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P a id H o lid a y P r o v i s i o n s
in M a j o r U n io n C o n t r a c t s ,
1958




Number of Paid Holidays
Changes Since *1950
Holiday Premium Pay
Elig ib ility Requirements
Pay for Holidays on Nonworkdays
Unpaid Holidays

Bulletin No. 1248
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner




P a id H o lid a y P r o v is io n s
in M a j o r U n i o n C o n t r a c t s ,
1958

Bulletin No. 1248
March 1959

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.5. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C. - Price 25 cents










P r e fa c e

F or this study, virtually all co llectiv e bargaining
agreem ents in the United States coverin g 1,000 or m ore
w o rk e rs, exclu sive o f railroad and airline agreem ents,
w ere analyzed fo r provisions dealing with holidays— the
number o f paid and unpaid holidays, eligibility re q u ire ­
m ents, rates o f pay fo r work on holidays, and pay fo r
holidays falling on nonworkdays.
The 1, 736 m a jor agreem ents studied cov ered ap­
proxim ately 7 .8 m illion w ork ers, or alm ost half o f e s ti­
m ated total agreem ent covera ge in the United States, out­
side o f the ra ilroa d and airline industries. The paid holiday
provision s of these agreem ents do not n e ce ssa rily re fle ct
policy in sm a ller co llectiv e bargaining situations or in
large o r sm all unorganized fir m s . The agreem ents studied
are part o f the Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics1 file of current
agreem ents maintained fo r public and governm ental use
under the provision s o f the Labor Management Relations
A ct, 1947.
This r e p o r t was prepared in the B u r e a u 1 s
D ivision o f Wages and Industrial Relations by Dena G.
W eiss and Henry S . R osenbloom , under the supervision
o f H arry P . C oh any.

Hi




Contents
Page
1

P r e v a le n c e o f paid h o lid a y s ______________________
S p e c ific h olid a ys o b s e r v e d ----------------------------------E lig ib ility fo r h olid a y pay ------------------------------------S e r v ic e re q u ire m e n ts ----------- --------------------------W ork re q u ire m e n ts ____________________________
R a tes o f pay fo r w o rk on paid h o l i d a y s __________
P a y f o r h olid a ys o c c u r r in g on nonw orkdays ____
H olid a ys o c c u r r in g during va ca tion p e r i o d _
_
Unpaid h o lid a y s _________ -_________________________
P a y fo r w ork in g on unpaid h olid ays ---------------

1

6
8
8
11

13
17
2 2

23
25

C h a rts:
1.
2.

T ota l paid h o lid a y s in m a jo r c o lle c t iv e bargain in g a g re e m e n ts ,
1950, 1 9 5 2 -5 3 , and 1958 _______________________________________________
P a y ra te s fo r w ork on paid h olid a ys in m a jo r c o lle c t iv e
ba rg a in in g a g r e e m e n ts , 1950, 1 9 5 2 -5 3 , and 1958 ___________ _______

2
15

T a b le s:
1.

P a id h olid a y p r o v is io n s in m a jo r c o lle c t iv e bargain in g
a g re e m e n ts b y in d u s t r y ______ _____ _____________ ____ ________ __________
2.
N u m ber o f paid h o lid a y s in m a jo r c o lle c t iv e b argain in g
a g re e m e n ts b y in du stry g r o u p ___________________ —__ _________________
3.
N u m ber o f paid h o lid a y p r o v is io n s in m a jo r c o lle c t iv e
b a rg a in in g a g re e m e n ts b y i n d u s t r y ____________________________________
4.
S p e c ific h o lid a y s gran ted in 10 o r m o r e m a jo r c o lle c t iv e
b a rg a in in g a g r e e m e n t s _____ _______________ ___ _ ___ —__________________
5.
S e r v ic e e lig ib ilit y f o r h olid a y pay in m a jo r c o lle c t iv e
b a rg a in in g a g re e m e n ts b y i n d u s t r y _________________________ __ _______
6.
W ork r e q u ire m e n ts fo r h olid ay pay in m a jo r c o lle c tiv e
b a rga in in g a g re e m e n ts by in du stry ___________________________________
7.
R ates o f pay f o r w ork on paid h olid ays in m a jo r c o lle c t iv e
b a rg a in in g a g re e m e n ts b y i n d u s t r y ___________________________________
8.
P a y p r o v is io n s fo r h olid a ys fa llin g on Saturday in m a jo r
c o lle c t iv e b argain in g a g re em en ts by i n d u s t r y ______________ __________
9.
P a y p r o v is io n s f o r h olid a ys fa llin g on an unscheduled w ork day in
m a jo r c o lle c t iv e bargain in g ag reem en ts by i n d u s t r y ________________
10. Unpaid h olid a ys in m a jo r c o lle c tiv e bargain in g a g reem en ts
11.

R ates o f pay f o r w ork on unpaid h olid ays in m a jo r c o lle c t iv e
b a rg a in in g a g re e m e n ts by in d u s t r y ____________________________________




v

3
3
4
6
8
10
14
18
20

24




Paid H o lid ay Provisions in M ajor Union Contracts, 1958
Nine out o f ten m a jo r a g reem en ts in e ffe c t in 1958 p ro v id e d fo r paid
h o lid a y s , as again st about three out o f fou r in 1 9 5 0 .1 In 1958, the p rin cip a l
in d u strie s in w hich m o s t w o r k e rs under m a jo r a g reem en ts did not r e c e iv e paid
h o lid a y s w e re c o a l m in in g and c o n s tr u c tio n . Although there has b een little change
in the p re v a le n ce o f paid h olid a y p r o v is io n s sin ce 1 9 5 2 -5 3 , the date o f the B u rea u , s
p re v io u s s t u d y ,2 the n u m ber o f paid h olid a ys has in c r e a s e d s ig n ifica n tly (ch a rt 1).
F o r m a l h a lf-d a y h olid a ys have a ls o b e co m e m o r e co m m o n . R ates o f pay f o r w ork
on paid h olid a ys have b een in c r e a s e d in m any a g re e m e n ts.
S cope o f Study
T h is study w as b a se d on an an a ly sis o f 1 ,7 3 6 c o lle c t iv e bargain in g a g r e e ­
m e n ts, each c o v e r in g 1 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e w o r k e r s , o r v irtu a lly a ll a g reem en ts o f
this s iz e in the U nited S ta te s, e x c lu s iv e o f r a ilr o a d s and a i r l i n e s .3 The 7 .8 m i l ­
lio n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d r e p r e s e n te d a lm o st h alf o f a ll the w o rk e rs estim a te d to be
under a g re e m e n ts in the U nited S ta tes, e x c lu s iv e pf r a ilr o a d and a irlin e a g r e e ­
m e n ts.
O f th e s e , about 5 m illio n w o r k e r s , c o v e r e d by 1 ,122 a g re e m e n ts , w ere
in m a n u fa ctu rin g, and 614 a g re e m e n ts app lied to 2 .8 m illio n w o rk e rs in nonm anu­
fa ctu rin g e sta b lish m e n ts (table 1).
A ll but 71 o f the 1 ,7 3 6 a g reem en ts w ere in e ffe c t during 1958. 4 A p p r o x i­
m a te ly 50 p e r c e n t o f the a g re e m e n ts w e re sch ed u led to e x p ire in 1958; term in a tion
in 1959 was stipu lated in about 35 p e rce n t.
O f the rem a in in g 209 lo n g -t e r m
a g r e e m e n ts , 12 did n ot lis t a s p e c ific te rm in a tion d ate.
P r e v a le n c e o f P a id H olid ays
W o rk e r s c o v e r e d by 9 out o f 10 m a jo r c o lle c t iv e bargain in g a g reem en ts
w e re a llow ed tim e o ff without lo s s o f pay to o b s e r v e national and r e lig io u s h o li­
d a y s, h olid a ys tra d itio n a lly o b s e r v e d in som e States o r a r e a s , and oth er days
d e c la r e d h olid a ys by e m p lo y e r s (table 1 ) . The 1,561 co n tra cts in clu d ed 153 w hich
a ls o r e c o g n iz e d c e r ta in unpaid h o lid a y s .
P a id h olid a y p r o v isio n s w ere m o r e p rev a len t in m anufacturing than in
n on m anufacturing a g r e e m e n ts .
V irtu a lly all o f the a g reem en ts in m anufacturing
in d u strie s con ta in ed such p r o v is io n s , as again st a p p rox im a tely th r e e -fo u r th s o f
the m a jo r non m an u factu rin g a g r e e m e n ts . The a b sen ce o f paid h olid ay p ro v is io n s
in m any c o n s tr u c tio n in du stry c o n tr a c ts la r g e ly accou n ted fo r this d iffe r e n c e .
A ll a g re e m e n ts in 16 m an u factu ring in d u stries and 1 nonm anufacturing industry
p ro v id e d fo r paid h o lid a y s .
1 H olid ay P r o v is io n s in U nion A g r e e m e n ts , 1950 (in M onthly L a b o r R e v ie w ,
January 1951, p . 2 4 ).
2 H oliday P r o v is io n s in Union A g r e e m e n ts , 1952-53 (in M onthly L a b o r R e ­
v ie w , F e b r u a r y 1954, p . 128) and L a b o r-M a n a g e m e n t C on tra ct P r o v is io n s , 1953:
P r e v a le n c e and C h a r a c t e r is t ic s o f S e le cte d C o lle c tiv e -B a r g a in in g C la u s e s . (BLS
B u ll. 1 1 6 6 .) M ay 1954, pp . 8 -1 3 .
3 A g re e m e n ts f o r the a irlin e and r a ilr o a d in d u stries a re not c o lle c t e d by
the B u rea u and, t h e r e fo r e , a re not in clu d ed in this study.
F o r an a n a ly sis o f
the c h a r a c t e r is t ic s o f the a g reem en ts stu d ied , s e e C h a r a c te r is tic s o f M a jo r Union
C on tra cts (in M onthly L a b o r R e v ie w , July 1956, p. 805).
4 T h e se a g re e m e n ts e x p ir e d late in 1957 and subsequent a g reem en ts w e re
not a v a ila b le at the tim e o f the stu dy, h e n ce , the e x p ire d a g reem en ts w ere inclu d ed
in the study.




2

C h a r t 1.
T O T A L P A ID H O L ID A Y S
IN M A J O R C O L L E C T I V E ! B A R G A I N I N G A G R E E M E N T S ,
1 9 5 0 ,1 9 5 2 -5 3 , AN D

19581

L e s s Than

6 Days

k ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Y / S S / S / / / / / / / / // // // // // // // // // // // // /./
/ / / / / S/ / / / / / /
V / / / / / / / / / / / / // // // // // // // // // // // // // .
S S / S S / /s/ / / / / / / // // // // // // // // // // // // /

58%:

6 Days

7 Days

8 Days

N um ber of
A gre e m e n ts W ith P a id
H o lid a y Provisions:
1950

t '//////A

1701

1 9 5 2 -5 3

E Z E 3

1,516

1958

1 .5 6 )

2
2
*ln addition to the 20agreements designated as"O therMin table 2, this chart includes

1For the year 1958,
half days were taken as the equivalent of I full day; thus, for example,
6 full days and
half days were counted,Tor this purpose, as 7 days.

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




under this category agreements (also shown in table 2 ) providing for only I half day in
addition to full-day holidays; e. g., 6 full days plus I half day.

3
TABLE 1. Paid holiday provisions in. m ajor collective bargaining agreements by industry, 1958
_ l ---------------'
Number without
Number with
................ KmnK
paid holiday
paid holiday
agrees neats
/ provisions*
provisions*
stud led
Industry
W orkers
W orkers
W orkers
Agreetnents
Agreements
Agreem ents
(000 *s)
(000«s)
(000 *s)
1,736

175

932.3

4 .903.7

7

13.2

10
109
12
45

24.0
363.9
33.2
116.7

10
107
12
44

24.0
357.9
33.2
115.6

_

2
1

_
6.0
1.2

47

473.7

47

473.7

-

-

39.2
29.0
124.9

13
17
55

38.2
29.0
124.9

1
-

1.0
-

36
58
24
25
22

71.7
112.7
70.7
131.9
76.9

36
58
24
25
22

71.7
112.7
70.7
131.9
76.9

-

-

34
123
64
143
106
144

92.1
723.1
175.6
402.9
461.0
1,314.3

34
123
64
143
104
143

92.1
723.1
175.6
402.9
457.0
1,313.3

2
1

4 .0
1.0

55.4

23

55.4

-

-

11

24.5

11

24.5

~

~

614

2 .836.1

446

1.917.0

168

919.1

16
109
75
81
14
85
29
54
148

261.1
553.6
591.7
204.7
28.2
219.2
146.0
181.0
645.5

13
99
75
80
13
82
19
46
18

29.8
525.3
591.7
200.3
26.7
213.4
104.8
167.3
56.6

3
10
1
1
3
10
8
130

231.3
28.3
4 .4
1.5
5.8
41.2
13.7
589.0

3

Furniture and fixtures

6 .8 2 0 .7

1.115

23

Ordnance and a cce sso rie s . ____
Food and kindred p r o d u c t s -------Tobacco manufactures .
Textile m ill products
Apparel and other finished
textile products
Lumber and wood products

1.561

4 .9 1 6 .9

14
17
55

Manufacturing

7 .7 5 3 .0

1,122

A ll industries

5.2

1

1.2

2

4 .0

Printing, publishing, and allied
Chemicals and allied products___
Products o f petroleum and coal__
Rubber products
Leather and leather products Stone, clay, and glass
products
Prim ary metal industries
—
Fabricated metal products
■
Machinery (except electrical) ___
Transportation equipment
Instruments and related

-

Miscellaneous manufacturing
industrie s

Mining, crude-petroleum and
natural-gas production
Transportation3
Communications
Utilities: E lectric and gas
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
Hotels and restaurants
------ -Services
Construction
Miscellaneous nonmanu-

1 Includes 153 agreem ents, covering 615,250 w ork ers, providing for both paid and unpaid holidays.
2 Includes 159 agreem ents, covering 887,650 w orkers, which provided for unpaid holidays only, and 16 agreem ents,
covering 44,600 w ork ers, which contained no holiday provisions.
3 Excludes railroad and airline industries.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal totals.

TABLE 2.

Number of paid holidays in m ajor collective bargaining agreements by industry group, 1958

Number o f days

All agreements with paid
holiday provisions
Less than 6 full days
6 full days . . _
6 full days plus 1 half day _
6 full days plus 2 half d a y s ______
7 full days
7 full days plus 1 half day _
7 full days plus 2 half days
.
8 full days _
. .
8 full days plus 1 half day ----8 full days plus 2 half d a y s ______
8 full days plus 4 half days
9 full d a y s ______________________
9 full days plus 1 half day
9 full days plus 2 half days ______
10 full days plus 1 half day ______
10 full days plus 2 half d a y s______
11 full days
11 full days plus 1 half day
12 full days
14 full days _ _ _
Other1

A ll industries
W orkers
Agreements
(000's)
1,561
76
314
24
121
571
13
20
256
4
8
1
57
2
4
29
1
1
35
1
2
1
20

Manufactur ing
W orkers
Agreements
(000 *s)

6 ,820.7

1,115

263.0
1,308.3
221.4
993.8
2,435. 5
36.2
42. 2
893.6
17.3
11.7
1.4
209.3
2.5
14.7
59.8
3.0
2.7
160.8
2.5
6.7
2.0
132.8

51
196
23
116
456
9
19
166
3
8
21
2
4
21
1
8
_
11

Nonmanufac tur ing
Workers
Agreements
(000 *s)

4,903.7

446

1,917.0

152.9
736. 5
218.9
987.2
1,988. 5
*9.6
39.2
544.3
16.1
11.7
52.3
2.5
14.7
46.6
2.7
13.7
.
46.6

25
118
1
5
115
4
1
90
1
1
36
8
1
27
1
2
1
9

110. 1
571.8
2.5
6.6
447.0
6.6
3.0
349.3
1.2
1.4
157.0
13.2
3.0
147.1
2.5
6.7
2.0
86.2

1 Includes 6 agreements in the food processing industry in which uhworked holidays are paid for only when they occur
during the intercampaign or nonprocessing season; 7 communications contracts which specify a definite number o f paid holidays for all or the m ajority of locations, plus additional holidays for designated areas, and 1 apparel agreement which pro­
vides for a minimum of 4 and a maximum of 6 holidays, based on date of em ployee's entrance on duty. A lso included are
2 agreements with paid holiday provisions which make no reference to the number to be granted. Other provisions were
found in 4 agreem ents.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal totals.




4

W o rk e r s c o v e r e d b y slig h tly m o r e than 30 p e rce n t o f the a g reem en ts
p ro v id in g paid h olid a ys r e c e iv e d le s s than 7 fu ll days (table 2)* Seven fu ll-d a y
h o lid a y s , the m o s t c o m m o n p r o v is io n , w e re p rov id ed by about 40 p e rce n t o f the
m an u factu rin g and about 25 p e r c e n t o f the nonm anufacturing a g r e e m e n ts . H ow ­
e v e r , as the n um ber o f h olid a ys in c re a s e d the m o r e lib e r a l p r a c tic e s w ere found
am ong nonm an u factu rin g in d u s tr ie s . T h u s, slig h tly m o r e than 20 p e rce n t o f the
n onm anufacturing c o n tr a c ts p ro v id e d f o r 8 d a y s, as again st about 15 p e r c e n t in
m a n u fa ctu rin g, and n on m anufacturing a g reem en ts accou n ted fo r m o r e than h a lf o f
th ose granting 9 days o r m o r e .
The m o r e lib e r a l b e n e fits in nonm anufacturing w e re a ccou n ted fo r by
su ch in d u strie s as u t ilit ie s , tra n sp orta tion , and co m m u n ica tio n s , w h ere 57 o f the
133 a g re e m e n ts (in both m an u factu rin g and nonm anufacturing in d u strie s) p rov id in g
9 o r m o r e h olid a ys w e re found (table 3 ). T ra n sp o rta tio n , h o w e v e r , was a ls o one
o f the fe w in d u strie s in w hich fe w e r than 6 paid h olid a ys w e re s p e c ifie d in a
sig n ifica n t n u m ber o f a g r e e m e n ts , the oth er in d u stries b ein g h o te ls , te x tile m ill
p r o d u cts , and a pp a rel»
P r o v is io n s fo r 7 fu ll days w e re found in about h a lf o r
m o r e o f the a g re e m e n ts in ru b b e r, stone and g la s s , p rim a ry m e ta ls , fa b r ic a te d
m eta l p rod u cts, m a ch in e ry (e x c e p t e le c t r ic a l), and e le c t r ic a l m a ch in e ry in d u s tr ie s .
T A B L E 3.

N u m b er o f p aid h o lid a y p r o v is io n s in m a jo r

N u m b er o f p aid h olid a ys
L e s s than
6 days

In d u stry

N o.

A gree­
m ents
A ll in d u s trie s
M a n u fa c tu r in g ______________________
O rd n a n ce and a c c e s s o r i e s

2

F o o d and k in d re d p ro d u cts
T o b a c c o m a n u fa ctu res
T e x tile m ill p ro d u cts
A p p a r e l and oth er fin ish e d
t e x tile p ro d u c ts
L u m b e r and w ood p rod u cts
(e x c e p t fu rn itu re)
F u rn itu re and fix tu r e s _
P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s __________
P rin tin g , p u b lish in g and

6
7
8
9

..... .

a l l i e d i n d u s t r ie s

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p r o d u c t s _____
P r o d u c ts o f p e tr o le u m and c o a l ____
R u b b er p rod u cts

L e a th e r and le a th e r p ro d u c ts
S ton e, c la y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s ____
P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s __________
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c t s _________
M a ch in e ry (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ______
E le c t r ic a l m a c h in e r y
T r a n s p o r ta tio n eq u ip m en t
In stru m en ts and re la te d
p ro d u c ts _
M is c e lla n e o u s m an u fa ctu rin g
in d u s trie s
_ _
_
_ _
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g

22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

M ining, c r u d e -p e t r o le u m and
n a tu ra l-g a s p ro d u c tio n __
T ra n s p o rta tio n 2
C o m m u n ica tio n s
U tilitie s : E le c t r ic and g a s _________
W h o le sa le tra d e _
R e ta il tra d e _
H otels and re s ta u ra n ts _ ____
S e r v ic e s
• _
C o n s t r u c t i o n __
M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g __

1

S ee fo otn ote 1, tab le 2.




W o rk e rs
(000* s)

A gree­
m ents

W o rk e rs
( 0 0 0 's)

A gree­
m ents

W o rk e rs
( 0 0 0 's)

6 fu ll days plus
2 h a lf days
A gree­
m ents

W o rk e rs
(000»s)

7 fu ll days
A gree­
m ents

W ork ers
(0 0 0 's )

76

1
3
4
5

6 fu ll da ys plus
1 h a lf day

6 fu ll days

263. 0

314

1, 308. 3

24

221. 4

121

993. 8

571

2, 435, 5

51

152. 9

196

736. 5

23

218. 9

116

987. 2

456

1 ,9 8 8 . 5

1
14
4
14

2. 1
28. 8
7. 1
3 5 ,9

.

.

.

_

-

11. 0
-

1
-

3. 3
-

5
29
2
11

14. 0
122. 6
8 .9
19. 5

_

_

3
2
15

7. 5
6. 2
4 2. 2

20

70. 8

8

181. 6

13

187. 2

1

2. 7

1

4. 5

1
-

11
4
32

34. 6
7. 2
83. 6

1
-

3. 0

2

3. 8

1

1. 0
1. 5

-

-

-

1
5
18

2. 6
8. 1
31. 8

-

-

10. 0
1. 8
-

1 5 .4
15. 1
1. 2
2. 0
38. 5
3 3 .4
2 0 .9
10. 1
21. 6
18. 1
176. 8

10
21
6
20
6
16

1
-

12
7
1
2
10
14
13
7

-

3
-

8

4

-

-

-

1
1

2. 0
2. 3

2
1

2
-

-

4 .5

14
33
12
41

5. 2
1. 8
18. 8
29. 5
111. 0
36. 1
771. 1

30
70
51
47

15. 7
4 7. 5
10. 8
123. 6
22. 6
52. 2
673. 2
76. 3
211. 5
315. 2
211. 0
12. 1

6

98

5

12. 1

9
23

-

-

-

-

1

9 .0

1

1. 2

7

-

-

2

3 .0

-

-

2

3. 0

2

5. 3

25

no.

i

118

571. 8

1

2. 5

5

6 .6

115

447. 0

4
40

5. 7
2 9 9 .9
3L 2
10. 3
2. 3
89. 8
45. 0
67. 0
20. 7

1
-

-

-

-

8

4 3 .6

21. 2
6 0 .4
2 0 3 .4
39. 2
1 2 .4
5 9 .6
12. 0
19. 9
19. 0

11
1

7
5
1
“

-

4.
46.
15.
1.
“

2

5
2

0
3
0
3

38
5
18
4

-

-

5

6 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

"

■

2. 5

23
23
17
5
18
6

10
5
■

■

E x clu d e s r a ilr o a d and a ir lin e in d u s tr ie s .

5

P a id h a lf h o lid a y s w e re m o s t p rev a len t in a p p a re l, tra n sp orta tion eq u ip ­
m e n t, and m a ch in e ry (e x c e p t e le c t r ic a l)— one o r m o r e paid h a lf h olid a ys w ere
s p e c ifie d in about a th ird o r m o r e o f the a g reem en ts f o r th ese th ree in d u s tr ie s .
O th er in d u strie s in w hich h a lf h olid ays w e re freq u en t w e re e le c t r ic a l m a ch in e ry
and fa b r ic a te d m eta l p r o d u cts.
Tw enty a g re e m e n ts in clu d ed in this study con tain ed h oliday p ro v is io n s
w h ich c o n fo r m e d to no s p e c ific pa ttern .
Som e co n tra cts n eg otia ted in se a s o n a l
in d u strie s a llo w e d paid h olid a ys on ly i f they o c c u r r e d ou tsid e the p e r io d o f m o s t
h e a v ily c o n ce n tra te d w o rk .
R e p re se n ta tiv e o f this type o f p r o v is io n w e re s ix
fo o d p r o c e s s in g a g re e m e n ts w hich e x p r e s s e d this lim ita tion g e n e ra lly as fo llo w s :
The fo llo w in g a re d e c la r e d /p a i d ^ h olid a ys i f they o c c u r during
the in te rca m p a ig n se a so n : New Y ear*s D ay, G ood F r id a y , D e c o ­
ra tio n D ay, Independence D ay, L a b o r D ay, T hanksgiving D ay,
and C h ristm a s Day e . . T h e re sh all b e no h olid a y s during the
ca m p a ig n se a s o n . 0 * The C om pany a g re e s to pay e m p lo y e e s
c o v e r e d by this a g re e m e n t during cam pa ign at one and o n e h alf tim e s the re g u la r sch ed u led stra ig h t-tim e ra te s . • . fo r
the tim e w ork ed on the follow in g h o lid a y s :
Thanksgiving D ay,
C h ristm a s D ay, and New Y e a r f s D ay. „ . .
i c o l l e c t i v e b a r gain in g a g r e e m e n t s by in d u s tr y , 1958
N u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s
7 lull a ays plus
8 fu ll d ays plus
9 fu ll days plus
More than
Other 1
10 full days
I or m ore
9 full days
1 or m ore
8 full days
1 or more
10 days
half days
, _______ __________
half days
half days
No.
W rk 'e rs
Workers
Workers
Workers
Workers
Workers
Workers
Workers
A g re e ­
A g ree­
A g ree­
A gree­
A g re e ­
A g ree­
A g re e ­
: A gree­
ments
ments
ments
ments
ments
ments
ments
(000«s)
(00 O' s)
(000* s) ments (000* s)
(000's)
(000's)
(000's)
(o o o '.)
33

7 8 .4

256

893. 6

13

30. 3

57

209. 3

6

17. 2

29

59. 8

41

1 7 7 .7

20

132. 8

28

68. 8

166

544. 3

11

27. 8

21

52. 3

6

17. 2

21

4 6 .6

9

1 6 .4

11

46. 6

1
2

1 .4
2 .9

_
4

_

.

_

_

_

.

-

-

1

1. 0

6

.
7

1 9 .7

-

-

1. 5

-

-

-

-

1

1. 0
0

5

2. 5
1. 5

:

;

:

:

-

-

-

-

6
7
8

29. 5
4. 5

_
-

_
i

10. 5

i

12
.

-

i
-

5. 2
-

3. 7

-

-

-

2

3. 1

3
38

6. 6
140. 1

-

-

4

18. 1

2

15. 5

-

-

1

1. 5

4
_

63
.

2
1

_

1
1
6
4
4

5
17

1
6
1
3
1

_

12

.
1.
19.
.
9.

6

4
9
14

5
8
7
2

2
2
2
2

2

. 1
4. 0

1
1

.2
30. 7
48. 2
. 2
5 .9
.6
. 8
52. 5
.6
53. 9
131. 5

1
1
6
22

1
1

1 .4
. 1

1

-

-

1
1

_

_
1 .4

_
5

_
7. 3

_
-

_
-

9
3

1

1
1
3
-

1

4

7. 6

-

-

-

-

5

9 .6

90

349. 3

2

-

4. 1
5. 5
-

1
6
2
6

2 .9
1 7 .4
1 7 6 .4
60. 9

-

3
-

4
17

1
6
1

6.8

34. 6
1. 5
4 6 .3

2.6

1

-

1

4. 0

28

-

-

3

2

17. 3

-

1

-

1

-

10
.

1

. 2
1 .4
1 7 .4
-

1
2
2

-

2. 3
1. 7

-

2 .9
2 .4
4. 5
-

12
.

1

3. 5

-

4

1. 9
1

-

-

2.6

36

15 7 .0

_

_

. 2
-

15
4

-

-

-

-

1

1 .4
-

88.0

’ 1
-

2 1 .4
30. 7
4. 2
-

3

81
.

1
1

2

4. 7

2
1
2

11. 7

.
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not e qu a l to t a ls .

4
"

5. 0
-

i
-

1
1
8

1. 4

2

-

2
1
2
2
1

1

1 1 .7

-

10
.

_

1. 3

-

-

-

13. 2

32

161. 3

9

4
9

16. 1
71. 7
4 6 .9
1 5 .9

7
_

83. 7
1. 6
1. 0
-

5. 3
5 .4
*

■

“

9

1
0
1
1
1
2
13
14
15

1
6
17
18
19

2
0
2
1

8. 2
6

3. 1
1. 6

1
2
3
4

4. 4
2 .9
1. 2

1
2
3

1
3
~

1
1

2
2
33

U

25

2
6
27
28
29
30
31

6

H oliday a llo w a n ce s w hich v a r ie d b y lo ca tio n w e re s p e c ifie d in sev en c o m m u n ica ­
tion s a g r e e m e n ts , a ll in tersta te in co v e ra g e * In th e s e , a d esig n a ted n u m ber o f
h o lid a y s w e r e a u th orized fo r a ll lo c a tio n s , and additional h olid a ys w e re p erm itted
in c e r ta in a r e a s , b a s e d on p re v a ilin g lo c a l p r a c tic e s * A l is t o f desig n ated h o li­
days fr o m w hich an a g r e e d upon num ber— m in im u m o f 4 and m axim u m o f 6 d e ­
pending on length o f s e r v ic e — c o u ld be s e le c t e d , was found in an a p p a rel a g r e e ­
m ent c o v e r in g o v e r 1 0 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs*
S p e c ific H olid ays O b s e r v e d
Union c o n tr a c ts ty p ic a lly nam e the h olid a y s to be ob serv ed * The 6 h o li­
days g e n e r a lly r e f e r r e d to as "sta n d a rd 1—C h ristm a s Day, L a b o r D ay, Thanksgiving
1
D ay, New Y ear*s D ay, Independence D ay, and M e m o ria l Day— w e re desig n ated
in fr o m 98 to 93 p e rce n t o f the a g reem en ts with paid h o lid a y s , in the o r d e r given
(table 4 ). The next m o s t fre q u e n tly r e c o g n iz e d h olid a y , W ash in gton ^ B irth d ay ,
w as lis te d in a lm o s t 30 p e r c e n t o f the a g reem en ts with paid h olid ay p r o v is io n s .
G ood F r id a y , added as the seventh h oliday in m o s t a g reem en ts n eg otiated in 1956
b y the U nited S t e e lw o r k e r s , w as m entioned in 22 p e r c e n t, and V etera n s Day
(N o v e m b e r 11) in about 18 p e r c e n t o f the a g re e m e n ts . F o r this study, E le ctio n
D ay w as n ot c o n s id e r e d as a paid holid ay if e m p lo y e e s w ere a llow ed annually le s s
than a h a lf day o ff; a fu ll day w as allow ed in 8 p e rce n t o f the c o n t r a c t s , and a
h a lf day in 2 percent*
E xtending the C h ristm a s h olid a y by adding eith er a fu ll day o r a h a lf­
day h o lid a y and o b s e r v in g a h a lf-d a y h olid ay on the day p reced in g New Y ear*s
Day r e p r e s e n t r e c e n t innovations in h olid ay sch ed u lin g . S im ila r ly , the day after
T h anksgiving Day w as c e le b r a t e d as a fo r m a l h olid a y in a sm a ll num ber o f a g r e e ­
m e n ts. H olid a ys o b s e r v e d in c e r ta in a rea s o n ly , such as P a t r i o t s Day in M a s s a ­
ch u setts and oth e r parts o f New E ngland, A d m is s io n Day in C a lifo r n ia , and San
Jacin to Day in T e x a s , and th ose r e c o g n iz e d only by a s p e c ific com p an y o r in d u s­
tr y , w e re p ro v id e d in a s m a ll n u m ber o f m a jo r a g re e m e n ts.
TABLE 4.

Specific holidays granted in 10 or more major

c o lle c t iv e b a r g a in in g a g r e e m e n t s ,

19581

Observed as—
Holiday

Christmas Day
- _ __ - —
Labor Day __ _______
Thanksgiving Day _ „ — — _
New Year *s Day _ - —
Independence Day ______________
Memorial Day . ___
Washington’ s Birthday — - Good Friday ______________ ___—
Veterans D a y __ . . .
Election Day __ —
Day before Christmas__________
Columbus Day __________________
Lincoln’s B irth d ay__ __________
Day after Thanksgiving_________
Easter _ - - Patriots* Day . _
Employee’ s b ir th d a y __________
Company or industry days ——
___
Admission Day
_ _ _
San Jacinto Day
- —
Day before New Year’s ______ —

Half holiday
Workers
Agreements
(000 >s)
_
6,6 3 8 .3
4 .0
6,6 3 0 .7
1
6 ,5 9 2 .4
6 ,3 6 2 .4
6,4 8 6 .0
6,4 1 1 .7
1.932.4
4
1,342.3
11.9
1,127.4
260.4
531. 1
32
351.3
180
1, 136. 9
361.8
362.3
175.8
106.0
45.2
28.9
25.3
54.9
24.8
150
1, 068. 0
“

Full holiday
Workers
Agreements
(000 ’s)
1,527
1,522
1,508
1,482
1,476
1,449
461
338
283
127
118
93
85
54
43
21
17
13
10
10
—

1 Based on a study of 1,736 agreements, 1,561 of which contained paid holi­
day provisions.




7
A few m a jo r a g re e m e n ts desig n ated E a s te r M onday, A ll Saints D ay, Y om
K ip p u r, and oth er r e lig io u s days as paid h o lid a y s .
H o w e v e r, the p r a c tic e o f
granting r e lig io u s h olid a ys m ay be m o re co m m o n than is su g g ested by the lis t
in ta b le 4 .
S om e a g re e m e n ts con tain ed a g en era l statem ent to the e ffe c t that
r e lig io u s h olid a ys w ill be aw arded; fo r ex a m p le:
E m p lo y e e s sh a ll be gran ted 8 h olid a ys p er ca len d a r y e a r to be
s e le c t e d fr o m the fo llo w in g : New Y e a r ls D ay, L in c o ln ^ B irth ­
day o . . and r e lig io u s h olid ays r e c o g n iz e d by the p re s e n t
p r a c t ic e o f /t h e C om p a n y /l
*

*

*

If an e m p lo y e r sh ou ld e le c t fo r r e lig io u s re a s o n s to c lo s e his
e sta b lish m e n t on a w ork in g day, which is a re lig io u s h olid ay • . .
re g u la r e m p lo y e e s sh all r e c e iv e fu ll pay fo r sa id day at straig h t
tim e • . .
U nder 17 a g r e e m e n ts , ea ch w o rk e r w as en titled to a paid h olid a y on his
b irth d a y .
The advantage o f a birthday h olid a y is that, unlike g en era l h o lid a y s ,
its o b s e r v a n c e d oes not r e s u lt in an in terru p tion o f n o rm a l o p e r a tio n s .
A few a g re e m e n ts p e rm itted the substitution o f h o lid a y s , if e m p lo y e e s
so d e s ir e d , o r fo r o th e r s p e c ifie d r e a s o n s .
Such p r o v is io n s , when in clu d ed in
in te rsta te c o n t r a c t s , a llo w e d lo c a l option in the c h o ic e o f h o lid a y s .
P io n e e r D ay, July 2 4 , o r oth er lo c a lly o b s e r v e d h olid a ys m ay
be su bstitu ted fo r W ashington*s B irthday if a m a jo r ity o f the
f o r c e in an exch an ge o r group o f exch an ges so d e s ir e .
*

*

*

W ashington *s B irth d a y is design ated as the h olid a y in F e b ru a ry
e x c e p t when the o b s e r v a n c e o f L incoln*s B irthday w ould p rov id e
a lo n g e r w eek en d, in w hich event Lineoln*s B irthday shall be
the o b s e r v e d h olid a y . . .
*

*

*

T h e se w ill be c o n s id e r e d h o lid a y s : . . . By lo c a l a g reem en t
another day o f g r e a te r lo c a l sig n ifica n ce m ay be substituted / fo r
M e m o r ia l Dayj7. T h is su bstituted h olid a y is not su b je ct to change
during the life o f this a g re e m e n t.
In so m e in s ta n c e s , sch ed ulin g o f a h olid ay depended upon the day o f the
w eek on w hich it f e l l .
F o r in sta n ce , in one c o n tra ct the follow in g p o s s ib ilitie s
w e r e m en tion ed:
T h e re sh a ll be
fo llo w s :

an eighth h olid ay

w hich

w ill be

o b s e r v e d as

If C h ristm a s Day is on —

The eighth h olid ay w ill be-

Sunday _______________________
M o n d a y ______________________
T u esd a y _____________________
W edn esday __________________
T h u rsd a y ___________________
F r i d a y _______________________
Saturday ______________ ______

P re ce d in g
P r e c e d in g
P r e c e d in g
Day a fte r
F ollow in g
P r e c e d in g
P r e c e d in g




F rid a y
F rid a y
M onday
T hanksgiving
F rid a y
T h u rsd ay
F rid a y

8

F o u r a g re e m e n ts d esig n a ted a lis t o f h olid a ys fr o m w hich e ith er the e m p lo y e r
o r the union s e le c t e d a d esig n a ted nu m ber; th ree o f th ese a g reem en ts w ere in
s e r v ic e in d u s tr ie s , and one in tra n sp orta tion equ ipm en t.
The e m p lo y e r sh a ll grant to a ll e m p lo y e e s c o v e r e d b y this
a g r e e m e n t, 6 h o lid a y s with pay during ea ch em p loy m en t y e a r
f r o m am ong the fo llo w in g h olid a y s: New Y ear*s D ay, D e c o r a ­
tion D ay, July 4 , C olu m bus D ay, L a b o r D ay, Thanksgiving D ay,
C h ristm a s D ay, and W a sh in gton ^ B irth d a y .
E lig ib ility fo r H olid ay P a y
T y p ic a lly , a w o rk e r m u st m e e t c e r ta in s e r v ic e o r w ork re q u ire m e n ts in
o r d e r to b e c o m e e lig ib le f o r h olid a y pay. S e r v ic e re q u ire m e n ts u su a lly r e fe r to
the length o f tim e n e c e s s a r y to gain s e n io r ity status o r to co m p le te a tr ia l p e r io d ,
and m a y r e f le c t an attem pt to r e s t r i c t paid h olid ay b en efits to re g u la r e m p lo y e e s .
W ork re q u ire m e n ts apply to sch e d u led w ork days im m e d ia te ly b e fo r e a n d /o r a fte r
the h o lid a y , and a re d e sig n e d c h ie fly to re d u ce a b s e n te e is m during the h olid ay
w eek . A m on g the m a jo r a g re e m e n ts stu d ied , w ork re q u ire m e n t p r o v is io n s w e re
m o r e c o m m o n than s e r v ic e re q u ire m e n t p r o v is io n s .
M any a g re e m e n ts c o n ­
tained a c o m b in a tio n o f both ty p e s.
S e r v ic e R e q u ir e m e n ts . — M ore than h alf o f the m a jo r a g reem en ts with
paid h olid a y p r o v is io n s stipu lated s e r v ic e req u irem en ts (table 5). I n m o s t c a s e s ,
le s s than 6 m onths o f s e r v ic e w as re q u ire d to b e co m e e lig ib le , and m o r e than
a fou rth o f the a g re e m e n ts s p e c ifie d 1 month o r l e s s . A substantial n u m ber o f
a g re e m e n ts (118) did not defin e s e r v ic e re q u ire m e n ts , but con tain ed g en era l p r o TABLE 5.

S e r v ic e e lig ib ilit y fo r h olid a y pay in m a jo r
S e r v ic e re q u ir e m e n ts —

In du stry

N o.

N um ber w ith
p aid h olid a y
p r o v is io n s
A gree­
m ents

W o rk e rs
(000 *s)

N o p r o v is io n
fo r s e r v ic e
re q u ir e m e n ts

L e s s than
1 m onth

W o rk e rs

A gree­
m en ts

(000 »s)

1 m onth

W ork ers

A gree­
m en ts

(0 0 0 's )

W o rk e rs

A gree­
m en ts

(000 *s)

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

A p p a r e l and oth er fin ish e d
te x tile p ro d u cts .
L u m b er and w o o d p ro d u cts
(e x c e p t fu rn itu re )
F u rn itu re anrf fix tu re s
-------- -----------------P a p e r and a llie d p ro d u cts _
P r in tin g , p u b lish in g , and
a llie d in d u s trie s
C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p rod u cts

L ea th er and lea th e r p r o d u c t s ____________
S tone, c la y , and g la s s p ro d u cts _
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u cts
E le c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

2 ,8 7 0 .2

26

6 8 .5

233

8 5 5 .6

4 9 0 3 .7

432

1 ,7 2 8 .1

19

3 5 .9

206

6 2 6 .7

10
107
12
44

2 4 .0
3 5 7 .9
3 3 .2
115.6

5
37
10
16

11 .5
7 6 .5
2 7 .0
3 7 .3

2
_

4 .2

_

_

3
14
1
12

7 .0
2 8 .5
1 .6
3 0 .2

47

4 7 3 .7

40

4 5 8 .1

2

6 .1

13
17
55

3 8 .2
2 9 .0
124.9

2
6
12

4 .0
13 .2
2 1 .0

-

-

36
58
24
25
22
34
123
64
143
104
143

7 1 .7
112.7
7 0 .7
131.9
7 6 .9
9 2 .1
7 23.1
175.6
4 0 2 .9
4 5 7 .0
1 ,3 1 3 .3

22
49
15
9
1
7
24
19
48
42
56

4 7 .9
9 7 .1
5 6 .5
7 7 .8
2 .9
15 .7
5 5 .9
7 2 .9
1 14.9
17 0 .2
3 3 7 .2

5 5 .4

11

2 7 .3

-

2 4 .5

1

3 .5

1

446

1 ,9 1 7 .0

283

1 ,1 4 2 .1

7

13
99
75
80
13
82
19
46
18
1

2 9 .8
5 2 5 .3
5 9 1 .7
2 0 0 .3
2 6 .7
2 1 3 .4
1 04.8
16 7 .3
5 6 .6
1.2

54
44
58
7
53
17
33
16
1

2 0 2 .5
3 7 5 .7
14 3 .2
11 .6
125.8
1 0 0 .3
131.5
5 0 .5
1 .2

1
3

_

1

3 .0

8
5
18

18 .9
5 .7
3 5 .1

5
4
1
4
8
15
22
12
30
18
20

8 .3
6 .7
1 .2
3 3 .2
4 5 .7
3 5 .3
7 5 .2
2 9 .8
6 6 .3
119 .8
6 5 .9

-

3

6 .1

1 .2

2

3 .5

3 2 .6

27

2 2 8 .9

1 .3
2 5 .5

1
17

2 .0
2 0 9 .0

-

-

2
1

2 .3
2 .5

_
-

_
-

2

4 .0

-

-

2
3
3

5 .5
4 .4
4 .0

-

-

1

1 .7

In stru m en ts and re la te d
M is c e lla n e o u s m an u factu rin g

N onm anufacturing
22

715

11

6

F o o d and k in d re d p rod u cts
T o b a c c o m a n u fa ctu res

6 ,8 2 0 .7

23

1
2
3
4
5

1,561
1 115

A ll in d u s trie s

M in in g, c r u d e -p e t r o le u m and
n a tu r a l-g a s p r o d u c t i o n _________________
T ra n s p o rta tio n 3
C o m m u n ica tion s
U tilities? E le c t r ic and gas
W h o le sa le trad e
R e ta il tra d e
. . . . . .
H otels and re s ta u ra n ts
S e r v ic e s
C o n s tru ctio n

_

_

1.2
4 .1
7 .6

_
_

_
.
_

1
2
4
_

_

2
1

3 .2
2 .6

1
1

1 .6
3 .5

“

~

1 T h e s e a g re e m e n ts r e fe r to s e r v ic e r e q u ir e m e n ts e x p r e s s e d in su ch g e n e r a l te r m s a s " e m p lo y e e m u st h ave s e n i o r i t y ,"
" r e g u la r e m p lo y e e s o n l y , " o r that e m p lo y e e s "m u s t have c o m p le te d p r o b a tio n a ry o r t r ia l p e r i o d ," w ithout d efin in g length o f
p r o b a tio n a ry p e r io d o r s e r v ic e n e c e s s a r y to attain th is statu s.
In clu d e s 2 m u ltie m p lo y e r a g re e m e n ts in the fo o d in d u stry in w h ich q u a lify in g s e r v ic e v a r ie s b y lo c a lit y .
1 a g re e m e n t




2

9

v is io n s su ch as nm u st have co m p le te d p rob a tion a ry o r tr ia l p e r i o d , " m u s t have
s e n io r it y , " o r s im ila r sta te m e n ts, without in d icatin g the length o f the tr ia l p e rio d
o r the tim e n e e d e d to a cq u ire s e n io rity sta tu s.
S e r v ic e re q u ire m e n ts w e re m o re com m on in m anufacturing than in non­
m a n u factu rin g a g r e e m e n ts .
In the fo r m e r c a te g o r y , to b a c c o , a p p a re l, p rin tin g,
c h e m ic a ls , and p e tr o le u m p ro d u cts w e re the on ly in d u stries in w hich the m a jo r ity
o f a g re e m e n ts did not con ta in su ch p r o v is io n s .
S e r v ic e r e q u ire m e n t c la u s e s ty p ica lly re a d as fo llo w s :
. « . e m p lo y e e s who have been on the p a y r o ll fo r 30 days sh all
r e c e iv e 8 h o u r s 1 str a ig h t-tim e pay f o r the h olid ay . . .
*

*

*

A ll e m p lo y e e s who a re te rm e d as re g u la r e m p lo y e e s pursuant
to A r t ic le IV o f this a g re em en t sh all r e c e iv e the fo llo w in g h o li­
days o ff with co m p e n s a tio n f o r 8 h ou rs at th eir re g u la r pay . . .
/ A r t i c l e IV p r o v id e s fo r a tr ia l o f 1 m o n th /
A*1 unusual co m b in a tio n o f s e r v ic e
a g re e m e n t in the le a th e r in d u stry :

re q u irem en ts

was con tain ed in an

E a ch e m p lo y e e who has b een in the em p lo y o f the com pan y f o r
sev en (7) days and in the industry th irty (30) days sh a ll r e c e iv e
pay f o r ea ch o f sa id h o lid a y s . . .
collective bargaining agreements by industry, 1958




Service requirements—
M o re than 1
but le s s than
3 m on th s

3 but ie s s
than 6 m on th s

W ork ers

A gree­
m en ts

(000 *s)

A gree­
m en ts

M o r e than
6 m onths

6 m onths

W ork ers
(000 »s)

A gree­
m en ts

W ork ers
(000 *s)

S e r v ic e
not d e fin e d 1

W o rk e rs

A gree­
m e n ts

( 0 0 0 's )

O ther 2

W ork ers

A gree­
m en ts

(0 0 0 's )

N o.

W o rk e rs

A gree­
m en ts

(000 fs)

251

1 .0 7 1 .9

137

1 ,1 6 3 .1

55

1 6 9 .8

23

11 1 .5

118

5 0 0 .7

3

9 .6

233

1 ,0 2 4 .1 .

119
_
5
1
4

1 ,0 8 5 .8
_
11 .1
4 .6
1 1 .6

41
_
3
3

1 3 2 .9
_
6 .7
_
5 .1

18
_
12
_
1

9 7 .7
_
8 7 .4
_
1 .5

44

1 6 3 .0

3

1
16
_
1

4 .5
6 8 .9
_
7 .0

2
_

9 .6
_
8 .4
_

_
-

-

1
2
3
4

-

-

4

6 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

2
4
7

1 2 .7
7 .4
1 0 .3

_
1
12

_
1 .7
4 9 .1

_
1
3

_
1 .1
5 .6

_
_
1

_
_
1 .2

1
_
2

2 .6
_
2 .7

_

_

6
7
8

1 0 .2
1 .2
_
_
_
3 .2
2 3 .4
1 3 .5
5 .4
2 0 .5

1
16
_
7

_

1 .0
6 6 .4
_
2 2 .9

_

_

_

3 .0

_

6
1
_
_
_
2
6
5
2
1

-

-

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

3 .3

1

1 .6

-

-

-

-

20

1

2 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

21

7 7 .3

14

3 6 .9

5

1 3 .8

74

3 3 7 .7

-

-

6 .9
4 6 .3
1 .2
1 .8
4 .5
1 4 .1
2 .5

2
4
1
5
_
_

3 .9
1 6 .9
1 .2
1 1 .6
_
_

_
_
3
2

_
_
1 0 .6
3 .2

12
26
12
2
18

4 2 .6
18 8 .1
3 2 .0
5 .5
5 7 .9
1 1 .7

_
_
_

_
_
_
-

_
_
4
1
4
16
6
18
21
19

_
_
7 .6
2 .5
8 .8
2 8 .0
2 0 .5
7 9 .5
1 1 8 .7
7 3 0 .4

1
_
5
1
5
.
1
4
5
3
3

7 .4
3 .5
1 2 .2
_
6 .5
6 .9
4 7 .5
6 .2
16 .1

3

11 .8

3

5 .4

2

6

1 4 .3

~

-

18

4 7 .8

18

7
3
_

1 7 .0
6 .9
_

1
2
1
4

1 .0
4 .9
2 .0
1 6 .0

3
8
1
1
1
3
1
_

_

_
4 .4
_
_
_
_
1 .7
-

5 .3
1 .3
9 .8
8 .4
2 9 .1
5 2 8 .7
4 1 .3
7 7 .2
3 5 .0
14 1 .5

_

_

-

_

_
2
_
_
.
_
1

3
1
7
4
6
52
20
34
17
43

_

_

_

_

_

2

3 .4

_

_

“

requires a specified period of service within the industry as well as for the employer.
3 Excludes railroad and airline industries.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

-

4

_
_
_
1
_
-

_

_

_

_
_
1 .2
_
_
_

_
_

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

T A B L E 6.

W ork requirem ents for holiday pay in m a jo r co llective bargaining agre em en ts by industry, 1958
No
provision
for Work
requirem ent s

N um ber with
paid holiday
p ro vision s

o

D ays to be w orked for pay eligibility-

Day bezore
E ither day
O nly day b efore D uring holiday
D uring other
and after
before or
holiday or only
w eek or pay­
specified period
O th er4
holi day 1
day after holiday*
after holiday
ro ll period
before h o lid a y 3
W ork ers
W o rk ers
W o rk e rs
W ork ers
W ork ers
W o rk ers
W ork ers
W ork ers
A greeA g reeA g reeA gree­
A g ree­
A g ree­
A gree­
A g ree­
; m ents
m ents
m ents
m ents
m ents
m ents
m ents
m ents
(000*s)
(000’ s)
(000’ s)
(000’ s)
(000*s)
(000*s)
(000's)

9

©
o
©

Industry

A l l i n d u s t r ie s _______________________
M anufacturing ___________________
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ____ _
Food and kindred products
T o bacco m anufactures ___
__
T e xtile m ill p r o d u c ts ______________
A p p are l and other finished
textile products
L u m ber and wood products
(except furniture) ________________
Furniture and fixtures
P a p er and a llied products __ ___
P rin tin g, publishing, and
allied indu stries
C h em ica ls and allied p r o d u c ts ___
P rodu cts of petroleum and c o a l __
Rubber products
Leather and leather p r o d u c t s ____
Stone, cla y , and gla ss p ro d u c ts__
P r im a r y m etal indu stries
F a b ricated m etal p r o d u c ts ________
M ach in ery (except e l e c t r i c a l ) ____
E le c tr ic a l m a c h in e r y ______________
T ransportation equipment __ _
Instrum ents and related
p r o d u c t s _____ _____________________
M iscella n eo u s m anufacturing
indu stries
__ __

,

1 ,5 6 1 6, 8 2 0 .7

340 1 ,2 2 8 .7

776 3 , 4 1 9 . 9

169 1, 0 5 5 .3

20

8 4 .8

196

8 5 8 .5

25

69. 1

35

1 0 4 .6

1, 115 4 , 9 0 3 . 7

173 | 5 6 8 .3

621 2 , 9 4 2 . 3

109

577. 0

15

7 7 .3

149

6 0 7 .9

21

6 0 .7

27

7 0 .4

2
9

5 .3
1 7 .2

_
_
_
-

3
15
3
3

4 .7
3 6 .4
9 .9
3. 1

1

_
6 .3

7

2 8 .6

_
6
4
-

_
1 4 .6
8 .6
-

10

5 4 .4

_

_

2

1 1 .5

-

_

_

-

1

1 .5

4

1 7 .0
3 .3

10
107
12
44

2 4 .0
3 5 7 .9
3 3 .2
1 1 5 .6

47

4 7 3 .7

13
17
55

1
23
4
3

2

3 .5

_
_
_
-

2 5 .3

4

1 6 5 .0

_

_

9
12
29

2 1 .6
19. 1
6 9 .8

_

_

1
_

10. 0

9

14. 1

-

-

32. 5
7 9 .7
1 8 .4
128. 0
1 9 .3
6 2 .6
6 3 4 .3
1 0 8 .4
208. 0
2 1 6 .5
9 4 5 .9

2
10
13
2
2
4
4
2
5
16
16

2. 3
1 8 .2
38. 1
2 .8
16. 1
2 5 .7
1 6 .5
3 .3
2 8 .6
7 7 .6
1 2 7 .3

_
_
1
1

_
5 .5
1 .2

3 2 .5
2. 1
9 .3
4 6 .6
4 7 .9
7 0 .2

14
38
6
22
7
27
94
49
75
48
82

2 2 .0

10

16. 1

4

3

4 .4

3

3 9 .7
13 .2
6. 0

4
53
1
29

22

2 1 7 .6

9

3 8 .2
29. 0
1 2 4 .9

2
2
8

4 .6
3. 8
1 2 .9

36
7 1 .7
1 1 2 .7
58
7 0 .7
24
25
1 3 1 .9
22
7 6 .9
34
92. 1
123
7 23. 1
1 7 5 .6
64
143
4 0 2 .9
104
457. 0
143 1 ,3 1 3 .3

10
7
4

19. 1
1 1 .2
8 .8

8
2
4
26
19
22

23

5 5 .4

6

1
1

2 4 .5

-

-

13. 0
2 4 3 .8
1 .5
7 4 .5

_

1
3
4
7
3
-

1 4 .7
3 .7
-

_
-

_
_
-

3
-

-

3
2
20
7
25
15
19

4 .4
2 .6
6 6 .6
50. 3
9 7 .5
8 9 .9
1 3 3 .5

2
1

_

_

6
1
1

4~6
1 .6
2 .8
1 2 .3
2. 1
1. 1

1
1
2
2
1

1 .2
1. 0
3 .2
6 .9
1 .5

-

-

4
3
2

1. 1
1 .5
6 .7
1 6 .3
3 3 .9

5 .8

1

1 .2

2

1 0 .4

10. 0

*

-

4

8 .4

1

1 .7

2 5 0 .6

4

8 .4

8

3 4 .2

4 .7
7 2 .5
8 0 .4
27. 0
5 7 .3
8 .9
■

3
1
”

5 .6
2 .8
-

6
1
1
-

2 9 .5
2 .0
2 .7
-

1

1

Nonmanufacturing ______________

446

1 , 9 1 7 .0

167

6 6 0 .4

155

4 7 7 .6

60

4 7 8 .3

5

7 .6

47

M ining, cru d e-p etroleu m and
n a tu ra l-g a s production ___ __
T ra n sp o rta tio n 5 ---------- __ __ __
C om m unications
__ __ __ __ __
U tilitie s: E le c tr ic and g a s -----------W holesale trade _ __ __
___
R etail t r a d e _________„_______________
H otels and r e s t a u r a n t s __ _
_
__
S e rv ice s
__ __
__ __ ---------C o n s tr u c tio n ___
______
_ __
M iscellaneous nonm anufacturing__

13
99
75
80
13
82
19
46
18
1

2 9 .8
5 2 5 .3
5 9 1 .7
2 0 0 .3
2 6 .7
2 1 3 .4
1 0 4 .8
1 6 7 .3
5 6 .6
1 .2

42
13
47
6
13
14
21
11

152.7
1 0 8 .6
1 2 3 .9
1 2 .7
46. 1
9 4 .3
8 1 .9
4 0 .4
■

10
23
30
20
5
54
3

2 1 .3
7 7 .5
185. 0
3 8 .2
1 1 .5
1 1 3 .8
5. 0
1 8 .8
5.5
1 .2

2
13
20

3 .9
1 8 5 .5
2 1 5 .8
32. 8
1 .5
2 5 .0
5.5
8 .4
■

1
1
1
1
1

2 .2
1. 0
1 .6
1. 0
1 .8

1
1
1
1
1
-

,

i

7
2
1

1
1
1
7
2
4
”

2 .0
6. 1
9 .6

-

-

7

13

4
“

1

-

1 R e fe rs to la st scheduled w orkday b efore and fir s t scheduled workday after the holiday. T h is a ls o ap plies to other ca teg o ries of days b efo re a n d /o r after the holiday.
* Included are 12 agre em en ts w hicn require work on the day before the holiday only, and 8 a g re em en ts which require w ork on the day after the holiday only.
3 Included are req u irem en ts such a s , "m u s t have w orked som etim e within 30 days im m ed iately preceding the holiday, " or "m u s t have earned som e w ages during the period,

fro m the date the fourth full w eek preceding a holiday begin s, to the date on which the noliday o c c u rs . "
* Included in this group are 5 ag re em en ts in which 2 w orkdays preceding and following the holiday m ust be w orked. F o r 4 a g re em en ts, w ork req u irem en ts vary for different
h o lid a ys; in another 4 a g re em en ts, they vary when the holidays fall on different days of the w eek; for 4 m ore a g re e m e n ts, req uirem ents vary by sen io r ity . In 3 a g re e m e n ts, an
em ployee m ust w ork during the w orkw eek or any of the 4 preceding w eeks. In another 3 a g re e m e n ts , the em ployee m u st w ork I day in calendar w eek preceding w eek in which
holiday f a lls , 1 day in holiday w eek, or 1 day in calendar week following the w eek in which holiday f a lls . F o r 2 a g re em en ts, either the w eek preceding or follow ing the holiday
m u st be w orked. F in a lly , in 10 ag re em en ts variou s other provisions are given.
E xcludes railroad and airlin e in d u strie s.

5

NOTE:




B ecause of rounding, sum s o f individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.

11

Vfork R e q u ire m e n ts. —Work req u ire m e n ts w ere im p o se d in about fo u r out o f
fiv e a g re e m e n ts con tain in g p r o v is io n s f o r paid h o lid a y s . B y fa r the m o s t co m m on
r e q u ire m e n t w as that w ork had to be p e r fo r m e d both on the la s t sch ed u led day
b e fo r e and on the f i r s t sch ed u led day a fter the h olid ay (table 6). A c o n s id e r a b ly
s m a lle r grou p o f c o n tr a c ts (196) re q u ire d that the e m p lo y e e w ork som etim e during
the h olid a y w eek o r p a y r o ll p e r io d , and 169 a g reem en ts s p e c ifie d that an em p loy ee
had to w o r k e ith e r the day b e fo r e o r the day after the h olid a y to r e c e iv e h olid ay pay.
A h igh er p r o p o r tio n o f a g reem en ts containing no w ork req u ire m e n ts w ere
found in non m an u factu rin g than in m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s . The a b s e n ce o f such
lim ita tio n s w as p a r tic u la r ly n o tice a b le in such nonm anufacturing in d u stries as
tra n sp o rta tio n , u t ilit ie s , c o n s tr u c tio n , s e r v i c e , and h otels and resta u ra n ts .
App a r e l was the on ly m an u factu rin g in d u stry in w hich w ork re q u irem en ts did hot
apply to a sig n ifica n t p r o p o r tio n o f a g reem en ts and w o r k e r s .
The fo llo w in g c la u s e s a re ty p ica l o f w ork req u ire m e n t p ro v is io n s rela tin g
to attendance on the day b e fo r e a n d /o r a fter the h olid ay:

/To r e c e iv e h olid a y pa y7 the e m p lo y e e m u st have w ork ed the
e n tire la st sch e d u le d w ork in g day p r io r to , and the en tire next
sch ed u led w ork in g day a fte r , su ch h olid ay within the e m p lo y e e 's
sch e d u le d w ork w eek . . .
*

*

*

T o r e c e iv e . . . h olid a y co m p e n s a tio n , an e m p lo y e e m u st have
w o rk e d his en tire r e g u la r ly sch ed u led w ork sh ift the day im ­
m e d ia te ly p r e c e d in g the h olid a y , u n less a sh o rt w ork sch ed u le
is a u th orized • • •
♦

*

*

T im e o f f • • • w ill be paid . . . p ro v id e d that: The em p loy ee
has w ork ed the sch e d u le d w ork in g day b e fo r e o r the sch ed u led
w ork in g day a fter su ch h o lid a y .
A g re e m e n ts w hich m ade h olid a y pay contingent on w ork p e rfo rm a n ce
during the h olid a y w eek o r o th er s p e c ifie d p e r io d g e n e ra lly rea d as fo llo w s :
E m p lo y e e s a re not e lig ib le fo r h olid a y pay if they have not
w ork ed at le a s t 8 h ou rs during the w eek the h olid a y o c c u r s
(u n less on v a ca tio n ).
*

*

*

E m p lo y e e s who w ork p r io r to a h olid ay within the pay p e rio d
during w h ich a h olid a y fa lls sh all r e c e iv e the stra ig h t-tim e h o li­
day pay, p ro v id e d he d oes not quit o r is d is ch a rg e d fo r ca u se
p r io r to the h olid a y and within the pay p e rio d during w hich the
h olid a y fa lls .
*

*

*

E m p lo y e e s w h ose s e r v ic e s do not term in a te p r io r to a h olid a y ,
and who have a ls o ea rn ed som e w ages during the p e r io d , fr o m
the date on w hich the fou rth fu ll w ork w eek . « • p re ce d in g a
h olid a y b e g in s , to the date on w hich the holid ay o c c u r s , and
who sh a ll not have b een la id o ff due to la ck o f w ork b e fo r e the
beginning o f the w ork w eek p re ce d in g the w ork w eek in w hich the
h olid a y o c c u r s , sh a ll be paid, as h olid a y pay, without w ork fo r
8 h ou rs at th e ir p e r s o n a l h ou rly rate « • •




*

*

*

12

A n e m p lo y e e to b e c o m e e lig ib le f o r thje h olid a y pay en u m erated
in ( l ) a bove sh a ll have been em p loy ed at le a s t 1 y e a r p r io r
to the h o lid a y to be paid and have w ork ed at le a s t 320 h ou rs in
the (13) w e e k p e r io d im m e d ia te ly p r e c e d in g the w eek in w h ich
the paid h o lid a y o c c u r s .
The fo llo w in g c la u se s illu stra te w o r k re q u ire m e n ts that v a ry by h olid ay:
E m p lo y e e s m u st w o r k the day b e fo r e and the day a fte r a ll h o li­
days lis te d , e x ce p t C h r is tm a s . E m p lo y e e s m u st w o r k the r e ­
q u ire d 6 sch ed u led w ork in g days p r io r to C h ristm a s and the day
a fte r • • .
*

*

*

A w age e a rn e r sh a ll r e c e iv e a h olid a y a llow a n ce o f eight hours*
pa y at h is re g u la r ra te fo r the h olid a y s . . . ; p ro v id e d that to
r e c e iv e this a llow a n ce f o r C h ristm a s Day, New Year*s D ay,
L in c o ln ’ s B irth d a y , and W ashington’ s B irth d ay , he m u st w o rk
on both h is la st sch e d u le d day b e fo r e and his next sch ed u led
day a fte r the h o lid a y , and to r e c e iv e this a llow a n ce fo r D e c o r a ­
tion D ay, the 4th o f July, L a b or D ay, P re s id e n tia l E le ctio n D ay,
V eteran*s D ay, and T hanksgiving D ay he m u st w o rk eith er his
la s t sch ed u led day b e fo r e o r h is next sch ed uled day a fter the
h o lid a y . • • •
In a few a g r e e m e n ts , w o r k req u ire m e n ts d iffe re d a c c o r d in g to the day o f
the w e e k on w h ich the h o lid a y f e ll, as in the fo llo w in g ex a m p le:
A n e m p lo y e e . . .
sh a ll be e lig ib le to r e c e iv e his re g u la r
s tr a ig h t-tim e shift pay fo r the day when not w o rk e d , p rov id ed he
has r e p o r te d to w o r k ( l ) the day b e fo r e and the day a fte r when
the h o lid a y fa lls on T u esd ay, W ednesday o r T hursday; (2) the
day a fte r w hen the h o lid a y fa lls on M onday and the day b e fo r e
w hen the h o lid a y fa ils on F rid a y and Saturday . . .
S om e a g re e m e n ts v a rie d w o rk req u ire m e n ts b y length o f s e r v ic e :
(a) T o r e c e iv e h o lid a y pay an e m p lo y e e with one y e a r o r
m o r e o f s e n io r ity w ith the com pan y m u st have w ork ed one day
w ithin the ten (10) ca len d a r days p re ce d in g the guaranteed paid
h o lid a y s .
(b) T o r e c e iv e h o lid a y pay, a re g u la r em p lo y e e with le s s
than one y e a r o f s e n io r ity in the C om pany m u st have w ork ed
ten (10) days in 30 ca le n d a r days p re c e d in g the guaranteed paid
h o lid a y and at le a s t one o f su ch ten days w ork ed sh all fa il in
the fiv e ca len d a r days p r io r to the guaranteed paid h olid a y .
*

*

*

T o b e e lig ib le f o r h o lid a y pay, an e m p lo y e e m u st have w ork ed
one day out o f the s ix w ork in g days p re ce d in g and one out o f the
s ix w ork in g days fo llo w in g the h olid a y ; ex ce p t that i f an e m p lo y e e
has th ree y e a r s o r m o r e o f s e r v ic e he sh a ll b e e lig ib le f o r h o li­
day pay i f he has w ork ed any part o f the 12 w eek s p re ce d in g o r
the s ix w ork in g days fo llo w in g the h olid a y .




13

W ork re q u ire m e n ts w e r e g e n e ra lly w aived i f w o r k e r s w e re unable to
fu lfill them f o r re a s o n s beyon d th eir c o n tr o l, such as illn e s s , in ju ry , te m p o ra ry
la y o ffs , death in the im m ed ia te fa m ily , o r oth er ap p roved o r e x cu sed a b s e n ce s
fo r good ca u se ,
F o r e x a m p le:
An oth e rw ise e lig ib le e m p loy ee w ho fa ils to m e e t the /work/ r e ­
q u irem en ts . . . sh a ll r e c e iv e h olid a y pay fo r such h olid a y
p ro v id e d his a b se n ce fr o m w o rk on a il, o r p a rt o f, the said
days b e fo r e o r a fte r su ch h olid a y is the re s u lt o f—
(a) p e r s o n a l illn e s s o r in ju ry w hich is substantiated b y
s a tis fa c to r y m e d ic a l e v id en ce p ro v id e d su ch illn e s s o r in ju ry
co m m e n ce d w ithin 1 ca len d a r w eek p r io r to such h olid a y o r on
the f i r s t sch ed u led w ork d ay a fte r such h olid a y.
(b) te m p o r a r y la y o ff, p ro v id e d such la y o ff co m m e n ce d
w ithin 1 ca len d a r w eek p r io r to such h olid a y o r on the f i r s t
sch ed u led w ork d a y a fte r su ch h olid a y .
(c )
oth er c o m p e llin g circ u m s ta n c e s o r re a s o n s a cce p ta b le
to the com pa n y.
*

*

*

/W o r k r e q u ir e m e n ts j sh all not apply if an e m p lo y e e is absent
b e ca u se o f ju r y duty, subpenaed in a co u rt c a s e , b e ca u se o f the
death o f any m e m b e r o f h is im m ed ia te fa m ily in cluding in -la w s ,
o r i f the h olid a y fa lls w ithin the fi r s t 10 days o f a b sen ce due to
an in d u stria l a c c id e n t co m p e n sa b le b y the C om pany, o r i f the
h olid a y fa lls w ithin a m axim u m 3-w e e k tour o f duty in the
N ational Guard o r in any A rm e d F o r c e s r e s e r v e .
*

*

*

An e m p lo y e e w ho is absent b e fo r e o r a fter a • • • h olid a y but
who has w ork ed e ith e r within the w eek a fter the h olid a y w ill
r e c e iv e h olid a y pay, p ro v id e d h is a b s e n ce is fo r ju s t cau se
w h ich the e m p lo y e e can substantiate . . .
R ates o f P a y fo r W ork on P aid H olid ays
M o st union c o n tra cts w ith paid h olid a y p r o v is io n s a ls o p ro v id e fo r the
paym ent o f p rem iu m ra te s to e m p lo y e e s who m a y be re q u ire d to w o rk on h o lid a y s .
A m on g the 1 ,4 6 5 a g re e m e n ts w hich p ro v id e d such p rem iu m r a te s , 38 p e rce n t
stipulated double tim e (i. e. , h olid a y pay plus s tra ig h t-tim e pay fo r h ou rs w ork ed );
7 p e r c e n t, double tim e and o n e -fo u rth ; 28 p e rce n t, double tim e and o n e -h a lf; and
18 p e r c e n t, trip le tim e . The rem a in in g 9 p e r c e n t o f the a g reem en ts with p rem iu m
pay p r o v is io n s contained oth er v a r ia tio n s .
S in ce 1950, double tim e has rem a in ed the m o s t co m m o n ra te , but the
p r o p o r tio n of co n tra cts granting p rem iu m ra te s o f double tim e and o n e -h a lf r o s e
fr o m 16 p e r c e n t in 1950 to 28 p e r c e n t in 1958, w hile trip le tim e show ed a th r e e ­
fo ld gain.
(See ch a rt 2. ) In 1950 as in 1958, the paym ent o f ra tes le s s than
double tim e w as in freq u en t. P re m iu m ra tes o f double tim e and o n e -h a lf o r trip le
tim e w e re m o r e co m m o n am on g m an u factu rin g than nonm anufacturing in d u stries
(table 7).
R ates o f double tim e and o n e -h a lf w e re p re v a le n t in ch e m ica ls and
in stru m en t m an u factu rin g, w h ere they a pp lied to tw o -th ird s o r m o r e o f the w o rk e rs
r e c e iv in g paid h o lid a y s .
A lthough fe w e r a g reem en ts ca lle d f o r trip le tim e than
fo r double tim e and o n e -h a lf, the h igh er p rem iu m rate app lied to a la r g e r num ber
o f w o r k e r s , a fa ct a ccou n ted fo r b y s e v e r a l tra n sp orta tion equipm ent and m a ch in ­
e r y (e x ce p t e le c t r ic a l) a g re e m e n ts co v e rin g la rg e n u m b ers.




T A B L E 7.

R ates o f pay fo r w ork on paid holid a ys in majjor co lle c t iv e bargaining a g re e m e n ts by industry, 1958
Num ber with
paid lolid a y
provi sions

Industry

A gree­
m ents

W ork ers
(000 *s) j

No re fe re n ce

P a y ra te fo r w o r k on paid holid a ys (including h olid a y pay) —
T im e and
o n e -h a lf

for w ork on
holiday1
A gree­
m ents

W o rk e rs

A gree­
m ents

(000 »s)

Doubles tim e*

W ork ers
(0 0 0 *s)

A gree­
m ents

W o rk e rs
(000 *s)

D ouble tim e
and o n e -h a lf
A gree­
m ents

T rip le tim e

W ork ers
(000 >s)

A gree­
m ents

O ther3

W ork ers
(0 0 0 's )

A gree­
m ents

W ork ers
(000*8)

1,561

6 ,8 2 0 .7

96

481. 1

54

1 68 .3

652

3 ,2 3 6 .5

409

1 .2 1 4 .5

_270

1 ,4 3 1 .2

80

289. 3

1,115

4 ,9 0 3 .7

68

3 7 8 .4

29

6 4 .9

432

2 ,2 0 2 .3

312

9 1 5 .1

234

1,222. 6

40

120. 6

10
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s
107
F ood and k ind red p rod u cts
12
T o b a cco m a n u fa c t u r e s
44
T extile m ill p r o d u c t s ___ __ __ ________ _____ __ . . . .
47
A p p a rel and other fin ish ed p r o d u c t s ___________
13
Lum ber and w ood p rod u cts (except furniture) _
F urniture and fix tu res
17
55
P a p er and a llie d p rod u cts
36
P rin tin g, p u blishing, and a llie d i n d u s t r i e s ____
C h e m i c a l ft anH a l li e d p r n d u cts
58
24
P rod u cts o f p etroleu m and c o a l — ----------------25
R ubber p rod u cts
L eather and lea th er p rod ucts
22
34
Stone, c la y , and g la s s p rod u cts
123
P r im a r y m eta l in d u stries
F a b r ic a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s
-----64
M a c h in e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ------_ _ _
143
104
E le c tr ic a l m a ch in ery
T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t
-----143
23
Instrum ents and re la te d p rod u cts
M iscella n eou s m anufacturing i n d u s t r i e s _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
11

2 4 .0
357.9
3 3.2
115.6
4 73 .7
3 8.2
2 9 .0
124.9
7 1 .7
112.7
7 0 .7
131.9
7 6 .9
9 2 .1
723.1
175.6
4 0 2 .9
4 57 .0
1 ,3 1 3 .3
5 5 .4
2 4 .5

_

1
3
1
1
2
2

1 .0
4 .5
2 .2
3 .4
6 .1
3 .6

6 .8
6 6 .5
2 4 .1
3 1 .5
168.1
1 4 .0
1 5.5
1 5.8
2 6 .8
3 1 .0
12.1
8 .3
1 1.6
1 7.5
6 4 8 .0
108.1
113.5
2 1 2 .4
6 5 8 .1
5 .3
7 .8

3
36
1
23
3
5
2
22
8
39
14
2
4
11
17
9
31
46
18
17
1

11.2
1 67 .4
2 .9
6 7 .5
2 3 .5
12.7
4 .0
5 3 .3
14.6
7 2 .3
4 1 .3
2 .2
11.6
4 1 .2
2 5 .8
1 7.8
6 1 .7
193.1
5 1 .4
3 8 .3
1.8

2
21

5 .1
9 6 .5

_
7

11
17
20
45
11
47
2
-

2 7 .0
3 6 .7
4 3 .9
2 0 6 .7
2 1 .1
5 8 5 .1
1 0.5
-

36

2 0 8 .7

A ll i n d u s t r i e s __

.

. . .

M a n u fa c tu r in g _______________________________

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

;

446

1 ,9 1 7 .0

6
1
5
37

_

-

-

1

-

1

1 0 .5

-

7
-

.

3 8 .6
-

-

-

-

3 .1
4 .4
1.6
1 .4
4 .7
1 03 .4

220

1 ,0 3 4 .3

97

2 9 9 .4

10
36
61
27
6
39
12
16
13
-

2 3 .4
172.0
5 1 7 .3
5 2 .9
1 3.6
8 8 .4
5 6 .1
6 6 .4
4 4 .3
-

3
12
5
42
6
11

6 .4
4 3 .6
1 9.3
121.2
11.8

-

7 .2

-

.
-

-

5. 1
8 .7
3 .0

2
4
1

6 .3

-

3

1. 1

-

5. 5
1.2
8 .8

3

-

-

-

-

1
1
3

9 .2
4 .0
12. 1
2 7 6 .0

4
34
9
14
5
3
8
10
13
13
7
5
6
10
83
33
58
38
71
3
5

3

1 0.2

1
3
1
1
2

28

1 02 .7

25

-

-

-

-

2
7
15
12
4
1
17
-

m

13.9

-

5 .8
9 .5
2 1 .7
2 4 .5
7 .2
1 .4
120. 3

-

1

1.1

-

-

2 .1

1
-

-

5
2
2

2 7 .0
4 .8
2 .3

-

.
-

6 .3
6 .5
6 .5
5 .9
12.9
1 7.3
14.2

2
2
3
2
6
2
5

-

-

-

-

-

40

168.7

M ining, cr u d e -p e tr o le u m and n a tu ra l-g a s
13
99
_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _75
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _
_
_
_
_
80
W h o le s a le t r a d e
13
R eta il t r a d e _ _ _ ________________ _ _ ____________82
_
_
_ _ _ _ __
_ _ _ __
H otels and restau ra n ts
19
S e r v ic e s _
46
18
C on stru ction
— _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . _ _
_ _ _
_
__ _
M iscella n eou s n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
1
p r o d u c t io n

T ra n sp ortation 4 . . .
.
.
.
.
C o m m u n ic a t io n s _ _ _ _ _ __
_
_
U tilities: E le c tr ic and gas

.

_

_

_

2 9 .8
5 25 .3
_5_ .7
91
2 0 0 .3
2 6.7
_2_ 3_ _
1 .4
104.8
167.3
5 6 .6
_ _ 1.2_
_

-

8
1
2
1
12

-

-

14

_ _ _ _ _ _
-

_

-

-

-

_

3

5

2 6 .0

_

3
_

-

5 1 .8

-

-

-

4

-

2 0 .6
5 .6
8 .5
1 .3
4 0 .8

.

6 .2
4 1 .9
3 .6

_

-

-

-

15
2
1

3 3 .3
-

5 5 .6
7 .0
1 .2

-

11
3
3
_

13

-

-

154.1
7 .7
7 .6
-

18
5
6

8 3 .2
4 1 .8
10.3
-

.

2 7 .5

-

-

3

6 .6
5 .3
■

3
-

-

4
2
5
-

-

17.4
6 .8
9 .2
-

■

1 This grou p in clu d es 17 a greem en ts w h ich p rohibited w ork on a ll paid h o lid a y s , and w hich th e re fo re m ade no r e fe r e n c e to ra te s o f pay.
2 Inclu des 100 a g re e m e n ts , co v e rin g 776 ,45 0 w o r k e r s , w hich provided double tim e and o n e -fo u rth .
T h ese 100 a g re e m e n ts w e r e d istrib u ted as fo llo w s : F urniture
and fix tu re s , 1 a g reem en t co v e rin g 2 ,4 0 0 w o r k e rs ; products o f petroleum and c o a l, 1 a gre e m e n t co v e rin g 1 ,2 5 0 w o r k e r s ; s ton e, cla y, and g la s s p ro d u cts , 2 a g r e e m e nts,
3 ,5 0 0 w o r k e r s ; p rim a r y m eta l in d u s trie s, 64 a g re e m e n ts, 622,200 w o r k e rs ; fa b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u cts , 14 a g re e m e n ts , 7 0 ,1 0 0 w o r k e r s ; m a ch in e ry ^ e x c e p t e le c t r ic a l),
4 a g re e m e n ts , 16,950 w o r k e r s ; tra n sporta tion equipm ent, 10 a greem en ts, 4 8 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s ; m in in g, cru d e p e tro le u m and n a tu ra l-g a s p rod u ction , 4 a g re e m e n ts , 12,056
w ork ers.
Under the te rm s o f m ost o f these a g re e m e n ts, negotiated by the U nited S te e lw o rk e rs o f A m e r ic a , this p rem iu m ra te went into e ffe c t on July 1, 1958.
The
p rev iou s ra te , in e ffe ct as o f July 1, 1957, w as double tim e and one-tenth.
3 In this group w e r e 24 a greem en ts w h ere prem ium pay v a rie d by h o lid a y s , and a num ber o f m a ritim e a g re e m e n ts w h ere ra te s depended upon whether w o rk was
p e rfo rm e d in p ort or at s e a .
In a num ber o f in sta n ce s, the rate o f pay fo r w o r k on holid a ys depended upon w hether o r not the h oliday had been sch ed u led to be w ork ed ,
2 w ere found w h ich a llow ed equal tim e o ff fo r holidays w ork ed , and som e in w hich e m p lo y e e s w e r e given the option o f accep tin g pay or the equivalent tim e added to
va ca tion s.
E m p loy ees c o v e r e d by 1 a greem en t re c e iv e d double tim e and e igh t-ten th s and in a n oth er, trip le tim e and o n e -h a lf.
A ls o includ ed a re a g re e m e n ts w h ere
p rem ium pay w as given fo r som e holid a ys and no re fe re n ce m ade to pay fo r o th e rs , som e w h ere p rem iu m pay v a r ie d by lo ca lity and by occu p a tio n , and one w h ich w as
not cle a r as to w hether h oliday pay w as in clu d ed in the prem ium ra te s.
E xclu d es ra ilro a d and a irlin e in d u stries.
NOTE:




B eca u se o f rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.

15
Chari 2.

PAY RATES FOR WORK ON PAID HOLIDAYS
IN MAJOR COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENTS
1950,1952-53, AND 1958

Double Time
and One-Half

N um ber of
A gre e m e n ts W ith
Premium P a y Provisions:

Triple Time
1950

X ///////A

1,412

1 9 5 2 -5 3
1958

1 ,5 6 4

BK88888

1 ,4 6 5

Other

U IT DSTA S D P R M N O L B R
NE
TE E A T E T F A O
B RA O L B RS A IS IC
UEU F A O T T T S

cu ssed .

1 For 1958, this category includes contracts providing a portion of the rate above
double time, but less than double time and one-half.

Eighty c o n tra cts did not fit into any o f the p rem iu m pay patterns d i s ­
In 24 a g re e m e n ts, the p rem iu m rate d iffe r e d a c c o r d in g to the holiday:
Any w o rk p e r fo r m e d on New Y e a r ’ s D ay, Independence Day and
L a b or D ay sh a ll be paid fo r at tim e and o n e -h a lf the re g u la r
rate o f pay, and any w o rk p e r fo r m e d on Thanksgiving Day and
C h ristm a s Day sh all be paid fo r at double the reg u la r rate o f pay.

P r o v is io n s fo r an extra d a y 's pay or co m p e n s a to ry tim e o ff in the fo rm
o f an extra day during the y e a r or in extended v a ca tio n s , h olid ay w o rk at p rem iu m
ra tes o r c o m p e n s a to ry tim e o ff at these r a te s , and h olid ay w o rk at p rem iu m rates
plus co m p e n s a to ry tim e o ff c o v e rin g the h ou rs w ork ed , w e re found in a s m a ll
n um ber o f a g re e m e n ts:
When an e m p lo y e e is re q u ire d to w o rk on one o f the 8 nam ed
h o lid a y s, he sh all r e c e iv e eith er an additional d a y 's pay o r an
equ ivalen t day o ff, as he then m ay e le c t • • •




*

*

*

16

If an e m p lo y e e . . . w ork s one o r m o r e o f the r e c o g n iz e d h o li­
days on a re g u la r sh ift, the em p loy ee sh all r e c e iv e equivalent
tim e o ff added to h is va ca tion o r m a y e le c t to r e c e iv e o v e rtim e
pay fo r that day.
*

*

*

A ny e m p lo y e e re q u ire d to w o rk on any o f th ese days sh all be
paid (in addition to his s a la r y f o r that w eek ) at the rate o f tim e
and o n e -h a lf o r sh all have co m p e n s a to ry tim e o ff, at the rate o f
tim e and o n e -h a lf at the e m p lo y e e 's option. Such co m p e n s a to ry
tim e o ff sh a ll be sch ed u led by m utual a g reem en t . . .
*

*

*

An e m p lo y e e who w ork s on a h olid a y shift sh all r e c e iv e double
tim e .
In addition to the d o u b le -tim e p a y m en t, the e m p loy ee
sh a ll b e given tim e o ff w ithin the follow in g 3 days equal to the
n u m ber o f h ou rs w ork ed on the h olid a y sh ift.
A few a g re e m e n ts s p e c ifie d d ifferen t p rem iu m pay p r o v is io n s depending
on w hether the h olid a y w as a sch ed uled day o f w o rk , o r w hether continuous
op e ra tio n s w e re in volv ed :
A n y e m p lo y e e w ho is sch ed uled to w o rk . . .
sh a ll be paid
tim e and o n e -q u a r te r rate fo r his sch ed uled 8 -h o u r tour o f duty
on that day . . .
In addition, such an e m p lo y e e sh a ll r e c e iv e
8 hou rs* pay at the r e g u la r rate . . . Should an e m p lo y e e w ho
w as not sch ed u led to w o rk on the h olid a y be re q u ire d to w o rk
on the h o lid a y , he sh all r e c e iv e in addition to the 8 h ours* pay
at the r e g u la r rate . . • the o v e rtim e rate o f tim e and t h r e e q u a rte rs . . .
*

*

*

E m p lo y e e s not w ork in g in continuous s e v e n -d a y o p e ra tio n s , w ho
m a y be re q u e ste d to and do w o rk on any o f the fo llo w in g h o lid a y s ,
sh a ll not r e c e iv e h olid a y pay but sh all be paid trip le tim e fo r
h ou rs w ork ed on the h olid a y . . .
E m p lo y e e s w ork in g on continuous op era tion s who w ork ed bn one
o f the fo r e g o in g h olid a ys w hich fa lls on one o f th eir r e g u la r ly
sch ed u led w ork da ys sh a ll not r e c e iv e h olid a y pay but sh a ll be
paid double tim e fo r the h ours w ork ed • . .
W ork re q u ire m e n ts o f som e in d u stries give r is e to unique pay p r o v is io n s .
The m a r itim e in du stry, fo r ex a m p le, n eg otiates d iffe re n t w o rk and pay p r o v is io n s
fo r sea o r p o r t duty. No w o r k is to be done on h olid a y s u n less a b s o lu te ly n e c e s ­
s a r y fo r n avigation and v e s s e l sa fety , ex ce p t that w atch es a re kept as re q u ire d
b y law . P re m iu m ra tes fo r o v e r tim e and h olid a y w o rk a re r e fe r r e d to as "p e n a lty 1
*
and " o v e r t im e " r a t e s , 5 as in the follow in g illu stra tio n :
The rate o f o v e rtim e pay sh a ll be $ 3 .2 9 p e r hour and the. rate o f
pen alty pay sh a ll be $2.19 p er hour . . . The penalty rate o f pay
sh a ll be paid lic e n s e d en g in eer o ffic e r s who p e r fo r m this re g u la r
w atch w o rk at sea on any o f the 9 h olid a ys d e s c r ib e d above . . «
5
T h ese a re a pa rt o f the industry*s dual p rem iu m rate s tru ctu re ; "p e n a lty "
r e f e r s to ce r ta in types o f w o rk p e r fo r m e d during the re g u la r w ork in g day, and the
" o v e r t im e " rate applied ty p ica lly to additional h ou rs w ork ed .




17

The o v e r tim e rate o f pay sh a ll be paid lic e n s e d en g in eer o ffic e r s
w ho p e r fo r m w o r k in p o r t on any o f the 9 h olid a ys d e s c rib e d
above • . • The o v e r tim e rate o f pay sh all a ls o be paid to non­
w atchstanding lic e n s e d en g in eer o ffic e r s who a re r e q u ire d to
p e r fo r m w o rk in p o r t . . . on any o f the 9 h olid ays • • •
O ther m a r itim e a g re e m e n ts ba sed p rem iu m h olid a y ra tes on m onthly
s a la r ie s and so m e in c o rp o r a te d ex tra com p en sa tion fo r w o rk on h olid ays into b a se
s a la r y r a te s .
H oliday w o rk p re m iu m s w ere not stipulated in 96 c o n tr a c ts ,
p roh ib ited h olid a y w ork :

1 7 o f w hich

The e m p lo y e r a g r e e s to o b s e r v e M e m o ria l D ay, L a b or D ay, and
T hanksgiving D ay o f ea ch y ea r during the life o f this a g reem en t
as h olid a ys w ith pay to a ll the em p lo y e e s . • • No w o rk sh all
be done on th ese h o lid a y s .
M ost o f the a g re e m e n ts with h olid a y w o rk r e s tr ic tio n s w e re in re ta il
trade and the a p p a re l in d u stry . L im ited r e s tr ic tio n s o f w o rk on so m e h o lid a y s ,
u su a lly L a b or D ay, w e r e found in a num ber o f con stru ction c o n tra cts .
P ay fo r H olidays O c c u r r in g on N onw orkdays
H olidays w h ich fa il on Sunday, n o rm a lly a day not w ork ed , a re o b se rv e d
in m o s t States on the fo llo w in g M onday, and this p r a c tic e is r e fle c te d in v irtu a lly
a il a g r e e m e n ts.
T h ere is , h o w e v e r, no g en era l nationw ide p r a c tic e reg a rd in g
h olid a ys fa ilin g on Saturday.
An an a ly sis o f 1,561 m a jo r a g reem en ts p rov id in g
paid h olid a ys in d ica te s that m any e m p lo y e e s and unions have yet to state a fixed
p o lic y in the a g re e m e n t, one w ay o r the oth er. M o r e o v e r , p r o v is io n s g overn in g
the o b se r v a n c e o f h o lid a y s fa ilin g on Saturday o r on other days w hich m ay be
n onw orkdays f o r s o m e w o r k e r s a re freq u en tly not c le a r ly sp e lle d out. The a b ­
se n ce o f s p e c ific p r o v is io n s can perh ap s be exp lain ed , in p a rt, b y the in freq u en cy
o f such o c c a s io n s during the co n tra ct te rm .
Sligh tly m o r e than h a lf o f the l , 5 6 l ag reem en ts with paid h olid ay p r o ­
v is io n s did not s p e c ific a lly r e fe r to Saturday holid ays (table 8).
F o r in sta n ce,
m an y a g reem en ts in this c a te g o r y read as fo llo w s :
• • • E ach re g u la r e m p loy ee not re q u ire d to w o rk on h olid a ys
a n d who has w ork ed his la st sch ed uled day b e fo r e and his fir s t
sch ed u led day a fte r the h olid a y, u n less fa ilu re to so w o rk is due
to his illn e s s o r h is b ein g on a lea ve o f a b s e n ce , sh a ll r e c e iv e
pay fo r su ch h olid a ys • . .
*

*

*

A w age e a r n e r sh a ll r e c e iv e a h olid a y allow a n ce o f 8 hours*
pay . . . fo r the h olid a ys . . . An e m p loy ee absent on his
la st sch ed u led day b e fo r e o r his fir s t sch ed uled day a fte r a
h olid a y who is paid fo r the day b e ca u s e o f v a ca tion • . • sh all
not be d isq u a lifie d fr o m r e c e iv in g the h olid a y allow a n ce b y such
a b s e n ce . . . . When a h olid a y w hich fa lls on Sunday is o b s e r v e d
b y the C om pany on M onday, these h olid ay p r o v is io n s apply only
to such M onday.
The f ir s t cla u se cited a b o v e , although not e x p lic it on this poin t, m a y p e r ­
haps be in te rp re te d to m ea n that a w o rk e r is entitled to pay f o r a h olid a y r e g a r d ­
le s s o f the day on w h ich it fa lls , p ro v id e d he m e e ts the e lig ib ility re q u ire m e n ts.
It is in te re stin g to n ote, h o w e v e r, that the secon d cla u se , in addition to e lig ib ility




TAB LE 8.

Pay provisions for holidays falling on Saturday in m ajot collective bargaining agreements by industry, 1958
A greem en ts
with paid
holiday
provisions

Industry

A g ree­
m ents

W ork ers
(000*s)

A g ree­
m ents

E m p lo yees given—

No extra pay
or extra day
off provided

No explicit
Saturday
provisions
W orkers
(000*8)

A gree­
m en ts

Extra day off
with pay

W ork ers
(0 0 0 ’ s)

A g ree­
m ents

A ll indu stries ----- -------------- :------------------------------- —

1 ,5 6 1

6 ,8 2 0 . 7

810

2 ,6 4 7 .4

41

1 2 6 .4

210

M anufacturing — — ----------------------- ------------------

1 ,1 1 5

4 ,9 0 3 . 7

601

1 ,7 6 5 .3

20

3 9 .0

137

2 4 .0
3 5 7 .9
3 3 .2
1 1 5 .6
4 7 3 .7

4
71

1
3
-

1 .4
4 .5
-

1

1.0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ---------- '---------------------Food and kindred products — ------------ . ..■■------■■
T obacco m anufactures —... .................. ........... ..........
T extile m ill p r o d u c ts ------- ------------—------------------A p p a re l and other finished p r o d u c t s --------------Lu m ber and wood products (except
furniture) ------------------------------------ -----------------------Furniture and fixtu res
--- ------ ----------- --------------P aper and allie d p r o d u c ts -------------------------------—
Prin tin g, publishing, and allie d p r o d u c ts ----C h em icals and allied p r o d u c t s ------------------------P roducts of petroleum and coal —---------------- —
Rubber products ------------ --------------------------------------Leather and leather p r o d u c t s ---------------------------Stone, clay, and g la ss products — ....... ---■—
P r im a r y m eta l in d u s t r ie s ----------------------------------F abricated m eta l p r o d u c ts -------------- —------------ —
M ach in ery (except ele c tric a l) ■.......... - ........———
■
E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery ----------------------------------------Transportation e q u ip m e n t --------------------------------Instrum ents and related products — ... . — — ..M iscella n eou s m anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ------ N on m an u factu rin g................... .........

1
0
107
1
2
44
47
13
17
55
36
58
24
25

2
2

34
123
64
143
104
143
23

1
1

3 8 .2
2 9 .0
1 2 4 .9
7 1 .7
112. 7
70. 7
1 3 1 ,9
7 6 .9
9 2 .1
72 3 .1
1 7 5 .6
4 0 2 .9
4 5 7 .0
1 ,3 1 3 .3
5 5 .4
2 4 .5

■ ----------■
■

446

1 ,9 1 7 .0

M ining, cru d e-p etroleu m and n a tu ralgas production — ------------------ —---------- ---- -------T ran sp o rtatio n 1 --------------------------------------------------C o m m u n ic a tio n s ----------------------—------ --— —---------U tilitie s: E le c tr ic and g a s -------------------------------W h olesa le trade
............— — ----------------------------R etail t r a d e ---------------- — .................— . . . ----------H otels and r e s t a u r a n t s ........... .... — ............. .........
S e rv ices ----------------------------------------------------------------C onstruction — ------- — - '■■■--■■ —■— ............. —M iscella n eou s nonm anu facturing---------------------

13
99
75
80
13
82
19
46
18

2 9 .8
5 2 5 .3
5 9 1 .7
2 0 0 .3
26. 7
2 1 3 .4
1 0 4 .8
1 6 7 .3
5 6 .6

1

1.2

1
0
26
28

1
2
8
51
13
25
7

8

18
27
73
29
83
47
45

1
1
5

209

1
0
56
28
17
4
53

8

19
13

1

11.2
2 1 7 .5
3 0 .3
5 4 .3
2 3 8 .5
3 5 .5
1 5 .8
1 1 7 .1

21.1
4 4 .8
2 1 .4

11.1

5 9 .0
8 0 .2
1 7 0 .1
60. 7

212.2
1 3 2 .0
1 9 3 .7
2 8 .9

10.1

8 8 2 .2

1 7 .2
2 3 3 .8
2 4 5 .0
3 4 .7
8 .7
1 4 1 .1
7 0 .7
8 2 .1
4 7 .8

1.2

-

1
5
1
1

-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
13
-

-

1

-

-

1.2
6 .4
7 .3
1 .5
-

1.6
1.0
1.2
2 .3
5 .2
2 .5
-

2.0

1
8

15

8

-

1
3
4
5
13
28
30
4

1

2
1

8 7 .4

73

-

5 .2
1 5 .1
3 8 .6
4 .5
2 1 .5

1
1
6

2
2
9

1

5

2
-

”

2.6
-

18
25

2
3

2
6
“

W ork ers
(000»s)

E x tra day*s
pay

Extra day oft
with pay or

O th er*

_____ extra p « r ________
A gree­
m en ts

W o rk ers

(000*s)

A gree­
m ents

(000*s)

A g ree­
m ents

W o rk ers
(000*s)

8 8 4 .9

39 7

2 ,6 8 7 .3

70

2 7 1 .5

33

2 0 3 .4

6 0 5 .6

307

2 ,2 5 5 .6

34

9 8 .0

5 .3
2 6 .6
-

3
13

10.0
-

1.2
1 4 .7
2 9 .2
14. 7
2 .9
3 .6
7 .1
1 5 .0

20.0

2 3 0 .8
2 1 7 .1
6 .4

1.2

279 . 3

1.0
7 6 .8
1 2 4 .8
53. 7
4 .1
4 .2
5 .1
9 .8
-

2

15
18

1
6
3
3
13

6

17
3

2

45
27
41
18
59

6.1
28. 7
2 .9
5 6 .2
2 2 5 .2
2. 7

10.0
6.6
3 .2
2 6 .0
2 9 .1

120.8
1 5 .0
3 .0
5 4 4 .9
9 4 .6
1 5 8 .6
5 9 .9
8 3 1 .1

1 4 0 .3

1
6

_

_

_

1
1

1.6

6

-

6
4

2
-

1

-

2
5
8

1 .5
-

2 5 .2
5 .5
4 .0
3. 7
4. 1
9 .8
2 4 .9
6 0 .0
-

i
-

2
-

_
7 9 .0
2. 7
-

2.0
-

1

1.2

-

4
"

4 .3
8 .9
*

2

4

20.2
11.2

4
-

90

431. 7

36

1 3 1 .2

17

1 0 5 .4

11.6

-

5 .4

-

6 5 .8
2 7 .0
-

8

2
24

1
1
1
6
5
1
2
3

1
2
5

2 0 4 .2
8 0 .2
3 4 .8
7 .8
4 0 .3
4 .5
3 9 .6

8.8

1
8
5
l
13

1

7
-

8
8

61.0
11.8
1.6

-■

1 5 .2
3 .0
3 3 .3
-

-

1

12.6
-

’

1
Includes agreements which referred specifically to holidays falling on a Saturday, and agreements prim arily in continuous-process industries which contained provi­
sions for holidays falling on any unscheduled workday.
* In 8 agreements, pay provisions were given only for some of the paid holidays.
For 6 agreements, specified work requirements had to be satisfied in order to
receive holiday pay.
In 3 agreements in the food industry, provision was made only for holidays falling on Saturday during a "nonprocessing w eek ."
For 3 more agree­
ments, provisions were given for certain groups of employees only. In 2 agreements, pay provisions varied for different holidays*
In 3 utilities agreements, holidays
falling on an unscheduled workday were not paid unless these exceeded 2 holidays per calendar year in which event the employee was paid for all holidays in excess of
this number. For 8 agreements, various other provisions were given.
1 Excludes railroad and airline industries.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




19
r e q u ir e m e n ts , d e a ls with, v a ca tio n and Sunday h o lid a y s , but is not e x p lic it as to
p o lic ie s g overn in g h o lid a y s on o th er n on w ork d ay s.
The fu ll intent of these and
s im ila r c la u s e s , w h ile n ot a pparent to an o u tsid e r studying the a g re e m e n t, m a y
p r e s e n t n o d iffic u ltie s to the p a r tie s th e m s e lv e s .^
When an is s u e d oes a r is e ,
the p a r tie s m a y , in the a b s e n c e o f e x p lic it co n tr a c t language, attem pt to settle
the m a tte r on an ad h o c b a s is , r e fe r to e a r lie r p r e c e d e n ts , o r a g r e e to fo llo w
in d u stry o r lo c a lit y p r a c t i c e s .
Of the 751 a g re e m e n ts w h ich contained p r o v is io n s fo r h olid a y s fa llin g
on a Saturday, on ly 41 s p e c ifie d that e m p lo y e e s w ould lo s e the h olid a y p a y . The
la r g e s t n u m ber o f a g re e m e n ts (3 9 7) p ro v id e d f o r an ex tra d a y 's p a y , but no a d ­
d ition a l tim e o f f , th e re b y p rev en tin g any l o s s e s in p ro d u ctio n tim e .
The next
m o s t fre q u e n t p r o v is io n , found in 210 a g r e e m e n ts , stipulateid an altern ate day o ff
w ith p a y, and 70 a g re e m e n ts a llo w e d an op tion o f eith e r 1 d a y 's pay o r another
day o ff. A g re e m e n ts w h ich con tained th ese ty p es o f p r o v is io n s w e r e freq u en tly
found in c o n tin u o u s -p r o c e s s in d u s tr ie s , n ota b ly c h e m ic a ls , p e tro le u m , p r im a r y
m e t a ls , and u tilitie s .
Illu stra tiv e o f the v a r io u s pay p r o v is io n s a r e the fo llo w in g c la u s e s :
W hen an a g r e e d h o lid a y s p e c ifie d in the a b ov e pa ra g ra p h o c c u r s ,
e m p lo y e e s sh a ll b e p a id f o r su ch h o lid a y . This p r o v is io n ap ­
p lie s ev en though the h o lid a y o c c u r s on Saturday . • •
*

*

*

When a h o lid a y f a lls on Saturday, the p r e c e d in g F r id a y sh a ll b e
o b s e r v e d a s d ie h o lid a y and sh a ll b e paid a s su ch h olid a y .
*

*

*

W hen a r e c o g n is e d h o lid a y o c c u r s on Saturday, the com p an y has
the o p tio n e ith e r to (a ) c o n s id e r the p re ce d in g F r id a y the h olid a y
and p a y h o lid a y p a y f o r F r id a y a s p ro v id e d in this s e c tio n o r
(b) c o n s id e r Saturday the h olid a y and pay 8 h o u r s 1 pay f o r Satur­
day a s p ro v id e d in this s e c tio n .
* The a b s e n c e o f a defin ite p r o v is io n dealing w ith this is s u e is often a
s o u r c e o f g r ie v a n c e s , and the d iffic u ltie s fa ce d b y an a rb itr a to r in attem pting to
se ttle su ch disp u tes is illu stra te d b y the fo llo w in g statem en t:
• • • L et us sa y the co n tra ct cla u se re a d s :
"E m p lo y e e s shall
b e paid a d a y 's w a g es fo r ea ch o f the fo llo w in g se v e n h olid a ys
on w hich they sh a ll not b e re q u ire d to w o rk . . . "
This m eans
on its fa c e that a h olid a y is payable by "a d a y 's w a g e s ." The
a r b itr a to r , t h e r e fo r e , aw ards an ex tra d a y 's pay fo r the h olid ay
even though it o c c u r r e d on a w eek en d. Su p pose, h o w e v e r, the
c o n tra ct re a d s in stea d , "E m p lo y e e s sh all be o ff on the fo llo w in g
sev en h olid a ys w ithout lo s s o f pay . . . ” The a r b itr a to r , c lin g ­
ing te n a cio u sly to the b a r e stru ctu re o f the w ord in g , re a d s the
d ir e c tio n s lit e r a lly .
The w o rk e rs w e re o ff; they lo s t no pay;
th ere is nothing that sa y s they sh a ll be paid a d a y 's w a g e s ,
paym ent is d en ied .
The trou b le w ith this a p p roa ch is that in
both c a s e s th ere m a y have b e e n the sam e a b s e n ce o f intent, o r
even an intent o p p o se d to the lite r a l m eaning o f the c la u s e .
The
d iffe r e n c e in w ord in g is fre q u e n tly quite fo rtu ito u s.
L ou is Y agoda, The N eed f o r P r e c is io n and C la rity (in U nderstanding
C o lle c t iv e B a rg a in in g : The E x e c u tiv e 's G uide, New Y o rk , A m e rica n M anagem ent
A s s o c ia tio n , 1958, pp. 1 4 9 -1 5 0 ).




TA B LE 9.

Pay provision* for holidays falling on an unscheduled workday in major collective bargaining agreements by industry, 1958

Industry

A g reem en ts with
j paid holiday
provisions

.A g r e e ­
m ents

W o rk ers

(000»s)

A gree­
ments

W o rk e rs

(000<s)

E m p lo y ees given—
No extra pay
or extra day
off provided

A g ree­
m ents

E xtra day off
w ith pay

W o rk ers

(000»s)

A g ree­
m ents

W ork er s!

(000>s)

E x tra d a y 's pay

A gree­
m ents

W o rk e rs
( 0 0 0 's )

E x tra ‘day off
with pay or
extra pay
A gree­
m ents

O th er1

W o rk ers

(000*s)

A gree­
m ents

W ork ers

(000'*)

1 .5 6 1

Manufacturing
O rdnance and a c c e s s o r ie s

6 ,8 2 0 . 7

1 ,2 3 4

4 ,5 0 6 .3

2
2

5 8 .6

70

2 8 0 .0

182

1 , 7 4 6 .1

35

9 0 .9

18

1 3 9 .0

1 ,1 1 5

A l l indu stries

4 ,9 0 3 . 7

932

3 ,0 1 6 .6

7

1 6 .5

34

1 8 8 .9

129

1 ,5 8 2 .2

9

2 4 .3

4

7 5 .4

2 4 .0
3 5 7 .9
3 3 .2
1 1 5 .6
4 7 3 .7
3 8 .2
2 9 .0
1 2 4 .9
7 1 .7
1 1 2 .7
7 0 .7
1 3 1 .9
7 6 .9
9 2 .1
7 2 3 .1
1 7 5 .6
4 0 2 .9
4 5 7 .0
1 ,3 1 3 .3
5 5 .4
2 4 .5

7
94

1 9 .2
2 6 6 .4
3 3 .2
9 6 .5
4 7 3 .7
3 8 .2
2 5 .3

1
2

1 .4
2 .7

5

1.6

2

7 2 .0

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

_
_
.

.
_
_

55. 1
5 5 .9
3 6 .4
1 7 .0
7 1 .5
8 9 .0
209. 1
1 5 1 .8
327. 1
3 1 0 .6
5 5 2 .2
4 2 .9
2 3 .3

-

1
0
107

T obacco m anufactures
T e xtile m ill products .
A p p are l and other finished textile p r o d u c ts -----Lum ber and wood products (except fu r n itu r e )__
Furniture and fixtures
Paper and a llie d products .
'
P rin tin g, publishing, and a llie d in d u stries ____
C h em ica ls and a llie d products
P roducts o f petroleum and coal
Rubber products
Leather and leather products ---------------- ------Stone, c la y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s __________—T r—
P r im a ry m e ta l indu stries
F a bricated m etal products . .
M ach in ery (except e le c tr ic a l)
E le c tric a l m ach in ery
.
T ransportation equipment
Instrum ents and related products
M iscella n eo u s m anufacturing indu stries

1
2

44
47
13
17
55
36
58
24
25

2
2

34
123
64
143
104
143
23

1
1

_____ ______ _____ __ __________

446

1 ,9 1 7 .0

M ining, cru d e-p etroleu m , and n atu ral-gas
production
Transportation*
C om m unications
U tilitie s: E le c tr ic and g as
W hn lesala trade
__
_ .
R etail trade
H otels and restau rants
---- . _
S e rv ic e s
Construction
- - - - - M iscella n eo u s nonmanufacturing indu stries ___

13
99
75
80
13
82
19
46
18

2 9 .8
5 2 5 .3
5 9 1 .7
2 0 0 .3
2 6 .7
2 1 3 .4
1 0 4 .8
1 6 7 .3
5 6 .6

Nonm anufacturing

No explicit p r o visions for an
unscheduled
workday

1

1.2

1
2

38
47
13
15
53
28
35
13
13

2
0

32
96
56
128

8
8
2
0
1
0

114

302

1
1
83
59
25

1
1

57
9
28
18

1

122.6

1 ,4 8 9 .7

1 8 .2
4 7 8 .7
5 2 4 .6
5 3 .2
2 4 .1
158. 1
7 1 .7
1 0 3 .6
5 6 .6

1.2

1
1
1

-

1

-

-

1.1
7 .3
1 .5
2 .5
-

15

4 2 .1

-

5 .2
_

2
•

6

12.8
-

.
5

2
_
-

-

2 1 .5

2.6

1

-

1
5
7

1

2.1
1 0 .7

1.2
20.8
8 .4

-

1 .4
•
1 .5
-

-

-

-

1
-

1
0
2
-

1

36

-

2
4
18

1
3
2
6

1 1 7 .7
2 4 .1
-

1.2
9 1 .1

-

3 .8
5 .1

61.8
1 .3
4 .2
5 .1
9 .8

.

-

-

-

1
3

1 .4
4 .5

6

1 9 .1

-

-

-

3 .7
-

2
-

1
13
7

1
2
1
1
27
8

1.0

2 6 .0
2 7 .5
1 1 5 .0
2 .5

1.6

-

5 1 4 .0
2 3 .8
7 5 .8
1 9 .5
7 3 4 .5
1 2 .5
-

53

1 6 3 .9

15
3
26
3

2
1
1
7
18

1
8
2

4
_
-

11.6
3 2 .3
3 8 .0
3 3 .9
1 .3
2 3 .3
3 .5

20.1
-

1
_
.
.
.
-

1
2
2

6.0
2.8

.

4 .0
•
2 .9
.
.
7 .0
.

-

-

-

1
.
-

2
26

-

1
.

5
•
13

1
6
-

1

_

1.2
_
_
_

.
_
_
_
.

_
_
_
_

1

2.2

.
_

-

-

66.6

14

_

5 .4
_

_
_
_
_

_
_

6 3 .7

„
.

11.8

8

5

2 4 .1
2 7 .0
_

1 5 .2
3 .0
3 1 .3

1

12.6

„

-

-

-

1 In 5 agreements, pay provisions were given only for some of the paid holidays.
For another 4 agreements, specified work requirements had to be satisfied in order
to receive holiday pay.
In 3 utilities agreements, holidays falling on an unscheduled workday were not paid unless these exceeded 2 holidays per calendar year, in which
event the employee was paid for all holidays in excess of this number.
For 2 agreements, different pay provisions applied when different holidays fell on die first or
second day of rest.
For 4 agreements, various other provisions were given.
a Excludes railroad and airline industries.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




21

A few a g re e m e n ts p ro v id e d pay fo r only som e of the h olid a ys fa llin g on
Saturday o r oth er u n sch edu led w o rk d a y s, as in the fo llo w in g ex a m p le:
The e m p lo y e r h e r e b y a g r e e s that a ll em p lo y e e s sh all b e granted
a d a y ’ s pay at th eir "n o r m a l r a t e " f o r C h ristm a s D ay and New
Y e a r 's D ay r e g a r d le s s o f the day of the w eek on w hich they fa ll
and sh a ll be granted a n o r m a l d a y ’ s pay at th eir "n o r m a l r a te "
fo r the fo llo w in g s ix plant h olid a ys p ro v id e d they fa il on n o rm a l
w ork d a y s . . .
E x p lic it p r o v is io n s f o r h olid a ys fa llin g on any nonw orkday w e r e found in
on ly about a fifth o f the a g re e m e n ts with paid h olid a y p r o v is io n s (table 9)*
The
d iffic u ltie s o f in te rp re tin g Saturday cla u s e s a ls o apply h e r e , and h en ce it m a y w e ll
be that the fin din gs u n d ersta te the p r a c t ic e o f com p en satin g f o r su ch h o lid a y s .
H o w e v e r, the r e la t iv e ly low in cid e n ce o f su ch p r o v is io n s can, to so m e extent,
a ls o be ex pla in ed b y the fa c t that in m any in d u stries on ly Saturday and Sunday
a re sch ed u led n on w ork d a y s. P r o b le m s rela tin g to nonw orkdays oth er than S atur­
day and Sunday w ould g e n e r a lly b e lim ited to in d u stries op era tin g on a 7 -d a y
b a s is .
In su ch in d u s tr ie s , f o r e x a m p le, an e m p lo y e e 's w ork w eek m a y b eg in on
a W edn esd ay, and his days o ff w ould then be M onday and T u esd ay,
M o r e than 75 p e r c e n t o f the w o r k e rs c o v e r e d b y e x p lic it p r o v is io n s fo r
h o lid a y s fa llin g ou tsid e a re g u la r w ork w eek w e re entitled to an add ition al d a y ’ s
pay.
C la u se s stipu latin g a n oth er day o ff with p ay o r an ex tra day o ff with pay
w e r e fa r le s s freq u e n t.
If a h o lid a y fa lls on an e m p lo y e e 's re g u la r day o ff he sh all be
paid 8 h o u rs stra ig h t tim e .
*

* *

W hen one o r m o r e o f the h olid ays r e fe r r e d to o c c u r s on the
r e g u la r ly sch ed u led day o ff o f an em p loy ee having s e n io r ity , and
when su ch e m p lo y e e is not com p en sated fo r the h olid a y under any
oth er p r o v is io n o f this s e c tio n , the em p loy ee sh all be granted a
substitute day o ff w ith pay . . .
A fe w a g re e m e n ts banned paym ents f o r such h olid a ys e n tire ly ,
them su b je ct to s p e c ia l c o n d itio n s.
If a h olid a y fa lls on the e m p lo y e e 's sch ed u led
she w ill not be paid . . •
*

*

o ff-d a y ,

o r m ade

he o r

*

If a h olid a y fa lls on an e m p lo y e e 's nonw orkday, he sh all not fo r
su ch r e a s o n b e en titled to have a w o rk day o ff with pay, p r o ­
v id e d , h o w e v e r , that if during a calen d ar y e a r m o r e than two
(2) h olid a ys fa ll on an e m p lo y e e 's n onw ork day the C om pany
sh a ll g iv e him one ( l ) w o rk day o ff with pay o r , at its option,
sh a ll g ive him one ( l ) d a y 's pay, fo r e v e r y h olid a y in e x c e s s
o f two (2) p e r ca le n d a r y ea r w hich fa lls on his nonw orkday.
*

* *

A n e m p lo y e e q u a lifie s f o r h olid a y paym ent under the fo llo w in g co n d itio n s:
When^the h o lid a y is o b s e r v e d on a day w hich is not p a rt o f the
e m p lo y e e 's fiv e -d a y w o r k w e e k , i f she h as "w ork ed o r been a s ­
sign ed to w o r k and e x c u s e d on that day o f the w eek on w h ich the
h o lid a y i s o b s e r v e d at le a s t th ree tim e s in the 26 ca len d a r w eek s
Im m e d ia te ly p r e c e d in g the w e e k in w h ich the h olid a y o c c u r s . . . .




22

When a r e c o g n iz e d h olid a y fa lls on the seventh day o f the w o r k ­
w eek o f a sh ift w o r k e r o r a sch ed uled w eek w o r k e r (w hich day
is h is se co n d r e s t day in that w ork w eek ) such h o lid a y s , fo r
p u rp o se s o f h o lid a y pay, sh a ll be co n s id e re d and trea ted with
r e s p e c t to e m p lo y e e s co n ce rn e d , in the sa m e m an n er as p r o ­
vided f o r h olid a ys fa llin g on Sunday and p u b lic ly o b s e r v e d on
M on day0 E ach e m p lo y e e s o a ffe cte d sh all b e granted tim e o ff
when p r a c t ic a b le , w ith stra ig h t-tim e pay.
If G ood F rid a y ,
L a b or D ay, G en era l E le c tio n Day or Thanksgiving Day fa lls on
an e m p lo y e e ^ f ir s t day -of r e s t he w ill be paid the s tr a ig h ttim e rate f o r that day.
H olidays O c c u r r in g D uring V acation P e r i o d .— P r o v is io n s f o r h olid a ys
fa llin g du rin g v a ca tion p e r io d s w e re analyzed in a re ce n t B u reau o f L a b o r Sta­
t is t ic s study o f v a ca tio n p o l i c i e s . 7 Of the 1 ,6 6 4 a g reem en ts w h ich had paid
v a ca tio n s , 1 ,0 6 9 gran ted v a rio u s h olid a y a llo w a n ce s . The m o s t co m m o n a llo w ­
a n ce, found in 578 a g r e e m e n ts , w as an ex tra day*s pay but no add ition al tim e o ff.

B u ll.

7 See P aid V a ca tion P r o v is io n s
1233 (p. 33).

in

M a jo r

Union C o n tra cts,

T A B L E 10.

Number
of
agreem ents
studied

Industry

N o.

. A gree; ments
A ll industries

___ __ _

Manufacturing _

1
2

3
4
5

6
7

8

9

1
0
1
1
1
2

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

20
2
1

2
2

26
27
28
29
30
31

__

__ __ __

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ----------Food and kindred p r o d u c t s _______
T ob a cco m anufactures
__ __ ---Textile m ill p r o d u c ts ____________
A p parel and other finished
textile p r o d u c t s __
________
Lum ber and wood products
(except furniture)
___ ___ —
Furniture and fixtures
__ __ _
P ap er and a llied products ___
Printing, publishing, and
allied industries __
_ _
C h em icals and a llied p r o d u c ts ___
P rod u cts o f petroleum and c o a l _
_
Rubber p r o d u c t s _________________
Leather and leather p ro d u c ts ____
Stone, cla y, and glass p r o d u c ts ___
P rim a ry m etal industries __ __
F a b rica ted m etal p r o d u c ts _______
M achinery (except e l e c t r i c a l ) ____
E le c tr ic a l m a c h in e r y ____________
T ransportation eq u ip m en t-----------Instrum ents and related
products
__
_
_ _
M iscella n eou s m anufacturing
industries
____ __
__
Nonmanufacturing

23
24
25

_

____

__

M ining, cru d e-p etroleu m , and
natural-gas production
T ransportation 3
C o m m u n ica tio n s _________________
U tilities: E le c tr ic and g a s ______
W holesale trade ---------------------------Retail trade
H otels and restaurants
S ervices
C onstruction
M iscellaneou s nonmanufacturing ..

W orkers
i (000*s)

Number
with
unpaid
holidays 1
A g re e ­
m ents

W orkers
(000*s)

1957,

BLS

Unpaid holidays in m ajor collective!

Number o f unpaid holidays—

1day
A g re e ­
m ents

2 days

W orkers
(000*s)

A gree­
m ents

3 days

W orkers
(000*s)

A g r e e ­ W orkers
m ents
(000*s)

1,736 7 ,7 5 3 .0

312 1 ,5 0 2 .9

52

121.0

42

266 .7

1
2

3 8.5

1 122 4 ,9 1 6 .9
,
1
0 24. 0
109
363.9
1
2 3 3.2

133

525.2

46

109. 0

39

2 5 6 .2

6

2 6 .4

_
19

_
4 9 .2

_
19.3
8 .7

_
3

1

_
4 .0
4 .6

_
-

5 5.5

_
7
5

251 .8

3

13.2

2
2

218. 1

-

-

1. 0
0
10
.

3. 1

-

-

-

-

-

4 .4
1. 0
1
-

2

5 .9
10
.
3 .4
5. I
2. 1

-

2

7. 0

-

-

-

-

45

116.7

2
2
2

47

473.7

28

14
17
55

3 9 .2
29. 0
124.9

6
2

13. 0
5. 0
1. 0
1

4

7

36
58
24
25

71.7
112.7
70. 7
131.9
7 6.9
92. 1
723. 1
175.6
4 02 .9
461. 0
1 ,3 1 4 .3

1

10
.

-

2
2

34
123
64
143
106
144
23

5 5.4

1
1

2 4 .5

614 2 ,8 3 6 . 1
16
109
75
81
14
85
29
54
148
3

261. 1
553 .6
591.7
204 .7
2 8.2
219.2
146.0
181. 0
645.5
5 .2

3

1
1
5
4
7

2
1
1
1
2
179

2

14
-

1
2
6

14
7

132

1

6.2

6 .4
52.5

1

5

2

6.2

5
4
-

10.2 .

4

8.7

3 .4
35.5

10
.

1
2
2
1

-

1

6 .5

2. 1
28. 1
5 .2
1.5
5. 1
3 .4
4 .3

3

1
1

3
-

10
.

“

■

2

6

1. 0
2

3

10.5

230. 0
3 8.5
4 .4
6. 0
19. 0

-

-

-

9 .5

-

1
1

-

1

9 .0

9 77 .8

1

9. 0

66.2

16.6
594.7
2 .5

1

-

1
1
2
I
“

1.2

4 .5
1.4
3 .5
1.4
“

2
1
,

1.0

_
-

2.2
-

-

1.8

*

6 1. 1
2
-

-

2

2. 1

-

2. 0
8. 0
-

1

3
-

-

-■

"

'

‘

1 Includes 159 agreem ents containing unpaid holidays only and 153 agreem ents having both paid and unpaid holidays.
2 Contains 6 agreem ents with 9 unpaid holidays; 8 agreem ents with 10; 6 agreem ents with 11; and 2 agreem ents with 12.
1 agreem ent contained an unpaid half holiday and one 7 Vz holidays. In 6 food processing agreem ents, holidays are unpaid if they
should occur during the "cam paign " season, but are paid if they should occur during the "in tercam paign" season. For 4 m ulti­
em ployer agreem ents, the number of unpaid holidays varies by geographical location. In 3 agreem ents, the number of unpaid




23
T h ree hundred a g re e m e n ts s p e c ifie d an ex tra day o ff with p a y . A c h o ice o f eith er
an e x tra day o ff w ith pay o r an ex tra day*s pay w as p ro v id e d fo r in 178; 169 o f
th ese a g ree m e n ts p ro v id e d that the a llow a n ce b e d eterm in ed at the e m p lo y e r ^
o r e m p lo y e e ^ option , and 9 re q u ire d that it be d eterm in ed b y m utual a g reem en t
b etw een the e m p lo y e r and e m p lo y e e . Only 42 a g re e m e n ts s p e c ific a lly p roh ib ited
any a llo w a n ce s f o r h olid a y s fa llin g during the v a ca tion p e r io d .
Unpaid H olidays
The re c o g n itio n o f unpaid h olid a ys has b een d eclin in g o v e r the past decad e
as m o r e paid h olid a ys w e r e o b s e r v e d .
In 1950, a B ureau o f L*abor S t a t is t ic s 1
stu d y 8 found unpaid h olid a ys in 38 p e rce n t o f the ag reem en ts an alyzed ; by 1958,
the p r o p o r tio n o f a g re e m e n ts w ith su ch p r o v is io n s had drop ped to le s s than
20 p e r c e n t.
Of the 312 a g re e m e n ts w hich s p e c ifie d unpaid h o lid a y s , 159 a ls o
granted paid h o lid a y s; thus, unpaid h olid a ys on ly w e re o b se rv e d in le s s than
10 p e r c e n t o f the a g r e e m e n ts.
The n u m ber o f unpaid h olid a ys ran ged fr o m a h a lf day to 12 d ays, with
about 2 out o f 3 o f the 312 a g re e m e n ts m entioning 6 o r fe w e r (table 10).
V irtu a lly
8 See footn ote 1, p.

1.

bargaining agreem ents by industry, 1958
Number o f unpaid holidays—
4 days
A g re e ­
m ents

6 days

5 days

W orkers
(000*s)

W ofk ers

A g re e ­
ments

(0 0 0 's)

15

6 3.3

16

7 i.3 ;

1
1

4 1 .2

1
1

2
5

3. 1
15.6

1
8

3

2 0 .5

-

-

(000*8)

W orkers

A g re e ­
m ents

(000*s)

222. 1

A g re e ­
ments

(000*s)

333. 1

1
2

37.3

-

4. 0
-

7
-

16.9
-

3
4

3 3.5

4

7 .7

2

7. 0

2

2. 0

-

-

-

1,'

-

-

30

178.4

1
2

1.2

-

4. 0
"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

10
.

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
1.4

7

4 .5
_
10
.

-

_
3. 0
_
-

_
-

_
3. 1

1

-

-

2. 0
4. 0
-

-

2. 0
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

22. 1

5

3 7 .8

59

11
.

-

2 7.2
10.7
“

1

-

2
1
“

-

11.0
1. 0
0
•-

~

2
3

1

(000’ s)

7. 1

2 0 8 .8

1

i

No.

W orkers

A g re e ­
ments
39

63

2 5.5

43

Other a

W orkers

-

1

1
1

A gree­
m ents

8 days

7 days

W ork ers i

“
-

1

-

1

1
1
2
-

3
4
48
~

-

1

-

201.2

41

11
.

40

4 .4
4 .7
7. 0
4 .2
179.9
“

1

215. 1

-

212.6
2 .5

1

28

1

_

1

I
25
"

171.3
30. 0
1.5
1.9
137.9

1
1

_
3

27

1
9
-

1

16
■

6
8

1.0

9

1
0
1
1
1
2

18. 0

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

,

2
0
2
1

295.9

200. 0
33. 1
_
9 .0
53. 8

2
2

23
24
25

2
6

27
28
29
30
31

holidays is not given. Finally, in I agreem ent, unpaid holidays vary by loca lity , and in another agreem ent, 1 unpaid holiday is
given to a certa in group o f em p loy ees only.
3 E xcludes ra ilroa d and a irlin e industries.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not equal tota ls.




T A B L E 11.

R ates of pay for w ork on unpaid holidays in m ajor co llective bargaining ag re em en ts by industry, 1958

to

~
______________________________
N um ber
with
unpaid
holid a ys

Industry

_

_____

M anufacturing ____ ___ _______
O rdnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _
F ood and kin d red p rod u cts
T o b a c c o m an u fa ctu res __________ _
T ex tile m ill p rod u cts _____________
A p p a rel and other finish ed
__ __
p rod u cts
_ ____
L um ber and w ood p rod u cts
(excep t fu rn itu re) _____ _________
Furnitu re and fix tu re s _____ _____
P a p er and a llie d p r o d u c t s _______ _
P rin tin g, publishing, and
a llie d in d u stries
____________
C h em ica ls and a llied p r o d u c t s ____
P rod u cts of p etroleu m and
co a l ____ _____ __ , _ _____ __ __
_
R ubber p rod u cts
___________ .
L ea th er and leath er p r o d u c t s _____
Stone, cla y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s __
P rim a ry m eta l in d u s t r ie s __ _______
F a b rica ted m etal p rod u cts _ -------M a ch in ery (excep t e le c t r ic a l)
E le c tr ic a l m a c h in e r y ___ ______ _
T ra n sp ortation e q u ip m e n t_________
Instrum ents and rela ted
p r oduct s
. ,
__________
M is ce lla n e o u s m anufacturing
in d u stries
____ __ _____________
N onm anufacturing ______________
M ining, cr u d e -p e tr o le u m , and
n a t u r a l-g a s p r o d u c tio n ______
T ra n sp ortation 2 _______ ___ ________
C om m unications ___________ ______
U tilities: E le c t r ic and gas
----W holesale trade ___________________
R eta il trad e
____ ____________
_________
H otels and restau ra n ts
S e rv ice s
__ _____ __ _____ _____
C on stru ction ________________ __ __
M is ce lla n e o u s non m anu factu ring__

No p ro v isio n

W orkers

A gree­
m ents
All Ind ustries

P ay rate s fo r w o rk on unpaid h o lid a ys—

(000*s)

W orkers

A gree­
m ents

T im e and
o n e -h a lf

Straight tim e

(000* s)

W ork ers

A gree­
m ents

A gree­
m ents

(000* s)

D ouble tim e

W ork ers
(000* s)

O ther 1

W ork ers

A gree­
m ents

(000*s)

W orkers

A gree­
m ents

(000*s)

312

1 ,5 0 2 .9

2
1

7 6 .6 ,

33

2 5 8 .7

95

2 8 1 .3

153

8 5 4 .6

1
0

3 1 .8

133

5 25 .2

13

5 7 .9 i
i

29

2 5 2 .4 ,

58

143.7

27

5 7 .5

6

13.7

.
-

15

3 3 .4
5 2 .2

-

6 .3
_

1

19

2

4. 0
_
2 .3

1.6

-

-

-

-

_
19

2
2
2
28

6
2
7

1

-

3

1
1
5
4
7

2
1
1
1
2
179

2
14
-

1

2

6
14
7
132

1

4 9 .2

6.2

5 5 .5

_

2
1

5 .5
10
.

_ ,
-

1

2
1

6.2

1

-

-

4

7 .5

-

-

4
-

4 .5
-

1.2

2
2
2

8 .5
5. 0
2 .3

-

1

10
.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

27. 1
-

-

11
.

-

-

3 .4
3 5.5

-

14. 0

-

3 .4
3. 0

10
.

-

-

-

2 5 1 .8
13. 0
5. 0
1. 0
1

1.0
-

6 .4
5 2 .5

6.2
8 .7

10.2

9 .0

-

1
1

1.8

27

1
1

2 5 0 .2

-

3
-

5 .4
2 2 .4
3 .5
4 .5
-

-

-

-

1.2

-

-

-

-

9 7 7 .8

8

18. 7

4

6 .3

230. 0
3 8 .5
4 .4
6. 0
19. 0

-

-

5. 0
-

-

2

3.3

2. 0

1

1.2

4

9 .2
“

66.2

16.6
594.7
2 .5

1

-

“

-

1
1

-

2
"

1

2.0
2 .3
“

-

2
7
-

2

2

-

1
1

5
-

1
2
1

18.5

-

-

9 .0

-

137.6

126

-

3 2 .5
-

-

2
2
11
1

8
1

6.0
11. 0
60.2
10
.
2 4 .5
2 .5

3. 0

6.2
1.8
2.8
2.2

9

37

1
2

11
.

2
-

1

-

2
5

116
"

1

-

1
1

1.0

-

-

797. 1

4

18. 1

2 3 0 .0
-

-

-

4.4
4. 0
1 4.4
5 4 4 .4

1

-

1

-

2

-

1.0
2 .7
14.4

'

1 F o r 4 a g re e m e n ts, pay ra tes vary for different unpaid holidays. 1 agreem en t provides for 2lU tim e s the s tra ig h t-tim e ra te, ai^other 2 V 1 t im e s , and a third 2 Vs tim e s.
0
F in a lly , fdr ^ a g r e e m e n t s , 1 provides for overtim e applicable to the craft involved, another sp e cifie s pay rates only for certain categ o ries of em p loy ees and the third provides a
flat amount in addition to the daily rate.
2 Excluded railread and airlin e in d u strie s.
NOTE:




B ecau se of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls .

^

25

a ll o f the a g re e m e n ts w h ich design ated sev en o r m o r e unpaid h olid a ys w e r e in
the co n stru ctio n in d u stry , w h ich , in tota l, accou n ted f o r m o r e than tw o -fifth s o f
a ll a g re e m e n ts with su ch h o lid a y s . Other in d u stries in w hich h olid a ys o ff w ithout
pay app lied to eith er a sig n ifica n t p r o p o r tio n o f a g reem en ts o r w o r k e rs w e re
te x tile m ill p r o d u cts, a p p a re l, lea th er and lea th er p ro d u cts , m in in g , and h otels
and r e sta u ra n ts .
P ay f o r W orking on Unpaid H o lid a y s .— P re m iu m pay fo r w o rk on an un­
paid h olid a y w as a fe a tu re o f c o lle c t iv e ba rg a in in g a g reem en ts p r io r to the advent
o f paid h olid a ys and p re m iu m pay fo r w ork in g on paid h o lid a y s . In m o s t a g r e e ­
m ents w ith unpaid h o lid a y s , the e m p lo y e e is com p en sa ted fo r h ou rs w ork ed on
su ch days b y a m u ltip le o f h is s tr a ig h t-tim e rate o f pay.
D ouble tim e , the co m p e n sa tion m o s t freq u en tly granted f o r w o rk on un­
paid h o lid a y s , w as stipulated in 153 c o n tr a c ts , 116 o f w h ich w e re in the c o n ­
stru ctio n in du stry (table 11). This rate w as a ls o in e ffe c t fo r co a l m in e r s . T im e
and o n e -h a li w as p ro v id e d in a n u m ber o f fo o d , te x tile , tra n sp orta tion , and h otel
and resta u ra n t a g r e e m e n ts . A s m a ll num ber o f a g reem en ts (21) did not s p e c i f i ­
c a lly design ate r a te s o f pay f o r w o rk on unpaid h olid a y s; in th ese in sta n ce s, it
m a y be a ssu m e d that a w o r k e r w ould r e c e iv e at le a st straigh t tim e fo r a ll h ours
w o rk e d .




* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1959 0 — 5 0 0 3 6 7