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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS. Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

No. 518

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES 1
B U R E A U OF LAB O R S T A T IS T IC S /
M I S C E L L A N E O U S

S E R I E S

PERSONNEL RESEARCH AGENCIES
1930 EDITION

JUNE, 1930

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1930

for tale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C,




-

*

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Price 3$ cent#

Acknowledgment
This bulletin has been prepared by Estelle M. Stewart, o f the
United States Department of Labor.
n




Contents
Page

Classification of personnel research and agencies engaged therein________
Introduction_______________________________________________________________
I. Federal agencies:
(a) In the Department of Labor--------------------------------------------------------(&) In other executive departments, boards, and commissions_____
II. State and municipal agencies:
(a) State agencies-------------------------------------------------------------------------------(&) Municipal agencies------------------------------------------------------------------------III. Nonofficial agencies:
(a) Associations, societies, foundations, research bureaus, institu­
tions, and manufacturing and business establishments________
(&) Universities and colleges--------------------------------------------------------------Index of organizations-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Subject index---------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------




hi

v
1
5
10
28
48

50
151
187
192




Classification of Personnel Research and Agencies
Engaged Therein
Employment Management—Personnel W ork
Federal agencies:
Page
Bureau of Efficiency___________________________________________________
21
Federal Reserve Board______________________________________________
26
United States Civil Service Commission----------------------------------------------18
Associations and institutions:
American Management Association___________________________________
56
61
American Society of Mechanical Engineers___________________________
Bureau of Personnel Administration__________________________________
71
Business Research Corporation_______________________________________
72
Dennison Manufacturing Co__________________________________________
148
Manufacturers’ Research Association_________________________________
90
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co______________________________________
92
National Industrial Conference Board________________________________
107
National Retail Dry Goods Association------------------------------------------------116
Personnel Research Federation_______________________________________
123
Research Bureau for Retail Training______________________________ 124-126
Retail Research Association___________________________________________
126
149
Scovill Manufacturing Co--------------------------------------------------------- --------Social Science Research Council______________________________________
129
Society of Industrial Engineers----------------------------------------------------------130
Taylor Society (Inc.)-------------------------------------------------------------------------132
Thompson & Lichtner Co--------------------------------------------------------------------136
The Travelers________________________________________________________
137
Young Men’s Christian Associations---------------------------------------------------145
Young Women’s Christian Associations____________________________ 146-148
Western Electric Co--------------------------------------------—
-------------------------------150
Universities and colleges:
Boston University_____________________________________________________
151
152
Bryn Mawr College------ ----------------------------------------------------------------------Chicago, University of-------------------------------------------------------------------------154
Columbia University, department of industrial relations--------------------157
La Salle Extension University----------------------------------------------------------168
Ohio State University, bureau of business research____ ______________
174
Syracuse University---------------------------------------------------- ------------------------182

Industrial Relations
(Wage and other incentives, adjustment, joint control, etc.)
Federal agencies:
Personnel Classification Board------------------------------------------------------------United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics----------------------------------------------Post Office, service relations division--------------------------------------------------Shipping Board-------------------------------------------------------------------------------




V

26
5
14
27

CLASSIFICATION OP PERSONNEL RESEARCH

VI

State agencies:
Massachusetts. Department of labor and industries_________________
Pennsylvania. Department of labor and industry___________________
Virginia. Department of labor and industry_________________________
Associations and institutions:
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America__________________________
American Engineering Council_______________________________________
American Federation of Labor_______________________________________
American Management Association___________________________________
Associated Industries of Massachusetts_______________________________
Boston Chamber of Commerce_________________________________________
Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship Clerks, research departmentBrotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees, department of sta­
tistics and research________________________________________________
Business Research Corporation______________________________________
Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America_______________
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, research depart­
ment________________________________________________________________
International Industrial Relations Association----------------------------------International Labor Office____________________________________________
Labor Bureau (Inc.)_________________________________________________
Merchants’ Association of New York-------------------------------------------------Metropolitan Life Insurance Co______________________________________
National Association of Manufacturers----------------------------------------------National Industrial Conference Board------------------------------------------------National Metal Trades Association-----------------------------------------------------Russell Sage Foundation_____________________________________________
Social Science Research Council----------------------------------------------------------Taylor Society (Inc.)-------------------------------------------------------------------------Universities and colleges:
Bryn Mawr College___________________________________________________
Columbia University, department of industrial relations_____________
Dartmouth College------------------------------------------------------------------------------Harvard University, Jacob Wertheim Research Fellowship Commit­
tee__________________________________________________________________
New York University.-------------------------------------------------------------------------Pennsylvania, University of, Wharton School, department of indus­
trial research----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Princeton University, industrial relations section____________________
Wisconsin, University of---------------------------------------------------------------------

Page
33
44
47
50
53
54
56
68

69
70
69
72
78
83
84
83
85
91
92
95
107
110
127
129
132
152
157
162
165
171
176
178
183

W orking Conditions— Horn’s of Labor—Fatigue and
Efficiency
Fereral agencies:
United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics---------------------------------------------Women’s Bureau----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Public Health Service------------------------------------------------------------------State agencies:
California. Industrial welfare commission---------------------------------------Massachusetts. Department of labor and industries________________
Ohio. Department of industrial relations-----------------------------------------Wisconsin. Industrial commission___________________________________




5
8

15
28
33
42
47

CLASSIFICATION OF PERSONNEL RESEARCH

VII

Associations and institutions:
Page
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America-------------------------------------50
American Association for Labor Legislation---------------------------------------51
American Federation of Labor-----------------------------------------------------------54
Association of Governmental Officials in Industry------------------------------68-69
Boston Chamber of Commerce-----------------------------------------------------------69
Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce--------------------------------------------------------69
Bureau of Applied Economics-------------------------------------------------------------70
Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America-----------------------------78
International Typographical Union-----------------------------------------------------84
Labor Bureau (Inc.)________________________________________________
85
Labor Research Association-----------------------------------------------------------------87
Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumbermen------------------------------------------89
National Industrial Conference Board-----------------------------------------------107
Western Electric Co_________________________________________________
150
Universities and colleges:
Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration_______________
164
Purdue University------------------------------------------------------------------------------178
Virginia, University of, Institute for Research in Social Sciences_____
182

Employment—Unemployment—Placement—
Turnover
Federal agencies:
United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics___________________________
------ Employment Service-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Women’s Bureau__________________________________________________
State agencies:
Illinois. Department of labor-------------------------------------------------------------Maryland. Board of labor and statistics--------------------------------------------Massachusetts. Department of labor and industries_________________
New York. Department of labor------------------------------------- ----------------Pennsylvania. Bureau of employment, department of labor and
industry------------------------------------------------------- , -----------------------------------Wisconsin. Industrial commission-----------------------------------------------------Associations and institutions:
American Association for Labor Legislation---------------------------------------American Federation of Labor-------------------------------------------------------------Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce----------------------------------------------------------Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce------------------------------------------------------Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America___________________
Industrial Relations Counselors (Inc.)----------------------------------------------Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumbermen-------------------------------------------Michigan Housing Association-------------------------------------------------------------National Bureau of Economic Research----------------------------------------------National Committee of Bureaus of Occupation-----------------------------------National Junior Personnel Service------------------------------- ---------------------Russell Sage Foundation---------------------------------------------------------------------Scovill Manufacturing Co--------------------------------------------------------------------Structural Service Bureau--------------------------------------------------------------------Taylor Society (Inc.)---------------------------------------------------------------------------Vocational Service for Juniors-------------------------------------------------------------Women’s Occupational Bureau---------------- ------------------------------------------Young Womea’s Christian Associations, National Board---------------------




5

9
8

29
31
33
40
45
47
51
54
69
74

78
80
89
94
97
102
109
127
149
131
132
141
142
146

VIII

CLASSIFICATION OF PERSONNEL RESEARCH

Universities and colleges:
Buffalo University of-------------------------------------------------------------------------New York University---------------------------------------------------------------------------Purdue University_____________________________________________________
Wisconsin, University of-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Page
152
171
178
183

Safety—Accidents— Standards— Codes
Federal agencies:
United States. Bureau of Chemistry and Soils______________________
10
-------Bureau of Labor Statistics----------------------------------------------------------5
------ Bureau of Mines-----------------------------------------------------------------------11
------ Bureau of Standards------------------------------------------------------------------13
------- Children’s Bureau----------------------------------------------------------------------6
-------Women’s Bureau---------------------------------------------------------------------------8
State agencies:
California. Industrial accident commission_________________________
28
Illinois; Department of labor------------------------------------------------------------29
Maine. Department of labor and industry_________________________
31
Massachusetts. Department of labor and industries________________
3H
New Jersey. Department of labor-----------------------------------------------------37
New York. Department of labor--------------------------------------------------------39
Ohio. Department of industrial relations and industrial com­
mission______________________________________________________________42-44
Pennsylvania. Department of labor and industry___________________
44
Virginia. Department of labor and industry________________________
47
Washington. Department of labor and industries_________________
47
47
Wisconsin. Industrial commission____________________________________
Associations and institutions:
American Academy of Political and Social Science_________________
50
American Chemical Society---------------------------------------------------------------52
American Electric Railway Transportation and Traffic Association__
52
American Engineering Council---------------------------- --------------------------,__
53
American Gas Association----------------------------------------------------------------54
American Museum of Safety------------------------------------------------------------60
American Railway Association----------------------------------------------------------60
American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers____________
60
American Society of Mechanical Engineers-------------------------------------61
American Society of Safety Engineers______________________________
63
American Standards Association--------------------------------------------------------65
Bureau of Railway Economics_______ ______________________________
72
Bureau of Safety--------------------------------------------------------------------------------72
Illuminating Engineering Society-----------------------------------------------------79
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------82
Labor Research Association_________________________________________
87
Management and Engineering Corporation___________________________
89
92
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co--------------------------------------------------------National Bureau of Casualty and Surety Underwriters-------------------95
National Electric Light Association_________________________________
103
National Fire Protection Association_________________________________
105
National Machine Tool Builders’ Association________________________
110
National Safety Council______________________________________________
117




CLASSIFICATION OF PERSONNEL KESEAkCS

Associations and institutions— Continued.
National Society for the Prevention of Blindness___________________
Norton C o____________________________________________________________
Portland Cement Association__________________________________________
Underwriters’ Laboratories___________________________________________
Waterfront Employers of Seattle_____________________________________

it
Page
120
148
124
138
142

Industrial Hygiene— Occupational Diseases
Federal agencies:
United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics__________________________
-------Bureau of Mines_________________________________________________
-------Public Health Service_____________________________________________
-------Women’s Bureau_________________________________________________
State agencies:
Massachusetts. Department of labor and industries________________
New Jersey. Department of labor___________________________________
New York. Department of labor_____________________________________
Pennsylvania. Department of labor and industries, bureau of indus­
trial standards______________________________________________________
Municipal agencies:
New York City. Department of health, division of industrial and
adult hygiene_______________________________________________________
Associations and institutions:
American Association of Industrial Physicians and Surgeons________
American Chemical Society____________________________________________
American Medical Association_______________________________________
American Posture League_____________________________________________
American Public Health Association__________________________________
Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees, department of statis­
tics and research------------------------------------------------------------------------------Consumers’ Leagues. Massachusetts----------------------------------------------------------New Jersey________ _______________________________________________
College of Physicians, section on public health and industrial hygiene.
Conference Board of Physicians in Industry_________________________
Edward L. Trudeau Foundation----------------------------------------------------------Life Extension Institute----------------------------------------------------------------------Metropolitan Life Insurance Co----------------------------------------------------------National Research Council____________________________________________
National Tuberculosis Association____________________________________
Norton Co_____________________________________________________________
Prudential Insurance Co. of America-------------------------------------------------Universities and colleges:
Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons---------------Harvard School of Public Health------------------------------------------------------Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health-----Ohio State University, department of public health and hygiene-----University of California, department of hygiene-------------------------------University of Pennsylvania. School of public hygiene-----------------------------Henry Phipps Institute for the Study, Treatment and Preven­
tion of Tuberculosis-------------------------------------------------------------------------Yale University, laboratory of applied physiology------------------------------




5
11

15
8

33
37
39
45

48
51
52
58
58
59
69
76
77
74
74
137
87
92
112
120
148
124
158
165
168
174
154
175
176
183

X

CLASSIFICATION OF PERSONNEL RESEARCH

Industrial Morbidity and Mortality
Federal agencies:
United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics__________________________
------- Public Health Service___________________________________________
Associations and institutions:
American Public Health Association_________________________________
Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees, department of sta­
tistics and research-------------------------------------------------------------------------International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions_____________________________________________________________
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, research depart­
ment-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Metropolitan Life Insurance Co______________________________________
Prudential Insurance Co. of America_________________________________

Page
5
15
59
69
82
83
92
124

Industrial Psychology
State agencies: Boston Psychopathic Hospital___________________________
Associations and institutions:
Judge Baker Foundation_____________________________________________
Massachusetts Society for Mental Hygiene__________________________
National Committee for Mental Hygiene_____________________________
National Research Council___________________________________________
Taylor Society (Inc.)________________________________________________
The Travelers________________________________________________________
Universities and colleges:
Columbia University, department of psychology--------------------------------Smith College---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Stanford University___________________________________________________
Syracuse University----------------------------------------------------------------------------University of Chicago_________________________________________________

32
85
90
100
112
132
137
157
180
180
182
154

Intelligence, Trade, and Aptitude Tests
Federal agencies:
United States. Civil Service Commission-------------------------------------------------War Department, General Staff----------------------------------------------------Associations and institutions:
National Research Council_____________________________________________
Western Electric Co-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Universities and colleges:
Columbia University, Teachers* College--------------------------------------------Dartmouth College------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ohio State University, department of psychology_____________________
Stanford University------------------------------------------------------------------------------

18
17
112
150
159
162
173
180

Training—Vocational Education
Federal agencies:
Federal Board for Vocational Eduction_______________________________
United States. Bureau of Education, Industrial Educational Divi­
sion_________________________________________________________________




23
13

CLASSIFICATION OF PERSONNEL RESEARCH

XI

State agencies:_______________________________________________________________ Page
Massachusetts. Department of education, division of vocational edu­
cation_______________________________________________________________
33
New York. Department of education_________________________________
38
Wisconsin. Industrial commission, apprenticeship division---------------47
Associations and institutions:
American Electric Railway Transportation and Traffic Association__
52
American Management Association-----------------------------------------------------56
American Society of Mechanical Engineers-----------------------------------------61
71
Bureau of Personnel Adminstration__________________________________
Business Training Corporation_______________________________________
73
Chamber of Commerce of the United States---------------------------------------73
Engineering Foundation------------------------------------------------------------------------78
International Industrial Relations Association_______________________
84
National Electric Light Association-----------------------------------------------------103
National Founders’ Association----------------------------------------------------------106
National Metal Trades Association-------------------------------------------------------110
National Research Council-------------------------------------------------------------------112
National Retail Dry Goods Association------------------------------------------------116
Research Bureau for Retail Training----------------------------------------------- 124-126
Retail Research Association-----------------------------------------------------------------126
Scovill Manufacturing Co--------------------------------------------------------------------149
135
Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry_______________
United Typothetse--------------------------------------------------------------------------------139
Universities and colleges:
Boston University--------------------------------------------------------------------------------151
Massachusetts Institute of Technology________________________________
168
Municipal University of Akron________________________________________
151
171
New York University_________________________________________________
Prince School of Education for Store Service_________________________
179
University of California, division of vocational education_____________
153
University of Michigan, department of education_____ ________________
171

Cost of Living— Budgets
Federal agencies:
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics____________________________
Asociations and institutions:
Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees, department of sta­
tistics and research______________________________________ _________
Bureau of Applied Economics-------------------------------------------------------------Labor Bureau (Inc.)---------------------------------------------------------------------------National Industrial Conference Board_________________________________
Western Electric Co------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5

69
70
85
107
150

Pension Plans—Retirement Systems
State agencies:
New York. Commission on old age security__________________________
Associations and institutions:
Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching_____________
Chamber of Commerce of the United States__________________________
Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumbermen____________________________
National Association for the Benefit of Middle-Age Employees_______




41
73
73
89
95

XII

CLASSIFICATION OF PERSONNEL RESEARCH

Associations and institutions— Continued.
National Civic Federation------------------------------------------------------------------National Education Association_______________________________________
Norton Co_____________________________________________________________
Woodward, Fondiller & Ryan--------------------------------------------------------------

Page
99
103
148
144

Employment of Women
Federal agencies:
United States Women’s Bureau_____________________________________
State agencies:
California. Industrial welfare comm ssion_________________________
Connect cut. Department of labor and factory inspection__________
Illinois. Department of labor______________________________________
Kansas. Commission of labor and industry_________________________
Massachusetts. Department of labor and industries, minimum wage
comm ss.on_________________________________________________________
New York. Department of labor____________________________________
North Dakota. Workmen’s compensation bureau, minimum wage
department---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Pennsylvania. Department of labor and industry, bureau of women
and ch ldren-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Texas. Department of labor_______________________________________
Washington. Department of labor and industries___________________
Wisconsin. Industrial commission---------------------------------------------------Associations and institutions:
American Academy of Political and Social Science__________________
Consumers’ Leagues_________________________________________________
Information Bureau on Women’s W ork--------------------------------------------National Committee of Bureaus of Occupation_______________________
Woman’s Occupational Bureau----------------------------------------------------------Women’s Educational and Industrial Union_________________________
Young Men’s Christian Assoc at ions, National Council_______________
Young Women’s Christian Associations* National Board_____________
Universities and colleges:
Bryn Mawr College_________________________________________________
University of Michigan, bureau of business research_________________

8

28
29
29
31
35
39
42
46
46
47
47
50
75
80
102
142
142
145
146
152
170

Child Labor—Vocational Guidance—Juvenile Placement
Federal agencies:
United States. Bureau of Education-------------------------------------------------------- Children’s Bureau----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Employment Service------------------------------------------------------------------State agencies:
Iowa. Bureau of labor ---------------------------------------------------------------------Maryland. Board of labor and statistics____________________________
Pennsylvania. Department of labor and industry, bureau of women
and children_______________________________________________________
Virginia. Department of labor and industry------------------------------------Washington. Department of labor and industries---------------------------Wiscons n. Industrial commission----------- -----------------------------------------




13
6

9
31
31
46
47
47
47

CLASSIFICATION OF PERSONNEL RESEARCH

Municipal agencies:
Oakland (Calif.) Board of Education, department of research______
Associations and institutions:
Consumers’ Leagues__________________________________________________
National Child Labor Committee_____________________________________
National Junior Personnel Service___________________________________
National Vocational Guidance Association______________________ _____
Vocational Adjustment Bureau for Girls____________________________
Vocational Service for Juniors_______________________________________
Women’s Educational and Industrial Union__________________________
Universities and colleges:
Columbia University, Teachers’ College_______________________________
Harvard University, bureau of vocational guidance__________________
New School for Social Research_____________________________________

XIII

Page
49
75
98
109
122
140
141
142
159
163
171

Handicapped and Disabled Workers
Federal agencies:
Federal Board for Vocational Education_____________________________
Associations and institutions:
American Heart Association___________________________________________
Institute for Crippled and Disabled___________________________________
National Research Council____________________________________________
National Society for the Prevention of Blindness______________________
National Tuberculosis Association-------------------------------------------------------Women’s Educational and Industrial Union__________________________
Universities and colleges:
University of Chicago, local community research committee___________

23
55
81
112
120
120
142
154

Psychopathic and Mentally Deficient Workers
State agencies:
Boston Psychopathic Hospital-------------------------------------------------------------New Jersey. Department of institutions and agencies_______________
Associations and institutions:
National Committee on Prisons and Prison Labor__________________
Training School at Vineland, N. J_____________________________________
Vocational Adjustment Bureau for Girls---------------------------------------------

32
36
102
136
140

Foreign-Born Workers
Federal agencies:
United States Women’s Bureau------------------------------------------------------------State agencies:
New York. Department of labor, division of aliens---------------------------Associations and institutions:
Social Science Research Council_________ ____________________________
Universities and colleges:
New York University----------------------------------------------------------------------------

8

39
129
171

Colored Workers
Federal agencies:
United States Women’s Bureau_____ ___________ _




$

XIV

CLASSIFICATION 03? PERSONNEL RESEARCH

Association and institutions:
Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce____________________________________
National Research Council____________________________________________
National Urban League------------------------------------------------------------------------Social Science Research Council_____________________________________
Universities and colleges:
University of Chicago, local community research committee__________
New York University_________________________________________________

Page

74
112
122
129
154
171

Public Employment
Federal agencies:
Bureau of Efficiency----------------------------------------------------------------------------Civil Service Commission--------------------------------------------------------------------Personnel Classification Board_______________________________________
Associations and institutions:
Bureau of Municipal Research of Philadelphia_______________________
Detroit Bureau of Governmental Research-----------------------------------------Institute for Government Research-----------------------------------------------------National Institute of Public Administration---------------------------------------Universities and colleges:
University of Chicago, local community research committee----------------




21
18
26
70
77
81
108
154

BULLETIN OF THE
U. S. B U R E A U OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON

no. Ji8

ju n e . 1930

PERSONNEL RESEARCH AGENCIES
Introduction
Bureau
published in 1921
bulletin
(No. 299) on Personnel Research
T“HE guide to of Labor Statistics Agencies, which wasa designed
as a
organized research in employment management,
industrial relations, training and working conditions.”
Personnel research was defined as studies and investigations of
all kinds concerned with any of the problems of (a) employment
management and industrial relations (such as selection and place­
ment of employees, job analyses and specifications, rating and grad­
ing, lines of promotion, labor turnover, absenteeism, wage and other
incentives, joint control, etc.); (&) vocational psychology, including
the development and standardization of intelligence and trade tests;
(c)training of managers, foremen, and workmen, either in schools
and colleges, in the factory, or under schemes of cooperation between
educational institutions and industrial establishments; (d) working
conditions in relation to output, including hours of labor, fatigue,
lighting, ventilation, food; (e) health hazards and occupational
diseases; ( /) safety codes and appliances; and (g ) the special
problems connected with the employment of women and young
persons, foreign-born workers and colored workers, the handicapped
or disabled, and the mentally deficient or unstable.
Since 1921 the whole field of organized research has expanded
enormously, both in amount and in scope. Organizations whose
major activity is research in the general field of employment rela­
tions and working conditions have grown in number and importance,
and many other groups are extending their activities into the same
field. A revision of Bulletin No. 299 was therefore undertaken to
bring the directory of these agencies to date, and the result is pre­
sented herewith as Bulletin No. 518.
The bureau relied for the completeness of this revision largely
upon the cooperation of the agencies involved with whom it was
in touch. It is of course possible that the bureau has missed some
organizations active in personnel research work, for want of avenues
of contact. It is hoped that if such agencies have been overlooked
in this compilation the bureau will be informed to that effect.
1




2

PERSONNEL RESEARCH AGENCIES

Most of the organizations engaged in personnel research work who
were asked for data for inclusion in the revised bulletin have
responded fully and freely. Others, however, submitted incomplete
statements, and still others failed to give any information at all.
Hence among all groups—official State agencies, universities and
colleges, and the nonofficial organizations—there are omissions which
the bureau regrets but could not avoid.
This bulletin must be considered as a continuation of Bulletin
No. 299, which brought the data down to 1921. All of the organi­
zations listed therein which have continued to function since 1921
are included, but it has not been the purpose to repeat the references
to studies and publications contained in the previous work. Rather
the purpose has been to carry on the story of the activities of these
various organizations from the point at which Bulletin No. 299 leaves
off, and to present later developments in the field. Some of the
early experimental agencies which were active in 1921 have dis­
appeared entirely, sometimes through absorption into other continu­
ing organizations; sometimes by new ones taking their places. More­
over, many of the publications and other data referred to in Bulletin
No. 299 are out of print or otherwise unavailable, and many changes
have taken place in organization and mode of procedure of some
of the agencies listed. Accordingly, reproduction of the data in
the earlier bulletin has not been considered worth while. It has,
however, been necessary for clarity to refer to it occasionally.
The same plan of presentation which Bulletin No. 299 followed is
given here—that is:
First. Division into two main heads:
1. Official agencies— (a) Federal; (5) State; (<?)Municipal.
2. Nonofficial agencies— (a) Associations, foundations, research
bureaus, and institutions, to which has been added manufacturing
and business establishments; (6) universities and colleges.
Second. Classification of personnel research activities and the
various agencies engaged therein, thus:
Employment management (personnel work) ; industrial relations;
working conditions (hours of labor, fatigue, and efficiency) ; employ­
ment (placement); unemployment; turnover; safety (accidents,
standards, codes); industrial hygiene (occupational diseases); in­
dustrial morbidity and mortality; industrial psychology; intelli­
gence, trade and aptitude tests; training (vocational education);
cost of living (budgets); pension plans (retirement systems); em­
ployment o f women; child labor (vocational guidance, juvenile
placement); handicapped and disabled workers; psychopathic and
mentally deficient workers; foreign-born workers; colored workers;
public employment.
It has been possible to present this classification as a reference
list only. A plan to classify the data under group headings de­
scriptive of the major activity of the group had to be abandoned
because of the physical difficulties involved, since that plan would
have necessitated dismembering many organizations which are
equally concerned with several different activities. Therefore an
alphabetical arrangement of the text is the best that can be made.
An effort to extend the scope of the study to manufacturing and
business establishments which are doing extensive personnel work




IN TEOD T CTIOH
7

3

lias not been very successful. In the first place the response to re­
quests for information was far from general.® In the second place,
while concerns of this kind engaged in personnel work among their
own employees often follow up their personnel activities with elabo­
rate research work, much of this research is wholly internal and
confidential, and is available only for very limited distribution.
However, much of this type of research work is published and given
a fair circulation through the medium of the conferences and pub­
lications of the American Management Association (p. 56). of which
many of the companies are members.
For the purpose of staying within the field of employment rela­
tions some rather arbitrary lines have been necessary. This is es­
pecially true with respect to placement and personnel work and
research courses in colleges and universities. Much of the former
class of work must be regarded—as in the case of business enter­
prises—as internal in nature and having no real bearing on person­
nel research in its wide application. Also, research courses are
often purely educational, and such actual research as is done is
essentially laboratory work, which only occasionally makes any
definite contribution to the field of personnel research. School work
of this character has not been included in this compilation. On the
other hand, similar organizations, such, for example, as the depart­
ment of industrial research of Wharton College, University of
Pennsylvania (p. 176), are not only college research classes in an
educational sense but research bureaus for the use of industry
generally as well.
Experimental work of colleges and universities in applied psy­
chology, intelligence and aptitude tests, and the like has also been
eliminated except in cases where it has a direct application to
industry and personnel.
• Such outstanding instances as Eastman Kodak Co. and R. H. Macy & Co., for example,
failed to reply to requests for information.

105636°—SO------ 2







I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

(a) IN THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics.
1712 G Street N W ., Washington, D. C.
Commissioner.

Ethelbert Stewart,

O r g a n iz e d January 1, 1885, under act of Congress approved June
27, 1884, as the Bureau of Labor in the Department of the Interior,
it was given independent status as the Department of Labor (with­
out Cabinet representation) in 1888. It again became the Bureau
of Labor in 1903 under the Department of Commerce and Labor,
from which it was transferred, with change of name to Bureau of
Labor Statistics, to the present Department of Labor upon its
establishment in 1913.
The function of the bureau as stated in the law creating it is to
“ collect information upon the subject of labor, its relation to capital,
the hours of labor and the earnings of laboring men and women,
and the means of promoting their material, social, intellectual and
moral prosperity.”
The bureau is primarily a fact-finding agency whose field of
work covers not only purely statistical data but many other sub­
jects of vital human welfare, a large part of which comes within
the scope of personnel research.
An abridged classified list of bulletins published by the bureau
will be found following the subject index to this bulletin. Those
dealing specifically with personnel research will be found under these
classifications: Employment and unemployment; industrial acci­
dents and hygiene; industrial relations and labor conditions; safety
codes; wages and hours.
The wages and hours series include, in addition to union wage
scales, studies of wages and hours in foundry and machine shops;
slaughtering and meat packing; the manufacture of worsted and
woolen goods, cotton goods, hosiery and underwear, men’s clothing,
and boots and shoes; the motor vehicle industry; the lumber indus­
try ; the iron and steel industry; and of common street laborers, etc.
In addition to the bulletins on employment progressive studies
are published monthly in the Labor Review showing the trend of
employment in selected manufacturing industries, in coal and metal­
liferous mining, in public utilities, in wholesale and retail trade, and
in the hotel industry.
A labor turnover rate is also published currently in the Labor
Review based on data from the reporting agencies, showing quits,
la
^
J
1 t turnover rates.
published every six
months, in the February and August issues of the Labor Review.




5

6

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

The industrial accident division of the bureau had its origin in a
special investigation of accidents in the iron and steel industry
authorized by resolution of the United States Senate in 1910. The
purpose of all accident inquiries conducted by the bureau is :
1. To set up the average experience as a standard by which a
given section of the industry may determine its relative standing
in the matter of accident occurrence.
2. To determine by year-by-year presentation whether the trend
of accidents is in the direction of increase or decrease.
3. To show by suitable examples the possibilities of accident pre­
vention when the problem is attacked with intelligence and vigor.
4. To afford illustrative material for use in the prosecution of accident-prevention campaigns.
For the past four years the bureau has been gathering information
regarding the experience of the State jurisdictions dealing with in­
dustrial accidents in order to determine accident rates for industrial
groups other than iron and steel.
Closely connected with the work of the industrial accident division
are the bureau’s activities in the development of industrial safety
codes, with which it works in cooperation with the American Stand­
ards Association (p. 65). The bureau is the authorized repre­
sentative of the Department of Labor on the executive and main
committees of the American Standards Association, and as such is
delegated to furnish representatives on all sectional committees hav­
ing to do with industrial safety codes from the ranks of workers
actually employed to use the tools and machines to which the codes
refer. The bureau publishes the safety codes as they are developed
and also undertakes to urge upon the States the adoption thereof.
The work of the bureau in the field of industrial hygiene includes
the publication of occasional bulletins and of articles in the Labor
Review dealing with industrial poisons or diseases. The most recent
studies in this line are concerned with the use of radium and radio­
active substances in the manufacture of clock dials and other articles
and the use of the spray method in painting.
Special studies in the personnel field not classified under the list
above referred to include health and recreational activities in indus­
trial establishments (Bui. No. 458) and apprenticeship in building
construction (Bui. No. 459).
The Labor Review carries advance summary accounts of most of
the studies published as bulletins, as well as special studies made by
the bureau staff which do not appear as bulletins, and occasional
articles contributed by students and investigators, which frequently
deal with some specific phase of personnel research.
Two publications of the bureau, Bulletin No. 439 and Bulletin
No. 491, are reference works presenting digests of all the recent
material published by the bureau.

Children’s Bureau.
Twentieth and D Streets NW ., Washington, D. C., Grace
Abbott, Chief.
E s t a b l is h e d by act of Congress approved April 9, 1912, the Chil­
dren’s Bureau is directed “ to investigate and report * * * upon
all matters pertaining to the welfare of children and child life,”




IN THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

7

including “ dangerous occupations, accidents, and diseases of children,
employment.”
The publications issued by the bureau dealing with the special
problems connected with the industrial aspects of child welfare have
related particularly to:
1.
Employment of children and young persons: (a) The extent,
distribution, causes, and effects of child labor; (i) Vocational oppor­
tunities for young workers; (c) Current statistical reports of child
employment; and (d) Vocational guidance, placement, and super­
vision of young persons in industry.
la. The first group of studies of the employment of children and
young persons, which have emphasized the work of children and
its effects, as well as legislative and other methods of meeting the
special problems presented, have been made in the fields of child
labor in rural communities, in canneries, in coal-mining communities,
in street trades, and in industrial home work; the employment of
school children; and the safety and health of working minors. The
reports issued are:
Child labor in rural communities:
Publication No. 115. Child labor and the work of mothers in the beet fields of
Colorado and Michigan. 122 pp. 1923.
Publication No. 123. Child labor on Maryland truck farms. 52 pp. 1923.
Publication No. 129. Child labor in North Dakota. 67 pp. 1923.
Publication No. 130. Child labor and the work of mothers on Norfolk truck
farms. 27 pp. 1924.
Publication No. 132. Work of children on truck and small-fruit farms in
southern New Jersey. 5S pp. 1924.
Publication No. 134. The welfare of children in cotton-growing areas of Texas.
83 pp. 1924.
Publication No. 151. Child labor in fruit and hop growing districts of the
northern Pacific Coast. 52 pp. 1925.
Publication No. 155. Child labor in representative tobacco-growing areas. 42
pp. 1926.
Publication No. 168. Work of Children on Illinois farms. 49 pp. 1925.
Publication No. 187. Children in agriculture. 81 pp. 1929.

Child labor in canneries:
Publication No. 98. Child labor and the work of mothers in oyster and
shrimp canning communities on the Gulf Coast. 114 pp. 1922.
Publication No. 198. Children in fruit and vegetable canneries— A survey in
seven States. (In press.)

Child labor in street trades:
Publication No. 183. Children in street work. 354 pp. 1928.
Publication No. 188. Child workers on city streets. 74 pp. 1929.

Children in industrial home work:
Publication No. 100. Industrial home work of children: a study made in
Providence, Pawtucket, and Central Falls, R. I. 80 pp. 1922.
Publication No. 185. Child labor in New Jersey. Part 2. Children engaged
in industrial home work. 62 pp. 1928.

Child labor in coal mining communities:
Publication No. 106. Child labor and the welfare of children in an anthracite
coal mining district. 94 pp. 1922.
Publication No. 117. The welrare of children in bituminous coal mining com­
munities in West Virginia. 77 pp. 1923.




8

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

The employment of school children:
Publication No. 192. Child labor in New Jersey.
school children. 140 pp. 1929.

Part 1. Employment of

Safety and health of working minors:
Publication No. 79. Physical standards for working children. 24 pp. [4th
ed.] 1926.
Publication No. 152. Industrial accidents to employed minors in Wisconsin,
Massachusetts, and New Jersey. 119 pp. 1926.

5.
The second class of inquiries in the field of the employment of
minors has dealt with the requirements of different occupations and
industries and the returns which they offer to the young worker.
A report already published in this field is No. 126, “ Minors in auto­
mobile and metal manufacturing industries in Michigan.” Reports
are in preparation of studies covering the printing and the women’s
clothing trades and certain clerical, commercial, and other occupa­
tions. In addition to such special surveys of selected industries, sta­
tistical studies have been made of what jobs are actually held by
boys and girls going to work at different ages and with different
educational and special training and the extent to which such factors
may affect their industrial lives.
Publications issued in this field are:
Publication No. 74. Industrial stability of child workers— A study of employment-certficate records in Connecticut. 8 6 pp. 1920.
Publication No. 89. The working children of Boston. 374 pp. 1922.
Publication No. 199. Child labor in New Jersey. Part 3. The working children
of Newark and Paterson. (In press.)

Reports are in preparation covering the industrial histories of
minors in Milwaukee, Wis., and in Rochester and Utica, N. Y., as
well as a study of the work histories of minors of subnormal mental­
ity in selected localities.
c. Current reports of employment certificates or permits issued to
children going to work are obtained by the bureau from cooperating
State or local officials responsible for the issuance of these certificates
or for the supervision of certificate issuance. A brief analytical
summary of these reports is included in the annual report of the
chief and is also published in leaflet form.
d. The report of a study of vocational guidance and placement
undertaken with the cooperation of the junior division of the United
States Employment Service, which covers the development, organiza­
tion, and status of vocational guidance in certain selected cities in
the United States, was issued as Publication No. 149, “ Vocational
guidance and junior placement.”

Women’s Bureau.
Twentieth and C Streets NW., Washington, D. C. Mary
Anderson, Director.
T h i s bureau, an outgrowth of the war-emergency body organized
under the name of “ Women in Industry Service,” was established as
a permanent bureau of the Department of Labor by act of Congress
approved June 5, 1920. Its duties as stated in the act are “ to formu­
late standards and policies which shall promote the welfare of wageearning women, improve their working conditions, increase their




IN THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

9

efficiency, and advance their opportunities for profitable employ­
ment,” and “ to investigate and report * * * upon all matters
pertaining to the welfare of women in industry.”
The publications of the bureau consist of annual reports of the
director, a series of Bulletins (Nos. 1 to 77, 1919-1929), charts of
labor legislation affecting woman workers, and exhibit material of
various kinds—motion pictures, miniature stage sets, posters, etc.—
which is lent to organizations. The bulletins include a series of
studies of labor laws and their effects (Nos. 2, 5, 6, 7, 16, 40, 61, 63,
65, 66, 68); standards for employment of women in industry (No. 3);
and a large number of reports upon special investigations. Included
in the last-mentioned group are general surveys of woman workers
in the industries of Kansas, Ehode Island, Georgia, Maryland, Ar­
kansas, Kentucky, South Carolina, Alabama, New Jersey, Missouri,
Ohio, Oklahoma, Illinois, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Delaware;
studies of industrial poisons (No. 57) and industrial accidents affect­
ing women (No. 60); two studies of absenteeism and labor turn­
over (No. 52, lost time and labor turnover in cotton mills; No. 69,
causes of absence for men and for women in four cotton m ills); a
special study of immigrant working women, and one of negro women
in industry in 15 States.
Studies in process of completion have to do with women in Florida
industries, in laundries, in meat-packing plants, and in Hawaiian
pineapple canneries, and a summary of the bureau’s wage material.
Current field investigations deal with output in relation to hours,
conditions in the cigar industry, and certain occupational hazards.

United States Employment Service.
1800 D Street NW., Washington, D. C. Francis I. Jones,
Director General.
A p u b l i c employment service was organized in a limited way in
the Bureau of Immigration in 1907, under the direction o f its
Division of Information. By the provisions of the organic act
creating the Department of Labor, March 4, 1913, this function
was designated United States Employment Service, and by order
promulgated January 3, 1918, by the Secretary of Labor in pur­
suance of an act approved October 6, 1917, the administration of
this service was transferred to the office of the Secretary of Labor
and made a distinct and separate unit of the Department of Labor.
State and municipal cooperation.—It is in cooperation with and
coordinates the public employment offices throughout the country for
the purpose of bringing together the worker and the job and main­
taining a system for clearing labor between the several States to the
end that labor will be properly distributed in relation to supply and
demand.
J u n i o r D i v i s i o n .—This division deals with the youth of the coun­
try, both sexes, between legal working age and 21, by cooperation
with the public schools or other agencies, State or city, for the place­
ment of juniors in employment.
I n d u s t r ia l D i v i s i o n .— Publishes the Monthly Industrial Employ­
ment Information Bulletin giving current comment on items affect­
ing employment tendencies, possibilities, and development in the im­
portant industrial centers throughout the United States.




10

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

F a r m L abor D iv is io n .— Recruits, directs, and distributes seasonal
labor for wheat harvesting, cotton picking, potato harvesting, apple
and berry picking, corn husking, and work in the sugar-beet fields
and factories.

( b ) IN OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS,
BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS
Department of Agriculture.
Soils.

Bureau of Chemistry and

Washington, D. C. David J. Price, Principal Engineer in
Charge of the Chemical Engineering Division.
T h e Bureau of Chemistry and Soils has had leadership in this
country in the work being carried on to develop methods of dust
explosion prevention in industrial plants. Studies have been made
to determine the causes of dust explosions in grain elevators, feed,
cereal, and flour mills, and starch factories. Recently this work has
been expanded to include other industrial plants such as cork mills,
hard rubber grinding mills, woodworking plants, aluminum, zinc,
and magnesium plants, spice mills, powdered milk plants, chocolate,
and cocoa plants, sugar refineries, and similar plants producing or
handling dusty material. There are approximately 28,000 manufac­
turing establishments in the United States subject to the hazard of
dust explosions. These plants employ more than 1,324,000 persons
and manufacture products having an annual value in excess of
$10,000,000,000.

The bureau is cooperating with the National Fire Protection Asso­
ciation in the preparation of safety codes for dust explosion preven­
tion in industrial plants. Codes have already been prepared for
terminal grain elevators, flour and feed mills, starch factories, sugar
and cocoa pulverizing plants, and pulverized fuel systems, and have
been approved by the American Standards Association.
The methods of preventing dust explosions developed by the
bureau have been instrumental in reducing the losses from dust explo­
sions in grain threshing machines and in the grain-handling indus­
tries. Progress is being made in the development of explosion
preventive measures in other industries.
In addition to the safety codes referred to there are a number of
publications describing the dust explosion prevention measures
developed by the bureau.
Bulletin 379. Dust explosions and fires in grain separators in the Pacific
Northwest. D. J. Price and B. B. McCormick.
Bulletin 681. Grain-dust explosions; investigation in the experimental attri­
tion mill at Pennsylvania State College. B. W . Dedrich, R. B. Fehr, and
D. J. Price.
Circular 98. The installation of dust-collecting fans on threshing machines
for the prevention of explosions and fires and for grain cleaning. H. E. Roethe
And E. N. Bates.
Circular 171. Unprotected electric lights. D. J. Price and H. R. Brown.
Dust explosions— Theory and nature of, phenomena, causes, and methods of
prevention. 320 pages. D. J. Price, H. H. Brown, H. E. Roethe, and H. R.
Brown. Published by the National Fire Protection Association, Boston.
Bulletin 1373. Dust control in grain elevators. H. R. Brown and J. O. Reed.
Technical Bulletin 44. The value of inert gas as a preventive of dust explo­
sions in grinding equipment. H. R. Brown.




IN OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS

11

More than 100 articles on dust explosions have been prepared for
publication in trade journals.
The bureau has also made investigations of cotton-gin fires and has
found that the main cause of ignition is static electricity. Publica­
tions on this subject are:
Circular 28. Cotton-gin fires.
Circular 271. Grounding cotton gins to prevent fires. H. E. Roethe.
Circular 76. Fires in cotton gins and how to prevent them. H. E. Roethe.

Department of Commerce.

Bureau of Mines.

Washington, D. C. Scott Turner, Director.
E s t a b l is h e d by act of Congress, approved May 16, 1910 (37 St at.
681), this bureau is authorized to conduct investigations designed to
improve health and safety in the mineral industry and to promote
efficient development and utilization of mineral resources. Its work
is organized under (a) the technologic branch, consisting of the
mechanical, mining, metallurgical, petroleum and natural gas, ex­
periment stations, helium, and explosives divisions; (&) the economic
branch, including the coal, mineral statistics, petroleum economics,
rare metals and nonmetals, and common metals divisions; (c) the
health and safety branch, comprising the health division and the
safety division; and (d) the administrative branch, consisting of the
office administration and information divisions. The principal ex­
periment station and central laboratories are at Pittsburgh, Pa.;
other experiment stations are located at Bartlesville, Okla. (petro­
leum) ; Berkeley, Calif.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Salt Lake City, Utah;
Seattle, Wash.; Tucson, Ariz.; Tuscaloosa, Ala.; New Brunswick,
N. J .; Rolla, Mo.; and Reno, Nev. The bureau has an experimental
mine at Bruceton, Pa., for explosion tests, etc. Investigations are
also carried on under cooperative agreements with various State
universities, mining schools, bureaus and commissions, and other
agencies. Each annual report of the director contains a record of
investigations completed or in progress.
For purposes of safety work the country is divided into 9 safety
districts, each with a district engineer in charge; and the bureau
maintains in them 11 mine-rescue cars and 11 saiety stations, which
render aid at mine disasters, and at which about 80,000 miners each
year are trained in first-aid and mine-rescue methods.
The publications of the bureau are the bulletins and the technical
papers (containing the results of investigations), the miners’ circu­
lars (written in nontechnical English and dealing with accident pre­
vention, rescue and first-aid methods, the safeguarding of health, and
other topics that directly concern the workers in mines, mills, and
metallurgical plants), the economic papers (analytical studies of pro­
duction statistics, sources, resources, distribution, and industrial flow
of mineral commodities), the annual report entitled “ Mineral re­
sources of the United States ” summarizing the production and con­
sumption of the different minerals, the annual reports of the director,
and miscellaneous handbooks on special subjects, posters, charts, and
schedules. A printed list of them may be obtained on application.
A mimeographed series of brief reports, presenting results of minor
investigations on special phases of major investigations, is also issued




12

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

and distributed to the technical press and to Government organiza­
tions, companies, or individuals interested.
Among the studies which have been published as bulletins or tech­
nical papers are many dealing with mine hazards, rescue and first-aid
training for miners, health and safety conditions in mines, quarries,
metallurgical plants, and in the oil and gas industries, explosives and
equipment used in mines and quarries, and related subjects, viz:
Coal dust, explosion tests, etc.:
Bulletins Nos. 20, 50, 52, 56, 102, 141, 107, 242, 268; Technical Papers Nos.
386, 448, 464; Serials Nos. 2606, 2638, 2649, 2793; Information Circulars Nos.
6008, 6039, 6085, 6112, 6158, 6178.

Mine gases, explosibility, testing, etc.:
Bulletins Nos. 42, 72, 197, 277, 279, 287; Technical Papers Nos. 39, 43, 119, 121,
134, 150, 190, 249, 320, 355, 357; Miners’ Circulars Nos. 14, 33, 34, 35; Serials
Nos. 2207, 2275, 2282, 2303, 2427.

Prevention of explosions:
Technical Papers Nos. 21, 56, 84; Bulletin No. 225; Miners’ Circulars Nos. 21,
*Z , 27; Serial No. 2856; Information Circular No. 6070.
2

Safety of mine electrical and other equipment:
Bulletins Nos.
75, 101, 103, 138,
2371, 2541, 2626,
6053, 6096, 6098,

46, 6 8 , 74, 240, 258, 305, 313; Technical Papers Nos. 19, 44,
228, 237, 271, 306, 402, 429, 454; Serials Nos. 2224, 2258, 2308,
2813, 2859; Information Circulars Nos. 6005, 6037, 6046, 6052,
6108.

Accident prevention in metal mines:
Bulletin No. 257 ; Technical Papers Nos. 30, 229, 244, 400; Serials Nos. 2255,
2259, 2863.

Safety in stone quarrying:
Technical Paper No. I l l ; Serial No. 2299.

Mine rescue and first aid, gas masks, oxygen-breathing apparatus,
etc.:
Bulletin No. 62; Technical Papers Nos. 11, 62, 77, 82, 122, 248, 272, 277, 292,
300, 334, 348, 373, 433; Miners’ Circulars Nos. 25, 30, 32; Serials Nos. 2209, 2234,
2360, 2445, 2473, 2489, 2494, 2591, 2719, 2750; First Aid Manual; Handbook on
Self-Contained Oxygen Breathing Apparatus.

Occupational diseases:
Miner’s nystagmus (Bulletin No. 93) ; pulmonary diseases due to rock dust
in metal mines (Bulletin No. 132; Technical Papers Nos. 105, 260, 372) ; control
of hookworm infection (Bulletin No. 139) ; compressed air illness (Technical
Paper No. 285) ; lead poisoning (Technical Paper No. 389) ; mercury poisoning
(Serial No. 2354).

Blast furnaces, hazards, and accident prevention:
Bulletins Nos. 130, 140; Technical Paper No. 136; asphyxiation by blast­
furnace gas (Technical Paper No. 106).

Steel plants:
Health conservation (Technical Paper No. 102) ; dust hazards (Technical
Paper No. 153) ; carbon monoxide poisoning (Technical Paper No. 156).
Explosibility of acetylene (Technical Paper No. 112) ; inflammability of
aluminum dust (Technical Paper No. 152) ; gasoline hazards (Technical Papers
Nos. 115, 127),




m

OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS

13

Hazards and safety measures in oil and gas industries:
Bulletins Ntfs. 231, 272; Technical Papers Nos. 352, 382, 392, 419, 422, 462;
Serials Nos. 2219, 2400, 2557, 2611, 2738, 2772, 2776, 2814, 2847, 2956; Information
Circular No. 6064).

Sanitation in mining communities:
Miners’ Circular No. 28; Technical Papers Nos. 261, 289; Serials Nos. 2391,
2646.

Mine ventilation:
Bulletins Nos. 204, 285; Technical Paper No. 251; Serials Nos. 2355, 2426,
2554, 2563, 2584, 2637; Information Circulars Nos. 6086, 6089, 6126, 6136.

Mine fires, prevention, means of fighting, etc.:
Bulletins Nos. 188, 229; Technical Papers Nos. 24, 314, 330, 363; Miners*
Circular No. 36; Serials Nos. 2240, 2262, 2325, 2335, 2499, 2801, 2914; Infor­
mation Circular No. 6073.

Industrial dusts, mitigation, respirators, etc.:
Technical Papers Nos. 153, 394; Serials Nos. 2213, 2291, 2337.

Safety education and organization:
Technical Paper No. 452; Serials Nos. 2223, 2245, 2251, 2260, 2361, 2366, 2372,
2457, 2704, 2838; Information Circulars Nos. 6020, 6045, 6055, 6063, 6095, 6117,
6130, 6153, 6191, 6194.

Accident statistics for coal mines, coke ovens, metal mines, quar­
ries, and metallurgical works are also published.

Department of Commerce.

Bureau of Standards.

Washington, D. C. George K Burgess, Director.
S a f e t y work of the Bureau of Standards subsequent to that pre­
sented in Bulletin No. 299 of the United States Bureau of Labor
Statistics (pp. 30-32), in so far as it concerns personnel, has been
in connection with the hazards in the use of gas appliances and the
hazards from ultra-violet radiation, on which the bureau has pub­
lished a number of technologic papers.
The bureau cooperates with the various State commissions in the
preparation of safety regulations, and it is represented upon a large
number of sectional committees which are developing safety codes
for which various engineering societies and other organizations
are sponsors.

Department of the Interior.

Bureau of Education.

Interior Building, Washington, D. C. Wm. John Cooper,
Commissioner.
S pecial studies on educational subjects by its own staff and other
specialists are published by this office in its series of bulletins.
Those covering personnel research include the following:
Biennial surveys and industrial education studies:
1923,
1925,
1927,
1929,
1922,

No.
.No.
No.
No.
No.

28.
37.
29.
21.
24.

Vocational education, 1920-1922.
Industrial education, 1922-1924.
Industrial education, 1924-1926.
Industrial education, 1926-1928.
Functions and administration of school janitor service.




14

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

1923, No. 3. History of the manual training school of Washington University.
1924, No. 2. Stat sties of industrial schools for delinquents, ,1920-1922.
1924, No. 11. Manual arts in the junior high school.
1928, No. 10. Statistics of industrial schools for delinquents, 1926-27.
1928, No. 18. Private and endowed schools offering trade and industrial
courses.
1929, No. 30. The general shop.

Industrial education circulars:
No. 16. March, 1923. Studies about occupations in public schools.
No. 17. April, 1923. Development of plans for the preparation of teachers.
No. 22. March, 1923. The preparation of teachers.
No. 23. June, 1924. Vocational education in Geneva, Switzerland.
No. 24. January, 1926. Dr. John de la Howe Industrial School, Willington, S. C.
No. 25. July, 1926. Relating foreman programs to the program for vocational
education.
No. 26. July, 1926. Time allotment to manual arts work.
No. 28. December, 1929. Grading in industrial schools and classes, with an
annotated general bibliography.

Miscellaneous:
1922. No. 32.
1929. No. 26.

A program of education in accident prevention.
Commercial education, 1926-1928.

Library leaflets:
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.

12.
15.
17.
19.
30.
32.
33.
36.

October, 1920. Educational surveys.
January, 1922. Vocational education.
February, 1923. Project method in education.
April, 1923. Education of women in the United States.
January, 1925. Education for citizenship.
October, 1925. Vocational guidance.
May, 1927. Vocational guidance.
May, 1929. Vocational guidance.

Post Office Department.
Service Relations, Washington, D. C. Louis Brehm, Direc­
tor.
A w e l f a r e d i v i s i o n was organized by the department in June,
1921. The name was changed to service relations on January 1,
1923. Extensive welfare and personnel activities are carried on
through this division, the objectives of which “ are to help in secur­
ing the best possible combination of satisfaction to the users of
the postal service and to the workers in the service.” The division
functions through local city and county organizations, called
“ councils.” Monthly bulletin letters are issued to the local service
councils and quarterly bulletin letters to the county service councils.
These letters pertain principally to health and welfare subjects.
The United States Public Health Service has cooperated in mak­
ing several surveys, one dealing with lighting standards and light­
ing equipment applicable to the needs of post-office work. Other
studies relate to dust hazard in mail bags; the dangers of carbon
monoxide in garages; the best type of shoulder straps for letter
carriers; and the relationship of illumination to ocular efficiency
and ocular fatigue.




IJ T OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS
S

Treasury Department.

15

Public Health Service.

Division of Scientific Research, Washington, D. C. Assist­
ant Surgeon General A. M. Stimson in Charge.
O f f ic e of I n d u s t r ia l H y g i e n e a n d S a n i t a t i o n .—Under the direc­
tion of Surgeon L. R. Thompson, this office investigates health
hazards and occupational diseases; working conditions in relation
to fatigue, ventilation, lighting, etc.; occupational morbidity and
mortality; and other phases bearing on the health of the industrial
worker. Only research in progress at the present time will be
mentioned.
Recently attention has been devoted particularly to the health
hazards of the dusty trades. A series of investigations has been
conducted in the field, including determination of the extent of
dustiness, observation of disabling sickness, physical examinations,
X rays of the chest, etc., of workers exposed to certain dusts as
exemplified in granite-cutting, a Portland cement plant, a cottoncloth manufacturing plant, hard and soft coal mines, a silverpolishing plant, and street sweeping in a large city. Bulletins cover­
ing each of these investigations are in course of preparation, two
having already been published. In view of the close bearing which
ventilation has on the mitigation of the dust hazard, that phase
received special consideration.
Publications in this series include two bulletins on the health of
workers in dusty trades: Health of workers in a Portland cement
plant (Bui. No. 176, 1928) and Exposure to siliceous dust (granite
industry) (Bui. No. 187, 1929); and the following reprints from
Public Health Service reports: Dust inhalation in its relation to
industrial tuberculosis (Reprint No. 990, 1925); a review of the
methods used for sampling aerial dust (Reprint No. 1004, 1925); a
study of the efficiency of dust-removing systems in •granite-cutting
plants (Reprint No. 1324, 1929) ; effect of inhaling siliceous dust
on quiescent tuberculous lesion (Reprint No. 1351, 1930).
Utilizing the same method of continuous observation, an investi­
gation has been made of the lead hazard in a battery-making plant,
particular attention being paid to the blood picture derived from
laboratory analysis. (Reprint No. 1299, 1929.) Another study in
which a unit has been kept in the field over a period of time is that
in regard to the high rate of pneumonia among steel workers, which
includes a measurement of radiant energy in its effect on skin
temperatures.
Investigations are being conducted as to the practical efficiency
of ventilating devices used in the removal of hazardous substances,
such as dusts, fumes, gases, and sprays. So far these studies have
related particularly to granite cutting, chromium-plating, and sand­
blasting. One report is given in Reprint No. 773, “ Efficiency of
various kinds of ventilating ducts” (1929). A further study was in
regard to the danger of benzol poisoning in chemical laboratories,
published as Reprint No. 1237 (1928).
The office is continuing an investigation of the possible harmful
effects of tetraethyl lead as used in gasoline for automobiles, with
respect to distributors, garage men, and individual users. Reports
already completed and published are: Proceedings of a conference to




16

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

determine whether or not there is a public-health question in the
manufacture, distribution, or use of tetraethyl lead gasoline, held at
Washington, D. C., May 20, 1925 (Bui. No. 158, 1925); the use of
tetraethyl lead gasoline in its relation to public health (Bui. No.
163, 1926); changes in the regulations proposed for tetraethyl lead
gasoline (Reprint No. 1260, 1928). Publications covering studies of
gasoline fumes, automobile exhaust gas, and carbon monoxide are:
The effect of gasoline fumes on dispensary attendance and output
in a group of workers (Reprint No. 786, 1922); the elimination of
carbon monoxide from the blood (Reprint No. 865, 1923); the prob­
lem of automobile exhaust gas in streets and repair shops in large
cities (Reprint No. 1217, 1928); effects of repeated daily exposure of
several hours to small amounts of automobile exhaust gas (Bui. No.
186,1929).
Studies of the distribution of daylight in buildings have been con­
tinued experimentally, with the hope of establishing satisfactory
standards of lighting for factories, hospitals, and schools. A special
study has also been made as to the loss of light in a large city due
to smoke, a continuous record having been obtained for a year. Pub­
lications in this field include “A survey of natural illumination
in an industrial plant” (Reprint No. 741, 1922) and two studies
in illumination made for the United States Post Office Department:
The hygienic conditions of illumination in certain post offices, espe­
cially relating to visual defects and effciency (Bui. No. 140, 1924);
and relationship of illumination to ocular efficiency and ocular
fatigue among the letter separators in the Chicago Post Office (Bui.
No. 181, 1928).
The possible health hazards connected with radium dial painting
in watch factories are being investigated, special attention being
given to the manner in which the workers are exposed to radium or
its emanations, and the possible methods of protection of the workers.
For a number of years the office has secured and published current
reports of disease prevalence among wage earners in different plants,
industries and occupations, based primarily on the records of sick
benefit associations, and has also analyzed more intensive data re­
lating to the incidence of disease according to diagnosis among wage
earners of different sexes, ages, races, and occupations. Morbidity
studies are covered in the following reprints: Disabling sickness
among employees of a rubber-manuiacturing establishment, 19181920 (No. 804, 1922); incidence of serious morbidity among a group
of wage earners (No. 807, 1922); sickness among 21,000 automobile
workers (No. 914, 1924); disabling sickness in cotton-mill communi­
ties of South Carolina (No. 929, 1924); a 10-year record of absences
from work on account of sickness and accidents—experiences of em­
ployees of the Edison Electric Illuminating Co. of Boston, 1915-1924
(No. 1142, 1927); sickness among persons m different occupations of
a public utility (No. 1207, 1928); sickness among industrial em­
ployees, frequency of disability lasting longer than one week from
important causes among 165,000 persons in industry in 1927 and a
summary of the morbidity experience from 1920 to 1927 (No. 1266);
sickness among industrial employees during the first three months
of 1929 (No. 1316, 1929); sickness among a group of industrial em­
ployees, 1928 (No. 1347, 1930); and Bulletin No. 165—Economic




IN OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS

17

status and health—a study and review of the relevant morbidity and
mortality data (1926).
Analyses of occupational mortality are carried out in so far as
data are available, and include at this time a study of deaths by
occupation among life-insurance policyholders, based on an investi­
gation by actuaries and insurance medical examiners. Studies are
also being made of the rate of physical impairment among workers in
broad industrial groups and in a few specific occupations.
Surgeon R. R. Sayers, of the Public Health Service, acts as chief
of the health and safety branch of the United States Bureau of
Mines and also as chief surgeon of the health division of the same
organization.
Articles on various phases of industrial hygiene by staff members
of the Public Health Service appear frequently in magazines, notably
the Nation’s Health and the Journal of Industrial Hygiene.

War Department.

General Staff.

State, War, and Navy Building, Washington, D. C.
1. U p o n the reorganization of the General Staff, in 1921, the ad­
visory board and training branch of the operations and training
division had charge of the training work or the Army previously
carried on by the education and recreation branch of the war plans
division, to which the duties of the committee on education and
special training (organized February, 1918) were transferred in
September, 1919. The advisory board, consisting of civilians (C. R.
Mann, chairman), formulated the plans for training to be carried
out by the training branch.
2. The method adopted by the board has been outlined in a
mimeographed memorandum “ The technique of Army training”
(8 pp.). It involves the preparation by the Army authorities of
minimum specifications of the personal characteristics, skill, and
knowledge needed to meet the requirements of each oi the many
grades and ratings of the Army; the preparation of standardized
tests for selecting and assigning men; the analysis of the required
skill and knowledge into unit operations and information topics
which make good instruction units, and the combination of these
into a practical school program; the preparation of students’ man­
uals and instructors’ guides; the determination of the average time
required for men to qualify for each grade or rating.
The personnel of the division of testing and grading (D. Edgar
Rice, director) of the research and development service was engaged
in administering tests for selection and assignment of men in the
various Army camps and posts. Up to May, 1921, about 58,000 men
had been tested and classified on the basis of several elementary
educational and vocational tests.
From 1*922, until it was dissolved in 1925, the advisory board was
engaged in the preparation of minimum specifications and index for
occupational specialists (A. G. O. Doc. No. 1121, 1923), and certain
training manuals for Army specialists.
Army intelligence test—Vocabulary.—This is a test given by line
officers, which may be used as a group test, known as the reading
vocabulary test; as an individual test (the verbal vocabulary test) ;
and as a literacy test. It is composed of 10 sheets, any one of which




18

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

may be used in the test. Instructions are issued that they be used
in irregular rotation. It provides for a possible score of 45. Recruits
making a score of 36 have a mental age of between 10 and 11 years
(Stanford revision of the Binet-Simon test) and may be accepted,
if otherwise qualified, without further mental test. A score of 22
to 32, inclusive, places the applicant in a doubtful group so far as the
line officer is concerned, and further intelligence tests are conducted
by a medical officer. A score of 20 or less indicates that the appli­
cant is below the mental age of 9 years and is ground for unqualified
rejection by the line recruiting officer. The literacy test on the same
sheet is not given to applicants making a score of 36 or more on the
third vocabulary test. All other accepted applicants are given this
test. The test consists of copying three simple questions and giving
a written answer for each. It has purposely been made very easy.
Performance test for the use of line and medical officers in testing
general intelligence of applicants for enlistment.—This is an indi­
vidual test. It is used in the examination of those who do not under­
stand English or who have learned too little English to take satis­
factorily the Binet-Simon test.
The abbreviation of the Stanford revision of the Binet-Simon
test for use of medical officers in testing general intelligence.—This
is an individual test and is given to applicants whose score on the
vocabulary test is below 34, unless the applicant is rejected for other
causes. The rough score is divided by 12 to give the mental age in
years and months. A mental age of 10 years or less by this test
is cause for rejection because of deficiency in general intelligence.
Applicants having a mental age of from 10 years and 1 month to
10 years and 6 months, inclusive, are accepted if generally very
desirable. Above this mental age they are accepted if otherwise
qualified.
Classification.—Tentative mobilization classification regulations
(A. G 381, July 17,1926) have been prepared. The purpose of these
r.
regulations is to insure as far as practicable that the Army, during
a national emergency, will use to the best advantage the training,
experience, and other qualifications that recruits bring with them
from civil life.

Civil Service Commission.
Research Division, Washington, D. C. L. J. O’Rourke,
Director.
T h e research division was established in 1922, when appropriation
was made available for the purpose of investigating the character,
training, and experience of applicants for positions in the classified
civil service.
The research programs undertaken have been concerned primarily
with problems of selection and management. The improvement of
selection methods is necessarily accompanied with consideration of
related problems of personnel administration. In developing selec­
tion devices the duties of each type of position are carefully studied
under actual working conditions, the results forming a basis for
reducing fatigue and conserving the energy of the worker and for




IN OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS

19

improving methods of selection and training, transfer and promotion
procedure, wage adjustment, organization of work, and coordination
of activities. The study of positions in the Postal Service, conducted
during 1923, 1924, and 1925, is an outstanding example or the extent
to which such analysis of duties may result in relieving unnecessary
expenditure of energy, and at the same time increasing production
and leading to better relations between employees and management.
For many positions general adaptability tests have been substituted
for an educational requirement where the requirement was intended
to insure a degree of general adaptability rather than a degree of
educational attainment. These tests are advantageous in that they
not only distinguish between those who are and those who are not
eligible, but they also differentiate among the abilities of the appli­
cants. The tests have been so constructed as to make possible a
method of interpreting a score made on one examination, in terms
of other examinations, and thus of guiding individuals to positions
for which they are qualified.
Special aptitude tests have been established for certain positions
which require that appointees have aptitude for particular types of
work, such as the distribution of mail, which is peculiar to the
Government service, and in which applicants can not, therefore, have
had previous training. Research studies have indicated that the
aptitude tests predict with a high degree of accuracy which appli­
cants will be most efficient in the occupation in question. Officials
of the departments concerned have also reported a much higher
efficiency in personnel secured through the new examinations.
Research procedure in connection with selection includes the fol­
lowing steps:
1. Study of the duties of the position in question.
2. Determination of the proficiency necessary to perform each of
these duties.1
3. Analysis of the qualifications necessary to attain such profi­
ciency.1
a. Skill and knowledge—training and experience.
& General intelligence—ability to learn and to adapt to new
.
situations.
c. Special aptitudes, including such qualities as ingenuity and
constructive ability.
d. Personality, including tact, perseverance, aggressiveness.
e. Physical qualifications—general and special.
4. Study of the relative importance of these qualifications as far
as fitness ior performing duties is concerned.1
5. Selection of a group of typical employees now performing
these duties, including both satisfactory and unsatisfactory workers,
concerning whom accurate ratings of individual efficiency are
obtained.
6. Construction of examinations, oral, written, or both, to measure
the essential qualifications.
1 In connection with these steps the relative efficiency of satisfactory and unsatisfactory
workers is studied in order to facilitate ascertaining the qualities that determine the
worker’s success or failure. This study varies in importance with the type of position
and with the possibility of securing a criterion of efficiency in that position.

105636°—30------3




20

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

7. Determination of the best method of giving examinations ; of
the importance of sample questions, specific directions, and various
methods of scoring; of the possibility of making several series of an
examinations which will be equal in difficulty.
8. Trials of proposed tests upon groups whose relative efficiency is
known; in other words, tests of the tests.
T
9. Selection, revision, or rejection of tests on the basis of statistical
evaluation of the results of the trials.
10. Assignment of relative weights to the several tests included in
the examination, and determination, on the basis of statistical evalua­
tion, of the score to be required as a passing grade.
Present research programs include the major steps listed below.
This research is basic for improving selection, placement, and adjust­
ment in the Federal service. The coordination of the work with
schools and industries represents not additional research but rather a
greater utilization of the materials developed for the service.
1. Study of a selected number of civil-service positions, with
regard to actual duties performed.
2. Determination, on the basis of actual case histories, of oppor­
tunities and of present and possible lines of promotion in those
positions.
3 Critical study of present examination standards in relation to
.
each other and to the requirements of the positions.
4. Improvement of the validity and the practicability of exami­
nations.
5. Study, in industry as well as in Government, of factors, such as
experience, not measured by tests.
6. Release of tests to industries, to determine industrial standards
of selection and to secure a clearer understanding of the limitations,
as well as the values, of our methods and measures.
7. Establishment of national standards, making test scores more
meaningful to placement officers.
8. Release of tests to schools, and development of cooperative
relations with research, guidance, and personnel directors in universi­
ties and secondary schools.
9. Release to schools of tables showing relationship between test
scores on our general intelligence tests and the intelligence tests used
in schools and colleges.
10. Development of a guidance card which will enable the appli­
cant to analyze opportunities in relation to his qualifications.
11. Preparation of sample tests, showing the nature of the exami­
nations used for the positions listed on the guidance card.
12. Coordination of the use of eligible registers, after determining
the extent to which eligibility for one position signifies ability to fill
other positions.
13. Dissemination, among present employees, of information con­
cerning lines of promotion, possibilities of transfer, and requirements
which must be met in order to secure such promotion or transfer.
Results of research undertaken have been published as follows:
O’Rourke, L. J. Selective tests. Proceedings of the forty-second annual
meeting of the National Civil Service Reform League, 1922,
Filer, Herbert A. Progress in civil service tests, Part L




TN OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS.

21

O’Rourke, L. J. Progress in civil service tests, Part II. Journal of Per­
sonnel Research, Vol. 1, No. 11, Mar., 1923.
------- Report of the Director of Research, Fortieth Annual Report, U. S.
Civil Service Commission, pp. 14-64.
------- Report of the Director of Research, Forty-first Annual Report, U. S.
Civil Service Commission, pp. 45-62.
-------Personnel work in the Federal Government. Vocational Guidance Maga­
zine, Vol. I ll, No. 4, p. 126, January, 1925. Reprinted in Principles and Prob­
lems of Vocational Guidance, edited by Frederick J. Allen; McGraw-Hill
Book Co.
------ Research in Federal personnel work. Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 22,
No. 2, pp. 115-116, February, 1925.
------ Report of the Director of Research, Forty-second Annual Report, U. S.
Civil Service Commission, pp. 44-74.
------- Saving dollars and energy. The Journal of Personnel Research, Vol.
IV, Nos. 9 and 10, pp. 351-364, January-February, 1926, and Vol. IV, No. 11,
pp. 433-450, March, 1926.
------ Building an eligible register. Postmaster’s Gazette, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp.
24-25, November, 1926.
------- Selection tests for police. Proceedings of the thirty-third convention
of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, 1926, p. 126.
-------Report of the Director of Research, Forty-third Annual Report, U. S.
Civil Service Commission, pp. 48-88.
•
------ The value of personnel research. Proceedings of Eighth International
Congress of Psychology, 1927, p. 403.
—
— Limitations of psychological studies as at present utilized by manage­
ment. Proceedings of International Management Congress, 1927.
------ Report of the Director of Research, Forty-fourth Annual Report, U. S.
Civil Service Commission, pp. 31-48.
------ Measuring judgment and resourcefulness— An interview technique. The
Personnel Journal, Vol. VII, No. 6 , pp. 427-440, April, 1929.
------ The use of scientific tests in the selection and promotion of police. The
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. CXLVI,
pp. 147-159, November, 1929.
------ Report of the Director of Research, Forty-fifth Annual Report, U. S.
Civil Service Commission, pp. 43-57.
------ A new emphasis in Federal personnel research. Government Printing
Office, 1930.
------ Office employment tests. Proceedings of the Personnel Administration
Conference, American Management Association, January, 1930.

Bureau of Efficiency.
W inder Building, Seventeenth and F Streets, Washington,
D. C. Herbert D. Brown, Chief.
E s t a b l is h e d as a division of the Civil Service Commission by
authority of the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation
act approved March 4, 1913 (37 Stat. 750); made an independent
establishment under present name by the urgent deficiency appropria­
tion act approved February 28,1916 (39 Stat. 15).
The functions of the Bureau of Efficiency are to investigate the
methods of business in the Government service, to investigate the
duplication of statistical and other work, to investigate the person­
nel needs of the executive departments and independent establish­
ments, and to establish and maintain a standard system of efficiency
ratings for the classified civil service in the District of Columbia.
The duties and powers of the bureau with reference to investigations
in the executive departments and independent establishments of the
Federal Government were extended by the act of Congress approved
May 16, 1928 (45 Stat. 576), to include the municipal government
of the District of Columbia.




22

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

By Executive order of October 24, 1921, the bureau was directed
by the President to prescribe a system of rating the efficiency of
employees in the classified service in the District of Columbia.
Under these instructions the bureau prescribed a uniform procedure
for rating the efficiency of employees engaged in clerical or routine
work. This system covered about 75 per cent of the total number
of employees in the departmental service. The principal features
of the system are described in the report of the bureau for the period
from November 1, 1921, to October 31, 1922.
During 1923 the bureau assisted the Director of the Bureau of
Engraving and Printing in the establishment of a system of efficiency
ratings for employees engaged in such clerical-mechanical processes
as counting, examining, assorting, pressing, and trimming. A for­
mula was also devised for rating plate printers which was used in
selecting surplus employees for dismissal.
In 1924 the Bureau of Efficiency completely revised the system of
efficiency ratings applicable to departmental employees and extended
the system to embrace virtually all employees in the classified de­
partmental service. The first rating under the amended system was
made as of November 15, 1924. A detailed description of the system
is printed as an appendix to the report of the bureau for the period
November 1, 1923, to October 31, 1924.
An investigation of the methods and procedures of the Civil Serv­
ice Commission, authorized by the legislative, executive, and judicial
appropriation act of March 3, 1917 (39 Stat. 1080), was submitted
to the President on April 7, 1922, and later transmitted to Con­
gress. The principal recommendations were for more practical
methods of examining candidates and for a modification of the com­
mission’s policy in the selection of eligibles for promotion. In 1928,
the bureau made another study of the organization and methods of
the Civil Service Commission at its request. A number of reports
containing recommendations for improving and simplifying the work
of the commission and expediting its business have been submitted.
By the act of March 3, 1917, referred to above, the bureau was
directed to make an investigation of the classification, salaries, and
efficiency of Federal employees in the District of Columbia and a
comparison of the rates of pay of employees of the Federal Govern­
ment with those of State and municipal governments and commercial
institutions performing similar services. This work, suspended dur­
ing the war and again during the life of the Joint Commission on
Reclassification of Salaries,2 was resumed at the beginning of 1920 at
the direction of members of the House Committee on Appropria­
tions. Moreover, it was necessary to classify all employments in the
departmental service as a preliminary step to the application of
salary standards in connection with the efficiency rating system.
Such a classification was specifically directed by the Executive order
of October 24,1921. Under this requirement a classification schedule
was formulated by the bureau with the concurrence of the heads of
the executive departments. All employees were allocated to their
proper grades in the classification schedule on the basis of the charac­
2 The report of this joint commission, created Mar. 1, 1919, by section 9 of the legisla­
tive, executive, and judicial appropriation act for 1919-20, submitting a classification of
positions on the basis of duties and qualifications, and schedules of compensation for the
respective classes, was printed as House Doc. 686, 66th Cong., 2d sess.




IN OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS

23

ter of the work to which they were assigned and the qualifications
required for its satisfactory performance.
The act providing for the classification of civilian positions within
the District of Columbia and in the field services was approved
March 4, 1923 (42 Stat. 1488). That act created an ex-officio board
known as the Personnel Classification Board, which consists of the
Director of the Bureau of the Budget, a member of the Civil Service
Commission, and the chief of the Bureau of Efficiency, or alternates
designated by those organizations. The act provides that the Bureau
of Efficiency shall render the board such cooperation and assistance
as may be required for the performance of its duties. Accordingly a
part of the staff of the bureau has been regularly detailed to the
board during the last seven years.
Prior to the retirement act of 1920, the bureau collected elaborate
statistics on the personnel of the Government service and from these
made actuarial calculations for the Senate Committee on Civil Serv­
ice and Retirement as to the cost of retiring civil employees of the
Government under the various plans proposed. On July 1, 1925, the
chief of the Bureau of Efficiency was appointed a member of the
Board of Actuaries, authorized by section 16 of the act approved
May 22, 1920, for the retirement of employees in the classified civil
service (41 Stat. 620). During recent years the bureau has made a
number of actuarial valuations of various existing and proposed re­
tirement plans covering various groups of employees in the service of
the Federal Government and the District of Columbia government.
The bureau is now cooperating with the Board of Actuaries and the
General Accounting Office in devising a uniform procedure for the
several departments and independent establishments for compiling
historical, statistical, and accounting data concerning employees
coming within the provisions of the civil service retirement and dis­
ability act.

Federal Board for Vocational Education.
Washington, D. C.

J. C. Wright, Director.

Federal Board for Vocational Education was created by
the act of Congress, approved February 23, 1917, which provided
Federal aid for schools and classes and teacher training carried
on under the direct supervision or control of State boards of voca­
tional education, in accordance with plans approved by the Federal
Board. Its primary function is the administration of this act. In
addition, it is charged with the administration of the act of Con­
gress, approved March 10, 1924, which extends the benefits of the
vocational education (Smith-Hughes) act of 1917 to the Territory
of Hawaii; of the act of Congress (George-Reed), approved Feb­
ruary 5, 1929, which provides for the further development of voca­
tional education in agriculture and home economics; and of the act
of Congress, approved June 2, 1920, and amended June 5, 1924,
which provides for the promotion of vocational rehabilitation of
ersons disabled in industry, or otherwise; and it is commissioned
y the act of Congress approved February 23, 1929, to provide for
the vocational rehabilitation of disabled residents of the District of
Columbia. By each of these acts the board is authorized to make
studies, investigations, and reports.
T

he

E




24

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

At the present time a number of important studies are under way
in all of the fields of vocational education for which the board is
responsible, and practically without exception these studies have been
instituted as a result of specific requests from (1) the States, (2)
national business and industrial organizations interested in voca­
tional training, and (3) from the various departments of the Gov­
ernment. Certain studies which appear to be necessary because of
the knowledge which the Federal board has of general conditions
prevailing in different fields of vocational education have also been
made, and others are now under way.
The results of the research work undertaken to promote the effi­
ciency of trade and industrial education are made available to the
States through regional conferences held annually with representa­
tives of State boards and through the publication of bulletins. The
special types of service to State boards, as described in the fourth
annual report, 1920 (pp. 28-40), includes studies of training of trade
and industrial teachers and development of methods of educational
trade analysis, effective programs for foremen’s conferences, and
methods of conducting local surveys. Short training courses on these
subjects have been given at the regional conferences. Recent bulle­
tins containing the results of studies in this field are:
No. 73. Part-time schools. A survey of experience in the United States and
foreign countries, with recommendations. 1922. 462 pp.
No. 78. Part-time cooperative courses. Suggestions for the information of
administrators and teachers interested in the organization of cooperative
courses, the duties and responsibilities of the coordinator, and the organization
of a curriculum. 1922. 31 pp.
No. 85. Program for training part-time teachers, organization and content
of a training program to prepare teachers for effective service in part-time
schools. 1923. 50 pp.
No. 87. Apprentice education. A survey of part-time education and other
forms of extension training in their relation to apprenticeship in the United
States. 1923. 521 pp.
No. 92. Apprentice education in the construction industry. 1924. 45 pp.
No. 95. Bricklaying. An analysis of the trade of bricklaying, together with
suggestive courses of training for apprentices and journeymen workers. 1924.
140 pp.
No. 99. Directory of trade schools. Classified by trades taught in day unit
and part-time trade courses which offer instruction in trade and industrial
education, excluding evening trade extension classes, 1925. 38 pp.
No. 102. Paper hanging. An analysis of the paper-hangers’ trade, together
with suggestive courses of training for apprentices and journeymen workers.
1925. 69 pp.
No. 106. Stone setting. The setting of cut-stone trim in brick buildings.
Specimen instruction material for use with advanced bricklayer apprentices
and journeymen workers. 1927. 114 pp.
No. 109. Layouts and equipment for automobile school shops, information and
suggestions regarding shop layouts and equipment for schools giving training
in automobile repairing. 1926. 27 pp.
No. 114. Training for leadership in trade and industrial education. 1927.
29 pp.
No. 125. The training of foremen conference leaders. Suggestions as to
methods to be followed and types of subject matter recommended by a com­
mittee of experienced conference leaders. 1927. 120 pp.
No. 127. Progress in foreman training. A study of the results of 11 leadertraining conferences conducted by the Federal Board for Vocational Education
during the years 1926 and 1927. 1928. 27 pp.
No. 128. Bibliography on foreman training. A selected and annotated list
of references on recent books, pamphlets, and magazine articles. 1928. 29 pp.




IK OTHER. EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS

25

No. 130. Cooperative part-time education. The present status of cooperative
schools and classes in the United States with suggestions as to methods by
which such work may be organized. 1928. 35 pp.
No. 131. Foremen training in the United States. A translation of a report
by a Swedish engineer on foreman training in the United States. 1928. 28 pp.

The results of the research work undertaken to aid the States in
the establishment of vocational schools and classes in commerce and
commercial pursuits are made available through such investigations
and reports as the situation with the States requesting such aid has
required; by conferences and special studies in the field of commercial
education in States and large cities; and by outlining and promoting
the educational programs of national trade associations. The results
of these studies and investigations constitute the following subseries
of bulletins:
No. 107. Vocational education for those engaged in the retail grocery business.
The program developed in cooperation with the National Association of Retail
Grocers. 1926. 179 pp.
No. 119. Elements of an educational program for laundry salesmen. De­
veloped by a committee of the Laundryowners National Association in coopera­
tion with the Federal Board for Vocational Education. 1927. 188 pp.
No. 123. A manual for conference leaders. For use in an educational pro­
gram for men engaged in the retail meat business. 1927. 39 pp.

In the field of vocational rehabilitation the results of the studies,
investigations, and surveys, which are described in the thirteenth
annual report, 1929 (p. 25 ff.), are made available through national
and regional conferences that are held in alternate years and consti­
tute the following subseries of bulletins:
No. 72. Vocational rehabilitation in rural communities. 1923. 13 pp.
No. 76. Vocational rehabilitation and workmen’s compensation. Interrela­
tion of the program of vocational rehabilitation and workmen’s compensation.
1922. 25 pp.
No. 80. Vocational rehabilitation. Its purpose, scope, and methods, with
iUustrative cases. 1923. 46 pp.
No. 93. Proceedings of the national conference on vocational rehabilitation
of civilian disabled. Washington, D. C. February 4-8, 1924. 1924. 23 pp.
No. 96. A study of occupations at which 6,097 physically disabled persons
are employed after being vocationally rehabilitated. 1925. 67 pp.
No. 104. Proceedings of the national conference on vocational rehabilitation
of the disabled civilian. Cleveland, Ohio. September 29-October 2, 1925.
1926. 152 pp.
No. 110. Employment training in civilian vocational rehabilitation; definition,
characteristics, and possibilities of employment training as a means of effecting
rehabilitation of the physically disabled. 1926.
No. 120. Vocational rehabilitation in the United States. The evolution, scope,
organization, and administration of the program of the vocational rehabilitation
of disabled persons. 1927. 98 pp.
No. 121. Proceedings of the fourth national conference on the vocational
rehabilitation of the disabled civilian. Memphis, Tenn. March 28-31, 1927.
1927. 144 pp.
No. 126. Workmen’s compensation legislation in relation to vocational rehabili­
tation. An analysis of certain provisions of workmen’s compensation laws show­
ing their relation to the administration of vocational rehabilitation of disabled
persons. 1927. 146 pp.
No. 132. A study of rehabilitated persons. A statistical analysis of the re­
habilitation of 6,391 disabled persons. 1928. 46 pp.
No. 133. Vocational rehabilitation of the disabled. Salient facts. 1928.
1 0 pp.
No. 134. Proceedings of the fifth national conference on vocational rehabilita­
tion of disabled persons. Milwaukee, Wis, September 26-28,, 1928. 1928,
?16 pp.




26

I. FEDERAL AGENCIES

Federal Reserve Board.
Washington, D. C.
P e r s o n n e l studies covering Federal reserve bank employees h a v e
been continued in recent years for administrative guidance in formu­
lating reserve bank personnel policies, but without publication of re­
sults. In 1921 a report prepared by the committee on personnel
appointed at the governors’ conference with the Federal Reserve
Board in April, 1920, was published, giving a survey of personnel
activities in Federal reserve banks.

Personnel Classification Board.
Washington, D. C. C. C. Van Leer, Chairman.
Personnel Classification Board was created on March 4, 1923,
through the enactment of the classification act of 1923. It is an
ex-officio board, which consists of the Director of the Bureau of the
Budget, or an alternate from that bureau designated by the director;
a member of the Civil Service Commission, or an alternate from
that commission designated by the commission; and the Chief of the
United States Bureau of Efficiency, or an alternate from that bureau
designated by the chief of the bureau. The director of the Bureau
of the Budget, or his alternate, is named in the statute as chairman of
the board.
The board has no specific appropriation of its own, but its staff
is composed of persons employed by the various other governmental
departments and establishments and detailed to the board for service.
For the fiscal year ending June 30,1929, it received an appropriation
of $75,000 for the conduct of a classification and compensation survey
of some 106,000 positions in the field service.
The fields of personnel administration covered in the activities of
the board are:
1. The classification of governmental positions in the District of
Columbia according to their duties and responsibilities, and the
allocation of these positions to salary grades contained in compensa­
tion schedules enacted by Congress.
2. The review and revision of efficiency or service rating systems
prepared by the Bureau of Efficiency, and certain phases of the
administration of these efficiency rating systems in cases of proposed
dismissals or reductions for inefficiency and in cases of proposed
reductions in force because of cessation or diminution of activities.
3. The study of rates of compensation provided in the act with a
view to reporting conclusions and recommendations to Congress as to
readjustments deemed just and reasonable.
4. The preparation of class specifications showing the title of each
class of positions, the duties and responsibilities involved, and the
minimum qualifications required for the satisfactory performance of
such duties and the discharge of such responsibilities.
A study under way at present is the field survey authorized by
section 2 of the act of May 28, 1928. (45 Stat. 776.) This involves
the study of the duties and responsibilities of some 106,000 positions
in the field service, the preparation of a classification plan for those
positions, a study of wage data as to positions in private employment
T

he




IN 0TH E B EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS

27

as well as in the Government service, and the preparation of a com­
pensation plan for Government positions.
Exclusive of circulars and forms of a routine nature, the publica­
tions of the board are as follows:
Form No. 12. Class specifications for positions in the departmental service.
Government Printing Office, 1924. (Out of print.)
Report of wage and personnel survey, field survey division, Personnel Clas­
sification Board, February, 1929. (H. Doc. 602, 70th Cong., 2d sess.) Govern­
ment Printing Office, 1929. Price, 60 cents.
Form No. 18. Preliminary class specifications of positions in the field service.
(In press.)
on

The board also has in preparation a supplemental or final report
the field service.

United States Shipping Board.
New Navy Building, Washington, D. C.

reports of the Shipping Board devote a chapter to the in ­
dustrial relations division of the bureau of operations, which is based
on the report of the division on industrial relations in the marine and
the dock departments.
A

nnual




II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

(a) STATE AGENCIES3
California.

Industrial Accident Commission.

State Building, San Francisco, Calif. W ill J. French,
Chairman.
T h i s commission, organized January 1, 1914, administers the
workmen’s compensation, insurance, and safety act. It is a division
of the department of industrial relations created in 1921.
D e p a r t m e n t of S a f e t y . C. H. Fry, director.—The work of the
safety department is divided into divisions: Boiler, construction,
electrical, elevator, logging and shipbuilding, mechanical, mining,
and oil. Surveys of the special hazards of the various industries
are made and general safety orders issued. Accident-prevention
work and safety campaigns are carried on by the department, a
recent campaign on prevention of accidents in building and engineer­
ing construction having been especially successful.
In addition to its regular safety orders, which are revised and
reissued from time to time, the safety department has published:
Organization of safety committees in industry.
Hazards ordinarUy found in garages and automobile service shops.
Hazards in the dry-cleaning industry.

Special problems under consideration at present are the fumigation
by hydrocyanic acid, spray coating, storing and use of photographic
films, and the special problem which has been brought uj> by the
erection of steel or reinforced-concrete buildings where it is neces­
sary to hoist steel close to high-tension power lines.

California.

Industrial Welfare Commission.

620 State Building, San Francisco, Calif. A. B. C. Dohrmann, Chairman.
C reated by act of the legislature approved May 26, 1913 (Laws,
1913, c. 324), to regulate working conditions and establish minimum
wages in occupations, trades, and industries in which women and
minors are employed, this commission administers the division of
industrial welfare of the department of industrial relations created
by section 364c, Political Code.
Recent publications of the commission contain results of investiga­
tions as follows:
8 Not all State departments of labor act as research agencies, and in a number of
instances departments which engage in some research work in connection with their other
duties do not publish nports of studies. Most of the State departments of lal)or are in
fact engaged chiefly in administration of the labor laws, and only in the larger industrial
States is research work in connection therewith attempted.

28




STATE AGENCIES

29

General conclusions as to effect of minimum wage regulation.
Report of factory and home work in the Chinese quarters, San Francisco and
Oakland.
Report of conditions in the fruit and vegetable canning industry. Fifth
Report, 1922-1926, pp. 13, 28, and 119.
Results of minimum wage regulation in California and investigations in
various industries. Sixth Biennial Report, 1926-1928, pp. 14 and 106-134.

Connecticut.
spection.

Department of Labor and Factory In­

Hartford, Conn. Charlotte Molyneux Holloway, Industrial
Investigator.
R e s e a r c h activities of the State department of labor are conducted
through the industrial investigator, who is directed by statute to
study the conditions of wage-earning women and girls. Reports of
the investigating division of the department comprise one part of
the biennial report of the department and deal with all wage earners
of the State, but with especial emphasis on working women.

Illinois Department of Labor.
State Capitol, Springfield, 111. Barney Cohen, Director of
Labor.
C r e a t e d under the act of March 7, 1917, known as the Civil Ad­
ministrative Code, the department of labor superseded numerous
agencies having to do with labor, which successive legislatures had
established since 1879. The duties of most of the surviving agencies
were brought under the jurisdiction of a single department head.
Jurisdiction over mines, however, was given to a department of mines
and minerals. The act of 1917 abolished the former separately func­
tioning bureau of labor statistics (also known as the board of com­
missioners of labor), the industrial ooard, the State factory inspector,
the State board of arbitration, and the general advisory board for
the free employment offices, and transferred their duties to the depart­
ment of labor.
The present work of the department of labor is organized into five
main divisions, as follows: Industrial commission, division of factory
inspection, division of inspection of private employment agencies,
division of free employment offices, and division of general advisory
board for the free employment offices. Much important work in the
field of personnel research in Illinois was done by State agencies
which existed before the establishment of the department of labor in
1917. Work in this field now falls under the bureau of statistics
and research of the industrial commission.
I n d u s t r ia l C o m m i s s i o n , 205 West Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111.
Clarence S. Piggott, chairman.—This division, which in 1917 suc­
ceeded the industrial board, administers the workmen’s compensation
act, furnishes the personnel and funds for most of the work of the
bureau of statistics and research, and has jurisdiction over the medi­
ators and conciliators of labor disputes. It is nominally a division of
the department of labor but in its administration of the workmen’s
compensation act and of the arbitration and conciliation act it is not
subject to the director of labor. Its annual report, however, is in­




30

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

eluded in the annual report of the department of labor. Publica­
tions of the industrial commission since 1917, aside from annual
reports, are listed under the bureau of statistics and research.
B u r e a u or S t a t is t i c s a n d R e s e a r c h , 205 West Wacker Drive.
Chicago, 111. Howard B. Myers, chief.—In 1917 the division oi
labor statistics of the department of labor took over the work of the
former bureau of labor statistics, especially in regard to industrial
accident statistics. In 1921 the general advisory board for the free
employment offices began publication of employment statistics and
of the monthly Employment Bulletin, which since July, 1923, has
been known as the Labor Bulletin. On July 1, 1925, the general
advisory board was given funds by the general assembly with which
to carry on statistical and research work for the department of labor,
including accident statistics, A bureau was formed, which has been
known successively as the bureau of industrial accident and labor
research (1925-1927), the bureau of labor statistics (1927-1929), and
by its present name since July, 1929. The bureau was transferred
July 1, 1927, to the industrial commission, though it still serves the
rest of the department of labor as well as the commission. It com­
piles the annual reports of the department of labor, prepares indus­
trial accident statistics, edits the monthly Labor Bulletin, the official
publication of the department, which contains figures and articles
on employment conditions, industrial accidents, occupational disease,
child labor, woman workers, hours of work, wages, labor turnover,
cost of living, and subjects dealing with the work of the various
divisions of the department of labor. Besides regular press releases
on employment and building it has published one special bulletin and
several pamphlets:
Bulletin No. 1. Accidents to employed minors in Illinois. A study of injuries
which occurred in 1923 to workers under 18 years of age. 1927. 52 pp.
Reprint from Labor Bulletin, March and April, 1928. The compensation trend
since 1913. The industrial commission watches compensation payments. 1928.
1 0 pp.
Pamphlet. Woman and child workers of Illinois. Why children should be
required to obey the child labor law. 1928. 15 pp.
D i v is i o n o f F a c t o r y I n s p e c t i o n , 608 South Dearborn Street,
Chicago, 111. W. H. Curran, chief inspector.—Service established
in 1893. Directly responsible to the governor until the consolidation
of activities in 1917. This division enforces the child labor law,
women’s 10-hour law, health, safety, and comfort act, garment law,
blower law, washhouse law, basement blower law, structural law,
occupational disease law, and bedding law. Statistics concerning its
work are published in the annual report of the department of labor.
D i v i s i o n of I n s p e c t i o n of P r iv a t e E m p l o y m e n t A g e n c ie s , 608
South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. John J. McKenna, chief in­
spector.—Continues the work of licensing private employment
agencies, which was begun in 1899 under the secretary of state, given
in 1903 to the bureau of labor statistics (board of commissioners
of labor), and carried on from 1909 to 1917 by a chief inspector. In
1917 this work was brought into the department of labor by the
Civil Administrative Code. The division issues licenses and enforces
regulations concerning private employment agencies. Its work is
summarized in the annual report of the department of labor.




STATE AGENCIES

31

D i v i s i o n o f F r e e E m p l o y m e n t O f f i c e s , State Capitol, Spring­
field, 111. Frank Unger, State superintendent.—Service established
in 1899, and was directly under the governor until 1917, when it was
brought into the department of labor. At present there are offices
in 16 Illinois cities. Its statistics and reports are published in the
monthly Labor Bulletin and in the annual report of the department
of labor.
D

G e n e r a l A d v is o r y B oard for t h e F r ee E m p l o y ­
O f f ic e s , 116 N o r t h D e a r b o r n S tr e e t, C h ic a g o , 111. B e n ja m in
M. S q u ire s , c h a ir m a n .— E s t a b lis h e d u n d e r th e fr e e e m p lo y m e n t r e ­
o r g a n iz a tio n a ct o f 1915 to a d v ise a n d co o p e ra te w it h th e fo r m e r
b u re a u o f la b o r sta tistic s a n d th e g e n e r a l su p e rin te n d e n t o f th e fr e e
e m p lo y m e n t offices in C h ic a g o . In 1917 it b ecam e a d iv is io n o f th e
d e p a r tm e n t o f la b o r. In 1921 th e w o r k o f th e p rese n t b u re a u o f sta ­
tistic s a n d research w a s b e g u n u n d e r th e b o a r d , b u t w a s tr a n s fe r r e d
in 1927 to th e in d u s tr ia l co m m issio n .
Its re p o rts a re p u b lish e d in
th e a n n u a l r e p o r ts o f th e d e p a rtm e n t o f la b o r .
iv is io n of t h e

m ent

Iowa.

Bureau of Labor.

Des Moines, Iowa. H. V. Hoyer, Commissioner.
I n a d d i t i o n to regular inspections of factories and workshops in
connection with the administration of State labor laws, the Iowa
Bureau of Labor publishes monthly the Iowa Employment Survey,
showing trend of employment in identical establishments. Biennial
reports contain wage and accident statistics and factory inspection
reports. A special investigation of children in industry attending
part-time school has been published as Bulletin No. 17 (1926).

Kansas.

Commission of Labor and Industry.

State House, Topeka, Kans.

C. J. Beckman, Commissioner.

T h e c o m m is s io n h a s r e c e n tly m a d e a s tu d y o f h o u r s a n d w a g e s o f
w o m e n e m p lo y e d in h o te ls a n d resta u ra n ts a n d is p la n n in g a n in d u s ­
t r ia l s u r v e y o f th re e cities in th e S ta te .

Maine.

Department of Labor and Industry.

Augusta, Me. Charles O. Beals, Commissioner.
C reated in 1911 to succeed the bureau of labor and industrial sta­
tistics. Industrial surveys are made from time to time in connection
with the administration of factory inspection and labor laws. Data
are now being compiled showing number and causes of industrial
accidents, looking toward the establishment of safety codes and prac­
tices and the inauguration of a program of accident prevention.

Maryland.

Board of Labor and Statistics.

16 West Saratoga Street, Baltimore. Dr. J. Knox Insley,
Commissioner.
C r e a t e d as the bureau of statistics and information by article 89,
chapter 211, sections 1 and 2; effective June 1,1884.
In addition to the administration of the various labor laws of the
State, it is the duty of the commissioner of labor and statistics to :
(a) Collect statistics concerning and examine into the conditions of




32

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

labor in the State, with especial reference to wages and the causes of
strikes and disagreements between employers and employees; (5)
Collect information in regard to the agricultural conditions and
products of the several counties of the State, the acreage under cul­
tivation and planted to the various crops, the character and price
of lands, livestock, etc., and all other matters pertaining to agricul­
tural pursuits which may be of general interest and calculated to
attract immigration to the State; (c) Collect information in regard
to the mineral products of the State, the output of mines, quarries,
etc., and of the manufacturing industries; (d) Collect information
in regard to railroads and other transportation companies, shipping,
and commerce; (e) Investigate the extent and the cause or causes of
unemployment in the State, and the remedies therefor adopted and
applied in the States of this country and in other countries.
Results of current and continuing investigations and studies are
published in the annual reports of the commissioner, and reports of
trend of employment in selected industries in Maryland are issued
monthly. Studies under way at present include: Child labor in
Maryland canneries; survey of unemployment in Baltimore; age
limits for employment in Maryland; age distribution of industrial
workers in Maryland; and trend of child labor in Maryland.
In addition to annual reports and monthly reports on trend of
employment, the board has issued the following reports of special
studies: Unemployment in Baltimore, February, 1928; unemploy­
ment in Baltimore, February, 1929; the mentally and educationally
retarded child laborer (April, 1929); berry and vegetable pickers in
Maryland fields (April, 1929 ^; and child labor in vegetable canner­
ies in Maryland (April, 1929).

Massachusetts.

Boston Psychopathic Hospital.

74 Fenwood Road, Boston, Mass. C. Macfie Campbell,
Director.
P s y c h o l o g ic a l D e p a r t m e n t . F. L. Wells, chief.—Personnel ac­
tivities of the department subsequent to those stated in Bulletin No.
299 (pp. 50-51) have been through the cooperation of the psycho­
logical laboratory with various organizations in vocational adjust­
ment problems. The most notable of these organizations are the
General Electric Co. and the Boston Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A.
The work with the General Electric Co. has been of a developmental
and research nature essentially. With the other two organizations
the immediate “ clinical” standpoint has been uppermost. Studies
covering various topics in the field are in progress; some have been
completed. Very little of this material is published. Publications
of related material include: Mental tests in clinical practice (World
Book Co., 1927) and the psychometric factor in medical problems (in
the American Journal o f Psychiatry, 1928, vol. 8, pp. 235-249).
The department has frequently participated in conferences deal­
ing with personnel adjustment problems from a variety of angles.




STATE AGENCIES

Massachusetts.

33

Department of Education.

Division of Vocational Education, State House, Boston,
Mass. R. O. Small, Director.
T h e continuation schools of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
concern themselves very definitely with the following problems affecting young workers in industry: (1) Organized employment place­
ment, (2) job analyses and specifications for purposes of upgrading
and making more valuable the services of such young employees,
(3) lines of promotion, (4) safety measures, and (5) special problems
of the young worker. The procedure includes an organized survey
of each job, accomplished by systematic follow-up on the part of the
teachers in the places of employment of the working minors.
The division sponsors a program for the training of foremen.
Training groups are organized on request by industry. The trainees
are afforded training which will fit them as conference leaders, so that
they may take charge of conferences and classes for the foremen on
returning to their respective plants.
The rehabilitation service is conducted by the division of vocational
education for those persons who have suffered a handicap which un­
fits them for continuance of specific employment. This service is
rendered on the individual basis in established schools or by a plan
of placement for training in industry.
In the field of trade and industrial education a concerted effort is
being made to place all the boys and girls who leave the school,
whether by graduation or otherwise, in the type of employment for
which training has been given. That a measure of success has been
attained might be claimed from the statistics of graduates for 1926
which would be a fair average. During this year 372 boys graduated
from the day industrial schools, 240 of whom are known to have
entered the trade for which each was trained, at an entering wage
which averaged $21.12.
During the same year there were 182 graduates from the girls’ day
industrial schools, 164 of whom entered occupations definitely related
to the trade for which trained. Figures are not available as to the
average entering wage, but it is known that all started on a living
w^Se*
The vocational agricultural education service because of its “ earn­
ing and learning ” and “ home project ” methods and because farming
is both a means of making a living and a mode of life concerns itself
with the upgrading of both living and working conditions and
achievement of steadily improving returns on capital, labor, and
management. Graduates are followed up for their encouragement
and guidance at least five years after their formal training courses
end.

Massachusetts.

Department of Labor and Industries.

State House, Boston, Mass. E. Leroy Sweetser, Commissioner.
T h e department of labor and industries, through its reorganization
in 1919, supersedes the board of labor and industries, the board of
conciliation and arbitration, the minimum wage commission, the
bureau of statistics, and the bureau of standard!. By authority of




34

tt. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

the commissioner, it is divided into five divisions, as follows—in­
dustrial safety, statistics, conciliation and arbitration, minimum
wage, and standards. During the year 1929 the Massachusetts In­
dustrial Commission was created and placed in the department, mak­
ing a sixth division. (See annual reports for a description of the
work of the department and its several divisions.)
D iv is io n of I n d u st r ia l S a f e t y . John P. Meade, director.—This
division is charged with the inspection work in industrial establish­
ments, the enforcement of protective labor laws, and the rules and
regulations of the department concerning the health and safety of
industrial employees. Its work includes the inspection of building
operations for the purpose of maintaining safe scaffolding and work:
platforms for employees and the enforcement of laws with regard
to employment in the construction of public works.
Special investigations by this division include establishments en­
gaged in the manufacture of storage batteries, chromium plating,
and plants using radioactive substances. More recent investigations
included tanneries and leather-finishing establishments.
Industrial injuries are investigated regularly. These include dis­
eases of occupation. In 1929, 554 cases of occupational disease were
investigated, affecting 493 men and 61 women. This number in­
cluded 345 cases of dermatitis. There were 70 cases of lead poison­
ing investigated, affecting 68 men and 2 women. No child under 18
years of age was included in the cases afflicted with lead poisoning,
cyanide poisoning, silicosis, or pneumoconiosis.
Rules and regulations and suggestions to employers and employ­
ees are prepared and published through the following bulletins:
No. 7. Rules and regulations governing compressed-air work.
No. 9. Safety rules and regulations and machinery standards.
No. 10. Rules and regulations relating to safe and sanitary working con­
ditions in foundries and the employment of women in core rooms.
No. 12. Rules and regulations for the prevention of accidents in building
operations.
No. 13. Revised rules and regulations pertaining to the painting business.
No. 14. Requirements for the care of employees injured or taken ill in indus*
trial establishments.
No. 16. Rules and regulations for safeguarding woodworking machinery.
No. 17. Rules and regulations for safeguarding power-press tools.
No. 18. Lighting code for factories, workshops, manufacturing, mechanical,
and mercantile establishments.
No. 19. Rules and regulations for the common drinking cup and common
towel.

Other bulletins contain suggestions for the protection of the eyes
and the prevention of accidents; for the prevention of anthrax; rules
and regulations for safety in the manufacture of benzene derivatives
and explosives; and rules and regulations for toilets in industrial
establishments.
B oard of C o n c il ia t io n a n d A r bitr atio n . Edward Fisher, chair­
man.—The functions of this board in matters pertaining to labor
disputes are three in number—conciliation, arbitration, and investi­
gation. The board investigates all labor troubles and disputes aris­
ing in the Commonwealth to ascertain the facts causing the same and
to endeavor to assist the parties concerned in adjusting their differ­
ences or failing thereto to induce the parties to submit the matter to
arbitration. The board has no power to arbitrate except by mutual




STATE AGENCIES

85

agreement of the parties concerned, and its decisions remain in effect
for a period of six months nnless other action is taken. During the
last 10 years the board has received 3,388 joint applications for
arbitration.
In addition to the investigation of conciliation cases the board has
the authority to make an investigation in any industry in which
labor trouble exists or is seriously threatened, provided more than
25 employees are involved, and provided that conciliation efforts
have been of no avail. Under such circumstances the board has the
right to publish a report of its investigation, finding the cause of
the trouble and assigning the responsibility or blame for its exist­
ence or continuance.
M i n i m u m W a g e D i v i s i o n . Ethel M . Johnson, assistant commis­
sioner, acting director.—It is the duty of the commission to investi­
gate occupations where women are employed, if there is reason to
believe that the wages paid to a substantial number of the women
are not sufficient to meet the cost of living, and to maintain the
worker in health. I f this is found to be the case, the commission
establishes a wage board for the occupation. I f the commission
approves the determinations of the wage board, it enters a decree
based on the findings, after first giving a public hearing for employ­
ers who would be affected. There are now 21 decrees in force cover­
ing about 35 different occupations.
D i v i s i o n o f S t a t is t i c s . Roswell F. Phelps, director.—The prin­
cipal branches of the work of this division are the collection and
publication of statistics of labor and manufactures and the adminis­
tration of the four State public employment offices. For the most
part the reports of the division are broad in scope and relate to
labor and industrial conditions throughout the entire State. The
reports issued periodically in print have reference to prevailing rates
of wages and hours of labor in the various trades, occupations, and
localities: the number and membership of labor organizations; the
results oi the annual census of manufactures (number of establish­
ments in operation, capital invested, value of stock and materials
used, amount paid in wages, number of wage earners employed,
value of products manufactured, goods exported, classified weekly
wages, and power used) and summaries of the activities of the four
public employment offices maintained by the Commonwealth. The
division also issues reports in mimeographed form (later summar­
ized in print in annual reports), covering the results of monthly
surveys having reference to volume of employment in representa­
tive manufacturing establishments, building construction, public
utilities, retail and wholesale trade, unemployment of buildingtrades men, and value represented by building permits granted in the
principal municipalities. While these reports may not be considered
as strictly within the field of personnel research, they incidentally
present data having a direct bearing on problems of personnel. The
only reports of the division issued within recent years which could
be definitely classified as personnel studies are the following:
Labor Bulletin No. 149. Salaries of office employees in Massachusetts. May
1, 1926.
“ Company Houses ” in Massachusetts owned or controlled by cotton textile
manufacturers. (Mimeographed, 1924.)
105636°— 30------ 4




36

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

D i v i s i o n o f S t a n d a r d s . Francis Meredith, director.—The division
of standards, to which has been delegated the enforcement of the
statutory provisions pertaining to weights and measures and the
issuance of licenses to hawkers, peddlers, and transient vendors,
would not properly be considered a personnel research agency.
M a s s a c h u s e t t s I n d u s t r ia l C o m m is s io n .
Frederick H. Payne,
chairman.—This commission was established by chapter 357, Acts of
1929, for the promotion and development of the industrial, agricul­
tural, and recreational resources of the Commonwealth, and is now
engaged in investigating conditions affecting the textile industry
in the Commonwealth with a view to devising ways and means to
effect an improvement of such conditions and also to investigate
as to the best methods of alleviating distress caused by extended
periods of unemployment in that and other industries (ch. 54, Acts
of 1929).

New Jersey.

Department of Institutions and Agencies.

Division of Classification and Parole. Trenton, N. J. C. T.
Jones, Director.
T h e bureau of education and classification of this division is
responsible for the proper functioning of the classification system
set up in each of the penal and correctional institutions. This sys­
tem provides for careful consideration of each individual case by a
committee composed of the institution superintendent, physician,
psychiatrist, psychologist, educational director, industrial or voca­
tional supervisor, social investigator or field officer, and disciplinary
officer. At the meetings of this committee recommendations for
medical care, training within the institution, transfer to another
institution, or other disposition as indicated are made, based upon
the reports of each of the above-mentioned specialists. This bureau
also assists in the development of the educational and vocational pro­
grams in the several State institutions.
This bureau considers all applications for admission to the State
institutions for mental defectives and classifies each case for the
institution which will be best suited to its needs. After commit­
ment by court it arranges for admission to the institution as classi­
fied. It also makes arrangements for all transfers from correctional
to charitable, from correctional to correctional, and from charitable
to charitable institutions. In its classification work this bureau
makes use of psychological and psychiatric examinations made by
the mental hygiene clinics which are conducted by the Trenton and
the Greystone Park State hospitals at various centers throughout
the State.
The details of the New Jersey classification system are described
in the following publications:
Classification as the basis for institutional training, treatment, and parole.
Paper read by William J. Ellis, commissioner of institutions and agencies, at
the fifty-ninth annual congress of American Prison Association, Toronto, Canada,
September 24, 1929.
The problem of the feeble-minded in New Jersey. By Dr. C. T. Jones, director
division of classification and parole, New Jersey Department of Institutions
and Agencies.




37

STATE AGENCIES

The New Jersey plan. By William J. Ellis. Welfare Magazine, January,
1927.
The problem of mentality while in the institution. Paper read by William
J. Ellis, commissioner of institutions and agencies, at twenty-first annual session
of National Conference of Juvenile Agencies, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1924.
Experience in classifying defective delinquents and some results effected by
transfer from correctional institutions to hospitals and institutions for feeble­
minded. By William J. Ellis, at the forty-eighth annual session of American
Association for Study of the Feeble-Minded, Washington, 1924.
Classification of prisoners for purposes of training work and parole. By
E. A. Doll, from Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, May, 1923.
The place of State institutions in the field of social hygiene. By E. A. Doll.
An address before the Women’s Social Hygiene Committee, Trenton, N. J., Janu­
ary, 1923.

New Jersey.

Department of Labor.

Trenton, N. J. Charles R. Blunt, Commissioner.
T h e New Jersey Department of Labor as now constituted, accord­
ing to the provisions of Public Laws, 1916, chapter 40, and amended
by Public Laws, 1922, chapter 252, is organized into eight bureaus as
follows: Bureau of general and structural inspection and explo­
sives; bureau of hygiene and sanitation; bureau of electrical and
mechanical equipment; bureau of child labor and women’s welfare;
workmen’s compensation bureau; bureau of statistics and records;
bureau of engineers’ license, steam boiler, and refrigerating plant
inspection; bureau of employment.
Recent numbers of the industrial bulletin of the department in­
clude special articles, summaries of special investigations, text of
regulations, etc., made by the various bureaus, viz:
1927— May, Organization, functions, and duties of the department of labor;
July, Importance of safety appliances; August, Safeguarding hazardous ma­
chine equipment; September, Benzol poisoning; October, Commutation of com­
pensation payments; November, Promotion of safety education; December,
Safety devices and protective clothing for workers in industry.
1928— January, Foundry hazards; March, Importance of the use of safety
goggles in industry; April, Safety education for the alien worker; May, Benzol
poisoning; June, Importance of regulating spray brush and coating operations
when poisonous compounds are used.
1929— February, The safety job of the State; May, The value and necessity
of chemical control in accident prevention; June, Industrial poisons; July, Should
trade products be labeled so that poisonous contents are indicated; September,
Placement of the juvenile worker; October, Health conservation in industry.
B

u r e a u of

G eneral

and

S t r u c t u r a l I n s p e c t io n

and

B

u r e a u of

Charles H. Weeks, deputy commissioner.—This bureau
has prepared and published the following safety codes and regu­
lations :
E

x p l o s iv e s .

Schedule of approval fees. 1926. 2 pp.
Specifications for fire towers, fire escapes, fireproofing of doors and windows
in connection with fire-escape construction. 1926. 15 pp.
Standard specifications for elevators located in factory buildings. 1913.
4 pp.
Passenger elevator interlock specifications. 1916. 9 pp.
Building code for the construction of theaters, grandstands, and buildings used
for motion-picture purposes and other public entertainments located in munici­
palities having no local building inspection. 1927. 17 pp.
Safety standards for the manufacture and storage of explosives. 1925.
2 0 pp.




38

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

B u r e a u o f H y g i e n e a n d S a n i t a t i o n . John Roach, deputy com­
missioner.—This bureau has prepared and published the following
codes:

Sanitary and engineering industrial standards. 1916. 36 pp.
Sanitary standards for the felt-hatting industry. 1915. 94 pp.
Safety standards for lead corroders and lead oxidizers, paint grinders, drycolor manufacturers. 1917. 28 pp.
Safety standards for the manufacture of nitro and amido compounds. 1919.
18 pp.
Instructions for the inspection of plants where anttine is produced or handled.
1917. 6 pp.
Standards for the promotion of safety education. 1925. 11 pp.
Safety standards for steam-power laundries. 1927. 11 pp.
B
P

or E n g i n e e r s ’ L i c e n s e , S t e a m B o il e r a n d R e f r ig e r a t in g
I n s p e c t i o n . Joseph F. Scott, chief examiner.—This bureau

ureau

lant

has prepared and published the following codes:
Standard boiler code. 1918. 164 pp.
Rules and regulations of bureau. 1924.

13 pp.

B u r e a u of E l e c t r ic a l a n d M e c h a n i c a l E q u i p m e n t . Charles H.
Weeks and John Roach, deputy commissioners, temporarily in
charge.—This bureau has prepared and published the following
codes:

Code for the safeguarding of mechanical power transmission apparatus.
1924. 29 pp.
General rules for the construction and installation of fire alarm signal sys­
tems. 1927. 23 pp.
Code of lighting for factories, mills, and other work places. 1924. 38 pp.
Rules and requirements for the installation and maintenance of engine stops
and speed-limit governors. 1916. 9 pp.
Safety standards relating to the use and care of abrasive wheels. 1922.
27 pp.
Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses. 1924.
50 pp.
Safety code affecting point of operation hazards on rubber mills and calen­
ders. 1923. 3 pp.
Safety code for laundries. 1927. 11 pp.
Safety code for woodworking plants. 1927. 18 pp.
Electrical safety rules. 1927. 6 pp.
Safety code for window cleaning operations. 1927. 4 pp.
Instructions for factory chiefs. 1926. 7 pp.
Rules and regulations for conducting fire drills and organizing fire brigades.
1922. 30 pp.

New York (State).

Department of Education.

Albany, N. Y.
D i v i s i o n o f V o c a t i o n a l a n d E x t e n s i o n E d u c a t i o n . Lewis A.
Wilson, Assistant Commissioner.—This division maintains the fol­
lowing services:
1. The training of conference leaders for industry.
2. The development of vocational and educational guidance in
junior and senior high schools, part-time schools, and evening schools.
3. Industrial and technical education, including cooperative rela­
tionship with industry in the establishment of apprentice training
programs and other types of plant training work.
4. Adult education, including the organization of special courses
for workers in industry.
5. The rehabilitation of physically handicapped, including train­
ing, placement, and follow-up.




STATE AGENCIES

39

6. Research, including industrial surveys, job analyses, and prep­
aration of instructional material, analyses of changing conditions
in trades and occupations, and studies of working children.
Research includes the making of special industrial surveys to de­
termine the needs of industrial education of the various communi­
ties in the State. In some cases it involves a detailed study of a
particular industry to determine the courses to be offered to meet
the particular needs of the industry.
The work in trade analyses is basic in the preparation of courses
of study for the all-day, part-time, and evening industrial schools.
A number of the courses of study which have been prepared as a
result of trade and job analyses are available for distribution.
This division is just completing a very detailed survey of about
140,000 working children in New York State. This study includes
information in regard to the education of the group, number of
jobs held, wages, savings, contribution to family support, use of
leisure time, previous vocational training, educational training in
employment, and other information in regard to the education and
economic status of this group. This study will be printed and
available for distribution.
Studies have been made of changing economic conditions and in­
dustrial trends in the State to serve as a basis for determining the
occupational training needs of the State. Some of this material has
been published in a paper entitled “ Some Industrial Needs of New
York State,” by Mr. Wilson.

New York (State).

Department of Labor.

124 East Twenty-eighth Street, New York, N. Y. Frances
Perkins, Industrial Commissioner.
T h is department is now under the administration of the industrial
commissioner, an office created by chapter 50, Laws of 1921, abolish­
ing the State industrial commission which had administered the labor
laws since 1915.
B u r e a u of I n d u st r ia l C ode, 124 East Twenty-eighth Street, New
York, N. Y.—This bureau is concerned with rules for safety and sani­
tation in industrial and mercantile establishments and is charged
with the revision and enlargement of the New York State industrial
code (the latest edition complete in one volume was published in
1920). Industrial codes now numbering 30 are published separately.
The bureau conducts the safety exhibits in connection with the
annual industrial safety congress of New York State which has
been held in various cities (twelfth, at Syracuse, N. Y., December 4
to 6, 1928; proceedings published in 1929).
D iv is io n of A l ie n s (until 1921 the bureau of industries and immi­
gration), 125 East Twenty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. Lil­
lian It. Sire, director.—Complaints by alien employees in New York
industries are investigated by this bureau, including wage claims, ex­
ploitation by employment agencies, and the like. It has also made
community surveys of immigrant living and labor conditions in a
large number of the towns of the State and studies of the relation­
ship between alien illiteracy and mental defect and industrial
accidents.




40

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

B u r e a u of I n d u s t r ia l H y g i e n e (from 1913 until 1924 the divi­
sion of industrial hygiene), 124 East Twenty-eighth Street, New
York, N. Y. J. D. Hackett, director.—The following publications
have been issued as special bulletins:

112. Economic value of clean windows and lighting fixtures. 1922. 16 pp.
128. Dust-collecting systems adapted for use in connection with the granitecutting industry. 1924. 31 pp.
129. Health hazards of wet grinding. 1924. 56 pp.
130. A study of hygienic conditions in steam laundries. 1924. 110 pp.
131. An analysis of 100 accidents on power punch presses with suggestions
as to the installation of guards. 1924. 27 pp.
139. An analysis of 300 accidents in woodworking factories with suggestions
as to safe practice and suitable machine guards. 1925. 63 pp.
An analysis of 100 accidents in paper and pulp factories.
Pneumoconiosis.— Three cases, two of silicosis and one of anthracosis.
Silicosis, a resume of the literature arranged for the use of physicians in the
State of New York.
Silicosis in New York State, a stuiy of 15 cases of silicosis from the stand­
point of compensation.
The lead hazard and compensation, a compend.
An analysis of 300 accidents in plants manufacturing or preparing food prod­
ucts, with suggestions as to safe practice and suitable machine guards. 1928.
Lead poisoning in New York State, a study of the health of 381 lead workers.
D

iv is io n of

M

e d ia t io n a n d

A

r b it r a t io n

(until 1923, bureau).

A.

J. Portenar, chief mediator.
B u r e a u of S t a t is t ic s a n d I n f o r m a t i o n , 124 East Twenty-eighth
Street, New York, N. Y. E. B . Patton, director.—This bureau has
published, in the series of special bulletins, various issues dealing
with statistics of unemployment, trade-unions, wages and hours,
strikes and lockouts, and industrial accidents; compilations of New
York labor laws; court decisions on workmen’s compensation, labor
laws, and industrial disputes; No. 76, European regulations for pre­
vention of occupational diseases (77 pp.)> & the results of special
n(l
investigations, as follows:

137.
Course of employment in sugar refineries in New York State, 1914-1925.
24 pp.
143.
Employment and earnings of men and women in New York State fac­
tories, June, 1924-June, 1925. 208 pp.

It also publishes monthly the Industrial Bulletin (until 1921 the
Labor Market Bulletin) giving current information about the extent
of employment in factories and building work, average earnings, and
food prices, labor supply and demand at State employment offices.
B u r e a u of W o m e n i n I n d u s t r y , 124 East Twenty-eighth Street,
New York, N. Y. Frieda S. Miller, director.—Results of special
investigations relating to women in industry made by this bureau
have been published in the following special bulletins:
109.
110.
116.
117.
121.
122.
127.
67 pp.
132.
1923.
134.
136.

Employment of women in 5 and 10 cent stores, 1921. 68 pp.
Women who work. 1922. 40 pp.
Children’s work accidents. 1923. 42 pp.
Outer wear knit goods industry. 1923. 19 pp.
Hours and earnings of women in five industries. 1923. 116 pp.
Trend of child labor in New York State, 1910-1922. 1923. 18 pp.
Some social and economic effects of work accidents to women. 1924
The trend of child labor in New York State— supplemental report for
1924. 8 pp.
The health of the working child, 1924. 91 pp.
Wages and hours of organized women in New York State. 1925 11 pp.




STATE AGENCIES

41

138. Vacation policies in manufacturing industries. 1925. 23 pp.
141. First principles of industrial posture and seating. 1926. 13 pp.
144. Some recent figures on accidents to women and minors. 1926. 70 pp.
147. Homework in the men’s clothing industry in New York and Rochester.
1926. 69 pp.
150. Chronic benzol poisoning among women industrial workers. 1927.
64 pp.
153. Hours and earnings of women employed in power laundries in New York
State. 1927. 72 pp.
154. The paper box industry in New York City. 1928. 90 pp.
158. Some social and economic aspects of homework. 1929. 40 pp.
Women in Binghamton industries. 1928. 113 pp.
A study of women in Newburgh industries has recently been issued in mimeo­
graphed form. An investigation of double compensation to minors and a study
of the effect of noise on hearing are in process of preparation.
J u n io r P la c e m e n t B u r e a u for minors in industry was established
in 1929, and monthly reports of the work of the bureau appear in the
Industrial Bulletin of the department of labor.
New commissions.—Governor Roosevelt, in cooperation with In­
dustrial Commissioner Perkins appointed in June, 1929, a committee
composed of representatives of organized wage earners to endeavor to
reduce industrial accidents. John Sullivan, president of the New
York State Federation of Labor, is chairman of this commission. It
is engaged in enlisting the interest of organized wage earners in New
York State in the matter of prevention of industrial accidents.
In October, 1929, Industrial Commissioner Perkins appointed an
advisory committee on employment. The purpose of this committee
is to make a study of public employment offices operated by the State
department of labor. At first the work of the committee will be
devoted to the study of public employment offices in New York City,
and later it will be extended to the up-State offices and also to a
study of the existing legislation for the regulation of private em­
ployment agencies. Mr. F. A. Silcox of the Industrial Relations
Counselors is chairman of the committee and Miss Mary LaDame has
been engaged to make the study under the supervision of the advisory
committee.

New York.

Commission on Old Age Security.

261 Broadway, New York, N. Y. Senator Seabury S. Mastick,
Chairman; Luther Gulick, Director of Research.
A h in v e s tig a t in g commission appointed by the governor and the
State legislature, under chapter 664 of the Laws of 1929, to deal
with the problem of old-age security in its relation to pension legis­
lation. The duties of the commission are outlined as follows:
1. To conduct an investigation in order to ascertain and report to
the legislature in February, 1930, the most practical and efficient
method of providing security against old-age want.
2. To investigate the industrial condition of aged men and women
with respect to security against old-age want.
3. To study the subject of district infirmaries.
4. To propose a method of financing any problem of old-age as­
sistance.
In its industrial aspect the work of the commission will include an
age analysis of the gainfully employed in the State and the securing
of data with regard to retirement and insurance compensation of




42

II.

state a n d

m u n ic ip a l

a g e n c ie s

every industry, for correlation with the employment age factors
developed through the age analysis of employees, additions and
separations.

North Dakota.

Workmen’s Compensation Bureau.

Bismarck, N. Dak.
M in im u m W a g e D e p a r tm e n t. Alice Angus, secretary.—Organ­
ized in 1919 to take charge of the administration of the minimum
wage law enacted in that year, this department makes investigations
of the hours of labor, working conditions, and wages of employed
women in the State. These investigations are reported upon bien­
nially, the latest being that of June 30,1928.

Ohio. Department of Industrial Relations and Indus­
trial Commission of Ohio.
Columbus, Ohio. W illiam T. Blake, Director of Depart­
ment of Industrial Relations; Wellington T. Leonard,
Chairman Industrial Commission.
In 1913, the legislature created the Industrial Commission of Ohio,
superseding the State liability board of awards which was created
in 1911. The duties of the following departments were also taken
over by the commission, which were independent prior to that time:
Commissioner of labor statistics; inspector of workshops, factories,
and public buildings; inspector of mines; examiner of steam engi­
neers ; board of boiler rules; State board of arbitration and concilia­
tion ; and the Ohio Board of Censors.
On July 1, 1921, the legislature created the department of indus­
trial relations, which has all power and duties previously vested in
the Industrial Commission of Ohio except the hearing of claims
under the workmen’s compensation law, the arbitration of labor
disputes, the supervision and appointment of the board of boiler
rules, and the prescribing of standards, devices, safeguards, etc., in
places of employment, which duties are still vested in the Industrial
Commission of Ohio. The board of censors was transferred to the
department of education on July 1, 1921.
The Industrial Commission of Ohio is a part of the department
of industrial relations for administrative purposes. All employees
for the execution of the powers and duties of the commission are
under the supervision and direction of the director of industrial rela­
tions except as noted in section 154r-45, General Code.
The director of industrial relations is ex officio secretary of the
Industrial Commission of Ohio.
The principal duties of the department are the administration of
the workmen’s compensation act; the inspection of workshops, fac­
tories, and public buildings; the enforcement of labor laws; the
collection and tabulation of labor statistics; the arbitration of labor
disputes; the licensing of private employment agencies and provid­
ing for the free employment system; the inspection of mines; the
inspection of steam boilers; and the licensing of steam engineers and
boiler operators.
Research work is carried on by the following divisions:




STATE AGENCIES

43

D iv isio n op L a b o r S t a t i s t ic s and E m p lo y m e n t O f f ic e s .
George
F. Miles, chief.—This division of the department in 1921 succeeded
the division of investigation and statistics of the industrial commis­
sion, which had in 1913 succeeded the office of the commissioner of
labor. The fields of work covered include:
1. The collection, compilation, and publication annually of sta­
tistics relating to classified wages, fluctuations in numbers employed,
total wages paid, etc., in all establishments employing five or more
persons. Statistics for mines and quarries include the above items
and also annual production.
2. The collection, compilation, and publication annually of union
rates of wages and hours of labor in 16 cities of the State.
3. Supervision of public employment offices and publications of
monthly and yearly summaries of the work of those offices.
4. Licensing and supervising all private employment offices.
D iv isio n o f S a f e t y a n d H y g ie n e . Thomas P. Kearns, chief.—
This division of the industrial commission was created in 1925 by
authority of a constitutional amendment and an act of the General
Assembly of Ohio.
The efforts of the division are directed to the promotion of educa­
tion, both of employers and of workers, in safe and hygienic good
practice in places of employment. The division functions as a
service bureau for the employers of the State to make surveys of in­
dustrial plants; submits recommendations for compliance with State
codes and the elimination of accident and disease hazards; assists in
installing safety organizations and accident records. The division
assists in conducting community safety campaigns and utilizes
other means and methods for the advancement of industrial safety
and hygiene. The preparation and revision of safety codes are con­
ducted by this division in collaboration with committees appointed
by the industrial commission. An annual safety congress and ex­
hibit is conducted by the division and brings together from 1,500
to 2,000 employers and workers.
The statistical laboratory of the division compiles detailed sta­
tistics of all injuries and diseases reported to the industrial commis­
sion and publishes such data monthly and annually. Special sta­
tistical studies of particular groups, classifications, or industries are
also made.
The publications of the division include a monthly safety period­
ical called the Ohio Industrial Commission Monitor, a monthly
series of safety posters, and the following reports:
Accident prevention and first-aid suggestions.
Proceedings of Ohio quarry operators’ safety conference.
Proceedings of Ohio electric light and power safety conference.
Special Bulletin No. 1. Statistical reports of injuries to minors under 18
years of age, occupational disease claims, and additional award claims.
Information regard ng the workmen’s compensation law of Ohio.
Organization and operation of the division of safety and hygiene of the
Industrial Commission of Ohio.
Organization of safety committees in industry.
General safety precautions for traveling cranes.
Proceed ngs of the first all-Ohio safety congress.
Proceedings of the second all-Ohio safety congress.
Proceedings of the t&ir4 aJl-Qhio safety congress,




44

II. STATE AND M UNICIPAL AGENCIES

This division is directly under the control and supervision of the
industrial commission and is maintained by an annual appropria­
tion from the State insurance fund, not to exceed 1 per cent of the
annual contribution paid by employers to the fund, to be expended in
the investigation and prevention of industrial accidents and diseases.
D iv is io n o f W o r k m e n ’s C om p en sation . R oss Hedges, chief.—
This division of the department was created in 1921 following the
enactment of the administrative code. It is charged with the admin­
istrative detail theretofore devolving on the Industrial Commission
of Ohio pertaining to claims for workmen’s compensation, excepting
that of the maintenance of the State insurance fund and disburse­
ments therefrom which are still wholly within the jurisdiction of the
industrial commission.
A report covering the activities of the division is issued annually
as a part of the report of the department of industrial relations and
industrial commission of Ohio.

Pennsylvania.

Department of Labor and Industry.

Harrisburg, Pa. Peter Glick, Secretary.
C r e a te d by an act of the legislature, approved June 2, 1913 (P. L.
396). Component units of the department engaged in research are:
The industrial board and the following bureaus: Executive,
inspection, employment, industrial relations, industrial standards,
statistics, women and children.
The executive bureau comprises three sections, one of which—the
editorial and publicity section—issues a monthly bulletin Labor
and Industry; issues special bulletins from time to time; edits and
publishes the decisions of the workmen’s compensation board and of
the courts in workmen’s compensation cases annually; issues all
industrial standards; examines and distributes all newspaper clip­
pings concerning the department.
B u r e a u o f I n d u s t r i a l R e la t io n s . David Williams, director.—
This bureau studies the conditions existing between employer and
employee in the industries of the State to the end that misunder­
standings may be avoided, or adjusted if they arise.
I n d u s t r ia l B oa rd . J. S. Arnold, secretary.—The industrial board
consists of five members who are representatives of the interests con­
cerned and affected by the scope of activity of the department of
labor and industry. The chairman is the secretary of labor and
industry, and the four other members are appointed by the governor
to represent employers, employees, women, and the public. The
board meets once a month.
The industrial board approves all regulations promulgated by the
department of labor and industry as well as safety devices required
by law or by departmental regulations. It also serves as an ap­
pellant body to which recourse may be had when undue hardship
is imposed on anyone through enforcement of a particular regulation
of the department.
Since its creation the board has approved approximately 50 codes
of rules or regulations in addition to many individual regulations
and interpretations that could not be classified under any particular
code. Approximately 750 safety devices have been approved. Two
advisory boards are available to the industrial board for expert




STATE AGENCIES

45

technical advice—one for the boiler code and one for the elevator
code. These advisory boards conduct examinations for boiler and
elevator inspectors, authorizing them to inspect boilers and elevators
in Pennsylvania.
B u r e a u o f In sp e c tio n . Harry D. Immel, director.—In the last
two years (1928 and 1929) the bureau of inspection has made a dis­
tinct departure from former practice of governmental enforcement
agencies for promotion of safety and health in industry. While
maintaining its obligation for enforcement of laws and regulations,
the bureau has developed an educational safety service. Factory in­
spection is conducted mainly on a basis of individual plant accident
records with a view to solution of individual plant problems. In
1929 the bureau conducted a year long state-wide industrial safety
campaign, in the course of which formation of plant safety commit­
tees, foremen’s clubs, and community safety councils was encouraged.
Many community safety meetings were sponsored by the bureau in
an effort to interest the general public in the accident situation.
Benefits already noted are the cooperation of many other agencies
with industry in efforts for general safety advancement and a better
attitude on the part of both labor and industry in the State toward
all of the work of the bureau of inspection.
B u r e a u or E m p lo y m e n t. S. S. Riddle, director.—Established by
act of assembly, approved June 4, 1915, for the purpose of aiding
unemployed persons to obtain suitable employment and employers
to obtain workers. To accomplish that purpose the bureau of em­
ployment operates free employment exchanges in 14 cities of Penn­
sylvania.
Cooperation is maintained with the United States Employment
Service and with various agencies and organizations throughout
the Commonwealth. Information is compiled from the recorded
experience of the employment exchanges.
The bureau of employment also supervises the fee-charging private
employment agencies licensed under the laws of Pennsylvania.
B u r e a u o f I n d u s t r i a l S ta n d a r d s. John Campbell, director.—
This bureau initiates the formulation of health and safety regula­
tions, through the use of national codes, representative committees,
and through its own research, and presents tentative drafts to the
industrial board for approval after public hearing. I t conducts any
investigations that might be requested by the industrial board and
investigates the merits of all safety devices submitted for approval.
I t prepares inspection information for the bureau of inspection on
the enforcement of laws and regulations.
The following health and safety regulations have been developed
and published:
Abrasive and polishing wheels; bakeries; brewing and bottling;
canneries; cereal mills; malt houses and grain elevators; compressed
air apparatus; construction and repairs; cranes and hoists; dry color
industry; elevators, escalators, dumbwaiters, and hoists; employment
of women; employment of minors; electrical safety; foundries;
handling, storage, and use of explosives in pits, quarries, and mines
other than coal mines; head and eye protection; heating boilers;
industrial lighting; industrial home work; industrial sanitation;




46

i l . STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

labor camps; ladders; laundries, lead corroding and lead oxidizing;
logging, sawmill, woodworking, veneer, and cooperage operations;
machine tools; manufacture of nitro and amido compounds; me­
chanical power transmission apparatus; mines other than coal mines;
miniature boilers; operation of motion-picture projectors; paint
grinding; pits and quarries; plants manufacturing or using explo­
sives; plant railways; power, foot, and hand cold-metal presses;
power boilers; printing and allied industries; protection from fire
and panic; railings; toe boards, open-sided floors, platforms, and
runways; safe practices recommendations; spray coating; stationary
engines; textile industries; tunnel construction and work in com­
pressed air; and window cleaning.
The regulations covering spray coating were developed after an
extensive study by this bureau, the results of which are found in
Special Bulletin No. 16, “ Spray painting in Pennsylvania.”
B u r e a u o f S t a t i s t ic s . William J. Maguire, director.—The powers
and duties of the bureau of statistics as defined by law are to collect,
compile, and submit for publication statistics relating to labor and
industry, to organizations of employees, and to organizations of
employers. The bureau now publishes and submits for publica­
tion regularly reports relating to industrial accidents, compensation,
employment, wages, building activities, and departmental records.
The statistics relating to industrial accidents have been greatly en­
larged during the past few years so as to provide data for the
direction of the accident prevention and safety activities of the
department.
B u r e a u o f W o m e n a n d C h ild r e n .
Sara M. Soifel, director.—
This bureau was established in 1925. Its work has been developed
in the following ways: First, research, making studies of the con­
ditions under which women and children are employed in the indus­
tries; second, administrative, enforcing home-work regulations;
third, educational, bringing to the attention of the public, the em­
ployers, and the workers pertinent facts concerning women and
children in industry.
During the five years of its existence the bureau has published
many bulletins dealing with specific problems. In the year 1928 the
bureau began a series of studies of the hours and earnings of men
and women in the textile industries. Special Bulletin No. 29.
“ Hours and earnings of men and women in the silk industry,
appeared in June, 1929. The other studies in this series, one dealing
with hosiery and the other with knit goods, are in preparation and
will be released shortly. A pamphlet, “ Some facts about Pennsyl­
vania women wage earners,” has recently been released.

Texas.

Department of Labor.

Austin, Tex. Charles McKemy, Commissioner.
R e s e a r c h work of the Texas State Department of Labor is largely
%
incidental to its routine administrative work, but some special studies
have been made and published in the industrial bulletin, which is
issued quarterly by the State bureau of labor statistics. A study
of “ Wages of women in relation to cost of living ” and a “ Survey
of labor conditions in State eleemosynary institutions ” are included
in the August 1, 1928, issue, and a “ Survey of rest and recreation




STATE

a g e n c ie s

47

facilities for female employees n and a “ Survey of the lumber-manu­
facturing industry ” appear in the issue of February 1, 1928. Fac­
tory inspection reports cover wages, hours, and general working
conditions.

Virginia.

Department of Labor and Industry,

Richmond, Va. John Hopkins Hall, jr., Commissioner.
R e s e a r c h work of the Virginia Department of Labor and Indus­
try is wholly in connection with administration and enforcement of
labor laws, and studies are not published. The annual reports of
the department cover salary and wage statistics and hours of labor
in classified industries, accident statistics, and child-labor data.

Washington.

Department of Labor and Industries,

Olympia, Wash. Claire Bowman, Director.
C r e a te d by act of February 9,1921, which reorganized the admin­
istrative departments of the State and brought together under a
single director various offices, boards, and commissions dealing
with labor. It comprises three divisions: Industrial insurance,
safety, and industrial relations.
I n d u s t r i a l W e l f a r e C o m m itte e . —This committee, consisting of
the director of labor and industries, the supervisor of industrial
insurance, the supervisor of industrial relations, and the supervisor
of women in industry, was created by act of March 24, 1913, and is
charged especially with enforcing labor laws for women and minors.
Field investigations are carried on in connection with industrial
insurance and safety and the special laws governing women and
children, and are reported upon in the biennial reports of the depart­
ment.

Wisconsin.

Industrial Commission.

Madison, Wis. Fred M. W ilcox, Chairman.
T h e Industrial Commission of Wisconsin was created by chapter
101, Wisconsin Statutes, in 1911, as successor to the bureau of labor
and industrial statistics. It functions through the divisions of
safety and sanitation; workmen’s compensation; woman and child
labor; employment; mediation and arbitration; apprenticeship; and
statistics.
Studies and investigations in relation to the administration of the
labor laws of the State are made continually. The industrial com­
mission’s activities and the results of various investigations are in
part reported by its publications, Biennial Report, 1926-1928; Wis­
consin Labor Market, issued monthly; Wisconsin Labor Statistics,
issued by serial numbers (about 10 to 15 reports annually), Wis­
consin Apprentice, fire prevention bulletins, etc.
The industrial commission has promulgated 19 codes covering as
many separate fields of safety and sanitation in industry. Such
codes are generally prepared and recommended by expert advisory
committees working in cooperation with the commission’s staff.
The Wisconsin Labor Market and Wisconsin Labor Statistics, in
addition to reporting standard tabulations in their respective fields,
have reported some 30 special studies within the past two years!




48

II. STATE AND MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

For example, the Wisconsin Labor Market of June, 1928, reported
houi*s and wages of women, girls, and boys in Wisconsin pea can­
neries, 1925-1927; the July, 1928, issue reported trade-union scales
of wages and hours for 92 local unions located in La Crosse, Mad­
ison, and Milwaukee as of May 15, 1928; the February, March, and
April, 1928, issues reported employees’ length of service, covering
employees on pay rolls in January, 1928; the January, 1930, issue
covered the ages of applicants registered by the Milwaukee and
Green Bay public employment offices, in January, 1930, etc. There
is no attempt to list all special topics covered from time to time.
Reference to the commission’s publications will serve to guide stu­
dents to the various studies made.

( b ) MUNICIPAL AGENCIES
New York (City).

Department of Health.

The Division of Industrial and Adult Hygiene. Elwood S.
Morton, M. D., Chief.
T h e division of industrial hygiene in the bureau of public health
education was abolished at the end of 1924 and reorganized Feb­
ruary 1, 1926, as the division of industrial and adult hygiene, a part
of the field medical bureau.
It is now a medical division and the work done is similar to that
formerly performed by this division, to wit: The inspection of
industrial establishments with special reference to the improvement
of the general health of the employee at his work; physical examina­
tions of various kinds of employees; special investigations of indus­
trial hazards in factories from which illness due to the industry
have been reported; special investigations of cases of illness from
occupation with the consent and cooperation of the attending
physician.
Special investigations, physical examinations, and research work
were carried on in paper-box factories, tobacco factories, spray-gun
work in painting, paint and varnish manufacturing, fur dyeing and
dressing, brass foundries, laundries, the rayon silk industry, sand
blasting, anilin dyeing, doll and toy factories, needle workers, auto­
mobile refinishing, glass-decorating establishments, department
stores, candy factories, motion-picture projection booths and thea­
ters, electroplating industry.
A n eye conservation study was conducted and examinations made
showing a considerable number of cases of progressive myopia.

Public-service corporations and hotels were visited with reference
to electrical shock, giving individual talks and demonstrations of
the prone pressure method of resuscitation from shock.
A study of the adolescent in industry covering a 3-year period has
been conducted in the continuation schools in the city of New York
by physical examination, follow-up, reexamination, and instruction
in health guidance. In the printing trade adolescents were examined
before being made apprentices in the composing room.
Special studies were conducted in the mental and psychological
effects of working under the mercury vapor lamp, methyl chloride in




MUNICIPAL AGENCIES

49

domestic refrigerators, and radium poisoning in dial painters and
others.
Cancer in its relation to the topography and density of popula­
tion was studied.
Publications in the department of health monthly bulletin:
Hygiene of brass foundries. By Samuel W. Greenbaum, M. D. September,
1923.
Investigation of 24 cases of human anthrax in New York City, October, 1920,
to December, 1923. By William Jacobsohn, M. D. March, 1924.
Investigation of 6 i cases of human anthrax for five years, 1919-1923, inclusive,
in New York City. (A summary.) By William Jacobsohn, M. D. July, 1924.
Reprint series. Department of health. Nos. 102 and 103.
Reprint No. 102. Cancer death rates. Smoke, topography, and population.
By Jerome Meyers, M. D. May, 1928.
Reprint No. 103. Medical and industrial findings among spray painters and
others in the automobile refinishing trade in Manhattan, Greater New York.
By Jerome Meyers, M. D. December, 1928.

Oakland (Calif.).

Public Schools.

Department of Research and Auxiliary Agencies. Richard
E. Rutledge, Director.
T h i s department includes departments of research, guidance, men­
tal testing,, child welfare, curriculum, and health. It is engaged in
a constant study of all the factors pertaining to individuals in the
public schools who need either adjustment in school or placement in
industry or vocational guidance. A staff of counselors is provided
in every junior and senior high school. The program of work is
outlined in the bulletin “ Handbook for school counselors,” issued in
1927.




III.

NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

(a) ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS,
RESEARCH BUREAUS, INSTITUTIONS, AND
MANUFACTURING AND BUSINESS ESTAB­
LISHMENTS
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America.
Suite 701-715, 31 Union Square, New York, N. Y.
R e s e a r c h D e p a r tm e n t.— Established July, 1920, partly as an out­
growth of the economic research work done in connection with an
injunction suit against the union at Rochester, N. Y., April-May,
1920. (Michael Stern v. Amalgamated Clothing Workers of
America.)
The department collects data on industrial and economic conditions
with particular reference to (1) the men’s clothing and related in­
dustries, (2) the cost of living, (3) wages and employment condi­
tions, (4) the labor banking movement in the United States; prepares
the economic briefs submitted by the union in wage arbitration cases
and makes the necessary investigations upon which the union briefs
and arguments are based. It is frequently called upon by the officers
of the union and the other departments (e. g., the organization,
editorial and publicity departments) to furnish information in con­
nection with their activities and to make investigations on wages,
production standards, week-work and piece-work systems, and other
similar problems relating to working conditions in the industry.

American Academy of Political and Social Science.
3622-24 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. Thorsten Sellin,
Editor o f the Annals.
O rg a n ized in December, 1889, to provide a national forum for the
discussion of political and social questions. The academy does not
take sides upon controverted questions, but seeks to secure and present
reliable information to assist the public in forming an intelligent and
accurate opinion. The annual membership fee is $5. The academy
publishes annually six issues of the Annals dealing with the most
prominent current social and political questions, each issue contain­
ing from 20 to 25 papers upon the same general subject, largely
solicited by the editorial office or presented at meetings of the acad­
emy. Personnel questions frequently appear in the Annals. Ar­
ticles dealing therein can be found in the published indexes—Twentyfifth anniversary index, July, 1890, to January, 1916; thirtieth
anniversary index, March, 1916, to July, 1921; and the thirty-fifth
anniversary index, September, 1921, to July, 1926. These indexes
are issued as supplements to the Annals,

W



ASSOCIATION'S, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

51

Articles covering personnel subjects which have appeared since
the latest index are:
The legal minimum wage in Massachusetts. Supplement to vol. 130, March,
1927.
Standards in industry. May, 1928, vol. 137.
Public construction and cylical unemployment. Supplement to September,
1928, vol. 139.
Women in the modern world. May, 1929, vol. 143.

American Association of Industrial Physicians and
Surgeons.
Volney S. Cheney, M. D., Secretary-Treasurer; care Armour
& Co., Union Stockyards, Chicago, 1 1.
1
O rg a n iz ed at Detroit, Mich., in 1915, to foster the study and dis­
cussion of the problems peculiar to the practice of industrial medi­
cine and surgery; to develop methods adapted to the conservation of
health among workers in the industries; to promote a more general
understanding of the purposes and results of the medical care of
employees; and to unite into one organization members of the medical
profession specializing in industrial medicine and surgery for their
mutual advancement in the practice of their profession. There are
240 members (annual dues $5). Meetings are held annually.
The official organ of the association, in which its proceedings are
published, is the Bulletin of the American Association of Industrial
Physicians and Surgeons, issued bimonthly by the secretary of the
association.

American Association for Labor Legislation.
131 East Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y. John B.
Andrews, Secretary.
O rg a n ized in 1906 to serve as the American branch of the Interna­
tional Association for Labor Legislation, the object of the association
is to investigate conditions underlying labor legislation and to col­
lect and disseminate information leading to the enactment and effi­
cient enforcement of laws for the promotion of the comfort, health,
and safety of employees. In 1928 there were 3,141 members (mini­
mum annual dues, $3). The annual meeting is held in the last week
of December in conjunction with one or more of the American eco­
nomic, sociological, statistical, and political science associations.
Investigations and studies have been made and conferences held by
the association for the purpose of determining standards for legis­
lation and furnishing data for the drafting of bills introduced in
Congress and the State legislatures and for briefs in support of them
on the following subjects: Workmen’s compensation (including
Federal employees, longshoremen, and seamen), vocational rehabili­
tation for industrial cripples, occupational diseases, health insur­
ance, maternity protection, regulation of fee-charging employment
agencies, one day rest in seven, women in industry, national public
employment service, unemployment insurance, administration of
labor laws.
In 1925 the International Association for Social Progress was
formed by merging the International Association for Labor Legis105636°— 30------ 5




52

III. N O NO FFICIAL

a g e n c ie s

tation, the International Association on Unemployment, and the
International Social Insurance Committee. The American section
is the American Association for Labor Legislation.
A publication, the American Legislation Review, is issued quar­
terly and contains the proceedings of annual meetings, annual reviews
of labor legislation, comparative digests, results of investigations,
and other papers.

American Chemical Society.
Mills Building, Washington, D. C.
C o m m itte e o n H a za rd o u s C h e m ic a ls a n d E x p lo siv es. G. St. J.
Perrot, chairman, Pittsburgh Experiment Station, United States
Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, Pa.—Organized in April, 1923, at the
request of and to cooperate with a similar committee of the National
Board of Fire Underwriters. A tentative report, amended to Janu­
ary, 1929, representing progress of the work to date, is contained
in “A table of common hazardous chemicals,” published by the Na­
tional Fire Protection Association (p. 105).

Joint Committee o n Atmospheric P o llu tio n b y Automobile
Exhaust Gases. Alexander Silverman, chairman, University of
Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa.— A delegate body created in 1927 with
the following organizations represented: American Automobile A s­
sociation, American Chemical Society, American Medical Associa­
tion, American Petroleum Institute, American Public Health Asso­
ciation, Motor Truck Association of America, National Association
of Taxicabs, National Safety Council, Society of Automotive En­
gineers, United States Bureau of Mines, and United States Public
Health Service. Problems connected with the discharge of carbon
monoxide into the atmosphere of public and private garages and
loading stations for trucks and taxicabs are under consideration, as
well as those involving congested traffic areas. Reports and recom­
mendations are not yet available.

American Electric Railway Transportation and Traffic
Association.
292 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. Guy C. Hecker,
General Secretary.
O rg a n ized in 1908 as one of the affiliated associations of the Amer­
ican Electric Railway Association for the interchange of ideas, con­
sideration of operating and transportation problems, methods of
promoting traffic, and all other matters incident thereto. The work
of committees of this association has covered reports relating to
general operating methods in detail, rules, freight and express time­
tables, the hiring and training of employees, block signals, multipleunit operation, traffic and safety, motor-bus operation, and other
matters relative to traffic and safety.
C o m m itte e o n t h e T r a n s p o r t a tio n E m p lo y e e . R. W. Emerson,
chairman.—The report of this committee presented at the annual
convention, September 28 to October 4, 1929, deals with the selection,
training, informational education, and accident proneness of trans­
portation department employees, and has been printed in pamphlet
form.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

53

C o m m i t t e e o n T r a f f ic an d S a f e t y . E . W . E m e r s o n , c h a ir m a n .—
T h e r e p o r t o f th is c o m m itte e p rese n te d a t th e a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n ,
S e p te m b e r 22 to 28, 1928, d eals w ith m e n a n d th e ir a ccid e n t te n d e n ­
cies, h ig h -a c c id e n t m e n , tre a tm e n t, selectio n , tu rn o v e r, f o llo w -u p ,
b o n u s p la n s , w e lfa r e w o r k , etc.
T h is r e p o r t is co n ta in e d in th e
v o lu m e o f 1928 p r o c e e d in g s, p a g e s 13-64.

C o m m itte e o n B o n u s a n d A w a r d S y stem s. G. T. Hellmuth,
chairman.—This report deals with the subject of bonus and award
systems in connection with safety work and accident-prevention
programs of electric railways. This report is contained in the vol­
ume of 1927 proceedings, pages 151-159. (Joint report with Ameri­
can Electric Railway Claims Association.)
C o m m itte e o n Bus O p e r a tio n . R. N. Graham, chairman.—This
report contains, among other things, suggested rules and instructions
for the guidance of bus operators and collectors. This report is
contained in the volume of 1927 proceedings, pages 14-96.
Earlier reports include those of the committee on personnel and
training contained in the volumes of proceedings, 1922, pages 334401; 1921, pages 197-221; 1915, pages 285-301; 1912, pages 331-364

American Engineering Council.
26 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. L. W . Wallace,
Executive Secretary.
A m e r ic a n Engineering Council was organized in Washington,
D. C., June, 1920.
The object of the organization is to “ further the public welfare
wherever technical and engineering knowledge or experience are
involved and to consider and act upon matters of common concern
to the engineering and allied technical professions.”
The membership of the council is composed of representatives
of National, State, and local engineering and allied technical soci­
eties. There are 26 such member organizations having a composite
membership of 57,65*3. Each member organization contributes
on the basis of $1 per year for each member.
Council gives consideration to all proposed National legislation
and all regulations projected by the Federal departments affecting
engineering and allied technical employees of the Federal Gov­
ernment.
From time to time council makes important studies some of which
have a direct bearing upon personnel matters. Among these are
the following:
Waste in industry, p u b lish e d in 1921, c o n ta in s a la r g e b o d y o f fa c t
m a te r ia l w ith resp ect to p e rso n n e l rec o rd s, p ro ce d u re o f e m p lo y m e n t,
u n e m p lo y m e n t a n d effo rts to o v erc o m e sea son a l flu c tu a tio n s ; record s
o f d isc h a r g e s a n d la y -o f fs , p r a ctic e o f te m p o r a r y sh u td o w n s, in ­
v e s tig a tio n o f r e s ig n a tio n s ; la b o r t u r n o v e r ; d e te r m in a tio n o f w a g e
s c a le s ; h o u r s o f la b o r ; m e th o d s o f sh o p r e p r e s e n ta tio n ; la b o r diffi­
cu ltie s du e to s trik e s, lo c k o u ts a n d s t o p p a g e s ; a c c id e n ts ; s a fe t y an d
w e lfa r e w o r k .
Twelve-hour shift in American industry is a c a r e fu l a n a ly s is o f
th e a d v a n ta g e s a n d d isa d v a n ta g e s o f th e 1 2 -h o u r s h ift .
Industrial coal—purchase, delivery, and storage, a m o n g o th er
p h a ses o f th e p r o b le m , p o in ts o u t h o w p r o d u c tio n sch ed u les m i g h t be




54

III.

n o n o f f ic ia l

a g e n c ie s

stabilized, hence eliminating a large degree of seasonal employment
obtaining in coal mines.
Safety and production is based upon a large amount of factual
material and sets forth the relationship between the rates of pro­
duction and accidents. The general conclusion is drawn that the
prevention of accidents is of major consequence and should receive
executive attention and direction. The report also lays down the
general principle that the efficient factory as measured in production
per man-hour is also a safe factory, or vice versa.
In addition to the foregoing the council has actively participated
in the several studies of the President’s unemployment conference
in so far as such effort has related to the elimination of unemploy­
ment and projected means for bringing about more uniform pro­
duction schedules in American industry.

American Federation of Labor.
A. F. of L. Building, Washington, D. C.
A s t a t i s t i c a l and information service is maintained by the Ameri­
can Federation of Labor to supply information at the request of
its affiliated organizations. While its research work is largely of a
secondary nature, several studies have been published in a “ Research
series,” among which are:
No. 1. Organized labor's modern wage policy.
No. 2. Wages and labor’s share. By Jurgen Kuczynski and Marguerite
Steinfeld.
No. 3. Wages and labor’s share in the value added by manufacture.
No. 6 . Wages in manufacturing industries, 1899 to 1927.

Current data on unemployment, compiled from reports of union
secretaries in 24 industrial centers, appear monthly in the American
Federationist.
Recent, publications are “A Scientific basis for shorter hours of
work,” and “A Comparison of wages, North and South.” A survey
of the unemployment provisions and old-age pensions of various
affiliated unions has been published under the title, “ Trade Union
Benefits,” by George W. Perkins and Matthew Woll.
A survey of the extent of the 5-day week and its effect on wages
is now being made.
The official organ of the American Federation of Labor, the
American Federationist, published monthly, covers the broad field
of which personnel relations are a part.

American Gas Association.
420 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. Alexander For­
ward, Managing Director.
Form ed June 6, 1918, by the union of the American Gas Institute
(founded 1906) and the National Commercial Gas Association
(founded 1905); incorporated, 1919.
G a s S a f e t y Code.— Prepared under the auspices and rules of
procedure of the American Standards Association by the American
Gas Association and the United States Bureau of Standards.
A p p lia n c e s . —The association with the governmental bureaus co­
operating has developed minimum safety requirements for the fol­




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

55

lowing gas appliances: Ranges, water heaters, tubing, incinerators,
house heating, and clothes dryers. The association maintains a labo­
ratory for the testing and approval of appliances based on these
requirements.
A c c id e n t P r e v e n tio n C o m m ittee. —The functions of the committee
are: To investigate preventable causes of casualties and damage in
the gas industry and to recommend methods, safe practices and
safety appliance for avoidance; to devise and promulgate plans for
interesting and educating employees and the public in accident pre­
vention ; to be helpful to the members of the association in their in­
dividual accident problems. The yearly reports are included in the
proceedings of the association; some of the reports, however, are
available separately.
A w a rd s. —The association yearly offers a gold medal and button
in recognition of the outstanding meritorious act performed in the
gas industry. The McCarter medal is also presented to employees
of member companies in recognition of the saving of human life
from gas asphyxiation by application of the Schaeffer prone-pressure
method of resuscitation.
C o m m itte e on E d u c a tio n o f G a s C om pan y E m p lo y ee s. —The pur­
pose of the committee is to make a thorough study of the educational
needs of gas-company employees and to recommend that form which
it is felt will be of greatest practical value to the employees and which
can be most successfully applied. The yearly reports of the com­
mittee are included in the proceedings of the association; some of
the reports are available separately.

American Heart Association (Inc.).
370 Seventh Avenue, New York, N. Y. Dr. I. C. Riggin,
Executive Secretary.
T he American Heart Association, organized in 1922, was incorpo­
rated in 1924 to coordinate the work of prevention and care of heart
disease which had been carried on independently by associations in
various parts of the country and to encourage and assist in the or­
ganization of new centers for this work. It is directing its energies
to the maintenance of a central office through which all the work of
its constituent groups can be coordinated and made more productive;
to the organization of membership; to education; and to field work.
The association is financed by voluntary contributions.
By gathering statistical data and acquiring additional knowledge
effective measures for the prevention and relief of heart disease may
become more widely known and intelligently applied, to the end that
(1) the etiological factors may be better controlled; (2) many hearts
may be saved from damage; (3) hearts already diseased may be pro­
tected from further injury; (4) the disease may be arrested before
its victim is materially incapacitated; (5) a larger proportion of
those with serious heart defects may be brought to economic inde­
pendence. A series of pamphlets is issued by the association dealing
with prevention and care of heart disease.
The Heart Council of Greater Cincinnati, an affiliated association,
has recently made a study of the predisposing factors in heart dis­
ease at middle age and beyond. Physical examination of 1,000 male
clerical workers, ranging in age from 25 to 65 years and representing




56

I I I , 1T OFFICIAL AGENCIES
S ON"

cross sections of those engaged in various types of industrial em­
ployment, formed the basis of this study.

American Management Association.
20 Yesey Street, New York, N. Y. W . J. Donald, Managing
Director.
In 1922 the National Association of Corporation Training (see
Bui. No. 299, p. 118) and the Industrial Relations Association of
America (Bui. No. 299, p. 105) were merged into the National Per­
sonnel Association. The name of this organization was changed in
1923 to the American Management Association. The National Asso­
ciation of Sales Managers joined the American Management Asso­
ciation in 1925.
Special Paper No. IT of the association, entitled “ The American
Management Association and Its Predecessors,” by W. H. Lange, of
the Industrial Relations Counselors (Inc.), is a history of the or­
ganization and of each of the component organizations out of which
it grew. This paper is the first interim report of the committee on
personnel administration,4 which is making a study of the develop­
ment of practices in personnel management and industrial relations
in American industry during the past 25 years, in which “ an attempt
will be made to establish trends and to outline current practices.”
Since 1923 “ the American Management Association has lessened
its emphasis on personnel management, recognizing it only in so far
as it is a general management problem.” However, personnel still
“ bulks very large in the whole program of the association ” and is
a included in the activities of each of the major divisions.” These
divisions are: Marketing management, production management,
office management, financial management, and general management.
In addition, there are several subject groups, such as employee tests,
employee representation, training of salesmen, industrial training,
and salary administration.
In general, it is the policy of the association not to undertake
research within its own offices, but rather to stimulate research in the
field of personnel on the part of its members. The results of studies
made by members are brought to the attention of the general member­
ship through the publications and conventions of the association. In
specific cases in which the association desires to have a study made,
it subsidizes an investigation by or through a member, a university
professor, or some expert research student.
Publications of the American Management Association covering
studies in the field of personnel research are:
1923: Discipline and its maintenance.
Vacations for office employees.
The negro in industry.
Wage payments— in cash or by check.
Employee stock ownership plans.
1924: Introduction of new employees.
Business suggestions from employees.
Rewards for inventions.
4 Final report will be published by the Industrial Relations Counselors (Inc.) as part of
its research series.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

57

1925: Compensating retail salespeople.
Training retail salespeople.
Payment for employees’ civil and military duties.
Vaccination of employees against smallpox.
Disseminating information among employees.
Pensions for industrial and commercial employees.
How New York employers treat absence for sickness.

Recent and forthcoming publications are:
General management series—
Trends in personnel health service. By W . H. Lange (second interim report
of committee on personnel administration).
The pension plan of the Atlantic Refining Co. By P. G. Wharton, assistant
general auditor of the Atlantic Refining Co.
How Bethlehem Steel Co. and other companies deal with cases of men who
must be retired, but who can not qualify under a pension plan. By George W .
Vary, superintendent of relief department, Bethlehem Steel Co.
Age in relation to employment. By C. R. Dooley, personnel manager of the
Standard Oil Co. of New York.
Training older employees for continued employment. By C. R. Dooley.
Extra incentives for executives in the American Rolling Mill Co. By S. R.
Rectanus, assistant to general manager.
The pension, retirement, and benefit plan of the Eastman Kodak Co. By
M. B. Folsom, assistant to the chairman.
Executive training programs. By Harold B. Bergen, manager personnel
department of Henry L. Doheny Co.
Training executives to train. By Morse Dell Plain, vice president Northern
Indiana Public Service Co.

Office executives series—
Extra incentives for billing machine operators in the Public Service Co. of
northern Illinois. By T. P. Johnson, assistant to the comptroller.
Measuring shop clerical work. By W . M. Smith, Western Electric Co.
Measuring office output— Summary of studies. By John Mitchell, General
Electric Co.
Functions and relations of office planning, personnel, and service depart­
ments. By H. C. Pennicke, manager planning and personnel, American Central
Life Insurance Co.
The office supervisor as a trainer. By Byron F. Field, superintendent train­
ing division, Commonwealth Edison Co.
Incentives for office workers. By C. A. Bethge, vice president Chicago Mail
Order Co.
Office management in branches. By W . Henry Smith, assistant vice presi­
dent, Retail Credit Co.
Standardizing, measuring, and compensating for office operations, by Marion
A. Bills, assistant secretary, Aetna Life Insurance Co.

Production executives’ series—
The time study department: Its place in the factory organization. By A. L.
Kress, head of central planning department, United States Rubber Co.

Institute of management series—
A method of determining who shall participate under a managerial profitsharing plan. By J. S. Keir, economist, and E. P. Hayes, of Dennison Manu­
facturing Co.
How to prepare and validate an employee test. By Eugene J. Benge.

Publications of the association “ are printed primarily for the
benefit of members. They are not made available for purchase by
nonmembers until six to eight months after members have received
them.”
In addition to special publications and proceedings of conven­
tions the American Management Association issues the Management
Review, a monthly magazine, and Personnel, issued quarterly. Per­




58

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

sonnel began as the official organ of the Industrial Relations Associa­
tion, and after a lapse in publication it was reestablished by the
American Management Association in May, 1927, since when it has
been issued quarterly. It contains “ articles on all sorts of personnel
problems, including selecting, training, compensating, transferring,
promoting, organizing and pensioning employees, including office and
iactory workers, retail and field salesmen, junior executive, and even
other executives.” It is available to members only.
Studies under way at present are:
Supervision of salesmen. By J. L. Palmer, assistant professor in marketing,
University of Chicago.
Selecting, recruiting, training, and compensating men in specialized posi­
tions. By Dr. R. W . Stone, professor of industrial relations, University of
Chicago.
The sales executive’s job. By Dr. Harry R. Tosdal, professor of marketing,
Harvard Business School.

American Medical Association.
535 North Dearborn Street, Chicago. Dr. Olin West,
Secretary.
O n e of the sections of the Scientific Assembly of the Association
is the section on preventive and industrial medicine and public
health, of which Dr. W. G. Smillie, Boston, is the secretary. Sub­
jects pertaining to public health and industrial medicine are discussed
before that section through papers formally presented by individual
authors and through general discussion participated in by the mem­
bers of the section. Scientific papers dealing with industrial medi­
cine and surgery are also presented from time to time before other
sections of the scientific assembly. Most of these contributions to
the annual programs of the association are published in the Journal
of the American Medical Association or in the Transactions of the
Sections.
The section on ophthalmology and the section on laryngology,
otology, and rhinology have considered at various sessions important
subjects pertaining to vision, hearing, etc., with especial reference to
the bearing of defective vision and hearing on the efficiency of
employees.
There are two important committees of the association engaged in
studying the dangers of poisonous gases and anesthesia accidents,
and various other committees of the association are devoting them­
selves directly or indirectly to the study of questions involving health
and human efficiency. From time to time there are published in the
Journal of the American Medical Association or in its other publica­
tions scientific articles having a bearing on industrial medicine and
surgery.

American Posture League.
1 Madison Avenue (Metropolitan Tower), New York, N. Y.
L. E. LaFetra, M. D., Secretary.
A n a t i o n a l health organization organized in 1913 and incorporated
the following year to do scientific and educational work in the stand­
ardization and improvement of conditions affecting the posture of
the human body.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

59

While the principal activities of this organization have been in
the field of personal, public, and school hygiene, its technical com­
mittee on seating has made anatomical studies for the improvement
of the design of chairs, stools, etc., for industrial establishments and
offices, so as to promote correct posture and help to eliminate fatigue.
Lists of reprints of articles on posture, wall charts, lantern slides,
and other educational material issued by the league may be obtained
on application.

American Public Health Association.
Penn Terminal Building, Seventh Avenue and Thirty-first
Street, New York, N. Y. Homer N. Calver, Secretary.
O r g a n iz e d in 1872 for the advancement of sanitary science and
promotion of organizations and measures for the practical applica­
tion of public and personal hygiene, it has grown steadily until to­
day it is the largest and best-known public health organization on
this continent. There are now 10 sections. They are health officers
section, laboratory section, vital statistics section, public health engi­
neering section, industrial hygiene section, foods, drugs, and nutri­
tion section, child hygiene section, public health education section,
public health nursing section, epidemiology section.
Meetings are held annually at a time and place determined by the
overning council. The fifty-ninth annual meeting will be held in
'ort Worth, Tex., the week of October 27, 1930.
The American Journal of Public Health is the official monthly
publication of the association, in which its proceedings and papers
and reports presented before its sections are published. This periodi­
cal has a department on industrial hygiene and occupational dis­
eases, consisting of abstracts of current literature, conducted by
Emery R. Hayhurst, M. D., and Leonard Greenburg, Ph. D.
S e c t i o n o n I n d u s t r ia l H y g i e n e . Carey P. McCord, M. D., 34
West Seventh Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, secretary.—This section was
. organized in 1914 and now has about 200 members. A sketch of the
development of industrial hygiene and protective legislation was pre­
pared by Dr. George M. Kober and appeared as a chapter in the
semicentennial volume, “A half century of public health,” published
by the American Public Health Association in 1921. Studies and
reports made by the section in the last few years have been published
in the American Journal of Public Health as follows:

f

Extension of industrial hygiene, March, 1925.
Industrial anthrax, January, 1926.
Industrial fatigue, December, 1929.
Lead poisoning, June, 1929, and December, 1929.
Skin irritants, April, 1929.
Silicosis, June, 1929.
Industrial morbidity data and the physician, July, 1927.
Carbon monoxide poisoning in industry, February, 1927.
Relation of health departments to industrial hygiene, February, 1926.
The medical consultant in industry afld his value to the State, December,
1926.
The promotion of industrial hygiene, March, 1925.
Industrial promotion in small plants, April, 1925.

The committee on industrial hygiene, a subcommittee of the com­
mittee on administrative practice of the association, has prepared a




60

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

form for the collection of the essential data with respect to health
conditions and health services of industries. The report will be
published in a forthcoming issue of the American Journal of Public
Health.

American Museum of Safety.
120 East Twenty-eighth Street New York, N. Y. Albert
A. Hopkins, Director. Office address, 141 East Twentyninth Street, New York, N. Y.
T h e American Museum of Safety, formerly the Safety Institute
of America, is an educational corporation maintained for the preven­
tion of accidental injury and loss of life and the elimination of
hazards to the health of industrial workers and of the public. Ex­
hibits in the museum present opportunity to visualize industrial
safety engineering and to study safety devices, materials, and meth­
ods with a view to promoting development and standardization.
The organization publishes Safety, a bimonthly magazine, and
administers the award of the Scientific American medal and the
E. H. Harriman memorial medals, the latter of which are given for
progress in safety in railroad operation. A special bulletin on
Guarding Machine Tools was published in 1925.

American Railway Association.
30 Yesey Street, New York, N. Y. H. J. Forster, Secretary.
T h e o b je c t of this association is the discussion and recommenda­
tion of methods for the management and operation of American rail­
ways. Its membership consists of common carriers which operate
American steam railways.
The activities of the association are conducted under eight divi­
sions, the names of which indicate their scope, as follows: Operating,
transportation, traffic, engineering, mechanical, purchase and stores,
freight claims, motor transport.
Three of these divisions are vitally concerned with standards;
namely, operating, which deals with problems of operation; engineer­
ing, which deals with the location, construction, and maintenance of
railroads; and mechanical, which deals with construction and main­
tenance of rolling stock.

American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers.
29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y.
in 1895 for the promotion of the arts and sciences con­
nected with heating and ventilating in all branches, the society now
has local chapters in Cleveland, Chicago, Kansas City, Boston,
Detroit, Minneapolis, New York, Buffalo, Toronto, Seattle, Phila­
delphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Madison.
The annual and semiannual meetings are held at times and places
determined by the council. The annual meeting is usually held in
January and the semiannual meeting in June. Annual dues, $25;
initiation fee for members and associates, $15: for junior mem­
bers, $12.
The research laboratory is located at the United States Bureau of
Mines ExpeAment Station, Pittsburgh, Pa., and F. C. Houghten
O rg a n ized




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

61

is director of research. This laboratory was established under an
agreement for cooperation in certain investigations between the
United States Bureau of Mines and the society, executed in July,
1919, by which the bureau furnishes at its Pittsburgh plant the
necessary office and laboratory space, light, power, heat, water, and
other general facilities, and the services of certain engineering
assistants, and the society provides the salaries of the director of
research, assistant director, and such other assistants as may be
required. Official reports of the research laboratory are published
in the monthly Journal of the society, and papers containing the
results of the investigations are presented at research sessions of
the society’s meetings.
The publications of the society include the Journal, which is now
a part of Heating, Piping, and Air Conditioning, the annual Trans­
actions of the society, the annual Guide, and the Code of Minimum
Requirements for the Heating and Ventilation of Buildings.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Calvin W .
Rice, Secretary.
T he American Society of Mechanical Engineers was organized in
April, 1880, to promote the art and science of mechanical engineering
and the allied arts and sciences. Local sections of the society have
been established in 70 industrial centers of the United States. Six­
teen professional divisions have been organized on the basis of a
common interest in a branch of engineering within the scope of the
society. These are: Aeronautic, applied mechanics, fuels, hydraulic,
iron and steel, machine-shop practice, management, materials han­
dling, national defense, oil and gas power, petroleum, power, print­
ing industries, railroad, textile, wood industries. The society has a
membership of more than 18,000.
M a n a g e m e n t D i v i s i o n .—Organized as the management section
on October 15, 1920, this division now has an enrollment of 6,325
members and holds sessions devoted to management topics at the
semiannual and annual meetings of the society.
The division also holds yearly a national meeting on management
either alone or in cooperation with the materials handling division
of the society or other management groups. A number of these
seessions are held in cooperation with the production executives
section of the American Management Association. In January,
1929, the division, with the American Management Association
cooperating, organized a national elimination of waste committee.
This committee is sponsoring in April of each year a nation-wide
campaign to reduce factory waste*
A bibliography of management literature to February, 1927, was
published in that year under the auspices of the management division.
B o il e r C ode C o m m i t t e e . M. Jurist, acting secretary.—In 1914
the committee prepared and issued the American Society of Me­
chanical Engineers boiler code, and revised editions were published
in 1918, 1924, and 1927. It contains standard specifications for the
construction, equipment, and use of power boilers. The committee




62

III. 1T
S ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

has also formulated rules for boilers of locomotives, low-pressure
heating boilers, miniature boilers, inspection, unfired pressure vessels,
and the care of power boilers in service. They have been adopted
officially by many States as well as by many boiler-insurance com­
panies, boiler manufacturers, and consulting engineers. The com­
mittee meets monthly and formulates “ Interpretations of the boiler
code,” which are published in data sheet form with index.
S a f e t y C o m m i t t e e . C . B. LePage, secretary.—For many years
the society has taken a part in encouraging the movement for safety
in industry and the development of safety codes by representative
committees. In October, 1921, the American Society of Mechanical
Engineers council appointed a standing committee to extend the
knowledge of safety, to promote operation in this field and to super­
vise all safety code activities of the society with the exception of those
of the boiler code group of committees. The society is now joint
sponsor for five sectional committees, organized to develop safety
codes for mechanical power transmission apparatus, elevators, ma­
chinery for compressing air, conveyors and conveying machinery,
and cranes, derricks, and hoists under the procedure of the American
Standards Association. The safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus was approved in 1923 as a tentative American
standard, and in November, 1927, was raised to the status of an
American standard by the American Standards Association. The
safety code for elevators, including dumb-waiters and escalators, was
approved in April, 1925, by the American Standards Association.
The safety codes of the other three sectional committees are now in
various stages of development.
In addition to the sectional committees for which it is a sponsor,
the American Society of Mechanical Engineers has representation on
committees forming safety codes for abrasive wheels, floor openings,
railings and toe boards, industrial sanitation, lighting factories,
mills, and other work places, forging and hot metal stamping, lad­
ders, laundries, logging and sawmill machinery, machine tools, paper
and pulp mills, power presses, rubber machinery, walkway surfaces,
amusement parks, window washing, colors for the identification of
gas-mask canisters, ventilation for metal mines, ventilation in coal
mines, ventilation, textile safety code, and low-voltage electrical
hazard.
Safety in industry.—Another important contact of the society in
safety work is with the National Safety Council through its engi­
neering section, the American Society of Safety Engineers. Under
the auspices of the American Society of Safety Engineers a joint
conference was held in New York in November, 1927, to discuss
safety in its relation to the activities of each of the participating
organizations. As an outgrowth of this conference, the four national
engineering societies are developing a plan to coordinate safety work
throughout the country by the appointment of safety representa­
tives in their local sections and student branches, and by the dis­
semination of printed lectures on the subject of safety in schools and
colleges. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers is one
of the first to put this plan into operation.
Talks on safety in industry have also been incorporated in the
programs of recent meetings of the American Society of Mechanical
Engineers, under the auspices of the American Society of Safety



ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

63

Engineers, and authors in general are urged to emphasize the safety
features of their work and plants in papers presented at American
Society of Mechanical Engineers meetings.
Engineering education,—In addition to the work of the manage­
ment division and the safety and boiler code committees, the society
has two standing committees—namely, the committee on relations
with colleges and the committee on education and training for the
industries—devoted to educational work. The former deals with the
activities of the student branches of the society, of which there are
now 96, and the latter acts in various ways to further industrial engi­
neering education. A group of 17 papers presented at sessions spon­
sored by the committee was published in pamphlet form under its
auspices in 1927. The committee on education and training for the
industries is also cooperating with the Society for the Promotion of
Engineering Education in its present important study of engineering
education of noncollege type. The society also has direct repre­
sentation on the board of investigation and control of the Society
for the Promotion of Engineering Education.
Publications.—The regular publications of the American Society
of Mechanical Engineers—Mechanical Engineering, its monthly jour­
nal, and the Transactions of the Professional Divisions—contain
many papers devoted entirely or in part to the various phases of
personnel research. A list of these, many of which are available
in pamphlet form, can be secured from the headquarters of the
society.

American Society of Safety Engineers— Engineering
Section of National Safety Council.
20 North Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111. W. Dean Keefer,
Secretary.
O r g a n iz e d in May, T911, as the United Association of Casualty
Inspectors; reorganized and incorporated as American Society of
Safety Engineers in 1915; amalgamated with engineering section of
the National Safety Council (see p. 117) in 1924. It has more than
1,100 members.
Participation of the National Safety Council in the formulation
of safety codes is largely through the membership of the American
Society of Safety Engineers, engineering section. Engineering rep­
resentatives have helped to formulate such codes as those dealing
with:
Ladders.
Forging and hot-metal stamping.
Paper and pulp mills.
Identification of piping systems.
Power presses.
Rubber mills and calenders.
Textile mills.
Abrasive wheels.
Aeronautics.
Building exits.
Dust explosion.
Electrical equipment in coal mines.
Elevators and escalators.
Foundries.
Gas safety code,




64

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

Protection of heads and eyes of industrial workers.
Ladders and stairs for mines.
Laundry machinery.
Lighting.
Logging and sawmill machinery.
Mechanical loading in underground metal mines.
Mechanical power-transmission apparatus.
Miscellaneous outside coal handling equipment.
National electrical safety code.
Pulverized fuel systems.
Rock dusting of coal mines.
Underground transportation in metal mines.
Wire rope for mines.
Woodworking.

The society is also represented on 28 other committees for codes
that have not yet been completed.
Special committees are appointed from time to time to study and
prepare reports on unusual accident problems such as:
The effect of annealing on chains.
Noise and its relation to accidents.
Low voltage electrical hazards.
Static electricity.
Wire rope attachments and connections.
Woodworking circular saws.

The society has undertaken the enormous task of formulating at
least one special report in pamphlet form on every industry in the
United States. Ultimately, this will mean a minimum of 300 pam­
phlets in this series. Reports have already been published on such
subjects as:
Brick making.
Leather tanneries.
Milk-bottling plants.
Food preserving and canning.
Candy, chocolate, and cocoa manufacture.
Dry cleaning and dyeing establishments.
Paper-box making.
Rayon manufacture.
Structural and sheet-metal fabrication.

More than 25 committees have been organized to study other
industries.
Each year regional safety conferences are organized to bring
safety information and inspiration to thousands of people who can
not attend the annual safety congress. Last year regional conferences
were held in more than 25 communities in different parts of the
country. Each is a one or two day conference. The average attend­
ance is about 500 persons.
Special activities are carried on not only to prevent accidents in
engineering colleges but also to create a safety consciousness in the
minds of student engineers, many of whom after graduation become
managing and operating executives in industrial concerns. Accidentprevention lectures have been prepared for presentation to engineer­
ing students, and a local contact man has been appointed in each
engineering college community to cooperate with the college authori­
ties in inaugurating and maintaining accident-prevention activities.
Four chapters of the American Society of Safety Engineers, engi­
neering section, have been organized in New York, Boston, Worcester%




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

65

and Newark to afford the members in these communities the addi­
tional opportunity of holding monthly meetings.
The annual meeting of the American Society of Safety Engineers,
engineering section, is held each year during the week ox the annual
safety congress of the National Safety Council.

American Standards Association.
29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. P. G. Agnew,
Secretary.
T he American Standards Association is a national industrial
standardization body composed of representatives of 41 national
organizations, including 25 trade associations, 9 technical societies,
and 7 departments of the Federal Government. Any national organ­
ization which has an important interest in industrial work is eligible
to become a member body of the association.
The chief purpose of the organization is to bring together manu­
facturers, distributors, consumers, technical specialists, and any
others directly concerned with a particular standardization project,
providing a procedure under which these agencies may work to­
gether to establish standards satisfactory to all. Such standards,
properly prepared and approved by the interested groups, are given
the status of American standards by the association.
The standards already approved include a large group of national
safety codes, and many other safety codes are now in course of
preparation. Some of these codes, such as the national electrical
safety code, the elevator safety code, and the safety code for abrasive
wheels, serve as the authoritative guides for the industries which
they concern.
Over 400 organizations, represented by more than 2,100 individ­
uals, have cooperated under American Standards Association pro­
cedure in the establishment of standards. A large share of the work
of these organizations has been in the safety code field.
Any responsible organization may bring about the initiation of a
standardization project under American Standards Association pro­
cedure. The request for initiation of a standard is approved by the
American Standards Association standards council, on which all of
the member bodies of the American Standards Association are repre­
sented. In the standards council are also vested the approval of the
personnel of the technical committees organized to establish stand­
ards and the final approval of the standards submitted by the tech­
nical committees to the American Standards Association. Not until
such approval is granted does a standard become an American stand­
ard. The control of finances and administrative policy of the Amer­
ican Standards Association is in the hands of a board of directors
composed, for the most part, of industrial executives nominated by
the member bodies.
The procedure of the association provides four general methods
for the establishment of American standards. These are:
1. Sectional committee method.—A sectional committee is a joint
technical committee made up of designated representatives ox all
vitally interested groups concerned with the subject being considered
for standardization. Such technical committees may work either:




66

H i. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

(a) Under the administrative support and direction of a sponsor
body, or, (b) autonomously (without such specific direction).
2. Existing standards method.—Existing standards may be ap­
proved when it is shown by proper exhibits of the submitting body
that the standard represents a true, competent, industrial opinion
with respect to its suitability for national adoption.
3. Proprietary method.—Proprietary standards, or standards de­
veloped by a body having an outstanding and controlling interest
and importance in the field of the standard, may be approved by the
American Standards Association when it is shown by methods set
down in the procedure that such a standard is supported by a con­
sensus of those substantially concerned with its development and use.
4. General acceptance method.—A fourth method, especially appli­
cable to simple cases not requiring continued technical consideration,
is known as the general acceptance method. Under this procedure
a conference of those principally concerned—producers, consumers,
and other important interests—is held. The decision of the confer­
ence is authenticated and supported by a sufficiently large number of
written acceptances of the conference’s recommendation from those
substantially concerned with the scope and provisions of the rec­
ommendation.
Under all these methods of procedure the project is undertaken, as
has been outlined, only upon the formal proposal of a responsible
industrial, commercial, governmental, or technical group.
The American Standards Association acts as the official channel
for international cooperation in standardization work with the simi­
lar national standardizing bodies in each of 20 foreign countries. It
is also the regular channel for the distribution of standards and
information concerning standardization activities originating both
in the United States and abroad.
The association was organized as the American Engineering Stand­
ards Committee in 1918 by five major engineering societies. As the
work of the committee grew and its activities extended into new
industrial fields, additional member bodies were added. In Novem­
ber, 1928, the committee was reorganized along broader and more
flexible lines and renamed the American Standards Association.
The following list shows those safety codes which have been ap­
proved by the American Standards Association and those which are
now in the course of preparation.
Approved safety codes
Building exits.
Lighting: Factories, mills, and other work places.
Ladders.
Elevators and escalators.
Lighting of school buildings.
Use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.
Protection of industrial workers in foundries.
Power presses and foot and hand presses.
Logging and sawmill machinery.
Mechanical power-transmisnion apparatus.
Forging and hot-meta! stamp.ng.
Rubber mills and calenders.
National electrical safety code.
Protection against lightning.
Gas.
Woodworking plants.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

67

Paper and pulp mills.
Protection of the heads and eyes of industrial workers.
Laundry machinery and operations.
Prevention of dust explosions:
Installation of pulverized-fuel systems.
Pulverizing systems for sugar and cocoa.
Prevention of dust explosions in starch factories.
Prevention of dust explosions in flour and feed mills.
Prevention of dust explosions in terminal grain elevators.
Safety codes in course of preparation
Construction work.
Floor and wall openings, railings, and toe boards.
Walkway surfaces.
Window washing.
Mechanical refrigeration.
Machine tools.
Compressed-air machinery.
Conveyors and conveying machinery.
Plate and sheet-metal working.
Rubber machinery.
Cranes, derricks, and hoists.
Electrical fire and safety code.
Colors for gas-mask canisters.
Textiles.
Industrial sanitation.
Ventilation.
Exhaust systems.
Amusement parks

The following are the member-bodies of the organization:
American Electric Railway Association.
American Gas Association.
American Gear Manufacturers4 Association.
American Home Economics Association.
American Institute of Architects.
American Institute of Electrical Engineers.
American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers,
American Mining Congress.
American Railway Association, engineering division.
American Society of Civil Engineers.
American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
American Society for Testing Materials.
Association of American Steel Manufacturers.
Cast-Iron Pipe Research Association.
Common Brick Manufacturers’ Association of America.
Electric light and power group:
Association of Edison Illuminating Companies.
National Electric Light Association.
Fire protection group:
Associated Factory Mutual Fire Insurance Companies.
National Board Fire Underwriters.
National Fire Protection Association.
Underwriters5 Laboratories.
Gas group:
Compressed Gas Manufacturers’ Association.
International Acetylene Association.
Laundryowners’ National Association of the United States and
Canada.
105636°— 30------ 6




68

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

National Association of Mutual Casualty Companies.
National Automatic Sprinkler Association.
National Bureau of Casualty and Surety Underwriters.
National Electrical Manufacturers’ Association.
National Machine Tool Builders’ Association.
National Safety Council.
The Panama Canal.
Portland Cement Association.
Society of Automotive Engineers.
Telephone group:
Bell Telephone System.
United States Independent Telephone Association.
United States Department of Agriculture.
United States Department of Commerce.
United States Department of the Interior.
United States Department of Labor.
United States Navy Department.
United States War Department.
In addition to its member bodies there are also about 400 sustaining
members, for the most part manufacturing organizations.

Associated Industries of Massachusetts.
Park Square Building, 31 St. James Avenue, Boston, Mass.
E. Grosvenor Plowman, Industrial Relations Adviser.
A m a n u fa c t u r e r ’s association embracing in its membership manu­
facturers in all lines of industry having plants in Massachusetts
organized to solve their common problems.
The personnel work of the Associated Industries is handled
through a staff of advisers on industrial relations and industrial
medicine. In addition, this association has assisted in the formation
and works with the New England Industrial Relations Conference.
This conference is an organization of 25 personnel managers who
meet regularly to exchange information on personnel subjects.
In general the Associated Industries of Massachusetts and the In­
dustrial Relations Conference do not carry on research projects.
Both organizations study industrial relations subjects of current in­
terest and prepare reports for confidential use. Studies of this sort
have been prepared on old-age pensions, workmen’s compensation,
vocational education, and similar subjects. These reports are not
available for distribution.
The Associated Industries of Massachusetts acts as one of the co­
operative agents of the United States Department of Labor in col­
lecting information with respect to the actual turnover situation in
Massachusetts industry.

Association of Governmental Officials in Industry of
the United States and Canada.
Louise E. Schultz, Industrial Commission of Minnesota,
St. Paul, Minn., Secretary-Treasurer.
F o r m e r ly the Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the
United States and Canada; present name adopted at the 1928 con­
vention held in New Orleans, La. The membership of this associa-




ASSOCIATION'S, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

69

tion consists of employees of Federal, State, Provincial, county, or
municipal departments having to do with the enforcement or super­
vision of labor laws. The annual dues of departments are deter­
mined upon the following basis: When the department staff con­
sists of 1 to 5 persons, $5; 6 to 25 persons, $10; 26 to 75 persons, $15;
and where the staff exceeds 75 persons, $20. Meetings are held
annually, the place being decided upon at the preceding convention
and the time fixed by the executive committee.
The proceedings of the annual conventions are published each
year as bulletins of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics
and contain papers and discussions on labor topics. A history of
the organization is given in the Labor Review for October, 1929.
(Vol. 29, No. 4, p. 25.)

Boston Chamber of Commerce.
80 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. M. D. Liming, Secretary.
A c o n f e r e n c e group of operating office managers, serving as one
of the committees of the bureau of commercial and industrial affairs
of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, has made several studies with
especial reference to the employment, training, and working condi­
tions of office employees. Among these studies may be mentioned:
Workable classification of office jobs (8 pp.)—a summary of stand­
ards adopted by factories, stores, insurance houses and banks, etc.,
for the classification of office jobs and the regularization of salaries;
Practical experience in office management (48 pp.), showing the
organization and administration of a modern office and outlining the
selection and training of new employees, assignment of tasks, the
line of promotion, hours, discipline, absenteeism, etc. (also includes
the physical organization of the office and types of service rendered
by various classes of employees).
The retail trade board (Daniel Bloomfield, manager), which is the
merchants’ section of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, has a per­
sonnel group composed of personnel managers and training direc­
tors of the representative stores in the city. This group studies the
problems of personnel in the retail stores and arranges cooperative
training courses for executives and nonexecutives under a plan
known as the merchants’ institute of the retail trade board.

Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce.
66 Court Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Grant Elbert Scott,
Secretary.
T he statistical and research department of the Brooklyn Chamber
of Commerce carries on continuous studies of employment, wages
and hours, safety and health, industrial welfare legislation, and age
limit in industry, for the use of members and 4 industry in Brooklyn
4
generally.” Reports are not published, but information is available
upon application to the office of the chamber.

Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees.
61 Putnam Avenue, Detroit, Mich.
o f S t a t is t i c s a n d R e s e a r c h .
L. E. Keller, statis­
tician,—Activities, of the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Em­

D

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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

ployees in personnel research are confined to studies of the occupa­
tions over which the organization has jurisdiction. Results of these
studies are published from time to time for the use of officials of the
brotherhood and systems divisions.
The research department is at present engaged in studies of the
hazards of employment; training and skill required; the growth and
development of new machines and devices; relation of wages paid
maintenance of way employees to the wages paid similar classes in
other industries; and the living standards and conditions of the craft
under existing wages.
A study is planned of the health hazards in maintenance of way
work, based primarily on the death benefit records of the brother­
hood, to determine the extent of hazard due to exposure to severe
weather conditions and to the handling of heavy materials.

Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight
Handlers, Express and Station Employees.
Brotherhood of Railway Clerks Building, Cincinnati, Ohio.
E. L. Oliver, director.—Established by
order of the convention of the Brotherhood of Railway Clerks in
1928 and supported by appropriation from the brotherhood treasury.
The purpose of the department is primarily to assist in the handling
of negotiations and arbitration of disputes between the organization
and the various railroad managements. Its work, therefore, involves
principally the collection and compilation of statistics and other data
bearing on wages, working conditions, labor efficiency, railroad op­
erating conditions, and the general economic and financial facts of
American industry. While the results of studies made by the de­
partment are available in bulletin form for the use of local and sys­
tems officers, they have not been published for general distribution.
R e s e a r c h D e p a r tm e n t.

Bureau of Applied Economics.
1523 L Street NW., Washington, D. C. W. Jett Lauck,
President; C. V. Maudlin, Managing Director.
O rg a n ized in 1914 and incorporated under the laws of Maryland,
this bureau is a private organization established for the purpose of
doing research and statistical work in the field of industrial, com­
mercial, and general economic activities. Its labor-research work
includes compilation of data regarding prices, cost of living, wages,
and other statistical information (e. g., for use in labor cases before
wage boards, etc.), original investigations of industrial and commer­
cial conditions, plant and industrial surveys, memoranda on indus­
trial and labor legislation, etc.

Bureau of Municipal Research of Philadelphia.
311 South Juniper Street, Philadelphia, Pa. W illiam C.
Beyer, Director.
O rg a n ized experimentally in November, 1908, with the aid of a
staff detailed from the New York bureau; employed its own staff
on and after July 1, 1909; incorporated in September, 1910. It is




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

71

a citizens’ research agency, supported by voluntary contributions and
equipped to serve officials and citizens in solving technical problems
of government.
Supplements to its report on “ Workingmen’s standard of living
in Philadelphia” (published in 1919 by Macmillan Co.), bringing
the cost-of-living figures down to November, 1919, August, 1920,
March, 1921, and March, 1923, respectively, were published as Nos.
393, 433, 463, and 567 of Citizens’ Business, a weekly publication of
the bureau.
The bureau conducted an inquiry into the changes in salaries of
municipal employes in 12 of the larger cities in the United States
during the period 1915-1925. The results of this inquiry were
published in a supplement to the National Municipal Review of
March, 1926. It is engaged at present in a study of separations
from the competitive class in the city service of Philadelphia. Some
of the results of this study have been published in Citizens’ Business.

Bureau of Personnel Administration.
Graybar Building, 420 Lexington Avenue, Room 1745, New
York, N. Y. Henry C. Metcalf, Director.
T h e Bureau of Personnel Administration, an adult education and
research organization, carries on four interrelated functions:
1. Private and group conferences or training courses in the philos­
ophy, principles, and technique of personnel administration.
2. Research dealing with employment, health and safety, service
features, joint relations, and education and training.
3. Personnel analysis, counseling and vocational placement.
4. Labor audits: Systematic analysis and statement of the facts
and forces in a company which affect employer-employee relations,
with recommendations for the improvement of the human relations.
Under the training division, the bureau has conducted seven con­
ference series for business managers, factory, office, and sales execu­
tives, personnel directors, research specialists, social workers, and
professional groups and students interested in management as a life
problem. From these conferences on business management as a pro­
fession the following volumes have been printed;
Linking Science and Industry. Williams & Wilkins Co., Baltimore, Md.
1925.
Scientific Foundations of Business Administration. Williams & Wilkins Co.,
Baltimore, Md. 1926.
Business Management as a Profession. A. W . Shaw Co., Chicago, 111. 1927.
The Psychological Foundations of Business Management. A. W. Shaw Co.,
Chicago, 111. 1927.
Leadership and the Fundamental Objectives of Business Management will be
published during 1930.

In its research division the bureau has conducted many labor audits
of industrial corporations.
The Research Study on Employee Representation, by E. R. Burton
(published by Williams & Wilkins Co., Baltimore, Md., in 1926), was
made under the direction of the Bureau of Personnel Administration.




72

III. N OK OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Bureau of Railway Economics.
Transportation Building, Washington, D. C. Julius H.
Parmelee, Director.
E s t a b l is h e d in 1910 by the principal American railroads for re­
search and dissemination of information in the general fields of
economics and transportation statistics and accounting. Personnel
research is incidental to the general work of the bureau but is touched
upon in most of its major activities. The bureau maintains files
covering information with regard to the employment of railway per­
sonnel, wages, hours, labor turnover, etc., and in addition has been
interested in the question of education for railway work and has
prepared a number of informal reports on that question. The bu­
reau is active in the work of the Harriman committee of award,
which each year grants medals to individual railway companies for
progress in the safety field and has made a number of studies on
safety as applied to railway operation.

Bureau of Safety.
20 Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111.

Charles B. Scott, President.

This bureau was incorporated March 2, 1915, and is supported by

contracts which it has with its several public utility company clients,
particularly the Inter-Company Insurance Trusteeship of the Middle
West Utilities Co. These contracts provide that the Bureau of Safety
shall direct and supervise the accident-prevention work of the several
clients, which include light and power, street car, gas, ice, and water
companies.
Its service includes inspection (survey, analysis, and report of
operating conditions, recommendations regarding operating hazards
and accident hazards caused by physical condition of the plant,
regular reinspection); organization of safety committees; statistics
of accidents (compilation, analysis, charts); instructional and edu­
cational work (to committees and to employees, by lectures, shop
bulletins for posting, safety bulletins for each employee).
The bureau makes studies of the effect of safety rules tentatively
adopted and of contrivances devised by men working in the plants
for their individual protection.

Business Research Corporation.
79 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. Stanley P. Farwell,
Vice President.
T h e Business Research Corporation is a client service, the primary
function of which is to give consulting management service to the
companies under the control of Mr. Samuel Insull and his associates
and secondarily to render similar service to industry generally on a
fee basis. Its employee relations work covers employment methods,
rating, promotion, trade tests, etc.; benefit and thrift plans and pen­
sion systems; training and education; general working conditions;
employee representation systems; personnel surveys; and so on. The
reports of its studies are confidential, but a monthly bulletin is issued
under the title “ Better Business Methods,”




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

73

Business Training Corporation.
350 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y.; Tribune Tower,
Chicago, 111.
T h i s corporation prepares and conducts training courses for retail
and wholesale salesmen. Among recent courses are those for Ameri­
can Gas Association, Sterling Silversmiths Guild, Hartford Fire
Insurance Co., Bigelow-Hartford Carpet Co., General Motors Truck
Co., and many others. This corporation also conducts a course in
modern production methods for the training of foremen. An outline
of the subject matter and method of procedure may be obtained on
application.

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
522 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Clyde Furst, Secretary.
A c h i e f interest of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement
of Teaching is the pensioning of superannuated teachers, and this
subject is covered in each of its annual reports.
In addition the foundation has issued two separate bulletins on
the subject within recent years. Bulletin No. 17, published in 1926,
“ Retiring allowances for officers and teachers in the Virginia public
schools,” is a study made by staff officers of the foundation at the
request of the Virginia State Teachers’ Association and the State
board of education. In 1928 a comprehensive report and plan cover­
ing Colorado was published as Bulletin No. 22, under the title “ A
retirement plan for Colorado public schools.” This work was done
with the cooperation of the Colorado Education Association, by
Howard J. Savage, of the foundation staff, and Edmund S. Cogswell,
consulting actuary. The officers of the Carnegie Foundation pre­
sent the Colorado plan as “ a successful and practical adaptation of
the fundamental principle of pensions to the present needs of those
concerned with education and the present possibilities of meeting
those needs.”

Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America.
1615 H Street, NW., Washington, D. C. W illiam Butterworth, President.
T his is a national organization of commercial organizations and
trade associations. Its activities are threefold: (1) To serve Ameri­
can business in the study and solution of its national problems; (2)
to interpret to the American business public those acts of the National
Government which affect business; (3) to present to the various
branches and departments of the National Government the opinion
of American business on business and economic questions. In the
formulation of this opinion on any subject it proceeds either by a
vote of delegates assembled in annual meeting or by the method of
referendum.
Several of the departments of the chamber, such as those dealing
with natural resources, manufactures, and transportation, have been
responsible for studies resulting in bulletins of information. Ex-




74

m.

n o n o f f i c ia l a g e n c i e s

amples are the following bulletins issued by the department of
manufacture:
Pensions: Fundamentals in the development of pension and other retirement
plans. 1929.
Foremanship: Fundamentals in the development of industrial foremen. 1925.
Growth of foremanship courses in the United States. 1927.
Apprenticeship: Information and experiences in the development of indus­
trial training. 1926.
Cooperative apprenticeship programs. 1927.
Employee representation or works councils. 1927.

Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce.
Cincinnati, Ohio.

W . C. Culkins, Executive Vice President.
C. Edythe Cowie, manager.—The re­
search department of the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce is en­
gaged in the business of commercial research, securing data on any
subject required, furnishing statistical information on Cincinnati,
and handling all trade inquiries.
It is at present engaged in a study of employment opportunities
for the colored population of Cincinnati; and one, in cooperation
with civic organizations, for a central clearing agency among em­
ployment agencies. The reports of the department are not published.
R esearch

D

epartm ent.

College of Physicians.
15 South Twenty-second Street, Philadelphia, Pa. Alex.
Heron Davisson, M. D., 4514 Springfield Avenue, Clerk.
S e c t io n o n P u b l i c H e a l t h a n d I n d u s t r ia l M e d i c i n e .—This sec­
tion of the College of Physicians was organized in 1917. The aver­
age membership has been 50 Fellows. Meetings are not held on any
schedule but three or four meetings are usually arranged for and
held during the year. Its proceedings have been published an­
nually—either in full or by title—in the Transactions of the Col­
lege of Physicians, beginning with third series (vol. 39, pp. 421-489),
1917). The scope and aims of the section are described in a paper
by Dr. James M. Anders in third series (vol. 39, p. 461).

Conference Board of Physicians in Industry.
247 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. Dr. F. L. Rector,
Secretary.
O r g a n iz e d in April, 1914, for cooperative effort in introducing
into industrial establishments the most effective measures for the
treatment of injuries or ailments of employees; for promoting sani­
tary conditions in workshops; and for prevention of industrial dis­
eases. It also acts as adviser on medical problems in industry to the
National Industrial Conference Board.
Membership is limited to 40 and is confined to the medical direc­
tors of industrial establishments who are on a full-time basis. It
is financed by contributions from the firms represented by the
members.
The boards meets bimonthly, five times a year, the midsummer
mee tg being omitted. Questions of administration of industrial
medical departments, the scope and value of medical records, meth­
ods of treating industrial accidents and illness occurring within the




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

75

plant, and related subjects are discussed at these meetings. Sug­
gested methods are tried out by different board members, under
actual conditions, and their experiences discussed at subsequent meet­
ings. Methods of first-aid treatment of industrial injuries, the con­
tents of first-aid outfits, the minimum size and equipment of firstaid rooms, methods of physical examination and classification of
physical findings, and medical terminology used in industrial work
have been promulgated and standardized by this board. These
standardized methods and classifications have been published in Re­
search Report No. 34 of the National Industrial Conference Board,
which contains also a list of members. During past years the board
has made a study of physical examinations among industrial work­
ers, medical aspects of workmen’s compensation laws, medical care
of industrial workers, and the cost of industrial medical work. Its
members have contributed extensively to medical literature and to
industrial personnel problems.
CONSUMERS* LEAGUES
T he various consumers’ leagues, organized either as State or as
city bodies, while not primarily research agencies, often do a great
deal of research work in connection with their major activities.
Studies by these groups deal principally with women and minors and
are made for the purpose of furnishing data and first-hand informa­
tion for use in promoting legislation and specific standards in indus­
try which consumers’ leagues are organized to promote.
Consumers’ leagues most active in investigating work, with a state­
ment of their recent activities, follow:

Consumers’ League of Cincinnati.
1024 Provident Bank Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. Frances R.
Whitney, Executive Secretary.
In 1925 the league made an investigation of the vacation policies
of 111 factories, stores, and miscellaneous establishments in Cincin­
nati, which was printed under the title of “ Vacations with Pay for
Production Workers,” by Annette Mann.
During 1927 a study was made of injuries to those minors employed
in Cincinnati during 1926 whose names appeared on the records of
the Industrial Commission of Ohio as claiming workmen’s compensa­
tion, and printed under the title, aA Study of Industrial Injuries to
Working Children in Cincinnati during 1926,” by Frances R. Whit­
ney, assisted by Nellie J. Rechenbach (September, 1927. 40 pp.).
The various types of employment agencies, both fee-charging and
free, and other means of establishing contact between the worker and
the job were investigated during the winter and spring of 1928. The
facts collected by this investigation were of service in drafting an
ordinance regulating the licensing and practices of private employ­
ment agencies which was passed by the city council in December, 1928.
This study was entitled 4 Employment Agencies in Cincinnati,” by
4
Frances R. Whitney (December, 1928. 80 pp.).
During the spring and summer of 1929, 100 working girls each
earning not more than $25 a week were personally interviewed as to




76

III. ITON”
OFFICIAL AGENCIES

their earnings and living costs. The results of this study will be­
come available by publication during 1930.
Minor studies are outlined briefly in the reports of the league for
1922-23 and 1923-24.

Consumers’ League of Connecticut.
36 Pearl Street, Hartford, Conn.
R e c e n t studies and publications of the Consumers’ League of
Connecticut in personnel research are:
1925. A study of wage-earning women, published in Pamphlet
No. 15: Answers to arguments against a shorter workday.
1927. A detailed study was made of all the child laborers who were
out of school in September, 1926, in Meriden, Middletown, Torrington, and Waterbury, and published in Pamphlet No. 16: 1,358
child laborers in four manufacturing cities.
1927.
A study of accidents to children in the State during the
period of one entire year, so far as incomplete records permitted,
and published in Pamphlet No. 18: Accidents to children under 18
years of age in the first compensation district of Connecticut.

Consumers’ League of Eastern Pennsylvania.
818 Otis Building, Philadelphia, Pa. A. Estelle Lauder,
Executive Secretary.
R e c e n t published studies of the Consumers’ League of Eastern
Pennsylvania in personnel reseach include:
Vacations with pay for factory workers.
Casualties of child labor— 10 children illegally employed in Pennsylvania, and
what happened to them.
Accidents to working children in Pennsylvania in 1923 (pub. 1925).
Save the children— advocates double compensation for children illegally
employed who suffer accidents, and quotes experiences of several States with
such a law.
Pennsylvania’s rank in child labor legislation.
Tragedies in industry— diseases of occupation in Pennsylvania.

A current study is an investigation of the candy industry, with
special reference to wages and hours of employment of women,
sanitary and health conditions, with a view to publishing a white
list of factories that meet definite standards adopted by a committee
of the National Consumers’ League.

Consumers’ League of Massachusetts.
3 Joy Street, Boston, Mass. Marion W . Baymenton, Execu­
tive Secretary.
T h e Consumers’ League of Massachusetts has since its inception
been active in original investigations of conditions of work, wages,
sanitation, and health, in support of its program for improved indus­
trial conditions, and publishes the results of its studies at irregular
intervals.
Its most recent publications in the personnel research field are:
The evolution of the modern food shop. June, 1921.
Occupational risks in the dry-cleansing trade. October, 1924.
Some types of industrial poisoning. July, 1929.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

Consumers’ League of New Jersey.
56 New Street, Newark, N. J. Katherine G. T. Wiley,
Executive Secretary.
T h e Consumers’ League of New Jersey has interested itself re­
cently in industrial diseases and industrial poisoning. Through its
secretary it instituted the first investigation of radium poisoning in
the manufacture of luminous watch dials. More recently Miss Wiley
has investigated cases of mercury poisoning in felt-hat manufacture
in New Jersey, the results of which are now in the hands of the
New Jersey Department of Labor.
A study of conditions affecting migratory children employed in
farm labor has been published under the title “ Child Farm Workers
Increase Delinquents,” by Katherine G. T. Wiley.

Consumers’ League of New York.
150 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Elinore M.‘ Herrick,
Executive Secretary.
R e c e n t activities of the Consumers’ League of New York in the
personnel field have been a study of the hotel industry, published
under the title “ Behind the Scenes in a Hotel,” and a similar study of
the candy industry. The results of the latter investigation were pub­
lished in March, 1928, as “ Behind the Scenes in Candy Factories,” and
as an outgrowth of this investigation a “ white list ” has been issued
of candy manufacturers in New York who conform to the league’s
standards of sanitation, wages, and hours.

Toledo Consumers’ League.
305 Commerce Guardian Building, Toledo, Ohio. Amy G.
Maher, President.
T h e league is organized to investigate conditions surrounding
wage-earning women and to create public opinion to support
improved legislation. It has made a recent study of conditions
surrounding social workers in Toledo.

Detroit Bureau of Governmental Research (Inc.).
51 Warren Avenue West, Detroit, Mich. Lent D. Upson,
Director.
O rg a n iz e d in 1916 “ to further effective government for Detroit
and Wayne County through improvement in administrative pro­
cedure.” Funds are obtained by specially designated subscriptions
made through the Detroit Community Fund.
Studies conducted by the bureau are reported upon to the chiefs
of the municipal or county departments immediately concerned and
are available for reference in mimeograph form. Among its more
important reports are:
Establishment of a police training school.
Suggested specifications for standardizations of grades and salaries in city
service.
Rating of examination papers.
Administration of civU service in Detroit.
Service records.




78

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

Standardization of police practice.
Police pensions.
Cost of establishing a pension system for the employees of the Detroit Public
Library.
Suggested revision of charter re civil service.
The teachers’ retirement fund.
Pension systems of the city of Detroit.

Studies in progress at present are: Detroit pension program; tests
for selecting patrolmen; and civil-service procedure.

Engineering Foundation.
29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Alfred D.
Flinn, Secretary and Director.
T h i s foundation, established in 1914 by the American Society of
Civil Engineers, American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical
Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and American
Institute of Electrical Engineers, is based on a gift by Ambrose
Swasey, of Cleveland, Ohio, subsequently increased by him and other
donors (present amount, $625,000). The income is used “ for the
furtherance of research in science and in engineering, or for the
advancement in any other manner of the profession of engineering
and the good of mankind.” It is administered by the engineering
foundation board, composed of members of the societies named and
members at large.
Besides researches relating to the physical aspects of engineering,
the foundation assisted in establishing and supporting the Personnel
Research Federation and has aided a few researches, the latest being
u Interests of engineers, a basis for vocational guidance,” by Ed­
ward K. Strong, jr., at Stanford University, a report on which was
printed in the Personnel Journal, April, 1929.

Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America.
105 East Twenty-second Street, New York, N. Y.
D e p a r t m e n t of R e s e a r c h a n d E d u c a t i o n . F. Ernest Johnson,
executive secretary.—Established in 1924. The major activities of
the department are in the field of social problems and movements.
The chief publication, the weekly Information Service, presents
information gathered from a great variety of sources, including
reports of researches and investigations by public and private
agencies. Thus the work of the department is largely in the field
of secondary rather than primary research. At the same time the
department makes studies of specific problems “ when there is no
other agency ready to make it, and when there is an urgent demand
from the constituency.” Chief emphasis is placed on economic
problems.
Department publications in the field of personnel research are:
Industrial relations in a hosiery mill. Information Service, May 19, 1928.
A study of industrial relations at the Real Silk Hosiery Mills (Inc.), Indi­
anapolis, Ind., and of relations between employers and the American Federa­
tion of Full Fashioned Hosiery Workers in the Philadelphia district; made
jointly by the department of research and education of the Federal Council
of Churches and the Social Justice Commission, Central Conference of Ameri«
can Rabbis.




a s s o c ia t io n s ,

s o c ie t ie s ,

FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

79

Unemployment; the problem and some proposed remedies. Information Serv­
ice, March 17, 1928. A monograph setting forth the present unemployment
situation.
The 12-hour day in the steel industry. Research Bulletin No. 3. A sum­
mary of the results of a number of investigations by industrial experts show­
ing the extent and character and social effects of the 12-hour day. 1923.
The coal strike in western Pennsylvania. Department of research and
education. Research Bulletin No. 7. A study based in part upon original field
investigation and also in part upon an analysis of economic data gathered
previously by expert students and the United States Coal Commission.
The enginemen’s strike on the Western Maryland Railroad. An analysis
of a significant industrial controversy and its effect upon the churches. Made
in cooperation with the social action department of the National Catholic
Welfare Conference and the Central Conference of American Rabbis.

A study of industrial relations in the coal-mining district of
Colorado is in progress, and publication of the report is expected
shortly.

Illuminating Engineering Society.
29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y.
O r g a n i z e d January 10, 1906, for the advancement of the theory
and practice of illuminating engineering and the dissemination of
knowledge relating thereto. The affairs of the society are managed
by a council consisting of the officers, two junior past presidents,
six directors, and the chairmen of the sections of the society. As
of December 1, 1929, sections are established with headquarters in
Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, and Philadelphia;
chapters in Baltimore, Md.; Buffalo, N. Y .; Cleveland, Ohio; Dallas,
Tex.; Pittsburgh, Pa.; Providence, R. I.; San Francisco, Calif.;
Seattle, Wash.; and Toronto, Canada.
Income is derived principally from membership dues (members
$15, associate members, $7.50) and from contributions from sus­
taining members of which there are approximately 175.
The scope of the society’s work includes all phases of light and
illumination, and is such that it embraces the interest and aims of
the scientific investigator as well as the practitioner. The Trans­
actions, the official publication, contain about 1,000 pages per
year devoted to technical papers and 200 pages devoted to illumi­
nating engineering news items and to the work of the society.
Technical papers presented in the Transactions cover a wide range
of topics and present a comprehensive view of the latest investiga­
tions and studies in lighting, including the application of light to
specific problems over a wide field.
Research and investigation in specialized subjects is carried on by
committees including such topics as lighting legislation, light, and
safety, nomenclature and standards, etc. Under the auspices of the
committee on lighting legislation has been prepared the code of
lighting factories, mills, and all other work places, which has been
adopted by the American Standards Association and which is now
being revised, and also the code of lighting school buildings, jointly
with the American Institute of Architects, which also has been
adopted by the American Standards Association. Both of these
codes are effective in a number of States, legislation based upon their
requirements having been enacted by law.




80

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

Industrial Relations Counselors (Inc.).
165 Broadway, New York, N. Y. Arthur H. Young, Indus­
trial Relations Counsel; Glenn A. Bowers, Director of
Research.
F o u n d e d and incorporated in 1926, this organization has a two­
fold function—first, research in the general field of human relations
in industry, which is entirely underwritten by Mr. John D. Rocke­
feller, jr.; and second, consulting service on a nonprofit-fee basis,
principally for industrial corporations. The industrial surveys made
by the service department for clients include wages and hours, em­
ployment procedure, administration, accident prevention, and la­
bor relations in general; these surveys and services are strictly
confidential.
The research department conducts original researches and in addi­
tion maintains an information service concerning activities in the
field of industrial relations and personnel administration and coop­
erates with other research organizations in the same field.
The only study published so far is “ Vacations with pay for in­
dustrial workers,” by C. M. Mills. Forthcoming publications include
a 6-volume report on unemployment compensation—the first one be­
ing “ Unemployment compensation in the United States,” prepared
by Bryce M. Stewart; the second, “ Unemployment compensation
in Great Britain,” by Mary B. Gilson; the third, “ Unemployment in­
surance in Germany,” by Mollie Ray Carroll; the fourth, “ Unem­
ployment insurance in Belgium, Holland, and Denmark,” by Con­
stance Kiehel; the fifth, “ Unemployment insurance in Switzerland,”
by Thomas G. Spates; and sixth, “ An international summary and
survey of unemployment compensation,” by Bryce M. Stewart.
There is also a forthcoming publication on “ Pensions for indus­
trial workers in the United States,” by Bryce M. Stewart and Murray
W. Latimer. Subsequent volumes in this series will include finan­
cial aspects of pensions, pensions in foreign countries, and possibly
an industrial pensions handbook. A study of employee death bene­
fits is also planned for the immediate future.
Bibliographies are issued in connection with these researches.

Information Bureau on Women’s Work.
305 Commerce Guardian Building, Toledo, Ohio. Rachel
Gallagher, Executive Secretary; Amy G. Maher, Director.
T h e bureau is a continuation of the research section of the Ohio
Council on Women in Industry,5 organized at the close of the war.
It is supported by private contributions. Its purpose is the study
of industrial conditions, especially as they affect woman workers,
and the education of public opinion. It has published the following
studies:
Factory inspection.
Jobs and workers: The need for an extension of the free-employment service.
Ohio’s women workers, an analysis of the census figures.
Are women’s wages a special problem?
Rooms: A study of rooming conditions in Toledo for nonfamily women (based
on interviews with landladies).
8U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. No. 299, p. 142.




ASSOCIATIONS,

s o c ie t ie s ,

f o u n d a t io n s , e t c .

81

The floating world: A study of rooming conditions in Toledo for nonfamily
women (based on interviews with employed women).
Is unemployment a personal or social problem?
Industrial accidents: A study of the Women’s Bureau findings for Ohio.
Wage rates, earnings, and fluctuation of employment: Ohio, 1914-1926 (inclu*
sive), with supplement bringing data on earnings through 1928.
Ohio wage earners in the manufacture of textiles and textile products,
1914-1927.

Institute for the Crippled and Disabled.
245 East Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y. John Culbert
Faries, Director.
E s ta b lis h e d by the American Red Cross in 1917 as the Red Cross
Institute for Crippled and Disabled Men. In November, 1919, it
was turned over to a board of trustees to be continued as a private
philanthropic institution under its present name.
Its purpose is primarily to help men who, through the loss of limb
or limbs or the impairment of use, find difficulty in earning a living.
As a means appropriate to its aim it maintains a shop for the manu­
facture of artificial limbs and appliances; a training school for giving
instruction in a variety of trades; an employment bureau for finding
suitable employment for handicapped men; a sheltered workroom for
crippled men and women who are unemployable under ordinary
conditions; and home work for those who can not work outside the
home.
A report of the activities of the institute, by the director, entitled
“ Three years of work for handicapped men,” published in July,
1920, covered three branches of its work and also contains a list of its
publications.
The institute publishes five times a year a 4-page paper entitled
“ Thumbs Up ” which from time to time contains articles on various
phases of work for cripples.

Institute for Government Research.
26 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. W. F. Willoughby,
Director.
T h i s institute was incorporated under the laws of the District of
Columbia, March 16, 1916, for the purpose of conducting scientific
investigations into the theory and practice of governmental adminis­
tration, including the conditions affecting the efficiency and welfare
of governmental officers and employees, and to perform such services
as may tend to the development and application of the principles
of efficiency in governmental administration. On July 1, 1928, the
institute, without any change in respect to its general functions,
became a part of the newly created organization known as the
Brookings Institution and now operates as a subordinate agency of
that institution.
The institute publishes the results of its researches in three series
of volumes under the general titles of “ Principles of administra­
tion,” “ Studies in administration,” and “ Service monographs of the
United States Government.” The first-named series attempts to de­
termine and make known the most approved principles of adminis­
tration. The second consists of detailed and critical studies of par­
ticular problems of public administration or administrative systems



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III. 2JON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

in the United States and foreign countries. The third has for its
purpose to give a detailed description of the history, organization, and
activities of the several administrative services of the National Gov­
ernment. All three series as a necessary part of their work deal
with problems of personnel. Special mention may be made, how­
ever, of the following publications that deal more particularly with
personnel matters:
Principles of public personnel administration. By Arthur W . Procter, 1921.
The Federal Service: A study of the system of personnel administration
of the United States Government. By Lewis Mayers. 1922.
Principles of public administration. By W. F. Willoughby. 1927.
Teachers’ pension systems in the United States. By Paul Studensky. 1921.

International Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions.
Ethelbert Stewart, United States Commissioner of Labor
Statistics, Secretary-Treasurer.
O r g a n iz e d as the National Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions at the first national conference of industrial
accident boards and commissions held at Lansing, Mich., in 1914;
present name adopted in 1916.
This association holds meetings once a year (now usually in Sep­
tember), or oftener, for the purpose of bringing together the officials
charged with the duty of administering the workmen’s compensation
laws of the United States and Canada to consider, and, so far as
possible, to agree on standardizing (a) ways of cutting down acci­
dents; (b) medical, surgical, and hospital treatment for injured
workers; (<?) means for the reeducation of injured workmen and
their restoration to industry; (d) methods of computing industrial
accident and sickness insurance costs; (e) practices in administering
compensation laws; (/) extensions and improvements in workmen’s
compensation legislation; and (g ) reports and tabulations of indus­
trial accidents and illnesses.
Annual conventions have been held since the association was
formed in 1914, the proceedings of which since 1916 have been pub­
lished by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. These pro­
ceedings have been indexed, and form a series of valuable references
to problems of workmen’s compensation.
Even more important than the compensation of the workmen for
accidents after they occur is the prevention of industrial accidents;
and the association has devoted a large portion of its time and activ­
ities to this subject. The proceedings of each convention contain
papers and discussion by experts on various phases of industrial
accident prevention—factory inspection, safety education, mechani­
cal safeguarding of machinery, etc.
The association has representatives on the safety code correlating
committee of the American Standards Association (formerly the
American Engineering Standards Committee). Under the auspices
of the American Standards Association it has been joint sponsor for
a safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels, a
safety code for woodworking plants, and a safety code for rubber
mills and calenders. It has had representatives on the sectional com­
mittees formulating the safety codes issued by the American Stand-




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

83

ards Association, which have been published by the United States
Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Eye injuries and the percentage of impairment therefrom consti­
tute another problem that has confronted those administering the
workmen’s compensation laws. After much study and discussion at
its annual conventions, the association adopted the report of the
committee on compensation for eye injuries of the section on ophthalmology of the American Medical Association as a guide for its mem­
bers in making awards for eye injuries. This report is published in
Bulletin No. 406 of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics
(pp. 81-86).
At its 1924 annual convention the association appointed a commit­
tee to cooperate with a committee of the National Association of
Legal Aid Organizations to consider the extent to which legal aid
organizations could assist industrial accident boards and commissions
in the task of administering the workmen’s compensation laws. This
committee has submitted a report each year since the 1925 meeting,
and its work has done much to acquaint the compensation officials
with the possibilities and advantages of cooperation between the two
organizations in connection with the administration of workmen’s
compensation legislation.
An article covering the history and accomplishments of the asso­
ciation will be found in the November, 1928, issue of the Labor
Review.

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.
1200 Fifteenth Street NW., Washington, D. C.
D e p a r t m e n t (founded November, 1923). M. H. Hedges,
director.—It is supported by union funds. It undertakes to gather,
organize, and classify all information bearing upon the daily prob­
lems of local and international unions. It has built up complete
wage files for electrical workers in United States, Panama, and Can­
ada, and collected and analyzed data relative to deaths by accident
and occupational disease. It has made studies of ownership in the
power field and the effect of machine production on employment. It
functions as an educational bureau for 1,000 local unions.
R

esearch

International Labor Office, Washington Branch.
Lenox Building, Washington, D. C. Leifur Magnusson,
Director.
T he Washington Branch of the International Labor Office, which
opened in 1920, is an agency of the International Labor Office of the
League of Nations at Geneva and is supported out of the general
budget of the league voted annually by the assembly of the league.
Research work of the Washington branch is rather incidental and
secondary. Its main task is to coordinate labor and industrial infor­
mation in the United States for the convenience of the main office
at Geneva, to add interpretative comment to that information, and
to be a personal contact for those in the United States who are inter­
ested in the work of the International Labor Office.
Publication of reports and memoranda produced by the Washing­
ton branch is through the International Labor Office only, although
105636°— 30------ 7




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

manuscript copies are filed in the Washington office, and the Wash­
ington branch contains a complete file of the publications of the
International Labor Office. Studies in manuscript form in the
Washington office are:
Right of association in the United States.
Settlement of industrial disputes in the United States.
Wage earners’ health insurance in the United States.

International Industrial Relations Association (For the
Study and Promotion of Satisfactory Human Rela­
tions and Conditions in Industry).
American Office, 130 East Twenty-second Street, New York,
N. Y. Mary van Kleek, Vice President.
T h i s organization was formed at an international congress held
at Flushing, Holland, in June, 1925, initiated by a voluntary com­
mittee of persons in various countries concerned both directly and
indirectly with the human aspect of industry. The aim of the asso­
ciation is indicated by its title. Membership is on an individual
basis and is open to all who are engaged in any undertaking involv­
ing the employment of persons or who are occupied in work of scien­
tific research or social significance bearing on industry and who are
in sympathy with the aims of the association. Funds are derived
from contributions from members and donors.
The activities of the association may be summarized under three
main headings:
1. Providing possibilities for study and for the interchange of
ideas and experience through the organization of meetings, summer
schools, and congresses.
2. Maintaining and extending the established contact, particularly
through the interchange of information and visits between members
of the various countries.
3. Creating industrial and public opinion by means of publications
from time to time.
The association has a considerable group of members in the United
States and Canada. In preparation for its report to the congress of
1928, held in Cambridge, England, a committee in the United States,
under the chairmanship of Glenn A. Bowers, of the Industrial Rela­
tions Counselors (Inc.), prepared a report on industrial relations in
this country. This report has been published as “ The development
of fundamental relationships within industry in the United States ”
(116 pp., reprinted from Vol. I of the Cambridge Proceedings).
Vol. II of the proceedings contains addresses before the congress and
round-table discussions on foreman training, the place of personnel
work, problems of research, etc. These two volumes and the report
of the summer school held at Baveno, Italy, June, 1927, on the elimi­
nation of unnecessary fatigue in industry are available through the
New York office of the organization.

International Typographical Union.
Indianapolis, Ind.
is a department of that organization
which primarily functions in the interests of its affiliated local unions
T h e B u re a u o f S ta tis tic s




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

85

when engaged in wage-scale negotiations or arbitration proceedings
relating to wages, hours, and working conditions.
Unions in wage-scale controversies are supplied with the record
of advertising lineage of the newspapers in their jurisdiction, to­
gether with advertising rates and circulations.
Advice as to business conditions in each locality is tendered in so
far as same is available.
Record is made of the wage scales and working hours of all affili­
ated unions and a pamphlet published annually which contains a
record of local union membership, date of meeting, newspaper and
job scales and working hours, the ratio of apprentices to journey­
men provided in each contract and the effective and expiration dates
of all contracts. Each change is registered so that unions may be
supplied with up-to-date information.
These changes are published monthly in a booklet known as the
Bulletin which contains chiefly statistical matter gathered from
various sources and tabulated for easy and ready reference.
The work of the bureau of statistics of the International Typo­
graphical Union is necessarily confined to questions relative to the
gathering and preparation of material relating to the activities and
working conditions of its own membership and is not a research
agency in the general acceptance of that term.

Judge Baker Foundation.
40 Court Street (Scollay Square), Boston, Mass. William
Healy, M. D., Augusta F. Bronner, Ph. D., Directors.
E s t a b l is h e d in 1917, this foundation was founded primarily for
the study of the problems of delinquency and in that connection
has to do with better educational and vocational adjustments. The
work on psychological tests has been extended to include a study of
personality problems and the carrying on of research in allied fields
in cooperation with other agencies. Publications include: “ Individ­
ual variations in mental equipment,” by Augusta F. Bronner; “ Men­
tal hygiene ” (vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 521-536) (Reprint No. 90 of the
national committee on mental hygiene); “ Special abilities and dis­
abilities.” Healy and Bronner: “A series of twenty case studies,”
“ Delinquents and criminals; their making and unmaking,” “A
manual of individual mental tests and testing.”

The Labor Bureau (Inc.).
Rooms 404-405, 2 West Forty-third Street, New York, N. Y.
Sara Bernheim, Executive Secretary.
T h i s b u r e a u w a s established in May, 1920, to furnish professional
services to labor organizations or joint groups consisting of both
employers and employees working in the interest of the industry and
to public movements of benefit to labor.
The work of the Labor Bureau (Inc.) has consisted in the prepa­
ration of research material for use in arbitrations or negotiations
with employers. Such material usually includes studies of compara­
tive wages, working conditions, health hazards, job analyses, eco­
nomic and financial status of the industry, the cost of living, changes
in the standard of living, etc. In this connection the bureau has




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

rendered assistance to unions in organization campaigns, agree­
ments and contracts, choice of arbitrators, negotiations and arbitra­
tion proceedings. Members of the staff have appeared and furnished
testimony at public hearings, including the United States Railroad
Labor Board, United States congressional committees, State and
municipal investigating bodies.
The Labor Bureau (Inc.) publishes a monthly economic news­
letter, Facts for Workers, which is primarily designed for republication in trade-union journals and labor papers and for the use of
individual members of labor organizations who desire comprehensive
and concise information on developments which are of significance
to labor. Each issue contains one article on some phase of the
bureau’s work, current items of economic interest, and regular re­
ports on wages, employment, the cost of living, as well as statistical
data showing the changes in prices, production and distribution,
with especial emphasis on six important industries—railroads, fuel,
textiles, building, iron and steel, paper and printing.
The Labor Bureau (Inc.) also maintains an auditing department,
the services of which have included the installation of bookkeeping
and accounting systems, periodic audits, and special examination of
books when some emergency or particular problem has arisen within
a union. Besides accounting and bookkeeping assistance, the bureau
has made numerous financial analyses of industries and business firms
whose financial strength, earnings, and economic policies have been
of interest to organized labor. It has also worked out an old-age
pension and insurance system and rendered other assistance where
the point of view and technical ability of a trained accountant was
required.
The following is a list of some of the other more specialized
studies prepared during recent years:
Case book on industrial arbitration.
Brief summary of the electrical industry in New York City.
Analysis of the premium wage situation in New York City job printing com­
posing rooms.
Brief to support a 48-hour law for women submitted to the New York
State Legislature.
Investigation of the activities of “ free-loan ” associations inside and outside
the labor movement to be used as a guide for a lending fund to be estab­
lished for a labor union which wants to tide its membership over the summer
slack work.
Summary of pension plans in operation in industrial plants.
Publicity direction and strike-strategy advice furnished during a New Eng­
land textile strike.
Labor sections of a political campaign handbook.
A study of the theater as a business, which includes an exhaustive survey of
the economic history as well as an economic analysis of the present-day
legitimate theater.
Data on subway construction work affecting New York City carpenters.
Shoe industry strike mediation. This included the establishment of ma­
chinery for negotiating prices and working conditions by a general manager
directly responsible to the union.
Preparation of a handbook on labor’s share in prosperity.




a s so c ia tio n s , s o c ie tie s , fo u n d a tio n s , e t c .

87

Labor Research Association.
80 East Eleventh Street, New York, N. Y. Robert W . Dunn,
Executive Secretary.
E s t a b l i s h e d in 1927 “ to conduct research into economic and so­
cial questions in the interests of the American labor movement and
to publish its findings in articles, leaflets, and books.” It has ren­
dered research service to a large number of labor unions, benefit
societies, fraternal organizations, and labor and progressive publica­
tions. The principal employment of the association, however, has
been the preparation of a series of books on Labor and Industry,
the first two of which have been published by International Pub­
lishers (381 Fourth Avenue, New York City). These two are Labor
and Automobiles, by Robert W. Dunn, and Labor and Silk, by Grace
Hutchins. The aim of these studies is “ to present a picture of the
development of the important American industries in relation to the
workers employed in them.” They give “ primary emphasis to the
workers and their problems.” Other volumes now in the course of
preparation will deal with coal, lumber, steel, tobacco, and other tex­
tiles. Still other industries will be dealt with in later volumes.
In addition to this series members of the association are now pre­
paring books for worker readers and written from the workers’ point
of view. They will deal with the conditions and problems of the
woman workers, the workers’ struggle for health and safety, ration­
alization in the United States, and the problems of the industrial
South. A handbook, “ Facts for workers,” is also being prepared
under the editorship of Solon De Leon. In all of these studies, as
well as those in the labor and industry series, special attention will
be paid to working conditions, hours, fatigue, health hazards, and
occupational diseases. The association is carrying on through a sub­
committee some of the activities under the direction of the Workers’
Health Bureau,6 which discontinued its work in 1928.
The association has printed and distributed the safety code for
workers in the construction industry which was prepared by the
Worker’s Health Bureau, the Rational trade-union safety stand­
ards committee for the building trades, and the committee on public
health and safety of the American Institute of Architects. The
studies of the association are also giving much consideration to the
problems of young workers, woman workers, foreign-born workers,
and negroes.

Life Extension Institute.
25 West Forty-third Street, New York, N. Y. Harold A. Ley,
President; Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D., Medical Director.
T h e Life Extension Institute was organized in 1913 as a selfsustaining, public-service institution with a hygiene reference board
of 100 leading physicians and public-health authorities under the
chairmanship of Prof. Irving Fisher, of Yale University. Its pur­
pose is to conserve health and prolong human life. To this end,
it has organized health services for individual subscribers, for groups
of employees, and for life-insurance companies which are interested
• See U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bui. No. 299, p. 164.




88

III. NOlSrOFFICIAL AGENCIES

in prolonging the lives of their policyholders. These services in­
clude periodic health examinations, reports based on the findings
covering physical disabilities or faults in living habits, educational
health literature, and a monthly health journal.
At the head office in New York, and also at the branch offices of
the institute in Chicago and Boston, complete equipment is available
for making health examinations according to life-extension stand­
ards. More than 9,500 especially trained physicians conduct lifeextension examinations in the principal cities and towns throughout
the United States and Canada.
In its industrial service the institute examines between 1,000 and
1,500 employees a month. The purpose of this service is to improve
the efficiency of the working force and reduce the sickness rate and
the turnover. It includes examination of employees at the plant
by a trained head-office examiner, a report to the employee covering
his exact physical condition, advice as to any medical treatment
indicated, and hygienic counsel. In the services of the institute
generally no medical treatment is given in connection with the in­
dustrial health service, and the results of the examination are held
as strictly confidential between the employee and the institute.
Analyses of the examinations of typical industrial and commercial
groups have been made disclosing the extent of the prevalence of
various impairments in the working population. The findings in
100,000 insurance health examinations made by the Life Extension
Institute between the years 1922 and 1927 have been tabulated and
the results incorporated in studies by the United States Public Health
Service and the Milbank Memorial Fund. It is understood that
these studies will be published by the United States Public Health
Service and the Journal of Hygiene. One of these studies is espec­
ially concerned with the relative prevalence of impairments in four
principal classifications of occupations, viz: Agricultural, profes­
sional, business, and skilled trades.
A statistical survey of 1,000 industrial workers examined in three
successive years, made with a view to determining the definite results
of these yearly examinations, disclosed the fact that at the time of
the third examination 50 per cent of the impairments found at the
time of the first examination had been eliminated.
A plan for mutual benefit associations, combining the health serv­
ice of the institute with group life and sickness insurance, has been
developed by Mr. Harold A. Ley, president of the institute, and such
associations have been organized in a number of industrial plants.
Reprints bearing upon these matters may be procured upon appli­
cation to the Institute.
List of Publications
Health building and life extension. By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. New
York, The Macmillan Co., 1923.
Survey of health conditions in industry. Made by the Life Extension In­
stitute for the committee on the elimination of waste in industry of the Feder­
ated American Engineering Societies.
Periodic physical examination: A national need. By Eugene Lyman Fisk,
M. D. 1921.
Fatigue in industry. By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. 1921.
Extending the health span and life span after forty. By Eugene Lyman.
Fisk, M. D. 1923.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

89

Life extension: Its personal and industrial importance. By Eugene Lyman
Fisk, M. D. 1925.
Why not make a business of health? By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. 1925.
Physical defects as revealed by periodic health examinations. By Louis 1.
Dublin, Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D., and Edwin W. Kopf. 1925.
Power. By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. 1926.
The value of complete routine examinations in supposedly healthy people.
By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. 1926.
Prevention of waste from ill health in industry. By Harold A. Ley. 1926.
The maintenance of human power. By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. 1927.
Industrial health. By Harold A. Ley. 1927.
Mutual benefit associations for employees. By Harold A. Ley. 1927.
Periodic health examinations. By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. 1928.
Industrial fatigue. By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. 1928.
How long will you live? By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D. 1929.
Are you using the benefit association for better cooperation? By Harold A.
Ley. 1929.
Possible extension of the human life cycle. By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D.
1929.
Periodic health examinations in industry. By Eugene Lyman Fisk, M. D.
1929.

Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumbermen.
500 Concord Building, Portland, Oreg. W . C. Ruegnitz,
President.
T h e F o u r L is an industrial relations organization of employees
and employers in the Pacific Northwest lumbering industry, sup­
ported and controlled jointly by men and managements, established
m 1918 to handle their common problems.
It publishes the Four L Lumber News, which is issued three times
a month, a magazine edition the first of the month and a newspaper
or supplement edition on the 10th and 20th of each month. The Four
L Lumber News is a publication devoted to the lumber industry and
ives special attention to common problems of men and management,
urveys of Pacific Northwest employment conditions are regularly
made and the findings published in the Four L Lumber News.
In addition to its employment studies the Four L organization has
made special studies concerning old age and pension systems, both
public and industrial. It also issues annual tabulations of wages,
showing high, low, and average wages paid for all occupations in
the logging and sawmilling industry of Oregon, Washington, and
Idaho.

§

Management and Engineering Corporation.
327 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111.
A S u b sid ia ry of Utilities, Power & Light Corporation, which owns
or controls a considerable number of electric light and gas companies
in various parts of the United States, and in addition two coal-min­
ing companies, a blast-furnace company, and a company engaged in
the manufacture of lumber and wood products. The Management
and Engineering Corporation serves all these operating companies
in a managerial and engineering capacity.
S a f e t y D e p a r tm e n t. Gordon Wilson, director of safety.—Organ­
ized in April, 1928, for accident prevention and first-aid work among
the operating companies and among the construction crews of the
Management and Engineering Corporation. Statistical studies are




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

made, of the causes leading to personal injuries and of the best
methods and equipment for eliminating these causes. This latter
task involves the testing of many items of plant equipment and the
establishment of standards for each item which appears to be the
most desirable in specific instances. First-aid instruction in artifi­
cial respiration by the Schaeffer prone-pressure method has been
developed and presented in an article in the October, 1929, issue of
National Safety News, entitled “ When the utility employee can
help the doctor.”
A proposed study for the immediate future is the relationship
between labor turnover and high injury rates in the coal fields of
eastern Kentucky.
Results of studies made by the safety department are not generally
available for distribution but appear in standard practice letters
which are issued to the operating subsidiaries and in the minutes of
quarterly conferences of the safety directors of all these operating
companies.

Manufacturers Research Association.
80 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. R. L. Tweedy, SecretaryTreasurer.
O rg a n ized in 1921. This association is composed of 11 industrial
companies and Harvard University. Its founders “ were actuated
by a desire to improve their managements and management methods;
insure the future growth of their companies, and increase profits.”
Income is derived from dues assessed against the member organizations.
The actual work of the association is carried on almost exclusively
by means of committees organized on a functional basis. Per­
sonnel work has been taken up at various times by special committees
appointed to consider specific problems. Some of the personnel
subjects investigated and reported on are:
Wage-payment methods.
Time study.
First weeks of the new employee.
Foreman training.
Suggestion systems.
Workmen’s compensation insurance.
Contact between management and employees.
Old-age pension plans.

These reports are circulated among the member organizations in
mimeographed form.

Massachusetts Society for Mental Hygiene.
5 Joy Street, Boston, Mass. Henry B. Elkind, M. D., Medical
Director.
O rga n ized and incorporated in 1913 for the conservation of mental
health and the prevention of mental disease and defect, this society
is at present largely confining itself to educational work through
public lectures, the preparation and distribution of literature, and
conferences. It is making a special effort in the field of mental
hygiene in business and industry and in that connection publishes




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ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

quarterly a special bulletin called The Human Factor.
publications on personnel subjects are:

Recent

Mental hygiene in industry. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, July, 1924.
Industrial psychiatry. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, October, 1924.
Behavior studies in industry. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, January, 1925.
Personnel science and administration from the standpoint of a hygienist.
Journal of Industrial Hygiene, September, 1925.
Industrial psychiatry. Mental Hygiene, April, 1929.
Personal factors in relation to the health of the worker. Mental Hygiene,
July, 1929.
(The first five of the above articles were written by Dr. Henry B. Elkind,
and the last one by Dr. C. Macfie CampbeU.)

Merchants’ Association of New York.
Woolworth Building, 233 Broadway, New York, N. Y. S. C.
Mead, Secretary.
I n d u s t r ia l B u r e a u .—In addition to other activities of an indus­
trial nature, the bureau carries on for the association a consultation
service in the field of industrial relations. Through this service,
which is in charge of an experienced staff, members of the association
and others are given active assistance in the solution of specific
problems.
A great part of the research work undertaken is for the purpose
of establishing data for use in the above connection. Where infor­
mation of public interest is discovered it is given publicity in printed
reports or in the columns of the association’s organ, Greater New
York, and the public press.
Below are listed the more recent, important reports:
Luncheon and locker facilities for employees. 1929. 5 pp.
Practice of rewarding employees for inventions and patentable ideas.
Holiday practices of offices, stores, and factories in New York City.
2 1 pp.
Report on payment of employees by check. July, 1924. 11 pp.
Personnel organization chart. 1926.

1928.
1925,

Industrial relations leaflets (series):
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.

1. What is industrial relations work? 1927,
2. The industrial relations policy. 1927.
3. The employment department. 1927.
4. Effective employment control. 1927.
5. The interview. 1927.
6 . Introduction and follow-up. 1927.
7. Training the worker. 1928.
8 . Transfers and promotions. 1928.
9. The exit interview. 1929.
10. Labor turnover. 1929.

Articles in Greater New York:
Hours of labor in candy industry. Vol. X , No. 21. 1921. 11 pp.
Factory hours shorter in New York City. Vol. X , No. 25. 1922. 7 pp.
Office hours and practices in New York City. Vol. X III, No. 12. 1924. 5 pp.
How about summer closing all day Saturday? Vol. XIV , No. 23. 1925.
1 2 pp.
Practice varies widely in Saturday closing. Vol. XIV, No. 27. 1925. 4 pp.
Saturday closing in two fields. Vol. XIV, No. 28. 1925. 11 pp.
The five-day week during the summer. Vol. XIV, No. 29. 1925. 12 pp.
New York City business practice on holidays. Vol. XIV , No. 8 . 1925. 17 pp.;
Vol. XIV , No. 9. 1925. 9 pp.
Continuation schools throughout the United States.
Vol. X , No. 23.
1921. 7 pp.




92

H I. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

How New York workers fare in illness. Vol. XIV , No. 25. 1925. 2 pp.
Unemployment insurance in the United States.
Vol. X III, No. 20.
1924. 11 pp.
Poll shows city workers favor daylight saving. Vol. X, No. 7. 1921. 11 pp.
Payment of employees by check. Vol. X III, No. 30. 1924. 2 pp.
Industrial plants reducing wages. Vol. X III, No. 20. 1924. 11 pp.
Some interesting figures concerning salaries. Vol. XV I, No. 7. 1929. 20 pp.

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
1 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y.
researches are conducted by four separate divisions and
bureaus of the Metropolitan. Those studies which are of wide in­
terest and available m published form, emanate chiefly from the
policyholders’ service bureau and the statistical bureau. But as a
large employer of clerical and field forces the company also conducts
for its own guidance certain personnel researches, which for the
sake of completeness are outlined below but are not available in
form for circulation. These internal unpublished studies are car­
ried on chiefly by the business research bureau and the personnel
division.
S t a t i s t i c a l B u r e a u . Louis I. Dublin, statistician.—A second re­
port on the occupational mortality experience of white male wage
earners in the industrial department of the Metropolitan Life Insur­
ance Co. has been prepared for the three years 1922 to 1924, and pub­
lished by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics as Bulletin
No. 507. It is a companion volume to an earlier study covering the
years 1911 to 1913 published by the United States Bureau of Labor
Statistics as Bulletin No. 207.
P erson n el

Occupation hazards and diagnostic signs: A guide to impairments to be
looked for in hazardous occupations. Published by the United States Bureau
of Labor Statistics as Bulletin No. 306. Available also as a pamphlet and pub­
lished by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
Mortality, morbidity, and working capacity of tuberculous patients after
discharge from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. Sanatorium between 1914
and 1927. By Augustus S. Knight and Louis I. Dublin.
Shifting of occupations among industrial insurance policyholders. A study
for the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. Published in the Labor
Review, April, 1924.
How dental statistics are secured in the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
A study by Thaddeus P. Hyatt and A. J. Lotka. Published in the Journal
of Dental Research, June, 1929.
Sickness census in Montreal, December, 1926. By Lee K. Frankel and Louis
I. Dublin, reprinted by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., 1927.
P o li c y h o ld e r s ’ S e rv ic e B u r e a u . James L. Madden, third vice
president in charge.—The Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. is inter­
ested not only in the health of its policyholders but also in their
economic welfare, and the policyholders’ service bureau is charged
with the responsibility of cooperating with industry to the end that
Metropolitan policyholders might have greater stability of employ­
ment. The relationship between stability of employment and good
health as well as steady premium income to the company is obvious.
The bureau’s economic services are rendered by eight divisions;
namely, economic and business research, marketing and distribution,
management, publicity and advertising, manufactures, industrial
relations, industrial health, and safety. There are two types of
service—those which pertain to whole industries or employers in a




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

93

common geographical area for the purpose of contributing toward
the economic welfare of Metropolitan ordinary and industrial policy­
holders, and specific services designed to assist group insurance
policyholders 01 the Metropolitan.
Industrial Relations Service. Roderic Olzendam, director.—The
activities cover the fields of employment management, selection, and
)lacement of employees, job analyses, wage plans, promotion policies,
abor turnover, absenteeism, suggestion systems, managerial profitsharing plans, profit-sharing arrangements for employees, mutual
benefit associations and remuneration, training of executives, junior
executives, managers, foremen, workers, working conditions in rela­
tion to output (hours, fatigue, food), and psychological matters in
the realm of human relations in industry. Broadly classified, the
above would read as follows: The activities cover the subjects of
employment and discharge, joint relationships, working conditions,
training and education, economic security, and psychology. Publi­
cations available to business executives, upon request.
Industrial Health Service. Dr. A. J. Lanza and Dr. Wade Wright,
directors, and assistant medical directors of the company.—Studies
and analyses of health and morbidity of employees, by industries,
and for group policyholders of the company are conducted. Sur­
veys of the methods of organization and administration in the field
of industrial medical service are made, the results of which are
published in the booklets of the “ Industrial health series.” Special
studies of occupational hazards are carried out and information on
all subjects connected with industrial hygiene is constantly collected
and distributed. A completely equipped industrial hygiene labora­
tory, in charge of Mr. J. William Fehnel, chemist, is operated by
this service for the investigation of particular problems in industrial
sanitation, the intensive study of temperatures and air conditions,
and for the analysis of injurious dusts, gases, and fumes and their
effect upon the health of workers. Publications available to business
executives and others interested in industrial hygiene, upon request.
Industrial Safety Service. W. Graham Cole, director.—Studies of
safety methods applicable to specific industries are conducted in
cooperation with State and National trade organizations. Indus­
trial accident prevention surveys, including a review of mechanical
guarding and educational activities, are made. Publications pre­
pared for executive attention and dealing with industrial safety
activities and special hazards incident to industrial operations are
available to business executives and others interested in industrial
safety, upon request.
Consulting assistance is given to city administrations and com­
munity safety organizations in the conduct of street-traffic surveys
and the development of public safety work, including the introduc­
tion of safety education material in grade-school curricula. Reports
of specific studies are printed and available to city officials and
others interested in traffic and public safety.
B u s in e s s R e s e a r c h B u r e a u . William A. Berridge, economist.—
Makes for, or in cooperation with, other divisions of the company
internal studies of salesman performance, labor turnover, remuner­
ation, and familar field-force personnel problems influenced by

{




94

III. NO O F IA A E C S
N F IC L G N IE

economic factors. Also works upon indices of those changes in exter­
nal economic conditions having a bearing thereon—indices such as
national employment, employment advertising, employment-office
operations, industrial wage rates, and the like. Issues findings only
occasionally in the form of articles for professional journals and
has nothing available for distribution.
P e r s o n n e l D iv isio n . William F. Dobbins, third vice president.—
Conducts from time to time, for company use, special investigations
and studies in various phases of personnel management as applied
to home office clerical employees, including such subjects as wagepayment methods, job analyses, work standards, labor turnover,
wage scales, ratings, employment tests, absenteeism and its control,
etc. This information is not in published form and is not available
for distribution.

Michigan Housing Association.
Buhl Building, Detroit, Mich. Dr. S. James Herman, Exexcutive Secretary.
T h e Michigan Housing Association was founded February 4 , 1928,
incorporated March 7, 1928. Income is derived largely from in­
dividual membership fees of $5 each. The efforts of the association
“ are devoted exclusively to a study of the housing needs of the lower
income group—those earning $150 per month or under, which fam­
ilies, particularly in the large industrial centers, are to-day denied
the opportunity for home ownership or even the rental of modern
housing facilities in keeping with American standards.”
This study has required consideration of other elements closely
related to housing, either as causal factors or as the resultants of
failure for its proper provision. Accordingly the following social
problems have had consideration in so far as they relate to housing:
Delinquency and crime; public and individual health; problems of
family integration and stabilization of the American home; stabiliza­
tion of employment as well as problems of unemployment and unem­
ployment insurance; old-age and widow’s pensions; economic bal­
ance between income and living cost; improvement in the standard
of American citizenship, including Americanization. These various
correlated subjects have necessarily been covered in a rather desul­
tory fashion, owing to limited income, and have consisted largely in
gathering information rather than in making specialized studies.
The results of the work of the association for its first year, which
embraced a city-wide census of room density in Detroit, have been
published in the July-August, 1929, issue of City Health, the official
bulletin of the Detroit Department of Health.
Work outlined for the coming year includes besides a legislative
program dealing with housing codes and housing plans, a sociologi­
cal inquiry, conducted by means of a questionnaire, to find why
families live in apartments rather than single dwellings. This study
is intended to bring out the changed social attitude behind this move­
ment and the probable economic reasons therefor and other relative
causal factors.
The Home Index is the official publication of the Michigan Hous­
ing Association. Other publications include:




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

95

Public credits and mass construction as a solution to the housing needs of
the lower-ineome group. Address before the Michigan Academy of Science,
Arts, and Letters.
Why public credits is the logical and practical solution of the housing prob­
lems of the lower-income group. Address before the Conference of Town
Planning Institute of Canada.
Public credits versus subsidies for housing. Address before National Con­
ference of Municipal Leagues.

National Association for the Benefit of Middle Age
Employees.
507 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. William Henry Roberts,
Executive Director.
T h i s organization was established in 1929 as a propaganda and
publicity medium to work toward “ the breaking down of the bar­
rier against employing men and women over 40 years of age.” It is
supported by membership fees and voluntary contributions.
It has inaugurated its program by undertaking a survey to deter­
mine the extent to which middle-aged workers are being displaced,
the influence of group insurance and industrial pensions on the em­
ployment of older workers, and the extent to which an age limit for
new employees is maintained.

National Association of Manufacturers.
11 West Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y.
K e l a t i o n s D e p a r t m e n t . Noel Sargent, Manager.—
Studies conducted by this department include: {a) Age distribution
of employees in American industries; (6) unemployment insurance;
(c) effect of industrial employment upon the health of woman fac­
tory workers. A study is in progress designed to show the relative
costs of building construction under open and closed shop condi­
tions, and one is contemplated on the relation of age to industrial ac­
cidents.
These studies, which are usually made at the request of member
bodies, are not generally published or distributed, although publi­
cation is sometimes made. 7
I

n d u s t r ia l

National Bureau of Casualty and Surety Underwriters.
1 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y.
Acting General Manager.

Albert W . Whitney,

E s t a b l i s h e d in December, 1910, by a group of stock casualty in­
surance companies to classify compensation and liability risks, regu­
late commissions, and construct a standard manual. In May, 1911,
the Bureau of Liability Insurance Statistics (organized 1896) was
merged with it. The original name Workmen’s Compensation Serv­
ice and Information Bureau was changed to Workmen’s Compensa­
tion Service Bureau in March, 1913, and to National Workmen’s
Compensation Service Bureau in June, 1916. The bureau was re­
organized in 1921 and 1929 with a further change of name as above.
Membership is open to stock companies engaged m casualty insurance
and suretyship.
TThe National Association of Manufacturers did not submit a list of publications.




96

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

The bureau at the present time makes rates for employers’ liability
insurance, miscellaneous public liability ancl property damage insur­
ance, plate glass, burglary, automobile, and steam-boiler insurance,
and administers rates for workmen’s compensation insurance in cer­
tain States. Commissions are regulated in the casualty and surety
fields through separate organizations which operate, however, through
the office of the bureau.
In addition to establishing manual or basic rates for particular
classifications for workmen’s compensation insurance the bureau has
prepared, tested, and published plans of (1) “ schedule rating,” for
modifying the manual rates by giving credits or debits for respec­
tively good or bad physical conditions (e. g., in regard to use and
efficiency of safety appliances) in the individual jalant as revealed by
inspection; and (2) “ experience rating,” for a further modification
based on the actual accident experience of the plant. Both of these
exert an important influence in the direction of accident prevention
because they offer to the employer a pecuniary inducement for im­
proving his risk and his experience. Experience rating is used also
in several other fields.
The bureau is fundamentally interested in the subject of safety
standards. It is represented on the board of directors and the coun­
cil of the American Standards Association and on 36 sectional com­
mittees functioning under the American Standards Association pro­
cedure on safety code projects. At the present time the bureau is
joint sponsor for the following four safety-code projects: (1) Safety
code for amusement parks, with the National Association of Amuse­
ment Parks; (2) safety code for conveyors and conveying machinery
with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers; (3) safety code
for mechanical power-transmissioi* apparatus, with the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers and the International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions; and safety code f qr
woodworking plants, with the International Association of Indus­
trial Accident Boards and Commissions.
The bureau, since 1922, has financed the work of the education
division of the National Safety Council. This includes the publish­
ing of a magazine on safety education and numerous pamphlets, as
well as the stimulation of safety education work in the schools
through the help of a field secretary and in other ways.
The bureau has also in its own name maintained a series of grad­
uate fellowships in the field of safety education and has published
the resulting theses in a series of monographs. The fellowship for
the current year is at Teachers College, Columbia University, and
deals with the subject of safety, hygiene, and sanitation in camps.
The American Engineering Council at the request of the bureau
and through its support has recently made a study of the relationship
between industrial safety and efficiency of production, the results of
which have appeared in a book entitled “ Safety and Production ”
published by Harper & Bros.
The library of the bureau, organized December, 1916, makes a spe­
cialty, in addition to gathering material pertaining to the casualtyinsurance business, of accumulating and minutely indexing data on
safety engineering and accident prevention, health service in indus­
try, occupational hazards and diseases, State safety regulations and
standards, and industrial and manufacturing processes. During the




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

97

past few years the library has issued annually a library bulletin
giving a cumulative index to current literature dealing with casualty
insurance, suretyship, and related subjects. Since May, 1929, this
service has been supplemented by issuing to the insurance company
members of the bureau a monthly bulletin giving abstracts of the
most important current contributions to the subject of industrial
safety and hygiene. From time to time the library issues special lists
of references on subjects of particular interest to the public as well
as to those engaged in the casualty-insurance business. Some of the
publications issued are:
A list of references on State insurance, particularly workmen’s compensation
insurance funds, competitive and monopolistic. 8 pp.
A selected reading list on casualty insurance. 4 pp.
An outline of source material on industrial safety (which appeared in the
Labor Review of September, 1927, pp. 236-245).
A review of general literature on industrial accidents, factory management,
hours of work, fatigue and rest periods, lighting, heating, ventilation and sani­
tation, and literature on these subjects in their relation to safety and production.
43 pp.
A tentative list of State regulations, orders, advisory pamphlets, and labor
laws relating to safety and industry. 18 pp.
A ready reference to compulsory automobile insurance. 6 pp.
A selected list of books and articles on aeronautics for the insurance under­
writer. 29 pp.
A bibliography of camp safety, hygiene, and sanitation. 12 pp.

These publications are issued free of charge, upon request, to public
libraries, universities, and other organizations and individuals inter­
ested in these subjects.
The bureau has also published the following:
Industrial safety standards. 120 pp.
Final report on benzol of committee on chemical and rubber sections of the
National Safety Council. 128 pp.

And four volumes on safety education, namely:
Safety education in the elementary schools. By Ruth Streitz. 142 pp.
Positive versus negative instruction. By James Vaughn. 168 pp.
Safety education in the vocational school. By Max S. Henig. 110 pp.
Safety education in the secondary schools. By Herbert J. Stack. 157 pp.

National Bureau of Economic Research (Inc.),
474 West Twenty-Fourth Street, New York, N. Y. Wesley
C. Mitchell and Edwin F. Gay, Directors of Research; G. R.
Stahl, Executive Secretary.
O r g a n iz e d in January, 1920, “ on the initiative of a small group
of economists and statisticians * * * to find facts divested of
propaganda and to make these facts generally available.” Its mem­
bership consists of business firms, trade-unions, universities, trade
and employers’ associations, Federal reserve banks, and individuals.
Income is derived “ in part from annual grants made by certain of
the large foundations, in part from extraordinary grants made by the
Government or an organization for some special piece of research to
be carried out, in part from sale of its reports, and largely from the
sustaining members.” (Annual subscriptions, $25 to $1,000.)
The board of directors, which is the governing body, is made up of
three classes: Directors at large, directors by university appointment,
and directors by appointment of other representative organizations.




98

III. N OK OFFICIAL AGENCIES

No research project may be undertaken and no report may be pub­
lished without the consent of the board of directors, and any direc­
tor dissenting from the findings and conclusions of a study approved
by the majority of the board for publication may submit a minority
report. The research staff “ consists regularly of from seven to nine
economists and statisticians, besides clerical assistants.”
In the special field at present under consideration the outstanding
studies conducted by the National Bureau of Economic Research have
grown out of the President’s conference on unemployment. The first
of these studies was Business Cycles and Unemployment, which was
followed by Employment, Hours and Earnings in Prosperity and
Depression, by Willford I. Kang.
The second and more recent study (May, 1929) is Recent Economic
Changes, the basic investigations for which, to quote the foreword of
the committee on recent economic changes of the President’s confer­
ence on unemployment, “ were made under the auspices of the
National Bureau of Economic Research (Inc.), with the assistance
of an unprecedented number of governmental and private agencies.”
Studies in progress are the American labor market, by Leo Wolman, and mechanization and restriction of immigration, by Harry
Jerome. The first “ will be devoted to the discussion of wages in the
manufacturing industries, in the coal industry, and in rail transpor­
tation, the building trades, and trade-union rates of wages.” The
second deals with “ the effects of immigration restriction and the
causes of changing productivity.”
The fourth volume of the projected statistical encvlopedia will
deal with labor statistics.

National Child Labor Committee.
215 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. Gertrude Folks
Zimand, Director of Besearch and Publicity.
T h e National Child Labor Committee was organized April 15,
1904, and incorporated by act of Congress in 1907, “ to promote the
welfare of society with respect to the employment of children in
gainful occupations; to investigate and report the facts concerning
child labor; to raise the standard of parental responsibility with
respect to the employment of children; to assist in protecting chil­
dren by suitable legislation against premature or otherwise injurious
employment; to aid in promoting the enforcement of laws relating
to child labor; to coordinate, unify, and supplement the work of
State or local child-labor organizations and encourage the formation
of such committees where they do not exist.”
The committee works in all sections of the United States. It deals
with child labor as a community, State, or national problem. It
conducts investigations in local communities, promotes legislation,
advices on administration, and maintains a general information
service on child-labor matters.
Since its organization the National Child Labor Committee has
published about 350 pamphlets, and since 1912 it has issued a childlabor bulletin now called The American Child. These publica­
tions contain occasional reports of the investigation of the employ­
ment of children in various occupations and in various localities.
Among the important studies of this kind published since 1921 are:
Rural child welfare.




E. N. Clopper.

1922.

ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

99

Child labor in the sugar beet fields of Michigan. Walter Armen trout, Sara A.
Brown, and Charles E. Gibbons. 1923.
Children working in the sugar beet fields of the North Platte Valley of
Nebraska. Sara A. Brown and R. O. Sargent. 1924.
Child labor among cotton growers of Texas. Charles E. Gibbons and Clara
B. Armentrout. 1925.
Children working on farms in certain sections of the western slope of Colorado.
Charles E. Gibbons and Howard M. Bell. 1925.
Enforcement of the child labor law in Kentucky. Charles E. Gibbons. 1925.
Children working in the sugar-beet fields of certain districts of the South
Platte Valley, Colorado. Sara A. Brown, R. O. Sargent, and Clara B. Armen­
trout. 1925.
Children working in Missouri. Charles E. Gibbons and Harvey N. Tuttle.
1927.
Fourteen is too early: Some psychological aspects of school-leaving and child
labor. Raymond G. Puller. 1927.
School or work in Indiana. Gibbons and Tuttle. 1927.
Child labor in Mississippi. Gibbons and Stansbury. 1928.
Child workers in two Connecticut towns (New Britain and Norwich). Claude
Robinson. 1929.
Child workers in Oklahoma. Gibbons and Stansbury. 1929.
Child workers in Tulsa. Gibbons and Stansbury. 1929.
Child labor in agriculture and farm life in the Arkansas Valley of Colorado.
Bertram J. Mautner and W . Lewis Abbott. 1929.

Joint Board of Sanitary Control in the Cloak, Suit and
Skirt, and Dress and Waist Industries.
31 Union.Square, New York, N. Y. George M. Price, M. D.,
Director.
O r g a n i z e d October 31, 1910, pursuant to the protocol entered into
after the strike in the summer of that year between the Cloak, Suit
and Skirt Manufacturers’ Protective Association, and the Cloak, Suit
and Skirt locals of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’
Union to establish standards of sanitary conditions, to which the
manufacturers and the unions shall be committed. In 1913 a pro­
tocol was also established in the dress and waist industry which then
joined in the work of the board, and has since been under its juris­
diction. The board consists of three representatives of the public,
two representatives of each of the two labor unions, viz, the joint
board of the Cloak, Skirt and Reefer Makers’ Union, and the joint
board of the Ladies’ Waist and Dressmakers’ Union, and two repre­
sentatives from each of the employers’ organizations.
A summary of the activities of the board in supervising fire drills,
first-aid wort, sanitation and general health education, and a list of
its publications, together with an account of the Union Health Center
which has taken over and carries on as a cooperative enterprise the
health, medical and dental services initiated by the board, are given
in “ Ten years of industrial sanitary self control: tenth annual report
of the joint board of sanitary control,” 1921.
The fifteenth anniversary was celebrated by a public dinner and the
issue of the fifteenth anniversary special report, 1925.

National Civic Federation.
Thirty-third Floor, Metropolitan Building, New York, N. Y.
Ralph M. Easley, Chairman Executive Council.
A n o r g a n i z a t i o n of representatives of capital, labor, and the gen­
eral public. Its purpose is “ to organize the best brains of the Nation
105636°— 30------ 8




m . N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

100

in an educational movement seeking the solution of some of the great
problems related to social and industrial p r o g r e s s ; to provide for
study and discussion of questions of national import; to aid thus in
the crystallization of the most enlightened public opinion and, when
desirable, to promote legislation in accordance therewith.”
The federation is composed of the following: Department on
industrial relations; commission on industrial inquiry; department
on active citizenship; industrial welfare department; department on
current economics; industrial round table department; and woman’s
department.
In connection with its pension program, the industrial welfare
department has issued a number of pamphlets dealing with the gen­
eral subject of industrial pensions, notably the report on the oldage pensions conference held under the auspices of the department
in April, 1927. It also conducted a field survey on the extent of oldage dependency in the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut,
and Pennsylvania and published a report on January 1, 1928, under
the title “ Extent of old-a^ge dependency.”
A current study in the industrial field is conducted by the commis­
sion on industrial inquiry, one phase of which, that of “ Forms of
employment contracts,” can be regarded as coming within the scope
of personnel research. This inquiry is concerned with the various
types of contractual relations, either oral or written, between an em­
ployer and an employee, which fix the individual workmen’s rights
and duties in relation to his employment, as distinguished from
collective trade agreements.
The official organ of the federation, the National Civic Federa­
tion Review, deals occasionally with various aspects of personnel
problems and programs.

National Committee for Mental Hygiene.
370 Seventh Avenue, New York, N. Y.
Secretary.

Clifford W . Beers,

T h e National Committee for Mental Hygiene is a voluntary asso­
ciation of physicians, psychiatrists, neurologists, psychologists, edu­
cators, judges, lawyers, clergymen, social and civic workers, business
men, and others interested in the conservation of mental health and
the reduction and prevention of mental and nervous disorders.
The national committee was founded in 1909 and incorporated in
1916 and is dependent upon voluntary contributions for its support.
In the beginning its program dealt largely with the improvement of
conditions among the insane, and through its surveys and studies,
at the invitation of governors, State legislatures, and other official
bodies responsible for the care of the insane, the committee helped
to eliminate abuses, abolish jail and almshouse custody and me­
chanical restraint, and raise standards of care and treatment in in­
stitutions to a humanitarian and medical level—in short, to make
insane asylums into mental hospitals.
In later years the national committtee’s work took on a more pre­
ventive character. Activities were undertaken and studies engaged
in dealing with the mental factors involved in various medical, legal,
industrial, educational, social, and other problems related to the
broad field of human behavior, on the theory that mental abnormal­




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

101

ity and deficiency were responsible for a great deal of social and indi­
vidual misery, and that the general improvement of mental health
would do much to mitigate existing evils and contribute substan­
tially to the betterment of human relationships.
In line with this view the national committee has sought to bring
about greater attention on the part of the medical profession to the
problems of mental disease and mental defect as well as to the men­
tal side of physical disease, and, as part of its program of education,
to enlist the interest of employers in the human factor—that is, the
mental, emotional, and “ personality ” elements entering into the
problem of work efficiency.
The national committee publishes a quarterly magazine, Mental
Hygiene, and a monthly Mental Hygiene Bulletin, as well as numer­
ous pamphlets and other publications dealing with the subject of
mental hygiene in all its ramifications. Among these are included
the following pamphlets dealing with the mental hygiene of industry:
Campbell, Dr. C. Macfie. Mental Hygiene in Industry. Reprint from Mental
Hygiene, 1921.
-------Personal factors in relation to the health of the individual worker. Re­
print from Mental Hygiene, 1929.
Cobb, Dr. Stanley. Application of psychiatry to industrial hygiene. Reprint
from Journal of Industrial Hygiene, November 1919.
Fisher, Boyd. Has mental hygiene a practical use in industry? Reprint
from Mental Hygiene, 1924.
Jarrett, Mary C. Mental hygiene of industry. Reprint from Mental Hy­
giene, 1920.
-------The practical value of mental hygiene in industry. Reprint from Hos­
pital Social Service, May, 1921.
-------The psychopathic employee; a problem of industry. Reprint from Medi­
cine and Surgery, September, 1917.
Pratt, Dr. George K. The problem of the mental misfit in industry. Reprint
from Mental Hygiene, 1922.
Pruette, Lorine, and Douglas Fryer. Affective factors in vocational malad­
justment. Reprint from Mental Hygiene, 1923.
Scott, Dr. Augusta. Neuropsychiatric work in industry. Reprint from Men­
tal Hygiene, 1923.

Wherever possible the committee has stimulated research and study
by others in a position to undertake fruitful activities in the field of
industrial relations and has cooperated with State societies for mental
hygiene, universities, industrial organizations, and other groups and
individuals engaged in various projects tending to promote knowledge
of the subject.
In contradistinction to the work done by the industrial psychol­
ogists on the experimental side, with reference to work methods,
individual output, mass production, waste motion, fatigue, and other
problems of work efficiency, the contribution of the psychiatrist and
the mental hygienist in industry has been largely on the emotional
and “ personality ” side of human study, concerned primarily with
the mental health of the worker, with problems of morbid preoccu­
pation, mental conflict, emotional instability, labor unrest, class an­
tagonism, excessive turnover, and friction in human relations in the
shop, store, office, or factory.
Among personnel research activities undertaken by the national
committee m its own field are a study of salary schedules for psychi­
atrists and psychologists in child-guidance clinics: a study of stand­
ards of training for psychiatric social workers witn special reference
t o the needs o f child-guidance clinics; and a comparative study o f




102

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

vacation schedules and related policies in a selected group of mental
hygiene and child-guidance clinics.

National Committee of Bureaus of Occupation.
1111 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. Katherine
W oodruff, Secretary.
A f e d e r a t i o n of occupational bureaus for trained woman workers
was organized in April, 1917, the purpose of which is “ to promote
among women and girls a better understanding of occupational and
professional requirements, to advance their interests and their effi­
ciency in vocations, to secure suitable employment for trained woman
workers—to the end that women may render increasingly valuable
service in all vocations and professions.”
Among the standards of eligibility for membership in the National
Committee is the requirement that member organizations “ shall pro­
vide in their constitutions not merely for placement work but also
for work of educational value such as investigations, research, the
opening up of new lines of occupation, and vocational and educa­
tional guidance.”
The present member organizations are: The Appointment Bureau,
Boston, Mass.; Chicago Collegiate Bureau of Occupations, Chicago,
111.; Collegiate Bureau of Occupations, Denver, Colo.; Bureau of
Vocational Service, Los Angeles, Calif.; Woman’s Occupational Bu­
reau, Minneapolis, Minn.; Bureau of Employment, Y. W. C. A., New
York, N. Y .; Pasadena Vocation Bureau, Pasadena, Calif.; Women’s
Employment Service, Y. W. C. A., Pittsburgh, Pa.
A study is being made of one section of the placement work to
determine what advantage a college-trained woman has over one who
has not had any college work or full college training. This will also
show the employer’s viewpoint on the employment of college-trained
people.

National Committee on Prisons and Prison Labor.
4 West Fifty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. Dr. E. Stagg
Whitin, Director.
E s t a b l i s h e d in August, 1909, for the purpose of studying the
problem of labor in prison with a view to causing the abolition of
the contract system of convict labor and the development of methods
of employing prisoners which are just to the State, industry, and
workers outside the prison, and to the prisoner and his family.
The committee has worked out a practical program which in­
cludes the employment of prisoners in farming, public works, and
in the production of commodities for State use, with the sale of
surplus goods above those which a State itself can consume to other
States, also for government use. This program aims to make the
prisons training schools for life after release and includes classifi­
cation of prisoners by psychiatric examination to determine appro­
priate treatment, industrial training, placement by trade tests, pay­
ment of wages based on individual efficiency and other incentives,
and industrial parole.
During the years 1924r-1927 the committee held six zone confer­
ences on the allocation of prison industries at which this program




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

103

w a s approved by the official representatives of 25 States. Reports
of progress have been made each year on behalf of the committee
to the conferences of the governors.
Impetus has been given to the work of the committee by the pass­
age, in 1929, of the Federal convict labor, bill, which divests prisonmade goods of their interstate character and will render the prisoncontract system unprofitable to the contractors who have been ex­
ploiting the prisoners. The committee is now working with the
governors of many of the States in the reorganization of prison
industries in preparation for the time (five years after passage)
when the bill becomes effective.
The committee has conducted research into the market for prisonmade goods and the selection of industries to meet the needs of this
market.
Among recent publications of the committee are:

The classification system in the New Jersey State Prison.
The survey of industries for correctional institutions for women.

National Education Association.
1201 Sixteenth Street NW., Washington, D. C.
D iv isio n . John K. Norton, director.—Established
March 1, 1922, to collect and disseminate information on the
financing of public education, the curriculum, teachers’ salaries, ten­
ure, retirement systems, and other school problems. It regularly
collects the latest studies from bureaus of educational research
throughout the country and issues the Research Bulletin five times
a year. It functions as an information service agency for the depart­
ments, committees, affiliated organizations, and individual members
of the association.
Representative topics covered by the Research Bulletin are: Sal­
aries in city school systems; the scheduling of teachers’ salaries;
efficient teaching and retirement legislation; the problem of teacher
tenure; practices affecting teacher personnel.
Material other than the Research Bulletin issued during the past
year includes tabulations of salaries paid teachers, principals, and
certain other school employees in specified cities and a series of
mimeographed bibliographies on the following subjects:
R esearch

Apportionment of State aid to public schools.
Teacher certification.
The county unit.
The organization of State departments of education.
The problem of teacher tenure.
State control of textbooks.
Teacher retirement.
State sources of revenue for public education.

National Electric Light Association.
420 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y.
Managing Director.

Paul S. Clapp,

h i s association was organized at Chicago in 1885, and its object
to advance the art and science of production, distribution, and use
of electricity for light, heat, and power for public service, in fur­
therance of which its activities are largely educational. It is a

T

is




104

H NO O F IA A E C S
I.
N F IC L G N IE

voluntary organization of companies engaged in, and individuals
affiliated with, or interested in, the electric light and power industry.
The association has four national sections—accounting, commercial,
engineering, and public relations—and 13 geographic divisions, under
which are grouped State associations and sections; also company
sections and local clubs. The functions and personnel of its nu­
merous committees, subcommittees, etc., are given in a pamphlet.
“ Organization personnel of the national electric light association,
published annually. Committee reports are printed and subse­
quently published in the volumes of proceedings. Among the sub­
jects which have been studied through committees are accident pre­
vention, resuscitation from electric shock, education of employees
in the industry, compensation and wage incentive plans, pensions,
medical and health, thrift plans, recruiting and selection of em­
ployees, and job specifications.
A c c i d e n t P r e v e n t i o n C o m m i t t e e .—The major functions of this
committee are: To promote accident prevention throughout the elec­
tric light and power industry; to study accident occurrence, cause,
and results; to develop and promote saxe methods and practices; to
promote resuscitation and first aid; to administer the Insull award
for the National Electric Light Association; to study fire prevention
in its relation to human safety. This committee has presented re­
ports since 1914. It was at first concerned with the preparation
of accident prevention rules relating to operating methods of com­
panies and workmen, later with the details of operating methods
and safety specifications for tools and appliances, such as safety
belts, rubber gloves, ladders, first aid kits, etc.
One of the outstanding achievements of the accident prevention
committee has been to cooperate with a number of other associa­
tions in establishing rules and methods for resuscitation. The rules
for resuscitation by the prone-pressure method have been approved
by the following: American Gas Association; American Red Cross;
American Telephone & Telegraph Co.; Bethlehem Steel Corpora­
tion; National Safety Council; United States Army, office of the Sur­
geon General, War Department; United States Bureau of Mines;
United States Bureau of Standards; United States Navy, Bureau of
Medicine and Surgery; United States Public Health Service. Thou­
sands of copies of these rules and charts descriptive of the method
have been distributed each year, and this method has been recom­
mended and urged upon member companies for adoption. Training
courses and instructions on this method of resuscitation are con­
tinually being impressed by the member companies on their
employees.
In 1920 its scope was extended to include also health promotion
and morbidity statistics and fire prevention and extinguishment.
Its reports cover these subjects in addition to material on operating
methods, organization methods, and apparatus.
Since 1920 this important phase of the activities of the association
has been contemporary with the general movement for the preven­
tion of industrial accidents.
Publications:
Accident prevention course for linemen.
Charts and booklets on resuscitation.
Common sense (4-page folder).




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

105

Suggestion systems.
Safe practices for construction and operating men in power system construc­
tion and alteration.
How to set up an accident-prevention organization.
Safety of operation in the steam plant.
First-aid talks.
E d u c a t i o n a l C o m m i t t e e . Fred R. Jenkins, Commonwealth Edi­
son Co., Chicago, 111., chairman.—The scope of this committee is: To
prepare fundamental and specialized courses for the education of
employees of member companies and others who desire to subscribe;
to conduct these courses among the member companies and allied in­
dustries ; to work closely and advise with all companies interested in
the education of employees; and to cooperate with all sections and
committees in the matters of education. The courses prepared by
this committee are: Practical electricity, bookkeeping and account­
ing, advanced course in electric utility accounting, electrical metermen’s course, lighting sales, merchandise sales, and power sales.
I n d u s t r ia l R e l a t io n s C o m m i t t e e ( P u b l i c R e l a t io n s N a t i o n a l
S e c t i o n ) . — I n 1924 th e e m p lo y e e r e la tio n s w ith th e p u b lic c o m m it ­
tee a n d th e c o m p a n y e m p lo y e e s’ o r g a n iz a tio n s c o m m itte e w ere
m e r g e d to f o r m th e I n d u s t r ia l R e la tio n s C o m m itte e . The scop e o f
th e c o m m itte e i s : To w o r k fo r th e a tta in m e n t o f m u tu a l u n d e r sta n d ­
in g a n d con fiden ce b etw e en e m p lo y e r s a n d e m p lo y e e s a n d to m a k e
a v a ila b le record s o f ex p e rie n c e w ith p la n s a n d m e th o d s d e sig n e d to
a c c o m p lis h su ch p u r p o s e s ; to fo s te r , t h r o u g h the e x ec u tiv es o f m e m ­
b er c o m p a n ies, th e p r o p e r ed u c a tio n o f em p lo y e e s in th e fu n d a ­
m e n ta l eco n om ic p r in c ip le s o f th e li g h t a n d p o w e r b u sin ess in the
p r o p e r u n d e r s ta n d in g o f th e in te rr e la tio n s o f th e p u b lic a n d th e
in d u s tr y , a n d in th e p r o p e r h a n d lin g o f c o m p la in ts a n d c o u rtesy to
th e p u b li c ; to fo ste r th e a c tiv itie s o f c o m p a n y e m p lo y e e s’ o r g a n iz a ­
tio n s. The c o m m itte e h as r e p o r te d a n n u a lly .

Publications.—In 1925 the report of the committee covered the
subjects of employment, compensation, education and training, and
pensions. The 1926 report of the committee covered recruiting and
selection of employees, job specifications, incentive forms of com­
pensation, pensions, medical and health. In 1927 the report covered
thrift plans, education and training. In 1928 and 1929 the com­
mittee published the following reports:
Health promotion in the public utility industry— Its necessity and importance.
Training for better public contact— Its necessity and importance.
Analysis of public contact work.
Building and conducting the training program.
Measurement of public contact training methods.

National Fire Protection Association.
60 Batterymarch Street, Boston, Mass.
worth, Managing Director.

Franklin H. Went­

O r g a n iz e d in 1895 to promote the science and improve the methods
of fire protection and prevention, to obtain and circulate information
on these subjects, and to secure the cooperation of its members in
establishing proper safeguards against loss of life and property by
fire. There are 150 members (annual dues, $60) and about 4,700
associates (annual dues, $10). The members are national institutes,
societies, and associations (e. g., of engineers and manufacturers)




106

III. N OK OFFICIAL AGEKCIES

having a direct interest in protection of life and property against
fire, State associations for reduction of fire waste, insurance boards
and associations; associates are other organizations, corporations,
and individuals.
A 4-day convention is held annually, at which reports on the
various standards for protection against fire are presented by com­
mittees of experts and discussed by the convention before adoption.
The following committees are especially concerned with investiga­
tions of industrial hazards: Safety to life, manufacturing risks and
special hazards, gases, hazardous chemicals and explosives, flam­
mable liquids. Other committees are concerned with fire-prevention
apparatus. The committee reports, with discussion and action
thereon, are published in the proceedings of the annual meetings.
The association employs seven field engineers—six to organize,
stimulate, and encourage local fire-prevention committees to study
and improve general fire-hazard conditions, and the other to pro­
mote general recognition of the national electric code governing the
safe installation of electric wiring and equipment. The advice and
experience of these field men are available to local chambers of
commerce, city officials, and fire-prevention organizations.
The 1929 revision of the national electric code adopted by the
electric committee of the association has been approved as “American
standard 5 by the American Standards Association.
5
The Safety Codes for the Prevention of Dust Explosions, drawn up
by the committee on dust explosion hazards, have been published
as Bulletin No. 433 of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.
These codes, for which the National Fire Protection Association
and the United States Department of Agriculture are joint sponsors,
were approved as “ tentative American standard 5 by the American
5
Standards Association in July, 1926.
The 1929 edition of the Building Exits Code of the association
covers exit requirements for schools, department stores, and factories
as well as public buildings and public institutions.
A list or the standard regulations for fire protection and the safe­
guarding of hazards, recommended by the association and adopted
as the official standard of the National Board of Fire Underwriters,
and other publications available for free distribution or for sale, is
contained in a pamphlet entitled “ The story of the National Fire
Protection Association, and list of its publications,5 obtainable on
5
application at the executive office.

National Founders’ Association.
29 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111.
retary,

J. M. Taylor, Sec­

O rga n ized in January, 1898, the original purpose of this associa­
tion was to provide machinery for bargaining collectively with the
Iron Molders5 Union. A joint board of conciliation was estab­
lished under the so-called New York agreement which was in force
until 1904, when it was abrogated. Since that time the association
has operated independently of the union and has adopted the openshop policy. In conjunction with the National Metal Trades Asso­
ciation it publishes the Shop Review in advocacy of this policy.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

107

It is a member association of the National Industrial Conference
Board.
C o m m i t t e e o n I n d u s t r ia l E d u c a t i o n .—This committee has set
up “ Minimum standards for foundry apprentices,” which have been
adopted by the National Founders’ Association and the American
Foundrymen’s Association’s members. The committee, recognizing
the need of proper text material, has compiled a text, 6 Elementary
6
foundry technology,” for the use of foundry apprentices. Another
publication by the committee, “ Human engineering and industrial
economy,” covers the field of personnel relations.

National Industrial Conference Board (Inc.).
247 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y.
President.

Magnus W . Alexander,

A c o o p e r a t iv e body composed of representatives of National and
State industrial associations and of closely allied engineering so­
cieties of a national character, organized in May, 1916, to provide a
clearing house of information, a forum for discussion, and machin­
ery for cooperative action on matters that vitally affect the industrial
development of the Nation. The stated objects of the board are:
1. To make impartial investigations in the field of industrial economics, and
to cooperate to this end with individuals, institutions, associations, and agencies
of Government.
2. To aid in securing, on the basis of established economic facts underlying
and affecting industrial conditions, joint deliberation of manufacturers and
associations of manufacturers in the United States.
3. To secure, analyze, and disseminate information concerning industrial
problems and experience in the United States and other countries.
4. To promote good understanding and friendly relations between employees
and employers for the benefit of both, and between those engaged in industry
and the public for the general good of the community.
5. To make the results of its research and collective experiences available
to governmental agencies when industrial and economic legislation and policies
are being formulated, in an endeavor to secure sympathetic consideration of
its views and opinions, and
6. In general, to encourage and promote the sound development of American
industry by all proper and legitimate means.

The affiliated organizations (1929) are:
American Cotton Manufacturers Association.
American Electric Railway Association.
American Gas Association.
American Paper and Pulp Association.
Associated Corn Products Manufacturers.
Bolt, Nut and Rivet Manufacturers Association.
Manufacturing Chemists’ Association of the United States.
National Association of Flat Rolled Steel Manufacturers.
National Association of Manufacturers.
National Association of Wool Manufacturers.
National Automobile Chamber of Commerce.
National Electric Light Association.
National Electrical Manufacturers Association.
National Founders’ Association.
National Metal Trades Association.
Rubber Manufacturers Association (Inc.).
Silk Association of America.
Tobacco Merchants Association of the United States.
Associated Industries of Massachusetts.
Associated Industries of New York State.
Illinois Manufacturers’ Association.




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H I. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Manufacturers Association of Connecticut.
Manufacturers Association of New Jersey.
Air Service, United States Army.
Military Intelligence Division, United States Army.
Ordnance Department, United States Army.
Bureau of Ordnance, United States Navy.

The publications of the board consist of research reports dealing
with a variety of industrial-economic subjects, including the field of
industrial relations. Periodical publications include the Conference
Board Bulletin, a monthly journal presenting statistical and other
information regarding important economic conditions and changes
affecting American industry; and the Service Letter on Industrial
Relations, published semimonthly, one issue of which each month con­
tains the results of the board’s monthly investigations of wages,
hours of work, employment, and cost of living, while the other is
devoted to a discussion of important industrial relations questions
and activities.
Research reports in the field of industrial relations include a
series of studies of “ Wages and hours in American manufacturing in­
dustries,” issued annually from 1922 to 1925 and covering the years
from 1914; another series of wage studies, “ Wages in the United
States,” issued in 1926,1927, and 1928; “ Cost of living in the United
States, 1914-1926,” issued in 1927 and revised in 1928; five studies in
“ Changes in the cost of living after July, 1914,” published periodi­
cally during 1922 and 1923 ; “ Cost of living in New York City, 1926,”
and “ Cost of living in 12 industrial cities,” published in 1928.
Special reports on varied topics include:
Clerical salaries in the United States. 1926.
Wages and hours in anthracite mining, June, 1914-October, 1921. 1922.
Minimum wage legislation in Massachusetts. 1927.
Medical care of industrial workers. 1926.
Legal restrictions on hours of work in the United States. 1924.
Experience with mutual benefit associations in the United States. 1923.
A manual for mutual benefit associations. 1924.
Industrial pensions in the United Sattes. 1925.
Employee magazines in the United States. 1927.
Industrial group insurance. 1927.
Night work in industry. 1927.
Supplemental bonuses for wage earners, supervisors, and executives. 1927.
Employee stock purchase plans in the United States. 1928.
The economic status of the wage earner in New York and other States. 1928.
Industrial relations programs in small plants. 1928.
Industrial lunch rooms. 1928.
Employee thrift and investment plans. 1929.
The workmen’s compensation problem in New York State. 1927.
Experience with works councils in the United States. 1922.
The growth of works councils in the United States. 1925.

National Institute of Public Administration.
261 Broadway, New York, N. Y.

Luther Gulick, Director.

Bureau of Municipal Research was incorporated in 1907. The
Training School for Public Service was affiliated with the bureau in
1911, and both of these organizations were fused with the National
Institute of Public Administration in 1921. The purpose of the
institute is to promote efficient and economical government and the
adoption of scientific methods in the transaction of public business*
The




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

109

The institute is financed by contributions from citizens interested in
the improvement of government administration.
The National Institute of Public Administration has made the
following studies in the field of personnel research.
City employment policies. Prepared for the Cincinnati city survey committee.
1924. The Government of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, pp. 149-178.
County employment policies. Prepared for the Cincinnati city survey commit­
tee. 1924. The Government of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, pp. 431-449.
Civil service administration in the State of New Jersey.6 Prepared for the
governor and the State audit and finance commission. 1929. 17 pp.
Classification of positions in the city of Camden, N. J.6 Prepared for the
board of commissioners, Camden. 1923. 182 pp.
The employment policy of the city of Camden, N. J.6 Prepared for the board
of commissioners, Camden. 1923. 23 pp.
Employment policy of the city of Charleston. Prepared for the city council,
Charleston, S. C. 1924. Report on Survey of the Government and Audit of
Finances of the City of Charleston, pp. 33-41.
Personnel supervision in the State of Virginia. Prepared for the governor
and his committee on consolidation and simplification. 1927. Organization and
management of the State Government of Virginia, Chap. IV, pp. 31-36.

The institute has now under way a study for the New York State
Commission on Old-Age Security on the age factor in industrial
employment. It will be the object of this study to determine the
extent to which employment is open to older men and women. A
further object of the study is to examine the influence of labor-saving
machinery, welfare legislation, pension plans, and other innovations
in labor management, upon the employment opportunities of middleaged and older men and women.

The National Junior Personnel Service (Inc.).
32 Waverly Place, New York, N. Y.
I

ncorporated

Anna Y. Reed, Director.

in April, 1923, in order:

1. To provide nonpartisan auspices f o r the d iscov ery o f facts bearing upon
problems of vocational and life adjustment and to issue such findings in the
form of fact-reports divorced from propaganda, in order that discussions of,
and efforts to solve, such problems may be based upon objective knowledge as
distinguished from subjective opinion.
2. To afford national leadership in instituting and evaluating experiments
in the guidance and personnel field.
3. To aid individual communities, institutions, and organizations in inter­
preting such experiments in terms of better and more adequate service to its
own youth.
4. To act as a national clearing house on personnel and guidance information
and practices.

The research division of the organization has the following com­
pleted studies to its credit:
Analysis of secretarial duties and traits.
By W . W . Charters and I. B.
Whitley.
Human waste in education. By Anna Y. Reed.
Adjustment problems of employed young men. Made by the research staff of
the organization under subvention from the Carnegie Foundation.
The young man and his career series. Pamphlets on occupational and train­
ing opportunities for young men of Greater New York which are being distrib­
uted by the Kiwanis Club of New York City. (Four issued to date.)
•Available to students and research workers in the library of the National Institute o f
Public Administration.




III. 1 O O F IA A E C S
S N F IC L G N IE
T

n o

A long-term experiment in vocational selection is under way in
cooperation with the employer and union organizations in the print­
ing trades of New York City. The purposes of this study are:
1. To discover, if possible, objective measures which may be employed at
least to guide away from the printing trade young men who are obviously
unsuited for the work.
2. To provide a demonstration experiment in the preparation and evaluation
of objective means of guidance and selection for different occupations.

The information division has responded in the past two years to
791 specific calls for service from business or educational institu­
tions. Seventeen foreign countries were represented among the
organizations requesting help.
The training division maintained in cooperation with New York
University (see p. 171) has developed rapidly. Seven students
enrolled in three courses in 1924 when the program was instituted.
This year there are 270 students enrolled in 11 courses dealing with
various aspects of the personnel field.

National Machine Tool Builders' Association.
1415 Enquirer Building, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Brul, General Manager.

Ernest F. Du-

T h i s association is joint sponsor for the safety code on power drive
of machine tools which is being prepared under the auspicies and
rules of procedure of the American Standards Association.
The association encourages apprentice training by issuing certifi­
cates to apprentices who complete a training course in the shops of
the members.

National Metal Trades Association.
122 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. Homer D. Sayre,
Commissioner; J. E. Nyhan, Secretary.
A n e m p l o y e r s ’ a sso c ia tio n o r g a n iz e d in 18 99 “ to secure a n d p r e ­
s erv e e q u ita b le c o n d itio n s in th e w o r k sh o p s o f m e m b e r s f o r th e
p r o te c tio n o f b o th e m p lo y e r a n d e m p lo y e e ” ; f o r “ in v e s tig a tio n a n d
a d ju s tm e n t o f q u estio n s a r is in g b etw e en m e m b e r s a n d th e ir e m p lo y e e s
w h ic h m a y com e w ith in th e ju r is d ic tio n o f th e a sso c ia tio n ” ; a n d u to
in tr o d u c e a n d e n c o u ra g e c o n stru c tiv e e d u c a tio n a l effo rts in th e field s
o f ec o n o m ic s, t r a in in g , s a fe t y , in d u s tr ia l re la tio n s, a n d su ch o th e r
su b je c ts as s h a ll a d d t o th e efficiency a n d a d v a n c e m e n t o f e m p lo y e e s
a n d fu r n is h a b ette r u n d e r s ta n d in g o f th e p r o b le m s o f in d u s t r y .”

An active advocate of the open-shop principle of industrial rela­
tions operating through 28 branch organizations located in the
northeastern States. More than 1,100 members constitute the active
membership. Preventive and defensive activities, safety, educa­
tional, industrial relations programs, special operative service, execu­
tive placement, the collection of wage and employment data, and like
services are administered by the commissioner, secretary, and staff
under the direct guidance of an executive committee of 5 elected
officers and an administrative council composed of the elected officers
and 12 elected representatives of the membership. By constitutional
provision the administrative council meets in April and October of
each year, and the entire membership assembles in convention each




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

I ll

April. Research through the national office is carried on under the
general direction of departmental committees. Ordinarily, each
committee is composed of four major executives, representing as
many member plants. Each committee employs a field force to carry
out its program.
Branch organizations are autonomous, each being governed by an
elected board with a secretary and staff administering branch affairs.
Chief among the activities of the branches are the operation of
employment departments, the collection and tabulation of wage,
employment and labor data, sponsoring of superintendents’ and
foremen’s clubs, employment executives’ clubs, and similar clubs, and
the administration of educational and other programs sponsored by
the national office. Branches utilize departmental committees in
much the same maimer as the national office.
The principal national departmental committees are:
I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s .—The function of the committee on indus­
trial relations is twofold in purpose. The first division of its effort
is in the conduct of special surveys and research studies on personnel
subjects of general interest to the entire membership. “ Experience
with group insurance,” “ Methods of wage payment,” “ Employee
medical service,” and “ Meeting the cost of employee superannuation ”
are typical of the general research reports issued by this committee.
The second phase of this committee’s work is the operation of a
consulting service and clearing house for information on industrial
relations. To make this service practical the field man carries on a
continuous program of individual plant investigation and study.
Upon completing an individual plant study the field man has a
written record of that plant’s organization, personnel, operating con­
ditions, and the methods and procedures of its personnel practice.
It is these records of plant visitations that enable the committee to
render its informational service. At each annual convention the com­
mittee makes a formal report of its activities and one or more sessions
are devoted to discussion of new projects within its field.
I n d u s t r i a l E d u c a t i o n .— The committee on industrial education,
which has functioned and reported annually since 1919, is concerned
with the formulation of policies and the development of standard
reference texts and other supplementary instructional material for
the use of members of the association.
Upon the urgent request of the membership, the committee devel­
oped a general apprentice-training program with a standard manual
as the basis of operation. This was done with the sincere desire of
affording greater facilities for teaching the machinists’ trade, and
for aiding those who are anxious to enter this field of activity. The
primary purpose of publishing the manual, “ Apprenticeship in
the metal trades,” is to establish uniformity in a subject which here­
tofore has been left more or less to individual effort. Diplomas and
individual pocket certificates are provided for those completing the
course.
Another industrial training publication is Elementary Machineshop Practice, a series of reference books. These books are not
intended to be exhaustive treatises, but may be used in the shop where
the instructor can demonstrate on the actual machine and not be
obliged to depend on illustrations or drawings to make his points




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

clear. They also serve as handbooks for beginners, apprentices, and
others who appreciate material of this kind in simplified form. The
series now consists of three volumes.
Sensing the need of the membership for competent leadership in
the shop, the committee on industrial education made an exhaustive
study, requiring approximately two years, in preparation for the
publication of material to be used in the discovery, training, and
development of foremen, particularly for use in the metal trades
industries.
This publication, entitled “ Foremanship,” consists of (a) the
introduction, containing information for management; (b) the
conference leader’s manual, in two parts, containing outlines and
suggestions for the leadership of foreman conferences; (c) 52 con­
ference outlines which serve as study assignments for foremen who
are enrolled in conference groups.
This work was first published in December, 1927, and a second
edition was published in 1929.
P r e v e n tio n o f I n d u s t r i a l A c c id e n t s . —The industrial accident
prevention activities of the National Metal Trades Association have
been continuously conducted since 1911 by a committee of prominent
manufacturers selected from the membership. A competent safety
engineer visits the members and makes surveys and analyses of plants
with improved safety conditions as an objective.
In recent years the work of the committee has been extended to
include assistance in reducing the amounts paid for workmen’s com­
pensation insurance.
“ Shop Safety,” an illustrated folder, issued at intervals by the
committee, is “ for the consideration of executives and others ” with
whom safety, to be successful, must originate. It deals with specific
accident prevention problems in an informative and interesting man­
ner. The committee also sends out to members attractive posters to
be displayed in shops for the edification and warning of the workmen.
Periodic publications.—The Bulletin, issued semimonthly by the
national office for the entire membership, reviews matters of signifi­
cance to executives in the industry and serves as a source of informa­
tion as to the activities of the association.
The Shop Review, a monthly magazine for employees in machine
shops, factories, and foundries, designed to give its readers a wider
comprehension of industrial problems, particularly employers’ and
employees’ mutual problems, is published in conjunction with the
National Founders’ Association.
The Labor Barometer, prepared monthly by the statistician of the
national staff, graphically shows the employment trends in the chief
metal trades centers and industries.
The Wage Survey, based on information from metal trades centers
and showing hourly earnings for key classifications of metal trades
occupations, is published semiannually.

National Research Council.
B and Twenty-first Streets, Washington, D. C. Vernon
Kellogg, Permanent Secretary^
E s t a b lis h e d in 1916 under the congressional charter of the Na­
tional Academy of Sciences and with the cooperation of the national




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

113

scientific and technical societies of the United States. The National
Research Council was organized as an emergency measure in con­
nection with the World War and has been continued by the national
academy in response to an Executive order of President Wilson for
the encouragement of research in the biological and physical sciences.
During the war the research council received a considerable part of
its support from the Government, but since its reorganization after
the war the council derives its support wholly from private sources.
As now constituted the research council is organized in 11 divisions
which are coordinated through a central executive board. Four of
these divisions are concerned with the more general aspects and
contacts of research, the divisions of Federal relations, foreign rela­
tions, States relations, and educational relations. The remaining 7
divisions are concerned with particular fields of science and tech­
nology, viz, physical sciences, engineering and industrial research,
chemistry and chemical technology, geology and geography, medical
sciences, biology and agriculture, and anthropology and psychology.
The personnel of these divisions and of numerous committees ap­
pointed under them is given in a pamphlet entitled “ National Re­
search Council, organization and members, 1929-1930” (64 pp.).
The activities of the National Research Council in matters relat­
ing to vocational training and the personnel of industry are sum­
marized below:
D iv isio n o f E n g in e e r in g a n d I n d u s t r i a l R e se a r c h .
Elmer A.
Sperry, chairman, 1929-30 :
Highway research board.—In connection with investigations on
problems of highway construction sponsored by the highway re­
search board, this board has published a summary of training speci­
fications for highway engineering positions prepared in cooperation
with the American Association of Engineers.
Minimum specifications for highway engineering position. By the committee
on specifications for highway engineering positions, American Association of
Engineers. A. B. McDaniel, chairman. National Research Council, Bulletin
No. 45. 1924. 105 pp.
Hatt, W . K. Research in highway education. Good Roads, No. 63, app.
179-181, 1922. Excerpt in Engineering News-Record, No. 90, p. 154. 1923.

American bureau of welding.—In the development of the art of
welding on a scientific basis it has been found necessary to prepare
special courses of training for welders. The following have been
published:
Spraragen, William. What technical foundation should foreman welders
possess? Journal of the American Welding Society, vol. 1, pp. 24-26. 1922.
Training course for oxyacetylene welders. Report of the committee on
training of welding operators, American Bureau of Welding. Journal of the
American Welding Society, vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 31-57. 1922. Reprinted as Bulle­
tin No. 4, American Welding Society. 1923. 30 pp.
Training course for electric arc welders. Report of the committee on train­
ing of welding operators, American Bureau of Welding. Journal of the
American Welding Society, vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 15-47. 1924. Reprinted as Bul­
letin No. 7, American Welding Society. 1924. 35 pp.

Industrial lighting.—This committee has made exhaustive factory
and laboratory tests relating to the fatigue, efficiency, and health of
industrial workers under varying conditions of lighting. A com­
prehensive report on these investigations is in the course of
preparation.




114

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

Ferree, C. E., and Rand, G. The effect of mixing artificial light with day­
light 011 important functions of the eye. Transactions of the Illuminating
Engineering Society. Reprint. 1925. 22 pp.
D i v i s i o n o f M e d i c a l S c i e n c e s . Ludvig Hektoen, chairman,
1929-30:
Problems of industrial medicine.—Special investigations have
recently been conducted in cooperation with organizations of granite
workers and manufacturers and of manufacturers of fan machinery
on the effects of the inhalation of dust from pneumatic drilling and
cutting tools in the granite industry and on means for reducing
the dust hazard in this industry below the hygienic limit of tolerance.
D i v i s i o n o f B i o l o g y a n d A g r i c u l t u r e . C. E. Allen, chairman,
1929-30:
Atmosphere and man.—A joint committee of this division and of
the division of medical sciences of the research council on the effects
of the atmosphere on human activity has made investigations of
mortality rates in New York City, of variations in the virulence
of influenza epidemics in various cities, and of atmospheric con­
ditions in about 20 factories in several industries.

Huntington, Ellsworth. Causes of geographical variations in the influenza
epidemic of 1918 in the cities of the United States. A report of the committee
on atmosphere and man, of the National Research Council. National Research
Council, Bulletin No. 34. 35 pp.
-------Temperature and mortality in New York City. Metropolitan Life
Insurance Co., Statistical Bulletin, yol. IV. 1923.
------- Influenza and the weather in the United States in 1918. Scientific
Monthly, vol. 17, pp. 462-471. 1923.
------ Civilization and climate. Third edition. 1924. Yale University Press,
xix, 453 pp.
------- W ea th er and health.

A com pa ra tiv e study o f d a ily m orta lity in N ew

York City in relation to temperature, atmospheric humidity, and interdiurnal
changes of temperature. National Research Council, Bulletin No. 75.
D i v i s i o n o f A n t h r o p o l o g y a n d P s y c h o l o g y . Fay-Cooper Cole,
chairman, 1929-30:
The division of anthropology and psychology is the successor to
the psychology committee which was formed in April, 1917, to organ­
ize and supervise psychological research and service in the war
emergency and of which various committees on problems of military
personnel appointed by the American Psychological Association
became subcommittees.
During the past 10 years work has been conducted by committees
of this division of the research council upon the following subjects
related to problems of personnel:
Psychology in aviation.—The committee on aural structure and
function (formerly the committee on vestibular research) has con­
ducted investigations upon the balancing function of a portion of
the inner ear with a view to developing tests which can be applied
to aviators.

Dodge, Raymond. Work of the committee on vestibular research. Journal
of Experimental Psychology, vol. 4, pp. 247-269. 1921.
Dunlap, Knight. Psychological research in aviation. Science, N. S., vol.
49, pp. 94-97. 1919.
------ Nystagmus test and practice. Journal of the American Medical Asso­
ciation, vol. 73, pp. 54-55. 1919.
Holsopple, J. Q. Reliability of scores in steadiness tests. Journal of Experi*
mental Psychology, vol. 5, pp. 203-213. 1922.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

115

Problenis of military psychology.—Advice lias been given from
time to time to the War and the Navy Departments in regard to per­
sonnel problems, particularly in the use of job specifications.
Personnel research in business and industry.—The early work of
this committee resulted in the organization in 1921 of the Personnel
Research Federation (p. 123), for the systematic study of problems
of personnel in industry. Tne committee has also been called upon
to advise the United States Civil Service Commission and the junior
employment service of the Children’s Bureau of the Department of
Labor and has cooperated with the Institute for Government Re­
search in the organization of the Bureau of Public Personnel Ad­
ministration and with the American Council on Education which has
undertaken the continuation of certain work initiated by the
committee.
Thurston, L. L., and Mann, Charles R. Vocational guidance for college
students. National Research Council, reprint and circular series, No. 62.
1925. 28 pp.

Scientific problems of human migration.—Members of this com­
mittee have compiled tests for mechanical ability, nonlanguage in­
telligence tests for persons of different nationalities, and tests for
certain traits of personality.
Tests of comparative abilities of whites and negroes:
Graham, James L. A comparison of white and negro college students in a
variety of mental tests. Doctoral dissertation.
Lanier, Lyle EL Prediction of the reliability of mental tests and tests of
special abilities. Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol. 10, pp. 69-113. 1927.
Peterson, Joseph. Problems, methods, and some results in race testing.
Hanover Conference Report. Social Science Research Council, pp. 34-53. 1927.
------ Problems and results of testing negro intelligence. Report of conference
on racial differences, held under auspices of committee on problems and pol­
icies, Social Science Research Council, and division of anthropology and
psychology, National Research Council, pp. 36-41. 1928.
------ Comparison of white and negro children in the rational learning test.
Twenty-seventh Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education,
Part I, pp. 333-341. 1928.

Mechanical ability:
Anderson, L. D. Objective measurements in shop courses. Industrial Arts
Magazine, vol. 15, pp. 263-267, 1926.
------ Environment and mechanical ability. Industrial Psychology, vol. 3, pp.
179-180. 1927.
-------The Minnesota mechanical-ability tests. Personnel Journal, vol. 6 pp
473-478. 1928.
-------The relationship of certain environmental factors to measures of mechani­
cal ability. Yearbook of the National Education Association, Nature and Nur­
ture, Part II, pp. 137-150. Bloomington, 111., Public School Pub. Co., 1928.
Carter, Harold D. The organization of mechanical intelligence. Pedagogical
Seminary and Journal of Genetic Psychology, vol. 35, pp. 270-285.
Edgerton, Harold A., and Paterson, Donald G. Tables of standard errors and
probable errors of percentages for varying numbers of cases. Journal of Applied
Psychology, vol. 10, pp. 378-391. 1926.
Hubbard, Ruth M. A measurement of mechanical interests. Pedagogical
Seminary and Journal of Genetic Psychology, vol. 35, pp. 22-lr-254. 1928.
Paterson, Donald G. The Minnesota mechanical-ability tests. Vocational
Guidance Bulletin, Minneapolis Public Schools, vol. 2. No. 9, pp. 1-2. 1928.
Paterson, Donald G .; Elliott, R. M .; Anderson, L. D .; Toops, H. A .; and
Heidreder, Edna. Minnesota mechanical ability tests. (To be published by the
University of Minnesota Press.) About 500 pp.
Rogers, H. W. Research on mechanical ability. Vocational Guidance Maga­
zine, vol. 11, pp. 178-180. 1924.
105636°— 30------- 9




116

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Analysis and measurement of human personality:
Cleeton, Glen U. Originality: A summary of experimental literature. Jour­
nal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, vol. 21, pp. 30^-315. 1926.
Cook, Helen E., and Manson, Grace E. Abilities necessary in effective retail
selling and a method of evaluating them. Journal of Personnel Research,
vol. 5, pp. 74-82. 1926.
Manson, Grace E. Group differences in intelligence tests. Journal of Applied
Phychology, vol. 9, pp. 156-175. 1925.
-------Personality differences in intelligence test performance. Journal of
Applied Psychology, vol. 9, pp. 230-255. 1925.
-------A bibliography of the analysis and measurement of human personality
up to 1926. National Research Council, reprint and circular series, No. 72,
59 pp. 1926.
Yoakum, C. S., and Manson, Grace E. Self ratings as a means of determining
trait relationships and relative desirability of traits. Journal of Abnormal and
Social Psychology, vol. 21, pp. 52-64. 1926.

Research on problems of the deaf and hard of heanwig.—Special
attention has been given to the industrial occupation of the deaf
and to methods for the training of the deaf for trades and for com­
merce; also to the requirements for the training of teachers of the
deaf.
Research recommendations of the second conference on problems of the deaf
and hard of hearing. Washington, D. C., February 1 and 2, 1929. National
Research Council, reprint and circular series, No. 88, 53 pp. 1929.

Psychology of the highway.—In addition to advising in the de­
signing of signals and signs for use on streets and highways, this
committee has developed tests for automobile drivers in cooperation
with certain taxicab companies and in cooperation with the Univer­
sity of Ohio, and the State Department of Highways of Ohio is now
conducting investigations on tests for the range and acuity of vision
of automobile drivers.

National Retail Dry Goods Association.
225 West Thirty-fourth Street, New York, N. Y. William A.
Fitzgerald, Director Bureau of Research and Information.
P e r s o n n e l G r o u p .—The personnel group of the National Eetail
Dry Goods Association is composed of employment managers, per­
sonnel directors, and training directors of member stores. It was
organized to provide a clearing house where personnel activities and
problems of retail stores may be presented and discussed. Data rela­
tive to these activities and problems is collected, analyzed, and
distributed to members.
Members are entitled to copies of all personnel group studies, a
copy of the Bulletin, which is issued monthly, and any information
which the personnel group may be able to secure for them on their
particular problems.
Each year the personnel group makes research studies of several
important subjects. The committees carrying on these investigations
are men and women actually doing personnel work in stores, consejtical nature but they are
After these studies are

.

3

Following is a list of the reports thus far distributed by the group:
Functions of the personnel department.
The cost of personnel departments in stores of various sizes.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATION'S, ETC.

117

An experiment in measuring the effect of personnel work.
Recommended reading for personnel workers.
The scope of training for retail store service.
The use of outside agencies in training retail salespeople.
How to approach a common maximum of individual sales production.
Methods of dealing with the long-service employee.
B u r e a u o f R e s e a r c h a n d I n f o r m a t i o n .—This division of the Na­
tional Retail Dry Goods Association also deals with and reports upon
personnel questions. Among its most recent reports are:

Personnel work— Its place in the stores. By B. Eugenia Lies.
Reports on policies of stores paying employees absent due to illness.
Pension plans.
S tore

M

anagers’

D

i v i s i o n .—

Published reports of this division

dealing with personnel are:
Bonus systems for floor men.
Budgetary control of personnel expense.
Compensation methods in nonselling departments.
Procedure for recording labor turnover.

National Safety Council.
20 West Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111.
aging Director.

W . H. Cameron, Man­

T h e National Safety Council was formed as a result of a meeting
of the Association of Iron and Steel Electrical Engineers held in
Milwaukee in 1912. There are now 5,300 members in the United
States, Canada, and several other countries.
It functions for the prevention of accidents in factories, in the
streets, schools, the air, mines, the home, and also for the health,
sanitation and general safety welfare of the public at large. The
work is carried on not only through the executive offices but also
through 60 affiliated local councils in as many leading cities of the
country.
The council’s activities are supported from income supplied by
members and, in the industrial division, all pay dues in proportion to
their size. The council also receives financial aid from the Rocke­
feller Foundation in addition to its paid memberships.
Safety work was continuously carried on in hundreds of industrial
plants embracing 150 different lines of industry during 1929. It is
estimated that 10,000,000 industrial workers receive regular safety
instruction through the various channels conducted by the council.
Affiliated with the national council is the education division located
in New York, which receives financial support from the National
Bureau of Casualty and Surety Underwriters. The division main­
tains a trained staff which devotes its entire time to serving the
schools of the Nation and to accident prevention fundamentals.
The council maintains a large publication service which includes
four monthly publications: The National Safety News, for industry;
Public Safety, for public officials, police chiefs, etc.; Safety Educa­
tion, for school children and the schools; and the Safe Worker,
which is distributed each month to 200,000 workers throughout the
country.
Another outstanding feature is the publication of safe practices
pamphlets for specific industries. These are published for 28 differ­
ent sections represented in the industrial division.




118

III. NOKOFFICIAL AGENCIES

Pamphlets so far published include:
General safe practices pamphlets
No. 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.

Ladders.
Stairs and stairways.
Boiler rooms.
Overhead traveling cranes.
Belt shifters and belt shippers.
Knots, bends, hitches, and slings.
Belts and belt guards.
Shafting, couplings, pulleys, gears, sprockets, and chains.
Engine guarding and engine stops.
Oiling devices and oilers.
Floors and flooring.
Scaffolds.
Grinding wheels.
Goggles.
Freight elevators.
Safe clothing.
Yards.
Power presses.
Exits, fire alarms, and fire drills.
Woodworking machinery and equipment.
Industrial accident statistices— How to compile and use them.
Shop lighting.
Gas and electric welding.
Fire extinguishment.
Acids and caustics.
Manila and wire ropes.
Drinking water, wash and locker rooms, and toilet facilities.
Commercial explosives.
Electrical equipment in industrial plants.

30. T ru ck s and w heelbarrow s.
31. F ire causes and prevention.

32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.

Exhaust systems.
Hoisting apparatus.
Industrial explosion hazards.
Conveyors.
Fire brigades.
Industrial ventilation.
Safety posters and bulletin boards.
Machine shop machinery.
Suggestion systems.
Hand tools.
Industrial safety organization.
Passenger elevators.
Skin troubles from oils and emulsions.
Industrial housekeeping.
Fuel handling, storing and firing.
Compressed air machinery and equipment.
Railroads and industrial plants.
Equipment and operation of steam boilers.
Practical methods for reducing fatigue.
Planning an industrial safety campaign.
Static electricity.
Checking plans and specifications for safety.
Handling material (hand and truck).
Handling material (mechanical equipment).
Investigation of accidents.
Construction of machinery guards.
Warehouses and shipping rooms.
Chemical laboratories.
Refrigeration.
Motion pictures in educational work.
Storage tanks for oils, acids, and dry materials.
Respirators, gas masks, and breathing apparatus.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

No. 65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
91.
93.

Teaching safety to new employees.
Pressure vessels, fired and unfired. (Part I.)
Maintaining interest in safety.
Pressure vessels. (Part II.)
Getting safety across to the commercial driver.
Maintenance and repair men.
Safe handling of chlorine.
Safety committees.
Safety in foundries.
Competition as an aid in promoting safety.
Safety inspections.
Portable electric hand tools.
Safety meetings.
Mathematical tables and data.
Engineering, a factor in safety.
Safety rules.
Warning signs.
Caring for injured workers.
Training for first aid.
Safety man in industry.
Safe practices in forging and hot-metal stamping.
Industrial accident statistics— How to analyze and use them.
Safety in the small plant.
Identification of piping systems.
Spray coating.
Topics for safety meetings.

Safe practices pamphlets for special industries
Chemicals:
No. 1. Pipe lines and tanks as causes of accidents.
2. Fume poisoning from nitric and mixed acids.
3. Chemical burns, their nature and treatment.
4. Safety in rayon manufacture.
Construction: No. 1. Safe practices on construction work.
Foods:
No. 1. Safety in food preserving and canning.
2. Safety in candy, chocolate, and cocoa manufacture.
Laundries: No. 1. Safety in dry cleaning and dyeing establishments.
Marine: No. 1. Hazards of fumigating ships.
M e ta ls :

No. 1. Cleaning and finishing rooms in foundries.
2. Blast furnaces.
3. Sheet-metal fabrication.
Mines:
No. 1. Underground mine cars and haulage.
2. Mine rescue work.
Petroleum:
No. 1. Safe practices in pulling wells.
2. Safety in gasoline service station operation.
3. Safe practices in loading tank cars (gasoline).
4. Safe practices in handling and laying pipe.
5. Safe sales truck driving.
6. Safe practices in cleaning petroleum stills.
7. Safety for the oil field pumper.
Paper and pulp:
No. 1. Paper and pulp mills.
2. Safety in paper-box manufacturing.
Public:
No. 1. Protection of the public.
2. Grounding practices.
Quarries: No. 1. Safety organization for the quarrying industry.
Rubber: No. 1. Compounding materials used in the rubber industry.
Textiles: No. 1. Cotton mills.
Brickyards: No. 89. Safe practices in brickmaking.
Tanneries: No. 90. Safety in leather tanneries.
Milk bottling: No. 92. Safety in milk-bottling plants.




119

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

120

Health practices pamphlets
No. 1. C hrom ium .

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Physical examination in industry.
Lead.
Dust.
Health supervision in industry.
Industrial eye hazards.
Carbon monoxide.
Infected wounds.
Gases and vapors.
Skin affections.

National Society for the Prevention of Blindness.
370 Seventh Avenue, New York, N. Y.
Secretary.

Eleanor P. Brown,

O rg a n ized as the National Committee for the Prevention of
Blindness in December, 1914, through the consolidation of the New
York State Committee for the Prevention of Blindness and the
American Association for the Conservation of Vision, incorporated
in 1918. The present name was adopted in 1927.
The society is a volunteer health organization supported entirely
by contributions and membership dues, the objects of which as stated
in its by-laws are: (1) To endeavor to ascertain, through study and
investigations, any causes, whether direct or indirect, which may
result in blindness or impaired vision; (2) to advocate measures
which shall lead to the elimination of such causes; (3) to disseminate
knowledge concerning all matters pertaining to the care and use of
the eyes.
Cooperating agencies in the industrial field include the American
Federation of Labor, the American Association of Industrial Physi­
cians, the National Safety Council, and the American Medical Asso­
ciation. The proceedings of the 1928 annual conference contain a
discussion of eyesight in industry, presented to the conference
through the cooperation of the American Association of Industrial
Physicians and Surgeons, giving various aspects of eye hazards in
industry and the place of proper lighting and equipment in pre­
venting not only accidents but the development of defective vision.
Acting with the National Safety Council the society conducted an
investigation of 583 industrial plants to determine the results of
mechanical safety devices in eye protection and conservation. Tb*>
report on this study has been published by the society.

National Tuberculosis Association.
370 Seventh Avenue, New York, N. Y.
M. D., Managing Director.

Kendall Emerson,

T h e National Tuberculosis Association was organized in 1904 as
the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuber­
culosis. The present name was adopted in 1918 when the association
was incorporated under the laws of the State of Maine. The fol­
lowing paragraphs summarize the special activities of the association
and some of its allied and affiliated agencies in the field of personnel
research and relations.
From 1917 to 1924 the National Tuberculosis Association conducted
a demonstration in Framingham, Mass., known as the Framingham




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATION’S, ETC.

121

Community Health and Tuberculosis Demonstration, financed by
special grant from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. The results
of that demonstration, particularly in the field of industrial relations
and personnel research are detailed in a summary report, Monograph
No. 10. Particular attention is directed to studies made in industrial
health service, studies on ventilation, safety studies, and studies on
sanitation and general health conditions in the working population
of Framingham.
Since 1917 the National Tuberculosis Association has been espe­
cially interested in mortality from dusty trades. Under the auspices
of a special committee of which Dr. Edward R. Baldwin, of Saranac
Lake, N. Y., was the chairman, studies were made of the marble
industries in Vermont, the limestone industries in Indiana, dealing
particularly with the prevalence of silicosis, anthracosis, and tuber­
culosis among workers in these industries. The studies of this com­
mittee are reported in a series of papers published in various volumes
of the Transactions of the National Tuberculosis Association. Refer­
ences will be furnished on request to the association. These studies
have supplemented previous studies made by Dr. Frederick L. Hoff­
man for the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics and for the
Prudential Life Insurance Co.
During the last 10 years especially, the National Tuberculosis
Association has stimulated organization of health service in industry
through its local and State tuberculosis associations. As early as
1916 the national association published a report entitled “ Working­
men’s organization in local antituberculosis campaign.” In March,
1926, the association published a special industrial health service
number of its Monthly Bulletin.
In these and in other w;ays the activity of associations in Philadel­
phia, Erie, Pa., Hudson County, N. J., Chicago, and elsewhere have
been stimulated to undertake definite health service designed for
the smaller industries where full-time health service can not ordin­
arily be provided. Details concerning activities in these cities will
be furnished on request.
Statistical studies of the incidence of tuberculosis in industry and
in industrial groups have been made and are now being made by the
association. At the present time an extended study in this field is
being carried on, the results of which will be reported at a later
date. The association through its various agencies has also stimu­
lated the development of sheltered employment for arrested cases
of tuberculosis and is now definitely working on a program of after­
care including prevocational training, special vocational training,
placement, and follow-up of arrested cases of tuberculosis. A special
report on sheltered employment in the United States, by Dr. H. A.
Pattison and Philip P. Jacobs, was published by the association
in 1927.
In various cities of the country, notably Boston, New York,
Minneapolis, and Philadelphia, special efforts have been made for
the placement of cases discharged from sanatoria with suitable arrest
of tuberculosis in normal industrial work. A special report on a
3-year experiment of this character was published in 1928 by the
New York Tuberculosis and Health Association, entitled “ Employ­
ment of the Tuberculous,” by Alice Campbell Klein and Grant
Thorburn, M. D.



122

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National Urban League.
17 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y.
Jones, Executive Secretary.

Eugene Kinckle

D e p a r t m e n t o f R e s e a r c h a n d I n v e s t i g a t i o n s . Ira DeA. Reid,
director.—The National Urban League was organized in 1910 “ to
promote the social and economic well-being of the American negro.”
It is supported by voluntary contributions. Efforts of the research
department have been directed in the special fields of housing,
health, and employment and have resulted in a series of unpublished
analyses of work opportunities, efficiency, turnover, skill, and avail­
ability of negro workers in selected cities. A study of the negro
worker in his relation to trade-unions has just been completed; and
a subject which the research department plans to take up is “ Oppor­
tunities for vocational training for negro youth.”

National Vocational Guidance Association.
Helen Dernbach, Director of Vocational and Educational
Guidance, School City of South Bend, Ind., Secretary.
T h e o r g a n i z a t i o n of this association was completed during a series
of meetings held at Grand Rapids, Mich., October 21-24, 1913.
(Papers presented were published by United States Bureau of Edu­
cation as Bulletin (1913, No. 14.) This was the third national con­
ference on vocational guidance, previous meetings having been held
at Boston in 1910, and New York City in 1912. Since that time the
association has met annually at the same place and during the two or
three days previous to the meeting of the department of superintend­
ence of the National Education Association.
There are now about 1,500 members and 29 branch associations.
The official organ of the association, the Vocational Guidance Maga­
zine, published by the Bureau of Vocational Guidance, Graduate
School of Education, Harvard University, is issued eight times a
year from October to May, inclusive. Dr. Fred C. Smith is editor.
The objects of the association as stated in the constitution are as
follows:
1. To unite all of those persons engaged in or interested in any phase of
vocational guidance in the United States into one national organization and
into branch organizations representing specific localities or specific problems
of guidance.
2. To encourage the formation of branch vocational guidance associations in
the United States which shall be affiliated with the National Vocational Guid­
ance Association.
3. To encourage experimentation in and the establishment of vocational guid­
ance service in communities of the United States.
4. To formulate standards and principles for vocational guidance.
5. To gather and disseminate information regarding problems of and progress
in vocational guidance.

Order of Railroad Telegraphers.
3673 West Pine Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. E. J. Manion,
President.
T h e s t a t i s t i c a l d e p a r t m e n t of the Order of Railroad Telegra­
phers carries on continuous studies of wages, hours, and working con­
ditions affecting its members and other workers in railroad teleg­
raphy, train dispatching and allied occupations, and comparative




ASSOCIATIONS, s o c i e t i e s , f o u n d a t i o n s , e t c .

123

studies in other fields. Special studies cover vacations, seniority,
etc., and a project for the immediate future deals with the relation
of unemployment to the introduction of mechanical appliances and
changes in operating methods. Results appear occasionally in the
official organ of the union, the Railroad Telegrapher.

Personnel Research Federation (Inc.).
29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. Walter V.
Bingham, Director; Paul S. Achilles, Secretary.

A f e d e r a t i o n of business firms, national associations, labor or­
ganizations, Government bureaus, research and social agencies, and
educational institutions for the furtherance of research activities
pertaining to personnel wherever such researches are conducted in
the spirit and with the methods of science.
Organized March 15, 1921, at a conference on personnel research
held under the auspices of National Research Council and Engineer­
ing Foundation, with the purpose of bringing about cooperation
among the many bodies conducting research relating to men and
women in industry and commerce, from management to unskilled
labor. Incorporated March 16, 1925, as a nonprofit corporation, for
“ the scientific study of man in relation to his occupations and his
education therefor, and the diffusion of knowledge concerning this
relation.”
The federation established in 1922 the Personnel Journal, in which
many reports of research have appeared, together with book reviews,
annotated references to current periodical literature, and news oi
research activities. Among its other publications are a comprehen­
sive manual of research procedure in vocational selection; a volume
on job analysis; bibliographies on psychological tests and on the per­
sonal interview; and a series of circulars and reprints dealing with
problems and methods of personnel investigation.
Formal and informal conferences have been held each year, bring­
ing together investigators and practitioners in employment and
placement, vocational guidance, industrial psychology, and the
science of labor.
The central staff has helped plan investigations; arranged for uni­
versity investigators to secure access to industrial data; brought
about some interchange of information between American and for­
eign research workers; assisted in planning the organization of re­
search departments; advised with advanced students regarding their
research training; and advised with executives regarding the appli­
cation of research findings. It has also carried on original investi­
gations of certain personnel techniques, and of personal factors in
accident causation, making practical demonstrations of the value of
psychological research in industries under working conditions. Its
chief function, however, is as a coordinating and informational
center.
Provision is made for several types of membership as follows:
1.
Corporate membership (corporations, educational institutions, govern­
mental agencies, other associations, bureaus, etc.) :
(а) Subscribing corporate membership. Minimum annual dues, $100.
(б) Sustaining corporate membership. Organizations contributing sub­
stantial sums, optional in amount, to the support of the federation or
branches of its work. Minimum, $250.




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2. Membership at large (individuals) :
(a) Subscribing membership, $8.
(&) Sustaining membership. Minimum, $250.

The original membership consisted of 5 educational institutions, 5
national associations and research bureaus, 1 business firm, and 14 in­
dividuals. In 1929 the membership included 7 business and indus­
trial firms, 6 governmental agencies, 18 educational institutions, 8
associations and research bureaus, and 185 individuals.

Portland Cement Association.
33 West Grand Avenue, Chicago, 111.

association issues a bimonthly Accident Prevention Magazine,
which contains papers on health and accident hazards of the cement
industry. It has prepared annually since 1913 a “ Study of acci­
dents ” occurring in the plants of member companies. T h e 1928
report is published in the May-June, 1929, number of Accident Pre­
vention Magazine (vol. 15, No. 3).
T

h is

Prudential Insurance Co. of America.
Newark, N. J.
istician.

Frederick L. Hoffman, Consulting Stat­

U n d e r the direction of Doctor Hoffman this office gives special
attention to industrial mortality and morbidity and in tne course of
the last 25 years has accumulated a large collection of data on practi­
cally every occupation or industry and the occupational diseases or
special mortality problems related thereto, including much material
obtained from its own specialized field investigations. Its studies
in these fields are made primarily for occupational-rating purposes,
but many of the results have a broader scientific value. In connection
with its public-health promoting activities some of this material has
been made available in bulletins of the United States Bureau of
Labor Statistics, among which the most recent are:
Bui. No. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry.
1922.
Bui. No. 426. Deaths from lead poisoning. 1927.
Bui. No. 488. Deaths from lead poisoning, 1925-1927. 1929.

Numerous papers on radium necrosis, miners’ nystagmus, sili­
cosis, lead poisoning, mule-spinners’ cancer, occupational cancer, etc.,
have also been published. Doctor Hoffman’s office readily cooperates
with any industrial investigation in which its resources can be
utilized. A complete collection of Doctor Hoffman’s scientific papers
is on file at the Army Medical Library, statistical division, Wash­
ington, D. C.

Research Bureau for Retail Training.
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Director.

David R. Craig,

T h e Research Bureau for Retail Training was organized in May,
1918, as a result of the desire of seven Pittsburgh stores to inaugurate
a program for careful study of personnel problems in the field of
retailing. These stores agreed to underwrite $32,000 each year for
a term of five years.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

125

The bureau started at Carnegie Institute of Technology where it
was part of the division of applied psychology, later the division of
cooperative research. The plans o± organization provided for the
cooperation of the seven supporting stores, the Carnegie Institute of
Technology, and the Pittsburgh public schools. In 1923 the bureau
became affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh, and in 1924 the
services of the bureau were made available to stores outside of
Pittsburgh.
Coordinate with this latter development was the endowment of
the bureau by 17 Pittsburgh stores as a permanent research organ­
ization at the university. When this endowment has been completed,
over a period of 10 years, the retail stores of Pittsburgh will have
spent approximately $1,000,000 for the support of research in the
field of personnel administration.
The bureau was established with the purpose in mind of applying
the principles of psychology, economics, education, and sociology to
the solution of department-store problems. Its work may be clas­
sified under three heads:
Research.— A systematic program of research in retail personnel field and
the adaptation of the results obtained from this study to the needs of the
member stores.
Training.— The training of training directors, employment officers, and other
personnel workers in retail stores and of teachers of high-school courses in
retailing.
Service.— Assistance rendered to the member stores in adapting bureau mate­
rial to their needs, in providing methods, programs, and forms; in advising with
the personnel departments and other executives about the best methods of
solving special personnel problems arising in each store.

The present research organization consists of six fields: Training
in salesmanship, training in merchandise information and fashion,
training in psychology of personality, training in service and opera­
tion, training executives, and employment management.
The following is a list of the research studies now in the making:
Executive training:
Store policies, their formulation and use.
Psychology for executives.
Bulletin on psychological principles for the use of training directors.

Salesmanship training:
Psychology for salespeople.
Technique of selling for lower-priced departments.
Training manual for service shoppers.
Technique of handling production records in training.
Technique of selling on the telephone.
Technique of selling for beauty-shop operators.
Technique of ensemble selling.
Coordinating advertising and merchandise information.
Situation cards for specific selling departments.

Nonselling training:
Packing department manual— Preparing the training program.
Packing department manual— Trainers’ guides.
Manual of operation for unit stock control clerical.




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General training:
Situation cards for store nurses.
Methods and devices for visual education.
Improving reading habits of store people.

Art and fashion:
A manual for teaching appreciation of line and design in merchandise.

Employment:
Studies of employment office routines: Employment procedure, timekeeping,
pay office.
Development and standardization of tests (for salesmanship, good taste,
etc.).
Development of personality rating scales.
The older employees.

Store analysis:
Standard functions of the personnel department.
Methods of distributing store information.
Standards of efficiency in nonselling departments.
Methods of determining and using production standards in receiving, check­
ing, and marking; credit; delivery.
Methods of evaluating equipment in receiving, checking, and marking; credit;
delivery.
A survey technique for studying store routines.

Administration of personnel work:
Group insurance for department stores.

Other fields:
Study of assurance.
Curriculum based on duty analysis of group of high schools in various retail
jobs.
Development of new personnel records for bureau students and alumni.
Study of success of bureau alumni in relation to items on bureau application
blank.

Publications for general distribution consist chiefly of a series of
salesmanship and merchandise manuals. Studies of a more confi­
dential nature are usually available only to the member stores.

Retail Research Association.
1440 Broadway, New York, N. Y.

P. J. Reilly, Director.

of large retail establishments (18 firms at
present, only one in a city, except in Boston) for cooperative re­
search covering the whole range of department-store functions.
Contributions to meet the financial requirements of its budget are
by membership assessment based primarily on sales volume.
P e r s o n n e l R e s e a r c h D i v i s i o n .—Organized as a separate research
division in July, 1929, by separation from the store operation and
personnel division. The chief functions of this division are con­
ducted cooperatively with the personnel directors and training direc­
tors of member stores through the research offices of individual
stores. Its major activities are: (1) Individual and cooperative
research in store employment, training, health, employee activities,
pay-roll budgeting and expense control, and selling service; (2) the
conduct of annual conferences, one for personnel directors and one
for training directors; (3) the conduct of store surveys in the per­
sonnel field; (4) the preparation of training manuals, films, etc.;
An

o r g a n iz a t io n




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

127

(5) the collection and dissemination of information on current and
leading practices; (6) the promotion and development of executive
training; (7) the development of standard personnel practices; (8)
administration of market training of assistant buyers in New York.
Investigation is by questionnaire, store study, conference, and
field work.
The results of the association’s researches are available to member
stores only.

Russell Sage Foundation.
130 East Twenty-second Street, New York, N. Y.
Glenn, General Director.

John M.

I n c o r p o r a t e d under the laws of the State of New York in April,
1907, with an endowment of $10,000,000 given in memory of her
husband by Mrs. Russell Sage to which she added $5,000,000 in 1918.
The purpose of the foundation as stated in its charter is “ the im­
provement of social and living conditions in the United States of
America.” Research and publications are means to this end which
are being employed.
This research work has been organized under the following depart­
ments: Charity organization, child helping, education, industrial
studies, recreation, remedial loans, surveys and exhibits. It also
maintains a library with a specialized collection of books and pam­
phlets on each subject.
The publications of the foundation contain the results of original
researches carried on by members of its staff, or by experts com­
missioned for special studies, and also of special investigations such
as the Pittsburgh survey which the foundation financed but did
not direct. A printed catalogue of publications may be obtained
from the publication department.
Industrial studies have been made by several of its departments;
for example, they have been included as integral parts of city sur­
veys made and directed by the department of surveys and exhibits
under the direction of Shelby M. Harrison. This department also
made a study of public employment offices, their organization and
administration, the technique of the local service and their place and
function in industrial life. The publication containing the results
of this study is found in the list given below.
A study of the organization of social case work to deal with
unemployment was published in 1923 under the title af “ The Burden
of Unemployment.” This investigation, which was made under the
auspices of the charity organization department, was a study of
unemployment relief measures in 15 American cities, 1921-22.
D e p a r t m e n t o f I n d u s t r i a l S t u d i e s .—Mary van Kleeck, di­
rector.—This department, organized in 1909, originally limited its
studies to women in industry, but in 1916 its present name was
adopted and its scope enlarged.
Since 1920 it has had under way a series of investigations of
labor’s participation in management. The purpose is to make an
accurate and impartial record of experiments in industry in the
United States in securing for the workers participation in those
decisions and practices of management which directly affect con­
ditions of employment and the relationship between employer and




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h i. n o n o f f i c i a l a g e n c ie s

employee. It is believed that such analysis of experience will afford
a basis for constructive action by employers and by wage earners
and leaders of labor in promoting more satisfactory human relations
in industry. The results are being published in the Industrial Re­
lations Series shown in the following list.
The department has also concerned itself with the relation of
government to industrial disputes, having made a preliminary
study of the operation of the Canadian industrial disputes act in
1916. It again investigated this subject covering the whole period
of operation of the act including the war and published the result in
the book entitled, “ Postponing Strikes.”
The director of the department has served as chairman of the
committee on governmental labor statistics of the American Statis­
tical Association which has concerned itself with making possible
conference and study on the part of statisticians in State and
Federal bureaus of labor statistics and in universities, banks and
other companies. This committee work is directed toward the im­
provement and the uniformity of statistics of employment and other
aspects of labor conditions. Office space is provided in the depart­
ment of industrial studies, and through the department budget the
expenses of the committee are paid. In Employment Statistics for
the United States published under the editorship of Ralph G.
Hurlin, director of the department of statistics of the foundation,
and William A. Berridge of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
a plan for governmental collection of statistics of employment form­
ulated through experience in collection of these statistics by State
and Federal bureaus was set up and the procedure outlined in detail.
List of industrial studies
Klein, Philip. The burden of unemployment: A study of the unemployment
relief measures in 15 American cities, 1921-22. 1923. 260 pp., diagrams.
Hurlin, Ralph G. and Berridge, William A., editors. Employment Statistics
for the United States: A plan for their national collection and a handbook of
methods recommended by the committee on governmental labor statistics of the
American Statistical Association. 1926. 215 pp., diagrams.
Selekman, Ben M. Postponing strikes: A study of the industrial disputes
investigation act of Canada. 1927. 405 pp., tables, diagrams.
Harrison, Shelby M. (In collaboration with Bradley Buell, Mary LaDame.
Leslie E. Woodcock, and Frederick A. King.) Public employment offices:
Their purpose, structure, and methods. 1924. 685 pp.; illustrations, forms,
tables. (Second printing.)
Bloch, Louis. The coal miners’ insecurity. 1922. 50 pp. (pamphlet).
Industrial relations series
Selekman, Ben M. Sharing management with the workers: A study of the
partnership plan of the Dutchess bleachery, Wappingers Falls, New York.
1924. 142 pp., tables.
-------Employees’ representation in steel works: A study of the industrial
representation plan of the Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. in the Minnequa Steel
Works. 1924. 293 pp., tables.
------- and van Kleeck, Mary. Employees’ represention in coal mines: A
study of the industrial representation plan of the coal mines of the Colorado
Fuel & Iron Co. 1924. 454 pp., maps, tables.
LaDame, Mary. The Filene Store: A study of employees’ relation to manage­
ment in a retail store. 1930. 547 pp., tables.

Loans to working men and credit unions are dealt with in the
pamphlet publications of the department of remedial loans.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC,

129

Social Science Research Council.
2715 New York Central Building, 230 Park Avenue, New
York, N. Y. Bobert S. Lynd, Permanent Secretary;
Meredith B. Givens, Industrial Belations Secretary.
T h e Social Science Research Council consists of 25 representa­
tives, three chosen by each of seven scientific associations, and four
members-at-large from the psychological, legal, and public health
fields. It was organized in 1923 by representatives of the American
Political Science Association, the American Sociological Society,
and the American Economic Association. During the two years
following its organization the membership of the council was in­
creased by the addition of members chosen by the American Statis­
tical Association, the American Psychological Association, the Amer­
ican Anthropological Association, and the American Historical
Association. The council has been concerned with general planning
and strategy in research in the social sciences, emphasizing especially
the need for joint attack upon common problems by students from
various disciplines. As restated in the summer of 1929 at the annual
Hanover conference, the objectives of the council include the follow­
ing : The improvement of research organization; the development of
personnel; the enlargement, improvement, and preservation of mate­
rials; the improvement of research methods; the facilitation of the
dissemination of materials, methods and results of investigations;
the facilitation of research work, and the enhancement of the pub­
lic appreciation of the significance of the social sciences.
Shortly after its organization, the council was intrusted with the
administration of funds for research and it has been able to finance
selected projects. In the fall of 1929 the first members of a full­
time staff were engaged and administrative headquarters were es­
tablished. The bulk of the council’s work is carried on by commit­
tees, assisted and coordinated by staff members. The chief of these
committees is that on problems and policy, organized in 1925 with
a rotating membership on a 3-year tenure. Advisory committees
are set up to aid in considering the many proposals for research
and other phases of council work.
Various committees of the Social Science Research Council have
been concerned with the problems of labor and industry. Among
these have been committees on industrial relations, corporate rela­
tions, interracial relations, business research, utilization of unpub­
lished social data, and other standing or special committees. The
advisory committee on industrial relations, formerly the committee
on labor and capital, was organized at the close of 1925. The name
was changed in 1927. In the fall of 1929 this committee consisted
of the following persons: Mr. Henry S. Dennison, chairman; Dr.
Walter V. Bingham, Mr. Morris E. Leeds, Dr. Harlow S. Person,
Miss Florence Thorne, Prof. Joseph H. Willits, Dr. Leo Wolman,
Prof. Selig Perlman, Dr. John A. Fitch. Under the auspices of this
committee a survey of industrial relations research in progress at
universities was carried out in 1927. A more elaborate survey of
research was completed in 1928 for the committee by Prof. Herman
Feldman, of Dartmouth College.
Through the Social Science Research Council grants-in-aid are
available annually to help mature scholars of established reputation




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III. N ON o f f i c i a l

a g e n c ie s

who have under way researches of major importance. A limited
number of postdoctoral research fellowships are also awarded to fur­
ther the training' and development of promising younger students in
the social sciences. The fellowships are open to men and women not
over 35 years of age who have the Ph.D. or its equivalent, while the
grants-in-aid are available for competent scholars with significant
projects.
Major council projects relating to industrial relations and allied
problems are the following: Two investigations have been set up
under the direction of the National Bureau of Economic Research:
A critical survey of statistics relating to the American labor mar­
ket, by Leo Wolman, and a study of output per man-hour in Ameri­
can industry since 1900, by Harry Jerome. An international study
of wage data is in progress, a report to be published by Prof. Henry
Clay, of the University of Manchester, following two conferences at
Geneva, the final one of which has not yet been held. A study of
the administration of labor laws in the United States is being con­
ducted under the auspices of the American Association for Labor
Legislation. Two studies have been organized under the Personnel
Research Federation. One is a study of restriction of output among
workers uninfluenced by unions, briefly called “ Conscious restriction
of output,” by Profs. William Leiserson and S. B. Mathewson, of
Antioch College; the other is a study of the technique and reliabil­
ity of the interview, by Dr. Walter V. Bingham.
Other council projects of interest in this field include studies of
penal farm colonies, a survey of research in interracial relations, an
investigation of the mental ability of the negro, studies of Mexican
immigration and Mexican labor in the United States, and a study
of negro migration. In addition, a number of projects have been
conducted by Social Science Research Council fellows in the field
of labor or industry.
The council, its staff, and advisory committees are continually
furnishing advice to. researchers and research organizations.

The Society of Industrial Engineers.
Engineering Building, 205 West Wacker Drive, Chicago,
111. George C. Dent, Executive Secretary.

A n o n p r o f i t organization founded in May, 1917, composed of
executives, engineers, works managers, etc., in industry Its declared
objects are: (1) To reduce waste and to increase efficiency, economy,
and good-will in industry and commerce, through the development,
dissemination, and application of scientific principles and methods
in management; (2) to promote a more general understanding of the
rights and interests of the public, investors, consumers, employees,
and executives; (3) to assist Federal, State, and local governments
in securing efficiency and economy concerning public affairs, and in
improving governmental activities affecting the management of in­
dustry and commerce; (4) to further the effective coordination of the
various functions of management.
The organization has a membership of 1,022, representing 118
different lines of industry, with local chapters in 14 large cities, and
student branches at 10 of the leading universities.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

131

The most important research committees are: Wage incentive
plans, time study engineering standardization, management termi­
nology, vaste elimination, plant maintenance, and elimination of
unnecessary fatigue in industry. Special investigations of indus­
trial subjects are carried on by local chapters.
Reports of research committees are published ty the society, and
a bulletin recording the activities of the local chapters and special
papers is published monthly.
In addition, the proceedings of national and special conventions
are published and contain valuable reports on research studies as
well as papers presented to the conventions on a wide range of
subjects. Recent publications of convention proceedings include:
Time study engineering conference (1928) and Trends in indus­
try (1929).

Structural Service Bureau.
705 Otis Building, Philadelphia, Pa.
T his bureau and members of its staff have collaborated with local
and national organizations and with governmental agencies in devel­
oping basic facts regarding economics of the building and construc­
tion industry.

Its consulting architect, D. Knickerbaeker Boyd, in collaboration
with Warner S. Hays, for the first time in this country, made an
investigation of time lost by the various building trades in any given
locality. The results were set forth in an address to the Engineers’
Club of Philadelphia on April 12, 1921, by Mr. Boyd and were pub­
lished in the Journal of the Engineers’ Club, June, 1921, issue, in an
article entitled “ The elimination of waste in the building industry.”
Mr. Boyd was also requested by the industrial relations committee
of the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce to arrange for the presen­
tation of views by labor at the conference on the construction indus­
tries held in Philadelphia on February 15-18, 1921. Because he had
been officially appointed by all labor organizations in that city as
“ spokesman ” and enjoyed also the confidence of other workers and
of organizations of employers, an array of speakers responded to his
call and their presentation of views and data occupying 36 pages in
the published proceedings of that conference constitute a notable
contribution, in connection with that whole conference and the
resolutions which it adopted, to the economics of the construction
industry.
The Structural Service Bureau also worked out the average number
of days’ employment which the Philadelphia bricklayer could nor­
mally expect in a year and the number of days he would probably
lose through unemployment, illness, and other causes beyond his
control. The results were published in the Labor Review of the
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, May, 1921 (pp. 107-110).
Similar figures which it worked out for all the building trades in
Philadelphia are given in the October, 1921, issue of the Labor
Review (pp. 98-100).
Further developments of these statistics including tables of time
lost, possible effective working-days, average days’ work per year,
and annual earnings in the building trades of Philadelphia were also
105636°— 30------ 10




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III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

published in an article, by D. Kniekerbacker Boyd of the Structural
Service Bureau, entitled “ Seasonal employment m building construc­
tion,” in Engineering News Record, issue of January 11, 1923 (pp.
63-65).
The staff of the Structural Service Bureau collaborated with the
committee on elimination of waste in industry of the Federated
American Engineering Societies and was instrumental in providing
much material for Chapter V, the building industry, by Sanford E.
Thompson, in the book, Waste in Industry, published by McGrawHill Co. for the Federated American Engineering Societies in 1921.
D. Knickerbacker Boyd, of the bureau, collaborated with the com­
mittee on seasonal operation in the construction industries of the
President’s conference on unemployment, as referred to in the book
by this title, published in 1924.

Taylor Society (Inc.).
29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y.
Managing Director.

H. S. Person,

O rg a n ized in 1911 as the Society to Promote the Science of Man­
agement; name changed in 1916 to honor the memory of Frederick
W. Taylor, pioneer in the development of science in management,
who had died in 1915.
Its objects are: First, to secure—for the common benefit of the
community, the worker, the manager, and the employer—full under­
standing and the adoption of the principles of administration and
management which, intelligently applied to organized effort, are
conducive to the gradual elimination of unnecessary labor and un­
duly burdensome toil; second, to promote a general recognition of the
fact that evaluation and application of those principles and the
mechanisms for their adaptation are the mutual concern of the com­
munity, the worker, the manager, and the employer; and third, to
inspire in each a constant adherence to the highest ethical conception
of their individual and collective responsibility.
The membership now consists of about 800 manufacturing and
merchandising executives, industrial, mechanical and management
engineers, personnel managers, students and teachers of management,
psychologists, economists, sociologists, journalists, and labor leaders,
classed into seven grades: Honorary members (elected for distin­
guished service); life members (who have prepaid all dues by pay­
ment of $500 or more); contributing members (firms or individuals
who contribute $100 or more annually); personal members (initia­
tion fee, $15; annual dues, $20); junior members (initiation fee, $5;
annual dues, $10); student associates (annual dues, $3); and firm
members, with two designated representatives who have all rights
and privileges of membership except the right to vote and hold office
(annual dues, $40).
National meetings bring the membership together at least twice a
year for the common consideration of noteworthy new ideas and
practices of management. In several cities throughout the country
the members have formed local sections, which meet as frequently
and regularly as the constituents desire.
The society names special committees from time to time to investi­
gate specific problems of management and to report at meetings. In




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

133

May, 1928, it called a 2-day conference in Detroit for the considera­
tion of the subject of time study in connection with the automobile
industry, the result of which was a significant review of prevailing
technique in that field in the light of the most advanced practices
in American industry generally. (Cf. Bulletins, Vol. V, No. 5,
October, 1920; Vol. VI, Nos. 5 and 6, October and December, 1921;
Vol. X III, No. 3, June, 1928.) Likewise, it was active with other
American interests in organizing the International Management
Institute at Geneva, Switzerland; it served on the American Com­
mittee on Participation in International Management Congresses and
helped organize the program and secure American papers for the
Prague Congress, 1924, and the Rome Congress, 1926. It organized a
conference in 1926 to promote the investigation undertaken in this
country and Canada by the British Industrial Mission to the United
States; in the spring of 1927, by invitation of the world economic
conference, Geneva, Switzerland, it sent Edward Eyre Hunt abroad
to present facts concerning the contribution of scientific management
to the organization and regulation of cartels; and it h^s been active
in cooperating with the International Society for the Promotion of
Human Relations in Industry, at The Hague. (Cf. Bulletins, Vol.
X II, No. 5, October, 1927; Vol. X II, No. 3, June, 1927.)
The Taylor Society cooperated in April, 1927, in a labor conven­
tion on the elimination of waste in industry, held under the auspices
of the Central Labor College of Philadelphia; it met in the spring
of 1928 with the United Textile Workers in Passaic, on unem­
ployment as a problem in management; in the winter of 1928, it
assisted the foreman’s and superintendent’s division of the Metal
Trades Association in laying out a program for the study of manage­
ment. (Cf. Bulletin, Vol. X II, No. 3, June, 1927.)
The main office of the Taylor Society acts in an advisory relation
to executive members on managerial problems throughout this and
nearly every other country. Stimulated by numerous requests from
students of scientific management in various countries, it completed
in 1929, a comprehensive treatise of the principles, history, and
status of scientific management in American industry, the chapters
being contributed by different members of the society. Simultane­
ous with publication in this country, it is to be translated into several
languages and printed in Europe.
Papers devoted to various aspects of personnel work and prob­
lems, to be found in the files of the Bulletin of the Taylor Society,
include:
Shop committees and trade-unions. By Theodore M. Ave-Lallemont. Vol.
5, No. 3, pp. 97-99.
Wage adjustment based on cost of living changes. By J. H. Batchelor.
Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 50-51.
Personnel activities of the Delaware & Hudson Railroad. By W . W . Bates.
Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 62-67.
Performance ratings and bonuses for salaried employees. By Howard G.
Benedict. Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 142-152.
Technique of cooperation— Union-management cooperation in the railroad
industry. By Otto S. Beyer, jr. Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 7-20.
Industrial psychology. By W . V. Bingham. Vol. 9, No. 6, pp. 243-248.
Man management. By Meyer Bloomfield. Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 157-162.




134

III. NON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Scientific management and organized labor, by Geoffffrey C. Brown (vol. 10,
No. 3, pp. 132-154) ; Workers’ participation in job study (vol. 12, No. 3, pp.
415-420) ; and Workers’ participation in management (vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 11-28).
Unemployment scores, by Morris L. Cooke (vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 163-170) ;
Some observations on workers’ organizations (vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 2-10) ; and
Who is boss in your shop (vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 3-10).
Taylor and trade-unions. By Frank B. Copley. Vol. 10, No. 4, pp. 182r-185.
Industrial relations. By Holland L. Cornick. Vol. 4, No. 6, pp. 32—
48.
How to figure labor turnover. By Frederick S. Crum. Vol. 4, No. 4, pp.
13-18.
Utilization of the maimed for the scientific organization of work. By Ch.
de Freminville, translated by Eleanor B. Cooke. Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 3-6.
A Dennisonian proposition, by Henry S. Dennison (vol. 5, No. 3, pp. 9 4 -9 7 );
and The President’s industrial conference of October, 1919 (vol. 5, No. 2,
pp. 79-92).
Hospital organization as shown by charts of personnel and powers and
functions. By Robert L. Dickinson. Vol. 3, No. 5, pp. 1-11.
Psychology in the organization of prison industries. By Edgar A. Doll.
Vol. 11, No. 4, pp. 219-223.
Methods of computing labor turnover. By Paul Douglas. Vol. 4, No. 4,
pp. 19-20.
The 3-shift system on the steel industry, by Horace B. Drury (vol. 6, No. 1,
pp. 2-49) ; and Scientific management and progress (vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 1-10).
A labor leader in scientific management. By Robert Fechner. Vol. 9, No.
2, pp. 90-92.
The engineering approach to the problem of continuous employment, by
Richard A. Feiss (vol. 6, No. 5, pp. 187-194) ; Scientific management during
times of depression (vol. 7, No: 4, pp. 126-128) ; Scientific management and
its relation to the health of the worker (vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 1 1 -1 3 ); and Taylor
the cooperationist (vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 86-88).
The new emphasis in the problem of reducing unemployment, by H. Feldman
(vol. 7, No. 5, pp. 176-182) ; and Unemployment compensation plans and labor
turnover (vol. 7, No. 6, pp. 241-243).
The illusion of final authority. By Mary Follett. Vol. 11, No. 6, p. 243.
Industrial relations— Some noteworthy recent developments. By Felix
Frankfurter. Vol. 4, No. 6, pp. 12-31.
Production incentives at the Curtis Publishing Co. By Walter D. Fuller.
Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 80-81.
Stop-watch time study: A symposium— An indictment and a defense. By
Frank B. and Lillian M. Gilbreth. Vol. 6, No. 3, pp. 97-135.
Scientific management and personnel work. By Mary Gilson. Vol. 9, No. 1,
pp. 39-50.
Remedies for unemployment. By J. D. Hackett. Vol. 7, No. 6, pp. 239-241.
Arbitrary management on the defensive. By Joseph K. Hart. Vol. 10, No. 1,
pp. 4-5.
Premium and bonus plans. By H. K. Hathaway. Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 59^-65.
Cost of living in relation to wage adjustments— A research made at the Holt
Manufacturing Co., Peoria, 111., under the direction of Ray M. Hudson. By Al­
fred B. Holt. Vol. 4, No. 5, pp. 29-46.
The supervisor of personnel. By Ernest M. Hopkins. Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 9-15.
Business cycles and unemployment. By Willard E. Hotchkiss. Vol. 9, No.
2, pp. 86-89.
Safeguarding industry by stabilizing employment. By Willford I. King.
Vol. 8, No. 3 pp. 85-95.
A practical plan for rating the efficiency of an office organization. By W . H.
Leffingwell. Vol. 8, No. 5, pp. 178-188.
The basis of industrial psychology. By Elton Mayo. Vol. 9, No. 6, pp.
249-259.
A method of evaluating clerical jobs and employees. By R. C. Nyman. Vol.
13, No. 4, pp. 170-173.
International Industrial Welfare Congress. By Louise C. Odencrantz. Vol.
10, No. 5, pp. 231-232.
Vehicular accident prevention. By J. E. Ogara. Vol. 13, No. 5, pp. 215-219.
The futility of lockouts and strikes. By Paul Ogilvie. Vol. 13, No. 6, pp.
219-224.
Industrial psychology, by Harlow S. Person (vol. 9, No. 4, pp. 163-171) ; The
manager, the workman, and the social scientist (vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 1 - 7 ) ; Scien­




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATION'S, ETC.

135

tific management, an analysis with particular emphasis on its attitude toward
human relations in industry (vol. 13, No. 5, pp. 199-205) ; Scientific manage­
ment and unemployment (vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 50-51) ; and The work-week or the
work-life? (vol. 13, No. 6, pp. 230-248).
Current wage theories. By C. A. Phillips. Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 1-3.
Mills and minds. By Arthur Pound. Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 83-98.
Principles of wage payments, by A. B. Rich (vol. 11, No. 4 pp. 214-218) ; and
*,
A wage system (vol. 5, No. 4, pp. 138-139).
Recent trends in industrial relations in Great Britain and Germany. By
Ben M. Selekman. Vol. 13, No. 5, pp. 178-186.
Mutual rating. By Henry Wood Shelton. Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 59-67 and vol.
7, No. 1, pp. 34—
36.
Raising the plane of industrial relations discussion. By Sumner H. Slichter.
Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 3-4.
Financial incentives. By Elliot Dunlap Smith. Vol. 12, No. 3, pp. 425-431.
Making the most of men. By Ida M. Tarbell. Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 80-81.
The field of personnel administration. By Ordway Tead. Vol. 8, No. 6, pp.
237-240.
The progressive relation between efficiency and consent, by Robert G. Valen­
tine (vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 7-20), and Two pioneer papers on industrial relations
(vol. 8. No. 6, pp. 225-236).
The social meaning of good management, by Mary van Kleeck (vol. 9, No. 6,
p. 242) ; and The interview as a method of research (vol. 11, No. 5, pp. 268-274).
Individuality in industry, by Robert B. Wolf (vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 2-8) ; and Con­
trol and consent (vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 5-18).
Experimental psychology in personnel problems. By C. S. Yoakum. Vol. 10,
No. 3, pp. 154-164.
Industrial relations symposium, Cambridge Meeting, October 4, 1919. Vol. 4,
No. 6, pp. 12-48.

Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry.
18 East Forty-first Street, New York, N. Y.
Macdonald, Secretary.

Ronald G.

An a s s o c i a t i o n organized for the encouragement of original
investigation and research work in mill engineering and the chem­
istry of paper, cellulose, and paper-making fibers generally; affiliated
to the American Paper and Pulp Association.
J o i n t T e x t b o o k C o m m i t t e e .— Has drawn up and published
(through McGraw-Hill Book Co.) a 5-volume text on the manu­
facture of plup and paper. Volumes 1 and 2 deal with related
technical subjects such as mathematics, chemistry, and physics, to
prepare the nontechnical student for the last three volumes which
discuss all phases of pulp and paper making. These texts are used
as the basis of correspondence courses offered to the men in the indus­
try by the university extension division of the University of Wiscon­
sin, the Massachusetts division of university extension, and the Insti­
tute of Industrial Arts of Canada.
T r a i n i n g f o r I n d u s t r y C o m m i t t e e . H. G. Noyes, chairman.—
Has divided the country “ into 12 areas with an area director in
charge of each section. His duties are twofold—first, to provide
summer employment in the mills for college students; and, second,
to arrange to have paper-mill superintendents and executives visit
the colleges and talk to the groups of men interested in the pulp and
paper industry. This makes it possible for technical men to obtain
some practical mill experience prior to their final entry into the
industry.”




136

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

The Thompson & Lichtner Co. (Inc.).
Statler Building, Boston, Mass.

is an organization of industrial engineers making investiga­
tions chiefly on a professional basis for clients. The organization is
made up of six divisions: Marketing, production and management,
cost and accounting, industry cooperation, engineering and testing,
and research. Personnel problems incident to each of these divi­
sions are covered in its work, but the larger phases of personnel work
are handled by the research division. This division includes research
studies for manufacturing and merchandising groups, trade asso­
ciations, and community, regional, or national civic and business
organizations. Studies of this character have been made for the
Hoover committee on elimination of waste in industry, the United
States Coal Commission, the New England Council, and the Boston
Chamber of Commerce.
Publications in the personnel field include:
T

h is

Time study and job analysis.
The building industry (Chap. V) and the boot and shoe industry (Chap.
V II) in Waste in Industry, published by the Hoover committee on elimina­
tion of waste in industry.
The practicability of continuous construction throughout the year (Chap.
VIII of Seasonal Operation in the Construction Industries).
Underground management in a bituminous coal mine (Chap. VII, seq. 1, of
What the Coal Commission Found).
Shoe manufacturing industry of New England, survey and report for the
Boston Chamber of Commerce, published by the chamber, 1925.
The foundry and machining industries of New England, for the Boston
Chamber of Commerce.

The Training School at Vineland, N. J.
Vineland, N. J. E. B. Johnstone, Sc. M., Director.
An i n s t i t u t i o n devoted to the interests of those whose minds

have not developed normally (a private institution but the State of
New Jersey sends here some of its mentally deficient wards).
T h e D e p a r t m e n t o f R e s e a r c h . Edgar A. Doll, Ph. D., director.—
Established in 1906. Former directors of research, Henry H. God­
dard and S. D . Porteus. The work of this department is devoted to
(1) diagnosis and classification of mentally deficient children and
adults, (2) graduate training of professional students in abnormal
and clinical psychology, (3) consultation examinations of a place­
ment and vocational guidance nature, and (4) psychological re­
search. The problems in research include (1) diagnosis, (2) charac­
teristics, (3) causes, and (4) amelioration of mental deficiency.
Special attention has been given of late to problems of industrial
and vocational classification and training. The present director is
consultant on problems of classification and training of inmate per­
sonnel in the State institutions of New Jersey with particular refer­
ence to correctional institutions.
The publication activities of this department are reported in an
extensive series of journal articles, monographs, and books. Many
of these publications appear in the Training School Bulletin, issued
monthly by the institution.
The department has also issued manjr other publications dealing
with numerous aspects of mental diagnosis, classification, and various




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, M C .

137

types of intelligence and other tests useful in personnel work, in­
cluding the translation of the writings of Binet and Simon. The
department played an important role in developing the army mental
tests. The work of the department is also revealed in such publica­
tions as Henry H. Goddard’s “ The Kallikak Family,” showing the
relation of mental deficiency to industrial problems. Much of the
present work of the department is devoted to the improvement of
the training of mental defectives by means of job analysis and im­
proved classification with scientific implications for personnel work
in general.

The Travelers.
Hartford, Conn.

William B. Bailey, Economist

of this company was established
in 1924 for the purpose of supplying policyholders with information
on personnel questions upon request. All work connected with the
service is handled in the office of the economist of the company. The
attempt is made to cover personnel work in all its phases. The
studies at present under way are industrial psychology and sugges­
tion systems.
Researches are not published, but information is available to pol­
icyholders upon request in the following specific personnel problems:
Safety; methods of paying wages (including premiums, bonuses, and
profit sharing); psychological tests and rating scales; education and
training; suggestion systems; works councils; unemployment insur­
ance ; benefit plans or associations; savings plans; stock ownership ;
health service for employees; recreation for employees; housing;
cafeterias and lunch rooms.
T

h e in d u s t r ia l r e l a t i o n s s e r v ic e

Edward L. Trudeau Foundation.
Saranac Lake, N. Y.

Edward R. Baldwin, M. D., Director.

inaugurated in December, 1916, as a memorial to
the American pioneer in tuberculosis research, whose name it bears,
and to continue the scientific investigations to which he had devoted
his life. The fund now amounts to $450,000, and the income is
devoted to the following purposes:
An

endow m ent

1. To maintain laboratories and carry on research into the nature, causes,
and treatment of tuberculosis.
2. To maintain regular courses of instruction for physicians and others in
the most advanced knowledge of the above subject, under the name of The
Trudeau School of Tuberculosis.
3. To offer young physicians and others the opportunities for research work,
while undergoing treatment for the disease, through the establishment of
fellowships.

For the past 10 years the staff of the Saranac Laboratory has
been engaged in the experimental study of pneumonoconiosis and
its relation to tuberculosis. With the cooperation of the United
States Public Health Service and that of the Metropolitan Life In­
surance Co. it has now become possible to conduct extended investi­
gations of the pathological, chemical, and bacteriological aspects of
these conditions. Thus far, the reactions to granite, marble, car­
borundum, quartz, soft coal, and asbestos dusts have been consid­
ered. In addition, the laboratory has cooperated with the Public




138

III. KOKOFEICIAL AGENCIES

Health Service in its study of the Barre granite industry. It is ex­
pected that some parts of a study of the Joplin County, Mo., lead
and zinc mining industry will also be carried on in this institution.
The plan of experimental procedure is being developed along the
following lines: (1) The character and extent of injury by various
dusts in the normal lung; (2) the effect of inhaled dusts upon pre­
existing and subsequently induced tuberculous infection and dis­
ease; (3) the degree of solubility of silica in the body fluids; (4) the
effects of various dusts upon the growth of the tubercle bacillus
both in vivo and in vitro.
The following publications have already appeared:
Gardner, L. U. Studies on the relation of mineral dusts to tuberculosis.
I.— The relatively early lesions in experimental pneumonoconiosis produced by
granite dust inhalation and their influence on pulmonary tuberculosis. (Am.
Rev. Tuberculosis, December, 1920, iv, 734.) II.— The relatively early lesions
in experimental pneumonoconiosis produced by marble dust inhalation and
their influence on pulmonary tuberculosis. (Ibid., November, 1922, vi, 782.)
III.— The relatively early lesions in experimental pneumonoconiosis produced
by carborundum dust inhalation and their influence on pulmonary tuberclosis.
(Ibid., July, 1923, vii, 344.)
------- Tuberculous infection and tuberculosis as modified by experimental
pneumonoconiosis. (Tubercle, 1924-25, vi, 336, 443.)
Cummings, D. E. Studies on experimental pneumonoconiosis. IV.— The
separation of particulate matter smaller than screen sizes into graded frac­
tions. (Journal of Industrial Hygiene, 1929, xi, No. 7, 245.)

Underwriters’ Laboratories.
207 East Ohio Street, Chicago, 111.

Dana Pierce, President.

and maintained by the National Board of Fire Un­
derwriters, for service—not profit: incorporated under the laws of
the State of Illinois in November, 1901. The object of Underwriters’
Laboratories is to bring to the user the best obtainable opinion on
the merits of appliances, devices, machines, and materials in respect
to life and fire hazards, accident, and theft prevention. Engineers
and inspectors are located throughout the United States and Canada.
The New York office (109 Leonard Street) is equipped for the
conduct of examinations and tests of all electrical devices under the
same conditions as those afforded at the principal office and testing
station in Chicago. An electrical laboratory is also maintained at
1014 Merchants’ Exchange Building, San Francisco.
Summaries of the laboratories’ reports are issued on printed cards
filed according to classifications, and cabinets containing these cards
are maintained at the offices of the principal boards of underwriters
and inspection bureaus in the United States, at many of the general
offices of insurance companies, by some insurance firms, certain Fed­
eral, State, and municipal departments, and at the offices of the
laboratories or of its engineers and inspectors in large cities. The
same information is also distributed by the following lists which are,
as a rule, revised semiannually:
E s t a b lis h e d

List
List
List
List
List
List

of
of
of
of
of
of

inspected fire protection appliances. July. 122 pp.
inspected gas, oil, and miscellaneous appliances. July. 112 pp.
inspected electrical appliances. April. 212 pp.
appliances inspected for accident hazard. October. 40 pp.
inspected automotive appliances. April. 48 pp.
inspected burglary protection appliances. January. 34 pp.




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

139

The results of the work in many classes of appliances are furnished
directly to building owners, architects, users, and other persons inter­
ested, by means of the laboratories’ engineers and stamps or labels
attached to such portion of the output as is found constructed in
accordance with standard requirements.
Schedules of fees for examinations and tests and of charges for
labels, as well as information regarding the three forms of super­
vision over goods marketed under the listings, namely, the reexamina­
tion, inspection, and label services, and a list of the addresses of
engineers and inspectors are given in the following pamphlet, obtain­
able on application: The organization, purpose, and methods of
Underwriters’ Laboratories (18 pp.)«
Underwriters’ Laboratories is one of the cooperating organizations
which constitute the electrical-safety conference, and is represented
in the fire-protection group of the American Standards Association,
the National Fire Protection Association, the American Society for
Testing Materials, and many others.

United Typothetse of America.
Tower Building, Washington, D. C.
Director.

Fred J. Hartman,

T h e United Typothetse of America (Inc.), the trade association
of the printing industry, was organized on October 17, 1887. The
first convention, held in Chicago on that date, was the result of a
general call to employing printers of the United States and Canada
for the “ interchange of opinion and the adoption of a wise policy ”
in regard to labor’s demand “ that nine hours shall constitute a day’s
labor.” Since that time, annual conventions have been held, the
forty-third having convened in Washington, D. C., September 16-19,
1929. With the passing of the years and the gradual evolution of
the trade association idea, these conventions have drifted away from
the discussion of controversial labor questions and have concerned
themselves almost entirely with the discussion and adoption of tech­
nical measures pertaining to finance, accounting, production, market­
ing, merchandising, and the training and selection of the personnel.
The association is a somewhat loose federation of some fifty-odd
local associations scattered quite generally over the United States
and portions of Canada, with the general offices located in Washing­
ton, D. C. Each local association has its own constitution and by­
laws and legal status, the members of which automatically become
members of the United Typothetae of America. The present mem­
bership of the United Typothetse of America is approximately 2,100.
The source of income is by dues assessed upon members, based upon
the mechanical pay roll of the member-firms. The minimum dues
are $4.50 a month per $1,000 of the annual mechanical pay roll.
The activities of the association cover the entire field of printing
management, along the specialized lines of production, marketing,
finance, research, and education.
The research work consists of fact finding, covering every phase
or condition in the industry. The association is now concerned with
the program for scientific research, covering printing processes,
equipment, and materials. This is a part of the general field of




140

HI. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

management which is to be given major consideration by the associa­
tion during the next four years.
The association has developed a far-flung educational program
reaching from the apprentice to the executive. It provides for per­
sonnel training in and for the industry. Cooperative measures have
been worked out with public and private schools of printing in the
United States and in Canada, which are the main source of em­
ployee supply. A Typothetse educational foundation, consisting of
$225,000 had been established at the Carnegie Institute of Technology
in June, 1927, where two chairs of printing have been endowed.
The training at Carnegie is concerned with printing management,
rather than with craftsmanship. Local Typothetee classes are held
in estimating, cost finding, and other management subjects. A com­
prehensive educational literature covering every phase of the in­
dustry is Typothetse’s main contribution toward better training of
printing personnel.
Typothetce Bulletin, published each week by the United Typothetae
of America, is the official organ of the association. Its purpose is to
furnish constructive and informative material pertaining to the
varied and manifold problems of management in the printing
business.
U. T. A. Typographic Library.—A set of books ultimately to be
composed of 65 volumes when all of the volumes are published, and
now containing 43 volumes. These books cover the fundamental
processes of the industry, designed specifically as reference books
for apprentices.
Standard textbooks amd apprenticeship lessons.—Written primarily
for use as source material for teachers of printing; any apprentice,
however, having the equipment at his disposal can follow in home
study the problems and questions in the lessons and books to great
profit.
Manuals on apprenticeship.—For the use of employers, foremen,
and instructors.
Management courses.—Courses in estimating, cost finding, account­
ing, advertising, and principles of salesmanship, used principally by
local associations in classes on these subjects. They are also adapted
to home study by the individual who has had some experience in the
particular line.
Printing Education.—A 16-page magazine issued five times the
year for teachers of printing in public and private schools.

Vocational Adjustment Bureau for Girls.
336 East Nineteenth Street, New York, N. Y.
Ittleson, President; Emily T. Burr, Director.

Mrs. Henry

O r g a n i z e d in 1919 to serve as a research and placement agency for
the Big Sister organizations, and other welfare bodies concerned with
the problem of the maladjusted girl. It is supported by membership
fees, grants from foundations and contributions from interested
individuals.
The Vocational Adjustment Bureau limits its field of activity to
problem girls between the ages of 14 and 30. About 60 per cent of
the cases handled are below normal intelligence; a large percentage
are emotionally unstable, some show psychopathic or neurotic tenden­




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

141

cies, and some are delinquent. The purpose of the bureau is to
attempt, through proper study and placement, to assist these girls to
become self-supporting and economically productive.
Publications of the bureau to date are:
An industrial calendar. By Katherine Treat.
A placement bureau and workshop for maladjusted girls. By Emily T. Burr.
Are we testing the right people: A way out for misfits. By Emily T. Burr.
Tests for garment machine operators. By Katherine Treat.
Industrially redeemable. By Emily T. Burr.
Adapting the feeble-minded to industry. By Emily T. Burr.
A technique for job analysis. By Vera E. Dye and Edna W . Unger.

Studies at present under way by the bureau are: Minimum levels
of accomplishment; team of tests for electric power machine opera­
tors; a report of the Vocational Adjustment Bureau over a 10-year
period, 1919-1929; and a study of its therapeutic workroom over a
period of four years.
In addition, the two following studies based on the records of the
bureau are available for reference in its office: A Study of the
psychological and sociological factors concerned in the industrial
adjustment of 100 girls of subnormal mentality, by Gertrude Breese,
and a Study of placement of 186 problem girls handled by the bureau
(giving in detail the kinds of jobs held, requirements, length of
service, and reasons for leaving), by Muriel Lanz.

Vocational Service for Juniors.8
122 East Twenty-fifth Street, New York, N. Y.
H. S. Hayes, Director.

Dr. Mary

M a i n t a i n s a fr e e e m p lo y m e n t b u reau w h e re y o u n g p e o p le fr o m 14
to 2 0 are g u id e d in to in v e s tig a te d jo b s su ite d , w h e re p o ssib le , to th e ir
a b ilitie s a n d in terests.

Drew up and secured the indorsement of a plan for the improve­
ment of the junior employment service of the State of New York.
Maintains an employment information service that tells adults
and juniors which of the nonprofit-making employment agencies of
the city is best suited to their particular needs.
Through a 5-year service demonstration of the value of vocational
counseling in the junior high schools secured the establishment of
the position of “ teacher of vocational and educational guidance ” in
the New York City schools. Now cooperates with the board of
education in the further development of this work.
Makes use of mental alertness and achievement tests in connection
with educational guidance, scholarship selection, and employment.
Reveals significant facts about vocational guidance and junior
placement in New York City through research studies. A study of
the records of 28,000 children who have applied at its employment
bureaus in the past 10 years will be published in 1930.
Publishes a directory of opportunities for vocational training in
New York City, which gives full information about all schools
preparing young people for various vocations.
8 Formerly Vocational Guidance and Employment Service for Juniors.




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Directs an apprentice-training program in the major phases of
vocational guidance in centers throughout the country for specially
qualified graduate students.
Recent publications in the personnel field are:
The fourth edition of the directory of opportunities for vocational training
in New York City. Published in September, 1925.
How boys and girls get jobs, by Margaret Barker. Published in the Personnel
Journal, August, 1927.
Auto mechanics as a field for junior workers, by Evelyn Heyman. Published
in the Personnel Journal, December, 1928.
Some problems in junior placement, by Clare Lewis. Published in the
Personnel Journal, August, 1929.

Waterfront Employers of Seattle.
564 Colman Building, Seattle, Wash. F. P. Foisie, Indus­
trial Relations Manager.
O n e o f t h e major activities of this organization of employers in
the shipping industry is organized accident prevention and the de­
velopment of safety codes for longshore labor. Studies are carried
on continually of earnings of longshoremen, and of the frequency,
severity, cost, and causation of accidents. The organization has
been instrumental in developing and promulgating the Pacific coast
marine safety code for stevedoring operations on board ship.

Woman’s Occupational Bureau.
1111 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. Katherine
W oodruff, Director.
T h i s is a vocational counseling and placement agency established
in 1916, which makes extensive surveys of the employment field
both from the standpoint of opportunity offered and of the require­
ments of the various positions handled by the bureau. Among its
most recent publications are:
Women in clerical and secretarial work in Minneapolis. By M. C. Elmer.
Opportunities for women trained in home economics (a study of Minneapolis
and St. Paul). By William H. Stead.
The profession of social work. By Frank J. Bruno.
Library work as a profession. By Gratia Countryman.
Nursing as a profession. By Ruth Houlton.

Women’s Educational and Industrial Union.
264 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass.
O r g a n i z e d 1877 and incorporated 1880, to promote the educational
industrial, and social advancement of women.
D e p a r t m e n t o f R e s e a r c h . Prof. Lucile Eaves, director.—The
expense and direction of this part of the union activities are shared
with Simmons College (see p. 179). Four fellowships with annual
stipends of $500, three furnished by the union and one by the Savings
Banks Association of Massachusetts, are awarded anually to woman
college graduates with training in economics and sociology. These
graduate students usually engage in cooperation research projects
shared by other groups registered at Simmons College. They are
given a year’s training in preparation for professional research
positions, which includes planning schedules and codes, arranging




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

143

of statistical tables, the use of punching, sorting, counting and cal­
culating machines, interpretation of statistical data, and literary
presentation of results of research. This fulfills the requirements
for the degree of master of science in research at Simmons College.
The results of investigations made and published, 1910-1921,
mainly by other agencies, have been issued in a series entitled
“ Studies in Economic Relations of Women ” (v. 1-11). A study of
Women Professional Workers, made for the union by Elizabeth
Kemper Adams, was published in 1921 by the Macmillan Co., New
York.
The following investigations have been made since 1921:
Gainful employment for handicapped women. By Lucile Eaves. Pamphlet
published by the Women’s Educational and Industrial Union, 1921.
The child and the machine (industrial accidents suffered by wage-earning
children). By Lucile Eaves. The Survey, January 8, 1921.
Savings for old age of women shoe workers. By Alice Channing. The
Survey, September 16, 1921.
Facts worth knowing about women savers. By Selma Eversole. The
Bankers Magazine, June, 1922.
Finding work for handicapped women. By Lucile Eaves. Hospital Social
Service, July, 1922.
A lariat for opportunity (funds available for continuing the education of
handicapped children). By Louise A. Schlichting. The Survey, December 15,
1923.
Who wants old age pensions? To-day’s producers. By Louise Schlichting.
More women than men. By Mabel P. Taylor. The Survey, July 15, 1924.
A legacy to wage-earning women. A study of working women in Brattleboro,
Vt. By Lucile Eaves and associates. Published by Women’s Educational and
Industrial Union, 1925. 135 pp.
The “ aged citizens” of Massachusetts (summary of the report of the Massa­
chusetts Commission on Old Age Pensions). By Lucile Eaves. The Survey,
February, 1926.
Productivity of a New England cotton mill. By Ann Jamba. Labor Review
(U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics), October, 1926.
Radcliffe’s working wives. By Anne Byrd Kennon. Radcliffe Quarterly,
January, 1927.
College wives who work. By Anne Byrd Kennon. Journal of Association of
University Women, X X , 100-106, June, 1927.
Why workers borrow— 4,000 credit union loans. By Mildred John. Labor
Review (U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics), July, 1927.
Cooperative credit (thrift agencies maintained by the New England Telephone
& Telegraph Co.). By Mildred John. The Survey, October 15, 1927.
The Christmas club idea in Boston. By Mildred John. The Bankers Maga­
zine, December, 1926 (also published in Our Boston, October, 1927).
Why workers borrow; a credit-union study. By Mildred John. Our Boston,
December, 1927.
The school and the working child. By Mary A. Clapp. Published by
Massachusetts Child Labor Committee, 1928.
The part-time worker in Boston settlements. By Anne Byrd Kennon.
Journal Sociology and Social Research, January-February, 1928.
Opportunities for employment of Boston colored girls. By Evlyn C. Klugh.
Opportunity, October, 1928.
When chronic illness hits the wage-earner. By Lucile Eaves. The Survey,
July 15, 1929.
Unemployment; a study of the case histories of 1,000 clients of three Boston
family relief agencies. By Wilhelmina Luten. The Family, 1930.

Unpublished reports of research—usually typewritten manuscripts
of master’s dissertations prepared under Doctor Eaves’ direction by
Simmons College students—may be consulted at the rooms of the
research department of the Women’s Educational and Industrial
Union, 264 Boylston Street. The following are of interest to investi­
gators of personnel or industrial topics:



144

I I I . N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

P ositions and salaries o f social w orkers.
M artin. 1920.

B y N aida L. C urtis and H elen E.

Old-age provision of women shoe workers in Lynn. By Alice Channing and
Elna Anderson. 1921.
Life insurance of women. By Fressa Sample Baker. 1922.
Thrift education in 24 mutual savings banks of Boston. By Selma A. Eversole. 1922.
Investments and savings reported by a group of 400 gainfully employed
women in Boston. By Selma A. Eversole. 1922.
Women depositors in Boston savings banks. By Selma A. Eversole. 1922.
The cooperative bank as a savings institution. By Beatrice McConnell. 1922.
Loans made by the Industrial Credit Union of Boston. By Marie Russell.
1923.
Part-time paid work of women in Boston colleges. By Dorothy G. Bancroft,
Gertrude McKee, and K. MacLarnie. 1925.
Skin cases; industrial clinic, Massachusetts General Hospital. By Suzanne
Dubreuith. 1925.
Aged female industrial workers having little or no old-age provision. Re­
ports by Elsie D. Harper, Doris Crouse, Mary M. Haller, edited by Lucile
Eaves. 1925.
Part-time paid work done by women students in colleges of Boston. By
Eileen F. Evans. 1925.
Present economic status of aged women industrial workers. By Eileen F.
Evans. 1925.
Old-age occupations. By Jeannette Dunster Studley. 1925.
Labor turnover in two Boston confectionery plants. By Isobel G. God­
dard. 1926.
Occupational hazards in the textile industry. By Ann Jamba. 1926.
Analysis of 500 compensable injuries to women working in Massachusetts
nontextile industries. By Katharine G. Pollock. 1926.
Twenty-five patients given vocational guidance tests, Boston Psychopathic
Hospital. By Jessie W . MacNaught. 1928.

Woodward, Fondiller & Ryan, Consulting Actuaries.
75 Fulton Street, New York, N. Y.

in 1923 by Joseph Hooker Woodward.
The firm of Woodward, Fondiller & Ryan employs a large num­
ber of Fellows and associates of the various actuarial societies, who
are engaged in consulting service on all types of insurance matters
and for pension funds. Research on all kinds of problems, including
those of a personnel character, is made for clients. Employment
management and industrial relations (such as selection and place­
ment of employees, job analyses and specifications, rating and grad­
ing, lines of promotion, labor turnover, absenteeism, wage and other
incentives, joint control, etc.) are handled for the insurance
companies.
In the pension field research activities cover fields of analytical
study of the need for pensions at various ages, the fitting of plans
to the individual needs of the industry so as to effect the proper
economies in (a) not pensioning too quickly if they are efficient,
and (b) not deferring retirement if the employee has reached the
point where retirement is necessary; analytical studies of the rate
of labor turnover in connection with the proper appraisal of the
cost of pension plans; analytical studies o f mortality and rates of
disablement in various industries; studies of the cost of financing
pensions according to the method best fitted to the industry’s needs;
analysis of the cost of retiring employees according to age at entry
to show the cost of retiring people coming in at ages 20, 30, 40, 50,
etc.; and studies showing that in many industries the cost of pen­
F

ounded




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

145

sioning employees taken on at ages 40, 50, or 55 is substantially less
as percentage of salary over their term of service, than is the case
for employees taken on at earlier ages.
The firm’s activities on research are almost entirely for private
clients and are the property of those clients. Little is available,
except in the form of a few papers and discussions for technical
societies, on the pension problem, although the firm expects in 1930
to publish a resume of its analyses on various important factors in
the problem.
Discussions
American Management Association, Bulletin No. 108. Discussion of Kodak
retirement annuity, life insurance and disability benefit plan. By Jonathan G.
Sharp (p. 18) and by Gilbert E. Ault (p. 28).
The Record— American Institute of Actuaries— October, 1929, Vol. XV III,
Part II. Discussion of Mr. Hohaus’ paper on group annuities. By Jonathan
G. Sharp (p. 240), by Gilbert E. Ault (p. 243), and by S. F. Conrod (p. 266*

Young Men’s Christian Associations, National Council.
347 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y.
p e r s o n n e l d i v i s i o n of the National Council of the Young
Men’s Christian Associations, Owen E. Pence, research secretary, is
carrying on extensive research work among the employed personnel
of the various Y. M. C. A. units. While these researches apply
chiefly to Y. M. C. A. staffs, treating Y. M. C. A. work as a distinct
profession, they are not wholly of an internal nature, and the scien­
tific method of treatment makes the results of these studies of far
wider application.
A series of studies has been made bearing upon selection, training,
rating, job analysis, promotion, turnover, etc., of positions within the
organizations—executive secretaries, physical directors, and other
employed workers. These include analyses of the activities of Y. M.
C. A. executive secretaries and physical directors by the Y. M. C. A.
College in Chicago and construction of job specifications for asso­
ciation secretaryships by the personnel division of the National Coun­
cil; personality ratings as instruments of selection, educational
status, and a study of promotion methods, made by the personnel
division; and a number of studies of personnel records and interview
technique.
The Y. M. C. A. College in Chicago is at present making a research
study of salaries at the professional level along three lines: (a) A
study of Y. M. C. A. secretaries and workers in comparable profes­
sions; (6) a study of the bases of compensation in different profes­
sions, as civil service, foreign service, etc.; (<?) a study of the eco­
nomic, social, and cultural demands upon secretaries of different
types. Professions used for comparative purposes are law, medicine,
dentistry, ministry, and teaching. Publication of this survey in
1930 is expected.
The National Council is also conducting certain investigations
wholly unrelated to internal organization; for example, a study of
the occupational choices of high-school boys, based on data secured
from negro high-school boys in Raleigh and Winston-Salem, N. C.;
Atlanta, Ga.; Roanoke, Ya.; Knoxville, Tenn.; St. Louis, Mo.; and
Washington, D. C.; and white high-school boys in Chattanooga,

The




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Teiiii.; St. Louis, Mo.; Columbus, Ohio; and Denver, Colo. The
findings of this study will be made available “ for whatever signifi­
cance or use they may be for curricula and program building to edu­
cators, teachers, Y. M. C. A. secretaries, and others who are working
with high-school boys.”
The employment of women in the Y. M. C. A. is another current
study made by the personnel division, the purpose of which is to
ascertain the extent to which women are being employed regularly
in local Y. M. C. A.’s in a secretarial capacity. Clerical work is not
included in the study. While its direct purpose is simply enumera­
tion, a it will lead also to inquiry as to the description of tasks which
it is believed women may perform as satisfactorily as men, and the
effect upon the profession of such employment.”
Publications connected with Y. M. C. A. personnel work are :
The personnel factor. An occasional journal presenting studies and discus­
sions of interest to the working personnel of the movement. (347 Madison
Avenue, New York, N. Y.)
The activities of the executive secretary. By L. W. Bartlett, Ii. M. Hogan,
A. W . Boyd. (University of Chicago Press, 1929.)
The activities of the physical director. By L. W . Bartlett and Alden Boyd.
(University of Chicago Press, 1929.)
Series of character and personality tests. By Goodwin B. Watson and
others. (Association Press, New York, 1929.)
Annual summary of research and studies published by the conference on
research. (Association Press, 347 Madison Avenue, New York.)

A number of the current studies which have been referred to
herein will be published during 1930; others will be made available
for reference use.

Young Women’s Christian Associations of the United
States of America, National Board.
600 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y.
General Secretary.

Anna V. Rice,

O r g a n i z e d in December, 1906, when individual associations hereto­
fore members of one of two national bodies—the International Board
of Women’s Christian Associations and the American committee
affiliated with the World’s Young Women’s Christian Association—
united to form the Young Women’s Christian Associations of the
United States of America and created the National Board. The
biennial convention, a meeting of accredited representatives of all
these local associations, is the legislative body for the whole and the
National Board its executives committee between successive conven­
tions. Proceedings of these conventions are issued in report form.
Through the work of 17 departments and divisions, and through
the studies and service of special councils and committees and by
conferences, the National Board acts as a resource and offers an
advisory service to 258 affiliated city associations, 139 town associa­
tions, 44 rural and district associations, and to 541 student associa­
tions representing a total membership of 698,418 women and girls in
all groups and classes in the community in more than 2,000 centers.
The service of the National Board to the local units consists of
help on organization, program, and personnel matters and work with
those dealing with membership groups such as business and pro­
fessional women, industrial women and girls, foreign-born and In-




ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.

147

dian women, younger girls, both those in school and those employed.
The development of work with these groups looks to a better under­
standing on their part of the communities in which they live, of
the social and economic forces which affect their lives to a better
informed and therefore more adequately carried citizenship responsi­
bility, and to a better understanding between all groups in the
community.
While the National Board is manifestly a service rather than a
research organization, certain personnel activities and studies are
carried on by its departments and divisions, some continuously, others
only occasionally as necessity requires.
The National Board maintains its own personnel bureau which
functions for the 3,700 members of the employed personnel and for
the local associations in the following ways: (1) It recruits recent
college graduates and young women irom related professional fields
for association work; (2) it offers the service of a specialized em­
ployment bureau to local associations and to association workers;
(3) it studies the best personnel practices in the local associations,
in other organizations, and in industry and offers an advisory serv­
ice to the local units in matters relating to salary scales, rates of
increase, hours of work, vacations, sick leave, leaves for study, con­
ference attendance, and other personnel problems; (4) it studies
and experiments with improved methods in references, rating scales,
recommendation forms, interview procedures; and (5) with the help
of graduate students it has studied the qualifications of workers now
in service in the associations of the United States and causes of
turnover in this professional group.
On the national staff is one secretary assigned to the task of work­
ing with the employment departments of local associations through
which 161,174 placements were made in 1928. There is a marked
increase in the amount of employment and vocational work done in
local associations and an increasing emphasis in all of them on the
vocational aspects of employment work. To meet this need the
National Board has been building its equipment in this field. Un­
published studies have been made cooperatively by the National
Board and local associations in two communities to discover the
extent to which the employment service needs of the communities are
met.
The publications in the field of personnel research include:
Present trends in the clerical occupations. A study of the history and
present status of the clerical occupations, deals particularly with the effects
of mechanization on office work and the present conditions of clerical workers,
including wages, educational requirements, and opportunities for advancement.
1928. 44 pp.
Jobs and marriage. Contains discussion outlines for the study of married
women in the business occupations, with questions and source material for
the consideration of the effects of work after marriage in the relations between
women and the husbands, the effects on children and on the home, the neces­
sity for the double salary and the influence on the offices themselves of the
employment of married women. 1928. 101 pp.
The young employed girl. A study of why girls go to work and what girls
go to work, prepared under the direction of the Carola Woerishoffer graduate
department of social economy and social research of Bryn Mawr College and
of Seybert Institution of Philadelphia. 1927, 124 pp.
105636°— 30------ 11




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Job analysis of industrial secretaries in the Young Women’s Christian
Association. Preliminary draft. 1928. 64 pp. (Mimeographed only.)
Unemployment. A study outline for leaders of discussion groups on the
problems of unemployment, designed especially for use by groups of business
or industrial girls, joint business and industrial groups, committees, and
boards. 1929. 30 pp.
Study of personnel practices in international institutes. Made by the depart­
ment of immigration and foreign communities, covering salaries, hours, vaca­
tions, training, turnover, and opportunities for further study and professional
advancement as applied to nationality secretaries in international institutes.
Available for reference only.
Studies in personnel. Deals particularly with causes of leaving, and profes­
sional standards in the Y. W. C. A. Published only in the form of a summary
in a series of articles in the Woman’s Press, January, February, and March,
1928.
Study of hours and wages of household employees. A continuous study,
interim reports of which have been published in the Woman’s Press in 1929.
Married women in industry. A continuous study made by the industrial
department, a report of which has appeared in the Woman’s Press, February,
1929, and a summary of which will appear in an early issue of the Survey.
The Young Women’s Christian Association as an employer. A study now
in process, made in cooperation with the Women’s Bureau of the United States
Department of Labor, a summary to appear in the April issue of the Woman’s
Press.
Study of wages in the silk industry in Pennsylvania. Made in connection
with the women’s and children’s bureau of that State, and published by the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, department of labor and industry. 1929.
74 pp.

Dennison Manufacturing Co.
Framingham, Mass.

J. S. Keir, Economist.

of the Dennison Manufacturing Co. is exten­
sive, but research in connection with it is chiefly such as is needed
in the development of personnel plans, and is not ordinarily pub­
lished. A study of occupations and ratings was made to furnish a
basis for determining qualifications for managerial partnership, the
results of which have been published by the American Management
Association under the title “A method of determining who shall par­
ticipate under a managerial profit-sharing plan.” (Institute of
Management Series No. 10.)
The

personn el w o rk

Norton Co.
Worcester, Mass.
M a n u f a c t u r e r s of grinding wheels and grinding machinery.
S erv ic e D e p a r tm e n t. W. Irving Clark, M . D ., service director.—

The personnel work of the Norton Co. is extensive and is organized
under the following departments: Employment, health, sanitation,
dental, athletic, catering, safety engineering, visiting nurse, hous­
ing, and education.
Published researches lie chiefly in the fields of industrial health
and hazards. Health and safety bulletins a re issued, and the fol­
lowing articles by Doctor Clark have been published:
A study of back strains.
The dust hazard in the abrasive industry (first study, 1925, second, 1929).
Effects of accidents on cardiac employees.
The fate of old employees.
Fractures.
Foreign body in the eye.
The general management of health in industry.
Heart disease in industry.




a s s o c ia t io n s ,

So c i e t i e s ,

f o u n d a t io n s , e t c .

149

Hernia in a grinding-wheel factory.
Our false standards of disability.
Old workers remain in industry.
Industrial medicine.
The treatment of burns.

Other publications include:
Relation of industrial surgeon to industry and society, and welfare insurance
and the factory, both by Dr. J. F. Curran; and Norton service to employees.

Scovill Manufacturing Go.
Waterbury, Conn.
O f f i c e o f t h e G e n e r a l S u p e r in te n d e n t. John H. Goss, vice
president and general superintendent.—All activities in industrial
relations in the Scovill Manufacturing Co., whether of a research or
administrative character, are centralized in this office. These are
described briefly in the following paragraphs.
Activities of the employment office, supervised by a graduate psy­
chologist, comprise (1) research in methods of selection of new em­
ployees, using psychological tests, physical measurements, and personal-history items; (2) similar research among candidates for
transfer and promotion; (3) statistical study of turnover and em­
ployment records in collaboration with the company statistician;
(4) studies of special occupations with a view to necessary training;
and, on the side of administration, an effort (5) for increased ac­
curacy and value of all employment records; and (6) for increased
effectiveness in interviewing applicants and candidates for promo­
tion.
The work of the hospital, supervised by a physician, includes (1)
care of all injury cases from beginning to end, involving reference
to specialists when necessary; (2) free examination and treatment of
minor illnesses, not due to injury, upon the application of any em­
ployee; (3) investigation of accident conditions, with the collabora­
tion of the compensation supervisor; (4) statistical study of acci­
dents and treatment of records (by the company statistician); (5)
study of accident proneness, by occupation and by individual, in
collaboration with the employment office; and (6) study of occupa­
tional diseases and hazards.
The safety engineer and compensation supervisor, separately or in
collaboration, (1) investigate all accidents; (2) plan and install
safety appliances, rules, instructions, and campaigns; (3) administer
compensation; (4) maintain records; and (5) join with the hospital,
employment office, and company statistician in study of accident
records.
The training of employees is handled partly by the foremen, partly
by special printed instructions prepared for given occupations and
used as a basis for certificate examinations, partly through wellestablished apprentice courses, and partly by a special training course
for executive candidates or by a part-time cooperative arrangement
with some of the universities. Recreational activities are organized
and controlled by a committee of the employees, with a full-time
chairman. Training and recreational activities are not at the present
time under research.




150

m . NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

Publications
Selective placement of metal workers. By M. Pond. Journal of Personnel
Research, January, February, March, 1927; Vol. V, No. 9, pp. 345-368, No. 10,
pp. 405-417, No. 11, pp. 452-466.

Western Electric Co.
195 Broadway, New York, N. Y.
T he personnel research work of the Western Electric Co. is car­
ried on by the personnel organizations of the company. The person­
nel director, located at New York, is responsible for the coordination
of various activities and studies in the field of industrial relations.
At plant locations the personnel organizations carry on studies
pertinent to their operations.
Studies, reports, surveys, and investigations which may be classi­
fied as personnel research are as follows:
Job classification study.— The objectives of the plan are the setting up of labor
grades and compensation schedules for office and technical jobs, and criteria
to guide and assist supervisors in respect to matters of salary increases and
promotions.
Cost of living study.— This study is designed to bring together, examine criti­
cally and to interpret existing information on the cost of living, wage differen­
tials, and principles on which to base wages.
Employee census.— This compilation, made biennially, is an enumeration of
age, length of service, and weekly earnings which is used to compute the pen­
sion liability of the company, changes in the general level of compensation, labor-turnover rates classified by length of service, salary and wage payments for
vacations, and similar analyses of specific personnel problems.
College graduate study.— An annual review of college graduate records is
compiled. The status of college graduates is examined' with reference to sal­
ary progress, stability of employment, and development in the ranks of the
company.
Rating forms.— A form has been developed and ratings have been made of
the supervisory forces of the company. Further attention is being paid to im­
provement of the form in order to establish an effective method of measuring
abilities of individual employees.
Training plans.— Coexistent with the work being conducted in the formation
of rating scales, suitable training plans will be worked out for the training of
capable employees to meet the need for supervisors.
Report of wage and working conditions survey, March 1929.— The purpose
of this survey was to ascertain and compare the wages prevailing in outside
companies for selected occupations analagous to those in the Western Electric
Co., and to determine whether or not appreciable variations or trends in wage
levels had occurred since 1926.
Aptitude tests.— Experimental work is being conducted at our plant loca­
tions to determine the practical use which can be made of tests to aid in the
selection of office and of factory workers.
An investigation of rest pauses, working conditions, and industrial efficiency.—
An experimental test room has been in operation since 192.7 to provide informa­
tion about the optimum working conditions for employees.
Interviewing program.— An experimental program of interviewing shop em­
ployees concerning working conditions has been introduced in one plant. The
interview is conducted by trained employees who offer each individual inter­
viewed an opportunity of expressing himself confidentially and in full detail
about any conditions which affect his job.
Health and safety studies.-^Constant attention is paid to the provision of
safe working conditions, but the chief emphasis has been placed on the edu­
cation of employees in regard to favorable health and safety practices. Other
features of the health and safety program that are being studied are ventila­
tion, posture, nutrition, treatments for the common cold, and rest homes for
employees.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

151

Final reports of studies and investigations are not published, but
are kept largely for administrative use, although they are distributed
in a limited field. Information concerning the company’s person­
nel activities and researches is, however, given upon request.

( b) UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES
Municipal University of Akron.
Akron, Ohio.
or E n g in e e r in g . Fred E . Ayer, dean.—Established in
1914, this college has a 5-year cooperative engineering course,
patterned after the “ Cincinnati plan,” in which the students are
grouped in two sections, one of which is at work in local engineering
shops (at a minimum wage of 30 cents per hour) and the other in
attendance at the university, and these sections change places every
nine weeks. The shop work and the university work are coordinated
by technically trained men experienced in engineering practice.
A cooperative course in municipal engineering has been arranged
in which the students work half time in the different engineering
departments of the city of Akron.
The large rubber companies in Akron have established well-defined
training courses on the cooperative plan in which students spend
soma time in every department of the plant. The length of this
course is 5 years of 11 months each. There is now in operation a
course in industrial engineering on the same cooperative basis.
There are two men employed by the university who are not only con­
ducting night classes in foremanship training at the university but
are also handling the same type of work in the plants of two of the
large rubber companies.
C o lle g e

Boston University.
525 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass.
V o c a t i o n a l D e p a r tm e n t, C o lle g e o f B u sin e ss A d m in is tr a t io n .
jH@r&ce G . Thacker.—The function of the department is to supervise

the required employment of students, conducting personal ana group
fconfemnces, with general instruction and guidance, and individual
(criticism. In addition to vocational conferences and a special course
in vocational problems, employment during the final year in an
approved business is required of day students, under the joint
supervision of the employer and the college. The student is under­
stood to be serving in a modified apprenticeship relation to the firm
.and to be carrying on special laboratory study as part of his college
.requirement.
L a b o r a n d P e r s o n n e l M a n a g e m e n t. R. G. Wells, director.—An
elective course “ open to executives and those who demonstrate their
ability to profit by the course.” A comprehensive course dealing
with every phase of the labor problem and the control of employees
in commercial and in industrial establishments; based on practical
experience and presented from the practical point of view. Special
emphasis upon the methods of building up and maintaining aa
;adequate working force and organization, with the concurrent probilems of personnel and employment management.




152

in .

n o n o f f ic ia l

a g e n c ie s

Bryn Mawr College.
Bryn Mawr, Pa.
C arola W oerishoffer G raduate D epartment of S ocial E conomy
S ocial R esearch. Dr. Susan M. Kingsbury, director.— Estab­
lished in 1915 as a graduate school to prepare students for profes­
sional service dealing with industrial and social relations. In 1918,
with the support and cooperation of the National W ar Council of
the Young Women’s Christian Association, courses in industrial
supervision, employment management, and labor organization were
introduced to meet the demands of industry for trained women to
fill positions as supervisors of women’s work, employment managers,
etc. This division has now been made permanent, as the Grace H.
Dodge Foundation, through a fund of $100,000 recently given to
Bryn Mawr College by Mr. John D. Rockefeller, jr., for the endow­
ment of instruction in industrial relations in this department, and
additional endowment is being raised to provide scholarships and
fellowships.

and

The instruction in industrial supervision and personnel administra­
tion is given bv Dr. Eleanor L. Dulles and includes a graduate course
dealing with the problems and technique of personnel administration
and three seminars in labor organization, research in labor prob­
lems, and social economy applied to industrial supervision and per­
sonnel administration, respectively (each two hours a week through­
out the year). The last-named seminar includes a practicum of 7
or 12 hours’ field work per week in industrial experience in or near
Philadelphia during the college year, and two months of nonresi­
dent work in an industrial or mercantile establishment during the
following summer under the supervision of the instructor. More
detailed information as to the requirements for the course and as
to the work of the year is given in the announcements of the depart­
ment, which are sent on request. These announcements also describe
the scholarships and fellowships available.
The seminar in social and industrial research, offered by the
director, is devoted to training in field investigations and the analy­
sis and interpretation of data secured.
Among the subjects of seminar researches recently made are the
following:
The young employed girl. By Hazel Grant Ormsbee. The Woman’s
Press, 1927.
Mothers in industry. By Gwendolyn S. Hughes. The New Republic, 1925.
The mothers’ assistance fund; actual and potential costs. By Bessie L. Hall.
To be published in 1930.
Skill and specialization. By Mildred Fairchild. To be published in 1930.

University of Buffalo.
Buffalo, N. Y.
B ureau o f B usiness a n d S ocial R esearch. Oliver C. Lockhart,
director; Robert Riegel, director of research.— Founded in 1926, with
the general purpose of collecting, preparing, and presenting depend­
able statistical information in the field of economic and social prob­
lems, with special reference to the Buffalo territory. Its policy, as
stated by Chancellor Samuel P. Capen at its inception, has been “ to*
study significant facts in a detached and scientific spirit * * *




153

UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

to present studies * * * in an intelligible and impartial
manner.”
The present work of the bureau consists of two principal types of
studies: (1) The bureau publishes a statistical survey monthly which
contains an analysis of current economic and business conditions and
discusses the local situation in comparison with the national situa­
tion. (2) The bureau also publishes from time to time monographs
of varying length upon particular economic and social problems.
Three of these have been published in book form during the past
year in the Buffalo Business Studies. In addition to these mono­
graphs, there are studies upon selected problems, issued from time
to time as supplements to the Statistical Survey.
Publications in the personnel field have been as follows:
Labor and employment. Statistical Survey, issues of April and August, 1926.
Labor turnover. Statistical Survey, October, 1926.
Comparative employment conditions in Buffalo and the New York State
index of employment. Statistical Survey, April, 1928.

University of California.
Berkeley, Calif.
D ivision o f V cational E ducation. Edwin A. Lee, director.—
Established in 1919 for the purpose of unifying the various activities
in the field of vocational education carried on in connection with
the university at Berkeley, and at Los Angeles in cooperation with
the State Department of Education.
R e s e a r c h a n d S erv ic e C e n te r . Emily G. Palmer, director.—
Established in 1920 under the division of vocational education.
Through this center the division has issued the following publica­
tions.
Part-time Education Series
An analysis of clerical positions for juniors in railway transportation.
August, 1921.
Part-time and continuation schools abroad; reprints.
The work of juniors in the telegraph service.
The work of juniors in retail grocery stores.
Third annual report of the director of part-time education. Stockton, Calif.,
October, 1922.
The administration of the part-time school in the smaU community. Part
1, March, 1924. Part 2, May, 1924.
The part-time school and the problem child: An investment in social
insurance. April, 1926.
A digest of laws for working boys and girls. June, 1927.
Developments in part-time education in California. March, 1928.
HomemaJcing Education Series
A study of occupations, other than homemaking, open to women trained
in home economics. February, 1928.
General Vocational Education Series
A study of vocational conditions in the city of Fresno.

November, 1926.

Trade and Industrial Series
Analysis
Analysis
Analysis
Analysis

of
of
of
of

the
the
the
the




house carpenter's trade. March, 1923.
cabinetmaker’s trade. September, 1923.
plasterer’s trade. April, 1924.
automechanic’s trade. June, 1925*

154

III. NON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

The problem of apprenticeship in the six basic building trades. September,
1926.
An analytical study of the duties of the chemical laboratory technician.
June, 1927.
Selection and purchase of equipment for trade and industrial classes. June,
1927.
Agriculture Education Series
Job analysis applied to the teaching of vocational agriculture.
Farm mechanics for California schools. November, 1922.
Farm mechanics in the agriculture curriculum. June, 1926.

May, 1922.

Vocational Education Ncics Notes
Vocational Education News Notes, Vol. II, Nos. 1-7, September, 1922-May,
1924 (Nos. 1, 3, and 5 out of print) ; Vol. I ll, Nos. 1-9, October, 1924-June,
1926 (No. 7 out of print) ; Vol. IV,. Nos. 1-4, November, 1926-November, 1927;
Vol. V, Nos. 1-4, November, 1928-November, 1929.
D e p a r tm e n t o f H y g ie n e . Kobert T. Legge, M. D., professor of
hygiene.—In this department two courses in industrial hygiene are
given as follows: 1. Principles of industrial hygiene; 2. Organiza­
tion of industrial health service, the latter being a laboratory and
field course. Investigation now under way is the study of ring­
worm of the feet which has become a public health question and is
so common among workers. Doctor Legge has recently contributed
the following scientific papers: Industrial hygiene; Carbon-monoxide
poisoning; Miners’ silicosis; Industrial tuberculosis; and a biog­
raphy on the life of Bernardino Ramazzini, the father of industrial
hygiene.
Problems of industrial nursing are taught by Dr. Edith S. Bryan,
professor of public health nursing.
M e d ic a l S c h o o l. —Professor Legge delivers a course of lectures
on industrial medicine, in which special consideration is given to
occupational hygiene for medical students.

University of Chicago.
Chicago, 111.
C o m m u n ity R e s e a r c h C o m m ittee.
Leonard D. White,
executive secretary.—This committee was organized in 1923, repre­
senting the social science departments of the University of Chicago
in a cooperative research program. Occasionally the committee
engages in research work in cooperation with agencies outside the
university.
Investigations in the personnel field under way and planned for
the immediate future include housing and population, immigration,
history and analysis of manufactures and industry in the Chicago
region, organizations of labor, and the Negro.
Completed studies, both published and unpublished, are:
Local

The prestige value of public employment in Chicago. By Leonard D. White.
Social Science Studies No. XIV, University of Chicago Press.
Conditions of municipal employment in Chicago. By Leonard D. White.
Submitted to Chicago City Council, published by Press of John E. Higgins.
The young cripple and his job. By Marion Hathway. Social Service Monograph No. 4, University of Chicago Press.
Negro home workers in Chicago. By Myra Hill Colson. Social Service
Review, September, 1928.
The training and placement of tlie adult .handicapped worker in Chicago,
By Cora S. McReynolds. Unpublished.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

155

S c h o o l o f C om m erce an d A d m in is tr a tio n . W. H. Spencer,
dean.—Included in the general program for business education are
several courses of study bearing directly on the general field of
personnel research. These include:
Commerce and Administration
(Associate Prof. R. W.
Stone).—Specific topics treated are:
(1) The factors making for ineffective work, such as labor turn­
over, absenteeism, withheld effort, personal incapacities of health,
training, etc., disharmonies of relationship between management and
the worker; (2) methods of securing effective effort, such as the
proper administration of the labor supply and the selection of
workers, promotion, demotion, transfer, and discharge; the regular­
ization of employment; education and training; safety and health;
“ welfare work ” ; hours of labor; wages and rewards; ]oint relations
with employees, whether through shop committees, unions, or indus­
trial councils, etc.; (3) the organization and functions of a personnel
department and its place in a business organization. Investigations
are assigned on special topics and the student is expected to do field
work upon some phases of employment problems.
Economics SIfi, 3^1 (Prof. H. A. Millis).—Trade-unionism, collec­
tive bargaining, and industrial arbitration.
Economics 31$ (Professor Millis).—A course in labor legislation,
the main divisions of which relate to the legal minimum wage, social
insurance, and woman and child labor.
Economics I^ fi (Professors Millis, Douglas, and Stone).—Research
J
in labor problems and personnel administration.
Psychology %35 (Associate Professor Kornhauser).—Business
psychology.
Psychology 335, 337 (Associate Professor Kornhauser).—Research
and special studies in industrial psychology.
Research work completed by members of the teaching staff during
recent years include:
Douglas, Paul H. Cases and problems in personnel administration (with
A. W. Kornhauser). University of Chicago Press. 77 pp. 1922.
------ The worker in modern economic society (with C. N. Hitchcock and W. E.
Atkins). University of Chicago Press. 929 pp.
1923.
------ Wages and the family. University of Chicago Press. 290 pp. 1925.
------ Personnel problems and the business cycle. Administration, Vol. IV,
1922, pp. 15-27.
------ Factors in making wage determinations. American Economic Review,
Vol. X III, 1923, p. 141.
------ The practice and theory of labor adjustment. Journal of Political
Economy, Vol. X X X I , 1923, pp. 288-293.
------ Analysis of strike statistics, 1880-1920. Journal of the American Statis­
tical Association, Vol. X V III, 1924, pp. 866-878.
------ Labor problems in modern society (with W . A. Orton). Study-outline.
Amherst College. 1924. 19 pp.
------ The movement of wages and the future of prices. Proceedings, Academy
of Political Science, 1925, pp. 90-98.
-------The amount and nature of the allowances under a family wage system.
Journal of Political Economy, Vol. X X X III, pp. 45-59,
-------The problem of the basic wage. University Journal of Business, Vol%
III, pp. 1-17.
-------Is industry able to pay all adult workers enough to support a family
of five? University Journal of Business, Vol. I ll, pp. 241-254.
-------Some precedents for the family wage system. International labor
Review, Vol. X I, pp. 3-15.
-------The movement of real wages and its economic significance. Proceedings,
American Economic Review, March, 1926.




156

III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

Douglas, Paul H. The modern technique of mass production and its relation
to wages. Proceedings, Academy of Political Science, Vol. XII, No. 3, 1927,
pp. 17-42.
------ The living wage and the family allowance system. Proceedings, Na­
tional Conference of Social Work, Vol. LIII, 1926, pp. 305-317.
------ What is happening to the white-collar-job market. System, Vol. L,
1926, pp. 719-721; 782-783.
------ Are we suffering from technological unemployment. Labor Bulletin
(Illinois Department of Labor), Vol. VII, 1928, pp. 135-136.
------ Salary increases for civil-service employees. United States congres­
sional hearings on Welch bill (70th Cong., 1st sess., hearings on H. R. 6518,
1928, pp. 15-35).
-------Are social services an adequate substitute for family endowment.
Social Service Review, Vol. I ll, 1929, pp. 217-223.
------ Wages in 1928. American Journal of Sociology, Vol. X X X IV , 1929,
pp. 1021-1029.
Kornhauser, Arthur W . The psychology of vocational selection. Psycho­
logical Bulletin, vol. 19, 1922, pp. 192-229.
------ Some business applications of a mental-alertness test. Journal of
Personnel Research, Vol. I, 1922, pp. 103-121.
-------A plan of apprentice training. Journal of Personnel Research, Vol. I,
1922, pp. 215-230.
------- Cases and problems in personnel administration (preliminary edition).
University of Chicago Press, 1922. 74 pp. (Paul H. Douglas and Arthur W .
Kornhauser.)
------ A note on the extent to which systems of character analysis are used
in the business world. Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 6, 1922, p. 302.
------ Scientific method in constructing psychological tests for business. Jour­
nal of Political Economy, Vol. X X X I , 1923, pp. 401-432.
------ A statistical study of a group of specialized office workers. Journal of
Personnel Research, vol. 2, 1923, pp. 103-123.
-------The motives-in-industry problem. The Annals, 1923, vol. 110, pp.
105-116.
-------Psychological tests for office occupations. University Journal of Busi­
ness, Vol. II, 1923, pp. 22-51.
-------Psychological tests for nonoffice occupations. University Journal of
Business, Vol. II, 1924, pp. 173-199.
-------A reinterpretation of the statistical method of Army trade tests. Jour­
nal of Applied Psychology, vol. 7, 1923, pp. 339-348.
-------Some phases of student personnel work in the School of Commerce and
Administration. The University of Chicago Magazine, vol. 16, 1924, pp. 301-302
and 315-316.
-------Psychological tests in business. Chicago, University of Chicago Press,
1924. 194 pp. (A. W. Kornhauser and F. A. Kingsbury.)
-------Intelligence test ratings of occupational groups. American Economic
Review, vol. 15, 1925, No. 1, supplement, pp. 110-122.
-------What are rating scales good for? Journal of Personnel Research, vol. 5,
1926, pp. 189-193.
-------Reliability of average ratings. Journal of Personnel Research, vol. 5,
1926, pp. 309-317.
-------A comparison of raters. Journal of Personnel Research, vol. 5, 1927, pp.
338-344.
-------A comparison of ratings on different traits. Journal of Personnel Re­
search, vol. 5, 1927, pp. 440-446.
------ The industrial psychology movement. Bulletin of the Society of Indus­
trial Engineers, Vol. X , 1928, pp. 9-10.

Associate Professor R. W. Stone will publish in 1930 studies of
“ Recruiting, selection, and remuneration of workers of specialized
positions’’ ; and “ Personnel problems in mergers.” He has under
way a comprehensive investigation of marketing labor in the Chicago
region, which is in part a study in economics but which involves
also an analysis of personnel administration. Units of this study
will be published in 1930.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

157

Columbia University.
New York, N. Y.
D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y .— Three courses are given in the de-

partment of psychology which have a bearing upon personnel work.
Applied psychology (Psychology 141-2), given by Prof. A. T. Poffenberger, includes a survey ox all applications of psychology to
business and industry. Business and vocational psychology (Psy­
chology el45-el46) given by Dr. P. S. Achilles, covers particularly
psychological devices used in vocational work. Psychological tests,
methods, and results (Psychology 111-112), given by Prof. H. E.
Garrett, comprises a survey of all psychological testing and measur­
ing devices.
Following is a list of published reports of work done in the field of
personnel work in this department:
Poffenberger, A. T. Applied psychology. New York, D. Appleton, 1927.
575 pp.
-------and (Y. H. Vartanian). The letter of application in vocational selection.
Journal of Applied Psychology, 1922, vol. 6, pp. 74-80.
------ The selection of a successful secretary. Journal of Applied Psychology,
1922, vol. 6, pp. 156-160.
-------The effects of continuous mental work. American Journal of Psychology,
1927, vol. 39, pp. 283-296.
------ The effects of continuous mental work upon output and feelings. Jour­
nal of Applied Psychology, 1928, vol. 12, pp. 459-469.
------ (with M. R. Neifeld) A mathematical analysis of work curves. Journal
of General Psychology.
Hollingworth, H. L. Vocational psychology and character analysis. New
York, D. Appleton, 1929.
Manzer, C. W . An experimental study of rest pauses. Archives of Psychol­
ogy, No. 90, July, 1927.
Weinland, J. D. Variability of performance in the curve of work. Archives
of Psychology, No. 87, May, 1927.
Crawley, S. L. An experimental investigation of recovery from work. Ar­
chives of Psychology, No. 85, October, 1926.
Ackerson, L. A, A correlational analysis of typing proficiency. Archives No.
82, February, 1926.
Anderson, R. G. A critical examination of test scoring methods. Archives
No. 80, August, 1925.
Bregman, E. O. Studies in industrial psychology. Archives of Psychology
No. 59, September, 1922.
Burr, E. T. Psychological tests, applied to factory workers. Archives of
Psychology No. 55, May, 1922.
Rogers, H. W . Some empirical tests in vocational selection. Archives of
Psychology, No. 49, April, 1922.

D epartment o f I ndustrial R elations, S chool o f B usiness.— F ive
courses are given in the department of industrial relations, School of
Business, which pertain to personnel work. Labor administration
(Industrial Relations 1 ), given by Prof. Paul F. Brissenden, presents
and evaluates current practice in employment management and per­
sonnel administration. Law of the employment of labor (Industrial
Relations 2 ), given by Prof. P. F . Brissenden, includes a study of the
legal rights and duties of the employer with respect to his employees
and of the workman with respect to his employer. Labor adminis­
tration (Industrial Relations e2r), given by Mr. Ordway Tead, is a
repetition of Industrial Relations 1. The adjustment of labor dis­
putes (Industrial Relations 101-2) consists of the study and discus­
sion of arbitration cases, and all the methods by which disputes are




158

I I I . NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

settled. Personnel and employment problems (Industrial Rela­
tions e303) given by Profs. H. D. Kitson, A. T. Poffenberger, and
P. F. Brissenden presents an opportunity for the joint considera­
tion of problems in vocational guidance and industrial personnel.
Publications of the department include the following:
Earnings of manufacturing wage earners, 1899-1027. By P. F. Brissenden.
United States Government Printing Office, 1929.
Labor turnover in the Federal service. By P. F. Brissenden, Chapter X V II
of report of wage and personnel survey of the United States Personnel Classi­
fication Board.

College of Physicians and Surgeons.
630 West One Hundred and Sixty-eighth Street, New York*
N. Y.
D e L a m a r I n s t i t u t e o f P u b lic H e a l t h . — Earle B. Phelps, pro­
fessor of sanitary science, is carrying on researches in a newly estab­
lished air hygiene laboratory. The various electrical properties of
the atmosphere, potential gradient, ionization and conductivity, and
the simultaneous values of atmospheric transparency, smoke and
dust, are being studied, with a view to establishing the variability
of these factors, and their possible relation to health and disease.
D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y .— Frederic S. Lee, professor of physiology; Ernest L. Scott, associate professor of physiology; Fred­
erick B. Flinn, associate professor of physiology in industrial
hygiene. This department carries on research in industrial physi­
ology. The following papers have been published:
Lee, Frederic S., and Van Buskirk, J. D. An examination of certain proposed
tests for fatigue. American Journal of Physiology, vol. 63, No. 2, January,
1923, pp. 185-206.
Lee, Frederic S., and Aronovitch, B. On Weichardt’s supposed “ fatigue
toxin.” American Journal of Physiology, vol. 69, No. 1, June, 1924, pp. 92-100.
Lee, Frederic S. Additional data concerning Weichardt’s supposed “ fatigue
toxin.” American Journal of Physiology, vol. 69, No. 1, June, 1924, pp. 101-106.
-------Chemical tests for fatigue in industry. Address before Premiere Reunion
Internationale pour l’lStude de Problemes d’l-Iygiene du Travail, Geneva, July
19, 1924.
-------Fatigue in industry. Journal of the National Institute of Social Sciences,
vol. 9, 1924, pp. 58-62.
-------The physiologist in industry. Atlantic Monthly, vol. 132, July, 1923, pp.
53-64.
Flinn, Frederick B. Industrial aspects of human fatigue. Journal of Per­
sonnel Research, vol. 2, No. 7, November, 1923.
-------Some effects of high environmental temperatures on the organism. Re­
print No. 1008 from Public Health Reports, vol. 40, No. 18, May 1, 1925, pp.
868-896.
-------Some of the potential public-health hazards from the use of ethyl gaso­
line. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, vol. 3, No. 2, February, 1926, pp. 51-66.
-------The so-called action of acid sodium phosphate in delaying the onset of
fatigue. Reprint No. 1094 from Public Health Reports, vol. 41, No. 29, July
16, 1926, pp. 1463-1476.
-------Radioactive material an industrial hazard? Journal of the American
Medical Association, vol. 87, December 18, 1926, pp. 2078-2081.
-------A case of antral sinusitis complicated by radium poisoning. Laryngo­
scope, St. Louis, May, 1927, pp. 3-11.
-------Some of the newer industrial hazards. Boston Medical and Surgical
Journal, vol. 197, No. 28, January 12. 1928, pp. 1309-1314.
-------The blastophoric effect of lead upon the germ cell. Eugenics, vol. 2,
No. 5, May, 1929.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

159

FI inn, Frederick B., and Von Glahn, William C. A chemical and pathologic
study of the effects of copper on the liver. Journal of Experimental Medicine,
vol. 49, No. 1, January 1, 1929, pp. 5-20.
Schlundt, Herman; Barker, Howard H .; and Flinn, Frederick B. The detec­
tion and estimation of radium and mesothorium in living persons. I. American
Journal of Rontgenology and Radium Therapy, vol. 21, No. 4, April, 1929, pp.
345-354.
Flinn, Frederick B., and Inouye, J. M. Some physiological aspects of copper
in the organism. Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 84, No. 1, October, 1929,
pp. 101-114.
Scott, Ernest L. The present status of our knowledge of fatigue products.
Reprint No. 465 from U. S. Public Health Reports, vol. 33, No. 17, April 26, 1913,
pp. 605-611.
Hastings, A. B. An investigation of changes in the blood and urine resulting
from fatigue. U. S. Public Health Reports, 1919, vol. 34, p. 1682.
-------Physiology of fatigue: Physio-chemical manifestations of fatigue in
the blood. Public Health Bulletin, No. 17, May, 1921.
Scott, E. L., and Hastings, A. B. Some phases of protein catabolism and
fatigue. U. S. Public Health Reports, 1920, vol. 35, p. 2445.

Researches as to the physiological effects of air conditions were
also made by Professor Lee for the New York State Commission
on Ventilation, of which he is a member.

Teachers College.
Columbia University, New York, N. Y.
D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y . E. L. Throndike, professor of edu­
cation.—The Thorndike intelligence examination for high-school
graduates is widely used for college admission. It is suitable for
use in selecting persons for high-grade positions in which knowledge
of many fields and ability for intelligent adjustment is desirable. A
new series is issued each year and current and back issues are obtain­
able from the bureau of publications of Teachers College.
Other intelligence tests made in the department are the Pintner
rapid survey test for grades 4 to 8, and the Pintner nonlanguage
primary mental test.
I nstitute o f E ducational R esearch.— E stablished in 1921. A
major study has been in vocational guidance, in which the careers
of 2,500 boys and girls tested in 1922 are being followed for a 10-year
period. The I. E. R. clerical test C l, and I. E. R. clerical test C2,
available through the Institute of Educational Research, division of
psychology, Teachers College, are prognostic measures of such abil­
ity. They can be used in grades 7 to 9.

The I. E. R. girls’ assembly test provides a measure of ability in
sewing and allied hand-crafts. Suitable for girls in grades 7 to 9.
Obtainable from the C. H. Stoelting Co., Chicago, 111.
The I. E. R. tests of selective and relational thinking, generaliza­
tion, and organization are useful in measuring ability for these types
of thinking. They are designated for high-school use. Obtainable
from the Institute of Educational Research.
The I. E. R. intelligence scale, CAVD, intended to measure in­
telligence of the somewhat academic type, is chiefly suitable for
adults of all levels of ability from very low to very high, but may
also be used for children of comparable intellectual status. Obtain­
able in five blanks, levels A to E, levels F to H, levels G to J, levels
I to M, levels M to Q, from the Institute of Educational Research.




160

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

D e p a r tm e n t
of
E d u c a t io n a l
A d m in is tr a tio n . —Publication:
Teacher Turnover in New York State. By Willard S. Elsbree,
Ph. D . Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, Columbia Univer­
sity, 1928.
D e p a r tm e n t o f G u id a n c e and P e r s o n n e l. Harry Dexter Kitson,
in charge.—A complete sequence of courses is offered leading to the
degree of doctor of philosophy in personnel. This sequence, de­
signed to prepare persons to do personnel work in educational institu­
tions, business and industrial establishments, and social agencies,
comprises training in the techniques of interviewing, testing, place­
ment, statistical investigation, clinical diagnosis, occupational analy­
sis, labor administration, etc.
Researches published by Dr. Kitson since 1921 are:
The psychology of vocational adjustment. Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott Co.,
1925. 286 pp.
How to find the right vocation. New York, Harper Bros., 1929. 201 pp.
Industrial psychology in Europe. Journal of Applied Psychology, September,
1921, pp. 286-290.
A shift of emphasis needed in personnel research. Journal of Applied
Psychology, Vol. VI, June, 1922, pp. 141-148.
A critical age as a factor in labor turnover. Journal of Industrial Hygiene,
Vol. IV, September, 1922, pp. 199-202.
A study of the output of workers under a particular wage incentive. Uni­
versity Journal of Business, Vol. I, November, 1922, pp. 54-68.
Height and weight as factors in salesmanship. Journal of Personnel Re­
search, Vol. I, October-November, 1922, pp. 289-294.
Second international conference on psychotechnics applied to vocational guid­
ance and to scientific management. Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. YI,
December, 1922, pp. 418-424.
Vocational guidance in Europe. School and Society, Vol. XVI, December 9,
1922, pp. 645-650.
(With Louise Culbertson.) The vocational changes of one thousand eminent
Americans. Vocational Guidance Magazine, Vol. I, March, 1923, pp. 128-180.
(With Claude Campbell.) Relation between labor turnover and industrial
accidents. Journal of Industrial hygiene, Vol. V, July, 1923, pp. 92-96.
(With Lucille Kirtley.) The vocational changes of one thousand American
women. School and Society, Vol. X IX , No. 474, January 26, 1924, pp. 1-3.
Trade and job analysis as an aid in vocational curriculum building. Twentythird Yearbook of the National Society for the Scientific Study of Education,
February, 1924, pp. 237-256.
(With Claude Campbell.) Seasonal fluctuations in frequency of industrial
accidents. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, March, 1924.
Psycho-economics— A name for the borderline activities of psychology and
economics. University Journal of Business, Vol. II, March, 1924, pp. 248-249.
(With George L. Donham.) A statistical study of the personality of the
workers in the metal trades. Journal of Personnel Research, vol. 2, April, 1924,
pp. 460-466.
Introduction to Choosing your life work, by Douglas Fryer. Philadelphia,
J. B. Lippincott Co., 1924.
Policies of vocational guidance. Contributions to vocational guidance; mono­
graphs on vocational education, 1924 series. No. 8. The Vocational Educa­
tion Association, of the Middle West.
More facts about vocational guidance. The Survey, January 15, 1925, p. 487.
Extra incentive wage plans from a psychological point of view. Bulletin,
American Management Association, New York, Production Executive’s Series,
1925, No. 9, pp. 3-6.
Article on job analysis. Encyclopedia Britannica, supplementary volumes
(13th Ed.), Vol. I, 1926, p. 966.
Vocational histories of office workers: A statistical study. Journal of Per­
sonnel Research, Vol. IV, No. 11, March, 1926, pp. 429-432.
Research in vocational guidance through the bureau of appointments. Ad­
dress before National Association of Appointment of Secretaries, Washington,
February, 1926, pp. 26-33.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

161

Extra-curricular activities as a means of guidance. Vocational Guidance
Magazine, Vol. IV, No. 8, May, 1926, pp. 357-361.
Psychotechnic in Amerikas Schulwesen, Handbuch der Arbeitswissenschaft.
Verlag Marhold, Halle, 1926.
A preliminary personnel study of psychologists. Psychological Review, Vol.
X X III, July, 1926, pp. 315-323.
Relation between age and promotion of university professors. School and
Society, Vol. X X I V ; September 25, 1926, pp. 400-405.
The scientific compilation of vocational histories as a method to be used in
vocational guidance. Teachers College Record, Vol. X X V III, September, 1926,
pp. 50-58.
Training leaders for guidance. Industrial Psychology, vol. 1, December,
1926, pp. 759-762.
Training for vocational counselors. Vocational Guidance Magazine, April,
1927, Vol. V, pp. 313-315.
Quantifying the analysis. Published by American Management Association,
20 Vesey Street, New York, 1927, pp. 15-19.
Vocational guidance in 1927. The Survey, Mid-monthly, April 15, 1927, pp.
103-104.
Vocational guidance through school subjects. Teachers College Record, Vol.
X X X V III, No. 9, pp. 900-916.
Principles of vocational guidance. Proceedings of the Fourth National Con­
ference on Vocational Rehabilitation of the Disabled Civilian, Bulletin No. 121,
No. 14, June, 1927. Conference held at Hotel Peabody, Memphis, Tenn., pp.
79-81.
Determination of vocational aptitudes. Does the typing test measure apti­
tude as typist or pianist? Personnel Journal, Vol. VI, October, 1927, pp. 192-199.
Vocational histories of psychologists. Personnel Journal, Vol. VI, No. 4, De­
cember, 1927, pp. 276-283.
The schooPs duty— To prepare for life’s occupations. Nation’s Schools, Vol. I,
January, 1928, pp. 37-45. (Translated into Spanish, “ La Orientacion Profesional,” Ed. Bulletin No. 39, April, 1928.)
Giving pupils information about occupations. The Nation's Schools, Vol. I,
February, 1928, pp. 27-30.
Introducing occupations into school subjects. Nation’s Schools, Vol. I, March,
1928, pp. 43-47.
The role of the vocational counselor in the school. Nation’s Schools, Vol. I,
May, 1928, pp. 47-55.
Does it pay to change jobs? Personnel Journal, June, 1928, Vol. VII, pp.
33-37. (Written with Noel Keys.)
Measuring the interest of teachers in their work. Teachers College Record,
Vol. X X X , October, 1928, pp. 28-33.
Trends in vocational guidance. In Objectives and Principles of Vocational
Education, edited by Edwin A. Lee, McGraw-Hill Book Co., N. Y., 1928,
pp. 289-310.
An interneship for vocational counselors. Teachers College Record, Vol.
X X X , April, 1929, pp. 703-708.
At what ages do nurses choose their profession? American Journal of
Nursing, June, 1929, pp. 649-651.
Finding suitable jobs for pupils who must work. Nation’s Schools, Vol.
IV, July, 1929, pp. 31-36.
Aiding the pupil to orient himself in the world of occupations. Nation’s
Schools, Vol. IV, August, 1929, pp. 25-31.
How deeply are you interested in your work? American Magazine, October,
1929, pp. 90-93.

Researches published by students:
Bergen, Harold B. Stability of men and women office workers. Journal
of Personnel Research, Vol. V, No. 3, July, 1926.
-------Social status of the clerical worker and his permanence on the job.
Journal of Applied Psychology, February, 1927, pp. 42-46.
Barker, Margaret. How boys and girls get work. Personnel Journal, Vol.
VI, August, 1927, pp. 119-123.
Ho, Ching-Ju, Ph. D. Personnel studies of scientist in the United States.
Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928.
Lloyd-Jones, Esther McD. Student personnel work. New York City, Harper
Bros, 1929. 253 pp.




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Dreese, Mitchell, Ph. D. Personnel studies of messengers in the Western
Union Telegraph Co. Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, Columbia
University, 1929.
Rankin, Majorie, Ph. D. Trends in educational occupations. Bureau of
Publications, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1929.
Anderson, Roy N. Rates of promotion in Army and Navy: A personnel
study of officers of highest ranks. Personnel Journal, Vol. VIII, June, 1929,
pp. 36-46.
-------A critical review of the tests proposed for the measurement of clerical
ability. Personnel Journal, 1930.

Dartmouth College.
Hanover, N. H.
Am os T u c k

S c h o o l o f A d m in is t r a tio n

and F in a n c e .

W . R.

Gray, dean.—A course on industrial relations is given by Prof. Her­
man Feldman in the first semester of the first year (three hours). It
attempts to combine the administrative approach to labor problem#
with the more general background of labor relations. A course on
the problems of labor policy, also by Professor Feldman, is given in
the first semester of the second year (three hours), and is concerned
largely with the types of situations arising in the relations of an
executive with associates and subordinates. This course may be fol­
lowed up by a specialized course on personnel management in the
second semester of the second year, which is offered only to students
who are definitely planning to enter personnel work. In addition,
Mr. Whiting Williams gives a 2-week conference course in the second
semester of the second year on the psychology of human relations in
industry.
As part of the requirements for the degree of master of commercial
science, students are required to make investigations and present a
thesis in the field of business for which they are preparing. The
thesis investigations in the labor field undertaken during the past
few years include such subjects as:
Industrial pensions: A constructive analysis. By D. S. Craig. 1925.
The shoe employers’ labor problem in Brockton. By T. L. Norton. 1924.
The labor bank movement. By H. L. Riddle, jr. 1924.
The selection and training of college men by department stores. By D. P.
Bent. 1926.

Personnel research.—A scholastic aptitude test (at present the
American Council on Education test) is given by the department of
psychology to the entire freshman class the night before college
opens. The scores are used by the dean of freshmen and by the per­
sonnel office for educational and vocational guidance. The depart­
ment of psychology is making a prolonged study of the usefulness of
these and other tests in educational prediction.
In determining occupational aptitudes, the personnel bureau takes
into account in addition to the scholastic aptitude scores, the indi­
vidual’s physical examination, financial and social status, personal
experience (especially in the way of summer jobs), interest in student
activities, and intellectual interests.




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163

University of Denver, School of Commerce, Accounts,
and Finance.
Bureau of Statistical Research, 2011 Glenarm Place, Den­
ver, Colo. F. L. Carmichael, Acting Director.
F o u n d ed in June, 1924, this bureau is supported in part by the
school of commerce of the University of Denver, in part by con­
tributions from interested business men and business groups, and in
part by funds from the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Foundation.
The work is carried on by staff members of the school of commerce
assigned to the bureau, by paid “ Fellows in statistical research,”
and occasional assistance by advanced students.
The bureau has been interested primarily in studies, both general
and specific, pertaining to business in Colorado and the mountain
region in relation to that in the country as a whole, but some atten­
tion is also paid to industrial and social welfare studies.
The bureau publishes the University of Denver Business Review
Studies bearing more or less directly on the personnel field which
have appeared therein are:
Changes in Denver’s social welfare. Vol. 2, Nos. 2 and 8, February-March,
1926.
Changes in economic welfare: Denver and Colorado. Vol. 3, No. 1, January,
1927.
The beet-sugar industry in Colorado and the United States. Vol. 5, No. 5,
May, 1929.
Occupational distribution of recent Denver High School graduates. Vol. 5,
No. 7, September, 1929.

A study of the automobile industry in Colorado and the moun­
tain region in 1929 is in progress.

Harvard University.
Cambridge, Mass.
B u r e a u o f V o c a t io n a l G u i d a n c e , L a w r e n c e H a l l , K ir k l a n d
S tre e t. J o h n M. B r e w e r , d ir e c t o r .— T h is b u r e a u is a d e p a r t m e n t o f
th e g r a d u a te s c h o o l o f e d u c a tio n . F o r m e r l y th e V o c a t i o n B u r e a u
of B o s t o n , it w a s t r a n s fe r r e d t o H a r v a r d U n iv e r s it y in 1917.

In 1921 the bureau took over the publication of the nationally cir­
culated Bulletin of Vocational Guidance, which was later changed
to the Vocational Guidance Magazine. This is now published eight
months a year, with Dr. Fred C. Smith as editor. The subscription
rate is $2 per year, or it may be obtained through membership in the
National Vocational Guidance Association or in one of its branches.
In addition to the publication of the magazine the bureau main­
tains an extensive library of books, pamphlets, and illustrative mate­
rials on educational and vocational guidance, carries on correspond­
ence and holds conferences on matters pertaining to vocational guid­
ance, and renders assistance in the conduct of courses in the graduate
school of education during the academic year and in the summer
session. The current courses being given include Principles of voca­
tional guidance, Counseling and administration of guidance, Testing
and measurement in vocational guidance, Occupational information
and labor problems, Seminary, and Education as guidance. The
bureau cooperates with other organizations in the furtherance of the
105636°— 30------- 12




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III.

n o n o f f ic ia l

a g e n c ie s

better understanding of the aims of vocational guidance and appro­
priate methods for its organization and administration.
The bureau assisted in 1921 in drawing up for the National Voca­
tional Guidance Association a brief statement of the Principles of
Vocational Guidance, a statement which has since been revised from
time to time and is circulated as an authoritative summary of the
aims, scope, methods, and administration of vocational guidance.
The publications of the staff of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance,
in addition to the magazine and the statement of principles, have re­
cently been issued by commercial publishers or by the Harvard Uni­
versity Press. They include the following:
Cases in the administration of guidance. By John M. Brewer and others.
McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1929.
Case studies in educational and vocational guidance. By John M. Brewer and
others. Ginn & Co. 1926.
Principles and problems in vocational guidance. By Frederick J. Allen.
McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1927.
Practice in vocational guidance. By Frederick J. Allen. McGraw-Hill Book
Co., 1927.
A guide to the study of occupations (revised). By Frederick J. Allen. Har­
vard University Press, 1925.
Training industrial workers. By Roy W . Kelly. The Ronald Press Co., 1920.

Certain publications by students and others have been prepared at
the Graduate School of Education with the cooperation of the bureau,
as follows:
The vocational guidance of college students. By Lewis A. Maverick. Har­
vard University Press, 1926.
Counseling the college student. By Helen D. Bragdon. Harvard University
Press, 1929. .
The orientation of college freshmen. By Henry J. Doermann. The Williams
& Wilkins Co., 1926.
Guidance for college women. By Maybelle B. Blake. D. Appleton & Co.,
1926.
Occupations. By Enoch B. Gowin, William A. Wheatley, and John M.
Brewer. (Revised.) Ginn & Co., 1923.
Teachers’ manual for the class in occupations. By Mildred E. Lincoln.
Ginn & Co., 1927.
Tests for educational and vocational information: A. Educational informa­
tion test; B. Vocational information test. By John M. Brewer, Harvard Uni­
versity, and Mildred E. Lincoln, Monroe Junior-Senior High School, Rochester,
N. Y., 1929.
G r a d u a te S c h o o l o f B u s in e s s A d m in is tr a t io n . W . B . Donham,
dean.—The study group in industrial management begins with a
general introductory course, during its first year, which deals with
executive problems in production management. The significant
labor aspects of the problems are stressed, and about one-third of the
year is devoted to technical and administrative problems arising
from the relationship of employer and employee in industry. The
point of view taken is that of the executive responsible for labor
policies. Some of the specific subjects are labor supply in connection
with the location of an enterprise, methods of wage payment, hours
of work, and fatigue; incentives or motivation such as pensions, em­
ployee ownership, and working conditions; collective bargaining;
and methods of control. In the second year field trips to factories
are taken, and during each visit, as well as in the discussions before
and after each trip, the significant labor aspects are emphasized. A
study of labor policies is the primary object of one or more trips to




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

165

factories where particularly successful or unique labor methods have
been established.
A research has been undertaken to determine the mental and or­
ganic effects of work and working conditions on the employee,
including a study of fatigue in its relation to morale, labor turnover,
absenteeism, and various disaffections of the worker. The studies
are being conducted by laboratory methods as well as under actual
working conditions.
The Bureau of Business Research has published Bulletin No. 25,
Labor Terminology, which gives precise meaning, by definition, to
labor terms in general use by labor unions in numerous industries.
J acob W e r t h e im R e s e a r c h F e llo w s h ip f o r t h e B e t t e r m e n t o f
I n d u s t r i a l R e la tio n s h ip s . Jam es F o r d , secretary.— T h is fe llo w ­
ship, established in 1923, has an endowm ent o f $100,000, the g if t o f
the fa m ily o f the late Jacob W erth eim . T h e income is to be used
“ fo r the su pport o f origin al research in the field o f indu strial cooper­
ation.”
T h e purpose o f the fellow sh ip is to enable persons who
already have expert know ledge o f plans fo r the betterm ent o f indus­
tria l relations to pursue research that m a y be o f general benefit in
solving problem s in th is field.

Studies in progress by Wertheim fellows are:
Industrial relations in the buUding industry. By William Haber, Ph. D. (in
press).
Longshoring. By Frank P. Foisie.
A study of technique for the measurement of executive ability. By Johnson
O’Connor.

Publications so far issued by the Wertheim committee are:
What the employer thinks. By J. David Houser.
Wertheim lectures on industrial relations, 1928 (published 1929).

Harvard School of Public Health.
55 Van Dyke Street, Boston, Mass. David L. Edsall, M. D.,
Dean.
I n 1918 Harvard University received funds with which to estab­
lish facilities for the training of industrial medical personnel and
for laboratory, clinical, and field research in matters relating to
the health of industrial workers. The work was under the super­
vision of the governing committee on industrial hygiene of the
Harvard Medical School. In 1921 the acquisition of new funds
made possible the organization of the Harvard School of Public
Health. Since that time the activities in industrial hygiene have
been centered in this school.
The courses now offered include the following subjects: Indus­
trial medicine, industrial toxicology, hygiene of ventilation and
illumination, physiology, nutritions, sanitary air analysis, ventila­
tion engineering, and air conditioning. Any or all of these courses
may be included in a program of work leading to the master or
doctor of public health degree. In addition to the regular courses
cooperative educational work is carried out extensively with the
engineering school and to some degree with the schools of business
administration and education. Detailed description of the courses,
requirements for admission, etc., are given in a catalogue obtainable
from the secretary of the school.




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III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

The laboratories of the school make possible studies upon smoke
and fumes; studies upon vapors, humidity, and temperature; and
studies upon varying atmospheric pressures. Elaborate and ex­
pensive apparatus and equipment for all of this work upon atmos­
phere has been obtained during the past few years and now make
it possible to provide artificial situations of almost any type and
upon a large enough scale to permit observations upon men. The
laboratories are also equipped for fundamental physiological and
biochemical work upon men and animals.
In addition to the investigations carried on in the School of
Public Health, Mr. Philip Drinker, Dr. Cecil K. Drinker, Mr. C. P.
Yaglou, and Dr. Alice Hamilton are concerned with field investi­
gative work of varied types. Graduate students are given oppor­
tunity to take part in the field work and to use field problems for
theses.
In order to get an estimate of the various activities in industrial
hygiene a list of papers published during the last three years is
given.
The Journal of Industrial Hygiene, published first in 1919 by the
division of industrial hygiene and since maintained by the School
of Public Health, affords a valuable outlet for papers upon the sub­
ject. It contaiiis both original contributions in industrial hygiene
and abstracts of articles scattered through various technical, trade,
and professional journals.
D e p a r t m e n t o f V e n t i l a t i o n a n d I l l u m i n a t i o n .—Publications of
this department dating from 1927 are as follows:
Yaglou, C. P. To gage workroom temperatures. Industrial Psychology,
1027, vol. 2, pp. 3-7.
Barreto, J. B., Drinker, P., Finn, J. L., and Thomson, R. M. Masks and res­
pirators for protection against dusts and fumes. Journal of Industrial Hygiene,
1027, vol. 9, pp. 26-41.
Sturgis, 0. 0., Drinker, P., and Thomson, R. M. Metal-fume fever: I. Clinical
observations on the effect of the experimental inhalation of zinc oxide by two
apparently normal persons. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, 1927, vol. 9, pp.
88-97.
Drinker, P., Thomson, R. M., and Finn, J. L. Metal-fume fever: II. Resist­
ance acquired by inhalation of zinc oxide on two successive days. Journal of
Industrial Hygiene, 1927, vol. 9, pp. 98-105.
------- Metal-fume fever: III. The effects of inhaling magnesium oxide fume.
Journal of Industrial Hygiene, 1927, vol. 9, pp. 187-192.
------ Metal-fume fever: IV. Threshold doses of zinc oxide, preventive meas­
ures, and the chronic effects of repeated exposures. Journal of Industrial Hy­
giene, 1927, vol. 9, pp. 331-345.
Yaglou, C. P. The comfort zone for men at rest and stripped to the waist.
Journal of Industrial Hygiene, 1927, vol. 9, pp. 251-263.
-------Temperature, humidity, and air movement in industries: The effective
temperature index. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, 1927, vol. 9, pp. 297-309.
------ Industrial ventilation with particular reference to hot and dusty trades.
Fuels and Furnaces, 1927, vol. 5, pp. 977-985.
Drinker, P., Thomson, R. M., and Finn, J. L. Quantitative measurements of
the inhalation, retention, and exhalation of dusts and fumes by man: I. Con­
centrations of 50 to 450 milligrams per cubic meter. Journal of Industrial Hy­
giene, 1928, vol. 10, pp. 13-25.
Drinker, K. R., and Drinker, P. Metal-fume fever: V. Results of the inhala­
tion by animals of zinc and magnesium oxide fumes. Journal of Industrial
Hygiene, 1928, vol. 10, pp. 56-70.
Yaglou, C. P. Ventilation in hot and dusty industries. Industrial Psychology,
1928, vol. 3, pp. 158-163.
------ and Dokoff, K. Calibration of the Kata thermometer over a wide range
of air conditions. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, 1929, vol. 11, pp. 278-291.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

167

Yaglou, C. P., and Drinker, P. The summer comfort zone: Climate and cloth­
ing. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, 1928, vol. 10, pp. 350-363.
Hatch, T., and Choate, S. P. Statistical description of the size properties of
nonuniform particulate substances. Journal, Franklin Institute, 1929, vol.
207, pp. 369-387.
Drinker, P., and McKhann, C. F. The use of a new apparatus for the pro­
longed administration of artificial respiration: I. A fatal case of poliomyelitis.
Journal of American Medical Association, 1929, vol. 92, pp. 1658-1660.
Drinker, P., and Shaw, L. A. An apparatus for the prolonged administration
of artificial respiration: I. A design for adults and children. Journal of Clinical
Investigation, 1929, vol. 7, pp. 229-247.
Shaw, L. A., and Drinker, P. An apparatus for the prolonged administration
of artificial respiration: II. A design for small children and infants with an
appliance for the administration of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Journal of
Clinical Investigation, 1929, vol. 8, pp. 33-46.
Drinker, P. Hygienic aspects of the industrial dust problem. Heating, Pip­
ing, and Air Conditioning, 1930, vol. 2, pp. 5-8.
D e p a r tm e n t o f P h y s io lo g y . —Publications of this department
dating from 1927 are as follows:
Turner, Abby H. The circulatory minute volumes of healthy young women
in reclining, sitting, and standing positions. American Journal of Physiology,
1927, vol. 80.
------ The adjustment of heart rate and arterial pressure in healthy young
women during prolonged standing. American Journal of Physiology, 1927,
vol. 81, pp. 197-214.
------ The vital capacity of college women. American Physical Education
Review, 1927, vol. 32.
Himwich, Harold E., and Castle, William B. Studies in the metabolism of
muscle: I. The respiratory quotient of resting muscle. American Journal of
Physiology, 1927, vol. 83, pp. 92-114.
Drinker, Cecil K. Instruction in the method of resuscitation— A lecture for
the use of instructors and teachers of first aid and resuscitation methods.
American Gas Association Monthly, June, 1928, vol. 10, pp. 349-354.
------ Instruction in the application of modern methods of resuscitation in
cases of gas poisoning, electric shock, submersion (apparent drowning), and
suspended respiration from other causes. A lecture for the use of instructors
in resuscitation methods. Issued by the Committee on Resuscitation, repre­
senting the Consolidated Gas Co. of New York and its affiliated gas and electric
companies. 1928.
-------and Drinker, Philip. The problem of resuscitation from electrical and
other accidents in the United States and Canada. Prepared as report on elec­
trical shock and resuscitation technique, by Dr. John W. Lieb, for meeting of
Union Internationale des Producteurs et Distributeurs d’Energie Electrique,
Paris, July 5 to 10, 1928. 31 pp.
Shaw, L. A., Messer, A. C., and Weiss, S. Cutaneous respiration in man:
I. Factors affecting the rate of carbon dioxide elimination and oxygen absorp­
tion. American Journal of Physiology, 1929, vol. xc, pp. 107-118.
Fairhall, L. T., and Hoyt, L. H. The excretion of zinc in health and disease.
Journal of Clinical Investigation, 1929, vol. vii, pp. 537-541.
Fairhall, L. T., and Walker, L. C. Foil-wrapped food material: I. An inves­
tigation concerning the use of zinc foil in the food industries. Food Industries,
1929 (November), pp. 642-645.
Heller, E., Killiches, W., and Drinker, C. K. The evaluation of 5 and 7 per
cent carbon dioxide mixtures as respiratory stimulants. Journal of Industrial
Hygiene, 1929, Vol. X I, pp. 293-300.
Drinker, C. K., and Shaughnessy, T. J. The use of 7 per cent carbon dioxide
and 93 per cent oxygen in the treatment of carbon monoxide poisoning. Jour­
nal of Industrial Hygiene, 1929, Vol. X I, pp. 301-314.
Hamilton, Dr. Alice. The storage-battery industry. Journal of Industrial
Hygiene, Vol. IX , 1927, pp. 346-369.
------ The lessening menace of benzol poisoning in American industry. Journal
of Industrial Hygiene, Vol. X , 1928, pp. 227-233.
------ Enameled sanitary ware manufacture. Journal of Industrial Hygiene,
Vol. X I, 1929, pp. 139-153.




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III. ITON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Johns Hopkins University.
School of Hygiene and Public Health, 615 North W olfe
Street, Baltimore, Md. W . H. Howell, Director.
T h e School of Hygiene and Public Health began its work in Octo­
ber, 1918. The income for its maintenance was furnished by the
Rockefeller Foundation, and subsequently the foundation appro­
priated to the Johns Hopkins University the sum of $5,000,000 as
an endowment for the school, together with an additional $1,000,000
for the construction of a suitable building.
The school was founded for two specific purposes: First, to train
investigators, teachers, officials, and other workers in the field of
hygiene and public health; second, as a research institute for the ad­
vancement of knowledge in these fields. Courses are offered leading
to the degrees of certificate in public health, master of science in
hygiene, doctor of science in hygiene, and doctor of public health.
Investigations are carried on from time to time relating to indus­
trial sanitation and hygiene from the standpoint of public health,
including the physiological effects of fatigue. The researches pub­
lished from the school are collected annually in a volume known
as “ Collected Papers.”

University of Iowa.
Iowa City, Iowa.
C om m erce. S. L.
Miller, director.—Organized in July, 1926. Two studies undertaken
by the bureau come within the field of personnel research: Attitudes
of laborers in Iowa and contiguous territory; and Attitudes of Iowa
employers. The first has been published; the second is under way.
B u r e a u o f B u sin e ss R e s e a r c h , C o lle g e o f

LaSalle Extension University.
La Salle Buildings, Forty-first Street and Michigan Avenue,
Chicago, 111. Hugo Diemer, Director Management
Courses.
E d u c a t io n a l D iv isio n . —A course in personnel management is
given under the direction of Mr. Diemer. In connection with the
course a consultation service is conducted for the advice of the
students on problems of organization, policy, or procedure in con­
nection with personnel activities.
A client service is also maintained which makes surveys upon re­
quest, particularly with relation to training programs and methods.
An internal survey was made a few years ago which included job
analyses, and established classifications and grades together with
starting rates of compensation and intervals and increments of pro­
motion. Investigations were made in the matter of time and job
standards and wage incentives in the transcribing, printing, and
multigraphing departments.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Cambridge, Mass.
T h e p e r s o n n e l d e p a rtm e n t, operating under the division of indus­
trial cooperation and research, assists industrial concerns in securing
the services of specially equipped and trained men, more particularly




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169

for positions in important advanced scientific work. This depart­
ment cooperates with the faculties of the several educational depart­
ments in matters of personnel and in placement of graduates.
The cooperative course in railroad operation (I-A ) is given by
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in cooperation with the
Boston & Maine Railroad. The work at the institute consists of
fundamental training in the principles of modern science, while the
work with the company provides practical experience in the operating
department of the railroad. The officials of the institute and of the
railroad cooperate with the intent to secure the maximum educational
value. The work with the railroad consists of four periods of 16
or 18 weeks each, and includes practical work in the following de­
oartments : Maintenance of way (including signaling), mechanical
(maintenance of equipment), conducting transportation, and execu­
tive (accouting, stores, etc.).
This course is five years in length, and the subjects taken in the first
two years are practically identical to those taken by other engineer­
ing students. During the last three years the students alternate
terms at the institute and at the railroad. A student entering the co­
operative course must satisfy the scholastic requirements of the
institute and the personal requirements of the railroad. During the
cooperative periods the students are regular paid employees of the
railroad and subject to its rules and regulations. Both the theoretical
and practical work of the final year are distinctly of postgraduate
caliber. At the successful completion of the course, the degrees of
bachelor of science and master of science are awarded.
A detailed description of this course is included in the regular
institute catalogue.
The cooperative course in electrical engineering (V I-A ) is given
by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology conjointly with five
large concerns representing the major fields of electrical engineering.
The work at the institute consists of instruction in the arts and
sciences fundamental to engineering, while the work with the com­
pany consists of practical experience laid out and supervised with
the intent*to secure the maximum possible educational value. Offi­
cials of the institute and of the companies work together to see that
the ideals of the cooperation are realized.
A student may choose one of three options known as: Option
1.—Manufacturing; option 2.—Public utilities; option 3.—Commu­
nication.
The manufacturing practice is obtained principally in the Lynn,
Schenectady, and Pittsfield works of the General Electric Co. Publie-utility practice may be taken with any one of three com­
panies: The Edison Electric Illuminating Co., of Boston, gives
practice in the generation and utilization of electric power, the
Boston Elevated Railway in electric transportation, and Stone &
Webster (Inc.) in the design, construction, and operation of power
plants. Communication practice is given in the factories of the
Western Electric Co. (Inc.), the telephone plant of the New York
Telephone Co., and the research laboratories of the Bell Telephone
Laboratories (Inc.).
This course is five years in length, the first two years being iden­
tical with the regular course in electrical engineering (Course V I)




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III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

at the institute and the last three being spent in alternate terms at
the institute and at the plant of the company. A student entering
the cooperative years must have satisfied the scholastic requirements
of the institute and the personal requirements of the company con­
cerned. Both the theoretical and practical work of the final year
are distinctly of postgraduate caliber. At the successful completion
of the course the degrees of master of science and bachelor of science
are awarded.
The institute publishes a special bulletin describing this course in
detail.
The work of the school of chemical engineering practice differs
from the usual cooperative engineering courses in three respects:
(1) The students are not employees of the cooperating companies,
hence receive no remuneration from them; (2) the plant work is not
given until the end of the senior year (X -B ) or until after the
bachelor’s degree has been obtained ( X - A ) ; (3) a member of the
faculty of the department, with an assistant, is resident at the plant
of the cooperating company throughout the year, devoting his entire
time to the intensive development of the educational possibilities of
the work.
The cooperating companies are:
Bangor (Me.) station.— Eastern Manufacturing Co. and Penobscot Chemica*
Fiber Co.
Boston (Mass.) station.— Merrimac Chemical Co. and Revere Sugar Refinery.
Buffalo (N. Y.) station.— Bethlehem Steel Co.
Bayonne (N. J.) station.— Tide Water Oil Co.

In the program leading to the degree of master of science the
field-station work is taken during July-December, eight weeks being
spent at each of three of the four field stations listed above. Follow­
ing a very carefully arranged schedule the students, working as
embryonic engineers, plan and carry to completion a series of tests
covering the basic operations of chemical engineering operation, viz,
flow of heat, flow of fluids, combustion, evaporation, filtration, dis­
tillation, etc.
After the completion of this work the students return tc*the insti­
tute for two special 5-week courses in chemical engineering design
and combustion. During the second term, a 15-week period, the
work is entirely elective, consisting of graduate courses in chemical
engineering, in applied chemistry, and the master of science thesis.
In the program leading to the bachelor of science degree, a student
may substitute for the last 22 weeks of the regular fourth year,
January-June (consisting largely of laboratory courses, elective
courses, and thesis), the field-station work previously described. In
the case of the bachelor’s degree men a thesis is completed at the
last field station visited.
The institute publishes a special bulletin describing the course in
detail.

University of Michigan.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
B u r e a u o f B u sin e ss R e s e a r c h , S c h o o l o f B u s in e s s A d m in is­
t r a t io n . Ernest M. Fisher, assistant director in charge.—The bureau

was founded in October, 1925, to coordinate and facilitate the re­




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

171

search work of the members of the faculty of the school of business
administration. One of its general field of activities is personnel re­
search.
A current survey in personnel work in an occupational survey of
business and professional women, which will result in a series of bul­
letins, the first of which will be released in the near future.
A study of labor turnover as a personnel problem is in progress.
Published bulletins, which can be secured through the bureau of
business research, include the following:
Factory labor turnover in Michigan. By O. W . Blackett. Published Novem­
ber, 1928, No. 1, Michigan Business Studies, Vol. II.
Business and the young accountant— Vocational experiences of the college
graduate. By Clarence S. Yoakum. Published May, 1929, No. 3, Michigan
Business Studies, Vol. II.
D e p a r tm e n t o f E d u c a tio n . —Under the direction of the vocational
education department, Prof. Thomas Diamond has conducted courses
for the training of foremen in the following cities: Grand Rapids,
Bay City, Holland, Muskegon, Saginaw, and Jackson. He has also
conducted courses for teachers in the Ford Trade School and in the
school for construction and repair men conducted by the Michigan
Bell Telephone Co.
U n iv e r s it y B u r e a u o f A p p o in tm e n ts a n d O c c u p a tio n a l I n f o r ­
m a tio n . T. Luther Purdon, director.—This bureau was formed in

1929 by the merger of two other organizations, the bureau of appoint­
ments, dealing with the placement of teachers, and the committee
on vocational counsel and placement, dealing with the counseling
and placement of people interested in business field.
The bureau is at present making a study of personality traits of
the employees of the Detroit Security & Trust Co., to determine
traits making for success and failure in the banking field.

New School for Social Research.
465 West Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y. John A.
Fitch, Director.
D u r in g the sessions of 1925-26, 1926-27, 1927-28, and 1928-29 the
new school offered courses by D r . Arthur Frank Payne on the tech­
nique, psychology, and organization of systems of vocational guid­
ance. These courses included discussions of the mainsprings of
human actions as embodied in the reactions of the working group, a
study of practices in the organization and administration of guid­
ance systems in various types of schools and institutions, and of the
systems of vocational guidance and employment adjustment in fac­
tories, offices, stores, and social-service institutions.

New York University.
Washington Square East, New York, N. Y.
S c h o o l o f E d u c a tio n , D e p a r tm e n t o f P e r s o n n e l A d m in is tr a tio n .

Prof. Anna Y. Reed, chairman.
1. Research.—Studies completed during the past year or at present
being made by graduate students under the supervision of the depart­
ment which are of interest to the business personnel field include the
following: Personnel problems of the adult immigrant, the educa­




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III. NONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

tional value of juvenile jobs, occupational opportunities for negro
women in Greater New York, survey of pupil characteristics and
problems in a boys’ vocational school, the stability of clerical em­
ployees in New York University.
2. Information and guidance.—The personnel bureau maintained
cooperatively with the National Junior Personnel Service (see p. 109)
not only serves all students of the university but gives individual help
with personal adjustment problems which are referred by business
firms in the metropolitan area. The bureau also serves as a clearing
house on personnel practices and during the past year the work of
this division included responses to requests from 73 firms for advice
and assistance in their personnel procedure.
Training.—In addition to a very comprehensive series of courses
which provide preparation for the personnel field in public schools
and colleges the department also oners courses bearing on the busi­
ness personnel field which supplement the courses offered by the
school of commerce. A course (160.9) providing general overview
of the evolution and present status of the personnel movement in
education and industry is given by Don H. Taylor, and another
(160.10) by the same instructor, deals with the application of voca­
tional psychology to problems of vocational guidance and selection;
Lynn A. Emerson offers a course (260.7-8) on personnel responsibili­
ties for training and education in business; Anna Y. Reed offers three
courses, placement principles and practices (160.20), women in busi­
ness, industry, and the professions (160.19), and research in personnel
problems (360.9-10), which draw heavily in their enrollment upon
persons engaged in personnel work in industry.
The work of this department was inaugurated through a series of
ersonnel services in 1924 conducted in cooperation with the National
unior Personnel Service (Inc.). (See p. 109.)

J

S c h o o l o f C om m erce, A c c o u n t s , a n d F in a n c e , D e p a r tm e n t o f
M a n a g e m e n t.— A course on production control and tim e stu dy, by
P r o f. W illia m B. C ornell and M r . N ath an iel M. C artm ell, is “ de­
signed p rim arily fo r those w ho expect to devote themselves to indu s­
tria l m anagem ent or to accounting or other w ork where a know ledge
o f control m ethods, job standardization, and tim e study w ill be o f
advantage.” A course in problem s in h an dlin g m en, b y A ssociate
P r o f. N ew m an L. H oo p in g arn er, fo r the purpose o f b rin g in g “ the
student face to face w ith the kinds o f situations encountered under
norm al conditions in industrial concerns, and upon the correct solu­
tion o f w hich success larg ely rests * * * is designed p rim a rily
fo r those already engaged in industry or those expecting to take
positions where a know ledge o f industrial problem s w ill be o f ad­
v an tage.” A course in personnel adm inistration, b y M r . G len n A.
B ow ers, deals “ w ith the fu n dam en tal principles o f personnel adm in ­
istration. It gives the student a good grasp o f the scientific and
h um an background o f the personnel field— its principles and prac­
tices. It covers broadly em ploym en t practice, health and sa fe ty ,
corporation instruction and train in g, problem s o f personnel research,
em ployee’s service features, the jo in t relation problem s o f the socalled 1 dem ocratic m ovem ents ’ in in du stry.” A course in labor
problem s and em ploym ent m anagem ent, by M r . B ennet F. Schauffler,
is “ designed fo r those w ho wish to learn the policies, routines, and




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

173

methods which have proved successful in the more advanced plants
of the country in connection with labor problems and employment
management.” A course on techniques of personnel management, by
Mr. Harold B. Bergen, has as its aim “ to make the student familiar
with the techniques utilized in the application of the fundamental
principles of personnel management, * * * job analysis, posi­
tion classification, determination of compensation standards, test
development, interviewing, rating of employees, selection, placement,
training-on-the-job, promotion, transfer, salary and wage adminis­
tration, etc.” A course on psychology for business executives, by
Associate Prof. Newman L. Hoopingarner, “ emphasizing and illus­
trating psychological technique from such standpoints as incentives
and how to use them, motivation, sizing up, developing and super­
vising personnel.” A course on personality development and voca­
tional orientation, by Associate Prof. Newman L. Hoopingarner,
concerns u the individual’s own problems of personality development
and vocational adjustment.” A course on techniques of supervision
and leadership, by Mr. Harold B. Bergen, offers “ a practical analysis
of successful executive behavior in the handling of men * * *
designed especially for individuals who supervise or direct the work
of others and for students who are interested in actual problems of
supervision and leadership.” Other courses are on office manage­
ment, problems in office management, problems in management,
technique of retail-store management, department-store operation,
wholesale organization and management, seminar in management,
etc.
S c h o o l o f R e t a i l i n g (formerly known as the Training School for
Teachers of Retail Selling), Norris A. Brisco, dean.—This is a gradu­
ate professional school preparing college graduates and others with
equivalent general ability for positions as teachers of salesmanship
or directors of training for department stores and for other man­
agerial positions in retail stores. A course in personnel relations, by
Dean Brisco, deals “ with the principles and the prevailing practices
in the field of human relations in business.” A course on psychology
of speech, by Mr. Clapp, concerns the place of speech in human rela­
tions and the cultivation of good speaking ability. A course on
personnel methods, by Miss Bloodworth, refers to “ handling people,
the human factor in business * * * interviewing, selection and
placement, the routine of employment, the new employee, training
and welfare, etc.”
G r a d u a te S c h o o l o f B u sin e ss A d m in is tr a t io n . Archibald Well­
ington Taylor, dean.—Certain courses in the School of Commerce,
Accounts, and Finance, mentioned above, are available to graduate
students.

Ohio State University.
Columbus, Ohio.
D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y . Herbert A. Toops and Harold E.
Burtt, professors of psychology.—Courses given by Doctor Burtt in
personnel work are: Psychology of personnel; industrial psychology;




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

educational and vocational guidance.
field include:

His published works in this

Measuring interest objectively. School and Society, 1923, vol. 17, pp. 444-448.
Vocational tests for agricultural engineers. With F. W . Ives, in Journal
of Applied Psychology, 1923, vol. 7, pp. 178-187.
Principles of employment psychology. Industrial Psychology, 1926, vol. 2,
pp. 634-640.)
Psychology and industrial efficiency. Appleton, 1929.

Articles by Doctor Toops on personnel subjects include:
Short cuts in testing skilled workers. Industry Illustrated, November, 1925,
pp. 31, 37-39.
Are you in the right job? Popular Science Monthly, vol. 103, No. 5, Novem­
ber, 1923, pp. 53-54.
Better training of employees through tests. Proceedings of Management
Week, Ohio State University, Part II, 1926, pp. 116-124.
D e p a r t m e n t o f P u b l i c H e a l t h a n d H y g i e n e . Dr. Emery R.
Hayhurst, professor of hygiene and head of department.—A special
course in industrial hygiene has been given by this department since
the opening of the school year, 1915. Beginning with graduate
students only the course was soon opened to undergraduate students
but since 1921-22 has been limited to those of junior standing or
above. The course, which is given in the college of medicine, is
elective in the various colleges of the university and is required of
students in industrial engineering. Beginning with the year 1928-29
the course has been given all three quarters and three or five hours
per week, the shorter course being lectures and demonstrations and
the longer course providing field work. Registration runs from 15
to 30, both men and women, each quarter. A historical approach,
the economics of the subject, the dangerous trades, the industrial
health hazards, the occupational diseases, and the methods of pre­
vention and control, including the principles of industrial medical
service, are the elements covered.
B

u r e a u of

B

u s in e s s

R

esearch,

C ollege

of

C om m erce

and

A

d m in

­

Spurgeon Bell, director.—“ The aim of the bureau of
business research is to make studies of business and industrial man­
agement and of the development of commerce and industry in Ohio.
Researches are made which are of value alike to the business and
industrial interests of the State and to the college of commerce and
administration in its teaching program.” Graduate students are
trained in research by working under the supervision of competent
members of the research staff.
The bureau publishes five regular bulletins each month:
is t r a t io n .

The Bulletin of Business Research.
The Wholesale Grocers’ Bulletin.
The Retail Dry Goods Bulletin.
Monthly Bulletin on Employment Conditions in Ohio, by cities and by indus­
tries.
Bulletin on Automobile Bill-of-Sale Registrations.

Published researches of the bureau in the personnel field are:
Sales force compensation and expense of Ohio wholesale grocers. Wholesale
Grocery Studies, R -l, 1924.
Administration of personnel functions in Ohio department stores. Depart­
ment Store Studies, X-18.
The construction industry in Ohio. Studies of Industries, R -6.




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

175

Industrial and commercial Ohio. Studies of Industries, X-23, Vol. I.
Labor management. Industrial Management Studies, X-20.
Ohio employment studies. Industrial Management Studies, R-7.

The extensive study on “ labor management ” is a manual of stand­
ard practice in employment, supervision of labor force, and training
of employees. The survey of industrial and commercial Ohio is a
continuing study.
Studies in progress or recently completed but not yet published
are:
Salaries and cost of living of university staffs of instruction. A comparison
of salary changes in a group of State universities with cost of living changes
in the period from 1914 to 1925.
Foremanship training. An examination into the past, present, and future of
foremanship training to determine the true function of foremanship and the
best methods of selection and upgrading foreman personnel.

University of Pennsylvania.
Philadelphia, Pa.
S c h o o l o f P u b lic H y g ie n e . D. H. Bergey, M. D., director pro
tempore.—The industrial hygiene department of this school, through
the research activities of Dr. Henry Field Smyth and Henry F.
Smyth, jr., has participated in the following studies of occupational
diseases and disease hazards:
A study of the anthrax problem in the tanning industry in Pennsylvania in
collaboration with the division of hygiene and engineering of the State depart
ment of labor, results of which were published in 1922.
Industrial anthrax in Pennsylvania. Nation’s Health, vol. 4, No. 5, pp.
290-294.
The anthrax hazard in Pennsylvania tanneries. American Journal of Hy­
giene, vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 340-367.
Anthrax, a hazard of industry. Hygeia, vol. 2, No. 6.

Doctor Smyth served as chairman of the committee on industrial
anthrax of the industrial hygiene section, American Public Health
Association, in a continued study of the incidence of anthrax in
industry, the report on which is to be published in the American
Journal of Public Health.
A study of the hazards of spray painting in Pennsylvania has been
made in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and
Industry, and the results published as Special Bulletin No. 16 of
the department, under the title “ Spray Painting in Pennsylvania.”
Further study of spray painting has been conducted by the spray
coating committee of the National Safety Council, field work on
which was directed by Doctor Smyth. Published reports are:
1927.— Spray coating. Report to chemical section, National Safety Council,
Appendix I ; Hazards of spray-coating process investigated (Nation’s Health,
vol. 9, No. 5 ) ; Spray-coating processes (Safety Engineering, vol. 14, No. 2).
1928.— Faulty practices in spray painting (proceedings of Pennsylvania
Safety Congress) ; and spray painting hazards as determined by the Pennsyl­
vania and National Safety Council surveys (joint paper with Henry F Smyth,
jr.), Journal of Industrial Hygiene, vol. 10, No. 8, pp. 163-213.
1929.— The injurious effect of lead enamel on the health of workmen. The
American Enameler, March, 1929.

Studies on the toxicity of various solvents are:
1928.— Inhalation experiments with certain lacquer solvents (joint paper with
Henry F. Smyth, jr.)
(Journal of Industrial Hygiene, Vol. X , No. 8, pp. 261271.)




176

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Study of hazards in connection with the industrial use of naphtha (in an
oilcloth plant) and of benzol in the textile leather and enamel leather industries,
made for the New Jersey Department of Labor. (Not published.)

The results of a two years’ study of turpentine dermatitis are to
be published jointly with Henry F. Smyth, jr., in the Journal of
Industrial Hygiene, 1930.
A continuing study of industrial skin irritation, as committee of
one, industrial hygiene section, American Public Health Association,
published in—
1928.— Skin irritants. (American Journal of Public Health, vol. 19, No. 4,
pp. 366-376.)
1929.— New skin irritants, to be published in American Journal of Public
Health, 1930.
Henry F. Smyth, jr. A study of methods of determining quantitatively small
amounts of benzene in vapors in the air of workrooms. (Results to be pub­
lished.)
1929.— The determination of small amounts of benzene in vapors in air. (To
appear in Journal of Industrial Hygiene.)

Henry Phipps Institute for the Study, Treatment, and
Prevention of Tuberculosis.
Seventh and Lombard Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. Charles
J. Hatfield, M. D., Director.
T h i s i n s t i t u t e , established in 1903 and supported up to May, 1919,
entirely by funds donated by Mr. Henry Phipps, is said to be the
first organization brought into existence for the express purpose of
eradicating tuberculosis through intensive and scientific research.
Since July 1, 1910, it has been under the supervision of the board of
trustees of the University of Pennsylvania.
Recent studies dealing with tuberculosis in industry are:
Tuberculosis as it affects industrial workers. By Dr. Frank A. Craig.
Journal of Industrial Hygiene, August, 1922, vol. 4, No. 4, p. 170; also Annual
Report of the Henry Phipps Institute, Vol. XVI, 1923.
Some industrial phases of tuberculosis. By Dr. Frank A. Craig. Nation’s
Health, August, 1922, Vol. IV, No. 8.
Health survey of the police and firemen of the city of Philadelphia. By Dr.
Frank A. Craig. Vol. X V II, Anuual Report of the Henry Phipps Institute, 1923.

Wharton School of Finance and Commerce.
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.
o f t h e courses of study in this school covers the field of labor
management (Prof. J. H. Willits, adviser). In the last two years
this course includes the following courses (each three hours, both
terms) in the department of geography and industry: 8. Industrial
management; 9. Field work in industry (inspection of management
problems in manufacturing establishments); 10. Industrial relations
and employment management; 12. Industrial policy; Industry re­
search (an intensive study of an industrial problem of a specific
industrial plant in the Philadelphia district).
D e p a r tm e n t o f I n d u s t r i a l R e se a r c h . Joseph H. Willits, direc­
tor.—Established at the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce
early in 1921, the purpose of this department is to “ apply the meth­
ods of thorough scientific research to various fundamental problems
in industry, such as industrial relations, so that human well-being,
and especially the more general distribution of human well-being,
One




UNIVEKSITIES AND COLLEGES

177

may be increased, and to provide a bureau to which the various ele­
ments of the industrial community may turn for scientific research on
industrial problems.”
The research has been and is on cooperative lines, the first under­
taken being a study of monthly labor turnover in 25 plants in diverse
industries in Philadelphia. The reporting was continued through
1928 and led to the publication of “ Labor mobility” and “ Four
years of labor mobility.” Work by members of the staff with the
United States Coal Commission, 1923, resulted in the publication of
“ Earnings of coal miners,” “ Conclusions and recommendations of
the United States Coal Commission as to labor relations in bitu­
minous mining,” and several chapters in “ What the coal commission
found.” “ The trend of wage earners’ savings ” was the result of a
study of savings institutions and methods in Philadelphia over a
considerable period.
Cooperation with the Metal Manufacturers’ Association of Phila­
delphia gave the department information on labor turnover, factory
lunch rooms, accidents, and accident-prevention methods, and earn­
ings of metal workers. Mimeographed reports on these subjects have
been issued to the cooperating companies.
The original material for the study entitled “ Earnings and work­
ing opportunity in the upholstery weavers’ trade ” came from the
members of a local union in the form of weekly reports of earnings
and hours over a 2-year period. “ Collective bargaining in the photo­
engraving industry ” came from employers and union officials m the
industry as well as a survey of the literature.
Monthly records of production and shipments of 49 iron and steel
foundries, originally sent to the Philadelphia Federal Reserve Bank,
supply material for a monthly report as well as for the study
“ Trends in foundry production.” The results of a survey of the
production of knitting machinery and of full-fashioned hosiery are
contained in “ Significant postwar changes in the full-fashioned
hosiery industry.”
Further research in the field is now being conducted on the subject
of output of hosiery manufacturers and earnings and working time
of a group of workers in the industry. The cooperation of the em­
ployers and of the union is making the respective studies possible.
“ Earnings in certain standard machine-tool occupations” is a
further development of the material supplied by the metal manufac­
turing plants, with the addition of some intensive data in a smaller
group of plants.
Data from woolen and worsted spinners are incorporated in the
“Analysis of production of worsted sales yarn.” The analysis of
“ Help-wanted advertising as an indicator of the demand for labor ”
makes use of the classified advertising in daily newspapers with con­
siderable attention to the various occupations and industries specified
in the advertisements.
Further studies now in progress concern the unemployment situa­
tion in Philadelphia, the use of the group bonus as an incentive, the
effect of the new mechanization on workmen, an index of wage rates
in the bituminous coal fields, and a study of earnings and selling costs
of sales clerks in a representative group of department stores.




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III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

Princeton University.
Industrial Relations Section, Department of Economics and
Social Institutions, Princeton, N. J.
T h e i n d u s t r ia l r e l a t i o n s se c tio n was founded in 1922. In 1926,
Prof. J. Douglas Brown became director and Miss Eleanor Davis,
assistant director.
The industrial relations section is a part of the department of
economics and social institutions of Princeton University. The
director of the section holds his position as a member of the faculty
of that department, and a committee of the department acts with him
in determining the policies of the section. Physically, the section is
located in the Princeton University Library and its own library is
coordinated with the library facilities of the university.
The income of the industrial relations section has been provided by
Mr. John D. Rockefeller, jr., on the basis of a fixed annual amount
for a period of years.
The industrial relations section covers in its work the subjects
concerned with employer-employee relations in industry either
through company sponsored plans or in the presence of trade-unions.
It covers also trade-union history, policies, and problems; labor legis­
lation, more especially in the United States; and industrial changes
affecting labor.
Its library contains periodicals, books, pamphlets, and unpublished
memoranda obtained by purchase, correspondence, and field inves­
tigation. Its catalogue now contains approximately 100,000 entries,
cross referenced by source and subject.
The industrial relations section has just completed a study of labor
banking which has been in preparation over a period of years. It
has in preparation a brief study of mutual benefit association plans.
It has under consideration a brief compilation of statistics con­
cerning employee stock ownership and a brief study of the use of
investment trusts in promoting thrift among employees. A good
deal of the work of the industrial relations section is concerned with
student instruction and with assistance to graduate students in in­
dustrial relations. The following is a list of completed studies:
In mimeographed form.— Employee savings plans; Group insurance; Labor
turnover; Reduction of absence and tardiness; and Rules and financial provi­
sions of industrial pension plans.
In typewritten form.— Building and loan associations; Corporation training
programs; Discharge; Employment contracts and applications; Loans to em­
ployees; Mutual aid associations; Profit sharing; Service awards; Suggestion
systems; Tendencies in mutual aid administration; Vacations for production
workers; and Veterans’ clubs.
In book form.— Employee stock ownership in the United States; and The
labor banking movement in the United States.

Purdue University.
Layfayette, Ind.
S c h o o ls o f E n g in e e r in g . —A.

A. Potter, dean, and J. E . Walters,
director, are carrying on the work of the personnel system.
To develop the personality, as well as the mind, the body, and the
character of the student, is the chief purpose of the personnel service
of the schools of engineering at Purdue University.
The major duties of the personnel service are as follows: (1) Per­
sonality development—to assist the students in the improvement of



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179

their personalities. (2) Occupational information—to assist in the
vocational guidance of students by giving them occupational informa­
tion. (3) Placement—to assist in the placement of senior students
in proper employment after graduation, and to help juniors and
underclassmen to secure summer work. (4) Records—to keep up-todate personnel records of all engineering students. (5) Assistance
to graduates—to assist engineering graduates of the university in
employment and other personnel matters.
Personnel studies concerning the proper adaptation of engineering
students and graduates are also being made by Mr. Walters.
The schools of engineering have also established an industrial
personnel laboratory which will contain the equipment, devices,
charts, and diagrams used in industrial personnel work; employment,
safety, health, training, and service.
George H. Shepard, professor of industrial engineering and man­
agement, is conducting tests to obtain quantitative data on the rela­
tion between rest periods during working hours in industry and
production or output. These tests continue from year to year as a
regular feature or the work in industrial management at Purdue
University.

Simmons College.
300 The Fenway, Boston, Mass.
Prof. Lucile Eaves.—
The work of this department is carried on in cooperation with the
research department of the Women’s Educational and Industrial
Union, with the Savings Banks Association of Massachusetts and
with various business, social, and medical agencies which supply
records for studies or permit the use of statistical equipments. Fur­
ther explanations of the organization of the research activities and
lists of recent studies are given under “ Women’s Educational and
Industrial Union.” (See p. 142.)
D e p a r tm e n t o f S o c ia l-E c o n o m ic R e s e a r c h .

Prince School of Education for Store Service (Gradu­
ate School of Simmons College).
19 Allston Street, Boston, Mass. Lucinda Wyman Prince,
Director.
E s t a b lis h e d in 1905 as the school of salesmanship at the Women’s
Educational and Industrial Union in Boston (see p. 142); in 1918 the
school moved into quarters of its own and the present name was
adopted. Its original object was to provide training for saleswomen
in department stores. The chief purpose of the school now is to
train personnel executives—educational directors, employment man­
agers, superintendents—for stores and, to an increasing extent, for
factories. It is affiliated with Simmons College and the National
Retail Dry Goods Association (see p. 116), and the Boston merchants
have cooperated in its support. A history of this school, together
with an account of the training methods developed, under the title
“ Department store education,” by Helen Rich Norton has been pub­
lished by United States Bureau of Education as its Bulletin (1917)
No. 9.

\(mm°

;’ o
>




ia

180

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

The director of the school is the author of Bulletin No. 22 (Com­
mercial Education Series No. 1), “ Retail selling ” (103 pp.), issued
by the Federal Board for Vocational Education in 1919.
P r in c e A lu m n a e A s s o c ia t io n h o ld s its a n n u a l m e e t in g a t th e sa m e
tim e as th e N a t io n a l R e t a il D r y G o o d s A s s o c ia t io n .
S e s s io n s a re d e ­
v o t e d to th e p r e s e n ta tio n a n d d is c u s s io n o f e d u c a t io n a l, e m p lo y m e n t ,
a n d r e se a rch w o r k in sto re s a n d t o th e w o r k o f te a c h e r s o f r e ta il
s e llin g in th e p u b li c s c h o o ls . I t s p u b lic a t io n th e P r i n c e A lu m n a e
N e w s c o n t a in s p a p e r s o n d e p a r t m e n t s to re p e r s o n n e l w o r k .

Smith College.
Northampton, Mass.
Prof. Everett Kimball, director.—A
graduate professional school offering courses in social work from the
psychiatric and mental hygiene point of view. It originated as an
emergency training course in psychiatric social work established in
1918 by the authorities of Smith College and the Boston Psycho­
pathic Hospital under the auspices of the National Committee for
Mental Hygiene (see p. 100) primarily to provide a supply of spe­
cially trained social workers to deal with mental and nervous cases
among returned soldiers.
The duration of the course is 14 months, in 3 divisions—a summer
session of 8 weeks of theoretical instruction, combined with clinical
observation, at Smith College; a training period of 9 months’ prac­
tical instruction carried on in cooperation with hospitals, clinics, and
social agencies (during 1928-1929 in Boston, Chicago, Foxboro,
Hathorne, Minneapolis, New York, Philadelphia, St. Paul, and
Worcester), and a concluding summer session o f 8 weeks of advanced
study. The social worker with psychiatric experience has been of
particular value in industrial and personnel work. In recognition
of this, the regular curriculum includes courses in social psychology,
mental tests, case work, government, medicine, industrial problems,
and social psychiatry. Details are given in bulletin of Smith College
School for Social Work, 1930-1931.
The second session’s work includes the preparation and writing of
a thesis under the supervision of a director of research. Many of
these theses (for complete list see bulletin) deal with problems of
personality in industry, schools, and society. It is proposed to pub­
lish the more outstanding of these theses in a quarterly, Smith Col­
lege Studies in Social Work.
S c h o o l f o r S o c ia l W o r k .

Stanford University.
Stanford University, Calif.
S c h o o l o f B u sin e ss.— The Stanford School of Business, organized
in 1925, includes among its purposes the teaching of business organi­
zation and administrative principles, and the investigation of special
problems including such as would fall under the heading “ person­
nel.” Dr. E. K. Strong, jr., previously carrying on research in this
field under the auspices of the department of psychology, has been
made a member of the school of business faculty, offering courses in
the psychological aspects of management and problems of personnel.
He still continues teaching in the department of psychology courses
dealing with applications of psychology especially in industrial and




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

181

vocational relationships. Special research projects have investigated
the vocational guidance possibilities of an interest blank which dis­
tinguishes members of each of various professions and occupations
from other individuals and vocational groups. Published articles
include:
Strong, E. K., jr. An interest test for personnel managers. Journal of Per­
sonnel Research, September, 1926, vol. 5, pp. 194-203.
-------Interest analysis of personnel managers. Journal of Personnel Research,
October, 1926, vol. 5, pp. 235-242.
------ Differentiation of certified public accountants from other occupational
groups. Journal Educational Psychology, April, 1927, vol. 18, pp. 227-238
------ A vocational interest test. Education Record, April, 1927, vol. 8, pp.
107-121.
S c h o o l o f E d u c a tio n . —Major contributions related to personnel
research have been made by Dr. Truman L. Kelley in his study of
differentiable mental abilities. He has also given invaluable aid,
primarily through statistical and critical advice, in various studies
of abilities necessary for vocational success, including those of
Cowdery, Jensen, MacQuarrie, Strong, and Zyve. He has been
teaching fundamental courses in statistics and classes on the methods
and interpretation of psychological and educational measurements.
Doctor Proctor has contributed in the field of vocational and educa­
tional guidance through both classwork and publications. The work
in intelligence testing formerly conducted in the department of
education was transferred to the department of psychology in 1922
on its reorganization under Dr. Lewis M. Terman. Periodical and
other publications from members of the school of education are:
Jensen, M. B. Trait differences in teachers, research workers, and admin*
istrators in education. 1927, Ph. D. thesis.
Kelley, T. L. Principles and technique of mental measurement. American
Journal of Psychology, July, 1923, vol. 34.
-------Distinctive ability. School and Society, October 23, i923, vol. 18, pp.
424-448.
------- Crossroads in the mind of man. Stanford University Press, 1927.
245 pp.
MacQuarrie, T. L. Measurement of mechanical ability. 1925, Ph. D. thesis.
-------Vocational guidance in universities. Vocational Guidance Magazine,
March, 1924, vol. 2, pp. 155-158.
-------Educational and vocational guidance. 1926. Boston, Houghton Mifflin
Co.
-------The public schools in vocational adjustment. Industrial Psychology,
December, 1926, vol. 1, pp. 776-780.
-------Prognostic tests as a determinant in commercial educational guidance.
Balance Sheet, September, 1927, vol. 9, pp. 4-6.
------ Vocational guidance in commercial courses. N. E. A. Proc. and Add.,
1927, vol. 65, pp. 340-342.
-------Vocations. 1929. Boston, Houghton Mifflin Co.
Zyve, David L. Stanford scientific aptitude test. 1928. Stanford University
Press.
D e p a r tm e n t o f P h y s io lo g y . —Profs. E . G. Martin and J. P .
Baumberger have completed and reported the results of studies in
industrial physiology as follows:
Baumberger, J. P. Fatigue and error in mental occupation. Journal of In­
dustrial Hygiene, 1921, vol. 3.
-------(With E. E. Perry) Weber’s law, tolerance and visual judgment of size
in the bottle making industry. Journal of Industrial Hygiene, September, 1923,
vol. 5, pp. 205-209.
-------Working capacity and the effect of alternating occupation on output
Journal of Industrial Hygiene, November, 1923, vol. 5, pp. 245-252.
Martin, E. G. Fatigue and rest. Industrial Psychology, May, 1926, vol. 1.




182

III. ETONOFFICIAL AGENCIES

D e p a r tm e n t o f P s y c h o lo g y . —The work of Dr. Lewis M. Terman
with intelligence tests has been continued, resulting in the production
of the Terman group test, founded on the principles of his previous
Stanford-Binet individual tests and the army group intelligence
tests. More recently, assisted by Dr. Maude A. Merrill, a revision
of the Stanford-Binet tests has been undertaken. Studies in mental
efficiency and in the field of industrial psychology have been made
possible by the addition to the department faculty"of Drs. Walter R.
Miles and Edward K. Strong, jr. Courses available include mental
and intelligence tests and the psychology of endowment by Doctors
Terman and Merrill; the physiological psychology of action by
Doctor Miles, and a seminar in applied psychology by Doctor Strong.
A limited bibliography of publications and dissertations includes:
Brammer, G. A. The static equilibrium of airplane pilots. 1924, A. M.
thesis.
Oowdery, K. M. An evaluation of the expressed attitudes of members of
three professions (medical, engineering, and legal). 1926, Ph. D. thesis.
Fearing, F. S. An experimental study of certain factors influencing static
equilibrium. 1924, A. M. thesis.
Laslett, H. R. The effects of loss of sleep on mental and physical efficiency.
1926, Ph. D. thesis.
Mackenzie, Hope. The permanency of interest. A. M. Thesis.
Merrill, Maude A. Relation of mental age to industrial efficiency of a group
of mental defectives. Journal Delinquency, 1925, vol. 9, pp. 83-104.
Miles, Walter R. Alcohol and human efficiency. Carnegie Institution of
Washington. Pub. No. 133. 298 pp.

Syracuse University.
Syracuse, N. Y.

Charles Lee Raper, dean.—
The courses of instruction in this college dealing with personnel
matters are: Industrial psychology and vocational psychology, by
Prof. H. W. Hepner (business psychology 108, three hours, spring
semester, and 109, three hours, fall semester); business management
and field work in organization and management, by Prof. M. C.
Cross (business management 103, three hours, spring semester, and
business management 116, two hours, spring semester); industrial
management, by Prof. S. T. Hart (business management 6, two or
three hours, spring semester).
C o lle g e o f B u s in e s s A d m in is t r a t io n .

University of Virginia.
Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, University, Va.
Wilson Gee, Director; Frank Traver deVyver, Research
Assistant in Labor Problems.
T h e Institute for Research in the social sciences was established
by a grant from the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial to the
University of Virginia for research in the field of social sciences, to
stimulate research on the part of the professors. Each research
problem in the institute is carried on as tne professor’s own research
project, usually assisted by a well-trained research worker. When
completed, the studies are published as a series of institute
monographs.
So far the only study in the field of personnel research which has
been undertaken is “ Labor in the South,” a study “ of the wage-earn­




UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

183

ing classes of the South and their living conditions and problems,
labor laws and labor movements.” This study, the work of Abraham
Berglund, G. T. Starnes, and Frank T. deVyver, will be completed
in 1930.

University of Wisconsin.
Madison, Wis.
John R. Commons, professor.—A
research course is conducted by Professor Commons and his associate
professors in the department of economics. This course covers four
sections: (a) Labor legislation; (b) labor history and industrial
government; (c) unemployment, causes and remedies; (d) labor
management. Research work in this field is carried on continuously,
but studies are not published. Doctoral dissertations and theses are
filed in the department library.
D e p a r tm e n t o f E co n om ics.

Yale University.
New Haven, Conn.

Dr. Arnold Gesell, director, is dealing with
personnel problems as represented by adolescents seeking employ­
ment, particularly those with subnormal or unstable constitutions.
L aboratory o f A pplied P hysiology. 4 Hillhouse Avenue. Yandell Henderson, professor, and Howard W. Haggard, associate pro­
fessor, of applied physiology.—The researches conducted in this
laboratory have been mainly studies in the physiology and toxicol­
ogy of gases, the treatment of asphyxia, the determination of the
maximum energy expenditure of which athletes are capable, and
recently the treatment of pneumonia. Professors Henderson and
Haggard were formerly consulting physiologists of the United
States Bureau of Mines, and during the war served with the
Chemical Warfare Service and the Medical Research Board of the
Air Service. Professor Henderson is now consulting physiologist
of the Chemical Warfare Service. The work done includes ex­
perimental studies on mine rescue oxygen apparatus (Bureau of
Mines Technical Paper No. 62), gas masks for the military service
and for industrial use, apparatus and methods for testing aviators
in respect to their ability to withstand altitude, and investigation
of carbon-monoxide poisoning and resuscitation. The inhalator
for the administration of oxygen and carbon dioxide, introduced
by Professors Henderson and Haggard, has in recent years come
into very wide use, and is not only saving thousands of lives,
but by rapid resuscitation is preventing post-asphyxial injuries.
This line of investigation has now been extended, in collaboration
with Dr. Pol N. Coryllos of the Cornell Medical School, to the treat­
ment of pneumonia. The staff of the laboratory carried out, in col­
laboration with the Bureau of Mines, an extensive investigation of
the physiological effects of automobile exhaust gas for the commis­
sions of the States of New York and New Jersey in charge of the
construction of the Holland Vehicular Tunnels under the Hudson
River. These investigations resulted in standards which have been
adopted all over the world in application to the ventilation requisite
in vehicular tunnels, garages, repair shops, and factories.
T h e P s y c h o -C lin ic ,




184

III. N ON OFFICIAL AGENCIES

The principal publications dealing with the foregoing topics,
which have appeared from this laboratory are as follows:
Noxious gases and the principles of respiration influencing their action. By
Y. Henderson and H. W. Haggard. Chemical Catalog Co., 419 Fourth Avenue,
New York City.
The maximum of human power and its fuel. By Y. Henderson and H. W.
Haggard. American Journal of Physiology, April, 1925, Vol. L X X II, p. 264.
The circulation and its measurement. By Y. Henderson and H. W . Haggard.
American Journal of Physiology, June, 1925, Vol. L X X III, p. 193.
The physiology of respiration in practical application. By Y. Henderson.
British Medical Journal, December 19, 1925, and January 9, 1920.
The treatment of carbon monoxide poisoning. By Y. Henderson. Journal of
American Medical Association, October 1, 1921, vol. 77, p. 1065.
Studies in carbon monoxide asphyxia— II. The growth of neuroblast in the
presence of carbon monoxide. By H. W . Haggard. American Journal of Physi­
ology, April, 1922, vol. 60, p. 244.
The toxicology of hydrogen sulphide. By H. W . Haggard. Journal of In­
dustrial Hygiene, March, 1925, vol. 7, p. 113.
The influence of hydrogen sulphide upon respiration. By H. W. Haggard and
Y. Henderson, with T. J. Charlton. American Journal of Physiology, July, 1922,
vol. 61, p. 289.
The science of health and disease. By H. W . Haggard. Harper Bros., New
York City. 524 pp.

The growing movement to establish schools of business research
in colleges and universities is resulting in a pronounced expansion
of research work. Most of this is along commercial lines, with the
field here defined as personnel research given only secondary or
incidental consideration.
Nevertheless some interesting work in the personnel field has been
and is being done through these agencies, and while it is not of
sufficient volume to be treated in detail, it is noted below and con­
stitutes part of the complete report on personnel research work in
colleges and universities.9
U n iv e r s it y

op

I l l in o is .

Urbana, 111. Bureau of Business Research, Charles M. Thompson, director.
Methods of training employees in stores of moderate size (1924).
U n iv e r s it y

of

K

an sas.

Lawrence, Kans. Bureau of Business Research, Jens P. Jensen, director.
Employee training in Kansas department stores (1925).
U n iv e r s it y

of

M in n e s o t a .

Minneapolis, Minn. Committee on Research, H. J. Ostlund, director.
Study of positions open to university-trained people in the field of finance in
the Twin Cities (1929).
U n iv e r s it y

of

N ebraska.

Lincoln, Nebr. Committee on Business Research, T. Bruce Robb, director.
Labor turnover in Nebraska department stores (1924).
U

n iv e r s it y of

N o r t h C a r o l in a .

Chapel Hill, N. C. Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, Howard
W. Odum, director.
Mill village population in North Carolina (an analysis of population charac­
teristics in selected mill villages; transiency, labor turnover, etc.).
Welfare work in mill villages (1929).
History of the textile industry (1930).
» Most of these data are taken from the report of the American Association of Collegiate
Schools of Business, “ Research Projects of Member Schools/’ January, 1929.




u n iv e r s it ie s

U n iv e r s it y

of

N orth D

and

colleges

185

akota.

Grand Forks, N. Dak.
Mexican labor in sugar-beet field of the United States (1929).
R

utgers

U n iv e r s it y .

New Brunswick, N. J. Bureau of Economic and Business Research, E. E.
Aggers, director.
Cost of living survey (in progress).
The effect on New Jersey labor situation of the immigration law (planned).
U n iv e r s it y

of

T

exas.

Austin, Tex. Bureau of Business Research, A. B. Cox, director.
Settlement of industrial disputes in Texas by arbitration (1929).







Index of Organizations
Pag®
Akron, Municipal University of............................................................................................ 151
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America.............................................................................
50
American Academy of Political and Social Science........ ........................ .................................. 50-51
American Association for Labor Legislation...................................................... : ...................... 51-52
52
American Chemical Society.................................................................... ...............................
AmericanEngineering Council................................................................................................53-54
American Federation of Labor................................................................................................
54
American Gas Association.................................................................................... .................. 54-55
American Heart Association (Inc.)...........................................................................................55-56
American Management Association......................................................................................... 56-58
American Medical Association................................................................................................
58
American Museum of Safety...................................................................................................
60
American Posture League.................................................................................................. . 58-59
American Public Health Association........................................................................................59-60
American Railway Association...............................................................................................
60
American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers............................... .............................60-61
American Society of Safety Engineers...................................................................................... 63-65
American Standards Association................................................... ......................................... 65-68
Applied Economics, Bureau of............................................................................... ................
70
Associated Industries of Massachusetts............................... ......... ...........................................
68
Blindness, National Society for the Prevention of.................................................................... 120
Boston Chamber of Commerce................................................................................................
69
Boston Psychopathic Hospital (State agency)...........................................................................
32
Boston University........................... ..................................................................................... 151
Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce............................................................................................
69
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, International...................... ...............................................
83
Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees................................... ...................................69-70
Bryn Mawr College............................................................................................................... 152
Buffalo, University of..................... .................... .............................................................. 152-153
Bureau of Applied Economics................................... .............................................................
70
Bureaus of Occupation, National Committee of........................................................................ 102
Business Administration, Harvard Graduate School of............................................................ 164-165
Business Research Corporation..................... ................................... .....................................
72
Business Training Corporation............. ........................... ............ . .... .................................
73
California:
Industrial accident commission (State agency)...................................................................
28
Industrial welfare commission (State agency)...................................................................... 28-29
University of.................................................................. ........................................... 153-154
Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching................ ............................................
73
Casualty and Surety Underwriters, National Bureau of............................................................. 95-97
Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America............................................................. 73-74
Chemical Society, American...................................................................................................
52
Chicago, University of........................................................................................................ 154-156
Child Labor Committee, National...........................................................................................98-99
Churches of Christ in America, Federal Council of.................................................................... 78-79
Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce...........................................................................................
74
Cincinnati, Consumers’ League of........................................................................................... 75-76
Civic Federation, National.................................................................................................... 99-100
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated............................................................................
50
College of Physicians..............................................................................................................
74
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.......................................................158-159
Conference Board of Physicians in Industry............................................................................. 74-75
Columbia University..... .................................................................................................... 157-158
Connecticut:
Consumers' League of.......................................................................................................
76
Department of labor and factory inspection........................................................................
29
Consumers’ leagues:
Cincinnati.......................................................................................................................75-76
Connecticut................................................................................................................... .
76
Eastern Pennsylvania.......................................................................................................
76
Massachusetts............................................................................................................... .
76




187

188

INDEX OF ORGANIZATIONS

Consumers’ leagues—Continued.
Page
New Jersey .........................—
........................................................................................
77
New York ................................................................................................ ....................
77
Toledo, Ohio....................................................................................................................
77
Crippled and Disabled, Institute for ........ . ......... .....................................................................
81
Dartmouth College.................................................................... .................. ................... 162
............ . ................ ....................... 148
Dennison Manufacturing Co......................................
Denver, University of.................................................. ...... ........................... . .................
163
Detroit Bureau of Governmental Research............................. .......................... ............ ......... 77-78
Economic Research, National Bureau of.............. ................................................................. 97-98
Education Association, National....................... ..... ................................. ..... ...................... .
103
Edward L. Trudeau Foundation......................................................... ......... ......... ......... 137-138
Electric Light Association, National................ ......... .......................... .... .......................... 103-106
Electric Railway Transportation and Traffic Association, American. .. ................ .................... 52-53
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of............
.... ..................... .............
83
Engineering Council, American.................................................... ................................. ........ 53-54
Engineering Foundation...... .................................................................................................
78
Federal agencies. (See under United States.)
Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America..........
Fire Protection Association, National..............................
Founders’ Association, National.......................................

....... ....................................... 78-79
............................................ 105-106
—
.................
.... . 106-107

Government Research, Institute for___ ________ _____ _ _____________ _____________ 81-82
Governmental Officials in Industry, Association of....................................................... .......... 68-69
Governmental Research, Detroit Bureau of .............................. ............. ........ ........................ 77-78
Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration..................................... .................... 164-165
Harvard School of Public Health.......................................................................................... 165-167
Harvard University............................................................................................................ 163-165
Heating and Ventilating Engineers, American Society of.............................. ........ .................... 60-61
176
Henry Phipps Institute for the Study, Treatment, and Prevention of Tuberculosis.-..................
Housing Association, Michigan............................................................................................... 94-95
Illinois:
Department of labor......................................................................................................... 29-31
University of............... ............................................ .....................................................
184
Illuminating Engineering Society.................................... ......... ....... ....................................
79
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, International Association of.................................. 82-83
Industrial Conference Board, National................................................ ................................. 107-108
Industrial Engineers, Society of.................................................................................... .......130-131
Industrial Physicians and Surgeons, American Association of.....................................................
51
Industrial Relations Association, International............................... .........................................
84
Industrial Relations Counselors (Inc.)...................... ..............................................................
80
Information Bureau on Women’s Work....................................................... ........................... 80-81
Institute for Crippled and Disabled..................................... .................................. ................
81
Institute for Government Research............................................................................. ............ 81-82
International Labor Office......................................................................................................83-84
International Typographical Union.................................. .......................................................84-85
Iowa:
31
Bureau of labor........................................................................... ....................................
University of.................................................................................................................... 168
Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene............ ......................................................... 168
Joint Board of Sanitary Control in Cloak, Suit, etc., Industries. ............................................ .
99
Judge Baker Foundation.......................................... ..............................................................
85
Junior Personnel Service, National........................................................... .......................... . 109-110
Kansas:
Commission of labor and industry...................................................................................
University of............................................. ......................................................................

81
184

Labor Bureau (Inc.)-................................ .......... .......... .................................................. 85-86
Labor departments. (See under specific States.)
Labor Legislation, American Association for..............................................................................51-52
Labor O
ffice, International...................................... ................... ........................................... 83-84
87
Labor Research Association...... ................................................ ............................................
La Salle Extension University.................................................................................................. 168
Life Extension Institute.......................................................................................................... 87-89
Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumbermen.................................................................................
89




INDEX OF ORGANIZATIONS

189

Page
Machine Tool Builders* Association, National......................................................................110
Maine. Department of labor and industry. ................................................... .................... .
31
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of..................................................................... 69-70
Management and Engineering Corporation. ................................................. .......................... 89-90
Management Association, American........................... . ............................... .........................56-58
Manufacturers, National Association of...............................................
....... ......................
95
Manufacturers Research Association. ...................................................... . ...........................
90
Maryland. Board of labor and statistics................................................................................. 31-32
Massachusetts:
68
Associated Industries of................................................................................ j ..................
Boston Chamber pf Commerce................................................ ..................... ...................
69
Boston Psychopathic Hospital (State agency)......................................................*__.........
32
Boston University......................................................................................... .................. 151
Consumers’ League of...................................... ................................................................
76
Department of education (State agency)....... ....................................... .............................
33
Department of labor and industries (State agency)......................................................... ... 33-36
Institute of Technology........................................................... .............. ................ . 1A8-170
Society for Mental Hygiene................................................................... . ..................... 90-91
Mechanical Engineers, American Society of..................................... ...... ........................... 61-63
Medical Association, American................................................................ ..... ................ ........
58
Mental Hygiene, Massachusetts Society for.......... ........................................ .................... .....90-91
Mental Hygiene, National Committee for.......................... ......... ........................................ 100-102
Merchants’ Association of New York......................................— .......... ................................. 91-92
Metal Trades Association, National...................................................................................... 110-112
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co............................................................................................. 92-94
Michigan Housing Association................................................ .............................................. 94-95
Michigan, University of..........................................................................
....................... 170-171
Middle-Age Employees, National Association for the Benefit of........................ .........................
95
Minnesota, University of............................................................................ ...........................
184
Municipal Research of Philadelphia, Bureau of............................ ...........................................70-71
Municipal University of Akron............................................................. -................................ 151
Municipal agencies:
New York (City). Department of health................................................. ....................... 48-49
Oakland (Calif.). Public schools........................................................ ...........................
49
Museum of Safety, American...............................i......... ..... ................ .................................
60
National Association for the Benefit of Middle-Age Employees..................................................
95
National Association of Manufacturers................. .......... .......................................................
95
National Bureau of Casualty and Surety Underwriters....... ......................................................95-97
National Bureau of Economic Research............................. -....................................................97-98
National Child Labor Committee.......... ................................................................-............... 98-99
National Civic Federation..................................................................................................... 99-100
National Committee for Mental Hygiene....................................... -........ .............................100-102
National Committee of Bureaus of Occupation......................................................................... 102
National Education Association....... _.......................................................... ......................... 103
National Fire Protection Association............................ ......... ............. —
............................. 105-106
National Founders’ Association............. .......... ...................................................................106-107
National Industrial Conference Board.................. ................................................................ 107-108
National Institute of Public Administration......................................... -.............................. 108-109
National Junior Personnel Service................................................. -...................................... 109-110
National Metal Trades Association..............................................................-........................ 110-112
National Research Council.................. ................................................................................ 112-116
National Safety Council.....................................................................-................................ 117-120
National Society for the Prevention of Blindness................................... -................................. 120
National Tuberculosis Association............................................................................. .......... 120-121
National Urban League.........................................................................................................
122
National Vocational Guidance Association............................................................................... 122
Nebraska, University of..................................................... -.................................................. 184
New Jersey:
Consumers’ League of...... ..... ...........................................................................................
77
Department of institutions and agencies................................................-........................... 36-37
Department of labor............................................................. -..........................................37-38
New School for Social Research............................................................................................... 171
New York (City). Department of health................................................................................ 48-49




190

IN E O O G N A IO S
D X F R A IZ T N

New York (State):
Page
Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce.......................................................................................
69
Commission on old age security (State agency).................................................................... 41-42
Consumers' League of.......................................................................................................
77
Department of Education (State agency)............................................................................ 38-39
Department of Labor (State agency)........................................................ . ........................39-41
Merchants’ Association of............. ..................................................................................91-92
New York University................................................................-.........................................171-173
North Carolina, University of.................................................................................................
184
North Dakota:
University of.................................................................-..............................................
185
Workmen’s compensation bureau (State agency).................... ....... — ............................ .
42
Norton Co........................................................................................ -................................ 148-149
Oakland (Calif.), Public Schools........................................................................................ .
49
Occupation, Bureaus of, National Committee of............................. .........................................
102
Ohio. Industrial relations, department of, and industrial commission....................................... 42-44
Ohio State University.......................................................................................................... 173-175
Pennsylvania:
Consumers’ League of Eastern...........................................................................................
76
Labor and industry, department of....................................................................................44-46
University of................................................................... .............................................175-176
Personnel Administration, Bureau of.......................................................................................
71
Personnel Classification Board (Federal agency)....................................................................... 26-27
Personnel Research Federation............................................................................................. 123-124
Philadelphia, Bureau of Municipal Research............................................................................ 70-71
Phipps, Henry, Institute for the Study, Treatment, and Prevention of Tuberculosis..................... 176
Physicians, College of....................... .....................................................................................
74
Physicians and Surgeons, College of...................................................................................... 158-159
Physicians in Industry, Conference Board of........................................................................... 74-75
Political and Social Science, American Academy of.................. ...............
.................... 50-51
Portland Cement Association................................................................
...............
124
Posture League, American.................................................— ............................ _ ............58-59
Prince School of Education for Store Service........... .............................. ....................... ........ 179-180
Princeton University........................................... ......
............................. ......................
178
Prisons and Prison Labor, National Committee on................................................................ 102-103
Prudential Insurance Co. of America............................... ....................................................... • 124
Public Administration, National Institute of..................... ............ ........ .......... _ ............ 108-109
Public Health Association, American.... ..................................... ......
....... .......... .......59-60
Public Health Service, United States........ .......... ........... ......
...............15-17
Pulp and Paper Industry, Technical Association of the.
..........
.................... ........ 135
............ ............ ..... 178-179
Purdue University.....................................................................
Railroad Telegraphers, Order of............................ . _ .................................. ..................122-123
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of....................................................... . ...............
70
Railway Association, American...............................................................................................
60
Railway Economics, Bureau of................................................. ..............................................
72
Research Association, Labor.......................................
....... ...
..........................
87
Research Bureau for Retail Training................................................... ................................. 124-426
Research Council, National................
......................................................................... 112-116
Retail Dry Goods Association, National..... ....................................................................... 116-117
Retail Research Association.................... ............................................................................ 126-127
Russell Sage Foundation................................................... ...... ................ .........................127-128
Rutgers University................................................................... ............................................. 185
Safety, Bureau of..................................................................................................................
72
Safety Council, National......................................................................................................117-120
Safety Engineers, American Society of.................................... .................................................63-65
Sanitary Control, Joint Board of, Cloak, Suit, etc., Industries....................................................
99
Scovill Manufacturing Co.........*..........................................................................................149-150
Simmons College.......................................................................................... ....................... 179
Smith College............................................................................ ........................................ 180
Social Research, New School for.................................................
.................. ................ 171
Social Science Research Council....................................................... ...... ........................... 129-130
Society of Industrial Engineers.............................................................. ............................... 130-131
Standards Association, American............................................................... .......................... 65-68
Stanford University............................................................................................................. 180-182
State agencies. (See under specific State.)




IN E O O G N A IO S
D X P R A IZ T N

191

Page
Structural Service Bureau.......... ..... .................................................................................... 131-132
Syracuse University.......................................... _..................................................................
182
Taylor Society (Inc.).........................................................................................................132-135
Teachers’ College, Columbia University................................ ............................................... 159-162
Technical Association of the Paper and Pulp Industry...................................... ....................... 135
Technology, Massachusetts Institute of........................................................................... ..... 168-170
Telegraphers, Order of Railroad.................................. . ........................................................ 122-123
Texas:
Department of labor (State agency)................................................................................... 46-47
University of................................................................................................................... 185
Thompson & Lichtner Co. (Inc.)............................................................................................. 136
Toledo Consumers’ League.....................................................................................................
77
Training School at Vineland, N. J .........................................................................................136-137
Travelers, The....................................................................................................................... 137
Trudeau Foundation, Edward L.......................................................................................... 137-138
Tuberculosis Association, National....................................................................................... 120-121
Typographical Union, International........................................................................................ 84-85
Typothet© of America, United............................. ...............................................................139-140
Underwriters’ Laboratories................................................................................................ 138-139
United States:
Chemistry and Soils, Bureau of. Department of Agriculture...............................................10-11
Children's Bureau. Department of Labor......................................................................... 6-8
Civil Service Commission............................................................................... ................. 18-21
Education, Bureau of. Department of Interior...................................................................13-14
Efficiency, Bureau of.......................................... -............................................................21-23
Employment Service. Department of Labor...................................................................... 9-10
26
Federal Reserve Board................................................................................................. .
Labor Statistics, Bureau of. Department of Labor.............................................................. 5-6
Mines, Bureau of. Department of Commerce................................................................... 11-13
Personnel Classification Board...........................................................................................26-27
Post O
ffice Department....................................................................................................
14
Public Health Service. Treasury Department....................—............................................ 15-17
Shipping Board................................................................................................................
27
Standards, Bureau of. Department of Commerce...............................................................
13
Vocational Education, Federal Board for.............................................................. ............. 23-25
War Department. General Staff......................................................................... . . ...........17-18
Women’s Bureau. Department of Labor.................................... ..................................... 8-9
United Typothetae of America............................................................................................. 139-140
Urban League, National......................................................................................................... 122
Vineland, N. J., Training School......................................................................................... 136-137
Virginia:
Labor and industry, department of....................................................................................
47
University of................................................................................................................ 182-183
Vocational Adjustment Bureau for Girls.................................................. .............................140-141
Vocational Guidance Association, National............................................................................... 122
Vocational Service for Juniors............................................................................... ............... 141-142
Washington. Labor and industries, department of (State agency)...........................................
47
Waterfront Employers of Seattle............................................................................................. 142
Western Electric Co............................................................................................................ 150-151
W
isconsin:
Industrial commission (State agency).................................................................................47-48
University of................................................................................................................... 183
Wharton School of Finance and Commerce, University of Pennsylvania................................... 176-177
Woman’s Occupational Bureau............................................................................................... 142
Women’s Educational and Industrial Union......................................................................... 142-144
Women’s Work, Information Bureau on..................................................................................80-81
Woodward, Fondiller & Ryan............................................................................. ................ 144-145
Yale University................................. -.............................................................................. 183-184
Young Men’s Christian Associations..................................................................................... 145-146
Young Women’s Christian Associations.................................................................................146-148




Subject Index
Page
Abrasive industry, dust hazard..................
148
(See also Safety cases.)
Absence and tardiness............................... 178
Accident causation, personal factors............ 123
Accident insurance costs..................... ......
82
Accident prevention.................... 12-13,28,31,34,
43-44,55,72,82,89-90,93,104-105,112,117,138
Vehicular........................................... 134
Accident statistics.............. . 13,30,31,47,72,149
Accidents, industrial.. 6,34,40,43,53,64,97,148,160
Children................................... 30,40,76,143
Longshoremen..... ..... ......................... 142
Portland cement industry.................... 124
Women.....................................9,40,81,144
Accounting education....................... ........
86
Acetylene, explosibility of................ . ........
12
Adjustment problems............................... 109
Adolescent in industry..............................
48
Adult education....................................... 38,71
(See also Industrial education.)
Advertising, help-wanted........................... 177
Aerial dust, sampling of.............................
15
Age analysis, gainfully employed........ 32,41-42,95
Age factor in labor turnover................ ....... 160
Age limit in industry........................... 69,95,109
Aged citizens............................................ 143
Agriculture:
Child labor......................................... 7,99
Vocational education...................... 23,33,154
Agricultural engineers..............................
174
Air conditioning. (See Dust hazards; Ventila­
tion.)
Airplane pilots......... ................................ 182
(See also Aviators.)
Alcohol and human efficiency..................... 182
39
Alien employees.......................................
Alternating occupation, effect on output___ 181
Aluminum dust........................................
12
Anthracite mining, wages.......................... 108
Anthrax....................................._...........59,175
Appliances........................ ................... 138-139
Electrical, safety specifications.............
104
Gas............ ................ .................... 54-55
Apprenticeship............................... 24,38,74,151
Building construction.......................... 6,154
Foundries.......................................... 107
Machine tool builders.......................... 110
Metal trades....................................... Ill
Printing industry............................... 140
Aptitude tests............................ . 19,150,162,181
Arbitration............................ .................
185
Army intelligence test............................... 17-18
Artificial respriration........................... 48,90,167
Asphyxiation, blast furnaces.......................
12
Atmospheric conditions........................... 52,114
Automobile drivers, tests.......................... 116
Automobile exhaust gas....................... 16,52,183
Automobile industry............................... 87,163
Sickness among workers.......................
16
Automobile mechanics. .......................... 142,153
Automobile service shops, hazards..............
28
Automotive applicances............................
138
Aviation, psychology research in................. 114
Aviators, tests for............................. ........ 183
Awards.................................................... 53,55
Bank employees.....................................
26
Personality traits................................ 171
Banking, labor. (See Labor banks.)
Battery industry. (See Storage-battery.)
Beet-sugar industry. (/See Sugar-beet.)
91
Behavior studies................... ...................
Benefit associations for employees............. 89,137
(See also Mutual benefit associations.)
Benzene vapors........................................
176
Benzol poisoning.......................................37,97
Binet-Simon intelligence tests.....................
18
Blast furnaces, accident prevention.............
12
Blindness, prevention of............................
120
192




Page
Boiler codes..............................................61-62
Bonus systems...... ...................... 53,108,117,134
Boot and shoe industry........................... / 136
Bottle-making industry.......................... __ 181
Bricklaying.............................................
24
Brickmaking.............................. .............
64
Safe practices. . ..............................
119
Building and loan associations.................... 178
Building construction costs.......................
95
Building exits code...................... ............ 106
Building trades..................... 131-132,136,165,174
Accident prevention work....................
28
Apprenticeship................................... 6,154
Industrial relations........................... .
165
Safety.......................................... 34,87,119
Bus operation...........................................
53
Business—
Cycles and unemployment...................
98
Hours and holidays.............................
91
Management and organization.............
71,
151,174,180,182
Personnel administration...................172-173
Research..........................................171,174
Cabinet makers. .....................................
153
Cafeterias and lunch rooms........................
137
Camp safety and hygiene........... ...............
97
Cancer.................................................. .
124
Candy factories........................................
77
Canning industries....................................
29
Child labor..................................... . 7,32
Carbon-monoxide poisoning................ 12,167,184
In garages...........................................
14
Carpenters.................................. ............
153
Cartels, organization and regulation............ 133
Casualty insurance...................................
97
Cement industry. ..................................... 124
Census of employees.................................. 150
35
Census of manufacturers...........................
Chairs, design of.......................................
59
Character analysis..................................156,157
Chemical engineering................................ 170
Chemical laboratory technicians................. 154
Chemicals:
Hazards........................... .................
52
Paper and pulp industry...................... 135
Safe practices...................................... 119
Child-guidance clinics............................ 101-102
Child labor___ 7-8,30-32,39,40,46-47,76,98-99,143
Farms................................................
77
Child welfare............................................
49
Chromium plating....................................
34
Civil-service employees............................ 77,156
Efficiency ratings............................ 21-23,26
Selection methods............................... 18-20
Tests.............. .................... ............. 20-21
(See also Government employees.)
Civilian vocational rehabilitation................
25
(See also Vocational rehabilitation.)
Classification of personnel.. 22-23,26-27,69,109,168
Municipal...........................................
77
Classification system, penal and correctional
institutions............................................
36
Clerical ability test.................................... 162
Clerical occupations, trend........................ 147
Clerical work for juniors............................. 153
Clerical workers................................. 57,156,160
Cloak, suit, and skirt industries. (See Cloth­
ing industries.)
Clothing industries....................................
50
Health and working conditions.............
99
Home work........................................
41
Coal dust, explosion tests...........................
12
Coal, industrial......................................... 53-54
Coal-mining communities, child labor.........
7
Coal-mining industry:
Earnings...........................................
177
Employee representation...................... 128
Underground management................... 136

SUBJECT INDEX

Page
Codes. (See Safety codes and regulations.)
177
Collective bargaining_________ ________
College graduates, stability of employment. _ 150
Colored workers. (See Negroes.)
Commerce:
Personnel administration..................... 155
25
Vocational schools...............................
35
Company housing.....................................
12
Compressed-air illness...............................
Conciliation and arbitration....................... 34-35
Confectionery plants, labor turnover______ 144
Construction industry.
(See Building
trades.)
Consumers' leagues. ................................. 75-77
Continuation schools........................... 33,91,153
Contracts of employment. ___ ______ _ ... 100
C onveyors and conveying machinery code...
62
Cooperative credit....................................
143
Copper, effects on liver_______ _________
159
Correctional institutions, classification sys­
tem. .................................. .................
36
Cost of living.......... 5,46,50,70,86,108,150,175,185
Cotton fields, child labor................ .........
99
11
Cotton-gin fires. .......................................
Cotton mills:
Productivity............. .........................
143
Sickness in communities.......................
16
Woman labor.....................................
9
Cranes, safety...........................................
62
Cripples:
Work for............................................
81
Young, jobs for.................................... 154
Daylight saving.......................................
92
Deaf, training for............. ........................ 116
Deaths by accident...................................
83
Deaths from lead poisoning........................ 124
Defectives, mental..................................136-137
85
Delinquents.............................................
Dental statistics........................................
92
Department stores:
Education.......................................... 179
Training for employees................ 125-126,184
Derricks, safety. ......... ..... .......................
62
Disability and benefit plans....................... 145
Discharges. ................. .......................... 53,178
184
Disease, science of health and.................. .
Diseases. (See Occupational diseases.)
Dress and waist industry. (See Clothing
industries.)
Dry cleaning establishments.......................
64
Dust-collecting systems.............................
40
Dust explosions................................... 10-11,12
Dust hazards................................ 12-13,114,148
Mail bags...........................................
14
Dust measurements.................................. 166
Dust phthisis........................................... 124
Dusty trades:
15
Health of workers................................
Ventilation............................... ......... 166
Earnings................................................ 117
Manufacturing employees.................... 158
(See also Wages.)
Economic conditions..-..................... 98,152-153
E dueational guidance.......................... . 164,181
Educational occupations............................ 162
Educational research..... .........................103,159
Efficiency, and alcohol.............................. 182
Efficiency in relation to illumination___ ...
16
Efficiency ratings................................ 21-23,134
Electric arc welders, training courses.......... 113
Electric light and power industry. ...........103-105
Electric railway transportation................... 52-53
Electric shock............................... ..........
48
Electrical appliances.............................. 138-139
Electrical equipment, mines.......................
12
Electrical engineering................................ 169
Electrical industries.................................. 150
Electrical safety rules................................
38
Electrical workers,wage files...... ................
83
Elevators, safety. .....................................
62
Employee representation......................56,71,128
Employee savings plans............................. 178
(See also Thrift plans.)
Employee stock ownership................. 56,137,178
Employee tests.........................................
56
Employee training. (See Training.)
Employment agencies...............................74,75
(Sec also Employment offices.)




193

Page
8
Employment certificates............... ............
Employment conditions..................... 50,153,174
Employment contracts.............................. 178
Employment management____ ______ 56,71,91,
93,135,144,151,152,157-158,172-173,176,181
Government employees........................81-82
Retail stores........................................ 126
Employment methods and policites...........72,109
Employment offices:
Minors............................................... 141
Private...................................... 29,30,43,51
Public.............. 9-10,29,31,35,41,43,45,51,128
Women.............................................. 147
Employment psychology........................... 174
Employment, standards of........................
9
E mployment statistics. .. . _ 5,31,32,35,40,128,149
E mployment of the tuberculous..............
121
Enameled sanitary ware manufacture. ........ 167
Engineering:
Education.......... 63,64-65,151,169-170,178-179
Illuminating..... ......... ............ ..........
79
Paper and pulp industry...................... 135
Research............................................
78
Standards...........................................
60
Equilibrium, static.................................... 182
Ethyl gasoline hazards.............................. 158
Executives, training of..... ............... 71,125,151
Exhaust gas. (See Automobile exhaust gas.)
Experience ratings, workmen’s compensa­
tion......................................................
96
Explosions...............................................
10
12
Prevention of.....................................
(See also Dust explosions.)
Explosives...............................................
52
Eye conservation..................................... 48,120
Eye hazards............................................. 120
83
Eye injuries.............................................
Factory executives, training...... ........ .......
71
Factory inspection............ ........... 30,31,42,45,82
Factory management.................................
97
Family allowances................................ . 155,156
Farm labor employment service.................
10
Farming. (See Agriculture.)
Fatigue............... 59,88,89,97,131,158-159,165,168
Mental occupations.......................... .
181
Federal employees. (See Government em­
ployees.)
Feeble minded, employment of....... .........36,141
Felt-hat industry...................................... 38,77
Financial management..............................
56
38
Fire drills................................................
Fire prevention...................................... 105-106
Cotton gins........................................
11
Mining..............................................
13
Firemen, health study................. ............. 176
First-aid equipment, etc............................
75
First-aid instruction................................
90
Mining..............................................
12
Five-aay week.........................................
91
Food preserving and canning......................
64
Foods, safe practices................................. 119
Zinc-foil wrapped__________________ 167
Foreman training.......... 24-25,33,73,74,90,171,175
Metal trades.................. ................. . 112
Foundries................................................ 136
Production......................................... 177
Training and education........................ 107
Foundry and machine shops, wages............
5
Free-loan associations................................
86
Fumes......... ........................................... 166
(See also Gases.)
Garages, hazards in..................................14,28
Garment machine operators, tests............... 141
Gas appliances..........................................54-55
Hazards.............................................
13
Gas company employees, education............
55
Gas safety code.........................................
54
Gases and vapors.............. .................... 120,184
Gases, m
ine, explosibility, etc....................
12
Gasoline hazards.......................................
12
Tetraethyllead..............................15-16,158
Government employees.
Administration, principles of................81-82
Classification...................................... 26-27
Efficiency ratings............................ 21-23,24
Retirement.........................................
23
Selection methods............................... 18 -20

194

SUBJECT INDEX

Page
Girls, employment of..............................147,152
Vocational adjustment...................... 140-141
10
Grain-dust explosions................................
Granite industry............................... 15,114,124
Group insurance...............................108, 111, 178
Department stores..................... ......... 126
Guidance............................................... .
49
(See also Vocational guidance.)
Handicapped workers.
Men, employment for..........................
81
Placement........ — ............................. 154
Women, employment for..................... 143
(See also Rehabilitation; Vocational edu­
cation.)
Health.............................. 58,69,126,148,168,184
Child labor.......... ..............................
8
Health and safety pructbes....... ............. 120,150
Health conservation.................. ..............
51
Health education........ ............... ............88,105
Clothing industry...... ........................
99
Health examinations. (See Physical exam­
inations.)
Health hazards-............................... 15,40,60,70
Health insurance...................................... 51,84
Health service.......................................... 57,93
Small plants....................................... 121
Heart diseases.... ................................ 55-56,148
Heating, (engineering................ ............. . 60-61
High-scnool graduates, occupational dis­
tribution.............................................. 163
Highway:
Education and engineering................... 113
Signal devices..................................... 116
Holiday practices....... ..............................
91
Home econom education.................... .
ics,
23
Homework.............................................
41
Children employed in............. ............
7
Chinese quarters. ................................
29
Handicapped....... ..............................
81
Homemaking education............................. 153
Hookworm infection..................................
12
Hosiery industry...................................... 177
78
Industrial relations..............................
Wages........... ...... .............................
5
Hospital organization---- ------- ------- ----- 134
77
Hotel industry............................... .........
Woman labor.....................................
31
Hours of work...... 5,42,47,53,54,91,97,108,122,148
Household employees..... .......................... 148
Housing............... ......................... 35,94-95,137
Rooming conditions............................ 80-81
Human engineering and industrial economy. 107
Humidity............................................... 166
Hydrogen sulphide, effect on respiration...... 184
Hygiene....................... ...... ............ ..... 59,168
(iSee also Industrial hygiene; Mental
hygiene.)
Illness. (See Occupational diseases; Sick­
ness.)
Illumination..........-..................-............. 14,16
Engineering........................................
79
Immigrant living......................................
39
Immigrant personnel problems................... 171
Immigration restriction............... .............
98
Incentives. (See Bonus systems; Employee
stock ownership; Payment of wages; Pro­
duction; Profit sharing.)
Industrial accidents. (See Accidents.)
Industrial disputes.......... ......... 34-35,40,134,185
Canada.............................................. 128
79
Coal mines.........................................
Enginemen.........................................
79
Settlement of......................................
84
Strike statistics...................................
155
Industrial education..................... 13-14,33,38-39
Electric light and power industry.......... 105
Foundry employees............................. 107
Metal trades..............-................... 111-112
Trade schools......................................
24
Industrial engineering................. 130-131,178-179
Industrial hygiene__ 6,17,40,43,59,93,154,165,174
Industrial medicine and surgery.. 51,58,74,154,165
Industrial physiology............................. 158-159
(See also Fatigue.)
Industrial psychology.............................156,157
Europe............................................... 160
(See also Psychology.)




Page
Industrial relations.. 27,42,44,68,78,84,91,100,105,
108, 111, 128,134,135,144,152,157-158,165,178
108
Small plants.......................................
Industrial relations research______ ______ 129
Industrial standards..................................
44
Influenza.................................................. 114
Inspection. (See Factory inspection.)
Insurance, industrial. ...............................
47
Insurance policyholders, occupational mor­
tality.................................................... 17,92
Insurance rates.........................................
96
Intelligence tests.................................... 115,137
Army.................................................17-18
18
Binet-Simon..... .................................
Group, differences in...........................
116
Pintner............................ .................
159
Ratings...... ....................................... 156
Interracial relations..................... .......... 129,130
Interviews, personal................ 91,123,130,135,150
Inventions, employee’s..............................
91
5
Iron and steel industry, wages....................
Job analysis.................. 33,39,93,123,136,160,168
Auto mechanic.................................... 153
Building trades...................................
153
Chemical laboratory technician............. 154
Electrical industry....................... ....... 105
O
ffice and technical jobs....................... 150
Secretaries, Y. M. C. A. and Y.W. C. A. 145,147
93
Joint relations.................... .......... ..........
(See also Employee representation; Works
councils.)
Juniors:
Employment of............ ...................
153
Personnel service....... ............... .......109-110
Placement work.................... 9,37,41,140-142
(See also Child labor.)
Labor adjustment______________ ______ 155
Labor banks..................... ................ 50,162,178
Labor conditions in the South................. 182-183
Labor disputes. (See industrial disputes.)
Labor efficiency........................................
70
Labor legislation............................ 51-52,155,183
Woman workers____ __________ ____
9
Labor management_________________ 175,183
Labor organizations................. ................
35
Research bureaus for.. 50,54,65,69,70,83,85,89
84
Right of association..... ........................
(See also Trade-unionism.)
Labor terminology....................................
165
Labor turnover.................... ..................5,9,53,
68,91,93,134,144,145,149,153,171,177,178
Age factor........................................... 160
Department stores............... ............... 184
Federal service.................................... 158
Laundries...... ...... ......... ............... ......... 38,40
Safe practices...................................... 119
Lay-offs................. ......................i .........
53
Lead hazards............................................ 175
Storage-battery manufacture.................
15
Lead poisoning....................................12,59,158
Deaths from........................................ 124
Leather finishing establishments................. 34,64
Licenses, private employment offices...........
30
Life-extension work................................... 87-89
Life-insurance policyholders, deaths by occu­
pation................................................... 17,92
Lighting........................................... 97,113-114
Codes.................................................
79
Equipment, post offices...................... .
14
Standards........................................... 14,16
Limestone industries, mortality, tuberculosis. 121
Linemen, accident prevention course........... 104
Living standards.....................................
71
Loans.............................................. 128,144,178
Lockouts. (See Industrial disputes.)
Longshoremen.......................................142,165
Lost time, building industry........ .............. 131
Lumber industry...................................... 47,89
Wages................................................
5
Lunch rooms............................................ 137
Machine production, effect on employment.
Machine tool builders:
Apprentice training............................ .
Earnings.............................................
Machinery, guarding of.............................
Machining industries... .............................

83
110
177
82
136

SUBJECT INDEX

Page
Maintenance-of-way employees__________ 69-70
Management............................................ 133
Printing industry................................ 140
(See also Employment management.)
Marble industries, mortality, tuberculosis... 121
56
Marketing management........................... .
Married women in industry.................... 147,148
Mass production and wages....................... 156
Maternity protection.................................
51
Mechanical-ability tests...... ................... 115,181
Mechanical engineering............................. 61-63
Mechanical-power transmission code...........38,62
Mechanical standards, railways..................
60
Medical care of employees...... 51,75,82,93,108, 111
Mental defectives............................. 136-137,182
Classification of...................................
36
Mental hygiene........................ 85,90-91,100-101
Mental occupations:
Continuous, effect of...................... ..... 157
Fatigue.............................................. 181
Mental tests............................................ 17-18,
32,36,49,85,123,137,141,149,156,157,181
Business............................................. 156
Comparison, whites and negroes............ 115
(See also under specific kind of test.)
Merchandise information, etc., training— 125-126
Mercury poisoning.................................... 12,77
Mercury vapor lamp, effect of....................
48
Messengers, telegraph service..................... 162
Metal-fume fever....................................... 166
Metal trades..........................................110-112
Industrial relations.............................. Ill
Personality study of workers..... ........... 160
Placement work.................................. 150
Safe practices...................................... 119
Mexican labor........................................130,185
Middle-aged employees.............................
95
Migration................................................ 115
Migratory children....................................
77
Milk-bottling plants..................... -...........
64
Safe practices...................................... 119
Mill villages............................................. 184
Mine rescue work.....................................
119
Oxygen apparatus.......... ..................... 183
Miner’s nystagmus.............. —
.................12,114
Mineral dusts, relation to tuberculosis..___
138
Minimum wage regulation............ 28-29,35, 42,51
Mining industries, safety work in..........11-13,119
Mobilization classification, Army...............
18
Morbidity, industrial........................—_ 16-17,93
Mortality, occupational..... ......... -............
92
152
Mothers in industry.................................
Motor-vehicle industry, wages............... —
5
Municipal engineering........ ...................... 151
Municipal research....................................70-71
Museum of safety......................................
60
Mutual benefit associations................. 89,108,178
Naphtha, hazards....................................
176
Negroes:
121
Economic condition of.........................
Employment of........................ 56,74,143,172
Home workers........ —.........................
154
Intelligence tests............... -................
115
Migration...........................................
130
Trade-union organization.................... . 122
Neuropsychiatric work in industry.......... — 101
Newspapers, wages, hours, etc....................
85
Night work......... ..... ................... ...........
108
Occupational bureaus for women..............

102
Occupational diseases................................ 6,12,
15,30,34,40,43,48,51,77,83,87,149
(See also Poisons; Tuberculosis.)
Occupational hazards................................
92
Dry-cleaning trade............................. .
76
Textile industry.................................. 144
17
Occupational morbidity.............................
Occupational mortality experience..............
92
Occupational opportunities.
Negro women and girls......................143,172
Young men......................................... 109
Occupational ratings.................................
148
Office-employment tests.............................
21
Office executives, training..........................
71
Office management....................................56,69
Office workers.................................... 57,156,160
41
Old-age assistance.....................................
Old-age pensions................... 68,86,89,90,100,162
Women.............................................. 143
105636°— 30-------14




195

Page
Old-age occupations___-....................... . __ 144
Older workers, employment of____ 95,126,148,149
Open shop............................................. 110-111
Output.
57
Clerical workers..................................
Continuous mental work...................... 157
Effect of alternating occupations........ — 181
Restriction of.....................................
130
113
Oxyacetylene welders, training courses____
Paper and pulp industry......................... - 135
Safe practices...................................... 119
Paper-box industry................................... 41,64
Paper hanging..........................................
24
Part-time education.................................24,153
Part-time work................................. ....... 143
College women......................... ......... 144
Payment of wages:
By check............................................91,92
Methods..................................... 90, 111, 137
Principle of...........................__........... 135
Wage incentive plans........................ 131,160
Penal institutions, classification system......
36
Pension systems........................ 57,72,74,144,178
Industrial workers........................ 80,108,162
Police.................................................
78
Retail stores........................................ 117
Teachers........................................ 73,78,82
Performance ratings.................................. 133
Personality:
Analysis and measurement................ .
116
Ratings................... .......................... 145
Tests............................................ .. 126,146
Personnel management. (See Employment
management.)
Personnel research....................... 109,155,160,168
Petroleum industry, safe practices............... 119
Photo-engraving industry.......................... 177
Physical examination of employees.............. 48,
55-56,75,88-89,120
Physical impairment among workers........ .
17
Physician in industry........................... 59,74-75
Physics, paper and pulp industry................ 135
Physiologist in industry............................. 158
Physiology of fatigue................................. 159
Piece-work systems...................................
50
Pintner rapid survey test........................... 159
Placement work........................... ...........33,179
Juniors................................. 9,37,41,140-142
Metal workers..................................... 150
Women..... ............ ........................... 102
(See also Vocational guidance.)
Plasterers.................. ............................._ 153
Pneum
onoconiosis.......... ............. .......... 40,138
Poisons, industrial..................... ........6,37,76,77
Woman labor......................................
9
Police:
Health study....................................... 176
Tests..................................................
78
Training schools..................................
77
Portland cement industry.......................... 124
15
Dust hazards...... ................................
Post offices, welfare work...........................
14
Posture and seating............................... 41,58-59
Price changes.......... ................................. 70,86
Printing industry......................................
85
Apprenticeship.................................... 140
Management....................................139-140
Prison industries.................................... 102-103
Prisoners, classification of...........................
37
Production incentives................................ 134
Production management............................
56
Production standards................................
50
Productivity, cotton mills.......................... 143
Professional opportunities, women.............. 142
Profit-sharing plans............................ 57,148,178
Protective clothing....................................
37
Psychiatric examinations...........................
36
Prisoners.........................................102
Psychiatric social work.............................. 180
Psychiatry, industrial.—
..........................91,101
Psychological tests. (See Mental tests.)
Psychology............................................. 93,133
Aviation............................................. 114
Business executives.............................. 173
Prison industries................................. 134
Vocational adjustment......................... 160
Psychopathic clinical work.........................
32
Psychopathic employee.............................. 101
Public contact work.................................. 105

196

SUBJECT INDEX

Page
95
Public credits, and housing.... ...................
154
Public employment............... ..... ............
Public utility industry:
Education work..................................
105
Safety work.......................................
72
Pulp and paper industry...........................
135
Quarries, safety work. .......................... 12,119
34
Radioactive substances............................
Hazards.......... ............. ......... ...... 158,159
Radium dial painting, hazards..... ............
16
Radium poisoning.............. —
................... 6,49
Railroads:
Education............... ..........................
72
Operation and management....... . 60,70,169
Personnel activities. ..........................
133
Railroad telegraphers.......... . .. ............... 122-123
Railway clerks. .......................... .............
70
Railway transportation, electric.................
52
Rating scales.............. . . ...................... . 148,150
Rayon manufacture........................... ......
64
Recreation- ......... ............................ . 46-47,127
Activities, industrial establishments___
6
Rehabilitation of disabled persons.. .........
23
(See also Vocational rehabilitation.)
Relationships within industry....................
84
Remedial loans. (See Loans.)
Reserve bank employees...........................
26
Respiration, effected by gases..................... 184
Rest periods............. ................ .......... 150,179
Woman employees.............................. 46-47
Restaurants, woman labor.........................
31
Resuscitation............... ....... ............... 167,183
Electric shock______________ ______ 104
Schaeffer prone-pressure method. .........48,90
Retail selling......................... ...... ....... 180
Retail stores........ ....................... ......... 116,174
Personnel work................................. 69,117
Training............................. 124-125,126-127
Retirement............................. ...... 57,144,145
Civil-service employees___ ____ ____
23
Teachers..........
......................... 78,103
Rock dust, metal mines. .......... ...............
12
Rooming conditions, woman workers..........80-81
Rubber industry...................................... 151
Safe practices...................................... 119
Rural child welfare.................................... 7,99
Safe practices... ..........-................ ._ 104,118-119
Safety.................... 33,43,47,53,54,69,72,117,137
Minors employed................ ..............
8
Safety codes and regulations .6,10,13,31,34,37-38,39
44-46,47,54,61-62,63,64, 66-67,72,82,87,96-97
Safety devices.................... ................ 37,45,149
Safety education...................... 13,37,45,82,96-97
Safety museum........................................
60
Safety organizations....... .......... ...............28,64
Safety work.___ ______ _______ ___ 62-63,93
Campaigns and conferences............. 28,43,64
Mining industries......... ..................... 11-13
Salaries.............................................. 71,92,156
Teachers................................. .......... 103
Social workers..................................... 144
(See also Wages.)
Salesmanship........................................... 160
Salespeople, training of...... .................. 56,57,73
Executives.........................................
71
Retail........................ ......... ...........117,125
Sanitation................................ ...............39,97
Clothing industries..............................
99
Mining communities...........................
13
Saturday holiday.............................. .......
91
Savings plans. (See Thrift plans.)
Schedule rating, workmen’s compensation...
96
School children, employment of...... ..........
8
Seasonal employment, building industry.. 132,136
Selection methods................. ................. 58,145
Civil service.............. .........................18-20
Seniority studies____ ________ ________
123
Shipping board, industrial relations.. ......
27
Shipping industry, accident prevention____ 142
Shoe industry.. ....................................... 162
Strike mediation.................................
86
Shop committees......................................
133
Shop safety..............................................
112
Shutdowns..............................................
53
Sickness frequency, industrial employees. 16-17,92
Sickness insurance costs.............................
82
Silicosis........................................ 40, 59,121,124




Page
Silk industry...................................... 46,87,148
Skin affections.......................................... 120
Skin irritants............................ ............. 176
Slaughtering and meat packing, wages........
5
Social science research............. . 129-133,171,179
Social work, training for__ _____________ 180
Social workers, conditions. _________
77
South, labor and working conditions........ 182-183
Spray painting............. ................... 6,46,49,175
Stability of employment...........................92,134
Child workers.....................................
8
Office workers..................................... 161
71
Standards of living___________ ________
Standards, safe. (See Safety codes.)
Static equilibrium..................................... 182
Steadiness tests.... .................................... 114
Steam laundries.......................................
40
Steam plant, safety of operation.................. 105
Steel plants:
128
Employee representation.....................
Health conservation.......... .................
12
Three-shift system.................. ..... ....... 134
Stock ownership. (See Employee stock
ownership.)
12
Stone quarrying, safety in..........................
Stone setting................. ..........................
24
Stop-watch time study. . ...........................
134
Storage-battery manufacture.....................34,167
Store employment..................................... 126
Store managers—................ ...................... 117
Stores. (See Department, Retail, and Whole­
sale stores.)
Street laborers, common, wages..................
5
Street trades, child labor...... ....................
7
Strikes. (See Industrial disputes.)
Student personnel work............................. 161
Sugar-beet industry................................163,185
Child labor.........................................
99
Superannuation.......................................73,111
(See also Old age; Retirement.)
Surgery, industrial__________ ______ 51,149
(See also Industrial medicine.)
Tanneries......................................... 34,64,175
Safe practices.... ............... ......... ........ 119
Teachers:
Pensions....................................... 73,82,103
103
Salaries............... ......... ....................
Training, Federal aid for.....................
23
Telegraph service, messengers............ ........ 162
Telegraphers, railroad......... ................ 122-123
Temperature......................................... 114,166
Ten-hour law, women......... ......................
30
Tests. (See under specific type of.)
Tetraethyl lead in gasoline........................ 15-16
Textile industries................................ 36,46,184
Occupational hazards........................ .
144
Safe practices.....................................
119
Theaters, econom analysis of business.......
ic
86
Thrift education....................................... 144
Thrift plans........................... 72,108,137,143,177
Time lost in building industry.................. . 131
Time study............................................ 90,13vS
Engineering standardization................. 131
Toxicology of gases............. ...................... 183
Trade analysis. (See Job analysis.)
Trade education. (See Industrial educa­
tion.)
Trade tests...............................................
72
Trade-unionism.......................... 40,133,134,155
(See also Labor organizations.)
52
Traffic, methods of promoting....................
Train dispatchers..... ................................ 122
Training and education............. 58,93,150,164,172
Army.................................................17-18
Department stores................. 125-126,179,184
Mental defectives.................. ...........136-137
Salespeople................................ 56,57,71,73
Store service........... ......................... 179-180
Vocational guidance. ........................
161
Transportation employees- .......................
52
Transportation operation. .........................
60
Tuberculosis......... .................................. 176
Incidence of, in industry......................
121
Mortality in dusty trades..................... 121
Research..........................................137-138
Tuberculous persons:
Employment of____ ________ ______ 121
Mortality and working experience.........
92

SUBJECT INDEX

Page
Turnover. (See Labor turnover.)
Twelve-hour shift............... ..... ............ . 53,79
Typing tests..... ...................... ............. 157,161
_
85
Typographical union, wages_ . . . _______
Ultra-violet radiation, hazards..................
13
Underground management, coal mines____
136
Unemployment................................... 32,35,36,
40,51,53,54,79,81,134,135,143,143,156,183
98
Business cycles—......... .......................
Relief measures................................... 123
Unemployment insurance...... 51,80,92,95,134,137
Union-management cooperation.. _.........
133
Union scales of wages. (See Wages.)
Upholstery weavers’, earnings.......... ......... 177
Vacations.................................... 41,56,123,178
With pay....................................... .75,76,80
Vaccination............................... .............
57
Vehicular accident prevention.................. 134
Ventilating devices, dusts, fumes, etc..........
15
Ventilating, engineering............... ............ 60-61
Ventilation................................... 62,97,166,183
Mines.......... ........................ ............
13
Vision, tests, auto drivers.......................... 116
Vital capacity studies, women.................... 167
Vocational adjustment............... .......140-141,160
Vocational counseling........ .......... ............ 161
Women............ ................. ............... 142
Vocational education............................... 13-14,
23-25,38-39, 68,142,151,153
Negroes........................................ ..... 122
Tuberculous persons......................... ~ 121
Vocational experience, business and profes­
sional women.... ...................................
171
Vocational guidance..................................
8,
14,78,122,141,159,160,164,171,181
7
Children........................................ .
College students.................................. 115




197

Page
Vocational guidance—Continued.
Tests.............................................. .
144
Training for...... ................................. 161
Vocational psychology........................... 157,172
Vocational rehabilitation___ _________ 23,25,51
Vocational selection................................156,157
Vocational tests. .................................. 174,181
Wage incentive plans...... ...................... 131,160
Wage payments. (See Payment of wages.)
Wage determinations....... ........................ 155
Based on cost of living.............. .......... 133
Wages-.................... 5, 9,31,35,40,43,46,47,48,50,
53,54,69,70,81,85,89,98,108,122,148,150,156
(See also under specific industry.)
Waste elimination, building industry....... 131-132
Waste in industry.......... ........ .................53,131
Watch factories, radium poisoning.............. 6,16
Waterfront employees................................ 142
Weather and health. ................................. 114
Welders, training courses........................... 113
Welfare work............................................
53
Mill villages........................................ 184
Wholesale groceries-....... ..... ......... .......... 174
Window cleaning operations......................
38
Woman employees in Y, M. C. A ............... 146
Women, business and professional............... 171
Women in industry............. ............. 8-9,28-29,
30,32,35,40-41,42.46,51,76,77,80,86,146-147
Factory workers, health oL...................
95
Occupational bureaus..........................
102
Vital capacity studies..........................
167
Woodworking plants................................. 38,40
Workmen’s compensation........ 25,51,82-83,90,108
Insurance rates....................................
96
State insurance........................ ..........
97
Works councils......................... ............ 108,137
(See also Employee representation.)




LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
The following is a list of all bulletins of the Bureau of Labor Statistics published since
July, 1912, except that in the case of bulletins giving the results of periodic surveys of the
bureau only the latest bulletin on any one subject is here listed.
A complete list of the reports and bulletins issued prior to July, 1912, as well as the bulletins
published since that date, will be furnished on application. Bulletins marked thus (*) are
out of print.

Conciliation and Arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).
♦No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York.
[1913.]
♦No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade on its inquiry
into industrial agreements. [1913.]
No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
♦No. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City.
[1914.]
♦No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry of
New York City. [1914.]
♦No. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite-coal industry. [1916.]
♦No. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry. [1916.]
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
No. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
No. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287, National War Labor Board: History of its formation, activities, etc.
[1921.]
♦No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement of railway labor disputes. [1922.]
No. 341. Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of New York City. [1923.]
No. 402. Collective bargaining by actors. [1926.]
No. 468. Trade agreements, 1927.
No. 481. Joint industrial control in the book and job printing industry. [1928.]
Cooperation.
No. 313. Consumers’ cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies (credit unions) in America and in foreign coun­
tries. [1922.]
No. 437. Cooperative movement in the United States in 1925 (other than agricul­
tural).
Employment and Unemployment.
♦No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices. [1913.]
No. 172. Unemployment in New York City, N. Y. [1915.]
♦No. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment indus­
tries. [1915.]
♦No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
No. 196. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis,
Minn., January 19 and 20, 1916.
♦No. 202. Proceedings of the conference of Employment Managers’ Association of
Boston, Mass., held May 10, 1916.
No. 206. The British system of labor exchanges. [1916.]
♦No. 227. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa.,
April 2 and 3, 1917.
No. 235. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
♦No. 241. Public employment offices in the United States. [1918.]
No. 247. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y., May
9 -11, 1918.
♦No. 310. Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes.
[1922.]
No. 409. Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.




(I)

Foreign Labor Laws.

♦No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European
countries. [1914.]
No. 494. Labor legislation of Uruguay. [1929.1
No. 510. Labor legislation of Argentina. [1930.] (In press.)
Housing.

♦No. 158. Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign
countries. [1914.]
No. 263. Housing by employers in the United States. [1920.]
No. 295. Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
No. 500. Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [ 1921 to]
1928.
Industrial Accidents and Hygiene.

♦No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary
ware factories. [1912.]
No. 120. Hygiene of painters' trade. [1913.]
♦No. 127. Dangers to workers from dust and fumes, and methods of protection.
[1913.]
♦No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead. [1914.]
♦No. 157. Industrial accident statistics. [1915.]
♦No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914.]
♦No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
No. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of lead
in the painting of buildings. [1916.]
♦No. 201. Report of the committee on statistics and compensation insurance cost
of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions. [1916.]
♦No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.]
♦No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives.
[1917.]
No. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
No. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts.)
[1918.]
♦No. 234. Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
No. 236. Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
No. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of Muni­
tion Workers’ Committee. [1919.]
No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
No. 276. Standardization of industrial accident statistics. [1920.]
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye-intermediates.
[1921.]
♦No. 291. Carbon-monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
No. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
No. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 19101919.
No. 306. Occupational hazard and diagnostic signs: A guide to impairments to be
looked for in hazardous occupations. [1922.]
No. 392. Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]
No. 405. Phosphorus necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and in the prepara­
tion of phosphorus. [1926.]
No. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
No. 428. Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at
Washington, D. C., July 14-16, 1926.
No. 460. A new test for industrial lead poisoning. 11928.]
No. 466. Settlement for accidents to American seamen. [1928.]
No. 488. Deaths from lead poisoning, 1825-1927.
No. 490. Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States to the end of 1927.
No. 507. Causes of death by occupation. [1929.]
Industrial Relations and Labor Conditions.

No. 237. Industrial unrest in Great Britain. [1917.]
No. 340. Chinese migrations, with special reference to labor conditions.




(II)

[1923.]

Industrial Realtions and Labor Conditions—Continued.

No. 349.
No. 361.
No. 380.
No. 383.
No. 384.
No. 399.

Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.]
Labor relations in the Fairmont (W. Va.) bituminous-coal field. f!924.]
Postwar labor conditions in Germany. (1925.1
Works council movement in Germany. [1925.]
Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920-1924.
Labor relations in the lace and laee-curtain industries in the United States.
[1925.]

Labor Laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to labor).

No. 211. Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. L1917.]
No. 229. Wage-payment legislation in the United States. 11917.]
No. 285. Minimum-wage laws of the United States: Construction and operation.
[1921.]
No. 321. Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
No. 322. Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
No. 343. Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]
No. 370. Labor laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating thereto.
[1925.]
No. 408. Laws relating to payment of wages. [1926.]
No. 486. Labor legislation of 1928.
No. 517. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1927-1928.
Proceedings of Annual Conventions of the Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the
United States and Canada. (Name changed in 1928 to Association of Governmental Officials
in Industry of the United States and Canada).

No. 266.
No. 307,
No. 323.
♦No. 352.
♦No. 389.
♦No. 411.
No. 429.
♦No. 455.
No. 480.
No. 508.

Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12 -15, 1920.
Eighth, New Orleans, La., May 2-6, 1921.
Ninth, Harrisburg, Pa., May 22-26, 1922.
Tenth, Richmond, Va., May 1-4, 1923.
Eleventh, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924,
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15 , 1925.
Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926.
Fourteenth, Paterson, N. J., May 31 to June 3, 1927.
Fifteenth, New Orleans, La., May 21-24, 1928.
Sixteenth, Toronto, Canada, June 4-7, 1929.

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions.

No. 210.
No. 248.
No. 264.
♦No. 273.
No. 281.
No. 304.
No. 333.
♦No. 359.
No. 385.
No. 395.
No. 406.
No. 432.
♦No. 456.
No. 485.
No. 511.

Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916.
Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25, 1917.
Fifth, Madison, Wig., September 24-27, 1918.
Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 1919.
Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920.
Eighth, Chicago, 111., September 19-23, 1921.
Ninth, Baltimore, Md., October 9-13, 1922.
Tenth, St. Paul, Minn., September 24-26, 1923.
Eleventh, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924.
Index to proceedings, 1914—
1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 17-20, 1925.
Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.
Fourteenth, Atlanta, Ga., September 27-29, 1927.
Fifteenth, Paterson, N. J., September 11-14 , 1928.
Sixteenth, Buffalo, N. Y., October 8 -11, 1929. (In press.)

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of the International Association of Public Employment
Services.

No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20, 19 13 ; second, Indianapolis, September
24 and 25, 19 14 ; third, Detroit, July 1 and 2, 1915.
No. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N. Y., July 20 and 21, 1916.
No. 311. Ninth, Buffalo, N. Y., September 7-9, 1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D. C., September 1 1 -1 3 , 1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto; Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924.
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N. Y., September 15-17 , 1923.
No. 478. Fifteenth, Detroit, Mich., October 25-28, 1927.
No. 501. Sixteenth, Cleveland, Ohio, September 18-21, 1928.




(Ill)

Productivity of Labor.

No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
No. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper boxboard industry. [1926.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.]
No. 474. Productivity of labor in merchant blast furnances. [1928.]
No. 475. Productivity of labor in newspaper printing. [1929.]
Retail Prices and Cost of Living.

♦No. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer. [1913.]
♦No. 130. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer [1913.]
♦No. 164. Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
No. 170. Foreign food prices as affected by the war. [1915.]
No. 357. Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
No. 369. The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. [1925.]
No. 495. Retail prices, 1890 to 1928.
Safety Codes.

♦No. 331. Code of lighting: Factories, mills, and other work places.
No. 336. Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
No. 350. Rules for governing the approval of headlighting devices for motor vehicles.
♦No. 351. Safety code for the construction, care, and use of ladders.
No. 375. Safety code for laundry machinery and operations.
No. 378. Safety code for woodworking plants.
No. 382. Code of lighting school buildings.
No. 410. Safety code for paper and pulp mills.
No. 430. Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.
No. 433. Safety codes for the prevention of dust explosions.
No. 436. Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.
No. 447. Safety code for rubber mills and calenders.
No. 451. Safety code for forging and hot-metal stamping.
No. 463. Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus—first revision.
No. 509. Textile safety code.
No. 512. Code for identification of gas-mask canisters.
Vocational and Workers* Education.

♦No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment.
[1915.]
♦No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va. [1915.]
♦No. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, Minn. [1917.]
No. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States.
[1920.]
No. 459. Apprenticeship in building construction. [1928.]
Wages and Hours of Labor.

♦No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in
the dress and waist industry of New York City. [1914.]
♦No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry.
[1914.]
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 19 11 to
1913.
No. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam railroad
cars, 1907 to 1913.
•No. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907
to 1914.
No. 204. Street-railway employment in the United States. [1917.]
No. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries,
1915.
No. 265.
No. 297.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
No. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
No. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines, 1924.
No. 407. Labor costs of production and wages and hours of labor in the pa
board industry. [1926.]




(IV)

Wages and Honrs of Labor—Continued.

No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and
1924.
No. 442. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1926.
No. 454. Hours and earnings in bituminous-coal mining, 1922, 1924, and 1926.
No. 471. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1927.
No. 472. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry,
1927.
No. 476. Union scales of wages and hours of labor, 1927. [Supplement to Bulletin
457.]
No. 482. Union scales of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1928.
No. 484. Wages and hours of labor of common street laborers, 1928.
No. 487, Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing, 1910
to 1928.
No. 492. Wages and hours of labor in cotton-goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1928.
No. 497. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States,
1928.
No. 498. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1910 to 1928.
No. 499. History of wages in the United States from colonial times to 1928.
No. 502. Wages and hours of labor in the motor-vehicle industry, 1928.
No. 503. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, 19 11 to 1928.
No. 504. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industries, 1907 to
1928.
No. 513. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1929. (In
press.)
No. 514. Pennsylvania Railroad wage data. From Report of Joint Fact Finding
Committee in wage negotiations in 1927. (In press.)
No. 515. Union scales of wages, May 15, 1929. (In press.)
No. 516. Hours and earnings in bituminous-coal mining, 1929. (In press.)
Welfare Work.

*No. 123. Employer’s welfare work. [1913.]
No. 222. Welfare work in British munitions factories. [1917.]
♦No. 250. Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United
States. [1919.]
No. 458. Health and recreation activities in industrial establishments, 1926.
Wholesale Prices.

No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign coun­
tries. [1921.]
No. 458. Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, 1923 to July, 1927.
No. 493. Wholesale prices, 1913 to 1928.
Women and Children in Industry.

No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in
selected industries in the District of Columbia. [1913.]
♦No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.]
No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]
♦No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee. [1913.]
♦No. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile
establishments and garment factories. [1914.]
♦No. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries.
[1915.]
♦No. 175. Summary of the report on conditions of women and child wage earners in
the United States. [1915.]
♦No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determinations in Oregon. [1915.]
♦No. 180. The boat and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women.
[1915.]
♦No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of
Boston, Mass. [1916.]
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.]
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
♦No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of
industrial employment of women and children. [1918.]
♦No. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war.
[1917.]
No. 253. Women in the lead Industries. [1919.]




(V )

Workmen's Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto).

♦No. 101.
♦No. 102.
No. 103.
No. 107.
♦No. 155.
♦No. 212.
•No. 243.
No. 301.
No. 312.
No. 379.
No. 477.
No. 496.

Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
British national insurance act, 1911.
Sickness and accident insurance law in Switzerland. [1912.]
Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]
Proceedings of the conference of social insurance called by the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Washington,
D. C., December 5-9, 1916.
Workmen’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign
countries, 1917 and 1918.
Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration.
[1922.]
National health insurance in Great Britain, 19 11 to 1921.
Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of
January 1, 1925.
Public-service retirement systems, United States and Europe. [1929.]
Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada as of
January, 1929. (With text of legislation enacted in 1927 and 1928.)

Miscellaneous series.

♦No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor
Statistics up to May 1, 1915.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
No. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
No. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
No. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washington,
D. C. [1921.]
No. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization.
[1922.]
No. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics. [1923.]
No. 342. International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and
problems. [1923.]
No. 346. Humanity in government. [1923.]
No. 372. Convict labor in 1923.
No. 386. Cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
No. 398. Growth of legal-aid work in the United States. [1926.]
No. 401. Family allowances in foreign countries. [1926.]
No. 461. Labor organization in Chile. [1928.]
No. 462. Park recreation areas in the United States. [1928.]
No. 465. Beneficial activities of American trade-unions. [1928.]
No. 479. Activities -and functions of a State department of labor. [1928.]
No. 483. Conditions in the shoe industry in Haverhill, Mass., 1928.
No. 489. Care of aged persons in United States. [1929.]
No. 491. Handbook of labor statistics, 1929 edition.
No. 505. Directory of homes for the aged in the United States. [1929.]
No. 506. Handbook of American trade-unions: 1929 edition.




(VI)