20 billion, but it has been announced that this commitment could increase to up to $80 billion as TALF expands. The funding provided
by TARP to the SPV is available to purchase surrendered assets from FRBNY and
offset losses associated with disposing of the surrendered assets.

Lending Program
In its current form, FRBNY’s TALF lending program makes three-year, nonrecourse loans to eligible borrowers. The TALF loans are secured by the posting of
collateral in the form of ABS, which may be backed by student, auto, credit card,
equipment, auto floorplan, small-business loans, or mortgage servicing advance
receivables. Both the interest rates and the haircuts on TALF loans are based on
the type and riskiness of the ABS securing the TALF loan. Since the loan is nonrecourse, FRBNY cannot hold the TALF borrower liable for any losses beyond the
surrender of any assets pledged as collateral — in this case, the ABS securities.
Eligible Borrowers and Eligible Collateral

TALF’s lending program makes secured loans to qualifying borrowers.223 TALF
participants must use a primary dealer to access TALF and to deliver the
collateral to the custodian bank (The Bank of New York Mellon (“BNYM”)).
The type and characteristics of eligible collateral for TALF is detailed in Table 2.26.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Collateral must meet eligibility criteria such as:224
• The collateral is in the form of U.S. dollar-denominated cash (not synthetic)
ABS.
• The ABS must have a short-term and long-term credit rating of the highest
investment-grade rating category (e.g., AAA) from two or more major, nationally
recognized statistical rating organizations (“NRSROs”). In addition, the ABS
cannot have a long-term credit rating less than the highest rating by a major
NRSRO. Major NRSROs for purposes of TALF are Fitch Ratings, Moody’s
Investors Service, and Standard & Poor’s.
• Substantially all of the loans underlying the ABS were originated in the United
States.
• The loans supporting the ABS were initially limited to auto, student, and credit
card loans, or small-business loans guaranteed by the U.S. Small Business
Administration (“SBA”). As of March 31, 2009, permissible underlying loans
also include equipment loans, floorplan loans, or receivables related to residential mortgage servicing advances (servicing advance receivables).
• ABS backed by credit card loans and dealer floorplan must be issued to refinance existing credit card and dealer floorplan ABS maturing in 2009, and must
be issued in amounts no greater than the amount of the maturing security.225
• Collateral cannot be backed by loans originated or securitized by the TALF borrower or an affiliate of the borrower. In other words, the TALF borrower cannot

Collateral: An asset pledged by a borrower to a lender until a loan is repaid. In
the case of TALF loans, the collateral is
asset-backed securities.
Custodian Bank: The bank that holds the
collateral and manages the accounts for
FRBNY.
Synthetic ABS: A security that derives its
value and cash flow from sources other
than from a physical set of reference
assets.

TABLE 2.26

TALF-ELIGIBLE ASSET-BACKED SECURITIES
Sector

Subsector

Loan Characteristics

Expected Life ABS Issuance Date

Retail loans and leases related to cars, light trucks,
motorcycles, and other recreational vehicles

Originated on or after
October 1, 2007

<5 years

January 1, 2009

Commercial, Government and rental fleet leases

Originated on or after
October 1, 2007

<5 years

January 1, 2009

Student Loans

Federally guaranteed (including consolidated) and private

Originated on or after
May 1, 2007

Credit Card Receivables

Consumer or corporate

Maturing in 2009

<5 years

January 1, 2009

Equipment Loans

Retail loans and leases

Originated on or after
October 1, 2007

<5 years

January 1, 2009

Floorplan loans

Revolving lines of credit to finance dealer investors

Maturing in 2009

<5 years

January 1, 2009

Small-Business Loans

Fully guaranteed SBA 7(a) and 504 loans, debentures, and
pools

Originated on or after
January 1, 2008

Servicing Advance
Receivables

Principal and interest, tax and insurance, and corporate
advances made by Fannie Mae- or Freddie Mac-approved
residential mortgage servicers under pooling and service
agreements

Originated on or after
January 1, 2007

Auto Loans

Source: FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.

January 1, 2009

January 1, 2008
<5 years

January 1, 2009

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

also be, or be affiliated with, either the institution that is selling the ABS or the
original lender.
Loan Terms by Asset Class

Skin in the game: Equity stake in an
investment; down payment; the amount
an investor can lose.

TALF loans are collateralized by ABS, as previously described, and are non-recourse to the borrower with terms of up to three years. The eligibility of the TALF
borrower and the TALF collateral is determined through the application process.
Once the collateral is deemed to be eligible, a haircut will be assigned to the collateral. Haircuts represent the amount of money put up by the borrower, or the borrower’s “skin in the game,” and are required for all TALF loans in varying amounts.
Under TALF, FRBNY will lend each borrower the amount of the purchase price of
the pledged ABS minus the haircut, subject to certain limitations. The risk for any
borrower is limited to the haircut amount; the Government is responsible for all
losses beyond that original down payment. The initial haircuts, as a percentage of
collateral value, are shown in Table 2.27.
Some of the underlying assets may have an average life beyond the defined
terms. If the average life of Government-guaranteed ABS (SBA loans) is greater
than five years, haircuts will increase by one percentage point for every two years of
average additional life. For all other ABS with average lives beyond five years, haircuts will increase by one percentage point for each additional year of average life.

TABLE 2.27

TALF HAIRCUT PERCENTAGES
ABS Expected Life (years)
Sector

Subsector

0-1

>1-2

Auto

Prime retail lease

>2-3

>3-4

>4-5

>5-6

>6-7

10%

11%

12%

13%

14%

NA

NA

Auto

Prime retail loan

6%

7%

8%

9%

10%

NA

NA

Auto

Sub-prime retail loan

9%

10%

11%

12%

13%

NA

NA

Auto

RV/Motorcycle

7%

8%

9%

10%

11%

NA

NA

Floorplan

Auto

12%

13%

14%

15%

16%

NA

NA

Credit Card

Prime

5%

5%

6%

7%

8%

NA

NA

Credit Card

Subprime

6%

7%

8%

9%

10%

NA

NA

Student Loan

Private

8%

9%

10%

11%

12%

13%

14%

Student Loan

Government Guaranteed

5%

5%

5%

5%

5%

6%

6%

Small Business

SBA Loans

5%

5%

5%

5%

5%

6%

6%

Source: FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (Operations for 3/17/2009),” http://www.newyorkfed.org/markets/
TALF_operations_090317.html, accessed 3/27/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Interest Rates

Interest rates are based on the loan asset class, and most are quoted at a spread
over the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) (a generally accepted interest
rate standard). Interest payments on the TALF loans are payable monthly. TALF
loan interest rates may be fixed or floating, as determined by the collateral, and are
generally below market rate. If the cash flow supporting the collateral has a fixed
interest rate, then the TALF loan will have a fixed interest rate; and if the cash flow
supporting the collateral has a floating interest rate, then the TALF loan interest rate will also float. Table 2.28 illustrates the interest rates for the March 2009
loans.

Asset Disposition Facility
FRBNY created TALF LLC, the SPV for the asset disposition facility, to “purchase
and manage any [surrendered] assets received by the New York Fed in connection
with any TALF loans.”226 TALF LLC will purchase these assets at a “price equal to
the outstanding TALF loan amount plus accrued but unpaid interest.”227 Both the
Federal Reserve and TARP will fund the purchase of the surrendered assets in the
form of a senior and subordinated loan, respectively.
When FRBNY created TALF LLC, TARP loaned TALF LLC $100 million to
provide initial funding, of which $15.75 million was allocated to cover administrative costs.228 TARP will continue to fund TALF LLC, as needed, until the full TARP
commitment has been invested. If more funds are required, then FRBNY would
make a non-recourse loan to the SPV.229

TABLE 2.28

TALF INTEREST RATES
Sector

Subsector

Fixed

Floating

Auto

3-year LIBOR + 100 bps
1-month LIBOR +
(2.733% for the March loans) 100 bps

Credit Card

3-year LIBOR + 100 bps
1-month LIBOR +
(2.733% for the March loans) 100 bps

Student Loan

Private

NA

1-month LIBOR +
100 bps

Student Loan

Government guaranteed

NA

1-month LIBOR +
50 bps

Small Business

SBA loans 7(a)

NA

Fed Funds Target + 75
bps

Small Business

SBA loans 504

3-year LIBOR + 50 bps
NA
(2.233% for the March loans)

Source: FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (Operations for 3/17/2009),” http://www.newyorkfed.org/markets/
TALF_operations_090317.html, accessed 3/27/2009.
Please refer to the “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses” discussion in this report for more information on SBA loans.

Spread: The difference between two
interest rates.
London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”):
The interest rate that large banks in
London charge each other for dollardenominated funds.
Basis Points (bps): One one-hundredth
of a percentage point. (For example, the
difference between interest rates of 5.5%
and 5.0% is 50 basis points.)
Federal Funds [Target] Rate: The interest
rate that financial institutions charge each
other for overnight loans of their monetary reserves. A rise in the Federal funds
rate (compared with other short-term
interest rates) suggests a tightening of
monetary policy, whereas a fall suggests
an easing. The Federal Funds Target Rate
is an interest rate goal set periodically by
the Federal Open Market Committee.

99

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

Subscription Date: Loan request date. For
TALF loans, requests include: ABS collateral expected to pledge, loan amount,
and interest rate format (fixed or floating).
CUSIPs: Unique identifying number assigned to all registered securities (similar
to a social security number).
Offering Documents/Prospectus: Documents which disclose and describe a securities offering to the public and private
investors, containing information required
under Federal and state securities laws as
applicable.
Settlement Date: The closing date for
the sale of an investment, similar to the
closing date for a home purchase. On the
settlement date (three days after trade
in the case of U.S. equities), funds and
securities trade hands and any necessary
legal documents are signed.

MONTHLY INTEREST EXAMPLE
If the TALF borrower owes 3% interest to FRBNY
($2.25 monthly) on a $900 TALF loan, and the
TALF borrower receives 6% interest
($5 monthly) on $1,000 of the ABS
collateral, then BNYM sends the difference of
$2.75 ($5 – $2.25) to the TALF borrower.

A portion of the interest rate paid by each borrower for a TALF loan will accumulate in the asset disposition facility and absorb losses on surrendered collateral.230 Once losses become greater than the accumulated interest, TARP will then
provide the additional funding for the SPV until the purchase of surrendered collateral exceeds the amount of committed funds by TARP — currently $20 billion
but anticipated to be up to $80 billion. FRBNY will provide any additional funding
once the TARP commitment is expended. The funding for the SPV will be in the
form of loans to the SPV, with TARP receiving interest at one-month LIBOR plus
3% and the Federal Reserve receiving one-month LIBOR plus 1%.231
Treasury’s maximum liability is for losses equal to the total amount committed to the SPV. Any residual returns (e.g., proceeds from the sale of the assets or
interest earned on the loans) would be shared between FRBNY and Treasury, with
Treasury receiving 90% and FRBNY receiving 10%.232

TALF Process Example
To start the process of ultimately obtaining a loan under TALF, an eligible borrower
contacts a primary dealer about receiving a TALF loan. Prior to the subscription
date of the TALF loan, the eligible borrower submits to the primary dealer its loan
package, which includes the loan request amount, interest rate format (based on
collateral), CUSIPs of the ABS, and the prospectus or offering documents. On
the subscription date of the loan, the primary dealer submits to BNYM (custodian
bank) and FRBNY the loan package of the borrower and the total loan amount
from all of the individual borrowers serviced by that primary dealer. BNYM then
reviews the loan packages.233
Prior to the settlement date, BNYM will return to each primary dealer a list
containing the borrower’s approved loan amount, ABS expected to be delivered,
administration fee, and haircut amount. On the settlement date, the primary dealer
submits to BNYM the ABS, the administration fee, and the haircut amount, and
BNYM credits the primary dealer’s account (for further delivery to the borrower)
the loan amount.234
In making the required monthly payments, any principal and interest that the
ABS generates (e.g., the amount of principal and interest to which the security
entitles the holder) is received by BNYM and applied to the TALF loan. Given the
low interest rate charged by FRBNY, at least initially, the interest earned on the
ABS will likely be greater than the interest charged by FRBNY on the TALF loan.
Accordingly, as long as the ABS maintains its value, the borrower will likely not
need to make any cash payment each month, but will actually receive a monthly
interest payment from BNYM (representing the interest paid on the ABS minus
the smaller TALF interest rate). If there is not enough interest received from the
ABS to cover the TALF loan payments, BNYM requests the balance from the TALF

101

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

borrower. As long as the TALF borrower makes the regular monthly interest payments, the collateral will be returned when the loan is repaid in full.235
If the borrower decides to walk away from the loan, it must submit a Collateral
Surrender and Acceptance Notice which signs over the rights to the collateral
to FRBNY. Since the loan is non-recourse, there is no further action against the
borrower, who can keep the total amount borrowed. If the borrower does not
submit the Collateral Surrender and Acceptance Notice, it may be required to
repay the entire TALF loan.236 Should the borrower surrender the loan, the Federal
Reserve will sell the surrendered collateral to the Asset Disposition SPV.237 When
the SPV buys the collateral, it pays the outstanding loan amount plus any unpaid
interest. For a detailed explanation of non-recourse loans and their application to
TALF, refer to SIGTARP’s Initial Report, Section 3: “TARP Implementation and
Administration.”
For further detail on the TALF process, see Figure 2.18.

FIGURE 2.18

TALF PROCESS FLOW
TALF BORROWER

Surrender
ABS collateral to
FRBNY

YES

Interest to
FRBNY

FEDERAL RESERVE

Fraud Prevention Provisions
SIGTARP identified a number of risks associated with TALF in its Initial Report.
Refer to Section 4 of this report for information on SIGTARP’s recommendations.
Acting on some of SIGTARP’s recommendations, the Federal Reserve has announced several fraud-prevention provisions for TALF.
The fraud deterrent and compliance framework announced by FRBNY includes: “a borrower acceptance standard, an assurance program related to borrower
eligibility requirements, on-site inspection rights related to the borrower’s obligations under the MLSA [Master Loan and Security Agreement] in respect to its
borrowings under the TALF and the right to reject a borrower for any reason.”238 To
further assist in the borrower screening, “primary dealers are required to apply their
internal customer identification program and due diligence procedures to each borrower.”239 “Instances may arise where a borrower will not be eligible on subscription
day because the borrower has been previously identified as ‘high-risk’ and, therefore, subjected to a more in-depth review by FRBNY compliance.”240
Additionally, an ABS issuer must provide a certification that the ABS are TALF
eligible, that an independent accounting firm has certified that the ABS are TALF
eligible, and the issuer has not made any material misstatements to an NRSRO
to obtain a particular credit rating.241 This certification provides that the loans are
made in good faith and in compliance with the standards set forth in the terms and
conditions of TALF. Table 2.29 provides the framework set forth for fraud deterrence and compliance.

Make TALF
loan interest
payments

NO

If no receipt
of interest
payment, sell
ABS to SPV

Interest received
Cash purchase
from TALF
of ABS
borrowersa

Cash purchase
of ABS

TALF LLC (SPV)

Receive portion of
the proceeds from
the management
and sale of ABS

Up to $20 billion
or TARP
commitment

TARP
Cash Flow

Decision Flow

Note:
a
A portion of the interest rate paid by each TALF borrower will
accumulate in the SPV.
Sources: Diagram based on Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan
Facility: Terms and Conditions from FRBNY, 3/19/2009,
www.newyorkfed.org accessed 3/27/2009; FRBNY, response to
SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.

102

SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

TABLE 2.29

TALF FRAUD PREVENTION AND COMPLIANCE FRAMEWORK
•
•

•
•
•
Issuer/
Sponsor

•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Auditor

•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Primary Dealer
•

•
•
•
•
•
•
•
FRBNY

•

Issuer/Sponsor certifies that:
The terms and conditions have been reviewed.
The ABS have the highest investment-grade rating category from two or more rating agencies; cannot have a rating
below the highest rating available from any NRSRO; the ratings depend on no third-party credit enhancement; and they
are not on review or watch from downgrade.
The securities are cleared through the Depository Trust Company (DTC).
Substantially all of the underlying borrowers are U.S.-domiciled.
The underlying assets are of a permitted type (auto, student, credit card, equipment, floorplan, or receivables), and
contain no exposures that are themselves cash or synthetic ABS.
All underlying loans were made after their respective eligibility dates.
The accounting firm it uses for FRBNY work on the securities may call the TALF compliance hotline, regardless of client
confidentiality rules.
It understands that the securities may not be submitted to TALF by anyone affiliated with originators of the underlying
loans.
It will issue a press release if any statements regarding basic eligibility criteria change or become false.
The information provided to the rating agencies was true.
It will cover any losses of the FRBNY and TALF LLC that resulted from relying on the information provided by the issuer/
sponsor (i.e., provide “indemnification”).
Should the collateral be proven to be ineligible, the issuer/sponsor agrees to allow Treasury officials, SIGTARP, and
GAO to have access to personnel, data, documents, etc. relevant to the breach.
Auditor Attestation Form confirms the issuer/sponsor’s eligibility claims:
Substantially all of the originations of the loans in ABS were made to U.S.-domiciled people or entities.
Underlying ABS credit exposure types are eligible and do not include exposures that are cash or synthetic ABS.
Substantially all of the underlying ABS Loan Characteristics (origination date, maturity date, etc.) meet the criteria.
Primary Dealer represents and warrants that:
It has the power and authority to enter into the agreements.
It is in good standing under the laws of its jurisdiction.
The agreement is legally binding.
It has made no untrue statement in any document, certificate, or statement related to the Agreement, or omitted any
material act. (With respect to the offering materials, this applies only to the Primary Dealer that acted as underwriter.)
It has provided each borrower with a copy of the lending agreement, and that the borrower has authorized the Primary
Dealer to act on its behalf.
It is subject to the certain rules, including that it maintains and is in compliance with an anti-money-laundering program
under the USA Patriot Act, that it is Federally regulated, that it has implemented a customer identity program enabling it
to know the identity of its customers, and that it will annually so certify.
Its customer agreements are in full force.
All written material delivered to the Lender, Administrator, or Custodian is accurate and complete.
The borrower is eligible.
The collateral is eligible.
FRBNY has limited on-site inspection rights of borrower personnel, data, documents, etc. relevant to the certifications
above.
FRBNY can reject a loan application for any reason.
FRBNY may review all loan files held by the custodian related to all of the TALF loans. If the collateral is found to be
ineligible, FRBNY has the right of indemnity against the issuer/sponsor in the event damages are suffered in relation to
the collateral and further remedy is available if there is evidence of fraudulent activity. If the borrower is ever found to
be ineligible, the non-recourse feature of the TALF loan becomes inapplicable and the borrower must repay the entire
loan amount.
FRBNY has established a telephone and Internet hotline to report fraudulent conduct or activity related to TALF.

Sources: Issuer/Sponsor: FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009; FRBNY, “Certification as to TALF
Eligibility,” 3/24/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009. Auditor: FRBNY, “Form of Auditor Attestation,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009. Primary Dealer: FRBNY, “Term
Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009; FRBNY, “Master Loan and Security Agreement,” 3/27/2009, www.newyorkfed.
org, accessed 3/27/2009. FRBNY: FRBNY, “Master Loan and Security Agreement,” 3/27/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009; FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently
Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.

103

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TABLE 2.30

Status of Funds
As of March 31, 2009, FRBNY lent $4.7 billion backed by auto and credit card
ABS collateral. Since the program’s commencement, there has been one group of
TALF loans issued. For a breakdown of the loans by ABS sector, see Table 2.30.
As of March 31, 2009, TARP loaned TALF LLC $100 million to provide initial
funding, of which $15.75 million was allocated to cover administrative costs.
As of the drafting of this report, no TALF-related assets had been surrendered.
Table 2.31 illustrates the total TARP commitment and total funds disbursed.

Executive Compensation
As of March 31, 2009, no executive compensation restrictions were placed on
any of the participants in TALF, including the issuer/sponsor or the borrower.
Originally, it was contemplated that the ABS issuers/sponsors and FRBNY would
be required to be bound by EESA executive compensation restrictions. After the
ARRA changes to EESA, however, Treasury removed the restrictions on TALF
issuers/sponsors, because “such a policy would not enhance the effectiveness of
the TALF in restoring consumer credit markets.”242 SIGTARP requested from OFS
and Treasury’s General Counsel a legal explanation for these changes; the letter
from SIGTARP and the responses from OFS and the Treasury General Counsel are
contained in Appendix I.

TALF LOANS

($ MILLIONS)
Interest Rates

Sector
Auto
Credit Card
Student Loan
Small Business
Total

Amount

Fixed

Floating

$1,902.4

2.733%

1.523%

2,804.5

2.733%

1.523%

–
–
$4,706.9

Source: Numbers affected by rounding. Data as of 3/31/2009.
FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (Operations
for 3/17/2009),” http://www.newyorkfed.org/markets/
TALF_operations_090317.html, accessed 3/27/2009.

TABLE 2.31

TARP LOANS TO TALF LLC
Total Committed
Total Disbursed

$20 billion
$100 million

Interest Received
Source: Numbers affected by rounding. Data as of 3/31/2009.
Treasury, GAO, and SIGTARP, briefing on TALF, 3/13/2009.

Going Forward
Treasury and the Federal Reserve have announced expansions in TALF. Additional
types of collateral have been made eligible for the April 2009 TALF loans.
Moreover, in conjunction with the introduction of the Public-Private Investment
Program (“PPIP”), a white paper issued by Treasury stated that TALF loans “will
be made available to investors to fund purchases of legacy securitization assets,”
which are expected to include legacy RMBS.243 Treasury also has announced that
it is exploring the possibility of extending TALF to AAA-rated tranches of new
securitizations in the form of CMBS, RMBS, and structures backed by corporate
debt. To accommodate these additions, TALF may increase its commitments up to
$1 trillion, with TARP participation increasing up to $80 billion.244 Treasury and
the Federal Reserve also expect to add collateralized debt obligations to the list of
eligible collateral.245

Collateralized Debt Obligation: A security
that entitles the purchaser to some portion of the cash flows from a portfolio of
assets, which may include bonds, loans,
mortgage-backed securities, or other
CDOs.

–

104

SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

April 2009 TALF Loans
FRBNY has released the terms for the April 14, 2009, TALF loans. Eligible collateral has been expanded to include ABS collateral backed by equipment loans, nonauto floorplan loans, leases of vehicle fleets, and receivables related to residential
mortgage servicing advances (servicing advance receivables). Table 2.32 and Table
2.33 illustrate the additional interest rates and haircuts for the April loans.
Legacy Assets in Public-Private Investment Program
Treasury, the Federal Reserve, and FDIC have announced the creation of PPIP
to facilitate the purchase of certain real estate-related legacy assets. The “PublicPrivate Investment Program” discussion immediately following describes how the
elements of PPIP provide leverage to private investors. As part of PPIP, Treasury
has announced that certain PPIP investment funds will be eligible to participate
in TALF, magnifying the leverage already provided to private capital. As further
discussed in Section 4 of this report, SIGTARP has recommended that PPIP funds
should not be permitted to participate in TALF without significant additional
protections.
TABLE 2.32

ADDITIONAL TALF INTEREST RATES
Sector

Subsector

Fixed

Floating

Equipment

3-year LIBOR + 100 1-month LIBOR + 100
bps
bps

Floorplan

3-year LIBOR + 100 1-month LIBOR + 100
bps
bps

Servicing
Advances

Residential
Mortgages

3-year LIBOR + 100 1-month LIBOR + 100
bps
bps

Source: Data as of 3/31/2009. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (Operations
for 4/7/2009),” http://www.newyorkfed.org/markets/talf_operations.html, accessed 3/27/2009.

TABLE 2.33

ADDITIONAL TALF APRIL LOAN HAIRCUT PERCENTAGES
ABS Expected Life (years)
Sector

Subsector

0-1

>1-2

Auto

Commercial and
Government Fleets

Auto

Rental Fleets

Equipment

Loans and Leases

Floorplan
Servicing
Advances

>2-3 >3-4 >4-5

9%

10%

11%

12%

13%

12%

13%

14%

15%

16%

5%

6%

7%

8%

9%

Non-auto

11%

12%

13%

14%

15%

Residential
Mortgages

12%

13%

14%

15%

16%

Source: Data as of 3/31/2009. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (Operations for
4/7/2009),” http://www.newyorkfed.org/markets/talf_operations.html, accessed 3/31/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

PUBLIC-PRIVATE INVESTMENT PROGRAM
On March 23, 2009, Treasury announced a coordinated effort with the Federal
Reserve and FDIC that, it has stated, will improve the health of financial institutions holding real estate-related assets in an attempt to increase the flow of credit
throughout the U.S. economy.246 The Public-Private Investment Program (“PPIP”)
will make investments in multiple Public-Private Investment Funds (“PPIFs”) to
purchase legacy loans and legacy securities (collectively “legacy assets”) from financial institutions.

Public-Private Investment Program Details
Under the terms of PPIP, Government funds will be invested in varying proportions
with private investors to purchase legacy assets. Plans for PPIP call for the use of
$75 billion of TARP funds in two new legacy asset subprograms and expansion of
TALF.247 Using significant leverage, either from, or backed by, the Government,
PPIP will involve from $500 billion to $1 trillion of capital for the purchase of
legacy loans and legacy securities in the Legacy Loans and Legacy Securities
programs:248
• Legacy Loans Program (“Loans Program”) — PPIFs in the Loans Program
will purchase real estate-related loans using TARP funds and private investment
capital combined with FDIC-guaranteed debt.
• Legacy Securities Program (“Securities Program”) — PPIFs in the Securities
Program will purchase real estate-related securities (i.e., MBS) using TARP
funds and private investment capital combined with TARP-issued debt.
• Expansion of TALF — TALF will be expanded to accept legacy securitized assets, which are expected to include legacy MBS.
Both the Loans Program and the Securities Program have equity and debt
financing elements. It is currently contemplated that TARP will be used to fund
Treasury’s equity position under PPIP.

Legacy Assets: Also known as troubled
assets, legacy assets are real estaterelated loans and securities (legacy loans
and legacy securities) that remain on
banks’ balance sheets and that have lost
value, but are difficult to price due to the
recent market disruption.

105

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

FIGURE 2.19

PPIP OVERVIEW

LEGACY LOANS
PROGRAM (PPIF)
Investment

EXPANSION OF
PROGRAM (PPIF)
Investment

Investment
Financing

Financing

Financing

Source: Based on Treasury, “Public-Private Investment Program: Fact Sheet,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, Chief of Compliance and CFO, SIGTARP interview, 3/30/2009.

Figure 2.19 describes the anticipated funding components of PPIP.
PPIP is designed to allow market participants to set the price for legacy assets
rather than having the Government or an independent third party determine value.
According to Treasury, this mechanism will help establish the highest market value
for the assets.249

Special Purpose Vehicle (“SPV”): An entity
whose operations are limited to the acquisition and financing of specific assets.

Legacy Loans Program
Treasury has stated that it intends for the Legacy Loans Program to provide
financial institutions of all sizes a mechanism for the disposition of hard-to-value
legacy loans through the formation of multiple special purpose vehicles (“SPVs”) or
PPIFs. Under the terms of the Loans Program, FDIC will oversee the formation,
funding, and operation of the PPIFs, which in turn will invest in legacy loans in an
auction process.250
Each PPIF will consist of equity made up of private investment capital
matched, dollar-for-dollar, with TARP funds and will have access to financing guaranteed by FDIC. FDIC will determine the financing level of the targeted legacy
loan pool based on its analysis and with the assistance of a third-party valuation
firm. Given the quality of the pool of legacy loans, FDIC will determine how much
of the loan purchase price it is willing to guarantee. According to the Treasury
fact sheet, it is contemplated that financing will not exceed a 6-to-1 debt-to-equity

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

ratio.251 Although FDIC will have an idea of value for the pool of legacy loans,
according to Treasury officials, FDIC will conduct an auction to determine the
ultimate price for the loan pools.252
The Legacy Loans Program includes a prohibition against private investor
participation in the auction process when the sellers of the loans at auction are
affiliates of the private investor, or where the seller of the loans at auction represents 10% or more of the aggregate private capital in the PPIF.253 In other words,
the bank selling the loan can invest up to 10% in the fund that is buying the loans
that it is selling. The PPIFs must agree to fraud, waste, and abuse protections and
provide access to SIGTARP.254
How the Legacy Loans Program Works255

1. Eligible banks, in conjunction with their primary banking regulators, identify a
pool of legacy loans they wish to sell and submit a request to FDIC.
2. FDIC engages a private, third-party firm to analyze and value the loans. Based
on this review, FDIC decides how much leverage (in the form of FDICguaranteed loans) it is willing to give to the pre-qualified private investors bidding on the asset. This amount may not exceed a 6-to-1 debt-to-equity ratio. In
effect, FDIC will guarantee up to $6 for every $1 that the PPIF invests.
3. FDIC conducts an auction, soliciting bids from the PPIFs.
4. Private investors must be pre-qualified and submit a refundable cash deposit of
5% of the bid value to FDIC in order to participate.256
5. The seller bank is then presented with the highest bid. If the seller accepts the
highest bid, the bidder is granted access to PPIF funding for purchase of the
legacy loans.
6. The PPIF debt is fully guaranteed by FDIC and collateralized by the purchased
loans and the buildings and/or land on which the purchased loans were taken.
7. The remaining capital is invested in the PPIF by private investors and Treasury
in equal parts. Therefore, of the $1 invested in the previous example, the private
investor would invest $0.50 and Treasury, using TARP funds, would invest the
remaining $0.50. In addition, Treasury receives warrants from the PPIF (the
SPV created to make the purchase) for its investment.
8. Any profits or losses will be passed on to the private investor and Government in
proportion to their investment, i.e., 50%/50%.
9. The guarantee by FDIC is such that the private investor need not pay back the
loan. If there are significant losses, the private investor can walk away from
the transaction and lose no more than its initial $0.50 investment, using the
example noted earlier.

Guarantee: A commitment from a thirdparty lending institution ensuring that
liabilities of a borrower will be met. If the
borrower fails to make payments, the
guarantor will step in and make the payment on the borrower’s behalf. Under the
Legacy Loans Program, the FDIC guarantee effectively commits the Government
to make up any shortfalls if the PPIF no
longer makes payments on the money
that it borrows to buy the legacy loans.

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FIGURE 2.20

Legacy Loans Program Example

LEGACY LOAN
$100 Face Value

$40.0

$4.5

$4.5

$51.0

$60 Winning Bid

Debt Financing (guaranteed by FDIC)
Equity Financing
$4.50 from Treasury
$4.50 from Private Investors
Bank Write Down

Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
Source: Diagram based on an understanding
of Treasury, “Fact Sheet: Public-Private
Investment Program,” 3/23/2009,
www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.

For more details on Securitization, refer
to “TARP Tutorial: Securitization” earlier
in this section.

Bank A, in conjunction with FDIC, determines that it would like to sell loans with
a face value of approximately $100. After analyzing the pool of loans, FDIC determines that the appropriate funding structure of a PPIF for such an investment is a
6-to-1 debt-to-equity structure. FDIC auctions the legacy loans and a private investor makes a $60 winning bid. The private investor who submitted the winning bid is
offered PPIF financing. The PPIF subsequently can obtain a loan for $51 that will
be 100% guaranteed by FDIC. The remaining $9 of the purchase price is invested
in the PPIF in equal parts by the private investor and Treasury — $4.50 each. The
seller, Bank A, receives the full price of $60 and the PPIF will be required to make
the interest payments on the $51 loan. Under this scenario, Treasury contributes
$4.50 and, in return, receives warrants in the PPIF and half of the future profits
and losses generated by the PPIF. If the investment fails entirely, Treasury loses
$4.50, the private investor loses $4.50, and FDIC loses $51. Figure 2.20 illustrates
the example legacy loan transaction funding structure by participant.

Legacy Securities Program
The Securities Program provides a mechanism for the disposition of legacy securities; the program targets securitized interests in mortgages (securities collateralized
or “backed” by real estate or residential or commercial properties), rather than
the mortgages themselves. The securitized interests include residential mortgagebacked securities (“RMBS”) and commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”)
that are held by a diverse group of financial institutions.
The Securities Program contemplates two approaches for stimulating private
capital investments in legacy securities: through the creation of PPIFs managed by
private fund managers and an expansion of the Federal Reserve’s TALF Program.
PPIF Managers

Under the Securities Program, Treasury will appoint up to five fund managers from
a pool of applicants to manage the PPIFs. According to Treasury officials, after
the initial pre-qualification of fund managers, Treasury will consider opening the
program to smaller fund managers. Qualified managers must meet the following
criteria, “which will be viewed on a holistic basis, and it is anticipated that failure to
meet any one criteria will not necessarily disqualify a proposal:”257
•
•
•
•
•

capacity to raise $500 million of private capital
experience investing in legacy securities
management of $10 billion in legacy securities
ability to manage in a manner consistent with Treasury’s investment objective
headquartered in the United States

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

As in the Legacy Loans Program, PPIFs can only purchase from sellers that are
not affiliates of the fund manager, and are also prohibited from purchasing from
any private investor who represents 10% or more of the aggregate private capital
raised.258 The PPIFs must agree to fraud, waste, and abuse protections and provide
access to the Special Inspector General.259
How the Legacy Securities Program Works260

1. Fund managers apply to Treasury with a proposed funding structure for the
creation of a PPIF.
• The proposal details the appropriate levels of debt and equity financing
necessary for the purchase of legacy securities, as well as other structured
considerations outlined in the application.
2. Fund managers appointed by Treasury are granted time to raise capital from
private investors for the purchase of legacy securities.
3. Treasury matches the capital raised by the fund manager dollar-for-dollar.
• Treasury receives warrants in the PPIF for its contribution in addition to a
share of any profits.
4. Fund managers can borrow additional money from Treasury of up to:
• 50 – 100% of total equity investments, depending on “restrictions on assetlevel leverage, withdrawal rights, disposition priorities, cash-flow priorities,
and other factors Treasury deems relevant.”261 The total PPIF fund could
thus consist of $1 of Treasury investment, $1 of private investment, and up
to $2 of non-recourse Treasury loans. Because the loan is non-recourse, the
total amount of exposure of the private investor is $1, while Treasury could
lose as much as $3. Furthermore, the fund manager, which will receive
fees from both the private investor and Treasury, is not required to have any
investment in the fund, and therefore has no risk of loss for its investment
decisions.
• Under the current structure, the fund manager can leverage the fund
through TALF loans, but, in that case, Treasury financing for the PPIF
would be limited to 50% of the total equity.
5. The fund manager purchases legacy securities and has full discretion over
investment decisions, including the price at which the securities will be purchased, and provides Treasury monthly reports on the PPIF’s activities.
6. The withdrawal rights of the private investors in the PPIF are yet to be determined, but for any PPIF receiving Treasury financing, no private investor can
withdraw (or have the voluntary right of withdrawal of) funds until the third
anniversary of the first investment made in the PPIF. The stated strategy is to
hold the securities for the long term, but not more than 10 years.262 It has not
been announced how Treasury will enforce this goal, or whether it will permit
members of the funds to sell or transfer their interests.

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For more information on TALF background and mechanics, refer to “TALF”
earlier in this section.

Expansion of TALF for Legacy Securities
The Securities Program also expands the terms of the previously announced TALF.
Acceptable collateral under TALF, as originally implemented, included newly
issued ABS backed by auto, student, credit card, and small-business loans. The
Securities Program would expand TALF so that TALF loans could be secured by
legacy MBS that were originally rated AAA, although it will not be required that
they have that rating at the time of purchase through the TALF program. Haircuts
and interest rates applicable to these loans will be determined at a later date.263
Executive Compensation
Treasury has not indicated to what extent the EESA executive compensation
restrictions will apply to the participants in the legacy loan, legacy security, or
expanded TALF programs. According to Treasury, “the applicability of the executive compensation regulations, which have not yet been published, will be factdependent. Until Fund Managers make proposals under the TALF program, it is
not known whether they will seek to be co-owners of the PPIFs. If they do, they
would not be passive investors and could be subject to the executive compensation
restrictions.”264

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

111

UNLOCKING CREDIT FOR SMALL BUSINESSES
On March 16, 2009, Treasury announced that it would purchase up to $15 billion in
securities backed by pools of Small Business Administration (“SBA”) loans in order
to encourage banks to extend more credit to small businesses.265 These securities will
be backed by loans participating in two SBA programs: the 7(a) Program and the 504
Community Development Loan Program. Banks often sell a portion of these loans in
a secondary market to pool assemblers (issuers).266 This secondary market serves as a
source of cash for banks, providing them money to make new loans.267 Frozen conditions in the secondary market have caused a reduction in the volume of new loans
written by banks. According to Treasury, the Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses
(“UCSB”) program was designed to provide banks the liquidity necessary to start writing new small-business loans again.268
In addition to stimulating the secondary markets for SBA loans, Treasury has
announced increased tracking of small-business-related lending. On March 16,
2009, the Treasury Secretary called for the 21 largest banks receiving TARP funding
to report the monthly amount of their small-business lending. This reporting would
begin with participants’ April 2009 submissions and include data on average smallbusiness loans outstanding and monthly originations to small businesses. In order to
make timely data available, the Treasury Secretary called for every U.S. bank to report
their total small-business lending on a quarterly basis instead of once per year. This
reporting would be facilitated by bank regulators. The Treasury Secretary “emphasized that all lenders (including those not participating in the FSP) should take a
special responsibility for providing the credit that small businesses need to operate,
expand and add jobs.”269

SBA 7(a) Program Securities
The SBA 7(a) Program assists small businesses that cannot otherwise obtain conventional loans at reasonable terms.270 If a small business meets specific SBA eligibility
requirements, it can borrow from a lender approved by SBA, and SBA will guarantee
a portion of that loan.271 Treasury announced that SBA, using non-TARP funds, will
temporarily raise its guarantee on 7(a) loans up to 90% from current levels of 75%
to 85%, and will also temporarily eliminate SBA loan fees.272 Loan fees can reach up
to 3.75% for the largest loans.273 Treasury announced in its March 16, 2009, press
release that, by the end of March 2009, it would begin using TARP funds to purchase securities backed by Government-guaranteed portions of these 7(a) Program
loans (“7(a) Program Securities”) that were securitized on or after July 1, 2008.274 The
origination date of the underlying loans is not a factor for eligibility.275 As of March
31, 2009, however, Treasury had not announced the execution of any of these purchases or published any more detailed terms. For a description of the securitization
process, refer to “TARP Tutorial: Securitization” earlier in this section. Further details
on these programs will be provided in SIGTARP’s next report.

7(a) Program: SBA loan program guaranteeing a percentage of loans for small
businesses that cannot otherwise obtain
conventional loans at reasonable terms.
504 Community Development Loan
Program: SBA loan program combining Government-guaranteed loans with
private-sector mortgage loans to provide
loans of up to $10 million for community
development.
Pool Assembler (issuer): A separate legal
entity that buys cash-flow-producing assets such as loans, pools them together,
and sells portions of the pools of loans
as securities.

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SBA 504 Program Securities
According to Treasury, SBA’s 504 Community Development Loan Program is aimed
at economic development in communities through long-term loans of up to $10 million, with approximately 50% of the financing guaranteed by SBA and the remainder
provided through private-sector mortgage loans.276 Like 7(a) loans, these privatesector mortgage loans (the portion of 504 Program loans not guaranteed by SBA)
were often pooled as securities (“504 Program Securities”) and sold in a secondary
market.277 However, according to Treasury, in the last year, this secondary market has
frozen.278 Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (“ARRA”),
SBA will begin to guarantee a portion of these 504 Program Securities.279 Treasury
stated that it will begin to use TARP funds to purchase these newly guaranteed 504
Program Securities, once SBA implements the new ARRA guidelines.280
Treasury also expects to begin purchasing some non-guaranteed 504 Program
Securities beginning in May 2009.281
As with 7(a) Program Securities, 504 Program Securities must have been securitized on or after July 1, 2008, with no restriction for the origination date of the underlying loans.282 The 504 Program Securities that are not guaranteed by SBA must also
meet certain eligibility criteria. However, as of March 31, 2009, these criteria were
not yet announced.283

Administration
Treasury has hired EARNEST Partners, LLC, an independent investment manager,
to assist in executing the program to purchase 7(a) Program Securities and 504
Program Securities. The Bank of New York Mellon will serve as Treasury’s custodian
for these securities. Treasury has stated that it and its investment manager will analyze current and historical prices of comparable securities to determine reasonable
prices aimed at providing liquidity to increase small-business lending while protecting
the taxpayers’ interest.284

Executive Compensation and Warrants
Treasury reported that executive compensation provisions under EESA will apply
to pool assemblers (issuers) who sell 7(a) Program Securities to Treasury; however,
they may apply differently for each pool assembler, based on the obligations incurred by the pool assemblers. As consideration for the purchase of 7(a) Program
Securities, Treasury will also receive warrants from pool assemblers, consistent with
EESA. Although warrant terms were still under consideration as of March 31, 2009,
Treasury expects that they will be in the form of rights to purchase common stock for
public companies or the rights to purchase common stock, preferred stock, or senior
debt obligations for private companies. Treasury has also indicated that executive
compensation and warrant requirements under EESA may also apply to entities selling 504 Program Securities to Treasury. The full application of these provisions was
still under consideration as of March 31, 2009.285

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

MAKING HOME AFFORDABLE PROGRAM
On March 4, 2009, the Administration announced a new program, Making Home
Affordable (“MHA”), which is intended to assist homeowners who are facing foreclosure or having difficulty making their monthly mortgage payments. As of
March 31, 2009, MHA funding has not been expended and the program details
are largely limited to those contained in the proposed term sheet made public on
March 4, 2009. MHA has three major initiatives, one of which involves TARP
funds:
• Loan modification program: The Home Affordable Modification Program
(“HAMP”) is designed to lower monthly payments of borrowers facing foreclosure, and will be funded by $50 billion from TARP and an additional $25 billion
from the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (“HERA”).286 Under HAMP, the
$50 billion from TARP will be used for modification of private-label mortgages
and the $25 billion from HERA will be used for modification of Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac mortgages.
• Loan refinancing program: The Home Affordable Refinancing Program
(“HARP”) intends to help borrowers refinance their mortgages at lower interest
rates and will be limited to homeowners with mortgages owned or guaranteed by
Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.
• Actions to lower mortgage interest rates by supporting Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac: This initiative includes investments intended to lower mortgage
interest costs for borrowers by increased liquidity at Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac through a $100 billion increase in planned Treasury purchases of both
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac preferred stock. Additionally, Treasury will allow
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac each to hold another $50 billion in mortgage
securities on their portfolios, with a corresponding increase in debt outstanding.

Homeownership and Foreclosure Avoidance in EESA
Prior to the formation of the MHA program, Congress directed Treasury to pursue
foreclosure mitigation policies “to the extent the Secretary acquires mortgages,
mortgage backed securities and other assets secured by residential real estate.”287
Specifically, EESA made Treasury responsible for the following actions if it decided
to acquire such assets:288
• implement a plan that seeks to maximize assistance for homeowners
• encourage servicers to take advantage of the Federal Housing Administration’s
(“FHA”) HOPE for Homeowners Plan
• use loan guarantees and credit enhancements to facilitate loan modification
• coordinate with FDIC, the Federal Reserve, Federal Housing Finance Agency
(“FHFA”), and FHA
• consent to reasonable loan modifications

Private-Label Mortgage: Loans that are
not issued or guaranteed by Fannie
Mae, Freddie Mac, Ginnie Mae, or
another Federal agency.

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Although Treasury has not yet acquired the assets that would trigger these
obligations, Treasury contends that the newly introduced MHA program addresses
most of these requirements. For a list of how the MHA program addresses the
EESA provisions for Treasury, see Table 2.34.

Home Affordable Modification Program
MHA offers the prospect of a loan modification to borrowers who are at “imminent
risk of default on their mortgage and can be expected to enter into foreclosure
proceedings.” The loan modifications offered in HAMP will be funded by up to $50
billion of TARP funds for modification of private-label mortgages, and an additional
$25 billion from HERA for modification of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
mortgages. The Administration believes HAMP may “reach three to four million
homeowners.”289 As of March 31, 2009, detailed program guidelines have not yet
been released; however, servicers have been given basic instructions so that modification negotiations with homeowners can begin immediately.
The Administration envisions a “shared partnership” between the Government
and private lenders to reduce a borrower’s monthly payments to an “affordable”
level — defined as 31% of a borrower’s monthly income. The private-sector lender
TABLE 2.34

TREASURY RESPONSES TO EESA
EESA Provisions

Section
of EESA

References to Treasury Involvement

Develop a homeowner assistance plan

109(a)

According to the “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” MHA provides homeowners
the ability to refinance or modify their existing mortgage
depending on eligibility.

Encourage servicers to utilize
FHA HOPE for Homeowners

109(a)

According to the “Making Home Affordable: Updated
Detailed Program Description,” MHA will provide similar
incentives to servicers for modifications under the HOPE
for Homeowners program.

109(a)

TARP requires loan modification support of certain participants. For example, Exhibit F of the Asset Guarantee
Program (“AGP”) requires that Citigroup adopt a loan
modification program.a

109(b)

According to the “Making Home Affordable: Updated
Detailed Program Description,” Treasury is responsible
for oversight and audit of loan modifications under the
terms of MHA.

109(c)

According to the “Making Home Affordable: Updated
Detailed Program Description,” MHA defines criteria for
determining eligibility for loan modification.

Use loan guarantees to facilitate modifications
Coordinate with other agencies

Consent to reasonable loan modification
requests

Note: MHA refers to Making Home Affordable as proposed 3/4/2009.
aExhibit

F FDIC Mortgage Loan Modification Program.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

will be responsible for all payment reductions necessary to bring a borrower’s
monthly payments down to 38% of the borrower’s gross monthly income. The additional reductions required to bring the borrower’s monthly payment down to 31%
of the borrower’s gross monthly income will be shared equally between the private
lender and the Government.290
To meet its portion of the shared program, Treasury will provide the following
types of support:
• monthly payment reduction payments to servicers
• payments to servicers for principal reductions
• support for extensions of the borrower’s loan term
Loan modification applications under the program will be accepted until
December 31, 2012.291 Any scheduled subsidy payments on a particular mortgage
will be made for a period of three to five years as defined under MHA.
To encourage wide adoption of the program, TARP will provide funding for incentive payments. These incentives will be targeted toward the three main participants in the loan workout process: the homeowners who stay current on their loans
after a modification, the loan servicers who establish successful modifications, and
the investors who own loans.

How the HAMP Loan Modification Subsidies Are To Be Determined
The MHA process puts borrowers facing default through a series of tests to see if
the loan qualifies for Government assistance and, if so, for how much.292 If a test is
failed at any stage, the loan servicer has the right either to attempt a loan modification, without Government incentives, or to proceed with foreclosure and eviction if
the borrower defaults. The first step in the modification process addresses
homeowner eligibility. If the homeowner is deemed eligible for modification, the
second step determines the appropriate subsidies from the Government.
Step #1: Is the homeowner eligible for loan modification under HAMP?293
The servicer must collect documentation that ALL of the following are true:
1. The mortgage was originated before January 1, 2009.
2. The borrower is an “owner-occupant” living in a one- to four-unit home as a
primary residence.
3. The borrower is not an “investor” living elsewhere.
4. The home is not vacant or condemned.
5. The borrower is at risk of “reasonably foreseeable or imminent default.”
6. The borrower has suffered an adverse event (either income reduction or
payment increase).

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7. The mortgage has an unpaid principal value of less than $729,750 for oneunit homes.
8. The borrower has limited liquid assets.
There is no minimum or maximum loan-to-value ratio for eligibility; that is, the
value of the home is not a consideration for eligibility, although it may affect the calculation of potential subsidies.
Step #2: What is the Federal subsidy?294
First, the lender must lower the borrower’s monthly payment to 38% of the borrower’s documented gross monthly income (by lowering the interest rate, extending
the term, reducing the principal, or a combination). Then the U.S. Government
will match dollar-for-dollar with the lender any reductions necessary to get the
monthly payment to 31% of the borrower’s monthly income. For purposes of these
calculations, “monthly payment” is defined as the sum of principal, interest, taxes,
insurance, and association fees (“PITIA”) related to the mortgage. The ratio of
PITIA to gross monthly income is referred to as the Front-End-Debt-To-Income
(“DTI”) test. In conducting the DTI test, the servicer will perform the following
tasks:
1. certify the borrower’s income
2. calculate the lender reductions necessary to make monthly loan payments
38% of monthly income
3. calculate the lender reductions and U.S. subsidies necessary to make
monthly loan payments 31% of monthly income
In addition to a DTI test, the servicer performs a net present value (“NPV”) test.
In this test, the servicer inputs the estimated foreclosure value of the home (that
is the amount of money left over that the servicer believes it could get if the home
is foreclosed upon and sold) into a cash-flow projection to see if subsidizing a loan
modification is less expensive to the servicer than letting the home fall into foreclosure. This includes:
1. obtain an estimate of the home value and projected losses should a
foreclosure occur
2. compare with estimated present value of cash flows under a loan
modification scenario
3. calculate the results of the NPV test
4. confirm that the test supports modification as the lowest cost alternative
(if yes, begin a 90-day trial period)

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

5. if 90-day trial period of reduced payments is successful (i.e., borrower
makes payments), begin monthly subsidies

Example of a HAMP Modification
Mr. Smith owns a single-family home which he bought for $200,000. In order to
buy the home, Mr. Smith took out a $160,000 mortgage with a 6.0% interest rate.
Mr. Smith pays $960 monthly on his mortgage. Due to recent budget cuts at his
company, Mr. Smith was moved to part-time work and may be at risk of defaulting
on his mortgage.
Mr. Smith called his mortgage servicer and asked whether he qualified for
HAMP assistance. After supplying evidence of his income, Mr. Smith and the servicer determine that his monthly mortgage payment is 43% of his gross monthly income. The servicer calculates that the monthly mortgage payment must be reduced
to $848 (or 38% of Mr. Smith’s monthly income) in order to qualify for additional
Government subsidies under HAMP. To do that, the servicer cuts the interest rate
to 4.89%.
Pursuant to the terms of HAMP, the lender further reduces the monthly payment on Mr. Smith’s mortgage to $692, which is 31% of his gross monthly income. To do that, the servicer cuts the interest rate to 3.2%. Assuming Mr. Smith
makes three payments at this new rate during a trial period, Treasury will then pay
the lender $78 monthly for five years (as long as Mr. Smith stays current on his
mortgage) for half the difference between the modified monthly mortgage payment
(38% of monthly income) and the lower modified monthly mortgage payment (31%
of monthly income) ($848 – $692). Mr. Smith will be able to keep this new, lower
mortgage payment for five years.
HAMP Incentive Payments

HAMP creates a series of incentive payments designed to encourage loan
modifications.295
To Loan Servicers296
• “Pay for Success” Up-Front Payments: An up-front payment of $1,000 will be
made to loan servicers for each eligible modification they successfully implement and bring through the 90-day trial period.
• “Pay for Success” Ongoing Payments: Additional payments of $1,000 per year
will be made for each year that the borrower stays current on their loan modification. This payment will be payable for up to three years.
• Responsible Modification Incentive Payment: A one-time payment of $500
will be made to a loan servicer who modifies a loan that is still current (less than
30 days delinquent).

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• Second Lien Release Success Payment: Delinquent loans are frequently accompanied by a second lien debt (such as a second mortgage or a home equity
line of credit). In order to reduce the overall monthly mortgage payments of the
borrower, servicers will be encouraged to contact second lien holders and attempt to negotiate the extinguishment of the second lien. Servicers will receive a
success payment equal to $250 per second lien extinguished, plus an additional
amount based on a schedule to be published by Treasury.

Second Lien Debt: Is subordinate to a
senior claim on the same collateral.
Mortgage Holders: Lender or investor
(depending on whether the mortgage
is securitized) who owns the right to
the borrower’s monthly payments. For
more information on how a securitization process works, refer to “TARP
Tutorial: Securitization” earlier in this
section.

To Mortgage Holders297
• Responsible Modification Incentive Payment: Mortgage holders will receive
$1,500 for making loan modifications made while a borrower at risk of imminent default is still current (less than 30 days delinquent).
• Home Price Decline Payments (up to $10 billion): The Administration,
working with FDIC, has announced a cash payment that provides lender compensation to offset partially the losses from failed modifications when home
prices decline. The payment is not fixed; rather, it is linked to declines in the
home price index.
• Second Lien Holder Incentives: Treasury will publish a schedule detailing incentive fees that may be paid to junior lien holders who extinguish their
junior liens. This is intended to reduce the borrower’s overall monthly mortgage
payments.
To Homeowners298
• “Pay for Success” Payment: Payments of up to $1,000 per year, for five years,
will be made to borrowers who remain current under their loan modification.
This payment will be applied directly to the reduction of their principal balance.

Total TARP-funded HAMP Incentives
In addition to the $78 monthly subsidy for the modification of Mr. Smith’s mortgage payments from the HAMP modification example, TARP is responsible for
funding a number of the HAMP incentive payments; if a delinquent loan like Mr.
Smith’s is modified under HAMP, and Mr. Smith makes all of his monthly payments for five years, at least $9,000 of incentive payments will be funded by TARP:
• $1,000 to loan servicers for upfront “Pay for Success” incentive
• $3,000 ($1,000/year for 3 years) paid to loan servicers for ongoing “Pay for
Success” incentives
• $5,000 ($1,000 annually) of principal reductions for borrowers

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

If the loan was current at the time of the modification, TARP would also be
responsible for the following incentive payments:
• $500 Responsible Modification payment to the loan servicer
• $1,500 Responsible Modification payment to the mortgage holder
In total, TARP would expend $15,680 to modify Mr. Smith’s mortgage —
$9,680 toward paying Mr. Smith’s mortgage and $6,000 in incentives to the
servicers and investors.

Other HAMP Provisions
In addition to the monetary initiatives of HAMP, the Administration announced
other actions to assist with homeowner loan modifications.
First, it released a set of standardized loan modification guidelines to be used as
an industry standard. These guidelines were developed by an interagency working
group of Federal agencies with housing interests, including Federal banking regulators, FDIC, National Credit Union Administration, FHA, and FHFA.
Second, all TARP recipients will be required to use these guidelines for loan
modifications.
Finally, the Administration announced that it will seek statutory changes
to the bankruptcy code to facilitate the goals of its loan modification program.
Specifically, its proposal would permit bankruptcy judges “to reduce the outstanding principal balance of a primary residence loan to current fair market value.”299
Further statutory changes would provide FHA and the Veterans Administration
with the authority to make partial payments of claims on insured mortgages in the
event of bankruptcy or voluntary modification.
HAMP Administration
Treasury has retained Fannie Mae as financial agent to manage the payment
program and Freddie Mac as compliance agent for monitoring of the program
administration. Ongoing reviews will be necessary to ensure continued eligibility,
to manage cash, and to monitor and track changes in status, such as a subsequent
delinquency.
Executive Compensation
Section 7002 of ARRA specifically exempted mortgage modification efforts from
EESA’s executive compensation restrictions. As such, no executive compensation
restrictions will apply to this program.

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EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
Any financial institution directly participating in TARP and under an ongoing
obligation to Treasury, other than in the mortgage modifications programs,
must abide by a set of executive compensation provisions set forth under EESA
legislation and regulations mandated by Treasury. Since October 14, 2008, shortly
after the original requirements were first enacted in Section 111 of EESA, there
have been additional regulations, amendments, and notices that will replace
previously existing guidelines. On February 17, 2009, Section 111 of EESA was
amended by Section 7001 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009 (“ARRA”).300 This legislation, which will be implemented by regulations
promulgated by Treasury, replaces the executive compensation guidelines in
Section 111 of EESA. As agreements are finalized and funding is issued, executive
compensation restrictions may also continue to be tailored more specifically for
each institution. Figure 2.21 describes the changes in executive compensation
restrictions set forth by Congress and Treasury regulation over time. Information
regarding each set of restrictions on the timeline is detailed in this section.

FIGURE 2.21

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION RESTRICTIONS TIMELINE

OCTOBER 2008

OCTOBER 3
EESA
EESA is enacted to include
executive compensation
restrictions for any
institution that was to sell
troubled assets to the
Government under TARP.

JANUARY 2009

JANUARY 16
NOTICE 2008-PSSFI
Mandated a more stringent
rule regarding golden
parachutes.

OCTOBER 14
TREASURY REGULATION
31 CFR PART 30
Implemented Section 111
of EESA to institutions that
received financial
assistance from Treasury.

FEBRUARY 2009

FEBRUARY 4
ADMINISTRATION
ANNOUNCEMENT ON
EXECUTIVE
COMPENSATION
New guidance on executive
compensation separating
companies receiving TARP
funding into two categories:
Exceptional Assistance and
Generally Available
Programs.

TBD
FORTHCOMING TREASURY
REGULATION
Will implement new
guidance and Section
7001 of ARRA when
released by Treasury.

FEBRUARY 17
AMERICAN RECOVERY AND
REINVESTMENT ACT,
(”ARRA”) SECTION 7001
Section 7001 of ARRA is
enacted, amending and
replacing Section 111 of
EESA and any Treasuryissued guidance prior to
this date.

Sources: EESA, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008; Treasury, “Treasury Regulation 31 CFR Part 30,” 10/14/2008; Treasury, “Notice 2008 - PSSFI,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/19/2009; Treasury, “Treasury Announces
New Restrictions on Executive Compensation,” 2/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/20/2009; ARRA, P.L. 111-5, 2/17/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

On February 5, 2009, SIGTARP announced an audit of controls over executive compensation. The audit has requested that recipients of TARP funds provide
“specific plans and the status of implementation of those plans, for addressing
executive compensation requirements associated with the funding.”301 Additionally,
after AIG paid out $165 million in bonuses on March 15, 2009, SIGTARP announced a review of Federal oversight of executive compensation. This includes
the bonus payments made by AIG.302 For more information on these audits, refer to
“SIGTARP Oversight Activities” in Section 1 of this report.

EESA Restrictions
Section 111 of EESA, as originally enacted, required any financial institution that
sells troubled assets to Treasury under TARP to abide by certain executive compensation rules. These rules have been replaced by Section 7001 of ARRA, which will
be implemented by Treasury regulation. All TARP executive compensation restrictions have their basis in the initial restrictions set forth by EESA:303
• Excessive Risk: Incentive compensation for Senior Executive Officers (“SEOs”)
must not encourage unnecessary and excessive risks that threaten the value of
the financial institution.
• Clawback: Mandatory clawback of any bonus or incentive compensation paid
to an SEO will be enforced if based on statements of earnings, gains, or other
criteria that are later proven to be materially inaccurate.
• Golden Parachute: Certain severance payments (golden parachute payments)
to SEOs are prohibited when Treasury purchases troubled assets directly from
the firm.
• Tax Deductibility: Executive compensation in excess of $500,000 or more for
each SEO may not be deducted by the TARP participant for tax purposes.304

Treasury Regulation 31 CFR Part 30
On October 14, 2008, Treasury provided guidance on executive compensation
through Treasury regulation 31 CFR Part 30. The regulation implemented Section
111 of EESA on executive compensation restrictions to those institutions that
received financial assistance from Treasury. This included all institutions participating in CPP and institutions participating in other TARP programs with language in
their contracts requiring them to do so. In addition, according to the regulation, all
institutions that received financial assistance through TARP must meet Treasury
restrictions for as long as they are participants in the program (i.e., as long as
Treasury holds the shares).305

Senior Executive Officers (“SEOs”) (as
defined in original Section 111 of EESA):
The top five highly paid executives.
Clawback: Recovery by the company of
bonuses or incentive compensation paid
to a senior executive.
Golden Parachute (as defined in original
Section 111 of EESA): Compensation to
(or for the benefit of) a Senior Executive
Officer made upon severance from employment that exceeds specified thresholds. Under EESA as originally enacted,
such compensation is limited to three
times the executive’s annual base salary.

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Notice 2008-PSSFI
On January 16, 2009, Treasury released Notice 2008-PSSFI which mandated a
more stringent rule for SSFI participants with respect to golden parachute payments and a clarified definition of SEO.306 Currently, AIG is the only institution
subject to this guidance; under the terms of Notice 2008-PSSFI, AIG must comply
with the following:
• Golden parachutes: Agree to the restrictions regarding golden parachutes
established under EESA and the Capital Purchase Program Interim Final Rule
(31 CFR Part 30) where senior partners, defined as employees who participate
in the company’s “senior partners plan,” are prohibited from receiving golden
parachute payments beyond three times their base salary amount. In addition,
under Notice 2008-PSSFI, the definition of golden parachutes is expanded
to prohibit the payment of all severance payments to the company’s top five
SEOs, which include its Principal Executive Officer (“PEO”), Principal Finance
Officer (“PFO”), and its next three highly compensated executives, according to
the guidance.307

For more information on the
executive compensation restrictions for
AIG, Citigroup, and Bank of America,
refer to SIGTARP’s Initial Report,
Section 3: “TARP Implementation and
Administration.”

Exceptional Assistance: Increased
assistance to an institution that needs
more than allowed under a generally
available program (i.e., CPP and CAP).
Generally Available Programs: Programs
having the same terms for all recipients,
with limits on the amount each institution
may receive and specified returns for
taxpayers (i.e., CPP or CAP).

Citigroup and Bank of America are following similar guidance on golden
parachutes according to their Securities Purchase Agreements under the Targeted
Investment Program. According to new agreements between AIG and the
Government, AIG will be following the executive compensation restrictions detailed
in ARRA’s Section 7001 when it is implemented by Treasury.308

Administration Announcement on Executive Compensation
On February 4, 2009, the Administration announced new guidance on executive
compensation restrictions. According to Treasury, these new restrictions would support the need to monitor and hold accountable institutions receiving Government
funding. The announcement contemplated requiring TARP recipients to complete,
annually, a certification of compliance with executive compensation guidelines. It
also noted that there would be differences in restrictions for institutions receiving
“exceptional assistance” (i.e., AIG, Citigroup, and Bank of America), and those
involved in generally available programs (i.e., CPP and CAP) within TARP.309
The Administration’s announcement contemplated that companies receiving
exceptional assistance from the Federal Government would have to comply with
the following restrictions:310
• Compensation Cap: The cap limits senior executives from receiving more than
$500,000 in total compensation (excludes restricted stock).
• Restricted Stock: Any pay over $500,000 must be in restricted stock that cannot be sold or transferred while the company is still receiving TARP assistance.

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• Say on Pay: Executive compensation and strategy must be fully disclosed and
subject to a “Say on Pay” shareholder vote.
• Clawbacks: Mandatory clawback of any bonus or incentive compensation paid
to an SEO will be enforced if based on statements of earnings, gains, or other
criteria that are later proven to be materially inaccurate.
• Golden Parachutes: Any form of severance payment to the top 10 senior
executives is prohibited, as are golden parachute payments greater than one
year’s compensation to the next 25 executives.
• Luxury Expenditures: TARP recipients’ boards of directors must adopt
company-wide policy on expenditures related to aviation, facility renovations,
entertainment and parties, and conferences.
Additionally, prior to the amendment of EESA, pursuant to the Administration’s
announcement, Treasury contemplated issuing guidance (subject to public
comment) on executive compensation requirements for institutions receiving
Government assistance through newly created generally available programs, such
as the Capital Assistance Program, and were to include the following:311
• Compensation Cap: Limits senior executives from receiving more than
$500,000 in total compensation plus restricted stock, unless waived by full public disclosure and a “Say on Pay” shareholder resolution.
• Clawbacks: Mandatory clawback of any bonus or incentive compensation paid
to an SEO will be enforced if based on statements of earnings, gains, or other
criteria that are later proven to be materially inaccurate.
• Golden Parachutes: Prohibits any severance payment to the top five senior
executives that is greater than one year’s compensation.
• Luxury Expenditures: TARP recipients’ boards of directors must adopt
company-wide policy on expenditures related to aviation, facility renovations,
entertainment and parties, and conferences.
Before regulations imposing the Administration’s executive compensation
restrictions could be issued, however, Section 111 of EESA was amended by
ARRA.312

EESA, as Amended
On February 17, 2009, EESA was amended with the passing of ARRA. Section
7001 of ARRA outlines the executive compensation guidelines that will replace
those set forth in Section 111 of EESA. As of March 31, 2009, Treasury regulations implementing these guidelines had not been released. The amendments to
EESA are more expansive as to whom the executive compensation restrictions
apply, as well as include provisions for the creation of a Board Compensation

Say on Pay: Provision that executive
compensation must be put to a nonbinding vote by shareholders.

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124

Committee, certification of compliance, and review of prior payments to executives.313 Treasury has indicated that it intends to issue new regulations that implement amended Section 111 of EESA, but it has not yet determined which restrictions set forth in the Administration’s February 4, 2009, announcement, if any, will
be included. As of March 31, 2009, the updated regulations had not been issued.314

Bonus and Incentive
There are three requirements in Section 7001 of ARRA by which all TARP recipients must abide, and a fourth bonus requirement that is applied to a varying
number of executives depending upon the amount of TARP funding received by
the institution. All requirements apply over the entire time that any obligation
arising from TARP assistance is outstanding. The Chief Executive Officer and the
Chief Financial Officer of each TARP recipient must provide a written certification
of compliance for the following requirements to either the Securities and Exchange
Commission (“SEC”) (public companies) or the Treasury Secretary (private companies).315 Requirements for TARP recipients are as follows:316

Senior Executive Officer (“SEO”) (definition
under ARRA): An individual who is one of
the top five most highly paid executives of
a public company, whose compensation
is required to be disclosed pursuant to
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and
any regulations issued thereunder, and
non-public company counterparts.
Golden Parachute (definition under ARRA):
Any payment to a senior executive officer
for departure from a company for any
reason, except for payments for services
performed or benefits accrued.

• Excessive Risk: limits on compensation that are based upon unnecessary and
excessive risks that threaten the value of the TARP recipient
• Clawbacks: recovery (clawback) of any bonus, retention award, or incentive
compensation paid to an SEO and any of the next 20 highest compensated employees resulting from materially inaccurate earnings, revenues, or gains
• Golden Parachutes: prohibits any severance payment to any SEO or any of the
next five highly compensated employees
• Bonus: prohibits the payments or accruing of any bonus, retention award, or
incentive compensation to the applicable employees shown in Table 2.35

TABLE 2.35

BONUS LIMITS, BY SIZE OF TARP FUNDING
Amount of TARP Funding

Applicable Employees

< $25,000,000

most highly compensated employee

≥ $25,000,000 < $250,000,000

5 most highly compensated employees

≥ $250,000,000 < $500,000,000

SEOs and at least 10 next highly compensated
employees

≥ $500,000,000

SEOs and at least 20 next highly compensated
employees

Note: The Treasury Secretary may determine a higher number based on the public’s best interest.
Source: ARRA, P.L. 111-5, 2/17/2009.

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The following bonus payments are allowed under Section 7001 of ARRA:
(i) any bonus payment required to be paid pursuant to an employment contract
executed before February 11, 2009, and (ii) payment of long-term restricted stock
that meets the following criteria:317
• does not fully vest during the period of any obligation arising from TARP
assistance
• has a value of not greater than 1/3 of the total amount of the annual compensation of the employee receiving stock
• is subject to other terms and conditions as the Treasury Secretary determines is
in the public interest
Further, ARRA requires Treasury to review all bonuses, retention awards, and
other compensation paid, before February 17, 2009, to SEOs and the next 20 highest compensated employees. This review is intended to determine if the payments
made were “inconsistent with the purposes of this section or the TARP or were
otherwise contrary to the public interest.” Should the Treasury Secretary find the
payments were inappropriate, he is required to seek to negotiate for reimbursement
to the Federal Government.318

Board Compensation Committee
Under ARRA, each TARP recipient must establish a Board Compensation
Committee. Board members must be independent directors, and the board will
convene for the purpose of reviewing employee compensation plans. The committee is required to meet at least semiannually to review the compensation plans proposed and assess any risk that these compensation plans may create for the TARP
recipient. The exception to this requirement is made for TARP recipients that are
not registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and have received $25
million or less in TARP assistance. These institutions may have their board of directors carry out the duties of the Board Compensation Committee.319
“Say on Pay”
Section 7001 of ARRA includes a provision for a non-binding vote by shareholders on executive compensation, otherwise known as “Say on Pay.” This provision
requires TARP recipients to permit an annual non-binding vote by shareholders on
executive compensation. The shareholder vote shall be non-binding on the board
of directors and will not override any board decisions. The executive compensation
voted on by the shareholders must be disclosed in the annual report.320

Vest: To become exercisable. Typically
used in the context of an employee stock
ownership or option program.

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Luxury Expenditures
Section 7001 of ARRA also addresses corporate luxury expenses; the legislation
states that the board of directors of any institution receiving TARP funds must have
a company-wide policy which includes excessive expenditures on entertainment
or events, office and facility renovations, aviation or other transportation services,
and other activities or events that are not reasonable expenditures for the following
activities:321
• staff development
• reasonable performance incentives
• other activities conducted in the normal course of business operations
The Treasury Secretary must promulgate regulations to implement these amendments to EESA. As of March 31, 2009, the Treasury Secretary has not done so.

SECT ION 3

TARP OPERATIONS AND
ADMINISTRATION

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TARP OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION
Under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (“EESA”), Congress
has authorized the Treasury Secretary to take such actions as necessary to build
the operational and administrative infrastructure to support TARP activities. EESA
authorized the establishment of an Office of Financial Stability (“OFS”) within the
Department of Treasury (“Treasury”) to be responsible for the administration of the
Troubled Asset Relief Program (“TARP”).322 Treasury has the authority to establish
program vehicles, issue regulations, directly hire or appoint employees, enter into
contracts, and designate financial institutions as financial agents of the Federal
Government.323 In addition to using permanent and interim staff, OFS relies on
contractors and financial agents in legal, investment consulting, accounting, and
other key service areas.324

TARP Administrative and Program Expenditures
Treasury stated that it had incurred $13.3 million in TARP-related administrative
expenditures through March 31, 2009.325 Table 3.1 summarizes these expenditures,

TABLE 3.1

TARP ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENDITURES AND OBLIGATIONS
Budget Object Class Title

Obligations for Period
Ending 3/31/2009

Expenditures for Period
Ending 3/31/2009

$3,830,093

$2,902,514

$3,830,093

$2,902,514

$28,714

$19,831

-

-

598,902

534,152

PERSONNEL SERVICES
Personnel Compensation & Services
TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES

NON-PERSONNEL SERVICES
Travel & Transportation of Persons
Transportation of Things
Rents, Communications, Utilities & Misc.
Charges
Printing & Reproduction

395

395

25,186,838

9,567,209

209,446

87,790

89,887

89,887

103,878

97,522

TOTAL NON-PERSONNEL SERVICES

$26,218,059

$10,396,785

GRAND TOTAL

$30,048,152

$13,299,298

Other Services
Supplies & Materials
Equipment
Land & Structures

Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

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as well as additional obligations through March 31, 2009. The majority of these
costs are allocated to Personnel Services and Non-Personnel Other Services.
Table 3.2 indicates the allocation of administrative obligations for NonPersonnel Other Services for the period ending March 31, 2009.326 Additionally,
Treasury has released details of programmatic expenditures. These expenditures
include costs to hire financial agents and legal firms associated with TARP operations. Table 3.3 shows the allocation of these programmatic costs as of March 31,
2009.
TARP operations are projected to cost approximately $175 million for fiscal year 2009.327 These costs are not reflected in determining any gains or losses
on the TARP-related transactions and are not included in the $700 billion limit
on asset purchases. Therefore, these expenditures will add to the Federal budget
deficit regardless of whether the TARP transactions result in a gain or a loss for the
Government.328

Current Contractors and Financial Agents
As of March 31, 2009, Treasury had retained 36 outside contractors, including
one asset manager to provide a range of services to assist in administering TARP.
TABLE 3.2

TARP ADMINISTRATIVE OBLIGATIONS – OTHER SERVICES
Vendor Name
Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau
Congressional Oversight Panel
CSC Systems and Solutions, LLC
Cushman and Wakefield of VA, Inc.
Ernst & Young, LLP
Federal Tech SVC Nat IT Program
FI Consulting
Government Accountability Office

Obligations as of
3/31/2009
$67,489
4,000,000
62,645
8,750
1,968,012
8,096
–9,000,000

Lindholm & Associates, Inc.

212,717

Pat Taylor & Associates, Inc.

230,978

PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP

6,914,303

Misc Oblig for Treasury (DO & BPD-ARC) Services

2,713,847

GRAND TOTAL
Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

$25,186,838

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

TABLE 3.3

TARP PROGRAMMATIC EXPENDITURES
Vendor Name
The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation
Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft, LLP

Expenditures as of 3/31/2009
$5,666,186
412,028

Ennis Knupp & Associates, Inc.

1,156,298

Hughes Hubbard & Reed, LLP

1,855,164

Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell, LLP

415,258

Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation

2,003,000

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, LLP

1,376,543

Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, LLP

2,699,151

Squire Sanders & Dempsey, LLP

1,804,672

Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, LLP (formerly
Thacher Proffitt & Wood)

97,477

The Boston Consulting Group

925,000

Venable, LLP

663,578

Freddie Mac

-

Fannie Mae

-

EARNEST Partners

-

Haynes and Boone, LLP

-

McKee Nelson, LLP

-

GRAND TOTAL

$19,074,355

Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

As permitted in EESA, Treasury has used streamlined solicitation procedures and
has structured several agreements and contracts to allow for flexibility in obtaining
the required services expeditiously. Table 3.4 lists outside vendors as of March 31,
2009.329
As required by EESA, SIGTARP must report the biographical information
for each person or entity hired to manage the troubled assets associated with
TARP.330 On March 16, 2009, OFS announced the hiring of EARNEST Partners
as the asset manager for the Small Business Initiative (Unlocking Credit for Small
Businesses). EARNEST Partners is an employee-owned firm specializing in equity,
fixed income, and alternative asset portfolio management. According to OFS,
the firm has significant experience with issues guaranteed by the Small Business
Administration. See Appendix C: “Reporting Requirements” for a biography on
EARNEST Partners. As of March 31, 2009, OFS has not hired any asset managers for other TARP initiatives. In the absence of asset managers, Bank of New

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132

TABLE 3.4

OUTSIDE VENDORS
Date

Vendor

Purpose

Type of Transaction*

10/10/2008

Simpson, Thacher & Bartlett, LLP

BPA

10/11/2008

Ennis Knupp & Associates, Inc.

10/14/2008

The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation

Legal Services
Investment and Advisory
Services
Custodian and Cash
Management

10/16/2008

PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP

Internal Control Services

BPA

10/18/2008
10/23/2008

Ernst & Young, LLP
GSA – Turner Consulting**

Accounting Services
Archiving Services

BPA
IAA

10/29/2008

Hughes Hubbard & Reed, LLP

Legal Services

BPA

10/29/2008
10/31/2008

Squire Sanders & Dempsey, LLP
Lindholm & Associates, Inc.**

Legal Services
Human Resources Services

BPA
Contract

11/7/2008

Thacher Proffitt & Wood***

Legal Services

BPA

11/14/2008
11/14/2008
12/3/2008
12/5/2008
12/5/2008
12/10/2008
12/12/2008
12/15/2008
12/24/2008
1/6/2009
1/7/2009
1/9/2009
1/27/2009
1/27/2009
2/2/2009

Securities and Exchange Commission
CSC Systems and Solutions, LLC
Trade and Tax Bureau – Treasury
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Washington Post
Thacher Proffitt & Wood***
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation
Office of Thrift Supervision
Cushman and Wakefield of VA, Inc.
Office of the Controller of the Currency
Colonial Parking
Internal Revenue Service
Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft, LLP
Whitaker Brothers Bus. Machines
Government Accountability Office

IAA
Procurement
IAA
IAA
Procurement
BPA
IAA
IAA
Procurement
IAA
Procurement
IAA
BPA
Procurement
IAA

2/9/2009

Pat Taylor and Associates, Inc.**

2/12/2009
2/18/2009
2/18/2009
2/20/2009
2/20/2009
2/22/2009

Locke Lord Bissell & Lidell, LLP
Freddie Mac
Fannie Mae
Congressional Oversight Panel
Simpson, Thacher & Bartlett, LLP
Venable, LLP

3/6/2009

The Boston Consulting Group

3/16/2009
3/23/2009
3/30/2009
3/30/2009
3/30/2009
3/30/2009
3/31/2009

EARNEST Partners
Heery International, Inc.
McKee Nelson, LLP
Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, LLP
Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft, LLP
Haynes and Boone, LLP
FI Consulting**

Detailees
IT Services
IT Services
Detailees
Vacancy Announcement
Legal Services
Legal Services
Detailees
Painting
Detailees
Parking
Detailees
Legal Services
Office Machines
Oversight
Temporary Employee
Services
Legal Services
Homeownership Program
Homeownership Program
Oversight
Legal Services
Legal Services
Management Consulting
Support
Asset Management Services
Architects
Legal Services
Legal Services
Legal Services
Legal Services
Modeling and Analysis

*IAA = Interagency Agreement. BPA = Blanket Purchase Agreement.
**Small or Women-, or Minority-Owned Small Business.
***Contract responsibilities assumed by Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal via novation.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

BPA
Financial Agent

Contract
Contract
Financial Agent
Financial Agent
IAA
Contract
Contract
Contract
Financial Agent
Procurement
Contract
Contract
Contract
Contract
BPA

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

York Mellon, as Treasury’s financial administrative agent, has subcontracted with
Gifford Fong to perform initial valuations of CPP transactions.331

Conflicts of Interest
Within the framework of TARP procurement and contracting, actual or potential
conflicts of interest (“COI”) can exist at the organizational level or pertain to an
individual employee. EESA provides the Treasury Secretary the authority to issue
regulations or guidelines necessary to address and manage, or to prohibit, COI that
can arise in connection with the administration and execution of TARP.332
TARP-related COI may occur due to a variety of situations, such as when
retained entities perform similar work for Treasury and other clients. In these situations, contracted entities may find that their duty to certain clients may impair their
objectivity when advising Treasury or may affect their judgment about the proper
use of nonpublic information. Conflicts may also arise from the personal interests of individuals employed by retained entities. Accordingly, Treasury has issued
interim guidelines to address potential COI.333
These interim COI rules require interested contractors to provide sufficient
information to evaluate the potential for organizational COI and plans to mitigate
them.334 The mitigation plan then becomes a binding term of the contract arrangement. On potential personal COI, the provisions require that managers and
employees of a hired entity disclose any financial holdings or personal and familial
relationships that could impair their objectivity.335
Financial agents and contractors have identified potential COI, and these
parties have proposed solutions to mitigate the identified conflicts. In response to
recommendations made to Treasury by the Comptroller General,336 Treasury has
taken steps to formalize its oversight and monitoring of potential COI.337

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S ECT I O N 4

LOOKING FORWARD: SIGTARP’S
RECOMMENDATIONS TO TREASURY

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

One of SIGTARP’s responsibilities is to provide recommendations to the
Department of Treasury (“Treasury”) so that Troubled Asset Relief Program
(“TARP”) programs can be designed or modified to facilitate transparency and
effective oversight and prevent fraud, waste, and abuse. SIGTARP’s Initial Report
to Congress, dated February 6, 2009 (the “Initial Report”), set forth a series of recommendations, some of which were adopted by Treasury and some of which were
not. Appendix J: “Treasury Response to SIGTARP Recommendations” contains
Treasury’s detailed statement as to what it believes it has done to address those
recommendations, and, for some of the recommendations that it has not implemented, why it has not done so. Set forth below are SIGTARP’s recommendations,
first with respect to implemented TARP programs and then for newly announced
programs.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EXISTING PROGRAMS
Oversight Language in TARP Agreements and Requiring
Recipients to Account for Use of TARP Funds
In its Initial Report, SIGTARP recommended that Treasury include language in
each of its new TARP-related agreements to facilitate compliance and oversight.
Although Treasury has not executed any agreements as part of a new program since
the Initial Report, it has indicated that it will include some of the recommended
oversight language in the finalized new agreement with American International
Group, Inc. (“AIG”) and in the Capital Assistance Program (“CAP”) documents.
Treasury has indicated, however, that it will not adopt SIGTARP’s recommendation that all TARP recipients be required to do the following:
• account for the use of TARP funds
• set up internal controls to comply with such accounting
• report periodically to Treasury on the results, with appropriate sworn
certifications
In light of the fact that the American taxpayer has been asked to fund this
extraordinary effort to stabilize the financial system, it is not unreasonable that the
public be told how those funds have been used by TARP recipients. Treasury is
now conducting regular surveys of the banks’ lending activities; however, with the
exception of Citigroup and Bank of America, Treasury has refused to seek further
details on TARP recipients’ use of funds.
As a result, in late January, SIGTARP decided to undertake, itself, a use of
funds project by conducting a survey of 364 TARP recipients that had received
funds as of January 31, 2009. Included in that survey was a request for a description of what the recipients actually did or plan to do with the TARP funds.

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Although the results of the survey still need to be analyzed, one thing is clear:
Treasury’s arguments that such an accounting was impractical, impossible, or a
waste of time because of the inherent fungibility of money were unfounded. Banks
generally provided a reasonable level of detail regarding their use of TARP funds,
and, while the response quality was not uniform, some banks were able to provide
detailed, at times even granular, descriptions of how they used taxpayer money.

Continuing Recommendation
SIGTARP continues to recommend that Treasury require all TARP recipients to
report on the actual use of TARP funds in the manner previously suggested. This
recommendation is particularly important with respect to the potential expansion
of the Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”) to include large insurance companies.
The American people have a right to know how their tax dollars are being used, particularly as billions of dollars are going to institutions for which banking is certainly
not part of the institution’s core business and may be little more than a way to gain
access to the low-cost capital provided under TARP. Similarly, in light of the controversy surrounding AIG’s use of Government assistance, both through the paying of
bonuses and in its dealings with counterparties, failure to impose this requirement
with respect to the injection of yet another $30 billion into AIG would not only
be a failure of oversight, but could call into further question the credibility of the
Government’s efforts with respect to the assistance provided to AIG. This recommendation applies not only to capital investment and lending programs involving
banks and other financial institutions, but also to programs in which TARP funds
are used to purchase troubled assets, including details of each transaction in the
Public-Private Investment Program (“PPIP”) as well as all transactions concerning
the surrender of collateral (including the identity of the surrendering borrowers) in
the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”).

Asset Management and Valuation Issues
In its Initial Report, SIGTARP noted that “[t]o date, Treasury has not fully developed significant policies or controls with respect to asset management issues,” and
recommended that “Treasury needs, in the near term, to begin developing a more
complete strategy on what to do with the substantial portfolio that it now manages
on behalf of the American people.”
As of the drafting of this report, however, no asset manager had been hired to
manage the existing asset portfolio, and no investment strategy has been developed.
Although Treasury did hire EARNEST Partners to manage the securities purchased
under the Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses program, their role is limited to
the program and, as of March 31, 2009, Treasury had not yet purchased securities under this particular program. Treasury has indicated that, while it has hired
some individuals to develop internal models of valuation and believes that it “has

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

developed a robust, defined valuation method for preferred stock and warrants received under the Capital Purchase Program,” no such valuation, as of the drafting
of this report, had occurred.338 Even if Treasury intends to hold these assets for the
foreseeable future, its delay in placing a value on these assets (and thus provide the
American people with some indication of the performance of their investments),
among other things, is detrimental to program transparency. Although other bodies have provided some valuation analysis (the Congressional Oversight Panel has
estimated that Treasury overpaid by $68 billion in its acquisitions of assets and the
Congressional Budget Office estimated that taxpayer loss in TARP will ultimately
be as high as $356 billion), SIGTARP believes that Treasury should provide its own
estimates on the value of the preferred shares, warrants of common stock, notes,
and other instruments that it now holds as a result of TARP. Finally, as TARP recipients pay back their TARP funds, Treasury must liquidate the warrants, either by
selling them back to the CPP recipient at a market price or by selling them in the
open market. While Treasury, in discussing these recommendations with SIGTARP,
has indicated that it has recently made asset management more of a priority and
expects to retain asset managers soon, it must act quickly. The failure to have an
asset manager, an investment plan, or an accurate valuation of the securities and
warrants it holds will soon be a significant deficiency in the program if not promptly
addressed.

Continuing Recommendations
As SIGTARP noted in the Initial Report, there are three particular aspects of asset
management that Treasury needs to address:
• Treasury should formalize its going-forward valuation methodology and begin
providing values of the TARP investments to the public.
• Treasury should develop an overall investment strategy to address the vast portfolio of securities that it holds.
• Treasury should decide whether it has any intention of exercising warrants in
order to hold the common stock. SIGTARP asked Treasury what its intentions
are on this point in January 2009, and it has not yet indicated its strategy on this
issue.

Potential Fraud Vulnerabilities Associated with TALF
In SIGTARP’s Initial Report, SIGTARP made a series of recommendations with
respect to the design and implementation of TALF. This section will discuss the
status of the implementation of those recommendations and then describe new and
ongoing recommendations for the design and operation of the program.

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SIGTARP previously recommended in its Initial Report that:
• Treasury should require that certain minimum underwriting standards and/
or other fraud prevention mechanisms are in place with respect to the assets
underlying the asset-backed securities (“ABS”) used for collateral.
Since the Initial Report, and after additional consultations with SIGTARP,
the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (“FRBNY”) and Treasury have taken some
important steps with respect to adopting fraud prevention mechanisms far beyond
what was initially contemplated for TALF. As set forth in greater detail in the TALF
discussion in Section 2 of this report, FRBNY now requires, among other things,
certifications from the sponsor, third-party attestations from accounting firms
regarding the pledged collateral, and due diligence procedures at the primary dealer
level. The TALF haircut methodology, which imposes different haircut percentages over different asset classes and maturities, has been designed, according to
Treasury and FRBNY, to be risk-sensitive and therefore incentivizes TALF borrowers to conduct due diligence about the quality of the underlying securities. FRBNY
has also imposed some oversight-enabling provisions for itself, including inspection rights and the ability to see through any special purpose vehicles (“SPVs”)
that borrowers may use to shield themselves from scrutiny. Although Treasury did
not require minimum underwriting standards for the ABS acting as collateral for
the TALF loans, it believes that the steps taken by FRBNY were sufficient, at least
with respect to the originally announced consumer-lending-oriented asset classes.
SIGTARP will continue to monitor this aspect of the program.
In its Initial Report, SIGTARP also recommended that:
• Treasury should consider requiring that beneficiaries (i.e., the TALF borrowers, the originators/sponsors, and the primary dealers) sign an agreement that
includes oversight-enabling provisions.
• Treasury should establish a compliance protocol with the Federal Reserve before
TALF is put into effect.
In SIGTARP’s view, Treasury did not receive sufficient oversight-enabling provisions in the agreements, nor has it established a sufficient compliance protocol
with the Federal Reserve. Although Treasury did obtain certain inspection rights for
the disposition SPV that it is funding, it has no oversight or access rights over any
of the borrowers, including the borrowers who default on their loans and surrender the ABS collateral to the SPV. Indeed, Treasury does not even have the right
to learn the identity of such borrowers. In other words, under its current agreement, Treasury does not have access to the identity, or any oversight authority over,
the borrowers from whom, in effect, it will be buying surrendered ABS. Although

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FRBNY officials have assured SIGTARP that it will provide this information in the
context of any audit or investigation that SIGTARP conducts, Treasury and Office
of Financial Stability (“OFS”)-Compliance did not obtain such access, for itself
or for SIGTARP, in its agreements with FRBNY. This failure also calls into question SIGTARP’s ability to fulfill its statutorily mandated reporting requirement of
including in its quarterly reports a listing of all institutions from which TARP buys
troubled assets, which arguably would include the identity of the party that surrenders TALF collateral. Furthermore, Treasury has only obtained limited access for
itself and SIGTARP with respect to the issuers of the ABS, who only have to grant
access if it is later determined that they pledged ineligible assets to the program.
This, of course, presents a significant chicken-and-egg problem, as Treasury (and
SIGTARP) will be far less likely to detect any eligibility problems if they cannot
inspect and test the assets in the first instance. Finally, as a result of its limited access, SIGTARP does not believe that Treasury has adopted SIGTARP’s recommendation of establishing a sufficient compliance protocol concerning TALF.
In addressing the potential fraud vulnerabilities of TALF in the Initial Report,
SIGTARP further recommended that:
• Treasury should exercise extreme caution and give careful consideration before
agreeing to the expansion of TALF to include mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”)
without further review and without considering certain minimum fraud protections.
• Treasury should oppose any expansion of TALF to legacy MBS without significant modifications to the program to ensure a full assessment of risks associated
with such an expansion.
Treasury and the Federal Reserve have signaled their intention to expand
TALF to allow the posting of both new and legacy MBS — both commercial MBS
(“CMBS”) and residential MBS (“RMBS”) — as collateral. As the terms of these
expansions have neither been formalized nor given final approval by the Federal
Reserve or Treasury, it remains to be seen if Treasury has exercised “extreme caution” in expanding TALF to newly issued MBS or whether it will require “significant modifications” before permitting legacy MBS to be included as well.
Accepting legacy MBS as collateral, in particular legacy RMBS, poses substantial issues from a credit loss and fraud loss perspective that are not readily
addressed by the current TALF design. Credit ratings, cited as one of the primary
credit protections in TALF as currently configured, have been proven to be of
questionable value in the general market for MBS, and for legacy RMBS they have
proven to be unreliable and largely irrelevant to the actual value and performance
of the security. Arguably, the wholesale failure of the credit rating agencies to rate
adequately such securities is at the heart of the securitization market collapse, if
not the primary cause of the current credit crisis. Furthermore, the underwriting

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standards (that is, the diligence the lender does before granting a loan, such as verifying a borrower’s income or reported assets) for RMBS in particular, have proven
to be woefully lax, potentially putting taxpayer money backing TALF in significant
jeopardy. Finally, legacy MBS, particularly RMBS, pose substantial valuation
challenges given how long the MBS market has been frozen, which gives rise to
the same conflict of interest and collusion vulnerabilities discussed in the “PublicPrivate Investment Program (“PPIP”)” discussion below.
As in the Initial Report, SIGTARP continues to recommend that Treasury not
participate in a TALF program expanded to newly issued MBS without exercising
an appropriate measure of caution, and, with respect to legacy assets, without significant modifications to the program. On that front, SIGTARP has had initial discussions with the Federal Reserve to discuss its plans for how the program will be
modified to accommodate the use of MBS as posted collateral. SIGTARP has been
informed by the Federal Reserve that it is considering, but has not yet adopted, the
following modifications with respect to legacy RMBS, at least, in order to address
the credit risks for such securities:
• acceptance of legacy RMBS as collateral based upon an examination of the
composition and performance of the loan portfolio underlying the RMBS, not
rating agency determinations
• a more granular determination of “haircut” percentages for RMBS, including a
close examination of the underwriting standards associated with the loans that
back the RMBS
• significantly higher haircuts relative to the haircuts imposed on asset classes
currently useable as collateral
As of the drafting of this report, FRBNY had not indicated what additional antifraud measures it will impose when TALF is expanded to MBS. This is of particular
importance because some of the anti-fraud provisions that FRBNY and Treasury
have cited as being significant (e.g., third-party attestation of assets, credit ratings,
etc.) for the original TALF program may not be relevant or useful for the expanded
TALF. SIGTARP encourages the Federal Reserve to continue this process and will
continue working with the Federal Reserve, FRBNY, and Treasury to recommend
protections in the program to avoid as much fraud and abuse as possible.

Recommendations
In light of the previous discussion, SIGTARP thus recommends that:
• Treasury and the Federal Reserve should provide to SIGTARP, for public disclosure in SIGTARP’s quarterly reports, the identity of the borrowers who surrender collateral in TALF.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

• Treasury should dispense with rating agency determinations and require a
security-by-security screening for each legacy RMBS. Treasury should refuse to
participate if the program is not designed so that RMBS, whether new or legacy,
will be rejected as collateral if the loans backing particular RMBS do not meet
certain baseline underwriting criteria or are in categories that have been proven
to be riddled with fraud, including certain undocumented subprime residential
mortgages (i.e., “liar loans”).
• Treasury should require significantly higher haircuts for all MBS, with particularly high haircuts for legacy RMBS, or other equally effective mitigation efforts.
• Treasury should require additional anti-fraud and credit protection provisions,
specific to all MBS, before participating in an expanded TALF, including minimum underwriting standards and other fraud prevention measures.
• Treasury should design a robust compliance protocol, with complete access
rights for itself, SIGTARP, and other relevant oversight bodies, to all TALF
transaction participants.
Treasury officials, in discussing these recommendations with SIGTARP, stated
that the potential expansion of the TALF program to include legacy MBS remains
in the design phase and will include more stringent standards, including “CUSIP
by CUSIP evaluation of underlying collateral, conducting due diligence with
respect to the underlying collateral and applying appropriate haircuts.”339 They
have also indicated that they will adopt SIGTARP’s recommendation, at least with
respect to newly issued RMBS, by reviewing certain minimum underwriting standards, including high credit scores and fully documented loans. These officials also
stated they are in the process of hiring a fraud specialist to assist them in developing risk mitigation efforts for all TARP programs — an action that SIGTARP previously recommended and which could greatly assist in the design of TARP programs
to account properly for the dangers of fraud.
Another new development with respect to TALF is that Treasury has announced, as part of PPIP, that Public-Private Investment Funds (“PPIFs”) operated under the Legacy Securities Program will be able to use PPIF funds and
Treasury leverage in TALF transactions. That issue, and SIGTARP’s recommendation regarding the danger of such a practice, are discussed in the upcoming
“Recommendations for Newly Announced Programs” portion of this section.

Executive Compensation
It has been more than two months since the American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act imposed new executive compensation requirements on TARP recipients. As of
the drafting of this report, Treasury has not issued regulations imposing these new
requirements or the executive compensation restrictions that the Administration
announced in early February. SIGTARP’s initial review of responses to its survey

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of 364 TARP recipients demonstrates that the absence of clear guidance on this
important issue has caused uncertainty among TARP recipients who have struggled
to understand and implement the requirements. This lack of clarity in executive
compensation limitations may also impede participation in other TARP programs.

Recommendation
Accordingly, SIGTARP recommends that:
• Treasury should address the confusion and uncertainty on executive compensation by immediately issuing the required regulations.
Treasury officials, in discussing this recommendation with SIGTARP, stated
that internal vetting on updated guidance is nearing completion and is expected to
be provided to the Office of Management and Budget for final clearance shortly.
They also indicated that the outcome of this effort is expected to be a “comprehensive rule” with applicability beyond CPP.

Lack of Resources within OFS-Compliance
The Compliance department within OFS has primary responsibility over a vast and
complex array of compliance and risk management functions. This responsibility
includes ensuring that appropriate internal controls are in place over OFS management of TARP programs, providing primary oversight of vendors that are providing
services to OFS, and monitoring TARP recipients’ compliance with their contractual and legal obligations. More than 500 financial institutions are already participating in various TARP programs; additional announced programs will expand
OFS-Compliance’s responsibilities to a mortgage modification program involving
millions of mortgages and to public-private partnerships that will involve not only
many new participants but also a whole new set of compliance challenges and
types of risk.
To carry out all of these responsibilities, now six months into TARP operations,
OFS-Compliance currently has a staff of approximately 10 employees. Although
SIGTARP has plans for a future audit to assess the integration and effectiveness of
OFS’s risk assessment and compliance efforts, SIGTARP makes a preliminary observation that the current resource commitment for this vitally important function
appears plainly inadequate. OFS has built substantially in the past six months, but
its compliance office has not grown in proportion to its historic task.

Recommendation
Accordingly, SIGTARP recommends as follows:
• Treasury should significantly increase the staffing levels of OFS-Compliance

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

and ensure the timely development and implementation of an integrated risk
management and compliance program.
Treasury officials, in discussing this recommendation with SIGTARP, acknowledged that their compliance and risk management efforts have been understaffed
but indicated they were in the process of making job offers to fill immediately five
compliance positions dealing primarily with executive compensation. They also
cited the use of Freddie Mac to facilitate compliance efforts in the area of home
loan modifications and a vendor who is providing general fraud prevention advice.
More broadly, they indicated that decisions are yet to be made concerning the ultimate size of their compliance efforts and the extent to which the functions would
be performed in-house or under contract.
SIGTARP is encouraged by Treasury’s efforts toward an increased emphasis
on compliance, but believes additional near-term attention needs to be devoted to
implement a comprehensive and integrated risk based compliance program.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR NEWLY ANNOUNCED
PROGRAMS
Capital Assistance Program
The CAP, as described in Section 2, contemplates additional capital infusions into
financial institutions and/or the conversion of the preferred shares that Treasury
obtained under the CPP into convertible preferred shares. Treasury announced
that it would require CAP applicants to set forth how they intend to use CAP funding. Notwithstanding this requirement, Treasury adamantly continues to refuse to
adopt SIGTARP’s recommendation that it require CAP recipients (and indeed all
TARP recipients) to report on how they actually used TARP funds. Putting aside
the value of this recommendation in other TARP programs, SIGTARP submits
that it is largely meaningless to require an applicant to report on its intended use of
funds without setting up a mechanism to monitor its actual use of funds.

Recommendations
SIGTARP therefore recommends that:
• Treasury should require CAP participants to (i) establish an internal control to
monitor their actual use of TARP funds, (ii) provide periodic reporting on their
actual use of TARP funds, and (iii) certify to OFS-Compliance, under the penalty of criminal sanction, that the report is accurate; the same criteria of internal
controls and regular certified reports should be applied to all conditions imposed
on CAP participants.

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• Treasury should require CAP participants to acknowledge explicitly the jurisdiction and authority of SIGTARP and other oversight bodies, as appropriate, to
oversee conditions contained in the agreement.

Operation of the Public-Private Investment Program
As discussed more fully in Section 2, PPIP is a program in which Government
funds will be invested side-by-side with private investors to purchase legacy assets,
including the “toxic” mortgages and legacy MBS widely believed to be one of the
root causes of the current financial crisis. As announced, PPIP consists of separate
subprograms.
• Under the Legacy Loans Program, newly formed PPIFs will bid on pools of legacy mortgages and other assets held on participating banks’ balance sheets. The
private equity in the PPIFs will be matched, dollar-for-dollar with TARP funds,
and the PPIF will be able to obtain financing guaranteed by the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to a 6-to-1 debt-to-equity ratio. The pools
of legacy loans will be assembled with the approval of FDIC, and the auction
process will be managed by FDIC. By way of example, a group of pre-qualified
private investors invests $50 million in a PPIF, which is then matched by $50
million in TARP funds. The PPIF obtains financing guaranteed by FDIC of up
to $600 million (a 6-to-1 ratio of the total $100 million of equity) and uses the
combined $700 million to purchase a pool of legacy mortgages. Any profits on
these transactions are shared equally between the private investors and TARP;
the private investors’ total potential loss, however, is limited to their investment,
$50 million, whereas Government interests could lose up to the remaining $650
million.
• Under the Legacy Securities Program, Treasury, through an application process,
will pre-qualify fund managers to manage PPIFs. The fund managers will raise
private capital for equity participation in the PPIF that will be matched, again,
dollar-for-dollar, with TARP funds. The PPIF will then be able to obtain additional financing in TARP funds, depending upon the circumstances, of up to 100%
of the amount of total equity. The fund manager, who earns a fee both from
Treasury and from the private investors, will then use the money to purchase
legacy MBS. For example, a fund manager selected by Treasury raises $500 million from private investors as equity in the PPIF. That $500 million is matched by
$500 million in TARP funds, making the total equity in the PPIF $1 billion. The
PPIF can then obtain up to an additional $1 billion loan (100% of the equity)
in TARP funds and use the whole $2 billion to purchase MBS. In this example,
profits again are shared 50%/50% between the private equity investor and TARP.
Losses are also suffered equally, but only up to the private investors’ equity. If the
PPIF failed completely, TARP would thus suffer 75% of the loss.

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• Finally, as a further extension of PPIP, TALF will be expanded to permit lending
based on the posting of legacy MBS as collateral.

Areas of Vulnerability within PPIP
Many aspects of PPIP could make it inherently vulnerable to fraud, waste, and
abuse. First, PPIP deals with assets that have recently been illiquid, making valuation difficult, therefore raising the danger that the Government will overpay for
the assets. Second, many of the participants in these markets, such as hedge funds,
are substantially unregulated and the internal oversight and compliance capability
at those institutions vary widely. Next, the interrelationships between the market
participants can be extremely complex and difficult to anticipate: the same entity
might buy and sell toxic assets for its own benefit and manage portfolios of toxic
assets for others, all while holding or managing equity or debt securities of the
banks and other institutions that have large positions in the same toxic assets.
Finally, the sheer size of the program — up to a trillion dollars for the PPIFs and up
to another trillion dollars for the expansion of TALF — is so large and the leverage
being provided to the private equity participants so beneficial, that the taxpayer risk
is many times that of the private parties, thereby potentially skewing the economic
incentives.
After receiving initial briefings from Treasury on PPIP and discussing the issue
with law enforcement partners, SIGTARP has identified three of the most significant areas of potential vulnerability to fraud and abuse applicable across the program. Because SIGTARP has not been provided with many of the specific details of
the mechanics of the various programs, SIGTARP’s observations and recommendations are necessarily at a high level.
Conflicts of Interest

The first area of vulnerability is that the private parties managing the PPIFs might
have a powerful incentive to make investment decisions that benefit themselves at
the expense of the taxpayer. By their nature and design, including the availability of
significant leverage, the PPIF transactions in these frozen markets will have a significant impact on how any particular asset is priced in the market. As a result, the increase in the price of such an asset will greatly benefit anyone who owns or manages
the same asset, including the PPIF manager who is making the investment decisions.
As an extremely simplified example from the Legacy Securities Program, assume that the fund manager of the PPIF owns 1 million bonds of MBS X in its
own account. MBS X is currently valued on the fund manager’s books at 20% of
its original value, or $20 per bond, for a total of $20 million. The fund manager
does an estimate and believes that, in a fully functioning market, MBS X is actually
worth 30% of face value, or $30 per bond. In the absence of a conflict of interest,
the fund manager, using PPIF funds, might be willing to pay up to $30 per bond

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in the market. However, the fund manager realizes that it can make more money
for itself if it drives the price even higher. It thus uses the funds it controls in the
PPIF to buy 1 million MBS X bonds from someone else at $40 per bond, or $40
million. This transaction has the potential, in the current illiquid market, of setting
the market price for that MBS X at $40, even though that price is far above what
the MBS is actually worth. As a result, the fund manager could sell the MBS on its
own books and recognize a profit of $20 million. Over time, however, the price of
MBS X declines to its actual value, $30 per bond, and results in a $10 million loss
to the PPIF fund. This loss has no negative impact to the fund manager, however,
because it did not have any of its own money invested in the fund. Indeed, the
fund manager has made money on the PPIF, because it has received fees from
both Treasury and the private investors based only on the total size of the PPIF. In
other words, the conflict results in an enormous profit for the fund manager at the
expense of the taxpayer.
The same incentives to overpay could exist in the Legacy Loans Program and
in numerous other factual circumstances. The incentives exist, for example, even
if the fund manager does not own MBS X but is merely managing other funds
that hold MBS X, as the manager earns fees based on the value of that fund, a
value that would, in this example, be significantly overstated (temporarily) as it can
increase the value of that fund based on valuing, or “marking” the MBS X at the
inflated “market” price that it set. The conflict can even exist if the manager holds
or manages equity tied to the value of the banks from which the MBS are being
purchased; here, using PPIF funds to overpay for bank assets may increase the
bank’s stock price, thus giving a greater profit to the fund manager.
Collusion

A closely related vulnerability is that PPIF managers might be persuaded, through
kickbacks, quid pro quo transactions, or other collusive arrangements, to manage
the PPIFs not for the benefit of the PPIF (and taxpayers), but rather for the benefit
of themselves and their collusive partners. In both the Legacy Loans Program and
the Legacy Securities Program, the significant Government-financed leverage presents a great incentive for collusion between the buyer and seller of the asset, or the
buyer and other buyers, whereby, once again, the taxpayer takes a significant loss
while others profit.
This time, consider an example from the Legacy Loans Program. Imagine
that a bank owns a pool of mortgage loans that both it and the private equity firm
investing in a PPIF values at $600 million. The private equity firm invests $60
million into the PPIF, which is matched by $60 million of TARP funds, and which
is leveraged by a loan of $720 million guaranteed by FDIC (the 6-to-1 debt-toequity ratio). The PPIF private equity firm surreptitiously agrees with the bank to
overpay for the pool of loans and causes the PPIF to bid $840 million at auction

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

for that pool. After the auction, the bank secretly pays the PPIF private equity
firm a kickback of $120 million, or half the difference between the auction price
($840 million) and the true value ($600 million). Although the PPIF will eventually
perform poorly as a result of the overpayment, the private equity firm’s loss is relatively small. Even if the PPIF was completely wiped out, the most the PPIF private
equity firm could lose is $60 million, which would still give it a guaranteed profit
of at least $60 million as a result of the kickback, a 100% return. Meanwhile, the
bank would have gained an illegal benefit of $120 million, all at the expense of the
taxpayer and FDIC. Of course, in practice, the collusive scheme would be far more
complex and would likely involve a series of affiliates and offsetting transactions,
but the principle would be the same.
The same collusion could occur in the Legacy Securities Program between
buyer and seller. Similarly, collusion could occur among other buyers. For example,
using the example described above involving MBS X, the fund manager could
convince another PPIF fund manager to overpay for MBS X, yielding the same
profits for the fund manager as if he himself directed the overpayment. In return,
the original fund manager could overpay for a different MBS that is on the other
PPIF fund manager’s books. As a result, both fund managers could potentially reap
significant illegal (and difficult to detect) profits, all at the expense of the taxpayer.
Money Laundering

National and international criminal organizations — from organized crime, to narcotics traffickers, to large-scale fraud operations — are continually looking for opportunities to make their illicit proceeds appear to be legitimate, thereby “laundering” those proceeds. It is estimated that the amount of funds laundered each year
is in the hundreds of billions of dollars worldwide. Money-laundering organizations
are highly sophisticated, utilizing the full arsenal of corporate, trust, and offshore
financial structures, and vast sums of illicit proceeds can and do make it into the
U.S. financial system each year.
Because of the significant leveraging available and the inherent imprimatur of
legitimacy associated with PPIP and TALF, these programs present an ideal opportunity to money-laundering organizations. If a criminal organization can successfully invest $10 million of illicit proceeds into a PPIF, not only does the organization enjoy the possibility of profiting through the Government-backed leverage, but
any eventual distributions from the PPIF are successfully laundered because they
appear to be PPIF investment gains rather than drug, prostitution, or illegal gambling proceeds. It would of course be unacceptable if TARP funds, FRBNY loans,
or FDIC guarantees were used to leverage the profits of drug cartels or organized
crime groups. This vulnerability is particularly problematic in light of the contemplation of the use of SPVs — legal entities created for the purpose of holding PPIF
assets — which can be, depending upon how they are designed, difficult to look

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behind to discern the true participants. Although the term sheets for PPIP place
requirements on the individual PPIF managers to conduct some screening of the
individual investors, it is not clear what ability Treasury will have to “look through”
to each of the individual investors to identify them and assure their legitimacy, or
have access to the individual investors’ books and records.
Recommendations

To address these vulnerabilities, SIGTARP makes the following recommendations
with respect to the design and implementation of PPIP.
• Treasury should impose strict conflict-of-interest rules upon PPIF managers
across all programs that specifically address whether and to what extent the
managers can (i) invest PPIF funds in legacy assets that they hold or manage on
behalf of themselves or their clients or (ii) conduct PPIF transactions with entities in which they have invested on behalf of themselves or others. SIGTARP
recognizes that there is a trade-off between hiring managers with significant
experience in the marketplace (who have the expertise to make them effective
asset managers but who have complex conflict-of-interest issues as a result) and
hiring managers who are not in the market at all (who have less expertise but
also no conflicts); however, Treasury should at least consider whether its fund
manager requirements address the serious conflict issues. It may very well be
that some of the conflicts cannot be mitigated under the current structure of
the programs unless the fund managers have no interests (and have no clients
who have interests) in the kinds of legacy assets that the PPIFs are purchasing.
This may, in turn, significantly limit what entities should be making PPIF investment decisions.
• Treasury should mandate transparency with respect to the participation and
management of PPIFs. This should include disclosure of the beneficial owners
of all of the private equity stakes in the PPIFs and of all transactions undertaken
in them. In addition to the reporting requirements contained in the PPIP term
sheets, Treasury should obtain and publicly disclose certified reports from all
PPIFs across all programs that include all transactions and the current valuation
of all assets. This transparency is necessary in light of the taxpayers’ reasonable
expectation of knowing how their money is being used, as a way to track and/or
deter the types of conflicts of interest and collusion abuses previously described,
and as a way to deter criminal organizations from trying to use PPIP to launder illicit proceeds. To the extent that PPIF managers are permitted to hold or
engage in transactions in the same securities that they are buying and selling
in the PPIFs, Treasury should require PPIF managers to report to Treasury on
any and all holdings and transactions in the same types of legacy assets on their
own behalf or on behalf of their clients. Such a disclosure would help identify

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

conflicts of interest. Moreover, in addition to the requirement that SIGTARP
will have access to all of the PPIF’s books and records, as set forth in the term
sheets, Treasury should impose a requirement that PPIF managers retain all
books and records pertaining in any way to the PPIF (including all e-mails, instant messages, and all other documents), and permit SIGTARP and other oversight entities access to the fund manager’s books and records and employees,
upon request. In this manner, Treasury, SIGTARP, and other oversight bodies
might be able to detect and address the potential conflicts and any indication of
collusion. Treasury should also require access to the private investors’ books and
records, at least to the extent that they relate to the PPIF investment.
• Treasury should require PPIF managers to provide PPIF equity stakeholders (including TARP) “most-favored nations clauses,” requiring that the fund
managers treat the PPIFs (and the taxpayers backing the PPIFs) on at least as
favorable terms as given to all other parties with whom they deal. In that same
vein, PPIF managers should be required to acknowledge that they owe the PPIF
investors – both the private investors and TARP – a fiduciary duty with respect
to the management of the PPIFs. Treasury should also require that each PPIF
fund manager have a robust ethics policy in place and a compliance apparatus
to ensure adherence to such code.
• In order to prevent money laundering and the participation of actors prone to
abusing the system, Treasury should require that all PPIF fund managers have
stringent investor-screening procedures, including comprehensive “Know Your
Customer” requirements at least as rigorous as that of a commercial bank or
retail brokerage operation. Additionally, fund managers should be required to
provide Treasury with the identities of all of the beneficial owners of the private
interests in the fund so that Treasury can do appropriate diligence to ensure that
investors in the funds are legitimate.

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Interactions between PPIP and TALF
In announcing the details of PPIP, Treasury has indicated that PPIFs under the
Legacy Securities Program could, in turn, use the leveraged PPIF funds (two-thirds
of which will likely be taxpayer money) to purchase legacy MBS through TALF,
greatly increasing taxpayer exposure to losses with no corresponding increase of
potential profits. By way of example, a PPIF manager could raise $500 million of
private equity, which would be matched with $500 million of TARP funds, and a
loan of an additional $500 million from TARP funds (according to the term sheet,
loans will only be given up to 50% of the total equity if investments will be made
through TALF rather than 100% otherwise). The PPIF could then take the total
$1.5 billion, bring it to the TALF window, and effectively use that money as the
“haircut” amount in a TALF financing to purchase legacy RMBS. Assuming that
the haircut will be 20% (larger than any existing haircut), the PPIF will be able to
receive a non-recourse loan from FRBNY for an additional $6 billion, enabling the
PPIF to purchase $7.5 billion in legacy RMBS. The private investors would thus
enjoy 50% of the profits from this enhanced buying power, but only be exposed to
less than 7% of the total losses if the fund were wiped out.
Aside from potential unfairness to the taxpayer, this leverage upon leverage on
legacy RMBS raises other significant issues. First, it only magnifies the dangerous
incentives discussed above (the conflicts of interest and collusion issues), because
the fund manager now has up to five times the buying power than it would if it
participated in the Legacy Securities PPIF alone. Moreover, it severely undermines
the validity of the methodology that the Federal Reserve has used to build the
haircut percentages in TALF thus far. The Federal Reserve has told SIGTARP that
it has determined its haircut percentage based at least in part on the fact that the
haircut represents a TALF borrower’s “skin in the game” — someone’s own capital
at risk — that incentivizes appropriate due diligence on the borrower’s part. If leveraged PPIFs are permitted to participate in TALF, that effectively lowers the private
equity’s skin in the game by at least the amount of money borrowed from TARP,
materially diminishing the incentive to do due diligence. Put in simpler terms, an
investor who is funding 100% of the haircut amount with his own money (as is
typical in TALF) can logically be expected to be far more careful than one only putting up 33% (as would occur under this example).
Recommendations
Accordingly, SIGTARP recommends that:
• Treasury should not allow Legacy Securities PPIFs to invest in TALF, unless
significant mitigating measures are included to address these dangers. These
might include prohibiting the use of TARP leverage if the PPIF invests through
TALF, or proportionately increasing haircuts for PPIFs that do so.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

Failure to adopt this recommendation may well protect the Federal Reserve’s
own balance sheet, but it would do so at the expense of putting at risk Treasury
assets, hardly a victory from the taxpayers’ perspective. SIGTARP thus further
recommends:
• All TALF modeling and decisions, whether on haircuts or any other credit or
fraud loss mechanisms, should account for potential losses to Government
interests broadly, including TARP funds, and not just potential losses to the
Federal Reserve.
Treasury officials, in discussing these recommendations with SIGTARP, recognize the increased risks associated with this area of the program but suggested that
flexibility would be needed to consider alternate ways of mitigating the risks to the
extent possible.
SIGTARP will continue to monitor the development of the PPIP requirements
and procedures and will make future recommendations concerning standards and
mechanisms that will help protect against fraud, waste, and abuse in the program,
as appropriate.

Design of the Mortgage Modification Program
Shortly after the February announcement of the Administration’s intent to launch a
mortgage modification plan, SIGTARP provided a series of high-level recommendations to address potential fraud in the program, first by providing OFS officials an
outline of potential fraud issues and then in a series of discussions with OFS and
other Treasury officials.
SIGTARP’s recommendations were made in the context of the Special
Inspector General’s prior experience as the founder of the Mortgage Fraud Group
in the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York and
after consultation with and advice from mortgage fraud experts at the Federal
Bureau of Investigation. The recommendations address some of the patterns of the
rampant mortgage fraud that contributed to the current financial crisis, including
corruption of many of the potential gatekeepers who were supposed to limit such
fraud: attorneys, appraisers, notaries, mortgage brokers, title insurance agents,
and insiders at banks and mortgage originators. Recognizing that many of the
most prevalent frauds had common characteristics, SIGTARP’s recommendations
reflected an attempt to shield the program from such schemes before they could be
adapted to the mortgage modification plan.
In general, mortgage fraud schemes are viewed by law enforcement in two
categories: (i) fraud for home, where a homeowner lies in order to get a mortgage for which he or she would otherwise not qualify; and (ii) fraud for profit,
which involves rings of individuals whose goal is to defraud banks and individual

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homeowners for the purpose of profit. Recognizing that the greatest economic
damage is done by those who commit mortgage fraud for profit, SIGTARP’s recommendations primarily address this type of fraud.
In this section, SIGTARP’s mortgage modification recommendations, followed
by Treasury’s response, are each discussed in detail.

Verification of Residence Recommendation
One of the most common characteristics of fraud-for-profit schemes is that the
individual holding the mortgage, often a “straw purchaser,” does not actually live in
the home for which he or she is obtaining a mortgage. Recognizing this indicator,
SIGTARP strongly recommended that Treasury include provisions to ensure that
the individual applying for the mortgage modification actually lives in the home,
including (i) a signed certification from the applicant, and (ii) third-party verification that the home is the applicant’s primary residence. Indeed, to guard against
servicer failings (such as not doing the verification but then claiming that it had) or
complicity (such as purposefully misrepresenting the residence of the applicant in
furtherance of a fraud-for-profit scheme), SIGTARP recommended that Treasury
require submission of third-party verification to Treasury or its agent prior to its
funding a modification.
Status of Recommendation

Treasury has partially implemented this recommendation. It has taken some
important steps, including requiring a signed certification from the applicant that
he or she lives in the home and requiring the servicer to acquire from the applicant some proof of residence. Treasury has not required, however, that the servicer
obtain third-party verification of the applicant’s residence before submitting and
implementing the mortgage modification. This is critical, as most fraud-for-profit
schemes have ready access to forged documents (e.g., false utility bills, pay stubs,
bank account statements). As a result, the current system will not capture a fraud
scheme that involves doctored documents or one involving the complicity or the
negligence of the servicer, because the servicer is not required to submit proof of
its verification of residence before receiving Government funding. Accordingly,
SIGTARP continues to recommend that:
• Before funding a mortgage modification, Treasury should require the servicer to
submit third-party verified evidence that the applicant is residing in the subject
property.
Treasury, in discussions with SIGTARP about this recommendation, indicated that servicers will be able to obtain (i) the borrowers’ tax return information
from the IRS and (ii) credit reports. If Treasury requires servicers to provide such

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

third-party verified information regarding residence to Treasury or its agent before funding a modification, it would represent a significant improvement in the
program.

Closing Procedures Recommendation
Many fraud-for-profit schemes involved fraudulent closings, at which signatures
were forged or where the homeowners and/or purchasers signed documents they
did not understand and thus could be charged exorbitant fees without their knowledge. As a result, several states have tightened the requirements of the typical mortgage closing procedure with measures that increase deterrence and which greatly
assist law enforcement in its investigation of mortgage fraud-for-profit schemes.
Adopting some of the characteristics of these reforms, SIGTARP recommended
that a closing-like procedure be conducted that would include:
• a closing warning sheet that would warn the applicant of the consequences of
fraud
• the notarized signature and thumbprint of each participant
• mandatory collection, copying, and retention of copies of identification documents of all participants in the transaction
• verbal and written warnings regarding hidden fees and payments so that applicants are made fully aware of:
• the benefits to which they are entitled under the program (to prevent a corrupt servicer from collecting payments from the Government and not passing
the full amount of the subsidies to the homeowners)
• the fact that no fee should be charged for the modification
Status of Recommendation

Treasury has decided against using a closing procedure, stating that mortgage modifications typically take place over the telephone and through the mail. Treasury has,
however, attempted to address several of the concerns raised in this recommendation
by: (i) including a fraud warning sheet with every mortgage modification solicitation
that includes SIGTARP’s hotline to report fraud; and (ii) beginning outreach efforts,
along with other agencies, to warn homeowners that they should not pay fees as part
of the program, as discussed more fully in the following paragraphs. SIGTARP remains concerned that Treasury has not taken sufficient action related to its previous
recommendation. Accordingly, SIGTARP continues to recommend that:
• Additional anti-fraud protections should be adopted to verify the identity of the
participants in the transaction and to address the potential for servicers to steal
from individuals by receiving Government subsidies without applying them for
the benefit of the homeowner.

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Treasury officials, in discussing this recommendation with SIGTARP, noted
that they have a financial agent agreement with Freddie Mac to provide a range of
compliance and anti-fraud efforts for the loan modification program and are consulting with an anti-fraud expert. They also indicated that these efforts would align
with many of the issues and recommendations identified by SIGTARP pertaining to
loan modifications and will include provisions that address potentially corrupt loan
servicers.

Income Verification Recommendation
One of the most common features of traditional mortgage fraud is that applicants
falsely inflate their income and support those lies with fraudulent documentation
and employment verification. In the mortgage modification program, due to the
increased subsidy for homeowners whose income is lower, there exists an incentive
for applicants to understate their income intentionally. To address this potential
fraud, SIGTARP recommended that Treasury require servicers to: (i) compare the
income reported on their initial mortgage application with the income reported on
the modification application, and, if they differ significantly, require an explanation
and verifiable documentation of the change in income; and (ii) require third-party
verification of employment.
Status of Recommendation

Treasury has not adopted this recommendation, but has taken some steps to verify
income, including requiring the homeowner to sign a waiver so that the servicer
can obtain tax return information for the applicant and requiring the applicant
to provide documentation to verify income. Although this is helpful, SIGTARP
believes that further action is still needed as it does not appear that Treasury is requiring the servicer actually to obtain and verify the income tax information before
approving the modification. Tax return information, for example, even if obtained,
may be of limited value given the time lag between the last income tax return and
the date of the application. Further, as noted earlier in the discussion, relying on
documentation provided by the borrower is unreliable given the prevalence and
ease with which false pay stubs, W-2s, and 1099s can be generated. Accordingly,
SIGTARP continues to recommend that:
• Treasury require that verifiable, third-party information be obtained to confirm
an applicant’s income before any modification payments are made.

Timing of Incentive Payments Recommendation
Generally speaking, one of the fraud dangers to the mortgage modification program
is the activity of “modification mills,” corrupt servicers that will churn out unverified or unlikely-to-perform mortgage modifications in order to collect the $1,000

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

up-front incentive payment. Because the servicer is not currently required to provide verified information prior to commencing a modification (and receiving the
$1,000 up-front payment), there is a fraud incentive for servicers to push through
modifications that do not necessarily meet the criteria and/or make modifications
that they know will never be successful. Indeed, it is unfortunately foreseeable
that a servicer could take a mortgage that is in default, submit fraudulent paperwork, and collect the $1,000 fee, without any intent on the part of the homeowner
to make any further payments on the mortgage modification. SIGTARP thus
recommended that Treasury delay the up-front payment by 90 days to ensure that
the homeowner has made several payments as part of the mortgage modification
program before awarding the servicer the $1,000 incentive payment.
Status of Recommendation

Treasury has implemented a procedure under which it will not pay the $1,000
incentive payment until after the homeowner has made three payments to the
servicer; however, these payments occur prior to the Government’s modification
of the mortgage and require no independent verification. Although Treasury’s
insistence of a servicer-run trial period is certainly an improvement over a system
of immediate incentive payments, it does not necessarily protect Treasury from
a corrupt servicer who could fraudulently claim that an applicant has successfully completed a trial period even if not true. Accordingly, to protect against such
fraud, SIGTARP continues to recommend that:
• Treasury should defer payment of the $1,000 incentive to the servicer until after the homeowner has verifiably made a minimum number of payments under
the mortgage modification program.
Treasury officials, in discussing this recommendation with SIGTARP, have
indicated that they will work with their agents “to verify that the borrower makes
the required number of payments under the trial modification.”340

Education and Outreach Recommendation
One of the most insidious forms of mortgage fraud are “foreclosure rescue scams,”
in which fraudsters trick struggling homeowners into paying up-front fees by
promising them assistance in navigating the foreclosure process. Sadly, most of
the companies promising these services do nothing for the homeowner other than
give them false hope while taking an exorbitant fee. SIGTARP therefore recommended that Treasury proactively educate homeowners about the nature of the
program, warn them about these predators, and publicize that no fee is necessary
to participate in the program.

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Status of Recommendation

Treasury is doing an excellent job in implementing this recommendation. The
Making Home Affordable website prominently features fraud warnings, and, in an
April 6, 2009, press conference, the Treasury Secretary, along with the Attorney
General, the Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the
head of the Federal Trade Commission, and the Attorney General for the State of
Illinois, announced a coordinated and detailed outreach effort to educate
homeowners about the dangers of such fraud, as well as efforts to detect and
prosecute such scams. SIGTARP’s Investigations Division will continue to work
with its partners to bring the perpetrators of such fraud to justice.

Mandated Data Collection Recommendation
Mortgage fraud is often perpetrated by repeat offenders, and one of law enforcement’s most powerful tools to detect this abuse is the capability to mine data to
identify those individuals and entities (such as appraisers, mortgage brokers, straw
purchasers, or attorneys) who repeatedly appear in connection with suspicious
foreclosures. SIGTARP recommended that Treasury require its agents to keep track
of the names and identifying information for each participant in each mortgage
modification transaction and to maintain a database of such information. Not only
would such a database assist law enforcement in the detection and apprehension
of fraudsters, but it could also assist in fraud prevention. For example, a centralized
database could identify if a potential homeowner applicant had already applied for
or received a mortgage modification on a different property, a strong indicator of
fraud (because an applicant can only live in one home, an application for an additional modification would strongly suggest that the homeowner had lied about his
or her primary residence).
Status of Recommendation

Treasury officials, in discussing this recommendation with SIGTARP, recognized
the importance of data mining to fraud prevention efforts and stated that they are
working with Freddie Mac, their compliance agent, to determine the feasibility of
this recommendation.

Auto Supplier Support Program
SIGTARP was briefed on the Auto Supplier Support Program shortly before it was
announced. At the time of the briefing, SIGTARP raised concerns regarding two
potential fraud vulnerabilities. First, SIGTARP inquired as to what protections
would be in place to prevent “phantom receivables” — auto parts that are subject
to TARP funding but never make it to the automobile manufacturers. Second,
SIGTARP warned of the dangers of commercial bribery, a vulnerability borne from
the structure of the program, which empowered the automobile manufacturers

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

with unfettered discretion to choose which suppliers and at what amounts the suppliers can participate in the program — effectively picking winners and losers with
no clear restrictions.
In discussions concerning this recommendation, Treasury has indicated that
certain financial aspects of the program would act as a disincentive to these vulnerabilities. SIGTARP awaits further briefing on the program.

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QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

ENDNOTES
1.

Since January 30, 2009, another 150 banks have received about $7.9 billion in CPP funding.

2.

Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

3.

Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008.

4.

Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009. This figure represents Treasury’s announced plans for TARP funding. GAO-09-539T reported the
same figure as the “projected use of funds.”

5.

Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.

6.

Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.

7.

Treasury, “Fact Sheet: Financial Stability Plan,” 2/10/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.

8.

Treasury, “Capital Purchase Program,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.

9.

Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.

10. CPP, TALF, and PPIP: Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, Chief of Compliance and CFO, SIGTARP interview, 3/30/2009.
11. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Announces Participation in Citigroup’s Exchange Offering,” 2/27/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/26/2009.
12. Treasury, “Treasury White Paper: The Capital Assistance Program and Its Role in the Financial Stability Plan,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/25/2009.
13. Treasury, GAO, SIGTARP meeting on CAP, 3/12/2009.
14. Treasury, “Guidelines for Systemically Significant Failing Institutions Program,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
15. Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.
16. Treasury Press Release, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/26/2009.
17. Treasury, “Program Description: Targeted Investment Program,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
18. Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.
19. Treasury, Report to Congress Pursuant to Section 102 of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act, 12/31/2008.
20. Treasury Press Release, “U.S. Government Finalizes Terms of Citi Guarantee Announced in November,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/26/2009.
21. Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.
22. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury, Federal Reserve and the FDIC Provide Assistance to Bank of America,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/31/2009.
23. Treasury, “Automotive Industry Financing Program,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/31/2009.
24. Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.
25. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 2/23/2009.
26. Treasury, “General Motors Corporation 2009 – 2014 Restructuring Plan,” 2/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 2/17/2009.
27. Treasury, SIGTARP briefing on auto industry, 4/14/2009.
28. Treasury, “Auto Supplier Support Program: Stabilizing the Auto Industry at a Time of Crisis,” 3/19/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
29. Treasury, SIGTARP briefing on auto industry, 4/14/2009.
30. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/25/2009.
31. FRBNY Press Release, “Joint Press Release,” 3/3/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/25/2009.
32. Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, Chief of Compliance and CFO, SIGTARP interview, 3/30/2009.
33. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Department Releases Details on Public Private Partnership Investment Program,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/26/2009.
34. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/26/2009.
35. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
36. Treasury Press Release, “Relief for Responsible Homeowners One Step Closer Under New Treasury Guidelines, With Detailed Program Requirements,
Servicers Can Now Begin ‘Making Home Affordable’ Loan Modifications, Extensive Borrower Outreach Efforts Underway,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/26/2009.
37. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/26/2009.
38. Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, Chief of Compliance and CFO, SIGTARP interview, 3/30/2009.
39. Treasury, “Program Descriptions: Capital Purchase Program,” 3/24/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/24/2009.
40. Treasury, “Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari Review of the Financial Market Crisis and the Troubled Assets Relief
Program,” 1/13/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/16/2009.
41. Treasury, “Treasury, Regulators Issue Additional Guidance on Capital Purchase Program,” 10/20/2008, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/16/2009.
42. Treasury, “Treasury Releases Capital Purchase Program Term Sheet for Privately Held Financial Institutions,” 11/17/2008, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/16/2009.
43. Treasury, “Treasury Releases Capital Purchase Program Term,” 1/14/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/16/2009.
44. Treasury, “Process Related FAQs for the Capital Purchase Program, Mutual Holding Company FAQs,” 4/7/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed
4/7/2009.

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45. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L. 11-5, 2/13/2009.
46. Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009. Two institutions, Bank of America Corporation and SunTrust
Banks, Inc., each received investments in two separate installments.
47. Congressional Oversight Panel, “February Oversight Report,” 2/6/2009, cop.senate.gov, accessed 3/26/2009.
48. Congressional Budget Office, “A Preliminary Analysis of the President’s Budget and an Update of CBO’s Budget and Economic Outlook,” March 2009,
www.cbo.gov, accessed 4/10/2009. “Oversight and Analysis Estimate of TARP’s Cost to Taxpayers Increases,” Wall Street Journal, 4/3/2009, www.wsj.
com, accessed 4/4/2009.
49. Warrants for private QFIs are generally exercised immediately. Certain Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) are not required to issue
warrants.
50. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 3/31/2009.
51. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L. 11-5, 2/13/2009.
52. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/10/2009.
53. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.
54. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.
55. Treasury, “Treasury Releases First Monthly Bank Lending Survey,” 2/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
56. Treasury, “Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability, Neel Kashkari Remarks at Brookings Institute,” 1/8/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
1/12/2009.
57. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 3/31/2009.
58. Treasury, “Treasury Department Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot,” 2/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
59. Treasury, letter to Jeffrey B. Weeden, 1/16/2009, received 1/22/2009.
60. Treasury, SIGTARP response to data call, 3/31/2009.
61. Treasury, “Treasury Department Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot,” 2/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
62. Treasury, “Treasury Department Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot,” 2/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
63. Treasury, “Treasury Department Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot,” 2/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
64. Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.
65. Treasury, “Treasury Department Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
66. Treasury, “Treasury Department Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
67. Treasury, “Treasury Department Monthly Lending and Intermediation Snapshot,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
68. Treasury, “Secretary Geithner Introduces Financial Stability Plan,” 2/10/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
69. Treasury, “Treasury White Paper: The Capital Assistance Program and Its Role in the Financial Stability Plan,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/25/2009.
70. FDIC, “FAQs — Supervisory Capital Assessment Program,” 2/25/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
71. Federal Reserve, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
72. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, “The Employment Situation: March 2009,” 4/3/2009, www.bls.gov, accessed 4/5/2009.
73. Treasury, “Treasury White Paper: The Capital Assistance Program and Its Role in the Financial Stability Plan,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/25/2009.
74. FDIC Press Release, “Agencies to Begin Forward-Looking Economic Assessments,” 2/25/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
75. FDIC, “FAQs — Supervisory Capital Assessment Program,” 2/25/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
76. FDIC, “FAQs — Supervisory Capital Assessment Program,” 2/25/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
77. Treasury, White Paper, “The Capital Assistance Program and Its Role in the Financial Stability Plan,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
78. Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock Terms,” 3/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
79. Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.
80. Treasury, “Fact Sheet, Financial Stability Plan,” 2/10/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
81. Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock Terms,” 3/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
82. Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock Terms,” 3/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
83. Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock Terms,” 3/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
84. Treasury, “Capital Assistance Program FAQs,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
85. Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock Terms,” 3/25/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009
86. Treasury, “Application Guidelines for Capital Assistance Program,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
87. Treasury, “Summary of Mandatorily Convertible Preferred Stock Terms,” no date, accessed 3/25/2009.
88. Treasury, White Paper, “The Capital Assistance Program and Its Role in the Financial Stability Plan,” no date, https://ustreas.gov/press/releases/reports/
tg40_capwhitepaper.pdf, accessed 4/3/2009.
89. Treasury, “Testimony By Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari, before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial
Services and General Government,” 12/4/2008, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/8/2009.
90. FDIC, “A Brief History of Deposit Insurance in the United States,” no date, http://www.fdic.gov/bank/historical/brief/brhist.pdf, accessed 4/3/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

91. OCC, “Supervisory Guidance, Supervisory Review Process Related to the Implementation of the Basel II Advanced Capital Framework,” no
date, www.occ.gov\ftp\release\2008-81a.pdf, accessed 4/3/2009.
92. Federal Reserve Board, “Basel II Capital Accord, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking,” 3/30/2006, www.federalreserve.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
93. FDIC, “FAQs—Supervisory Capital Assessment Program,” no date, www.fdic.gov/news/press/2009/pr09025a.pdf, accessed 4/15/2009.
94. SIGTARP, “Initial Report to Congress,” 2/6/2009, www.sigtarp.gov, accessed 3/25/2009.
95. As of March 31, 2009, $122.5 billion has been allocated to institution-specific participants, $85 billion has been expended, while $37.5 billion
has been announced but not disbursed. This is a total increase of $30 billion since SIGTARP’s Initial Report.
96. AIG, “Securities Purchase Agreement,” 11/25/2008.
97. Treasury, Press Release, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/4/2009.
98. Treasury, Press Release, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/4/2009.
99. Treasury, Press Release, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/4/2009.
100. Treasury, Press Release, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
101. Treasury, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/4/2009.
102. Treasury, Press Release, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/4/2009.
103. Treasury, Press Release, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov,
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104. Federal Reserve, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
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accessed 3/4/2009.
107. AIG, Restructuring Term Sheet, “Exchange of Series D Fixed Rate Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock for Series E Fixed Rate
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108. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/6/2009.
109. AIG Restructuring Term Sheet, “Exchange of Series D Fixed Rate Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock for Series E Fixed Rate
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110. AIG, Restructuring Term Sheet, “Exchange of Series D Fixed Rate Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock for Series E Fixed Rate
Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock,” 3/2/2009.
111. AIG, Restructuring Term Sheet, “Exchange of Series D Fixed Rate Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock for Series E Fixed Rate
Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock,” 3/2/2009.
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114. AIG, Restructuring Term Sheet, “Issuance of Additional Preferred Stock,” 3/2/2009.
115. Treasury, “Treasury Department Releases Text of Letter From Secretary Geithner to Hill Leadership on AIG,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/19/2009.
116. Treasury, “Treasury Department Releases Text of Letter From Secretary Geithner to Hill Leadership on AIG,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/19/2009.
117. Treasury Press Release, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/4/2009.
118. Treasury Press Release, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/4/2009.
119. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L. 115-5, 2/17/2009.
120. Treasury, “Treasury Department Releases Text of Letter From Secretary Geithner to Hill Leadership on AIG,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/19/2009.
121. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L. 111-5, 2/17/2009.
122. Treasury, Fifth Tranche Report to Congress, 2/6/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 2/24/2009.
123. Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 3/31/2009.
124. Citigroup Inc., “Securities Purchase Agreement,” 12/31/2008.
125. Citigroup Inc., “What Citi is Doing to Expand the Flow of Credit, Support Homeowners and Help the U.S. Economy, TARP Progress Report for
Fourth Quarter 2008,” 2/6/2009, www.citigroup.com, accessed 2/24/2009.
126. Citigroup Inc., “What Citi is Doing to Expand the Flow of Credit, Support Homeowners and Help the U.S. Economy, TARP Progress Report for
Fourth Quarter 2008,” 2/6/2009, www.citigroup.com, accessed 2/24/2009.
127. Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 3/31/2009.

163

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128. Treasury Press Release, “U.S. Government Finalizes Terms of Citi Guarantee Announced in November,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/16/2009.
129. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Announces Participation in Citigroup’s Exchange Offering,” 2/27/2009. www.treas.gov, accessed 3/2/2009.
130. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Announces Participation in Citigroup’s Exchange Offering,” 2/27/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/2/2009.
131. Citigroup Inc., 8-K, “Citi to Exchange Preferred Securities for Common, Increasing Tangible Common Equity to as Much as $81 Billion,” 2/27/2009,
www.sec.gov, accessed 3/2/2009.
132. Citigroup Inc., 8-K, “Citi Files Registration Statement for Exchange Offer,” 3/19/2009, www.sec.gov, accessed 3/20/2009.
133. Treasury, “Treasury Announces Participation in Citigroup’s Exchange Offering,” 2/27/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/2/2009.
134. Citigroup Inc., 8-K, “Citi to Exchange Preferred Securities for Common, Increasing Tangible Common Equity to as Much as $81 Billion,” 2/27/2009,
www.sec.gov, accessed 3/2/2009.
135. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Announces Participation in Citigroup’s Exchange Offering,” 2/27/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/2/2009.
136. The actual dollar value of these obligations would depend on the losses incurred as well as the deductibles, loss sharing provisions, and other terms of
the agreements.
137. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
138. Summary of Agreement between Citigroup, Treasury, FDIC, and the Federal Reserve Board.
139. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Exhibit B,” 1/15/2009.
140. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
141. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
142. Treasury, “Treasury, FDIC, and Federal Reserve Announce Assistance to Citigroup,” 11/23/2008, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/9/2009.
143. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
144. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
145. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
146. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Schedule A,” 1/15/2009.
147. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Schedule A,” 1/15/2009.
148. Treasury, SIGTARP interview, 2/10/2009.
149. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Exhibit B,” 1/15/2009.
150. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Exhibit B,” 1/15/2009.
151. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Exhibit B,” 1/15/2009.
152. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Exhibit B,” 1/15/2009.
153. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Exhibit B,” 1/15/2009.
154. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Exhibit B,” 1/15/2009.
155. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
156. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
157. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, “Exhibit B,” 1/15/2009.
158. Citigroup Inc., Master Agreement, 1/15/2009.
159. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.
160. Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 3/31/2009.
161. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury, Federal Reserve, and the FDIC Provide Assistance to Bank of America,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
1/16/2009.
162. Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 3/31/2009.
163. FDIC, “FDIC Press Release,” 1/16/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed 1/23/2009.
164. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury, Federal Reserve, and the FDIC Provide Assistance to Bank of America,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
1/16/2009.
165. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury, Federal Reserve, and the FDIC Provide Assistance to Bank of America,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
1/16/2009.
166. Bank of America Corp, “10-K,” 2/27/2009, www.sec.gov, accessed 4/17/2009.
167. Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
168. Treasury, “Program Descriptions Automotive Industry Financing Program,” http://www.treas.gov, accessed 1/12/2009.
169. White House Press Release, “Geithner, Summers Convene Official Designees to Presidential Task Force on the Auto Industry,” 2/20/2009, www.whitehouse.gov, accessed 3/10/2009.
170. Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, SIGTARP briefing, 4/14/2009.
171. Treasury, “Geithner, Summers Convene Official Designees to Presidential Task Force on the Auto Industry,” 2/20/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/16/2009.
172. White House Press Release, “President Obama Announces Key Administration Posts,” 2/23/2009, www.whitehouse.gov, accessed 3/16/2009.
173. White House Press Release, “Obama Administration New Path to Viability for GM & Chrysler,” 3/30/2009, www.whitehouse.gov, accessed 3/30/09.
174. Treasury, “GM Viability Assessment,” 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

175. Treasury, “Tranche Report to Congress,” 1/7/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/14/2009.
176. Treasury, “General Motors Corporation 2009-2014 Restructuring Plan,” p. 20, 2/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 2/17/2009.
177. Treasury, “General Motors Corporation 2009-2014 Restructuring Plan” pp. 35 – 36, 2/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 2/17/2009.
178. Treasury, briefing on AIFP, 3/30/2009.
179. General Motors Corporation, Form 10-K, Exhibit 23.a, 3/5/09, www.sec.gov, accessed 3/5/2009.
180. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Announces TARP Investment in GMAC,” 12/29/2008, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/16/2009.
181. GMAC, “GMAC Receives $5.0 Billion Investment from the U.S. Treasury,” 12/29/2008, www.gmacfs.com, accessed 1/13/2009.
182. Treasury, Transactions Report, 1/27/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/14/2009.
183. SIGTARP Initial Report to Congress, Section 3: “TARP Implementation and Administration, Institution-specific Assistance,” 2/6/2009, www.sigtarp.gov,
accessed 4/9/2009.
184. Treasury, “Chrysler’s Viability Assessment,” 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/3/2009.
185. White House Press Release, “Obama Administration New Path to Viability for GM & Chrysler,” March 30, 2009, www.whitehouse.gov, accessed
3/30/2009.
186. Treasury, briefing on AIFP, 3/30/2009.
187. Treasury, Fifth Tranche Report to Congress, 2/6/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/14/2009.
188. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/9/2009.
189. Treasury, SIGTARP briefing, 4/14/2009.
190. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Announces Auto Supplier Support Program; Program Will Aid Critical Sector of American Economy,” 3/19/2009,
www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
191. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Announces Auto Supplier Support Program; Program Will Aid Critical Sector of American Economy,” 3/19/2009,
www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
192. Treasury, “Auto Supplier Support Program: Stabilizing the Auto Industry in a Time of Crisis,” 3/19/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
193. Treasury, “Auto Supplier Support Program: Stabilizing the Auto Industry in a Time of Crisis,” 3/19/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
194. Treasury, briefing on ASSP, 3/18/2009.
195. Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
196. Treasury, “Auto Supplier Support Program: Stabilizing the Auto Industry in a Time of Crisis,” 3/19/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/19/2009.
197. Treasury, briefing on ASSP, 3/18/2009.
198. Treasury, “The U.S. Treasury Department Summary Response to February 6, 2009 Recommendations of SIGTARP,” 4/7/2009, accessed 4/ 7/2009.
199. Treasury, SIGTARP briefing, 4/14/2009.
200. Treasury, briefing on ASSP, 3/18/2009.
201. Treasury, briefing on ASSP, 3/18/2009.
202. Program Description: Treasury, briefing on ASSP, 3/18/2009; Discount Amounts: Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
203. Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
204. Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
205. Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
206. Treasury, briefing on ASSP, 3/18/2009.
207. Treasury, “Obama Administration’s New Warranty Commitment Program,” 3/30/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/30/2009.
208. Treasury, SIGTARP briefing, 4/14/2009.
209. Treasury, “Obama Administration New Path to Viability for GM & Chrysler, GM and Chrysler Restructuring Fact Sheet,” 3/30/09, www.financialstability.
gov, accessed 3/30/2009.
210. Treasury, briefing with OFS Compliance, 4/6/2009.
211. Treasury, “Obama Administration’s New Warranty Commitment Program,” 3/30/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/30/2009.
212. Treasury, “Obama Administration’s New Warranty Commitment Program,” 3/30/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/30/2009.
213. Treasury, “Obama Administration’s New Warranty Commitment Program,” 3/30/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/30/2009.
214. HUD, “Glossary,” no date, www.hud.gov, accessed 3/31/2009.
215. Standard & Poor’s, “Guide to Credit Rating Essentials,” no date, www.standardandpoors.com, accessed 3/3/2009.
216. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
217. Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, Chief of Compliance and CFO, SIGTARP interview, 3/30/2009.
218. Treasury, White Paper, “The Consumer Business and Lending Initiative,” 3/3/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/10/2009.
219. FRBNY, “Monetary Report to Congress,” 2/24/2009, www.federalreserve.gov, accessed 3/10/2009.
220. Treasury, White Paper, “The Consumer Business and Lending Initiative,” 3/3/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/27/2009.
221. Treasury, White Paper, “Public Private Investment Program,” 3/33/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/27/2009.
222. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
223. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
224. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.

165

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225. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
226. FRBNY, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
227. FRBNY, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
228. OFS, FRBNY, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009
229. Treasury, “TALF LLC Credit Agreement,” 3/3/2009.
230. FRBNY, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
231. Treasury, “TALF LLC Credit Agreement,” 3/3/2009.
232. FRBNY, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
233. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
234. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
235. FRBNY, “Master Loan and Security Agreement,” 3/27/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
236. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
237. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
238. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
239. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
240. FRBNY, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
241. FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Frequently Asked Questions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
242. Treasury, response to SIGTARP letter dated 3/4/2009, received 3/9/2009.
243. Treasury, White Paper, “Public-Private Investment Program,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
244. FRBNY, Press Release, www.federalreserve.gov, 3/3/2009, accessed 3/27/2009.
245. FRBNY, Press Release, www.federalreserve.gov, 3/3/2009, accessed 3/27/2009.
246. Treasury Press Release, “Treasury Department Releases Details on Public Private Partnership Investment Program,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/23/2009.
247. Treasury indicated projected funding of $75 billion to $100 billion for the new PPIP. As of March 31, 2009, PPIP funds have not officially been committed and thus this report uses a conservative estimate of $75 billion.
248. Treasury, “Public-Private Investment Program: Fact Sheet,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
249. Treasury, “Public-Private Investment Program: Fact Sheet,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
250. Treasury, “Legacy Loans Program: Summary of Terms,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
251. Treasury, “Public-Private Investment Program: Fact Sheet,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
252. Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
253. Treasury, “Legacy Loans Program: Summary of Terms,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
254. Treasury, “Legacy Loans Program: Summary of Terms,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
255. Treasury, “Legacy Loans Program: Summary of Terms,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
256. Treasury, “Legacy Loans Program: Summary of Terms,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
257. Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009. Treasury, “Legacy Securities Public-Private Investment Funds: Summary of Terms,” 4/6/2009, www.
treas.gov, accessed 4/6/2009.
258. Treasury, “Legacy Securities Public-Private Investment Funds: Summary of Terms,” 4/6/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/6/2009.
259. Treasury, “Legacy Securities Public-Private Investment Funds: Summary of Terms,” 4/6/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/6/2009.
260. Treasury, “Legacy Securities Public-Private Investment Funds: Summary of Terms,” 4/6/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/6/2009.
261. Treasury, “Legacy Securities Public-Private Investment Funds: Summary of Terms,” 4/6/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/6/2009.
262. Treasury, “Legacy Securities Public-Private Investment Funds: Summary of Terms,” 4/6/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/6/2009.
263. Treasury, “Public-Private Investment Program: White Paper,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/23/2009.
264. Treasury Office of General Counsel, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
265. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
266. SBA, “Recovery Act: Frequently Asked Questions,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
267. SBA, “Recovery Act: Frequently Asked Questions,” no date, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
268. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
269. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
270. GAO, “Small Business Administration: Additional Guidance on Documenting Credit Elsewhere Decisions Could Improve 7(a) Program Oversight,”
2/12/2009, www.gao.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
271. GAO, “Small Business Administration: Additional Guidance on Documenting Credit Elsewhere Decisions Could Improve 7(a) Program Oversight,”
2/12/2009, www.gao.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
272. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
273. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.

QUARTERLY REPORT TO CONGRESS I APRIL 21, 2009

274. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009; Treasury, “Unlocking Credit
for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
275. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
276. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
277. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
278. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
279. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
280. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
281. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
282. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
283. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses Fact Sheet,” 3/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/17/2009.
284. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
285. Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/18/2009.
286. Treasury, response to SIGTARP draft, 4/9/2009.
287. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 109, 10/3/2008.
288. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 109, 10/3/2008.
289. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
290. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
291. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Summary Guidelines,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
292. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
293. Treasury, “Home Affordable Modification Guidelines: March 4, 2009,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
294. Treasury, “Home Affordable Modification Guidelines: March 4, 2009,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
295. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
296. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
297. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
298. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
299. Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
300. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
301. Office of the Special Inspector General, “Engagement Memo — Audit of the Use of TARP Funds and Audit of Controls Over Executive Compensation,”
2/5/2009.
302. Office of the Special Inspector General, “Engagement Memo — Review of Federal Oversight of Executive Compensation Requirements Including
Bonus Payments to AIG and Other TARP Recipients,” 3/20/2009.
303. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008.
304. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008.
305. Treasury, “Treasury Regulation 31 CFR Part 30,” 10/14/2008.
306. Treasury, “Notice 2008-PSSFI,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/19/2009.
307. Treasury, “Notice 2008-PSSFI,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/19/2009.
308. Treasury, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/12/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/4/2009.
309. Treasury, “Treasury Announces New Restrictions on Executive Compensation,” 2/4/2009,www.treas.gov, accessed 3/20/2009.
310. Treasury, “Treasury Announces New Restrictions on Executive Compensation,” 2/4/2009,www.treas.gov, accessed 3/20/2009.
311. Treasury, “Treasury Announces New Restrictions on Executive Compensation,” 2/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/20/2009.
312. Treasury Office of General Counsel, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
313. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
314. Treasury Office of General Counsel, response to SIGTARP draft report, 4/9/2009.
315. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
316. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
317. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
318. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
319. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
320. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
321. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L 111-5, 2/17/2009.
322. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008.
323. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008.
324. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/08/2009.

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SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL I TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

325. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/08/2009.
326. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/08/2009.
327. GAO-09-504, “Troubled Asset Relief Program: March 2009 Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues,” 3/31/2009.
328. Congressional Budget Office, “Congressional Budget Office Press Release,” 09/28/2008, www.cbo.gov, accessed 1/15/2009.
329. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/08/2009.
330. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008.
331. Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/08/2009.
332. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 110-343, 10/3/2008.
333. Treasury, “U.S. Department of Treasury Press Release,” 10/6/2008, www.treasury.gov, accessed 1/15/2009.
334. TARP Conflicts of Interest, Interim Rule, Billing Code 4810-25-P, 1/21/2009.
335. GAO-09-161, “Troubled Asset Relief Program: Additional Actions Needed to Better Ensure Integrity, Accountability, and Transparency,”
12/2/2008.
336. GAO-09-161, “Troubled Asset Relief Program: Additional Actions Needed to Better Ensure Integrity, Accountability, and Transparency,”
12/2/2008.
337. Treasury, “Summary Response to Recommendations in December 2008 GAO Report,” 1/22/2009.
338. Treasury, “SIGTARP’s Recommendations for the Operation of TARP, Comments by the Office of Financial Stability,” 4/13/2009.
339. Treasury, “SIGTARP’s Recommendations for the Operation of TARP, Comments by the Office of Financial Stability,” 4/13/2009.
340. Treasury, “SIGTARP’s Recommendations for the Operation of TARP, Comments by the Office of Financial Stability,” 4/13/2009.
Sources for Figure 2.1. TARP Projected Funding: CPP, TALF, and PPIP: Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, Chief of Compliance and CFO,
SIGTARP interview, 3/30/2009; AIFP: Treasury, Fifth Tranche Report to Congress, 3/6/2009, p. 2 states that Treasury will fund an additional $4
billion on 3/17/2009; ASSP: Treasury, “Auto Supplier Support Program: Stabilizing the Auto Industry in a Time of Crisis,” 3/19/2009, www.treas.
gov, accessed 3/19/2009; UCSB: Treasury, “Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses: FAQ on Implementation,” 3/17/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/18/2009; SSFI: Treasury, “U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Board Announce Participation in AIG Restructuring Plan,” 3/2/2009, www.treas.
gov, accessed 3/4/2009; TIP: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/2/2009; AGP: Treasury, “Treasury, Federal Reserve, and FDIC Provide Assistance
to Bank of America,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 1/16/2009; Treasury, “U.S. Government Finalizes Terms of Citi Guarantee Announced
in November,” 1/16/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/30/2009; TALF: Treasury, “Financial Stability Plan Fact Sheet,” 2/10/2009, www.treas.gov,
accessed 3/17/2009; MHA: Treasury, “Making Home Affordable: Updated Detailed Program Description,” 3/4/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/4/2009; GAO, “Report to Congressional Committees: Troubled Asset Relief Program — March 2009 Status of Efforts to Address Transparency
and Accountability Issues,” 3/26/2009; PPIP: Treasury, “Public-Private Investment Program: Fact Sheet,” 3/23/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/23/2009; Treasury, SIGTARP briefing, 4/14/2009.

GLOSSARY I APPENDIX A

GLOSSARY
This appendix provides a glossary of terms that are used throughout the context of this report.
504 Community Development Loan Program: SBA loan program
combining Government-guaranteed loans with private-sector mortgage loans
to provide up to $10 million in financing for community development.
7(a) Program: SBA loan program guaranteeing a percentage of loans for
small businesses that cannot otherwise obtain conventional loans at reasonable terms.
Accrual Assets: In the context of the Citigroup Master Agreement, accrual
assets are those that are held on the bank’s books at accrued value (i.e., gains
and accruals are earned but not necessarily received), as opposed to “markto-market” value.
Annual Coupon Rate: The annual amount of interest scheduled to be paid
on a fixed income investment, such as a bond or a mortgage.
Asset-Backed Security (“ABS”): “A type of financial security that is very
similar in structure to a mortgage-backed security (see Mortgage-Backed
Security), but is backed by a pool of consumer loans and generally does not
include mortgage loans. Most ABSs are backed by credit card receivables,
auto loans, student loans, or other loan and lease obligations.”
Asset Guarantee Program (“AGP”): “Established under section 102 of
EESA, allows the Department of the Treasury to assume a loss position with
specified attachment and detachment points on certain assets held by the
qualifying financial institution; the set of insured assets would be selected
by the Treasury and its agents in consultation with the financial institution
receiving the guarantee.”
Auction: “An asset sales strategy in which assets are sold either individually
or in pools to the highest bidder.”
Automotive Industry Financing Program (“AIFP”): The Automotive
Industry Financing Program was created to provide strategic investments in
U.S. automotive companies to prevent a significant disruption of the U.S.
automotive industry or to financial markets.
Bad Bank: An entity (the “bad bank”) that is legally separated from the bank
that created it (the “good bank”) and into which are placed problem loans
(or other troubled assets). Usually created by banks seeking to clean up their
balance sheets.
Balance Sheet: “The balance sheet is a snapshot of a company’s financial
standing at an instant in time. The balance sheet shows a company’s financial
position, what it owns (assets) and what it owes (liabilities). The ‘bottom line’
of a balance sheet must always balance (i.e., assets = liabilities + net worth).”
Bank: “Means:
A. a banking institution organized under the laws of the United States, or
a Federal savings association, as defined in section 2(5) of the Home
Owners’ Loan Act [12 USCS 1462(5)],
B. a member bank of the Federal Reserve System,
C. any other banking institution, whether incorporated or not, doing business under the laws of any State or of the United States, a substantial
portion of the business of which consists of receiving deposits or exercising fiduciary powers similar to those permitted to national banks under
the authority of the Comptroller of the Currency pursuant to section 92a
of Title 12, and which is supervised and examined by State or Federal
authority having supervision over banks, and which is not operated for
the purpose of evading the provisions of this title, and
D. a receiver, conservator, or other liquidating agent of any institution or
firm included in clauses (A), (B), or (C) of this paragraph.”

Bank Holding Company (“BHC”): “A company that owns and/or controls
one or more U.S. banks or one that owns, or has controlling interest in, one
or more banks. A bank holding company may also own another bank holding
company, which in turn owns or controls a bank; the company at the top of
the ownership chain is called the top holder.”
Baseline Value: In reference to Citigroup Master Agreement, Baseline Value
is the value of each covered asset on November 21, 2008. For mark-tomarket assets, it is the fair market value, and accrual assets, it is the unpaid
principal balance.
Basic Exchange: In reference to Citigroup exchange offer, taking one type
of stock (i.e., preferred) and converting it at a specific rate to another type of
stock (i.e., common).
Basis Points: One-hundredth of a percentage point. (For example, the difference between interest rates of 5.5% and 5.0% is 50 basis points.)
Bonus Pool: A pool or fund of money accumulated during the year by a business to be paid out at the end of a specified time period, typically a year, as
compensation to employees of the business as a reward for achieving certain
defined levels of company and/or employee performance.
Call Report: Quarterly report of financial condition commercial banks file
with their Federal and state regulatory agencies.
Capital: “Tangible and intangible resources that can be used or invested to
produce a stream of benefits over time.”
Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”): The Capital Purchase Program is a
program that is part of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (“TARP”). It is a
program that will invest in Qualifying Financial Institutions by purchasing
preferred stock and equity warrants.
Clawback: In reference to EESA, “Provision for the recovery of bonuses or
incentive compensation paid to a senior executive based on statements of
earnings, gains, or other criteria that are later proven to be materially inaccurate.”
Closing Date: In reference to the Citigroup Master Agreement, “the time
and date on which the closing occurs is the closing date.”
Collateral: An asset pledged by a borrower to a lender until a loan is repaid.
Collateralized: Securing a loan with assets.
Collateralized Debt Obligation (“CDO”): “A collateralized debt obligation
(CDO) is a security that entitles the purchaser to some portion of the cash
flows from a portfolio of assets, which may include bonds, loans, mortgagebacked securities, or other CDOs. For a given pool, CDOs designated as
senior debt, mezzanine debt, subordinated debt, and equity often are issued.”
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities (“CMBS”): “A financial instrument that is backed by a mortgage or a group of mortgages that are packaged
together. The security is bought and sold in financial markets. An MBS can
be backed either by residential real estate loans (“RMBS”) or commercial real
estate loans (“CMBS”).”
Commitment: “Any legally binding arrangements that obligate a bank to
extend credit in the form of loans or lease financing receivables; to purchase
loans, securities, or other assets; or to participate in loans and leases.
Commitments also include overdraft facilities, revolving credit, home equity

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and mortgage lines of credit, eligible ABCP liquidity facilities, and similar
transactions. Normally, commitments involve a written contract or agreement
and a commitment fee, or some other form of consideration.”

Party A may require Party B to make an equity investment in Party A.

Common Stock: “A security that provides voting rights in a corporation and
pays a dividend after preferred stock holders have been paid.”

Equity Security: “Any stock or similar security, certificate of interest or
participation in any profit sharing agreement, preorganization certificate
or subscription, transferable share, voting trust certificate or certificate of
deposit for an equity security, limited partnership interest, interest in a joint
venture, or certificate of interest in a business trust; any security future on
any such security; or any security convertible, with or without consideration into such a security, or carrying any warrant or right to subscribe to
or purchase such a security; or any such warrant or right; or any put, call,
straddle, or other option or privilege of buying such a security from or selling
such a security to another without being bound to do so.”

Convertible Preferred Stock: Traditionally, “convertible preferred stock”
referred to preferred stock that could be converted into common stock at
the option of the shareholder. In the context of TARP’s CAP, however, the
conversion is at the option of the QFI (qualifying financial institution), and
the shareholder must mandatorily accept common stock upon notice of
conversion.
Covered Asset: In reference to the Citigroup Master Agreement, Covered
Asset is an asset owned by Citigroup or any of its subsidiaries that is included
in the ring-fence.
Credit Enhancement: “Techniques whereby a company attempts to reduce
the credit risk of its obligations. Credit enhancement may be provided by a
third party (external credit enhancement) or by the originator (internal credit
enhancement), and more than one type of enhancement may be associated
with a given issuance.” For example, an MBS issuer may purchase an insurance policy which will pay investors if MBS losses rise above a certain level.

Equity Interest: See Equity.

Exceptional Assistance: In reference to TARP, institutions requiring assistance beyond the assistance of the widely available program (i.e., CPP and
CAP) are classified as requiring “Exceptional Assistance.”
Executive Compensation: The terminology for how top executives of
business corporations are paid for the services they provide. The forms of
compensation typically include a base salary, bonuses, shares, options, and
other company benefits.
Expenditure: The actual spending of money — an outlay.

Credit Protection: Security against losses on an investment. For TALF
purposes, TARP funding is used as credit protection on the Federal Reserve
loans (i.e., losses on the loans are absorbed by TARP funds up to the commitment amount).
Credit Rating: An assessment of the willingness and ability to pay of a
borrower for a fixed-income security. Ratings are issued primarily by national
firms such as Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, and Fitch.
CUSIP: CUSIP stands for Committee on Uniform Securities Identification
Procedures. A CUSIP number identifies most securities, including stocks
of all registered U.S. and Canadian companies, and U.S. Government and
municipal bonds.
Custodian: “A bank, trust, or other financial institution that agrees to hold
and manage assets on behalf of another person or entity.”
Default: The failure to live up to the terms of a contract. Generally, default is
used to indicate the inability of a borrower to pay the interest or principal on
a debt when it is due.
Derivative Asset: An asset whose stated value or cash flow is determined by
reference to the value or cash flow of another asset (the “underlying asset”).
Derivative Instrument: See Derivative Asset.
Distributions: Payments of cash or other consideration from a trust fund or
corporation to an investor.
Divestiture: Change of ownership and/or control of a business from a
majority (non-disadvantaged) to disadvantaged persons.
Dividend: “Distributions to stockholders of cash or stock declared by the
company’s board of directors.”
Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (“EESA”): “An act
to provide authority for the Federal Government to purchase and insure
certain types of troubled assets for the purposes of providing stability to and
preventing disruption in the economy and financial system and protecting
taxpayers, to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide incentives
for energy production and conservation, to extend certain expiring provisions,
to provide individual income tax relief, and for other purposes.”
Equity: The ownership interest of stockholders in a company.
Equity Capital Facility: An agreement between two parties under which

Expense: “Outflow or other depletion of assets or incurrences of liabilities
(or a combination of both) during some period as a result of providing goods,
rendering services, or carrying out other activities related to an entity’s
programs and missions, the benefits from which do not extend beyond the
present operating period.”
Facility: In the context of finance, a “facility” is an agreement between two
parties under which one may require the other to provide capital to the
requestor. The provider of the facility provides funds in the form of either
debt or equity.
Federal Banking Agency (“FBA”): “The term appropriate Federal banking
agency means—
(1) the Comptroller of the Currency, in the case of any national banking
association, or any Federal branch or agency of a foreign bank;
(2) the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, in the case of—
(A) any State member insured bank,
(B) any branch or agency of a foreign bank with respect to any provision of the Federal Reserve Act which is made applicable under the
International Banking Act of 1978,
(C) any foreign bank which does not operate an insured branch,
(D) any agency or commercial lending company other than a Federal
agency,
(E) supervisory or regulatory proceedings arising from the authority given
to the Board of Governors under section 7(c)(1) of the International
Banking Act of 1978, including such proceedings under the Financial
Institutions Supervisory Act of 1966, and
(F) any bank holding company and any subsidiary of a bank holding
company (other than a bank);
(3) the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in the case of a State
nonmember insured bank, or a foreign bank having an insured branch;
and
(4) the Director of the Office of Thrift Supervision in the case of any savings
association or any savings and loan holding company.
Under the rule set forth in this subsection, more than one agency may
be an appropriate Federal banking agency with respect to any given
institution.”
Federal Funds Rate: “The interest rate that financial institutions charge
each other for overnight loans of their monetary reserves.”
Financial Guarantor Counterparty Exposure: The maximum amount that
may be lost by a financial institution if there is a failure to pay a financial

GLOSSARY I APPENDIX A

guaranty claim by the financial institution (the “counterparty”) who had
promised to guarantee against a loss.
Financial Stability Plan: Plan to stabilize and repair the financial system,
and support the flow of credit necessary for recovery.
Fiscal Year: “A yearly accounting period. The Federal Government’s fiscal
year begins October 1 and ends September 30. Fiscal years are designated
by the calendar years in which they end — for example, fiscal year 2009 will
begin on October 1, 2008, and end on September 30, 2009. The budget
year is the fiscal year for which the budget is being considered; in relation
to a session of Congress, it is the fiscal year that starts on October 1 of the
calendar year in which that session of Congress began.”
Floorplan: In reference to the TALF program, revolving lines of credit
(similar to a credit card) to finance automobile dealer inventories (cars on the
lot). A form of retail goods inventory financing in which each loan advance is
made against a specific piece of collateral. As each piece of collateral is sold
by the dealer, the loan advance against the piece of collateral is repaid.
Generally Available Programs: Programs having the same terms for all
recipients, with limits on the amount each institution may receive and specified returns for taxpayers (i.e., CPP or CAP).
Going Concern: Term used by auditors to refer to a company that is able to
operate into the foreseeable future.

Insolvent: A condition where a financial institution has liabilities that exceed
its assets. By definition, shareholders’ equity in such a situation would be
negative.
Interest: “Interest means any payment to a consumer or to an account for
the use of funds in an account, calculated by application of a periodic rate
to the balance. The term does not include the payment of a bonus or other
consideration worth $10 or less given during a year, the waiver or reduction
of a fee, or the absorption of expenses.”
In-the-Money: “A term used to describe an option contract that has a positive value if exercised. A call with a strike price of $390 on gold trading at
$400 is in-the-money by $10.”
Legacy Assets: Also known as troubled assets, real estate-related loans and
securities that remain on banks’ balance sheets and that have lost value, but
are difficult to price due to the recent market disruption.
Legacy Loans: Underperforming real estate-related loans held by a bank that
it wishes to sell, but recent market disruptions have made difficult to price.
Legacy Securities: Troubled real estate-related securities [Residential
Mortgage-Backed Securities (“RMBS”), Commercial Mortgage-Backed
Securities (“CMBS”), and Asset-Backed Securities (“ABS”)] on institutions’
balance sheets due to an inability to determine value.
Leverage: The ratio of a company’s debt to its equity.

Golden Parachute (as defined in original Section 111 of EESA):
Compensation to (or for the benefit of) a senior executive officer made upon
severance from employment that exceeds specified thresholds. Under EESA,
such compensation is limited to three times the executive’s annual base
salary.
Golden Parachute (definition under ARRA): Any payment to a senior
executive officer for departure from a company for any reason, except for
payments for services performed or benefits accrued.
Guarantee: A commitment from a third-party lending institution ensuring
that liabilities of a borrower will be met. If the borrower fails to make
payments, the guarantor will step in and make the payment on the borrower’s
behalf.
Guaranty: Can be used interchangeably with Guarantee. Historically,
guarantee had been used as a verb and guaranty had been used as a noun.
Guaranty is now primarily seen in financial and banking contexts.
Haircut: Difference in the value of the collateral and the value of the loan;
that is, the collateral value of the loan minus the loan amount. For example:
A borrower has $100 worth of collateral for a loan. The bank issues the
borrower a $90 loan backed by the $100 of collateral. The bank has applied
a 10% haircut to that collateral. Generally, the higher the haircut, the riskier
the collateral is perceived to be.
Holding Company: A company whose primary business is holding a controlling interest in the securities of other companies. Technically, “A) any bank
holding company (as defined in section 2 of the Bank Holding Company Act
of 1956); B) any company described in section 4(f)(1) of the Bank Holding
Company Act of 1956; and C) any savings and loan holding company (as
defined in the Home Owners’ Loan Act).”
HOPE for Homeowners Program: “A program under the Department
of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”), designed to help mortgage
borrowers at risk of default and foreclosure to refinance into more affordable,
sustainable loans which are in turn guaranteed by HUD.”
Illiquid: Assets that cannot be quickly converted to cash.
Impaired Capital: “Capital position of a bank where the par value of all of
its capital stock is less than the sum of paid in capital, surplus, and undivided
profits.”

LIBOR: “The London Interbank Offered Rate. The rate of interest at which
banks borrow funds from other banks, in marketable size, in the London
interbank market. LIBOR rates are disseminated by the British Bankers
Association. Some interest rate futures contracts, including Eurodollar
futures, are cash settled based on LIBOR.”
Liquidity: A measure of the ease with which assets can be bought and sold
in the markets, often characterized by “bid” and “asked” prices that are close,
and the presence of a willing pool of buyers and sellers. In the context of
financial institution balance sheets, “liquidity” often refers to the availability
of cash for lending.
Loan Portfolio: The total amount of dollars the bank has lent to customers
and expects to be repaid.
Loan-to-value ratio: In real estate lending, the amount of the loan divided
by the appraised value of the property underlying the loan.
Market Capitalization: The value of a corporation determined by multiplying the current market price of one share of the corporation by the
number of total outstanding shares. This metric is often used to determine
the aggregate value of a company.
Market Value: The price at which an asset can be sold in an orderly market,
to a willing buyer by a willing seller, in a reasonable amount of time.
Mark-to-Market Assets: In the context of the Citigroup Master Agreement,
the portion of the covered assets that are valued at current market value.
Mortgage Holder: Investor/lender who owns the right to the borrower’s
monthly payments.
Mortgage-Backed Securities (“MBS”): “Debt obligations that represent
claims to the cash flows from pools of mortgage loans, most commonly
on residential property. Mortgage loans are purchased from banks, mortgage companies, and other originators and then assembled into pools by a
Governmental, quasi-Governmental, or private entity. The entity then issues
securities that represent claims on the principal and interest payments made
by borrowers on the loans in the pool, a process known as securitization.”
Mutual Organization: A company that is owned effectively by its customers,
through shares of ownership related to the depositors.

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Net Loss: Net loss occurs when total expenses exceed total revenues.
Net Present Value: “The present value of the estimated future cash inflows
minus the present value of the cash outflows.”
Non-Agency Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities: Mortgage-backed
securities in which the securities, and the loans underlying the securities, are
serviced or originated by private investors and not by Fannie Mae or Freddie
Mac.
Non-Cumulative Preferred Shares: Shares where unpaid dividends do not
accrue when a company misses a dividend payment.
Non-Recourse Funding/Loan: “A debt for which the debtor’s obligation to
repay is limited to the collateral securing the debt and for which a deficiency
judgment against the debtor is not permitted, and would limit the amount of
a non-recourse debt to the net equity in the collateral, as defined.”

Private-Label Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities: A mortgagebacked security that is backed by private-label mortgages.
Procurement: “In the Federal Government, the process of obtaining
services, supplies, and equipment in conformance with applicable laws and
regulations.”
Professional Forecaster: Economic forecasters conduct analysis to predict
economic growth, inflation, interest rates, and many other critical indicators of future business activity. Provides an expert opinion on the future
performance of the economy. The three forecasters used for the purpose of
the Stress Test were the Consensus Forecasts, the Blue Chip Survey, and the
Survey of Professional Forecasters.
Profit: The difference between the selling price of a good and the cost of that
good.
Prospectus: See Offering Documents.

Obligation: The legal responsibility to make a payment to another party,
usually by contract.
Offering Documents: Documents which disclose and describe a securities
offering to either public or private investors, containing information required
under Federal and state securities laws as applicable.
Office of Financial Stability (“OFS”): “Office within the Department of the
Treasury created by EESA to operate the TARP.”
Overcollateralization: The pledge of more collateral than the face amount
of a loan. See Haircut definition for an example.
Pool: A collection of assets, usually fixed-income assets such as loans or
mortgages, placed into a legally separate account for the benefit of certain
investors.
Pool Assemblers: See Securities Issuer.
Preferred Stock: “A form of ownership in a company that generally entitles
the owner of the shares (an investor) to collect dividend payments. Preferred
shares are senior to common stock, but junior to debt.”
Premium(s): As referenced in a financial guaranty discussion, the institution receiving the guarantee pays the guarantor an agreed-upon amount for
the protection offered by the guarantee — the same way auto insurance
premiums ensure protection for damage or loss.
President’s Corporate Fraud Task Force: The President’s Corporate Fraud
Task Force was created by Executive Order of President George W. Bush to
“provide direction for the investigation and prosecution of cases of securities fraud, accounting fraud, mail and wire fraud, money laundering, tax
fraud based on such predicate offenses, and other related financial crimes
committed by commercial entities and directors, officers, professional
advisers, and employees thereof.” Created in 2002, it is an inter-agency group
that coordinates enforcement efforts among several agencies including the
Department of Justice, the Commodities Futures Trading Commission, the
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Treasury, Labor, the Securities and
Exchange Commission, and U.S. Postal Inspection Service.
President’s Designee: One or more officers from the Executive Branch
designated by the President.
Primary Dealer: “S securities dealer or Government securities dealer that is
designated as a primary dealer by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York from
time to time.”
Private Applicant: In reference to TARP, a private applicant is any
Qualifying Financial Institution whose shares are not traded on a national
securities exchange, excluding S corporations and mutual organizations.
Private-Label Mortgage: Loans that are not issued or guaranteed by Fannie
Mae, Freddie Mac, Ginnie Mae, or other Federal agency.

Public Applicant: In reference to TARP, a public applicant is a Qualifying
Financial Institution whose securities are traded on a national securities
exchange and that is required to file, under national securities laws, periodic
reports with either the Securities and Exchange Commission or its primary
Federal banking regulator.
Purchasing Authority: The authority to purchase goods and services.
Qualifying Financial Institution (“QFI”): As it relates to TARP, “Qualifying
Financial Institution (QFI) means (i) any U.S. bank or U.S. savings association not controlled by a Bank Holding Company (‘BHC’) or Savings and
Loan Company (‘SLHC’); (ii) any top-tier U.S. BHC, (iii) any top-tier U.S.
SLHC which engages solely or predominately in activities that are permitted
for financial holding companies under relevant law; and (iv) any U.S. bank
or U.S. savings association controlled by a U.S. SLHC that does not engage
solely or predominately in activities that are permitted for financial holding
companies under relevant law. QFI shall not mean any BHC, SLHC, bank or
savings association controlled by a foreign bank or company.”
Realized Profit or Loss: The profit or loss realized by an investor on a security after it has been finally sold and all costs and benefits of the holding have
been accounted for.
Receivables: Accounts receivable represent claims to cash or other assets
that arise from the sale of goods or services, duties, certain license fees,
recoveries, or other provisions of the law.
Redeem: To buy back a prior obligation. In the case of CAP, the QFI can buy
back (redeem) its CPP shares with the funds received from the CAP investment.
Regulatory Capital: The net capital position of a financial institution as
determined by the rules of the applicable Federal or state banking regulator.
Reorganization: A plan overseen by a bankruptcy court under which a
debtor firm resolves its obligations to its creditors and recapitalizes for the
future.
Restructuring Period: Begins the date the announcement to restructure was
made and ends the date that restructuring is complete.
Restructuring Plan: A plan to achieve and sustain the long-term viability,
international competitiveness, and energy efficiency of the Company and its
subsidiaries.
Revenue: Money obtained for sale of goods and services during a specific
period.
Rights Offering: “Means offers and sales for cash of equity securities where:
1) The issuer grants the existing security holders of a particular class of
equity securities (including holders of depositary receipts evidencing those
securities) the right to purchase or subscribe for additional securities of that

GLOSSARY I APPENDIX A

class; and 2) The number of additional shares an existing security holder may
purchase initially is in proportion to the number of securities he or she holds
of record on the record date for the rights offering. If an existing security
holder holds depositary receipts, the proportion must be calculated as if the
underlying securities were held directly.”
Ring-Fencing: Segregating assets from the rest of a financial institution,
often so that the assets’ problems can be addressed in isolation.
Risk-Based Premium: A premium is the price of insurance protection for a
specified risk for a specified period of time. A risk-based premium is where
the price paid escalates in line with the probability of default and loss upon
default.
Risk-Weighted Assets: “The amount of a bank’s total assets after adjusting
based on the risk factor assigned to each individual asset.”
S Corporation: “Any U.S. bank, U.S. savings association, bank holding
company (“BHC”), or savings and loan holding company (“SLHC”) organized
such that it is exempt from most Federal income taxes as they are passed
through to the shareholders.”
Savings and Loan Association: “A financial institution that accepts deposits
primarily from individuals and channels its funds primarily into residential
mortgage loans.”
Savings and Loan Holding Company (“SLHC”): Any company that
directly or indirectly controls a savings association or that controls any other
company that is a savings and loan holding company, excluding bank holding
companies that are registered under, and subject to, the Bank Holding
Company Act of 1956, or to any company directly or indirectly controlled by
such company (other than a savings association).
Savings Association: “Any Federal savings association or Federal savings
bank; any building and loan association, savings and loan association,
homestead association, or cooperative bank if such association or cooperative bank is a member of the Deposit Insurance Fund; and any savings bank
or cooperative bank which is deemed by the Director of the Office of Thrift
Supervision to be a savings association under section 10(1) of the Home
Owners’ Loan Act.”
Say on Pay: In reference to TARP, “say on pay” is a provision where executive compensation must be approved by shareholders.
Schedule A: In reference to the Citigroup Master Agreement, Schedule A lists
covered assets.
Second Lien Debt: Debt that is ranked lower than senior debt in the event
of a liquidation or bankruptcy restructuring.
Secondary Market: Created when banks sell a portion of their loans to a
dealer who then pools the loans together and sells portions of the loan pools
as securities to investors. The secondary market serves as a source of cash for
banks, providing them money to make new loans.
Secure: A process where the borrower offers an asset to which the lender has
access in the event of the borrower failing to make repayment. A mortgage
backed by property is an example.
Securities: A security is “any note, stock, treasury stock, security future,
bond, debenture, evidence of indebtedness, certificate of interest or
participation in any profit-sharing agreement, collateral-trust certificate,
preorganization certificate or subscription, transferable share, investment
contract, voting-trust certificate, certificate of deposit for a security, fractional
undivided interest in oil, gas, or other mineral rights, any put, call, straddle,
option, or privilege on any security (including a certificate of deposit) or on
any group or index of securities (including any interest therein or based on
the value thereof), or any put, call, straddle, option, or privilege entered into
on a national securities exchange relating to foreign currency, or, in general,

any interest or instrument commonly known as a ‘security,’ or any certificate
of interest or participation in, temporary or interim certificate for, receipt
for, guarantee of, or warrant or right to subscribe to or purchase, any of the
foregoing.”
Securities Issuer: A separate legal entity that buys cash-flow-producing
assets such as loans, pools them together, and sells portions of the pools of
loans as securities.
Securitization: “The process by which financial assets are transformed into
securities.”
Senior Debt: Debt that is ranked higher than subordinated debt in the event
of a liquidation or bankruptcy restructuring.
Senior Executive Officer (“SEO” as defined in ARRA): An individual who
is one of the top five most highly paid executives of a public company, whose
compensation is required to be disclosed pursuant to the Securities Exchange
Act of 1934, and any regulations issued thereunder, and non-public company
counterparts.
Senior Executive Officer (“SEO” as defined in EESA): The top five highly
paid executives.
Senior Oversight Committee (“SOC”): In reference to Citigroup Master
Agreement, SOC consists of Citigroup’s Chief Financial Officer, Chief Risk
Officer, General Counsel, Controller, Chief Accounting Officer, and the
Treasurer.
Senior Preferred Stock: Shares that give the stockholder priority dividend
and liquidation claims over junior preferred and common stockholders.
Senior Secured Interest: A senior proprietary right in a debtor’s property
that secures payment for performance of an obligation.
Servicing Advance Receivables: Receivables accrued by a loan servicing
company when it advances its own funds for customary expenses involved in
servicing a portfolio of loans. Examples of such expenses include collection
expenses, property maintenance, etc.
Settlement: The physical act of exchanging cash for securities on the settlement date.
Settlement Date: The closing date for the sale of an investment, similar to
the closing date for a home purchase. On the settlement date (three days
after trade in the case of U.S. equities), funds and securities trade hands and
any necessary legal documents are signed.
Skin in the Game: Equity stake in an investment; down payment; amount
an investor can lose.
Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program Act of
2009: Would expand the authority of the TARP Special Inspector General
to conduct, supervise, and coordinate audits and investigations regarding any
action taken pursuant to EESA.
Special Purpose Company: See Special Purpose Vehicle.
Special Purpose Vehicle (“SPV”): “Any vehicle that places the transferred assets presumptively beyond the reach of the transferor (e.g., legally
isolated).”
Spread: The difference between the interest rate paid and the interest rate
received.
Strike Price: “The price, specified in the option contract, at which the
underlying futures contract, security, or commodity will move from seller to
buyer.” Also called exercise price.

173

174

APPENDIX A I GLOSSARY

Subordinated: A claim that is lower in rank than senior in the event of a
liquidation or reorganization.
Subordinated Debt: Funding that has a lesser priority than other debt
issued.
Subprime: “Refers to borrowers who do not qualify for prime interest rates
because they exhibit one or more of the following characteristics: weakened
credit histories typically characterized by payment delinquencies, previous
charge-offs, judgments, or bankruptcies; low credit scores; high debt-burden
ratios; or high loan-to-value ratios.”
Subscription Date: Loan request date. For TALF loan requests, includes:
ABS collateral expected to pledge, loan amount, and interest rate format
(fixed or floating).
Synthetic ABS: A security that derives its value and cash flow from derivative
and physical sources other than from a physical set of reference assets.
Systemically Significant: A financial institution whose failure would impose
significant losses on creditors and counterparties, call into question the
financial strength of other similarly situated financial institutions, disrupt
financial markets, raise borrowing costs for households and businesses, and
reduce household wealth.
Systemically Significant Failing Institution (“SSFI”): “Established to
provide stability and prevent disruptions to financial markets from the failure
of institutions that are critical to the functioning of the nation’s financial
system.”
TALF: Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility is a Federal Reserve loan
program intended to increase the availability of loans to consumers and small
businesses. TARP funds will be indirectly invested in this program through a
special purpose vehicle.
Tangible Common Equity (“TCE”): Common equity minus intangibles
assets. TCE is a more conservative measure of capital. Only capital that is
‘real’ and possessing the last claim on the assets of a company can be counted
as TCE. It can be thought of as the amount that would be left over if the
bank were dissolved and all creditors and higher levels of stock, such as
preferred stock, were paid off. TCE is the highest “quality” of capital in the
sense of providing a buffer against loss by claimants on the bank.
Tangible Common Equity Ratio (“TCE Ratio”): Is Tangible Common
Equity (TCE) divided by Risk-Adjusted Assets. TCE Ratio determines what
percentage of a bank’s total assets is categorized as TCE (the higher the
percentage, the better it is for the bank).
Targeted Investment Program (“TIP”): TARP program that was created
“to stabilize the financial system by making investments in institutions that
are critical to the functioning of the financial system. This program focuses
on the complex relationships and reliance of institutions within the financial
system. Investments made through the TIP seek to avoid significant market
disruptions resulting from the deterioration of one financial institution that
can threaten other financial institutions and impair broader financial markets
and pose a threat to the overall economy.”
TARP Investment Committee: Includes the Troubled Asset Relief Program’s
(“TARP’s”) Chief Investment Officer and senior officials on financial
markets, economic policy, financial institutions, and financial stability.
Tier One Capital (“T1”): Common Equity + Preferred Equity + Retained
Earnings – Goodwill. Often called “core capital,” it is the measure of bank
capital traditionally used by regulators in the United States. It can be
described as a measure of the bank’s ability to sustain future losses and
still meet depositor’s demands. T1 is a concept coordinated internationally

through an agreement known as the “Basel II Accord.”
Tier One Capital Ratio (“T1 Ratio”): Is Tier One Capital divided by RiskAdjusted Assets.
Trading Counterparty Exposure: The maximum amount that may be lost by
a securities trader if there is a failure to make good on a trade arranged with
another financial institution (the “counterparty”).
Troubled Assets: The term ‘‘troubled assets’’ means—
(A) residential or commercial mortgages and any securities, obligations, or
other instruments that are based on or related to such mortgages, that
in each case was originated or issued on or before March 14, 2008, the
purchase of which the Secretary determines promotes financial market
stability; and
(B) any other financial instrument that the Secretary, after consultation with
the Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System,
determines the purchase of which is necessary to promote financial
market stability, but only upon transmittal of such determination, writing,
to the appropriate committees of Congress.
Trust Preferred Security: A security that has both equity and debt characteristics. Trust Preferred Security is created by creation of a trust and issuing
debt to the trust. A company would create a trust preferred security to realize
tax benefits, since the trust is tax deductible.
Variable Rate of Interest: “Interest rate that changes periodically in relation
to an index.”
Vest: To become exercisable. Typically used in the context of an employee
stock ownership or option program.
Volatility: “A statistical measurement of the rate of price change of a futures
contract, security, or other instrument underlying an option.”
Warrant: “A certificate issued by a company giving the holder the right to
purchase securities at a stipulated price within specific time limits or with
no expiration date (perpetual warrant). A warrant is sometimes offered by a
company as an inducement to buy other securities.”
Warranty: Usually written, it is a guarantee of the integrity of a product, and
the manufacturer’s responsibility for the repair or replacement of defective
parts.
Write Down: The act of recognizing the loss on an asset as permanent on a
bank’s balance sheet.

GLOSSARY I APPENDIX A

Sources

Housing and Urban Development, “Hope for Homeowners,” www.hud.gov, accessed 1/28/2009.

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, P.L. 111-5, 2/13/2009.

Institute for Telecommunication Sciences, “Glossary,” www.its.bldrdoc.gov/fs-1037/dir-028/_4167.htm,
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California State Senate, “Senate Bill 668,” http://info.sen.ca.gov/pub/01-02/bill/sen/sb_0651-0700/
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National Archives and Records Administration, “Code of Federal Regulations - Title 12: Banks and
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Congressional Budget Office, “The Budget and Economic Outlook,” www.cbo.gov/budget/glossary.
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Securities and Exchange Commission, “Final Rule: Amendment to Definition of Equity Security,” 6/7/2002,
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FDIC, “Accounting for Loss Contingencies,” no date, www.fdic.gov/deposit/insurance/initiative/
Reserving_Board.pdf, accessed 4/8/2009.

Securities and Exchange Commission, “Market Capitalization,” http://www.sec.gov/answers/
marketcapitalization.htm, accessed 03/31/2009.

FDIC, “Credit Card Securitization Manual,” no date, www.fdic.gov/regulations/examinations/credit_card_
securitization/glossary.html, accessed 4/8/2009.

Securities and Exchange Commission, “Final Rule: Cross-Border Tender and Exchange Offers, Business
Combinations and Rights Offerings,” www.sec.gov/rules/final/33-7759.htm#P274_55926, accessed
1/28/2009.

FDIC, “FAQS-Supervisory Capital Assessment Program,” 2/25/2009, www.fdic.gov, accessed
3/25/2009.
FDIC, “6500 – Consumer Protection, FDIC Laws, Regulations, Related Acts,” www.fdic.gov, accessed
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Securities and Exchange Commission, “Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. and the Board
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FRBNY, “Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility: Terms and Conditions,” 3/19/2009, www.newyorkfed.org, accessed 3/27/2009.
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gov/download/pls/15C2D.txt, accessed 1/28/2009.

175

176

APPENDIX B I ACRONYMS

ACRONYMS
ABS

Asset-Backed Securities

LSA

Loan and Security Agreement

AGP

Asset Guarantee Program

LIBOR

London Interbank Offered Rate

AIFP

Automotive Industry Financing Program

LLC

Limited Liability Company

AIG

American International Group, Inc.

MBS

Mortgage-Backed Securities

AIGI

Assistant Inspector General for Investigations

MHA

Making Home Affordable

ARRA

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

NRSRO

Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization

ASSP

Auto Supplier Support Program

NPV

Net Present Value

BHC

Bank Holding Company

NY HIFCA

New York High Intensity Financial Crime Area

BNYM

Bank of New York Mellon

OCC

Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

bps

Basis Points

OFS

Office of Financial Stability

CAP

Capital Assistance Program

OGC

Office of General Counsel

CBO

Congressional Budget Office

P.L.

Public Law

CDFI

Community Development Financial Institution

PEO

Principal Executive Officer

CDO

Collateralized Debt Obligation

PFO

Principal Finance Officer

CEO

Chief Executive Officer

PITIA

CIO

Chief Information Officer

Principal, Interest, Taxes, Insurance, and Association
Fees

CMBS

Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities

PPIF

Public-Private Investment Fund

Conflicts of Interest

PPIP

Public-Private Investment Program

Congressional Oversight Panel

QFI

Qualifying Financial Institution

CPP

Capital Purchase Program

RMBS

Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities

DOJ

Department of Justice

SBA

Small Business Administration

Debt to Income

SEC

Securities and Exchange Commission

Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008

SEO

Senior Executive Officer

FBA

Federal Banking Agency

SIGTARP

FBI

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief
Program

FDIC

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

SIGTARP Act Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief
Program Act of 2009

FHA

Federal Housing Administration

SLHC

Savings and Loan Holding Company

FHFA

Federal Housing Finance Agency

SOC

Senior Oversight Committee

FinCEN

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

SPV

Special Purpose Vehicle

FRBNY

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

SSFI

Systemically Significant Failing Institution

FSOB

Financial Stability Oversight Board

T1

Tier One Capital

FSP

Financial Stability Plan

TALF

Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility

GAO

Government Accountability Office

TARP

Troubled Asset Relief Program

GM

General Motors Corporation

TARP-IGC

TARP Inspector General Council

GMAC

GMAC LLC

TCE

Tangible Common Equity

HAMP

Home Affordable Modification Program

TIP

Targeted Investment Program

HARP

Home Affordable Refinancing Program

UAW

United Auto Workers

HERA

Housing and Economic Recovery Act

UCSB

Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses

HUD

Department of Housing and Urban Development

USDOT

U.S. Department of Transportation

ICE

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

USPIS

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

IG

Inspector General

VEBA

Voluntary Employees Beneficiary Association

IRS-CI

Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation

COI
COP

DTI
EESA

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
This appendix provides a compilation of the data necessary to meet the reporting requirements of the Special
Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program outlined in EESA Section 121. Italics style indicates
narrative taken as verbatim from source documents.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.

a description of the categories of troubled assets purchased or otherwise procured by the Secretary.
a listing of the troubled assets purchased in each such category described under [the first bullet].
an explanation of the reasons the Secretary deemed it necessary to purchase each such troubled asset.
a listing of each financial institution that such troubled assets were purchased from.
a listing of and detailed biographical information on each person or entity hired to manage such troubled assets.
a current estimate of the total amount of troubled assets purchased pursuant to any program established under
section 101, the amount of troubled assets on the books of the Treasury, the amount of troubled assets sold, and the
profit and loss incurred on each sale or disposition of each such troubled asset.
G. a listing of the insurance contracts issued under section 102.
H. a detailed statement of all purchases, obligations, expenditures, and revenues associated with any program
established by the Secretary of the Treasury under sections 101 and 102.

177

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APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

A—Description of Categories1
In response to SIGTARP’s data call, Treasury stated:
Treasury posts several documents on its public website
that are responsive to this question, available at http://www.
financialstability.gov/latest/reportsanddocs.html. The tranche
reports and reports under section 105(a) describe, at a high level,
Treasury’s programs and troubled asset purchases. The transaction
reports describe these purchases in detail, including the type of
asset purchased, the identity of the institution selling the asset, and
the price Treasury paid for the asset.2
Set forth below are descriptions of the TARP programs
provided by Treasury on its website. Sections 2 and 3 of this
Report provide more detailed descriptions of each type of asset
and each TARP program as of March 31, 2009.

A.1 Capital Purchase Program3
Treasury created the Capital Purchase Program (CPP) in October
2008 to stabilize the financial system by providing capital to viable
financial institutions of all sizes throughout the nation. With a
strengthened capital base, financial institutions have an increased
capacity to lend to U.S. businesses and consumers and to support
the U.S. economy.
Through the CPP, Treasury will invest up to $250 billion in
U.S. banks that are healthy, but desire an extra layer of capital for
stability or lending. Since its inception in October 2008, the CPP
has strengthened regional, small and large financial institutions as
well as Community Development Financial Institutions in over 48
states and Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. Treasury and
the nation’s Federal banking agencies (FBA), which include the
FDIC, the Federal Reserve, The Office of the Comptroller of the
Currency (OCC), and the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), are
currently in the process of analyzing and evaluating the applications that have been received for CPP.
A.2 Capital Assistance Program4
On February 25, 2009 the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced the terms and conditions for the Capital Assistance Program (CAP). The CAP is a core element of the Administration’s
Financial Stability Plan.
The purpose of the CAP is to restore confidence throughout the
financial system that the nation’s largest banking institutions have
a sufficient capital cushion against larger than expected future
losses, should they occur due to a more severe economic environment, and to support lending to creditworthy borrowers.
Under CAP, Federal banking supervisors will conduct forwardlooking assessments to evaluate the capital needs of the major U.S.
banking institutions under a more challenging economic environment. Should that assessment indicate that an additional capital
buffer is warranted, banks will have an opportunity to turn first
to private sources of capital. In light of the current challenging
market environment, the Treasury is making Government capital

available immediately through the CAP to eligible banking institutions to provide this buffer.
Eligible U.S. banking institutions with assets in excess of $100
billion on a consolidated basis are required to participate in the
coordinated supervisory assessments, and may access the CAP immediately as a means to establish any necessary additional buffer.
Eligible U.S. banking institutions with consolidated assets below
$100 billion may also obtain capital from the CAP.

A.3 Systemically Significant Failing Institution Program5
This program was established to provide stability and prevent
disruptions to financial markets from the failure of institutions that
are critical to the functioning of the nation’s financial system. 
A.4 Targeted Investment Program6
Treasury created the Targeted Investment Program (TIP) to stabilize the financial system by making investments in institutions that
are critical to the functioning of the financial system. This program
focuses on the complex relationships and reliance of institutions
within the financial system. Investments made through the TIP
seek to avoid significant market disruptions resulting from the
deterioration of one financial institution that can threaten other
financial institutions and impair broader financial markets and
pose a threat to the overall economy. Through the TIP, Treasury is
working to stabilize the financial system by reducing the chance
that one firm’s distress will threaten otherwise financially-sound
businesses, institutions, and municipalities, which could cause an
adverse spillover effect on employment, output, and incomes.
Treasury will determine the form, terms, and conditions of
any investment made pursuant to this program on a case-by-case
basis in accordance with the considerations mandated in The
Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (EESA). Treasury
may invest in any financial instrument, including debt, equity,
or warrants, that the Secretary of the Treasury determines to be a
troubled asset, after consultation with the Chairman of the Board
of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and notice to Congress.
Treasury will require any institution participating in this program
to provide Treasury with warrants or alternative consideration,
as necessary, to minimize the long-term costs and maximize the
benefits to the taxpayers in accordance with EESA.
A.5 Asset Guarantee Program7
Under the Asset Guarantee Program (AGP), Treasury will guarantee certain assets held by the qualifying financial institution.
The set of insured assets is selected by the Treasury and its agents in
consultation with the financial institution receiving the guarantee.
In accordance with section 102(a), assets to be guaranteed must
have been originated before March 14, 2008. Treasury determines
the eligibility of participants and the allocation of resources on a
case-by-case basis. The program is meant for systemically significant institutions, and could be used in coordination with other

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

programs. Treasury may, on a case-by-case basis, use this program
in coordination with a broader guarantee involving other agencies
of the United States Government.
In implementing the AGP, Treasury collects a premium, deliverable in a form deemed appropriate by the Treasury Secretary.
As required by the statute, an actuarial analysis would be used
to ensure that the expected value of the premium is no less than
the expected value of the losses to TARP from the guarantee. The
United States Government would also provide a set of portfolio
management guidelines to which the institution must adhere for
the guaranteed portfolio.

A.6 Automotive Industry Financing Program8
The objective of the Automotive Industry Financing Program
(AIFP) is to prevent a significant disruption of the American
automotive industry, which would pose a systemic risk to financial
market stability and have a negative effect on the economy of the
United States. The program requires participating institutions to
implement plans that will achieve long-term viability.
Participating institutions must also adhere to rigorous executive
compensation standards and other measures to protect the taxpayer’s interests, including limits on the institution’s expenditures
and other corporate governance requirements.
A.7 Automotive Supplier Support Program
On March 19, 2009, Treasury announced a new program
aimed at supporting the suppliers to the U.S. auto manufacturing industry. The Auto Supplier Support Program (“ASSP”) is a
renewable one-year program that will provide up to $5 billion in
financing that is intended to benefit both the suppliers and the
auto manufacturers. The program provides Government-backed
protection to the suppliers against any failure by the manufacturers to make payments on goods that they receive from their
suppliers, even if the manufacturers file for bankruptcy.9
A.8 Auto Warranty Commitment Program
As another complementary program to AIFP, the Auto Warranty
Commitment Program was devised by the Administration to
bolster consumer confidence in automobile warranties on domestically produced vehicles. Currently, only GM and Chrysler
have agreed to participate in this program. In order to reassure
consumers that their auto warranties will be honored during
this period of restructuring, the Administration will provide
Government-back financing.10
A.9 Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility
Under the initial terms and conditions announced for the TALF,
the Federal Reserve will lend on a non-recourse basis to holders
of certain AAA-rated ABS fully secured by newly and recently
originated consumer and small business loans. TALF loans will

have a one-year term and will be secured by eligible collateral.
Haircuts (a percentage reduction used for collateral valuation) will
be determined based on the price volatility of the class of eligible
collateral and will provide additional protection to the taxpayers by
protecting the Government from loss. Treasury will purchase up to
$20 billion of subordinated debt backed by the collateral received,
which will be priced at the loan value plus accrued interest. The
TARP CPP guidelines on executive compensation will be applied
to the originators of the credit exposures underlying the ABS.11
On February 10, 2009, the Administration announced the
expansion of TALF to up to $1 trillion as part of the Consumer
and Business Lending Initiatives under the Financial Stability
Plan.12 According to Treasury, the expected expansion of TALF
will increase TARP credit protection from $20 billion to up to
$80 billion.13

A.10 Public-Private Investment Program14
To address the challenge of legacy assets, Treasury – in conjunction
with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Federal
Reserve – has announced the Public-Private Investment Program
as part of its efforts to repair balance sheets throughout our financial system and ensure that credit is available to the households and
businesses, large and small, that will help drive us toward recovery.
Using $75 to $100 billion in TARP capital and capital from
private investors, the Public-Private Investment Program will
generate $500 billion in purchasing power to buy legacy assets –
with the potential to expand to $1 trillion over time. The PublicPrivate Investment Program will be designed around three basic
principles: maximizing the impact of each taxpayer dollar, shared
risk and profits with private sector participants, and private sector
price discovery.
A.11 Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses15
As another part of the Consumer and Business Lending Initiative,
the Treasury Department will begin making direct purchases of
securities backed by SBA loans to get the credit market moving
again, and it will stand ready to purchase new securities to ensure
that community banks and credit unions feel confident in extending new loans to local businesses. These purchases, combined with
higher loan guarantees and reduced fees, will help provide lenders
with the confidence that they need to extend credit, knowing they
both have a backstop against their risk and a source of liquidity.
These measures will complement other steps the Administration is
taking to help small businesses recover and grow, including several
tax cuts under the Recovery Act.
A.12 Making Home Affordable Program16
The Administration’s Making Home Affordable program will offer
assistance to as many as 7 to 9 million homeowners making a goodfaith effort to make their mortgage payments, while attempting to

179

180

APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

prevent the destructive impact of the housing crisis on families and
communities. It will not provide money to speculators, and it will
target support to the working homeowners who have made every
possible effort to stay current on their mortgage payments. Just as
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act works to save or create several million new jobs and the Financial Stability Plan works
to get credit flowing, the Making Home Affordable program will
support a recovery in the housing market and ensure that these
workers can continue paying off their mortgages.
By supporting low mortgage rates by strengthening confidence
in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, providing up to 4 to 5 million
homeowners with new access to refinancing and creating a comprehensive stability initiative to offer reduced monthly payments for
up to 3 to 4 million at-risk homeowners, this plan brings together
the Government, lenders, loan servicers, investors and borrowers
to share responsibility towards ensuring working Americans can
afford to stay in their homes.

B—Listing of Troubled Assets Purchased, by
Category and Financial Institution
In response to SIGTARP’s data call question regarding this
reporting requirement, Treasury stated:
Treasury posts transaction reports for all the troubled asset
purchases on its public website within two business days after each
transaction. Information on all transactions is available at http://
www.financialstability.gov/impact/transactions.htm. Since the publication of the SIGTARP Report in February, Treasury continues
to invest funds in financial institutions across the United States
through the Capital Purchase Program (CPP), and has committed
to lend $20 billion to support the Term Asset-Backed Securities
Loan Facility. Guidelines for all TARP programs, which explain
the programs’ scope and purpose, are also posted on Treasury’s website at http://www.financialstability.gov/roadtostability/programs.
htm. Additional responsive information about these programs and
the purchases made under them is in [TARP] tranche reports and
the section 105(a) reports, which are also posted on Treasury’s
website.
Table C.1 provides details on TARP transactions, as of
March 31, 2009.

TABLE C.1
TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Capital Repayment Details

Name of
Institution

City

State

Investment Description

Investment Price

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

CPP

10/28/2008

Bank of America Corporation

Charlotte

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$15,000,000,000

Par

$43,657,466,160

CPP

10/28/2008

Bank of New York Mellon Corporation

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$3,000,000,000

Par

$32,470,578,250

CPP

10/28/2008

Citigroup Inc.

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$25,000,000,000

Par

$13,947,814,100

CPP

10/28/2008

The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$10,000,000,000

Par

$48,996,918,130

CPP

10/28/2008

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$25,000,000,000

Par

$99,885,593,340

CPP

10/28/2008

Morgan Stanley

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$10,000,000,000

Par

$24,641,694,000

CPP

10/28/2008

State Street Corporation

Boston

MA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$2,000,000,000

Par

$13,347,223,740

CPP

10/28/2008

Wells Fargo & Company

San Francisco

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$25,000,000,000

Par

$60,432,395,520

CPP

11/14/2008

Bank of Commerce Holdings

Redding

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$17,000,000

Par

$43,903,440

CPP

11/14/2008

1st FS Corporation

Hendersonville

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$16,369,000

Par

$23,735,750

CPP

11/14/2008

UCBH Holdings, Inc.

San Francisco

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$298,737,000

Par

$181,858,360

CPP

11/14/2008

Northern Trust Corporation

Chicago

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$1,576,000,000

Par

$13,367,556,660

CPP

11/14/2008

SunTrust Banks, Inc.

Atlanta

GA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$3,500,000,000

Par

$4,202,497,360

CPP

11/14/2008

Broadway Financial Corporation

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$9,000,000

Par

$9,133,320

CPP

11/14/2008

Washington Federal Inc.

Seattle

WA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$200,000,000

Par

$1,170,144,630

CPP

11/14/2008

BB&T Corp.

Winston-Salem

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$3,133,640,000

Par

$9,482,120,280

CPP

11/14/2008

Provident Bancshares Corp.

Baltimore

MD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$151,500,000

Par

$236,259,600

CPP

11/14/2008

Umpqua Holdings Corp.

Portland

OR

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$214,181,000

Par

$545,230,800

CPP

11/14/2008

Comerica Inc.

Dallas

TX

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$2,250,000,000

Par

$2,767,794,530

CPP

11/14/2008

Regions Financial Corp.

Birmingham

AL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$3,500,000,000

Par

$2,959,132,320

CPP

11/14/2008

Capital One Financial Corporation

McLean

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$3,555,199,000

Par

$4,798,190,160

CPP

11/14/2008

First Horizon National Corporation

Memphis

TN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$866,540,000

Par

$2,207,553,300

CPP

11/14/2008

Huntington Bancshares

Columbus

OH

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$1,398,071,000

Par

$607,815,640

CPP

11/14/2008

KeyCorp

Cleveland

OH

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$2,500,000,000

Par

$3,893,328,350

CPP

11/14/2008

Valley National Bancorp

Wayne

NJ

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$300,000,000

Par

$1,670,246,880

CPP

11/14/2008

Zions Bancorporation

Salt Lake City

UT

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$1,400,000,000

Par

$1,133,752,880

CPP

11/14/2008

Marshall & Ilsley Corporation

Milwaukee

WI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$1,715,000,000

Par

$1,493,779,750

CPP

11/14/2008

U.S. Bancorp

Minneapolis

MN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$6,599,000,000

Par

$25,690,779,180

CPP

11/14/2008

TCF Financial Corporation

Wayzata

MN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$361,172,000

Par

$1,502,245,920

CPP

11/21/2008

First Niagara Financial Group

Lockport

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$184,011,000

Par

$1,291,630,230

CPP

11/21/2008

HF Financial Corp.

Sioux Falls

SD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$25,000,000

Par

$51,267,750

CPP

11/21/2008

Centerstate Banks of Florida Inc.

Davenport

FL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$27,875,000

Par

$137,338,740

CPP

11/21/2008

City National Corporation

Beverly Hills

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$400,000,000

Par

$1,638,858,100

CPP

11/21/2008

First Community Bankshares Inc.

Bluefield

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$41,500,000

Par

$134,986,890

CPP

11/21/2008

Western Alliance Bancorporation

Las Vegas

NV

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$140,000,000

Par

$177,429,600

CPP

11/21/2008

Webster Financial Corporation

Waterbury

CT

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$400,000,000

Par

$224,595,500

CPP

11/21/2008

Pacific Capital Bancorp

Santa Barbara

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$180,634,000

Par

$319,388,290

CPP

11/21/2008

Heritage Commerce Corp.

San Jose

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$40,000,000

Par

$62,060,250

CPP

11/21/2008

Ameris Bancorp

Moultrie

GA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$52,000,000

Par

$63,928,830

CPP

11/21/2008

Porter Bancorp Inc.

Louisville

KY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$35,000,000

Par

$93,902,280

CPP

11/21/2008

Banner Corporation

Walla Walla

WA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$124,000,000

Par

$50,846,430

CPP

11/21/2008

Cascade Financial Corporation

Everett

WA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$38,970,000

Par

$30,275,000

CPP

11/21/2008

Columbia Banking System, Inc.

Tacoma

WA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$76,898,000

Par

$116,825,600

CPP

11/21/2008

Heritage Financial Corporation

Olympia

WA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$24,000,000

Par

$70,422,550

CPP

11/21/2008

First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.

Chula Vista

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$19,300,000

Par

$28,701,000

CPP

11/21/2008

Severn Bancorp, Inc.

Annapolis

MD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$23,393,000

Par

$31,711,050

CPP

11/21/2008

Boston Private Financial Holdings, Inc.

Boston

MA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$154,000,000

Par

$224,945,370

CPP

11/21/2008

Associated Banc-Corp

Green Bay

WI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$525,000,000

Par

$1,975,437,000

CPP

11/21/2008

Trustmark Corporation

Jackson

MS

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$215,000,000

Par

$1,053,633,500

CPP

11/21/2008

First Community Corporation

Lexington

SC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$11,350,000

Par

$21,357,600

CPP

11/21/2008

Taylor Capital Group

Rosemont

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$104,823,000

Par

$49,417,250

CPP

11/21/2008

Nara Bancorp, Inc.

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$67,000,000

Par

$77,166,180

CPP

12/5/2008

Midwest Banc Holdings, Inc.

Melrose Park

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$84,784,000

Par

$28,937,510

CPP

12/5/2008

MB Financial Inc.

Chicago

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$196,000,000

Par

$475,102,400

CPP

12/5/2008

First Midwest Bancorp, Inc.

Itasca

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$193,000,000

Par

$417,740,290

CPP

12/5/2008

United Community Banks, Inc.

Blairsville

GA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$180,000,000

Par

$200,066,880

CPP

12/5/2008

Wesbanco Bank Inc.

Wheeling

WV

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$75,000,000

Par

$606,387,630

Note

Capital
Repayment Date

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

Purchase
Date

Program

181

Continued on next page

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TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Capital Repayment Details

City

State

Investment Description

CPP

12/5/2008

Encore Bancshares Inc.

Houston

TX

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

CPP

12/5/2008

Manhattan Bancorp

El Segundo

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$1,700,000

Par

$18,943,000

CPP

12/5/2008

Iberiabank Corporation

Lafayette

LA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$90,000,000

Par

$735,085,940

CPP

12/5/2008

Eagle Bancorp, Inc.

Bethesda

MD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$38,235,000

Par

$79,656,250

CPP

12/5/2008

Sandy Spring Bancorp, Inc.

Olney

MD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$83,094,000

Par

$183,068,640

CPP

12/5/2008

Coastal Banking Company, Inc.

Fernandina Beach

FL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$9,950,000

Par

$15,414,000

CPP

12/5/2008

East West Bancorp

Pasadena

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$306,546,000

Par

$291,314,650

CPP

12/5/2008

South Financial Group, Inc.

Greenville

SC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$347,000,000

Par

$93,256,900

CPP

12/5/2008

Great Southern Bancorp

Springfield

MO

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$58,000,000

Par

$187,467,810

CPP

12/5/2008

Cathay General Bancorp

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$258,000,000

Par

$516,650,050

CPP

12/5/2008

Southern Community Financial Corp.

Winston-Salem

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$42,750,000

Par

$59,701,200

CPP

12/5/2008

CVB Financial Corp

Ontario

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$130,000,000

Par

$552,192,810

CPP

12/5/2008

First Defiance Financial Corp.

Defiance

OH

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$37,000,000

Par

$49,351,360

CPP

12/5/2008

First Financial Holdings Inc.

Charleston

SC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$65,000,000

Par

$89,482,050

CPP

12/5/2008

Superior Bancorp Inc.

Birmingham

AL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$69,000,000

Par

$40,198,000

CPP

12/5/2008

Southwest Bancorp, Inc.

Stillwater

OK

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$70,000,000

Par

$137,023,040

CPP

12/5/2008

Popular, Inc.

San Juan

PR

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$935,000,000

Par

$609,195,600

CPP

12/5/2008

Blue Valley Ban Corp

Overland Park

KS

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$21,750,000

Par

$33,120,000

CPP

12/5/2008

Central Federal Corporation

Fairlawn

OH

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$7,225,000

Par

$11,895,800

CPP

12/5/2008

Bank of Marin Bancorp

Novato

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$28,000,000

Par

$110,862,540

CPP

12/5/2008

Bank of North Carolina

Thomasville

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$31,260,000

Par

$44,497,750

CPP

12/5/2008

Central Bancorp, Inc.

Somerville

MA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

$7,773,440

CPP

12/5/2008

Southern Missouri Bancorp, Inc.

Poplar Bluff

MO

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$9,550,000

Par

$22,550,400

CPP

12/5/2008

State Bancorp, Inc.

Jericho

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$36,842,000

Par

$111,873,300

CPP

12/5/2008

TIB Financial Corp

Naples

FL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$37,000,000

Par

$42,055,890

CPP

12/5/2008

Unity Bancorp, Inc.

Clinton

NJ

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$20,649,000

Par

$22,695,370

CPP

12/5/2008

Old Line Bancshares, Inc.

Bowie

MD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$7,000,000

Par

$22,785,800

CPP

12/5/2008

FPB Bancorp, Inc.

Port St. Lucie

FL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$5,800,000

Par

$5,145,000

CPP

12/5/2008

Sterling Financial Corporation

Spokane

WA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$303,000,000

Par

$108,457,650

CPP

12/5/2008

Oak Valley Bancorp

Oakdale

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$13,500,000

Par

$28,732,500

CPP

12/12/2008

Old National Bancorp

Evansville

IN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$100,000,000

Par

$740,113,030

CPP

12/12/2008

Capital Bank Corporation

Raliegh

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$41,279,000

Par

$51,528,000

CPP

12/12/2008

Pacific International Bancorp

Seattle

WA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$6,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

12/12/2008

SVB Financial Group

Santa Clara

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$235,000,000

Par

$658,989,330

CPP

12/12/2008

LNB Bancorp Inc.

Lorain

OH

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$25,223,000

Par

$36,480,000

CPP

12/12/2008

Wilmington Trust Corporation

Wilmington

DE

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$330,000,000

Par

$669,704,970

CPP

12/12/2008

Susquehanna Bancshares, Inc

Lititz

PA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$300,000,000

Par

$804,115,380

CPP

12/12/2008

Signature Bank

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$120,000,000

Par

$993,131,400

CPP

12/12/2008

HopFed Bancorp

Hopkinsville

KY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$18,400,000

Par

$34,963,500

CPP

12/12/2008

Citizens Republic Bancorp, Inc.

Flint

MI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$300,000,000

Par

$195,777,400

CPP

12/12/2008

Indiana Community Bancorp

Columbus

IN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$21,500,000

Par

$43,654,000

CPP

12/12/2008

Bank of the Ozarks, Inc.

Little Rock

AR

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$75,000,000

Par

$389,244,200

CPP

12/12/2008

Center Financial Corporation

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$55,000,000

Par

$47,342,160

CPP

12/12/2008

NewBridge Bancorp

Greensboro

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$52,372,000

Par

$33,034,160

CPP

12/12/2008

Sterling Bancshares, Inc.

Houston

TX

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$125,198,000

Par

$479,709,000

CPP

12/12/2008

The Bancorp, Inc.

Wilmington

DE

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$45,220,000

Par

$61,751,360

CPP

12/12/2008

TowneBank

Portsmouth

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$76,458,000

Par

$383,395,740

CPP

12/12/2008

Wilshire Bancorp, Inc.

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$62,158,000

Par

$151,776,240

CPP

12/12/2008

Valley Financial Corporation

Roanoke

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$16,019,000

Par

$22,276,800

CPP

12/12/2008

Independent Bank Corporation

Ionia

MI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$72,000,000

Par

$56,230,200

CPP

12/12/2008

Pinnacle Financial Partners, Inc.

Nashville

TN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$95,000,000

Par

$569,040,000

CPP

12/12/2008

First Litchfield Financial Corporation

Litchfield

CT

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

$16,499,000

CPP

12/12/2008

National Penn Bancshares, Inc.

Boyertown

PA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$150,000,000

Par

$681,513,000

CPP

12/12/2008

Northeast Bancorp

Lewiston

ME

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$4,227,000

Par

$17,430,710

CPP

12/12/2008

Citizens South Banking Corporation

Gastonia

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$20,500,000

Par

$38,181,280

CPP

12/12/2008

Virginia Commerce Bancorp

Arlington

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$71,000,000

Par

$101,147,520

CPP

12/12/2008

Fidelity Bancorp, Inc.

Pittsburgh

PA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$7,000,000

Par

$30,612,800

Investment Price
$34,000,000

Par

Capital
Repayment Date

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

3/31/2009 (e)

$90,000,000

3/31/2009 (d)

$28,000,000

3/31/2009 (d)

$100,000,000

3/31/2009 (d)

$120,000,000

$90,474,000

Continued on next page

APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

Name of
Institution

Note

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

Purchase
Date

Program

TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Capital Repayment Details

Name of
Institution

City

State

Investment Description

CPP

12/12/2008

LSB Corporation

North Andover

MA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$15,000,000

Par

CPP

12/19/2008

Intermountain Community Bancorp

Sandpoint

ID

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$27,000,000

Par

$38,446,800

CPP

12/19/2008

Community West Bancshares

Goleta

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$15,600,000

Par

$15,615,600

CPP

12/19/2008

Synovus Financial Corp.

Columbus

GA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$967,870,000

Par

$1,073,699,250

CPP

12/19/2008

Tennessee Commerce Bancorp, Inc.

Franklin

TN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$30,000,000

Par

$36,341,760

CPP

12/19/2008

Community Bankers Trust Corporation

Glen Allen

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$17,680,000

Par

$72,991,200

CPP

12/19/2008

BancTrust Financial Group, Inc.

Mobile

AL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$50,000,000

Par

$111,838,440

CPP

12/19/2008

Enterprise Financial Services Corp.

St. Louis

MO

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$35,000,000

Par

$125,230,560

CPP

12/19/2008

Mid Penn Bancorp, Inc.

Millersburg

PA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

$66,120,000

CPP

12/19/2008

Summit State Bank

Santa Rosa

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$8,500,000

Par

$21,827,000

CPP

12/19/2008

VIST Financial Corp.

Wyomissing

PA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$25,000,000

Par

$40,096,000

CPP

12/19/2008

Wainwright Bank & Trust Company

Boston

MA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$22,000,000

Par

$47,232,720

CPP

12/19/2008

Whitney Holding Corporation

New Orleans

LA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$300,000,000

Par

$771,523,900

CPP

12/19/2008

The Connecticut Bank and Trust Company

Hartford

CT

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$5,448,000

Par

$11,592,750

CPP

12/19/2008

CoBiz Financial Inc.

Denver

CO

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$64,450,000

Par

$122,871,000

CPP

12/19/2008

Santa Lucia Bancorp

Atascadero

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

$22,114,500

CPP

12/19/2008

Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida

Stuart

FL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$50,000,000

Par

$58,090,490

CPP

12/19/2008

Horizon Bancorp

Michigan City

IN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$25,000,000

Par

$36,119,400

CPP

12/19/2008

Fidelity Southern Corporation

Atlanta

GA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$48,200,000

Par

$23,352,000

CPP

12/19/2008

Community Financial Corporation

Staunton

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$12,643,000

Par

$17,448,000

CPP

12/19/2008

Berkshire Hills Bancorp, Inc.

Pittsfield

MA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$40,000,000

Par

$280,999,200

CPP

12/19/2008

First California Financial Group, Inc

Westlake Village

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$25,000,000

Par

$48,741,000

CPP

12/19/2008

AmeriServ Financial, Inc.

Johnstown

PA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$21,000,000

Par

$35,295,450

CPP

12/19/2008

Security Federal Corporation

Aiken

SC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$18,000,000

Par

$38,099,000

CPP

12/19/2008

Wintrust Financial Corporation

Lake Forest

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$250,000,000

Par

$293,687,100

CPP

12/19/2008

Flushing Financial Corporation

Lake Success

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$70,000,000

Par

$130,730,320

CPP

12/19/2008

Monarch Financial Holdings, Inc.

Chesapeake

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$14,700,000

Par

$29,299,500

CPP

12/19/2008

StellarOne Corporation

Charlottesville

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$30,000,000

Par

$270,142,620

CPP

12/19/2008

Union Bankshares Corporation

Bowling Green

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$59,000,000

Par

$188,276,900

CPP

12/19/2008

Tidelands Bancshares, Inc

Mt. Pleasant

SC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$14,448,000

Par

$13,044,850

CPP

12/19/2008

Bancorp Rhode Island, Inc.

Providence

RI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$30,000,000

Par

$82,995,510

CPP

12/19/2008

Hawthorn Bancshares, Inc.

Lee’s Summit

MO

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$30,255,000

Par

$48,597,590

CPP

12/19/2008

The Elmira Savings Bank, FSB

Elmira

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$9,090,000

Par

$20,528,200

CPP

12/19/2008

Alliance Financial Corporation

Syracuse

NY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$26,918,000

Par

$82,147,260

CPP

12/19/2008

Heartland Financial USA, Inc.

Dubuque

IA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$81,698,000

Par

$220,349,960

CPP

12/19/2008

Citizens First Corporation

Bowling Green

KY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$8,779,000

Par

$7,876,000

Note

Investment Price

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

Purchase
Date

Program

Capital
Repayment Date

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

$39,970,740

(b)

12/19/2008

FFW Corporation

Wabash

IN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,289,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Plains Capital Corporation

Dallas

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$87,631,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Tri-County Financial Corporation

Waldorf

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$15,540,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(c)

12/19/2008

OneUnited Bank

Boston

MA

Preferred Stock

$12,063,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Patriot Bancshares, Inc.

Houston

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$26,038,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Pacific City Finacial Corporation

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$16,200,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Marquette National Corporation

Chicago

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$35,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Exchange Bank

Santa Rosa

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$43,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Monadnock Bancorp, Inc.

Peterborough

NH

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,834,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Bridgeview Bancorp, Inc.

Bridgeview

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$38,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Fidelity Financial Corporation

Wichita

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$36,282,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

Patapsco Bancorp, Inc.

Dundalk

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/19/2008

NCAL Bancorp

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

$9,294,000

Par

N/A

$80,000,000

Par

$357,193,930

12/19/2008

FCB Bancorp, Inc.

Louisville

KY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

CPP

12/23/2008

First Financial Bancorp

Cincinnati

OH

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

CPP

12/23/2008

Bridge Capital Holdings

San Jose

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$23,864,000

Par

$30,996,000

CPP

12/23/2008

International Bancshares Corporation

Laredo

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$216,000,000

Par

$535,103,400

CPP

12/23/2008

First Sound Bank

Seattle

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$7,400,000

Par

N/A

CPP

12/23/2008

M&T Bank Corporation

Buffalo

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$600,000,000

Par

$5,024,309,160

CPP

12/23/2008

Emclaire Financial Corp.

Emlenton

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$7,500,000

Par

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

CPP

$30,766,500
Continued on next page

183

184

TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Capital Repayment Details

City

State

Investment Description

CPP

12/23/2008

Park National Corporation

Newark

OH

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$100,000,000

Par

$778,939,000

CPP

12/23/2008

Green Bankshares, Inc.

Greeneville

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$72,278,000

Par

$115,957,600

CPP

12/23/2008

Cecil Bancorp, Inc.

Elkton

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$11,560,000

Par

$18,813,900

CPP

12/23/2008

Financial Institutions, Inc.

Warsaw

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$37,515,000

Par

$82,334,100

CPP

12/23/2008

Fulton Financial Corporation

Lancaster

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$376,500,000

Par

$1,163,114,160

CPP

12/23/2008

United Bancorporation of Alabama, Inc.

Atmore

AL

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$10,300,000

Par

N/A

CPP

12/23/2008

MutualFirst Financial, Inc.

Muncie

IN

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$32,382,000

Par

$33,528,000

CPP

12/23/2008

BCSB Bancorp, Inc.

Baltimore

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$10,800,000

Par

$27,308,750

CPP

12/23/2008

HMN Financial, Inc.

Rochester

MN

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$26,000,000

Par

$12,905,300

CPP

12/23/2008

First Community Bank Corporation of America

Pinellas Park

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$10,685,000

Par

$17,019,100

CPP

12/23/2008

Sterling Bancorp

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$42,000,000

Par

$179,249,400

CPP

12/23/2008

Intervest Bancshares Corporation

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$25,000,000

Par

$17,782,250

CPP

12/23/2008

Peoples Bancorp of North Carolina, Inc.

Newton

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$25,054,000

Par

$31,849,250

CPP

12/23/2008

Parkvale Financial Corporation

Monroeville

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$31,762,000

Par

$59,599,440

CPP

12/23/2008

Timberland Bancorp, Inc.

Hoquiam

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$16,641,000

Par

$36,352,200

CPP

12/23/2008

1st Constitution Bancorp

Cranbury

NJ

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$12,000,000

Par

$26,350,000

CPP

Investment Price

12/23/2008

Central Jersey Bancorp

Oakhurst

NJ

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$11,300,000

Par

(b)

12/23/2008

Western Illinois Bancshares Inc.

Monmouth

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,855,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Saigon National Bank

Westminster

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,549,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Capital Pacific Bancorp

Portland

OR

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Uwharrie Capital Corp

Albemarle

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(c)

12/23/2008

Mission Valley Bancorp

Sun Valley

CA

Preferred Stock

$5,500,000

Par

$14,202,750

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

The Little Bank, Incorporated

Kinston

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Pacific Commerce Bank

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,060,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Citizens Community Bank

South Hill

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Seacoast Commerce Bank

Chula Vista

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,800,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

TCNB Financial Corp.

Dayton

OH

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Leader Bancorp, Inc.

Arlington

MA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,830,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Nicolet Bankshares, Inc.

Green Bay

WI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$14,964,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Magna Bank

Memphis

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$13,795,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Western Community Bancshares, Inc.

Palm Desert

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,290,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Community Investors Bancorp, Inc.

Bucyrus

OH

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,600,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Capital Bancorp, Inc.

Rockville

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Cache Valley Banking Company

Logan

UT

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,767,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Citizens Bancorp

Nevada City

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,400,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

12/23/2008

Tennessee Valley Financial Holdings, Inc.

Oak Ridge

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

$58,623,500

CPP

Capital
Repayment Date

12/23/2008

Pacific Coast Bankers’ Bancshares

San Francisco

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$11,600,000

Par

N/A

CPP

12/31/2008

SunTrust Banks, Inc.

Atlanta

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$1,350,000,000

Par

$4,202,497,360

CPP

12/31/2008

The PNC Financial Services Group Inc.

Pittsburgh

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$7,579,200,000

Par

$13,021,631,040

CPP

12/31/2008

Fifth Third Bancorp

Cincinnati

OH

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$3,408,000,000

Par

$1,688,165,880

CPP

12/31/2008

Hampton Roads Bankshares, Inc.

Norfolk

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$80,347,000

Par

$169,790,840

CPP

12/31/2008

CIT Group Inc.

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$2,330,000,000

Par

$1,108,591,330
$129,659,800

CPP

12/31/2008

West Bancorporation, Inc.

West Des Moines

IA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

CPP

(b)

12/31/2008

First Banks, Inc.

Clayton

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$36,000,000

Par

$295,400,000

Par

CPP

(a)

1/9/2009

Bank of America Corporation

Charlotte

NC

N/A

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$10,000,000,000

Par

$43,657,466,160

CPP

1/9/2009

FirstMerit Corporation

Akron

CPP

1/9/2009

Farmers Capital Bank Corporation

Frankfort

OH

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$125,000,000

Par

$1,482,499,200

KY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$30,000,000

Par

CPP

1/9/2009

Peapack-Gladstone Financial Corporation

$115,284,190

Gladstone

NJ

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$28,685,000

Par

$149,630,970

CPP

1/9/2009

CPP

1/9/2009

Commerce National Bank

Newport Beach

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$5,000,000

Par

$15,982,000

The First Bancorp, Inc.

Damariscotta

ME

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$25,000,000

Par

$154,000,600

CPP

1/9/2009

Sun Bancorp, Inc.

Vineland

NJ

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

CPP

1/9/2009

Crescent Financial Corporation

Cary

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$89,310,000

Par

$113,951,640

$24,900,000

Par

CPP

1/9/2009

American Express Company

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$3,388,890,000

$34,657,200

Par

$15,805,838,680

CPP

1/9/2009

Central Pacific Financial Corp.

Honolulu

HI

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

CPP

1/9/2009

Centrue Financial Corporation

St. Louis

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$135,000,000

Par

$160,944,000

$32,668,000

Par

CPP

1/9/2009

Eastern Virginia Bankshares, Inc.

Tappahannock

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

N/A

$24,000,000

Par

$49,593,290
Continued on next page

APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

Name of
Institution

Note

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

Purchase
Date

Program

TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Purchase
Date

Name of
Institution

City

State

Investment Description

CPP

1/9/2009

Colony Bankcorp, Inc.

Fitzgerald

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

CPP

1/9/2009

Independent Bank Corp.

Rockland

MA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

CPP

1/9/2009

Cadence Financial Corporation

Starkville

MS

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

CPP

1/9/2009

LCNB Corp.

Lebanon

OH

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

CPP

1/9/2009

Center Bancorp, Inc.

Union

NJ

CPP

1/9/2009

F.N.B. Corporation

Hermitage

CPP

1/9/2009

C&F Financial Corporation

CPP

1/9/2009

North Central Bancshares, Inc.

CPP

1/9/2009

CPP

Program

Note

Capital Repayment Details

Investment Price
$28,000,000

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

Par

$78,158,000

Par
Par
Par

$10,000,000

Par

$93,795,020

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$100,000,000

Par

$687,968,320

West Point

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$20,000,000

Par

$43,928,000

Fort Dodge

IA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$10,200,000

Par

$16,451,750

Carolina Bank Holdings, Inc.

Greensboro

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$16,000,000

Par

$14,225,400

1/9/2009

First Bancorp

Troy

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$65,000,000

Par

$198,917,460

CPP

1/9/2009

First Financial Service Corporation

Elizabethtown

KY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$20,000,000

Par

$51,936,900

CPP

1/9/2009

Codorus Valley Bancorp, Inc.

York

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$16,500,000

Par

$32,466,080

CPP

1/9/2009

MidSouth Bancorp, Inc.

Lafayette

LA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$20,000,000

Par

$67,768,320

CPP

1/9/2009

First Security Group, Inc.

Chattanooga

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$33,000,000

Par

$55,335,400

CPP

1/9/2009

Shore Bancshares, Inc.

Easton

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$25,000,000

Par

$15,000,000

$63,526,500

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

3/31/2009 (d)

$52,664,300

$13,400,000

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

$240,203,750

$44,000,000

Capital
Repayment Date

$46,206,090

$140,783,750
N/A

(b)

1/9/2009

The Queensborough Company

Louisville

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$12,000,000

Par

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

American State Bancshares, Inc.

Great Bend

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Security California Bancorp

Riverside

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,815,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Security Business Bancorp

San Diego

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,803,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Sound Banking Company

Morehead City

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,070,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(c)

1/9/2009

Mission Community Bancorp

San Luis Obispo

CA

Preferred Stock

$5,116,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Redwood Financial Inc.

Redwood Falls

MN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,995,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Surrey Bancorp

Mount Airy

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Independence Bank

East Greenwich

RI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,065,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Valley Community Bank

Pleasanton

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Rising Sun Bancorp

Rising Sun

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,983,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Community Trust Financial Corporation

Ruston

LA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$24,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

GrandSouth Bancorporation

Greenville

SC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$9,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Texas National Bancorporation

Jacksonville

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,981,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

Congaree Bancshares, Inc.

Cayce

SC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,285,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/9/2009

New York Private Bank & Trust Corporation

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$267,274,000

Par

N/A

CPP

1/16/2009

Home Bancshares, Inc.

Conway

AR

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$50,000,000

Par

$396,704,050

CPP

1/16/2009

Washington Banking Company/ Whidbey Island
Bank

Oak Harbor

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$26,380,000

Par

$64,797,200

CPP

1/16/2009

New Hampshire Thrift Bancshares, Inc.

Newport

NH

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

$41,673,000

CPP

1/16/2009

Bar Harbor Bankshares/Bar Harbor Bank & Trust Bar Harbor

ME

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$18,751,000

Par

$66,871,000

CPP

1/16/2009

Somerset Hills Bancorp

Bernardsville

NJ

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$7,414,000

Par

$31,909,320

CPP

1/16/2009

SCBT Financial Corporation

Columbia

SC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$64,779,000

Par

$236,629,800

CPP

1/16/2009

S&T Bancorp

Indiana

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$108,676,000

Par

$586,180,770

CPP

1/16/2009

ECB Bancorp, Inc./East Carolina Bank

Engelhard

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$17,949,000

Par

$43,513,200

CPP

1/16/2009

First BanCorp

San Juan

PR

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$400,000,000

Par

$394,250,220

CPP

1/16/2009

Texas Capital Bancshares, Inc.

Dallas

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$75,000,000

Par

$348,852,840

CPP

1/16/2009

Yadkin Valley Financial Corporation

Elkin

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$36,000,000

Par

$85,920,850

1/16/2009

Carver Bancorp, Inc

New York

NY

Preferred Stock

$18,980,000

Par

$8,422,700

CPP

1/16/2009

Citizens & Northern Corporation

Wellsboro

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$26,440,000

Par

$165,688,890

CPP

1/16/2009

MainSource Financial Group, Inc.

Greensburg

IN

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$57,000,000

Par

$161,901,480

CPP

1/16/2009

MetroCorp Bancshares, Inc.

Houston

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$45,000,000

Par

$30,405,420

CPP

1/16/2009

United Bancorp, Inc.

Tecumseh

MI

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$20,600,000

Par

$47,495,700

CPP

1/16/2009

Old Second Bancorp, Inc.

Aurora

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$73,000,000

Par

$87,801,450

CPP

1/16/2009

Pulaski Financial Corp

Creve Coeur

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$32,538,000

Par

$51,210,000

CPP

(c)

CPP

1/16/2009

OceanFirst Financial Corp.

Toms River

NJ

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$38,263,000

Par

$126,370,300

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Community 1st Bank

Roseville

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,550,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

TCB Holding Company, Texas Community Bank

The Woodlands

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$11,730,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Centra Financial Holdings, Inc./Centra Bank, Inc. Morgantown

WV

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$15,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

First Bankers Trustshares, Inc.

Quincy

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Pacific Coast National Bancorp

San Clemente

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,120,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(c)

1/16/2009

Community Bank of the Bay

Oakland

CA

Preferred Stock

$1,747,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Redwood Capital Bancorp

Eureka

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,800,000

Par

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

CPP

N/A
Continued on next page

185

186

TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Capital Repayment Details

Purchase
Date

Name of
Institution

City

State

Investment Description

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Syringa Bancorp

Boise

ID

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$8,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Idaho Bancorp

Boise

ID

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Puget Sound Bank

Bellevue

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

United Financial Banking Companies, Inc.

Vienna

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,658,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Dickinson Financial Corporation II

Kansas City

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$146,053,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

The Baraboo Bancorporation

Baraboo

WI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$20,749,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Bank of Commerce

Charlotte

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

State Bankshares, Inc.

Fargo

ND

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$50,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

BNCCORP, Inc.

Bismarck

ND

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$20,093,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

First Manitowoc Bancorp, Inc.

Manitowoc

WI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$12,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(c)

1/16/2009

Southern Bancorp, Inc.

Arkadelphia

AR

Preferred Stock

$11,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Morrill Bancshares, Inc.

Merriam

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$13,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/16/2009

Treaty Oak Bancorp, Inc.

Austin

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,268,000

Par

1/23/2009

1st Source Corporation

South Bend

IN

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$111,000,000

Par

$450,275,300

CPP

1/23/2009

Princeton National Bancorp, Inc.

Princeton

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$25,083,000

Par

$46,172,000

CPP

1/23/2009

AB&T Financial Corporation

Gastonia

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$3,500,000

Par

$16,008,000

CPP

1/23/2009

First Citizens Banc Corp

Sandusky

OH

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$23,184,000

Par

$57,892,480

CPP

1/23/2009

WSFS Financial Corporation

Wilmington

DE

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$52,625,000

Par

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

N/A

CPP

Capital
Repayment Date

$137,849,400

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Commonwealth Business Bank

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,701,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Seaside National Bank & Trust

Orlando

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,677,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

CalWest Bancorp

Rancho Santa Margarita CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,656,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Fresno First Bank

Fresno

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,968,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

First ULB Corp.

Oakland

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Alarion Financial Services, Inc.

Ocala

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,514,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Midland States Bancorp, Inc.

Effingham

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,189,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Moscow Bancshares, Inc.

Moscow

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,216,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Farmers Bank

Windsor

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$8,752,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

California Oaks State Bank

Thousand Oaks

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,300,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Pierce County Bancorp

Tacoma

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,800,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Calvert Financial Corporation

Ashland

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,037,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Liberty Bancshares, Inc.

Jonesboro

AR

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$57,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Crosstown Holding Company

Blaine

MN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,650,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

BankFirst Capital Corporation

Macon

MS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$15,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Southern Illinois Bancorp, Inc.

Carmi

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

FPB Financial Corp.

Hammond

LA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,240,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/23/2009

Stonebridge Financial Corp.

West Chester

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,973,000

Par

N/A

CPP

1/30/2009

Peoples Bancorp Inc.

Marietta

OH

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$39,000,000

Par

$135,498,220

CPP

1/30/2009

Anchor BanCorp Wisconsin Inc.

Madison

WI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$110,000,000

Par

$29,101,950

CPP

1/30/2009

Parke Bancorp, Inc.

Sewell

NJ

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$16,288,000

Par

$28,231,000

CPP

1/30/2009

Central Virginia Bankshares, Inc.

Powhatan

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$11,385,000

Par

$10,254,200

CPP

1/30/2009

Flagstar Bancorp, Inc.

Troy

MI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$266,657,000

Par

$67,784,250

CPP

1/30/2009

Middleburg Financial Corporation

Middleburg

VA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$22,000,000

Par

$52,004,980

CPP

1/30/2009

Peninsula Bank Holding Co.

Palo Alto

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$6,000,000

Par

$18,530,000

CPP

1/30/2009

PrivateBancorp, Inc.

Chicago

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$243,815,000

Par

$485,928,300

CPP

1/30/2009

Central Valley Community Bancorp

Fresno

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$7,000,000

Par

$35,688,140

CPP

1/30/2009

Plumas Bancorp

Quincy

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$11,949,000

Par

$28,608,240

CPP

1/30/2009

Stewardship Financial Corporation

Midland Park

NJ

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

$45,461,900

CPP

1/30/2009

Oak Ridge Financial Services, Inc.

Oak Ridge

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$7,700,000

Par

$6,984,900

CPP

1/30/2009

First United Corporation

Oakland

MD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$30,000,000

Par

$51,302,360

CPP

1/30/2009

Community Partners Bancorp

Middletown

NJ

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$9,000,000

Par

$23,316,000

CPP

1/30/2009

Guaranty Federal Bancshares, Inc.

Springfield

MO

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$17,000,000

Par

$13,848,900

CPP

1/30/2009

Annapolis Bancorp, Inc.

Annapolis

MD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$8,152,000

Par

$10,474,720

CPP

1/30/2009

DNB Financial Corporation

Downingtown

PA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$11,750,000

Par

$19,574,560

CPP

1/30/2009

Firstbank Corporation

Alma

MI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$33,000,000

Par

$38,076,000

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Valley Commerce Bancorp

Visalia

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Greer Bancshares Incorporated

Greer

SC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$9,993,000

Par

N/A
Continued on next page

APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

Note

Investment Price

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

Program

TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Capital Repayment Details

Note

Purchase
Date

Name of
Institution

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Ojai Community Bank

Ojai

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,080,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Adbanc, Inc

Ogallala

NE

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$12,720,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Beach Business Bank

Manhattan Beach

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(c)

1/30/2009

Legacy Bancorp, Inc.

Milwaukee

WI

Preferred Stock

$5,498,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

First Southern Bancorp, Inc.

Boca Raton

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Country Bank Shares, Inc.

Milford

NE

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,525,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Katahdin Bankshares Corp.

Houlton

ME

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,449,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Rogers Bancshares, Inc.

Little Rock

AR

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$25,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

UBT Bancshares, Inc.

Marysville

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$8,950,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Bankers’ Bank of the West Bancorp, Inc.

Denver

CO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$12,639,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

W.T.B. Financial Corporation

Spokane

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$110,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

AMB Financial Corp.

Munster

IN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,674,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Goldwater Bank, N.A.

Scottsdale

AZ

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,568,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Equity Bancshares, Inc.

Wichita

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$8,750,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

WashingtonFirst Bank

Reston

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,633,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Central Bancshares, Inc.

Houston

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,800,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Hilltop Community Bancorp, Inc.

Summit

NJ

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Northway Financial, Inc.

Berlin

NH

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Monument Bank

Bethesda

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,734,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

Metro City Bank

Doraville

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

F & M Bancshares, Inc.

Trezevant

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,609,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

1/30/2009

First Resource Bank

Exton

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,600,000

Par

N/A

CPP

2/6/2009

MidWest One Financial Group, Inc.

Iowa City

IA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$16,000,000

Par

$80,438,050

CPP

2/6/2009

Lakeland Bancorp, Inc.

Oak Ridge

NJ

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$59,000,000

Par

$189,508,000

CPP

2/6/2009

Monarch Community Bancorp, Inc.

Coldwater

MI

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$6,785,000

Par

$7,075,890

CPP

2/6/2009

The First Bancshares, Inc.

Hattiesburg

MS

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$5,000,000

Par

$29,361,800

CPP

2/6/2009

Carolina Trust Bank

Lincolnton

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

$7,516,800

CPP

2/6/2009

Alaska Pacific Bancshares, Inc.

Juneau

AK

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$4,781,000

Par

$2,354,400

$3,000,000

Par

N/A

City

State

Investment Description

Investment Price

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

Program

(c)

2/6/2009

PGB Holdings, Inc.

Chicago

IL

Preferred Stock

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

The Freeport State Bank

Harper

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$301,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Stockmens Financial Corporation

Rapid City

SD

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$15,568,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

US Metro Bank

Garden Grove

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,861,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

First Express of Nebraska, Inc.

Gering

NE

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Mercantile Capital Corp.

Boston

MA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Citizens Commerce Bancshares, Inc.

Versailles

KY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,300,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(c)

2/6/2009

Liberty Financial Services, Inc.

New Orleans

LA

Preferred Stock

$5,645,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Lone Star Bank

Houston

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,072,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

First Market Bank, FSB

Richmond

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$33,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Banner County Ban Corporation

Harrisburg

NE

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$795,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Centrix Bank & Trust

Bedford

NH

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Todd Bancshares, Inc.

Hopkinsville

KY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Georgia Commerce Bancshares, Inc.

Atlanta

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$8,700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

First Bank of Charleston, Inc.

Charleston

WV

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,345,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

F & M Financial Corporation

Salisbury

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$17,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

The Bank of Currituck

Moyock

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,021,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

CedarStone Bank

Lebanon

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,564,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Community Holding Company of Florida, Inc.

Miramar Beach

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,050,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Hyperion Bank

Philadelphia

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,552,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

Pascack Community Bank

Westwood

NJ

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,756,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/6/2009

First Western Financial, Inc.

Denver

CO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$8,559,000

Par

N/A

CPP

2/13/2009

QCR Holdings, Inc.

Moline

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$38,237,000

Par

$36,429,240

CPP

2/13/2009

Westamerica Bancorporation

San Rafael

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$83,726,000

Par

$1,315,545,000

CPP

2/13/2009

The Bank of Kentucky Financial Corporation

Crestview Hills

KY

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$34,000,000

Par

$106,647,000

CPP

2/13/2009

PremierWest Bancorp

Medford

OR

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$41,400,000

Par

$99,564,950

CPP

2/13/2009

Carrollton Bancorp

Baltimore

MD

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$9,201,000

Par

$13,127,670

CPP

2/13/2009

FNB United Corp.

Asheboro

NC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$51,500,000

Par

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

$29,712,800

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

CPP

Capital
Repayment Date

Continued on next page

187

188

TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Capital Repayment Details

Purchase
Date

Name of
Institution

City

State

Investment Description

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

First Menasha Bancshares, Inc.

Neenah

WI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,797,000

Par

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

1st Enterprise Bank

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,400,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

DeSoto County Bank

Horn Lake

MS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,173,000

Par

Capital
Repayment Date

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

N/A

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Security Bancshares of Pulaski County, Inc.

Waynesville

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,152,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

State Capital Corporation

Greenwood

MS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$15,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

BankGreenville

Greenville

SC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Corning Savings and Loan Association

Corning

AR

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$638,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Financial Security Corporation

Basin

WY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

ColoEast Bankshares, Inc.

Lamar

CO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Santa Clara Valley Bank, N.A.

Santa Paula

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Reliance Bancshares, Inc.

Frontenac

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$40,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Regional Bankshares, Inc.

Hartsville

SC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Peoples Bancorp

Lynden

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$18,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

First Choice Bank

Cerritos

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,200,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Gregg Bancshares, Inc.

Ozark

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$825,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Hometown Bancshares, Inc.

Corbin

KY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Midwest Regional Bancorp, Inc.

Festus

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Bern Bancshares, Inc.

Bern

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$985,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Northwest Bancorporation, Inc.

Spokane

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Liberty Bancshares, Inc.

Springfield

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$21,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

F&M Financial Corporation

Clarksville

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$17,243,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Meridian Bank

Devon

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,200,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/13/2009

Northwest Commercial Bank

Lakewood

WA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,992,000

Par

N/A

CPP

2/20/2009

Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc.

Narberth

PA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$30,407,000

Par

$27,839,010

CPP

2/20/2009

First Merchants Corporation

Muncie

IN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$116,000,000

Par

$228,510,620

CPP

2/20/2009

Northern States Financial Corporation

Waukegan

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$17,211,000

Par

$30,336,400

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Sonoma Valley Bancorp

Sonoma

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$8,653,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Guaranty Bancorp, Inc.

Woodsville

NH

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,920,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

The Private Bank of California

Los Angeles

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,450,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Lafayette Bancorp, Inc.

Oxford

MS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,998,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Liberty Shares, Inc.

Hinesville

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$17,280,000

Par

N/A
N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

White River Bancshares Company

Fayetteville

AR

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$16,800,000

Par

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

United American Bank

San Mateo

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$8,700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Crazy Woman Creek Bancorp, Inc.

Buffalo

WY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,100,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

First Priority Financial Corp.

Malvern

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,579,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Mid-Wisconsin Financial Services, Inc.

Medford

WI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Market Bancorporation, Inc.

New Market

MN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,060,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Hometown Bancorp of Alabama, Inc.

Oneonta

AL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,250,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Security State Bancshares, Inc.

Charleston

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$12,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

CBB Bancorp

Cartersville

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,644,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

BancPlus Corporation

Ridgeland

MS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$48,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Central Community Corporation

Temple

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$22,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

First BancTrust Corporation

Paris

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,350,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Premier Service Bank

Riverside

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Florida Business BancGroup, Inc.

Tampa

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$9,495,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/20/2009

Hamilton State Bancshares

Hoschton

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,000,000

Par

N/A

2/27/2009

Lakeland Financial Corporation

Warsaw

IN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$56,044,000

Par

$238,224,660

CPP
CPP

2/27/2009

First M&F Corporation

Kosciusko

MS

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$30,000,000

Par

$56,120,400

CPP

2/27/2009

Southern First Bancshares, Inc.

Greenville

SC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$17,299,000

Par

$17,082,450

2/27/2009

Integra Bank Corporation

Evansville

IN

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$83,586,000

Par

$39,208,050

CPP

CPP
(b)

2/27/2009

Community First Inc.

Columbia

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$17,806,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

BNC Financial Group, Inc.

New Canaan

CT

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,797,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

California Bank of Commerce

Lafayette

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Columbine Capital Corp.

Buena Vista

CO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,260,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

National Bancshares, Inc.

Bettendorf

IA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$24,664,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

First State Bank of Mobeetie

Mobeetie

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$731,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Ridgestone Financial Services, Inc.

Brookfield

WI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,900,000

Par

N/A
Continued on next page

APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

Note

Investment Price

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

Program

TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Capital Repayment Details

Note

Purchase
Date

Name of
Institution

City

State

Investment Description

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Community Business Bank

West Sacramento

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,976,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

D.L. Evans Bancorp

Burley

ID

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$19,891,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

TriState Capital Holdings, Inc.

Pittsburgh

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$23,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Green City Bancshares, Inc.

Green City

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$651,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

First Gothenburg Bancshares, Inc.

Gothenburg

NE

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,570,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Green Circle Investments, Inc.

Clive

IA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,400,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Private Bancorporation, Inc.

Minneapolis

MN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,960,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Regent Capital Corporation

Nowata

OK

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,655,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Central Bancorp, Inc.

Garland

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$22,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Medallion Bank

Salt Lake City

UT

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$11,800,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

PSB Financial Corporation

Many

LA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$9,270,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Avenue Financial Holdings, Inc.

Nashville

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,400,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Howard Bancorp, Inc.

Ellicott City

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,983,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

FNB Bancorp

South San Francisco

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$12,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

The Victory Bank

Limerick

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$541,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

2/27/2009

Catskill Hudson Bancorp, Inc

Rock Hill

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

Investment Price

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

Program

2/27/2009

Midtown Bank & Trust Company

Atlanta

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,222,000

Par

3/6/2009

HCSB Financial Corporation

Loris

SC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$12,895,000

Par

$41,694,870

CPP

3/6/2009

First Busey Corporation

Urbana

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$100,000,000

Par

$277,931,320

CPP

3/6/2009

First Federal Bancshares of Arkansas, Inc.

Harrison

AR

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$16,500,000

Par

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

N/A

CPP

Capital
Repayment Date

$22,780,900

CPP

(c)

3/6/2009

Citizens Bancshares Corporation

Atlanta

GA

Preferred Stock

$7,462,000

Par

$6,521,820

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

ICB Financial

Ontario

CA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

First Texas BHC, Inc.

Fort Worth

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$13,533,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Farmers & Merchants Bancshares, Inc.

Houston

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$11,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Blue Ridge Bancshares, Inc.

Independence

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$12,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

First Reliance Bancshares, Inc.

Florence

SC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$15,349,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Merchants and Planters Bancshares, Inc.

Toone

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,881,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

First Southwest Bancorporation, Inc.

Alamosa

CO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Germantown Capital Corporation, Inc.

Germantown

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,967,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

BOH Holdings, Inc.

Houston

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

AmeriBank Holding Company

Collinsville

OK

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,492,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Highlands Independent Bancshares, Inc.

Sebring

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Pinnacle Bank Holding Company, Inc.

Orange City

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,389,000

Par

N/A
N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Blue River Bancshares, Inc.

Shelbyville

IN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$5,000,000

Par

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Marine Bank & Trust Company

Vero Beach

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

Community Bancshares of Kansas, Inc.

Goff

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$500,000

Par

N/A

(b)

3/6/2009

Regent Bancorp, Inc.

Davie

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$9,982,000

Par

N/A

(b)

3/6/2009

Park Bancorporation, Inc.

Madison

WI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$23,200,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/6/2009

PeoplesSouth Bancshares, Inc.

Colquitt

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$12,325,000

Par

N/A

CPP

3/13/2009

First Place Financial Corp.

Warren

OH

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$72,927,000

Par

$57,029,280

CPP

3/13/2009

Salisbury Bancorp, Inc.

Lakeville

CT

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$8,816,000

Par

$41,391,300

CPP

3/13/2009

First Northern Community Bancorp

Dixon

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$17,390,000

Par

$43,183,460

CPP

3/13/2009

Discover Financial Services

Riverwoods

IL

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$1,224,558,000

Par

$3,038,006,290

CPP

3/13/2009

Provident Community Bancshares, Inc.

Rock Hill

SC

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

$9,266,000

Par

$4,738,200

CPP

(c)

3/13/2009

First American International Corp.

Brooklyn

NY

Preferred Stock

$17,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

BancIndependent, Inc.

Sheffield

AL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$21,100,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

Haviland Bancshares, Inc.

Haviland

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$425,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

1st United Bancorp, Inc.

Boca Raton

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

Madison Financial Corporation

Richmond

KY

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,370,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

First National Corporation

Strasburg

VA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$13,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

St. Johns Bancshares, Inc.

St. Louis

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

Blackhawk Bancorp, Inc.

Beloit

WI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$10,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

IBW Financial Corporation

Washington

DC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$6,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

Butler Point, Inc.

Catlin

IL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$607,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

Bank of George

Las Vegas

NV

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,672,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

Moneytree Corporation

Lenoir City

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$9,516,000

Par

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

CPP
CPP

N/A
Continued on next page

189

190

TARP TRANSACTION DETAIL, THROUGH MARCH 31, 2009
Seller

Purchase Details

Note

Purchase
Date

Name of
Institution

City

State

Investment Description

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

Sovereign Bancshares, Inc.

Dallas

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

CPP

(b)

3/13/2009

First Intercontinental Bank

Doraville

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

3/20/2009

Heritage Oaks Bancorp

Paso Robles

CA

Preferred Stock w/Warrants

CPP

Investment Price

Pricing
Mechanism

Market
Capitalization as
of 3/31/2009

$18,215,000

Par

$6,398,000

Par
Par

Capital Repayment
Amount (f)

N/A

$21,000,000

Capital
Repayment Date

N/A
$32,174,950
N/A

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

Community First Bancshares Inc.

Union City

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$20,000,000

Par

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

First NBC Bank Holding Company

New Orleans

LA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$17,836,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

First Colebrook Bancorp, Inc.

Colebrook

NH

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

Kirksville Bancorp, Inc.

Kirksville

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$470,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

Peoples Bancshares of TN, Inc

Madisonville

TN

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,900,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

Premier Bank Holding Company

Tallahassee

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$9,500,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

Citizens Bank & Trust Company

Covington

LA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,400,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

Farmers & Merchants Financial Corporation

Argonia

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$442,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/20/2009

Farmers State Bankshares, Inc.

Holton

KS

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

SBT Bancorp, Inc.

Simsbury

CT

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

CSRA Bank Corp.

Wrens

GA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,400,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Trinity Capital Corporation

Los Alamos

NM

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$35,539,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Clover Community Bankshares, Inc.

Clover

SC

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Pathway Bancorp

Cairo

NE

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,727,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Colonial American Bank

West Conshohocken

PA

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$574,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

MS Financial, Inc.

Kingwood

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$7,723,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Triad Bancorp, Inc.

Frontenac

MO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$3,700,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Alpine Banks of Colorado

Glenwood Springs

CO

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$70,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Naples Bancorp, Inc.

Naples

FL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$4,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

CBS Banc-Corp.

Russellville

AL

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$24,300,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

IBT Bancorp, Inc.

Irving

TX

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$2,295,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Spirit BankCorp, Inc.

Bristow

OK

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$30,000,000

Par

N/A

CPP

(b)

3/27/2009

Maryland Financial Bank

Towson

MD

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

$1,700,000

Par

N/A

11/25/2008

AIG

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$40,000,000,000

Par

$2,690,747,000

SSFI
AIFP

12/29/2008
(g)

AIFP
AIFP

GMAC LLC

Detroit

MI

Preferred Stock w/ Exercised Warrants

12/29/2008

General Motors Corporation

Detroit

MI

Debt Obligation

12/31/2008

AIFP

General Motors Corporation

Detroit

MI

Debt Obligation w/ Warrants and
Additional Note

$5,000,000,000

Liquidation Preference

N/A

$884,024,131

N/A

$1,184,373,880

$13,400,000,000

N/A

$1,184,373,880
NA

1/2/2009
(h)

TIP
TIP

Chrysler Holding LLC

Auburn Hills

MI

Debt Obligation w/ Additional Note

$4,000,000,000

N/A

1/16/2009

Chrysler Financial Services Americas LLC

Farmington Hills

MI

Debt Obligation w/ Additional Note

$1,500,000,000

N/A

NA

12/31/2008

AIFP

Citigroup Inc.

New York

NY

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$20,000,000,000

Par

$13,947,814,100

1/16/2009

Bank of America Corporation

Charlotte

NC

Preferred Stock w/ Warrants

$20,000,000,000

Par

$43,657,466,160

AGP

(j)

1/16/2009

Citigroup Inc.

New York

NY

Preferred Stock and Warrants

$5,000,000,000

N/A

$13,947,814,100

CBLI

(i)

3/3/2009

TALF LLC

Wilmington

DE

Debt Obligation w/Additional Note

$20,000,000,000

N/A

N/A

TOTAL

$328,553,711,131

$353,000,000

Notes:
(a) This transaction was included in previous Transactions Reports with Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. listed as the qualifying institution and a 10/28/2008 transaction date, footnoted to indicate that settlement was deferred pending merger. The purchase of Merrill Lynch by Bank of America was completed on 1/1/2009, and
this transaction under the CPP was funded on 1/9/2009.
(b) Privately-held qualified financial institution; Treasury received a warrant to purchase additional shares of preferred stock, which it exercised immediately.
(c) To promote community development financial institutions (CDFIs), Treasury does not require warrants as part of its investment in certified CDFIs when the size of the investment is $50 million or less.
(d) Repayment pursuant to Title VII, Section 7001(g) of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
(e) Redemption pursuant to a qualified equity offering.
(f) This amount does not include accrued and unpaid dividends, which must be paid at the time of capital repayment.
(g) Treasury committed to lend General Motors Corporation up to $1,000,000,000. The ultimate level of funding was dependent upon the level of investor participation in GMAC LLC’s rights offering. The amount has been updated to reflect the final level of funding.
(h) The loan was funded through Chrysler LB Receivables Trust, a special purpose vehicle created by Chrysler Financial. The Amount of $1,500,000,000 represents the maximum loan amount. The loan will be incrementally funded.
(i) The loan was funded through TALF LLC, a special purpose vehicle created by The Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The amount of $20,000,000,000 represents the maximum loan amount. The loan will be incrementally funded.
(j) Transaction type is a guarantee instead of a purchase.
Source: Transactions: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/31/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009; Market Capitalization: Capital IQ, Inc. (a division of Standard & Poor’s), www.capitaliq.com, accessed 4/2/2009 at 2:00 pm EST.
Key:
CPP
SSFI
AIFP
TIP
AGP
CBLI

Capital Purchase Program
Systemically Significant Failing Institution Program
Automotive Industry Financing Program
Targeted Investment Program
Asset Guarantee Program
Consumer and Business Lending Initiative Investment Program

APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

Program

Capital Repayment Details

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

C—Explanation of the Secretary
In its data call response, Treasury provided SIGTARP with
determinations signed by the Treasury Secretary since
SIGTARP’s Initial Report. These determinations relate to the
following programs:17
• TALF
• Auto Supplier Support Program
• Home Affordable Modification Program (“HAMP”)
Please refer to part A of this appendix for details provided on
Treasury’s website regarding the purpose of each program and
part B for a listing of troubled asset purchases.

D—Financial Institutions
See part B of this appendix.

E—Listing and Detailed Biographical Information
of Asset Manager18
In response to SIGTARP’s data call question regarding this
reporting requirement, Treasury stated:
The Office of Financial Stability recently hired an asset
manager [EARNEST Partners] for the Small Business Initiative
[Unlocking Credit for Small Businesses] on March 16, 2009. As
of March 31, 2009, OFS has not yet hired asset managers for any
other TARP programs.
EARNEST Partners is an employee-owned firm that has been
managing institutional portfolios for almost 20 years. EARNEST
Partners manage a broad range of equity, fixed income, and alternative asset portfolios for over 350 institutional clients. The firm’s
investment professionals possess considerable expertise and experience in analyzing not only the broad fixed income market but
also several niche areas, including a long-standing and significant
portfolio involvement with issues guaranteed by the Small Business
Administration (SBA).

F—Summary of TARP Transactions by Program19
In response to SIGTARP’s data call question regarding this
reporting requirement, Treasury stated:
This information is contained in our transaction reports, which
are posted on Treasury’s website at http://www.financialstability.gov/
latest/reportsanddocs.html. The Transactions Report that provides
this information as of March 31, 2009 was posted on April 2,
2009.

As of March 31, 2009, no troubled assets have been sold,
except for preferred stock repurchased by certain recipients of
investments under the CPP. Treasury has received $353 million in
principal and $2.3 million in accrued and unpaid dividends from
the repurchase of senior preferred shares by five financial institutions that participated in the CPP. Participants that are interested
in repurchasing their senior preferred shares are required to repurchase these assets at par (i.e., the purchase price paid by Treasury).
Therefore, Treasury has not taken a loss on the repurchase of senior
preferred shares.
As of March 31, 2009, Treasury continues to hold the warrants received from the four publicly traded financial institutions
that repurchased preferred shares. Treasury also continues to hold
the warrant preferred shares received upon exercise of the warrant from the one private financial institution that completed a
repurchase transaction. Treasury is waiting to hear from the issuers
whether they will invoke their right to purchase the warrants
before they are offered for sale to a third-party. If the issuers choose
not to exercise this right within 15 calendar days, Treasury will
liquidate the warrants. The private institution has notified Treasury
that it will repurchase its warrant preferred shares at their aggregate liquidation preference. Treasury will receive a profit from
the sale of these assets, regardless of the final purchaser, since the
Treasury did not incur any additional cost to acquire them.
SIGTARP will provide more information on this in its next
quarterly report.

191

192

APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

Table C.2 provides a summary of the total amount of
troubled assets purchased and held on Treasury’s books as of
March 31, 2009.

H—Detailed Statement of Expenditures and
Revenues

G—Insurance Contracts20

In response to SIGTARP’s data call question regarding this
reporting requirement, Treasury stated:
Treasury provides information about TARP purchases, obligations, expenditures, and revenues on Treasury’s public website.
Treasury posts a transaction report for each purchase of troubled
assets two business days after the transaction. Treasury also posts
a detailed financial statement as part of its report under section
105(a) of EESA.
Treasury stated that it has incurred $13.3 million in TARPrelated administrative expenditures through March 31, 2009.
Table C.3 summarizes actual administrative TARP expenditures
as of March 31, 2009.

See part B of this appendix for Purchases and see part F of this
appendix for TARP Transactions.

In response to SIGTARP’s data call question regarding this
reporting requirement, Treasury stated:
On January 16, 2009, TARP closed on the guarantee transaction with Citigroup, as announced in a joint statement by the
Treasury, Federal Reserve and FDIC on November 23, 2008. No
other insurance contracts have been issued as of March 31, 2009.
Details of the terms and conditions of the Citigroup transaction are included in the Institution-Specific Assistance part of
Section 2: “TARP Implementation.”

TABLE C.2

TOTAL AMOUNT OF TROUBLED ASSETS PURCHASED AND HELD ON TREASURY’S BOOKS, AS OF
MARCH 31, 2009 ($ BILLIONS)
Obligationsa
$198.8
40.0
40.0
24.8
5.0
20.0
$328.6

Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”)
Systemically Significant Failing Institutions (“SSFI”)
Targeted Investment Program (“TIP”)
Automotive Industry Financing Program (“AIFP”)d
Asset Guarantee Program (“AGP”)
Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”)e
TOTAL

Expendedb
$198.8
40.0
40.0
24.5
0.1
$303.4

On Treasury’s Booksc
$198.8
40.0
40.0
24.5
0.1
$303.4

Note:
Numbers affected by rounding.
a From a budgetary perspective, what Treasury has committed to spend (e.g. signed agreements with TARP recipients).
b Represents TARP cash that has left the Treasury.
c All assets are currently carried at par value.
d Treasury’s $1.5 billion loan to Chrysler Financial represents the maximum loan amount. This $1.5 billion has not been fully expended because the loan will be funded incrementally at $100 million
per week. As of 3/31/2009, $1,175 million out of the $1.5 billion has been funded.
e TALF falls under the Consumer and Business Lending Initiative. Treasury’s $20 billion obligation to TALF represents the maximum obligated amount. This $20 billion has not been fully expended
because the loan will be funded as needed by TALF. As of 3/31/2009, $100 million out of the $20 billion has been funded.
Sources: Treasury, Transactions Report, 4/02/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/9/2009.

TABLE C.3

TARP ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENDITURES AND OBLIGATIONS
Budget Object Class Title
PERSONNEL SERVICES
Personnel Compensation & Benefits
TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES
NON-PERSONNEL SERVICES
Travel & Transportation of Persons
Transportation of Things
Rents, Communications,
Utilities & Misc. Charges
Printing & Reproduction
Other Services
Supplies & Materials
Equipment
Land & Structures
TOTAL NON-PERSONNEL
SERVICES
TOTAL
Note: Numbers affected by rounding.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

Obligations for Period Ending
3/31/2009

Expenditures for
Period Ending 3/31/2009

$3,830,093
$3,830,093

$2,902,514
$2,902,514

$28,714
–

$19,831
–

598,902
395
25,186,838
209,446
89,887
103,878

534,152
$395
9,567,209
87,790
89,887
97,522

$26,218,059
$30,048,152

$10,396,785
$13,299,298

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS I APPENDIX C

In addition to administrative expenditures, Treasury has released the details of programmatic expenditures. These expenditures include costs to hire financial agents and legal firms associated with TARP operations. Table C.4 indicates the allocation of
these programmatic costs as of March 31, 2009.
As of March 31, 2009, revenue to date has been received
from various programs; the breakdown of such revenue is provided in Table C.5.

TABLE C.5

TABLE C.4

DIVIDEND AND INTEREST PAYMENTS,
BY PROGRAM ($ MILLIONS)

TARP PROGRAMMATIC EXPENDITURES ($ MILLIONS)
Vendor Name

Expenditures as of
3/31/2009

Program

Amount

$5.7

CPP

0.4

SSFI

Ennis Knupp & Associates, Inc.

1.2

TIP

Hughes Hubbard & Reed, LLP

1.9

AGP

26.9

Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell, LLP

0.4

AIFP

250.6

Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation

2.0

TOTAL

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett MNP, LLP

1.4

Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, LLP

2.7

Squire Sanders & Dempsey, LLP

1.8

The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation
Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft, LLP

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. Data as of 3/31/2009.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, LLP (formerly Thacher Proffitt & Wood)

0.1

The Boston Consulting Group

0.9

Venable, LLP

0.7

Freddie Mac

–

Fannie Mae

–

EARNEST Partners

–

Haynes and Boone, LLP

–

McKee Nelson, LLP
TOTAL

Note: Numbers affected by rounding. Data as of 3/31/2009.
Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

–
$19.1

$2,517.9
–
328.9

$3,124.3

193

194

APPENDIX C I REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

Endnotes
1
Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
2
Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.
3
Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
4
Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
5
Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
6
Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
7
Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
8
Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
9
Treasury, “Treasury Announces Auto Supplier Support Program; Program Will Aid Critical Sector of American Economy,” 3/19/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed
3/19/2009.
10 Treasury, “Obama Administration’s New Warranty Commitment Program,” 3/30/2009, www.treas.gov, accessed 3/30/2009.
11 Treasury, Section 105(a) Report, www.financialstabiliy.gov, 12/5/2009, accessed 4/10/2009.
12 Treasury, “Fact Sheet: Financial Stability Plan,” 2/10/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/10/2009.
13 Treasury, Office of Financial Stability, Chief of Compliance and CFO, SIGTARP interview, 3/30/2009.
14 Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
15 Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
16 Treasury, Programs webpage, 3/30/2009, www.financialstability.gov, accessed 4/9/2009.
17 Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.
18 Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 3/31/2009. According to Treasury, information on EARNEST Partners is based on representations by the company received
by OFS and from the company website.
19 Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.
20 Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

PRINCIPAL/INCOME TRANSACTION REPORT I APPENDIX D

PRINCIPAL/INCOME TRANSACTION REPORT
This appendix provides a copy of the TARP Principal/Income Transaction Report, as of March 31, 2009. Treasury provided
this document in its April 8, 2009, response to the SIGTARP data call.

195

196

APPENDIX D I PRINCIPAL/INCOME TRANSACTION REPORT

Troubled Asset Relief Program
Principal / Income Transaction Report
As of : 01-Apr-2009 12:01 PM
Start Date : 27-Oct-2008 End Date : 01-Apr-2009

Payment Date

CUSIP

QFI Name

Program ID

Payment Type

17296C985

CITIGROUP INC

24

DIVIDEND PAYMENT

Amount

AGP
17-Feb-2009

26,893,333.33
26,893,333.33

AIFP
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Mar-2009
17-Mar-2009
17-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009

361859960
361859986
1712J19A6
1712J19A6
1712J19B4
1712J89A1
1712J89B9
3704269M2
3704429B3
3704429E7

GMAC LLC
GMAC LLC
CHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES AMERICAS LLC
CHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES AMERICAS LLC
CHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES AMERICAS LLC
CHRYSLER HOLDINGS LLC
CHRYSLER HOLDINGS LLC
GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION
GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION
GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION

AIF0002
AIF0002
AIF0004
AIF0004
AIF0004
AIF0003
AIF0003
AIF0001
AIF0001
AIF0001

DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
INTEREST PAYMENT
PRINCIPAL PAYMENT
INTEREST PAYMENT
INTEREST PAYMENT
INTEREST PAYMENT
INTEREST PAYMENT
INTEREST PAYMENT
INTEREST PAYMENT

2,875,000.00
51,111,111.11
898,751.74
3,499,054.95
33,218.75
48,888,888.89
3,263,333.33
9,085,803.57
125,083,333.93
9,356,970.50
254,095,466.77

CPP
01-Dec-2008
15-Dec-2008
15-Dec-2008
22-Dec-2008
15-Jan-2009
12-Feb-2009
12-Feb-2009
12-Feb-2009
12-Feb-2009
12-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
13-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009

46625H894
857477897
867914608
06426P982
617446943
096065982
702898966
702898982
882559966
882559982
029851961
029851987
03074A987
063425201
101119972
108030982
126600980
15201P984
152418984
15346Q988
15643B981
268253986
277196200
289660987
290828201
302549969
302549985
309562981
32022D983
320724982
404172983
426927984
453397960
453397986
591650981
60520E989
60907Q985
63080P980
65080T987
671807980
67984M985
69444Q986
72650P965
72650P981
742282981
75777X969
75777X985
811707405
834728982
84223P984
85856G209
887098986
904214988
937303980
958372963
958372989
97186T983
00037W981
011634961

JPMORGAN CHASE AND CO
STATE STREET CORPORATION
SUNTRUST BANKS, INC.
BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON
MORGAN STANLEY
BLUE VALLEY BAN CORP
PATAPSCO BANCORP, INC.
PATAPSCO BANCORP, INC.
TEXAS NATIONAL BANCORPORATION INC.
TEXAS NATIONAL BANCORPORATION INC.
AMERICAN STATE BANCSHARES, INC.
AMERICAN STATE BANCSHARES, INC.
AMERISERV FINANCIAL, INC.
BANK OF MARIN BANCORP
BOSTON PRIVATE FINANCIAL
BRIDGE CAPITAL HOLDINGS
CVB FINANCIAL CORP.
CENTERSTATE BANKS OF FLORIDA INC.
CENTRAL BANCORP, INC
CENTRAL FEDERAL CORPORATION
CENTRUE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
ECB BANCORP, INC.
EASTERN VIRGINIA BANKSHARES, INC.
THE ELMIRA SAVINGS BANK, FSB
EMCLAIRE FINANCIAL CORP.
FPB FINANCIAL CORP.
FPB FINANCIAL CORP.
FARMERS CAPITAL BANK CORPORATION
FIRST FINANCIAL SERVICE CORPORATION
FIRST LITCHFIELD FINANCIAL CORPORATION
HF FINANCIAL CORP.
HERITAGE COMMERCE CORP
INDEPENDENCE BANK
INDEPENDENCE BANK
METROCORP BANCSHARES, INC.
MISSION VALLEY BANCORP
MONARCH FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.
NARA BANCORP, INC.
NEWBRIDGE BANCORP
OAK VALLEY BANCORP
OLD LINE BANCSHARES, INC.
PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL BANCORP
PLAINS CAPITAL CORPORATION
PLAINS CAPITAL CORPORATION
PRINCETON NATIONAL BANCORP, INC.
REDWOOD CAPITAL BANCORP
REDWOOD CAPITAL BANCORP
SEACOAST BANKING CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
SOMERSET HILLS BANCORP
SOUTHERN BANCORP, INC.
STELLARONE CORPORATION
TIMBERLAND BANCORP, INC.
UMPQUA HOLDINGS CORP
WASHINGTON BANKING COMPANY
WESTERN ILLINOIS BANCSHARES, INC.
WESTERN ILLINOIS BANCSHARES, INC.
WILSHIRE BANCORP, INC.
AB&T FINANCIAL CORPORATION
ALARION FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.

29
20
5
15
18
118
289
289
376
376
74
74
207
127
72
115
106
23
133
123
248
349
250
293
173
506
506
85
342
185
10
55
203
203
440
139
233
88
141
205
159
67
41
41
372
389
389
175
269
490
237
365
14
157
6
6
158
379
378

DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

114,583,333.33
13,055,555.56
15,069,444.44
21,666,666.67
106,944,444.00
211,458.33
4,200.00
46,666.67
1,791.00
19,905.00
2,700.00
30,000.00
163,333.33
272,222.22
1,796,666.67
172,351.11
1,263,888.89
325,208.33
97,222.22
70,243.06
163,340.00
72,294.58
120,000.00
70,700.00
54,166.67
891.00
9,900.00
150,000.00
100,000.00
87,500.00
291,666.67
466,666.67
477.00
5,325.00
181,250.00
39,722.22
114,333.33
781,666.67
458,255.00
131,250.00
68,055.56
56,875.00
61,348.00
681,574.44
76,642.50
1,377.50
15,305.56
388,888.89
29,861.94
44,305.56
233,333.33
120,185.00
2,707,009.86
106,252.78
4,459.00
49,508.33
543,882.50
10,694.44
1,793.00

PRINCIPAL/INCOME TRANSACTION REPORT I APPENDIX D

Payment Date

CUSIP

QFI Name

Program ID

Payment Type

17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009

011634987
019205988
025816950
03076K983
045487980
054937958
055367981
05566T986
055936967
055936983
059690982
05969A980
05978R974
060505450
060505963
061590964
061590980
063904981
06424J988
066440967
066440983
06652V984
066849985
067021964
067021980
10855P968
10855P984
11144L982
12466Q989
125581983
127171965
127171981
12738A986
130496961
130496987
131601965
131601981
13169Q961
13169Q987
139741961
139741987
139793988
14040N979
14042V961
14042V987
143785988
146875208
147272983
149150989
149841983
151408978
15146R988
15234K960
15234K986
153770987
154760987
172922981
172967499
17315R963
17315R989
174420984
174532960
174532986
17462Q982
176682979
178566972
19041N985
190897967
192025989
19623P986
197236979
200340206
202750964
202750980
203612981
20365L985
203719968
203719984
204154967
204154983
204157986
20716N961
20716N987
225744978

ALARION FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.
ALLIANCE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY
AMERIS BANCORP
ASSOCIATED BANC-CORP
BB AND T CORP
BCSB BANCORP, INC.
BNC BANCORP
BNCCORP, INC.
BNCCORP, INC.
BANCORP RHODE ISLAND, INC.
THE BANCORP, INC.
BANCTRUST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
BANK OF AMERICA CORPORATION
BANK OF AMERICA
BANK OF COMMERCE
BANK OF COMMERCE
BANK OF THE OZARKS, INC.
BANK OF COMMERCE HOLDINGS
BANKFIRST CAPITAL CORPORATION
BANKFIRST CAPITAL CORPORATION
BANNER CORPORATION/BANNER BANK
BAR HARBOR BANKSHARES
THE BARABOO BANCORPORATION, INC.
THE BARABOO BANCORPORATION, INC.
BRIDGEVIEW BANCORP, INC.
BRIDGEVIEW BANCORP, INC.
BROADWAY FEDERAL BANK
C&F FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CIT GROUP INC.
CACHE VALLEY BANKING COMPANY
CACHE VALLEY BANKING COMPANY
CADENCE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CALIFORNIA OAKS STATE BANK
CALIFORNIA OAKS STATE BANK
CALVERT FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CALVERT FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CALWEST BANCORP
CALWEST BANCORP
CAPITAL BANCORP, INC.
CAPITAL BANCORP, INC.
CAPITAL BANK CORPORATION
CAPITAL ONE FINANCIAL CORP
CAPITAL PACIFIC BANCORP
CAPITAL PACIFIC BANCORP
CAROLINA BANK HOLDINGS, INC.
CARVER BANCORP, INC.
CASCADE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CATHAY GENERAL BANCORP
CECIL BANCORP, INC.
CENTER BANCORP, INC.
CENTER FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CENTRA FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CENTRA FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CENTRAL JERSEY BANCORP
CENTRAL PACIFIC FINANCIAL CORP.
CITIZENS & NORTHERN CORPORATION
CITIGROUP INC
CITIZENS BANCORP
CITIZENS BANCORP
CITIZENS REPUBLIC BANCORP, INC.
CITIZENS COMMUNITY BANK
CITIZENS COMMUNITY BANK
CITIZENS FIRST CORPORATION
CITIZENS SOUTH BANKING CORPORATION
CITY NATIONAL CORPORATION
COASTAL BANKING COMPANY, INC.
COBIZ FINANCIAL INC.
CODORUS VALLEY BANCORP, INC.
COLONY BANKCORP, INC.
COLUMBIA BANKING SYSTEM, INC.
COMERICA INC.
COMMONWEALTH BUSINESS BANK
COMMONWEALTH BUSINESS BANK
COMMUNITY BANKERS TRUST CORPORATION
COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
COMMUNITY INVESTORS BANCORP, INC.
COMMUNITY INVESTORS BANCORP, INC.
COMMUNITY TRUST FINANCIAL CORPORATION
COMMUNITY TRUST FINANCIAL CORPORATION
COMMUNITY WEST BANCSHARES
CONGAREE BANCSHARES, INC.
CONGAREE BANCSHARES, INC.
CRESCENT FINANCIAL CORPORATION

378
311
232
58
76
12
294
128
483
483
255
149
131
38
21
458
458
130
1
461
461
63
256
443
443
253
253
7
324
247
314
314
300
418
418
432
432
219
219
307
307
61
22
64
64
338
413
65
103
192
304
132
257
257
371
241
419
24
325
325
116
164
164
339
195
25
90
166
358
259
66
16
57
57
113
194
284
284
322
322
82
384
384
201

DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

Amount
19,903.89
209,362.22
16,944,450.00
606,666.67
6,125,000.00
39,605,727.78
78,000.00
303,916.67
7,286.25
80,930.14
233,333.33
395,675.00
388,888.89
50,000,000.00
222,916,666.67
1,087.50
12,083.33
656,250.00
214,861.11
4,262.50
47,361.11
1,446,666.67
75,524.86
7,518.25
83,572.36
26,600.00
295,555.56
113,750.00
100,000.00
14,562,500.00
3,094.00
34,428.33
220,000.00
907.50
10,083.33
286.00
3,168.61
1,281.50
14,226.67
3,055.00
33,944.44
361,191.25
44,933,765.14
2,600.00
28,888.89
80,000.00
76,447.22
454,650.00
2,508,333.33
83,488.89
50,000.00
481,250.00
5,437.50
60,416.67
81,611.11
675,000.00
106,494.44
371,527,777.78
6,760.00
75,111.11
2,625,000.00
1,950.00
21,666.67
68,281.11
179,375.00
4,666,666.67
96,736.11
501,277.78
82,500.00
140,000.00
897,143.33
28,437,500.00
2,117.50
23,530.83
137,511.11
98,334.44
1,690.00
18,777.78
10,800.00
120,000.00
121,333.33
1,476.00
16,425.00
124,500.00

197

198

APPENDIX D I PRINCIPAL/INCOME TRANSACTION REPORT

Payment Date

CUSIP

QFI Name

Program ID

Payment Type

17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009

227647963
227647989
253238968
253238984
268948981
27579R401
29255V987
293712972
301227963
301227989
30242L967
30242L983
30245D962
30245D988
302520978
30254M978
30886Z967
30886Z983
315831982
316144963
316144997
316394980
317585982
31866P987
318672979
318910981
319287967
319287983
31929F968
31929F984
319395984
319459988
319835989
31983A970
31985E988
31986N987
32006W981
320209984
32022X989
320239965
320517980
32076T967
32076T983
320867971
33582V983
33589V986
336312962
33647C970
336901988
33735L965
33735L999
337915987
343873204
360271977
38141G997
386627962
386627988
390905982
394361984
40424G983
409321981
420476970
42234Q987
42722X981
436893986
439734989
440407989
446150955
450828975
451126965
451126981
453836983
453838948
454674987
45881M985
459044988
460927981
49326A978
50181P985
502100209
50215P985
52168W967
52168W983
530176940

CROSSTOWN HOLDING COMPANY
CROSSTOWN HOLDING COMPANY
DICKINSON FINANCIAL CORP. II
DICKINSON FINANCIAL CORP. II
EAGLE BANCORP, INC.
EAST WEST BANCORP, INC.
ENCORE BANCSHARES INC.
ENTERPRISE FINACIAL SERVICES CORP./ ENTERPRISE BANK
EXCHANGE BANK
EXCHANGE BANK
FFW Corporation
FFW Corporation
FCB BANCORP, INC.
FCB BANCORP, INC.
F.N.B. CORPORATION
FPB BANCORP, INC.
FARMERS BANK, WINDSOR, VIRGINIA
FARMERS BANK, WINDSOR, VIRGINIA
FIDELITY BANCORP, INC.
FIDELITY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
FIDELITY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
FIDELITY SOUTHERN CORPORATION
FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, INC.
THE FIRST BANCORP, INC.
FIRST BANCORP
FIRST BANCORP
FIRST BANKS, INC.
FIRST BANKS, INC.
FIRST BANKERS TRUSTSHARES, INC.
FIRST BANKERS TRUSTSHARES, INC.
FIRST CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
FIRST CITIZENS BANC CORP
FIRST COMMUNITY CORPORATION
FIRST COMMUNITY BANCSHARES INC.
FIRST COMMUNITY BANK CORPORATION OF AMERICA
1ST CONSTITUTION BANCORP
FIRST DEFIANCE FINANCIAL CORP.
FIRST FINANCIAL BANCORP
1ST FINANCIAL SERVICES CORPORATION
FIRST FINANCIAL HOLDINGS INC.
FIRST HORIZON NATIONAL CORPORATION
FIRST MANITOWOC BANCORP, INC.
FIRST MANITOWOC BANCORP, INC.
FIRST MIDWEST BANCORP, INC.
FIRST NIAGRA FINANCIAL GROUP
FIRST PACTRUST BANCORP, INC.
FIRST SECURITY GROUP, INC.
FIRST SOUND BANK
1ST SOURCE CORPORATION
FIRST ULB CORP.
FIRST ULB CORP.
FIRSTMERIT CORPORATION
FLUSHING FINANCIAL CORPORATION
FULTON FINANCIAL CORPORATION
GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC
GRANDSOUTH CORPORATION
GRANDSOUTH CORPORATION
GREAT SOUTHERN BANCORP
GREEN BANKSHARES, INC.
HMN FINANCIAL, INC.
HAMPTON ROADS BANKSHARES, INC.
HAWTHORNE BANCSHARES, INC.
HEARTLAND FINANCIAL USA, INC.
HERITAGE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
HOME BANCSHARES, INC.
HOPFED BANCORP
HORIZON BANCORP
HUNTINGTON BANCSHARES
IBERIABANK CORPORATION
IDAHO BANCORP
IDAHO BANCORP
INDEPENDENT BANK CORP.
INDEPENDENT BANK CORPORATION
INDIANA COMMUNITY BANCORP
INTERMOUNTAIN COMMUNITY BANCORP
INTERNATIONAL BANCSHARES CORPORATION
INTERVEST BANCSHARES CORPORATION
KEYCORP KEYBANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
LCNB CORP.
LNB BANCORP, INC.
LSB CORPORATION
LEADER BANCORP, INC.
LEADER BANCORP, INC.
LIBERTY BANCSHARES, INC.

456
456
441
441
84
93
79
135
177
177
8
8
363
363
306
179
406
406
261
275
275
178
234
186
368
368
446
446
309
309
204
427
78
26
296
369
108
46
2
110
27
486
486
54
9
70
374
137
292
276
276
51
226
263
17
327
327
102
180
295
236
264
326
69
86
109
176
28
81
396
396
268
182
119
62
136
316
30
302
91
267
215
215
454

DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND

PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT

Amount
2,931.50
32,541.67
52,946.75
588,269.03
371,729.17
2,980,308.33
330,555.56
272,222.22
30,100.00
334,444.44
5,096.00
56,692.22
6,510.00
72,286.67
500,000.00
56,388.89
2,409.00
26,742.22
61,250.00
25,396.00
282,193.33
374,888.89
270,941.67
125,000.00
1,611,111.11
325,000.00
166,162.50
1,846,250.00
3,625.00
40,277.78
194,444.44
70,840.00
132,416.67
484,166.67
77,169.44
86,666.67
359,722.22
577,777.78
206,885.97
631,944.44
10,952,102.78
4,350.00
48,333.33
1,876,388.89
2,146,795.00
225,166.67
165,000.00
53,444.44
339,166.67
1,347.50
14,972.22
625,000.00
544,444.44
2,719,166.67
148,611,111.00
4,050.00
45,000.00
563,888.89
522,007.78
187,777.78
502,168.75
235,316.67
635,428.89
280,000.00
201,388.89
161,000.00
194,444.44
17,670,064.03
875,000.00
2,501.25
27,791.67
390,790.00
630,000.00
188,125.00
210,000.00
1,560,000.00
180,555.56
31,597,222.22
67,000.00
220,701.25
131,250.00
3,796.00
42,105.56
15,812.50

PRINCIPAL/INCOME TRANSACTION REPORT I APPENDIX D

Payment Date

CUSIP

QFI Name

Program ID

Payment Type

17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009

530176965
53700P965
53700P981
55261F989
55264U975
55920M961
55920M987
56062Y987
562754986
571599968
571599984
571837988
59540G982
597746965
597746981
598039980
598251973
605038983
608875969
608875985
617774963
617774989
619462963
619462989
62845B971
628794968
628794984
637138975
644722985
64975C969
64975C985
65406E961
65406E987
658418983
663904985
665859880
675234983
680033966
680277985
68275Z990
693475964
69404P986
69406T960
69406T986
694076969
694076985
694100967
694100983
700658982
701492985
70335A965
70335A999
704699974
710577982
720304963
720304989
72346Q971
733174973
736233982
743859308
74531Y967
74531Y983
745548982
74824R968
74824R984
757903968
757903984
7591EP969
767644966
767644982
783859960
78401V979
78486Q986
800363988
802235986
812502961
812502987
813903986
814124962
814124988
81412M962
81412M988
81811M985
825107980

LIBERTY BANCSHARES, INC.
THE LITTLE BANK, INCORPORATED
THE LITTLE BANK, INCORPORATED
M&T BANK CORPORATION
MB FINANCIAL INC.
MAGNA BANK
MAGNA BANK
MAINSOURCE FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
MANHATTAN BANCORP
MARQUETTE NATIONAL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
MARQUETTE NATIONAL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
MARSHALL AND ILSLEY CORPORATION
MID PENN BANCORP, INC./MID PENN BANK
MIDLAND STATES BANCORP, INC.
MIDLAND STATES BANCORP, INC.
MIDSOUTH BANCORP, INC.
MIDWEST BANC HOLDINGS, INC.
MISSION COMMUNITY BANCORP
MONADNOCK BANCORP, INC.
MONADNOCK BANCORP, INC.
MORRILL BANCSHARES, INC
MORRILL BANCSHARES, INC
MOSCOW BANCSHARES, INC.
MOSCOW BANCSHARES, INC.
MUTUALFIRST FINANCIAL, INC.
NCAL BANCORP
NCAL BANCORP
NATIONAL PENN BANCHSHARES, INC.
NEW HAMPSHIRE THRIFT BANCSHARES, INC.
NEW YORK PRIVATE BANK & TRUST CORPORATION
NEW YORK PRIVATE BANK & TRUST CORPORATION
NICOLET BANKSHARES, INC.
NICOLET BANKSHARES, INC.
NORTH CENTRAL BANCSHARES, INC.
NORTHEAST BANCORP
NORTHERN TRUST CORPORATION
OCEANFIRST FINANCIAL CORP.
OLD NATIONAL BANCORP
OLD SECOND BANCORP, INC.
ONE UNITED BANK
THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.
PACIFIC CAPITAL BANCORP
PACIFIC CITY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
PACIFIC CITY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
PACIFIC COAST BANKERS' BANCSHARES
PACIFIC COAST BANKERS' BANCSHARES
PACIFIC COAST NATIONAL BANCORP
PACIFIC COAST NATIONAL BANCORP
PARK NATIONAL CORPORATION
PARKVALE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
PATRIOT BANCSHARES, INC.
PATRIOT BANCSHARES, INC.
PEAPACK-GLADSTONE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
PEOPLES BANCORP OF NORTH CAROLINA, INC.
PIERCE COUNTY BANCORP
PIERCE COUNTY BANCORP
PINNACLE FINANCIAL PARTNERS, INC.
POPULAR, INC.
PORTER BANCORP INC
PROVIDENT BANKSHARES CORP
PUGET SOUND BANK
PUGET SOUND BANK
PULASKI FINANCIAL CORP.
THE QUEENSBOROUGH COMPANY
THE QUEENSBOROUGH COMPANY
REDWOOD FINANCIAL, INC.
REDWOOD FINANCIAL, INC.
REGIONS BANK
RISING SUN BANCORP
RISING SUN BANCORP
S&T BANCORP, INC.
SCBT FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SVB FINANCIAL GROUP
SANDY SPRING BANCORP, INC.
SANTA LUCIA BANCORP
SEASIDE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST
SEASIDE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST
SECURITIY FEDERAL CORPORATION
SECURITY BUSINESS BANCORP
SECURITY BUSINESS BANCORP
SECURITY CALIFORNIA BANCORP
SECURITY CALIFORNIA BANCORP
SEVERN BANCORP, INC.
SHORE BANCSHARES, INC.

454
150
150
160
49
278
278
423
80
167
167
39
138
398
398
370
45
170
227
227
532
532
401
401
290
301
301
189
228
524
524
216
216
336
191
4
565
31
489
97
32
53
142
142
428
428
315
315
174
346
98
98
125
329
430
430
184
117
60
13
424
424
507
47
47
199
199
19
313
313
347
305
87
89
168
212
212
208
143
143
107
107
71
394

DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND

PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT
PAYMENT

Amount
175,694.44
4,875.00
54,166.67
4,333,333.33
1,905,555.56
8,970.00
99,630.56
229,583.33
16,527.78
24,850.00
276,111.11
21,675,694.44
77,777.78
2,799.50
31,133.06
100,000.00
824,288.89
25,850.00
1,288.00
14,264.44
4,712.50
52,361.11
1,710.50
18,993.33
233,870.00
7,000.00
77,777.78
1,312,500.00
40,277.78
120,276.00
1,336,370.00
9,724.00
108,073.33
51,000.00
36,986.25
19,918,888.91
154,114.86
875,000.00
294,027.78
93,823.33
47,370,000.00
2,107,396.67
11,340.00
126,000.00
7,540.00
83,777.78
1,493.50
16,594.44
722,222.22
229,392.22
18,228.00
202,517.78
143,425.00
180,945.56
1,870.00
20,777.78
831,250.00
9,090,277.78
408,333.33
1,914,791.67
1,631.25
18,125.00
131,055.83
5,400.00
60,000.00
1,350.00
14,975.00
44,236,111.11
2,691.00
29,915.00
437,722.78
260,915.42
2,056,250.00
807,858.33
31,111.11
1,562.00
17,346.39
140,000.00
2,610.00
29,015.00
3,069.00
34,075.00
272,918.33
125,000.00

199

200

APPENDIX D I PRINCIPAL/INCOME TRANSACTION REPORT

Payment Date

CUSIP

QFI Name

Program ID

Payment Type

17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009
18-Feb-2009
02-Mar-2009
16-Mar-2009
16-Mar-2009
16-Mar-2009
18-Mar-2009
20-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009

82669G989
836068965
836068981
837841956
842632986
843120965
843120981
843380981
844767970
846851988
855716205
856577960
856577986
858907967
859158966
859319956
861756963
861756989
866264989
86663B987
86806M304
86888W964
86888W980
869099986
87161C972
87182V967
87182V983
872242961
872242987
872275987
87230P962
87230P988
872449988
88043P983
88059U967
88059U983
88224Q974
886374982
89214T309
89464P965
89464P981
89546L966
89546L982
898402987
90262T506
902973981
905399986
90944L988
90944R985
90984P980
910305960
910305986
913290987
918183963
918183989
918255985
919513945
919513960
919629980
919794966
92778Q976
929328987
930705975
938824208
947890976
949746978
950810986
95123P981
957638976
95801P964
95801P980
966612202
971807201
97650W975
984314989
989701966
084680982
46625H894
857477897
867914608
867914707
605038983
06426P982
063425201

SIGNATURE BANK
SOUND BANKING COMPANY
SOUND BANKING COMPANY
THE SOUTH FINANCIAL GROU INC.
SOUTHERN COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS BANCORP, INC.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS BANCORP, INC.
SOUTHERN MISSOURI BANCORP, INC.
SOUTHWEST BANCORP INC.
TAYLOR CAPITAL GROUP
STATE BANCORP, INC.
STATE BANKSHARES, INC.
STATE BANKSHARES, INC.
STERLING BANCSHARES, INC.
STERLING BANCORP
STERLING FINANCIAL CORPORATION
STONEBRIDGE FINANCIAL CORP.
STONEBRIDGE FINANCIAL CORP.
SUMMIT STATE BANK
SUN BANCORP, INC.
SUPERIOR BANCORP
SURREY BANCORP
SURREY BANCORP
SUSQUEHANNA BANCSHARES, INC.
SYNOVUS FINANCIAL CORP.
SYRINGA BANCORP
SYRINGA BANCORP
TCB HOLDING COMPANY
TCB HOLDING COMPANY
TCF FINANCIAL CORPORATION
TCNB FINANCIAL CORP
TCNB FINANCIAL CORP
TIB FINANCIAL CORP
TENNESSEE COMMERCE BANCORP, INC.
TENNESSEE VALLEY FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.
TENNESSEE VALLEY FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.
TEXAS CAPITAL BANCSHARES, INC.
TIDELANDS BANCSHARES, INC.
TOWNEBANK
TREATY OAK BANCORP, INC
TREATY OAK BANCORP, INC
TRI-COUNTY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
TRI-COUNTY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
TRUSTMARK CORPORATION
UCBH HOLDINGS INC.
US BANCORP
UNION BANKSHARES CORPORATION
UNITED BANCORP, INC.
UNITED BANCORPORATION OF ALABAMA, INC.
UNITED COMMUNITY BANKS, INC.
UNITED FINANCIAL BANKING COMPANIES, INC.
UNITED FINANCIAL BANKING COMPANIES, INC.
UNITY BANCORP, INC.
UWHARRIE CAPITAL CORP
UWHARRIE CAPITAL CORP
VIST FINANCIAL CORP.
VALLEY COMMUNITY BANK
VALLEY COMMUNITY BANK
VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
VALLEY NATIONAL BANCORP
VIRGINIA COMMERCE BANCORP
WSFS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
WAINWRIGHT BANK & TRUST COMPANY
WASHINGTON FEDERAL S AND L ASSOCIATION
WEBSTER FINANCIAL CORPORATION
WELLS FARGO AND COMPANY
WESBANCO, INC.
WEST BANCORPORATION, INC.
WESTERN ALLIANCE BANCORPORATION
WESTERN COMMUNITY BANCSHARES, INC.
WESTERN COMMUNITY BANCSHARES, INC.
WHITNEY HOLDING CORPORATION
WILMINGTON TRUST CORPORATION
WINTRUST FINANCIAL CORPORATION
YADKIN VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION
ZIONS BANCORPORATION
BERKSHIRE HILLS BANCORP, INC.
JPMORGAN CHASE AND CO
STATE STREET CORPORATION
SUNTRUST BANKS, INC.
SUNTRUST BANKS, INC.
MISSION COMMUNITY BANCORP
BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON
BANK OF MARIN BANCORP

104
144
144
99
105
491
491
145
114
83
146
477
477
147
299
183
559
559
148
188
112
202
202
95
100
395
395
218
218
52
213
213
152
101
350
350
373
246
153
555
555
75
75
77
3
48
238
448
272
59
426
426
154
129
129
155
254
254
169
34
221
514
156
11
50
36
68
270
44
280
280
161
94
222
391
37
200
29
20
5
5
170
15
127

DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
RETURN OF DIVIDEND OVERPAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
FULL REDEMPTION

Amount
1,050,000.00
1,386.00
15,350.00
3,373,611.11
415,625.00
1,375.00
15,277.78
92,847.22
680,555.56
1,222,935.00
358,186.11
18,125.00
201,388.89
1,095,482.50
303,333.33
2,945,833.33
3,019.50
33,528.61
66,111.11
446,550.00
670,833.33
900.00
10,000.00
2,625,000.00
7,527,877.78
2,900.00
32,222.22
4,255.75
47,245.83
4,564,812.78
1,300.00
14,444.44
359,722.22
233,333.33
1,950.00
21,666.67
302,083.33
112,373.33
669,007.50
1,181.75
13,162.78
10,878.00
120,866.67
2,508,333.33
3,775,707.07
83,404,027.78
458,888.89
82,972.22
74,388.89
1,750,000.00
2,051.75
22,789.17
200,754.17
6,500.00
72,222.22
194,444.44
2,475.00
27,500.00
140,166.25
3,791,666.67
621,250.00
160,798.61
171,111.11
2,527,777.78
4,666,666.67
371,527,777.78
729,166.67
225,000.00
1,633,333.33
4,745.00
52,650.00
2,333,333.33
2,887,500.00
1,944,444.44
145,000.00
17,694,444.44
311,111.11
312,500,000.00
25,000,000.00
43,750,000.00
14,062,500.00
-270.00
37,500,000.00
28,000,000.00

PRINCIPAL/INCOME TRANSACTION REPORT I APPENDIX D

Payment Date

CUSIP

QFI Name

Program ID

Payment Type

31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009
31-Mar-2009

063425201
15234K986
15234K986
316773407
450828975
450828975
680033966
680033966
82669G989
82669G989

BANK OF MARIN BANCORP
CENTRA FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CENTRA FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.
FIFTH THIRD BANCORP
IBERIABANK CORPORATION
IBERIABANK CORPORATION
OLD NATIONAL BANCORP
OLD NATIONAL BANCORP
SIGNATURE BANK
SIGNATURE BANK

127
257
257
40
81
81
31
31
104
104

DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
FULL REDEMPTION
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
FULL REDEMPTION
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT
FULL REDEMPTION
FULL REDEMPTION
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

Amount
178,888.89
95,833.33
15,000,000.00
42,600,000.00
90,000,000.00
575,000.00
638,888.89
100,000,000.00
120,000,000.00
766,666.67
2,870,873,839.24

TIP
17-Feb-2009
17-Feb-2009

060505435
172967929

BANK OF AMERICA CORPORATION
CITIGROUP INC

38
24

DIVIDEND PAYMENT
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

128,888,888.89
200,000,000.00
328,888,888.89
3,480,751,528.23

Source: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

201

202

APPENDIX E I CROSS REFERENCE OF REPORT TO THE INSPECTOR GENERAL ACT OF 1978

CROSS-REFERENCE OF REPORT TO THE INSPECTOR GENERAL
ACT OF 1978
This appendix cross-references this report to the reporting requirements under the Inspector General Act of 1978
(P.L. 95-452), as amended, 5 U.S.C. APP.

Section

Statute (Inspector General Act of 1978)

SIGTARP Action

Report Reference

Section
5(a)(1)

“Description of significant problems, abuses, and
deficiencies... ”

List problems, abuses, and deficiencies
from SIGTARP audits and investigations.

Section 1: “The Office of the SIGTARP”
Section 4: “Looking Forward”

Section
5(a)(2)

“Description of recommendations for corrective action…with respect to significant problems, abuses,
or deficiencies... ”

List recommendations from SIGTARP
audits and investigations.

Section 1: “The Office of the SIGTARP”
Section 4: “Looking Forward”

Section
5(a)(3)

“Identification of each significant recommendation
described in previous semiannual reports on which
corrective action has not been completed...”

List all instances of incomplete corrective action from previous semiannual
reports.

Section 4: “Looking Forward”

Section
5(a)(4)

“A summary of matters referred to prosecutive
authorities and the prosecutions and convictions
which have resulted... ”

List status of SIGTARP investigations
referred to prosecutive authorities.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

Section
5(a)(5)

“A summary of each report made to the [Treasury
Secretary] under section 6(b)(2)... ” (instances
where information requested was refused or not
provided)

List TARP oversight reports by Treasury,
FSOB, SEC, GAO, COP, OMB, CBO,
Federal Reserve, FDIC, and SIGTARP.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

Section
5(a)(6)

“A listing, subdivided according to subject matter,
of each audit report issued...” showing dollar value
of questioned costs and recommendations that
funds be put to better use.

List SIGTARP audits.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

Section
5(a)(7)

“A summary of each particularly significant
report... ”

Provide a synopsis of significant
SIGTARP audits.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

Section
5(a)(8)

“Statistical tables showing the total number of audit
reports and the total dollar value of questioned
costs... ”

Provide statistical tables showing dollar
value of questioned cost from SIGTARP
audits.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

Section
5(a)(9)

“Statistical tables showing the total number of audit
reports and the dollar value of recommendations
that funds be put to better use by management...”

Provide statistical tables showing dollar
value of funds put to better use by
management from SIGTARP audits.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

Section
5(a)(10)

“A summary of each audit report issued before
the commencement of the reporting period for
which no management decision has been made by
the end of reporting period, an explanation of the
reasons such management decision has not been
made, and a statement concerning the desired
timetable for achieving a management decision...”

Provide a synopsis of significant
SIGTARP audit reports in which recommendations by SIGTARP are still open.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

Section
5(a)(11)

“A description and explanation of the reasons for
any significant revised management decision...”

Explain audit reports in which significant
revisions have been made to management decisions.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

Section
5(a)(12)

“Information concerning any significant management decision with which the Inspector General is in
disagreement...”

Provide information where management
disagreed with a SIGTARP audit finding.

At press time, SIGTARP had not issued reportable investigations or audits. This field will be
populated in later reports as appropriate.

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENTS OF AUDITS I APPENDIX F

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENTS OF
AUDITS
This appendix provides announcements of public audits by
the following agencies:
A. U.S. Department of Treasury Inspector General
(“Treasury OIG”)
B. Federal Reserve Board Office of Inspector General
(“Federal Reserve OIG”)
C. Government Accountability Office (“GAO”)
D. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Office of the
Inspector General (“FDIC OIG”)

A – Treasury OIG1
As reported in the Initial Report, Treasury OIG is currently
performing one case study audit of Treasury’s selection of
City National Bank, Beverly Hills, California, to receive $400
million under the Capital Purchase Program. Treasury OIG
issued the engagement letter on this audit on December 4,
2008, and held entrance conferences with Treasury officials
on December 11, 2008, and Office of the Comptroller of the
Currency officials on January 6, 2009. The work on this audit
is ongoing.
Treasury OIG initiated an inquiry into the role, if any,
and actions by the Treasury Department in the decision by
American International Group (“AIG”) to pay bonuses of
more than $160 million to AIG employees. Treasury OIG
plans to inquire into the activities of Treasury’s Office of
General Counsel (“OGC”) and other Treasury officials in
reviewing the bonus contracts entered into by AIG and its
employees, with a view to determining the particulars of the
obligations incurred and the conclusions reached by OGC.
The work on this inquiry is ongoing.

B – Federal Reserve OIG2
The Federal Reserve OIG is conducting an audit of the Board
of Governors of the Federal Reserve System’s (“Board”)
processing of Capital Purchase Program applications from
Board-supervised financial institutions (fieldwork is ongoing).

C – GAO3
Leveraging and Deleveraging Financial Institutions
The purpose of this mandate is to determine the extent to
which leverage and sudden deleveraging of financial institutions was a factor behind the current financial crisis. This
study will:
1. examine to what extent large financial institutions have deleveraged since the financial crisis started, and how such
actions, if at all, have contributed to the crisis
2. analyze how Federal regulators were overseeing the use of
leverage by such institutions and what actions, if any, they
have taken to limit the use of leverage
3. review the recommendations that have been made by
regulators, market participants, and others to address
concerns about leverage and deleverage
4. review the regulations under which the Federal
Reserve regulates the extension of credit by banks and
broker-dealers
Implications of Actions Taken in Response to
Economic Slowdown/Financial Distress for Debt and
Debt Management
GAO is seeking to answer the following questions:
1. What are Treasury’s borrowing plans to finance asset
and capital purchases through the Troubled Asset Relief
Program (“TARP”) and obtain the funds needed to increase Federal spending during a recession?
2. What are the scale and timing of borrowing decisions?
3. What cost-cutting borrowing options exist to fund TARP’s
capital purchases?
4. What Treasury securities would be most attractive to
domestic and foreign buyers in the short run and medium
run?
5. What debt management policies would reduce the possibility of stress in financial markets in the medium and
long term?

203

204

APPENDIX F I PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENTS OF AUDITS

Federal Assistance Under Automotive Industry
Financing Program
In December 2008, Treasury announced that it would provide about $18 billion to Chrysler and General Motors, and
required that they submit restructuring plans by February 17,
2009. By the end of March 2009, the companies must report
on their progress in implementing the plans.
GAO is seeking to answer the following questions:
1. What is the nature and purpose of the Federal assistance
provided to the automakers under the Troubled Asset
Relief Program?
2. What mechanisms did Treasury establish to protect the
taxpayers’ interests in providing Federal assistance to the
automakers?
3. What steps have the automakers taken, or do they plan to
take, to restructure their companies?
Troubled Asset Relief Program’s (“TARP’s”) Fiscal
Year 2009 Financial Statement Audit
The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L.
110-343) established the Office of Financial Stability within
the Department of Treasury and authorized the Troubled
Asset Relief Program (“TARP”). The act requires TARP to

annually prepare and issue audited financial statements
prepared in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles, and GAO to annually audit such statements. GAO’s objectives are to determine:
1. if TARP’s financial statements are fairly presented in
all material respects as of and for the period ended
September 30, 2009
2. if TARP’s internal controls related to the financial statements are effective as of September 30, 2009
3. if there is any reportable noncompliance with selected provisions of laws and regulations

CPP
GAO is seeking to:
1. evaluate Treasury’s application review and approval
process
2. evaluate how regulators and Treasury are applying criteria
for institutions returning funds
Mortgage Mitigation
GAO is seeking to:
1. evaluate Treasury’s internal control framework for the
Home Affordable Modification Program (“HAMP”)
2. assess Treasury’s analytical and empirical basis for HAMP

D – FDIC OIG4
No ongoing audits have been announced.

Endnotes
1

Treasury OIG, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/1/2009.

2

Federal Reserve OIG, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/9/2009.

3

GAO, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

4

FDIC OIG, response to SIGTARP data call, 3/30/2009.

KEY OVERSIGHT REPORTS AND TESTIMONIES I APPENDIX G

KEY OVERSIGHT REPORTS AND TESTIMONIES
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (“TREASURY”)
Roles and Mission
The mission of Treasury is to serve the American people and strengthen national security by managing the U.S. Government’s finances effectively;
promoting economic growth and stability; and ensuring the safety, soundness, and security of the U.S. and international financial systems. Treasury advises
the President on economic and financial issues, encourages sustainable economic growth, and fosters improved governance in financial institutions.
Oversight Reports
Treasury, Section 105(a) Report, 12/5/2008, www.financialstability.gov/latest/reportsanddocs.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, Section 102 Report, 12/31/2008, www.financialstability.gov/latest/reportsanddocs.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, Section 105(a) Report, 1/6/2009, www.financialstability.gov/latest/reportsanddocs.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, Section 105(a) Report, 2/3/2009, www.financialstability.gov/latest/reportsanddocs.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, Transactions Report, www.financialstability.gov/latest/reportsanddocs.html, 2/6/2009, accessed 4/2/2009 (released weekly).
Treasury, Section 105(a) Report, 3/6/2009, www.financialstability.gov/latest/reportsanddocs.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, Tranche Report, www.financialstability.gov/latest/reportsanddocs.html, 3/30/2009, accessed 4/2/2009 (for every $50 billion committed).
Recorded Testimony
Treasury, “HP-1234 Neel Kashkari Testimony before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs,” 10/23/2008, www.
financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1273 Testimony of Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari before the House Committee on Oversight and
Government Reform, Subcommittee for Domestic Policy,” 11/14/2008, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed
4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1279 Testimony by Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. before the House Committee on Financial Services,” 11/18/2008,
www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “Joint Statement by Treasury, Federal Reserve and the FDIC on Citigroup,” Press Release, 11/23/2008, www.financialstability.gov/latest/
speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1301 Secretary Paulson Remarks on the US Economy and Financial System,” 12/1/2008, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speechestestimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1312 Neel Kashkari Testimony before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government,”
12/4/2008, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1314 Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari Remarks on Financial Markets and TARP Update,” 12/5/2008,
www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1321 Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari Update on the TARP Program,” 12/8/2008, www.financialstability.
gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP 1322 Neel Kashkari Testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives Financial Services Committee,” 12/10/2008, www.
financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1332 Secretary Paulson Statement on Stabilizing the Automotive Industry,” 12/19/2008, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speechestestimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1347 Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari Remarks at Brookings Institution,” 1/8/2009, www.
financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1349 Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari Review of the Financial Market Crisis and the Troubled Asset Relief
Program,” 1/13/2009, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “HP-1349 Neel Kashkari Review of the Financial Market Crisis & TARP,” 1/13/2009, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.
html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “Secretary Tim Geithner Opening Statement—Delivery Senate Banking Committee Hearing,” Press Release, 2/10/2009, www.
financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “Secretary Tim Geithner Opening Statement—Senate Budget Committee Hearing Policies to Address the Crises in Financial and Housing
Markets,” Press Release, 2/11/2009, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “U.S. Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner Written Testimony House Ways and Means Committee Hearing—As Prepared for Delivery,” Press
Release, 3/3/2009, hwww.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner House Budget Committee Hearing Opening Statement—As Prepared for Delivery,” Press Release,
3/5/2009, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.

205

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APPENDIX G I KEY OVERSIGHT REPORTS AND TESTIMONIES

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (“TREASURY”)
Treasury, “Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari Testimony before the House Committee on Oversight and Government
Reform, Subcommittee on Domestic Policy—As Prepared for Delivery,” Press Release, 3/11/2009, www.financialstability.gov/latest/speechestestimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner Senate Budget Committee Hearing Opening Statement,” Press Release, 3/12/2009, www.financialstability.
gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner Written Testimony House Financial Services Committee Hearing,” Press Release, 3/24/2009,
www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner Remarks before the Council on Foreign Relations As Prepared for Delivery,” Press Release, 3/25/2009,
www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.
Treasury, “Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner Written Testimony House Financial Services Committee Hearing,” Press Release, 3/26/2009,
www.financialstability.gov/latest/speeches-testimony.html, accessed 4/2/2009.

FINANCIAL STABILITY OVERSIGHT BOARD (“FSOB”)
Roles and Mission
FSOB is responsible for reviewing the exercise of authority under programs developed in accordance with EESA, including:
• policies implemented by the Secretary and the Office of Financial Stability, including the appointment of financial agents, the designation of asset
classes to be purchased, and plans for the structure of vehicles used to purchase troubled assets
• the effect of such actions in assisting American families in preserving home ownership, stabilizing financial markets, and protecting taxpayers
In addition, FSOB is responsible for making recommendations to the Secretary on the use of the authority under EESA, as well as for reporting any
suspected fraud, misrepresentation, or malfeasance to SIGTARP or the U.S. Attorney General.
Oversight Reports
FSOB, Amended and Restated Bylaws, http://www.treasury.gov/initiatives/eesa/ docs/Amended_Bylaws.pdf.
FSOB, Statement and Procedures Regarding Public Access to Records of the Financial Stability Board, http://www.treasury.gov/ initiatives/eesa/
docs/records-procedures. pdf.
FSOB, Minutes of the Financial Stability Oversight Board Meeting, October 7, 2008, http:// www.treasury.gov/initiatives/eesa/docs/ FINSOB-MinutesOctober-7-2008.pdf.
FSOB, Minutes of the Financial Stability Oversight Board Meeting, October 13, 2008, http:// www.treasury.gov/initiatives/eesa/docs/
-Minutes-October-13-2008.pdf.”
FSOB, Minutes of the Financial Stability Oversight Board Meeting, October 22, 2008, http:// www.treasury.gov/initiatives/eesa/docs/ FINSOB-MinutesOctober-22-2008.pdf.
FSOB, Minutes of the Financial Stability Oversight Board Meeting, November 9, 2008, http:// www.treasury.gov/initiatives/eesa/docs/ FINSOBMinutes-November-9-2008.pdf.
FSOB, Minutes of the Financial Stability Oversight Board Meeting, December 10, 2008, http://www.treasury.gov/initiatives/ eesa/docs/FINSOB-%20
Minutes- December-10-2008.pdf.
FSOB, Minutes of Financial Stability Oversight Board Meeting, December 19, 2008, http://www.treas.gov/initiatives/eesa/docs/FINSOBMinutesDecember-19-2008.pdf.
FOSB, First Quarterly Report to Congress pursuant to section 104(g) of the EESA, for quarter ending December 31, 2008, http://www.treas.gov/
initiatives/eesa/docs/ FINSOB-Qrtly-Rpt-123108.pdf.
FSOB, Minutes of Financial Stability Oversight Board Meeting, January 8, 2009, http://www. treas.gov/initiatives/eesa/docs/FINSOBMinutesJanuary-8-2009.pdf.
FSOB, Minutes of Financial Stability Oversight Board Meeting, January 15, 2009, http://www. treas.gov/initiatives/eesa/docs/FINSOBMinutes011509.pdf.
Recorded Testimony
None

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (“SEC”)
Roles and Mission
SEC administers the federal securities laws, requires disclosure by public companies, and brings enforcement actions against violators of securities law.
While other federal and state agencies are legally responsible for regulating mortgage lending and the credit markets, SEC has taken these decisive actions
to address the extraordinary caused by the current credit crisis:
• aggressively combating fraud and market manipulation through enforcement actions
• taking swift action to stabilize financial markets
• enhancing transparency in financial disclosure

KEY OVERSIGHT REPORTS AND TESTIMONIES I APPENDIX G

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (“SEC”)
Oversight Reports
SEC, “Report and Recommendations Pursuant to Section 133 of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008: Study on Mark-toMarket Accounting,” Office of the Chief Accountant, Division of Corporation Finance, 12/30/2008, http://www.sec.gov/ news/studies/2008/
marktomarket123008. pdf, accessed 1/22/2009.
Recorded Testimony
SEC, “Testimony Concerning Turmoil in U.S. Credit Markets: Recent Actions Regarding Government Sponsored Entities, Investment Banks and Other
Financial Institutions,” Chairman Christopher Cox, SEC, before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, U.S. Senate, 9/23/2008,
http://www.sec.gov/news/testimony/2008/ts092308cc. htm, accessed 1/22/2009.
SEC, “Testimony Concerning the Role of Federal Regulators: Lessons from the Credit Crisis for the Future of Regulation,” Chairman Christopher
Cox, SEC, before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives, 10/23/2008, http://www.sec.gov/news/
testimony/2008/ts102308cc.htm, accessed 1/22/2009.
SEC, “Testimony Concerning Securities Law Enforcement in the Current Financial Crisis,” Commissioner Elisse B. Walter, SEC, before the United
States House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services, 3/20/2009, http://www.sec.gov/news/testimony/2009/ts032009ebw.htm,
accessed 3/23/2009.

GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE (“GAO”)
Roles and Mission
GAO is tasked with performing ongoing oversight of TARP’s performance, including:
• evaluating the characteristics of asset purchases and the disposition of assets acquired
• assessing TARP’s efficiency in using the funds
• evaluating compliance with applicable laws and regulations
• assessing the efficiency of contracting procedures
• auditing TARP’s annual financial statements and internal controls
• submitting reports to Congress at least every 60 days
Oversight Reports
GAO, “TARP: Additional Actions Needed to Better Ensure Integrity, Accountability, and Transparency” (GAO-09-161), 12/2/2008,
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09161.pdf, accessed 4/8/2009.
GAO, “TARP: Status of Efforts to Address Defaults and Foreclosures in Mortgages” (GAO-09-231), 12/4/2008, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/
d09231t.pdf, accessed 4/8/2009.
GAO, “Troubled Asset Relief Program: Status of Efforts to Address Defaults and Foreclosures on Home Mortgages” (GAO-09-231T), 12/4/2008,
http://www.gao. gov/new.items/d09231t.pdf, accessed on 1/22/2009.
GAO, “Auto Industry: A Framework for Considering Federal Financial Assistance” (GAO-09-247T ), 12/5/2008,
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09247t.pdf, accessed 1/22/2009.
GAO, “Troubled Asset Relief Program: Additional Actions Needed to Better Ensure Integrity, Accountability, and Transparency” (GAO-09-266T),
12/10/2008, http://www. gao.gov/new.items/d09266t.pdf, accessed 1/22/2009.
GAO, “High-Risk Series: An Update” (GAO-09-271), 1/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09271.pdf, accessed 4/8/2009.
GAO, “Troubled Asset Relief Program: Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues” (GAO-09-296), 1/2009, http://www.gao.
gov/new.items/d09296.pdf, accessed 4/8/2009.
GAO, “Financial Regulation: A Framework for Craft and Assessing Proposals to Modernize the Outdated U.S. Financial Regulatory System” (GAO-09216), 1/8/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09216. pdf, accessed 1/22/2009.
GAO, “Small Business Administration: Additional Guidance on Documenting Credit Elsewhere Decisions Could Improve 7(a) Program Oversight”
(GAO-09-228), 2/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09228.pdf, accessed 3/23/2009.
GAO, “TARP: Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues” (GAO-09-359), 2/5/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/
d09359t.pdf, accessed 4/8/2009.
GAO, “TARP: Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues” (GAO-09-417), 2/24/2009,
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09417t.pdf, accessed 4/8/2009.
GAO, “Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues” (GAO-09-474), 2/24/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09474t.pdf,
accessed 3/23/2009.
GAO, “Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues” (GAO-09-474), 3/11/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09474t.pdf,
accessed 3/23/2009.
GAO, “Preliminary Observations on Assistance Provided to AIG” (GAO-09-490), 3/18/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09490t.pdf, accessed
3/23/2009.
GAO, “Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues” (GAO-09-484), 3/19/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09484t.pdf,
accessed 3/23/2009.

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APPENDIX G I KEY OVERSIGHT REPORTS AND TESTIMONIES

GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE (“GAO”)
GAO, “Troubled Asset Relief Program: Capital Purchase Program Transactions for the Period October 28, 2008 through March 20, 2009 and
Information on Financial Agency Agreements, Contracts, and Blanket Purchase Agreements Awarded as of March 13, 2009” (GAO-09-522SP, an
E-supplement to GAO-09-504), 3/31/2009, www.gao.gov, accessed 3/31/2009.
GAO, “TARP: March 2009 Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues” (GAO-09-522), 3/31/2009,
http://www.gao.gov/special.pubs/gao-09-522sp/index.html, accessed 4/8/2009.
GAO, “TARP: Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues” (GAO-09-539), 3/31/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/
d09539t.pdf accessed 4/8/2009.
Recorded Testimony
GAO, “FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, Preliminary Observations on Assistance Provided to AIG,” Orice M. Williams, Director
Financial Markets and Community Investment, 3/18/2009, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09490t.pdf, accessed 3/23/2009.”
GAO, “Relief Program: Status of Efforts to Address Transparency and Accountability Issues,” Gene L. Dodaro, acting comptroller general of the United
States, before the Senate Committee on Finance, 3/31/2009, www.gao.gov, accessed 3/31/2009.
CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT PANEL (“COP”)
Roles and Mission
COP is tasked with reviewing the current state of the financial markets and the regulatory system. As a by-product of these oversight activities, COP is
required to produce the following reports to Congress:
• regular reports every 30 days that cover a variety of issues, including administration of the program, the impact of purchases on the financial
markets/financial institutions, market transparency, and the effectiveness of foreclosure mitigation, minimization of long-term costs, and maximization
of benefits for taxpayers
• a special report on regulatory reform, published no later than January 20, 2009, analyzing the current state of the regulatory system and its
effectiveness at overseeing the participants in the financial system and protecting consumers. The report is to provide recommendations for
improvement regarding whether any participants in the financial markets that are currently outside the regulatory system should become subject to
the regulatory system, the rationale underlying such recommendation, and whether there are any gaps in existing consumer protections.
Oversight Reports
COP, “Questions about the $700 Billion Emergency Economic Stabilization Funds,” The First Report of the Congressional Oversight Panel for
Economic Stabilization, 12/10/2008, http://cop.senate.gov/documents/cop-121008-report.pdf, accessed on 1/22/2009.
COP, Regulatory Reform Hearing on December 16, 2008, http://cop.senate.gov/hearings/library/hearing-121608-firsthearing.cfm.
COP, “Special Report on Regulatory Reform,” 1/2009, http://cop.senate.gov/documents/cop-012909-report-regulatoryreform.pdf.
COP, “Accountability for the Troubled Asset Relief Program,” The Second Report of the Congressional Oversight Panel, 1/9/2009, http://cop.senate.
gov/documents/cop-010909-report.pdf, accessed on 1/22/2009.
COP, Regulatory Reform Hearing on January 14, 2009, http://cop.senate.gov/hearings/ library/hearing-011409-regulatoryreform.cfm.
COP, “Report to the Congressional Oversight Panel for Economic Stabilization Legal Analysis of the Investments by the U.S. Department of the
Treasury in Financial Institutions under the Troubled Asset Relief Program,” by Timothy G. Massad, Esq., 1/27/2009, http://cop.senate.gov/
documents/cop-020609-report-dpvaluation-legal.pdf, accessed on 3/23/2009.
COP, “February Oversight Report, Valuing Treasury’s Acquisitions,” 2/6/2009, http://cop.senate.gov/documents/cop-020609-report.pdf, accessed
on 3/23/2009.
Recorded Testimony
COP, “Learning from the Past—Lessons from the Banking Crises of the 20th Century,” 3/19/2009, http://cop.senate.gov/hearings/library/hearing031909-lessons.cfm, accessed on 3/23/2009.

OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET (“OMB”)
Roles and Mission
OMB’s predominant mission is to assist the President in overseeing the preparation of the federal budget and to supervise its administration in Executive
Branch agencies. In helping to formulate the President’s spending plans, OMB evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs, policies, and procedures,
assesses competing funding demands among agencies, and sets funding priorities. OMB ensures that agency reports, rules, testimony, and proposed
legislation are consistent with the President’s Budget and with Administration policies.
In addition, OMB oversees and coordinates the Administration’s procurement, financial management, information, and regulatory policies. In each of these
areas, OMB’s role is to help improve administrative management, to develop better performance measures and coordinating mechanisms, and to reduce
any unnecessary burdens on the public.
Oversight Reports
OMB, “OMB Report under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act, Section 202,” 2/5/2008, www.whitehouse.gov/omb/ legislative/eesa_120508.
pdf, accessed 1/19/09.
Recorded Testimony
None

KEY OVERSIGHT REPORTS AND TESTIMONIES I APPENDIX G

CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE (“CBO”)
Roles and Mission
CBO’s mandate is to provide the Congress with objective, nonpartisan, and timely analyses to aid in economic and budgetary decisions on the wide array of
programs covered by the federal budget, and the information and estimates required for the Congressional budget process.
CBO assists the House and Senate Budget Committees, and the Congress more generally, by preparing reports and analyses. In accordance with the
CBO’s mandate to provide objective and impartial analysis, CBO’s reports contain no policy recommendations.
Oversight Reports
CBO, “The Troubled Asset Relief Program: Report on Transactions Through December 31, 2008,” 1/2009, http://www.cbo. gov/ftpdocs/99xx/
doc9961/01-16-TARP.pdf, accessed 1/22/2009.
CBO, “Estimated Costs of Additional Debt Service That Would Result from Enacting H.R.1, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009,”
1/27/2009, http://www.cbo.gov/ftpdocs/99xx/doc9970/1-27-RyanLetter-09stimulus.pdf, accessed 3/23/2009.
CBO, “Estimated Macroeconomic Impacts of H.R.1 as Passed by the Senate and the House,” 2/11/2009, http://www.cbo.gov/ftpdocs/99xx/
doc9987/Gregg_Year-by-Year_Stimulus.pdf, accessed 3/23/2009.
Recorded Testimony
None

FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD (“FEDERAL RESERVE”)
Roles and Mission
Federal Reserve’s duties fall into four general areas:
• conducting the nation’s monetary policy by influencing the monetary and credit conditions in the economy in pursuit of maximum employment, stable
prices, and moderate long-term interest rates
• supervising and regulating banking institutions to ensure the safety and soundness of the nation’s banking and financial system and to protect the
credit rights of consumers
• maintaining the stability of the financial system and containing systemic risk that may arise in financial markets
• providing financial services to depository institutions, the U.S. government, and foreign official institutions, including playing a major role in operating
the nation’s payments system
Oversight Reports
No report issued to date
Recorded Testimony
Federal Reserve, “Economic Outlook and Financial Markets,” Chairman Ben S. Bernanke, Testimony before the Committee on the Budget, U.S. House
of Representatives, 10/20/2008, http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/testimony/ bernanke20081020a.htm, accessed 1/22/2009.
Federal Reserve, “Foreclosure Prevention Efforts and Market Stability,” Governor Elizabeth A. Duke, Testimony before the Committee on Banking,
Housing, and Urban Affairs, U.S. Senate, 10/23/2008, http://www.federalreserve.gov/ newsevents/testimony/duke20081023a.htm, accessed
1/22/2009.
Federal Reserve, “TARP and the Federal Reserve’s Liquidity Facilities,” Chairman Ben S. Bernanke, Testimony before the Committee on Financial
Services, U.S. House of Representatives, 11/18/2008, http://www.federalreserve. gov/newsevents/testimony/bernanke20081118a.htm, accessed
1/22/2009.
Federal Reserve, “Effects of the Financial Crisis on Small Business,” Governor Randall S. Kroszner, Testimony before the Committee on Small
Business, U.S. House of Representatives, 11/20/2008, http://www.federalreserve. gov/newsevents/testimony/kroszner20081120a.htm, accessed
1/22/2009.
Federal Reserve, “The Crisis and the Policy Response,” Chairman Ben S. Bernanke, Stamp Lecture, London School of Economics, 1/13/2009,
http://www.federalreserve.gov/ newsevents/speech/bernanke20090113a.htm, accessed 1/22/2009.
Federal Reserve, “Troubled Asset Relief Program,” Vice Chairman Donald L. Kohn, Testimony before the Committee on Financial Services, 1/13/2009,
http://www. federalreserve.gov/newsevents/testimony/kohn20090113a. htm, accessed 1/22/2009.
Federal Reserve, “Federal Reserve programs to strengthen credit markets and the economy,” Chairman Ben S. Bernanke , Testimony before the
Financial Services, U.S. House of Representatives, 2/10/2009, http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/testimony/bernanke20090210a.htm,
accessed 3/23/009.
Federal Reserve, “Federal Reserve programs to strengthen credit markets and the economy,” Chairman Ben S. Bernanke, Testimony before the
Committee on Financial Services, U.S. House of Representatives, 2/10/2009, http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/testimony/2009testimony.
htm, accessed 4/2/2009.
Federal Reserve, “American International Group,” Vice Chairman Donald L. Kohn, Testimony before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban
Affairs, 3/5/2009, http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/testimony/2009testimony.htm, accessed 4/2/2009.
Federal Reserve, “American International Group,” Vice Chairman Donald L. Kohn, Testimony before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban
Affairs, U.S. Senate, 3/5/2009, http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/testimony/kohn20090305a.htm, accessed 3/23/2009.

209

210

APPENDIX G I KEY OVERSIGHT REPORTS AND TESTIMONIES

FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD (“FEDERAL RESERVE”)
Federal Reserve, “American International Group,” Chairman Ben S. Bernanke, Testimony before the Committee on Financial Services, U.S. House of
Representatives, 3/24/2009, http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/testimony/2009testimony.htm, accessed 4/2/2009.
Federal Reserve, “Credit availability and prudent lending standards,” Governor Elizabeth A. Duke, Testimony before the Committee on Financial
Services, U.S. House of Representatives, 3/25/2009, http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/testimony/2009testimony.htm, accessed
4/2/2009.

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION (FDIC)
Roles and Mission
FDIC is an independent agency created by Congress that maintains the stability and public confidence in the nation’s financial system by insuring
deposits, examining and supervising financial institutions, and managing receiverships.
Oversight Reports
None
Recorded Testimony
FDIC, U.S. Senate, “Statement of Sheila C. Bair, Chairman, FDIC, on Turmoil in the U.S. Credit Markets: Examining Recent Regulatory Responses,”
Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, 10/23/2008, http://banking.senate. gov/public/_files/BAIRCreditMarkettestimony102308.pdf,
accessed 1/22/2009.
FDIC, U.S. House of Representatives, “Statement of Sheila C. Bair, Chairman, FDIC, on Oversight of Implementation of the Emergency Economic
Stabilization Act of 2008 and of Government Lending and Insurance Facilities,” Committee on Financial Services, 11/18/2008, http://www.house.
gov/apps/list/hearing/financialsvcs_dem/bair111808.pdf, accessed 1/22/2009.
FDIC, U.S. Senate, “Statement of Michael H. Krimminger, Special Advisor for Policy, Office of the Chairman; FDIC on Oversight of Implementation of
the EESA of 2008 and Efforts to Mitigate Foreclosures,” Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government Committee on Appropriations,
12/4/2008, http://www.fdic.gov/news/news/speeches/archives/2008/ chairman/spdec0408.html, accessed 1/22/2009.
FDIC, U.S. House of Representatives, “Statement of John F. Bovenzi, Deputy to the Chairman and COO, FDIC, on Priorities for the Next
Administration: Use of TARP Funds Under the EESA of 2008,” Committee on Financial Services, 1/13/2009, http://www.fdic.gov/news/news/
speeches/ chairman/spjan1309.html, accessed 1/22/2009.

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL (FDIC OIG)
Roles and Mission
The Office of Inspector General promotes the economy, efficiency, and effectiveness of FDIC programs and operations, and protects against fraud,
waste, and abuse, to assist and augment the FDIC’s contribution to stability and public confidence in the nation’s financial system.
Oversight Reports
FDIC OIG, “Controls Over the FDIC’s Processing of Capital Purchase Program Applications from FDIC-Supervised Institutions,” 3/20/2008, www.
fdicoig.gov, accessed 3/30/2009.

Recorded Testimony
None

KEY OVERSIGHT REPORTS AND TESTIMONIES I APPENDIX G

SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR THE TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM (“SIGTARP”)
Roles and Mission
SIGTARP is responsible for conducting, supervising, and coordinating audits and investigations of the purchase, management, and sale of by the Secretary
of the Treasury under any program established by the Secretary under EESA. SIGTARP shall also establish, maintain, and oversee such systems,
procedures, and controls as the Special Inspector General considers appropriate.
SIGTARP’s mission is to advance economic stability by promoting the efficiency and effectiveness of TARP management, through transparency, through
coordinated oversight, and through robust enforcement against those, whether inside or outside of Government, who waste, steal, or abuse TARP
funds.
Oversight Reports
SIGTARP, “Use of Funds Letter,” 2/5/2009, http://www.sigtarp.gov/reports/audit/2009/Use_of_Funds_Request_Letter.pdf, accessed 3/23/09.
SIGTARP, “Initial Report to Congress,” 2/6/2009, http://www.sigtarp.gov/reports/audit/2009/Questions_and_Answers_Regarding_Use_of_Funds_
Request_Letter.pdf, accessed 3/23/09.
SIGTARP, “Questions and Answers Regarding the February 6, 2009 SIG TARP Letter,” 2/6/2009, http://www.sigtarp.gov/reports/congress/2009/
SIGTARP_Initial_Report_to_the_Congress.pdf, accessed 3/23/09.
Recorded Testimony
SIGTARP, Letter to Chairmen and Ranking Members of Congressional Committees Reported to by SIGTARP, 1/7/2009. (See SIGTARP Initial Report to
Congress, Appendix G)
SIGTARP, Letter to Chairmen and Ranking Members of Congressional Committees Reported to by SIGTARP, 1/22/2009. (See SIGTARP Initial Report to
Congress, Appendix G)
SIGTARP, Testimony Before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, Special Inspector General Neil Barofsky, 2/5/2009,
http://www.sigtarp.gov/reports/testimony/2009/Hearing_Transcript_Senate_Committee_on_Banking_Housing_and_Urban_Affairs.pdf, accessed on
3/23/2009.
SIGTARP, Testimony Before the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Special Inspector General Neil Barofsky, 2/11/2009, http://www.sigtarp.gov/
reports/testimony/2009/Testimony_Before_the_Senate_Committee_on_The_Judiciary.pdf, accessed on 3/23/2009.
SIGTARP, Testimony Before the House Committee on Financial Services Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, Special Inspector General
Neil Barofsky, 2/24/2009,http://www.sigtarp.gov/reports/testimony/2009/Testimony_Before_the_House_Committee_on_Financial_Services_
Subcommittee_on_Oversight_and_Investigations.pdf, accessed on 3/23/2009.
SIGTARP, Testimony Before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Domestic Policy, Special Inspector
General Neil Barofsky, 3/11/2009, http://www.sigtarp.gov/reports/testimony/2009/Testimony_Before_the_House_Committee_on_Oversight_and_
Government_Reform_Subcommittee_on_Domestic_Policy.pdf, accessed on 3/23/2009.
SIGTARP, Testimony Before the House Committee on Ways and Means Subcommittee on Oversight, 3/19/2009, Special Inspector General Neil
Barofsky, http://www.sigtarp.gov/reports/testimony/2009/Testimony_Before_the_House_Committee_on_Ways_and_Means_Subcommittee_on_
Oversight.pdf, accessed on 3/23/2009.
SIGTARP, Testimony Before the United States Senate Finance Committee, Special Inspector General Neil Barofsky, 3/31/2009, http://www.sigtarp.
gov/reports/testimony/2009/Testimony_Before_the_Senate_Finance_Committee.pdf, accessed on 4/2/2009.
Note: Italics style indicates verbatim narrative taken from source documents.
Sources: Treasury, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; Treasury Inspector General, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; Financial Stability Oversight Board, www.treas.gov, accessed 4/2/2009;
SEC, www.sec.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; GAO, www.gao.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; COP, www.cop.senate.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; OMB, www.whitehouse.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; CBO,
www.cbo.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; Federal Reserve Board, www.federalreserve.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; FDIC, www.fdic.gov, accessed 4/2/2009; FDIC OIG, www.fdicoig.gov, accessed
4/10/2009.

211

212

APPENDIX H I WARRANTS

WARRANTS
When a warrant’s exercise price is lower than the current
market price of the stock, the warrants are “in the
money.” When the strike price (exercise price) is above the
stock’s market price, it is “out of the money.” It is important
to note that even warrants that are “out of the money” have
value; this value is based on the possibility that the share
price will eventually rise above the strike price. It is not
unusual that warrants are “out of the money” when they are
issued. The following table contains the current status of the
warrants that Treasury obtained under CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP,
and AGP (for publicly traded companies).
As of March 31, 2009, Treasury continued to hold the warrants received from the four publicly traded financial institutions and the single private financial institution that repurchased preferred shares from the Government. On March 31,
2009, Iberiabank Corporation, Bank of Marin

Bancorp, Old National Bancorp, Signature Bank, and Centra
Financial Holdings, Inc./Centra Bank, Inc. repurchased their
preferred shares. Upon repurchase of their preferred shares,
institutions have a right to purchase their Government-held
warrants before they are offered for sale to a third party. Only
the private financial institution, Centra Financial Holdings,
Inc./Centra Bank, Inc., had notified Treasury of its intention
to repurchase its warrant preferred shares at their aggregate
liquidation preference. If the four publicly traded financial institutions choose not to exercise this right within 15
calendar days of repurchase, Treasury has stated that it will
liquidate the warrants. Treasury has stated that it will receive
a profit from the sale of these assets, regardless of the final
purchaser, since Treasury did not incur any additional cost to
acquire them. Details of these share repurchases and their
corresponding impact on Treasury’s warrant portfolio will be
provided in SIGTARP’s next quarterly report.

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

$8.99

$6.25

OUT

(2.74)

Participant

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Exchange

Program

1st Constitution Bancorp

12/23/2008

FCCY

$8.81

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

200,222

1st FS Corporation

11/14/2008

FFIS

$7.50

OTC BB

CPP - Public

276,815

$8.87

$4.75

OUT

(4.12)

1st Source Corporation

1/23/2009

SRCE

$17.43

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

837,947

$19.87

$18.05

OUT

(1.82)

AB&T Financial
Corporation

1/23/2009

ABTO

$6.90

OTC BB

CPP - Public

80,153

$6.55

$6.00

OUT

(0.55)

AIG

11/25/2008

AIG

$1.77

NYSE

SSFI

53,798,766

$2.50

$1.00

OUT

(1.50)

Alaska Pacific
Bancshares, Inc.

2/6/2009

AKPB

$4.15

OTC BB

CPP - Public

175,772

$4.08

$3.60

OUT

(0.48)

Alliance Financial
Corporation

12/19/2008

ALNC

$23.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

173,069

$23.33

$17.94

OUT

(5.39)

American Express
Company

1/9/2009

AXP

$19.23

NYSE

CPP - Public

24,264,129

$20.95

$13.63

OUT

(7.32)

Ameris Bancorp

11/21/2008

ABCB

$9.21

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

679,443

$11.48

$4.71

OUT

(6.77)

AmeriServ Financial, Inc.

12/19/2008

ASRV

$1.85

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,312,500

$2.40

$1.67

OUT

(0.73)

Anchor BanCorp
Wisconsin, Inc.

1/30/2009

ABCW

$2.02

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

7,399,103

$2.23

$1.35

OUT

(0.88)

Annapolis Bancorp, Inc.

1/30/2009

ANNB

$2.10

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

299,706

$4.08

$2.72

OUT

(1.36)

Continued on next page

WARRANTS I APPENDIX H

213

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Participant

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Associated Banc-Corp

11/21/2008

ASBC

$17.10

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

3,983,308

$19.77

$15.45

OUT

(4.32)

Bancorp Rhode Island,
Inc.

12/19/2008

BARI

$19.55

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

192,967

$23.32

$18.07

OUT

(5.25)

BancTrust Financial
Group, Inc.

12/19/2008

BTFG

$11.01

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

730,994

$10.26

$6.33

OUT

(3.93)

Bank of America
Corporation

1/16/2009

BAC

$7.18

NYSE

TIP

150,375,940

$13.30

$6.82

OUT

(6.48)

Bank of America
Corporation

10/28/2008

BAC

$23.02

NYSE

CPP - Public

73,075,674

$30.79

$6.82

OUT

(23.97)

Bank of America
Corporation

1/9/2009

BAC

$12.99

NYSE

CPP - Public

48,717,116

$30.79

$6.82

OUT

(23.97)

11/14/2008

BOCH

$5.25

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

405,405

$6.29

$5.04

OUT

(1.25)

Bank of Commerce
Holdings
1

Exchange

Program

Bank of Marin Bancorp

12/5/2008

BMRC

$23.15

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

154,242

$27.23

$21.51

OUT

(5.72)

Bank of New York Mellon
Corporation

10/28/2008

BK

$31.80

NYSE

CPP - Public

14,516,129

$31.00

$28.25

OUT

(2.75)

Bank of North Carolina

12/5/2008

BNCN

$7.97

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

543,337

$8.63

$6.05

OUT

(2.58)

Bank of the Ozarks, Inc.

12/12/2008

OZRK

$27.02

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

379,811

$29.62

$23.08

OUT

(6.54)

Banner Corporation

11/21/2008

BANR

$9.17

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,707,989

$10.89

$2.91

OUT

(7.98)

Bar Harbor Bankshares/
Bar Harbor Bank & Trust

1/16/2009

BHB

$23.70

AMEX

CPP - Public

104,910

$26.81

$23.30

OUT

(3.51)

BB&T Corp.

11/14/2008

BBT

$28.05

NYSE

CPP - Public

13,902,573

$33.81

$16.92

OUT

(16.89)

BCSB Bancorp, Inc.

12/23/2008

BCSB

$7.75

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

183,465

$8.83

$8.75

OUT

(0.08)

Berkshire Hills Bancorp,
Inc.

12/19/2008

BHLB

$28.53

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

226,330

$26.51

$22.92

OUT

(3.59)

Blue Valley Ban Corp.

12/5/2008

BVBC

$15.25

OTC BB

CPP - Public

111,083

$29.37

$12.00

OUT

(17.37)

Boston Private Financial
Holdings, Inc.

11/21/2008

BPFH

$5.65

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,887,500

$8.00

$3.51

OUT

(4.49)

Bridge Capital Holdings

12/23/2008

BBNK

$4.40

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

396,412

$9.03

$4.50

OUT

(4.53)

Broadway Financial
Corporation

11/14/2008

BYFC

$5.85

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

183,175

$7.37

$5.24

OUT

(2.13)

C&F Financial Corporation

1/9/2009

CFFI

$18.93

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

167,504

$17.91

$14.45

OUT

(3.46)

Cadence Financial
Corporation

1/9/2009

CADE

$5.15

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,145,833

$5.76

$4.42

OUT

(1.34)

Capital Bank Corporation

12/12/2008

CBKN

$7.05

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

749,619

$8.26

$4.56

OUT

(3.70)

Capital One Financial
Corporation

11/14/2008

COF

$31.19

NYSE

CPP - Public

12,657,960

$42.13

$12.24

OUT

(29.89)

Carolina Bank Holdings,
Inc.

1/9/2009

CLBH

$6.30

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

357,675

$6.71

$4.20

OUT

(2.51)

Carolina Trust Bank

2/6/2009

CART

$6.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

86,957

$6.90

$4.80

OUT

(2.10)

Carrollton Bancorp

2/13/2009

CRRB

$6.10

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

205,379

$6.72

$5.12

OUT

(1.60)

Continued on next page

214

APPENDIX H I WARRANTS

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Cascade Financial
Corporation

11/21/2008

CASB

$4.89

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

863,442

$6.77

$2.50

OUT

(4.27)

Cathay General Bancorp

12/5/2008

CATY

$20.48

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,846,374

$20.96

$10.43

OUT

(10.53)

Participant

Exchange

Program

Cecil Bancorp, Inc.

12/23/2008

CECB

$6.25

OTC BB

CPP - Public

261,538

$6.63

$5.10

OUT

(1.53)

Center Bancorp, Inc.

1/9/2009

CNBC

$8.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

173,410

$8.65

$7.22

OUT

(1.43)

Center Financial
Corporation

12/12/2008

CLFC

$7.08

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

864,780

$9.54

$2.82

OUT

(6.72)

Centerstate Banks of
Florida, Inc.

11/21/2008

CSFL

$15.02

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

250,825

$16.67

$11.01

OUT

(5.66)

Central Bancorp, Inc.

12/5/2008

CEBK

$5.88

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

234,742

$6.39

$4.74

OUT

(1.65)

Central Federal
Corporation

12/5/2008

CFBK

$3.10

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

336,568

$3.22

$2.90

OUT

(0.32)

Central Jersey Bancorp

12/23/2008

CJBK

$6.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

268,621

$6.31

$6.50

IN

0.19

Central Pacific Financial
Corp.

1/9/2009

CPF

$7.92

NYSE

CPP - Public

1,585,748

$12.77

$5.60

OUT

(7.17)

Central Valley Community
Bancorp

1/30/2009

CVCY

$5.07

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

158,133

$6.64

$4.67

OUT

(1.97)

Central Virginia
Bankshares, Inc.

1/30/2009

CVBK

$5.34

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

263,542

$6.48

$3.95

OUT

(2.53)

Centrue Financial
Corporation

1/9/2009

1

$6.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

508,320

$9.64

$5.38

OUT

(4.26)

CIT Group, Inc.

12/31/2008

CIT

$4.54

NYSE

CPP - Public

88,705,584

$3.94

$2.85

OUT

(1.09)

Citigroup, Inc.

12/31/2008

C

$6.71

NYSE

AGP

$10.61

$2.53

OUT

(8.08)

Citigroup, Inc.

1/16/2009

C

$3.50

NYSE

TIP

188,500,000

10.61

$2.53

OUT

(8.08)

Citigroup, Inc.

10/28/2008

C

$13.41

NYSE

CPP - Public

210,084,034

$17.85

$2.53

OUT

(15.32)

Citizens & Northern
Corporation

1/16/2009

CZNC

$18.78

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

194,794

$20.36

$18.49

OUT

(1.87)

Citizens First Corporation

12/19/2008

CZFC

$4.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

254,218

$5.18

$4.00

OUT

(1.18)

Citizens Republic
Bancorp, Inc.

12/12/2008

CRBC

$2.33

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

17,578,125

$2.56

$1.55

OUT

(1.01)

Citizens South Banking
Corporation

12/12/2008

CSBC

$6.52

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

428,870

$7.17

$5.08

OUT

(2.09)

City National Corporation

11/21/2008

CYN

$35.64

NYSE

CPP - Public

1,128,668

$53.16

$33.77

OUT

(19.39)

Coastal Banking
Company, Inc.

12/5/2008

CBCO

$5.75

OTC BB

CPP - Public

205,579

$7.26

$6.00

OUT

(1.26)

CoBiz Financial, Inc.

12/19/2008

COBZ

$9.59

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

895,968

$10.79

$5.25

OUT

(5.54)

Codorus Valley Bancorp,
Inc.

1/9/2009

CVLY

$9.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

263,859

$9.38

$8.06

OUT

(1.32)

Colony Bankcorp, Inc.

1/9/2009

CBAN

$8.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

500,000

$8.40

$6.39

OUT

(2.01)

Columbia Banking
System, Inc.

11/21/2008

COLB

$8.85

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

796,046

$14.49

$6.40

OUT

(8.09)

254,476,909

Continued on next page

WARRANTS I APPENDIX H

215

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Program

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Participant

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Comerica, Inc.

11/14/2008

CMA

$21.95

NYSE

CPP - Public

11,479,592

$29.40

$18.31

OUT

(11.09)

Commerce National Bank

1/9/2009

CNBF

$6.00

OTC BB

CPP - Public

87,209

$8.60

$6.10

OUT

(2.50)

Community Bankers Trust
Corporation

12/19/2008

BTC

$3.00

AMEX

CPP - Public

780,000

$3.40

$3.40

OUT

0.00

Community Financial
Corporation

12/19/2008

CFFC

$4.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

351,194

$5.40

$4.00

OUT

(1.40)

Community Partners
Bancorp

1/30/2009

CPBC

$3.98

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

288,462

$4.68

$3.35

OUT

(1.33)

Community West
Bancshares

12/19/2008

CWBC

$3.81

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

521,158

$4.49

$2.64

OUT

(1.85)

Crescent Financial
Corporation

1/9/2009

CRFN

$4.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

833,705

$4.48

$3.60

OUT

(0.88)

CVB Financial Corp.

12/5/2008

CVBF

$11.04

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,669,521

$11.68

$6.63

OUT

(5.05)

Discover Financial
Services

3/13/2009

DFS

$6.23

NYSE

CPP - Public

20,500,915

$8.96

$6.31

OUT

(2.65)

DNB Financial
Corporation

1/30/2009

DNBF

$5.99

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

186,311

$9.46

$7.52

OUT

(1.94)

Eagle Bancorp, Inc.

12/5/2008

EGBN

$6.15

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

770,867

$7.44

$6.25

OUT

(1.19)

East West Bancorp

12/5/2008

EWBC

$15.64

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

3,035,109

$15.15

$4.57

OUT

(10.58)

Eastern Virginia
Bankshares, Inc.

1/9/2009

EVBS

$9.81

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

373,832

$9.63

$8.39

OUT

(1.24)

ECB Bancorp, Inc./East
Carolina Bank

1/16/2009

ECBE

$15.93

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

144,984

$18.57

$15.30

OUT

(3.27)

Emclaire Financial Corp.

12/23/2008

EMCF

$23.50

OTC BB

CPP - Public

50,111

$22.45

$21.50

OUT

(0.95)

Encore Bancshares, Inc.

12/5/2008

EBTX

$13.23

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

364,026

$14.01

$8.87

OUT

(5.14)

Enterprise Financial
Services Corp.

12/19/2008

EFSC

$14.46

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

324,074

$16.20

$9.76

OUT

(6.44)

F.N.B. Corporation

1/9/2009

FNB

$12.08

NYSE

CPP - Public

1,302,083

$11.52

$7.67

OUT

(3.85)

Farmers Capital Bank
Corporation

1/9/2009

FFKT

$24.41

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

223,992

$20.09

$15.67

OUT

(4.42)

Fidelity Bancorp, Inc.

12/12/2008

FSBI

$6.75

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

121,387

$8.65

$10.07

IN

1.42

Fidelity Southern
Corporation

12/19/2008

LION

$3.18

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,266,458

$3.19

$2.40

OUT

(0.79)
(8.80)

Exchange

Fifth Third Bancorp

12/31/2008

FITB

$8.26

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

43,617,747

$11.72

$2.92

OUT

Financial Institutions, Inc.

12/23/2008

FISI

$13.34

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

378,175

$14.88

$7.62

OUT

(7.26)

First Bancorp

1/9/2009

FBNC

$15.74

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

616,308

$15.82

$11.97

OUT

(3.85)

First BanCorp

1/16/2009

FBP

$8.59

NYSE

CPP - Public

5,842,259

$10.27

$4.26

OUT

(6.01)

First Busey Corporation

3/6/2009

BUSE

$6.15

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,147,666

$13.07

$7.76

OUT

(5.31)

First California Financial
Group, Inc.

12/19/2008

FCAL

$5.55

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

599,042

$6.26

$4.20

OUT

(2.06)

First Citizens Banc Corp.

1/23/2009

FCZA

$6.56

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

469,312

$7.41

$7.51

IN

0.10

Continued on next page

216

APPENDIX H I WARRANTS

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

First Community Bank
Corporation of America

12/23/2008

FCFL

$5.13

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

228,312

$7.02

$4.10

OUT

(2.92)

First Community
Bankshares Inc.

11/21/2008

FCBC

$24.88

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

176,546

$35.26

$11.67

OUT

(23.59)

First Community
Corporation

11/21/2008

FCCO

$8.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

195,915

$8.69

$6.60

OUT

(2.09)

First Defiance Financial
Corp.

12/5/2008

FDEF

$7.67

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

550,595

$10.08

$6.08

OUT

(4.00)

First Federal Bancshares
of Arkansas, Inc.

3/6/2009

FFBH

$3.86

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

321,847

$7.69

$4.70

OUT

(2.99)

First Financial Bancorp

12/23/2008

FFBC

$12.26

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

930,233

$12.90

$9.53

OUT

(3.37)

First Financial Holdings,
Inc.

12/5/2008

FFCH

$20.65

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

483,391

$20.17

$7.65

OUT

(12.52)

First Financial Service
Corporation

1/9/2009

FFKY

$12.58

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

215,983

$13.89

$11.10

OUT

(2.79)

First Horizon National
Corporation

11/14/2008

FHN

$9.35

NYSE

CPP - Public

12,743,235

$10.20

$10.74

IN

0.54

First Litchfield Financial
Corporation

12/12/2008

FLFL

$7.10

OTC BB

CPP - Public

199,203

$7.53

$7.00

OUT

(0.53)

First M&F Corporation

2/27/2009

FMFC

$6.23

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

513,113

$8.77

$6.12

OUT

(2.65)

First Merchants
Corporation

2/20/2009

FRME

$11.12

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

991,453

$17.55

$10.79

OUT

(6.76)

First Midwest Bancorp,
Inc.

12/5/2008

FMBI

$18.48

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,305,230

$22.18

$8.59

OUT

(13.59)

First Niagara Financial
Group

11/21/2008

FNFG

$14.37

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,906,191

$14.48

$10.89

OUT

(3.59)

First Northern Community
Bancorp

3/13/2009

FNRN

$4.05

OTC BB

CPP - Public

352,977

$7.39

$4.99

OUT

(2.40)

First PacTrust Bancorp,
Inc.

11/21/2008

FPTB

$8.80

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

280,795

$10.31

$6.75

OUT

(3.56)

First Place Financial Corp.

3/13/2009

FPFC

$2.38

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

3,670,822

$2.98

$3.36

IN

0.38

First Security Group, Inc.

1/9/2009

FSGI

$5.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

823,627

$6.01

$3.37

OUT

(2.64)

Participant

Exchange

Program

First Sound Bank

12/23/2008

FSWA

$6.01

OTC BB

CPP - Public

114,080

$9.73

$3.00

OUT

(6.73)

First United Corporation

1/30/2009

FUNC

$12.15

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

326,323

$13.79

$8.38

OUT

(5.41)

Firstbank Corporation

1/30/2009

FBMI

$6.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

578,947

$8.55

$5.01

OUT

(3.54)

FirstMerit Corporation

1/9/2009

FMER

$18.51

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

952,260

$19.69

$18.20

OUT

(1.49)

Flagstar Bancorp, Inc.

1/30/2009

FBC

$0.60

NYSE

CPP - Public

64,513,790

$0.62

$0.75

IN

0.13

Flushing Financial
Corporation

12/19/2008

FFIC

$12.01

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

751,611

$13.97

$6.02

OUT

(7.95)

FNB United Corp.

2/13/2009

FNBN

$3.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,207,143

$3.50

$2.60

OUT

(0.90)

FPB Bancorp, Inc.

12/5/2008

FPBI

$4.10

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

183,158

$4.75

$2.50

OUT

(2.25)

Continued on next page

WARRANTS I APPENDIX H

217

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Fulton Financial
Corporation

12/23/2008

FULT

$8.76

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

5,509,756

$10.25

$6.63

OUT

(3.62)

General Motors
Corporation

12/29/2008

GM

$3.60

NYSE

AIFP

1,733,068

$5.02

$1.94

OUT

(3.08)

GMAC LLC

12/29/2008

GJM

$9.00

NYSE

AIFP

250,002

$0.01

$7.46

IN

7.45

Great Southern Bancorp

12/5/2008

GSBC

$8.15

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

909,091

$9.57

$14.01

IN

4.44

Green Bankshares, Inc.

12/23/2008

GRNB

$14.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

635,504

$17.06

$8.80

OUT

(8.26)

Guaranty Federal
Bancshares, Inc.

1/30/2009

GFED

$5.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

459,459

$5.55

$5.30

OUT

(0.25)

Hampton Roads
Bankshares, Inc.

12/31/2008

HMPR

$8.73

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,325,858

$9.09

$7.79

OUT

(1.30)

Hawthorn Bancshares,
Inc.

12/19/2008

HWBK

$16.13

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

245,443

$18.49

$11.75

OUT

(6.74)

HCSB Financial
Corporation

3/6/2009

HCFB

$11.01

OTC BB

CPP - Public

91,714

$21.09

$11.01

OUT

(10.08)

Heartland Financial USA,
Inc.

12/19/2008

HTLF

$21.33

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

609,687

$20.10

$13.54

OUT

(6.56)

Heritage Commerce
Corp.

11/21/2008

HTBK

$11.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

462,963

$12.96

$5.25

OUT

(7.71)

Heritage Financial
Corporation

11/21/2008

HFWA

$12.06

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

276,074

$13.04

$10.45

OUT

(2.59)

Participant

Exchange

Program

Heritage Oaks Bancorp

3/20/2009

HEOP

$4.25

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

611,650

$5.15

$4.15

OUT

(1.00)

HF Financial Corp.

11/21/2008

HFFC

$12.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

302,419

$12.40

$12.75

IN

0.35

HMN Financial, Inc.

12/23/2008

HMNF

$3.99

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

833,333

$4.68

$3.10

OUT

(1.58)

Home Bancshares, Inc.

1/16/2009

HOMB

$21.76

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

288,129

$26.03

$19.97

OUT

(6.06)

HopFed Bancorp

12/12/2008

HFBC

$11.25

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

243,816

$11.32

$9.75

OUT

(1.57)

Horizon Bancorp

12/19/2008

HBNC

$13.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

212,104

$17.68

$11.10

OUT

(6.58)

Huntington Bancshares

11/14/2008

HBAN

$7.79

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

23,562,994

$8.90

$1.66

OUT

(7.24)

1

12/5/2008

IBKC

$50.82

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

276,980

$48.74

$45.94

OUT

(2.80)

Independent Bank Corp.

1/9/2009

INDB

$25.29

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

481,664

$24.34

$14.75

OUT

(9.59)

Independent Bank
Corporation

12/12/2008

IBCP

$2.01

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

3,461,538

$3.12

$2.34

OUT

(0.78)

Indiana Community
Bancorp

12/12/2008

INCB

$12.81

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

188,707

$17.09

$13.00

OUT

(4.09)

Integra Bank Corporation

2/27/2009

IBNK

$1.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

7,418,876

$1.69

$1.89

IN

0.20

Intermountain Community
Bancorp

12/19/2008

IMCB

$5.30

OTC BB

CPP - Public

653,226

$6.20

$4.60

OUT

(1.60)

International Bancshares
Corporation

12/23/2008

IBOC

$20.65

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,326,238

$24.43

$7.80

OUT

(16.63)

Intervest Bancshares
Corporation

12/23/2008

IBCA

$3.76

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

691,882

$5.42

$2.15

OUT

(3.27)

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

10/28/2008

JPM

$37.60

NYSE

CPP - Public

88,401,697

$42.42

$26.58

OUT

(15.84)

Iberiabank Corporation

Continued on next page

218

APPENDIX H I WARRANTS

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Exchange

Program

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Participant

Transaction
Date

KeyCorp

11/14/2008

KEY

$9.60

NYSE

CPP - Public

35,244,361

$10.64

$7.87

OUT

(2.77)

Lakeland Bancorp, Inc.

2/6/2009

LBAI

$7.82

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

949,571

$9.32

$8.03

OUT

(1.29)

Lakeland Financial
Corporation

2/27/2009

LKFN

$17.45

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

396,538

$21.20

$19.19

OUT

(2.01)

LCNB Corp.

1/9/2009

LCNB

$9.20

OTC BB

CPP - Public

217,063

$9.26

$9.50

IN

0.24

LNB Bancorp, Inc.

12/12/2008

LNBB

$5.60

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

561,343

$6.74

$5.00

OUT

(1.74)

LSB Corporation

12/12/2008

LSBX

$13.92

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

209,497

$10.74

$8.94

OUT

(1.80)

M&T Bank Corporation

12/23/2008

MTB

$53.90

NYSE

CPP - Public

1,218,522

$73.86

$45.24

OUT

(28.62)

MainSource Financial
Group, Inc.

1/16/2009

MSFG

$11.70

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

571,906

$14.95

$8.04

OUT

(6.91)

Manhattan Bancorp

12/5/2008

MNHN

$8.00

OTC BB

CPP - Public

29,480

$8.65

$4.75

OUT

(3.90)

Marshall & Ilsley
Corporation

11/14/2008

MI

$14.70

NYSE

CPP - Public

13,815,789

$18.62

$5.63

OUT

(12.99)

MB Financial, Inc.

12/5/2008

MBFI

$26.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,012,048

$29.05

$13.60

OUT

(15.45)

MetroCorp Bancshares,
Inc.

1/16/2009

MCBI

$6.13

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

771,429

$8.75

$2.79

OUT

(5.96)

Mid Penn Bancorp, Inc.

12/19/2008

MPB

$22.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

73,099

$20.52

$19.00

OUT

(1.52)

Middleburg Financial
Corporation

1/30/2009

MBRG

$11.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

208,202

$15.85

$11.47

OUT

(4.38)

MidSouth Bancorp, Inc.

1/9/2009

MSL

$11.90

AMEX

CPP - Public

208,768

$14.37

$10.24

OUT

(4.13)

Midwest Banc Holdings,
Inc.

12/5/2008

MBHI

$2.26

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

4,282,020

$2.97

$1.01

OUT

(1.96)

Monarch Community
Bancorp, Inc.

2/6/2009

MCBF

$3.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

260,962

$3.90

$3.46

OUT

(0.44)

Monarch Financial
Holdings, Inc.

12/19/2008

MNRK

$6.86

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

264,706

$8.33

$5.10

OUT

(3.23)

Morgan Stanley

10/28/2008

MS

$15.20

NYSE

CPP - Public

65,245,759

$22.99

$22.77

OUT

(0.22)

MutualFirst Financial, Inc.

12/23/2008

MFSF

$6.75

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

625,135

$7.77

$4.80

OUT

(2.97)

Nara Bancorp, Inc.

11/21/2008

NARA

$7.52

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,042,531

$9.64

$2.94

OUT

(6.70)

National Penn
Bancshares, Inc.

12/12/2008

NPBC

$14.23

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,470,588

$15.30

$8.30

OUT

(7.00)

New Hampshire Thrift
Bancshares, Inc.

1/16/2009

NHTB

$7.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

184,275

$8.14

$7.25

OUT

(0.89)

NewBridge Bancorp

12/12/2008

NBBC

$2.60

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,567,255

$3.06

$2.11

OUT

(0.95)

North Central
Bancshares, Inc.

1/9/2009

FFFD

$10.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

99,157

$15.43

$12.25

OUT

(3.18)

Northeast Bancorp

12/12/2008

NBN

$7.24

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

67,958

$9.33

$7.51

OUT

(1.82)

Northern States Financial
Corporation

2/20/2009

NSFC

$3.14

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

584,084

$4.42

$7.45

IN

3.03

Northern Trust
Corporation

11/14/2008

NTRS

$44.92

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

3,824,624

$61.81

$59.82

OUT

(1.99)

Continued on next page

WARRANTS I APPENDIX H

219

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Oak Ridge Financial
Services, Inc.

1/30/2009

BKOR

$6.41

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

163,830

$7.05

$3.90

OUT

(3.15)

Oak Valley Bancorp

12/5/2008

OVLY

$5.68

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

350,346

$5.78

$3.75

OUT

(2.03)

OceanFirst Financial
Corp.

1/16/2009

OCFC

$14.83

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

380,853

$15.07

$10.22

OUT

(4.85)

Old Line Bancshares, Inc.

12/5/2008

OLBK

$7.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

141,892

$7.40

$5.90

OUT

(1.50)

Old National Bancorp1

12/12/2008

ONB

$15.48

NYSE

CPP - Public

813,008

$18.45

$11.17

OUT

(7.28)

Participant

Exchange

Program

Old Second Bancorp, Inc.

1/16/2009

OSBC

$9.01

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

815,339

$13.43

$6.35

OUT

(7.08)

Pacific Capital Bancorp

11/21/2008

PCBC

$13.31

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,512,003

$17.92

$6.77

OUT

(11.15)

Pacific International
Bancorp

12/12/2008

PIBW

$5.01

OTC BB

CPP - Public

127,785

$7.63

$3.50

OUT

(4.13)

Park National Corporation

12/23/2008

PRK

$63.95

AMEX

CPP - Public

227,376

$65.97

$55.75

OUT

(10.22)

Parke Bancorp, Inc.

1/30/2009

PKBK

$6.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

299,779

$8.15

$7.00

OUT

(1.15)

Parkvale Financial
Corporation

12/23/2008

PVSA

$12.48

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

376,327

$12.66

$10.98

OUT

(1.68)

Peapack-Gladstone
Financial Corporation

1/9/2009

PGC

$22.89

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

143,139

$30.06

$18.03

OUT

(12.03)

Peninsula Bank Holding
Co.

1/30/2009

PBKH

$9.75

OTC BB

CPP - Public

81,670

$11.02

$10.00

OUT

(1.02)

Peoples Bancorp of North
Carolina, Inc.

12/23/2008

PEBK

$9.31

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

357,234

$10.52

$5.75

OUT

(4.77)

Pinnacle Financial
Partners, Inc.

12/12/2008

PNFP

$26.37

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

534,910

$26.64

$23.71

OUT

(2.93)

Plumas Bancorp

1/30/2009

PLBC

$6.97

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

237,712

$7.54

$5.99

OUT

(1.55)

Popular, Inc.

12/5/2008

BPOP

$5.85

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

20,932,836

$6.70

$2.16

OUT

(4.54)

Porter Bancorp, Inc.

11/21/2008

PBIB

$15.51

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

299,829

$17.51

$11.33

OUT

(6.18)

PremierWest Bancorp

2/13/2009

PRWT

$3.91

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,038,462

$5.98

$4.02

OUT

(1.96)

Princeton National
Bancorp, Inc.

1/23/2009

PNBC

$19.17

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

155,025

$24.27

$14.00

OUT

(10.27)

PrivateBancorp, Inc.

1/30/2009

PVTB

$14.58

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,290,026

$28.35

$14.46

OUT

(13.89)

Provident Bancshares
Corp.

11/14/2008

PBKS

$8.99

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,374,608

$9.57

$7.05

OUT

(2.52)

Provident Community
Bancshares, Inc.

3/13/2009

PCBS

$2.49

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

178,880

$7.77

$2.65

OUT

(5.12)

Pulaski Financial Corp.

1/16/2009

PULB

$7.52

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

778,421

$6.27

$5.00

OUT

(1.27)

QCR Holdings, Inc.

2/13/2009

QCRH

$10.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

521,888

$10.99

$8.04

OUT

(2.95)

Regions Financial Corp.

11/14/2008

RF

$9.67

NYSE

CPP - Public

48,253,677

$10.88

$4.26

OUT

(6.62)

Royal Bancshares of
Pennsylvania

2/20/2009

RBPA.A

$3.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,104,370

$4.13

$2.10

OUT

(2.03)

S&T Bancorp

1/16/2009

STBA

$29.14

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

517,012

$31.53

$21.21

OUT

(10.32)

Salisbury Bancorp, Inc.

3/13/2009

SAL

$22.65

AMEX

CPP - Public

57,671

$22.93

$24.55

IN

1.62

Continued on next page

220

APPENDIX H I WARRANTS

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Sandy Spring Bancorp,
Inc.

12/5/2008

SASR

$19.36

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

651,547

$19.13

$11.16

OUT

(7.97)

Santa Lucia Bancorp

12/19/2008

SLBA

$15.50

OTC BB

CPP - Public

37,360

$16.06

$11.50

OUT

(4.56)

SCBT Financial
Corporation

1/16/2009

SCBT

$29.49

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

303,083

$32.06

$20.90

OUT

(11.16)

Seacoast Banking
Corporation of Florida

12/19/2008

SBCF

$7.41

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,179,245

$6.36

$3.03

OUT

(3.33)

Security Federal
Corporation

12/19/2008

SFDL

$16.00

OTC BB

CPP - Public

137,966

$19.57

$15.50

OUT

(4.07)

Participant

Exchange

Program

Severn Bancorp, Inc.

11/21/2008

SVBI

$4.95

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

556,976

$6.30

$3.15

OUT

(3.15)

Shore Bancshares, Inc.

1/9/2009

SHBI

$20.75

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

172,970

$21.68

$16.75

OUT

(4.93)

1

12/12/2008

SBNY

$25.60

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

595,829

$30.21

$28.23

OUT

(1.98)

Somerset Hills Bancorp

1/16/2009

SOMH

$6.62

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

163,065

$6.82

$6.16

OUT

(0.66)

South Financial Group,
Inc.

12/5/2008

TSFG

$4.02

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

10,106,796

$5.15

$1.10

OUT

(4.05)

Southern Community
Financial Corp.

12/5/2008

SCMF

$3.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,623,418

$3.95

$3.56

OUT

(0.39)

Southern First
Bancshares, Inc.

2/27/2009

SFST

$5.82

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

330,554

$7.85

$5.61

OUT

(2.24)

Southern Missouri
Bancorp, Inc.

12/5/2008

SMBC

$11.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

114,326

$12.53

$10.80

OUT

(1.73)

Southwest Bancorp, Inc.

12/5/2008

OKSB

$12.57

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

703,753

$14.92

$9.38

OUT

(5.54)

Signature Bank

State Bancorp, Inc.

12/5/2008

STBC

$10.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

465,569

$11.87

$7.70

OUT

(4.17)

State Street Corporation

10/28/2008

STT

$41.81

NYSE

CPP - Public

5,576,208

$53.80

$30.78

OUT

(23.02)

StellarOne Corporation

12/19/2008

STEL

$17.04

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

302,623

$14.87

$11.91

OUT

(2.96)

Sterling Bancorp

12/23/2008

STL

$12.27

NYSE

CPP - Public

516,817

$12.19

$9.90

OUT

(2.29)

Sterling Bancshares, Inc.

12/12/2008

SBIB

$5.68

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,615,557

$7.18

$6.54

OUT

(0.64)

Sterling Financial
Corporation

12/5/2008

STSA

$5.75

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

6,437,677

$7.06

$2.07

OUT

(4.99)

Stewardship Financial
Corporation

1/30/2009

SSFN

$11.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

127,119

$11.80

$8.14

OUT

(3.66)

Summit State Bank

12/19/2008

SSBI

$5.00

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

239,212

$5.33

$4.60

OUT

(0.73)

Sun Bancorp, Inc.

1/9/2009

SNBC

$7.19

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,543,376

$8.68

$5.19

OUT

(3.49)

SunTrust Banks, Inc.

11/14/2008

STI

$33.52

NYSE

CPP - Public

11,891,280

$44.15

$11.74

OUT

(32.41)

SunTrust Banks, Inc.

12/31/2008

STI

$29.54

NYSE

CPP - Public

6,008,902

$33.70

$11.74

OUT

(21.96)

Superior Bancorp Inc.

12/5/2008

SUPR

$4.30

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,923,792

$5.38

$3.98

OUT

(1.40)

Susquehanna
Bancshares, Inc.

12/12/2008

SUSQ

$14.30

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

3,028,264

$14.86

$9.33

OUT

(5.53)

SVB Financial Group

12/12/2008

SIVB

$32.82

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

708,116

$49.78

$20.01

OUT

(29.77)

Synovus Financial Corp.

12/19/2008

SNV

$7.95

NYSE

CPP - Public

15,510,737

$9.36

$3.25

OUT

(6.11)

Taylor Capital Group

11/21/2008

TAYC

$8.92

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,462,647

$10.75

$4.45

OUT

(6.30)

Continued on next page

WARRANTS I APPENDIX H

221

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Participant

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

TCF Financial Corporation

11/14/2008

TCB

$14.48

NYSE

CPP - Public

3,199,988

$16.93

$11.76

OUT

(5.17)

Tennessee Commerce
Bancorp, Inc.

12/19/2008

TNCC

$6.89

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

461,538

$9.75

$7.68

OUT

(2.07)

Texas Capital
Bancshares, Inc.

1/16/2009

TCBI

$11.11

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

758,086

$14.84

$11.26

OUT

(3.58)

The Bancorp, Inc.

12/12/2008

TBBK

$4.06

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,960,405

$3.46

$4.24

IN

0.78

The Bank of Kentucky
Financial Corporation

2/13/2009

BKYF

$18.99

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

274,784

$18.56

$19.00

IN

0.44

The Connecticut Bank
and Trust Company

12/19/2008

CTBC

$4.60

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

175,742

$4.65

$3.25

OUT

(1.40)

The Elmira Savings Bank,
FSB

12/19/2008

ESBK

$9.80

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

116,538

$11.70

$10.75

OUT

(0.95)

Exchange

Program

The First Bancorp, Inc.

1/9/2009

FNLC

$18.09

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

225,904

$16.60

$15.86

OUT

(0.74)

The First Bancshares, Inc.

2/6/2009

FBMS

$7.60

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

54,705

$13.71

$9.82

OUT

(3.89)

The Goldman Sachs
Group, Inc.

10/28/2008

GS

$93.57

NYSE

CPP - Public

12,205,045

$122.90

$106.02

OUT

(16.88)

The PNC Financial
Services Group Inc.

12/31/2008

PNC

$49.00

NYSE

CPP - Public

16,885,192

$67.33

$29.29

OUT

(38.04)

TIB Financial Corp.

12/5/2008

TIBB

$4.88

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,063,218

$5.22

$2.88

OUT

(2.34)

Tidelands Bancshares, Inc

12/19/2008

TDBK

$2.88

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

571,821

$3.79

$3.05

OUT

(0.74)

Timberland Bancorp, Inc.

12/23/2008

TSBK

$7.45

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

370,899

$6.73

$5.16

OUT

(1.57)
(4.98)

TowneBank

12/12/2008

TOWN

$21.69

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

538,184

$21.31

$16.33

OUT

Trustmark Corporation

11/21/2008

TRMK

$17.90

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,647,931

$19.57

$18.38

OUT

(1.19)

U.S. Bancorp

11/14/2008

USB

$26.30

NYSE

CPP - Public

32,679,102

$30.29

$14.61

OUT

(15.68)

UCBH Holdings, Inc.

11/14/2008

UCBH

$3.99

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

7,847,732

$5.71

$1.51

OUT

(4.20)

Umpqua Holdings Corp.

11/14/2008

UMPQ

$14.35

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,221,795

$14.46

$9.06

OUT

(5.40)

Union Bankshares
Corporation

12/19/2008

UBSH

$23.34

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

422,636

$20.94

$13.85

OUT

(7.09)

United Bancorp, Inc.

1/16/2009

UBCP

$9.08

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

311,492

$9.92

$9.45

OUT

(0.47)

United Bancorporation of
Alabama, Inc.

12/23/2008

UBAB

$15.50

OTC BB

CPP - Public

104,040

$14.85

$15.50

IN

0.65

United Community Banks,
Inc.

12/5/2008

UCBI

$12.33

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,132,701

$12.66

$4.16

OUT

(8.50)

Unity Bancorp, Inc.

12/5/2008

UNTY

$4.50

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

764,778

$4.05

$3.19

OUT

(0.86)

Valley Financial
Corporation

12/12/2008

VYFC

$6.20

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

344,742

$6.97

$4.76

OUT

(2.21)

Valley National Bancorp

11/14/2008

VLY

$17.55

NYSE

CPP - Public

2,297,090

$19.59

$12.37

OUT

(7.22)

Virginia Commerce
Bancorp

12/12/2008

VCBI

$5.45

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,696,203

$3.95

$3.79

OUT

(0.16)

VIST Financial Corp.

12/19/2008

VIST

$9.31

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

364,078

$10.30

$7.00

OUT

(3.30)

Continued on next page

222

APPENDIX H I WARRANTS

STATUS OF WARRANTS TREASURY OBTAINED UNDER CPP, SSFI, TIP, AIFP, AND AGP

Number of
Warrants
Received

Strike
Price as
Stated
in the
Agreements

Stock
Price as of
3/31/2009

In or
Out
of the
Money?

Amount “In
the Money”
or “Out of
the Money”
as of
3/31/2009

Transaction
Date

Ticker
Symbol

Stock Price
as of
Transaction
Date

Wainwright Bank & Trust
Company

12/19/2008

WAIN

$7.33

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

390,071

$8.46

$6.48

OUT

(1.98)

Washington Banking
Company/ Whidbey Island
Bank

1/16/2009

WBCO

$7.84

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

492,164

$8.04

$6.80

OUT

(1.24)

Washington Federal, Inc.

11/14/2008

WFSL

$15.22

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,707,456

$17.57

$13.29

OUT

(4.28)

Webster Financial
Corporation

11/21/2008

WBS

$11.70

NYSE

CPP - Public

3,282,276

$18.28

$4.25

OUT

(14.03)

Participant

Exchange

Program

Wells Fargo & Company

10/28/2008

WFC

$34.46

NYSE

CPP - Public

110,261,688

$34.01

$14.24

OUT

(19.77)

Wesbanco Bank, Inc.

12/5/2008

WSBC

$25.07

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

439,282

$25.61

$22.83

OUT

(2.78)

West Bancorporation, Inc.

12/31/2008

WTBA

$12.25

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

474,100

$11.39

$7.45

OUT

(3.94)

Westamerica
Bancorporation

2/13/2009

WABC

$45.52

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

246,640

$50.92

$45.56

OUT

(5.36)

Western Alliance
Bancorporation

11/21/2008

WAL

$10.17

NYSE

CPP - Public

1,574,213

$13.34

$4.56

OUT

(8.78)

Whitney Holding
Corporation

12/19/2008

WTNY

$15.11

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

2,631,579

$17.10

$11.45

OUT

(5.65)

Wilmington Trust
Corporation

12/12/2008

WL

$21.69

NYSE

CPP - Public

1,856,714

$26.66

$9.69

OUT

(16.97)

Wilshire Bancorp, Inc.

12/12/2008

WIBC

$8.36

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

949,460

$9.82

$5.16

OUT

(4.66)

Wintrust Financial
Corporation

12/19/2008

WTFC

$20.06

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

1,643,295

$22.82

$12.30

OUT

(10.52)

WSFS Financial
Corporation

1/23/2009

WSFS

$28.54

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

175,105

$45.08

$22.36

OUT

(22.72)

Yadkin Valley Financial
Corporation

1/16/2009

YAVY

$11.77

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

385,990

$13.99

$7.45

OUT

(6.54)

Zions Bancorporation

11/14/2008

ZION

$32.69

NASDAQ

CPP - Public

5,789,909

$36.27

$9.83

OUT

(26.44)

Note:
1 Participant repurchased shares on 3/31/2009. As of 3/31/2009, Treasury was still waiting to see if the four participants would invoke their rights to repurchase the warrants.
Sources: Participants and Transaction Date: Treasury, Transactions Report, 3/30/2009, Stock Price: Capital IQ, Inc. (a division of Standard & Poor’s), www.capitaliq.com, accessed 3/12/2009 at 11:00 am
EST and 4/2/2009 at 2:00 pm EST (except 3/31/2009 market price data for United Bancorporation of Alabama, Inc., HCSB Financial Corporation, and DNB Financial Corporation, and 12/12/2008 and
3/31/2009 market price data for Pacific International Bancorp., which were collected from Yahoo Finance website, http://finance.yahoo.com, accessed 4/2/2009, 4/8/2009 and 4/17/2009); Number of
Warrants Received and Strike Price: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/1/2009; Repurchases: Treasury, response to SIGTARP data call, 4/8/2009.

CORRESPONDENCE WITH TREASURY REGARDING TALF I APPENDIX I

CORRESPONDENCE WITH TREASURY REGARDING TALF
This appendix provides a copy of the March 4, 2009, letter from SIGTARP to Neel Kashkari, Interim Assistant Secretary for
Financial Stability, regarding information about the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (“TALF”), as well as the
March 9, 2009, response letter. It also contains a Treasury memo on the same subject, dated April 14, 2009.

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APPENDIX I I CORRESPONDENCE WITH TREASURY REGARDING TALF

CORRESPONDENCE WITH TREASURY REGARDING TALF I APPENDIX I

225

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APPENDIX I I CORRESPONDENCE WITH TREASURY REGARDING TALF

CORRESPONDENCE WITH TREASURY REGARDING TALF I APPENDIX I

227

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APPENDIX J I RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS
This appendix provides copies of letters to SIGTARP in response to SIGTARP recommendations:

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS
Date

Respondent

Regarding

4/7/2009

Treasury

Recommendations in SIGTARPS’s 2/6/2009 Initial Report to Congress

4/10/2009

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Recommendations in SIGTARPS’s Draft 4/21/2009 Quarterly Report to Congress

4/14/2009

Treasury

Recommendations in SIGTARPS’s Draft 4/21/2009 Quarterly Report to Congress

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS I APPENDIX J

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APPENDIX J I RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS I APPENDIX J

231

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APPENDIX J I RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS I APPENDIX J

233

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APPENDIX J I RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS I APPENDIX J

235

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APPENDIX J I RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS I APPENDIX J

237

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APPENDIX J I RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS I APPENDIX J

239

240

APPENDIX J I RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS I APPENDIX J

241

242

APPENDIX J I RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS

RESPONSES TO SIGTARP RECOMMENDATIONS I APPENDIX J

243

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APPENDIX K I ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

USE OF FUNDS REQUEST LETTER I APPENDIX L

USE OF FUNDS REQUEST LETTER
This appendix contains a copy of the February 5, 2009, letter from SIGTARP sent to TARP recipients requesting information
on their usage of TARP funds.

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APPENDIX L I USE OF FUNDS REQUEST LETTER

OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL
TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM
1500 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 1064
Washington, D.C. 20220

February 5, 2009

(Addressee)
The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (“EESA”) that established the Troubled
Asset Relief Program (TARP) also created the Office of the Special Inspector General Troubled
Asset Relief Program (SIGTARP). SIGTARP is responsible for coordinating and conducting
audits and investigations of any program established by the Secretary of the Treasury under the
act. As part of an audit into TARP recipients’ use of funds and their compliance with EESA’s
executive compensation requirements,
I am requesting that you provide my office, within 30 days of this request, the following
information:
(1) A narrative response specifically outlining (a) your anticipated use of TARP
funds; (b) whether the TARP funds were segregated from other institutional
funds; (c) your actual use of TARP funds to date; and (d) your expected use of
unspent TARP funds. In your response, please take into consideration your
anticipated use of TARP funds at the time that you applied for such funds, or
any actions that you have taken that you would not have been able to take
absent the infusion of TARP funds.
(2) Your specific plans, and the status of implementation of those plans, for
addressing executive compensation requirements associated with the funding.
Information provided regarding executive compensation should also include
any assessments made of loan risks and their relationship to executive
compensation; how limitations on executive compensation will be
implemented in line with Department of Treasury guidelines; and whether any
such limitations may be offset by other changes to other, longer-term or
deferred forms of executive compensation.

USE OF FUNDS REQUEST LETTER I APPENDIX L

February 5, 2009
Page 2

In connection with this request:
(1) We anticipate that responses might well be quantitative as well as qualitative
in nature regarding the impact of having the funds, and we encourage you to
make reference to such sources as statements to the media, shareholders, or
others concerning your intended or actual use of TARP funds, as well as any
internal email, budgets, or memoranda describing your anticipated use of
funds. We ask that you segregate and preserve all documents referencing
your use or anticipated use of TARP funds such as any internal email,
budgets, or memoranda regarding your anticipated or actual use of TARP
funds.
(2) Your response should include copies of pertinent supporting documentation
(financial or otherwise) to support your response.
(3) Further, I request that, your response be signed by a duly authorized senior
executive officer of your company, including a statement certifying the
accuracy of all statements, representations, and supporting information
provided, subject to the requirements and penalties set forth in Title 18,
United States Code, Section 1001.
(4) Responses should be provided electronically within 30 days to SIGTARP at
SIGTARP.response@do.treas.gov with an original signed certification and
any other supporting documentation mailed to: Special Inspector General –
TARP; 1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW; Suite 1064; Washington, D.C.
20220.
We think this initiative is vital to providing transparency of the TARP program, and to the ability
of SIGTARP and others to assess the effectiveness of TARP programs over time. If you have
any questions regarding this initiative, please feel free to contact Mr. Barry W. Holman, my
Deputy Inspector General for Audit at (202) 927-9936.
Very truly yours,

Neil M. Barofsky
Special Inspector General
OMB Control No. 1505-0212
(Expires August 2009)
An agency is not authorized to conduct, and persons are not required to respond to, an information collection request
unless it displays a valid control number. Response is mandatory for all selected participants in the TARP program.

247


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102