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Occupational Wage Survey

SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA
December 1951

B u lle tin

N o. 1078

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
I N T R O D U C T I O N ......................................................

1

THE SCRANTON METROPOLITAN A R E A ........................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ...............................................................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ...........
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .....................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ....................................
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ...........................

3
5
5
6

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Bui] ding c o n s t r u c t i o n .................... ..................................
C-205
Bakeries ......
C-27
P r i n t i n g .....................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ..........................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s ...... ......................................
C-58
Restaurants ..................................................................
C-7011 Hotels .......................................................................

8
8
8
8
8
8
8

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ....................

9

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ........................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ......................................................
E-3
Paid holidays ...............................
E-4
Paid vacations ...............................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave .........................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses .................. .......... ............. ...........
E-7
Insurance and pension plans .........................

9
10
10
11
12
14.
14

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ..........................................................

15

I N D E X ......................................................................................

17

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cdnts

May 8, 1952

Introduction 1/
The Scranton area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys*
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis*
Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupationst
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping*
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4,) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions*
Earnings information for occupations that are charac­
teristic of particular local industries has been presented, when
studied, in Series B tables*
This supplemental coverage was
omitted in the survey in the Scranton area. Union scales (Series
C tables) are presented in lieu of occupational earnings for
several industries or trades in which the great majority of the
workers are employed under terms of collective-bargaining agree­
ments, and the contract or minimum rates are indicative of
prevailing pay practices#
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such
as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, nonproduc­
tion bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Scranton Metropolitan A re a
The Scranton Metropolitan Area (Lackawanna County) had
approximately 257,000 inhabitants in 1950* About half of these
were concentrated in Scranton-Pennsylvania*s third largest city*
Nonagri cultural wage and salary workers in the area
totaled more than 80,000 in December 1951*
About a third of
these were employed in manufacturing - textile industries em­
ploying more than 5>000, apparel establishments over 9,000, and
metalworking and machinery manufacturing almost 5,000 workers*

1/ Prepared in the Bureau*s regional office in New York, N.Y*,
by Frank C* Grella under the direction of Frederick W* Mueller,
Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst* The planning and
central direction of the program was carried bn in the Bureau*s
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations in Washington, D* C#




The Scranton area has long been noted as one of the
principal anthracite areas of the United States, and in December
1951 approximately 12,000 workers were engaged in coal mining*
Within recent years, however, employment in the mines has de­
clined, and this is a factor contributing to critical unemploy­
ment in the area, where more than 11,000 were jobless
in
December*
The unemployment problem was partially relieved during
World War II by the migration of thousands of workers and their
families to defense areas*
Since the end of the war, strong
efforts have been made to attract new and more diversified indus­
try into the area*
This program has resulted in the building
of more than 35 new plants and the expansion of more than 55
plants in the area since 194-5*
Collective-bargaining agreements were in effect in
firms which employed more than 60 percent of the plant workers
and about 15 percent of the office workers in the industry and
establishment-size groups surveyed by the Bureau in December
1951*
Unionization was, strongest in the public utilities and
transportation industry group.

Occupational W ag e Structure
Wage and salary levels in the Scranton area were
affected by numerous formal wage adjustments between January
1950- t h e base date for the Wage Stabilization Board *s 10 percent
ncatch-up" wage increase formula - and December 1951* Virtually
all manufacturing plant workers and three-fourths of the office
workers had received at least one general wage increase during
the 2-year period.
A substantial majority of the workers in
nonmanufacturing establishments also received formal wage ad­
justments during the same period.

Formalized wage and salary structures for time workers
were reported in establishments employing approximately 80 per­
cent of plant workers* Formalized plans providing a single rate
for each job classification affected nearly twice as many plant
workers as did plans providing a range of rates for each job*
Formal wage plans, providing rate ranges in nearly all Instances,
affected half the office workers, while salaries far the remain­
ing 50 percent were established by individual determination*
The latter method of establishing rates for nonoffice workers
was significant only In retail and wholesale trade* Established
minimum entrance rates for inexperienced plant workers were a
part of the formalized rate structures in Scranton area firms

2

employing nearly all plant workers*
On a n all-industry basis,
more than half the plant workers were in establishments with
minimum entrance rates of 75 eents an hour or less* The bulk
of manufacturing plant employment was found in establishments
paying a 75-cent minimum*
Ik retail trade and service indus­
tries over 30 percent of the plant workers were employed in
establishments with a minimum rate of 60 cents or less * A minimum
of $1*10 or higher was reported l y firms employing three out of
a
five plant workers in the transportation, ccmmunicat ion, and
other public utilities group*

About a seventh of all plant workers in manufacturing
establishments worked on the late shifts in December 1951* More
than half the workers on the second shift received no shift dif­
ferential above d a y (first-shift) rates* Al l those working the
third shift, however, received a shift premium of 5 or more cents
an hour* Fringe benefits were more generous for office workers




than for plant workers* Practically all office workers but only
three out of four plant workers received paid holidays - typically
6 a year* Virtually all office workers were granted paid vaca­
tions, with half the workers receiving 2 weeks
or more and
the remainder receiving 1 week after 1 y e a r ,s service* After
the same period of service,
about three-fourths of the plant
workers received 1 week's vacation*
third of the offiee
workers were employed in establishments providing formal pro­
visions for paid sick leave without a ny waiting period to em­
ployees with a y e a r 1s service* Pension plans were provided by
firms employing 30 percent of the office workers and 25 percent
of the plant workers in all industries* These plans, with vary­
ing eligibility conditions, were most common in the public utili­
ties division* Christmas
or year-end bonuses were frequent
supplements to the wage structure of a number of Soranton firms
engaged in trade, finance, or service* Such bonuses were paid
in establishments which employed half the offiee workers and 40
percent of the plant workers*

A

3.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l

t O ffice QcCUfuUtOtU

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Scranton, Fa., by industry division, December 1951)

N UM BER OF W O RKERS REC EIV IN G STR A IG H T-TIM E W EEK LY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
Weekly 22.50 I 5 .OO 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50
Weekly
hours
earnings
and
(Standard) (Standard)

30,00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 A7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00

S

27.50

4 0 .0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 17.50 60.00 6 2 .5 0 65.00 17.50

8

A verage

Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

72.50 75.00 80.0C
and
75.00 a o . o o o v a r

Men
t

Clerks, accounting ........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ...•••••..............

Clerks, order ..................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................
Wholesale t r a d e .......................................
Retail trade ................ . ............... .. ....................

4 0 .0

39
"

"12

'

27
16

48.00

-

" 4 0 ."0 "

36.50'
44.50
42.50

-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

-

46

4 0 .0
37.5
38.5

6 0 .5 0

-

-

56.00

“

.

.
-

•

-

-

_

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

58.00

18

-

“

~W ~
11

_

“

-

.
-

20

3

_

2
1

1
•

•

1

-

1
1

-

2
2
2

2
1
1

1

3

_
_

-

“

“

“

“

2
1
1

19
14

Billers, machine (billing machine) .••••••
M a n u facturing ............... ..........
Nonmanufacturing............ ...... ••••
tttttrtrtttrtftrrtfItltM U M ttttM rTtttM

Biller 8 . machine (bookkeeping machine) ...
Nonmanufacturing..... ................

—

50
52

28
13
H

29
28

33.00
39.5
" 3 9 ; r " 33750“
4 0 .0
33.00
39.0
34*50

4 1 .0

3 0 .0 0

36.50
39.5
" 3 9 . 5 " 35.50
39 .5
32.00

T»»»»ttTTTTTTtt-T-T-r-T

22

Bookkeepers. h a n d .........................
Manufacturing ............. ............
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Retail t r a d e ............... ...... .

95

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

49
25

2

2

8

-

-

-

2

2

2

2

8
4
4

-

5
5

1

~W ~

51.00
51.50
50.50
52.00

»»»»»»•». t t t t T t t t T T T T - t - r T T .

12

40.5
40.5
41.0

Bookkeeplng-machine operators, class A ...

10

39.5

!
1

-

a

38.0

22

3 8 .0

59
15
32

4 0 .0
3 6 .5

38.00
46.50
34.50
37.00
33 .00

IDia I A o e l a
p e p A e ##

. ................................................
j

|

( *

ii ii"i i '*i

Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g ...................... .. ............................
Manufacturing .......................................... ....................
Nonmanufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Retail trade ................ .. .......................................
## ( i i i
ii i i i
i ii'
r

227

10 A
123
17
76

38.0

39.5
“3975“
39.5

4 0 .0

3 8 .0 0
4 2 .0 0
37.50
34.50
32.00

10

39.5
37.5
41.5

Clerks. file, class B ............ ••••••••

95

37.0

_

-

79

37.0
30.5
37.5

44.50
" 2 .00 “
4
45.50

See footnote at end of table.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




23

56

“

4
4

4

10
10
10

6
2
4

1
2

6
-

6
4

2

2

2

a.

_

1
1

16

10
10

1
1

_

1

4

1

9
4

-

1

1
1
«.

1

1

2
1

_

1

1

2
1
1

_
_

3
3

“

1

2
1

_
-

2
2
2

-

6

1
1

4

1
1
1

1

-

5
4

8

28

7

17

1
1

1
1

11

2

2

2
1
1

3

7

2
1

5

1

1

7
5

2

-

5

1

11

1

-

-

-

1

4
7

-

5
5

-

-

-

-

2
2

3
3

1

-

3

3

1

1

3
4

3

2

2
1
1

.

14
4

2
2

2
2

10
10

2
2

1
1

7
5

_
_

1

2
2

1

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

.

2

—

*

4

1
.
•

_

3

_

_

!

2
3

11

-

-

-

3

11

1

H

8

10

2

-

.

-

8
8

4

11

9

~

11
2

9

2
5

7

1

11

3

5
5

(
y
£

33

24
3
6

4

12

5

-

-

—

1

“

16

5

2

i

2
2

13
4
9

61
28
33

3

3

10
20

2

2
1

14

48

7

8

-

-

“

9

a

23
18
5

13

8

26

6

2

12
1

3
5

19
7

3
3

-

-

_

1

5

1

.

2

4

9
3

7

6

3
3

1
1

3

7
7

7

1

7
-

“

7

6
6

5

9
-

13
9
4

39

10

_
1

6
1

2

1

-

-

4

10

11

1

2
8
2
1

35.00

Clarks, general •••••••••.................
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ............... .......

11

!

8
6
2
2

3
-

4 0 .0 0 .
42.50“

-

3
^

42.00

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...
Manufac t u r i n g .... ........ .......... .
Nonmanufacturing ••••••........... •••••

2

5 i

-

_

17
13
4

3
3

4 2 .0 0

R

2
•

1

i

Women

R

2

2
1

3

3

2

2

4

2
2

-

-

2

-

_

_

1

2

-

1

•

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Fa., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT <F LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

4.

Office OccHfuUUuU - Gont inumd
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Scranton, Fa., by Industry division, December 1951)

N UM BER OF W ORKERS REC EIV IN G STR A IG H T-TIM E W EEK LY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly 22 .5 0 25.0 0 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00
Weekly
earnings and
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52*50 55.00 57.50 60.0 0 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 over

Women - Continued

Clerks, order ..............................

30
----I 6 ~ '
i,
/

Clerks, p a y r o l l .................... •••••••
Manufacturing .......... .................
Nonmanufacturing........... ............
Retail trade .................... ••••

105
74
31
14

Kev-Dunch o p e r a t o r s ....... ............ •••
Mbnllfanfn|T ( _ JT M M T i r .T1TTlttT-rT.rr

39.5

“

2

_

31.50
32.50

2

38.5
39.5

47.50
50.50

3 8 .0

46.00

39.5
35.5

Stenographers, g e n e r a l ................... .
M a n u facturing ..... ••••......... .......
Nonmanufaoturing.......................

43*50
47.00

38.5
38.5
38.5

235
112' '
123
30
47
15

..

“

39.50
v i .no
>

36.5
37".5

—

130
47
83
42

...

42700"
43.50
39.50

39.0
39.0

Secretaries ...... ..........................
M a n u facturing................... .......
Nonmanufacturing ........... ......... .
Retail trade ...................... .
Finance * * ...... ....................

IT4 ne n n a JH
I

42.00

41.0 0

4 0 .0

26

38 .0
39.0
36.5

43.50
38.00

36.00
37.00

1
2

20
13
11 “ X T
2
6
2
4

7

-

-

-

— r
5
3

1

11
11

-

-

1

_

9

3
3

2
- —

5
r —

4
r —

2

2
2

4
1
2

3
2
1

66
22

16

-

- :

-

-

1

2

-

*

18

4

2
16 ;

-

1

2 s

1

2
2

.

22

9

3

8
8

13
9

44

1

9

1
2

38.50

1
1 :
—

3

3

1
12

r ---- g4
-

1
1

33
4

7
3
4

6
1
5

4

33
V —
27
26
27
18
9

1

5

8

2
2

2
2

9
g~

2
-

2
-

5
5
-

3

1
2
1

2
1
1
1

7

6
1
-

2
1
1
1

1
1

2

-

-

2

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2

-

2
2

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

1
1

-

-

2
1

-

• -

6

3

1
1

2
-

12
8 —
4

5
5

3

1

1
1

-

1

«
■

7

7

3 ------- l

3

3

4070"

—

15

.....................
................................

2
---- 5"

39.50

4 0 .0

23

10

I
42.50

39*5

26

Office girls ..............................
nrv ................... .........................................

39.5

4 0 .0 — 45750*

5

7

16
9 —
7

-

1

15
r

2
2

5

18
V

12
6

9
4
5
-

6

3

3

4

14

14
5
9

17

12
10
2

7

7

3
2
1

3
1
4
2

2
2

5

2
4

5

12

1

1
1

6
2

3

1
2

5
3

2

2

-

4
3

-

-

2

-

2
1
1

7

4

9
9
-

»
.
---- 1
r
-

2
5

1
3

2

1

1
1

5
3

-

2
1

.
_

-

-

-

1
1

-

_
_
-

-

-

-

_

_
-

2
1

3

_

i
Mb
n i t ____^
^__
MAMnamif a
niv
. . . . .
................
P o + n -n f m H n ........................... .. ...............................

39.5

Switchboard operator-receptionists • • • • • • • •

49
25

0.
1

37.00

38.5

4 3 .OO

40.5

39 .0

34.00
33.00

39.5

61
--- 2l ~
40
19

3

2

10

3

6
2

2

10

4

1

6

37.00

— 4 0 . O'
■ aq n

1
•»

40. 00“

Transcribing-machine operators, general ...

16

39.0

1

35.50

Typists, class A
Manufacturing............... .. ......... ..

34

39.0

48.00

397T

5 0 .3 0 1

40.0

35.50

T v d Ists. cl*88

6

—

z r~

176

M

V7
XU /
4 « .U.4 1

2/
*
**

*

A
f

“

4 .-6
0

...

✓OQ #?
7 «
^0 *

40.0 0
32.00
37.00

3

i

34.00

3

3

12 |
3 !
9

3

13

3

2
1

10

2
1

1---------_
_
_

4
4

-

-

-

1

7

5

62

18

7

1
4

4

1

61

7

8
10
4

3

9
6
-------5 -

30
14

16
9

2

4
1

5
5

2
1

3

8

3

6
2

3

1

1

“

-

1

1

14

5

7

2
2

—

1
1

5

1

2

18
17

8
7
1

13
1
1

4
1
1

2

2 ____ L
2
5

3
$

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2
2

1
1

1

1

1

6
2
4

6

1

_

6

1

-

_

2

-

2

-

-

Tabi* k-2t P^u^olliancU and ^JocJmical Occupation*
(Average atraight-tims weekly hours and earnings i / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Scranton, Fa., by industry division, December 19 5 1 )

y

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Table A-3t McUntoHOHC* a n d floWOO 'P la n t O ccu p a tion ^

1/

(Average hourly earnings
for men in selected occtq»ations studied on an area
basis in Scranton, Pa., by industry division, December 1951)

N UM BER OF W O RKERS REC EIV IN G . STR A IG H T -TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$

28
22

*
1.69
1.68

Electricians, maintenance ....................... .
Manufacturing ......................................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................................

41
30
ii

1.84
“ 1783“
1.71

Engineers, stationary ........................................................................................
Manufacturing ................................ .....................................................................

37
25

1.62
'T77T"

Firemen, stationary boiler ...................................... ..
Manufacturing ................................................................................. ...
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Retail trade ..................................
S e r v i c e s .................... ...................

72
47
25
9

1 .2 6

2/13

1.29

8

5
3

1 .21

5

2
2

Helpers, trades, ma i n t e n a n c e ...................... .
Manufacturing ............... ......................
Nonmanufacturing ........................... .......

140
92
48

1.33
1.23
1.51

Machinists, maintenance ............................ ..
Manufacturing...... ....... ....... ...............

55
55

1.60

Maintenance men, general utility .... .............. .
Manufacturing..... .......................... .
Nonmanufacturing ..................................

1 .68
55
35-.. "“1775
20
1.65

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) .••••••.........
Nonmanufacturing ....................... ...........
Public utilities * .............................

98
$3
57

Mechanics, maintenance •••••••••••••••••..... ..•••••
Manufacturing ............................ .........

162
~i5r~

Oilers ••••....... ...................................
Manufacturing .....................................
Pipe fitters, maintenance ••••••••.... ......... .
Manufacturing...... ..............................
Tool-and-die m a k e r s ................... ......... .
Manufacturing ................ ........ •••••••.....

1/

2/

—

10

1.32
1.04

h
»

Carpenters, maintenance .................. ...... .
Manufacturing ............ .....................

1

_

2
2
1
1

_ _

1

1

5
5
-

3

_

3

_
-

-

3

2
2

19
19
*-

1
1

_

8
3
5

3
3

,7

12
10
2

2
2

11

-

6

5

"

3
3
-

3
3
-

8
8

1

8
4
4

_

_

1

2
1
1

-

1?
10
5

8
8

-

.

.

_

3 _A_
3
4

_

2

7
7

_

8
8

-

1
1

8
8

2
2

20

17

6
11

5
5
-

1

14
5
9

1

16
4

1
1

9
9

13
13

3

1
1

14
3

3
3

'

-1
1

_
_

_

1
x

6
5

8
2
6

1

4
4

3

11

_
1

8

4

_

_

2
2

8
8 ! .

6
6

-

-

-

3

_

_

_

1

_

_

-

1

-

-

«

_

_

_

4

2
2

4

8

4.

5

3

4

5

3

7
7

9
4
5

j -

| ~

46

3

5
-

5
5

2
2
2

_

46
29

1

29
29
24

! _

2
2
2

1
1

3

.

14
T T j

6
6

20
20

1 4
| 3

3
3

6
6

5
5

6
6

6
6

1
1

29
25

3
3

-

-

2
2

1
1

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
2

21
21

7
7

9

-

*

-

8
8

16
15

22
22

22
22

1 .2 1
1.2 1

4
4

2
2

3
3

-

2
2

-

2
2

4
4

11

9

31

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

31

-

11
11

1.61

-

_

2

"

_

_

7
7

_
4

3
3

1.61

1.76
"1775”

_
j
—

3
3

i
_____I ____
_

1
1

1
1

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Workers were distributed as follows* 2 at 75 to 80 cents; 3 at 80 to 85 cents; 5 at 85 to 90 cents; and 3 at 90 to 95 cents.
(excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

* Transportation


_
-

1

_

-

4

1.60

1.91
1.91

2
2

-

4

-

2
2

-

107
16"7

_

4

3

2

3
3

-

-

5
4

2
2

_

4
4

-

1.59
1.58"'

IT”

1

3

16
16
-

3
3

x

4

1
1

4
l
3

1

2

4
3

VI)

Average
hourly
earnings

Occupation and industry division

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20
*
and
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2 .1 5 2.20 2.25

Number
of
workers

4
4

1
1
1
1

4

-

5
-

5

19
19

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Pm., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6,

Ta b l e A-4 i

G u & t o d i c U ,

W a * l * U o 4 U U U j > ,

C M t d

S f u f i f U M f

O c C M f i a t f a i l

(Average h o u r l y earnings 1 / f o r selected o ccupations 2 / studied on a n a r e a
b a sis in Scranton, Pa., by in d u s t r y d ivision, D e c ember 1951)

N UM BER OF W O RKERS REC EIV IN G STR A IG H T -TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
N m e Aeae
u b r vrg
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
•
o
f
hu l
or y
w r e s erig Under0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 I.i5 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00
okr
anns
1
and
D.75 .80 . 5 .90 . 5 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 .80 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 over
8
9

Occupation and industry division

40
55—
15

Guards...................... .............
Manufacturing................... *.......
Nonmanufacturing ..... ....... *..... ........*
Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ......... .
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing.................. ..... .

322

172
150

25
*
70

* # .. ........ ..... ........... ........ .

15

3
4
240

Janitors* porters, and cleaners (women) ........ .
Manufacturing....... ....................
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••*••••
P i U t ntmtlM * T... Mf„ __
ihf
Pa4b4
- 1
iiii irrriii t iiitit
t

59
181
21

44
70
46

tjrTrttiiT-T-TT-ii.... 1

$
1.36
1.46'' -

1

2

1

2

-

“

~

-

42 50 10
51
13 34 ~~S~ 38
2
29 16
13

22
1
21

.97 31
I
'.b3'' .91 31
1 .21

8

-

.84
.91

16
16

128 45
l6 21
112 24

15

•74
.79
.81

16

5

2

10

12
1
18 3

.85
.5
9
,*
7>

21

.81
1 .0 1

Order fillers... ........ ................ .
Manufacturing...... ........ ............ .
Nonmanufacturing ...... .
Uhnlop lo t r H IlttTTlttttfTTTtrI.1IT___ T1___.T
a
.aa

T

Packers................................ .
Manufacturing............. ..... .........
Nonmanufacturing.............. ••••••••••..... .

1 .12

2

~ 78-- r~T7TI
23
1.15

16
5

6
2

-

“
9
5
4
2
1

7

1
1

2
2

-

-

12
11
1

_

_

3
3

3
3
-

3

4

3

4

-

6

3
3

10

7

29

1

1
6
3

22

-

7

5
5

7
7

1

6
1

x

x

-

1
1

3
3
x

3

5

2

6
1

.

3

2
1

3
3

_
-

_
_

_

_

_

_

-

_

2

1

2

1
1

2
2

_

x

x

2

x
2

5
3

1

-

21 i 17
16
6
1
3
1

1
1

-

9
9
-

-

2
2
14
5 !x
2
2
7 i_
21
61 8
x
/
30 i 4 12 1 " '
"
!
I
1
J
1 1
24
3
- 1
2
11
1
13
x
13
i

153
1.23
7 "iTir^ —
1.28
106
1.09
40

2
2

15

“

1 .21

8

13
3

10
! 10

8
17
— rT T

4
4
15

2

2

6
6

2
1
1

-

■

-

3
3

x

1

16

-

— T

-

1

14

8

5
5

8
6

“
*

2

-

4

5
5

1
1

x

2

8

13

9
14 14
2
2 ~~6T
13 j 12 12 | 3
13

5

2

8

5 ! i

2

8

-

5
5

1

-

-

~

1

i
i

13

1
_

1

1
101

Receiving clerks.......................

..............
T £7___ ____ ................ .. .
1

—

54
33—

2

1.40
1.33"
l
1.51
1.57
•

Nonmanufacturing .............. .....................
Retail trade •.....••••••........... .... .

22
20

Shipping clerks..... ••••••••••...............
Manufacturing....... ....................

74
35
39
18

Nonmanufacturing

_




-

5
3
2
2

~

i
i
—

1.54

1
-

-

-

, ; 1

|

i

r —

r

“

2
1 1
1 1

-

1
1

1

1 .2 1

-

1
x

1

2

-

i
i

5
5

_

~ ;

1
-

“

3
3

9

15

6

12

-

3
3

3

-

6

6

8

4

6

6

3

5

“

7

3

1

1

3
9
9

3

2
1

8

2

-

8

-

•

2

5

-

3
3

1

2

1
1

12

1
1

1

-,

17

~ ir

7

4
4
j

~

1.3 8 ”

2

— T—

r 1

~

_

See footnotes at end of table*
# Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

*
*

6
i
—

_

1.38

Nonmanufacturing

6

-

1.25

11

:

Trr^
~ 2

1.42

49
38

9!3

2
2

-

2

2

3

4
4

3

1

_

1
1
-

-

?

5

3

8
2
6

5

_

2

1

10

3
3

—

3
3

3
3

-

1
1

-

-

“

“

2
2

X

2

-

-

1

2

2

4

2
2

3

-

2

-

-

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

7
-

7
3

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Pa., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

.

7

GuAtodtial, WtHMiuuUiMf, and. SlUppiHf OetmfUiiiotU -GontiMMmd

Table i-it

(Average h o u r l y earnings 1 / fo r selected o c c u p ations 2 / studied o n a n a r e a
b a sis in Scranton, Pa., by indu s t r y division, De c e m b e r 1951)

N UM BER OF W O RKERS REC EIVIN G STR A IG H T -TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$

Occupation and industry division

Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d ....... ............
Manufacturing ........ ........... ..................
Nonmanufacturing ................. ...... .......... .
PnKl 1n n+.IUtiea * ..............................
Wholesale t r a d e .... ••••••................. ..
Retail t r a d e ........... •••••••..................

Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons) ................ .
M a n u f a cturing ................ ............ .......
Nonmanufacturing.......................... ........

o
f

752
“ 238—
514
272
94
145

hourly

$
$
$
$
$
$
$'
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Jnder 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.0G
*
and
.80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.6C I .65 1.70 lt75 1,80 1.85 1.90 3.95 2.00 over
0.75

$
1.29
14
i :i b ' 1.35
14
1
_
1.17
1.28
11

90
25
65
14

1.28
1.39
1.23
1.04

+r«de ....................................

38

198
101
54
40

_
2

11

23
12
11

12
8
4

5
6

8
3

2
2
2

11
11
3
8

-

5
5
-

37

26

1.24

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 4 tons) ...
Manufacturing ............................. ........ .
Nonmanufaoturing ...................................
Public utilities * ..............................
Wholesale trade ........................... .
Retail t r a d e ............. .............. ........

5
3
2

242

tt

1.40
■ 1 :55"
1.37
1 .*>0
1.29
1.20

-

-

-

2
2

2

2
-

35
15
20

37
23
14

42

_

_

4

4

20
—

6
8

6
8

10
6
4
4

-

28
H

1 7
j ---7

10
6
4

-

1 _
| 2
i

2
2

1
1

16
16

1

4
12

9
-

13
13

9

10

30
14

25
15
10

24
12
12

56
32
2 — T
26
54

0
1

16

7
3

12
~

14
9

_

_

2

16

7

3
2
1
1

3

-

14

_
_

15
2
13

3

3

4

-

2

15
11
4

14
1

7
7

12

2

7
-

-

7

—T

9

238
33
205
175
1

9
21

11

1
_

-

10

1

1

35
28
7

8
2
6

32

1

5
2

6

-

_

1
1

_

_

_

2
2

_

1
1

10

_

2
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

8
8

_

_

_

_

2
2

10

_

9
1

1

84 20
2
1
83 18
a? | O.W

26
2
24

4

7

1
_

74
y9

13

4

— IT

74

18

8

_

_

6

8

1

20

_T

8

18

|

i

|

I
i
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) ....
Nonmanufacturing.................. ................
Pnhl 1« lit! 1 I+ 1Afl * t ,,,,,,,,,it,rTt---rT---rrtTTT
.

107
~TS3—
98

1.51
1.50

1

|

- 1

-

1

3
3

~

- 1

1
1

-

47
47
47

!

48
48
48

s
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) ........................................
Nonmanufacturing

2
-

1
“

6
6

23
23

-

4
4
9

1

!

2

i
i

60
57

1.46
1.46

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

“

-

"
"

-

“

-

~

12
12

5
5

13
12
1
1

1
-

3
3

4
4

—

-

2
2

7
6

30
30

2
1

~

_

2

~

1
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ................... ...... .
ManiifActurlng . . . ....... ........... ........... .

50
44

1.43
1.42

3
3

_

j
—

1
37

_ —

10
r

i
1
W a t c h m e n ...... ...................................... .
Ma n u f a c t u r i n g ....... ............................. .
Nonmanufacturing ...................................... ,
Public utilities * ............... ..... ...........
FI manna ** ._T.......f.......TT.....T1....... Tt
r»a« T 1 .1 T T I T T r T _ r . , . 1 .t t t t .T T t T . 1 ..... fftt
_

206
137
69
26
14
13

.98
1.01
.93
.99
.97
•73

6
-

6

5

40
24
16
13

13
4
9
2
2
1

24
12
12
4
7

21
18
3
2

20
15
5
3

10
10
-

19
16
3

18
15
3

3

2
!

1/
2/
*
**

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

3 i
3

^

-

6
6

3
3
2

I

i

1
f
—

_
-

1

_

-

_
-

! 6
l

4
2

-

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

8.

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective harg»*»i»»g
between employers and trade-unions. Bates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15:

Builduup GoHAtsutJctton

Table C-205:

April 1 1952
,

B r i cklayers ....................... .
Carpenters ........... .......................
Electricians ............ ........... ........
Painters ....................................
PIustarera .................................

Plumber8 ...................................
Building l a b o r e r s .................. ........

12.875
2.250
2.500
2.125
2.640
2.530
1.575

Hours
per
week

Go*UiM44*d

Table C-42:

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Bread only - Machine shops: - Continued
Mixers' helpers, flour blenders, machine
wrappers set**************************
Pie and pastry shops:
ffwHt. cookers .......................
Ovenmen .................. .
General helpers ••••••••••••••»••••••»*••

Bak&Uel

Hours
per
week

$1,430

40

1.625
1.387
1.050

40
40
40

PsU hAu U }

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

Classification

Rate
per
hour




$1,500
1.433
1.305
1.180
1.008

44
44
45
45
45

1.478
1.473
1.408
1.370
1.333
1.300
1.268

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.388
1.370
1.178
1.315

40
40
40
40

1.550
1.400
1.375
1.350

40
40
40
40

1.625
1.550
1.500
1.300
1.075

40
40
40
40
40

1.555

40

1.505

Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder press assistants ............
Platen press assistants ..............
Pressmen, cylinder:
2 -color or perfeotor p r e s s e s .........
1 or 2 p r e s s e s .......................
Pressmen, platen:
1 to 3 presses, hand fed .............

40

1.430

Bookbinders:
Machine workers ...... ................
Bench workers .........................
Compositors, h a n d .... ......... .........
Electrotypers ............................
Machine operators ...... ................
Machinist o p e r a t o r s ..................
Mailers ..................................

2.061

1.288

yflt
374-

2.375
2.269

3#
374-

1.959
2.570

37440

40

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day w o r k ..... ......
Compositors, hand - night work ..........
Machine operators - day work ............
Machine operators - night w o r k ...... .
Machinist operators - day work ..........
Machinist operators - night work ........
Mailers - day w o r k ......................
Mailers - night work ....................
Photoengravers - night w o r k .............
Pressmen, web presses - day w o r k ..... .
Pressmen, web presses - night work •
Stereotypers - day w o r k ...... ........ ..
Stereotypers - night w o r k ........ .

2.462
2.564
2.462
2.564
2.513
2.615
1.966
2.046
2.971
2.346
2.710
2.387
2.728

39
39
39
39
39
39
35
35
35
40
35

Helpers »»••••••••»»•»••••»»»»»•»*»»•••»•
Furniture
Helpers
General - F r e i g h t ............... ...........

37s37s37#37r
37
40

1.881
1.538

Beer
Helpers ......a......*.......*...........
Bakery - Biscuit ............ ...............
Building:
Construction:
Service •£ to £ t o n ...................
Heavy duty trailer and winch truck ...
Material:
Ready-mix and eoncrete-mixer .........
Department s t o r e ............................

Hours
per
week

$1,575
1.450
1.300

40
40
45

1.150
i .500

40
40

1.500
1.423
1.525

40
40
48

1.400

48

1.445
1.385
1.490
1.440
1.660
1.560

40
40
48
48
40
50

37 L

1.991

Rate
per
hour

Clas sification

37£

2.266

Classification

Hours
per
week

Hours
per
week

$1,175

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops:
Bread and cake - Rand shops:
Agreement A:
Overmen, dough mixers, second hands ..
Bench h a n d s ............... ...........
Agreement B:
Mixers, ovenmen, first hands .........
Bench hands, oven helpers ............
Wrappers, utility men ................
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread and rolls department:
M i x e r s .............................
Molders, third mixers .............
Ovenmen ............................
Packers ............................
Hand wrappers .....................
Bench hands ........................
General helpers ...................
Cake department:
Molders and helpers ...............
Ovenmen, m i x e r s ...................
H e l p e r s ..................... .
Women machine operators ...........
Agreement B:
Bread department:
Mixers, scalers, sponge dough ....
Dividers, molder operators ........
Wrapping-machine operators ........
Flour blenders ....................
Cake department:
Working foremen ...................
Mixers and scalers, icing mixers ••
O v e n m e n ................. ........ .
Packers, dumpers, pan greasers ....
Women e m p l o y e e s ............... .
Agreement C:
Doughnut machine operators, mixers ...
Wrapping-machine operators, scalers,
molder o p e r a t o r s ............... .
Pan rackera, cake depositors, flour
blenders, depositor h e l p e r s ..... .
Mixers1 helpers, oven dumpers and
feeders, cake d u m p e r s ............ .
Bread packers, pan greasers ..........
Bench helpers, floor girls, icers ....
Cake cutters, machine wrappers ......
Bread only - Machine shops:
Molders, divider operators, mixers ......
Utility men .............. ...............

M<Uo*t>Utch 2>^UaBtd <Owd cJtelfL&U.
July 1, 1951

Rate
per
hour

Classifiestion

Table C-27:
Table C-205 *

-

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Bak&Ued,

2.400
2.320

2.4 0 0
2.480

Railway express .............................
Haulers •**»••••••••••••••*•••••••»•••••••••

Table C-58:
January 1, 1952

f

m

Rate
per
week

Chefs ..............
First c o o k s .......
Second oooks .......
Round cooks .......
Short orders ......
Sa n d w i e h m e n .......
Waitresses ........
Waiters ............
Bus boys ......... .
Bus girls ..........
Bartenders ........
Bartenders (service)
Porters ............
Dishwashers ........
Kitohenmen .........
Potwashers .........

40
35

Table C-7011i

Hours
per
week

$80.00
80.00
70.00
60.00
49.50
38.50
22.00
24.50
24.50
24.50
60.00
60.00
33.00
33.00
33.00
33.00

Classification

48
48
48
48
48
48
44
48
48
44
40
40
48
48
48
48

JfoieU

January 1, 1952

Table C-41*

JUccal

Op&uUinXf

Classification

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$30.00
31.50
31.50

48
48
48

27.72
30.60

48
48

15.24
15.84

48
48

October 1, 1951
Chambermaids:
Classification

1.405
1.360
1.130
1.180

40
40
40
40

1.560
1.550

40
40

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

•eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Night

.....................

Elevator operators:
Busses:
First 3 months
4 —12 months
After 1 year
1-man oars

$1,290
1.340
1.370
1.370

Night ,.M .............................
Bellboys:

_

Night

t . T t t T ........................ - ......................... .. ..........................

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Pa., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

9<

D:

Entrance Rates

M j~ m 4 ~ e ~ U *H c .lU U tl~ P l*d W *» lU u v

E:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in Minimum rate (in cents)

All
industries
2/

All establishments ............

100.0

Under 50 ......................
5 0 .............................
Over 50 and under 55 ..........
Over 55 and under 60 .........
6 0 .............................
Over 60 and under 65 ..........
65 .............................
Over 65 and under 70 .........
Over 70 and tinder 75 .........
75 .............................
Over 75 and under 80 ..........
80 .............................
Over 80 and tinder 85 .........
85 .............................
Over 85 and under 90 ..........
9 0 .............................
Over 90 and under 95 ..........
Over 95 and under 100 ........
1 0 0 ................... ........
Over 100 and under 105 .......
Over 105 and under IlO .......
110 ...........................
Over 110 and under 115 .......
H 5 ....... ,..................
Over 115 and under 120 .......
1 2 0 ...........................
Over 120 and under 125 .......
Over 125 and under 130 .......
1 3 0 ............................
Over 130 and under 135 .......
Over 135 and under 140 .......
Over 140 and under 145 .......
Over 145 and under 150 .......
150 and over ..................

0.7
.7
.6
1.3
7.2
1.7
3.4
.4
.3
40.0
1.8
4.0
2.0
6.5
3.4
1.5
.9
1.4
.6
1.8
3.7
1.4
3.0
.5
.9
.8
.1
.1
1.4
2.4
2.2
.4
.3
.7

Establishments with no
established minimum ........

1/
2/
*

1.9

Manufa cturing
establ isbment8
wit h 251 or
21-250
more
workers
workers

100.0

100.0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

_
_
_

3.1

_

_

11.3
1.4
_
-

5.2
_
_

56.3
.7
4.9
1.9
5.9
1.3
3.2
_

44.3
_
6.0
4.8
8.1
3.4
2.7
_

1.9
3.0
.4
1.1
1.1
_

2.9
8.0

.6
3.7
-

-

4.6
3.0
_
7.0
-

100.0

100.0

_
_

_
_
8.8
25.0
- ■
_
_
-

13.3
13.5
10.0
_
_

_
_
_
_
7.2
38.9
19.0
_
-




: SUUt ^Ule^JttuU P^OaUlOHd
”

Percent of plant
workers employed
on each shift
in -

Services

100.0
16.3

5.7
5.0
6.7
15.1
10.2
6.3
3.2
1.4
12.1
6.0
1.8
-

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments .................

10.8

3.0

Receiving shift differential .....

4.5

3.0

Uniform cents (per hour) ......
5 cents .....................
7 cents .....................
7£ cents ....................
8 cents .....................
9 cents .....................
10 cents ....................
15 cents ....................
16 c e n t s ..... ..............
18 cents ....................
28 cents ....................

4.1
1.9
.6
-

3.0
.3
_

Uniform percentage .............
7 percent ...................
percent ..................
10 percent ..................

.4

9.7
18.1
2.6
5.3
2.5
-

6.3
5.1
-

-

-

4.2
2.8

-

-

_
_
-

.4
_

All
manufacturing
Indus 1
tries
3d or
2d
other
shift
shift

_
4.9
11.0
10.7
8.9
-

3.4
3.5
.4
1.2
_

1.3
-

7.4
-

13.2
2.6

5.3

-

-

_

5.1
_
-

.7
_

a/)
a/)
.£
6.3

.4
0/)
(1/)
-

-

_

.5
_

.3
.7
.9
.3
.1
-

-

4.9
6.3

Receiving no differential ........

.4
-

-

_

_

-

-

5.3
2.3

1.3

-

_

2.9

12.5

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
206597 0 — 52------- 2

Table E - l

Shift differential

_
_
_
_

Supplementary W age Practices

1.3

1/

Less than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Pa., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10,

Table E-2i

pi .ECENT

Weekly hours

All establishments..... *...............
Under 35 hours .......................... .
35 hours .................................
Over 35 and under 37^ h o u r s .... ........
37£ hours ................................
Over 3?£ and under 40 hours .............
40 hours ........................... ......
Over 40 and under 44- h o u r s ..............
44 hours ................. .
Over 44 and under 48 hours ..............
48 hours ......... ............... ........
Over 48 hours ............................

1/
2/
*
**

Al
l
i dustries
n

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

3.3
13.6
3.9
7.0
3.3
58.1
8.1
2.4

S ch e d u le d lAJj&eJzltf JfoaML

OF OFFICE W O R K E R S

Public
uiiis
tlte*

Wholesale
trade

ij

E M P L O Y E D IN—

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN—

Finance**

6.2

-

.3

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

4.7
2.3
27.6
5.5
58.7

1.3
1.2
7.5
.5
79.0
3.5
.8
-

100.0

6.7
12.0
13.3
1.8
47.1
19.1

10.9

57.7
15.1
1.8

20.2

-

-

19.7
5.7

7.7
1.9
26.0

-

1.2
-

-

-

-

9.2
59.9
15.9
4.1
-

-

-

Al
l
i dustries 2/ Manufacturing
n

100.0

iQ0*p

28.8
5.8
_

Public
u i i i s*
tlte

0 .4

-

9.6

lOOiO...

_
-

•2
3.3
.9
74.8
1.7
3.1
6.9
6.4
2.3

4.5
.7
86.9
_
_
5.7
-

2.2

.100,0

Wholesale
trade

100.0

_

_
_
_

9.0
_

44.9

55.4

_

14.2
6.3
15.1

3.2
44.2
7.7

Retail trade

100.0

Secvioee

100.0
2.5

_

_
2.9
39.5
13.7
22.4
19.2
2.3

1.3
_
46.1
_
_
50.1

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Pfrid Jhlidadfi

Table E-3*

PERCENT OF OFFICE W O R K E R S EM P L O Y E D IN—
Number of paid holidays

All
i dustries
n

Manufacturing

PERCENT OF PLANT WO R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN—

Public
uiiis
tlte*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

A
H
industries

Manufacturing

Public
uiiis
tlte*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

\/

All establishments .....................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments providing paid
holidays .............. ...............

97.5

98.8

98.2

100.0

98.9

100.0

45.2

78.4

77.6

94.0

98.6

88.0

20.8

_

.7
4.2
2.3
7.6
47.7
1.3
7.1
6.1
.1
1.3
-

_

_

1 day ••••••..........................
3 days
4 days •••••..........................
5 days .............. .................
6 d a y s ...............................
6£ days ...... ....... ................
7 days ...............................
8 days ........ .......................
8£ d a y s ................. ......... .
9 days ...............................
12 d a y s ................ .............
13 days ..............................

Establishments providing no
paid holidays ..........................

1/
*
**

_

-

.6
.1
2.7
65.7
6.4
5.7
7.1
.3
4.6
3.4
.9

1.1
.4
6.8
81.6
.5
4.6
3.8
-

2.5

1.2

_

_

_

_

_

_

14.3
2.8
22.2
17.1
3.2
38.6
-

79.3
6.6
5.2
8.9
-

1.8

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

.6
78.3
4.1
1.5
14*4
-

1.1

_

_

_
44.6
29.3
1.2
19.6
5.3

_
19.8
25.4
-

54.8

21.6

5.6
2.1

1 0 .4
52.3
.3
5.5
1.4
-

2 2 .4

-

5.8

_

_

6.0

55.8
4.5
21.9
-

13.3
2.6
s
-

“

“

1.4

12.0

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Pa., December 1951
u-s» DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_
4.9

73.2
11.2
14.2
-

8.8
6.0
13.3
28.1
24.3
1.6
11.9
-

79.2

11,

Table E-4:

Paid V&c&tami (fyobmal pAouUiOHi)

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

Vacation policy

All establishments ......................

All
in d u s trie s

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s*

100.0

100.0

- ..3 2 2 a S _

98.0

99.4

86.1

W holesale
tr a d e

.

R e ta il tr a d e

100.0

100.0

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

F in a n c e * *

S ervices

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.6

100.0

97.6

AH
in d u s trie s 1 /

.

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W holesale
tr a d e

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.1

96.4

100.0

100.0

99.2

96.2

62.6
33.6

R e ta il tr a d e

S ervices

1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations .....

_

_

_

_

•

Under 1 week .........................
1 week ................................
Over 1 and trader 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ...............................
3 weeks ...............................

47.6
.2
48.0
2.2

51.9
.6
41.3
5.6

82.2
-

46.9
-

3.9
-

53.1

61.6
37.0

-

-

-

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

2.0

.6

13.9

-

1.4

-

98.1

99.9

86.1

2 years of

-

100.0

_

61.9
-

.2
72.2
1.0
22.7
1.0

75.6
1.4
18.1
1.3

2.4

2.9

3.6

97.6

97.6

97.0

35.7
-

_

_

92.2
-

59.5
-

1.9
44.2
_

7.8

40.5

53.1

-

-

-

-

-

.
8

_

3.8

service

Establishments with paid vacations .....

_

-

_

Under 1 week ..........................
1 week ................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ...............................
3 weeks ...............................

25.5
2.3
68.1
2.2

23.4
5.9
65.0
5.6

15.5
70.6
-

Establishments with no paid vacations ....

1.9

.1

13.9

100.0
_

98.6
_

46.2
_

45-9
_

53.8
-

52.7
-

-

1.4

100.0
_
_

_

-

-

-

2.4

2.4

3.0

100.0

24.6
_
73.0

100.0

100.0
_

.2
58.5
4.6
33.3
1.0

67.7
6.3
21.7
1.3

99.2

96.2

44.2

55.8

1.9
20.1

55.8

44.2

77.2

47.7

.8

3.8

100.0

99.2

96.2

27.7
_

1.9
7.8
77,9

38.3

48.5

-

-

5 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ......

99.6

99.9

100.0

100.0

98.6

100.0

97.6

97.6

97.0

1 w e e k ...........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..............
2 weeks ....... .........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..............
3 weeks ................................

9.9
1.5
82.3
1.0
4.9

14.3
3.8
76.2
•
5.6

1.4

17.7
82.3

9.4

_
94.3
5.7
-

19.8
.
77.8
_

30.9
2.9
61.4
_

39.4
2.5
53.8

-

2.4

1.3

-

-

11.6

Establishments with no paid vacations ....

.4

.1

-

2.4

2.4

3.0

-

-

.8

99.6

99.9

100.0

100.0

98.6

100.0

97.6

97.6

97.0

9.3
1.5
64.6

12.9
3.8
62.6

1.4
-

9.4
71.8

_
66.0

19.8
_

39.4
2.5
50.6

-

30.9
2.9
54.2
.1
9.5

2.4

2.4

3.0

-

98.6
_

-

-

-

77.4
.
11.8

-

-

1.4

100.0
_
_
100.0

_

72.3

57.9
3.8

15 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ......
1 week .................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ............. .
2 weeks ........... .....................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..............
3 w e e k s ....... ........................

39.5

17.7
79.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

24.2

20.6

59.1

3.3

17.4

34.0

Establishments with no paid vacations ....

.4

.1

1/
*
#*

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, end real estate.




1.4

77.8
-

100.0
_
_

49.9

_

_

4.5

50.1

100.0

99.2

96.2

27.7

1.9
7.8
73.3

38.3

-

67.4
4.9

16.2
.8

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Pa., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

57.9
3.8

Table E~5i

Paid S ick J & 4 e (dJ&HHol PacuUUmiA)
tG*>

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments .....................

M a n u fa c tu rin g

All
in d u s trie s

100.0

.

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W holesale
tr a d e

100.0

100.0

100.0.

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

if

R e ta il tr a d e

F in a n c e * *

S ervices

AH
,
in d u s trie s

.

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

--- 1QQ.Q

4 0 .8

5.7

-

4.0

1.0

-

•

25.1

-

.
-

_

.7
.3
-

_
-

_
-

_
18.8
1.8

.
-

-

“

-

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

--- 1DQ*.0.

W holesale
tr a d e

R e ta il tr a d e

S ervices

100.0

100.0

100.0

6 months of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

20.3

25.1

-

“

1.5
5.4
5.8
5.8
-

-

_

.

-

14.0
25.2
1.6

5.7
-

59.2

94.3

100.0

96.0

99.0

4 0 .8

4 1 .4

15.1

6.2

1.0

10 days ..............................
12 d a y s ..... ............. ......... .

1.4
•4

3.9
5.4
14.7
1.1
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ............... .

79.7

74.9

100.0

33.1

31.1

38.6

-

_

_
-

4 days ...............................

7 d a y s ...............................

1 year

-

-

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

4.5

-

74.9

100.0

-

34.5

23.7

_

.
5.8
1.8
18.8
3.6

23.7
—
-

of

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............. .
5 days .............................. .
6 days ..................... .........
8 days ...............................
10 d a y s ....... ....... ..............
18 d a y s .............. ........... .
20 days ............................. ...
22 d a y s ...................................................................................................

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .........................................................

2.2
.5
5.8
1.5
10.4
7.1
5.3
.3

5.4
3.9
15.8
2.6
3.4
-

38.6

-

-

-

66.9

68.9

61.4

-

100.0

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), conmunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

2.4
.6
.2
.2
•6

_

_
15.1
-

2.3
.2
.2
2.4
.5
-

-

-

-

-

_

-

.
5.7
35.7

25.2
14.0
-

1.6

59.2

-

-

-

84.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.6

-

58.6

.7
.3
-

-

-

-

4.5

“

93.8

99.0

100.0

100.0

Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton,

76.3

Pa., December 1951

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

65.5

13.

Table 3 -5 1

P a id S ic J l JH/&G4M6 (Q o k m o l P a 04H&40HA) - C o n tin u e d

PER CEN T OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments

All
industries

Public
utilities*

Manufacturing

PERCEN T OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

40.8

4 1 .4

15.1

100.0

100.0

3 3 .1

31.1

38.6

2 .2
.5
5*8

5.4
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

25.2

-

9 .3
2 .6

19.7

_

_

-

2.6

—

—

2.4
11.6
-

ioo.a_

Services

AH
industries 1 /

---

100.0

Manufacturing

100.0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

_
_

_
-

100.0

2 3 .7

5.8
1.8

23.7

_

-

1 0 0 .0

34*5

100.0

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e .... ......... .
5 d a y s ................ ..............
6 d a y s ...............................
7 d a y s ...............................
8 d a y s ...............................
10 days ..............................
15 d a y s ........................ .
18 d a y s ...... ........... ...........
20 d a y s ........................ .
24 d a y s ....... ............... ......
33 days ..............................
40 days ..............................
Over.40 d a y s .................... ••••
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave •••••••...........

.

_

—

5.7
—

_

_

-

-

38.6

-

1 .6
-

-

-

-

-

35.7

-

1 .0
3 .9

_

4

6

.-

1 .3

3.4

6

1
.

61.49

15.1
-

_
—
•
-

1 .0

_
2.3
.2

.7
■
a

.8
1.6
.5
.6
-

-

-

-

-

-

4.5
-

-

-

-

-

—

-

_
—
•

-

-

59.2

58.6

84.9

93.8

99.0

4 2 .9

1 0 0 .0

6.3
12.5
3.6

-

—
-

“

“

•

6 68.9

-

6.2

_

41*4

15.1

6.3

1 .0

_

_

15.1
-

2.3

-

.8

84.9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

65.5

76.3

35.8

23.7

15 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

3

3
2 .2

31.1

.

38.6
6
_

5 d a y s ................. .............
6 days •••••..........................
7 d a y s ...............................
8 d a y s .............................. .
10 d a y s ..... ........ ...... •••••••••
18 d a y s ....................... ......
20 d a y s ........... ............... .
35 d a y s ..............................
50 days •••................ ...... .
Over 50 d a y s ............ ........... .

14.6
3.4

.
38.6

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e .........

66.4

68.9

61.4

1/
*
**

5.4

-

25.2

•4
5.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.5
-

5.1
-

1 .0

2 .6

2.7
6.3
11.7

-

-

-

1 1 .6
2 .2

“

1.5

5.7
35.7

57.1

58.6

1 0 0 .0

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

2.4
—
—

-

.
.7

•2

.5
1 .6
.1
.6

93.7

■
a

-

-

—
-

—
-

-

"

“

1 0 0 .0

_

5.8

23.7

1 .8

*
_
-

99.0

_

1 0 0 .0

-

6.3
3.6
—

-

12.5
1.3
4.5

6 4 .2

-

76.3

&04U4A&L

Table E-6:

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Type of bonus

A ll
in d u s trie s

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

M a n u fa c tu rin g

W holesale
tr a d e

R e ta il tr a d e

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

F in a n c e * *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ............................

52.5

28.5

30.9

58.7

81.2

Christmas or year-end ...............
Profit-sharing ......................
O t h e r ....................... ........

48.4
8.8
3.1

20.9
3. A
4.2

30.9
-

58.7
16.7
5.9

80.6
27.4
-

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ...............................

47.5

71.5

69.1

41.3

18.8

20.4

46.0

All establishments ................. .

1/
2/
*
**

“

100.0

S ervices

100.0

Ali
in d u s trie s 1 /

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s

100.0

100.0

100.0

79.6

54.0

44.9

41.9

73.9
5.7

54.0

39.3
1.9
4.4

34.2
1.7
6.0

55.1

58.1

*

81.9

-

-

W holesale
tr a d e

R e ta il tr a d e

S ervices

100.0

100.0

18.1

53.7

79.5

42.9

18.1

53.7
8.9
3.9

79.5
4.5
-

42.9

46.3

20.5

57.1

iQStP...

-

-

100.0

_

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Uhduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

a4ui P-ettUott P<lanA>

Table E-7*

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S1 E M P L O Y E D IN —

Type of plan

All establishments .....................

All
in d u strie s*

100.0

M a n u fa c tu rin g

100.0

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P u b lic
u tilitie s*

W holesale
tr a d e

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

R e ta il tr a d e

F in a n c e * *

S ervices

A ll
in d u s trie s

1/

.

M a n u fa c tu rin g

100.0

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W holesale
tr a d e

R e ta il tr a d e

S ervices

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2/ .....................

80.7

71.9

82.9

80.3

82.8

100.0

64.3

78.3

76.3

94.0

71.1

86.3

59.9

Life insurance ......................
Health insurance ....................
Hospitalization .....................
Retirement pension ..................

69.4
53.4
52.9
30.2

49.3
44.1
48.8
33.6

82.9
69.5
9.5
56.4

65.6
27.5
30.8
10.2

78.3
80.1
81.2
13.7

100.0
43.1
57.5
40.5

56.3
36.5
64.3
10.3

55.5
65.8
59.8
23.3

47.7
64.1
59.0
24.5

94.0
82.0
40.5
36.8

54.4
29.5
22.8
10.2

74.1
79.6
81.8
13.8

59.9
36.8
59.9
10.8

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ........................

19.3

28.1

17.1

19.7

17.2

35.7

21.7

23.7

6.0

28.9

13.7

40.1

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately,
Uhduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Ph., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1$

A ppendix — Scope

W i t h
f o rmation

the

exc e p t i o n

p r esented

in

field

representatives

ments

in

tion,

u n i f o r m

u p o n

the

area

this

of

of the

B u r e a u

surveyed.

job

the

u n i o n

b u l l e t i n

In

was

t o

scale

were

rates,
b y

used;

of

o f

a

cer t a i n

co m b i n a t i o n

b y

are

o c cupa­

available

request.

The
time
b u t

a n d

earnings

d a t a

clerical,
power
A - l

through

other

for

(b)

plant,

turing;

br o a d

and

(d)

A-4).

public

schedules

a n d

cov e r e d

divisions.

re e d

As
a

above
omitted

of

c o v e r e d

and

(o)

trade;

in

size
t h e y

studied

the

w a r rant

ship p i n g
are i

and

(tables

m a n u f a c ­

trade;

was

these

table

only

S m a l l e r

c o s t - o f - l i v i n g

on

are

for

r e p o r t e d
(rounded

time

salaries

pations

have

workers

a l l

studied,

m i n i m u m

covered

wer e

l o w i n g

size

jobs,

d a t a

for

for

these

separ a t e l y
size

t o

a c t u a l l y

schedule

for

of

were
the

for

e s t a b l i s h ­

em p l o y m e n t

in

p l ant

included

br o a d

the

the

the

a r e a

specific

(see

f o l ­

s i c k

fr o m

informal

v a r i e d

p l a nt

m e nts

was

surveyed

greater
studied

w i t h

p r o p ortion
in

order

available




t o

of large

t h a n

office

a n d

firms

p l ant

m e e t i n g

m a x i m i z e

resources.

E a c h

the
group

s m a l l

n u m b e r
of

Where

the

for

w h i c h

earnings
50

of

w o r k

the

for

total
s t udy
for

hours
sc h e d ­

s t r a i g h t -

these

cents.

the

over­

i n c l uding

w e e k l y

The

occu­
n umber

e m p l oyment
a n d

n o t

Data

are

sh o w n

to w o r k

the

e s t a b l i s h m e n t s

cretion

e s t a b l i s h ­
of

on

of

the

on l y

to

in
the

full-time
full-time

classification.

i n

plans

plans
of

the

the

m a y
is

be

t o

of

off

workers

establishments

p r e c e d i n g

H e a l t h
surance

insurance
a n d

the

is

p e n s i o n

those

e v e n

the

w o m e n

s u m mary

is

a n y

practice

office

of

benefits.
it

however,

p a y

p r o v ision

is

These
paid

u n d e r

for

the

It

excludes
the

leave
a t
a

plans
b y

and

a t

for
for

in
in

of e l i ­

v a c a t i o n

S i c k

is

workers

r e c e i v i n g

granted

f u l l

It

employed

arrangements.
p a y

office

Because

a c t u a l l y

p r o v i d i n g

o f

a l l

tables.

hours.

supervisor.

t h o u g h

included,
plans.

w i t h

w i t h o u t

pay m e n t

insurance

t o

The

form a l

other

li m i t e d
time

t o

t o

workers

observe

w e e k l y

smaller.

or

f u r ther

a l l

p r o p o r t i o n

o ff

empl o y e r

of

r e l a t i n g

time

refers

individual

tha t

sch e d u l e d

lim i t e d

w h e r e b y

the

pr o p o r t i o n

the

a m o u n t

h e a l t h

in

se c t i o n

are

clude

practices

departments)

s u m m a r i z i n g

benefits

wa g e

specified

some

divisions.

o f

in

excluded,

earnings,

est i m a t e d

scope

a l s o

r e f e r to t h e

n e a r e s t

occupational

r e q u i r e m e n t s ,

leave

p eriod
A

the

the

h i r e d

as

terms

table

of

for

w e e k l y

refers to the

given

in

gibi l i t y

only

indus t r y

t o

are

included.

half-hour)

surveyed •

(or

offices

were

cross - i n d u s t r y

w e i g h t

p r e m i u m p a y for

bonuses

incentive

are

average

w i t h i n

those

workers

pre s e n t e d

i n dustry

ea c h

proper

excludes

clerical, t h e y

r o u n d e d

Information
a n d

jobs

f r e q u e n t l y

a n d

ne a r e s t

paid;

presented

i.e.,

establishments

e x t e n t

the

establishments

n u m b e r

i n f ormation

office

b e e n

workers,

inclusion.

a n d

its

occupation.

industry

c h a r acteristic

limits

sur v e y i n g
jobs

requirements

in w h i c h

establishment

A l t h o u g h

esta b l i s h e d

size

of

deter m i n e d

table).

those

the

industries

given
a n d

Nonpr o d u o t i o n
bonuses

for

are

w o r k

of
the

was

i n dustry

salespersons,

as

ules

of

work.

question, e x c e p t

A m o n g

b y

earnings

in a r e p ­

obtained
o f

a n d

finance,

Information

i n sufficient

their

office

communication,

e a c h

studied.

f u r n ished

t o

in

foll o w i n g

were

a n d

r e t a i l

a l s o

(a)

m a i n t e n a n c e

groupings

services.

benefits

in c o m p i l i n g

o c c u p a t i o n s :

railroads),

establishments

indicated

because

indu s t r y

w h olesale

estate;

certain

occupations

of

technical,

(except

sup p l e m e n t a r y

ments

types

a nd

were

custodial, warehousing,

The

group

divisions

f o l l o w i n g

utilities;

and

resentative

the

the

p r o f e ssional

t r a nsportation

insurance,

were

i n dustry

however,

d a t a

n i g h t

commissions
S i x

size,
of

est a b l i s h ­

workers

these

in­

visits

r epresentative

cl a s s i f y i n g

descriptions

o f

col l e c t e d

d Method of Survey

d i s ­
plans
l e a s t

w a i t i n g
a l s o

e x ­

e m p l o y e r s .

tabul a t i o n

f o r

in­

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN SCRANTON, PA., 1/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, DECEMBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
_ study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of

1

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

stu d y

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ............................. ...
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public utilities•..
Wholesale trade....... .................
Retail trade ...........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .......
Services 2/ ..................... ......

21
21
21

378
192
186

149
65
84

39,300
25,700
13,600

23,580
14,570
9,010

3,250
1,400
1,850

21
21
21
21
21

24
35
81
16
30

13
17
26
11
17

3,400
1,300
6,000
1,200
1,700

2,540
720
3,450
1,000
1,300

370
180
530
670
100

1/ Scranton Metropolitan Area (Lackawanna County),
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




17

Index




3,

V
*

Bartender (restaurants) ................................ • •
Bellboy (hotels) ••••••••»••........0
Bench hand (bakeries) ............................ ..••.•••
Biller, machine •••••••••••.... ................••••••.•••
Bookbinder (printing)
Bookkeeper, hand ....................
Bookkeeping-machine operator ••••••.......•...........• •••
Bricklayer (building construction) • ••••..................
Bus boy (restaurants) • •.... ...... .•••••...••............
Bus girl (restaurants) ••••••••••••••••••............... .
Carpenter (building construction) • ••••..................
Carpenter, m a i n t e n a n c e .... •••••••....... • •..... ....••••
Chambermaid (hotels)
Chef (restaurants) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Cleaner ....... ..................
Clerk, a c c o u n t i n g .......... ......... ......................
Clerk, file • •......... .............. ..•.•.••••...•......
Clerk, general • ••••........••••••.••...... ...............
Clerk, o r d e r ....... .......... ........ ........ ...........
Clerk, p a y r o l l .......• •••........................ .........
Compositor, hand (printing) ••••••••••....
Cook (restaurants) • ......................... ............
Dishwasher (restaurants) ••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••
Draftsman ........ ..........................................
Electrician (building construction) .... .................
Electrician, maintenance *•••••»•••••.... •...............
Electrotyper (printing) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Elevator operator (hotels) .....•••••••••••..... •••••••••
Engineer, stationary ••••••.... ................. •........
Fireman, stationary boiler • •....
G u a r d ....... •••••••••••.......... •............. ....... .
Helper (bakeries)
Helper, motortruck driver ...•••..... ••••••••••••••••..••
Helper, trades, maintenance •••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••
Houseman (hotels) • • •.... ....... ......... .
Janitor ......... . . . . . . c . . . •••••••••........ ••••••••••••
Key-punch operator • •.......... ........ ...................
Kitchenraan (restaurants)
........ .
Laborer (building construction) ........
...... ...0.
Machine operator (printing) ............................ .
Machinist, maintenance
••••••••»•••••••
Jailer (printing) ............... .
Maintenance man, general utility ............... .........

O C ^C x-^O ^V ^C jO
O X X ^O /iO X ^vJtU 0 O U 00VA000000£s 'I^ > *>V>O'0000VSi O O O O V > > O JO O O
x &Qt
‘ UV a
O O O OaUO W O O O

Eage
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)
Mechanic, maintenance ••••••••••••
Mixer (bakeries) ......... ........
Molder (bakeries) ••••••••••••••••
Motortruck driver ••••••••••••.•••
Nurse, industrial (registered) ...
Office girl ......... ••••••......
O i l e r .............................
Operator (local transit) •••••••••
Order filler •••••••••••••••••.•••
Ovenman (bakeries) •••••••••......
Packer •••••••••••••.••......
Painter (building construction) *•
Photoengraver (printing) •••••••••
Pipe fitter, maintenance •••••••••
Plasterer (building construction)
Plumber (building construction) ••
Porter .......................... .
Porter (restaurants) ........•••••
Potwasher (restaurants) ••••••••••
Press assistant (printing) •••••..
Press feeder (printing) ••••••••••
Pressman (printing) ••••••••••••••
Receiving clerk •••••.••••••••••••
Sandwichraan (restaurants) .•••••••
Secretary .................. .
Shipping clerk •••••.•••••••••••••
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ....
Stenographer •••••••••••••....... •
Stereotyper (printing) •••••••••••
Stock handler
Switchboard operator
Switchboard operator-receptionist
Tool-and-die maker •••••••••••••••
Transcribing-machine operator ••••
Truck driver ..........
Trucker, hand
Trucker, power ••.................. ,
Typist ........... ...... ...... .
Waiter (restaurants)
Waitress (restaurants) •....... ...<
Watchman
Wrapper (bakeries) ..•••••••......,
☆ u. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G O F F I C E :0 — 1952







THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational v&ge surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
BIS Bulletin No.
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, Virginia
Seattle, Washington

This report was prepared
munications may be addressed to:

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1059
1064
1042
1058
1057

in the Bureau’s

Robert R.
Bureau of
341 Ninth
New York,

Price
20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Middle Atlantic Regional Office.

Com­

Behlow, Regional Director
Labor Statistics
Avenue
New York

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.

The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New Jersey

New York
Pennsylvania