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Table
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Producer Price Indexes and percent changes by stage of processing
Producer Price Indexes and percent changes for selected commodity groupings by stage of processing
Producer Price Indexes and percent changes for selected commodity groupings by stage of processing - Continued
Producer Price Indexes for selected commodity groupings
Producer price indexes for the net output of major industry groups

FOR DATA ONLY: (202) 606-7828
FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION:
(202) 606-7705
MEDIA CONTACT: (202) 606-5902

USDL 95-47
TRANSMISSION OF MATERIAL IN THIS
RELEASE IS EMBARGOED UNTIL
8:30 A.M. (E.S.T.), FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 10, 1995

PRODUCER PRICE INDEXES -- JANUARY 1995
The Producer Price Index for Finished Goods increased 0.3 percent in
January, seasonally adjusted, the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U. S.
Department of Labor reported today. In December, this index rose 0.4
percent, following a 0.6 percent advance in November. Prices received by
domestic producers of intermediate goods moved up 1.0 percent in January
after increasing 0.4 percent in the previous month. The Crude Goods Price
Index turned up 1.0 percent after falling 0.4 percent in December. (See
table A.)
Among finished goods, food prices turned down after rising
substantially in December, and the index for finished goods other than
foods and energy moved up 0.2 percent in January after increasing 0.3
percent a month earlier. In contrast, the index for finished energy goods
advanced 2.3 percent after declining 1.0 percent in the previous month.
Table A. Monthly and annual percent changes in selected stage-ofprocessing price indexes, seasonally adjusted.
Finish
ed
goods
Except

Month

Total

Foods

foods
and
Energy energy

Change in
finished
goods
from 12
months
ago
(unadj.)

IntermediateCrude
goods goods

1994
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

0.5
0.2
0
0
-0.1
0.1
0.2
0.6
-0.3
-0.4
0.6
0.4

-0.2
-0.3
0.3
-0.5
-0.6
-0.4
0.4
0.2
-0.2
0
0.8
1.4

1.9
2.1
-0.5
0.1
-1.0
0.3
0.9
2.3
-2.4
-1.2
2.2
-1.0

0.4
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.3
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1
-0.4
0.1
0.3

0.2
0.2
0.2
-0.4
-0.4
0.1
0.6
1.9
1.5
1.0
1.3
1.7

0.3
0.3
0.1
0
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.7
0.4
0.3
0.9
0.4

1.3
-0.6
1.2
0.6
-1.5
1.1
-0.4
0
-2.4
-0.2
0.5
-0.4

1995
Jan.

0.3

-0.6

2.3

0.2

1.6

1.0

1.0

Note: Figures shown above and elsewhere in this release may differ from
those previously reported because seasonal adjustment factors have been
recalculated to reflect developments through 1994. In addition, data for
September 1994 have been revised to reflect the availability of late
reports and corrections by respondents.
Before seasonal adjustment, the Producer Price index for Finished
Goods moved up 0.2 percent in January to 126.5 (1982 =100). From January
1994 to January 1995, the Finished Goods Price Index rose 1.6 percent.
During this same period, consumer food prices increased 0.6 percent, the
index for finished energy goods advanced 3.9 percent, and prices for
finished goods other than foods and energy were up 1.5 percent. Prices
received by domestic producers of intermediate goods increased 5.2 percent
during the 12 months ended in January 1995, and crude material prices fell
2.2 percent over the same period.
Finished goods
The Producer Price Index for finished energy goods advanced 2.3
percent in January, seasonally adjusted. This followed a December decline
of 1.0 percent. Gasoline prices turned up 7.9 percent, following a 3.0
percent decrease in the previous month. Prices also turned up after
falling a month earlier for residential electricity and residential natural
gas. Prices for home heating oil, however, turned down 5.2 percent after
rising 3.0 percent in December.
Prices for finished consumer foods declined 0.6 percent in January,

following a 1.4 percent increase in December. Prices turned down almost 27
percent for fresh and dry vegetables after skyrocketing 61 percent a month
earlier. Prices also turned down after rising in the previous month for
fresh fruits and melons, eggs for fresh use, and roasted coffee. Prices
fell more in January than in December for dairy products and processed
turkeys. By contrast, prices turned up after falling in the previous month
for beef and veal, processed finfish and shellfish, processed young
chickens, and processed fruits and vegetables. Pork prices increased
almost 6 percent after inching up slightly in December. Price increases
also accelerated for soft drinks and for shortening and cooking oils.
Table B. Monthly and annual percent changes in selected price indexes for
intermediate goods and crude goods,
seasonally adjusted.
Interm
Crude
ediate
goods
goods
Change in
Change in
intermedi
crude
ate
Exclud
goods
Excludi
goods
ing
from
ng
foods 12 months
Energy foods
from 12
and
ago
and
months ago
Month Foods Energy energy (unadj.)
Foods (unadj energy
(unadj.)
.)
1994
Jan.
0.2
0.9
0.2
0.9
-0.8
4.1
2.8
1.8
Feb.
0.7
2.3
0
0.9
0.3
-6.3
2.4
0.4
Mar.
-0.3
0
0.2
0.7
-0.7
5.0
0.5
1.5
Apr.
-0.4
-0.8
0.1
0.5
-0.5
1.1
0
0.2
May
-0.8
-0.6
0.3
0.9
-3.9
1.2
-1.0
-3.3
June
-0.9
0
0.6
1.3
-0.5
2.5
0.9
-1.0
July
-2.3
1.0
0.3
1.8
-2.3
0.1
2.2
0.7
Aug.
0.3
1.6
0.6
2.5
-1.1
0.4
1.7
1.3
Sept.
0.5
-1.7
0.8
2.8
-0.2
-5.7
0.8
-1.3
Oct.
-0.9
-1.6
0.6
3.0
-1.1
-0.4
0.6
-4.1
Nov.
0.2
2.1
0.9
3.9
0.7
-1.0
3.1
-2.7
Dec.
-0.8
0
0.5
4.4
0.2
-2.3
2.3
-1.1
1995
Jan.
0.7
1.0
1.0
5.2
-0.1
-0.1
3.0
-2.2
Note: Figures shown above and elsewhere in this release may differ from
those previously reported because seasonal adjustment factors have been

recalculated to reflect developments through 1994. In addition, data for
September 1994 have been revised to reflect the availability of late
reports and corrections by respondents.
The index for consumer goods other than foods and energy inched up 0.1
percent in January after increasing 0.3 percent in the previous month.
Prices turned down in January after rising in December for prescription
drugs, apparel, alcoholic beverages, and periodicals. Prices rose much
less in January than in the previous month for passenger cars and light
trucks. Prices for tobacco products and newspaper circulation were
unchanged after moving up somewhat in December. By contrast, price
increases accelerated for cosmetics and sanitary papers. Prices turned up
after falling or showing no change a month earlier for textile
housefurnishings, books, and sporting goods.
The capital equipment index rose 0.3 percent in January after
advancing 0.4 percent in December. Increases were registered for civilian
aircraft, metal cutting machine tools, paper industry machinery, truck
trailers, and pumps and compressors. By contrast, prices for heavy trucks
declined 1.8 percent. Prices also moved down for transformers and power
regulators.
Intermediate goods
The Producer Price Index for Intermediate Materials, Supplies, and
Components increased 1.0 percent seasonally adjusted in January, after
rising 0.4 percent in December. When food and energy prices are excluded,
this index also increased 1.0 percent in January, following a 0.5 percent
advance in December. Prices for both durable and nondurable manufacturing
materials, construction materials, as well as containers rose more than in
December. The intermediate energy materials index increased after
remaining unchanged a month earlier, and the foods and feeds index turned
up after falling in December. (See table B.)
The index for nondurable manufacturing materials increased 2.0 percent
after rising 1.1 percent a month earlier. The rise in the paperboard index
accelerated to 4.9 percent in January from 0.1 percent in the previous
month. Prices for paper, plastic resins and materials, both intermediate
and miscellaneous organic chemicals, synthetic fibers, and phosphates also
rose more than in December. The index for alkalies and chlorine, however,
turned down 2.1 percent after rising 4.5 percent a month ago. Prices for
primary organic chemicals and for inedible fats and oils rose less than
they had in December.
The index for durable manufacturing materials moved up 1.8 percent in

January after a December advance of 1.0 percent. The rise in the aluminum
mill shapes index accelerated to 9.6 percent in January from 4.2 percent a
month earlier. Prices for semifinished steel mill products and cold rolled
steel sheets and strip also rose more than in December. Indexes for hot
rolled steel sheet and strip and flat glass turned up after falling in the
previous month. In addition, prices for hot rolled steel bars rose after
remaining unchanged a month earlier. The index for plywood, however,
turned down 3.1 percent after advancing 0.2 percent in December. Prices
for copper and brass mill shapes rose less than in December.
The rise in the container index accelerated to 1.9 percent in January
from 0.9 percent in December. This increase was mainly a result of the
paper boxes and containers index, which rose 2.4 percent after increasing
0.8 percent in the prior month.
Prices for materials and components for construction registered a 0.6
percent advance in January after increasing 0.2 percent in December.
Indexes for fabricated structural metal products, concrete products,
switchgear, and heating equipment rose more than in December. The decline
in the softwood lumber index slowed to 1.3 percent from 4.0 percent in
December. Prices for millwork were unchanged after falling month earlier.
By contrast, the plywood index turned down 3.1 percent after rising 0.2
percent a month earlier. Prices for gypsum products also fell after
advancing in December. In addition, indexes for plastic construction
products and nonferrous wire and cable rose less than in the prior month.
The index for intermediate energy goods rose 1.0 percent in January
after remaining unchanged the month before. The gasoline index turned up
7.9 percent after falling 3.0 percent in December. Prices for liquid
asphalt and natural gas to electric utilities also turned up in January
after falling in the prior month. In addition, the index for diesel fuel
fell less than in December, and residual fuel prices rose more than in the
previous month. In contrast, the jet fuels index
after rising 3.0 percent a month earlier. Prices
commercial natural gas also fell after increasing
commercial electric power and liquefied petroleum
had risen in the previous month.

turned down 1.3 percent
for both industrial and
in December. Indexes for
gas rose less than they

The Producer Price Index for intermediate foods and feeds turned up
0.7 percent in January after falling 0.8 percent in December. The beef and
veal index turned up 2.7 percent after falling 1.4 percent a month earlier.
Prices for prepared animal feeds and for natural and processed cheese also
turned up after falling in December. Indexes for pork, confectionery
materials, and refined sugar rose more in January than in December. In

addition, prices for miscellaneous beverage materials remained unchanged
after falling in the previous month. In contrast, the index for flour
turned down 0.3 percent after rising 0.7 percent a month earlier. Prices
for crude vegetable oils also fell after increasing in the previous month,
and the fluid milk products index fell more than in December.
Crude goods
The Producer Price Index for Crude Materials for Further Processing
moved up 1.0 percent in January after declining 0.4 percent in December.
The index for crude energy materials fell less than in December, and prices
for basic industrial materials rose more than in the prior month. By
contrast, the crude foodstuffs and feedstuffs index turned down after
rising a month earlier. (See table B.)
The index for crude energy materials declined 1.3 percent seasonally
adjusted in January, the third consecutive monthly decline. The natural
gas to pipelines index fell 2.8 percent. Crude petroleum prices rose 2.5
percent.
The rise in the crude nonfood materials less energy index accelerated
to 3.0 percent from 2.3 percent in December. The iron and steel scrap
index rose 4.8 percent in January after increasing 3.3 percent in the prior
month. Prices for wastepaper, raw cotton, pulpwood logs, and construction
sand and gravel also rose more than in December. The cattle hide index
turned up after falling a month earlier, and miscellaneous roundwood prices
were unchanged after falling in December. In contrast, the rise in the
index for copper base scrap slowed to 1.4 percent in January from 6.2
percent in the previous month.
The crude foodstuffs and feedstuffs index declined 0.1 percent in
January after increasing 0.2 percent in December. The fresh vegetables
except potatoes index turned down 33.2 percent following a 91.0 percent
rise in December. Prices for slaughter broilers, fluid milk, fresh fruits
and melons, and corn also turned down after increasing a month earlier.
The slaughter cattle index, however, turned up 2.6 percent after falling
about 1 percent in December. Prices for Louisiana rough rice and both
unprocessed finfish and shellfish also rose after declining a month
earlier. In addition, slaughter hog prices rose more than they had risen
in December.
Net output price indexes for mining, manufacturing, and other industries
Mining. The Producer Price Index for the net output of total domestic
mining industries decreased 0.4 percent in January after falling 0.8

percent in both December and November. (Net output price indexes are not
seasonally adjusted.) In January, price declines for the bituminous coal
and lignite mining industry group slowed to 0.3 percent from 7.2 percent a
month earlier. The index for nonmetallic minerals mining rose more rapidly
than a month earlier. Prices for the metal mining industry rose
substantially for the fifth consecutive month. The oil and gas extraction
industry group index, however, fell 1.0 percent after moving up 0.3 percent
in December.
Manufacturing. The Producer Price Index for total domestic manufacturing
industries turned up 0.6 percent in January, following a 0.2 percent
decline in December. Prices turned up after declining or showing no change
a month earlier for the industry groups for rubber and plastic products,
food and kindred products, textile mill products, and for electrical and
electronic machinery. Price increases accelerated for the industry groups
for primary metal industries, paper and allied products, nonmetallic
mineral products, fabricated metal products, nonelectrical machinery,
transportation equipment, and leather and leather products. Prices for the
petroleum refining industry group moved down 0.5 percent in January after
falling 5.7 percent in December. The index for the chemicals industry
group rose 1.3 percent for the second consecutive month. By contrast,
prices turned down after rising a month earlier for the apparel industry
group.
Other. Among other industries, prices for waste paper collection advanced
over 15 percent in January, the third consecutive substantial monthly
increase. The index for the U. S. Postal Service increased 10.3 percent,
reflecting across-the-board rate hikes for domestic services. Other
increases were for crude petroleum pipelines, metal scrap collection, water
transportation of freight, n.e.c., tugging and towing services, freight
transportation arrangement, hotels and motels, and health services. Prices
declined, however, for deep sea domestic transportation of freight, radio
broadcasting, scheduled air transportation, airports and airport services,
and passenger car rental.
Resampling of industries
Effective with this release, another set of resampled industries is
introduced. Under the resampling procedure, the sample for an industry is
updated to reflect current conditions more accurately when the structure,
membership, technology, or product mix of an industry has shifted
significantly. The Bureau of Labor Statistics published the first results
of this systematic process in July 1986. Subsequent efforts have been
completed at 6-month intervals.

Thirty-seven new or resampled industries are being introduced this
month. Among the newly introduced series are data for skilled and
intermediate nursing care facilities and for building cleaning and
maintenance services, n.e.c. Indexes for these industries and most of
their products will continue to appear in table 5 of the monthly detailed
report, Producer Price Indexes.
Standard
Industrial
Classification
(SIC)
code
1475
2079
2095
2211
2221
2257
2261
2262
2269
2411
2711
3211
3291
3353
3354
3355
3411
3443
3498
3523
3524
3533
3534
3559
3571
3572
3579
3596
3634
3663

Industry

Phosphate rock
Shortening, table oils, and other edible fats and oils, n.e.c.
Roasted coffee
Broadwoven fabric mills, cotton
Broadwoven fabric mills, manmade fiber and silk
Weft knit fabric
Finishers of broadwoven fabrics of cotton
Finishers of broadwoven fabrics of manmade fiber and silk
Finishers of textiles, n.e.c.
Logging
Newspaper publishing
Flat glass
Abrasive products
Aluminum sheet, plate, and foil
Aluminum extruded products
-6Aluminum rolling and drawing, n.e.c.
Metal cans
Fabricated plate work (boiler shapes)
Fabricated pipe and pipe fittings
Farm machinery and equipment
Lawn and garden tractors and home and garden equipment
Oil and gas field machinery and equipment
Elevators and moving stairways
Special industry machinery, n.e.c.
Electronic computers
Computer storage devices
Office machines, n.e.c.
Scales and balances, except laboratory
Electric housewares and fans
Radio and television broadcasting communications equipment

3714
3728
4731
7349
8053

Motor vehicle parts and accessories
Aircraft parts and auxiliary equipment, n.e.c.
Arrangement of transportation of freight and cargo
Building cleaning and maintenance services, n.e.c.
Skilled and intermediate nursing care facilities

For information on specific additions, deletions, and recodes of
indexes that are effective this month, see tables 13 through 18 of Producer
Price Indexes, Data for January 1995.
New seasonal adjustment method implemented
Effective with this release, a new methodology has been used to
calculate seasonally adjusted data. In January, BLS switched from the
Bureau of the Census' X-11 program to a new system for calculating its
Commodity and Stage-of-Processing indexes. Central to this change is the
use of Statistics Canada's X-11ARIMA/88 methodology (Dagum 1988) for
seasonal adjustment. This methodology for seasonal adjustment incorporates
a number of technical enhancements that improve the estimation of seasonal
factors. To receive a summary report on the new methodology, please
contact our Branch of Information and Analysis at 202-606-7705, or see
"Summary of changes to the Producer Price Index seasonal adjustment
methodology" in the January 1995 issue of Producer Price Indexes.
Recalculation of Seasonal Adjustment Factors
Effective with this release, seasonal adjustment factors have been
recalculated to reflect 1994 price movement patterns for stage-ofprocessing (SOP) and commodity groupings. This routine annual
recalculation may affect seasonally adjusted indexes and percent changes
from January 1990 to the present. Revised seasonally adjusted data for
this period, as well as seasonal factors to be used through December 1995,
are available on request from BLS. Table C shows 1994 monthly seasonally
adjusted percent changes for the three major SOP categories calculated with
the old seasonal factors, compared with the percent changes for
recalculated indexes. The latter incorporate the new seasonal factors that
reflect 1994 price movement patterns and the impact of the new seasonal
adjustment methodology mentioned above.
-7Table C. Over-the-month percent changes in major stage-of-processing
indexes, seasonally adjusted, using former and recalculated seasonal
factors for 1994
Finished Goods
Intermediate Goods
Crude Goods
Month
Former
Recalculated
Former
Recalculated
Former Recalculated

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

0.3
0.4

0.5
0.2
0.2 0
0
0
-0.2 -0.1
0.1 0.1
0.5 0.2
0.5 0.6
-0.3 -0.3
-0.5 -0.4
0.5 0.6
0.2 0.4

0.1
0.4
0.1
0.6
0.4
0.3
0.3
1.1
0.3

0.3
0.3
0.2
0
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.6
0.4
0.3
0.9
0.4

0.1
0

0.7

1.7 1.3
-1.4 -0.6
1.3 1.2
-0.2 0.6
-1.5 -1.5
0.8 1.1
-0.5 -0.4
0.1 0.0
-2.1 -2.4
-0.6 -0.2
1.0 0.5
0.3 -0.4

In addition, Intervention Analysis Seasonal Adjustment (IASA) methods
were introduced to calculate seasonally adjusted data for electric power
and residential natural gas. This methodology improves the quality of the
seasonal factor estimates for these indexes.
*****
Producer Price Index data for February 1995 will be
released on Wednesday, March 15, at 8:30 a.m. (E.S.T.)
*****
Information in this news release will be made available to sensory impaired
individuals upon request. Voice phone: 202-606-7828; TDD phone: 202-6065897; TDD Message Referral phone: 1-800-326-2577.
Table 1. Producer Price Indexes and percent changes by stage of processing
(1982=100)
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
|
|
|Unadjusted
|
|
|
| percent
|Seasonally adjusted
| Relative |
Unadjusted index
|change to
|percent change from:
Grouping
|importance|
|Jan. 1995 from:|
|
|_______________________|_______________|_______________________________
|
Dec.
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Sept. |Dec.
|Jan.
| Jan. | Dec. |Oct. to|Nov. to |Dec. to
|
1994 1/|1994 2/|1994 2/|1995 2/| 1994 | 1994 | Nov. |
Dec. | Jan.
_________________________________________________|__________|_______|_______|_______|_______|_______|_______|_________|____________
|
Finished goods...................................| 100.000
125.6
126.2
126.5
1.6
0.2
0.6
0.4
0.3
Finished consumer goods........................|
76.503
123.5
123.9
124.0
1.5
.1
.7
.4
.3
Finished consumer foods......................|
22.779
126.3
128.5
127.8
.6
-.5
.8
1.4
-.6
Crude......................................|
1.746
106.6
142.0
119.8
-3.5 -15.6
10.7
24.2
-16.2
Processed..................................|
21.034
127.8
127.5
128.3
.9
.6
.2
-.1
.6
Finished consumer goods, excluding foods.....|
53.724
122.2
121.7
122.2
1.9
.4
.7
-.1
.7
Nondurable goods less foods................|
35.826
117.8
115.8
116.4
2.1
.5
.9
-.3
.9
Durable goods..............................|
17.898
129.2
132.2
132.6
1.6
.3
.3
.3
.2

Capital equipment..............................|
23.497
Manufacturing industries.....................|
6.077
Nonmanufacturing industries..................|
17.420
|
Intermediate materials, supplies, and components.| 100.000
Materials and components for manufacturing.....|
49.653
Materials for food manufacturing.............|
3.209
Materials for nondurable manufacturing.......|
15.715
Materials for durable manufacturing..........|
11.851
Components for manufacturing 3/..............|
18.878
Materials and components for construction......|
14.138
Processed fuels and lubricants.................|
12.598
Manufacturing industries ....................|
5.165
Nonmanufacturing industries..................|
7.433
Containers.....................................|
3.606
Supplies.......................................|
20.005
Manufacturing industries.....................|
7.502
Nonmanufacturing industries..................|
12.503
Feeds......................................|
1.183
Other supplies.............................|
11.320
|
Crude materials for further processing...........| 100.000
Foodstuffs and feedstuffs......................|
40.376
Nonfood materials..............................|
59.624
Nonfood materials except fuel 4/.............|
41.862
Manufacturing 4/...........................|
36.331
Construction...............................|
5.531
Crude fuel 5/................................|
17.762
Manufacturing industries...................|
3.836
Nonmanufacturing industries................|
13.926
|
Special groupings
|
|
Finished goods, excluding foods..................|6/ 77.221
Intermediate materials less foods and feeds......|7/ 95.608
Intermediate foods and feeds.....................|7/ 4.392
Crude materials less agricultural products 4/ 8/.|9/ 58.465
|
Finished energy goods............................|6/ 13.556
Finished goods less energy.......................|6/ 86.444
Finished consumer goods less energy..............|6/ 62.947
|
Finished goods less foods and energy.............|6/ 63.665
Finished consumer goods less foods and energy....|6/ 40.168
Consumer nondurable goods less foods and energy..|6/ 22.270

133.5
133.1
133.6

135.1
134.1
135.4

135.8
134.6
136.1

1.9
1.7
1.9

.5
.4
.5

.1
.1
.1

.4
.3
.4

.3
.4
.2

120.1
123.7
118.5
122.3
127.4
124.5
137.5
86.6
89.5
84.8
131.6
127.2
131.2
125.1
102.8
128.2

121.1
126.2
117.5
126.8
131.8
124.8
139.4
82.4
85.2
80.6
137.3
128.2
133.2
125.6
97.5
129.6

122.2
127.8
118.0
129.3
134.2
125.4
140.4
82.1
85.2
80.0
139.5
129.2
134.2
126.5
97.8
130.5

5.2
6.9
-.8
12.5
11.3
1.5
4.0
3.3
2.5
3.6
10.5
2.2
3.7
1.3
-12.3
2.9

.9
1.3
.4
2.0
1.8
.5
.7
-.4
0
-.7
1.6
.8
.8
.7
.3
.7

.9
.9
1.4
1.0
1.6
.2
.9
2.2
1.8
2.4
1.5
.4
.7
.2
-3.1
.5

.4
.6
-.3
1.1
1.0
0
.2
0
.2
0
.9
.2
.4
.2
-1.2
.3

1.0
1.2
.6
2.0
1.8
.5
.6
1.0
.9
.9
1.9
.6
.8
.6
.2
.6

99.7
101.3
94.8
99.1
90.8
195.1
78.6
78.4
79.7

99.9
101.7
94.9
100.7
92.3
196.2
76.0
76.0
77.0

100.9
102.1
96.1
103.5
95.2
197.7
74.4
74.6
75.3

-2.2
-9.0
2.8
16.8
20.4
-2.1
-20.7
-18.6
-21.2

1.0
.4
1.3
2.8
3.1
.8
-2.1
-1.8
-2.2

.5
.7
.3
2.1
2.4
.1
-4.0
-3.7
-3.9

-.4
.2
-.9
-1.0
-1.2
.6
-.4
-.4
-.4

1.0
-.1
1.8
2.7
2.9
.6
-4.7
-3.9
-4.8

125.3
120.4
113.9
93.9

125.5
121.6
111.5
93.8

126.0
122.7
112.0
94.9

1.9
5.6
-4.1
2.3

.4
.9
.4
1.2

.5
1.0
.2
0

.1
.5
-.8
-1.0

.6
1.0
.7
1.6

79.6
133.6
133.6

75.8
135.4
135.5

76.5
135.5
135.4

3.9
1.2
1.0

.9
.1
-.1

2.2
.3
.4

-1.0
.6
.7

2.3
0
-.1

136.4
138.2
144.6

138.1
139.9
145.1

138.6
140.3
145.5

1.5
1.2
1.0

.4
.3
.3

.1
.1
.1

.3
.3
.2

.2
.1
.1

|
Intermediate energy goods........................|7/ 12.739
86.5
82.3
82.0
3.1
-.4
2.1
0
1.0
Intermediate materials less energy...............|7/ 87.261
127.5
129.7
131.1
5.5
1.1
.8
.4
1.0
Intermediate materials less foods and energy.....|7/ 82.869
128.3
130.8
132.3
6.0
1.1
.9
.5
1.0
|
Crude energy materials 4/........................|9/ 34.502
71.3
68.7
68.6
-5.9
-.1
-1.7
-3.0
-1.3
Crude materials less energy......................|9/ 65.498
116.4
119.0
120.9
-.2
1.6
1.6
1.0
1.1
Crude nonfood materials less energy 5/...........|9/ 25.122
159.2
168.0
173.7
17.4
3.4
3.1
2.3
3.0
|
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1/

Comprehensive relative importance figures are computed
6/ Percent of total finished goods.
once each year in December.
7/ Percent of total intermediate materials.
2/ Data for Sept. 1994 have been revised to reflect the availability
8/ Formerly titled "Crude materials for
of late reports and corrections by respondents. All data are subject
further processing, excluding crude
to revision 4 months after original publication.
foodstuffs and feedstuffs, plant and
3/ Not seasonally adjusted.
animal fibers, oilseeds, and leaf tobacco."
4/ Includes crude petroleum.
9/ Percent of total crude materials.
5/ Excludes crude petroleum.
Table 2. Producer Price Indexes and percent changes for selected commodity groupings by stage of processing
(1982=100 unless otherwise indicated)
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
|
|
|Unadjusted
|
|
|
| percent
|Seasonally adjusted
|
|
Unadjusted index
|change to
|percent change from:
Commodity |
|
|Jan. 1995 from:|
code
|
Grouping
|_______________________|_______________|________________________
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|Sept. |Dec.
|Jan.
| Jan. | Dec. |Oct. to|Nov. to|Dec. to
|
|1994 1/|1994 1/|1995 1/| 1994 | 1994 | Nov. | Dec. | Jan.
___________|_______________________________________________________|_______|_______|_______|_______|_______|_______|_______|________
|
|
|FINISHED GOODS.........................................| 125.6
126.2
126.5
1.6
0.2
0.6
0.4
0.3
| FINISHED CONSUMER GOODS...............................| 123.5
123.9
124.0
1.5
.1
.7
.4
.3
| FINISHED CONSUMER FOODS..............................| 126.3
128.5
127.8
.6
-.5
.8
1.4
-.6
|
|
01-11
|
Fresh fruits and melons 2/..........................| 85.2
83.5
81.7
-1.2
-2.2
-4.9
17.3
-2.2
01-13
|
Fresh and dry vegetables 2/.........................| 111.7
215.2
157.9
2.3 -26.6
13.4
61.4
-26.6
01-71-07
|
Eggs for fresh use (Dec. 1991=100) 2/...............| 81.4
85.9
78.7
-5.1
-8.4
14.2
1.1
-8.4
02-11
|
Bakery products 2/..................................| 160.5
161.9
162.2
2.3
.2
.4
.2
.2
02-13
|
Milled rice 2/......................................| 103.8
99.5
99.4
-31.5
-.1
-1.2
-.2
-.1
02-14-02
|
Pasta products (June 1985=100) 2/...................| 122.3
127.4
127.4
6.3
0
-.9
0
0
02-21-01
|
Beef and veal.......................................| 101.1
101.3
104.2
-.8
2.9
.9
-1.4
2.7
02-21-04
|
Pork................................................| 98.0
90.1
95.7
-8.0
6.2
-.5
.1
5.8
02-22-03
|
Processed young chickens............................| 114.2
104.9
108.0
-1.5
3.0
-1.5
-.7
2.7

02-22-06
02-23
02-3
02-4
02-55
02-62
02-63-01
02-76

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
02-61
|
03-81-01
|
03-81-02
|
03-81-03
|
03-82
|
04-3
|
05-41
|
05-51
|
05-71
|
05-73-02-01|
06-35
|
06-36
|
06-71
|
06-75
|
07-12
|
09-15-01
|
09-31-01
|
09-32-01
|
09-33
|
12-1
|
12-3
|
12-4
|
12-5
|
12-62
|
12-64
|
12-66
|
14-11-01
|
15-11
|
15-12
|
15-2
|
15-5
|
15-94-02
|
15-94-04
|
|

Processed turkeys...................................|
Finfish and shellfish...............................|
Dairy products......................................|
Processed fruits and vegetables.....................|
Confectionery end products 2/.......................|
Soft drinks.........................................|
Roasted coffee......................................|
Shortening and cooking oils 2/......................|
|
FINISHED CONSUMER GOODS EXCLUDING FOODS..............|
|
Alcoholic beverages.................................|
Women's apparel 2/..................................|
Men's and boys' apparel.............................|
Girls', children's, and infants' apparel 2/.........|
Textile housefurnishings 2/.........................|
Footwear............................................|
Residential electric power (Dec. 1990=100)..........|
Residential gas (Dec. 1990=100).....................|
Gasoline............................................|
Fuel oil No. 2......................................|
Pharmaceutical preps, ethical (Prescription)........|
Pharmaceutical preps,proprietary (Over-counter).....|
Soaps and synthetic detergents 2/...................|
Cosmetics and other toilet preparations 2/..........|
Tires, tubes, tread, etc 2/.........................|
Sanitary papers and health products 2/..............|
Newspaper circulation...............................|
Periodical circulation..............................|
Book publishing 2/..................................|
Household furniture.................................|
Floor coverings 2/..................................|
Household appliances 2/.............................|
Home electronic equipment 2/........................|
Household glassware 2/..............................|
Household flatware 2/...............................|
Lawn and garden equip., ex. tractors 2/.............|
Passenger cars......................................|
Toys, games, and children's vehicles................|
Sporting and athletic goods 2/......................|
Tobacco products....................................|
Mobile homes 2/.....................................|
Jewelry, platinum, & karat gold 2/..................|
Costume jewelry and novelties 2/....................|
|

111.8
162.1
118.8
120.6
157.3
126.3
151.4
135.0

104.8
162.2
118.5
119.4
156.1
127.4
153.2
144.4

97.2
170.2
116.9
120.0
156.1
130.6
150.2
147.9

-8.0
-.6
-2.8
-.7
.3
2.9
47.3
5.6

-7.3
4.9
-1.4
.5
0
2.5
-2.0
2.4

-1.4
1.8
.7
-.6
-.4
.1
1.5
3.4

-1.6
-2.7
-.5
-.3
-.5
.4
1.5
2.0

-2.8
.6
-.6
.4
0
1.3
-.8
2.4

122.2

121.7

122.2

1.9

.4

.7

-.1

.7

124.2
119.6
128.8
119.2
117.4
135.6
113.0
107.5
67.0
57.8
250.7
184.7
121.5
128.4
98.3
133.1
176.5
172.1
176.7
138.6
121.2
112.7
79.9
150.1
136.7
129.0
129.2
122.5
120.1
224.9
138.0
127.8
134.4

124.9
119.6
129.1
118.6
118.2
136.4
108.8
107.6
58.3
57.0
251.9
185.0
121.4
128.7
98.8
133.1
177.9
172.9
178.8
139.5
121.5
112.5
79.9
149.6
138.0
129.6
135.9
122.8
120.1
224.9
141.7
127.6
134.4

125.3
118.7
129.2
118.2
119.3
137.0
110.0
108.1
59.4
54.5
250.1
184.5
121.5
130.5
98.5
133.8
178.8
174.8
180.2
139.9
121.7
112.5
80.1
151.1
138.0
129.8
136.0
122.9
121.0
225.0
142.4
127.8
134.4

-.9
-1.0
.9
-1.8
2.0
1.1
2.5
-2.5
11.2
4.8
.9
1.7
-.1
1.0
.1
.4
3.7
2.9
4.8
2.8
.2
-.3
-.7
5.6
5.3
1.9
1.7
.8
.7
.1
7.4
.2
.7

.3
-.8
.1
-.3
.9
.4
1.1
.5
1.9
-4.4
-.7
-.3
.1
1.4
-.3
.5
.5
1.1
.8
.3
.2
0
.3
1.0
0
.2
.1
.1
.7
0
.5
.2
0

0
-.5
.2
-.7
.4
.1
1.9
.3
4.5
3.3
1.1
.3
-.2
-1.4
.9
-.3
0
.5
1.1
0
.5
-.1
-.1
0
0
.1
.4
.7
0
.2
.9
-.2
0

.2
.2
.2
.3

-.4
-.8
-.3
-.3
.9
.2
1.4
.5
7.9
-5.2
-1.4
-.1
.1
1.4
-.3
.5
0
-.6
.8
.3
.2
0
.3
1.0
0
.2
.1
-.2
.7
0
.5
.2
0

0

.1
-1.2
-.1
-3.0
3.0
.3
.3
.1
.8
-.5
.2
.7
.3
-.1
.4
-.2
-.3
0
-.5
.8
.4
.4
.2
-.2
.3
.5
.1
0

11-1
11-2
11-37
11-38
11-39
11-41
11-44
11-51
11-62
11-64
11-65
11-74
11-76
11-79-05
11-91
11-92
11-93
12-2
14-11-05
14-11-06
14-14
14-21-02
14-31
14-4

02-12-03
02-53
02-54
02-72
02-9

03-1
03-2
03-3
03-4
03-83-03
04-2

| CAPITAL EQUIPMENT.....................................|
|
|
|
Agricultural machinery and equipment 2/.............|
|
Construction machinery and equipment................|
|
Metal cutting machine tools 2/......................|
|
Metal forming machine tools 2/......................|
|
Tools, dies, jigs, fixtures, and ind. molds 2/......|
|
Pumps, compressors, and equipment...................|
|
Industrial material handling equipment 2/...........|
|
Electronic computers (Dec. 1990=100) 2/.............|
|
Textile machinery 2/................................|
|
Paper industries machinery (June 1982=100) 2/.......|
|
Printing trades machinery 2/........................|
|
Transformers and power regulators 2/................|
|
Communication & related equip. (Dec. 1985=100) 2/...|
|
X-ray and electromedical equipment 2/...............|
|
Oil field and gas field machinery 2/................|
|
Mining machinery and equipment 2/...................|
|
Office and store machines and equipment 2/..........|
|
Commercial furniture 2/.............................|
|
Light motor trucks..................................|
|
Heavy motor trucks..................................|
|
Truck trailers 2/...................................|
|
Civilian aircraft (Dec. 1985=100) 2/................|
|
Ships (Dec. 1985=100) 2/............................|
|
Railroad equipment 2/...............................|
|
|
|INTERMEDIATE MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, AND COMPONENTS.......|
|
|
| INTERMEDIATE FOODS AND FEEDS..........................|
|
|
|
Flour 2/............................................|
|
Refined sugar 2/....................................|
|
Confectionery materials.............................|
|
Crude vegetable oils 2/.............................|
|
Prepared animal feeds 2/............................|
|
|
| INTERMEDIATE MATERIALS LESS FOODS AND FEEDS...........|
|
|
|
Synthetic fibers 2/.................................|
|
Processed yarns and threads 2/......................|
|
Gray fabrics 2/.....................................|
|
Finished fabrics....................................|
|
Industrial textile products 2/......................|
|
Leather 2/..........................................|

133.5

135.1

135.8

1.9

.5

.1

.4

.3

137.5
133.8
143.9
142.3
131.8
135.4
122.7
57.7
145.1
147.7
131.3
125.7
110.8
112.1
110.8
130.9
111.0
144.8
152.3
140.5
124.3
136.1
131.3
129.9

138.2
134.2
143.9
143.7
132.2
135.9
123.5
56.0
145.5
147.8
131.8
127.2
111.0
112.1
112.0
133.5
111.1
145.4
159.4
142.1
129.2
135.9
131.3
130.2

138.4
135.3
145.1
143.9
132.3
137.6
123.9
56.0
145.5
149.0
132.2
126.7
111.6
112.0
112.2
133.8
111.0
146.0
160.0
139.5
130.2
139.0
131.9
131.1

1.9
1.4
2.5
2.6
1.8
2.3
1.7
-6.0
.7
1.6
1.5
2.3
1.5
-1.8
2.2
2.7
-.4
2.0
2.6
1.7
8.6
3.9
1.2
2.5

.1
.8
.8
.1
.1
1.3
.3
0
0
.8
.3
-.4
.5
-.1
.2
.2
-.1
.4
.4
-1.8
.8
2.3
.5
.7

.1
.1
.6
.4
.1
.1
.3
-2.8
0
.1
0
-.4
.5
.1
-.1
.6
0
.6
-.7
-.1
1.3
.1
0
0

.4
.2
-.4
0
.2
.3
.2
.4
.2
0
0
.5
-.1
0
.1
.3
0
.1
1.4
2.0
2.5
-.5
0
0

.1
.2
.8
.1
.1
.7
.3
0
0
.8
.3
-.4
.5
-.1
.2
.2
-.1
.4
.2
-1.8
.8
2.3
.5
.7

120.1

121.1

122.2

5.2

.9

.9

.4

1.0

113.9

111.5

112.0

-4.1

.4

.2

-.8

.7

111.0
117.9
117.8
132.7
109.0

113.9
119.3
107.1
141.5
104.0

113.6
120.0
108.8
140.2
104.2

-.3
1.9
1.8
-1.5
-10.1

-.3
.6
1.6
-.9
.2

-1.5
.5
-.4
8.9
-2.4

.7

.5
.1
-.7

-.3
.6
1.5
-.9
.2

120.4

121.6

122.7

5.6

.9

1.0

.5

1.0

105.9
109.0
117.6
119.1
117.5
184.4

104.0
110.2
117.7
119.5
117.4
190.7

105.9
111.3
118.2
119.8
117.5
191.5

2.0
3.9
1.5
.5
1.6
11.9

1.8
1.0
.4
.3
.1
.4

-.6
.5
.2
.4
0
1.2

.5
.3
.5
-.2
.2
.5

1.8
1.0
.4
.2
.1
.4

0

05-32
|
Liquefied petroleum gas.............................| 60.0
64.4
63.8
15.2
-.9
5.0
4.1
2.5
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
See footnotes at end of table.
Table 2. Producer Price Indexes and percent changes for selected commodity groupings by stage of processing - Continued
(1982=100 unless otherwise indicated)
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
|
|
|Unadjusted
|
|
|
| percent
|Seasonally adjusted
|
|
Unadjusted index
|change to
|percent change from:
Commodity |
|
|Jan. 1995 from:|
code
|
Grouping
|_______________________|_______________|________________________
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|Sept. |Dec.
|Jan.
| Jan. | Dec. |Oct. to|Nov. to|Dec. to
|
|1994 1/|1994 1/|1995 1/| 1994 | 1994 | Nov. | Dec. | Jan.
___________|_______________________________________________________|_______|_______|_______|_______|_______|_______|_______|________
|
|
| INTERMEDIATE MATERIALS LESS FOODS AND FEEDS
|
|
-Continued..........................................|
05-42
|
Commercial electric power...........................| 136.9
126.9
127.5
2.7
0.5
1.0
0.5
0.2
05-43
|
Industrial electric power...........................| 134.9
127.5
127.9
1.3
.3
1.2
.2
.2
05-52
|
Commercial natural gas (Dec. 1990=100) 2/...........| 99.8
102.3
102.2
-6.2
-.1
2.5
.6
-.1
05-53
|
Industrial natural gas (Dec. 1990=100) 2/...........| 95.3
97.3
97.0
-6.7
-.3
2.4
.9
-.3
05-54
|
Natural gas to electric utilities (Dec. 1990=100) 2/| 87.2
98.0
99.0
7.4
1.0
13.8
-.7
1.0
05-72-03
|
Jet fuels...........................................| 55.6
57.0
52.5
6.5
-7.9
.8
3.0
-1.3
05-73-03
|
No. 2 Diesel fuel...................................| 57.7
54.3
52.1
1.4
-4.1
5.1
-4.8
-1.1
05-74
|
Residual fuel.......................................| 54.7
50.9
50.2
18.4
-1.4
-2.3
.8
4.4
06-1
|
Industrial chemicals 2/.............................| 119.8
124.2
126.1
16.1
1.5
.6
1.3
1.5
06-21
|
Prepared paint 2/...................................| 135.6
136.4
137.9
2.8
1.1
.1
.4
1.1
06-22
|
Paint materials 2/..................................| 133.3
135.8
137.9
5.4
1.5
.4
1.3
1.5
06-31
|
Medicinal and botanical chemicals 2/................| 125.6
126.3
125.7
.3
-.5
.6
0
-.5
06-4
|
Fats and oils, inedible 2/..........................| 116.1
140.3
143.3
43.4
2.1
3.1
14.8
2.1
06-51
|
Mixed fertilizers...................................| 106.5
107.3
108.6
6.4
1.2
.2
-.1
.8
06-52-01
|
Nitrogenates........................................| 114.9
121.7
129.4
27.2
6.3
.7
1.8
5.1
06-52-02
|
Phosphates 2/.......................................| 97.2
100.1
105.2
19.5
5.1
-.4
1.0
5.1
06-53
|
Other agricultural chemicals........................| 141.4
144.0
143.5
3.8
-.3
.2
.5
-.9
06-6
|
Plastic resins and materials 2/.....................| 126.3
136.0
140.4
22.1
3.2
2.0
2.3
3.2
07-11-02
|
Synthetic rubber 2/.................................| 110.9
115.5
118.9
12.6
2.9
.7
.1
2.9
07-21
|
Plastic construction products 2/....................| 126.1
129.2
129.4
9.2
.2
.9
.8
.2
07-22
|
Unsupported plastic film, sheet, & other shapes 2/..| 123.5
129.2
131.8
9.7
2.0
2.3
.7
2.0
07-26
|
Plastic parts and components for manufacturing 2/...| 113.5
113.9
114.1
.5
.2
.2
.1
.2
08-11
|
Softwood lumber.....................................| 192.9
189.5
189.0
-12.8
-.3
-.8
-4.0
-1.3
08-12
|
Hardwood lumber 2/..................................| 168.8
169.3
169.6
1.9
.2
-.2
.5
.2
08-2
|
Millwork............................................| 161.6
163.5
163.9
.7
.2
.5
-.1
0
08-3
|
Plywood 2/..........................................| 165.7
172.8
167.4
4.8
-3.1
5.0
.2
-3.1
09-11
|
Woodpulp 2/.........................................| 123.4
138.9
143.6
42.3
3.4
-1.0
3.0
3.4

09-13
09-14
09-15-03
09-2
09-37
10-15
10-17
10-22
10-25-01
10-25-02
10-26
10-3
10-4
10-5
10-6
10-7
10-88
10-89
11-45
11-48
11-49-02
11-49-05
11-71
11-73
11-75
11-78
11-94
11-95
13-11
13-22
13-3
13-6
13-7
13-8
14-12
14-23
14-25
15-42
15-6

01-21

|
Paper 2/............................................|
|
Paperboard 2/.......................................|
|
Paper boxes and containers 2/.......................|
|
Building paper and board 2/.........................|
|
Commercial printing (June 1982=100) 2/..............|
|
Foundry and forge shop products.....................|
|
Steel mill products 2/..............................|
|
Primary nonferrous metals 2/........................|
|
Aluminum mill shapes 2/.............................|
|
Copper and brass mill shapes 2/.....................|
|
Nonferrous wire and cable 2/........................|
|
Metal containers 2/.................................|
|
Hardware............................................|
|
Plumbing fixtures and brass fittings................|
|
Heating equipment...................................|
|
Fabricated structural metal products 2/.............|
|
Fabricated ferrous wire products (June 1982=100) 2/.|
|
Other misc. metal products 2/.......................|
|
Mechanical power transmission equipment.............|
|
Air conditioning and refrigeration equipment........|
|
Metal valves, ex.fluid power (Dec. 1982=100)........|
|
Ball and roller bearings 2/.........................|
|
Wiring devices......................................|
|
Motors, generators, motor generator sets............|
|
Switchgear, switchboard, etc., equipment............|
|
Electronic components and accessories 2/............|
|
Internal combustion engines.........................|
|
Machine shop products 2/............................|
|
Flat glass 2/.......................................|
|
Cement..............................................|
|
Concrete products...................................|
|
Asphalt felts and coatings..........................|
|
Gypsum products 2/..................................|
|
Glass containers 2/.................................|
|
Motor vehicle parts.................................|
|
Aircraft engines & engine parts (Dec. 1985=100).....|
|
Aircraft parts & aux.equip.,nec (June 1985=100) 2/..|
|
Photographic supplies 2/............................|
|
Medical/surgical/personal aid devices...............|
|
|
| CRUDE MATERIALS FOR FURTHER PROCESSING................|
|
|
| CRUDE FOODSTUFFS AND FEEDSTUFFS......................|
|
|
|
Wheat...............................................|

128.0
146.9
139.1
148.6
137.0
124.4
114.8
122.9
129.1
177.1
143.2
108.2
138.0
160.3
143.0
128.7
122.9
122.9
140.7
127.3
141.3
146.1
142.3
140.5
137.1
115.9
133.6
130.3
111.4
121.7
125.3
95.6
146.2
128.2
114.6
130.6
134.3
122.7
140.7

136.1
156.6
146.7
149.8
139.0
124.9
115.7
144.0
141.2
195.7
150.1
109.1
138.5
161.0
143.1
130.6
123.6
123.8
141.2
127.2
142.2
147.4
143.8
140.9
137.4
114.9
133.8
130.9
111.9
122.3
126.7
95.9
149.4
128.5
114.6
130.8
134.1
123.4
141.1

140.2
164.2
150.2
148.2
139.7
126.6
117.6
150.4
154.8
196.9
151.6
109.5
139.2
161.7
145.3
131.9
123.9
124.3
143.9
128.3
142.8
148.5
145.0
142.2
139.4
114.6
134.8
131.0
112.3
123.3
127.5
96.3
147.7
128.3
114.7
133.5
134.9
124.4
141.7

14.4
26.1
15.4
6.8
3.2
3.4
5.6
59.7
29.6
34.9
14.4
.5
2.1
2.7
2.9
5.6
1.8
1.8
3.4
1.3
3.3
2.5
3.9
1.9
3.2
-2.4
1.7
1.6
4.5
7.6
4.1
.5
30.7
1.3
.9
2.2
1.4
-1.5
1.7

3.0
4.9
2.4
-1.1
.5
1.4
1.6
4.4
9.6
.6
1.0
.4
.5
.4
1.5
1.0
.2
.4
1.9
.9
.4
.7
.8
.9
1.5
-.3
.7
.1
.4
.8
.6
.4
-1.1
-.2
.1
2.1
.6
.8
.4

2.1
3.4
1.8
2.0
.3
.1
.4
5.8
3.4
6.5
2.4
.3
.2
.5
.1
.9
.5
.5
.3
.1
1.3
.3
.5
.1
.1
-.2
.1
.1
1.6
.4
.4
-.2
-1.9
0
.1
.1
.2
.2
.2

1.9
.1
.8
-.2
.7
.2
.1
5.8
4.2
3.3
1.8
.5
.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
-.1
.3
.3
-.1
.1
-.6
.4
.2
-1.7
.7
.2
.4
2.2
.2
.2
-.1
-.1
-.2
.1

3.0
4.9
2.4
-1.1
.5
1.2
1.6
4.4
9.6
.6
1.0
.4
.2
.4
.9
1.0
.2
.4
1.4
.6
-.1
.7
.6
.7
1.4
-.3
.1
.1
.4
.6
.5
.3
-1.1
-.2
.2
1.1
.6
.8
0

99.7

99.9

100.9

-2.2

1.0

.5

-.4

1.0

101.3

101.7

102.1

-9.0

.4

.7

.2

-.1

105.7

108.8

105.8

-6.5

-2.8

-4.2

-3.3

-3.5

01-22-02-05|
01-31
|
01-32
|
01-41-02
|
01-42
|
01-6
|
01-83-01-31|
02-52-01-01|

Corn................................................|
Slaughter cattle....................................|
Slaughter hogs......................................|
Slaughter broilers/fryers...........................|
Slaughter turkeys...................................|
Fluid milk..........................................|
Soybeans............................................|
Cane sugar,raw 2/...................................|

88.7
100.7
59.8
129.3
131.5
94.9
97.0
114.4

89.5
103.3
52.7
111.3
128.6
94.2
94.8
116.0

90.3
107.4
60.4
111.1
104.7
92.1
93.3
117.7

-24.3
-2.5
-14.7
-3.5
4.0
-7.3
-19.8
2.3

.9
4.0
14.6
-.2
-18.6
-2.2
-1.6
1.5

-1.9
3.4
-11.1
-8.1
2.1
-1.6
2.7
0

.2
-1.1
12.4
6.3
-2.5
.9
-3.0
2.5

-.3
2.6
16.6
-6.8
-2.1
-1.3
-2.3
1.5

|
|
| CRUDE NONFOOD MATERIALS..............................| 94.8
94.9
96.1
2.8
1.3
.3
-.9
1.8
|
|
01-51-01-01|
Raw cotton..........................................| 122.5
133.3
144.4
33.8
8.3
12.6
3.7
6.0
01-92-01-01|
Leaf tobacco........................................| 102.8
107.4
107.4
1.8
0
-.2
1.3
1.7
04-11
|
Cattle hides........................................| 211.5
223.1
221.2
23.0
-.9
-.9
-3.2
1.0
05-1
|
Coal 2/.............................................| 97.8
93.0
92.9
-4.5
-.1
2.3
-6.6
-.1
05-31
|
Natural gas (to pipelines) 2/.......................| 74.2
71.2
69.2
-25.5
-2.8
-3.6
2.3
-2.8
05-61
|
Crude petroleum 2/..................................| 48.3
47.2
48.4
23.2
2.5
-.6
-3.9
2.5
08-5
|
Logs, timber, etc. 2/...............................| 212.6
214.3
215.9
-3.5
.7
.2
.4
.7
09-12
|
Wastepaper 2/.......................................| 260.1
293.6
344.6
216.7
17.4
7.3
9.8
17.4
10-11
|
Iron ore 2/.........................................| 82.6
83.7
83.7
1.3
0
1.3
0
0
10-12
|
Iron and steel scrap 2/.............................| 193.3
200.9
210.5
3.3
4.8
2.3
3.3
4.8
10-21
|
Nonferrous metal ores (Dec. 1983=100) 2/............| 88.9
95.9
100.1
45.9
4.4
2.7
3.9
4.4
10-23-01
|
Copper base scrap 2/................................| 165.4
186.0
188.6
48.5
1.4
6.2
6.2
1.4
10-23-02
|
Aluminum base scrap.................................| 182.2
227.4
241.5
87.6
6.2
14.2
3.0
3.7
13-21
|
Construction sand, gravel, and crushed stone........| 138.3
138.5
139.9
2.3
1.0
.1
.1
.6
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1/

Data for September 1994 have been revised to reflect
2/ Not seasonally adjusted.
the availability of late reports and corrections by respondents.
3/ Not available.
All data are subject to revision 4 months after original
publication.
Table 3. Producer Price Indexes for selected commodity groupings
(1982=100 unless otherwise indicated)
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
|
|
|
|
|
Unadjusted index 1/
|
Commodity|
|___________________________________|
code
|
Grouping
|Sept. 1994 | Dec. 1994 | Jan. 1995 |
_________|________________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|
|
|
|
|
|
| Finished Goods (1967=100)......................|
352.5
|
354.3
|
355.0
|
| All commodities................................|
121.0
|
121.8
|
122.6
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15

01-1
01-2
01-3
01-4
01-5
01-7
01-8
01-83
01-9
02-1
02-2
02-22
02-5
02-6
02-63
02-7
03-81

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

MAJOR COMMODITY GROUPS

|
|
Farm products and processed foods and feeds....|
Farm products................................|
Processed foods and feeds....................|
|
Industrial commodities.........................|
Textile products and apparel.................|
Hides, skins, leather, and related products..|
Fuels and related products and power 2/......|
Chemicals and allied products 2/.............|
Rubber and plastic products..................|
Lumber and wood products.....................|
Pulp, paper, and allied products.............|
Metals and metal products....................|
Machinery and equipment......................|
Furniture and household durables.............|
Nonmetallic mineral products.................|
Transportation equipment.....................|
Miscellaneous products.......................|
|
Industrial commodities less fuels and related |
products and power...........................|
|
|
OTHER COMMODITY GROUPINGS
|
|
Fruits and melons, fresh and dry vegetables,
|
and tree nuts................................|
Grains.........................................|
Slaughter livestock............................|
Slaughter poultry..............................|
Plant and animal fibers........................|
Chicken eggs...................................|
Hay, hayseeds, and oilseeds....................|
Oilseeds.......................................|
Other farm products............................|
Cereal and bakery products.....................|
Meats, poultry, and fish.......................|
Processed poultry..............................|
Sugar and confectionery........................|
Beverages and beverage materials...............|
Packaged beverage materials....................|
Fats and oils..................................|
Apparel........................................|

117.1
101.3
125.0
121.7
118.7
150.8
79.9
134.8
118.5
178.3
154.5
126.5
125.2
126.2
125.1
135.6
141.8
133.3

97.2
94.2
91.3
128.3
122.1
98.8
122.4
107.6
153.4
150.4
110.8
115.7
133.9
129.7
146.1
133.6
123.5

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

118.1
105.6
124.3
122.4
118.8
153.6
76.3
138.6
120.6
179.4
159.1
130.7
125.4
126.7
125.8
138.6
142.5
135.6

136.7
95.3
91.6
114.2
132.6
100.0
123.3
106.5
160.2
151.3
107.8
109.1
131.2
130.6
147.6
145.4
123.6

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

117.9
103.5
125.1
123.4
119.1
153.9
76.3
140.2
121.7
179.3
162.1
133.1
125.9
127.1
126.6
139.4
143.0
136.8

110.5
95.5
96.4
108.6
143.5
92.5
121.2
104.5
160.2
151.4
110.8
109.8
131.8
131.7
145.2
145.7
123.2

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

04-4
05-3
05-4
05-7
06-3
06-5
06-7
07-1
07-11
07-13
07-2
08-1
09-1

| Other leather and related products.............|
137.5
|
137.9
|
138.3
|
| Gas fuels 2/...................................|
69.8
|
68.6
|
66.9
|
| Electric power.................................|
134.1
|
127.1
|
127.9
|
| Refined petroleum products.....................|
63.0
|
57.6
|
57.2
|
| Drugs and pharmaceuticals......................|
206.6
|
207.5
|
206.5
|
| Agricultural chemicals and products............|
121.4
|
125.0
|
128.3
|
| Other chemicals and allied products............|
127.6
|
129.1
|
129.8
|
| Rubber and rubber products.....................|
112.2
|
113.6
|
114.4
|
| Rubber, except natural rubber..................|
110.4
|
114.9
|
118.3
|
| Miscellaneous rubber products..................|
129.0
|
130.1
|
131.1
|
| Plastic products...............................|
124.6
|
127.1
|
128.4
|
| Lumber.........................................|
184.7
|
182.2
|
181.9
|
| Pulp, paper, and products, excluding building |
|
|
|
|
paper and board..............................|
136.3
|
143.8
|
148.2
|
09-15
| Converted paper and paperboard products........|
138.1
|
143.7
|
146.2
|
10-1
| Iron and steel.................................|
123.1
|
124.4
|
127.0
|
10-2
| Nonferrous metals..............................|
131.2
|
144.7
|
150.6
|
10-25
| Nonferrous mill shapes.........................|
130.5
|
142.0
|
151.3
|
11-3
| Metalworking machinery and equipment...........|
137.0
|
137.3
|
137.9
|
11-4
| General purpose machinery and equipment........|
135.2
|
136.0
|
137.1
|
11-6
| Special industry machinery.....................|
146.5
|
147.0
|
148.0
|
11-7
| Electrical machinery and equipment.............|
123.4
|
123.4
|
123.9
|
11-9
| Miscellaneous machinery and equipment..........|
125.2
|
125.9
|
126.2
|
12-6
| Other household durable goods..................|
141.5
|
142.4
|
143.2
|
13-2
| Concrete ingredients...........................|
129.8
|
130.2
|
131.4
|
14-1
| Motor vehicles and equipment...................|
129.0
|
133.0
|
133.1
|
15-1
| Toys, sporting goods, small arms, etc..........|
127.3
|
127.5
|
128.3
|
15-4
| Photographic equipment and supplies............|
114.5
|
115.7
|
115.6
|
15-9
| Other miscellaneous products...................|
127.8
|
128.7
|
130.1
|
__________________________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|
1/

Data for Sept. 1994 have been revised to reflect the
availability of late reports and corrections by
respondents. All data are subject to revision 4
months after original publication.

2/

Prices of some items in this grouping are lagged 1 month.

Table #4
Producer price indexes for the net output of major industry groups
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
|
|
|
|
Unadjusted
|
|
|
Index
| percent change
Industry
|
Industry 1/
|Index|_______________________|to_Jan._1995_from:__
code
|
|base |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|Sep.
|Dec.
|Jan.
| Jan. | Dec.

|
|
|1994 2/|1994 2/|1995 2/| 1994 | 1994
__________________|______________________________________________|_____|_______|_______|_______|________|___________
|
|
|
|Total mining industries...................... |12/84| 72.4
70.8
70.5
-7.0
-0.4
10
| Metal mining................................ |12/84| 87.6
94.5
98.2
39.3
3.9
12
| Coal mining................................. |12/85| 94.3
89.6
89.3
-4.8
-.3
13
| Oil and gas extraction...................... |12/85| 69.2
67.4
66.7
-11.2
-1.0
14
| Mining and quarrying of non-metallic
|
|
| minerals, except fuels..................... |12/84| 120.5
120.8
122.1
1.9
1.1
|
|
|
|Total manufacturing industries............... |12/84| 121.1
121.7
122.4
2.6
.6
20
| Food and kindred products................... |12/84| 119.9
119.4
120.1
.1
.6
21
| Tobacco manufactures........................ |12/84| 187.9
187.8
187.9
.2
.1
22
| Textile mill products....................... |12/84| 113.8
114.2
114.6
1.0
.4
23
| Apparel and other finished products made
|
|
| from fabrics and similar materials......... |12/84| 119.7
119.9
119.6
.1
-.3
24
| Lumber and wood products, except furniture.. |12/84| 154.1
155.7
155.5
-.7
-.1
25
| Furniture and fixtures...................... |12/84| 130.3
131.0
131.4
3.0
.3
26
| Paper and allied products................... |12/84| 125.5
131.7
134.6
12.3
2.2
27
| Printing, publishing, and allied industries. |12/84| 150.3
152.1
153.9
3.7
1.2
28
| Chemicals and allied products............... |12/84| 132.0
136.1
137.9
8.7
1.3
29
| Petroleum refining and related products..... |12/84| 79.5
73.8
73.4
8.7
-.5
30
| Rubber and miscellaneous plastic products... |12/84| 117.9
119.7
121.0
4.6
1.1
31
| Leather and leather products................ |12/84| 131.3
132.5
133.1
2.3
.5
32
| Stone, clay, glass, and concrete products... |12/84| 120.7
121.4
122.3
4.6
.7
33
| Primary metal industries.................... |12/84| 118.7
123.0
126.3
12.1
2.7
34
| Fabricated metal products, except machinery |
|
| and transportation equipment............... |12/84| 120.8
121.9
122.6
2.9
.6
35
| Machinery, except electrical................ |12/84| 117.7
117.8
118.4
1.1
.5
36
| Electrical and electronic machinery,
|
|
| equipment, and supplies.................... |12/84| 112.6
112.7
113.1
.5
.4
37
| Transportation equipment.................... |12/84| 128.2
131.6
132.2
2.2
.5
38
| Measuring and controlling instruments;
|
|
| photographic, medical, optical goods;
|
|
| watches, clocks............................ |12/84| 122.0
122.7
123.0
1.0
.2
39
| Miscellaneous manufacturing industries...... |12/85| 123.6
124.1
124.9
1.9
.6
|
|
|
|Services industries
|
|
42
| Motor freight transportation and warehousing |06/93| 102.3
102.9
103.1
2.5
.2
43
| United States Postal Service................ |06/89| 119.8
119.8
132.1
10.3
10.3
44
| Water transportation........................ |12/92| 100.3
103.6
102.8
4.5
-.8
45
| Transportation by air....................... |12/92| 108.5
108.8
108.0
-1.1
-.7
46
| Pipe lines, except natural gas.............. |12/86| 103.0
107.0
110.9
10.0
3.6
|
|
|
__________________|______________________________________________|_____|____________________________________________

01/ Indexes in this table are derived from the net-output-weighted industry price indexes shown in table 5.
Because of differences in coverage and aggregation methodology, they will generally not match the movements
of similarly-titled indexes which are derived from traditional commodity groupings shown in table 6.
2/ Data for Sep. 1994 have been revised to reflect the availability of late reports and corrections by respondents.
All data are subject to revision four months after original publication. Data are not seasonally adjusted.
3/ Not available.