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Occupational Wage Survey
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
OCTOBER 1959

No. 1265-5
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
J a m e s P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan C laguo, Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey




ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
OCTOBER 1959

B u lle tin N o . 1 2 6 5 - 5
Jan u ary 1960

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT O F LABOR
Ja m e s P. Mitchell, S e c re tary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S . Government Printing O ffic e , W ashington 2 5 , D.C.

Price 2 5 cents




Preface

Contents
Page

The Community Wage Survey Program

Introduction ___________________________________________________________
W a g e trends for selected occupational g r o u p s ______________________

The Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly conducts
areawide wage surveys in a number of important industrial
centers. The studies, made from late fall to early spring,
relate to occupational earnings and related supplementary
benefits. A preliminary report is available on completion
of the study in each area, usually in the month following the
payroll period studied. This bulletin provides additional data
not included in the earlier report. A consolidated analytical
bulletin summarizing the results of all of the year's surveys
is issued after completion of the final area bulletin for the
current round of surveys.

Tables:
1.
2.

A.

This report was prepared in the Bureau's regional
office in Chicago, HI., by Woodrow C. Linn, under the di­
rection of George E. Votava, Regional Wage and Industrial
Relations Analyst.




1
4

B.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s within s c o p e of s u r v e y ______ Indexes of st andard w e e k l y salaries a n d straight-time
hou r l y earnings for selected occupational groups,
a n d p e r c e n t s of in c r e a s e for selected peri o d s _________ _
O c c upational earnings: *
A-l. Office occupations _____________________________________
A -2. Professiona l a n d technical occupations - ___________ -_
A-3. M a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t occupations . -----------A- 4 . Custodial a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t occupations _______
E s t a b l i s h m e n t practices a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e
proyisions: *
B - 1. Shift differentials ___________________
-B-2. M i n i m u m e n trance salaries for w o m e n office
w o r k e r s __________________ ____ - _____________________ B-3. Sch e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ______________ - __________- _____
B-4. P a i d h o l i d a y s _________ 2 - - - _________________ ________ _
B -5. P a i d v a c a t i o n s ____ ______________________________________
B -6. Health, insurance, a n d p e n s i o n plans _______________

Appen d i x :

Occupational d e s c r i p t i o n s ________

* NOTE:
Similar tabulations a r e available in the St. L o u i s a r e a
reports for J a n u a r y 1952, D e c e m b e r 1952, J a n u a r y 1954, F e b ­
r u a r y 1955, F e b r u a r y 1956, F e b r u a r y 1957, N o v e m b e r 1957 a n d
O c t o b e r 1958.
T h e F e b r u a r y 1957 r eport w a s limited to o c c u p a ­
tional earnings of plant w o r k e r s in .manufacturing a n d public
utilities.
M o s t of the r eports include data o n es t a b l i s h m e n t
practices a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e provisions.
A directory indi­
cating date of study a n d the price of the reports, as well as r e ­
ports for other m a j o r areas, is available u p o n request.

A current report on occupational earnings and supple­
mentary wage practices is also available for gray iron foundries
in the St. Louis area (May 1959). Union scales, indicative of
prevailing pay levels, are available for the following trades or
industries: Building construction, printing, local-transit operat­
ing employees, and motortruck drivers and helpers.
iii

3

3

5
9
10
11

13
14
15
16
17
19
21




Occupational Wage Survey—St. Louis, Mo.
Introduction

This area is one of several important industrial centers in
which the U. S. Department of L a b o rs Bureau of Labor Statistics has
conducted surveys of occupational earnings and related wage benefits
on an areawide basis. In this area, data were obtained by personal
visits of Bureau field economists to representative establishments
within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation,1
communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major in­
dustry groups excluded from these studies are government operations
and the.construction and extractive industries. Establishments having
fewer than a prescribed number of workers are omitted also because
they furnish insufficient employment in the occupations studied to war­
rant inclusion. Wherever possible, separate tabulations are provided
for each of the broad industry divisions.
These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because of the
unnecessary cost involved in surveying all establishments. To obtain
appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
than of small establishments is studied. In combining the data, how­
ever, all establishments are given their appropriate weight. Estimates
based on-the establishments studied are presented, therefore, as re­
lating to all establishments in the industry grouping and area, ex­
cept for those below the minimum size studied.
Occupations and Earnings
The occupations selected for study are common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupational clas­
sification is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to
take account of interestablishment variation in duties within the same
job. (See appendix for listing of these descriptions.) Earnings data are
presented (in the A-series tables) for the following types of occupa­
tions: (a) Office clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) mainte­
nance and powerplant; and (d) custodial and material movement.
Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for
full-time workers, i. e. , those hired to work a regular weekly sched­
ule in the given occupational classification. Earnings data exclude
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
1 Railroads, formerly excluded from the scope of these studies,
have been added in nearly all of the areas to be studied during the
winter of 1959-60; railroads will be added in the remaining areas next
year. For scope of survey in this area, see footnote to "transporta­
tion, communication, and other public utilities1 in table 1.
1




late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded also, but cost-ofliving bonuses and incentive earnings are included. Where weekly
hours are reported, as for office clerical occupations, reference is
to the work schedules (rounded to the nearest half hour) for which
straight-time salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these
occupations have been rounded to the nearest half dollar.
Average earnings of men and women are presented separately
for selected occupations in which both sexes are commonly employed.
Differences in pay levels of men and women in these occupations are
largely due to (l) differences in the distribution of the sexes among
industries and establishments; (2) differences in specific duties per­
formed, although the occupations are appropriately classified within
the same survey job description; and (3) differences in length of serv­
ice or merit review when individual salaries are adjusted on this basis.
Longer average service of men would result in higher average pay
when both sexes are employed within the same rate range. Job
descriptions used in classifying employees in these surveys are usu­
ally more generalized than those used in individual establishments to
allow for minor differences among establishments in specific duties
performed.
Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actu­
ally surveyed. Because of differences in occupational structure among
establishments, the estimates of occupational employment obtained
from the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate the
relative importance of the jobs studied. These differences in occu­
pational structure do not materially affect the accuracy of the earn**
ings data.
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Information is presented also (in the B-series tables) on se ­
lected establishment practices and supplementary benefits as they re­
late to office and plant workers. The term "office workers, " as used
in this bulletin, includes working aupervisors and nonsupervisory
workers performing clerical or related functions, and excludes admin­
istrative, executive, and professional personnel. "Plant workers" in­
clude working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administrative,
executive, and professional employees, and force-account construction
employees who are utilized as a separate work force are excluded.
Cafeteria workers and routemen are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, but are included as plant workers in nonmanufacturing industries.

2

S h ift d if f e r e n t ia l d a ta (ta b le B - l ) a r e lim it e d to m a n u fa c tu r in g
i n d u s t r i e s . T h is in fo r m a t io n i s p r e s e n t e d b o th in t e r m s o f (a ) e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t p o lic y , 2 p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f t o t a l p la n t w o r k e r e m p lo y ­
m e n t , a n d (b ) e f f e c t i v e p r a c t i c e , p r e s e n t e d o n th e b a s i s o f w o r k e r s
a c t u a l l y e m p l o y e d o n th e s p e c i f i e d s h i f t a t th e t im e o f th e s u r v e y .
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g v a r i e d d i f f e r e n t i a l s , th e a m o u n t a p p ly in g to
a m a j o r i t y w a s u s e d o r , i f n o a m o u n t a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y , th e c l a s ­
sific a tio n "o th e r " w as u se d .
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in w h ic h s o m e l a t e s h i f t h o u r s a r e p a i d a t n o r m a l r a t e s , a d i f f e r e n t i a l w a s r e c o r d e d o n ly
i f i t a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y o f th e s h i f t h o u r s .

M in im u m e n t r a n c e r a t e s ( t a b le B - 2 ) r e l a t e o n ly to th e e s t a b ­
lis h m e n ts v is ite d .
T h ey a r e p r e se n te d on an e sta b lish m e n t, ra th e r
th a n o n a n e m p lo y m e n t b a s i s .
P a id h o lid a y s ; p a id v a c a tio n s ; an d
h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , a n d p e n s io n p la n s a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y o n th e
b a s i s t h a t t h e s e a r e a p p l i c a b l e to a l l p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s i f a m a ­
j o r i t y o f s u c h w o r k e r s a r e e l i g i b l e o r m a y e v e n t u a lly q u a lif y f o r th e
p r a c t i c e s l i s t e d . S c h e d u le d h o u r s a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y o n th e b a s i s
t h a t t h e s e a r e a p p l i c a b l e to a l l p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s i f a m a j o r i t y
a r e c o v e r e d . 3 B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,, s u m s o f i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s in t h e s e
ta b u la tio n s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a ls .

T h e f i r s t p a r t o f th e p a i d h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s th e n u m ­
b e r o f w h o le a n d h a lf h o lid a y s a c t u a l l y p r o v id e d .
The seco n d p a rt
c o m b in e s w h o le a n d h a lf h o lid a y s to sh o w t o t a l h o lid a y t i m e .

D a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d fo r a ll h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , a n d p e n sio n
p la n s f o r w h ic h a t l e a s t a p a r t o f th e c o s t i s b o r n e b y th e e m p l o y e r ,
e x c e p t i n g o n ly l e g a l r e q u i r e m e n t s s u c h a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a t io n
a n d s o c i a l s e c u r i t y . S u c h p la n s in c lu d e t h o s e u n d e r w r it t e n b y a c o m ­
m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n y a n d t h o s e p r o v id e d th r o u g h a u n io n fu n d o r
p a id d i r e c t l y b y th e e m p lo y e r o u t o f c u r r e n t o p e r a t in g fu n d s o r f r o m
a fu n d s e t a s i d e f o r t h is p u r p o s e .
D e a th b e n e fits a r e in c lu d e d a s a
fo r m o f life in s u r a n c e .
S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e i s lim ite d - to th a t ty p e o f i n ­
s u r a n c e u n d e r w h ic h p r e d e t e r m i n e d c a s h p a y m e n t s a r e m a d e d i r e c t l y
to th e i n s u r e d o n a w e e k l y o r m o n t h ly b a s i s d u r in g i l l n e s s o r a c c i d e n t
d isa b ility .
I n f o r m a t io n i s p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s u c h p l a n s to w h ic h th e
e m p lo y e r c o n tr ib u te s .
H o w e v e r , in N e w Y o r k a n d N e w J e r s e y , w h ic h
h a v e e n a c t e d t e m p o r a r y d i s a b i l i t y in s u r a n c e la w s w h ic h r e q u ir e e m ­
p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , 4 p l a n s a r e in c l u d e d o n ly i f th e e m p l o y e r (1 ) c o n ­
t r i b u t e s m o r e th a n i s l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d , o r (2 ) p r o v i d e s th e e m p l o y e e
w ith b e n e f i t s w h ic h e x c e e d th e r e q u i r e m e n t s o f th e la w . T a b u l a t i o n s
o f p a i d s i c k - l e a v e p la n s a r e l i m i t e d to f o r m a l p l a n s 5 w h ic h p r o v id e
f u ll p a y o r a p r o p o r t io n o f th e w o r k e r 's p a y d u r in g a b s e n c e f r o m w o r k
b e c au se o f illn e ss .
S e p a r a t e t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r o v id e d a c c o r d i n g to
(1 ) p l a n s w h ic h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y a n d n o w a i t i n g p e r i o d , a n d (2 ) p l a n s
p r o v id in g e it h e r p a r t ia l p a y o r a w a itin g p e r io d .
In a d d it io n to th e
p r e s e n t a t io n o f th e p r o p o r t io n s o f w o r k e r s w h o a r e p r o v id e d s i c k n e s s
an d a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r p a id s ic k le a v e , an u n d u p lic a te d to ta l i s
sh o w n o f w o r k e r s w ho r e c e iv e e it h e r o r b o th ty p e s o f b e n e f i t s .

T h e s u m m a r y o f v a c a t io n p la n s i s lim it e d to f o r m a l a r r a n g e ­
m e n t s , e x c l u d i n g i n f o r m a l p l a n s w h e r e b y t im e o f f w ith p a y i s g r a n t e d
a t th e d i s c r e t i o n o f th e e m p l o y e r .
S e p a r a t e e s t im a t e s a r e p r o v id e d
a c c o r d in g to e m p lo y e r p r a c t i c e in c o m p u tin g v a c a t io n p a y m e n t s , s u c h
a s tim e p a y m e n t s , p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n in g s , o r f l a t - s u m a m o u n ts .
H o w e v e r , in th e t a b u la t io n s o f v a c a t io n a llo w a n c e s , p a y m e n t s n o t o n
a tim e b a s i s w e r e c o n v e r te d ; fo r e x a m p le , a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f
a n n u a l e a r n in g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s th e e q u iv a le n t o f 1 w e e k 's p a y .

C a t a s t r o p h e i n s u r a n c e , s o m e t i m e s r e f e r r e d to a s , e x t e n d e d
m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e , i n c l u d e s t h o s e p la n s w h ic h a r e d e s i g n e d to p r o t e c t
e m p l o y e e s in c a s e o f s i c k n e s s a n d i n ju r y in v o lv in g e x p e n s e s b e y o n d
th e n o r m a l c o v e r a g e o f h o s p i t a l i z a t i o n , m e d i c a l , a n d s u r g i c a l p l a n s .
M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p la n s p r o v id in g f o r c o m p le t e o r p a r t i a l
p a y m e n t o f d o c t o r s ' f e e s . S u c h p la n s m a y b e u n d e r w r itte n b y c o m m e r ­
c ia l in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s o r n o n p r o fit o r g a n iz a t io n s o r th e y m a y b e
s e lf- in su r e d .
T a b u l a t i o n s o f r e t i r e m e n t p e n s io n p l a n s a r e l i m i t e d to
t h o s e p l a n s t h a t p r o v i d e m o n t h ly p a y m e n t s f o r th e r e m a i n d e r o f th e
w o r k e r 's lif e .

2 A n e s t a b lis h m e n t w a s c o n s id e r e d a s h a v in g a p o lic y i f it m e t
e i t h e r o f th e fo llo w in g c o n d it io n s : (1 ) O p e r a t e d l a t e s h i f t s a t th e t im e
o f th e s u r v e y ,
o r (2 ) h a d f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s c o v e r in g la t e s h i f t s .
3 S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s f o r o ffic e w o r k e r s ( f i r s t s e c t io n o f
t a b le B - 3 ) in s u r v e y s m a d e p r i o r to la t e 1 9 5 7 a n d e a r l y 1 9 5 8 w e r e
p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s e m ­
p lo y e d in o f f i c e s w ith th e i n d i c a t e d w e e k ly h o u r s f o r w o m e n w o r k e r s .

4 T h e t e m p o r a r y d i s a b ilit y la w s in C a l i f o r n i a a n d R h o d e I s la n d
do n ot r e q u ir e e m p lo y e r c o n tr ib u tio n s.
5 A n e s t a b lis h m e n t w a s c o n s id e r e d a s h a v in g a f o r m a l p la n if
i t e s t a b l i s h e d a t l e a s t th e m in im u m n u m b e r o f d a y s o f s i c k le a v e t h a t
c o u ld b e e x p e c te d b y e a c h e m p lo y e e . S u c h a p la n n e e d n o t b e w r it t e n ,
b u t in fo r m a l s i c k - l e a v e a llo w a n c e s , d e t e r m in e d o n a n in d iv id u a l b a s i s ,
w e r e e x c lu d e d .




3

TA BLE 1.

E stablishm ents and w orkers within scope of survey and number studied in St. Louis, Mo. , 1 by m ajor in d u stry2 division, October 1959
Minimum
employment
in e stab lish ­
m ents in 8cope
of study

Industry division

W orkers in establishm ents

Number of establishm ents

Studied

Within scope of study

Within
scope of
study s

Studied

T o ta l4

Office

Plant

T o ta l4

A ll d iv isio n s --------------------------------------------------- __

_

960

244

327, 900

55, 000

211, 400

197, 760

Manufacturing ____________________________________ -N onm anufacturing___________________________________
Transportation, communication, and other
public u tilities * -----------------------------------------W holesale t r a d e _______________________________ ___
R etail trade 8 -----------------------------------------------Finance, insurance, and r e a l estate _________ ____
S e r v ic e s 9 ------------------------------------------------------

101
-

399
561

100
144

208, 600
119, 300

25, 300
29, 700

150, 700
60, 700

131, 030
66, 730

101
51
101
51
51

94
172
65
116
114

39
38
15
26
26

10, 200
5, 200
(7)
9, 900
(7)

27, 500
8, 600
(7)
*900
(7)

50,
19,
17,
17,
14,

600
400
400
200
700

39,
7,
7,
7,
5,

540
030
400
630
130

1 The St. Louis Metropolitan A rea (City of St. Louis, Jefferson , St. Louis, and St. Charles Counties, Mo. ; and Madison and St. Clair Counties, 111.). The "w ork ers within scope of study"
e stim ates shown in this table provide a reasonably accu rate d escription of the size and com position of the labor force included in the survey. The estim ates a re not intended, however, to serve
a s a b a sis of com parison with other a re a employment indexes to m easu re employment trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys req u ires the use of establishm ent data com piled con­
siderably in advance of the pay period studied, and (2) sm all establishm ents a re excluded from the scope of the survey.
* The 1957 rev ised edition of the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual was used in classify in g establishm ents by industry division. M ajor changes from the e arlie r edition (used in the
B u reau 's labor m arket wage survey p rogram p rio r to the winter of 1958-59) a re the tran sfer of m ilk pasteurization plants and ready-m ixed concrete establishm ents from trade (wholesale and
retail) to m anufacturing, and the tran sfer of radio and television broadcastin g from se rv ic e s to the transportation, communication, and other public utilities division.
5
Includes a ll establishm ents with total employment a t or above the m inim um -size lim itation. All outlets (within the area) of com panies in such in dustries a s trade, finance, auto rep air
serv ice, and m otion-picture theaters a re considered a s 1 establishm ent.
4 Includes executive, pro fessio n al, and other w orkers excluded from the sep arate office and plant categories.
5 R ailro ad s were included; taxicab s and se rv ic e s incidental to water transportation were excluded.
6 Excludes departm ent and lim ited-p rice v ariety sto re s.
7 This industry division is represented in estim ates for "a ll in du stries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the S e rie s A and B tab les, although coverage was insufficient to justify sep arate p rese n ­
tation of data.
8 E stim ate relate s to rea l estate establishm ents only.
9 Hotels; person al s e rv ic e s; business se r v ic e s; automobile rep air shops; motion pictures; nonprofit m em bership organizations; and engineering and arch itectural s e rv ic e s.

TA BLE 2.

Indexes of standard weekly s a la r ie s and straight-tim e hourly earnings for selected occupational groups in St. Louis, Mo. ,
October 1959 and October 1958, and percents of in cre a se for selected periods
indexes
(Decem ber 1952 = 100)

Industry and occupational group

October 1959

October 1958

October 1958
to
October 1959

November 1957
to
October 1958

P ercent in cre a se s from —
Febru ary 1955
F ebru ary 1956
to
to
F ebru ary 1956
November 1957

January 1954
to
Febru ary 1955

Decem ber 1952
to
January 1954

All in du stries:
Office c le ric a l (women)
_________ _
Industrial nuTRftR (wnm#>ni
_
Skilled maintenance (men) ----------------------------------U n sk illfi plant (men)
_ _________ _

134.
142.
140.
136.

6
4
1
9

128. 9
136. 0
134. 4
131. 5

4.
4.
4.
4.

4
7
3
1

4.
5.
4.
3.

0
6
2
2

8.
10.
10.
9.

1
3
0
4

4.
6.
6.
4.

2
6
1
4

4.
3.
3.
3.

2
0
2
0

5.
6.
7.
8.

7
4
1
5

Manufacturing:
Office cle rical (women)
Industrial nurse** (women)
grilled maintenance (men)
Unskilled plsnt
-

134.
142.
139138.

9
4
8
3

129.
136.
133.
132.

4. 0
4. 7
4. 5
4.8

4.
5.
4.
4.

3
6
1
2

9.
10.
10.
10.

1
3
0
0

4.
6.
6.
4.

8
6
2
6

3. 1
3. 8
2.9
2. 6

5.
5.
7.
7.

5
6
0
4




_________ ____
_
________
__________ _
— _ _______ _
_

7
0
8
0

4

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P r e s e n t e d in t a b le 2 a r e i n d e x e s o f s a l a r i e s o f o f f ic e c l e r i c a l
w o r k e r s an d in d u str ia l n u r s e s , an d o f a v e r a g e e a r n in g s of s e le c te d
p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .

F o r o ff ic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a n d i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , th e in d e x e s
r e la t e to a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s f o r n o r m a l h o u r s o f w o r k , th a t i s ,
th e s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u le f o r w h ic h s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a r e p a i d .
F o r p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , th e y m e a s u r e c h a n g e s in s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y
e a r n in g s , e x c lu d in g p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r tim e an d fo r w o rk on w e e k ­
e n d s , h o lid a y s , an d la te s h ift s .
T h e* in d e x e s a r e b a s e d o n d a t a f o r
s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t io n s a n d in c lu d e m o s t o f th e n u m e r i c a l l y im p o r t a n t
j o b s w i t h i n e a c h g r o u p . T h e o f f i c e c l e r i c a l d a t a a r e b a s e d o n w o m e n in
th e fo llo w in g 18 j o b s :
B i l l e r s , m a c h in e (b illin g m a c h in e ); b o o k k e e p in g m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A an d B ; C o m p to m e te r o p e r a t o r s ; c le r k s , file ,
c la s s - A an d B ; c le r k s , o r d e r ; c le r k s , p a y r o ll; k ey p u n ch
o p e ra to rs;
o ffic e g i r l s ; s e c r e t a r i e s ; s t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l; sw itc h b o a r d o p e r a ­
t o r s ; sw itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t i o n i s t s ; ta b u la tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ;
tr a n sc r ib in g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s , g e n e r a l; an d ty p is ts , c la s s A and B .
T h e in d u s t r ia l n u r s e d a ta a r e b a s e d on w o m e n in d u s t r ia l n u r s e s .
M en
in th e fo llo w in g 10 s k i l l e d m a in t e n a n c e jo b s a n d 3 u n s k il le d jo b s w e r e
in c lu d e d in th e p l a n t w o r k e r d a t a :
S k ille d — c a r p e n te r s; e le c tr ic ia n s ;
m a c h in is ts ; m e c h a n ic s; m e c h a n ic s, a u to m o tiv e ; m illw r ig h ts ; p a in te r s ;
p i p e f i t t e r s ; s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r s ; a n d to o l a n d d ie m a k e r s ; u n s k i l l e d —
ja n ito r s ,
p o rte rs,
and c le a n e rs; la b o r e r s ,
m a t e r i a l h a n d lin g ; an d
w a tc h m en .

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s o r a v e r a g e h o u rly e a r n in g s w e r e
c o m p u te d f o r e a c h o f th e s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s .
The a v e ra g e s a la r ie s
o r h o u r ly e a r n in g s w e r e th e n m u lt ip lie d b y th e a v e r a g e o f 1 9 5 3 an d
1 9 5 4 e m p l o y m e n t in th e j o b .
T h e s e w e ig h te d e a r n in g s f o r in d iv id u a l
o c c u p a t io n s w e r e th e n t o t a le d to o b ta in a n a g g r e g a t e f o r e a c h o c c u p a ­
tio n a l g r o u p .
F i n a l l y , th e r a t i o o f t h e s e g r o u p a g g r e g a t e s f o r a g iv e n
y e a r to th e a g g r e g a t e f o r th e b a s e p e r io d ( s u r v e y m o n th , w in t e r 1 9 5 2 - 5 3 )




w a s c o m p u te d a n d th e r e s u l t m u lt ip lie d b y th e b a s e y e a r
g e t th e in d e x f o r th e g iv e n y e a r .

in d e x

(1 0 0 ) to

A d ju s t m e n t s h a v e b e e n m a d e w h e r e n e c e s s a r y to m a in t a in
c o m p a r a b i l i t y . F o r e x a m p l e , in m o s t o f th e a r e a s s u r v e y e d , r a i l r o a d s
w e r e in c lu d e d in th e c o v e r a g e o f th e s u r v e y s f o r th e f i r s t t im e th is
y ear.
In c o m p u t in g th e i n d e x e s , d a t a r e l a t i n g to th e r a i l r o a d in d u s t r y
w e r e e x c lu d e d .

T h e in d e x e s m e a s u r e , p r i n c i p a l l y , th e e f f e c t s o f ( l ) g e n e r a l
s a l a r y a n d w a g e c h a n g e s ; (2 ) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d
b y i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h ile in th e s a m e j o b ; a n d (3 ) c h a n g e s in th e
la b o r fo r c e su c h a s la b o r tu r n o v e r , fo r c e e x p a n s io n s , fo r c e r e d u c ­
t i o n s , a n d c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d b y e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t s w ith d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s .
C h a n g e s in th e l a b o r f o r c e c a n
c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in th e o c c u p a t io n a l a v e r a g e s w ith o u t
a c tu a l w age c h a n g e s.
F o r e x a m p le , a f o r c e e x p a n s io n m ig h t i n c r e a s e
th e p r o p o r t io n o f lo w e r p a i d w o r k e r s in a s p e c i f i c o c c u p a t io n a n d r e ­
s u l t in a d r o p in th e a v e r a g e , w h e r e a s a r e d u c t i o n in th e p r o p o r t i o n
o f lo w e r p a i d w o r k e r s w o u ld h a v e th e o p p o s i t e e f f e c t .
The m ovem ent
o f a h ig h - p a y in g e s t a b l i s h m e n t o u t o f a n a r e a c o u ld c a u s e th e a v e r a g e
e a r n i n g s t o d r o p , e v e n th o u g h n o c h a n g e in r a t e s o c c u r r e d in o t h e r
a r e a e sta b lish m e n ts.

T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p lo y m e n t w e ig h ts e lim in a t e s th e e f f e c t s
o f c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t io n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h jo b i n ­
c lu d e d in th e d a t a .
N o r a r e th e i n d e x e s in f lu e n c e d b y c h a n g e s in
s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s o r in p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e , s i n c e th e y
a r e b a s e d on p a y fo r s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r s .
I n d e x e s f o r th e p e r i o d 1 9 5 3 to 1 9 5 9 f o r w o r k e r s
la b o r m a r k e t s a p p e a r e d in B L S B u ll. 1 2 4 0 - 2 2 , W a g e s
B e n e f i t s , 2 0 L a b o r M a r k e t s , W in te r 1 9 5 8 - 5 9 .

in 1 7 m a j o r
an d R e la te d

A*

5

O c c u p a t io n a l E a r n in g s

Table A -l, Office Occupations
(A verage straig h t-tim e weekly hours and earn in gs fo r sele cted occupations studied on an a r e a b a sis
by industry division, St. L o u is, Mo. , O ctober 1959)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

A
verage
NUMBER O W
F ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W
EEKLY EARNINGS O
F—
$
$
$
$
Under lo . 00 45. 00 50. 00 15. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 lo . 00 I s . 00 lo . 00 I s . 0 0 1*0 0 .0 0 ?05.00 ft 0 .0 0 fts.o o f t 0 .0 0
W
eekly
W
eekly
hours 1 earnings 1
and
(Standard) (Standard) lo . 00 under
and
45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95. 00 1 0 0 .0 0 105.00 1 1 0 .0 0 115.00 1 2 0 .0 0 over

Men
C lerk s, accounting, c la s s A __________
M anufacturing _____________________
Nonmanufacturing __________________
Public u tilities 3 _________________
W holesale trade _________________
Finance 4 _________________________

588
309
279
80
85
69

39.5 $98. 50
39.5 1 0 0 . So
39.5
96. 50
40. 0 1 0 2 . 00
39.5
94. 50
40. 0 8 8 . 00

C lerk s, accounting, c la s s B __________
M anufacturing _____________________
Nonmanufacturing __________________
Public u tilities 3 _________________
F in a n c e 4 ________________________

378
144
234
95
83

39.5
39.5
39.5
40. 0
39. 0

83. 50
91. 00
79. 00
94. 50
59. 00

C lerk s, o rd er
________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g______________________
Nonmanufacturing __________________
W holesale trade _________________

342
165
177
161

40.
40.
40.
40.

87. 50
89. SO
8 6 . 00
8 9 . 00

C lerk s, p ay ro ll _______________________
M an u fa ctu rin g ______________________
Nonmanufacturing __________________
Public u tilities 3 _________________

153
88
65
64

39.5
39. 0
40. 0
40. 0

94.
93.
97.
97.

Office boys ____________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g______________________
N on m an ufacturin g___________________
Public u tilities 3 _________________
Finance 4 _________________________

416
185
231
99
78

39.5
39.5
39.5
40. 0
39. 0

60. 00
58. SO
61. 00
74. 50
48. 00

Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs, c la s s A .
M an u fa ctu rin g______________________
N onm anufacturing______-____________
Public u tilities 3 _________________

105
51
54
31

39.5
40. 0
39.5
40. 0

104.50
104.00
105.50
109.50

Tabulating-m achine o p erato rs, c la s s B .
M an u fa ctu rin g______________________
Nonmanufacturing __________________
P ublic u tilities 3 _________________

202
114
88
48

39.5
39.5
39.5
40. 0

88. 00
85. 50
91. 00
99. 00

75

40. 0

82.

244
96
148
47
83

39.5
40. 0
39.5
40. G
40. 0

6 8 . 50
8 8 . 50
62. 00

75

39.5

71. 50

Tabulating-m achine

o p e rato rs, c la s s C

0
0
0
0

50
00
00
50

00

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
"
_

_
_
-

-

_
-

-

26
26
26

23
23

8
8

_
»
-

34
11
23

74
21
53

2

6

32
7
25

1
1

_
_
"
17
8

1
22

_
-

8
6
2
2

13
13
-

5
3

3
3
_
-

4

13

2
2
2

12
1

54

45
42
3

34
24
10
3
_

2
2

75
37
38
1
25

—

f r

21
6
3

19

31

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
_

_
_
_

1

33

_
_
_

_
-

_
-

2

16
17
7
10
10

1

_
_
-

9
4
16
8
8

7

“

-

_

2
2

_
-

33
14
19
3

75
30
45
3
23
13

84
37
47
3
23
21

4

19
3
16
9

19
13

48
36
27
-

49
18
31
16
-

49
27

55
23
32
32

34

22

80
35
45
45

8
2
6
6

2
1
1
1

1
1

10

20

-

7
3
3

7
5

10
1

17

20
6

4
3

5
4

16
15

1
1

1
1

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_

14
9
5
2

6
3
3
1

16
4
12
9

64
35
29
4
9
14

44
23

14
4
10

10

3
-

18
16

21

4
5

11

?8
11

30

2
1

17
17

18
18

5
5
_
“

5
5
_
-

11

9
8
1
_
-

72
3
69
69
-

1

2

1
-

7
4
4

-

12

14
13

20

13
1

16
6

6
28
16

77
30
47
28
5
5

22
22

1

16
16

_
_
_
_
-

1
1
_
_
-

7
1
6
-

7
5
2
1

24
12
12
11

_
_
_
15

17
12
5

37
25
12
6

48
24
24
21

14

9
9

17
5
12
10
-

1
1
1
-

4
2
2
-

13
7
1

20

13
7
7

-

12
12

2
2

61
39

22

7

14
14
_
_
_
_
9

7

8

7

2
-

7

14

4

4
1
-

-

-

25
15
10
-

3

3

10
10

6

5

4

4

11

11

11

4

13

1

4

17

22

13
9

12
7
5

8
5

4

_

14

5

5

-

40
12
28
28
-

11

3
3

-

-

2

2

3

7
3

15
12

1
1
-

12

6
6

51
31

1
_
1
_

3

10

4

3

7

7

3

4

44
31
13
4
2

8

5
3
3
-

29
5
24
6

5
7
7
-

54

1 45

9
2

5
6

5
1
1

~

1
1

_

-

2
-

6

1

2

1

4
4

.

_

_
_

.
>
-

.

2

1

Women
B ille r s, machine (billing machine) ____
M an u fa ctu rin g______________________
Nonmanufacturing __________________
Public u tilities 3 _________________
W holesale trade _________________
B ille r s , machine (bookkeeping machine)

70. 00
72. 00

_

31

21
10
11

28
14
14

14

-

-

_

2

_

_

-

-

15

9

14

11

37
25
12
2
10

-

_

-

7

20

11

11

-

2

2

12

2

15
_

1
1

-

_

8

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

19

-

_

3

8

See footnotes at end of table.




NOTE:

E stim a te s for a ll in d u stries, nonmanufacturing, and public u tilities include data fo r ra ilro a d s (SIC 40), om itted from the scope
of all labor m arket wage su rv ey s made before the winter of 1959-60.
Where sign ificant, the effect of the inclusion of r a il­
roads is g r e a te st on the data shown sep arately fo r the public u tilities division .
The trend of earn in gs in sele cted occupational
groups in all in d u stries, excluding ra ilr o a d s, ap p ears in table 2, page 3.
D ata fo r nonmanufacturing do not include inform ation fo r departm ent and lim ited -p rice v ariety s to r e s; the rem ain der of r e ta il
trade is ap p ro p riately rep resen ted in data fo r all in du stries combined and fo r nonmanufacturing.

_

-

-

-

6
Table A-l. Office Occupations-Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e weekly hours and earn in gs fo r sele cted occupations studied on an a r e a b a sis
by in dustry division, St. L o u is, Mo. , October 1959)

NUMBER O W
F ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM W
E EEKLY EARNINGS O
F—
S
$
40. 00 I s . 00 S o . 00 $5 5 .00 $6 0 .00 $65. 00 $70. 00 $75. 00 $80. 00 $8 5 .00 $90. 00 $95. 00 foo.oo ^05.00 110.00 *15.00 *120.00
W
eeklyj W . Under and
eekly
earnings1
and
(Standard) (Standard) fo. 00 under
45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95. 00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 over
A erage
v

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

Women— Continued

1

2

33

1
1

2
2

33
33

47
2
45
45

19
8
11
1

32
11
21
3

40
15
25
9

6
5
1
-

15
7
8
-

2
2

126
3
123

207
28
179

161
18
143

141
75
66

118

16
40

27
2

40
23
17
7
10
"

31
22
9
2
2
"

23
21
2
2

37

15
100

87,
48
39
2
35
1

55
19
36

29
126

80
40
40
13
22
1

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
-

_
-

33
17
16
2
10

87
33
54
6
13
20

117
92
25
3
2
13

-

-

57
20
37
3
5
21

92
51
41

-

34
6
28
5
5
1

20
8

41
16
25
15
5
~

45
19
26
15
1
"

103
23
80
67

158
61
97
10
_
48

192
59
133
5
11
69

215
98
117
6
40
37

260
114
146
21
28
49

149
70
79
12
25
4

148
70
78
24
17
11

115
48
67
25
14
1

66
14
52
41
7

48
21
27
18
7
1

19
10
9
6
2
-

18
13
5
5
-

3

10

18
13

-

10
2

42
21
21
"

74
35
39
~

19

3
"

61
45
16
2

30
23
7
2

24
10
14
14

16
2
14
6

11
3

1
1

1
1

7
1
6

170
43
127

101
44
57
18
13
24

128
69
59
17
6
20

88
47
41
1
22
18

35
10
25
14
4
-

30

10
10

5
3
2

1

35
83

155
55
100
13
26
47

14
8
6

_
-

"

184
73
111
6
19
77

40
13
27
15

45
14
31
15

93
19
74
35

69
36
33
11

44
17
27
21

47
24
23
15

64
20
44
35

16

3

13
11

27
18
9

“

5

_
-

40
40

31
30
1
1

52
47

56
39
17
7
-

90
56
34
10
10

100

101

44
11

36
2
10

93
54
39
24
11

69
40
29
15
8

_
-

10
10
-

107

162
90
72
4

176
97
79
7
34

97
52
45
1
26

120
100
20
3

71
32
39
25
8

Bookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to rs, c la s s A ___________
M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
Finance 4 ______________________________________

207
53
154
94

39. 0 $70. 50
39.5
77. 50
39. 0 68. 50
38.5
62. 00

Bookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to rs, c la s s B ____________
M an u fa ctu rin g____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
P ublic u tilities 3 ________________________________
W holesale trade _______________________________
Finance 4 ______________________________________

993
302
691
26
156
425

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40. 0
39. 0

61. 50
69. 50
57. 50
74. 00
67. 50
52. 50

C lerk s, accounting, c la s s A _________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
Public u tilities 3 ________________________________
W holesale trade _______________________________
F in a n c e 4 _____________________________________

586
296
290
73
59
73

39.5
39.5
39. 0
40. 0
40. 0
37.5

85. 00
86. 50
84. 00
93.50
85.50
75.50

C lerk s, accounting, c la s s B ________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
P ublic u tilities 3 ________________________________
W holesale trade ____________________________
Finance 4 _______________________________________

1, 516
618
898
181
151
287

39.5
40. 0
39. 0
39. 5
40. 0
38. 0

63.00
65. 00
62. 00
75. 50
66. 00
53. 00

C lerk s, file, c la s s A ________________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g ____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
Public u tilities 3 ________________________________

311
157
154
31

39.5
40. 0
39.5
39.5

68. 00
68. 50
68. 00
81. 50

_
-

C lerk s, file, c la s s B ________________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g ____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
Public u tilitie s 3 ________________________________
W holesale trad e _______________________________
Finance 4 _______________________________________

928
363
565
84
134
269

39.5
40. 0
39.5
40. 0
40. 0
39. 0

55. 50
57. 00
54. 50
65. 50
54.50
50. 00

C lerk s, o rd er ______ _______________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g ____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
W holesale trade _______________________________

487
198
289
164

40. 0
3975
40. 0
40. 0

63. 00
68.50
59. 50
61. 00

C lerk s, p ay ro ll _____________________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
Public u tilities 3 ________________________________
W holesale trad e _______________________________

773
497
276
116
59

39.5
40. 0
39.5
39. 0
39.5

71. 00
68. 00
77. 00
80. 50
82. 50

1, 104
548“
456
142
155

39.5
39.5
39.5
40. 0
39.5

71. 00
71. 00
71. 50
85. 00
68. 00

Com ptom eter o p e r a t o r s ______________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g ____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
Public u tilities 3 ________________________________
W holesale trade _______________________________

See footnotes at end of table.




-

-

-

-

_
-

37

_

_
-

-

-

3
-

3

-

37

_

-

-

"

-

-

_

-

-

30
16
14
_

-

-

S

5

4
“
90
63
27
1
9

-

-

60

47
1
20

-

-

44

16

3
-

SI

-

5
-

65

-

3

3

-

30
14
2
"
3
-

-

-

3
3
-

"

-

11
-

-

4
4
-

6

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

22
12
10
7
1
"

21
11
10
4
4
-

19
5
14
13

2
2

16
12
4

17
12
5
5

5
3
2
2
-

2
1
1
1
"

_
-

-

-

1

1

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

"

"

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

"

-

-

-

_
-

4

-

6
1
1

-

-

1

-

1
1

1

-

2
-

-

-

"

17
14

3

3
-

3
3
-

9
9

30
18
12
7
1

48
27
21
11
8

26
15
11
8
1

24
5
19
13
6

124
45
79
77

87
62
25
21

22
15
7
2
5

1
1
-

-

4

2
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

3

2
-

2
7
5
2
-

2

-

1

-

1

-

-

5
2

3
3

-

3
1
1

-

3

1
1

2
-

2
-

-

-

2

_

"

_

-

-

-

7

Table A -l. Office Occupations-Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e weekly hou rs and earn in gs for sele cted occupations studied on an a r e a b a sis
by industry division , St. L o u is, M o ., October 1959)

NUMBER O W
F ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM W
E EEKLY EARNINGS O
F—

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
w
orkers

W
eeklw
W
eekly .
hours
earnings Under
(Standard) (Standard) $
40.0 0

$
$
$
.$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
4 0 .0 0 4 5.00 50.00 55.00 6 0 . 0 0 65.0 0 70.00 75.00 80.00 8 5.00 9 0.00 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 . 0 0 105.00 1 1 0 . 0 0 115.00 1 2 0 . 0 0
^and^
and
45. 00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.0 0 70.00 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5.00 9 0 .0 0 9 5.00 1 0 0 . 0 0 105.00 1 1 0 . 0 0 115.00 1 2 0 . 0 0 over

Women—C ontinue d
D uplicating-m achine o p erato rs
(M irheograph or Ditto) ----------------M an u factu rin g_____________________

106

62

39.5
3 9.5

$66.50
6 l.5 0

3 9.5
4 6 .0
39.0
4 0 .0
39.5
37.5

7 0.50
6 7 .0 0
73.50
8 5 .0 0
74.50
59.00
54.00
“ 51750“
56.00
6 2.50
50.00

Keypunch o p erato rs _________________
M a n u fa c tu rin g ____________________
N on m an ufactu rin g_________________
Public u tilities 3 ________________
W holesale t r a d e _______________
Finance 4 _______________________

1,042
569
533
244
80

O ffice g i r l s __________________________
M anufacturing ____________________
N o n m a n u factu rin g ________________
Public u tilities 3 ________________
Finance 4 _______________________

282
114
34
75

39.0
4 6 .0
38.5
38.5
37.5

S e c r e t a r i e s __________________________
M a n u fa c tu r in g ____________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________
Public u tilities 3 ________________
W holesale t r a d e _______________
Finance 4 _______________________

2,89 5
17588
1,307
400
243
328

39.5
39.5
39.5
3 9.5
4 0 .0
39.0

85.0 0
8 6 .5 6
8 3 .5 0
9 5 .0 0
8 1 .0 0
72.5 0

S ten ograp h ers, gen eral _____________
M a n u fa c tu rin g ____________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________
Public u t ilit ie s 3 ________________
W holesale t r a d e _______________
Finance 4 _______________________

3, 182
1,641
1,541
509
394
432

3 9.5
39.5
39.5
4 0 .0
39.5
38.5

70.00
71.5 0
68.50
8 1 .0 0

162

168

Sten ograp h ers, t e c h n ic a l_________
M anufacturing-_________________
N o n m a n u factu rin g _____________

247
196
51.

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
39.5

Sw itchboard o p e r a t o r s ___________
M a n u fa c tu rin g _________________
N o n m a n u factu rin g _____________
Public u t ilit ie s 3 _____________
Finance 4 ____________________

467
145
322
78
69

Switchboard o p erato r-re ce p tio n ists
M a n u fa c tu rin g _________________
N on m an ufactu rin g______________
P ublic u t ilit ie s 3 ____________
W holesale t r a d e ____________
Finance 4 ____________________

66.00
60.00

74.00
75.50

14
14

10
10

7
3

20

132

67
3b
31

2

-

_

3

-

_
-

1

3

37

-

11

15

90
9
81

241
85
156

-

15
-

5

-

21

15

12

38
75

-

4

173
71

2 39

231
119

3
4

5
27
368
143
225
28
58
76

-

10

54

_

_

_

_

-

-

11
2

-

68.00

-

-

-

-

9

39.5
3 9.5
39.5
4 0 .0
38.5

65. 50
7 6 . 5o
6 0 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

_

3

137

24

-

3

60.00

-

603
257
316
55
134
57

39.5
3 9 .5
3 9.5
39.5
39.5
38.0

6 5 .0 0
64. §0
6 5 .5 0
75.0 0
6 4 .5 0
6 0.50

Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs, c l a s s B
M anufacturing ----------- ---------------N on m an ufactu rin g__________________
Public u t ilit ie s 3_________________
Finance 4 ________________________

191
78
113
45
59

39.0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
37.5

8 1 .0 0
$ 3 .6 0
79.50
9 7 .5 0
6 6 .5 0

Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs, c la s s C
N o n m a n u factu rin g _________________

74
65

39.0
39.0

7 6.00
75755

See footnotes at end of table-




4

'

-

3

_

-

_

-

1
_

4
4

11

-

3

-

23
23

2
1
1

2

26

-

3

8

1

4

1
1

83
34
49

-

31

10

10

26

112

1

tl

9

67

9
7

15
5

74
4o
34
4
25
4

_

47

2
1

-

98
62
36

34

81
38
43

14

-

116

8

9

20

5
-

14

19

1

-

16

41

_

3

54
15
39

23

9

16

16

-

15

1
10

-

14
7

7
9

-

-

7
7

10

5
15

88

115
67“
48

6
6

20
1
11

-

44

12

138
54
84
34
24
24

69
35
34

-

27

11

102

18
5
50
500
287
213
27
68

69
38
26
12

11

39

101

138
3
47
59
576
3o3”
273
61

73
107

5

112

15
18
38

399
247
152
65
66
11

18

7

6

2
21

5
7

_

3

14

-

-

-

3

14

93
52
41
3
19
19

52
l6
36

174
91
83
5
23
26

103
76
27
7
10
8

40
4

7
3
4

17

15
5

-

-

-

-

-

9
-

8

18
-

16

_

_

12

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

4

16

3
7

4
4

_

1

1

2
2

7
5

_
_

_

-

-

-

17
-

172
94
78

51
48
3

16

45
24

29
9
21

33
19
14

-

7

257
148
109
63
29
9

66

31

-

11

29

2 32
166

10

2

112

26
12

48

248
" 1 7 5'
73
31
20

3

62
16

15
1

8
2

17
-

58
14
44

33
7
26

-

2
10

42
16
26
19

21
11
10
6

3
7

21

-

-

-

17
3
14

30
lS
15

18
16

-

11

-

2

4
33
24
9
2

8

4

1

7

5

27

19
19

1

t

26

_
_

_

_
_

.
_
_

2

_

1

1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_

_
_

.

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

375
179
196
89
17

263
139
124
58
27
9

183
103
80
49
14
-

140

76
34

55
24
31

60

19

10

2

22
2

6

"

-

3
-

81
32
49
45
4
-

39
19

6
1

18
4
14
14

-

5
4

5
5

20
20

-

11

182
98
84
78
6

-

42
24
18
18
-

20
11

14
98
96

_
_

-

338
226

45
29

-

1

4
3
"

_
_

388
223 “
165
19
47
63

42
40

23

-

-

40
31
9

137

-

11

44
31
13

34
4
30

40

1

33

-

22

45
42
3
-

-

_

§2

58
41
9

22

-

47
13

1
1
1

-

1

-

-

1
1

_

_
-

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

4

_

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

1

_

_

-

1
1

_

10

2
2

19
18
-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
i

1
1

1
1

_

_

_

6

-

-

_
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

'

-

-

-

-

-

2
1
1
1

4

5

16

5

4
4

1
1

11
10

-

-

"

-

4
4

-

-

-

“
_

3
3

1

3
3
-

_

1
1
_

15

_

-

-

15
15
-

-

_

.

8

Table A-1. Office Occupat tons-Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e weekly hours and earn in gs fo r sele cted occupations studied on an a r e a b a sis
by in du stry division , St. L o u is, Mo. , O ctober 1959)
Avksaob
Sex, occupation, and in dustry division

Number
of
worker*

W
eekly, Weekly, Under
hour*
earning*
(Standard) (Standard) 40. 00

$
40. 00
and
under
4 5 .0 0

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNING8 OF—
$
S
$
$
$
$
S
50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 *85. 00 *90. 00 *95. 00 foo.oo 1*05.00 fio .o o *115.00 f20.00
and
50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95. 00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 over

4 5 .0 0

Women— Continued
T ran scribin g-m ach in e o p e ra to rs, gen eral __________
M an u fa ctu rin g____________________________________
Nonm anufacturing ________________________________
P u blic u tilities 3 ________________________________
W holesale trad e ----------------------------------------F in an c e4 _______________________________________
T y p ists, c l a s s A ____________________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g____________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ________________________________
P u blic u tilitie s 3 ________________________________
F in an c e4 _____________________________________
T y p ists, c l a s s B ____________________________________
M an u fa ctu rin g ____________________________________
Nonm anufacturing -----------------------------------------P u blic u tilitie s 3 ________________________________
W holesale trad e _______________________________
F in a n c e 4 _______________________________________

1
2
3
4

691
40T “
288
30
85
147

39. C $ 6 4 .5 0
5970" 65. ob
3 9 .0
64. 00
90. 00
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
66.50
3 8 .5
58. 00

-

"

28
11
17
6
8

105
41
64
9
49

132
92
40
7
30

135
84
51
8
37

84
50
34
25
7

42
17
25
15
5

92
73
19
9
10

28
17
11
6
3
1

24
15
9
8
1
-

13
2
11
11
-

6
1
5
5
-

802
343
78
183

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
39. 0

69.00
7 1 .5 0
6 5.50
75.5 0
5 9 .0 0

_
-

4
4
4

26
6
20
20

65
19
46
46

73
39
34
2
27

126
59
67
9
35

139
^>9
80
24
40

117
101
16
10
5

125
80
45
10
6

69
64
5
1
-

32
22
10
9
"

19
6
13
12
-

4
4
-

2, 179
928
1, 251
177
363
482

3 9 .5
40. 0
39. 0
3 9 .5
40. 0
3 8 .5

58. 00
6 1 .5 0
55. 00
6 9.50
5 6 .5 0
48. 50

_
-

149
12
137
11
113

398
66
332
18
73
188

445
ll6
329
19
111
137

316
188
128
11
76
19

287
212
75
13
28
11

361
247
114
28
26
9

72
23
49
26
14
5

60
36
24
6
17

42
7
35
31
4

32
19
13
10
3

17
2
15
15
_

-

4f>9~

Standard hours re fle c t the workweek fo r which em ployees rec eiv e their reg u la r straigh t-tim e s a la r ie s and the earn in gs co rresp o n d to these weekly hours.
W orkers w ere d istrib u ted a s follow s: 23 at $120 to $130; 13 at $130 to $140; 9 at $140 and over.
T ran sp ortation , com m unication, and other public u tilitie s.
F in an ce, in su ran ce, and re a l estate .




-

2
2
2
-

2
2
1
_
-

1
1
_
-

-

_

_
-

_
_
_
-

_
-

_
"
_
_
-

9
Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e weekly hours and earn in gs for selected occupations studied on an a r e a b asis
by industry division , St. L o u is, Mo. , October 1959)

NUM
BER OF W
ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM W
E EEKLY EARNINGS O
F—

Avebaob
Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

at

workers

S
•
<
$
s
S
S
S
s
%
s
1
$
s
$
$
$
$
s
s
s
W i
eekly
Weekly i
earnings Under 70.00 75. 0C 80. 0C 85. 00 9 0 .0 0 95. 00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 155.00 160.00 ,165.00 170.00
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
and
70. 00 75- 00 80. 0( 85. P 90.00 95. 00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 155.00 160.00 165.00 170.00 over
C

Men
D raftsm en , le a d e r
M anufacturing -

102
89

D raftsm en , sen io r --------M a n u fa c tu rin g ----------N o n m an u factu rin g -----P ublic u tilities 3 ----

865
739
116
64

D raftsm en , jun ior —
M an u fa ctu rin g --Nonmanufacturing

354

475
91

4 0 .0

40.0

40. 0

40. 0

$157.00
158. 50
120. 00

120. 00

"

‘

23
4

29
20
9
-

32
12

37
29
8

16
13

22
19

_

_

-

-

-

39.5
40. 0

119.50
140.50

40. 0
40. 0
39.5

92. 50

27

104. 00

5

89. 00
89. 00

8
7

95. 00

"

32

-

44

19

"
37

1
1

2
2

1
1

1
1

2
2

9
8

7
1

2
2

14
14

1
1

34
30
4
4

66
66
'

82

79
73
6
6

74
70
4
3

72
64
8
8

43

39'

95

4
4

79
77
2
2

11

5
"

2
2

6
5

28

21

_

21

"

"

40

45

18
1

"29

22

42
39
3

20
20

55

71
67
4

37
32
5

38
35
3

17

20

3
2
1

8
8

41
40

27
26

17

36
3T

19
18

8
8

5
3

1
1

2
1

8
"

57
2

40

73
9
2

37

7

-

21

Women
N u rse s, in du strial (re g iste re d )
M a n u fa c tu rin g -----------------

204

F55

40. 0

40. 0

13

2
2

1 Standard hours re fle c t the workweek fo r which em ployees receiv e their regu lar straigh t-tim e sa la r ie s and the earn in gs correspon d to these weekly h ou rs.
* W orkers w ere distribu ted a s follow s: 8 at $170 to $180; 18 at $190 to $200; 3 at $200 and over.
3 Tran sp ortation , com m unication, and other public u tilitie s.
NOTE: See note on p. 5, relatin g to the inclusion of r a ilr o a d s.




9

89

28

4
4

1
1

2 29
----- T T

26

1
1
_

1
-------r
_
-

“

2b

28
27
1
1

-

-

-

26
26

_

_

_

_

“

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

10

Table A-3. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earn in gs fo r men in sele cted occupations stu died on an a r e a b a sis
by industry division , St. L o u is, Mo. , October 1959)

Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
of

Average.
$
hourly 1 Under 1. 80
earnings $
and
1. 80

M anufacturing -------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------Public u tilities 2 --------------------------------

538
' 477
61
36

$2.
2.
2.
2.

83
86
64
46

$

1.90

under
1.90 2. 00

_
-

S

S

2. 10

2. 20

2. 30

1
“
1

_
-

7
1
6

-

2. 00

1

2. 10

2. 20

$

NUM
BER O W
F ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS O
F—
S
$
S
$
$
$
i$
2. 40 2. 50 2. 60 | $2. 70 1$ 80 2. 90 3. 00 3. 10 3. 20
| 2.
i i •

2. 30

2 .40 _2._50_ ( 2. 60 _ 2. 70 1 2. 80 l_2, 9P_ ' J . 00 J U lo _ ! J . 20- -3.10
48
41
81
67
32
58
56
31
59
57
78
16
32 ' 48
58"
3i
59
49
10
25
3
7
3
23
1
9
-

-

1

-

-

"

“

-

9

3
1

-

"

13

30

4

21

30

4

21

6

20

2

2
-

62
57
5

E le c tr ic ia n s, m a in te n a n c e ------------------------M an u fa ctu rin g --------- ----------------------------

1,589
1,402

3. 03
3. 03

-

2

“

~

E n gin eers, s t a t i o n a r y ------------------------------M anufacturing -------------------------------------N on m an u factu rin g -------------------------------

401

2.81

2T 9
B

12

112

2 .2 6

12

-

-

404

26
2
324

2

3. 02

$

-

"

-

-

16

-

14
12

15

51

13

35

3

17
2
15

18

166

225

129
125

156

224
8
8

116
116

237
235

183
183

59

58

36
36

26

59

3
-

11

52
40
12

23
23

-

"

16
7
9

6

4

33
33

19

l5

63
63

4

56
45

-

11

5
5

159

356

193

34

56

7

F irem en , station ary b o i l e r -----------------------M anufacturing ----------------------------------N on m an u factu rin g -------------------------------

2 82

2. 64
2. 64
2 .6 6

2

-

6

20
“

H e lp ers, tra d e s, m aintenance ------------------M anufacturing -----------------------------------

1,221

2. 55
2 .5 6

25

8

15

24
24

49
49

46
40

178

174

60
52

117

M achine-tool o p e ra to rs, toolroom -------------M anufacturing -----------------------------------

639
638

2 .8 8
2. 88

-

■

■

■

-

6

10

4
4

18

"240

34

M ach in ists, maintenance ------------------------M a n u fa c tu rin g -----------------------------------

1,271
1,161

3. 03
3. 02

-

-

-

-

1
1

36

86

21
21

278

T19

M echanics, autom otive (m a in te n a n c e ) ---------M anufacturing ----------------------------------Nonmanufacturing -----------------------------Public u tilities 2 ----------------------------

880
174
706
677

2. 71
2. 82
2 .6 9
2. 69

-

-

-

-

-

28

8

449
3b
411
411

104
32
72
63

25
15

M echanics, m aintenance ---------------------- -—
M anufacturing ----------------------------------N o n m an u factu rin g -----------------------------Public u tilities 2 ----------------------------

1,235
1,152
83
54

2. 76
2. 76
2. 78
2 .9 2

-

-

-

6

6

182

M illw rights -----------------------------------------M anufacturing -----------------------------------

607

-

-

O ilers -----------------------------------------------M a n u fa c tu rin g -----------------------------------

397
377

2. 50
2. 5l

-

-

--- 602—

3. 02
3. 02

49
49

14

P a in te rs, m a in te n a n c e ---------------------------M anufacturing ----------------------------------N o n m an u factu rin g -------------------------------

116

1

122

1, 1B
O

-

7 ' 15...

16

8
-

2

-

43

1

-

-

_
-

97
' 87

-

■

-

-

48

65
1

14
-

14

21
21
-

5

14

-

-

-

-

5

~

45
45

-

'

1
-

18
41

-

5

14

11
ii

-

-

-

5

-

193

34

56

2
2

240

34

48
48

213

-

213

65
65

"

■

■

“

189

204

16
12

-

206
2b6

•

3

"
-

54

27
27

27

22
21
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

18

18

61

61

30
30

49"

“

■

"

33
30
3

42
32
10

36
-

36

13
13

i02

221

120
-

' 240

177

-

"

~

-

125
122
3
3

72
53
19
19

-

12

12

1
1

135

135

101

101

128

-

23
18

118

37
37

9
9

13
13

44
44

13
13

31

31

31
3i

33

37

34
34

13
13

■

106

106

12
8

-

"

“

"

20

16
8
8

17

45
44

23
14
9

53
53

32
32

“

-

6

"

15
“

30
30 '

■

26
22
4

15

1

31
3i

■

~

-

~

8
8

1

_

-

-

6

— 5—

33
33

27

30
29

161

147

96

14

14

22
22

58

5

-

194

138
366
130 --- 366

-

161

194

12

"

1Z

-

-

7

8
4

5
5

8
8

62

17

_

30
30

“

10

-

i7

■

10

62

7
7

■

-

_
-

-

1

64
64

67

441

116

-

-

-

” 13

■

"

-

_

-

Sh eet-m etal w ork ers, m aintenance -------------M anufacturing ---------------------------------- •----

2 .9 9
3. 00

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

3 .1 7

_
-

_
-

_
"

-

_
-

-

-

-

38
18

39

110
8
8

17

1 4 ---

— r~
.
■

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on w eekends, holiday s, and late sh ifts.
2 T ran sp ortation , com m unication, and other public u tilitie s.
3 W orkers w ere distributed a s follow s: 4 at $ 1 .2 0 to $ 1 .3 0 ; 5 at $ 1 .3 0 to $ 1 .4 0 ; and 15 at $ 1 .4 0 to $ 1 .5 0 .




39
39

2

8

54
13
41
41

-

relatin g to the inclusion of r a ilr o a d s.

75
75

-

9

_

NOTE: See note on p. 5,

“

-

-

22

74
74

2 .9 6
P ip e fitte rs, m aintenance -------------------------- 1,213
M anufacturing ----------------------------------- ‘I.T 58 " 1 7 0 0 —

TT7—

~

-

83

30

Tool and die m a k ers ---------------------------------1, 179
M an u fa ctu rin g --------------------------------------- 17170“

"

1
l
-

-

30

169

14

-

15
15
-

39

30

-

3. 80

14

39
39

30

173

3. 70

14

3. 80
and
over
4
4

25

3

-

3. 40 _3, 50 , JL-60

$

39

3

-

$
3. 70

25
25

4

-

$
3. 60

2
2

4

[1709

19

$
3. 50

10

2. 72

307

H 5

-

66

$
3. 40

6

2 .2 6

423

2

' 1 8 "'
8

“

162
35

$
3. 30

Z
O
8
6

230
9
2

120

2 78

266
26
20

13

120

188

39
14

5
2

19

19

47

~

"

115"

“ 47--- “ 67 “ "441

430

“430

116

55"

-

6

3

49

5

“
“
1
-

3
3
15
i5

11
Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earn in gs for selected occupations studied on an a r e a b a s is
by industry division , St. L o u is, M o ., October 1959)

NUM
BER OF W
ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS O
F—
Occupation 1 and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
Average
hourly Under 1. 00 1. 10
earnings2
and
$
under
1. 10 1.20

$
1. 20
1. 30

$
1. 30
1.40

$
1.40
1. 50

$
1.50
1.60

$
1. 60
1. 70

$
1.70
1.80

$
1. 80
1. 90

$
1. 90
2. 00

$
2. 00
2. 10

$
2. 10
2. 20

E levator o p e ra to rs, p a sse n g e r Im e n )________
Nbnmanufacturing ________ _____________
Finance 3

- 195
j
Ill

$ 1.26
1. 16
1.21

-

59
54
3

7
7
7

107
107
98

3
3
3

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

E levator o p e ra to rs, p a sse n g e r 1
women) _____
Nonmanufacturing
P ublic u tilitie s4 ___ __
F in a n c e 5 ________ _____

258
237
42
102

1. 32
1.28
1.80
1.21

8
8
-

45
45
5

36
35
9

100
100
1
81

8
8
1
7

2
1
1
-

4
4
4
-

10
10
10
-

8
-

10
_
-

25
25
24
-

1
1
1
-

1
-

G uards
__ __ __ __ ________
M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Public u t ilitie s4 ________
Finance 3 _______________ —

879
59T
189
71
112

2 .2 0
2. 30
1.85
2 .4 2
1.51

-

7
7
7

7
7
7

21
21
19

12
12
10

21
21
21

8
8
8

17
8
9
9

13
4
9
8

44
32
12
11

88
83
5
5

89
89
-

468
99
369
15
121

414
70
344
1
19
109

101
9
92
6
14
49

77
20
57
6
10
17

250
171
79
15
It
?

383
252
131
76
15
-

3 92
333
59
5
44
“

399
377
22
4
15
2

622
580
42
18
9
-

_ ..............

$
2 .2 0
2 .3 0
18 '
-

$
$
2. 30 2 .4 0
2 .4 0 2 .5 0

$
2. 50
2. 60

$ ,
2 .6 0
2 .7 0

$
$
$
$
2. 70 2. 80 2. 90 3. 00
and
2. 6U 2. 90 3. 00 over

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

.
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

26
18
8
1
7

13
7
6
6
-

232
209
23
23

125
96
29
29
-

89
77
12
12
-

41
41
-

26
26
-

-

-

-

229 347
n n r r ~ 259
88
92
86
84
4
3
-

3 04
231
73
68
4

157
95
150 ' — 87
7
8
4
8
-

23
23
-

_
-

_
'

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Ja n ito rs, p o rte rs, and cle an e rs (men) _______
M anufacturing ____________
Nonmanufacturing
Public u tilitie s4 ________ ______________
W holesale trade
F in an c e 3 __ __________ .

4, 811
2, 818
1, 993
369
174
393

1.67
1. 89
1.36
1. v8
1.67
1. 19

Ill
Ill
-

439
20
419
88

Ja n ito rs, p o rte rs, and clean ers (w om en )_____
M anufacturing
__ _________
Nonmanufacturing ____ ___
Public u tilitie s4
F in a n c e 3 __ __________ .

1, 145
253
892
108
477

1.29
1.64
1. 19
1. 54
1. 17

41
41
-

49
15
34
1

583
g"
575
383

139
12
127
10
93

26
12
14
4
-

51
48
3
2
-

105
rs
87
81
-

21
20
1
1
-

40
38
2
2
-

28
26
2
2
-

36
36
-

13
12
1
1
-

5
5
5

7
7
-

-

L a b o r e r s, m a te ria l handling __ ______________
M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing _____ ___
Public u tilities 4 ------------ _______ ______
W holesale t r a d e ------- —

7, 100
4, 541
2 ,559
1,524
792

2. 09
2 .0 6
2. 14
2 .2 5
1.98

20
20
20

36
23
13
-

20
2
18
18

147
33
114
85

38
§
30
30

190
176
14
4
10

160
121
39
4
25

497
449
48
3
45

1005
827
178
14
160

83 0
748
82
7
12

415
335
80
50
17

827
363
464
355
108

1018
424
594
583
3

669
356
313
137
83

774
281
493
359
134

203
176
27
6
21

10
10
-

52
29
23
2
21

-

160
160
-

20
20
-

O rder fille r s ....
M anufacturing _ _______ __ _
Nonmanufacturing _______ _
P u blic u tilitie s4
W holesale trade

2,204
1,020
1, 184
59
879

2. 13
2 .2 5
2 .4 5
2.2 5

18
18
-

26

22
12
10
5

12
12
-

24
24
24

44
12
32
25

62
48
14
10

194
107
87
80

113
50
63
53

238
216
22
16

149
34
115
98

162
"5'6“
106
12
48

236
120
116
6
108

643
3 03
340
23
185

198
10
188
168

28
28
18
10

14
4
10
10

_
-

-

-

P a c k e r s, shipping (men) ____ _
M anufacturing
__ ____ ___

917
548

2 .0 9
2. 15

9
9
_
_
-

6
6

9
-

32
18

44
9

40
20

40
10

83
26

79
“ 57---

58
40

65
33

39
30

189
TT9

86
86

65
18

36

5
-

5
-

5

-

P a c k e r s, shipping (women) ____
M anufacturing ______________ —

550
513

1.78
1.79

5
-

35
30

2 .2 5
2 .2 5
2 .2 4
2 .3 9
2. 11

_
“

_
-

2.2 2
2 .2 6
2. 15
2 .2 4

-

.
-

R eceivin g c le rk s
__________
M anufacturing
____ __
Nonmanufacturing
Public u tilities 4 ------ —
Wholesale trade _______ —
Shipping c l e r k s __ __ _______
M an u factu rin g_________ __
Nonmanufacturing
_____
W holesale trade ____ ___

See footnotes at end of table.




663
---- 377“
286
112
122
384

272
112
79

z .io

Tz

14
14

21
— r15
5

20
11
10 — 5 ~

1
-----j—
-

30

32
32

l
1

6
1

_
-

-

219
219

72
64

7
"

13
12

6
-

_
-

124
124

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

5
5
-

6
6
-

34
6
28
10

56
44
12
11

75
61
14
2

124
80
44
34
10

107
16
91
78
8

29
5
24
24

5

-

6
6
-

-

10
3
7
6

10
5
5
-

-

15
15
15

56
48
8
-

-

16
6
10
10

98
84
14
-

-

14
14
14

2
2
-

-

.
-

-

-

17
17
-

_
-

35
1?
18

19

15
15
-

46
37

35

37

13

26
9

33

11
11

-

23
2U

-

22
22
-

5

27
13
14
13

25

5

69
41
28
26

3 <r

3

16

7

9
9

7

4

25

2

-

3
3

1
1
-

12

Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations-Continued
(Average straigh t-tim e hourly earn in gs for selected occupations studied on an a r e a b a s is
by industry d ivisio n , .St- L o u is, M o ., October 1959)

O ccupation 1 and industry division

Number
of
workers

361
Shipping and receivin g c le rk s ________ _______
M an u factu rin g ____________________________ ------ I9T
167
Nonmanufacturing ________________________
26
Public u tilitie s4
____ ______________
94
W holesale t r a d e __ ____ __ --------- --

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
!$
1$
$
$
$
i$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.50 1. 60 1.70 ! $1.80 1.90 2. 00 2. 10 2 .2 0 2. 30 2 .4 0 2. 50 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2. 80 2. 90 3. 00
and
1..50 _2^60_ 1.70 i 1.80 1.90 _2._00_ 2._10_ 2 .2 0 _ 2, 3 Q_ 2 .4 0 2. 50 _2_. 60_ _ 2 .7 0_ 2. 80 2. 90 3 .00 over_

$
$
$
1.20 1. 30 1.40

$

$
Average
hourly earnings Under 1. 00
and
$
1. 00 n v

1.10
1.20

1.30

$ 2 .2 3
2 .2 1
2 .2 6
2 .4 7
2 .3 6

“

-

-

-

1 .4 0

-

26
26

-

5
5
-

- i
-

13
13
-

21
2!
-

34
2
32 |
15

27
5
22
22

1

13
11
2

30
5
25
12
2

12
6
6
5
-

78
17
61
2
35

183
40
143
142
1

88
---- ST~
1
1
-

44
12
32
32

31
15
16
16

1
1
1

8
8
7
1

3
1
2

7

1
1
1

140
81
59
2
49

1803
138
1665
1613
52

517
37
480
30
260

258
80
178
178

176
175
1
1
-

_
-

336
336
-

-t

T r u c k d r iv e r s5 _____ _______ __ ___________
M an u factu rin g____________________________
Nonmanufacturing __ ____ __________ __
Public u tilitie s4 - _
_ _________________
W holesale trade _____________ ________

3,785
965
2, 820
1, 837
751

2 .57
2. 72
2. 52
2 .5 3
2 .4 9

-

-

_
-

_
-

1
1
1
-

16
16
-

9
9
-

6
2
4
4

-

_
-

12
12
-

151
8
143
17
125

2
99
23
76
25
51

T ru c k d riv ers, light (under 1 V2 t o n s ) ____
M an u factu rin g_________________________
Nonmanufacturing _________________

192
116
76

2 .4 2
2. 54
2 .2 5

“

-

-

-

-

-

9
9

-

"

"

12
12
-

1
1

36
36

-

32
30
2

13
13
-

35
15
20

-

8
8

46
46
“

-

T ru c k d riv ers, medium (l V2 to and
including 4 tons) ________ ____ ________
M anufacturing _____ _________________
N on m an ufactu rin g_____________________
P u blic u tilitie s4 ____________________

1, 701
539
1, 162
7 09

2. 55
2 .7 8
2 .4 5
2 .4 8

“

-

-

-

1
16
- — rr
1
1
-

-

6
2
4
4

-

-

-

148
6"
142
17

63
23
40
25

48
17
31
2

137
6
131
131

97
----38
59
2

552
48
504
502

232
22
210
24

39
39
"

34
33
1
1

- 6328
- "326
-

T ru c k d riv e rs, heavy (over 4 tons,
t r a ile r type) ___ __ __ __ __ __ ____ __
Nonmanufacturing _____ ____ __ _____
Public u tilitie s4 ____ ______________
Wholesale trad e ____ __ _______ __

1, 179
1, 130
676
264

2 .5 9
2 .5 8
2. 56
2. 62

- t

-

-

- 1
-

-

-

-

-

-

30
30
30

10
10
10
-

9
-

715
710
660
50

279
27 0
6
74

no

-

18
-

-

T ru c k e rs, power (forklift) «*.____ __ ________
M an u factu rin g____________________________
Nonmanufacturing __ __ __ __ _______ __
P ublic u tilitie s4 _______________________
W holesale trad e ____ __ _____,______ __

1. 923
1,619
3 04
91
130

2 .3 1
2 .2 8
2 .4 6
2 .3 8
2. 53

_
-

.
-

_
-

69
69
-

28
28
-

158
143
15
15

174
170
4
4
-

136
132
4
4
-

334
318
16
9
3

122
86
36
22
-

403
3 02
101
52
8

149
93
56
32

101
33
68
68

137
137
-

4

-

41
41
"

T ru c k e rs, power (other than fork lift) _______
M anufacturing
__ __ ___
__ __ __ ---- —

330
285

2 .3 4
2. 35

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

10
10

43
43

145
111

38
32

23
23

32
32

---------6

-

6
6

_

-

1
1

5
5

7
7

614
n

1,494
586

1.51
1. 97

22

22

680

43
6

38
11

19

75
48

103
102

55
48

19
4

86
76

119
102

103
99

13
10

50
36

-

10
10

27
24

10
10

-

-

_
Watchmen __ __ __ __ ____ __ _ ____ _ ___
M an u factu rin g ___ __— ___ __ ___________

1
j

!
- i

1
-

.
-

-

1
1

.
-

3
3

-

36
36
-

21
21
-

1
1
2
3
4
5
6

D ata lim ited to men w ork ers except where otherw ise indicated.
E xcludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on w eekends, holidays, and late sh ifts.
Fin an ce, in su ran ce, and re a l e state .
T ran sp ortation , com m unication, and other public u tilities.
Includes a ll d riv e rs r e g a r d le ss of siz e and type of truck operated.
All w orkers w ere at $3 to $3. 10.

NOTE: See note on p. 5, relatin g to the inclusion of ra ilr o a d s.




-

...

T
~

110

-

1 10
11
7
4

-

8
-

_

B :

E s ta b lish m e n t

P r a c tic e s

and

S u p p le m e n ta r y

W age

P r o v isio n s

13
T a b le

B - l. S h i f t D i f f e r e n t i a l s

( F e r c e n t o f m a n u fa c tu rin g plant w o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s h avin g fo r m a l p r o v is io n s fo r sh ift w o rk ,
an d in e s t a b lis h m e n t s a c tu a lly o p e ra tin g la t e s h ift s by typ e an d am ou n t o f d iffe r e n t ia l,
S t. L o u is , M o.., O ctob er 1959)

In establishmen ts having formal
provisions 1 for--

Shift differential

In establishmen ts actually
operating—

Second shift
work

Third or other
shift work

90.9

88.7

1 8 .6

7.2

90.9

88.7

1 8.6

7.2

Uniform cents (per hour)
________________
5 cents
__ _______________ ______ __
6 cents
_
_ _________________ _______
8 cents
_ __
_
__
__ _
_ __ _
9 cents _
_
__ _ _ _ _ _
10 rents
_ ... ...... . _
11 cents _________ __________ _______
12 cents
_____ __ __ _________________
12 Va cents _______________________ _____
14 cents _ ______ ________ ___________
15 cents ______________ _________________
Over 15 cents
_
___ __ ___ _

50.3
14.5
5 .1
1 1.8

46.0
.7
1 .3
2. 4
20.2
.5
1 0.7

10.3
2.4
1.3
3. 1
2.8
.2

5.8
-

Uniform percentage ________________________
5 percent
_______________________________
7 percent __________________________ __
7 V percent
?,
_ _ ________ ___
_ __
8 percent ________________________________
10 percent
_ ______________ ___________
12 Va percent __ ___________ ____________
13 percent
______________________________
15 percent

3 7 .1

22.0

8 .5

11.5

.2

-

16.2
2.1
1.2
2.3

O ther3 _____________________________ _________

3.5

20.8

Total

........................................................................

With shift pay differential

No shift pay differential

_____

_

__

-

1 2.9
-

2. 1
.6
1.8
1.4

9.2
1.8
6 .1

-

.3
5.7
4. 3

Second shift

.1
.4

7.5

Third or other
shift

-

.2
.6
1.7
.2
1.5
-

( 2)
.9
.6

1.2
2.0
-

.4
.3
.1
( 2)
-

.8

1 .0

1. 1

2.9

.3

_____________ _______

1 In c lu d e s e s t a b lis h m e n t s c u r r e n tly o p e ra tin g la te s h if t s , an d e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s c o v e rin g
la te s h ifts ev en though they w e r e not c u r r e n t ly o p e ra tin g la te s h ift s .
2 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.
3 In c lu d e s su c h c o m b in atio n p la n s a s fu ll d a y ’s pay fo r re d u c e d h o u rs p lu s a p aid lunch p e rio d ; fu ll d a y 's pay for
r e d u c e d h o u rs p lu s a fla t su m ; and fu ll d a y ’s pay fo r re d u c e d h o u rs p lu s a c e n t s - p e r - h o u r or p e rc e n ta g e d iffe r e n t ia l.




14
T a b l e B -2 . M in im u m

E n tra n c e S a la r ie s fo r W o m e n O ffic e W o r k e r s

(Distribution of establishm ents studied in a ll in dustries and in industry d ivisions by m in im u m en tran ce s a l a r y fo r se le c te d c a te g o r ie s
of inexperienced women office w orkers, St. L o u is, Mo. , O ctober 1959)
Inexperienced typists
Manufacturing
Minimum weekly sala ry 1

All
indu stries

Other in ex p er ien ced c le r ic a l w o rk ers 2

N onm anufacturing

M anufacturing

B ased on standard weekly h ours 3 of—
All
schedules

40

All
schedules

37 Va

A ll
in d u strie s

A ll
sch ed u les

40

N onm anufacturing

B a sed on standard w eek ly hours 3 of—

,

40

A ll
sch ed u les

37 y2

40

E stablishm ents s t u d ie d -----------------------------------------

244

100

XXX

144

XXX

XXX

244

100

XXX

144

XXX

XXX

E stablishm ents having a specified m in im u m __________

134

66

55

68

7

51

147

65

54

82

7

62

_
12
8
8
3
7
7
5
2
2
3
1
2
2

_
1
1
-

_
8
6
4
3
6
4
3
1
2
3
1
2
2

2
22
14
18
12
19
12
7
12
2
3
3
3
6
1

_
4
6
11
4
10
4
3
7
1
2
2
1

_
3
3
8
3
8
4
3
7
1
2
2
1

1
1
1
1

1
13
5
3
5

1
2

1
1

2
18
8
7
8
9
8
4
5
1
1
1
2
2

-

-

$37.
$40.
$42.
$45.
$47.
$50.
$52.
$55.
$57.
$60.
$62.
$65.
$67.
$70.
$72.
$75.
$77.
$80.

50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

_
3
5
9
5
12
5
3
8
2
2
2
1
4
1
2

3
2
7
3
10
5
3
7
2
2
2
1
4
1
1

-

.

under $40. 00 _________________________
under $42. 50 _________________________
under $45. 00 _________________________
under $47. 50 ....................................................
under $50. 00 _________________________
under $52. 50 ______________________ ___
under $55. 00 _________________________
under $57. 50 ---------------------------------under $60. 00 _________________________
under $62. 50 _________________________
under $65. 00 __________ _______________
under $67. 50 _________________________
under $70. 00 ---------------------------------------------------------------under $72. 50 _________________________
under $75. 00 _________________________
under $77. 50 ..................................................... ......................
under $80. 00 ______________________________________
o v e r ____________________________________________________

15
13
17
8
19
12
8
10
4
5
3
3
6
1
3
2
5

2

E stablishm ents having no specified m in im u m _____________

61

24

E stablishm ents which did not employ w orkers
in this category ______________________________________________________

49

10

-

-

2
2
1
-

-

_

4

4

-

-

1
2
_
-

_
-

9

6
2
5
1
1
1

2
2
_

2

1
2
3

-

4

3

3

2
3
1

XXX

37

XXX

XXX

66

25

XXX

41

XXX

XXX

XXX

39

XXX

XXX

31

10

XXX

21

XXX

XXX

1
2
3

4

3

-

2
3
1

1 Low est sala ry rate form ally established for hiring inexperienced w orkers for typing or other cle ric a l jobs.
2 R ates applicable to m e ssen g ers, office g irls, or sim ilar su b clerical jobs a re not considered.
3 Hours refle ct the workweek for which em ployees receive their regu lar straight-tim e s a la r ie s. Data a re presented for a ll workweeks combined, and for the m ost common workweeks reported.
NOTE: See note on p. 15, relating to the inclusion of railro a d s.




15
T a b le

B -3. S c h e d u l e d W e e k l y H o u r s

(P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n of o ffice and plant w o rk ers in a ll in d u stries and in in d u stry d iv isio n s by sch ed uled w eek ly hours
of f ir s t - s h if t w o r k e r s , St. L o u is, M o ., O ctober 19 5 9 )
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
W eekly hours

All !
industries

A ll w o rk ers --------------------------------------U nder 35 hours ----------------------------------35 hours -------------------------------------------------O ver 35 and under 3 l l/z hours ----------------37Va hours ----------------------------------------------O ver 37Va and under 383 hours -------------/4
38^4 hours ----------------------------------------------O ver 383 and under 40 hours ----------------/4
40 h ours ------------------------------------------Over 40 hours ------------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5

100

3
2
8
1
4
(5 )
82
1

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public g
utilities

W
holesale
trade

100

100

100

100

10
1
89

9
5
15
2
11
57

1
1
8
4
86
(5 )

4
1
1
(5 )
94

Finance3

A
ll
industries4

100
1
1
1
3
(5 )
90
4

Manufacturing

100
1
1
1
5
90
3

100

100

-

98
2

98
2

Includes data fo r r e ta il trade (ex cep t dep artm en t and lim ite d - p r ic e v a r ie ty s t o r e s ), and s e r v ic e s in addition to th o se in d u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a r a te ly .
T ran sp ortation , com m u n ication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
F in an ce, in su ra n ce, and re a l e s ta te .
Includes data fo r r e ta il trade (ex cep t dep artm en t and lim ite d - p r ic e v a r ie ty s t o r e s ), re a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s in addition to th ose in d u stry d iv isio n s show n s ep a ra tely .
L e ss than 0 . 5 p erc en t.




NOTE:

E s tim a te s for a ll in d u str ie s , n onm anufacturing, and public u tilitie s include data fo r ra ilro a d s (SIC 4 0 ), om itted from the sco p e
of a ll lab or m a rk et w age su r v ey s m ade b efo re the w in ter of 1 9 5 9 - 6 0 .
W here s ig n ific a n t, the e ffe c t of the in clu sio n of r a il­
road s is g r e a te s t on the data shown s e p a r a te ly for the public u tilitie s d iv isio n .

W
holesale
trade

Public 2
utilities *

1
1
1

16
T a b le

B -4. P a id H o l i d a y s

(P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n of o ffice and plant w o rk ers in a ll in d u stries and in in d u stry d iv isio n s by num ber of paid h olid ays
provided annu ally, St. L o u is, Mo. , O ctober 195 9 )
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Item

All
industries*

Manufacturing

Public utilities

W
holesale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
All 4
industries

Finance 3

Manufacturing

W
holesale
trade

Public 2
utilities*

A ll w o rk e rs ----------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

W ork ers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p ro vid in g
paid h o lid ay s -----------------------------------------W ork ers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p ro vid in g
no p aid h o lid ay s --------------------------------------

99

100

100

99

99

100

100

100

100

( •)

"

■

1
14
2
3
47
(?)
(5 )
(5 )
27
1
1
1
2
1

1
13
1
3
57
1
(5 )
18
1
1
4
”

11
(5 )
65
19
5
”

1

(5)

-

N um ber o f d a y s
L e s s than 6 h o lid ay s --------------------------------6 h o lid ay s --------------------------------- --------------6 h o lid ay s p lu s 1 h a lf day --------------------------6 h o lid ay s p lu s 2 h a lf day s -------- ---------------7 h o lid ay s -----------------------------------------------7 h o lid ay s p lu s 1 h a lf day -------------------------7 h o lid ay s p lu s 2 h alf day s ------------------------7 h olid ay s p lu s 4 h a lf d ay s ------------------------8 h o lid ay s -----------------------------------------------8 h o lid ay s p lu s l h a lf d a y --------------------------8 h o lid ay s p lu s 2 h a lf day s ------------------------9 h o lid ay s -----------------------------------------------11 h o lid ay s ----------------------------------------------12 h o lid ay s -----------------------------------------------

_

_
28
56
3
13
-

_
3
3
2
7
74
3
4
3

2
19
(5 )
5
52
1
1
15
1
1
2
”

3
11
7
57
1
1
16
1
3
“

17
52
-

-

12 day s ----------------------------------------------------11 or m o re day s ----------------------------------------

%l!z

or m o re day s --------------------------------------

8 or m o re d ay s -----------------------------------------

7Va or m o r e day s -------------------------------------7 or m o re day s ----------------------------------------6Va or m o re day s -------------------------------------6 or m o re d ay s ----------------------------------------5 V2 or m o re day s -------------------------------------5 or m o re d ay s -----------------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5
4
no h alf

-

25
6
"

7

-

1

T o ta l h o l i d a y t i m e *

9 or m ore day s -----------------------------------------

33
3
56
1

1
2

4

6
33
34
84
85
99
99
99

_

4

5
5
24
25
85
86
99
99
100

_
5
24
24
89
89
100
100
100

16
16
72
72
100
100
100

2
3

3
3

8

io
85
85
94
97
100
100
100

!
;
i

j

4

20
20
78

78

97
97
99

-

3

4

4
22
22
86
86
97
97
99

_
6
31
31
83
83
100
100
100

_
8
8
67
67
100
100
100

i ----------------------Includes data fo r r e ta il trade (ex cep t d ep artm en t and lim ite d - p r ic e v a r ie ty s t o r e s ), and s e r v ic e s in addition to th o se in d u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a r a te ly .
T ran sp ortation , com m u n ication , and other p ub lic u t ilit ie s .
F in a n ce , in su ra n ce, and r e a l e s ta te .
Includes data fo r r e ta il trade (ex cep t d ep artm en t and lim ite d - p r ic e v a r ie ty s t o r e s ), re a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s in addition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s shown se p a r a te ly .
L e ss than 0. 5 p e r c e n t.
A ll com b in ation s of fu ll and h alf days that add to the sa m e am ount are com bined; fo r ex a m p le, the p ro p o rtio n of w o rk ers r e c e iv in g a total of 7 days in clu d es th o se w ith 7 fu ll days and
d a y s, 6 fu ll days and 2 h alf d ays, 5 fu ll days and 4 h a lf d a y s, and so on.
P ro p o rtio n s w ere then cu m u lated .

NOTE: See note on p. 15, re la tin g to the in c lu sio n of r a ilr o a d s .




17

Table B-5. Paid Vacations
(P e rc e n t d istrib u tio n of o ffic e and p lan t w o r k e r s in a ll in d u str ie s and in in d u stry d iv isio n s by v a c a tio n pay
p r o v is io n s , St. L o u is, M o ., O ctober 1959)
OFFICE WORKERS
V a catio n policy

A ll w o rk e rs ___________________________________

All
industries

100

Manufacturing

Public
utilities 2

PLANT WORKERS
W
holesale
trade

Finance 3

All 4
industries

Manufacturing

Public .
utilities “

W
holesale
trade

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
99
( 5)

99
99
-

100
99
( 5)

100
100
-

100
100
-

99
92
7
1

99
91
8
1

100
99
1
-

100
100
_

( 5)

( 5)

-

-

-

( 5)

( 5)

“

-

4
46
4
2

4
53
1
3

2
34
3
-

15
38
10
-

48
9
5

8
10
1
( 5)

9
8
1
-

2
23
1
1

19
20
7
-

32
2
65
( 5)
-

22
3
76
-

82
3
15
-

45
52
3
~

( 5)
99
-

87
( 5)
11
1
1

88
( 5)
10
1
1

88
( 5)
11
1

72
23
5
-

8
9
82
( 5)
1

9
4
85
2

4
41
55
( 5)

22
( 5)
75
3
-

_
100
-

56
10
30
1
3

63
9
24
1
4

17
31
51
1

41
2
52
5
~

2
( 5)
97

2
1
95
2

1
99

2
( 5)
96
3

_
99
( 5)

17
20
57
1
4

6
93
1

7
2
86
5

-

15
15
67
1
3

1

1
90
1
7

M e th o d o f p a y m e n t
W o rk ers in e sta b lis h m e n ts providin g
p aid v a c a tio n s ______________ ____ _________
L e n g th -o f-tim e p a y m e n t___________________
P e r c e n ta g e paym ent ____ ________ _____
F la t- s u m paym ent
_.
_
_ __ __
O ther
__
___ ___ ____ _ _______
W o rk ers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p rovidin g
no paid v a c a tio n s ____________________________
A m ount o f v a c a tio n p a y 6
A fter 6 m on ths of s e r v ic e
L e s s than 1 w eek
_
__
1 w eek ______________________ _________________
O ver 1 an d under 2 w eek s ____________________
2 w eek s ----------------------------------------------------

_

A fter 1 y e a r of s e r v ic e
1 w eek ________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s ____________________
2 w eek s _____________________________________ _
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
____ ___
__ ___
3 w eek s
A fter 2 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w eek ________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s ____________________
2 w eek s
_ _ ____
___ ___
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
_________ ____
3 w eek s
_ __ ________ ____
___ _______
A fter 3 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w eek
____________________ ______________
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s
__ _ _________ __
2 w eek s _ ___ _______________________ _ ___
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s ____________________
3 w eek s ---------------------------------------------------

( 5)

1

( 5)

-

A fter 5 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w eek _ __ ___ __
_________ ____________
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s
_________ _______
2 w eek s _______________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks __ ____
__
3 w eek s
4 w eek s
_ ___ ___________ _______ _____

S ee footn otes at end of ta b le .




_
91
2
7

_
90

_
99

( 5)

( 5)

9

1

_
97
3
-

_
87
7
6

( 5)

92
1
5

( 5)

_

99
_
1

_

95
5
_
~

18
Table B-5. Paid Vacations-Continued
(P e rc e n t d istrib u tio n of o ffic e and plant w o r k e r s in a ll in d u str ie s and in in d u stry d iv isio n s by v ac atio n pay
p r o v is io n s , S t. L o u is , M o. , O ctober 1959)
OFFICE WORKERS
V a catio n policy

All
industries

Manufacturing

PLANT WORKERS
W
holesale
trade

Public
utilities 2

Finance 3

All
industries 4

Manufacturing

W
holesale
trade

Public 2
utilities

A m o u n t o f v a c a t i o n p a y 6 — C o n tin u e d
A fter 10 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
l w e e k _______________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s
__ ______________
2 w eek s ______________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
____ ______ ___
3 w eek s
_______________ _____________ ___
4 w eek s

_
65
3
30
2

_
57
3
36
4

_
77
( 5)
23
"

.
77
3
20
-

_
69
7
25
-

1
( 5)
60
12
25
2

1
_
57
16
22
3

_
70
_
29
1

_
68
7
25
-

_
11
( 5)
85
( 5)
4
-

_
4
91
5
-

_
4
( 5)
96
-

_
29
71
-

_
16
76
8
-

1
( 5)
9
1
86
( 5)
2
( 5)

1
3
1
92
( 5)
3
-

.
_
_
99
1
( 5)

35
_
65
_
_
-

_
9
( 5)
76
( 5)
15
-

4
81
1
14
-

1
( 5)
9
1
75
1
13
( 5)

1
3
1
83
1
11
-

.
62
_
38
( 5)

_
31
61
_
8
-

_
8
( 5)
66
1
25

_
4
64
3
29

1
( 5)
9
1
59
7
23
( 5)

1
3
1
62
10
23

.
-

_
31

A fter 15 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w eek
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s
2 w eek s
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
3 w eek s _ _ __ ______________ ___________ __
O ver 3 an d under 4 w eek s ___________________
4 w eek s
O ver 4 w eek s
A fter 20 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w eek
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s
2 w eek s ______________________________________
O ver 2 an d under 3 w eek s ___________________
3 w eek s
_
__
O ver 3 and under 4 w eek s ___________________
4 w eek s
___
_
_____
O ver 4 w eek s

_

_

_

4
( 5)
75
21
-

25
63
11
-

_
13
77
11
-

_

_
25
59

3
72

A fter 2 5 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w eek
__ ___ __ _______ _______ __ __
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s ___________________
2 w e e k s ______________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
3 w eek s _____________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w eek s ___________________
4 w eek s
____ ______________ ______________
O ver 4 w eek s _______________________________

1
*
3
4
5
6
s e r v ic e

-

4
( 5)
73
-

23

-

_

-

15

24

_

-

60
-

39
( 5)

57
-

12

In clu d es d ata fo r r e t a il tr a d e (e x ce p t d ep artm en t and lim it e d - p r ic e v a r ie ty s t o r e s ) , and s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to th ose in d u stry d iv isio n s shown s e p a r a t e ly .
T r a n sp o r ta tio n , co m m u n ic atio n , and other public u t ilit ie s .
F in a n c e , in su r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e .
In clu d es d ata fo r r e t a il tr a d e (ex cep t d e p artm en t and lim it e d - p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s ) , r e a l e sta te , and s e r v ic e s in add itio n to th o se in d u stry d iv isio n s shown s e p a r a t e ly .
L e s s than 0 .5 p e rc e n t.
P e r io d s of s e r v ic e w e re a r b it r a r ily ch o sen and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e f le c t the in d iv id u al p r o v isio n s fo r p r o g r e s s io n s .
F o r e x a m p le , the ch an ges in p ro p o rtio n s in d icated a t 10 y e a r s '
in clu de ch an g es in p r o v isio n s o c c u rrin g betw een 5 and 10 y e a r s .

N O TE: S ee note p .1 5 , r e la tin g to the in c lu sio n of r a il r o a d s .
In the ta b u la tio n s of v a c a tio n a llo w a n c e s by y e a r s of s e r v ic e , p aym en ts other than "len gth of t i m e , " su ch a s p e rc e n ta g e
of an n ual e a rn in g s or fla t- s u m p ay m e n ts, w e re co n v e rte d to an eq u iv alen t tim e b a s i s ; fo r e x a m p le , a paym ent of 2 p ercen t o f an n ual e a r n in g s w as c o n sid e r e d a s 1 w e e k 's pay.




19
Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
(P e rc e n t o f o ffic e and plant w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u stry d iv isio n s em p loy ed in e sta b lis h m e n ts providin g
h e alth , in su r a n c e , or p en sio n b e n e fits, S t. L o u is , M o. , O ctob er 1959)
OFFICE WORKERS
T y pe o f b en efit

PLANT WORKERS
W
holesale
trade

Public
utilities *

100
W o rk e rs in e sta b lis h m e n ts providin g:
T/ifft in su r a n r e
A c cid e n tal death an d d ism e m b e rm e n t
in su ra n c e
_
_ _ _ _ _ __ ___
S ic k n e s s an d a c c id e n t in su ra n c e or
sic k le a v e or both * _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _
S ic k n e ss an d a c c id e n t in su ra n c e _
.. .
S ic k le a v e (fu ll pay an d no
w aitin g period)
S ic k le a v e (p a r t ia l pay or
w aitin g p e rio d )________ ________________
H o sp ita liz a tio n in su ra n c e
__ __
____
S u r g ic a l in su ra n c e _________________________
M e d ica l in su ra n c e
_ __
C a ta stro p h e in s u r a n c e _____________________
R e tire m e n t pen sion ....... . ......
No h e alth , in su r a n c e , or p en sion p l a n ____

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

All .
industries1

Finance 3

All 4
industries

W
holesale
trade

Manufacturing

Public.
utilities2

100

100

100

100

87

95

58

93

99

88

95

64

85

53

70

37

66

28

65

70

43

61

76
45

81
65

93
16

77
62

55
27

87
75

95
86

64
30

74
56

52

55

63

45

43

17

15

20

49

7
75
76
68
32
73
3

1
91
89
79
37
84
3

26
72
72
67
22
50
2

8
84
84
74
21
59
5

7
41
50
48
46
80
(*)

9
85
83
70
14
69
4

7
90
87
74
15
78
2

22
78
78
64
22
61

8
78
78
52
11
63
15

In c lu d es d a ta for r e t a il tra d e (ex cep t dep artm en t an d lim it e d - p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s ^ an d s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to th o se in d u stry d iv isio n s shown s e p a r a t e ly .
* T r a n sp o r ta tio n , co m m u n ic atio n , an d other public u t ilit ie s .
3 F in a n c e , in su r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .
* In c lu d es d a ta fo r r e t a il tra d e (ex cep t d ep artm en t and lim it e d - p r ic e v a r ie ty s t o r e s ) , r e a l e s t a t e , an d s e r v i c e s in ad d itio n to th o se in d u stry d iv isio n s shown s e p a r a t e ly .
U n du p licated to tal o f w o r k e r s re c e iv in g sic k le a v e or s ic k n e s s an d a c c id e n t in su r a n c e shown s e p a r a t e ly b elow .
S ic k - le a v e p lan s a r e lim ite d to th o se w hich d e fin ite ly e s t a b lis h a t le a s t
the m in im u m n u m ber of d a y s ' pay that can be ex p ec te d by eac h em p lo y e e .
In fo rm a l s ic k - le a v e a llo w a n c e s d e te rm in e d on an in d iv id u al b a s i s a r e e x clu d ed .
6 L e s s than 0 .5 p e rc e n t.
N O TE: S ee note on p. 15, r e la tin g to the in c lu sio n of r a il r o a d s .







21

Appendix:

Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose o f preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’ s wage surveys is to a ssist its
field staff in classifyin g into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll
titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This is
essential in order to permit the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau’ s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those
prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’ s field economists are
instructed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped workers,
part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

O FFIC E

BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statements, b ills, and invoices on a machine other
than an ordinary or electromatic typewriter. May also keep records as
to billings or shipping charges or perform other clerica l work incidental
to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, machine, are
cla ssified by type of machine, as follow s:

Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott
Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register, with or without
a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.

Biller , machine (billing machine) — Uses a special billing ma­

chine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott Fisher, Burroughs, e tc., which are
combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and in­
voices from customers’ purchase orders, internally prepared orders,
shipping memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of prede­
termined discounts and shipping charges and entry of necessary
extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing ma­
chine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine.
The operation usually involves a large number of carbon copies of
the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine)— Uses a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstrarid, Elliott Fisher, Remington Rand, e tc ., which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare custom ers’
bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally in­
volves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers’ ledger rec­
ord. The machine automatically accumulates figures on a number
of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically
the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of book­
keeping.
Works from uniform and standard types o f sales and
credit slips.




Class A — Keeps a set o f records requiring a knowledge o f
and experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with
the structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines
proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used
in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance
sheets, and other records by hand.
Class B — Keeps a record o f one or more phases or sections of
a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of basic book­
keeping • Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
customers’ accounts (not including a simple type of billing described
under biller, machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc. May check or a ssist in preparation o f trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A — Under general direction of a bookkeeper or account­
ant, has responsibility for keeping one or more section s o f a com ­
plete set of books or records relating to one phase o f an establish­
ment's business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing
subsidiary ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts

22

CLERK, ACCOUNTING— Continued
p a y a b le ; e x a m in in g
c o u n t in g
p ro p e r

and

d is t r ib u t io n ;

a s s ig n a t io n s

ju s t in g

and

c o d in g

in v o ic e s

r e q u ir e s

and

c lo s in g

CLERK, PAYROLL

a llo c a t io n s .

jo u r n a l

or v o u ch e rs

ju d g m e n t

e n t r ie s ;

and

M ay
m ay

w it h

p ro p e r a c ­

e x p e r ie n c e

a s s is t

d ir e c t

in

in

m a k in g

p r e p a r in g ,

c la s s

B

ad ­

a c c o u n t in g

c le r k s .

co u n ts

U nder

o p e r a t io n s
p a y a b le

r e c o n c ilin g

does

p r in c ip le s
in g w o r k

but is

is

or

r e q u ir e
fo u n d

in

o f f ic e s
a

co st

of

in

in

r o u tin e

e a r n in g s

a c c o u n t in g

th e

and

a c ­

b ased

in g

t im e ,
out

w ages

o f c o m p a n y e m p lo y e e s

p a y r o ll s h e e t s .
on

t im e

or

s h o w in g

ra te ,

p r o d u c tio n

and

p a y e n v e lo p e s .

fo r

M ay u se

a

su ch

as

in s u r a n c e ,

a s s is t

and e n te rs

in v o lv e :

p a y m a ste r

c a lc u la t in g

and

nam e,

to ta l w a g e s

m a k in g

n e ce s­

w o rk e rs*

c a lc u la t e d

w o r k e r 's

in

th e

C a lc u la t in g

r e c o r d s ; p o s t in g

in f o r m a t io n

d e d u c t io n s

p aych ecks

D u tie s

d a ta

w o r k in g

due.

M ay

u p a n d d is t r ib u t -

m a c h in e .

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR

c o n t r o lle d
d a ta .

T h is

b o o k k e e p in g

m o re

r o u tin e a c c o u n t ­

am ong

fu n c t io n a l b a s is

th e

or a c ­

r e g is te r s ;

le d g e r s

a c c o u n t in g

w h ic h

m o re

voucher

s u b s id ia r y

s im p le

k n o w le d g e

or

jo u r n a l v o u c h e r s

v o u ch e rs

p o s t in g

on

s u b d iv id e d

one

s im p le

e n t e r in g

p o s t in g
a

p e rfo rm s

p o s t in g

a cco u n ts;

le d g e r s ,

not

as

v o u ch e rs,

bank

g e n e ra l

s u p e r v is io n ,

su ch

on

o n p a y r o ll s h e e t ,

m ake

Class B—

by

d a ta

d ays,

c o u n t in g

jo b

C o m p u te s
sa ry

se v e ra l w o rk e rs.

P rim a ry
t ic a l

d u ty

c o m p u ta tio n s .

t ic a l or

o th e r

to m e te r

b u t, in

ty p e

is

to o p e ra te

T h is

jo b

is

o f c le r k , w h ic h

w h ic h , u s e

of

a C o m p to m e te r to p e rfo rm

n o t to b e

t h is

co n fu se d

m a y in v o lv e
m a c h in e

is

w it h

m a th e m a ­

th a t o f s t a t is ­

fre q u e n t u se

of a C om p­

in c id e n t a l to p e rfo r m a n c e

o f o th e r d u tie s .

CLERK, FILE

Class A—
ber

of

v a r ie d

pondence
reco rd s

In

an

or o th e r
of

e s t a b lis h e d

s u b je c t

m a t e r ia l;

v a r io u s

v is e

o th e rs

fo rm

in c id e n t a l

in

m a tte r

ty p e s

f ilin g

and

c le r ic a l

m ay

in

f ilin g

f ile s ,

sy ste m

c la s s if ie s

a ls o

f ile

c o n ju n c t io n

lo c a t in g

c o n t a in in g
and

t h is

m a t e r ia l.

w it h

f ile s

m a t e r ia l

in

th e

a

in d e x e s

num ­

M ay

or

m ay

f ile s .

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)

co rre s­
U nder

keep

su p e r­

M ay p e r­

fo r in k

p re p a re

Class B—
a lr e a d y
or

been

a s s is t s

c le r ic a l

P e rfo rm s
c la s s if ie d

in

lo c a t in g

r o u tin e
or

f ilin g ,

w h ic h

is

m a t e r ia l

in

u s u a lly

e a s ily
f ile s .

o f m a t e r ia l t h a t h a s

id e n t if ia b le ,

an d p a p e r fe e d

s t e n c il

m a ste rs.

M ay

CLERK, ORDER

to m a k e
sh e e t;

p e r s o n a lly .

up

th e

a c k n o w le d g e
th a t th e y h a v e
in v o ic e s




D u tie s

o rd e r;

c h e c k in g

o rd e r

sh e e ts

out an

p r ic e s

and

o rd e r s h e e t
q u a n t it ie s

to r e s p e c t iv e

c r e d it d e p a rtm e n t to d e te r m in e

r e c e ip t
been
w it h

of

o rd e rs

f ille d ,

keep

fro m
f ile

o r ig in a l o r d e rs .

b y m a il,

any combination of the following:

in v o lv e

c u s t o m e r s ; m a k in g

d is t r ib u t in g

M a y c h e c k w it h

p in g

c u s t o m e r s * o r d e r s fo r m a t e r ia l o r m e r c h a n d is e

lis t in g
of

th e

it e m s o n

d e p a rtm e n ts to b e
c r e d it r a t in g

c u s t o m e r s , f o llo w

it e m s

s u p e r v is o r y

M akes

n e ce ssa ry

s t a p le

f ile

a d ju s tm e n t s u c h
Is

of u sed

c o m p le t e d

r e s p o n s i­

o r h a n d w r it t e n m a t t e r ,

n o t r e q u ir e d

s t e n c ils

to

o r D it t o

m a t e r ia l.

a

s u p e r v is io n

a c c o u n t in g

s e r ie s

of

h o le s

and
in

th e

a lp h a b e t ic a l o r a n u m e r ic a l

f o r m a t io n
v ic e

on re co rd s.

a tta ch e d

to

M ay

m a c h in e .

and

w it h

no

s t a t is t ic a l d a ta
ca rd s

in

keyp u n ch

a

s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s i­
o n t a b u la t in g

s p e c if ie d

m a c h in e , f o llo w in g

d u p lic a t e c a r d s

b y u s in g

M ay

of

keep

f ile s

ca rd s

w rit te n

th e d u p lic a t in g

pu nch

by

s e q u e n c e , u s in g

ca rd s.

in ­
de­

M a y v e r if y

ow n w o rk or w o rk o f o th e rs.

o rd e r
f ille d .

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL

o f cu sto m e r,

up o rd e rs

o f o rd e rs r e c e iv e d , a n d

g e n e ra l

re co rd s

p u n c h in g
an

to

no

c y lin d e r s p e e d .

M ay keep

so rt, c o lla t e , an d

U nder

Q u o t in g p r i c e s

m a c h in e .

co u n te r an d

o r D it t o m a s t e r .

w it h

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

b ilit ie s ,

p h o n e, or

and

o f t y p e w r it t e n

in c id e n t a l

p e rfo rm

d u tie s .

R e c e iv e s

c o p ie s

o r lo c a t e s

M ay

s u p e r v is io n

m u ltip le

u s in g a M im e o g r a p h o r D it t o
as

d u tie s .

g e n e ra l

b ilit ie s , re p ro d u ce s

ch eck

to

P e rfo rm s

see

s h ip ­

e ra t in g

m in o r

d is t r ib u t in g

v a r io u s

o f f ic e

m a il,

r o u tin e

m a c h in e s

su ch

d u tie s
as

su ch

s e a le r s

a n d o t h e r m in o r c l e r i c a l w o r k .

as

ru n n in g

e rra n d s, op­

o r m a i l e r s , o p e n in g

and

23
SECRETARY

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR

P e rfo rm s s e c r e t a r ia l a n d
m in is t r a t iv e

o r e x e c u t iv e

fo r s u p e r io r ; r e c e iv in g

p e o p le

phone

p e rso n a l

c a lls ;

w r it in g

h a n d lin g

c le r ic a l d u tie s

p o s it io n .

D u tie s

c o m in g
and

in t o

fo r a

in c lu d e

s u p e r io r in

s im ila r

m a c h in e

m a c h in e ,

re p ro d u ce d

is

and

o f f ic e ; a n s w e r in g

n o t u s e d ) e it h e r in

t r a n s c r ib in g

on a t r a n s c r ib in g

m em o ra n d u m s

fo r in f o r m a t io n

Class A—

ad­

and

c o u n t in g

m a k in g

la t o r,

im p o r t a n t o r c o n f id e n t ia l m a il, a n d

r o u tin e c o r r e s p o n d e n c e o n o w n in it ia t iv e ; t a k in g

t r a n s c r ib in g

an

m a k in g a p p o in t m e n t s

sh o rth a n d

d ic t a t io n

m a c h in e .

o r th e

M ay

d ic t a t io n

reco rd e d

p re p a re

re p o rts

c a lc u la t o r ,

d if f ic u lt w ir in g

or

as

e it h e r

in

sh o rth a n d

m a l r o u tin e
M ay a ls o

to

o fte n

of

p la n n in g

in

or by S te n o ty p e

v o c a b u la r y , a n d

ty p e

fro m

re co rd s,

copy.

d e r, k e e p

s im p le

work ( s e e

t r a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e

or

m o re p e r s o n s ,

o r s im ila r m a c h in e , in v o lv in g

to t r a n s c r ib e

w rit te n

one

and

m a c h in e

t h is

M a y a ls o

o p e r a t io n s

a n o r­

d ic t a t io n

on a
keep

f ile s

in

o p e ra to r).

to th e

to

ta k e

e it h e r in s h o r t h a n d o r b y S t e n o t y p e
t e c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d
s c ie n t if ic
a ls o
keep

d ic t a t io n

fro m

s im p le

w ritte n

copy.

re co rd s, e tc .

fro m

one

or

m o re p e r s o n s

o r s im ila r m a c h in e , in v o lv in g

v o c a b u la r y s u c h

r e s e a r c h a n d to t r a n s c r ib e t h is

ty p e

M ay

as

in le g a l b r ie f s

d ic t a t io n

a ls o

a v a r ie d

o r re p o rts

on a t y p e w r it e r .

se t up and

keep

f ile s

in

so n s
w ho

w ho
a ls o

t o ll

Such

on

th e

c a ll
act

in , o r
as

an d ta k e

in v o lv in g

M ay

re p o rts

of new

o c c a s io n a lly

r e c e p t io n is t s

ta k e

see

M a y g iv e

s w it c h b o a r d .

te le p h o n e

s w it c h b o a r d

in f o r m a t io n

o rd e rs.

Fo r

a

to

ty p e

be

ta k e n .
t r a in in g

t r a in e d

m a c h in e s
s p e c if ic
so m e

w o rk

c a lls .

t io n
or

to

p e rf o r m in g

d u tie s

o r m o n it o r - t y p e s w it c h b o a r d , a c t s

p e rfo rm

or c le r ic a l

r o u tin e
w o rk

s w it c h b o a r d .




c le r ic a l

m ay

ta k e

w o rk a s
th e

as

A s

a

new

o p e ra to rs

in

a n d c o m p le x

o f th e

w o rk

and

m o re
o p e ra ­

w ir in g

re p o rts.

p r o d u c tio n

d if f ic u lt

m a y in c lu d e

r e p e t it iv e

a re

T h is

of

th e

of a

th e

b a s ic

of

c o m p le x

a r e c u r r in g

m a c h in e .

as

s im p le

th e

t a b u la t in g

fo r

w o rk .

or

s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c in g

in s t r u c t io n s . M a y in c lu d e

f ilin g

u n it ,

p e t it iv e

O p e ra te s
su ch

Th e

w o rk

s im p le

t y p ic a lly

e x a m p le , in d iv id u a l

e le c t r ic a l

s o r t in g

s in g le

p o s i­

r e c e p t io n is t a n d m a y a ls o

p a rt o f r e g u la r d u t ie s .

m a jo r p a r t o f t h i s

w o r k e r 's

T h is
t im e

a cco u n t­

p u n c h , c o lla t o r , e t c .,
w ir in g fro m d ia g r a m s

in v o lv e s

p o r t io n s

or c o lla t in g

of

ru n s, or

a

re ­

o p e r a t io n s .

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
P r im a r y d u ty i s to t r a n s c r ib e d ic t a t io n in v o lv in g

on a

w h e re

t r a in in g

w o rk e rs

o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t io n is t .

o f o p e ra to r,

th e

but

re p o rt.

n a tu re

in c lu d e

o f th e

w ir ­
ta b u ­

a c o m p le t e

m o re

M ay a ls o

o p e r a t io n

o f so m e

fo r e x a m p le ,

e x e r c is e ,

lo n g e r a n d

a d d itio n

p e rfo rm e d u n d e r

p e rfo rm a n ce

in v o lv e s ,

u s u a lly

or e le c t r ic a l a c ­

c a lc u la t o r , in

w o rk is

a c c o u n t in g

w e ll e s t a b lis h e d .
in

t a b u la t in g

t a b u la t o r a n d

a

n o rm a l r o u tin e

v o c a b u la r y fro m t r a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e
a d d itio n

re ­

r e q u ir in g

to p e r­

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In

t a b u la t in g

c o m p le x

in

o f lo n g

w o rk t y p ic a lly

s t u d ie s

e m p lo y e e s

w it h
t e le p h o n e

th e

stu d y , or p a rts

and

Class C—
in g

m essag es.

and

p e rfo rm s

o p e ra to rs.

m o re

and

The

p ro c e d u re s a re

Does not include transcribing-machine work.

a s in g le - o r m u lt ip le - p o s it io n

c a lls

ste p s

or p a r t ia lly

com ­

and

n o n r e c u r r in g

seq u en ces

ta b u ­

o rd e r,

D u t i e s in v o lv e h a n d lin g in c o m in g , o u t g o in g , a n d in t r a p la n t o r o f f ic e
re co rd

lo n g

in v o lv e d

s u p e r v is io n

su ch as

in s t r u c t io n s

and

M ay

of

of

a c ­

th e

P e rfo rm s

o th e rs.

as

s u p e r v is o r s p e rf o r m in g t a b u la t in g - m a c h in e

O p e ra te s

m a c h in e s

s m a ll t a b u la t in g

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
O p e ra te s

w o r k in g

a n d d a y -to -d a y

in g fro m d ia g r a m s .
la t io n s

is

or

t y p ic a lly

o p e r a t io n s ,

e le c t r ic a l

s u p e r v is io n , a n d

v a r ie t y

s o rt e r , re p ro d u c e r, a n d c o lla t o r .

s p e c if ic

d u ty

s e q u e n c in g

o f t a b u la t in g - m a c h in e

c o u n t in g

STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
P rim a ry

and

or

m a c h in e s

c o m p le t e r e p o r t in g

a

ir r e g u la r

a n d o p e r a t in g

Class B—

o r­

Does not include transcribing-machine

e tc .

su ch

t y p e w r it e r .

se t up and

a g ro u p

a re

o p e ra to r, is

fro m d ia g r a m s
fro m

Th e

w h ic h

e x p e r ie n c e d

d ic t a t io n

r e q u ir e d .

so m e

or

o f s u p e rio r.

ta k e

t a b u la t in g

c o lla t o r

in v o lv e

Does not include
is

in t e r p r e t e r ,

t y p ic a lly

to rs

d u ty

of

in c lu d in g

p o rts

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
P rim a ry

v a r ie t y

a s s ig n m e n t s

in f o r m a t io n

s p e c ia l

a

p le t e r e p o r t in g a s s ig n m e n t s w it h o u t c l o s e

(w h e re

or b y S te n o ty p e

O p e ra te s

m a c h in e s , t y p ic a lly

ty p e

t y p in g

w h ile

at

re c o rd s . M ay a ls o ty p e

copy

W o rk e rs

and

v o lv in g

s im p le

a v a r ie d

o r re p o rts
d ic t a t io n
as

do

c le r ic a l

t r a n s c r ib in g

t e c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d v o c a b u la r y

on s c ie n t if ic
in

w o rk .

sh o rth a n d

re se a rch

a re

n o t in c lu d e d .

or b y S te n o ty p e

a s te n o g ra p h e r, g e n e r a l.

su ch
A

fro m

in ­

a s le g a l b r ie f s

w o rk e r w ho

o r s im ila r m a c h in e

w rit te n

d ic t a t io n

is

ta k e s

c la s s if ie d

24

TYPIST

TYPIST— Continued
U s e s a t y p e w r it e r to m a k e

out b ills
c lu d e
in g

a fte r

t y p in g

c a lc u la t io n s

of

su ch

as

M ay

k e e p in g

d is t r ib u t in g

do

c le r ic a l

s im p le

o f v a r io u s

m ade

m a t e r ia l o r to m a k e

b y a n o th e r p e rs o n .

or

in v o lv in g

f ilin g

re co rd s

fo r u s e

lit t le

in

t u a tio n , e t c .,

M ay in ­

t e r ia l;

d u p lic a t ­

to

s p e c ia l t r a in in g ,

fo rm

w hen

u n if o r m it y

le t t e r s

v a r y in g

Class B—

it in v o lv e s

c o m b in in g

fo r c o rre c t

la y o u t a n d
and

d e t a ils

t y p in g

b a la n c e
to

o r f o r e ig n la n g u a g e m a ­

o f c o m p lic a t e d
in

s t a t is t ic a l t a b le s

s p a c in g .

M ay

ty p e

ro u tin e

s u it c ir c u m s t a n c e s .

a n d r e p o r t s , o r s o r t in g

one or more of the following:

r e s p o n s ib ilit y

o f t e c h n ic a l o r u n u s u a l w o rd s

p la n n in g

m a in t a in

m a il.

P e rfo rm s

t e r ia l in f i n a l fo rm

w o rk

re co rd s,

in c o m in g

Class A—
so u rce s

c o p ie s

been

s t e n c il s , m a t s , o r s im ila r m a t e r ia ls

p ro ce sse s.

and

have

T y p in g

m a t e r ia l fro m

s p e llin g ,

P e rfo rm s

one or more of the following:

C opy

fro m ro u g h o r c l e a r d r a f t s ; r o u t in e t y p in g o f f o r m s , in s u r a n c e

m a­

e t c .;

se v e ra l

s e t t in g u p

p le x

s y lla b ic a t io n , p u n c-

t a b le s

s im p le

a lr e a d y

sta n d a rd

se t up and

t y p in g

p o lic ie s ,

t a b u la t io n s , o r c o p y in g m o re c o m ­

sp aced

p r o p e r ly .

beam s

and

P R O F E S S IO N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR— Continued

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
( A s s is t a n t d ra ftsm a n )
D ra w s
m an

or o th e rs

U se s

v a r io u s

fro m

s im p le

to

s c a le

in v o lv e d
u n it s

or p a rts

of

d r a w in g s

fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s t r u c t io n , o r
ty p e s

o f d r a f t in g

p la n s

or

t o o ls

sk e tch e s,

or

a s

m a n u fa c t u rin g

r e q u ir e d .

p e rfo rm

p re p a re d

by d ra fts­
p u rp o se s.

M ay p re p a re

o th e r d u tie s

d r a w in g s

u n d e r d ir e c t io n

p le t e d
w r it in g

stre n g th

of

s p e c if ic a t io n s ;

d e t a il u n it s
a

m a k in g
in

o f c o m p le t e

s p e c ia liz e d

m a t e r ia ls ,

d im e n s io n s , m a t e r ia ls

s p e c if ic a t io n s . M a y in k

in

of a d ra ftsm a n .

in

w o rk , c h e c k in g

f ie ld

lin e s

a d ju s t m e n t s
and

as

or

le t t e r s

d r a w in g s , o r t r a c e
su ch

tru sse s;

to b e

v e r if y in g

u sed , and

changes

in

d r a w in g s

o n p e n c il d r a w in g s ,
d r a w in g s .

W o rk i s

a r c h it e c t u r a l, e le c t r ic a l,

com ­

q u a n t it ie s ;
or

p re p a re

f r e q u e n t ly

m e c h a n ic a l, or

s t r u c t u r a l d r a f t in g .

DRAFTSMAN, LEADER
P la n s
a r a t io n

of

and

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

d ir e c t s

w o r k in g

p la n s

a c t iv it ie s

and

of one

o r m o re d r a fts m e n

d e t a il d r a w in g s

fro m

ro u g h

in

p re p ­

o r p r e lim in a r y

s k e t c h e s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s t r u c t io n , o r m a n u fa c tu rin g p u r p o s e s . D u t ie s
in v o lv e
and

a combination of the following:

w ritte n

d u tie s
f ic u lt
r e g u la r

to

or

v e rb a l

o rd e rs;

s u b o r d in a t e s

p r o b le m s .

M ay

a s s ig n m e n t ,

m in is t r a t iv e

and
a s s is t

or

In t e r p r e t in g b lu e p r in t s , s k e t c h e s ,

d e te r m in in g

in s p e c t in g

r e la t e d

p ro ce d u re s;

t h e ir w o rk ;

s u b o r d in a t e s

p e rfo rm

w o rk

d u rin g

d u tie s

of

a s s ig n in g

p e rf o r m in g m o re d if ­
e m e r g e n c ie s
a

or

s u p e r v is o r y

a s

or

a

ad­

n a tu re .

A
e m p lo y e e s
p r e m is e s

r e g is te r e d
or

n u rse

o th e r p e rs o n s

of a fa cto ry

tre a te d ;

p r e p a r in g

c o n d u c t in g
and

ill

G iv in g

f ir s t

a id

s e r v ic e .t o

or su ffe r an

to th e

D u tie s

e x a m in a t io n s

e m p lo y e e s ; a n d p la n n in g

fo r c o m p e n s a tio n
and

h e a lt h

a n d c a r r y in g

ill

o r in ju r e d

a c c id e n t

in v o lv e

re co rd s

or o th e r p u rp o s e s ;

e v a lu a t io n s

o f a p p lic a n ts

o u t p ro g ra m s in v o lv in g

a c t iv it ie s

DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
P re p a re s

in g
of

D u tie s

p la n s , d e t a il
d r a f t in g

p la n s

fro m

a combination of the following:

n o te s,

P r e p a r in g

d r a w in g s , m a p s , c r o s s - s e c t io n s , e t c ., to

in s t r u m e n t s ; m a k in g




a n d d e t a il d r a w in g s

w e lf a r e ,

sa fe ty

of

a ll

o th e r

p e r s o n n e l.

ro u g h

fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s t r u c t io n , o r m a n u fa c tu rin g

in v o lv e

and

h e a lt h ,

h e a lt h

or

TRACER

w o r k in g

o r d e t a ile d s k e t c h e s
p o ses.

o f p la n t e n v ir o n m e n t ,

th e

to

o f p a t ie n t s

e d u c a t io n , a c c id e n t p r e v e n t io n , e v a lu a t io n
a f f e c t in g

on th e

a combina-

i l l o r in ju r e d ; a t t e n d in g

o f e m p lo y e e s ' in ju r i e s ; k e e p in g

a c c id e n t re p o rts

p h y s ic a l

n u r s in g

becom e

o r o th e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .

tion of the following:
s u b s e q u e n t d r e s s in g

w h o g iv e s
w ho

e n g in e e r in g

c o m p u ta tio n s

s c a le
su ch

as

by

C o p ie s

p u r­

w o rk ­
u se

th o se

in g

c lo t h

or

p la n s a n d d r a w in g s p re p a r e d

paper

over

T -sq u a re , co m p a ss, and
in g s

a n d d o s im p le

d r a w in g

and

o t h e r d r a f t in g

le t t e r in g .

t r a c in g
to o ls .

b y o th e r s , b y p la c in g
w it h
M ay

pen

or p e n c il.

p re p a re

s im p le

tra c­
U se s
d ra w ­

25

M A IN T E N A N C E

D

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE
P e rfo rm s th e
t a in

in

ca rp e n try

g o o d r e p a ir b u ild in g

co u n te rs,

b e n ch e s,

m a d e o f w o o d in
P la n n in g
v erb a l

and

an

and

c o m p u ta tio n s
e ssa ry
r e q u ir e s

out
u s in g

ro u n d e d

In

a v a r ie t y
m e a s u r in g

to

w o rk .

f lo o r s ,

s t a irs ,

t r im

most of the following:

e m p lo y e d

w it h

o p e ra te s

a

v a lv e s .

M ay

o f th e

and

a c q u ir e d

th ro u g h

a

fo r­

A s s is t s

or

u t iliz a t io n

of

w o rk th e

e le c t r ic a l

e le c t r ic

most of the following:

in v o lv e s

o f e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t s u c h
c o n t r o lle r s , c ir c u it

as

b re a k e rs,

tra d e

o r o th e r t r a n s m is s io n

e n e rg y

f u n c t io n s

In s t a llin g

in
or

su ch

lo a d

sy ste m

or

r e q u ir e m e n t s

of

w ir in g

e le c t r ic ia n ’ s h a n d t o o ls
e r a l, th e
and

w o rk

e x p e r ie n c e

o f th e

and

r e p a ir in g

h e a t in g

u n it s ,

g e n e ra tin g , d is ­

m it t e d

to

any

c o n d u it

e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g

W o rk

in

and

t e s t in g

e le c ­

a v a r ie t y

in s t r u m e n t s .

r e q u ir e s

th ro u g h

fo rm a l

a

th e

th a t a re

p ly
t io n ,

th e

e s t a b lis h m e n t

or

m a in t a in s
and

and

ro u n d e d

In

su ch

of

jig s ,

gen­

t r a in in g

a p p re n tic e s h ip

or

in

w h ic h

e m p lo y e d

W o rk

in v o lv e s :

t u r b in e s ,
b o ile r - f e d

as

ste a m

v e n t ila t in g

and

th e o p e r a t io n

e q u ip m e n t ( m e c h a n i c a l o r e l e c t r i c a l )

a ir - c o n d it io n in g .

e q u ip m e n t s u c h

s u p e r v is e

w it h

r e f r ig e r a t in g

e q u ip m e n t ,

e q u ip m e n t

to s u p ­

of

m a c h in e r y , te m p e r a tu r e , a n d

s u p e r v is e t h e s e




o p e r a t io n s .

w h ic h

by hand

w a te r an d

b o ile r r o o m

or

sa fe ty

e q u ip m e n t .

s k ill e d m a in t e n a n c e
s k ill, su c h

t o o ls ; c le a n in g
by

p e rfo rm

c o n f in e d

s p e c ia liz e d

th e

of le s s e r

h o ld in g
by

tra d e

lif t in g ,

a re a s; and

in

o p e r a t io n s ,

on a

a re a , m a­

m a t e r ia ls

fro m

to s u p p ly in g ,

m a c h in e

w o r k in g

k e e p in g

or

jo u r n e y m a n . T h e

v a r ie s

w o r k in g

tra d e s,

as

f u ll- t im e

to

to o ls ;
k in d

tra d e :

a n d h o ld in g

o th e rs

or

he

p a rts

m a­

is

of

a

of
In

p e r­
tra d e

b a s is .

as

jig

in

m a c h in e s

f ix t u r e s ,

th e

o p e r a t io n

or

in

th e

d ie s .

c o n s t r u c t io n

W o rk

c is io n

se tu p s

m e a s u r in g

r e q u is it e
to o ls

and

o r a h ig h

d e g re e

m a k in g

o f a c c u r a c y ; u s in g

n e ce ssa ry

t o le r a n c e s
need

c u t t in g

or

d r e s s in g ,

and

fe e d s,

to

e x c lu d e d

fro m

t h is

to o ls ,

d re ss
o ils .

it e m s

t o o ls ,

to

of p re ­
and

op­

o p e r a t io n

b e r e q u ir e d
and

P la n n in g
r e q u ir in g

t o o lin g

d u rin g

M ay

la t h e s ,
g au g es,

a v a r ie t y

sp eed s,

a d ju s t m e n t s

d im e n s io n s .

lu b r ic a t in g

o f m a c h in e

g r in d e r s , e n g in e

o p e r a t io n s ; p r o c e s s in g

to

to

re co g ­

s e le c t

p ro p e r

F o r c r o s s - in d u s t r y w a g e stu d y

p u r p o s e s , m a c h in e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s , to o lro o m , in
a re

or m o re t y p e s

o f m a c h in e - s h o p

in s t r u m e n t s ; s e le c t in g

se q u en ce ;

w hen

one

most of the following:

in v o lv e s

a n d p e rf o r m in g d if f ic u l t m a c h in in g
c o m p lic a t e d

of

b o re rs, c y lin d r ic a l or s u rfa c e

t o o l a n d d ie

jo b b in g

sh o p s

c la s s if ic a t io n .

and

m a in t a in in g

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

g e n e ra to rs , m o to rs
ste a m

b o ile r s

r e p a ir s ; k e e p in g

and

a re co rd

of

f u e l c o n s u m p tio n .
M a y also
Head or chief engineers in establishments
employing more than one engineer are excluded.
o p e r a t io n

f ir e

p o w e r, h e a t , r e f r ig e r a ­

O p e r a t in g

e n g in e s , a ir c o m p r e s s o r s ,

w a t e r p u m p s ; m a k in g

in

d ir e c t e d

p e rfo rm e d b y w o rk e rs

e ra t io n

m ay a ls o

and

as

to

c le a n in g

S p e c ia liz e s
to o ls ,

n iz e

and

to

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM

c o o la n t s
and

r e p a ir in g

w o rk e r

ta sk s

p e rm itt e d

p e rfo rm

o r m illin g

a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

e n g in e s

m a t e r ia ls

th e h e lp e r i s
to o ls

a ls o

to

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O p e ra te s

in

o r g e n e ra l d u tie s

w it h

a c h ie v e

o f s t a t io n a r y

e s t a b lis h m e n t in
f u e ls

sy ste m s,

c o m p u ta tio n s r e la t in g

e le c t r ic ia n

a c q u ir e d

th e

Fe e d s

o f a v a r ie t y

o r e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t ; u s in g

m a in t e n a n c e

u s u a lly

sta n d a rd

m e a s u r in g

a s s is t

o r m o re w o r k e r s

o th e r u n s k ille d

and

e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k in g fro m b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , l a y ­

e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k in g

or

e q u ip m e n t ; a s s i s t i n g

tra d e s

t e r ia ls

a n e s t a b lis h m e n t .

one

h e lp e r is

th e

o u t, o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; lo c a t i n g a n d d ia g n o s in g t r o u b le
t r ic a l

as

g e n e ra to rs , t r a n s fo r m e r s , s w it c h b o a r d s ,

m o to rs,

o il,

s p e c if ic

a w o rk e r s u p p lie d
c h in e , a n d

e x p e r ie n c e .

i n s t a l l a t i o n , m a in t e n a n c e , o r r e p a ir o f e q u ip m e n t fo r t h e
t r ib u tio n ,

c le a n ,

b y p e rf o r m in g

so m e
of

to f u r n is h

ste a m .

HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE

n ec­

ca rp e n te r

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
v a r ie t y

or

sh o p

m a in t e n a n c e

a n d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly

p o r ta b le

sta n d a rd
m a t e r ia ls

o f w o rk ; s e le c t in g
w o rk

o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g

a

b o ile r s

p o w e r,

m e c h a n ic a l s t o k e r , g a s , o r o il b u rn e r; c h e c k s

p e rfo r m in g

P e rfo rm s

s t a t io n a r y
h e a t,

b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , m o d e ls , o r

o f c a r p e n t e r ’ s h a n d t o o ls ,

d im e n s io n s

F ir e s

m a in ­

a s b in s , c r ib s ,

c a s in g s , and

in s t r u m e n t s ; m a k in g

g e n e r a l, th e

t r a in in g

m a l a p p re n tic e s h ip

d o o rs,

o f w o r k fro m

sta n d a rd

r e la t in g

fo r th e

n e c e s s a r y to c o n s t r u c t a n d

e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o rk in v o lv e s

la y in g

in s t r u c t io n s ;

p o w e r t o o ls ,

d u tie s

w o o d w o r k a n d e q u ip m e n t s u c h

p a r t it io n s ,

P O W E R P L A N T

P ro d u ce s
m e ta l p a rts
in v o lv e s

r e p la c e m e n t p a r t s a n d

most of the following:

s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; p la n n in g
c h in is t ’s

new

o f m e c h a n i c a l e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t e d

and

In t e r p r e t in g

la y in g

h a n d t o o ls a n d p r e c is io n

p a rts

in

in

e s t a b lis h m e n t .

an

w rit te n

o u t o f w o r k ; u s in g

m e a s u r in g

m a k in g r e p a ir s

in s t r u c t io n s

of

W o rk
and

a v a r ie t y

of

m a­

in s t r u m e n t s ; s e t t in g

up

and

26

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE— Continued
o p e r a t in g
an ces;

sta n d a rd

m a c h in e

t o o ls ;

MILLWRIGHT— Continued

s h a p in g

o f m e ta l p a rts

to

c lo s e

m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e la t in g to d im e n s io n s

t o o lin g ,f e e d s
e r t ie s

of

and

th e

sp ee d s

com m on

e q u ip m e n t r e q u ir e d

o f m a c h in in g ; k n o w le d g e

m e ta ls ;

fo r h is

s e le c t in g

w o rk ;

f it t in g

c h a n i c a l e q u ip m e n t .

In

a

m a c h in e - s h o p

ro u n d e d

t r a in in g

in

fo rm a l a p p re n t ic e s h ip

g e n e r a l,

th e

sta n d a rd

and

p r a c t ic e

th e

w o r k in g

p a rts

p ro p ­

r e q u ir e d .

la t in g
and

th ro u g h

a

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
R e p a ir s

e q u ip m e n t

to

p e rf o r m in g

r e p a ir s

d ia g n o s e

most of the following:

so u rce

th a t

of

in v o lv e

E x a m in in g

t r o u b le ; d is a s s e m b lin g

th e

u se

of su ch

b ro k e n

or

d e f e c t iv e

v a lv e s ; r e a s s e m b lin g
a n d m a k in g
lig h t s ,

m e c h a n ic
th ro u g h

a fo rm a l

b o lts .

ro u n d e d

In

a p p re n t ic e s h ip

and

of an

o r f it t in g
and

e s­

to b e

w o rk

e q u ip m e n t

e x p e r ie n c e

u s u a lly

t r a in in g

and

m a n t lin g

to d ia g n o s e

m a c h in e s

h a n d t o o ls

in

p a rts

it e m s

w it h

s c r a p in g

m ent p a rt b y a
fo r

m a jo r

fo r th e

o b ta in e d

r e p a ir s ;

p ro d u c tio n

w o rk

p e r ie n c e
t r a in in g
w h o se

of

a

fro m

of

a c q u ir e d

e x p e r ie n c e .

a c q u ir e d

a c q u ir e d

primary duties

p a rts;

w ritte n

o rd e re d

r e p la c in g

and

m echan­

o r p a r t ly

in v o lv e

b ro k e n

th e

m a c h in e

a d ju s t m e n t s

or

th ro u g h
E x c lu d e d

a

of

s e t t in g

t h is

sh o p

f o r m a jo r r e p a ir s

ro u n d e d

or

c la s s if ic a t io n

u p o r a d ju s tin g

In

t r a in in g

fo rm a l a p p re n tic e s h ip
fro m

or

m a­

g e n e r a l,
and

ex­

e q u iv a le n t
a re

w o rk e rs

P a in t s
t a b lis h m e n t .
lia r it ie s
su rfa ce

and

in s t a lls

m a c h in e s

or




heavy

h e a v y e q u ip m e n t a n d

e q u ip m e n t

w hen

d r iv e s

and

a

in

sp eed

good

In

t r a in in g

fo rm a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip

p a rts

o rd e r p o w e r t r a n s m is s io n

re d u ce rs.

a ro u n d e d

o il or g re a s e ,

th e

g e n e r a l,

and

th e

e x p e r ie n c e

m ill­
in

o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g

m o v in g p a r t s

or

r e q u ir e s

chan ges

in

w a lls ,

w o o d w o rk , an d

involves the following:

ty p e s

and

c o lo r s ,

o f p a in t r e q u ir e d

th e
and

o r w e a r in g

su r­

b y r e m o v in g

in t e r s t ic e s ;

o i l s , w h it e

o ld

In

and

of

of an e s­

su rfa ce

o r b y p la c in g p u tty

p a in t w it h

sp ra y

gun

o th e r p a in t in g r e d ie n t s

g e n e r a l,

ro u n d e d t r a in in g

f in is h

a p p ly in g

le a d , a n d

c o n s is t e n c y .

f ix t u r e s

K n o w le d g e

pecu­

fo r d if f e r e n t a p p lic a t io n s ; p r e p a r in g

th e

w o rk o f

e x p e r ie n c e

th e

u s u a lly

m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g

and

or fille r

or b ru sh .

to o b ta in

m a in t e n a n c e

a c q u ir e d

in

M ay

p ro p e r
p a in t e r

th ro u g h

a fo r­

e x p e r ie n c e .

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
In s t a lls
p ip e f it t in g s

in

d is m a n t le s

and

th e p la n t la y o u t

o r r e p a ir s

an

w a te r, ste a m , g a s ,

e s t a b lis h m e n t .

W o rk

to lo c a t e

o r o th e r w rit te n

c u t t in g

le n g t h s w it h

c h is e l an d

c h in e ; t h r e a d in g
or

s p e c if ic a t io n s ;

p o w e r - d r iv e n

p ip e

and

s iz e

of

sto ck s

sta n d a rd

p ip e

p ip e s

p ip e f it t e r

p o s it io n

v a r io u s

and

sh o p

r e q u ir e d ;

d ie s ;
p ip e

o f p ip e

s iz e s

m a k in g

sta n d a rd

th ro u g h a fo rm a l

ro u n d ed

a p p re n tic e s h ip

In

t r a in in g
or

fro m

o f p ip e

and

d r a w in g s
to c o r r e c t

o r p ip e - c u t t in g
p ip e

c o u p lin g s

c o m p u ta tio n s

m ee t s p e c if ic a t io n s r e q u ir e s

b e n d in g
w it h

o f p ip e

most of the following:

h am m er o r o x y a c e t y le n e to rc h

w it h

m a c h in e s ; a s s e m b lin g

p ip e to h a n g e r s ; m a k in g

or o th e r ty p e s

in v o lv e s

L a y i n g o u t o f w o r k a n d m e a s u r in g

a c q u ir e d
or

m a in t a in in g

and re d e co ra te s

W o rk

fo r p a in t in g

m a in t e n a n c e

m a c h in e s

a lin in g

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE

f lo w ,

m a c h in e s .

MILLWRIGHT
new

as

th ro u g h

w h e th e r f in is h e d

In s t a lls

o f g r a v it y ;

a

re ­

d e f e c t iv e

s h o p ; r e a s s e m b lin g

fo r o p e r a t io n .

r e q u ir e s

ce n te rs

c o m p u ta tio n s

d is ­

u se

m a c h in e to a m a c h in e

s p e c if ic a t io n s

fro m

m e c h a n ic

in v o lv e

t h a t m a in ly

o f th e

and

sh o p

la y in g

u s in g

o f m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o f a n e s t a b li s h m e n t .

s t o c k ; o rd e rin g th e p ro d u c tio n o f a r e p la c e ­

a ll n e c e s s a ry

e x p e r ie n c e .

e s t a b lis h m e n t .

m a c h in e s

t r o u b le ; d is m a n t lin g

o r s e n d in g

p r e p a r in g
of p a rts

E x a m in in g

r e p a ir s

f it t in g

m a in t e n a n c e

u s u a lly
and

and

machine s h o p

c h in e s ; a n d m a k in g
th e

so u rce

a n d p e rf o r m in g

su ch

and

L u b r i c a t e s , w it h
fa ce s

m ix

R e p a i r s m a c h in e r y o r m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o f a n

i c a l e q u ip m e n t

sta n d a rd

m a t e r ia ls ,

and

OILER

c o lo r

of the following:

of

w o r k n o r m a lly r e q u ir e s

and

o f th e a u t o m o t iv e

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE

m o st

stre n g th

u s e d ; in s t a llin g

n a il h o le s

W o rk in v o lv e s

a n d r ig g in g ; m a k in g

P la n n in g

s p e c if ic a t io n s ;

p a rts;

a d ju s tin g

w h e e ls , a d ju s tin g b ra k e s

o r e q u iv a le n t

o r o th e r

a s s e m b lie s in th e v e h ic le

g e n e r a l, th e

t r a in in g

b lu e p r in t s

a u t o m o t iv e

a s w re n ch e s,

s t o c k ; g r in d in g

a d ju s t m e n t s ; a lin in g
body

r e q u ir e s

fro m

a n d in s t a llin g th e v a r io u s

n e ce ssa ry

o r t ig h t e n in g

p a rts

stre sse s,

e q u ip m e n t a n d

h a n d t o o ls

g a u g e s , d r i l l s , o r s p e c i a l i z e d e q u ip m e n t in d i s a s s e m b l i n g
r e p la c in g

to

most of the following:

e x p e r ie n c e .

a u t o m o b ile s , b u s e s , m o t o r t ru c k s , a n d t r a c t o r s

W o rk in v o lv e s

o f h a n d t o o ls

w r ig h t 's

e x p e r ie n c e .

W o rk in v o lv e s

w o r k ; in t e r p r e t in g

b a l a n c in g o f e q u ip m e n t ; s e l e c t i n g s t a n d a r d t o o l s , e q u ip m e n t , a n d

tra d e

t a b lis h m e n t .

th e

v a r ie t y

and

r e q u ir e s

a c q u ir e d

a re

out of

m e­

in t o

w o r k n o r m a lly

u s u a lly
and

o f w o rk ,

m a t e r ia ls , p a r t s ,

a s s e m b lin g

m a c h in is t 's

o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g

of

t o le r ­

m a­

b y h a n d - d riv e n
a n d f a s t e n in g

r e la t in g to p r e s s u r e s ,
te sts

g e n e r a l, th e

to

d e te rm in e

w o rk

a n d e x p e r ie n c e

e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g

of

th e

u s u a lly
and

ex­

Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building
sanitation or heating systems a r e excluded.
p e rie n c e .

27

TOOL AND DIE MAKER

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE

Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of
vents and traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and
fixtures; opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber's snake. In
general, the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiv­
alent training and experience.
SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE

Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheetmetal equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans,
shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an
establishment. Work involves most of the following: Planning and lay­
ing out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints, models,
or other specifications; setting up and operating all available types of
sheet-metal-working machines; using a variety of handtools in cutting,
bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; installing sheetmetal articles as required. In general, the work of the maintenance
sheet-metal worker requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

(Die maker; jig maker; toolmaker; fixture maker; gauge maker)
Constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gauges, jigs, fix­
tures or dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work. Work
involves most of the following: Planning and laying out of work from
models, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications;
using a variety of tool and die maker's handtools and precision meas­
uring instruments, understanding of the working properties of common
metals and alloys; setting up and operating of machine tools and related
equipment; making necessary shop computations relating to dimensions
of work, speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heattreating of metal
parts during fabrication as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve
required qualities; working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling
of parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances; selecting appropriate
materials, tools, and processes. In general, the tool and die maker's
work requires a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom practice
usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.

C USTOD IAL AND M ATER IAL MOVEMENT
ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— Continued

Transports passengers between floors of an office building,
apartment house, department store, hotel or similar establishment.
Workers who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such as
those of starters and janitors are excluded.

or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following:
Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures;polish­
ing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor mainte­
nance services; cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers
who specialize in window washing are excluded.

GUARD

Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour,
maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate and check on identity of employees and
other persons entering.
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER

(Sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial




LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING

(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store,
or other establishment whose duties involve one or more of the follow­
ing: Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or

28

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING— Continued

from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelv­
ing, or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location; trans­
porting materials or merchandise by hand truck, car, or wheelbarrow.
Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are excluded.
ORDER FILLER

(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, customers'
orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling orders and indi­
cating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requisi­
tion additional stock, or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform
other related duties.

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued

For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKDRIVER

Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport ma­
terials, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of estab­
lishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses,
wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail establishments
and customers' houses or places of business. May also load or unload
truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep
truck in good working order. Driver-salesmen and over-the-road drivers
are excluded.

PACKER, SHIPPING

Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing
them in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being
dependent upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the
type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the
placing of items in shipping containers and may involve one or more of
the following: Knowledge of various items of stock in order to verify
content; selection of appropriate type and size of container; inserting
enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent
breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; applying labels or
entering identifying data on container. Packers who also make wooden
boxes or crates are excluded.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK

Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is respon­
sible for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping
work involves: A knowledge of shipping procedures, practices, routes,
available means of transportation and rates; and preparing records of the
goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping
charges, and keeping a file of shipping records. May direct or assist in
preparing the merchandise for shipment. Receiving work involves: Veri­
fying or directing others in verifying the correctness of shipments against
bills of lading, invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and
rejecting damaged goods; routing merchandise or materials to proper de­
partments; maintaining necessary records and files.




For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size
and type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on
the basis of trailer capacity.)
Truckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under 1% tons)

Truckdriver, medium ( l l to and including 4 tons)
A
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)
TRUCKER, POWER

Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered
truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a
warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of
truck, as follows:
Trucker, power ( o k i t
frlf)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)
WATCHMAN

Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property
against fire, theft, and illegal entry.
* U S. G V R M N PR TIN O F E : I960 0 —540323
O E N E T IN G F IC

Occupational Wage Surveys
Occupational wage surveys are being conducted in 60 major labor markets during late 1959 and early I960. These bulletins, when available,
may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing O ffice, Washington 25, D .C ., or from any of the BLS regional
sales offices shown below.
A summary bulletin containing data for all labor markets, combined with additional analysis, will be issued early in 1961.
Bulletins for the areas listed below are now available.




Cleveland, Ohio, September 1959—BLS Bull. 1265-1, price 20 cents
Seattle, Wash., August 1959—BLS Bull. 1265-2, price 25 cents
Dallas, T ex., October 1959—BLS Bull. 1265-3, price 20 cents





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102