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Occupational Wage Survey

Bulletin No. 1095

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commiftioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION.................................................................................

1

THE ST. LOUIS METROPOLITAN AREA .............................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E .................................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ....................................•............ .
A-2
Professional and technical occupations...........
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ............ ............. ............
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ............................

3
8
9
11

Average earnings far selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2337
Women's and misses1 coats and suits ..............
B-235
M i l l i n e r y ......................................................................
B-2431
M i l l v o r k ........................................
B-336
Foundries, nonferrous ....................
B-342
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware
...................o....... .
B-3439
Heating a p p a r a t u s .... .............
B-35
Machinery industries ..........
B-40
Railroads ........... ............ *o...........................................
B-63
Insurance carriers .............. ................. .••••••••••••••...... .

14
U
15
15
16
16
17
19
19

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ......................
C-205
Bakeries .......................................................................
C-2082
Malt liquors ...................................................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g .......................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ............
C-542
Meat c u t t e r s .......
C-5452
Milk dealers .................................................................
C-58
Restaurants ............
C-7011 Hotels .........................................................................

20
20
20
21
21
21
22
22
22
23

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plantworkers .......

24

Wags practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ............ ......... • ••••........ .............
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ..............................................
E-3
Paid holidays ..................................................................
E-4
Paid vacations ............
E-5
Paid sick leave ..........
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ......... ....... ....... .............. .............. • •••
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ............

24
25
25
26
27
29
29

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey .................................. .

30

INDEX ........................................................................................

32

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports are available
upon request for auto repair shops (May 1951). ferrous foundries
(June 1951), paints and varnishes
(May 1951), power laundries
(Mqr 1951), women's cement process shoes - slip lasted (August
1951), women's cement process shoes - conventional lasted (August
1951).

For sale by tbe Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

June 11, 1952

- Price 25 cents

Introduction

y

The Sto Louis area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
whioh the Bureau of labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys © Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis© Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilised in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(o) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping©
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions© 2/
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey© Earnings data for these jobs
have been presented in Series B tables© Union Scales (Series C
tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational
earnings for several industries or trades in whioh the great
majority of the workers are employed under terms of collectivebargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are
indicative of prevailing pay practices©
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans©

The St. Louis Metropolitan A rea
The St© Louis Metropolitan Area, consisting of the
oityofSt© Louis, St© Louis and St© Charles Counties in Missouri,
and Madison and St© Clair Counties, Illinois, was the ninth
largest standard metropolitan area in the United States in 1950©
The total population of the area numbered 1,681,300, a gain of
17 percent over 1940© The population of the city of St© Louis
increased about 5 percent during the decade, reaching a total
of 856,800©

1/ Prepared in the Bureaufs regional offioe in Chicago, 111*,
by Walter C© Lemon under the direction of George Eo Votava,
Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst© The planning
and central direction of the program was carried on in the
B u r e a u ^ Division of Wages and Industrial Relations©
2/ The construction and extractive industries and govern­
ment institutions were excluded from the study; see appendix
for discussion of scope and method of survey©



This leading city of the Mississippi Valley is situated
on the Mississippi River a short distance below the mouth of the
Missouri, and serves as the hub of the inland waterways system
which provides service south to New Orleans, north to Minneapo­
lis, northeast to Chicago and the Great Lakes, east to Pitts­
burgh, and west to Kansas City - thus serving as a major trans­
fer point between barge lines and railroads© S t 0 Louis, the
terminus of 18 trunk line railroads, is the second largest trans­
portation center in the United States© Twenty-two motor bus
lines and six commercial air lines furnish additional transpor­
tation facilities© Highway freight is serviced by 293 truck
lines ©
In January 1952 the number of wage and salaried work­
ers in nonagricultural employment in the metropolitan area was
estimated to be more than 693,OCX)© About 40 percent of this
total were employed in the wide variety of manufacturing estab­
lishments located in the area© Total manufacturing employment
was divided almost evenly between firms producing durable and
nondurable goods©
The wide divers if ioation of manufacturing
is further emphasized by the fact that no single industry group
employed 15 percent of the workers©
The primary-metals industry accounted for the great­
est number of workers in the durable-goods manufacturing group,
with approximately 29,000 employees engaged in the production
of steel, iron and steel castings, reenforcing bars, pipes and
tubing, wire, nonferrous castings, and other miscellaneous pri­
mary products of ferrous and nonferrous metals© Other prominent
durable-goods industries included those producing electrical
machinery and transportation equipment, each of which industries
emplqyed in excess of 21,000 workers; nonelectrical machinery
manufacturing with 20,000 workers employed the next largest
number in the durable-goods group, and fabricated metal manu­
facturing followed, with well over 19,000 workers©
The most important segment of the nondurable-goods
industry group was the processing of food and related products
(primarily meat packing, beverages, grain mill, and bakery prod­
ucts) which furnished employment to more than 36,000 persona in
January© Other major nondurable industries included chemicals,
apparel, footwear, and printing and publishing©
Because of splendid transportation facilities and a
very extensive trade territory, St© Louis is one of the leading
distribution centers of the United States© Of the estimated
420,000 wage and salary workers on the payrolls of her nonmanu­
facturing establishments in January 1952, more than 105,000 were
employed in retail trade© Wholesale trade furnished employment
for an additional 50,000 workers©

2 / See appendix table for listing
able-goods industries©

of durable- and nondur­

2

Approximately 70,000 employees were included in vari­
ous segments of transportation, communication, and other public
utilities. Of this total,railroads accounted for almost 28,000,
Service industries employed 40,000 persons in such diverse
fields as automobile and other repair shops, laundries, clean­
ing and dyeing establishments, hotels, theatres, radio and tele­
vision stations, and business service establishments. Finance,
insurance, and real estate operations employed an estimated
30,000 workers © Federal, State, and local government offices
and institutions accounted for mare than 42,000 employees.
Union organization was very extensive in the indus­
tries and establishment-size groups covered in the St, Louis
area as is indicated by the fact that practically all the non­
office workers were employed in plants having written agreements
with labor organizations 0 In durable-goods manufacturing indus­
tries too, virtually all factory workers were employed in union
plants. Labor-management agreements covered nearly all plant
workers in the transportation (except railroads), communication,
and other public utilities group. In other nonmanufacturing
industries union agreements covered about four-fifths of the
workers in services, three-fourths in wholesale trade, and
approximately a third in finance.
Unionization was relatively insignificant among St,
Louis office workers • Oily in the transportation, communication,
and other public utilities group, in which nearly three-fourths
of all office employees worked in establishments having written
agreements covering office workers, was unionization in offices
found to any appreciable degree. No more than 10 percent of the
office workers in each of the other industry groups were employed
under union contract termso

Occupational W age Structure
During the period between January 1, 1950, the base
period for the Wage Stabilization Board*s 10 percent "catch up"
wage formula, and January 1952, a great majority of the estab­
lishments in the St, Louis area had made seme formal upward ad­
justments in wage rates for nonoffice workers. In durable-goods
manufacturing establishments, approximately seven-eighths of
the plant workers had received total increases of 10 to 30 cents
an hour, with more than a third of the workers receiving pay
raises totaling 15 to 20 cents.
In nondurable-goods industries more than 40 percent
of all plant workers included in the survey received increases
amounting to 20 to 25 cents. Although a majority of the plant
workers received cents-per-hour raises, percentage increases
also were commonly reported. Formal wage increases for office
workers also were extensive, especially in the manufacturing



and public utilities industry groups. In many instances, office
employees were granted pay increases on an individual basis,
rather than general increases.
Formalized wage and salary structures were reported
in establishments employing approximately 95 percent of St, Louis
nonoffice workers. Among the industry groups studied, plans
providing a single or flat rate for time-rated plant jobs were
typical of nondurable-goods manufacturing; transportation (except
railroads), communication, and other public utilities; and serv­
ices, In other industry groups wage progression plans providing
for a range of rates for each job were more common than single­
rate plans. Nearly a fourth of all plant workers were paid in­
centive rates; in manufacturing industries more than a third were
working under incentive plans. In nonmanufacturing industries
incentive plans were relatively insignificant or nonexistent.
For office workers, plans providing a range of rates
for each job classification covered about three-fifths of the
workers 0 Virtually all the remaining workers were employed in
establishments that determined salaries on an individual basis.
Established minimum entrance rates for hiring inex­
perienced plant workers were part of the formalized rate struc­
ture in virtually all of the firms within scope of the survey.
Entrance rates ranged from 60 cents to more than $1,65, Approxi­
mately half the plant workers were employed in establishments
with entrance rates of $1,05 and over, and more than a fifth of
the plant workers were employed in establishments with minimum
rates above $1,20 an hour,
Vhges and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing. In 18 of
the 25 office classifications permitting comparison, average
salaries of workers in manufacturing plants exceeded those in
nonmanufacturing establishments® Average hourly earnings for
plant jobs studied in all industries were higher in manufactur­
ing for 17 of 22 job categories for which comparisons were
possible,
Che-fifth of all plant workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were working on late shifts in January 1952, Almost all
these workers received shift premium payments expressed either
in cents-per-hour or as a percentage of day rates. The most
common second-shift differential was 5 cents.
More than four-fifths of the women office workers were
scheduled to work 40 hours a week in January 1952® In the fi­
nance, real estate, and insurance, and services industries, a
shorter workweek was scheduled for a significant number of office
employees. The scheduled workweek for about three-fourths of
St, Louis plant workers was 40 hours, A large majority of the
remaining plant workers were scheduled to work more than 40
hours.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
T»bi« A-i:

Office Occupation*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, January 1952)

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louie, Ho., January 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroad*), cossmmlcation, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMKin' OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
__________________________________________________________ ________
_




BOTE:

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the emission of department and
limited-price variety stores; the reminder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nonasmufactoring.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

h

m i

* A-i:

Ojjico Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, Janaary 1952)

See footnotes at end of table.
•
Transportation (excluding railroads), cossnmi cation, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5

O ^ict Occupation* - Gon tinnod

ra>i«A-i:

(A verage s t r a i g h t - t i m e weekly h o u rs and e a rn in g s 1 / f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d i e d
on an a re a b a s is i n S t . L o u is , Mo., by in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , J a n u a ry 1 9 5 2 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
•
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
u
$
$
$
$
$ _ $
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 U0.00 U2.50 U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
aad
fo.oo 32.50 35,00 37.50 U0.00 U2.50 U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women - Continued
Calculating-machine operators
(other than Cosntcaeter type) ••••••«..

276
—

Durable goods ................ .
Nondurable goods........ ..... .
Nonmanufacturing ......... ..........

w~
23
11

2h2

68
17

Clerks, accounting ................. .
Manufacturing.... ...........
Durable goods .......... ........ .
Nondurable goods ....... ••.«••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••..•••
Public utilities * ••.....
Wholesale trade ••••••............
Finance
......... ............
Services 2/ ............... .
Clerks, file, class A ............ •••••
Manufacturing ................... .
Durable goods ......... ......... .
Nondurable goods ....................................
.
ng m t i t i t t t i T f t m t t t t
jj^nloQfllA fna/lo i n i l l ** m i i n i
m i
nannA

_T-

nTTiniri'mi**!

1,865
“ ^705“
238
U67
1,16 0
282
3U9
261
108
2UU
69
20
h9

175
ih

107

Uo.o
50.0
Uo.o
ItO.O
UO.O
Uo,5
■^9.5

1
U8.00
U8.50
U9.50
U7.00
U8.00
U6,00
]|l,qo

UO.O
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
Uo.o
39.0
Uo.5

U8.50
U9.50
50.00
U9.50
U7.50
50.50
U8.00
U3.00
U5.50

39.0
39.5
Uo.o
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.0

U3.oo
U6750
U5.50
U7.00
U1.5 0
U2.00
U0.50

Manufacturing •••.••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods......••••••.......
Nondurable goods •••••......••••••
Nonm&nufacturing
Public utilities * ................
Whole sale trade ...................
Finance ** t..................
Services 2 / .................. .

1,185
uiu
257
157
771
113
186
366
57

39.5
UO.O
UO.O
Uo.o
39.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.0
Uo.o

38.00 —
Ul.Oo
U2.50
38.00
37.00
U0.5o
38.50
3U.50
38.00

Clerks, general ............... .......
Manufacturing ••••••.... .......... .
Durable goods .......... • • • • .... ..
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • «
Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finance * * • • • • • • • • • • • • .... ••••• •«
Services 2/ •••••••••........ .

839
309
158
151
530
135
179
108

39.5
UO.O
Uo.o
U0.0
39.0
Uo.o
37.5
39.5

52.00
56.00
60.00
52.50
U9.00
U8.00
51.00
U8.00

525

uo.o

U9.00
U7.50
UU.50
U8.50
51.00
U7.50
52.50

Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ».•••••••••••••«•••••
Public utilities * ••••••••••••••••
wholesale trade ............. ••••

261

uo.o

5U
207
26U
39
182

Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
U0.0

_
_

1

.

2

_
_
13

_

22

.

13

_
1

uu
15

~ w

-

_

15
29
_
_
28
-

-

•
-

-

5
1

_

-

-

_

-

_
_

_

1
62
8
5U
_
_

.
_
-

133
2U
9
15
109
10
6
87
1
_
-

UQ
Uo

222
206
7U “ US26
U2
20
32
1U 8
160
2
27
28
U7
56
9U
2
35
«
,
-

27

37
1

6
25
8

1
36
17

2U
5
5
_
19
9

257
83
U7
36
17U
5U
30
26
UU

177
79
U5
3U
98
19
27
22
8

165
29
1U
15
136
26
38
18
21

1U1
U5
23
22
96
16
50
10
lU

26
U6
r
7 —
2
5
2
6
38
19
26
10
11

U3
23
7
16
20

21
U

.
_

•

7!
7

18
12
12
6
_
6

-

.-

35
17
6
11
18
8
5

6

132
22U
113
55
32
17
38
81
111
77
UU
2U
38 1 lU
1 0 : 19
1 ! 13

26
~T5~
.
1
_
lU
11
5
5

3

1

5
2
1
1
3
2
1

36
13
10
3
23
6

u

26

u

26

_

_

no
31
7
2U
79
18
U5
10
1

99
27
15
12
72
17
13
16
*

35
17
U
13
18
8
3
1
1

52
27
15
12
25
15
2
2
-

25
16
3
13
9
1
6
1
1

6
U
3
1
2

8
u
1
3
£
1

3
1

_

18

UU
3
2
1
U1
8
7
13

83
13
6
7
70
28
18
2

87
U2
6
36
U5
18
1U
-

120
U2
2
Uo
78
32
25
13

126
U9
1U
35
77
lU
37
lU

55
12
10
2
U3
18
13
10

63
Ul
13
28
22

67
50
17
33
17
6

U6
29.
8
21
17

Uo
12
2
10
28

26
7

U

U

61
71
2U ~ 1 T
7
8
2U
U6
U7
1
U2
38

53

U

19

12

3
lU

5

lU
iu
11
3

1

21
12
12

_

25
iu
3
n
n
9
1
_
1

18
7
3
U
n
2
8
_

10
5
1
U
5
U
1
_

-

-

1
1

_

_

-

-

«
•
-

1

1
2

_

_

_

_

_

25
18
1:
17
7
5

1
1
_
1

5
U
1
3
1
1
_
_

.

_

_
_
_

.

_
_

-

_

_

_

_
_

.

_
_
_

_

_

-

_

1

2

22
21
20
1
1

20
1

27
1
8
18

7
1
1

51
33
32
1
18
1
lU
3

75
31
21
10
UU
21

1
19
7
u
7

.

_

u
17
2
lU

U8
x
1
_
U7
8

61
30
25
5
31
9
lU
k

136
50
20
30
86
15
Uo
1
18

-

_
..

n

181
78
39
39
103
21
25
U6
1

-

-

See footnote* at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding Railroads), oonaunleatlen, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

31
6

7

.

_
.

-

_

lU
k
10
63
Y

Uo

iu

_

28
3
2
1
25
12
8

166
132
55 “ T 8“
2
5
U6
50
11 1
8U
10
9
UU
29
U2
51
1
1

.

16
6

-

19
--- IT
U
_
.
2
15'
8
5

_

-

-

-

.

.

UU
22
21
1
22
2

23
21
17

17
16
IU
2
1

15
9
7
2
6

19
19
19

J.

57
39
29
10
18
2

28
23

5

I U

_

6

1

1
-

5

-

1

-

30
29
1
28
1
1

7

u

3
3

1

5

3

_

_

9
7
2

90
9
8
1
81

7
19

u
2
1

6

2

U U
5

6
1

2
2
2
“

39
1

38

m
1

■
*

1
1
1
_

U

7

u
1
3

7
1
6

-

-

-

_1
_
_

_
_

_
-

-

1
1
1

*
•

_

1
1
1

_
"

"

“

6

Table A-l:

GU<c* Occupation* - Continued

(A verage s tr a i g h t - t i m e w eekly h ours and e a rn in g s 1 / f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d
on an a re a b a s is i n S t . L o u is , M o., by i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , Jan u ary 1 9 $ 2 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS R ECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

Sax, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 10.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 5o.oo 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
1
•
30.00
3?,$P 35.00 37.50 liO.OO J.2.50 1.5.00 1.7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

b
90.00
and
over

■ Continued
*

Clerks, payroll ..............
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••.
Durable goods •.••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••.
Public utilities * •••••••••••••
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••.
Finance «* •••••••••••.......

838
552
304
21*8
286
162
53
10

1*0,0
39.5
1*0.0
39*5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
10.0

1*9.00
1*8.00
1*8.00
1*8.00
50.50
1*9.50
53.00
50.50

Duplicating-machine operators ........
Manufacturing..................
Durable goods ............. .
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing ................
Wholesale trade........... ...
Finance # * ...................
Services 2 / .................

178
B
is
33
51
94

1*0.0
10.0
1*0.0
2*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5
39.5

1*2.50
1*5.00
1*3.00
1*1.50
1*2.50
1*1*.5o
1*1.00
1*1.50

Key-punch operators ..... ...........
Manufacturing..................
Durable goods ....... .........
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••.
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••«
Finance ** •••••••••••••••••«••«

41*2

124

39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.0
39.5
39.0

1*7.00
l*8.oo
1*9.50
1*7.00
1*6.00
1*6.50
1*2.00

Office girls ......... .
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••«,
Durable goods
Nondurable goods •»•.•••«••••••<
Nonmanufacturing
.... •••••••••<
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ••••••••••.....
Finance **
......
Services 2/

238
""105
37
66
133
26
36
21
22

39.5
"39.5
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0

37.50
38.50”
39.50
37.50
36.50
10.50
36.50
31*. 00
31.50

Secretaries .............. .........
Manufacturing
Durable goods.......•••••••••«
Nondurable goods ••.•••••••••••«
Nonnarufacturing ••••••••••••••••«<
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••.,

1,831
932
10-2
520
899
Hi3
290
224
189

1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
10.0
39.0
10.0

58.00
60.00
60.00
60.00
56.50
61*.50
51*.oo
51*.oo
55.50

3,662
1,671*
755
919
1,988
268
61*7
655
259

10.0
1*0.0
10.0
10.0
39.5
39.5
10.0
39.5
10.0

47.50
1*8.50
1*8.00
1*9.00
1*6.50
5l*oo
1*7.50
1(5.00
1*1*.50

Finance «*

Services 2/
Stenographers, general.............
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••«
Nonnanufacturing •••••••••••••••••«
Public utilities * ••••••••••••,
Wholesale trade
Finance «* ..........••••••••••«

Services 2/

22
19
33

209

83
126
233

44

•
•
_
•
•

-

14
ii*
6
8
-

•
«

-

-

-

19
7
Jr — r
.

.

13
6

5
2

-

-

•

2
1*

-

2*

.
-

•
•
•

•
•

1
*

-

1*
ia

•

•
.
•

-

— 5"
3

2

36
«

5
9
20

•

2
-

.

-

1*
n
•
l i

89
50
29
21
39
34

105
81
32
49
24
7
9
1

60
45
31
14
15
8
2

2
-

1*4
8
3
5
36
3
3
18

14
9
5
4
5
2
1
-

51
30
5
25
21
1
20

60
29
8
21
31
5
24

45
19
15

10
25

24
11
9
2
13
3

16
14
3 ----8"
1
5
2
3
11
8
10
3
•
1

5

31
1
1

56 104
10 ~ T T
20
9
26
1
46
58
3
32
23
11
4
18
12

94
48
13
35
46
4
24
9
8

233
96
51
45
137
6
56
31
39

152
68
38
30
84
4
27
41
9

269
137
40
94
135
15
39
35
37

202
133
74
59
69
6
18
20
24

156
98
39
59
58
14
23
8
6

150
91
27
64
59
20
9
15
6

102
60
28
32
42
9
17
3
10

71
42
19
23
29
9
6
5
4

80
19
7
12
61
33
8
9
4

49
23
15
8
26
14
2
2
8

386
157
68
89
229
41
72
82
14

473
235
109
126
238
37
no
49
26

264
156
66
90
108
23
43
38

187
113
64
49
74
27
22
6
4

165
76^
37
39
89
37
31
3
6

56
35
9
26
21
18
2

20
15
6
9
5

26
17
6

17

10
10
4
6

3
3
1
2

1

1

20
8
8

9
7
5
2
2

•

12
2*
1
7

22
15
--- 5"----8"
•

8
11*
1
12

63
31*
9 ~~S1
12
1
*
28
5
23
25
7
3
9
7
8
1*
1
4

•

25
15
13

-

-

1*

•
•

-

•
-

-

•

“

-

-

-

33
25
21*
1
8
-

-'
7
*

64
13
5
8
51
18
16
**

-

•

30
4

26

1*
-

?8
70
10
30
28
20
4

4

26
7
16

98
60
33
27
38
13
5
1

41
10
6
4
31
8
17
2

75
63
52
n
12
8

-

114
77
42
35
37
31
3
1

26
11
3
8
15
6
7
-

20
9
2
7
11
7
1
-

13

38
13
7
6
25

57
20
10
10
37
8
13

4

20

—W
7
5
1

35
22
15
7
13
3
6

17
7
2
5
10
5

1

21
15
n
4
6
2
1
1

-

-

«»
.

1
1

1
1

4

.
-

_

1

1
•

18

18
8
2
4
1

•

.

_

18
17
1
-

5
5.

3
1

5

1
2
2

m

_

-

-

4
2
1
1
2
1
1
-

_
•

_
_

_
_
-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

4

45
24
13
11
21
6
5

38
16
5

13

22
3
3

5
3

26
21
12
9
5
2

20
9
1
8
n

n

W

4
4

7
7
3
4

1
1
.

_
•
-

•

1

_

1

4

3
1
1

•

26
18

•

•

m

1

1

1

•
-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
**
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




15
12
1*
8
3
1

-

234
no
1*9
61
124
18
24
1*2
35

-

460
198
101
97
262
10
67
133
43

640
268
96
172
372
27
89
148
67

615
223
102
121
392
30
163
127
60

•

1

n

9

6
4

3

n

3
8
6

m

31
22

n
n

9
5
2

20
19
9
10
1
1

17
13

10
9

2
4

1
1

n

m

m

-

-

4

7
7
5
2

1
1

9

1

m

m
m
m
m
m

1
1
1

m

Table A-l:

O ffice O ccupation^ - C ontinued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, January 1952)

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-tiee salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Except hotels.

y
*

Transportation (excluding railroads), coaaunication, and other public utilities.

**

Finance, insurance, and real estate.




8

Table A-2j

P^offed>li04uU CUtd 7ecJu>U cai 0cC M fxU iO 4tl

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, January 1952)

1/
I

f

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Includes 3 workers at $120 and under 125; 2 at $125 - 130; 1 at $130 - 135; 6 at $135 - liiO and 6 at $HiO and over.
Includes 2 workers at $120 and under 125; 2 at $125 - 130; 1 at $130 - 135; 1 at $135 - li*0 and 1 at $li*0 and over.




— — — — —
—
'
"
NOTE: Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries coabined and for nonmanufacturing.

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Maintenance and Powek Plant Occupation*

Table A-3i

(Average hourly earnings V for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under L.10 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 i . e 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2.05 2 . 1 0 2.15 2 . 2 0 2.30 2 .U0 2,50
o
and
1
1 .1 0

2i50 qyer

2
L.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1 . 3 0 1.35 1 .1.0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 ^65. 1 *2 0 .1,75 1,80 1*85 1 * 2 0 1.95 2 * 0 0 1*05 _ *j£ .2*15 2 , 2 0 2 * 3 0

$
carpenters, maintenance ...........................
Manufacturing.... ...... ..... ..... ........ .
Durable goods ................. .............

652

1 .9 6

22

-

.

-

.

.

-

? .1 0
1 *6 7

Engineers, stationary .................... •••••••••

S
k

11
6
3
3

5

1.92

33U
21 i "
B
72

Nonmanufacturing ........................... .

20

17

10
5

l

1 ,2 0 8
2 .0 1
1 ,0 2 1 “' 2 .0 1 '

623
39$
187
Jl
t

20

15

k

-

•

1.78
?,Q8

68
20

Electricians, maintenance ..... •••••••••••••••••••*•
Manufacturing ...... ....... ....... .......... .
Durable good3 ••••••••••......... ......... .

259
3?5

18
18

-

W 1.95
T

—

2.05
2.05
1.91
2.16
1.93
1.95

Nondurable goods ............. ........ ••••••
Nonmanufacturing........................ .
.^aevt m s 1.
i
....^

176
86

Firemen, stationary boiler •••••••••••••••••.......
Manufacturing ••••••••••.......................
Durable goods......................... ....
Nondurable goods ...................... ••••••
Nonmanufacturing ............................. .

553
UU9
197
252
10U

Helpers, trades, maintenance........... ......... .
Manufacturing ........ ........................
Durable goods ................. ••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ....................... .......
. .
Public utilities « .... ... .. . ..... TttTtt
Uhnlnsnle trade -TTT.T.__ --..-TT.TTT.--TTTTTTt

1,829
1,1*69“
531
938
360

303
1*6

9 ,1 5

1 .6 6

1.61*
1 .6 6

1.1*7
1.77
1.55
1 .5 k
1.58

Machine-tool operators, toolroom......... .
| annfartiiring tmttttttmtirtiTutfiirif t m . n i
f
Durable goods
........ •••••••........

1,086

•

.

-

-

-

-

-

.

1*

18

.
.
.
18
_
| .
-

9
.
3
3
_
3

2

26

32
~

_

11*

3

T

5

2~
2
22

6

2
2

.
-

56

110

Z1 0 2
~

6

21
20
20
1
100
91

_

36

85

66
8

6

9

3

_

3
1

25
1

U

8
1

30
30

65

28

6 l

26

ljsw
603

T766
1.92

2

21*
12

1*

-

3

2

_

_

_

36
36
36

_

_

_

_

_

1

I. 7 0
1.71*
1.71
1.77

69

1.63
1.76
1.92

3

5

11*

a*

.

26

92
30

6
1

1
1

3

56
50
7
13
*

88
62

.

^r ~

18
12
11
1

n

6

5
5

10

2
2

1*

31
29

2

17
17
17

1*
k
1*

n*
lU

18

88

6 * 11*9
1

6 0

6 8

56
36

1

56
32
18

_

_

_

_

1

1*

3

k
30

81
17

20

23

21*

t

Q
7
_

_

_

_

-

1 0

k
13

2

U

k
16
15

67

2 0

_

1*

k

k

17

107

15
9

L
*
4
O

63
17
15

6

6

-

-

-

1*

-

_

2
2

15
15

67
67

j

21

1

■>

15
97

2U

11

U7

2

6
2
2

5
u
k

12

33
32
k

6

u
k
_

1

_

100
100

23
17

lno
J.VW

6
11
6

8

5

5
1

28
1

U

07
7

25
18

5

2
1
X
1
X

58

O f

57
1

1

18

16

_

.

.

_

_

_

_

_

5U
c.
y
5U*

61
61
61

5U
C.
l
9U
5U

lt)9 2 6 0 57
1 0 6 103
82 2 6 0 U9
90
81
15 2 0 6 U 6
O
1 6 2 2 2 67 5U
0

7
f

2 0
1 6 0 157 1 1 * 8
1
2 0 1 0 0 2 153 105

16

.

32

U5

107

1 5 6 32

8
8

66

19

69

o 71

165

1 IU
112

29
18
3
ic
A9

u
U
.
U
.
360

351
351
9

59
21

69
69

32

9
12

38
93
93
93

_
_

_I

-

_
_

.

.

250
_ 250

IS

.

•
‘?v

9

7

3
-

65
Ul
U0

U

61

5 U

6 0
6 0

53
53

103

5 3

U7
n

37
15
15

U 6
2 U

22

3

8

9

25
18
i;
t
A9
3
7
5

2 6
U

1

36

1 * 5
6

■■
*9

25
11

3 8
8
18
18 0
8
2 0
5

2 2
2 0

82

8 2
_
82

0 7

2

1

_

5 o

u

.

1 2
1 2

50

1 6
6

208
150
129

2/37
" 19
•
22
19

22
22

_

70
■1

18

1

2 U

2

X
9

8
8

8

_

2

■■
*9
1

_

1

_

O
c,

.

9
5

k

-

_

12

10U
92
12
6
c
9

1*6

98
_

_

12
12

9U
62
32

n

101

16
16

7
17

9 U

78

1

_

1 * 0 U 8
1 * 0 U 8
U o 32

7

5
5

32

1

5U

26

13

28
2
26
1

1 *1*
1 21 0

171
153
18

8

29

35
.
35
7

6 8

21
20

2

-

18

16

156
98
58

10

6

17
17
1
16

18

3

58
l

60

1U
16

30
13

1 0

156

10
6

11
16

6
6

*

22
8

27
27

6
1

Ci,

16

1*2

1*0
2
2

60
6

21

66

15
*
13
*
3

76
76

$3

n
n

32
26
9
17

_
-

19
19
5
1U

1

38

6
6

3
3

2
2
2

5U
51
3U
17
3

122

w

2 19 * k 1 6 16 79 6 197
0

2 2

1 . 8 6
2 . 0 U
1.72
1.69

H*

9 * 123
1

9

See footnotes at end of table.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

*

U

1 . 6 8

126
81
15
*
61*0
520

1?

3

3 1

1*

1.71

6 6
766

1
1

29
28
28

2

1*
-

8 2 8 1.72
'
5
1*7
281
258
39

17
17

221
175 277 1 21 *
20
W " i u r 191
10
1
81
177
7
67 181
19
8 6 1 01 *
10
37
27
s
82
1 01 *
16
21
5
L
21

2
2

12
8
5

1

3

78
30

•
»

1*8

l

29
12
10

118
108

6 0 62 . 2 0

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Manufacturing....................... ...... .
Tkirable grwvis
Nondurable goods .................... ••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••*•••••••••••.•••••.... ••••••••
Public utilities * ................. .




3 9

28

20

l a

2

S ~ ~2

~

1
26
26

_

18
1*8
l* T T
l
38
.
9
1
1*

5

9

_
9
-

72
6U
52

15

30
27
26

2
2
2

.

5
3
2

11*

1 , 3 0 2.05
0

Maintenance men. general utility
.......... ......
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...................
N i r i » l l goods
«nhifbe
Nomanufacturing
......
Public utilities * ......... ..... .... T_
_
I^irklesaln trade t.tT1t1t.T...T.TTT.....T,tt,tlt
Services k
......... •••••••.... .
/

5

3
3

1*

1*59 1.92
— EETT 1.93
i i 2 2 1.93

Machinists, maintenance .......................
Manufacturing .......... .......................
Durable goods ................ ....... ......
Kmuhirahlp. gnnda .tTTt.T«TTlttttttttfTltfl,tt,
,

5

23
18

1
1

1

2.03
1.77

1.69
1.70
1.52
1.83

7
1*

51 1 2 1
50 1 2 0
72
35

26

32
31
27
k

•8
5
23
18
5
35
13

5

.

_

1

-

8

1 2
1 2

_

_

_

1 2

_ _

5
5
3

1

8

_

2

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF IABCR
Bureau bf Labor Statistics

NOTE:

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores) the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nomanufacturing.

10

Table A-3?

M cU to teH & H C M

an d

p 0 W & l P la n t

O c CU p a t U m l - G o tttU lU e d

(A verage h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 / f o r men i n s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d i e d on an a r e a
b a s is i n S t . LouTs, Mo., by i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , J a n u a ry 1 9 5 2 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS R ECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Mechanics, maintenance ........................ .
Manufacturing ...................... ..... •••••
Durable goods ...•••.... ............. .
Nondurable goods............... .

588

Millwrights..................... ......... .
Manufacturing ...••••............ ••••••••••..•••

10
*9

Nondurable goods...... ....... ........ .

252
292
UU
13

21
2*

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ ^
$
$ -$
$
$ - $,
$ - $
Aeae
vrg
$ - $
.
hul
ory
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.k o 1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 i.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 2 1*0 2.50
e r i g Undei
anns
and
$
1.10
.*
* .*
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1 0 1 1 5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 .0 5 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 2 1 0 2,50 over

$
1.90
1.90
1.78
2.01
1*86

1.95
1 .9 5
1.98
1.93

d l e r s ..................... ..................
Manufacturing .............. ••••••.......... .
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods
Mci m mif ar-Bi ng ..................................
na

5U2
151
337
5U

1.72
1.75
1.50
1.87
1.39

Painters, maintenance...... ..... .............. .
Manufacturing .............. .

1*18
375
99
276
13
*
17
l*
i

1.99
2 .0 0
1.70
*• 17
2 .0 8
1.91
1.8 7
I.3 8

798
752
181
571

2.07
2.07
1.90
2.13

Nondurable goods.................... ......
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
p K |jr> U+illt-1-*
^"
iiTitrtintiittittuti'TTTtft
n^A M iiiitrimttrt'rtftttTtTrvtti^^^rt
M
Pipe fitters, maintenance ...... ............. .
Manufacturing ••••...... .
Durable goods ........ ...................
Nondurable goods ..........................
Plumbers, maintenance....... ••••............... .
ng otittttrtitttttrtrrtTttrittttt'rrrrt*t

227
— S5C—
80
uuu

88
86
18
*
38
2

ft
ft
37
27

59
18
*
30
18

58
58
35
23

19
8
6
2
11
8

6
6
3
3

3
3
2
1

-

k
1
*

1

-

1
*

70
70
15
55

11
*
11
*
1C
A/
22

96
96
79
I
t
2*
1

96
96
7
89

32
32
16
16

33
33
p
c
O:
8

3*
1
35
%
c\
k

16
16
l*
l
2

35
35
ll
2*
1

13
13

10
10

z
2

197
197

16
16

_

13

10

6
6
2
1
*

2

197

16

1?
19
15
1
*
-

23
20
16
U
3
■
»
j

5k
52
J*
21
2
2

9
9
c
f
?
1
*
-

53
53
o
1 1*
*
-

3
3

12
1
*
10 h“X
.
10
u

-

-

-

-

-

-

22
22
20
2

2*
1
20
19
1
1
*

22
22
.
22

H*
1*
1
u*
-

17
13
13
j
*

12
12
11
1

6
6
5
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

1
1

1

3

8
-

-

-

_

_

_

T
5
3

11
9
9

37
7
7

2

30

2

*
1
5 6* 1 8
5 ~ W ~ w
2 1 7 31
*
3 17 17

27
11
1
10
16

33
33
27
6

21
21
5
15
-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1

1
*
-

6
-

-

2
1

_
-

_
-

-

_
2

-

1
1

.
1
*

_
6

_
-

1
1

_
3

Tool-and-die makers ................... ........ .
f
i
n r iiurttifiitiiitittTtTutTtfttiM'rrii
j

950
950
935

2.03
2.03
18*
.1
2.11a

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

•

•

“

-

-

“

-

-

“

-

-

-

2.19
2 .1 9
2.19

1
1/

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y
All workers were at $2.70 - 2.80.
J / All workers were at $2.70 - 2.80.
y
Except hotels.
y
All workers were at $2.60 - 2.70.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




“

16
16
16
-

5
1
*
5 “T
2
1
*
l
2

15
15
8
7

25
18
18
-

31
31
5
26

63
62
28
3U

70
70
57
13

1 7 169
*
1*6 1 1
3*
21
7
25 127

1

2
2

2
2

13
10
8
2

1*1
1*1
29
12

2?
25
25
-

1?
19
7
12

28
28
2
26

3
3
1
2

6
8
8

1

6

-

-

-

-

.

-

_

_

_

.

6
6
6

_
_

_

_
.

2
2
2

16
16
16

5
c
J
5

3
3
1
7

13
*
ha
Hi
13
*

3

f
6

.
•

t

l
l

.

_

-

-

-

_

19
19
7
16
_

19
15
2
13
1
*

20 1?1
20 118
5
15 118
7
j
1

_

8
6
7
3
2
c

1*1
35
8
29
6
8

6
8

1

2

3
3
3

28
2.13
- 27— " 5 . E
TI—

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ......... ........
Manufacturing »•••••••••••••........... ••••••»•*
Durable goods... ................ ........
Nondurable goods ....... ........

21
18
1
*
1*
1
Q
7

-

n
n
u

_

63 ,
&

1
1

55
5
5

_
_

62
1

1

55
5/11

18 2 *
15
18 2 *
15
15
15
3 2*

7*
1
7*
1

1
X

13

16
8
k
l6 ---8 ~ I
_
2
16
8
2

25
25

39
39

25

3
S

l*
i8
±UO
177
±77

1 1 111?
8*
Tf* 1*12
t
A (.
0*
1Li* l*p
Jfl .l
Ol
l

_

7i

3
7
7

39
70
77
70
77

11

92
92
oo

m
•

*

J
.

Taw® a-4:

CwUod&d, W a^eitO H linf1 and Sklpfuw p OcGMfi&tisml

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in St. Louis7 Mo., by industry division, January 1952)

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), conainication, and other public utilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and real estate.




NOTE:

Occupational

Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
linited-prlce variety storesj the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

12

Table A-5:

Custodial, 'kJandtouUnx}, and SUippinf Occupation* - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in St. Louis7 Mo., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—'

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Packers (nan) .*»*.......... .....*****.....********
ninufscttirlng •••••••••+•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods ••••••••••••••••••••*•••••••••••
NoodunbX9 j[oods •••••#••#••••••••••••••••••••
NdiuftnctrAC^uriR^
Wholesale tx*ada •••••••••••••••••*••••••••••••

2,106
1,510
1,139
371
596
Ii65

Packers (vonen) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••*••••••••
Manufacturing
Nonasnufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • *• • •
• • • • • • • • • • • • **• •
Services 3 / ......... *............ ...............*...............

1,557
237
152

Average
hourly
earnings

[Jnder0.75

$
0.75

$
1*31*
1.36
1.36
1.36
1.30
1*30

$
$
0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1 .20 1.25 1.30 L x i.5o 1.55 1.50 L.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.8 5 1.90 *2.00 *2.10
and

.80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1,05 1.10 1.15 1 .20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.50 1.55 i.5o 1.55 L.60 1.65 1.79 1.75
_38

3

87
3

“

26
12
12

3
12
12

3
85
85

120
1*10
1.11*
12C
.85
.67 6/2.2°

5

15

5
5

15
15

9
1
8
”

Receiving clerks
Manufacturing
Durable goods ................................
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Nonasnufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .... • • • • • •
Public utilities * .................
Wholesale trade • • • • • . . « • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * •

1*76
271
209
62
205
125

1*10
21*7
103
11*1*
163
128

1.1*8
1.5 1
1.1*6
1.55
1.1*1*
1.1*9

Shipping-and-receiving clerks • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * •
Manufacturing • • • » • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Durable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . * • • • • • • • • « • • • • •
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • «•
• • • «• • • • • • • • • «•
Nonnanufacturlng • *«• • • • «• • • • • • • • • *
• •••• •••••••••
Wholesale trade • • • «• *• • • • .... • • •
•• • • • • • • •
•••
Services 3 / • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • «*
••••••••••••••••

539
237“
81*
153
302
165
30

-

1*53
1.53
1.52
1.57
1.1*9
1.57
1.1*7

Shipping clerks ............................ ......................................... ...
Manufacturing
Durable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • *
•• • • .• • • • • • • • • «• •
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • *
• • • *• • • • • • *• • • •
Nonnanufacturlng • • • • • • • • • «• • • • «• *•
••••••••• •••• •
Wholesale trade

26

15

1.51*
1.55"“
1.50
1.5 7
1.55
1.59
1.55

Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d ..... *...................
Manufacturing
Durable goods • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * * • • • « •
Nondurable goods • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • ............• • • • • • • • *
Nonaanufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • •
Public utilities a • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • •
Wholesale trade • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • •

2
3

7,381
5,213
2,933
2,260
2,168
685
986

1.39
1.53
1.30
1.59
1.3 1
1.35
1.30

.

-

-

7

5
5
5

7
*
*

l

•

50_

“
-

1
1

-JO

5o

50
•

105
21
16
5
5
55 85
5

6

90

55
36
15
6

5 618 150
17
7 — f 612 128
10
6 22

8
•

20
10

15
3

8

10
10

3
11

8

9

8

1
1

15

-

5
5

•

•

60 _J8_
30 27
•
25
6 27
30 1 1
5
25

5

5

Sae footnotes at and of tabla*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), co— mlcatlon, and other public utilities*




26
12
15
15

5
5

-

•

25
17
12
5
8
8

75

3
1
1
X
2
2

.

1

.

“
20
2
9

18
18

9
2
2
7
7

15
*
■

179
151
91
60
28
18

32
20

96 102 512 _2J6 _12k
78 66 593 139 83
78 66 568 122 71
.
.
25 17 12
18 36 19 97 51
22 19 59 58
11

6
6~
6
.
-

6
1

5
5

1
5

5

•

5

31

5

1
17
13
13

•
•

18

5
5
51

28

10
18

13
5

59
27
6
21
32
16

51 138
29 135
12
3

13
7
6

13
9
5

29
22
21
1
7

39
21
20
1
18

53
35
33
1
9

6
5
3
1
2

83
27
27

16

-

-

13
12
5
8
1
•

23
17
11
6
6
6

20
20
18
2

16
7

31
sir

22

7
1

•*
U
17
16
“

30
7
2
23
5

22
7
15

9
8
1

1.85

52
31
6
25
21
21

31
31
1
30

16

6
6
6

2
2
1
1

35
n
8
3
23

-

-

19

27
3
1
2
25
25

2
2
1
1

22
19
2
17
3

50 66
5 ~5^
1 17
1
. 9
CX i* C fOt
.
1 11 35 21
• 35
1
5
10
“ "

6
3
3

31

3
3

31
5

5

5

10
3

5

3

63
55
58
7
8
8

123
99
62
31 37
15 25
15 25
5$

31

•

“

1.90 ?.oo ?.10 over

5

28
~

«
.
.

16
16

•
•
•
*

•

28
28

t
5
•

•
•
•
“

2
2

-

28 155 95
25 ~ § F “ W
1 10
3

17
2 ~ i£n
2
6
g
8
3
_
3

10

58
26
26

1.80

_

“

25
20
20
.

5
5

.
.

.

56
16
38

56 58
33
35 25
8
12 15
2 XX
5

37 102
12 83
12 15
•
69
25 19
23 13

26
21
18
3
5
5

17
9
6

53
20
20
23
17
5

29

1

•
•

II67 752 1015 688 _25L
56 107 152 _230_
52 70 106 151 332 1070 653 299 239 178 292 130
36 55 32 81 159 955 653 181 206 178 109 129
•
6 25 75 60 173 135
118 33
1
183
15 37 36 89 51 97 99 716 559 73 163 177
.
•
•
2
2
1 596 161
5
5
3
12
5 20 68 52 39 62 170 275 29 133 27

1

2

1
1
5
5

19
23
5
5
19
19

78 207 183

375
197 176 372
12 135
2
185 52 370
10
7 2
6
2
5 •
8 10
1

66
15
51
12

«.

.
u

15 38
15 27
9 6

8
8
•

58
19
19

_

"

7
7

16

1
1

9—

u

1

9

5

-

-

-

5
1

12
11

1
1

1
5
5

11
1
1

•

18

5
5

16

6
10

.

„

.

-

„

•
57
33
pp
25

«

18
18

786

W
786

9

5

1

5

u

5
5

13

Table k - k :

G

ttiio d tu U

,

W

a > td t0 4 4 l* 4 U f r

C L H J&

S U

ip f U

H

f

O c C U f u U iO H d .

- G o tU tH U s d

(A verage h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s 2 / s tu d i e d on a n a re a
b a s i s i n S t . L o u is , Mo., by in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n j J a n u a ry 1 9 5 2 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Track drivers, light (under l£ tons) .............
Nonmanufactaring ...................... ..
Wholesale trade .......... ..................
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 1 tons) ••
*
Durable goods .................. ....... .
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........ ....... ..... .

Number
o
f
w
orkers

556
W
21*2

$
$
$
$
$
$ _ $
$
$
$
Average
$
$
$
$
$ ^ *
$
$
$
h u l Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20 l a s 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 i.5o 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 .8 0 1.85 1.90 2 .0 0
ory
erig $
anns
0.75
.80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1 .7 0 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0

!.«
i

1 .1*6

1 .6 0
2 ,3 6 1
R , ~ 1 75
Jq
256
1.1*7
1 .8 8
593
1,512
1.51
61*0
1.1*9

Truck drivers, heavy (over 1 tons, trailer type) ....
*
Manufacturing............. ............
Hurahlft goods
ttnI,tttt,
Nondurable goods ...........................
unimmiitrtitTiiniiiiiimi
Public utilities * .........................
It11111tTT1TfTfTI 1“TflTfTTl l*||

1.155
106 1
38
68
1,01*9
558
256

1.70
1 .6 9
1 .5 3
1.78
1 70
1.59
1.81

Truck drivers, heavy (over 1 tons, other than
*
trailer type)..... ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ......... ...... ............. .

367
121*
1.089
920
1*80
1*
1*0
169
105
3*
l

1.57
1.59
1 .1*6
1.73
1.1*5
1.
1*2
1 .5 0

- — ir~
-

.
-

—
nr1
u

-

_

_

_

i
*

1

6
— g~

—

k
^TT
-

32
32
32

3

-

21*
21*
8

1*0
1*0
1*0

2

l*
i
l*
l
-

1
*

8

16

-

7
_
_

_

6
_

_

i
*

1

2

3

8

1*

83
8
8

9

75

1

2
2

33
30
25

Truckers, power (other than fork*lift) ••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ................................ .
Durable goods ..••••••••••.............. •••••
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••.......... ••••
Nnrnmamifar.tnfingr ttT.tt.tT.... TT...... Tf,ftTtftf
watchmen ....................................... .
Manufacturing.................. .............
Durable goods ............. ................
Nondurable goods •••••••••»•.............. .
Nonmanufacturing...................... ••••••..
Public utilities
............................
Finance • * ....................................
*
Services 3 / .............................. .

1/
JJ

3/
V
5/
y

*
**

315
282“
221*
58
33
1,227
” 958
1*07
551
269
13
*
32
13
*

1.51
1.51
1.1*7
1.65
1 .5 0
1.29
1.3h
1 .2 2
1.1*3
1 .0 8
1.23
•7 *
.79

10
10
10

_

_

_

_

_

_

_ 1

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
1

_

_

1

36
36
1*
32

_

35
35
26
9

30
27
27
3

-

.

_

-

.

.

.

_

_ I

3*
1
3*
1
9
15

27

~ir
i
*
23
1*
15

1*2
1*2
8
—
1 28
~
33 1
21*
1
*
.
29
1*
8
l*
l
9
10
x
2
X !
1
*

11*
3
_
3
n

_

1
1

2
2
2
_

1

85
1**
1
8
33
15
is

76
59
39
20
17
10

32
106
ia* " S i
21*
9
80
5
2
18
1*

79
72
39
33
7

3

6
6
6
_

179
176
139
37
3

15
3
-

1*2
1*2
38

285
39
39
.
21*6
182

166
90
80
10
76
58

86
1
1
•
85
73

517
10
10
.
5 07

_

-

_

_

1

_
_
- |

-

160
157
57

-

_

2

Exclude* praniun pay for overtime and night work.
Study Halted to aen workers except where otherwise indicated.
Except hotel* •
Worker*were distributed as follows* 26 at $0.60 - .65; l * at $0.6$ - .70; and 135 at$0.70 - ,75.
l
Workers were distributed as follows* 3 at $0.50 - .55; and 7 k at $0.70 - .75.
Workerswere distributed as follows* 1 8 at $0.55 - .60; 28 at $0.60 - .65; 32 at$0.65 -.70; and 12 at $0.70 - .75.
*
TraiExportation ^excludingrailroad*), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

7
1
-

392 __Z6 _
61
50
1*0
50
21
26
331
12
231

1.97
1.77

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ......................
Manufacturing ..... .......... .................
Durable goods ............. ........... .....
Nondurahla j/rwls TTT,,t..._TT.TTrTtT,T,,rTttT>,
Nonmanufacturing.... ••••••....................
PuhH« ntmtlfis « TTT________ TT______ TTTtr
_
Wholesale trade o..............................

u

-

5
5
5
_

65
16
16
19
*

_

*
131+ 22i 133
80
75 2 0 k
65 176
13
*
28
10
37
20
59
53
2
1*8
55
3
18
86
78
78
8

17
*
17
*
17
*
_

61
1*6
21*
22
15
10

79
70
_
70
9

50 _63Lj
3 * 12
1
10
12
21*
1 6 622
555
16
67

2
_
2

85
75
75

29
9
9

10

136
87
19
68
19
*
32
7
7
7
_

66
51
-

?
3
8

29
„
.
29
20
9
6
6
3
3

12
12
•
12

1*
1*
1*
1*

l+o
l*o
22
18

3
-

-

29
11
1
10
18
8

80
80
1
79
-

116
112

89
5U

233
233

112
u

5U
35
20

233
_

17

221*
-

3 181
16
3

17

_
221*

16
165

over

16
16

k

3
_

32
29
23
6
3

16

.

_
_
.-

_

_

•165

1 7 !— _
*
_
-h tr

20

52
52
2
50

1031
30
30

_
-

8

_

2

-

$
2 .1 0
an i
r

28
28
6
22

3

33
33

237

35 1 08
3u 1 0 8
_
2
3 * 1 06
1
1

75
75
.
75

_

6
6
6

_
_
_

.
_

.
.

.
-

.
.
.
.

-

3

10

1*0
38
16
22
2

33
17
17
16

18
18
18
•

23
i5
_
15
8
3

25
20
20
5
■
»
j

10
10
10

21
18
18
.
3

25
25
17
8

1*
1
+
1*

10
10
•
10

3

8
6
.
8
-

172
172
.
172
-

17
17
_
17
_

6

k

11+
10
10
.

5
5

k
1

26
25
3
22
1

.
3
■
»

6
-

lU

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations

T B2337: W arnin'4 and Mi'UeAr Goat*, and S u iti if
able NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS O F O c c u p a tio n

arid s e x

Number
of

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
Under o. 85

fr
0.85

$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
]—
$
$
0 .50 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.1C 1.20 1.30 i.ao 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 $ .ao $
2
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.50 3 .00 3 .2 0 3* uC
and

.90

•95

1 .0 0 1.05 1 .10 1.20 1.30 i.ao 1.50 1 .60 l .?0 1.80 1.90 2. CO 2 .10 2.20 2.30 2.50 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 3.00 3.20 3. ^0
over-

All Plant Occupations
All workers ........................................
h e n .................................................
Women ...............................................

389
153

236

$
1.71

2.10
1.U5

19
7

12

“

Ik
-

22

15
3

1U
l

22
1

13

21

21
a
17

10

2a
6

7

12

12
2

lU

18

10

18

-

"

-

-

-

-

i
i

-

1

9

h * 2

15
5

26
8
18

9
13

10

1
-

2
3

22

17

15

8

28
16

13

16

9

7

7

7

12

6

10
6

a

3
2

2
1
1

10
1

a

1

8

11

5 ' 7
1

3

3

7
5

3
2

2

1

2

1

7
5
2

1

3

16

2
1

16

1

_
1

-

Selected Plant •Occupations
Cutters and markers (men) 3/a ........................
Pres&ers, hand (men) 3/ b .............................
Pressers, hand and machine (15 men and 1 woman) ^ / b
Sewers, hand (finishers) (5 m e n and 91 women) ......
Time . . ........... ...........................
Incentive .................................. ........
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand (tailor)
system (men and women) ................ .............
Men 3/b .....................................
W o m e n ............................ ...................
Time .............................................
Incentive ........................................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (women)
a .............

27
19

16
96
19
77

130
60
70
9

61
9

1.97
2.26
2.19
1 .3 9
1.11
1.U6
2 .1 1
2.U6
1 .8 1
1 .1 6
1.91
.92

5

7

3

l

5
1

k

h

k

3

3

-

-

-

2

-

:

:

U

-

l

k
1

11

3

2
1
1
1

3

2

1

1
1

7
1
6

3

1
2

1

- _

2

a

9

10

3

2

r

5

2

5

1

5

9

11

9

8

5

6

5

2
3

1

a
i
3

5
5

5

3

1

3

1
1

_

2
1

1

2

6

3

7

7

3

1

3

5
1

1
6
3

2
5

i
i
3
1

9

2
1
1

3
2
1

1
5

2

10

8
a
a

5

1
1

5

2

1
a

1
8

l
a

2

a

8

2

_

3
8

5
a

8
a
a

8

a

a

3

2

5

1

5

2

6

1

1
1

2

3
2

a

2

1

1

3

:

5
3

2

1

2

1

1

2

1

13
13
“

1/

The study-covered regular (inside) and contract shops with 8 or more workers in part of industry group 2337 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19u5 tditior.) prepared by the
of the budget,
Establishments manufacturing fur coats or single skirts were excluded from the study. Cutting shops with u or more workers were included, data relate to a September 1951 payroll

2/

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by methou of wage payment,
ta}
All or p r e d o minantly time workers.
(,b) All or p r edominantly incentive workers.

3/

Table l- 235»

M iU inm fU } i f

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers engaged in the manufacture of women«s, misses*, children’*, and infants* trimmed hats from felt or straw hat bodies and purchased millinery
material. Data relate to a March 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
~y
Workers were
distributed as
follows:
8 at $0.75 and
under ,80; 2 at $0.85 - .90; 2 at $0.90
- .95.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
h/
Workers weredistributed as follows:
2 at $2.80 and under 2.90; 7 at $U - a. 10.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
5/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
~
~
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




15

MilLwik

Table B-2^31;

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

U8
Cabinetmakers (millwork) ........ .....................
Cut-off-saw operators (treadle-operated or swinging) •«

50
20

1.63
1.62

Molder and sticker operators (set-up and operate) • •• ••

2U
17
11

1.77
1.31

23

10
7

2/

3/

O
Q
J
O
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 4 tons) ....
.

20

$

1.50
1.52

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1.25

1.35

l. Lo

$
1.1*5

$

1.20

$
1.30

$

1.15

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.20

$
1$
1.05 1.10
and
under
1.10 1.15

*
■ l« j
J-oHJ

Occupation

1.25

1.30

1.35

l.iiO

i.lj5

1.50

1.55J 1.60 -iȣ5- 1.70

8

li
t

2
2

2

U*

-

1

-

b
2

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

h
0
X7

1

J.
u

5

1.53

Irt
AW

-

-

b

1

2
1

2
6

-

-

6

2
2

“

“

-

2

-

-

-

-

b

2
b

-

li

2

2

-

-

$
■
$
$
$
$
s
$
1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15

1*851 1.90

1»75_ 1.80

2
8
6
2

18

2

1

J

2
-

6
18
3

$
1.80

b

-

.

2.00

1.95

2.05

2.10

2.15

2.20

2

2

2

.

_

.

2

-

2

1

li

6

~

2

2

“

"

“

“

■

”

“

“

~

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
2

2 / The study in clu d ed e sta b lish m en ts w ith more than 20 w orkers engaged in th e p rod u ction o f m illw ork (Gtfoup 2431) a s d e fin e d in th e Standard In d u s tr ia l C l a s s i f i c a t io n Manual (194.5 e d i t i o n ) prepared by the
Bureau o f the Budget*
Data lim it e d t o men w ork ers. A l l w orkers were paid tim e r a t e s .
2 / E xcludes premium pay f o r overtim e and n ig h t work.

able B-3 3 6 :

f

y

o

U

H

&

U

e

l

,

l/ A

<

U

t

£

e

V

l

O

U

d

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f

Ave a e
rg
1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 L o o 1 . 0 5 1 . 1 0
h u l (f.80 8.85 8.90 8.95 L o o i.0 5 i .1 0 1 . U i .2 0 1.25 1 . 3 0 £-35 1.40 1.45 1.50
ory
erig
anns
and
undez
2/
a/
.85 .90 .95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 I.4 0 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 over

M l K»,ant Qpcupatioflg
All workers ............................ .

910
876
34.

$
1.46
1.47
1 .1 6

93
38
15
39
9
20
14
79
49
30
27
50
8

1.36
1.72
1.51
1.44
1.55
1 .6 8
1.78
1.73
1.73
1 .7 2
1.31
1 .3 0
1.31

18
15
3

38
20
18

111
111

62
62

94
94

85
84
l

57
57

41
41

23
23

88
87
1

17
17

20
20

56
56

77
77

10
10

6
6

8
8

6

_

1

21

1

12

17

1
-

1
3

1
8

1
7
6

6
3
-

1
-

1
12
-

13
1

2
1
2

2

1
1

1
3
-

_

1
1

3
6
2
1

1

9

6
2
-

_

-

_
_

1
2
1
7
2
5

-

4

-

_

_

_

_

_

2

11
35

_
2

I

3

Q
y
2
6

_
1
_

r
_

r
_

jj

"

2
2

1
1

18
18

7
7

15
8
7

6
6

30
26
4.

_
-

_
-

5
-

_
-

4
1
-

2
-

1
1

5
5.

14
14

Selected Plant Occumtions - Men
Chippers and grinders j/ ..........................
Coremakers, hand 2 / .......................
Coremakers, machine j / ..... ................ .....
Furnace tenders J / ...............................
Maintenance men, general utility j / ................
Molders, floor j/ ................................
Molders, machine: Total
'- j o _
pj n
__ TtT.,.. T..........j
Tr|f»pnt.iTO i i
i -ri....... rtttv
Pourers, metal l/ ................................
Shake-out men 3/ ••»•••••••»«•••••••••»»•••**•••»•••.»
Watchmen j / .... .....................................

-

1
2
2
1

-

_
1

_
-

6
-

_
-

-

_

_

11

>

3

4
10
-

3
1

_

11
5

6
3
3
11
12

8

1
2
2

6

4

-

6

1

_

1

J

j

4

i

2
1

2

2
1

_

1

1

_

1

_

_

_

_
_
_
_

1

_

2
2

~

_

_
_
_

1

4
-

4

1

1
_

i_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1 / The, study cov ered independent n on ferrou s fo u n d r ie s (e x ce p t d i e -c a s t i n g fo u n d r ie s ) w ith 8 o r more w ork ers. Data r e la t e t o an August 1951 p a y r o ll p e r io d .
2j E x cludes premium pay f o r ov ertim e and n ig h t w ork.
2 / I n s u f f i c ie n t da ta t o perm it p r e s e n ta tio n o f sep a ra te averages by method o f wage payment. Workers were predom inantly paid on a tim e b a s i s .
O ccup ationa l Wage Survey, S t . L o u is , M o., January 1952
U .S% DEPARTMENT (F LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




_

16

Gutleny, atfond

Table B-3^2:

and ctfG/idw&im 1/

oJ
oa

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
earnings

^

jjf m i i t i M r i t m r i t m i __»»
l/l

87
20
13
7
10
21

$ ,
1.35

l . U 1.U5 i.50 1.55
o

1.60 1.65

$
$
1.70 $
1.80 \.85 1.90 *1.95 $2.00 $
2.05 $2.10 $2.1S $2.20 $2.25
1.75 $

1.50 1.55

1.60

1.80 1.85

1.70 1.75

1.90 1.95

2.00

1.65

10
2

k

1

1

~

2

3

”

1

2

3
2
1

“

2

1

-

2.10
2

2.15

2.20

2.25

2.30

2

1

10

3 k

8

31

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
6
1

-

-

1

-

1

1

-

-

“

1

1
X

6

10

3

1
h

“

2.05
80

1.78
1.77
1.80
1.28
2.20

9

1.25

$
1.30

JL*2Q_ 1*25 -1*3Q .1*35- 1*UQ !Ji5

$
2.01
1.80
1.32
1.92

82
13

$
1,20

under

y
Heat treaters, class B lj/a ........................ .
Inspectors, class C U / ............. ••••••••••••••
i
Machine-tool operators, production, class A U/a .....
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B h / * t o t a l .........
T
Tine .......................
Incentive ........................
Machine-tool operators, production, class C U/b •••••

s
1.15
and

“

“

5
5

-

2

1

1

1

1/ The study covered firms with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of cutlery, hand tools, and hardware (Group 3U2) as defined in the Standard Industrial classification Manual (19U5 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
1*/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-3^39:

JfecUUuj Aff&icUu i/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of

Average
hourly

1.05

a
$
s
$
s
$
s
$ _
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
L.1 5 if. 20 U25 L.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 U 50 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1 .7 0 1.7 5 1 .8 0 1.8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5
$

t i o

and
£/

1 .1 0 i . i 5

L.20 L.25

1.30

L.35 1.1*0 i.i*5 i .5 o 1.55 1,60 1.65 1*70 - 1.75 1 .8 0 1*85_ 1.90 1 .9 5 - 2.QQ 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .? 0 2 .? 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 over

Men
Assentolers, class B 3 / a .......... ...... .
Assemblers, class C 3/a ..................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B 3/a .................
Inspectors, class B~ 3 / a .................. .
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 3/a ......
Maintenance men, general utility 3 / a .... .
Painters, rough 3 / a ........... T .......
Power-shear operators, class A 3/a ......
Power-shear operators, class B 3 / a ......
Punch-press operators, class A 3/a ......
Punch-press operators, class B 3 / b ...... .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand 3/a .....
Tool-and-die makers 3/a ....'.....7 ...... .
Welders, hand, class~A 3/a ..............
Welders, hand, class B 3/a ..............
Welders, machine, class~B 3/a ........... ,

11*3
266
5U
19
32
50
58
30
73
83
200

$
1.61*
1 .6 5
1 .6 7
1.71*
1 .2 5
1 .7 2
1.5 2
1.61*
1 .3 9
1 .7 8

2

-

_

-

1
*
-

1
*
-

i

_

_

_

8

58
-

_

u

_

.

.

17

9

_

.
.
.

_
.

2

-

6

-

-

-

6

8

9

21
.
2

1
*
.
18

ij*
i

10

28

6

6

-

20
21*1*

12
123

.
.

.

-

•

•

8

23

10

139

1.27
2 .2 8
1 .7 6
1.1*1*
1.U5

-

18
88

"

6

16

1*
1

1
*

2

76

1.1*0

3

2

6

-

-

6

1*66
12
22

66

3

_
2
2
1
2

l

_

8
121

12

8

21*
1
*

_
_

_

81

25
5

12
3

28
-

1
*
2

3
.

9
1

1
5

1
2

2

_
»

_

l

1
*

_
.
12
28
16
71

-

-

-

-

_

10

_

20

2
10

“

12
*

"

22

3

1
*

1

1

_

2
2

6
.
-

-

_

6
1
*

7

-

15
_
» 1

1
*
13
3

5
1
*

1

-

7
2

_

_

22
8
5

_

_

11
2
1
1
1

1
*

1
*

k

13
5

7
1

-

8
8

1
3

_

5

-

-

•

6

13

1

-

2

2

_

.

.

.

_

_

2
.

6

3

1

_

_

1

1

6

-

1

.

.

.

-

1

1

-

_

_

2

3

1

1

-

1

2

1
8

12
1
-

1

10
1

3

h

3

-

1

3

_

3
2
.

1

Women
Assemblers, class C 3/b

21

2

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of commercial and domestic heating and cooking equipment (Groups 3132 and 31*39 except electrical stoves) as defined
in Tihe Standard Industrial Classification Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
O c c u p a tio n a l Wage S urvey, S t . L o u is , M o., J a n u a ry 1952
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau o f L abor S t a t i s t i c s
(b) All or predominantly Incentive workers.




17

M acUin&uf On&tUbUml 1/

Table 1-35:

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wr
o kers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING !TRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
S
$
s
$
Average
1*0 1.1*5 1.50 i.55 1 . 6 0 1 .6 5 i.7 0 i.7 5 i .8 0 1.85 i .9 0 \ o 9 S 2.00 $
f.1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 f.25 f.30 i-35 1 .
2.1C $
.* 2
2.05 $
2.15 2.20 2.3C S2 1 C * .5 0
h u l Unde*
ory
erig
anns
$
and
1 .1 0
y
1*0
1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1 . 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1.55 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 1 .8 5 1 . 9 0 1 .9 5 2.00 2 .0 5 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.3C 2.1+C 2.5C over

Men

Assemblers, class B:” Total ........................
Incentive .................

Rll
fl
399
*<
75
2*
i
161
h$

Inspectors, class A 3/a ............. ..............
Inspectors, class B 3/a ............................
Inspectors, class C 3/a ............................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 3/a .................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A h j : Total ..............................
Incentive ........................
Automatic-lathe operators, class A 3/a ...........
Drill-press operators, radial,
”
class A: Total ..............................
,
Tn
n flnt.i v » ._...... *
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A 3/a ..........................
Engine-* a+.he operativra. class i. Tv - a
tt . l
Time ....... .
Incentive ....
Grinding-machine operators, class A: Total ......
T i m e .....
Incentive .
Milling-machine operators, class At Total .......
T i m e .....
Incentive ..
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A: Total ................
Time ..............
T r f n . vs
n.iti
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B V*. Total ..............................
—
T i m e .............................
Incentive ........................
Drill-press operators, radial, class B 3/a .......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B 3/a ..................... .....
Engine-lathe operators, class B 3 / a ..... ........
Grinding-machine operators, class B: Total ......
T i m e .....
Incentive .
Milling-machine operators, class B: Total .......
T i m e .....
Incentive ..
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B 3/a ....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand”
screw machine), class R : Total ................
Time ..............
Incentive ..........

See footnotes at end or table.-




76
bh

31
213

*
1, f
R)
i.5o
1-1+9
1.68
1 ,3 8
* ,9 7
1.88
1.55
1.31*
1 .2I
*

1,11*7
073
17U
18

1 .9 1
1 .8 7
2 .1 2
1 .8 0

11
**
3U
10

1.77
1.92
1.83
2.27
1.89
1.87
1.98
1.96
1.83
2.13

125
86
39

1.66
I.6 3
1.78
1.60

125
100
5*
1
25
29
8*
1
51
33
36

1.61*
1.73
1.73
1.69
1.76
1.70
1.65
1.79
1.63

2 30
205
25

1.63
1.62
1.70

_

_

-

_
12

20

_
23

_
20

2
2

12
12

6

10

-

_
1
23

11
*1*0
1
37
»
2
2*
1
23

1*
1
l*
l
31
_
2
1
21

32 1 2 0
30 1 19
2
1
18
_
2
20

_
17
2
18

55
52
3
32

18
18

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

1

_

_

9
1

1

18
17
1

1

-

15
*

3
1
2

_

1.87
1.76
2.10

736
592
mu
50

_

1.78
1 .7 5
1.89

90
179
lUU
3$
63
53
12
152
87
65

_

70
10
2

70
J7
l*
l
8
6
7
6
5
3

88
2

g
1
*

2

1
*

10
81
80
1
k
0
1
*
8

10
7

35
3U
1
2

96 136 122
95 133 115
1
3
7
_
7

-

2

11
11

-

0
j
2

2

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

.

_
_

_

_
_

_

_
-

_

_
_

_

_
_

_

_
_

.

_
.

1
1
.

-

-

_

_

_

-

.

1
_

_

_

-

_

_

_

2

-

-

_

_

_
.

_
_

_
_

-

_
-

-

_

1
1

_
_
-

_

_

_
_

_
_

1

2
2

_

.
1
8
8
_

6
6
1
H*
l*
l

21
27
27

10
2
_

in
XU
1
_

7 * 111
1
7n 101
(V
1
* 10
.
5

56
38
18
.

30
18
12
.

19
1+

.

1

j

3
-

12
ll
*
l*
l

1
1

21
20
1

6
1
*
2

9
8

215 123
208 n)[
7
9
26
11

77
66
11
1

73
52
21

2
29
10
10

21
17
1
*

-

12
*
1*1

_

2
.

1
_
1
_
.

1
1

31
23
8

12
*
37
5
7

97
81
16
3

1
*
1
*
2
_
2
1
.
1
_

33
2
7
1
*
3
8
6
2
6

32
28
5
2
3
17
15
2
13

28
1
*
5
1
*
1
18
16
2
_

6
6
_
12

13
13

32
30
2

76
7*
1
2

55
5*
1
1

16
10
6

18
l*
l

_

3
1
2
6
1
*
2
5
13
10
3

_

7
f

0

J

_

2
3
.

8
29
29
15
U*

T
l

1

3
2

1
*
3

7
1

1

25
21

1

-

2

1
*

15:
.

1

)
.

T
16
_

1

-

91
70

7

J

,

7

J

_
7
1
1
.

272
OC
16
_

3
13

_

-

2

2
.

35
on
C\J

13
i
,
u

1*
1

16

H*

13

15

9

1*
1

16
_

l£

13

1

.

_

.

_

1

2

17
x|
12
5

J

c

<
>

3

5

5

-1

1

X
17

on
1

_
13
12
1

16
22
21
1
l*
l
10
1
*
8
8
_

I!
l*
l
13
1
5
1
*
1
ll
ll

_
10
9
1
_
_
7
_
7

10
g
1*
1*
17
16
1
3*
1
2*
1
10

5

_
_
6
_
6

19
17
2

9
7
2

1
*
.

12
8

3

1
*

3

7

1
,
u

■
a

25

1
*

1*
:

<

20

J

k

k
9

1
*
1
8
1
+
1
*
8

_
_
_
_
_

2
_
2
_

1
*
5

8

«

_

1
.
H

6

2
1
.
1
5

6

12
6

_

_

1
3

7

_
_

6
7

3

k

_
_
1
*

9

k

i

2

1
*

1

3

3

_

_

1

33

2
1

5
1
.
1
9

3

1
_
1
1
*
_
1
*

3
1
_
1
3
_

1

33

c

j

1.
u

_

"

_

j

_

_

1
_

_

_

"

_

_

_

_

2
2

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
O.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18

M acJtinosuf. ^nA uU ^ imi

Table B-35:

1/ -

GotUUwmd

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EA RNINGS OF—
Occupation and ser

of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5
$ _ $
$
$
$
t .
Average
$ , $
hourly Under 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1.20 1.2 5 1.30 1.35 1.1:0 1 .1 5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.6 5 1.70 1.7 5 i.e o 1.8 5 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .10 2 .15 2.20 2.30 2*10
earnings
e
1.10
. J
7
1 .1 5 1.20 1.2 5 1.30 1.3 5 1.1 0 1 .1 5 1.50 1.5 5 1.60 1.6 5 I.7 0 1.7 5 1.80 1.8 5 1.90 1*95 2.00 2.05 2 .10 2 .15 2.20 2.30 2 .10 2.50

$

2.50
and
over

Men - Continued

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 1/:
Total
••••••••••••••••
“
Time
In con tive
Drill-press operators, radial, class C 3/a •••••••••
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C:
Total ..................... ••••••
' ime
’
Incentive
Engire-lathe operators, class C 3/b ............. .
Grir.dingmachine operators, clasT C:
Total ••••••••
Time ■•••••
incentive .
Milling-machine operators, class C 3/a
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C 3/& .................. .
Machine-tool operators, toolroom 3/a ••••••»••••••**•••
Machinists, production 3/a •»••••••*••»••»•••»•••.••**•
Tool-end-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) 3/a ••»»•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••«
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) 3/a • »••
Stock handlers and truckers, hand 3 / a ................. .
Welders, hand, class A 3/a
Void e r s, hand, class B 3 /a

i
k
k

“

k

118
110
8
5l
51
il
l
10

1.5 1
1 .3 1
1.3 7
1.66
1.59
i.i+8
2.03

8
8
-

_

26

1 .5 k

23
159
291

l.i-0
2.02

116

2.26
2.21

217
208
157

1.30

li+8

-

«.

k

2

2
-

8
7
1

8
6
2

61
60
1

25
25

-

“

-

-

1

5

58
57
1
2
-

16
16
3
-

-

3
2
1
-

k
-

k
l
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

1

2

“-

3

k

_

72
70
2
1

32
30
2

“

21
16
5
1

2k

1

10
8
2

23
1
9
6
6
l,
i

1
1
22
21
1

7

8

2
1
Ik
lk
-

"

3

5

“

-

9
-

-

1.88

2

5

k

-

~

-

2
1

3
-

2

10
-

1
“

"

1

8 17
8 13

7

5

-

1

1

1.
16

1
k

19

k

2

5

8

-

6

7

3

-

6
-

3

-

1
1

3
1

2

-

3

2
-

-

2
6

2

1

2-

1
1

5

-

5

"

6
6
“

1

-

-

5
■

1

■-

-

1

-

-

-

3

19

k

3

19

“

~

“

1

3

1

7

8

5
u k

-

-

1

-

5

-

-

-

-

“

-

1

3
3

k

-

96

lie

1

l

-

-

26

1.3 2
1.32
1.3 5

6

3

95

1.29

6

3

-

_

83 28
70 33

-

2

-

30

"

“

-

17

82

k

k

6

k

33

k

8

61

5
5

68

10
7
3

k
k
~

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

1

1

1

1

1

6

5

65

1

-

1

2

1

2

8

81

21
28

7
-

12
1

20

3
1

-

W'omen

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 1/:
Total
~
Time .........................
Incentive •••••••«•••..•••*•<
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C V a

l/

107
81

6

3

-

“

k

66
2

8

The study included establishments with more than 20 workers in the machinery (ncnelectrical) industry (Croup 35) aB defined in the standard Industrial Classification Manual (19l5 edition) prepared b y

the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments *ith more than 7 workers were included in the study.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
3 / Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
1 /
Includes data for operators o f other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Data relate to

a

November 1951 payroll period.

■

-

6

1

-

-

51

9

1

l
3

5

2

1.56

k2

28

7

. l

1

2k

12

11
11

3

2

5

3

1.95

2

k

2

8
8
-

7

1.56
1.3 7
1.9 7
1 .3 1

311
236
108

19

R cU lsiO O cld . if

Tabl® B-kO:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation

Number
of
workers

2f

Average
hourly
earnings
3/

Carpenters, maintenance ..............................
Electricians, maintenance .f.n .f..,M t .tIIMtt,tlini
Helpers, trades, maintenance
Janitors and cleaners ................................
Machinists, maintenance #tTT.ftTTtt..Ttttt.ItlTT,ttItt
Maintenance men, general utility
.......
Mechanics, maintenance
Painters, maintenance........... .............
pipe fitters, maintenance
Sheet.«»metfl1 wnrlfers, ma 1ntenence t,TTrttTt|tI(TTTT.Ilt
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ................. .
Truck drivers, medium (1^ to and including i tons) ...
t
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ........ ............ .

352
358
177
220
553
100
i7
i
72
25
127
1,887
195
i| 8
0

$ .
1.30 1.35 I.it0 L a
i.5o 1.55
and
under
1 *3 5
ltUQ... 1 * 1 5 - 1.5o_ 1 1 5 5 .. 1 .6 0

<
k
1.90
1.97
1.63
1.1:7
1.96
1.90
1.90
1.89
1.95
1.97
1.62
1.72
1.69

$ .
1 .6 0

$
1.65

$
1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90 ^.95

$
$
$
2.00 2.05 2.10

2.15

1*65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.05

26
6
s

27
6

l

33

160

il
l

1

18

125
12

2.00

-

-

1

-

-

-

20

67

-

76
2
"

“

-

-

2tt
ii
10

637
30
28

650

-

130
10
37

333

-

-

“
“

U 97

6

-

13
p
0
i3
t
19
119

*

"

*

*

-

i
t

-

-

-

“

-

5

k
h

58
1h 3
10

"

1

1n*
7

k2

87
-

2.20

-

jy

-

2.15

lo j

33!?

Ik

23

2.10

-

noo
XO

-

-

-

-

-

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 100 workers in the railroad industry (Group I O as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19h9 edition)
t)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers; all were paid on a time basis.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-63

9n

&

4

4

/

u

u

u

>

1/ G

e

&

v

U

e

s

U

'

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

U n d e r j o . o o 3 * 2 .5 0 f e . o o 3 * 7 .5 0 & . 0 0 & . 5 o
Weekly
Weekly
earnings $
hours
(Standard) (Standard) 3 0 . 0 0
3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 . 5 0 JiO.OO ]j 2 . 5 0 j.

2.50 f e . o o

f e .5 0

f e .o o

f e .o o

£ 7 .5 0

f o . ,0 0 I

5.00 i i 7 . 5 0

Occupation and sex

5 0 .0 0

5 2 ,. 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 - 5 .2 *5 0 . 6 0 * 0 0 . 6 2 . 5 0

I

2.50 f e . o o

f e .5 0

f e .o o

f e .5 0

$ 5 .0 0

f e .o o

f e .o o

9 0 .0 0

7 2 . 5 0 ■ 7 5 .0 0 - 8 0 . 0 0

85*0 0

90*0 0

9V 9r

.
10
_

6
2
_

3
8
_

17

8

and
6 5*O Q . 6 7 . 5 0 - 7 0 * 0 0

Men
Clerks, accounting •••••••••••••
Clerks, correspondence, class A
Section heads ...••••••........
Tabulating-machine operators ...
underwriters *••••••••••••••••••

20
2 it
5o
10
9 it

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .- 5

177
37
25
31
2 i |0
13
7 lt
82*
36

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .6

$
6 5 .0 0
7 U .5 0
7 J * .5 0
6 0 .5 0
8 1 .5 0

.
_

_

_

-

-

-

•

“

“

“

“

-

.
-

12
-

18
6
_

3
k
..

76
-

58
3
6
6

-

-

2

1
1
-

”

“

22*
6
-

9
1
-

-

it
3
5
13

3

-

-

_

-

“

1
1
1

1
1
7

it
3
10
1

8
it
5
3
2

lit
-

-

-

1
3
8

-

1
2

2
5
1

10
-

2
-

-

7

3
9
2
1

3
1
5
-

2
1
1
6

1
1
8
-

.
.

-

_
_

_

6

.
.
.

_
_
.

.

it
.

-

-

3

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

7

1

1

2

1

6

1

_

*

1

1

3

“

“

*

2

it
1
it

1
_
8

5
-

1

l
11

y 27

Women
Clerks, accounting •••••••••••••
Clerks, actuarial ••••••••••••••
Clerks, correspondence, class A
Clerks, correspondence, class B
Clerks, file, class B ••••••••••
Clerks, premium-ledger-card ....
Clerks, underwriter ••••••••••••
Key-punch operators ••••..... .
Premium acceptors ..............
Section heads
Stenographers, general •••••••••
Tabulating-machine operators •••
Typists, class A •••••••••••••••
Typists, class B •••••••••••••••
Underwriters ........

5
k

166
9
100
262
20

3 8 .5

.00

LL
it6 .5 0
6 3 .0 0

5.0
k5
36.00

itl.0 0
it5 .o o
il2 .5 0
L 5 .o o

62.50
i t l t .o o

L 5 .5 0
it3 . 0 0
3 8 .5 0

61.50

16
.
-

'

-

9
7
-

.

3
3
-

8

31

27
h
8
13

7
1

5
19
3
26
-

13
97

36

.

20

39
2
1

k
13
k

10
12*
13
27
«
15

k
k
l

16
6
20
3
8
7
5
39
1
21
33

2
1

11
11
6
2

33
-

13
-

20

5
1

9

1

2
1
lit
it
it
3
-3
1
1
1

3
5
2
3
2
it
10
2

13

1

3

5
3
3

.

.

3

it

3

1

.

1

2

-

2
1

*

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19lt9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget.
2 j Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
3/ Includes 11 workers at $90 - 95; 6 at $95 - 100; 3 at $100 - 105; 5 at $110 - 115; 2 at $115 and over.




Occupation*! Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

20

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated,)

B u ild in g G a n A tb u c tio u

Table C-205* B

January 2 , 1952
Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

13.450
Bricklayers
2.750
Carpenters
E l 1 d a n * ............................... 2.750
Painters .o................................. 2.600
PI ap+,flT*e*rs T.r...T.......................... 3 . 0 0 0
PIlimbers T T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.750
1.350
Building laborers ........................

B

&

J

z

e

/

l

i

e

A

July 1, 1951

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Leadmen or first h a n d s ........... ..... 11.425
Second hands, benchmen........ ........
1.312
Bread and cake - Semi-machine shops:
Leadmen, mixers, ovenmen............... 1 . 6 0 3
Bench or machine h a n d s ....... .........
1.492
Miscellaneous helpers, men
1.070
Sunday help and miscellaneous helpers,
women ...............................
1 .0 0 0
Bread - Machine shops:
leadmen ...................... ........... I . 8 5 3
Oven hands ........ ......... .........
1.743
Assistant spongers ..................... 1 . 6 8 8
First bench hands, scalers .......... .
1.660
Bench and machine hands ................ 1.633
1 .4 6 8
Bread counters ................. .......
Helpers, pan greasers..... ............
1.440
Ingredient scalers .....................
1.323
Wrapping- and slicing-machine
operators.... ....................... 1 . 2 4 8
Beltmen:
First 6 m o n t h s ...... ....... .......
1.173
1 .2 4 8
Experienced ........................
Cake - Machine shops:
Leadmen ................................. 1.853
Ovenmen, mixers ..................... ,. 1.743
Machine hands ........................ ,. 1.633
Cake counters .........................
1 .4 6 8
Helpers ............................
1.440
Icing mixers, ingredient scalers ....... 1.409
Car crews:
1.260
Inexperienced ......................
Experienced ......................... 1.335
Miscellaneous helpers:
Inexperienced (first 6 months) ...... 1.135
Experienced (after 6 months) ...... •• 1 . 2 1 0
1.160
Leadladies ............................
Women helpers:
Inexperienced (first 6 months) ..... . 1.035
1 .1 1 0
Experienced (after 6 months) .... .




k

&

U

e

l

-

G

a

n

i

i

n Table C -205:
u
e
d

B a & e k ie d

Hours
per
week

48
48
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

C la s s ific a t io n

-

C o n tin u ed

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Table C-205:

a

Rate
p er
hour

Hebrew - Hand s h o p s :
Leadmen, b a k e r s , ovenmen ...................................... ♦ 1 ,7 1 9
Second h a n d s ................................ ..
1 .4 9 0
M is c e lla n e o u s h e lp e r s .............................................
.8 2 5
C r a c k e r s and c o o k i e s :
Agreem ent A:
Leadmen ........................ ......................................... .... 1 .6 7 5
Oven o p e r a t o r s ............................... ....................... 1 .6 7 5
C ra ck e r-d o u g h m ix e r s , sw eet-d ou g h
m ix e r s , graham -dough m ix e r s , d o u g h m achine s e t -u p and o p e r a t o r s ,
sp on g e m ix e r s , en ro b in g -m a ch in e
s e t -u p and o p e r a t o r s .................................... 1 .6 5 0
M arshm allow -m achine s e t -u p and o p e r ­
a t o r s , ic in g -m a c h in e s e t -u p and
o p e r a t o r s .............................................................
1 .6 2 5
1 .5 0 0
Head s t o c k k e e p e r s .............................................
D ou gh -break r o l l fe e d e r s ...............................
1 .4 7 5
1 .3 6 0
W rapping-m achine s e t -u p men ........................
Agreem ent B:
Sponge m ix in g d ep a rtm en t:
Head m i x e r s ...................................... .. ............. 1 .4 3 0
Sponge and dough m ix ers ........................... 1 .3 2 0
1 .2 2 0
M ix e r s ’ h e lp e r s .............................................
Sw eet m ix in g d ep a rtm en t:
1 ,4 3 0
Head m ix e rs ......................................................
1 .3 2 0
M ix ers ..................................................................
1 .2 2 0
M ix e r s ’ h e lp e r s .............................................
Baking d ep a rtm en t:
M a ch in em en ......................................................... 1 .4 2 0
1 .3 8 0
P e e le r s ............................... ................................
1 .3 2 0
Ovenmen ................................................................
1 .2 8 0
Oven t a k e - o u t men ........................................
S h e e t e r s and la m in a t o r s , r e lie f m e n
1 .2 5 0
(s w e e t) ...........................................................
S t a c k e r s , m e n ............................................... .. 1 .2 3 0
C o s t and raw m a t e r ia l c h e c k e r s . . . . .
1 .2 2 0
G e n e ra l h e l p , s e m i - s k i l l e d ...................
1 .1 5 0
Sponge and s w e e t -p a c k in g d ep a rtm en t:
Supplymen ...........................................................
1 .1 9 5
G e n e ra l h e l p , s e m i - s k i l l e d , men . . . .
1 .1 5 0
W orking s u p e r v i s o r s , women .......... ..
1 .0 5 5
C h e ck e rs , w o m e n ............................................. 1.0 1 5
G e n e ra l h e l p , s e m i - s k i l l e d ,
women ............................................. ..................
.8 5 5
I c i n g d ep a rtm en t:
M ix e r s , m a ch in em en ......................................
1 .3 2 0
1 .2 9 0
M arshm allow and i c i n g m ix ers . . . . . . .
G en e ra l h e l p , s e m i - s k i l l e d , men . . . .
1 .1 5 0
Women em p loy ees:
M achine o p e r a t o r s ..........................
1 .0 4 0
M achine f e e d e r s ......................................
.9 3 5
G e n e r a l h e l p , s e m i - s k i l l e d women,
t r o l l e y g i r l s .......... ..................................
.8 5 5
C a rton and caddy fo rm in g and w rapping
d e p a rtm e n t:
Machinemen ( s e t - u p and a d j u s t e r s ) •• 1 .3 2 0
1 .2 9 0
M achine o p e r a t o r s , men . . . . . . . o . . . . .

Hours
per
week

48
48
48

o o

Table C-15

40

40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Cr a c k e r s and cookies: - Con t i n u e d
A g r e e m e n t B: - C o n t i n u e d
R e c e i v i n g department:
W o r k i n g supervisors ................ ♦ 1 . 3 0 0
R e c e i v e r s .............................
1.250
R e c eivers' helpers, loaders and
u n l o a d e r 8 ..........................
1.170
S h i p p i n g department:
W o r king supervisors, m e n ...........
1.300
Checkers, m e n ........................
1.250
As s e m b l e r s a nd l o a d e r s , m e n ...... 0 1.170
A g r e e m e n t C:
B a k i n g and m i x i n g departments:
Hea d m i x e r s ......................... .
1.655
B akers .............................. tt
1.600
S ponge m i x e r s ........................
1.545
R o l l e r m e n ........... ............ .
1,435
A s s e m b l y m e n ........................ .
1,405
Mixers' help e r s , stackers, general
h e l p ............................... .
1.380
P a c k i n g d epartment:
F l o o r m e n ..............................
1,270
W o m e n employees:
W o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s ..... .
1,270
Packers, spo n g e ................. .
1.160
Tally clerks ............ .
1.140
M a c h i n e operators ............. .
1.195
Other h e l pers .....................
1.105

Hours
per

week

40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
. 40
40

T*bl. C-2082:

^

^

4

4

January 1 , 1952

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Beer bottlers .................... ..
♦1.895
Brewers................................... 2.045
Engineers ............................. .
2 .4 2 5
Firemen ......... .......... ............ .
2 .0 5 5
Freight handlers........ ........... .
1,895
Maintenance men .......... ,.............. .
*
2.155
Millworkers ............. ........ ........ . 1.^95
Oilers .................... ....
1.985
Pulverized fuel operators ...... ......... .
2.105

HourB
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40

40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L A B ®
Bureau of labor Statistics

21

Ta b l e C-27:

PfoUtUtUf

P/U+lti*Uf - 6o*U i4U 40&

T a ble C-27:

R a te
p e r
hour

Book and j o b s h o p s :
B in d e ry women ................................................................ 1 1 .2 2 0
2 .2 2 0
B ook b in d ers ............................... .. ..........
C o m p o s it o r s , h a n d ............................... .................... . 2 .3 4 0
E l e c t r o t y p e r s ............................. .
2 .4 0 9
2 .3 4 0
M achine o p e r a t o r s ..................................................
2 .3 4 0
M achine t e n d e r s (m a c h in is t s ) .............................
2 .2 8 6
2 .5 6 0
P h o to e n g ra v e rs .............................................................
P r e s s a s s i s t a n t s and f e e d e r s :
C y lin d e r p r e s s e s , 27 x 4-1 i n .
o r l a r g e r ..............................................................
1 .9 6 5
1 .6 8 0
Sm all c y l i n d e r ................... ..................................
P la t e n p r e s s e s (2 o r more y e a r s ’
s e r v i c e ) ......................... .
1 .2 7 5
2 .1 8 5
R o t a r y , web p r e s s e s ............ .....
Pressm en, c y l i n d e r :
1 5 - c o l o r , 1 4 - c o l o r ................. .........
2 .5 7 5
1 s in g le -r o ll ro ta ry , 1 2 -r o ll
r o t a r y ......................
2 .5 2 5
Second men on 5 - c o l o r ; se co n d men on
2 - r o l l r o t a r y ; 1 2 - c o l o r l e s s than
68 i n . ; 1 r o to g r a v u r e , s h e e t -fe d ,
s i n g l e - c o l o r ; 1 19 x 28 i n . t o 24
x 35 i n . p r e s s w it h o u t a s s i s t a n t s ;
a l l makes o f a u to m a tics p r i n t in g
from c y l in d e r up t o 6 8 i n . ; 1 a u t o ­
m a t ic 17 x 22 i n . t o 6 8 i n . and 2
2 .4 1 5
p la t e n ............................
1 2 - c o l o r 6 8 i n . and o v e r , 1 d o u b le
c y l in d e r p e r f e c t i n g
............ 2 .4 5 5
1 2 - c o l o r C la yb ou rn ............ .
2 .4 8 5
H and-fed equ ipm en t:
1 c y l i n d e r , 24 x 36 i n . o r l e s s . . . .
2 .1 3 5
2 c y l i n d e r , 24 x 36 i n . o r l e s s ;
1 c y l i n d e r , 24 x 36 i n . o r l e s s
and 1 o r 2 p l a t e n ............................... ..
2 .2 1 5
1 c y l i n d e r , 25 x 38 i n . o r l a r g e r
and l e s s than 68 i n .....................
2 .2 1 5
1 c y l i n d e r , 2 5 x 38 i n . o r l a r g e r
and l e s s than 68 i n . and 1 o r 2
p l a t e n .......... ..................................................
2 .3 2 5
V e r t i c a l equipm ent:
A l l a u to m a tics p r i n t in g from
c y l in d e r l e s s than 17 x 22 i n . ,
2 p r e s s e s ; 1 a u tom a tic c y l in d e r
l e s s than 17 x 22 i n . and 2 han df e d p la t e n s ....... ................................
2 .2 6 5

Hours
p er
week

37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37

1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2

37 1 /2
37 1 /2
37 1 /2
37 1 /2
37 1 /2
37 1 /2

37 1 /2




Book and job shops: - C o ntinued
Stereotypers:
A g r e e m e n t A .............................. 12.836
A g r e e m e n t B ......... .................. ..
2.896
A g r e e m e n t C ....... ................... ...
2 . 749

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day w o r k ........ .
Compositors, hand - night wor k ............
Mac h i n e operators - day w o r k ..............
Mac h i n e operators - night wor k ...........
Machine tenders (machinists) d a y w o r k . ..... ..... ........... .
M a c h i n e tenders (machinists) ni g h t w o r k .................................
Mailers - d a y w o r k ...... ...................
Mailers - night w o r k ................. .
P h o t oengravers - d a y w o r k ............ .
P h o t oengravers - n i g h t w o r k ...............
Pressmen, w e b presses - d a y w o r k ........ .
R o t o g r a v u r e .................... ..........
Pressmen, w e b presses - n i g h t w o r k ...... .
R o t o g r a v u r e ................ ............ .
Pressmen-in-charge - d ay w o r k ..... ........
R o t o g r a v u r e ......... .......... .
P r e s s m en-in-charge - night w o r k ...........
R o t o g r a v u r e ............. .................
Stereotypers - day w o r k
...... ...... .
Stereo-typers - night w o r k ........ .

37 1 /2
Table C-^l:

2.786

Hours
per
week

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2

2.944

36
36
36
36

2.786

36 1/4

2 . 944
2.406
2.600

36 1/4
37 1/2

2.944
2.786

2.893
3.053
2.467
2.720
2.663
2 . 929
2.653
2.907
2.863

1/4
1/4
1/4
1/4

35
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
35
35
37 1/2
37 1/2
35

3.134
2.586

35
,
37 1/2

2.791

35

J io ca l

6p& uUi4Uj. C sttfU otfeeA

37 1 /2

October 1, 1951

37 1 /2
Classif i c a t i o n

37 1 /2

Rate
per
hour

1-man cars and busses:

37 1 /2

1 .9 7 0

37 1 /2

2 .0 0 5
2 .1 6 5

37 1 /2
37 1 /2

2 .1 6 5
2 .0 8 5
2 .2 6 5

37 1 /2
37 1 /2
37 1 /2

F i rst 4 mon t h s ........................... ♦ 1 . 4 0 0
5 — 8 m o n t h s .............................
1.450
9 - 1 2 m o n t h s ............. ............. .
1.500
Af t e r 12 mont h s ................TTT...T.. TT
1.550
St. Louis County:
Busses:
F i rst 6 months
Af t e r 6 months

........................
........................

*

U

o

*

P

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t

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h

July 1, 1951
Rate
p>er
hour

37 1 /2
37 1 /2

Offset presses:
M u l t i l i t h : 14 x 19 i n .............
P ressm en , p l a t e n :
1 o r 2, h a n d -fe d ....................
3 o r 4, h a n d -fe d .....................
2 a u to m a tics o r 2 a u to m a tics and
1 h a n d -fe d ; 1 cou p on , 42 i n .........
1 co u p o n , 28 i n ..................... .
1 New Era ................................................

Cl a s s i f i c a t i o n

M

<ind <Jfelp&U

July 1, 1951

Ju l y 1, 1951

C la s s ific a t io n

Table C-42:

1.275
1.375

Hours
per
week

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bakery:
Cracker
ll.XXD 48
Relay drivers - special delivery....
1.225 40
1.228 57
Roll, doughnut, and pastry...... ......
Yeast
Agreement A ........... ............
1.553 42 1/2
Agreement B ..... ..... ........... . 1.683 33 1/2
Agreement C .........................
1.312 48
Food pxroducts:
Start ...........................
1.285 48
After 3 months ...................
1.389 48
After 6 m o n t h s ..........
1.493 48
Beer:
2.020 40
Brewery and distributor
Helpers
2.020 40
Building:
Construction:
Dump truck:
Under 4 cubic yards
1.660 40
4 and less than 7 cubic yards
1.810 40
7 cubic yards and o v e r
.
2.310 40
Pick-up driving
1.560 40
Machinery hauling
1.810 40
Euclid, wagon:
2.360 40
7 - 1 3 cubic y a r d s
13
16 cubic yards
2.460 40
Material:
Agitator or mixer:
3 cubic yards or less ............
1.650 40
Over 3 and up to and including
5 cubic yards
1.800 40
Over 5 cubic yards
1.970 40
Toumamixers
2.400 40
Dry-batch truck:
3 1/2 cubic yards or l e s s ........
1.550 40
Over 3 l/2 cubic y a r d s .... ......
1.810 40
Flat-bed or opjen truck:
8 tons or less ..............
1.550 40
8
15 t o n s .....
1.810 40
Over 15 tons
2.200 40
Lumber
1.450 40
Plumbing:
1/2
3 1/2 tons
1.500 40
Over 3 1/2 t o n s
1.600 40
All tractors
1.600 40
Cheese
1.520 40
Cleaning and dyeing:
Relay drivers
1.000 45
Rug or furniture
1.088 45
Coal
............... .......
1.320 48
Helpers ...........
1.210 48
Commission h o u s e
.... . Tt 1.330 40
Helpers
. 1.230 40
Department store
1.550 40
Relay, tractors and freight
1.575 40
Helpers (junior)
.
1.050 40
Combination drivers Furniture and bulk
1.650 40
Helpers
. 1.595 40

. . .. . . . . .. ........................
.
.
:
.
.
.

.
..............
.........................
. . .. . . . . .. . ....................

-

.....................
........
...... ..........
................................
............................
................... .
......................

...........................
.......................
....... „....................
.
.
.
.
............. ...........
............................„..
.................... .........
........................ .
....... ...................
...................
...... .....................................
......................................
...................................
•••••••••••......
......... ....................
...........................
.............................................
.......................................
...................
............. ...............
...
..........................................

S

b

'

U

U

22

Table C-421 M

e

t

o

b

t

i

u

t

c

k

j

b

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U

t

A Tablel C-542:
&
4

M e a t G u tt& U

Table C-58*

R & ita U /U L H ti

&itd cMelp&U- Continued
January 1 , 1952

July 1, 1951

Classification

Fish - Special delivery ...................

Flowers - Wholesale .......................
Freight - General:
Agreement A:
Local:
1/2 - 5 tons ......................
5 tons and o v e r ................
Helpers ..........................
Tractor:
1/2 - 5 tons ......... *......... .
5 tons and o v e r ..................
Helpers ..........................
Agreement B:
Tractor:
1/2 - 5 tons ....................
5 tons and over *........... .
Helpers ......................... .
Transfer:
1/2 - 5 t o n s .....................
5 tons and over ................. .
Helpers ....................... .
Furniture .........o.......................*•
Helpers
..........................
Grocery - Chain s t o r e .... *................
Helpers 1.................................
Ice .......................................
Helpers ..................................
laundry:
Overall - Utility drivers ...............
Towel supply....................... .
Mattress - Wholesale ......................
Meat:
Packinghouse ...'.................••••••••
Pmilt r y , , , , , .....................................
Milk:
Relay drivers ..........................
Route riders, wholesale, relief .........
Tractor or tank d rivers.... i...........
Moving ................................... .
Helpers
Newspaper:
Dtv -........ .............. ............
Helpers
N i g h t ......................... ........
Helpers
Railway express.... .................. ..




.

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

H.450
1.200
1.150
1.320

40
40
40
40

Classification

January 1, 1952
Rate
per
week

Head meat cutters......... ................. 199.50

Hours
per
week

1/40

Self-service markets employing female
wrappers:
11 or more full-time employees ......... 119.50
10 or less full-time employees ........ 104.50

1.500
1.600
1.380

48
48
48

1.520
1.600
1.380

48
48
48

1.590
1.590
1.390

48
48
48

1.490
1.590
1.390
1.650
1.570
1.713
1.540
1.358
1.213

Journeyman meat cutters......... ......... .
Self-service markets employing female
wrappers ............... .............

48
48
48
40
40

35
35

87.00

1/40

90.50

35

Apprentices:
First 6 m o n t h s...... ••••••........ .
Second 6 months ••••••••..............
Second year ......... ........... .
Third year ........... .............. ..

52.00
57.00
63.00
72.50

40
40
40
40

Wrappers - Self-service markets:

46
46

Starting r a t e ................ •••••»••
After 90 days ..................... .

1/

44.50
48.50

40
40

45-hour week in markets employing only one man*

48
48
Table C-5452:

1.400
1.400
1.650

40
40
40

1.850
1.110

40
40

1.559
1.759
1.589
1.400
1.350

48
48
48
40
40

1.763
1.550
1.850
1.613
1.925
1.710
1.510

40

40
40
40

40
40

40

January 1, 1952

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Dairy and ice cream plant:
Female inspectors ••••............... .
40
H.273
General plant employees ............... .
40
1.331
Horseshoers....... ................... .
40
1.545
Ice cream wrappers ....................... 1.283
40
Plant foremen ............ ...............
1.577
40
Semi-skilled............................
40
1.373
Skilled ................................. 1.477 - 40
Clerical and office:
Cashiers •••••.......................
40
1.633
Clerks ................ .......... .......
40
1.313
Multilith and photostat operators ........ 1.477
40

Classification

Rate
per
week

Class A Restaurants, Cafes and Taverns:
Bartenders:
♦52.80
Beverage establishments............
Restaurants serving beverages ........ 57.75
Culinary:
Chefs ....................... .......
69.60
52.80
Cold meat men, carvers........•••••••
52.80
Cooks, all o t h e r ....................
Cooks1 assistants.......... .........
36.30
Dish-up men or women
41.25
Full-time pastry c o o k s ........ •••••»• 52.80
Miscellaneous kitchen help and
30.80
dishwashers ................. ......
Pie cooks or combination ........... .
41.25
Salad or pantry girls ................
36.30
Sandwich and steam table ............ . 50.05
Second or dinner c o o k s .... •••••.....
58.30
Swing cooks, fry cooks, night cooks ... 55.55
Class B Restaurants, Cafes and Taverns:
Bartenders:
52.80
Beverage establishments ............ .
Restaurants serving beverages....... . 57.75
Culinary:
Carvers, sandwich, and steamtable
men ...................................... 50.05
Chefs ............................... 63.80
Dish-up men or women ••••••••••...... . 41.25
Fry and all other cooks ........ .
50.05
Miscellaneous kitchen help and dish30.80
washers ...........................
Night cooks ........... ..............
52.80
Salad or pantry girls and cooks'
assistants ...... ..................
36.30
Second or dinner cooks ............. . 55.00
Swing m e n .......................... . 52.80
Class A and B Restaurants, Cafes and Taverns:
Waitresses:
Tap roams and restaurants:
Bus g i r l s ................ .......
26.40
Restaurant fountain and counter
g i r l s ..........................
33.00
Waitresses .......................
26.40
Cafeteria:
Bus g i r l s ...... ........ ........ . 33.00
Restaurant fountain and counter
girls ..........................
38.50
Waitresses ...... .................
38.50
Waiters:
Bus b o y s .......................... .
26.40
Captains ••••........ ......... .
55.00
Waiters..................... .
26.40

Hours
per
week

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

48
48

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

23

Table C-7011:

c M o te li,

Table C-7011;

Rate
per
week

Class A Hotels:
Bartenders:
Bartenders .......................... 159.00
Service bartenders ................... 66.00
Culinary:
Coffee shop:
All cooks .................... .
52.75
AO. 10
Sandwich m e n ........ ..... .
Main kitchen:
Assistant cooks ..................
50.90
Butchers..........................
60.85
Cold meat m e n ....................
58.35
Try cooks ........................
58.35
Night chefs ......................
63.25
Roast cooks ......................
58.35
Second butchers..... ..... .......
A9.05
66.85
Second cooks ................ .
Swing men ........................
60.85
Pantry and vegetable cooks:
Assistant pantry........ .
36.50
Assistant vegetable cooks ......... 3A.55
39.60
Head pantry •••••••...............
35.80
Head vegetable cooks .............
Pot washers.... .............. .
3A.05
Pastry room:
Assistant bread men ............... A9.05
5A.60
Assistant chefs ..................
Bake shop helpers (pot washers) .... 36.00
Bread m e n ..... ......... .........
58.95
70.50
Chefs ............................
Miscellaneous:
Housekeeping:
30.00
Chambermaids ••••...........
Housemen ............. •••••••••••••
36.75
Inspectresses...... ..............
3A.25
linen room girls ................. . 32.25
Window washers..............•••••• A3.25
Kitchen:
Miscellaneous kitchen workers •••••• 28.75
Silver polishers - head men •••••••• 36.00
Storeroom helpers e................ 35.00
Laundry:
Guaranteed AO hours work at 6A cents
per hour .............
25.60
Maintenance:
Head maintenance men ••.•••••••.... 67.50
65.00
Maintenance assistants




-

C o n tin u e d

Table C-7011:

January 1, 1952

January 1, 1952

Classification

J ta te U s

Hours
per
week

A8
A8

A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8

A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8

A0
A8
A8

Classification

J to te U ' • C o n tin u e d
January 1, 1952

Rate
per
week

Glass A Hotels: - Continued
Miscellaneous: - Continued
Receiving department:
♦35.00
Receiving clerks ............ .
Watchmen.........................
35.00
Service:
Baggage porters:
Residential.................. . 23.25
Transient .....................
18.75
Bellboys t
Residential..... ........ .....
20.50
Semi-transient ......... .......
17.25
1A.50
Transient................ .
Doormen:
Residential .......... ........ . 27.75
Transient ........ ....... .....
20.75
Telephone operators ..............
39.50
38.00
Valets ...........................
Waitresses:
Cafe and restaurants in hotels:
Bus g i r l s .................... . 2A.50
22.00
Waitresses ................... .
Cafeterias and lunch counters:
Bus girls ................... .
2A.50
Counter girls:
Cafeteria ............... .
27.50
25.50
Lunch counter ......... .....
Waiters:
Bus boys •••••••••••••....... .....
2A.50
52.00
Waiter captains..... .............
Waiters •••••.....................
22.00
Class B and C Hotels:
Bartenders:
59.00
Bartenders............ .............
Service bartenders ...••••••.......... 66.00
Culinary:
37.00
Assistant pastry cooks ........ ......
Coffee shop cooks ............... .
A9.65
A0.10
Corner grill cooks ..................
Fry cooks .............. ............. A9.05
Night cooks ............. ............
A7.25
Other cooks - except fry cooks ...... . 50.90
Pantry ...... ......... ___________ ... 3A.55
Pastry cooks ••••........ ............
50.90
Pot washers ............ ......... ..
3A.05
Sandwich m e n .... ..... .............. A0.10
Second cooks ••••............... .....
5A.60
Vegetable cooks ••••......... .......
3A.55

Hours
per
week

A8
A8

Classification

Class B and C Hotels: - Continued
Miscellaneous:
Housekeeping:
Chambermaids •••••••........ .
Housemen ......... ............
Inspectresses ................
Linen roam girls ..............

A8
A8

Kitchen:
Miscellaneous kitchen workers ••
Silver polishers - head men ....
Store room helpers ............
Laundry:
Guaranteed AO hours work at 6A
cents per hour .........<>••..
Maintenance:
Head maintenance men ..........
Maintenance assistants ..... .
Receiving department:
Receiving clerks ......... .
Watchmen.... ........... .....
Service:
Baggage porters:
Residential ...............
Transient ...... ...........
Bellboys:
Residential...........
Semi-transient
Transient........... .....
Doorman - Transient ..........
Telephone operators ••••••.....
Valets .......................
Waitresses:
Cafes and restaurants in hotels:
Bus girls •••••..........
Waitresses.......... .
Waitress captains ....... .
1
Cafeteria and lunch counters:
Bus girls ........... .
Counter girls:
Cafeteria ............. .
Lunch counter ...........
Waiters:
Bus boys .....................
Waiter captains..............
Waiters.............. .

A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8

A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8

A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
2/

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week_

♦29.25
35.25
32.25
30.75
A3.25

A8
A8
A8
A8
A8

28.25
35.00
30.50

A8
A8
A8

25.60

A0

65.00
63.00

A8
A8

33.00
35.00

A8
A8

23.25
18.75

A8
A8

20.50
17.25
16.00
23.75
39.00
38.00

A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8

2A.00
22.60
/ 150.00

A8
A8
A8

2A.50

A8

27.50
25.50

A8
A8

2A.50
52.00
22.00

A8
A3
A8

Monthly salary - Class A, B, and C hotels.

Entrance Rates

D;
Table D-lr

f

Z

s

t

b

u

z

H

&

G

.

R

a

t

e

d

f1 /o

v

i

P

U

u

t

t

T

V

a

b

J

^

e

b

d

P e r c e n t o f p l a n t w ork ers i n e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith s p e c i f i e d
minimum r a t e s i n M a n u fa ctu rin g
Minimum r a t e ( i n c e n t s )

A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s

E:

N ondurable
D u rable
A ll
W hole­ R e t a i l S e r v ­
g ood s
good s
P u b lic
in d u s s a le tra d e
ic e s
u t ilit ie s *
E sta b lish m sn ts w ith tr ie s
tr a d e
y
y
2/
2 1 -2 5 0 251 o r 2 1 -2 5 0 251 o r
more
more
w ork ers
w ork ers
w ork ers
w ork ers

...............

1 0 0 .0

O ver 50 and under 55 ..........
O ver 55 and tinder 6 0 ..........
6 0 ....................................................
Over 60 and und er 65 ..........
6 5 .....................................................
O ver 65 and u nd er 70 ..........
7 0 .....................................................
Over 70 and u nd er 75 ..........
7 5 ....................................................
O ver 75 and und er 80 ..........
8 0 ....................................................
Over 80 and under 85 ..........
85 ....................................................
Over 85 and under 90 ..........
9 0 ....................................................
Over 90 and under 95 ..........
Over 95 and und er 100 . . . .
100 ..................................................
O ver 100 and under 105 . . .
1 0 5 ..................................................
O ver 105 and under 110 . . .
1 1 0 ..................................................
O ver 110 and u nd er 115 . . .
1 1 5 ..................................................
Over 115 and u n d er 1 20 . . .
O ver 120 and un d er 125 . . .
125 ..................................................
Over 125 and u nd er 1 30 . . .
130 ..................................................
Over 130 and und er 135 . . .
Over 135 and und er 14-0 . . .
Over 14-0 and tinder 14-5 . . .
Over 14.5 and u nd er 1 5 0 . . .
Over 150 and und er 155 . . .
Over 155 and un d er 160 . . .
160 ..................................................
Over 160 and u nd er 165 . . .
165 and o v e r .............................

0 .1
.4
1 .4
1 .3
.1
.1
.A
.2
1 2 .8
.4
.9
1 .1
7 .3
.6
1 .3
2 .4
1 .3
4 .3
6 .2
.3 .2
1 1 .5
3 .3
3 .8
.6
5 .4
4 .7
1 .3
5 .7
.1
1 .7
1 .4
1 .3
2 .6
.7
.6
1 .2
.3
.4

E sta b lish m en ts w ith no
e s t a b l is h e d minimum . . . .

7 .1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Supplementary Wage Practices

r t .E i
ai - :

S h ift 3>ift&>ue*U*cU PAatUiiOMi
P e r c e n t o f p l a n t w ork ers em ployed
on e a ch s h i f t i n -

10 0 .0

A l l manufei c t u r i n e in d ii s t r i e s 1 /

1 0 .2
4 .5
1 7 .3
6 .8
8 .4
_
1 2 .8
1 3 .4
9 .9
3 .2
9 .0
4 .5
_
-

2 .9
.9
3 .6
1 .4
2 .6
2 .2
3 .3
4 .2
8 .2
5 .9
2 4 .9
6 .8
3 .8
3 .4
2 .0
3 .3
1 0 .4
_
2 .1
3 .3
.9
-

3 .9

3 9 .5
3 .0
,2 3 .6
_
1 0 .0
_
5 .4
_
_
7 .6
_
_
-

1 0 .9

_
2 1 .0
2 .2
2 .1
1 .4
9 .5
7 .7
3 .0
7 .6
1 6 .3
_

_
2 .5
.9
2 3 .9
2 .0
3 .9
-

1 4 .4
2 .0
3 .3
7 .0
.2
2 .7
3 .0
9 .2
1 0 .3
7 .6
1 .5
3 .2
3 .6
1 .2
1 4 .1
-

2 .7
8 .6
2 .4
1 1 .8
2 .1
8 .5
5 .6
5 .7
5 .6
5 .9
-

2 .9
_

1 .0
.5
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

-

1 2 .3

3 9 .6

2 .4
4 .0
1 .6
1 3 .9
1 8 .1
.1
8 .3
_

3 .0
4 .9
6 .1
3 .1
1 .9
5 .2
-

6 .5
_
_
-

1 .7

3 .3

1 .5
_
_
_

l /
Lowest r a t e s f o r m a lly e s t a b l is h e d f o r h i r i n g e i t h e r men o r women p l a n t w ork ers o t h e r than
watchmen.
2 / E x clu d e s d a ta f o r f i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .
A lth ou gh d a ta c o u ld n o t b e shown s e p a r a t e l y f o r r e t a i l t r a d e due t o t h e o m is s io n o f d e p a r t ­
ment and l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r i e t y s t o r e s , th e rem a in d er o f r e t a i l t r a d e i s a p p r o p r i a t e l y r e p r e s e n t e d
i n t h e d a ta f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s . "
f j E x ce p t h o t e l s .
*
T r a n s p o r t a t io n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m u n ica tion , and o t h e r p u b li c u t i l i t i e s .




P e r c e n t o f w ork ers
on e x t r a s h i f t s ,
a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s ...............
R e c e iv in g s h i f t
d i f f e r e n t i a l ......................
U niform c e n t s
(p e r h o u r) ...................
Under 4 c e n t s ..........
4 cen ts
5 cen ts . . . . . . . . . . .
6 c e n t s ........................
7 c e n t s ........................
7& c e n t s ......................
8 c e n t s ........................
10 c e n t s ......................
Over 10 c e n t s ..........

C u t le r y ,
M achinery hand t o o l s ,
in d u s t r ie s
and
hardw are
3d o r
3d o r 2d
3d o r 2d
3d o r 2d
3d o r 2d
2d
oth er
oth er
oth er
oth er
oth er
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
.s h if t
s h ift
s h ift

A ll
i n d u s t r ie s

D urable
g ood s

N ondurable
g ood s

46 . 1

1 5 ,7

5 .7

1 2 .7

6,5

1 4 .3

2 .2

lt3

04

1 3 .7

5 .5

1 5 .0

5 .2

1 2 .0

5 .9

1 3 .2

2 .2

1 .2

~

1 0 .6
.5
2 .6
4 .8
( 2 /)
.5
.2
.2
1 .2
.6

5 .0
_
.4
.3
2 .0

9 .6
.7
3 .5
3 .8
.1
.2
.3
1 .0

4 .3
.7
_

5 .9

5 .0
.6
2 .6
.5

.
1

1 1 .9
.3
1 .3
6 .0
1 .0
.4
-

.5
_
_
-

1 .0
(g /)

1 .5
1 .4

1

4 ,

.
6

_
_
_
_

-

1 1 .9

S h ift d iffe r e n t ia l

.
1
(2 /)
1 .6
.6

-

2 .5
_
-

U niform p e r c e n t a g e . . .
5 p e r c e n t ...................
8 p e r c e n t ...................
10 p e r c e n t .................
15 p e r c e n t .................

2 .9
1 .3
.8
.8
-

!i
.1

5 .0
2 .2
1 .4
1 .4
-

O th er ....................................

.2

.2

.4

.4

R e c e iv in g no
d i f f e r e n t i a l ......................

.7

.6

.7

.5

1/
2/

.3
(2 /)
T

.5
(2 /)
■ .3

.
1
.
1

_
.8
1 .3
.2
2 .2
1 .4

.9
-

.4

_
.6
-

.
1

-

-

1 .0
1 .0

_

-

-

.6
.6
-

.7

-

-

.1

.1

. 4
-

.
1

-

-

.1

-

-

6 .9
.2
6 .7
-

-

-

1 .3

.7

.6

1 .1

-

I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r i n d u s t r ie s o t h e r th a n t h o s e shown s e p a r a t e l y .
L ess th a n .0 5 o f 1 p e r c e n t .

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

25

Sch edu led 'ItJjeeJzlif Jtau/iA,

Table E-2

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS l / EMPLOYED IN—
M a n u f a c t u r in g

Weekly hours

All establishments

...............................................

35 hours ........................................ . . ..........
35 h o u r s ............... ........................................ ..
Over 35 and under 3 7 ^ hours .......... .
37-5 hours ........................................................ ..
Over 3 7 i and under i 0 hours .............
|
Under

itO hours .................................
Over iiO and under i i hours ............ . •
tt
Ui hours ..................................
Over ii and under JU h o u r s ..............
tt
8
US h o u r s ......................... ........
it9 hours-.................................
53 hours ............... ............. •••••

5Ij hours ........................ ........ .

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

All
indus­
tries

A
ll

Durable
goods

durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

.

_

_

.6

1.1*
1 .1

3 .1

2 .8

-

-

.
2 .6
2 .2
U.U
iu7

8 3 .9
1 .1
.7

_

1 .0
.6
2 .1
2 .0
9 3 .9
.1
.3

-

2 .9
3 .2
9 3 .1
.2

i.b

.9
9it.6
-

.6

.t
i

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

~

-

-

.7

-

All
indus­
tries
y

Services

1 0 0 .0

3 .3
-

100.0

_

.3

1 .5
i t .8
1 2 .6
1 6 .9
6 3 .9

8 8 .7
2 .9

1 0 0 .0

_

_

1 8 .8
1 6 .9
2 .8
2.1
5 2 .6

-

-

2 .3

.1
.2

-

-

-

-

Finance**

3/

1 0 0 .0

l.l

9 1. h
3 .6
.1

Retail
|ad e

“

i
2 .3
1 .6

M a n u fa c tu r e

All

Durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_

7 7 .0
1 .6
3 .a
3.7

3.3

1.7

-

7 .6

2 .3

3 .9

.7
.1

“

.1

1.0
.U
-

.7
~

-

5 .3
1 .2

.3

1 0 0 .0
_

3 .1
1 .6
1 .3
8 I4 .5
1 .3
1 .2

1.0

durabie
goods

-

9 1.ii
2.3
-

-

7 .3
3 .6
3 .0
7 5.5
-

2 .7
5 .1
-

2 .3

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
tr|de

Services
3/

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_
-

1 0 0 .0

_
-

66.3
-

2.2
29.9

-

-

-

2 .1
5.U
(5 / )
6 .1
.9
U 3.2

.5

8 2 .9
6 .7
2 .0
7 .9

i.t
ti

1 5 .0
5 .0

-

lit.3
-

1 .6

3.6
■

/ Data relate to women workers.
2/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the data for "all industries."
2 / Except hotels.
( J Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2 / Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transpdrtation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
1

Table 1 -3 :

f lc u d

jM

s d e u fi

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Nunfcer o f p a id h o lid a y s

Manufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

All
indus­
tries

A
ll

Durable
goods

durable
goods

A ll e sta b lis h m e n ts ...............................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

E s ta b lis h m a its p ro v id in g p a id h o lid a y s . .

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .8

9 8 .0

9 9 .3

9 8 .1

1 d a y ......................................................................
Ig days ........................................................
3 d a y s ....................................................................
it days ........... '........................
5 days ....................................
6 days ....................................
6jr days ...................................
7 ^days ....................................
l\ days .................................................................
8 days ...........................t ......................................
8 f days .................................................................
9 days ...................................................................
1 Q | days ...............................................................
11 days ...................................... ..........................
Establisnments providing no paid
holidays ..................................

Non­

Retail
trade
1/

Finance**

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

ii.3

-

- ■

.6
.6
.6
5 3 .6
.2
1 6 .9
1 .2
2 1 .9
.1
.7
.h
.6

.5

1 .3
.2
7 1 .5
-

1 2 .2
-

1 1 .8

2 .6
.2
73.it
-

1 8 .8
-

.2
70.it
-

5 .U
-

2 it.0

-

2it.9
-

it0.it
-

3U.5

-

5 5 .3
5 .9
2 9 .0
1 .6
-

r.7
12.0
2.2
13.3

ii.7
5 8 .1

All
indus­
tries
3/

Services
2/

-

3 5 .3
2 2 .1
6 . it
-

3 1 .9
2 .1

i

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0 1 1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
.3
1 .3
.2
1.0

1 .6
6 2 .2
.3
1 2 .9
.1
1 1 .8
(V )

9k. 8
.3
.3
1 .3
2 .1
6 6 .3
-

ll.it
-

1 3 .1

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

i

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 1 .0

9 9 .8

7 5 .5

9 8 .7

79.5

_

.5
2.3

.5
76.2
-

.6
-

-

_

-

-

-

.2

it.it
5 2 .9
-

n .5

1 1 .3

-

3 0 .6

-

2it. 8
-

25.8
-

2it.9

-

5 7 .7
it.6
3 it.e

-

1 .9
-

2 .2
2 .1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

3.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5. 2

9.0

.2

"

1.9

8.3

'

.7

2it.5

73.3
1 .3
.3
1 .6
.9

-

2.0

_

_

-

-

2 .1
-

1.2

-

.2

Services
1/

Non- durabie
goods

-

-

Retail
trade
1/

Durable '
goods

All

1 .3

-

-

20.5

1 / Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the data for "all industries."
2/ Except hotels.
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
2 / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
l j Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate..




26

Table S-k:

P

a

i

d

(

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W O RK ERS E M PLO Y ED I N -

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

f

-

W

U

M

&

l

P

/

U

H

U

4

4

0

H

4

P E R C E N T OF PLA N T W O R K ER S E M PL O Y E D 1 N -

M anufacturing

M anufacturing
Vacation policy

t

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

H

y

All
indus­
tries

3/

All

D urable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

y

Services

y

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

• 0 0 .0
1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid vacations .....
1 week ............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...........
2 weeks ...........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...........
3 weeks ............................

99.9
27.8
71.5
.6

99.9
25.3
7k.6
-

99.7
33.1
66.6
-

99.9
17.2

100.0
79.6

100.0

100.0
1.0

98.7
21.8
«
.

99.0
68.9
2.3
27.8

98.0
82.7

100.0
58.2
_

95.3
78.9
«
,

7k.3
2.6
-

99.6
86.7
1.0
11.9

100.0
100.0

98.8
•
.2

99.3
82.6
.7
15.8
.1
.1

15.3

39.5
2.3

-

-

-

-

12.7
•3
3.k

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

.1

.1

.7

.k

-

1.0

2.0

-

k.7

Information not available............. .

(/
U)

(J±/>

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

All establishments .....................

100.0

100.0

1 year of service

(k/>

3 1 .6

«
82.7
-

20. k
-

6 5 .2

3.2

-

-

.3

-

-

-

-

1.3

-

.1

-

-

-

-

•

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations .... .
1 week .............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............
2 weeks ............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........... .
3 weeks ............................

99.9
13.3
•k
83.8
.6
1.8

99.9
17.5
78.7
3.7

99.7
2k.k
75.3
-

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

.1

.1

.3

-

-

Information not available ..............

(/
U)

-

.1

-

(V)

99.9
10.3
82.0
-

7.6

100.0
6.1
—
93.9
-

100.0
1 8 .k
l.k
77.0
3.2
-

100.0
.5
99.3
.2

98.7
9.3
3.8
83.0
2.6
-

99.5
65.9
6.5
25.6
l.k

1.7

-

99.0
63.5
2.3
29.2
_
k.O

-

-

1.3

.5

.k

-

1.0

-

-

k.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

99.5
6.9
90.2
.1
2.3

99.6
7.5
89.k

.1

99.6
7k.k
8.0
15.5
_

100.0
82.5
12.3
5 .2

-

100.0
29.5
70.5
-

100.0
37.9
3.6
56.2
2.3

-

95.3
63.5
7.2
20.9
.3
3.k

5 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ... .
1 w e e k ............. ................
2 weeks ............................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s .......... ..
3 weeks .............................

99.9
1.2
92.5
2.7
3.5

99.9
1.8
9k. k
3.7

99.7
1.6
98.1
-

2.7

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

.1

.1

.3

-

-

-

-

-

.5

.k

Information not available ..............

(/
h)

(V)

-

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

99.9
2.1
90.2
•
.
7.6

100.0
97.9
2.1

100.0
1.7
95.1
3.2
-

100.0
.1
8l.k
10.5
8.0

100.0
1.0
9 6 .k
2.6
-

100.0

99.0
10.2
82.5

100.0
98.1

-

6.3

1.9

-

1.0

-

-

k.7

-

-

-

-

5.5
9k.5

100.0
3.2
9k. 5
2.3

95.3
2k.5
67.1
.3
3.k

15 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations .....
1 week ..............................
2 weeks .............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............
3 weeks ............................
Over 3 weeks .............. .........

99.9
1.0
58.2
1.0
38.6
1.1

99.9
l.k
55.k
k3.1
-

99.7
1.6
70.0
28.1
.3

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

.1

.1

Information not available ..............

(V)

(V)

99.9
1.2
kO.O
58.7
-

100.0
•
2k.3
75.7
-

100.0
1.7
80.2
3.2
lk. 9
-

100.0
.1
5 2 .1

2.2
ko.i

5.5
-

100.0
1.0
9k.5
2.6
1.9
-

99.5
6.9
55.2
.1
37.3

.5

99.6
7.5
51.3
k0.8
.k

100.0
5.5
6 9 .7
•
2k.e
-

99.0
10.2
26.6

100.0
_

62.2
-

5k. 9

1.0

k5.1

-

100.0
3.2
76.9
2.3
17.6

-

95.3
2k.5
67.1
.3
3.k

k.7

.1

X /
Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the data for "all industries.”
2/
Except hotels.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Occupational
Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., January 1952
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

$




>

)

27

Table E-5:

Paid B lok J loa oe (tfoim cU PaouUIohA
)
P E R C E N T OF PL A N T W O R K ER S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W O RK ERS E M PLO Y ED I N -

P rovision s f o r paid s ic k leave

A l l establish m en ts ...................................................

Manufacturing

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

2/

2 /

All
indus­
tries

All

3/

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

16 . li

10 0 .0

100 .0

100'. 0

100 .0

10 0 .0

100.0

100 .0

3 1 .6

38.0

3 7 .8

38.2

3 2 .8

3 3 .5

20.8

1 5 .2

8 .7

5 .2

2 .3

9 .0

1 .5
7 .6

-

2 .9
.9
.5
.9

2.6

2 .3

2.8
1 .0

100 .0

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1/

Non­
durable
goods

100 .0

10 0 .0

•Public
utili­
ties*

Durable
goods

2/

100 .0

100.0

1 year o f s e r v ic e

E stablishm ents with form al p ro v isio n s
f o r p aid sic k le ave ...........................................

3 days ........................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
6 days ........................................................................
7 days ........................................................................
9 days ........................................................................
10 days ......................................................................
12 days ......................................................................
Hi days ......................................................................
15 days ......................................................................
18 d a y s .....................................................................
20 days ......................................................................
21 days ......................................................................
Establishm ents with no form al p ro v isio n s
f o r p aid sic k le ave ...........................................
Inform ation not a v a ila b le ..................................

.9
5 .5
3 .1
1 .5
lli. 6

2.8
.2
1 .9
.5
.6

6 8 .U

(k /)

-

1 0 .3
5 .5
-

3 .1
U. 9
-

2U.8

1 9 .9

29.8

2.8

-

-

.5
_
.2
.6

1 .0

6 2 .0

6 2 .2

(U /)

1 .1

-

.it
-

6 1 .7
.1

_
-

«.

l.li
3 .2
8 .7
1 0 . it
-

2.2

.6
6.6
2 .it

-

-

1 .8

6 .2

3 .0

9 .9

2.6

1 .2
1 .1
.6

1 .6

1 3 .1
1 9 .7
-

.2
-

-

.2
.li
(U /)

_

3 .0

_
-

-

2 .5

-

-

2 .3

2 .5

.it
-

1 .3

.6
-

_
-

-

-

-

U2.9

2 .7

1 5 .0

_

U. 7
7 .1
1 1 .9

.5
.9

-

-

-

_
2 .U

3 .8
_
l .li

1 2 .7
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
3 .7
.5

1 .0
.3

_
_
_
-

6 7 .2

6 6 .5

7 9 .2

8U.8

9 1 .3

9U.8

9 7 .7

9 1 .0

8 3 .6

5 7 .1

9 7 .3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 0 .8

1 5 .2

8 .9

5 .2

2 .3

9 .0

1 8 .5

U2.9

2 .7

.6
6 .6
2.it
3 .0
2 .6
-

2 .9
.7
.2
.9
.5
.2
1 .3
_

2 .5
.It
-

2 .3
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

2 .8
1 .0
_
_
_
_

1 5 .0
It. 7
2 .3
1 1 .9

.5
.9

2 years o f se r v ic e

E stablishm ents with form al p ro v isio n s
f o r paid sic k leave ............................................
3 days ........................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
6 days ........................................................................
7 days ........................................................................
10 days ......................................................................
12 days ......................................................................
13 days ......................................................................
lli days ......................................................................
15 days ......................................................................
18 d a y s ....................................................... ..............
20 days ......................................................................
21 days ......................................................................
22 days ......................................................................
2li d a y s .......... -..........................................................
E stablishm ents w ith no form al p ro v isio n s
f o r p aid sic k leave ............................................
Infopmation not a v a i l a b l e ............................... ..

3 3 .2

iil.it

3 7 .8

l t 5 .l

3 3 .2

3 3 .5

.2
ii.2
2 .3
1 .5
1 6 .7
2 .8
.1
.2
2 .5
-

-

-

-

-

7 . it
2 .8
28 .7
-

6 .9
5 .5
-

7 .9
3it. it
-

-

'l .l i
3 .2
3 .2
1 0 . it
1 .8
U.5
1 .0
.2
-

8 .7
9 .9

1 .7
.6
.it

6 6 .8

(h /)

-

2 3 .3
1 .0
1 .1
-

-

-

5 8 .6

6 2 .2

.5
1 .2
.2
.6

(V)

See f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ica tion ,
-*-* F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




2.U
.li

U.3
-

1 9 .7
9 .2

2 .2
-

-

-

.2
.it
.8

-

-

5 .3
2 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.2
.6

1 .7
_
.6
_

_

-

-

5U.6

6 6 .8

6 6 .5

7 9 .2

8U.8

9 1 .1

_
1 .3
2 .U
li. It

2 .7
2 .1

3 .8
l .l i

_

_
_

_
_

-

-

_
_

9 7 .7

9 1 .0

_
_
_

8 .2

.5

2 .2

_

_

-

-

-

9ii.e

3 .7

1 .0
.3

8 1 .5

5 7 .1

_

9 7 .3

.1

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey,

Aqd o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ,

St. Louis, Mo., J a n u a r y 1952
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

28

Table £ -5 : P a id

S lc J l Jijg G 4J4>

(tf -O b m o l

- G o H .tiH H *d

P E R C E N T OF PLA N T W O R K ER S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W O R K ER S EM PL O Y E D I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

A ll establishments ............................................

Manufacture

Manufacturing
A
ll
in u
d s­
tries

A
ll

D
urable
good
s

N
on­
d rable
u
good
s

Pb
u lic
u
tili­
ties*

W
hole­
sa
le
trad
e

R
etail
trad
e

F
inance**

y

S
ervices
2/

A
ll
in u
d s­
tries
3/

A
ll

D
urable
good
s

N
on­
d rab
u le
good
s

Pb
u lic
u
tili­
ties*

W
hole­
sa
le
trad
e

R
etail
We

Services
£/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

33.2

iil.lt

37.8

U 5.i

33.2

33.5

20.6

15.2

8.9

5.2

2.3

9.0

18.5

L2.9

2.7

.2
3 .5
2.3
1.5
15.1
1.6
.2
.3
1.7
.3
.5
3 .8
.5
Jt
.8
(L /)
-

-

l.L
3 .2
3 .2
10.it
1.3
_
.2
1.0
_
6.8
3.0
2.5
-

_
2.2
6.2
7.2
_
2.7

.6
6 .6
2 .it
3.0
2.6

2.9
.7
.2
,9
.it

2.3
1.0
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
-

.it
.1
_
_
1.2
.8
.it
lit/)

2.3
_
_
_
_
_
_

15.0
it. 7
2.3
11.9
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

2.6
.it
_
_
_
_
_
_
1 .6
_
.6
_
_
_
_

_

lt.9
30.5
6.9
2 .it
.it
-

_
2.1
_
2.1
_
19.7
8.9
.it
-

.

5.9
2.8 '
26.8
.5
3.U
.6
3.2
,2
-

_
6.9
5.5
23.3
1.0
1.1
-

-

-

-

.2

-

-

66.8

58.6

62.2

Sli. 8

66.8

66.5

79.2

8it.8

91.1

9it.8

97.7

91.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

U5.1

73.0

33.5

20.8

15.2

11.2

5.2

2.3

9 .0

Lit. 2

L2.9

2.7

_
it.9
27.lt
3 .1
6.9
_
_
_
_
_
_
.it
2 .it

_
2.1
_
2.1
_
_
_
_
_

l.it
3 .2
3 .2
10.it
1.8
_
.2
1.0
_
_
_

_
2.2
_
6.2
7.2

.6
6 .6
2 .it

2.3

2 .?
1.0
_
_
_
_

_

15.0
L.7
2.3
11.9

.5
.9

2.3

_
_
_
_

2.6
.it
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

5 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .....................................
3 days ...............................................................
5 days ...............................................................
6 days ...............................................................
7 days ...............................................................
10 days .............................................................
12 days .............................................................
Ill days .............................................................
15 days .............................................................
20 days ......................................- - ...................
21 days .............................................................
25 days .............................................................
27 d a y s ............................................
30 days .............................................................
36 days .............................................................
U0 days .............................................................
L2 days .............................................................
L5 d a y s ........................................................ ....
65 days .............................................................
72 days . . ; ....................................... . .............
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ......................................
Information not available .............................

a /)

(L /)

-

_

.1

_
2.5

( V

.7

)

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

1.3
2 . it
2.5
_

.5
.9
_
1.0
.3

_
_
_

8.2

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

2.2

-

-

81.5

57.1

97.3

-

-

-

_
_
3 .8
l.it'

1.9
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

3.7
2.1
_
_
2.7
.5

15 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ......................................
3 days .................................; ............................
5 days ............................................
6 days ...............................................................
7 days ...............................................................
10 days .............................................................
12 days .............................................................
Ill days .............................................................
15 days .............................................................
20 days .............................................................
21 days .............................................................
25 days ................. ...........................................
30 days .............................................................
h 0 ' days .............................................................
50 days .............................................................
5L days .............................................................
58 days .............................................................
60 d a y s .........................................................T
T
65 days .............................................................
72 days .............................................................
8U days .............................................................
98 days .............................................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ........................
Information not available .......................... ..

1/
i n The
2/
7/

\j

*
**

37.0

Li.L

.2
3 .5
2.3
1.5
H i.3
2.3
.2
.8
1 .7
.3
.5
.L
.3
1.9
2.0
.6

5 .9
2.8
25.3
1 .5
.5
3 . It
.6
.2
1.2

37.8

6.9
5.5
23.3
1 .0
1.1
-

3 .8

-

_
-

63.0

58.6

62.2

‘k
.

(L /)

(It/)

-

-

19.7
_
_
8.9
lit

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

I
2.5

5U.8

27.0

66.5

-

2.5

7.5

39.8

.1

2.7

3 .0
2 .6
_
_

.

-

79.2
-

.it
.1
_
.6
_
.it
1.2
o
•7
.2

_
-

2.9
.7
.2
.9
.it
(it/)

8it.8
-

2.3

88.8
-

.6
1 .6

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

1.3
2.L
2.5
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
l.it
3 .8

1.9
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
0.2

_
_
3.7
2.1

_
3 .2

2.2

_

_

_

-

-

-

25.7

-

91.0

55.8

57.1

9it.8
-

97.7
-

-

1.0
.3

-

-

-

97.3
-

A lth ou g h d a t a c o u ld n o t b e shown s e p a r a t e l y f o r r e t a i l t r a d e due t o th e o m is s io n o f dep a rtm en t and l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r i e t y s t o r e s , th e rem a in d er o f r e t a i l t r a d e i s a p p r o p r i a t e l y r e p r e s e n t e d
d a t a f o r na l l i n d u s t r i e s . "
E x ce p t h o t e l s .
I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r i n d u s t r i e s o t h e r th an t h o s e shown s e p a r a t e l y .
Less t h a n .05 of 1 percent.

T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c e p t r a i l r o a d s ) , com m u n ica tion , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




29

Table 1-6:

Aa

H

p

M

k

f

o

/Sotuidedo
&
t
i

M

'

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
All
indus­
tries

Typ e of b o n u s

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All •

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

100.0

100.0

50.9

58.3

28.1

22.2

17 . 1
*

28.5

12.3

U9 .1

U 0.6

58.3

27.9

u o .6
-

-

12.6

2.6

U.O

.6

3.7
8.6
.1

U 3.8

ok

12.6
.8

.5

21** 0
2.2
1.9

19.2

5.2

U 0 .6
U.o

63.9

87.7

U 5 .1

71.9

77.8

82.6

71.5

87.7

50.9

36.0
36.0

Ot h e r .....................................

1 .1

29.0
1.6
1.6

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h no n o n p r o d u c t i o n
b o n u s e s ....................................

58.0

65.9

67.8

-

1 9.1
*

100.0

-

-

U 1.7

-

100.0

5.3
-

-

59 .U

.1

( 5/ )
'

1/

100.0

2/

5U -9

32.2

32.a

( 5/ )

100.0

Services

1/

100.0

Retail
trade

U9.7

31*. 1

37.5
2.8
3 .1

.................

Whole­
sale
trade

Non­
durable

3.6
7.7
1.1

U 2.0

I n f o r m a t i o n n ot a v a i lable

Public
ties*

Durable
goods

All

12.3

100.0

.8

2/

M a n u f a c t u r in g

100.0

100.0

C h r i s t m a s o r y e a r - e n d ..... ..............
P r o f i t - s h a r i n g ............................

A
H
tnes

Services

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
b o n u s e s U/ .....................................

Finance**

100.0

100.0

.........................

Retail
trade
2/

100.0

All establishments

Whole­
sale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

'

A lth ou g h d a ta c o u l d n o t be shown s e p a r a t e l y f o r r e t a i l t r a d e due t o o m is s io n o f d epa rtm en t and l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r i e t y s t o r e s , th e rem ain der o f r e t a i l t r a d e i s a o D r o p r ia t e ly r e p r e s e n t e d i n

the d a ta f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s . "
2/

E x ce p t h o t e l s .

3/

Includes data for industries other thain those shown separately.

U/
5/
*
**

U n d u p lica te d t o t a l .
L ess th a n .0 $ o f 1 p e r c e n t .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m u n ica tion , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and real estate.

Table 1-71 JbtdtidOH&e Oh J P-CHdiOH, P la tid
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED INM a n u fa c tu r e G

M anu factu ring

Type of p l a n

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

1/

Services

All
tp

All

. Public
utili- *
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1/

2/

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1/

.........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h insurance or
p e n s i o n p l a n s U/ ..........................

91.7

9U .8

9U .6

95.0

98.9

82.9

93.2

72.3

91.7

95.9

99.2

91 .U

100.0

82.8

50.5

91.8
72.8
6 U .2
52.1

89.1
81.8
86.2
5U . 1

9U .6

79.6
60.1
U 6.9
39.6

93.2
91*.6
91.2
U 6.6

88.2
75.3
1 7.3
*
U 8.5

U 2.1

58.2

50.0

91.1
86.3
72.u
U 7 .U

71.U
55.7
U 3.9

57.2

8U.U
79 .U
6U .5
U6.3

7U .3

61.3

70.0
2U .6
23.8

50.0

59.1
85.6
25.0
79.8

85.8
55.3

H o s p i t i l i z a t i o n .........................
R e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n ................. ..

8U .0
65.0
51*. l
53.5

69.9

29.3

26.3
9.9

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h no i n surance or
p e n s i o n p l a n s . . ..........................

8.3

5.2

5 .U

U .9

1 .1

17.1

6 .8

27.7

8.3

U.l

.8

8.6

-

17.2

U 9.5

<ao

( 5/ )

All'establishments

Life insurance

..........................

Hpalt.h insurarinp .............................................

I n f o r m a t i o n n o t a v a i l a b l e ...... . .........

63.6

1 1.6
*

1C 0.0

.1

96.2

“
'

'

'

E x ce p t h o t e l s .
O c c u p a t io n a l Wage S u rv e y , S t . L o u is , M o ., January 1952
I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r i n d u s t r i e s o t h e r th a n t h o s e shown s e p a r a t e l y .
u . S . DEPARTMENT QF LABOR
U n d u p lica te d t o t a l .
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s
L e ss th a n .0 5 o f 1 p e r c e n t .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m u n ica tion , and o t h e r p u b li c u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




"

'

1 / A lth ou g h d a ta c o u l d n o t be shown s e p a r a t e l y f o r r e t a i l t r a d e due t o t h e o m is s io n o f depa rtm en t and l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r i e t y s t o r e s , th e rem a in d er o f r e t a i l t r a d e i s
in th e d a ta f o r " a l l in d u s t r ie s ."
2/
3/
V
5f
*
**

~

*30 (
JJ* 7

a p p r o p r ia te ly rep resen ted

30

Appendix

Scope ar

With the exception of the union soale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was oolleoted by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed.
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations t (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings a r e : manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services.
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Sach group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings,
including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers te the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables.
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

31
ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN ST* LOUIS, MO., l/
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated.
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
_

All divisions ..............................••••••
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••...... .
Durable goods 2 / ...........................
Nondurable goods £ / ••••••••••............ .
Nonmanufacturing
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communications, and other public
utilities •••••••.............. ..........
Wholesale trade .........<>•••...............
Retail trade / ............ .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ••••••••
Services (except hotels) 6/.••••••.••.......

101
101
101
-

1,447
42G
200
220
It 027

273
108
55
53
165

339,600
205,500
114,800
90,700
134,100

160,200
108,280
64,080
44,200
52,020

28,210
13,720
7,060
6,660
14,490

52

27,500
28,100
45,600
17,700

15,200

21,430
8,330
9,740
8,300
4,220

4,240
2,620
1,360
5,510
760

431
379
787
1,009
2,081
4,672
14,819
24,765
6,342

431
270
543
868
1,470
3,388
10,921
20,973
3,698

12
17
91
39
84
448
1,256

101
21
101
21
21

94
222
246

21
51
19
38
36

8
8
21
8
21
21
2 / 21
101
21

11
11
H
18
16
26
104
22
50

11
7
8
11
9
11
37
13
20

41 3

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 7 J
Women's and misses' coats and suits .............
Millinery ........................... ............
Mlllwork ••••••••.................... ..........
Foundries, nonferrous .c..••••••............ •••••
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware ••••••••.... .
Heating apparatus ................................
Machinery industries....... .
Railroads.... .......................... •••••••••
Insurance carriers ...............................

8/

-

2,401

1J St. Louis Metropolitan Area (St. Louis City, St. Charles and St. Louis Counties, Mo., and Madison and St. Clair Counties, 111.).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2 / Metal working; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
fj Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
%/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade in the numbered tables due to the omission of department and limitedprice variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in data for all industries combined and for the nonmanu­
facturing industry group.
6 / Personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit member­
ship organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
y Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
8/ Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with 4 or more workers were included.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.



32

Index
Page

Assembler (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) .............
Assembler (heating apparatus) •••••••••••••••••....... •••••
Assembler (machinery) ....... •••••••••..........••••«••••••
Assembler, sash, door, or frame (millwork) ......... •••••••
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) ...•••••.... • ••••....
Bartender (hotels) ••••.... ..........
Bartender (restaurants) ............. ••.••••••••••••••••••••
Bench hand (bakeries)
Biller, machine ••••••••..... •• •••.......
Blocker, hand (millinery) ••••••••••••••............. .......
Bookbinder (printing) •..... ......
Bookkeeper, hand ••........... •..... ••.•••••••••••••••••••
Bookkeeping-machine operator •••••«••••••..... ••• •.........
Brewer (malt liquors) •••••••••••••...... •••••...........
Bricklayer (building construction) •••••..... •••••.... ••••
Bus boy or girl (hotels) ..•••••.....•••••.•••••••••••••••••
Bus boy or girl (restaurants)
Butcher (hotels) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••...... ........
Cabinetmaker (millwork) ••.••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Calculating-machine operator •••••••••••••••••••••........ .
Carpenter (building construction) ••••.•••••.....•••••••••..
Carpenter, maintenance •••••••.....•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Chambermaid (hotels) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Chef (hotels)
...... ••...... .........••••••••••.••••.....
Chef (restaurants) .••••••.•••••.... ••••••••••.•••.........
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) ......... ••••••••
Cleaner ......... ••••••••••......•..... .............. .....
Cleaner (railroads) •••.••••••••••.... •••.••.••••••••.....
Clerk, accounting •••••••••••••••••••..... .......... • •.....
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) •••••••........••••••
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) ••«••••••••#••••••••••
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) •••••••••••••••••
Clerk, file ................................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ••••.....••••••••••••••••••
Clerk, general ••••••••••••••••••.••.••...... .
Clerk (milk dealers)
Clerk, order .••••••••••••••••••..... .
Clerk, payroll •»••••••••••••............... ...............
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ...... ......
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) •••••.•••...........
Compositor, hand (printing) ••••••••••••....
Cook (hotels) •••••«••.... ...•••••..••.•••o.
Cook (restaurants) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Coremaker (nonferrous foundries) ••••••»••••........... .
Crane operator, electric bridge ••.••••»•..... .
Cut-off-saw operator (millwork) ..... .
Cutter and marker (women's and misses' coats and suits) ••••
Draftsman....... .................................... .
Drill-press operator (heating apparatus)



16

16
17
15
17
23

22
20

U
H

21
3,

U
4

20
20
23

22
23
15
4, 5

20
9
19
23
23

22
15

11
19
3, 5
19
19
19
5
19
3, 5

22
t

v

19
19

21
23

22
15

11
15
14

8
16

Page
Drill-press operator (machinery) •••••......... ............ 17, IB
Duplicating-machine o p e r a t o r ........ .
3, 6
Electrician (building construction) .........•••••••••••••••
20
Electrician, maintenance ...................... .............
9
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ....................
17
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) .......... .
19
Engine-lathe operator (machinery)
17, IB
Engineer (malt liquors) ..........•«•••••••......•••«•••••••
20
Engineer, stationary .............. .......
9
Fireman (malt liquors) ........................................
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r ............... ...........
9
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) ......................
15
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ..................... . 17, IB
Guard ........
11
Heat treater (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) .... .
16
Helper (bakeries) .............................
Helper, motortruck driver .........................•••••••••
21, 22
Helper, trades, maintenance..... .........................
9
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ....................
19
Inspector (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) ••••••••••••••
16
Inspector (heating apparatus) ...............
16
Inspector (machinery) .........................
Inspector (milk dealers) ......
22
J a n i t o r .... ...........••••••••........
11
Janitor (heating apparatus) •••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
16
Janitor (machinery) .......
17
Janitor (railroads) ........
19
6
Key-punch operator ••••..... ...................... .
19
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ......... •••••••••••
Laborer (building construction) •••••••••.... ...........
20
Machine operator (printing) ••••.•••••........... ••••••••••..
21
Machine tender (printing)
21
Machine-tool operator, production (cutlery, hand tools,
and hardware) .................... .............. .......
16
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) .............. 17, IB
Machine-tool operator, toolroom ••••••••••••••••••••••••..••
9
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery)
........... .
IB
Machinist, maintenance ••«••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
9
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) •••••••••*• •••••••••••••••
19
Machinist, production (machinery)
IB
Mailer (printing) .......... ................... ............
21
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y ....
9
Maintenance man, general utility (heating apparatus) •••••••
16
Maintenance man, general utility (nonferrous
foundries) ••••
15
Maintenance man, general utility (railroads) ............ .
19
Maintenance man (hotels) ......................
23
Maintenance man (malt liquors) .......................... .
20
Meat cutter (meat cutters) .............
22
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)
••••••.
Mechanic, maintenance.......
••••••••••
10

20

9

33

Index

GontUuned
Sm

Z§2S
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) ............. ............
Milling-machine operator (machinery) .............. .
Millwright.................................................
Mixer (bakeries) ....................... ...................
Molder (nonferrous foundries)
...... ..................
Molder operator (millwork) .•••••••...... ..................
Motortruck driver ..........................................
Nurse, industrial (registered) ........ .......... ..........
Off-bearer, machine (millwork) .... ...................... .
Office b o y ...........................
Office g i r l .................................
O i l e r ...... •••••......••••••••••••...................•••••
Oiler (malt liquors) •••••........ ••••••••..............
Operator (local transit) ......
Order filler ............•••••••••••........................
Ovenman (bakeries) .......................................
Packer .....................................................
Packer (bakeries) •••••••••....... .........................
Painter (building construction) ............................
Painter, maintenance ••••••••••••..... ••••••.....••••••••••
Painter, maintenance (railroads) .............. ••••••......
Painter, rough (heating apparatus)
Photoengraver (printing) .... ...........................
Pipe fitter, maintenance.... ...........................
0
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ..............
Planer operator (millwork) ...........
••••••••
Plasterer (building construction) ....... ................. .
Plumber (building construction) .... •«•••«••••...•••.......
Plumber, maintenance ............ ••••.••••••••••••••••••••••
Porter ......
Power-shear operator (heating apparatus) ••...•••••..... .
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ......................
Press assistant (printing) ...... ••••••••••••••.......
Press feeder (printing) ..... ........................... .
Presser (women*s and misses*
coats andsuits) ......... •••••
Pressman (printing).... ..............
Punch-press operator (heating apparatus)
Receiving c l e r k ............. ................. ••••••......
Rip-saw operator (millwork) .................
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ••••.........
Secretary •••..••••••••••••••.....
Section head (insurance carriers) •••••••................ .
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women*s and misses* coats
and suits) ......... ........•••••.....••••••••..........
Sewing-machine operator (millinery) ..... ••••••••••........
Sewing-machine operator (women*s and misses* coats
and suits) ........ .......................... ..........
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries) ............... .
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance.................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) ••••••••••••••..
Shipping clerk ••••••••••...... ;................. ..........



19
17, 18
10
20
15
15
21, 22
8
15
3
6
10
20
21
11
20
12
20
20
10
19
16
21
10
19
15
20
20
10
11
16
19
21
21
14
21
16
12
15
17
6
19
14
14

14
15
10
19
12

s

12
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ..............................
Stenographer •••••••••••••••••......... ....................
6, 7
19
Stenographer (insurance carriers) •••••....................
Stereotyper (printing) ...............................
21
Sticker operator (millwork) .....................
15
Stock handler ••••.....
11
Stock handler (heating apparatus)
^
Stock handler (machinery) ................................. .
18
Stock handler (millwork) ...................................
15
Stock handler (railroads) ••••••••••••••••••••••......... .
19
Straw operator (millinery) .............••••••...........
14
Switchboard operator ••••••••«••••.........................
7
Switchboard operator-receptionist................
7
Tabulating-machine operator..... .....................•••••
3, 7
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ••••......
19
Telephone operator (hotels) ................................
23
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women*s and misses* coats
and suits) ........ .....................................
14
Tool-and-die maker .........................
••••
10
Tool-and-die maker (cutlery, hand tools,and hardware) •••••
16
Tool-and-die maker (heating apparatus) .....................
16
Tool-and-die maker (m&chinery) ........ ..................
18
Tracer ••••••............ ........••••..................••••
8
Transcribing-machine operator ........ ..................
7
Trimmer (millinery) ....... ..............•••••••••.••......
14
Truck d r i v e r .... ........
13
Tnick driver (millwork) ...................
••••
15
19
Truck driver (railroads) ...................................
Trucker, hand
...... ••••••••«.•••••••••..................
12
Trucker, hand (heating apparatus) •••••«•«...... ••••••«•••••
16
Trucker, hand (machinery) .......... *........... ...... .
18
Trucker, hand (millwork) •••••••«•....... .................
15
Trucker, hand (railroads) .................................
19
Trucker, power ••«•••••••..............
•••....•«••
13
Trucker, power (railroads) ......... ...............
19
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ..... ...... .
17, 18
T y p i s t ................................... .................
7
Typist (insurance carriers) ................................
19
Underwriter (insurance carriers) •••••................. .
19
Waiter (hotels) •••••«........
.
23
Waiter (restaurants) ............
22
Watchman .......
••••••••••••••••
13
Watchman (hotels)
......... •••••••••••.......
23
Watchman (nonferrous foundries) ............................
15
Welder, hand (heating apparatus) ................................. 16
Welder, hand (machinery) ........... ......••••••••••«•••••.
18
Welder, machine (heating apparatus)
16
Window washer (hotels) ..........••••«............••••••••••
23
Wrapper (bakeries) ...........
20
Wrapper, ice cream (milk dealers)
22
Wrapper (meat cutters) ........
•«•••••••••.•••••
22
☆

u. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 195 2

O — 212835

THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:

£x2ss

BIS

City
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
Seattle, Washington
This report was prepared in the
cations may be addressed to:

1045
iou
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1064
1067
1068
1070
1042
1071
1058
1069
1057

20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15
25
15
20
20
15
15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

's North Central Regional Office. Communi-

Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics* regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.




The North Central Region includes the following States:
Nebraska
Illinois
Michigan
North Dakota
Indiana
Minnesota
Ohio
Iowa
Missouri
South Dakota
Kansas
Montana
Wisconsin
Kentucky





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102