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NEWARK-JERSEY CITY , NEW JERSEY
N o ve m b e r

Bulletin No.

1116-11

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




1 9 5 2

BU REA U
Ew an

OF

LA BO R

S T A T IS T IC S

C la g u e - C o m m is s io n e r




Occupational Wage Survey




NEW ARK-JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY
Novem ber

1952

Bulletin No. 1116-11
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin * Secretary
B U R E A U OF L A B O R STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

- Price 20 cents




Contents

Fage

Letter of Transmittal

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E .............




1

THE NEWARK-JERSBY CITY A R E A .................................

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s ,
Washington, D* C*, March 30, 1953#
The S ecretary of Labors
I have the honor to transm it herewith a re p o rt on
occupational wages and re la te d b e n e fits in Newark-Jer s$y C ity,
N* J* , during November 1952* S im ilar stu dies are being con­
ducted in a number of o th er larg e labor-m arket areas during the
f is c a l year 1953* These stu d ie s have been .designed to meet a
v a rie ty of governm ental and nongovernmental uses and provide
area-w ide earnings inform ation fo r many occupations common to
most m anufacturing and nonmanufacturing in d u strie s, as w ell as
summaries of se lected supplementary wage benefits* Whenever
p o ssib le , separate d ata have been presented fo r in d iv id u al major
in d u stry division s*
This re p o rt was prepared in the Bureau* s reg io n al of­
fic e in New York, N* Y*, by Frank C* G rella under the d ire c tio n
of Paul E* Warwick, Regional Wage and In d u stria l R elations
Analyst* The planning and c e n tra l d ire c tio n of the program was
c arried on in th e Bureau’s D ivision of Wages and In d u s tria l
R elations*
Ewan Clague, Commissioner,
Hon* M artin P* Durkin,
S ecretary of Labor*

I N T R O D U C T I O N ..................................................

1

TABIESl
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations ••••••••**•**•••••••*.•••••
A-2
Professional and technical occupations •••••••
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ••••*•
A-%4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
o c c u p a t i o n s ......•••••••••••••*••••••••**••

3
5
6
7

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-2333
Wom e n ’s and misses' dresses ••.••••••••••..•*•
9
B-2851
Paints and varnishes ••»••••••••••••••••••••••
9
B-35
Machinery industries *••....•..•••............... 10
Machine-tool accessories .............
11
B-7211
Power laundries ••••••••••••••••..*•.......
12
Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction •••••••••••••••••..••**•
C-205
Bakeries .................. *..... ...............
C-27
M i n t i n g ...................... *****..... ••••••
Ch 41
Local transit operating employees ••••*......
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers •••••••••*•*•*•

13
13
13
13
13

Supplementary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions .•••••••••••.•*•
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours .......................
D-3
Paid holidays ••*•.....*...... ............... .
D-4
Paid vacations ••••••••••••••••••••.••••*•.**•
D-5
Insurance and pension plans *•••.*•.... ••••••

14
14
15
15
18

APPENDIX 1
Seope and method of survey ................... .

19

INDEX

21




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY
Introduction
The Newark-Jersey C ity area is one o f sev era l im portant
in d u str ia l cen ters in which th e Bureau of Labor S t a t is t ic s conducted
occu pational wage surveys during la te 1952 and ea rly 1953. In such
su rveys, occupations common to a v a rie ty o f manufacturing and non­
m anufacturing in d u str ie s are stud ied on a community-wide b a s is . 1 /
C ross-in du stry methods o f sampling are thus u tiliz e d in com piling
earnings data fo r the fo llo w in g types of occupations: (a ) o ffic e ;
(b) p r o fe ssio n a l and te c h n ic a l; (c ) maintenance and power p lan t;
and (d) c u sto d ia l, w arehousing, and shipping. In presen tin g earn­
ings inform ation fo r such jobs (ta b les A -l through A 4 ) , separate
data are provided wherever p o ssib le fo r in d ivid u al broad industry
d iv is io n s .
Earnings inform ation fo r ch a r a c teristic occupations in
cer ta in more narrowly d efin ed in d u stries is presented in S eries B
ta b le s . Union s c a le s (S e r ie s C ta b le s) are presented fo r se le c te d
occupations in se v e r a l in d u stries or trades in which the great ma­
jo r ity o f the workers are employed under terms of c o lle c tiv e -b a r ­
gain in g agreem ents, and th e contract or minimum ra tes are b e liev ed
to be in d ic a tiv e o f p r ev a ilin g pay p r a c tic e s.
Data are c o lle c te d and summarized on s h ift operations and
d if f e r e n t ia ls , hours o f work, and supplementary b e n e fits such as
va ca tio n a llow an ces, paid h o lid a y s, and insurance and pension p la n s.

The Newark-Jersey City Area
The Newark-Jersey C ity area (E ssex, Hudson, and Union
C ounties) has about 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 population and i s the most important
cen ter o f commerce and in d u stry in New Jersey.
There was a moderate labor surplus in the area a t the tim e
o f th e Bureau’s survey, although o v e r a ll employment has r is e n gradu­
a lly in recen t y ea rs. N onagricultu ral wage and sa la ried workers
(exclu d in g co n stru ctio n and government) in November 1952 numbered
approxim ately 650,000. T h r e e -fifth s of th ese were employed in manu­
fa ctu rin g in d u s tr ie s . The a r e a ’s fa c to r ie s produce a large v a r ie ty
o f hard and s o ft goods. Most important in terms o f employment are
the metalworking in d u str ie s which had more than 1 5 0 ,0 0 0 people on
1 / See appendix fo r d iscu ssio n o f scope and method of survey.
D ifferen ces between th e scope of th is survey and the la s t previous
survey (November 1951) are in d icated in the appendix ta b le .




NEWARK-JERSEY CITY, N. J
th e ir p a y r o lls. O il r e fin e r ie s and in d u str ia l chem ical plants em­
ployed more than 50,000 workers. The food and beverage in d u stries,
marked by the recen t com pletion o f a large new brewery, employed
alm ost 30,000 workers. The garment trades provided work for nearly
^0,000 peop le.
The importance of the area as a commercial and transpor­
ta tio n center i s in d icated by th e fa c t th a t approxim ately 120,000
workers were occupied in w holesale and r e t a il trade a c t iv it ie s , and
approxim ately 35,000 workers were engaged in fin a n ce, insurance,
and r e a l e s ta te o f f ic e s . The a rea 's tran sp ortation (excluding r a i l ­
ro a d s), communication, and other p u blic u t i l i t i e s employed more than
6 0 ,0 0 0 workers.
With resp ect to p lan t (n o n o ffice) workers, labor-manage­
ment r e la tio n s o f firm s w ith in the scope o f th e Bureau's study were
la r g e ly form alized by w ritten co lle ctiv e-b a rg a in in g agreements. In
manufacturing in d u str ie s, 9 o f 10 plant workers were in e s ta b lish ­
ments which had w ritten agreements w ith labor unions. A sig n ific a n t
portion o f th is u n ion iza tio n was found in such in d u stries as auto­
m otive equipment, fa b rica ted m etal products, e le c tr ic a l equipment
and m achinery, in d u str ia l ch em icals, petroleum r e f in in g and apparel.
In nonmanufacturing, the h ig h est degree of u n ion iza tio n was found
in public u t i l i t i e s where 9 of 10 p la n t workers were employed in
firm s th a t had labor co n tra cts. This compared w ith k o f 5 in whole­
sa le trade and 1 o f 3 in r e t a il estab lish m en ts.
U nionization among o ffic e workers was most h eavily con­
centrated in u t i l i t i e s where 9 o f 10 workers were in establishm ents
w ith union con tracts covering o ffic e workers; in manufacturing the
r a tio was 1 o f
On an a ll-in d u s tr y b a s is , approxim ately a th ird
of the o ffic e workers in the area were covered by union-contract
p ro v isio n s.

Occupational Wage Structure
Wage and sa la ry le v e ls in the area had increased sin ce the
date of the Bureau's la s t survey (November 1951), r e fle c tin g in part
the in flu en ce o f across-the-board in cre a ses. Based on an a n a ly sis
of firm s in the area employing 200 or more workers, fo r which gen­
e r a l wage change data were c o lle c te d , form al wage adjustments fo r
plant workers were most freq u en tly made on a cents-per-hour b a s is ,
and ty p ic a lly ranged from 3 to 8 cen ts. Among o ffic e workers, gen­
e r a l in creases most commonly ranged from $1 to $3 a week.
Form alized wage plans for tim e-rated p lant workers were in
e ffe c t fo r establish m en ts employing 90 percent of the plant workers.
Plans providing a range of ra tes fo r in d iv id u a l occupations were

2
somewhat more common than single-rate structures, particularly in
manufacturing and utilities. In wholesale trade, however, the sin­
gle-rate system was almost twice as prevalent as rate-range plans.
Eighty percent of the area’s office workers within the scope of the
study were employed In establishments with formal salary structures,
almost all of which were on a rate-range basis. Salaries for the
remaining 20 percent were individually determined.
Virtually all Newark-Jersey City employers within the
scope of the survey had formally established minimum entrance rates
covering inexperienced persons. Half the workers were employed in
establishments having minimum entrance rates of $1 . 1 5 o t more an
hour. Among manufacturing establishments, larger plants (employing
1,000 or more workers) tended to have higher minimums than smaller
plants. Half the workers in the larger firms were employed in es­
tablishments having minimum rates of $1^20 or more, compared with
$1.10 or more in smaller plants. Minimums below $1 were rare in
large plants, but were recorded in plants employing more than a
third of the workers in smaller factories. Among public utilities,
minimum rates in establishments employing nearly half the workers
were closely grouped between $1.20 and $1.25. Forty percent of the
employees in retail trade were in establishments having minimum en­
trance rates of 75 cents an hour.
Average weekly salaries of the 22 women’s office occupa­
tions studied ranged from $^0 for office girls to $66 for secretar­
ies. In 1^ occupations, however, average salaries were concentrated
in the narrow range of $50 to $55 a week. Wide ranges of straighttime average hourly earnings for men plant workers were found among




maintenance, power plant, shipping, and warehousing occupations.
At or near the top brackets were the maintenance crafts. In this
group, average earnings ranged from $1.99 for painters to $2 .2 7 for
pipefitters. Within the top group of hourly rates, there were also
such occupations as tool-and-die makers, stationary engineers, and
maintenance machinists. Average hourly earnings for oilers, powertruck operators, plant guards, shipping clerks, and material-han­
dling laborers were clustered between $1.60 and $1.75* Below this
group in average hourly earnings were the custodial occupations,
including watchmen at $1.30 and men janitors at $1.39*
The prevailing paid vacation practice for plant workers
was 1 week after 1 year, 2 weeks after 5 years, and 3 weeks after
15 years of service. Among office workers, general practice was 2
weeks after 1 year and 3 weeks after 15 years of service.
Less than 20 percent of the plant personnel in manufac­
turing were working on extra shifts at the time of the Bureau’s sur­
vey. The great majority of the establishments, however, had provi­
sions covering the payment of extra shift work and these almost in­
variably provided for some form of pay differential over day rates;
frequently, a fixed percentage. For both second and third shifts,
10 percent was most commonly reported. A substantial number of
workers also were employed in establishments having provisions for
the addition of a cents-per-hour differential to the base rate of
employees working on late shifts. For second-shift work, these dif­
ferentials were most commonly 5 cents, although 10-cent differen­
tials were frequently reported. For third-shift work, there was a
strong concentration at 10 cents an hour.

3
A :

Cross-Industry

Table A-l:

Occupations

Office OcCMfuUiOHA

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
35.00

Weekly
Weekly Under
erig
anns
hus
or
(tnad (tnad $
Sadr) Sadr)
35.00 37.50

37.50

s
40.00 42.50

45.00

40.00

42.50 45.00

47.50

j ----- rt----- $
47.50 | 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50

$

50.00 1 52.50 55.00 157.50 60.00

Men

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
and
62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 over

1

Clerks, order .............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Wholesale trade .....................

326
1Z5"1
180
162

38.5
39.0
38.5
38.5

18.00
71.00
65.50
65.50

_
*

-

-

~

1
1
~

4
4
-

7 !
-1
7
7

Clerks, payroll ........ ..................
Manufacturing..........................

213
176

39.5
39.5

70.00
70.00

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

2
2

1
-

8
1
5
2 ---- 5 --- T" —

Office boys ...............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Finance * * ..........................

479
2l0~
199
90

38.5
39.0
37.5
37.5

a . 50
42.00
40.50
40.50

2/75
28
47
18

73
35
38
20

87
68
19
4

54
32
22
14

32
22
10

51
23
28
22

31
23
8
3

37
30
7
3

Tabu^ting-machine operators ...............
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......... ..............

305
95
210

38.0
39.0
37.5

64.50
67.50
i 63.50

“

49
2
47

27
2
25

11
3
8

548
253
295
68

37.5
38.5
36.5
37.5

50.00
; 51.00
! 49.00
j 51.50

65
18
47
14

103
47
56
9

38
3
35
1

"

_

_

_ !
- 1
“

“

6 ___ 4_
-!
6
4

28
4
24
22

31
2
29
29

43
25
18
16

13
ir

22
22

30

11
4
7
3

18
15
3
-

3
3
3

3
3
-

_
-

2
2

2
2
-

_
-

3
1
2

10
4
6

7
6
1

15
3
12

34
20

7
3
4

19
14
5

14
8
6

84
43
59 - 1527
25
12
17

43
17
26
12

26
15
11
-

9

1
1
-

4
4
-

24
4!
20 i
18!

13
13
-

W ~—

11
4
2 --- F ~
2
5
2
1
20
rr

u

9
9
7

22
1
I5- --- T ~

12
4
8
6

17
10
7
5

16
1
15
15

4
A
~

10
8
2
2

19
7

12
12

8
1

1
1

16
16

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

22
8
14

51
4
47

3
3

._
-

_
-

4

1

-

1
1
-

- 1
-

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

_
-

44
34
10
10

44
22
22
20

4
2
2
2

18
18

5
9
5 --- §“
■
17
13 —
4

_
6 i
ZH
2 !

-

Women

Billers, machine (billing machine) .........
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................

5 ____
5I
5
-i

23 ___
'
12
25
11
27
~

16 i

- 1

30

10 t

2

21

20

29

5

26

6

-!
-i

15 i
1
15
15 I

6
6

5
_I
5!
5!

18
8

10
9

10
10
9

33
3
30
10

25
22
3
3

8
2
6
2

25
13
12
12

2 i

12

106
14
92 ;
5
71 !

58
12
46
11
34

40
10
30
13
16

27
14
13
2
11

120
67
53
21
25

76
5
71

49
21
28

24
8
16

69

58
10
48
14
18

21

2

53
13
40

111
70
41

71
47
24

63
35
28

72
55
17

102
84
18

69
44
25

97
68
29

Billers, machine (bookkeepihg machine) ......

173

39.0

! 47.00

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ......
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Finance ** ..........................

241
123
118
77

38.0
38.5
37.5
36.5'

S 55.00
: 60.00
49.50
46.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ......

Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ..... ..............
Finance ** ........................

650
233
417
66
282

38.0
39.0
37.5
39.5
36.5

52.00
56.50
49.50
49.00
48.50

1
1

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) ....................
Manufacturing........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

795
508
287

38.5
39.0
37.0

54.50
55.50
52.00

- _____2 _ ___
___ £ L
2
3

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) .......................

115

38.0

51.00

- ___ 1_

- ____ 4_

Clerks, file. cI s b s A .....................
Manufacturing .......... ............. .
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Finance ** ..........................

339
126
213
124

38.5
39.0
38.0
37.5

50.50
51.50
50.00
45.00

___12_
13
-

4

Clerks, file, class B ...... ...............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing...................................................... ..

1.250
465
785
108
458

38.5
39.5
37.5
39.5
37! 5

42.00 ___ 22
44.50
1
40.50
91
41.50
37’50
.
80

Finance ** ...................................................... ...............

27
9
26 ----8“
1
1
-

-

2 ;

-

- |

1

2

-

2

2
10

10

9

19

-

10
2
2

I

37
28 —
9
6

2

6
3
_

11
18
n r " 16
1
2
8
6

1
17
--- g“
9
-

5
1
4
~

4
2

1
1

_

_

_

_

4
4
-

2
2

5
5

-

_

13
11
2

5
5

2

30
27
3

2

-

-

21

49
40
9

25
23
2

8
8
-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

3

-

-

_

-

—
-

-

-

-

-

16

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
5

-

-

_

-

.
-

-

21
21

_

21

21

23

2

12

8

7

9

2

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

32
2
30
27

80
24
56
42

50
16
34
27

12
7
5
3

16
4
12
10

19
15
4
2

33
17
16
8

20
8
12
-

18
4
14

20
2
18
1

9
9
-

2
1
1

5
1
4

-

-

-

1
1
-

4
2
2
-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

108
355
21
73
87 i 282
21
17
250
53

200
92
108
16
70

140
79
61
26

126
74
52
19
4

76
51
25
6

51
40
11

39
18
21

36
7
29

20
5
15

2
1
1

_
-

_

_

_

-

_
-

_

-

_
-

_

-

5
3
2

-

-

-

_

*

3

-

-

_
-

-

1
1

’

-

'

_______

See footnotes at end of table.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate




Occupational Vage Survey, Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4

O^iCB 0cOi€patiO4U- GattliHdted

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Weekly
Weekly Under
erig
anns
(tnad (tnad $
Sadr) Sadr)
35.00

I -----:
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
«
!
$
$
$
r
,
1
h.oo 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 i 52.50 $
55.00 $57.50 60.0 62.50 65.00 67.50 $ 70.00 72.50 75.00 $80.00 85.00 $
90.00 *95.00 *100.00
and
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 1 52.50 1 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 over
i
!

Women - Continued

Clerks, order ............................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................

399
253
146
124

38.5
38.5
38.5
38.5

$
53.50
53.00
54.00
56.50

Clerks, payroll ..........................
Manufacturing...... ...................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

1.125
864
261

38.5
39.0
37.5

55.00
55.50
52.50

Duplicating-machine operators ..............
Nonmanufacturing *.... .................

84
60

38,5.. 48.50
38.0
47.50

Key-ounch operators .......................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance ** ..........................

781
349
432
74
261

38.0
49.50
39.0
52.50
37.0 1 47.50
37.0 j 45.50
37.5 i 48.50

-

Office girls .................. ...........
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

474
U5“
328
192

38.0 1 40.00
39.0 ; 41.00
39.50
37.5
37.0 I 36.OO

3/104
30
74
67

3
3

6
1
-

12
9
3
-

28
13
15
10

11
9
2
“

40
29
11
11

15
12
3

20
15
5

71
38
33

28
10
18

12a
89
34

8

7
7
“

1
1

13
11

13
9

24
1
23
12
2

33
4
29
24
5

59
16
43
34

55 h n ?
16
33
22
97
21
91

7

_
■
____ 1 ____8_(■

-

31

-

37
33
4
“

32
25
7
7

17
15
2
2

13
7
6
6

12
1
11
11

8
4
4
4

25
13
12
12

8
_
8
8

7
3
4
4

1
1
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

_
-

117
102
15

155
121
34

85
56
29

137
109
28

44
35
9

86
78
8

31
25
6

58

48
10

40
34
6

60
55
5

13
13
-

15
11
4

16
10
6

8
3
5

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
.
-

9
6

4
2

4
2

9
4

11
10

2
1

7
3

_

_

_

_

_ |
j -----

-

-

1
1

_

-

1
1

_

-

-

-

-

86
25
61
30

103

108
36
72
13
35

74
31
43
3
38

107
60
47
5
40

30
22
8
5
3

35

44
59
8
36

93
57
36
1
33

9
1
5

15
15
-

9
8
1
1
-

3
3
_
-

1
1
_

1
_
1
1
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

57
4
53

20
20
-

60
33
27

14
1
13

9
2
7

5
4
1

5
5

_
-

_
-

- ;
-

_
_
-

_
_
_ 1 -- ~
_
-

_

_ 1
_ ;
_

_

7

32
3
29
6

18
18
10!
1
“

17
17
5
6

78
23
55
4
8
4
35

80
24
56
6
2
39

163
87
76
2
13
7
53

99
219
235
61
106
133
102 1 113
38
4 1 20
3
10 1 26
!
28
12 i
4
3
12
32
48

339
243
96
10
13
7
50

265
383
198
297
86
67
7 i 12
11
10
9
28
39

164
159
80
56
84
103
39
3
15
15
10
3!
60 | 36

250
100
150
39
22
8
80

298
123
175
49
16
39
47

451
254
197
19
72
16
63

234
157
77
23
2
2
48

371
205
166
22
67
9
60

161
121
40
11
2
18

219
119
100
28
18
36

121
84
37
24
1
_

55
37 !
18 |
18

65

U

34 !
31

14

26

Secretaries ..............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ...... ..............
Retail trade 4/ .....................
Finance ** ..........................

3.206
1,999
1,207
162
156
79
561

38.5
39.0
37.5
36.0
39.5
38.5
37.0

66.00
66.50
64.50
72.50
60.00
60.50
63.50

Stenographers, general................... .
Manufacturing..... ....... ............
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade 4/ ......................
Finance ** ..........................

2.789
1,518
1,271
276
283
96
470

38.5
39.0
37.5
36.0
38.5
38.5
37.0

53.00
54.50
51.50
52.50
51.50
47.50
49.50

6j
6
1
5
-

27 L
4
23
17
6

-

Stenographers, technical ..................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......... ............

286
170
116

39.0
39.5
39.0

60.00
61.00
58.50

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
3
“

3
2
1

7
3
4

21
7
14

26
7
19

12
2
10

36
25
11

44
36
8

45
31
14

13
3
10

Switchboard operators .....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Retail trade 4/ .....................
Finance * * ..........................

602
215
387
69
132

39.5
39.0
39.5.
39.0
37.0

51.50
56.00
49.00
45.50
49.50

_
-

13
1
12
3
6

17
3
14
2
1

68
9
59
24
7

25
25
2
9

106
15
91
16
36

40
24
16
5
3

97
33
64
9
37

38
12
26
2
14

42
31
11
4
2

55
21
34
9

43
20
23
7

Switchboard operator-receptionists .........
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .................... .

653
454
199
94

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.5

51.00
52.00
49.50
49.00

_ ___ 21.
16
15
5
~

56
40
16
5

118
79
39
21

38
13
25
21

123
77
46
16

36
20
16
-

3?
20
15
5

65
62
3
2

43
43
-

-

Tabulating-machine operators ...............
Manufacturing........ .................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

516
235
281

37.5
38.5
36.5

55.50 _
58.00
53.00

- _ 4Q_
_
30
10
10 !
_
___ L_j
1

_
-

32
3
29

44
4
40

38

30
17
13

52
20
32

72
47
25

102
66
36

56
30
26

20
3
17

-'
H

-

|
1
-

60
26
34
3
14
4
13

18
3
15

7
31

1

_____ ,

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

*
*




-

_
- --- —
- 1

i
1
1
.
|

206
120
86
13
11
5
40

271
214
57
3
6
32

194
86
108
10
8
_
68

319
234
85
32
2
2
25

138
74
64
5
8

56
40
16
1
1
-

14
8
6
6
-

24
17
7
1
1
_
“

5
3
2
_
_

-

51
37
14
2
_
3

17
16
1

21
11
10

20
14
6

_
-

17
10
7

_
-

_
_
-

7
6
1
-

14
14
-

10
8
2
-

14
9
5
2
1

6
2
4
-

4
4
-

1
1
•
-

25
25

18
13
5
4

4

18
13
5
5

2
2

_
-

_

11
11

13
13

20
6
14

2
2

4
2
2

-

115
84
31
10
12

-

4
-

-

-

63

68

_
_

_
-

10
6
4
4

_
_
_
_
_
_

4r -—

W~

22
3
2
4
4

30
10
3
-

-

41
14
27
14
1
_
12

2

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

1
_
1
_
-

1
_
1

_
_

_
_

-

-

2
2
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
-

1
1
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
-

1
1

_
_

_

_

_

38

-

2
1
1
_
-

_

1

_

5

Office

Table A-l*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1952)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Average
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
----- 1
! ----$
$
!
$
$
s
$
$
$
i
•
T
$
s
s
$
$
$
$
.
$
$
s
$
I
s
Weekly
Weekly Under 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 I50.00 : 52.50 55.00 57.50 |60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
100.00
erig
anns
(tnad (tnad $
Sadr) Sadr)
and
1
35.00 1 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 152.50 r 55.00 57.50
60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 05.00 100.001 nvfir
i

Women - Continued

i

*

Transcribing-machine operators, general .....
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

248
142
106

38.0
38.0
38.0

50.50
51.50
49.00

- ;
“ |

5
3
2

6
6
-

22
22

25
22
3 |

47
W
28

Typists, class A ..........................
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Public utilities * ...................
Finance * * .......... ...............

963
621
342
60
188

39.0 I 52.50
39.5 i 53.00
38.0 i 52.00
50.50
37.5
51.50
37.5

_
- 1

-

6
6
6

99 I

-

-

25
13
12
2
5

96
63
33
4
23

2,565
1,330
1,235
158
214
53
657

45.50
47.00
44.00
47.00
j45.50
41.50
41.50

Typists, class B ..........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ...................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade l j .....................
Finance ** ..........................

38.5
39.0
37.5
35.5
39.0
38.0
37.5

uu

55
11
22

42ft

48
267 __
1 278
187
1
89
39 ! 255 ! 158
228
47
223 1 120
98
1
33 ! 41
1 1 12
36
8
i
8
14 ! 12
2 i 17
11 !
6
5
27
67
183
133 ! 54
1 -----

j

119
95
24

_
-

5
5

46
40
6

37
22
15

8
6
2

10
8
2

21

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

87
10
59
33
15
39 r 5Z“ — 5 E ~ - IT-—
—
48
7
1
5
4
_
2
2
l
3
2
1
2
2
_
_
_
_
6
17
"
“
"
"

4
_
4
4

2
_
2
_
2
_

1
_
1
1

5

21
12
9

45
26
19

3
3
-

126
76
50
16
28

221
127
94
g
68

53

270
324
124
151 — 2 I T — w r
111
119
37
8
17
7
40
6
8
_
2
4
30
68
9

371
198
173
21
70
69

2
2
-

14
6
8
in
90
21
1
15

24 I
1$
9 j

22
I9~
3

19
12
3

3

_

4
4

_
_
-

_
_

3
2
1

3

1
1

i

i
1 _____
_

_
-

5
4
1
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
1

_

1
1
_

-

2
_
2

-

-

2

-

-

_
_

_
_

-

1

-

_
_
_
_
_
_

_

-

_
_

_

_ |
"
■
_
_
_
1

_
_

”

-

-

3/
2/
J/

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows* 1 at $27.50 to $30; 57 at $30 to $32.50; 17 at $32.50 to $35.
Workers were distributed as follows* 1 at $27.50 to $30; 82 at $30 to $32.50 ; 21 at $32.50 to $35.
L j Excludes limited-price variety stores.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
G*td ^BcAfUCcU OcCHfuUiOttd

Table A -2 :

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Newark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1952)
Y
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEK!i EARNINGS OF
S
S
$
$
$
$
s
$
$

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly Weekly Ifeder
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) $
45.00

45.00
50.00

$

50.00

$

55.00

$

85.00

90.00

80.00 85.00

90.00

and
92.00 100.00 105.00 L10.00 115.00 12QJQQ 125.00 130,00 135,00 140.00 150-JK 16Q.0Q- over

60.00 65.00

Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................................
Draftsmen, chief ...........................................................................
Manufacturing............................. ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing.......... .............
Draftsmen. Junior .........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Manufacturing........ .................

$
i 92.50
! 89.50
99.50

-

1118.50

-

39.0
39.5
38.5

231
165
66

39.0
39.0
40.0

!114.06

39.5
39.5

j 66.00
66.00

223
189

39.5
39.0

49.50
! 48.00

329
2§5“

39.5
39.5

600
--- Z 7 T

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) .......... .
Manufacturing ..........................

70.00

75*00

1
I

i

Men
1,256
(jar
376

|

“

:130.00

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

~

-

“

50
123
33 ; 116

-

]
7;

-

-

i
!

101
82

83
64

5
2

97
88

1

2 ! 21
2
3
2/32
31

139
132

-

2
2

10 ; 46
6 ! 40
4 ! 6

2
- !
2

-

$
s
$
s
$
$
95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.0C125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 150.00 160.00

65.00 $
70.00 *75.00 80.00
55.00 60.00 $

7
-

17
I 10 1

19
13

1 22

30 1
27

262
222
40

158
130
28

-

-

-

~

“

”

94
78

64
64

27
23

11
7

15
9

9
”

-

-

-

”

“

6
1

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

57
51

61
59

38
26

13
13

8
5

-

-

-

103
90
13

87
129
70 ; 80
17
49

126
99
27

94
4b
48

45
22
23

44
24
20

37
12
25

17
2
15

34
24
10

17
3
14

9
1
8

14
1
13

15
8
7

_
-

68
66
2

2

2

29

10
5
5

17
12
5

36
20
16

15
11
4

14
5
9

13
12
1

4
3
1

3
3

2/20
9
11

_
-

_
-

_

_

~
-

-

-

-

—

*
*

9

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

”

"

-

!
67.00
i 67.00

U

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
2/ Workers were distributed as follows* 14 at $160 to $170; 3 at $170 to $180; 3 at $190.
2/ Workers were distributed as follows* 2 at $35 to $40; 30 at $40 to $45.




2
0

1
1
J
_____

“

Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1952
IT.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6

Table A-3:

M

(t in t e 4 U iH C e G + td P < U U & 1 P l a n t G h C M fu U iC M d ,

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men In selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Newark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
of
W
orkers

A
verage
h rly
ou
earnings

Carpenters, maintenance ............................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................

870
795

$
2.12
2.10

Electrician s, maintenance .........................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................

l.W*7
1,281*

2.18
2.15

Engineers, stationary .................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................

831*
51*6
288

2.22
2.29
2.09

Firemen, stationary boiler .......................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................

980
661
319

Helpers, trades, maintenance ..................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................
D \ 4 nf4 14f ^as Ji
itV1

2,506
2,005
501

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ...........................
Manufacturing ...........................................................

531*
53U

2.08
2.08

-

Machinists, maintenance .............................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................

1.521*
1,1*02
122

2.09
2.08
2.23

_
-

_
-

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ....................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................
U iaI
V
a
....
i r- i
-,

1.266
230
1,036
198

1.97
1.95
1.97
2 .13

_
-

_
-

Mechanics, maintenance ...............................................
Manufacturing...................... ....................................

2.307
2,075

2.00
2.03

-

-

Millwrights ................ ..............................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................

385
385

2.05
2.05

_
-

_
-

_
-

Oilers ...............................................................................
Manufacturing...........................................................

1*68
1*25

1.65
1.68

5 / 81
50

11
+*
11
**

Painters, maintenance .................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................

578
1*57

1.99
2.01

_

P ip efitters, maintenance ..........................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................

1.190
1,121
69

2.27
2.26
2.51

Plumbers, maintenance .................................................
ng . . . .
! . . . 1. r
( , _.

91*
83

2.00
2.00

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ...........................

177
170

2.15
2.11*

1.976
1,860

2.21
2.21

Manufacturing ..........................
fool-and-die makers ........................
Manufacturing ..........................

_

_
-

_

_ ____2_
8
1
-

-

$
s
2.05 *2.10 *2 .15 2.20 *2.25 *2.30 *2.35 *2.1*0 *2.50 *2.60 *2.70 *2.80
and
2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.1*0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

i.5 o

21*
21*
_
-

1.5 5

1.6 0

1.65

$
1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

$
1.90

1.95 *2.00

1.55

$ ,
Under 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5
$
1.35
1.1*0 1.1*5 i.5 o

1.6 0

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.8 0

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

5
_
-

91
90

6
1

20
-

93
7
7 “TT

16
“

89
57

1
130
3
1 ” 157“ — r

1*
£

.8
7

19
19

75
75

1*0
1*0

36
35

61*
62

30
30

62
57

15
10

29
27

1*6
91*
35 — w

50
w

18
11*

-

5
1
*

18
18

38
32

50
50

16
11*

61*
61*

101
93

59
58

136
131*

70
1*7

61
60

76
71

192
185

121*
121*

79
36

30
27

3*+
1
*
30

19
19
-

22
6
16

19
+
37
12

13
7
6

21
15
6

20
9
11

29
28
1

6
2
1
*

15
27
7 “ IT
8
12

99
79
20

35
33
2

37
51
27 ~ W
2
10

19
ll*
5

161*
57
107

19
IF
3

l
1

8
29
29 ----- T
-

12
12
-

-

1*3
1*3
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

39
28"

93
KT

_ ____ 1
3
-

25

-

1.72
1.73
1.70

3/ 1 I16 ___lk ___ lfi. ___ 50.
118
8
9
19
28
10
5
31

102
60
1*2

102
75
27

71
57
lit

29
23
6

21
20
1

95
33
58

32
32
-

2+
1
21*
“

22
15
7

30
26
1
*

70
1
*
66

33
31
2

33
15
18

..
-

-

1.72
1.77
1.1*9
1 l»
Q
-Lsuy

y u ie ___ 20
21
203
215
9
2

102
81
21
21

87
63
21*
2l*

107
67
1*0
J7

92
89
3

93
86
7
g

117
82
35
35

81*
2
82
69

156
156
-

1
1

37
33
1
*

105
105
-

736
729
7

3
3

_
-

11*
11*

15
15
-

_
-

____ z. ____ 1_
2
1

5
5

1
1

2
2

1
1

60
60

56
56

7
7

28
28

31*
3l*

9§
96

35
35

5°
5o

92
92

30
30

1
1

5
13
13 ----- F

-

6
6

-

7
7

_
-

83
83
-

18
18
-

10
10
“

3-53
153
-

39
37
2

191*
191*
-

91
66
25

29
27
2

57
38
19

11*8
li*5
3

78
71*
1*

U7
117
-

133
132
1

127
89
38

2
2
“

35
33
2

73
6U
9

7
7
-

72
69
3

15
1
11*

13
+
u3
-

1*6
21*
22

1
1
-

39
1
38

2+
1

1

36
30
6

86
1*7
39
15

31+
9
22
327
55

100 209
6 13
92 196
5
2

1*2
7
35

17
2
15

71
6
65
1
*

11
**
n
33

17
3
H
*

11
5
6
5

33
33
32

26
26
-

89
20
69
65

_
1
*
- ------T
-

12
12

_
-

61
11*

20
11*

137
95

55
55

122
U5

87
71

116
116

259
258

93
93

118
118

80
73

178
176

195
191

182
179

11*9
il*fl

1*5
26

23
21

101
99

_
-

_
-

_
-

12
12

1
1

3
3

1
1

10
10

3+
1
31*

27
27

53
53

23
23

71
71

18
18

65
W

31*
3l+

26
26

_
-

7
7

_
-

20
20

17
17

1*2
1*2

21
21

11
*+

29
23

26
26

33
33

13
13

12
12

10
10

3
3

_
-

6
-

1
*
1
*

10
10

_
-

1
*
1
*

_
-

32
32

_

_

-

2

2

11
10

15
15

39
39

39
39

28
27

18
12

57
1*5

37
13

26
21

19
15

13
13

62
61

11
n

58
57

2
-

51
u8

_
-

_
-

_
-

n
11

19

-

57
18

15
15
•
_
-

16
16
-

_
.
-

_
.
-

1
_
1

3
2
1

78
78
-

1*1
H*
-

18
16
2

29
29
-

1*0
l*o
-

39
38
1

11+
11*
-

35
35
-

1*9
i*8
1

216
213
3

92
92
-

15
+
26
19

3
2
1

29
27
2

211
206
5

8
8
-

_

_

_

6

_

_

20
20

5
5

1
*

7
7

1
1

32
32

_

_

1

_

_

_

2
2

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

6
6

9
9

-

1
*
1
*

21
21

5
f

10
9

5
5

5
T

10
10

30
27

29
29

1
*
1
*

_

9
9

6
6

12
12

63
62

70 109
70 108

11*3
137

177
170

187

196
163
33
5

113
no
3
2

-

-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

9 ____ 1
9

___ 56. ___ 16.
3
3

_

25

_

21
*
15

31*2
115
105
U2 ~ 9E ~ “ W

-

12 2/105
n
103
1
2

56
11*1
7
5
5
l 3 F ------T ~ ~ W — r — r
_
_
-

-

3

2
2

_
_
-

_

u+

88
71
17

11*8
lfc"
2

2
7
£ ------5"

26
56

11*
nr

_
-

-

-

1
20
1
1 — 5o~— r

11*0 21*8 157
11*0 ~ " W ” 15T

_
-

lh
_

5
------

3
-

1*6
18
3
1 1 ------T — n r

1/ Excludes premium pay far overtime and night work.
Workers were distributed as follows: 50 at $2.80 to $2.90} 38 at $2.90 to $3} 17 at $3 to $3.20.
Workers were distributed as follows: 3 at $0.95 to $1} 15 at $1.05 to $1.10; 1 at $1.10 to $1.15} 27 at $1.15 to $1.20; h at $1.20 to $1.25; 16 at $1.25 to $1.30; 80 at$1.30 to$1.35.
y
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $0.95 to $1; 2 at $1.05 to $1.10; 52 at $1.10 to $1.15; 98 at $1.15 to $1.20; 51 at $1.20 to $1.25; 33 at $1.25 to $1.30; 181 at $1.30 to $1.35.
y
Workers were distributed as follows: 12 at $0.90 to $.95; 6 at $1.05 to $1.10; 7 at $1.15 to $1.20; 8 at $1.20 to $1.25; 19 at $1.25 to $1.30; 29 at $1.30 to $1.35.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

y
y




7

G u l t o d U U , 7 t/c iA e A (U 4 A A 4 U f,a H < l S U ip fU t U f Q cC M fl& U a M d

Table U :

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
Under 0.90

$

$

$
0.95

$

$

$

$

1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15

$

$

1.30 1.35

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30

$

$

1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55

%

and

0.90
.95

1.00 1.05

1.10 1.15

1.20 1.25

1.30 1.35 1.40 1 »_45_ 1*50- l«35- 1.60

1.70

1.80 ■ f L 1.9Q- 1.95
laf i -

1.75

2.00 ^ 1Q_ 2 .2Q 2.3Q over.

%

Crane operators, electric bridge
391
357

1.70
1.69

70
70

1.71
1.71

1.439
1,209

.
-

7A

1.61
1.62
1.53
1#31

Janitors, sorters, and cleaners (men) ......
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ....... ..............
Retail trade 2 / .....................
I4nonnA
T

5.096
3,475
1,621
501
97
252
382

1.39
1.44
1.31
1.48
1.30
1.25
1.24

218
51
167
17
9

16

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (vomen) .....
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
d .w i ■
,
«
i
t
Retail trade 3/ .....................

1.235
463
772
107
75
491

1.10

0-57
7
150

46

46

11

404
53
351
34

i!oi

6
11

18
28
4
.

16

1.01
1.10

12

1.00

84

3
15

280

38
3
4
28

Laborers, material handling 5/ .............
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
D ,kl 1. nil 1Ilia. I
,
t
Wholesale trade ......... ............
Retail trade 2/ .....................

7.494
5,418
2,076
702
861
411

1.60
1.57
1.67
1.75
l !62
1.72

£2_
23

27

160
154

17

46
33
13

142
134

6

8

6

_
-

12

4
9

4
4

2

Order fillers .............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.................... .
Wholesale t r ade.....................
Retail trade 2/ .....................

2.094
908
1,186
347
462

1.63
1.63
1.64
1.50
1.82

3
3
"

24
24
24

2

3
3
3
“

23

Packers, class A (men) .............. ......
Manufacturing ...... ...................

810
764

1.64
1.67

_

_

Packers, class A (vomen) ...................
Manufacturing ..........................

140
128

1.48
1.51

"

Packers. class B (men) .................. .
Manufacturing ..........................

1.400

1.48
1.49

12
12

Manufacturing ..........................

$

$

1.20 1.25

-

-

10
10

56
56

11
11

35
35

36
36

65
65

16
16

103
73

14
14

-

6
6

24
24

—
-

1
1

1
1

2
2

11
11

-

6
6

“

4

-

3
3

35

104
83

40
40
-

77
77
-

27
27
-

27
23
4

2
1
1

32
32
_

1

21

228
187
41
g

104
82

14

122
112
10

2

21

2

1

290
241
49
-

220

360
198
162

67
49
18

8
8

68

L

Q0
28

L2
i

6

6
8

8

-

-

-

12

8

4
_
_
4

62

162

33 121
30 120
1
3
1
3
_
-

_
5
_

i
_
_

3
3
-

3
3
-

1
2

12
10

2

7
7

-

Crane operators, electric bridge
Manufacturing ......................... .

Guards ...................................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing.......... .............

230

1,132

1.25

-

10

_
-

_
-

22
8
14

49

26

120

26

14

23
-

12

93
27
4
9
4
.

9

2

9

10

"

30

2
-

~

16

104
33
71

1
10
7

26
44

6

_

110
130
17
14
33
41

63
30
33
3
14

103
30
73

10

97
91

121
12

4
53

8

23
3
2

29
15
14
7

~

1

_

_

38
37

64
38
92

282
246
36

3
3
2

1
1

200

100

13
13
3
"

3

469
269

64

~

_

113
106
7

176
160

16

90
72
18

1

15

1

A81
433
48
14
24
7

u

91
72
19
3
15

_

_

30

10

1

“

28

127
27

50
47
3

117
108
9
3

244
157
87
14

308

579

240
68
2

462

25

20
5

117
75
3

54

53
13

18
18
-

67
67
-

68
1

314

249
236
13

443
367
76
52

1
12

10

359

302
57
34
19

37
37
-

6

256
220

355
214
141
87
23
14

5

11
8

1

3

165
55
45

_
_

59
9

1
_

u

22

a

_
_
_
_

L

4

_
_
_

65

133

389

262

4

-

_

207
84
123
34
5
19
52

8
3
5
5

4
5

“

_

-

1

240

37
37
37

96
4

_

_
-

6

_

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
-

32
32

“

21
43
35

308
6

5
5

1

_

3

8

30

109
96
13

16
1

24

21

12

69

6
*
*

15
14
_

36
3
23

8

-

-

-

-

-

528 1,174 135
400 439 135

121
99

259
57

-

22

202

43
43
-

20
2

110
92

_

-

218
217

234
223

2
2

56
56

1

11

_

_

1

11

_

-

-

23
5
18
_

8

28
28
_
_
-

12
12

869

656

566

457
199
3
189
4

421
145

16

735
coo

2

112

142

“

317
114
203
179

138

195

65

18
2
2

1

11

8

337
141
196
2
183

20

1

70
46
24
22
2

194
_
194

54
-54

84

84

95
95

31
31

42
42

4
4

8
8

-

“

3
3

3
3

253
253
-

36
32
4
-

168

~

1

1

358
76
282
5

128

143

130
8
-

40
“ --- T

27
27

79
76

12
9

33
27

147
145

2
2

21
21

36
36

98
98

2
2

_

4
4

11

16
16

13
13

8
8

19
19

2

3

2

3

13
13

42
42

2

2

2

1
1

“

113

44
43

42
42

32
32

14
13

228
52

28

138

22

138

141
132

199
134

33
33

67
67

131
127

38
38

11
11

111

-

6l6

53
53
-

104
64
55

3

Occupational Wage Survey, Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2
2

-

24
24
_
-

4
4
_
_
-

3
3
_
_
-

3
3

2
2

34.
34

-

6
6

-

-

-

12
12

7

7

27
27

8

Table A-4i

& u d /o d u U ,J(/€ r te /u H € d u tf,€ i* u £ S U ip fU + u j O c o u fu U io H d .’ C o n tin u e d
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Newark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

o
f
Workers

$
Average
hul
o r y Under 0.90
erig $
anns
0.90
.95

$
1.00

$
1.05

$
1.10

$
1.15

$
1.20

$
1.25

1.00 1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30 1.35

$
0.95

1.833
1,222
611

$
1.26
1.33
1.11

Receiving clerks .........................
Manufacturing.........................

669
503

1.63
1.63

ShiDDing clerks ..........................
Manufacturing................. ........

423315

1.75
1.68

Shirming-and-receiving clerks ..............
Manufacturing...... ...................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

270
120
150

1.68
1.67
1.68

-

Truck drivers, light (under 1J tons) .......
-Manufacturing .........................

213
128

1.58
1.80

10

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and Including
4 tons) ................................
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......... ............
Wholesale trade ............... ......

2.158__
1,217
941
471

1.88
1.96
1.77
1.71

_
_

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) ..........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Publ 1c nti 1ities • __T...............

1.495
287
1.208
653

2.20
2.11
2.22
2.16

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other
than trailer tvne) ......................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ...................... .

628
149
479

1.98
1.90
2.00

Truckers. power (fork-lift) ......... .
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

1.203
918
285

1.72
1.69
1.83

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .....
Manufacturing...... ...................

405
350

1.67
1.65

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

3
3

Watchmen.................................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
PI rwincA ** ,.

1.356
953
403
123

1.30
1.33
1.22
1.21

• 95
47
48
6

63
37
26

Ill
96
15

64
55
9

35
15
20
1

114
39
75
68

43
25
18

114
94
20

44
33
11

$
1.30

Packers, class 6 (women) ..................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

62
_
62

102
10
92

81
25
56

203
64
139

38
12
26

148
134
14

52
43
9

208
3
205

36
5

-

1
1

-

23
15

“

19
19

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

$
1.35

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
and
1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 over

16

“

-

20

..10-

_
_

-

lf .
l
10
10

-

_

_

~

22
22

530
530

179
179

38
38

43
43

48
48

2
2

9
9

4
4

1
1

2
2

2
2

_

1
1

3
3

7
7

_

1
1
“

19
12

37
29

34
34

35
33

30
30

38
37

37
36

56
56

168
78

20
18

24
17

34
29

16
13

15
13

28
17

8
5

3
3

8
8

1

28
25
3

12
12

39
34

26
25

1
1

22
21

9
8

42
42

73
49

20
20

29
29

13
5

25
25

22
19

40
4

4
4

3
3

1
1

a
13

22
22

11
1
10

24
12
12

5
5
“

2
2

16
15
1

24

”

28
20
8

24

18
8
10

23
20
3

31
26
5

48
8
40

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
-

4

-

12
1
11

34
6

26
24

?
2

21
21

19
15

9
3

n
10

-

3
3

-

5
5

39
38

65
34
31
1

7
7

51
37
14
1

89
16
73
71

164
26
138
65

38
29
9
1

294
16
278
269

78
50
28
20

9
9
-

212
36
176

122
82
40

a

13
28
28

-

689
" W
28

_
_

119
82
37

-

8
8

16
16

20
10
10
10

4
4
-

n
li
-

14
14
-

18
13
5

70
48
22

281
25
256
?yt>
r

26
26
-

710
23
687
403

6/309
81
228

6
6
—

66
31
35

126
61
65

85
8
77

8
8

20
5
15

88
4
84

68
10
58

46
17
29

7/ 90
2
88

104
35
69

132
121
n

104
78
26

70

88
36

_

53
13
40

73
73
-

_
-

-

1
1

1
1

.
-

_

2
~

*_
-

1
1

2
2
_

_
-

53
44
9

-

2
2
-

50
39
11

_
-

_

_

_




-

-

-

-

8
8

“

4

~

5
5
“

•
~

_ 2

_

2

4

6

~

2

4

6

*
*

2
2

_

-

6
6

40
40

39
39
~

*
36
“

58
56
2

72
72
~

98
98
”

80
55
25

no
104
6

7
7

26
26

20
20

14
10

14
14

43
43

27
27

76
64

38
38

8
8

80
48

20
13

26
26

1
1

87
59
28

98
64
34
14

88
72
16
15

107
76
31

35
35
-

43
35
8

48
36
12

20
l6
4

2
2
-

26
23
3

33
33
-

5

22
19
3

5

16
15
1

“

-

~

~

“

_

_

_

-

-

_

3

3

6

1/ Excludes nremium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
i j Workers were distributed as follows* 34 at $0.65 to $.70j 15 at $0.75 to $.80; 43 at $0.80 to $.85; 65 at $0.85 to $.90.
j Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous studies.
\J
/ Workers were distributed as follows* 89 at $2.30 to $2.40; 148 at $2.40 to $2.50; 72 at $2.50 to $2.60.
2/ Workers were distributed as follows: 48 at $2.30 to $2.40; 42 at $2.40 to $2.50.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communiontion, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

6

4
1

_

2

_
-

-

4
1

4

12
4

70

24
24
-

4

-

5

4
4

“

_
_

9

B:

C h a ra cte ristic

Table B-2333:

W

In d u stry

o m e n /A

O ccu p a tio n s

< z n £ A fo & A e l' S b t e d d & l

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

O ccupation and sex

Number
of
Workers

A ll p la n t o ccu p a tio n s: T o ta l .......................................
M en ....................................
W omen...............................

3 ,3 4 8
276
3 ,0 72

$
$
Average $ .7 5 $ .8 0 $ .8 5 $ .9 0 $ .9 5 1 .0 0 $ .1 0 1 .2 0 $ .3 0 $ .4 0 $ .5 0 $ .6.0 $ .7 0 $ .8 0 1 .9 0 $ .0 0 $ .1 0 $ .2 0 $ .3 0 s2 .4 0 $ .6 0 $ .8 0 $ .0 0 $3 .2 0 $3 .4 0 $3 .6 0 $3 .8 0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
2
2
3
2
2
0
2
0
2
0
hourly 0
earnings and
mid
under
2/
.8 0 .85 .9 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .1 0 1 .2 0 1 .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 over

$

251
8
243

191
1
190

257
2
255

296
4
292

96
3
93

55
4
51

85
1
84

71
4
67

87

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

87

7

8
3

2

-

-

213

185
2
183

127
9
118

155
10
145

134

-

-

-

213
-

134
-

91
1
90

90
12
78

201
38
163

121
11
110

106
40
66

1

-

15

1

-

-

142
6
136

128
17
111

105
13
92

2

1 .7 1
2 .6 8
1 .6 3

2
-

75
34

39
19
20

19
6
13

4
4
-

24
20
4

7

10

-

-

-

-

42

39
31
8

-

4
4

20
20

9

-

-

a

S e le c te d P la n t O ccupations
C u tters and markers (men) 3 a / .......................................
I n sp e c to r s, f in a l (exam in ers)
(women) 3 a / ................................................................................
P resserB , hand (men and women) 3 b / ..........................
M e n 2 b / ......................................
Wo m e n 2 k / ....................................
Sewers, hand (women) ...........................
Tim a
Incentive .........................................................................................
Sewing-machine operators, section
system (women) 3b / ...................................................................
Sewing-machine operators, single hand
(tailor) system
m a n and
women) 3b/ .........................................................................................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (women) 3a/ .................
Wo r k distributors (women) 3 a / ..........................................

(1

1 ,2 8 4

38

2 .6 9

29
327
193
134
307
102
205

1 .2 4
2 .5 9
2 .9 5
2 .0 7
1 .2 4
1 .0 4
1 .3 4

697

1 .8 1

1 ,2 85
248
14

1 .8 2
.93
1 .0 8

10

9

7

20
17
3

16
16

17

7

-

42
22
20

3

3

5

4

3
-

3
-

9

2

-

-

3

-

3

9

2

2

39
10
29

4

5

18

9
-

9

-

-

17

3
5
-

18
1
17

8

28
15
13

16
12
4

18
12
6

25
23
2

22
10
12

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

33

19
19

58
8
50

24

16

57
22
35

24

2

4

5

18

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

3

10

2

10

9

7

3

11

16

31

36

37

62

65

41

32

32

34

26

26

28

50

24

45

34

22

6

9

7

-

4

4
59

11

3

8
36

14
19

20
16

45
75

63
15

66

142

90

87

57

78

64

47

105

70

34

48

116

58

35

20

11

-

-

-

17

“

2

~

3

9

~

1/ The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops employing 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of women's and misses' dresses (Group 2333) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing housedresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses' and maids' uniforms (Group 2334) were excluded from the study. Data relate to an
August 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-2851:

PcUntl cu A VaAtttili&i 1/
n
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and sex

N u m b er
of
W orkers

M en
Labelers and packers ...........................
Maintenance men, general utility .............
Mixers ...........................................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ............
Technicians .....................................
Tinters ..........................................
Varnish makers ..................................

A v erage
hou rly
earnings

o
2 //

105
100

*
1 .6 3
1 .8 3
1 .6 5
1 .4 5
1 .7 3
1 .8 4
1 .7 3

33

1 .5 4

177
72
313
235
m

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ ,
$ ,
1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0
and
under

1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0
9

-

-

_
-

_

7
5
_

7
_

-

-

-

18

_
-

14

_
-

7

6

-

-

-

33

7

5

5

1

1

_

_

-

7

-

6

7

_

-

“

33
_

26
13
20
1
18

-

5
-

14
9

4

-

23
7

5

6
8
14
14
1
9
4

10

23

-

-

39
38
8
6
15

34
40
2

4

32
2
53
6
31
1
2

6
8
14

7
1
1
1
8
14
9

1
12

1

1
6

-

-

18

-

16

4
14
53
2
n
n

8

23

1

-

5
12

25
5
3
3

12
18
14

3
7

17
4

3
-

2
10
1

-

-

2

-

8

2

3
_

-

-

-

Women
Ta ViaI ot * mv3 pa^lrara
m

1

8

4,

l/ The study covered establishments employing 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of paints, varnishes, lacquers, japans, enamels, and shellac (Group 2851) as defined in the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all or a majority of workers in each occupation reported were paid on a time basis.




Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10

Table B-35:

M c u J u H & U f, J n c t fi t il s U e l

if

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns
2/

$
Under 1.10
*
1.10

$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
1.40 1.A5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.30 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
and
1.A0 1.A5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

$
$
$
1.15 1.20 1.25

$
$
1.30 1.35

1.20

1,25

1.30

1.35

-

6
6

-

11
11
149
149
-

2
2
20
12
8
9
9
-

3
2
1
6
6

-

1

Machinery 3/
Men
%

Assemblers, class A:

Total ...............
Time ..............
Incentive .........
Assemblers, class Bs Total ...............
Time ..............
Incentive .........
Assemblers, class Cs Total ...............
Time ..............
Incentive .........
Electricians, maintenance 4a/ ..............
Inspectors, class As Total ...............

1,044
519
525
1,035
766
269
686
483
203
135
A20

2.05
1.83
2.27
1.7A
1.66
1.98
1.61
1.53
1.81
2.07
1.99

Incentive .........
Inspector^, class B Aa/ ...................
Inspectors, class C: Total ...................................
Time ...............................

71
395

2.19
1.30
1.73
1.67
2.07
1.A2
1.52

Tnpon+.'i vp

Janitors, porters, and cleaners 4a/ ..................
Laborers, material handling 4a/ ...........................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A £/s Total .................................................
T i m e .............................................
Incentive ................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class As Total ......................
TM mo
Incentive ................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A Ab/ .......................................
Engine-lathe operators,
class As Total .................................................
Time .............................................
Incentive ...............
Grinding-machine operators,
class As Total .................................................
T i m e .............................................
Milling-machine operators,
class As Total ......................
T i m e ....................
Incentive ................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class As Total ......................
T i m e ....................
Incentive ...............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B £/x Total......................
T i m e ....................
Incentive ................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class B A b / ..........................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class Bs Total ..............
T i m e ........... .
Incentive .......
Engine-lathe operators,
class Bs Total ......................
Time ....................
Incentive ...............
See footnotes at end of table,




28
5
21
2
37
523

-

2
2
-

19
19
-

2
2
-

2
14
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

-

14

12
6
12
2 9 2.0A ,2 2
1,A36
1.95
86 2 0 5
.2
17A
9A
80

1.93
1.81
2.08

-

2
2
1
2 2
A
16 25

-

2
4
4
69

2
2

16

3
3
-

38
37
1
47
46
1

15
15
-

21
20
1
50
49
1
44
9
35

-

-

-

-

_

_

9
14
14

14

7
7

52

29
18

40
42

A

7

-

1 _
10 2 2 2 2 2 2
10 6
0
35
13
_
-

6
6

38

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

->

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

17

2
2
1
1

-

-

-

6
1
2
2

2
2

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

22
.0
1.97
2 10

_

250
167
83

2.08
1.96
2.32

_

381
179

2.08
1.98
2.17

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

20
.0

1.84
1.70

-

-

-

1
1

3
3

19A

1.90

-

-

-

-

-

-

337
195
1A2

1.79

-

-

-

1
1

3
_
3

1
1

2
2

-

_

-

7
7

-

2,309
1,252
1,057

2AO
179

6
1

1.61

2.04

1.68
1.67
1.73

_
“

"

”

1
1
2
0
11
9

37
35

-

204
125
7Q

22
0

18
14
4

1

72
179

-

30
6
8
8

-

19

45
28
27

2
2

A

_

-

1.79
1.99
1.92
2.24

_

6
6
116

1
1

77

_

k

2
1
6 2
5 2
0
1 1
2 6
1 2
2
1 -

-

448

-

12
11
1
73
62
11
30
17
13
/

_

A2

25
24
1
77
77

-

-

-

-

-

_

32
18
14

46
27
19

-

-

2
2
10
2
75
27

1

-

-

-

-

-

51
35

134
108

5
4

16 2
6
8

2
2

3
3

_

4
4
-

1
1

1
1

77
50
27

130

116
14

42
39
3
277
274
3
60
48
12
5
6

5
8

31
30
1
20
16
4
71
60
11
4
51

-

50
49

15

19
17

9

_

6

5
1
67
11
8 9
8
37
78
8
37
10 1
2
0
6 25 16
1
110
57
77
73
54
89
2
1
3
4
2 4 5
3
2 1 5
2
6 7 6
JJL

5
5

A4
44

-

-

4
4

1
1

10
10
-

1
1
-

10 11
9
9
1 2
12 16
6 1
107
19

127
34

2
1
3
9
6 14 5 11
10
11 1 11
4
2 1 5 2 2 3 4 2 0 6
2 12 1 37 2 2 2 54
0
1 - 30 2 19 23 52
2
2
11 1 7 2 1 3
-

15
13

22
20
2
118
112
6
88
80
8

42

4
1
1
1
-

237
156
a

59
41
18
30
22
8
87
24
63
2
32
30

5
4
3
0
2
4
9
9

2

137
30
29

18
34
•/
a
JH-

12
5
3

11
27
80
78

18
15
70
65
5
32
3

2

30
3

-

-

231
190
41

177
152
25

304
218

19

42
37
5

14

32
28
4

79
74
5

65
53

37
25

53
47
6

53
52

2
1
2
1

6

13

2
42
a

1

12
2 12
2
3
24
24
-

9

3

24
19
5

24
19
5

128
91
37

195
139
56

13

2
1
6

30

2
6
4

8
6

421

28
4
173

2
6 2
15
8 7
2 16 4

27

24
18

3

12
1

56

2
2
34

12

-

55
28
27

22 2 2
2 0

269
204 . 90
132
65

6
41
32
9

1
1

10
10
-

-

8

a
81
5
5
3

8
28
73

6
17
52

4
9
8

-

10

3

-

18
4

31

8

3

1
2
2

a

90
58
32

2
6
6
2

3

2
1
3 1
1
5
330
116 62
199
2
16 8 36 16
6
8 46
0
114
113
8 6
2 14
8 6
2 14
6 2 14 9
1
73
6 - 7
59
2
14
15
14
32
2
2 6 _
10 14 6 2
2 8
2 6
0
13
44
2
6 8 5
8 18 12 6
49
9
40

165

a

163

79

15

2

2

9
3

2
1
2
1
70
70

_

-

19
19
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

1

-

_
-

_
-

1
1

-

-

28

36

28

36

4

2
1
_
2
1
2
2

-

-

-

-

8
8
6

-

2
2

6
6

_

-

-

_

_

5
_
5

7
_
7

8
_
8

52
3
49
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

6
5
_
5

6 12
_
6 12
46
2
6
46
2
6
1 1

7
_
7

2
_
2
8
8

3
3

4
_
4
7
7

-

-

-

23

10
10

13
-13

3
_
3

_
_

_
_

4
_
4

4

4

6

-

-

-

_

_

4

4

6

36

43

2
0

13

3
17

13

11
11

6
3
3

6
2
4

29
29
_
_

80
_
80
18
_
18
4

50
152

-

59
59
4
4
_

52
9
43
22
_
22
6

2
3 2
16
4

2

12

2
2
*
*

58
14
44
41
_

-

19
7

33
24
9

70
33
37
113
48
65
18

1

3
3
-

6

126
112
14
36
2
34
11

3
23

-

5

”

Occupational Wage Survey, Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1
1

Table B-351

McuJuM&uf OnduAbUel y -Q aH lU taecl
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Number
o
f
Worke e
r

Occupation and sex

2

1
1.10

1.10

$
1.15

$
1.20

1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

$ ,
1.60

1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
$
1.80 1.85

1.2
0

%
Average
hul
o r y Under
erig
anns
/
1.15

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

9

-

1.90

$
$
1.90

20$
.0 2.10 $.2
20

2 0 2.10 2 0
.0
.2

2.30

$
$
$
s
$
$
2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
and
2.40

20 20
.5 .6

2.70

2.80

over

Machinery t/ - Continued
Men - Continued

a

Grinding-machine operators, class B 4a/ ...
Milling-machine operators,
class Bt Total .................. ....
T i m e .............................................
Incentive ...................................
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class B 4 b / ..........................................................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class Bt Total ..................................................
Incentive ...................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 5/s Total ..................................................
T i m e ....................
Incentive ................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class C 4 b / ..........................
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class C 4a/ .........
Turret-lathe operators, band (including
hand screw machine),
olase Ct To t a l ......................
Tip*
Incentive .......... .....
Machine-tool operators, toolroom 4 a / ...... ..
Machinists, production 4a/ .....................................
Tool-end-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) 4a/ .................................................
Tool-end-die makers (other than tool-end-die

Jk n t . m l e m A#
m

o1
Time .........................
va

Welders, hand, class B 4a/ .....................................

2

342

1.91

-

-

-

-

-

7

333
213

-

-

-

-

6

12
0

1.80
1.74
1.91

9
9

192

2.11

336

1.81

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

HI

l!90

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

1.81
1.49
1.97

4
4
-

5
5
-

13
13
-

18
18

65
60
5

53
46
7

38
31
7

-

18

1,626
547
1,079

5

1

-

7

6
1

15
4
4

-

3
14
7
7

-

-

2

1.66

-

-

-

-

205

1.53

-

-

13

9

19

128
51
77
318
324

1.63
1.53
1.69
2.08
1.96

1
1

-

-

_

_

1
1

10
10

448

1
1
61
51

3

3

37
29

10 8
1
3

2.22

58

9

2 2 2
6
2
18
1 19
8 1 3

11
9
4
5

-

6
3
3

-

-

9

19
15
4

27

24
16

113
65
48

8

1
98
81
17

2

8

-

-

-

844
670

1.54
1.53

4

4
-

79
4

16
13
3

6

-

4

17

16
6
10

64
49
15

23

43
32

14

11

72
7
65

15
15

51
51

2
1
0
2 2
1 1
5 1 134
6
2 -

11
11

4

2

_

3
3

-

_
-

_
_

_
-

2

4

-

_

_

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

9

-

_

-

9

3
3

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

2

-

-

3

-

-

-

1

9

2

1

-

12

1

-

_

_

_

12

1

_

_

_

108
33

65
62

4

-

46

7

3

15
9

5

7

2

5

8

4

55

33

17

Q

12

2

5
-

4

5

2

5

2
20
11

1
25

23

5
5

2
0
_
2
0

134

42
_
42

4

7

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

_

•

_
-

_

_
-

_
_
-

-

7

-

559

_

2

5
18

7

28

18

7
13
45

46

63
54

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

18

134

53

44

58

93

41

2
2

7
/
*
2
2

2
c

K
0

oq
/

18

24

44

139

i an
104
1 ft
J.O

25
;o

13

O
d.Q
y

"
12

5

4

1

5

3

66
T
V
X1
12

36

86

O
Q
*7

1
0
X
X

0

-

72

2

X.J

6

2
-

_
-

_

-

2

-

-

-

14
7

3

-

-

5

1

o y
,*?

4

9

2
2

11
30

16

-

9

92
65
27

3

4

/
12

54
5
49

11 11 2
0
6 12 4
24
_
18
6 6 12 4
8
8 8 6
53

29

43
32

2
1

13

6

34

24

-

1

12 2 10
6 0
12 8
6
19
11 81
14
1 5
5

31
28
3

-

1*.95

-

5

2

30

Kin 1 2.21
/H/
otin
2.22
X/ f
1.80

5

7

19

4

29

-

119
138
286

2
2

11

30

on
4r
20
7
8

7

24
3

23
4

5

73

37

19

80
11
22

45
11
4

28
19
9

80
25
21

8

120

-

-

-

2

-

5

2

52

35
3

44
5

13

13
7

195
32

25
502

171
55

41

10

4
3

52
4

35
-

41

10

5

2

84

4

13

4

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

19
19

-

16
16

P7
55

/

K

J
4
£

18
9

10
i

3
3

5

6

18

6

n
XX

Women
Assemblers, class C 4b/ ...................
Inspectors, class C 4a/ ...................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 4 b / ......... ...................

-

327

1.69

6

407
127
77

2.01
1.97
1.98

-

305

1.76

-

448

8
5

2.22

-

9

3

9

13

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

9

1
8

3

-

Machine-tool Accessories
Men
Machine-tool operators, production,
class At Total 4a/. £ / ..................
Engine-lathe operators* class A 4 a / .....
Grinding-machine operators, class A 4a/ . . .
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 4 a / ................................. ..............................
Tool-end-die makers (tool-end-die
jobbing shops) 4a/ ..................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

34

-

44

-

8

45

69
35
7

33

-

14

36

-

34

-

2

2

134

53

44

58

_

_

41

-

7

-

3/ The study covered establishments employing more than 20 vorkers in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) ns defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the
Bureau o f the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) employing more than 7 vorkers vere also included. Data relate to a December 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y

2/

In c lu d e s d a t a f o r m a c h in e -to o l a c c e s s o r y e sta b lish m e n ts (Group 3543) fo r which se p a r a te d a ta are p r e se n te d .
I n s u f f i c i e n t d a ta t o w a rran t p r e s e n t a tio n o f sep a rate a vera g es b y method o f wage payment.

y

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r o p e r a to r s o f machine t o o l s in a d d itio n t o th ose shown s e p a r a t e ly .

(a) All or predominantly time vorkers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




_
-

_

93

-

18

-

-

-

-

12

Table B-7211*

P oM & l JlcU 44i<lft4£A

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

%

0.70

%
0.75

0.80

%
0.85

*
0.90

%
0.95

%

1.00

*
1.10

X

1.05

1.15

*
1.20

*
1.25

S
1.30

1.35

1.4Q

"1
1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60
and

1,10

1-15

1.20

1.25

1.30 . 1.35
.
.

1.40

1.45

1,50

1.55

1.60

over

19
-

-

13
9

8
15

1
6

-

-

-

-

15

8

19

4

4

1
5
9
6

_

3
19

1
24

_

1

2

-

$

~1

$

X

and
under

.80

.75

____ S

i. ____ l2Q_ -

.95 . 1.00 - 1.05

Men

X
Extractor operators y
....................
Firemen, stationary boiler y
...................
Identifiers y
...........................
Washers, machine
. .............................

y

131
55
28
89

1.01
1.28
1.00
1.20

-

-

4

-

2
5

12

14
4

-

1

"

33
1
8

28
2
4
6

1
64
1
63
7

5
30
30
4

9
2

19
4

24
2

2
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

4
20
4
16
90
65
25
4
4

2
11
11
62
8
54
-

4
5
5
28

2
5
5
6

3
3
3
5

4

-

-

24
3
3

6
3
3

5
3
3

-

-

-

-

3

9

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

1

4

10

“

-

_

_

2

_

_

_

_

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

_
_
-

1
2

_

_
_
-

1

_
_
-

2

_
-

_
_
_

_

‘
W o men

y

Clerks, retail receiving
.....................
Finishers, flatwork, machine:
Total ...........
Incentive ....
Total ..............................
Time ............................
Incentive ......................
Markers:
Total ...................................
Time ............................ ....
Incentive ...........................
Pressers, machine, shirts:
Total ...............
Time ............
Incentive .......
Wrappers, bundle:
Total ..................
Time .................
Incentive ............
Identifiers:

15
1,017
668
349
114
64
50
156
62
94
544
164
380
121
107
14

_

1.10
66
62
4

.34

•78
.94
.89
.82
.98
.96
.81
1.07
1.01
.98
1.02
.87
.84
1.11

-

4
4
_

4
4

217
197
20
7
4
3
26
25
1
13
-

13
37
35
2

480
399
81
62
56
6
32
20
12
27
18
9
29
29

46

2
58

5

4

54
9
4
5
11
11
69
9
60
5
3
2

41
11
-

11
23
9
14
131
46
85
11
11

-

44
2
42
21
21

9

_

_

2
22
4
18
-

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E W E E K L Y

y

Number

Average

1/
Budget.
2/

y
y

%

-

1
1

-

-

-

1

27

9

-

-

-

27
-

9
-

-

1
1
3
-

3
-

_
-

8
-

4
-

8

4

-

-

-

1
1

-

8
8
-

E A R N IN G S O F —

50.00

60.00

1
65.00 70.00

75.00

80.00

85.00

90.00

1
*
1
$
1
1
1
1
95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00

50.00

55.00

60.00

65.00

70.00

75.00

80.00

85.00

90.00

95.00

100,00 105.00 UQ.OO 115.00. 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00

11
11

25
25

25
21

50
46

43
43

67
51

53
53

64
60

62
62

45
45

weekly

45.00

earnings

and
under

%
573
545

82.51
83.20

-

%

of

y

Routemen, retail (driversalesmen):
Total £ / ...........................
5-day workweek ................................

1

1
55.00

workers

Occupation

%

2

%

%

%

-

ar

29
29

23
23

18
18

17
17

9
9

5
5

7
7

9
9

over

ii
u

Tbs study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared b y the Bu r e a u of the
Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
Excludes premium pay for overtime «nd night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J . , November 1952
Insufficient d ata to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of worKers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Data limited to m e n workers.
Bure a u of Labor Statistics
Straight-time earnings (includes conanission earnings).
Includes 24 routemen on a 5i<-day workweek and 4 routemen on a 6-day workweek.




13

O Union W age Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Additional
information is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries or trades.)

Table

C-15:

Table C-205*

B a ild u u } G o M A h u o tio H

B d A e/U ed > ~ G o *U cH H je(£

Table C-27:

P ^ U tU tU ^ -G o * * t* H4 te< £

___________________ Ju ly 1 , 1952
"'Hale'” Hours
per
per
hour
week

C la ssifica tio n

B ricklayers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ♦3.650
Carpenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1*00
E le c tr ic ia n s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1*50
2.900
P ain ters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P la s te re rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.650
Plumbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.250
2.560
RiHi^wg laborers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Table C-205*

35
35
1*0
35
35
1*0
35

& C iA e/U ed>

__________ Ju ly 1 , 1952________
H ours
per

C la ssifica tio n
B r e a d and c a k e - Hand sh o p s t
F orem en, o v e n w o r k e r s , dou gh m ix e r s • • • • • • • •
Bench w o r k e r s , s e c o n d h a n d s • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
T h i r d h a n d s • • • . • • ............ ............................................
B r e a d and c a k e - M a ch in e s h o p s :
A greem en t A :
Keymen (ov erm en ) .............................. ......................
Overm en, m i x e r s ............ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
M o ld e r s , benchm en, d i v i d e r s , p e e l e r s ,
s c a l e r s , o v e n d u m pers, m i x e r s ' h e l p e r s ,
s c a l e r - f e e d e r s , i c i n g m a k e rs • • • • • • • • • •
R o l l p a n n e r s ..................... .............................• • • • •
Keymen (w r a p p in g -m a c h in e
o p e r a t o r s ) ................................• • • • ............. ..
C h e c k e r s ( c a k e ) .......................................................
Keymen ( c h e c k e r s , b r e a d ) ...................................
I c in g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , s c a l e r f e e d e r s ' h e l p e r s .....................................
C h eckers (b re a d ) • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
F l o u r d u m pers, s i f t e r s , m ach in e h e l p e r s ,
p an g r e a s e r s , c a k e du m pers, a u x i l i a r y
w o r k e r s , p a c k e r s and h e l p e r s ( c a k e ) . . .
S l i c e r s , w rap pers, p ack ers
( b r e a d ) • • • • • • • • • ................... ...................... ..
Cake w r a p p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
(wom en), m ach in e o p e r a t o r s
(women) ................
l e e r s ( w o m e n ) ............................................................
Hand w r a p p e r s (women) .........................................
A gre em e n t B :
B r e a d d e p a r tm e n t:
Dough m i x e r s , p r o o f - b o x w o r k e r s ,
o v e n m e n ............ ..
Pan d u m pers, d i v i d e r a e n , m o ld e r s ,
r o l l - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , benchm en,
m achinem en, dou gh m i x e r s 1 h e l p e r s ,
i n g r e d i e n t s c a l e r s .....................................
Keymen (w r a p p in g m a c h i n e ) ..................... ..
C h e c k e r s • • • • • . , ..............................................
P u i g r e a s e r s , f l o u r d u m pers, s t o c k m en, b e n c h and m ach in e
h e l p e r s ..............................................................
W rap p in g -m a ch in e h e l p e r s ............................
B read r a c k e r s
Hand w r a p p e r s (women) • • • • » • • • • • • • • • • •




♦1.875
1.708
1.528

1*8
1*8
1*8

1.915
1.865

1*0
1*0

1.71*5
1.71*5

1*0
1*0

1 .710
1.710
1.615

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.565
1.51*5

1*0
1*0

1.505

1*0

1.505

1*0

1.1*30
1.285
1.265

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.900

1*0

1.780
1.71*5
1.580

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.51*0
1.51*0
1.51*0
1.300

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

R a te

C la ssifica tio n

per
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops - Continued
Agreement B - Continued
Cake department:
Ingredient sc a le rs and sca lin g machine operators •••••••••••»•••
Depositor o p erators' helpers ••••••
Dumpers, grease-machine o p erators,
a u x ilia ry workers •••••••••••••••
Hand wrappers (women) ••««•••••.•••
Hebrew baking:
Foremen, ovenmen ••••••..••«................
Second hands, mixers ••••••••••••••••••••
Bread c a r r i e r s , helpers •••••••••••••••••
Crackers and cookies:
Doughnut-machine o p erators, mixers ............
Ovenmen •••••••••••••••••••••••«••.••••••
Icing mixers
Ingredient sc a le rs
F o r k -lif t operators, scaling-machine
operators
Cake dumpers ................................................ *•••••••
Grease-machine o p erators, cake wrappingmachine operators, feed ers, a u x ilia ry
w o rk ers......... •••••...............•••••••••••••••••
Packers and helpers ..••••.................. ...................
Checkers, packers (women) •••••...........................

* Table C-27:

Hours
per
week

Ju ljT -llJg ? .
C la ssifica tio n
N e w s p a p e r s:
C o m p o s ito r s , hand - d a y work ................................
C o m p o s ito r s , hand - n i g h t w ork • • • • • • • • • • • • •
M a ch in e o p e r a t o r s - d a y w o r k ................................
M ach in e o p e r a t o r s - n i g h t work ................ ..
M ach in e t e n d e r s ( m a c h i n i s t s ) - d a y work • • • •
M achine t e n d e r s ( m a c h in i s t s ) - n i g h t work • •
M a i l e r s - d a y w o r k .............................. .............
M a i l e r s - n i g h t w ork • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
P h o to e n g r a v e r s - n i g h t work • • • • • • • • • • • • • » • •
P ressm e n , web p r e s s e s - d a y w ork • • • • « • • • • • •
P ressm e n , web p r e s s e s - n i g h t w ork • • • • • « • • •
S t e r e o t y p e r s - d a y work ...........................................
S t e r e o t y p e r s - n i g h t work ............................• • • • •

,780
,600

1*0
1*0

,5U0
,300

1*0
1*0

,320
,200
,520

1*5
1*5
1*5

,865
,865
►
71*5
►
71*5

l*o
l*o
l*o
l*o

1 .565
1 .515

l*o
1*0

1 .5 0 5
1 .5 0 5
1 .2 6 5

1*0
1*0
1*0

Table C-U*

G p e /u M

TEEe
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦2.853
2.960
2.853
2.960
2.853
2.960
2.U60
2.900
3.093
2.773
3.193
2.667
3.333

37
37
37
37
37
37
37
32
37
37
33
37
30

1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1/2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
3/1*
1/2

JZ oC cU
n f C tH fU o y e e d

C la ssifica tio n

- H a r ­ Hours
per
per
hour
week

1-man ca rs and busses:
F i r s t 3 months
♦1.770
1 - 12 months . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 .8 2 0
*
A fter 1 year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 .8 7 0

1*0
1*0
Uo

P *U H ti*U }

Ju ly 1 . 1952
C la ssifica tio n

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops:
Bindery women •••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••• ♦1.351
Bookbinders:
Hi-Die c u tte r8 , non-precision paper
cu tte rs (6b-inch knife or under),
operators of Cleveland folding
machines with one feeder ••••••»•••«•»• 2.371*
Compositors, hand
2.759
E lectro ty p ers •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••. 3 .1 6 0
Machine operators .............................
2.759
Machine tenders (m achinists) ••••••••••••••• 2.759
Mailers - daywork
2.731
Photoengravers •••.••••••••••••••••••••».••• 3.31*2
Press a ss is ta n ts and feed ers:
2 -co lo r Duplex press •••••••••••••»••••»• 2.21*6
2 -co lo r press with 3 -co lo r
attachment
2.337
Pressmen, cylind er:
Special Kidder presses .............................•••• 2.792
1 or 2 ‘ in g le -co lo r presses (not over
s
68 inches) ••••••••................ •»•••••••••• 2 .731
Pressmen, platen :
2.1*28
1 to 3 hand-fed presses ...................................
1 hand-fed presses ••••••••••»••.................. 2.503
*
2.579
2.731
Stereotypers - day
3.193

Hours
per
week

Table C-l*2:

M ot& U > U € cA
a n d o t fe lp e A d ,

__________________ Ju ly 1 , 1952
36 l A

R a te

C la ssifica tio n

36
36
37
36
36
36
35

1/1*
1/1*
3 /2
1/1*
1/U
lA

36 l A
36 1/1*
36 l A
36 l A
36
36
36
36
37

lA
lA
lA
lA
1 /2

Armored c a r ............ .............................................. .
B e e r d r i v e r s • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ............
B u t t e r and e g g • • » • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . ,
G en eral • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • <
T ra cto r t r a i l e r
H e lp e r s ....................................... ...................... .
L a u n d ry - L in e n s u p p l y • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . ,
M a r k e t:
3 t o n s o r l e s s .......... ..
l* t o n s • • • • • » • • • • • • • • • • ............
5 t o n s » • • • » • • • • ................. • • • • » • • • • • • • <
7£ t o n s ........................................... ..
T r a c t o r and t r a i l e r o r 6 -w h e e l t r u c k
H e lp e r s • • • • • • • • • • • ..........• • • • • • • • • • • •
N ew spaper s u p p l y :
D a y .....................................• • • • • ............. ..
N i g h t ................................................ ..
R a i lw a y e x p r e s s ......................... ..
H e l p e r s ...............................................................
S o ft d rin k :
A greem ent A .......... ••••••••••••.,
A greem en t B • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ,

per
hour

Hours
per

♦1.790
2.100
1.725
1 .7 6 0
1.900
1.1*30
1.625

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*8
1*8
1*8
1*0

1 .780
1 .8 3 0
1 .8 5 0
1 .900
1 .960
1 .6 0 0

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

2.300
2.31*0
1.693
1.583

1*0
37
1*0
1*0

1.8 7 5
1.975

1*0
1*0

Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey C ity, N. J . , November 1952
D.S. D RTM T OF LABO
EPA
EN
R
Bureau of Labor S ta t i s t i c s

H

D:

Supplementary W age Practices

Table D-1j

S i t^ift ni Poiirl
h f bfee tc tvlot
U

1/

Percent of total plant employment
(a1------------------------By establiahme nt policy in All manufacturing
Machinery
industries 2/
indu stries
2d shift
2d shift
3d or other
3d or other
shift work
work
shift work
work

Shift differential

All workers ..................................
Workers in establishments having provisions
for late shifts ............ ...............
With shift differential ....................
Uniform cents (per hour) ................
Under 5 cents .......................
5 cents .............................
6 cents .............................
7 cents ................ .............
Over 7 and under 10 cents ............
10 cents ............................
Over 10 cents.......................
Uniform percentage.... .................
Older 5 percent .....................
5 percent ...........................
Over 5 and under 10 percent ..........
10 percent................. .........
Over 10 percent.......... ...........
Other .................................
With no shift differential .................
Workers in establishments having no provisions
for late shifts........ ................

--- 1bl-------------------------Actually working on extra shifts in All manufacturing
Machinery
industries 2/
indiistries
3d or other
3d or other
2d shift
2d shift
shift
shift

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

90.5
89.9
38.1
1.9
12.9
4.7
5.6
1.2
10.8
1.0
49.7
*5
5.0
3.8
40.4
2.1
.6

81.1
80.7
35.5
2.2
1.9
1.0
1.6
18.8
10.0
42.4
.5
1.0
6.2
30.6
4.1
2.8

73.4
73.4
19.1
14.6
4.5
50.5
12.4
36.2
1.9
3.8
-

1.0
.5
6.0
.3
.2

.1
1.0

.4

88.2
88.2
22.3
7.0
2.8
12.5
62.1
9.9
2.5
49.7
3.8
-

9.5

18.9

11.8

26.6

XXX

m

XXX

XXX

XXX

14.4
14.2
6.4
.2
2.3
.6
.9
.3
1.9
.2
7.5

4.2
4.1
2.7
.2
.1
.1
.2
1.4
.7
1.1

0.7
.7
.1
_
-

(2 /)

(2 /)

.3
.1

12.6
12.6
2.7
.6
2.1
9.4
4.0
.7
4.7
.5
-

XXX

XXX

XXX

(2/)

-

.1
.5
.1
.4
.1
-

An

t

l/ Shift differential data are presented in terms of (a) establishment policy and (b) workers actually employed on late shifts at the time of the survey.
establishment was considered as having a policy if it net any of the following conditions
(l) operated late shifts at the time of the survey, (2) had unioncontract provisions covering late shifts, or (3) had operated late shifts within 6 months prior to the survey.
2/ Includes data for machinery industries also shown separately.
Less than 0.05 percent.

2
/

Table D-2*

S h d l dl/elfJ o M
c e u e iekt f u

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS l /
W eekly h o u r s

All
o f Manufacturing
industries

A l l w o r k e r s .......................................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

O ld e r 3 5 h o u r s ...................... .......................................
3 5 h o u r s ......................................................... .....................
O ver 3 5 and u n d e r 37$- h o u r s ...........................
37$- h o u r s ............................................................................
O ver 3 7 $ and u n d e r 4 0 h o u r s ............................
4 0 h o u r s ......................... ....................................................
O ver 4 0 and u n d e r 4 4 h o u r s ..............................
44 h o u r s ...........................................................................
O v er 4 4 and u n d e r 4 8 h o u r s ......................... ..
48 h o u r s ...............................................................................
O ver 4 8 h o u r s ...............................................................

0 .2
1 3 .8
5 .6
2 5 .2
1 2 .7
4 0 .9
-

0 .2
2 .6
5 .8
1 5 .3
1 6 .9
5 7 .3
-

.5
.3
.8
—

.7
1 .2
”

Public
.
utilities*^/

1 0 0 .0

6 6 .3
1 .2
3 2 .0
-

.5

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade^/

1 0 0 .0

1 4 .3
6 .5
6 .5
3 .1
6 9 .6
—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

EMPLOYED IN—

1 0 0 .0

1 3 .7
1 8 .4
5 .5
6 2 .1
-

.3
**

Finance**

1 0 0 .0

1 3 .4
9 .7
5 7 .7
1 6 .4
2 .8
—

Services

All
,/
industries 2 /

1 0 0 .0
0 .1
.8
1 .4
2 .7
.6
7 1 .7
3 .6
1 .5

3.9
7 .6
6 .1

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 .0
1 .8
2 .6
7 2 .9
1 .8
1 .2
2 .3
9 .2
7 .2

Public
.
utilities* 2 /

1 0 0 .0

_
-

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

0 .6
_
-

9 2 .6
-

8 9 .8
-

1 .0
-

5.1

6 .4

4 .5

-

Retail trade£/

Services

1 0 0 .0

_
6 .2
7 .5
5 7 .0
5 .3
2 .9
2 1 .1
-

1/ Data relate to women workers.
2/

Includes data for services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.

i
j

2/

Estimates are not oomparable with those published in the previous (November 1951) bulletin due to differences in the method of classifying occupational groups.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
2/ Includes data for real estate and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newerk-Jersey City, N. J., November 1952
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




15

Table D -3:

P

a id

J

l a l id c u

fi.

PIjRCENT OP OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number o f paid h olidays
A
ll
. anufacturing
industries 1/ M

Public
.
utilities* 2/

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Sendees

V

All
, ,
anufacturing
industries 4/ M

Public
.
utilities *2/

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade
3/

A ll workers ..............................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establish m ents providing paid
h olid ay s 2 / ..................... ........................ ..
1 to 5 days .......................................................
6 days ..................................................................
7 days ..................................................................
8 days ..................................................................
9 days ..................................................................
10 days ................................................................
11 days ................................................................
12 days ................................................................
Over 12 days .....................................................
E stab lish m ents providin g no paid
h olid ay s ................................................................

9 9 .9
.4
8 .5
3 7 .7
1 1 .4
7 .6
2 .0
2 .2
2 9 .5
.6

1 0 0 .0
.1
1 2 .2
5 7 .9
2 1 .0
3 .0
2 .0
.1
3 .7

1 0 0 .0
1 .0
2 .2
.2
4 7 .1
2 .0
5 .5
4 2 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 9 .3
2 7 .0
2 .2
1 3 .3
7 .3
1 6 .9
1 4 .0

9 7 .7
1 .7
6 / 2 2 .9
6/ 5 7 .2
2 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8
2 .0
2 3 .4
4 5 .2
1 6 .5
2 .9
3 .7
1 .6
2 .5

9 8 .2
1 .2
2 4 .1
4 8 .0
2 1 .1
.7
2 .8

9 9 .9
7 .4
2 6 .3
.4

1 0 0 .0

9 3 .9
2 .9
6 / 2 4 .6
6/ 4 9 .3
.7

1 6 .9
2 0 .8
9 .3
2 0 .8

1 0 .2
6 .2

.3

2 8 .0
1 .4
1 0 .8
2 5 .6

2 .2

1 .8

.1

-

Senrieee

6 .1

(7/)
1 2 .1
1 .1
1 .2

•

-

_

6/

9 .6
4 .3

8 3 .1
2 .5

2 .3

_

-

.1

_

-

-

-

1/
2/
2/

In clu des d ata f o r s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to those in dustry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
E stim ates a re n ot comparable with those published in the previous (November 1951) b u lle tin due to d iffe r e n c e s
Excludes lim ite d -p r ic e v a r ie ty s to r e s .
( J
In clu des d ata f o r r e a l e s t a t e and s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to th ose in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
2/ Paid h o lid ay s o f l e s s than a f u l l day have been om itted.
6/ E stim ates in th e e a r l i e r study in c o r r e c tly included one estab lishm en t as providing 7 paid holidays in stea d o f
workers in stea d o f 7 * . C orrected d ata a re as fo llo w s ! O ffic e workers - a l l in d u s tr ie s , 6 days, 1 0 .6 p e rce n t; 7 days,
5 4 .6 ; 7 £ days, 1 1 .4 ; 11 d ay s, 5 .2 . - P lan t workers - a l l in d u s tr ie s , 6 days, 2 7 .3 p e rce n t; 7 days, 3 8 .1 ; r e t a i l tr a d e ,
2/ Less than 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.
*
T ran sp o rtatio n (exclu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in an ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .

T a b le

d

- 4

in th e method o f c la s s if y in g o ccup ation al groups.

6 , and an a d d itio n a l estab lishm en t as providing 11 paid holidays f o r o f f ic e
3 0 .6 ; 7£ days, 1 . 2 ; 11 days, 4 . 9 ; r e t a i l tr a d e , 6 days, 2 0 .9 p e rce n t; 7 days,
6 days, 2 0 .3 p e rce n t; 7 days, 3 7 .8 .

P aid Vacation* {tyoAnuzl PAOduliond)

i

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy
’
"

.

A
U
industries 1/

M
anufacturing

,

Public _
utilities* 2/

W
holesale
trade

”

All workers .........................

1 6 .3
1 5 .9

Retail trade
2/

Finance**

Services

A
U
, ,
industries 4/ Manufacturing

Public .
utilities *2/

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade
2/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
98.9
7.3
_
80.2
10.9
.5
1.1
.7
.4
-

100.0
97.8
10.5
8 6 .2
1.1
2 .2
1.4
.8
-

100.0
100.0
5/ 1.0
•
5/99.0
-

100.0
100.0
13.1
86.9
-

100.0
100.0
17.7
6 8 .2
14.1
■-

100.0
100.0
.1
'60.4
39.5
-

99.5
89.7
60.7
1.7
24.7
1.1
1.5
9.0
•6
6.4
1.5
.3
.2
.8

100.0
87.6
67.9
2 .2
15.6
1.9
11.4
.7
8 .2
1.9
.3
.3
1.0

93.6
93.6
5/ 26.5
5/ 57.4
9.7
-

100.0
100.0
57.4
.
4 2 .6
-

100.0
100.0
21.7
72.5
5.8
-

—

.5

—

Sendees

6.4

After 1 year of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations .....................
Length-bf-time payment ............
1 week .........................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ......
2 w e e k s..................... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........
3 weeks ........................
Percentage payment 6/ ............. .
Under 2 percent ................
2 percent ......................
Over 2 but less than 3 percent ...
3 percent ......................
4 percent ......................
Flat-sum payment..................
Workers in establishments providing no
paid vacations .....................

•

**

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b le .
*
T ra n sp o rta tio n (ex clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ,
* * F in an ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e . _________ __________________________




-

Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey C ity , N. J . , November 1952
U .S . DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
_________
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

E stim ates are provided s e p a r a te ly , according to employer p r a c tic e in computing
v acatio n payments (le n g th -o f-tim e , percentage or f la t-s u m ); percentage and
fla t-su m payments were converted to eq u iv a len t tim e periods in e a r l i e r s tu d ie s .

Table D-4*

Pcud 7/acaUo4U tyobm cd PaoiaUUh U ) -Qo+Ui*iMed

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN Vacation policy

X
J

A l _ , M n facturing
l
au
idsre
nutis

2
J

Pbi _ ,
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Srie
evcs

Finance**

I
j
J

Al
l
, M n facturing
au
idsre
nutis

7
j

Pbi _/
ulc
uiiis*
tl t e

y

All workers .........................

100.0

100.P

100.0
98.9
2.0
1.2
83.9
11.2
.6
1.1
.7
.4
-

100.0
97.8
3.6
2.4
90.7
1.1
2.2
1.4
.8
-

---100*0 —

_

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

RetaiMrpde

100.0 ...

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

..100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
-

100.0
100.0
.1
85.8
14.1
-

100.0
100.0
(2/)
60.5
39.5
-

99.5
89.7
31.8
18.8
36.5
1.1
1.5
9.0
3.6
4.2
.3
.9
.8

100.0
87.6
34.5
24.0
27.2
1.9
11.4
4*6
5.3
.3
1 .2
1 .0

93.6
93.6
21.4
_
62.5
9.7
-

100.0
100.0
15.9
_
84.1
_
_
-

100.0
100.0
5.8
_
88.4
5.8
-

9 3 .6
9 3 .6
1 .0
8 2 .9
9 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 .1
9 4 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.7
9 3 .5
5 .8
-

6 .4

—

9 3 .6
9 3 .6
8 3 .9
9 .7
_
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 7 .7
2 .3
_
_

100.0 _

After 2 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ....................
Length-of-time payment ............
1 week ..................... .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......
2 weeks .............. .........
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......
3 weeks ................... .
Percentage payment 6/ .............
2 percent......... ............
Over 2 but less than 3 percent ...
3 percent .................... .
Over 3 but less than A percent ...
A percent .....................
Flat-sum payment ...........................................
Workers in estab lishm en ts providing no
paid v acatio n s .................................................

100.0
100.0
1.0
99.0
~

“

-

“

.5

—

“

6 .4

A fte r 3 y ears o f s e rv ic e
Workers in estab lishm en ts providing
paid v acatio n s ..................................................
L ength-of-tim e payment .............................
1 week ..........................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................
2 weeks ........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................
3 weeks ........................................................
Percentage payment 6 / ................................
2 p ercen t ....................................................
Over 2 but l e s s than 3 percent . . .
Over 3 but le s s than 4 percent . . .
4 percen t ....................................................
F lat-su m payment ...........................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing no
paid v acatio n s ..................................................

1 0 0 .0
98 .9
1 .4
1 .3
8 4 .2
1 1 .2
.8
1 .1
.7
.4
-

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .8
2 .4
2 .5
9 1 .4
1 .5
2 .2
1 .4
.8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .0
9 9 .0
*“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 5 .9
1 4 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
(2/)
6 0 .5
3 9 .5
-

9 9 .5
8 9 .7
2 2 .7
1 7 .0
4 7 .4
1 .1
1 .5
9 .0
3 .6
1 .8
2 .7
.9
.8
.5

“

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .6
2 5 .3
2 1 .8
3 8 .6
1 .9
U .4
4 .6
2 .2
3 .4
1 .2
1 .0
**

A fte r 5 y ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s .................................................
Len gth-of-tim e paym en t................ .............
l o r e e k ..........................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................
2 weeks ........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................
3 weeks ........................................................
Percentage payment 6/ ................................
2 percent ................................................. ..
Over 3 but l e s s than 4 percent . . .
4 percent ....................................................
Over 4 but l e s s than 6 percen t . . .
Flat-sum paym en t................ ..........................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing no
paid v acatio n s ..................................................

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
.5
.2
8 1 .9
1 2 .0
4 .3
1 .1
.7
.4
-

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .8
1 .0
.4
9 4 .0
.2
2 .2
2 .2
1 .4
.8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 7 .3
2 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 4 .5
1 5 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 9 .6
4 3 .8
6 .6
-

<

9 9 .5
8 9 .7
.4
2 .6
8 2 .1
1.0
3 .6
9 .0
.9
.5
6 .1
1 .5
.8
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .6
.3
3 .3
8 0 .5
.5
3 .0
1 1 .4
1 .1
.7
7.7
1 .9
1.0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.7
8 7 .3
1 2 .0
_
_

6 .4
------------------- L

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Srie
evoe

17

Table D-A:

ft Odd VcUXitiOdPi {tyo/UM&l PaX U jO jC)~Oo+U<HMecl
UU H
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN V acation p o lic y

A
U
industries

A ll workers ..............................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
.5
6 8 .3
1 3 .0
16.A
.7
1 .1
.7
.A
-

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .8
1 .0
8 3 .1
1 .8
1 1 .9
2 .2
1.A
.8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 0 .6
9.A
-

.

M
anufacturing

Public
#
utilities* 2/

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade
2/

Finance •
•

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 3 .9
3.A
2 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 1 .1
2A.8
1A.1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 8 .3
A6.2
2 5 .5
-

A
U
industries

Services

I

1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

Public 0 /
utilities *2/

W
holesale
trade

RetaU^rade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 3 .6
9 3 .6
6 3 .8
1 0 .7
1 9 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9A.2
_
3 .5
2 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.7
6 9 .1
_
2A.A
5 .8
-

A fte r 10 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in esta b lish m e n ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................
L en gth-o f-tim e payment ..............................
1 w e e k ............................................................
2 w e e k s ..................... '...................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...................
3 weeks ..........................................................
A weeks and over .....................................
Percentage payment 6/ ................................
2 p e rce n t .....................................................
Over 3 but l e s s than A p e rce n t . . .
A p e rce n t .....................................................
Over A but l e s s than 6 p e rce n t . . .
6 p e rce n t and over .................................
Flat-sum payment ............................................
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts providing no
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................

-

“

-

-

-

9 9 .5
8 9 .7
.A
7 7 .6
2 .6
8 .6
.5
9 .0
•9
.5
A .3
1 .5
1 .8
.8
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .6
.3
7 8 .9
2 .A
6 .0
1 1 .A
1 .1
.7
5 .3
1 .9
2 .A
1 .0
-

6.A

-

-

A fte r 15 y ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in esta b lish m e n ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................
L en g th -o f-tim e payment ..............................
1 w e e k ............................................................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...................
3 weeks ..........................................................
Over 3 and under A weeks ...................
A weeks and over .....................................
Percentage payment 6/ ................................
2 p e rce n t .....................................................
Over 3 bu t l e s s than A p e rce n t . . .
A p e rce n t .....................................................
Over A but l e s s than 6 p e rce n t . . .
6 p e rce n t and o v e r ................................
F lat-su m payment ............................................
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts providing no
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
.2
2 5 .7
3 .2
6 8 .0
1 .1
.7
1 .1
.7
.A
-

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .8
Q
27 !5
7 0 .5
2 .2
l.A
.8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7.A
9 2 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 8 .5
5 8 .8
2 .7
“

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5A.1
3 1 .8
1A.1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 1 .8
1 2 .1
6 2 .0
A .l
“

9 9 .5
8 9 .7
.A
3 1 .5
1 .1
5 6 .2
.5
9 .0
.9
.5
1 .5
1 .5
A.6
.8
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .6
.3
2 7 .3
.6
5 9 .A
1 1 .A
1 .1
.7
1 .8
1 .9
5 .9
1 .0
-

9 3 .6
9 3 .6
6 .0
9 .7
7 7 .9
6 .A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 5 .A
A2.3
2 ,3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.7
66.A
2 7 .1
5 .8
-

A fte r 20 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................
Length-of-'tim e p ay m en t..............................
1 week ............................................................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...................
3 w e e k s .........................................................
A weeks and o v e r .....................................
Percentage payment 6/ ................................
2 p ercen t .....................................................
Over 3 but l e s s than A p e rce n t . . .
A p e rce n t .....................................................
Over A but l e s s than 6 p e rce n t . . .
6 p ercen t and over ................................
Flat-sum p ay m en t............................................
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts providing no
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
(2/)
2 1 .0
1 .7
6 0 .5
1 5 .7
1 .1
.7
.A
-

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .8
2 1 .8
.5
7 3 .8
1 .7
2 .2
l.A
.8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7 .A
9 2 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 1 .3
6 6 .0
2 .7
-

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 7 .5
2 3 .9
3 8 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 7 .6
5 .6
2 7 .1
A9.7
-

9 9 .5
8 9 .7
.2
2 5 .0
1 .1
6 0 .0
3.A
9 .0
.9
.5
1 .5
1 .5
A.6
.8
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .6
2 1 .A
.6
6 5 .0
.6
1 1 .A
1 .1
.7
1 .8
1 .9
5 .9
1 .0

9 3 .6
9 3 .6
6 .0
9 .7
7 7 .9
6 .A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 2 .1
A5.6
2 .3
_
_

~

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.7
A5.3
2 6 .7
2 7 .3
_
_

Servioee

18

Table D-4*

P aid Vacation^ {tyokmoU P^uuU4io4iA)-QoHllHuext

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

\
J

Al
l
idsre
nutis
100.0

100.0

100.0
98.9
(7/)
20.4
1.5
55.3
21.7
1 .1
.7
.4
-

All workers....-....................

M n f cturing
aua

100.0
97.8
20.9
_
68.5
8.4
2 .2
1.4
.8
-

Pbi
ulc
uiiis 2/
tlte*

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

k

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

y

Finance**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
7.4
92.6
-

100.0
100.0
29.5
57.5
13.0
-

100.0
100.0
37.5
16.6
45.9
-

100.0
100.0
17.6
5.6
22.9
53.9
-

99.5
89.7
.2
23.9
1.1
54.4
10.1
9.0
.9
.5
.9
1.5
5.2
.8

100.0
87.6
20.0
.6
59.0
8 .0
11.4
1 .1
.7
1 .1
1 .9
6 .6
1.0

Srie
evos

Al
l
, M
anufacturing
idsre
nutis

.

Pbi _
ulc
uiiis*2/
tl t e

W o esale
hl
tae
rd

Rti t a e
eal r d

100.0

100.0

100.0

93.6
93.6
6.0
9.7
77.9
-

100.0
100.0
50.6
36.2
1 3 .2
-

100.0
100.0
.7
45.3
21.1
32.9
-

y

Srie
evcs

After 25 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations .....................
Length-of-time payment ............
1 w e e k ........................
2 weeks ............... ..... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......
3 weeks .......................
4 weeks and o v e r ...............
Percentage payment & / .............
2 percent .....................
Over 3 but less than 4 percent ...
4 percent .....................
Over 4 but less than 6 percent ...
6 percent and over .............
Flat-sum payment..................
Workers in establishments providing no
paid vacations ....................

~

.5

*

6.4

Includes data fo r s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to those in d u stry d iv is io n s shovn se p a r a te ly .
Estim ates are n ot comparable with those published in th e previous (November 1951) b u lle tin due to d iffe re n c e s in the method o f c la s s if y in g o ccu p ation al groups.
Excludes lim ite d -p r ic e v a r ie ty s to r e s .
Includes data fo r r e a l e s ta t e and s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to th ose in d ustry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
5/ Estim ates in th e e a r l i e r study in c o r r e c tly included one estab lishm en t as providing 1 week's ra th e r than 2 weeks* v acatio n pay. Corrected d ata a re as fo llo w s* O ffic e workers - a l l Indusweek, 8 .1 p e rce n t; 2 weeks, 8 8 .5 ; p u b lic u t i l i t i e s , 1 week, 0 .4 p e rce n t; 2 weeks, 9 9 .6 ; P la n t workers - a l l in d u s tr ie s , 1 week, 6 8 .6 p e rce n t; 2 weeks, 2 6 .4 ; p u b lic u t i l i t i e s , 1 week, 3 1 .0
tr ie s , 1
p e rce n t; 2 weeks, 6 9 .0 .
Percen t o f annual earn in g s.
v .
Less than 0 .0 5 p e rce n t.
«
T ran sp ortation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
»» F in ance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .

H
j

y
.

u

cutd PtHliOH. P lotti

Table D -5 j

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type o f plan
industries l/

Manufacturing

Public
/
utilities* y

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

W
holesale
trade

RetaiHrpde

Finanoe**

Servioes

All
. anufacturing
industries jy M

Public
.
utilities*2 /

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade
y

A ll workers .............................................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts having
insurance or pension plans $ / ................
Insurance plans £/ ......................................
L ife ...............................................................
A ccid ental death and
dismemberment......................................
Sick n ess and a cc id en t .........................
H o sp ita liz a tio n ..................................
S u rg ic a l ......................................................
Medical ........................................................
R etirem ent-pension plan ...........................
Workers in estab lish m en ts having no
insurance or pension plans .......................

-

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 4 .1
9 3 .7
8 6 .0

9 6 .8
9 6 .7
9 2 .5

9 8 .9
9 7 .7
4 7 .8

9 2 .6
9 2 .6
8 0 .9

9 5 .0
9 0 .1
9 0 .1

8 8 .4
8 8 .4
8 8 .4

9 4 .7
9 4 .2
8 7 .7

9 5 .3
9 5 .3
9 0 .3

9 3 .6
9 3 .6
5 8 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 3 .0

9 2 .0
8 7 .4
8 7 .4

3 4 .2
4 0 .7
6 3 .8
4 8 .2
3 5 .6
7 0 .0

4 0 .9
5 7 .6
6 9 .9
6 7 .5
3 3 .2
6 7 .8

8 0 .7
, 4 2 .1
6/ 5 .4
4 .5
4 .7
9 5 .6

1 5 .2
5 3 .2
6 6 .4
5 2 .5
3 3 .3
3 6 .2

6 1 .4
2 1 .8
7 0 .1
6 3 .2
4 0 .4
7 1 .3

6 .9
1 0 .1
7 1 .8
2 1 .0
5 1 .4
7 2 .8

3 5 .1
5 0 .0
7 3 .3
6 7 .3
3 5 .0
6 2 .8

3 2 .1
5 5 .6
7 8 .0
7 2 .2
3 6 .5
6 3 .7

5 8 .2
5 2 .6
6/ 1 7 .9
1 3 .7
8 .5
8 1 .7

5 .4
5 8 .1
6 7 .1
5 8 .1
3 0 .3
4 3 .4

3 8 .8
2 0 .9
7 0 .5
5 9 .6
3 6 .5
7 2 .6

5 .9

3 .2

1 .1

7 .4

5 .0

1 1 .6

5 .3

4 .7

6 .4

-

8 .0

1/ Includes data fo r serv io es in ad d ition to those in d ustry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
2/ E stim ates sure n ot comparable with those published in th e previous (November 1951) b u lle tin due to d iffe r e n c e s in the method o f c la s s if y in g o ccu p a tio n a l group.
2/ Excludes lim ite d -p ric e v a r ie ty s to r e s .
i j
Includes r e a l e s ta t e and s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to th ose in dustry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
% / Unduplicated t o t a l .
6/ E stim ates in the e a r l i e r study in c o r r e c tly included one estab lishm en t as having a h o s p ita liz a tio n p lan . Corrected d ata a re as follo w s* O ffic e workers - a l l in d u s tr ie s , 5 7 .6 p e rce n t;
public u t i l i t i e s , 2 .7 p e rce n t; P la n t workers - a l l in d u s tr ie s , 6 0 .9 p e rce n t; p u b lic u t i l i t i e s , 2 3 .5 p e rce n t.
#
T ran sp ortation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jereey C ity , N. J . , November 1952
* * F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .
U .S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




19

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau's occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources. In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community. Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.
Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.
With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau's
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-U). The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they furnished
insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




such jobs were included only for firms meeting
ments of the broad industry divisions.

the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment's full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.
The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries, these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

20

in te rn s o f t o t a l p la n t employment, w hereas p ro p o rtio n s in th e sec­
ond ta b u la tio n re p re s e n t o n ly th o se w orkers a c tu a lly employed on
th e s p e c ifie d l a t e s h ift*

o ffic e w orkers o f th e ta b le sum m arizing scheduled w eekly h o u rs.
Because o f e l i g i b i l i t y re q u ire m e n ts, th e p ro p o rtio n a c tu a lly r e ­
c e iv in g th e s p e c ific b e n e fits may be sm a lle r.

In fo rm atio n on wage p ra c tic e s o th e r th an s h i f t d if f e r ­
e n tia ls r e f e r s to a l l o ffic e and p la n t w orkers as s p e c ifie d in th e
in d iv id u a l ta b le s . I t i s p re se n te d in term s o f th e p ro p o rtio n o f
a l l w orkers employed in o ffic e s (or p la n t d ep artm en ts) th a t observe
th e p ra c tic e in q u e s tio n , ex cep t in th e s e c tio n r e la tin g to women

The summary o f v a c a tio n p la n s i s lim ite d to form al a r ­
rangem ents • I t excludes in fo rm al p la n s whereby tim e o f f w ith pay
i s g ran ted a t th e d is c r e tio n o f th e em ployer o r o th e r s u p e rv is o r.
T ab u latio n s o f in su ran ce and p en sio n p la n s have been co n fined to
th o se fo r which a t l e a s t a p a r t o f th e c o s t i s borne by th e em ployer.

E stab lish m en ts and Workers in M ajor In d u stry D iv isio n s and in S e lec ted In d u s trie s in N ew ark-Jersey C ity , N. J . , 2 /
and dum ber S tu d ied by th e B ureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s , November 1952

Item

Minimum number
o f w orkers in
esta b lish m e n ts
stu d ie d
2/

Number o f
e s t a b li shment s
E stim ated
to ta l
w ith in
S tudied
scope o f
stu d y

' E stim ated
to ta l
w ith in
scope o f
stu d y

Employment
In e sta b lish m e n ts
stu d ie d
T o ta l

O ffice

In d u s try d iv is io n s l a which o ccu p atio n s
wore surveyed on an a re a b a s is
A ll d i v i s i o n s ...............*..................................... ..
M anufacturing • * • • • • • • • • • • • • * • « • • • • • • • • • * • • • • *
N onm anufacturing ................................... ....................
T ra n s p o rta tio n (ex clu d in g r a ilr o a d s ) ,
com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic
Ut i H tie S ......................................................................
W holesale tra d e ......................* • • » • • • • • • » • • • • • •
R e ta il tra d e (ex cep t v a r ie ty s to re s ) • • •••»
F in an ce, in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s ta te * * ••* ••
S e rv ic e s 2 / ••••••••«o***********«****»****

1,033
599
434

240
128
112

431,900
303,400
128,500

241,750
162,400
79,350

45,500
22,780
22,720

101
51
101
51
51

52
123
59
85
115

18
23
18
22
31

36,700
14,200
29,700
25,800
22,100

30,860
3 ,2 70
17,140
16,630
11,450

6 ,4 8 0
1 ,0 90
1 ,7 80
11,740
1 ,6 30

8
8
i / 21
21

104
66
253
74

33
17
49
19

3 ,4 3 8
4 ,6 21
47 ,13 0
5,796

1 ,3 80
2 ,6 64
31,560
2,795

17
511
5,002
167

101
-

I n d u s trie s i n which oooupatlons war*
surveyed on an In d u s try b a s is U
Women’s and m is s e s ’ d re s s e s ................................................
P a in ts and v a rn ish e s ...........................• ••*<,..
M achinery in d u s tr ie s • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * * • • • • • * • • • • *
Power la u n d rie s ........................................ ..

2 / N ew ark-Jersey C ity A rea (E ssex, Hudson, and Union C ounties ) 0
2 / T o ta l esta b lish m e n t employment* The minimum s iz e o f esta b lish m e n t stu d ie d in th e November 1951 su rv ey was 21 w orkers in whole­
s a le tra d e ; fin a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a te ; and s e rv ic e s ; and 101 in th e o th e r m ajor in d u s try d iv is io n s *
2 / H o te ls; p erso n al s e rv ic e s ; b u sin e ss s e rv ic e s ; autom obile r e p a ir shops; ra d io b ro ad castin g and te le v is io n ; m otion p ic tu r e s ; non­
p r o f it membership o rg a n iz a tio n s ; and en g in ee rin g and a r c h ite c tu r a l serv ices*
i j I n d u s trie s a re d e fin e d in fo o tn o te s to wage ta b le s*
2 / E stab lish m en ts m anufacturing m ach in e-to o l a c c e ss o rie s w ith 8 o r more w orkers were a ls o included*




21

Index
A ssem bler (m ach in ery ), 1 0 , 11

Key-punch o p e ra to r,

Bench hand ( b a k e rie s ), 13
B i l l e r , m achine, 3
Bookbinder ( p r in tin g ) , 13
Bookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to r, 3
B ric k la y e r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 13

L ab eler and packer (p a in ts and
v a rn is h e s ), 9
L aborer (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 13
L ab o rer, m a te ria l h a n d lin g , 7
L ab o rer, m a te ria l h an d lin g
(m ach in ery), 10

C alcu latin g -m ach in e o p e ra to r, 3
C a rp en ter (b u ild in g c o n s tr u c tio n ) , 13
C a rp e n te r, m ain ten an ce, 6
C le a n e r, 7
C le rk , f i l e , 3
C le rk , o rd e r, 3 , b
C le rk , p a y r o ll, 3 , b
C le rk , r e t a i l re c e iv in g (power
la u n d r ie s ) , 12
C om positor, hand ( p r in tin g ) , 13
Crane o p e ra to r, e l e c t r i c b rid g e , 7
C u tte r and m arker (w om ens and m isses*
d re sse s), 9
D raftsm an, 5
D r ill- p r e s s o p e ra to r (m ach in ery ), 10, 11
D u p licatin g -m ach in e o p e ra to r, k
E le c tr ic ia n (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 13
E le c tr ic ia n , m ain ten an ce, 6
E le c tr ic ia n , m aintenance (m ach in ery), 10
E le c tro ty p e r ( p r in tin g ) , 13
E n g in e -la th e o p e ra to r (m ach in ery), 10, 11
E n g in eer, s ta tio n a r y , 6
E x tra c to r o p e ra to r (power la u n d rie s ), 12
F in is h e r , fla tw o rk (power la u n d r ie s ) , 12
F irem an, s ta tio n a ry b o il e r , 6
Firem an, s ta tio n a ry b o ile r (power
la u n d r ie s ) , 12
G rinding-m achine o p e ra to r (m ach in ery), 10, 11
G uard, 7
H elper ( b a k e r ie s ) , 13
H elp er, m o to rtru ck d r iv e r , 13
H elp er, tr a d e s , m ain ten an ce, 6
I d e n t if i e r (power la u n d r ie s ) , 12
In s p e c to r (m ach in ery ), 10 , 11
In s p e c to r, f i n a l (ex am in er)(women*s and
m isses* d r e s s e s ) , 9
J a n ito r , 7
J a n ito r (m ach in ery ), 10




b

Machine o p e ra to r ( p r in tin g ) , 13
M achine te n d e r ( p r in tin g ) , 13
M achine-tool o p e ra to r, p ro d u c tio n
(m ach in ery), 10 , 11
M achine-tool o p e ra to r, toolroom , 6
M achine-tool o p e ra to r, toolroom
(m ach in ery), 11
M ach in ist, m aintenance, 6
M a ch in ist, p ro d u c tio n (m ach in ery), 11
M ailer ( p r in tin g ) , 13
M aintenance man, g e n e ra l u t i l i t y
(p a in ts and v a rn is h e s ), 9
M arker (power la u n d r ie s ) , 12
M echanic, autom otive (m ain ten an ce), 6
M echanic, m aintenance, 6
M illing-m achine o p e ra to r (m ach in ery ), 10, 11
M illw rig h t, 6
M ixer (b a k e rie s ), 13
M ixer (p a in ts and v a rn is h e s ), 9
M older (b a k e rie s ), 13
M otortruck d r iv e r , 13
N urse, in d u s tr ia l ( r e g is te r e d ) , 5
O ffice boy, 3
O ffice g i r l , b
O ile r , 6
O perator ( lo c a l t r a n s i t ) , 13
O rder f i l l e r , 7
Ovenman ( b a k e r ie s ) > 13
P ack er, 7, 8
Packer (b a k e rie s ), 13
P a in te r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 13
P a in te r , m aintenance, 6
P hotoengraver ( p r in tin g ) , 13
P i p e f i t t e r , m aintenance, 6
P la s te r e r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 13
Plumber (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 13
P o rte r, 7
P ress a s s is ta n t ( p r i n ti n g ) , 13
P re ss fe e d e r
( p r in tin g ) , 13

P re s se r (women*s and m isses*
d re s s e s ), 9
P re s s e r, m achine, s h ir t s (power
la u n d r ie s ) , 12
Pressm an ( p r in tin g ) , 13
R eceiving c le r k , 8
Routeman (d riv er-salesm an )(p o w er
la u n d r ie s ) , 12
Screw-machine o p e ra to r, autom atic
(m ach in ery), 11
S e c re ta ry , b
Sewer, hand (fin ish e r)(w o m e n 's and m isses*
d re sse s), 9
Sewing-machine o p e ra to r (women *s and
m isses* d r e s s e s ) , 9
S h eet-m etal w orker, m aintenance, 6
Shipping c le rk , 8
S h ip p in g -an d -rece iv in g c le r k , 8
S ten o g rap h er, b
S te re o ty p e r ( p r in tin g ) , 13
Stock h an d ler and tr u c k e r , hand (p a in ts
and v a rn is h e s ), 9
Sw itchboard o p e ra to r, U
Sw itchboard o p e ra to r-re c e p tio n is t, ^
T abulating-m achine o p e ra to r, 3, ^
T ech n ician (p a in ts and v a rn is h e s ), 9
Thread trim m er (clean er)(w om en 's and m isses*
d re s s e s ), 9
T in te r (p a in ts and v a rn is h e s ), 9
T o o l-an d -d ie m aker, 6
T o o l-an d -d ie maker (m achinery), 11
T ra c e r, 5
T ran scribin g -m ach in e o p e ra to r, 5
Truck d r iv e r , 8
T ru ck er, pow er, 8
T u rre t-la th e o p e ra to r, hand
(m ach in ery), 10, 11
T y p is t, 5
V arnish maker (p a in ts and v a rn is h e s ), 9
W asher, machine (power la u n d rie s ), 12
Watchman, 8
W elder, hand (m ach in ery), 11
Work d is tr ib u to r (women's and m isses*
d r e s s e s ), 9
W rapper (b a k e rie s ), 13
W rapper, bundle (power la u n d rie s ), 12
☆

U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R IN TIN G O F F I C E : 0 —249469







O ffic e .

T h is r e p o r t was p r e p a r e d i n th e B u re a u ’ s ’M id d le A t l a n t i c R e g io n a l
C o m m u n icatio n s m ay b e a d d r e s s e d t o :
R o b e r t R . B eh lo w , R e g io n a l D i r e c t o r
B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s
3 4 1 N in th A venue
Room 1 0 0 0
New Y o rk 1 , New Y ork

The s e r v i c e s o f th e B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s ' r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s
a r e a v a i l a b l e f o r c o n s u l t a t i o n o n s t a t i s t i c s r e l a t i n g t o w ages an d i n d u s t r i a l
r e l a t i o n s , em p lo y m en t, p r i c e s , l a b o r t u r n o v e r , p r o d u c t i v i t y , w ork i n j u r i e s ,
c o n s t r u c t i o n and h o u s in g .

The M id d le A t l a n t i c R e g io n i n c lu d e s th e f o llo w in g S t a t e s :
D e la w a re
New J e r s e y

New Y o rk
P e n n s y lv a n ia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102